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Sample records for interacting semiconductor quantum

  1. Pseudorelativistic laser-semiconductor quantum plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunliang; Eliasson, Bengt

    2016-04-01

    A model is presented for the nonlinear interaction between a large-amplitude laser and semiconductor plasma in the semirelativistic quantum regime. The collective behavior of the electrons in the conduction band of a narrow-gap semiconductor is modeled by a Klein-Gordon equation, which is nonlinearly coupled with the electromagnetic (EM) wave through the Maxwell equations. The parametric instabilities involving the stimulated Raman scattering and modulational instabilities are analyzed theoretically and the resulting dispersion relation relation is solved numerically to assess the quantum effects on the instability. The study of the quasi-steady-state solution of the system and direct numerical simulations demonstrate the possibility of the formation of localized EM solitary structures trapped in electrons density holes.

  2. Competing interactions in semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    van den Berg, R.; Brandino, G. P.; El Araby, O.; Konik, R. M.; Gritsev, V.; Caux, J. -S.

    2014-10-14

    In this study, we introduce an integrability-based method enabling the study of semiconductor quantum dot models incorporating both the full hyperfine interaction as well as a mean-field treatment of dipole-dipole interactions in the nuclear spin bath. By performing free induction decay and spin echo simulations we characterize the combined effect of both types of interactions on the decoherence of the electron spin, for external fields ranging from low to high values. We show that for spin echo simulations the hyperfine interaction is the dominant source of decoherence at short times for low fields, and competes with the dipole-dipole interactions at longer times. On the contrary, at high fields the main source of decay is due to the dipole-dipole interactions. In the latter regime an asymmetry in the echo is observed. Furthermore, the non-decaying fraction previously observed for zero field free induction decay simulations in quantum dots with only hyperfine interactions, is destroyed for longer times by the mean-field treatment of the dipolar interactions.

  3. Competing interactions in semiconductor quantum dots

    DOE PAGESBeta

    van den Berg, R.; Brandino, G. P.; El Araby, O.; Konik, R. M.; Gritsev, V.; Caux, J. -S.

    2014-10-14

    In this study, we introduce an integrability-based method enabling the study of semiconductor quantum dot models incorporating both the full hyperfine interaction as well as a mean-field treatment of dipole-dipole interactions in the nuclear spin bath. By performing free induction decay and spin echo simulations we characterize the combined effect of both types of interactions on the decoherence of the electron spin, for external fields ranging from low to high values. We show that for spin echo simulations the hyperfine interaction is the dominant source of decoherence at short times for low fields, and competes with the dipole-dipole interactions atmore » longer times. On the contrary, at high fields the main source of decay is due to the dipole-dipole interactions. In the latter regime an asymmetry in the echo is observed. Furthermore, the non-decaying fraction previously observed for zero field free induction decay simulations in quantum dots with only hyperfine interactions, is destroyed for longer times by the mean-field treatment of the dipolar interactions.« less

  4. Parametric interactions in presence of different size colloids in semiconductor quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vanshpal, R. Sharma, Uttam; Dubey, Swati

    2015-07-31

    Present work is an attempt to investigate the effect of different size colloids on parametric interaction in semiconductor quantum plasma. Inclusion of quantum effect is being done in this analysis through quantum correction term in classical hydrodynamic model of homogeneous semiconductor plasma. The effect is associated with purely quantum origin using quantum Bohm potential and quantum statistics. Colloidal size and quantum correction term modify the parametric dispersion characteristics of ion implanted semiconductor plasma medium. It is found that quantum effect on colloids is inversely proportional to their size. Moreover critical size of implanted colloids for the effective quantum correction is determined which is found to be equal to the lattice spacing of the crystal.

  5. Interaction of graphene quantum dots with bulk semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, P. K.; Kushavah, Dushyant; Mohapatra, J.; Singh, B. P.

    2015-05-01

    Highly luminescent graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are synthesized through thermolysis of glucose. The average lateral size of the synthesized GQDs is found to be ˜5 nm. The occurrence of D and G band at 1345 and 1580 cm-1 in Raman spectrum confirms the presence of graphene layers. GQDs are mostly consisting of 3 to 4 graphene layers as confirmed from the AFM measurements. Photoluminescence (PL) measurement shows a distinct broadening of the spectrum when GQDs are on the semiconducting bulk surface compared to GQDs in water. The time resolved PL measurement shows a significant shortening in PL lifetime due to the substrate interaction on GQDs compared to the GQDs in solution phase.

  6. Interaction of graphene quantum dots with bulk semiconductor surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mohapatra, P. K.; Singh, B. P.; Kushavah, Dushyant; Mohapatra, J.

    2015-05-15

    Highly luminescent graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are synthesized through thermolysis of glucose. The average lateral size of the synthesized GQDs is found to be ∼5 nm. The occurrence of D and G band at 1345 and 1580 cm{sup −1} in Raman spectrum confirms the presence of graphene layers. GQDs are mostly consisting of 3 to 4 graphene layers as confirmed from the AFM measurements. Photoluminescence (PL) measurement shows a distinct broadening of the spectrum when GQDs are on the semiconducting bulk surface compared to GQDs in water. The time resolved PL measurement shows a significant shortening in PL lifetime due to the substrate interaction on GQDs compared to the GQDs in solution phase.

  7. Quantum interference measurement of spin interactions in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, Vincent; Zhang, Yao; Soghomonian, Victoria; Heremans, Jean J.

    2015-03-30

    Quantum interference is used to measure the spin interactions between an InAs surface electron system and the iron center in the biomolecule hemin in nanometer proximity in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure. The interference quantifies the influence of hemin on the spin decoherence properties of the surface electrons. The decoherence times of the electrons serve to characterize the biomolecule, in an electronic complement to the use of spin decoherence times in magnetic resonance. Hemin, prototypical for the heme group in hemoglobin, is used to demonstrate the method, as a representative biomolecule where the spin state of a metal ion affects biological functions. The electronic determination of spin decoherence properties relies on the quantum correction of antilocalization, a result of quantum interference in the electron system. Spin-flip scattering is found to increase with temperature due to hemin, signifying a spin exchange between the iron center and the electrons, thus implying interactions between a biomolecule and a solid-state system in the hemin/InAs hybrid structure. The results also indicate the feasibility of artificial bioinspired materials using tunable carrier systems to mediate interactions between biological entities.

  8. Quantum interference measurement of spin interactions in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deo, Vincent; Zhang, Yao; Soghomonian, Victoria; Heremans, Jean J.

    2015-03-30

    Quantum interference is used to measure the spin interactions between an InAs surface electron system and the iron center in the biomolecule hemin in nanometer proximity in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure. The interference quantifies the influence of hemin on the spin decoherence properties of the surface electrons. The decoherence times of the electrons serve to characterize the biomolecule, in an electronic complement to the use of spin decoherence times in magnetic resonance. Hemin, prototypical for the heme group in hemoglobin, is used to demonstrate the method, as a representative biomolecule where the spin state of a metal ion affects biologicalmore » functions. The electronic determination of spin decoherence properties relies on the quantum correction of antilocalization, a result of quantum interference in the electron system. Spin-flip scattering is found to increase with temperature due to hemin, signifying a spin exchange between the iron center and the electrons, thus implying interactions between a biomolecule and a solid-state system in the hemin/InAs hybrid structure. The results also indicate the feasibility of artificial bioinspired materials using tunable carrier systems to mediate interactions between biological entities.« less

  9. Quantum interference measurement of spin interactions in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deo, Vincent; Zhang, Yao; Soghomonian, Victoria; Heremans, Jean J.

    2015-03-01

    Quantum interference is used to measure the spin interactions between an InAs surface electron system and the iron center in the biomolecule hemin in nanometer proximity in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure. The interference quantifies the influence of hemin on the spin decoherence properties of the surface electrons. The decoherence times of the electrons serve to characterize the biomolecule, in an electronic complement to the use of spin decoherence times in magnetic resonance. Hemin, prototypical for the heme group in hemoglobin, is used to demonstrate the method, as a representative biomolecule where the spin state of a metal ion affects biological functions. The electronic determination of spin decoherence properties relies on the quantum correction of antilocalization, a result of quantum interference in the electron system. Spin-flip scattering is found to increase with temperature due to hemin, signifying a spin exchange between the iron center and the electrons, thus implying interactions between a biomolecule and a solid-state system in the hemin/InAs hybrid structure. The results also indicate the feasibility of artificial bioinspired materials using tunable carrier systems to mediate interactions between biological entities.

  10. Exciton-Phonon Interaction Effects in II-Vi Compound Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelekanos, Nikolaos Themelis

    1992-01-01

    In this thesis, we report on two specific examples of exciton-LO phonon Frohlich interaction effects, namely, hot carrier relaxation and temperature dependent exciton linewidth broadening. These phenomena are considered in the context of quasi-two dimensional excitons in strongly polar II-VI semiconductor quantum wells. Hot-exciton luminescence phenomena are investigated in a single quantum well of ZnTe/MnTe where tunneling through thin MnTe barrier layers suppresses the formation of thermalized luminescence. For near resonant photoexcitation, the secondary emission spectrum is modulated by distinct LO-phonon peaks, which, for sufficiently high order of scattering ( >=4), behave like hot luminescence (HPL) as opposed to resonant Raman scattering. This is confirmed by time-resolved spectroscopy as well as by steady-state characteristics such as linewidth broadening and lack of polarization memory. Several novel observations are made: (1) The LO-phonon intermediated energy relaxation involves Coulomb-correlated pairs, i.e. hot excitons, as opposed to independently-relaxing free electrons and holes. (2) The additional weak disorder originating from QW thickness fluctuations plays a major role in the details of the HPL spectra. The major contribution to the ground state exciton linewidth at room temperature originates from LO phonon -intermediated exciton scattering to higher exciton states. A measure of the effect is given by the parameter Gamma_{LO} which increases with the polarity of the material and is independent of dimensionality provided that the LO phonon energy is greater than the exciton binding energy. Measurements of Gamma_{LO} are performed in two quantum well systems: CdTe/MnTe and (Zn,Cd)Se/ZnSe. In the latter system, a strong reduction of Gamma _{LO} is observed as the quantum well width becomes comparable to the three-dimensional exciton Bohr radius. This is explained in terms of a model where quasi-2D confinement effects increase the exciton binding

  11. Interaction between metamaterial resonators and intersubband transitions in semiconductor quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbay, Alon; Reno, John; Wendt, Joel R.; Gin, Aaron; Wanke, Michael C.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Shaner, Eric; Brener, Igal

    2011-05-01

    We report on the coupling and interaction between the fundamental resonances of planar metamaterials (split ring resonators) and intersubband transitions in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells structures in the mid-infrared. An incident field polarized parallel to the sample surface is converted by the metamaterial resonators into a field with a finite component polarized normal to the surface and interacts strongly with the large dipole moment associated with quantum well intersubband transitions.

  12. Terahertz Optical Gain Based on Intersubband Transitions in Optically-Pumped Semiconductor Quantum Wells: Coherent Pumped-Probe Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ansheng; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    1999-01-01

    Terahertz optical gain due to intersubband transitions in optically-pumped semiconductor quantum wells (QW's) is calculated nonperturbatively. We solve the pump- field-induced nonequilibrium distribution function for each subband of the QW system from a set of rate equations that include both intrasubband and intersubband relaxation processes. The gain arising from population inversion and stimulated Raman processes is calculated in a unified manner. We show that the coherent pump and signal wave interactions contribute significantly to the THz gain. Because of the optical Stark effect and pump-induced population redistribution, optical gain saturation at larger pump intensities is predicted.

  13. Electron Spin Dynamics in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Marie, X.; Belhadj, T.; Urbaszek, B.; Amand, T.; Krebs, O.; Lemaitre, A.; Voisin, P.

    2011-07-15

    An electron spin confined to a semiconductor quantum dot is not subject to the classical spin relaxation mechanisms known for free carriers but it strongly interacts with the nuclear spin system via the hyperfine interaction. We show in time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy experiments on ensembles of self assembled InAs quantum dots in GaAs that this interaction leads to strong electron spin dephasing.

  14. Engineered spin-state transitions of two interacting electrons in semiconductor nanowire quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan-Ting; Cheng, Shun-Jen; Tang, Chi-Shung

    2010-06-01

    Spin properties of two interacting electrons in a quantum dot (QD) embedded in a nanowire with controlled aspect ratio and longitudinal magnetic fields are investigated by using a configuration-interaction (CI) method. The developed CI theory based on a three-dimensional parabolic model provides explicit formulations of the Coulomb matrix elements and allows for straightforward and efficient numerical implementation. Our studies reveal fruitful features of spin-singlet-triplet transitions of two electrons confined in a nanowire QD, as a consequence of the competing effects of geometry-controlled kinetic-energy quantization, Coulomb interaction, and spin-Zeeman energy. The developed theory is further employed to study various spin states of two quantum-confined electrons in the regime of “crossover” dimensionality, from quasi-two-dimensional (disklike) QDs to finite one-dimensional (rodlike) QDs.

  15. Quantum ratchet in two-dimensional semiconductors with Rashba spin-orbit interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Yee Sin; Ma, Zhongshui; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Ratchet is a device that produces direct current of particles when driven by an unbiased force. We demonstrate a simple scattering quantum ratchet based on an asymmetrical quantum tunneling effect in two-dimensional electron gas with Rashba spin-orbit interaction (R2DEG). We consider the tunneling of electrons across a square potential barrier sandwiched by interface scattering potentials of unequal strengths on its either sides. It is found that while the intra-spin tunneling probabilities remain unchanged, the inter-spin-subband tunneling probabilities of electrons crossing the barrier in one direction is unequal to that of the opposite direction. Hence, when the system is driven by an unbiased periodic force, a directional flow of electron current is generated. The scattering quantum ratchet in R2DEG is conceptually simple and is capable of converting a.c. driving force into a rectified current without the need of additional symmetry breaking mechanism or external magnetic field. PMID:25598490

  16. Quantum ratchet in two-dimensional semiconductors with Rashba spin-orbit interaction.

    PubMed

    Ang, Yee Sin; Ma, Zhongshui; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Ratchet is a device that produces direct current of particles when driven by an unbiased force. We demonstrate a simple scattering quantum ratchet based on an asymmetrical quantum tunneling effect in two-dimensional electron gas with Rashba spin-orbit interaction (R2DEG). We consider the tunneling of electrons across a square potential barrier sandwiched by interface scattering potentials of unequal strengths on its either sides. It is found that while the intra-spin tunneling probabilities remain unchanged, the inter-spin-subband tunneling probabilities of electrons crossing the barrier in one direction is unequal to that of the opposite direction. Hence, when the system is driven by an unbiased periodic force, a directional flow of electron current is generated. The scattering quantum ratchet in R2DEG is conceptually simple and is capable of converting a.c. driving force into a rectified current without the need of additional symmetry breaking mechanism or external magnetic field. PMID:25598490

  17. Interaction of a conjugated polyaromatic molecule with a single dangling bond quantum dot on a hydrogenated semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Godlewski, Szymon; Kolmer, Marek; Engelund, Mads; Kawai, Hiroyo; Zuzak, Rafal; Garcia-Lekue, Aran; Saeys, Mark; Echavarren, Antonio M; Joachim, Christian; Sanchez-Portal, Daniel; Szymonski, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Controlling the strength of the coupling between organic molecules and single atoms provides a powerful tool for tuning electronic properties of single-molecule devices. Here, using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) supported by theoretical modeling, we study the interaction of a planar organic molecule (trinaphthylene) with a hydrogen-passivated Ge(001):H substrate and a single dangling bond quantum dot on that surface. The electronic structure of the molecule adsorbed on the hydrogen-passivated surface is similar to the gas phase structure and the measurements show that HOMO and LUMO states contribute to the STM filled and empty state images, respectively. Furthermore, we show that the electronic properties are not significantly affected when the molecule is attached to the single dangling bond, which is in contrast with the strong interaction of the molecule with a dangling bond dimer. Our results show that the dangling bond quantum dots could stabilize organic molecules on a hydrogenated semiconductor without affecting their originally designed gas phase electronic properties. Together with the ability to laterally manipulate the molecules on the surface, this will be advantageous in the construction of single-molecule devices, where the coupling and positioning of the molecules on the substrate could be tuned by a proper design of the surface quantum dot arrays, comprising both single and dimerized dangling bonds. PMID:26766161

  18. Interactions between Redox Complexes and Semiconductor Quantum Dots Coupled via a Peptide Bridge

    PubMed Central

    Medintz, Igor L.; Pons, Thomas; Trammell, Scott A.; Grimes, Amy F.; English, Doug S.; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B.; Dawson, Philip E.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2009-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) have a large fraction of their atoms arrayed on their surfaces and are capped with bifunctional ligands, which make their photoluminescence highly sensitive to potential charge transfer to, or from, the surrounding environment. In this report, we used peptides as bridges between CdSe-ZnS QDs and metal complexes to promote charge transfer between the metal complexes and QDs. We found that quenching of the QD emission is highly dependent on the relative position of the oxidation levels of QDs and metal complex used; it also traces the number of metal complexes brought in close proximity of the nanocrystal surface. In addition, partial bleaching of the absorption was measured for the QD-metal complex assemblies. These proximity driven interactions were further used to construct sensing assemblies to detect proteolytic enzyme activity. PMID:19049466

  19. Quantum diffusion of H(D) in semiconductors and metals, and the role of the interaction with impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Cannelli, G.; Cantelli, R.; Giovine, E.; Trequattrini, F.; Cordero, F.

    1998-12-31

    The mobility of hydrogen and its isotopes in metals has been the object of investigation for several years, whereas the diffusion studies of H in doped semiconductors started more recently. Although the H diffusion coefficient in metals may be several orders of magnitudes higher than in semiconductors, the dynamics of H in metals and semiconductors presents many common features, like precipitation, trapping by heavier impurities and, as indicated by recent results, quantum tunneling at low temperature. In boron doped silicon, the relaxation rates {tau}{sup {minus}1}(T) of H and B obtained from anelastic relaxation were joined with those from infrared absorption: the remarkably wide range obtained (11 decades) clearly shows a deviation of {tau}{sup {minus}1}(T) from the classical dependence at low temperature. However, the results obtained and their analysis do not allow yet to draw conclusions on the mechanism governing the H(D) dynamics. Recently, the investigation of the dynamics of H(D) in GaAs doped with Zn revealed a dissipation peak at 20 K in the kHz range. This relaxation has the highest rate found for H in a semiconductor: more than 15 orders of magnitude higher than in all the other semiconductors measured so far. The analysis of the dissipation curves clearly indicates that the nature of the H reorientation is quantistic. In metals two regimes of the H mobility are observed: hopping with deviations from a classical Arrhenius motion, and a much faster tunneling within few close sites. In the latter regime the H dynamics does not consist of jumps but of transitions between the quantized energy levels of the tunnel systems. The types of interactions assisting the H transitions and the geometry of the tunnel systems are an open problem: although the two-level tunnel system (TLS) has been widely used to explain neutron diffusion, specific heat, and acoustic spectroscopy results in interstitial solutions (NbO{sub x}H{sub y}), recently this model has appeared

  20. Semiconductor double quantum dot micromaser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y-Y; Stehlik, J; Eichler, C; Gullans, M J; Taylor, J M; Petta, J R

    2015-01-16

    The coherent generation of light, from masers to lasers, relies upon the specific structure of the individual emitters that lead to gain. Devices operating as lasers in the few-emitter limit provide opportunities for understanding quantum coherent phenomena, from terahertz sources to quantum communication. Here we demonstrate a maser that is driven by single-electron tunneling events. Semiconductor double quantum dots (DQDs) serve as a gain medium and are placed inside a high-quality factor microwave cavity. We verify maser action by comparing the statistics of the emitted microwave field above and below the maser threshold. PMID:25593187

  1. Optically controlled spins in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Sophia

    2010-03-01

    Spins in charged semiconductor quantum dots are currently generating much interest, both from a fundamental physics standpoint, as well as for their potential technological relevance. Being naturally a two-level quantum system, each of these spins can encode a bit of quantum information. Optically controlled spins in quantum dots possess several desirable properties: their spin coherence times are long, they allow for all-optical manipulation---which translates into fast logic gates---and their coupling to photons offers a straightforward route to exchange of quantum information between spatially separated sites. Designing the laser fields to achieve the unprecedented amount of control required for quantum information tasks is a challenging goal, towards which there has been recent progress. Special properties of hyperbolic secant optical pulses enabled the design of single qubit rotations, initially developed about the growth axis z [1], and later about an arbitrary direction [2]. Recently we demonstrated our theoretical proposal [1] in an ensemble of InAs/GaAs quantum dots by implementing ultrafast rotations about the z axis by an arbitrary angle [3], with the angle of rotation as a function of the optical detuning in excellent agreement with the theoretical prediction. We also developed two-qubit conditional control in a quantum dot `molecule' using the electron-hole exchange interaction [4]. In addition to its importance in quantum dot-based quantum computation, our two-qubit gate can also play an important role in photonic cluster state generation for measurement-based quantum computing [5]. [1] S. E. Economou, L. J. Sham, Y. Wu, D. S. Steel, Phys. Rev. 74, 205415 (2006) [2] S. E. Economou and T. L. Reinecke, Phys. Rev. Lett., 99, 217401 (2007) [3] A. Greilich, S. E. Economou et al, Nature Phys. 5, 262 (2009) [4] S. E. Economou and T. L. Reinecke, Phys. Rev. B, 78, 115306 (2008) [5] S. E. Economou, N. H. Lindner, and T. Rudolph, in preparation

  2. The quantum hydrodynamic model for semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Carl L.

    1995-02-01

    Quantum semiconductor devices are playing an increasingly important role in advanced microelectronic applications, including multiple-state logic and memory devices. To model quantum devices, the classical hydrodynamic model for semiconductor devices can be extended to include O(h(2)) quantum corrections. This proposal focused on theoretical and computational investigations of the flow of electrons in semiconductor devices based on the quantum hydrodynamic model. The development of efficient, robots numerical methods for the QHD model in one and two spatial dimensions we also emphasized.

  3. Nonlinear optical interactions in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salour, M. M.

    1985-12-01

    The optical pumping technique in GaAs has led to the development of a novel and highly sensitive optical temperature sensor. Completed is the experiment on two photon optical pumping in ZnO. An external cavity semiconductor laser involving ZnO as a gain medium was demonstrated under two-photon excitation. This laser should have a major impact on the development of tunable blue-green radiation for submarine communication. Completed is a paper on heat buildup in semiconductor platelets. New lasers are used to explore elementary excitation in optical thin film layers of semiconductors. This has led to the first demonstration of the feasibility of room temperature operation of a tunable coherent source involving multiple quantum well material. Completed is the construction of a simple remote (non-contact) temperature sensor to directly measure heat buildup in semiconductor materials as a result of high power optical laser excitation. Finally, an experiment involving optical frequency mixing to probe electrodynamics in the GaAlAs multiple quantumwell and superlattice structures, utilizing two recently constructed tunabel laser systems,has been successful. Attempts were focused on observing a number of new optical effects including nonlinear absorption and transmission phenomena, enhanced spontaneous and stimulated light scattering processes, etc. The construction of an external cavity semiconductor HgCdTe has been successful.

  4. Charge state hysteresis in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. H.; Rossi, A.; Lai, N. S.; Leon, R.; Lim, W. H.; Dzurak, A. S.

    2014-11-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots provide a two-dimensional analogy for real atoms and show promise for the implementation of scalable quantum computers. Here, we investigate the charge configurations in a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor double quantum dot tunnel coupled to a single reservoir of electrons. By operating the system in the few-electron regime, the stability diagram shows hysteretic tunnelling events that depend on the history of the dots charge occupancy. We present a model which accounts for the observed hysteretic behaviour by extending the established description for transport in double dots coupled to two reservoirs. We demonstrate that this type of device operates like a single-electron memory latch.

  5. Charge state hysteresis in semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C. H.; Rossi, A. Lai, N. S.; Leon, R.; Lim, W. H.; Dzurak, A. S.

    2014-11-03

    Semiconductor quantum dots provide a two-dimensional analogy for real atoms and show promise for the implementation of scalable quantum computers. Here, we investigate the charge configurations in a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor double quantum dot tunnel coupled to a single reservoir of electrons. By operating the system in the few-electron regime, the stability diagram shows hysteretic tunnelling events that depend on the history of the dots charge occupancy. We present a model which accounts for the observed hysteretic behaviour by extending the established description for transport in double dots coupled to two reservoirs. We demonstrate that this type of device operates like a single-electron memory latch.

  6. Electron - polar acoustical phonon interactions in nitride based diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum well via hot electron magnetotransport

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Ankur; Shinde, Satyam; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2015-05-15

    In this paper the hot electron transport properties like carrier energy and momentum scattering rates and electron energy loss rates are calculated via interactions of electrons with polar acoustical phonons for Mn doped BN quantum well in BN nanosheets via piezoelectric scattering and deformation potential mechanisms at low temperatures with high electric field. Electron energy loss rate increases with the electric field. It is observed that at low temperatures and for low electric field the phonon absorption is taking place whereas, for sufficient large electric field, phonon emission takes place. Under the piezoelectric (polar acoustical phonon) scattering mechanism, the carrier scattering rate decreases with the reduction of electric field at low temperatures wherein, the scattering rate variation with electric field is limited by a specific temperature beyond which there is no any impact of electric field on such scattering.

  7. Semiconductor quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jianjun; Cao, Guozhong

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been drawing great attention recently as a material for solar energy conversion due to their versatile optical and electrical properties. The QD-sensitized solar cell (QDSC) is one of the burgeoning semiconductor QD solar cells that shows promising developments for the next generation of solar cells. This article focuses on recent developments in QDSCs, including 1) the effect of quantum confinement on QDSCs, 2) the multiple exciton generation (MEG) of QDs, 3) fabrication methods of QDs, and 4) nanocrystalline photoelectrodes for solar cells. We also make suggestions for future research on QDSCs. Although the efficiency of QDSCs is still low, we think there will be major breakthroughs in developing QDSCs in the future. PMID:24191178

  8. Semiconductor-inspired superconducting quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Yun-Pil

    Superconducting circuits offer tremendous design flexibility in the quantum regime culminating most recently in the demonstration of few qubit systems supposedly approaching the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Competition in the solid-state comes from semiconductor qubits, where nature has bestowed some very useful properties which can be utilized for spin qubit based quantum computing. Here we present an architecture for superconducting quantum computing based on selective design principles deduced from spin-based systems. We propose an encoded qubit approach realizable with state-of-the-art tunable Josephson junction qubits. Our results show that this design philosophy holds promise, enables microwave-free control, and offers a pathway to future qubit designs with new capabilities such as with higher fidelity or, perhaps, operation at higher temperature. The approach is especially suited to qubits based on variable super-semi junctions.

  9. Electrical properties of semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Kharlamov, V. F. Korostelev, D. A.; Bogoraz, I. G.; Milovidova, O. A.; Sergeyev, V. O.

    2013-04-15

    A method, which makes it possible to obtain semiconductor particles V Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -20} cm{sup 3} in volume (quantum dots) with a concentration of up to 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} and electrical contacts to each of them, is suggested. High variability in the electrical properties of such particles from a metal oxide (CuO or NiO) after the chemisorption of gas molecules is found.

  10. Quantum weak turbulence with applications to semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lvov, Yuri Victorovich

    Based on a model Hamiltonian appropriate for the description of fermionic systems such as semiconductor lasers, we describe a natural asymptotic closure of the BBGKY hierarchy in complete analogy with that derived for classical weak turbulence. The main features of the interaction Hamiltonian are the inclusion of full Fermi statistics containing Pauli blocking and a simple, phenomenological, uniformly weak two particle interaction potential equivalent to the static screening approximation. The resulting asymytotic closure and quantum kinetic Boltzmann equation are derived in a self consistent manner without resorting to a priori statistical hypotheses or cumulant discard assumptions. We find a new class of solutions to the quantum kinetic equation which are analogous to the Kolmogorov spectra of hydrodynamics and classical weak turbulence. They involve finite fluxes of particles and energy across momentum space and are particularly relevant for describing the behavior of systems containing sources and sinks. We explore these solutions by using differential approximation to collision integral. We make a prima facie case that these finite flux solutions can be important in the context of semiconductor lasers. We show that semiconductor laser output efficiency can be improved by exciting these finite flux solutions. Numerical simulations of the semiconductor Maxwell Bloch equations support the claim.

  11. Quantum optics with quantum dots. Towards semiconductor sources of quantum light for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beveratos, Alexios; Abram, Izo; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Robert-Philip, Isabelle

    2014-12-01

    For the past fifteen years, single semiconductor quantum dots, often referred to as solid-state artificial atoms, have been at the forefront of various research direction lines for experimental quantum information science, in particular in the development of practical sources of quantum states of light. Here we review the research to date, on the tailoring of the emission properties from single quantum dots producing single photons, indistinguishable single photons and entangled photon pairs. Finally, the progress and future prospects for applications of single dots in quantum information processing is considered.

  12. Guiding effect of quantum wells in semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Aleshkin, V Ya; Dikareva, Natalia V; Dubinov, A A; Zvonkov, B N; Karzanova, Maria V; Kudryavtsev, K E; Nekorkin, S M; Yablonskii, A N

    2013-05-31

    The guiding effect of InGaAs quantum wells in GaAs- and InP-based semiconductor lasers has been studied theoretically and experimentally. The results demonstrate that such waveguides can be effectively used in laser structures with a large refractive index difference between the quantum well material and semiconductor matrix and a large number of quantum wells (e.g. in InP-based structures). (semiconductor lasers. physics and technology)

  13. Beam excited acoustic instability in semiconductor quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rasheed, A.; Siddique, M.; Huda, F.; Jamil, M.; Jung, Y.-D.

    2014-06-15

    The instability of hole-Acoustic waves due to electron beam in semiconductor quantum plasmas is examined using the quantum hydrodynamic model. The quantum effects are considered including Bohm potential, Fermi degenerate pressure, and exchange potential of the semiconductor quantum plasma species. Our model is applied to nano-sized GaAs semiconductor plasmas. The variation of the growth rate of the unstable mode is obtained over a wide range of system parameters. It is found that the thermal effects of semiconductor species have significance over the hole-Acoustic waves.

  14. Quantum transport in nanoscale semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Gregory Millington

    Because of technological advancement, transistor dimensions are approaching the length scale of the electron Fermi wavelength, on the order of only nanometers. In this regime, quantum mechanical phenomena will dominate electron transport. Using InAs single quantum wells, we have fabricated Y-shaped electron waveguides whose lengths are smaller than the elastic mean free path. Electron transport in these waveguides is ballistic, a quantum mechanical phenomenon. Coupled to the electron waveguide are two gates used to coherently steer the electron wave. We demonstrate for the first time that gating modifies the electron's wave function, by changing its geometrical resonance in the waveguide. Evidence of this alteration is the observation of anti-correlated, oscillatory transconductances. Our data provides direct evidence of wavefunction steering in a transistor structure and has applications in high-speed, low-power electronics. Quantum computing, if realized, will have a significant impact in computer security. The development of quantum computers has been hindered by challenges in producing the basic building block, the qubit. Qubit approaches using semiconductors promise upscalability and can take the form of a single electron transistor. We have designed, fabricated, and characterized single electron transistors in InAs, and separately in silicon, for the application of quantum computing. With the InAs single electron transistor, we have demonstrated one-electron quantum dots using a single-top-gate transistor configuration on a composite quantum well. Electrical transport data indicates a 15meV charging energy and a 20meV orbital energy spacing, which implies a quantum dot of 20nm in diameter. InAs is attractive due to its large electron Lande g-factor. With the silicon-based single electron transistor, we have demonstrated a structure that is similar to conventional silicon-based metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors. The substrate is undoped and

  15. Charge Transfer Dynamics from Photoexcited Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Haiming; Yang, Ye; Wu, Kaifeng; Lian, Tianquan

    2016-05-01

    Understanding photoinduced charge transfer from nanomaterials is essential to the many applications of these materials. This review summarizes recent progress in understanding charge transfer from quantum dots (QDs), an ideal model system for investigating fundamental charge transfer properties of low-dimensional quantum-confined nanomaterials. We first discuss charge transfer from QDs to weakly coupled acceptors within the framework of Marcus nonadiabatic electron transfer (ET) theory, focusing on the dependence of ET rates on reorganization energy, electronic coupling, and driving force. Because of the strong electron-hole interaction, we show that ET from QDs should be described by the Auger-assisted ET model, which is significantly different from ET between molecules or from bulk semiconductor electrodes. For strongly quantum-confined QDs on semiconductor surfaces, the coupling can fall within the strong coupling limit, in which case the donor-acceptor interaction and ET properties can be described by the Newns-Anderson model of chemisorption. We also briefly discuss recent progress in controlling charge transfer properties in quantum-confined nanoheterostructures through wavefunction engineering and multiple exciton dissociation. Finally, we identify a few key areas for further research.

  16. Charge Transfer Dynamics from Photoexcited Semiconductor Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiming; Yang, Ye; Wu, Kaifeng; Lian, Tianquan

    2016-05-27

    Understanding photoinduced charge transfer from nanomaterials is essential to the many applications of these materials. This review summarizes recent progress in understanding charge transfer from quantum dots (QDs), an ideal model system for investigating fundamental charge transfer properties of low-dimensional quantum-confined nanomaterials. We first discuss charge transfer from QDs to weakly coupled acceptors within the framework of Marcus nonadiabatic electron transfer (ET) theory, focusing on the dependence of ET rates on reorganization energy, electronic coupling, and driving force. Because of the strong electron-hole interaction, we show that ET from QDs should be described by the Auger-assisted ET model, which is significantly different from ET between molecules or from bulk semiconductor electrodes. For strongly quantum-confined QDs on semiconductor surfaces, the coupling can fall within the strong coupling limit, in which case the donor-acceptor interaction and ET properties can be described by the Newns-Anderson model of chemisorption. We also briefly discuss recent progress in controlling charge transfer properties in quantum-confined nanoheterostructures through wavefunction engineering and multiple exciton dissociation. Finally, we identify a few key areas for further research. PMID:27215815

  17. Quantum weak turbulence with applications to semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lvov, Y. V.; Binder, R.; Newell, A. C.

    1998-10-01

    Based on a model Hamiltonian appropriate for the description of fermionic systems such as semiconductor lasers, we describe a natural asymptotic closure of the BBGKY hierarchy in complete analogy with that derived for classical weak turbulence. The main features of the interaction Hamiltonian are the inclusion of full Fermi statistics containing Pauli blocking and a simple, phenomenological, uniformly weak two-particle interaction potential equivalent to the static screening approximation. We find a new class of solutions to the quantum kinetic equation which are analogous to the Kolmogorov spectra of hydrodynamics and classical weak turbulence. They involve finite fluxes of particles and energy in momentum space and are particularly relevant for describing the behavior of systems containing sources and sinks. We make a prima facie case that these finite flux solutions can be important in the context of semiconductor lasers and show how they might be used to enhance laser performance.

  18. Biosensing with Luminescent Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Sapsford, Kim E.; Pons, Thomas; Medintz, Igor L.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2006-01-01

    Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) are a recently developed class of nanomaterial whose unique photophysical properties are helping to create a new generation of robust fluorescent biosensors. QD properties of interest for biosensing include high quantum yields, broad absorption spectra coupled to narrow size-tunable photoluminescent emissions and exceptional resistance to both photobleaching and chemical degradation. In this review, we examine the progress in adapting QDs for several predominantly in vitro biosensing applications including use in immunoassays, as generalized probes, in nucleic acid detection and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) - based sensing. We also describe several important considerations when working with QDs mainly centered on the choice of material(s) and appropriate strategies for attaching biomolecules to the QDs.

  19. Electron states in semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Dhayal, Suman S.; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.; Ruda, Harry E.; Nair, Selvakumar V.

    2014-11-28

    In this work, the electronic structures of quantum dots (QDs) of nine direct band gap semiconductor materials belonging to the group II-VI and III-V families are investigated, within the empirical tight-binding framework, in the effective bond orbital model. This methodology is shown to accurately describe these systems, yielding, at the same time, qualitative insights into their electronic properties. Various features of the bulk band structure such as band-gaps, band curvature, and band widths around symmetry points affect the quantum confinement of electrons and holes. These effects are identified and quantified. A comparison with experimental data yields good agreement with the calculations. These theoretical results would help quantify the optical response of QDs of these materials and provide useful input for applications.

  20. Quantum tunneling between bent semiconductor nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, A. A.; Chaves, Andrey Farias, G. A.; Pereira, T. A. S.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-11-07

    We theoretically investigate the electronic transport properties of two closely spaced L-shaped semiconductor quantum wires, for different configurations of the output channel widths as well as the distance between the wires. Within the effective-mass approximation, we solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using the split-operator technique that allows us to calculate the transmission probability, the total probability current, the conductance, and the wave function scattering between the energy subbands. We determine the maximum distance between the quantum wires below which a relevant non-zero transmission is still found. The transmission probability and the conductance show a strong dependence on the width of the output channel for small distances between the wires.

  1. Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Biomedicial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Lijia; Gao, Yanfang; Yan, Feng

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are nanometre-scale crystals, which have unique photophysical properties, such as size-dependent optical properties, high fluorescence quantum yields, and excellent stability against photobleaching. These properties enable QDs as the promising optical labels for the biological applications, such as multiplexed analysis of immunocomplexes or DNA hybridization processes, cell sorting and tracing, in vivo imaging and diagnostics in biomedicine. Meanwhile, QDs can be used as labels for the electrochemical detection of DNA or proteins. This article reviews the synthesis and toxicity of QDs and their optical and electrochemical bioanalytical applications. Especially the application of QDs in biomedicine such as delivering, cell targeting and imaging for cancer research, and in vivo photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer are briefly discussed. PMID:22247690

  2. Semiconductor Lasers Containing Quantum Wells in Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Qiu, Yueming

    2004-01-01

    In a recent improvement upon In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP semiconductor lasers of the bipolar cascade type, quantum wells are added to Esaki tunnel junctions, which are standard parts of such lasers. The energy depths and the geometric locations and thicknesses of the wells are tailored to exploit quantum tunneling such that, as described below, electrical resistances of junctions and concentrations of dopants can be reduced while laser performances can be improved. In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP bipolar cascade lasers have been investigated as sources of near-infrared radiation (specifically, at wavelengths of about 980 and 1,550 nm) for photonic communication systems. The Esaki tunnel junctions in these lasers have been used to connect adjacent cascade stages and to enable transport of charge carriers between them. Typically, large concentrations of both n (electron-donor) and p (electron-acceptor) dopants have been necessary to impart low electrical resistances to Esaki tunnel junctions. Unfortunately, high doping contributes free-carrier absorption, thereby contributing to optical loss and thereby, further, degrading laser performance. In accordance with the present innovation, quantum wells are incorporated into the Esaki tunnel junctions so that the effective heights of barriers to quantum tunneling are reduced (see figure).

  3. Biosynthesis of cadmium sulphide quantum semiconductor crystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dameron, C. T.; Reese, R. N.; Mehra, R. K.; Kortan, A. R.; Carroll, P. J.; Steigerwald, M. L.; Brus, L. E.; Winge, D. R.

    1989-04-01

    NANOMETRE-SCALE semiconductor quantum crystallites exhibit size-dependent and discrete excited electronic states which occur at energies higher than the band gap of the corresponding bulk solid1-4. These crystallites are too small to have continuous energy bands, even though a bulk crystal structure is present. The onset of such quantum properties sets a fundamental limit to device miniaturization in microelectronics5. Structures with either one, two or all three dimensions on the nanometer scale are of particular interest in solid state physics6. We report here our discovery of the biosynthesis of quantum crystallites in yeasts Candida glabrata and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cultured in the presence of cad-mium salts. Short chelating peptides of general structure (γ-Glu-Cys)n-Gly control the nucleation and growth of CdS crystallites to peptide-capped intracellular particles of diameter 20 Å. These quantum CdS crystallites are more monodisperse than CdS par-ticles synthesized chemically. X-ray data indicate that, at this small size, the CdS structure differs from that of bulk CdS and tends towards a six-coordinate rock-salt structure.

  4. Optically Loaded Semiconductor Quantum Memory Register

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Danny; Kiselev, Andrey A.; Ross, Richard S.; Rakher, Matthew T.; Jones, Cody; Ladd, Thaddeus D.

    2016-02-01

    We propose and analyze an optically loaded quantum memory that exploits capacitive coupling between self-assembled quantum-dot molecules and electrically gated quantum-dot molecules. The self-assembled dots are used for spin-photon entanglement, which is transferred to the gated dots for long-term storage or processing via a teleportation process heralded by single-photon detection. We illustrate a device architecture enabling this interaction and outline both its operation and fabrication. We provide self-consistent Poisson-Schrödinger simulations to establish the design viability, to refine the design, and to estimate the physical coupling parameters and their sensitivities to dot placement. The device we propose generates heralded copies of an entangled state between a photonic qubit and a solid-state qubit with a rapid reset time upon failure. The resulting fast rate of entanglement generation is of high utility for heralded quantum networking scenarios involving lossy optical channels.

  5. Semiconductor quantum dot-inorganic nanotube hybrids.

    PubMed

    Kreizman, Ronen; Schwartz, Osip; Deutsch, Zvicka; Itzhakov, Stella; Zak, Alla; Cohen, Sidney R; Tenne, Reshef; Oron, Dan

    2012-03-28

    A synthetic route for preparation of inorganic WS(2) nanotube (INT)-colloidal semiconductor quantum dot (QD) hybrid structures is developed, and transient carrier dynamics on these hybrids are studied via transient photoluminescence spectroscopy utilizing several different types of QDs. Measurements reveal efficient resonant energy transfer from the QDs to the INT upon photoexcitation, provided that the QD emission is at a higher energy than the INT direct gap. Charge transfer in the hybrid system, characterized using QDs with band gaps below the INT direct gap, is found to be absent. This is attributed to the presence of an organic barrier layer due to the relatively long-chain organic ligands of the QDs under study. This system, analogous to carbon nanotube-QD hybrids, holds potential for a variety of applications, including photovoltaics, luminescence tagging and optoelectronics. PMID:22354096

  6. Spin Qubits with Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarucha, Seigo; Yamamoto, Michihisa; Oiwa, Akira; Choi, Byung-Soo; Tokura, Yasuhiro

    This section describes recent progresses on the research of spin qubits realized in semiconductor quantum dot (QD) systems. After we argue the scheme of initialization and detection of individual spin states, we discuss the key idea of the universal gates constituted with QDs proposed by D. Loss and D. P. DiVincenzo. In order to achieve universal quantum gate operations, we need single qubit coherent manipulations and two qubit controlled-NOT or control-Z gates. For the first type of gate, instead of the standard rf magnetic field driven electron spin resonance (ESR), we proposed and implemented electric dipole induced spin resonance (EDSR), which has various advantages over ESR, including low dissipation, individual access to the spins and integrability. We describes recent progress in the fast Rabi oscillations. The second type of gate can be realized by the exchange coupling between nearby QDs. We also discuss the experiments combining single- and two-qubit operations. Finally, we argue the progress of the coupling of the spins in QDs with the "flying qubits", namely, photons of visible or microwave and itinerant electrons in the wave guides.

  7. Colloidal crystal formation in a semiconductor quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zeba, I.; Uzma, Ch.; Jamil, M.; Salimullah, M.; Shukla, P. K.

    2010-03-15

    The static shielding and the far-field dynamical oscillatory wake potentials in an ion-implanted piezoelectric semiconductor with colloid ions as test particles have been investigated in detail. The dielectric response function of the semiconductor is contributed by the quantum effect of electrons through the Bohm potential and lattice electron-phonon coupling effects. It is found that the quantum effect causes tighter binding of the electrons reducing the quantum Debye shielding length and the effective length of the wake potential to several angstroms. Hence, a quasiquantum lattice of colloid ions can be formed in the semiconductor in the quantum scales giving rise to drastic modifications of the ion-implanted semiconductor properties.

  8. Voltage-controlled quantum light from an atomically thin semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Chitraleema; Kinnischtzke, Laura; Goodfellow, Kenneth M.; Beams, Ryan; Vamivakas, A. Nick

    2015-06-01

    Although semiconductor defects can often be detrimental to device performance, they are also responsible for the breadth of functionality exhibited by modern optoelectronic devices. Artificially engineered defects (so-called quantum dots) or naturally occurring defects in solids are currently being investigated for applications ranging from quantum information science and optoelectronics to high-resolution metrology. In parallel, the quantum confinement exhibited by atomically thin materials (semi-metals, semiconductors and insulators) has ushered in an era of flatland optoelectronics whose full potential is still being articulated. In this Letter we demonstrate the possibility of leveraging the atomically thin semiconductor tungsten diselenide (WSe2) as a host for quantum dot-like defects. We report that this previously unexplored solid-state quantum emitter in WSe2 generates single photons with emission properties that can be controlled via the application of external d.c. electric and magnetic fields. These new optically active quantum dots exhibit excited-state lifetimes on the order of 1 ns and remarkably large excitonic g-factors of 10. It is anticipated that WSe2 quantum dots will provide a novel platform for integrated solid-state quantum photonics and quantum information processing, as well as a rich condensed-matter physics playground with which to explore the coupling of quantum dots and atomically thin semiconductors.

  9. Influence of the Nuclear Electric Quadrupolar Interaction on the Coherence Time of Hole and Electron Spins Confined in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackmann, J.; Glasenapp, Ph.; Greilich, A.; Bayer, M.; Anders, F. B.

    2015-11-01

    The real-time spin dynamics and the spin noise spectra are calculated for p and n -charged quantum dots within an anisotropic central spin model extended by additional nuclear electric quadrupolar interactions and augmented by experimental data. Using realistic estimates for the distribution of coupling constants including an anisotropy parameter, we show that the characteristic long time scale is of the same order for electron and hole spins strongly determined by the quadrupolar interactions even though the analytical form of the spin decay differs significantly consistent with our measurements. The low frequency part of the electron spin noise spectrum is approximately 1 /3 smaller than those for hole spins as a consequence of the spectral sum rule and the different spectral shapes. This is confirmed by our experimental spectra measured on both types of quantum dot ensembles in the low power limit of the probe laser.

  10. Quantum coherence induces pulse shape modification in a semiconductor optical amplifier at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kolarczik, Mirco; Owschimikow, Nina; Korn, Julian; Lingnau, Benjamin; Kaptan, Yücel; Bimberg, Dieter; Schöll, Eckehard; Lüdge, Kathy; Woggon, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Coherence in light–matter interaction is a necessary ingredient if light is used to control the quantum state of a material system. Coherent effects are firmly associated with isolated systems kept at low temperature. The exceedingly fast dephasing in condensed matter environments, in particular at elevated temperatures, may well erase all coherent information in the material at timescales shorter than a laser excitation pulse. Here we show for an ensemble of semiconductor quantum dots that even in the presence of ultrafast dephasing, for suitably designed condensed matter systems quantum-coherent effects are robust enough to be observable at room temperature. Our conclusions are based on an analysis of the reshaping an ultrafast laser pulse undergoes on propagation through a semiconductor quantum dot amplifier. We show that this pulse modification contains the signature of coherent light–matter interaction and can be controlled by adjusting the population of the quantum dots via electrical injection. PMID:24336000

  11. Exciton absorption of entangled photons in semiconductor quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Ferney; Guzman, David; Salazar, Luis; Quiroga, Luis; Condensed Matter Physics Group Team

    2013-03-01

    The dependence of the excitonic two-photon absorption on the quantum correlations (entanglement) of exciting biphotons by a semiconductor quantum well is studied. We show that entangled photon absorption can display very unusual features depending on space-time-polarization biphoton parameters and absorber density of states for both bound exciton states as well as for unbound electron-hole pairs. We report on the connection between biphoton entanglement, as quantified by the Schmidt number, and absorption by a semiconductor quantum well. Comparison between frequency-anti-correlated, unentangled and frequency-correlated biphoton absorption is addressed. We found that exciton oscillator strengths are highly increased when photons arrive almost simultaneously in an entangled state. Two-photon-absorption becomes a highly sensitive probe of photon quantum correlations when narrow semiconductor quantum wells are used as two-photon absorbers. Research funds from Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de los Andes

  12. Quasibound states in semiconductor quantum well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihani, Samir; Page, Hideaki; Beere, Harvey E.

    2010-02-01

    We present a study on quasibound states in multiple quantum well structures using a finite element model (FEM). The FEM is implemented for solving the effective mass Schrödinger equation in arbitrary layered semiconductor nanostructures with an arbitrary applied potential. The model also includes nonparabolicity effects by using an energy dependent effective mass, where the resulting nonlinear eigenvalue problem was solved using an iterative approach. We focus on quasibound/continuum states above the barrier potential and show that such states can be determined using cyclic boundary conditions. This new method enables the determination of both bound and quasibound states simultaneously, making it more efficient than other methods where different boundary conditions have to be used in extracting the relevant states. Furthermore, the new method lifted the problem of quasibound state divergence commonly seen with many other methods of calculation. Hence enabling accurate determination of dipole matrix elements involving both bound and quasibound states. Such calculations are vital in the design of intersubband optoelectronic devices and reveal the interesting properties of quasibound states above the potential barriers.

  13. Integrated superconducting detectors on semiconductors for quantum optics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniber, M.; Flassig, F.; Reithmaier, G.; Gross, R.; Finley, J. J.

    2016-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum photonic circuits can be used to efficiently generate, manipulate, route and exploit nonclassical states of light for distributed photon-based quantum information technologies. In this article, we review our recent achievements on the growth, nanofabrication and integration of high-quality, superconducting niobium nitride thin films on optically active, semiconducting GaAs substrates and their patterning to realize highly efficient and ultra-fast superconducting detectors on semiconductor nanomaterials containing quantum dots. Our state-of-the-art detectors reach external detection quantum efficiencies up to 20 % for ~4 nm thin films and single-photon timing resolutions <72 ps. We discuss the integration of such detectors into quantum dot-loaded, semiconductor ridge waveguides, resulting in the on-chip, time-resolved detection of quantum dot luminescence. Furthermore, a prototype quantum optical circuit is demonstrated that enabled the on-chip generation of resonance fluorescence from an individual InGaAs quantum dot, with a linewidth <15 μeV displaced by 1 mm from the superconducting detector on the very same semiconductor chip. Thus, all key components required for prototype quantum photonic circuits with sources, optical components and detectors on the same chip are reported.

  14. Quantum coherence in semiconductor nanostructures for improved lasers and detectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Weng Wah Dr.; Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Cederberg, Jeffrey George; Modine, Normand Arthur; Biefeld, Robert Malcolm

    2006-02-01

    The potential for implementing quantum coherence in semiconductor self-assembled quantum dots has been investigated theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical modeling suggests that coherent dynamics should be possible in self-assembled quantum dots. Our experimental efforts have optimized InGaAs and InAs self-assembled quantum dots on GaAs for demonstrating coherent phenomena. Optical investigations have indicated the appropriate geometries for observing quantum coherence and the type of experiments for observing quantum coherence have been outlined. The optical investigation targeted electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in order to demonstrate an all optical delay line.

  15. Electron Liquids in Semiconductor Quantum Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Aron Pinczuk

    2009-05-25

    The groups led by Stormer and Pinczuk have focused this project on goals that seek the elucidation of novel many-particle effects that emerge in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) as the result from fundamental quantum interactions. This experimental research is conducted under extreme conditions of temperature and magnetic field. From the materials point of view, the ultra-high mobility systems in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum structures continue to be at the forefront of this research. The newcomer materials are based on graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite. The graphene research is attracting enormous attention from many communities involved in condensed matter research. The investigated many-particle phenomena include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect, composite fermions, and Dirac fermions, and a diverse group of electron solid and liquid crystal phases. The Stormer group performed magneto-transport experiments and far-infrared spectroscopy, while the Pinczuk group explores manifestations of such phases in optical spectra.

  16. Semiconductor Quantum Rods as Single Molecule FluorescentBiological Labels

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Boussert, Benjamine; Koski, Kristie; Gerion, Daniele; Manna, Liberato; Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-05-29

    In recent years, semiconductor quantum dots have beenapplied with great advantage in a wide range of biological imagingapplications. The continuing developments in the synthesis of nanoscalematerials and specifically in the area of colloidal semiconductornanocrystals have created an opportunity to generate a next generation ofbiological labels with complementary or in some cases enhanced propertiescompared to colloidal quantum dots. In this paper, we report thedevelopment of rod shaped semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum rods) asnew fluorescent biological labels. We have engineered biocompatiblequantum rods by surface silanization and have applied them fornon-specific cell tracking as well as specific cellular targeting. Theproperties of quantum rods as demonstrated here are enhanced sensitivityand greater resistance for degradation as compared to quantum dots.Quantum rods have many potential applications as biological labels insituations where their properties offer advantages over quantumdots.

  17. Charge transport in semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentzel, Tamar Shoshana

    In this thesis, we study charge transport in arrays of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots. Nanocrystals are synthesized in solution, and an organic ligand on the surface of the nanocrystal creates a potential barrier that confines charges in the nanocrystal. Optical absorption measurements reveal discrete electronic energy levels in the nanocrystals resulting from quantum confinement. When nanocrystals are deposited on a surface, they self-assemble into a close-packed array forming a nanocrystal solid. We report electrical transport measurements of a PbSe nanocrystal solid that serves as the channel of an inverted field-effect transistor. We measure the conductance as a function of temperature, source-drain bias and. gate voltage. The data indicates that holes are the majority carriers; the Fermi energy lies in impurity states in the bandgap of the nanocrystal; and charges hop between the highest occupied valence state in the nanocrystals (the 1S h states). At low source-drain voltages, the activation energy for hopping is given by the energy required to generate holes in the 1Sh state plus activation over barriers resulting from site disorder. The barriers from site disorder are eliminated with a sufficiently high source-drain bias. From the gate effect, we extract the Thomas-Fermi screening length and a density of states that is consistent with the estimated value. We consider variable-range hopping as an alternative model, and find no self-consistent evidence for it. Next, we employ charge sensing as an alternative to current measurements for studying transport in materials with localized sites. A narrow-channel MOSFET serves as a charge sensor because its conductance is sensitive to potential fluctuations in the nearby environment caused by the motion of charge. In particular, it is sensitive to the fluctuation of single electrons at the silicon-oxide interface within the MOSFET. We pattern a strip of amorphous germanium within 100 nm of the transistor. The

  18. Quantum spin Hall effect in inverted type-II semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaoxing; Hughes, Taylor L; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Wang, Kang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2008-06-13

    The quantum spin Hall (QSH) state is a topologically nontrivial state of quantum matter which preserves time-reversal symmetry; it has an energy gap in the bulk, but topologically robust gapless states at the edge. Recently, this novel effect has been predicted and observed in HgTe quantum wells and in this Letter we predict a similar effect arising in Type-II semiconductor quantum wells made from InAs/GaSb/AlSb. The quantum well exhibits an "inverted" phase similar to HgTe/CdTe quantum wells, which is a QSH state when the Fermi level lies inside the gap. Due to the asymmetric structure of this quantum well, the effects of inversion symmetry breaking are essential. Remarkably, the topological quantum phase transition between the conventional insulating state and the quantum spin Hall state can be continuously tuned by the gate voltage, enabling quantitative investigation of this novel phase transition. PMID:18643529

  19. Spin Quantum Kinetics in Relaxation and Transport of Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han-Chieh; Mou, Chung-Yu; Lyon, Stephen A.

    2007-03-01

    Generalized Kadanoff-Baym Equation (GKBE) with spin degree of freedom is firstly presented and its theoretical framework of applications, which aims to semiconductor quantum kinetics in femtosecond and nanometer scales, demonstrated. The GKBE was constructed by Green functions thermally averaging Pauli equation of motion with using Langreth theorem. As applied for relaxation, Kadanoff-Baym ansatz was made and carrier-carrier scattering (CCS) with random-phase approximation considered. The derivation can simulate an evolution of excited carriers spreading via CCS, buildup of magnetic field by Rashba effect and formation of spin relaxation, where energy non-conserving event and memory effect are figured out. For transport, retarded Green functions were retrieved from spin Dyson equation as an input for GKBE with the presence of electron-phonon (impurity) interaction. The part is useful for spin Hall effect in precisely estimating spin current and accumulation in nanostructures or ballistic regime.

  20. Trion-based Optical Processes in Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Thomas Kendrick

    In a semiconductor, negative charge is carried by conduction-band electrons and positive charge is carried by valence-band holes. While charge transport properties can be understood by considering the motion of these carriers individually, the optical properties are largely determined by their mutual interaction. The hydrogen-like bound state of an electron with a hole, or exciton, is the fundamental optical excitation in direct-gap materials such as gallium arsenide and cadmium telluride. In this dissertation, we consider charged excitons, or trions. A bound state of an exciton with a resident electron or hole, trions are a relatively pure manifestation of the three-body problem which can be studied experimentally. This is a subject of practical as well as academic interest: Since the trion is the elementary optical excitation of a resident free carrier, the related optical processes can open pathways for manipulating carrier spin and carrier transport. We present three experimental investigations of trion-based optical processes in semiconductor quantum wells. In the first, we demonstrate electromagnetically induced transparency via the electron spin coherence made possible by the trion transition. We explore the practical limits of this technique in high magnetic fields. In the second, we present a direct measurement of trion and exciton oscillator strength at high magnetic fields. These data reveal insights about the structure of the trion's three-body wavefunction relative to that of its next excited state, the triplet trion. In the last, we investigate the mechanism underlying exciton-correlated tunneling, an optically-controllable transport process in mixed-type quantum wells. Extensive experimental studies indicate that it is due to a local, indirect interaction between an exciton and a hole, forming one more example of a trion-mediated optical process. This dissertation includes previously published co-authored material.

  1. Bias-induced photoluminescence quenching of single colloidal quantum dots embedded in organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao; Dorn, August; Nair, Gautham P; Bulović, Vladimir; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2007-12-01

    We demonstrate reversible quenching of the photoluminescence from single CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots embedded in thin films of the molecular organic semiconductor N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (TPD) in a layered device structure. Our analysis, based on current and charge carrier density, points toward field ionization as the dominant photoluminescence quenching mechanism. Blinking traces from individual quantum dots reveal that the photoluminescence amplitude decreases continuously as a function of increasing forward bias even at the single quantum dot level. In addition, we show that quantum dot photoluminescence is quenched by aluminum tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq3) in chloroform solutions as well as in thin solid films of Alq3 whereas TPD has little effect. This highlights the importance of chemical compatibility between semiconductor nanocrystals and surrounding organic semiconductors. Our study helps elucidate elementary interactions between quantum dots and organic semiconductors, knowledge needed for designing efficient quantum dot organic optoelectronic devices. PMID:18034504

  2. A Quantum Dot with Spin-Orbit Interaction--Analytical Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basu, B.; Roy, B.

    2009-01-01

    The practical applicability of a semiconductor quantum dot with spin-orbit interaction gives an impetus to study analytical solutions to one- and two-electron quantum dots with or without a magnetic field.

  3. Pseudospin anisotropy of trilayer semiconductor quantum Hall ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miravet, D.; Proetto, C. R.

    2016-08-01

    When two Landau levels are brought to a close coincidence between them and with the chemical potential in the integer quantum Hall regime, the two Landau levels can just cross or collapse while the external or pseudospin field that induces the alignment changes. In this work, all possible crossings are analyzed theoretically for the particular case of semiconductor trilayer systems, using a variational Hartree-Fock approximation. The model includes tunneling between neighboring layers, bias, intralayer, and interlayer Coulomb interaction among the electrons. We have found that the general pseudospin anisotropy classification scheme used in bilayers applies also to the trilayer situation, with the simple crossing corresponding to an easy-axis ferromagnetic anisotropy analogy, and the collapse case corresponding to an easy-plane ferromagnetic analogy. An isotropic case is also possible, with the levels just crossing or collapsing depending on the filling factor and the quantum numbers of the two nearby levels. While our results are valid for any integer filling factor ν (=1 ,2 ,3 ,... ), we have analyzed in detail the crossings at ν =3 and 4, and we have given clear predictions that will help in their experimental search. In particular, the present calculations suggest that by increasing the bias, the trilayer system at these two filling factors can be driven from an easy-plane anisotropy regime to an easy-axis regime, and then can be driven back to the easy-plane regime. This kind of reentrant behavior is a unique feature of the trilayers, compared with the bilayers.

  4. Microscopic Modeling of Intersubband Optical Processes in Type II Semiconductor Quantum Wells: Linear Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Kolokolov, Kanstantin I.; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    2003-01-01

    Linear absorption spectra arising from intersubband transitions in semiconductor quantum well heterostructures are analyzed using quantum kinetic theory by treating correlations to the first order within Hartree-Fock approximation. The resulting intersubband semiconductor Bloch equations take into account extrinsic dephasing contributions, carrier-longitudinal optical phonon interaction and carrier-interface roughness interaction which is considered with Ando s theory. As input for resonance lineshape calculation, a spurious-states-free 8-band kp Hamiltonian is used, in conjunction with the envelop function approximation, to compute self-consistently the energy subband structure of electrons in type II InAs/AlSb single quantum well structures. We demonstrate the interplay of nonparabolicity and many-body effects in the mid-infrared frequency range for such heterostructures.

  5. Quantum statistical theory of semiconductor junctions in thermal equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1977-01-01

    Free carrier and electric field distributions of one-dimensional semiconductor junctions are evaluated using a quantum mechanical phase-space distribution and its corresponding Boltzmann equation. Attention is given to quantum and exchange corrections in cases of high doping concentrations when carrier densities become degenerate. Quantitative differences between degenerate and classical junction characteristics, e.g., maximum electric field and built-in voltage and carrier concentration within the transition region, are evaluated numerically.

  6. Quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical etching of semiconductor nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Wang, George T.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical (QSC-PEC) etching provides a new route to the precision fabrication of epitaxial semiconductor nanostructures in the sub-10-nm size regime. For example, quantum dots (QDs) can be QSC-PEC-etched from epitaxial InGaN thin films using narrowband laser photoexcitation, and the QD sizes (and hence bandgaps and photoluminescence wavelengths) are determined by the photoexcitation wavelength.

  7. Tuning exchange interactions in organometallic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Naveen; Manning, Lane W.; Hua, Kim-Ngan; Headrick, Randall L.; Cherian, Judy G.; Bishop, Michael M.; McGill, Stephen A.; Furis, Madalina I.

