Science.gov

Sample records for interactive identification key

  1. Illustrated Plant Identification Keys: An Interactive Tool to Learn Botany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Helena; Pinho, Rosa; Lopes, Lisia; Nogueira, Antonio J. A.; Silveira, Paulo

    2011-01-01

    An Interactive Dichotomous Key (IDK) for 390 "taxa" of vascular plants from the Ria de Aveiro, available on a website, was developed to help teach botany to school and universitary students. This multimedia tool includes several links to Descriptive and Illustrated Glossaries. Questionnaires answered by high-school and undergraduate students about…

  2. New distribution records for the rare genus Afrotremex Pasteels (Siricidae: Hymenoptera) and provision of interactive Lucid identification keys to species

    PubMed Central

    Goulet, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Afrotremex Pasteels, 1951 is a rare genus of wasps endemic to the Afrotropical region, containing 6 species represented by 14 specimens. Specimens were previously only recorded from central Africa: Cameroon, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Gabon and Uganda. New information Here we record two additional specimens housed in the Natural History Museum in London (BMNH), one of which is a male of A. xylophagus Goulet, 2014 collected in Ghana (previously Gold Coast). This record extends the known distribution of the genus into west Africa, and represents the second known male specimen for the genus. The other BMNH specimen is a female paratype of A. violaceus Pasteels, 1951 collected in the Democratic Republic of Congo. We provide high quality photographs of these additional two specimens. Images of all six known species are openly available online on WaspWeb. In addition we have developed interactive online Lucid Matrix and Lucid Phoenix identification keys to the species, which are openly available on WaspWeb at: http://www.waspweb.org/Siricoidea/Siricidae/Keys/index.htm PMID:26696771

  3. Afrotropical Ophioninae (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae): an update of Gauld and Mitchell’s revision, including two new species and an interactive matrix identification key

    PubMed Central

    Rousse, Pascal; van Noort, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The revision of the Afrotropical Ophioninae is updated, based on the examination of about 800–900 individuals in the South African and European museum collections. A robust interactive matrix key was built to provide quick and reliable identifications. The key is available online at http://www.waspweb.org. Two new species are described: Dicamptus maxipol sp. n. and Enicospilus gauldetmitchellorum sp. n. Numerous new distribution and biological records are provided, and noticeable morphological intra-specific variations are detailed. Enicospilus batus Gauld & Mitchell, syn. n. is considered as a junior synonym of Enicospilus luebberti (Enderlein). PMID:25709521

  4. Non-Interactive Key Exchange and Key Assignment Schemes

    E-print Network

    Paterson, Kenny

    -interactive key exchange (NIKE) scheme allows two users to compute a unique shared key without any interaction's public key pkB, along with some public parameters. We provide different security models for NIKE introduce arbitrary public keys in the system. We give constructions for secure NIKE, with respect to those

  5. Identification of Key Barriers in Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect

    2008-03-31

    This report documents the identification of key barriers in the development of an adequate national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project, being performed under a Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration grant. Many barriers exist that prevent the development of an adequate number of propertly trained national security personnel. Some barriers can be eliminated in a short-term manner, whereas others will involve a long-term strategy that takes into account public policy.

  6. Species Identification Key of Korean Mammal Hair

    PubMed Central

    LEE, Eunok; CHOI, Tae-Young; WOO, Donggul; MIN, Mi-Sook; SUGITA, Shoei; LEE, Hang

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hair microstructures of Korean terrestrial mammals from 23 species (22 wild and one domestic) were analyzed using light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to construct a hair identification key. The hairs were examined using the medulla structures and cuticular scales of guard hairs from the dorsal regions of mature adult animals. All cuticular scale structures in the hair of Rodentia, Lagomorpha, Carnivora and Insectivora showed the petal pattern, and those of Artiodactyla and Chiroptera showed the wave pattern and coronal pattern, respectively. Rodentia, Lagomorpha and Carnivora showed multicellular, and Insectivora and Artiodactyla showed unicellular regular, mesh or columnar in the medulla structures, respectively. Chiroptera did not show the medulla structures in their hair. We found that it is possible to distinguish between species and order based on general appearance, medulla structures and cuticular scales. Thus, we constructed a hair identification key with morphological characteristics from each species. This study suggests that hair identification keys could be useful in fields, such as forensic science, food safety and foraging ecology. PMID:24451929

  7. Running head: TEMPORAL DYNAMICS AND THE IDENTIFICATION OF MUSICAL KEY 1 Temporal Dynamics and the Identification of Musical Key

    E-print Network

    Marcus, Gary F.

    Running head: TEMPORAL DYNAMICS AND THE IDENTIFICATION OF MUSICAL KEY 1 Temporal Dynamics and the Identification of Musical Key Morwaread Mary Farbood, Gary Marcus, and David Poeppel New York University Author. It is not the copy of record. #12;TEMPORAL DYNAMICS AND THE IDENTIFICATION OF MUSICAL KEY 2 Abstract A central

  8. Molecular identification key of the family Streptococcaceae.

    PubMed

    Kanyó, István; Nagy, Dénes

    2014-03-01

    The gene order conservation (GOC) between the species of family Streptococcaceae was analysed. The rate of GOC in the strains belonging to the same species is 70% or more. When we compared different species belonging to the same genus, the rate of GOC was 30-47% while it was below 20% when the species were from different genera. A molecular identification key was established for identifying those genera and species within the family Streptococcaceae which have an already known full genome sequence (24 Streptococcus and 2 Lactococcus species). Identical genome parts of the species belonging to the same genus were used for determination of genera. These are the sections surrounding the replication origin dnaA, the sequence from gene phaB to the gene accA, and the sequence of alr acpS secA. Sections around the genes pepX, leuS and rplM were used for identifying the species. The gene order analysis and data in molecular identification key showed that S. uberis and S. parauberis also belong to the same species, and our suggestion for their new names is S. uberis subsp. uberis and S uberis subsp. parauberis. Based on this data, a new definition of bacterial species is proposed: two isolates belong to the same species if the order of the genes in their genomes is almost identical. PMID:24631752

  9. Weed Identification: Using Plant Structures as a Key (Spanish) 

    E-print Network

    Baumann, Paul A.

    1999-08-30

    Weed identification is necessary to the success of any weed control program. Frequently, simple plant keys or "picture book identification guides are used to identify weeds. This handbook, which identifies and labels plant structures, is intended...

  10. A visual identification key utilizing both gestalt and analytic approaches to identification of Carices present in North America (Plantae, Cyperaceae)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Images are a critical part of the identification process because they enable direct, immediate and relatively unmediated comparisons between a specimen being identified and one or more reference specimens. The Carices Interactive Visual Identification Key (CIVIK) is a novel tool for identification of North American Carex species, the largest vascular plant genus in North America, and two less numerous closely-related genera, Cymophyllus and Kobresia. CIVIK incorporates 1288 high-resolution tiled image sets that allow users to zoom in to view minute structures that are crucial at times for identification in these genera. Morphological data are derived from the earlier Carex Interactive Identification Key (CIIK) which in turn used data from the Flora of North America treatments. In this new iteration, images can be viewed in a grid or histogram format, allowing multiple representations of data. In both formats the images are fully zoomable. PMID:24723777

  11. Interaction: The Key to Successful Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Al

    This paper discusses the impediments to distance education (DE) programs and the critical value of interaction and dialog in DE learning environments. The types of interaction to be considered when designing a DE program are listed, including interaction to increase learning, to increase participation, to develop communication, to receive…

  12. Interactive Secret Key Generation over Reciprocal Fading Channels

    E-print Network

    Khisti, Ashish

    Interactive Secret Key Generation over Reciprocal Fading Channels Ashish Khisti Dept. of Electrical--We study a two-terminal secret-key generation problem over a two-way, approximately reciprocal, block of the secret-key is gen- erated from the correlated channel state sequences by creating omniscience between

  13. Using Web-Based Key Character and Classification Instruction for Teaching Undergraduate Students Insect Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golick, Douglas A.; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M.; Steckelberg, Allen L.; Brooks, David. W.; Higley, Leon G.; Fowler, David

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether undergraduate students receiving web-based instruction based on traditional, key character, or classification instruction differed in their performance of insect identification tasks. All groups showed a significant improvement in insect identifications on pre- and post-two-dimensional picture specimen quizzes. The study also determined student performance on insect identification tasks was not as good as for family-level identification as compared to broader insect orders and arthropod classification identification tasks. Finally, students erred significantly more by misidentification than misspelling specimen names on prepared specimen quizzes. Results of this study support that short web-based insect identification exercises can improve insect identification performance. Also included is a discussion of how these results can be used in teaching and future research on biological identification.

  14. [Impact of interactivity on identification with characters in fiction].

    PubMed

    Soto-Sanfiel, María T; Aymerich-Franch, Laura; Ribes Guàrdia, Francesc Xavier

    2010-11-01

    The effect of interactivity on identification with characters in audiovisual fiction was observed. 310 participants were asked to watch a film in one of these two conditions: 1) interactive (they selected the plot), and 2) non-interactive (they consumed the fiction in a conventional way). After watching the movie, they completed a questionnaire with the EDI scale of identification and empathy with characters, created by Igartua and Paez. The capacity to intervene in the configuration of the plot (interactivity) affected identification with characters. The results provide data about the psychology of media and interactivity in communication and allow us to understand the processes of empathy and identification with characters. PMID:21044519

  15. Using Web-Based Key Character and Classification Instruction for Teaching Undergraduate Students Insect Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golick, Douglas A.; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M.; Steckelberg, Allen L.; Brooks, David. W.; Higley, Leon G.; Fowler, David

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether undergraduate students receiving web-based instruction based on traditional, key character, or classification instruction differed in their performance of insect identification tasks. All groups showed a significant improvement in insect identifications on pre- and post-two-dimensional picture…

  16. Identification of the Key Fields and Their Key Technical Points of Oncology by Patent Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Chen, Juan; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Background This paper aims to identify the key fields and their key technical points of oncology by patent analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings Patents of oncology applied from 2006 to 2012 were searched in the Thomson Innovation database. The key fields and their key technical points were determined by analyzing the Derwent Classification (DC) and the International Patent Classification (IPC), respectively. Patent applications in the top ten DC occupied 80% of all the patent applications of oncology, which were the ten fields of oncology to be analyzed. The number of patent applications in these ten fields of oncology was standardized based on patent applications of oncology from 2006 to 2012. For each field, standardization was conducted separately for each of the seven years (2006–2012) and the mean of the seven standardized values was calculated to reflect the relative amount of patent applications in that field; meanwhile, regression analysis using time (year) and the standardized values of patent applications in seven years (2006–2012) was conducted so as to evaluate the trend of patent applications in each field. Two-dimensional quadrant analysis, together with the professional knowledge of oncology, was taken into consideration in determining the key fields of oncology. The fields located in the quadrant with high relative amount or increasing trend of patent applications are identified as key ones. By using the same method, the key technical points in each key field were identified. Altogether 116,820 patents of oncology applied from 2006 to 2012 were retrieved, and four key fields with twenty-nine key technical points were identified, including “natural products and polymers” with nine key technical points, “fermentation industry” with twelve ones, “electrical medical equipment” with four ones, and “diagnosis, surgery” with four ones. Conclusions/Significance The results of this study could provide guidance on the development direction of oncology, and also help researchers broaden innovative ideas and discover new technological opportunities. PMID:26599967

  17. A Dichotomous Key for the Identification of Common British Wild Flower Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Piers

    2004-01-01

    This article argues the need for, and provides, a dichotomous single access key for the identification of common British wild flower families. A minimum of technical vocabulary is used while at the same time retaining most of the recent botanical names of families. The key provides a user-friendly opportunity for school pupils to become familiar…

  18. A Key for the Identification of Eighteen Common Timbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    Dichotomous key for 18 woods in common domestic and architectural use in Britain is provided. It is based upon structures visible with the naked eye and a hand-lens. Descriptions of the necessary anatomy and terminology are given. Timbers include yew, pine, spruce, oak, sweet chestnut, elm, ash, teak, cherry, walnut, mahogany, box, beech,…

  19. Controlling hydrotreater fouling -- Problem identification is key to cost-effective solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Groce, B.C. )

    1994-01-01

    There are many variables which can impact fouling in hydrotreater preheat exchangers and reactors. Identification of the fouling mechanisms and the impact of various operating variables on fouling is essential to developing the most cost-effective solution to hydrotreater fouling. This paper addresses the use of deposit analyses and feedstock characterization to help identify the different hydrotreater fouling mechanisms. It also expands on how problem identification is key to solving these problems. Several brief case studies present a problem identification and chemical solution approach to controlling hydrotreater fouling.

