Sample records for interactions symbiosis predator-prey

  1. Investigating Predator-Prey Interactions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ethel D. Stanley (Beloit College; Biology)

    2006-05-20

    In a mixed culture, how does the population of Didinium affect the population of Paramecium â?? and vice versa? Predator-prey cycles can be modeled using the Biota simulation. How do variables such as the presence of a refuge or the availability of food perturb the population cycles? * study the effects that the presence of a refuge from predators has on a model microbial population

  2. Predator-Prey Interactions of Marine Invaders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gil Rilov

    Predator-prey interactions are among the most fundamental processes shaping the structure and function of ecological communities,\\u000a particularly in marine systems. In the past several decades, it has become clear that humans are interfering considerably\\u000a with these interactions in many marine systems, mainly by removing top predators via harvesting (Myers and Worm 2003), but\\u000a also through biological introductions. Most introduced species

  3. Bacterial Predator-Prey Interaction at Low Prey Density

    PubMed Central

    Varon, M.; Zeigler, B. P.

    1978-01-01

    A bacterial predator-prey interaction was studied using Bdellovibrio and bioluminescent prey bacteria. The attacking bdellovibrio causes decay of bioluminescence, which is correlated with bdellovibrio penetration into the prey. The behavior of the prey and predator populations over time was found to be well described by a Lotka-Volterra model. By using this model, the probability of bdellovibrio penetration after encountering a prey cell was found to be approximately 3.0%. The prey density required to give the bdellovibrios a 50% chance of survival was calculated to be at least 3.0 × 106 cells per ml, and the density required for population equilibria was calculated to be about 7 × 105 prey bacteria per ml. These values, not generally characteristic of natural habitats, suggest that the existence of Bdellovibrio in nature is limited to special ecological niches. PMID:16345299

  4. A synthesis of subdisciplines: predator–prey interactions and biodiversity and ecosystem functioning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony R. Ives; J Bradley; E William; Marine Biology

    Abstract The last 15 years has seen parallel surges of interest in two research areas that have rarely intersected: biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (BEF), and multispecies predator– prey,interactions (PPI). Research addressing,role of,biodiversity in ecosystem functioning has focused primarily on single trophic-level systems, emphasizing additive effects of diversity that manifest through resource partitioning and the sampling effect. Conversely, research addressing predator–prey

  5. Enhancing species distribution modeling by characterizing predator-prey interactions.

    PubMed

    Trainor, Anne M; Schmitz, Oswald J; Ivan, Jacob S; Shenk, Tanya M

    2014-01-01

    Niche theory is a well-established concept integrating a diverse array of environmental variables and multispecies interactions used to describe species geographic distribution. It is now customary to employ species distribution models (SDMs) that use environmental variables in conjunction with species location information to characterize species' niches and map their geographic ranges. The challenge remains, however, to account for the biotic interactions of species with other community members on which they depend. We show here how to connect species spatial distribution and their dependence with other species by modeling spatially explicit predator-prey interactions, which we call a trophic interaction distribution model (TIDM). To develop the principles, we capitalized on data from Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) reintroduced into Colorado. Spatial location information for lynx obtained from telemetry was used in conjunction with environmental data to construct an SDM. The spatial locations of lynx-snowshoe hare encounters obtained from snow-tracking in conjunction with environmental data were used to construct a TIDM. The environmental conditions associated with lynx locations and lynx-hare encounters identified through both SDM and TIDM revealed an initial transient phase in habitat use that settled into a steady state. Nevertheless, despite the potential for the SDM to broadly encompass all lynx hunting and nonhunting spatial locations, the spatial extents of the SDM and TIDM differed; about 40% of important lynx-snowshoe hare locations identified in the TIDM were not identified in the lynx-only SDM. Our results encourage greater effort to quantify spatial locations of trophic interactions among species in a community and the associated environmental conditions when attempting to construct models aimed at projecting current and future species geographic distributions. PMID:24640545

  6. Comparative analysis of marine ecosystems: workshop on predator–prey interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Kevin M.; Ciannelli, Lorenzo; Hunsicker, Mary; Rindorf, Anna; Neuenfeldt, Stefan; Möllmann, Christian; Guichard, Frederic; Huse, Geir

    2010-01-01

    Climate and human influences on marine ecosystems are largely manifested by changes in predator–prey interactions. It follows that ecosystem-based management of the world's oceans requires a better understanding of food web relationships. An international workshop on predator–prey interactions in marine ecosystems was held at the Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA on 16–18 March 2010. The meeting brought together scientists from diverse fields of expertise including theoretical ecology, animal behaviour, fish and seabird ecology, statistics, fisheries science and ecosystem modelling. The goals of the workshop were to critically examine the methods of scaling-up predator–prey interactions from local observations to systems, the role of shifting ecological processes with scale changes, and the complexity and organizational structure in trophic interactions. PMID:20462888

  7. Predator-prey interactions of salmon in the plume and near-shore ocean

    E-print Network

    Predator-prey interactions of salmon in the plume and near-shore ocean: implications for density), Elizabeth Daly, Jim Ruzicka (OSU), and Beth Phillips (UW) CRBF & W Ocean Workshop, February 14, 2013 #12;Presentation Outline · Background on competition involving salmon in the ocean · Interactions between wild

  8. Complex predator-prey interactions and predator intimidation among crayfish, piscivorous fish, and small benthic fish

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank J. Rahel; Roy A. Stein

    1988-01-01

    Predator-prey interactions were studied among a small prey fish (the johnny darter Etheostoma nigrum) and two predators (crayfish Orconectes rusticus and smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieui) with complementary foraging behaviors. When only smallmouth bass were present, darters reduced activity to 6% of control rates and spent most of the time hiding under tile shelters. When only crayfish were present, darter activity

  9. Predator-Prey Models

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Smith

    Using Maple, Mathmatica, or MatLab, learner should be able to develop and explore the Lotka-Volterra model for predator-prey interactions as a prototypical first-order system of differential equations.

  10. Predator-prey interactions between two amphibian species: effects of insecticide exposure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine M. Bridges

    1999-01-01

    The presence of environmental contaminants may alter predator-prey interactions among aquatic species by altering activity\\u000a levels of predators or prey, or by altering predator avoidance behavior. The outcome of a predatory encounter may be dependent\\u000a upon whether both species are exposed to a contaminant simultaneously, or whether exposure occurs only in one of the species.\\u000a In a laboratory experiment, I

  11. Signalling displays during predator–prey interactions in a Puerto Rican anole, Anolis cristatellus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MANUEL LEAL; JAVIER A. RODRIuGUEZ-ROBLES

    1997-01-01

    We examined conspicuous signalling displays in the context of predator–prey interactions. To determine in which context Puerto Rican crested anoles,Anolis cristatellusperform conspicuous signals, we exposed wild lizards to a model of a natural snake predator. The lizards gave six behavioural responses to the model: immobility, predator inspection, flight, lateral face-off, dewlapping and push-ups. They displayed significantly more push-ups and push-up

  12. The role of turbidity as a constraint on predator-prey interactions in aquatic environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark V. Abrahams; Michael G. Kattenfeld

    1997-01-01

    Many of the world's most productive aquatic ecosystems usually contain turbid water. Paradoxically, many fish species that\\u000a live in these habitats are also those that often rely on vision to detect their predators and their prey. For these fish,\\u000a turbidity will reduce the distance at which predator-prey interactions occur, and there should be a reduction in the opportunity\\u000a for behavioural

  13. Predator-Prey Interaction between Largemouth Bass and Bluegills as Influenced by Simulated, Submersed Vegetation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JACQUELINE F. SAVINO; ROY A. STEIN

    1982-01-01

    Data from the literature suggest that predatory success declines as habitat complexity increases. To explain this phenomenon, we studied the predator-prey interaction between largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and bluegills Lepomis macrochirus in four laboratory pools (2.4-3.0 m diameter, 0.7 m deep), each with a different density (0, 50, 250, 1,000 stems\\/m e) of artificial plant stems. Behavior was quantified for

  14. Predator-Prey Interactions between Shell-Boring Beetle Larvae and Rock-Dwelling Land Snails

    PubMed Central

    Castillo Cajas, Ruth F.; van Moorsel, Coline H. M.; Kundrata, Robin; Welter-Schultes, Francisco W.; Giokas, Sinos; Schilthuizen, Menno

    2014-01-01

    Drilus beetle larvae (Coleoptera: Elateridae) are specialized predators of land snails. Here, we describe various aspects of the predator-prey interactions between multiple Drilus species attacking multiple Albinaria (Gastropoda: Clausiliidae) species in Greece. We observe that Drilus species may be facultative or obligate Albinaria-specialists. We map geographically varying predation rates in Crete, where on average 24% of empty shells carry fatal Drilus bore holes. We also provide first-hand observations and video-footage of prey entry and exit strategies of the Drilus larvae, and evaluate the potential mutual evolutionary impacts. We find limited evidence for an effect of shell features and snail behavioral traits on inter- and intra-specifically differing predation rates. We also find that Drilus predators adjust their predation behavior based on specific shell traits of the prey. In conclusion, we suggest that, with these baseline data, this interesting predator-prey system will be available for further, detailed more evolutionary ecology studies. PMID:24964101

  15. Predator-prey interactions between shell-boring beetle larvae and rock-dwelling land snails.

    PubMed

    Baalbergen, Els; Helwerda, Renate; Schelfhorst, Rense; Castillo Cajas, Ruth F; van Moorsel, Coline H M; Kundrata, Robin; Welter-Schultes, Francisco W; Giokas, Sinos; Schilthuizen, Menno

    2014-01-01

    Drilus beetle larvae (Coleoptera: Elateridae) are specialized predators of land snails. Here, we describe various aspects of the predator-prey interactions between multiple Drilus species attacking multiple Albinaria (Gastropoda: Clausiliidae) species in Greece. We observe that Drilus species may be facultative or obligate Albinaria-specialists. We map geographically varying predation rates in Crete, where on average 24% of empty shells carry fatal Drilus bore holes. We also provide first-hand observations and video-footage of prey entry and exit strategies of the Drilus larvae, and evaluate the potential mutual evolutionary impacts. We find limited evidence for an effect of shell features and snail behavioral traits on inter- and intra-specifically differing predation rates. We also find that Drilus predators adjust their predation behavior based on specific shell traits of the prey. In conclusion, we suggest that, with these baseline data, this interesting predator-prey system will be available for further, detailed more evolutionary ecology studies. PMID:24964101

  16. Chytridiomycosis impacts predator-prey interactions in larval amphibian communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew J. Parris; Joseph G. Beaudoin

    2004-01-01

    Despite ecologists increasingly recognizing pathogens as playing significant roles in community dynamics, few experimental studies have quantified patterns of disease impacts on natural systems. Amphibians are experiencing population declines, and a fungal pathogen ( Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis; Chytridiomycota) is a suspected causal agent in many declines. We studied the effects of a pathogenic fungus on community interactions between the gray treefrog,

  17. Shifts in the Trophic Ecology of Brook Trout Resulting from Interactions with Yellow Perch: An Intraguild Predator-Prey Interaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David R. Browne; Joseph B. Rasmussen

    2009-01-01

    In size-structured populations, predator-prey interactions may be preceded by a phase of resource competition earlier in ontogeny, with potential consequences for population dynamics and resource management. We hypothesized that brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and yellow perch Perca flavescens would compete for shared resources and interact as predator and prey. We used stable isotopes and stomach content analysis to compare the

  18. Genetic variation, predator–prey interactions and food web structure

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Laraño, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Food webs are networks of species that feed on each other. The role that within-population phenotypic and genetic variation plays in food web structure is largely unknown. Here, I show via simulation how variation in two key traits, growth rates and phenology, by influencing the variability of body sizes present through time, can potentially affect several structural parameters in the direction of enhancing food web persistence: increased connectance, decreased interaction strengths, increased variation among interaction strengths and increased degree of omnivory. I discuss other relevant traits whose variation could affect the structure of food webs, such as morphological and additional life-history traits, as well as animal personalities. Furthermore, trait variation could also contribute to the stability of food web modules through metacommunity dynamics. I propose future research to help establish a link between within-population variation and food web structure. If appropriately established, such a link could have important consequences for biological conservation, as it would imply that preserving (functional) genetic variation within populations could ensure the preservation of entire communities. PMID:21444316

  19. Reciprocal Behavioral Plasticity and Behavioral Types during Predator-Prey Interactions

    PubMed Central

    McGhee, Katie E.; Pintor, Lauren M.; Bell, Alison M.

    2014-01-01

    How predators and prey interact has important consequences for population dynamics and community stability. Here we explored how predator-prey interactions are simultaneously affected by reciprocal behavioral plasticity (i.e., plasticity in prey defenses countered by plasticity in predator offenses and vice versa) and consistent individual behavioral variation (i.e., behavioral types) within both predator and prey populations. We assessed the behavior of a predator species (northern pike) and a prey species (three-spined stickleback) during one-on-one encounters. We also measured additional behavioral and morphological traits in each species. Using structural equation modeling, we found that reciprocal behavioral plasticity as well as predator and prey behavioral types influenced how individuals behaved during an interaction. Thus, the progression and ultimate outcome of predator-prey interactions depend on both the dynamic behavioral feedback occurring during the encounter and the underlying behavioral type of each participant. We also examined whether predator behavioral type is underlain by differences in metabolism and organ size. We provide some of the first evidence that behavioral type is related to resting metabolic rate and size of a sensory organ (the eyes). Understanding the extent to which reciprocal behavioral plasticity and intraspecific behavioral variation influence the outcome of species interactions could provide insight into the maintenance of behavioral variation as well as community dynamics. PMID:24231533

  20. Thermal acclimation of interactions: differential responses to temperature change alter predator–prey relationship

    PubMed Central

    Grigaltchik, Veronica S.; Ward, Ashley J. W.; Seebacher, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Different species respond differently to environmental change so that species interactions cannot be predicted from single-species performance curves. We tested the hypothesis that interspecific difference in the capacity for thermal acclimation modulates predator–prey interactions. Acclimation of locomotor performance in a predator (Australian bass, Macquaria novemaculeata) was qualitatively different to that of its prey (eastern mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki). Warm (25°C) acclimated bass made more attacks than cold (15°C) acclimated fish regardless of acute test temperatures (10–30°C), and greater frequency of attacks was associated with increased prey capture success. However, the number of attacks declined at the highest test temperature (30°C). Interestingly, escape speeds of mosquitofish during predation trials were greater than burst speeds measured in a swimming arena, whereas attack speeds of bass were lower than burst speeds. As a result, escape speeds of mosquitofish were greater at warm temperatures (25°C and 30°C) than attack speeds of bass. The decline in the number of attacks and the increase in escape speed of prey means that predation pressure decreases at high temperatures. We show that differential thermal responses affect species interactions even at temperatures that are within thermal tolerance ranges. This thermal sensitivity of predator–prey interactions can be a mechanism by which global warming affects ecological communities. PMID:22859598

  1. Predator prey interactions of Procambarus clarkii with aquatic macroinvertebrates in single and multiple prey systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Alexandra Marçal; Bandeira, Nuno; Anastácio, Pedro Manuel

    2005-11-01

    Understanding the interspecific interactions of Procambarus clarkii with other aquatic macroinvertebrates will help to unveil the mechanisms and processes underlying biological invasiveness. The purpose of this study was to investigate predator-prey interactions of two ontogenic phases of P. clarkii with native and exotic species of aquatic macroinvertebrates at a single and multiple prey level. We performed laboratory experiments to determine the consumption and the behavioral responses of Chironomus riparius, Physa acuta and Corbicula fluminea to P. clarkii. The presence of P. clarkii significantly affected the abundance of C. riparius and P. acuta, but not of C. fluminea whether prey species were provided singly or simultaneously. The consumption of C. riparius by P. clarkii was higher than P. acuta for both crayfish sizes and situations (single/multiple prey systems) and C. fluminea was never consumed. Physa acuta was the only species that exhibited an anti-predator behavior to P. clarkii. Our results show that P. clarkii can have strong consumptive and trait effects on aquatic macroinvertebrate prey at a single and multiple prey level, resulting in differential impacts on different prey species. This study clarifies some aspects of the predator-prey interactions between P. clarkii and native as well as other exotic macroinvertebrate species that have invaded freshwater biocenosis worldwide.

  2. Predator-Prey Interactions Shape Thermal Patch Use in a Newt Larvae-Dragonfly Nymph Model

    PubMed Central

    Gvoždík, Lumír; ?ernická, Eva; Van Damme, Raoul

    2013-01-01

    Thermal quality and predation risk are considered important factors influencing habitat patch use in ectothermic prey. However, how the predator’s food requirement and the prey’s necessity to avoid predation interact with their respective thermoregulatory strategies remains poorly understood. The recently developed ‘thermal game model’ predicts that in the face of imminent predation, prey should divide their time equally among a range of thermal patches. In contrast, predators should concentrate their hunting activities towards warmer patches. In this study, we test these predictions in a laboratory setup and an artificial environment that mimics more natural conditions. In both cases, we scored thermal patch use of newt larvae (prey) and free-ranging dragonfly nymphs (predators). Similar effects were seen in both settings. The newt larvae spent less time in the warm patch if dragonfly nymphs were present. The patch use of the dragonfly nymphs did not change as a function of prey availability, even when the nymphs were starved prior to the experiment. Our behavioral observations partially corroborate predictions of the thermal game model. In line with asymmetric fitness pay-offs in predator-prey interactions (the ‘life-dinner’ principle), the prey’s thermal strategy is more sensitive to the presence of predators than vice versa. PMID:23755175

  3. Predator-prey interactions between omnivorous diaptomid copepods and rotifers: The role of prey morphology and behavior

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CRAIG E. WILLIAMSON

    1987-01-01

    Suspension-feeding diaptomid copepods feed selectively on several rotifer species. Predator-prey interactions between Diaptomus pallidus and seven species of rotifers were quantified and behav- ioral probabilities computed. Prey size was a good predictor of the probability of Diaptomus avoiding a prey following an encounter but had little or no predictive value in subsequent levels of interaction (capture, ingestion). Three of the

  4. Do Predators Always Win? Starfish versus Limpets: A Hands-On Activity Examining Predator-Prey Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faria, Claudia; Boaventura, Diana; Galvao, Cecilia; Chagas, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    In this article we propose a hands-on experimental activity about predator-prey interactions that can be performed both in a research laboratory and in the classroom. The activity, which engages students in a real scientific experiment, can be explored not only to improve students' understanding about the diversity of anti-predator behaviors but…

  5. Suspended sediment alters predator-prey interactions between two coral reef fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenger, A. S.; McCormick, M. I.; McLeod, I. M.; Jones, G. P.

    2013-06-01

    Sediment derived from agriculture and development increases water turbidity and threatens the health of inshore coral reefs. In this study, we examined whether suspended sediment could change predation patterns through a reduction in visual cues. We measured survivorship of newly settled Chromis atripectoralis exposed to Pseudochromis fuscus, a common predator of juvenile damselfishes, in aquaria with one of four turbidity levels. Increased turbidity led to a nonlinear response in predation patterns. Predator-induced mortality was ~50 % in the control and low turbidity level, but exhibited a substantial increase in the medium level. In the highest turbidity level, predation rates declined to the level seen in the control. These results suggest an imbalance in how the predator and prey cope with turbidity. A turbidity-induced change to the outcome of predator-prey interactions represents a major change to the fundamental processes that regulate fish assemblages.

  6. Infrared tomographic PIV and 3D motion tracking system applied to aquatic predator-prey interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Deepak; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2013-02-01

    Infrared tomographic PIV and 3D motion tracking are combined to measure evolving volumetric velocity fields and organism trajectories during aquatic predator-prey interactions. The technique was used to study zebrafish foraging on both non-evasive and evasive prey species. Measurement volumes of 22.5 mm × 10.5 mm × 12 mm were reconstructed from images captured on a set of four high-speed cameras. To obtain accurate fluid velocity vectors within each volume, fish were first masked out using an automated visual hull method. Fish and prey locations were identified independently from the same image sets and tracked separately within the measurement volume. Experiments demonstrated that fish were not influenced by the infrared laser illumination or the tracer particles. Results showed that the zebrafish used different strategies, suction and ram feeding, for successful capture of non-evasive and evasive prey, respectively. The two strategies yielded different variations in fluid velocity between the fish mouth and the prey. In general, the results suggest that the local flow field, the direction of prey locomotion with respect to the predator and the relative accelerations and speeds of the predator and prey may all be significant in determining predation success.

  7. Predator-Prey Simulation Exercises for the Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    James Waddell (University of Maine at Orono; )

    2009-08-26

    Illustrations of predator-prey interactions looking at different prey distributions, structural complexity of the environment, prey's reproductive rate,and both predator-prey reproduction in a complex environment.

  8. Clay Caterpillar Whodunit: A Customizable Method for Studying Predator-Prey Interactions in the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Rachel; Klemens, Jeffrey A.; Agosta, Salvatore J.; Bartlow, Andrew W.; Wood, Steve; Carlson, Jason A.; Stratford, Jeffrey A.; Steele, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Predator-prey dynamics are an important concept in ecology, often serving as an introduction to the field of community ecology. However, these dynamics are difficult for students to observe directly. We describe a methodology that employs model caterpillars made of clay to estimate rates of predator attack on a prey species. This approach can be…

  9. A lumped parameter model for acarine predator–prey population interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G Buffoni; G Gilioli

    2003-01-01

    We hereby describe a modelling strategy, based on the implementation of composite models for the numerical simulation of the predator–prey local dynamics. We define a lumped parameter model for the dynamics of the system, where the abundance of the populations are given in terms of their biomass. The model is characterised by bio-ecological parameters (maximum specific rates and conversion factors)

  10. Effects of an Infectious Fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, on Amphibian Predator-Prey Interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara A. Han; Catherine L. Searle; Andrew R. Blaustein; Howard Browman

    2011-01-01

    The effects of parasites and pathogens on host behaviors may be particularly important in predator-prey contexts, since few animal behaviors are more crucial for ensuring immediate survival than the avoidance of lethal predators in nature. We examined the effects of an emerging fungal pathogen of amphibians, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, on anti-predator behaviors of tadpoles of four frog species. We also investigated

  11. Spatial ecology of predator-prey interactions: corridors and patch shape influence seed predation.

    SciTech Connect

    J. L . Orrock; B. J. Danielson; M. J. Burns; D. J. Levey

    2003-02-03

    J.L. Orrock, B.J. Danielson, M.J. Burns, and D.J. Levey. 2003. Spatial ecology of predator-prey interactions: corridors and patch shape influence seed predation. Ecology, 84(10):2589-2599. Abstract: Corridors that connect patches of disjunct habitat may be promising tools for mediating the negative impacts of habitat fragmentation, but little is known about how corridors affect ecological interactions. In eight 12-ha experimental landscapes, we examined how corridors affect the impact of invertebrate, rodent, and avian seed predators on pokeweed, Phytolacca americana. Over 13 months in 2000 and 2001, we quantified the effects of patch shape, connectivity, and predator type on the number of seeds germinating in the field (germinants), seed removal, and the viability of remaining seeds. Corridors did not affect the number of P. americana germinants in experimental exclosures or the viability of seeds remaining in exclosures. However, corridors affected the removal of seeds in a predator-specific manner: invertebrates removed more seeds in unconnected patches, whereas rodents removed more seeds in connected patches. Seed removal by birds was similar in connected and unconnected patches. Total seed removal by all seed predators was not affected by corridors, because invertebrates removed more seeds where rodents removed fewer seeds, and vice versa. Overall, seed predation signi®cantly reduced the number and viability of remaining seeds, and reduced the number of germinants in 2000 but not in 2001. The abundance of naturally occurring P. americana plants in our experimental patches in 2000 decreased with increasing seed removal from exclosures but was not related to viability or germinants in 2000, suggesting that seed removal may shape the distribution and abundance of this species. Complementary patterns of seed removal by rodents and invertebrates suggest that corridors alter the effects of these predator taxa by changing the relative amounts of edge and core (nonedge) habitats in a patch. Because invertebrates and rodents do not completely overlap in the seeds they consume, corridors may change predation pressure on seeds that are primarily consumed by one predator type, with potential consequences for the composition of plant and seed predator communities.

  12. A link between water availability and nesting success mediated by predator-prey interactions in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Lecomte, Nicolas; Gauthier, Gilles; Giroux, Jean-François

    2009-02-01

    Although water availability is primarily seen as a factor affecting food availability (a bottom-up process), we examined its effect on predator-prey interactions through an influence on prey behavior (a top-down process). We documented a link between water availability, predation risk, and reproductive success in a goose species (Chen caerulescens atlantica) inhabiting an Arctic environment where water is not considered a limited commodity. To reach water sources during incubation recesses, geese nesting in mesic tundra (low water availability) must move almost four times as far from their nest than those nesting in wetlands, which reduced their ability to defend their nest against predators and led to a higher predation rate. Nesting success was improved in high rainfall years due to increased water availability, and more so for geese nesting in the low water availability habitat. Likewise, nesting success was improved in years where the potential for evaporative water loss (measured by the atmospheric water vapor pressure) was low, presumably because females had to leave their nest less often to drink. Females from water-supplemented nests traveled a shorter distance to drink, and their nesting success was enhanced by 20% compared to the control. This shows that water availability and rainfall can have a strong effect on predator-prey dynamics and that changes in precipitation brought by climate change could have an impact on some Arctic species through a top-down effect. PMID:19323230

  13. Hydrodynamic mediation of predator–prey interactions: differential patterns of prey susceptibility and predator success explained by variation in water flow

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sean P. Powers; John N. Kittinger

    2002-01-01

    In most shallow water marine systems, fluid movements vary on scales that may influence local community dynamics both directly, through changes in the abundance of species, and indirectly, by modifying important behaviors of organisms. We examined how differences in current speed affect the outcome of predator–prey interactions for two species of marine benthic predators (knobbed whelks, Busycon carica, and blue

  14. Effects of an infectious fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, on amphibian predator-prey interactions.

    PubMed

    Han, Barbara A; Searle, Catherine L; Blaustein, Andrew R

    2011-01-01

    The effects of parasites and pathogens on host behaviors may be particularly important in predator-prey contexts, since few animal behaviors are more crucial for ensuring immediate survival than the avoidance of lethal predators in nature. We examined the effects of an emerging fungal pathogen of amphibians, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, on anti-predator behaviors of tadpoles of four frog species. We also investigated whether amphibian predators consumed infected prey, and whether B. dendrobatidis caused differences in predation rates among prey in laboratory feeding trials. We found differences in anti-predator behaviors among larvae of four amphibian species, and show that infected tadpoles of one species (Anaxyrus boreas) were more active and sought refuge more frequently when exposed to predator chemical cues. Salamander predators consumed infected and uninfected tadpoles of three other prey species at similar rates in feeding trials, and predation risk among prey was unaffected by B. dendrobatidis. Collectively, our results show that even sub-lethal exposure to B. dendrobatidis can alter fundamental anti-predator behaviors in some amphibian prey species, and suggest the unexplored possibility that indiscriminate predation between infected and uninfected prey (i.e., non-selective predation) could increase the prevalence of this widely distributed pathogen in amphibian populations. Because one of the most prominent types of predators in many amphibian systems is salamanders, and because salamanders are susceptible to B. dendrobatidis, our work suggests the importance of considering host susceptibility and behavioral changes that could arise from infection in both predators and prey. PMID:21311771

  15. Effects of an Infectious Fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, on Amphibian Predator-Prey Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Barbara A.; Searle, Catherine L.; Blaustein, Andrew R.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of parasites and pathogens on host behaviors may be particularly important in predator-prey contexts, since few animal behaviors are more crucial for ensuring immediate survival than the avoidance of lethal predators in nature. We examined the effects of an emerging fungal pathogen of amphibians, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, on anti-predator behaviors of tadpoles of four frog species. We also investigated whether amphibian predators consumed infected prey, and whether B. dendrobatidis caused differences in predation rates among prey in laboratory feeding trials. We found differences in anti-predator behaviors among larvae of four amphibian species, and show that infected tadpoles of one species (Anaxyrus boreas) were more active and sought refuge more frequently when exposed to predator chemical cues. Salamander predators consumed infected and uninfected tadpoles of three other prey species at similar rates in feeding trials, and predation risk among prey was unaffected by B. dendrobatidis. Collectively, our results show that even sub-lethal exposure to B. dendrobatidis can alter fundamental anti-predator behaviors in some amphibian prey species, and suggest the unexplored possibility that indiscriminate predation between infected and uninfected prey (i.e., non-selective predation) could increase the prevalence of this widely distributed pathogen in amphibian populations. Because one of the most prominent types of predators in many amphibian systems is salamanders, and because salamanders are susceptible to B. dendrobatidis, our work suggests the importance of considering host susceptibility and behavioral changes that could arise from infection in both predators and prey. PMID:21311771

  16. Interaction between Coastal and Oceanic Ecosystems of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean through Predator-Prey Relationship Studies

    PubMed Central

    Allain, Valerie; Fernandez, Emilie; Hoyle, Simon D.; Caillot, Sylvain; Jurado-Molina, Jesus; Andréfouët, Serge; Nicol, Simon J.

    2012-01-01

    The Western and Central Pacific Ocean sustains the highest tuna production in the world. This province is also characterized by many islands and a complex bathymetry that induces specific current circulation patterns with the potential to create a high degree of interaction between coastal and oceanic ecosystems. Based on a large dataset of oceanic predator stomach contents, our study used generalized linear models to explore the coastal-oceanic system interaction by analyzing predator-prey relationship. We show that reef organisms are a frequent prey of oceanic predators. Predator species such as albacore (Thunnus alalunga) and yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) frequently consume reef prey with higher probability of consumption closer to land and in the western part of the Pacific Ocean. For surface-caught-predators consuming reef prey, this prey type represents about one third of the diet of predators smaller than 50 cm. The proportion decreases with increasing fish size. For predators caught at depth and consuming reef prey, the proportion varies with predator species but generally represents less than 10%. The annual consumption of reef prey by the yellowfin tuna population was estimated at 0.8±0.40CV million tonnes or 2.17×1012±0.40CV individuals. This represents 6.1%±0.17CV in weight of their diet. Our analyses identify some of the patterns of coastal-oceanic ecosystem interactions at a large scale and provides an estimate of annual consumption of reef prey by oceanic predators. PMID:22615796

  17. Coevolution can reverse predator-prey cycles.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Michael H; Weitz, Joshua S

    2014-05-20

    A hallmark of Lotka-Volterra models, and other ecological models of predator-prey interactions, is that in predator-prey cycles, peaks in prey abundance precede peaks in predator abundance. Such models typically assume that species life history traits are fixed over ecologically relevant time scales. However, the coevolution of predator and prey traits has been shown to alter the community dynamics of natural systems, leading to novel dynamics including antiphase and cryptic cycles. Here, using an eco-coevolutionary model, we show that predator-prey coevolution can also drive population cycles where the opposite of canonical Lotka-Volterra oscillations occurs: predator peaks precede prey peaks. These reversed cycles arise when selection favors extreme phenotypes, predator offense is costly, and prey defense is effective against low-offense predators. We present multiple datasets from phage-cholera, mink-muskrat, and gyrfalcon-rock ptarmigan systems that exhibit reversed-peak ordering. Our results suggest that such cycles are a potential signature of predator-prey coevolution and reveal unique ways in which predator-prey coevolution can shape, and possibly reverse, community dynamics. PMID:24799689

  18. Coevolution can reverse predator–prey cycles

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Michael H.; Weitz, Joshua S.

    2014-01-01

    A hallmark of Lotka–Volterra models, and other ecological models of predator–prey interactions, is that in predator–prey cycles, peaks in prey abundance precede peaks in predator abundance. Such models typically assume that species life history traits are fixed over ecologically relevant time scales. However, the coevolution of predator and prey traits has been shown to alter the community dynamics of natural systems, leading to novel dynamics including antiphase and cryptic cycles. Here, using an eco-coevolutionary model, we show that predator–prey coevolution can also drive population cycles where the opposite of canonical Lotka–Volterra oscillations occurs: predator peaks precede prey peaks. These reversed cycles arise when selection favors extreme phenotypes, predator offense is costly, and prey defense is effective against low-offense predators. We present multiple datasets from phage–cholera, mink–muskrat, and gyrfalcon–rock ptarmigan systems that exhibit reversed-peak ordering. Our results suggest that such cycles are a potential signature of predator–prey coevolution and reveal unique ways in which predator–prey coevolution can shape, and possibly reverse, community dynamics. PMID:24799689

  19. Predator/Prey-Interactions Promote Decomposition of Low-Quality Detritus

    E-print Network

    Pennings, Steven C.

    ) and predacious omnivores (Decapoda: Armases cinereum) and their interactions. Both crabs and snails alone present. Our findings suggest that unidirectional facilitation of omnivorous semi-terrestrial crabs and Wise 2000, 2004; Wu et al. 2011), but rarely have omnivorous detritivores, feeding on both detritus

  20. Indirect ecological impacts of an invasive toad on predator–prey interactions among native species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David W. M. Nelson; Michael R. Crossland; Richard Shine

    2010-01-01

    One of the many ways that invasive species can affect native ecosystems is by modifying the behavioural and ecological interactions\\u000a among native species. For example, the arrival of the highly toxic cane toad (Bufo marinus) in tropical Australia has induced toad-aversion in some native predators. Has that shift also affected the predators’ responses\\u000a to native prey—for example, by reducing vulnerability

  1. Evolution of virulence driven by predator-prey interaction: Possible consequences for population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Morozov, A Yu; Adamson, M W

    2011-05-01

    The evolution of pathogen virulence in natural populations has conventionally been considered as a result of selection caused by the interactions of the host with its pathogen(s). The host population, however, is generally embedded in complex trophic interactions with other populations in the community, in particular, intensive predation on the infected host can increase its mortality, and this can affect the course of virulence evolution. Reciprocally, in the long run, the evolution of virulence within an infected host can affect the patterns of population dynamics of a predator consuming the host (e.g. resulting in large amplitude oscillations, causing a severe drop in the population size, etc.). Surprisingly, neither the effect of predation on the evolution of virulence within a host, nor the influence of the evolution of virulence upon the consumer's dynamics has been addressed in the literature yet. In this paper, we consider a classical S-I ecoepidemiological model in which the infected host is consumed by a predator. We are particularly interested in the evolutionarily stable virulence of the pathogen in the model and its dependence upon ecologically relevant parameters. We show that predation can prominently shift the evolutionarily stable virulence towards more severe strains as compared to the same system without predation. We demonstrate that the evolution of virulence can result in a succession of dynamical regimes and can even lead to the extinction of the predator in the long run. The presence of a predator can indirectly affect the evolution within its prey since the evolutionarily stable virulence becomes a function of the prey growth rate, which would not be the case in a predator-free system. We find that the evolutionarily stable virulence largely depends on the carrying capacity K of the prey in a non-monotonous way. The model also predicts that in an eutrophic environment the shift of virulence towards evolutionarily stable benign strains can cause demographically stochastic evolutionary suicide, resulting in the extinction of both species, thus artificially maintaining severe strains of pathogen can enhance the persistence of both species. PMID:21320512

  2. Ultrasonic predator–prey interactions in water–convergent evolution with insects and bats in air?

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Maria; Wahlberg, Magnus; Surlykke, Annemarie; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2013-01-01

    Toothed whales and bats have independently evolved biosonar systems to navigate and locate and catch prey. Such active sensing allows them to operate in darkness, but with the potential cost of warning prey by the emission of intense ultrasonic signals. At least six orders of nocturnal insects have independently evolved ears sensitive to ultrasound and exhibit evasive maneuvers when exposed to bat calls. Among aquatic prey on the other hand, the ability to detect and avoid ultrasound emitting predators seems to be limited to only one subfamily of Clupeidae: the Alosinae (shad and menhaden). These differences are likely rooted in the different physical properties of air and water where cuticular mechanoreceptors have been adapted to serve as ultrasound sensitive ears, whereas ultrasound detection in water have called for sensory cells mechanically connected to highly specialized gas volumes that can oscillate at high frequencies. In addition, there are most likely differences in the risk of predation between insects and fish from echolocating predators. The selection pressure among insects for evolving ultrasound sensitive ears is high, because essentially all nocturnal predation on flying insects stems from echolocating bats. In the interaction between toothed whales and their prey the selection pressure seems weaker, because toothed whales are by no means the only marine predators placing a selection pressure on their prey to evolve specific means to detect and avoid them. Toothed whales can generate extremely intense sound pressure levels, and it has been suggested that they may use these to debilitate prey. Recent experiments, however, show that neither fish with swim bladders, nor squid are debilitated by such signals. This strongly suggests that the production of high amplitude ultrasonic clicks serve the function of improving the detection range of the toothed whale biosonar system rather than debilitation of prey. PMID:23781206

  3. Ultrasonic predator-prey interactions in water-convergent evolution with insects and bats in air?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Maria; Wahlberg, Magnus; Surlykke, Annemarie; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2013-01-01

    Toothed whales and bats have independently evolved biosonar systems to navigate and locate and catch prey. Such active sensing allows them to operate in darkness, but with the potential cost of warning prey by the emission of intense ultrasonic signals. At least six orders of nocturnal insects have independently evolved ears sensitive to ultrasound and exhibit evasive maneuvers when exposed to bat calls. Among aquatic prey on the other hand, the ability to detect and avoid ultrasound emitting predators seems to be limited to only one subfamily of Clupeidae: the Alosinae (shad and menhaden). These differences are likely rooted in the different physical properties of air and water where cuticular mechanoreceptors have been adapted to serve as ultrasound sensitive ears, whereas ultrasound detection in water have called for sensory cells mechanically connected to highly specialized gas volumes that can oscillate at high frequencies. In addition, there are most likely differences in the risk of predation between insects and fish from echolocating predators. The selection pressure among insects for evolving ultrasound sensitive ears is high, because essentially all nocturnal predation on flying insects stems from echolocating bats. In the interaction between toothed whales and their prey the selection pressure seems weaker, because toothed whales are by no means the only marine predators placing a selection pressure on their prey to evolve specific means to detect and avoid them. Toothed whales can generate extremely intense sound pressure levels, and it has been suggested that they may use these to debilitate prey. Recent experiments, however, show that neither fish with swim bladders, nor squid are debilitated by such signals. This strongly suggests that the production of high amplitude ultrasonic clicks serve the function of improving the detection range of the toothed whale biosonar system rather than debilitation of prey. PMID:23781206

  4. Pesticide impacts on predator-prey interactions across two levels of organisation.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Jes Jessen; Nørum, Ulrik; Jerris, Morten Rygaard; Wiberg-Larsen, Peter; Kristensen, Esben Astrup; Friberg, Nikolai

    2013-09-15

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of a short pulse exposure of the pyrethroid lambda-cyhalothrin (LC) on the predator and anti-predator behaviour of the same species; Gammarus pulex. Predator behaviour, at the level of the individual, was studied in indoor microcosms using video tracking equipment during simultaneous exposure of the predator (G. pulex) and its prey (Leuctra nigra) during 90 min exposure of 1, 6.6 or 62.1 ngL(-1) LC. During an initial 30 min of exposure, the predator and prey organisms were maintained physically separated, and the actual interaction was studied through the subsequent 60 min of exposure. The anti-predator behaviour of G. pulex (drift suppression in response to the presence of brown trout) was studied in outdoor stream channels during a 90 min pulse exposure to LC (7.4 or 79.5 ngL(-1)) with, or without, brown trout. Based on survival curves for L. nigra we found that the mortality rate for L. nigra significantly decreased during exposure to 6.6 and 62.1 ngL(-1) LC (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively). We found no significant effects suggesting that G. pulex was repelled by contaminated prey items (P>0.05). We found that the exposure of G. pulex to 7.4 and 79.5 ngL(-1) LC significantly increased drift (from ?0% to ?100% in both treatments; P<0.001) independent of the presence of brown trout (P<0.05). In other words, the natural anti-predator behaviour of G. pulex was overruled by the stress response to LC exposure increasing G. pulex predation risk from drift feeding brown trouts. Our results show that the anti-predator and predator behaviour of G. pulex were significantly changed during exposure to very low and environmentally realistic LC concentrations and exposure duration. The potential implications for the field scenario are discussed. PMID:23891783

  5. Global qualitative analysis of a ratio-dependent predator–prey system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yang Kuang; Edoardo Beretta

    1998-01-01

    .  ?Ratio-dependent predator–prey models are favored by many animal ecologists recently as more suitable ones for predator–prey\\u000a interactions where predation involves searching process. However, such models are not well studied in the sense that most\\u000a results are local stability related. In this paper, we consider the global behaviors of solutions of a ratio-dependent predator–prey\\u000a systems. Specifically, we shall show that ratio

  6. Potential impact of low-concentration silver nanoparticles on predator-prey interactions between predatory dragonfly nymphs and Daphnia magna as a prey.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Lok R; Dubey, Brajesh

    2012-07-17

    This study investigated the potential impacts of low-concentration citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (citrate-nAg; 2 ?g L(-1) as total Ag) on the interactions of Daphnia magna Straus (as a prey) with the predatory dragonfly ( Anax junius : Odonata) nymph using the behavioral, survival, and reproductive end points. Four different toxicity bioassays were evaluated: (i) horizontal migration; (ii) vertical migration; (iii) 48 h survival; and (iv) 21 day reproduction; using four different treatment combinations: (i) Daphnia + citrate-nAg; (ii) Daphnia + predator; (iii) Daphnia + citrate-nAg + predator; and (iv) Daphnia only (control). Daphnia avoided the predators using the horizontal and vertical movements, indicating that Daphnia might have perceived a significant risk of predation. However, with citrate-nAg + predator treatment, Daphnia response did not differ from control in the vertical migration test, suggesting that Daphnia were unable to detect the presence of predator with citrate-nAg treatment and this may have potential implication on daphnids population structure owing to predation risk. The 48 h survival test showed a significant mortality of Daphnia individuals in the presence of predators, with or without citrate-nAg, in the test environment. Average reproduction of daphnids increased by 185% with low-concentration citrate-nAg treatment alone but was severely compromised in the presence of predators (decreased by 91.3%). Daphnia reproduction was slightly enhanced by approximately 128% with citrate-nAg + predator treatment. Potential mechanisms of these differential effects of low-concentration citrate-nAg, with or without predators, are discussed. Because silver dissolution was minimal, the observed toxicity could not be explained by dissolved Ag alone. These findings offer novel insights into how exposure to low-concentration silver nanoparticles could influence predator-prey interactions in the fresh water systems. PMID:22697289

  7. Predator\\/prey interactions: A link between the individual level and both higher and lower level effects of toxicants in aquatic ecosystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judith S. Weis; Graeme Smith; Celine Santiago-Bass

    2000-01-01

    Behavior can demonstrate linkages ofcontaminant effects at different levels oforganization from the biochemical\\/cellular to theorganism, population, and community levels.Mummichogs, Fundulus heteroclitus, from acontaminated area were previously found to havereduced condition, growth, and longevity, comparedwith conspecifics from clean sites. Thispopulation-level observation may be due to theirimpaired predator\\/prey behavior, which is associatedwith altered levels of serotonin in their brains. Theyare slow, less

  8. An experimental study on the effects of crayfish on the predator-prey interaction between bass and sculpin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David L. McNeely; Brenda N. Futrell; Andrew Sih

    1990-01-01

    1.We examined the hypothesis that in a one predator-two prey system, prey that share a common refuge might have indirect interactions mediated by their reciprocal effects on each other's refuge use. Our experiments were done in laboratory pools with plexiglas refuges, using predatory smallmouth bass, Micropterus dolemieui, that can consume crayfish, Orconectes putnami and mottled sculpin, Cottus bairdi.2.Bass consumed 35%

  9. Probability of Detecting Marine Predator-Prey and Species Interactions Using Novel Hybrid Acoustic Transmitter-Receiver Tags

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Laurie L.; Jonsen, Ian D.; Mills Flemming, Joanna E.; Lidgard, Damian C.; Bowen, William D.; Iverson, Sara J.; Webber, Dale M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the nature of inter-specific and conspecific interactions in the ocean is challenging because direct observation is usually impossible. The development of dual transmitter/receivers, Vemco Mobile Transceivers (VMT), and satellite-linked (e.g. GPS) tags provides a unique opportunity to better understand between and within species interactions in space and time. Quantifying the uncertainty associated with detecting a tagged animal, particularly under varying field conditions, is vital for making accurate biological inferences when using VMTs. We evaluated the detection efficiency of VMTs deployed on grey seals, Halichoerus grypus, off Sable Island (NS, Canada) in relation to environmental characteristics and seal behaviour using generalized linear models (GLM) to explore both post-processed detection data and summarized raw VMT data. When considering only post-processed detection data, only about half of expected detections were recorded at best even when two VMT-tagged seals were estimated to be within 50–200 m of one another. At a separation of 400 m, only about 15% of expected detections were recorded. In contrast, when incomplete transmissions from the summarized raw data were also considered, the ratio of complete transmission to complete and incomplete transmissions was about 70% for distances ranging from 50–1000 m, with a minimum of around 40% at 600 m and a maximum of about 85% at 50 m. Distance between seals, wind stress, and depth were the most important predictors of detection efficiency. Access to the raw VMT data allowed us to focus on the physical and environmental factors that limit a transceiver’s ability to resolve a transmitter’s identity. PMID:24892286

  10. A Predator–Prey system with anorexia response

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhenkun Huang; Xinghua Wang; Yonghui Xia

    2007-01-01

    A Predator–Prey system is proposed with an introduction of anorexia response on one prey population. By using the comparison theorem and constructing suitable Lyapunov function, we study such Predator–Prey system with almost periodic coefficients. Some sufficient conditions are obtained for the existence of a unique almost periodic solution. Numerical simulations of Predator–Prey system with anorexia response and the one without

  11. Anthropogenic resource subsidies decouple predator-prey relationships.

    PubMed

    Rodewald, Amanda D; Kearns, Laura J; Shustack, Daniel P

    2011-04-01

    The extent to which resource subsidies affect food web dynamics is poorly understood in anthropogenic landscapes. To better understand how species interactions are influenced by subsidies, we studied breeding birds and nest predators along a rural-to-urban landscape gradient that varied in subsidies provided to generalist predators. We hypothesized that resource subsidies in urban landscapes would decouple predator-prey relationships, as predators switch from natural to anthropogenic foods. From 2004 to 2009, we surveyed nest predators and monitored 2942 nests of five songbird species breeding in 19 mature forest stands in Ohio, USA. Eighteen species were video-recorded depredating nests. Numbers of avian and mammalian nest predators were positively associated with the amount of urban development surrounding forests, with the exception of Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater). Although nest survival strongly declined with detections of nest predators in rural landscapes, nest survival and predator numbers were unrelated in urban landscapes. Thus, the strength of interaction between breeding birds and nest predators diminished as landscapes surrounding forested parks became more urbanized. Our work suggests that decoupling of predator-prey relationships can arise when synanthropic predators are heavily subsidized by anthropogenic resources. In this way, human drivers can alter, and completely disarticulate, relationships among species that are well established in more natural systems. PMID:21639056

  12. Along Came a Spider: Using Live Arthropods in a Predator-Prey Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Matthew L.; Hari, Janice

    2011-01-01

    We developed a predator-prey activity with eighth-grade students in which they used wolf spiders ("Lycosa carolinensis"), house crickets ("Acheta domestica"), and abiotic factors to address how (1) adaptations in predators and prey shape their interaction and (2) abiotic factors modify the interaction between predators and prey. We tested student…

  13. Variation in predator foraging behavior changes predator-prey spatio-temporal dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. Foraging underlies the ability of all animals to acquire essential resources and, thus, provides a critical link to understanding population dynamics. A key issue is how variation in foraging behavior affects foraging efficiency and predator-prey interactions in spatially-heterogeneous environmen...

  14. Ecological conditions affect evolutionary trajectory in a predator-prey system.

    PubMed

    Gallet, Romain; Tully, Thomas; Evans, Margaret E K

    2009-03-01

    The arms race of adaptation and counter adaptation in predator-prey interactions is a fascinating evolutionary dynamic with many consequences, including local adaptation and the promotion or maintenance of diversity. Although such antagonistic coevolution is suspected to be widespread in nature, experimental documentation of the process remains scant, and we have little understanding of the impact of ecological conditions. Here, we present evidence of predator-prey coevolution in a long-term experiment involving the predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus and the prey Pseudomonas fluorescens, which has three morphs (SM, FS, and WS). Depending on experimentally applied disturbance regimes, the predator-prey system followed two distinct evolutionary trajectories, where the prey evolved to be either super-resistant to predation (SM morph) without counter-adaptation by the predator, or moderately resistant (FS morph), specialized to and coevolving with the predator. Although predation-resistant FS morphs suffer a cost of resistance, the evolution of extreme resistance to predation by the SM morph was apparently unconstrained by other traits (carrying capacity, growth rate). Thus we demonstrate empirically that ecological conditions can shape the evolutionary trajectory of a predator-prey system. PMID:19154363

  15. The direct and indirect effects of temperature on a predator–prey relationship

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael T. Anderson; Joseph M. Kiesecker; Douglas P. Chivers; Andrew R. Blaustein

    2001-01-01

    Abiotic factors may directly influence community structure by influencing biotic interactions. In aquatic systems, where gape-limited predators are common, abiotic factors that influence organisms' growth rates potentially mediate predator-prey interactions indirectly through effects on prey size. We tested the hypothesis that temperature influences interactions between aquatic size-limited insect predators ( Notonecta kirbyi) and their larval anuran prey (Hyla regilla) beyond

  16. Moorea BIOCODE barcode library as a tool for understanding predator-prey interactions: insights into the diet of common predatory coral reef fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leray, M.; Boehm, J. T.; Mills, S. C.; Meyer, C. P.

    2012-06-01

    Identifying species involved in consumer-resource interactions is one of the main limitations in the construction of food webs. DNA barcoding of prey items in predator guts provides a valuable tool for characterizing trophic interactions, but the method relies on the availability of reference sequences to which prey sequences can be matched. In this study, we demonstrate that the COI sequence library of the Moorea BIOCODE project, an ecosystem-level barcode initiative, enables the identification of a large proportion of semi-digested fish, crustacean and mollusks found in the guts of three Hawkfish and two Squirrelfish species. While most prey remains lacked diagnostic morphological characters, 94% of the prey found in 67 fishes had >98% sequence similarity with BIOCODE reference sequences. Using this species-level prey identification, we demonstrate how DNA barcoding can provide insights into resource partitioning, predator feeding behaviors and the consequences of predation on ecosystem function.

  17. Combined effect of UV-irradiation and TiO?-nanoparticles on the predator-prey interaction of gammarids and mayfly nymphs.

    PubMed

    Kal?íková, Gabriela; Englert, Dominic; Rosenfeldt, Ricki R; Seitz, Frank; Schulz, Ralf; Bundschuh, Mirco

    2014-03-01

    Although nanoparticle production and application increases continuously, their implications in species interactions, especially in combination with other environmental stressors, are rarely assessed. Therefore, the present study investigated the influence of 2 mg/L titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2; <100 nm) on the interaction between the prey Ephemerella ignita (Ephemeroptera) and the predator Gammarus fossarum (Amphipoda) over 96 h considering UV-irradiation at field relevant levels (approximately 11.4 W/m(2)) as an additional environmental factor (n = 16). At the same time, gammarid's consumption of an alternative food source, i.e. leaf discs, was assessed. All endpoints covered were not affected by nTiO2 alone, while the combination of nTiO2 and UV caused a reduction in gammarid's predation (68%), leaf consumption (60%) and body weight (22%). These effects were most likely triggered by the UV-induced formation of reactive oxygen species by nTiO2. The present study, hence, highlights the importance to cover UV-irradiation during the risk assessment of nanoparticles. PMID:24370671

  18. Human Activity Helps Prey Win the Predator-Prey Space Race

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tyler B. Muhly; Christina Semeniuk; Alessandro Massolo; Laura Hickman; Marco Musiani; Matjaz Perc

    2011-01-01

    Predator-prey interactions, including between large mammalian wildlife species, can be represented as a “space race”, where prey try to minimize and predators maximize spatial overlap. Human activity can also influence the distribution of wildlife species. In particular, high-human disturbance can displace large carnivore predators, a trait-mediated direct effect. Predator displacement by humans could then indirectly benefit prey species by reducing

  19. Emergence of Oscillatory Turing Patterns Induced by Cross Diffusion in a Predator-Prey System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, An-Wei; Jin, Zhen; Li, Li; Wang, Jian-Zhong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we presented a predator-prey model with self diffusion as well as cross diffusion. By using theory on linear stability, we obtain the conditions on Turing instability. The results of numerical simulations reveal that oscillating Turing patterns with hexagons arise in the system. And the values of the parameters we choose for simulations are outside of the Turing domain of the no cross diffusion system. Moreover, we show that cross diffusion has an effect on the persistence of the population, i.e., it causes the population to run a risk of extinction. Particularly, our results show that, without interaction with either a Hopf or a wave instability, the Turing instability together with cross diffusion in a predator-prey model can give rise to spatiotemporally oscillating solutions, which well enrich the finding of pattern formation in ecology.

  20. The stabilizing effects of genetic diversity on predator-prey dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Christopher F; Masse, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity among prey in their susceptibility to predation is a potentially important stabilizer of predator-prey interactions, reducing the magnitude of population oscillations and enhancing total prey population abundance. When microevolutionary responses of prey populations occur at time scales comparable to population dynamics, adaptive responses in prey defense can, in theory, stabilize predator-prey dynamics and reduce top-down effects on prey abundance. While experiments have tested these predictions, less explored are the consequences of the evolution of prey phenotypes that can persist in both vulnerable and invulnerable classes. We tested this experimentally using a laboratory aquatic system composed of the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus as a predator and the prey Synura petersenii, a colony-forming alga that exhibits genetic variation in its propensity to form colonies and colony size (larger colonies are a defense against predators). Prey populations of either low initial genetic diversity and low adaptive capacity or high initial genetic diversity and high adaptive capacity were crossed with predator presence and absence. Dynamics measured over the last 127 days of the 167-day experiment revealed no effects of initial prey genetic diversity on the average abundance or temporal variability of predator populations. However, genetic diversity and predator presence/absence interactively affected prey population abundance and stability; diversity of prey had no effects in the absence of predators but stabilized dynamics and increased total prey abundance in the presence of predators. The size structure of the genetically diverse prey populations diverged from single strain populations in the presence of predators, showing increases in colony size and in the relative abundance of cells found in colonies. Our work sheds light on the adaptive value of colony formation and supports the general view that genetic diversity and intraspecific trait variation of prey can play a vital role in the short-term dynamics and stability of planktonic predator-prey systems. PMID:25339982

  1. Testing for predator dependence in predator-prey dynamics: a non-parametric approach.

    PubMed Central

    Jost, C; Ellner, S P

    2000-01-01

    The functional response is a key element in all predator-prey interactions. Although functional responses are traditionally modelled as being a function of prey density only, evidence is accumulating that predator density also has an important effect. However, much of the evidence comes from artificial experimental arenas under conditions not necessarily representative of the natural system, and neglecting the temporal dynamics of the organism (in particular the effects of prey depletion on the estimated functional response). Here we present a method that removes these limitations by reconstructing the functional response non-parametrically from predator-prey time-series data. This method is applied to data on a protozoan predator-prey interaction, and we obtain significant evidence of predator dependence in the functional response. A crucial element in this analysis is to include time-lags in the prey and predator reproduction rates, and we show that these delays improve the fit of the model significantly. Finally, we compare the non-parametrically reconstructed functional response to parametric forms, and suggest that a modified version of the Hassell-Varley predator interference model provides a simple and flexible function for theoretical investigation and applied modelling. PMID:11467423

  2. Extra Exercises for Chapter 20 on Predator-Prey Cycles

    E-print Network

    Ford, Andrew

    has come to be known as the competitive exclusion principle (Hardin 1960) or Gause's principle (after environmental modeling class dealt with the competitive exclusion principle, and they helpedExtra Exercises for Chapter 20 on Predator-Prey Cycles Confirming the Competitive Exclusion

  3. Effects of uniform rotational flow on predator-prey system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Hee

    2012-12-01

    Rotational flow is often observed in lotic ecosystems, such as streams and rivers. For example, when an obstacle interrupts water flowing in a stream, energy dissipation and momentum transfer can result in the formation of rotational flow, or a vortex. In this study, I examined how rotational flow affects a predator-prey system by constructing a spatially explicit lattice model consisting of predators, prey, and plants. A predation relationship existed between the species. The species densities in the model were given as S (for predator), P (for prey), and G (for plant). A predator (prey) had a probability of giving birth to an offspring when it ate prey (plant). When a predator or prey was first introduced, or born, its health state was assigned an initial value of 20 that subsequently decreased by one with every time step. The predator (prey) was removed from the system when the health state decreased to less than zero. The degree of flow rotation was characterized by the variable, R. A higher R indicates a higher tendency that predators and prey move along circular paths. Plants were not affected by the flow because they were assumed to be attached to the streambed. Results showed that R positively affected both predator and prey survival, while its effect on plants was negligible. Flow rotation facilitated disturbances in individuals’ movements, which consequently strengthens the predator and prey relationship and prevents death from starvation. An increase in S accelerated the extinction of predators and prey.

  4. Persistent predator–prey dynamics revealed by mass extinction

    PubMed Central

    Sallan, Lauren Cole; Kammer, Thomas W.; Ausich, William I.; Cook, Lewis A.

    2011-01-01

    Predator–prey interactions are thought by many researchers to define both modern ecosystems and past macroevolutionary events. In modern ecosystems, experimental removal or addition of taxa is often used to determine trophic relationships and predator identity. Both characteristics are notoriously difficult to infer in the fossil record, where evidence of predation is usually limited to damage from failed attacks, individual stomach contents, one-sided escalation, or modern analogs. As a result, the role of predation in macroevolution is often dismissed in favor of competition and abiotic factors. Here we show that the end-Devonian Hangenberg event (359 Mya) was a natural experiment in which vertebrate predators were both removed and added to an otherwise stable prey fauna, revealing specific and persistent trophic interactions. Despite apparently favorable environmental conditions, crinoids diversified only after removal of their vertebrate consumers, exhibiting predatory release on a geological time scale. In contrast, later Mississippian (359–318 Mya) camerate crinoids declined precipitously in the face of increasing predation pressure from new durophagous fishes. Camerate failure is linked to the retention of obsolete defenses or “legacy adaptations” that prevented coevolutionary escalation. Our results suggest that major crinoid evolutionary phenomena, including rapid diversification, faunal turnover, and species selection, might be linked to vertebrate predation. Thus, interactions observed in small ecosystems, such as Lotka-Volterra cycles and trophic cascades, could operate at geologic time scales and higher taxonomic ranks. Both trophic knock-on effects and retention of obsolete traits might be common in the aftermath of predator extinction. PMID:21536875

  5. Effect of different predation rate on predator-prey model with harvesting, disease and refuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusawidjayanti, K.; Suryanto, A.; Wibowo, R. B. E.

    2015-03-01

    This paper deals with predator-prey interactions with predator harvesting and prey refuge. The predator may be infective by a disease. Therefore the predator is divided into two subclasses, i.e. infective and susceptible predator. It is assumed that susceptible predator have higher predation rate than infective predator, and hence the growth rate of susceptible predator will be higher than infective predator. It is found that the model has five equilibrium points. Finally, numerical simulation are presented not only to illustrate equilibrium point but also to illustrate effect of predation rate.

  6. Predator-prey systems depend on a prey refuge.

    PubMed

    Chivers, W J; Gladstone, W; Herbert, R D; Fuller, M M

    2014-11-01

    Models of near-exclusive predator-prey systems such as that of the Canadian lynx and snowshoe hare have included factors such as a second prey species, a Holling Type II predator response and climatic or seasonal effects to reproduce sub-sets of six signature patterns in the empirical data. We present an agent-based model which does not require the factors or constraints of previous models to reproduce all six patterns in persistent populations. Our parsimonious model represents a generalised predator and prey species with a small prey refuge. The lack of the constraints of previous models, considered to be important for those models, casts doubt on the current hypothesised mechanisms of exclusive predator-prey systems. The implication for management of the lynx, a protected species, is that maintenance of an heterogeneous environment offering natural refuge areas for the hare is the most important factor for the conservation of this species. PMID:25058806

  7. Nash Equilibria in Noncooperative Predator-Prey Games

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Angel Manuel [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Plaza de Ciencias 3, 28040 (Spain)], E-mail: Angel_Ramos@mat.ucm.es; Roubicek, Tomas [Mathematical Institute, Charles University, Sokolovska 83, CZ-186 75 Praha 8 and Institute of Information Theory and Automation, Academy of Sciences, Pod vodarenskou vezi 4 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: roubicek@karlin.mff.cuni.cz

    2007-09-15

    A noncooperative game governed by a distributed-parameter predator-prey system is considered, assuming that two players control initial conditions for predator and prey, respectively. Existence of a Nash equilibrium is shown under the condition that the desired population profiles and the environmental carrying capacity for the prey are sufficiently small. A conceptual approximation algorithm is proposed and analyzed. Finally, numerical simulations are performed, too.

