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Sample records for interactions symbiosis predator-prey

  1. Role reversal in a predator-prey interaction.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Garduño, Faustino; Miramontes, Pedro; Marquez-Lago, Tatiana T

    2014-10-01

    Predator-prey relationships are one of the most studied interactions in population ecology. However, little attention has been paid to the possibility of role exchange between species, despite firm field evidence of such phenomena in nature. In this paper, we build a mathematical model capable of reproducing the main phenomenological features of role reversal in a classical system and present results for both the temporal and spatio-temporal cases. We show that, depending on the choice of parameters, our role-reversal dynamical system exhibits excitable-like behaviour, generating waves of species' concentrations that propagate through space. Our findings fill a long-standing gap in modelling ecological interactions and can be applicable to better understanding ecological niche shifts and planning of sustainable ecosystems. PMID:26064541

  2. Elevated CO2 Affects Predator-Prey Interactions through Altered Performance

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Bridie J. M.; Domenici, Paolo; McCormick, Mark I.; Watson, Sue-Ann; Munday, Philip L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has shown that exposure to elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) affects how fishes perceive their environment, affecting behavioral and cognitive processes leading to increased prey mortality. However, it is unclear if increased mortality results from changes in the dynamics of predator-prey interactions or due to prey increasing activity levels. Here we demonstrate that ocean pCO2 projected to occur by 2100 significantly effects the interactions of a predator-prey pair of common reef fish: the planktivorous damselfish Pomacentrus amboinensis and the piscivorous dottyback Pseudochromis fuscus. Prey exposed to elevated CO2 (880 µatm) or a present-day control (440 µatm) interacted with similarly exposed predators in a cross-factored design. Predators had the lowest capture success when exposed to elevated CO2 and interacting with prey exposed to present-day CO2. Prey exposed to elevated CO2 had reduced escape distances and longer reaction distances compared to prey exposed to present-day CO2 conditions, but this was dependent on whether the prey was paired with a CO2 exposed predator or not. This suggests that the dynamics of predator-prey interactions under future CO2 environments will depend on the extent to which the interacting species are affected and can adapt to the adverse effects of elevated CO2. PMID:23484032

  3. Predator-prey interactions mediated by prey personality and predator hunting mode.

    PubMed

    Belgrad, Benjamin A; Griffen, Blaine D

    2016-04-13

    Predator-prey interactions are important drivers in structuring ecological communities. However, despite widespread acknowledgement that individual behaviours and predator species regulate ecological processes, studies have yet to incorporate individual behavioural variations in a multipredator system. We quantified a prevalent predator avoidance behaviour to examine the simultaneous roles of prey personality and predator hunting mode in governing predator-prey interactions. Mud crabs, Panopeus herbstii, reduce their activity levels and increase their refuge use in the presence of predator cues. We measured mud crab mortality and consistent individual variations in the strength of this predator avoidance behaviour in the presence of predatory blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, and toadfish, Opsanus tau We found that prey personality and predator species significantly interacted to affect mortality with blue crabs primarily consuming bold mud crabs and toadfish preferentially selecting shy crabs. Additionally, the strength of the predator avoidance behaviour depended upon the predation risk from the predator species. Consequently, the personality composition of populations and predator hunting mode may be valuable predictors of both direct and indirect predator-prey interaction strength. These findings support theories postulating mechanisms for maintaining intraspecies diversity and have broad implications for community dynamics. PMID:27075257

  4. Local genetic adaptation generates latitude-specific effects of warming on predator-prey interactions.

    PubMed

    De Block, Marjan; Pauwels, Kevin; Van Den Broeck, Maarten; De Meester, Luc; Stoks, Robby

    2013-03-01

    Temperature effects on predator-prey interactions are fundamental to better understand the effects of global warming. Previous studies never considered local adaptation of both predators and prey at different latitudes, and ignored the novel population combinations of the same predator-prey species system that may arise because of northward dispersal. We set up a common garden warming experiment to study predator-prey interactions between Ischnura elegans damselfly predators and Daphnia magna zooplankton prey from three source latitudes spanning >1500 km. Damselfly foraging rates showed thermal plasticity and strong latitudinal differences consistent with adaptation to local time constraints. Relative survival was higher at 24 °C than at 20 °C in southern Daphnia and higher at 20 °C than at 24 °C, in northern Daphnia indicating local thermal adaptation of the Daphnia prey. Yet, this thermal advantage disappeared when they were confronted with the damselfly predators of the same latitude, reflecting also a signal of local thermal adaptation in the damselfly predators. Our results further suggest the invasion success of northward moving predators as well as prey to be latitude-specific. We advocate the novel common garden experimental approach using predators and prey obtained from natural temperature gradients spanning the predicted temperature increase in the northern populations as a powerful approach to gain mechanistic insights into how community modules will be affected by global warming. It can be used as a space-for-time substitution to inform how predator-prey interaction may gradually evolve to long-term warming. PMID:23504827

  5. Predator prey interactions of Procambarus clarkii with aquatic macroinvertebrates in single and multiple prey systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Alexandra Marçal; Bandeira, Nuno; Anastácio, Pedro Manuel

    2005-11-01

    Understanding the interspecific interactions of Procambarus clarkii with other aquatic macroinvertebrates will help to unveil the mechanisms and processes underlying biological invasiveness. The purpose of this study was to investigate predator-prey interactions of two ontogenic phases of P. clarkii with native and exotic species of aquatic macroinvertebrates at a single and multiple prey level. We performed laboratory experiments to determine the consumption and the behavioral responses of Chironomus riparius, Physa acuta and Corbicula fluminea to P. clarkii. The presence of P. clarkii significantly affected the abundance of C. riparius and P. acuta, but not of C. fluminea whether prey species were provided singly or simultaneously. The consumption of C. riparius by P. clarkii was higher than P. acuta for both crayfish sizes and situations (single/multiple prey systems) and C. fluminea was never consumed. Physa acuta was the only species that exhibited an anti-predator behavior to P. clarkii. Our results show that P. clarkii can have strong consumptive and trait effects on aquatic macroinvertebrate prey at a single and multiple prey level, resulting in differential impacts on different prey species. This study clarifies some aspects of the predator-prey interactions between P. clarkii and native as well as other exotic macroinvertebrate species that have invaded freshwater biocenosis worldwide.

  6. Predator-Prey Interactions Shape Thermal Patch Use in a Newt Larvae-Dragonfly Nymph Model

    PubMed Central

    Gvoždík, Lumír; Černická, Eva; Van Damme, Raoul

    2013-01-01

    Thermal quality and predation risk are considered important factors influencing habitat patch use in ectothermic prey. However, how the predator’s food requirement and the prey’s necessity to avoid predation interact with their respective thermoregulatory strategies remains poorly understood. The recently developed ‘thermal game model’ predicts that in the face of imminent predation, prey should divide their time equally among a range of thermal patches. In contrast, predators should concentrate their hunting activities towards warmer patches. In this study, we test these predictions in a laboratory setup and an artificial environment that mimics more natural conditions. In both cases, we scored thermal patch use of newt larvae (prey) and free-ranging dragonfly nymphs (predators). Similar effects were seen in both settings. The newt larvae spent less time in the warm patch if dragonfly nymphs were present. The patch use of the dragonfly nymphs did not change as a function of prey availability, even when the nymphs were starved prior to the experiment. Our behavioral observations partially corroborate predictions of the thermal game model. In line with asymmetric fitness pay-offs in predator-prey interactions (the ‘life-dinner’ principle), the prey’s thermal strategy is more sensitive to the presence of predators than vice versa. PMID:23755175

  7. Toxicity tests based on predator-prey and competitive interactions between freshwater macroinvertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, E.J.; Blockwell, S.J.; Pascoe, D.

    1994-12-31

    Simple multi-species toxicity tests based on the predation of Daphnia magna Straus by Hydra oligactis (Pallas) and competition between Gammarus pulex (L.) and Asellus aquaticus (L.) were used to determine the effects of three reference chemicals. Criteria examined included functional responses; time to first captures; handling times (predator/prey systems) and co-existence and growth. The tests which proved most practicable and sensitive (lowest observed effects 0.1, 21, and 80 {micro}g/l for lindane, copper and 3,4 dichloroaniline, respectively) were: (1) predator-prey tests: determining changes in the size-structure of predated D. magna populations and (2) competition tests: measuring the feeding rate of G. pulex competing with A. aquaticus, using a bioassay based on the time-response analysis of the consumption of Artemia salina eggs. The concentration of a chemical which affected particular response criteria was fond to depend on the test system employed. Results of the tests indicated that effects were often not dose-related and that a given criterion could be variously affected by different test concentrations. The complex pattern of responses may be explained in terms of the differential sensitivity of the interacting species and perhaps subtle alteration in strategies. The sensitivity of the bioassay endpoints is compared to those of a range of single species tests, and their value for predicting the impact pollutants may have upon natural freshwater ecosystems is discussed.

  8. Environmental constraints upon locomotion and predator-prey interactions in aquatic organisms: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Domenici, P; Claireaux, G; McKenzie, D J

    2007-11-29

    Environmental constraints in aquatic habitats have become topics of concern to both the scientific community and the public at large. In particular, coastal and freshwater habitats are subject to dramatic variability in various environmental factors, as a result of both natural and anthropogenic processes. The protection and sustainable management of all aquatic habitats requires greater understanding of how environmental constraints influence aquatic organisms. Locomotion and predator-prey interactions are intimately linked and fundamental to the survival of mobile aquatic organisms. This paper summarizes the main points from the review and research articles which comprise the theme issue 'Environmental constraints upon locomotion and predator-prey interactions in aquatic organisms'. The articles explore how natural and anthropogenic factors can constrain these two fundamental activities in a diverse range of organisms from phytoplankton to marine mammals. Some major environmental constraints derive from the intrinsic properties of the fluid and are mechanical in nature, such as viscosity and flow regime. Other constraints derive from direct effects of factors, such as temperature, oxygen content of the water or turbidity, upon the mechanisms underlying the performance of locomotion and predator-prey interactions. The effect of these factors on performance at the tissue and organ level is reflected in constraints upon performance of the whole organism. All these constraints can influence behaviour. Ultimately, they can have an impact on ecological performance. One issue that requires particular attention is how factors such as temperature and oxygen can exert different constraints on the physiology and behaviour of different taxa and the ecological implications of this. Given the multiplicity of constraints, the complexity of their interactions, and the variety of biological levels at which they can act, there is a clear need for integration between the fields of

  9. Gyrokinetic turbulence cascade via predator-prey interactions between different scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Sumire; Gurcan, Ozgur D.

    2015-05-01

    Gyrokinetic simulations in a closed fieldline geometry are presented to explore the physics of nonlinear transfer in plasma turbulence. As spontaneously formed zonal flows and small-scale turbulence demonstrate "predator-prey" dynamics, a particular cascade spectrum emerges. The electrostatic potential and the density spectra appear to be in good agreement with the simple theoretical prediction based on Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation |ϕ˜ k | 2˜|n˜ k | 2∝k-3/(1+k2 ) 2 , with the spectra becoming anisotropic at small scales. The results indicate that the disparate scale interactions, in particular, the refraction and shearing of larger scale eddies by the self-consistent zonal flows, dominate over local interactions, and contrary to the common wisdom, the comprehensive scaling relation is created even within the energy injection region.

  10. Nonadditive impacts of temperature and basal resource availability on predator-prey interactions and phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Zacharia J; Kishida, Osamu

    2015-08-01

    Predicting the impacts of climate change on communities requires understanding how temperature affects predator-prey interactions under different biotic conditions. In cases of size-specific predation, environmental influences on the growth rate of one or both species can determine predation rates. For example, warming increases top-down control of food webs, although this depends on resource availability for prey, as increased resources may allow prey to reach a size refuge. Moreover, because the magnitude of inducible defenses depends on predation rates and resource availability for prey, temperature and resource levels also affect phenotypic plasticity. To examine these issues, we manipulated the presence/absence of predatory Hynobius retardatus salamander larvae and herbivorous Rana pirica tadpoles at two temperatures and three basal resource levels. and measured their morphology, behavior, growth and survival. Prior work has shown that both species express antagonistic plasticity against one another in which salamanders enlarge their gape width and tadpoles increase their body width to reach a size-refuge. We found that increased temperatures increased predation rates, although this was counteracted by high basal resource availability, which further decreased salamander growth. Surprisingly, salamanders caused tadpoles to grow larger and express more extreme defensive phenotypes as resource levels decreased under warming, most likely due to their increased risk of predation. Thus, temperature and resources influenced defensive phenotype expression and its impacts on predator and prey growth by affecting their interaction strength. Our results indicate that basal resource levels can modify the impacts of increased temperatures on predator-prey interactions and its consequences for food webs. PMID:25820751

  11. Predator-prey interactions between blue crabs and ribbed mussels living in clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Junda

    1991-01-01

    Predator-prey interactions between blue crabs ( Callinectes sapidus) and ribbed mussels ( Geukensia demissa) were studied by manipulating different components of mussel clump structure in the laboratory to test their effects on the mussels' susceptibility to crab predation. Mussels with stronger attachment strength or those buried deeper in the sediment suffered lower mortality. Blue crabs showed no significant size selectivity when two size classes of mussles (30-40 and 50-60 mm in shell heights) were offered. When juvenile mussels were attached to adult conspecifics and completely buried in the centres of clumps as in the field, blue crabs did not actively search for them. The crabs, however, did consume juveniles as by-products when they preyed upon the adult mussels to which the juveniles were attached.

  12. Do Predators Always Win? Starfish versus Limpets: A Hands-On Activity Examining Predator-Prey Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faria, Claudia; Boaventura, Diana; Galvao, Cecilia; Chagas, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    In this article we propose a hands-on experimental activity about predator-prey interactions that can be performed both in a research laboratory and in the classroom. The activity, which engages students in a real scientific experiment, can be explored not only to improve students' understanding about the diversity of anti-predator behaviors but…

  13. Waves affect predator-prey interactions between fish and benthic invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Gabel, Friederike; Stoll, Stefan; Fischer, Philipp; Pusch, Martin T; Garcia, Xavier-François

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of waves on predator-prey interactions in the littoral zones of freshwaters. We conducted a set of mesocosm experiments to study the differential effects of ship- and wind-induced waves on the foraging success of littoral fish on benthic invertebrates. Experiments were conducted in a wave tank with amphipods (Gammarus roeseli) as prey, and age-0 bream (Abramis brama, B0), age-0 and age-1 dace (Leuciscus leuciscus, D0 and D1) as predators. The number of gammarids suspended in the water column was higher in the wave treatments compared to a no-wave control treatment, especially during pulse waves mimicking ship-induced waves in comparison to continuous waves mimicking wind-induced waves. The resulting higher prey accessibility in the water column was differently exploited by the three types of predatory fish. D0 and D1 showed significantly higher foraging success in the pulse wave treatment than in the continuous and control treatments. The foraging success of D0 appears to be achieved more easily, since significantly higher swimming activity and more foraging attempts were recorded only for D1 under the wave treatments. In contrast, B0 consumed significantly fewer gammarids in both wave treatments than in the control. Hence, waves influenced predator-prey interactions differently depending on wave type and fish type. It is expected that regular exposure to ship-induced waves can alter littoral invertebrate and fish assemblages by increasing the predation risk for benthic invertebrates that are suspended in the water column, and by shifting fish community compositions towards species that benefit from waves. PMID:21104276

  14. Effects of Endosulfan on Predator-Prey Interactions Between Catfish and Schistosoma Host Snails.

    PubMed

    Monde, Concillia; Syampungani, Stephen; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    The effect of the pesticide endosulfan on predator-prey interactions between catfish and Schistosoma host snails was assessed in static tank experiments. Hybrid catfish (Clarias gariepinus × C. ngamensis) and Bulinus globosus were subjected to various endosulfan concentrations including an untreated control. The 48- and 96-h LC50 values for catfish were 1.0 and <0.5 µg/L, respectively, whereas the 48- and 96-h LC50 values for snails were 1137 and 810 µg/L. To assess sublethal effects on the feeding of the catfish on B. globosus, endosulfan concentrations between 0.03 and 1.0 µg/L were used. Predation was significantly greater (p < 0.001) in control tanks than in all other treatments. There was progressively decreasing predation with increasing toxicant concentration. Biological control of Schistosoma host snails using fish may be affected in endosulfan-polluted aquatic systems of Southern Africa because it has been found present at concentrations that are indicated to cause lethal effects on the evaluated hybrid catfish and to inhibit the predation of snails by this hybrid catfish. PMID:27033099

  15. Clay Caterpillar Whodunit: A Customizable Method for Studying Predator-Prey Interactions in the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Rachel; Klemens, Jeffrey A.; Agosta, Salvatore J.; Bartlow, Andrew W.; Wood, Steve; Carlson, Jason A.; Stratford, Jeffrey A.; Steele, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Predator-prey dynamics are an important concept in ecology, often serving as an introduction to the field of community ecology. However, these dynamics are difficult for students to observe directly. We describe a methodology that employs model caterpillars made of clay to estimate rates of predator attack on a prey species. This approach can be…

  16. Linking biomechanics and ecology through predator-prey interactions: flight performance of dragonflies and their prey.

    PubMed

    Combes, S A; Rundle, D E; Iwasaki, J M; Crall, J D

    2012-03-15

    Aerial predation is a highly complex, three-dimensional flight behavior that affects the individual fitness and population dynamics of both predator and prey. Most studies of predation adopt either an ecological approach in which capture or survival rates are quantified, or a biomechanical approach in which the physical interaction is studied in detail. In the present study, we show that combining these two approaches provides insight into the interaction between hunting dragonflies (Libellula cyanea) and their prey (Drosophila melanogaster) that neither type of study can provide on its own. We performed >2500 predation trials on nine dragonflies housed in an outdoor artificial habitat to identify sources of variability in capture success, and analyzed simultaneous predator-prey flight kinematics from 50 high-speed videos. The ecological approach revealed that capture success is affected by light intensity in some individuals but that prey density explains most of the variability in success rate. The biomechanical approach revealed that fruit flies rarely respond to approaching dragonflies with evasive maneuvers, and are rarely successful when they do. However, flies perform random turns during flight, whose characteristics differ between individuals, and these routine, erratic turns are responsible for more failed predation attempts than evasive maneuvers. By combining the two approaches, we were able to determine that the flies pursued by dragonflies when prey density is low fly more erratically, and that dragonflies are less successful at capturing them. This highlights the importance of considering the behavior of both participants, as well as their biomechanics and ecology, in developing a more integrative understanding of organismal interactions. PMID:22357584

  17. How moths escape bats: predicting outcomes of predator-prey interactions.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Aaron J; Conner, William E

    2016-09-01

    What determines whether fleeing prey escape from attacking predators? To answer this question, biologists have developed mathematical models that incorporate attack geometries, pursuit and escape trajectories, and kinematics of predator and prey. These models have rarely been tested using data from actual predator-prey encounters. To address this problem, we recorded multi-camera infrared videography of bat-insect interactions in a large outdoor enclosure. We documented 235 attacks by four Myotis volans bats on a variety of moths. Bat and moth flight trajectories from 50 high-quality attacks were reconstructed in 3-D. Despite having higher maximum velocity, deceleration and overall turning ability, bats only captured evasive prey in 69 of 184 attacks (37.5%); bats captured nearly all moths not evading attack (50 of 51; 98%). Logistic regression indicated that prey radial acceleration and escape angle were the most important predictors of escape success (44 of 50 attacks correctly classified; 88%). We found partial support for the turning gambit mathematical model; however, it underestimated the escape threshold by 25% of prey velocity and did not account for prey escape angle. Whereas most prey escaping strikes flee away from predators, moths typically escaped chasing bats by turning with high radial acceleration toward 'safety zones' that flank the predator. This strategy may be widespread in prey engaged in chases. Based on these findings, we developed a novel geometrical model of predation. We discuss implications of this model for the co-evolution of predator and prey kinematics and pursuit and escape strategies. PMID:27340205

  18. Spatial ecology of predator-prey interactions: corridors and patch shape influence seed predation.

    SciTech Connect

    J. L . Orrock; B. J. Danielson; M. J. Burns; D. J. Levey

    2003-02-03

    J.L. Orrock, B.J. Danielson, M.J. Burns, and D.J. Levey. 2003. Spatial ecology of predator-prey interactions: corridors and patch shape influence seed predation. Ecology, 84(10):2589-2599. Abstract: Corridors that connect patches of disjunct habitat may be promising tools for mediating the negative impacts of habitat fragmentation, but little is known about how corridors affect ecological interactions. In eight 12-ha experimental landscapes, we examined how corridors affect the impact of invertebrate, rodent, and avian seed predators on pokeweed, Phytolacca americana. Over 13 months in 2000 and 2001, we quantified the effects of patch shape, connectivity, and predator type on the number of seeds germinating in the field (germinants), seed removal, and the viability of remaining seeds. Corridors did not affect the number of P. americana germinants in experimental exclosures or the viability of seeds remaining in exclosures. However, corridors affected the removal of seeds in a predator-specific manner: invertebrates removed more seeds in unconnected patches, whereas rodents removed more seeds in connected patches. Seed removal by birds was similar in connected and unconnected patches. Total seed removal by all seed predators was not affected by corridors, because invertebrates removed more seeds where rodents removed fewer seeds, and vice versa. Overall, seed predation signi®cantly reduced the number and viability of remaining seeds, and reduced the number of germinants in 2000 but not in 2001. The abundance of naturally occurring P. americana plants in our experimental patches in 2000 decreased with increasing seed removal from exclosures but was not related to viability or germinants in 2000, suggesting that seed removal may shape the distribution and abundance of this species. Complementary patterns of seed removal by rodents and invertebrates suggest that corridors alter the effects of these predator taxa by changing the relative amounts of edge and core

  19. Mathematical model for cell competition: Predator-prey interactions at the interface between two groups of cells in monolayer tissue.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Seiya; Takamatsu, Atsuko; Ohsawa, Shizue; Igaki, Tatsushi

    2016-09-01

    The phenomenon of 'cell competition' has been implicated in the normal development and maintenance of organs, such as in the regulation of organ size and suppression of neoplastic development. In cell competition, one group of cells competes with another group through an interaction at their interface. Which cell group "wins" is governed by a certain relative fitness within the cells. However, this idea of cellular fitness has not been clearly defined. We construct two types of mathematical models to describe this phenomenon of cell competition by considering the interaction at the interface as a predator-prey type interaction in a monolayer tissue such as epithelium. Both of these models can reproduce several typical experimental observations involving systems of mutant cells (losers) and normal cells (winners). By analyzing one of the model and defining an index for the degree of fitness in groups of cells, we show that the fate of each group mainly depends on the relative carrying capacities of certain resources and the strength of the predator-prey interaction at the interface. This contradicts the classical hypothesis in which the relative proliferation rate determines the winner. PMID:27234645

  20. Predator-prey spatial game as a tool to understand the effects of protected areas on harvester-wildlife interactions.

    PubMed

    Tolon, Vincent; Martin, Jodie; Dray, Stéphane; Loison, Anne; Fischer, Claude; Baubet, Eric

    2012-03-01

    No-take reserves are sometimes implemented for sustainable population harvesting because they offer opportunities for animals to spatially avoid harvesters, whereas harvesters can benefit in return from the reserve spillover. Here, we used the framework of predator-prey spatial games to understand how protected areas shape spatial interactions between harvesters and target species and determine animal mortality. In these spatial games, the "predator" searches for "prey" and matches their habitat use, unless it meets spatial constraints offering the opportunity for prey to avoid the mortality source. However, such prey refuges could attract predators in the surroundings, which questions the potential benefits for prey. We located, in the Geneva Basin (France), hunting dogs and wild boar Sus scrofa L. during hunting seasons with global positioning systems and very-high-frequency collars. We quantified how the proximity of the reserve shaped the matching between both habitat uses using multivariate analyses and linked these patterns to animals' mortality with a Cox regression analysis. Results showed that habitat uses by both protagonists disassociated only when hunters were spatially constrained by the reserve. In response, hunters increased hunting efforts near the reserve boundary, which induced a higher risk exposure for animals settled over the reserve. The mortality of adult wild boar decreased near the reserve as the mismatch between both habitat uses increased. However the opposite pattern was determined for younger individuals that suffered from the high level of hunting close to the reserve. The predator-prey analogy was an accurate prediction of how the protected area modified spatial relationships between harvesters and target species. Prey-searching strategies adopted by hunters around reserves strongly impacted animal mortality and the efficiency of the protected area for this harvested species. Increasing reserve sizes and/or implementing buffer areas

  1. Evolution determines how global warming and pesticide exposure will shape predator-prey interactions with vector mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tam T; Janssens, Lizanne; Dinh, Khuong V; Op de Beeck, Lin; Stoks, Robby

    2016-07-01

    How evolution may mitigate the effects of global warming and pesticide exposure on predator-prey interactions is directly relevant for vector control. Using a space-for-time substitution approach, we addressed how 4°C warming and exposure to the pesticide endosulfan shape the predation on Culex pipiens mosquitoes by damselfly predators from replicated low- and high-latitude populations. Although warming was only lethal for the mosquitoes, it reduced predation rates on these prey. Possibly, under warming escape speeds of the mosquitoes increased more than the attack efficiency of the predators. Endosulfan imposed mortality and induced behavioral changes (including increased filtering and thrashing and a positional shift away from the bottom) in mosquito larvae. Although the pesticide was only lethal for the mosquitoes, it reduced predation rates by the low-latitude predators. This can be explained by the combination of the evolution of a faster life history and associated higher vulnerabilities to the pesticide (in terms of growth rate and lowered foraging activity) in the low-latitude predators and pesticide-induced survival selection in the mosquitoes. Our results suggest that predation rates on mosquitoes at the high latitude will be reduced under warming unless predators evolve toward the current low-latitude phenotype or low-latitude predators move poleward. PMID:27330557

  2. Coevolution can reverse predator-prey cycles.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Michael H; Weitz, Joshua S

    2014-05-20

    A hallmark of Lotka-Volterra models, and other ecological models of predator-prey interactions, is that in predator-prey cycles, peaks in prey abundance precede peaks in predator abundance. Such models typically assume that species life history traits are fixed over ecologically relevant time scales. However, the coevolution of predator and prey traits has been shown to alter the community dynamics of natural systems, leading to novel dynamics including antiphase and cryptic cycles. Here, using an eco-coevolutionary model, we show that predator-prey coevolution can also drive population cycles where the opposite of canonical Lotka-Volterra oscillations occurs: predator peaks precede prey peaks. These reversed cycles arise when selection favors extreme phenotypes, predator offense is costly, and prey defense is effective against low-offense predators. We present multiple datasets from phage-cholera, mink-muskrat, and gyrfalcon-rock ptarmigan systems that exhibit reversed-peak ordering. Our results suggest that such cycles are a potential signature of predator-prey coevolution and reveal unique ways in which predator-prey coevolution can shape, and possibly reverse, community dynamics. PMID:24799689

  3. Interaction between Coastal and Oceanic Ecosystems of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean through Predator-Prey Relationship Studies

    PubMed Central

    Allain, Valerie; Fernandez, Emilie; Hoyle, Simon D.; Caillot, Sylvain; Jurado-Molina, Jesus; Andréfouët, Serge; Nicol, Simon J.

    2012-01-01

    The Western and Central Pacific Ocean sustains the highest tuna production in the world. This province is also characterized by many islands and a complex bathymetry that induces specific current circulation patterns with the potential to create a high degree of interaction between coastal and oceanic ecosystems. Based on a large dataset of oceanic predator stomach contents, our study used generalized linear models to explore the coastal-oceanic system interaction by analyzing predator-prey relationship. We show that reef organisms are a frequent prey of oceanic predators. Predator species such as albacore (Thunnus alalunga) and yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) frequently consume reef prey with higher probability of consumption closer to land and in the western part of the Pacific Ocean. For surface-caught-predators consuming reef prey, this prey type represents about one third of the diet of predators smaller than 50 cm. The proportion decreases with increasing fish size. For predators caught at depth and consuming reef prey, the proportion varies with predator species but generally represents less than 10%. The annual consumption of reef prey by the yellowfin tuna population was estimated at 0.8±0.40CV million tonnes or 2.17×1012±0.40CV individuals. This represents 6.1%±0.17CV in weight of their diet. Our analyses identify some of the patterns of coastal-oceanic ecosystem interactions at a large scale and provides an estimate of annual consumption of reef prey by oceanic predators. PMID:22615796

  4. Interaction between coastal and oceanic ecosystems of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean through predator-prey relationship studies.

    PubMed

    Allain, Valerie; Fernandez, Emilie; Hoyle, Simon D; Caillot, Sylvain; Jurado-Molina, Jesus; Andréfouët, Serge; Nicol, Simon J

    2012-01-01

    The Western and Central Pacific Ocean sustains the highest tuna production in the world. This province is also characterized by many islands and a complex bathymetry that induces specific current circulation patterns with the potential to create a high degree of interaction between coastal and oceanic ecosystems. Based on a large dataset of oceanic predator stomach contents, our study used generalized linear models to explore the coastal-oceanic system interaction by analyzing predator-prey relationship. We show that reef organisms are a frequent prey of oceanic predators. Predator species such as albacore (Thunnus alalunga) and yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) frequently consume reef prey with higher probability of consumption closer to land and in the western part of the Pacific Ocean. For surface-caught-predators consuming reef prey, this prey type represents about one third of the diet of predators smaller than 50 cm. The proportion decreases with increasing fish size. For predators caught at depth and consuming reef prey, the proportion varies with predator species but generally represents less than 10%. The annual consumption of reef prey by the yellowfin tuna population was estimated at 0.8 ± 0.40 CV million tonnes or 2.17 × 10(12)± 0.40 CV individuals. This represents 6.1% ± 0.17 CV in weight of their diet. Our analyses identify some of the patterns of coastal-oceanic ecosystem interactions at a large scale and provides an estimate of annual consumption of reef prey by oceanic predators. PMID:22615796

  5. Bottom-up meets top-down: leaf litter inputs influence predator-prey interactions in wetlands.

    PubMed

    Stoler, Aaron B; Relyea, Rick A

    2013-09-01

    While the common conceptual role of resource subsidies is one of bottom-up nutrient and energy supply, inputs can also alter the structural complexity of environments. This can further impact resource flow by providing refuge for prey and decreasing predation rates. However, the direct influence of different organic subsidies on predator-prey dynamics is rarely examined. In forested wetlands, leaf litter inputs are a dominant energy and nutrient resource and they can also increase benthic surface cover and decrease water clarity, which may provide refugia for prey and subsequently reduce predation rates. In outdoor mesocosms, we investigated how inputs of leaf litter that alter benthic surface cover and water clarity influence the mortality and growth of gray treefrog tadpoles (Hyla versicolor) in the presence of free-swimming adult newts (Notophthalmus viridiscens), which are visual predators. To manipulate surface cover, we added either oak (Quercus spp.) or red pine (Pinus resinosa) litter and crossed these treatments with three levels of red maple (Acer rubrum) litter leachate to manipulate water clarity. In contrast to our predictions, benthic surface cover had no effect on tadpole survival while darkening the water caused lower survival. In addition, individual tadpole mass was lowest in the high maple leachate treatments, suggesting an interaction between bottom-up effects of leaf litter and top-down effects of predation risk that altered mortality and growth of tadpoles. Our results indicate that realistic changes in forest tree composition, which cause concomitant changes in litter inputs to wetlands, can substantially alter community interactions. PMID:23386045

  6. Gyrokinetic turbulence cascade via predator-prey interactions between different scales

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Sumire Gurcan, Ozgur D.

    2015-05-15

    Gyrokinetic simulations in a closed fieldline geometry are presented to explore the physics of nonlinear transfer in plasma turbulence. As spontaneously formed zonal flows and small-scale turbulence demonstrate “predator-prey” dynamics, a particular cascade spectrum emerges. The electrostatic potential and the density spectra appear to be in good agreement with the simple theoretical prediction based on Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation | ϕ{sup ~}{sub k} |{sup 2}∼| n{sup ~}{sub k} |{sup 2}∝k{sup −3}/(1+k{sup 2}){sup 2}, with the spectra becoming anisotropic at small scales. The results indicate that the disparate scale interactions, in particular, the refraction and shearing of larger scale eddies by the self-consistent zonal flows, dominate over local interactions, and contrary to the common wisdom, the comprehensive scaling relation is created even within the energy injection region.