  20. Key Binding Interactions for Memantine in the NMDA Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Memantine (Namenda) is prescribed as a treatment for moderate to severe Alzheimer’s Disease. Memantine functions by blocking the NMDA receptor, but the key binding interactions between drug and receptor are not fully elucidated. To determine key binding interactions of memantine, we made side-by-side comparisons of IC50 for memantine and amantadine, a structurally related drug, in the GluN1/GluN2B NMDA receptor. We identified hydrophobic binding pockets for the two methyl groups on memantine formed by the residues A645 and A644 on the third transmembrane helices of GluN1 and GluN2B, respectively. Moreover, we found that while adding two methyl groups to amantadine to produce memantine greatly improves affinity, adding a third methyl group to produce the symmetrical trimethylamantadine diminished affinity. Our results provide a better understanding of chemical-scale interactions between memantine and the NMDA channel, which will potentially benefit the development of new drugs for neurodegenerative diseases involving NMDA receptors. PMID:23421676

  1. Development of an interactive tutorial on quantum key distribution

    E-print Network

    DeVore, Seth

    2016-01-01

    We describe the development of a Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorial (QuILT) on quantum key distribution, a context which involves a practical application of quantum mechanics. The QuILT helps upper-level undergraduate students learn quantum mechanics using a simple two state system and was developed based upon the findings of cognitive research and physics education research. One protocol used in the QuILT involves generating a random shared key over a public channel for encrypting and decrypting information using single photons with non-orthogonal polarization states, and another protocol makes use of two entangled spin-1/2 particles. The QuILT uses a guided approach and focuses on helping students build links between the formalism and conceptual aspects of quantum physics without compromising the technical content. We also discuss findings from a preliminary in-class evaluation.

  2. A key to the identification of arrested gastrointestinal nematode larvae of sheep in Britain.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D R; Probert, A J

    1993-03-01

    A simple key is presented for the identification of arrested larval nematodes recovered from the gastrointestinal tract of sheep slaughtered in Britain. The parasites included in this key are those species which are most commonly seen to undergo arrested development in sheep. They include Teladorsagia (Ostertagia) spp., Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus axei, intestinal Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus battus, Nematodirus filicollis, and Cooperia spp. Easily identifiable morphological features, together with overall dimensions, are used to separate these species. PMID:8493769

  3. Dynamics of particles with "key-lock" interactions

    E-print Network

    Nicholas A. Licata; Alexei V. Tkachenko

    2006-12-19

    The dynamics of particles interacting by key-lock binding of attached biomolecules are studied theoretically. Examples of such systems include DNA-functionalized colloids as well as nanoparticles grafted with antibodies to cell membrane proteins. Depending on the coverage of the functional groups, we predict two distinct regimes separated by a percolation transition. In the localized regime at low coverage, the system exhibits a broad, power law like distribution of particle departure times. At higher coverage, there is an interplay between departure dynamics and particle diffusion. This interplay leads to a sharp increase of the departure times, a phenomenon qualitatively similar to aging in glassy systems. This diffusive regime is analogous to dispersive transport in disordered semiconductors: depending on the interaction parameters, the diffusion behavior ranges from standard diffusion to anomalous, subdiffusive behavior. The connection to recent experiments and implications for future studies are discussed.

  4. Bacteria and Archaea in acidic environments and a key to morphological identification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, E.I.

    2000-01-01

    Natural and anthropogenic acidic environments are dominated by bacteria and Archaea. As many as 86 genera or species have been identified or isolated from pH <4.5 environments. This paper reviews the worldwide literature and provide tables of morphological characteristics, habitat information and a key for light microscope identification for the non-microbiologist.

  5. Identification of key players for the impact of perturbations in food webs

    E-print Network

    Identification of key players for the impact of perturbations in food webs By Helge Aufderheide1, complex system to a perturba- tion. Recent attempts to predict the behavior of food webs has revealed to efficiently arrive at this solution. Then, in our assessment of model food webs, we find that it is most

  6. A Molecular Key for the Identification of Blow Flies in Southeastern Nebraska

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The identification of blow flies (Calliphoridae) (typically the first colonizers of cadavers) is difficult, especially in the earlier instars because of their small size, similarity and simplicity in external morphology. We consider how taxonomic keys based on molecular genetic data facilitate accur...

  7. Bioactive nanofibers enable the identification of thrombospondin 2 as a key player in enamel regeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhan; Newcomb, Christina J; Lei, Yaping; Zhou, Yan; Bornstein, Paul; Amendt, Brad A; Stupp, Samuel I; Snead, Malcolm L

    2015-08-01

    Tissue regeneration and development involves highly synchronized signals both between cells and with the extracellular environment. Biomaterials can be tuned to mimic specific biological signals and control cell response(s). As a result, these materials can be used as tools to elucidate cell signaling pathways and candidate molecules involved with cellular processes. In this work, we explore enamel-forming cells, ameloblasts, which have a limited regenerative capacity. By exposing undifferentiated cells to a self-assembling matrix bearing RGDS epitopes, we elicited a regenerative signal at will that subsequently led to the identification of thrombospondin 2 (TSP2), an extracellular matrix protein that has not been previously recognized as a key player in enamel development and regeneration. Targeted disruption of the thrombospondin 2 gene (Thbs2) resulted in enamel formation with a disordered architecture that was highly susceptible to wear compared to their wild-type counterparts. To test the regenerative capacity, we injected the bioactive matrix into the enamel organ and discovered that the enamel organic epithelial cells in TSP-null mice failed to polarize on the surface of the artificial matrix, greatly reducing integrin ?1 and Notch1 expression levels, which represent signaling pathways known to be associated with TSP2. These results suggest TSP2 plays an important role in regulating cell-matrix interactions during enamel formation. Exploiting the signaling pathways activated by biomaterials can provide insight into native signaling mechanisms crucial for tooth development and cell-based strategies for enamel regeneration. PMID:26004236

  8. Identification of Inhibitors of Biological Interactions Involving Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Marasco, Daniela; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina Liana

    2015-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions involving disordered partners have unique features and represent prominent targets in drug discovery processes. Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) are involved in cellular regulation, signaling and control: they bind to multiple partners and these high-specificity/low-affinity interactions play crucial roles in many human diseases. Disordered regions, terminal tails and flexible linkers are particularly abundant in DNA-binding proteins and play crucial roles in the affinity and specificity of DNA recognizing processes. Protein complexes involving IDPs are short-lived and typically involve short amino acid stretches bearing few “hot spots”, thus the identification of molecules able to modulate them can produce important lead compounds: in this scenario peptides and/or peptidomimetics, deriving from structure-based, combinatorial or protein dissection approaches, can play a key role as hit compounds. Here, we propose a panoramic review of the structural features of IDPs and how they regulate molecular recognition mechanisms focusing attention on recently reported drug-design strategies in the field of IDPs. PMID:25849651

  9. Image use in field guides and identification keys: review and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Leggett, Roxanne; Kirchoff, Bruce K.

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims Although illustrations have played an important role in identification keys and guides since the 18th century, their use has varied widely. Some keys lack all illustrations, while others are heavily illustrated. Even within illustrated guides, the way in which images are used varies considerably. Here, we review image use in paper and electronic guides, and establish a set of best practices for image use in illustrated keys and guides. Scope Our review covers image use in both paper and electronic guides, though we only briefly cover apps for mobile devices. With this one exception, we cover the full range of guides, from those that consist only of species descriptions with no keys, to lavishly illustrated technical keys. Emphasis is placed on how images are used, not on the operation of the guides and key, which has been reviewed by others. We only deal with operation when it impacts image use. Main points Few illustrated keys or guides use images in optimal ways. Most include too few images to show taxonomic variation or variation in characters and character states. The use of multiple images allows easier taxon identification and facilitates the understanding of characters. Most images are usually not standardized, making comparison between images difficult. Although some electronic guides allow images to be enlarged, many do not. Conclusions The best keys and guides use standardized images, displayed at sizes that are easy to see and arranged in a standardized manner so that similar images can be compared across species. Illustrated keys and glossaries should contain multiple images for each character state so that the user can judge variation in the state. Photographic backgrounds should not distract from the subject and, where possible, should be of a standard colour. When used, drawings should be prepared by professional botanical illustrators, and clearly labelled. Electronic keys and guides should allow images to be enlarged so that their details can be seen. PMID:22476475

  10. Bryophytes for Beginners: The Usability of a Printed Dichotomous Key versus a Multi-Access Computer-Based Key for Bryophyte Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stagg, Bethan C.; Donkin, Maria E.; Smith, Alison M.

    2015-01-01

    Bryophytes are a rewarding study group in field biology and the UK bryophyte flora has international importance to biodiversity conservation. We designed an identification key to common woodland moss species and compared the usability of two formats, web-based multi-access and printed dichotomous key, with undergraduate students. The rate of…

  11. Identification of miRNA-Target RNA Interactions Using CLASH.

    PubMed

    Helwak, Aleksandra; Tollervey, David

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed protocol for the experimental identification of miRNA-target RNA interaction sites using cross-linking, ligation, and sequencing of hybrids (CLASH). The basis of the technique is the purification of UV-stabilized Argonaute (AGO)-RNA complexes assembled in living cells, with subsequent ligation of AGO-associated RNA-RNA duplexes to form chimeric RNAs. Following cDNA synthesis, DNA library preparation and high-throughput sequencing, interacting RNA molecules are unambiguously identified as chimeric reads in bioinformatic analysis of sequencing data. CLASH potentially recovers any RNA duplex that is bound by RNA-binding protein, so modified approaches would be suitable for the identification of many other inter- and intramolecular RNA-RNA interactions. Since CLASH analysis is independent of bioinformatic predictions it allows the identification and analysis of RNA targeting rules in an unbiased way. PMID:26463387

  12. Conceptual response distance and intervening keys distinguish action goals in the Stroop color-identification task.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Proctor, Robert W

    2014-10-01

    In previous studies, a physical response-distance effect was found in the two-choice Stroop color-identification task, with the Stroop effect being larger when the two response keys were physically close together than when they were far apart. In the present study, we found a conceptual response-distance effect, with the Stroop effect being larger when the response keys were conceptually close (labeled as "5" and "6") than when they were conceptually far (labeled as "1" and "9"). Moreover, a response-distance effect due to pure physical distance was not evident; rather, the effect was found only when additional keys were placed between the two far response keys. These results are in agreement with a view that response keys are coded as action goals, with farther conceptual distance and additional keys helping distinguish the action goals. The results are difficult to reconcile with accounts that place emphasis on the physical separation of the effectors or their inanimate extensions. PMID:24578092

  13. THE IDENTIFICATION AND TESTING OF INTERACTION PATTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a method for identifying and assessing the significance of interaction patterns among various chemicals and chemical classes of importance to regulatory toxicologists. To this end, efforts were made to assemble and evaluate experimental data on toxicologically...