  8. Climate and Demography Dictate the Strength of Predator-Prey Overlap in a Subarctic Marine Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Hunsicker, Mary E.; Ciannelli, Lorenzo; Bailey, Kevin M.; Zador, Stephani; Stige, Leif Christian

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that climate and anthropogenic influences on marine ecosystems are largely manifested by changes in species spatial dynamics. However, less is known about how shifts in species distributions might alter predator-prey overlap and the dynamics of prey populations. We developed a general approach to quantify species spatial overlap and identify the biotic and abiotic variables that dictate the strength of overlap. We used this method to test the hypothesis that population abundance and temperature have a synergistic effect on the spatial overlap of arrowtooth flounder (predator) and juvenile Alaska walleye pollock (prey, age-1) in the eastern Bering Sea. Our analyses indicate that (1) flounder abundance and temperature are key variables dictating the strength of flounder and pollock overlap, (2) changes in the magnitude of overlap may be largely driven by density-dependent habitat selection of flounder, and (3) species overlap is negatively correlated to juvenile pollock recruitment when flounder biomass is high. Overall, our findings suggest that continued increases in flounder abundance coupled with the predicted long-term warming of ocean temperatures could have important implications for the predator-prey dynamics of arrowtooth flounder and juvenile pollock. The approach used in this study is valuable for identifying potential consequences of climate variability and exploitation on species spatial dynamics and interactions in many marine ecosystems. PMID:23824707

  9. A derivation of Holling's type I, II and III functional responses in predator-prey systems.

    PubMed

    Dawes, J H P; Souza, M O

    2013-06-21

    Predator-prey dynamics is most simply and commonly described by Lotka-Volterra-type ordinary differential equations (ODEs) for continuous population density variables in the limit of large population sizes. One popular extension of these ODEs is the so-called Rosenzweig-MacArthur model in which various interaction rates between the populations have a nonlinear dependence on the prey concentration. Nonlinear 'functional responses' of this type were originally proposed by Holling on the basis of a general argument concerning the allocation of a predator's time between two activities: 'prey searching' and 'prey handling'. Although these functional responses are constructed in terms of the behaviour of an individual predator, they are routinely incorporated at the population level in models that include reproduction and death. In this paper we derive a novel three variable model for the simplest possible mathematical formulation of predator-prey dynamics that allows the interplay between these various processes to take place, on their different characteristic timescales. We study its properties in detail and show how it reduces to Holling's functional responses in special limits. As a result we are able to establish direct links between individual-level and population-level behaviour in the context of these well-known functional responses. PMID:23500600

  10. Simple Finite Element Methods for Approximating Predator-Prey Dynamics in Two Dimensions Using MATLAB.

    PubMed

    Garvie, Marcus R; Burkardt, John; Morgan, Jeff

    2015-03-01

    We describe simple finite element schemes for approximating spatially extended predator-prey dynamics with the Holling type II functional response and logistic growth of the prey. The finite element schemes generalize 'Scheme 1' in the paper by Garvie (Bull Math Biol 69(3):931-956, 2007). We present user-friendly, open-source MATLAB code for implementing the finite element methods on arbitrary-shaped two-dimensional domains with Dirichlet, Neumann, Robin, mixed Robin-Neumann, mixed Dirichlet-Neumann, and Periodic boundary conditions. Users can download, edit, and run the codes from http://www.uoguelph.ca/~mgarvie/ . In addition to discussing the well posedness of the model equations, the results of numerical experiments are presented and demonstrate the crucial role that habitat shape, initial data, and the boundary conditions play in determining the spatiotemporal dynamics of predator-prey interactions. As most previous works on this problem have focussed on square domains with standard boundary conditions, our paper makes a significant contribution to the area. PMID:25616741

  11. THE ROSENZWEIG-MACARTHUR PREDATOR-PREY HAL L. SMITH*

    E-print Network

    Smith, Hal

    THE ROSENZWEIG-MACARTHUR PREDATOR-PREY MODEL HAL L. SMITH* SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICAL AND STATISTICAL. It is the per predator kill rate. 1 #12;2 H.L. Smith 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1 that solutions are bounded in the future and therefore are defined for all t 0. #12;4 H.L. Smith Notice that 2

  12. On the Galton-Watson predator-prey process Gerold Alsmeyer

    E-print Network

    Alsmeyer, Gerold

    1 On the Galton-Watson predator-prey process Gerold Alsmeyer Mathematisches Seminar Universit¨at Kiel Ludewig-Meyn-Straße 4 D-24098 Kiel We consider a probabilistic, discrete-time predator-prey model evolves according to an ordinary supercritical Galton-Watson process. Each prey is either killed

  13. A Predator-Prey system with viral infection and anorexia response

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhenkun Huang; Fengde Chen; Xinghua Wang

    2006-01-01

    The generalized Gause model of Predator–Prey system is proposed with an introduction of viral infection on prey population and anorexia response on predator population. By using the comparison theorem and constructing suitable Lyapunov function, we study such modified Predator–Prey system with almost periodic coefficients. Some sufficient conditions are obtained for the existence of a unique almost periodic solution. Numerical simulations

  14. Predator-prey pursuit-evasion games in structurally complex environments.

    PubMed

    Morice, Sylvie; Pincebourde, Sylvain; Darboux, Frédéric; Kaiser, Wilfried; Casas, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    Pursuit and evasion behaviors in many predator-prey encounters occur in a geometrically structured environment. The physical structures in the environment impose strong constraints on the perception and behavioral responses of both antagonists. Nevertheless, no experimental or theoretical study has tackled the issue of quantifying the role of the habitat's architecture on the joint trajectories during a predator-prey encounter. In this study, we report the influence of microtopography of forest leaf litter on the pursuit-evasion trajectories of wolf spiders Pardosa sp. attacking the wood cricket Nemobius sylvestris. Fourteen intact leaf litter samples of 1 m × 0.5 m were extracted from an oak-beech forest floor in summer and winter, with later samples having the most recently fallen leaves. Elevation was mapped at a spatial resolution of 0.5 mm using a laser scanner. Litter structuring patterns were identified by height transects and experimental semi-variograms. Detailed analysis of all visible leaf-fragments of one sample enabled us to relate the observed statistical patterns to the underlying geometry of individual elements. Video recording of pursuit-evasion sequences in arenas with flat paper or leaf litter enabled us to estimate attack and fleeing distances as a function of substrate. The compaction index, the length of contiguous flat surfaces, and the experimental variograms showed that the leaf litter was smoother in summer than in winter. Thus, weathering as well as biotic activities compacted and flattened the litter over time. We found good agreement between the size of the structuring unit of leaf litter and the distance over which attack and escape behaviors both were initiated (both ?3 cm). There was a four-fold topographical effect on pursuit-escape sequences; compared with a flat surface, leaf litter (1) greatly reduced the likelihood of launching a pursuit, (2) reduced pursuit and escape distances by half, (3) put prey and predator on par in terms of pursuit and escape distances, and (4) reduced the likelihood of secondary pursuits, after initial escape of the prey, to nearly zero. Thus, geometry of the habitat strongly modulates the rules of pursuit-evasion in predator-prey interactions in the wild. PMID:23720527

  15. Gause’s principle in interspecific competition of the cyclic predator-prey system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Qiuhui; Wang, Haoying; Chen, Luyi; Huang, Zhong; He, Mingfeng

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we study the law of survival for species in interspecific competition in the cyclic and predator-prey system. In our model, the successful rate for a predator to prey depends on the individual ability to prey and the two interacting clusters sizes, and the size of a cluster is determined by the aggregation degree between individuals. Experimental results show that only one species can survive when competition occurs on one niche. And which species can survive ultimately depends on the relative relationship between the average individual ability to prey and the aggregation degree between it and its competing species. If competing species have identical values for the average individual ability to prey and the aggregation degree, the species that can survive is determined at random. Therefore, Gause’s Competitive Exclusion Principle is correct, but the causes of competing species to survive are different.

  16. On the Neimark-Sacker bifurcation in a discrete predator-prey system.

    PubMed

    Hone, A N W; Irle, M V; Thurura, G W

    2010-11-01

    A two-parameter family of discrete models describing a predator-prey interaction is considered, which generalizes a model discussed by Murray, and originally due to Nicholson and Bailey, consisting of two coupled nonlinear difference equations. In contrast to the original case treated by Murray, where the two populations either die out or may display unbounded growth, the general member of this family displays a somewhat wider range of behaviour. In particular, the model has a nontrivial steady state which is stable for a certain range of parameter values, which is explicitly determined, and also undergoes a Neimark-Sacker bifurcation that produces an attracting invariant curve in some areas of the parameter space and a repelling one in others. PMID:22881206

  17. Turing patterns and a stochastic individual-based model for predator-prey systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Seido

    2012-02-01

    Reaction-diffusion theory has played a very important role in the study of pattern formations in biology. However, a group of individuals is described by a single state variable representing population density in reaction-diffusion models and interaction between individuals can be included only phenomenologically. Recently, we have seamlessly combined individual-based models with elements of reaction-diffusion theory. To include animal migration in the scheme, we have adopted a relationship between the diffusion and the random numbers generated according to a two-dimensional bivariate normal distribution. Thus, we have observed the transition of population patterns from an extinction mode, a stable mode, or an oscillatory mode to the chaotic mode as the population growth rate increases. We show our phase diagram of predator-prey systems and discuss the microscopic mechanism for the stable lattice formation in detail.

  18. Spatiotemporal complexity of a ratio-dependent predator-prey system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiming; Liu, Quan-Xing; Jin, Zhen

    2007-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the emergence of a ratio-dependent predator-prey system with Michaelis-Menten-type functional response and reaction diffusion. We obtain the conditions of Hopf, Turing, and wave bifurcation in a spatial domain. Furthermore, we present a theoretical analysis of evolutionary processes that involves organisms distribution and their interaction of spatially distributed population with local diffusion. The results of numerical simulations reveal that the typical dynamics of population density variation is the formation of isolated groups, i.e., stripelike or spotted or coexistence of both. Our study shows that the spatially extended model has not only more complex dynamic patterns in the space, but also chaos and spiral waves. It may help us better understand the dynamics of an aquatic community in a real marine environment.

  19. Shifting prey selection generates contrasting herbivore dynamics within a large-mammal predator-prey web.

    PubMed

    Owen-Smith, Norman; Mills, M G L

    2008-04-01

    Shifting prey selection has been identified as a mechanism potentially regulating predator-prey interactions, but it may also lead to different outcomes, especially in more complex systems with multiple prey species available. We assessed changing prey selection by lions, the major predator for 12 large herbivore species in South Africa's Kruger National Park. The database was provided by records of found carcasses ascribed to kills by lions assembled over 70 years, coupled with counts of changing prey abundance extending over 30 years. Wildebeest and zebra constituted the most favored prey species during the early portion of the study period, while selection for buffalo rose in the south of the park after a severe drought increased their vulnerability. Rainfall had a negative influence on the proportional representation of buffalo in lion kills, but wildebeest and zebra appeared less susceptible to being killed under conditions of low rainfall. Selection by lions for alternative prey species, including giraffe, kudu, waterbuck, and warthog, was influenced by the changing relative abundance and vulnerability of the three principal prey species. Simultaneous declines in the abundance of rarer antelope species were associated with a sharp increase in selection for these species at a time when all three principal prey species were less available. Hence shifting prey selection by lions affected the dynamics of herbivore populations in different ways: promoting contrasting responses by principal prey species to rainfall variation, while apparently being the main cause of sharp declines by alternative prey species under certain conditions. Accordingly, adaptive responses by predators, to both the changing relative abundance of the principal prey species, and other conditions affecting the relative vulnerability of various species, should be taken into account to understand the interactive dynamics of multispecies predator-prey webs. PMID:18481536

  20. Predator-Prey Dynamics Driven by Feedback between Functionally Diverse Trophic Levels

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, Kai; Gaedke, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    Neglecting the naturally existing functional diversity of communities and the resulting potential to respond to altered conditions may strongly reduce the realism and predictive power of ecological models. We therefore propose and study a predator-prey model that describes mutual feedback via species shifts in both predator and prey, using a dynamic trait approach. Species compositions of the two trophic levels were described by mean functional traits—prey edibility and predator food-selectivity—and functional diversities by the variances. Altered edibility triggered shifts in food-selectivity so that consumers continuously respond to the present prey composition, and vice versa. This trait-mediated feedback mechanism resulted in a complex dynamic behavior with ongoing oscillations in the mean trait values, reflecting continuous reorganization of the trophic levels. The feedback was only possible if sufficient functional diversity was present in both trophic levels. Functional diversity was internally maintained on the prey level as no niche existed in our system, which was ideal under any composition of the predator level due to the trade-offs between edibility, growth and carrying capacity. The predators were only subject to one trade-off between food-selectivity and grazing ability and in the absence of immigration, one predator type became abundant, i.e., functional diversity declined to zero. In the lack of functional diversity the system showed the same dynamics as conventional models of predator-prey interactions ignoring the potential for shifts in species composition. This way, our study identified the crucial role of trade-offs and their shape in physiological and ecological traits for preserving diversity. PMID:22096560

  1. Foraging and vulnerability traits modify predator-prey body mass allometry: freshwater macroinvertebrates as a case study.

    PubMed

    Klecka, Jan; Boukal, David S

    2013-09-01

    1. Predation is often size selective, but the role of other traits of the prey and predators in their interactions is little known. This hinders our understanding of the causal links between trophic interactions and the structure of animal communities. Better knowledge of trophic traits underlying predator-prey interactions is also needed to improve models attempting to predict food web structure and dynamics from known species traits. 2. We carried out laboratory experiments with common freshwater macroinvertebrate predators (diving beetles, dragonfly and damselfly larvae and water bugs) and their prey to assess how body size and traits related to foraging (microhabitat use, feeding mode and foraging mode) and to prey vulnerability (microhabitat use, activity and escape behaviour) affect predation strength. 3. The underlying predator-prey body mass allometry characterizing mean prey size and total predation pressure was modified by feeding mode of the predators (suctorial or chewing). Suctorial predators fed upon larger prey and had ˜3 times higher mass-specific predation rate than chewing predators of the same size and may thus have stronger effect on prey abundance. 4. Strength of individual trophic links, measured as mortality of the focal prey caused by the focal predator, was determined jointly by the predator and prey body mass and their foraging and vulnerability traits. In addition to the feeding mode, interactions between prey escape behaviour (slow or fast), prey activity (sedentary or active) and predator foraging mode (searching or ambush) strongly affected prey mortality. Searching predators was ineffective in capturing fast-escape prey in comparison with the remaining predator-prey combinations, while ambush predators caused higher mortality than searching predators and the difference was larger in active prey. 5. Our results imply that the inclusion of the commonly available qualitative data on foraging traits of predators and vulnerability traits of prey could substantially increase biological realism of food web descriptions. PMID:23869526

  2. Modeling symbiosis by interactions through species carrying capacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Yukalova, E. P.; Sornette, D.

    2012-08-01

    We introduce a mathematical model of symbiosis between different species by taking into account the influence of each species on the carrying capacities of the others. The modeled entities can pertain to biological and ecological societies or to social, economic and financial societies. Our model includes three basic types: symbiosis with direct mutual interactions, symbiosis with asymmetric interactions, and symbiosis without direct interactions. In all cases, we provide a complete classification of all admissible dynamical regimes. The proposed model of symbiosis turned out to be very rich, as it exhibits four qualitatively different regimes: convergence to stationary states, unbounded exponential growth, finite-time singularity, and finite-time death or extinction of species.

  3. Use of Cobra Lily (Darlingtonia californica) & Drosophila for Investigating Predator-Prey Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Carl R.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an experiment that uses the cobra lily (Darlingtonia californica) and fruit flies (Drosophila virilis) to investigate predator-prey relationships in a classroom laboratory. Suggestions for classroom extension of this experimental system are provided. (ZWH)

  4. Behavioral response races, predator-prey shell games, ecology of fear, and patch use of pumas and their ungulate prey.

    PubMed

    Laundré, John W

    2010-10-01

    The predator-prey shell game predicts random movement of prey across the landscape, whereas the behavioral response race and landscape of fear models predict that there should be a negative relationship between the spatial distribution of a predator and its behaviorally active prey. Additionally, prey have imperfect information on the whereabouts of their predator, which the predator should incorporate in its patch use strategy. I used a one-predator-one-prey system, puma (Puma concolor)-mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) to test the following predictions regarding predator-prey distribution and patch use by the predator. (1) Pumas will spend more time in high prey risk/low prey use habitat types, while deer will spend their time in low-risk habitats. Pumas should (2) select large forage patches more often, (3) remain in large patches longer, and (4) revisit individual large patches more often than individual smaller ones. I tested these predictions with an extensive telemetry data set collected over 16 years in a study area of patchy forested habitat. When active, pumas spent significantly less time in open areas of low intrinsic predation risk than did deer. Pumas used large patches more than expected, revisited individual large patches significantly more often than smaller ones, and stayed significantly longer in larger patches than in smaller ones. The results supported the prediction of a negative relationship in the spatial distribution of a predator and its prey and indicated that the predator is incorporating the prey's imperfect information about its presence. These results indicate a behavioral complexity on the landscape scale that can have far-reaching impacts on predator-prey interactions. PMID:21058559

  5. Symbiosis

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John W. Kimball

    This online textbook chapter reviews symbiotic relationships, specifically mutualism, commensalism, and parasitism. The chapter includes examples for each relationship as well as a discussion about the evolution of symbiosis. Links direct readers to related chapters within the collection.

  6. Predator-Prey Model for A-Ring Haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Madhusudhana, P.; Colwell, J. E.; Sremcevic, M.; Bradley, E. T.

    2013-12-01

    Cassini ISS, VIMS, UVIS spectroscopy and occultations show bright haloes around the strongest density waves. . We observe opposing effects: both small and large particles are found at the perturbed locations. Based on a predator-prey model for ring dynamics, we offer the following explanation: Cyclic velocity changes cause perturbed regions to reach higher collision speeds at some orbital phases, which preferentially removes small regolith particles; This forms a halo around the ILR; Surrounding particles diffuse back too slowly to erase the effect; Meteoritic bombardment creates fresh ice fragments at the regions of decreased regolith. Our explanation is based on the idea that moon-triggered clumping occurs at perturbed regions in Saturn's rings. Cyclic system trajectories forced around the stable point create both high velocity dispersion and large aggregates at these distances. This explanation supports the view of a triple architecture of ring particles: a broad size distribution of particles; that aggregate into temporary rubble piles; coated by a regolith of dust. The aggregate model can explain the dynamic nature of the rings and the aggregates can renew rings by shielding and recycling fresh ice.

  7. Predator-Prey model for haloes in Saturn's A ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.; Bradley, E. Todd; Colwell, Joshua E.; Madhusudhanan, Prasanna; Sremcevic, Miodrag

    2013-04-01

    UVIS SOI reflectance spectra show bright 'haloes' around the locations of some of the strongest resonances in Saturn's A ring (Esposito etal 2005). UV spectra constrain the size and composition of the icy ring particles (Bradley etal 2010, 2012). The correspondence of IR, UV spectroscopy, HSP wavelet analysis indicate that we detect the same phenomenon. We investigate the Janus 2:1. 4:3, 5:3, 6:5 and Mimas 5:3 inner Lindblad resonances as well as at the Mimas 5:3 vertical resonance (bending wave location). Models of ring particle regolith evolution (Elliott and Esposito 2010) indicate the deeper regolith is made of older and purer ice. The strong resonances can cause streamline crowding (Lewis and Stewart 2005) which damps the interparticle velocity, allowing temporary clumps to grow, which in turn increase the velocity, eroding the clumps and releasing smaller particles and regolith (see the predator-prey model of Esposito etal 2012). This cyclic behavior, driven by the resonant perturbation from the moon, can yield collision velocities at particular azimuths greater than 1m/sec, sufficient to erode the aggregates (Blum 2006), exposing older, purer materials: In the perturbed region, collisions erode the regolith, removing smaller particles. The released regolith material settles in the less perturbed neighboring regions. Diffusion spreads these ring particles with smaller regolith into a 'halo'. Thus, the radial location of the strongest resonances can be where we find both large aggregates and disrupted fragments, in a balance maintained by the periodic moon forcing. If this stirring exposes older, and purer ice, the velocity threshold for eroding the aggregates can explain why only the strongest Lindblad resonances show haloes. Diffusion can explain the morphology of these haloes, although they are not well-resolved spatially by UVIS.

  8. Predator-Prey Model for Haloes in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.; Colwell, Joshua; Sremcevic, Miodrag; Madhusudhanan, Prasanna

    Particles in Saturn’s rings have a tripartite nature: (1) a broad distribution of fragments from the disruption of a previous moon that accrete into (2) transient aggregates, resembling piles of rubble, covered by a (3) regolith of smaller grains that result from collisions and meteoritic grinding. Evidence for this triple architecture of ring particles comes from a multitude of Cassini observations. In a number of ring locations (including Saturn’s F ring, the shepherded outer edges of rings A and B and at the locations of the strongest density waves) aggregation and dis-aggregation are operating now. ISS, VIMS, UVIS spectroscopy and occultations show haloes around the strongest density waves. Based on a predator-prey model for ring dynamics, we offer the following explanation: •Cyclic velocity changes cause the perturbed regions to reach higher collision speeds at some orbital phases, which preferentially removes small regolith particles; •This forms a bright halo around the ILR, if the forcing is strong enough; •Surrounding particles diffuse back too slowly to erase the effect; they diffuse away to form the halo. The most rapid time scale is for forcing/aggregate growth/disaggregation; then irreversible regolith erosion; diffusion and/or ballistic transport; and slowest, meteoritic pollution/darkening. We observe both smaller and larger particles at perturbed regions. Straw, UVIS power spectral analysis, kittens and equinox objects show the prey (mass aggregates); while the haloes’ VIMS spectral signature, correlation length and excess variance are created by the predators (velocity dispersion) in regions stirred in the rings. Moon forcing triggers aggregation to create longer-lived aggregates that protect their interiors from meteoritic darkening and recycle the ring material to maintain the current purity of the rings. It also provides a mechanism for creation of new moons at resonance locations in the Roche zone, as proposed by Charnoz etal and Canup.

  9. Maternal effects mechanism of population cycling: a formidable competitor to the traditional predator–prey view

    PubMed Central

    Inchausti, Pablo; Ginzburg, Lev R.

    2009-01-01

    In the language of mathematics, one needs minimally two interacting variables (two dimensions) to describe repeatable periodic behaviour, and in the language of density dependence, one needs delayed, not immediate, density dependence to produce cyclicity. Neither language specifies the causal mechanism. There are two major potential mechanisms: exogenous mechanisms involving species interactions as in predator–prey or host–parasite, and endogenous mechanisms such as maternal effects where population growth results from the cross-generational transmission of individual quality. The species interactions view stemming from a major observation of Elton and a simultaneous independent theory by Lotka and Volterra is currently dominant. Most ecologists, when faced with cyclic phenomena, automatically look for an interacting species one step below or above in a food chain in order to find an explanation. Maternal effects hypothesis, verbally suggested in the 1950s, had only found its theoretical implementation in the 1990s. In a relatively short time, the degree of acceptance of this view grew to the level of a ‘minority opinion’ as evidenced by the widely used textbook of Begon et al. This short review attempts to describe the arguments for and against this internal two-dimensional approach. PMID:19324616

  10. Human Activity Helps Prey Win the Predator-Prey Space Race

    PubMed Central

    Muhly, Tyler B.; Semeniuk, Christina; Massolo, Alessandro; Hickman, Laura; Musiani, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Predator-prey interactions, including between large mammalian wildlife species, can be represented as a “space race”, where prey try to minimize and predators maximize spatial overlap. Human activity can also influence the distribution of wildlife species. In particular, high-human disturbance can displace large carnivore predators, a trait-mediated direct effect. Predator displacement by humans could then indirectly benefit prey species by reducing predation risk, a trait-mediated indirect effect of humans that spatially decouples predators from prey. The purpose of this research was to test the hypothesis that high-human activity was displacing predators and thus indirectly creating spatial refuge for prey species, helping prey win the “space race”. We measured the occurrence of eleven large mammal species (including humans and cattle) at 43 camera traps deployed on roads and trails in southwest Alberta, Canada. We tested species co-occurrence at camera sites using hierarchical cluster and nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMS) analyses; and tested whether human activity, food and/or habitat influenced predator and prey species counts at camera sites using regression tree analysis. Cluster and NMS analysis indicated that at camera sites humans co-occurred with prey species more than predator species and predator species had relatively low co-occurrence with prey species. Regression tree analysis indicated that prey species were three times more abundant on roads and trails with >32 humans/day. However, predators were less abundant on roads and trails that exceeded 18 humans/day. Our results support the hypothesis that high-human activity displaced predators but not prey species, creating spatial refuge from predation. High-human activity on roads and trails (i.e., >18 humans/day) has the potential to interfere with predator-prey interactions via trait-mediated direct and indirect effects. We urge scientist and managers to carefully consider and quantify the trait-mediated indirect effects of humans, in addition to direct effects, when assessing human impacts on wildlife and ecosystems. PMID:21399682

  11. Ecosystem-based management of predator-prey relationships: piscivorous birds and salmonids.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Francis K; Parrish, Julia K; Thompson, Christopher W; Maranto, Christina

    2008-04-01

    Predator-prey relationships are often altered as a result of human activities. Where prey are legally protected, conservation action may include lethal predator control. In the Columbia River basin (Pacific Northwest, USA and Canada), piscivorous predators have been implicated in contributing to a lack of recovery of several endangered anadromous salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.), and lethal and nonlethal control programs have been instituted against both piscine and avian species. To determine the consequences of avian predation, we used a bioenergetics approach to estimate the consumption of salmonid smolts by waterbirds (Common Merganser, California and Ring-billed Gull, Caspian Tern, Double-crested Cormorant) found in the mid-Columbia River from April through August, 2002-2004. We used our model to explore several predator-prey scenarios, including the impact of historical bird abundance, and the effect of preserving vs. removing birds, on smolt abundance. Each year, <1% of the estimated available salmonid smolts (interannual range: 44,830-109,209; 95% CI = 38,000-137,000) were consumed, 85-98% away from dams. Current diet data combined with historical gull abundance at dams suggests that past smolt consumption may have been 1.5-3 times current numbers, depending on the assumed distribution of gulls along the reaches. After the majority (80%) of salmonid smolts have left the study area, birds switch their diet to predominantly juvenile northern pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus oregonensis), which as adults are significant native salmonid predators in the Columbia River. Our models suggest that one consequence of removing birds from the system may be increased pikeminnow abundance, which--even assuming 80% compensatory mortality in juvenile pikeminnow survival--would theoretically result in an annual average savings of just over 180,000 smolts, calculated over a decade. Practically, this suggests that smolt survival could be maximized by deterring birds from the river when smolts are present, allowing bird presence after the diet switch to act as a tool for salmonid-predator control, and conducting adult-pikeminnow control throughout. Our analysis demonstrates that identifying the strength of ecosystem interactions represents a top priority when attempting to manage the abundance of a particular ecosystem constituent, and that the consequences of a single-species view may be counterintuitive, and potentially counterproductive. PMID:18488627

  12. Predator-prey trophic relationships in response to organic management practices.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jason M; Barney, Sarah K; Williams, Mark A; Bessin, Ricardo T; Coolong, Timothy W; Harwood, James D

    2014-08-01

    A broad range of environmental conditions likely regulate predator-prey population dynamics and impact the structure of these communities. Central to understanding the interplay between predator and prey populations and their importance is characterizing the corresponding trophic interactions. Here, we use a well-documented molecular approach to examine the structure of the community of natural enemies preying upon the squash bug, Anasa tristis, a herbivorous cucurbit pest that severely hinders organic squash and pumpkin production in the United States. Primer pairs were designed to examine the effects of organic management practices on the strength of these trophic connections and link this metric to measures of the arthropod predator complex density and diversity within an experimental open-field context. Replicated plots of butternut squash were randomly assigned to three treatments and were sampled throughout a growing season. Row-cover treatments had significant negative effects on squash bug and predator communities. In total, 640 predators were tested for squash bug molecular gut-content, of which 11% were found to have preyed on squash bugs, but predation varied over the season between predator groups (coccinellids, geocorids, nabids, web-building spiders and hunting spiders). Through the linking of molecular gut-content analysis to changes in diversity and abundance, these data delineate the complexity of interaction pathways on a pest that limits the profitability of organic squash production. PMID:24673741

  13. Computational Science Technical Note CSTN-015 A Zoology of Emergent Patterns in a Predator-Prey Simulation Model

    E-print Network

    Hawick, Ken

    0 Computational Science Technical Note CSTN-015 A Zoology of Emergent Patterns in a Predator Zoology of Emergent Patterns in a Predator-Prey Simulation Model}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the Sixth CSTN-015 A Zoology of Emergent Patterns in a Predator-Prey Simulation Model K.A. Hawick, H.A. James

  14. Predator-prey interactions between Orius insidiosus and flower thrips

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The great debates generated in Australia some 50 years ago regarding the relative merits of density dependent versus density independent forces in population dynamics were both reiterations of earlier ecological debates and precursors of succeeding ones. Perhaps, as has been recently emphasised, the...

  15. Novel predator-prey interactions: is resistance futile?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer E. Smith; Christopher J. Whelan; Steven J. Taylor; Michael L. Denight; Mike M. Stake

    2007-01-01

    Premise: Prey species may possess inappropriate behavioural, morphological, and\\/or physiological responses to introduced, novel predators. Thus, introduced predators may exert strong selection on prey species. Organisms: Black-capped vireo, Vireo atricapilla, and the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. Data: Behavioural response of and time-energy budget for parental vireo defence against nest predation by fire ants. Field site: Fort Hood, Texas, an 88,500-hectare

  16. Predator-prey interactions, resource depression and patch revisitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Generalist predators may be confronted by different types of prey in different patches: sedentary and conspicuous, cryptic (with or without refugia), conspicuous and nonsocial, or conspicuous and social. I argue that, where encounter rates with prey are of most importance, patch revisitation should be a profitable tactic where prey have short 'recovery' times (conspicuous, nonsocial prey), or where anti-predator response (e.g. shoaling) may increase conspicuousness. Predictions are made for how temporal changes in prey encounter rates should affect revisit schedules and feeding rates for the 4 different prey types.

  17. Landscape heterogeneity shapes predation in a newly restored predator?prey system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew J. Kauffman; Nathan Varley; Douglas W. Smith; Daniel R. Stahler; Daniel R. MacNulty; Mark S. Boyce

    2007-01-01

    Because some native ungulates have lived without top predators for generations, it has been uncertain whether runaway predation would occur when predators are newly restored to these systems. We show that landscape features and vegetation, which influence predator detection and capture of prey, shape large-scale patterns of predation in a newly restored predator-prey system. We analysed the spatial distribution of

  18. Random dispersal in a predator-prey-parasite model 1 Introduction

    E-print Network

    Baglama, James

    Random dispersal in a predator-prey-parasite model Abstract. 1 Introduction An intermediate host is a host that harbors the parasite only for a short transition period of time, during which some developmental stage may be completed. On the other hand, a definitive host is a host in which the parasite

  19. Deterministic and Stochastic Analysis of a Prey-Dependent Predator-Prey System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiti, Alakes; Samanta, G. P.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on studies of the deterministic and stochastic behaviours of a predator-prey system with prey-dependent response function. The first part of the paper deals with the deterministic analysis of uniform boundedness, permanence, stability and bifurcation. In the second part the reproductive and mortality factors of the prey and…

  20. Stabilizing effects in spatial parasitoid–host and predator–prey models: a review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cheryl J. Briggs; Martha F. Hoopes

    2004-01-01

    We review the literature on spatial host–parasitoid and predator–prey models. Dispersal on its own is not stabilizing and can destabilize a stable local equilibrium. We identify three mechanisms whereby limited dispersal of hosts and parasitoids combined with other features, such as spatial and temporal heterogeneity, can promote increased persistence and stability. The first mechanism, “statistical stabilization”, is simply the statistical

  1. Adaptive behaviour and multiple equilibrium states in a predator-prey model.

    PubMed

    Pimenov, Alexander; Kelly, Thomas C; Korobeinikov, Andrei; O'Callaghan, Michael J A; Rachinskii, Dmitrii

    2015-05-01

    There is evidence that multiple stable equilibrium states are possible in real-life ecological systems. Phenomenological mathematical models which exhibit such properties can be constructed rather straightforwardly. For instance, for a predator-prey system this result can be achieved through the use of non-monotonic functional response for the predator. However, while formal formulation of such a model is not a problem, the biological justification for such functional responses and models is usually inconclusive. In this note, we explore a conjecture that a multitude of equilibrium states can be caused by an adaptation of animal behaviour to changes of environmental conditions. In order to verify this hypothesis, we consider a simple predator-prey model, which is a straightforward extension of the classic Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model. In this model, we made an intuitively transparent assumption that the prey can change a mode of behaviour in response to the pressure of predation, choosing either "safe" of "risky" (or "business as usual") behaviour. In order to avoid a situation where one of the modes gives an absolute advantage, we introduce the concept of the "cost of a policy" into the model. A simple conceptual two-dimensional predator-prey model, which is minimal with this property, and is not relying on odd functional responses, higher dimensionality or behaviour change for the predator, exhibits two stable co-existing equilibrium states with basins of attraction separated by a separatrix of a saddle point. PMID:25732186

  2. Convergence Results in a Well-Known Delayed Predator-Prey System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edoardo Beretta; Yang KuangU

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we provide a detailed and explicit procedure of obtaining some regions of attraction for the positive steady state (assumed to exist) of a well known Lotka–Volterra type predator-prey system with a single discrete delay. Our procedure requires the delay length to be small. A detailed example is presented. The method used here is to construct a proper

  3. Predator-prey relationships and the evolution of colour polymorphism: a comparative analysis in diurnal raptors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. ROULIN; M. WINK

    2004-01-01

    Genetically based variation in coloration occurs in populations of many organisms belonging to various taxa, includ- ing birds, mammals, frogs, molluscs, insects and plants. Colour polymorphism has evolved in raptors more often than in any other group of birds, suggesting that predator-prey relationships was a driving evolutionary force. Individuals displaying a new invading colour morph may enjoy an initial foraging

  4. Chaos in a Predator-Prey Model with an Omnivore Joseph P. Previte

    E-print Network

    Previte, Joseph P.

    Chaos in a Predator-Prey Model with an Omnivore Joseph P. Previte Kathleen A. Hoffman § August 17-prey equations in a biologically reasonable way. We characterize the third species first as an omnivore who and Namba [24] numerically demonstrate that the addition of an omnivore (defined as feeding on more than one

  5. Senses & Sensibility: Predator-Prey Experiments Reveal How Fish Perceive & Respond to Threats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jason; Holloway, Barbara; Ketcham, Elizabeth; Long, John

    2008-01-01

    The predator-prey relationship is one of the most recognizable and well-studied animal relationships. One of the more striking aspects of this relationship is the differential natural selection pressure placed on predators and their prey. This differential pressure results from differing costs of failure, the so-called life-dinner principle. If a…

  6. Examining predator-prey body size, trophic level and body mass across marine and terrestrial mammals.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Marlee A; Rogers, Tracey L

    2014-12-22

    Predator-prey relationships and trophic levels are indicators of community structure, and are important for monitoring ecosystem changes. Mammals colonized the marine environment on seven separate occasions, which resulted in differences in species' physiology, morphology and behaviour. It is likely that these changes have had a major effect upon predator-prey relationships and trophic position; however, the effect of environment is yet to be clarified. We compiled a dataset, based on the literature, to explore the relationship between body mass, trophic level and predator-prey ratio across terrestrial (n = 51) and marine (n = 56) mammals. We did not find the expected positive relationship between trophic level and body mass, but we did find that marine carnivores sit 1.3 trophic levels higher than terrestrial carnivores. Also, marine mammals are largely carnivorous and have significantly larger predator-prey ratios compared with their terrestrial counterparts. We propose that primary productivity, and its availability, is important for mammalian trophic structure and body size. Also, energy flow and community structure in the marine environment are influenced by differences in energy efficiency and increased food web stability. Enhancing our knowledge of feeding ecology in mammals has the potential to provide insights into the structure and functioning of marine and terrestrial communities. PMID:25377460

  7. The Predator-Prey Relationship between the Octopus (Octopus bimaculatus) and the California Scorpionfish (Scorpaena guttata)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PETER B. TAYLOR; LO-CHAI CHEN

    The predator-prey relationships between the California scorpionfish Scorpaena guttata Girard and the octopus Octopus bimaculatus Verrill were exam­ ined by observations of behavior in aquariums. California scorpionfish eat small octopuses, but they specifically evade large octopuses attempting to stalk them, in contrast with their defensive behavior, employing the venomous spines, against other potential predators. They appear to discriminate between predatory

  8. Robustness of predator-prey models for confinement regime transitions in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H. [Department of Physics, Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Chapman, S. C. [Department of Physics, Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Tromso (Norway); Dendy, R. O. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-15

    Energy transport and confinement in tokamak fusion plasmas is usually determined by the coupled nonlinear interactions of small-scale drift turbulence and larger scale coherent nonlinear structures, such as zonal flows, together with free energy sources such as temperature gradients. Zero-dimensional models, designed to embody plausible physical narratives for these interactions, can help to identify the origin of enhanced energy confinement and of transitions between confinement regimes. A prime zero-dimensional paradigm is predator-prey or Lotka-Volterra. Here, we extend a successful three-variable (temperature gradient; microturbulence level; one class of coherent structure) model in this genre [M. A. Malkov and P. H. Diamond, Phys. Plasmas 16, 012504 (2009)], by adding a fourth variable representing a second class of coherent structure. This requires a fourth coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equation. We investigate the degree of invariance of the phenomenology generated by the model of Malkov and Diamond, given this additional physics. We study and compare the long-time behaviour of the three-equation and four-equation systems, their evolution towards the final state, and their attractive fixed points and limit cycles. We explore the sensitivity of paths to attractors. It is found that, for example, an attractive fixed point of the three-equation system can become a limit cycle of the four-equation system. Addressing these questions which we together refer to as 'robustness' for convenience is particularly important for models which, as here, generate sharp transitions in the values of system variables which may replicate some key features of confinement transitions. Our results help to establish the robustness of the zero-dimensional model approach to capturing observed confinement phenomenology in tokamak fusion plasmas.

  9. Equilibrium points, stability and numerical solutions of fractional-order predator-prey and rabies models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, E.; El-Sayed, A. M. A.; El-Saka, H. A. A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we are concerned with the fractional-order predator-prey model and the fractional-order rabies model. Existence and uniqueness of solutions are proved. The stability of equilibrium points are studied. Numerical solutions of these models are given. An example is given where the equilibrium point is a centre for the integer order system but locally asymptotically stable for its fractional-order counterpart.

  10. Predator-Prey Dynamics: The Role of Predators in the Control of Problem Species

    E-print Network

    Wangchuk, Tashi

    2004-01-01

    understanding of this particular predator-prey dynamics is essential to quantify the impact of C. alpinus in regulating S. scrofa population. This study complements an ongoing project financed by the Bhutan Trust Fund for Wildlife Conservation (BTF) which... area. The other 40% can be addressed through trapping and shooting of wild boars if conditions are favourable. This combination of actions may result in a balanced approach to the human-wildlife conflicts caused by wild dogs and wild boars...

  11. The rainbow bridge: Hamiltonian limits and resonance in predator-prey dynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aaron A. King; William M. Schaffer

    1999-01-01

    .  ?In the presence of seasonal forcing, the intricate topology of non-integrable Hamiltonian predator-prey models is shown to\\u000a exercise profound effects on the dynamics and bifurcation structure of more realistic schemes which do not admit a Hamiltonian\\u000a formulation. The demonstration of this fact is accomplished by writing the more general models as perturbations of a Hamiltonian\\u000a limit, ?, in which are

  12. a Predator-Prey Model Based on the Fully Parallel Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Mingfeng; Ruan, Hongbo; Yu, Changliang

    We presented a predator-prey lattice model containing moveable wolves and sheep, which are characterized by Penna double bit strings. Sexual reproduction and child-care strategies are considered. To implement this model in an efficient way, we build a fully parallel Cellular Automata based on a new definition of the neighborhood. We show the roles played by the initial densities of the populations, the mutation rate and the linear size of the lattice in the evolution of this model.

  13. Optimal Harvesting in an Age-Structured Predator-Prey Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fister, K. Renee [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Murray State University, Murray, KY 42071-3341 (United States)], E-mail: renee.fister@murraystate.edu; Lenhart, Suzanne [Department of Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1300 (United States) and Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6016 (United States)], E-mail: lenhart@math.utk.edu

    2006-06-15

    We investigate optimal harvesting control in a predator-prey model in which the prey population is represented by a first-order partial differential equation with age-structure and the predator population is represented by an ordinary differential equation in time. The controls are the proportions of the populations to be harvested, and the objective functional represents the profit from harvesting. The existence and uniqueness of the optimal control pair are established.

  14. Asymptotic behavior of a stochastic non-autonomous predator-prey model with impulsive perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ruihua; Zou, Xiaoling; Wang, Ke

    2015-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a stochastic non-autonomous Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model with impulsive effects. The asymptotic properties are examined. Sufficient conditions for persistence and extinction are obtained, our results demonstrate that the impulse has important effects on the persistence and extinction of the species. We also show that the solution is stochastically ultimate bounded under some conditions. Finally, several simulation figures are introduced to confirm our main results.

  15. Effects of the heterogeneous landscape on a predator-prey system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Hee

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand how a heterogeneous landscape affects a predator-prey system, a spatially explicit lattice model consisting of predators, prey, grass, and landscape was constructed. The predators and preys randomly move on the lattice space and the grass grows in its neighboring site according to its growth probability. When predators and preys meet at the same site at the same time, a number of prey, equal to the number of predators are eaten. This rule was also applied to the relationship between the prey and grass. The predator (prey) could give birth to an offspring when it ate prey (grass), with a birth probability. When a predator or prey animal was initially introduced, or newly born, its health state was set at a given high value. This health state decreased by one with every time step. When the state of an animal decreased to less than zero, the animal died and was removed from the system. The heterogeneous landscape was characterized by parameter H, which controlled the heterogeneity according to the neutral model. The simulation results showed that H positively or negatively affected a predator’s survival, while its effect on prey and grass was less pronounced. The results can be understood by the disturbance of the balance between the prey and predator densities in the areas where the animals aggregated.

  16. Predator-prey imbalances due to a pesticide: density and applicability timing as determining factors for experimental assessments.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, María Florencia; Negro, Carlos Leandro

    2014-09-01

    Predator-prey relationships are determining factors in sustaining community structure but xenobiotics, including pesticides, have the potential to alter them, causing imbalances at the ecosystem level. Although invertebrate predation on zooplankton is of high importance in shallow lakes, there is still little information regarding disturbances on this trophic interaction. This work assessed the potential effects of a chlorpyrifos-based pesticide (CLP) on the interaction between prawns Macrobrachium borellii and cladocerans Ceriodaphnia dubia, taking into account prey densities, specific time of exposure and contamination level. The analysis was focused on the specific sensitivity of both species and, especially, on the predation rate of M. borellii on C. dubia. The latter was evaluated through different treatments that combined predator and/or prey exposure to the insecticide, before (lapse of 12 h) or during the interaction. Under low prey density, when prawns were previously exposed to the insecticide, their consumption rate was lower than that of controls. Conversely, when cladocerans or both species were previously exposed, the prawns' feeding rate was higher. Under high prey density, there were no substantial differences among treatments. Comparatively, cladocerans were significantly more consumed when the exposure of both species was performed before rather than during the interaction. From the results obtained, it can be assumed that the trophic interaction under study is sensitive to CLP and that individual density and specific time of exposure are important variables to be considered in similar studies in order to obtain realistic results. PMID:24903805

  17. Bifurcations and chaos in a predator-prey system with the Allee effect.

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Andrew; Petrovskii, Sergei; Li, Bai-Lian

    2004-01-01

    It is known from many theoretical studies that ecological chaos may have numerous significant impacts on the population and community dynamics. Therefore, identification of the factors potentially enhancing or suppressing chaos is a challenging problem. In this paper, we show that chaos can be enhanced by the Allee effect. More specifically, we show by means of computer simulations that in a time-continuous predator-prey system with the Allee effect the temporal population oscillations can become chaotic even when the spatial distribution of the species remains regular. By contrast, in a similar system without the Allee effect, regular species distribution corresponds to periodic/quasi-periodic oscillations. We investigate the routes to chaos and show that in the spatially regular predator-prey system with the Allee effect, chaos appears as a result of series of period-doubling bifurcations. We also show that this system exhibits period-locking behaviour: a small variation of parameters can lead to alternating regular and chaotic dynamics. PMID:15306340

  18. The population dynamics of pike, Esox lucius , and perch, Perca fluviatilis , in a simple predator-prey system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James W. Treasurer; Roger Owen; Eric Bowers

    1992-01-01

    The population dynamics and predator-prey relationship of pike, Esox lucius, and perch, Perca fluviatilis, were examined in simple fish communities in two adjacent shallow lakes, Lochs Kinord and Davan, Deeside, Scotland. Few perch survive to age 3 but Z is low for fish > 3 years and perch live up to 17 years. Population fecundity remained relatively high and constant

  19. Global stability of stage-structured predator-prey models with Beddington-DeAngelis functional response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Meng; Wang, Ke

    2011-09-01

    Two stage-structured predator-prey systems with Beddington-DeAngelis functional response are proposed. The first one is deterministic. The Second one takes the random perturbation into account. For each system, sufficient conditions for global asymptotic stability are established. Some simulation figures are introduced to support the analytical findings.

  20. Dynamics of a predator-prey model with Allee effect and prey group defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Khairul

    2015-02-01

    Dynamical properties of a Gauss type of planar predator-prey system with Allee effect and non-monotonic response function are discussed. We are interested in persistent features lying in the first quadrant, which amount to structurally stable phase portraits. We show that all positive solutions are uniformly bounded. It is also proved that the system has at most two equilibria in the interior of the first quadrant and can exhibit interesting bifurcation phenomena, including Bogdanov-Takens, Hopf, transcritical and saddle-node bifurcations. The system may have a stable periodic orbit, or a homoclinic loop, or a heteroclinic connection, a saddle point, or a stable focus, depending on parameter values. Biologically, both populations may survive for certain values of parameters. Computer simulations are also given in support of the conclusions.

  1. Analysis of a predator-prey model with Holling II functional response concerning impulsive control strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing; Teng, Zhidong; Chen, Lansun

    2006-08-01

    According to biological and chemical control strategy for pest control, we investigate the dynamic behavior of a Holling II functional response predator-prey system concerning impulsive control strategy-periodic releasing natural enemies and spraying pesticide at different fixed times. By using Floquet theorem and small amplitude perturbation method, we prove that there exists a stable pest-eradication periodic solution when the impulsive period is less than some critical value. Further, the condition for the permanence of the system is also given. Numerical results show that the system we consider can take on various kinds of periodic fluctuations and several types of attractor coexistence and is dominated by periodic, quasiperiodic and chaotic solutions, which implies that the presence of pulses makes the dynamic behavior more complex. Finally, we conclude that our impulsive control strategy is more effective than the classical one if we take chemical control efficiently.

  2. Enhanced understanding of predator-prey relationships using molecular methods to identify predator species, individual and sex.

    PubMed

    Mumma, Matthew A; Soulliere, Colleen E; Mahoney, Shane P; Waits, Lisette P

    2014-01-01

    Predator species identification is an important step in understanding predator-prey interactions, but predator identifications using kill site observations are often unreliable. We used molecular tools to analyse predator saliva, scat and hair from caribou calf kills in Newfoundland, Canada to identify the predator species, individual and sex. We sampled DNA from 32 carcasses using cotton swabs to collect predator saliva. We used fragment length analysis and sequencing of mitochondrial DNA to distinguish between coyote, black bear, Canada lynx and red fox and used nuclear DNA microsatellite analysis to identify individuals. We compared predator species detected using molecular tools to those assigned via field observations at each kill. We identified a predator species at 94% of carcasses using molecular methods, while observational methods assigned a predator species to 62.5% of kills. Molecular methods attributed 66.7% of kills to coyote and 33.3% to black bear, while observations assigned 40%, 45%, 10% and 5% to coyote, bear, lynx and fox, respectively. Individual identification was successful at 70% of kills where a predator species was identified. Only one individual was identified at each kill, but some individuals were found at multiple kills. Predator sex was predominantly male. We demonstrate the first large-scale evaluation of predator species, individual and sex identification using molecular techniques to extract DNA from swabs of wild prey carcasses. Our results indicate that kill site swabs (i) can be highly successful in identifying the predator species and individual responsible; and (ii) serve to inform and complement traditional methods. PMID:23957886

  3. A Comparison of the Seasonal Movements of Tiger Sharks and Green Turtles Provides Insight into Their Predator-Prey Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Richard; Thums, Michele; Bell, Ian; Meekan, Mark G.; Stevens, John D.; Barnett, Adam

    2012-01-01

    During the reproductive season, sea turtles use a restricted area in the vicinity of their nesting beaches, making them vulnerable to predation. At Raine Island (Australia), the highest density green turtle Chelonia mydas rookery in the world, tiger sharks Galeocerdo cuvier have been observed to feed on green turtles, and it has been suggested that they may specialise on such air-breathing prey. However there is little information with which to examine this hypothesis. We compared the spatial and temporal components of movement behaviour of these two potentially interacting species in order to provide insight into the predator-prey relationship. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that tiger shark movements are more concentrated at Raine Island during the green turtle nesting season than outside the turtle nesting season when turtles are not concentrated at Raine Island. Turtles showed area-restricted search behaviour around Raine Island for ?3–4 months during the nesting period (November–February). This was followed by direct movement (transit) to putative foraging grounds mostly in the Torres Straight where they switched to area-restricted search mode again, and remained resident for the remainder of the deployment (53–304 days). In contrast, tiger sharks displayed high spatial and temporal variation in movement behaviour which was not closely linked to the movement behaviour of green turtles or recognised turtle foraging grounds. On average, tiger sharks were concentrated around Raine Island throughout the year. While information on diet is required to determine whether tiger sharks are turtle specialists our results support the hypothesis that they target this predictable and plentiful prey during turtle nesting season, but they might not focus on this less predictable food source outside the nesting season. PMID:23284819

  4. A comparison of the seasonal movements of tiger sharks and green turtles provides insight into their predator-prey relationship.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Richard; Thums, Michele; Bell, Ian; Meekan, Mark G; Stevens, John D; Barnett, Adam

    2012-01-01

    During the reproductive season, sea turtles use a restricted area in the vicinity of their nesting beaches, making them vulnerable to predation. At Raine Island (Australia), the highest density green turtle Chelonia mydas rookery in the world, tiger sharks Galeocerdo cuvier have been observed to feed on green turtles, and it has been suggested that they may specialise on such air-breathing prey. However there is little information with which to examine this hypothesis. We compared the spatial and temporal components of movement behaviour of these two potentially interacting species in order to provide insight into the predator-prey relationship. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that tiger shark movements are more concentrated at Raine Island during the green turtle nesting season than outside the turtle nesting season when turtles are not concentrated at Raine Island. Turtles showed area-restricted search behaviour around Raine Island for ?3-4 months during the nesting period (November-February). This was followed by direct movement (transit) to putative foraging grounds mostly in the Torres Straight where they switched to area-restricted search mode again, and remained resident for the remainder of the deployment (53-304 days). In contrast, tiger sharks displayed high spatial and temporal variation in movement behaviour which was not closely linked to the movement behaviour of green turtles or recognised turtle foraging grounds. On average, tiger sharks were concentrated around Raine Island throughout the year. While information on diet is required to determine whether tiger sharks are turtle specialists our results support the hypothesis that they target this predictable and plentiful prey during turtle nesting season, but they might not focus on this less predictable food source outside the nesting season. PMID:23284819

  5. Inconstancy in predator/prey ratios in Quaternary large mammal communities of Italy, with an appraisal of mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raia, Pasquale; Meloro, Carlo; Barbera, Carmela

    2007-03-01

    Constancy in predator/prey ratio (PPR) is a controversial issue in ecological research. Published reports support both constancy and inconstancy of the ratio in animal communities. Only a few studies, however, specifically address its course through time. Here we study the course of predator/prey ratio in communities of large Plio-Pleistocene mammals in Italy. After controlling for taphonomic biases, we find strong support for PPR inconstancy through time. Extinction, dispersal events, and differences in body size trends between predators and their prey were found to affect the ratio, which was distributed almost bimodally. We suggest that this stepwise dynamic in PPR indicates changes in ecosystem functioning. Prey richness was controlled by predation when PPR was high and by resources when PPR was low.

  6. Differential effects of mercury on activity and swimming endurance in a model aquatic predator-prey system

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, M.J.; Carlson, J.K.; Benson, W.H. [Univ. of Mississippi, University, MS (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In addition to direct effects of contaminants on organisms, populations and communities, there may also be indirect or secondary effects related to altered behavior. This study examined the effects of mercury exposure on locomotory behavior in a model predator-prey system of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). At both low and high mercury concentrations, there was a significant effect of exposure on unforced activity and swimming endurance in fathead minnows. At all tested mercury concentrations, activity and endurance also were both positively correlated to body length. However, largemouth bass unforced activity and swimming endurance were not affected by exposure to low mercury concentrations. In light of these differential locomotory effects at environmentally relevant mercury concentrations, the potential impact on aquatic predator-prey systems will be discussed.

  7. Plant strategies of manipulating predatorprey interactions through allelochemicals: Prospects for application in pest control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcel Dicke; Maurice W. Sabelis; Junji Takabayashi; Jan Bruin; Maarten A. Posthumus

    1990-01-01

    To understand the role of allelochemicals in predator-prey interactions it is not sufficient to study the behavioral responses of predator and prey. One should elucidate the origin of the allelochemicals and be aware that it may be located at another trophic level. These aspects are reviewed for predator-prey interactions in general and illustrated in detail for interactions between predatory mites

  8. Shedding light on microbial predator-prey population dynamics using a quantitative bioluminescence assay.

    PubMed

    Im, Hansol; Kim, Dasol; Ghim, Cheol-Min; Mitchell, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the dynamics of predation by Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD 100. Predation tests with two different bioluminescent strains of Escherichia coli, one expressing a heat-labile bacterial luciferase and the other a heat-stable form, showed near identical losses from both, indicating that protein expression and stability are not responsible for the "shutting-off" of the prey bioluminescence (BL). Furthermore, it was found that the loss in the prey BL was not proportional with the predator-to-prey ratio (PPR), with significantly greater losses seen as this value was increased. This suggests that other factors also play a role in lowering the prey BL. The loss in BL, however, was very consistent within nine independent experiments to the point that we were able to reliably estimate the predator numbers within only 1 h when present at a PPR of 6 or higher, Using a fluorescent prey, we found that premature lysis of the prey occurs at a significant level and was more prominent as the PPR ratio increased. Based upon the supernatant fluorescent signal, even a relatively low PPR of 10-20 led to approximately 5% of the prey population being prematurely lysed within 1 h, while a PPR of 90 led to nearly 15% lysis. Consequently, we developed a modified Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model that accounted for this lysis and is able to reliably estimate the prey and bdelloplast populations for a wide range of PPRs. PMID:24272279

  9. Predator-prey reversal: a possible mechanism for ecosystem hysteresis in the North Sea?

    PubMed

    Fauchald, Per

    2010-08-01

    Removal of large predatory fishes from marine ecosystems has resulted in persistent ecosystem shifts, with collapsed predator populations and super-abundant prey populations. One explanation for these shifts is reversals of predator-prey roles that generate internal feedbacks in the ecosystems. Pelagic forage fish are often predators and competitors to the young life stages of their larger fish predators. I show that cod recruitment in the North Sea has been negatively related to the spawning-stock biomass of herring for the last 44 years. Herring, together with the abundance of Calanus finmarchicus, the major food for cod larvae, were the main predictors of cod recruitment. These predictors were of equivalent importance, worked additively, and explained different parts of the dynamics in cod recruitment. I suggest that intensive harvesting of cod has released herring from predator control, and that a large population of herring suppresses cod recruitment through predation on eggs and larvae. This feedback mechanism can promote alternative stable states and therefore cause hysteresis to occur under changing conditions; however, harvesting of herring might at present prevent a shift in the ecosystem to a herring-dominated state. PMID:20836439

  10. Transmission Dynamics of Resistant Bacteria in a Predator-Prey System

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xubin; Pan, Qiuhui

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact on human health caused by the addition of antibiotics in the feed of food animals. We use the established transmission rule of resistant bacteria and combine it with a predator-prey system to determine a differential equations model. The equations have three steady equilibrium points corresponding to three population dynamics states under the influence of resistant bacteria. In order to quantitatively analyze the stability of the equilibrium points, we focused on the basic reproduction numbers. Then, both the local and global stability of the equilibrium points were quantitatively analyzed by using essential mathematical methods. Numerical results are provided to relate our model properties to some interesting biological cases. Finally, we discuss the effect of the two main parameters of the model, the proportion of antibiotics added to feed and the predation rate, and estimate the human health impacts related to the amount of feed antibiotics used. We further propose an approach for the prevention of the large-scale spread of resistant bacteria and illustrate the necessity of controlling the amount of in-feed antibiotics used.

  11. A Bayesian estimation of a stochastic predator-prey model of economic fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibeh, Ghassan; Luchinsky, Dmitry G.; Luchinskaya, Daria D.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we develop a Bayesian framework for the empirical estimation of the parameters of one of the best known nonlinear models of the business cycle: The Marx-inspired model of a growth cycle introduced by R. M. Goodwin. The model predicts a series of closed cycles representing the dynamics of labor's share and the employment rate in the capitalist economy. The Bayesian framework is used to empirically estimate a modified Goodwin model. The original model is extended in two ways. First, we allow for exogenous periodic variations of the otherwise steady growth rates of the labor force and productivity per worker. Second, we allow for stochastic variations of those parameters. The resultant modified Goodwin model is a stochastic predator-prey model with periodic forcing. The model is then estimated using a newly developed Bayesian estimation method on data sets representing growth cycles in France and Italy during the years 1960-2005. Results show that inference of the parameters of the stochastic Goodwin model can be achieved. The comparison of the dynamics of the Goodwin model with the inferred values of parameters demonstrates quantitative agreement with the growth cycle empirical data.

  12. Colored-noise-induced Hopf bifurcations in predator-prey communities.

    PubMed

    Mankin, Romi; Laas, Tõnu; Sauga, Ako; Ainsaar, Ain; Reiter, Eerik

    2006-08-01

    A broad class of (N+1) -species ratio-dependent predator-prey stochastic models, which consist of one predator population and N prey populations, is considered. The effect of a fluctuating environment on the carrying capacities of prey populations is taken into account as colored noise. In the framework of the mean-field theory, approximate self-consistency equations for prey-populations mean density and for predator-population density are derived (to the first order in the noise variance). In some cases, the mean field exhibits Hopf bifurcations as a function of noise correlation time. The corresponding transitions are found to be reentrant, e.g., the periodic orbit appears above a critical value of the noise correlation time, but disappears again at a higher value of the noise correlation time. The nonmonotonous dependence of the critical control parameter on the noise correlation time is found, and the conditions for the occurrence of Hopf bifurcations are presented. Our results provide a possible scenario for environmental-fluctuations-induced transitions between the oscillatory regime and equilibrium state of population sizes observed in nature. PMID:17025387

  13. Talking helps: evolving communicating agents for the predator-prey pursuit problem.

    PubMed

    Jim, K C; Giles, C L

    2000-01-01

    We analyze a general model of multi-agent communication in which all agents communicate simultaneously to a message board. A genetic algorithm is used to evolve multi-agent languages for the predator agents in a version of the predator-prey pursuit problem. We show that the resulting behavior of the communicating multi-agent system is equivalent to that of a Mealy finite state machine whose states are determined by the agents' usage of the evolved language. Simulations show that the evolution of a communication language improves the performance of the predators. Increasing the language size (and thus increasing the number of possible states in the Mealy machine) improves the performance even further. Furthermore, the evolved communicating predators perform significantly better than all previous work on similar prey. We introduce a method for incrementally increasing the language size, which results in an effective coarse-to-fine search that significantly reduces the evolution time required to find a solution. We present some observations on the effects of language size, experimental setup, and prey difficulty on the evolved Mealy machines. In particular, we observe that the start state is often revisited, and incrementally increasing the language size results in smaller Mealy machines. Finally, a simple rule is derived that provides a pessimistic estimate on the minimum language size that should be used for any multi-agent problem. PMID:11224918

  14. Harvesting creates ecological traps: consequences of invisible mortality risks in predator-prey metacommunities.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Peter A; Ruokolainen, Lasse; Shuter, Brian J; McCann, Kevin S

    2012-02-01

    Models of two-patch predator-prey metacommunities are used to explore how the global predator population changes in response to additional mortality in one of the patches. This could describe the dynamics of a predator in an environment that includes a refuge area where that predator is protected and a spatially distinct ("risky") area where it is harvested. The predator's movement is based on its perceived fitness in the two patches, but the risk from the additional mortality is potentially undetectable; this often occurs when the mortality is from human harvesting or from a novel type of top predator. Increases in undetected mortality in the risky area can produce an abrupt collapse of either the refuge population or of the entire predator population when the mortality rate exceeds a threshold level. This is due to the attraction of the risky patch, which has abundant prey due to its high predator mortality. Extinction of the refuge predator population does not occur when the refuge patch has a higher maximum per capita predator growth rate than the exploited patch because the refuge is then more attractive when the predator is rare. The possibility of abrupt extinction of one or both patches from high densities in response to a small increase in harvest is often associated with alternative states. In such cases, large reductions in mortality may be needed to avoid extinction in a collapsing predator population, or to reestablish an extinct population. Our analysis provides a potential explanation for sudden collapses of harvested populations, and it argues for more consideration of adaptive movement in designing protected areas. PMID:22624310

  15. Discovering the Power of Individual-Based Modelling in Teaching and Learning: The Study of a Predator-Prey System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginovart, Marta

    2014-08-01

    The general aim is to promote the use of individual-based models (biological agent-based models) in teaching and learning contexts in life sciences and to make their progressive incorporation into academic curricula easier, complementing other existing modelling strategies more frequently used in the classroom. Modelling activities for the study of a predator-prey system for a mathematics classroom in the first year of an undergraduate program in biosystems engineering have been designed and implemented. These activities were designed to put two modelling approaches side by side, an individual-based model and a set of ordinary differential equations. In order to organize and display this, a system with wolves and sheep in a confined domain was considered and studied. With the teaching material elaborated and a computer to perform the numerical resolutions involved and the corresponding individual-based simulations, the students answered questions and completed exercises to achieve the learning goals set. Students' responses regarding the modelling of biological systems and these two distinct methodologies applied to the study of a predator-prey system were collected via questionnaires, open-ended queries and face-to-face dialogues. Taking into account the positive responses of the students when they were doing these activities, it was clear that using a discrete individual-based model to deal with a predator-prey system jointly with a set of ordinary differential equations enriches the understanding of the modelling process, adds new insights and opens novel perspectives of what can be done with computational models versus other models. The complementary views given by the two modelling approaches were very well assessed by students.