    2015-09-01

    Organic semiconductors are emerging as a leading area of research as they are expected to overcome limitations of inorganic semiconductor devices for certain applications where low cost manufacturing, device transparency in the visible range or mechanical flexibility are more important than fast switching times. Solution processing methods produce thin films with millimeter sized crystalline grains at very low cost manufacturing prices, ideally suited for optical spectroscopy investigations of long range many-body effects in organic systems. To this end, we synthesized an entire family of organosoluble 3-d transition metal Pc's and successfully employed a novel solution-based pen-writing deposition technique to fabricate long range ordered thin films of mixtures of metal-free (H2Pc) molecule and organometallic phthalocyanines (MPc's). Our previous studies on the parent MPc crystalline thin films identified different electronic states mediating exchange interactions in these materials. This understanding of spin-dependent exchange interaction between delocalized π-electrons with unpaired d spins enabled the further tuning of these interactions by mixing CoPc and H2Pc in different ratios ranging from 1:1 to 1000:1 H2Pc:MPc. The magnitude of the exchange is also tunable as a function of the average distance between unpaired spins in these materials. Furthermore, high magnetic field (B < 25T) MCD and magneto-photoluminescence show evidence of spin-polarized band-edge excitons in the same materials.

  8. Semiconductor quantum dots in bioanalysis: crossing the valley of death.

    PubMed

    Algar, W Russ; Susumu, Kimihiro; Delehanty, James B; Medintz, Igor L

    2011-12-01

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have evolved beyond scientific novelties and are transitioning into bona fide analytical tools. We describe the burgeoning role of QDs in many different fields of bioanalyses and highlight the advantages afforded by their unique physical and optical properties. PMID:21928771

  9. Valley Polarization in Size-Tunable Monolayer Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guohua; Czaplewski, David A.; Jung, Il Woong; Lenferink, Erik J.; Stanev, Teodor K.; Stern, Nathaniel P.

    Controlling the size of semiconductor nanostructures allows manipulation of the optical and electrical properties of band carriers. We show that laterally-confined monolayer MoS2 quantum dots can be created through top-down nanopatterning of an atomically-thin two-dimensional semiconductor. Semiconductor-compatible nanofabrication processing allows for these low-dimensional materials to be integrated into complex systems that harness their controllable optical properties. Size-dependent exciton energy shifts and linewidths are observed, demonstrating the influence of quantum confinement. The patterned dots exhibit the same valley polarization characteristics as in a continuous MoS2 sheet, suggesting that monolayer semiconductor quantum dots could have potential for advancing quantum information applications. This work is supported by ISEN, the DOE-BES (DE-SC0012130), the NSF MRSEC program (DMR-1121262), and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, DOE-BES (DE-AC02-06CH11357). N.P.S. is an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow.

  10. Magnetoexcitons in type-II semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuster, Gonzalo; Barticevic, Zdenka; Pacheco, Monica; Oliveira, Luiz E.

    2004-03-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of excitons in type-II semiconductor quantum dots (QD). In these systems the confinement of electrons inside the QD and the hole outside the QD produces a ring-like structure [1-2]. Recently, Ribeiro et al [3], in a magnetophotoluminescence study of type-II InP/GaAs self-assembled quantum dots, observed Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillations characteristic of the ring topology for neutral excitons. Using a simple model they have derived the groundstate hole energy as a function of the magnetic field, and obtained values for the ring parameters which are in good agreement with the measured values. However, some of the features observed experimentally, in the photoluminescence intensity, can not be well explained under that approach. In this work we present a more realistic model which considers the finite width of the ring and the electron-hole interaction included via a perturbative approach. The calculations are performed within the oneparticle formalism using the effective mass approximation. The confinement potential for electrons is modelled as the superposition of a quantum well potential along the axial direction, and a parabolic lateral confinement potential. The energies for the hole in the ring plane are calculated using the method of reference [4]. Theoretical calculations are in good agreement with the experimental results of reference [3] provided that excitonic effects are properly taken into account. References 1. A.O. Govorov et al., Physica E 13 , 297 (2002). 2. K. L. Janssens et al. Phys. Rev B64, 155324 (2001), and Phys. Rev. B66, 075314 (2002). 3. E. Ribeiro, G. Medeiros-Ribeiro, and W.Carvalho Jr., and A.O. Govorov, condmat/0304092 (2003). 4. Z. Barticevic, G. Fuster, and M. Pacheco,Phys. Rev. B 65, 193307 (2002).

  11. Optical properties of charged semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Praket P.

    The effect of n-type doping on the luminescence properties of II-VI quantum dots is studied. The addition of two shells of CdS on CdSe quantum dots prevents the creation of surface traps and makes the system stable under reducing environment. The injection of electrons into films of quantum dots leads to lower photoluminescence (PL) efficiency, with the extent of quenching dependent on both the number and the quantum states of the spectator charges in the nanocrystal. It is found that a 1Pe electron is an eightfold better PL quencher than the 1Se electron. Reduced threshold for stimulated emission is also observed in doped CdSe/CdS films. Time resolved photoluminescence measurements are used to extract the recombination rates of a charged exciton, called trion. It is observed that the negative trion has a radiative rate ˜2.2 +/- 0.4x faster than a neutral exciton, while its non-radiative recombination rate is slower than the biexciton non-radiative recombination rate by a factor of 7.5 +/- 1.7. The knowledge of the recombination rates of the trion enables us to calculate the quantum yield of a negative trion to be ˜10% for the nanocrystals investigated in our work. This is larger than the off state quantum yield from a single quantum dot photoluminescence trajectory and eliminates the formation of negative trion as the possible reason for the PL blinking of single quantum dots. Single quantum dot electrochemistry has also been achieved. It is shown that by varying the Fermi level of the system electrons can be reversibly injected into and extracted out of single CdSe/CdS and CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles to modulate the photoluminescence.

  12. Energy transfer processes in semiconductor quantum dots: bacteriorhodopsin hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovich, Aliaksandra; Sukhanova, Alyona; Bouchonville, Nicolas; Molinari, Michael; Troyon, Michel; Cohen, Jacques H. M.; Rakovich, Yury; Donegan, John F.; Nabiev, Igor

    2009-05-01

    The potential impact of nanoscience on energy transfer processes in biomolecules was investigated on the example of a complex between fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals and photochromic membrane protein. The interactions between colloidal CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and bacteriorhodopsin (bR) protein were studied by a variety of spectroscopic techniques, including integrated and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies, zeta potential and size measurement, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. QDs' luminescence was found to be strongly modulated by bacteriorhodopsin, but in a controllable way. Decreasing emission lifetimes and blue shifts in QDs' emission at increasing protein concentrations suggest that quenching occurs via Förster resonance energy transfer. On the other hand, concave Stern-Volmer plots and sigmoidal photoluminescence quenching curves imply that the self-assembling of NCs and bR exists, and the number of nanocrystals (NCs) per bacteriorhodopsin contributing to energy transfer can be determined from the inflection points of sigmoidal curves. This number was found to be highly dependent not only on the spectral overlap between NC emission and bR absorption bands, but also on nanocrystal surface charge. These results demonstrate the potential of how inorganic nanoscale materials can be employed to improve the generic molecular functions of biomolecules. The observed interactions between CdTe nanocrystals and bacteriorhodopsin can provide the basis for the development of novel functional materials with unique photonic properties and applications in areas such as all-optical switching, photovoltaics and data storage.

  13. Semiconductor quantum wells: old technology or new device functionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbas, R. M.; Lo, Y. C.; Hsieh, K. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Reed, F. E.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, T.

    2009-08-01

    The introduction of semiconductor quantum wells in the 1970s created a revolution in optoelectronic devices. A large fraction of today's lasers and light emitting diodes are based on quantum wells. It has been more than 30 years but novel ideas and new device functions have recently been demonstrated using quantum well heterostructures. This paper provides a brief overview of the subject and then focuses on the physics of quantum wells that the lead author believes holds the key to new device functionalities. The data and figures contained within are not new. They have been assembled from 30 years of work. They are presented to convey the story of why quantum wells continue to fuel the engine that drives the semiconductor optoelectronic business. My apologies in advance to my students and co-workers that contributed so much that could not be covered in such a short manuscript. The explanations provided are based on the simplest models possible rather than the very sophisticated mathematical models that have evolved over many years. The intended readers are those involved with semiconductor optoelectronic devices and are interested in new device possibilities.

  14. Generation of infrared entangled light in asymmetric semiconductor quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Xin-You; Wu, Jing; Zheng, Li-Li; Huang, Pei

    2010-12-01

    We proposed a scheme to achieve two-mode CV entanglement with the frequencies of entangled modes in the infrared range in an asymmetric semiconductor double-quantum-wells (DQW), where the required quantum coherence is obtained by inducing the corresponding intersubband transitions (ISBTs) with a classical field. By numerically simulating the dynamics of system, we show that the entanglement period can be prolonged via enhancing the intensity of classical field, and the generation of entanglement doesn't depend intensively on the initial condition of system in our scheme. Moreover, we also show that a bipartite entanglement amplifier can be realized in our scheme. The present research provides an efficient approach to achieve infrared entangled light in the semiconductor nanostructure, which may have significant impact on the progress of solid-state quantum information theory.

  15. Probing dopants in wide semiconductor quantum point contacts.

    PubMed

    Yakimenko, I I; Berggren, K-F

    2016-03-16

    Effects of randomly distributed impurities on conductance, spin polarization and electron localization in realistic gated semiconductor quantum point contacts (QPCs) have been simulated numerically. To this end density functional theory in the local spin-density approximation has been used. In the case when the donor layer is embedded far from the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) the electrostatic confinement potential exhibits the conventional parabolic form, and thus the usual ballistic transport phenomena take place both in the devices with split gates alone and with an additional metallic gate on the top. In the opposite case, i.e. when the randomly distributed donors are placed not far away from the 2DEG layer, there are drastic changes like the localization of electrons in the vicinity of confinement potential minima which give rise to fluctuations in conductance and resonances. The conductance as a function of the voltage applied to the top gate for asymmetrically charged split gates has been calculated. In this case resonances in conductance caused by randomly distributed donors are shifted and decrease in amplitude while the anomalies caused by interaction effects remain unmodified. It has been also shown that for a wide QPC the polarization can appear in the form of stripes. The importance of partial ionization of the random donors and the possibility of short range order among the ionized donors are emphasized. The motivation for this work is to critically evaluate the nature of impurities and how to guide the design of high-mobility devices. PMID:26885626

  16. Quantum Hall effect in semiconductor systems with quantum dots and antidots

    SciTech Connect

    Beltukov, Ya. M.; Greshnov, A. A.

    2015-04-15

    The integer quantum Hall effect in systems of semiconductor quantum dots and antidots is studied theoretically as a factor of temperature. It is established that the conditions for carrier localization in quantum-dot systems favor the observation of the quantum Hall effect at higher temperatures than in quantum-well systems. The obtained numerical results show that the fundamental plateau corresponding to the transition between the ground and first excited Landau levels can be retained up to a temperature of T ∼ 50 K, which is an order of magnitude higher than in the case of quantum wells. Implementation of the quantum Hall effect at such temperatures requires quantum-dot systems with controllable characteristics, including the optimal size and concentration and moderate geometrical and composition fluctuations. In addition, ordered arrangement is desirable, hence quantum antidots are preferable.

  17. Electrostatic enhancement of light emitted by semiconductor quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokhin, A.; Neogi, A.; Llopis, A.; Mahat, M.; Gumen, L.; Pereira, S.; Watson, I.

    2015-10-01

    Carrier dynamics in metal-semiconductor structures is driven by electrodynamic coupling of carriers to the evanescent field of surface plasmons. Useful modifications in electron and hole dynamics due to presence of metallic inclusions show promise for applications from light emitters to communications. However, this picture does not include contributions from electrostatics. We propose here an electrostatic mechanism for enhancement of light radiated from semiconductor emitter which is comparable in effect to plasmonic mechanism. Arising from Coulomb attraction of e-h pairs to their electrostatic images in metallic nanoparticles, this mechanism produces large carrier concentrations near the nanoparticle. A strong inhomogeneity in the carrier distribution and an increase in the internal quantum efficiency are predicted. In our experiments, this manifests as emission enhancement in InGaN quantum well (QW) radiating in the near-UV region. This fundamental mechanism provides a new perspective for improving the efficiency of broadband light emitters.

  18. Low frequency hybrid instability in quantum magneto semiconductor plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, A.; Jamil, M.; Areeb, F.; Siddique, M.; Salimullah, M.

    2016-05-01

    The excitation of electrostatic, comparatively low frequency, lower-hybrid waves (LHWs) induced by electron beam in semiconductor plasma is examined using a quantum hydrodynamic model. Various quantum effects are taken into account including the recoil effect, Fermi degenerate pressure, and exchange-correlation potential. The effects of different parameters like the electron-to-hole number density ratio, scaled electron beam temperature and streaming speed, propagation angle and cyclotron frequency over the growth, and phase speed of LHWs are investigated. It is noticed that an increase in the electron number density and streaming speed enhance the instability. Similar effects are observed on decreasing the propagation angle with magnetic field.

  19. Optimization of semiconductor quantum devices by evolutionary search.

    PubMed

    Goldoni, G; Rossi, F

    2000-07-15

    A novel simulation strategy is proposed for searching for semiconductor quantum devices that are optimized with respect to required performances. Based on evolutionary programming, a technique that implements the paradigm of genetic algorithms in more-complex data structures than strings of bits, the proposed algorithm is able to deal with quantum devices with preset nontrivial constraints (e.g., transition energies, geometric requirements). Therefore our approach allows for automatic design, thus avoiding costly by-hand optimizations. We demonstrate the advantages of the proposed algorithm through a relevant and nontrivial application, the optimization of a second-harmonic-generation device working in resonance conditions. PMID:18064261

  20. Quantum Spin Hall Effect in Inverted Type II Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chaoxing; Hughes, Taylor L.; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Wang, Kang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    The quantum spin Hall (QSH) state is a topologically non-trivial state of quantum matter which preserves time-reversal symmetry; it has an energy gap in the bulk, but topologically robust gapless states at the edge. Recently, this novel effect has been predicted and observed in HgTe quantum wells. In this work we predict a similar effect arising in Type-II semiconductor quantum wells made from InAs/GaSb/AlSb. Because of a rare band alignment the quantum well band structure exhibits an 'inverted' phase similar to CdTe/HgTe quantum wells, which is a QSH state when the Fermi level lies inside the gap. Due to the asymmetric structure of this quantum well, the effects of inversion symmetry breaking and inter-layer charge transfer are essential. By standard self-consistent calculations, we show that the QSH state persists when these corrections are included, and a quantum phase transition between the normal insulator and the QSH phase can be electrically tuned by the gate voltage.

  1. Quantum information processing with electronic and nuclear spins in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, Paul Victor

    Traditional electronic and communication devices operate by processing binary information encoded as bits. Such digital devices have led to the most advanced technologies that we encounter in our everyday lives and they influence virtually every aspect of our society. Nonetheless, there exists a much richer way to encode and process information. By encoding information in quantum mechanical states as qubits, phenomena such as coherence and entanglement can be harnessed to execute tasks that are intractable to digital devices. Under this paradigm, it should be possible to realize quantum computers, quantum communication networks and quantum sensors that outperform their classical counterparts. The electronic spin states of color-center defects in the semiconductor silicon carbide have recently emerged as promising qubit candidates. They have long-lived quantum coherence up to room temperature, they can be controlled with mature magnetic resonance techniques, and they have a built-in optical interface operating near the telecommunication bands. In this thesis I will present two of our contributions to this field. The first is the electric-field control of electron spin qubits. This development lays foundation for quantum electronics that operate via electrical gating, much like traditional electronics. The second is the universal control and entanglement of electron and nuclear spin qubits in an ensemble under ambient conditions. This development lays foundation for quantum devices that have a built-in redundancy and can operate in real-world conditions. Both developments represent important steps towards practical quantum devices in an electronic grade material.

  2. Nonlinear intersubband optical absorption in a semiconductor quantum well

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, D.; Chuang, S. L.

    1987-01-01

    The third-order nonlinear intersubband absorption in a semiconductor quantum well is studied theoretically using the density matrix formalism including intrasubband relaxation. It is shown that the peak absorption is reduced by half for an optical intensity 1 MW/sq cm for the well size L = 126.5 A with 3.0 x 10 to the 16th/cu cm electrons.

  3. Spin dynamics of an individual Cr atom in a semiconductor quantum dot under optical excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuente-Sampietro, A.; Utsumi, H.; Boukari, H.; Kuroda, S.; Besombes, L.

    2016-08-01

    We studied the spin dynamics of a Cr atom incorporated in a II-VI semiconductor quantum dot using photon correlation techniques. We used recently developed singly Cr-doped CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots to access the spin of an individual magnetic atom. Auto-correlation of the photons emitted by the quantum dot under continuous wave optical excitation reveals fluctuations of the localized spin with a timescale in the 10 ns range. Cross-correlation gives quantitative transfer time between Cr spin states. A calculation of the time dependence of the spin levels population in Cr-doped quantum dots shows that the observed spin dynamics is dominated by the exciton-Cr interaction. These measurements also provide a lower bound in the 20 ns range for the intrinsic Cr spin relaxation time.

  4. Peptide linkers for the assembly of semiconductor quantum dot bioconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeneman, Kelly; Mei, Bing C.; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Delehanty, James B.; Mattoussi, Hedi; Medintz, Igor

    2009-02-01

    The use of semiconductor luminescent quantum dots for the labeling of biomolecules is rapidly expanding, however it still requires facile methods to attach functional globular proteins to biologically optimized quantum dots. Here we discuss the development of controlled variable length peptidyl linkers to attach biomolecules to poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) coated quantum dots for both in vitro and in vivo applications. The peptides chosen, β-sheets and alpha helices are appended to polyhistidine sequences and this allows for control of the ratio of peptide bioconjugated to QD and the distance from QD to the biomolecule. Recombinant DNA engineering, bacterial peptide expression and Ni-NTA purification of histidine labeled peptides are utilized to create the linkers. Peptide length is confirmed by in vitro fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET).

  5. Semiconductor-inspired design principles for superconducting quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Shim, Yun-Pil; Tahan, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting circuits offer tremendous design flexibility in the quantum regime culminating most recently in the demonstration of few qubit systems supposedly approaching the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Competition in the solid-state comes from semiconductor qubits, where nature has bestowed some very useful properties which can be utilized for spin qubit-based quantum computing. Here we begin to explore how selective design principles deduced from spin-based systems could be used to advance superconducting qubit science. We take an initial step along this path proposing an encoded qubit approach realizable with state-of-the-art tunable Josephson junction qubits. Our results show that this design philosophy holds promise, enables microwave-free control, and offers a pathway to future qubit designs with new capabilities such as with higher fidelity or, perhaps, operation at higher temperature. The approach is also especially suited to qubits on the basis of variable super-semi junctions. PMID:26983379

  6. Semiconductor-inspired design principles for superconducting quantum computing

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Yun-Pil; Tahan, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting circuits offer tremendous design flexibility in the quantum regime culminating most recently in the demonstration of few qubit systems supposedly approaching the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Competition in the solid-state comes from semiconductor qubits, where nature has bestowed some very useful properties which can be utilized for spin qubit-based quantum computing. Here we begin to explore how selective design principles deduced from spin-based systems could be used to advance superconducting qubit science. We take an initial step along this path proposing an encoded qubit approach realizable with state-of-the-art tunable Josephson junction qubits. Our results show that this design philosophy holds promise, enables microwave-free control, and offers a pathway to future qubit designs with new capabilities such as with higher fidelity or, perhaps, operation at higher temperature. The approach is also especially suited to qubits on the basis of variable super-semi junctions. PMID:26983379

  7. Semiconductor-inspired design principles for superconducting quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Yun-Pil; Tahan, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Superconducting circuits offer tremendous design flexibility in the quantum regime culminating most recently in the demonstration of few qubit systems supposedly approaching the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Competition in the solid-state comes from semiconductor qubits, where nature has bestowed some very useful properties which can be utilized for spin qubit-based quantum computing. Here we begin to explore how selective design principles deduced from spin-based systems could be used to advance superconducting qubit science. We take an initial step along this path proposing an encoded qubit approach realizable with state-of-the-art tunable Josephson junction qubits. Our results show that this design philosophy holds promise, enables microwave-free control, and offers a pathway to future qubit designs with new capabilities such as with higher fidelity or, perhaps, operation at higher temperature. The approach is also especially suited to qubits on the basis of variable super-semi junctions.

  8. Quantum limit for nuclear spin polarization in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildmann, Julia; Kavousanaki, Eleftheria; Burkard, Guido; Ribeiro, Hugo

    2014-05-01

    A recent experiment [E. A. Chekhovich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 066804 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.066804] has demonstrated that high nuclear spin polarization can be achieved in self-assembled quantum dots by exploiting an optically forbidden transition between a heavy hole and a trion state. However, a fully polarized state is not achieved as expected from a classical rate equation. Here, we theoretically investigate this problem with the help of a quantum master equation and we demonstrate that a fully polarized state cannot be achieved due to formation of a nuclear dark state. Moreover, we show that the maximal degree of polarization depends on structural properties of the quantum dot.

  9. Quantum effects on compressional Alfven waves in compensated semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, M. R.

    2015-03-15

    Amplitude modulation of a compressional Alfven wave in compensated electron-hole semiconductor plasmas is considered in the quantum magnetohydrodynamic regime in this paper. The important ingredients of this study are the inclusion of the particle degeneracy pressure, exchange-correlation potential, and the quantum diffraction effects via the Bohm potential in the momentum balance equations of the charge carriers. A modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived for the evolution of the slowly varying amplitude of the compressional Alfven wave by employing the standard reductive perturbation technique. Typical values of the parameters for GaAs, GaSb, and GaN semiconductors are considered in analyzing the linear and nonlinear dispersions of the compressional Alfven wave. Detailed analysis of the modulation instability in the long-wavelength regime is presented. For typical parameter ranges of the semiconductor plasmas and at the long-wavelength regime, it is found that the wave is modulationally unstable above a certain critical wavenumber. Effects of the exchange-correlation potential and the Bohm potential in the wave dynamics are also studied. It is found that the effect of the Bohm potential may be neglected in comparison with the effect of the exchange-correlation potential in the linear and nonlinear dispersions of the compressional Alfven wave.

  10. Molecular Spintronics: Wiring Spin Coherence between Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Min

    2004-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are attractive candidates for scalable solid state implementations of quantum information processing based on electron spin states, where a crucial requirement for practical devices is to have efficient and tunable spin coupling between them. We focus on recent femtosecond time-resolved Faraday rotation studies of self-assembled multilayer spintronic devices based on colloidal quantum dots bridged by conjugated molecules (M. Ouyang et al., Science 301, 1074 (2003)). The data reveal the instantaneous transfer of spin coherence through conjugated molecular bridges spanning quantum dots of different size over a broad range of temperature. The room temperature spin transfer efficiency exceeds 20%, which approximately doubles the value measured at T=4.5K. A molecular π-orbital mediated spin coherence transfer mechanism is proposed to provide a qualitative insight into the experimental observations, suggesting a correlation between the stereochemistry of molecules and the transfer process. The results show that conjugated molecules can be used not only as physical links for the assembly of functional networks, but also as efficient channels for shuttling quantum information. This class of structures may be useful as two-spin quantum devices operating at ambient temperatures and may offer promising opportunities for future versatile molecule-based spintronic technologies.

  11. Phonon induced pure dephasing process of excitonic state in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tongyun; Han, Peng; Wang, Xinke; Feng, Shengfei; Sun, Wenfeng; Ye, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yan

    2016-04-01

    We present a theoretical study on the pure dephasing process of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots induced by lattice vibrations using continuum model calculations. By solving the time dependent Liouville-von Neumann equation, we present the ultrafast Rabi oscillations between excitonic state and virtual state via exciton-phonon interaction and obtain the pure dephasing time from the fast decayed envelope of the Rabi oscillations. The interaction between exciton and longitudinal optical phonon vibration is found to dominate the pure dephasing process and the dephasing time increases nonlinearly with the reduction of exciton-phonon coupling strength. We further find that the pure dephasing time of large quantum dots is more sensitive to temperature than small quantum dots.

  12. Uniform Doping in Quantum-Dots-Based Dilute Magnetic Semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Saha, Avijit; Shetty, Amitha; Pavan, A R; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Shibata, Tomohiro; Viswanatha, Ranjani

    2016-07-01

    Effective manipulation of magnetic spin within a semiconductor leading to a search for ferromagnets with semiconducting properties has evolved into an important field of dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS). Although a lot of research is focused on understanding the still controversial origin of magnetism, efforts are also underway to develop new materials with higher magnetic temperatures for spintronics applications. However, so far, efforts toward quantum-dots(QDs)-based DMS materials are plagued with problems of phase separation, leading to nonuniform distribution of dopant ions. In this work, we have developed a strategy to synthesize highly crystalline, single-domain DMS system starting from a small magnetic core and allowing it to diffuse uniformly inside a thick CdS semiconductor matrix and achieve DMS QDs. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy-scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM-EDX) indicates the homogeneous distribution of magnetic impurities inside the semiconductor QDs leading to superior magnetic property. Further, the versatility of this technique was demonstrated by obtaining ultra large particles (∼60 nm) with uniform doping concentration as well as demonstrating the high quality magnetic response. PMID:27295453

  13. Hot electron dynamics at semiconductor surfaces: Implications for quantum dot photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisdale, William A., III

    Finding a viable supply of clean, renewable energy is one of the most daunting challenges facing the world today. Solar cells have had limited impact in meeting this challenge because of their high cost and low power conversion efficiencies. Semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots, are promising materials for use in novel solar cells because they can be processed with potentially inexpensive solution-based techniques and because they are predicted to have novel optoelectronic properties that could enable the realization of ultra-efficient solar power converters. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding regarding the behavior of highly-excited, or "hot," charge carriers near quantum-dot and semiconductor interfaces, which is of paramount importance to the rational design of high-efficiency devices. The elucidation of these ultrafast hot electron dynamics is the central aim of this Dissertation. I present a theoretical framework for treating the electronic interactions between quantum dots and bulk semiconductor surfaces and propose a novel experimental technique, time-resolved surface second harmonic generation (TR-SHG), for probing these interactions. I then describe a series of experimental investigations into hot electron dynamics in specific quantum-dot/semiconductor systems. A two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy (2PPE) study of the technologically-relevant ZnO(1010) surface reveals ultrafast (sub-30fs) cooling of hot electrons in the bulk conduction band, which is due to strong electron-phonon coupling in this highly polar material. The presence of a continuum of defect states near the conduction band edge results in Fermi-level pinning and upward (n-type) band-bending at the (1010) surface and provides an alternate route for electronic relaxation. In monolayer films of colloidal PbSe quantum dots, chemical treatment with either hydrazine or 1,2-ethanedithiol results in strong and tunable electronic coupling between neighboring quantum dots

  14. Quantum random number generator based on photonic emission in semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Stipcević, M; Rogina, B Medved

    2007-04-01

    We report upon the realization of a novel fast nondeterministic random number generator whose randomness relies on the intrinsic randomness of the quantum physical processes of photonic emission in semiconductors and subsequent detection by the photoelectric effect. Timing information of detected photons is used to generate binary random digits-bits. The bit extraction method based on the restartable clock method theoretically eliminates both bias and autocorrelation while reaching efficiency of almost 0.5 bits per random event. A prototype has been built and statistically tested. PMID:17477690

  15. Activation of molecular catalysts using semiconductor quantum dots

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Thomas J.; Sykora, Milan; Klimov, Victor I.

    2011-10-04

    Photocatalytic materials based on coupling of semiconductor nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQD) and molecular catalysts. These materials have capability to drive or catalyze non-spontaneous chemical reactions in the presence of visible radiation, ultraviolet radiation, or both. The NQD functions in these materials as a light absorber and charge generator. Following light absorption, the NQD activates a molecular catalyst adsorbed on the surface of the NQD via transfer of one or more charges (either electrons or electron-holes) from the NQD to the molecular catalyst. The activated molecular catalyst can then drive a chemical reaction. A photoelectrolytic device that includes such photocatalytic materials is also described.

  16. Potential energy surface of excited semiconductors: Graphene quantum dot and BODIPY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colherinhas, Guilherme; Fileti, Eudes Eterno; Chaban, Vitaly V.

    2016-08-01

    Binding energy (BE) is an important descriptor in chemistry, which determines thermodynamics and phase behavior of a given substance. BE between two molecules is not directly accessible from the experiment. It has to be reconstructed from cohesive energies, vaporization heats, etc. We report BE for the excited states of two semiconductor molecules - boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) and graphene quantum dot (GQD) - with water. We show, for the first time, that excitation increases BE twofold at an optimal separation (energy minimum position), whereas higher separations lead to higher differences. Interestingly, the effects of excitation are similar irrespective of the dominant binding interactions (van der Waals or electrostatic) in the complex. This new knowledge is important for simulations of the excited semiconductors by simplified interaction functions.

  17. Polaron mass of charge carriers in semiconductor quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, A. Yu. Proshina, O. V.

    2015-10-15

    A theory of the interaction of charge carriers with optical phonons in a quantum well is developed with consideration for interface optical phonons. The dependence of the polaron effective mass on the quantum-well dimensions and dielectric characteristics of barriers is analyzed in detail. It is shown that, in narrow quantum wells, a quasi-two-dimensional polaron can be formed. In this case, however, the interaction parameters are defined by the charge-carrier effective mass in the quantum well and by the frequencies of interface optical phonons. If barriers are made of a nonpolar material, the polaron effective mass depends on the quantum-well width. As the quantum-well width is increased, a new mechanism of enhancement of the electron–phonon interaction develops. The mechanism is implemented, if the optical phonon energy is equal to the energy of one of the electronic transitions. This condition yields an unsteady dependence of the polaron effective mass on the quantum-well width.

  18. Emission energy control of semiconductor quantum dots using phase change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Shohei; Sato, Yu; Yamamura, Ariyoshi; Saiki, Toshiharu

    2015-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots have paid much attention as it is a promising candidate for quantum, optical devices, such as quantum computer and quantum dot laser. We propose a local emission energy control method of semiconductor quantum dots using applying strain by volume expansion of phase change material. Phase change material can change its phase crystalline to amorphous, and the volume expand by its phase change. This method can control energy shift direction and amount by amorphous religion and depth. Using this method, we matched emission energy of two InAs/InP quantum dots. This achievement can connect to observing superradiance phenomenon and quantum dot coupling effect.

  19. INTERACTING QUANTUM SPIN CHAINS

    SciTech Connect

    ZHELUDEV,A.

    2001-09-09

    A brief review of recent advances in neutron scattering studies of low-dimensional quantum magnets is followed by a particular example. The separation of single-particle and continuum states in the weakly-coupled S = l/2 chains system BaCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} is described in some detail.

  20. Optical Control of Semiconductor Quantum Dot Spin Qubits with Microcavity Exciton-Polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puri, Shruti; McMahon, Peter L.; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-03-01

    Topological surface codes demand the least stringent threshold conditions and are most promising for implementing large quantum algorithms. Based on the resource requirements to reach fault tolerance, we develop a hardware platform for large scale quantum computation with semiconductor quantum dot (QD) electron spin qubits. The current proposals for implementation of two-qubit gates and quantum non demolition (QND) readout in a QuDOS (Quantum Dots with Optically Controlled Spins) architecture suffer from large error rates. In our scheme, the optical manipulation of the QD spin qubits is carried out using their Coulomb exchange interaction with optically excited, spin-polarized, laterally confined quantum well (LcQW) exciton-polaritons. The small mass of polaritons protects them from interaction with their solid-state environment (phonons) and enables strong coupling between spin qubits separated by a few microns. Furthermore, the excitation manifold of the QD is well separated from that of the LcQW polaritons, preventing a spin-flip event during readout. We will outline schemes for implementing fast, high-fidelity, single qubit gate, two-qubit geometric phase gate and single-shot QND measurement and analyze important decoherence mechanisms. The work being presented was carried out at Stanford University. Currently the author is at University of Sherbrooke, Canada.

  1. Strong coupling among semiconductor quantum dots induced by a metal nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Based on cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED), we investigate the light-matter interaction between surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in a metal nanoparticle (MNP) and the excitons in semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs) in an SQD-MNP coupled system. We propose a quantum transformation method to strongly reveal the exciton energy shift and the modified decay rate of SQD as well as the coupling among SQDs. To obtain these parameters, a simple system composed of an SQD, an MNP, and a weak signal light is designed. Furthermore, we consider a model to demonstrate the coupling of two SQDs mediated by SPP field under two cases. It is shown that two SQDs can be entangled in the presence of MNP. A high concurrence can be achieved, which is the best evidence that the coupling among SQDs induced by SPP field in MNP. This scheme may have the potential applications in all-optical plasmon-enhanced nanoscale devices. PMID:22297024

  2. Monte Carlo Simulation of Quantum Transport in Semiconductors Using Wigner Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, A.; García-García, J.; Bordone, P.; Brunetti, R.; Jacoboni, C.

    Charge transport in mesoscopic semiconductor systems must be analyzed in terms of a quantum theory since nowadays typical dimensions of the physical structures are comparable with the electron coherence length. Theoretical approaches based on fully quantum mechanical grounds have been developed in the last decade with the purpose of analyzing the quantum electron-phonon interaction in electron transport. The Wigner function (WF) formalism is particularly suitable for the analysis of mesoscopic structures owing to its phase-space formulation that allows a natural treatment of space dependent problems with given boundary conditions. The Hamiltonian describing the system is [1] {H}=-frac{hbar^2}{2m}nabla^2 +sum_qb... ...iqr} ) +V(r) +eE\\cdot r

  3. Semiconductor quantum dot scintillation under gamma-ray irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Letant, S E; Wang, T

    2006-08-23

    We recently demonstrated the ability of semiconductor quantum dots to convert alpha radiation into visible photons. In this letter, we report on the scintillation of quantum dots under gamma-ray irradiation, and compare the energy resolution of the 59 keV line of Americium 241 obtained with our quantum dot-glass nanocomposite material to that of a standard sodium iodide scintillator. A factor 2 improvement is demonstrated experimentally and interpreted theoretically using a combination of energy-loss and photon transport models. These results demonstrate the potential of quantum dots for room-temperature gamma-ray detection, which has applications in medical imaging, environmental monitoring, as well as security and defense. Present technology in gamma radiation detection suffers from flexibility and scalability issues. For example, bulk Germanium provides fine energy resolution (0.2% energy resolution at 1.33 MeV) but requires operation at liquid nitrogen temperature. On the other hand, Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride is a good room temperature detector ( 1% at 662 keV) but the size of the crystals that can be grown is limited to a few centimeters in each direction. Finally, the most commonly used scintillator, Sodium Iodide (NaI), can be grown as large crystals but suffers from a lack of energy resolution (7% energy resolution at 662 keV). Recent advancements in nanotechnology6-10 have provided the possibility of controlling materials synthesis at the molecular level. Both morphology and chemical composition can now be manipulated, leading to radically new material properties due to a combination of quantum confinement and surface to volume ratio effects. One of the main consequences of reducing the size of semiconductors down to nanometer dimensions is to increase the energy band gap, leading to visible luminescence, which suggests that these materials could be used as scintillators. The visible band gap of quantum dots would also ensure both efficient photon counting

  4. Stimulated Brillouin scattering of laser radiation in a piezoelectric semiconductor: Quantum effect

    SciTech Connect

    Uzma, Ch.; Zeba, I.; Shah, H. A.; Salimullah, M.

    2009-01-01

    Using quantum-hydrodynamic model, the phenomenon of the stimulated Brillouin scattering of a laser radiation in an unmagnetized piezoelectric semiconductor has been examined in detail. It is noticed that the Bohm potential in the electron dynamics of the semiconductor plasma enhances drastically the growth rate of the stimulated Brillouin scattering at higher values of the electron number density of the semiconductor plasma and the wave number of the electron-acoustic wave in the semiconductor.

  5. Dielectric confinement influenced screened Coulomb potential for a semiconductor quantum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonyan, K. H.; Margaryan, N. B.

    2016-01-01

    A formalism of the Thomas-Fermi method has been applied for studying the screening effect due to quasi-one-dimensional electron gas in a semiconductor cylindrical quantum wire embedded in the barrier environment. With taking into account of strongly low dielectric properties of the barrier material, an applicability of the quantum wire effective interaction potential of the confined charge carriers has been revealed. Both screened quasi- one-dimensional interaction potential and effective screening length analytical expressions are derived in the first time. It is shown that in the long wavelength moderate limit dielectric confinement effect enhances strength of the screening potential depending on the both radius of the wire and effective screening length, whereas in the long wavelength strong limit the screening potential solely is determined by barrier environment dielectric properties.

  6. Quantum control and process tomography of a semiconductor quantum dot hybrid qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dohun; Shi, Zhan; Simmons, C. B.; Ward, D. R.; Prance, J. R.; Koh, Teck Seng; Gamble, John King; Savage, D. E.; Lagally, M. G.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, Mark A.

    2014-07-01

    The similarities between gated quantum dots and the transistors in modern microelectronics--in fabrication methods, physical structure and voltage scales for manipulation--have led to great interest in the development of quantum bits (qubits) in semiconductor quantum dots. Although quantum dot spin qubits have demonstrated long coherence times, their manipulation is often slower than desired for important future applications, such as factoring. Furthermore, scalability and manufacturability are enhanced when qubits are as simple as possible. Previous work has increased the speed of spin qubit rotations by making use of integrated micromagnets, dynamic pumping of nuclear spins or the addition of a third quantum dot. Here we demonstrate a qubit that is a hybrid of spin and charge. It is simple, requiring neither nuclear-state preparation nor micromagnets. Unlike previous double-dot qubits, the hybrid qubit enables fast rotations about two axes of the Bloch sphere. We demonstrate full control on the Bloch sphere with π-rotation times of less than 100 picoseconds in two orthogonal directions, which is more than an order of magnitude faster than any other double-dot qubit. The speed arises from the qubit's charge-like characteristics, and its spin-like features result in resistance to decoherence over a wide range of gate voltages. We achieve full process tomography in our electrically controlled semiconductor quantum dot qubit, extracting high fidelities of 85 per cent for X rotations (transitions between qubit states) and 94 per cent for Z rotations (phase accumulation between qubit states).

  7. Theory of quantum control of spin-photon dynamics and spin decoherence in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wang

    Single electron spin in a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) and single photon wavepacket propagating in an optical waveguide are investigated as carriers of quantum bit (qubit) for information processing. Cavity quantum electrodynamics of the coupled system composed of charged QD, microcavity and waveguide provides a quantum interface for the interplay of stationary spin qubits and flying photon qubits via cavity assisted optical control. This interface forms the basis for a wide range of essential functions of a quantum network, including transferring, swapping, and entangling qubits at distributed quantum nodes as well as a deterministic source and an efficient detector of a single photon wavepacket with arbitrarily specified shape. The cavity assisted optical process also made possible ultrafast initialization and QND readout of the spin qubit in QD. In addition, the strong optical nonlinearity of dot-cavity-waveguide coupled system enables phase gate and entanglement operation for flying single photon qubits in waveguides. The coherence of the electron spin is the wellspring of these quantum applications being investigated. At low temperature and strong magnetic field, the dominant cause of electron spin decoherence is the coupling with the interacting lattice nuclear spins. We present a quantum solution to the coupled dynamics of the electron with the nuclear spin bath. The decoherence is treated in terms of quantum entanglement of the electron with the nuclear pair-flip excitations driven by the various nuclear interactions. A novel nuclear interaction, mediated by virtue spin-flips of the single electron, plays an important role in single spin free-induction decay (FID). The spin echo not only refocuses the dephasing by inhomogeneous broadening in ensemble dynamics but also eliminates the decoherence by electron-mediated nuclear interaction. Thus, the decoherence times for single spin FID and ensemble spin echo are significantly different. The quantum theory of

  8. QCAD simulation and optimization of semiconductor double quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Erik; Gao, Xujiao; Kalashnikova, Irina; Muller, Richard Partain; Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Young, Ralph Watson

    2013-12-01

    We present the Quantum Computer Aided Design (QCAD) simulator that targets modeling quantum devices, particularly silicon double quantum dots (DQDs) developed for quantum qubits. The simulator has three di erentiating features: (i) its core contains nonlinear Poisson, e ective mass Schrodinger, and Con guration Interaction solvers that have massively parallel capability for high simulation throughput, and can be run individually or combined self-consistently for 1D/2D/3D quantum devices; (ii) the core solvers show superior convergence even at near-zero-Kelvin temperatures, which is critical for modeling quantum computing devices; (iii) it couples with an optimization engine Dakota that enables optimization of gate voltages in DQDs for multiple desired targets. The Poisson solver includes Maxwell- Boltzmann and Fermi-Dirac statistics, supports Dirichlet, Neumann, interface charge, and Robin boundary conditions, and includes the e ect of dopant incomplete ionization. The solver has shown robust nonlinear convergence even in the milli-Kelvin temperature range, and has been extensively used to quickly obtain the semiclassical electrostatic potential in DQD devices. The self-consistent Schrodinger-Poisson solver has achieved robust and monotonic convergence behavior for 1D/2D/3D quantum devices at very low temperatures by using a predictor-correct iteration scheme. The QCAD simulator enables the calculation of dot-to-gate capacitances, and comparison with experiment and between solvers. It is observed that computed capacitances are in the right ballpark when compared to experiment, and quantum con nement increases capacitance when the number of electrons is xed in a quantum dot. In addition, the coupling of QCAD with Dakota allows to rapidly identify which device layouts are more likely leading to few-electron quantum dots. Very efficient QCAD simulations on a large number of fabricated and proposed Si DQDs have made it possible to provide fast feedback for design

  9. Optical pump-probe measurements of local nuclear spin coherence in semiconductor quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Sanada, H; Kondo, Y; Matsuzaka, S; Morita, K; Hu, C Y; Ohno, Y; Ohno, H

    2006-02-17

    We demonstrate local manipulation and detection of nuclear spin coherence in semiconductor quantum wells by an optical pump-probe technique combined with pulse rf NMR. The Larmor precession of photoexcited electron spins is monitored by time-resolved Kerr rotation (TRKR) as a measure of nuclear magnetic field. Under the irradiation of resonant pulsed rf magnetic fields, Rabi oscillations of nuclear spins are traced by TRKR signals. The intrinsic coherence time evaluated by a spin-echo technique reveals the dependence on the orientation of the magnetic field with respect to the crystalline axis as expected by the nearest neighbor dipole-dipole interaction. PMID:16606048

  10. Tunable optical delay via carrier induced exciton dephasing in semiconductor quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Susanta; Guo, Yan; Wang, Hailin

    2006-04-01

    We report the experimental realization of a tunable optical delay by exploiting unique incoherent nonlinear optical processes in semiconductors. The tunable optical delay takes advantage of the strong Coulomb interactions between excitons and free carriers and uses optical injection of free carriers to broaden and bleach an exciton absorption resonance. Fractional delay exceeding 200% has been obtained for an 8 ps optical pulse propagating near the heavy-hole excitonic transition in a GaAs quantum well structure. Tunable optical delay based on optical injection of free carriers avoids strong absorption of the pump beam and is also robust against variations in the frequency of the pump beam. PMID:19516421

  11. Electron transport and dephasing in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huibers, Andrew Gerrit A.

    At low temperatures, electrons in semiconductors can be phase coherent over distances exceeding tens of microns and are sufficiently monochromatic that a variety of interesting quantum interference phenomena can be observed and manipulated. This work discusses electron transport measurements through cavities (quantum dots) formed by laterally confining electrons in the two-dimensional sub-band of a GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction. Metal gates fabricated using e-beam lithography enable fine control of the cavity shape as well as the leads which connect the dot cavity to source and drain reservoirs. Quantum dots can be modeled by treating the devices as chaotic scatterers. Predictions of this theoretical description are found to be in good quantitative agreement with experimental measurements of full conductance distributions at different temperatures. Weak localization, the suppression of conductance due to phase-coherent backscattering at zero magnetic field, is used to measure dephasing times in the system. Mechanisms responsible for dephasing, including electron-electron scattering and Nyquist phase relaxation, are investigated by studying the loss of phase coherence as a function of temperature. Coupling of external microwave fields to the device is also studied to shed light on the unexpected saturation of dephasing that is observed below an electron temperature of 100 mK. The effect of external fields in the present experiment is explained in terms of Joule heating from an ac bias.

  12. Multi-band Bloch equations and gain spectra of highly excited II-VI semiconductor quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Girndt, A.; Jahnke, F.; Knorr, A.; Koch, S.W.; Chow, W.W.

    1997-04-21

    Quasi-equilibrium excitation dependent optical probe spectra of II-VI semiconductor quantum wells at room temperature are investigated within the framework of multi-band semiconductor Bloch equations. The calculations include correlation effects beyond the Hartree-Fock level which describe dephasing, interband Coulomb correlations and band-gap renormalization in second Born approximation. In addition to the carrier-Coulomb interaction, the influence of carrier-phonon scattering and inhomogeneous broadening is considered. The explicit calculation of single particle properties like band structure and dipole matrix elements using k {center_dot} p theory makes it possible to investigate various II-VI material combinations. Numerical results are presented for CdZnSe/ZnSe and CdZnSe/MnZnSSe semiconductor quantum-well systems.

  13. Peptide-mediated cellular delivery of semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmill, Kelly Boeneman; Muttenthaler, Markus; Delehanty, James; Deschamps, Jeff; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael; Dawson, Philip; Huston, Alan; Medintz, Igor

    2013-05-01

    CdSe/ZnS semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are ideal materials for biological sensing and cellular imaging applications due to their superior photophysical properties in comparison to fluorescent proteins or dyes and their ease of conjugation to biological materials. We have previously developed a number of in vitro FRET based biosensors in the laboratory for detection of proteases and biological and chemical agents. We would like to expand these biosensing capabilities into cellular systems, requiring development of QD cellular delivery techniques. Peptide mediated cellular delivery of QDs is ideal as peptides are small, easily conjugated to QDs, easily manipulated and synthesized, and can be designed with "handles" for further chemical conjugation with other cargo. Here we discuss four cell delivery peptides that facilitate QD uptake in live cells. Understanding these peptides will help us design better nanoparticle cellular delivery systems and advance our capabilities for in vivo biosensing.

  14. Lissajous Rocking Ratchet: Realization in a Semiconductor Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, Sergey; Kästner, Bernd; Schumacher, Hans W.; Kohler, Sigmund; Ludwig, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Breaking time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in the absence of a net bias can give rise to directed steady-state nonequilibrium transport phenomena such as ratchet effects. Here we present, theoretically and experimentally, the concept of a Lissajous rocking ratchet based on breaking TRS. Our system is a semiconductor quantum dot with periodically modulated dot-lead tunnel barriers. Broken TRS gives rise to single electron tunneling current. Its direction is fully controlled by exploring frequency and phase relations between the two barrier modulations. The concept of Lissajous ratchets can be realized in a large variety of different systems, including nanoelectrical, nanoelectromechanical, or superconducting circuits. It promises applications based on a detailed on-chip comparison of radio-frequency signals.

  15. Development of segmented semiconductor arrays for quantum imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulec, B.; Medipix2 Collaboration

    2003-09-01

    The field of pixel detectors has grown strongly in recent years through progress in CMOS technology, which permits many hundreds of transistors to be implemented in an area of 50-200 μm 2. Pulse processing electronics with noise of the order of 100 e - RMS permits to distinguish photons of a few kilo-electron-Volts from background noise. Techniques are under development, which should allow single chip systems (area ˜1 cm 2) to be extended to larger areas. This paper gives an introduction into the concept of quantum imaging using direct conversion in segmented semiconductor arrays. An overview of projects from this domain using strip, pad and in particular hybrid pixel detectors will be presented. One of these projects, the Medipix project, is described in more detail. The effect of different correction methods like threshold adjustment and flat field correction is illustrated and new measurement results and images are presented.

  16. Injection locking of a semiconductor double-quantum-dot micromaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.-Y.; Stehlik, J.; Gullans, M. J.; Taylor, J. M.; Petta, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The semiconductor double-quantum-dot (DQD) micromaser generates photons through single-electron tunneling events. Charge noise couples to the DQD energy levels, resulting in a maser linewidth that is 100 times larger than the Schawlow-Townes prediction. We demonstrate linewidth narrowing by more than a factor of 10 using injection locking. The injection locking range is measured as a function of input power and is shown to be in excellent agreement with the Adler equation. The position and amplitude of distortion sidebands that appear outside of the injection locking range are quantitatively examined. Our results show that this unconventional maser, which is impacted by strong charge noise and electron-phonon coupling, is well described by standard laser models.

  17. Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Bioimaging and Biodiagnostic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairdolf, Brad A.; Smith, Andrew M.; Stokes, Todd H.; Wang, May D.; Young, Andrew N.; Nie, Shuming

    2013-06-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are light-emitting particles on the nanometer scale that have emerged as a new class of fluorescent labels for chemical analysis, molecular imaging, and biomedical diagnostics. Compared with traditional fluorescent probes, QDs have unique optical and electronic properties such as size-tunable light emission, narrow and symmetric emission spectra, and broad absorption spectra that enable the simultaneous excitation of multiple fluorescence colors. QDs are also considerably brighter and more resistant to photobleaching than are organic dyes and fluorescent proteins. These properties are well suited for dynamic imaging at the single-molecule level and for multiplexed biomedical diagnostics at ultrahigh sensitivity. Here, we discuss the fundamental properties of QDs; the development of next-generation QDs; and their applications in bioanalytical chemistry, dynamic cellular imaging, and medical diagnostics. For in vivo and clinical imaging, the potential toxicity of QDs remains a major concern. However, the toxic nature of cadmium-containing QDs is no longer a factor for in vitro diagnostics, so the use of multicolor QDs for molecular diagnostics and pathology is probably the most important and clinically relevant application for semiconductor QDs in the immediate future.

  18. Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Bioimaging and Biodiagnostic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kairdolf, Brad A.; Smith, Andrew M.; Stokes, Todd H.; Wang, May D.; Young, Andrew N.; Nie, Shuming

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are light-emitting particles on the nanometer scale that have emerged as a new class of fluorescent labels for chemical analysis, molecular imaging, and biomedical diagnostics. Compared with traditional fluorescent probes, QDs have unique optical and electronic properties such as size-tunable light emission, narrow and symmetric emission spectra, and broad absorption spectra that enable the simultaneous excitation of multiple fluorescence colors. QDs are also considerably brighter and more resistant to photobleaching than are organic dyes and fluorescent proteins. These properties are well suited for dynamic imaging at the single-molecule level and for multiplexed biomedical diagnostics at ultrahigh sensitivity. Here, we discuss the fundamental properties of QDs; the development of next-generation QDs; and their applications in bioanalytical chemistry, dynamic cellular imaging, and medical diagnostics. For in vivo and clinical imaging, the potential toxicity of QDs remains a major concern. However, the toxic nature of cadmium-containing QDs is no longer a factor for in vitro diagnostics, so the use of multicolor QDs for molecular diagnostics and pathology is probably the most important and clinically relevant application for semiconductor QDs in the immediate future. PMID:23527547

  19. Semiconductor quantum dots for bioimaging and biodiagnostic applications.

    PubMed

    Kairdolf, Brad A; Smith, Andrew M; Stokes, Todd H; Wang, May D; Young, Andrew N; Nie, Shuming

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are light-emitting particles on the nanometer scale that have emerged as a new class of fluorescent labels for chemical analysis, molecular imaging, and biomedical diagnostics. Compared with traditional fluorescent probes, QDs have unique optical and electronic properties such as size-tunable light emission, narrow and symmetric emission spectra, and broad absorption spectra that enable the simultaneous excitation of multiple fluorescence colors. QDs are also considerably brighter and more resistant to photobleaching than are organic dyes and fluorescent proteins. These properties are well suited for dynamic imaging at the single-molecule level and for multiplexed biomedical diagnostics at ultrahigh sensitivity. Here, we discuss the fundamental properties of QDs; the development of next-generation QDs; and their applications in bioanalytical chemistry, dynamic cellular imaging, and medical diagnostics. For in vivo and clinical imaging, the potential toxicity of QDs remains a major concern. However, the toxic nature of cadmium-containing QDs is no longer a factor for in vitro diagnostics, so the use of multicolor QDs for molecular diagnostics and pathology is probably the most important and clinically relevant application for semiconductor QDs in the immediate future. PMID:23527547

  20. Few-body properties of interacting spins in III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodworth, Ryan

    We perform theoretical analyses of several novel device applications which make use of the distinctive electronic and optical properties of III-V semiconductors. Electron spins in semiconductor quantum dots are a promising candidate for the physical realization of a solid-state quantum computer. Whenever three or more spins interact simultaneously, the system's full Hamiltonian is found to include nonlinear interactions that significantly influence its dynamics in experimentally relevant parameter regimes. We consider the implications of these results for the proposed implementations of known quantum algorithms; in particular, we describe a method for circumventing the four-body effects in an encoded system (four spins per logical bit) by the appropriate tuning of material parameters. We calculate the spin coherence lifetime of a conduction electron in a semiconductor due to exchange scattering from neutral donors. The average lifetime is computed in two and in three dimensions using the Born approximation. We find that, for realistic values of the impurity concentrations, these lifetimes are comparable to those of spin decoherence mechanisms commonly ascribed to experimentally observed lifetimes. We also develop a numerical model for charge diffusion in a GaAs heterostructure laser. We construct and solve rate equations for conduction electrons coupled to a single optical cavity mode in a microdisk. Our results extend previous theoretical approaches to diffusion and are consistent with applicable experiments.

  1. An impedance analysis of double-stream interaction in semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, P. W.; Durney, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    The electromagnetic waves propagating through a drifting semiconductor plasma are studied from a macroscopic point of view in terms of double-stream interaction. The possible existing waves (helicon waves, longitudinal waves, ordinary waves, and pseudolongitudinal waves) which depend upon the orientation of the dc external magnetic field are derived. A powerful impedance concept is introduced to investigate the wave behavior of longitudinal (space charge) waves or pseudolongitudinal waves in a semiconductor plasma. The impedances due to one- and two-carrier stream interactions were calculated theoretically.

  2. Nonequilibrium thermal effects on exciton time correlations in coupled semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, J. C.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Quiroga, L.

    2013-12-04

    Theoretical guides to test 'macroscopic realism' in solid-state systems under quantum control are highly desirable. Here, we report on the evolution of a Leggett-Garg inequality (LGI), a combination of two-time correlations, in an out-of-equilibrium set up consisting of two interacting excitons confined in separate semiconductor quantum dots which are coupled to independent baths at different temperatures (T{sub 1} ≠ T{sub 2}). In a Markovian steady-state situation we found a rich variety of dynamical behaviors in different sectors of the average temperature (T{sub M} = (T{sub 1}+T{sub 2})/2) vs. coupling strength to the reservoirs (Γ) space parameter. For high T{sub M} and Γ values the LGI is not violated, as expected. However, by decreasing T{sub M} or Γ a sector of parameters appears where the LGI is violated at thermal equilibrium (T{sub 1} = T{sub 2}) and the violation starts decreasing when the system is moved out of the equilibrium. Surprisingly, at even lower T{sub M} values, for any Γ, there is an enhancement of the LGI violation by exposing the system to a temperature gradient, i.e. quantum correlations increase in a nonequilibrium thermal situation. Results on LGI violations in a steady-state regime are compared with other non-locality-dominated quantum correlation measurements, such as concurrence and quantum discord, between the two excitons under similar temperature gradients.

  3. Coherent quantum depletion of an interacting atom condensate

    PubMed Central

    Kira, M.

    2015-01-01

    Sufficiently strong interactions promote coherent quantum transitions in spite of thermalization and losses, which are the adversaries of delicate effects such as reversibility and correlations. In atomic Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs), strong atom–atom interactions can eject atoms from the BEC to the normal component, yielding quantum depletion instead of temperature depletion. A recent experiment has already been verified to overcome losses. Here I show that it also achieves coherent quantum-depletion dynamics in a BEC swept fast enough from weak to strong atom–atom interactions. The elementary coherent process first excites the normal component into a liquid state that evolves into a spherical shell state, where the atom occupation peaks at a finite momentum to shield 50% of the BEC atoms from annihilation. The identified coherent processes resemble ultrafast semiconductor excitations expanding the scope of BEC explorations to many-body non-equilibrium studies. PMID:25767044

  4. Coherent quantum depletion of an interacting atom condensate.

    PubMed

    Kira, M

    2015-01-01

    Sufficiently strong interactions promote coherent quantum transitions in spite of thermalization and losses, which are the adversaries of delicate effects such as reversibility and correlations. In atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), strong atom-atom interactions can eject atoms from the BEC to the normal component, yielding quantum depletion instead of temperature depletion. A recent experiment has already been verified to overcome losses. Here I show that it also achieves coherent quantum-depletion dynamics in a BEC swept fast enough from weak to strong atom-atom interactions. The elementary coherent process first excites the normal component into a liquid state that evolves into a spherical shell state, where the atom occupation peaks at a finite momentum to shield 50% of the BEC atoms from annihilation. The identified coherent processes resemble ultrafast semiconductor excitations expanding the scope of BEC explorations to many-body non-equilibrium studies. PMID:25767044

  5. Fast gain and phase recovery of semiconductor optical amplifiers based on submonolayer quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, Bastian Owschimikow, Nina; Kaptan, Yücel; Kolarczik, Mirco; Switaiski, Thomas; Woggon, Ulrike; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Rosales, Ricardo; Strittmatter, André; Bimberg, Dieter; Pohl, Udo W.

    2015-11-16

    Submonolayer quantum dots as active medium in opto-electronic devices promise to combine the high density of states of quantum wells with the fast recovery dynamics of self-assembled quantum dots. We investigate the gain and phase recovery dynamics of a semiconductor optical amplifier based on InAs submonolayer quantum dots in the regime of linear operation by one- and two-color heterodyne pump-probe spectroscopy. We find an as fast recovery dynamics as for quantum dot-in-a-well structures, reaching 2 ps at moderate injection currents. The effective quantum well embedding the submonolayer quantum dots acts as a fast and efficient carrier reservoir.

  6. Instantaneous amplitude and frequency dynamics of coherent wave mixing in semiconductor quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Chemla, D.S.

    1993-06-30

    This article reviews recent investigations of nonlinear optical processes in semiconductors. Section II discusses theory of coherent wave mixing in semiconductors, with emphasis on resonant excitation with only one exciton state. Section III reviews recent experimental investigations of amplitude and phase of coherent wave-mixing resonant with quasi-2d excitons in GaAs quantum wells.

  7. Quantum dynamical phenomena of independent electrons in semiconductor superlattices subject to a uniform electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, A.M.

    1994-07-27

    This report discusses the following topics: Bloch oscillations and other dynamical phenomena of electrons in semiconductor superlattices; solvable dynamical model of an electron in a one-dimensional aperiodic lattice subject to a uniform electric field; and quantum dynamical phenomena of electrons in aperiodic semiconductor superlattices.

  8. Hybrid em wave - polar semiconductor interaction: A polaronic study

    SciTech Connect

    Paliwal, Ayushi Dubey, Swati; Ghosh, S.

    2015-07-31

    Present paper considers incidence of a most realistic hybrid pump wave on a weakly polar semiconductor having a very small coupling constant. Possibility of optical parametric interaction has been explored in the presence of an external transverse magnetic field. The effect of doping concentrations and transverse magnetostatic field on threshold characteristics of optical parametric interaction in polar semiconductor plasma has been studied, using hydrodynamic model of semiconductors, in the far infrared regime. Numerical estimations have been carried out by using data of weakly polar III-V GaAs semiconductor and influence of control parameters on electron-LO phonon interaction has been analyzed. A particular range of physical parameters is found to be suitable for minimum threshold. The choice of nonlinear medium and favorable range of operating parameters are crucial aspects in design and fabrication of parametric amplifiers and oscillators. The hybrid mode of the pump is found to be favorable for the onset of the said process and realization of a low cost amplifier.

  9. Antiferromagnetic order in a semiconductor quantum well with spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinescu, D. C.

    2015-05-01

    An argument is made on the existence of a low-temperature itinerant antiferromagnetic (AF) spin alignment, rather than persistent helical (PH), in the ground state of a two dimensional electron gas in a semiconductor quantum well with linear spin-orbit Rashba-Dresselhaus interaction at equal coupling strengths, α. This result is obtained on account of the opposite-spin single-particle state degeneracy at k = 0 that makes the spin instability possible. A theory of the resulting magnetic phase is formulated within the Hartree-Fock approximation of the Coulomb interaction. In the AF state the direction of the fractional polarization is obtained to be aligned along the displacement vector of the single-particle states.

  10. Modeling direct band-to-band tunneling: From bulk to quantum-confined semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Ziegler, A.; Luisier, M.; Schenk, A.

    2015-06-21

    A rigorous framework to study direct band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in homo- and hetero-junction semiconductor nanodevices is introduced. An interaction Hamiltonian coupling conduction and valence bands (CVBs) is derived using a multiband envelope method. A general form of the BTBT probability is then obtained from the linear response to the “CVBs interaction” that drives the system out of equilibrium. Simple expressions in terms of the one-electron spectral function are developed to compute the BTBT current in two- and three-dimensional semiconductor structures. Additionally, a two-band envelope equation based on the Flietner model of imaginary dispersion is proposed for the same purpose. In order to characterize their accuracy and differences, both approaches are compared with full-band, atomistic quantum transport simulations of Ge, InAs, and InAs-Si Esaki diodes. As another numerical application, the BTBT current in InAs-Si nanowire tunnel field-effect transistors is computed. It is found that both approaches agree with high accuracy. The first one is considerably easier to conceive and could be implemented straightforwardly in existing quantum transport tools based on the effective mass approximation to account for BTBT in nanodevices.

  11. Electronic Properties of Semiconductor Quantum-Ring Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Mónica; Fuster, Gonzalo; Barticevic, Zdenka

    2002-03-01

    Motivated by the interesting electronic properties exhibited by these nanorings when they are threaded by a magnetic field, we studied a new semiconductor structure formed by two coupled rings which are concentrically disposed. In order to calculate the two-ring electronic spectrum it is assumed that the in-plane electronic-potential of each ring is generated by a rotation, around the ring axis, of a one-dimensional parabolic potential centered to a distance ρ=ρo of the ring center. The potential of the two-rings system is then assumed as a superposition of a potential for each ring with their minimum at different radii and being truncated in the intersection point. In this way a potential barrier is formed in between the rings. We solve the in-plane problem by expanding the corresponding envelope function as a linear combination of solutions of isolated rings. We have made a detailed study about the influence of the characteristic confinement-parameters of each rings, and of the barrier strength, on the electronic energy spectrum of the system. A uniform magnetic field is applied along the common ring axis and we explore the effects on the Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillations in the energy levels caused by the particular geometry of two coupled quantum-rings.