  7. An ecological regime shift resulting from disrupted predator-prey interactions in Holocene Australia.

    PubMed

    Prowse, Thomas A A; Johnson, Christopher N; Bradshaw, Corey J A; Brook, Barry W

    2014-03-01

    The mass extinction events during human prehistory are striking examples of ecological regime shifts, the causes of which are still hotly debated. In Australia, human arrival approximately 50 thousand years ago was associated with the continental-scale extinction of numerous marsupial megafauna species and a permanent change in vegetation structure. An alternative stable state persisted until a second regime shift occurred during the late Holocene, when the largest two remaining marsupial carnivores, the thylacine and devil, disappeared from mainland Australia. These extinctions have been widely attributed to the human-assisted invasion of a competing predator, the dingo. In this unusual case, the simultaneous effects of human "intensification" (population growth and technological advances) and climate change (particularly increased ENSO variability) have been largely overlooked. We developed a dynamic model system capable of simulating the complex interactions between the main predators (humans, thylacines, devils, dingoes) and their marsupial prey (macropods), which we coupled with reconstructions of human population growth and climate change for late-Holocene Australia. Because the strength of important interspecific interactions cannot be estimated directly, we used detailed scenario testing and sensitivity analysis to identify robust model outcomes and investigate competing explanations for the Holocene regime shift. This approach identified human intensification as the most probable cause, while also demonstrating the potential importance of synergies with the effects of climate change. Our models indicate that the prehistoric impact of humans on Australian mammals was not limited to the late Pleistocene (i.e., the megafaunal extinctions) but extended into the late Holocene. PMID:24804453

  8. Evolution of virulence driven by predator-prey interaction: Possible consequences for population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Morozov, A Yu; Adamson, M W

    2011-05-01

    The evolution of pathogen virulence in natural populations has conventionally been considered as a result of selection caused by the interactions of the host with its pathogen(s). The host population, however, is generally embedded in complex trophic interactions with other populations in the community, in particular, intensive predation on the infected host can increase its mortality, and this can affect the course of virulence evolution. Reciprocally, in the long run, the evolution of virulence within an infected host can affect the patterns of population dynamics of a predator consuming the host (e.g. resulting in large amplitude oscillations, causing a severe drop in the population size, etc.). Surprisingly, neither the effect of predation on the evolution of virulence within a host, nor the influence of the evolution of virulence upon the consumer's dynamics has been addressed in the literature yet. In this paper, we consider a classical S-I ecoepidemiological model in which the infected host is consumed by a predator. We are particularly interested in the evolutionarily stable virulence of the pathogen in the model and its dependence upon ecologically relevant parameters. We show that predation can prominently shift the evolutionarily stable virulence towards more severe strains as compared to the same system without predation. We demonstrate that the evolution of virulence can result in a succession of dynamical regimes and can even lead to the extinction of the predator in the long run. The presence of a predator can indirectly affect the evolution within its prey since the evolutionarily stable virulence becomes a function of the prey growth rate, which would not be the case in a predator-free system. We find that the evolutionarily stable virulence largely depends on the carrying capacity K of the prey in a non-monotonous way. The model also predicts that in an eutrophic environment the shift of virulence towards evolutionarily stable benign strains can

  9. Exponential Runge-Kutta integrators for modelling Predator-Prey interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diele, F.; Marangi, C.; Ragni, S.

    2012-09-01

    Spatially explicit models consisting of reaction-diffusion partial differential equations are considered in order to model prey-predator interactions, since it is known that the role of spatial processes reveals of great interest in the study of the effects of habitat fragmentation on biodiversity. As almost all of the realistic models in biology, these models are nonlinear and their solution is not known in closed form. Our aim is approximating the solution itself by means of exponential Runge-Kutta integrators. Moreover, we apply the shift-and-invert Krylov approach in order to evaluate the entire functions needed for implementing the exponential method. This numerical procedure reveals to be very eff cient in avoiding numerical instability during the simulation, since it allows us to adopt high order in the accuracy. This work has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013, SPA.2010.1.1-04: "Stimulating the development of GMES services in specif c are", under grant agreement 263435, project title: Biodiversity Multi-Source Monitoring System:from Space To Species (BIOSOS) coordinated by CNR-ISSIA, Bari-Italy (http://www.biosos.eu).

  10. Phylogeographic Triangulation: Using Predator-Prey-Parasite Interactions to Infer Population History from Partial Genetic Information

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, A. Márcia; Thode, Guillermo; Real, Raimundo; Feliu, Carlos; Vargas, J. Mario

    2012-01-01

    Phylogeographic studies, which infer population history and dispersal movements from intra-specific spatial genetic variation, require expensive and time-consuming analyses that are not always feasible, especially in the case of rare or endangered species. On the other hand, comparative phylogeography of species involved in close biotic interactions may show congruent patterns depending on the specificity of the relationship. Consequently, the phylogeography of a parasite that needs two hosts to complete its life cycle should reflect population history traits of both hosts. Population movements evidenced by the parasite’s phylogeography that are not reflected in the phylogeography of one of these hosts may thus be attributed to the other host. Using the wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and a parasitic tapeworm (Taenia pisiformis) as an example, we propose comparing the phylogeography of easily available organisms such as game species and their specific heteroxenous parasites to infer population movements of definitive host/predator species, independently of performing genetic analyses on the latter. This may be an interesting approach for indirectly studying the history of species whose phylogeography is difficult to analyse directly. PMID:23209834

  11. Incorporating anthropogenic effects into trophic ecology: predator-prey interactions in a human-dominated landscape.

    PubMed

    Dorresteijn, Ine; Schultner, Jannik; Nimmo, Dale G; Fischer, Joern; Hanspach, Jan; Kuemmerle, Tobias; Kehoe, Laura; Ritchie, Euan G

    2015-09-01

    Apex predators perform important functions that regulate ecosystems worldwide. However, little is known about how ecosystem regulation by predators is influenced by human activities. In particular, how important are top-down effects of predators relative to direct and indirect human-mediated bottom-up and top-down processes? Combining data on species' occurrence from camera traps and hunting records, we aimed to quantify the relative effects of top-down and bottom-up processes in shaping predator and prey distributions in a human-dominated landscape in Transylvania, Romania. By global standards this system is diverse, including apex predators (brown bear and wolf), mesopredators (red fox) and large herbivores (roe and red deer). Humans and free-ranging dogs represent additional predators in the system. Using structural equation modelling, we found that apex predators suppress lower trophic levels, especially herbivores. However, direct and indirect top-down effects of humans affected the ecosystem more strongly, influencing species at all trophic levels. Our study highlights the need to explicitly embed humans and their influences within trophic cascade theory. This will greatly expand our understanding of species interactions in human-modified landscapes, which compose the majority of the Earth's terrestrial surface. PMID:26336169

  12. Ultrasonic predator-prey interactions in water-convergent evolution with insects and bats in air?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Maria; Wahlberg, Magnus; Surlykke, Annemarie; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2013-01-01

    Toothed whales and bats have independently evolved biosonar systems to navigate and locate and catch prey. Such active sensing allows them to operate in darkness, but with the potential cost of warning prey by the emission of intense ultrasonic signals. At least six orders of nocturnal insects have independently evolved ears sensitive to ultrasound and exhibit evasive maneuvers when exposed to bat calls. Among aquatic prey on the other hand, the ability to detect and avoid ultrasound emitting predators seems to be limited to only one subfamily of Clupeidae: the Alosinae (shad and menhaden). These differences are likely rooted in the different physical properties of air and water where cuticular mechanoreceptors have been adapted to serve as ultrasound sensitive ears, whereas ultrasound detection in water have called for sensory cells mechanically connected to highly specialized gas volumes that can oscillate at high frequencies. In addition, there are most likely differences in the risk of predation between insects and fish from echolocating predators. The selection pressure among insects for evolving ultrasound sensitive ears is high, because essentially all nocturnal predation on flying insects stems from echolocating bats. In the interaction between toothed whales and their prey the selection pressure seems weaker, because toothed whales are by no means the only marine predators placing a selection pressure on their prey to evolve specific means to detect and avoid them. Toothed whales can generate extremely intense sound pressure levels, and it has been suggested that they may use these to debilitate prey. Recent experiments, however, show that neither fish with swim bladders, nor squid are debilitated by such signals. This strongly suggests that the production of high amplitude ultrasonic clicks serve the function of improving the detection range of the toothed whale biosonar system rather than debilitation of prey. PMID:23781206

  13. Predator-prey interactions between the corallivorous snail Coralliophila abbreviata and the carnivorous deltoid rock snail Thais deltoidea.

    PubMed

    Sharp, William C; Delgado, Gabriel A

    2015-10-01

    Coral reefs in the Florida Keys have become highly degraded in recent decades, prompting efforts to reestablish populations of vital reef-accreting corals to restore reef structure and ecological function. However, predation on these corals by the corallivorous gastropod Coralliophila abbreviata has been a substantial and chronic impediment to these restoration efforts. We conducted laboratory experiments to determine whether Thais deltoidea, a carnivorous gastropod that commonly occurs with C. abbreviata, is a predator of C. abbreviata. We demonstrated that T. deltoidea readily preys upon C. abbreviata and preferentially targets smaller individuals, a foraging behavior that may optimize the energy gained due to reduced handling and consumption times. If this trophic relationship proves ecologically relevant, understanding the predator-prey dynamics between these species could ultimately aid in the development of a comprehensive coral reef restoration strategy for Florida. PMID:26803883

  14. Chemotactic predator-prey dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Ankush; Kruppa, Tobias; Löwen, Hartmut

    2011-03-01

    A discrete chemotactic predator-prey model is proposed in which the prey secrets a diffusing chemical which is sensed by the predator and vice versa. Two dynamical states corresponding to catching and escaping are identified and it is shown that steady hunting is unstable. For the escape process, the predator-prey distance is diffusive for short times but exhibits a transient subdiffusive behavior which scales as a power law t¹/³ with time t and ultimately crosses over to diffusion again. This allows us to classify the motility and dynamics of various predatory microbes and phagocytes. In particular, there is a distinct region in the parameter space where they prove to be infallible predators. PMID:21517532

  15. Predator-Prey Interactions are Context Dependent in a Grassland Plant-Grasshopper-Wolf Spider Food Chain.

    PubMed

    Laws, Angela N; Joern, Anthony

    2015-06-01

    Species interactions are often context dependent, where outcomes vary in response to one or more environmental factors. It remains unclear how abiotic conditions like temperature combine with biotic factors such as consumer density or food quality to affect resource availability or influence species interactions. Using the large grasshopper Melanoplus bivittatus (Say) and a common wolf spider [Rabidosa rabida (Walkenaer)], we conducted manipulative field experiments in tallgrass prairie to examine how spider-grasshopper interactions respond to manipulations of temperature, grasshopper density, and food quality. Grasshopper survival was density dependent, as were the effects of spider presence and food quality in context-dependent ways. In high grasshopper density treatments, predation resulted in increased grasshopper survival, likely as a result of reduced intraspecific competition in the presence of spiders. Spiders had no effect on grasshopper survival when grasshoppers were stocked at low densities. Effects of the experimental treatments were often interdependent so that effects were only observed when examined together with other treatments. The occurrence of trophic cascades was context dependent, where the effects of food quality and spider presence varied with temperature under high-density treatments. Temperature weakly affected the impact of spider presence on M. bivittatus survivorship when all treatments were considered simultaneously, but different context-dependent responses to spider presence and food quality were observed among the three temperature treatments under high-density conditions. Our results indicate that context-dependent species interactions are common and highlight the importance of understanding how key biotic and abiotic factors combine to influence species interactions. PMID:26313957

  16. Seasonal changes in infaunal community structure in a hypertrophic brackish canal: Effects of hypoxia, sulfide, and predator-prey interaction.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Gen; Nakamura, Yasuo; Koizumi, Tomoyoshi; Yamada, Katsumasa

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a one-year survey of macrozoobenthic community structure at 5 stations in a eutrophic canal in inner Tokyo Bay, focusing on the impacts of hypoxia, sediment H2S, and species interaction in the littoral soft-bottom habitats. Complete defaunation or decreasing density of less-tolerant taxa occurred under hypoxia during warmer months, especially at subtidal or sulfidic stations; this was followed by rapid recolonization by opportunistic polychaetes in fall-winter. Sedimentary H2S increased the mortality of macroinvertebrates under hypoxia or delayed population recovery during recolonization. The density of several polychaetes (e.g., Pseudopolydora reticulata) declined in winter, coincident with immigration of the predator Armandia lanceolata. This suggests that absence of A. lanceolata under moderate hypoxia enabled the proliferation of prey taxa. We conclude that oxygen concentration, sediment H2S, and hypoxia-induced changes in species interactions are potential drivers for spatiotemporal changes in macrozoobenthic assemblage structure in hypoxia-prone soft-bottom communities. PMID:25925266

  17. Probability of Detecting Marine Predator-Prey and Species Interactions Using Novel Hybrid Acoustic Transmitter-Receiver Tags

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Laurie L.; Jonsen, Ian D.; Mills Flemming, Joanna E.; Lidgard, Damian C.; Bowen, William D.; Iverson, Sara J.; Webber, Dale M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the nature of inter-specific and conspecific interactions in the ocean is challenging because direct observation is usually impossible. The development of dual transmitter/receivers, Vemco Mobile Transceivers (VMT), and satellite-linked (e.g. GPS) tags provides a unique opportunity to better understand between and within species interactions in space and time. Quantifying the uncertainty associated with detecting a tagged animal, particularly under varying field conditions, is vital for making accurate biological inferences when using VMTs. We evaluated the detection efficiency of VMTs deployed on grey seals, Halichoerus grypus, off Sable Island (NS, Canada) in relation to environmental characteristics and seal behaviour using generalized linear models (GLM) to explore both post-processed detection data and summarized raw VMT data. When considering only post-processed detection data, only about half of expected detections were recorded at best even when two VMT-tagged seals were estimated to be within 50–200 m of one another. At a separation of 400 m, only about 15% of expected detections were recorded. In contrast, when incomplete transmissions from the summarized raw data were also considered, the ratio of complete transmission to complete and incomplete transmissions was about 70% for distances ranging from 50–1000 m, with a minimum of around 40% at 600 m and a maximum of about 85% at 50 m. Distance between seals, wind stress, and depth were the most important predictors of detection efficiency. Access to the raw VMT data allowed us to focus on the physical and environmental factors that limit a transceiver’s ability to resolve a transmitter’s identity. PMID:24892286

  18. The invisible fish: hydrodynamic constraints for predator-prey interaction in fossil fish Saurichthys compared to recent actinopterygians

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Ilja; Pacholak, Steffen; Licht, Martin; Schneider, Jörg W.; Brücker, Christoph; Brandt, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent pike-like predatory fishes attack prey animals by a quick strike out of rest or slow movement. This fast-start behaviour includes a preparatory, a propulsive and a final phase, and the latter is crucial for the success of the attack. To prevent prey from escape, predators tend to minimise the duration of the interaction and the disturbance caused to surrounding water in order to not be detected by the prey's lateral line sensory system. We compared the hydrodynamic properties of the earliest fossil representative of the pike-like morphotype, the Triassic actinopterygian Saurichthys, with several recent pike-like predators by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Rainbow trout has been used as a control example of a fish with a generalist body shape. Our results show that flow disturbance produced by Saurichthys was low and similar to that of the recent forms Belone and Lepisosteus, thus indicative of an effective ambush predator. Drag coefficients are low for all these fishes, but also for trout, which is a good swimmer over longer distances but generates considerable disturbance of flow. Second-highest flow disturbance values are calculated for Esox, which compensates the large disturbance with its extremely high acceleration performance (i.e. attacks at high speeds) and the derived teleostean protrusible mouth that allows prey catching from longer distances compared to the other fishes. We show CFD modelling to be a useful tool for palaeobiological reconstruction of fossil fishes, as it allows quantification of impacts of body morphology on a hypothesised lifestyle. PMID:26603471

  19. The invisible fish: hydrodynamic constraints for predator-prey interaction in fossil fish Saurichthys compared to recent actinopterygians.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Ilja; Pacholak, Steffen; Licht, Martin; Schneider, Jörg W; Brücker, Christoph; Brandt, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Recent pike-like predatory fishes attack prey animals by a quick strike out of rest or slow movement. This fast-start behaviour includes a preparatory, a propulsive and a final phase, and the latter is crucial for the success of the attack. To prevent prey from escape, predators tend to minimise the duration of the interaction and the disturbance caused to surrounding water in order to not be detected by the prey's lateral line sensory system. We compared the hydrodynamic properties of the earliest fossil representative of the pike-like morphotype, the Triassic actinopterygian Saurichthys, with several recent pike-like predators by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Rainbow trout has been used as a control example of a fish with a generalist body shape. Our results show that flow disturbance produced by Saurichthys was low and similar to that of the recent forms Belone and Lepisosteus, thus indicative of an effective ambush predator. Drag coefficients are low for all these fishes, but also for trout, which is a good swimmer over longer distances but generates considerable disturbance of flow. Second-highest flow disturbance values are calculated for Esox, which compensates the large disturbance with its extremely high acceleration performance (i.e. attacks at high speeds) and the derived teleostean protrusible mouth that allows prey catching from longer distances compared to the other fishes. We show CFD modelling to be a useful tool for palaeobiological reconstruction of fossil fishes, as it allows quantification of impacts of body morphology on a hypothesised lifestyle. PMID:26603471

  20. Group formation stabilizes predator-prey dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fryxell, John M; Mosser, Anna; Sinclair, Anthony R E; Packer, Craig

    2007-10-25

    Theoretical ecology is largely founded on the principle of mass action, in which uncoordinated populations of predators and prey move in a random and well-mixed fashion across a featureless landscape. The conceptual core of this body of theory is the functional response, predicting the rate of prey consumption by individual predators as a function of predator and/or prey densities. This assumption is seriously violated in many ecosystems in which predators and/or prey form social groups. Here we develop a new set of group-dependent functional responses to consider the ecological implications of sociality and apply the model to the Serengeti ecosystem. All of the prey species typically captured by Serengeti lions (Panthera leo) are gregarious, exhibiting nonlinear relationships between prey-group density and population density. The observed patterns of group formation profoundly reduce food intake rates below the levels expected under random mixing, having as strong an impact on intake rates as the seasonal migratory behaviour of the herbivores. A dynamical system model parameterized for the Serengeti ecosystem (using wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) as a well-studied example) shows that grouping strongly stabilizes interactions between lions and wildebeest. Our results suggest that social groups rather than individuals are the basic building blocks around which predator-prey interactions should be modelled and that group formation may provide the underlying stability of many ecosystems. PMID:17960242

  1. Disentangling mite predator-prey relationships by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sayas, Consuelo; Pina, Tatiana; Gómez-Martínez, María A; Camañes, Gemma; Ibáñez-Gual, María V; Jaques, Josep A; Hurtado, Mónica A

    2015-11-01

    Gut content analysis using molecular techniques can help elucidate predator-prey relationships in situations in which other methodologies are not feasible, such as in the case of trophic interactions between minute species such as mites. We designed species-specific primers for a mite community occurring in Spanish citrus orchards comprising two herbivores, the Tetranychidae Tetranychus urticae and Panonychus citri, and six predatory mites belonging to the Phytoseiidae family; these predatory mites are considered to be these herbivores' main biological control agents. These primers were successfully multiplexed in a single PCR to test the range of predators feeding on each of the two prey species. We estimated prey DNA detectability success over time (DS50), which depended on the predator-prey combination and ranged from 0.2 to 18 h. These values were further used to weight prey detection in field samples to disentangle the predatory role played by the most abundant predators (i.e. Euseius stipulatus and Phytoseiulus persimilis). The corrected predation value for E. stipulatus was significantly higher than for P. persimilis. However, because this 1.5-fold difference was less than that observed regarding their sevenfold difference in abundance, we conclude that P. persimilis is the most effective predator in the system; it preyed on tetranychids almost five times more frequently than E. stipulatus did. The present results demonstrate that molecular tools are appropriate to unravel predator-prey interactions in tiny species such as mites, which include important agricultural pests and their predators. PMID:25824504

  2. Direct identification of predator-prey dynamics in gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Sumire Gürcan, Özgür D; Diamond, Patrick H.

    2015-09-15

    The interaction between spontaneously formed zonal flows and small-scale turbulence in nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations is explored in a shearless closed field line geometry. It is found that when clear limit cycle oscillations prevail, the observed turbulent dynamics can be quantitatively captured by a simple Lotka-Volterra type predator-prey model. Fitting the time traces of full gyrokinetic simulations by such a reduced model allows extraction of the model coefficients. Scanning physical plasma parameters, such as collisionality and density gradient, it was observed that the effective growth rates of turbulence (i.e., the prey) remain roughly constant, in spite of the higher and varying level of primary mode linear growth rates. The effective growth rate that was extracted corresponds roughly to the zonal-flow-modified primary mode growth rate. It was also observed that the effective damping of zonal flows (i.e., the predator) in the parameter range, where clear predator-prey dynamics is observed, (i.e., near marginal stability) agrees with the collisional damping expected in these simulations. This implies that the Kelvin-Helmholtz-like instability may be negligible in this range. The results imply that when the tertiary instability plays a role, the dynamics becomes more complex than a simple Lotka-Volterra predator prey.

  3. Direct identification of predator-prey dynamics in gyrokinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Sumire; Gürcan, Özgür D.; Diamond, Patrick H.

    2015-09-01

    The interaction between spontaneously formed zonal flows and small-scale turbulence in nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations is explored in a shearless closed field line geometry. It is found that when clear limit cycle oscillations prevail, the observed turbulent dynamics can be quantitatively captured by a simple Lotka-Volterra type predator-prey model. Fitting the time traces of full gyrokinetic simulations by such a reduced model allows extraction of the model coefficients. Scanning physical plasma parameters, such as collisionality and density gradient, it was observed that the effective growth rates of turbulence (i.e., the prey) remain roughly constant, in spite of the higher and varying level of primary mode linear growth rates. The effective growth rate that was extracted corresponds roughly to the zonal-flow-modified primary mode growth rate. It was also observed that the effective damping of zonal flows (i.e., the predator) in the parameter range, where clear predator-prey dynamics is observed, (i.e., near marginal stability) agrees with the collisional damping expected in these simulations. This implies that the Kelvin-Helmholtz-like instability may be negligible in this range. The results imply that when the tertiary instability plays a role, the dynamics becomes more complex than a simple Lotka-Volterra predator prey.

  4. Predator-prey-substrate model of wastewater treatment in bioreactor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadikin, Zubaidah; Salim, Normah; Allias, Razihan

    2013-04-01

    This paper analyses the mathematical model of the interaction between predator-prey and substrate that have been expressed as a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. This mathematical model can help to investigate the biological reaction of the interaction of predator-prey and substrate in biological wastewater treatment to improve the quality of water that flows out from the reactor. By using Monod Kinetics Growth Model, the steady state solutions have been obtained and their stability is determined as a function of the residence time.

  5. Non-constant positive steady-states of a diffusive predator-prey system in homogeneous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Wonlyul; Ryu, Kimun

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the existence and non-existence of non-constant positive steady-states of a diffusive predator-prey interaction system under homogeneous Neumann boundary condition. In homogeneous environment, we show that the predator-prey model with Leslie-Gower functional response has no non-constant positive solution, but the system with a general functional response may have at least one non-constant positive steady-state under some conditions.

  6. Role of seasonality on predator-prey-subsidy population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Levy, Dorian; Harrington, Heather A; Van Gorder, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    The role of seasonality on predator-prey interactions in the presence of a resource subsidy is examined using a system of non-autonomous ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The problem is motivated by the Arctic, inhabited by the ecological system of arctic foxes (predator), lemmings (prey), and seal carrion (subsidy). We construct two nonlinear, nonautonomous systems of ODEs named the Primary Model, and the n-Patch Model. The Primary Model considers spatial factors implicitly, and the n-Patch Model considers space explicitly as a "Stepping Stone" system. We establish the boundedness of the dynamics, as well as the necessity of sufficiently nutritional food for the survival of the predator. We investigate the importance of including the resource subsidy explicitly in the model, and the importance of accounting for predator mortality during migration. We find a variety of non-equilibrium dynamics for both systems, obtaining both limit cycles and chaotic oscillations. We were then able to discuss relevant implications for biologically interesting predator-prey systems including subsidy under seasonal effects. Notably, we can observe the extinction or persistence of a species when the corresponding autonomous system might predict the opposite. PMID:26916622

  7. Along Came a Spider: Using Live Arthropods in a Predator-Prey Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Matthew L.; Hari, Janice

    2011-01-01

    We developed a predator-prey activity with eighth-grade students in which they used wolf spiders ("Lycosa carolinensis"), house crickets ("Acheta domestica"), and abiotic factors to address how (1) adaptations in predators and prey shape their interaction and (2) abiotic factors modify the interaction between predators and prey. We tested student…

  8. Environmental versus demographic variability in stochastic predator-prey models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobramysl, U.; Täuber, U. C.

    2013-10-01

    In contrast to the neutral population cycles of the deterministic mean-field Lotka-Volterra rate equations, including spatial structure and stochastic noise in models for predator-prey interactions yields complex spatio-temporal structures associated with long-lived erratic population oscillations. Environmental variability in the form of quenched spatial randomness in the predation rates results in more localized activity patches. Our previous study showed that population fluctuations in rare favorable regions in turn cause a remarkable increase in the asymptotic densities of both predators and prey. Very intriguing features are found when variable interaction rates are affixed to individual particles rather than lattice sites. Stochastic dynamics with demographic variability in conjunction with inheritable predation efficiencies generate non-trivial time evolution for the predation rate distributions, yet with overall essentially neutral optimization.

  9. How the Magnitude of Prey Genetic Variation Alters Predator-Prey Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Michael H

    2016-09-01

    Evolution can alter the stability and dynamics of ecological communities; for example, prey evolution can drive cyclic dynamics in predator-prey systems that are not possible in the absence of evolution. However, it is unclear how the magnitude of additive genetic variation in the evolving species mediates those effects. In this study, I explore how the magnitude of prey additive genetic variation determines what effects prey evolution has on the dynamics and stability of predator-prey systems. I use linear stability analysis to decompose the stability of a general eco-evolutionary predator-prey model into components representing the stabilities of the ecological and evolutionary subsystems as well as the interactions between those subsystems. My results show that with low genetic variation, the cyclic dynamics and stability of the system are determined by the ecological subsystem. With increased genetic variation, disruptive selection always destabilizes stable communities, stabilizing selection can stabilize or destabilize communities, and prey evolution can alter predator-prey phase lags. Stability changes occur approximately when the magnitude of genetic variation balances the (in)stabilities of the ecological and evolutionary subsystems. I discuss the connections between my stability results and prior results from the theory of adaptive dynamics. PMID:27501090

  10. Coexistence in a predator-prey system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droz, Michel; Pȩkalski, Andrzej

    2001-05-01

    We propose a lattice model of two populations, predators and prey. The model is solved via Monte Carlo simulations. Each species moves randomly on the lattice and can live only a certain time without eating. The lattice cells are either grass (eaten by prey) or tree (giving cover for prey). Each animal has a reserve of food that is increased by eating (prey or grass) and decreased after each Monte Carlo step. To breed, a pair of animals must be adjacent and have a certain minimum of food supply. The number of offspring produced depends on the number of available empty sites. We show that such a predator-prey system may finally reach one of the following three steady states: coexisting, with predators and prey; pure prey; or an empty one, in which both populations become extinct. We demonstrate that the probability of arriving at one of the above states depends on the initial densities of the prey and predator populations, the amount of cover, and the way it is spatially distributed.

  11. Moorea BIOCODE barcode library as a tool for understanding predator-prey interactions: insights into the diet of common predatory coral reef fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leray, M.; Boehm, J. T.; Mills, S. C.; Meyer, C. P.

    2012-06-01

    Identifying species involved in consumer-resource interactions is one of the main limitations in the construction of food webs. DNA barcoding of prey items in predator guts provides a valuable tool for characterizing trophic interactions, but the method relies on the availability of reference sequences to which prey sequences can be matched. In this study, we demonstrate that the COI sequence library of the Moorea BIOCODE project, an ecosystem-level barcode initiative, enables the identification of a large proportion of semi-digested fish, crustacean and mollusks found in the guts of three Hawkfish and two Squirrelfish species. While most prey remains lacked diagnostic morphological characters, 94% of the prey found in 67 fishes had >98% sequence similarity with BIOCODE reference sequences. Using this species-level prey identification, we demonstrate how DNA barcoding can provide insights into resource partitioning, predator feeding behaviors and the consequences of predation on ecosystem function.

  12. Trophic organisation and predator-prey interactions among commercially exploited demersal finfishes in the coastal waters of the southeastern Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurahiman, K. P.; Nayak, T. H.; Zacharia, P. U.; Mohamed, K. S.

    2010-05-01

    Trophic interactions in commercially exploited demersal finfishes in the southeastern Arabian Sea of India were studied to understand trophic organization with emphasis on ontogenic diet shifts within the marine food web. In total, the contents of 4716 stomachs were examined from which 78 prey items were identified. Crustaceans and fishes were the major prey groups to most of the fishes. Based on cluster analysis of predator feeding similarities and ontogenic diet shift within each predator, four major trophic guilds and many sub-guilds were identified. The first guild 'detritus feeders' included all size groups of Cynoglossus macrostomus, Pampus argenteus, Leiognathus bindus and Priacanthus hamrur. Guild two, named 'Shrimp feeders', was the largest guild identified and included all size groups of Rhynchobatus djiddensis and Nemipterus mesoprion, medium and large Nemipterus japonicus, P. hamrur and Grammoplites suppositus, small and medium Otolithes cuvieri and small Lactarius lactarius. Guild three, named 'crab and squilla feeders', consisted of few predators. The fourth trophic guild, 'piscivores', was mainly made up of larger size groups of all predators and all size groups of Pseudorhombus arsius and Carcharhinus limbatus. The mean diet breadth and mean trophic level showed strong correlation with ontogenic diet shift. The mean trophic level varied from 2.2 ± 0.1 in large L. bindus to 4.6 ± 0.2 in large Epinephelus diacanthus and the diet breadth from 1.4 ± 0.3 in medium P. argenteus to 8.3 ± 0.2 in medium N. japonicus. Overall, the present study showed that predators in the ecosystem have a strong feeding preference for the sergestid shrimp Acetes indicus, penaeid shrimps, epibenthic crabs and detritus.

  13. Interactions in a tritrophic acarine predator-prey metapopulation system V: within-plant dynamics of Phytoseiulus persimilis and Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Phytoseiidae, Tetranychidae).

    PubMed

    Nachman, Gösta; Zemek, Rostislav

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the relative contributions of bottom-up (plant condition) and top-down (predatory mites) factors on the dynamics of the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae), a series of experiments were conducted in which spider mites and predatory mites were released on bean plants. Plants inoculated with 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 adult female T. urticae were either left untreated or were inoculated with 3 or 5 adult female predators (Phytoseiulus persimilis) one week after the introduction of spider mites. Plant area, densities of T. urticae and P. persimilis, and plant injury were assessed by weekly sampling. Data were analysed by a combination of statistical methods and a tri-trophic mechanistic simulation model partly parameterised from the current experiments and partly from previous data. The results showed a clear effect of predators on the density of spider mites and on the plant injury they cause. Plant injury increased with the initial number of spider mites and decreased with the initial number of predators. Extinction of T. urticae, followed by extinction of P. persimilis, was the most likely outcome for most initial combinations of prey and predators. Eggs constituted a relatively smaller part of the prey population as plant injury increased and of the predator population as prey density decreased. We did not find statistical evidence of P. persimilis having preference for feeding on T. urticae eggs. The simulation model demonstrated that bottom-up and top-down factors interact synergistically to reduce the density of spider mites. This may have important implications for biological control of spider mites by means of predatory mites. PMID:14580059

  14. Wave propagation in predator-prey systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sheng-Chen; Tsai, Je-Chiang

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we study a class of predator-prey systems of reaction-diffusion type. Specifically, we are interested in the dynamical behaviour for the solution with the initial distribution where the prey species is at the level of the carrying capacity, and the density of the predator species has compact support, or exponentially small tails near x=+/- ∞ . Numerical evidence suggests that this will lead to the formation of a pair of diverging waves propagating outwards from the initial zone. Motivated by this phenomenon, we establish the existence of a family of travelling waves with the minimum speed. Unlike the previous studies, we do not use the shooting argument to show this. Instead, we apply an iteration process based on Berestycki et al 2005 (Math Comput. Modelling 50 1385-93) to construct a set of super/sub-solutions. Since the underlying system does not enjoy the comparison principle, such a set of super/sub-solutions is not based on travelling waves, and in fact the super/sub-solutions depend on each other. With the aid of the set of super/sub-solutions, we can construct the solution of the truncated problem on the finite interval, which, via the limiting argument, can in turn generate the wave solution. There are several advantages to this approach. First, it can remove the technical assumptions on the diffusivities of the species in the existing literature. Second, this approach is of PDE type, and hence it can shed some light on the spreading phenomenon indicated by numerical simulation. In fact, we can compute the spreading speed of the predator species for a class of biologically acceptable initial distributions. Third, this approach might be applied to the study of waves in non-cooperative systems (i.e. a system without a comparison principle).