  16. Dynamic of a delayed predator-prey model with birth pulse and impulsive harvesting in a polluted environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Jia, Jianwen

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a delayed predator-prey model with birth pulse and impulsive harvesting in a polluted environment. Existence conditions of the predator-extinction periodic solution are derived by developing the discrete dynamical system, which is determined by the stroboscopic map. Further, we discuss the global attractivity of predator-extinction periodic solution and permanence of the system, and obtain the threshold conditions. The results provide a dependable theoretical strategies to protect population from extinction in a polluted environment. Finally, the numerical simulations are presented for verifying the theoretical conclusions.

  17. Modelling Spatial Interactions in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis using the Calculus of Wrapped Compartments

    E-print Network

    Calcagno, Cristina; Damiani, Ferruccio; Drocco, Maurizio; Sciacca, Eva; Spinella, Salvatore; Troina, Angelo; 10.4204/EPTCS.67.3

    2011-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) is the most wide-spread plant-fungus symbiosis on earth. Investigating this kind of symbiosis is considered one of the most promising ways to develop methods to nurture plants in more natural manners, avoiding the complex chemical productions used nowadays to produce artificial fertilizers. In previous work we used the Calculus of Wrapped Compartments (CWC) to investigate different phases of the AM symbiosis. In this paper, we continue this line of research by modelling the colonisation of the plant root cells by the fungal hyphae spreading in the soil. This study requires the description of some spatial interaction. Although CWC has no explicit feature modelling a spatial geometry, the compartment labelling feature can be effectively exploited to define a discrete surface topology outlining the relevant sectors which determine the spatial properties of the system under consideration. Different situations and interesting spatial properties can be modelled and analysed in such a ligh...

  18. A multispecies statistical age-structured model to assess predator-prey balance: application to an intensively managed Lake Michigan pelagic fish community

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsehaye, Iyob; Jones, Michael L.; Bence, James R.; Brenden, Travis O.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Warner, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Using a Bayesian model fitting approach, we developed a multispecies statistical catch-at-age model to assess trade-offs between predatory demands and prey productivities, focusing on the Lake Michigan pelagic fish community. We assessed these trade-offs in terms of predation mortalities and productivities of alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) and functional responses of salmonines. Our predation mortality estimates suggest that salmonine consumption has been a major driver of historical fluctuations in prey abundance, with sharp declines in alewife abundance in the 1980s and 2000s coinciding with estimated increases in predation mortalities. While Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were food limited during periods of low alewife abundance, other salmonines appeared to maintain a (near) maximum per-predator consumption across all observed prey densities, suggesting that feedback mechanisms are unlikely to help maintain a balance between predator consumption and prey productivity in Lake Michigan. This study demonstrates that a multispecies modeling approach that combines stock assessment methods with explicit consideration of predator–prey interactions could provide the basis for tactical decision-making from a broader ecosystem perspective.

  19. Strain-specific functional and numerical responses are required to evaluate impacts on predator-prey dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhou; Lowe, Chris D; Crowther, Will; Fenton, Andy; Watts, Phillip C; Montagnes, David J S

    2013-02-01

    We use strains recently collected from the field to establish cultures; then, through laboratory studies we investigate how among strain variation in protozoan ingestion and growth rates influences population dynamics and intraspecific competition. We focused on the impact of changing temperature because of its well-established effects on protozoan rates and its ecological relevance, from daily fluctuations to climate change. We show, first, that there is considerable inter-strain variability in thermal sensitivity of maximum growth rate, revealing distinct differences among multiple strains of our model species Oxyrrhis marina. We then intensively examined two representative strains that exhibit distinctly different thermal responses and parameterised the influence of temperature on their functional and numerical responses. Finally, we assessed how these responses alter predator-prey population dynamics. We do this first considering a standard approach, which assumes that functional and numerical responses are directly coupled, and then compare these results with a novel framework that incorporates both functional and numerical responses in a fully parameterised model. We conclude that: (i) including functional diversity of protozoa at the sub-species level will alter model predictions and (ii) including directly measured, independent functional and numerical responses in a model can provide a more realistic account of predator-prey dynamics. PMID:23151643

  20. Light-Limitation on Predator-Prey Interactions: Consequences for Metabolism and Locomotion of

    E-print Network

    Thuesen, Erik V.

    -Sea Cephalopods BRAD A. SEIBEL1, *, ERIK V. THUESEN2 , AND JAMES J. CHILDRESS3 1 Rosenstiel School of Marine leading to modern cephalopods is poorly known due to a limited fossil record of soft-bodied cephalopods. There has, however, been much speculation based on the better fossil record of the shelled cephalopods from

  1. Lagrangian studies of animal swimming and aquatic predator-prey interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Dabiri

    2008-01-01

    Experimental studies of animal swimming have been traditionally based on an Eulerian perspective in which the time-dependent flow field surrounding the animal is measured at fixed locations in space. The measured velocity field and its derivatives (e.g. vorticity) can, in principle, be used to deduce the forces, energetics, and fluid transport associated with locomotion in real fluids. However, achieving a

  2. EFFECT OF MIREX ON PREDATOR-PREY INTERACTION IN AN EXPERIMENTAL ESTUARINE ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tests of 14- to 16-days duration were conducted to determine the distribution and sublethal effects of mirex in an experimental estuarine ecosystem. The insecticide was translocated from water at concentrations of 0.011 to 0.13 microgram/liter to sand, plant, and animal component...

  3. PREDATOR-PREY INTERACTIONS BETWEEN EAGLES AND CACKLING CANADA AND ROSS' GEESE DURING WINTER IN CALIFORNIA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SCOTT R. MCWILLIAMS; JON P. DUNN; DENNIS G. RAVELING

    1994-01-01

    Cackling Geese (Brunta canadensis minima) were preyed on heavily in northeastern California by Golden Eagles (Aquila chysaetos) and less commonly by Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus Zeucocephalus) in 19851990. Eagle predation on Cackling Geese was minimal in other wintering locations in California. In the Klamath Basin, eagles killed Cackling Geese most frequently soon (

  4. Effect of an abiotic disturbance on a lotic predator-prey interaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandra J. Walde

    1986-01-01

    A model derived from marine research, and recently applied to stream communities, suggests that community structure is more likely to be influenced by predators in benign versus harsh abiotic regimes. Experiments were conducted to determine if increasing the harshness of a particular regime would alter the impact of a stream invertebrate predator on prey densities in field enclosures. Density of

  5. Time-related predator/prey interactions between birds and fish in a northern Swedish river.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, K

    1989-03-01

    Seasonal and diel activity patterns of mergansers, gulls, and terns along a river in northern Sweden were documented, as were those of their fish prey. The seasonal and diel activity patterns of goosandersMergus merganser and gulls (Larus canus, L. argentatus, andL. fuscus) were closely related to that of the river lampreyLampetra fluviatilis. During the peak spawning of the river lamprey, birds showed a nocturnal peak in fishing activity. During the summer solstice, birds were active for 24 h. The activity patterns of red-breasted merganserMergus serrator, ternsSterna spp., and three-spined sticklebacksGasterosteus aculeatus were also similar. Activity pattern of the prey apparently influenced breeding time, diel activity and foraging area of the twoMergus species. Social relations between gulls probably corrdinated their peak in fishing, which coincided with the time lampreys were most efficiently exploited. PMID:23494338

  6. Time-related predator\\/prey interactions between birds and fish in a northern Swedish river

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kjell SjiJberg

    1989-01-01

    Seasonal and diel activity patterns of mergansers, gulls, and terns along a river in northern Sweden were documented, as were those of their fish prey. The seasonal and diel activity patterns of goosandersMergus merganser and gulls (Larus canus, L. argentatus, andL. fuscus) were closely related to that of the river lampreyLampetra fluviatilis. During the peak spawning of the river lamprey,

  7. Effects of PredatorPrey Interactions and Benthic Habitat Complexity on Selectivity of a Foraging Generalist

    E-print Network

    compared the prey selection of yellow perch (230­311 mm) foraging on common Great Lakes prey species--northern crayfish Orconectes virilis, round gobies Neogobius melanostomus, and alewives Alosa pseudoharengus in simple benthic habitat but selection for round gobies and against crayfish in complex habitat. Predator

  8. Hypoxic refuges, predator-prey interactions and habitat selection by fishes.

    PubMed

    Hedges, K J; Abrahams, M V

    2015-01-01

    Localized hypoxic habitats were created in Delta Marsh, Manitoba, Canada to determine the potential of regions of moderate hypoxia to act as refuges for forage fishes from piscine predators. Minnow traps and giving-up density (GUD) plates (plexiglas plates covered with trout crumble and fine gravel) were used to assess habitat use and perceived habitat quality for forage fishes, respectively, while passive integrated transponder tags provided data on habitat use by predator species to assess the level of predation risk. Data were collected both before and after a hypoxia manipulation (2-3?mg?l(-1) dissolved oxygen, DO) to create a before-after control-effect style experiment. Fathead minnows Pimephales promelas were more abundant and consumed more food from GUD plates in hypoxic bays after the DO manipulation, indicating hypoxic locations were perceived as higher quality, lower-risk habitats. The frequency of predator visits was not consistently affected. The duration of visits, and therefore the total time spent in these habitats, however, was significantly shorter. These predator data, combined with the prey information, are consistent with the hypothesis that hypoxic regions function as predator refuges. The refuge effect is not the result of predator exclusion, however; instead predators are rendered less capable of foraging and pose less of a threat in hypoxic locations. PMID:25557430

  9. PREDATOR-PREY (VOLE-CRICKET) INTERACTIONS: THE EFFECTS OF WOOD PRESERVATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of loss of crickets (Acheta domestica), with and without the presence of an adventitious predator, the gray-tailed vole (Microtus canicaudus), has been studied in Terrestrial Microcosm Chambers (TMC-II) treated with pine stakes impregnated with creosote, bis(tri-n-butylt...

  10. Predator-prey Interactions of Fishes in Two Nebraska Sandhill Lakes Timothy J. DeBates

    E-print Network

    Lakes Timothy J. DeBates 20 February 2003 Although largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and northern that largemouth bass relative abundance was positively correlated with bluegill and yellow perch proportional, largemouth bass, and northern pike in Pelican and West Long lakes, Nebraska, in 2001. Although bluegill

  11. Persistence and global stability of Bazykin predator-prey model with Beddington-DeAngelis response function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwardi, Sahabuddin; Haque, Mainul; Mandal, Prashanta Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In this article, a predator-prey model of Beddington-DeAngelis type with discrete delay is proposed and analyzed. The essential mathematical features of the proposed model are investigated in terms of local, global analysis and bifurcation theory. By analyzing the associated characteristic equation, it is found that the Hopf bifurcation occurs when the delay parameter ? crosses some critical values. In this article, the classical Bazykin's model is modified with Beddington-DeAngelis functional response. The parametric space under which the system enters into Hopf bifurcation for both delay and non-delay cases are investigated. Global stability results are obtained by constructing suitable Lyapunov functions for both the cases. We also derive the explicit formulae for determining the stability, direction and other properties of bifurcating periodic solutions by using normal form and central manifold theory. Our analytical findings are supported by numerical simulations. Biological implication of the analytical findings are discussed in the conclusion section.

  12. A predator-prey model with a holling type I functional response including a predator mutual interference

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seo, G.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    The most widely used functional response in describing predator-prey relationships is the Holling type II functional response, where per capita predation is a smooth, increasing, and saturating function of prey density. Beddington and DeAngelis modified the Holling type II response to include interference of predators that increases with predator density. Here we introduce a predator-interference term into a Holling type I functional response. We explain the ecological rationale for the response and note that the phase plane configuration of the predator and prey isoclines differs greatly from that of the Beddington-DeAngelis response; for example, in having three possible interior equilibria rather than one. In fact, this new functional response seems to be quite unique. We used analytical and numerical methods to show that the resulting system shows a much richer dynamical behavior than the Beddington-DeAngelis response, or other typically used functional responses. For example, cyclic-fold, saddle-fold, homoclinic saddle connection, and multiple crossing bifurcations can all occur. We then use a smooth approximation to the Holling type I functional response with predator mutual interference to show that these dynamical properties do not result from the lack of smoothness, but rather from subtle differences in the functional responses. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  13. The Helmholtz Theorem for the Lotka-Volterra Equation, the Extended Conservation Relation, and Stochastic Predator-Prey Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Yi-An Ma; Hong Qian

    2014-05-16

    We carry out a mathematical analysis, \\`{a} la Helmholtz's and Boltzmann's 1884 studies of monocyclic Newtonian mechanics, for the Lotka-Volterra (LV) equation exhibiting oscillatory predator-prey dynamics. One of the important features of the latter system, absent in the classical mechanical model, is a natural stochastic dynamic formulation of which the LV equation is the infinite population limit. The invariant density for the stochastic dynamics plays a central role in the deterministic LV dynamics. We show how the conservation law along a single trajectory can be extended to incorporate both variations in model parameter $\\alpha$ and in the initial conditions: Helmholtz's theorem establishes a broadly valid conservation law in a class of ecological dynamics. We analyze the relationships among mean ecological activeness $\\theta$, quantities characterizing dynamic ranges of populations $\\mathcal{A}$ and $\\alpha$, and the ecological force $F_{\\alpha}$. The analysis identifies an entire orbit as a stationary ecology, and establishes the notion of an "equation of ecological state". Studies of the stochastic dynamics with finite populations show the LV equation as the rubust, fast cyclic underlying behavior. The mathematical narrative provides a novel way of capturing long-term ecological dynamical behavior with an emergent conservative ecology.

  14. Food-Web Structure in Relation to Environmental Gradients and Predator-Prey Ratios in Tank-Bromeliad Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Dézerald, Olivier; Leroy, Céline; Corbara, Bruno; Carrias, Jean-François; Pélozuelo, Laurent; Dejean, Alain; Céréghino, Régis

    2013-01-01

    Little is known of how linkage patterns between species change along environmental gradients. The small, spatially discrete food webs inhabiting tank-bromeliads provide an excellent opportunity to analyse patterns of community diversity and food-web topology (connectance, linkage density, nestedness) in relation to key environmental variables (habitat size, detrital resource, incident radiation) and predators:prey ratios. We sampled 365 bromeliads in a wide range of understorey environments in French Guiana and used gut contents of invertebrates to draw the corresponding 365 connectance webs. At the bromeliad scale, habitat size (water volume) determined the number of species that constitute food-web nodes, the proportion of predators, and food-web topology. The number of species as well as the proportion of predators within bromeliads declined from open to forested habitats, where the volume of water collected by bromeliads was generally lower because of rainfall interception by the canopy. A core group of microorganisms and generalist detritivores remained relatively constant across environments. This suggests that (i) a highly-connected core ensures food-web stability and key ecosystem functions across environments, and (ii) larger deviations in food-web structures can be expected following disturbance if detritivores share traits that determine responses to environmental changes. While linkage density and nestedness were lower in bromeliads in the forest than in open areas, experiments are needed to confirm a trend for lower food-web stability in the understorey of primary forests. PMID:23977128

  15. From Cues to Signals: Evolution of Interspecific Communication via Aposematism and Mimicry in a Predator-Prey System

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Kenna D. S.; Goldman, Brian W.; Dworkin, Ian; Bryson, David M.; Wagner, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    Current theory suggests that many signaling systems evolved from preexisting cues. In aposematic systems, prey warning signals benefit both predator and prey. When the signal is highly beneficial, a third species often evolves to mimic the toxic species, exploiting the signaling system for its own protection. We investigated the evolutionary dynamics of predator cue utilization and prey signaling in a digital predator-prey system in which prey could evolve to alter their appearance to mimic poison-free or poisonous prey. In predators, we observed rapid evolution of cue recognition (i.e. active behavioral responses) when presented with sufficiently poisonous prey. In addition, active signaling (i.e. mimicry) evolved in prey under all conditions that led to cue utilization. Thus we show that despite imperfect and dishonest signaling, given a high cost of consuming poisonous prey, complex systems of interspecific communication can evolve via predator cue recognition and prey signal manipulation. This provides evidence supporting hypotheses that cues may serve as stepping-stones in the evolution of more advanced communication and signaling systems that incorporate information about the environment. PMID:24614755

  16. From cues to signals: evolution of interspecific communication via aposematism and mimicry in a predator-prey system.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Kenna D S; Goldman, Brian W; Dworkin, Ian; Bryson, David M; Wagner, Aaron P

    2014-01-01

    Current theory suggests that many signaling systems evolved from preexisting cues. In aposematic systems, prey warning signals benefit both predator and prey. When the signal is highly beneficial, a third species often evolves to mimic the toxic species, exploiting the signaling system for its own protection. We investigated the evolutionary dynamics of predator cue utilization and prey signaling in a digital predator-prey system in which prey could evolve to alter their appearance to mimic poison-free or poisonous prey. In predators, we observed rapid evolution of cue recognition (i.e. active behavioral responses) when presented with sufficiently poisonous prey. In addition, active signaling (i.e. mimicry) evolved in prey under all conditions that led to cue utilization. Thus we show that despite imperfect and dishonest signaling, given a high cost of consuming poisonous prey, complex systems of interspecific communication can evolve via predator cue recognition and prey signal manipulation. This provides evidence supporting hypotheses that cues may serve as stepping-stones in the evolution of more advanced communication and signaling systems that incorporate information about the environment. PMID:24614755

  17. Consequences of a refuge for the predator-prey dynamics of a wolf-elk system in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Joshua F; Hebblewhite, Mark; Bardsley, John

    2014-01-01

    Refugia can affect predator-prey dynamics via movements between refuge and non-refuge areas. We examine the influence of a refuge on population dynamics in a large mammal predator-prey system. Wolves (Canis lupus) have recolonized much of their former range in North America, and as a result, ungulate prey have exploited refugia to reduce predation risk with unknown impacts on wolf-prey dynamics. We examined the influence of a refuge on elk (Cervus elaphus) and wolf population dynamics in Banff National Park. Elk occupy the Banff townsite with little predation, whereas elk in the adjoining Bow Valley experience higher wolf predation. The Banff refuge may influence Bow Valley predator-prey dynamics through source-sink movements. To test this hypothesis, we used 26 years of wolf and elk population counts and the Delayed Rejection Adaptive Metropolis Markov chain Monte Carlo method to fit five predator-prey models: 1) with no source-sink movements, 2) with elk density-dependent dispersal from the refuge to the non-refuge, 3) with elk predation risk avoidance movements from the non-refuge to the refuge, 4) with differential movement rates between refuge and non-refuge, and 5) with short-term, source-sink wolf movements. Model 1 provided the best fit of the data, as measured by Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). In the top model, Banff and Bow Valley elk had median growth rates of 0.08 and 0.03 (95% credibility intervals [CIs]: 0.027-0.186 and 0.001-0.143), respectively, Banff had a median carrying capacity of 630 elk (95% CI: 471.9-2676.9), Bow Valley elk had a median wolf encounter rate of 0.02 (95% CI: 0.013-0.030), and wolves had a median death rate of 0.23 (95% CI: 0.146-0.335) and a median conversion efficiency of 0.07 (95% CI: 0.031-0.124). We found little evidence for potential source-sink movements influencing the predator-prey dynamics of this system. This result suggests that the refuge was isolated from the non-refuge. PMID:24670632

  18. Consequences of a Refuge for the Predator-Prey Dynamics of a Wolf-Elk System in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Joshua F.; Hebblewhite, Mark; Bardsley, John

    2014-01-01

    Refugia can affect predator-prey dynamics via movements between refuge and non-refuge areas. We examine the influence of a refuge on population dynamics in a large mammal predator-prey system. Wolves (Canis lupus) have recolonized much of their former range in North America, and as a result, ungulate prey have exploited refugia to reduce predation risk with unknown impacts on wolf-prey dynamics. We examined the influence of a refuge on elk (Cervus elaphus) and wolf population dynamics in Banff National Park. Elk occupy the Banff townsite with little predation, whereas elk in the adjoining Bow Valley experience higher wolf predation. The Banff refuge may influence Bow Valley predator-prey dynamics through source-sink movements. To test this hypothesis, we used 26 years of wolf and elk population counts and the Delayed Rejection Adaptive Metropolis Markov chain Monte Carlo method to fit five predator-prey models: 1) with no source-sink movements, 2) with elk density-dependent dispersal from the refuge to the non-refuge, 3) with elk predation risk avoidance movements from the non-refuge to the refuge, 4) with differential movement rates between refuge and non-refuge, and 5) with short-term, source-sink wolf movements. Model 1 provided the best fit of the data, as measured by Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). In the top model, Banff and Bow Valley elk had median growth rates of 0.08 and 0.03 (95% credibility intervals [CIs]: 0.027–0.186 and 0.001–0.143), respectively, Banff had a median carrying capacity of 630 elk (95% CI: 471.9–2676.9), Bow Valley elk had a median wolf encounter rate of 0.02 (95% CI: 0.013–0.030), and wolves had a median death rate of 0.23 (95% CI: 0.146–0.335) and a median conversion efficiency of 0.07 (95% CI: 0.031–0.124). We found little evidence for potential source-sink movements influencing the predator-prey dynamics of this system. This result suggests that the refuge was isolated from the non-refuge. PMID:24670632

  19. Consequences of size structure in the prey for predator–prey dynamics: the composite functional response

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Volker H. W. Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Summary 1. Current formulations of functional responses assume that the prey is homogeneous and independent of intraspecific processes. Most prey populations consist of different coexisting size classes that often engage in asymmetrical intraspecific interactions, including cannibalism, which can lead to nonlinear interaction effects. This may be important as the size structure with the prey could alter the overall density-dependent predation

  20. The anatomy of predator–prey dynamics in a changing climate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CHRISTOPHER C. WILMERS; ERIC POST; ALAN HASTINGS

    2007-01-01

    Summary 1. Humans are increasingly influencing global climate and regional predator assem- blages, yet a mechanistic understanding of how climate and predation interact to affect fluctuations in prey populations is currently lacking. 2. Here we develop a modelling framework to explore the effects of different predation strategies on the response of age-structured prey populations to a changing climate. 3. We

  1. Turing patterns and apparent competition in predator-prey food webs on networks

    E-print Network

    Fernandes, Lucas D

    2012-01-01

    Reaction-diffusion systems may lead to the formation of steady state heterogeneous spatial patterns, known as Turing patterns. Their mathematical formulation is important for the study of pattern formation in general and play central roles in many fields of biology, such as ecology and morphogenesis. In the present study we focus on the role of Turing patterns in describing the abundance distribution of predator and prey species distributed in patches in a scale free network structure. We extend the original model proposed by Nakao and Mikhailov by considering food chains with several interacting pairs of preys and predators. We identify patterns of species distribution displaying high degrees of apparent competition driven by Turing instabilities. Our results provide further indication that differences in abundance distribution among patches may be, at least in part, due to self organized Turing patterns, and not necessarily to intrinsic environmental heterogeneity.

  2. Nonlinearities lead to qualitative differences in population dynamics of predator-prey systems.

    PubMed

    Ameixa, Olga M C C; Messelink, Gerben J; Kindlmann, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Since typically there are many predators feeding on most herbivores in natural communities, understanding multiple predator effects is critical for both community and applied ecology. Experiments of multiple predator effects on prey populations are extremely demanding, as the number of treatments and the amount of labour associated with these experiments increases exponentially with the number of species in question. Therefore, researchers tend to vary only presence/absence of the species and use only one (supposedly realistic) combination of their numbers in experiments. However, nonlinearities in density dependence, functional responses, interactions between natural enemies etc. are typical for such systems, and nonlinear models of population dynamics generally predict qualitatively different results, if initial absolute densities of the species studied differ, even if their relative densities are maintained. Therefore, testing combinations of natural enemies without varying their densities may not be sufficient. Here we test this prediction experimentally. We show that the population dynamics of a system consisting of 2 natural enemies (aphid predator Adalia bipunctata (L.), and aphid parasitoid, Aphidius colemani Viereck) and their shared prey (peach aphid, Myzus persicae Sulzer) are strongly affected by the absolute initial densities of the species in question. Even if their relative densities are kept constant, the natural enemy species or combination thereof that most effectively suppresses the prey may depend on the absolute initial densities used in the experiment. Future empirical studies of multiple predator - one prey interactions should therefore use a two-dimensional array of initial densities of the studied species. Varying only combinations of natural enemies without varying their densities is not sufficient and can lead to misleading results. PMID:23638107

  3. Nonlinearities Lead to Qualitative Differences in Population Dynamics of Predator-Prey Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ameixa, Olga M. C. C.; Messelink, Gerben J.; Kindlmann, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Since typically there are many predators feeding on most herbivores in natural communities, understanding multiple predator effects is critical for both community and applied ecology. Experiments of multiple predator effects on prey populations are extremely demanding, as the number of treatments and the amount of labour associated with these experiments increases exponentially with the number of species in question. Therefore, researchers tend to vary only presence/absence of the species and use only one (supposedly realistic) combination of their numbers in experiments. However, nonlinearities in density dependence, functional responses, interactions between natural enemies etc. are typical for such systems, and nonlinear models of population dynamics generally predict qualitatively different results, if initial absolute densities of the species studied differ, even if their relative densities are maintained. Therefore, testing combinations of natural enemies without varying their densities may not be sufficient. Here we test this prediction experimentally. We show that the population dynamics of a system consisting of 2 natural enemies (aphid predator Adalia bipunctata (L.), and aphid parasitoid, Aphidius colemani Viereck) and their shared prey (peach aphid, Myzus persicae Sulzer) are strongly affected by the absolute initial densities of the species in question. Even if their relative densities are kept constant, the natural enemy species or combination thereof that most effectively suppresses the prey may depend on the absolute initial densities used in the experiment. Future empirical studies of multiple predator – one prey interactions should therefore use a two-dimensional array of initial densities of the studied species. Varying only combinations of natural enemies without varying their densities is not sufficient and can lead to misleading results. PMID:23638107

  4. Temperature-altered predator-prey dynamics in freshwater ponds in Arctic Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culler, L. E.; Ayres, M.

    2011-12-01

    Temperature sets the pace of many biological processes including species interactions. Describing the response of terrestrial and aquatic habitats to climate warming therefore requires studies of cross-trophic level dynamics. I use freshwater pond ecosystems in Arctic Greenland to study how the thermal environment shapes interactions between predators and their prey. This system is of interest because warming trends are notable, freshwaters are responding rapidly and dynamically to changes in temperature, and the biology of freshwaters is intimately linked to the terrestrial environment. My focal species are the Arctic mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae, Aedes nigripes) and its invertebrate predator, a predaceous diving beetle (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae, Colymbetes dolabratus). Both species develop as larvae in snow-melt ponds in May and June. I used experimental and observational studies to test effects of temperature on larval mosquito growth rates and predation rates by C. dolabratus. Results indicate strong effects of temperature on growth rate and development time but weak effects of temperature on consumption of mosquitoes by their predators. Incorporation of measured temperature response functions into a mosquito demographic model will elucidate how mosquito population dynamics in Arctic Greenland may change with temperature. For example, warming increases growth rate and decreases development time of mosquito larvae, which shortens the time larvae are exposed to predation. Additionally, decreased development time leads to an earlier mosquito emergence, with potential consequences for the health of wildlife. Evaluation of this model will reveal the importance of considering cross-trophic level dynamics when predicting mosquito population response to warming. Future studies will address interesting properties emerging from modeling, such as how shorter development time affects adult size and fitness, and connecting results to terrestrial systems in Arctic Greenland.

  5. Man-Computer Symbiosis Through Interactive Graphics: A Survey and Identification of Critical Research Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoop, Patricia A.

    The purpose of this report was to determine the research areas that appear most critical to achieving man-computer symbiosis. An operational definition of man-computer symbiosis was developed by: (1) reviewing and summarizing what others have said about it, and (2) attempting to distinguish it from other types of man-computer relationships. From…

  6. Schoolyard Symbiosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allard, David W.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses different types of symbiosis--mutualism, commensalism, and parasitism--and examples of each type including lichens, legumes, mistletoe, and epiphytes. Describes how teachers can use these examples in the study of symbiosis which allows teachers to focus on many basic concepts in evolution, cell biology, ecology, and other fields of…

  7. Neo-Symbiosis: The Next Stage in the Evolution of Human Information Interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Douglas; Greitzer, Frank L.

    2008-12-01

    In his 1960 paper Man-Machine Symbiosis, Licklider predicted that human brains and computing machines will be coupled in a tight partnership that will think as no human brain has ever thought and process data in a way not approached by the information-handling machines we know today. Today we are on the threshold of resurrecting the vision of symbiosis. While Licklider’s original vision suggested a co-equal relationship, here we discuss an updated vision, neo-symbiosis, in which the human holds a superordinate position in an intelligent human-computer collaborative environment. This paper was originally published as a journal article and is being published as a chapter in an upcoming book series, Advances in Novel Approaches in Cognitive Informatics and Natural Intelligence.

  8. Long-range interactions and evolutionary stability in a predator-prey system Erik M. Rauch1,2

    E-print Network

    to the global mixing of species due to human intervention and to global transport of infectious disease. DOI: 10 to biological modeling repre- sent evolutionary and ecological systems using quantities av- eraged over space experience different local environments, they consume resources locally, and they travel distances which

  9. Linking predator-prey interactions with exposure to a trophically transmitted parasite using PCR-based analyses.

    PubMed

    Luong, Lien T; Chapman, Eric G; Harwood, James D; Hudson, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Parasite transmission is determined by the rate of contact between a susceptible host and an infective stage and susceptibility to infection given an exposure event. Attempts to measure levels of variation in exposure in natural populations can be especially challenging. The level of exposure to a major class of parasites, trophically transmitted parasites, can be estimated by investigating the host's feeding behaviour. Since the parasites rely on the ingestion of infective intermediate hosts for transmission, the potential for exposure to infection is inherently linked to the definitive host's feeding ecology. Here, we combined epidemiological data and molecular analyses (polymerase chain reaction) of the diet of the definitive host, the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus), to investigate temporal and individual heterogeneities in exposure to infection. Our results show that the consumption of cricket intermediate hosts accounted for much of the variation in infection; mice that had consumed crickets were four times more likely to become infected than animals that tested negative for cricket DNA. In particular, pregnant female hosts were three times more likely to consume crickets, which corresponded to a threefold increase in infection compared with nonpregnant females. Interestingly, males in breeding condition had a higher rate of infection even though breeding males were just as likely to test positive for cricket consumption as nonbreeding males. These results suggest that while heterogeneity in host diet served as a strong predictor of exposure risk, differential susceptibility to infection may also play a key role, particularly among male hosts. By combining PCR analyses with epidemiological data, we revealed temporal variation in exposure through prey consumption and identified potentially important individual heterogeneities in parasite transmission. PMID:23110593

  10. Chemical cues from multiple predator-prey interactions induce changes in behavior and growth of anuran larvae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Eklöv

    2000-01-01

    Chemical signals are used as information by prey to assess predation risk in their environment. To evaluate the effects of\\u000a multiple predators on prey growth, mediated by a change in prey activity, I exposed small and large bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) larvae (tadpoles) to chemical cues from different combinations of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) and larval dragonfly (Anax junius) predators. Water

  11. Predator-prey relations between age-1+ summer flounder (Paralichthys dentatus, Linnaeus) and age-0 winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus, Walbaum): predator diets, prey selection, and effects of sediments and macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Manderson; Phelan; Stoner; Hilbert

    2000-08-23

    Laboratory experiments and weekly trammel net surveys in the Navesink River, New Jersey (USA) were used to examine the predator-prey interaction between age-1+ summer flounder (Paralichthys dentatus) and age-0 winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus). Winter flounder (24-67 mm TL) were the dominant piscine prey of summer flounder (n=95, 252-648 mm TL) collected in trammel nets. We observed a temporal shift in summer flounder diets from sand shrimp (Crangon septemspinosa) and winter flounder, dominant during June and early July, to blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and other fishes (primarily Atlantic silversides, Menidia menidia and Atlantic menhaden, Brevortia tyrannus) later in the summer. Variations in prey selection appeared to be related to changes in the spatial distribution of predators and spatio-temporal variation in prey availability. In laboratory experiments, summer flounder (271-345 mm total length, TL) preferred demersal winter flounder to a pelagic fish (Atlantic silversides) and a benthic invertebrate (sand shrimp) prey, and the vulnerability of winter flounder increased with increasing prey body size from 20 to 90 mm TL. Experiments testing habitat effects showed that mortality of winter flounder in three different size classes (20-29, 40-49, 60-69 mm TL) was not influenced by sediment grain sizes permitting differential burial of the prey. However, vegetation enhanced survival, with fish suffering lower mortality in eelgrass (Zostera marina, 15+/-0.04%) than in sea lettuce (Ulva lactuca, 38+/-0.04%) or bare sand (70+/-0.07%) when the macrophytes were planted to produce similar leaf surface areas (5000 cm(2) m(-2)). Prey vulnerability appeared to be related to the role of vision in the predator's attack strategy and prey activity levels. PMID:10958899

  12. Exploring Symbiosis

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Josh Lord

    2005-01-01

    In this activity, learners discover which plants and animals have symbiotic relationships and how this impacts each organism. Learners explore the advantages and disadvantages of different types of symbiosis.

  13. Neo-Symbiosis: The Next Stage in the Evolution of Human Information Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Douglas; Greitzer, Frank L.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract--The purpose of this paper is to re-address the vision of human-computer symbiosis as originally expressed by J.C.R. Licklider nearly a half-century ago. We describe this vision, place it in some historical context relating to the evolution of human factors research, and we observe that the field is now in the process of re-invigorating Licklider’s vision. We briefly assess the state of the technology within the context of contemporary theory and practice, and we describe what we regard as this emerging field of neo-symbiosis. We offer some initial thoughts on requirements to define functionality of neo-symbiotic systems and discuss research challenges associated with their development and evaluation.

  14. Man-Computer Symbiosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. R. Licklider

    1960-01-01

    Man-computer symbiosis is an expected development in cooperative interaction between men and electronic computers. It will involve very close coupling between the human and the electronic members of the partnership. The main aims are 1) to let computers facilitate formulative thinking as they now facilitate the solution of formulated problems, and 2) to enable men and computers to cooperate in

  15. Effect of Predator-Prey Phylogenetic Similarity on the Fitness Consequences of Predation: A Trade-off between Nutrition and Disease?

    PubMed

    Pfennig

    2000-03-01

    A largely neglected aspect of foraging behavior is whether the costs and benefits of predation vary as a function of phylogenetic (i.e., genetic) similarity between predator and prey. Prey of varying phylogenetic similarities to predators might differ in value because both the risk of pathogen transmission and the nutritional quality of prey typically decline with decreasing phylogenetic similarity between predator and prey. I experimentally evaluated this hypothesis by feeding omnivorous spadefoot toad tadpoles (Spea bombifrons, Spea multiplicata, and Scaphiopus couchii) either conspecific tadpoles or an equal mass of three different species of heterospecific prey, all of which contained naturally occurring bacteria. I also examined which prey species Spea tadpoles preferred. I found that all three species of tadpoles performed best on, and preferred to eat, prey that were of intermediate phylogenetic similarity to the predators. Prey of intermediate phylogenetic similarity may provide the greatest fitness benefits to predators because such prey balance the nutritional benefits of closely related prey with the cost of parasite transmission between closely related individuals. PMID:10718730

  16. Neo-Symbiosis: The Next Stage in the Evolution of Human Information Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Douglas; Greitzer, Frank L.

    2008-03-01

    We re-address the vision of human-computer symbiosis expressed by J. C. R. Licklider nearly a half-century ago, when he wrote: “The hope is that in not too many years, human brains and computing machines will be coupled together very tightly, and that the resulting partnership will think as no human brain has ever thought and process data in a way not approached by the information-handling machines we know today.” (Licklider, 1960). Unfortunately, little progress was made toward this vision over four decades following Licklider’s challenge, despite significant advancements in the fields of human factors and computer science. Licklider’s vision was largely forgotten. However, recent advances in information science and technology, psychology, and neuroscience have rekindled the potential of making the Licklider’s vision a reality. This paper provides a historical context for and updates the vision, and it argues that such a vision is needed as a unifying framework for advancing IS&T.

  17. Feedbacks between protistan single-cell activity and bacterial physiological structure reinforce the predator/prey link in microbial foodwebs

    PubMed Central

    Sintes, Eva; del Giorgio, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    The trophic interactions between bacteria and their main predators, the heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNFs), play a key role in the structuring and functioning of aquatic microbial food webs. Grazing regulation of bacterial communities, both of biomass and community structure, have been frequently reported. Additionally, bottom-up responses of the HNF at the population level (numerical responses) have also been extensively described. However, the functional response of HNF at the single-cell level has not been well explored. In this study, we concurrently measured the physiological structure of bacterial communities and HNF single-cell activities during re-growth cultures of natural aquatic communities. We found that changes in the abundance and proportion of the preferred, highly active bacterial prey, caused by the feeding activity of their predators (HNF), induced a negative feedback effect on the single-cell activity of these HNF. These shifts in the specific cellular activity of HNF occur at a much shorter time scale than population level shifts in flagellate abundance, and offer a complementary mechanism to explain not only the tight coupling between bacteria and HNF, but also the relative constancy of bacterial abundance in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:25250018

  18. "Prey Play": Learning about Predators and Prey through an Interactive, Role-Play Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deaton, Cynthia C. M.; Dodd, Kristen; Drennon, Katherine; Nagle, Jack

    2012-01-01

    "Prey Play" is an interactive role-play activity that provides fifth-grade students with opportunities to examine predator-prey interactions. This four-part, role-play activity allows students to take on the role of a predator and prey as they reflect on the behaviors animals exhibit as they collect food and interact with one another, as well as…

  19. Ocean Predator/Prey Populations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Susan Kelly Topic: Population change Course type: Introductory undergraduate course Description Modeling impact of change in food web Learning Goals or Outcomes Students will see how changes on one trophic level ...

  20. Habitat context influences predator interference interactions and the strength of resource partitioning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Randall Hughes; Jonathan H. Grabowski

    2006-01-01

    Despite increasing evidence that habitat structure can shape predator–prey interactions, few studies have examined the impact of habitat context on interactions among multiple predators and the consequences for combined foraging rates. We investigated the individual and combined effects of stone crabs (Menippe mercenaria) and knobbed whelks (Busycon carica) when foraging on two common bivalves, the hard clam (Mercenaria mercenaria) and

  1. Predatorprey coupling: interaction between mink Mustela vison and muskrat Ondatra zibethicus across Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nina Holmengen; Knut Lehre Seip; Mark Boyce; Nils Chr

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we explore variation in the predator-prey interaction between mink Mustela vison and muskrat Ondatra zibethicus across Canada based on 25 years of mink (predator) and muskrat (prey) data from the Hudson's Bay Company. We show that predatorprey interactions have stronger signatures in the west of Canada than in the east. In particular, we show that the observed

  2. Probabilistic patterns of interaction: the effects of link-strength variability on food web structure

    PubMed Central

    Yeakel, Justin D.; Guimarães, Paulo R.; Novak, Mark; Fox-Dobbs, Kena; Koch, Paul L.

    2012-01-01

    Patterns of species interactions affect the dynamics of food webs. An important component of species interactions that is rarely considered with respect to food webs is the strengths of interactions, which may affect both structure and dynamics. In natural systems, these strengths are variable, and can be quantified as probability distributions. We examined how variation in strengths of interactions can be described hierarchically, and how this variation impacts the structure of species interactions in predator–prey networks, both of which are important components of ecological food webs. The stable isotope ratios of predator and prey species may be particularly useful for quantifying this variability, and we show how these data can be used to build probabilistic predator–prey networks. Moreover, the distribution of variation in strengths among interactions can be estimated from a limited number of observations. This distribution informs network structure, especially the key role of dietary specialization, which may be useful for predicting structural properties in systems that are difficult to observe. Finally, using three mammalian predator–prey networks (two African and one Canadian) quantified from stable isotope data, we show that exclusion of link-strength variability results in biased estimates of nestedness and modularity within food webs, whereas the inclusion of body size constraints only marginally increases the predictive accuracy of the isotope-based network. We find that modularity is the consequence of strong link-strengths in both African systems, while nestedness is not significantly present in any of the three predator–prey networks. PMID:22832361

  3. Integrating models to investigate critical phenological overlaps in complex ecological interactions: The mountain pine beetle-fungus symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Addison, Audrey; Powell, James A; Bentz, Barbara J; Six, Diana L

    2015-03-01

    The fates of individual species are often tied to synchronization of phenology, however, few methods have been developed for integrating phenological models involving linked species. In this paper, we focus on mountain pine beetle (MPB, Dendroctonus ponderosae) and its two obligate mutualistic fungi, Grosmannia clavigera and Ophiostoma montium. Growth rates of all three partners are driven by temperature, and their idiosyncratic responses affect interactions at important life stage junctures. One critical phase for MPB-fungus symbiosis occurs just before dispersal of teneral (new) adult beetles, when fungi are acquired and transported in specialized structures (mycangia). Before dispersal, fungi must capture sufficient spatial resources within the tree to ensure contact with teneral adults and get packed into mycangia. Mycangial packing occurs at an unknown time during teneral feeding. We adapt thermal models predicting fungal growth and beetle development to predict overlap between the competing fungi and MPB teneral adult feeding windows and emergence. We consider a spectrum of mycangial packing strategies and describe them in terms of explicit functions with unknown parameters. Rates of growth are fixed by laboratory data, the unknown parameters describing various packing strategies, as well as the degree to which mycangial growth is slowed in woody tissues as compared to agar, are determined by maximum likelihood and two years of field observations. At the field location used, the most likely fungus acquisition strategy for MPB was packing mycangia just prior to emergence. Estimated model parameters suggested large differences in the relative growth rates of the two fungi in trees at the study site, with the most likely model estimating that G. clavigera grew approximately twenty-five times faster than O. montium under the bark, which is completely unexpected in comparison with observed fungal growth on agar. PMID:25556687

  4. Escherichia coli interactions with Acanthamoeba: a symbiosis with environmental and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Alsam, Selwa; Jeong, Seok Ryoul; Sissons, James; Dudley, Ricky; Kim, Kwang Sik; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2006-06-01

    The ability of Acanthamoeba to feed on Gram-negative bacteria, as well as to harbour potential pathogens, such as Legionella pneumophila, Coxiella burnetii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Vibrio cholerae, Helicobacter pylori, Listeria monocytogenes and Mycobacterium avium, suggest that both amoebae and bacteria are involved in complex interactions, which may play important roles in the environment and in human health. In this study, Acanthamoeba castellanii (a keratitis isolate belonging to the T4 genotype) was used and its interactions with Escherichia coli (strain K1, a cerebrospinal fluid isolate from a meningitis patient, O18 : K1 : H7, and a K-12 laboratory strain, HB101) were studied. The invasive K1 isolate exhibited a significantly higher association with A. castellanii than the non-invasive K-12 isolate. Similarly, K1 showed significantly increased invasion and/or uptake by A. castellanii in gentamicin protection assays than the non-invasive K-12. Using several mutants derived from K1, it was observed that outer-membrane protein A (OmpA) and LPS were crucial bacterial determinants responsible for E. coli K1 interactions with A. castellanii. Once inside the cell, E. coli K1 remained viable and multiplied within A. castellanii, while E. coli K-12 was killed. Again, OmpA and LPS were crucial for E. coli K1 intracellular survival in A. castellanii. In conclusion, these findings suggest that E. coli K1 interactions with A. castellanii are carefully regulated by the virulence of E. coli. PMID:16687585

  5. Foraging behavior and prey interactions by a guild of predators on various lifestages of Bemisia tabaci

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James R. Hagler; Charles G. Jackson; Rufus Isaacs; Scott A. Machtley

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) is fed on by a wide variety of generalist predators, but there is little information on these predator-prey interactions. A laboratory investigation was conducted to quantify the foraging behavior of the adults of five common whitefly predators presented with a surfeit of whitefly eggs, nymphs, and adults. The beetles, Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville and Collops

  6. Effects of intra- and interspecific interactions on species responses to environmental change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JEREMY W. FOX; PETER J. MORIN

    Summary 1. The extent of directional environmental change expected in the next century under- scores the need to understand density-dependent population regulation. 2. Direct density dependence generated by intraspecific competition and \\/or predator- prey interactions should buffer environmentally produced changes in density-independent growth rates ( r ). Density dependence generated by interspecific competition should magnify sensitivity to changes in r

  7. Dynamic Map: Representation of interactions between robots

    SciTech Connect

    Zanardi, C. [GRPR, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    As robotics applications become more complex, the need for tools to analyze and explain interactions between robots has become more acute. We introduce the concept of Dynamic Map (DM), which can serve as a generic tool to analyze interactions between robots or with their environment. We show that this concept can be applied to different kinds of applications, like a predator-prey situation, or collision avoidance.

  8. Development of a novel system for isolating genes involved in predator-prey interactions using host independent derivatives of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adrian A Medina; Robert M Shanks; Daniel E Kadouri

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a gram-negative bacterium that preys upon other gram-negative bacteria. Although the life cycle of Bdellovibrio has been extensively investigated, very little is known about the mechanisms involved in predation. RESULTS: Host-Independent (HI) mutants of B. bacteriovorus were isolated from wild-type strain 109J. Predation assays confirmed that the selected HI mutants retained their ability to prey on

  9. Sensory ecology of predator-prey interactions: responses of the AN2 interneuron in the field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus to the echolocation calls of sympatric bats.

    PubMed

    Fullard, James H; Ratcliffe, John M; Guignion, Cassandra

    2005-07-01

    We observed the responses of the AN2 interneuron in the Pacific field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus, a cell implicated in eliciting avoidance flight away from bats, to acoustic stimuli representing the echolocation calls of bats as well as field recordings of search and gleaning attack calls of six species of insectivorous sympatric bats (West Australia, Australia: Tadarida australis, Chalinolobus goudii, Nyctophilus geoffroyi; Queensland, Australia: Vespadelus pumilus, Myotis adversus; Kaua'i, Hawai'i: Lasiurus cinereus). The broad frequency sensitivity of the AN2 cell indicates that T. oceanicus has evolved to detect a wide range of echolocation call frequencies. The reduced sensitivity of this cell at frequencies higher than 70 kHz suggests that some bats (e.g., the gleaning species, N. geoffroyi) may circumvent this insect's auditory defences by using frequency-mismatched (allotonic) calls. The calls of the freetail bat, T. australis evoked the strongest response in the AN2 cell but, ironically, this may allow this bat to prey upon T. oceanicus as previous studies report that under certain conditions, flying crickets exhibit ambiguous directional responses towards frequencies similar to those emitted by this bat. Short duration calls (1--2 ms) are sufficient to evoke AN2 responses with instantaneous spike periods capable of causing defensive flight behaviours; most bats tested emit calls of durations greater than this. The short calls of N. geoffroyi produced during gleaning attacks may reduce this species' acoustic conspicuousness to this cricket. PMID:15886992

  10. Sensory ecology of predator–prey interactions: responses of the AN2 interneuron in the field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus to the echolocation calls of sympatric bats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James H. Fullard; John M. Ratcliffe; Cassandra Guignion

    2005-01-01

    We observed the responses of the AN2 interneuron in the Pacific field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus, a cell implicated in eliciting avoidance flight away from bats, to acoustic stimuli representing the echolocation calls of bats as well as field recordings of search and gleaning attack calls of six species of insectivorous sympatric bats (West Australia, Australia: Tadarida australis, Chalinolobus goudii, Nyctophilus

  11. Does the presence of the SW Atlantic burrowing crab Chasmagnathus granulatus Dana affect predator–prey interactions between shorebirds and polychaetes?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabriela Palomo; Florencia Botto; Diego Navarro; Mauricio Escapa; Oscar Iribarne

    2003-01-01

    The burrowing crab Chasmagnathus granulatus is an important bioturbator that generates dense burrow assemblages (crab beds) characteristic of intertidal habitats of SW Atlantic estuaries. Crab bioturbation affects the topography and hydrodynamics of the sediment, increasing sediment water and organic matter content, decreasing sediment hardness and changing the grain size frequency distribution. In this study, we found that burrowing crabs can

  12. THE EFFECT OF SIZE ON THE FAST-START PERFORMANCE OF RAINBOW TROUT SALMO GAIRDNERI, AND A CONSIDERATION OF PISCIVOROUS PREDATOR-PREY INTERACTIONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. W. WEBB

    SUMMARY The fast-start (acceleration) performance of seven groups of rainbow trout from 9-6 to 387 cm total length was measured in response to d.c. electric shock stimuli. Two fast-start kinematic patterns, L- and S-start were observed. In L-starts the body was bent into an L or U shape and a recoil turn normally accompanied acceleration. Free manoeuvre was not possible

  13. International Symbiosis Society

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The International Symbiosis Society (ISS) "is primarily involved with the promotion of research and education in the growing field of symbiosis. The Society seeks also to build ongoing and useful communication between the many researchers working in the various sub-fields of symbiosis, as well as connect symbiologists to those in other areas of ecology and biological sciences generally." Hosted by Boston University, the ISS website contains information about membership, and the international journal _Symbiosis_. For authors interested in submitting a manuscript to the journal, the site provides brief, downloadable instructions. In addition, the site links to the websites of Society members working in a variety of areas including Bark Beetles/Fungi, Cyanobacterial Symbioses, Lichens, Marine Symbioses, Mycorhizae, and more. Also, be sure to check out the fascinating images in the Symbiosis Gallery! This site is also reviewed in the June 10, 2005 _NSDL Life Sciences Report_.

  14. Trait-Mediated Indirect Interactions in a Simple Aquatic Food Web

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott D. Peacor; Earl E. Werner

    1997-01-01

    This investigation examines the role of trait-mediated indirect interactions in a simple aquatic food web. We conducted the experiments in cattle watering tanks in order to establish whether competitive and predator-prey interactions between two species are affected by other species in the system; i.e., are pairwise interaction strengths affected by the background species assemblage? We examined the survival and growth

  15. Planet - Disk Symbiosis

    E-print Network

    Re'em Sari; Peter Goldreich

    2003-07-05

    Planets form in disks around young stars. Interactions with these disks cause them to migrate and thus affect their final orbital periods. We suggest that the connection between planets and disks may be deeper and involve a symbiotic evolution. By contributing to the outward transport of angular momentum, planets promote disk accretion. Here we demonstrate that planets sufficiently massive to open gaps could be the primary agents driving disk accretion. Those having masses below the gap opening threshold drift inward more rapidly than the disk material and can only play a minor role in its accretion. Eccentricity growth during gap formation may involve an even more intimate symbiosis. Given a small initial eccentricity, just a fraction of a percent, the orbital eccentricity of a massive planet may grow rapidly once a mass in excess of the planet's mass has been repelled to form a gap around the planet's orbit. Then, as the planet's radial excursions approach the gap's width, subsequent eccentricity growth slows so that the planet's orbit continues to be confined within the gap.

  16. Interactions between the leech Glossiphonia complanata and its gastropod prey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christer Briinmark; Bjiirn Malmqvist

    1986-01-01

    Predator-prey interactions between the predatory leech, Glossiphonia complanata, and its gastropod prey were investigated in laboratory experiments, including behavioural observations with the aid of time-lapse video technique. Six gastropod species were investigated, viz. Lymnaea peregra, Planorbis planorbis, Physa fontinalis, Ancylus fluviatilis, Bithynia tentaculata, and Theodoxus fluviatilis. The species studied exhibited anti-predator defences, which had their maximum efficiency at different stages

  17. Molecular diagnosis of a previously unreported predator–prey association in coffee: Karnyothrips flavipes Jones (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae) predation on the coffee berry borer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juliana Jaramillo; Eric G. Chapman; Fernando E. Vega; James D. Harwood

    2010-01-01

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, is the most important pest of coffee throughout the world, causing losses estimated at US $500 million\\/year. The thrips Karnyothrips flavipes was observed for the first time feeding on immature stages of H. hampei in April 2008 from samples collected in the Kisii area of Western Kenya. Since the trophic interactions between H. hampei

  18. Predator-Prey Relations and Competition for Food Between Age0 Lake Trout and Slimy Sculpins in the Apostle Island Region of Lake Superior

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick L. Hudson; Jacqueline F. Savino; Charles R. Bronte

    1995-01-01

    Slimy sculpins (Cottus cognatus) are an important component of the fish community on reefs and adjacent nursery areas of the Great Lakes and overlap spatially with age-0 lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush). Important interactions between these fishes are possible during the lake trout's first year of life, which could include predation on each other's eggs and larvae, and competition for food

  19. Symbiosis-mediated outbreaks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Symbiosis simply means "living together" and in its narrowest form can mean two species deriving mutual benefit from the association. Recent studies have made evident that insect associations with microorganisms can range the gamut from casual associations to obligate or context-dependent mutualisms...

  20. Survival through Symbiosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdi, S. Wali

    1992-01-01

    Describes symbiosis and its significance in the day-to-day lives of plants and animals. Gives specific examples of mutualism, commensalism, and parasitism in the relationships among fungus and plant roots, animals and bacteria, birds and animals, fish, and predator and prey. (MDH)

  1. Molecular diagnosis of a previously unreported predator-prey association in coffee: Karnyothrips flavipes Jones (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae) predation on the coffee berry borer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Juliana; Chapman, Eric G.; Vega, Fernando E.; Harwood, James D.

    2010-03-01

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, is the most important pest of coffee throughout the world, causing losses estimated at US 500 million/year. The thrips Karnyothrips flavipes was observed for the first time feeding on immature stages of H. hampei in April 2008 from samples collected in the Kisii area of Western Kenya. Since the trophic interactions between H. hampei and K. flavipes are carried out entirely within the coffee berry, and because thrips feed by liquid ingestion, we used molecular gut-content analysis to confirm the potential role of K. flavipes as a predator of H. hampei in an organic coffee production system. Species-specific COI primers designed for H. hampei were shown to have a high degree of specificity for H. hampei DNA and did not produce any PCR product from DNA templates of the other insects associated with the coffee agroecosystems. In total, 3,327 K. flavipes emerged from 17,792 H. hampei-infested berries collected from the field between April and September 2008. Throughout the season, 8.3% of K. flavipes tested positive for H. hampei DNA, although at times this figure approached 50%. Prey availability was significantly correlated with prey consumption, thus indicating the potential impact on H. hampei populations.

  2. Molecular diagnosis of a previously unreported predator-prey association in coffee: Karnyothrips flavipes Jones (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae) predation on the coffee berry borer.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Juliana; Chapman, Eric G; Vega, Fernando E; Harwood, James D

    2010-03-01

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, is the most important pest of coffee throughout the world, causing losses estimated at US $500 million/year. The thrips Karnyothrips flavipes was observed for the first time feeding on immature stages of H. hampei in April 2008 from samples collected in the Kisii area of Western Kenya. Since the trophic interactions between H. hampei and K. flavipes are carried out entirely within the coffee berry, and because thrips feed by liquid ingestion, we used molecular gut-content analysis to confirm the potential role of K. flavipes as a predator of H. hampei in an organic coffee production system. Species-specific COI primers designed for H. hampei were shown to have a high degree of specificity for H. hampei DNA and did not produce any PCR product from DNA templates of the other insects associated with the coffee agroecosystems. In total, 3,327 K. flavipes emerged from 17,792 H. hampei-infested berries collected from the field between April and September 2008. Throughout the season, 8.3% of K. flavipes tested positive for H. hampei DNA, although at times this figure approached 50%. Prey availability was significantly correlated with prey consumption, thus indicating the potential impact on H. hampei populations. PMID:20094879

  3. Interactions of biotic and abiotic environmental factors in an ectomycorrhizal symbiosis, and the potential for selection mosaics

    PubMed Central

    Piculell, Bridget J; Hoeksema, Jason D; Thompson, John N

    2008-01-01

    Background Geographic selection mosaics, in which species exert different evolutionary impacts on each other in different environments, may drive diversification in coevolving species. We studied the potential for geographic selection mosaics in plant-mycorrhizal interactions by testing whether the interaction between bishop pine (Pinus muricata D. Don) and one of its common ectomycorrhizal fungi (Rhizopogon occidentalis Zeller and Dodge) varies in outcome, when different combinations of plant and fungal genotypes are tested under a range of different abiotic and biotic conditions. Results We used a 2 × 2 × 2 × 2 factorial experiment to test the main and interactive effects of plant lineage (two maternal seed families), fungal lineage (two spore collections), soil type (lab mix or field soil), and non-mycorrhizal microbes (with or without) on the performance of plants and fungi. Ecological outcomes, as assessed by plant and fungal performance, varied widely across experimental environments, including interactions between plant or fungal lineages and soil environmental factors. Conclusion These results show the potential for selection mosaics in plant-mycorrhizal interactions, and indicate that these interactions are likely to coevolve in different ways in different environments, even when initially the genotypes of the interacting species are the same across all environments. Hence, selection mosaics may be equally as effective as genetic differences among populations in driving divergent coevolution among populations of interacting species. PMID:18507825

  4. Predator-prey relations and competition for food between age-0 lake trout and slimy sculpins in the Apostle Island region of Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, Patrick L.; Savino, Jacqueline F.; Bronte, Charles R.

    1995-01-01

    Slimy sculpins (Cottus cognatus) are an important component of the fish community on reefs and adjacent nursery areas of the Great Lakes and overlap spatially with age-0 lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush). Important interactions between these fishes are possible during the lake trout's first year of life, which could include predation on each other's eggs and larvae, and competition for food resources. We investigated the diets of age-0 lake trout and slimy sculpins on a lake trout spawning reef (Gull Island Shoal) and adjacent nursery area (near Michigan Island) in the Apostle Island Region of western Lake Superior during June through September from 1988 through 1991. Organisms in stomachs of 511 lake trout and 562 sculpins were identified and counted. Of the 11 major food types found in age-0 lake trout stomachs from both areas, Mysis was the dominant food item (mean volume in stomachs = 68%) and occurred in about 3/4 of the fish analyzed. Copepods, cladocerans, chironomid pupae, fish, and Bythotrephes were also common in the diet (frequency of occurrence > 4%). Diets of lake trout were more diverse on the reef than on the nursery area where Mysis dominated the diet. Slimy sculpins were only found in lake trout greater than 50 mm. Mysis was an important food item of slimy sculpins over the reef but not over the nursery area, where Diporeia was by far the most important taxon. A variety of benthic invertebrates (Asellus, chironomids, benthic copepods, and snails) comprised the bulk of the sculpin diet over the reef. Sculpins also ate lake trout eggs in November. Based on cluster analysis, diets were most similar over the reef where both consumed Mysis, calanoid copepods and chironomid pupae. Diets diverged over the nursery areas where sculpins were strictly benthic feeders and lake trout maintained their planktonic diet. In Lake Superior, where lake trout recruitment through natural reproduction has become well established, the coexistence of the two species appears amicable. However, in other Great Lakes with higher sculpin to lake trout ratios on a reef the coexistence of the two species may be a bottleneck for age-0 lake trout survival beginning with egg deposition and ending when age-0 lake trout move off the reef and the two species no longer compete for a common food resource.