  12. Quantum band engineering of nitride semiconductors for infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malis, O.; Edmunds, C.; Li, D.; Shao, J.; Gardner, G.; Li, W.; Fay, P.; Manfra, M. J.

    2014-02-01

    The III-nitride semiconductors have been proposed as candidate materials for new quantum cascade lasers in the nearinfrared (1.5-3 μm), and far-infrared (30-60 μm), due to the large conduction-band offset between GaN and Alcontaining alloys (>1 eV), and the large longitudinal optical (LO) phonon energy (90 meV), respectively. The challenges of III-nitride intersubband devices are twofold: material and design related. Due to large electron effective mass, the nitride intersubband materials require the ability to fine-tune the atomic structure at an unprecedented sub-nanometer level. Moreover, the III-N materials exhibit built-in polarization fields that complicate the design of intersubband lasers. This paper presents recent results on c-plane nitride resonant-tunneling diodes that are important for the prospects of farinfrared nitride lasers. We also report near-infrared absorption and photocurrent measurements in nonpolar (m-plane) AlGaN/GaN superlattices.

  13. Continuing progress toward controlled intracellular delivery of semiconductor quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Breger, Joyce; Delehanty, James B; Medintz, Igor L

    2015-01-01

    The biological applications of luminescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) continue to grow at a nearly unabated pace. This growth is driven, in part, by their unique photophysical and physicochemical properties which have allowed them to be used in many different roles in cellular biology including: as superior fluorophores for a wide variety of cellular labeling applications; as active platforms for assembly of nanoscale sensors; and, more recently, as a powerful tool to understand the mechanisms of nanoparticle mediated drug delivery. Given that controlled cellular delivery is at the intersection of all these applications, the latest progress in delivering QDs to cells is examined here. A brief discussion of relevant considerations including the importance of materials preparation and bioconjugation along with the continuing issue of endosomal sequestration is initially provided for context. Methods for the cellular delivery of QDs are then highlighted including those based on passive exposure, facilitated strategies that utilize peptides or polymers and fully active modalities such as electroporation and other mechanically based methods. Following on this, the exciting advent of QD cellular delivery using multiple or combined mechanisms is then previewed. Several recent methods reporting endosomal escape of QD materials in cells are also examined in detail with a focus on the mechanisms by which access to the cytosol is achieved. The ongoing debate over QD cytotoxicity is also discussed along with a perspective on how this field will continue to evolve in the future. PMID:25154379

  14. Quantum correlation between the junction-voltage fluctuation and the photon-number fluctuation in a semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, W. H.; Yamamoto, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The photon-number fluctuation of the external field from a semiconductor laser - which was reduced to below the standard quantum limit - is shown to be correlated with the measured junction-voltage noise. The spectral density of the sum of the photon-number fluctuation and junction-voltage fluctuation falls below the squeezed photon-number fluctuation. This confirms the theoretical predictions that this correlation, which originates in the dipole interaction between the internal field and electron-hole pairs, extends into the quantum regime.

  15. Nonradiative resonance energy transfer between semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Samosvat, D. M. Chikalova-Luzina, O. P.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2015-07-15

    A microscopic analysis of the mechanisms of nonradiative energy transfer in a system of two semiconductor QDs caused by Coulomb interaction of donor and acceptor electrons is performed. The energy transfer rate is calculated for QDs based on III–V compounds using the Kane model. Conditions are analyzed under which energy transfer from a donor to an acceptor is possible. The mixing in of the p states of the valence band to the s states of the conduction band is found to give rise to additional contributions to the matrix element of energy transfer. It is shown that these additional contributions play a considerable role in the energy transfer process at distances between QDs close to contact distances or much greater. The influence of the exchange interaction on the energy transfer mechanism is analyzed, and it is shown that this interaction should be taken into account for a quantitative description of the energy transfer when QDs are separated by a distance close to the contact distance.

  16. Quantum Effects in the Thermoelectric Power Factor of Low-Dimensional Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Nguyen T.; Hasdeo, Eddwi H.; Nugraha, Ahmad R. T.; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Saito, Riichiro

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the interplay between the confinement length L and the thermal de Broglie wavelength Λ to optimize the thermoelectric power factor of semiconducting materials. An analytical formula for the power factor is derived based on the one-band model assuming nondegenerate semiconductors to describe quantum effects on the power factor of the low-dimensional semiconductors. The power factor is enhanced for one- and two-dimensional semiconductors when L is smaller than Λ of the semiconductors. In this case, the low-dimensional semiconductors having L smaller than their Λ will give a better thermoelectric performance compared to their bulk counterpart. On the other hand, when L is larger than Λ , bulk semiconductors may give a higher power factor compared to the lower dimensional ones.

  17. Quantum Effects in the Thermoelectric Power Factor of Low-Dimensional Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Hung, Nguyen T; Hasdeo, Eddwi H; Nugraha, Ahmad R T; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Saito, Riichiro

    2016-07-15

    We theoretically investigate the interplay between the confinement length L and the thermal de Broglie wavelength Λ to optimize the thermoelectric power factor of semiconducting materials. An analytical formula for the power factor is derived based on the one-band model assuming nondegenerate semiconductors to describe quantum effects on the power factor of the low-dimensional semiconductors. The power factor is enhanced for one- and two-dimensional semiconductors when L is smaller than Λ of the semiconductors. In this case, the low-dimensional semiconductors having L smaller than their Λ will give a better thermoelectric performance compared to their bulk counterpart. On the other hand, when L is larger than Λ, bulk semiconductors may give a higher power factor compared to the lower dimensional ones. PMID:27472126

  18. Diode-Laser Pumped Far-Infrared Local Oscillator Based on Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolokolov, K.; Li, J.; Ning, C. Z.; Larrabee, D. C.; Tang, J.; Khodaparast, G.; Kono, J.; Sasa, S.; Inoue, M.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The contents include: 1) Tetrahertz Field: A Technology Gap; 2) Existing THZ Sources and Shortcomings; 3) Applications of A THZ Laser; 4) Previous Optical Pumped LW Generations; 5) Optically Pumped Sb based Intersubband Generation Whys; 6) InGaAs/InP/AlAsSb QWs; 7) Raman Enhanced Optical Gain; 8) Pump Intensity Dependence of THZ Gain; 9) Pump-Probe Interaction Induced Raman Shift; 10) THZ Laser Gain in InGaAs/InP/AlAsSb QWs; 11) Diode-Laser Pumped Difference Frequency Generation (InGaAs/InP/AlAsSb QWs); 12) 6.1 Angstrom Semiconductor Quantum Wells; 13) InAs/GaSb/AlSb Nanostructures; 14) InAs/AlSb Double QWs: DFG Scheme; 15) Sb-Based Triple QWs: Laser Scheme; and 16) Exciton State Pumped THZ Generation. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  19. Enhanced refractive index without absorption in four-level asymmetrical double semiconductor quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Chengxian; Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the absorptive-dispersive properties of a weak probe field in a four-level asymmetrical double semiconductor quantum well. It is found that the enhanced refraction index without absorption can be easily controlled via adjusting properly the corresponding parameters of the system. Our scheme may provide some new possibilities for technological applications in dispersion compensation and solid-state quantum communication for quantum information processing.

  20. Exciton Kinetics in Strained II-Vi Semiconductor Multiple Quantum Wells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hefetz, Yaron

    1987-09-01

    Two groups of wide gap II-VI semiconductor superlattices based on ZnSe/Zn(,1-x)Mn(,x)Se and CdTe/ZnTe were investigated using CW and time-resolved photoluminescence, excitation, reflectance, and photomodulated reflectance spectroscopy at various temperatures and under an external magnetic field. All these lattice mismatch strained layer structures were grown by MBE technique and exhibit strong excitonic photoluminescence at low temperatures. By studying the dynamics of the exciton recombination processes, the role of strain, quantum confinement and localization effects were revealed. In the CdTe/ZnTc system where the lattice mismatch is (DELTA)a/a (TURNEQ) 6% the inhomogeneously broadened ((TURN)40 mev) luminescence line is governed by excitonic localization in well width fluctuations. Exchange interactions of the carriers with the Mn('++) ions in the dilute magnetic semiconductor Zn(,1-x)Mn(,x)Se in thin film and the barrier of the MQW structures influence their optical behavior in an exernal magnetic field. "Giant" Zeeman splittings of up to (TURN)10 mev/Tesla were measured in samples with moderate Mn concentration (x = .23). Antiferromagnetic interaction reduces these splittings in samples with higher Mn concentrations. In observing the time evolution of the carrier in Zn(,1-x)Mn(,x)Se MQW we found that the capture time of these carriers into the well is on the order of 1 psec but the last stages of thermalization, exciton formations and localization is (TURN)70 ps. The fast capture of electrons and holes into the quantum wells bypass the energy transfer into the Mn internal transition that is responsible to the efficient "yellow" luminescence in ZnMnSe mixed crystals.

  1. Determination of spin-orbit coefficients in semiconductor quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faniel, S.; Matsuura, T.; Mineshige, S.; Sekine, Y.; Koga, T.

    2011-03-01

    We report the determination of the intrinsic spin-orbit interaction (SOI) parameters for In0.53Ga0.47As/In0.52Al0.48As quantum wells (QWs) from the analysis of the weak antilocalization effect. We show that the Dresselhaus SOI is mostly negligible in this system and that the intrinsic parameter for the Rashba effect, aSO≡α/, is given to be aSOm*/me=(1.46-1.51×10-17NS [m-2]) eÅ2, where α is the Rashba SOI coefficient, is the expected electric field within the QW, m*/me is the electron effective mass ratio, and NS is the sheet carrier density. These values for aSOm* were also confirmed by the observation of beatings in the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in our most asymmetric QW sample.

  2. Tunable Quantum Dot Solids: Impact of Interparticle Interactions on Bulk Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Fan, Hongyou; Brener, Igal; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Li, Binsong

    2015-09-01

    QD-solids comprising self-assembled semiconductor nanocrystals such as CdSe are currently under investigation for use in a wide array of applications including light emitting diodes, solar cells, field effect transistors, photodetectors, and biosensors. The goal of this LDRD project was develop a fundamental understanding of the relationship between nanoparticle interactions and the different regimes of charge and energy transport in semiconductor quantum dot (QD) solids. Interparticle spacing was tuned through the application of hydrostatic pressure in a diamond anvil cell, and the impact on interparticle interactions was probed using x-ray scattering and a variety of static and transient optical spectroscopies. During the course of this LDRD, we discovered a new, previously unknown, route to synthesize semiconductor quantum wires using high pressure sintering of self-assembled quantum dot crystals. We believe that this new, pressure driven synthesis approach holds great potential as a new tool for nanomaterials synthesis and engineering.

  3. Optimal quantum control via numerical pulse shape optimization for two exciton qubits confined to semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Reuble; Shi Yang, Hong Yi; Hall, Kimberley

    2015-03-01

    Optimal quantum control (OQC), which iteratively optimizes the control Hamiltonian to achieve a target quantum state, is a versatile approach for manipulating quantum systems. For optically-active transitions, OQC can be implemented using femtosecond pulse shaping which provides control over the amplitude and/or phase of the electric field. Optical pulse shaping has been employed to optimize physical processes such as nonlinear optical signals, photosynthesis, and has recently been applied to optimizing single-qubit gates in multiple semiconductor quantum dots. In this work, we examine the use of numerical pulse shape optimization for optimal quantum control of multiple qubits confined to quantum dots as a function of their electronic structure parameters. The numerically optimized pulse shapes were found to produce high fidelity quantum gates for a range of transition frequencies, dipole moments, and arbitrary initial and final states. This work enhances the potential for scalability by reducing the laser resources required to control multiple qubits.

  4. Integrated semiconductor quantum dot scintillation detector: Ultimate limit for speed and light yield

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oktyabrsky, Serge; Yakimov, Michael; Tokranov, Vadim; Murat, Pavel

    2016-03-30

    Here, a picosecond-range timing of charged particles and photons is a long-standing challenge for many high-energy physics, biophysics, medical and security applications. We present a design, technological pathway and challenges, and some properties important for realization of an ultrafast high-efficient room-temperature semiconductor scintillator based on self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QD) embedded in a GaAs matrix. Low QD density (<; 1015 cm-3), fast (~5 ps) electron capture, luminescence peak redshifted by 0.2-0.3 eV from GaAs absorption edge with fast decay time (0.5-1 ns) along with the efficient energy transfer in the GaAs matrix (4.2 eV/pair) allows for fabrication of a semiconductormore » scintillator with the unsurpassed performance parameters. The major technological challenge is fabrication of a large volume (> 1 cm3 ) of epitaxial QD medium. This requires multiple film separation and bonding, likely using separate epitaxial films as waveguides for improved light coupling. Compared to traditional inorganic scintillators, the semiconductor-QD based scintillators could have about 5x higher light yield and 20x faster decay time, opening a way to gamma detectors with the energy resolution better than 1% and sustaining counting rates MHz. Picosecond-scale timing requires segmented low-capacitance photodiodes integrated with the scintillator. For photons, the proposed detector inherently provides the depth-of-interaction information.« less

  5. Repeated interactions in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneau, Laurent; Joye, Alain; Merkli, Marco

    2014-07-15

    Analyzing the dynamics of open quantum systems has a long history in mathematics and physics. Depending on the system at hand, basic physical phenomena that one would like to explain are, for example, convergence to equilibrium, the dynamics of quantum coherences (decoherence) and quantum correlations (entanglement), or the emergence of heat and particle fluxes in non-equilibrium situations. From the mathematical physics perspective, one of the main challenges is to derive the irreversible dynamics of the open system, starting from a unitary dynamics of the system and its environment. The repeated interactions systems considered in these notes are models of non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics. They are relevant in quantum optics, and more generally, serve as a relatively well treatable approximation of a more difficult quantum dynamics. In particular, the repeated interaction models allow to determine the large time (stationary) asymptotics of quantum systems out of equilibrium.

  6. Implications of mercury interactions with band-gap semiconductor oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Granite, E.J.; King, W.P.; Stanko, D.C.; Pennline, H.W.

    2008-09-01

    Titanium dioxide is a well-known photooxidation catalyst. It will oxidize mercury in the presence of ultraviolet light from the sun and oxygen and/or moisture to form mercuric oxide. Several companies manufacture self-cleaning windows. These windows have a transparent coating of titanium dioxide. The titanium dioxide is capable of destroying organic contaminants in air in the presence of ultraviolet light from the sun, thereby keeping the windows clean. The commercially available self-cleaning windows were used to sequester mercury from oxygen–nitrogen mixtures. Samples of the self-cleaning glass were placed into specially designed photo-reactors in order to study the removal of elemental mercury from oxygen–nitrogen mixtures resembling air. The possibility of removing mercury from ambient air with a self-cleaning glass apparatus is examined. The intensity of 365-nm ultraviolet light was similar to the natural intensity from sunlight in the Pittsburgh region. Passive removal of mercury from the air may represent an option in lieu of, or in addition to, point source clean-up at combustion facilities. There are several common band-gap semiconductor oxide photocatalysts. Sunlight (both the ultraviolet and visible light components) and band-gap semiconductor particles may have a small impact on the global cycle of mercury in the environment. The potential environmental consequences of mercury interactions with band-gap semiconductor oxides are discussed. Heterogeneous photooxidation might impact the global transport of elemental mercury emanating from flue gases.

  7. Exciton-phonon interaction in crystals and quantum size structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaremko, A. M.; Yukhymchuk, V. O.; Dzhagan, V. M.; Valakh, M. Ya; Baran, J.; Ratajczak, H.

    2007-12-01

    In this report, the problem of electron-phonon interaction (EPI) in bulk semiconductors and quantum dots (QDs) is considered. It is shown that the model of strong EPI developed for organic molecular crystals can be successfully applied to bulk and nano-sized semiconductors. The idea of the approach proposed is to describe theoretically the experimental Raman (IR) spectra, containing the phonon replicas, by varying the EPI constant. The main parameter of the theoretical expression (βS) is the ratio of EPI constant (χS) to the frequency of the corresponding phonon mode (ΩS). The theoretical results show that variation of the QD size can change the value of χS.

  8. Terahertz quantum transport in semiconductor nanostructures with the UCSB free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    Quantum transport in semiconductor nanostructures takes on new dimensions in the presence of intense terahertz electric fields. Terahertz frequencies lift us into the regime where the scattering and relaxation is not so important and strong terahertz electric fields provided by the UCSB FEL`s explore non-linear dynamics far from the perturbative limit. New quantum transport channels that are assisted by the absorption or emission of a photon appear in current voltage characteristics. We will describe some of these experiments, the new phenomena they expose and the potential impact on future terahertz semiconductor electronics.

  9. Semiconductor surface sublimation energies and atom-atom interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Srinivasan; Berding, M. A.; Sher, A.; Chen, A.-B.

    1990-01-01

    The energy required to remove an atom from semiconductor surfaces is calculated using a Green's-function approach. Contrary to intuition, it is found that, in some cases, less energy is needed to remove an atom from the nearly full surface than from a nearly empty surface. The results are explained in terms of the relative energies of anion and cation dangling bonds, and the charge transfers between them. The deducted effective pair-interaction energies and their effects on surface morphology and growth perfection are discussed.

  10. Emergence of the persistent spin helix in semiconductor quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Koralek, J D; Weber, C P; Orenstein, J; Bernevig, B A; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Mack, S; Awschalom, D D

    2009-04-01

    According to Noether's theorem, for every symmetry in nature there is a corresponding conservation law. For example, invariance with respect to spatial translation corresponds to conservation of momentum. In another well-known example, invariance with respect to rotation of the electron's spin, or SU(2) symmetry, leads to conservation of spin polarization. For electrons in a solid, this symmetry is ordinarily broken by spin-orbit coupling, allowing spin angular momentum to flow to orbital angular momentum. However, it has recently been predicted that SU(2) can be achieved in a two-dimensional electron gas, despite the presence of spin-orbit coupling. The corresponding conserved quantities include the amplitude and phase of a helical spin density wave termed the 'persistent spin helix'. SU(2) is realized, in principle, when the strengths of two dominant spin-orbit interactions, the Rashba (strength parameterized by alpha) and linear Dresselhaus (beta(1)) interactions, are equal. This symmetry is predicted to be robust against all forms of spin-independent scattering, including electron-electron interactions, but is broken by the cubic Dresselhaus term (beta(3)) and spin-dependent scattering. When these terms are negligible, the distance over which spin information can propagate is predicted to diverge as alpha approaches beta(1). Here we report experimental observation of the emergence of the persistent spin helix in GaAs quantum wells by independently tuning alpha and beta(1). Using transient spin-grating spectroscopy, we find a spin-lifetime enhancement of two orders of magnitude near the symmetry point. Excellent quantitative agreement with theory across a wide range of sample parameters allows us to obtain an absolute measure of all relevant spin-orbit terms, identifying beta(3) as the main SU(2)-violating term in our samples. The tunable suppression of spin relaxation demonstrated in this work is well suited for application to spintronics. PMID:19340077

  11. Quantum filter of spin polarized states: Metal–dielectric–ferromagnetic/semiconductor device

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Vladimir I.; Khmelinskii, Igor

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • Development of a new spintronics device. • Development of quantum spin polarized filters. • Development of theory of quantum spin polarized filter. - Abstract: Recently we proposed a model for the Quantum Spin-Polarized State Filter (QSPSF). The magnetic moments are transported selectively in this model, detached from the electric charge carriers. Thus, transfer of a spin-polarized state between two conductors was predicted in a system of two levels coupled by exchange interaction. The strength of the exchange interaction between the two conductive layers depends on the thickness of the dielectric layer separating them. External magnetic fields modulate spin-polarized state transfer, due to Zeeman level shift. Therefore, a linearly growing magnetic field generates a series of current peaks in a nearby coil. Thus, our spin-state filter should contain as least three nanolayers: (1) conductive or ferromagnetic; (2) dielectric; and (3) conductive or semiconductive. The spectrum of spin-polarized states generated by the filter device consists of a series of resonance peaks. In a simple case the number of lines equals S, the total spin angular momentum of discrete states in one of the coupled nanolayers. Presently we report spin-polarized state transport in metal–dielectric–ferromagnetic (MDF) and metal–dielectric–semiconductor (MDS) three-layer sandwich devices. The exchange-resonance spectra in such devices are quite specific, differing also from spectra observed earlier in other three-layer devices. The theoretical model is used to interpret the available experimental results. A detailed ab initio analysis of the magnetic-field dependence of the output magnetic moment averaged over the surface of the device was carried out. The model predicts the resonance structure of the signal, although at its present accuracy it cannot predict the positions of the spectral peaks.

  12. Evaluating charge noise acting on semiconductor quantum dots in the circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Basset, J.; Stockklauser, A.; Jarausch, D.-D.; Frey, T.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Wallraff, A.; Ensslin, K.; Ihn, T.

    2014-08-11

    We evaluate the charge noise acting on a GaAs/GaAlAs based semiconductor double quantum dot dipole-coupled to the voltage oscillations of a superconducting transmission line resonator. The in-phase (I) and the quadrature (Q) components of the microwave tone transmitted through the resonator are sensitive to charging events in the surrounding environment of the double dot with an optimum sensitivity of 8.5×10{sup −5} e/√(Hz). A low frequency 1/f type noise spectrum combined with a white noise level of 6.6×10{sup −6} e{sup 2}/Hz above 1 Hz is extracted, consistent with previous results obtained with quantum point contact charge detectors on similar heterostructures. The slope of the 1/f noise allows to extract a lower bound for the double-dot charge qubit dephasing rate which we compare to the one extracted from a Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian approach. The two rates are found to be similar emphasizing that charge noise is the main source of dephasing in our system.

  13. Wake potential with exchange-correlation effects in semiconductor quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Arroj A.; Jamil, M.; Hussain, A.

    2015-09-15

    Using the non-relativistic quantum hydrodynamic model, wake potential has been studied in a magnetized semiconductor quantum plasma in the presence of upper hybrid wave which is excited via externally injected electron beam. The quantum effect contains electron exchange and correlation potential, Fermi degenerate pressure, and Bohm potential. It is found that the contribution of quantum mechanical electron exchange and correlation potential significantly modifies the amplitude and the effective length of the oscillatory wake potential. In the electron-hole plasma systems, electron exchange-correlation effects tend to increase the magnitude of the wake potential and are much effective at the distances of the order of Debye-length. The application of the work in context of the semiconductor plasmas have also been analyzed graphically.

  14. Control of ferromagnetism by manipulating the carrier wavefunction in ferromagnetic semiconductor (In,Fe)As quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc Anh, Le; Nam Hai, Pham; Tanaka, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated the control of ferromagnetism in a surface quantum well containing a 5 nm-thick n-type ferromagnetic semiconductor (FMS) (In,Fe)As layer sandwiched between two InAs layers, by manipulating the carrier wavefunction. The Curie temperature (TC) of the (In,Fe)As layer was effectively changed by up to 12 K (ΔTC/TC = 55%). Our calculation using the mean-field Zener theory reveals an unexpectedly large s-d exchange interaction in (In,Fe)As. Our results establish an effective way to control the ferromagnetism in quantum heterostructures of n-type FMSs, as well as require reconsideration on the current understanding of the s-d exchange interaction in narrow gap FMSs.

  15. Control of ferromagnetism by manipulating the carrier wavefunction in ferromagnetic semiconductor (In,Fe)As quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Duc Anh, Le; Nam Hai, Pham; Tanaka, Masaaki

    2014-01-27

    We demonstrated the control of ferromagnetism in a surface quantum well containing a 5 nm-thick n-type ferromagnetic semiconductor (FMS) (In,Fe)As layer sandwiched between two InAs layers, by manipulating the carrier wavefunction. The Curie temperature (T{sub C}) of the (In,Fe)As layer was effectively changed by up to 12 K (ΔT{sub C}/T{sub C} = 55%). Our calculation using the mean-field Zener theory reveals an unexpectedly large s-d exchange interaction in (In,Fe)As. Our results establish an effective way to control the ferromagnetism in quantum heterostructures of n-type FMSs, as well as require reconsideration on the current understanding of the s-d exchange interaction in narrow gap FMSs.

  16. Emergence of the Persistent Spin Helix in Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Koralek, Jake; Weber, Chris; Orenstein, Joe; Bernevig, Andrei; Zhang, Shoucheng; Mack, Shawn; Awschalom, David

    2011-08-24

    According to Noether's theorem, for every symmetry in nature there is a corresponding conservation law. For example, invariance with respect to spatial translation corresponds to conservation of momentum. In another well-known example, invariance with respect to rotation of the electron's spin, or SU(2) symmetry, leads to conservation of spin polarization. For electrons in a solid, this symmetry is ordinarily broken by spin-orbit (SO) coupling, allowing spin angular momentum to flow to orbital angular momentum. However, it has recently been predicted that SU(2) can be recovered in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), despite the presence of SO coupling. The corresponding conserved quantities include the amplitude and phase of a helical spin density wave termed the 'persistent spin helix' (PSH). SU(2) is restored, in principle, when the strength of two dominant SO interactions, the Rashba ({alpha}) and linear Dresselhaus ({beta}{sub 1}), are equal. This symmetry is predicted to be robust against all forms of spin-independent scattering, including electron-electron interactions, but is broken by the cubic Dresselhaus term ({beta}{sub 3}) and spin-dependent scattering. When these terms are negligible, the distance over which spin information can propagate is predicted to diverge as {alpha} {yields} {beta}{sub 1}. Here we observe experimentally the emergence of the PSH in GaAs quantum wells (QW's) by independently tuning {alpha} and {beta}{sub 1}. Using transient spin-grating spectroscopy (TSG), we find a spin-lifetime enhancement of two orders of magnitude near the symmetry point. Excellent quantitative agreement with theory across a wide range of sample parameters allows us to obtain an absolute measure of all relevant SO terms, identifying {beta}{sub 3} as the main SU(2) violating term in our samples. The tunable suppression of spin-relaxation demonstrated in this work is well-suited for application to spintronics.

  17. Nonlocal biphoton generation in a Werner state from a single semiconductor quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumano, H.; Nakajima, H.; Kuroda, T.; Mano, T.; Sakoda, K.; Suemune, I.

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate the generation of a Werner-like state from a single semiconductor quantum dot. The tomographic analysis with temporal gating brings us to a systematic understanding of the relation between the time evolution of quantum correlation and a set of parameters characterizing the exciton states, including fine-structure splitting and cross-dephasing time. The Werner state relates the Bell's parameter in the Clauser, Horne, Shimony, and Holt inequality with a fidelity, which facilitates the evaluation of nonlocality.

  18. A semiclassical method in the theory of light scattering by semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, I. G.; Korovin, L. I. Pavlov, S. T.

    2008-06-15

    A semiclassical method is proposed for the theoretical description of elastic light scattering by arbitrary semiconductor quantum dots under conditions of size quantization. This method involves retarded potentials and allows one to dispense with boundary conditions for electric and magnetic fields. Exact results for the Umov-Poynting vector at large distances from quantum dots in the case of monochromatic and pulsed irradiation and formulas for differential scattering cross sections are obtained.

  19. Enhanced refractive index without absorption in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nan; Shui, Tao; Qian, Biqi; Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the absorptive-dispersive properties of a weak probe field in a ladder-type quantum dot. It is found that the enhanced refraction index without absorption can be easily controlled via adjusting properly the corresponding parameters of the system. Our scheme may provide some new possibilities for technological applications in dispersion compensation and solid-state quantum communication for quantum information processing.

  20. Quantum computing with quantum dots using the Heisenberg exchange interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewaele, Nick J.

    One of the most promising systems for creating a working quantum computer is the triple quantum dots in a linear semiconductor. One of the biggest advantages is that we are able to perform Heisenberg exchange gates on the physical qubits. These exchanges are both fast and relatively low energy. Which means that they would be excellent for producing fast and accurate operations. In order to prevent leakage errors we use a 3 qubit DFS to encode a logical qubit. Here we determine the theoretical time dependent affects of applying the Heisenberg exchange gates in the DFS basis as well as the effect of applying multiple exchange gates at the same time. we also find that applying two heisenberg exchange gates at the same time is an effective way of implementing a leakage elimination operator.

  1. ll 7. 08i Electron-hole scattering and the negative absolute mobility of electrons in a semiconductor quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, W.; Zheng, T.F.; Lax, M.

    1988-05-15

    We study the transport of a quasi-two-dimensional electron-hole gas in a semiconductor quantum well. The screening in the presence of the electron-hole interaction is carefully considered. The method of nonequilibrium phonon wave packet, developed by us, is generalized to include the simultaneous presence of two-dimensional electrons and holes. The occurrence of negative absolute mobility for electrons is discussed. The mobility of minority electrons and majority holes are calculated by use of a drifted temperature model for both types of carriers. The mobilities of minority electrons (from negative to positive) as functions of lattice temperature and electric field are shown. Comparison is made with experiment.

  2. Experimental researches on quantum transport in semiconductor two-dimensional electron systems

    PubMed Central

    Kawaji, Shinji

    2008-01-01

    The author reviews contribution of Gakushuin University group to the progress of the quantum transport in semiconductor two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) for forty years from the birth of the 2DES in middle of the 1960s till the finding of temperature dependent collapse of the quantized Hall resistance in the beginning of this century. PMID:18941299

  3. Electron-hole correlations in semiconductor quantum dots with tight-binding wave fuctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seungwon, L.; Jonsson, L.; Wilkins, J.; Bryant, G.; Klimeck, G.

    2001-01-01

    The electron-hole states of semiconductor quantum dots are investigated within the framework of empirical tight-binding descriptions for Si, as an example of an indirect-gap material, and InAs and CdSe as examples of typical III-V and II-VI direct-gap materials.

  4. Nonequilibrium spin transport through a diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum dot system with noncollinear magnetization

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Minjie; Jalil, Mansoor Bin Abdul; Tan, Seng Gee

    2013-03-15

    The spin-dependent transport through a diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum dot (QD) which is coupled via magnetic tunnel junctions to two ferromagnetic leads is studied theoretically. A noncollinear system is considered, where the QD is magnetized at an arbitrary angle with respect to the leads' magnetization. The tunneling current is calculated in the coherent regime via the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism, incorporating the electron-electron interaction in the QD. We provide the first analytical solution for the Green's function of the noncollinear DMS quantum dot system, solved via the equation of motion method under Hartree-Fock approximation. The transport characteristics (charge and spin currents, and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR)) are evaluated for different voltage regimes. The interplay between spin-dependent tunneling and single-charge effects results in three distinct voltage regimes in the spin and charge current characteristics. The voltage range in which the QD is singly occupied corresponds to the maximum spin current and greatest sensitivity of the spin current to the QD magnetization orientation. The QD device also shows transport features suitable for sensor applications, i.e., a large charge current coupled with a high TMR ratio. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The spin polarized transport through a diluted magnetic quantum dot is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model is based on the Green's function and the equation of motion method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The charge and spin currents and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) are investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system is suitable for current-induced spin-transfer torque application. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A large tunneling current and a high TMR are possible for sensor application.

  5. Using metal complex-labeled peptides for charge transfer-based biosensing with semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medintz, Igor L.; Pons, Thomas; Trammell, Scott A.; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B.; Dawson, Philip E.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2009-02-01

    Luminescent colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have unique optical and photonic properties and are highly sensitive to charge transfer in their surrounding environment. In this study we used synthetic peptides as physical bridges between CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs and some of the most common redox-active metal complexes to understand the charge transfer interactions between the metal complexes and QDs. We found that QD emission underwent quenching that was highly dependent on the choice of metal complex used. We also found that quenching traces the valence or number of metal complexes brought into close proximity of the nanocrystal surface. Monitoring of the QD absorption bleaching in the presence of the metal complex provided insight into the charge transfer mechanism. The data suggest that two distinct charge transfer mechanisms can take place. One directly to the QD core states for neutral capping ligands and a second to surface states for negatively charged capping ligands. A basic understanding of the proximity driven charge-transfer and quenching interactions allowed us to construct proteolytic enzyme sensing assemblies with the QD-peptide-metal complex conjugates.

  6. Measurement of accumulation of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots by pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Kenton L; Bouldin, Jennifer L; Buchanan, Roger A

    2012-01-01

    As the production and use of nanomaterials increases, it is important to understand their environmental and biological fate. Because their unmatched chemical, physical, and optical properties make them useful in a wide variety of applications including biomedical imaging, photo-voltaics, and light emitting diodes, the use of semiconductor nanocrystals such as quantum dots (QDs) is increasing rapidly. Although QDs hold great potential in a wide variety of industrial and consumer applications, the environmental implications of these particles is largely unexplored. The nanocrystal core of many types of QDs contains the toxic metal cadmium (Cd), so possible release of Cd from the QD core is cause for concern. Because many types of QDs are miscible in water, QD interactions with aquatic organisms and their environment require more attention. In the present study we used fluorometry to measure time and dose dependent uptake, accumulation, and post-exposure clearance of accumulated QDs in the gut tract by the aquatic vertebrate Pimephales promelas. By using fluorometry, we were able to measure accumulated QD concentrations. To our knowledge, this is the first reported attempt to quantify accumulated QDs in an organism and is an important step in understanding the interactions among QDs in aquatic organisms and environments. PMID:22942867

  7. Measurement of Accumulation of Semiconductor Nanocrystal Quantum Dots by Pimephales Promelas

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, Kenton L.; Bouldin, Jennifer L.; Buchanan, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    As the production and use of nanomaterials increases, it is important to understand their environmental and biological fate. Because their unmatched chemical, physical, and optical properties make them useful in a wide variety of applications including biomedical imaging, photo-voltaics, and light emitting diodes, the use of semiconductor nanocrystals such as quantum dots (QDs) is increasing rapidly. Although QDs hold great potential in a wide variety of industrial and consumer applications, the environmental implications of these particles is largely unexplored. The nanocrystal core of many types of QDs contains the toxic metal cadmium (Cd), so possible release of Cd from the QD core is cause for concern. Because many types of QDs are miscible in water, QD interactions with aquatic organisms and their environment require more attention. In the present study we used fluorometry to measure time and dose dependent uptake, accumulation, and post-exposure clearance of accumulated QDs in the gut tract by the aquatic vertebrate Pimephales promelas. By using fluorometry, we were able to measure accumulated QD concentrations. To our knowledge, this is the first reported attempt to quantify accumulated QDs in an organism and is an important step in understanding the interactions among QDs in aquatic organisms and environments. PMID:22942867

  8. Toxicological studies of semiconductor quantum dots on immune cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Ricken, James Bryce; Rios, Lynette; Poschet, Jens Fredrich; Bachand, Marlene; Bachand, George David; Greene, Adrienne Celeste; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2008-11-01

    Nanoengineered materials hold a vast promise of enabling revolutionary technologies, but also pose an emerging and potentially serious threat to human and environmental health. While there is increasing knowledge concerning the risks posed by engineered nanomaterials, significant inconsistencies exist within the current data based on the high degree of variability in the materials (e.g., synthesis method, coatings, etc) and biological test systems (e.g., cell lines, whole organism, etc). In this project, we evaluated the uptake and response of two immune cell lines (RAW macrophage and RBL mast cells) to nanocrystal quantum dots (Qdots) with different sizes and surface chemistries, and at different concentrations. The basic experimental design followed a 2 x 2 x 3 factorial model: two Qdot sizes (Qdot 520 and 620), two surface chemistries (amine 'NH{sub 2}' and carboxylic acid 'COOH'), and three concentrations (0, 1 nM, and 1 {micro}M). Based on this design, the following Qdots from Evident Technologies were used for all experiments: Qdot 520-COOH, Qdot 520-NH{sub 2}, Qdot 620-COOH, and Qdot 620-NH{sub 2}. Fluorescence and confocal imaging demonstrated that Qdot 620-COOH and Qdot 620-NH{sub 2} nanoparticles had a greater level of internalization and cell membrane association in RAW and RBL cells, respectively. From these data, a two-way interaction between Qdot size and concentration was observed in relation to the level of cellular uptake in RAW cells, and association with RBL cell membranes. Toxicity of both RBL and RAW cells was also significantly dependent on the interaction of Qdot size and concentration; the 1 {micro}M concentrations of the larger, Qdot 620 nanoparticles induced a greater toxic effect on both cell lines. The RBL data also demonstrate that Qdot exposure can induce significant toxicity independent of cellular uptake. A significant increase in TNF-{alpha} and decrease in IL-10 release was observed in RAW cells, and suggested that Qdot exposure

  9. Design and synthesis of organic semiconductors with strong noncovalent interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Neil Maxwell

    2008-10-01

    The development of organic molecules as active components of electronic and optoelectronic devices has seen unprecedented progress in the past decade. This attention is primarily due to the potential impact on large-area and low-cost fabrication of devices, integrated circuits, flexible displays, and in particular, organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). Organic semiconductors that pack face-to-face in the solid state are of particular interest since they are known to self-assemble into 1-D nanostructures due to strong pi-pi interactions. Engineering linear/planar molecules to pack face-to-face is challenging because the interacting forces between organic molecules are relatively weak. Three approaches were used to induce face-to-face packing in organic semiconductors: (1) several derivatives of hexaazatrinaphthylene, (HATNA), were designed which vary in their degree of hydrogen bonding, rigidity, and electron deficiency. Hydrogen bonded moieties induced strong interaction between cores that formed robust nanowires when subjected to nonpolar solvents. While no device data was measured for these materials, substituents location was found to have a profound effect on the electronic properties; (2) Inspired by S···S interactions found in tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and electrostatic interactions found in 1,2,5-thiadiazole derivatives, a hybrid of these two molecules was developed (BT-TTF-1). Short intermolecular S···S, S···N, and S···C contacts define the solid state structure of BT-TTF-1 single crystals which pi-stack along the [100]. Theoretical insight into the nature of the interactions revealed that the close contacts are electrostatic in origin rather than the result of London dispersion forces. Thermal evaporation yields a network of poorly connected crystals which significantly limits the mobility. Solvent-cast single-crystal nanowire transistors showed mobilities as large as 0.36 cm2/Vs with excellent device characteristics underscoring the

  10. Photoinduced 2-way electron transfer in composites of metal nanoclusters and semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Navendu; Paul, Sneha; Samanta, Anunay

    2016-07-01

    In order to explore the potential of nanocomposites comprising semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoclusters (NCs) in photovoltaic and catalytic applications, the interaction between CdTe QDs and gold NCs, Au10 and Au25, stabilized by histidine, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glutathione, is studied by an ultrafast transient absorption (TA) technique. Temporal and spectral studies of the transients reveal photoinduced 2-way electron transfer between the two constituents of the nanocomposites, where Au NCs, which generally act as electron donors when used as photosensitizers, perform the role of the efficient electron acceptor. Interestingly, it is found that the electron transfer dynamics in these composites is governed not by the distance of separation of the constituents but by the nature of the surface capping ligands. Despite a large separation between the QDs and NCs in a giant BSA-capped system, a higher electron transfer rate in this composite suggests that unlike other smaller capping agents, which act more like insulators, BSA allows much better electron conduction, as indicated previously.In order to explore the potential of nanocomposites comprising semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoclusters (NCs) in photovoltaic and catalytic applications, the interaction between CdTe QDs and gold NCs, Au10 and Au25, stabilized by histidine, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glutathione, is studied by an ultrafast transient absorption (TA) technique. Temporal and spectral studies of the transients reveal photoinduced 2-way electron transfer between the two constituents of the nanocomposites, where Au NCs, which generally act as electron donors when used as photosensitizers, perform the role of the efficient electron acceptor. Interestingly, it is found that the electron transfer dynamics in these composites is governed not by the distance of separation of the constituents but by the nature of the surface capping ligands. Despite a large separation

  11. High-Frequency EPR and ENDOR Spectroscopy on Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Baranov, Pavel G.; de Mello Donegá, Celso; Schmidt, Jan

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy are excellent tools for the investigation of the electronic properties of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The great attractions of these techniques are that, in contrast to optical methods, they allow the identification of the dopants and provide information about the spatial distribution of the electronic wave function. This latter aspect is particularly attractive because it allows for a quantitative measurement of the effect of confinement on the shape and properties of the wave function. In this contribution EPR and ENDOR results are presented on doped ZnO QDs. Shallow donors (SDs), related to interstitial Li and Na and substitutional Al atoms, have been identified in this material by pulsed high-frequency EPR and ENDOR spectroscopy. The shallow character of the wave function of the donors is evidenced by the multitude of ENDOR transitions of the 67Zn nuclear spins and by the hyperfine interaction of the 7Li, 23Na and 27Al nuclear spins that are much smaller than for atomic lithium, sodium and aluminium. The EPR signal of an exchange-coupled pair consisting of a shallow donor and a deep Na-related acceptor has been identified in ZnO nanocrystals with radii smaller than 1.5 nm. From ENDOR experiments it is concluded that the deep Na-related acceptor is located at the interface of the ZnO core and the Zn(OH)2 capping layer, while the shallow donor is in the ZnO core. The spatial distribution of the electronic wave function of a shallow donor in ZnO semiconductor QDs has been determined in the regime of quantum confinement by using the nuclear spins as probes. Hyperfine interactions as monitored by ENDOR spectroscopy quantitatively reveal the transition from semiconductor to molecular properties upon reduction of the size of the nanoparticles. In addition, the effect of confinement on the g-factor of SDs in ZnO as well as in CdS QDs

  12. Anisotropy of the electron g factor in quantum wells based on cubic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, P. S.

    2013-09-15

    A new mechanism for the spin splitting of electron levels in asymmetric quantum wells based on GaAs-type semiconductors relative to rotations of the magnetic field in the well plane is suggested. It is demonstrated that the anisotropy of the Zeeman splitting (linear in a magnetic field) arises in asymmetric quantum wells due to the interface spin-orbit terms in the electron Hamiltonian. In the case of symmetric quantum wells, it is shown that the anisotropy of the Zeeman splitting is a cubic function of the magnitude of the magnetic field, depends on the direction of the magnetic field in the interface plane as the fourth-order harmonic, and is governed by the spin-orbit term of the fourth order by the kinematic momentum in the electron Hamiltonian of a bulk semiconductor.

  13. Observation of quantum oscillation of work function in ultrathin-metal/semiconductor junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Takhar, Kuldeep; Meer, Mudassar; Khachariya, Dolar; Ganguly, Swaroop; Saha, Dipankar

    2015-09-15

    Quantization in energy level due to confinement is generally observed for semiconductors. This property is used for various quantum devices, and it helps to improve the characteristics of conventional devices. Here, the authors have demonstrated the quantum size effects in ultrathin metal (Ni) layers sandwiched between two large band-gap materials. The metal work function is found to oscillate as a function of its thickness. The thermionic emission current bears the signature of the oscillating work function, which has a linear relationship with barrier heights. This methodology allows direct observation of quantum oscillations in metals at room temperature using a Schottky diode and electrical measurements using source-measure-units. The observed phenomena can provide additional mechanism to tune the barrier height of metal/semiconductor junctions, which are used for various electronic devices.

  14. Optically engineered ultrafast pulses for controlled rotations of exciton qubits in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamouras, Angela; Mathew, Reuble; Hall, Kimberley C.

    2012-07-01

    Shaped ultrafast pulses designed for controlled-rotation (C-ROT) operations on exciton qubits in semiconductor quantum dots are demonstrated using a quantum control apparatus operating at ˜1 eV. Optimum pulse shapes employing amplitude and phase shaping protocols are implemented using the output of an optical parametric oscillator and a programmable pulse shaping system, and characterized using autocorrelation and multiphoton intrapulse interference phase scan techniques. We apply our pulse characterization results and density matrix simulations to assess the fundamental limits on the fidelity of the C-ROT operation, providing a benchmark for the evaluation of sources of noise in other quantum control experiments. Our results indicate the effectiveness of pulse shaping techniques for achieving high fidelity quantum operations in quantum dots with a gate time below 1 ps.

  15. Advantages of an indirect semiconductor quantum well system for infrared detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Chan-Lon; Somoano, Robert; Pan, Dee-Son

    1989-01-01

    The infrared intersubband absorption process in quantum well systems with anisotropic bulk effective masses, which usually occurs in indirect semiconductors was analyzed. It is found that the anisotropic effective mass can be utilized to provide allowed intersubband transitions at normal incidence to the quantum well growth direction. This transition is known to be forbidden for cases of isotropic effective mass. This property can be exploited for infrared sensor application of quantum well structures by allowing direct illumination of large surface areas without using special waveguide structures. The 10-micron intersubband absorption in quantum wells made of the silicon-based system Si/Si(1-x)Ge(x) was calculated. It is found that it is readily possible to achieve an absorption constant of the order of 10,000/cm in these Si quantum wells with current doping technology.

  16. Transition metal doped semiconductor quantum dots: Optical and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahnovsky, Yuri; Proshchenko, Vitaly; Pimachev, Artem

    We study optical and magnetic properties of CdSe and Cd-Mn-Se quantum dots (QD). We find that there are two luminescence lines, one is fast and another is slow (~1ms). With the increase of a QD diameter the slow luminescence disappears at some critical QD size, thus only one line (fast) remains. Using the SAC SI computational method we find that D = 3.2 nm and D = 2.7 nm if the Mn impurity is located inside a QD or on a QD surface, respectively. For two or four Mn atoms in the quantum dot, now absorption takes place because the transition is spin-allowed. The DFT calculations of the magnetic state reveal that it is an antiferromagnet. We also study other quantum dots such as Cd-Mn-Se, Zn-Mn-S, and Zn-Mn-Se, doped and undoped. We find the slow luminescence energies for low concentrations of Mn impurities for each QD type. The calculations indicate that two luminescence lines, fast and slow, should always take place. However for Pb-Mn-S quantum dots there are now Mn levels inside a HOMO-LUMO gap, i.e., the Mn-levels are located in a PbS conduction band. The presence of Mn dopants increases the band gap and also removes the exciton peak. This effect is different to the other quantum dots.

  17. Controlling Light-Matter Interaction in Semiconductors with Hybrid Nano-Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehl, Michael R.

    Nano-structures, such as photonic crystal cavities and metallic antennas, allow one to focus and store optical energy into very small volumes, greatly increasing light-matter interactions. These structures produce resonances which are typically characterized by how well they confine energy both temporally (quality factor -- Q) and spatially (mode volume -- V). In order to observe non-linear effects, modified spontaneous emission (e.g. Purcell enhancement), or quantum effects (e.g. vacuum Rabi splitting), one needs to maximize the ratio of Q/V while also maximizing the coupling between the resonance and the active medium. In this dissertation I will discuss several projects related by the goal of controlling light-matter interactions using such nano-structures. In the first portion of this dissertation I will discuss the deterministic placement of self-assembled InAs quantum dots, which would allow one to precisely position an optically-active material, for maximum interaction, inside of a photonic crystal cavity. Additionally, I will discuss the use of atomic layer deposition to tune and improve both the resonance wavelength and quality factor of silicon based photonic crystal cavities. Moving from dielectric materials to metals allows one to achieve mode-volumes well below the diffraction limit. The quality factor of these resonators is severely limited by Ohmic loss in the metal; however, the small mode-volume still allows for greatly enhanced light-matter interaction. In the second portion of this dissertation I will investigate the coupling between an array of metallic resonators (antennas) and a nearby semiconductor quantum well. Using time-resolved pump-probe measurements I study the properties of the coupled system and compare the results to a model which allows one to quantitatively compare various antenna geometries.

  18. Excitons and charged excitons in semiconductor quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Riva, C.; Peeters, F. M.; Varga, K.

    2000-05-15

    A variational calculation of the ground-state energy of neutral excitons and of positively and negatively charged excitons (trions) confined in a single-quantum well is presented. We study the dependence of the correlation energy and of the binding energy on the well width and on the hole mass. The conditional probability distribution for positively and negatively charged excitons is obtained, providing information on the correlation and the charge distribution in the system. A comparison is made with available experimental data on trion binding energies in GaAs-, ZnSe-, and CdTe-based quantum well structures, which indicates that trions become localized with decreasing quantum well width. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  19. Exploring semiconductor quantum dots and wires by high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Molina Rubio, Sergio I; Galindo, Pedro; Gonzalez, Luisa; Ripalda, JM; Varela del Arco, Maria; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    We review in this communication our contribution to the structural characterisation of semiconductor quantum dots and wires by high resolution electron microscopy, both in phase-contrast and Z-contrast modes. We show how these techniques contribute to predict the preferential sites of nucleation of these nanostructures, and also determine the compositional distribution in 1D and 0D nanostructures. The results presented here were produced in the framework of the European Network of Excellence entitled 'Self-Assembled semiconductor Nanostructures for new Devices in photonics and Electronics (SANDiE)'.

  20. Emergence of resonant mode-locking via delayed feedback in quantum dot semiconductor lasers.

    PubMed

    Tykalewicz, B; Goulding, D; Hegarty, S P; Huyet, G; Erneux, T; Kelleher, B; Viktorov, E A

    2016-02-22

    With conventional semiconductor lasers undergoing external optical feedback, a chaotic output is typically observed even for moderate levels of the feedback strength. In this paper we examine single mode quantum dot lasers under strong optical feedback conditions and show that an entirely new dynamical regime is found consisting of spontaneous mode-locking via a resonance between the relaxation oscillation frequency and the external cavity repetition rate. Experimental observations are supported by detailed numerical simulations of rate equations appropriate for this laser type. The phenomenon constitutes an entirely new mode-locking mechanism in semiconductor lasers. PMID:26907071

  1. All quantum dot mode-locked semiconductor disk laser emitting at 655 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Bek, R. Kersteen, G.; Kahle, H.; Schwarzbäck, T.; Jetter, M.; Michler, P.

    2014-08-25

    We present a semiconductor disk laser mode-locked by a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) with emission in the red spectral range. Both the gain and the absorber structure are fabricated by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy in an anti-resonant design using quantum dots as active material. A v-shaped cavity is used to tightly focus onto the SESAM, producing pulses with a duration of about 1 ps at a repetition rate of 852 MHz.

  2. Anomalous quantum efficiency for photoconduction and its power dependence in metal oxide semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. S.; Wang, W. C.; Lu, M. L.; Chen, Y. F.; Lin, H. C.; Chen, K. H.; Chen, L. C.

    2013-07-01

    The quantum efficiency and carrier lifetime that decide the photoconduction (PC) efficiencies in the metal oxide semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have been investigated. The experimental result surprisingly shows that the SnO2, TiO2, WO3, and ZnO NWs reveal extraordinary quantum efficiencies in common, which are over one to three orders of magnitude lower than the theoretical expectation. The surface depletion region (SDR)-controlled photoconductivity is proposed to explain the anomalous quantum efficiency and its power dependence. The inherent difference between the metal oxide nanostructures such as carrier lifetime, carrier concentration, and dielectric constant leading to the distinct PC performance and behavior are also discussed.The quantum efficiency and carrier lifetime that decide the photoconduction (PC) efficiencies in the metal oxide semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have been investigated. The experimental result surprisingly shows that the SnO2, TiO2, WO3, and ZnO NWs reveal extraordinary quantum efficiencies in common, which are over one to three orders of magnitude lower than the theoretical expectation. The surface depletion region (SDR)-controlled photoconductivity is proposed to explain the anomalous quantum efficiency and its power dependence. The inherent difference between the metal oxide nanostructures such as carrier lifetime, carrier concentration, and dielectric constant leading to the distinct PC performance and behavior are also discussed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01635h

  3. Biexciton induced refractive index changes in a semiconductor quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei, S.

    2015-06-01

    We present a detailed theoretical study of linear and third order nonlinear refractive index changes in a optically driven disk-like GaN quantum dot. In our numerical calculations, we consider the three level system containing biexciton, exciton, and ground states and use the compact density matrix formalism and iterative method to obtain refractive index changes. Variational method through effective mass approximation are employed to calculate the ground state energy of biexciton and exciton states. The evolution of refractive index changes around one, two and three photon resonance is investigated and discussed for different quantum dot sizes and light intensities. Size-dependent three-photon nonlinear refractive index change versus incident photon energy compared to that of two-photon is obtained and analyzed. As main result, we found that around resonance frequency at exciton-biexciton transition the quantum confinement has great influence on the linear change in refractive index so that for very large quantum dots, it decreases. Moreover, it was found that third order refractive index changes for three photon process is strongly dependent on QD size and light intensity. Our study reveals that considering our simple model leads to results which are in good agreement with other rare numerical results. Comparison with experimental results has been done.

  4. Self-action effects in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dneprovskii, V. S.; Kanev, A. R.; Kozlova, M. V.; Smirnov, A. M.

    2014-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) dynamic photonic crystal regime has been utilized to investigate self-diffraction effect and nonlinear optical properties of excitons in CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots (QDs). Self-diffraction at 2D photonic crystal arises for three intersecting beams of Nd+3:YAG laser second harmonic in the case of one-photon resonant excitation of the exciton (electron - hole) transition QDs. The relaxation time of excited excitons has been measured by pump and probe technique at induced one-dimensional transient diffraction grating. Two-exponential decay with initial fast and slow parts was discovered. Self-action effect has been discovered in the case of stationary resonant excitation of excitons in CdSe/ZnS QDs by the beam of second harmonic of powerful 12-nanosecond laser pulses. The bleaching of exciton absorption and the creation of transparency channel (this effect provokes self-diffraction of the second harmonic beam) was explained by the dominating coexisting and competing processes of state filling in stationary excited quantum dots and Stark-shift of exciton spectral band. The peculiarities of the influence of these processes at the change of exciton absorption in quantum dots in the case of different detuning from exciton resonance (quantum dots with different size have been used) was analyzed.

  5. Quantum theory of the electronic and optical properties of low-dimensional semiconductor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Wayne Heung

    This thesis examines the electronic and optical properties of low-dimensional semiconductor systems. A theory is developed to study the electron-hole generation-recombination process of type-II semimetallic semiconductor heterojunctions based on a 3 x 3 k·p matrix Hamiltonian (three-band model) and an 8 x 8 k·p matrix Hamiltonian (eight-band model). A novel electron-hole generation and recombination process, which is called activationless generation-recombination process, is predicted. It is demonstrated that the current through the type-II semimetallic semiconductor heterojunctions is governed by the activationless electron-hole generation-recombination process at the heterointerfaces, and that the current-voltage characteristics are essentially linear. A qualitative agreement between theory and experiments is observed. The numerical results of the eight-band model are compared with those of the threeband model. Based on a lattice gas model, a theory is developed to study the influence of a random potential on the ionization equilibrium conditions for bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) in III--V semiconductor heterostructures. It is demonstrated that ionization equilibrium conditions for bound electron-hole pairs change drastically in the presence of strong disorder. It is predicted that strong disorder promotes dissociation of excitons in III--V semiconductor heterostructures. A theory of polariton (photon dressed by phonon) spontaneous emission in a III--V semiconductor doped with semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) or quantum wells (QWs) is developed. For the first time, superradiant and subradiant polariton spontaneous emission phenomena in a polariton-QD (QW) coupled system are predicted when the resonance energies of the two identical QDs (QWs) lie outside the polaritonic energy gap. It is also predicted that when the resonance energies of the two identical QDs (QWs) lie inside the polaritonic energy gap, spontaneous emission of polariton in the polariton

  6. Photoinduced 2-way electron transfer in composites of metal nanoclusters and semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Navendu; Paul, Sneha; Samanta, Anunay

    2016-08-01

    In order to explore the potential of nanocomposites comprising semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoclusters (NCs) in photovoltaic and catalytic applications, the interaction between CdTe QDs and gold NCs, Au10 and Au25, stabilized by histidine, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glutathione, is studied by an ultrafast transient absorption (TA) technique. Temporal and spectral studies of the transients reveal photoinduced 2-way electron transfer between the two constituents of the nanocomposites, where Au NCs, which generally act as electron donors when used as photosensitizers, perform the role of the efficient electron acceptor. Interestingly, it is found that the electron transfer dynamics in these composites is governed not by the distance of separation of the constituents but by the nature of the surface capping ligands. Despite a large separation between the QDs and NCs in a giant BSA-capped system, a higher electron transfer rate in this composite suggests that unlike other smaller capping agents, which act more like insulators, BSA allows much better electron conduction, as indicated previously. PMID:27396603

  7. Space- and time-dependent quantum dynamics of spatially indirect excitons in semiconductor heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Grasselli, Federico Goldoni, Guido

    2015-01-21

    We study the unitary propagation of a two-particle one-dimensional Schrödinger equation by means of the Split-Step Fourier method, to study the coherent evolution of a spatially indirect exciton (IX) in semiconductor heterostructures. The mutual Coulomb interaction of the electron-hole pair and the electrostatic potentials generated by external gates and acting on the two particles separately are taken into account exactly in the two-particle dynamics. As relevant examples, step/downhill and barrier/well potential profiles are considered. The space- and time-dependent evolutions during the scattering event as well as the asymptotic time behavior are analyzed. For typical parameters of GaAs-based devices, the transmission or reflection of the pair turns out to be a complex two-particle process, due to comparable and competing Coulomb, electrostatic, and kinetic energy scales. Depending on the intensity and anisotropy of the scattering potentials, the quantum evolution may result in excitation of the IX internal degrees of freedom, dissociation of the pair, or transmission in small periodic IX wavepackets due to dwelling of one particle in the barrier region. We discuss the occurrence of each process in the full parameter space of the scattering potentials and the relevance of our results for current excitronic technologies.

  8. Space- and time-dependent quantum dynamics of spatially indirect excitons in semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasselli, Federico; Bertoni, Andrea; Goldoni, Guido

    2015-01-01

    We study the unitary propagation of a two-particle one-dimensional Schrödinger equation by means of the Split-Step Fourier method, to study the coherent evolution of a spatially indirect exciton (IX) in semiconductor heterostructures. The mutual Coulomb interaction of the electron-hole pair and the electrostatic potentials generated by external gates and acting on the two particles separately are taken into account exactly in the two-particle dynamics. As relevant examples, step/downhill and barrier/well potential profiles are considered. The space- and time-dependent evolutions during the scattering event as well as the asymptotic time behavior are analyzed. For typical parameters of GaAs-based devices, the transmission or reflection of the pair turns out to be a complex two-particle process, due to comparable and competing Coulomb, electrostatic, and kinetic energy scales. Depending on the intensity and anisotropy of the scattering potentials, the quantum evolution may result in excitation of the IX internal degrees of freedom, dissociation of the pair, or transmission in small periodic IX wavepackets due to dwelling of one particle in the barrier region. We discuss the occurrence of each process in the full parameter space of the scattering potentials and the relevance of our results for current excitronic technologies.

  9. Graphene activating room-temperature ferromagnetic exchange in cobalt-doped ZnO dilute magnetic semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhihu; Yang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Chao; Yao, Tao; Cai, Liang; Yan, Wensheng; Jiang, Yong; Hu, Fengchun; He, Jingfu; Pan, Zhiyun; Liu, Qinghua; Wei, Shiqiang

    2014-10-28

    Control over the magnetic interactions in dilute magnetic semiconductor quantum dots (DMSQDs) is a key issue to future development of nanometer-sized integrated "spintronic" devices. However, manipulating the magnetic coupling between impurity ions in DMSQDs remains a great challenge because of the intrinsic quantum confinement effects and self-purification of the quantum dots. Here, we propose a hybrid structure to achieve room-temperature ferromagnetic interactions in DMSQDs, via engineering the density and nature of the energy states at the Fermi level. This idea has been applied to Co-doped ZnO DMSQDs where the growth of a reduced graphene oxide shell around the Zn(0.98)Co(0.02)O core turns the magnetic interactions from paramagnetic to ferromagnetic at room temperature, due to the hybridization of 2p(z) orbitals of graphene and 3d obitals of Co(2+)-oxygen-vacancy complexes. This design may open up a kind of possibility for manipulating the magnetism of doped oxide nanostructures. PMID:25222885

  10. Third generation photovoltaics based on multiple exciton generation in quantum confined semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Beard, Matthew C; Luther, Joseph M; Semonin, Octavi E; Nozik, Arthur J

    2013-06-18

    Improving the primary photoconversion process in a photovoltaiccell by utilizing the excess energy that is otherwise lost as heat can lead to an increase in the overall power conversion efficiency (PCE). Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) with at least one dimension small enough to produce quantum confinement effects provide new ways of controlling energy flow not achievable in thin film or bulk semiconductors. Researchers have developed various strategies to incorporate these novel structures into suitable solar conversion systems. Some of these methods could increase the PCE past the Shockley-Queisser (SQ) limit of ∼33%, making them viable "third generation photovoltaic" (TGPV) cell architectures. Surpassing the SQ limit for single junction solar cells presents both a scientific and a technological challenge, and the use of semiconductor NCs to enhance the primary photoconversion process offers a promising potential solution. The NCs are synthesized via solution phase chemical reactions producing stable colloidal solutions, where the reaction conditions can be modified to produce a variety of shapes, compositions, and structures. The confinement of the semiconductor NC in one dimension produces quantum films, wells, or discs. Two-dimensional confinement leads to quantum wires or rods (QRs), and quantum dots (QDs) are three-dimensionally confined NCs. The process of multiple exciton generation (MEG) converts a high-energy photon into multiple electron-hole pairs. Although many studies have demonstrated that MEG is enhanced in QDs compared with bulk semiconductors, these studies have either used ultrafast spectroscopy to measure the photon-to-exciton quantum yields (QYs) or theoretical calculations. Implementing MEG in a working solar cell has been an ongoing challenge. In this Account, we discuss the status of MEG research and strategies towards implementing MEG in working solar cells. Recently we showed an external quantum efficiency for photocurrent of greater

  11. Spatially correlated two-dimensional arrays of semiconductor and metal quantum dots in GaAs-based heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Nevedomskiy, V. N. Bert, N. A.; Chaldyshev, V. V.; Preobrazhernskiy, V. V.; Putyato, M. A.; Semyagin, B. R.

    2015-12-15

    A single molecular-beam epitaxy process is used to produce GaAs-based heterostructures containing two-dimensional arrays of InAs semiconductor quantum dots and AsSb metal quantum dots. The twodimensional array of AsSb metal quantum dots is formed by low-temperature epitaxy which provides a large excess of arsenic in the epitaxial GaAs layer. During the growth of subsequent layers at a higher temperature, excess arsenic forms nanoinclusions, i.e., metal quantum dots in the GaAs matrix. The two-dimensional array of such metal quantum dots is created by the δ doping of a low-temperature GaAs layer with antimony which serves as a precursor for the heterogeneous nucleation of metal quantum dots and accumulates in them with the formation of AsSb metal alloy. The two-dimensional array of InAs semiconductor quantum dots is formed via the Stranski–Krastanov mechanism at the GaAs surface. Between the arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots, a 3-nm-thick AlAs barrier layer is grown. The total spacing between the arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots is 10 nm. Electron microscopy of the structure shows that the arrangement of metal quantum dots and semiconductor quantum dots in the two-dimensional arrays is spatially correlated. The spatial correlation is apparently caused by elastic strain and stress fields produced by both AsSb metal and InAs semiconductor quantum dots in the GaAs matrix.