  14. Interactive Bayesian identification of kinematic mechanisms

    E-print Network

    Barragán, Patrick R

    2015-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of identifying mechanisms based on data gathered from a robot's interaction with them. We present a decision-theoretic formulation of this problem, using Bayesian filtering techniques to ...

  15. SATER/LLNL: an interactive identification/estimation/control package

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; Journeay, C H

    1982-09-01

    This issue of the computer program newsletter focuses on SATER/LLNL - an interactive code for identification, estimation, and classical control. A brief description of the SATER/LLNL operation is included as well as a sample session. Attached is the fundamental reference that details more of the package.

  16. Algorithm 1: Key Word Identification Hybrid DIAAF/RS Input:(a) A documentbase (the training part, where the

    E-print Network

    Coenen, Frans

    ; #12; Algorithm 1: Key Word Identification Hybrid DIAAF/RS Input:(a) A documentbase (the training part, where the noise words have been removed); (b words SKW ; Begin Algorithm: (1) SKW an empty set for holding the identified key words in ; (2) C

  17. Understanding Dengue Virus Capsid Protein Interaction with Key Biological Targets.

    PubMed

    Faustino, André F; Martins, Ivo C; Carvalho, Filomena A; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Santos, Nuno C

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes over 500,000 hospitalizations and 20,000 deaths worldwide every year. Dengue epidemics now reach temperate regions due to globalization of trade and travel and climate changes. Currently, there are no successful therapeutic or preventive approaches. We previously developed a peptide drug lead, pep14-23, that inhibits the biologically relevant interaction of DENV capsid (C) protein with lipid droplets (LDs). Surprisingly, pep14-23 also inhibits DENV C interaction with very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). We thus investigated the similarity between the proposed DENV C molecular targets in LDs and VLDL, respectively, the proteins perilipin 3 (PLIN3) and apolipoprotein E (APOE). APOE N-terminal and PLIN3 C-terminal regions are remarkably similar, namely APOE ?-helix 4 (APOE?4) and PLIN3 ?-helix 5 (PLIN3?5) sequences, which are also highly superimposable structurally. Interestingly, APOE ?-helical N-terminal sequence and structure superimposes with DENV C ?-helices ?1 and ?2. Moreover, the DENV C hydrophobic cleft can accommodate the structurally analogous APOE?4 and PLIN3?5 helical regions. Mirroring DENV C-LDs interaction (previously shown experimentally to require PLIN3), we experimentally demonstrated that DENV C-VLDL interaction requires APOE. Thus, the results fit well with previous data and suggest future drug development strategies targeting the above mentioned ?-helical structures. PMID:26161501

  18. Understanding Dengue Virus Capsid Protein Interaction with Key Biological Targets

    PubMed Central

    Faustino, André F.; Martins, Ivo C.; Carvalho, Filomena A.; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Santos, Nuno C.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes over 500,000 hospitalizations and 20,000 deaths worldwide every year. Dengue epidemics now reach temperate regions due to globalization of trade and travel and climate changes. Currently, there are no successful therapeutic or preventive approaches. We previously developed a peptide drug lead, pep14-23, that inhibits the biologically relevant interaction of DENV capsid (C) protein with lipid droplets (LDs). Surprisingly, pep14-23 also inhibits DENV C interaction with very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). We thus investigated the similarity between the proposed DENV C molecular targets in LDs and VLDL, respectively, the proteins perilipin 3 (PLIN3) and apolipoprotein E (APOE). APOE N-terminal and PLIN3 C-terminal regions are remarkably similar, namely APOE ?-helix 4 (APOE?4) and PLIN3 ?-helix 5 (PLIN3?5) sequences, which are also highly superimposable structurally. Interestingly, APOE ?-helical N-terminal sequence and structure superimposes with DENV C ?-helices ?1 and ?2. Moreover, the DENV C hydrophobic cleft can accommodate the structurally analogous APOE?4 and PLIN3?5 helical regions. Mirroring DENV C-LDs interaction (previously shown experimentally to require PLIN3), we experimentally demonstrated that DENV C-VLDL interaction requires APOE. Thus, the results fit well with previous data and suggest future drug development strategies targeting the above mentioned ?-helical structures. PMID:26161501

  19. Diptera of forensic importance in the Iberian Peninsula: larval identification key.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Y; Magaña, C; Martínez-Sánchez, A; Rojo, S

    2010-09-01

    A revision of the species and families of sarcosaprophagous flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae, Muscidae, Fanniidae, Drosophilidae, Phoridae, Piophilidae and Stratiomyidae) suitable for forensic purposes in the Iberian Peninsula is presented. Morphological characteristics that allow the accurate identification of third instars of the species present in the Iberian Peninsula are described and presented in the form of a diagnostic key. For larval Calliphoridae, characteristics such as the spines of the body segments were useful for the genus Calliphora whereas features of the anal segment and the cephalopharyngeal skeleton were useful for larvae of Lucilia. Identification of three Chrysominae species present in the Iberian Peninsula is included. For larval Sarcophagidae, characters such as the arrangement and shape of spiracular openings, structures of the anal segment and the cephalopharyngeal skeleton were used for the first time. A new record of Sarcophaga cultellata Pandellé, from a human corpse, is also included as well as recent incursions into the European cadaveric entomofauna such as Synthesiomyia nudiseta (van der Wulp) and Hermetia illucens (Linnaeus). This work provides useful new information that could be applied to forensic investigations in the Iberian Peninsula and in southern Europe. PMID:20557457

  20. Universally Composable Non-Interactive Key Exchange Eduarda S.V. Freire1

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    consider the notion of a non-interactive key exchange (NIKE). A NIKE scheme allows a party A to compute requires no interaction between A and B, a feature which distinguishes NIKE from regular (i.e., interactive is a formalization of NIKE protocols as ideal functionalities in the Universal Composability (UC) framework. As we

  1. Key interactions of surfactants in therapeutic protein formulations: A review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tarik A; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Kishore, Ravuri S K

    2015-11-01

    Proteins as amphiphilic, surface-active macromolecules, demonstrate substantial interfacial activity, which causes considerable impact on their multifarious applications. A commonly adapted measure to prevent interfacial damage to proteins is the use of nonionic surfactants. Particularly in biotherapeutic formulations, the use of nonionic surfactants is ubiquitous in order to prevent the impact of interfacial stress on drug product stability. The scope of this review is to convey the current understanding of interactions of nonionic surfactants with proteins both at the interface and in solution, with specific focus to their effects on biotherapeutic formulations. PMID:26435336

  2. Analysis of Collusion-Attack Free ID-Based Non-interactive Key Sharing

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Analysis of Collusion-Attack Free ID-Based Non-interactive Key Sharing Muxiang Zhang Verizon Communications, Inc. 40 Sylvan Road, Waltham, MA 02451, USA muxiang.zhang@verizon.com Abstract Recently, Tanaka

  3. Data publication and dissemination of interactive keys under the open access model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concepts of publication, citation and dissemination of interactive keys and other online keys are discussed and illustrated by a sample paper published in the present issue (doi: 10.3897/zookeys.21.271). The present model is based on previous experience with several existing examples of publishi...

  4. A Teaching Exercise for the Identification of Bacteria Using An Interactive Computer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Trevor N.; Smith, John E.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an interactive Fortran computer program which provides an exercise in the identification of bacteria. Provides a way of enhancing a student's approach to systematic bacteriology and numerical identification procedures. (Author/MA)

  5. Identification of the Key Amino Acids of Glial Cell Line-derived Neurotrophic Factor Family Receptor 1 Involved in Its

    E-print Network

    Tian, Weidong

    Identification of the Key Amino Acids of Glial Cell Line-derived Neurotrophic Factor Family the structural basis of GFR 1 function. In this study, based on evolutionary trace method and relative solvent buds during kidney development (13) and plays an important role in sperm cell development (14

  6. Raman spectroscopic identification of scytonemin and its derivatives as key biomarkers in stressed environments.

    PubMed

    Varnali, Tereza; Edwards, Howell G M

    2014-12-13

    Raman spectroscopy has been identified as an important first-pass analytical technique for deployment on planetary surfaces as part of a suite of instrumentation in projected remote space exploration missions to detect extant or extinct extraterrestrial life signatures. Aside from the demonstrable advantages of a non-destructive sampling procedure and an ability to record simultaneously the molecular signatures of biological, geobiological and geological components in admixture in the geological record, the interrogation and subsequent interpretation of spectroscopic data from these experiments will be critically dependent upon the recognition of key biomolecular markers indicative of life existing or having once existed in extreme habitats. A comparison made with the characteristic Raman spectral wavenumbers obtained from standards is not acceptable because of shifts that can occur in the presence of other biomolecules and their host mineral matrices. In this paper, we identify the major sources of difficulty experienced in the interpretation of spectroscopic data centring on a key family of biomarker molecules, namely scytonemin and its derivatives; the parent scytonemin has been characterized spectroscopically in cyanobacterial colonies inhabiting some of the most extreme terrestrial environments and, with the support of theoretical calculations, spectra have been predicted for the characterization of several of its derivatives which could occur in novel extraterrestrial environments. This work will form the foundation for the identification of novel biomarkers and for their Raman spectroscopic discrimination, an essential step in the interpretation of potentially complex and hitherto unknown biological radiation protectants based on the scytoneman and scytonin molecular skeletons which may exist in niche geological scenarios in the surface and subsurface of planets and their satellites in our Solar System. PMID:25368346

  7. Identification of Key Proteins in Human Epithelial Cells Responding to Bystander Signals From Irradiated Trout Skin

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard; Wang, Jiaxi; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel; Howe, Orla

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander signaling has been found to occur in live rainbow trout fish (Oncorhynchus mykiss). This article reports identification of key proteomic changes in a bystander reporter cell line (HaCaT) grown in low-dose irradiated tissue-conditioned media (ITCM) from rainbow trout fish. In vitro explant cultures were generated from the skin of fish previously exposed to low doses (0.1 and 0.5 Gy) of X-ray radiation in vivo. The ITCM was harvested from all donor explant cultures and placed on recipient HaCaT cells to observe any change in protein expression caused by the bystander signals. Proteomic methods using 2-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and mass spectroscopy were employed to screen for novel proteins expressed. The proteomic changes measured in HaCaT cells receiving the ITCM revealed that exposure to 0.5 Gy induced an upregulation of annexin A2 and cingulin and a downregulation of Rho-GDI2, F-actin-capping protein subunit beta, microtubule-associated protein RP/EB family member, and 14-3-3 proteins. The 0.1 Gy dose also induced a downregulation of Rho-GDI2, hMMS19, F-actin-capping protein subunit beta, and microtubule-associated protein RP/EB family member proteins. The proteins reported may influence apoptotic signaling, as the results were suggestive of an induction of cell communication, repair mechanisms, and dysregulation of growth signals. PMID:26673684

  8. The Keys to Interactive Parenting Scale: A Window into Many Facets of Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comfort, Marilee; Gordon, Philip R.; Unger, Donald G.