  5. Interactions between cougars (Puma concolor) and gray wolves (Canis lupus) in Banff National Park, Alberta

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea D. KORTELLO; Thomas E. HURD; Dennis L. MURRAY

    2007-01-01

    Large carnivore populations are recovering in many protected areas in North America, but the effect of increasing carnivore numbers on existing predator-prey and predator-predator interactions is poorly understood. We studied diet and spatial overlap among cougars (Puma concolor) and gray wolves (Canis lupus) in Banff National Park, Alberta (1993-2004) to evaluate how wolf recovery in the park influenced diet choice

  6. Crab: snail size-structured interactions and salt marsh predation gradients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel E. Schindler; Brett M. Johnson; Neil A. MacKay; Nicolaas Bouwes; James F. Kitchell

    1994-01-01

    We studied size-structured predator-prey interactions between blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and marsh periwinkles (Littoraria irrorata) with a combination of field studies, laboratory experiments and individual-based modeling. Size distributions of Littoraria differed among years at the same sites in a salt marsh and could largely be explained by dominance of strong cohorts in the population. At a given site, abundance increased

  7. Antagonistic Selection or Trait Compensation? Diverse Patterns of Predation-Induced Prey Mortality due to the Interacting Effects of Prey Phenotype and the Environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bianca WohlfahrtSteven; Steven M. Vamosi

    2009-01-01

    Differentiation among closely related prey species may result from differing adaptations to heterogeneous environments. Many\\u000a studies have focused on competition for shared resources as a major factor promoting differentiation, with considerably less\\u000a attention focused on interacting effects of abiotic factors and predator–prey relationships. To further investigate the effects\\u000a of interacting selective factors on the outcomes of mortality and survival in

  8. Predation: Prey plumage adaptation against falcon attack.

    PubMed

    Palleroni, Alberto; Miller, Cory T; Hauser, Marc; Marler, Peter

    2005-04-21

    Several plumage types are found in feral pigeons (Columba livia), but one type imparts a clear survival advantage during attacks by the swiftest of all predators--the peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus). Here we use quantitative field observations and experiments to demonstrate both the selective nature of the falcon's choice of prey and the effect of plumage coloration on the survival of feral pigeons. This plumage colour is an independently heritable trait that is likely to be an antipredator adaptation against high-speed attacks in open air space. PMID:15846334

  9. Transcriptome analysis of Sinorhizobium meliloti during symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Ampe, Frederic; Kiss, Ernö; Sabourdy, Frédérique; Batut, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Background Rhizobia induce the formation on specific legumes of new organs, the root nodules, as a result of an elaborated developmental program involving the two partners. In order to contribute to a more global view of the genetics underlying this plant-microbe symbiosis, we have mined the recently determined Sinorhizobium meliloti genome sequence for genes potentially relevant to symbiosis. We describe here the construction and use of dedicated nylon macroarrays to study simultaneously the expression of 200 of these genes in a variety of environmental conditions, pertinent to symbiosis. Results The expression of 214 S. meliloti genes was monitored under ten environmental conditions, including free-living aerobic and microaerobic conditions, addition of the plant symbiotic elicitor luteolin, and a variety of symbiotic conditions. Five new genes induced by luteolin have been identified as well as nine new genes induced in mature nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. A bacterial and a plant symbiotic mutant affected in nodule development have been found of particular interest to decipher gene expression at the intermediate stage of the symbiotic interaction. S. meliloti gene expression in the cultivated legume Medicago sativa (alfalfa) and the model plant M. truncatula were compared and a small number of differences was found. Conclusions In addition to exploring conditions for a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of the model rhizobium S. meliloti, the present work has highlighted the differential expression of several classes of genes during symbiosis. These genes are related to invasion, oxidative stress protection, iron mobilization, and signaling, thus emphasizing possible common mechanisms between symbiosis and pathogenesis. PMID:12620125

  10. The Rhizobium-plant symbiosis.

    PubMed Central

    van Rhijn, P; Vanderleyden, J

    1995-01-01

    Rhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Azorhizobium species are able to elicit the formation of unique structures, called nodules, on the roots or stems of the leguminous host. In these nodules, the rhizobia convert atmospheric N2 into ammonia for the plant. To establish this symbiosis, signals are produced early in the interaction between plant and rhizobia and they elicit discrete responses by the two symbiotic partners. First, transcription of the bacterial nodulation (nod) genes is under control of the NodD regulatory protein, which is activated by specific plant signals, flavonoids, present in the root exudates. In return, the nod-encoded enzymes are involved in the synthesis and excretion of specific lipooligosaccharides, which are able to trigger on the host plant the organogenic program leading to the formation of nodules. An overview of the organization, regulation, and function of the nod genes and their participation in the determination of the host specificity is presented. PMID:7708010

  11. Nitric oxide in legume-rhizobium symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Meilhoc, Eliane; Boscari, Alexandre; Bruand, Claude; Puppo, Alain; Brouquisse, Renaud

    2011-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous signaling molecule with a broad spectrum of regulatory functions in plant growth and development. NO has been found to be involved in various pathogenic or symbiotic plant-microbe interactions. During the last decade, increasing evidence of the occurrence of NO during legume-rhizobium symbioses has been reported, from early steps of plant-bacteria interaction, to the nitrogen-fixing step in mature nodules. This review focuses on recent advances on NO production and function in nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. First, the potential plant and bacterial sources of NO, including NO synthase-like, nitrate reductase or electron transfer chains of both partners, are presented. Then responses of plant and bacterial cells to the presence of NO are presented in the context of the N(2)-fixing symbiosis. Finally, the roles of NO as either a regulatory signal of development, or a toxic compound with inhibitory effects on nitrogen fixation, or an intermediate involved in energy metabolism, during symbiosis establishment and nodule functioning are discussed. PMID:21893254

  12. Bark Beetle-Fungal Symbiosis: Context Dependency in Complex Associations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. D. KLEPZIGl; D. L. SIX

    Recent thinking in symbiosis research has emphasized a holistic consideration of these complex interactions. Bark beetles and their associated microbes are one group which has previously not been addressed in this manner. We review the study of symbiotic interactions among bark beetles and microbes in light of this thinking. We describe the considerable progress already made, examine areas where further

  13. Symbiosis catalyses niche expansion and diversification

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Jeffrey B.

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between species are important catalysts of the evolutionary processes that generate the remarkable diversity of life. Symbioses, conspicuous and inherently interesting forms of species interaction, are pervasive throughout the tree of life. However, nearly all studies of the impact of species interactions on diversification have concentrated on competition and predation leaving unclear the importance of symbiotic interaction. Here, I show that, as predicted by evolutionary theories of symbiosis and diversification, multiple origins of a key innovation, symbiosis between gall-inducing insects and fungi, catalysed both expansion in resource use (niche expansion) and diversification. Symbiotic lineages have undergone a more than sevenfold expansion in the range of host-plant taxa they use relative to lineages without such fungal symbionts, as defined by the genetic distance between host plants. Furthermore, symbiotic gall-inducing insects are more than 17 times as diverse as their non-symbiotic relatives. These results demonstrate that the evolution of symbiotic interaction leads to niche expansion, which in turn catalyses diversification. PMID:23390106

  14. Evolving together: the biology of symbiosis, part 1

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Symbioses, prolonged associations between organisms often widely separated phylogenetically, are more common in biology than we once thought and have been neglected as a phenomenon worthy of study on its own merits. Extending along a dynamic continuum from antagonistic to cooperative and often involving elements of both antagonism and mutualism, symbioses involve pathogens, commensals, and mutualists interacting in myriad ways over the evolutionary history of the involved “partners.” In this first of 2 parts, some remarkable examples of symbiosis will be explored, from the coral-algal symbiosis and nitrogen fixation to the great diversity of dietary specializations enabled by the gastrointestinal microbiota of animals. PMID:16389385

  15. Ant-plants and fungi: a new threeway symbiosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emmanuel Defossez; Marc-André Selosse; Marie-Pierre Dubois; Laurence Mondolot; Antonella Faccio; Champlain Djieto-Lordon; Doyle McKey; Rumsaïs Blatrix

    2009-01-01

    Summary • Symbioses between plants and fungi, fungi and ants, and ants and plants all play important roles in ecosystems. Symbioses involving all three partners appear to be rare. Here, we describe a novel tripartite symbiosis in which ants and a fungus inhabit domatia of an ant-plant, and present evidence that such interactions are widespread.  We investigated 139 individuals

  16. Organism Interactions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Marsh

    2008-09-16

    Complete both parts in the assignment below. At the conclusion of this assignment, you will go to our class testing site on nutips and take a short quiz called \\"Organism Interactions.\\" Objectives: In this activity: 1. Students will define symbiosis and distinguish the type of symbiotic relationship that is occurring; mutualism, commensalism, or parasitism. 2. Students will distinguish competition from symbiosis. Part I. Link to the following website and read the information provided on Symbiosis. As you are reading you ...

  17. Sensory Information and Encounter Rates of Interacting Species

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Andrew M.; McKinley, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Most motile organisms use sensory cues when searching for resources, mates, or prey. The searcher measures sensory data and adjusts its search behavior based on those data. Yet, classical models of species encounter rates assume that searchers move independently of their targets. This assumption leads to the familiar mass action-like encounter rate kinetics typically used in modeling species interactions. Here we show that this common approach can mischaracterize encounter rate kinetics if searchers use sensory information to search actively for targets. We use the example of predator-prey interactions to illustrate that predators capable of long-distance directional sensing can encounter prey at a rate proportional to prey density to the power (where is the dimension of the environment) when prey density is low. Similar anomalous encounter rate functions emerge even when predators pursue prey using only noisy, directionless signals. Thus, in both the high-information extreme of long-distance directional sensing, and the low-information extreme of noisy non-directional sensing, encounter rate kinetics differ qualitatively from those derived by classic theory of species interactions. Using a standard model of predator-prey population dynamics, we show that the new encounter rate kinetics derived here can change the outcome of species interactions. Our results demonstrate how the use of sensory information can alter the rates and outcomes of physical interactions in biological systems. PMID:23966847

  18. Evolution of symbiosis with resource allocation from fecundity to survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Shin

    2014-05-01

    Symbiosis is one of the most fundamental relationships between or among organisms and includes parasitism (which has negative effects on the fitness of the interacting partner), commensalism (no effect), and mutualism (positive effects). The effects of these interactions are usually assumed to influence a single component of a species' fitness, either survival or fecundity, even though in reality the interaction can simultaneously affect both of these components. I used a dual lattice model to investigate the process of evolution of mutualistic symbiosis in the presence of interactive effects on both survival and fecundity. I demonstrate that a positive effect on survival and a negative effect on fecundity are key to the establishment of mutualism. Furthermore, both the parasitic and the mutualistic behaviour must carry large costs for mutualism to evolve. This helps develop a new understanding of symbiosis as a function of resource allocation, in which resources are shifted from fecundity to survival. The simultaneous establishment of mutualism from parasitism never occurs in two species, but can do so in one of the species as long as the partner still behaves parasitically. This suggests that one of the altruistic behaviours in a mutualistic unit consisting of two species must originate as a parasitic behaviour.

  19. Coral Reef Genomics: Developing tools for functional genomics ofcoral symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Jodi; Brokstein, Peter; Manohar, Chitra; Coffroth, MaryAlice; Szmant, Alina; Medina, Monica

    2005-03-01

    Symbioses between cnidarians and dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium are widespread in the marine environment. The importance of this symbiosis to reef-building corals and reef nutrient and carbon cycles is well documented, but little is known about the mechanisms by which the partners establish and regulate the symbiosis. Because the dinoflagellate symbionts live inside the cells of their host coral, the interactions between the partners occur on cellular and molecular levels, as each partner alters the expression of genes and proteins to facilitate the partnership. These interactions can examined using high-throughput techniques that allow thousands of genes to be examined simultaneously. We are developing the groundwork so that we can use DNA microarray profiling to identify genes involved in the Montastraea faveolata and Acropora palmata symbioses. Here we report results from the initial steps in this microarray initiative, that is, the construction of cDNA libraries from 4 of 16 target stages, sequencing of 3450 cDNA clones to generate Expressed Sequenced Tags (ESTs), and annotation of the ESTs to identify candidate genes to include in the microarrays. An understanding of how the coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis is regulated will have implications for atmospheric and ocean sciences, conservation biology, the study and diagnosis of coral bleaching and disease, and comparative studies of animal-protest interactions.

  20. Cell Biology of Cnidarian-Dinoflagellate Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Allemand, Denis; Weis, Virginia M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The symbiosis between cnidarians (e.g., corals or sea anemones) and intracellular dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium is of immense ecological importance. In particular, this symbiosis promotes the growth and survival of reef corals in nutrient-poor tropical waters; indeed, coral reefs could not exist without this symbiosis. However, our fundamental understanding of the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis and of its links to coral calcification remains poor. Here we review what we currently know about the cell biology of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis. In doing so, we aim to refocus attention on fundamental cellular aspects that have been somewhat neglected since the early to mid-1980s, when a more ecological approach began to dominate. We review the four major processes that we believe underlie the various phases of establishment and persistence in the cnidarian/coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis: (i) recognition and phagocytosis, (ii) regulation of host-symbiont biomass, (iii) metabolic exchange and nutrient trafficking, and (iv) calcification. Where appropriate, we draw upon examples from a range of cnidarian-alga symbioses, including the symbiosis between green Hydra and its intracellular chlorophyte symbiont, which has considerable potential to inform our understanding of the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis. Ultimately, we provide a comprehensive overview of the history of the field, its current status, and where it should be going in the future. PMID:22688813

  1. Science Shorts: How Symbiosis Creates Diversity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Joshua Lord

    2010-01-01

    Diversity in habitats on Earth is astounding--whether on land or in the sea--and this is in part due to symbiosis. The lesson described in this article helps students understand how symbiosis affects different organisms through a fun and engaging game where

  2. Phosphorus and Nitrogen Regulate Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis in Petunia hybrida

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Eva; Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence; Feller, Urs; Reinhardt, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus and nitrogen are essential nutrient elements that are needed by plants in large amounts. The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis between plants and soil fungi improves phosphorus and nitrogen acquisition under limiting conditions. On the other hand, these nutrients influence root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi and symbiotic functioning. This represents a feedback mechanism that allows plants to control the fungal symbiont depending on nutrient requirements and supply. Elevated phosphorus supply has previously been shown to exert strong inhibition of arbuscular mycorrhizal development. Here, we address to what extent inhibition by phosphorus is influenced by other nutritional pathways in the interaction between Petunia hybrida and R. irregularis. We show that phosphorus and nitrogen are the major nutritional determinants of the interaction. Interestingly, the symbiosis-promoting effect of nitrogen starvation dominantly overruled the suppressive effect of high phosphorus nutrition onto arbuscular mycorrhiza, suggesting that plants promote the symbiosis as long as they are limited by one of the two major nutrients. Our results also show that in a given pair of symbiotic partners (Petunia hybrida and R. irregularis), the entire range from mutually symbiotic to parasitic can be observed depending on the nutritional conditions. Taken together, these results reveal complex nutritional feedback mechanisms in the control of root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. PMID:24608923

  3. A novel reef coral symbiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantos, O.; Bythell, J. C.

    2010-09-01

    Reef building corals form close associations with unicellular microalgae, fungi, bacteria and archaea, some of which are symbiotic and which together form the coral holobiont. Associations with multicellular eukaryotes such as polychaete worms, bivalves and sponges are not generally considered to be symbiotic as the host responds to their presence by forming physical barriers with an active growth edge in the exoskeleton isolating the invader and, at a subcellular level, activating innate immune responses such as melanin deposition. This study describes a novel symbiosis between a newly described hydrozoan ( Zanclea margaritae sp. nov.) and the reef building coral Acropora muricata (= A. formosa), with the hydrozoan hydrorhiza ramifying throughout the coral tissues with no evidence of isolation or activation of the immune systems of the host. The hydrorhiza lacks a perisarc, which is typical of symbiotic species of this and related genera, including species that associate with other cnidarians such as octocorals. The symbiosis was observed at all sites investigated from two distant locations on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and appears to be host species specific, being found only in A. muricata and in none of 30 other species investigated at these sites. Not all colonies of A. muricata host the hydrozoans and both the prevalence within the coral population (mean = 66%) and density of emergent hydrozoan hydranths on the surface of the coral (mean = 4.3 cm-2, but up to 52 cm-2) vary between sites. The form of the symbiosis in terms of the mutualism-parasitism continuum is not known, although the hydrozoan possesses large stenotele nematocysts, which may be important for defence from predators and protozoan pathogens. This finding expands the known A. muricata holobiont and the association must be taken into account in future when determining the corals’ abilities to defend against predators and withstand stress.

  4. Brain-Computer Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Schalk, Gerwin

    2009-01-01

    The theoretical groundwork of the 1930’s and 1940’s and the technical advance of computers in the following decades provided the basis for dramatic increases in human efficiency. While computers continue to evolve, and we can still expect increasing benefits from their use, the interface between humans and computers has begun to present a serious impediment to full realization of the potential payoff. This article is about the theoretical and practical possibility that direct communication between the brain and the computer can be used to overcome this impediment by improving or augmenting conventional forms of human communication. It is about the opportunity that the limitations of our body’s input and output capacities can be overcome using direct interaction with the brain, and it discusses the assumptions, possible limitations, and implications of a technology that I anticipate will be a major source of pervasive changes in the coming decades. PMID:18310804

  5. The origin of synergistic symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Frank, S A

    1995-10-01

    A dominant theme in the history of life has been the evolutionary innovations of cooperative symbioses: the first genomes near the origin of life, integrated prokaryotic cells, the complex symbiotic communities that evolved into modern eukaryotic cells, lichens, mycorrhizae, and so on. In this paper, a model of cooperative symbiosis that shows a threshold condition for the evolution of cooperation is analyzed. The threshold is not easily passed, but cooperative evolution proceeds rapidly once a symbiosis overcomes the threshold. In the model presented here, each species has genetic variability for a symbiotic trait. The trait imposes a reproductive cost on its bearer but enhances the reproduction of its partner species. For example, in the origin of genetic systems, the trait may cause biochemical synergism for the rate of replication of primitive RNA strands as in Eigen and Schuster's hypercycle model. Models of growth are contrasted with synergism, which are most appropriate for the evolution of genetic systems and for mutualisms such as lichens, with the strategic and psychological applications of the Prisoner's Dilemma model. PMID:8538218

  6. The genome of Laccaria bicolor provides insights into mycorrhizal symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F.; Aerts, A.; Ahren, D.; Brun, A.; Danchin, E. G. J.; Duchaussoy, F.; Gibon, J.; Kohler, A.; Lindquist, E.; Peresa, V.; Salamov, A.; Shapiro, H. J.; Wuyts, J.; Blaudez, D.; Buee, M.; Brokstein, P.; Canback, B.; Cohen, D.; Courty, P. E.; Coutinho, P. M.; Delaruelle, C.; Detter, J. C.; Deveau, A.; DiFazio, S.; Duplessis, S.; Fraissinet-Tachet, L.; Lucic, E.; Frey-Klett, P.; Fourrey, C.; Feussner, I.; Gay, G.; Grimwood, J.; Hoegger, P. J.; Jain, P.; Kilaru, S.; Labbe, J.; Lin, Y. C.; Legue, V.; Le Tacon, F.; Marmeisse, R.; Melayah, D.; Montanini, B.; Muratet, M.; Nehls, U.; Niculita-Hirzel, H.; Secq, M. P. Oudot-Le; Peter, M.; Quesneville, H.; Rajashekar, B.; Reich, M.; Rouhier, N.; Schmutz, J.; Yin, T.; Chalot, M.; Henrissat, B.; Kues, U.; Lucas, S.; Van de Peer, Y.; Podila, G. K.; Polle, A.; Pukkila, P. J.; Richardson, P. M.; Rouze, P.; Sanders, I. R.; Stajich, J. E.; Tunlid, A.; Tuskan, G.; Grigoriev, I. V.

    2007-08-10

    Mycorrhizal symbioses the union of roots and soil fungi are universal in terrestrial ecosystems and may have been fundamental to land colonization by plants 1, 2. Boreal, temperate and montane forests all depend on ectomycorrhizae1. Identification of the primary factors that regulate symbiotic development and metabolic activity will therefore open the door to understanding the role of ectomycorrhizae in plant development and physiology, allowing the full ecological significance of this symbiosis to be explored. Here we report the genome sequence of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor (Fig. 1) and highlight gene sets involved in rhizosphere colonization and symbiosis. This 65-megabase genome assembly contains 20,000 predicted protein-encoding genes and a very large number of transposons and repeated sequences. We detected unexpected genomic features, most notably a battery of effector-type small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown function, several of which are only expressed in symbiotic tissues. The most highly expressed SSP accumulates in the proliferating hyphae colonizing the host root. The ectomycorrhizae-specific SSPs probably have a decisive role in the establishment of the symbiosis. The unexpected observation that the genome of L. bicolor lacks carbohydrate-active enzymes involved in degradation of plant cell walls, but maintains the ability to degrade non-plant cell wall polysaccharides, reveals the dual saprotrophic and biotrophic lifestyle of the mycorrhizal fungus that enables it to grow within both soil and living plant roots. The predicted gene inventory of the L. bicolor genome, therefore, points to previously unknown mechanisms of symbiosis operating in biotrophic mycorrhizal fungi. The availability of this genome provides an unparalleled opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the processes by which symbionts interact with plants within their ecosystem to perform vital functions in the carbon and nitrogen cycles that are fundamental to sustainable plant productivity.

  7. Impact of simulated microgravity on the normal developmental time line of an animal-bacteria symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Foster, Jamie S; Khodadad, Christina L M; Ahrendt, Steven R; Parrish, Mirina L

    2013-01-01

    The microgravity environment during space flight imposes numerous adverse effects on animal and microbial physiology. It is unclear, however, how microgravity impacts those cellular interactions between mutualistic microbes and their hosts. Here, we used the symbiosis between the host squid Euprymna scolopes and its luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri as a model system. We examined the impact of simulated microgravity on the timeline of bacteria-induced development in the host light organ, the site of the symbiosis. To simulate the microgravity environment, host squid and symbiosis-competent bacteria were incubated together in high-aspect ratio rotating wall vessel bioreactors and examined throughout the early stages of the bacteria-induced morphogenesis. The host innate immune response was suppressed under simulated microgravity; however, there was an acceleration of bacteria-induced apoptosis and regression in the host tissues. These results suggest that the space flight environment may alter the cellular interactions between animal hosts and their natural healthy microbiome. PMID:23439280

  8. Impact of simulated microgravity on the normal developmental time line of an animal-bacteria symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Jamie S.; Khodadad, Christina L. M.; Ahrendt, Steven R.; Parrish, Mirina L.

    2013-01-01

    The microgravity environment during space flight imposes numerous adverse effects on animal and microbial physiology. It is unclear, however, how microgravity impacts those cellular interactions between mutualistic microbes and their hosts. Here, we used the symbiosis between the host squid Euprymna scolopes and its luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri as a model system. We examined the impact of simulated microgravity on the timeline of bacteria-induced development in the host light organ, the site of the symbiosis. To simulate the microgravity environment, host squid and symbiosis-competent bacteria were incubated together in high-aspect ratio rotating wall vessel bioreactors and examined throughout the early stages of the bacteria-induced morphogenesis. The host innate immune response was suppressed under simulated microgravity; however, there was an acceleration of bacteria-induced apoptosis and regression in the host tissues. These results suggest that the space flight environment may alter the cellular interactions between animal hosts and their natural healthy microbiome. PMID:23439280

  9. The origin of new qualities in the evolution of interacting dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirvelis, Dobilas

    1999-03-01

    The principles of the emergence of new qualities are analyzed on the basis of the evolutionary analogies of biological systems and models of interacting systems. It is pointed out that competition does not create new qualities; it only elaborates on and disseminates a certain trait of the system. New qualities are generated by symbiotic interactions: mutualism, cooperation and predator-prey-like ones. Special attention is called to the evolution of the predator-prey-like system, as it evolves into an organized and even anticipatory system: when this system becomes a simple cybernetic regulator, when the predator specializes to process ˜1 bit of information; when the system can regulate many parameters and the predator becomes a complex processor of information that controls the activity of the Prey, that is the transformations of matter/energy, when additional memory structures that contain fixed sets of programs emerge (programmed control); and when, finally, a special structure that can model the internal and external world and store information develops, and the whole system becomes an anticipatory system.

  10. Differential spatio-temporal expression of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases regulates apocarotenoid fluxes during AM symbiosis.

    PubMed

    López-Ráez, Juan A; Fernández, Iván; García, Juan M; Berrio, Estefanía; Bonfante, Paola; Walter, Michael H; Pozo, María J

    2015-01-01

    Apocarotenoids are a class of compounds that play important roles in nature. In recent years, a prominent role for these compounds in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis has been shown. They are derived from carotenoids by the action of the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) enzyme family. In the present study, using tomato as a model, the spatio-temporal expression pattern of the CCD genes during AM symbiosis establishment and functioning was investigated. In addition, the levels of the apocarotenoids strigolactones (SLs), C13 ?-ionol and C14 mycorradicin (C13/C14) derivatives were analyzed. The results suggest an increase in SLs promoted by the presence of the AM fungus at the early stages of the interaction, which correlated with an induction of the SL biosynthesis gene SlCCD7. At later stages, induction of SlCCD7 and SlCCD1 expression in arbusculated cells promoted the production of C13/C14 apocarotenoid derivatives. We show here that the biosynthesis of apocarotenoids during AM symbiosis is finely regulated throughout the entire process at the gene expression level, and that CCD7 constitutes a key player in this regulation. Once the symbiosis is established, apocarotenoid flux would be turned towards the production of C13/C14 derivatives, thus reducing SL biosynthesis and maintaining a functional symbiosis. PMID:25480008

  11. Leeches and their microbiota: naturally simple symbiosis models.

    PubMed

    Graf, Joerg; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Rio, Rita V M

    2006-08-01

    Strictly blood-feeding leeches and their limited microbiota provide natural and powerful model systems to examine symbiosis. Blood is devoid of essential nutrients and it is thought that symbiotic bacteria synthesize these for the host. In this review, three distinct leech-microbe associations are described: (i) the mycetome, which is the large symbiont-containing organ associated with the esophagus; (ii) the nephridia and bladders that form the excretory system; and (iii) the digestive tract, where two bacterial species dominate the microbiota. The current knowledge and features of leech biology that promote the investigation of interspecific interactions (host-microbe and microbe-microbe) and their evolution are highlighted. PMID:16843660

  12. The bifunctional plant receptor, OsCERK1, regulates both chitin-triggered immunity and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in rice.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Kana; Kozaki, Toshinori; Kouzai, Yusuke; Ozawa, Kenjirou; Ishii, Kazuo; Asamizu, Erika; Okabe, Yoshihiro; Umehara, Yosuke; Miyamoto, Ayano; Kobae, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Kohki; Kaku, Hanae; Nishizawa, Yoko; Shibuya, Naoto; Nakagawa, Tomomi

    2014-11-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to threats from pathogenic microbes and thus developed an innate immune system to protect themselves. On the other hand, many plants also have the ability to establish endosymbiosis with beneficial microbes such as arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi or rhizobial bacteria, which improves the growth of host plants. How plants evolved these systems managing such opposite plant-microbe interactions is unclear. We show here that knockout (KO) mutants of OsCERK1, a rice receptor kinase essential for chitin signaling, were impaired not only for chitin-triggered defense responses but also for AM symbiosis, indicating the bifunctionality of OsCERK1 in defense and symbiosis. On the other hand, a KO mutant of OsCEBiP, which forms a receptor complex with OsCERK1 and is essential for chitin-triggered immunity, established mycorrhizal symbiosis normally. Therefore, OsCERK1 but not chitin-triggered immunity is required for AM symbiosis. Furthermore, experiments with chimeric receptors showed that the kinase domains of OsCERK1 and homologs from non-leguminous, mycorrhizal plants could trigger nodulation signaling in legume-rhizobium interactions as the kinase domain of Nod factor receptor1 (NFR1), which is essential for triggering the nodulation program in leguminous plants, did. Because leguminous plants are believed to have developed the rhizobial symbiosis on the basis of AM symbiosis, our results suggest that the symbiotic function of ancestral CERK1 in AM symbiosis enabled the molecular evolution to leguminous NFR1 and resulted in the establishment of legume-rhizobia symbiosis. These results also suggest that OsCERK1 and homologs serve as a molecular switch that activates defense or symbiotic responses depending on the infecting microbes. PMID:25231970

  13. Predator-prey relationships of winter flounder, Pleuronectes americanus,

    E-print Network

    , New Jersey 07732 Abstract.- A 39-month study of the effects of cessation of sew- age sludge disposal that are variably influenced by sewage sludge. There were limited changes in winter flounder diets and abun- dance of dominant benthic macro- faunal species following cessation ofsewage sludge disposal. The com- parison

  14. Predator-prey relationships on Apiaceae at an organic farm.

    PubMed

    Shirk, Paul D; Shapiro, Jeffrey P; Reitz, Stuart R; Thomas, Jean M G; Koenig, Rosalie L; Hay-Roe, Mirian M; Buss, Lyle J

    2012-06-01

    Orius insidiosus (Say) and O. pumilio (Champion) were confirmed to be sympatric in north central Florida as the major predators of the Florida flower thrips, Frankliniella bispinosa (Morgan), on flowers of Queen Anne's lace, Daucus carota L. and false Queen Anne's lace, Ammi majus L. F. bispinosa was the predominant thrips observed on both flowers but colonized D. carota to a greater extent and earlier in the season than A. majus. Despite differences in the abundance of F. bispinosa on the two plants, neither Orius species showed host plant affinities. Population profiles for the thrips and Orius spp. followed a density dependent response of prey to predator with a large initial prey population followed by a rapid decline as the predator populations increased. The temporal increases in Orius spp. populations during the flowering season suggest that they were based on reproductive activity. As observed in a previous study, O. insidiosus had a larger population than O. pumilio and also had a predominantly male population on the flowers. By examining carcasses of the prey, there appeared to be no sexual preference of the thrips as prey by the Orius spp. as the prey pattern followed the demographics of the thrips sex ratio. Few immatures of either thrips or Orius spp. were observed on D. carota or A. majus, which suggests that oviposition and nymphal development occurred elsewhere. Based on these findings, D. carota and A. majus could serve as a banker plant system for Orius spp. PMID:22732606

  15. Predator-Prey Relationships on Apiaceae at an Organic Farm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orius insidiosus and O. pumilio were confirmed to be sympatric in north central Florida as the major predators of the Florida flower thrips, Frankliniella bispinosa, on flowers of Queen Anne’s lace, Daucus carota and false Queen Anne’s lace, Ammi majus. F. bispinosa was the predominant thrips observ...

  16. Predator-prey relationships among larval dragonflies, salamanders, and frogs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Caldwell; J. H. Thorp; T. O. Jervey

    1980-01-01

    Tadpoles of the barking tree frog, Hyla gratiosa, are abundant in spring and summer in some ponds and Carolina bays on the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. To determine how these tadpoles survive in the presence of predaceous salamander larvae, Ambystoma talpoideum, and larvae of an aeshnid dragonfly, Anax junius, we determined fields densities and sizes of the

  17. Predator-Prey Dynamics for Rabbits, Trees, and Romance

    E-print Network

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    romantic relationships between individuals. Different romantic styles lead to different dynamics and ultimate fates. Love affairs involving more than two individuals can lead to chaos. Strange attractors

  18. The paradox of enrichment in phytoplankton by induced competitive interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tubay, Jerrold M.; Ito, Hiromu; Uehara, Takashi; Kakishima, Satoshi; Morita, Satoru; Togashi, Tatsuya; Tainaka, Kei-ichi; Niraula, Mohan P.; Casareto, Beatriz E.; Suzuki, Yoshimi; Yoshimura, Jin

    2013-01-01

    The biodiversity loss of phytoplankton with eutrophication has been reported in many aquatic ecosystems, e.g., water pollution and red tides. This phenomenon seems similar, but different from the paradox of enrichment via trophic interactions, e.g., predator-prey systems. We here propose the paradox of enrichment by induced competitive interactions using multiple contact process (a lattice Lotka-Volterra competition model). Simulation results demonstrate how eutrophication invokes more competitions in a competitive ecosystem resulting in the loss of phytoplankton diversity in ecological time. The paradox is enhanced under local interactions, indicating that the limited dispersal of phytoplankton reduces interspecific competition greatly. Thus, the paradox of enrichment appears when eutrophication destroys an ecosystem either by elevated interspecific competition within a trophic level and/or destabilization by trophic interactions. Unless eutrophication due to human activities is ceased, the world's aquatic ecosystems will be at risk. PMID:24089056

  19. A Symbiosis of Animation and Music ROBERT E. PRINGLE BRIAN J. ROSS

    E-print Network

    A Symbiosis of Animation and Music ROBERT E. PRINGLE BRIAN J. ROSS Brock University Department­ jects is investigated. An interactive environment for producing musically­controlled computer animations in a temporal setting, allow complex animation control. The script language has a number of functions that can

  20. Spatial pattern formation in a model ecosystem: exchange between symbiosis and competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tainaka, Kei-ichi; Terazawa, Naotaka; Yoshida, Noriyoshi; Nakagiri, Nariyuki; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2001-04-01

    Spatial pattern dynamics in a lattice ecosystem composed of two species is studied. Depending on values of a parameter, the exchange of relationship between competition and symbiosis takes place. While interaction parameters between species are fixed, spatial distribution of species naturally evolves into a specific pattern of either competition or mutualism.

  1. Bdellovibrio predation in the presence of decoys: Three-way bacterial interactions revealed by mathematical and experimental analyses.

    PubMed

    Hobley, Laura; King, John R; Sockett, R Elizabeth

    2006-10-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a small, gram-negative, motile bacterium that preys upon other gram-negative bacteria, including several known human pathogens. Its predation efficiency is usually studied in pure cultures containing solely B. bacteriovorus and a suitable prey. However, in natural environments, as well as in any possible biomedical uses as an antimicrobial, Bdellovibrio is predatory in the presence of diverse decoys, including live nonsusceptible bacteria, eukaryotic cells, and cell debris. Here we gathered and mathematically modeled data from three-member cultures containing predator, prey, and nonsusceptible bacterial decoys. Specifically, we studied the rate of predation of planktonic late-log-phase Escherichia coli S17-1 prey by B. bacteriovorus HD100, both in the presence and in the absence of Bacillus subtilis nonsporulating strain 671, which acted as a live bacterial decoy. Interestingly, we found that although addition of the live Bacillus decoy did decrease the rate of Bdellovibrio predation in liquid cultures, this addition also resulted in a partially compensatory enhancement of the availability of prey for predation. This effect resulted in a higher final yield of Bdellovibrio than would be predicted for a simple inert decoy. Our mathematical model accounts for both negative and positive effects of predator-prey-decoy interactions in the closed batch environment. In addition, it informs considerations for predator dosing in any future therapeutic applications and sheds some light on considerations for modeling the massively complex interactions of real mixed bacterial populations in nature. PMID:17021228

  2. Getting What Is Served? Feeding Ecology Influencing Parasite-Host Interactions in Invasive Round Goby Neogobius melanostomus

    PubMed Central

    Emde, Sebastian; Kochmann, Judith; Kuhn, Thomas; Plath, Martin; Klimpel, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are increasingly impacted by alien invasive species which have the potential to alter various ecological interactions like predator-prey and host-parasite relationships. Here, we simultaneously examined predator-prey interactions and parasitization patterns of the highly invasive round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) in the rivers Rhine and Main in Germany. A total of 350 N. melanostomus were sampled between June and October 2011. Gut content analysis revealed a broad prey spectrum, partly reflecting temporal and local differences in prey availability. For the major food type (amphipods), species compositions were determined. Amphipod fauna consisted entirely of non-native species and was dominated by Dikerogammarus villosus in the Main and Echinogammarus trichiatus in the Rhine. However, the availability of amphipod species in the field did not reflect their relative abundance in gut contents of N. melanostomus. Only two metazoan parasites, the nematode Raphidascaris acus and the acanthocephalan Pomphorhynchus sp., were isolated from N. melanostomus in all months, whereas unionid glochidia were only detected in June and October in fish from the Main. To analyse infection pathways, we examined 17,356 amphipods and found Pomphorhynchus sp. larvae only in D. villosus in the river Rhine at a prevalence of 0.15%. Dikerogammarus villosus represented the most important amphipod prey for N. melanostomus in both rivers but parasite intensities differed between rivers, suggesting that final hosts (large predatory fishes) may influence host-parasite dynamics of N. melanostomus in its introduced range. PMID:25338158

  3. Getting what is served? Feeding ecology influencing parasite-host interactions in invasive round goby Neogobius melanostomus.

    PubMed

    Emde, Sebastian; Kochmann, Judith; Kuhn, Thomas; Plath, Martin; Klimpel, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are increasingly impacted by alien invasive species which have the potential to alter various ecological interactions like predator-prey and host-parasite relationships. Here, we simultaneously examined predator-prey interactions and parasitization patterns of the highly invasive round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) in the rivers Rhine and Main in Germany. A total of 350 N. melanostomus were sampled between June and October 2011. Gut content analysis revealed a broad prey spectrum, partly reflecting temporal and local differences in prey availability. For the major food type (amphipods), species compositions were determined. Amphipod fauna consisted entirely of non-native species and was dominated by Dikerogammarus villosus in the Main and Echinogammarus trichiatus in the Rhine. However, the availability of amphipod species in the field did not reflect their relative abundance in gut contents of N. melanostomus. Only two metazoan parasites, the nematode Raphidascaris acus and the acanthocephalan Pomphorhynchus sp., were isolated from N. melanostomus in all months, whereas unionid glochidia were only detected in June and October in fish from the Main. To analyse infection pathways, we examined 17,356 amphipods and found Pomphorhynchus sp. larvae only in D. villosus in the river Rhine at a prevalence of 0.15%. Dikerogammarus villosus represented the most important amphipod prey for N. melanostomus in both rivers but parasite intensities differed between rivers, suggesting that final hosts (large predatory fishes) may influence host-parasite dynamics of N. melanostomus in its introduced range. PMID:25338158

  4. Bacterial Leaf Symbiosis in Angiosperms: Host Specificity without Co-Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Benny; Vandamme, Peter; Merckx, Vincent; Smets, Erik; Dessein, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial leaf symbiosis is a unique and intimate interaction between bacteria and flowering plants, in which endosymbionts are organized in specialized leaf structures. Previously, bacterial leaf symbiosis has been described as a cyclic and obligate interaction in which the endosymbionts are vertically transmitted between plant generations and lack autonomous growth. Theoretically this allows for co-speciation between leaf nodulated plants and their endosymbionts. We sequenced the nodulated Burkholderia endosymbionts of 54 plant species from known leaf nodulated angiosperm genera, i.e. Ardisia, Pavetta, Psychotria and Sericanthe. Phylogenetic reconstruction of bacterial leaf symbionts and closely related free-living bacteria indicates the occurrence of multiple horizontal transfers of bacteria from the environment to leaf nodulated plant species. This rejects the hypothesis of a long co-speciation process between the bacterial endosymbionts and their host plants. Our results indicate a recent evolutionary process towards a stable and host specific interaction confirming the proposed maternal transmission mode of the endosymbionts through the seeds. Divergence estimates provide evidence for a relatively recent origin of bacterial leaf symbiosis, dating back to the Miocene (5–23 Mya). This geological epoch was characterized by cool and arid conditions, which may have triggered the origin of bacterial leaf symbiosis. PMID:21915326

  5. The symbiont side of symbiosis: do microbes really benefit?

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Justine R.; Gerardo, Nicole M.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial associations are integral to all eukaryotes. Mutualism, the interaction of two species for the benefit of both, is an important aspect of microbial associations, with evidence that multicellular organisms in particular benefit from microbes. However, the microbe’s perspective has largely been ignored, and it is unknown whether most microbial symbionts benefit from their associations with hosts. It has been presumed that microbial symbionts receive host-derived nutrients or a competition-free environment with reduced predation, but there have been few empirical tests, or even critical assessments, of these assumptions. We evaluate these hypotheses based on available evidence, which indicate reduced competition and predation are not universal benefits for symbionts. Some symbionts do receive nutrients from their host, but this has not always been linked to a corresponding increase in symbiont fitness. We recommend experiments to test symbiont fitness using current experimental systems of symbiosis and detail considerations for other systems. Incorporating symbiont fitness into symbiosis research will provide insight into the evolution of mutualistic interactions and cooperation in general. PMID:25309530

  6. 7/29/13 The Legume-Rhizobium Symbiosis -Ecology -Oxford Bibliographies www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780199830060/obo-9780199830060-0095.xml?print 1/18

    E-print Network

    Sachs, Joel

    7/29/13 The Legume-Rhizobium Symbiosis - Ecology - Oxford Bibliographies www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780199830060/obo-9780199830060-0095.xml?print 1/18 The Legume-Rhizobium Symbiosis Joel L. Sachs, Kelsey A for sugars from the plant. This legume-rhizobium interaction has become a key model

  7. Rich-and-Poor Model for Human and Nature Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motesharrei, S.; Kalnay, E.; Rivas, J.; Rich-n-Poor

    2011-12-01

    Historical evidence shows collapse of several civilizations in different regions of the world. Jared Diamond presents an account of such societal failures in his 2005 book "Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed." As a precursor to building a complex model for interaction of human and environment, we developed a "thought-experiment" model based on Lotka-Volterra equations for the interaction of two species, known as the Predator-Prey model. We constructed a fairly simple rich-and-poor model that includes only four state variables (or stocks): Rich Population, Poor Population, Nature, and Rich Savings. We observed several scenarios for growth of societies by varying the model's parameter values, including scenarios that resemble the catastrophic fall of ancient civilizations such as the Maya and Anasazi.

  8. ORIGINAL ARTICLE A novel symbiosis between

    E-print Network

    Macalady, Jenn

    that are symbiotic with sulfur-oxidizing chemoautotrophic bacteria are ubiquitous, and often numericallyORIGINAL ARTICLE A novel symbiosis between chemoautotrophic bacteria and a freshwater cave amphipod animals and chemoautotrophic bacteria form the foundation of entire ecosystems at deep-sea hydrothermal

  9. Signaling in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Maria J

    2005-01-01

    Many microorganisms form symbioses with plants that range, on a continuous scale, from parasitic to mutualistic. Among these, the most widespread mutualistic symbiosis is the arbuscular mycorrhiza, formed between arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and vascular flowering plants. These associations occur in terrestrial ecosystems throughout the world and have a global impact on plant phosphorus nutrition. The arbuscular mycorrhiza is an endosymbiosis in which the fungus inhabits the root cortical cells and obtains carbon provided by the plant while it transfers mineral nutrients from the soil to the cortical cells. Development of the symbiosis involves the differentiation of both symbionts to create novel symbiotic interfaces within the root cells. The aim of this review is to explore the current understanding of the signals and signaling pathways used by the symbionts for the development of the AM symbiosis. Although the signal molecules used for initial communication are not yet known, recent studies point to their existence. Within the plant, there is evidence of arbuscular mycorrhiza-specific signals and of systemic signaling that influences phosphate-starvation responses and root development. The landmark cloning of three plant signaling proteins required for the development of the symbiosis has provided the first insights into a signaling pathway that is used by AM fungi and by rhizobia for their symbiotic associations with legumes. PMID:16153162

  10. Symbiosis of Thioautotrophic Bacteria with Riftia Introduction

    E-print Network

    Stewart, Frank

    into the processes by which metabolites (e.g., carbon, sulfide, nitrogen) and waste products (e.g., protons) cycle-rich hydrothermal vents. In the decade following the initial description of this symbiosis in 1981 (Cavanaugh et al power for autotrophic carbon fixation. Given their ability to synthesize C3 compounds from a C1 compound

  11. Unethical and Deadly Symbiosis in Higher Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Larry Crumbley; Ronald Flinn; Kenneth J. Reichelt

    2012-01-01

    As administrators are pressured to increase retention rates in accounting departments, and higher education in general, a deadly symbiosis is occurring. Most students and parents only wish high grades, so year after year many educators engage in unethical grade inflation and course work deflation. Since administrators use the students to audit the educators' performance in order to achieve their goal

  12. Interaction strengths in balanced carbon cycles and the absence of a relation between ecosystem complexity and stability

    PubMed Central

    Neutel, Anje-Margriet; Thorne, Michael AS

    2014-01-01

    The strength of interactions is crucial to the stability of ecological networks. However, the patterns of interaction strengths in mathematical models of ecosystems have not yet been based upon independent observations of balanced material fluxes. Here we analyse two Antarctic ecosystems for which the interaction strengths are obtained: (1) directly, from independently measured material fluxes, (2) for the complete ecosystem and (3) with a close match between species and ‘trophic groups’. We analyse the role of recycling, predation and competition and find that ecosystem stability can be estimated by the strengths of the shortest positive and negative predator-prey feedbacks in the network. We show the generality of our explanation with another 21 observed food webs, comparing random-type parameterisations of interaction strengths with empirical ones. Our results show how functional relationships dominate over average-network topology. They make clear that the classic complexity-instability paradox is essentially an artificial interaction-strength result. PMID:24636521

  13. Shifting species interactions in terrestrial dryland ecosystems under altered water availability and climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCluney, Kevin E.; Belnap, Jayne; Collins, Scott L.; González, Angélica L.; Hagen, Elizabeth M.; Holland, J. Nathaniel; Kotler, Burt P.; Maestre, Fernando T.; Smith, Stanley D.; Wolf, Blair O.

    2012-01-01

    Species interactions play key roles in linking the responses of populations, communities, and ecosystems to environmental change. For instance, species interactions are an important determinant of the complexity of changes in trophic biomass with variation in resources. Water resources are a major driver of terrestrial ecology and climate change is expected to greatly alter the distribution of this critical resource. While previous studies have documented strong effects of global environmental change on species interactions in general, responses can vary from region to region. Dryland ecosystems occupy more than one-third of the Earth's land mass, are greatly affected by changes in water availability, and are predicted to be hotspots of climate change. Thus, it is imperative to understand the effects of environmental change on these globally significant ecosystems. Here, we review studies of the responses of population-level plant-plant, plant-herbivore, and predator-prey interactions to changes in water availability in dryland environments in order to develop new hypotheses and predictions to guide future research. To help explain patterns of interaction outcomes, we developed a conceptual model that views interaction outcomes as shifting between (1) competition and facilitation (plant-plant), (2) herbivory, neutralism, or mutualism (plant-herbivore), or (3) neutralism and predation (predator-prey), as water availability crosses physiological, behavioural, or population-density thresholds. We link our conceptual model to hypothetical scenarios of current and future water availability to make testable predictions about the influence of changes in water availability on species interactions. We also examine potential implications of our conceptual model for the relative importance of top-down effects and the linearity of patterns of change in trophic biomass with changes in water availability. Finally, we highlight key research needs and some possible broader impacts of our findings. Overall, we hope to stimulate and guide future research that links changes in water availability to patterns of species interactions and the dynamics of populations and communities in dryland ecosystems.

  14. Structural basis for regulation of rhizobial nodulation and symbiosis gene expression by the regulatory protein NolR.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon Goo; Krishnan, Hari B; Jez, Joseph M

    2014-04-29

    The symbiosis between rhizobial microbes and host plants involves the coordinated expression of multiple genes, which leads to nodule formation and nitrogen fixation. As part of the transcriptional machinery for nodulation and symbiosis across a range of Rhizobium, NolR serves as a global regulatory protein. Here, we present the X-ray crystal structures of NolR in the unliganded form and complexed with two different 22-base pair (bp) double-stranded operator sequences (oligos AT and AA). Structural and biochemical analysis of NolR reveals protein-DNA interactions with an asymmetric operator site and defines a mechanism for conformational switching of a key residue (Gln56) to accommodate variation in target DNA sequences from diverse rhizobial genes for nodulation and symbiosis. This conformational switching alters the energetic contributions to DNA binding without changes in affinity for the target sequence. Two possible models for the role of NolR in the regulation of different nodulation and symbiosis genes are proposed. To our knowledge, these studies provide the first structural insight on the regulation of genes involved in the agriculturally and ecologically important symbiosis of microbes and plants that leads to nodule formation and nitrogen fixation. PMID:24733893

  15. Long-distance transport of signals during symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhi-Ping; Illana, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Legumes enter nodule symbioses with nitrogen-fixing bacteria (rhizobia), whereas most flowering plants establish symbiotic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Once first steps of symbiosis are initiated, nodule formation and mycorrhization in legumes is negatively controlled by a shoot-derived inhibitor (SDI), a phenomenon termed autoregulation. According to current views, autoregulation of nodulation and mycorrhization in legumes is regulated in a similar way. CLE peptides induced in response to rhizobial nodulation signals (Nod factors) have been proposed to represent the ascending long-distance signals to the shoot. Although not proven yet, these CLE peptides are likely perceived by leucine-rich repeat (LRR) autoregulation receptor kinases in the shoot. Autoregulation of mycorrhization in non-legumes is reminiscent to the phenomenon of “systemic acquired resistance” in plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:21455020

  16. Effects of multiple climate change factors on the tall fescue–fungal endophyte symbiosis: infection frequency and tissue chemistry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    •Climate change (altered CO2, warming, and precipitation) may affect plant–microbial interactions, such as the Lolium arundinaceum–Neotyphodium coenophialum symbiosis, to alter future ecosystem structure and function. •To assess this possibility, tall fescue tillers were collected from an existing c...

  17. Naïveté in novel ecological interactions: lessons from theory and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Carthey, Alexandra J R; Banks, Peter B

    2014-11-01

    The invasion of alien species into areas beyond their native ranges is having profound effects on ecosystems around the world. In particular, novel alien predators are causing rapid extinctions or declines in many native prey species, and these impacts are generally attributed to ecological naïveté or the failure to recognise a novel enemy and respond appropriately due to a lack of experience. Despite a large body of research concerning the recognition of alien predation risk by native prey, the literature lacks an extensive review of naïveté theory that specifically asks how naïveté between novel pairings of alien predators and native prey disrupts our classical understanding of predator-prey ecological theory. Here we critically review both classic and current theory relating to predator-prey interactions between both predators and prey with shared evolutionary histories, and those that are ecologically 'mismatched' through the outcomes of biological invasions. The review is structured around the multiple levels of naïveté framework of Banks & Dickman (2007), and concepts and examples are discussed as they relate to each stage in the process from failure to recognise a novel predator (Level 1 naïveté), through to appropriate (Level 2) and effective (Level 3) antipredator responses. We discuss the relative contributions of recognition, cue types and the implied risk of cues used by novel alien and familiar native predators, to the probability that prey will recognise a novel predator. We then cover the antipredator response types available to prey and the factors that predict whether these responses will be appropriate or effective against novel alien and familiar native predators. In general, the level of naïveté of native prey can be predicted by the degree of novelty (in terms of appearance, behaviour or habitat use) of the alien predator compared to native predators with which prey are experienced. Appearance in this sense includes cue types, spatial distribution and implied risk of cues, whilst behaviour and habitat use include hunting modes and the habitat domain of the predator. Finally, we discuss whether the antipredator response can occur without recognition per se, for example in the case of morphological defences, and then consider a potential extension of the multiple levels of naïveté framework. The review concludes with recommendations for the design and execution of naïveté experiments incorporating the key concepts and issues covered here. This review aims to critique and combine classic ideas about predator-prey interactions with current naïveté theory, to further develop the multiple levels of naïveté framework, and to suggest the most fruitful avenues for future research. PMID:25319946

  18. Interactive effects of ocean acidification and rising sea temperatures alter predation rate and predator selectivity in reef fish communities.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Maud C O; Munday, Philip L; Rummer, Jodie L; McCormick, Mark I; Corkill, Katherine; Watson, Sue-Ann; Allan, Bridie J M; Meekan, Mark G; Chivers, Douglas P

    2015-05-01

    Ocean warming and acidification are serious threats to marine life. While each stressor alone has been studied in detail, their combined effects on the outcome of ecological interactions are poorly understood. We measured predation rates and predator selectivity of two closely related species of damselfish exposed to a predatory dottyback. We found temperature and CO2 interacted synergistically on overall predation rate, but antagonistically on predator selectivity. Notably, elevated CO2 or temperature alone reversed predator selectivity, but the interaction between the two stressors cancelled selectivity. Routine metabolic rates of the two prey showed strong species differences in tolerance to CO2 and not temperature, but these differences did not correlate with recorded mortality. This highlights the difficulty of linking species-level physiological tolerance to resulting ecological outcomes. This study is the first to document both synergistic and antagonistic effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on a crucial ecological process like predator-prey dynamics. PMID:25430991

  19. Signaling in Ectomycorrhizal Symbiosis Establishment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paula Baptista; Rui Manuel Tavares; Teresa Lino-Neto

    \\u000a For the ectomycorrhizal establishment, different signals must be exchanged between plants and fungal partners. After a brief\\u000a description of the ectomycorrhiza formation, the present chapter highlights the recent works on the nature of the signal molecules\\u000a involved in this type of plant–microbe interaction. Signals involved in the fungal spore germination and mycelium growth,\\u000a including the chemoattraction of the mycelium by

  20. The Symbiosis Evolution Model of Innovation Poles in Regional Innovation System: Evolution of Regional Innovation System Depends on Symbiosis Coefficient

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zibiao Li; Baomin Hu; Wei Zhao

    2009-01-01

    In this article, an innovation pole is defined as a regional industrial innovation subsystem producing dense innovative activities, being representative in innovation scale, and driving the development of regional economy. We regard the regional innovation system as a symbiosis evolution system of the multi-innovation poles. Then, using of the theory and methods of ecology, this article analyses the symbiosis evolution

  1. Oak Root Response to Ectomycorrhizal Symbiosis Establishment: RNA-Seq Derived Transcript Identification and Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Lino-Neto, Teresa; Monteiro, Filipa; Figueiredo, Andreia; Sousa, Lisete; Pais, Maria Salomé; Tavares, Rui; Paulo, Octávio S.

    2014-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal symbiosis is essential for the life and health of trees in temperate and boreal forests where it plays a major role in nutrient cycling and in functioning of the forest ecosystem. Trees with ectomycorrhizal root tips are more tolerant to environmental stresses, such as drought, and biotic stresses such as root pathogens. Detailed information on these molecular processes is essential for the understanding of symbiotic tissue development in order to optimize the benefits of this natural phenomenon. Next generation sequencing tools allow the analysis of non model ectomycorrhizal plant-fungal interactions that can contribute to find the “symbiosis toolkits” and better define the role of each partner in the mutualistic interaction. By using 454 pyrosequencing we compared ectomycorrhizal cork oak roots with non-symbiotic roots. From the two cDNA libraries sequenced, over 2 million reads were obtained that generated 19552 cork oak root unique transcripts. A total of 2238 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed when ECM roots were compared with non-symbiotic roots. Identification of up- and down-regulated gens in ectomycorrhizal roots lead to a number of insights into the molecular mechanisms governing this important symbiosis. In cork oak roots, ectomycorrhizal colonization resulted in extensive cell wall remodelling, activation of the secretory pathway, alterations in flavonoid biosynthesis, and expression of genes involved in the recognition of fungal effectors. In addition, we identified genes with putative roles in symbiotic processes such as nutrient exchange with the fungal partner, lateral root formation or root hair decay. These findings provide a global overview of the transcriptome of an ectomycorrhizal host root, and constitute a foundation for future studies on the molecular events controlling this important symbiosis. PMID:24859293

  2. Cell wall remodeling in mycorrhizal symbiosis: a way towards biotrophism

    PubMed Central

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Bonfante, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Cell walls are deeply involved in the molecular talk between partners during plant and microbe interactions, and their role in mycorrhizae, i.e., the widespread symbiotic associations established between plant roots and soil fungi, has been investigated extensively. All mycorrhizal interactions achieve full symbiotic functionality through the development of an extensive contact surface between the plant and fungal cells, where signals and nutrients are exchanged. The exchange of molecules between the fungal and the plant cytoplasm takes place both through their plasma membranes and their cell walls; a functional compartment, known as the symbiotic interface, is thus defined. Among all the symbiotic interfaces, the complex intracellular interface of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis has received a great deal of attention since its first description. Here, in fact, the host plasma membrane invaginates and proliferates around all the developing intracellular fungal structures, and cell wall material is laid down between this membrane and the fungal cell surface. By contrast, in ectomycorrhizae (ECM), where the fungus grows outside and between the root cells, plant and fungal cell walls are always in direct contact and form the interface between the two partners. The organization and composition of cell walls within the interface compartment is a topic that has attracted widespread attention, both in ecto- and endomycorrhizae. The aim of this review is to provide a general overview of the current knowledge on this topic by integrating morphological observations, which have illustrated cell wall features during mycorrhizal interactions, with the current data produced by genomic and transcriptomic approaches. PMID:24926297

  3. Cell wall remodeling in mycorrhizal symbiosis: a way towards biotrophism.

    PubMed

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Bonfante, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Cell walls are deeply involved in the molecular talk between partners during plant and microbe interactions, and their role in mycorrhizae, i.e., the widespread symbiotic associations established between plant roots and soil fungi, has been investigated extensively. All mycorrhizal interactions achieve full symbiotic functionality through the development of an extensive contact surface between the plant and fungal cells, where signals and nutrients are exchanged. The exchange of molecules between the fungal and the plant cytoplasm takes place both through their plasma membranes and their cell walls; a functional compartment, known as the symbiotic interface, is thus defined. Among all the symbiotic interfaces, the complex intracellular interface of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis has received a great deal of attention since its first description. Here, in fact, the host plasma membrane invaginates and proliferates around all the developing intracellular fungal structures, and cell wall material is laid down between this membrane and the fungal cell surface. By contrast, in ectomycorrhizae (ECM), where the fungus grows outside and between the root cells, plant and fungal cell walls are always in direct contact and form the interface between the two partners. The organization and composition of cell walls within the interface compartment is a topic that has attracted widespread attention, both in ecto- and endomycorrhizae. The aim of this review is to provide a general overview of the current knowledge on this topic by integrating morphological observations, which have illustrated cell wall features during mycorrhizal interactions, with the current data produced by genomic and transcriptomic approaches. PMID:24926297

  4. The microbiota, chemical symbiosis, and human disease.

    PubMed

    Redinbo, Matthew R

    2014-11-25

    Our understanding of mammalian-microbial mutualism has expanded by combing microbial sequencing with evolving molecular and cellular methods, as well as unique model systems. Here, the recent literature linking the microbiota to diseases of three of the key mammalian mucosal epithelial compartments-nasal, lung, and gastrointestinal tract-is reviewed with a focus on new knowledge about the taxa, species, proteins, and chemistry that promote health and impact progression toward disease. The information presented is further organized by specific diseases now associated with the microbiota: Staphylococcus aureus infection and rhinosinusitis in the nasal-sinus mucosa, as well as cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and asthma in the pulmonary tissues. For the vast and microbially dynamic gastrointestinal compartment, several disorders are considered, including obesity, atherosclerosis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, drug toxicity, and even autism. Our appreciation of the chemical symbiosis ongoing between human systems and the microbiota continues to grow and suggests new opportunities for modulating this symbiosis using designed interventions. PMID:25305474

  5. Coevolution in Rhizobium-legume symbiosis?

    PubMed

    Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2009-08-01

    Legume nodules, specialized structures for nitrogen fixation, are probably the result of coevolution of plants and ancestral rhizobia. Among the evolutionary processes leading to legume radiation and divergence, coevolution with rhizobia might have occurred. Alternatively, bacteria could have been constantly selected by plants, with bacteria slightly influencing plant evolution (required to fulfill the criteria for a coevolutionary hypothesis). Evidence of bacterial effects on plant evolution is scarce but being searched for. Bacterial genetic plasticity may be indicative of the large capacity of Rhizobium to adapt to legumes. Events such as symbiotic replacement, easy recruitment of symbiotic bacteria by legume plants, and lateral transfer of symbiotic genes seem to erase the coevolutionary or selected relationships in rhizobial-legume symbiosis. In particular, the hypotheses proposed are (1) Rhizobium replaced Bradyrhizobium in a few hosts of the Phaseoleae tribe, Phaseolus vulgaris and P. coccineus; (2) Rhizobium etli as a species did not coevolve with bean; and (3) beta-Proteobacteria replaced alpha-Proteobacteria in South American mimosas. Novel results on symbiosis suggest a more complex evolutionary process for nodulation that may include multiple organisms, such as mycorrhiza, nematodes, and other bacteria in addition to rhizobia. PMID:19485766

  6. Bacterial RuBisCO Is Required for Efficient Bradyrhizobium/Aeschynomene Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Gourion, Benjamin; Delmotte, Nathanaël; Bonaldi, Katia; Nouwen, Nico; Vorholt, Julia A.; Giraud, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Rhizobia and legume plants establish symbiotic associations resulting in the formation of organs specialized in nitrogen fixation. In such organs, termed nodules, bacteria differentiate into bacteroids which convert atmospheric nitrogen and supply the plant with organic nitrogen. As a counterpart, bacteroids receive carbon substrates from the plant. This rather simple model of metabolite exchange underlies symbiosis but does not describe the complexity of bacteroids' central metabolism. A previous study using the tropical symbiotic model Aeschynomene indica/photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS278 suggested a role of the bacterial Calvin cycle during the symbiotic process. Herein we investigated the role of two RuBisCO gene clusters of Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS278 during symbiosis. Using gene reporter fusion strains, we showed that cbbL1 but not the paralogous cbbL2 is expressed during symbiosis. Congruently, CbbL1 was detected in bacteroids by proteome analysis. The importance of CbbL1 for symbiotic nitrogen fixation was proven by a reverse genetic approach. Interestingly, despite its symbiotic nitrogen fixation defect, the cbbL1 mutant was not affected in nitrogen fixation activity under free living state. This study demonstrates a critical role for bacterial RuBisCO during a rhizobia/legume symbiotic interaction. PMID:21750740

  7. The Genome of Laccaria Bi color Provides Insights into Mycorrhizal Symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F [UMR, France; Aerts, A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ahren, D [Lund University, Sweden; Brun, A [UMR, France; Duchaussoy, F [UMR, France; Gibon, J [UMR, France; Kohler, A [UMR, France; Lindquist, E [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pereda, V [UMR, France; Salamov, A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Shapiro, HJ [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wuyts, J [UMR, France; Blaudez, D [UMR, France; Buee, M [UMR, France; Brokstein, P [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Canbeck, B [Lund University, Sweden; Cohen, D [UMR, France; Courty, PE [UMR, France; Coutinho, PM [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS and Unive; Danchin, E [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS and Unive; Delaruelle, C [UMR, France; Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deveau, A [UMR, France; DiFazio, Stephen P [West Virginia University; Duplessis, S [UMR, France; Fraissinet-Tachet, L [Universite de Lyon, France; Lucic, E [UMR, France; Frey-Klett, P [UMR, France; Fourrey, C [UMR, France; Feussner, I [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Gay, G [Universite de Lyon, France; Grimwood, Jane [Stanford University; Hoegger, P J [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Jain, P [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Kilaru, S [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Labbe, J [UMR, France; Lin, Y C [Ghent University, Belgium; Legue, V [UMR, France; Le Tacon, F [UMR, France; Marmeisse, R [Universite de Lyon, France; Melayah, D [Universite de Lyon, France; Montanini, B [UMR, France; Muratet, M [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Nehls, U [Eberhard-Karls-Universitat, Tubingen, Germany; Niculita-Hirzel, H [University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Oudot-Le Secq, M P [UMR, France; Peter, M [UMR, France; Quesneville, H [Unite de Recherches en Genomique-Info,Evry Cedex; Rajashekar, B [Lund University, Sweden; Reich, M [UMR, France; Rouhler, N [UMR, France; Schmutz, Jeremy [Stanford University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Chalot, M [UMR, France; Henrissat, B [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS and Unive; Kues, U [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Lucas, S [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Van de Peer, Y [Ghent University, Belgium; Podila, G [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Polle, A [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Pukkila, P J [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rouze, P [Ghent University, Belgium; Sanders, I R [University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Stajich, J E [University of California, Berkeley; Tunlid, A [Lund University, Sweden; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Grigoriev, I. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2008-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbioses the union of roots and soil fungi are universal in terrestrial ecosystems and may have been fundamental to land colonization by plants1,2. Boreal, temperate and montane forests all depend on ectomycorrhizae1. Identification of the primary factors that regulate symbiotic development and metabolic activity will therefore open the door to understanding the role of ectomycorrhizae in plant development and physiology, allowing the full ecological significance of this symbiosis to be explored. Here we report the genome sequence of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor (Fig. 1) and highlight gene sets involved in rhizosphere colonization and symbiosis. This 65-megabase genome assembly contains 20,000 predicted protein-encoding genes and a very large number of transposons and repeated sequences. We detected unexpected genomic features, most notably a battery of effector-type small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown function, several of which are only expressed in symbiotic tissues. The most highly expressed SSP accumulates in the proliferating hyphae colonizing the host root. The ectomycorrhizae-specific SSPs probably have a decisive role in the establishment of the symbiosis. The unexpected observation that the genome of L. bicolor lacks carbohydrate-active enzymes involved in degradation of plant cell walls, but maintains the ability to degrade non-plant cell wall polysaccharides, reveals the dual saprotrophic and biotrophic lifestyle of the mycorrhizal fungus that enables it to grow within both soil and living plant roots. The predicted gene inventory of the L. bicolor genome, therefore, points to previously unknown mechanisms of symbiosis operating in biotrophic mycorrhizal fungi. The availability of this genome provides an unparalleled opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the processes by which symbionts interact with plants within their ecosystem to perform vital functions in the carbon and nitrogen cycles that are fundamental to sustainable plant productivity.