  12. Quantum oscillations in Rashba semiconductor BiTeCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Zhao, D.; Xiang, Z. J.; Shang, C.; Luo, X. G.; Pan, B. Y.; Li, S. Y.; Wu, T.; Chen, X. H.

    2014-11-01

    Recently, a Dirac surface state (SS) was observed in Rashba semiconductor BiTeCl by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), which suggested strong inversion symmetry breaking therein, despite the absence of such symmetry breaking in existing first-principles calculations. To clarify the aforementioned conflict as well as understand the nature of such emergent phenomenon, we employ both high-field Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillation and Hall measurements to study BiTeCl single crystals. Both techniques yield consistent observation of a three-dimensional Fermi surface from a bulk state, while Dirac surface state contribution appears absent. Finally, we propose that various gating techniques could be used to explore the novel topological nature of this material.

  13. Charge transport through a semiconductor quantum dot-ring nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurpas, Marcin; Kędzierska, Barbara; Janus-Zygmunt, Iwona; Gorczyca-Goraj, Anna; Wach, Elżbieta; Zipper, Elżbieta; Maśka, Maciej M.

    2015-07-01

    Transport properties of a gated nanostructure depend crucially on the coupling of its states to the states of electrodes. In the case of a single quantum dot the coupling, for a given quantum state, is constant or can be slightly modified by additional gating. In this paper we consider a concentric dot-ring nanostructure (DRN) and show that its transport properties can be drastically modified due to the unique geometry. We calculate the dc current through a DRN in the Coulomb blockade regime and show that it can efficiently work as a single-electron transistor (SET) or a current rectifier. In both cases the transport characteristics strongly depend on the details of the confinement potential. The calculations are carried out for low and high bias regime, the latter being especially interesting in the context of current rectification due to fast relaxation processes.

  14. Pauli equation for semiconductor quantum dot photoluminescence kinetics investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkov, Vadim K.; Leonov, Mikhail Y.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2012-11-01

    We develop a theory of secondary emission from a single quantum dot, when the lowest-energy states of its electron-hole pairs are involved in the photoluminescence process. For the sake of definiteness, our model allows for two states contributing to the luminescence. We analyze the dependency of secondary emission intensity on the energy gap between the states, while considering that the gap is determined by the quantum dot's size. An analytical expression for the time-dependent signal of thermalized luminescence is obtained using an analytical solution to the kinetic Pauli equation. This expression yields the signal of stationary luminescence as the spectral width of the excitation pulse tends to zero.

  15. Generation and Detection of Spin Currents in Semiconductor Nanostructures with Strong Spin-Orbit Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichele, Fabrizio; Hennel, Szymon; Pietsch, Patrick; Wegscheider, Werner; Stano, Peter; Jacquod, Philippe; Ihn, Thomas; Ensslin, Klaus

    2015-05-01

    Storing, transmitting, and manipulating information using the electron spin resides at the heart of spintronics. Fundamental for future spintronics applications is the ability to control spin currents in solid state systems. Among the different platforms proposed so far, semiconductors with strong spin-orbit interaction are especially attractive as they promise fast and scalable spin control with all-electrical protocols. Here we demonstrate both the generation and measurement of pure spin currents in semiconductor nanostructures. Generation is purely electrical and mediated by the spin dynamics in materials with a strong spin-orbit field. Measurement is accomplished using a spin-to-charge conversion technique, based on the magnetic field symmetry of easily measurable electrical quantities. Calibrating the spin-to-charge conversion via the conductance of a quantum point contact, we quantitatively measure the mesoscopic spin Hall effect in a multiterminal GaAs dot. We report spin currents of 174 pA, corresponding to a spin Hall angle of 34%.

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW A review of the coherent optical control of the exciton and spin states of semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, A. J.

    2010-10-01

    The spin of a carrier trapped in a self-assembled quantum dot has the potential to be a robust optically active qubit that is compatible with existing III-V semiconductor device technology. A key requirement for building a quantum processor is the ability to dynamically prepare, control and detect single quantum states. Here, experimental progress in the coherent optical control of single semiconductor quantum dots over the past decade is reviewed, alongside an introductory discussion of the basic principles of coherent control.

  17. Formation of strain-induced quantum dots in gated semiconductor nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Thorbeck, Ted; Zimmerman, Neil M.

    2015-08-15

    A long-standing mystery in the field of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is: Why are there so many unintentional dots (also known as disorder dots) which are neither expected nor controllable. It is typically assumed that these unintentional dots are due to charged defects, however the frequency and predictability of the location of the unintentional QDs suggests there might be additional mechanisms causing the unintentional QDs besides charged defects. We show that the typical strains in a semiconductor nanostructure from metal gates are large enough to create strain-induced quantum dots. We simulate a commonly used QD device architecture, metal gates on bulk silicon, and show the formation of strain-induced QDs. The strain-induced QD can be eliminated by replacing the metal gates with poly-silicon gates. Thus strain can be as important as electrostatics to QD device operation operation.

  18. Individual Cr atom in a semiconductor quantum dot: Optical addressability and spin-strain coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuente-Sampietro, A.; Utsumi, H.; Boukari, H.; Kuroda, S.; Besombes, L.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the optical addressability of the spin of an individual chromium atom (Cr) embedded in a semiconductor quantum dot. The emission of Cr-doped quantum dots and their evolution in magnetic field reveal a large magnetic anisotropy of the Cr spin induced by local strain. This results in the zero field splitting of the 0, ±1 , and ±2 Cr spin states and in a thermalization on the magnetic ground states 0 and ±1 . The observed strong spin to strain coupling of Cr is of particular interest for the development of hybrid spin-mechanical devices where coherent mechanical driving of an individual spin in an oscillator is needed. The magneto-optical properties of Cr-doped quantum dots are modeled by a spin Hamiltonian including the sensitivity of the Cr spin to the strain and the influence of the quantum dot symmetry on the carrier-Cr spin coupling.

  19. Interacting quantum fields and the chronometric principle

    PubMed Central

    Segal, I. E.

    1976-01-01

    A form of interaction in quantum field theory is described that is physically intrinsic rather than superimposed via a postulated nonlinearity on a hypothetical free field. It derives from the extension to general symmetries of the distinction basic for the chronometric cosmology between the physical (driving) and the observed energies, together with general precepts of quantum field theory applicable to nonunitary representations. The resulting interacting field is covariant, causal, involves real particle production, and is devoid of nontrivial ultraviolet divergences. Possible physical applications are discussed. PMID:16592353

  20. Interaction picture density matrix quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Fionn D. Lee, D. K. K.; Foulkes, W. M. C.; Blunt, N. S.; Shepherd, James J.; Spencer, J. S.

    2015-07-28

    The recently developed density matrix quantum Monte Carlo (DMQMC) algorithm stochastically samples the N-body thermal density matrix and hence provides access to exact properties of many-particle quantum systems at arbitrary temperatures. We demonstrate that moving to the interaction picture provides substantial benefits when applying DMQMC to interacting fermions. In this first study, we focus on a system of much recent interest: the uniform electron gas in the warm dense regime. The basis set incompleteness error at finite temperature is investigated and extrapolated via a simple Monte Carlo sampling procedure. Finally, we provide benchmark calculations for a four-electron system, comparing our results to previous work where possible.

  1. All-optical depletion of dark excitons from a semiconductor quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidgall, E. R.; Schwartz, I.; Cogan, D.; Gershoni, D.; Gantz, L.; Heindel, T.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-05-11

    Semiconductor quantum dots are considered to be the leading venue for fabricating on-demand sources of single photons. However, the generation of long-lived dark excitons imposes significant limits on the efficiency of these sources. We demonstrate a technique that optically pumps the dark exciton population and converts it to a bright exciton population, using intermediate excited biexciton states. We show experimentally that our method considerably reduces the dark exciton population while doubling the triggered bright exciton emission, approaching thereby near-unit fidelity of quantum dot depletion.

  2. Effect of charge imbalance parameter on LEKW in ion-implanted quantum semiconductor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, Sandhya; Yadav, Nishchhal; Ghosh, S.

    2015-07-31

    In this study we present an analytical investigation on the propagation characteristics of electro-kinetic wave modified through quantum correction term and charge imbalance parameter using quantum hydrodynamic model for an ion-implanted semiconductor plasma. The dispersion relation has been analyzed in two distinct velocity regimes. We found that as the number of negative charges resides on the colloids increases, their role become increasing effective. The present investigation is important for understanding of wave and instability phenomena and can be put to various interesting applications.

  3. Decoherence-protected spin-photon quantum gates in a hybrid semiconductor-superconductor circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Tu, Tao; Gong, Bo; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-12-01

    High-fidelity gate operations are a crucial function for quantum information processing. This problem is particularly challenging for hybrid systems where coherence and control time scales greatly differ by orders of magnitude among different elements. Here we propose decoherence-protected gate operations in an important class of hybrid system in the context of a spin qubit in semiconductor quantum dots coupled to a superconductor resonator. Our scheme is able to generate complex photon states for various applications even in the presence of practical imperfections: limited available control of the spin-photon hybrid system and demanding spin decoherence in current state-of-the-art devices.

  4. Kinetics of pulse-induced photoluminescence from a semiconductor quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Rukhlenko, Ivan D; Leonov, Mikhail Yu; Turkov, Vadim K; Litvin, Aleksandr P; Baimuratov, Anvar S; Baranov, Alexander V; Fedorov, Anatoly V

    2012-12-01

    Optical methods, which allow the determination of the dominant channels of energy and phase relaxation, are the most universal techniques for the investigation of semiconductor quantum dots. In this paper, we employ the kinetic Pauli equation to develop the first generalized model of the pulse-induced photoluminescence from the lowest-energy eigenstates of a semiconductor quantum dot. Without specifying the shape of the excitation pulse and by assuming that the energy and phase relaxation in the quantum dot may be characterized by a set of phenomenological rates, we derive an expression for the observable photoluminescence cross section, valid for an arbitrary number of the quantum dot's states decaying with the emission of secondary photons. Our treatment allows for thermal transitions occurring with both decrease and increase in energy between all the relevant eigenstates at room or higher temperature. We show that in the general case of N states coupled to each other through a bath, the photoluminescence kinetics from any of them is determined by the sum of N exponential functions, whose exponents are proportional to the respective decay rates. We illustrate the application of the developed model by considering the processes of resonant luminescence and thermalized luminescence from the quantum dot with two radiating eigenstates, and by assuming that the secondary emission is excited with either a Gaussian or exponential pulse. Analytic expressions describing the signals of secondary emission are analyzed, in order to elucidate experimental situations in which the relaxation constants may be reliably extracted from the photoluminescence spectra. PMID:23262711

  5. Cryptography based on the absorption/emission features of multicolor semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ming; Chang, Shoude; Grover, Chander P.

    2004-06-01

    Further to the optical coding based on fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), a concept of using mixtures of multiple single-color QDs for creating highly secret cryptograms based on their absorption/emission properties was demonstrated. The key to readout of the optical codes is a group of excitation lights with the predetermined wavelengths programmed in a secret manner. The cryptograms can be printed on the surfaces of different objects such as valuable documents for security purposes.

  6. Optically pumped semiconductor quantum dot disk laser operating at 1180 nm.

    PubMed

    Rautiainen, Jussi; Krestnikov, Igor; Butkus, Mantas; Rafailov, Edik U; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate an optically pumped semiconductor disk laser using 39 layers of Stranski-Krastanov InGaAs quantum dots self-assembled during epitaxial growth on a monolithic GaAs/AlAs distributed Bragg reflector. The gain structure bonded to an intracavity diamond crystal heat spreader allows 1.75 W single-transverse-mode output (M(2)<1.2) with circular beam shape operating at 1180 nm in a disk laser geometry. PMID:20195322

  7. Charged quantum dot micropillar system for deterministic light-matter interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Androvitsaneas, P.; Young, A. B.; Schneider, C.; Maier, S.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.; Knauer, S.; Harbord, E.; Hu, C. Y.; Rarity, J. G.; Oulton, R.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are semiconductor nanostructures in which a three-dimensional potential trap produces an electronic quantum confinement, thus mimicking the behavior of single atomic dipole-like transitions. However, unlike atoms, QDs can be incorporated into solid-state photonic devices such as cavities or waveguides that enhance the light-matter interaction. A near unit efficiency light-matter interaction is essential for deterministic, scalable quantum-information (QI) devices. In this limit, a single photon input into the device will undergo a large rotation of the polarization of the light field due to the strong interaction with the QD. In this paper we measure a macroscopic (˜6∘ ) phase shift of light as a result of the interaction with a negatively charged QD coupled to a low-quality-factor (Q ˜290 ) pillar microcavity. This unexpectedly large rotation angle demonstrates that this simple low-Q -factor design would enable near-deterministic light-matter interactions.

  8. Quantum well states in Rashba semiconductor BiTeI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang; Zhu, Zhihuai; Hamidian, Mohammad; Chen, Pengcheng; Yam, Yau Chuen; Hoffman, Jennifer

    BiTeI displays large Rashba-type spin splitting in both valence and conduction bands. In this work, we use scanning tunneling microscopy to reveal the bipolar nature of BiTeI, confirming the previously observed p-n junction electronic structure. We also discover two-dimensional quantum well states both below and above the semiconducting gap on the Te-terminated surface. This work sheds light on the origin of the giant Rashba splitting in the system. This effort is funded by the NSF Grant DMR-1410480.

  9. Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots with tunable surface composition.

    PubMed

    Wei, Helen Hsiu-Ying; Evans, Christopher M; Swartz, Brett D; Neukirch, Amanda J; Young, Jeremy; Prezhdo, Oleg V; Krauss, Todd D

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal CdS quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized with tunable surface composition. Surface stoichiometry was controlled by applying reactive secondary phosphine sulfide precursors in a layer-by-layer approach. The surface composition was observed to greatly affect photoluminescence properties. Band edge emission was quenched in sulfur terminated CdS QDs and fully recovered when QDs were cadmium terminated. Calculations suggest that electronic states inside the band gap arising from surface sulfur atoms could trap charges, thus inhibiting radiative recombination and facilitating nonradiative relaxation. PMID:22924603

  10. Theory of electron g-tensor in bulk and quantum-well semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Wayne H.; Flatte', Michael E.

    2004-03-01

    We present quantitative calculations for the electron g-tensors in bulk and quantum-well semiconductors based on a generalized P.p envelope function theory solved in a fourteen-band restricted basis set. The dependences of g-tensor on structure, magnetic field, carrier density, temperature, and spin polarization have been explored and will be described. It is found that at temperatures of a few Kelvin and fields of a few Tesla, the g-tensors for bulk semiconductors develop quasi-steplike dependences on carrier density or magnetic field due to magnetic quantization, and this effect is even more pronounced in quantum-well semiconductors due to the additional electric quantization along the growth direction. The influence of quantum confinement on the electron g-tensors in QWs is studied by examining the dependence of electron g-tensors on well width. Excellent agreement between these calculated electron g-tensors and measurements [1-2] is found for GaAs/AlGaAs QWs. This work was supported by DARPA/ARO. [1] A. Malinowski and R. T. Harley, Phys. Rev. B 62, 2051 (2000);[2] Le Jeune et al., Semicond. Sci. Technol. 12, 380 (1997).

  11. Importance of quantum correction for the quantitative simulation of photoexcited scanning tunneling spectra of semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnedler, M.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Ebert, Ph.

    2016-05-01

    Photoexcited scanning tunneling spectroscopy is a promising technique for the determination of carrier concentrations, surface photovoltages, and potentials of semiconductors with atomic spatial resolution. However, extraction of the desired quantities requires computation of the electrostatic potential induced by the proximity of the tip and the tunnel current. This calculation is based on an accurate solution of the Poisson as well as the continuity equations for the tip-vacuum-semiconductor system. For this purpose, the carrier current densities are modeled by classical drift and diffusion equations. However, for small tip radii and highly doped materials, the drift and diffusion transport model significantly overestimates a semiconductor's carrier concentration near the surface, making the quantification of physical properties impossible. In this paper, we apply quantum correction to the drift and diffusion model, in order to account for the so-called quantum compressibility, i.e., reduced compressibility of the carrier gas due to the Pauli principle, in the region of the tip-induced band bending. We compare carrier concentrations, potentials, and tunnel currents derived with and without quantum correction for GaN (10 1 ¯0 ) and GaAs(110) surfaces to demonstrate its necessity.

  12. Quantum centipedes: collective dynamics of interacting quantum walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krapivsky, P. L.; Luck, J. M.; Mallick, K.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the quantum centipede made of N fermionic quantum walkers on the one-dimensional lattice interacting by means of the simplest of all hard-bound constraints: the distance between two consecutive fermions is either one or two lattice spacings. This composite quantum walker spreads ballistically, just as the simple quantum walk. However, because of the interactions between the internal degrees of freedom, the distribution of its center-of-mass velocity displays numerous ballistic fronts in the long-time limit, corresponding to singularities in the empirical velocity distribution. The spectrum of the centipede and the corresponding group velocities are analyzed by direct means for the first few values of N. Some analytical results are obtained for arbitrary N by exploiting an exact mapping of the problem onto a free-fermion system. We thus derive the maximal velocity describing the ballistic spreading of the two extremal fronts of the centipede wavefunction, including its non-trivial value in the large-N limit.

  13. The interaction of quantum gravity with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, D. R.

    2010-11-01

    The interaction of (linearized) gravitation with matter is studied in the causal approach up to the second order of perturbation theory. We consider the generic case and prove that gravitation is universal in the sense that the existence of the interaction with gravitation does not put new constraints on the Lagrangian for lower spin fields. We use the formalism of quantum off-shell fields which makes our computation more straightforward and simple.

  14. Profiling the local carrier concentration across a semiconductor quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Walrath, J. C.; Lin, Yen-Hsiang; Huang, S.; Goldman, R. S.

    2015-05-11

    We profile the local carrier concentration, n, across epitaxial InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) consisting of 3D islands on top of a 2D alloy layer. We use scanning thermoelectric microscopy to measure a profile of the temperature gradient-induced voltage, which is converted to a profile of the local Seebeck coefficient, S. The S profile is then converted to a conduction band-edge profile and compared with Poisson-Schrodinger band-edge simulations. Our combined computational-experimental approach suggests a reduced carrier concentration in the QD center in comparison to that of the 2D alloy layer. The relative roles of free carrier trapping and/or dopant expulsion are discussed.

  15. Barrier penetration effects on thermopower in semiconductor quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, R. G.; Sankeshwar, N. S. Mulimani, B. G.

    2014-01-15

    Finite confinement effects, due to the penetration of the electron wavefunction into the barriers of a square well potential, on the low–temperature acoustic-phonon-limited thermopower (TP) of 2DEG are investigated. The 2DEG is considered to be scattered by acoustic phonons via screened deformation potential and piezoelectric couplings. Incorporating the barrier penetration effects, the dependences of diffusion TP and phonon drag TP on barrier height are studied. An expression for phonon drag TP is obtained. Numerical calculations of temperature dependences of mobility and TP for a 10 nm InN/In {sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N quantum well for different values of x show that the magnitude and behavior of TP are altered. A decrease in the barrier height from 500 meV by a factor of 5, enhances the mobility by 34% and reduces the TP by 58% at 20 K. Results are compared with those of infinite barrier approximation.

  16. Highly entangled photons from hybrid piezoelectric-semiconductor quantum dot devices.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Rinaldo; Wildmann, Johannes S; Zallo, Eugenio; Schmidt, Oliver G; Rastelli, Armando

    2014-06-11

    Entanglement resources are key ingredients of future quantum technologies. If they could be efficiently integrated into a semiconductor platform, a new generation of devices could be envisioned, whose quantum-mechanical functionalities are controlled via the mature semiconductor technology. Epitaxial quantum dots (QDs) embedded in diodes would embody such ideal quantum devices, but a fine-structure splitting (FSS) between the bright exciton states lowers dramatically the degree of entanglement of the sources and hampers severely their real exploitation in the foreseen applications. In this work, we overcome this hurdle using strain-tunable optoelectronic devices, where any QD can be tuned for the emission of photon pairs featuring the highest degree of entanglement ever reported for QDs, with concurrence as high as 0.75 ± 0.02. Furthermore, we study the evolution of Bell's parameters as a function of FSS and demonstrate for the first time that filtering-free violation of Bell's inequalities requires the FSS to be smaller than 1 μeV. This upper limit for the FSS also sets the tuning range of exciton energies (∼1 meV) over which our device operates as an energy-tunable source of highly entangled photons. A moderate temporal filtering further increases the concurrence and the tunability of exciton energies up to 0.82 and 2 meV, respectively, though at the expense of 60% reduction of count rate. PMID:24845369

  17. Spin-Photon Entanglement in Semiconductor Quantum Dots: Towards Solid-State-Based Quantum Repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Greve, Kristiaan; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    `In this chapter, we introduced and analyze techniques that allow truly secure secret key sharing over long distances, using public, open channels, where the laws of quantum mechanics ensure the security of the long distance key sharing - an idea generally referred to as the essence of a quantum repeater. We describe several proof-of-principle experiments where technology based on self-assembled quantum dots is used as the backbone of a future quantum repeater.'

  18. Single Electron Charging and Quantum Effects in Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foxman, Ethan Bradley

    1993-01-01

    We present an experimental study of a small region (~0.3 times 0.3 mum^2) of two-dimensional electron gas in a GaAs/rm Al_{x}Ga_{1-x}As heterostructure. The small electron gas is coupled to electrical leads through tunnel barriers formed by negatively biased Schottky gates on the surface of the heterostructure. Electron transport is studied as a function of gate voltage, magnetic field, temperature, bias voltage and tunneling barrier height. We observe a rich interplay between single electron charging and quantum effects. The conductance of such systems was known to consist of a series of nearly periodic conductance peaks.^{1,2} We further investigate this behavior and show that our observations are consistent with a model that synthesizes classical single electron charging and a discrete tunneling density of states.^{3,4}. We investigate the nature and origin of this tunneling density of states. The spectrum of states is determined through current-voltage measurements and low-bias conductance measurements. The tunneling density of states is mapped as a function of gate voltage and magnetic field. In the latter case, we show that our observations can be understood through a self-consistent model of single electron charging in the quantum Hall regime.^5. Lastly, we report conductance measurements in the regime where the conductance across the tunnel barriers separating the small electron gas from its leads becomes of order e^2/h. We observe that in this regime single electron charging effects are quenched. This effect is shown to arise from an increased capacitance across one of the barriers and from the increased lifetime broadening of states in the small electron gas. ^6 (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617 -253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.) ftn^1J. H. F. Scott -Thomas, S. B. Field, M. A. Kastner, H. I. Smith, and D. A. Antoniadis, Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 583 (1989). ^2U. Meirav, M. A. Kastner, and S. J. Wind

  19. III-V semiconductor quantum well and superlattice detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Martin; Fuchs, Frank; Schneider, Harald; Fleissner, Joachim; Schmitz, J.; Pletschen, Wilfried; Braunstein, Juergen; Ziegler, Johann; Cabanski, Wolfgang A.; Koidl, Peter; Weimann, Guenter

    1998-10-01

    The paper reviews the development of IR detectors for the 8 - 12 micrometer wavelength range based on GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well structures and InAs/(GaIn)Sb short-period superlattices (SPSLs) at the Fraunhofer-Institute IAF. Photoconductive GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) are used for the fabrication of starring IR cameras for thermal imaging in the third atmospheric window. The long wavelength infrared (LWIR) camera, devleoped in cooperation with AEG Infrarot-Module (AIM), consists of a two-dimensional focal plane array (FPA) with 256 X 256 detector elements, flip- chip bonded to a read-out integrated circuit (ROIC). The technology for the fabrication of FPAs, electrical and optical properties of single detector elements in the two-dimensional arrangement and the properties of the LWIR camera system are reported. A noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) below 10 mK has been measured at an operation temperature of T equals 65 K with an integration time of 20 ms. More than 99.8% of all pixels are working and no cluster defects are observed. InAs/(GaIn)Sb SPSLs with a broken gap type-II band alignment are well suited for the fabrication of IR detectors covering the 3 - 12 micrometer spectral range. Due to the lattice mismatch of the InAs/(GaIn)Sb SPSL with respect to GaSb, tight control of thickness and composition of the layers and a controlled formation of the chemical bonds across the interface in the SPSLs are used for strain compensation. Photodiodes with a cut-off wavelength (lambda) c equals 8 micrometer and a current responsivity R(lambda ) equals 2 A/W exhibit a dynamic impedance of R0A equals 1k(Omega) cm2 at T equals 77 K. This leads to a Johnson- noise limited detectivity in excess of D* equals 1 X 1012 cm(Hz)1/2/W for these type of detectors.

  20. Control of the spin geometric phase in semiconductor quantum rings

    PubMed Central

    Nagasawa, Fumiya; Frustaglia, Diego; Saarikoski, Henri; Richter, Klaus; Nitta, Junsaku

    2013-01-01

    Since the formulation of the geometric phase by Berry, its relevance has been demonstrated in a large variety of physical systems. However, a geometric phase of the most fundamental spin-1/2 system, the electron spin, has not been observed directly and controlled independently from dynamical phases. Here we report experimental evidence on the manipulation of an electron spin through a purely geometric effect in an InGaAs-based quantum ring with Rashba spin-orbit coupling. By applying an in-plane magnetic field, a phase shift of the Aharonov–Casher interference pattern towards the small spin-orbit-coupling regions is observed. A perturbation theory for a one-dimensional Rashba ring under small in-plane fields reveals that the phase shift originates exclusively from the modulation of a pure geometric-phase component of the electron spin beyond the adiabatic limit, independently from dynamical phases. The phase shift is well reproduced by implementing two independent approaches, that is, perturbation theory and non-perturbative transport simulations. PMID:24067870

  1. Injection locking of a semiconductor double-quantum-dot micromaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.-Y.; Stehlik, J.; Gullans, M. J.; Taylor, J. M.; Petta, J. R.

    Narrow linewidth lasers and masers are desirable for applications such as frequency standards and low-noise amplifiers. Recently we have demonstrated a double-quantum-dot (DQD) micromaser, which generates photons through single electron tunneling events. Charge noise couples to the DQD energy levels and results in a maser linewidth that is 100 times larger than the Schawlow-Townes prediction. We demonstrate linewidth narrowing by more than a factor of 10 using injection locking. The injection locking range is measured as a function of input power and shown to be in excellent agreement with the Adler equation. The position and amplitude of distortion sidebands that appear outside of the injection locking range are quantitatively examined. Our results show that this unconventional maser, which is impacted by strong charge noise and electron-phonon coupling, is well described by standard laser models. Supported by the National Science Foundation and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation's EPiQS initiative through Grant No. GBMF4535.

  2. Transport and photodetection in self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Razeghi, M; Lim, H; Tsao, S; Szafraniec, J; Zhang, W; Mi, K; Movaghar, B

    2005-02-01

    A great step forward in science and technology was made when it was discovered that lattice mismatch can be used to grow highly ordered, artificial atom-like structures called self-assembled quantum dots. Several groups have in the meantime successfully demonstrated useful infrared photodetection devices which are based on this technology. The new physics is fascinating, and there is no doubt that many new applications will be found when we have developed a better understanding of the underlying physical processes, and in particular when we have learned how to integrate the exciting new developments made in nanoscopic addressing and molecular self-assembly methods with semiconducting dots. In this paper we examine the scientific and technical questions encountered in current state of the art infrared detector technology and suggest ways of overcoming these difficulties. Promoting simple physical pictures, we focus in particular on the problem of high temperature detector operation and discuss the origin of dark current, noise, and photoresponse. PMID:21727426

  3. Anomalous quantum efficiency for photoconduction and its power dependence in metal oxide semiconductor nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chen, R S; Wang, W C; Lu, M L; Chen, Y F; Lin, H C; Chen, K H; Chen, L C

    2013-08-01

    The quantum efficiency and carrier lifetime that decide the photoconduction (PC) efficiencies in the metal oxide semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have been investigated. The experimental result surprisingly shows that the SnO2, TiO2, WO3, and ZnO NWs reveal extraordinary quantum efficiencies in common, which are over one to three orders of magnitude lower than the theoretical expectation. The surface depletion region (SDR)-controlled photoconductivity is proposed to explain the anomalous quantum efficiency and its power dependence. The inherent difference between the metal oxide nanostructures such as carrier lifetime, carrier concentration, and dielectric constant leading to the distinct PC performance and behavior are also discussed. PMID:23779084

  4. Quantum size effects on CdTexS1 - x semiconductor-doped glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros Neto, J. A.; Barbosa, L. C.; Cesar, C. L.; Alves, O. L.; Galembeck, F.

    1991-11-01

    We present experimental evidences of quantum confinement in borosilicate glasses with a new microcrystallite CdTexS1-x semiconductor. The microcrystallite sizes are controlled by the heat-treatment time and temperature. Transmission electron microscopy measurements show the microcrystallites average diameters near 55 Å for the sample treated for the longest time. We observe a red shift from 570 to 640 nm in the absorption and photoluminescence spectra as the size increases. These shifts agree with the expected quantum-confined energies, varying from 0.80 to 0.60 eV. The absorption spectra also show a second feature which can be assigned to the second quantum-confined transition.

  5. Silicon Metal-oxide-semiconductor Quantum Dots for Single-electron Pumping.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alessandro; Tanttu, Tuomo; Hudson, Fay E; Sun, Yuxin; Möttönen, Mikko; Dzurak, Andrew S

    2015-01-01

    As mass-produced silicon transistors have reached the nano-scale, their behavior and performances are increasingly affected, and often deteriorated, by quantum mechanical effects such as tunneling through single dopants, scattering via interface defects, and discrete trap charge states. However, progress in silicon technology has shown that these phenomena can be harnessed and exploited for a new class of quantum-based electronics. Among others, multi-layer-gated silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) technology can be used to control single charge or spin confined in electrostatically-defined quantum dots (QD). These QD-based devices are an excellent platform for quantum computing applications and, recently, it has been demonstrated that they can also be used as single-electron pumps, which are accurate sources of quantized current for metrological purposes. Here, we discuss in detail the fabrication protocol for silicon MOS QDs which is relevant to both quantum computing and quantum metrology applications. Moreover, we describe characterization methods to test the integrity of the devices after fabrication. Finally, we give a brief description of the measurement set-up used for charge pumping experiments and show representative results of electric current quantization. PMID:26067215

  6. Silicon Metal-oxide-semiconductor Quantum Dots for Single-electron Pumping

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Alessandro; Tanttu, Tuomo; Hudson, Fay E.; Sun, Yuxin; Möttönen, Mikko; Dzurak, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    As mass-produced silicon transistors have reached the nano-scale, their behavior and performances are increasingly affected, and often deteriorated, by quantum mechanical effects such as tunneling through single dopants, scattering via interface defects, and discrete trap charge states. However, progress in silicon technology has shown that these phenomena can be harnessed and exploited for a new class of quantum-based electronics. Among others, multi-layer-gated silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) technology can be used to control single charge or spin confined in electrostatically-defined quantum dots (QD). These QD-based devices are an excellent platform for quantum computing applications and, recently, it has been demonstrated that they can also be used as single-electron pumps, which are accurate sources of quantized current for metrological purposes. Here, we discuss in detail the fabrication protocol for silicon MOS QDs which is relevant to both quantum computing and quantum metrology applications. Moreover, we describe characterization methods to test the integrity of the devices after fabrication. Finally, we give a brief description of the measurement set-up used for charge pumping experiments and show representative results of electric current quantization. PMID:26067215

  7. Accurate band gaps of semiconductors and insulators from Quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, Roman; Hood, Randolph; Morales, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    Ab initio calculations are useful tools in developing materials with targeted band gaps for semiconductor industry. Unfortunately, the main workhorse of ab initio calculations - density functional theory (DFT) in local density approximation (LDA) or generalized gradient approximation (GGA) underestimates band gaps. Several approaches have been proposed starting from empirical corrections to more elaborate exchange-correlation functionals to deal with this problem. But none of these work well for the entire range of semiconductors and insulators. Deficiencies of DFT as a mean field method can be overcome using many-body techniques. Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods can obtain a nearly exact numerical solutions of both total energies and spectral properties. Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC), the most widely used QMC method, has been shown to provide gold standard results for different material properties, including spectroscopic constants of dimers and clusters, equation of state for solids, accurate descriptions of defects in metals and insulators. To test DMC's accuracy in a wider range of semiconductors and insulators we have computed band gaps of several semiconductors and insulators. We show that DMC can provide superior agreement with experiment compared with more traditional DFT approaches including high level exchange-correlation functionals (e.g. HSE).

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations for point defects in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Point defects in silicon have been studied extensively for many years. Nevertheless the mechanism for self diffusion in Si is still debated. Direct experimental measurements of the selfdiffusion in silicon are complicated by the lack of suitable isotopes. Formation energies are either obtained from theory or indirectly through the analysis of dopant and metal diffusion experiments. Density functional calculations predict formation energies ranging from 3 to 5 eV depending on the approximations used for the exchange-correlation functional [1]. Analysis of dopant and metal diffusion experiments result in similar broad range of diffusion activation energies of 4.95 [2], 4.68 [3], 2.4 eV [4]. Assuming a migration energy barrier of 0.1-0.3 eV [5], the resulting experimental interstitial formation energies range from 2.1 - 4.9 eV. To answer the question of the formation energy of Si interstitials we resort to a many-body description of the wave functions using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) techniques. Previous QMC calculations resulted in formation energies for the interstitials of around 5 eV [1,6]. We present a careful analysis of all the controlled and uncontrolled approximations that affect the defect formation energies in variational and diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. We find that more accurate trial wave functions for QMC using improved Jastrow expansions and most importantly a backflow transformation for the electron coordinates significantly improve the wave functions. Using zero-variance extrapolation, we predict interstitial formation energies in good agreement with hybrid DFT functionals [1] and recent GW calculations [7]. [4pt] [1] E. R. Batista, J. Heyd, R. G. Hennig, B. P. Uberuaga, R. L. Martin, G. E. Scuseria, C. J. Umrigar, and J. W. Wilkins. Phys. Rev. B 74, 121102(R) (2006).[0pt] [2] H. Bracht, E. E. Haller, and R. Clark-Phelps, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 393 (1998). [0pt] [3] A. Ural, P. B. Griffin, and J. D. Plummer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 3454 (1999). [0pt

  9. Phase Recovery Acceleration of Quantum-Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers by Optical Pumping to Quantum-Well Wetting Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungho

    2013-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the phase recovery acceleration of quantum-dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) by means of the optical pump injection to the quantum-well (QW) wetting layer (WL). We compare the ultrafast gain and phase recovery responses of QD SOAs in either the electrical or the optical pumping scheme by numerically solving 1088 coupled rate equations. The ultrafast gain recovery responses on the order of sub-picosecond are nearly the same for the two pumping schemes. The ultrafast phase recovery is not significantly accelerated by increasing the electrical current density, but greatly improved by increasing the optical pumping power to the QW WL. Because the phase recovery time of QD SOAs with the optical pumping scheme can be reduced down to several picoseconds, the complete phase recovery can be achieved when consecutive pulse signals with a repetition rate of 100 GHz is injected.

  10. Hidden quantum mirage by negative refraction in semiconductor P-N junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu-Hui; Zhu, Jia-Ji; Yang, Wen; Lin, Hai-Qing; Chang, Kai

    2016-08-01

    We predict a robust quantum interference phenomenon in a semiconductor P-N junction: with a local pump on one side of the junction, the response of a local probe on the other side behaves as if the disturbance emanates not from the pump but instead from its mirror image about the junction. This phenomenon follows from the matching of Fermi surfaces of the constituent materials, thus it is robust against the details of the junction (e.g., width, potential profile, and even disorder), in contrast to the widely studied anomalous focusing caused by negative refraction. The recently fabricated P-N junctions in 2D semiconductors provide ideal platforms to explore this phenomenon and its applications to dramatically enhance charge and spin transport as well as carrier-mediated long-range correlation.

  11. Photoemission and Masing in a Cavity-Coupled Semiconductor Double Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petta, Jason

    2015-05-01

    Semiconductor circuit QED devices are exciting platforms for studying the coupled dynamics of single charges, photons, and phonons. I will describe a newly discovered maser, which is driven by single electron tunneling events that result in gigahertz frequency photon emission. Semiconductor double quantum dots, sometimes referred to as electrically tunable ``artificial molecules,'' serve as the gain medium and are placed inside of a high quality factor microwave cavity. Maser action is verified by comparing the statistics of the emitted microwave field above and below the maser threshold. Furthermore, by driving the cavity with a seed tone, it is possible to injection lock the maser, greatly reducing the emission linewidth. The frequency range over which the maser can be injection locked closely follows predictions from Adler's equation. Research was performed in collaboration with Yinyu Liu, Jiri Stehlik, Christopher Eichler, Michael Gullans, and Jacob Taylor. We acknowledge support from the Sloan and Packard Foundations, ARO, DARPA, and the NSF.

  12. Quantum state tomography of large nuclear spins in a semiconductor quantum well: Optimal robustness against errors as quantified by condition numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranowicz, Adam; Ã-zdemir, Şahin K.; Bajer, Jiří; Yusa, Go; Imoto, Nobuyuki; Hirayama, Yoshiro; Nori, Franco

    2015-08-01

    We discuss methods of quantum state tomography for solid-state systems with a large nuclear spin I =3 /2 in nanometer-scale semiconductors devices based on a quantum well. Due to quadrupolar interactions, the Zeeman levels of these nuclear-spin devices become nonequidistant, forming a controllable four-level quantum system (known as quartit or ququart). The occupation of these levels can be selectively and coherently manipulated by multiphoton transitions using the techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) [Yusa et al., Nature (London) 434, 1001 (2005), 10.1038/nature03456]. These methods are based on an unconventional approach to NMR, where the longitudinal magnetization Mz is directly measured. This is in contrast to the standard NMR experiments and tomographic methods, where the transverse magnetization Mx y is detected. The robustness against errors in the measured data is analyzed by using the condition number based on the spectral norm. We propose several methods with optimized sets of rotations yielding the highest robustness against errors, as described by the condition number equal to 1, assuming an ideal experimental detection. This robustness is only slightly deteriorated, as given by the condition number equal to 1.05, for a more realistic "noisy" Mz detection based on the standard cyclically ordered phase sequence (CYCLOPS) method.

  13. Quantum confinement in semiconductor nanofilms: Optical spectra and multiple exciton generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelinskii, Igor; Makarov, Vladimir I.

    2016-04-01

    We report optical absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra of Si and SnO2 nanocrystalline films in the UV-vis-NIR range, featuring discrete bands resulting from transverse quantum confinement, observed in the optical spectra of nanofilms for the first time ever. The film thickness ranged from 3.9 to 12.2 nm, depending on the material. The results are interpreted within the particle-in-a-box model, with infinite walls. The calculated values of the effective electron mass are independent on the film thickness and equal to 0.17mo (Si) and 0.21mo (SnO2), with mo the mass of the free electron. The second calculated model parameter, the quantum number n of the HOMO (valence band), was also thickness-independent: 8.00 (Si) and 7.00 (SnO2). The transitions observed in absorption all start at the level n and correspond to Δn = 1, 2, 3, …. The photoluminescence bands exhibit large Stokes shifts, shifting to higher energies with increased excitation energy. In effect, nanolayers of Si, an indirect-gap semiconductor, behave as a direct-gap semiconductor, as regards the transverse-quantized level system. A prototype Si-SnO2 nanofilm photovoltaic cell demonstrated photoelectron quantum yields achieving 2.5, showing clear evidence of multiple exciton generation, for the first time ever in a working nanofilm device.

  14. Noncovalent Interactions by Quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Dubecký, Matúš; Mitas, Lubos; Jurečka, Petr

    2016-05-11

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) is a family of stochastic methods for solving quantum many-body problems such as the stationary Schrödinger equation. The review introduces basic notions of electronic structure QMC based on random walks in real space as well as its advances and adaptations to systems with noncovalent interactions. Specific issues such as fixed-node error cancellation, construction of trial wave functions, and efficiency considerations that allow for benchmark quality QMC energy differences are described in detail. Comprehensive overview of articles covers QMC applications to systems with noncovalent interactions over the last three decades. The current status of QMC with regard to efficiency, applicability, and usability by nonexperts together with further considerations about QMC developments, limitations, and unsolved challenges are discussed as well. PMID:27081724

  15. Interaction picture density matrix quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Malone, Fionn D; Blunt, N S; Shepherd, James J; Lee, D K K; Spencer, J S; Foulkes, W M C

    2015-07-28

    The recently developed density matrix quantum Monte Carlo (DMQMC) algorithm stochastically samples the N-body thermal density matrix and hence provides access to exact properties of many-particle quantum systems at arbitrary temperatures. We demonstrate that moving to the interaction picture provides substantial benefits when applying DMQMC to interacting fermions. In this first study, we focus on a system of much recent interest: the uniform electron gas in the warm dense regime. The basis set incompleteness error at finite temperature is investigated and extrapolated via a simple Monte Carlo sampling procedure. Finally, we provide benchmark calculations for a four-electron system, comparing our results to previous work where possible. PMID:26233116

  16. Exchange Instabilities in Semiconductor Double-Quantum-Well Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lian; Ortalano, M. W.; Das Sarma, S.

    1997-03-01

    We study interaction-driven spontaneous spin and pseudospin (layer degree of freedom) polarization instabilities in double-layer electron systems in the Hartree-Fock approximation (HFA) and in self-consistent local density and local spin density approximations ( LDA and LSDA). Within the HFA, both spin and pseudospin instabilities are found at low electron densities. However, this spontaneous pseudospin polarization is an ``easy-plane'' magnetization rather than a bilayer to monolayer charge transfer transition. Correlation effects are treated in self-consistent LDA and LSDA calculations, which give qualitatively the same results as the HFA. Recent experimentsfootnote Y. Katayama, D.C. Tsui, H.C. Manoharan, and M. Shayegan, Surf. Sci. 305, 405 (1994); K. Katayama et al., Phys. Rev. B 52, 14817 (1995); X. Ying, S.R. Parihar, H.C. Manoharan, and M. Shayegan, ibid 52, 11611 (1995); N.K. Patel et al., ibid 53, 15433 (1996). involving charge transfers in double-layer systems under an external bias potential are quantitatively explained by the self-consistent LDA and LSDA calculations. preprint

  17. Nonlinear quantum optics mediated by Rydberg interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firstenberg, O.; Adams, C. S.; Hofferberth, S.

    2016-08-01

    By mapping the strong interaction between Rydberg excitations in ultra-cold atomic ensembles onto single photons via electromagnetically induced transparency, it is now possible to realize a medium which exhibits a strong optical nonlinearity at the level of individual photons. We review the theoretical concepts and the experimental state-of-the-art of this exciting new field, and discuss first applications in the field of all-optical quantum information processing.

  18. Statistically interacting quantum gases in D dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Geoffrey G.

    Chapter 1. Exact and explicit results are derived for the thermodynamic properties (isochores, isotherms, isobars, response functions, speed of sound) of a quantum gas in dimensions D ≥ 1 and with fractional exclusion statistics 0 ≤ g ≤ 1 connecting bosons (g = 0) and fermions (g = 1). In D = 1 the results are equivalent to those of the Calogero-Sutherland model, a gas with long-range two-body interaction. Emphasis is given to the crossover between boson-like and fermion-like features, caused by aspects of the statistical interaction that mimic long-range attraction and short-range repulsion. A phase transition along the isobar occurs at a nonzero temperature in all dimensions. The T-dependence of the speed of sound is in simple relation to isochores and isobars. The effects of soft container walls are accounted for rigorously for the case of a pure power-law potential. Chapter 2. The exact thermodynamics (isochores, isotherms, isobars, response functions, speed of sound) is worked out for a statistically interacting quantum gas in D dimensions. The results in D = 1 are those of the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz for the Nonlinear Schrodinger model, a gas with repulsive two-body contact potential. In all dimensions the ideal boson and fermion gases are recovered in the weak-coupling and strong-coupling limits, respectively. For all nonzero couplings ideal fermion gas behavior emerges for D >> 1 and, in the limit D → infinity, a phase transition occurs at T > 0. Significant deviations from ideal quantum gas behavior are found for intermediate coupling and finite D . Chapter 3. Methodology previously developed in the framework of the coordinate Bethe ansatz applied to integrable quantum gas models is employed to calculate some ground-state properties and elementary excitations for quantum gas models in D = 1 dimensions with statistical interactions that are not equivalent to dynamical interactions. The focus in this comparative study is on modifications of the

  19. Fast two-qubit gates for quantum computing in semiconductor quantum dots using a photonic microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solenov, Dmitry; Economou, Sophia E.; Reinecke, T. L.

    2013-01-01

    Implementations for quantum computing require fast single- and multiqubit quantum gate operations. In the case of optically controlled quantum dot qubits, theoretical designs for long-range two- or multiqubit operations satisfying all the requirements in quantum computing are not yet available. We have developed a design for a fast, long-range two-qubit gate mediated by a photonic microcavity mode using excited states of the quantum-dot-cavity system that addresses these needs. This design does not require identical qubits, it is compatible with available optically induced single-qubit operations, and it advances opportunities for scalable architectures. We show that the gate fidelity can exceed 90% in experimentally accessible systems.

  20. The doping of the polyimide alignment layer by semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konshina, E. A.; Galin, I. F.; Gavrish, E. O.; Vakulin, D. A.

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the electro-optic properties of nematic liquid crystal cells oriented by polyimide (PI) layer doped with 3.5 nm semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) CdSe/ZnS at concentrations of 0.05 and 0.1 wt. %. It is shown that doping PI orienting layer by QDs reduces the permittivity and the phase delay, as well as increases the electrical resistance of the cells. Also we observed deceleration of liquid crystal (LC) optical response caused by the screening effect of the orienting layer.

  1. Photo- and electroluminescence from semiconductor colloidal quantum dots in organic matrices: QD-OLED

    SciTech Connect

    Vitukhnovskii, A. G. Vaschenko, A. A.; Bychkovskii, D. N.; Dirin, D. N.; Tananaev, P. N.; Vakshtein, M. S.; Korzhonov, D. A.

    2013-12-15

    The results are reported of an experimental study of samples of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with luminescent layers fabricated on the basis of two types of CdSe/CdS/ZnS semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) with average CdSe core diameters of 3.2 and 4.1 nm and the same overall diameters of 6.5 nm. The dependences of the LED efficiency on the applied voltage are determined. Assumptions are made about ways of optimizing the design of high-efficiency LEDs.

  2. Kondo effect in a semiconductor quantum dot coupled to ferromagnetic electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaya, K.; Kitabatake, M.; Shibata, K.; Jung, M.; Kawamura, M.; Hirakawa, K.; Machida, T.; Taniyama, T.; Ishida, S.; Arakawa, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Using a laterally fabricated quantum-dot (QD) spin-valve device, we experimentally study the Kondo effect in the electron transport through a semiconductor QD with an odd number of electrons (N). In a parallel magnetic configuration of the ferromagnetic electrodes, the Kondo resonance at N =3 splits clearly without external magnetic fields. With applying magnetic fields (B), the splitting is gradually reduced, and then the Kondo effect is almost restored at B =1.2T. This means that, in the Kondo regime, an inverse effective magnetic field of B ˜1.2T can be applied to the QD in the parallel magnetic configuration of the ferromagnetic electrodes.

  3. Time-resolved photoluminescence properties of semiconductor quantum dot superlattices of different microcrystal shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Weon-Sik Choi, Eunjin; Ku Jung, Yun; Jung, Jin-Seung; Lee, Jin-Kyu

    2014-04-14

    We report time-resolved photoluminescence properties on semiconductor quantum dot (QD) superlattices (SLs) using PL lifetime imaging microscopy at a single particle level. PL lifetime imaging technique clearly reveals that different shaped QD SL microcrystals have different time-resolved PL characteristics. The faceted SL microcrystals consisted of well-organized QDs showed faster recombination rates than those of the spherical microparticles including randomly organized QDs, which can be explained by the different degree of energetic couplings among component QDs due to different packing fraction.

  4. Surfactant-assisted synthesis of water-soluble and biocompatible semiconductor quantum dot-micelles.

    SciTech Connect

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Bunge, Scott D.; Gabaldon, John; Fan, Hongyou; Scullin, Chessa; Leve, Erik W.; Wilson, Michael C.; Tallant, David Robert; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2005-04-01

    We report a simple, rapid approach to synthesize water-soluble and biocompatible fluorescent quantum dot (QD) micelles by encapsulation of monodisperse, hydrophobic QDs within surfactant/lipid micelles. Analyses of UV-vis and photo luminescence spectra, along with transmission electron microscopy, indicate that the water-soluble semiconductor QD micelles are monodisperse and retain the optical properties of the original hydrophobic QDs. The QD micelles were shown to be biocompatible and exhibited little or no aggregation when taken up by cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

  5. Precision, all-optical measurement of external quantum efficiency in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chengao; Li, Chia-Yeh; Hasselbeck, Michael P.; Imangholi, Babak; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2011-05-01

    External quantum efficiency of semiconductor photonic devices is directly measured by wavelength-dependent laser-induced temperature change (scanning laser calorimetry) with very high accuracy. Maximum efficiency is attained at an optimum photo-excitation level that can be determined with an independent measurement of power-dependent temperature or power-dependent photoluminescence. Time-resolved photoluminescence lifetime and power-dependent photoluminescence measurements are used to evaluate unprocessed heterostructures for critical performance parameters. The crucial importance of parasitic background absorption is discussed.

  6. Imaging of free carriers in semiconductors via optical feedback in terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzapesa, F. P. Brambilla, M.; Dabbicco, M.; Scamarcio, G.; Columbo, L. L.; Vitiello, M. S.

    2014-01-27

    To monitor the density of photo-generated charge carriers on a semiconductor surface, we demonstrate a detectorless imaging system based on the analysis of the optical feedback in terahertz quantum cascade lasers. Photo-excited free electron carriers are created in high resistivity n-type silicon wafers via low power (≅40 mW/cm{sup 2}) continuous wave pump laser in the near infrared spectral range. A spatial light modulator allows to directly reconfigure and control the photo-patterned intensity and the associated free-carrier density distribution. The experimental results are in good agreement with the numerical simulations.

  7. Effect of quantum parameter – H on space-charge wave spectra in n-type semiconductor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S. Muley, Apurva

    2015-07-31

    The present paper deals with the propagation characteristics of very fundamental wave i.e. space – charge wave while propagating through quantum semiconductor plasma. We have used quantum hydrodynamic model to derive the most general dispersion relation in terms of quantum parameter – H. We have found that in presence of an external electrostatic field, the wave spectra (dispersion as well as gain characteristics) not only modified due to presence of quantum effect but also two novel modes of propagation are introduced due to this effect. Hence it may be concluded that to miniaturize the opto-electronic devices, one should use highly doped semiconductor medium at comparatively lower temperature so that the quantum effects predominate.

  8. Colloquium: Nonlinear collective interactions in quantum plasmas with degenerate electron fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P. K.; Eliasson, B.

    2011-07-01

    The current understanding of some important nonlinear collective processes in quantum plasmas with degenerate electrons is presented. After reviewing the basic properties of quantum plasmas, model equations (e.g., the quantum hydrodynamic and effective nonlinear Schroedinger-Poisson equations) are presented that describe collective nonlinear phenomena at nanoscales. The effects of the electron degeneracy arise due to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle and Pauli's exclusion principle for overlapping electron wave functions that result in tunneling of electrons and the electron degeneracy pressure. Since electrons are Fermions (spin-1/2 quantum particles), there also appears an electron spin current and a spin force acting on electrons due to the Bohr magnetization. The quantum effects produce new aspects of electrostatic (ES) and electromagnetic (EM) waves in a quantum plasma that are summarized in here. Furthermore, nonlinear features of ES ion waves and electron plasma oscillations are discussed, as well as the trapping of intense EM waves in quantum electron-density cavities. Specifically, simulation studies of the coupled nonlinear Schroedinger and Poisson equations reveal the formation and dynamics of localized ES structures at nanoscales in a quantum plasma. The effect of an external magnetic field on the plasma wave spectra and develop quantum magnetohydrodynamic equations are also discussed. The results are useful for understanding numerous collective phenomena in quantum plasmas, such as those in compact astrophysical objects (e.g., the cores of white dwarf stars and giant planets), as well as in plasma-assisted nanotechnology (e.g., quantum diodes, quantum free-electron lasers, nanophotonics and nanoplasmonics, metallic nanostructures, thin metal films, semiconductor quantum wells, and quantum dots, etc.), and in the next generation of intense laser-solid density plasma interaction experiments relevant for fast ignition in inertial confinement fusion

  9. Lossless propagation in metal-semiconductor-metal plasmonic waveguides using quantum dot active medium.

    PubMed

    Sheikhi, K; Granpayeh, N; Ahmadi, V; Pahlavan, S

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we analyze and simulate the lossless propagation of lightwaves in the active metal-semiconductor-metal plasmonic waveguides (MSMPWs) at the wavelength range of 1540-1560 nm using a quantum dot (QD) active medium. The Maxwell's equations are solved in the waveguide, and the required gains for achieving lossless propagation are derived. On the other hand, the rate equations in quantum dot active regions are solved by using the Runge-Kutta method, and the achievable optical gain is derived. The analyses results show that the required optical gain for lossless propagation in MSMPWs is achievable using the QD active medium. Also, by adjusting the active medium parameters, the MSMPWs loss can be eliminated in a specific bandwidth, and the propagation length increases obviously. PMID:25967191

  10. Bound states in optical absorption of semiconductor quantum wells containing a two-dimensional electron Gas

    PubMed

    Huard; Cox; Saminadayar; Arnoult; Tatarenko

    2000-01-01

    The dependence of the optical absorption spectrum of a semiconductor quantum well on two-dimensional electron concentration n(e) is studied using CdTe samples. The trion peak (X-) seen at low n(e) evolves smoothly into the Fermi edge singularity at high n(e). The exciton peak (X) moves off to high energy, weakens, and disappears. The X,X- splitting is linear in n(e) and closely equal to the Fermi energy plus the trion binding energy. For Cd0.998Mn0.002Te quantum wells in a magnetic field, the X,X- splitting reflects unequal Fermi energies for M = +/-1/2 electrons. The data are explained by Hawrylak's theory of the many-body optical response including spin effects. PMID:11015866

  11. Control of Nanostructures and Interfaces of Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Quantum-Dots-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianjun; Cao, Guozhong

    2015-05-21

    Nanostructured metal oxide semiconductors (MOS), such as TiO2 and ZnO, have been regarded as an attractive material for the quantum dots sensitized solar cells (QDSCs), owing to their large specific surface area for loading a large amount of quantum dots (QDs) and strong scattering effect for capturing a sufficient fraction of photons. However, the large surface area of such nanostructures also provides easy pathways for charge recombination, and surface defects and connections between adjacent nanoparticles may retard effective charge injection and charge transport, leading to a loss of power conversion efficiency. Introduction of the surface modification for MOS or QDs has been thought an effective approach to improve the performance of QDSC. In this paper, the recent advances in the control of nanostructures and interfaces in QDSCs and prospects for the further development with higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) have been discussed. PMID:26263261

  12. Charge sensed Pauli blockade in a metal-oxide-semiconductor lateral double quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khoi T; Lilly, Michael P; Nielsen, Erik; Bishop, Nathan; Rahman, Rajib; Young, Ralph; Wendt, Joel; Dominguez, Jason; Pluym, Tammy; Stevens, Jeffery; Lu, Tzu-Ming; Muller, Richard; Carroll, Malcolm S

    2013-01-01

    We report Pauli blockade in a multielectron silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor double quantum dot with an integrated charge sensor. The current is rectified up to a blockade energy of 0.18 ± 0.03 meV. The blockade energy is analogous to singlet-triplet splitting in a two electron double quantum dot. Built-in imbalances of tunnel rates in the MOS DQD obfuscate some edges of the bias triangles. A method to extract the bias triangles is described, and a numeric rate-equation simulation is used to understand the effect of tunneling imbalances and finite temperature on charge stability (honeycomb) diagram, in particular the identification of missing and shifting edges. A bound on relaxation time of the triplet-like state is also obtained from this measurement. PMID:24199677

  13. Quantum theory of the complex dielectric constant of free carriers in polar semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, B.

    1982-09-01

    The optical constants and reflectivity of a semiconductor are known as functions of the real and imaginary parts of the complex dielectric constant. The imaginary part of the complex dielectric constant e/sub 2/ is proportional to the optical conductivity, which has recently been calculated from the quantum density matrix equation of motion. The expression obtained for e/sub 2/ reduces to the Drude result, as obtained from the quasi-classical Boltzmann transport equation, in the limit of low frequencies and elastic scattering mechanisms, and to the quantum result found using time dependent perturbation theory in the limit of high frequencies. This paper derives the real part of the complex dielectric constant e/sub 1/ for a III-V or II-VI semiconductor with the band structure of the Kane theory, using the quantum density matrix method. The relation of e/sub 1/ to the second order perturbation energy of the system is shown, and the reflectivity is a minimum when the second order perturbation energy vanishes. The quantum calculation for e/sub 1/ gives approximately the same result as the Drude theory, except near the fundamental absorption edge, and reduces to the Drude result at low frequencies. Using the complex dielectric constant, the real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index, the skin depth, and surface impedance, and the reflectivity are found. The plasma resonance is examined. The surface impedance and the skin depth are shown to reduce to the usual classical result in the limit that e/sub 1/ = 0 and w tau << 1, where w is the angular frequency of the applied field and tau is the electron scattering time.

  14. Efficient spin filter using multi-terminal quantum dot with spin-orbit interaction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We propose a multi-terminal spin filter using a quantum dot with spin-orbit interaction. First, we formulate the spin Hall effect (SHE) in a quantum dot connected to three leads. We show that the SHE is significantly enhanced by the resonant tunneling if the level spacing in the quantum dot is smaller than the level broadening. We stress that the SHE is tunable by changing the tunnel coupling to the third lead. Next, we perform a numerical simulation for a multi-terminal spin filter using a quantum dot fabricated on semiconductor heterostructures. The spin filter shows an efficiency of more than 50% when the conditions for the enhanced SHE are satisfied. PACS numbers: 72.25.Dc,71.70.Ej,73.63.Kv,85.75.-d PMID:21711500

  15. Semiconductor quantum dots affect fluidity of purple membrane from Halobacterium salinarum through disruption of bacteriorhodopsin trimer organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchonville, Nicolas; Molinari, Michael; Le Cigne, Anthony; Troyon, Michel; Sukhanova, Alyona; Nabiev, Igor R.

    2012-10-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is a unique protein of purple membranes (PMs) of the bacterium Halobacterium salinarum. Tight trimers of this integral photochromic protein form a highly ordered 2D hexagonal crystalline lattice within the PMs. Due to strong excitonic interactions between the bR chromophores (retinals) in the protein trimers, PMs exhibit a strong circular dichroism (CD) activity in the region of the retinal absorption band, which allows monitoring the regularity and stability of the bR trimer organization within the membrane. In this study, the effects of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) on the bR intramembrane organization and the time course of bR monomerization caused by detergents have been analyzed. The results show that the interaction with QDs does not influence the bR structural organization but considerably accelerates the monomerization of the protein by detergents. These data have been confirmed by the results of atomic force microscopy (AFM) followed by Fourier transform analysis, which have shown that interactions with QDs cause an eightfold acceleration of bR monomerization with Triton. The data show that interactions of nanoparticles with biological membranes may modulate the membrane fluidity and the structural organization and function of integral proteins embedded in these membranes.

  16. Theory and modeling of electrically tunable metamaterial devices using inter-subband transitions in semiconductor quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Gabbay, Alon; Brener, Igal

    2012-03-12

    In this paper, we propose a new and versatile mechanism for electrical tuning of planar metamaterials: strong coupling of metamaterial resonances to engineered intersubband transitions that can be tuned through the application of an electrical bias. We present the general formalism that allows calculating the permittivity tensor for intersubband transitions in generic semiconductor heterostructures and we study numerically the specific case of coupling and tuning metamaterials in the thermal infrared through coupling to biased GaAs semiconductor quantum wells. This tuning mechanism can be scaled from the visible to the far infrared by the proper choice of metamaterials and semiconductor heterostructures. PMID:22418541

  17. Synthesis and size-dependent properties of zinc-blende semiconductor quantum rods.

    PubMed

    Kan, Shihai; Mokari, Taleb; Rothenberg, Eli; Banin, Uri

    2003-03-01

    Dimensionality and size are two factors that govern the properties of semiconductor nanostructures. In nanocrystals, dimensionality is manifested by the control of shape, which presents a key challenge for synthesis. So far, the growth of rod-shaped nanocrystals using a surfactant-controlled growth mode, has been limited to semiconductors with wurtzite crystal structures, such as CdSe (ref. 3). Here, we report on a general method for the growth of soluble nanorods applied to semiconductors with the zinc-blende cubic lattice structure. InAs quantum rods with controlled lengths and diameters were synthesized using the solution-liquid-solid mechanism with gold nanocrystals as catalysts. This provides an unexpected link between two successful strategies for growing high-quality nanomaterials, the vapour-liquid-solid approach for growing nanowires, and the colloidal approach for synthesizing soluble nanocrystals. The rods exhibit both length- and shape-dependent optical properties, manifested in a red-shift of the bandgap with increased length, and in the observation of polarized emission covering the near-infrared spectral range relevant for telecommunications devices. PMID:12612671

  18. Synthesis and size-dependent properties of zinc-blende semiconductor quantum rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Shihai; Mokari, Taleb; Rothenberg, Eli; Banin, Uri

    2003-03-01

    Dimensionality and size are two factors that govern the properties of semiconductor nanostructures. In nanocrystals, dimensionality is manifested by the control of shape, which presents a key challenge for synthesis. So far, the growth of rod-shaped nanocrystals using a surfactant-controlled growth mode, has been limited to semiconductors with wurtzite crystal structures, such as CdSe (ref. 3). Here, we report on a general method for the growth of soluble nanorods applied to semiconductors with the zinc-blende cubic lattice structure. InAs quantum rods with controlled lengths and diameters were synthesized using the solution-liquid-solid mechanism with gold nanocrystals as catalysts. This provides an unexpected link between two successful strategies for growing high-quality nanomaterials, the vapour-liquid-solid approach for growing nanowires, and the colloidal approach for synthesizing soluble nanocrystals. The rods exhibit both length- and shape-dependent optical properties, manifested in a red-shift of the bandgap with increased length, and in the observation of polarized emission covering the near-infrared spectral range relevant for telecommunications devices.