    2006-01-01

    The Keys to Interactive Parenting Scale (KIPS) is a brief practical tool to assess the quality of parenting interactions across 12 parenting behaviors. Family service providers from a variety of education, health, and social service settings can use KIPS to identify parenting strengths and needs. In this article, the authors describe the rating…

  9. Person Identification and Interaction of Social Robots by Using Wireless Tags

    E-print Network

    Kanda, Takayuki

    Person Identification and Interaction of Social Robots by Using Wireless Tags Takayuki Kanda1-mail: kanda@atr.co.jp Abstract - This paper reports a trial of immersing interactive humanoid robots. For this purpose, we developed interactive humanoid robots equipped with wireless person identification technology

  10. Interactive Effects of Work Group and Organizational Identification on Job Satisfaction and Extra-Role Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Dick, Rolf; van Knippenberg, Daan; Kerschreiter, Rudolf; Hertel, Guido; Wieseke, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Past research has focused on the differential relationships of organizational and work group identification with attitudes and behavior. However, no systematic effort has been undertaken yet to explore interactive effects "between" these foci of identification. We predicted that in cases of positive overlap of identifications (i.e. high work group…

  11. Identification of novel CBP interacting proteins in embryonic orofacial tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Xiaolong; Warner, Dennis R.; Roberts, Emily A.; Pisano, M. Michele; Greene, Robert M. . E-mail: greene@louisville.edu

    2005-04-15

    cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) plays an important role as a general co-integrator of multiple signaling pathways and interacts with a large number of transcription factors and co-factors, through its numerous protein-binding domains. To identify nuclear factors associated with CBP in developing orofacial tissue, a yeast two-hybrid screen of a cDNA library derived from orofacial tissue from gestational day 11 to 13 mouse embryos was conducted. Using the carboxy terminus (amino acid residues 1676-2441) of CBP as bait, several novel proteins that bind CBP were identified, including an Msx-interacting-zinc finger protein, CDC42 interaction protein 4/thyroid hormone receptor interactor 10, SH3-domain GRB2-like 1, CCR4-NOT transcription complex subunit 3, adaptor protein complex AP-1 {beta}1 subunit, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B subunit 1 ({alpha}), and cyclin G-associated kinase. Results of the yeast two-hybrid screen were confirmed by glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays. The identification of these proteins as novel CBP-binding partners allows exploration of new mechanisms by which CBP regulates and integrates diverse cell signaling pathways.

  12. Identification of key genes associated with colorectal cancer based on the transcriptional network.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoting; Li, Hengping; Niu, Xianping; Li, Guofeng; Han, Ning; Li, Xin; Li, Guang; Liu, Yangzhou; Sun, Guixin; Wang, Yong; Li, Zengchun; Li, Qinchuan

    2015-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is among the most lethal human cancers, but the mechanism of the cancer is still unclear enough. We aimed to explore the key genes in CRC progression. The gene expression profile (GSE4183) of CRC was obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus database which included 8 normal samples, 15 adenoma samples, 15 CRC samples and 15 inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) samples. Thereinto, 8 normal, 15 adenoma, and 15 CRC samples were chosen for our research. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in normal vs. adenoma, normal vs. CRC, and adenoma vs. CRC, were identified using the Wilcoxon test method in R respectively. The interactive network of DEGs was constructed to select the significant modules using the Pearson's correlation. Meanwhile, transcriptional network of DEGs was also constructed using the g: Profiler. Totally, 2,741 DEGs in normal vs. adenoma, 1,484 DEGs in normal vs. CRC, and 396 DEGs in adenoma vs. CRC were identified. Moreover, function analysis of DEGs in each group showed FcR-mediated phagocytosis pathway in module 1, cardiac muscle contraction pathway in module 6, and Jak-STAT signaling pathway in module 19 were also enriched. Furthermore, MZF1 and AP2 were the transcription factor in module 6, with the target SP1, while SP1 was also a transcription in module 20. DEGs like NCF1, AKT, SP1, AP2, MZF1, and TPM might be used as specific biomarkers in CRC development. Therapy targeting on the functions of these key genes might provide novel perspective for CRC treatment. PMID:25613817

  13. Why and how might genetic and phylogenetic diversity be reflected in the identification of key biodiversity areas?

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, T. M.; Cuttelod, A.; Faith, D. P.; Garcia-Moreno, J.; Langhammer, P.; Pérez-Espona, S.

    2015-01-01

    Key biodiversity areas' are defined as sites contributing significantly to the global persistence of biodiversity. The identification of these sites builds from existing approaches based on measures of species and ecosystem diversity and process. Here, we therefore build from the work of Sgró et al. (2011 Evol. Appl. 4, 326–337. (doi:10.1111/j.1752-4571.2010.00157.x)) to extend a framework for how components of genetic diversity might be considered in the identification of key biodiversity areas. We make three recommendations to inform the ongoing process of consolidating a key biodiversity areas standard: (i) thresholds for the threatened species criterion currently consider a site's share of a threatened species' population; expand these to include the proportion of the species' genetic diversity unique to a site; (ii) expand criterion for ‘threatened species' to consider ‘threatened taxa’ and (iii) expand the centre of endemism criterion to identify as key biodiversity areas those sites holding a threshold proportion of the compositional or phylogenetic diversity of species (within a taxonomic group) whose restricted ranges collectively define a centre of endemism. We also recommend consideration of occurrence of EDGE species (i.e. threatened phylogenetic diversity) in key biodiversity areas to prioritize species-specific conservation actions among sites. PMID:25561678

  14. Identification of key peptidoglycan hydrolases for morphogenesis, autolysis, and peptidoglycan composition of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lactobacillus plantarum is commonly used in industrial fermentation processes. Selected strains are also marketed as probiotics for their health beneficial effects. Although the functional role of peptidoglycan-degrading enzymes is increasingly documented to be important for a range of bacterial processes and host-microbe interactions, little is known about their functional roles in lactobacilli. This knowledge holds important potential for developing more robust strains resistant to autolysis under stress conditions as well as peptidoglycan engineering for a better understanding of the contribution of released muramyl-peptides as probiotic immunomodulators. Results Here, we explored the functional role of the predicted peptidoglycan hydrolase (PGH) complement encoded in the genome of L. plantarum by systematic gene deletion. From twelve predicted PGH-encoding genes, nine could be individually inactivated and their corresponding mutant strains were characterized regarding their cell morphology, growth, and autolysis under various conditions. From this analysis, we identified two PGHs, the predicted N-acetylglucosaminidase Acm2 and NplC/P60 D,L-endopeptidase LytA, as key determinants in the morphology of L. plantarum. Acm2 was demonstrated to be required for the ultimate step of cell separation of daughter cells, whereas LytA appeared to be required for cell shape maintenance and cell-wall integrity. We also showed by autolysis experiments that both PGHs are involved in the global autolytic process with a dominant role for Acm2 in all tested conditions, identifying Acm2 as the major autolysin of L. plantarum WCFS1. In addition, Acm2 and the putative N-acetylmuramidase Lys2 were shown to play redundant roles in both cell separation and autolysis under stress conditions. Finally, the analysis of the peptidoglycan composition of Acm2- and LytA-deficient derivatives revealed their potential hydrolytic activities by the disappearance of specific cleavage products. Conclusion In this study, we showed that two PGHs of L. plantarum have a predominant physiological role in a range of growth conditions. We demonstrate that the N-acetylglucosaminidase Acm2 is the major autolysin whereas the D,L-endopeptidase LytA is a key morphogenic determinant. In addition, both PGHs have a direct impact on PG structure by generating a higher diversity of cleavage products that could be of importance for interaction with the innate immune system. PMID:23066986

  15. Social-and Interactive-Television Applications Based on Real-Time Ambient-Audio Identification

    E-print Network

    Cortes, Corinna

    Social- and Interactive-Television Applications Based on Real-Time Ambient-Audio Identification applications for mass personalization: personalized content layers, ad hoc social communities, real. Our audio identification system does not use dedicated interactive TV hardware and does not compromise

  16. Identification of key neoculin residues responsible for the binding and activation of the sweet taste receptor

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Taichi; Terada, Tohru; Nakajima, Ken-ichiro; Kojima, Masaki; Koshiba, Seizo; Matsumura, Yoshitaka; Kaneda, Kohei; Asakura, Tomiko; Shimizu-Ibuka, Akiko; Abe, Keiko; Misaka, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Neoculin (NCL) is a heterodimeric protein isolated from the edible fruit of Curculigo latifolia. It exerts a taste-modifying activity by converting sourness to sweetness. We previously demonstrated that NCL changes its action on the human sweet receptor hT1R2-hT1R3 from antagonism to agonism as the pH changes from neutral to acidic values, and that the histidine residues of NCL molecule play critical roles in this pH-dependent functional change. Here, we comprehensively screened key amino acid residues of NCL using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and alanine scanning mutagenesis. We found that the mutations of Arg48, Tyr65, Val72 and Phe94 of NCL basic subunit increased or decreased both the antagonist and agonist activities. The mutations had only a slight effect on the pH-dependent functional change. These residues should determine the affinity of NCL for the receptor regardless of pH. Their locations were separated from the histidine residues responsible for the pH-dependent functional change in the tertiary structure. From these results, we concluded that NCL interacts with hT1R2-hT1R3 through a pH-independent affinity interface including the four residues and a pH-dependent activation interface including the histidine residues. Thus, the receptor activation is induced by local structural changes in the pH-dependent interface. PMID:26263392

  17. Adaptively-Secure, Non-Interactive Public-Key Encryption Ran Canetti

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Adaptively-Secure, Non-Interactive Public-Key Encryption Ran Canetti canetti@watson.ibm.com Shai Halevi shaih@alum.mit.edu Jonathan Katz jkatz@cs.umd.edu November 23, 2004 Abstract Adaptively-secure encryption schemes ensure secrecy even in the presence of an adversary who can corrupt parties in an adaptive

  18. Sakai-Ohgishi-Kasahara Identity-Based Non-Interactive Key Exchange Revisited and More

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    , 2014 Abstract Identity-based non-interactive key exchange (IB-NIKE) is a powerful but a bit overlooked extensively investigated over the past three decades, IB-NIKE has remained largely unstudied. Currently, there are only few IB-NIKE schemes in the literature. Among them, Sakai-Ohgishi-Kasahara (SOK) scheme

  19. Non-Interactive Key Exchange Eduarda S.V. Freire1,

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    -Universit¨at Bochum Abstract Non-interactive key exchange (NIKE) is a fundamental but much-overlooked cryp- tographic primitive. It appears as a major contribution in the ground-breaking paper of Diffie and Hellman, but NIKE for this primitive and explore the relationships between them. We then give constructions for secure NIKE

  20. Adaptive Multiparty Non-interactive Key Exchange Without Setup In The Standard Model

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Abstract Non-interactive key exchange (NIKE) is a fundamental notion in Cryptography. This notion was introduced by Diffie and Hellman in 1976. They proposed the celebrated 2-party NIKE protocol and left open as a fascinating question, whether NIKE could be realized in the mul- tiparty setting. NIKE has since then been

  1. Freshness-Preserving Non-Interactive Hierarchical Key Agreement Protocol over WHMS

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunsung

    2014-01-01

    The digitization of patient health information (PHI) for wireless health monitoring systems (WHMSs) has brought many benefits and challenges for both patients and physicians. However, security, privacy and robustness have remained important challenges for WHMSs. Since the patient's PHI is sensitive and the communication channel, i.e., the Internet, is insecure, it is important to protect them against unauthorized entities, i.e., attackers. Otherwise, failure to do so will not only lead to the compromise of a patient's privacy, but will also put his/her life at risk. This paper proposes a freshness-preserving non-interactive hierarchical key agreement protocol (FNKAP) for WHMSs. The FNKAP is based on the concept of the non-interactive identity-based key agreement for communication efficiency. It achieves patient anonymity between a patient and physician, session key secrecy and resistance against various security attacks, especially including replay attacks. PMID:25513824