  15. Ecoepidemic predator-prey model with feeding satiation, prey herd behavior and abandoned infected prey.

    PubMed

    Kooi, Bob W; Venturino, Ezio

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we analyse a predator-prey model where the prey population shows group defense and the prey individuals are affected by a transmissible disease. The resulting model is of the Rosenzweig-MacArthur predator-prey type with an SI (susceptible-infected) disease in the prey. Modeling prey group defense leads to a square root dependence in the Holling type II functional for the predator-prey interaction term. The system dynamics is investigated using simulations, classical existence and asymptotic stability analysis and numerical bifurcation analysis. A number of bifurcations, such as transcritical and Hopf bifurcations which occur commonly in predator-prey systems will be found. Because of the square root interaction term there is non-uniqueness of the solution and a singularity where the prey population goes extinct in a finite time. This results in a collapse initiated by extinction of the healthy or susceptible prey and thereafter the other population(s). When also a positive attractor exists this leads to bistability similar to what is found in predator-prey models with a strong Allee effect. For the two-dimensional disease-free (i.e. the purely demographic) system the region in the parameter space where bistability occurs is marked by a global bifurcation. At this bifurcation a heteroclinic connection exists between saddle prey-only equilibrium points where a stable limit cycle together with its basin of attraction, are destructed. In a companion paper (Gimmelli et al., 2015) the same model was formulated and analysed in which the disease was not in the prey but in the predator. There we also observed this phenomenon. Here we extend its analysis using a phase portrait analysis. For the three-dimensional ecoepidemic predator-prey system where the prey is affected by the disease, also tangent bifurcations including a cusp bifurcation and a torus bifurcation of limit cycles occur. This leads to new complex dynamics. Continuation by varying one parameter

  16. Matching allele dynamics and coevolution in a minimal predator prey replicator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardanyés, Josep; Solé, Ricard V.

    2008-01-01

    A minimal Lotka Volterra type predator prey model describing coevolutionary traits among entities with a strength of interaction influenced by a pair of haploid diallelic loci is studied with a deterministic time continuous model. We show a Hopf bifurcation governing the transition from evolutionary stasis to periodic Red Queen dynamics. If predator genotypes differ in their predation efficiency the more efficient genotype asymptotically achieves lower stationary concentrations.

  17. Predator-prey model for the self-organization of stochastic oscillators in dual populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Sara; Anderson, Johan; Gürcan, Ozgür D.

    2015-12-01

    A predator-prey model of dual populations with stochastic oscillators is presented. A linear cross-coupling between the two populations is introduced following the coupling between the motions of a Wilberforce pendulum in two dimensions: one in the longitudinal and the other in torsional plain. Within each population a Kuramoto-type competition between the phases is assumed. Thus, the synchronization state of the whole system is controlled by these two types of competitions. The results of the numerical simulations show that by adding the linear cross-coupling interactions predator-prey oscillations between the two populations appear, which results in self-regulation of the system by a transfer of synchrony between the two populations. The model represents several important features of the dynamical interplay between the drift wave and zonal flow turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas, and a novel interpretation of the coupled dynamics of drift wave-zonal flow turbulence using synchronization of stochastic oscillator is discussed.

  18. Simulation and analysis of a model dinoflagellate predator-prey system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoleni, M. J.; Antonelli, T.; Coyne, K. J.; Rossi, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    This paper analyzes the dynamics of a model dinoflagellate predator-prey system and uses simulations to validate theoretical and experimental studies. A simple model for predator-prey interactions is derived by drawing upon analogies from chemical kinetics. This model is then modified to account for inefficiencies in predation. Simulation results are shown to closely match the model predictions. Additional simulations are then run which are based on experimental observations of predatory dinoflagellate behavior, and this study specifically investigates how the predatory dinoflagellate Karlodinium veneficum uses toxins to immobilize its prey and increase its feeding rate. These simulations account for complex dynamics that were not included in the basic models, and the results from these computational simulations closely match the experimentally observed predatory behavior of K. veneficum and reinforce the notion that predatory dinoflagellates utilize toxins to increase their feeding rate.

  19. A fluid mechanical model for mixing in a plankton predator-prey system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, J.; Dabiri, J. O.

    2009-04-01

    A Lagrangian method is developed to study mixing of small particles in open flows. Particle Lagrangian Coherent Structures (pLCS) are identified as transport barriers in the dynamical systems of particles. We apply this method to a planktonic predator-prey system in which moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita uses its body motion to generate fluid currents which carry their prey to the vicinity of their capture appendages. With the flow generated by the jellyfish experimentally measured and the dynamics of prey particles in the flow described by a modified Maxey-Riley equation, we use pLCS to identify the capture region in which prey can be captured. The properties of the capture region enable analysis of the effects of several physiological and mechanical parameters on the predator-prey interaction, such as prey size, escape force, predator perception, etc. The method provides a new methodology to study dynamics and mixing of small organisms in general.

  20. Testing for predator dependence in predator-prey dynamics: a non-parametric approach.

    PubMed Central

    Jost, C; Ellner, S P

    2000-01-01

    The functional response is a key element in all predator-prey interactions. Although functional responses are traditionally modelled as being a function of prey density only, evidence is accumulating that predator density also has an important effect. However, much of the evidence comes from artificial experimental arenas under conditions not necessarily representative of the natural system, and neglecting the temporal dynamics of the organism (in particular the effects of prey depletion on the estimated functional response). Here we present a method that removes these limitations by reconstructing the functional response non-parametrically from predator-prey time-series data. This method is applied to data on a protozoan predator-prey interaction, and we obtain significant evidence of predator dependence in the functional response. A crucial element in this analysis is to include time-lags in the prey and predator reproduction rates, and we show that these delays improve the fit of the model significantly. Finally, we compare the non-parametrically reconstructed functional response to parametric forms, and suggest that a modified version of the Hassell-Varley predator interference model provides a simple and flexible function for theoretical investigation and applied modelling. PMID:11467423

  1. Persistence in nonautonomous predator-prey systems with infinite delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Zhidong; Rehim, Mehbuba

    2006-12-01

    This paper studies the general nonautonomous predator-prey Lotka-Volterra systems with infinite delays. The sufficient and necessary conditions of integrable form on the permanence and persistence of species are established. A very interesting and important property of two-species predator-prey systems is discovered, that is, the permanence of species and the existence of a persistent solution are each other equivalent. Particularly, for the periodic system with delays, applying these results, the sufficient and necessary conditions on the permanence and the existence of positive periodic solutions are obtained. Some well-known results on the nondelayed periodic predator-prey Lotka-Volterra systems are strongly improved and extended to the delayed case.

  2. Spatio-Temporal Oscillations in Predator-Prey Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomé, T.; de Carvalho, K. Cristina

    2005-10-01

    In recent years a particularly great effort has been made to understand the role of space given by a spatial structure and local interactions in the characterization of the dynamics of competing biological species. Irreversible stochastic lattice models have been studied to mimic predator-prey systems with Markovian local rules based in the Lotka-Volterra model. One of the problems being studied is the stability of the temporal oscillations of the population of two-species systems-whether they are synchronized. Here we study the temporal oscillations of a two-species system by considering two probabilistic cellular automata defined in regular lattices where each site can be in three states: empty, occupied by a prey, or occupied by a predator. One of them, the isotropic model, has local rules similar to those of the contact process and try to mimic the Lotka-Volterra model mechanisms. The other automaton, the anisotropic model, is based in rules that are similar to the isotropic model, but a anisotropic neighborhood is considered. This model was introduced to explore the effect of spatial anisotropy in temporal oscillations. In fact, it has been pointed out that temporally periodic states can be stable in spatial anisotropic irreversible systems whose anisotropy is exploited conveniently. We show Monte Carlo simulations performed on square lattices for both automata. Our results indicate that, in the thermodynamic limit, oscillations can occur only at a local level, even in the anisotropic model. We observe that for given sets of control parameters a spatio-temporal oscillation occurs in the system. These structures are analyzed.

  3. Predator-prey systems depend on a prey refuge.

    PubMed

    Chivers, W J; Gladstone, W; Herbert, R D; Fuller, M M

    2014-11-01

    Models of near-exclusive predator-prey systems such as that of the Canadian lynx and snowshoe hare have included factors such as a second prey species, a Holling Type II predator response and climatic or seasonal effects to reproduce sub-sets of six signature patterns in the empirical data. We present an agent-based model which does not require the factors or constraints of previous models to reproduce all six patterns in persistent populations. Our parsimonious model represents a generalised predator and prey species with a small prey refuge. The lack of the constraints of previous models, considered to be important for those models, casts doubt on the current hypothesised mechanisms of exclusive predator-prey systems. The implication for management of the lynx, a protected species, is that maintenance of an heterogeneous environment offering natural refuge areas for the hare is the most important factor for the conservation of this species. PMID:25058806

  4. Nash Equilibria in Noncooperative Predator-Prey Games

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Angel Manuel Roubicek, Tomas

    2007-09-15

    A noncooperative game governed by a distributed-parameter predator-prey system is considered, assuming that two players control initial conditions for predator and prey, respectively. Existence of a Nash equilibrium is shown under the condition that the desired population profiles and the environmental carrying capacity for the prey are sufficiently small. A conceptual approximation algorithm is proposed and analyzed. Finally, numerical simulations are performed, too.

  5. Effect of different predation rate on predator-prey model with harvesting, disease and refuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusawidjayanti, K.; Suryanto, A.; Wibowo, R. B. E.

    2015-03-01

    This paper deals with predator-prey interactions with predator harvesting and prey refuge. The predator may be infective by a disease. Therefore the predator is divided into two subclasses, i.e. infective and susceptible predator. It is assumed that susceptible predator have higher predation rate than infective predator, and hence the growth rate of susceptible predator will be higher than infective predator. It is found that the model has five equilibrium points. Finally, numerical simulation are presented not only to illustrate equilibrium point but also to illustrate effect of predation rate.

  6. How localized consumption stabilizes predator-prey systems with finite frequency of mixing.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Parviez R

    2003-04-01

    Predator-prey theory began with aspatial models that assumed organisms interacted as if they were "well-mixed" particles that obey the laws of mass action, but it has become clear that both the spatial and individual nature of many organisms can change how the dynamics of such systems function. Here I examine how localized consumption of prey by predators changes the dynamics of predator-prey systems; I use an individual-based simulation of the Rosenzweig-MacArthur model in implicit space and its mean-field approximation. In combination with limited movement, localized consumption makes the predator-prey dynamics more stable than the comparable "well-mixed" Rosenzweig-MacArthur model. Using a spatial correlation, one can directly compare a simplified version of the individual-based model with the Rosenzweig-MacArthur model. While this comparison allows the changes in the dynamics to be captured by the "well-mixed" Rosenzweig-MacArthur model, the parameters of the functional response are now dependent on the movement parameters, and so the functional response must be estimated statistically from the dynamics of the individual-based model. Yet this implies that aspatial models may work in a scale-specific fashion for spatial systems. Unlike many recent spatial models, the localized consumption and limited movement in the model presented here cannot produce coherent spatial patterns and do not depend on a patchy structure, as found in metapopulation models. Instead, the individual nature of the interactions creates a diffusion-limited reaction, which appears closer to a form of ephemeral refuge. PMID:12776885

  7. Predator-prey model for the self-organization of stochastic oscillators in dual populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Sara; Anderson, Johan; Gürcan, Ozgur D.

    A predator-prey model of dual populations with stochastic oscillators is presented. A linear cross-coupling between the two populations is introduced that follows the coupling between the motions of a Wilberforce pendulum in two dimensions: one in the longitudinal and the other in torsional plain. Within each population a Kuramoto type competition between the phases is assumed. Thus, the synchronization state of the whole system is controlled by these two types of competitions. The results of the numerical simulations show that by adding the linear cross-coupling interactions predator-prey oscillations between the two populations appear which results in self-regulation of the system by a transfer of synchrony between the two populations. The model represents several important features of the dynamical interplay between the drift wave and zonal flow turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas, and a novel interpretation of the coupled dynamics of drift wave-zonal flow turbulence using synchronization of stochastic oscillator is discussed. Sara Moradi has benefited from a mobility grant funded by the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office and the MSCA of the European Commission (FP7-PEOPLE-COFUND-2008 nº 246540).

  8. Simple finite element methods for approximating predator-prey dynamics in two dimensions using MATLAB.

    PubMed

    Garvie, Marcus R; Burkardt, John; Morgan, Jeff

    2015-03-01

    We describe simple finite element schemes for approximating spatially extended predator-prey dynamics with the Holling type II functional response and logistic growth of the prey. The finite element schemes generalize 'Scheme 1' in the paper by Garvie (Bull Math Biol 69(3):931-956, 2007). We present user-friendly, open-source MATLAB code for implementing the finite element methods on arbitrary-shaped two-dimensional domains with Dirichlet, Neumann, Robin, mixed Robin-Neumann, mixed Dirichlet-Neumann, and Periodic boundary conditions. Users can download, edit, and run the codes from http://www.uoguelph.ca/~mgarvie/ . In addition to discussing the well posedness of the model equations, the results of numerical experiments are presented and demonstrate the crucial role that habitat shape, initial data, and the boundary conditions play in determining the spatiotemporal dynamics of predator-prey interactions. As most previous works on this problem have focussed on square domains with standard boundary conditions, our paper makes a significant contribution to the area. PMID:25616741

  9. Climate and Demography Dictate the Strength of Predator-Prey Overlap in a Subarctic Marine Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Hunsicker, Mary E.; Ciannelli, Lorenzo; Bailey, Kevin M.; Zador, Stephani; Stige, Leif Christian

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that climate and anthropogenic influences on marine ecosystems are largely manifested by changes in species spatial dynamics. However, less is known about how shifts in species distributions might alter predator-prey overlap and the dynamics of prey populations. We developed a general approach to quantify species spatial overlap and identify the biotic and abiotic variables that dictate the strength of overlap. We used this method to test the hypothesis that population abundance and temperature have a synergistic effect on the spatial overlap of arrowtooth flounder (predator) and juvenile Alaska walleye pollock (prey, age-1) in the eastern Bering Sea. Our analyses indicate that (1) flounder abundance and temperature are key variables dictating the strength of flounder and pollock overlap, (2) changes in the magnitude of overlap may be largely driven by density-dependent habitat selection of flounder, and (3) species overlap is negatively correlated to juvenile pollock recruitment when flounder biomass is high. Overall, our findings suggest that continued increases in flounder abundance coupled with the predicted long-term warming of ocean temperatures could have important implications for the predator-prey dynamics of arrowtooth flounder and juvenile pollock. The approach used in this study is valuable for identifying potential consequences of climate variability and exploitation on species spatial dynamics and interactions in many marine ecosystems. PMID:23824707

  10. Are classical predator-prey models relevant to the real world?

    PubMed

    Dostálková, Iva; Kindlmann, Pavel; Dixon, Anthony F G

    2002-10-01

    Mathematical models of predator-prey population dynamics are widely used for predicting the effect of predators as biocontrol agents, but the assumptions of the models are more relevant to parasite-host systems. Predator-prey systems, at least in insects, substantially differ from what is assumed by these models. The main differences are: (i) Juveniles and adults have to be considered as two different entities, as the former stay within a patch and do not reproduce, while the latter move between patches of prey and reproduce there. (ii) Because of their high mobility, food availability is likely to be less restrictive for adults than juveniles, which are confined to one patch. Therefore, a functional response to prey abundance may not be important for adults. (iii) Egg and larval cannibalism are common in insect predators. Therefore, the quality of patches of prey for their larvae determines the reproductive strategy of adult predators more than the availability of food for the adults. Here we develop a new model, based on the above considerations, which is suitable for modelling these interactions. We show that selection should favour mechanisms that enable predators to avoid reproducing in patches with insufficient prey and those already occupied by predators. PMID:12381433

  11. Predator-prey model for the self-organization of stochastic oscillators in dual populations.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Sara; Anderson, Johan; Gürcan, Ozgür D

    2015-12-01

    A predator-prey model of dual populations with stochastic oscillators is presented. A linear cross-coupling between the two populations is introduced following the coupling between the motions of a Wilberforce pendulum in two dimensions: one in the longitudinal and the other in torsional plain. Within each population a Kuramoto-type competition between the phases is assumed. Thus, the synchronization state of the whole system is controlled by these two types of competitions. The results of the numerical simulations show that by adding the linear cross-coupling interactions predator-prey oscillations between the two populations appear, which results in self-regulation of the system by a transfer of synchrony between the two populations. The model represents several important features of the dynamical interplay between the drift wave and zonal flow turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas, and a novel interpretation of the coupled dynamics of drift wave-zonal flow turbulence using synchronization of stochastic oscillator is discussed. PMID:26764797

  12. Influence of edge on predator prey distribution and abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Steven H.

    2004-03-01

    I investigated the effect of spatial configuration on distribution and abundance of invertebrate trophic groups by counting soil arthropods under boxes (21 × 9.5 cm) arranged in six different patterns that varied in the amount of edge (137-305 cm). I predicted fewer individuals from the consumer trophic group (Collembola) in box groups with greater amount of edge. This prediction was based on the assumption that predators (mites, ants, spiders, centipedes) select edge during foraging and thereby reduce abundance of the less mobile consumer group under box patterns with greater edge. Consumer abundance (Collembola) was not correlated with amount of edge. Among the predator groups, mite, ant and centipede abundance related to the amount of edge of box groups. However, in contrast to predictions, abundance of these predators was negatively correlated with amount of edge in box patterns. All Collembola predators, with the exception of ants, were less clumped in distribution than Collembola. The results are inconsistent with the view that predators used box edges to predate the less mobile consumer trophic group. Alternative explanations for the spatial patterns other than predator-prey relations include (1) a negative relationship between edge and moisture, (2) a positive relationship between edge and detritus decomposition (i.e. mycelium as food for the consumer group), and (3) a negative relationship between edge and the interstices between adjacent boxes. Landscape patterns likely affect microclimate, food, and predator-prey relations and, therefore, future experimental designs need to control these factors individually to distinguish among alternative hypotheses.

  13. Environmental vs. demographic variability in stochastic lattice predator-prey models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauber, Uwe C.

    2014-03-01

    In contrast to the neutral population cycles of the deterministic mean-field Lotka-Volterra rate equations, including spatial structure and stochastic noise in models for predator-prey interactions yields complex spatio-temporal structures associated with long-lived erratic population oscillations. Environmental variability in the form of quenched spatial randomness in the predation rates results in more localized activity patches. Population fluctuations in rare favorable regions in turn cause a remarkable increase in the asymptotic densities of both predators and prey. Very intriguing features are found when variable interaction rates are affixed to individual particles rather than lattice sites. Stochastic dynamics with demographic variability in conjunction with inheritable predation efficiencies generate non-trivial time evolution for the predation rate distributions, yet with overall essentially neutral optimization.

  14. Predator-prey pursuit-evasion games in structurally complex environments.

    PubMed

    Morice, Sylvie; Pincebourde, Sylvain; Darboux, Frédéric; Kaiser, Wilfried; Casas, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    terms of pursuit and escape distances, and (4) reduced the likelihood of secondary pursuits, after initial escape of the prey, to nearly zero. Thus, geometry of the habitat strongly modulates the rules of pursuit-evasion in predator-prey interactions in the wild. PMID:23720527

  15. Turing patterns and a stochastic individual-based model for predator-prey systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Seido

    2012-02-01

    Reaction-diffusion theory has played a very important role in the study of pattern formations in biology. However, a group of individuals is described by a single state variable representing population density in reaction-diffusion models and interaction between individuals can be included only phenomenologically. Recently, we have seamlessly combined individual-based models with elements of reaction-diffusion theory. To include animal migration in the scheme, we have adopted a relationship between the diffusion and the random numbers generated according to a two-dimensional bivariate normal distribution. Thus, we have observed the transition of population patterns from an extinction mode, a stable mode, or an oscillatory mode to the chaotic mode as the population growth rate increases. We show our phase diagram of predator-prey systems and discuss the microscopic mechanism for the stable lattice formation in detail.

  16. Modeling symbiosis by interactions through species carrying capacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Yukalova, E. P.; Sornette, D.

    2012-08-01

    We introduce a mathematical model of symbiosis between different species by taking into account the influence of each species on the carrying capacities of the others. The modeled entities can pertain to biological and ecological societies or to social, economic and financial societies. Our model includes three basic types: symbiosis with direct mutual interactions, symbiosis with asymmetric interactions, and symbiosis without direct interactions. In all cases, we provide a complete classification of all admissible dynamical regimes. The proposed model of symbiosis turned out to be very rich, as it exhibits four qualitatively different regimes: convergence to stationary states, unbounded exponential growth, finite-time singularity, and finite-time death or extinction of species.

  17. Foraging and vulnerability traits modify predator-prey body mass allometry: freshwater macroinvertebrates as a case study.

    PubMed

    Klecka, Jan; Boukal, David S

    2013-09-01

    1. Predation is often size selective, but the role of other traits of the prey and predators in their interactions is little known. This hinders our understanding of the causal links between trophic interactions and the structure of animal communities. Better knowledge of trophic traits underlying predator-prey interactions is also needed to improve models attempting to predict food web structure and dynamics from known species traits. 2. We carried out laboratory experiments with common freshwater macroinvertebrate predators (diving beetles, dragonfly and damselfly larvae and water bugs) and their prey to assess how body size and traits related to foraging (microhabitat use, feeding mode and foraging mode) and to prey vulnerability (microhabitat use, activity and escape behaviour) affect predation strength. 3. The underlying predator-prey body mass allometry characterizing mean prey size and total predation pressure was modified by feeding mode of the predators (suctorial or chewing). Suctorial predators fed upon larger prey and had ˜3 times higher mass-specific predation rate than chewing predators of the same size and may thus have stronger effect on prey abundance. 4. Strength of individual trophic links, measured as mortality of the focal prey caused by the focal predator, was determined jointly by the predator and prey body mass and their foraging and vulnerability traits. In addition to the feeding mode, interactions between prey escape behaviour (slow or fast), prey activity (sedentary or active) and predator foraging mode (searching or ambush) strongly affected prey mortality. Searching predators was ineffective in capturing fast-escape prey in comparison with the remaining predator-prey combinations, while ambush predators caused higher mortality than searching predators and the difference was larger in active prey. 5. Our results imply that the inclusion of the commonly available qualitative data on foraging traits of predators and vulnerability traits

  18. Use of Cobra Lily (Darlingtonia californica) & Drosophila for Investigating Predator-Prey Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Carl R.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an experiment that uses the cobra lily (Darlingtonia californica) and fruit flies (Drosophila virilis) to investigate predator-prey relationships in a classroom laboratory. Suggestions for classroom extension of this experimental system are provided. (ZWH)

  19. Predator prey size relationship between Pseudopleuronectes americanus and Carcinus maenas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairchild, E. A.; Howell, W. H.

    2000-10-01

    Young-of-year flatfish grow through a series of critical periods in which they are vulnerable to different predators, including decapod crustaceans. The purpose of this study was to determine if winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, were vulnerable to one such decapod, the green crab, Carcinus maenas, and to determine if vulnerability differed between wild and cultured fish. To examine the predator-prey size relationship, an experiment was conducted in which six cultured and three wild winter flounder size class treatments were tested against six crab size class treatments. Flounder of all size classes were preyed on by all size classes of green crabs; however, mortality was highest when the largest crabs were matched with the smallest flounder. The number of flounder killed per day was significantly higher (31%) in winter flounder <20 mm compared to all other larger fish size classes (4-8%). Additionally, these fish were attacked at a faster rate than any other fish size class. For the 31-60 mm fish size classes tested, more wild fish (11%) were killed per day by crabs than cultured fish (6.3%). These results suggest that in a winter flounder stock enhancement program, only fish >20 mm should be released to promote post-release survival.

  20. Predator-Prey Model for Haloes in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.; Colwell, Joshua; Sremcevic, Miodrag; Madhusudhanan, Prasanna

    Particles in Saturn’s rings have a tripartite nature: (1) a broad distribution of fragments from the disruption of a previous moon that accrete into (2) transient aggregates, resembling piles of rubble, covered by a (3) regolith of smaller grains that result from collisions and meteoritic grinding. Evidence for this triple architecture of ring particles comes from a multitude of Cassini observations. In a number of ring locations (including Saturn’s F ring, the shepherded outer edges of rings A and B and at the locations of the strongest density waves) aggregation and dis-aggregation are operating now. ISS, VIMS, UVIS spectroscopy and occultations show haloes around the strongest density waves. Based on a predator-prey model for ring dynamics, we offer the following explanation: •Cyclic velocity changes cause the perturbed regions to reach higher collision speeds at some orbital phases, which preferentially removes small regolith particles; •This forms a bright halo around the ILR, if the forcing is strong enough; •Surrounding particles diffuse back too slowly to erase the effect; they diffuse away to form the halo. The most rapid time scale is for forcing/aggregate growth/disaggregation; then irreversible regolith erosion; diffusion and/or ballistic transport; and slowest, meteoritic pollution/darkening. We observe both smaller and larger particles at perturbed regions. Straw, UVIS power spectral analysis, kittens and equinox objects show the prey (mass aggregates); while the haloes’ VIMS spectral signature, correlation length and excess variance are created by the predators (velocity dispersion) in regions stirred in the rings. Moon forcing triggers aggregation to create longer-lived aggregates that protect their interiors from meteoritic darkening and recycle the ring material to maintain the current purity of the rings. It also provides a mechanism for creation of new moons at resonance locations in the Roche zone, as proposed by Charnoz etal and

  1. Predator-Prey model for haloes in Saturn's A ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.; Bradley, E. Todd; Colwell, Joshua E.; Madhusudhanan, Prasanna; Sremcevic, Miodrag

    2013-04-01

    UVIS SOI reflectance spectra show bright 'haloes' around the locations of some of the strongest resonances in Saturn's A ring (Esposito etal 2005). UV spectra constrain the size and composition of the icy ring particles (Bradley etal 2010, 2012). The correspondence of IR, UV spectroscopy, HSP wavelet analysis indicate that we detect the same phenomenon. We investigate the Janus 2:1. 4:3, 5:3, 6:5 and Mimas 5:3 inner Lindblad resonances as well as at the Mimas 5:3 vertical resonance (bending wave location). Models of ring particle regolith evolution (Elliott and Esposito 2010) indicate the deeper regolith is made of older and purer ice. The strong resonances can cause streamline crowding (Lewis and Stewart 2005) which damps the interparticle velocity, allowing temporary clumps to grow, which in turn increase the velocity, eroding the clumps and releasing smaller particles and regolith (see the predator-prey model of Esposito etal 2012). This cyclic behavior, driven by the resonant perturbation from the moon, can yield collision velocities at particular azimuths greater than 1m/sec, sufficient to erode the aggregates (Blum 2006), exposing older, purer materials: In the perturbed region, collisions erode the regolith, removing smaller particles. The released regolith material settles in the less perturbed neighboring regions. Diffusion spreads these ring particles with smaller regolith into a 'halo'. Thus, the radial location of the strongest resonances can be where we find both large aggregates and disrupted fragments, in a balance maintained by the periodic moon forcing. If this stirring exposes older, and purer ice, the velocity threshold for eroding the aggregates can explain why only the strongest Lindblad resonances show haloes. Diffusion can explain the morphology of these haloes, although they are not well-resolved spatially by UVIS.

  2. Biocontrol in an impulsive predator-prey model.

    PubMed

    Terry, Alan J

    2014-10-01

    We study a model for biological pest control (or "biocontrol") in which a pest population is controlled by a program of periodic releases of a fixed yield of predators that prey on the pest. Releases are represented as impulsive increases in the predator population. Between releases, predator-pest dynamics evolve according to a predator-prey model with some fairly general properties: the pest population grows logistically in the absence of predation; the predator functional response is either of Beddington-DeAngelis type or Holling type II; the predator per capita birth rate is bounded above by a constant multiple of the predator functional response; and the predator per capita death rate is allowed to be decreasing in the predator functional response and increasing in the predator population, though the special case in which it is constant is permitted too. We prove that, when the predator functional response is of Beddington-DeAngelis type and the predators are not sufficiently voracious, then the biocontrol program will fail to reduce the pest population below a particular economic threshold, regardless of the frequency or yield of the releases. We prove also that our model possesses a pest-eradication solution, which is both locally and globally stable provided that predators are sufficiently voracious and that releases occur sufficiently often. We establish, curiously, that the pest-eradication solution can be locally stable whilst not being globally stable, the upshot of which is that, if we delay a biocontrol response to a new pest invasion, then this can change the outcome of the response from pest eradication to pest persistence. Finally, we state a number of specific examples for our model, and, for one of these examples, we corroborate parts of our analysis by numerical simulations. PMID:25195089

  3. Do predator-prey relationships on the river bed affect fine sediment ingress?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathers, Kate; Rice, Stephen; Wood, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Ecosystem engineers are organisms that alter their physical environment and thereby influence the flow of resources through ecosystems. In rivers, several ecosystem engineers are also important geomorphological agents that modify fluvial sediment dynamics. By altering channel morphology and bed material characteristics, such modifications can affect the availability of habitats for other organisms, with implications for ecosystem health and wider community composition. In this way geomorphological and ecological systems are intimately interconnected. This paper focuses on one element of this intricate abiotic-biotic coupling: the interaction between fine sediment ingress into the river bed and the predator-prey relationships of aquatic organisms living on and in the river bed. Signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) have been shown to modify fine sediment fluxes in rivers, but their effect on fine sediment ingress into riverbeds remains unclear. Many macroinvertebrate taxa have adapted avoidance strategies to avoid predation by crayfish, with one example being the freshwater shrimp (Gammarus pulex) which relies on open interstitial spaces within subsurface sediments as a refuge from crayfish predation. Fine sedimentation that fills gravelly frameworks may preclude access to those spaces, therefore leaving freshwater shrimp susceptible to predation. Ex-situ experiments were conducted which sought to examine: i) if freshwater shrimps and signal crayfish, alone and in combination, influenced fine sediment infiltration rates; and ii) whether modifications to substratum composition, specifically the introduction of fine sediment, modified predator-prey interactions. The results demonstrate that crayfish are significant geomorphic agents and that fine sediment ingress rates were significantly enhanced in their presence compared to control conditions or the presence of only freshwater shrimps. The combination of both organisms (i.e. allowing the interaction between

  4. Population and Evolutionary Dynamics based on Predator-Prey Relationships in a 3D Physical Simulation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takashi; Pilat, Marcin L; Suzuki, Reiji; Arita, Takaya

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that population dynamics and evolutionary dynamics, occurring at different time scales, can be affected by each other. Our purpose is to explore the interaction between population and evolutionary dynamics using an artificial life approach based on a 3D physically simulated environment in the context of predator-prey and morphology-behavior coevolution. The morphologies and behaviors of virtual prey creatures are evolved using a genetic algorithm based on the predation interactions between predators and prey. Both population sizes are also changed, depending on the fitness. We observe two types of cyclic behaviors, corresponding to short-term and long-term dynamics. The former can be interpreted as a simple population dynamics of Lotka-Volterra type. It is shown that the latter cycle is based on the interaction between the changes in the prey strategy against predators and the long-term change in both population sizes, resulting partly from a tradeoff between their defensive success and the cost of defense. PMID:26934093

  5. An experimental analysis of the importance of body-size in the seastar-mussel predator-prey relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Ulrich; Meusel, Bodo; Stielau, Cordula

    1999-04-01

    Laboratory feeding experiments were conducted to elucidate size-relationships in the seastar-mussel ( Asterias rubens-Mytilus edulis) predator-prey interaction. This is one of the most well-known predator-prey relationships in marine benthic ecology and the dependence of seastar feeding rates and prey size selection are crucial for modelling. Moreover, the hypothesis should be tested that large individuals of M. edulis enjoy a size-refuge from seastar predation in the Baltic sea. Ingestion rates showed an allometric relationship to seastar size. They increased slightly more than cubically (b = 3.62) with the linear size of the seastars and slightly more than linearly (b = 1.27) with the body mass of the seastars. Somatic growth rates were linearly related to ingestion rates. Larger seastars tended to eat larger mussels. This relationship was significant for the largest size of mussels eaten and for the mean size of mussels eaten, but not for the minimal size. Size selection of seastars did not depend on the spatial arrangement of mussel sizes relative to the initial position of the seastars in the aquarium. Mussels of > 48 mm in length are safe from predation by the largest seastars found in the western Baltic sea.