  19. Numerical simulation of nonlinear mode interactions in ridge-waveguide semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalagara, Hemashilpa; Eliseev, Petr G.; Osinski, Marek

    2012-02-01

    Nonlinear perturbation of effective group index is calculated numerically in semiconductor ridge waveguide laser structures under an influence of a strong driving wave (mode). Model of nonlinear interaction of waves is used to obtain conditions for appearance of anomalous dispersion of modal index and also for inversion of the group index of guided waves (modes of the ridge-waveguide laser structures). Ranges around critically anomalous dispersion (CAD) points, where the effective group index passes zero value, are calculated numerically. CAD points form closed loops in graphs of detuning vs. driving wave intensity. These loops define ranges where superluminal propagation, as well as slowed reflection of probe wave can be obtained. Numerical simulations are performed for an InGaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs double quantum well (DQW) laser structure and also for a GaAs/AlGaAs separate confinement heterostructure. The threshold intensities for the appearance of CAD points, as well as the influence of relaxation rate and optical confinement on the appearance of superluminal regime are compared for the DQW and SCH structures.

  20. Decoupling the effects of confinement and passivation on semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Roya; Hall, Colin; Murphy, Peter J; Reece, Peter J; Charrault, Eric; Evans, Drew

    2016-07-20

    Semiconductor (SC) quantum dots (QDs) have recently been fabricated by both chemical and plasma techniques for specific absorption and emission of light. Their optical properties are governed by the size of the QD and the chemistry of any passivation at their surface. Here, we decouple the effects of confinement and passivation by utilising DC magnetron sputtering to fabricate SC QDs in a perfluorinated polyether oil. Very high band gaps are observed for fluorinated QDs with increasing levels of quantum confinement (from 4.2 to 4.6 eV for Si, and 2.5 to 3 eV for Ge), with a shift down to 3.4 eV for Si when oxygen is introduced to the passivation layer. In contrast, the fluorinated Si QDs display a constant UV photoluminescence (3.8 eV) irrespective of size. This ability to tune the size and passivation independently opens a new opportunity to extending the use of simple semiconductor QDs. PMID:27385513

  1. Energy-transfer pumping of semiconductor nanocrystals using an epitaxial quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achermann, Marc; Petruska, Melissa A.; Kos, Simon; Smith, Darryl L.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2004-06-01

    As a result of quantum-confinement effects, the emission colour of semiconductor nanocrystals can be modified dramatically by simply changing their size. Such spectral tunability, together with large photoluminescence quantum yields and high photostability, make nanocrystals attractive for use in a variety of light-emitting technologies-for example, displays, fluorescence tagging, solid-state lighting and lasers. An important limitation for such applications, however, is the difficulty of achieving electrical pumping, largely due to the presence of an insulating organic capping layer on the nanocrystals. Here, we describe an approach for indirect injection of electron-hole pairs (the electron-hole radiative recombination gives rise to light emission) into nanocrystals by non-contact, non-radiative energy transfer from a proximal quantum well that can in principle be pumped either electrically or optically. Our theoretical and experimental results indicate that this transfer is fast enough to compete with electron-hole recombination in the quantum well, and results in greater than 50 per cent energy-transfer efficiencies in the tested structures. Furthermore, the measured energy-transfer rates are sufficiently large to provide pumping in the stimulated emission regime, indicating the feasibility of nanocrystal-based optical amplifiers and lasers based on this approach.

  2. Spin-orbit interaction in multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Ya-Fei

    2015-01-07

    In this paper, we investigate how the structure of multiple quantum wells affects spin-orbit interactions. To increase the interface-related Rashba spin splitting and the strength of the interface-related Rashba spin-orbit interaction, we designed three kinds of multiple quantum wells. We demonstrate that the structure of the multiple quantum wells strongly affected the interface-related Rashba spin-orbit interaction, increasing the interface-related Rashba spin splitting to up to 26% larger in multiple quantum wells than in a stepped quantum well. We also show that the cubic Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction similarly influenced the spin relaxation time of multiple quantum wells and that of a stepped quantum well. The increase in the interface-related Rashba spin splitting originates from the relationship between interface-related Rashba spin splitting and electron probability density. Our results suggest that multiple quantum wells can be good candidates for spintronic devices.

  3. Pump-probe quantum state tomography in a semiconductor optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Grosse, N B; Owschimikow, N; Aust, R; Lingnau, B; Koltchanov, A; Kolarczik, M; Lüdge, K; Woggon, U

    2014-12-29

    Pump-probe quantum state tomography was applied to the transmission of a coherent state through an In(Ga)As based quantum dot optical amplifier during the interaction with an optical pump pulse. The Wigner function and the statistical moments of the field were extracted and used to determine the degree of population inversion and the signal-to-noise ratio in a sub-picosecond time window. PMID:25607214

  4. Nano-photonics in III-V semiconductors for integrated quantum optical circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasley, Nicholas Andrew

    This thesis describes the optical spectroscopic measurements of III-V semiconductors used to investigate a number of issues related to the development of integrated quantum optical circuits. The disorder-limited propagation of photons in photonic crystal waveguides in the slow-light regime is investigated. The analysis of Fabry-Perot resonances is used to map the mode dispersion and extract the photon localisation length. Andersonlocalised modes are observed at high group indices, when the localisation lengths are shorter than the waveguide lengths, consistent with the Fabry-Perot analysis. A spin-photon interface based on two orthogonal waveguides is introduced, where the polarisation emitted by a quantum dot is mapped to a path-encoded photon. Operation is demonstrated by deducing the spin using the interference of in-plane photons. A second device directly maps right and left circular polarisations to anti-parallel waveguides, surprising for a non-chiral structure but consistent with an off-centre dot. Two dimensional photonic crystal cavities in GaInP and full control over the spontaneous emission rate of InP quantum dots is demonstrated by spectrally tuning the exciton emission energy into resonance with the fundamental cavity mode. Fourier transform spectroscopy is used to investigate the short coherence times of InP quantum dots in GaInP photonic crystal cavities. Additional technological developments are also presented including a quantum dot registration technique, electrical tuning of quantum dot emission and uniaxial strain tuning of H1 cavity modes.

  5. Organic analogues of diluted magnetic semiconductors: bridging quantum chemistry to condensed matter physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furis, Madalina; Rawat, Naveen; Cherian, Judy G.; Wetherby, Anthony; Waterman, Rory; McGill, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    The selective coupling between polarized photons and electronic states in materials enables polarization-resolved spectroscopy studies of exchange interactions, spin dynamics, and collective magnetic behavior of conduction electrons in semiconductors. Here we report on Magnetic Circular Dichroism (MCD) studies of magnetic properties of electrons in crystalline thin films of small molecule organic semiconductors. Specifically, the focus was on the magnetic exchange interaction properties of d-shell ions (Cu2+, Co2+ and Mn2+) metal phthalocyanine (Pc) thin films that one may think of as organic analogues of diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS). These films were deposited in-house using a recently developed pen-writing method that results in crystalline films with macroscopic long range ordering and improved electronic properties, ideally suited for spectroscopy techniques. Our experiments reveal that, in analogy to DMS, the extended π-orbitals of the Pc molecule mediate the spin exchange between highly localized d-like unpaired spins. We established that exchange mechanisms involve different electronic states in each species and/or hybridization between d-like orbitals and certain delocalized π-orbitals. Unprecedented 25T MCD and PL conducted in the unique 25T Split Florida HELIX magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) will prove useful in probing these exchange interactions.

  6. Optical Study of Exciton Localization Phenomena in Semimagnetic Semiconductors and Their Multiple Quantum Wells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi-Cheng

    1986-12-01

    The results of picosecond photomodulation and photoluminescence spectroscopies in novel II-VI semimagnetic semiconductors Cd(,1-x)Mn(,x)Te (x < 0.50) bulk and multiple quantum well (MQW) samples are presented. By studying excitonic emission near the bandgap of semiconductors, it is found that excitons can be confined or localized by alloy potential fluctuations, quantum well confinements, local strain of heterointerfaces and energy self-trapping. Steady-state photoluminescence in undoped CdTe/Cd(,1 -x)Mn(,x)Te MQW samples at low temperature shows intense excitonic emission where their radiative quantum efficiencies are two or three orders of magnitude larger than that of the high quality CdTe bulk samples. Time-resolved photoluminescence shows that the excitons have relatively short lifetime (500 picosecond). High quantum efficiency and short exciton lifetime suggest that the radiative recombination is a dominating factor in the excitonic-decay processes in the MQW samples. In general, excitonic emission energies in CdMnTe MQW samples are lower than the free exciton energies (typically 20-40 meV lower as noted from the reflectance spectra). The behavior of these emissions under an external magnetic field (up to 36 tesla) shows that excitons prefer to be localized at the heterointerfaces rather than at the center of the wells in MQW samples. The kinetics of the free and the heterointerface localized excitons in the Cd(,1-x)Mn(,x)Te/Cd(,1-y)Mn(,y)Te MQW samples have been studied by using a transient photoluminescence technique. Exciton lifetimes have been measured in several samples with various quantum well widths. The trapping time of the free exciton localized at the interface has been observed in the wide quantum well samples. The average energy loss rate of localized excitons has been calculated. The resonance excitation spectra of steady-state and transient luminescence show that the exciton spectra are spatially inhomogeneously broadened. An external magnetic

  7. Decay and Dissociation of Excitons in Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum Dots in the Presence of Small Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Kathryn Eileen

    This dissertation describes interactions between colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and small organic molecules that affect the electronic structure of the surfaces of the QDs and influence the decay and dissociation pathways available to excitonic charge carriers (electrons and holes) in the QDs. Pathways by which electrons and holes in QDs leave conduction and valence band-edge states, respectively, include charge trapping to a state localized in the QD core or on the surface, charge transfer to a redox partner, and radiative recombination. Analysis of transient absorption and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopies enabled the construction of a time-resolved, charge carrier-resolved map of decay from the first excitonic state of colloidal CdSe QDs. This map reveals three different populations of CdSe QDs that differ in the timescales of available hole and electron-trapping processes. The mechanism by which a p-substituted aniline quenches the PL of CdSe QDs upon displacing native hexadecylamine ligands depends on the electronic nature of its para substituent. Anilines with electron withdrawing substituents quench PL through incomplete passivation of Cd2+ surface sites, and anilines with electron donating substituents quench PL through photoinduced hole transfer. Transient absorption measurements on both the picosecond and microsecond timescales reveal that a series of alkyl-substituted p-benzoquinone (s-BQ) molecules participate in both static and collisional photoinduced electron transfer (PET) with PbS QDs. The efficiencies of both static and collisional PET are limited by the presence of the oleate ligand shell, and depend on the size and shape of the (s-BQ) molecule. A model for the dependence of the collisional quenching efficiency on the volume of the s-BQ molecule produces a parameter that provides a quantitative measure of the permeability of the organic ligand shell of the QDs. Thermodynamically spontaneous electron transfer occurs

  8. Quantum interactions between nonperturbative vacuum fields

    SciTech Connect

    Millo, R.; Faccioli, P.; Scorzato, L.

    2010-04-01

    We develop an approach to investigate the nonperturbative dynamics of quantum field theories, in which specific vacuum field fluctuations are treated as the low-energy dynamical degrees of freedom, while all other vacuum field configurations are explicitly integrated out from the path integral. We show how to compute the effective interaction between the vacuum field degrees of freedom both perturbatively (using stochastic perturbation theory) and fully nonperturbatively (using lattice field theory simulations). The present approach holds to all orders in the couplings and does not rely on the semiclassical approximation.

  9. Quantum states of charge carriers and longitudinal conductivity in double periodic n-type semiconductor lattice structures in electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Perov, A. A. Penyagin, I. V.

    2015-07-15

    Quantum states of charge carriers in double periodic semiconductor superlattices of n-type quantum dots with Rashba spin–orbit coupling in an electron gas have been calculated in the one-electron approximation in the presence of mutually perpendicular electric and magnetic fields. For these structures in weak constant electric field, the solution to the quasi-classical kinetic Boltzmann equation shows that the states of carriers in magnetic Landau minibands with negative differential conductivity are possible.

  10. III-V semiconductor Quantum Well systems: Physics of Gallium Arsenide two-dimensional hole systems and engineering of mid-infrared Quantum Cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, YenTing

    This dissertation examines two types of III-V semiconductor quantum well systems: two-dimensional holes in GaAs, and mid-infrared Quantum Cascade lasers. GaAs holes have a much reduced hyperfine interaction with the nuclei due to the p-like orbital, resulting in a longer hole spin coherence time comparing to the electron spin coherence time. Therefore, holes' spins are promising candidates for quantum computing qubits, but the effective mass and the Lande g-factor, whose product determines the spin-susceptibility of holes, are not well known. In this thesis, we measure the effective hole mass through analyzing the temperature dependence of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in a relatively strong interacting two-dimensional hole systems confined to a 20 nm-wide, (311)A GaAs quantum well. The holes in this system occupy two nearly-degenerate spin subbands whose effective mass we measure to be ˜ 0.2 me. We then apply a sufficiently strong parallel magnetic field to fully depopulate one of the spin subbands, and the spin susceptibility of the two-dimensional hole system is deduced from the depopulation field. We also confine holes in closely spaced bilayer GaAs quantum wells to study the interlayer tunneling spectrum as a function of interlayer bias and in-plane magnetic field, in hope of probing the hole's Fermi contour. Quantum Cascade lasers are one of the major mid-infrared light sources well suited for applications in health and environmental sensing. One of the important factors that affect Quantum Cascade laser performance is the quality of the interfaces between the epitaxial layers. What has long been neglected is that interface roughness causes intersubband scattering, and thus affecting the relation between the lifetimes of the upper and lower laser states, which determines if population inversion is possible. We first utilize strategically added interface roughness in the laser design to engineer the intersubband scattering lifetimes. We further

  11. Quantum dynamics of interacting spins mediated by phonons and photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senko, Crystal

    2015-03-01

    Techniques that enable robust, controllable interactions among quantum particles are now being actively explored. They constitute a key ingredient for quantum information processing and quantum simulations. We describe two atom-based platforms to experimentally realize and study quantum dynamics with controllable, long-range spin-spin interactions. Using trapped atomic ions, we implemented tunable spin-spin interactions mediated by optical dipole forces, which represent a new approach to study quantum magnetism. This platform has enabled sophisticated manipulations of more than 10 spins, and realization of quantum simulations of integer-spin chains. In a separate set of experiments we realized a hybrid system in which single photons, confined to sub-wavelength dimensions with a photonic crystal cavity, are coupled to single trapped neutral atoms. Extending this architecture to multiple atoms enables photon-induced quantum gates, and tunable spin-spin interactions, between distant atoms.

  12. Charge Carrier Dynamics of Quantum Confined Semiconductor Nanoparticles Analyzed via Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibert, Arthur Joseph, III

    Semiconductor nanoparticles are tiny crystalline structures (typically range from 1 - 100 nm) whose shape in many cases can be dictated through tailored chemical synthesis with atomic scale precision. The small size of these nanoparticles often results in quantum confinement (spatial confinement of wave functions), which imparts the ability to manipulate band-gap energies thus allowing them to be optimally engineered for different applications (i.e., photovoltaics, photocatalysis, imaging). However, charge carriers excited within these nanoparticles are often involved in many different processes: trapping, trap migration, Auger recombination, non-radiative relaxation, radiative relaxation, oxidation / reduction, or multiple exciton generation. Broadband ultrafast transient absorption laser spectroscopy is used to spectrally resolve the fate of excited charge carriers in both wavelength and time, providing insight as to what synthetic developments or operating conditions will be necessary to optimize their efficiency for certain applications. This thesis outlines the effort of resolving the dynamics of excited charge carriers for several Cd and Si based nanoparticle systems using this experimental technique. The thesis is organized into five chapters and two appendices as indicated below. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the photophysics of semiconductor nanoparticles. It begins by defining what nanoparticles, semiconductors, charge carriers, and quantum confinement are. From there it details how the study of charge carrier dynamics within nanoparticles can lead to increased efficiency in applications such as photocatalysis. Finally, the experimental methodology associated with ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy is introduced and its power in mapping charge carrier dynamics is established. Chapter 2 (JPCC, 19647, 2011) introduces the first of the studied samples: water-solubilized 2D CdSe nanoribbons (NRs), which were synthesized in the Osterloh

  13. Quantifying the cellular uptake of semiconductor quantum dot nanoparticles by analytical electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hondow, Nicole; Brown, M Rowan; Starborg, Tobias; Monteith, Alexander G; Brydson, Rik; Summers, Huw D; Rees, Paul; Brown, Andy

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor quantum dot nanoparticles are in demand as optical biomarkers yet the cellular uptake process is not fully understood; quantification of numbers and the fate of internalized particles are still to be achieved. We have focussed on the characterization of cellular uptake of quantum dots using a combination of analytical electron microscopies because of the spatial resolution available to examine uptake at the nanoparticle level, using both imaging to locate particles and spectroscopy to confirm identity. In this study, commercially available quantum dots, CdSe/ZnS core/shell particles coated in peptides to target cellular uptake by endocytosis, have been investigated in terms of the agglomeration state in typical cell culture media, the traverse of particle agglomerates across U-2 OS cell membranes during endocytosis, the merging of endosomal vesicles during incubation of cells and in the correlation of imaging flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy to measure the final nanoparticle dose internalized by the U-2 OS cells. We show that a combination of analytical transmission electron microscopy and serial block face scanning electron microscopy can provide a comprehensive description of the internalization of an initial exposure dose of nanoparticles by an endocytically active cell population and how the internalized, membrane bound nanoparticle load is processed by the cells. We present a stochastic model of an endosome merging process and show that this provides a data-driven modelling framework for the prediction of cellular uptake of engineered nanoparticles in general. PMID:25762522

  14. A gate defined quantum dot on the two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide semiconductor WSe2.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiang-Xiang; Liu, Di; Mosallanejad, Vahid; You, Jie; Han, Tian-Yi; Chen, Dian-Teng; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2015-10-28

    Two-dimensional layered materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), are promising materials for future electronics owing to their unique electronic properties. With the presence of a band gap, atomically thin gate defined quantum dots (QDs) can be achieved on TMDCs. Herein, standard semiconductor fabrication techniques are used to demonstrate quantum confined structures on WSe2 with tunnel barriers defined by electric fields, therefore eliminating the edge states induced by etching steps, which commonly appear in gapless graphene QDs. Over 40 consecutive Coulomb diamonds with a charging energy of approximately 2 meV were observed, showing the formation of a QD, which is consistent with the simulations. The size of the QD could be tuned over a factor of 2 by changing the voltages applied to the top gates. These results shed light on a way to obtain smaller quantum dots on TMDCs with the same top gate geometry compared to traditional GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures with further research. PMID:26412019

  15. Time-independent quantum circuits with local interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifnashri, Sahand; Kianvash, Farzad; Nobakht, Jahangir; Karimipour, Vahid

    2016-06-01

    Heisenberg spin chains can act as quantum wires transferring quantum states either perfectly or with high fidelity. Gaussian packets of excitations passing through dual rails can encode the two states of a logical qubit, depending on which rail is empty and which rail is carrying the packet. With extra interactions in one or between different chains, one can introduce interaction zones in arrays of such chains, where specific one- or two-qubit gates act on any qubit which passes through these interaction zones. Therefore, universal quantum computation is made possible in a static way where no external control is needed. This scheme will then pave the way for a scalable way of quantum computation where specific hardware can be connected to make large quantum circuits. Our scheme is an improvement of a recent scheme where we borrowed an idea from quantum electrodynamics to replace nonlocal interactions between spin chains with local interactions mediated by an ancillary chain.

  16. Excited state interactions in graphene oxide-semiconductor/metal nanoparticle architectures for sensing and energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightcap, Ian V.

    The recent emergence of graphene, along with its unique and impressive set of properties, has resulted in a concerted effort to incorporate the material into electronic devices and composite materials. Graphene oxide, a chemically modified form of graphene which can be produced economically and in large scale, is one of the most common starting materials for making graphene composite materials with improved conductivity, photovoltaic performance, and photocatalytic activity, to name a few examples. This dissertation describes progress made in understanding and quantifying the electronic properties of graphene oxide as they relate to electron storage and shuttling in composite materials. A more complete understanding of the nature of electronic interactions in graphene composites was achieved through two processes: 1) A dual electron-titration showing storage and shuttling of electrons in reduced graphene oxide. 2) A method developed to isolate the energy and electron transfer pathways involved in the deactivation of excited CdSe quantum dots by RGO. The results obtained from these two processes provide insight into the electronic interactions between graphene, semiconductors, and metals. Additionally, composite films were constructed to demonstrate the electron transfer properties of reduced graphene oxide. TiO2-reduced graphene oxide films were made via a simple drop-cast technique. The films show enhanced photovoltaic and photocatalytic characteristics when compared to TiO2-only films. A stacked architecture incorporating single-layer reduced graphene oxide on thin TiO2 nanoparticle films was developed as a method for illumination-controlled deposition of metal nanoparticles. Films of metal nanoparticles made using this technique were employed as Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman (SERRS) sensors and show nano-molar sensitivity. Finally, quantum dot-reduced graphene oxide composites were made via an electrophoretic deposition process. The resulting films were used

  17. Modified transverse phonon-helicon interaction in colloids laden semiconductor plasmas due to Bohm potential and Fermi degenerate pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Aartee Yadav, N.; Ghosh, S.

    2015-07-31

    A detailed study of the quantum modification of acousto-helicon wave spectra due to Bohm potential and Fermi degenerate pressure in colloids laden semiconductor plasma has been presented. We have used quantum hydrodynamic model of plasmas to arrive at most general dispersion relation in presence of magnetic field. This dispersion relation has been analyzed in three different velocity regimes and the expressions for gain constants have been obtained. From the present study it has been concluded that the quantum effect and the magnetic field significantly modify the wave characteristics particularly in high doping regime in semiconductor plasma medium in presence of colloids in it.

  18. High Resolution Coherent Population Trapping on a Single Hole Spin in a Semiconductor Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houel, Julien; Prechtel, Jonathan H.; Kuhlmann, Andreas V.; Brunner, Daniel; Kuklewicz, Christopher E.; Gerardot, Brian D.; Stoltz, Nick G.; Petroff, Pierre M.; Warburton, Richard J.

    2014-03-01

    We report high resolution coherent population trapping on a single hole spin in a semiconductor quantum dot. The absorption dip signifying the formation of a dark state exhibits an atomic physicslike dip width of just 10 MHz. We observe fluctuations in the absolute frequency of the absorption dip, evidence of very slow spin dephasing. We identify the cause of this process as charge noise by, first, demonstrating that the hole spin g factor in this configuration (in-plane magnetic field) is strongly dependent on the vertical electric field, and second, by characterizing the charge noise through its effects on the optical transition frequency. An important conclusion is that charge noise is an important hole spin dephasing process.

  19. High speed all-optical encryption and decryption using quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenbo; Hu, Hongyu; Dutta, Niloy K.

    2013-11-01

    A scheme to realize high speed all-optical encryption and decryption using key-stream generators and an XOR gate based on quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers (QD-SOAs) was studied. The key used for encryption and decryption is a high speed all-optical pseudorandom bit sequence (PRBS) which is generated by a linear feedback shift register (LFSR) composed of QD-SOA-based logic XOR and AND gates. Two other kinds of more secure key-stream generators, i.e. cascaded design and parallel design, were also designed and investigated. Nonlinear dynamics including carrier heating and spectral hole-burning in the QD-SOA are taken into account together with the rate equations in order to realize all-optical logic operations. Results show that this scheme can realize all-optical encryption and decryption by using key-stream generators at high speed (~250 Gb/s).

  20. Suppressing the Fluorescence Blinking of Single Quantum Dots Encased in N-type Semiconductor Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Zhang, Guofeng; Wang, Zao; Li, Zhijie; Chen, Ruiyun; Qin, Chengbing; Gao, Yan; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2016-01-01

    N-type semiconductor indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles are used to effectively suppress the fluorescence blinking of single near-infrared-emitting CdSeTe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs), where the ITO could block the electron transfer from excited QDs to trap states and facilitate more rapid regeneration of neutral QDs by back electron transfer. The average blinking rate of QDs is significantly reduced by more than an order of magnitude and the largest proportion of on-state is 98%, while the lifetime is not considerably reduced. Furthermore, an external electron transfer model is proposed to analyze the possible effect of radiative, nonradiative, and electron transfer pathways on fluorescence blinking. Theoretical analysis based on the model combined with measured results gives a quantitative insight into the blinking mechanism. PMID:27605471

  1. Strongly modified four-wave mixing in a coupled semiconductor quantum dot-metal nanoparticle system

    SciTech Connect

    Paspalakis, Emmanuel; Evangelou, Sofia; Kosionis, Spyridon G.; Terzis, Andreas F.

    2014-02-28

    We study the four-wave mixing effect in a coupled semiconductor quantum dot-spherical metal nanoparticle structure. Depending on the values of the pump field intensity and frequency, we find that there is a critical distance that changes the form of the spectrum. Above this distance, the four-wave mixing spectrum shows an ordinary three-peaked form and the effect of controlling its magnitude by changing the interparticle distance can be obtained. Below this critical distance, the four-wave mixing spectrum becomes single-peaked; and as the interparticle distance decreases, the spectrum is strongly suppressed. The behavior of the system is explained using the effective Rabi frequency that creates plasmonic metaresonances in the hybrid structure. In addition, the behavior of the effective Rabi frequency is explained via an analytical solution of the density matrix equations.

  2. Suppressing the Fluorescence Blinking of Single Quantum Dots Encased in N-type Semiconductor Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Zhang, Guofeng; Wang, Zao; Li, Zhijie; Chen, Ruiyun; Qin, Chengbing; Gao, Yan; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2016-01-01

    N-type semiconductor indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles are used to effectively suppress the fluorescence blinking of single near-infrared-emitting CdSeTe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs), where the ITO could block the electron transfer from excited QDs to trap states and facilitate more rapid regeneration of neutral QDs by back electron transfer. The average blinking rate of QDs is significantly reduced by more than an order of magnitude and the largest proportion of on-state is 98%, while the lifetime is not considerably reduced. Furthermore, an external electron transfer model is proposed to analyze the possible effect of radiative, nonradiative, and electron transfer pathways on fluorescence blinking. Theoretical analysis based on the model combined with measured results gives a quantitative insight into the blinking mechanism. PMID:27605471

  3. Many-body Effects in a Laterally Inhomogeneous Semiconductor Quantum Well

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng; Li, Jian-Zhong; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Many body effects on conduction and diffusion of electrons and holes in a semiconductor quantum well are studied using a microscopic theory. The roles played by the screened Hartree-Fock (SHE) terms and the scattering terms are examined. It is found that the electron and hole conductivities depend only on the scattering terms, while the two-component electron-hole diffusion coefficients depend on both the SHE part and the scattering part. We show that, in the limit of the ambipolax diffusion approximation, however, the diffusion coefficients for carrier density and temperature are independent of electron-hole scattering. In particular, we found that the SHE terms lead to a reduction of density-diffusion coefficients and an increase in temperature-diffusion coefficients. Such a reduction or increase is explained in terms of a density-and temperature dependent energy landscape created by the bandgap renormalization.

  4. Quasiparticle parity lifetime of bound states in a hybrid superconductor-semiconductor quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Albrecht, Sven; Kirsanskas, Gediminas; Chang, Willy; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Krogstrup, Peter; Jespersen, Thomas; Nygård, Jesper; Flensberg, Karsten; Marcus, Charles

    2015-03-01

    We measure quasiparticle transport in an InAs nanowire that is half-covered with epitaxial superconducting aluminum, then locally gated to form a quantum dot. We observe negative differential conductance at finite source-drain bias, and temperature dependent even-odd alternations in the Coulomb blockade peak spacings at zero bias. These observations can be understood in terms of a mid-gap semiconductor discrete state and a continuum of BCS quasiparticle states. Comparing with simple models, we bound the discrete state's parity lifetime and the quasiparticle temperature. These results indicate that parity fluctuations are slow, and imply Majorana qubit poisoning times on the order of a millisecond. Additional results indicate that the bound states move to zero energy in a magnetic field, qualitatively consistent with expectations for Majorana fermions in a finite system. Research supported by Microsoft Station Q, Danish National Research Foundation, Villum Foundation, Lundbeck Foundation, and the European Commission.

  5. Optical Properties of Planar Nanostructures Based on Semiconductor Quantum Dots and Plasmonic Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakanov, A. G.; Toropov, N. A.; Vartanyan, T. A.

    2016-03-01

    The optical properties of a composite material consisting of a thin polymer film, which is activated by semiconductor CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) and silver nanoparticles, on a transparent dielectric substrate have been investigated. It is revealed that the presence of silver nanoparticles leads to an increase in the QD absorption (by a factor of 4) and in the fluorescence intensity (by a factor of 10), whereas the fluorescence time drops by a factor of about 10. Excitation of the composite medium by a pulsed laser is found to result in narrowing of the fluorescence band and a sublinear dependence of its intensity on the pulse energy. In the absence of silver nanoparticles, the fluorescence spectrum of QDs is independent of the excitation-pulse energy density, and the fluorescence intensity depends linearly on the pulse energy in the entire range of energy densities, up to 75 mJ/cm2.

  6. Electron Raman scattering in semiconductor quantum well wire of cylindrical ring geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re., Betancourt-Riera; Ri., Betancourt-Riera; M. Nieto Jalil, J.; Riera, R.

    2015-11-01

    We study the electron states and the differential cross section for an electron Raman scattering process in a semiconductor quantum well wire of cylindrical ring geometry. The electron Raman scattering developed here can be used to provide direct information about the electron band structures of these confinement systems. We assume that the system grows in a GaAs/Al0.35Ga0.65As matrix. The system is modeled by considering T = 0 K and also a single parabolic conduction band, which is split into a sub-band system due to the confinement. The emission spectra are discussed for different scattering configurations, and the selection rules for the processes are also studied. Singularities in the spectra are found and interpreted.

  7. Electrical Control of near-Field Energy Transfer between Quantum Dots and Two-Dimensional Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Klots, Andrey R; Newaz, A K M; Niezgoda, J Scott; Orfield, Noah J; Escobar, Carlos A; Wynn, Alex; Efimov, Anatoly; Jennings, G Kane; Rosenthal, Sandra J; Bolotin, Kirill I

    2015-07-01

    We investigate near-field energy transfer between chemically synthesized quantum dots (QDs) and two-dimensional semiconductors. We fabricate devices in which electrostatically gated semiconducting monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is placed atop a homogeneous self-assembled layer of core-shell CdSSe QDs. We demonstrate efficient nonradiative Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) from QDs into MoS2 and prove that modest gate-induced variation in the excitonic absorption of MoS2 leads to large (∼500%) changes in the FRET rate. This in turn allows for up to ∼75% electrical modulation of QD photoluminescence intensity. The hybrid QD/MoS2 devices operate within a small voltage range, allow for continuous modification of the QD photoluminescence intensity, and can be used for selective tuning of QDs emitting in the visible-IR range. PMID:26027714

  8. Microwave-driven coherent operation of a semiconductor quantum dot charge qubit

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Dohun; Ward, D. R.; Simmons, C. B.; Gamble, John King; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Nielsen, Erik; Savage, D. E.; Lagally, M. G.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; et al

    2015-02-16

    An intuitive realization of a qubit is an electron charge at two well-defined positions of a double quantum dot. The qubit is simple and has the potential for high-speed operation because of its strong coupling to electric fields. But, charge noise also couples strongly to this qubit, resulting in rapid dephasing at all but one special operating point called the ‘sweet spot’. In previous studies d.c. voltage pulses have been used to manipulate semiconductor charge qubits but did not achieve high-fidelity control, because d.c. gating requires excursions away from the sweet spot. Here, by using resonant a.c. microwave driving wemore » achieve fast (greater than gigahertz) and universal single qubit rotations of a semiconductor charge qubit. The Z-axis rotations of the qubit are well protected at the sweet spot, and we demonstrate the same protection for rotations about arbitrary axes in the X–Y plane of the qubit Bloch sphere. We characterize the qubit operation using two tomographic approaches: standard process tomography and gate set tomography. Moreover, both methods consistently yield process fidelities greater than 86% with respect to a universal set of unitary single-qubit operations.« less

  9. Microwave-driven coherent operation of a semiconductor quantum dot charge qubit

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dohun; Ward, D. R.; Simmons, C. B.; Gamble, John King; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Nielsen, Erik; Savage, D. E.; Lagally, M. G.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.

    2015-02-16

    An intuitive realization of a qubit is an electron charge at two well-defined positions of a double quantum dot. The qubit is simple and has the potential for high-speed operation because of its strong coupling to electric fields. But, charge noise also couples strongly to this qubit, resulting in rapid dephasing at all but one special operating point called the ‘sweet spot’. In previous studies d.c. voltage pulses have been used to manipulate semiconductor charge qubits but did not achieve high-fidelity control, because d.c. gating requires excursions away from the sweet spot. Here, by using resonant a.c. microwave driving we achieve fast (greater than gigahertz) and universal single qubit rotations of a semiconductor charge qubit. The Z-axis rotations of the qubit are well protected at the sweet spot, and we demonstrate the same protection for rotations about arbitrary axes in the X–Y plane of the qubit Bloch sphere. We characterize the qubit operation using two tomographic approaches: standard process tomography and gate set tomography. Moreover, both methods consistently yield process fidelities greater than 86% with respect to a universal set of unitary single-qubit operations.

  10. Exciton Absorption in Semiconductor Quantum Wells Driven by a Strong Intersubband Pump Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ansheng; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    1999-01-01

    Optical interband excitonic absorption of semiconductor quantum wells (QW's) driven by a coherent pump field is investigated based on semiconductor Bloch equations. The pump field has a photon energy close to the intersubband spacing between the first two conduction subbands in the QW's. An external weak optical field probes the interband transition. The excitonic effects and pump-induced population redistribution within the conduction subbands in the QW system are included. When the density of the electron-hole pairs in the QW structure is low, the pump field induces an Autler-Townes splitting of the exciton absorption spectrum. The split size and the peak positions of the absorption doublet depend not only on the pump frequency and intensity but also on the carrier density. As the density of the electron-hole pairs is increased, the split contrast (the ratio between the maximum and minimum values) is decreased because the exciton effect is suppressed at higher densities due to the many-body screening.

  11. Microwave-driven coherent operation of a semiconductor quantum dot charge qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dohun; Ward, D. R.; Simmons, C. B.; Gamble, John King; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Nielsen, Erik; Savage, D. E.; Lagally, M. G.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    An intuitive realization of a qubit is an electron charge at two well-defined positions of a double quantum dot. This qubit is simple and has the potential for high-speed operation because of its strong coupling to electric fields. However, charge noise also couples strongly to this qubit, resulting in rapid dephasing at all but one special operating point called the ‘sweet spot’. In previous studies d.c. voltage pulses have been used to manipulate semiconductor charge qubits but did not achieve high-fidelity control, because d.c. gating requires excursions away from the sweet spot. Here, by using resonant a.c. microwave driving we achieve fast (greater than gigahertz) and universal single qubit rotations of a semiconductor charge qubit. The Z-axis rotations of the qubit are well protected at the sweet spot, and we demonstrate the same protection for rotations about arbitrary axes in the X-Y plane of the qubit Bloch sphere. We characterize the qubit operation using two tomographic approaches: standard process tomography and gate set tomography. Both methods consistently yield process fidelities greater than 86% with respect to a universal set of unitary single-qubit operations.

  12. Photoelectrochemical Conversion from Graphitic C3N4 Quantum Dot Decorated Semiconductor Nanowires.

    PubMed

    An, Tiance; Tang, Jing; Zhang, Yueyu; Quan, Yingzhou; Gong, Xingao; Al-Enizi, Abdullah M; Elzatahry, Ahmed A; Zhang, Lijuan; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2016-05-25

    Despite the recent progress of developing graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) as a metal-free photocatalyst, the synthesis of nanostructured g-C3N4 has still remained a complicated and time-consuming approach from its bulk powder, which substantially limits its photoelectrochemical (PEC) applications as well as the potential to form composites with other semiconductors. Different from the labor-intensive methods used before, such as exfoliation or assistant templates, herein, we developed a facile method to synthesize graphitic C3N4 quantum dots (g-CNQDs) directly grown on TiO2 nanowire arrays via a one-step quasi-chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process in a homemade system. The as-synthesized g-CNQDs uniformly covered over the surface of TiO2 nanowires and exhibited attractive photoluminescence (PL) properties. In addition, compared to pristine TiO2, the heterojunction of g-CNQD-decorated TiO2 nanowires showed a substantially enhanced PEC photocurrent density of 3.40 mA/cm(2) at 0 V of applied potential vs Ag/AgCl under simulated solar light (300 mW/cm(2)) and excellent stability with ∼82% of the photocurrent retained after over 10 h of continuous testing, attributed to the quantum and sensitization effects of g-CNQDs. Density functional theory calculations were further carried out to illustrate the synergistic effect of TiO2 and g-CNQD. Our method suggests that a variety of g-CNQD-based composites with other semiconductor nanowires can be synthesized for energy applications. PMID:27149607

  13. Efficient Light-driven Long Distance Charge Separation and H2 Generation in Semiconductor Quantum Rods and Nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Tianquan

    Quantum confined semiconductor nanocrystals (0D quantum dots, 1D quantum rods and 2D quantum platlets) have been intensively investigated as light harvesting and charge separation materials for photovoltaic and photocatalytic applications. The efficiency of these semiconductor nanocrystal-based devices depends on many fundamental processes, including light harvesting, carrier relaxation, exciton localization and transport, charge separation and charge recombination. The competition between these processes determines the overall solar energy conversion (solar to electricity or fuel) efficiency. Semiconductor nano-heterostructures, combining two or more material components, offer unique opportunities to control their charge separation properties by tailoring their compositions, dimensions and spatial arrangement. Further integration of catalysts (heterogeneous or homogeneous) to these materials form multifunctional nano-heterostructures. Using 0D, 1D and 2D CdSe/CdS/Pt heterostructures as model systems, we directly probe the above-mentioned fundamental exciton and carrier processes by transient absorption and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. We are examining how to control these fundamental processes through the design of heterostructures to achieve long-lived charge separation and efficient H2 generation. In this talk, we will discuss a new model for exciton dissociation by charge transfer in quantum dots (i.e. Auger assisted electron transfer), mechanism of 1D and 2D exciton transport and dissociation in nanorods, and key factors limiting H2 generation efficiency in CdSe/CdS/Pt nanorod heterostructures.

  14. Designing Learning Environments to Teach Interactive Quantum Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puente, Sonia M. Gomez; Swagten, Henk J. M.

    2012-01-01

    This study aims at describing and analysing systematically an interactive learning environment designed to teach Quantum Physics, a second-year physics course. The instructional design of Quantum Physics is a combination of interactive lectures (using audience response systems), tutorials and self-study in unit blocks, carried out with small…

  15. A compact quantum correction model for symmetric double gate metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Edward Namkyu; Shin, Yong Hyeon; Yun, Ilgu

    2014-11-07

    A compact quantum correction model for a symmetric double gate (DG) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) is investigated. The compact quantum correction model is proposed from the concepts of the threshold voltage shift (ΔV{sub TH}{sup QM}) and the gate capacitance (C{sub g}) degradation. First of all, ΔV{sub TH}{sup QM} induced by quantum mechanical (QM) effects is modeled. The C{sub g} degradation is then modeled by introducing the inversion layer centroid. With ΔV{sub TH}{sup QM} and the C{sub g} degradation, the QM effects are implemented in previously reported classical model and a comparison between the proposed quantum correction model and numerical simulation results is presented. Based on the results, the proposed quantum correction model can be applicable to the compact model of DG MOSFET.

  16. Quantum Hall effect and semiconductor-to-semimetal transition in biased black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shengjun; van Veen, Edo; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Roldán, Rafael

    2016-06-01

    We study the quantum Hall effect of two-dimensional electron gas in black phosphorus in the presence of perpendicular electric and magnetic fields. In the absence of a bias voltage, the external magnetic field leads to a quantization of the energy spectrum into equidistant Landau levels, with different cyclotron frequencies for the electron and hole bands. The applied voltage reduces the band gap, and eventually a semiconductor-to-semimetal transition takes place. This nontrivial phase is characterized by the emergence of a pair of Dirac points in the spectrum. As a consequence, the Landau levels are not equidistant anymore but follow the ɛn∝√{n B } characteristic of Dirac crystals as graphene. By using the Kubo-Bastin formula in the context of the kernel polynomial method, we compute the Hall conductivity of the system. We obtain a σx y∝2 n quantization of the Hall conductivity in the gapped phase (standard quantum Hall effect regime) and a σx y∝4 (n +1 /2 ) quantization in the semimetallic phase, characteristic of Dirac systems with nontrivial topology.

  17. Theoretical simulation of carrier capture and relaxation rates in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yunhu; Zhang, Guoping; Guo, Ling; Qi, Guoqun; Li, Xiaoming

    2014-06-14

    Based on Auger scattering mechanism, carrier-carrier scattering dynamics between the two-dimensional carrier reservoir (also called wetting layer, i.e., WL) and the confined quantum dot ground and first excited state in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers (QD-SOAs) are investigated theoretically in this paper. The scattering rates for independent electron and hole densities are calculated. The results show an ultra-fast carrier capture (relaxation) rate up to 1 ps{sup −1}, and there is a complex dependence of the Coulomb scattering rates on the WL electron and hole densities. In addition, due to the different effective mass and the level distribution, the scattering rates for electron and hole are very different. Finally, in order to provide a direction to control (increase or decrease) the input current in realistic QD-SOA systems, a simple method is proposed to determine the trends of the carrier recovery rates with the WL carrier densities in the vicinity of the steady-state.

  18. Multiplexed molecular profiling of prostate cancer specimens using semiconductor quantum dot bioconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yun; Numora, Takeo; Chung, Leland; Zhau, Haiyen; Nie, Shuming

    2007-02-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are light emitting semi-conductor nanocrystals with novel optical properties including superior photostability, narrow emission spectra with continuous excitation spectra. These properties make QDs especially suitable for multiplexed fluorescent labeling, live cell imaging, and in vivo animal imaging. The multiplexing potential has been recognized but real applications of biological/clinical significance are few. In this study, we used quantum dots to study epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), an important process involved in the bone metastasis of prostate cancer. Two prostate cancer cells lines with distinct molecular profiles, representing the two ends of the EMT process, were selected for this study. Four EMT-related biomarkers including E-cadherin, N-cadherin, Vimentin, and RANKL were stained with QD-antibody conjugates with elongation factor 1alpha as the internal control. Morphological information of the QD-stained cells was obtained by digital-color imaging and quantitative information obtained by spectra analysis using a spectrometer. Two types of analysis were performed: abundance of each biomarker in the same cell line relative to the internal control; and the relative abundance of these markers between the two cell lines. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of QDs for multiplexed profiling of FFPE cells/tissue of clinical significance; however, the standardization and quantification still awaits optimization.

  19. Silver Nanoshell Plasmonically Controlled Emission of Semiconductor Quantum Dots in the Strong Coupling Regime.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ning; Yuan, Meng; Gao, Yuhan; Li, Dongsheng; Yang, Deren

    2016-04-26

    Strong coupling between semiconductor excitons and localized surface plasmons (LSPs) giving rise to hybridized plexciton states in which energy is coherently and reversibly exchanged between the components is vital, especially in the area of quantum information processing from fundamental and practical points of view. Here, in photoluminescence spectra, rather than from common extinction or reflection measurements, we report on the direct observation of Rabi splitting of approximately 160 meV as an indication of strong coupling between excited states of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) and LSP modes of silver nanoshells under nonresonant nanosecond pulsed laser excitation at room temperature. The strong coupling manifests itself as an anticrossing-like behavior of the two newly formed polaritons when tuning the silver nanoshell plasmon energies across the exciton line of the QDs. Further analysis substantiates the essentiality of high pump energy and collective strong coupling of many QDs with the radiative dipole mode of the metallic nanoparticles for the realization of strong coupling. Our finding opens up interesting directions for the investigation of strong coupling between LSPs and excitons from the perspective of radiative recombination under easily accessible experimental conditions. PMID:26972554

  20. Fast optical source for quantum key distribution based on semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Jofre, M; Gardelein, A; Anzolin, G; Amaya, W; Capmany, J; Ursin, R; Peñate, L; Lopez, D; San Juan, J L; Carrasco, J A; Garcia, F; Torcal-Milla, F J; Sanchez-Brea, L M; Bernabeu, E; Perdigues, J M; Jennewein, T; Torres, J P; Mitchell, M W; Pruneri, V

    2011-02-28

    A novel integrated optical source capable of emitting faint pulses with different polarization states and with different intensity levels at 100 MHz has been developed. The source relies on a single laser diode followed by four semiconductor optical amplifiers and thin film polarizers, connected through a fiber network. The use of a single laser ensures high level of indistinguishability in time and spectrum of the pulses for the four different polarizations and three different levels of intensity. The applicability of the source is demonstrated in the lab through a free space quantum key distribution experiment which makes use of the decoy state BB84 protocol. We achieved a lower bound secure key rate of the order of 3.64 Mbps and a quantum bit error ratio as low as 1.14×10⁻² while the lower bound secure key rate became 187 bps for an equivalent attenuation of 35 dB. To our knowledge, this is the fastest polarization encoded QKD system which has been reported so far. The performance, reduced size, low power consumption and the fact that the components used can be space qualified make the source particularly suitable for secure satellite communication. PMID:21369207

  1. Interaction of Globular Plasma Proteins with Water-Soluble CdSe Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Jyotsana; Rawat, Kamla; Sanwlani, Shilpa; Bohidar, H B

    2015-06-01

    The interactions between water-soluble semiconductor quantum dots [hydrophilic 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-coated CdSe] and three globular plasma proteins, namely, bovine serum albumin (BSA), β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) and human serum albumin (HSA), are investigated. Acidic residues of protein molecules form electrostatic interactions with these quantum dots (QDs). To determine the stoichiometry of proteins bound to QDs, we used dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential techniques. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments revealed energy transfer from tryptophan residues in the proteins to the QD particles. Quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of protein molecules was noticed during this binding process (hierarchy HSA<β-Lg

  2. Mechanism of electronic-excitation transfer in organic light-emitting devices based on semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Vitukhnovskii, A. G. Vashchenko, A. A.; Lebedev, V. S.; Vasiliev, R. B.; Brunkov, P. N.; Bychkovskii, D. N.

    2013-07-15

    The results of an experimental study of organic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with luminescent layers based on two types of CdSe/CdS semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) with an average CdSe core diameter of 3 and 5 nm and a characteristic CdS shell thickness of 0.5 nm are presented. The dependences of the LED efficiency on the QD concentration are determined. The experimental data are used to determine the mechanism of electronic-excitation transfer from the organic matrix to the semiconductor QDs. Ways of optimizing the design of the LEDs in order to improve their efficiency are suggested on this basis.

  3. Angular dependent study on spin transport in magnetic semiconductor heterostructures with Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzanian, S. M.; Shokri, A. A.; Mikaili Agah, K.; Elahi, S. M.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate theoretically the effects of Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling (DSOC) on the spin-dependent current and shot noise through II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductor/nonmagnetic semiconductor (DMS/NMS) barrier structures. The calculation of transmission probability is based on an effective mass quantum-mechanical approach in the presence of an external magnetic field applied along the growth direction of the junction and also applied voltage. We also study the dependence of spin-dependent properties on external magnetic field and relative angle between the magnetizations of two DMS layers in CdTe/CdMnTe heterostructures by including the DSOC effect. The results show that the DSOC has great different influence on transport properties of electrons with spin up and spin down in the considered system and this aspect may be utilized in designing new spintronics devices.

  4. Wavelength-dependent femtosecond pulse amplification in wideband tapered-waveguide quantum well semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Xia, Mingjun; Ghafouri-Shiraz, H

    2015-12-10

    In this paper, we study the wavelength-dependent amplification in three different wideband quantum well semiconductor optical amplifiers (QWAs) having conventional, exponentially tapered, and linearly tapered active region waveguide structures. A new theoretical model for tapered-waveguide QWAs considering the effect of lateral carrier density distribution and the strain effect in the quantum well is established based on a quantum well transmission line modeling method. The temporal and spectral characteristics of amplified femtosecond pulse are analyzed for each structure. It was found that, for the amplification of a single femtosecond pulse, the tapered-waveguide QWA provides higher saturation gain, and the output spectra of the amplified pulse in all three structures exhibit an apparent redshift and bandwidth narrowing due to the reduction of carrier density; however, the output spectrum in the tapered-waveguide amplifier is less distorted and exhibits smaller bandwidth narrowing. For the simultaneous amplification of two femtosecond pulses with different central frequencies, in all the three structures, two peaks appear in the output spectra while the peak at the frequency closer to the peak frequency of the QWA gain spectrum receives higher amplification due to the frequency (wavelength) dependence of the QWA gain. At a low peak power level of the input pulse, the bandwidth of each window in the tapered structure is larger than that of the conventional waveguide structure, which aggravates the spectrum alias in the amplification of femtosecond pulses with different central frequencies. As the peak powers of the two pulses increase, the spectrum alias in the conventional waveguide becomes more serious while there are small changes in the tapered structures. Also, we have found that in the amplification of a femtosecond pulse train, the linear-tapered QWAs exhibit the fastest gain recovery as compared with the conventional and exponentially tapered QWAs. PMID

  5. Limitation of electron mobility from hyperfine interaction in ultraclean quantum wells and topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, S. A.; Burkard, Guido

    2016-07-01

    The study of electron transport and scattering processes limiting electron mobility in high-quality semiconductor structures is central to solid-state electronics. Here, we uncover an unavoidable source of electron scattering which is caused by fluctuations of nuclear spins. We calculate the momentum relaxation time of electrons in quantum wells governed by the hyperfine interaction between electrons and nuclei and show that this time depends greatly on the spatial correlation of nuclear spins. Moreover, the scattering processes accompanied by a spin flip are a source of the backscattering of Dirac fermions at conducting surfaces of topological insulators.

  6. Quantum mechanical description of the interactions between DNA and water.

    PubMed

    Westerhoff, Lance M; Merz, Kenneth M

    2006-05-01

    In recent years, a lot of attention has been focused on the electronic properties of DNA. With recent advances in linear scaling quantum mechanics there are now new tools available to enhance our understanding of the electronic properties of DNA among other biomolecules. Using both explicit solvent models and implicit (continuum) solvent models, the electronic characteristics of a dodecamer duplex DNA have been fully studied using both divide and conquer (D&C), semi-empirical quantum mechanics and non-D&C semi-empirical quantum mechanics. According to the AM1 Hamiltonian, approximately 3.5 electrons (approximately 0.3 electron/base pair) are transferred from the duplex to the solvent. According to the density of state (DOS) analysis, in vacuo DNA has a band gap of approximately 1 eV showing that in the absence of solvent, the DNA may exhibit similar properties to those of a semiconductor. Upon increasing solvation (2.5-5.5 A), the band gap ranges from approximately 3 eV to approximately 6 eV. For the implicit solvent model, the band gap continues this widening trend to approximately 7 eV. Therefore, upon solvation and in the absence of dopants, the DNA should begin to loose its conductive properties. Finally, when one considers the energy and localization of the frontier orbitals (HOMO and LUMO), solvent has a stabilizing effect on the DNA system. The energy of the HOMO drops from approximately 15 eV in vacuo to approximately 2 eV for 5.5 A of water to approximately -8 eV for the implicit solvent model. Similarly, the LUMO drops from approximately 16 eV for in vacuo to approximately 9 eV for 5.5 A of water to approximately -1 eV for the implicit model. Beyond the importance of the computed results on the materials properties of DNA, the present work also shows that the behavior of intercalators will be affected by the electronic properties of DNA. This could have an impact on our understanding of how DNA based drugs interact with DNA and on the design of new DNA

  7. Sharing of classical and quantum correlations via XY interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jieci; Silva, Jaime; Lanceros-Mendez, Senentxu

    2014-09-15

    The sharing of classical and quantum correlations via XY interaction is investigated. The model includes two identical networks consisting of n nodes, the ith node of one network sharing a correlated state with the jth node of the other network, while all other nodes are initially unconnected. It is shown that classical correlation, quantum discord as well as entanglement can be shared between any two nodes of the network via XY interaction and that quantum information can be transferred effectively between them. It is found that there is no simple dominating relation between the quantum correlation and entanglement in inertial system.

  8. Semiconductor Quantum Dots and Quantum Dot Arrays and Applications of Multiple Exciton Generation to Third-Generation Photovoltaic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nozik, Arthur J.; Beard, Matthew C.; Luther, Joseph M.; Law, Matt; Ellingson, Randy J.; Johnson, Justin C.

    2010-10-14

    Here, we will first briefly summarize the general principles of QD synthesis using our previous work on InP as an example. Then we will focus on QDs of the IV-VI Pb chalcogenides (PbSe, PbS, and PbTe) and Si QDs because these were among the first QDs that were reported to produce multiple excitons upon absorbing single photons of appropriate energy (a process we call multiple exciton generation (MEG)). We note that in addition to Si and the Pb-VI QDs, two other semiconductor systems (III-V InP QDs(56) and II-VI core-shell CdTe/CdSe QDs(57)) were very recently reported to also produce MEG. Then we will discuss photogenerated carrier dynamics in QDs, including the issues and controversies related to the cooling of hot carriers and the magnitude and significance of MEG in QDs. Finally, we will discuss applications of QDs and QD arrays in novel quantum dot PV cells, where multiple exciton generation from single photons could yield significantly higher PV conversion efficiencies.

  9. Large enhancements of thermopower and carrier mobility in quantum dot engineered bulk semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanfeng; Sahoo, Pranati; Makongo, Julien P A; Zhou, Xiaoyuan; Kim, Sung-Joo; Chi, Hang; Uher, Ctirad; Pan, Xiaoqing; Poudeu, Pierre F P

    2013-05-22

    The thermopower (S) and electrical conductivity (σ) in conventional semiconductors are coupled adversely through the carriers' density (n) making it difficult to achieve meaningful simultaneous improvements in both electronic properties through doping and/or substitutional chemistry. Here, we demonstrate the effectiveness of coherently embedded full-Heusler (FH) quantum dots (QDs) in tailoring the density, mobility, and effective mass of charge carriers in the n-type Ti(0.1)Zr(0.9)NiSn half-Heusler matrix. We propose that the embedded FH QD forms a potential barrier at the interface with the matrix due to the offset of their conduction band minima. This potential barrier discriminates existing charge carriers from the conduction band of the matrix with respect to their relative energy leading to simultaneous large enhancements of the thermopower (up to 200%) and carrier mobility (up to 43%) of the resulting Ti(0.1)Zr(0.9)Ni(1+x)Sn nanocomposites. The improvement in S with increasing mole fraction of the FH-QDs arises from a drastic reduction (up to 250%) in the effective carrier density coupled with an increase in the carrier's effective mass (m*), whereas the surprising enhancement in the mobility (μ) is attributed to an increase in the carrier's relaxation time (τ). This strategy to manipulate the transport behavior of existing ensembles of charge carriers within a bulk semiconductor using QDs is very promising and could pave the way to a new generation of high figure of merit thermoelectric materials. PMID:23607819

  10. Correction: Charge-tunnelling and self-trapping: common origins for blinking, grey-state emission and photoluminescence enhancement in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, M. A.; Fisher, A. A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Correction for `Charge-tunnelling and self-trapping: common origins for blinking, grey-state emission and photoluminescence enhancement in semiconductor quantum dots' by M. A. Osborne, et al., Nanoscale, 2016, 8, 9272-9283.

  11. Coulomb Interaction Effects In Semiconductor Heterostructures With Spin-Orbit Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capps, Jeremy Patrick

    In this thesis we analyze two different situations where the interplay between the spin-orbit coupling (SOI) of the Rashba and Dresselhaus type, linear in the electron momentum, and the Coulomb interaction generates a specific macroscopic phenomenology that can be experimentally observed. In the first problem, we investigate the Friedel oscillations that can be sustained in the presence of the Coulomb repulsion in a two-dimensional lateral superlattice with SOI and analyze the dependence on several system parameters. Then, we are concerned with the properties of a single quantum well in the special regime where the coupling strengths of the Rashba and Dresselhaus interactions are equal. Starting from general total-energy considerations, we demonstrate that the SU(2) spin-rotation symmetry and the resulting persistent helical state (PHS) predicted to occur are not in fact realized; the actual spin order being that of an itinerant antiferromagnet (IAF). We obtain numerical results that describe the temperature evolution of the order parameter in the IAF state and determine the critical temperature of the transition to the paramagnetic order. Transport in this state is modeled by using the solutions of a Boltzmann equation obtained within the relaxation time approximation. Numerical estimates performed for realistic GaAs and InAs samples indicate that at low temperatures, the amplitude of the spin-Seebeck coefficient can be increased by scattering on magnetic impurities.

  12. Three-mode entanglement via tunneling-induced interference in a coupled triple-semiconductor quantum-well structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lue Xinyou; Wu Jing

    2010-07-15

    A simple scheme is proposed to achieve three-mode continuous-variable (CV) entanglement in a coupled triple-semiconductor quantum-well (TSQW) structure via tunneling-induced interference. In the present scheme, the TSQW structure is trapped into a triply resonant cavity, and the tunneling-induced interference effects considered here are the key to realizing entanglement. By numerically simulating the dynamics of the system, we show that the strength of tunneling-induced interference can effectively influence the period of entanglement, and the generation of entanglement does not depend intensively on the initial condition of the cavity field in our scheme. As a result, the present research provides an efficient approach to achieve three-mode CV entanglement in a semiconductor nanostructure, which may have an impact on the progress of solid-state quantum-information theory.

  13. Extended coherence length of spatially oscillating electron-spin polarization in dilute-magnetic-semiconductor quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, Takuma

    2013-12-04

    We have investigated the possibility that the coherence length of spatially oscillating electron-spin polarization is improved in dilute magnetic semiconductors. In usual nonmagnetic quantum wells, the spin polarization of the electrons injected from a ferromagnetic source electrode oscillates spatially because of the spin precession due to spin-orbit effective magnetic fields, i.e., the Rashba and Dresselhaus fields. However, the polarization is damped within an oscillation period by the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation. In paramagnetic dilute magnetic semiconductors, impurity spin polarization is induced under the electron-spin polarization, and this impurity polarization influences the electron-spin precession and possibly improves the spatial electron-spin coherence. The validity of this effect is demonstrated by a numerical simulation for a CdMnTe quantum well.

  14. Carrier dynamics in inhomogeneously broadened InAs/AlGaInAs/InP quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Karni, O. Mikhelashvili, V.; Eisenstein, G.; Kuchar, K. J.; Capua, A.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Ivanov, V.; Reithmaier, J. P.

    2014-03-24

    We report on a characterization of fundamental gain dynamics in recently developed InAs/InP quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers. Multi-wavelength pump-probe measurements were used to determine gain recovery rates, following a powerful optical pump pulse, at various wavelengths for different bias levels and pump excitation powers. The recovery was dominated by coupling between the electronic states in the quantum-dots and the high energy carrier reservoir via capture and escape mechanisms. These processes determine also the wavelength dependencies of gain saturation depth and the asymptotic gain recovery level. Unlike quantum-dash amplifiers, these quantum-dots exhibit no instantaneous gain response, confirming their quasi zero-dimensional nature.

  15. Calculation of output characteristics of semiconductor quantum-well lasers with account for both electrons and holes

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolova, Z N; Tarasov, I S; Asryan, L V

    2014-09-30

    Using an extended theoretical model, which includes the rate equations for both electrons and holes, we have studied the output characteristics of semiconductor quantum-well lasers. We have found non-trivial dependences of electron and hole concentrations in the waveguide region of the laser on the capture velocities of both types of carriers from the waveguide region into the quantum well. We have obtained the dependences of the internal differential quantum efficiency and optical output power of the laser on the capture velocities of electrons and holes. An increase in the capture velocities has been shown to result in suppression of parasitic recombination in the waveguide region and therefore in a substantial increase in the quantum efficiency and output power. (lasers)

  16. Magnetic Interactions in the Diluted Magnetic Semiconductor Mn_xGe_1-x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, Steven C.; Hellberg, C. Stephen

    2001-03-01

    Much current debate has focused on the origins of ferromagnetism in III-V magnetic semiconductors. Less attention has been paid to magnetically doped Group-IV semiconductors, although they have been predicted to have Curie temperatures of the same order [1]. We use density-functional theoretical (DFT) methods to study the electronic structure and magnetic interactions in Mn_xGe_1-x, the first such elemental magnetic semiconductor to be realized experimentally [2]. We use ordered supercells to simulate 6% Mn concentration, and calculate total energies within DFT for a variety of positional and magnetic arrangements of Mn at fixed concentration. We then fit these energies to a Heisenberg model to extract the spin coupling constants. The result is a strong but very short-ranged antiferromagnetic interaction between Mn atoms, and a weaker but longer-ranged ferromagnetic interaction. The ferromagnetic interaction dominates at all Mn-Mn distances beyond nearest neighbor. [1] T. Dietl et al., Science 287, 1019 (2000). [2] Y.D. Park, J. Mattson, A. Hanbicki, and B. Jonker (unpublished).

  17. Nonperturbative THz nonlinearities for many-body quantum control in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, C.; Maag, T.; Bayer, A.; Hohenleutner, M.; Baierl, S.; Bougeard, D.; Mootz, M.; Koch, S. W.; Kira, M.; Huber, R.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum computing and ultrafast quantum electronics constitute pivotal technologies of the 21st century and revolutionize the way we process information. Successful implementations require controlling superpositions of states and coherence in matter, and exploit nonlinear effects for elementary logic operations. In the THz frequency range between optics and electronics, solid state systems offer a rich spectrum of collective excitations such as excitons, phonons, magnons, or Landau electrons. Here, single-cycle THz transients of 8.7 kV/cm amplitude centered at 1 THz strongly excite inter-Landau-level transitions of magnetically biased GaAs quantum wells, facilitating coherent Landau ladder climbing by more than six rungs, population inversion, and coherent polarization control. Strong, highly nonlinear pump-probe and four- and six-wave mixing signals, entirely unexpected for this paragon of the harmonic oscillator, are revealed through two-time THz spectroscopy. In this scenario of nonperturbative polarization dynamics, our microscopic theory shows how the protective limits of Kohn's theorem are ultimately surpassed by dynamically enhanced Coulomb interactions, opening the door to exploiting many-body dynamics for nonlinear quantum control.