  8. Growth Conditions Determine the DNF2 Requirement for Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Mondy, Samuel; Ratet, Pascal; Gourion, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Rhizobia and legumes are able to interact in a symbiotic way leading to the development of root nodules. Within nodules, rhizobia fix nitrogen for the benefit of the plant. These interactions are efficient because spectacularly high densities of nitrogen fixing rhizobia are maintained in the plant cells. DNF2, a Medicago truncatula gene has been described as required for nitrogen fixation, bacteroid’s persistence and to prevent defense-like reactions in the nodules. This manuscript shows that a Rhizobium mutant unable to differentiate is not sufficient to trigger defense-like reactions in this organ. Furthermore, we show that the requirement of DNF2 for effective symbiosis can be overcome by permissive growth conditions. The dnf2 knockout mutants grown in vitro on agarose or Phytagel as gelling agents are able to produce nodules fixing nitrogen with the same efficiency as the wild-type. However, when agarose medium is supplemented with the plant defense elicitor ulvan, the dnf2 mutant recovers the fix? phenotype. Together, our data show that plant growth conditions impact the gene requirement for symbiotic nitrogen fixation and suggest that they influence the symbiotic suppression of defense reactions in nodules. PMID:24632747

  9. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis can mitigate the negative effects of night warming on physiological traits of Medicago truncatula L.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yajun; Wu, Songlin; Sun, Yuqing; Li, Tao; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Caiyan; Lin, Ge; Chen, Baodong

    2015-02-01

    Elevated night temperature, one of the main climate warming scenarios, can have profound effects on plant growth and metabolism. However, little attention has been paid to the potential role of mycorrhizal associations in plant responses to night warming, although it is well known that symbiotic fungi can protect host plants against various environmental stresses. In the present study, physiological traits of Medicago truncatula L. in association with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis were investigated under simulated night warming. A constant increase in night temperature of 1.53 °C significantly reduced plant shoot and root biomass, flower and seed number, leaf sugar concentration, and shoot Zn and root P concentrations. However, the AM association essentially mitigated these negative effects of night warming by improving plant growth, especially through increased root biomass, root to shoot ratio, and shoot Zn and root P concentrations. A significant interaction was observed between R. irregularis inoculation and night warming in influencing both root sucrose concentration and expression of sucrose synthase (SusS) genes, suggesting that AM symbiosis and increased night temperature jointly regulated plant sugar metabolism. Night warming stimulated AM fungal colonization but did not influence arbuscule abundance, symbiosis-related plant or fungal gene expression, or growth of extraradical mycelium, indicating little effect of night warming on the development or functioning of AM symbiosis. These findings highlight the importance of mycorrhizal symbiosis in assisting plant resilience to climate warming. PMID:25033924

  10. Quantifying potential industrial symbiosis : a case study of brick manufacturing

    E-print Network

    Hodge, Matthew M

    2007-01-01

    Humanity is currently on an unsustainable path of growth and development. One tool to address sustainability in industrial activities is Industrial Symbiosis, which is the study of cooperation across industry boundaries ...

  11. WASTE TO VALUE: INCORPORATING INDUSTRIAL SYMBIOSIS FOR SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technical Challenge: Investigators will examine the role of technology innovations as well as environmental justice (EJ) obligations in initiating and implementing urban-industrial symbiosis in Commerce City (CC), CO. The sustainability challenge invol...

  12. Symbiosis and the origin of eukaryotic motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Hinkle, G.

    1991-01-01

    Ongoing work to test the hypothesis of the origin of eukaryotic cell organelles by microbial symbioses is discussed. Because of the widespread acceptance of the serial endosymbiotic theory (SET) of the origin of plastids and mitochondria, the idea of the symbiotic origin of the centrioles and axonemes for spirochete bacteria motility symbiosis was tested. Intracellular microtubular systems are purported to derive from symbiotic associations between ancestral eukaryotic cells and motile bacteria. Four lines of approach to this problem are being pursued: (1) cloning the gene of a tubulin-like protein discovered in Spirocheata bajacaliforniesis; (2) seeking axoneme proteins in spirochets by antibody cross-reaction; (3) attempting to cultivate larger, free-living spirochetes; and (4) studying in detail spirochetes (e.g., Cristispira) symbiotic with marine animals. Other aspects of the investigation are presented.

  13. Fair Trade in the Underworld: the Ectomycorrhizal Symbiosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Martin

    The ectomycorrhizal fungi have a beneficial impact on plant growth and nutrient cycling in forest ecosystems. The differentiation\\u000a of an effective symbiosis induces a series of complex and overlapping morphogenetic processes in the colonizing mycorrhizal\\u000a hyphae and lateral roots of host trees. Up- and down-regulation of gene expression is a major mechanism for controlling ectomycorrhizal\\u000a symbiosis development and functioning. Transcript

  14. Industrial Symbiosis in Puerto Rico: Environmentally Related Agglomeration Economies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marian R. Chertow; Weslynne S. Ashton; Juan C. Espinosa

    2008-01-01

    Chertow M. R., Ashton W. S. and Espinosa J. C. Industrial symbiosis in Puerto Rico: environmentally related agglomeration economies, Regional Studies. Industrial symbiosis, a sub-field of industrial ecology, examines the flow of water, energy, materials, and by-products across firms in geographic proximity. Environmentally related co-location benefits often result that have not been a focus of traditional agglomeration economies, but extend

  15. Academia–Industry Symbiosis in Organic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Michaudel, Quentin; Ishihara, Yoshihiro; Baran, Phil S.

    2015-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Collaboration between academia and industry is a growing phenomenon within the chemistry community. These sectors have long held strong ties since academia traditionally trains the future scientists of the corporate world, but the recent drastic decrease of public funding is motivating the academic world to seek more private grants. This concept of industrial “sponsoring” is not new, and in the past, some companies granted substantial amounts of money per annum to various academic institutions in exchange for a prime access to all their scientific discoveries and inventions. However, academic and industrial interests were not always aligned, and therefore the investment has become increasingly difficult to justify from industry's point of view. With fluctuating macroeconomic factors, this type of unrestricted grant has become more rare and has been largely replaced by smaller and more focused partnerships. In our view, forging a partnership with industry can be a golden opportunity for both parties and can represent a true symbiosis. This type of project-specific collaboration is engendered by industry's desire to access very specific academic expertise that is required for the development of new technologies at the forefront of science. Since financial pressures do not allow companies to spend the time to acquire this expertise and even less to explore fundamental research, partnering with an academic laboratory whose research is related to the problem gives them a viable alternative. From an academic standpoint, it represents the perfect occasion to apply “pure science” research concepts to solve problems that benefit humanity. Moreover, it offers a unique opportunity for students to face challenges from the “real world” at an early stage of their career. Although not every problem in industry can be solved by research developments in academia, we argue that there is significant scientific overlap between these two seemingly disparate groups, thereby presenting an opportunity for a symbiosis. This type of partnership is challenging but can be a win-win situation if both parties agree on some general guidelines. PMID:25702529

  16. Determinant factors of industrial symbiosis: greening Pasir Gudang industrial park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, B. T.; Ho, C. S.; Matsuoka, Y.; Chau, L. W.; Gomi, K.

    2014-02-01

    Green industry has been identified as an important element in attaining greater sustainability. It calls for harmonizing robust economic growth with environment protection. Industries, particularly in developing and transitional nations such as Malaysia, are in need of a reform. Many experts and international organizations suggest the concept of industrial symbiosis. Mainly, there are successful cases of industrial symbiosis practices around the world. However, there are numerous cases of failure too. As industrial symbiosis is an emerging new approach, with a short history of two decades, a lot of researches are generally focused on narrow context and technical details. There is a lack of concerted efforts to look into the drivers and barriers of industrial symbiosis across different cases. This paper aims to examine the factors influencing the development of industrial symbiosis from various countries to supports such networks to evolve in Pasir Gudang. The findings show institution, law and regulation, finance, awareness and capacity building, technology, research and development, information, collaboration, market, geography proximity, environmental issues and industry structure affect the formation of industrial symbiosis.

  17. Soil nematodes mediate positive interactions between legume plants and rhizobium bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jun-ichiro Horiuchi; Balakrishnan Prithiviraj; Harsh P. Bais; Bruce A. Kimball; Jorge M. Vivanco

    2005-01-01

    Symbiosis between legume species and rhizobia results in the sequestration of atmospheric nitrogen into ammonium, and the\\u000a early mechanisms involved in this symbiosis have become a model for plant-microbe interactions and thus highly amenable for\\u000a agricultural applications. The working model for this interaction states that the symbiosis is the outcome of a chemical\\/molecular\\u000a dialogue initiated by flavonoids produced by the

  18. Academia-industry symbiosis in organic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Michaudel, Quentin; Ishihara, Yoshihiro; Baran, Phil S

    2015-03-17

    Collaboration between academia and industry is a growing phenomenon within the chemistry community. These sectors have long held strong ties since academia traditionally trains the future scientists of the corporate world, but the recent drastic decrease of public funding is motivating the academic world to seek more private grants. This concept of industrial "sponsoring" is not new, and in the past, some companies granted substantial amounts of money per annum to various academic institutions in exchange for prime access to all their scientific discoveries and inventions. However, academic and industrial interests were not always aligned, and therefore the investment has become increasingly difficult to justify from industry's point of view. With fluctuating macroeconomic factors, this type of unrestricted grant has become more rare and has been largely replaced by smaller and more focused partnerships. In our view, forging a partnership with industry can be a golden opportunity for both parties and can represent a true symbiosis. This type of project-specific collaboration is engendered by industry's desire to access very specific academic expertise that is required for the development of new technologies at the forefront of science. Since financial pressures do not allow companies to spend the time to acquire this expertise and even less to explore fundamental research, partnering with an academic laboratory whose research is related to the problem gives them a viable alternative. From an academic standpoint, it represents the perfect occasion to apply "pure science" research concepts to solve problems that benefit humanity. Moreover, it offers a unique opportunity for students to face challenges from the "real world" at an early stage of their career. Although not every problem in industry can be solved by research developments in academia, we argue that there is significant scientific overlap between these two seemingly disparate groups, thereby presenting an opportunity for a symbiosis. This type of partnership is challenging but can be a win-win situation if both parties agree on some general guidelines, including clearly defined goals and deliverables, biweekly meetings to track research progress, and quarterly or annual meetings to recognize overarching, common objectives. This Account summarizes our personal experience concerning collaborations with various industrial groups and the way it impacted the research programs for both sides in a symbiotic fashion. PMID:25702529

  19. Bacterial Communities Associated with the Lichen Symbiosis? †

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Scott T.; Cropsey, Garrett W. G.; Caporaso, J. Gregory; Knight, Rob; Fierer, Noah

    2011-01-01

    Lichens are commonly described as a mutualistic symbiosis between fungi and “algae” (Chlorophyta or Cyanobacteria); however, they also have internal bacterial communities. Recent research suggests that lichen-associated microbes are an integral component of lichen thalli and that the classical view of this symbiotic relationship should be expanded to include bacteria. However, we still have a limited understanding of the phylogenetic structure of these communities and their variability across lichen species. To address these knowledge gaps, we used bar-coded pyrosequencing to survey the bacterial communities associated with lichens. Bacterial sequences obtained from four lichen species at multiple locations on rock outcrops suggested that each lichen species harbored a distinct community and that all communities were dominated by Alphaproteobacteria. Across all samples, we recovered numerous bacterial phylotypes that were closely related to sequences isolated from lichens in prior investigations, including those from a lichen-associated Rhizobiales lineage (LAR1; putative N2 fixers). LAR1-related phylotypes were relatively abundant and were found in all four lichen species, and many sequences closely related to other known N2 fixers (e.g., Azospirillum, Bradyrhizobium, and Frankia) were recovered. Our findings confirm the presence of highly structured bacterial communities within lichens and provide additional evidence that these bacteria may serve distinct functional roles within lichen symbioses. PMID:21169444

  20. A review of industrial symbiosis research: theory and methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Hongmei; Chen, Bin; Su, Meirong; Liu, Gengyuan

    2015-03-01

    The theory, methodologies, and case studies in the field of industrial symbiosis have been developing for nearly 30 years. In this paper, we trace the development history of industrial symbiosis, and review its current theoretical and methodological bases, as well as trends in current research. Based on the research gaps that we identify, we provide suggestions to guide the future development of this approach to permit more comprehensive analyses. Our theoretical review includes key definitions, a classification system, and a description of the formation and development mechanisms. We discuss methodological studies from the perspective of individual industrial metabolic processes and network analysis. Analyzing specific metabolic processes can help to characterize the exchanges of materials and energy, and to reveal the ecological performance and economic benefits of the symbiosis. Network analysis methods are increasingly being used to analyze both the structural and functional characteristics of a system. Our suggestions for future research focus on three aspects: how to quantitatively classify industrial symbiosis systems, monitor the dynamics of a developing industrial symbiosis system, and analyze its internal attributes more deeply.

  1. DELLA proteins regulate arbuscule formation in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Floss, Daniela S.; Levy, Julien G.; Lévesque-Tremblay, Véronique; Pumplin, Nathan; Harrison, Maria J.

    2013-01-01

    Most flowering plants are able to form endosymbioses with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. In this mutualistic association, the fungus colonizes the root cortex and establishes elaborately branched hyphae, called arbuscules, within the cortical cells. Arbuscule development requires the cellular reorganization of both symbionts, and the resulting symbiotic interface functions in nutrient exchange. A plant symbiosis signaling pathway controls the development of the symbiosis. Several components of the pathway have been identified, but transcriptional regulators that control downstream pathways for arbuscule formation are still unknown. Here we show that DELLA proteins, which are repressors of gibberellic acid (GA) signaling and function at the nexus of several signaling pathways, are required for arbuscule formation. Arbuscule formation is severely impaired in a Medicago truncatula Mtdella1/Mtdella2 double mutant; GA treatment of wild-type roots phenocopies the della double mutant, and a dominant DELLA protein (della1-?18) enables arbuscule formation in the presence of GA. Ectopic expression of della1-?18 suggests that DELLA activity in the vascular tissue and endodermis is sufficient to enable arbuscule formation in the inner cortical cells. In addition, expression of della1-?18 restores arbuscule formation in the symbiosis signaling pathway mutant cyclops/ipd3, indicating an intersection between DELLA and symbiosis signaling for arbuscule formation. GA signaling also influences arbuscule formation in monocots, and a Green Revolution wheat variety carrying dominant DELLA alleles shows enhanced colonization but a limited growth response to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. PMID:24297892

  2. DELLA proteins regulate arbuscule formation in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Floss, Daniela S; Levy, Julien G; Lévesque-Tremblay, Véronique; Pumplin, Nathan; Harrison, Maria J

    2013-12-17

    Most flowering plants are able to form endosymbioses with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. In this mutualistic association, the fungus colonizes the root cortex and establishes elaborately branched hyphae, called arbuscules, within the cortical cells. Arbuscule development requires the cellular reorganization of both symbionts, and the resulting symbiotic interface functions in nutrient exchange. A plant symbiosis signaling pathway controls the development of the symbiosis. Several components of the pathway have been identified, but transcriptional regulators that control downstream pathways for arbuscule formation are still unknown. Here we show that DELLA proteins, which are repressors of gibberellic acid (GA) signaling and function at the nexus of several signaling pathways, are required for arbuscule formation. Arbuscule formation is severely impaired in a Medicago truncatula Mtdella1/Mtdella2 double mutant; GA treatment of wild-type roots phenocopies the della double mutant, and a dominant DELLA protein (della1-?18) enables arbuscule formation in the presence of GA. Ectopic expression of della1-?18 suggests that DELLA activity in the vascular tissue and endodermis is sufficient to enable arbuscule formation in the inner cortical cells. In addition, expression of della1-?18 restores arbuscule formation in the symbiosis signaling pathway mutant cyclops/ipd3, indicating an intersection between DELLA and symbiosis signaling for arbuscule formation. GA signaling also influences arbuscule formation in monocots, and a Green Revolution wheat variety carrying dominant DELLA alleles shows enhanced colonization but a limited growth response to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. PMID:24297892

  3. Shared Skeletal Support in a Coral-Hydroid Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Pantos, Olga; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2011-01-01

    Hydroids form symbiotic relationships with a range of invertebrate hosts. Where they live with colonial invertebrates such as corals or bryozoans the hydroids may benefit from the physical support and protection of their host's hard exoskeleton, but how they interact with them is unknown. Electron microscopy was used to investigate the physical interactions between the colonial hydroid Zanclea margaritae and its reef-building coral host Acropora muricata. The hydroid tissues extend below the coral tissue surface sitting in direct contact with the host's skeleton. Although this arrangement provides the hydroid with protective support, it also presents problems of potential interference with the coral's growth processes and exposes the hydroid to overgrowth and smothering. Desmocytes located within the epidermal layer of the hydroid's perisarc-free hydrorhizae fasten it to the coral skeleton. The large apical surface area of the desmocyte and high bifurcation of the distal end within the mesoglea, as well as the clustering of desmocytes suggests that a very strong attachment between the hydroid and the coral skeleton. This is the first study to provide a detailed description of how symbiotic hydroids attach to their host's skeleton, utilising it for physical support. Results suggest that the loss of perisarc, a characteristic commonly associated with symbiosis, allows the hydroid to utilise desmocytes for attachment. The use of these anchoring structures provides a dynamic method of attachment, facilitating detachment from the coral skeleton during extension, thereby avoiding overgrowth and smothering enabling the hydroid to remain within the host colony for prolonged periods of time. PMID:21695083

  4. AM symbiosis alters phenolic acid content in tomato roots

    PubMed Central

    Flors, Victor; García, Juan M; Pozo, Maria J

    2010-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi colonize the roots of most plants to establish a mutualistic symbiosis leading to important benefits for plant health. We have recently shown that AM symbiosis alters both transcriptional and hormonal profiles in tomato roots, many of these changes related to plant defense. Here, we analytically demonstrate that the levels of other important defense-related compounds as phenolic acids are also altered in the symbiosis. Both caffeic and chlorogenic acid levels significantly decreased in tomato roots upon mycorrhization, while ferulic acid increased. Moreover, in the case of caffeic acid a differential reduction was observed depending on the colonizing AM fungus. The results confirm that AM associations imply the regulation of plant defense responses, and that the host changes may vary depending on the AM fungus involved. The potential implications of altered phenolic acid levels on plant control over mycorrhizal colonization and in the plant resistance to pathogens is discussed. PMID:21490421

  5. AM symbiosis alters phenolic acid content in tomato roots.

    PubMed

    López-Ráez, Juan A; Flors, Victor; García, Juan M; Pozo, Maria J

    2010-09-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi colonize the roots of most plants to establish a mutualistic symbiosis leading to important benefits for plant health. We have recently shown that AM symbiosis alters both transcriptional and hormonal profiles in tomato roots, many of these changes related to plant defence. Here, we analytically demonstrate that the levels of other important defence-related compounds as phenolic acids are also altered in the symbiosis. Both caffeic and chlorogenic acid levels significantly decreased in tomato roots upon mycorrhization, while ferulic acid increased. Moreover, in the case of caffeic acid a differential reduction was observed depending on the colonizing AM fungus. The results confirm that AM associations imply the regulation of plant defence responses, and that the host changes may vary depending on the AM fungus involved. The potential implications of altered phenolic acid levels on plant control over mycorrhizal colonization and in the plant resistance to pathogens is discussed. PMID:21490421

  6. Specificity and stability of the Acromyrmex-Pseudonocardia symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Andersen, S B; Hansen, L H; Sapountzis, P; Sørensen, S J; Boomsma, J J

    2013-08-01

    The stability of mutualistic interactions is likely to be affected by the genetic diversity of symbionts that compete for the same functional niche. Fungus-growing (attine) ants have multiple complex symbioses and thus provide ample opportunities to address questions of symbiont specificity and diversity. Among the partners are Actinobacteria of the genus Pseudonocardia that are maintained on the ant cuticle to produce antibiotics, primarily against a fungal parasite of the mutualistic gardens. The symbiosis has been assumed to be a hallmark of evolutionary stability, but this notion has been challenged by culturing and sequencing data indicating an unpredictably high diversity. We used 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA to estimate the diversity of the cuticular bacterial community of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior and other fungus-growing ants from Gamboa, Panama. Both field and laboratory samples of the same colonies were collected, the latter after colonies had been kept under laboratory conditions for up to 10 years. We show that bacterial communities are highly colony-specific and stable over time. The majority of colonies (25/26) had a single dominant Pseudonocardia strain, and only two strains were found in the Gamboa population across 17 years, confirming an earlier study. The microbial community on newly hatched ants consisted almost exclusively of a single strain of Pseudonocardia while other Actinobacteria were identified on older, foraging ants in varying but usually much lower abundances. These findings are consistent with recent theory predicting that mixtures of antibiotic-producing bacteria can remain mutualistic when dominated by a single vertically transmitted and resource-demanding strain. PMID:23899369

  7. Trophic interactions in a high arctic snow goose colony.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Gilles; Bêty, Joël; Giroux, Jean-François; Rochefort, Line

    2004-04-01

    We examined the role of trophic interactions in structuring a high arctic tundra community characterized by a large breeding colony of greater snow geese (Chen caerulescens atlantica). According to the exploitation ecosystem hypothesis of Oksanen et al. (1981), food chains are controlled by top-down interactions. However, because the arctic primary productivity is low, herbivore populations are too small to support functional predator populations and these communities should thus be dominated by the plant/ herbivore trophic-level interaction. Since 1990, we have been monitoring annual abundance and productivity of geese, the impact of goose grazing, predator abundance (mostly arctic foxes, Alopex lagopus) and the abundance of lemmings, the other significant herbivore in this community, on Bylot Island, Nunavut, Canada. Goose grazing consistently removed a significant proportion of the standing crop (?40%) in tundra wetlands every year. Grazing changed plant community composition and reduced the production of grasses and sedges to a low-level equilibrium compared to the situation where the presence of geese had been removed. Lemming cyclic fluctuations were strong and affected fox reproduction. Fox predation on goose eggs was severe and generated marked annual variation in goose productivity. Predation intensity on geese was closely related to the lemming cycle, a consequence of an indirect interaction between lemming and geese via shared predators. We conclude that, contrary to the exploitation ecosystem hypothesis, both the plant/herbivore and predator/prey interactions are significant in this arctic community. PMID:21680492

  8. THE ROLE OF SYMBIOSIS IN THE EVOLUTION OF THE BIOSPHERE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    NICOLAE BOTNARIUC

    2005-01-01

    The biological systems of all the hierarchy (individuals, populations, ecosystems, biomes, biosphere) by their intrinsic trait of absorbing more and more solar energy, display a tendency of distancing from the state of thermodynamic equilibrium. Biodiversity, by its accelerated growth due to the positive feedback, is the materialization of this trend. Symbiosis, which determines the emergence of new taxa in all

  9. Sustainable agriculture: possible trajectories from mutualistic symbiosis and plant neodomestication

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    degradation of soil and water quality [6]. A fundamental issue for agriculture during this century is thusSustainable agriculture: possible trajectories from mutualistic symbiosis and plant. Based on recent findings, new trajectories for agriculture and plant breeding which take into account

  10. Search Engine-Crawler Symbiosis: Adapting to Community Interests

    E-print Network

    Bradshaw, Shannon

    Search Engine-Crawler Symbiosis: Adapting to Community Interests Gautam Pant, Shannon Bradshaw-pant,shannon-bradshaw,filippo-menczer}@uiowa.edu Abstract. Web crawlers have been used for nearly a decade as a search engine component to create and update large collections of documents. Typically the crawler and the rest of the search engine are not closely

  11. Plant demographic responses to mycorrhizal symbiosis in tallgrass prairie

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. C. Hartnett; R. J. Samenus; L. E. Fischer; B. A. D. Hetrick

    1994-01-01

    The effects of mycorrhizal symbiosis on seedling emergence, flowering and densities of several grasses and forbs were assessed in native tallgrass prairie and in sown garden populations at the Konza Prairie in northeastern Kansas. Mycorrhizal activity was experimentally suppressed with the fungicide benomyl. Flowering and stem densities of the cool-season grass, Dichanthelium oligosanthes, sedges (Carex spp.), and the forb Aster

  12. Advancing the science of microbial symbiosis to support invasive species management: a case study on Phragmites in the Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Kurt P; Bacon, Charles; Bickford, Wesley; Braun, Heather; Clay, Keith; Leduc-Lapierre, Michèle; Lillard, Elizabeth; McCormick, Melissa K; Nelson, Eric; Torres, Monica; White, James; Wilcox, Douglas A

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of literature supports microbial symbiosis as a foundational principle for the competitive success of invasive plant species. Further exploration of the relationships between invasive species and their associated microbiomes, as well as the interactions with the microbiomes of native species, can lead to key new insights into invasive success and potentially new and effective control approaches. In this manuscript, we review microbial relationships with plants, outline steps necessary to develop invasive species control strategies that are based on those relationships, and use the invasive plant species Phragmites australis (common reed) as an example of how development of microbial-based control strategies can be enhanced using a collective impact approach. The proposed science agenda, developed by the Collaborative for Microbial Symbiosis and Phragmites Management, contains a foundation of sequential steps and mutually-reinforcing tasks to guide the development of microbial-based control strategies for Phragmites and other invasive species. Just as the science of plant-microbial symbiosis can be transferred for use in other invasive species, so too can the model of collective impact be applied to other avenues of research and management. PMID:25745417

  13. Advancing the science of microbial symbiosis to support invasive species management: a case study on Phragmites in the Great Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Kurt P.; Bacon, Charles; Bickford, Wesley; Braun, Heather; Clay, Keith; Leduc-Lapierre, Michèle; Lillard, Elizabeth; McCormick, Melissa K.; Nelson, Eric; Torres, Monica; White, James; Wilcox, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of literature supports microbial symbiosis as a foundational principle for the competitive success of invasive plant species. Further exploration of the relationships between invasive species and their associated microbiomes, as well as the interactions with the microbiomes of native species, can lead to key new insights into invasive success and potentially new and effective control approaches. In this manuscript, we review microbial relationships with plants, outline steps necessary to develop invasive species control strategies that are based on those relationships, and use the invasive plant species Phragmites australis (common reed) as an example of how development of microbial-based control strategies can be enhanced using a collective impact approach. The proposed science agenda, developed by the Collaborative for Microbial Symbiosis and Phragmites Management, contains a foundation of sequential steps and mutually-reinforcing tasks to guide the development of microbial-based control strategies for Phragmites and other invasive species. Just as the science of plant-microbial symbiosis can be transferred for use in other invasive species, so too can the model of collective impact be applied to other avenues of research and management. PMID:25745417

  14. Expression of phenazine biosynthetic genes during the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis of Glomus intraradices.

    PubMed

    León-Martínez, Dionicia Gloria; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe; Olalde-Portugal, Víctor

    2012-04-01

    To explore the molecular mechanisms that prevail during the establishment of the arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis involving the genus Glomus, we transcriptionally analysed spores of Glomus intraradices BE3 during early hyphal growth. Among 458 transcripts initially identified as being expressed at presymbiotic stages, 20% of sequences had homology to previously characterized eukaryotic genes, 30% were homologous to fungal coding sequences, and 9% showed homology to previously characterized bacterial genes. Among them, GintPbr1a encodes a homolog to Phenazine Biosynthesis Regulator (Pbr) of Burkholderia cenocepacia, an pleiotropic regulatory protein that activates phenazine production through transcriptional activation of the protein D isochorismatase biosynthetic enzyme phzD (Ramos et al., 2010). Whereas GintPbr1a is expressed during the presymbiotic phase, the G. intraradices BE3 homolog of phzD (BGintphzD) is transcriptionally active at the time of the establishment of the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. DNA from isolated bacterial cultures found in spores of G. intraradices BE3 confirmed that both BGintPbr1a and BGintphzD are present in the genome of its potential endosymbionts. Taken together, our results indicate that spores of G. intraradices BE3 express bacterial phenazine biosynthetic genes at the onset of the fungal-plant symbiotic interaction. PMID:24031884

  15. The first thousand days - intestinal microbiology of early life: establishing a symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Wopereis, Harm; Oozeer, Raish; Knipping, Karen; Belzer, Clara; Knol, Jan

    2014-08-01

    The development of the intestinal microbiota in the first years of life is a dynamic process significantly influenced by early-life nutrition. Pioneer bacteria colonizing the infant intestinal tract and the gradual diversification to a stable climax ecosystem plays a crucial role in establishing host-microbe interactions essential for optimal symbiosis. This colonization process and establishment of symbiosis may profoundly influence health throughout life. Recent developments in microbiologic cultivation-independent methods allow a detailed view of the key players and factors involved in this process and may further elucidate their roles in a healthy gut and immune maturation. Aberrant patterns may lead to identifying key microbial signatures involved in developing immunologic diseases into adulthood, such as asthma and atopic diseases. The central role of early-life nutrition in the developmental human microbiota, immunity, and metabolism offers promising strategies for prevention and treatment of such diseases. This review provides an overview of the development of the intestinal microbiota, its bidirectional relationship with the immune system, and its role in impacting health and disease, with emphasis on allergy, in early life. PMID:24899389

  16. Eco-evolutionary experience in novel species interactions.

    PubMed

    Saul, Wolf-Christian; Jeschke, Jonathan M

    2015-03-01

    A better understanding of how ecological novelty influences interactions in new combinations of species is key for predicting interaction outcomes, and can help focus conservation and management efforts on preventing the introduction of novel organisms or species (including invasive species, GMOs, synthetic organisms, resurrected species and emerging pathogens) that seem particularly 'risky' for resident species. Here, we consider the implications of different degrees of eco-evolutionary experience of interacting resident and non-resident species, define four qualitative risk categories for estimating the probability of successful establishment and impact of novel species and discuss how the effects of novelty change over time. Focusing then on novel predator-prey interactions, we argue that novelty entails density-dependent advantages for non-resident species, with their largest effects often being at low prey densities. This is illustrated by a comparison of predator functional responses and prey predation risk curves between novel species and ecologically similar resident species, and raises important issues for the conservation of endangered resident prey species. PMID:25626585

  17. 60 million years of co-divergence in the fig–wasp symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Rønsted, Nina; Weiblen, George D; Cook, James M; Salamin, Nicolas; Machado, Carlos A; Savolainen, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    Figs (Ficus; ca 750 species) and fig wasps (Agaoninae) are obligate mutualists: all figs are pollinated by agaonines that feed exclusively on figs. This extraordinary symbiosis is the most extreme example of specialization in a plant–pollinator interaction and has fuelled much speculation about co-divergence. The hypothesis that pollinator specialization led to the parallel diversification of fig and pollinator lineages (co-divergence) has so far not been tested due to the lack of robust and comprehensive phylogenetic hypotheses for both partners. We produced and combined the most comprehensive molecular phylogenetic trees to date with fossil data to generate independent age estimates for fig and pollinator lineages, using both non-parametric rate smoothing and penalized likelihood dating methods. Molecular dating of ten pairs of interacting lineages provides an unparalleled example of plant–insect co-divergence over a geological time frame spanning at least 60 million years. PMID:16321781

  18. SYMBIOSIS (2009) 47, 109115 2009 Balaban, Philadelphia/Rehovot ISSN 0334-5114 Compatibility and thigmotropism in the lichen symbiosis

    E-print Network

    Lutzoni, François M.

    2009-01-01

    and thigmotropism in the lichen symbiosis: A reappraisal Suzanne Joneson* and François Lutzoni Duke University, 2008) Abstract The development of many complex stratified lichen thalli is made through stages symbiotic pairings, such as with its natural photobiont Asterochloris sp. Keywords: Lichen, thallus

  19. Lotus japonicus E3 Ligase SEVEN IN ABSENTIA4 Destabilizes the Symbiosis Receptor-Like Kinase SYMRK and Negatively Regulates Rhizobial Infection[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Den Herder, Griet; Yoshida, Satoko; Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; Ried, Martina K.; Parniske, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The Lotus japonicus SYMBIOSIS RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (SYMRK) is required for symbiotic signal transduction upon stimulation of root cells by microbial signaling molecules. Here, we identified members of the SEVEN IN ABSENTIA (SINA) E3 ubiquitin-ligase family as SYMRK interactors and confirmed their predicted ubiquitin-ligase activity. In Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, SYMRK–yellow fluorescent protein was localized at the plasma membrane, and interaction with SINAs, as determined by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, was observed in small punctae at the cytosolic interface of the plasma membrane. Moreover, fluorescence-tagged SINA4 partially colocalized with SYMRK and caused SYMRK relocalization as well as disappearance of SYMRK from the plasma membrane. Neither the localization nor the abundance of Nod-factor receptor1 was altered by the presence of SINA4. SINA4 was transcriptionally upregulated during root symbiosis, and rhizobia inoculated roots ectopically expressing SINA4 showed reduced SYMRK protein levels. In accordance with a negative regulatory role in symbiosis, infection thread development was impaired upon ectopic expression of SINA4. Our results implicate SINA4 E3 ubiquitin ligase in the turnover of SYMRK and provide a conceptual mechanism for its symbiosis-appropriate spatio-temporal containment. PMID:22534128

  20. ARTICLE IN PRESS Interactions between ectomycorrhizal symbiosis and uorescent

    E-print Network

    Thioulouse, Jean

    and £uorescent pseudomonads on Acacia holosericea: isolation of mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB) from a Soudano online Abstract Acacia holosericea seedlings were planted in 1-l pots filled with a soil collected from an Australian Acacia plantation in Southern Senegal. After 6 months of culture, mycorrhizosphere soil, roots

  1. Root endophyte symbiosis in vitro between the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Tricholoma matsutake and the arbuscular mycorrhizal plant Prunus speciosa.

    PubMed

    Murata, Hitoshi; Yamada, Akiyoshi; Yokota, Satoru; Maruyama, Tsuyoshi; Endo, Naoki; Yamamoto, Kohei; Ohira, Tatsuro; Neda, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    We previously reported that Tricholoma matsutake and Tricholoma fulvocastaneum, ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes that associate with Pinaceae and Fagaceae, respectively, in the Northern Hemisphere, could interact in vitro as a root endophyte of somatic plants of Cedrela odorata (Meliaceae), which naturally harbors arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in South America, to form a characteristic rhizospheric colony or "shiro". We questioned whether this phenomenon could have occurred because of plant-microbe interactions between geographically separated species that never encounter one another in nature. In the present study, we document that these fungi formed root endophyte interactions and shiro within 140 days of inoculation with somatic plants of Prunus speciosa (=Cerasus speciosa, Rosaceae), a wild cherry tree that naturally harbors arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Japan. Compared with C. odorata, infected P. speciosa plants had less mycelial sheath surrounding the exodermis, and the older the roots, especially main roots, the more hyphae penetrated. In addition, a large number of juvenile roots were not associated with hyphae. We concluded that such root endophyte interactions were not events isolated to the interactions between exotic plants and microbes but could occur generally in vitro. Our pure culture system with a somatic plant allowed these fungi to express symbiosis-related phenotypes that varied with the plant host; these traits are innately programmed but suppressed in nature and could be useful in genetic analyses of plant-fungal symbiosis. PMID:24158697

  2. Range Expansion Drives Dispersal Evolution In An Equatorial Three-Species Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Guillot, Sylvain; Gaume, Laurence; McKey, Doyle; Kjellberg, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Background Recurrent climatic oscillations have produced dramatic changes in species distributions. This process has been proposed to be a major evolutionary force, shaping many life history traits of species, and to govern global patterns of biodiversity at different scales. During range expansions selection may favor the evolution of higher dispersal, and symbiotic interactions may be affected. It has been argued that a weakness of climate fluctuation-driven range dynamics at equatorial latitudes has facilitated the persistence there of more specialized species and interactions. However, how much the biology and ecology of species is changed by range dynamics has seldom been investigated, particularly in equatorial regions. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied a three-species symbiosis endemic to coastal equatorial rainforests in Cameroon, where the impact of range dynamics is supposed to be limited, comprised of two species-specific obligate mutualists –an ant-plant and its protective ant– and a species-specific ant parasite of this mutualism. We combined analyses of within-species genetic diversity and of phenotypic variation in a transect at the southern range limit of this ant-plant system. All three species present congruent genetic signatures of recent gradual southward expansion, a result compatible with available regional paleoclimatic data. As predicted, this expansion has been accompanied by the evolution of more dispersive traits in the two ant species. In contrast, we detected no evidence of change in lifetime reproductive strategy in the tree, nor in its investment in food resources provided to its symbiotic ants. Conclusions/Significance Despite the decreasing investment in protective workers and the increasing investment in dispersing females by both the mutualistic and the parasitic ant species, there was no evidence of destabilization of the symbiosis at the colonization front. To our knowledge, we provide here the first evidence at equatorial latitudes that biological traits associated with dispersal are affected by the range expansion dynamics of a set of interacting species. PMID:19401769

  3. The receptor kinase CERK1 has dual functions in symbiosis and immunity signalling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Dong, Wentao; Sun, Jongho; Feng, Feng; Deng, Yiwen; He, Zuhua; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Wang, Ertao

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of symbiotic interactions between mycorrhizal fungi, rhizobial bacteria and their legume hosts involves a common symbiosis signalling pathway. This signalling pathway is activated by Nod factors produced by rhizobia and these are recognised by the Nod factor receptors NFR1/LYK3 and NFR5/NFP. Mycorrhizal fungi produce lipochitooligosaccharides (LCOs) similar to Nod factors, as well as short-chain chitin oligomers (CO4/5), implying commonalities in signalling during mycorrhizal and rhizobial associations. Here we show that NFR1/LYK3, but not NFR5/NFP, is required for the establishment of the mycorrhizal interaction in legumes. NFR1/LYK3 is necessary for the recognition of mycorrhizal fungi and the activation of the symbiosis signalling pathway leading to induction of calcium oscillations and gene expression. Chitin oligosaccharides also act as microbe associated molecular patterns that promote plant immunity via similar LysM receptor-like kinases. CERK1 in rice has the highest homology to NFR1 and we show that this gene is also necessary for the establishment of the mycorrhizal interaction as well as for resistance to the rice blast fungus. Our results demonstrate that NFR1/LYK3/OsCERK1 represents a common receptor for chitooligosaccharide-based signals produced by mycorrhizal fungi, rhizobial bacteria (in legumes) and fungal pathogens. It would appear that mycorrhizal recognition has been conserved in multiple receptors across plant species, but additional diversification in certain plant species has defined other signals that this class of receptors can perceive. PMID:25399831

  4. Establishment of Coral–Algal Symbiosis Requires Attraction and Selection

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Go; Kai, Sayaka; Hayashibara, Takeshi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Coral reef ecosystems are based on coral–zooxanthellae symbiosis. During the initiation of symbiosis, majority of corals acquire their own zooxanthellae (specifically from the dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium) from surrounding environments. The mechanisms underlying the initial establishment of symbiosis have attracted much interest, and numerous field and laboratory experiments have been conducted to elucidate this establishment. However, it is still unclear whether the host corals selectively or randomly acquire their symbionts from surrounding environments. To address this issue, we initially compared genetic compositions of Symbiodinium within naturally settled about 2-week-old Acropora coral juveniles (recruits) and those in the adjacent seawater as the potential symbiont source. We then performed infection tests using several types of Symbiodinium culture strains and apo-symbiotic (does not have Symbiodinium cells yet) Acropora coral larvae. Our field observations indicated apparent preference toward specific Symbiodinium genotypes (A1 and D1-4) within the recruits, despite a rich abundance of other Symbiodinium in the environmental population pool. Laboratory experiments were in accordance with this field observation: Symbiodinium strains of type A1 and D1-4 showed higher infection rates for Acropora larvae than other genotype strains, even when supplied at lower cell densities. Subsequent attraction tests revealed that three Symbiodinium strains were attracted toward Acropora larvae, and within them, only A1 and D1-4 strains were acquired by the larvae. Another three strains did not intrinsically approach to the larvae. These findings suggest the initial establishment of corals–Symbiodinium symbiosis is not random, and the infection mechanism appeared to comprise two steps: initial attraction step and subsequent selective uptake by the coral. PMID:24824794

  5. The Winnowing: Establishing the Squid-Vibrio Symbiosis

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Spencer V. Nyholm

    This Nature Reviews Microbiology article examines the symbiosis between the squid Euprymna scolopes and its luminous bacterial symbiont, Vibrio fischeri. Using image-rich illustrations, it depicts the progression of light-organ colonization as a series of steps and discusses the advent of genomic approaches used to study this model system. A subscription is required to access the full-text version of this article.

  6. The secret languages of coevolved symbioses: Insights from the Euprymna scolopes-Vibrio fischeri symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret; Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A. C.; Gillette, Amani A.; Peyer, Suzanne M.; Harvie, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent research on a wide variety of systems has demonstrated that animals generally coevolve with their microbial symbionts. Although such relationships are most often established anew each generation, the partners associate with fidelity, i.e., they form exclusive alliances within the context of rich communities of non-symbiotic environmental microbes. The mechanisms by which this exclusivity is achieved and maintained remain largely unknown. Studies of the model symbiosis between the Hawaiian squid Euprymna scolopes and the marine luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri provide evidence that the interplay between evolutionarily conserved features of the innate immune system, most notably MAMP/PRR interactions, and a specific feature of this association, i.e., luminescence, are critical for development and maintenance of this association. As such, in this partnership and perhaps others, symbiotic exclusivity is mediated by the synergism between a general animal-microbe ‘language’ and a ‘secret language’ that is decipherable only by the specific partners involved. PMID:22154556

  7. Zooxanthellar symbiosis in planula larvae of the coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    PubMed

    Gaither, Michelle R; Rowan, Rob

    2010-04-30

    We characterized the planular-zooxanthellae symbiosis of the coral Pocillopora damicornis using criteria that are familiar in studies on corals. Similar to adult corals, planulae exhibited photoacclimation, as changes in symbiont chlorophyll a (chl a); changes in the light-saturation constant for photosynthesis (I(k)); and, at insufficient light, fewer zooxanthellae, decreased respiration, increased weight loss, and increased sensitivity to photoinhibition. Numbers of zooxanthellae in newly-released planulae varied by at least three-fold within broods. Planulae with low versus high numbers of zooxanthellae (termed pale versus dark planulae, respectively) did not differ in symbiont chl-a content, I(k), or biomass-specific rate of dark respiration. Pale planulae had lower rates of photosynthesis, but this difference vanished after three weeks, when zooxanthellar numbers increased by 225% in pale planulae and by 31% in dark planulae. Numbers of zooxanthellae also increased significantly in planulae cultured in ammonium-enriched seawater; ammonium also apparently prevented weight loss and induced settlement. Approximately 70% of photosynthetically-fixed carbon (labeled using (14)C) apparently was translocated from the zooxanthellae to their host. A comparison of planulae cultured at 0.3% versus 11% sunlight suggested that photosynthesis provided ~ 31% of the energy utilized by the latter. Overall, we conclude that the physiology of symbiosis in planulae of P. damicornis is broadly similar to symbiosis physiology in adult corals. PMID:20526380

  8. Rhizobiales as functional and endosymbiontic members in the lichen symbiosis of Lobaria pulmonaria L.

    PubMed Central

    Erlacher, Armin; Cernava, Tomislav; Cardinale, Massimiliano; Soh, Jung; Sensen, Christoph W.; Grube, Martin; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobiales (Alphaproteobacteria) are well-known beneficial partners in plant-microbe interactions. Less is known about the occurrence and function of Rhizobiales in the lichen symbiosis, although it has previously been shown that Alphaproteobacteria are the dominating group in growing lichen thalli. We have analyzed the taxonomic structure and assigned functions to Rhizobiales within a metagenomic dataset of the lung lichen Lobaria pulmonaria L. One third (32.2%) of the overall bacteria belong to the Rhizobiales, in particular to the families Methylobacteriaceae, Bradyrhizobiaceae, and Rhizobiaceae. About 20% of our metagenomic assignments could not be placed in any of the Rhizobiales lineages, which indicates a yet undescribed bacterial diversity. SEED-based functional analysis focused on Rhizobiales and revealed functions supporting the symbiosis, including auxin and vitamin production, nitrogen fixation and stress protection. We also have used a specifically developed probe to localize Rhizobiales by confocal laser scanning microscopy after fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH-CLSM). Bacteria preferentially colonized fungal surfaces, but there is clear evidence that members of the Rhizobiales are able to intrude at varying depths into the interhyphal gelatinous matrix of the upper lichen cortical layer and that at least occasionally some bacteria also are capable to colonize the interior of the fungal hyphae. Interestingly, the gradual development of an endosymbiotic bacterial life was found for lichen- as well as for fungal- and plant-associated bacteria. The new tools to study Rhizobiales, FISH microscopy and comparative metagenomics, suggest a similar beneficial role for lichens than for plants and will help to better understand the Rhizobiales-host interaction and their biotechnological potential. PMID:25713563

  9. Predator-Induced Breeding Suppression and Its Consequences for Predator-Prey Population Dynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Graeme D. Ruxton; Steven L. Lima

    1997-01-01

    Recent empirical evidence demonstrates that certain small mammals suppress breeding in response to strong predation pressure, the interpretation being that non-breeding individuals have a better chance of avoiding predation than those in a reproductive state. A separate strand of recent research has sought to explain empirical observations of cycling in small mammal (especially vole) populations of Fennoscandia as being due

  10. DYNAMIC SADDLE-NODE BIFURCATION IN A CLASS OF SLOW AND FAST PREDATOR-PREY MODELS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hafida Boudjellaba; Tewfik Sari

    We study the stability loss delay phenomenon in the dy- namic saddle-node bifurcation in a class of three-dimensional prey and predator systems. The dynamics of the predator is assumed to be slow comparatively to the dynamics of the preys. As an application, a well- known model considered by Clark will be discussed. AMS Subject Classifications: 34D15, 34E15, 92D25. Keywords Asymptotic

  11. Quantification of predator-prey body size relationships is essential to under-

    E-print Network

    relationships for cephalopods in this region are scarce despite their importance to a wide range of preda- tors (Gannon et al., 1997; Wil- liams, 1999). As with the bones and otoliths of prey fish, cephalopod beaks of cephalopods in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (Bowman et al., 2000) are either based on few observations (n=25

  12. Apes finding ants: Predator-prey dynamics in a chimpanzee habitat in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Garrido, Alejandra; Umaru, Buba; Allon, Oliver; Sommer, Volker

    2013-12-01

    Some chimpanzee populations prey upon army ants, usually with stick tools. However, how their prey's subterranean nesting and nomadic lifestyle influence the apes' harvesting success is still poorly understood. This is particularly true for chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes ellioti) at Gashaka/Nigeria, which consume army ants (Dorylus rubellus) with much higher frequency than at other sites. We assessed various harvesting and search options theoretically available to the apes. For this, we reconstructed annual consumption patterns from feces and compared the physical characteristics of exploited ant nests with those that were not targeted. Repeated exploitation of a discovered nest is viable only in the short term, as disturbed colonies soon moved to a new site. Moreover, monitoring previously occupied nest cavities is uneconomical, as ants hardly ever re-used them. Thus, the apes have to detect new nests regularly, although colony density is relatively low (1 colony/1.3 ha). Surprisingly, visual search cues seem to be of limited importance because the probability of a nest being exploited was independent of its conspicuousness (presence of excavated soil piles, concealing leaf-litter or vegetation). However, chimpanzees preferentially targeted nests in forests or at the base of food trees, that is, where the apes spend relatively more time and/or where ant colony density is highest. Taken together, our findings suggest that, instead of employing a search strategy based on visual cues or spatial memory, chimpanzee predation on army ants contains a considerable opportunistic element. PMID:24022711

  13. Population dynamics and predator-prey relationships of the Carmen Mountains white-tailed deer

    E-print Network

    Atkinson, Don Eugene

    1976-01-01

    lion (Felis concolor). Local residents with experience suggested further criteria for identification and ass1sted in identification (McBride and Scudday, personal communication). Seats of the three predators were collected as encountered on all por...

  14. Spatial Geographic Mosaic in an Aquatic Predator-Prey Johel Chaves-Campos1

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Steven G.

    but not for the fish. Gene flow among snail populations in Cuatro Cie´negas could explain the mosaic of local flow and documented spatial variation in crushing resistance in the freshwater snails Mexipyrgus of the crushing morphotype in the trophically polymorphic fish Herichthys minckleyi. Crushing resistance

  15. Period Doubling Cascades in a Predator-Prey Model with a Scavenger

    E-print Network

    Previte, Joseph P.

    that it scavenges). A possible triple of such species are hyena/lion/antelope, where the hyena scavenges lion carcasses and preys upon antelope. The novel aspects of this model together with its accessibility make

  16. Hatching in dabbling ducks and emergence in chironomids: a case of predator–prey synchrony?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa Dessborn; Johan Elmberg; Petri Nummi; Hannu Pöysä; Kjell Sjöberg

    2009-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that dabbling ducks (Anas spp.) time breeding to coincide with annual regional peaks in emerging dipterans, especially Chironomidae, which are important\\u000a prey for newly hatched ducklings. However, this hypothesis has never been evaluated in a replicated lake-level study, including\\u000a year effects in emergence patterns. We collected duck and invertebrate data from 12 lakes during the nesting

  17. Predator-prey oscillations, synchronization and pattern formation in ecological systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernd Blasius; Ralf Tonjes

    Ecological systems and their component biological populations exhibit a broad spectrum of non-equilibrium dynamics ranging from characteristic natural cy-cles to more complex chaotic oscillations [1]. Perhaps the most spectacular example of this dynamic is Ecology's well known hare-lynx cycle. Despite unpredictable population fluctuations from one cycle to the next in the snow-shoe hare (Lepus americanus) and the Canadian lynx (Lynx

  18. MATH 4452 (Ng/Spring 2012) Lotka-Volterra Equations (continuous Predator-Prey model) -CDS

    E-print Network

    Ng, Peh H.

    equation is called a coupled system. For instance, the two populations could be sharks and tuna fish. The sharks will be the parasite or predator while the tuna fish will be host or prey. The rate of growth of tuna fish (host) is proportional to the amount of tuna (host) available but at the same time

  19. An introduction to repast simphony modeling using a simple predator-prey example.

    SciTech Connect

    Tatara, E.; North, M. J.; Howe, T. R.; Collier, N. T.; Vos, J. R.; Decision and Information Sciences; PantaRei Corp.; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Illinois

    2006-01-01

    Repast is a widely used, free, and open-source, agent-based modeling and simulation toolkit. Three Repast platforms are currently available, each of which has the same core features but a different environment for these features. Repast Simphony (Repast S) extends the Repast portfolio by offering a new approach to simulation development and execution. This paper presents a model of wolf-sheep predation as an introductory tutorial and illustration of the modeling capabilities of Repast S. We use a model of wolf-sheep predation to demonstrate the capabilities of the Repast S toolkit and as an introductory tutorial. While the example is not intended to model real phenomenon, the model's complexity is high enough to illustrate how the user may develop multi-agent models. Spatial and temporal patterns emerge in the model consisting of potentially hundreds of instances of three agent types. It is important to note that Repast S and its related tools are still under development. This paper presents the most current information at the time it was written. However, changes may occur before the planned final release.

  20. Predator-prey association in mono- and dicultures: Effect of maize and bean vegetation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Moshe Coll; Dale G. Bottrell

    1995-01-01

    The effect of bean and maize vegetation on the abundance of prey, predators, and predation rate in larvae of the Mexican bean beetle (Epilachna varivestis Mulsant (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)) was investigated. Prey and predator densities were determined when bean and maize plants were grown alone (monocultures) and when bean plants were intercropped with tall or short maize plants (dicultures). On bean

  1. Predator–Prey Relationships in a Two-Species Toxicity Test System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timo Hamers; Paul Henning Krogh

    1997-01-01

    In a two-species toxicity test system survival and reproduction of both the predatorHypoaspis aculeifer(Gamasida) and the preyFolsomia fimetaria(Collembola) were studied after 21 days of residual exposure to a soil contamination of the insecticide dimethoate. Additional experiments were run to analyze which species–species and compound–species relationships determine the outcome of this two–species experiment. Number of adultF. fimetariawere reduced by both predation

  2. A bioeconomic model of a ratio-dependent predator-prey system and optimal harvesting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. K. Kar; Swarnakamal Misra; B. Mukhopadhyay

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of a ratio-dependent prey-predator model with combined harvesting. The existence of steady\\u000a states and their stability are studied using eigenvalue analysis. Boundedness of the exploited system is examined. We derive\\u000a conditions for persistence and global stability of the system. The possibility of existence of bionomic equilibria has been\\u000a considered. The problem of optimal harvest

  3. Optimal-Sustainable Management of Multi-Species Fisheries: Lessons from a Predator-Prey Model

    E-print Network

    Woodward, Richard T.

    if it does not lead to a decline in net present value of the fishery. This definition is based on the principle of intergenerational fairness. If the sustainability, or intergenerational fairness, is held as an obligation by fishery managers, then the traditional present-value maximization objective would

  4. Conflict and assessment in a predator-prey system: ground squirrels versus rattlesnakes.

    PubMed

    Swaisgood; Owings; Rowe

    1999-05-01

    Adult California ground squirrels, Spermophilus beecheyi beecheyi, actively confront and harass northern Pacific rattlesnakes, Crotalus viridis oreganus, which are the principal predator of ground squirrel pups. In this report we examine the roles of risk (snake size) and context (location of encounter and squirrel reproductive category) in rattlesnake assessment by ground squirrels. In interpreting the results, we borrow heavily from the well-developed conceptual framework applied in the analogous case of intraspecific conflict. Large and small snakes were tethered near the home burrows of male ground squirrels, and maternal and nonmaternal female ground squirrels. Ground squirrels appeared to employ assessment strategies which served to mediate the level of risk associated with confronting larger snakes. The results suggest that ground squirrels exercise greater caution when dealing with large snakes and invest more in monitoring the snake from a safe distance. Maternal squirrels, which have more at stake reproductively, spent more time and effort in snake-directed activities than did squirrels from other reproductive categories. Mothers also differentiated more strongly between large and small snakes, perhaps reflecting the greater vulnerability of their pups to larger snakes. Finally, ground squirrels discriminated between snakes found close to their home burrow and those encountered further abroad. At the home burrow, squirrels monitored the snake from a closer distance, displayed a greater willingness to confront the snake, and escalated to more dangerous levels of harassment. This assessment strategy may reflect a higher payoff to squirrels that persist in driving snakes out of the home area, thereby reducing the risk of future ambush. Copyright 1999 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID:10328789

  5. Conflict and assessment in a predator–prey system: ground squirrels versus rattlesnakes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RONALD R. SWAISGOOD; DONALD H. OWINGS; MATTHEW P. ROWE

    1999-01-01

    Adult California ground squirrels,Spermophilus beecheyi beecheyi, actively confront and harass northern Pacific rattlesnakes,Crotalus viridis oreganus, which are the principal predator of ground squirrel pups. In this report we examine the roles of risk (snake size) and context (location of encounter and squirrel reproductive category) in rattlesnake assessment by ground squirrels. In interpreting the results, we borrow heavily from the well-developed

  6. Am. Midl. Nat. 150:254-267 Seasonal Differences in Predator-preyBehavior in

    E-print Network

    Pennuto, Chris

    conditions (e.g.,water temperature : Department of Biology and Great Lakes Research Center, Buffalo State College, Buffalo, New York 14222. Telephone (716)878-3756: FAX (716)878-4028; e-mail: pennutcm@buffalos- tate.edu. #12;temperature (Huryn

  7. SUPPORTING ONLINE MATERIAL Cyclic dynamics in a simple vertebrate predator-prey community

    E-print Network

    Helsinki, University of

    , the main alternate prey are birds (ptarmigan, waders and passerines) for the snowy owl, small birds, fishes at snowmelt (N') based on the density of winter nests for 1988-2002 and on direct live-trapping for 1998 to be looked for since only the male snowy owl hunts (and feeds the female) while the skuas take turns

  8. Predator-prey coevolution: Australian native bees avoid their spider predators.

    PubMed Central

    Heiling, A M; Herberstein, M E

    2004-01-01

    Australian crab spiders Thomisus spectabilis manipulate visual flower signals to lure introduced Apis mellifera. We gave Australian native bees, Austroplebia australis, the choice between two white daisies, Chrysanthemum frutescens, one of them occupied by a crab spider. The colour contrast between flowers and spiders affected the behaviour of native bees. Native bees approached spider-occupied flowers more frequently. However, native bees avoided flowers occupied by spiders and landed on vacant flowers more frequently. In contrast to honeybees that did not coevolve with T. spectabilis, Australian native bees show an anti-predatory response to avoid flowers occupied by this predator. PMID:15252982

  9. Predator-prey coevolution: Australian native bees avoid their spider predators.

    PubMed

    Heiling, A M; Herberstein, M E

    2004-05-01

    Australian crab spiders Thomisus spectabilis manipulate visual flower signals to lure introduced Apis mellifera. We gave Australian native bees, Austroplebia australis, the choice between two white daisies, Chrysanthemum frutescens, one of them occupied by a crab spider. The colour contrast between flowers and spiders affected the behaviour of native bees. Native bees approached spider-occupied flowers more frequently. However, native bees avoided flowers occupied by spiders and landed on vacant flowers more frequently. In contrast to honeybees that did not coevolve with T. spectabilis, Australian native bees show an anti-predatory response to avoid flowers occupied by this predator. PMID:15252982

  10. Evolutionary Tradeoff an dE quilibrium in an Aquatic Predator-Prey System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LAURA E. JONES; STEPHEN P. ELLNER

    2004-01-01

    Due to the conventional distinction between ecological (rapid) and evolutionary (slow) timescales, ecological and population models have typically ignored the effects of evolution. Yet the potential for rapid evolutionary change has been recently established and may be critical to understanding how populations persist in changing environments. In this paper we examine the relationship between ecological and evolutionary dynamics, focusing on

  11. Evolutionary tradeoff and equilibrium in an aquatic predator-prey system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura E. Jones; Stephen P. Ellner

    2004-01-01

    Due to the conventional distinction between ecological (rapid) and evolutionary (slow) timescales, ecological and population models have typically ignored the effects of evolution. Yet the potential for\\u000a rapid evolutionary change has been recently established and may be critical to understanding how populations persist in changing\\u000a environments. In this paper we examine the relationship between ecological and evolutionary dynamics, focusing on

  12. Litter-forager termite mounds enhance the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between Acacia holosericea A.Cunn. Ex G.Don and

    E-print Network

    Thioulouse, Jean

    Litter-forager termite mounds enhance the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between Acacia holosericea A; ectomycorrhizal symbiosis; Acacia holosericea. Abstract The hypothesis of the present study was that the termite mound material on (i) the ectomycorrhization symbiosis between Acacia holosericea (an Australian Acacia

  13. Effects of geographical heterogeneity in species interactions on the evolution of venom genes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Dan; Olenzek, Amy M; Duda, Thomas F

    2015-04-22

    Geographical heterogeneity in the composition of biotic interactions can create a mosaic of selection regimes that may drive the differentiation of phenotypes that operate at the interface of these interactions. Nonetheless, little is known about effects of these geographical mosaics on the evolution of genes encoding traits associated with species interactions. Predatory marine snails of the family Conidae use venom, a cocktail of conotoxins, to capture prey. We characterized patterns of geographical variation at five conotoxin genes of a vermivorous species, Conus ebraeus, at Hawaii, Guam and American Samoa, and evaluated how these patterns of variation are associated with geographical heterogeneity in prey utilization. All populations show distinct patterns of prey utilization. Three 'highly polymorphic' conotoxin genes showed significant geographical differences in allelic frequency, and appear to be affected by different modes of selection among populations. Two genes exhibited low levels of diversity and a general lack of differentiation among populations. Levels of diversity of 'highly polymorphic' genes exhibit a positive relationship with dietary breadth. The different patterns of evolution exhibited by conotoxin genes suggest that these genes play different roles in prey capture, and that some genes are more greatly affected by differences in predator-prey interactions than others. Moreover, differences in dietary breadth appear to have a greater influence on the differentiation of venoms than differences in the species of prey. PMID:25788600

  14. Perturbations to trophic interactions and the stability of complex food webs

    PubMed Central

    O'Gorman, Eoin J.; Emmerson, Mark C.