  2. Freshness-preserving non-interactive hierarchical key agreement protocol over WHMS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsung

    2014-01-01

    The digitization of patient health information (PHI) for wireless health monitoring systems (WHMSs) has brought many benefits and challenges for both patients and physicians. However, security, privacy and robustness have remained important challenges for WHMSs. Since the patient's PHI is sensitive and the communication channel, i.e., the Internet, is insecure, it is important to protect them against unauthorized entities, i.e., attackers. Otherwise, failure to do so will not only lead to the compromise of a patient's privacy, but will also put his/her life at risk. This paper proposes a freshness-preserving non-interactive hierarchical key agreement protocol (FNKAP) for WHMSs. The FNKAP is based on the concept of the non-interactive identity-based key agreement for communication efficiency. It achieves patient anonymity between a patient and physician, session key secrecy and resistance against various security attacks, especially including replay attacks. PMID:25513824

  3. Guide and keys for the identification of Syllidae (Annelida, Phyllodocida) from the British Isles (reported and expected species)

    PubMed Central

    San Martín, Guillermo; Worsfold, Tim M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In November 2012, a workshop was carried out on the taxonomy and systematics of the family Syllidae (Annelida: Phyllodocida) at the Dove Marine Laboratory, Cullercoats, Tynemouth, UK for the National Marine Biological Analytical Quality Control (NMBAQC) Scheme. Illustrated keys for subfamilies, genera and species found in British and Irish waters were provided for participants from the major national agencies and consultancies involved in benthic sample processing. After the workshop, we prepared updates to these keys, to include some additional species provided by participants, and some species reported from nearby areas. In this paper, we provide the revised keys to enable rapid identification of Syllidae from the seas around Britain and Ireland. One new combination, Palposyllis propeweismanni, is proposed. PMID:25878521

  4. An Identification Key to Rodent Prey in Owl Pellets from the Northwestern and Southeastern United States: Employing Incisor Size to Distinguish among Genera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Stephen B.; Cosentino, Bradley J.

    2006-01-01

    We present an identification key to the common rodent prey found in owl pellets from the Northwestern (NW) and Southeastern (SE) United States that is based on differences in incisor size (arc diameter) among genera.

  5. The development of a healthy eating indicator shopping basket tool (HEISB) for use in food access studies-identification of key food items. — Measures of the Food Environment

    Cancer.gov

    Anderson A, Dewar J, Marshall D, Cummins S, Taylor M, Dawson J, Sparks L. The development of a healthy eating indicator shopping basket tool (HEISB) for use in food access studies-identification of key food items.

  6. Hypermedia in the Plant Sciences: The Weed Key and Identification System/Videodisc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragan, Lawrence C.

    1991-01-01

    In cooperation with a university educational technology unit, an agronomy professor used hypercard and videodisk technology to develop a computer program for identification of 181 weed species based on user-selected characteristics. This solution was found during a search for a way to organize course content in a concise, manageable system. (MSE)

  7. MOLECULAR TAXONOMIC KEYS – ARE THEY THE SOLUTION FOR SPECIES IDENTIFICATION IN FORENSIC ENTOMOLOGY?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A functional diagnostic technique must have the ability to unambiguously identify and differentiate insect species. Insect species developing in cadavers are often used to estimate the time since death or postmortem interval (PMI). Accurate identification of the species involved is essential, but ex...

  8. ?-Synuclein interactions with phospholipid model membranes: Key roles for electrostatic interactions and lipid-bilayer structure.

    PubMed

    Pirc, Katja; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar

    2015-10-01

    ?-Synuclein is a small presynaptic protein that is critically implicated in the onset of Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. It has been assumed that the pathogenesis of ?-synuclein is associated with its aggregation, while for its physiological function, binding of ?-synuclein to the synaptic vesicle membrane appears to be most important. The present study investigated the mechanism of ?-synuclein binding to the lipid membrane. Upon binding to negatively charged small unilamellar vesicles consisting of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol or 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol in the liquid-crystalline state, ?-synuclein undergoes conformational transition from its native unfolded form to an ?-helical structure. The positively charged N-terminal part of ?-synuclein is likely to be involved in interactions with the negatively charged lipid surface. ?-Synuclein did not associate with vesicles consisting of the zwitterionic (neutral) lipids 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine or 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. The data obtained by circular dichroism spectroscopy, fluorescence anisotropy measurements, differential scanning calorimetry, and calcein efflux assays indicate that in addition to electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions are important in the association of ?-synuclein with membranes. The mechanism of ?-synuclein binding to lipid membranes is primarily dependent on the surface charge density of the lipid bilayer and the phase state of the lipids. We propose that ?-synuclein has a lipid ordering effect and thermally stabilises vesicles. PMID:26119565

  9. Identification of Candidate Genes related to Bovine Marbling using Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Dajeong; Kim, Nam-Kuk; Park, Hye-Sun; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Cho, Yong-Min; Oh, Sung Jong; Kim, Tae-Hun; Kim, Heebal

    2011-01-01

    Complex traits are determined by the combined effects of many loci and are affected by gene networks or biological pathways. Systems biology approaches have an important role in the identification of candidate genes related to complex diseases or traits at the system level. The present study systemically analyzed genes associated with bovine marbling score and identified their relationships. The candidate nodes were obtained using MedScan text-mining tools and linked by protein-protein interaction (PPI) from the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD). To determine key node of marbling, the degree and betweenness centrality (BC) were used. The hub nodes and biological pathways of our network are consistent with the previous reports about marbling traits, and also suggest unknown candidate genes associated with intramuscular fat. Five nodes were identified as hub genes, which was consistent with the network analysis using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). Key nodes of the PPI network have positive roles (PPAR?, C/EBP?, and RUNX1T1) and negative roles (RXRA, CAMK2A) in the development of intramuscular fat by several adipogenesis-related pathways. This study provides genetic information for identifying candidate genes for the marbling trait in bovine. PMID:21912507

  10. The undecided have the key: Interaction-driven opinion dynamics in a three state model

    E-print Network

    Balenzuela, Pablo; Semeshenko, Viktoriya

    2015-01-01

    The effects of interpersonal interactions on individual's agreements result in a social aggregation process which is reflected in the formation of collective states, as for instance, groups of individuals with a similar opinion about a given issue. This field, which has been a longstanding concern of sociologists and psychologists, has been extended into an area of experimental social psychology, and even has attracted the attention of physicists and mathematicians. In this article, we present a novel model of opinion formation in which agents may either have a strict preference for a choice, or be undecided. The opinion shift emerges during interpersonal communications, as a consequence of a cumulative process of conviction for one of the two extremes opinions through repeated interactions. There are two main ingredients which play key roles in determining the steady state: the initial fraction of undecided agents and the conviction's sensitivity in each interaction. As a function of these two parameters, th...

  11. Elmidae (Coleoptera, Byrrhoidea) larvae in the state of São Paulo, Brazil: Identification key, new records and distribution

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Melissa Ottoboni; Valente-Neto, Francisco; Fonseca-Gessner, Alaíde Aparecida

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The family Elmidae Curtis, 1830 has cosmopolitan distribution and most species inhabit riffles on streams and rivers, hence the name “riffle beetle”. In recent years, this family has been featured in papers addressing the assessment and environmental monitoring of water quality. In Brazil, studies on the family remain scarce and the present investigation is a pioneering study in the state of São Paulo. This study aims to propose a taxonomic key for the identification of larvae of Elmidae genera known to occur in the State, as well as to report new records and the distribution of these genera. The material analyzed was collected from various locations in each of 15 drainage basins from 2005 to 2010. The identification key includes 12 genera (Austrolimnius Carter & Zeck, 1929, Heterelmis Sharp, 1882, Hexacylloepus Hinton, 1940, Hexanchorus Sharp, 1882, Huleechius Brown, 1981, Macrelmis Motschulsky, 1859, Microcylloepus Hinton, 1935, Neoelmis Musgrave, 1935, Phanocerus Sharp, 1882, Potamophilops Grouvelle, 1896, Stegoelmis Hinton, 1939 and Xenelmis Hinton, 1936) known in Brazil as well as three morphotypes designated herein as Genus A, Genus M and Genus X. The genus Hexanchorus is recorded for the first time in the state of São Paulo. PMID:22368452

  12. Argentine Hydrellia Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera, Ephydridae): new species and key to identification.

    PubMed

    Júnior, Francisco De Assis Rodrigues; Mathis, Wayne Nielsen; Hauser, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hydrellia egeriae sp. nov., a new species of Hydrellia from Campana (34 14' 04 S, 58 52' 32 W) and Hurlingham (3435'14 S, 5838'27 W), Buenos Aires province, Argentina is described. A key to the Argentine Hydrellia species is presented. PMID:26249060

  13. Identification and Characterization of Key Human Performance Issues and Research in the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Paul U.; Sheridan, Tom; Poage, james L.; Martin, Lynne Hazel; Jobe, Kimberly K.

    2010-01-01

    This report identifies key human-performance-related issues associated with Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) research in the NASA NextGen-Airspace Project. Four Research Focus Areas (RFAs) in the NextGen-Airspace Project - namely Separation Assurance (SA), Airspace Super Density Operations (ASDO), Traffic Flow Management (TFM), and Dynamic Airspace Configuration (DAC) - were examined closely. In the course of the research, it was determined that the identified human performance issues needed to be analyzed in the context of NextGen operations rather than through basic human factors research. The main gaps in human factors research in NextGen were found in the need for accurate identification of key human-systems related issues within the context of specific NextGen concepts and better design of the operational requirements for those concepts. By focusing on human-system related issues for individual concepts, key human performance issues for the four RFAs were identified and described in this report. In addition, mixed equipage airspace with components of two RFAs were characterized to illustrate potential human performance issues that arise from the integration of multiple concepts.

  14. Strategy for the identification of key odorants: application to shrimp aroma.

    PubMed

    Rochat, S; Egger, J; Chaintreau, A

    2009-09-01

    The GC-SNIF technique was used to obtain the olfactograms of shrimps, and their impact odorants were identified by MS hyphenated to the GC/olfactometric system and by comprehensive two-dimensional GC hyphenated to a time-of-flight MS. Confirming these identifications by their linear retention indices required application of a new strategy to compare retention indices between both instruments and with the in-house database. The aldehydes were confirmed by using their pentafluorophenylhydrazone derivatives, and 2-ethyl-3,5-dimethyl pyrazine had to be resolved from co-eluting compounds and then identified by multidimensional GC hyphenated to an MS and a sniff port. In both shrimp products, the most important odorants were trimethylamine, 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, and 2-ethyl-3,5-dimethyl pyrazine, together with common carbonyl compounds. PMID:19651413

  15. Identification of glucose-6-phosphate transporter as a key regulator functioning at the autophagy initiation step.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hye-Hyun; Oh, Yumin; Lee, Huikyong; Lee, WonJae; Chang, Jae-Woong; Pyo, Ha-Kyung; Nah, Do hyung; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2015-07-22

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involving autophagosome formation via lysosome. However, the initiation step of autophagy is largely unknown. We found an interaction between ULK1 and ATG9 in mammalian cells and utilized the interaction to identify novel regulators of autophagy upstream of ULK1. We established a cell-based screening assay employing bimolecular fluorescence complementation. By performing gain-of-function screening, we identified G6PT as an autophagy activator. G6PT enhanced the interaction between N-terminal Venus-tagged ULK1 and C-terminal Venus-tagged ATG9, and increased autophagic flux independent of its transport activity. G6PT negatively regulated mTORC1 activity, demonstrating that G6PT functions upstream of mTORC1 in stimulating autophagy. PMID:25982172

  16. Interaction of deep and shallow convection is key to Madden-Julian Oscillation simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guang J.; Song, Xiaoliang

    2009-05-01

    This study investigates the role of the interaction between deep and shallow convection in MJO simulation using the NCAR CAM3. Two simulations were performed, one using a revised Zhang-McFarlane convection scheme for deep convection and the Hack scheme for shallow convection, and the other disallowing shallow convection below 700 mb in the tropical belt. The two simulations produce dramatically different MJO characteristics. While the control simulation produces realistic MJOs, the simulation without shallow convection has very weak MJO signals in the Indian Ocean and western Pacific. Composite analysis finds that shallow convection serves to precondition the lower troposphere by moistening it ahead of deep convection. It also produces enhanced low-level mass convergence below 850 mb ahead of deep convection. This work, together with previous studies, suggests that a correct simulation of the interaction between deep and shallow convection is key to MJO simulation in global climate models.