  6. Predator-prey interactions between Orius insidiosus and flower thrips

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The great debates generated in Australia some 50 years ago regarding the relative merits of density dependent versus density independent forces in population dynamics were both reiterations of earlier ecological debates and precursors of succeeding ones. Perhaps, as has been recently emphasised, the...

  7. Predator-prey interactions, resource depression and patch revisitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Generalist predators may be confronted by different types of prey in different patches: sedentary and conspicuous, cryptic (with or without refugia), conspicuous and nonsocial, or conspicuous and social. I argue that, where encounter rates with prey are of most importance, patch revisitation should be a profitable tactic where prey have short 'recovery' times (conspicuous, nonsocial prey), or where anti-predator response (e.g. shoaling) may increase conspicuousness. Predictions are made for how temporal changes in prey encounter rates should affect revisit schedules and feeding rates for the 4 different prey types.

  8. Predator-prey trophic relationships in response to organic management practices.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jason M; Barney, Sarah K; Williams, Mark A; Bessin, Ricardo T; Coolong, Timothy W; Harwood, James D

    2014-08-01

    A broad range of environmental conditions likely regulate predator-prey population dynamics and impact the structure of these communities. Central to understanding the interplay between predator and prey populations and their importance is characterizing the corresponding trophic interactions. Here, we use a well-documented molecular approach to examine the structure of the community of natural enemies preying upon the squash bug, Anasa tristis, a herbivorous cucurbit pest that severely hinders organic squash and pumpkin production in the United States. Primer pairs were designed to examine the effects of organic management practices on the strength of these trophic connections and link this metric to measures of the arthropod predator complex density and diversity within an experimental open-field context. Replicated plots of butternut squash were randomly assigned to three treatments and were sampled throughout a growing season. Row-cover treatments had significant negative effects on squash bug and predator communities. In total, 640 predators were tested for squash bug molecular gut-content, of which 11% were found to have preyed on squash bugs, but predation varied over the season between predator groups (coccinellids, geocorids, nabids, web-building spiders and hunting spiders). Through the linking of molecular gut-content analysis to changes in diversity and abundance, these data delineate the complexity of interaction pathways on a pest that limits the profitability of organic squash production. PMID:24673741

  9. L-shaped prey isocline in the Gause predator-prey experiments with a prey refuge.

    PubMed

    Křivan, Vlastimil; Priyadarshi, Anupam

    2015-04-01

    Predator and prey isoclines are estimated from data on yeast-protist population dynamics (Gause et al., 1936). Regression analysis shows that the prey isocline is best fitted by an L-shaped function that has a vertical and a horizontal part. The predator isocline is vertical. This shape of isoclines corresponds with the Lotka-Volterra and the Rosenzweig-MacArthur predator-prey models that assume a prey refuge. These results further support the idea that a prey refuge changes the prey isocline of predator-prey models from a horizontal to an L-shaped curve. Such a shape of the prey isocline effectively bounds amplitude of predator-prey oscillations, thus promotes species coexistence. PMID:25644756

  10. Cooperation can emerge in prisoner's dilemma from a multi-species predator prey replicator dynamic.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Elisabeth; Griffin, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study a generalized variation of the replicator dynamic that involves several species and sub-species that may interact. We show how this dynamic comes about from a specific finite-population model, but also show that one must take into consideration the dynamic nature of the population sizes (and hence proportions) in order to make the model complete. We provide expressions for these population dynamics to produce a kind of multi-replicator dynamic. We then use this replicator dynamic to show that cooperation can emerge as a stable behavior when two species each play prisoner's dilemma as their intra-species game and a form of zero-sum predator prey game as their inter-species game. General necessary and sufficient conditions for cooperation to emerge as stable are provided for a number of game classes. We also showed an example using Hawk-Dove where both species can converge to stable (asymmetric) mixed strategies. PMID:27318117

  11. Climate-ecosystem change off southern California: Time-dependent seabird predator-prey numerical responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydeman, William J.; Thompson, Sarah Ann; Santora, Jarrod A.; Koslow, J. Anthony; Goericke, Ralf; Ohman, Mark D.

    2015-02-01

    Climate change may increase both stratification and upwelling in marine ecosystems, but these processes may affect productivity in opposing or complementary ways. For the Southern California region of the California Current Ecosystem (CCE), we hypothesized that changes in stratification and upwelling have affected marine bird populations indirectly through changes in prey availability. To test this hypothesis, we derived trends and associations between stratification and upwelling, the relative abundance of potential prey including krill and forage fish, and seabirds based on the long-term, multi-disciplinary CalCOFI/CCE-LTER program. Over the period 1987 through 2011, spring and summer seabird density (all species combined) declined by ~2% per year, mostly in the northern sector of the study region. Krill showed variable trends with two species increasing and one deceasing, resulting in community reorganization. Nearshore forage fish, dominated by northern anchovy (Engraulis mordax) as well as offshore mesopelagic species, show declines in relative abundance over this period. The unidirectional decline in springtime seabird density is largely explained by declining nearshore fish abundance in the previous season (winter). Interannual variability in seabird density, especially in the 2000s, is explained by variability in krill abundance. Changes in the numerical responses of seabirds to prey abundance correspond to a putative ecosystem shift in 1998-1999 and support aspects of optimal foraging (diet) theory. Predator-prey interactions and numerical responses clearly explain aspects of the upper trophic level patterns of change in the pelagic ecosystem off southern California.

  12. Rank One Strange Attractors in Periodically Kicked Predator-Prey System with Time-Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenjie; Lin, Yiping; Dai, Yunxian; Zhao, Huitao

    2016-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of the problem of rank one strange attractor in a periodically kicked predator-prey system with time-delay. Our discussion is based on the theory of rank one maps formulated by Wang and Young. Firstly, we develop the rank one chaotic theory to delayed systems. It is shown that strange attractors occur when the delayed system undergoes a Hopf bifurcation and encounters an external periodic force. Then we use the theory to the periodically kicked predator-prey system with delay, deriving the conditions for Hopf bifurcation and rank one chaos along with the results of numerical simulations.

  13. Examining predator-prey body size, trophic level and body mass across marine and terrestrial mammals.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Marlee A; Rogers, Tracey L

    2014-12-22

    Predator-prey relationships and trophic levels are indicators of community structure, and are important for monitoring ecosystem changes. Mammals colonized the marine environment on seven separate occasions, which resulted in differences in species' physiology, morphology and behaviour. It is likely that these changes have had a major effect upon predator-prey relationships and trophic position; however, the effect of environment is yet to be clarified. We compiled a dataset, based on the literature, to explore the relationship between body mass, trophic level and predator-prey ratio across terrestrial (n = 51) and marine (n = 56) mammals. We did not find the expected positive relationship between trophic level and body mass, but we did find that marine carnivores sit 1.3 trophic levels higher than terrestrial carnivores. Also, marine mammals are largely carnivorous and have significantly larger predator-prey ratios compared with their terrestrial counterparts. We propose that primary productivity, and its availability, is important for mammalian trophic structure and body size. Also, energy flow and community structure in the marine environment are influenced by differences in energy efficiency and increased food web stability. Enhancing our knowledge of feeding ecology in mammals has the potential to provide insights into the structure and functioning of marine and terrestrial communities. PMID:25377460

  14. Effect of a protection zone in the diffusive Leslie predator-prey model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yihong; Peng, Rui; Wang, Mingxin

    In this paper, we consider the diffusive Leslie predator-prey model with large intrinsic predator growth rate, and investigate the change of behavior of the model when a simple protection zone Ω for the prey is introduced. As in earlier work [Y. Du, J. Shi, A diffusive predator-prey model with a protection zone, J. Differential Equations 229 (2006) 63-91; Y. Du, X. Liang, A diffusive competition model with a protection zone, J. Differential Equations 244 (2008) 61-86] we show the existence of a critical patch size of the protection zone, determined by the first Dirichlet eigenvalue of the Laplacian over Ω and the intrinsic growth rate of the prey, so that there is fundamental change of the dynamical behavior of the model only when Ω is above the critical patch size. However, our research here reveals significant difference of the model's behavior from the predator-prey model studied in [Y. Du, J. Shi, A diffusive predator-prey model with a protection zone, J. Differential Equations 229 (2006) 63-91] with the same kind of protection zone. We show that the asymptotic profile of the population distribution of the Leslie model is governed by a standard boundary blow-up problem, and classical or degenerate logistic equations.

  15. The Macaroni Lab: A Directed Inquiry Project on Predator-Prey Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyler, Michelle; Rivera, John; Roffol, Melanie; Gibson, David J.; Middleton, Beth A.; Mathis, Marilyn

    1999-01-01

    Presents a directed-inquiry activity to take students one step beyond observation of how living organisms capture prey. Uses a field lab based upon predator-prey relationships to enliven the teaching of food web concepts to non-science-major freshman undergraduates. Can also be used in teaching high school biology students through college science…

  16. Positive solutions of a diffusive Leslie-Gower predator-prey model with Bazykin functional response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we consider a diffusive Leslie-Gower predator-prey model with Bazykin functional response and zero Dirichlet boundary condition. We show the existence, multiplicity and uniqueness of positive solutions when parameters are in different regions. Results are proved by using bifurcation theory, fixed point index theory, energy estimate and asymptotical behavior analysis.

  17. Predation of Notiophilus (Coleoptera: Carabidae) on Collembola as a Predator-Prey Teaching Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The carabid beetle (Notiophilus) preys readily on an easily-cultured collembolan in simple experimental conditions. Some features of this predator-prey system are outlined to emphasize its use in biology instruction. Experiments with another potential collembolan are described in the context of developing the method for more advanced studies.…

  18. Deterministic and Stochastic Analysis of a Prey-Dependent Predator-Prey System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiti, Alakes; Samanta, G. P.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on studies of the deterministic and stochastic behaviours of a predator-prey system with prey-dependent response function. The first part of the paper deals with the deterministic analysis of uniform boundedness, permanence, stability and bifurcation. In the second part the reproductive and mortality factors of the prey and…

  19. Senses & Sensibility: Predator-Prey Experiments Reveal How Fish Perceive & Respond to Threats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jason; Holloway, Barbara; Ketcham, Elizabeth; Long, John

    2008-01-01

    The predator-prey relationship is one of the most recognizable and well-studied animal relationships. One of the more striking aspects of this relationship is the differential natural selection pressure placed on predators and their prey. This differential pressure results from differing costs of failure, the so-called life-dinner principle. If a…

  20. Bionomic Exploitation of a Ratio-Dependent Predator-Prey System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiti, Alakes; Patra, Bibek; Samanta, G. P.

    2008-01-01

    The present article deals with the problem of combined harvesting of a Michaelis-Menten-type ratio-dependent predator-prey system. The problem of determining the optimal harvest policy is solved by invoking Pontryagin's Maximum Principle. Dynamic optimization of the harvest policy is studied by taking the combined harvest effort as a dynamic…

  1. Adaptive behaviour and multiple equilibrium states in a predator-prey model.

    PubMed

    Pimenov, Alexander; Kelly, Thomas C; Korobeinikov, Andrei; O'Callaghan, Michael J A; Rachinskii, Dmitrii

    2015-05-01

    There is evidence that multiple stable equilibrium states are possible in real-life ecological systems. Phenomenological mathematical models which exhibit such properties can be constructed rather straightforwardly. For instance, for a predator-prey system this result can be achieved through the use of non-monotonic functional response for the predator. However, while formal formulation of such a model is not a problem, the biological justification for such functional responses and models is usually inconclusive. In this note, we explore a conjecture that a multitude of equilibrium states can be caused by an adaptation of animal behaviour to changes of environmental conditions. In order to verify this hypothesis, we consider a simple predator-prey model, which is a straightforward extension of the classic Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model. In this model, we made an intuitively transparent assumption that the prey can change a mode of behaviour in response to the pressure of predation, choosing either "safe" of "risky" (or "business as usual") behaviour. In order to avoid a situation where one of the modes gives an absolute advantage, we introduce the concept of the "cost of a policy" into the model. A simple conceptual two-dimensional predator-prey model, which is minimal with this property, and is not relying on odd functional responses, higher dimensionality or behaviour change for the predator, exhibits two stable co-existing equilibrium states with basins of attraction separated by a separatrix of a saddle point. PMID:25732186

  2. Form of an evolutionary tradeoff affects eco-evolutionary dynamics in a predator-prey system.

    PubMed

    Kasada, Minoru; Yamamichi, Masato; Yoshida, Takehito

    2014-11-11

    Evolution on a time scale similar to ecological dynamics has been increasingly recognized for the last three decades. Selection mediated by ecological interactions can change heritable phenotypic variation (i.e., evolution), and evolution of traits, in turn, can affect ecological interactions. Hence, ecological and evolutionary dynamics can be tightly linked and important to predict future dynamics, but our understanding of eco-evolutionary dynamics is still in its infancy and there is a significant gap between theoretical predictions and empirical tests. Empirical studies have demonstrated that the presence of genetic variation can dramatically change ecological dynamics, whereas theoretical studies predict that eco-evolutionary dynamics depend on the details of the genetic variation, such as the form of a tradeoff among genotypes, which can be more important than the presence or absence of the genetic variation. Using a predator-prey (rotifer-algal) experimental system in laboratory microcosms, we studied how different forms of a tradeoff between prey defense and growth affect eco-evolutionary dynamics. Our experimental results show for the first time to our knowledge that different forms of the tradeoff produce remarkably divergent eco-evolutionary dynamics, including near fixation, near extinction, and coexistence of algal genotypes, with quantitatively different population dynamics. A mathematical model, parameterized from completely independent experiments, explains the observed dynamics. The results suggest that knowing the details of heritable trait variation and covariation within a population is essential for understanding how evolution and ecology will interact and what form of eco-evolutionary dynamics will result. PMID:25336757

  3. Robustness of predator-prey models for confinement regime transitions in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2013-04-15

    Energy transport and confinement in tokamak fusion plasmas is usually determined by the coupled nonlinear interactions of small-scale drift turbulence and larger scale coherent nonlinear structures, such as zonal flows, together with free energy sources such as temperature gradients. Zero-dimensional models, designed to embody plausible physical narratives for these interactions, can help to identify the origin of enhanced energy confinement and of transitions between confinement regimes. A prime zero-dimensional paradigm is predator-prey or Lotka-Volterra. Here, we extend a successful three-variable (temperature gradient; microturbulence level; one class of coherent structure) model in this genre [M. A. Malkov and P. H. Diamond, Phys. Plasmas 16, 012504 (2009)], by adding a fourth variable representing a second class of coherent structure. This requires a fourth coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equation. We investigate the degree of invariance of the phenomenology generated by the model of Malkov and Diamond, given this additional physics. We study and compare the long-time behaviour of the three-equation and four-equation systems, their evolution towards the final state, and their attractive fixed points and limit cycles. We explore the sensitivity of paths to attractors. It is found that, for example, an attractive fixed point of the three-equation system can become a limit cycle of the four-equation system. Addressing these questions which we together refer to as 'robustness' for convenience is particularly important for models which, as here, generate sharp transitions in the values of system variables which may replicate some key features of confinement transitions. Our results help to establish the robustness of the zero-dimensional model approach to capturing observed confinement phenomenology in tokamak fusion plasmas.

  4. Stability of a Beddington-DeAngelis type predator-prey model with trichotomous noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yanfei; Niu, Siyong

    2016-06-01

    The stability analysis of a Beddington-DeAngelis (B-D) type predator-prey model driven by symmetric trichotomous noises is presented in this paper. Using the Shapiro-Loginov formula, the first-order and second-order solution moments of the system are obtained. The moment stability conditions of the B-D predator-prey model are given by using Routh-Hurwitz criterion. It is found that the stabilities of the first-order and second-order solution moments depend on the noise intensities and correlation time of noise. The first-order and second-order moments are stable when the correlation time of noise is increased. That is, the trichotomous noise plays a constructive role in stabilizing the solution moment with regard to Gaussian white noise. Finally, some numerical results are performed to support the theoretical analyses.

  5. Stability and delay in a three species predator-prey system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Soumen; Maitra, Sarit

    2016-06-01

    In this article a multi-team delayed predator-prey model has been considered. There are two preys and one predator species in this model and the time delay appears for gestation of the predator. The essential mathematical features of the proposed model around the interior equilibrium point are studied in terms of local asymptotic stability by constructing a suitable Lyapunov functional and the condition for existence of Hopf-bifurcation is derived. By the assumption that the prey teams may help each other the effect of the rate of cooperation on the stability of the predator-prey model has been observed. Numerically a critical value for the delay parameter is obtained as a condition for Hopf-bifurcation.

  6. Landscape heterogeneity shapes predation in a newly restored predator-prey system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauffman, M.J.; Varley, N.; Smith, D.W.; Stahler, D.R.; MacNulty, D.R.; Boyce, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Because some native ungulates have lived without top predators for generations, it has been uncertain whether runaway predation would occur when predators are newly restored to these systems. We show that landscape features and vegetation, which influence predator detection and capture of prey, shape large-scale patterns of predation in a newly restored predator-prey system. We analysed the spatial distribution of wolf (Canis lupus) predation on elk (Cervus elaphus) on the Northern Range of Yellowstone National Park over 10 consecutive winters. The influence of wolf distribution on kill sites diminished over the course of this study, a result that was likely caused by territorial constraints on wolf distribution. In contrast, landscape factors strongly influenced kill sites, creating distinct hunting grounds and prey refugia. Elk in this newly restored predator-prey system should be able to mediate their risk of predation by movement and habitat selection across a heterogeneous risk landscape. ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  7. Equilibrium points, stability and numerical solutions of fractional-order predator-prey and rabies models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, E.; El-Sayed, A. M. A.; El-Saka, H. A. A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we are concerned with the fractional-order predator-prey model and the fractional-order rabies model. Existence and uniqueness of solutions are proved. The stability of equilibrium points are studied. Numerical solutions of these models are given. An example is given where the equilibrium point is a centre for the integer order system but locally asymptotically stable for its fractional-order counterpart.

  8. Optimal Harvesting in an Age-Structured Predator-Prey Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fister, K. Renee Lenhart, Suzanne

    2006-06-15

    We investigate optimal harvesting control in a predator-prey model in which the prey population is represented by a first-order partial differential equation with age-structure and the predator population is represented by an ordinary differential equation in time. The controls are the proportions of the populations to be harvested, and the objective functional represents the profit from harvesting. The existence and uniqueness of the optimal control pair are established.

  9. a Predator-Prey Model Based on the Fully Parallel Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Mingfeng; Ruan, Hongbo; Yu, Changliang

    We presented a predator-prey lattice model containing moveable wolves and sheep, which are characterized by Penna double bit strings. Sexual reproduction and child-care strategies are considered. To implement this model in an efficient way, we build a fully parallel Cellular Automata based on a new definition of the neighborhood. We show the roles played by the initial densities of the populations, the mutation rate and the linear size of the lattice in the evolution of this model.

  10. On certain new exact solutions of a diffusive predator-prey system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraenkel, R. A.; Manikandan, K.; Senthilvelan, M.

    2013-05-01

    We construct exact solutions for a system of two coupled nonlinear partial differential equations describing the spatio-temporal dynamics of a predator-prey system where the prey per capita growth rate is subject to the Allee effect. Using the {G'}/{G} expansion method, we derive exact solutions to this model for two different wave speeds. For each wave velocity we report three different forms of solutions. We also discuss the biological relevance of the solutions obtained.

  11. Asymptotic behavior of a stochastic non-autonomous predator-prey model with impulsive perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ruihua; Zou, Xiaoling; Wang, Ke

    2015-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a stochastic non-autonomous Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model with impulsive effects. The asymptotic properties are examined. Sufficient conditions for persistence and extinction are obtained, our results demonstrate that the impulse has important effects on the persistence and extinction of the species. We also show that the solution is stochastically ultimate bounded under some conditions. Finally, several simulation figures are introduced to confirm our main results.

  12. Existence of traveling wave solutions in a diffusive predator-prey model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianhua; Lu, Gang; Ruan, Shigui

    2003-02-01

    We establish the existence of traveling front solutions and small amplitude traveling wave train solutions for a reaction-diffusion system based on a predator-prey model with Holling type-II functional response. The traveling front solutions are equivalent to heteroclinic orbits in R(4) and the small amplitude traveling wave train solutions are equivalent to small amplitude periodic orbits in R(4). The methods used to prove the results are the shooting argument and the Hopf bifurcation theorem. PMID:12567231

  13. A comparison of two predator-prey models with Holling's type I functional response.

    PubMed

    Seo, Gunog; Kot, Mark

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we analyze a laissez-faire predator-prey model and a Leslie-type predator-prey model with type I functional responses. We study the stability of the equilibrium where the predator and prey coexist by both performing a linearized stability analysis and by constructing a Lyapunov function. For the Leslie-type model, we use a generalized Jacobian to determine how eigenvalues jump at the corner of the functional response. We show, numerically, that our two models can both possess two limit cycles that surround a stable equilibrium and that these cycles arise through global cyclic-fold bifurcations. The Leslie-type model may also exhibit super-critical and discontinuous Hopf bifurcations. We then present and analyze a new functional response, built around the arctangent, that smoothes the sharp corner in a type I functional response. For this new functional response, both models undergo Hopf, cyclic-fold, and Bautin bifurcations. We use our analyses to characterize predator-prey systems that may exhibit bistability. PMID:18346761

  14. Restructuring fundamental predator-prey models by recognising prey-dependent conversion efficiency and mortality rates.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiqiu; Montagnes, David J S

    2015-05-01

    Incorporating protozoa into population models (from simple predator-prey explorations to complex food web simulations) is of conceptual, ecological, and economic importance. From theoretical and empirical perspectives, we expose unappreciated complexity in the traditional predator-prey model structure and provide a parsimonious solution, especially for protistologists. We focus on how prey abundance alters two key components of models: predator conversion efficiency (e, the proportion of prey converted to predator, before mortality loss) and predator mortality (δ, the portion of the population lost though death). Using a well-established model system (Paramecium and Didinium), we collect data to parameterize a range of existing and novel population models that differ in the functional forms of e and δ. We then compare model simulations to an empirically obtained time-series of predator-prey population dynamics. The analysis indicates that prey-dependent e and δ should be considered when structuring population models and that both prey and predator biomass also vary with prey abundance. Both of these impact the ability of the model to predict population dynamics and, therefore, should be included in theoretical model evaluations and assessment of ecosystem dynamics associated with biomass flux. PMID:25819465

  15. Effects of the heterogeneous landscape on a predator-prey system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Hee

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand how a heterogeneous landscape affects a predator-prey system, a spatially explicit lattice model consisting of predators, prey, grass, and landscape was constructed. The predators and preys randomly move on the lattice space and the grass grows in its neighboring site according to its growth probability. When predators and preys meet at the same site at the same time, a number of prey, equal to the number of predators are eaten. This rule was also applied to the relationship between the prey and grass. The predator (prey) could give birth to an offspring when it ate prey (grass), with a birth probability. When a predator or prey animal was initially introduced, or newly born, its health state was set at a given high value. This health state decreased by one with every time step. When the state of an animal decreased to less than zero, the animal died and was removed from the system. The heterogeneous landscape was characterized by parameter H, which controlled the heterogeneity according to the neutral model. The simulation results showed that H positively or negatively affected a predator’s survival, while its effect on prey and grass was less pronounced. The results can be understood by the disturbance of the balance between the prey and predator densities in the areas where the animals aggregated.

  16. Bacterial predator-prey dynamics in microscale patchy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Hol, Felix J H; Rotem, Or; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Dekker, Cees; Koster, Daniel A

    2016-02-10

    Soil is a microenvironment with a fragmented (patchy) spatial structure in which many bacterial species interact. Here, we explore the interaction between the predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus and its prey Escherichia coli in microfabricated landscapes. We ask how fragmentation influences the prey dynamics at the microscale and compare two landscape geometries: a patchy landscape and a continuous landscape. By following the dynamics of prey populations with high spatial and temporal resolution for many generations, we found that the variation in predation rates was twice as large in the patchy landscape and the dynamics was correlated over shorter length scales. We also found that while the prey population in the continuous landscape was almost entirely driven to extinction, a significant part of the prey population in the fragmented landscape persisted over time. We observed significant surface-associated growth, especially in the fragmented landscape and we surmise that this sub-population is more resistant to predation. Our results thus show that microscale fragmentation can significantly influence bacterial interactions. PMID:26865299

  17. Analysis of a predator-prey system with predator switching.

    PubMed

    Khan, Q J A; Balakrishnan, E; Wake, G C

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we consider an interaction of prey and predator species where prey species have the ability of group defence. Thresholds, equilibria and stabilities are determined for the system of ordinary differential equations. Taking carrying capacity as a bifurcation parameter, it is shown that a Hopf bifurcation can occur implying that if the carrying capacity is made sufficiently large by enrichment of the environment, the model predicts the eventual extinction of the predator providing strong support for the so-called 'paradox of enrichment'. PMID:14670532

  18. Switching from simple to complex dynamics in a predator-prey-parasite model: An interplay between infection rate and incubation delay.

    PubMed

    Bairagi, N; Adak, D

    2016-07-01

    Parasites play a significant role in trophic interactions and can regulate both predator and prey populations. Mathematical models might be of great use in predicting different system dynamics because models have the potential to predict the system response due to different changes in system parameters. In this paper, we study a predator-prey-parasite (PPP) system where prey population is infected by some micro parasites and predator-prey interaction occurs following Leslie-Gower model with type II response function. Infection spreads following SI type epidemic model with standard incidence rate. The infection process is not instantaneous but mediated by a fixed incubation delay. We study the stability and instability of the endemic equilibrium point of the delay-induced PPP system with respect to two parameters, viz., the force of infection and the length of incubation delay under two cases: (i) the corresponding non-delayed system is stable and (ii) the corresponding non-delayed system is unstable. In the first case, the system populations coexist in stable state for all values of delay if the force of infection is low; or show oscillatory behavior when the force of infection is intermediate and the length of delay crosses some critical value. The system, however, exhibits very complicated dynamics if the force of infection is high, where the system is unstable in absence of delay. In this last case, the system shows oscillatory, stable or chaotic behavior depending on the length of delay. PMID:27091744

  19. Modelling the dynamics of traits involved in fighting-predators-prey system.

    PubMed

    Kooi, B W

    2015-12-01

    We study the dynamics of a predator-prey system where predators fight for captured prey besides searching for and handling (and digestion) of the prey. Fighting for prey is modelled by a continuous time hawk-dove game dynamics where the gain depends on the amount of disputed prey while the costs for fighting is constant per fighting event. The strategy of the predator-population is quantified by a trait being the proportion of the number of predator-individuals playing hawk tactics. The dynamics of the trait is described by two models of adaptation: the replicator dynamics (RD) and the adaptive dynamics (AD). In the RD-approach a variant individual with an adapted trait value changes the population's strategy, and consequently its trait value, only when its payoff is larger than the population average. In the AD-approach successful replacement of the resident population after invasion of a rare variant population with an adapted trait value is a step in a sequence changing the population's strategy, and hence its trait value. The main aim is to compare the consequences of the two adaptation models. In an equilibrium predator-prey system this will lead to convergence to a neutral singular strategy, while in the oscillatory system to a continuous singular strategy where in this endpoint the resident population is not invasible by any variant population. In equilibrium (low prey carrying capacity) RD and AD-approach give the same results, however not always in a periodically oscillating system (high prey carrying-capacity) where the trait is density-dependent. For low costs the predator population is monomorphic (only hawks) while for high costs dimorphic (hawks and doves). These results illustrate that intra-specific trait dynamics matters in predator-prey dynamics. PMID:25773467

  20. Dynamics of a Diffusive Predator-Prey Model with General Nonlinear Functional Response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We study a diffusive predator-prey model with nonconstant death rate and general nonlinear functional response. Firstly, stability analysis of the equilibrium for reduced ODE system is discussed. Secondly, sufficient and necessary conditions which guarantee the predator and the prey species to be permanent are obtained. Furthermore, sufficient conditions for the global asymptotical stability of the unique positive equilibrium of the system are derived by using the method of Lyapunov function. Finally, we show that there are no nontrivial steady state solutions for certain parameter configuration. PMID:24688422

  1. Stability and bifurcation analysis for a delayed Lotka-Volterra predator-prey system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiang-Ping; Chu, Yan-Dong

    2006-11-01

    The present paper deals with a delayed Lotka-Volterra predator-prey system. By linearizing the equations and by analyzing the locations on the complex plane of the roots of the characteristic equation, we find the necessary conditions that the parameters should verify in order to have the oscillations in the system. In addition, the normal form of the Hopf bifurcation arising in the system is determined to investigate the direction and the stability of periodic solutions bifurcating from these Hopf bifurcations. To verify the obtained conditions, a special numerical example is also included.

  2. Influence of predator mutual interference and prey refuge on Lotka-Volterra predator-prey dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liujuan; Chen, Fengde; Wang, Yiqin

    2013-11-01

    A Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model incorporating a constant number of prey using refuges and mutual interference for predator species is presented. By applying the divergency criterion and theories on exceptional directions and normal sectors, we show that the interior equilibrium is always globally asymptotically stable and two boundary equilibria are both saddle points. Our results indicate that prey refuge has no influence on the coexistence of predator and prey species of the considered model under the effects of mutual interference for predator species, which differently from the conclusion without predator mutual interference, thus improving some known ones. Numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the validity of our results.

  3. An implementation of continuous genetic algorithm in parameter estimation of predator-prey model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windarto

    2016-03-01

    Genetic algorithm is an optimization method based on the principles of genetics and natural selection in life organisms. The main components of this algorithm are chromosomes population (individuals population), parent selection, crossover to produce new offspring, and random mutation. In this paper, continuous genetic algorithm was implemented to estimate parameters in a predator-prey model of Lotka-Volterra type. For simplicity, all genetic algorithm parameters (selection rate and mutation rate) are set to be constant along implementation of the algorithm. It was found that by selecting suitable mutation rate, the algorithms can estimate these parameters well.

  4. A Rao-Blackwellized particle filter for joint parameter estimation and biomass tracking in a stochastic predator-prey system.

    PubMed

    Martín-Fernández, Laura; Gilioli, Gianni; Lanzarone, Ettore; Miguez, Joaquin; Pasquali, Sara; Ruggeri, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Diego P

    2014-06-01

    Functional response estimation and population tracking in predator-prey systems are critical problems in ecology. In this paper we consider a stochastic predator-prey system with a Lotka-Volterra functional response and propose a particle filtering method for: (a) estimating the behavioral parameter representing the rate of effective search per predator in the functional response and (b) forecasting the population biomass using field data. In particular, the proposed technique combines a sequential Monte Carlo sampling scheme for tracking the time-varying biomass with the analytical integration of the unknown behavioral parameter. In order to assess the performance of the method, we show results for both synthetic and observed data collected in an acarine predator-prey system, namely the pest mite Tetranychus urticae and the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis. PMID:24506552

  5. Predator-prey effective model for the laminar-turbulent transition in a pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hong-Yan; Hsieh, Tsung-Lin; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2015-11-01

    The goal of our work is to understand the phenomenology of the laminar-turbulent transition in terms of standard phase transition concepts, and to calculate the universality class from first principles. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of transitional pipe flow show that a collective mode -- a zonal flow -- is activated by Reynolds stress and suppresses turbulence subsequently, leading to stochastic predator-prey-like oscillations. Here we describe in detail the effective stochastic theory for such spatial-extended predator-prey modes. We present Monte Carlo simulations of the effective theory, showing that it reproduces the phenomenology of pipe flow experiments, including the phase diagram of puff decay and splitting. In particular, the theory predicts a super-exponential lifetime statistics for both puff decay and puff-splitting, in agreement with experimental data on pipe flow, and can be mapped exactly to the field theory of directed percolation. Our calculations strongly suggest that transitional turbulence in pipes is in the universality class of directed percolation. This work was partially supported by the National Science Foundation through grant NSF-DMR-1044901.