    2009-01-01

    The pattern of predator–prey interactions is thought to be a key determinant of ecosystem processes and stability. Complex ecological networks are characterized by distributions of interaction strengths that are highly skewed, with many weak and few strong interactors present. Theory suggests that this pattern promotes stability as weak interactors dampen the destabilizing potential of strong interactors. Here, we present an experimental test of this hypothesis and provide empirical evidence that the loss of weak interactors can destabilize communities in nature. We ranked 10 marine consumer species by the strength of their trophic interactions. We removed the strongest and weakest of these interactors from experimental food webs containing >100 species. Extinction of strong interactors produced a dramatic trophic cascade and reduced the temporal stability of key ecosystem process rates, community diversity and resistance to changes in community composition. Loss of weak interactors also proved damaging for our experimental ecosystems, leading to reductions in the temporal and spatial stability of ecosystem process rates, community diversity, and resistance. These results highlight the importance of conserving species to maintain the stabilizing pattern of trophic interactions in nature, even if they are perceived to have weak effects in the system. PMID:19666606

  15. A plant receptor-like kinase required for both bacterial and fungal symbiosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Silke Stracke; Catherine Kistner; Satoko Yoshida; Lonneke Mulder; Shusei Sato; Takakazu Kaneko; Satoshi Tabata; Niels Sandal; Jens Stougaard; Krzysztof Szczyglowski; Martin Parniske

    2002-01-01

    Most higher plant species can enter a root symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, in which plant carbon is traded for fungal phosphate. This is an ancient symbiosis, which has been detected in fossils of early land plants. In contrast, the nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses of plants with bacteria evolved more recently, and are phylogenetically restricted to the rosid I clade

  16. A jetdisk symbiosis model for Gamma Ray Bursts: fluence distribution, CRs

    E-print Network

    Falcke, Heino

    A jet­disk symbiosis model for Gamma Ray Bursts: fluence distribution, CRs and š's G. Pugliese 1­disk symbiosis model to explain Gamma Ray Bursts and their afterglows. It is proposed that GRBs are created or the Galactic cosmic ray spectra. INTRODUCTION Gamma­Ray Bursts are short bursts that peak in the soft fl

  17. STAKEHOLDER PARTICIPATION IN EVALUATING LIFE CYCLE OF SOCIAL BENEFITS OF INDUSTRIAL SYMBIOSIS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Biji Kurup; Daniela Stehlik

    Industrial symbiosis refers to the exchange of product, by-product and waste between industries that reduce the ecological, social and economic footprint of industrial areas. This is achieved through reduced variables such as emissions, stringent regulatory and legal requirements, community objections and costs of business opportunities. Benefits of industrial symbiosis (IS) have typically been documented in environmental and\\/or financial terms for

  18. Impediment to Symbiosis Establishment between Giant Clams and Symbiodinium Algae Due to Sterilization of Seawater

    PubMed Central

    Kurihara, Takeo; Yamada, Hideaki; Inoue, Ken; Iwai, Kenji; Hatta, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    To survive the juvenile stage, giant clam juveniles need to establish a symbiotic relationship with the microalgae Symbiodinium occurring in the environment. The percentage of giant clam juveniles succeeding in symbiosis establishment (“symbiosis rate”) is often low, which is problematic for seed producers. We investigated how and why symbiosis rates vary, depending on whether giant clam seeds are continuously reared in UV treated or non treated seawater. Results repeatedly demonstrated that symbiosis rates were lower for UV treated seawater than for non treated seawater. Symbiosis rates were also lower for autoclaved seawater and 0.2-µm filtered seawater than for non treated seawater. The decreased symbiosis rates in various sterilized seawater suggest the possibility that some factors helping symbiosis establishment in natural seawater are weakened owing to sterilization. The possible factors include vitality of giant clam seeds, since additional experiments revealed that survival rates of seeds reared alone without Symbiodinium were lower in sterilized seawater than in non treated seawater. In conclusion, UV treatment of seawater was found to lead to decreased symbiosis rates, which is due possibly to some adverse effects common to the various sterilization techniques and relates to the vitality of the giant clam seeds. PMID:23613802

  19. Carbon availability for the fungus triggers nitrogen uptake and transport in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is characterized by a transfer of nutrients in exchange for carbon. We tested the effect of the carbon availability for the AM fungus Glomus intraradices on nitrogen (N) uptake and transport in the symbiosis. We followed the uptake and transport of 15N and ...

  20. Published in Symbiosis (1999) 27:125-134 Ow et al.(1999) -1

    E-print Network

    Elhai, Jeff

    Published in Symbiosis (1999) 27:125-134 Ow et al.(1999) -1 Reconstitution of a cycad a cycad and cyanobacterium. Reconstitution was achieved also with Nostoc 2S9B, a soil cyanobacterium with the plant. Keywords: cyanobacteria -- mucilage -- Nostoc -- symbiosis -- Zamia 1. Introduction Cycads

  1. Impediment to symbiosis establishment between giant clams and Symbiodinium algae due to sterilization of seawater.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Takeo; Yamada, Hideaki; Inoue, Ken; Iwai, Kenji; Hatta, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    To survive the juvenile stage, giant clam juveniles need to establish a symbiotic relationship with the microalgae Symbiodinium occurring in the environment. The percentage of giant clam juveniles succeeding in symbiosis establishment ("symbiosis rate") is often low, which is problematic for seed producers. We investigated how and why symbiosis rates vary, depending on whether giant clam seeds are continuously reared in UV treated or non treated seawater. Results repeatedly demonstrated that symbiosis rates were lower for UV treated seawater than for non treated seawater. Symbiosis rates were also lower for autoclaved seawater and 0.2-µm filtered seawater than for non treated seawater. The decreased symbiosis rates in various sterilized seawater suggest the possibility that some factors helping symbiosis establishment in natural seawater are weakened owing to sterilization. The possible factors include vitality of giant clam seeds, since additional experiments revealed that survival rates of seeds reared alone without Symbiodinium were lower in sterilized seawater than in non treated seawater. In conclusion, UV treatment of seawater was found to lead to decreased symbiosis rates, which is due possibly to some adverse effects common to the various sterilization techniques and relates to the vitality of the giant clam seeds. PMID:23613802

  2. The symbiosis between Rhizobium leguminosarum and Pisum savitum: regulation of the nitrogenase activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Appels

    1989-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Rhizobium can form a symbiosis with plants of the family Leguminosae. Both bacteria and plant show considerable biochemical and morphological changes in order to develop and carry out the symbiosis. The Rhizobia induce special structures on the legumes, which are called root nodules. In these root nodules, the differentiated bacteria - so-called bacteroids - are localized.

  3. A minimal model of predator-swarm interactions

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yuxin

    2014-01-01

    We propose a minimal model of predator-swarm interactions which captures many of the essential dynamics observed in nature. Different outcomes are observed depending on the predator strength. For a "weak" predator, the swarm is able to escape the predator completely. As the strength is increased, the predator is able to catch up with the swarm as a whole, but the individual prey are able to escape by "confusing" the predator: the prey forms a ring with the predator at the center. For higher predator strength, complex chasing dynamics are observed which can become chaotic. For even higher strength, the predator is able to successfully capture the prey. Our model is simple enough to be amenable to a full mathematical analysis which is used to predict the shape of the swarm as well as the resulting predator-prey dynamics as a function of model parameters. We show that as the predator strength is increased, there is a transition (due to a Hopf bifurcation) from confusion state to chasing dynamics, and we compute ...

  4. Secondary Symbiosis Between Paramecium and Chlorella Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuuki Kodama; Masahiro Fujishima

    2010-01-01

    Each symbiotic Chlorella species of Paramecium bursaria is enclosed in a perialgal vacuole (PV) membrane derived from the host digestive vacuole (DV) membrane. Algae-free paramecia and symbiotic algae are capable of growing independently and paramecia can be reinfected experimentally by mixing them. This phenomenon provides an excellent model for studying cell-to-cell interaction and the evolution of eukaryotic cells through secondary

  5. Functional diversity in coral–dinoflagellate symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Stat, Michael; Morris, Emily; Gates, Ruth D.

    2008-01-01

    Symbioses are widespread in nature and occur along a continuum from parasitism to mutualism. Coral–dinoflagellate symbioses are defined as mutualistic because both partners receive benefit from the association via the exchange of nutrients. This successful interaction underpins the growth and formation of coral reefs. The symbiotic dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium is genetically diverse containing eight divergent lineages (clades A–H). Corals predominantly associate with clade C Symbiodinium and to a lesser extent with clades A, B, D, F, and G. Variation in the function and interactive physiology of different coral–dinoflagellate assemblages is virtually unexplored but is an important consideration when developing the contextual framework of factors that contribute to coral reef resilience. In this study, we present evidence that clade A Symbiodinium are functionally less beneficial to corals than the dominant clade C Symbiodinium and may represent parasitic rather than mutualistic symbionts. Our hypothesis is supported by (i) a significant correlation between the presence of Symbiodinium clade A and health-compromised coral; (ii) a phylogeny and genetic diversity within Symbiodinium that suggests a different evolutionary trajectory for clade A compared with the other dominant Symbiodinium lineages; and (iii) a significantly lower amount of carbon fixed and released by clade A in the presence of a coral synthetic host factor as compared with the dominant coral symbiont lineage, clade C. Collectively, these data suggest that along the symbiotic continuum the interaction between clade A Symbiodinium and corals may be closer to parasitism than mutualism. PMID:18591663

  6. Interactions between benthic predators and zooplanktonic prey are affected by turbulent waves.

    PubMed

    Robinson, H E; Finelli, C M; Koehl, M A R

    2013-11-01

    Predators capture prey in complex and variable environments. In the ocean, bottom-dwelling (benthic) organisms are subjected to water currents, waves, and turbulent eddies. For benthic predators that feed on small animals carried in the water (zooplankton), flow not only delivers prey, but can also shape predator-prey interactions. Benthic passive suspension feeders collect prey delivered by movement of ambient water onto capture-surfaces, whereas motile benthic predators, such as burrow-dwelling fish, dart out to catch passing zooplankton. How does the flow of ambient water affect these contrasting modes of predation by benthic zooplanktivores? We studied the effects of turbulent, wavy flow on the encounter, capture, and retention of motile zooplanktonic prey (copepods, Acartia spp.) by passive benthic suspension feeders (sea anemones, Anthopleura elegantissima). Predator-prey interactions were video-recorded in a wave-generating flume under two regimes of oscillating flow with different peak wave velocities and levels of turbulent kinetic energy ("weak" and "strong" waves). Rates of encounter (number of prey passing through a sea anemone's capture zone per time), capture (prey contacting and sticking to tentacles per time), and retention (prey retained on tentacles, without struggling free or washing off, per time) were measured at both strengths of waves. Strong waves enhanced encounter rates both for dead copepods and for actively swimming copepods, but there was so much variability in the behavior of the live prey that the effect of wave strength on encounter rates was not significant. Trapping efficiency (number of prey retained per number encountered) was the same in both flow regimes because, although fewer prey executed maneuvers to escape capture in strong waves, more of the captured prey was washed off the predators' tentacles. Although peak water velocities and turbulence of waves did not affect feeding rates of passive suspension-feeding sea anemones, increases in these aspects of flow have been shown to enhance feeding rates and efficiency of motile benthic fish that lunge out of their burrows to catch zooplankton. Faster, more turbulent flow interferes with the ability of prey to detect predators and execute escape maneuvers, and thus enhances capture rates both for passive suspension-feeding predators and for actively swimming predators. However, prey captured in the mouths of fish are not washed away by ambient flow, whereas prey captured on the tentacles of suspension feeders can be swept off before they are ingested. Therefore, the effects of flowing water on predation on zooplankton by benthic animals depend on the feeding mode of the predator. PMID:23942646

  7. High phosphate reduces host ability to develop arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis without affecting root calcium spiking responses to the fungus

    PubMed Central

    Balzergue, Coline; Chabaud, Mireille; Barker, David G.; Bécard, Guillaume; Rochange, Soizic F.

    2013-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis associates soil fungi with the roots of the majority of plants species and represents a major source of soil phosphorus acquisition. Mycorrhizal interactions begin with an exchange of molecular signals between the two partners. A root signaling pathway is recruited, for which the perception of fungal signals triggers oscillations of intracellular calcium concentration. High phosphate availability is known to inhibit the establishment and/or persistence of this symbiosis, thereby favoring the direct, non-symbiotic uptake of phosphorus by the root system. In this study, Medicago truncatula plants were used to investigate the effects of phosphate supply on the early stages of the interaction. When plants were supplied with high phosphate fungal attachment to the roots was drastically reduced. An experimental system was designed to individually study the effects of phosphate supply on the fungus, on the roots, and on root exudates. These experiments revealed that the most important effects of high phosphate supply were on the roots themselves, which became unable to host mycorrhizal fungi even when these had been appropriately stimulated. The ability of the roots to perceive their fungal partner was then investigated by monitoring nuclear calcium spiking in response to fungal signals. This response did not appear to be affected by high phosphate supply. In conclusion, high levels of phosphate predominantly impact the plant host, but apparently not in its ability to perceive the fungal partner. PMID:24194742

  8. Contribution of NFP LysM Domains to the Recognition of Nod Factors during the Medicago truncatula/Sinorhizobium meliloti Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Bensmihen, Sandra; de Billy, Françoise; Gough, Clare

    2011-01-01

    The root nodule nitrogen fixing symbiosis between legume plants and soil bacteria called rhizobia is of great agronomical and ecological interest since it provides the plant with fixed atmospheric nitrogen. The establishment of this symbiosis is mediated by the recognition by the host plant of lipo-chitooligosaccharides called Nod Factors (NFs), produced by the rhizobia. This recognition is highly specific, as precise NF structures are required depending on the host plant. Here, we study the importance of different LysM domains of a LysM-Receptor Like Kinase (LysM-RLK) from Medicago truncatula called Nod factor perception (NFP) in the recognition of different substitutions of NFs produced by its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti. These substitutions are a sulphate group at the reducing end, which is essential for host specificity, and a specific acyl chain at the non-reducing end, that is critical for the infection process. The NFP extracellular domain (ECD) contains 3 LysM domains that are predicted to bind NFs. By swapping the whole ECD or individual LysM domains of NFP for those of its orthologous gene from pea, SYM10 (a legume plant that interacts with another strain of rhizobium producing NFs with different substitutions), we showed that NFP is not directly responsible for specific recognition of the sulphate substitution of S. meliloti NFs, but probably interacts with the acyl substitution. Moreover, we have demonstrated the importance of the NFP LysM2 domain for rhizobial infection and we have pinpointed the importance of a single leucine residue of LysM2 in that step of the symbiosis. Together, our data put into new perspective the recognition of NFs in the different steps of symbiosis in M. truncatula, emphasising the probable existence of a missing component for early NF recognition and reinforcing the important role of NFP for NF recognition during rhizobial infection. PMID:22087221

  9. Sustainable agriculture: possible trajectories from mutualistic symbiosis and plant neodomestication.

    PubMed

    Duhamel, Marie; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Food demand will increase concomitantly with human population. Food production therefore needs to be high enough and, at the same time, minimize damage to the environment. This equation cannot be solved with current strategies. Based on recent findings, new trajectories for agriculture and plant breeding which take into account the belowground compartment and evolution of mutualistic strategy, are proposed in this opinion article. In this context, we argue that plant breeders have the opportunity to make use of native arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis in an innovative ecologically intensive agriculture. PMID:24055138

  10. Plant-endophyte symbiosis in non-leguminous plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Becking

    1970-01-01

    Summary  A wide taxonomic range of non-leguminous dicotyledonous plants bear root nodules and are able to fix atmospheric nitrogen.\\u000a These plants belong to the orders Casuarinales, Myricales, Fagales, Rhamnales, Coriariales, and Rosales. Actinomycetes are\\u000a involved in the root-nodule symbiosis.\\u000a \\u000a Nitrogen fixation is inhibited by hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Combined nitrogen depress nodule formation, but nitrogen fixation\\u000a still occurs in the presence

  11. Why Does Gunnera Do It and Other Angiosperms Don't? An Evolutionary Perspective on the Gunnera – Nostoc Symbiosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce Osborne; Birgitta Bergman

    The Gunnera–Nostoc symbiosis\\u000a is an enigmatic plant–cyanobacterial symbiosis: the only known angiosperm–cyanobacterial symbiosis.\\u000a We postulate that this symbiosis, together with perhaps all other plant–cyanobacterial symbioses,\\u000a was more important in the geological past and was a response to a unique suite of environmental\\u000a conditions that are uncommon today. Phylogenetic analyses indicate a distinct origin for the evolution\\u000a of the Gunnera–Nostoc symbiosis\\u000a within the angiosperms,

  12. Variability of community interaction networks in marine reserves and adjacent exploited areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montano-Moctezuma, G.; Li, H.W.; Rossignol, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    Regional and small-scale local oceanographic conditions can lead to high variability in community structure even among similar habitats. Communities with identical species composition can depict distinct networks due to different levels of disturbance as well as physical and biological processes. In this study we reconstruct community networks in four different areas off the Oregon Coast by matching simulated communities with observed dynamics. We compared reserves with harvested areas. Simulations suggested that different community networks, but with the same species composition, can represent each study site. Differences were found in predator-prey interactions as well as non-predatory interactions between community members. In addition, each site can be represented as a set of models, creating alternative stages among sites. The set of alternative models that characterize each study area depicts a sequence of functional responses where each specific model or interaction structure creates different species composition patterns. Different management practices, either in the past or of the present, may lead to alternative communities. Our findings suggest that management strategies should be analyzed at a community level that considers the possible consequences of shifting from one community scenario to another. This analysis provides a novel conceptual framework to assess the consequences of different management options for ecological communities. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Interactions among phytophagous mites, and introduced and naturally occurring predatory mites, on strawberry in the UK.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Jean; Pepper, Nicola; Easterbrook, Mike; Pope, Tom; Solomon, Mike

    2007-01-01

    In choice test experiments on strawberry leaf disc arenas the phytoseiid mites Neoseiulus californicus and N. cucumeris were more effective than Typhlodromus pyri as predators of the phytophagous mites Tetranychus urticae and Phytonemus pallidus. There were no preferences shown for either prey by any of these predators. In multiple predator leaf disc experiments both Phytoseiulus persimilis and N. cucumeris significantly reduced numbers of T. urticae eggs and active stages; this effect was seen when the two species were present alone or in combination with other predator species. Neoseiulus californicus was less effective at reducing T. urticae numbers, and T. pyri was not effective; no interaction between predator species was detected in these experiments. When T. urticae alone was present as prey on potted plants, P. persimilis and N. californicus were the only phytoseiids to significantly reduce T. urticae numbers. These two predator species provided effective control of T. urticae when P. pallidus was also present; however, none of the predators reduced numbers of P. pallidus. There were no significant negative interactions when different species of predators were present together on these potted plants. In field experiments, releases of both P. persimilis and N. cucumeris significantly reduced T. urticae numbers. However, there was a significant interaction between these predator species, leading to poorer control of T. urticae when both species were released together. These results show the importance of conducting predator/prey feeding tests at different spatial scales. PMID:17713859

  14. Unveiling in situ interactions between marine protists and bacteria through single cell sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Garcia, Manuel; Brazel, David; Poulton, Nicole J; Swan, Brandon K; Gomez, Monica Lluesma; Masland, Dashiell; Sieracki, Michael E; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2012-01-01

    Heterotrophic protists are a highly diverse and biogeochemically significant component of marine ecosystems, yet little is known about their species-specific prey preferences and symbiotic interactions in situ. Here we demonstrate how these previously unresolved questions can be addressed by sequencing the eukaryote and bacterial SSU rRNA genes from individual, uncultured protist cells collected from their natural marine environment and sorted by flow cytometry. We detected Pelagibacter ubique in association with a MAST-4 protist, an actinobacterium in association with a chrysophyte and three bacteroidetes in association with diverse protist groups. The presence of identical phylotypes among the putative prey and the free bacterioplankton in the same sample provides evidence for predator–prey interactions. Our results also suggest a discovery of novel symbionts, distantly related to Rickettsiales and the candidate divisions ZB3 and TG2, associated with Cercozoa and Chrysophyta cells. This study demonstrates the power of single cell sequencing to untangle ecological interactions between uncultured protists and prokaryotes. PMID:21938022

  15. Symbiosis as a source of selectable epigenetic variation: taking the heat for the big guy

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Scott F.; McDonald, Emily; Boyle, Nicole; Buttino, Nicholas; Gyi, Lin; Mai, Mark; Prakash, Neelakantan; Robinson, James

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary developmental biology is based on the principle that evolution arises from hereditable changes in development. Most of this new work has centred on changes in the regulatory components of the genome. However, recent studies (many of them documented in this volume) have shown that development also includes interactions between the organism and its environment. One area of interest concerns the importance of symbionts for the production of the normal range of phenotypes. Many, if not most, organisms have ‘outsourced’ some of their developmental signals to a set of symbionts that are expected to be acquired during development. Such intimate interactions between species are referred to as codevelopment, the production of a new individual through the coordinated interactions of several genotypically different species. Within the past 2 years, several research programmes have demonstrated that such codevelopmental schemes can be selected. We will focus on symbioses in coral reef cnidarians symbiosis, pea aphids and cactuses, wherein the symbiotic system provides thermotolerance for the composite organism. PMID:20083641

  16. Symbiosis as a source of selectable epigenetic variation: taking the heat for the big guy.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Scott F; McDonald, Emily; Boyle, Nicole; Buttino, Nicholas; Gyi, Lin; Mai, Mark; Prakash, Neelakantan; Robinson, James

    2010-02-27

    Evolutionary developmental biology is based on the principle that evolution arises from hereditable changes in development. Most of this new work has centred on changes in the regulatory components of the genome. However, recent studies (many of them documented in this volume) have shown that development also includes interactions between the organism and its environment. One area of interest concerns the importance of symbionts for the production of the normal range of phenotypes. Many, if not most, organisms have 'outsourced' some of their developmental signals to a set of symbionts that are expected to be acquired during development. Such intimate interactions between species are referred to as codevelopment, the production of a new individual through the coordinated interactions of several genotypically different species. Within the past 2 years, several research programmes have demonstrated that such codevelopmental schemes can be selected. We will focus on symbioses in coral reef cnidarians symbiosis, pea aphids and cactuses, wherein the symbiotic system provides thermotolerance for the composite organism. PMID:20083641

  17. Understanding resilience in industrial symbiosis networks: insights from network analysis.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Shauhrat S; Khanna, Vikas

    2014-08-01

    Industrial symbiotic networks are based on the principles of ecological systems where waste equals food, to develop synergistic networks. For example, industrial symbiosis (IS) at Kalundborg, Denmark, creates an exchange network of waste, water, and energy among companies based on contractual dependency. Since most of the industrial symbiotic networks are based on ad-hoc opportunities rather than strategic planning, gaining insight into disruptive scenarios is pivotal for understanding the balance of resilience and sustainability and developing heuristics for designing resilient IS networks. The present work focuses on understanding resilience as an emergent property of an IS network via a network-based approach with application to the Kalundborg Industrial Symbiosis (KIS). Results from network metrics and simulated disruptive scenarios reveal Asnaes power plant as the most critical node in the system. We also observe a decrease in the vulnerability of nodes and reduction in single points of failure in the system, suggesting an increase in the overall resilience of the KIS system from 1960 to 2010. Based on our findings, we recommend design strategies, such as increasing diversity, redundancy, and multi-functionality to ensure flexibility and plasticity, to develop resilient and sustainable industrial symbiotic networks. PMID:24768838

  18. Aphids evolved novel secreted proteins for symbiosis with bacterial endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Shigenobu, Shuji; Stern, David L

    2013-01-01

    Aphids evolved novel cells, called bacteriocytes, that differentiate specifically to harbour the obligatory mutualistic endosymbiotic bacteria Buchnera aphidicola. The genome of the host aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum contains many orphan genes that display no similarity with genes found in other sequenced organisms, prompting us to hypothesize that some of these orphan genes are related to lineage-specific traits, such as symbiosis. We conducted deep sequencing of bacteriocytes mRNA followed by whole mount in situ hybridizations of over-represented transcripts encoding aphid-specific orphan proteins. We identified a novel class of genes that encode small proteins with signal peptides, which are often cysteine-rich, that are over-represented in bacteriocytes. These genes are first expressed at a developmental time point coincident with the incorporation of symbionts strictly in the cells that contribute to the bacteriocyte and this bacteriocyte-specific expression is maintained throughout the aphid's life. The expression pattern suggests that recently evolved secretion proteins act within bacteriocytes, perhaps to mediate the symbiosis with beneficial bacterial partners, which is reminiscent of the evolution of novel cysteine-rich secreted proteins of leguminous plants that regulate nitrogen-fixing endosymbionts. PMID:23173201

  19. Shared metabolic pathways in a coevolved insect-bacterial symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Russell, Calum W; Bouvaine, Sophie; Newell, Peter D; Douglas, Angela E

    2013-10-01

    The symbiotic bacterium Buchnera aphidicola lacks key genes in the biosynthesis of five essential amino acids (EAAs), and yet its animal hosts (aphids) depend on the symbiosis for the synthesis of these EAAs (isoleucine, leucine, methionine, phenylalanine, and valine). We tested the hypothesis, derived from genome annotation, that the missing Buchnera reactions are mediated by host enzymes, with the exchange of metabolic intermediates between the partners. The specialized host cells bearing Buchnera were separated into a Buchnera fraction and a Buchnera-free host cell fraction (HF). Addition of HF to isolated Buchnera preparations significantly increased the production of leucine and phenylalanine, and recombinant enzymes mediating the final reactions in branched-chain amino acid and phenylalanine synthesis rescued the production of these EAAs by Buchnera preparations without HF. The likely precursors for the missing proximal reactions in isoleucine and methionine synthesis were identified, and they differed from predictions based on genome annotations: synthesis of 2-oxobutanoate, the aphid-derived precursor of isoleucine synthesis, was stimulated by homoserine and not threonine via threonine dehydratase, and production of the homocysteine precursor of methionine was driven by cystathionine, not cysteine, via reversal of the transsulfuration pathway. The evolution of shared metabolic pathways in this symbiosis can be attributed to host compensation for genomic deterioration in the symbiont, involving changes in host gene expression networks to recruit specific enzymes to the host cell. PMID:23892755

  20. Component modeling in ecological risk assessment: Disturbance in interspecific interactions caused by air toxics introduced into terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swider, Jan Zenon

    The human health risk assessment (HRA), initiated by the onset of nuclear industry, has been a well established methodology for assessing the impacts of human created contamination on an individual human being and entire population. The wide spread of applications and tools grown upon this methodology allows one not only to identify the hazards, but also to manage the risks. Recently, there has existed an increased awareness of the need to conduct ecological risk assessments (ERA) in addition to HRAs. The ERAs are, by and large, more complex than typical HRAs and involve not only different species but whole ecological systems. Such complex analyses require a thorough understanding of the processes underway in the ecosystem, including the contaminant transport through the food web, population dynamics as well as intra- and inter-specific relationships. The exposure pathways change radically depending on the consumer tier. Plants produce their nutriment from the sunlight and raw inorganic compounds. Animals and other living forms obtain energy by eating plants, other animals and detritus. Their double role as food consumers and food producers causes a trophic structure of the ecological system, where nutrients and energy are transferred from one trophic level to another. This is a dynamic process of energy flow, mostly in the form of food, varying with time and space. In order to conduct an efficient ERA, a multidisciplinary framework is needed. This framework can be enhanced by analyzing predator-prey interactions during the environmental disturbances caused by a pollutant emission, and by assessing the consequences of such disturbances. It is necessary to develop a way to describe how human industrial activity affects the ecosystems. Existing ecological studies have mostly been focused either on pure ecological interdependencies or on limited perspectives of human activities. In this study, we discuss the issues of air pollution and its ecological impacts from the Ecological Risk Assessment standpoint and examine the impact of air toxics emissions on an ecosystem, with particular emphasis on predator-prey interactions. Such analysis may help to identify the most likely conditions leading to the ecosystem instability and possibility of its recuperation.

  1. Combined and interactive effects of global climate change and toxicants on populations and communities.

    PubMed

    Moe, S Jannicke; De Schamphelaere, Karel; Clements, William H; Sorensen, Mary T; Van den Brink, Paul J; Liess, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Increased temperature and other environmental effects of global climate change (GCC) have documented impacts on many species (e.g., polar bears, amphibians, coral reefs) as well as on ecosystem processes and species interactions (e.g., the timing of predator-prey interactions). A challenge for ecotoxicologists is to predict how joint effects of climatic stress and toxicants measured at the individual level (e.g., reduced survival and reproduction) will be manifested at the population level (e.g., population growth rate, extinction risk) and community level (e.g., species richness, food-web structure). The authors discuss how population- and community-level responses to toxicants under GCC are likely to be influenced by various ecological mechanisms. Stress due to GCC may reduce the potential for resistance to and recovery from toxicant exposure. Long-term toxicant exposure can result in acquired tolerance to this stressor at the population or community level, but an associated cost of tolerance may be the reduced potential for tolerance to subsequent climatic stress (or vice versa). Moreover, GCC can induce large-scale shifts in community composition, which may affect the vulnerability of communities to other stressors. Ecological modeling based on species traits (representing life-history traits, population vulnerability, sensitivity to toxicants, and sensitivity to climate change) can be a promising approach for predicting combined impacts of GCC and toxicants on populations and communities. PMID:23147390

  2. Diet of lake trout and burbot in northern Lake Michigan during spring: Evidence of ecological interaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobs, Gregory R.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Bunnell, David B.; Holuszko, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    We used analyses of burbot (Lota lota) and lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) diets taken during spring gill-net surveys in northern Lake Michigan in 2006-2008 to investigate the potential for competition and predator-prey interactions between these two species. We also compared our results to historical data from 1932. During 2006-2008, lake trout diet consisted mainly of alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus) and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), whereas burbot utilized a much wider prey base including round goby (Neogobius melanostomus), rainbow smelt, alewives, and sculpins. Using the Schoener's diet overlap index, we found a higher potential for interspecific competition in 1932 than in 2006-2008, though diet overlap was not significant in either time period. No evidence of cannibalism by lake trout or lake trout predation on burbot was found in either time period. In 2006-2008, however, lake trout composed 5.4% (by weight) of burbot diet. To determine whether this predation could be having an impact on lake trout rehabilitation efforts in northern Lake Michigan, we developed a bioenergetic-based consumption estimate for burbot on Boulder Reef (a representative reef within the Northern Refuge) and found that burbot alone can consume a considerable proportion of the yearling lake trout stocked annually, depending on burbot density. Overall, we conclude that predation, rather than competition, is the more important ecological interaction between burbot and lake trout, and burbot predation may be contributing to the failed lake trout rehabilitation efforts in Lake Michigan.

  3. COMBINED AND INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE AND TOXICANTS ON POPULATIONS AND COMMUNITIES

    PubMed Central

    Moe, S Jannicke; De Schamphelaere, Karel; Clements, William H; Sorensen, Mary T; Van den Brink, Paul J; Liess, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Increased temperature and other environmental effects of global climate change (GCC) have documented impacts on many species (e.g., polar bears, amphibians, coral reefs) as well as on ecosystem processes and species interactions (e.g., the timing of predator–prey interactions). A challenge for ecotoxicologists is to predict how joint effects of climatic stress and toxicants measured at the individual level (e.g., reduced survival and reproduction) will be manifested at the population level (e.g., population growth rate, extinction risk) and community level (e.g., species richness, food-web structure). The authors discuss how population- and community-level responses to toxicants under GCC are likely to be influenced by various ecological mechanisms. Stress due to GCC may reduce the potential for resistance to and recovery from toxicant exposure. Long-term toxicant exposure can result in acquired tolerance to this stressor at the population or community level, but an associated cost of tolerance may be the reduced potential for tolerance to subsequent climatic stress (or vice versa). Moreover, GCC can induce large-scale shifts in community composition, which may affect the vulnerability of communities to other stressors. Ecological modeling based on species traits (representing life-history traits, population vulnerability, sensitivity to toxicants, and sensitivity to climate change) can be a promising approach for predicting combined impacts of GCC and toxicants on populations and communities. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2013;32:49–61. © 2012 SETAC PMID:23147390

  4. Protocol: using virus-induced gene silencing to study the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Pisum sativum

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an alternative reverse genetics tool for silencing of genes in some plants, which are difficult to transform. The pea early-browning virus (PEBV) has been developed as a VIGS vector and used in pea for functional analysis of several genes. However, the available PEBV-VIGS protocols are inadequate for studying genes involved in the symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Here we describe a PEBV-VIGS protocol suitable for reverse genetics studies in pea of genes involved in the symbiosis with AMF and show its effectiveness in silencing genes involved in the early and late stages of AMF symbiosis. PMID:21156044

  5. A native fungal symbiont facilitates the prevalence and development of an invasive pathogen-native vector symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lilin; Lu, Min; Niu, Hongtao; Fang, Guofei; Zhang, Shuai; Sun, Jianghua

    2013-12-01

    Invasive pathogen-insect symbioses have been extensively studied in many different ecological niches. Whether the damage of symbioses in different introduced regions might be influenced by other microorganisms has, however, received little attention. Eight years of field data showed that the varied levels of the nematode and beetle populations and infested trees of the invasive Bursaphelenchus xylophilus--Monochamus alternatus symbiosis were correlated with patterns in the isolation frequencies of ophiostomatoid fungi at six sites, while the laboratory experiments showed that the nematode produced greater numbers of offspring with a female-biased sex ratio and developed faster in the presence of one native symbiotic ophiostomatoid fungus, Sporothrix sp. 1. Diacetone alcohol (DAA) from xylem inoculated with Sporothrix sp. 1 induced B. xylophilus to produce greater numbers of offspring. Its presence also significantly increased the growth and survival rate of M. alternatus, and possibly explains the prevalence of the nematode-vector symbiosis when Sporothrix sp. 1 was dominant in the fungal communities. Studying the means by which multispecies interactions contributed to biogeographical dynamics allowed us to better understand the varied levels of damage caused by biological invasion across the invaded range. PMID:24597227

  6. Effects of multiple climate change factors on the tall fescue-fungal endophyte symbiosis: infection frequency and tissue chemistry.

    SciTech Connect

    Brosi, Glade [University of Kentucky; McCulley, Rebecca L [University of Kentucky; Bush, L P [University of Kentucky; Nelson, Jim A [University of Kentucky; Classen, Aimee T [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Norby, Richard J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Climate change (altered CO{sub 2}, warming, and precipitation) may affect plant-microbial interactions, such as the Lolium arundinaceum-Neotyphodium coenophialum symbiosis, to alter future ecosystem structure and function. To assess this possibility, tall fescue tillers were collected from an existing climate manipulation experiment in a constructed old-field community in Tennessee (USA). Endophyte infection frequency (EIF) was determined, and infected (E+) and uninfected (E-) tillers were analysed for tissue chemistry. The EIF of tall fescue was higher under elevated CO{sub 2} (91% infected) than with ambient CO{sub 2} (81%) but was not affected by warming or precipitation treatments. Within E+ tillers, elevated CO{sub 2} decreased alkaloid concentrations of both ergovaline and loline, by c. 30%; whereas warming increased loline concentrations 28% but had no effect on ergovaline. Independent of endophyte infection, elevated CO{sub 2} reduced concentrations of nitrogen, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. These results suggest that elevated CO{sub 2}, more than changes in temperature or precipitation, may promote this grass-fungal symbiosis, leading to higher EIF in tall fescue in old-field communities. However, as all three climate factors are likely to change in the future, predicting the symbiotic response and resulting ecological consequences may be difficult and dependent on the specific atmospheric and climatic conditions encountered.

  7. gamm header will be provided by the publisher On the Approximation of Transport Pheno-

    E-print Network

    -prey interaction in jellyfish to the investigation of blood flow in the cardiovascular sys- tem. Our approach Phenomena and the consideration of predator-prey interaction in jellyfish [20] to the investigation of blood

  8. Microbial experimental evolution as a novel research approach in the Vibrionaceae and squid-Vibrio symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Soto, William; Nishiguchi, Michele K.

    2014-01-01

    The Vibrionaceae are a genetically and metabolically diverse family living in aquatic habitats with a great propensity toward developing interactions with eukaryotic microbial and multicellular hosts (as either commensals, pathogens, and mutualists). The Vibrionaceae frequently possess a life history cycle where bacteria are attached to a host in one phase and then another where they are free from their host as either part of the bacterioplankton or adhered to solid substrates such as marine sediment, riverbeds, lakebeds, or floating particulate debris. These two stages in their life history exert quite distinct and separate selection pressures. When bound to solid substrates or to host cells, the Vibrionaceae can also exist as complex biofilms. The association between bioluminescent Vibrio spp. and sepiolid squids (Cephalopoda: Sepiolidae) is an experimentally tractable model to study bacteria and animal host interactions, since the symbionts and squid hosts can be maintained in the laboratory independently of one another. The bacteria can be grown in pure culture and the squid hosts raised gnotobiotically with sterile light organs. The partnership between free-living Vibrio symbionts and axenic squid hatchlings emerging from eggs must be renewed every generation of the cephalopod host. Thus, symbiotic bacteria and animal host can each be studied alone and together in union. Despite virtues provided by the Vibrionaceae and sepiolid squid-Vibrio symbiosis, these assets to evolutionary biology have yet to be fully utilized for microbial experimental evolution. Experimental evolution studies already completed are reviewed, along with exploratory topics for future study. PMID:25538686

  9. Friend or foe? A behavioral and stable isotopic investigation of an ant-plant symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Tillberg, Chadwick V

    2004-08-01

    In ant-plant symbioses, the behavior of ant inhabitants affects the nature of the interaction, ranging from mutualism to parasitism. Mutualistic species confer a benefit to the plant, while parasites reap the benefits of the interaction without reciprocating, potentially resulting in a negative impact on the host plant. Using the ant-plant symbiosis between Cordia alliodora and its ant inhabitants as a model system, I examine the costs and benefits of habitation by the four most common ant inhabitants at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. Costs are measured by counting coccoids associated with each ant species. Benefits include patrolling behavior, effectiveness at locating resources, and recruitment response. I also compare the diets of the four ant species using stable isotope analysis of nitrogen (N) and carbon (C). Ants varied in their rates of association with coccoids, performance of beneficial behaviors, and diet. These differences in cost, benefit, and diet among the ant species suggest differences in the nature of the symbiotic relationship between C. alliodora and its ants. Two of the ant species behave in a mutualistic manner, while the other two ant species appear to be parasites of the mutualism. I determined that the mutualistic ants feed at a higher trophic level than the parasitic ants. Behavioral and dietary evidence indicate the protective role of the mutualists, and suggest that the parasitic ants do not protect the plant by consuming herbivores. PMID:15179580

  10. Modelling multi-species interactions in the Barents Sea ecosystem with special emphasis on minke whales and their interactions with cod, herring and capelin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrøm, Ulf; Smout, Sophie; Howell, Daniel; Bogstad, Bjarte

    2009-10-01

    The Barents Sea ecosystem, one of the most productive and commercially important ecosystems in the world, has experienced major fluctuations in species abundance the past five decades. Likely causes are natural variability, climate change, overfishing and predator-prey interactions. In this study, we use an age-length structured multi-species model (Gadget, Globally applicable Area-Disaggregated General Ecosystem Toolbox) to analyse the historic population dynamics of major fish and marine mammal species in the Barents Sea. The model was used to examine possible effects of a number of plausible biological and fisheries scenarios. The results suggest that changes in cod mortality from fishing or cod cannibalism levels have the largest effect on the ecosystem, while changes to the capelin fishery have had only minor effects. Alternate whale migration scenarios had only a moderate impact on the modelled ecosystem. Indirect effects are seen to be important, with cod fishing pressure, cod cannibalism and whale predation on cod having an indirect impact on capelin, emphasising the importance of multi-species modelling in understanding and managing ecosystems. Models such as the one presented here provide one step towards an ecosystem-based approach to fisheries management.

  11. Differential Effects of Rare Specific Flavonoids on Compatible and Incompatible Strains in the Myrica gale-Frankia Actinorhizal Symbiosis? †

    PubMed Central

    Popovici, Jean; Comte, Gilles; Bagnarol, Émilie; Alloisio, Nicole; Fournier, Pascale; Bellvert, Floriant; Bertrand, Cédric; Fernandez, Maria P.

    2010-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites, and specifically phenolics, play important roles when plants interact with their environment and can act as weapons or positive signals during biotic interactions. One such interaction, the establishment of mutualistic nitrogen-fixing symbioses, typically involves phenolic-based recognition mechanisms between host plants and bacterial symbionts during the early stages of interaction. While these mechanisms are well studied in the rhizobia-legume symbiosis, little is known about the role of plant phenolics in the symbiosis between actinorhizal plants and Frankia genus strains. In this study, the responsiveness of Frankia strains to plant phenolics was correlated with their symbiotic compatibility. We used Myrica gale, a host species with narrow symbiont specificity, and a set of compatible and noncompatible Frankia strains. M. gale fruit exudate phenolics were extracted, and 8 dominant molecules were purified and identified as flavonoids by high-resolution spectroscopic techniques. Total fruit exudates, along with two purified dihydrochalcone molecules, induced modifications of bacterial growth and nitrogen fixation according to the symbiotic specificity of strains, enhancing compatible strains and inhibiting incompatible ones. Candidate genes involved in these effects were identified by a global transcriptomic approach using ACN14a strain whole-genome microarrays. Fruit exudates induced differential expression of 22 genes involved mostly in oxidative stress response and drug resistance, along with the overexpression of a whiB transcriptional regulator. This work provides evidence for the involvement of plant secondary metabolites in determining symbiotic specificity and expands our understanding of the mechanisms, leading to the establishment of actinorhizal symbioses. PMID:20190089

  12. Industrial symbiosis and the successional city : adapting exchange networks to energy constraints

    E-print Network

    Terway, Timothy M. (Timothy Michael)

    2007-01-01

    Industrial ecology offers models for hybridizing technology and natural processes, human desires and the capacities of ecosystems in an effort to reconcile the expanding conflicts among them. Industrial symbiosis applies ...

  13. Phylogenyofarbuscular mycorrhizal fungi predicts community composition of symbiosis-associated bacteria

    E-print Network

    Rilli, Matthias C.

    Phylogenyofarbuscular mycorrhizal fungi predicts community composition of symbiosis the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, common symbionts of higher plants, on the composition showed that the phylogeny of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal isolates was a highly significant predictor

  14. The Laccaria and Tuber Genomes Reveal Unique Signatures of Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Evolution (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Steve

    2010-03-24

    Francis Martin from the French agricultural research institute INRA talks on how "The Laccaria and Tuber genomes reveal unique signatures of mycorrhizal symbiosis evolution" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  15. Density-mediated, context-dependent consumer-resource interactions between ants and extrafloral nectar plants.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Scott A; Holland, J Nathaniel

    2008-05-01

    Interspecific interactions are often mediated by the interplay between resource supply and consumer density. The supply of a resource and a consumer's density response to it may in turn yield context-dependent use of other resources. Such consumer-resource interactions occur not only for predator-prey and competitive interactions, but for mutualistic ones as well. For example, consumer-resource interactions between ants and extrafloral nectar (EFN) plants are often mutualistic, as EFN resources attract and reward ants which protect plants from herbivory. Yet, ants also commonly exploit floral resources, leading to antagonistic consumer-resource interactions by disrupting pollination and plant reproduction. EFN resources associated with mutualistic ant-plant interactions may also mediate antagonistic ant-flower interactions through the aggregative density response of ants on plants, which could either exacerbate ant-flower interactions or alternatively satiate and distract ants from floral resources. In this study, we examined how EFN resources mediate the density response of ants on senita cacti in the Sonoran Desert and their context-dependent use of floral resources. Removal of EFN resources reduced the aggregative density of ants on plants, both on hourly and daily time scales. Yet, the increased aggregative ant density on plants with EFN resources decreased rather than increased ant use of floral resources, including contacts with and time spent in flowers. Behavioral assays showed no confounding effect of floral deterrents on ant-flower interactions. Thus, ant use of floral resources depends on the supply of EFN resources, which mediates the potential for both mutualistic and antagonistic interactions by increasing the aggregative density of ants protecting plants, while concurrently distracting ants from floral resources. Nevertheless, only certain years and populations of study showed an increase in plant reproduction through herbivore protection or ant distraction from floral resources. Despite pronounced effects of EFN resources mediating the aggregative density of ants on plants and their context-dependent use of floral resources, consumer-resource interactions remained largely commensalistic. PMID:18543629

  16. Interactive exploration of multidimensional data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. Rabenhorst

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a system called diamond for interactive exploration of multidimensional data. Diamond takes advantage of human pattern recognition and processing capacity, and puts major emphasis on performance and responsiveness. This creates a highly productive symbiosis between the human and the system. The basic philosophy of diamond is to depict the data with pictures, and to help the user

  17. Gatekeeper tyrosine phosphorylation is autoinhibitory for Symbiosis Receptor Kinase.

    PubMed

    Paul, Anindita; Samaddar, Sandip; Bhattacharya, Avisek; Banerjee, Anindyajit; Das, Abhishek; Chakrabarti, Saikat; DasGupta, Maitrayee

    2014-08-25

    Plant receptor-like kinases (RLKs) are distinguished by having a tyrosine in the 'gatekeeper' position. Previously we reported Symbiosis Receptor Kinase from Arachis hypogaea (AhSYMRK) to autophosphorylate on the gatekeeper tyrosine (Y670), though this phosphorylation was not necessary for the kinase activity. Here we report that recombinant catalytic domain of AhSYMRK with a phosphomimic substitution in the gatekeeper position (Y670E) is catalytically almost inactive and is conformationally quite distinct from the corresponding native enzyme. Additionally, we show that gatekeeper-phosphorylated AhSYMRK polypeptides are inactive and depletion of this inactive form leads to activation of intramolecular autophosphorylation of AhSYMRK. Together, our results suggest gatekeeper tyrosine autophosphorylation to be autoinhibitory for AhSYMRK. PMID:24996184

  18. Lipopolysaccharide mutants of Rhizobium meliloti are not defective in symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Clover, R.H.; Kieber, J.; Signer, E.R. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (USA))

    1989-07-01

    Mutants of Rhizobium meliloti selected primarily for bacteriophage resistance fall into 13 groups. Mutants in the four best-characterized groups (class A, lpsB, lpsC, and class D), which map to the rhizobial chromosome, appear to affect lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as judged by the reactivity with monoclonal antibodies and behavior on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels of extracted LPS. Mutations in all 13 groups, in an otherwise wild-type genetic background, are Fix{sup +} on alfalfa. This suggests that LPS does not play a major role in symbiosis. Mutations in lpsB, however, are Fix{sup {minus}} in one particular genetic background, evidently because of the cumulative effect of several independent background mutations. In addition, an auxotrophic mutation evidently equivalent to Escherichia coli carAB is Fix{sup {minus}} on alfalfa.

  19. Nuclear energy and waste management pyroprocess for system symbiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Toru; Minato, Kazuo; Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Nishihara, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    The actinide management has become a key issue in nuclear energy. Recovering and fissioning transuranium elements reduce the long-term proliferation risks and the environmental burden. The better way of waste management will be made by system symbiosis: a combination of light-water reactor and fast reactor and/or accelerator-driven transmutation system should be sought. The new recycling technology should be able to achieve good economy with smaller plants, which can process fuels from different types of reactors on a common technical basis. Ease in handling the higher heat load of transuranium nuclides is also important. Pyroprocesses with the use of molten salts are regarded as the strong candidate for such recycling technology. In JAEA, the first laboratory for the high-temperature chemistry of Am and Cm has been established. The fundamental data will be combined with the computer code for predicting the molten-salts electrolytic processes.

  20. The engine of the reef: photobiology of the coral-algal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Roth, Melissa S

    2014-01-01

    Coral reef ecosystems thrive in tropical oligotrophic oceans because of the relationship between corals and endosymbiotic dinoflagellate algae called Symbiodinium. Symbiodinium convert sunlight and carbon dioxide into organic carbon and oxygen to fuel coral growth and calcification, creating habitat for these diverse and productive ecosystems. Light is thus a key regulating factor shaping the productivity, physiology, and ecology of the coral holobiont. Similar to all oxygenic photoautotrophs, Symbiodinium must safely harvest sunlight for photosynthesis and dissipate excess energy to prevent oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is caused by environmental stressors such as those associated with global climate change, and ultimately leads to breakdown of the coral-algal symbiosis known as coral bleaching. Recently, large-scale coral bleaching events have become pervasive and frequent threatening and endangering coral reefs. Because the coral-algal symbiosis is the biological engine producing the reef, the future of coral reef ecosystems depends on the ecophysiology of the symbiosis. This review examines the photobiology of the coral-algal symbiosis with particular focus on the photophysiological responses and timescales of corals and Symbiodinium. Additionally, this review summarizes the light environment and its dynamics, the vulnerability of the symbiosis to oxidative stress, the abiotic and biotic factors influencing photosynthesis, the diversity of the coral-algal symbiosis, and recent advances in the field. Studies integrating physiology with the developing "omics" fields will provide new insights into the coral-algal symbiosis. Greater physiological and ecological understanding of the coral-algal symbiosis is needed for protection and conservation of coral reefs. PMID:25202301

  1. Unfolding the secrets of coral-algal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Rosic, Nedeljka; Ling, Edmund Yew Siang; Chan, Chon-Kit Kenneth; Lee, Hong Ching; Kaniewska, Paulina; Edwards, David; Dove, Sophie; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Dinoflagellates from the genus Symbiodinium form a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with reef-building corals. Here we applied massively parallel Illumina sequencing to assess genetic similarity and diversity among four phylogenetically diverse dinoflagellate clades (A, B, C and D) that are commonly associated with corals. We obtained more than 30?000 predicted genes for each Symbiodinium clade, with a majority of the aligned transcripts corresponding to sequence data sets of symbiotic dinoflagellates and <2% of sequences having bacterial or other foreign origin. We report 1053 genes, orthologous among four Symbiodinium clades, that share a high level of sequence identity to known proteins from the SwissProt (SP) database. Approximately 80% of the transcripts aligning to the 1053 SP genes were unique to Symbiodinium species and did not align to other dinoflagellates and unrelated eukaryotic transcriptomes/genomes. Six pathways were common to all four Symbiodinium clades including the phosphatidylinositol signaling system and inositol phosphate metabolism pathways. The list of Symbiodinium transcripts common to all four clades included conserved genes such as heat shock proteins (Hsp70 and Hsp90), calmodulin, actin and tubulin, several ribosomal, photosynthetic and cytochrome genes and chloroplast-based heme-containing cytochrome P450, involved in the biosynthesis of xanthophylls. Antioxidant genes, which are important in stress responses, were also preserved, as were a number of calcium-dependent and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases that may play a role in the establishment of symbiosis. Our findings disclose new knowledge about the genetic uniqueness of symbiotic dinoflagellates and provide a list of homologous genes important for the foundation of coral-algal symbiosis. PMID:25343511

  2. Lichen Symbiosis: Nature's High Yielding Machines for Induced Hydrogen Production

    PubMed Central

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Kastanaki, Elizabeth; Pirintsos, Stergios; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939) and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont’s and photobiont’s consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration) establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont’s hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein) to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state) constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications. PMID:25826211

  3. Lichen Symbiosis: Nature's High Yielding Machines for Induced Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Kastanaki, Elizabeth; Pirintsos, Stergios; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939) and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont's and photobiont's consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration) establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont's hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein) to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state) constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications. PMID:25826211

  4. Harnessing mosquito-Wolbachia symbiosis for vector and disease control.

    PubMed

    Bourtzis, Kostas; Dobson, Stephen L; Xi, Zhiyong; Rasgon, Jason L; Calvitti, Maurizio; Moreira, Luciano A; Bossin, Hervé C; Moretti, Riccardo; Baton, Luke Anthony; Hughes, Grant L; Mavingui, Patrick; Gilles, Jeremie R L

    2014-04-01

    Mosquito species, members of the genera Aedes, Anopheles and Culex, are the major vectors of human pathogens including protozoa (Plasmodium sp.), filariae and of a variety of viruses (causing dengue, chikungunya, yellow fever, West Nile). There is lack of efficient methods and tools to treat many of the diseases caused by these major human pathogens, since no efficient vaccines or drugs are available; even in malaria where insecticide use and drug therapies have reduced incidence, 219 million cases still occurred in 2010. Therefore efforts are currently focused on the control of vector populations. Insecticides alone are insufficient to control mosquito populations since reduced susceptibility and even resistance is being observed more and more frequently. There is also increased concern about the toxic effects of insecticides on non-target (even beneficial) insect populations, on humans and the environment. During recent years, the role of symbionts in the biology, ecology and evolution of insect species has been well-documented and has led to suggestions that they could potentially be used as tools to control pests and therefore diseases. Wolbachia is perhaps the most renowned insect symbiont, mainly due to its ability to manipulate insect reproduction and to interfere with major human pathogens thus providing new avenues for pest control. We herein present recent achievements in the field of mosquito-Wolbachia symbiosis with an emphasis on Aedes albopictus. We also discuss how Wolbachia symbiosis can be harnessed for vector control as well as the potential to combine the sterile insect technique and Wolbachia-based approaches for the enhancement of population suppression programs. PMID:24252486

  5. Species specificity of symbiosis and secondary metabolism in ascidians.

    PubMed

    Tianero, Ma Diarey B; Kwan, Jason C; Wyche, Thomas P; Presson, Angela P; Koch, Michael; Barrows, Louis R; Bugni, Tim S; Schmidt, Eric W

    2015-03-01

    Ascidians contain abundant, diverse secondary metabolites, which are thought to serve a defensive role and which have been applied to drug discovery. It is known that bacteria in symbiosis with ascidians produce several of these metabolites, but very little is known about factors governing these 'chemical symbioses'. To examine this phenomenon across a wide geographical and species scale, we performed bacterial and chemical analyses of 32 different ascidians, mostly from the didemnid family from Florida, Southern California and a broad expanse of the tropical Pacific Ocean. Bacterial diversity analysis showed that ascidian microbiomes are highly diverse, and this diversity does not correlate with geographical location or latitude. Within a subset of species, ascidian microbiomes are also stable over time (R=-0.037, P-value=0.499). Ascidian microbiomes and metabolomes contain species-specific and location-specific components. Location-specific bacteria are found in low abundance in the ascidians and mostly represent strains that are widespread. Location-specific metabolites consist largely of lipids, which may reflect differences in water temperature. By contrast, species-specific bacteria are mostly abundant sequenced components of the microbiomes and include secondary metabolite producers as major components. Species-specific chemicals are dominated by secondary metabolites. Together with previous analyses that focused on single ascidian species or symbiont type, these results reveal fundamental properties of secondary metabolic symbiosis. Different ascidian species have established associations with many different bacterial symbionts, including those known to produce toxic chemicals. This implies a strong selection for this property and the independent origin of secondary metabolite-based associations in different ascidian species. The analysis here streamlines the connection of secondary metabolite to producing bacterium, enabling further biological and biotechnological studies. PMID:25171330

  6. Interactions of bullfrog tadpole predators and an insecticide: Predation release and facilitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, M.D.; Semlitsch, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of a contaminant on a community may not be easily predicted, given that complex changes in food resources and predator-prey dynamics may result. The objectives of our study were to determine the interactive effects of the insecticide carbaryl and predators on body size, development, survival, and activity of tadpoles of the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana). We conducted the study in cattle tank mesocosm ponds exposed to 0, 3.5, or 7.0 mg/l carbaryl, and no predators or two red-spotted newts (Notophthalmus viridescens), bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), or crayfish (Orconectes sp.). Carbaryl negatively affected predator survival by eliminating crayfish from all ponds, and by eliminating bluegill sunfish from ponds exposed to the highest concentration of carbaryl; carbaryl exposure did not effect survival of red-spotted newts. Because crayfish were eliminated by carbaryl, bullfrogs were released from predation and survival was near that of predator controls at low concentrations of carbaryl exposure. High concentrations of carbaryl reduced tadpole survival regardless of whether predators survived carbaryl exposure or not. Presence of crayfish and newts reduced tadpole survival, while bluegill sunfish appeared to facilitate bullfrog tadpole survival. Presence of carbaryl stimulated bullfrog tadpole mass and development. Our study demonstrates that the presence of a contaminant stress can alter community regulation by releasing prey from predators that are vulnerable to contaminants in some exposure scenarios.

  7. Interactive Resource Planning—An Anticipative Concept in the Simulation-Based Decision Support System EXPOSIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leopold-Wildburger, Ulrike; Pickl, Stefan

    2008-10-01

    In our research we intend to use experiments to study human behavior in a simulation environment based on a simple Lotka-Volterra predator-prey ecology. The aim is to study the influence of participants' harvesting strategies and certain personality traits derived from [1] on the outcome in terms of sustainability and economic performance. Such an approach is embedded in a research program which intends to develop and understand interactive resource planning processes. We present the general framework as well as the new decision support system EXPOSIM. The key element is the combination of experimental design, analytical understanding of time-discrete systems (especially Lotka-Volterra systems) and economic performance. In the first part, the general role of laboratory experiments is discussed. The second part summarizes the concept of sustainable development. It is taken from [18]. As we use Lotka-Volterra systems as the basis for our simulations a theoretical framework is described afterwards. It is possible to determine optimal behavior for those systems. The empirical setting is based on the empirical approach that the subjects are put into the position of a decision-maker. They are able to model the environment in such a way that harvesting can be observed. We suggest an experimental setting which might lead to new insights in an anticipatory sense.

  8. The interactive effects of multiple stressors on physiological stress responses and club cell investment in fathead minnows.

    PubMed

    Manek, Aditya K; Ferrari, Maud C O; Niyogi, Som; Chivers, Douglas P

    2014-04-01

    Anthropogenic activities have dramatically increased over the past decades, with the consequence that many organisms are simultaneously exposed to multiple stressors. Understanding how organisms respond to these stressors is a key focus for scientists from many disciplines. Here we investigated the interactive effects of two stressors, UV radiation (UVR) and cadmium (Cd) exposure on a common freshwater fish, fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). UVR is known to influence the density of epidermal club cells (ECCs), which are not only a key component of the innate immune system of fishes, but are also the source of chemical alarm cues that serve to warn other fishes of nearby predators. In contrast, Cd impairs the physiological stress response and ability of fish to respond to alarm cues. We used an integrative approach to examine physiological stress response as well as investment in ECCs. Fish exposed to UVR had higher levels of cortisol than non-exposed controls, but Cd reduced cortisol levels substantially for fish exposed to UVR. Fish exposed to UVR, either in the presence or absence of Cd, showed consistent decreases in ECC investment compared to non-exposed controls. Despite differences in ECC number, there was no difference in the potency of alarm cues prepared from the skin of UVR and Cd exposed or non-exposed fish indicating that UVR and Cd exposure combined may have little influence on chemically-mediated predator-prey interactions. PMID:24463029

  9. Life at the limits: peculiar features of lichen symbiosis related to extreme environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vera, J.-P.; Horneck, G.; Rettberg, P.; Ott, S.