  18. Magneto-optical response of layers of semiconductor quantum dots and nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskoboynikov, O.; Wijers, C. M. J.; Liu, J. L.; Lee, C. P.

    2005-06-01

    In this paper a comparative theoretical study was made of the magneto-optical response of square lattices of nanoobjects (dots and rings). Expressions for both the polarizability of the individual objects as their mutual electromagnetic interactions (for a lattice in vacuum) was derived. The quantum-mechanical part of the derivation is based upon the commonly used envelope function approximation. The description is suited to investigate the optical response of these layers in a narrow region near the interband transitions onset, particularly when the contribution of individual level pairs can be separately observed. A remarkable distinction between clearly quantum-mechanical and classical electromagnetic behavior was found in the shape and volume dependence of the polarizability of the dots and rings. This optical response of a single plane of quantum dots and nanorings was explored as a function of frequency, magnetic field, and angle of incidence. Although the reflectance of these layer systems is not very strong, the ellipsometric angles are large. For these isolated dot-ring systems they are of the order of magnitude of degrees. For the ring systems a full oscillation of the optical Bohm-Ahronov effect could be isolated. Layers of dots do not display any remarkable magnetic field dependence. Both type of systems, dots and rings, exhibit an outspoken angular-dependent dichroism of quantum-mechanical origin.

  19. Effect of Pure Dephasing and Phonon Scattering on the Coupling of Semiconductor Quantum Dots to Optical Cavities.

    PubMed

    Jarlov, C; Wodey, É; Lyasota, A; Calic, M; Gallo, P; Dwir, B; Rudra, A; Kapon, E

    2016-08-12

    Using site-controlled semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) free of multiexcitonic continuum states, integrated with photonic crystal membrane cavities, we clarify the effects of pure dephasing and phonon scattering on exciton-cavity coupling in the weak-coupling regime. In particular, the observed QD-cavity copolarization and cavity mode feeding versus QD-cavity detuning are explained quantitatively by a model of a two-level system embedded in a solid-state environment. PMID:27563983

  20. Effect of Pure Dephasing and Phonon Scattering on the Coupling of Semiconductor Quantum Dots to Optical Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarlov, C.; Wodey, É.; Lyasota, A.; Calic, M.; Gallo, P.; Dwir, B.; Rudra, A.; Kapon, E.

    2016-08-01

    Using site-controlled semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) free of multiexcitonic continuum states, integrated with photonic crystal membrane cavities, we clarify the effects of pure dephasing and phonon scattering on exciton-cavity coupling in the weak-coupling regime. In particular, the observed QD-cavity copolarization and cavity mode feeding versus QD-cavity detuning are explained quantitatively by a model of a two-level system embedded in a solid-state environment.

  1. Holonomic quantum computation on microwave photons with all resonant interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ping; Yu, Long-Bao; Zhou, Jian

    2016-08-01

    The intrinsic difficulties of holonomic quantum computation on superconducting circuits are originated from the use of three levels in superconducting transmon qubits and the complicated dispersive interaction between them. Due to the limited anharmonicity of transmon qubits, the experimental realization seems to be very challenging. However, with recent experimental progress, coherent control over microwave photons in superconducting circuit cavities is well achieved, and thus provides a promising platform for quantum information processing with photonic qubits. Here, with all resonant inter-cavity photon–photon interactions, we propose a scheme for implementing scalable holonomic quantum computation on a circuit QED lattice. In our proposal, three cavities, connected by a SQUID, are used to encode a logical qubit. By tuning the inter-cavity photon–photon interaction, we can construct all the holonomies needed for universal quantum computation in a non-adiabatic way. Therefore, our scheme presents a promising alternative for robust quantum computation with microwave photons.

  2. PREFACE: Singular interactions in quantum mechanics: solvable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Antonio, Gianfausto; Exner, Pavel; Geyler, Vladimir

    2005-06-01

    editors study a toy model of a decay under the influence of a time-periodic δ potential. E Demiralp describes the spectrum of a spherical harmonic oscillator amended with a concentric family of δ-shell interactions. Another of the editors presents an isoperimetric problem for point interactions arranged at vertices of a polygon. W Huddell and R Hughes show how singular perturbations of a one-dimensional Dirac operator can be approximated by regular potentials, and J Brasche constructs a family of Hamiltonians in which the singular interaction has a more complicated support, namely a Brownian path. Finally, B Pavlov and I Antoniou apply the singular perturbation technique to another classical Hamiltonian, that of a generalized Friedrichs model; no matter that the unperturbed observable is called momentum in their paper. The three papers in the following group are distinguished by the fact that they consider systems which are fully or partially periodic. F Bentosela and M Tater analyse scattering on a crystalline `slab' modelled by point interactions distributed periodically on a finite number of parallel plates. E de Prunelé studies evolution of wavepackets in crystal models of different geometries, and M Avdonin et al discuss a simple model of a spin-dependent scattering on a one-dimensional array of quantum dots. The next group of papers is devoted to a topic which was untouched at the time of the aforementioned first edition, namely quantum graphs, which became a subject of interest after numerous applications of such systems to semiconductor, carbon and other nanostructures. Most contributions here deal with the `usual' model in which the Hamiltonian is a Schrödinger operator supported by the graph. P Kuchment describes spectral properties of such graphs, in particular periodic ones and those with decorations. S Albeverio and K Pankrashkin present a modification of Krein's formula which is suitable for constructing Hamiltonians of quantum graphs using boundary

  3. Optical properties of diluted magnetic semiconductor Cu:ZnS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imam, N. G.; Bakr Mohamed, Mohamed

    2014-09-01

    Herein quantum dots (QDs) of diluted magnetic semiconductor Cu:ZnS have been synthesized via a simple chemical synthesis method. A single phase solid solution is formed up to x = 0.1 which confirmed by using X-ray diffraction. Crystal structure and microstructure analyses were performed by Rietveld refinement. Photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra were recorded for pure and Cu doped ZnS QDs excited at 268 and 228 nm respectively. PL emission and excitation spectra were investigated in different wavelength regions within the range of 200-900 nm. PL results in the range of 220-300 nm emission band reveals that the band gap of pure ZnS QDs is about 4.43 eV which greater than that of bulk ZnS (3.7 eV). The band gap of Cu:ZnS QDs is tunable with Cu content (x) as well as the crystalline size, and it is peaked around 4.47 eV. PL emission in the range of 350-650 nm exhibits a green fluorescence band peaking around 552 nm for pure ZnS QDs, which confirms the characteristic feature of Zn2+ as luminescent centers in the lattice, while blue emission bands peaked around 471 nm for Cu:ZnS QDs that is attributed to the transition of electrons from conduction band of ZnS to the Cu impurity level. The blue shift of the absorption peak directly reflects the effect of quantum confinement. The PL results have been supported by X-ray phase analysis, high-resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM and SEM), compositional evaluation (EDX) and magnetic measurements (VSM).

  4. Controllable photo-brightening/photo-darkening of semiconductor quantum dots under laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivenkov, Victor; Tretyachenko, Anna; Samokhvalov, Pavel S.; Chistyakov, Alexander A.; Nabiev, Igor

    2016-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that photo-induced changes in the optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) can be controlled by tuning the parameters of their laser irradiation to vary the relative contributions of photo-brightening and photo-darkening of QDs. For this purpose, the effects of the QD size, photon energy, and intensity of irradiation of QDs on the competing processes of photo-darkening and photo-brightening have been investigated. We have found that photo-brightening of QDs is not accompanied by detectable growth of their photoluminescence (PL) decay time, this process being most pronounced for QDs with an originally low PL quantum yield (QY). In this case, an increase in the PL QY is assumed to be caused by transition of some QDs from the dark (non-emissive) state to the bright (emissive) state. On the other hand, the photo-darkening effect, which was observed only under UV irradiation at 266 nm, was accompanied by simultaneous drop of both the QD QY and their PL decay time. We have also found that, at a constant dose of absorbed energy, the photo-brightening and photo-darkening processes do not depend on the excitation intensity. Thus, the photo-induced changes in the optical properties of QDs are one-photon processes. These data may help to optimize the QD operational conditions in practical applications requiring their intense excitation and add to understanding the fundamental mechanisms of the irreversible photo-induced changes that occur in colloidal QDs under illumination.

  5. Strain-induced vertical self-organization of semiconductor quantum dots: A computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Shtinkov, N.

    2013-12-28

    Atomistic strain simulations based on the valence force field method are employed to study the vertical arrangements of semiconductor quantum dot (QD) multilayers. The effects of the QD shape, dimensions, and materials parameters are systematically investigated, varying independently the following parameters: spacer width H, QD lateral spacing D, base b, and height h, slope of the side facets, elastic properties of the dot and the substrate materials, and lattice mismatch between the dot and the substrate. The transition between vertically aligned and anti-aligned structures is found to be determined mainly by the ratios H/D and b/D, as well as by the strain anisotropy of the substrate and to a lesser extent of the QD. The dependence on the QD height h is significant only for steep side facets and large aspect ratios h/b, and the effects of the lattice mismatch strain and the bulk elastic moduli are found to be negligible. The comparison with experimental data shows an excellent agreement with the results from the simulations, demonstrating that the presented analysis results in precise theoretical predictions for the vertical self-organization regime in a wide range of QD materials systems.

  6. Spin splitting generated in a Y-shaped semiconductor nanostructure with a quantum point contact

    SciTech Connect

    Wójcik, P. Adamowski, J. Wołoszyn, M.; Spisak, B. J.

    2015-07-07

    We have studied the spin splitting of the current in the Y-shaped semiconductor nanostructure with a quantum point contact (QPC) in a perpendicular magnetic field. Our calculations show that the appropriate tuning of the QPC potential and the external magnetic field leads to an almost perfect separation of the spin-polarized currents: electrons with opposite spins flow out through different output branches. The spin splitting results from the joint effect of the QPC, the spin Zeeman splitting, and the electron transport through the edge states formed in the nanowire at the sufficiently high magnetic field. The Y-shaped nanostructure can be used to split the unpolarized current into two spin currents with opposite spins as well as to detect the flow of the spin current. We have found that the separation of the spin currents is only slightly affected by the Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The spin-splitter device is an analogue of the optical device—the birefractive crystal that splits the unpolarized light into two beams with perpendicular polarizations. In the magnetic-field range, in which the current is carried through the edges states, the spin splitting is robust against the spin-independent scattering. This feature opens up a possibility of the application of the Y-shaped nanostructure as a non-ballistic spin-splitter device in spintronics.

  7. Multivalent display of DNA conjugates on semiconductor quantum dots utilizing a novel conjugation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasuhn, Duane E.; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B.; Vora, Gary J.; Mattoussi, Hedi M.; Dawson, Philip E.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2009-02-01

    One of the most prominent research areas in nanotechnology is the development of nanoparticle systems for biomedical applications. This is founded upon the expectation that such species could ultimately be imbued with multiple simultaneous functions, such as the presentation of a therapeutic payload or diagnostic sensor for in vivo trafficking to desired cell types. In recent years, semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been actively explored as novel display systems, because of their unique photophysical properties. Using an aniline-mediated hydrazone coupling, a polyhisitidine-appended peptide was derivatized with a DNA strand and successfully self-assembled to QDs, yielding nanoparticles displaying up to approximately 15 peptide/DNA conjugates. This ligation method is a viable chemistry for displaying biomolecules, because of the orthogonality of the ketone and hydrazine moieties to most biological functionality and the reaction can be performed under mild conditions in aqueous media. The modified QDs were further characterized by gel electrophoresis, and microarray studies; showing the self-assembly was successful and the DNA strands were still available for hybridization with a complement sequence.

  8. Ligand-Mediated Control of the Confinement Potential in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Victor

    This thesis describes the mechanisms by which organic surfactants, particularly thiophenols and phenyldithiocarbamates, reduce the confinement potential experienced by the exciton of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The reduction of the confinement potential is enabled by the creation of interfacial electronic states near the band edge of the QD upon ligand adsorption. In the case of thiophenols, we find that this ligand adsorbs in two distinct binding modes, (i) a tightly bound mode capable of exciton delocalization, and (ii) a more weakly bound mode that has no discernable effect on exciton confinement. Both the adsorption constant and reduction in confinement potential are tunable by para substitution and are generally anticorrelated. For tightly bound thiophenols and other moderately delocalizing ligands, the degree of delocalization induced in the QD is approximately linearly proportional to the fractional surface area occupied by the ligand for all sizes of QDs. In the case of phenyldithiocarbamates, the reduction in the confinement potential is much greater, and ligand adjacency must be accounted for to model exciton delocalization. We find that at high surface coverages, exciton delocalization by phenyldithiocarbamates and other highly delocalizing ligands is dominated by ligand packing effects. Finally, we construct a database of electronic structure calculations on organic molecules and propose an algorithm that combines experimental and computational screening to find novel delocalizing ligands.

  9. Pulse propagation and optically controllable switch in coupled semiconductor-double-quantum-dot nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedi, H. R.

    2016-05-01

    The problem of pulse propagation is theoretically investigated through a coupled semiconductor-double-quantum-dot (SDQD) nanostructure. Solving the coupled Maxwell-Bloch equations for the SDQD and field simultaneously, the dynamic control of pulse propagation through the medium is numerically explored. It is found that when all the control fields are in exact resonance with their corresponding transitions, a weak Gaussian-shaped probe pulse is transmitted through the medium nearly without any significant absorption and losses so that it can preserve its shape for quite a long propagation distance. In contrast, when one of the control fields is not in resonance with its corresponding transition, the probe pulse will be absorbed by the QD medium after a short distance. Then we consider the probe pulses with higher intensities. It is realized that an intense probe pulse experiences remarkable absorption and broadening during propagation. Finally, we demonstrate that this SDQD system can be employed as an optically controllable switch for the wave propagation to transit from an absorbing phase to a perfect transparency for the probe field. The required time for such switch is also estimated through realistic values.

  10. Monolithically integrated quantum dot optical modulator with Semiconductor optical amplifier for short-range optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naokatsu; Akahane, Kouichi; Umezawa, Toshimasa; Kawanishi, Tetsuya

    2015-04-01

    A monolithically integrated quantum dot (QD) optical gain modulator (OGM) with a QD semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) was successfully developed. Broadband QD optical gain material was used to achieve Gbps-order high-speed optical data transmission, and an optical gain change as high as approximately 6-7 dB was obtained with a low OGM voltage of 2.0 V. Loss of optical power due to insertion of the device was also effectively compensated for by the SOA section. Furthermore, it was confirmed that the QD-OGM/SOA device helped achieve 6.0-Gbps error-free optical data transmission over a 2.0-km-long photonic crystal fiber. We also successfully demonstrated generation of Gbps-order, high-speed, and error-free optical signals in the >5.5-THz broadband optical frequency bandwidth larger than the C-band. These results suggest that the developed monolithically integrated QD-OGM/SOA device will be an advantageous and compact means of increasing the usable optical frequency channels for short-reach communications.

  11. Spin splitting generated in a Y-shaped semiconductor nanostructure with a quantum point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, P.; Adamowski, J.; Wołoszyn, M.; Spisak, B. J.

    2015-07-01

    We have studied the spin splitting of the current in the Y-shaped semiconductor nanostructure with a quantum point contact (QPC) in a perpendicular magnetic field. Our calculations show that the appropriate tuning of the QPC potential and the external magnetic field leads to an almost perfect separation of the spin-polarized currents: electrons with opposite spins flow out through different output branches. The spin splitting results from the joint effect of the QPC, the spin Zeeman splitting, and the electron transport through the edge states formed in the nanowire at the sufficiently high magnetic field. The Y-shaped nanostructure can be used to split the unpolarized current into two spin currents with opposite spins as well as to detect the flow of the spin current. We have found that the separation of the spin currents is only slightly affected by the Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The spin-splitter device is an analogue of the optical device—the birefractive crystal that splits the unpolarized light into two beams with perpendicular polarizations. In the magnetic-field range, in which the current is carried through the edges states, the spin splitting is robust against the spin-independent scattering. This feature opens up a possibility of the application of the Y-shaped nanostructure as a non-ballistic spin-splitter device in spintronics.

  12. Flow cytometric analysis to detect pathogens in bacterial cell mixtures using semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Megan A; Keng, Peter C; Krauss, Todd D

    2008-02-01

    Compared to a common green organic dye, semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) composed of CdSe/ZnS core/shell bioconjugates display brighter fluorescence intensities, lower detection thresholds, and better accuracy in analyzing bacterial cell mixtures composed of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 and harmless E. coli DH5alpha using flow cytometry. For the same given bacterial mixture, QDs display fluorescence intensity levels that are approximately 1 order of magnitude brighter compared to the analogous experiments that utilize the standard dye fluorescein isothiocyanate. Detection limits are lowest when QDs are used as the fluorophore label for the pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 serotype: limits of 1% O157:H7 in 99% DH5alpha result, corresponding to 106 cells/mL, which is comparable to other developing fluorescence-based techniques for pathogen detection. Finally, utilizing QDs to label E. coli O157:H7 in cell mixtures results in greater accuracy and more closely approaches the ideal fluorophore for pathogen detection using flow cytometry. With their broader absorption spectra and narrower emission spectra than organic dyes, QDs can make vast improvements in the field of flow cytometry, where single-source excitation and simultaneous detection of multicolor species without complicating experimental setups or data analysis is quite advantageous for analyzing heterogeneous cell mixtures, both for prokaryotic pathogen detection and for studies on eukaryotic cell characteristics. PMID:18186615

  13. Ratiometric fluorescence, electrochemiluminescence, and photoelectrochemical chemo/biosensing based on semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Peng; Hou, Xiandeng; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Ratiometric fluorescent sensors, which can provide built-in self-calibration for correction of a variety of analyte-independent factors, have attracted particular attention for analytical sensing and optical imaging with the potential to provide a precise and quantitative analysis. A wide variety of ratiometric sensing probes using small fluorescent molecules have been developed. Compared with organic dyes, exploiting semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) in ratiometric fluorescence sensing is even more intriguing, owing to their unique optical and photophysical properties that offer significant advantages over organic dyes. In this review, the main photophysical mechanism for generating dual-emission from QDs for ratiometry is discussed and categorized in detail. Typically, dual-emission can be obtained either with energy transfer from QDs to dyes or with independent dual fluorophores of QDs and dye/QDs. The recent discovery of intrinsic dual-emission from Mn-doped QDs offers new opportunities for ratiometric sensing. Particularly, the signal transduction of QDs is not restricted to fluorescence, and electrochemiluminescence and photoelectrochemistry from QDs are also promising for sensing, which can be made ratiometric for correction of interferences typically encountered in electrochemistry. All these unique photophysical properties of QDs lead to a new avenue of ratiometry, and the recent progress in this area is addressed and summarized here. Several interesting applications of QD-based ratiometry are presented for the determination of metal ions, temperature, and biomolecules, with specific emphasis on the design principles and photophysical mechanisms of these probes.

  14. Exchange interaction and the tunneling induced transparency in coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Halyne; Alcalde, Augusto; Ulloa, Sergio

    2014-03-01

    Stacked semiconductor quantum dots coupled by tunneling are unique ``quantum molecule'' where it is possible to create a multilevel structure of excitonic states. This structure allows the investigation of quantum interference processes and their control via electric external fields. In this work, we investigate the optical response of a quantum molecule coherently driven by a polarized laser, considering the splitting in excitonic levels caused by isotropic and anisotropic exchange interactions. In our model we consider interdot transitions mediated by the the hole tunneling between states with the same total spin and, between bright and dark exciton states. Using realistic experimental parameters, we demonstrate that the excitonic states coupled by tunneling exhibit an enriched and controllable optical response. Our results show that through the appropriate control of the external electric field and light polarization, the tunneling coupling establishes an efficient destructive quantum interference path that creates a transparency window in the absorption spectra, whenever states of appropriate symmetry are mixed by the hole tunneling. We explore the relevant parameters space that would allows with the experiments. CAPES, INCT-IQ and MWN/CIAM-NSF.

  15. Interaction of solitons with a string of coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vijendra; Swami, O. P.; Taneja, S.; Nagar, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we develop a theory for discrete solitons interaction with a string of coupled quantum dots in view of the local field effects. Discrete nonlinear Schrodinger (DNLS) equations are used to describe the dynamics of the string. Numerical calculations are carried out and results are analyzed with the help of matlab software. With the help of numerical solutions we demonstrate that in the quantum dots string, Rabi oscillations (RO) are self trapped into stable bright Rabi solitons. The Rabi oscillations in different types of nanostructures have potential applications to the elements of quantum logic and quantum memory.

  16. One- and two-photon pumped soft lithographed DFB laser systems based on semiconductor core-shell quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todescato, F.; Fortunati, I.; Gardin, S.; Signorini, R.; Bozio, R.; Jasieniak, J. J.; Martucci, A.; Della Giustina, G.; Brusatin, G.; Guglielmi, M.

    2010-02-01

    In the last years inorganic semiconductor (particularly CdSe and CdS) quantum dots (QDs) have received great attention for their important optical properties. The possibility to tune the emission wavelength, together with their high fluorescence quantum efficiency and photostability, can be exploited in photonic and optoelectronic technological applications. The design of DFB devices, based on QDs as active optical material, leads to the realization of compact laser systems. In this work we explore the use of an inorganic/organic hybrid material composed of CdSe-ZnS semiconductor quantum dots doped into a zirconia sol-gel matrix for optical gain applications. Through the use of soft lithography on a sol-gel germania-silica hybrid, large scale distributed feedback gratings can be created. Used in conjunction with the CdSe-ZnS/ZrO2 hybrids, these gratings can act as microcavities and allow for the realization of true lasing action. The lasing properties within these devices are characterized in the femtosecond regime by both one- and two-photon excitation. From experimental data the value of the optical gain of the core-shell quantum dot samples has been estimated. Moreover, one- and two-photon lasing threshold and stability are reported.

  17. Experimental realization of a strongly interacting quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Kuzmich, Alex

    2016-05-01

    A quantum memory is a device which enables the storage and retrieval of quantum states of light. Ground atomic states interact only weakly with the environment and with each other, enabling memories with long storage times. However, for scalable generation and distillation of entanglement within distributed quantum information systems, it is desirable to controllably switch on and off interactions between the individual atoms. We realize a strongly interacting quantum memory by coupling the ground state of an ultra-cold atomic gas to a highly excited Rydberg state. The memory is subsequently retrieved into a propagating light field which is measured using the Hanbury Brown-Twiss photo-electric detection. The results reveal memory transformation from an initially prepared coherent state into the state of single excitation.

  18. Quantum confinement, carrier dynamics and interfacial processes in nanostructured direct/indirect-gap semiconductor-glass composites

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph H. Simmons

    2002-08-13

    The behavior of semiconductor clusters precipitated in an insulated matrix was investigated. Semiconductor compositions of CdTe, Si and Ge were studies and the insulating matrix was amorphous SiO2. As a function of size, quantum confinement effects were observed in all three composite systems. However significant differences were observed between the direct-gap column 2-6 semiconductors and the indirect-gap column 4 semiconductors. As observed by others, the direct-gap 2-6 semiconductors showed a distinct saturation in the energy-gap blue shift with decreasing size. Theoretical studies using a 20-band k dot p calculation of the electronic and valence bands for a 3-dimensionally confined CdTe semiconductor showed that mixing of the conduction band states leads to a flattening of the central valley. This increases the electron mass drastically and saturates the size dependent blue shift in the bandgap. In contrast, the blue shift in the Si and Ge nanocrystals showed no sign of saturation and increased drastically with decreasing size. In fact, Si and Ge crystals were formed with blue shift values that moved the bandgap to the near UV region. We examined the absorption curves to determine whether the bandgap was direct or indirect in the quantum dots. The results are that the absorption shows an indirect gap for all but the smallest Si crystals and an indirect gap for all Ge crystals. Raman studies showed negligible size dependence due to a lack of phonon confinement in the matrix embedded clusters. Exciton saturation and recovery times were found to be very short (of the order of 400fs) and are the fastest reported for any quantum dot system. Work to examine the type of confinement obtained in a matrix that consists of a transparent conductor is under way. Studies of the photoinduced absorption change in GeSe glasses showed a significant effect of photodarkening, regardless of composition. The photodarkening effect appears to be composed of permanent and transient

  19. Quantum Theory of Atomic and Molecular Structures and Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrides, Constantinos

    This dissertation consists of topics in two related areas of research that together provide quantum mechanical descriptions of atomic and molecular interactions and reactions. The first is the ab initio electronic structure calculation that provides the atomic and molecular interaction potential, including the long-range potential. The second is the quantum theory of interactions that uses such potentials to understand scattering, long-range molecules, and reactions. In ab initio electronic structure calculations, we present results of dynamic polarizabilities for a variety of atoms and molecules, and the long-range dispersion coefficients for a number of atom-atom and atom-molecule cases. We also present results of a potential energy surface for the triatomic lithium-ytterbium-lithium system, aimed at understanding the related chemical reactions. In the quantum theory of interactions, we present a multichannel quantum-defect theory (MQDT) for atomic interactions in a magnetic field. This subject, which is complex especially for atoms with hyperfine structure, is essential for the understanding and the realization of control and tuning of atomic interactions by a magnetic field: a key feature that has popularized cold atom physics in its investigations of few-body and many-body quantum systems. Through the example of LiK, we show how MQDT provides a systematic and an efficient understanding of atomic interaction in a magnetic field, especially magnetic Feshbach resonances in nonzero partial waves.

  20. Spin-valley qubit in nanostructures of monolayer semiconductors: Optical control and hyperfine interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Tong, Qingjun; Liu, Gui-Bin; Yu, Hongyi; Yao, Wang

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the optical control possibilities of spin-valley qubit carried by single electrons localized in nanostructures of monolayer TMDs, including small quantum dots formed by lateral heterojunction and charged impurities. The quantum controls are discussed when the confinement induces valley hybridization and when the valley hybridization is absent. We show that the bulk valley and spin optical selection rules can be inherited in different forms in the two scenarios, both of which allow the definition of spin-valley qubit with desired optical controllability. We also investigate nuclear spin-induced decoherence and quantum control of electron-nuclear spin entanglement via intervalley terms of the hyperfine interaction. Optically controlled two-qubit operations in a single quantum dot are discussed.

  1. Inter-band optoelectronic properties in quantum dot structure of low band gap III-V semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Anup; Maiti, Biswajit; Chanda, Debasree

    2014-04-14

    A generalized theory is developed to study inter-band optical absorption coefficient (IOAC) and material gain (MG) in quantum dot structures of narrow gap III-V compound semiconductor considering the wave-vector (k{sup →}) dependence of the optical transition matrix element. The band structures of these low band gap semiconducting materials with sufficiently separated split-off valance band are frequently described by the three energy band model of Kane. This has been adopted for analysis of the IOAC and MG taking InAs, InSb, Hg{sub 1−x}Cd{sub x}Te, and In{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x}As{sub y}P{sub 1−y} lattice matched to InP, as example of III–V compound semiconductors, having varied split-off energy band compared to their bulk band gap energy. It has been found that magnitude of the IOAC for quantum dots increases with increasing incident photon energy and the lines of absorption are more closely spaced in the three band model of Kane than those with parabolic energy band approximations reflecting the direct the influence of energy band parameters. The results show a significant deviation to the MG spectrum of narrow-gap materials having band nonparabolicity compared to the parabolic band model approximations. The results reflect the important role of valence band split-off energies in these narrow gap semiconductors.

  2. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Optical velocimeter based on a semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, P. Ya; Dubnishchev, Yu N.; Meledin, V. G.

    1988-03-01

    It is shown that optical velocimeters using diffraction beam splitters are not critically sensitive to the stability of the emission wavelength of a semiconductor laser. A functional scheme of a semiconductor laser source with systems for stabilization of the temperature and pump current is described. The technical characteristics are given of a semiconductor-laser velocimeter for the determination of the velocity and length of rolling stock.

  3. Simultaneous multichannel wavelength multicasting and XOR logic gate multicasting for three DPSK signals based on four-wave mixing in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jun; Lu, Guo-Wei; Sakamoto, Takahide; Akahane, Kouichi; Yamamoto, Naokatsu; Wang, Danshi; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Hongxiang; Zhang, Min; Kawanishi, Tetsuya; Ji, Yuefeng

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate simultaneous multichannel wavelength multicasting (MWM) and exclusive-OR logic gate multicasting (XOR-LGM) for three 10Gbps non-return-to-zero differential phase-shift-keying (NRZ-DPSK) signals in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier (QD-SOA) by exploiting the four-wave mixing (FWM) process. No additional pump is needed in the scheme. Through the interaction of the input three 10Gbps DPSK signal lights in QD-SOA, each channel is successfully multicasted to three wavelengths (1-to-3 for each), totally 3-to-9 MWM, and at the same time, three-output XOR-LGM is obtained at three different wavelengths. All the new generated channels are with a power penalty less than 1.2dB at a BER of 10(-9). Degenerate and non-degenerate FWM components are fully used in the experiment for data and logic multicasting. PMID:25606876

  4. Phonon-Electron Interactions in Piezoelectric Semiconductor Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Vikrant J.; Rais-Zadeh, Mina

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive investigation of phonon-electron interactions in bulk acoustic standing wave (BAW) resonators made from piezoelectric semiconductor (PS) materials. We show that these interactions constitute a significant energy loss mechanism and can set practical loss limits lower than anharmonic phonon scattering limits or thermoelastic damping limits. Secondly, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that phonon-electron interactions, under appropriate conditions, can result in a significant acoustic gain manifested as an improved quality factor (Q). Measurements on GaN resonators are consistent with the presented interaction model and demonstrate up to 35% dynamic improvement in Q. The strong dependencies of electron-mediated acoustic loss/gain on resonance frequency and material properties are investigated. Piezoelectric semiconductors are an extremely important class of electromechanical materials, and this work provides crucial insights for material choice, material properties, and device design to achieve low-loss PS-BAW resonators along with the unprecedented ability to dynamically tune resonator Q. PMID:25001100

  5. Single particle density of trapped interacting quantum gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bala, Renu; Bosse, J.; Pathak, K. N.

    2015-05-15

    An expression for single particle density for trapped interacting gases has been obtained in first order of interaction using Green’s function method. Results are easily simplified for homogeneous quantum gases and are found to agree with famous results obtained by Huang-Yang-Luttinger and Lee-Yang.

  6. Generating and moving Dirac points in a two-dimensional deformed honeycomb lattice arrayed by coupled semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Juan Duan, Yifeng; Chen, PeiJian; Peng, Yan

    2015-03-15

    Analysis of the electronic properties of a two-dimensional (2D) deformed honeycomb structure arrayed by semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is conducted theoretically by using tight-binding method in the present paper. Through the compressive or tensile deformation of the honeycomb lattice, the variation of energy spectrum has been explored. We show that, the massless Dirac fermions are generated in this adjustable system and the positions of the Dirac cones as well as slope of the linear dispersions could be manipulated. Furthermore, a clear linear correspondence between the distance of movement d (the distance from the Dirac points to the Brillouin zone corners) and the tunable bond angle α of the lattice are found in this artificial planar QD structure. These results provide the theoretical basis for manipulating Dirac fermions and should be very helpful for the fabrication and application of high-mobility semiconductor QD devices.

  7. Quantum state engineering with circuit electromechanical three-body interactions.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Mehdi; Pernpeintner, Matthias; Gross, Rudolf; Huebl, Hans; Hartmann, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    We propose a hybrid system with quantum mechanical three-body interactions between photons, phonons, and qubit excitations. These interactions take place in a circuit quantum electrodynamical architecture with a superconducting microwave resonator coupled to a transmon qubit whose shunt capacitance is free to mechanically oscillate. We show that this system design features a three-mode polariton-mechanical mode and a nonlinear transmon-mechanical mode interaction in the strong coupling regime. Together with the strong resonator-transmon interaction, these properties provide intriguing opportunities for manipulations of this hybrid quantum system. We show, in particular, the feasibility of cooling the mechanical motion down to its ground state and preparing various nonclassical states including mechanical Fock and cat states and hybrid tripartite entangled states. PMID:25978232

  8. Quantum State Engineering with Circuit Electromechanical Three-Body Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi, Mehdi; Pernpeintner, Matthias; Gross, Rudolf; Huebl, Hans; Hartmann, Michael J.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a hybrid system with quantum mechanical three-body interactions between photons, phonons, and qubit excitations. These interactions take place in a circuit quantum electrodynamical architecture with a superconducting microwave resonator coupled to a transmon qubit whose shunt capacitance is free to mechanically oscillate. We show that this system design features a three-mode polariton-mechanical mode and a nonlinear transmon-mechanical mode interaction in the strong coupling regime. Together with the strong resonator-transmon interaction, these properties provide intriguing opportunities for manipulations of this hybrid quantum system. We show, in particular, the feasibility of cooling the mechanical motion down to its ground state and preparing various nonclassical states including mechanical Fock and cat states and hybrid tripartite entangled states.

  9. Interaction of phase and amplitude shaping in an external cavity semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilny, Rouven H.; Döpke, Benjamin; Balzer, Jan C.; Brenner, Carsten; Klehr, Andreas; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrashort pulse generation with semiconductor lasers poses a promising alternative to currently available femtosecond laser sources like solid state and fiber lasers. Semiconductor devices can be produced inexpensively, are energy efficient and their wavelength can be designed by band gap engineering. Furthermore they feature a tunable repetition rate. Yet pulse duration and peak power of those devices limit their potential for applications so far. However, recent research demonstrated a reduction of the pulse width from 534 fs (full width half maximum) to 216 fs by shaping the spectrally resolved spectral phase and amplitude inside the cavity. The utilized system consisted of a mode-locked edge emitting semiconductor laser diode, a spatial light modulator inside the external cavity to carry out the pulse shaping and an evolutionary algorithm to optimize the phase and amplitude. Here we present the results of separate phase and amplitude shaping as well as their interaction if optimized together at the same time. Furthermore we demonstrate the flexibility of the phase and amplitude shaping with respect to each other. Thus we expect of our system to enable adaptation to a resonator external dispersion.

  10. Peptide-coated semiconductor quantum dots and their applications in biological imaging of single molecules in live cells and organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinaud, Fabien Florent

    2007-12-01

    A new surface chemistry has been developed for the solubilization and biofunctionalization of inorganic semiconductor nanocrystals fluorescent probes, also known as quantum dots. This chemistry is based on the surface coating of quantum dots with custom-designed polycysteine peptides and yields water-soluble, small, monodispersed and colloidally stable probes that remain bright and photostable in complex biological milieus. This peptide coating strategy was successfully tested on several types of core and core-shell quantum dots emitting from the visible (e.g. CdSe/ZnS) to the NIR spectrum range (e.g. CdTe/CdSe/ZnS). By taking advantage of the versatile physico-chemical properties of peptides, a peptide "toolkit" was designed and employed to impart several biological functions to individual quantum dots and control their biochemical activity at the nanometer scale. These biofunctionalized peptide-coated quantum dots were exploited in very diverse biological applications. Near-infrared emitting quantum dot probes were engineered with optimized blood circulation and biodistribution properties for in vivo animal imaging. Visible emitting quantum dots were used for single molecule tracking of raft-associated GPI-anchored proteins in live cells. This last application revealed the presence of discrete and non-caveolar lipid microdomains capable of impeding free lateral diffusions in the plasma membrane of Hela cells. Imaging and tracking of peptide-coated quantum dots provided the first direct evidence that microdomains having the composition and behavior expected for lipid rafts can induce molecular compartmentalization in the membrane of living cells.

  11. RKKY interaction in a chirally coupled double quantum dot system

    SciTech Connect

    Heine, A. W.; Tutuc, D.; Haug, R. J.; Zwicknagl, G.; Schuh, D.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-12-04

    The competition between the Kondo effect and the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yoshida (RKKY) interaction is investigated in a double quantum dots system, coupled via a central open conducting region. A perpendicular magnetic field induces the formation of Landau Levels which in turn give rise to the so-called Kondo chessboard pattern in the transport through the quantum dots. The two quantum dots become therefore chirally coupled via the edge channels formed in the open conducting area. In regions where both quantum dots exhibit Kondo transport the presence of the RKKY exchange interaction is probed by an analysis of the temperature dependence. The thus obtained Kondo temperature of one dot shows an abrupt increase at the onset of Kondo transport in the other, independent of the magnetic field polarity, i.e. edge state chirality in the central region.

  12. Effective quantum dynamics of interacting systems with inhomogeneous coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, C. E.; Retamal, J. C.; Christ, H.; Solano, E.

    2007-03-15

    We study the quantum dynamics of a single mode (particle) interacting inhomogeneously with a large number of particles and introduce an effective approach to find the accessible Hilbert space, where the dynamics takes place. Two relevant examples are given: the inhomogeneous Tavis-Cummings model (e.g., N atomic qubits coupled to a single cavity mode, or to a motional mode in trapped ions) and the inhomogeneous coupling of an electron spin to N nuclear spins in a quantum dot.

  13. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of complexes of semiconductor quantum dots with chlorin e6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundelev, Evgeny V.; Orlova, Anna O.; Maslov, Vladimir G.; Baranov, Alexsander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2016-04-01

    Experimental investigation of circular dichroism (CD) spectra of complexes based on ZnS:Mn/ZnS and CdSe/ZnS QDs and chlorin e6 (Ce6) molecules in aqua solutions at different pH level, in methanol and in DMSO were carried out. The changes in CD spectra of Ce6 upon its bonding in complex with semiconductor QDs were analyzed. Application of CD spectroscopy allowed to obtain the CD spectrum of luminescent Ce6 dimer for the first time, and to discover a nonluminescent Ce6 aggregate, preliminary identified as a "tetramer", dissymmetry factor of which is 40 times larger than that for its monomer. The analysis of obtained data showed that in complexes with QDs Ce6 can be either in the monomeric form or in the form of non-luminescent tetramer. The interaction of relatively unstable luminescent Ce6 dimerwith QDs leads to its partial monomerization and formation complexes with chlorin e6 in monomeric form.

  14. One-dimensional quantum transport in hybrid metal-semiconductor nanotube systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelin, Maxim; Bondarev, Igor

    We study the inter-play between the intrinsic 1D conductance of metallic atomic wires (AWs) and plasmon mediated near-field effects for semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes (CNs) that encapsulate AWs of finite length. We use the matrix Green's functions formalism to develop an electron transfer theory for such a hybrid quasi-1D metal-semiconductor nanotube system. The theory predicts Fano resonances in electron transmission through the system. That is the AW-CN near-field interaction blocks some of the pristine AW transmission band channels to open up new coherent channels in the CN forbidden gap outside the pristine AW transmission band. This makes the entire hybrid system transparent in the energy domain where neither of the individual pristine constituents, neither AW nor CN, are transparent. The effect can be used to control electron charge transfer in semiconducting CN based devices for nanoscale energy conversion, separation and storage. Nsf-ECCS-1306871 (M.G.), DOE-DE-SC0007117 (I.B.).

  15. Squeezing terahertz light into nanovolumes: nanoantenna enhanced terahertz spectroscopy (NETS) of semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Toma, Andrea; Tuccio, Salvatore; Prato, Mirko; De Donato, Francesco; Perucchi, Andrea; Di Pietro, Paola; Marras, Sergio; Liberale, Carlo; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; De Angelis, Francesco; Manna, Liberato; Lupi, Stefano; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Razzari, Luca

    2015-01-14

    Terahertz spectroscopy has vast potentialities in sensing a broad range of elementary excitations (e.g., collective vibrations of molecules, phonons, excitons, etc.). However, the large wavelength associated with terahertz radiation (about 300 μm at 1 THz) severely hinders its interaction with nano-objects, such as nanoparticles, nanorods, nanotubes, and large molecules of biological relevance, practically limiting terahertz studies to macroscopic ensembles of these compounds, in the form of thick pellets of crystallized molecules or highly concentrated solutions of nanomaterials. Here we show that chains of terahertz dipole nanoantennas spaced by nanogaps of 20 nm allow retrieving the spectroscopic signature of a monolayer of cadmium selenide quantum dots, a significant portion of the signal arising from the dots located within the antenna nanocavities. A Fano-like interference between the fundamental antenna mode and the phonon resonance of the quantum dots is observed, accompanied by an absorption enhancement factor greater than one million. NETS can find immediate applications in terahertz spectroscopic studies of nanocrystals and molecules at extremely low concentrations. Furthermore, it shows a practicable route toward the characterization of individual nano-objects at these frequencies. PMID:25422163

  16. Interaction effects on the tunneling of electron-hole pairs in coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Hector M.; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H.; Ulloa, Sergio E.

    2001-03-01

    The transit time of carriers is beginning to be an important parameter in the physical operation of semiconductor quantum dot `devices'. In the present work, we study the coherent propagation of electron-hole pairs in coupled self-assembled quantum dots in close proximity. These systems, achieved experimentally in a number of different geometries, have been recently implemented as a novel storage of optical information that may give rise to smart pixel technology in the near future [1]. Here, we apply an effective mass hamiltonian approach and solve numerically the time dependent Schroedinger equation of a system of photo-created electron-hole pairs in the dots. Our approach takes into account both Coulomb interactions and confinement effects. The time evolution is investigated in terms of the structural parameters for typical InAs-GaAs dots. Different initial conditions are considered, reflecting the basic processes that would take place in these experiments. We study the probabilities of finding the electron and hole in either the same or adjacent quantum dot, and study carefully the role of interactions in this behavior. [1] T. Lundstrom, W. Schoenfeld, H. Lee, and P. M. Petroff, Science 286, 2312 (1999).

  17. Quench dynamics in long-range interacting quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Zhexuan

    2016-05-01

    A distinctive feature of atomic, molecular, and optical systems is that interactions between particles are often long-ranged. Control techniques from quantum optics often allow one to tune the pattern of these long-range interactions, creating an entirely new degree of freedom, absent in typical condensed matter systems. These tunable long-range interactions can result in very different far-from-equilibrium dynamics compared to systems with only short-range interactions. In the first half of the talk, I will describe how very general types of long-range interactions can qualitatively change the entanglement and correlation growth shortly after a quantum quench. In the second half of the talk I will show that, at longer times, long-range interactions can lead to exotic quasi-stationary states and dynamical phase transitions. These theoretical ideas have been explored in recent trapped-ion experiments, and connections to these experiments will be emphasized in both parts of the talk.

  18. Ballistic graphene nanoribbon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors: A full real-space quantum transport simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Gengchiau; Neophytou, Neophytos; Lundstrom, Mark S.; Nikonov, Dmitri E.

    2007-09-01

    A real-space quantum transport simulator for graphene nanoribbon (GNR) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) has been developed and used to examine the ballistic performance of GNR MOSFETs. This study focuses on the impact of quantum effects on these devices and on the effect of different type of contacts. We found that two-dimensional (2D) semi-infinite graphene contacts produce metal-induced-gap states (MIGS) in the GNR channel. These states enhance quantum tunneling, particularly in short channel devices, they cause Fermi level pinning and degrade the device performance in both the ON-state and OFF-state. Devices with infinitely long contacts having the same width as the channel do not indicate MIGS. Even without MIGS quantum tunneling effects such as band-to-band tunneling still play an important role in the device characteristics and dominate the OFF-state current. This is accurately captured in our nonequilibrium Greens' function quantum simulations. We show that both narrow (1.4 nm width) and wider (1.8 nm width) GNRs with 12.5 nm channel length have the potential to outperform ultrascaled Si devices in terms of drive current capabilities and electrostatic control. Although their subthreshold swings under forward bias are better than in Si transistors, tunneling currents are important and prevent the achievement of the theoretical limit of 60 mV/dec.

  19. Two Dimensional Effective Electron Mass at the Fermi Level in Quantum Wells of III-V, Ternary and Quaternary Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, S; Chatterjee, B; Debbarma, S; Ghatak, K P

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we study the influence of strong electric field on the two dimensional (2D)effective electron mass (EEM) at the Fermi level in quantum wells of III-V, ternary and quaternary semiconductors within the framework of k x p formalism by formulating a new 2D electron energy spectrum. It appears taking quantum wells of InSb, InAs, Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te and In(1-x)Ga(x)As(1-y)P(y) lattice matched to InP as examples that the EEM increases with decreasing film thickness, increasing electric field and increases with increasing surface electron concentration exhibiting spikey oscillations because of the crossing over of the Fermi level by the quantized level in quantum wells and the quantized oscillation occurs when the Fermi energy touches the sub-band energy. The electric field makes the mass quantum number dependent and the oscillatory mass introduces quantum number dependent mass anisotropy in addition to energy. The EEM increases with decreasing alloy composition where the variations are totally band structure dependent. Under certain limiting conditions all the results for all the cases get simplified into the well-known parabolic energy bands and thus confirming the compatibility test. The content of this paper finds three applications in the fields of nano-science and technology. PMID:26716200

  20. Asymmetric current-phase relation due to spin-orbit interaction in semiconductor nanowire Josephson junction

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, Tomohiro; Eto, Mikio; Nazarov, Yuli V.

    2013-12-04

    We theoretically study the current-phase relation in semiconductor nanowire Josephson junction in the presence of spin-orbit interaction. In the nanowire, the impurity scattering with strong SO interaction is taken into account using the random matrix theory. In the absence of magnetic field, the Josephson current I and phase difference φ between the superconductors satisfy the relation of I(φ) = –I(–φ). In the presence of magnetic field along the nanowire, the interplay between the SO interaction and Zeeman effect breaks the current-phase relation of I(φ) = –I(–φ). In this case, we show that the critical current depends on the current direction, which qualitatively agrees with recent experimental findings.

  1. Electromagnetically induced grating via coherently driven the n-doped In0.47Ga0.53As semiconductor quantum well nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseri, Tayebeh

    2016-06-01

    A new scheme for investigating electromagnetically induced grating (EIG) in the vanishing two-photon absorption condition in a three-level ladder-configuration n-doped semiconductor quantum well is presented. By applying a standing-wave field interacting with the system, the absorption and dispersion of the probe field will change with the spatial periodical modulation. It is shown that the first-order diffraction intensity sensitively depends on the intensity of coupling fields, detuning of applied laser fields and interaction length. Moreover, it can reach its maximum on varying the system parameters. A novel result shows the considerable efficiency of higher order diffractions is significantly improved via relative phase between applied laser fields. Furthermore, it is found that the intensity of the switching and coupling fields can increase the efficiency of the phase grating in the present model. Such a unique feature of the cooperative Electromagnetic Induced Grating may be extended to further develop diffraction based new photonic devices in quantum information networks and new photonic devices in all-optical switching and optical imaging.

  2. Calendar effects in quantum mechanics in view of interactive holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovich, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Quantum mechanics in terms of interactive holography appears as `normal' science [1]. With the holography quantum behavior is determined by the interplay of material formations and their conjugate images. To begin with, this effortlessly elucidates the nonlocality in quantum entanglements. Then, it has been shown that Schr"odinger's dynamics for a single particle arises from Bi-Fragmental random walks of the particle itself and its holographic image. For many particles this picture blurs with fragments merging as bosons or fermions. In biomolecules, swapping of particles and their holographic placeholders leads to self-replication of the living matter. Because of broad interpretations of quantum formalism direct experiments attributing it to holography may not be very compelling. The holographic mechanism better reveals as an absolute frame of reference. A number of physical and biological events exhibit annual variations when Earth orbital position changes with respect to the universal holographic mechanism. The well established calendar variations of heart attacks can be regarded as a positive outcome of a generalization of the Michelson experiment, where holography is interferometry and ailing hearts are detectors of pathologically replicated proteins. Also, there have been already observed calendar changes in radioactive decay rates. The same could be expected for various fine quantum experiences, like, e.g., Josephson tunneling. In other words, Quantum Mechanics (February) Quantum Mechanics (August). [1] S. Berkovich, ``A comprehensive explanation of quantum mechanics,'' www.cs.gwu.edu/research/technical-report/170 .

  3. Tapered InAs/InGaAs quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier design for enhanced gain and beam quality.

    PubMed

    Mesaritakis, Charis; Kapsalis, Alexandros; Simos, Hercules; Simos, Christos; Krakowski, Michel; Krestnikov, Igor; Syvridis, Dimitris

    2013-07-15

    In this Letter, a design for a tapered InAs/InGaAs quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier is proposed and experimentally evaluated. The amplifier's geometry was optimized in order to reduce gain saturation effects and improve gain efficiency and beam quality. The experimental measurements confirm that the proposed amplifier allows for an elevated optical gain in the saturation regime, whereas a five-fold increase in the coupling efficiency to a standard single mode optical fiber is observed, due to the improvement in the beam quality factor M² of the emitted beam. PMID:23939062

  4. Modeling of High-Quality Factor XNOR Gate Using Quantum-Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers at 1 Tb/s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotb, Amer

    2015-06-01

    The modeling of all-optical logic XNOR gate is realized by a series combination of XOR and INVERT gates. This Boolean function is simulated by using Mach-Zehnder interferometers (MZIs) utilizing quantum-dots semiconductor optical amplifiers (QDs-SOAs). The study is carried out when the effect of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) is included. The dependence of the output quality factor ( Q-factor) on signals and QDs-SOAs' parameters is also investigated and discussed. The simulation is conducted under a repetition rate of ˜1 Tb/s.

  5. Charge carrier generation in photosensitive amorphous molecular semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, Y.; Kharkyanen, V.; Zabolotny, M.; Zabolotnaya, T.

    2006-05-01

    Thermalization process in photosensitive amorphous molecular semiconductors are theoretically considered from standpoint of their parameters, namely: thermalization time, thermalization length. The heat electron formed in consequence of absorption of the light quantum by semiconductor molecules loses his surplus energy in the time of inelastic interaction with neighbouring atoms. The results of theoretical predictions are confirmed by the experimental ones obtained for a number of molecular semiconductors (anthracene, pentacene, PVC, PEPC).

  6. Generation of a multi-qubit W entangled state through spatially separated semiconductor quantum-dot-molecules in cavity-quantum electrodynamics arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Siping; Yu, Rong; Li, Jiahua; Wu, Ying

    2014-04-07

    Generating entangled states attract tremendous interest as the most vivid manifestation of nonlocality of quantum mechanics and also for emerging applications in quantum information processing (QIP). Here, we propose theoretically a scheme for the deterministic generation of a three-qubit W sate with three semiconductor quantum-dot-molecules (QDMs) trapped in spatially separated cavities connected by optical fibers. The proposed scheme takes full advantage of the voltage-controlled tunnelling effects in QDMs, which induces the quantum coherence and further controls the generation of the W entangled state. The influences of the system parameters and various decoherence processes including spontaneous decay and photon leakage on the fidelity of the W state are discussed in details. Numerical results indicate that our scheme is not only robust against these decoherence factors but also insensitive to the deviation of the system parameters from the ideal conditions. Furthermore, the present scheme can be directly extended to realize an N-qubit W state. Also, this scheme can be generically transferred to other physical systems, including circuit quantum electrodynamics and photonic crystal cavities. The results obtained here may be useful in real experiments for realizing QIP in a solid-state platform.

  7. Designing learning environments to teach interactive Quantum Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Puente, Sonia M.; Swagten, Henk J. M.

    2012-10-01

    This study aims at describing and analysing systematically an interactive learning environment designed to teach Quantum Physics, a second-year physics course. The instructional design of Quantum Physics is a combination of interactive lectures (using audience response systems), tutorials and self-study in unit blocks, carried out with small groups. Individual formative feedback was introduced as a rapid assessment tool to provide an overview on progress and identify gaps by means of questioning students at three levels: conceptual; prior knowledge; homework exercises. The setup of Quantum Physics has been developed as a result of several loops of adjustments and improvements from a traditional-like type of teaching to an interactive classroom. Results of this particular instructional arrangement indicate significant gains in students' achievements in comparison with the traditional structure of this course, after recent optimisation steps such as the implementation of an individual feedback system.

  8. Effect of carrier dynamics and temperature on two-state lasing in semiconductor quantum dot lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Korenev, V. V. Savelyev, A. V.; Zhukov, A. E.; Omelchenko, A. V.; Maximov, M. V.

    2013-10-15

    It is analytically shown that the both the charge carrier dynamics in quantum dots and their capture into the quantum dots from the matrix material have a significant effect on two-state lasing phenomenon in quantum dot lasers. In particular, the consideration of desynchronization in electron and hole capture into quantum dots allows one to describe the quenching of ground-state lasing observed at high injection currents both qualitatevely and quantitatively. At the same time, an analysis of the charge carrier dynamics in a single quantum dot allowed us to describe the temperature dependences of the emission power via the ground- and excited-state optical transitions of quantum dots.

  9. Comprehensive comparison and experimental validation of band-structure calculation methods in III-V semiconductor quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerveas, George; Caruso, Enrico; Baccarani, Giorgio; Czornomaz, Lukas; Daix, Nicolas; Esseni, David; Gnani, Elena; Gnudi, Antonio; Grassi, Roberto; Luisier, Mathieu; Markussen, Troels; Osgnach, Patrik; Palestri, Pierpaolo; Schenk, Andreas; Selmi, Luca; Sousa, Marilyne; Stokbro, Kurt; Visciarelli, Michele

    2016-01-01

    We present and thoroughly compare band-structures computed with density functional theory, tight-binding, k · p and non-parabolic effective mass models. Parameter sets for the non-parabolic Γ, the L and X valleys and intervalley bandgaps are extracted for bulk InAs, GaAs and InGaAs. We then consider quantum-wells with thickness ranging from 3 nm to 10 nm and the bandgap dependence on film thickness is compared with experiments for In0.53Ga0.47 As quantum-wells. The impact of the band-structure on the drain current of nanoscale MOSFETs is simulated with ballistic transport models, the results provide a rigorous assessment of III-V semiconductor band structure calculation methods and calibrated band parameters for device simulations.

  10. Short-time-interaction quantum measurement through an incoherent mediator

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, J.; Romero, G.; Lizuain, I.; Muga, J. G.; Retamal, J. C.; Roos, C. F.; Solano, E.

    2010-06-15

    We propose a method of indirect measurements where a probe is able to read, in short interaction times, the quantum state of a remote system through an incoherent third party, hereafter called a mediator. The probe and system can interact briefly with the mediator in an incoherent state but not directly among themselves and, nevertheless, the transfer of quantum information can be achieved with robustness. We exemplify our measurement scheme with a paradigmatic example of this tripartite problem--a qubit-oscillator-qubit setup--and discuss different physical scenarios, pointing out the associated advantages and limitations.

  11. Observation of topological transitions in interacting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roushan, Pedram

    2015-03-01

    Topology, despite its mathematical abstractness, often manifests itself in physics and plays a pivotal role in our understanding of natural phenomena. Notable examples include the discoveries of topological phases in condensed matter systems which have changed the modern conception of phases of matter. The global nature of topological ordering, however, makes direct experimental probing an outstanding challenge. Present experimental tools are mainly indirect and inadequate for studying such properties at a fundamental level. Here, we employ the exquisite control afforded by superconducting quantum circuits to directly investigate topological properties of quantum spin systems. The essence of our approach is to infer local curvature by measuring the deflection of quantum trajectories topological properties are then revealed from a quantum analog of the Gauss-Bonnet theorem. We benchmark our technique by constructing the topological phase diagram of the celebrated Haldane model. The nature of the individual phases is revealed by visualizing their microscopic spin texture and evolution across the transition. Furthermore, we demonstrate the power of our method in studying the topology of interacting quantum systems, utilizing a novel qubit architecture which enables control over every term in a two-qubit Hamiltonian. We discovered an interaction-driven topological phase, whose emergence is understood by fully exploring the parameter-space of the Hamiltonian. Our work establishes a generalizable experimental platform to study fundamental aspects of topological phenomena in quantum systems. NSF Grants: DMR-0907039 and DMR-1029764.

  12. Comparing multiple exciton generation in quantum dots to impact ionization in bulk semiconductors: implications for enhancement of solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Beard, Matthew C; Midgett, Aaron G; Hanna, Mark C; Luther, Joseph M; Hughes, Barbara K; Nozik, Arthur J

    2010-08-11

    Multiple exciton generation (MEG) in quantum dots (QDs) and impact ionization (II) in bulk semiconductors are processes that describe producing more than one electron-hole pair per absorbed photon. We derive expressions for the proper way to compare MEG in QDs with II in bulk semiconductors and argue that there are important differences in the photophysics between bulk semiconductors and QDs. Our analysis demonstrates that the fundamental unit of energy required to produce each electron-hole pair in a given QD is the band gap energy. We find that the efficiency of the multiplication process increases by at least 2 in PbSe QDs compared to bulk PbSe, while the competition between cooling and multiplication favors multiplication by a factor of 3 in QDs. We also demonstrate that power conversion efficiencies in QD solar cells exhibiting MEG can greatly exceed conversion efficiencies of their bulk counterparts, especially if the MEG threshold energy can be reduced toward twice the QD band gap energy, which requires a further increase in the MEG efficiency. Finally, we discuss the research challenges associated with achieving the maximum benefit of MEG in solar energy conversion since we show the threshold and efficiency are mathematically related. PMID:20698615

  13. Comparing Multiple Exciton Generation in Quantum Dots To Impact Ionization in Bulk Semiconductors: Implications for Enhancement of Solar Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, Matthew C.; Midgett, Aaron G.; Hanna, Mark C.; Luther, Joseph M.; Hughes, Barbara K.; Nozik, Arthur J.

    2010-07-26

    Multiple exciton generation (MEG) in quantum dots (QDs) and impact ionization (II) in bulk semiconductors are processes that describe producing more than one electron-hole pair per absorbed photon. We derive expressions for the proper way to compare MEG in QDs with II in bulk semiconductors and argue that there are important differences in the photophysics between bulk semiconductors and QDs. Our analysis demonstrates that the fundamental unit of energy required to produce each electron-hole pair in a given QD is the band gap energy. We find that the efficiency of the multiplication process increases by at least 2 in PbSe QDs compared to bulk PbSe, while the competition between cooling and multiplication favors multiplication by a factor of 3 in QDs. We also demonstrate that power conversion efficiencies in QD solar cells exhibiting MEG can greatly exceed conversion efficiencies of their bulk counterparts, especially if the MEG threshold energy can be reduced toward twice the QD band gap energy, which requires a further increase in the MEG efficiency. Finally, we discuss the research challenges associated with achieving the maximum benefit of MEG in solar energy conversion since we show the threshold and efficiency are mathematically related.

  14. Properties of nanocones formed on a surface of semiconductors by laser radiation: quantum confinement effect of electrons, phonons, and excitons.

    PubMed

    Medvid, Artur; Onufrijevs, Pavels; Mychko, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of the analysis of experimental results, a two-stage mechanism of nanocones formation on the irradiated surface of semiconductors by Nd:YAG laser is proposed for elementary semiconductors and solid solutions, such as Si, Ge, SiGe, and CdZnTe. Properties observed are explained in the frame of quantum confinement effect. The first stage of the mechanism is characterized by the formation of a thin strained top layer, due to redistribution of point defects in temperature-gradient field induced by laser radiation. The second stage is characterized by mechanical plastic deformation of the stained top layer leading to arising of nanocones, due to selective laser absorption of the top layer. The nanocones formed on the irradiated surface of semiconductors by Nd:YAG laser possessing the properties of 1D graded bandgap have been found for Si, Ge, and SiGe as well, however QD structure in CdTe was observed. The model is confirmed by "blue shift" of bands in photoluminescence spectrum, "red shift" of longitudinal optical line in Raman back scattering spectrum of Ge crystal, appearance of Ge phase in SiGe solid solution after irradiation by the laser at intensity 20 MW/cm2, and non-monotonous dependence of Si crystal micro-hardness as function of the laser intensity. PMID:22060172

  15. Quantum Interactive Dualism: An Alternative to Materialism

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, Henry P

    2005-06-01

    Materialism rest implicitly upon the general conception of nature promoted by Galileo and Newton during the seventeenth century. It features the causal closure of the physical: The course of physically described events for all time is fixed by laws that refer exclusively to the physically describeable features of nature, and initial conditions on these feature. No reference to subjective thoughts or feeling of human beings enter. That simple conception of nature was found during the first quarter of the twentieth century to be apparently incompatible with the empirical facts. The founders of quantum theory created a new fundamental physical theory, quantum theory, which introduced crucially into the causal structure certain conscious choices made by human agents about how they will act. These conscious human choices are ''free'' in the sense that they are not fixed by the known laws. But they can influence the course of physically described events. Thus the principle of the causal closure of the physical fails. Applications in psycho-neuro-dynamics are described.

  16. Temperature Dependence of Band Gaps in Semiconductors: Electron-Phonon Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhosale, J. S.; Ramdas, A. K.; Burger, A.; Muñoz, A.; Romero, A. H.; Cardona, M.; Lauck, R.; Kremer, R. K.

    2013-03-01

    A theoretical investigation with ab initio techniques of the electron-phonon interaction of semiconductors with chalcopyrite structure and its comparison with modulated reflectivity experiments yield a striking difference between those with (AgGaS2) and without (ZnSnAs2) d electrons in their valence bands. The former exhibit a non-monotonic temperature dependence of the band gaps whose origin is not yet fully understood. The analysis of this temperature dependence with the Bose-Einstein oscillator model[1] involving two oscillator terms having weights of opposite signs, provides an excellent agreement with the experimental data and correlates well with the characteristic peaks in the phonon density of states associated with the acoustical phonon modes. This work underscores the need for theoretical understanding of the electron-phonon interaction involving d electrons, particularly in ab initio investigations.

  17. Bistability characteristics of different types of optical modes amplified by quantum dot vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasaimeh, Omar

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the characteristics of optical bistability of different types of optical modes amplified by small-size quantum dot vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers operated in reflection. Our analysis reveals that TE01 mode exhibits stronger intensity-dependent non-linearity in small radius devices, which results in stronger optical phase modulation and therefore larger hysteresis width compared with the other modes. The effect of the wavelength detuning of the input signal on the shape of the hysteresis loop is studied. We find that butterfly hysteresis loop exhibits the largest hysteresis width compared with clockwise and counterclockwise loops. Our analysis reveals that doping the quantum dots with p-type doping slightly reduces the hysteresis width while doping the dots with n-type doping clearly increases the hysteresis width for any wavelength detuning. We estimate that the hysteresis width of quantum dot active layer will exhibit higher hysteresis width compared with quantum well active layer having the same threshold gain.