  6. Effects of the prey refuge distribution on a predator-prey system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Hee; Kwon, Ohsung; Song, Hark-Soo

    2016-03-01

    The existence of prey refuges in a predator-prey system is known to be strongly related to the ecosystem's stability. In this study, we explored how the prey refuge distribution affects the predator-prey system. To do so, we constructed a spatial lattice model to simulate an integrative predator (wolf) - prey (rabbit) - plant (grass) relationship. When a wolf (rabbit) encountered a rabbit (grass), the wolf (rabbit) tended to move to the rabbit (grass) for foraging while the rabbit tended to escape from the wolf. These behaviors were mathematically described by the degrees of willingness for hunting ( H) and escaping ( E). Initially, n refuges for prey were heterogeneously distributed in the lattice space. The heterogeneity was characterized as variable A. Higher values of A equate to higher aggregation in the refuge. We investigated the mean population density for different values of H, E, and A. To simply characterize the refuge distribution effect, we built an H-E grid map containing the population density for each species. Then, we counted the number of grids, N, with a population density ≥ 0.25. Simulation results showed that an appropriate value of A positively affected prey survival while values of A were too high had a negative effect on prey survival. The results were explained by using the trade-off between the staying time of the prey in the refuge and the cluster size of the refuge.

  7. Predator-prey relationships in a Mediterranean vertebrate system: Bonelli's eagles, rabbits and partridges.

    PubMed

    Moleón, Marcos; Sánchez-Zapata, José A; Gil-Sánchez, José M; Ballesteros-Duperón, Elena; Barea-Azcón, José M; Virgós, Emilio

    2012-03-01

    How predators impact on prey population dynamics is still an unsolved issue for most wild predator-prey communities. When considering vertebrates, important concerns constrain a comprehensive understanding of the functioning of predator-prey relationships worldwide; e.g. studies simultaneously quantifying 'functional' and 'numerical responses' (i.e., the 'total response') are rare. The functional, the numerical, and the resulting total response (i.e., how the predator per capita intake, the population of predators and the total of prey eaten by the total predators vary with prey densities) are fundamental as they reveal the predator's ability to regulate prey population dynamics. Here, we used a multi-spatio-temporal scale approach to simultaneously explore the functional and numerical responses of a territorial predator (Bonelli's eagle Hieraaetus fasciatus) to its two main prey species (the rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus and the red-legged partridge Alectoris rufa) during the breeding period in a Mediterranean system of south Spain. Bonelli's eagle responded functionally, but not numerically, to rabbit/partridge density changes. Type II, non-regulatory, functional responses (typical of specialist predators) offered the best fitting models for both prey. In the absence of a numerical response, Bonelli's eagle role as a regulating factor of rabbit and partridge populations seems to be weak in our study area. Simple (prey density-dependent) functional response models may well describe the short-term variation in a territorial predator's consumption rate in complex ecosystems. PMID:21947548

  8. Predator-prey dynamics stabilised by nonlinearity explain oscillations in dust-forming plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, A. E.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2016-04-01

    Dust-forming plasmas are ionised gases that generate particles from a precursor. In nature, dust-forming plasmas are found in flames, the interstellar medium and comet tails. In the laboratory, they are valuable in generating nanoparticles for medicine and electronics. Dust-forming plasmas exhibit a bizarre, even puzzling behaviour in which they oscillate with timescales of seconds to minutes. Here we show how the problem of understanding these oscillations may be cast as a predator-prey problem, with electrons as prey and particles as predators. The addition of a nonlinear loss term to the classic Lotka-Volterra equations used for describing the predator-prey problem in ecology not only stabilises the oscillations in the solutions for the populations of electrons and particles in the plasma but also explains the behaviour in more detail. The model explains the relative phase difference of the two populations, the way in which the frequency of the oscillations varies with the concentration of the precursor gas, and the oscillations of the light emission, determined by the populations of both species. Our results demonstrate the value of adopting an approach to a complex physical science problem that has been found successful in ecology, where complexity is always present.

  9. Predator-prey dynamics stabilised by nonlinearity explain oscillations in dust-forming plasmas.

    PubMed

    Ross, A E; McKenzie, D R

    2016-01-01

    Dust-forming plasmas are ionised gases that generate particles from a precursor. In nature, dust-forming plasmas are found in flames, the interstellar medium and comet tails. In the laboratory, they are valuable in generating nanoparticles for medicine and electronics. Dust-forming plasmas exhibit a bizarre, even puzzling behaviour in which they oscillate with timescales of seconds to minutes. Here we show how the problem of understanding these oscillations may be cast as a predator-prey problem, with electrons as prey and particles as predators. The addition of a nonlinear loss term to the classic Lotka-Volterra equations used for describing the predator-prey problem in ecology not only stabilises the oscillations in the solutions for the populations of electrons and particles in the plasma but also explains the behaviour in more detail. The model explains the relative phase difference of the two populations, the way in which the frequency of the oscillations varies with the concentration of the precursor gas, and the oscillations of the light emission, determined by the populations of both species. Our results demonstrate the value of adopting an approach to a complex physical science problem that has been found successful in ecology, where complexity is always present. PMID:27046237

  10. Predator-prey dynamics stabilised by nonlinearity explain oscillations in dust-forming plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Ross, A. E.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    Dust-forming plasmas are ionised gases that generate particles from a precursor. In nature, dust-forming plasmas are found in flames, the interstellar medium and comet tails. In the laboratory, they are valuable in generating nanoparticles for medicine and electronics. Dust-forming plasmas exhibit a bizarre, even puzzling behaviour in which they oscillate with timescales of seconds to minutes. Here we show how the problem of understanding these oscillations may be cast as a predator-prey problem, with electrons as prey and particles as predators. The addition of a nonlinear loss term to the classic Lotka-Volterra equations used for describing the predator-prey problem in ecology not only stabilises the oscillations in the solutions for the populations of electrons and particles in the plasma but also explains the behaviour in more detail. The model explains the relative phase difference of the two populations, the way in which the frequency of the oscillations varies with the concentration of the precursor gas, and the oscillations of the light emission, determined by the populations of both species. Our results demonstrate the value of adopting an approach to a complex physical science problem that has been found successful in ecology, where complexity is always present. PMID:27046237

  11. Complex dynamics in a singular Leslie-Gower predator-prey bioeconomic model with time delay and stochastic fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Qingling; Yan, Xing-Gang

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a class of singular Leslie-Gower predator-prey bioeconomic models with environment fluctuations and time delays is investigated. Local stability analysis of the model reveals that there is a phenomenon of singularity induced bifurcation due to variation of economic interest of harvesting. By choosing the delay as a bifurcation parameter, it is shown that the Hopf bifurcations can occur as the delay crosses some critical values. Then, the effect of a fluctuating environment on the singular stochastic delayed predator-prey bioeconomic model is discussed. Finally numerical simulations demonstrate that the amplitude of oscillation for population is enhanced when compared with the oscillation observed in the deterministic environment.

  12. Canard cycles for predator-prey systems with Holling types of functional response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengzhi; Zhu, Huaiping

    By using the singular perturbation theory developed by Dumortier and Roussarie and recent work of De Maesschalck and Dumortier, we study the canard phenomenon for predator-prey systems with response functions of Holling types. We first develop a formula for computing the slow divergence integrals. By using the formula we prove that for the systems with the response function of Holling types III and IV the cyclicity of any limit periodic set is at most two, that is at most two families of hyperbolic limit cycles or at most one family of limit cycles with multiplicity two can bifurcate from the limit periodic set by small perturbations. We also indicate the regions in parameter space where the corresponding limit periodic set has cyclicity at most one or at most two.

  13. Dynamic analysis of a fractional order delayed predator-prey system with harvesting.

    PubMed

    Song, Ping; Zhao, Hongyong; Zhang, Xuebing

    2016-06-01

    In the study, we consider a fractional order delayed predator-prey system with harvesting terms. Our discussion is divided into two cases. Without harvesting, we investigate the stability of the model, as well as deriving some criteria by analyzing the associated characteristic equation. With harvesting, we investigate the dynamics of the system from the aspect of local stability and analyze the influence of harvesting to prey and predator. Finally, numerical simulations are presented to verify our theoretical results. In addition, using numerical simulations, we investigate the effects of fractional order and harvesting terms on dynamic behavior. Our numerical results show that fractional order can affect not only the stability of the system without harvesting terms, but also the switching times from stability to instability and to stability. The harvesting can convert the equilibrium point, the stability and the stability switching times. PMID:27026265

  14. Cannibalistic Predator-Prey Model with Disease in Predator — A Delay Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Santosh; Samanta, Sudip; Chattopadhyay, Joydev

    In this paper, we propose and analyze a cannibalistic predator-prey model with a transmissible disease in the predator population. The disease can be transmitted through contacts with infected individuals as well as the cannibalism of an infected predator. We also consider incubation delay in disease transmission, where the incubation period represents the time in which the infectious agent develops in the host. Local stability analysis of the system around the biologically feasible equilibria is studied. Bifurcation analysis of the system around interior equilibrium is also studied. Applying the normal form theory and central manifold theorem, the direction of Hopf bifurcation, the stability and the period of bifurcating periodic solutions are derived. Under appropriate conditions, the permanence of the system with time delay is proved. Our results suggest that incubation delay destabilizes the system and can produce chaos. We also observe that cannibalism can control disease and population oscillations. Extensive numerical simulations are performed to support our analytical results.

  15. Pursuit-evasion predator-prey waves in two spatial dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biktashev, V. N.; Brindley, J.; Holden, A. V.; Tsyganov, M. A.

    2004-12-01

    We consider a spatially distributed population dynamics model with excitable predator-prey kinetics, where species propagate in space due to their taxis with respect to each other's gradient in addition to, or instead of, their diffusive spread. Earlier, we have described new phenomena in this model in one spatial dimension, not found in analogous systems without taxis: reflecting and self-splitting waves. Here we identify new phenomena in two spatial dimensions: unusual patterns of meander of spirals, partial reflection of waves, swelling wave tips, attachment of free wave ends to wave backs, and as a result, a novel mechanism of self-supporting complicated spatiotemporal activity, unknown in reaction-diffusion population models.

  16. Responses of many-species predator-prey systems to perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaily, Shadi; Pleimling, Michel

    2015-03-01

    We study the responses of many-species predator-prey systems, both in the well-mixed case as well as on a two-dimensional lattice, to permanent and transient perturbations. In the case of a weak transient perturbation the system returns to the original steady state, whereas a permanent perturbation pushes the system into a new steady state. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we monitor the approach to stationarity after a perturbation through a variety of quantities, as for example time-dependent particle densities and correlation functions. Different types of perturbations are studied, ranging from a change in reaction rates to the injection of additional individuals into the system, the latter perturbation mimicking immigration. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation through Grant DMR-1205309.

  17. Stationary distribution and periodic solution for stochastic predator-prey systems with nonlinear predator harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Wenjie; Jiang, Daqing

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of the stochastic autonomous and non-autonomous predator-prey systems with nonlinear predator harvesting respectively. For the autonomous system, we first give the existence of the global positive solution. Then, in the case of persistence, we prove that there exists a unique stationary distribution and it has ergodicity by constructing a suitable Lyapunov function. The result shows that, the relatively weaker white noise will strengthen the stability of the system, but the stronger white noise will result in the extinction of one or two species. Particularly, for the non-autonomous periodic system, we show that there exists at least one nontrivial positive periodic solution according to the theory of Khasminskii. Finally, numerical simulations illustrate our theoretical results.

  18. Dynamics of a predator-prey model with Allee effect and prey group defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Khairul

    2015-02-01

    Dynamical properties of a Gauss type of planar predator-prey system with Allee effect and non-monotonic response function are discussed. We are interested in persistent features lying in the first quadrant, which amount to structurally stable phase portraits. We show that all positive solutions are uniformly bounded. It is also proved that the system has at most two equilibria in the interior of the first quadrant and can exhibit interesting bifurcation phenomena, including Bogdanov-Takens, Hopf, transcritical and saddle-node bifurcations. The system may have a stable periodic orbit, or a homoclinic loop, or a heteroclinic connection, a saddle point, or a stable focus, depending on parameter values. Biologically, both populations may survive for certain values of parameters. Computer simulations are also given in support of the conclusions.

  19. Dynamics of stochastic predator-prey models with Holling II functional response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qun; Zu, Li; Jiang, Daqing

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the dynamics of stochastic predator-prey models with Holling II functional response. For the stochastic systems, we firstly establish sufficient conditions for the existence of the globally positive solutions. Then we investigate the asymptotic moment estimations of the positive solutions and study the ultimately bounded in the mean of them. Thirdly, by constructing some suitable Lyapunov functions, we verify that there are unique stationary distributions and they are ergodic. The obtained results show that the systems still retain some stability in the sense of weak stability provided that the intensity of the white noise is relatively small. Finally, some numerical simulations are introduced to illustrate our main results.

  20. Periodic solutions of a nonautonomous predator-prey system with stage structure and time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rui; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2006-11-01

    A nonautonomous Lotka-Volterra type predator-prey model with stage structure and time delays is investigated. It is assumed in the model that the individuals in each species may belong to one of two classes: the immatures and the matures, the age to maturity is presented by a time delay, and that the immature predators do not feed on prey and do not have the ability to reproduce. By some comparison arguments we first discuss the permanence of the model. By using the continuation theorem of coincidence degree theory, sufficient conditions are derived for the existence of positive periodic solutions to the model. By means of a suitable Lyapunov functional, sufficient conditions are obtained for the uniqueness and global stability of the positive periodic solutions to the model.

  1. The diffusive Lotka-Volterra predator-prey system with delay.

    PubMed

    Al Noufaey, K S; Marchant, T R; Edwards, M P

    2015-12-01

    Semi-analytical solutions for the diffusive Lotka-Volterra predator-prey system with delay are considered in one and two-dimensional domains. The Galerkin method is applied, which approximates the spatial structure of both the predator and prey populations. This approach is used to obtain a lower-order, ordinary differential delay equation model for the system of governing delay partial differential equations. Steady-state and transient solutions and the region of parameter space, in which Hopf bifurcations occur, are all found. In some cases simple linear expressions are found as approximations, to describe steady-state solutions and the Hopf parameter regions. An asymptotic analysis for the periodic solution near the Hopf bifurcation point is performed for the one-dimensional domain. An excellent agreement is shown in comparisons between semi-analytical and numerical solutions of the governing equations. PMID:26471317

  2. Spatiotemporal complexity in a predator--prey model with weak Allee effects.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yongli; Banerjee, Malay; Kang, Yun; Wang, Weiming

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we study the rich dynamics of a diffusive predator-prey system with Allee effects in the prey growth. Our model assumes a prey-dependent Holling type-II functional response and a density dependent death rate for predator. We investigate the dissipation and persistence property, the stability of nonnegative and positive constant steady state of the model, as well as the existence of Hopf bifurcation at the positive constant solution. In addition, we provide results on the existence and non-existence of positive non-constant solutions of the model. We also demonstrate the Turing instability under some conditions, and find that our model exhibits a diffusion-controlled formation growth of spots, stripes, and holes pattern replication via numerical simulations. One of the most interesting findings is that Turing instability in the model is induced by the density dependent death rate in predator. PMID:25365601

  3. Internally driven alternation of functional traits in a multispecies predator-prey system.

    PubMed

    Tirok, Katrin; Gaedke, Ursula

    2010-06-01

    The individual functional traits of different species play a key role for ecosystem function in aquatic and terrestrial systems. We modeled a multispecies predator-prey system with functionally different predator and prey species based on observations of the community dynamics of ciliates and their algal prey in Lake Constance. The model accounted for differences in predator feeding preferences and prey susceptibility to predation, and for the respective trade-offs. A low food demand of the predator was connected to a high food selectivity, and a high growth rate of the prey was connected to a high vulnerability to grazing. The data and the model did not show standard uniform predator-prey cycles, but revealed both complex dynamics and a coexistence of predator and prey at high biomass levels. These dynamics resulted from internally driven alternations in species densities and involved compensatory dynamics between functionally different species. Functional diversity allowed for ongoing adaptation of the predator and prey communities to changing environmental conditions such as food composition and grazing pressure. The trade-offs determined whether compensatory or synchronous dynamics occurred which influence the variability at the community level. Compensatory dynamics were promoted by a joint carrying capacity linking the different prey species which is particularly relevant at high prey biomasses, i.e., when grazers are less efficient. In contrast, synchronization was enhanced by the coupling of the different predator and prey species via common feeding links, e.g., by a high grazing pressure of a nonselective predator. The communities had to be functionally diverse in terms of their trade-offs and their traits to yield compensatory dynamics. Rather similar predator species tended to cycle synchronously, whereas profoundly different species did not coexist. Compensatory dynamics at the community level thus required intermediately strong tradeoffs for functional

  4. A comparison of the seasonal movements of tiger sharks and green turtles provides insight into their predator-prey relationship.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Richard; Thums, Michele; Bell, Ian; Meekan, Mark G; Stevens, John D; Barnett, Adam

    2012-01-01

    During the reproductive season, sea turtles use a restricted area in the vicinity of their nesting beaches, making them vulnerable to predation. At Raine Island (Australia), the highest density green turtle Chelonia mydas rookery in the world, tiger sharks Galeocerdo cuvier have been observed to feed on green turtles, and it has been suggested that they may specialise on such air-breathing prey. However there is little information with which to examine this hypothesis. We compared the spatial and temporal components of movement behaviour of these two potentially interacting species in order to provide insight into the predator-prey relationship. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that tiger shark movements are more concentrated at Raine Island during the green turtle nesting season than outside the turtle nesting season when turtles are not concentrated at Raine Island. Turtles showed area-restricted search behaviour around Raine Island for ∼3-4 months during the nesting period (November-February). This was followed by direct movement (transit) to putative foraging grounds mostly in the Torres Straight where they switched to area-restricted search mode again, and remained resident for the remainder of the deployment (53-304 days). In contrast, tiger sharks displayed high spatial and temporal variation in movement behaviour which was not closely linked to the movement behaviour of green turtles or recognised turtle foraging grounds. On average, tiger sharks were concentrated around Raine Island throughout the year. While information on diet is required to determine whether tiger sharks are turtle specialists our results support the hypothesis that they target this predictable and plentiful prey during turtle nesting season, but they might not focus on this less predictable food source outside the nesting season. PMID:23284819

  5. A Comparison of the Seasonal Movements of Tiger Sharks and Green Turtles Provides Insight into Their Predator-Prey Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Richard; Thums, Michele; Bell, Ian; Meekan, Mark G.; Stevens, John D.; Barnett, Adam

    2012-01-01

    During the reproductive season, sea turtles use a restricted area in the vicinity of their nesting beaches, making them vulnerable to predation. At Raine Island (Australia), the highest density green turtle Chelonia mydas rookery in the world, tiger sharks Galeocerdo cuvier have been observed to feed on green turtles, and it has been suggested that they may specialise on such air-breathing prey. However there is little information with which to examine this hypothesis. We compared the spatial and temporal components of movement behaviour of these two potentially interacting species in order to provide insight into the predator-prey relationship. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that tiger shark movements are more concentrated at Raine Island during the green turtle nesting season than outside the turtle nesting season when turtles are not concentrated at Raine Island. Turtles showed area-restricted search behaviour around Raine Island for ∼3–4 months during the nesting period (November–February). This was followed by direct movement (transit) to putative foraging grounds mostly in the Torres Straight where they switched to area-restricted search mode again, and remained resident for the remainder of the deployment (53–304 days). In contrast, tiger sharks displayed high spatial and temporal variation in movement behaviour which was not closely linked to the movement behaviour of green turtles or recognised turtle foraging grounds. On average, tiger sharks were concentrated around Raine Island throughout the year. While information on diet is required to determine whether tiger sharks are turtle specialists our results support the hypothesis that they target this predictable and plentiful prey during turtle nesting season, but they might not focus on this less predictable food source outside the nesting season. PMID:23284819

  6. Inconstancy in predator/prey ratios in Quaternary large mammal communities of Italy, with an appraisal of mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raia, Pasquale; Meloro, Carlo; Barbera, Carmela

    2007-03-01

    Constancy in predator/prey ratio (PPR) is a controversial issue in ecological research. Published reports support both constancy and inconstancy of the ratio in animal communities. Only a few studies, however, specifically address its course through time. Here we study the course of predator/prey ratio in communities of large Plio-Pleistocene mammals in Italy. After controlling for taphonomic biases, we find strong support for PPR inconstancy through time. Extinction, dispersal events, and differences in body size trends between predators and their prey were found to affect the ratio, which was distributed almost bimodally. We suggest that this stepwise dynamic in PPR indicates changes in ecosystem functioning. Prey richness was controlled by predation when PPR was high and by resources when PPR was low.

  7. Spatiotemporal Patterns of a Predator-Prey System with an Allee Effect and Holling Type III Functional Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jinfeng

    A diffusive Gause type predator-prey system with Allee effect in prey growth and Holling type III response subject to Neumann boundary conditions is investigated. Existence of nonconstant positive steady state solutions is proved by Leray-Schauder degree theory and bifurcation theory. Global stability of the positive equilibrium of the system is also investigated. Moreover, bifurcations of spatially homogeneous and nonhomogeneous periodic solutions are analyzed. Our rigorous results justify some recent ecological observations.

  8. Dynamics and pattern formation in a diffusive predator-prey system with strong Allee effect in prey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Shi, Junping; Wei, Junjie

    The dynamics of a reaction-diffusion predator-prey system with strong Allee effect in the prey population is considered. Nonexistence of nonconstant positive steady state solutions are shown to identify the ranges of parameters of spatial pattern formation. Bifurcations of spatially homogeneous and nonhomogeneous periodic solutions as well as nonconstant steady state solutions are studied. These results show that the impact of the Allee effect essentially increases the system spatiotemporal complexity.

  9. Global existence of solutions and uniform persistence of a diffusive predator-prey model with prey-taxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sainan; Shi, Junping; Wu, Boying

    2016-04-01

    This paper proves the global existence and boundedness of solutions to a general reaction-diffusion predator-prey system with prey-taxis defined on a smooth bounded domain with no-flux boundary condition. The result holds for domains in arbitrary spatial dimension and small prey-taxis sensitivity coefficient. This paper also proves the existence of a global attractor and the uniform persistence of the system under some additional conditions. Applications to models from ecology and chemotaxis are discussed.

  10. On the selection of ordinary differential equation models with application to predator-prey dynamical models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Cao, Jiguo; Carroll, Raymond J

    2015-03-01

    We consider model selection and estimation in a context where there are competing ordinary differential equation (ODE) models, and all the models are special cases of a "full" model. We propose a computationally inexpensive approach that employs statistical estimation of the full model, followed by a combination of a least squares approximation (LSA) and the adaptive Lasso. We show the resulting method, here called the LSA method, to be an (asymptotically) oracle model selection method. The finite sample performance of the proposed LSA method is investigated with Monte Carlo simulations, in which we examine the percentage of selecting true ODE models, the efficiency of the parameter estimation compared to simply using the full and true models, and coverage probabilities of the estimated confidence intervals for ODE parameters, all of which have satisfactory performances. Our method is also demonstrated by selecting the best predator-prey ODE to model a lynx and hare population dynamical system among some well-known and biologically interpretable ODE models. PMID:25287611

  11. Using predator-prey theory to predict outcomes of broadscale experiments to reduce apparent competition.

    PubMed

    Serrouya, Robert; Wittmann, Meike J; McLellan, Bruce N; Wittmer, Heiko U; Boutin, Stan

    2015-05-01

    Apparent competition is an important process influencing many ecological communities. We used predator-prey theory to predict outcomes of ecosystem experiments aimed at mitigating apparent competition by reducing primary prey. Simulations predicted declines in secondary prey following reductions in primary prey because predators consumed more secondary prey until predator numbers responded to reduced prey densities. Losses were exacerbated by a higher carrying capacity of primary prey and a longer lag time of the predator's numerical response, but a gradual reduction in primary prey was less detrimental to the secondary prey. We compared predictions against two field experiments where endangered woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) were victims of apparent competition. First, when deer (Odocoileus sp.) declined suddenly following a severe winter, cougar (Puma concolor) declined with a 1-2-year lag, yet in the interim more caribou were killed by cougars, and caribou populations declined by 40%. Second, when moose (Alces alces) were gradually reduced using a management experiment, wolf (Canis lupus) populations declined but did not shift consumption to caribou, and the largest caribou subpopulation stabilized. The observed contrasting outcomes of sudden versus gradual declines in primary prey supported theoretical predictions. Combining theory with field studies clarified how to manage communities to mitigate endangerment caused by apparent competition that affects many taxa. PMID:25905509

  12. A predator-prey model with diseases in both prey and predator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xubin; Pan, Qiuhui; He, Mingfeng; Kang, Yibin

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present and analyze a predator-prey model, in which both predator and prey can be infected. Each of the predator and prey is divided into two categories, susceptible and infected. The epidemics cannot be transmitted between prey and predator by predation. The predation ability of susceptible predators is stronger than infected ones. Likewise, it is more difficult to catch a susceptible prey than an infected one. And the diseases cannot be hereditary in both of the predator and prey populations. Based on the assumptions above, we find that there are six equilibrium points in this model. Using the base reproduction number, we discuss the stability of the equilibrium points qualitatively. Then both of the local and global stabilities of the equilibrium points are analyzed quantitatively by mathematical methods. We provide numerical results to discuss some interesting biological cases that our model exhibits. Lastly, we discuss how the infectious rates affect the stability, and how the other parameters work in the five possible cases within this model.

  13. Phase diagram of a cyclic predator-prey model with neutral-pair exchange.

    PubMed

    Guisoni, Nara C; Loscar, Ernesto S; Girardi, Mauricio

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we obtain the phase diagram of a four-species predator-prey lattice model by using the proposed gradient method. We consider cyclic transitions between consecutive states, representing invasion or predation, and allowed the exchange between neighboring neutral pairs. By applying a gradient in the invasion rate parameter one can see, in the same simulation, the presence of two symmetric absorbing phases, composed by neutral pairs, and an active phase that includes all four species. In this sense, the study of a single-valued interface and its fluctuations give the critical point of the irreversible phase transition and the corresponding universality classes. Also, the consideration of a multivalued interface and its fluctuations bring the percolation threshold. We show that the model presents two lines of irreversible first-order phase transition between the two absorbing phases and the active phase. Depending on the value of the system parameters, these lines can converge into a triple point, which is the beginning of a first-order irreversible line between the two absorbing phases, or end in two critical points belonging to the directed percolation universality class. Standard simulations for some characteristic values of the parameters confirm the order of the transitions as determined by the gradient method. Besides, below the triple point the model presents two standard percolation lines in the active phase and above a first-order percolation transition as already found in other similar models. PMID:24032801

  14. Talking helps: evolving communicating agents for the predator-prey pursuit problem.

    PubMed

    Jim, K C; Giles, C L

    2000-01-01

    We analyze a general model of multi-agent communication in which all agents communicate simultaneously to a message board. A genetic algorithm is used to evolve multi-agent languages for the predator agents in a version of the predator-prey pursuit problem. We show that the resulting behavior of the communicating multi-agent system is equivalent to that of a Mealy finite state machine whose states are determined by the agents' usage of the evolved language. Simulations show that the evolution of a communication language improves the performance of the predators. Increasing the language size (and thus increasing the number of possible states in the Mealy machine) improves the performance even further. Furthermore, the evolved communicating predators perform significantly better than all previous work on similar prey. We introduce a method for incrementally increasing the language size, which results in an effective coarse-to-fine search that significantly reduces the evolution time required to find a solution. We present some observations on the effects of language size, experimental setup, and prey difficulty on the evolved Mealy machines. In particular, we observe that the start state is often revisited, and incrementally increasing the language size results in smaller Mealy machines. Finally, a simple rule is derived that provides a pessimistic estimate on the minimum language size that should be used for any multi-agent problem. PMID:11224918

  15. Transmission Dynamics of Resistant Bacteria in a Predator-Prey System

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xubin; Pan, Qiuhui

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact on human health caused by the addition of antibiotics in the feed of food animals. We use the established transmission rule of resistant bacteria and combine it with a predator-prey system to determine a differential equations model. The equations have three steady equilibrium points corresponding to three population dynamics states under the influence of resistant bacteria. In order to quantitatively analyze the stability of the equilibrium points, we focused on the basic reproduction numbers. Then, both the local and global stability of the equilibrium points were quantitatively analyzed by using essential mathematical methods. Numerical results are provided to relate our model properties to some interesting biological cases. Finally, we discuss the effect of the two main parameters of the model, the proportion of antibiotics added to feed and the predation rate, and estimate the human health impacts related to the amount of feed antibiotics used. We further propose an approach for the prevention of the large-scale spread of resistant bacteria and illustrate the necessity of controlling the amount of in-feed antibiotics used. PMID:25821510

  16. Maternal effects on offspring consumption can stabilize fluctuating predator-prey systems.

    PubMed

    Garbutt, Jennie S; Little, Tom J; Hoyle, Andy

    2015-12-01

    Maternal effects, where the conditions experienced by mothers affect the phenotype of their offspring, are widespread in nature and have the potential to influence population dynamics. However, they are very rarely included in models of population dynamics. Here, we investigate a recently discovered maternal effect, where maternal food availability affects the feeding rate of offspring so that well-fed mothers produce fast-feeding offspring. To understand how this maternal effect influences population dynamics, we explore novel predator-prey models where the consumption rate of predators is modified by changes in maternal prey availability. We address the 'paradox of enrichment', a theoretical prediction that nutrient enrichment destabilizes populations, leading to cycling behaviour and an increased risk of extinction, which has proved difficult to confirm in the wild. Our models show that enriched populations can be stabilized by maternal effects on feeding rate, thus presenting an intriguing potential explanation for the general absence of 'paradox of enrichment' behaviour in natural populations. This stabilizing influence should also reduce a population's risk of extinction and vulnerability to harvesting. PMID:26631563

  17. Shedding light on microbial predator-prey population dynamics using a quantitative bioluminescence assay.

    PubMed

    Im, Hansol; Kim, Dasol; Ghim, Cheol-Min; Mitchell, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the dynamics of predation by Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD 100. Predation tests with two different bioluminescent strains of Escherichia coli, one expressing a heat-labile bacterial luciferase and the other a heat-stable form, showed near identical losses from both, indicating that protein expression and stability are not responsible for the "shutting-off" of the prey bioluminescence (BL). Furthermore, it was found that the loss in the prey BL was not proportional with the predator-to-prey ratio (PPR), with significantly greater losses seen as this value was increased. This suggests that other factors also play a role in lowering the prey BL. The loss in BL, however, was very consistent within nine independent experiments to the point that we were able to reliably estimate the predator numbers within only 1 h when present at a PPR of 6 or higher, Using a fluorescent prey, we found that premature lysis of the prey occurs at a significant level and was more prominent as the PPR ratio increased. Based upon the supernatant fluorescent signal, even a relatively low PPR of 10-20 led to approximately 5% of the prey population being prematurely lysed within 1 h, while a PPR of 90 led to nearly 15% lysis. Consequently, we developed a modified Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model that accounted for this lysis and is able to reliably estimate the prey and bdelloplast populations for a wide range of PPRs. PMID:24272279

  18. On the dynamics of a generalized predator-prey system with Z-type control.

    PubMed

    Lacitignola, Deborah; Diele, Fasma; Marangi, Carmela; Provenzale, Antonello

    2016-10-01

    We apply the Z-control approach to a generalized predator-prey system and consider the specific case of indirect control of the prey population. We derive the associated Z-controlled model and investigate its properties from the point of view of the dynamical systems theory. The key role of the design parameter λ for the successful application of the method is stressed and related to specific dynamical properties of the Z-controlled model. Critical values of the design parameter are also found, delimiting the λ-range for the effectiveness of the Z-method. Analytical results are then numerically validated by the means of two ecological models: the classical Lotka-Volterra model and a model related to a case study of the wolf-wild boar dynamics in the Alta Murgia National Park. Investigations on these models also highlight how the Z-control method acts in respect to different dynamical regimes of the uncontrolled model. PMID:27474208

  19. Fluctuation-induced patterns and rapid evolution in predator-prey ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2014-03-01

    Predator-prey ecosystems exhibit noisy, persistent cycles that cannot be described by intuitive population-level differential equations such as the Lotka-Volterra equations. Traditionally this paradox has been met by including additional nonlinearities such as predator satiation to force limit cycle behavior. Over the last few years, it has been realized that individual-level descriptions, combined with systematic perturbation techniques can reproduce the key features of such systems in a minimal way, without requiring many additional assumptions or fine tunings. Here I review work in this area that uses these techniques to treat spatial patterns and the phenomenon of rapidly evolving prey sub-populations. In the latter case, I show how stochastic individual-level models reproduce the key features observed in chemostats and in the wild, including anomalous phase shifts between predator and prey species, evolutionary cycles and cryptic cycles. This work shows that stochastic individual-level models naturally describe systems where evolutionary time scales surprisingly match ecosystem time scales.