    A lichen is a symbiotic association formed by a mycobiont (fungi), a photobiont (algae) and/or a cyanobacteria. The special symbiotic contact and interaction between the bionts in a lichen is a prerequisite for maintainance of viability for each of them during influences by harsh environmental factors. In nature parameters like UV radiation, low or high temperatures and dryness may have a destructive impact on all life functions of an organism. But with lichens the evolution has created a peculiar symbiosis which enables a wide variety of lichen species to colonize habitats where their separate bionts would not be able to survive. The results of our investigations are demonstrating these aspects (de Vera et al. 2003, 2004).We have already investigated the viability of the entire lichen thallus, the embedded spores in lichen apothecia (fruiting bodies) as well as the isolated spores and isolated photobionts after exposure to most extreme conditions caused by simulated space parameters as extreme UV radiation and vacuum. The results presented here focuse on the survival capacity of the isolated photobionts from the two lichen species Xanthoria elegans and Fulgensia bracteata which are not protected by the fungal structure of the lichen thallus. They are based on examinations using a Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM), analysed by modern methods of the Image Tool Program and by culture experiments. In contrast to photobionts embedded in the entire lichen thallus the isolated photobionts are much more sensitve to the extreme conditions of UV radiation and vaccum: while 50 % of the bionts in an entire lichen thallus are able to cope with simulated extreme space conditions (UV-radiation: ? quad ? 160nm and vacuum: p = 10-5 Pa) during an exposure time of 2 weeks, the viability of the isolated photobiont cells was already decreasing after 2 hours of exposure. All photobiont cells were inactivated after longer exposure times of about 8 hours. Further more analysis concerning the UV and vacuum effect on the cultured mycobiont will demonstrate the peculiar function of symbiosis in a lichen system to withstand extreme environmental conditions. References: de Vera JP et al. 2003, Int. J. Astrobiol. 1 (4), 285-293 de Vera JP et al. 2004, Adv. Space Res. (in press)

  10. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2007.0709 , 2611-26192742007Proc. R. Soc. B

    E-print Network

    Wisenden, Brian D.

    by exposure to skin-penetrating pathogens (water moulds: Saprolegnia ferax and Saprolegnia parasitica), skin to predator­prey interactions. Cell contents released when these cells are damaged in predator attacks have

  11. Arbuscular Mycorrhiza–Specific Signaling in Rice Transcends the Common Symbiosis Signaling Pathway[W

    PubMed Central

    Gutjahr, Caroline; Banba, Mari; Croset, Vincent; An, Kyungsook; Miyao, Akio; An, Gynheung; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Imaizumi-Anraku, Haruko; Paszkowski, Uta

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge about signaling in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses is currently restricted to the common symbiosis (SYM) signaling pathway discovered in legumes. This pathway includes calcium as a second messenger and regulates both AM and rhizobial symbioses. Both monocotyledons and dicotyledons form symbiotic associations with AM fungi, and although they differ markedly in the organization of their root systems, the morphology of colonization is similar. To identify and dissect AM-specific signaling in rice (Oryza sativa), we developed molecular phenotyping tools based on gene expression patterns that monitor various steps of AM colonization. These tools were used to distinguish common SYM-dependent and -independent signaling by examining rice mutants of selected putative legume signaling orthologs predicted to be perturbed both upstream (CASTOR and POLLUX) and downstream (CCAMK and CYCLOPS) of the central, calcium-spiking signal. All four mutants displayed impaired AM interactions and altered AM-specific gene expression patterns, therefore demonstrating functional conservation of SYM signaling between distant plant species. In addition, differential gene expression patterns in the mutants provided evidence for AM-specific but SYM-independent signaling in rice and furthermore for unexpected deviations from the SYM pathway downstream of calcium spiking. PMID:19033527

  12. The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis influences sulfur starvation responses of Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Sieh, Daniela; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Devers, Emanuel A; Brueckner, Franziska; Hoefgen, Rainer; Krajinski, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is a mutualistic interaction that occurs between the large majority of vascular plants and fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota. In addition to other nutrients, sulfur compounds are symbiotically transferred from AM fungus to host plants; however, the physiological importance of mycorrhizal-mediated sulfur for plant metabolism has not yet been determined. We applied different sulfur and phosphate fertilization treatments to Medicago truncatula and investigated whether mycorrhizal colonization influences leaf metabolite composition and the expression of sulfur starvation-related genes. The expression pattern of sulfur starvation-related genes indicated reduced sulfur starvation responses in mycorrhizal plants grown at 1 mM phosphate nutrition. Leaf metabolite concentrations clearly showed that phosphate stress has a greater impact than sulfur stress on plant metabolism, with no demand for sulfur at strong phosphate starvation. However, when phosphate nutrition is high enough, mycorrhizal colonization reduces sulfur stress responses, probably as a result of symbiotic sulfur uptake. Mycorrhizal colonization is able to reduce sulfur starvation responses in M. truncatula when the plant's phosphate status is high enough that sulfur starvation is of physiological importance. This clearly shows the impact of mycorrhizal sulfur transfer on plant metabolism. PMID:23190168

  13. [Symbiosis between the nodule bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) under salinization conditions].

    PubMed

    Ibragimova, M V; Rumiantseva, M L; Onishchuk, O P; Belova, V S; Kurchak, O N; Andronov, E E; Dziubenko, N I; Simarov, B V

    2006-01-01

    Two hundred forty-three isolates of alfalfa nodule bacteria (Sinorhizobium meliloti) were obtained from legume nodules and soils sampled in the northern Aral region, experiencing secondary salinization. Isolates obtained from nodules (N isolates) were significantly more salt-tolerant than those from soils (S isolates) when grown in a liquid medium with 3.5% NaCl. It was found that wild species of alfalfa, melilot, and trigonella preferably formed symbioses with salt-tolerant nodule bacteria in both salinized and nonsalinized soils. Only two alfalfa species, Medicago falcata and M. trautvetteri, formed efficient symbioses in soils contrasting in salinity. The formation of efficient symbiosis with alfalfa in the presence of 0.6% NaCl was studied in 36 isolates (N and S) differing in salt tolerance and symbiotic efficiency. Fifteen isolates formed efficient symbioses in the presence of salt. The increase in the dry weight of the plants was 25-68% higher than in the control group. The efficiency of symbiotic interaction under salinization conditions depended on the efficiency of the isolates under standard conditions but did not correlate with the source of nodule bacteria (soil or nodule) or their salt tolerance. The results indicate that nodule bacterium strains forming efficient symbioses under salinization conditions can be found. PMID:16579450

  14. RAM1 and RAM2 function and expression during arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and Aphanomyces euteiches colonization.

    PubMed

    Gobbato, Enrico; Wang, Ertao; Higgins, Gillian; Bano, Syeda Asma; Henry, Christine; Schultze, Michael; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2013-10-01

    The establishment of the symbiotic interaction between plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi requires a very tight molecular dialogue. Most of the known plant genes necessary for this process are also required for nodulation in legume plants and only very recently genes specifically required for AM symbiosis have been described. Among them we identified RAM (Reduced Arbuscular Mycorrhization)1 and RAM2, a GRAS transcription factor and a GPAT respectively, which are critical for the induction of hyphopodia formation in AM fungi. RAM2 function is also required for appressoria formation by the pathogen Phytophtora palmivora. Here we investigated the activity of RAM1 and RAM2 promoters during mycorrhization and the role of RAM1 and RAM2 during infection by the root pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches. pRAM1 is activated without cell type specificity before hyphopodia formation, while pRAM2 is specifically active in arbusculated cells providing evidence for a potential function of cutin momomers in the regulation of arbuscule formation. Furthermore, consistent with what we observed with Phytophtora, RAM2 but not RAM 1 is required during Aphanomyces euteiches infection. PMID:24270627

  15. RAM1 and RAM2 function and expression during Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis and Aphanomyces euteiches colonization

    PubMed Central

    Gobbato, Enrico; Wang, Ertao; Higgins, Gillian; Bano, Syeda Asma; Henry, Christine; Schultze, Michael; Oldroyd, Giles ED

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of the symbiotic interaction between plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi requires a very tight molecular dialogue. Most of the known plant genes necessary for this process are also required for nodulation in legume plants and only very recently genes specifically required for AM symbiosis have been described. Among them we identified RAM (Reduced Arbuscular Mycorrhization)1 and RAM2, a GRAS transcription factor and a GPAT respectively, which are critical for the induction of hyphopodia formation in AM fungi. RAM2 function is also required for appressoria formation by the pathogen Phytophtora palmivora. Here we investigated the activity of RAM1 and RAM2 promoters during mycorrhization and the role of RAM1 and RAM2 during infection by the root pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches. pRAM1 is activated without cell type specificity before hyphopodia formation, while pRAM2 is specifically active in arbusculated cells providing evidence for a potential function of cutin momomers in the regulation of arbuscule formation. Furthermore, consistent with what we observed with Phytophtora, RAM2 but not RAM1 is required during Aphanomyces euteiches infection. PMID:24270627

  16. Long-distance transport of signals during symbiosis: are nodule formation and mycorrhization autoregulated in a similar way?

    PubMed

    Staehelin, Christian; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Illana, Antonio; Vierheilig, Horst

    2011-03-01

    Legumes enter nodule symbioses with nitrogen-fixing bacteria (rhizobia), whereas most flowering plants establish symbiotic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Once first steps of symbiosis are initiated, nodule formation and mycorrhization in legumes is negatively controlled by a shoot-derived inhibitor (SDI), a phenomenon termed autoregulation. According to current views, autoregulation of nodulation and mycorrhization in legumes is regulated in a similar way. CLE peptides induced in response to rhizobial nodulation signals (Nod factors) have been proposed to represent the ascending long-distance signals to the shoot. Although not proven yet, these CLE peptides are likely perceived by leucine-rich repeat (LRR) autoregulation receptor kinases in the shoot. Autoregulation of mycorrhization in non-legumes is reminiscent to the phenomenon of "systemic acquired resistance" in plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:21455020

  17. Live imaging of symbiosis: spatiotemporal infection dynamics of a GFP-labelled Burkholderia symbiont in the bean bug Riptortus pedestris.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Fukatsu, Takema

    2014-03-01

    Many insects possess endosymbiotic bacteria inside their body, wherein intimate interactions occur between the partners. While recent technological advancements have deepened our understanding of metabolic and evolutionary features of the symbiont genomes, molecular mechanisms underpinning the intimate interactions remain difficult to approach because the insect symbionts are generally uncultivable. The bean bug Riptortus pedestris is associated with the betaproteobacterial Burkholderia symbiont in a posterior region of the midgut, which develops numerous crypts harbouring the symbiont extracellularly. Distinct from other insect symbiotic systems, R. pedestris acquires the Burkholderia symbiont not by vertical transmission but from the environment every generation. By making use of the cultivability and the genetic tractability of the symbiont, we constructed a transgenic Burkholderia strain labelled with green fluorescent protein (GFP), which enabled detailed observation of spatiotemporal dynamics and the colonization process of the symbiont in freshly prepared specimens. The symbiont live imaging revealed that, at the second instar, colonization of the symbiotic midgut M4 region started around 6 h after inoculation (hai). By 24 hai, the symbiont cells appeared in the main tract and also in several crypts of the M4. By 48 hai, most of the crypts were colonized by the symbiont cells. By 72 hai, all the crypts were filled up with the symbiont cells and the symbiont localization pattern continued during the subsequent nymphal development. Quantitative PCR of the symbiont confirmed the infection dynamics quantitatively. These results highlight the stinkbug-Burkholderia gut symbiosis as an unprecedented model for comprehensive understanding of molecular mechanisms underpinning insect symbiosis. PMID:24103110

  18. Setting realistic recovery targets for two interacting endangered species, sea otter and northern abalone.

    PubMed

    Chadès, Iadine; Curtis, Janelle M R; Martin, Tara G

    2012-12-01

    Failure to account for interactions between endangered species may lead to unexpected population dynamics, inefficient management strategies, waste of scarce resources, and, at worst, increased extinction risk. The importance of species interactions is undisputed, yet recovery targets generally do not account for such interactions. This shortcoming is a consequence of species-centered legislation, but also of uncertainty surrounding the dynamics of species interactions and the complexity of modeling such interactions. The northern sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) and one of its preferred prey, northern abalone (Haliotis kamtschatkana), are endangered species for which recovery strategies have been developed without consideration of their strong predator-prey interactions. Using simulation-based optimization procedures from artificial intelligence, namely reinforcement learning and stochastic dynamic programming, we combined sea otter and northern abalone population models with functional-response models and examined how different management actions affect population dynamics and the likelihood of achieving recovery targets for each species through time. Recovery targets for these interacting species were difficult to achieve simultaneously in the absence of management. Although sea otters were predicted to recover, achieving abalone recovery targets failed even when threats to abalone such as predation and poaching were reduced. A management strategy entailing a 50% reduction in the poaching of northern abalone was a minimum requirement to reach short-term recovery goals for northern abalone when sea otters were present. Removing sea otters had a marginally positive effect on the abalone population but only when we assumed a functional response with strong predation pressure. Our optimization method could be applied more generally to any interacting threatened or invasive species for which there are multiple conservation objectives. PMID:23083059

  19. Emergy-based assessment on industrial symbiosis: a case of Shenyang Economic and Technological Development Zone.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yong; Liu, Zuoxi; Xue, Bing; Dong, Huijuan; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Chiu, Anthony

    2014-12-01

    Industrial symbiosis is the sharing of services, utility, and by-product resources among industries. This is usually made in order to add value, reduce costs, and improve the environment, and therefore has been taken as an effective approach for developing an eco-industrial park, improving resource efficiency, and reducing pollutant emission. Most conventional evaluation approaches ignored the contribution of natural ecosystem to the development of industrial symbiosis and cannot reveal the interrelations between economic development and environmental protection, leading to a need of an innovative evaluation method. Under such a circumstance, we present an emergy analysis-based evaluation method by employing a case study at Shenyang Economic and Technological Development Zone (SETDZ). Specific emergy indicators on industrial symbiosis, including emergy savings and emdollar value of total emergy savings, were developed so that the holistic picture of industrial symbiosis can be presented. Research results show that nonrenewable inputs, imported resource inputs, and associated services could be saved by 89.3, 32.51, and 15.7 %, and the ratio of emergy savings to emergy of the total energy used would be about 25.58 %, and the ratio of the emdollar value of total emergy savings to the total gross regional product (GRP) of SETDZ would be 34.38 % through the implementation of industrial symbiosis. In general, research results indicate that industrial symbiosis could effectively reduce material and energy consumption and improve the overall eco-efficiency. Such a method can provide policy insights to industrial park managers so that they can raise appropriate strategies on developing eco-industrial parks. Useful strategies include identifying more potential industrial symbiosis opportunities, optimizing energy structure, increasing industrial efficiency, recovering local ecosystems, and improving public and industrial awareness of eco-industrial park policies. PMID:25023655

  20. Can rare positive interactions become common when large carnivores consume livestock?

    PubMed

    Sundararaj, Vijayan; McLaren, Brian E; Morris, Douglas W; Goyal, S P

    2012-02-01

    Livestock populations in protected areas are viewed negatively because of their interaction with native ungulates through direct competition for food resources. However, livestock and native prey can also interact indirectly through their shared predator. Indirect interactions between two prey species occur when one prey modifies either the functional or numerical responses of a shared predator. This interaction is often manifested as negative effects (apparent competition) on one or both prey species through increased predation risk. But indirect interactions can also yield positive effects on a focal prey if the shared predator modifies its functional response toward increased consumption of an abundant and higher-quality alternative prey. Such a phenomenon between two prey species is underappreciated and overlooked in nature. Positive indirect effects can be expected to occur in livestock-dominated wildlife reserves containing large carnivores. We searched for such positive effects in Acacia-Zizhypus forests of India's Gir sanctuary where livestock (Bubalus bubalis and Bos indicus) and a coexisting native prey (chital deer, Axis axis) are consumed by Asiatic lions (Panthera leo persica). Chital vigilance was higher in areas with low livestock density than in areas with high livestock density. This positive indirect effect occurred because lion predation rates on livestock were twice as great where livestock were abundant than where livestock density was low. Positive indirect interactions mediated by shared predators may be more common than generally thought with rather major consequences for ecological understanding and conservation. We encourage further studies to understand outcomes of indirect interactions on long-term predator-prey dynamics in livestock-dominated protected areas. PMID:22624309

  1. Linking phenological shifts to species interactions through size-mediated priority effects.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Nick L; Van Allen, Benjamin G; Rudolf, Volker H W

    2014-01-26

    Interannual variation in seasonal weather patterns causes shifts in the relative timing of phenological events of species within communities, but we currently lack a mechanistic understanding of how these phenological shifts affect species interactions. Identifying these mechanisms is critical to predicting how interannual variation affects populations and communities. Species' phenologies, particularly the timing of offspring arrival, play an important role in the annual cycles of community assembly. We hypothesize that shifts in relative arrival of offspring can alter interspecific interactions through a mechanism called size-mediated priority effects (SMPE), in which individuals that arrive earlier can grow to achieve a body size advantage over those that arrive later. In this study, we used an experimental approach to isolate and quantify the importance of SMPE for species interactions. Specifically, we simulated shifts in relative arrival of the nymphs of two dragonfly species to determine the consequences for their interactions as intraguild predators. We found that shifts in relative arrival altered not only predation strength but also the nature of predator-prey interactions. When arrival differences were great, SMPE allowed the early arriver to prey intensely upon the late arriver, causing exclusion of the late arriver from nearly all habitats. As arrival differences decreased, the early arriver's size advantage also decreased. When arrival differences were smallest, there was mutual predation, and the two species coexisted in similar abundances across habitats. Importantly, we also found a nonlinear scaling relationship between shifts in relative arrival and predation strength. Specifically, small shifts in relative arrival caused large changes in predation strength while subsequent changes had relatively minor effects. These results demonstrate that SMPE can alter not only the outcome of interactions but also the demographic rates of species and the structure of communities. Elucidating the mechanisms that link phenological shifts to species interactions is crucial for understanding the dynamics of seasonal communities as well as for predicting the effects of climate change on these communities. PMID:24460681

  2. Complementarity and redundancy of interactions enhance attack rates and spatial stability in host-parasitoid food webs.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Guadalupe; Frost, Carol M; Rand, Tatyana A; Didham, Raphael K; Tylianakis, Jason M

    2014-07-01

    Complementary resource use and redundancy of species that fulfill the same ecological role are two mechanisms that can respectively increase and stabilize process rates in ecosystems. For example, predator complementarity and redundancy can determine prey consumption rates and their stability, yet few studies take into account the multiple predator species attacking multiple prey at different rates in natural communities. Thus, it remains unclear whether these biodiversity mechanisms are important determinants of consumption in entire predator-prey assemblages, such that food-web interaction structure determines community-wide consumption and stability. Here, we use empirical quantitative food webs to study the community-wide effects of functional complementarity and redundancy of consumers (parasitoids) on herbivore control in temperate forests. We find that complementarity in host resource use by parasitoids was a strong predictor of absolute parasitism rates at the community level and that redundancy in host-use patterns stabilized community-wide parasitism rates in space, but not through time. These effects can potentially explain previous contradictory results from predator diversity research. Phylogenetic diversity (measured using taxonomic distance) did not explain functional complementarity or parasitism rates, so could not serve as a surrogate measure for functional complementarity. Our study shows that known mechanisms underpinning predator diversity effects on both functioning and stability can easily be extended to link food webs to ecosystem functioning. PMID:25163121

  3. Cell and developmental biology of arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Gutjahr, Caroline; Parniske, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The default mineral nutrient acquisition strategy of land plants is the symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungi. Research into the cell and developmental biology of AM revealed fascinating insights into the plasticity of plant cell development and of interorganismic communication. It is driven by the prospect of increased exploitation of AM benefits for sustainable agriculture. The plant cell developmental program for intracellular accommodation of AM fungi is activated by a genetically defined signaling pathway involving calcium spiking in the nucleus as second messenger. Calcium spiking is triggered by chitooligosaccharides released by AM fungi that are probably perceived via LysM domain receptor kinases. Fungal infection and calcium spiking are spatiotemporally coordinated, and only cells committed to accommodating the fungus undergo high-frequency spiking. Delivery of mineral nutrients by AM fungi occurs at tree-shaped hyphal structures, the arbuscules, in plant cortical cells. Nutrients are taken up at a plant-derived periarbuscular membrane, which surrounds fungal hyphae and carries a specific transporter composition that is of direct importance for symbiotic efficiency. An elegant study has unveiled a new and unexpected mechanism for specific protein localization to the periarbuscular membrane, which relies on the timing of gene expression to synchronize protein biosynthesis with a redirection of secretion. The control of AM development by phytohormones is currently subject to active investigation and has led to the rediscovery of strigolactones. Nearly all tested phytohormones regulate AM development, and major insights into the mechanisms of this regulation are expected in the near future. PMID:24099088

  4. Microgravity effects on the legume/Rhizobium symbiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, James E.

    1997-01-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is of critical importance to world agriculture and likely will be a critical part of life support systems developed for prolonged missions in space. Bacteroid formation, an essential step in an effective Dutch White Clover/Rhizobium leguminosarum bv trifolii symbiosis, is induced by succinic acid which is produced by the plant and which is bound and incorporated by the bacterium. Aspirin mimics succinate in its role as a bacteroid inducer and measures of aspirin binding mimiced measurements of succinate binding. In normal gravity (1×g), rhizobium bacteria immediately bound relatively high levels of aspirin (or succinate) in a readily reversible manner. Within a few seconds a portion of this initially bound aspirin became irreversibly bound. In the microgravity environment aboard the NASA 930 aircraft, rhizobia did not display the initial reversible binding of succinate, but did display a similar kinetic pattern of irreversible binding, and ultimately bound 32% more succinate (Acta Astronautica 36:129-133, 1995.) In normal gravity succinate treated cells stop dividing and swell to their maximum size (twice the normal cell volume) within a time equivalent to the time required for two normal cell doublings. Swelling in microgravity was tested in FPA and BPM sample holders aboard the space shuttle (USML-1, and STS-54, 57, and 60.) The behavior of cells in the two sample holders was similar, and swelling behavior of cells in microgravity was identical to behavior in normal gravity.

  5. The effects of SO sub 2 on Azolla - Anabaena symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeseoun Hur; Wellburn, A.R. (Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom))

    1991-05-01

    Cultures of Azolla pinnata containing Anabaena were investigated as a sensitive and reproducible bioindicator of air pollution. Three equal doses of SO{sub 2} (week*ppb: 1*100, 2*50, 4*25) were applied to Azolla cultures growing in nitrogen-free medium in a specially-designed exposure system. Exposure to high concentrations of SO{sub 2} showed highly significant reductions in growth of the fern, while nitrogen fixation and heterocyst development were severely damaged. This was associated with a reduction of protein content in the SO{sub 2}-exposed ferns and again more significant at higher SO{sub 2} levels. There was a variation in the absolute amount of the individual pigments between SO{sub 2} doses and/or treatments which was related to the physiological development of the ferns throughout the fumigations. Moreover, the ratio of violaxanthin to antheraxanthin in the 100 ppb SO{sub 2}-treated ferns was significantly higher than that in the clean air-grown ferns. The results clearly demonstrate that SO{sub 2} has adverse effects on the symbiosis and suggest that this fern is a promising bioindicator of air pollution and a very good model to investigate the inter-relationships between photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation and air pollution stress.

  6. Paracatenula, an ancient symbiosis between thiotrophic Alphaproteobacteria and catenulid flatworms

    PubMed Central

    Gruber-Vodicka, Harald Ronald; Dirks, Ulrich; Leisch, Nikolaus; Stoecker, Kilian; Bulgheresi, Silvia; Heindl, Niels Robert; Horn, Matthias; Lott, Christian; Loy, Alexander; Wagner, Michael; Ott, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Harnessing chemosynthetic symbionts is a recurring evolutionary strategy. Eukaryotes from six phyla as well as one archaeon have acquired chemoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. In contrast to this broad host diversity, known bacterial partners apparently belong to two classes of bacteria—the Gamma- and Epsilonproteobacteria. Here, we characterize the intracellular endosymbionts of the mouthless catenulid flatworm genus Paracatenula as chemoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing Alphaproteobacteria. The symbionts of Paracatenula galateia are provisionally classified as “Candidatus Riegeria galateiae” based on 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization together with functional gene and sulfur metabolite evidence. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis shows that all 16 Paracatenula species examined harbor host species-specific intracellular Candidatus Riegeria bacteria that form a monophyletic group within the order Rhodospirillales. Comparing host and symbiont phylogenies reveals strict cocladogenesis and points to vertical transmission of the symbionts. Between 33% and 50% of the body volume of the various worm species is composed of bacterial symbionts, by far the highest proportion among all known endosymbiotic associations between bacteria and metazoans. This symbiosis, which likely originated more than 500 Mya during the early evolution of flatworms, is the oldest known animal–chemoautotrophic bacteria association. The distant phylogenetic position of the symbionts compared with other mutualistic or parasitic Alphaproteobacteria promises to illuminate the common genetic predispositions that have allowed several members of this class to successfully colonize eukaryote cells. PMID:21709249

  7. Stress tolerance in plants via habitat-adapted symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Rusty J; Henson, Joan; Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth; Hoy, Marshal; Wright, Leesa; Beckwith, Fleur; Kim, Yong-Ok; Redman, Regina S

    2008-04-01

    We demonstrate that native grass species from coastal and geothermal habitats require symbiotic fungal endophytes for salt and heat tolerance, respectively. Symbiotically conferred stress tolerance is a habitat-specific phenomenon with geothermal endophytes conferring heat but not salt tolerance, and coastal endophytes conferring salt but not heat tolerance. The same fungal species isolated from plants in habitats devoid of salt or heat stress did not confer these stress tolerances. Moreover, fungal endophytes from agricultural crops conferred disease resistance and not salt or heat tolerance. We define habitat-specific, symbiotically-conferred stress tolerance as habitat-adapted symbiosis and hypothesize that it is responsible for the establishment of plants in high-stress habitats. The agricultural, coastal and geothermal plant endophytes also colonized tomato (a model eudicot) and conferred disease, salt and heat tolerance, respectively. In addition, the coastal plant endophyte colonized rice (a model monocot) and conferred salt tolerance. These endophytes have a broad host range encompassing both monocots and eudicots. Interestingly, the endophytes also conferred drought tolerance to plants regardless of the habitat of origin. Abiotic stress tolerance correlated either with a decrease in water consumption or reactive oxygen sensitivity/generation but not to increased osmolyte production. The ability of fungal endophytes to confer stress tolerance to plants may provide a novel strategy for mitigating the impacts of global climate change on agricultural and native plant communities. PMID:18256707

  8. Chickpea rhizobia symbiosis genes are highly conserved across multiple Mesorhizobium species.

    PubMed

    Laranjo, Marta; Alexandre, Ana; Rivas, Raúl; Velázquez, Encarna; Young, J Peter W; Oliveira, Solange

    2008-11-01

    Chickpea has been considered as a restrictive host for nodulation by rhizobia. However, recent studies have reported that several Mesorhizobium species may effectively nodulate chickpea. With the purpose of investigating the evolutionary relationships between these different species with the ability of nodulating the same host, we analysed 21 Portuguese chickpea rhizobial isolates. Symbiosis genes nifH and nodC were sequenced and used for phylogenetic studies. Symbiotic effectiveness was determined to evaluate its relationship with symbiosis genes. The comparison of 16S rRNA gene-based phylogeny with the phylogenies based on symbiosis genes revealed evidence of lateral transfer of symbiosis genes across different species. Chickpea is confirmed as a nonpromiscuous host. Although chickpea is nodulated by many different species, they share common symbiosis genes, suggesting recognition of only a few Nod factors by chickpea. Our results suggest that sequencing of nifH or nodC genes can be used for rapid detection of chickpea mesorhizobia. PMID:18795953

  9. Structural basis for regulation of rhizobial nodulation and symbiosis gene expression by the regulatory NolR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The symbiosis between rhizobial microbes and host plants involves the coordinated expression of multiple genes, which leads to nodule formation and nitrogen fixation. As part of the transcriptional machinery for nodulation and symbiosis across a range of Rhizobium, NolR serves as a global regulatory...

  10. Coevolutionary dynamics of adaptive radiation for food-web development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroshi C. Ito; Masakazu Shimada; Takashi Ikegami

    2009-01-01

    To investigate how complex food-webs can develop through repeated evolutionary diversification, a predator–prey model was\\u000a analyzed. In the model, each individual has two traits: trait x as a predator and trait y as a prey. These traits constitute a two-dimensional phenotype space, in which the whole group of individuals are represented\\u000a as a phenotype distribution. Predator–prey interactions among the phenotypes

  11. Predation affects the susceptibility of hard clam Meretrix lusoria to Hg-stressed birnavirus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chung-Min Liao; Ching-Hung Yeh; Szu-Chieh Chen

    2008-01-01

    Predator–prey interaction in aquatic ecosystem is one of the simplest drivers affecting the species population dynamics. Predation controls are recognized as important aspects of ecosystem husbandry and management. In this paper we investigated how predation control cause an increase in host growth in the abundance of hard clam (Meretrix lusoria) populations subject to mercury (Hg)-stressed birnavirus. Here we linked predator–prey

  12. Allometric degree distributions facilitate food-web stability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Björn C. Rall; Ulrich Brose; Sonja B. Otto

    2007-01-01

    In natural ecosystems, species are linked by feeding interactions that determine energy fluxes and create complex food webs. The stability of these food webs1,2 enables many species to coexist and to form diverse ecosystems. Recent theory finds predator-prey body-mass ratios to be critically important for food-web stability3-5.However,themechanismsresponsibleforthisstability areunclear.Hereweuseabioenergeticconsumer-resourcemodel6 to explore how and why only particular predator-prey body-mass ratios promote stability

  13. Commonalities and Differences among Symbiosis Islands of Three Mesorhizobium loti Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kasai-Maita, Hiroko; Hirakawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Kaneko, Takakazu; Miki, Kumiko; Maruya, Jumpei; Okazaki, Shin; Tabata, Satoshi; Saeki, Kazuhiko; Sato, Shusei

    2013-01-01

    To shed light on the breadth of the host range of Mesorhizobium loti strain NZP2037, we determined the sequence of the NZP2037 symbiosis island and compared it with those of strain MAFF303099 and R7A islands. The determined 533 kb sequence of NZP2037 symbiosis island, on which 504 genes were predicted, implied its integration into a phenylalanine-tRNA gene and subsequent genome rearrangement. Comparative analysis revealed that the core regions of the three symbiosis islands consisted of 165 genes. We also identified several NZP2037-specific genes with putative functions in nodulation-related events, suggesting that these genes contribute to broaden the host range of NZP2037. PMID:23666538

  14. Divining the essence of symbiosis: insights from the squid-vibrio model.

    PubMed

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    2014-02-01

    Biology has a big elephant in the room. Researchers are learning that microorganisms are critical for every aspect of the biosphere's health. Even at the scale of our own bodies, we are discovering the unexpected necessity and daunting complexity of our microbial partners. How can we gain an understanding of the form and function of these "ecosystems" that are an individual animal? This essay explores how development of experimental model systems reveals basic principles that underpin the essence of symbiosis and, more specifically, how one symbiosis, the squid-vibrio association, provides insight into the persistent microbial colonization of animal epithelial surfaces. PMID:24504482

  15. The Light-Organ Symbiosis of Vibrio fischeri and the Hawaiian squid, Euprymna scolopes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Joerg Graf

    This informational web page features the luminescent bacteria that live within the light organs of the bobtailed squid and the Hawaiian squid. The page includes a discussion of how symbionts and host influence each others development, bacterial genes required to successfully colonize the squid, the "venting" microenvironment, evidence for oxidative stress occurring inside the light organ, initiation of symbiosis, and the investigators who study the V. fischeri-E. scolopes symbiosis. It also features color images and links to selected reviews and research publications.

  16. The Light-Organ Symbiosis of Vibrio Fischeri and the Hawaiian Squid, Euprymna Scolopes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Graf, Joerg

    This informational web page features the luminescent bacteria that live within the light organs of the bobtailed squid and the Hawaiian squid. The page includes a discussion of how symbionts and host influence each others development, bacterial genes required to successfully colonize the squid, the "venting" microenvironment, evidence for oxidative stress occurring inside the light organ, initiation of symbiosis, and the investigators who study the V. fischeri-E. scolopes symbiosis. It also features color images and links to selected reviews and research publications.

  17. Stress tolerance in plants via habitat-adapted symbiosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, R.J.; Henson, J.; Van Volkenburgh, E.; Hoy, M.; Wright, L.; Beckwith, F.; Kim, Y.-O.; Redman, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that native grass species from coastal and geothermal habitats require symbiotic fungal endophytes for salt and heat tolerance, respectively. Symbiotically conferred stress tolerance is a habitat-specific phenomenon with geothermal endophytes conferring heat but not salt tolerance, and coastal endophytes conferring salt but not heat tolerance. The same fungal species isolated from plants in habitats devoid of salt or heat stress did not confer these stress tolerances. Moreover, fungal endophytes from agricultural crops conferred disease resistance and not salt or heat tolerance. We define habitat-specific, symbiotically-conferred stress tolerance as habitat-adapted symbiosis and hypothesize that it is responsible for the establishment of plants in high-stress habitats. The agricultural, coastal and geothermal plant endophytes also colonized tomato (a model eudicot) and conferred disease, salt and heat tolerance, respectively. In addition, the coastal plant endophyte colonized rice (a model monocot) and conferred salt tolerance. These endophytes have a broad host range encompassing both monocots and eudicots. Interestingly, the endophytes also conferred drought tolerance to plants regardless of the habitat of origin. Abiotic stress tolerance correlated either with a decrease in water consumption or reactive oxygen sensitivity/generation but not to increased osmolyte production. The ability of fungal endophytes to confer stress tolerance to plants may provide a novel strategy for mitigating the impacts of global climate change on agricultural and native plant communities.The ISME Journal (2008) 2, 404-416; doi:10.1038/ismej.2007.106; published online 7 February 2008. ?? 2008 International Society for Microbial Ecology All rights reserved.

  18. Evolutionary Dynamics of Nitrogen Fixation in the Legume–Rhizobia Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Hironori; Aoki, Seishiro; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    The stabilization of host–symbiont mutualism against the emergence of parasitic individuals is pivotal to the evolution of cooperation. One of the most famous symbioses occurs between legumes and their colonizing rhizobia, in which rhizobia extract nutrients (or benefits) from legume plants while supplying them with nitrogen resources produced by nitrogen fixation (or costs). Natural environments, however, are widely populated by ineffective rhizobia that extract benefits without paying costs and thus proliferate more efficiently than nitrogen-fixing cooperators. How and why this mutualism becomes stabilized and evolutionarily persists has been extensively discussed. To better understand the evolutionary dynamics of this symbiosis system, we construct a simple model based on the continuous snowdrift game with multiple interacting players. We investigate the model using adaptive dynamics and numerical simulations. We find that symbiotic evolution depends on the cost–benefit balance, and that cheaters widely emerge when the cost and benefit are similar in strength. In this scenario, the persistence of the symbiotic system is compatible with the presence of cheaters. This result suggests that the symbiotic relationship is robust to the emergence of cheaters, and may explain the prevalence of cheating rhizobia in nature. In addition, various stabilizing mechanisms, such as partner fidelity feedback, partner choice, and host sanction, can reinforce the symbiotic relationship by affecting the fitness of symbionts in various ways. This result suggests that the symbiotic relationship is cooperatively stabilized by various mechanisms. In addition, mixed nodule populations are thought to encourage cheater emergence, but our model predicts that, in certain situations, cheaters can disappear from such populations. These findings provide a theoretical basis of the evolutionary dynamics of legume–rhizobia symbioses, which is extendable to other single-host, multiple-colonizer systems. PMID:24691447

  19. Lipo-Chitin Oligosaccharides, Plant Symbiosis Signalling Molecules That Modulate Mammalian Angiogenesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Djordjevic, Michael A.; Bezos, Anna; Susanti; Marmuse, Laurence; Driguez, Hugues; Samain, Eric; Vauzeilles, Boris; Beau, Jean-Marie; Kordbacheh, Farzaneh; Rolfe, Barry G.; Schwörer, Ralf; Daines, Alison M.; Gresshoff, Peter M.; Parish, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    Lipochitin oligosaccharides (LCOs) are signaling molecules required by ecologically and agronomically important bacteria and fungi to establish symbioses with diverse land plants. In plants, oligo-chitins and LCOs can differentially interact with different lysin motif (LysM) receptors and affect innate immunity responses or symbiosis-related pathways. In animals, oligo-chitins also induce innate immunity and other physiological responses but LCO recognition has not been demonstrated. Here LCO and LCO-like compounds are shown to be biologically active in mammals in a structure dependent way through the modulation of angiogenesis, a tightly-regulated process involving the induction and growth of new blood vessels from existing vessels. The testing of 24 LCO, LCO-like or oligo-chitin compounds resulted in structure-dependent effects on angiogenesis in vitro leading to promotion, or inhibition or nil effects. Like plants, the mammalian LCO biological activity depended upon the presence and type of terminal substitutions. Un-substituted oligo-chitins of similar chain lengths were unable to modulate angiogenesis indicating that mammalian cells, like plant cells, can distinguish between LCOs and un-substituted oligo-chitins. The cellular mode-of-action of the biologically active LCOs in mammals was determined. The stimulation or inhibition of endothelial cell adhesion to vitronectin or fibronectin correlated with their pro- or anti-angiogenic activity. Importantly, novel and more easily synthesised LCO-like disaccharide molecules were also biologically active and de-acetylated chitobiose was shown to be the primary structural basis of recognition. Given this, simpler chitin disaccharides derivatives based on the structure of biologically active LCOs were synthesised and purified and these showed biological activity in mammalian cells. Since important chronic disease states are linked to either insufficient or excessive angiogenesis, LCO and LCO-like molecules may have the potential to be a new, carbohydrate-based class of therapeutics for modulating angiogenesis. PMID:25536397

  20. Evolutionary History of the Symbiosis Between Fungus-Growing Ants and Their Fungi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ignacio H. Chapela; Stephen A. Rehner; Ted R. Schultz; Ulrich G. Mueller

    1994-01-01

    The evolutionary history of the symbiosis between fungus-growing ants (Attini) and their fungi was elucidated by comparing phylogenies of both symbionts. The fungal phylogeny based on cladistic analyses of nuclear 28S ribosomal DNA indicates that, in contrast with the monophyly of the ants, the attine fungi are polyphyletic. Most cultivated fungi belong to the basidiomycete family Lepiotaceae; however, one ant

  1. THE FUNGUS DOES NOT TRANSFER CARBON TO OR BETWEEN ROOTS IN AN ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL SYMBIOSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Very large amounts of photosynthetically fixed carbon move from plants to their fungal partners in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis. There is also evidence for transfer of carbon in the reverse direction. However, the significance and even existence of fungus-to-plant carbon transfer has b...

  2. Analysis of the Symbiosis of the Logistics Enterprises in Logistics Park under Ecological Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fang Wei; Wang Lili

    2010-01-01

    By using of the symbiotic theory in population ecology, this article describes three symbiosis patterns between logistics enterprises in logistics park, parasitism, commensalism and mutualism. And then it analyzed the economic benefits of symbiotic logistics enterprises in the park by using the logistic model of ecology.

  3. SYMBIOSIS: Development, Implementation, and Assessment of a Model Curriculum across Biology

    E-print Network

    Karsai, Istvan

    Article SYMBIOSIS: Development, Implementation, and Assessment of a Model Curriculum across Biology, Mathematics and Statistics, and Curriculum and Instruction have developed a biology­math integrated curricu at the introductory level. This article addresses the history and development of the curriculum, previous assessment

  4. A community of ants, fungi, and bacteria: A multilateral approach to studying symbiosis

    E-print Network

    Currie, Cameron R.

    2001-01-01

    The ancient and highly evolved mutualism between fungus-growing ants and their fungi is a textbook example of symbiosis. The ants carefully tend the fungus, which serves as their main food source, and traditionally are believed to be so successful...

  5. The effect of pseudo-microgravity on the symbiosis of plants and microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Maki, Asano; Aoki, Toshio; Tamura, Kenji; Wada, Hidenori; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yamashita, Masamichi

    The symbiosis of plants and microorganisms is important to conduct agriculture under space environment. However, we have less knowledge on whether this kind of symbiosis can be established under space condition. We examined the functional compounds responsible to symbiosis between rhizobiaum and Lotus japonicus as a model of symbiotic combination. The existence of the substances for their symbiosis, some flavonoids, have already been known from the study of gene expression, but the detail structures have not yet been elucidated. Pseudomicrogravity was generated by the 3D-clinorotation. Twenty flavonoids were found in the extracts of 16 days plants of Lotus japonicus grown under the normal gravity by HPLC. Content of two flavonoids among them was affected by the infection of Mesorhizobium loti to them. It has a possibility that the two flavonoids were key substances for their combination process. The productions of those flavonoids were confirmed also under the pseudo-microgravity. The amount of one flavonoid was increased by both infection of rhizobium and exposure to the normal and pseudo-micro gravity. Chemical species of these flavonoids were identified by LC- ESI/MS and spectroscopic analysis. To show the effects of pseudo-microgravity on the gene expression, enzymic activities related to the functional compounds are evaluated after the rhizobial infection.

  6. Proteomic and transcriptional analyses of coral larvae newly engaged in symbiosis with dinoflagellates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melissa L. deBoer; Dave A. Krupp; Virginia M. Weis

    2007-01-01

    Many marine cnidarians, such as stony corals, engage in intracellular symbiosis with dinoflagellates, forming the trophic and structural foundation of the coral reef ecosystem. Very little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms that are at work in these associations. In this study, we examined changes in both the soluble proteome and the transcriptome of larvae of the Hawaiian

  7. Effects of nano-TiO2 on the agronomically-relevant Rhizobium-legume symbiosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of nano-TiO2 on Rhizobium-legume symbiosis was studied using garden peas and the compatible bacterial partner Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841. Exposure to nano-TiO2 did not affect the germination of peas grown aseptically, nor did it impact the gross root structure. However, nano-...

  8. Coral fluorescence and symbiosis : photoacclimation, thermal shock, life history changes, and implications for reef monitoring

    E-print Network

    Roth, Melissa Susan

    2010-01-01

    of the conservation and management of coral reef ecosystems.coral colony size distributions on Kenyan reefs under different managementcoral reefs, understanding the coral symbiosis physiology and having nondestructive tools to monitor coral health will be critical for the conservation and management

  9. Fungal and algal gene expression in early developmental stages of lichen-symbiosis

    E-print Network

    Lutzoni, François M.

    Fungal and algal gene expression in early developmental stages of lichen-symbiosis Suzanne Joneson1 in vitro in early lichen development. cDNA libraries of upregulated genes were created with suppression subtractive hybridiza- tion in the first two stages of lichen development. Quantitative PCR subsequently

  10. Nuclear calcium changes at the core of symbiosis signalling Giles ED Oldroyd and J Allan Downie

    E-print Network

    Downie, J. Allan

    -activated kinase that is required for both mycorrhization and nodulation. The nodulation signalling pathway, the model legume Lotus japonicus contains seven genes that are required for both mycorrhization and mycorrhization despite conservation in early signalling. Calcium as a secondary messenger in symbiosis signalling

  11. Possible Roles of Sulfur-Containing Amino Acids in a Chemoautotrophic Bacterium-Mollusc Symbiosis

    E-print Network

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    Possible Roles of Sulfur-Containing Amino Acids in a Chemoautotrophic Bacterium-Mollusc Symbiosis avoiding its toxic effects. The sulfur-containing free amino acids taurine and thiotaurine may function in sulfide detoxification by serving as sulfur storage compounds or as transport compounds between symbiont

  12. The promiscuous larvae: flexibility in the establishment of symbiosis in corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbo, V. R.; Baird, A. H.; van Oppen, M. J. H.

    2013-03-01

    Coral reefs thrive in part because of the symbiotic partnership between corals and Symbiodinium. While this partnership is one of the keys to the success of coral reef ecosystems, surprisingly little is known about many aspects of coral symbiosis, in particular the establishment and development of symbiosis in host species that acquire symbionts anew in each generation. More specifically, the point at which symbiosis is established (i.e., larva vs. juvenile) remains uncertain, as does the source of free-living Symbiodinium in the environment. In addition, the capacity of host and symbiont to form novel combinations is unknown. To explore patterns of initial association between host and symbiont, larvae of two species of Acropora were exposed to sediment collected from three locations on the Great Barrier Reef. A high proportion of larvae established symbiosis shortly after contact with sediments, and Acropora larvae were promiscuous, taking up multiple types of Symbiodinium. The Symbiodinium types acquired from the sediments reflected the symbiont assemblage within a wide range of cnidarian hosts at each of the three sites, suggesting potential regional differences in the free-living Symbiodinium assemblage. Coral larvae clearly have the capacity to take up Symbiodinium prior to settlement, and sediment is a likely source. Promiscuous larvae allow species to associate with Symbiodinium appropriate for potentially novel environments that may be experienced following dispersal.

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and alleviation of osmotic stress. New perspectives for molecular studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JuanManuel Ruiz-Lozano

    2003-01-01

    Water deficit is considered one of the most important abiotic factors limiting plant growth and yield in many areas on earth. Several eco-physiological studies have demonstrated that the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis often results in altered rates of water movement into, through and out of the host plants, with consequent effects on tissue hydration and plant physiology. It is now

  14. Role of Hfq in an animal-microbe symbiosis under simulated microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Kyle C.; Khodadad, Christina L. M.; Foster, Jamie S.

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity has a profound impact on the physiology of pathogenic microbes; however, its effects on mutualistic microbes are relatively unknown. To examine the effects of microgravity on those beneficial microbes that associate with animal tissues, we used the symbiosis between the bobtail squid Euprymna scolopes and a motile, luminescent bacterium, Vibrio fischeri as a model system. Specifically, we examined the role of Hfq, an RNA-binding protein known to be an important global regulator under space flight conditions, in the squid-vibrio symbiosis under simulated microgravity. To mimic a reduced gravity environment, the symbiotic partners were co-incubated in high-aspect-ratio rotating wall vessel bioreactors and examined at various stages of development. Results indicated that under simulated microgravity, hfq expression was down-regulated in V. fischeri. A mutant strain defective in hfq showed no colonization phenotype, indicating that Hfq was not required to initiate the symbiosis with the host squid. However, the hfq mutant showed attenuated levels of apoptotic cell death, a key symbiosis phenotype, within the host light organ suggesting that Hfq does contribute to normal light organ morphogenesis. Results also indicated that simulated microgravity conditions accelerated the onset of cell death in wild-type cells but not in the hfq mutant strains. These data suggest that Hfq plays an important role in the mutualism between V. fischeri and its animal host and that its expression can be negatively impacted by simulated microgravity conditions.

  15. A Genomic Reappraisal of Symbiotic Function in the Aphid/Buchnera Symbiosis: Reduced Transporter Sets

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Genomic Reappraisal of Symbiotic Function in the Aphid/Buchnera Symbiosis: Reduced Transporter the physiology of aphids by complementing their exclusive phloem sap diet. In this study, we reappraised the transport function of different Buchnera strains, from the aphids Acyrthosiphon pisum, Schizaphis graminum

  16. Difference in Striga-susceptibility is reflected in strigolactone secretion profile, but not in compatibility and host preference in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in two maize cultivars.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Kaori; Arakawa, Ryota; Ishimoto, Keiko; Kim, Hyun Il; Kisugi, Takaya; Xie, Xiaonan; Nomura, Takahito; Kanampiu, Fred; Yokota, Takao; Ezawa, Tatsuhiro; Yoneyama, Koichi

    2015-05-01

    Strigolactones released from plant roots trigger both seed germination of parasitic weeds such as Striga spp. and hyphal branching of the symbionts arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Generally, strigolactone composition in exudates is quantitatively and qualitatively different among plants, which may be involved in susceptibility and host specificity in the parasite-plant interactions. We hypothesized that difference in strigolactone composition would have a significant impact on compatibility and host specificity/preference in AM symbiosis. Strigolactones in root exudates of Striga-susceptible (Pioneer 3253) and -resistant (KST 94) maize (Zea mays) cultivars were characterized by LC-MS/MS combined with germination assay using Striga hermonthica seeds. Levels of colonization and community compositions of AM fungi in the two cultivars were investigated in field and glasshouse experiments. 5-Deoxystrigol was exuded exclusively by the susceptible cultivar, while the resistant cultivar mainly exuded sorgomol. Despite the distinctive difference in strigolactone composition, the levels of AM colonization and the community compositions were not different between the cultivars. The present study demonstrated that the difference in strigolactone composition has no appreciable impact on AM symbiosis, at least in the two maize cultivars, and further suggests that the traits involved in Striga-resistance are not necessarily accompanied by reduction in compatibility to AM fungi. PMID:25754513

  17. A novel genetic locus outside the symbiotic island is required for effective symbiosis of Bradyrhizobium japonicum with soybean Glycine max.

    PubMed

    Becker, Bernd Ulrich; Bonnard, Nathalie; Boiffin, Vincent; Mörschel, Erhard; Tresierra, Alvaro; Müller, Peter

    2004-11-01

    In order to investigate the symbiotic interaction between soybean and Bradyrhizobium japonicum, TnphoA mutagenesis of the microsymbiont was performed. Mutant strain 2-10 was found to induce a strongly reduced number of ineffective nodules. Ultrastructural analysis of the soybean nodule central tissue revealed the presence of numerous starch granules and vacuoles in the infected cells. In addition, the number of symbiosomes was extremely low, indicating an impaired interaction between the plant and invading bacteria. Cloning and sequencing of the mutated DNA region uncovered four open reading frames (ORFs) lacking any data base similarities. ORFs srrA1 and srrA2, the 2-10 TnphoA insertion site, are encoded in the same reading frame. A 35-kDa expression product in Escherichia coli indicated the presence of a common protein, called SrrA (symbiotically relevant region) in B. japonicum 110spc4, encoded by combined srrA1 and srrA2 genes. The analysis of gene disruption mutants revealed that srrB and srrC were also required for effective symbiosis with soybeans. Further downstream the gene for a putative inner membrane protein (pipA) of unknown function was encoded on the opposite strand. Primer extension studies led to the conclusion that the organization of genes differed from the RhizoBase annotation in this particular region of B. japonicum USDA110. PMID:15501655

  18. The pha gene cluster of Rhizobium meliloti involved in pH adaptation and symbiosis encodes a novel type of

    E-print Network

    The pha gene cluster of Rhizobium meliloti involved in pH adaptation and symbiosis encodes a novel mutant of Rhizobium meliloti affected in the invasion of alfalfa root nodules (Inf¹ /Fix¹ ) is Kþ sen

  19. Demographic Modeling of a Predator-Prey System and Its implication for the Gombe Population of Procolobus rufomitratus tephrosceles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Fourrier; Robert W. Sussman; Rebecca Kippen; Geoff Childs

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the viability of colobus populations under conservative estimates of predation by chimpanzees. If fertility and\\u000a mortality schedules remain constant, intensely hunted red colobus populations will experience negative growth rates if one\\u000a allows the assumption of stable age structure to persist into the future. Demographic models have many advantages in studies\\u000a of primate behavior and ecology. Researchers use them

  20. Habitat loss decreases predator/prey ratios in a pine-bark beetle Krista L. Ryall and Lenore Fahrig

    E-print Network

    Habitat loss decreases predatorÁ/prey ratios in a pine-bark beetle system Krista L. Ryall of natural habitats, resulting in isolation of remaining habitat fragments. Using a pine-bark beetle and Lenore Fahrig Ryall, K. L. and Fahrig, L. 2005. Habitat loss decreases predatorÁ/prey ratios in a pine

  1. To dare or not to dare? Risk management by owls in a predator-prey foraging game.

    PubMed

    Embar, Keren; Raveh, Ashael; Burns, Darren; Kotler, Burt P

    2014-07-01

    In a foraging game, predators must catch elusive prey while avoiding injury. Predators manage their hunting success with behavioral tools such as habitat selection, time allocation, and perhaps daring-the willingness to risk injury to increase hunting success. A predator's level of daring should be state dependent: the hungrier it is, the more it should be willing to risk injury to better capture prey. We ask, in a foraging game, will a hungry predator be more willing to risk injury while hunting? We performed an experiment in an outdoor vivarium in which barn owls (Tyto alba) were allowed to hunt Allenby's gerbils (Gerbillus andersoni allenbyi) from a choice of safe and risky patches. Owls were either well fed or hungry, representing the high and low state, respectively. We quantified the owls' patch use behavior. We predicted that hungry owls would be more daring and allocate more time to the risky patches. Owls preferred to hunt in the safe patches. This indicates that owls manage risk of injury by avoiding the risky patches. Hungry owls doubled their attacks on gerbils, but directed the added effort mostly toward the safe patch and the safer, open areas in the risky patch. Thus, owls dared by performing a risky action-the attack maneuver-more times, but only in the safest places-the open areas. We conclude that daring can be used to manage risk of injury and owls implement it strategically, in ways we did not foresee, to minimize risk of injury while maximizing hunting success. PMID:24810326

  2. Computational Science Technical Note CSTN-188 Emergent System Eects from Microscopic Evasion Choices in a Predator-Prey

    E-print Network

    Hawick, Ken

    Ken Hawick, Computer Science, Massey University, Albany, North Shore 102-904, Auckland, New Zealand Science Massey University - Albany Campus North Shore 102-904, Auckland New Zealand email: c.scogings@massey.ac.nz Ken A. Hawick Computer Science Massey University - Albany Campus North Shore 102-904, Auckland New

  3. Journal of Theoretical Biology 238 (2006) 1835 Spatiotemporal complexity of patchy invasion in a predator-prey

    E-print Network

    Journal of Theoretical Biology 238 (2006) 18­35 Spatiotemporal complexity of patchy invasion Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Biological invasion; Predator­prey system; Patchy spread; Allee many ecological applications; in particular, it plays a major role in connection to biological invasion

  4. Exploitation of an ancient escape circuit by an avian predator: prey sensitivity to model predator display in the field.

    PubMed

    Jablo?ski, P G; Strausfeld, N J

    2000-08-01

    Certain insectivorous birds, such as the painted redstart (Myioborus pictus), undertake flush pursuit--a characteristic display that elicits an escape reaction by an insect, which the bird then chases in the air and eats. This account describes experiments showing that flush pursuit uses visual displays, which are likely to exploit an ancient neural circuit in dipteran insects, the visual systems of which are well documented as detecting looming stimuli and triggering an escape responses. Using models that decompose components of the redstart display, specific elements of the display were analyzed for their contribution in triggering visually induced escape behavior by dipterous insects. Elements tested were pivoting body movements, patterning on the spread tail and wings, and visual contrast of model redstarts against pale and dark backgrounds. We show that contrasting patterns within the plumage are crucial to foraging success, as is contrast of the bird against a background. Visual motion also significantly contributes to the successful flushing. In contrast, unpatterned models and patterned models that do not contrast with the background are less successful in eliciting escape responses of flies. Natural visual stimuli provided by Myioborus pictus are similar to those known to trigger looming and time-to-collision neurons in the escape circuits of flies and other insects, such as orthopterans. We propose that the tuning properties of these neural pathways might have contributed to the evolution of foraging displays in flush-pursuing birds. PMID:11111136

  5. Exploitation of an Ancient Escape Circuit by an Avian Predator: Prey Sensitivity to Model Predator Display in the Field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. J. Strausfeld

    2000-01-01

    Certain insectivorous birds, such as the painted redstart (Myioborus pictus), undertake flush pursuit – a characteristic display that elicits an escape reaction by an insect, which the bird then chases in the air and eats. This account describes experiments showing that flush pursuit uses visual displays, which are likely to exploit an ancient neural circuit in dipteran insects, the visual

  6. Computational Science Technical Note CSTN-085 Cross-Caste Communication in a Multi-Agent Predator-Prey Model

    E-print Network

    Hawick, Ken

    and can gain an advantage by trading o numbers of unproductive soldiers against numbers of defenseless communities such as termites or bacterial colonies where workers might summon soldiers to where of unproductive soldiers against numbers of defenseless but productive workers. We show how even relatively sim

  7. Quasicycles in a spatial predator-prey model Carlos A. Lugo and Alan J. McKane*

    E-print Network

    McKane, Alan

    to stochastic fluctuations about the time-independent solutions of the deterministic equations which of the same phenomena con- structed at different scales, for instance, by deriving macro- scopic models from characteristics. They may have an age, sex, be hungry at a given time, and so on. These are essentially agent

  8. Orientation of Rhizophagus grandis (Coleoptera: Rhizophagidae) to oxygenated monoterpenes in a species-specific predator-prey relationship

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Claude Grégoire; Daniel Couillien; Ralph Krebber; Winfried A. König; Holger Meyer; Wittko Francke

    1992-01-01

    Summary The predator,Rhizophagus grandis, is linked to its specific prey,Dendroctonus micans, by semiochemical signals regulating oviposition and long range orientation. A mixture of simple oxygenated monoterpenes [(-)—fenchone, (-)—pinocamphone, rac. camphor, terpinene-4-ol, borneol, fenchol and verbenone], identified from the frass ofD. micans has been found to be extremely active in a flight windtunnel as a long—range attractant for the predator. The

  9. Discovering the Power of Individual-Based Modelling in Teaching and Learning: The Study of a Predator-Prey System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginovart, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The general aim is to promote the use of individual-based models (biological agent-based models) in teaching and learning contexts in life sciences and to make their progressive incorporation into academic curricula easier, complementing other existing modelling strategies more frequently used in the classroom. Modelling activities for the study…

  10. Interactive Effects of Nitrogen and Climate Change on Biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, E. M.; Bowman, W. D.; Clark, C. M.; Compton, J. E.; Pardo, L. H.; Soong, J.

    2011-12-01

    Biodiversity has been described as the diversity of life on earth within species, between species and in ecosystems. Biodiversity contributes to regulating ecosystem services like climate, flood, disease, and water quality regulation. Biodiversity also supports and sustains ecosystem services that provide material goods like food, fiber, fuel, timber and water, and to non-material benefits like educational, recreational, spiritual, and aesthetic ecosystem services. The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment estimated that the rate of biodiversity loss due to human activity in the last 50 years has been more rapid than at any other time in human history, and that many of the drivers of biodiversity loss are increasing. The strongest drivers of biodiversity loss include habitat loss, overexploitation, invasive species, climate change, and pollution, including pollution from reactive nitrogen. Of these stressors, climate change and reactive nitrogen from anthropogenic activities are causing some of the most rapid changes. Climate change is causing warming trends that result in consistent patterns of poleward and elevational range shifts of flora and fauna, causing changes in biodiversity. Warming has also resulted in changes in phenology, particularly the earlier onset of spring events, migration, and lengthening of the growing season, disrupting predator-prey and plant-pollinator interactions. In addition to warming, elevated carbon dioxide by itself can affect biodiversity by influencing plant growth, soil water, tissue stoichiometry, and trophic interactions. Nitrogen enrichment also impacts ecosystems and biodiversity in a variety of ways. Nitrogen enhances plant growth, but has been shown to favor invasive, fast-growing species over native species adapted to low nitrogen conditions. Although there have been a limited number of empirical studies on climate change and nitrogen interactions, inferences can be drawn from observed responses to each stressor by itself. For example, in certain arid ecosystems of southern California, elevated nitrogen has promoted invasions of annual non-native grasses. At the same time, a period of above-normal precipitation years has exacerbated the grass invasions. Increased grass cover has altered the hydrologic cycle of these areas and increased fire risk, ultimately leading to conversion of the ecosystem from diverse shrublands to less diverse grasslands. In addition to empirical studies, modeling can be used to simulate climate change and nitrogen interactions. The ForSAFE-VEG model, for example, has been used to examine climate change and nitrogen interactions in Rocky Mountain alpine vegetation communities. Results from both empirical studies and modeling indicate that nitrogen and climate change interact to drive losses in biodiversity greater than those caused by either stressor alone. Reducing inputs of anthropogenic reactive nitrogen may be an effective mitigation strategy for protecting biodiversity in the face of climate change.