  17. Identification of Novel G Protein-Coupled Receptor-Interacting Proteins. Richard T. Premont

    E-print Network

    Hall, Randy A

    1 Identification of Novel G Protein-Coupled Receptor-Interacting Proteins. Richard T. Premont , and Randy A. Hall For: G Protein Pathways. A volume of Methods in Enzymology R. Iyengar and J. D, Atlanta, GA 30322 Running header: GPCR-Interacting Proteins #12;2 The superfamily of G protein

  18. Identification of miR-145 as a key regulator of the pigmentary process.

    PubMed

    Dynoodt, Peter; Mestdagh, Pieter; Van Peer, Gert; Vandesompele, Jo; Goossens, Karen; Peelman, Luc J; Geusens, Barbara; Speeckaert, Reinhart M; Lambert, Jo L W; Van Gele, Mireille J L

    2013-01-01

    The current treatments for hyperpigmentation are often associated with a lack of efficacy and adverse side effects. We hypothesized that microRNA (miRNA)-based treatments may offer an attractive alternative by specifically targeting key genes in melanogenesis. The aim of this study was to identify miRNAs interfering with the pigmentary process and to assess their functional role. miRNA profiling was performed on mouse melanocytes after three consecutive treatments involving forskolin and solar-simulated UV (ssUV) irradiation. Sixteen miRNAs were identified as differentially expressed in treated melan-a cells versus untreated cells. Remarkably, a 15-fold downregulation of miR-145 was detected. Overexpression or downregulation of miR-145 in melan-a cells revealed reduced or increased expression of Sox9, Mitf, Tyr, Trp1, Myo5a, Rab27a, and Fscn1, respectively. Moreover, a luciferase reporter assay demonstrated direct targeting of Myo5a by miR-145 in mouse and human melanocytes. Immunofluorescence tagging of melanosomes in miR-145-transfected human melanocytes displayed perinuclear accumulation of melanosomes with additional hypopigmentation of harvested cell pellets. In conclusion, this study has established an miRNA signature associated with forskolin and ssUV treatment. The significant down- or upregulation of major pigmentation genes, after modulating miR-145 expression, suggests a key role for miR-145 in regulating melanogenesis. PMID:22895360

  19. Automatic and Interactive Key Posture Design by Combing the PIK with Parametric Posture Splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shilei; Wu, Bing; Liang, Jiahong; Su, Jiongming

    Key posture design is commonly needed in computer animation. This paper presents an automatic and interactive whole body posture designing technique by combining the PIK (prioritized inverse kinematics) with the proposed parametric human posture splicing technique. The key feature of PIK is that the user can design a posture by adding high level constraints with different priorities. However, the PIK is essentially a numerical IK algorithm which relies on the iterative optimization starting from a good enough initial posture to get the final result. To speed up the running efficiency and ensure the lifelikeness of the final posture, the parametric posture splicing technique is proposed to generate the initial guess of the PIK. According to the set of the high level constraints, the whole body is divided into some partial parts, whose postures are then generated by the parametric posture synthesis from a single posture database. Then an initial posture guess with some main characteristics of the finally acceptable posture can be generated approximately by splicing these partial body postures together. Starting from this initial guess and with all constraints considered at different priority levels, the PIK can be initialized with a bias defined by this particularly initial guess and iterated step by step to get a final posture. The total process of the whole body posture generation is automatic and interactive. The experimental results show that this combination method can not only improve the computation efficiency of the PIK but also can simultaneously ensure the naturalness of the final posture.

  20. Visible Wavelength Spectroscopy of Ferric Minerals: A Key Tool for Identification of Ancient Martian Aqueous Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murchie, Scott L.; Bell, J. F., III; Morris, Richard V.

    2000-01-01

    The mineralogic signatures of past aqueous alteration of a basaltic Martian crust may include iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, zeolites, carbonates, phyllosilicates, and silica. The identities, relative abundances, and crystallinities of the phases formed in a particular environment depend on physicochemical conditions. At one extreme, hot spring environments may be characterized by smectite-chlorite to talc-kaolinite silicate assemblages, plus crystalline ferric oxides dominated by hematite. However, most environments, including cold springs, pedogenic layers, and ponded surface water, are expected to deposit iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, carbonates, and smectite-dominated phyllosilicates. A substantial fraction of the ferric iron is expected to occur in nanophase form, with the exact mineralogy strongly influenced by Eh-pH conditions. Detection of these phases has been an objective of a large body of terrestrial telescopic, Mars orbital, and landed spectral investigations and in situ compositional measurements. However, clear identifications of many of these phases is lacking. Neither carbonate nor silica has been unequivocally detected by any method. Although phyllosilicates may occur near the limit of detection by remote sensing, in general they appear to occur in only poorly crystalline form. In contrast, compelling evidence for ferric iron minerals has been gathered by recent telescopic investigations, the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP), and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). These data yield two crucial findings: (1) In the global, high spatial resolution TES data set, highly crystalline ferric iron (as coarse-grained 'gray' hematite) has been recognized but with only very limited spatial occurrence and (2) Low-resolution telescopic reflectance spectroscopy, very limited orbital reflectance spectroscopy, and landed multispectral imaging provide strong indications that at least two broad classes of ferric iron minerals are commonplace in non-dust covered regions.

  1. Reduced and oxidised scytonemin: theoretical protocol for Raman spectroscopic identification of potential key biomolecules for astrobiology.

    PubMed

    Varnali, Tereza; Edwards, Howell G M

    2014-01-01

    Scytonemin is an important UV-radiation protective biomolecule synthesised by extremophilic cyanobacteria in stressed terrestrial environments. Scytonemin and its reduced form have been both isolated experimentally and the Raman spectrum for scytonemin has been assigned and characterised experimentally both in extracts and in living extremophilic cyanobacterial colonies. Scytonemin is recognised as a key biomarker molecule for terrestrial organisms in stressed environments. We propose a new, theoretically plausible structure for oxidised scytonemin which has not been mentioned in the literature hitherto. DFT calculations for scytonemin, reduced scytonemin and the new structure modelled and proposed for oxidised scytonemin are reported along with their Raman spectroscopic data and ?max UV-absorption data obtained theoretically. Comparison of the vibrational spectroscopic assignments allows the three forms of scytonemin to be detected and identified and assist not only in the clarification of the major features in the experimentally observed Raman spectral data for the parent scytonemin but also support a protocol proposed for their analytical discrimination. The results of this study provide a basis for the search for molecules of this type in future astrobiological missions of exploration and the search for extinct and extant life terrestrially. PMID:23981417

  2. Integrated omics for the identification of key functionalities in biological wastewater treatment microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Narayanasamy, Shaman; Muller, Emilie E L; Sheik, Abdul R; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Biological wastewater treatment plants harbour diverse and complex microbial communities which prominently serve as models for microbial ecology and mixed culture biotechnological processes. Integrated omic analyses (combined metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics) are currently gaining momentum towards providing enhanced understanding of community structure, function and dynamics in situ as well as offering the potential to discover novel biological functionalities within the framework of Eco-Systems Biology. The integration of information from genome to metabolome allows the establishment of associations between genetic potential and final phenotype, a feature not realizable by only considering single ‘omes’. Therefore, in our opinion, integrated omics will become the future standard for large-scale characterization of microbial consortia including those underpinning biological wastewater treatment processes. Systematically obtained time and space-resolved omic datasets will allow deconvolution of structure–function relationships by identifying key members and functions. Such knowledge will form the foundation for discovering novel genes on a much larger scale compared with previous efforts. In general, these insights will allow us to optimize microbial biotechnological processes either through better control of mixed culture processes or by use of more efficient enzymes in bioengineering applications. PMID:25678254

  3. The cassava mealybug (Phenacoccus manihoti) in Asia: first records, potential distribution, and an identification key.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Soroush; Kondo, Takumasa; Winotai, Amporn

    2012-01-01

    Phenacoccus manihoti Matile-Ferrero (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), one of the most serious pests of cassava worldwide, has recently reached Asia, raising significant concern over its potential spread throughout the region. To support management decisions, this article reports recent distribution records, and estimates the climatic suitability for its regional spread using a CLIMEX distribution model. The article also presents a taxonomic key that separates P. manihoti from all other mealybug species associated with the genus Manihot. Model predictions suggest P. manihoti imposes an important, yet differential, threat to cassava production in Asia. Predicted risk is most acute in the southern end of Karnataka in India, the eastern end of the Ninh Thuan province in Vietnam, and in most of West Timor in Indonesia. The model also suggests P. manihoti is likely to be limited by cold stress across Vietnam's northern regions and in the entire Guangxi province in China, and by high rainfall across the wet tropics in Indonesia and the Philippines. Predictions should be particularly important to guide management decisions for high risk areas where P. manihoti is absent (e.g., India), or where it has established but populations remain small and localized (e.g., South Vietnam). Results from this article should help decision-makers assess site-specific risk of invasion, and develop proportional prevention and surveillance programs for early detection and rapid response. PMID:23077659

  4. Complex dynamics of a nonlinear aerospace structure: Experimental identification and modal interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, J. P.; Renson, L.; Kerschen, G.

    2014-06-01

    Nonlinear system identification is a challenging task in view of the complexity and wide variety of nonlinear phenomena. The present paper addresses the identification of a real-life aerospace structure possessing a strongly nonlinear component with multiple mechanical stops. The complete identification procedure, from nonlinearity detection and characterization to parameter estimation, is carried out based upon experimental data. The combined use of various analysis techniques, such as the wavelet transform and the restoring force surface method, brings different perspectives to the dynamics. Specifically, the structure is shown to exhibit particularly interesting nonlinear behaviors, including jumps, modal interactions, force relaxation and chattering during impacts on the mechanical stops.