  20. Predator-Prey Model for Haloes in Saturn’s Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.; Madhusudhanan, P.; Colwell, J. E.; Bradley, E.; Sremcevic, M.

    2013-10-01

    Particles in Saturn’s rings have a tripartite nature: (1) a broad distribution of fragments from the disruption of a previous moon that accrete into (2) transient aggregates, resembling piles of rubble, covered by a (3) regolith of smaller grains that result from collisions and meteoritic grinding. Evidence for this triple architecture of ring particles comes from a multitude of Cassini observations. In a number of ring locations (including Saturn’s F ring, the shepherded outer edges of rings A and B and at the locations of the strongest density waves) aggregation and dis-aggregation are operating now. ISS, VIMS, UVIS spectroscopy and occultations show haloes around the strongest density waves. Based on a predator-prey model for ring dynamics, we offer the following explanation: 1. Cyclic velocity changes cause the perturbed regions to reach higher collision speeds at some orbital phases, which preferentially removes small regolith particles; 2. This forms a bright halo around the ILR, if the forcing is strong enough; 3. Surrounding particles diffuse back too slowly to erase the effect; they diffuse away to form the halo. The most rapid time scale is for forcing/aggregate growth/disaggregation; then irreversible regolith erosion; diffusion and/or ballistic transport; and slowest, meteoritic pollution/darkening. We observe both smaller and larger particles at perturbed regions. Straw, UVIS power spectral analysis, kittens and equinox objects show the prey (mass aggregates); while the haloes’ VIMS spectral signature, correlation length and excess variance are created by the predators (velocity dispersion) in regions stirred in the rings. Moon forcing triggers aggregation to create longer-lived aggregates that protect their interiors from meteoritic darkening and recycle the ring material to maintain the current purity of the rings. It also provides a mechanism for creation of new moons at resonance locations in the Roche zone, as proposed by Charnoz etal and

  1. Analysis of a stochastic predator-prey model with applications to intrahost HIV genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Leviyang, Sivan

    2012-12-01

    During an infection, HIV experiences strong selection by immune system T cells. Recent experimental work has shown that MHC escape mutations form an important pathway for HIV to avoid such selection. In this paper, we study a model of MHC escape mutation. The model is a predator-prey model with two prey, composed of two HIV variants, and one predator, the immune system CD8 cells. We assume that one HIV variant is visible to CD8 cells and one is not. The model takes the form of a system of stochastic differential equations. Motivated by well-known results concerning the short life-cycle of HIV intrahost, we assume that HIV population dynamics occur on a faster time scale then CD8 population dynamics. This separation of time scales allows us to analyze our model using an asymptotic approach. Using this model we study the impact of an MHC escape mutation on the population dynamics and genetic evolution of the intrahost HIV population. From the perspective of population dynamics, we show that the competition between the visible and invisible HIV variants can reach steady states in which either a single variant exists or in which coexistence occurs depending on the parameter regime. We show that in some parameter regimes the end state of the system is stochastic. From a genetics perspective, we study the impact of the population dynamics on the lineages of an HIV sample taken after an escape mutation occurs. We show that the lineages go through severe bottlenecks and that in certain parameter regimes the lineage distribution can be characterized by a Kingman coalescent. Our results depend on methods from diffusion theory and coalescent theory. PMID:22139471

  2. Testing predator-prey theory using broad-scale manipulations and independent validation.

    PubMed

    Serrouya, Robert; McLellan, Bruce N; Boutin, Stan

    2015-11-01

    A robust test of ecological theory is to gauge the predictive accuracy of general relationships parameterized from multiple systems but applied to a new area. To address this goal, we used an ecosystem-level experiment to test predator-prey theory by manipulating prey abundance to determine whether predation was density dependent, density independent, compensatory or depensatory (inversely density dependent) on prey populations. Understanding the nature of predation is of primary importance in community ecology because it establishes whether predation has little effect on prey abundance (compensatory), whether it promotes coexistence (density dependent) and reduces the equilibrium of prey (density independent) or whether it can be destabilizing (depensatory). We used theoretical predictions consisting of functional and numerical equations parameterized independently from meta-analyses on wolves (Canis lupus) and moose (Alces alces), but applied to our specific wolf-moose system. Predictions were tested by experimentally reducing moose abundance across 6500 km(2) as a novel way of evaluating the nature of predation. Depensatory predation of wolves on moose was the best explanation of the population dynamic - a mechanism that has been hypothesized to occur but has rarely been evaluated. Adding locally obtained kill rates and numerical estimates to the independent data provided no benefit to model predictions, suggesting that the theory was robust to local variation. These findings have critical implications for any organism that is preyed upon but that also has, or will be, subject to increased human exploitation or perturbations from environmental change. If depensatory predation is not accounted for in harvest models, predicted yields will be excessive and lead to further population decline. PMID:26101058

  3. Characterization of multiple spiral wave dynamics as a stochastic predator-prey system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otani, Niels F.; Mo, Alisa; Mannava, Sandeep; Fenton, Flavio H.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Luther, Stefan; Gilmour, Robert F., Jr.

    2008-08-01

    A perspective on systems containing many action potential waves that, individually, are prone to spiral wave breakup is proposed. The perspective is based on two quantities, “predator” and “prey,” which we define as the fraction of the system in the excited state and in the excitable but unexcited state, respectively. These quantities exhibited a number of properties in both simulations and fibrillating canine cardiac tissue that were found to be consistent with a proposed theory that assumes the existence of regions we call “domains of influence,” each of which is associated with the activity of one action potential wave. The properties include (i) a propensity to rotate in phase space in the same sense as would be predicted by the standard Volterra-Lotka predator-prey equations, (ii) temporal behavior ranging from near periodic oscillation at a frequency close to the spiral wave rotation frequency (“type-1” behavior) to more complex oscillatory behavior whose power spectrum is composed of a range of frequencies both above and, especially, below the spiral wave rotation frequency (“type-2” behavior), and (iii) a strong positive correlation between the periods and amplitudes of the oscillations of these quantities. In particular, a rapid measure of the amplitude was found to scale consistently as the square root of the period in data taken from both simulations and optical mapping experiments. Global quantities such as predator and prey thus appear to be useful in the study of multiple spiral wave systems, facilitating the posing of new questions, which in turn may help to provide greater understanding of clinically important phenomena such as ventricular fibrillation.

  4. Characterization of multiple spiral wave dynamics as a stochastic predator-prey system.

    PubMed

    Otani, Niels F; Mo, Alisa; Mannava, Sandeep; Fenton, Flavio H; Cherry, Elizabeth M; Luther, Stefan; Gilmour, Robert F

    2008-08-01

    A perspective on systems containing many action potential waves that, individually, are prone to spiral wave breakup is proposed. The perspective is based on two quantities, "predator" and "prey," which we define as the fraction of the system in the excited state and in the excitable but unexcited state, respectively. These quantities exhibited a number of properties in both simulations and fibrillating canine cardiac tissue that were found to be consistent with a proposed theory that assumes the existence of regions we call "domains of influence," each of which is associated with the activity of one action potential wave. The properties include (i) a propensity to rotate in phase space in the same sense as would be predicted by the standard Volterra-Lotka predator-prey equations, (ii) temporal behavior ranging from near periodic oscillation at a frequency close to the spiral wave rotation frequency ("type-1" behavior) to more complex oscillatory behavior whose power spectrum is composed of a range of frequencies both above and, especially, below the spiral wave rotation frequency ("type-2" behavior), and (iii) a strong positive correlation between the periods and amplitudes of the oscillations of these quantities. In particular, a rapid measure of the amplitude was found to scale consistently as the square root of the period in data taken from both simulations and optical mapping experiments. Global quantities such as predator and prey thus appear to be useful in the study of multiple spiral wave systems, facilitating the posing of new questions, which in turn may help to provide greater understanding of clinically important phenomena such as ventricular fibrillation. PMID:18850871

  5. Discovering the Power of Individual-Based Modelling in Teaching and Learning: The Study of a Predator-Prey System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginovart, Marta

    2014-08-01

    The general aim is to promote the use of individual-based models (biological agent-based models) in teaching and learning contexts in life sciences and to make their progressive incorporation into academic curricula easier, complementing other existing modelling strategies more frequently used in the classroom. Modelling activities for the study of a predator-prey system for a mathematics classroom in the first year of an undergraduate program in biosystems engineering have been designed and implemented. These activities were designed to put two modelling approaches side by side, an individual-based model and a set of ordinary differential equations. In order to organize and display this, a system with wolves and sheep in a confined domain was considered and studied. With the teaching material elaborated and a computer to perform the numerical resolutions involved and the corresponding individual-based simulations, the students answered questions and completed exercises to achieve the learning goals set. Students' responses regarding the modelling of biological systems and these two distinct methodologies applied to the study of a predator-prey system were collected via questionnaires, open-ended queries and face-to-face dialogues. Taking into account the positive responses of the students when they were doing these activities, it was clear that using a discrete individual-based model to deal with a predator-prey system jointly with a set of ordinary differential equations enriches the understanding of the modelling process, adds new insights and opens novel perspectives of what can be done with computational models versus other models. The complementary views given by the two modelling approaches were very well assessed by students.

  6. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of a Diffusive Leslie-Gower Predator-Prey Model with Ratio-Dependent Functional Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hong-Bo; Ruan, Shigui; Su, Ying; Zhang, Jia-Fang

    This paper is devoted to the study of spatiotemporal dynamics of a diffusive Leslie-Gower predator-prey system with ratio-dependent Holling type III functional response under homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions. It is shown that the model exhibits spatial patterns via Turing (diffusion-driven) instability and temporal patterns via Hopf bifurcation. Moreover, the existence of spatiotemporal patterns is established via Turing-Hopf bifurcation at the degenerate points where the Turing instability curve and the Hopf bifurcation curve intersect. Various numerical simulations are also presented to illustrate the theoretical results.

  7. Dynamic of a delayed predator-prey model with birth pulse and impulsive harvesting in a polluted environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Jia, Jianwen

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a delayed predator-prey model with birth pulse and impulsive harvesting in a polluted environment. Existence conditions of the predator-extinction periodic solution are derived by developing the discrete dynamical system, which is determined by the stroboscopic map. Further, we discuss the global attractivity of predator-extinction periodic solution and permanence of the system, and obtain the threshold conditions. The results provide a dependable theoretical strategies to protect population from extinction in a polluted environment. Finally, the numerical simulations are presented for verifying the theoretical conclusions.

  8. Existence and stability of periodic solution of a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model with state dependent impulsive effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Linfei; Peng, Jigen; Teng, Zhidong; Hu, Lin

    2009-02-01

    According to biological and chemical control strategy for pest, we investigate the dynamic behavior of a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey state-dependent impulsive system by releasing natural enemies and spraying pesticide at different thresholds. By using Poincaré map and the properties of the Lambert W function, we prove that the sufficient conditions for the existence and stability of semi-trivial solution and positive periodic solution. Numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate the feasibility of our main results.

  9. A predator-prey model for moon-triggered clumping in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.; Albers, Nicole; Meinke, Bonnie K.; Sremčević, Miodrag; Madhusudhanan, Prasanna; Colwell, Joshua E.; Jerousek, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    UVIS occultation data show clumping in Saturn's F ring and at the B ring outer edge, indicating aggregation and disaggregation at these locations that are perturbed by Prometheus and by Mimas. The inferred timescales range from hours to months. Occultation profiles of the edge show wide variability, indicating perturbations by local mass aggregations. Structure near the B ring edge is seen in power spectral analysis at scales 200-2000 m. Similar structure is also seen at the strongest density waves, with significance increasing with resonance strength. For the B ring outer edge, the strongest structure is seen at longitudes 90° and 270° relative to Mimas. This indicates a direct relation between the moon and the ring clumping. We propose that the collective behavior of the ring particles resembles a predator-prey system: the mean aggregate size is the prey, which feeds the velocity dispersion; conversely, increasing dispersion breaks up the aggregates. Moons may trigger clumping by streamline crowding, which reduces the relative velocity, leading to more aggregation and more clumping. Disaggregation may follow from disruptive collisions or tidal shedding as the clumps stir the relative velocity. For realistic values of the parameters this yields a limit cycle behavior, as for the ecology of foxes and hares or the "boom-bust" economic cycle. Solving for the long-term behavior of this forced system gives a periodic response at the perturbing frequency, with a phase lag roughly consistent with the UVIS occultation measurements. We conclude that the agitation by the moons in the F ring and at the B ring outer edge drives aggregation and disaggregation in the forcing frame. This agitation of the ring material may also allow fortuitous formation of solid objects from the temporary clumps, via stochastic processes like compaction, adhesion, sintering or reorganization that drives the denser parts of the aggregate to the center or ejects the lighter elements. Any of

  10. Strain-specific functional and numerical responses are required to evaluate impacts on predator-prey dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhou; Lowe, Chris D; Crowther, Will; Fenton, Andy; Watts, Phillip C; Montagnes, David J S

    2013-02-01

    We use strains recently collected from the field to establish cultures; then, through laboratory studies we investigate how among strain variation in protozoan ingestion and growth rates influences population dynamics and intraspecific competition. We focused on the impact of changing temperature because of its well-established effects on protozoan rates and its ecological relevance, from daily fluctuations to climate change. We show, first, that there is considerable inter-strain variability in thermal sensitivity of maximum growth rate, revealing distinct differences among multiple strains of our model species Oxyrrhis marina. We then intensively examined two representative strains that exhibit distinctly different thermal responses and parameterised the influence of temperature on their functional and numerical responses. Finally, we assessed how these responses alter predator-prey population dynamics. We do this first considering a standard approach, which assumes that functional and numerical responses are directly coupled, and then compare these results with a novel framework that incorporates both functional and numerical responses in a fully parameterised model. We conclude that: (i) including functional diversity of protozoa at the sub-species level will alter model predictions and (ii) including directly measured, independent functional and numerical responses in a model can provide a more realistic account of predator-prey dynamics. PMID:23151643

  11. Sperm whale predator-prey interactions involve chasing and buzzing, but no acoustic stunning.

    PubMed

    Fais, A; Johnson, M; Wilson, M; Aguilar Soto, N; Madsen, P T

    2016-01-01

    The sperm whale carries a hypertrophied nose that generates powerful clicks for long-range echolocation. However, it remains a conundrum how this bizarrely shaped apex predator catches its prey. Several hypotheses have been advanced to propose both active and passive means to acquire prey, including acoustic debilitation of prey with very powerful clicks. Here we test these hypotheses by using sound and movement recording tags in a fine-scale study of buzz sequences to relate the acoustic behaviour of sperm whales with changes in acceleration in their head region during prey capture attempts. We show that in the terminal buzz phase, sperm whales reduce inter-click intervals and estimated source levels by 1-2 orders of magnitude. As a result, received levels at the prey are more than an order of magnitude below levels required for debilitation, precluding acoustic stunning to facilitate prey capture. Rather, buzzing involves high-frequency, low amplitude clicks well suited to provide high-resolution biosonar updates during the last stages of capture. The high temporal resolution helps to guide motor patterns during occasionally prolonged chases in which prey are eventually subdued with the aid of fast jaw movements and/or buccal suction as indicated by acceleration transients (jerks) near the end of buzzes. PMID:27340122

  12. Sperm whale predator-prey interactions involve chasing and buzzing, but no acoustic stunning

    PubMed Central

    Fais, A.; Johnson, M.; Wilson, M.; Aguilar Soto, N.; Madsen, P. T.

    2016-01-01

    The sperm whale carries a hypertrophied nose that generates powerful clicks for long-range echolocation. However, it remains a conundrum how this bizarrely shaped apex predator catches its prey. Several hypotheses have been advanced to propose both active and passive means to acquire prey, including acoustic debilitation of prey with very powerful clicks. Here we test these hypotheses by using sound and movement recording tags in a fine-scale study of buzz sequences to relate the acoustic behaviour of sperm whales with changes in acceleration in their head region during prey capture attempts. We show that in the terminal buzz phase, sperm whales reduce inter-click intervals and estimated source levels by 1–2 orders of magnitude. As a result, received levels at the prey are more than an order of magnitude below levels required for debilitation, precluding acoustic stunning to facilitate prey capture. Rather, buzzing involves high-frequency, low amplitude clicks well suited to provide high-resolution biosonar updates during the last stages of capture. The high temporal resolution helps to guide motor patterns during occasionally prolonged chases in which prey are eventually subdued with the aid of fast jaw movements and/or buccal suction as indicated by acceleration transients (jerks) near the end of buzzes. PMID:27340122

  13. PREDATOR-PREY (VOLE-CRICKET) INTERACTIONS: THE EFFECTS OF WOOD PRESERVATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of loss of crickets (Acheta domestica), with and without the presence of an adventitious predator, the gray-tailed vole (Microtus canicaudus), has been studied in Terrestrial Microcosm Chambers (TMC-II) treated with pine stakes impregnated with creosote, bis(tri-n-butylt...

  14. Visual illusions in predator-prey interactions: birds find moving patterned prey harder to catch.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, Liisa; Valkonen, Janne; Mappes, Johanna; Rojas, Bibiana

    2015-09-01

    Several antipredator strategies are related to prey colouration. Some colour patterns can create visual illusions during movement (such as motion dazzle), making it difficult for a predator to capture moving prey successfully. Experimental evidence about motion dazzle, however, is still very scarce and comes only from studies using human predators capturing moving prey items in computer games. We tested a motion dazzle effect using for the first time natural predators (wild great tits, Parus major). We used artificial prey items bearing three different colour patterns: uniform brown (control), black with elongated yellow pattern and black with interrupted yellow pattern. The last two resembled colour patterns of the aposematic, polymorphic dart-poison frog Dendrobates tinctorius. We specifically tested whether an elongated colour pattern could create visual illusions when combined with straight movement. Our results, however, do not support this hypothesis. We found no differences in the number of successful attacks towards prey items with different patterns (elongated/interrupted) moving linearly. Nevertheless, both prey types were significantly more difficult to catch compared to the uniform brown prey, indicating that both colour patterns could provide some benefit for a moving individual. Surprisingly, no effect of background (complex vs. plain) was found. This is the first experiment with moving prey showing that some colour patterns can affect avian predators' ability to capture moving prey, but the mechanisms lowering the capture rate are still poorly understood. PMID:25947086

  15. Bifurcation analysis and dimension reduction of a predator-prey model for the L-H transition

    SciTech Connect

    Dam, Magnus; Brøns, Morten; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Naulin, Volker; Xu, Guosheng

    2013-10-15

    The L-H transition denotes a shift to an improved confinement state of a toroidal plasma in a fusion reactor. A model of the L-H transition is required to simulate the time dependence of tokamak discharges that include the L-H transition. A 3-ODE predator-prey type model of the L-H transition is investigated with bifurcation theory of dynamical systems. The analysis shows that the model contains three types of transitions: an oscillating transition, a sharp transition with hysteresis, and a smooth transition. The model is recognized as a slow-fast system. A reduced 2-ODE model consisting of the full model restricted to the flow on the critical manifold is found to contain all the same dynamics as the full model. This means that all the dynamics in the system is essentially 2-dimensional, and a minimal model of the L-H transition could be a 2-ODE model.

  16. Delay-induced Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation in a Leslie-Gower predator-prey model with nonmonotonic functional response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jiao; Song, Yongli

    2014-07-01

    This work is concerned with the dynamics of a Leslie-Gower predator-prey model with nonmonotonic functional response near the Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation point. By analyzing the characteristic equation associated with the nonhyperbolic equilibrium, the critical value of the delay inducing the Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation is obtained. In this case, the dynamics near this nonhyperbolic equilibrium can be reduced to the study of the dynamics of the corresponding normal form restricted to the associated two-dimensional center manifold. The bifurcation diagram near the Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation point is drawn according to the obtained normal form. We show that the change of delay can result in heteroclinic orbit, homoclinic orbit and unstable limit cycle.

  17. The dynamics of a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model with state dependent impulsive harvest for predator.

    PubMed

    Nie, Linfei; Teng, Zhidong; Hu, Lin; Peng, Jigen

    2009-11-01

    According to the economic and biological aspects of renewable resources management, we propose a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model with state dependent impulsive harvest. By using the Poincaré map, some conditions for the existence and stability of positive periodic solution are obtained. Moreover, we show that there is no periodic solution with order larger than or equal to three under some conditions. Numerical results are carried out to illustrate the feasibility of our main results. The bifurcation diagrams of periodic solutions are obtained by using the numerical simulations, and it is shown that a chaotic solution is generated via a cascade of period-doubling bifurcations, which implies that the presence of pulses makes the dynamic behavior more complex. PMID:19523503

  18. A plasma source driven predator-prey like mechanism as a potential cause of spiraling intermittencies in linear plasma devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiser, D.; Ohno, N.; Tanaka, H.; Vela, L.

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional global drift fluid simulations are carried out to analyze coherent plasma structures appearing in the NAGDIS-II linear device (nagoya divertor plasma Simulator-II). The numerical simulations reproduce several features of the intermittent spiraling structures observed, for instance, statistical properties, rotation frequency, and the frequency of plasma expulsion. The detailed inspection of the three-dimensional plasma dynamics allows to identify the key mechanism behind the formation of these intermittent events. The resistive coupling between electron pressure and parallel electric field in the plasma source region gives rise to a quasilinear predator-prey like dynamics where the axisymmetric mode represents the prey and the spiraling structure with low azimuthal mode number represents the predator. This interpretation is confirmed by a reduced one-dimensional quasilinear model derived on the basis of the findings in the full three-dimensional simulations. The dominant dynamics reveals certain similarities to the classical Lotka-Volterra cycle.

  19. Something old, something new: auxin and strigolactone interact in the ancient mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Foo, Eloise

    2013-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, formed between more than 80% of land plants and fungi from the phylum Glomeromycota, is an ancient association that is believed to have evolved as plants moved onto land more than 400 mya. Similarly ancient, the plant hormones auxin and strigolactone are thought to have been present in the plant lineage since before the divergence of the bryophytes in the case of auxin and before the colonisation of land in the case of strigolactones. The discovery of auxin in the 1930s predates the discovery of strigolactones as a plant hormone in 2008 by over 70 y. Recent studies in pea suggest that these two signals may interact to regulate mycorrhizal symbiosis. Furthermore, the first quantitative studies are presented that show that low auxin content of the root is correlated with low strigolactone production, an interaction that has implications for how these plant hormones regulate several developmental programs including shoot branching, secondary growth and root development. With recent advances in our understanding of auxin and strigolactone biosynthesis, together with the discovery of the fungal signals that activate the plant host, the stage is set for real breakthroughs in our understanding of the interactions between plant and fungal signals in mycorrhizal symbiosis. PMID:23333973

  20. Dynamics of a modified Leslie-Gower predator-prey model with Holling-type II schemes and a prey refuge.

    PubMed

    Yue, Qin

    2016-01-01

    We propose a modified Leslie-Gower predator-prey model with Holling-type II schemes and a prey refuge. The structure of equilibria and their linearized stability is investigated. By using the iterative technique and further precise analysis, sufficient conditions on the global attractivity of a positive equilibrium are obtained. Our results not only supplement but also improve some existing ones. Numerical simulations show the feasibility of our results. PMID:27119065

  1. Fitting a predator prey model to zooplankton time-series data in the Gironde estuary (France): Ecological significance of the parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Valérie; Chardy, Pierre; Sautour, Benoît

    2006-05-01

    The relationships between the seasonal fluctuations of the copepod Eurytemora affinis and the mysid Neomysis integer were studied from observed data and experimental results, using a predator-prey model in the oligo-mesohaline area of the Gironde estuary. Mean seasonal fluctuations of abundances were derived from long term data series collected from 1978 to 2003 for both species. In situ predator-prey experiments over a seasonal cycle were used to estimate the seasonal variation of the consumption rate of N. integer on E. affinis and to verify the order of magnitude of the biological parameters given by the model. Predator-prey experiments revealed a high seasonal variation in maximum consumption rates with a mean of 56 ± 9 ind. pred -1 d -1. Maximum consumption rates were always higher for adults than for juveniles of Neomysis integer. Recorded selectivities were higher on nauplii than on copepodids + adults of Eurytemora affinis, both for the juveniles and the adults of N. integer. Neomysis integer mainly fed on meroplanktonic larvae, when they were available in higher abundances, than E. affinis in their environment. Spring increases of abundance for Eurytemora affinis copepodids + adults seemed to be mainly controlled by temperature whereas its decreasing abundance in summer was more related to Neomysis integer predation, suggesting that summer fluctuations of E. affinis abundance are probably controlled by mysid predation at summer times. Using a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model, the seasonal peak of abundance of the mysid N. integer was well reproduced considering a predation on copepodids + adults of E. affinis, and suggested a dependence between mysid and copepod seasonal variations. However, the seasonal peak amplitude could not be explained solely by a predation on copepodids + adults or on nauplii of the copepod. Thus, N. integer is probably dependent on the seasonal fluctuations of the copepod's abundance, complementing its diet with macrophytal

  2. Permanence for a delayed periodic predator-prey model with prey dispersal in multi-patches and predator density-independent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Long; Teng, Zhidong

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, we study two species time-delayed predator-prey Lotka-Volterra type dispersal systems with periodic coefficients, in which the prey species can disperse among n patches, while the density-independent predator species is confined to one of patches and cannot disperse. Sufficient conditions on the boundedness, permanence and existence of positive periodic solution for this systems are established. The theoretical results are confirmed by a special example and numerical simulations.

  3. Multiple positive almost periodic solutions to an impulsive non-autonomous Lotka-Volterra predator-prey system with harvesting terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongkun; Ye, Yuan

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, by using Mawhin's continuation theorem of coincidence degree theory, we study an impulsive non-autonomous Lotka-Volterra predator-prey system with harvesting terms and obtain some sufficient conditions for the existence of multiple positive almost periodic solutions for the system under consideration. Our results of this paper are completely new and our method used in this paper can be used to study the existence of multiple positive almost periodic solutions to other types of population systems.

  4. A predator-prey model with a holling type I functional response including a predator mutual interference

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seo, G.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    The most widely used functional response in describing predator-prey relationships is the Holling type II functional response, where per capita predation is a smooth, increasing, and saturating function of prey density. Beddington and DeAngelis modified the Holling type II response to include interference of predators that increases with predator density. Here we introduce a predator-interference term into a Holling type I functional response. We explain the ecological rationale for the response and note that the phase plane configuration of the predator and prey isoclines differs greatly from that of the Beddington-DeAngelis response; for example, in having three possible interior equilibria rather than one. In fact, this new functional response seems to be quite unique. We used analytical and numerical methods to show that the resulting system shows a much richer dynamical behavior than the Beddington-DeAngelis response, or other typically used functional responses. For example, cyclic-fold, saddle-fold, homoclinic saddle connection, and multiple crossing bifurcations can all occur. We then use a smooth approximation to the Holling type I functional response with predator mutual interference to show that these dynamical properties do not result from the lack of smoothness, but rather from subtle differences in the functional responses. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  5. Food-web structure in relation to environmental gradients and predator-prey ratios in tank-bromeliad ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Dézerald, Olivier; Leroy, Céline; Corbara, Bruno; Carrias, Jean-François; Pélozuelo, Laurent; Dejean, Alain; Céréghino, Régis

    2013-01-01

    Little is known of how linkage patterns between species change along environmental gradients. The small, spatially discrete food webs inhabiting tank-bromeliads provide an excellent opportunity to analyse patterns of community diversity and food-web topology (connectance, linkage density, nestedness) in relation to key environmental variables (habitat size, detrital resource, incident radiation) and predators:prey ratios. We sampled 365 bromeliads in a wide range of understorey environments in French Guiana and used gut contents of invertebrates to draw the corresponding 365 connectance webs. At the bromeliad scale, habitat size (water volume) determined the number of species that constitute food-web nodes, the proportion of predators, and food-web topology. The number of species as well as the proportion of predators within bromeliads declined from open to forested habitats, where the volume of water collected by bromeliads was generally lower because of rainfall interception by the canopy. A core group of microorganisms and generalist detritivores remained relatively constant across environments. This suggests that (i) a highly-connected core ensures food-web stability and key ecosystem functions across environments, and (ii) larger deviations in food-web structures can be expected following disturbance if detritivores share traits that determine responses to environmental changes. While linkage density and nestedness were lower in bromeliads in the forest than in open areas, experiments are needed to confirm a trend for lower food-web stability in the understorey of primary forests. PMID:23977128

  6. Theoretical study and control optimization of an integrated pest management predator-prey model with power growth rate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kaibiao; Zhang, Tonghua; Tian, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    This work presents a pest control predator-prey model, where rate of change in prey density follows a scaling law with exponent less than one and the control is by an integrated management strategy. The aim is to investigate the change in system dynamics and determine a pest control level with minimum control price. First, the dynamics of the proposed model without control is investigated by taking the exponent as an index parameter. And then, to determine the frequency of spraying chemical pesticide and yield releases of the predator, the existence of the order-1 periodic orbit of the control system is discussed in cases. Furthermore, to ensure a certain robustness of the adopted control, i.e., for an inaccurately detected species density or a deviation, the control system could be stabilized at the order-1 periodic orbit, the stability of the order-1 periodic orbit is verified by an stability criterion for a general semi-continuous dynamical system. In addition, to minimize the total cost input in pest control, an optimization problem is formulated and the optimum pest control level is obtained. At last, the numerical simulations with a specific model are carried out to complement the theoretical results. PMID:27378223

  7. A density dependent delayed predator-prey model with Beddington-DeAngelis type function response incorporating a prey refuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Jai Prakash; Abbas, Syed; Thakur, Manoj

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes a predator-prey model incorporating a prey refuge. The feeding rate of consumers (predators) per consumer (i.e. functional response) is considered to be of Beddington-DeAngelis type. The Beddington-DeAngelis functional response is similar to the Holling-type II functional response but contains an extra term describing mutual interference by predators. We investigate the role of prey refuge and degree of mutual interference among predators in the dynamics of system. The dynamics of the system is discussed mainly from the point of view of permanence and stability. We obtain conditions that affect the persistence of the system. Local and global asymptotic stability of various equilibrium solutions is explored to understand the dynamics of the model system. The global asymptotic stability of positive interior equilibrium solution is established using suitable Lyapunov functional. The dynamical behaviour of the delayed system is further analyzed through incorporating discrete type gestation delay of predator. It is found that Hopf bifurcation occurs when the delay parameter τ crosses some critical value. The analytical results found in the paper are illustrated with the help of numerical examples.