  11. A model symbiosis reveals a role for sheathed-flagellum rotation in the release of immunogenic lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Caitlin A; Hunt, Jason R; Kremer, Natacha; Krasity, Benjamin C; Apicella, Michael A; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J; Ruby, Edward G

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial flagella mediate host–microbe interactions through tissue tropism during colonization, as well as by activating immune responses. The flagellar shaft of some bacteria, including several human pathogens, is encased in a membranous sheath of unknown function. While it has been hypothesized that the sheath may allow these bacteria to evade host responses to the immunogenic flagellin subunit, this unusual structural feature has remained an enigma. Here we demonstrate that the rotation of the sheathed flagellum in both the mutualist Vibrio fischeri and the pathogen Vibrio cholerae promotes release of a potent bacteria-derived immunogen, lipopolysaccharide, found in the flagellar sheath. We further present a new role for the flagellar sheath in triggering, rather than circumventing, host immune responses in the model squid-vibrio symbiosis. Such an observation not only has implications for the study of bacterial pathogens with sheathed flagella, but also raises important biophysical questions of sheathed-flagellum function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01579.001 PMID:24596150

  12. A nonRD receptor-like kinase prevents nodule early senescence and defense-like reactions during symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Berrabah, Fathi; Bourcy, Marie; Eschstruth, Alexis; Cayrel, Anne; Guefrachi, Ibtissem; Mergaert, Peter; Wen, Jiangqi; Jean, Viviane; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Gourion, Benjamin; Ratet, Pascal

    2014-09-01

    Rhizobia and legumes establish symbiotic interactions leading to the production of root nodules, in which bacteria fix atmospheric nitrogen for the plant's benefit. This symbiosis is efficient because of the high rhizobia population within nodules. Here, we investigated how legumes accommodate such bacterial colonization. We used a reverse genetic approach to identify a Medicago truncatula gene, SymCRK, which encodes a cysteine-rich receptor-like kinase that is required for rhizobia maintenance within the plant cells, and performed detailed phenotypic analyses of the corresponding mutant. The Medicago truncatula symCRK mutant developed nonfunctional and necrotic nodules. A nonarginine asparate (nonRD) motif, typical of receptors involved in innate immunity, is present in the SymCRK kinase domain. Similar to the dnf2 mutant, bacteroid differentiation defect, defense-like reactions and early senescence were observed in the symCRK nodules. However, the dnf2 and symCRK nodules differ by their degree of colonization, which is higher in symCRK. Furthermore, in contrast to dnf2, symCRK is not a conditional mutant. These results suggest that in M. truncatula at least two genes are involved in the symbiotic control of immunity. Furthermore, phenotype differences between the two mutants suggest that two distinct molecular mechanisms control suppression of plant immunity during nodulation. PMID:24916161

  13. Comparative phylogeography, genetic differentiation and contrasting reproductive modes in three fungal symbionts of a multipartite bark beetle symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Roe, Amanda D; Rice, Adrianne V; Coltman, David W; Cooke, Janice E K; Sperling, Felix A H

    2011-02-01

    Multipartite symbioses are complex symbiotic relationships involving multiple interacting partners. These types of partnerships provide excellent opportunities in which to apply a comparative approach to identify common historical patterns of population differentiation and species-specific life history traits. Using three symbiotic blue-stain fungal species (Ophiostomatacea) associated with outbreaking populations of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) in western Canada, we applied phylogenetic, population genetic and demographic approaches to clarify phylogeographic patterns among the three fungal species. Broadly, the three species showed significant population differentiation, forming northern and southern populations, despite dramatic differences in haplotype diversity. Finer structuring and population demographic patterns were less consistent, showing some interspecific incongruence. By contrasting these species simultaneously, we were able to identify differences in recombination rate and ecological traits that can explain the observed patterns of incongruence among the fungal species. By applying a comparative approach to partners of a multipartite symbiosis, we were able to distinguish congruent population structuring and species-specific differences that help us to understand the complexity and evolution of this symbiotic system. PMID:21166729

  14. Convergent losses of decay mechanisms and rapid turnover of symbiosis genes in mycorrhizal mutualists.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Annegret; Kuo, Alan; Nagy, Laszlo G; Morin, Emmanuelle; Barry, Kerrie W; Buscot, Francois; Canbäck, Björn; Choi, Cindy; Cichocki, Nicolas; Clum, Alicia; Colpaert, Jan; Copeland, Alex; Costa, Mauricio D; Doré, Jeanne; Floudas, Dimitrios; Gay, Gilles; Girlanda, Mariangela; Henrissat, Bernard; Herrmann, Sylvie; Hess, Jaqueline; Högberg, Nils; Johansson, Tomas; Khouja, Hassine-Radhouane; LaButti, Kurt; Lahrmann, Urs; Levasseur, Anthony; Lindquist, Erika A; Lipzen, Anna; Marmeisse, Roland; Martino, Elena; Murat, Claude; Ngan, Chew Y; Nehls, Uwe; Plett, Jonathan M; Pringle, Anne; Ohm, Robin A; Perotto, Silvia; Peter, Martina; Riley, Robert; Rineau, Francois; Ruytinx, Joske; Salamov, Asaf; Shah, Firoz; Sun, Hui; Tarkka, Mika; Tritt, Andrew; Veneault-Fourrey, Claire; Zuccaro, Alga; Tunlid, Anders; Grigoriev, Igor V; Hibbett, David S; Martin, Francis

    2015-04-01

    To elucidate the genetic bases of mycorrhizal lifestyle evolution, we sequenced new fungal genomes, including 13 ectomycorrhizal (ECM), orchid (ORM) and ericoid (ERM) species, and five saprotrophs, which we analyzed along with other fungal genomes. Ectomycorrhizal fungi have a reduced complement of genes encoding plant cell wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDEs), as compared to their ancestral wood decayers. Nevertheless, they have retained a unique array of PCWDEs, thus suggesting that they possess diverse abilities to decompose lignocellulose. Similar functional categories of nonorthologous genes are induced in symbiosis. Of induced genes, 7-38% are orphan genes, including genes that encode secreted effector-like proteins. Convergent evolution of the mycorrhizal habit in fungi occurred via the repeated evolution of a 'symbiosis toolkit', with reduced numbers of PCWDEs and lineage-specific suites of mycorrhiza-induced genes. PMID:25706625

  15. New evidence for the symbiosis between Tuber aestivum and Picea abies.

    PubMed

    Stobbe, Ulrich; Stobbe, Annika; Sproll, Ludger; Tegel, Willy; Peter, Martina; Büntgen, Ulf; Egli, Simon

    2013-11-01

    The Burgundy truffle (Tuber aestivum Vittad.), an ectomycorrhizal fungus living in association with host plants, is one of the most exclusive delicacies. The symbiosis with deciduous oak, beech, and hazel dominates our concept of truffle ecophysiology, whereas potential conifer hosts have rarely been reported. Here, we present morphological and molecular evidence of a wildlife T. aestivum symbiosis with Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.) and an independent greenhouse inoculation experiment, to confirm our field observation in southwest Germany. A total of 27 out of 50 P. abies seedlings developed T. aestivum ectomycorrhizae with a mean mycorrhization rate of 19.6 %. These findings not only suggest P. abies to be a productive host species under suitable biogeographic conditions but also emphasize the broad ecological amplitude and great symbiotic range of T. aestivum. While challenging common knowledge, this study demonstrates a significant expansion of the species' cultivation potential to the central European regions, where P. abies forests occur on calcareous soils. PMID:23674121

  16. Symbiosis of sea anemones and hermit crabs: different resource utilization patterns in the Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafeiadou, Anna-Maria; Antoniadou, Chryssanthi; Chintiroglou, Chariton

    2012-09-01

    The small-scale distribution and resource utilization patterns of hermit crabs living in symbiosis with sea anemones were investigated in the Aegean Sea. Four hermit crab species, occupying shells of nine gastropod species, were found in symbiosis with the sea anemone Calliactis parasitica. Shell resource utilization patterns varied among hermit crabs, with Dardanus species utilizing a wide variety of shells. The size structure of hermit crab populations also affected shell resource utilization, with small-sized individuals inhabiting a larger variety of shells. Sea anemone utilization patterns varied both among hermit crab species and among residence shells, with larger crabs and shells hosting an increased abundance and biomass of C. parasitica. The examined biometric relationships suggested that small-sized crabs carry, proportionally to their weight, heavier shells and increased anemone biomass than larger ones. Exceptions to the above patterns are related either to local resource availability or to other environmental factors.

  17. Man-robot symbiosis: a framework for cooperative intelligence and control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynne E. Parker; F. G. Pin

    1988-01-01

    The man-robot symbiosis concept has the fundamental objective of bridging the gap between fully human-controlled and fully autonomous systems to achieve true man-robot cooperative control and intelligence. Such a system would allow improved speed, accuracy, and efficiency of task execution, while retaining the man in the loop for innovative reasoning and decision-making. The symbiont would have capabilities for supervised and

  18. Medicago truncatula , a model plant for studying the molecular genetics of the Rhizobium -legume symbiosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David G. Barker; Sylvie Bianchi; François Blondon; Yvette Dattée; Gérard Duc; Sadi Essad; Pascal Flament; Philippe Gallusci; Gérard Génier; Pierre Guy; Xavier Muel; Jacques Tourneur; Jean Dénarié; Thierry Huguet

    1990-01-01

    Medicago truncatula has all the characteristics required for a concerted analysis of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis withRhizobium using the tools of molecular biology, cellular biology and genetics.M. truncatula is a diploid and autogamous plant has a relatively small genome, and preliminary molecular analysis suggests that allelic\\u000a heterozygosity is minimal compared with the cross-fertilising tetraploid alfalfa (Medicago sativa). TheM. truncatula cultivar Jemalong is

  19. Complete genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. S23321: insights into symbiosis evolution in soil oligotrophs.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Takashi; Tsukui, Takahiro; Maita, Hiroko; Okamoto, Shinobu; Oshima, Kenshiro; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Saito, Akihiro; Futamata, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Reiko; Shimomura, Yumi; Haruta, Shin; Morimoto, Sho; Wang, Yong; Sakai, Yoriko; Hattori, Masahira; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi; Nagashima, Kenji V P; Masuda, Sachiko; Hattori, Tsutomu; Yamashita, Akifumi; Bao, Zhihua; Hayatsu, Masahito; Kajiya-Kanegae, Hiromi; Yoshinaga, Ikuo; Sakamoto, Kazunori; Toyota, Koki; Nakao, Mitsuteru; Kohara, Mitsuyo; Anda, Mizue; Niwa, Rieko; Jung-Hwan, Park; Sameshima-Saito, Reiko; Tokuda, Shin-Ichi; Yamamoto, Sumiko; Yamamoto, Syuji; Yokoyama, Tadashi; Akutsu, Tomoko; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Nakahira-Yanaka, Yuka; Takada Hoshino, Yuko; Hirakawa, Hideki; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Terasawa, Kimihiro; Itakura, Manabu; Sato, Shusei; Ikeda-Ohtsubo, Wakako; Sakakura, Natsuko; Kaminuma, Eli; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2012-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium sp. S23321 is an oligotrophic bacterium isolated from paddy field soil. Although S23321 is phylogenetically close to Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110, a legume symbiont, it is unable to induce root nodules in siratro, a legume often used for testing Nod factor-dependent nodulation. The genome of S23321 is a single circular chromosome, 7,231,841 bp in length, with an average GC content of 64.3%. The genome contains 6,898 potential protein-encoding genes, one set of rRNA genes, and 45 tRNA genes. Comparison of the genome structure between S23321 and USDA110 showed strong colinearity; however, the symbiosis islands present in USDA110 were absent in S23321, whose genome lacked a chaperonin gene cluster (groELS3) for symbiosis regulation found in USDA110. A comparison of sequences around the tRNA-Val gene strongly suggested that S23321 contains an ancestral-type genome that precedes the acquisition of a symbiosis island by horizontal gene transfer. Although S23321 contains a nif (nitrogen fixation) gene cluster, the organization, homology, and phylogeny of the genes in this cluster were more similar to those of photosynthetic bradyrhizobia ORS278 and BTAi1 than to those on the symbiosis island of USDA110. In addition, we found genes encoding a complete photosynthetic system, many ABC transporters for amino acids and oligopeptides, two types (polar and lateral) of flagella, multiple respiratory chains, and a system for lignin monomer catabolism in the S23321 genome. These features suggest that S23321 is able to adapt to a wide range of environments, probably including low-nutrient conditions, with multiple survival strategies in soil and rhizosphere. PMID:22452844

  20. Symbiont-driven sulfur crystal formation in a thiotrophic symbiosis from deep-sea hydrocarbon seeps

    PubMed Central

    Eichinger, Irmgard; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Schmid, Markus; Fisher, Charles R; Bright, Monika

    2014-01-01

    The siboglinid tubeworm Sclerolinum contortum symbiosis inhabits sulfidic sediments at deep-sea hydrocarbon seeps in the Gulf of Mexico. A single symbiont phylotype in the symbiont-housing organ is inferred from phylogenetic analyses of the 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (16S rRNA) gene and fluorescent in situ hybridization. The phylotype we studied here, and a previous study from an arctic hydrocarbon seep population, reveal identical 16S rRNA symbiont gene sequences. While sulfide is apparently the energy source for the symbionts (and ultimately the gutless host), both partners also have to cope with its toxicity. This study demonstrates abundant large sulfur crystals restricted to the trophosome area. Based on Raman microspectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis, these crystals have the same S8 sulfur configuration as the recently described small sulfur vesicles formed in the symbionts. The crystals reside adjacent to the symbionts in the trophosome. This suggests that their formation is either extra- or intracellular in symbionts. We propose that formation of these crystals provides both energy-storage compounds for the symbionts and serves the symbiosis by removing excess toxic sulfide from host tissues. This symbiont-mediated sulfide detoxification may have been crucial for the establishment of thiotrophic symbiosis and continues to remain an important function of the symbionts. PMID:24992535

  1. Large-Scale Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics of the Pea aphid-Buchnera Symbiosis*

    PubMed Central

    Poliakov, Anton; Russell, Calum W.; Ponnala, Lalit; Hoops, Harold J.; Sun, Qi; Douglas, Angela E.; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2011-01-01

    Many insects are nutritionally dependent on symbiotic microorganisms that have tiny genomes and are housed in specialized host cells called bacteriocytes. The obligate symbiosis between the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum and the ?-proteobacterium Buchnera aphidicola (only 584 predicted proteins) is particularly amenable for molecular analysis because the genomes of both partners have been sequenced. To better define the symbiotic relationship between this aphid and Buchnera, we used large-scale, high accuracy tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-LTQ-Orbtrap) to identify aphid and Buchnera proteins in the whole aphid body, purified bacteriocytes, isolated Buchnera cells and the residual bacteriocyte fraction. More than 1900 aphid and 400 Buchnera proteins were identified. All enzymes in amino acid metabolism annotated in the Buchnera genome were detected, reflecting the high (68%) coverage of the proteome and supporting the core function of Buchnera in the aphid symbiosis. Transporters mediating the transport of predicted metabolites were present in the bacteriocyte. Label-free spectral counting combined with hierarchical clustering, allowed to define the quantitative distribution of a subset of these proteins across both symbiotic partners, yielding no evidence for the selective transfer of protein among the partners in either direction. This is the first quantitative proteome analysis of bacteriocyte symbiosis, providing a wealth of information about molecular function of both the host cell and bacterial symbiont. PMID:21421797

  2. Forests trapped in nitrogen limitation – an ecological market perspective on ectomycorrhizal symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Oskar; Näsholm, Torgny; Högberg, Peter; Högberg, Mona N

    2014-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal symbiosis is omnipresent in boreal forests, where it is assumed to benefit plant growth. However, experiments show inconsistent benefits for plants and volatility of individual partnerships, which calls for a re-evaluation of the presumed role of this symbiosis. We reconcile these inconsistencies by developing a model that demonstrates how mycorrhizal networking and market mechanisms shape the strategies of individual plants and fungi to promote symbiotic stability at the ecosystem level. The model predicts that plants switch abruptly from a mixed strategy with both mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal roots to a purely mycorrhizal strategy as soil nitrogen availability declines, in agreement with the frequency distribution of ectomycorrhizal colonization intensity across a wide-ranging data set. In line with observations in field-scale isotope labeling experiments, the model explains why ectomycorrhizal symbiosis does not alleviate plant nitrogen limitation. Instead, market mechanisms may generate self-stabilization of the mycorrhizal strategy via nitrogen depletion feedback, even if plant growth is ultimately reduced. We suggest that this feedback mechanism maintains the strong nitrogen limitation ubiquitous in boreal forests. The mechanism may also have the capacity to eliminate or even reverse the expected positive effect of rising CO2 on tree growth in strongly nitrogen-limited boreal forests. PMID:24824576

  3. Nitrate regulates rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbiosis in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Nanjareddy, Kalpana; Blanco, Lourdes; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Affantrange, Xochitl Alvarado; Sánchez, Federico; Lara, Miguel

    2014-03-01

    Nitrogen-limited conditions are considered to be a prerequisite for legume-rhizobial symbiosis, but the effects of nitrate-rich conditions on symbiotic status remain poorly understood. We addressed this issue by examining rhizobial (Rhizobim tropici) and arbusclar mycorrhizal (Glomus intraradices) symbiosis in Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Negro Jamapa under nitrate pre-incubation and continuous nitrate conditions. Our results indicate that nitrate pre-incubation, independent of the concentration, did not affect nodule development. However, the continuous supply of nitrate at high concentrations impaired nodule maturation and nodule numbers. Low nitrate conditions, in addition to positively regulating nodule number, biomass, and nitrogenase activity, also extended the span of nitrogen-fixing activity. By contrast, for arbuscular mycorrhizae, continuous 10 and 50?mmol/L nitrate increased the percent root length colonization, concomitantly reduced arbuscule size, and enhanced ammonia transport without affecting phosphate transport. Therefore, in this manuscript, we have proposed the importance of nitrate as a positive regulator in promoting both rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbiosis in the common bean. PMID:24387000

  4. Large-scale label-free quantitative proteomics of the pea aphid-Buchnera symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Poliakov, Anton; Russell, Calum W; Ponnala, Lalit; Hoops, Harold J; Sun, Qi; Douglas, Angela E; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2011-06-01

    Many insects are nutritionally dependent on symbiotic microorganisms that have tiny genomes and are housed in specialized host cells called bacteriocytes. The obligate symbiosis between the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum and the ?-proteobacterium Buchnera aphidicola (only 584 predicted proteins) is particularly amenable for molecular analysis because the genomes of both partners have been sequenced. To better define the symbiotic relationship between this aphid and Buchnera, we used large-scale, high accuracy tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-LTQ-Orbtrap) to identify aphid and Buchnera proteins in the whole aphid body, purified bacteriocytes, isolated Buchnera cells and the residual bacteriocyte fraction. More than 1900 aphid and 400 Buchnera proteins were identified. All enzymes in amino acid metabolism annotated in the Buchnera genome were detected, reflecting the high (68%) coverage of the proteome and supporting the core function of Buchnera in the aphid symbiosis. Transporters mediating the transport of predicted metabolites were present in the bacteriocyte. Label-free spectral counting combined with hierarchical clustering, allowed to define the quantitative distribution of a subset of these proteins across both symbiotic partners, yielding no evidence for the selective transfer of protein among the partners in either direction. This is the first quantitative proteome analysis of bacteriocyte symbiosis, providing a wealth of information about molecular function of both the host cell and bacterial symbiont. PMID:21421797

  5. Multi-gene analysis of Symbiodinium dinoflagellates: a perspective on rarity, symbiosis, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Hollie M.; Gates, Ruth D.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiodinium, a large group of dinoflagellates, live in symbiosis with marine protists, invertebrate metazoans, and free-living in the environment. Symbiodinium are functionally variable and play critical energetic roles in symbiosis. Our knowledge of Symbiodinium has been historically constrained by the limited number of molecular markers available to study evolution in the genus. Here we compare six functional genes, representing three cellular compartments, in the nine known Symbiodinium lineages. Despite striking similarities among the single gene phylogenies from distinct organelles, none were evolutionarily identical. A fully concatenated reconstruction, however, yielded a well-resolved topology identical to the current benchmark nr28S gene. Evolutionary rates differed among cellular compartments and clades, a pattern largely driven by higher rates of evolution in the chloroplast genes of Symbiodinium clades D2 and I. The rapid rates of evolution observed amongst these relatively uncommon Symbiodinium lineages in the functionally critical chloroplast may translate into potential innovation for the symbiosis. The multi-gene analysis highlights the potential power of assessing genome-wide evolutionary patterns using recent advances in sequencing technology and emphasizes the importance of integrating ecological data with more comprehensive sampling of free-living and symbiotic Symbiodinium in assessing the evolutionary adaptation of this enigmatic dinoflagellate. PMID:24883254

  6. Interaction

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wolfgang Christian

    Set values for the initial position, velocity, and mass of the two particles, and click on the button "Initialize Animation" to play the animation using your specified values. Note, if m or v are too large, the particles may actually pass through one another which will seem a little strange. Note: the interaction between the particles is a "non-contact" interaction, much like the electrostatic force on two charges. Mathematically, it is actually a Hooke's law interaction.

  7. Developing microbeplant interactions for applications in plant-growth promotion and disease control,

    E-print Network

    Chen, Wilfred

    , 2004), endophyte applications (Ryan et al., 2008), and rhizosphere bacteria responses to transgenic and molecular interactions of plant-associated bacteria (Sorensen and Sessitsch, 2007), rhizosphere interactions- pounds with pharmaceutical and industrial relevance using plant­bacteria symbiosis is energy efficient

  8. Assemblage and interaction structure of the anemonefish-anemone mutualism across the Manado

    E-print Network

    Northampton, University of

    Assemblage and interaction structure of the anemonefish-anemone mutualism across the Manado region of anemonefish and sea anemones--allows us to test different hypotheses focused on the obligate mutualism between specialist. Keywords Coral reef fish . Anemone . Symbiosis . Mutualism . Interaction structure . Nestedness

  9. Piscivore-Prey Fish Interactions: Mechanisms behind Diurnal Patterns in Prey Selectivity in Brown and Clear Water

    PubMed Central

    Ranåker, Lynn; Persson, Jens; Jönsson, Mikael; Nilsson, P. Anders; Brönmark, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Environmental change may affect predator-prey interactions in lakes through deterioration of visual conditions affecting foraging success of visually oriented predators. Environmental change in lakes includes an increase in humic matter causing browner water and reduced visibility, affecting the behavioural performance of both piscivores and prey. We studied diurnal patterns of prey selection in piscivorous pikeperch (Sander lucioperca) in both field and laboratory investigations. In the field we estimated prey selectivity and prey availability during day and night in a clear and a brown water lake. Further, prey selectivity during day and night conditions was studied in the laboratory where we manipulated optical conditions (humic matter content) of the water. Here, we also studied the behaviours of piscivores and prey, focusing on foraging-cycle stages such as number of interests and attacks by the pikeperch as well as the escape distance of the prey fish species. Analyses of gut contents from the field study showed that pikeperch selected perch (Perca fluviatilis) over roach (Rutilus rutilus) prey in both lakes during the day, but changed selectivity towards roach in both lakes at night. These results were corroborated in the selectivity experiments along a brown-water gradient in day and night light conditions. However, a change in selectivity from perch to roach was observed when the optical condition was heavily degraded, from either brown-stained water or light intensity. At longer visual ranges, roach initiated escape at distances greater than pikeperch attack distances, whereas perch stayed inactive making pikeperch approach and attack at the closest range possible. Roach anti-predatory behaviour decreased in deteriorated visual conditions, altering selectivity patterns. Our results highlight the importance of investigating both predator and prey responses to visibility conditions in order to understand the effects of degrading optical conditions on piscivore-prey interaction strength and thereby ecosystem responses to brownification of waters. PMID:25379665

  10. Piscivore-prey fish interactions: mechanisms behind diurnal patterns in prey selectivity in brown and clear water.

    PubMed

    Ranåker, Lynn; Persson, Jens; Jönsson, Mikael; Nilsson, P Anders; Brönmark, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Environmental change may affect predator-prey interactions in lakes through deterioration of visual conditions affecting foraging success of visually oriented predators. Environmental change in lakes includes an increase in humic matter causing browner water and reduced visibility, affecting the behavioural performance of both piscivores and prey. We studied diurnal patterns of prey selection in piscivorous pikeperch (Sander lucioperca) in both field and laboratory investigations. In the field we estimated prey selectivity and prey availability during day and night in a clear and a brown water lake. Further, prey selectivity during day and night conditions was studied in the laboratory where we manipulated optical conditions (humic matter content) of the water. Here, we also studied the behaviours of piscivores and prey, focusing on foraging-cycle stages such as number of interests and attacks by the pikeperch as well as the escape distance of the prey fish species. Analyses of gut contents from the field study showed that pikeperch selected perch (Perca fluviatilis) over roach (Rutilus rutilus) prey in both lakes during the day, but changed selectivity towards roach in both lakes at night. These results were corroborated in the selectivity experiments along a brown-water gradient in day and night light conditions. However, a change in selectivity from perch to roach was observed when the optical condition was heavily degraded, from either brown-stained water or light intensity. At longer visual ranges, roach initiated escape at distances greater than pikeperch attack distances, whereas perch stayed inactive making pikeperch approach and attack at the closest range possible. Roach anti-predatory behaviour decreased in deteriorated visual conditions, altering selectivity patterns. Our results highlight the importance of investigating both predator and prey responses to visibility conditions in order to understand the effects of degrading optical conditions on piscivore-prey interaction strength and thereby ecosystem responses to brownification of waters. PMID:25379665

  11. Control of microbial communities by the macrofauna: a sensitive interaction in the context of extreme summer temperatures?

    PubMed

    Viergutz, Carsten; Kathol, Marcel; Norf, Helge; Arndt, Hartmut; Weitere, Markus

    2007-02-01

    Climate models predict an increasing frequency of extremely hot summer events in the northern hemisphere for the near future. We hypothesised that microbial grazing by the metazoan macrofauna is an interaction that becomes unbalanced at high temperatures due to the different development of the grazing rates of the metazoans and the growth rates of the microbial community with increasing temperature. In order to test this hypothesis, we performed grazing experiments in which we measured the impact of increasing temperatures on the development of the grazing rates of riverine mussels in relation to the growth rates of a unicellular prey community (a natural heterotrophic flagellate community from a large river). In a first experimental series using Corbicula fluminea as a grazer and under the addition of a carbon source (yeast extract), the increase of the prey's growth rates was considerably stronger than that of the predator's grazing rates when temperatures were increased from 19 to over 25 degrees C. This was also the outcome when the mussels had been acclimatized to warm temperatures. Hereafter, specific experiments with natural river water at temperatures of 25 and 30 degrees C were performed. Again, a strong decrease of the mussels' grazing rates in relation to the flagellate growth rates with increasing temperature occurred for two mussel species (C. fluminea and Dreissena polymorpha). When performing the same experiment using a benthic microbial predator community (biofilms dominated by ciliates) instead of the benthic mussels, an increase of the grazing rates relative to the growth rates with temperature could be observed. Our data suggest that predator-prey interactions (between metazoans and microbes) that are balanced at moderate temperatures could become unbalanced at high temperatures. This could have significant effects on the structure and function of microbial communities in light of the predicted increasing frequency of summer heat waves. PMID:16964501

  12. The medicago genome provides insight into evolution of rhizobial symbiosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Medicago truncatula is an excellent model for the study of legume-specific biology, especially endosymbiotic interactions with bacteria and fungi. This paper describes the sequence of the euchromatic portion of the M. truncatula genome based on a recently completed BAC-based assembly supplemented by...

  13. Nonredundant Regulation of Rice Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis by Two Members of the PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER1 Gene Family[W

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shu-Yi; Grønlund, Mette; Jakobsen, Iver; Grotemeyer, Marianne Suter; Rentsch, Doris; Miyao, Akio; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Kumar, Chellian Santhosh; Sundaresan, Venkatesan; Salamin, Nicolas; Catausan, Sheryl; Mattes, Nicolas; Heuer, Sigrid; Paszkowski, Uta

    2012-01-01

    Pi acquisition of crops via arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is becoming increasingly important due to limited high-grade rock Pi reserves and a demand for environmentally sustainable agriculture. Here, we show that 70% of the overall Pi acquired by rice (Oryza sativa) is delivered via the symbiotic route. To better understand this pathway, we combined genetic, molecular, and physiological approaches to determine the specific functions of two symbiosis-specific members of the PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER1 (PHT1) gene family from rice, ORYsa;PHT1;11 (PT11) and ORYsa;PHT1;13 (PT13). The PT11 lineage of proteins from mono- and dicotyledons is most closely related to homologs from the ancient moss, indicating an early evolutionary origin. By contrast, PT13 arose in the Poaceae, suggesting that grasses acquired a particular strategy for the acquisition of symbiotic Pi. Surprisingly, mutations in either PT11 or PT13 affected the development of the symbiosis, demonstrating that both genes are important for AM symbiosis. For symbiotic Pi uptake, however, only PT11 is necessary and sufficient. Consequently, our results demonstrate that mycorrhizal rice depends on the AM symbiosis to satisfy its Pi demands, which is mediated by a single functional Pi transporter, PT11. PMID:23073651

  14. Transcript profiling coupled with spatial expression analyses reveals genes involved in distinct developmental stages of an arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyuan; Blaylock, Laura A; Endre, Gabriella; Cho, Jennifer; Town, Christopher D; VandenBosch, Kathryn A; Harrison, Maria J

    2003-09-01

    The formation of symbiotic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is a phenomenon common to the majority of vascular flowering plants. Here, we used cDNA arrays to examine transcript profiles in Medicago truncatula roots during the development of an AM symbiosis with Glomus versiforme and during growth under differing phosphorus nutrient regimes. Three percent of the genes examined showed significant changes in transcript levels during the development of the symbiosis. Most genes showing increased transcript levels in mycorrhizal roots showed no changes in response to high phosphorus, suggesting that alterations in transcript levels during symbiosis were a consequence of the AM fungus rather than a secondary effect of improved phosphorus nutrition. Among the mycorrhiza-induced genes, two distinct temporal expression patterns were evident. Members of one group showed an increase in transcripts during the initial period of contact between the symbionts and a subsequent decrease as the symbiosis developed. Defense- and stress-response genes were a significant component of this group. Genes in the second group showed a sustained increase in transcript levels that correlated with the colonization of the root system. The latter group contained a significant proportion of new genes similar to components of signal transduction pathways, suggesting that novel signaling pathways are activated during the development of the symbiosis. Analysis of the spatial expression patterns of two mycorrhiza-induced genes revealed distinct expression patterns consistent with the hypothesis that gene expression in mycorrhizal roots is signaled by both cell-autonomous and cell-nonautonomous signals. PMID:12953114

  15. Marine microbial symbiosis heats up: the phylogenetic and functional response of a sponge holobiont to thermal stress

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lu; Liu, Michael; Simister, Rachel; Webster, Nicole S; Thomas, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale mortality of marine invertebrates is a major global concern for ocean ecosystems and many sessile, reef-building animals, such as sponges and corals, are experiencing significant declines through temperature-induced disease and bleaching. The health and survival of marine invertebrates is often dependent on intimate symbiotic associations with complex microbial communities, yet we have a very limited understanding of the detailed biology and ecology of both the host and the symbiont community in response to environmental stressors, such as elevated seawater temperatures. Here, we use the ecologically important sponge Rhopaloeides odorabile as a model to explore the changes in symbiosis during the development of temperature-induced necrosis. Expression profiling of the sponge host was examined in conjunction with the phylogenetic and functional structure and the expression profile of the symbiont community. Elevated temperature causes an immediate stress response in both the host and symbiont community, including reduced expression of functions that mediate their partnership. Disruption to nutritional interdependence and molecular interactions during early heat stress further destabilizes the holobiont, ultimately leading to the loss of archetypal sponge symbionts and the introduction of new microorganisms that have functional and expression profiles consistent with a scavenging lifestyle, a lack virulence functions and a high growth rate. Previous models have postulated various mechanisms of mortality and disease in marine invertebrates. Our study suggests that interruption of symbiotic interactions is a major determinant for mortality in marine sessile invertebrates. High symbiont specialization and low functional redundancy, thus make these holobionts extremely vulnerable to environmental perturbations, including climate change. PMID:23283017

  16. SYMBIOSIS BETWEEN AN ALPHEID SHRIMP AND A XANTHOID CRAB IN SALT MARSHES OF MID-ATLANTIC STATES, U.S.A.

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    SYMBIOSIS BETWEEN AN ALPHEID SHRIMP AND A XANTHOID CRAB IN SALT MARSHES OF MID-ATLANTIC STATES, U snapping shrimp (Alpheus heterochaelis) participates in a symbiosis with the black-clawed mud crab.S.A. We surveyed eight mid-Atlantic salt marshes and found that 11% of occupied crab burrows (n ¼ 1042

  17. Spatial Heterogeneity in the Strength of Plant-Herbivore Interactions under Predation Risk: The Tale of Bison Foraging in Wolf Country

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Léa; Fortin, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in the strength of trophic interactions is a fundamental property of food web spatial dynamics. The feeding effort of herbivores should reflect adaptive decisions that only become rewarding when foraging gains exceed 1) the metabolic costs, 2) the missed opportunity costs of not foraging elsewhere, and 3) the foraging costs of anti-predator behaviour. Two aspects of these costs remain largely unexplored: the link between the strength of plant-herbivore interactions and the spatial scale of food-quality assessment, and the predator-prey spatial game. We modeled the foraging effort of free-ranging plains bison (Bison bison bison) in winter, within a mosaic of discrete meadows. Spatial patterns of bison herbivory were largely driven by a search for high net energy gains and, to a lesser degree, by the spatial game with grey wolves (Canis lupus). Bison decreased local feeding effort with increasing metabolic and missed opportunity costs. Bison herbivory was most consistent with a broad-scale assessment of food patch quality, i.e., bison grazed more intensively in patches with a low missed opportunity cost relative to other patches available in the landscape. Bison and wolves had a higher probability of using the same meadows than expected randomly. This co-occurrence indicates wolves are ahead in the spatial game they play with bison. Wolves influenced bison foraging at fine scale, as bison tended to consume less biomass at each feeding station when in meadows where the risk of a wolf's arrival was relatively high. Also, bison left more high-quality vegetation in large than small meadows. This behavior does not maximize their energy intake rate, but is consistent with bison playing a shell game with wolves. Our assessment of bison foraging in a natural setting clarifies the complex nature of plant-herbivore interactions under predation risk, and reveals how spatial patterns in herbivory emerge from multi-scale landscape heterogeneity. PMID:24039909

  18. Symbiosis and the social network of higher plants.

    PubMed

    Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Volkening, Jeremy D; Sussman, Michael R; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2013-02-01

    In the Internet era, communicating with friends and colleagues via social networks constitutes a significant proportion of our daily activities. Similarly animals and plants also interact with many organisms, some of which are pathogens and do no good for the plant, while others are beneficial symbionts. Almost all plants indulge in developing social networks with microbes, in particular with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, and emerging evidence indicates that most employ an ancient and widespread central 'social media' pathway made of signaling molecules within what is called the SYM pathway. Some plants, like legumes, are particularly active recruiters of friends, as they have established very sophisticated and beneficial interactions with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, also via the SYM pathway. Interestingly, many members of the Brassicaceae, including the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, seem to have removed themselves from this ancestral social network and lost the ability to engage in mutually favorable interactions with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Despite these generalizations, recent studies exploring the root microbiota of A. thaliana have found that in natural conditions, A. thaliana roots are colonized by many different bacterial species and therefore may be using different and probably more recent 'social media' for these interactions. In general, recent advances in the understanding of such molecular machinery required for plant-symbiont associations are being obtained using high throughput genomic profiling strategies including transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics. The crucial mechanistic understanding that such data reveal may provide the infrastructure for future efforts to genetically manipulate crop social networks for our own food and fiber needs. PMID:23246268

  19. Microbial Symbiosis: In Sickness and in Health In this special issue, we explore the theme of symbiosis

    E-print Network

    Ruby, Edward G.

    challenging to distinguish. One of the hallmarks of the lives of symbiotic bacteria is the diversity 2008 in San Diego, CA. The core principle govern- ing symbiotic interactions is adaptation, in both for most bacteria can make the distinction between adaptation of the individual and the population

  20. An insect pathogenic symbiosis between a Caenorhabditis and Serratia

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Julie; Cooper, Vaughn; Thomas, W. Kelley

    2011-01-01

    We described an association between a strain of the nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae, i.e. KT0001, and the bacteria Serratia sp. SCBI (South African Caenorhabditis briggsae isolate), which was able to kill the insect Galleria (G. mellonella). Here we show that the Serratia sp. SCBI lines the gut of the nematode, similar to the Heterorhabditis-Photorhabdus complex, indicating that the association is possibly internal. We also expand on the relevance of this tripartite, i.e. insect-nematode-bacteria, interaction in the broader evolutionary context and Caenorhabditis natural history. PMID:21389770

  1. Host/Microbe Interactions Revealed Through "Omics" in the Symbiosis Between the Hawaiian Bobtail Squid

    E-print Network

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    the innate immune system and symbiotic bacteria (McFall-Ngai, 2002, 2008: Nyholm and McFall- Ngai, 2004 by the innate immune system of the host, and a diel rhythm that helps regulate the symbiont population. We also

  2. ESPM131 Other Symbiotic Interacts S06 Reminder about definition of symbiosis

    E-print Network

    Bruns, Tom

    of vascular plants are host to this fungus in Australia Gaeumannomyces graminis (Take-all decline) life cycle are lichenized! (Lutzoni et al. 2001) Algae ­ about 100 "species" of photobionts Trebouxia green alga, or Nostoc

  3. Mutual Parasitism and Symbiosis: Interaction between Media Professionals and Sources with a Stake in Education Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Mike

    This paper explores ways in which the press influences the generation and implementation of education policy. An associated purpose was to conceptualize an education policy that incorporates the media's role. The paper is divided into four parts. First, it outlines the details of the research design and the conceptual framework for the study. It…

  4. Polyester synthesis genes associated with stress resistance are involved in an insect–bacterium symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Won, Yeo Jin; Nikoh, Naruo; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Han, Sang Heum; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Rhee, Young Ha; Park, Ha Young; Kwon, Jeong Yun; Kurokawa, Kenji; Dohmae, Naoshi; Fukatsu, Takema; Lee, Bok Luel

    2013-01-01

    Many bacteria accumulate granules of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) within their cells, which confer resistance to nutritional depletion and other environmental stresses. Here, we report an unexpected involvement of the bacterial endocellular storage polymer, PHA, in an insect–bacterium symbiotic association. The bean bug Riptortus pedestris harbors a beneficial and specific gut symbiont of the ?-proteobacterial genus Burkholderia, which is orally acquired by host nymphs from the environment every generation and easily cultivable and genetically manipulatable. Biochemical and cytological comparisons between symbiotic and cultured Burkholderia detected more PHA granules consisting of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate and associated phasin (PhaP) protein in the symbiotic Burkholderia. Among major PHA synthesis genes, phaB and phaC were disrupted by homologous recombination together with the phaP gene, whereby ?phaB, ?phaC, and ?phaP mutants were generated. Both in culture and in symbiosis, accumulation of PHA granules was strongly suppressed in ?phaB and ?phaC, but only moderately in ?phaP. In symbiosis, the host insects infected with ?phaB and ?phaC exhibited significantly lower symbiont densities and smaller body sizes. These deficient phenotypes associated with ?phaB and ?phaC were restored by complementation of the mutants with plasmids encoding a functional phaB/phaC gene. Retention analysis of the plasmids revealed positive selection acting on the functional phaB/phaC in symbiosis. These results indicate that the PHA synthesis genes of the Burkholderia symbiont are required for normal symbiotic association with the Riptortus host. In vitro culturing analyses confirmed vulnerability of the PHA gene mutants to environmental stresses, suggesting that PHA may play a role in resisting stress under symbiotic conditions. PMID:23757494

  5. The genus Pseudovibrio contains metabolically versatile bacteria adapted for symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Bondarev, Vladimir; Richter, Michael; Romano, Stefano; Piel, Jörn; Schwedt, Anne; Schulz-Vogt, Heide N

    2013-01-01

    The majority of strains belonging to the genus Pseudovibrio have been isolated from marine invertebrates such as tunicates, corals and particularly sponges, but the physiology of these bacteria is poorly understood. In this study, we analyse for the first time the genomes of two Pseudovibrio strains – FO-BEG1 and JE062. The strain FO-BEG1 is a required symbiont of a cultivated Beggiatoa strain, a sulfide-oxidizing, autotrophic bacterium, which was initially isolated from a coral. Strain JE062 was isolated from a sponge. The presented data show that both strains are generalistic bacteria capable of importing and oxidizing a wide range of organic and inorganic compounds to meet their carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous and energy requirements under both, oxic and anoxic conditions. Several physiological traits encoded in the analysed genomes were verified in laboratory experiments with both isolates. Besides the versatile metabolic abilities of both Pseudovibrio strains, our study reveals a number of open reading frames and gene clusters in the genomes that seem to be involved in symbiont–host interactions. Both Pseudovibrio strains have the genomic potential to attach to host cells, interact with the eukaryotic cell machinery, produce secondary metabolites and supply the host with cofactors. PMID:23601235

  6. Symbiosis insights through metagenomic analysis of a microbialconsortium

    SciTech Connect

    Woyke, Tanja; Teeling, Hanno; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Hunteman,Marcel; Richter, Michael; Gloeckner, Frank Oliver; Boffelli, Dario; Barry, Kerrie W.; Shapiro, Harris J.; Anderson, Iain J.; Szeto, Ernest; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mussmann, Marc; Amann, Rudolf; Bergin, Claudia; Ruehland, Caroline; Rubin, Edward M.; Dubilier, Nicole

    2006-09-01

    Symbioses between bacteria and eukaryotes are ubiquitous, yet our understanding of the interactions driving these associations is hampered by our inability to cultivate most host-associated microbes. Here, we used a metagenomic approach to describe four co-occurring symbionts from the marine oligochaete Olavius algarvensis, a worm lacking a mouth, gut, and nephridia. Shotgun sequencing and metabolic pathway reconstruction revealed that the symbionts are sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria, all of which are capable of carbon fixation, providing the host with multiple sources of nutrition. Molecular evidence for the uptake and recycling of worm waste products by the symbionts suggests how the worm could eliminate its excretory system, an adaptation unique among annelid worms. We propose a model which describes how the versatile metabolism within this symbiotic consortium provides the host with an optimal energy supply as it shuttles between the upper oxic and lower anoxic coastal sediments which it inhabits.

  7. Enhanced production of steviol glycosides in mycorrhizal plants: A concerted effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis on transcription of biosynthetic genes.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Shantanu; Upadhyay, Shivangi; Singh, Ved Pal; Kapoor, Rupam

    2015-04-01

    Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni) produces steviol glycosides (SGs) - stevioside (stev) and rebaudioside-A (reb-A) that are valued as low calorie sweeteners. Inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) augments SGs production, though the effect of this interaction on SGs biosynthesis has not been studied at molecular level. In this study transcription profiles of eleven key genes grouped under three stages of the SGs biosynthesis pathway were compared. The transcript analysis showed upregulation of genes encoding 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway enzymes viz.,1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phospate synthase (DXS), 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phospate reductoisomerase (DXR) and 2-C-methyl-D-erytrithol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase (MDS) in mycorrhizal (M) plants. Zn and Mn are imperative for the expression of MDS and their enhanced uptake in M plants could be responsible for the increased transcription of MDS. Furthermore, in the second stage of SGs biosynthesis pathway, mycorrhization enhanced the transcription of copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPPS) and kaurenoic acid hydroxylase (KAH). Their expression is decisive for SGs biosynthesis as CPPS regulates flow of metabolites towards synthesis of kaurenoid precursors and KAH directs these towards steviol synthesis instead of gibberellins. In the third stage glucosylation of steviol to reb-A by four specific uridine diphosphate (UDP)-dependent glycosyltransferases (UGTs) occurs. While higher transcription of all the three characterized UGTs in M plants explains augmented production of SGs; higher transcript levels of UGT76G1, specifically improved reb-A to stev ratio implying increased sweetness. The work signifies that AM symbiosis upregulates the transcription of all eleven SGs biosynthesis genes as a result of improved nutrition and enhanced sugar concentration due to increased photosynthesis in M plants. PMID:25734328

  8. Metabolic analysis of Chlorobium chlorochromatii CaD3 reveals clues of the symbiosis in 'Chlorochromatium aggregatum'.

    PubMed

    Cerqueda-García, Daniel; Martínez-Castilla, León P; Falcón, Luisa I; Delaye, Luis

    2014-05-01

    A symbiotic association occurs in 'Chlorochromatium aggregatum', a phototrophic consortium integrated by two species of phylogenetically distant bacteria composed by the green-sulfur Chlorobium chlorochromatii CaD3 epibiont that surrounds a central ?-proteobacterium. The non-motile chlorobia can perform nitrogen and carbon fixation, using sulfide as electron donors for anoxygenic photosynthesis. The consortium can move due to the flagella present in the central ?-protobacterium. Although Chl. chlorochromatii CaD3 is never found as free-living bacteria in nature, previous transcriptomic and proteomic studies have revealed that there are differential transcription patterns between the symbiotic and free-living status of Chl. chlorocromatii CaD3 when grown in laboratory conditions. The differences occur mainly in genes encoding the enzymatic reactions involved in nitrogen and amino acid metabolism. We performed a metabolic reconstruction of Chl. chlorochromatii CaD3 and an in silico analysis of its amino acid metabolism using an elementary flux modes approach (EFM). Our study suggests that in symbiosis, Chl. chlorochromatii CaD3 is under limited nitrogen conditions where the GS/GOGAT (glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthetase) pathway is actively assimilating ammonia obtained via N2 fixation. In contrast, when free-living, Chl. chlorochromatii CaD3 is in a condition of nitrogen excess and ammonia is assimilated by the alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) pathway. We postulate that 'Chlorochromatium aggregatum' originated from a parasitic interaction where the N2 fixation capacity of the chlorobia would be enhanced by injection of 2-oxoglutarate from the ?-proteobacterium via the periplasm. This consortium would have the advantage of motility, which is fundamental to a phototrophic bacterium, and the syntrophy of nitrogen and carbon sources. PMID:24285361

  9. The Independent Acquisition of Plant Root Nitrogen-Fixing Symbiosis in Fabids Recruited the Same Genetic Pathway for Nodule Organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Svistoonoff, Sergio; Benabdoun, Faiza Meriem; Nambiar-Veetil, Mathish; Imanishi, Leandro; Vaissayre, Virginie; Cesari, Stella; Diagne, Nathalie; Hocher, Valérie; de Billy, Françoise; Bonneau, Jocelyne; Wall, Luis; Ykhlef, Nadia; Rosenberg, Charles; Bogusz, Didier; Franche, Claudine; Gherbi, Hassen

    2013-01-01

    Only species belonging to the Fabid clade, limited to four classes and ten families of Angiosperms, are able to form nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses (RNS) with soil bacteria. This concerns plants of the legume family (Fabaceae) and Parasponia (Cannabaceae) associated with the Gram-negative proteobacteria collectively called rhizobia and actinorhizal plants associated with the Gram-positive actinomycetes of the genus Frankia. Calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is a key component of the common signaling pathway leading to both rhizobial and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses (AM) and plays a central role in cross-signaling between root nodule organogenesis and infection processes. Here, we show that CCaMK is also needed for successful actinorhiza formation and interaction with AM fungi in the actinorhizal tree Casuarina glauca and is also able to restore both nodulation and AM symbioses in a Medicago truncatula ccamk mutant. Besides, we expressed auto-active CgCCaMK lacking the auto-inhibitory/CaM domain in two actinorhizal species: C. glauca (Casuarinaceae), which develops an intracellular infection pathway, and Discaria trinervis (Rhamnaceae) which is characterized by an ancestral intercellular infection mechanism. In both species, we found induction of nodulation independent of Frankia similar to response to the activation of CCaMK in the rhizobia-legume symbiosis and conclude that the regulation of actinorhiza organogenesis is conserved regardless of the infection mode. It has been suggested that rhizobial and actinorhizal symbioses originated from a common ancestor with several independent evolutionary origins. Our findings are consistent with the recruitment of a similar genetic pathway governing rhizobial and Frankia nodule organogenesis. PMID:23741336

  10. Geometric factors influencing the diet of vertebrate predators in marine and terrestrial environments

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Chris; Codron, Daryl; Scofield, Conrad; Clauss, Marcus; Bielby, Jon; Enquist, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Predator–prey relationships are vital to ecosystem function and there is a need for greater predictive understanding of these interactions. We develop a geometric foraging model predicting minimum prey size scaling in marine and terrestrial vertebrate predators taking into account habitat dimensionality and biological traits. Our model predicts positive predator–prey size relationships on land but negative relationships in the sea. To test the model, we compiled data on diets of 794 predators (mammals, snakes, sharks and rays). Consistent with predictions, both terrestrial endotherm and ectotherm predators have significantly positive predator–prey size relationships. Marine predators, however, exhibit greater variation. Some of the largest predators specialise on small invertebrates while others are large vertebrate specialists. Prey–predator mass ratios were generally higher for ectothermic than endothermic predators, although dietary patterns were similar. Model-based simulations of predator–prey relationships were consistent with observed relationships, suggesting that our approach provides insights into both trends and diversity in predator–prey interactions. PMID:25265992

  11. Geometric factors influencing the diet of vertebrate predators in marine and terrestrial environments.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Chris; Codron, Daryl; Scofield, Conrad; Clauss, Marcus; Bielby, Jon

    2014-12-01

    Predator-prey relationships are vital to ecosystem function and there is a need for greater predictive understanding of these interactions. We develop a geometric foraging model predicting minimum prey size scaling in marine and terrestrial vertebrate predators taking into account habitat dimensionality and biological traits. Our model predicts positive predator-prey size relationships on land but negative relationships in the sea. To test the model, we compiled data on diets of 794 predators (mammals, snakes, sharks and rays). Consistent with predictions, both terrestrial endotherm and ectotherm predators have significantly positive predator-prey size relationships. Marine predators, however, exhibit greater variation. Some of the largest predators specialise on small invertebrates while others are large vertebrate specialists. Prey-predator mass ratios were generally higher for ectothermic than endothermic predators, although dietary patterns were similar. Model-based simulations of predator-prey relationships were consistent with observed relationships, suggesting that our approach provides insights into both trends and diversity in predator-prey interactions. PMID:25265992

  12. Specialized cheating of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis by an epiparasitic liverwort.

    PubMed Central

    Bidartondo, Martin I; Bruns, Thomas D; Weiss, Michael; Sérgio, Cecília; Read, David J

    2003-01-01

    Many non-photosynthetic vascular plants in 10 diverse families obtain all of their carbon from fungi, but in most cases the fungi and the ultimate sources of carbon are unknown. In a few cases, such plants have been shown to be epiparasitic because they obtain carbon from neighbouring green plants through shared mycorrhizal fungi. In all such cases, the epiparasitic plants have been found to specialize upon narrow lineages of ecto- or arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Here we show that a non-vascular plant, the non-photosynthetic liverwort Cryptothallus mirabilis, is epiparasitic and is specialized on Tulasnella species that form ectomycorrhizae with surrounding trees at four locations in England, France and Portugal. By using microcosm experiments we show that the interaction with Tulasnella is necessary for growth of Cryptothallus, and by using labelling experiments we show that (14)CO(2) provided to birch seedlings is transferred to Cryptothallus by Tulasnella. This is one of the first documented cases of epiparasitism by a non-vascular plant and of ectomycorrhizal formation by Tulasnella. These results broaden the emerging association between epiparasitism and mycorrhizal specialization into a new class of plants and a new order of fungi. PMID:12737662

  13. A biological market analysis of the plant-mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Gregory A K; Kiers, E Toby; Gardner, Andy; West, Stuart A

    2014-09-01

    It has been argued that cooperative behavior in the plant-mycorrhizal mutualism resembles trade in a market economy and can be understood using economic tools. Here, we assess the validity of this "biological market" analogy by investigating whether a market mechanism--that is, competition between partners over the price at which they provide goods--could be the outcome of natural selection. Then, we consider the conditions under which this market mechanism is sufficient to maintain mutualistic trade. We find that: (i) as in a market, individuals are favored to divide resources among trading partners in direct relation to the relative amount of resources received, termed linear proportional discrimination; (ii) mutualistic trade is more likely to be favored when individuals are able to interact with more partners of both species, and when there is a greater relative difference between the species in their ability to directly acquire different resources; (iii) if trade is favored, then either one or both species is favored to give up acquiring one resource directly, and vice versa. We then formulate testable predictions as to how environmental changes and coevolved responses of plants and mycorrhizal fungi will influence plant fitness (crop yields) in agricultural ecosystems. PMID:24909843

  14. An original mode of symbiosis in open ocean plankton.

    PubMed

    Decelle, Johan; Probert, Ian; Bittner, Lucie; Desdevises, Yves; Colin, Sébastien; de Vargas, Colomban; Galí, Martí; Simó, Rafel; Not, Fabrice

    2012-10-30

    Symbiotic relationships are widespread in nature and are fundamental for ecosystem functioning and the evolution of biodiversity. In marine environments, photosymbiosis with microalgae is best known for sustaining benthic coral reef ecosystems. Despite the importance of oceanic microbiota in global ecology and biogeochemical cycles, symbioses are poorly characterized in open ocean plankton. Here, we describe a widespread symbiotic association between Acantharia biomineralizing microorganisms that are abundant grazers in plankton communities, and members of the haptophyte genus Phaeocystis that are cosmopolitan bloom-forming microalgae. Cophylogenetic analyses demonstrate that symbiont biogeography, rather than host taxonomy, is the main determinant of the association. Molecular dating places the origin of this photosymbiosis in the Jurassic (ca. 175 Mya), a period of accentuated marine oligotrophy. Measurements of intracellular dimethylated sulfur indicate that the host likely profits from antioxidant protection provided by the symbionts as an adaptation to life in transparent oligotrophic surface waters. In contrast to terrestrial and marine symbioses characterized to date, the symbiont reported in this association is extremely abundant and ecologically active in its free-living phase. In the vast and barren open ocean, partnership with photosymbionts that have extensive free-living populations is likely an advantageous strategy for hosts that rely on such interactions. Discovery of the Acantharia-Phaeocystis association contrasts with the widely held view that symbionts are specialized organisms that are rare and ecologically passive outside the host. PMID:23071304

  15. Symbiosis Teaching Workshop -5th International Symbiosis Society Congress, Vienna, August 4-10, 2006 LL A BA B AA C T I V I T YC T I V I T Y

    E-print Network

    Carrapiço, Francisco

    the cyanobiont is transferred between generations as akinete inocula. The presence of Anabaena throughout Figure 3. Anabaena azollae: heterocyst (a); vegetative cell (b); polar nodules (c). Azolla filiculoides: trichomes (d). Azolla is in permanent symbiosis with the nitrogen fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena azollae

  16. Genome of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus provides insight into the oldest plant symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Tisserant, Emilie; Malbreil, Mathilde; Kuo, Alan; Kohler, Annegret; Symeonidi, Aikaterini; Balestrini, Raffaella; Charron, Philippe; Duensing, Nina; Frei dit Frey, Nicolas; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne; Gilbert, Luz B.; Handa, Yoshihiro; Herr, Joshua R.; Hijri, Mohamed; Koul, Raman; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Krajinski, Franziska; Lammers, Peter J.; Masclaux, Frederic G.; Murat, Claude; Morin, Emmanuelle; Ndikumana, Steve; Pagni, Marco; Petitpierre, Denis; Requena, Natalia; Rosikiewicz, Pawel; Riley, Rohan; Saito, Katsuharu; San Clemente, Hélène; Shapiro, Harris; van Tuinen, Diederik; Bécard, Guillaume; Bonfante, Paola; Paszkowski, Uta; Shachar-Hill, Yair Y.; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Young, J. Peter W.; Sanders, Ian R.; Henrissat, Bernard; Rensing, Stefan A.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Corradi, Nicolas; Roux, Christophe; Martin, Francis

    2013-01-01

    The mutualistic symbiosis involving Glomeromycota, a distinctive phylum of early diverging Fungi, is widely hypothesized to have promoted the evolution of land plants during the middle Paleozoic. These arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) perform vital functions in the phosphorus cycle that are fundamental to sustainable crop plant productivity. The unusual biological features of AMF have long fascinated evolutionary biologists. The coenocytic hyphae host a community of hundreds of nuclei and reproduce clonally through large multinucleated spores. It has been suggested that the AMF maintain a stable assemblage of several different genomes during the life cycle, but this genomic organization has been questioned. Here we introduce the 153-Mb haploid genome of Rhizophagus irregularis and its repertoire of 28,232 genes. The observed low level of genome polymorphism (0.43 SNP per kb) is not consistent with the occurrence of multiple, highly diverged genomes. The expansion of mating-related genes suggests the existence of cryptic sex-related processes. A comparison of gene categories confirms that R. irregularis is close to the Mucoromycotina. The AMF obligate biotrophy is not explained by genome erosion or any related loss of metabolic complexity in central metabolism, but is marked by a lack of genes encoding plant cell wall-degrading enzymes and of genes involved in toxin and thiamine synthesis. A battery of mycorrhiza-induced secreted proteins is expressed in symbiotic tissues. The present comprehensive repertoire of R. irregularis genes provides a basis for future research on symbiosis-related mechanisms in Glomeromycota. PMID:24277808

  17. Medicago sativa - Sinorhizobium meliloti Symbiosis Promotes the Bioaccumulation of Zinc in Nodulated Roots.

    PubMed

    Zribi, Kais; Nouairi, Issam; Slama, Ines; Talbi-Zribi, Ons; Mhadhbi, Haythem

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated effects of Zn supply on germination, growth, inorganic solutes (Zn, Ca, Fe, and Mg) partitioning and nodulation of Medicago sativa This plant was cultivated with and without Zn (2 mM). Treatments were plants without (control) and with Zn tolerant strain (S532), Zn intolerant strain (S112) and 2 mM urea nitrogen fertilisation. Results showed that M. sativa germinates at rates of 50% at 2 mM Zn. For plants given nitrogen fertilisation, Zn increased plant biomass production. When grown with symbionts, Zn supply had no effect on nodulation. Moreover, plants with S112 showed a decrease of shoot and roots biomasses. However, in symbiosis with S532, an increase of roots biomass was observed. Plants in symbiosis with S. meliloti accumulated more Zn in their roots than nitrogen fertilised plants. Zn supply results in an increase of Ca concentration in roots of fertilised nitrogen plants. However, under Zn supply, Fe concentration decreased in roots and increased in nodules of plants with S112. Zn supply showed contrasting effects on Mg concentrations for plants with nitrogen fertilisation (increase) and plants with S112 (decrease). The capacity of M. sativa to accumulate Zn in their nodulated roots encouraged its use in phytostabilisation processes. PMID:25174424

  18. Intracellular catalytic domain of symbiosis receptor kinase hyperactivates spontaneous nodulation in absence of rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sudip; Dutta, Ayan; Bhattacharya, Avisek; DasGupta, Maitrayee

    2014-12-01

    Symbiosis Receptor Kinase (SYMRK), a member of the Nod factor signaling pathway, is indispensible for both nodule organogenesis and intracellular colonization of symbionts in rhizobia-legume symbiosis. Here, we show that the intracellular kinase domain of a SYMRK (SYMRK-kd) but not its inactive or full-length version leads to hyperactivation of the nodule organogenic program in Medicago truncatula TR25 (symrk knockout mutant) in the absence of rhizobia. Spontaneous nodulation in TR25/SYMRK-kd was 6-fold higher than rhizobia-induced nodulation in TR25/SYMRK roots. The merged clusters of spontaneous nodules indicated that TR25 roots in the presence of SYMRK-kd have overcome the control over both nodule numbers and their spatial position. In the presence of rhizobia, SYMRK-kd could rescue the epidermal infection processes in TR25, but colonization of symbionts in the nodule interior was significantly compromised. In summary, ligand-independent deregulated activation of SYMRK hyperactivates nodule organogenesis in the absence of rhizobia, but its ectodomain is required for proper symbiont colonization. PMID:25304318

  19. Towards symbiosis in knowledge representation and natural language processing for structuring clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chunhua; Payne, Philip R O; Velez, Mark; Johnson, Stephen B; Bakken, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    The successful adoption by clinicians of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) contained in clinical information systems requires efficient translation of free-text guidelines into computable formats. Natural language processing (NLP) has the potential to improve the efficiency of such translation. However, it is laborious to develop NLP to structure free-text CPGs using existing formal knowledge representations (KR). In response to this challenge, this vision paper discusses the value and feasibility of supporting symbiosis in text-based knowledge acquisition (KA) and KR. We compare two ontologies: (1) an ontology manually created by domain experts for CPG eligibility criteria and (2) an upper-level ontology derived from a semantic pattern-based approach for automatic KA from CPG eligibility criteria text. Then we discuss the strengths and limitations of interweaving KA and NLP for KR purposes and important considerations for achieving the symbiosis of KR and NLP for structuring CPGs to achieve evidence-based clinical practice. PMID:24943582

  20. Effects of nano-ZnO on the agronomically relevant Rhizobium-legume symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu Chu; Fan, Ruimei; Grusak, Michael A; Sherrier, Janine D; Huang, C P

    2014-11-01

    The impact of nano-ZnO (nZnO) on Rhizobium-legume symbiosis was studied with garden pea and its compatible bacterial partner Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841. Exposure of peas to nZnO had no impact on germination, but significantly affected root length. Chronic exposure of plant to nZnO impacted its development by decreasing the number of the first- and the second-order lateral roots, stem length, leaf surface area, and transpiration. The effect of nZnO dissolution on phytotoxicity was also examined. Results showed that Zn(2+) had negative impact on plant development. Exposure of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 to nZnO brought about morphological changes by rendering the microbial cells toward round shape and damaging the bacterial surface. Furthermore, the presence of nZnO in the rhizosphere affected root nodulation, delayed the onset of nitrogen fixation, and caused early senescence of nodules. Attachment of nanoparticles on the root surface and dissolution of Zn(2+) are important factors affecting the phytotocity of nZnO. Hence, the presence of nZnO in the environment is potentially hazardous to the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis system. PMID:25124056