  18. Quantum dot sensitized solar cells. A tale of two semiconductor nanocrystals: CdSe and CdTe.

    PubMed

    Bang, Jin Ho; Kamat, Prashant V

    2009-06-23

    CdSe and CdTe nanocrystals are linked to nanostructured TiO2 films using 3-mercaptopropionic acid as a linker molecule for establishing the mechanistic aspects of interfacial charge transfer processes. Both these quantum dots are energetically capable of sensitizing TiO2 films and generating photocurrents in quantum dot solar cells. These two semiconductor nanocrystals exhibit markedly different external quantum efficiencies ( approximately 70% for CdSe and approximately 0.1% for CdTe at 555 nm). Although CdTe with a more favorable conduction band energy (E(CB) = -1.0 V vs NHE) is capable of injecting electrons into TiO2 faster than CdSe (E(CB) = -0.6 V vs NHE), hole scavenging by a sulfide redox couple remains a major bottleneck. The sulfide ions dissolved in aqueous solutions are capable of scavenging photogenerated holes in photoirradiated CdSe system but not in CdTe. The anodic corrosion and exchange of Te with S dominate the charge transfer at the CdTe interface. Factors that dictate the efficiency and photostability of CdSe and CdTe quantum dots are discussed. PMID:19435373

  19. Satellite structures in the spectral functions of the two-dimensional electron gas in semiconductor quantum wells: A GW plus cumulant study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischner, Johannes; Vigil-Fowler, Derek; Louie, Steven G.

    2014-03-01

    We present theoretical calculations for the spectral functions and single-particle densities of states of the two-dimensional electron gas in semiconductor quantum wells at different electron densities using the GW plus cumulant method. We compare our results to GW only calculations and find significant differences in the description of the satellites between the two theories: While GW theory predicts the existence of a plasmaron excitation, no such excitation is found in GW plus cumulant theory. We compare our results to experimental tunneling spectra from semiconductor quantum wells and find good agreement for the satellite properties.

  20. Quantum teleportation of dynamics and effective interactions between remote systems.

    PubMed

    Muschik, Christine A; Hammerer, Klemens; Polzik, Eugene S; Cirac, Ignacio J

    2013-07-12

    Most protocols for quantum information processing consist of a series of quantum gates, which are applied sequentially. In contrast, interactions between matter and fields, for example, as well as measurements such as homodyne detection of light are typically continuous in time. We show how the ability to perform quantum operations continuously and deterministically can be leveraged for inducing nonlocal dynamics between two separate parties. We introduce a scheme for the engineering of an interaction between two remote systems and present a protocol that induces a dynamics in one of the parties that is controlled by the other one. Both schemes apply to continuous variable systems, run continuously in time, and are based on real-time feedback. PMID:23889374

  1. Block-adaptive quantum mechanics: an adaptive divide-and-conquer approach to interactive quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bosson, Maël; Grudinin, Sergei; Redon, Stephane

    2013-03-01

    We present a novel Block-Adaptive Quantum Mechanics (BAQM) approach to interactive quantum chemistry. Although quantum chemistry models are known to be computationally demanding, we achieve interactive rates by focusing computational resources on the most active parts of the system. BAQM is based on a divide-and-conquer technique and constrains some nucleus positions and some electronic degrees of freedom on the fly to simplify the simulation. As a result, each time step may be performed significantly faster, which in turn may accelerate attraction to the neighboring local minima. By applying our approach to the nonself-consistent Atom Superposition and Electron Delocalization Molecular Orbital theory, we demonstrate interactive rates and efficient virtual prototyping for systems containing more than a thousand of atoms on a standard desktop computer. PMID:23108532

  2. A Model for a Quantum Level System-Apparatus Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A quantum system is investigated which consists of a two-state spin which interacts with a model apparatus consisting of a large number of bosons. The Hamiltonian which describes the interaction of system and apparatus is defined and the evolution of an initial state of the two by means of an evolution operator over time is calculated. Some insights into the nature of such measurement processes can be made.

  3. Quantum field theory of interacting plasmon-photon-phonon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieu Nguyen, Van; Nguyen, Bich Ha

    2015-09-01

    This work is devoted to the construction of the quantum field theory of the interacting system of plasmons, photons and phonons on the basis of general fundamental principles of electrodynamics and quantum field theory of many-body systems. Since a plasmon is a quasiparticle appearing as a resonance in the collective oscillation of the interacting electron gas in solids, the starting point is the total action functional of the interacting system comprising electron gas, electromagnetic field and phonon fields. By means of the powerful functional integral technique, this original total action is transformed into that of the system of the quantum fields describing plasmons, transverse photons, acoustic as well as optic longitudinal and transverse phonons. The collective oscillations of the electron gas is characterized by a real scalar field φ(x) called the collective oscillation field. This field is split into the static background field φ0(x) and the fluctuation field ζ(x). The longitudinal phonon fields {{{Q}}al}(x), {{{Q}}ol}(x) are also split into the background fields {Q}0al(x), {Q}0ol(x) and dynamical fields {{{q}}al}(x), {{{q}}ol}(x) while the transverse phonon fields {{{Q}}at}(x), {{{Q}}ot}(x) themselves are dynamical fields {{{q}}at}(x), {{{q}}ot}(x) without background fields. After the canonical quantization procedure, the background fields φ0(x), {Q}0al(x), {Q}0ol(x) remain the classical fields, while the fluctuation fields ζ(x) and dynamical phonon fields {{{q}}al}(x), {{{q}}at}(x), {{{q}}ol}(x), {{{q}}ot}(x) become quantum fields. In quantum theory, a plasmon is the quantum of Hermitian scalar field σ(x) called the plasmon field, longitudinal phonons as complex spinless quasiparticles are the quanta of the effective longitudinal phonon Hermitian scalar fields {{θ }a}(x), {{θ }0}(x), while transverse phonons are the quanta of the original Hermitian transverse phonon vector fields {{{q}}at}(x), {{{q}}ot}(x). By means of the functional integral

  4. Metal colloids and semiconductor quantum dots: Linear and nonlinear optical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, D. O.; My, R.; Tung, Y.; Ueda, A.; Zhu, J.; Collins, W. E.; Hall, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    One aspect of this project involves a collaborative effort with the Solid State Division of ORNL. The thrust behind this research is to develop ion implantion for synthesizing novel materials (quantum dots wires and wells, and metal colloids) for applications in all optical switching devices, up conversion, and the synthesis of novel refractory materials. In general the host material is typically a glass such as optical grade silica. The ions of interest are Au, Ag, Cd, Se, In, P, Sb, Ga and As. An emphasis is placed on host guest interactions between the matrix and the implanted ion and how the matrix effects and implantation parameters can be used to obtain designer level optical devices tailored for specific applications. The specific materials of interest are: CdSe, CdTe, InAs, GaAs, InP, GaP, InSb, GaSb and InGaAs. A second aspect of this research program involves using porous glass (25-200 A) for fabricating materials of finite size. In this part of the program, we are particularly interested in characterizing the thermodynamic and optical properties of these non-composite materials. We also address how phase diagram of the confined material is altered by the interfacial properties between the confined material and the pore wall.

  5. Metal colloids and semiconductor quantum dots: Linear and nonlinear optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, D. O.; My, R.; Tung, Y.; Ueda, A.; Zhu, J.; Collins, W. E.; Hall, Christopher

    1995-08-01

    One aspect of this project involves a collaborative effort with the Solid State Division of ORNL. The thrust behind this research is to develop ion implantion for synthesizing novel materials (quantum dots wires and wells, and metal colloids) for applications in all optical switching devices, up conversion, and the synthesis of novel refractory materials. In general the host material is typically a glass such as optical grade silica. The ions of interest are Au, Ag, Cd, Se, In, P, Sb, Ga and As. An emphasis is placed on host guest interactions between the matrix and the implanted ion and how the matrix effects and implantation parameters can be used to obtain designer level optical devices tailored for specific applications. The specific materials of interest are: CdSe, CdTe, InAs, GaAs, InP, GaP, InSb, GaSb and InGaAs. A second aspect of this research program involves using porous glass (25-200 A) for fabricating materials of finite size. In this part of the program, we are particularly interested in characterizing the thermodynamic and optical properties of these non-composite materials. We also address how phase diagram of the confined material is altered by the interfacial properties between the confined material and the pore wall.

  6. Automated generation of quantum-accurate classical interatomic potentials for metals and semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Aidan; Foiles, Stephen; Schultz, Peter; Swiler, Laura; Trott, Christian; Tucker, Garritt

    2013-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) is a powerful condensed matter simulation tool for bridging between macroscopic continuum models and quantum models (QM) treating a few hundred atoms, but is limited by the accuracy of available interatomic potentials. Sound physical and chemical understanding of these interactions have resulted in a variety of concise potentials for certain systems, but it is difficult to extend them to new materials and properties. The growing availability of large QM data sets has made it possible to use more automated machine-learning approaches. Bartók et al. demonstrated that the bispectrum of the local neighbor density provides good regression surrogates for QM models. We adopt a similar bispectrum representation within a linear regression scheme. We have produced potentials for silicon and tantalum, and we are currently extending the method to III-V compounds. Results will be presented demonstrating the accuracy of these potentials relative to the training data, as well as their ability to accurately predict material properties not explicitly included in the training data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy Nat. Nuclear Security Admin. under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Genotoxic capacity of Cd/Se semiconductor quantum dots with differing surface chemistries

    PubMed Central

    Manshian, Bella B.; Soenen, Stefaan J.; Brown, Andy; Hondow, Nicole; Wills, John; Jenkins, Gareth J. S.; Doak, Shareen H.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dots (QD) have unique electronic and optical properties promoting biotechnological advances. However, our understanding of the toxicological structure–activity relationships remains limited. This study aimed to determine the biological impact of varying nanomaterial surface chemistry by assessing the interaction of QD with either a negative (carboxyl), neutral (hexadecylamine; HDA) or positive (amine) polymer coating with human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells. Following QD physico-chemical characterisation, cellular uptake was quantified by optical and electron microscopy. Cytotoxicity was evaluated and genotoxicity was characterised using the micronucleus assay (gross chromosomal damage) and the HPRT forward mutation assay (point mutagenicity). Cellular damage mechanisms were also explored, focusing on oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Cell uptake, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were found to be dependent on QD surface chemistry. Carboxyl-QD demonstrated the smallest agglomerate size and greatest cellular uptake, which correlated with a dose dependent increase in cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. Amine-QD induced minimal cellular damage, while HDA-QD promoted substantial induction of cell death and genotoxicity. However, HDA-QD were not internalised by the cells and the damage they caused was most likely due to free cadmium release caused by QD dissolution. Oxidative stress and induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species were only partially associated with cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by the QD, hence were not the only mechanisms of importance. Colloidal stability, nanoparticle (NP) surface chemistry, cellular uptake levels and the intrinsic characteristics of the NPs are therefore critical parameters impacting genotoxicity induced by QD. PMID:26275419

  8. Superfluorescence from photoexcited semiconductor quantum wells: Magnetic field, temperature, and excitation power dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Kankan; Wang, Yongrui; Kim, Ji-Hee; Noe, G. Timothy; McGill, Stephen A.; Belyanin, Alexey; Kono, Junichiro

    2015-06-01

    Superfluorescence (SF) is a many-body process in which a macroscopic polarization spontaneously builds up from an initially incoherent ensemble of excited dipoles and then cooperatively decays, producing a delayed pulse of coherent radiation. SF arising from electron-hole recombination has recently been observed in In0.2Ga0.8As /GaAs quantum wells [G. T. Noe et al., Nature Phys. 8, 219 (2012), 10.1038/nphys2207 and J.-H. Kim et al., Sci. Rep. 3, 3283 (2013), 10.1038/srep03283], but its observability conditions have not been fully established. Here, by performing magnetic field (B ), temperature (T ), and pump power (P ) dependent studies of SF intensity, linewidth, and delay time through time-integrated and time-resolved magnetophotoluminescence spectroscopy, we have mapped out the B -T -P region in which SF is observable. In general, SF can be observed only at sufficiently low temperatures, sufficiently high magnetic fields, and sufficiently high laser powers with characteristic threshold behavior. We provide theoretical insights into these behaviors based primarily on considerations on how the growth rate of macroscopic coherence depends on these parameters. These results provide fundamental new insight into electron-hole SF, highlighting the importance of Coulomb interactions among photogenerated carriers as well as various scattering processes that are absent in SF phenomena in atomic and molecular systems.

  9. Observation of topological transitions in interacting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roushan, P.; Neill, C.; Chen, Yu; Kolodrubetz, M.; Quintana, C.; Leung, N.; Fang, M.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T.; Polkovnikov, A.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, J. M.

    2014-11-01

    Topology, with its abstract mathematical constructs, often manifests itself in physics and has a pivotal role in our understanding of natural phenomena. Notably, the discovery of topological phases in condensed-matter systems has changed the modern conception of phases of matter. The global nature of topological ordering, however, makes direct experimental probing an outstanding challenge. Present experimental tools are mainly indirect and, as a result, are inadequate for studying the topology of physical systems at a fundamental level. Here we employ the exquisite control afforded by state-of-the-art superconducting quantum circuits to investigate topological properties of various quantum systems. The essence of our approach is to infer geometric curvature by measuring the deflection of quantum trajectories in the curved space of the Hamiltonian. Topological properties are then revealed by integrating the curvature over closed surfaces, a quantum analogue of the Gauss-Bonnet theorem. We benchmark our technique by investigating basic topological concepts of the historically important Haldane model after mapping the momentum space of this condensed-matter model to the parameter space of a single-qubit Hamiltonian. In addition to constructing the topological phase diagram, we are able to visualize the microscopic spin texture of the associated states and their evolution across a topological phase transition. Going beyond non-interacting systems, we demonstrate the power of our method by studying topology in an interacting quantum system. This required a new qubit architecture that allows for simultaneous control over every term in a two-qubit Hamiltonian. By exploring the parameter space of this Hamiltonian, we discover the emergence of an interaction-induced topological phase. Our work establishes a powerful, generalizable experimental platform to study topological phenomena in quantum systems.

  10. Observation of topological transitions in interacting quantum circuits.

    PubMed

    Roushan, P; Neill, C; Chen, Yu; Kolodrubetz, M; Quintana, C; Leung, N; Fang, M; Barends, R; Campbell, B; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Kelly, J; Megrant, A; Mutus, J; O'Malley, P J J; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T; Polkovnikov, A; Cleland, A N; Martinis, J M

    2014-11-13

    Topology, with its abstract mathematical constructs, often manifests itself in physics and has a pivotal role in our understanding of natural phenomena. Notably, the discovery of topological phases in condensed-matter systems has changed the modern conception of phases of matter. The global nature of topological ordering, however, makes direct experimental probing an outstanding challenge. Present experimental tools are mainly indirect and, as a result, are inadequate for studying the topology of physical systems at a fundamental level. Here we employ the exquisite control afforded by state-of-the-art superconducting quantum circuits to investigate topological properties of various quantum systems. The essence of our approach is to infer geometric curvature by measuring the deflection of quantum trajectories in the curved space of the Hamiltonian. Topological properties are then revealed by integrating the curvature over closed surfaces, a quantum analogue of the Gauss-Bonnet theorem. We benchmark our technique by investigating basic topological concepts of the historically important Haldane model after mapping the momentum space of this condensed-matter model to the parameter space of a single-qubit Hamiltonian. In addition to constructing the topological phase diagram, we are able to visualize the microscopic spin texture of the associated states and their evolution across a topological phase transition. Going beyond non-interacting systems, we demonstrate the power of our method by studying topology in an interacting quantum system. This required a new qubit architecture that allows for simultaneous control over every term in a two-qubit Hamiltonian. By exploring the parameter space of this Hamiltonian, we discover the emergence of an interaction-induced topological phase. Our work establishes a powerful, generalizable experimental platform to study topological phenomena in quantum systems. PMID:25391961

  11. Self-interaction and relaxation-corrected pseudopotentials for II-VI semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Dirk; Krüger, Peter; Pollmann, Johannes

    1996-08-01

    We report the construction of pseudopotentials that incorporate self-interaction corrections and electronic relaxation in an approximate but very efficient, physically well-founded, and mathematically well-defined way. These potentials are particularly useful for II-VI compounds which are distinguished by their highly localized and strongly bound cationic semicore d electrons. Self-interaction corrections to the local-density approximation (LDA) of density-functional theory are accounted for in the solids to a significant degree by constructing appropriate self-interaction-corrected (SIC) pseudopotentials that take atomic SIC contributions into account. In this way translational symmetry of the Hamiltonian is preserved. Without increasing the complexity of the numerical calculations we approximately account, in addition, for electronic relaxation in the solids by incorporating into our pseudopotentials relevant relaxation in the involved atoms. By this construction we arrive at very useful self-interaction and relaxation-corrected pseudopotentials and effective one-particle Hamiltonians which constitute the basis for ab initio LDA calculations yielding significant improvements in electronic properties of II-VI compound semiconductors and their surfaces. The procedure is computationally not more involved than any standard LDA calculation and, nevertheless, overcomes to a large extent the well-known shortcomings of ``state of the art'' LDA calculations employing standard pseudopotentials. Our results for electronic and structural properties of II-VI compounds agree with a whole body of experimental data.

  12. Madelung and Hubbard interactions in polaron band model of doped organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Png, Rui-Qi; Ang, Mervin C Y; Teo, Meng-How; Choo, Kim-Kian; Tang, Cindy Guanyu; Belaineh, Dagmawi; Chua, Lay-Lay; Ho, Peter K H

    2016-01-01

    The standard polaron band model of doped organic semiconductors predicts that density-of-states shift into the π-π* gap to give a partially filled polaron band that pins the Fermi level. This picture neglects both Madelung and Hubbard interactions. Here we show using ultrahigh workfunction hole-doped model triarylamine-fluorene copolymers that Hubbard interaction strongly splits the singly-occupied molecular orbital from its empty counterpart, while Madelung (Coulomb) interactions with counter-anions and other carriers markedly shift energies of the frontier orbitals. These interactions lower the singly-occupied molecular orbital band below the valence band edge and give rise to an empty low-lying counterpart band. The Fermi level, and hence workfunction, is determined by conjunction of the bottom edge of this empty band and the top edge of the valence band. Calculations are consistent with the observed Fermi-level downshift with counter-anion size and the observed dependence of workfunction on doping level in the strongly doped regime. PMID:27582355

  13. Spin Relaxation in III-V Semiconductors in various systems: Contribution of Electron-Electron Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Fatih; Kesserwan, Hasan; Manchon, Aurelien

    2015-03-01

    In spintronics, most of the phenomena that we are interested happen at very fast time scales and are rich in structure in time domain. Our understanding, on the other hand, is mostly based on energy domain calculations. Many of the theoretical tools use approximations and simplifications that can be perceived as oversimplifications. We compare the structure, material, carrier density and temperature dependence of spin relaxation time in n-doped III-V semiconductors using Elliot-Yafet (EY) and D'yakanov-Perel'(DP) with real time analysis using kinetic spin Bloch equations (KSBE). The EY and DP theories fail to capture details as the system investigated is varied. KSBE, on the other hand, incorporates all relaxation sources as well as electron-electron interaction which modifies the spin relaxation time in a non-linear way. Since el-el interaction is very fast (~ fs) and spin-conserving, it is usually ignored in the analysis of spin relaxation. Our results indicate that electron-electron interaction cannot be neglected and its interplay with the other (spin and momentum) relaxation mechanisms (electron-impurity and electron-phonon scattering) dramatically alters the resulting spin dynamics. We use each interaction explicitly to investigate how, in the presence of others, each relaxation source behaves. We use GaAs and GaN for zinc-blend structure, and GaN and AlN for the wurtzite structure.

  14. Interaction-induced backscattering in short quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, M.-T.; Micklitz, T.; Levchenko, A.; Matveev, K. A.

    2014-10-01

    We study interaction-induced backscattering in clean quantum wires with adiabatic contacts exposed to a voltage bias. Particle backscattering relaxes such systems to a fully equilibrated steady state only on length scales exponentially large in the ratio of bandwidth of excitations and temperature. Here we focus on shorter wires in which full equilibration is not accomplished. Signatures of relaxation then are due to backscattering of hole excitations close to the band bottom which perform a diffusive motion in momentum space while scattering from excitations at the Fermi level. This is reminiscent to the first passage problem of a Brownian particle and, regardless of the interaction strength, can be described by an inhomogeneous Fokker-Planck equation. From general solutions of the latter we calculate the hole backscattering rate for different wire lengths and discuss the resulting length dependence of interaction-induced correction to the conductance of a clean single channel quantum wire.

  15. Exchange interaction effects on waves in magnetized quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Trukhanova, Mariya Iv. Andreev, Pavel A.

    2015-02-15

    We have applied the many-particle quantum hydrodynamics that includes the Coulomb exchange interaction to magnetized quantum plasmas. We considered a number of wave phenomena that are affected by the Coulomb exchange interaction. Since the Coulomb exchange interaction affects the longitudinal and transverse-longitudinal waves, we focused our attention on the Langmuir waves, the Trivelpiece-Gould waves, the ion-acoustic waves in non-isothermal magnetized plasmas, the dispersion of the longitudinal low-frequency ion-acoustic waves, and low-frequency electromagnetic waves at T{sub e} ≫ T{sub i}. We have studied the dispersion of these waves and present the numeric simulation of their dispersion properties.

  16. Emergence of competing magnetic interactions induced by Ge doping in the semiconductor FeGa3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Quiceno, J. C.; Cabrera-Baez, M.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Avila, M. A.; Dalpian, G. M.; Osorio-Guillén, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    FeGa3 is an unusual intermetallic semiconductor that presents intriguing magnetic responses to the tuning of its electronic properties. When doped with Ge, the system evolves from diamagnetic to paramagnetic to ferromagnetic ground states that are not well understood. In this work, we have performed a joint theoretical and experimental study of FeGa3 -xGex using density functional theory and magnetic susceptibility measurements. For low Ge concentrations we observe the formation of localized moments on some Fe atoms and, as the dopant concentration increases, a more delocalized magnetic behavior emerges. The magnetic configuration strongly depends on the dopant distribution, leading even to the appearance of antiferromagnetic interactions in certain configurations.

  17. Single step deposition of an interacting layer of a perovskite matrix with embedded quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Thi Tuyen; Suarez, Isaac; Sanchez, Rafael S.; Martinez-Pastor, Juan P.; Mora-Sero, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    Hybrid lead halide perovskite (PS) derivatives have emerged as very promising materials for the development of optoelectronic devices in the last few years. At the same time, inorganic nanocrystals with quantum confinement (QDs) possess unique properties that make them suitable materials for the development of photovoltaics, imaging and lighting applications, among others. In this work, we report on a new methodology for the deposition of high quality, large grain size and pinhole free PS films (CH3NH3PbI3) with embedded PbS and PbS/CdS core/shell Quantum Dots (QDs). The strong interaction between both semiconductors is revealed by the formation of an exciplex state, which is monitored by photoluminescence and electroluminescence experiments. The radiative exciplex relaxation is centered in the near infrared region (NIR), ~1200 nm, which corresponds to lower energies than the corresponding band gap of both perovskite (PS) and QDs. Our approach allows the fabrication of multi-wavelength light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on a PS matrix with embedded QDs, which show considerably low turn-on potentials. The presence of the exciplex state of PS and QDs opens up a broad range of possibilities with important implications in both LEDs and solar cells.Hybrid lead halide perovskite (PS) derivatives have emerged as very promising materials for the development of optoelectronic devices in the last few years. At the same time, inorganic nanocrystals with quantum confinement (QDs) possess unique properties that make them suitable materials for the development of photovoltaics, imaging and lighting applications, among others. In this work, we report on a new methodology for the deposition of high quality, large grain size and pinhole free PS films (CH3NH3PbI3) with embedded PbS and PbS/CdS core/shell Quantum Dots (QDs). The strong interaction between both semiconductors is revealed by the formation of an exciplex state, which is monitored by photoluminescence and

  18. Cold atom simulation of interacting relativistic quantum field theories.

    PubMed

    Cirac, J Ignacio; Maraner, Paolo; Pachos, Jiannis K

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate that Dirac fermions self-interacting or coupled to dynamic scalar fields can emerge in the low energy sector of designed bosonic and fermionic cold atom systems. We illustrate this with two examples defined in two spacetime dimensions. The first one is the self-interacting Thirring model. The second one is a model of Dirac fermions coupled to a dynamic scalar field that gives rise to the Gross-Neveu model. The proposed cold atom experiments can be used to probe spectral or correlation properties of interacting quantum field theories thereby presenting an alternative to lattice gauge theory simulations. PMID:21231152

  19. Entanglement replication via quantum repeated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendenbaum, Pierre; Platini, Thierry; Karevski, Dragi

    2015-04-01

    We study entanglement creation between two independent XX chains, which are repeatedly coupled locally to spin-1/2 Bell pairs. We show analytically that in the steady state the entanglement of the Bell pairs is perfectly transferred to the chains, generating large-scale interchain pair correlations. However, before the steady state is reached, within a growing causal region around the interacting locus the chains are found in a current driven nonequilibrium steady state (NESS). In the NESS, the chains cross entanglement decays exponentially with respect to the distance to the boundary sites with a typical length scale which is inversely proportional to the driving current.

  20. The diamagnetic susceptibility of a donor in a semiconductor core shell quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Sudharshan, M. S.; Subhash, P.; Shaik, Nagoor Babu; Kalpana, P.; Jayakumar, K.; Reuben, A. Merwyn Jasper D.

    2015-06-24

    The effect of Aluminium concentration, shell thickness and size of the core shell Quantum Dot on the Diamagnetic Susceptibility of a donor in the Core Shell Quantum Dot is calculated in the effective mass approximation using the variational method. The results are presented and discussed.

  1. Analysis of strain effects on the dynamic spectra of a quantum well semiconductor optical amplifier using quantum well transmission line modelling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Mingjun; Ghafouri-Shiraz, H.

    2016-04-01

    This paper studies the strain (i.e. compressive (CS) and tensile (TS)) effects on the dynamic spectra of an amplified femtosecond pulse in a quantum well semiconductor optical amplifier (QW-SOA) using quantum well transmission line modelling (QW-TLM) method. Based on the analysis of band structure, the gain spectrum as well as the spontaneous spectrum of quantum well (QW) in the CS, unstrained (US) and TS are investigated using QW-TLM and it was found that in the CS QW, the magnitude ratio of the gain spectrum and the spontaneous emission spectrum is the largest. Furthermore, QW-TLM is adopted to investigate the dynamic spectral evolution of femtosecond pulse amplification in QW-SOAs and it was found that as the femtosecond pulse approaches the amplifier output, the centre frequency of the amplified femtosecond pulse spectra decreases and its bandwidth decreases. The output spectra of the amplified femtosecond pulse in QW amplifiers under the CS, US and TS cases are compared and the simulation results show that in a CS QW-SOA the spectral shape exhibits the largest magnitude and the smallest fluctuation due to the largest gain and the largest ratio between the gain and noise.

  2. Lecture Notes on Interacting Quantum Fields in de Sitter Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, E. T.

    2013-09-01

    We discuss peculiarities of quantum fields in de Sitter (dS) space on the example of the self-interacting massive real scalar, minimally coupled to the gravity background. Nonconformal quantum field theories (QFTs) in dS space show very special infrared behavior, which is not shared by quantum fields neither in flat nor in anti-dS space: in dS space loops are not suppressed in comparison with tree level contributions because there are strong infrared corrections. That is true even for massive fields. Our main concern is the interrelation between these infrared effects, the invariance of the QFT under the dS isometry and the (in)stability of dS invariant states (and of dS space itself) under nonsymmetric perturbations.

  3. Lecture Notes on Interacting Quantum Fields in de Sitter Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, E. T.

    2014-10-01

    We discuss peculiarities of quantum fields in de Sitter (dS) space on the example of the self-interacting massive real scalar, minimally coupled to the gravity background. Nonconformal quantum field theories (QFTs) in dS space show very special infrared behavior, which is not shared by quantum fields neither in flat nor in anti-dS space: in dS space loops are not suppressed in comparison with tree level contributions because there are strong infrared corrections. That is true even for massive fields. Our main concern is the interrelation between these infrared effects, the invariance of the QFT under the dS isometry and the (in)stability of dS invariant states (and of dS space itself) under nonsymmetric perturbations.

  4. Kondo and Majorana doublet interactions in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younghyun; Liu, Dong E.; Gaidamauskas, Erikas; Paaske, Jens; Flensberg, Karsten; Lutchyn, Roman

    We study the properties of a quantum dot coupled to a normal lead and a time-reversal topological superconductor with Majorana Kramers pair at the end. We explore the phase diagram of the system as a function of Kondo and Majorana-induced coupling strengths using perturbative renormalization group study and slave-boson mean-field theory. We find that, in the presence of coupling between a quantum dot and a Majorana doublet, the system flows to a new fixed point controlled by the Majorana doublet, rather than the Kondo coupling, which is characterized by correlations between a localized spin and the fermion parity of each spin sector of the topological superconductor. We find that this fixed point is stable with respect to Gaussian fluctuations. We also investigate the effect of spin-spin interaction between a quantum dot and Majorana doublet and compare the result with a case where a normal lead is directly coupled to Majorana doublet.

  5. Decoherence in an interacting quantum field theory: Thermal case

    SciTech Connect

    Koksma, Jurjen F.; Prokopec, Tomislav; Schmidt, Michael G.

    2011-04-15

    We study the decoherence of a renormalized quantum field theoretical system. We consider our novel correlator approach to decoherence where entropy is generated by neglecting observationally inaccessible correlators. Using out-of-equilibrium field theory techniques at finite temperatures, we show that the Gaussian von Neumann entropy for a pure quantum state asymptotes to the interacting thermal entropy. The decoherence rate can be well described by the single particle decay rate in our model. Connecting to electroweak baryogenesis scenarios, we moreover study the effects on the entropy of a changing mass of the system field. Finally, we compare our correlator approach to existing approaches to decoherence in the simple quantum mechanical analogue of our field theoretical model. The entropy following from the perturbative master equation suffers from physically unacceptable secular growth.

  6. TRIQS: A toolbox for research on interacting quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parcollet, Olivier; Ferrero, Michel; Ayral, Thomas; Hafermann, Hartmut; Krivenko, Igor; Messio, Laura; Seth, Priyanka

    2015-11-01

    We present the TRIQS library, a Toolbox for Research on Interacting Quantum Systems. It is an open-source, computational physics library providing a framework for the quick development of applications in the field of many-body quantum physics, and in particular, strongly-correlated electronic systems. It supplies components to develop codes in a modern, concise and efficient way: e.g. Green's function containers, a generic Monte Carlo class, and simple interfaces to HDF5. TRIQS is a C++/Python library that can be used from either language. It is distributed under the GNU General Public License (GPLv3). State-of-the-art applications based on the library, such as modern quantum many-body solvers and interfaces between density-functional-theory codes and dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) codes are distributed along with it.

  7. Quantum chaos and thermalization in isolated systems of interacting particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgonovi, F.; Izrailev, F. M.; Santos, L. F.; Zelevinsky, V. G.

    2016-04-01

    This review is devoted to the problem of thermalization in a small isolated conglomerate of interacting constituents. A variety of physically important systems of intensive current interest belong to this category: complex atoms, molecules (including biological molecules), nuclei, small devices of condensed matter and quantum optics on nano- and micro-scale, cold atoms in optical lattices, ion traps. Physical implementations of quantum computers, where there are many interacting qubits, also fall into this group. Statistical regularities come into play through inter-particle interactions, which have two fundamental components: mean field, that along with external conditions, forms the regular component of the dynamics, and residual interactions responsible for the complex structure of the actual stationary states. At sufficiently high level density, the stationary states become exceedingly complicated superpositions of simple quasiparticle excitations. At this stage, regularities typical of quantum chaos emerge and bring in signatures of thermalization. We describe all the stages and the results of the processes leading to thermalization, using analytical and massive numerical examples for realistic atomic, nuclear, and spin systems, as well as for models with random parameters. The structure of stationary states, strength functions of simple configurations, and concepts of entropy and temperature in application to isolated mesoscopic systems are discussed in detail. We conclude with a schematic discussion of the time evolution of such systems to equilibrium.

  8. Quantum interactions with closed timelike curves and superluminal signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bub, Jeffrey; Stairs, Allen

    2014-02-01

    There is now a significant body of results on quantum interactions with closed timelike curves (CTCs) in the quantum information literature, for both the Deutsch model of CTC interactions (D-CTCs) and the projective model (P-CTCs). As a consequence, there is a prima facie argument exploiting entanglement that CTC interactions would enable superluminal and, indeed, effectively instantaneous signaling. In cases of spacelike separation between the sender of a signal and the receiver, whether a receiver measures the local part of an entangled state or a disentangled state to access the signal can depend on the reference frame. We propose a consistency condition that gives priority to either an entangled perspective or a disentangled perspective in spacelike-separated scenarios. For D-CTC interactions, the consistency condition gives priority to frames of reference in which the state is disentangled, while for P-CTC interactions the condition selects the entangled state. Using the consistency condition, we show that there is a procedure that allows Alice to signal to Bob in the past via relayed superluminal communications between spacelike-separated Alice and Clio, and spacelike-separated Clio and Bob. This opens the door to time travel paradoxes in the classical domain. Ralph [T. C. Ralph, arXiv:1107.4675 [quant-ph].] first pointed this out for P-CTCs, but we show that Ralph's procedure for a "radio to the past" is flawed. Since both D-CTCs and P-CTCs allow classical information to be sent around a spacetime loop, it follows from a result by Aaronson and Watrous [S. Aaronson and J. Watrous, Proc. R. Soc. A 465, 631 (2009), 10.1098/rspa.2008.0350] for CTC-enhanced classical computation that a quantum computer with access to P-CTCs would have the power of PSPACE, equivalent to a D-CTC-enhanced quantum computer.

  9. Optical Control of Intersubband Absorption in a Multiple Quantum Well-Embedded Semiconductor Microcravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ansheng; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    2000-01-01

    Optical intersubband response of a multiple quantum well (MQW)-embedded microcavity driven by a coherent pump field is studied theoretically. The n-type doped MQW structure with three subbands in the conduction band is sandwiched between a semi-infinite medium and a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). A strong pump field couples the two upper subbands and a weak field probes the two lower subbands. To describe the optical response of the MQW-embedded microcavity, we adopt a semi-classical nonlocal response theory. Taking into account the pump-probe interaction, we derive the probe-induced current density associated with intersubband transitions from the single-particle density-matrix formalism. By incorporating the current density into the Maxwell equation, we solve the probe local field exactly by means of Green's function technique and the transfer-matrix method. We obtain an exact expression for the probe absorption coefficient of the microcavity. For a GaAs/Al(sub x)Ga(sub 1-x)As MQW structure sandwiched between a GaAs/AlAs DBR and vacuum, we performed numerical calculations of the probe absorption spectra for different parameters such as pump intensity, pump detuning, and cavity length. We find that the probe spectrum is strongly dependent on these parameters. In particular, we find that the combination of the cavity effect and the Autler-Townes effect results in a triplet in the optical spectrum of the MQW system. The optical absorption peak value and its location can be feasibly controlled by varying the pump intensity and detuning.

  10. Spin transistor action via tunable Landau-Zener transitions in magnetic semiconductor quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Dieter

    2013-03-01

    Spin-transistors, employing spin-orbit interaction like Datta-Das prototypes, principally suffer from low signal levels due to limitations in spin injection efficiency, fast spin relaxation and dephasing processes. Here we present an alternative concept to implement spin transistor action where efficiency is improved by keeping spin transport adiabatic. To this end a helical stray field B, generated by ferromagnetic Dysprosium stripes, is superimposed upon a two-dimensional electron system in (Cd,Mn)Te, containing Mn ions with spin 5/2. Due to the giant spin splitting, occurring at low temperatures and small B in (Cd,Mn)Te quantum wells, the B-helix translates into a spin-helix and the electron spins follow adiabatically the imposed spin texture. Within this approach the transmission of spin-polarized electrons between two contacts is regulated by changing the degree of adiabaticity, i.e. an electron's ability to follow the spin helix. This is done by means of a small applied homogeneous magnetic field while the degree of adiabaticity is monitored by the channel resistance. Our scheme allows spin information to propagate efficiently over typical device distances and provides an alternative route to realize spintronics applications. We note that our concept is not restricted to a particular choice of materials, temperature, methods of spin injection, manipulation as well as detection. Work done in cooperation with Christian Betthausen, Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, University of Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg, Germany; Tobias Dollinger, Henri Saarikosi, Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg, Germany; Valeri Kolkovsky, Grzegorz Karczewski, Tomasz Wojtowicz, Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-02668 Warsaw, Poland; and Klaus Richter, Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg. Financial support from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft through SFB 689, WE 247618, and FOR 1483 is

  11. 25 Gbit/s differential phase-shift-keying signal generation using directly modulated quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeghuzi, A. Schmeckebier, H.; Stubenrauch, M.; Bimberg, D.; Meuer, C.; Schubert, C.; Bunge, C.-A.

    2015-05-25

    Error-free generation of 25-Gbit/s differential phase-shift keying (DPSK) signals via direct modulation of InAs quantum-dot (QD) based semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) is experimentally demonstrated with an input power level of −5 dBm. The QD SOAs emit in the 1.3-μm wavelength range and provide a small-signal fiber-to-fiber gain of 8 dB. Furthermore, error-free DPSK modulation is achieved for constant optical input power levels from 3 dBm down to only −11 dBm for a bit rate of 20 Gbit/s. Direct phase modulation of QD SOAs via current changes is thus demonstrated to be much faster than direct gain modulation.

  12. Influence of optical pumping wavelength on the ultrafast gain and phase recovery acceleration of quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungho

    2013-10-01

    We numerically investigate the influence of the optical pumping wavelength on the ultrafast gain and phase recovery acceleration of quantum-dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) by solving 1088 coupled rate equations. The temporal variations of the gain and phase recovery response at the ground state (GS) of QDs are calculated at various signal wavelengths when the optical pumping wavelengths at the excited state (ES) of QDs are varied. The phase recovery response is fastest when the wavelength of the signal and pumping beams corresponds to the respective emission wavelength of the GS and the ES in the same size of QDs. The absorption efficiency of the optical pumping beam at the ES is determined by the Lorentzian line shape function of the homogeneous broadening.

  13. Enhanced four-wave mixing efficiency in four-subband semiconductor quantum wells via Fano-type interference.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaopeng; Yang, Wen-Xing; Chuang, You-Lin; Chen, Ai-Xi; Liu, Ang; Huang, Yan; Lee, Ray-Kuang

    2014-11-17

    We propose and analyze an efficient way to enhance four-wave mixing (FWM) signals in a four-subband semiconductor quantum well via Fano-type interference. By using Schrödinger-Maxwell formalism, we derive explicitly analytical expressions for the input probe pulse and the generated FWM field in linear regime under the steady-state condition. With the aid of interference between two excited subbands tunneling to the common continuum, the efficiency to generate FWM field is found to be significantly enhanced, up to 35%. More interestingly, a linear growth rate in the FWM efficiency is demonstrated as the strength of Fano-type interference increases in presence of the continuum states, which can be maintained for a certain propagation distance (i.e., 50μm). PMID:25402157

  14. Anomalous D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation in semiconductor quantum wells under a strong magnetic field in the Voigt configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Yu, T.; Wu, M. W.

    2013-06-01

    We report an anomalous scaling of the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation with the momentum relaxation in semiconductor quantum wells under a strong magnetic field in the Voigt configuration. We focus on the case in which the external magnetic field is perpendicular to the spin-orbit-coupling-induced effective magnetic field and its magnitude is much larger than the latter one. It is found that the longitudinal spin relaxation time is proportional to the momentum relaxation time even in the strong-scattering limit, indicating that the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation demonstrates Elliott-Yafet-like behavior. Moreover, the transverse spin relaxation time is proportional (inversely proportional) to the momentum relaxation time in the strong- (weak-) scattering limit, both in the opposite trends against the well-established conventional D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation behaviors. We further demonstrate that all the above anomalous scaling relations come from the unique form of the effective inhomogeneous broadening.

  15. Quantum size effects in layered VX2 (X = S, Se) materials: Manifestation of metal to semimetal or semiconductor transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasey, A. H. M. Abdul; Chakrabarty, Soubhik; Das, G. P.

    2015-02-01

    Most of the two dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) are nonmagnetic in pristine form. However, 2D pristine VX2 (X = S, Se, Te) materials are found to be ferromagnetic. Using spin polarized density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have studied the electronic, magnetic, and surface properties of this class of materials in both trigonal prismatic H- and octahedral T-phase. Our calculations reveal that they exhibit materially different properties in those two polymorphs. Most importantly, detailed investigation of electronic structure explored the quantum size effect in H-phase of these materials thereby leading to metal to semimetal (H-VS2) or semiconductor (H-VSe2) transition when downsizing from bilayer to corresponding monolayer.

  16. Efficient dipole-dipole coupling of Mott-Wannier and Frenkel excitons in (Ga,In)N quantum well/polyfluorene semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itskos, G.; Heliotis, G.; Lagoudakis, P. G.; Lupton, J.; Barradas, N. P.; Alves, E.; Pereira, S.; Watson, I. M.; Dawson, M. D.; Feldmann, J.; Murray, R.; Bradley, D. D. C.

    2007-07-01

    We investigate interactions between Mott-Wannier (MW) and Frenkel excitons in a family of hybrid structures consisting of thin organic (polyfluorene) films placed in close proximity (systematically adjusted by GaN cap layer thickness) to single inorganic [(Ga,In)N/GaN] quantum wells (QWs). Characterization of the QW structures using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and atomic force microscopy allows direct measurement of the thickness and the morphology of the GaN cap layers. Time-resolved photoluminescence experiments in the 8-75K temperature range confirm our earlier demonstration that nonradiative energy transfer can occur between inorganic and organic semiconductors. We assign the transfer mechanism to resonant Förster (dipole-dipole) coupling between MW exciton energy donors and Frenkel exciton energy acceptors and at 15K we find transfer efficiencies of up to 43%. The dependence of the energy transfer rate on the distance R between the inorganic QW donor dipole and organic film acceptor dipole indicates that a plane-plane interaction, characterized by a 1/R2 variation, best describes the situation found in our structures.

  17. Relativistic laser-plasma interactions in the quantum regime.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, Bengt; Shukla, P K

    2011-04-01

    We consider nonlinear interactions between a relativistically strong laser beam and a plasma in the quantum regime. The collective behavior of electrons is modeled by a Klein-Gordon equation, which is nonlinearly coupled with the electromagnetic wave through the Maxwell and Poisson equations. This allows us to study nonlinear interactions between arbitrarily large-amplitude electromagnetic waves and a quantum plasma. We have used our system of nonlinear equations to study theoretically the parametric instabilities involving stimulated Raman scattering and modulational instabilities. A model for quasi-steady-state propagating electromagnetic wave packets is also derived, and which shows possibility of localized solitary structures in a quantum plasma. Numerical simulations demonstrate collapse and acceleration of electrons in the nonlinear stage of the modulational instability, as well as possibility of the wake-field acceleration of electrons to relativistic speeds by short laser pulses at nanometer length scales. Our study is relevant for understanding the localization of intense electromagnetic pulses in a quantum plasma with extremely high electron densities and relatively low temperature. PMID:21599316

  18. Interacting Electrodynamics of Short Coherent Conductors in Quantum Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altimiras, C.; Portier, F.; Joyez, P.

    2016-07-01

    When combining lumped mesoscopic electronic components to form a circuit, quantum fluctuations of electrical quantities lead to a nonlinear electromagnetic interaction between the components, which is generally not understood. The Landauer-Büttiker formalism that is frequently used to describe noninteracting coherent mesoscopic components is not directly suited to describe such circuits since it assumes perfect voltage bias, i.e., the absence of fluctuations. Here, we show that for short coherent conductors of arbitrary transmission, the Landauer-Büttiker formalism can be extended to take into account quantum voltage fluctuations similarly to what is done for tunnel junctions. The electrodynamics of the whole circuit is then formally worked out disregarding the non-Gaussianity of fluctuations. This reveals how the aforementioned nonlinear interaction operates in short coherent conductors: Voltage fluctuations induce a reduction of conductance through the phenomenon of dynamical Coulomb blockade, but they also modify their internal density of states, leading to an additional electrostatic modification of the transmission. Using this approach, we can quantitatively account for conductance measurements performed on quantum point contacts in series with impedances of the order of RK=h /e2 . Our work should enable a better engineering of quantum circuits with targeted properties.

  19. The use of bulk states to accelerate the band edge statecalculation of a semiconductor quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Vomel, Christof; Tomov, Stanimire Z.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Marques,Osni A.; Dongarra, Jack J.

    2006-05-10

    We present a new technique to accelerate the convergence of the folded spectrum method in empirical pseudopotential band edge state calculations for colloidal quantum dots. We use bulk band states of the materials constituent of the quantum dot to construct initial vectors and a preconditioner. We apply these to accelerate the convergence of the folded spectrum method for the interior states at the top of the valence and the bottom of the conduction band. For large CdSe quantum dots, the number of iteration steps until convergence decreases by about a factor of 4 compared to previous calculations.

  20. Graded doping low internal loss 1060-nm InGaAs/AlGaAs quantum well semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Shao-Yang; Zhai, Teng; Zhang, Rui-Kang; Lu, Dan; Wang, Wei; Ji, Chen

    2015-06-01

    Internal loss is a key internal parameter for high power 1060-nm InGaAs/AlGaAs semiconductor laser. In this paper, we discuss the origin of internal loss of 1060-nm InGaAs/GaAs quantum well (QW) AlGaAs separate confinement heterostructure semiconductor laser, and the method to reduce internal loss. By light doping the n-cladding layer, and stepwise doping the p-cladding layer combined with the expanded waveguide layer, a broad area laser with internal loss of 1/cm is designed and fabricated. Ridge waveguide laser with an output power of 350 mW is obtained. The threshold current and slope efficiency near the threshold current are 20 mA and 0.8 W/A, respectively. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274046, 61335009, 61201103, and 61320106013) and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA014202).

  1. Surface-emitting quantum cascade laser with 2nd-order metal-semiconductor gratings for single-lobe emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, C.; Sigler, C.; Kirch, J. D.; Lindberg, D.; Earles, T.; Botez, D.; Mawst, L. J.

    2016-03-01

    Grating-coupled, surface-emitting (GCSE) quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) are demonstrated with high-power, single-lobe surface emission. A 2nd-order Au-semiconductor distributed-feedback (DFB)/ distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) grating is used for feedback and out-coupling. The DFB and DBR grating regions are 2.55 mm- and 1.28 mm-long, respectively, for a total grating length of 5.1 mm. The lasers are designed to operate in a symmetric longitudinal mode by causing resonant coupling of the guided optical mode to the antisymmetric surface-plasmon modes of the 2nd-order metal/semiconductor grating. In turn, the antisymmetric longitudinal modes are strongly absorbed by the metal in the grating, causing the symmetric longitudinal mode to be favored to lase, which produces a single lobe beam over a grating duty-cycle range of 36-41 %. Simulations indicate that the symmetric mode is always favored to lase, independent of the random phase of residual reflections from the device's cleaved ends. Peak pulsed output powers of ~ 0.4 W were measured with single-lobe, single-mode operation near 4.75 μm.

  2. Interaction driven quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood; Nam, Jungtae; Kim, Keun Soo; Eom, Jonghwa

    2016-01-01

    The honeycomb lattice structure of graphene gives rise to its exceptional electronic properties of linear dispersion relation and its chiral nature of charge carriers. The exceptional electronic properties of graphene stem from linear dispersion relation and chiral nature of charge carries, originating from its honeycomb lattice structure. Here, we address the quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers and single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The quantum Hall plateaus started to appear more than 3 T and became clearer at higher magnetic fields up to 9 T. Shubnikov-de Hass oscillations were manifestly observed in graphene bilayers texture. These unusual plateaus may have been due to the layers interaction in artificially stacked graphene bilayers. Our study initiates the understanding of interactions between artificially stacked graphene layers. PMID:27098387

  3. Interaction driven quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood; Nam, Jungtae; Kim, Keun Soo; Eom, Jonghwa

    2016-01-01

    The honeycomb lattice structure of graphene gives rise to its exceptional electronic properties of linear dispersion relation and its chiral nature of charge carriers. The exceptional electronic properties of graphene stem from linear dispersion relation and chiral nature of charge carries, originating from its honeycomb lattice structure. Here, we address the quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers and single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The quantum Hall plateaus started to appear more than 3 T and became clearer at higher magnetic fields up to 9 T. Shubnikov-de Hass oscillations were manifestly observed in graphene bilayers texture. These unusual plateaus may have been due to the layers interaction in artificially stacked graphene bilayers. Our study initiates the understanding of interactions between artificially stacked graphene layers. PMID:27098387

  4. Interaction driven quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood; Nam, Jungtae; Kim, Keun Soo; Eom, Jonghwa

    2016-04-01

    The honeycomb lattice structure of graphene gives rise to its exceptional electronic properties of linear dispersion relation and its chiral nature of charge carriers. The exceptional electronic properties of graphene stem from linear dispersion relation and chiral nature of charge carries, originating from its honeycomb lattice structure. Here, we address the quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers and single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The quantum Hall plateaus started to appear more than 3 T and became clearer at higher magnetic fields up to 9 T. Shubnikov-de Hass oscillations were manifestly observed in graphene bilayers texture. These unusual plateaus may have been due to the layers interaction in artificially stacked graphene bilayers. Our study initiates the understanding of interactions between artificially stacked graphene layers.

  5. Semiconductor Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Synthesis Approaches Towards Large-Scale Industrial Production for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Michael Z.; Zhu, Ting

    2015-12-01

    This paper reviews the experimental synthesis and engineering developments that focused on various green approaches and large-scale process production routes for quantum dots. Fundamental process engineering principles were illustrated. In relation to the small-scale hot injection method, our discussions focus on the non-injection route that could be scaled up with engineering stir-tank reactors. In addition, applications that demand to utilize quantum dots as "commodity" chemicals are discussed, including solar cells and solid-state lightings.

  6. Electron Transfer as a Probe of the Interfacial Quantum Dot-Organic Molecule Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Mark D.

    This dissertation describes a set of experimental and theoretical studies of the interaction between small organic molecules and the surfaces of semiconductor nanoparticles, also called quantum dots (QDs). Chapter 1 reviews the literature on the influence of ligands on exciton relaxation dynamics following photoexcitation of semiconductor QDs, and describes how ligands promote or inhibit processes such as emission, nonradiative relaxation, and charge transfer to redox active adsorbates. Chapter 2 investigates the specific interaction of alkylcarboxylated viologen derivatives with CdS QDs, and shows how a combination of steady-state photoluminescence (PL) and transient absorption (TA) experiments can be used to reveal the specific binding geometry of redox active organic molecules on QD surfaces. Chapter 3 expands on Chapter 2 by using PL and TA to provide information about the mechanisms through which methyl viologen (MV 2+) associates with CdS QDs to form a stable QD/MV2+ complex, suggesting two chemically distinct reactions. We use our understanding of the QD/molecule interaction to design a drug delivery system in Chapter 4, which employs PL and TA experiments to show that conformational changes in a redox active adsorbate may follow electron transfer, "activating" a biologically inert Schiff base to a protein inhibitor form. The protein inhibitor limits cell motility and may be used to prevent tumor metastasis in cancer patients. Chapter 5 discusses future applications of QD/molecule redox couples with an emphasis on efficient multiple charge-transfer reactions -- a process facilitated by the high degeneracy of band-edge states in QDs. These multiple charge-transfer reactions may potentially increase the thermodynamic efficiency of solar cells, and may also facilitate the splitting of water into fuel. Multiple exciton generation procedures, multi-electron transfer experiments, and future directions are discussed.

  7. Surface Plasmon Enhanced Sensitive Detection for Possible Signature of Majorana Fermions via a Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Jun; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we theoretically propose an optical scheme to detect the possible signature of Majorana fermions via the optical pump-probe spectroscopy, which is very different from the current tunneling measurement based on electrical methods. The scheme consists of a metal nanoparticle and a semiconductor quantum dot coupled to a hybrid semiconductor/superconductor heterostructures. The results show that the probe absorption spectrum of the quantum dot presents a distinct splitting due to the existence of Majorana fermions. Owing to surface plasmon enhanced effect, this splitting will be more obvious, which makes Majorana fermions more easy to be detectable. The technique proposed here open the door for new applications ranging from robust manipulation of Majorana fermions to quantum information processing based on Majorana fermions. PMID:26310929

  8. Surface Plasmon Enhanced Sensitive Detection for Possible Signature of Majorana Fermions via a Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-Jun; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2015-08-01

    In the present work, we theoretically propose an optical scheme to detect the possible signature of Majorana fermions via the optical pump-probe spectroscopy, which is very different from the current tunneling measurement based on electrical methods. The scheme consists of a metal nanoparticle and a semiconductor quantum dot coupled to a hybrid semiconductor/superconductor heterostructures. The results show that the probe absorption spectrum of the quantum dot presents a distinct splitting due to the existence of Majorana fermions. Owing to surface plasmon enhanced effect, this splitting will be more obvious, which makes Majorana fermions more easy to be detectable. The technique proposed here open the door for new applications ranging from robust manipulation of Majorana fermions to quantum information processing based on Majorana fermions.

  9. Antenna-load interactions at optical frequencies: impedance matching to quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Olmon, R L; Raschke, M B

    2012-11-01

    The goal of antenna design at optical frequencies is to deliver optical electromagnetic energy to loads in the form of, e.g., atoms, molecules or nanostructures, or to enhance the radiative emission from such structures, or both. A true optical antenna would, on a qualitatively new level, control the light-matter interaction on the nanoscale for controlled optical signal transduction, radiative decay engineering, quantum coherent control, and super-resolution microscopy, and provide unprecedented sensitivity in spectroscopy. Resonant metallic structures have successfully been designed to approach these goals. They are called optical antennas in analogy to radiofrequency (RF) antennas due to their capability to collect and control electromagnetic fields at optical frequencies. However, in contrast to the RF, where exact design rules for antennas, waveguides, and antenna-load matching in terms of their impedances are well established, substantial physical differences limit the simple extension of the RF concepts into the optical regime. Key distinctions include, for one, intrinsic material resonances including quantum state excitations (metals, metal oxides, semiconductor homo- and heterostructures) and extrinsic resonances (surface plasmon/phonon polaritons) at optical frequencies. Second, in the absence of discrete inductors, capacitors, and resistors, new design strategies must be developed to impedance match the antenna to the load, ultimately in the form of a vibrational, electronic, or spin excitation on the quantum level. Third, there is as yet a lack of standard performance metrics for characterizing, comparing and quantifying optical antenna performance. Therefore, optical antenna development is currently challenged at all the levels of design, fabrication, and characterization. Here we generalize the ideal antenna-load interaction at optical frequencies, characterized by three main steps: (i) far-field reception of a propagating mode exciting an antenna

  10. New nonlinear optical effect: self-reflection phenomenon due to exciton-biexciton-light interaction in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadzhi, P. I.; Lyakhomskaya, K. D.; Nadkin, L. Y.; Markov, D. A.

    2002-05-01

    The characteristic peculiarities of the self-reflection of a strong electromagnetic wave in a system of coherent excitons and biexcitons due to the exciton-photon interaction and optical exciton-biexciton conversion in semiconductors were investigated as one of the manifestations of nonlinear optical Stark-effect. It was found that a monotonously decreasing standing wave with an exponential decreasing spatial tail is formed in the semiconductor. Under the action of the field of a strong pulse, an optically homogeneous medium is converted, into the medium with distributed feedback. The appearance of the spatially separated narrow pears of the reflective index, extinction and reflection coefficients is predicted.

  11. Quantum dynamics and topological excitations in interacting dipolar particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Ana

    2016-05-01

    Dipole-dipole interactions, long-range and anisotropic interactions that arise due to the virtual exchange of photons, are of fundamental importance in optical physics, and are enabling a range of new quantum technologies including quantum networks and optical lattice atomic clocks. In this talk I will first discuss how arrays of dipolar particles with a simple J = 0- J = 1 internal level structure can naturally host topological and chiral excitations including Weyl quasi-particles. Weyl fermions were first predicted to exist in the context of high energy physics but only recently have been observed in solid state systems. I will discuss a proposal of using Mott insulators of Sr atoms to observe and probe the Weyl excitation spectrum and its non-trivial chirality. Finally I will report on a recent experiment done at JILA which validates the underlying microscopic model that predicts the existence of these excitations. The experiment measured the collective emission from a coherently driven gas of ultracold 88 Sr atoms and observed a highly directional and anisotropic emission intensity and a substantial broadening of the atomic spectral lines. All of the measurements are well reproduced by the theoretical model. These investigations open the door for the exploration of novel quantum many-body systems involving strongly interacting atoms and photons, and are useful guides for further developments of optical atomic clocks and other applications involving dense atomic ensembles. AFOSR, MURI-AFOSR, ARO,NSF-PHY-1521080, JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844.

  12. Photocurrent generation through electron-exciton interaction at the organic semiconductor donor/acceptor interface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijia; Zhang, Qiaoming; Lei, Yanlian; Zhu, Furong; Wu, Bo; Zhang, Ting; Niu, Guoxi; Xiong, Zuhong; Song, Qunliang

    2013-10-21

    In this work, we report our effort to understand the photocurrent generation that is contributed via electron-exciton interaction at the donor/acceptor interface in organic solar cells (OSCs). Donor/acceptor bi-layer heterojunction OSCs, of the indium tin oxide/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerene (C60)/molybdenum oxide/Al type, were employed to study the mechanism of photocurrent generation due to the electron-exciton interaction, where CuPc and C60 are the donor and the acceptor, respectively. It is shown that the electron-exciton interaction and the exciton dissociation processes co-exist at the CuPc/C60 interface in OSCs. Compared to conventional donor/acceptor bi-layer OSCs, the cells with the above configuration enable holes to be extracted at the C60 side while electrons can be collected at the CuPc side, resulting in a photocurrent in the reverse direction. The photocurrent thus observed is contributed to primarily by the charge carriers that are generated by the electron-exciton interaction at the CuPc/C60 interface, while charges derived from the exciton dissociation process also exist at the same interface. The mechanism of photocurrent generation due to electron-exciton interaction in the OSCs is further investigated, and it is manifested by the transient photovoltage characteristics and the external quantum efficiency measurements. PMID:24002235

  13. Long-range p-d exchange interaction in a ferromagnet-semiconductor hybrid structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenev, V. L.; Salewski, M.; Akimov, I. A.; Sapega, V. F.; Langer, L.; Kalitukha, I. V.; Debus, J.; Dzhioev, R. I.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Müller, D.; Schröder, C.; Hövel, H.; Karczewski, G.; Wiater, M.; Wojtowicz, T.; Kusrayev, Yu. G.; Bayer, M.

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid structures synthesized from different materials have attracted considerable attention because they may allow not only combination of the functionalities of the individual constituents but also mutual control of their properties. To obtain such a control an interaction between the components needs to be established. For coupling the magnetic properties, an exchange interaction has to be implemented which typically depends on wavefunction overlap and is therefore short-ranged, so that it may be compromised across the hybrid interface. Here we study a hybrid structure consisting of a ferromagnetic Co layer and a semiconducting CdTe quantum well, separated by a thin (Cd, Mg)Te barrier. In contrast to the expected p-d exchange that decreases exponentially with the wavefunction overlap of quantum well holes and magnetic atoms, we find a long-ranged, robust coupling that does not vary with barrier width up to more than 30 nm. We suggest that the resulting spin polarization of acceptor-bound holes is induced by an effective p-d exchange that is mediated by elliptically polarized phonons.

  14. Selective interactions in trapped ions: State reconstruction and quantum logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, E.

    2005-01-01

    We propose the implementation of selective interactions of atom-motion subspaces in trapped ions. These interactions yield resonant exchange of population inside a selected subspace, leaving the others in a highly dispersive regime. Selectivity allows us to generate motional Fock (and other nonclassical) states with high purity out of a wide class of initial states, and becomes an unconventional cooling mechanism when the ground state is chosen. Individual population of number states can be distinctively measured, as well as the motional Wigner function. Furthermore, a protocol for implementing quantum logic through a suitable control of selective subspaces is presented.

  15. A nonlinear Bloch model for Coulomb interaction in quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Bidegaray-Fesquet, Brigitte Keita, Kole

    2014-02-15

    In this paper, we first derive a Coulomb Hamiltonian for electron–electron interaction in quantum dots in the Heisenberg picture. Then we use this Hamiltonian to enhance a Bloch model, which happens to be nonlinear in the density matrix. The coupling with Maxwell equations in case of interaction with an electromagnetic field is also considered from the Cauchy problem point of view. The study is completed by numerical results and a discussion about the advisability of neglecting intra-band coherences, as is done in part of the literature.

  16. Coulomb interaction effects on the Majorana states in quantum wires.

    PubMed

    Manolescu, A; Marinescu, D C; Stanescu, T D

    2014-04-30

    The stability of the Majorana modes in the presence of a repulsive interaction is studied in the standard semiconductor wire-metallic superconductor configuration. The effects of short-range Coulomb interaction, which is incorporated using a purely repulsive δ-function to model the strong screening effect due to the presence of the superconductor, are determined within a Hartree-Fock approximation of the effective Bogoliubov-De Gennes Hamiltonian that describes the low-energy physics of the wire. Through a numerical diagonalization procedure we obtain interaction corrections to the single particle eigenstates and calculate the extended topological phase diagram in terms of the chemical potential and the Zeeman energy. We find that, for a fixed Zeeman energy, the interaction shifts the phase boundaries to a higher chemical potential, whereas for a fixed chemical potential this shift can occur either at lower or higher Zeeman energies. These effects can be interpreted as a renormalization of the g-factor due to the interaction. The minimum Zeeman energy needed to realize Majorana fermions decreases with the increasing strength of the Coulomb repulsion. Furthermore, we find that in wires with multi-band occupancy this effect can be enhanced by increasing the chemical potential, i.e. by occupying higher energy bands. PMID:24722427

  17. Quantum Monte Carlo Studies of Interaction-Induced Localization in Quantum Dots and Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devrim Güçlü, A.