  5. The Undecided Have the Key: Interaction-Driven Opinion Dynamics in a Three State Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The effects of interpersonal interactions on individual’s agreements result in a social aggregation process which is reflected in the formation of collective states, as for instance, groups of individuals with a similar opinion about a given issue. This field, which has been a longstanding concern of sociologists and psychologists, has been extended into an area of experimental social psychology, and even has attracted the attention of physicists and mathematicians. In this article, we present a novel model of opinion formation in which agents may either have a strict preference for a choice, or be undecided. The opinion shift emerges, in a threshold process, as a consequence of a cumulative persuasion for either one of the two opinions in repeated interactions. There are two main ingredients which play key roles in determining the steady states: the initial fraction of undecided agents and the change in agents’ persuasion after each interaction. As a function of these two parameters, the model presents a wide range of solutions, among which there are consensus of each opinion and bi-polarization. We found that a minimum fraction of undecided agents is not crucial for reaching consensus only, but also to determine a dominant opinion in a polarized situation. In order to gain a deeper comprehension of the dynamics, we also present the theoretical framework of the model. The master equations are of special interest for their nontrivial properties and difficulties in being solved analytically. PMID:26436421

  6. Interaction Studies of Withania Somnifera's Key Metabolite Withaferin A with Different Receptors Assoociated with Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Rekha; Sharma, Nitika; Roy, Sujata; Thakur, Ashoke R; Ganesh, Subhadra; Kumar, Sriram; Devi, Jamuna; Rajkumar, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Withania somnifera commonly known as Ashwagandha in India is used in many herbal formulations to treat various cardiovascular diseases. The key metabolite of this plant, Withaferin A was analyzed for its molecular mechanism through docking studies on different targets of cardiovascular disease. Six receptor proteins associated with cardiovascular disease were selected and interaction studies were performed with Withaferin A using AutoDock Vina. CORINA was used to model the small molecules and HBAT to compute the hydrogen bonding. Among the six targets, ?1- adrenergic receptors, HMG-CoA and Angiotensinogen-converting enzyme showed significant interaction with Withaferin A. Pharmacophore modeling was done using PharmaGist to understand the pharmacophoric potential of Withaferin A. Clustering of Withaferin A with different existing drug molecules for cardiovascular disease was performed with ChemMine based on structural similarity and physicochemical properties. The ability of natural active component, Withaferin A to interact with different receptors associated with cardiovascular disease was elucidated with various modeling techniques. These studies conclusively revealed Withaferin A as a potent lead compound against multiple targets associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26548552

  7. Molecular Identification of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus, Scombridae) Larvae and Development of a DNA Character-Based Identification Key for Mediterranean Scombrids

    PubMed Central

    Puncher, Gregory Neils; Arrizabalaga, Haritz; Alemany, Francisco; Cariani, Alessia; Oray, Isik K.; Karakulak, F. Saadet; Basilone, Gualtiero; Cuttitta, Angela; Mazzola, Salvatore; Tinti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    The Atlantic bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus, is a commercially important species that has been severely over-exploited in the recent past. Although the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean stock is now showing signs of recovery, its current status remains very uncertain and as a consequence their recovery is dependent upon severe management informed by rigorous scientific research. Monitoring of early life history stages can inform decision makers about the health of the species based upon recruitment and survival rates. Misidentification of fish larvae and eggs can lead to inaccurate estimates of stock biomass and productivity which can trigger demands for increased quotas and unsound management conclusions. Herein we used a molecular approach employing mitochondrial and nuclear genes (CO1 and ITS1, respectively) to identify larvae (n = 188) collected from three spawning areas in the Mediterranean Sea by different institutions working with a regional fisheries management organization. Several techniques were used to analyze the genetic sequences (sequence alignments using search algorithms, neighbour joining trees, and a genetic character-based identification key) and an extensive comparison of the results is presented. During this process various inaccuracies in related publications and online databases were uncovered. Our results reveal important differences in the accuracy of the taxonomic identifications carried out by different ichthyoplanktologists following morphology-based methods. While less than half of larvae provided were bluefin tuna, other dominant taxa were bullet tuna (Auxis rochei), albacore (Thunnus alalunga) and little tunny (Euthynnus alletteratus). We advocate an expansion of expertise for a new generation of morphology-based taxonomists, increased dialogue between morphology-based and molecular taxonomists and increased scrutiny of public sequence databases. PMID:26147931

  8. Molecular Identification of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus, Scombridae) Larvae and Development of a DNA Character-Based Identification Key for Mediterranean Scombrids.

    PubMed

    Puncher, Gregory Neils; Arrizabalaga, Haritz; Alemany, Francisco; Cariani, Alessia; Oray, Isik K; Karakulak, F Saadet; Basilone, Gualtiero; Cuttitta, Angela; Mazzola, Salvatore; Tinti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    The Atlantic bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus, is a commercially important species that has been severely over-exploited in the recent past. Although the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean stock is now showing signs of recovery, its current status remains very uncertain and as a consequence their recovery is dependent upon severe management informed by rigorous scientific research. Monitoring of early life history stages can inform decision makers about the health of the species based upon recruitment and survival rates. Misidentification of fish larvae and eggs can lead to inaccurate estimates of stock biomass and productivity which can trigger demands for increased quotas and unsound management conclusions. Herein we used a molecular approach employing mitochondrial and nuclear genes (CO1 and ITS1, respectively) to identify larvae (n = 188) collected from three spawning areas in the Mediterranean Sea by different institutions working with a regional fisheries management organization. Several techniques were used to analyze the genetic sequences (sequence alignments using search algorithms, neighbour joining trees, and a genetic character-based identification key) and an extensive comparison of the results is presented. During this process various inaccuracies in related publications and online databases were uncovered. Our results reveal important differences in the accuracy of the taxonomic identifications carried out by different ichthyoplanktologists following morphology-based methods. While less than half of larvae provided were bluefin tuna, other dominant taxa were bullet tuna (Auxis rochei), albacore (Thunnus alalunga) and little tunny (Euthynnus alletteratus). We advocate an expansion of expertise for a new generation of morphology-based taxonomists, increased dialogue between morphology-based and molecular taxonomists and increased scrutiny of public sequence databases. PMID:26147931

  9. Plant cell wall biosynthesis: genetic, biochemical and functional genomics approaches to the identification of key genes.

    PubMed

    Farrokhi, Naser; Burton, Rachel A; Brownfield, Lynette; Hrmova, Maria; Wilson, Sarah M; Bacic, Antony; Fincher, Geoffrey B

    2006-03-01

    Cell walls are dynamic structures that represent key determinants of overall plant form, plant growth and development, and the responses of plants to environmental and pathogen-induced stresses. Walls play centrally important roles in the quality and processing of plant-based foods for both human and animal consumption, and in the production of fibres during pulp and paper manufacture. In the future, wall material that constitutes the major proportion of cereal straws and other crop residues will find increasing application as a source of renewable fuel and composite manufacture. Although the chemical structures of most wall constituents have been defined in detail, the enzymes involved in their synthesis and remodelling remain largely undefined, particularly those involved in polysaccharide biosynthesis. There have been real recent advances in our understanding of cellulose biosynthesis in plants, but, with few exceptions, the identities and modes of action of polysaccharide synthases and other glycosyltransferases that mediate the biosynthesis of the major non-cellulosic wall polysaccharides are not known. Nevertheless, emerging functional genomics and molecular genetics technologies are now allowing us to re-examine the central questions related to wall biosynthesis. The availability of the rice, Populus trichocarpa and Arabidopsis genome sequences, a variety of mutant populations, high-density genetic maps for cereals and other industrially important plants, high-throughput genome and transcript analysis systems, extensive publicly available genomics resources and an increasing armoury of analysis systems for the definition of candidate gene function will together allow us to take a systems approach to the description of wall biosynthesis in plants. PMID:17177793

  10. Identification of Key Drought Stress-Related Genes in the Hyacinth Bean

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lu-Ming; Wang, Biao; Cheng, Lin-Jing; Wu, Tian-Long

    2013-01-01

    Hyacinth bean (Lablab purpureus [Linn.] Sweet) possesses excellent characteristics for field production, but the response of this plant to drought stress has not been described at the molecular level. Suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH) is an effective way to exploit key factors for plant responses to drought stress that are involved in transcriptional and metabolic activities. In this study, forward and reverse SSH libraries were generated from root tissues of the drought-tolerant hyacinth bean genotype MEIDOU 2012 under water–stress conditions. A total of 1,287 unigenes (94 contigs and 1,193 singletons) were derived from sequence alignment and cluster assembly of 1400 ESTs, and 80.6% of those hit against NCBI non-redundant (nr) database with E value <1E?06. BLASTX analysis revealed that the majority top matches were proteins form Glycine max (L.) Merrill. (61.5%). According to a gene ontology (GO) functional classification, 816 functionally annotated unigenes were assigned to the biological process category (74.1%), and 83.9% of them classified into molecular function and 69.2% involved in cellular component. A total of 168 sequences were further annotated with 207 Enzyme Commission (EC) codes and mapped to 83 different KEGG pathways. Seventeen functionally relevant genes were found to be overrepresented under drought stress using enrichment analysis. Differential expression of unigenes were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR assays, and their transcript profiles generally divided into three patterns, depending on the expression peaked levels after 6, 8 or 10 days dehydration, which indicated that these genes are functionally associated in the drought-stress response. PMID:23472143

  11. Large-Scale Identification and Analysis of Suppressive Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cokol, Murat; Weinstein, Zohar B.; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Tasan, Murat; Doak, Allison; Cansever, Dilay; Mutlu, Beste; Li, Siyang; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Guvenek, Aysegul; Cokol, Melike; Cetiner, Selim; Giaever, Guri; Iossifov, Ivan; Nislow, Corey; Shoichet, Brian; Roth, Frederick P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY One drug may suppress the effects of another. Although knowledge of drug suppression is vital to avoid efficacy-reducing drug interactions or discover countermeasures for chemical toxins, drug-drug suppression relationships have not been systematically mapped. Here, we analyze the growth response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to anti-fungal compound (“drug”) pairs. Among 440 ordered drug pairs, we identified 94 suppressive drug interactions. Using only pairs not selected on the basis of their suppression behavior, we provide an estimate of the prevalence of suppressive interactions between anti-fungal compounds as 17%. Analysis of the drug suppression network suggested that Bromopyruvate is a frequently suppressive drug and Staurosporine is a frequently suppressed drug. We investigated potential explanations for suppressive drug interactions, including chemogenomic analysis, coaggregation, and pH effects, allowing us to explain the interaction tendencies of Bromopyruvate. PMID:24704506

  12. Specific trophic factor-receptor interactions. Key selective elements in brain development and "regeneration".

    PubMed

    Fine, R E; Rubin, J B

    1988-05-01

    An hypothesis is presented which emphasizes the key role of specific trophic factor-receptor interactions in the development of the brain. We postulate that very early in development neurons become dependent on external factors (mainly neuropeptides) for guidance and survival. These requirements are the key to the selection process which results in the creation of a functional nervous system. These specific localized trophic factor requirements are postulated to persist throughout life. Disruptions in specific trophic factor-receptor systems are postulated to be responsible for a variety of age-related neurodegenerative diseases. The implications of recent animal and human transplant experiments in the context of the theoretical framework discussed above are profound. It would appear that the mature mammalian brain possesses an exquisite ability to regenerate specific connections to replace those lost due to death or injury to nerve cells. Unfortunately, it does not contain a population of undifferentiated stem cells to supply the necessary healthy neurons. The reason for this appears obvious based on the theoretical considerations given above, that the specific trophic factor-receptor interactions needed to produce a functional brain circuitry are necessarily stringently selective. Therefore, a significant stem cell population does not survive. However, if an appropriate stem cell population, ie, a fetal transplant, is provided, the brain will "heal itself" according to the program outlined above. In the future it may be technically feasible to perform genetic testing of newborns to determine to which genetic neurological diseases they are susceptible and at an appropriate time provide the appropriate fetal transplant. Obviously, society will have to deal with the profound ethical questions this technology will raise. PMID:2834427

  13. For realizing a robot working in human society, interaction with humans is the key issue. We have

    E-print Network

    Kanda, Takayuki

    Abstract For realizing a robot working in human society, interaction with humans is the key issue. We have developed a robot that interacts with humans based on visual recognition. This robot has two and a binocular stereo vision system. The binocular vision system indicates what the robot is looking

  14. MAX--An Interactive Computer Program for Teaching Identification of Clay Minerals by X-ray Diffraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohut, Connie K.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses MAX, an interactive computer program for teaching identification of clay minerals based on standard x-ray diffraction characteristics. The program provides tutorial-type exercises for identification of 16 clay standards, self-evaluation exercises, diffractograms of 28 soil clay minerals, and identification of nonclay minerals. (MDH)

  15. Identification and Biochemical Characterization of PGC-1beta-Interacting Proteins

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Hongsheng

    2008-01-01

    of these aforementioned processes represent key steps in the regulation of gene transcription. Therefore, the full functional activity of NRs depends upon their ability to interact with protein cofactors, termed coactivator and corepressor proteins. Metabolic syndrome...