  8. Food-Web Structure in Relation to Environmental Gradients and Predator-Prey Ratios in Tank-Bromeliad Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Dézerald, Olivier; Leroy, Céline; Corbara, Bruno; Carrias, Jean-François; Pélozuelo, Laurent; Dejean, Alain; Céréghino, Régis

    2013-01-01

    Little is known of how linkage patterns between species change along environmental gradients. The small, spatially discrete food webs inhabiting tank-bromeliads provide an excellent opportunity to analyse patterns of community diversity and food-web topology (connectance, linkage density, nestedness) in relation to key environmental variables (habitat size, detrital resource, incident radiation) and predators:prey ratios. We sampled 365 bromeliads in a wide range of understorey environments in French Guiana and used gut contents of invertebrates to draw the corresponding 365 connectance webs. At the bromeliad scale, habitat size (water volume) determined the number of species that constitute food-web nodes, the proportion of predators, and food-web topology. The number of species as well as the proportion of predators within bromeliads declined from open to forested habitats, where the volume of water collected by bromeliads was generally lower because of rainfall interception by the canopy. A core group of microorganisms and generalist detritivores remained relatively constant across environments. This suggests that (i) a highly-connected core ensures food-web stability and key ecosystem functions across environments, and (ii) larger deviations in food-web structures can be expected following disturbance if detritivores share traits that determine responses to environmental changes. While linkage density and nestedness were lower in bromeliads in the forest than in open areas, experiments are needed to confirm a trend for lower food-web stability in the understorey of primary forests. PMID:23977128

  9. From Cues to Signals: Evolution of Interspecific Communication via Aposematism and Mimicry in a Predator-Prey System

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Kenna D. S.; Goldman, Brian W.; Dworkin, Ian; Bryson, David M.; Wagner, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    Current theory suggests that many signaling systems evolved from preexisting cues. In aposematic systems, prey warning signals benefit both predator and prey. When the signal is highly beneficial, a third species often evolves to mimic the toxic species, exploiting the signaling system for its own protection. We investigated the evolutionary dynamics of predator cue utilization and prey signaling in a digital predator-prey system in which prey could evolve to alter their appearance to mimic poison-free or poisonous prey. In predators, we observed rapid evolution of cue recognition (i.e. active behavioral responses) when presented with sufficiently poisonous prey. In addition, active signaling (i.e. mimicry) evolved in prey under all conditions that led to cue utilization. Thus we show that despite imperfect and dishonest signaling, given a high cost of consuming poisonous prey, complex systems of interspecific communication can evolve via predator cue recognition and prey signal manipulation. This provides evidence supporting hypotheses that cues may serve as stepping-stones in the evolution of more advanced communication and signaling systems that incorporate information about the environment. PMID:24614755

  10. Consequences of a refuge for the predator-prey dynamics of a wolf-elk system in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Joshua F; Hebblewhite, Mark; Bardsley, John

    2014-01-01

    Refugia can affect predator-prey dynamics via movements between refuge and non-refuge areas. We examine the influence of a refuge on population dynamics in a large mammal predator-prey system. Wolves (Canis lupus) have recolonized much of their former range in North America, and as a result, ungulate prey have exploited refugia to reduce predation risk with unknown impacts on wolf-prey dynamics. We examined the influence of a refuge on elk (Cervus elaphus) and wolf population dynamics in Banff National Park. Elk occupy the Banff townsite with little predation, whereas elk in the adjoining Bow Valley experience higher wolf predation. The Banff refuge may influence Bow Valley predator-prey dynamics through source-sink movements. To test this hypothesis, we used 26 years of wolf and elk population counts and the Delayed Rejection Adaptive Metropolis Markov chain Monte Carlo method to fit five predator-prey models: 1) with no source-sink movements, 2) with elk density-dependent dispersal from the refuge to the non-refuge, 3) with elk predation risk avoidance movements from the non-refuge to the refuge, 4) with differential movement rates between refuge and non-refuge, and 5) with short-term, source-sink wolf movements. Model 1 provided the best fit of the data, as measured by Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). In the top model, Banff and Bow Valley elk had median growth rates of 0.08 and 0.03 (95% credibility intervals [CIs]: 0.027-0.186 and 0.001-0.143), respectively, Banff had a median carrying capacity of 630 elk (95% CI: 471.9-2676.9), Bow Valley elk had a median wolf encounter rate of 0.02 (95% CI: 0.013-0.030), and wolves had a median death rate of 0.23 (95% CI: 0.146-0.335) and a median conversion efficiency of 0.07 (95% CI: 0.031-0.124). We found little evidence for potential source-sink movements influencing the predator-prey dynamics of this system. This result suggests that the refuge was isolated from the non-refuge. PMID:24670632

  11. Consequences of a Refuge for the Predator-Prey Dynamics of a Wolf-Elk System in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Joshua F.; Hebblewhite, Mark; Bardsley, John

    2014-01-01

    Refugia can affect predator-prey dynamics via movements between refuge and non-refuge areas. We examine the influence of a refuge on population dynamics in a large mammal predator-prey system. Wolves (Canis lupus) have recolonized much of their former range in North America, and as a result, ungulate prey have exploited refugia to reduce predation risk with unknown impacts on wolf-prey dynamics. We examined the influence of a refuge on elk (Cervus elaphus) and wolf population dynamics in Banff National Park. Elk occupy the Banff townsite with little predation, whereas elk in the adjoining Bow Valley experience higher wolf predation. The Banff refuge may influence Bow Valley predator-prey dynamics through source-sink movements. To test this hypothesis, we used 26 years of wolf and elk population counts and the Delayed Rejection Adaptive Metropolis Markov chain Monte Carlo method to fit five predator-prey models: 1) with no source-sink movements, 2) with elk density-dependent dispersal from the refuge to the non-refuge, 3) with elk predation risk avoidance movements from the non-refuge to the refuge, 4) with differential movement rates between refuge and non-refuge, and 5) with short-term, source-sink wolf movements. Model 1 provided the best fit of the data, as measured by Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). In the top model, Banff and Bow Valley elk had median growth rates of 0.08 and 0.03 (95% credibility intervals [CIs]: 0.027–0.186 and 0.001–0.143), respectively, Banff had a median carrying capacity of 630 elk (95% CI: 471.9–2676.9), Bow Valley elk had a median wolf encounter rate of 0.02 (95% CI: 0.013–0.030), and wolves had a median death rate of 0.23 (95% CI: 0.146–0.335) and a median conversion efficiency of 0.07 (95% CI: 0.031–0.124). We found little evidence for potential source-sink movements influencing the predator-prey dynamics of this system. This result suggests that the refuge was isolated from the non-refuge. PMID:24670632

  12. Interaction between host genotype and environmental conditions affects bacterial density in Wolbachia symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Mouton, Laurence; Henri, Hélène; Charif, Delphine; Boulétreau, Michel; Vavre, Fabrice

    2007-04-22

    Regulation of microbial population density is a necessity in stable symbiotic interactions. In Wolbachia symbiosis, both bacterial and host genotypes are involved in density regulation, but environmental factors may also affect bacterial population density. Here, we studied the interaction between three strains of Wolbachia in two divergent homozygous lines of the wasp Leptopilina heterotoma at two different temperatures. Wolbachia density varied between the two host genotypes at only one temperature. Moreover, at this temperature, reciprocal-cross F1 insects displayed identical Wolbachia densities, which were intermediate between the densities in the two parental lines. While these findings confirm that the host genotype plays an important role in Wolbachia density, they also highlight its interaction with environmental conditions, making possible the evolution of local adaptations for the regulation of Wolbachia density. PMID:17251124

  13. Relative importance of evolutionary dynamics depends on the composition of microbial predator-prey community.

    PubMed

    Friman, Ville-Petri; Dupont, Alessandra; Bass, David; Murrell, David J; Bell, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Community dynamics are often studied in subsets of pairwise interactions. Scaling pairwise interactions back to the community level is, however, problematic because one given interaction might not reflect ecological and evolutionary outcomes of other functionally similar species interactions or capture the emergent eco-evolutionary dynamics arising only in more complex communities. Here we studied this experimentally by exposing Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 prey bacterium to four different protist predators (Tetrahymena pyriformis, Tetrahymena vorax, Chilomonas paramecium and Acanthamoeba polyphaga) in all possible single-predator, two-predator and four-predator communities for hundreds of prey generations covering both ecological and evolutionary timescales. We found that only T. pyriformis selected for prey defence in single-predator communities. Although T. pyriformis selection was constrained in the presence of the intraguild predator, T. vorax, T. pyriformis selection led to evolution of specialised prey defence strategies in the presence of C. paramecium or A. polyphaga. At the ecological level, adapted prey populations were phenotypically more diverse, less stable and less productive compared with non-adapted prey populations. These results suggest that predator community composition affects the relative importance of ecological and evolutionary processes and can crucially determine when rapid evolution has the potential to change ecological properties of microbial communities. PMID:26684728

  14. Bifurcation analysis of a discrete-time ratio-dependent predator-prey model with Allee Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lifang; Cao, Hongjun

    2016-09-01

    A discrete-time predator-prey model with Allee effect is investigated in this paper. We consider the strong and the weak Allee effect (the population growth rate is negative and positive at low population density, respectively). From the stability analysis and the bifurcation diagrams, we get that the model with Allee effect (strong or weak) growth function and the model with logistic growth function have somewhat similar bifurcation structures. If the predator growth rate is smaller than its death rate, two species cannot coexist due to having no interior fixed points. When the predator growth rate is greater than its death rate and other parameters are fixed, the model can have two interior fixed points. One is always unstable, and the stability of the other is determined by the integral step size, which decides the species coexistence or not in some extent. If we increase the value of the integral step size, then the bifurcated period doubled orbits or invariant circle orbits may arise. So the numbers of the prey and the predator deviate from one stable state and then circulate along the period orbits or quasi-period orbits. When the integral step size is increased to a critical value, chaotic orbits may appear with many uncertain period-windows, which means that the numbers of prey and predator will be chaotic. In terms of bifurcation diagrams and phase portraits, we know that the complexity degree of the model with strong Allee effect decreases, which is related to the fact that the persistence of species can be determined by the initial species densities.

  15. The influence of dispersal on a predator-prey system with two habitats.

    PubMed

    Gramlich, P; Plitzko, S J; Rudolf, L; Drossel, B; Gross, T

    2016-06-01

    Dispersal between different habitats influences the dynamics and stability of populations considerably. Furthermore, these effects depend on the local interactions of a population with other species. Here, we perform a general and comprehensive study of the simplest possible system that includes dispersal and local interactions, namely a 2-patch 2-species system. We evaluate the impact of dispersal on stability and on the occurrence of bifurcations, including pattern forming bifurcations that lead to spatial heterogeneity, in 19 different classes of models with the help of the generalized modelling approach. We find that dispersal often destabilizes equilibria, but it can stabilize them if it increases population losses. If dispersal is nonrandom, i.e. if emigration or immigration rates depend on population densities, the correlation of stability with dispersal rates is positive in part of the models. We also find that many systems show all four types of bifurcations and that antisynchronous oscillations occur mostly with nonrandom dispersal. PMID:27038668

  16. Collective behavior and predation success in a predator-prey model inspired by hunting bats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan; Abaid, Nicole

    2013-12-01

    We establish an agent-based model to study the impact of prey behavior on the hunting success of predators. The predators and prey are modeled as self-propelled particles moving in a three-dimensional domain and subject to specific sensing abilities and behavioral rules inspired by bat hunting. The predators randomly search for prey. The prey either align velocity directions with peers, defined as "interacting" prey, or swarm "independently" of peer presence; both types of prey are subject to additive noise. In a simulation study, we find that interacting prey using low noise have the maximum predation avoidance because they form localized large groups, while they suffer high predation as noise increases due to the formation of broadly dispersed small groups. Independent prey, which are likely to be uniformly distributed in the domain, have higher predation risk under a low noise regime as they traverse larger spatial extents. These effects are enhanced in large prey populations, which exhibit more ordered collective behavior or more uniform spatial distribution as they are interacting or independent, respectively.

  17. Absorbing phase transition in a four-state predator-prey model in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Rakesh; Mohanty, P. K.; Basu, Abhik

    2011-05-01

    The model of competition between densities of two different species, called predator and prey, is studied on a one-dimensional periodic lattice, where each site can be in one of the four states, say, empty, or occupied by a single predator, or occupied by a single prey, or by both. Along with the pairwise death of predators and growth of prey, we introduce an interaction where the predators can eat one of the neighboring prey and reproduce a new predator there instantly. The model shows a non-equilibrium phase transition into an unusual absorbing state where predators are absent and the lattice is fully occupied by prey. The critical exponents of the system are found to be different from those of the directed percolation universality class and they are robust against addition of explicit diffusion.

  18. The limits of adaptation: humans and the predator-prey arms race.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Geerat J

    2012-07-01

    In the history of life, species have adapted to their consumers by evolving a wide variety of defenses. By contrast, animal species harvested in the wild by humans have not adapted structurally. Nonhuman predators have high failure rates at one or more stages of an attack, indicating that victim species have spatial refuges or phenotypic defenses that permit further functional improvement. A new compilation confirms that species in the wild cannot achieve immunity from human predation with structural defenses. The only remaining options are to become undesirable or to live in or escape to places where harvesting by people is curtailed. Escalation between prey defenses and predators' weapons may be restricted under human dominance to interactions involving those low-level predators that have benefited from human overexploitation of top consumers. PMID:22759280

  19. Turing patterns and apparent competition in predator-prey food webs on networks.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, L D; de Aguiar, M A M

    2012-11-01

    Reaction-diffusion systems may lead to the formation of steady-state heterogeneous spatial patterns, known as Turing patterns. Their mathematical formulation is important for the study of pattern formation in general and plays central roles in many fields of biology, such as ecology and morphogenesis. Here we show that Turing patterns may have a decisive role in shaping the abundance distribution of predators and prey living in patchy landscapes. We extend the original model proposed by Nakao and Mikhailov [Nat. Phys. 6, 544 (2010)] by considering food chains with several interacting pairs of prey and predators distributed on a scale-free network of patches. We identify patterns of species distribution displaying high degrees of apparent competition driven by Turing instabilities. Our results provide further indication that differences in abundance distribution among patches can be generated dynamically by self organized Turing patterns and not only by intrinsic environmental heterogeneity. PMID:23214853

  20. Turing patterns and apparent competition in predator-prey food webs on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, L. D.; de Aguiar, M. A. M.

    2012-11-01

    Reaction-diffusion systems may lead to the formation of steady-state heterogeneous spatial patterns, known as Turing patterns. Their mathematical formulation is important for the study of pattern formation in general and plays central roles in many fields of biology, such as ecology and morphogenesis. Here we show that Turing patterns may have a decisive role in shaping the abundance distribution of predators and prey living in patchy landscapes. We extend the original model proposed by Nakao and Mikhailov [Nat. Phys.1745-247310.1038/nphys1651 6, 544 (2010)] by considering food chains with several interacting pairs of prey and predators distributed on a scale-free network of patches. We identify patterns of species distribution displaying high degrees of apparent competition driven by Turing instabilities. Our results provide further indication that differences in abundance distribution among patches can be generated dynamically by self organized Turing patterns and not only by intrinsic environmental heterogeneity.

  1. Temperature-altered predator-prey dynamics in freshwater ponds in Arctic Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culler, L. E.; Ayres, M.

    2011-12-01

    Temperature sets the pace of many biological processes including species interactions. Describing the response of terrestrial and aquatic habitats to climate warming therefore requires studies of cross-trophic level dynamics. I use freshwater pond ecosystems in Arctic Greenland to study how the thermal environment shapes interactions between predators and their prey. This system is of interest because warming trends are notable, freshwaters are responding rapidly and dynamically to changes in temperature, and the biology of freshwaters is intimately linked to the terrestrial environment. My focal species are the Arctic mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae, Aedes nigripes) and its invertebrate predator, a predaceous diving beetle (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae, Colymbetes dolabratus). Both species develop as larvae in snow-melt ponds in May and June. I used experimental and observational studies to test effects of temperature on larval mosquito growth rates and predation rates by C. dolabratus. Results indicate strong effects of temperature on growth rate and development time but weak effects of temperature on consumption of mosquitoes by their predators. Incorporation of measured temperature response functions into a mosquito demographic model will elucidate how mosquito population dynamics in Arctic Greenland may change with temperature. For example, warming increases growth rate and decreases development time of mosquito larvae, which shortens the time larvae are exposed to predation. Additionally, decreased development time leads to an earlier mosquito emergence, with potential consequences for the health of wildlife. Evaluation of this model will reveal the importance of considering cross-trophic level dynamics when predicting mosquito population response to warming. Future studies will address interesting properties emerging from modeling, such as how shorter development time affects adult size and fitness, and connecting results to terrestrial systems in Arctic Greenland.

  2. Man-Computer Symbiosis Through Interactive Graphics: A Survey and Identification of Critical Research Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoop, Patricia A.

    The purpose of this report was to determine the research areas that appear most critical to achieving man-computer symbiosis. An operational definition of man-computer symbiosis was developed by: (1) reviewing and summarizing what others have said about it, and (2) attempting to distinguish it from other types of man-computer relationships. From…

  3. Altered Carbohydrates Allocation by Associated Bacteria-fungi Interactions in a Bark Beetle-microbe Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fangyuan; Lou, Qiaozhe; Wang, Bo; Xu, Letian; Cheng, Chihang; Lu, Min; Sun, Jianghua

    2016-01-01

    Insect-microbe interaction is a key area of research in multiplayer symbiosis, yet little is known about the role of microbe-microbe interactions in insect-microbe symbioses. The red turpentine beetle (RTB) has destroyed millions of healthy pines in China and forms context-dependent relationships with associated fungi. The adult-associated fungus Leptographium procerum have played key roles in RTB colonization. However, common fungal associates (L. procerum and Ophiostoma minus) with RTB larvae compete for carbohydrates. Here, we report that dominant bacteria associated with RTB larvae buffer the competition by inhibiting the growth and D-glucose consumption of O. minus. However, they didn’t inhibit the growth of L. procerum and forced this fungus to consume D-pinitol before consuming D-glucose, even though D-glucose was available and a better carbon source not only for L. procerum but also for RTB larvae and associated bacteria. This suggests the most frequently isolated bacteria associated with RTB larvae could affect fungal growth and the sequence of carbohydrate consumption. Thus, this regulates carbohydrate allocation in the RTB larva-microbe community, which may in turn benefit RTB larvae development. We also discuss the mechanism of carbohydrate allocation in the RTB larva-microbe community, and its potential contribution to the maintenance of a symbiotic community. PMID:26839264

  4. Schoolyard Symbiosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allard, David W.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses different types of symbiosis--mutualism, commensalism, and parasitism--and examples of each type including lichens, legumes, mistletoe, and epiphytes. Describes how teachers can use these examples in the study of symbiosis which allows teachers to focus on many basic concepts in evolution, cell biology, ecology, and other fields of…

  5. Neo-Symbiosis: The Next Stage in the Evolution of Human Information Interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Douglas; Greitzer, Frank L.

    2008-12-01

    In his 1960 paper Man-Machine Symbiosis, Licklider predicted that human brains and computing machines will be coupled in a tight partnership that will think as no human brain has ever thought and process data in a way not approached by the information-handling machines we know today. Today we are on the threshold of resurrecting the vision of symbiosis. While Licklider’s original vision suggested a co-equal relationship, here we discuss an updated vision, neo-symbiosis, in which the human holds a superordinate position in an intelligent human-computer collaborative environment. This paper was originally published as a journal article and is being published as a chapter in an upcoming book series, Advances in Novel Approaches in Cognitive Informatics and Natural Intelligence.

  6. Effect of delay in a Lotka-Volterra type predator-prey model with a transmissible disease in the predator species.

    PubMed

    Haque, Mainul; Sarwardi, Sahabuddin; Preston, Simon; Venturino, Ezio

    2011-11-01

    We consider a system of delay differential equations modeling the predator-prey ecoepidemic dynamics with a transmissible disease in the predator population. The time lag in the delay terms represents the predator gestation period. We analyze essential mathematical features of the proposed model such as local and global stability and in addition study the bifurcations arising in some selected situations. Threshold values for a few parameters determining the feasibility and stability conditions of some equilibria are discovered and similarly a threshold is identified for the disease to die out. The parameter thresholds under which the system admits a Hopf bifurcation are investigated both in the presence of zero and non-zero time lag. Numerical simulations support our theoretical analysis. PMID:21784082

  7. Interrupting peptidoglycan deacetylation during Bdellovibrio predator-prey interaction prevents ultimate destruction of prey wall, liberating bacterial-ghosts.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Carey; Lerner, Thomas R; Bui, Nhat Khai; Somers, Hannah; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi; Liddell, Susan; Clark, Ana; Vollmer, Waldemar; Lovering, Andrew L; Sockett, R Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The peptidoglycan wall, located in the periplasm between the inner and outer membranes of the cell envelope in Gram-negative bacteria, maintains cell shape and endows osmotic robustness. Predatory Bdellovibrio bacteria invade the periplasm of other bacterial prey cells, usually crossing the peptidoglycan layer, forming transient structures called bdelloplasts within which the predators replicate. Prey peptidoglycan remains intact for several hours, but is modified and then degraded by escaping predators. Here we show predation is altered by deleting two Bdellovibrio N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) deacetylases, one of which we show to have a unique two domain structure with a novel regulatory"plug". Deleting the deacetylases limits peptidoglycan degradation and rounded prey cell "ghosts" persist after mutant-predator exit. Mutant predators can replicate unusually in the periplasmic region between the peptidoglycan wall and the outer membrane rather than between wall and inner-membrane, yet still obtain nutrients from the prey cytoplasm. Deleting two further genes encoding DacB/PBP4 family proteins, known to decrosslink and round prey peptidoglycan, results in a quadruple mutant Bdellovibrio which leaves prey-shaped ghosts upon predation. The resultant bacterial ghosts contain cytoplasmic membrane within bacteria-shaped peptidoglycan surrounded by outer membrane material which could have promise as "bacterial skeletons" for housing artificial chromosomes. PMID:27211869

  8. Spatial distribution of predator/prey interactions in the Scotia Sea: implications for measuring predator/fisheries overlap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Keith; Sims, Michelle; White, Richard W.; Gillon, Keith W.

    2004-06-01

    The measurement of spatial overlap between predators and fisheries exploiting a common prey source is dependent upon the measurement scale used; inappropriate scales may produce misleading results. Previous assessments of the level of overlap between predators and fisheries for Antarctic krill ( Euphausia superba) in the region of the South Shetland Islands used different measurement scales and arrived at contradictory conclusions. At-sea data from observations of krill predators during the CCAMLR 2000 Survey were used to identify the areas of potential overlap with fisheries in the Scotia Sea and to determine the scale at which such overlap should be measured. The relationship between autocorrelation and sampling distance was used to identify the characteristic scales of the distribution of predators, krill and krill fisheries, and an effort-corrected index of relative abundance as a function of distance from land was used to identify the characteristics of areas of high potential for overlap. Despite distinct differences in foraging ecology, a group of krill-dependent species including chinstrap penguin ( Pygoscelis antarctica), (Antarctic) fur seal ( Arctocephalus sp. ( gazella)) and white-chinned petrel ( Procellaria aequinoctialis) showed similar patterns of distribution; the relative abundances were highest at 60-120 km from land and decreased sharply at distances greater than 150 km from land. There were more inter-specific differences in the characteristic scales, which were of the order of 50-100 km. Antarctic krill had a characteristic scale of approximately 200 km and the relationship with distance from land showed a log-linear decline. Krill fisheries operate at a scale of 150 km and occur almost entirely within 100 km of land. The requirement of land for breeding and the biological and oceanographic conditions that produce the high concentrations of krill associated with those land areas produce a system in which the demand for Antarctic krill from fisheries and predators is essentially co-extensive. The areas of greatest potential overlap are within 150-200 km of land and to accommodate the scales of operation of the processes involved the extent of such overlap in these areas should be assessed at scales of 70-100 km.

  9. Interrupting peptidoglycan deacetylation during Bdellovibrio predator-prey interaction prevents ultimate destruction of prey wall, liberating bacterial-ghosts

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Carey; Lerner, Thomas R.; Bui, Nhat Khai; Somers, Hannah; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi; Liddell, Susan; Clark, Ana; Vollmer, Waldemar; Lovering, Andrew L.; Sockett, R. Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The peptidoglycan wall, located in the periplasm between the inner and outer membranes of the cell envelope in Gram-negative bacteria, maintains cell shape and endows osmotic robustness. Predatory Bdellovibrio bacteria invade the periplasm of other bacterial prey cells, usually crossing the peptidoglycan layer, forming transient structures called bdelloplasts within which the predators replicate. Prey peptidoglycan remains intact for several hours, but is modified and then degraded by escaping predators. Here we show predation is altered by deleting two Bdellovibrio N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) deacetylases, one of which we show to have a unique two domain structure with a novel regulatory”plug”. Deleting the deacetylases limits peptidoglycan degradation and rounded prey cell “ghosts” persist after mutant-predator exit. Mutant predators can replicate unusually in the periplasmic region between the peptidoglycan wall and the outer membrane rather than between wall and inner-membrane, yet still obtain nutrients from the prey cytoplasm. Deleting two further genes encoding DacB/PBP4 family proteins, known to decrosslink and round prey peptidoglycan, results in a quadruple mutant Bdellovibrio which leaves prey-shaped ghosts upon predation. The resultant bacterial ghosts contain cytoplasmic membrane within bacteria-shaped peptidoglycan surrounded by outer membrane material which could have promise as “bacterial skeletons” for housing artificial chromosomes. PMID:27211869

  10. Understanding the importance of episodic acidification on fish predator-prey interactions: does weak acidification impair predator recognition?

    PubMed

    Brown, Grant E; Elvidge, Chris K; Ferrari, Maud C O; Chivers, Douglas P

    2012-11-15

    The ability of prey to recognize predators is a fundamental prerequisite to avoid being eaten. Indeed, many prey animals learn to distinguish species that pose a threat from those that do not. Once the prey has learned the identity of one predator, it may generalize this recognition to similar predators with which the prey has no experience. The ability to generalize reduces the costs associated with learning and further enhances the ability of the prey to avoid relevant threats. For many aquatic organisms, recognition of predators is based on odor signatures, consequently any anthropogenic alteration in water chemistry has the potential to impair recognition and learning of predators. Here we explored whether episodic acidification could influence the ability of juvenile rainbow trout to learn to recognize an unknown predator and then generalize this recognition to a closely related predator. Trout were conditioned to recognize the odor of pumpkinseed sunfish under circumneutral (~pH 7) conditions, and then tested for recognition of pumpkinseed or longear sunfish under both neutral or weakly acidic (~pH 6) conditions. When tested for a response to pumpkinseed odor, we found no significant effect of predator odor pH: trout responded similarly regardless of pH. Moreover, under neutral conditions, trout were able to generalize their recognition to the odor of longear sunfish. However, the trout could not generalize their recognition of the longear sunfish under acidic conditions. Given the widespread occurrence of anthropogenic acidification, acid-mediated impairment of predator recognition and generalization may be a pervasive problem for freshwater salmonid populations and other aquatic organisms. PMID:23063639

  11. Neo-Symbiosis: The Next Stage in the Evolution of Human Information Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Douglas; Greitzer, Frank L.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract--The purpose of this paper is to re-address the vision of human-computer symbiosis as originally expressed by J.C.R. Licklider nearly a half-century ago. We describe this vision, place it in some historical context relating to the evolution of human factors research, and we observe that the field is now in the process of re-invigorating Licklider’s vision. We briefly assess the state of the technology within the context of contemporary theory and practice, and we describe what we regard as this emerging field of neo-symbiosis. We offer some initial thoughts on requirements to define functionality of neo-symbiotic systems and discuss research challenges associated with their development and evaluation.

  12. The Role of Zonal Flows and Predator-Prey Oscillations in Triggering the L-H Transition and in Internal Transport Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, L.; Zeng, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Peebles, W. A.; McKee, G. R.; Yan, Z.; Groebner, R. J.; Burrell, K. H.; Tynan, G. R.; Boedo, J. A.; Solomon, W. M.

    2012-10-01

    Low frequency Zonal Flows (ZFs) have been observed to trigger the L-H transition near the power threshold, by either an extended predator-prey limit cycle oscillation (LCO [1]) or a short (˜0.5-1.5 ms) ZF burst executing only part of one limit cycle. Localized turbulence suppression (kθρs˜0.5) is initiated as the ZF shearing rate approaches the turbulence decorrelation rate. Turbulence-flow correlations (via Doppler Backscattering) show that the ZF amplitude and shear initially lag the rms fluctuation level by 90^o during LCO, transitioning to 180^o as the increasing ion pressure gradient and resulting equilibrium ExB shear secure the final transition to ELM-free H-mode. In a separate experiment, localized suppression of electron-scale fluctuations (kθρs˜3) by ZF shear is also observed in an internal thermal electron transport barrier. However, in contrast to the L-H transition, here the density fluctuation level is always anti-correlated (180^o out of phase) with the ZF shearing rate. 4pt[1] L. Schmitz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 155002 (2012).

  13. Teaching Symbiosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Argues that the meaning of the word "symbiosis" be standardized and that it should be used in a broad sense. Also criticizes the orthodox teaching of general principles in this subject and recommends that priority be given to continuity, intimacy, and associated adaptations, rather than to the harm/benefit relationship. (Author/JN)

  14. Mandible-Powered Escape Jumps in Trap-Jaw Ants Increase Survival Rates during Predator-Prey Encounters

    PubMed Central

    Larabee, Fredrick J.; Suarez, Andrew V.

    2015-01-01

    Animals use a variety of escape mechanisms to increase the probability of surviving predatory attacks. Antipredator defenses can be elaborate, making their evolutionary origin unclear. Trap-jaw ants are known for their rapid and powerful predatory mandible strikes, and some species have been observed to direct those strikes at the substrate, thereby launching themselves into the air away from a potential threat. This potential escape mechanism has never been examined in a natural context. We studied the use of mandible-powered jumping in Odontomachus brunneus during their interactions with a common ant predator: pit-building antlions. We observed that while trap-jaw ant workers escaped from antlion pits by running in about half of interactions, in 15% of interactions they escaped by mandible-powered jumping. To test whether escape jumps improved individual survival, we experimentally prevented workers from jumping and measured their escape rate. Workers with unrestrained mandibles escaped from antlion pits significantly more frequently than workers with restrained mandibles. Our results indicate that some trap-jaw ant species can use mandible-powered jumps to escape from common predators. These results also provide a charismatic example of evolutionary co-option, where a trait that evolved for one function (predation) has been co-opted for another (defense). PMID:25970637

  15. Symbiosis: An Evolutionary Innovator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Emily

    2003-01-01

    Defines symbiosis and describes the connection between symbiosis and evolution, how it is described in science textbooks, and genetic variability. Discusses educational policy and science curriculum content. (YDS)

  16. Neo-Symbiosis: The Next Stage in the Evolution of Human Information Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Douglas; Greitzer, Frank L.

    2008-03-01

    We re-address the vision of human-computer symbiosis expressed by J. C. R. Licklider nearly a half-century ago, when he wrote: “The hope is that in not too many years, human brains and computing machines will be coupled together very tightly, and that the resulting partnership will think as no human brain has ever thought and process data in a way not approached by the information-handling machines we know today.” (Licklider, 1960). Unfortunately, little progress was made toward this vision over four decades following Licklider’s challenge, despite significant advancements in the fields of human factors and computer science. Licklider’s vision was largely forgotten. However, recent advances in information science and technology, psychology, and neuroscience have rekindled the potential of making the Licklider’s vision a reality. This paper provides a historical context for and updates the vision, and it argues that such a vision is needed as a unifying framework for advancing IS&T.

  17. Gr and hp-1 tomato mutants unveil unprecedented interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and fruit ripening

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The roots of plants interact with soil mycorrhizal fungi to facilitate soil nutrient acquisition by the plant and carbon transfer to the fungus. Here we use tomato fruit ripening mutations to demonstrate that this root interaction communicates with and supports genetic mechanisms associated with th...

  18. "Prey Play": Learning about Predators and Prey through an Interactive, Role-Play Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deaton, Cynthia C. M.; Dodd, Kristen; Drennon, Katherine; Nagle, Jack

    2012-01-01

    "Prey Play" is an interactive role-play activity that provides fifth-grade students with opportunities to examine predator-prey interactions. This four-part, role-play activity allows students to take on the role of a predator and prey as they reflect on the behaviors animals exhibit as they collect food and interact with one another, as well as…

  19. Integrating models to investigate critical phenological overlaps in complex ecological interactions: the mountain pine beetle-fungus symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Addison, Audrey; Powell, James A; Bentz, Barbara J; Six, Diana L

    2015-03-01

    The fates of individual species are often tied to synchronization of phenology, however, few methods have been developed for integrating phenological models involving linked species. In this paper, we focus on mountain pine beetle (MPB, Dendroctonus ponderosae) and its two obligate mutualistic fungi, Grosmannia clavigera and Ophiostoma montium. Growth rates of all three partners are driven by temperature, and their idiosyncratic responses affect interactions at important life stage junctures. One critical phase for MPB-fungus symbiosis occurs just before dispersal of teneral (new) adult beetles, when fungi are acquired and transported in specialized structures (mycangia). Before dispersal, fungi must capture sufficient spatial resources within the tree to ensure contact with teneral adults and get packed into mycangia. Mycangial packing occurs at an unknown time during teneral feeding. We adapt thermal models predicting fungal growth and beetle development to predict overlap between the competing fungi and MPB teneral adult feeding windows and emergence. We consider a spectrum of mycangial packing strategies and describe them in terms of explicit functions with unknown parameters. Rates of growth are fixed by laboratory data, the unknown parameters describing various packing strategies, as well as the degree to which mycangial growth is slowed in woody tissues as compared to agar, are determined by maximum likelihood and two years of field observations. At the field location used, the most likely fungus acquisition strategy for MPB was packing mycangia just prior to emergence. Estimated model parameters suggested large differences in the relative growth rates of the two fungi in trees at the study site, with the most likely model estimating that G. clavigera grew approximately twenty-five times faster than O. montium under the bark, which is completely unexpected in comparison with observed fungal growth on agar. PMID:25556687

  20. Mutualistic and antagonistic trophic interactions in canola: the role of aphids in shaping pest and predator populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aphids have important effects on the abundance and occurrence of tending ants, predators, and pests in agronomic systems, and DNA-based gut content analysis can aid in establishing predator-prey interactions. The purpose of this study was to determine how the presence of aphids, ants, and pest indiv...