    2009-03-01

    We investigate interaction-induced localization of electrons in both quantum dots and inhomogeneous quantum wires using variational and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo methods. Quantum dots and wires are highly tunable systems that enable the study of the physics of strongly correlated electrons. With decreasing electronic density, interactions become stronger and electrons are expected to localize at their classical positions, as in Wigner crystallization in an infinite 2D system. (1) Dots: We show that the addition energy shows a clear progression from features associated with shell structure to those caused by commensurability of a Wigner crystal. This cross-over is, then, a signature of localization; it occurs near rs˜20. For higher values of rs, the configuration symmetry of the quantum dot becomes fully consistent with the classical ground state. (2) Wires: We study an inhomogeneous quasi-one-dimensional system -- a wire with two regions, one at low density and the other high. We find that strong localization occurs in the low density quantum point contact region as the gate potential is increased. The nature of the transition from high to low density depends on the density gradient -- if it is steep, a barrier develops between the two regions, causing Coulomb blockade effects. We find no evidence for ferromagnetic spin polarization for the range of parameters studied. The picture emerging here is in good agreement with the experimental measurements of tunneling between two wires. Collaborators: C. J. Umrigar (Cornell), Hong Jiang (Fritz Haber Institut), Amit Ghosal (IISER Calcutta), and H. U. Baranger (Duke).

  18. Single step deposition of an interacting layer of a perovskite matrix with embedded quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Thi Tuyen; Suarez, Isaac; Sanchez, Rafael S; Martinez-Pastor, Juan P; Mora-Sero, Ivan

    2016-08-14

    Hybrid lead halide perovskite (PS) derivatives have emerged as very promising materials for the development of optoelectronic devices in the last few years. At the same time, inorganic nanocrystals with quantum confinement (QDs) possess unique properties that make them suitable materials for the development of photovoltaics, imaging and lighting applications, among others. In this work, we report on a new methodology for the deposition of high quality, large grain size and pinhole free PS films (CH3NH3PbI3) with embedded PbS and PbS/CdS core/shell Quantum Dots (QDs). The strong interaction between both semiconductors is revealed by the formation of an exciplex state, which is monitored by photoluminescence and electroluminescence experiments. The radiative exciplex relaxation is centered in the near infrared region (NIR), ≈1200 nm, which corresponds to lower energies than the corresponding band gap of both perovskite (PS) and QDs. Our approach allows the fabrication of multi-wavelength light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on a PS matrix with embedded QDs, which show considerably low turn-on potentials. The presence of the exciplex state of PS and QDs opens up a broad range of possibilities with important implications in both LEDs and solar cells. PMID:27437778

  19. High Efficiency Four-Wave Mixing with Relaxation Coupling of Longitude-Optical Phonons in Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Yan-Chao; Zheng, Xue-Jun; Wang, Deng-Long; Ding, Jian-Wen

    2015-05-01

    The time-dependent analysis of four-wave mixing (FWM) has been performed in four-level double semiconductor quantum wells (SQWs) considering the cross-coupling of the longitude-optical phonons (LOP) relaxation. It is shown that both the amplitude and the conversion efficiency of the FWM field enhance greatly with the increasing strength of cross-coupling of LOP relaxation. Interestingly, a double peak value of the conversion efficiency is obtained under a relatively weak single-photon detuning considering the LOP coupling. When the detuning becomes stronger, the double peaks turn into one peak appearing at the line respect to the about equality two control fields. The results can be interpreted by the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency and the indirect transition. Such controlled high efficiency FWM based on the cross-coupling LOP may have potential applications in quantum control and communications. Supported by Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University under Grant (IRT1080), National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 51272158, 11374252, and 51372214, Changjiang Scholar Incentive Program under Grant No. [2009] 17, Scientific Research Fund of Hunan Provincial Education Department of China under Grant No. 12A140, the Science and Technology Foundation of Guizhou Province of China under Grant No. J20122314

  20. Momentum Transfer Studies and Studies of Linear and Nonlinear Optical Properties of Metal Colloids and Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, W. E.; Burger, A.; Dyer, K.; George, M.; Henderson, D.; Morgan, S.; Mu, R.; Shi, D.; Conner, D; Thompson, E.; Collins, L.; Curry, L.; Mattox, S.; Williams, G.

    1996-01-01

    Phase 1 of this work involved design work on a momentum transfer device. The progress on design and testing will be presented. Phase 2 involved the systematic study of the MPD thruster for dual uses. Though it was designed as a thruster for space vehicles, the characteristics of the plasma make it an excellent candidate for industrial applications. This project sought to characterize the system for use in materials processing and characterization. The surface modification on ZnCdTe, CdTe, and ZnTe will be presented. Phase 3 involved metal colloids and semiconductor quantum dots. One aspect of this project involves a collaborative effort with the Solid State Division of ORNL. The thrust behind this research is to develop ion implantation for synthesizing novel materials (quantum dots wires and wells, and metal colloids) for applications in all optical switching devices, up conversion, and the synthesis of novel refractory materials. The ions of interest are Au, Ag, Cd, Se, In, P, Sb, Ga, and As. The specific materials of interest are: CdSe, CdTe, InAs, GaAs, InP, GaP, InSb, GaSb, and InGaAs. A second aspect of this research program involves using porous glass (25-200 A) for fabricating materials of finite size. The results of some of this work will also be reported.

  1. Quantum Mechanical Effects on the Threshold Voltage of Double-Gate Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guang-Xi; Liu, Ran; Qiu, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Ling-Li; Tang, Ting-Ao

    2010-03-01

    A model for a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) with a double gate (DG) is developed. Quantum mechanical effects on the threshold voltage (VTH) are modeled and investigated analytically. The analytic model shows how VTH is increased with quantum mechanical effect. The model is applicable to both symmetric DG (SDG) and asymmetric DG (ADG) nMOSFETs, and is also applicable to both doped and undoped DG nMOSFETs. The analytic results are verified by comparing with the results obtained from simulations using Schred, and good agreement is observed. The VTH of an ADG nMOSFET will shift more than that of an SDG nMOSFET, and the VTH of a DG transistor with (110)-silicon (Si) orientation will shift more than that of a DG transistor with (100)-Si orientation. When the silicon thickness tsi < 3 nm, the VTH shift will be significant, and one should be careful in the use of an extremely thin silicon body. When the body doping density (NA) is not high (<1018 cm-3), the VTH shift is almost the same for different NA. When NA > 1018 cm-3, the higher the NA, the more the VTH shift.

  2. Emission enhancement and polarization of semiconductor quantum dots with nanoimprinted plasmonic cavities: towards scalable fabrication of plasmon-exciton displays.

    PubMed

    Cadusch, Jasper J; Panchenko, Evgeniy; Kirkwood, Nicholas; James, Timothy D; Gibson, Brant C; Webb, Kevin J; Mulvaney, Paul; Roberts, Ann

    2015-09-01

    Here we present an application of a high throughput nanofabrication technique to the creation of a plasmonic metasurface and demonstrate its application to the enhancement and control of radiation by quantum dots (QDs). The metasurface consists of an array of cold-forged rectangular nanocavities in a thin silver film. High quantum efficiency graded alloy CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots were spread over the metasurface and the effects of the plasmon-exciton interactions characterised. We found a four-fold increase in the QDs radiative decay rate and emission brightness, compared to QDs on glass, along with a degree of linear polarisation of 0.73 in the emitted field. Such a surface could be easily integrated with current QD display or organic solar cell designs. PMID:26223481

  3. Entanglement via tunable Fano-type interference in asymmetric semiconductor quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xiangying; Li, Jiahua; Lv, Xin-You; Si, Liu-Gang; Yang, Xiaoxue

    2009-10-01

    Entanglement is realized in asymmetric coupled double quantum wells (DQWs) trapped in a doubly resonant cavity by means of Fano-type interference through a tunneling barrier, which is different from the previous studies on entanglement induced by strong external driven fields in atomic media. We investigate the generation and evolution of entanglement and show that the strength of Fano interference can influence effectively the degree of the entanglement between two cavity modes and the enhanced entanglement can be generated in this DQW system. The present investigation may provide research opportunities in quantum entangled experiments in the DQW solid-state nanostructures and may result in a substantial impact on the technology for entanglement engineering in quantum information processing.

  4. Emission enhancement and polarization of semiconductor quantum dots with nanoimprinted plasmonic cavities: towards scalable fabrication of plasmon-exciton displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadusch, Jasper J.; Panchenko, Evgeniy; Kirkwood, Nicholas; James, Timothy D.; Gibson, Brant C.; Webb, Kevin J.; Mulvaney, Paul; Roberts, Ann

    2015-08-01

    Here we present an application of a high throughput nanofabrication technique to the creation of a plasmonic metasurface and demonstrate its application to the enhancement and control of radiation by quantum dots (QDs). The metasurface consists of an array of cold-forged rectangular nanocavities in a thin silver film. High quantum efficiency graded alloy CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots were spread over the metasurface and the effects of the plasmon-exciton interactions characterised. We found a four-fold increase in the QDs radiative decay rate and emission brightness, compared to QDs on glass, along with a degree of linear polarisation of 0.73 in the emitted field. Such a surface could be easily integrated with current QD display or organic solar cell designs.Here we present an application of a high throughput nanofabrication technique to the creation of a plasmonic metasurface and demonstrate its application to the enhancement and control of radiation by quantum dots (QDs). The metasurface consists of an array of cold-forged rectangular nanocavities in a thin silver film. High quantum efficiency graded alloy CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots were spread over the metasurface and the effects of the plasmon-exciton interactions characterised. We found a four-fold increase in the QDs radiative decay rate and emission brightness, compared to QDs on glass, along with a degree of linear polarisation of 0.73 in the emitted field. Such a surface could be easily integrated with current QD display or organic solar cell designs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C5NR04042F

  5. Combining semiconductor quantum dots and bioscaffolds into nanoscale energy transfer devices.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Christopher M; Stewart, Michael H; Susumu, Kimihiro; Medintz, Igor L

    2015-11-01

    Significant advances have been made in the development of nanoscale devices capable of exciton transport via Förster resonance energy transfer. Several requirements must be met for effective operation, including a reliable energy-harvesting source along with highly organized, precisely placed energy relay elements. For the latter, biological scaffolds such as DNA provide a customizable, symmetric, and stable structure that can be site-specifically modified with organic fluorophores. Here, advancements in nanoscale energy transfer devices incorporating semiconductor nanocrystals and bioscaffolds are reviewed with discussion of biofunctionalization, linker chemistries, design considerations, and concluding with applications in light harvesting, multiplexed biosensing, and optical logic. PMID:26560627

  6. Emission spectrum of a dressed exciton-biexciton complex in a semiconductor quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Muller, Andreas; Fang, Wei; Lawall, John; Solomon, Glenn S

    2008-07-11

    The photoluminescence spectrum of a single quantum dot was recorded as a secondary resonant laser optically dressed either the vacuum-to-exciton or the exciton-to-biexciton transitions. High-resolution polarization-resolved measurements using a scanning Fabry-Pérot interferometer reveal splittings of the linearly polarized fine-structure states that are nondegenerate in an asymmetric quantum dot. These splittings manifest as either triplets or doublets and depend sensitively on laser intensity and detuning. Our approach realizes complete resonant control of a multiexcitonic system in emission, which can be either pulsed or continuous wave, and offers direct access to the emitted photons. PMID:18764226

  7. Slow light in semiconductor quantum dots: Effects of non-Markovianity and correlation of dephasing reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogilevtsev, D.; Reyes-Gómez, E.; Cavalcanti, S. B.; Oliveira, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    A theoretical investigation on slow light propagation based on electromagnetically induced transparency in a three-level quantum-dot system is performed including non-Markovian effects and correlated dephasing reservoirs. It is demonstrated that the non-Markovian nature of the process is quite essential even for conventional dephasing typical of quantum dots leading to significant enhancement or inhibition of the group velocity slow-down factor as well as to the shifting and distortion of the transmission window. Furthermore, the correlation between dephasing reservoirs may also either enhance or inhibit non-Markovian effects.

  8. Quantum gas microscopy of the interacting Harper-Hofstadter system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, M. Eric; Lukin, Alex; Preiss, Philipp; Rispoli, Matthew; Schittko, Robert; Kaufman, Adam; Greiner, Markus

    2016-05-01

    At the heart of many topological states is the underlying gauge field. One example of a gauge field is the magnetic field which causes the deflection of a moving charged particle. This behavior can be understood through the Aharonov-Bohm phase that a particle acquires upon traversing a closed path. Gauge fields give rise to novel states of matter that cannot be described with symmetry breaking. Instead, these states, e.g. fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states, are characterized by topological invariants, such as the Chern number. In this talk, we report on experimental results upon introducing a gauge field in a system of strongly-interacting ultracold Rb87 atoms confined to a 2D optical lattice. With single-site resolution afforded by a quantum gas microscope, we can prepare a fixed atom number and project hard walls. With an artificial gauge field, this quantum simulator realizes the Harper-Hofstadter Hamiltonian. We can independently control the two tunneling strengths as well as dynamically change the flux. This flexibility enables studies of topological phenomena from many perspectives, e.g. site-resolved images of edge currents. With the strong on-site interactions possible in our system, these experiments will pave the way to observing FQH-like states in a lattice.

  9. Initial Conditions Effects in the Population Dynamics of a Driven Semiconductor Quantum Well Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Voutsinas, Evangelos; Boviatsis, John

    2007-12-26

    We study Rabi oscillations between two subbands of a symmetric double quantum well that is coupled by a strong electromagnetic field. We use the effective nonlinear Bloch equations for the description of the system dynamics and present numerical results for different initial conditions of the system.

  10. Investigation of Transmission Resonances with Specific Properties in Rectangular Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niketic, Nemanja; Milanovic, Vitomir; Radovanovic, Jelena

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we provide a detailed analysis of the energy position and type of transmission maxima in rectangular quantum wells (QWs), taking into consideration the difference of electron effective masses in the barrier and well layers. Particular attention is given to transmission maxima that are less than unity and the implications of effective…

  11. Quantum-tomographic cryptography with a semiconductor single-photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Kaszlikowski, D.; Yang, L.J.; Yong, L.S.; Willeboordse, F.H.; Kwek, L.C.

    2005-09-15

    We analyze the security of so-called quantum-tomographic cryptography with the source producing entangled photons via an experimental scheme proposed by Fattal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 37903 (2004)]. We determine the range of the experimental parameters for which the protocol is secure against the most general incoherent attacks.

  12. Interacting anyons in topological quantum liquids: the golden chain.

    PubMed

    Feiguin, Adrian; Trebst, Simon; Ludwig, Andreas W W; Troyer, Matthias; Kitaev, Alexei; Wang, Zhenghan; Freedman, Michael H

    2007-04-20

    We discuss generalizations of quantum spin Hamiltonians using anyonic degrees of freedom. The simplest model for interacting anyons energetically favors neighboring anyons to fuse into the trivial ("identity") channel, similar to the quantum Heisenberg model favoring neighboring spins to form spin singlets. Numerical simulations of a chain of Fibonacci anyons show that the model is critical with a dynamical critical exponent z=1, and described by a two-dimensional (2D) conformal field theory with central charge c=7/10. An exact mapping of the anyonic chain onto the 2D tricritical Ising model is given using the restricted-solid-on-solid representation of the Temperley-Lieb algebra. The gaplessness of the chain is shown to have topological origin. PMID:17501404

  13. Negative Differential Conductivity in an Interacting Quantum Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labouvie, Ralf; Santra, Bodhaditya; Heun, Simon; Wimberger, Sandro; Ott, Herwig

    2015-07-01

    We report on the observation of negative differential conductivity (NDC) in a quantum transport device for neutral atoms employing a multimode tunneling junction. The system is realized with a Bose-Einstein condensate loaded in a one-dimensional optical lattice with high site occupancy. We induce an initial difference in chemical potential at one site by local atom removal. The ensuing transport dynamics are governed by the interplay between the tunneling coupling, the interaction energy, and intrinsic collisions, which turn the coherent coupling into a hopping process. The resulting current-voltage characteristics exhibit NDC, for which we identify atom number-dependent tunneling as a new microscopic mechanism. Our study opens new ways for the future implementation and control of complex neutral atom quantum circuits.

  14. Negative Differential Conductivity in an Interacting Quantum Gas.

    PubMed

    Labouvie, Ralf; Santra, Bodhaditya; Heun, Simon; Wimberger, Sandro; Ott, Herwig

    2015-07-31

    We report on the observation of negative differential conductivity (NDC) in a quantum transport device for neutral atoms employing a multimode tunneling junction. The system is realized with a Bose-Einstein condensate loaded in a one-dimensional optical lattice with high site occupancy. We induce an initial difference in chemical potential at one site by local atom removal. The ensuing transport dynamics are governed by the interplay between the tunneling coupling, the interaction energy, and intrinsic collisions, which turn the coherent coupling into a hopping process. The resulting current-voltage characteristics exhibit NDC, for which we identify atom number-dependent tunneling as a new microscopic mechanism. Our study opens new ways for the future implementation and control of complex neutral atom quantum circuits. PMID:26274404

  15. Photoinduced electron transfer from semiconductor quantum dots to metal oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tvrdy, Kevin; Frantsuzov, Pavel A.; Kamat, Prashant V.

    2011-01-01

    Quantum dot-metal oxide junctions are an integral part of next-generation solar cells, light emitting diodes, and nanostructured electronic arrays. Here we present a comprehensive examination of electron transfer at these junctions, using a series of CdSe quantum dot donors (sizes 2.8, 3.3, 4.0, and 4.2 nm in diameter) and metal oxide nanoparticle acceptors (SnO2, TiO2, and ZnO). Apparent electron transfer rate constants showed strong dependence on change in system free energy, exhibiting a sharp rise at small driving forces followed by a modest rise further away from the characteristic reorganization energy. The observed trend mimics the predicted behavior of electron transfer from a single quantum state to a continuum of electron accepting states, such as those present in the conduction band of a metal oxide nanoparticle. In contrast with dye-sensitized metal oxide electron transfer studies, our systems did not exhibit unthermalized hot-electron injection due to relatively large ratios of electron cooling rate to electron transfer rate. To investigate the implications of these findings in photovoltaic cells, quantum dot-metal oxide working electrodes were constructed in an identical fashion to the films used for the electron transfer portion of the study. Interestingly, the films which exhibited the fastest electron transfer rates (SnO2) were not the same as those which showed the highest photocurrent (TiO2). These findings suggest that, in addition to electron transfer at the quantum dot-metal oxide interface, other electron transfer reactions play key roles in the determination of overall device efficiency. PMID:21149685

  16. Bacterial Interactions with CdSe Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, P.; Nadeau, J. L.; Kumar, A.; Clarke, S.; Priester, J. H.; Stucky, G. D.

    2007-12-01

    Cadmium selenide quantum dots (QDs) are semiconductor nanoparticles that are manufactured for biomedical imaging, photovoltaics, and other applications. While metallic nanoparticles can be made biotically by bacteria and fungi, and thus occur in nature, the fate of either natural or engineered QDs and relationships to nanoparticle size, conjugate and biotic conditions are mostly unknown. Working with several different bacterial strains and QDs of different sizes and conjugate chemistries, including QDs synthesized by a Fusarium fungal strain, we show that QDs can enter cells through specfic receptor-mediated processes, that QDs are broken down by bacteria during cell association, and that toxicity to cells is much like that imposed by Cd(II) ions. The mechanisms of entry and toxicity are not fully understood, but preliminary evidence suggests that electron transfer between cells and QDs occurs. Also, cell membranes are compromised, indicating oxidative stress is occurring. Results with planktonic and biofilm bacteria are similar, but differently, biofilms tend to accumulate Cd(II) associated with QD treatments.

  17. Multiphysics modeling of non-linear laser-matter interactions for optically active semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraczek, Brent; Kanp, Jaroslaw

    Development of photonic devices for sensors and communications devices has been significantly enhanced by computational modeling. We present a new computational method for modelling laser propagation in optically-active semiconductors within the paraxial wave approximation (PWA). Light propagation is modeled using the Streamline-upwind/Petrov-Galerkin finite element method (FEM). Material response enters through the non-linear polarization, which serves as the right-hand side of the FEM calculation. Maxwell's equations for classical light propagation within the PWA can be written solely in terms of the electric field, producing a wave equation that is a form of the advection-diffusion-reaction equations (ADREs). This allows adaptation of the computational machinery developed for solving ADREs in fluid dynamics to light-propagation modeling. The non-linear polarization is incorporated using a flexible framework to enable the use of multiple methods for carrier-carrier interactions (e.g. relaxation-time-based or Monte Carlo) to enter through the non-linear polarization, as appropriate to the material type. We demonstrate using a simple carrier-carrier model approximating the response of GaN. Supported by ARL Materials Enterprise.

  18. Interacting quasi-band theory for electronic states in compound semiconductor alloys: Wurtzite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishi, Ayaka; Oda, Masato; Shinozuka, Yuzo

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports on the electronic states of compound semiconductor alloys of wurtzite structure calculated by the recently proposed interacting quasi-band (IQB) theory combined with empirical sp3 tight-binding models. Solving derived quasi-Hamiltonian 24 × 24 matrix that is characterized by the crystal parameters of the constituents facilitates the calculation of the conduction and valence bands of wurtzite alloys for arbitrary concentrations under a unified scheme. The theory is applied to III–V and II–VI wurtzite alloys: cation-substituted Al1‑ x Ga x N and Ga1‑ x In x N and anion-substituted CdS1‑ x Se x and ZnO1‑ x S x . The obtained results agree well with the experimental data, and are discussed in terms of mutual mixing between the quasi-localized states (QLS) and quasi-average bands (QAB): the latter bands are approximately given by the virtual crystal approximation (VCA). The changes in the valence and conduction bands, and the origin of the band gap bowing are discussed on the basis of mixing character.

  19. Temperature dependence of band gaps in semiconductors: Electron-phonon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhosale, J.; Ramdas, A. K.; Burger, A.; Muñoz, A.; Romero, A. H.; Cardona, M.; Lauck, R.; Kremer, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    We have theoretically investigated, by ab initio techniques, the phonon properties of several semiconductors with chalcopyrite structure. Comparison with experiments has led us to distinguish between materials with d electrons in the valence band (e.g., CuGaS2, AgGaS2) and those without d electrons (e.g., ZnSnAs2). The former exhibit a rather peculiar nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the energy gap which, so far, has resisted cogent theoretical description. We analyze this nonmonotonic temperature dependence by fitting two Bose-Einstein oscillators with weights of opposite sign leading to an increase at low temperatures and a decrease at higher temperatures and find that the energy of the former correlates well with characteristic peaks in the phonon density of states associated with low-energy vibrations of the d-electron elements. We hope that this work will encourage theoretical investigations of the electron-phonon interaction in this direction, especially of the current ab initio type.

  20. Enhanced nonlinear interactions in quantum optomechanics via mechanical amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemonde, Marc-Antoine; Didier, Nicolas; Clerk, Aashish A.

    2016-04-01

    The quantum nonlinear regime of optomechanics is reached when nonlinear effects of the radiation pressure interaction are observed at the single-photon level. This requires couplings larger than the mechanical frequency and cavity-damping rate, and is difficult to achieve experimentally. Here we show how to exponentially enhance the single-photon optomechanical coupling strength using only additional linear resources. Our method is based on using a large-amplitude, strongly detuned mechanical parametric drive to amplify mechanical zero-point fluctuations and hence enhance the radiation pressure interaction. It has the further benefit of allowing time-dependent control, enabling pulsed schemes. For a two-cavity optomechanical set-up, we show that our scheme generates photon blockade for experimentally accessible parameters, and even makes the production of photonic states with negative Wigner functions possible. We discuss how our method is an example of a more general strategy for enhancing boson-mediated two-particle interactions and nonlinearities.

  1. Gapped triplet p -wave superconductivity in strong spin-orbit-coupled semiconductor quantum wells in proximity to s -wave superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, T.; Wu, M. W.

    2016-05-01

    We show that gapped triplet superconductivity, i.e., a triplet superconductor with a triplet order parameter, can be realized in strong spin-orbit-coupled (100) quantum wells in proximity to an s -wave superconductor. It is revealed that in quantum wells with the singlet order parameter induced from the superconducting proximity effect, not only can the triplet pairings arise due to spin-orbit coupling, but the triplet order parameter can also be induced due to the repulsive effective electron-electron interaction, including the electron-electron Coulomb and electron-phonon interactions. This is a natural extension of the work of de Gennes, in which the repulsive-interaction-induced singlet order parameter arises in normal metal in proximity to an s -wave superconductor [Rev. Mod. Phys. 36, 225 (1964), 10.1103/RevModPhys.36.225]. Specifically, we derive the effective Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation, in which the self-energies due to the effective electron-electron interactions contribute to the singlet and triplet order parameters. It is further shown that for the singlet order parameter, it is efficiently suppressed due to this self-energy renormalization, whereas for the triplet order parameter it is the p -wave (px±i py ) one with the d vector parallel to the effective magnetic field due to the spin-orbit coupling. Finally, we perform a numerical calculation in InSb (100) quantum wells. Specifically, we reveal that the Coulomb interaction is much more important than the electron-phonon interaction at low temperature. Moreover, it is shown that with proper electron density, the minimum of the renormalized singlet and the maximum of the induced triplet order parameters are comparable, and hence they can be experimentally distinguished.

  2. Experimental studies of the quantum Hall insulator: Electron-phonon interactions and localization length spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Rupert Murray

    The quantum Hall effect appears in two-dimensional electron gases (2DEG's) confined at the interfaces of semiconductor heterostructures. The plateau regions are electrical insulators while the transition between the plateaus is metallic. Two techniques have been used to study aspects of this insulating behavior; heating experiments using DC techniques and localization length spectroscopy through high frequency transport experiments. Heating experiments pump energy into a system while the experimenter observes the physical mechanisms that nature uses to remove this energy. The principle mechanism for energy removal from 2DEG's is the interaction of electrons with phonons. We have performed heating experiments from the center of the plateaus, moving outwards towards the transition region. A relationship between the input power and the effective electron temperature P ˜ Tp+2 is found to exist. At the center of the plateaus p + 2 = 5 but near the plateau edges p + 2 ≈ 4. Simultaneously, the phonon emission rate ( t-1e-ph ) from the hot electron system has been measured. We find t-1e-ph to be about 1 x 108 T 3 K-3s-1 at odd plateaus and about 10 times smaller (1 x 107 T 3 K-3s-1) at even plateaus. A new technique for probing the electron localization length via microwave transport measurements has been developed. Using a resonant technique, the real and imaginary parts of the longitudinal conductivity (sigma xx) are measured for frequencies 1.25 ≤ f ≤ 10 GHz. This is the first experiment to closely examine the insulating quantum Hall plateau regime at these frequencies whereas previous experiments have focused on the sigmaxx peaks between plateaus. The real part of sigmaxx is found to scale linearly with frequency, i.e. sigmaxx ˜ xi f where xi is the localization length. The scaled conductivity allows calculation of the localization length of electrons in the quantum Hall plateaus. The measurement agrees with localization length measurements made at DC.

  3. Application of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots as fluorescent labels for diagnosis of brain glial cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farias, Patrícia M. A.; Santos, Beate S.; Menezes, Frederico D.; Ferreira, Ricardo; Oliveira, Fernando J. M., Jr.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; Romão, Luciana; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Amaral, Jane C. O. F.; Fontes, Adriana; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2006-02-01

    In this work we present the preparation, characterization and conjugation of colloidal core shell CdS-Cd(OH) II quantum dots to health and cancer glial rats living cells in culture media. The particles were obtained via colloidal synthesis in aqueous medium, with final pH=7.3-7.4. Laser Scan Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) and Fluorescence Microscopy were used to evaluate fluorescence intensities and patterns of health and cancer (glioblastoma) glial cells labeled with the quantum dots in different time intervals. Health and cancer glial cells clearly differ in their fluorescence intensities and patterns. These different fluorescence intensities and patterns may be associated to differences concerning cellular membrane and metabolic features of health and cancer cells. The results obtained indicate the potential of the methodology for fast and precise cancer diagnostics.

  4. Polarization-resolved resonant fluorescence of a single semiconductor quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J.; Founta, S.; Hughes, M.; Hopkinson, M.; Ramsay, A. J.; Skolnick, M. S.; Shih, C. K.

    2012-12-01

    We observe the resonantly excited emission of a single self assembled quantum dot (QD) positioned in a planar μ-cavity, free of any background scattering from defects in the surrounding lattice matrix. Making use of this technique, we are able to obtain the second-order correlation function g2(τ) and, therefore, observe its oscillations under strong continuous-wave excitation. By determining that its correlation function is near zero for g2(τ = 0), we are able to verify its status as a single quantum emitter. By altering the input scheme geometry, we are also able to demonstrate further direct control of a single QD's properties by gaining access to and observing emission from both of its polarization states πx and πy by merely tuning the excitation wavelength.

  5. Magnetic field dependence of the energy of negatively charged excitons in semiconductor quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Riva, C.; Peeters, F. M.; Varga, K.

    2001-03-15

    We present a variational calculation of the spin-singlet and spin-triplet states of a negatively charged exciton (trion) confined to a single quantum well in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. We calculated the probability density and the pair correlation function of the singlet and triplet trion states. The dependence of the energy levels and of the binding energy on the well width and on the magnetic field strength was investigated. We compared our results with the available experimental data on GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells and find that in the low-magnetic-field region (B<18 T) the observed transitions are those of the singlet and the dark triplet trion (with angular momentum L{sub z}=-1), while for high magnetic fields (B>25 T) the dark trion becomes optically inactive and possibly a transition to a bright triplet trion (angular momentum L{sub z}=0) state is observed.

  6. Synthesis of Non-blinking Semiconductor Quantum Dots Emitting in the Near-Infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Allison M.; Mangum, Benjamin D.; Piryatinski, Andrei; Park, Young-Shin; Htoon, Han; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.

    2012-06-21

    Our previous work demonstrates that Quasi-Type II CdSe/CdS core-shell quantum dots with thick shells (3-5 nm) exhibit unique photophysical characteristics, including improved chemical robustness over typical thin-shelled core/shell systems and the elimination of blinking through suppression of nonradiative Auger recombination. Here we describe a new thick-shelled heterostructure, InP/CdS, which exhibits a Type II bandgap alignment producing near-infrared (NIR) emission. Samples with a range of shell thicknesses were synthesized, enabling shell-thickness-dependent study of the absorbance and emission spectra, fluorescence lifetimes, and quantum yields. InP/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell structures were also synthesized to reduce cadmium exposure for applications in the biological environment. Single particle spectroscopy indicates reduced blinking and improved photostability with increasing shell thickness, resulting in thick-shelled dots that are appropriate for single-particle tracking measurements with NIR emission.

  7. Photon echo transients from an inhomogeneous ensemble of semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poltavtsev, S. V.; Salewski, M.; Kapitonov, Yu. V.; Yugova, I. A.; Akimov, I. A.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Kavokin, A. V.; Bayer, M.

    2016-03-01

    An ensemble of quantum dot excitons may be used for coherent information manipulation. Due to the ensemble inhomogeneity any optical information retrieval occurs in the form of a photon echo. We show that the inhomogeneity can lead to a significant deviation from the conventional echo timing sequence. Variation of the area of the initial rotation pulse, which generates excitons in a dot subensemble only, reveals this complex picture of photon echo formation. We observe a retarded echo for π /2 pulses, while for 3 π /2 the echo is advanced in time as evidenced through monitoring the Rabi oscillations in the time-resolved photon echo amplitude from (In,Ga)As/GaAs self-assembled quantum dot structures and confirmed by detailed calculations.

  8. Configuration interaction matrix elements for the quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Rachel; Macek, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    In the spherical model of the quantum Hall system, the two-body matrix elements and pseudopotentials can be found analytically in terms of a general scalar pair interaction potential by expressing the pair interaction as a weighted sum over Legendre polynomials. For non-infinite systems, only a finite set of terms in the potential expansion contribute to the interactions; the contributing terms define an effective spatial potential for the system. The connection between the effective spatial potential and the pseudopotential is one-to-one for finite systems, and any completely defined model pseudopotential can be analytically inverted to give a unique corresponding spatial potential. This technique of inverting the pseudopotential to derive effective spatial potentials may be of use for developing accurate model spatial potentials for quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We demonstrate the technique and the corresponding spatial potentials for a few example model pseudopotentials. Supported by Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. DOE, Grant DE-FG02-02ER15283 to the University of Tennessee.

  9. Effect of metal side claddings on emission decay rates of single quantum dots embedded in a sub-wavelength semiconductor waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takumi; Ota, Yasutomo; Ishida, Satomi; Kumagai, Naoto; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2016-08-01

    We experimentally investigate the emission decay rates of self-assembled single InAs quantum dots (QDs) embedded in sub-wavelength semiconductor waveguides with and without metal side claddings. Compared with as-grown single QDs, we observe a clear suppression (enhancement) in the radiative decay rates of single InAs QDs embedded in the sub-wavelength semiconductor waveguides without (with) metal cladding, respectively. The decay rate for QDs in metal-clad waveguides is ∼2 times faster than that in waveguides without metal. Numerical calculations using models that include the effects of structural imperfections show good agreement with the experimental results, and reveal that the most important structural imperfection is the gap between the metal and the semiconductor.

  10. Many-Body Effects and Lineshape of Intersubband Transitions in Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng

    2003-01-01

    Intersubband Transition (ISBT) infrared (IR) absorption and PL in InAs/AlSb were studied for narrow Quantum Wells (QWs). A large redshift was observed (7-10 meV) as temperature increased. A comprehensive many-body theory was developed for ISBTs including contributions of c-c and c-phonon scatterings. Many-body effects were studied systematically for ISBTs. Redshift and linewidth dependence on temperature, as well as spectral features were well explained by theory.

  11. Spectroscopy of colloidal semiconductor core/shell nanoplatelets with high quantum yield.

    PubMed

    Tessier, M D; Mahler, B; Nadal, B; Heuclin, H; Pedetti, S; Dubertret, B

    2013-07-10

    Free standing two-dimensional materials appear as a novel class of structures. Recently, the first colloidal two-dimensional heterostructures have been synthesized. These core/shell nanoplatelets are the first step toward colloidal quantum wells. Here, we study in detail the spectroscopic properties of this novel generation of colloidal nanoparticles. We show that core/shell CdSe/CdZnS nanoplatelets with 80% quantum yield can be obtained. The emission time trace of single core/shell nanoplatelets exhibits reduced blinking compared to core nanoplatelets with a two level emission time trace. At cryogenic temperatures, these nanoplatelets have a quantum yield close to 100% and a stable emission time trace. A solution of core/shell nanoplatelets has emission spectra with a full width half-maximum close to 20 nm, a value much lower than corresponding spherical or rod-shaped heterostructures. Using single particle spectroscopy, we show that the broadening of the emission spectra upon the shell deposition is not due to dispersity between particles but is related to an intrinsic increased exciton-phonon coupling in the shell. We also demonstrate that optical spectroscopy is a relevant tool to investigate the presence of traps induced by shell deposition. The spectroscopic properties of the core/shell nanoplatelets presented here strongly suggest that this new generation of objects will be an interesting alternative to spherical or rod-shaped nanocrystals. PMID:23731211

  12. Interband emission energy in a dilute nitride quaternary semiconductor quantum dot for longer wavelength applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mageshwari, P. Uma; Peter, A. John; Lee, Chang Woo; Duque, C. A.

    2016-07-01

    Excitonic properties are studied in a strained Ga1-xInxNyAs1-y/GaAs cylindrical quantum dot. The optimum condition for the desired band alignment for emitting wavelength 1.55 μm is investigated using band anticrossing model and the model solid theory. The band gap and the band discontinuities of a Ga1-xInxNyAs1-y/GaAs quantum dot on GaAs are computed with the geometrical confinement effect. The binding energy of the exciton, the oscillator strength and its radiative life time for the optimum condition are found taking into account the spatial confinement effect. The effects of geometrical confinement and the nitrogen incorporation on the interband emission energy are brought out. The result shows that the desired band alignment for emitting wavelength 1.55 μm is achieved for the inclusion of alloy contents, y=0.0554% and x=0.339% in Ga1-xInxNyAs1-y/GaAs quantum dot. And the incorporation of nitrogen and indium shows the red-shift and the geometrical confinement shows the blue-shift. And it can be applied for fibre optical communication networks.

  13. Textbook treatments of quantum electromagnetic interaction: pedagogical and conceptual problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile-Peláez, F. Javier

    2001-07-01

    In this paper we review and discuss the approaches used, almost universally, in textbooks dealing with quantum mechanics, and particularly those focused on optoelectronics devices, to explain the atom-field interactions. For this purpose, a true understanding and careful use of the first-order perturbation theory are necessary. By providing two alternative full derivations of the absorption/emission processes when the radiation is in a coherent multimode state, we highlight a number of conceptual and didactical failures in the usual textbook presentations, and propose more suitable and convincing strategies to improve them.

  14. Controllable electron interactions in quantum dots coupled to nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacla, Alexandre; Cheng, Guanglei; Tomczyk, Michelle; Levy, Jeremy; Daley, Andrew; Pekker, David

    We theoretically study transport properties in quantum dot devices proximity coupled to superconducting nanowires. In particular, we investigate the controllable transition from resonant pair tunneling to Andreev bound states, which has been recently observed in nanodevices fabricated at the interface of the oxide heterostructure LaAlO3/SrTiO3. We show that such a transition in transport features can signify a Lifshitz transition, at which electron interactions change from attractive to repulsive. We also discuss an alternate description in terms of magnetic impurities.

  15. Carrier escape from ground state and non-zero resonance frequency at low bias powers for semiconductor quantum-dot lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Grillot, F.; Even, J.

    2012-06-01

    The three-dimensional confinement of electrons and holes in the semiconductor quantum dot (QD) structure profoundly changes its density of states compared to the bulk semiconductor or the thin-film quantum well (QW) structure. The aim of this paper is to theoretically investigate the microwave properties of InAs/InP(311B) QD lasers. A new expression of the modulation transfer function is derived for the analysis of QD laser modulation properties based on a set of four rate equations. Analytical calculations point out that carrier escape from ground state (GS) to excited state (ES) induces a non-zero resonance frequency at low bias powers. Calculations also show that the carrier escape leads to a larger damping factor offset as compared to conventional QW lasers. These results are of prime importance for a better understanding of the carrier dynamics in QD lasers as well as for further optimization of low cost sources for optical telecommunications.

  16. Shear viscosity of strongly interacting fermionic quantum fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhira, Nandan; McKenzie, Ross H.

    2015-09-01

    Eighty years ago, Eyring proposed that the shear viscosity of a liquid η has a quantum limit η ≳n ℏ where n is the density of the fluid. Using holographic duality and the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence in string theory, Kovtun, Son, and Starinets (KSS) conjectured a universal bound η/s ≥ℏ/4 π kB for the ratio between the shear viscosity and the entropy density s . Using dynamical mean-field theory, we calculate the shear viscosity and entropy density for a fermionic fluid described by a single-band Hubbard model at half-filling. Our calculated shear viscosity as a function of temperature is compared with experimental data for liquid 3He . At low temperature, the shear viscosity is found to be well above the quantum limit and is proportional to the characteristic Fermi liquid 1 /T2 dependence, where T is the temperature. With increasing temperature and interaction strength U , there is significant deviation from the Fermi liquid form. Also, the shear viscosity violates the quantum limit near the crossover from coherent quasiparticle-based transport to incoherent transport (the bad metal regime). Finally, the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density is found to be comparable to the KSS bound for parameters appropriate to liquid 3He . However, this bound is found to be strongly violated in the bad metal regime for parameters appropriate to lattice electronic systems such as organic charge-transfer salts.

  17. Measurements of the spin-orbit interaction and Landé g factor in a pure-phase InAs nanowire double quantum dot in the Pauli spin-blockade regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiyin; Huang, Shaoyun; Lei, Zijin; Pan, Dong; Zhao, Jianhua; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate direct measurements of the spin-orbit interaction and Landé g factors in a semiconductor nanowire double quantum dot. The device is made from a single-crystal pure-phase InAs nanowire on top of an array of finger gates on a Si/SiO2 substrate and the measurements are performed in the Pauli spin-blockade regime. It is found that the double quantum dot exhibits a large singlet-triplet energy splitting of ΔST ˜ 2.3 meV, a strong spin-orbit interaction of ΔSO ˜ 140 μeV, and a large and strongly level-dependent Landé g factor of ˜12.5. These results imply that single-crystal pure-phase InAs nanowires are desired semiconductor nanostructures for applications in quantum information technologies.

  18. Effect of additional optical pumping injection into the ground-state ensemble on the gain and the phase recovery acceleration of quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungho

    2014-02-01

    The effect of additional optical pumping injection into the ground-state ensemble on the ultrafast gain and the phase recovery dynamics of electrically-driven quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers is numerically investigated by solving 1088 coupled rate equations. The ultrafast gain and the phase recovery responses are calculated with respect to the additional optical pumping power. Increasing the additional optical pumping power can significantly accelerate the ultrafast phase recovery, which cannot be done by increasing the injection current density.

  19. Emission switching in carbon dots coated CdTe quantum dots driving by pH dependent hetero-interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiao; Wang, Hao; Yi, Qinghua; Wang, Yun; Cong, Shan; Zhao, Jie; Sun, Yinghui; Zou, Guifu E-mail: jiexiong@uestc.edu.cn; Qian, Zhicheng; Huang, Jianwen; Xiong, Jie E-mail: jiexiong@uestc.edu.cn; Luo, Hongmei

    2015-11-16

    Due to the different emission mechanism between fluorescent carbon dots and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), it is of interest to explore the potential emission in hetero-structured carbon dots/semiconducting QDs. Herein, we design carbon dots coated CdTe QDs (CDQDs) and investigate their inherent emission. We demonstrate switchable emission for the hetero-interactions of the CDQDs. Optical analyses indicate electron transfer between the carbon dots and the CdTe QDs. A heterojunction electron process is proposed as the driving mechanism based on N atom protonation of the carbon dots. This work advances our understanding of the interaction mechanism of the heterostructured CDQDs and benefits the future development of optoelectronic nanodevices with new functionalities.

  20. Challenges in the simulation of dye-sensitized ZnO solar cells: quantum confinement, alignment of energy levels and excited state nature at the dye/semiconductor interface.

    PubMed

    Amat, Anna; De Angelis, Filippo

    2012-08-14

    We report a first principles density functional theory/time-dependent density functional theory (DFT/TDDFT) computational investigation on a prototypical perylene dye anchored to realistic ZnO nanostructures, approaching the size of the ZnO nanowires used in dye-sensitized solar cells devices. DFT calculations were performed on (ZnO)(n) clusters of increasing size, with n up to 222, of 1.3 × 1.5 × 3.4 nm dimensions, and for the related dye-sensitized models. We show that quantum confinement in the ZnO nanostructures substantially affects the dye/semiconductor alignment of energy levels, with smaller ZnO models providing unfavourable electron injection. An increasing broadening of the dye LUMO is found moving to larger substrates, substantially contributing to the interfacial electronic coupling. TDDFT excited state calculations for the investigated dye@(ZnO)(222) system are fully consistent with experimental data, quantitatively reproducing the red-shift and broadening of the visible absorption spectrum observed for the ZnO-anchored dye compared to the dye in solution. TDDFT calculations on the fully interacting system also introduce a contribution to the dye/semiconductor admixture, due to configurational excited state mixing. Our results highlight the importance of quantum confinement in dye-sensitized ZnO interfaces, and provide the fundamental insight lying at the heart of the associated DSC devices. PMID:22743544

  1. Decoherence processes during optical manipulation of excitonic qubits in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. Q.; Muller, A.; Bianucci, P.; Rossi, E.; Xue, Q. K.; Takagahara, T.; Piermarocchi, C.; MacDonald, A. H.; Shih, C. K.

    2005-07-01

    Using photoluminescence spectroscopy, we have investigated the nature of Rabi oscillation damping during optical manipulation of excitonic qubits in self-assembled quantum dots. Rabi oscillations were recorded by varying the pulse amplitude for fixed pulse durations between 4ps and 10ps . Up to five periods are visible, making it possible to quantify the excitation dependent damping. We find that this damping is more pronounced for shorter pulse widths and show that its origin is the nonresonant excitation of carriers in the wetting layer, most likely involving bound-to-continuum and continuum-to-bound transitions.

  2. Low-threshold, high quantum efficiency stop-cleaved InGaAsP semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Antreasyan, A.; Chen, C.Y.; Napholtz, S.G.; Wilt, D.P.

    1985-08-15

    InGaAsP double-channel--planar-buried-heterostructure lasers with stop-cleaved mirrors emitting at 1.3 ..mu..m have been fabricated. Threshold currents as low as 18 mA and differential quantum efficiencies as high as 39% have been obtained. Furthermore, we have achieved a yield greater than 50% in obtaining good quality facets utilizing the stop-cleaving technique. Our result represents one of the lowest threshold currents obtained so far at 1.3-..mu..m wavelength among the structures designed for monolithic optoelectronic integration.

  3. Quantum Defect Theory for Long-range Anisotropic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzic, Brandon P.; Bohn, John L.; Greene, Chris H.

    2014-05-01

    Quantum Defect Theory (QDT) is a numerically efficient and accurate tool for studying a wide variety of ultracold atomic collisions, where the asymptotic behavior of the atoms is well described by a set of simple parameters. However, analytic formulas for these parameters only exist for the pure - 1 /R6 potential. The long-range parameters are given by simple power law equations in the collision energy, and the bound state energies of different partial waves are simply related. We extend these formulas to encompass all potentials of the form - 1 /Rn , where n > 2 . Moreover, the accuracy of QDT is limited by long-range anisotropic interactions, which, for example, play an important role in collisions of dysprosium or erbium atoms. We present our recent developments on numerically treating this type of interaction within perturbation theory. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy.

  4. Quantum correlations of two qubits interacting with a macroscopic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Lu, Jing; Zhou, Lan

    2015-04-01

    We consider two particles of spin- interacting with a one-dimensional -spin array, which is an exactly solvable model. The dynamics of entanglement and quantum discord (QD) of the spins of the two particles is investigated by regarding the 1D -spin array as the environment. It is found that although the entanglement may suffer a sudden death and a sudden birth in the evolution, it can neither be generated nor become larger than its initial value. Different from the entanglement dynamics, QD can be amplified and even be generated by the interaction between particles and the common environment. We also observe that QD decays asymptotically to zero and later experiences a rival when the average number of excitation in the 1D -spin array becomes larger in the case of nonzero inter-distance between two particles.

  5. Efficient quantum modeling of inelastic interactions in nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Lannoo, M.; Cavassilas, N.; Luisier, M.; Bescond, M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an efficient direct quantum method to model inelastic scattering in nanoelectronic structures including degenerate band extrema. It couples the Born series expansion of the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) to an analytic continuation based on the Padé approximant technique. Using a two-band k .p Hamiltonian, we analyze the electron transport through a linear chain in the presence of both optical and acoustic phonons. Results are consistently compared with the usual, computationally expensive, self-consistent Born approximation (SCBA). We find that our approach provides a much better convergence for both types of phonons in the presence of strong multiband coupling. The calculation of the current to the fifth order in the interactions is sufficient to reproduce the influence of all considered phonon interactions. We also show that the method can be applied to the calculation of the density of carriers which depicts however a slower convergence rate than the current. The capability to efficiently calculate both current and carrier density represents a clear advantage in a context of increasing request for atomistic quantum simulations.

  6. Limits Of Quantum Information In Weak Interaction Processes Of Hyperons

    PubMed Central

    Hiesmayr, B. C.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the achievable limits of the quantum information processing of the weak interaction revealed by hyperons with spin. We find that the weak decay process corresponds to an interferometric device with a fixed visibility and fixed phase difference for each hyperon. Nature chooses rather low visibilities expressing a preference to parity conserving or violating processes (except for the decay Σ+→ pπ0). The decay process can be considered as an open quantum channel that carries the information of the hyperon spin to the angular distribution of the momentum of the daughter particles. We find a simple geometrical information theoretic interpretation of this process: two quantization axes are chosen spontaneously with probabilities where α is proportional to the visibility times the real part of the phase shift. Differently stated, the weak interaction process corresponds to spin measurements with an imperfect Stern-Gerlach apparatus. Equipped with this information theoretic insight we show how entanglement can be measured in these systems and why Bell’s nonlocality (in contradiction to common misconception in literature) cannot be revealed in hyperon decays. Last but not least we study under which circumstances contextuality can be revealed. PMID:26144247

  7. Semi-stochastic full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Adam; Petruzielo, Frank; Khadilkar, Mihir; Changlani, Hitesh; Nightingale, M. P.; Umrigar, C. J.

    2012-02-01

    In the recently proposed full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo (FCIQMC) [1,2], the ground state is projected out stochastically, using a population of walkers each of which represents a basis state in the Hilbert space spanned by Slater determinants. The infamous fermion sign problem manifests itself in the fact that walkers of either sign can be spawned on a given determinant. We propose an improvement on this method in the form of a hybrid stochastic/deterministic technique, which we expect will improve the efficiency of the algorithm by ameliorating the sign problem. We test the method on atoms and molecules, e.g., carbon, carbon dimer, N2 molecule, and stretched N2. [4pt] [1] Fermion Monte Carlo without fixed nodes: a Game of Life, death and annihilation in Slater Determinant space. George Booth, Alex Thom, Ali Alavi. J Chem Phys 131, 050106, (2009).[0pt] [2] Survival of the fittest: Accelerating convergence in full configuration-interaction quantum Monte Carlo. Deidre Cleland, George Booth, and Ali Alavi. J Chem Phys 132, 041103 (2010).

  8. Quantifying the density of surface capping ligands on semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Naiqian; Palui, Goutam; Merkl, Jan-Philip; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2015-03-01

    We have designed a new set of coordinating ligands made of a lipoic acid (LA) anchor and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrophilic moiety appended with a terminal aldehyde for the surface functionalization of QDs. This ligand design was combined with a recently developed photoligation strategy to prepare hydrophilic CdSe-ZnS QDs with good control over the fraction of intact aldehyde (-CHO) groups per nanocrystal. We further applied the efficient hydrazone ligation to react aldehyde-QDs with 2-hydrazinopyridine (2-HP). This covalent modification produces QD-conjugates with a well-defined absorption feature at 350 nm ascribed to the hydrazone chromophore. We exploited this unique optical signature to accurately measure the number of aldehyde groups per QD when the fraction of LA-PEG-CHO per nanocrystal was varied. This allowed us to extract an estimate for the number of LA-PEG ligands per QD. These results suggest that hydrazone ligation has the potential to provide a simple and general analytical method to estimate the number of surface ligands for a variety of nanocrystals such as metal, metal oxide and semiconductor nanocrystals.

  9. Highly Transparent, Visible-Light Photodetector Based on Oxide Semiconductors and Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung Won; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Park, Jin-Seong; Kang, Seong Jun

    2015-09-01

    Highly transparent phototransistors that can detect visible light have been fabricated by combining indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) and quantum dots (QDs). A wide-band-gap IGZO film was used as a transparent semiconducting channel, while small-band-gap QDs were adopted to absorb and convert visible light to an electrical signal. Typical IGZO thin-film transistors (TFTs) did not show a photocurrent with illumination of visible light. However, IGZO TFTs decorated with QDs showed enhanced photocurrent upon exposure to visible light. The device showed a responsivity of 1.35×10(4) A/W and an external quantum efficiency of 2.59×10(4) under illumination by a 635 nm laser. The origin of the increased photocurrent in the visible light was the small band gap of the QDs combined with the transparent IGZO films. Therefore, transparent phototransistors based on IGZO and QDs were fabricated and characterized in detail. The result is relevant for the development of highly transparent photodetectors that can detect visible light. PMID:26293387

  10. A Closer Look into the Traditional Purification Process of CdSe Semiconductor Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, Behtash; Meulenberg, Robert W

    2015-12-15

    This paper describes how the postprocessing procedure for wurtzite CdSe quantum dots (QDs) 4.8 and 6.7 nm in diameter is affected by both the choice of nonsolvent and the number of processing steps. Using a host of analytical techniques (ultraviolet-visible, photoluminescence, nuclear magnetic, X-ray photoelectron, and infrared spectroscopy, as well as thermogravimetric analysis), we find that control over the ligand type and surface density can be achieved simply by the number of washing steps used during the postprocessing procedure. Using multiple washing steps we can achieve colloidally stable solutions of QDs with organic mass fractions as low as 13% by mass. For CdSe QDs passivated with trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) and stearic acid (SA), essentially no TOPO is bound to the particle surface after three or four washing steps, with a plateau in the amount of SA being removed. The results can be explained using the L- and X-type ligand classification system for QDs, with L-type ligands (TOPO) removed in the early processing steps but the removal of X-type (SA) ligand stalling at a large number of washing steps due to charging of the QDs. Importantly, very little change is observed in the photoluminescence (PL) properties, suggesting that the choice of nonsolvent during postprocessing will allow the production of QD materials with very low organic content by mass but with good PL quantum yields. PMID:26625188

  11. Nonlinear optical spectra having characteristics of Fano interferences in coherently coupled lowest exciton biexciton states in semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Gotoh, Hideki Sanada, Haruki; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Sogawa, Tetsuomi

    2014-10-15

    Optical nonlinear effects are examined using a two-color micro-photoluminescence (micro-PL) method in a coherently coupled exciton-biexciton system in a single quantum dot (QD). PL and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (PLE) are employed to measure the absorption spectra of the exciton and biexciton states. PLE for Stokes and anti-Stokes PL enables us to clarify the nonlinear optical absorption properties in the lowest exciton and biexciton states. The nonlinear absorption spectra for excitons exhibit asymmetric shapes with peak and dip structures, and provide a distinct contrast to the symmetric dip structures of conventional nonlinear spectra. Theoretical analyses with a density matrix method indicate that the nonlinear spectra are caused not by a simple coherent interaction between the exciton and biexciton states but by coupling effects among exciton, biexciton and continuum states. These results indicate that Fano quantum interference effects appear in exciton-biexciton systems at QDs and offer important insights into their physics.

  12. Monolithically integrated quantum dot optical modulator with semiconductor optical amplifier for thousand and original band optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naokatsu; Akahane, Kouichi; Umezawa, Toshimasa; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Kawanishi, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    A monolithically integrated quantum dot (QD) optical gain modulator (OGM) with a QD semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) was successfully developed with T-band (1.0 µm waveband) and O-band (1.3 µm waveband) QD optical gain materials for Gbps-order, high-speed optical data generation. The insertion loss due to coupling between the device and the optical fiber was effectively compensated for by the SOA section. It was also confirmed that the monolithic QD-OGM/SOA device enabled >4.8 Gbps optical data generation with a clear eye opening in the T-band. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated error-free 4.8 Gbps optical data transmissions in each of the six wavelength channels over a 10-km-long photonic crystal fiber using the monolithic QD-OGM/SOA device in multiple O-band wavelength channels, which were generated by the single QD gain chip. These results suggest that the monolithic QD-OGM/SOA device will be advantageous in ultra-broadband optical frequency systems that utilize the T+O-band for short- and medium-range optical communications.

  13. CuSbS2: a promising semiconductor photo-absorber material for quantum dot sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhifeng; Huang, Jiajun; Han, Jianhuan; Hong, Tiantian; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Zhihua

    2016-06-22

    A facile, low-cost, simple solution-based process for preparing novel promising chalcostibite CuSbS2 sensitized ZnO nanorod arrays, and the application of these as photoanodes of semiconductor quantum dot sensitized inorganic-organic solar cells (QDSSCs) is reported for the first time. ZnO/CuSbS2 nanofilms were designed and prepared through a simple successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method and heat treatment process by employing ZnO nanorods as reactive templates. Novel efficient QDSSCs based on the ZnO/CuSbS2 nanofilms plus a solid electrolyte of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) were formed, and a power conversion efficiency of 1.61% was achieved. The excellent photoelectric performance is attributed to the improved light absorption efficiency, widened light absorption region, ideal band gap value, and high speed electron injection and transportation. The results demonstrate that a novel ternary sensitizer (I-V-VI2) can be synthesized via a low-cost method as described here and has great promising potential as a sensitizer in solar cells. PMID:27297190

  14. Development of High Quantum Efficiency UV/Blue Photocathode Epitaxial Semiconductor Heterostructures for Scintillation and Cherenkov Radiation Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leopold, Daniel J.

    2002-01-01

    The primary goal of this research project was to further extend the use of advanced heteroepitaxial-semiconductor crystal growth techniques such as molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and to demonstrate significant gains in UV/blue photonic detection by designing and fabricating atomically-tailored heteroepitaxial GaAlN/GaInN photocathode device structures. This NASA Explorer technology research program has focused on the development of photocathodes for Cherenkov and scintillation radiation detection. Support from the program allowed us to enhance our MBE system to include a nitrogen plasma source and a magnetic bearing turbomolecular pump for delivery and removal of high purity atomic nitrogen during GaAlN/GaInN film growth. Under this program we have also designed, built and incorporated a cesium activation stage. In addition, a connected UHV chamber with photocathode transfer/positioner components as well as a hybrid phototube stage was designed and built to make in-situ quantum efficiency measurements without ever having to remove the photocathodes from UHV conditions. Thus we have constructed a system with the capability to couple atomically-tailored MBE-grown photocathode heterostructures with real high gain readout devices for single photon detection evaluation.

  15. Controlling the onset of OB/OM in a semiconductor quantum well system in an inverted Y-type configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raheli, Ali; Hamedi, H. R.; Sahrai, M.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of optical bistability (OB) and optical multistability (OM) is numerically investigated in a four-level inverted Y-type semiconductor quantum well (SQW) structure immersed in a unidirectional ring cavity. In the four-level SQW system under consideration, a closed loop configuration is coupled to the upper level through a tunable probe field. We show that the OB threshold intensity can be controlled via the intensity of coupling fields which gives rise to the absorption variation of the probe field. In addition, due to the existence of the closed-loop configuration, the OB and OM behaviors of the proposed SQW medium are dependent on the relative phase of the applied fields. It is found that the OB can be switched to OM or vice versa by properly adjusting the relative phase of the applied fields. The results may provide new possibilities in real experiments for realizing an all-optical switching or coding element in a solid-state platform.

  16. Nonlinear interaction of infrared waves on a VO2 surface at a semiconductor-metal phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, N. K.; Zhukov, E. A.; Novokhatskii, V. V.

    1984-04-01

    Nonlinear interactions (including wavefront reversal) of light from CW or pulsed 10.6-micron CO2 lasers at the semiconductor-metal phase transition in a VO2 film are investigated experimentally. The results are presented in graphs and characterized in detail. The intensity reflection coefficients of the three-wave interactions are found to be 0.5 percent for a CW reference wave of intensity 900 mW/sq cm and 42 percent for a pulsed reference wave of threshold density 600-800 microjoule/sq cm.

  17. Quantum theory of chiral interactions in cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issaenko, S. A.; Harris, A. B.; Lubensky, T. C.

    1999-07-01

    The effective chiral interaction between molecules arising from long-range quantum interactions between fluctuating charge moments is analyzed in terms of a simple model of chiral molecules. This model is based on the approximations that (a) the dominant excited states of a molecule form a band whose width is small compared to the average energy of excitation above the ground state and (b) biaxial orientational correlation between adjacent molecules can be neglected. Previous treatments of quantum chiral interactions have been based on a multipole expansion of the effective interaction energy within second-order perturbation theory. We consider a system consisting of elongated molecules and, although we invoke the expansion in terms of coordinates transverse to the long axis of constituent molecules, we treat the longitudinal coordinate exactly. Such an approximation is plausible for molecules in real liquid crystals. The macroscopic cholesteric wave vector Q (Q=2π/P, where P is the pitch) is obtained via Q=h/K2, where K2 is the Frank elastic constant for twist and h is the torque field which we calculate from the effective chiral interaction κIJaI×aJ.RIJ, where the unit vector aI specifies the orientation of molecule I and RIJ is the displacement of molecule I relative to molecule J. We identify two distinct physical limits depending on whether one or both of the interacting molecules are excited in the virtual state. When both molecules are excited, we regain the R-8IJ dependence of κIJ on intermolecular separation found previously by Van der Meer et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 65, 3935 (1976)]. The two-molecule, unlike the one-molecule term, can be interpreted in terms of a superposition of pairwise interactions between individual atoms (or local chiral centers) on the two molecules. Contributions to κIJ when one molecule is excited in the virtual state are of order R-7IJ for helical molecules which are assumed not to have a global dipole moment, but whose atoms

  18. Non-equilibrium slave bosons approach to quantum pumping in interacting quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citro, Roberta; Romeo, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    We review a time-dependent slave bosons approach within the non-equilibrium Green's function technique to analyze the charge and spin pumping in a strongly interacting quantum dot. We study the pumped current as a function of the pumping phase and of the dot energy level and show that a parasitic current arises, beyond the pure pumping one, as an effect of the dynamical constraints. We finally illustrate an all-electrical mean for spin-pumping and discuss its relevance for spintronics applications.

  19. Interferometry and topological quantum computation using Majorana Fermions at semiconductor/superconductor interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sau, Jay; Tewari, Sumanta; Das Sarma, Sankar

    2011-03-01

    Majorana Fermions are hitherto unobserved exotic Fermionic excitations, which are their own anti-particles. Recently, a lot of excitement has been generated by proposals to realize Majorana fermions in topological superconductors in a rather general class of topological superconductors, some of which may be as simple as the interface 1D or 2D InAs and Al in the appropriate parameter regime might have exotic topological properties and Majorana Fermions. In my talk, I will discuss recent proposals for performing interferometry in 2D and 1D versions of such systems together with ideas for performing Quantum Computation using such robust Majorana fermion based qubits. This work is supported by DARPA-QuEST, JQI-NSF- PFC, and LPS-NSA.

  20. Profiling the local carrier concentration and dopant distribution across a semiconductor quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walrath, J. C.; Chang, A. S.; Lin, Y. H.; Huang, S.; Goldman, R. S.

    We profile the local carrier concentration, n, across epitaxial InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) consisting of 3D islands on top of a 2D alloy layer. We use scanning thermoelectric microscopy to profile the temperature gradient-induced voltage, which is converted to a profile of the local Seebeck coefficient, S. The S profile is then converted to a conduction band-edge profile and compared with Poisson-Schrodinger band-edge simulations. Our combined computational-experimental approach suggests a reduced carrier concentration in the QD center in comparison to that of the 2D alloy layer. We further use 3D atom probe tomography, which enables 3D imaging with a few Angstrom resolution, to profile the distribution of Si dopants. We discuss the correlation between the Si dopant distribution and the observed carrier concentration profile.