  1. How Symbiosis Creates Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    Diversity in habitats on Earth is astounding--whether on land or in the sea--and this is in part due to symbiosis. The lesson described in this article helps students understand how symbiosis affects different organisms through a fun and engaging game where they match hosts and symbionts based on their respective needs. This 45-minute lesson is…

  2. Computer symbiosis: Emergence of symbiotic behavior through evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ikegami, Takashi; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    1989-01-01

    Symbiosis is altruistic cooperation between distinct species. It is one of the most effective evolutionary processes, but its dynamics are not well understood as yet. A simple model of symbiosis is introduced, where we consider interactions between hosts and parasites and also mutations of hosts and parasites. It is found that a symbiotic state emerges for a suitable range of mutation rates. The symbiotic state is not static, but dynamically oscillates. Harmful parasites violating symbiosis appear periodically, but are rapidly extinguished by hosts and other parasites, and the symbiotic state is recovered. The emergence of ''Tit for Tat'' strategy to maintain symbiosis is discussed. 4 figs.

  3. On Human Symbiosis and the Vicissitudes of Individuation. Infantile Psychosis, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahler, Margaret S.

    The concepts of symbiosis and separation-individuation are explained, and the symbiosis theory of infantile psychosis is presented. Diagnostic considerations and clinical cases of child psychosis are reviewed; prototypes of mother-child interaction are described; and therapy is discussed. A summary of the symbiosis theory and a bibliography of…

  4. Assessment of agglomeration, co-sedimentation and trophic transfer of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in a laboratory-scale predator-prey model system.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Govind Sharan; Kumar, Ashutosh; Shanker, Rishi; Dhawan, Alok

    2016-01-01

    Nano titanium dioxide (nTiO2) is the most abundantly released engineered nanomaterial (ENM) in aquatic environments. Therefore, it is prudent to assess its fate and its effects on lower trophic-level organisms in the aquatic food chain. A predator-and-prey-based laboratory microcosm was established using Paramecium caudatum and Escherichia coli to evaluate the effects of nTiO2. The surface interaction of nTiO2 with E. coli significantly increased after the addition of Paramecium into the microcosm. This interaction favoured the hetero-agglomeration and co-sedimentation of nTiO2. The extent of nTiO2 agglomeration under experimental conditions was as follows: combined E. coli and Paramecium > Paramecium only > E. coli only > without E. coli or Paramecium. An increase in nTiO2 internalisation in Paramecium cells was also observed in the presence or absence of E. coli cells. These interactions and nTiO2 internalisation in Paramecium cells induced statistically significant (p < 0.05) effects on growth and the bacterial ingestion rate at 24 h. These findings provide new insights into the fate of nTiO2 in the presence of bacterial-ciliate interactions in the aquatic environment. PMID:27530102

  5. Assessment of agglomeration, co-sedimentation and trophic transfer of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in a laboratory-scale predator-prey model system

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Govind Sharan; Kumar, Ashutosh; Shanker, Rishi; Dhawan, Alok

    2016-01-01

    Nano titanium dioxide (nTiO2) is the most abundantly released engineered nanomaterial (ENM) in aquatic environments. Therefore, it is prudent to assess its fate and its effects on lower trophic-level organisms in the aquatic food chain. A predator-and-prey-based laboratory microcosm was established using Paramecium caudatum and Escherichia coli to evaluate the effects of nTiO2. The surface interaction of nTiO2 with E. coli significantly increased after the addition of Paramecium into the microcosm. This interaction favoured the hetero-agglomeration and co-sedimentation of nTiO2. The extent of nTiO2 agglomeration under experimental conditions was as follows: combined E. coli and Paramecium > Paramecium only > E. coli only > without E. coli or Paramecium. An increase in nTiO2 internalisation in Paramecium cells was also observed in the presence or absence of E. coli cells. These interactions and nTiO2 internalisation in Paramecium cells induced statistically significant (p < 0.05) effects on growth and the bacterial ingestion rate at 24 h. These findings provide new insights into the fate of nTiO2 in the presence of bacterial-ciliate interactions in the aquatic environment. PMID:27530102

  6. Symbiosis: Rich, Exciting, Neglected Topic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Jane Thomas

    1974-01-01

    Argues that the topic of symbiosis has been greatly neglected and underemphasized in general-biology textbooks. Discusses many types and examples of symbiosis, and provides an extensive bibliography of the literature related to this topic. (JR)

  7. Deadly competition and life-saving predation: the potential for alternative stable states in a stage-structured predator-prey system.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Benjamin J; Rombado, Bianca R; Rudolf, Volker H W

    2016-08-31

    Predators often undergo complete ontogenetic diet shifts, engaging in resource competition with species that become their prey during later developmental stages. Theory posits that this mix of stage-specific competition and predation, termed life-history intraguild predation (LHIGP), can lead to alternative stable states. In one state, prey exclude predators through competition (i.e. juvenile competitive bottleneck), while in the alternative, adult predators control prey density to limit competition and foster coexistence. Nevertheless, the interactions leading to these states have not been demonstrated in an empirical LHIGP system. To address this gap, we manipulated densities of cannibalistic adult cyclopoid copepods (Mesocyclops edax) and their cladoceran prey (Daphnia pulex) in a response-surface design and measured the maturation and survival of juvenile copepods (nauplii). We found that Daphnia reduced and even precluded both nauplii maturation and survival through depletion of a shared food resource. As predicted, adult copepods enhanced nauplii maturation and survival through Daphnia consumption, yet this positive effect was dependent on the relative abundance of Daphnia as well as the absolute density of adult copepods. Adult copepods reduced nauplii survival through cannibalism at low Daphnia densities and at the highest copepod density. This work demonstrates that predation can relax a strong juvenile competitive bottleneck in freshwater zooplankton, though cannibalism can reduce predator recruitment. Thus, our results highlight a key role for cannibalism in LHIGP dynamics and provide evidence for the interactions that drive alternative stable states in such systems. PMID:27581881

  8. A multispecies statistical age-structured model to assess predator-prey balance: application to an intensively managed Lake Michigan pelagic fish community

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsehaye, Iyob; Jones, Michael L.; Bence, James R.; Brenden, Travis O.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Warner, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Using a Bayesian model fitting approach, we developed a multispecies statistical catch-at-age model to assess trade-offs between predatory demands and prey productivities, focusing on the Lake Michigan pelagic fish community. We assessed these trade-offs in terms of predation mortalities and productivities of alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) and functional responses of salmonines. Our predation mortality estimates suggest that salmonine consumption has been a major driver of historical fluctuations in prey abundance, with sharp declines in alewife abundance in the 1980s and 2000s coinciding with estimated increases in predation mortalities. While Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were food limited during periods of low alewife abundance, other salmonines appeared to maintain a (near) maximum per-predator consumption across all observed prey densities, suggesting that feedback mechanisms are unlikely to help maintain a balance between predator consumption and prey productivity in Lake Michigan. This study demonstrates that a multispecies modeling approach that combines stock assessment methods with explicit consideration of predator–prey interactions could provide the basis for tactical decision-making from a broader ecosystem perspective.

  9. Predator-prey relations and competition for food between age-0 lake trout and slimy sculpins in the Apostle Island region of Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, Patrick L.; Savino, Jacqueline F.; Bronte, Charles R.

    1995-01-01

    Slimy sculpins (Cottus cognatus) are an important component of the fish community on reefs and adjacent nursery areas of the Great Lakes and overlap spatially with age-0 lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush). Important interactions between these fishes are possible during the lake trout's first year of life, which could include predation on each other's eggs and larvae, and competition for food resources. We investigated the diets of age-0 lake trout and slimy sculpins on a lake trout spawning reef (Gull Island Shoal) and adjacent nursery area (near Michigan Island) in the Apostle Island region of western Lake Superior during June through September from 1988 through 1991. Organisms in stomachs of 511 lake trout and 562 sculpins were identified and counted. Of the 11 major food types found in age-0 lake trout stomachs from both areas, Mysis was the dominant food item (mean volume in stomachs = 68%) and occurred in about 3/4 of the fish analyzed. Copepods, cladocerans, chironomid pupae, fish, and Bythotrephes were also common in the diet (frequency of occurrence > 4%). Diets of lake trout were more diverse on the reef than on the nursery area where Mysis dominated the diet. Slimy sculpins were only found in lake trout greater than 50 mm. Mysis was an important food item of slimy sculpins over the reef but not over the nursery area, where Diporeia was by far the most important taxon. A variety ofben-thic invertebrates (Asellus, chironomids, benthic copepods, and snails) comprised the bulk of the sculpin diet over the reef. Sculpins also ate lake trout eggs in November. Based on cluster analysis, diets were most similar over the reef where both consumed Mysis, calanoid copepods and chironomid pupae. Diets diverged over the nursery areas where sculpins were strictly benthic feeders and lake trout maintained their planktonic diet. In Lake Superior, where lake trout recruitment through natural reproduction has become well established, the coexistence of the two

  10. Interactions of biotic and abiotic environmental factors in an ectomycorrhizal symbiosis, and the potential for selection mosaics

    PubMed Central

    Piculell, Bridget J; Hoeksema, Jason D; Thompson, John N

    2008-01-01

    Background Geographic selection mosaics, in which species exert different evolutionary impacts on each other in different environments, may drive diversification in coevolving species. We studied the potential for geographic selection mosaics in plant-mycorrhizal interactions by testing whether the interaction between bishop pine (Pinus muricata D. Don) and one of its common ectomycorrhizal fungi (Rhizopogon occidentalis Zeller and Dodge) varies in outcome, when different combinations of plant and fungal genotypes are tested under a range of different abiotic and biotic conditions. Results We used a 2 × 2 × 2 × 2 factorial experiment to test the main and interactive effects of plant lineage (two maternal seed families), fungal lineage (two spore collections), soil type (lab mix or field soil), and non-mycorrhizal microbes (with or without) on the performance of plants and fungi. Ecological outcomes, as assessed by plant and fungal performance, varied widely across experimental environments, including interactions between plant or fungal lineages and soil environmental factors. Conclusion These results show the potential for selection mosaics in plant-mycorrhizal interactions, and indicate that these interactions are likely to coevolve in different ways in different environments, even when initially the genotypes of the interacting species are the same across all environments. Hence, selection mosaics may be equally as effective as genetic differences among populations in driving divergent coevolution among populations of interacting species. PMID:18507825

  11. Symbiosis-mediated outbreaks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Symbiosis simply means "living together" and in its narrowest form can mean two species deriving mutual benefit from the association. Recent studies have made evident that insect associations with microorganisms can range the gamut from casual associations to obligate or context-dependent mutualisms...

  12. Survival through Symbiosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdi, S. Wali

    1992-01-01

    Describes symbiosis and its significance in the day-to-day lives of plants and animals. Gives specific examples of mutualism, commensalism, and parasitism in the relationships among fungus and plant roots, animals and bacteria, birds and animals, fish, and predator and prey. (MDH)

  13. Study of cnidarian-algal symbiosis in the "omics" age.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Eli; Weis, Virginia M

    2012-08-01

    The symbiotic associations between cnidarians and dinoflagellate algae (Symbiodinium) support productive and diverse ecosystems in coral reefs. Many aspects of this association, including the mechanistic basis of host-symbiont recognition and metabolic interaction, remain poorly understood. The first completed genome sequence for a symbiotic anthozoan is now available (the coral Acropora digitifera), and extensive expressed sequence tag resources are available for a variety of other symbiotic corals and anemones. These resources make it possible to profile gene expression, protein abundance, and protein localization associated with the symbiotic state. Here we review the history of "omics" studies of cnidarian-algal symbiosis and the current availability of sequence resources for corals and anemones, identifying genes putatively involved in symbiosis across 10 anthozoan species. The public availability of candidate symbiosis-associated genes leaves the field of cnidarian-algal symbiosis poised for in-depth comparative studies of sequence diversity and gene expression and for targeted functional studies of genes associated with symbiosis. Reviewing the progress to date suggests directions for future investigations of cnidarian-algal symbiosis that include (i) sequencing of Symbiodinium, (ii) proteomic analysis of the symbiosome membrane complex, (iii) glycomic analysis of Symbiodinium cell surfaces, and (iv) expression profiling of the gastrodermal cells hosting Symbiodinium. PMID:22983032

  14. Expanding genomics of mycorrhizal symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Alan; Kohler, Annegret; Martin, Francis M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2014-01-01

    The mycorrhizal symbiosis between soil fungi and plant roots is a ubiquitous mutualism that plays key roles in plant nutrition, soil health, and carbon cycling. The symbiosis evolved repeatedly and independently as multiple morphotypes [e.g., arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM), ectomycorrhizal (ECM)] in multiple fungal clades (e.g., phyla Glomeromycota, Ascomycota, Basidiomycota). The accessibility and cultivability of many mycorrhizal partners make them ideal models for symbiosis studies. Alongside molecular, physiological, and ecological investigations, sequencing led to the first three mycorrhizal fungal genomes, representing two morphotypes and three phyla. The genome of the ECM basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor showed that the mycorrhizal lifestyle can evolve through loss of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) and expansion of lineage-specific gene families such as short secreted protein (SSP) effectors. The genome of the ECM ascomycete Tuber melanosporum showed that the ECM type can evolve without expansion of families as in Laccaria, and thus a different set of symbiosis genes. The genome of the AM glomeromycete Rhizophagus irregularis showed that despite enormous phylogenetic distance and morphological difference from the other two fungi, symbiosis can involve similar solutions as symbiosis-induced SSPs and loss of PCWDEs. The three genomes provide a solid base for addressing fundamental questions about the nature and role of a vital mutualism. PMID:25408690

  15. Expanding genomics of mycorrhizal symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Alan; Kohler, Annegret; Martin, Francis M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2014-11-04

    The mycorrhizal symbiosis between soil fungi and plant roots is a ubiquitous mutualism that plays key roles in plant nutrition, soil health, and carbon cycling. The symbiosis evolved repeatedly and independently as multiple morphotypes [e.g., arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM), ectomycorrhizal (ECM)] in multiple fungal clades (e.g., phyla Glomeromycota, Ascomycota, Basidiomycota). The accessibility and cultivability of many mycorrhizal partners make them ideal models for symbiosis studies. Alongside molecular, physiological, and ecological investigations, sequencing led to the first three mycorrhizal fungal genomes, representing two morphotypes and three phyla. The genome of the ECM basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor showed that the mycorrhizal lifestyle can evolve through loss of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) and expansion of lineage-specific gene families such as short secreted protein (SSP) effectors. The genome of the ECM ascomycete Tuber melanosporum showed that the ECM type can evolve without expansion of families as in Laccaria, and thus a different set of symbiosis genes. The genome of the AM glomeromycete Rhizophagus irregularis showed that despite enormous phylogenetic distance and morphological difference from the other two fungi, symbiosis can involve similar solutions as symbiosis-induced SSPs and loss of PCWDEs. The three genomes provide a solid base for addressing fundamental questions about the nature and role of a vital mutualism.

  16. Expanding genomics of mycorrhizal symbiosis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kuo, Alan; Kohler, Annegret; Martin, Francis M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2014-11-04

    The mycorrhizal symbiosis between soil fungi and plant roots is a ubiquitous mutualism that plays key roles in plant nutrition, soil health, and carbon cycling. The symbiosis evolved repeatedly and independently as multiple morphotypes [e.g., arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM), ectomycorrhizal (ECM)] in multiple fungal clades (e.g., phyla Glomeromycota, Ascomycota, Basidiomycota). The accessibility and cultivability of many mycorrhizal partners make them ideal models for symbiosis studies. Alongside molecular, physiological, and ecological investigations, sequencing led to the first three mycorrhizal fungal genomes, representing two morphotypes and three phyla. The genome of the ECM basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor showed that the mycorrhizal lifestyle can evolvemore » through loss of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) and expansion of lineage-specific gene families such as short secreted protein (SSP) effectors. The genome of the ECM ascomycete Tuber melanosporum showed that the ECM type can evolve without expansion of families as in Laccaria, and thus a different set of symbiosis genes. The genome of the AM glomeromycete Rhizophagus irregularis showed that despite enormous phylogenetic distance and morphological difference from the other two fungi, symbiosis can involve similar solutions as symbiosis-induced SSPs and loss of PCWDEs. The three genomes provide a solid base for addressing fundamental questions about the nature and role of a vital mutualism.« less

  17. Symbiosis, Empathy, Suicidal Behavior, and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Joseph

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the theoretical concept of symbiosis, as described by Mahler and her co-workers, and its clinical applications in suicidal situations. Also, the practical implications of the concept of symbiosis for assessment and treatment are discussed (Author)

  18. Evolving together: the biology of symbiosis, part 1

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Symbioses, prolonged associations between organisms often widely separated phylogenetically, are more common in biology than we once thought and have been neglected as a phenomenon worthy of study on its own merits. Extending along a dynamic continuum from antagonistic to cooperative and often involving elements of both antagonism and mutualism, symbioses involve pathogens, commensals, and mutualists interacting in myriad ways over the evolutionary history of the involved “partners.” In this first of 2 parts, some remarkable examples of symbiosis will be explored, from the coral-algal symbiosis and nitrogen fixation to the great diversity of dietary specializations enabled by the gastrointestinal microbiota of animals. PMID:16389385

  19. Auxin influences strigolactones in pea mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Foo, E

    2013-03-15

    Hormone interactions are essential for the control of many developmental processes, including intracellular symbioses. The interaction between auxin and the new plant hormone strigolactone in the regulation of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis was examined in one of the few auxin deficient mutants available in a mycorrhizal species, the auxin-deficient bsh mutant of pea (Pisum sativum). Mycorrhizal colonisation with the fungus Glomus intraradices was significantly reduced in the low auxin bsh mutant. The bsh mutant also exhibited a reduction in strigolactone exudation and the expression of a key strigolactone biosynthesis gene (PsCCD8). Strigolactone exudation was also reduced in wild type plants when the auxin content was reduced by stem girdling. Low strigolactone levels appear to be at least partially responsible for the reduced colonisation of the bsh mutant, as application of the synthetic strigolactone GR24 could partially rescue the mycorrhizal phenotype of bsh mutants. Data presented here indicates root auxin content was correlated with strigolactone exudation in both mutant and wild type plants. Mutant studies suggest that auxin may regulate early events in the formation of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis by controlling strigolactone levels, both in the rhizosphere and possibly during early root colonisation. PMID:23219475

  20. Mastering ectomycorrhizal symbiosis: the impact of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Nehls, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Mycorrhiza formation is the consequence of a mutualistic interaction between certain soil fungi and plant roots that helps to overcome nutritional limitations faced by the respective partners. In symbiosis, fungi contribute to tree nutrition by means of mineral weathering and mobilization of nutrients from organic matter, and obtain plant-derived carbohydrates as a response. Support with easily degradable carbohydrates seems to be the driving force for fungi to undergo this type of interaction. As a consequence, the fungal hexose uptake capacity is strongly increased in Hartig net hyphae of the model fungi Amanita muscaria and Laccaria bicolor. Next to fast carbohydrate uptake and metabolism, storage carbohydrates are of special interest. In functional A. muscaria ectomycorrhizas, expression and activity of proteins involved in trehalose biosynthesis is mainly localized in hyphae of the Hartig net, indicating an important function of trehalose in generation of a strong carbon sink by fungal hyphae. In symbiosis, fungal partners receive up to approximately 19 times more carbohydrates from their hosts than normal leakage of the root system would cause, resulting in a strong carbohydrate demand of infected roots and, as a consequence, a more efficient plant photosynthesis. To avoid fungal parasitism, the plant seems to have developed mechanisms to control carbohydrate drain towards the fungal partner and link it to the fungus-derived mineral nutrition. In this contribution, current knowledge on fungal strategies to obtain carbohydrates from its host and plant strategies to enable, but also to control and restrict (under certain conditions), carbon transfer are summarized. PMID:18272925

  1. Evolution of symbiosis with resource allocation from fecundity to survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Shin

    2014-05-01

    Symbiosis is one of the most fundamental relationships between or among organisms and includes parasitism (which has negative effects on the fitness of the interacting partner), commensalism (no effect), and mutualism (positive effects). The effects of these interactions are usually assumed to influence a single component of a species' fitness, either survival or fecundity, even though in reality the interaction can simultaneously affect both of these components. I used a dual lattice model to investigate the process of evolution of mutualistic symbiosis in the presence of interactive effects on both survival and fecundity. I demonstrate that a positive effect on survival and a negative effect on fecundity are key to the establishment of mutualism. Furthermore, both the parasitic and the mutualistic behaviour must carry large costs for mutualism to evolve. This helps develop a new understanding of symbiosis as a function of resource allocation, in which resources are shifted from fecundity to survival. The simultaneous establishment of mutualism from parasitism never occurs in two species, but can do so in one of the species as long as the partner still behaves parasitically. This suggests that one of the altruistic behaviours in a mutualistic unit consisting of two species must originate as a parasitic behaviour.

  2. Coral Reef Genomics: Developing tools for functional genomics ofcoral symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Jodi; Brokstein, Peter; Manohar, Chitra; Coffroth, MaryAlice; Szmant, Alina; Medina, Monica

    2005-03-01

    Symbioses between cnidarians and dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium are widespread in the marine environment. The importance of this symbiosis to reef-building corals and reef nutrient and carbon cycles is well documented, but little is known about the mechanisms by which the partners establish and regulate the symbiosis. Because the dinoflagellate symbionts live inside the cells of their host coral, the interactions between the partners occur on cellular and molecular levels, as each partner alters the expression of genes and proteins to facilitate the partnership. These interactions can examined using high-throughput techniques that allow thousands of genes to be examined simultaneously. We are developing the groundwork so that we can use DNA microarray profiling to identify genes involved in the Montastraea faveolata and Acropora palmata symbioses. Here we report results from the initial steps in this microarray initiative, that is, the construction of cDNA libraries from 4 of 16 target stages, sequencing of 3450 cDNA clones to generate Expressed Sequenced Tags (ESTs), and annotation of the ESTs to identify candidate genes to include in the microarrays. An understanding of how the coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis is regulated will have implications for atmospheric and ocean sciences, conservation biology, the study and diagnosis of coral bleaching and disease, and comparative studies of animal-protest interactions.

  3. Cell Biology of Cnidarian-Dinoflagellate Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Allemand, Denis; Weis, Virginia M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The symbiosis between cnidarians (e.g., corals or sea anemones) and intracellular dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium is of immense ecological importance. In particular, this symbiosis promotes the growth and survival of reef corals in nutrient-poor tropical waters; indeed, coral reefs could not exist without this symbiosis. However, our fundamental understanding of the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis and of its links to coral calcification remains poor. Here we review what we currently know about the cell biology of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis. In doing so, we aim to refocus attention on fundamental cellular aspects that have been somewhat neglected since the early to mid-1980s, when a more ecological approach began to dominate. We review the four major processes that we believe underlie the various phases of establishment and persistence in the cnidarian/coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis: (i) recognition and phagocytosis, (ii) regulation of host-symbiont biomass, (iii) metabolic exchange and nutrient trafficking, and (iv) calcification. Where appropriate, we draw upon examples from a range of cnidarian-alga symbioses, including the symbiosis between green Hydra and its intracellular chlorophyte symbiont, which has considerable potential to inform our understanding of the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis. Ultimately, we provide a comprehensive overview of the history of the field, its current status, and where it should be going in the future. PMID:22688813

  4. Brain-Computer Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Schalk, Gerwin

    2009-01-01

    The theoretical groundwork of the 1930’s and 1940’s and the technical advance of computers in the following decades provided the basis for dramatic increases in human efficiency. While computers continue to evolve, and we can still expect increasing benefits from their use, the interface between humans and computers has begun to present a serious impediment to full realization of the potential payoff. This article is about the theoretical and practical possibility that direct communication between the brain and the computer can be used to overcome this impediment by improving or augmenting conventional forms of human communication. It is about the opportunity that the limitations of our body’s input and output capacities can be overcome using direct interaction with the brain, and it discusses the assumptions, possible limitations, and implications of a technology that I anticipate will be a major source of pervasive changes in the coming decades. PMID:18310804

  5. A novel reef coral symbiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantos, O.; Bythell, J. C.

    2010-09-01

    Reef building corals form close associations with unicellular microalgae, fungi, bacteria and archaea, some of which are symbiotic and which together form the coral holobiont. Associations with multicellular eukaryotes such as polychaete worms, bivalves and sponges are not generally considered to be symbiotic as the host responds to their presence by forming physical barriers with an active growth edge in the exoskeleton isolating the invader and, at a subcellular level, activating innate immune responses such as melanin deposition. This study describes a novel symbiosis between a newly described hydrozoan ( Zanclea margaritae sp. nov.) and the reef building coral Acropora muricata (= A. formosa), with the hydrozoan hydrorhiza ramifying throughout the coral tissues with no evidence of isolation or activation of the immune systems of the host. The hydrorhiza lacks a perisarc, which is typical of symbiotic species of this and related genera, including species that associate with other cnidarians such as octocorals. The symbiosis was observed at all sites investigated from two distant locations on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and appears to be host species specific, being found only in A. muricata and in none of 30 other species investigated at these sites. Not all colonies of A. muricata host the hydrozoans and both the prevalence within the coral population (mean = 66%) and density of emergent hydrozoan hydranths on the surface of the coral (mean = 4.3 cm-2, but up to 52 cm-2) vary between sites. The form of the symbiosis in terms of the mutualism-parasitism continuum is not known, although the hydrozoan possesses large stenotele nematocysts, which may be important for defence from predators and protozoan pathogens. This finding expands the known A. muricata holobiont and the association must be taken into account in future when determining the corals’ abilities to defend against predators and withstand stress.

  6. PtSRR1, a putative Pisolithus tinctorius symbiosis related receptor gene is expressed during the first hours of mycorrhizal interaction with Castanea sativa roots

    PubMed Central

    Acioli-Santos, B.; Malosso, E.; Calzavara-Silva, C.E.; Lima, C.E.P.; Figueiredo, A.; Sebastiana, M.; Pais, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    PtSRR1 EST was previously identified in the first hours of Pisolithus tinctorius and Castanea sativa interaction. QRT-PCR confirmed PtSRR1 early expression and in silico preliminary translated peptide analysis indicated a strong probability that PtSRR1 be a transmembrane protein. These data stimulate the PtSRR1 gene research during ectomycorrhiza formation. PMID:24031360

  7. Contribution of the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis to heavy metal phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Göhre, Vera; Paszkowski, Uta

    2006-05-01

    High concentrations of heavy metals (HM) in the soil have detrimental effects on ecosystems and are a risk to human health as they can enter the food chain via agricultural products or contaminated drinking water. Phytoremediation, a sustainable and inexpensive technology based on the removal of pollutants from the environment by plants, is becoming an increasingly important objective in plant research. However, as phytoremediation is a slow process, improvement of efficiency and thus increased stabilization or removal of HMs from soils is an important goal. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi provide an attractive system to advance plant-based environmental clean-up. During symbiotic interaction the hyphal network functionally extends the root system of their hosts. Thus, plants in symbiosis with AM fungi have the potential to take up HM from an enlarged soil volume. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about the contribution of the AM symbiosis to phytoremediation of heavy metals. PMID:16555102

  8. Mycetocyte symbiosis in insects.

    PubMed

    Douglas, A E

    1989-11-01

    1. Non-pathogenic microorganisms, known as mycetocyte symbionts, are located in specialized 'mycetocyte' cells of many insects that feed on nutritionally unbalanced or poor diets. The insects include cockroaches, Cimicidae and Lygaeidae (Heteroptera), the Homoptera, Anoplura, the Diptera Pupiparia, some formicine ants and many beetles. 2. Most mycetocyte symbionts are prokaryotes and a great diversity of forms has been described. None has been cultured in vitro and their taxonomic position is obscure. Yeasts have been reported in Cerambycidae and Anobiidae (Coleoptera) and a few planthoppers. They are culturable and those in anobiids have been assigned to the genus Torulopsis. 3. The mycetocyte cells may be associated with the gut, lie free in the abdominal haemocoel or be embedded in the fat body of the insect. The mycetocytes are large polyploid cells which rarely divide and the symbionts are restricted to their cytoplasm. 4. The mycetocyte symbionts are transmitted maternally from one insect generation to the next. In many beetles (Anobiidae, Cerambycidae, Chrysomelidae and cleonine Curculionidae), the microoganisms are smeared onto the eggs and consumed by the hatching larvae. In other insects, they are transferred from mycetocytes to oocytes in the ovary, a process known as transovarial transmission. The details of transmission in the different insect groups vary with the age of the mother (adult, larva or embryo) at which symbiont transfer to the ovary is initiated; whether isolated symbionts or intact mycetocytes are transferred; and the site of entry of symbionts to the egg (anterior, posterior or apolar). 5. Within an individual insect, the biomass of symbionts varies in a regular fashion with age, weight and sex of the insect. Suppression of symbiont growth rate and lysis of 'excess' microorganisms may contribute to the regulation of symbionts (including freshly-isolated preparations of unculturable forms) are used to investigate interactions between the

  9. Symbiosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bicevskis, Rob

    2002-01-01

    Exposing today's students to a balance of science and the outside world is critical. The outdoors provides a context for practical applications of science, exposing the relevance of science to everyday life. Outdoor education instills an awareness that the health of the environment is directly coupled with our own health, enabling us to make…

  10. The genome of Laccaria bicolor provides insights into mycorrhizal symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F.; Aerts, A.; Ahren, D.; Brun, A.; Danchin, E. G. J.; Duchaussoy, F.; Gibon, J.; Kohler, A.; Lindquist, E.; Peresa, V.; Salamov, A.; Shapiro, H. J.; Wuyts, J.; Blaudez, D.; Buee, M.; Brokstein, P.; Canback, B.; Cohen, D.; Courty, P. E.; Coutinho, P. M.; Delaruelle, C.; Detter, J. C.; Deveau, A.; DiFazio, S.; Duplessis, S.; Fraissinet-Tachet, L.; Lucic, E.; Frey-Klett, P.; Fourrey, C.; Feussner, I.; Gay, G.; Grimwood, J.; Hoegger, P. J.; Jain, P.; Kilaru, S.; Labbe, J.; Lin, Y. C.; Legue, V.; Le Tacon, F.; Marmeisse, R.; Melayah, D.; Montanini, B.; Muratet, M.; Nehls, U.; Niculita-Hirzel, H.; Secq, M. P. Oudot-Le; Peter, M.; Quesneville, H.; Rajashekar, B.; Reich, M.; Rouhier, N.; Schmutz, J.; Yin, T.; Chalot, M.; Henrissat, B.; Kues, U.; Lucas, S.; Van de Peer, Y.; Podila, G. K.; Polle, A.; Pukkila, P. J.; Richardson, P. M.; Rouze, P.; Sanders, I. R.; Stajich, J. E.; Tunlid, A.; Tuskan, G.; Grigoriev, I. V.

    2007-08-10

    Mycorrhizal symbioses the union of roots and soil fungi are universal in terrestrial ecosystems and may have been fundamental to land colonization by plants 1, 2. Boreal, temperate and montane forests all depend on ectomycorrhizae1. Identification of the primary factors that regulate symbiotic development and metabolic activity will therefore open the door to understanding the role of ectomycorrhizae in plant development and physiology, allowing the full ecological significance of this symbiosis to be explored. Here we report the genome sequence of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor (Fig. 1) and highlight gene sets involved in rhizosphere colonization and symbiosis. This 65-megabase genome assembly contains 20,000 predicted protein-encoding genes and a very large number of transposons and repeated sequences. We detected unexpected genomic features, most notably a battery of effector-type small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown function, several of which are only expressed in symbiotic tissues. The most highly expressed SSP accumulates in the proliferating hyphae colonizing the host root. The ectomycorrhizae-specific SSPs probably have a decisive role in the establishment of the symbiosis. The unexpected observation that the genome of L. bicolor lacks carbohydrate-active enzymes involved in degradation of plant cell walls, but maintains the ability to degrade non-plant cell wall polysaccharides, reveals the dual saprotrophic and biotrophic lifestyle of the mycorrhizal fungus that enables it to grow within both soil and living plant roots. The predicted gene inventory of the L. bicolor genome, therefore, points to previously unknown mechanisms of symbiosis operating in biotrophic mycorrhizal fungi. The availability of this genome provides an unparalleled opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the processes by which symbionts interact with plants within their ecosystem to perform vital functions in the carbon and nitrogen cycles that are