  16. An illustrated identification key to four different species of adult Dinoderus (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae), commonly attacking dried cassava chips in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Schäfer; Goergen; Borgemeister

    2000-07-01

    Bostrichids of the genus Dinoderus are commonly found as pests of dried cassava chips in West Africa. An illustrated key facilitating the identification of the four most frequent African species, i.e. D. bifoveolatus (Wollaston), D. minutus (Fabricius), D. porcellus Lesne, and D. oblongopunctatus Lesne is presented. PMID:10758263

  17. Improved symbol rate identification method for on-off keying and advanced modulation format signals based on asynchronous delayed sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Sheng; Jin, Shang; Xia, Wenjuan; Ke, Changjian; Liu, Deming

    2015-11-01

    Symbol rate identification (SRI) based on asynchronous delayed sampling is accurate, cost-effective and robust to impairments. For on-off keying (OOK) signals the symbol rate can be derived from the periodicity of the second-order autocorrelation function (ACF2) of the delay tap samples. But it is found that when applied this method to advanced modulation format signals with auxiliary amplitude modulation (AAM), incorrect results may be produced because AAM has significant impact on ACF2 periodicity, which makes the symbol period harder or even unable to be correctly identified. In this paper it is demonstrated that for these signals the first order autocorrelation function (ACF1) has stronger periodicity and can be used to replace ACF2 to produce more accurate and robust results. Utilizing the characteristics of the ACFs, an improved SRI method is proposed to accommodate both OOK and advanced modulation formant signals in a transparent manner. Furthermore it is proposed that by minimizing the peak to average ratio (PAPR) of the delay tap samples with an additional tunable dispersion compensator (TDC) the limited dispersion tolerance can be expanded to desired values.

  18. Scanning electron microscopy of Anopheles hyrcanus group (Diptera: Culicidae) eggs in Thailand and an ultrastructural key for species identification.

    PubMed

    Saeung, Atiporn; Hempolchom, Chayanit; Yasanga, Thippawan; Otsuka, Yasushi; Thongsahuan, Sorawat; Srisuka, Wichai; Chaithong, Udom; Taai, Kritsana; Somboon, Pradya; Choochote, Wej

    2014-03-01

    The eggs of Anopheles argyropus, Anopheles crawfordi, Anopheles nigerrimus, Anopheles nitidus, Anopheles paraliae, Anopheles peditaeniatus, Anopheles pursati, and Anopheles sinensis are described with the aid of scanning electron micrographs. Comparisons of the egg structure among the eight species showed that the eggs differed with respect to the following characteristics: the deck-complete (An. argyropus, An. nigerrimus, An. paraliae, An. peditaeniatus, and An. sinensis); variable (complete, split and incomplete decks found together within an egg batch/An. crawfordi); and division into an area at each end (An. nitidus and An. pursati). The ratios of the entire length per maximal deck width within the area covered by floats were 3.33-6.86 (An. sinensis), 8.78-18.20 (An. peditaeniatus), 13.67-22 (An. nigerrimus), 26.33-44.25 (An. paraliae), and 26.99-75.94 (An. argyropus). The numbers of float ribs were 21-27 (An. peditaeniatus) and 28-34 (An. nigerrimus), and the total numbers of anterior and posterior tubercles were 6-8 (An. paraliae) and 9-11 (An. argyropus). Exochorionic sculpturing was of reticulum type (An. argyropus, An. crawfordi, An. nigerrimus, An. nitidus, An. paraliae, An. peditaeniatus, and An. sinensis) and pure tubercle type (An. pursati). Attempts are proposed to construct a robust key for species identification based on the morphometrics and ultrastructures of eggs under scanning electron microscopy. PMID:24337511

  19. Automatic Identification and Organization of Index Terms for Interactive Browsing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wacholder, Nina; Evans, David K.; Klavans, Judith L.

    The potential of automatically generated indexes for information access has been recognized for several decades, but the quantity of text and the ambiguity of natural language processing have made progress at this task more difficult than was originally foreseen. Recently, a body of work on development of interactive systems to support phrase…

  20. Factor Selection and Structural Identification in the Interaction ANOVA Model

    E-print Network

    Davidian, Marie

    and interactions in a model is similar to the idea of heredity used in regression models. This paper introduces model while also adhering to the heredity-type constraint on the model. A group norm penalty is placed is called GASH-ANOVA for grouping and selection using heredity in ANOVA. It is shown that the procedure has

  1. Identification of Protein Complexes by Comparative Analysis of Yeast and Bacterial Protein Interaction Data

    E-print Network

    Shamir, Ron

    Identification of Protein Complexes by Comparative Analysis of Yeast and Bacterial Protein Abstract Mounting evidence shows that many protein complexes are conserved in evolution. Here we use combines protein interaction data, that are available for each of the two species, and orthology

  2. Identification of Global Ferredoxin Interaction Networks in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Peden, Erin A.; Boehm, Marko; Mulder, David W.; Davis, ReAnna; Old, William M.; King, Paul W.; Ghirardi, Maria L.; Dubini, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Ferredoxins (FDXs) can distribute electrons originating from photosynthetic water oxidation, fermentation, and other reductant-generating pathways to specific redox enzymes in different organisms. The six FDXs identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are not fully characterized in terms of their biological function. In this report, we present data from the following: (a) yeast two-hybrid screens, identifying interaction partners for each Chlamydomonas FDX; (b) pairwise yeast two-hybrid assays measuring FDX interactions with proteins from selected biochemical pathways; (c) affinity pulldown assays that, in some cases, confirm and even expand the interaction network for FDX1 and FDX2; and (d) in vitro NADP+ reduction and H2 photo-production assays mediated by each FDX that verify their role in these two pathways. Our results demonstrate new potential roles for FDX1 in redox metabolism and carbohydrate and fatty acid biosynthesis, for FDX2 in anaerobic metabolism, and possibly in state transition. Our data also suggest that FDX3 is involved in nitrogen assimilation, FDX4 in glycolysis and response to reactive oxygen species, and FDX5 in hydrogenase maturation. Finally, we provide experimental evidence that FDX1 serves as the primary electron donor to two important biological pathways, NADPH and H2 photo-production, whereas FDX2 is capable of driving these reactions at less than half the rate observed for FDX1. PMID:24100040

  3. Identification of key genes associated with the human abdominal aortic aneurysm based on the gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xudong; Zheng, Chengfei; He, Yunjun; Tian, Lu; Li, Jianhui; Li, Donglin; Jin, Wei; Li, Ming; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-12-01

    The present study was aimed at screening the key genes associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in the neck, and to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the development of AAA. The gene expression profile, GSE47472, including 14 AAA neck samples and eight donor controls, was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. The total AAA samples were grouped into two types to avoid bias. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened in patients with AAA and subsequently compared with donor controls using linear models for microarray data, or the Limma package in R, followed by gene ontology enrichment analysis. Furthermore, a protein?protein interaction (PPI) network based on the DEGs was constructed to detect highly connected regions using a Cytoscape plugin. In total, 388 DEGs in the AAA samples were identified. These DEGs were predominantly associated with limb development, including embryonic limb development and appendage development. Nuclear receptor co?repressor 1 (NCOR1), histone 4 (H4), E2F transcription factor 4 (E2F4) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4? (HNF4A) were the four transcription factors associated with AAA. Furthermore, HNF4A indirectly interacted with the other three transcription factors. Additionally, six clusters were selected from the PPI network. The DEG screening process and the construction of an interaction network enabled an understanding of the mechanism of AAA to be gleaned. HNF4A may exert an important role in AAA development through its interactions with the three other transcription factors (E2F4, NCOR1 and H4), and the mechanism of this coordinated regulation of the transcription factors in AAA may provide a suitable target for the development of therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:26498477

  4. Quantum information technology with Sagnac interferometer: Interaction-free measurement, quantum key distribution and quantum secret sharing

    E-print Network

    Wellington Alves de Brito; Rubens Viana Ramos

    2007-06-08

    The interferometry of single-photon pulses has been used to implement quantum technology systems, like quantum key distribution, interaction-free measurement and some other quantum communication protocols. In most of these implementations, Mach-Zehnder, Michelson and Fabry-Perot interferometers are the most used. In this work we present optical setups for interaction-free measurement, quantum key distribution and quantum secret sharing using the Sagnac interferometer. The proposed setups are described as well the quantum protocols using them are explained.

  5. Simple Protein Complex Purification and Identification Method Suitable for High- throughput Mapping of Protein Interaction Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Markillie, Lye Meng; Lin, Chiann Tso; Adkins, Joshua N.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Hill, Eric A.; Hooker, Brian S.; Moore, Priscilla A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Shi, Liang; Wiley, H. S.; Kery, Vladimir

    2005-04-11

    Most of the current methods for purification and identification of protein complexes use endogenous expression of affinity tagged bait, tandem affinity tag purification of protein complexes followed by specific elution of complexes from beads, gel separation, in-gel digestion and mass spectrometric analysis of protein interactors. We propose a single affinity tag in vitro pulldown assay with denaturing elution, trypsin digestion in organic solvent and LC ESI MS/MS protein identification using SEQUEST analysis. Our method is simple, easy to scale up and automate thus suitable for high throughput mapping of protein interaction networks and functional proteomics.

  6. Identification of Key Factors Involved in the Biosorption of Patulin by Inactivated Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Zhouli; Yuan, Yahong; Cai, Rui; Niu, Chen; Yue, Tianli

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the key factors involved in patulin adsorption by heat-inactivated lactic acid bacteria (LAB) cells. For preventing bacterial contamination, a sterilization process was involved in the adsorption process. The effects of various physical, chemical, and enzymatic pre-treatments, simultaneous treatments, and post-treatments on the patulin adsorption performances of six LAB strains were evaluated. The pre-treated cells were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the removal of patulin by viable cells was mainly based on adsorption or degradation, depending on the specific strain. The adsorption abilities were widely increased by NaOH and esterification pre-treatments, and reduced by trypsin, lipase, iodate, and periodate pre-treatments. Additionally, the adsorption abilities were almost maintained at pH 2.2-4.0, and enhanced significantly at pH 4.0-6.0. The effects of sodium and magnesium ions on the adsorption abilities at pH 4 were slight and strain-specific. A lower proportion of patulin was released from the strain with higher adsorption ability. Analyses revealed that the physical structure of peptidoglycan was not a principal factor. Vicinal OH and carboxyl groups were not involved in patulin adsorption, while alkaline amino acids, thiol and ester compounds were important for patulin adsorption. Additionally, besides hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction also participated in patulin adsorption, which was enhanced with the increase in pH (4.0-6.0). PMID:26581099

  7. Identification of Key Factors Involved in the Biosorption of Patulin by Inactivated Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Zhouli; Yuan, Yahong; Cai, Rui; Niu, Chen; Yue, Tianli

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the key factors involved in patulin adsorption by heat-inactivated lactic acid bacteria (LAB) cells. For preventing bacterial contamination, a sterilization process was involved in the adsorption process. The effects of various physical, chemical, and enzymatic pre-treatments, simultaneous treatments, and post-treatments on the patulin adsorption performances of six LAB strains were evaluated. The pre-treated cells were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the removal of patulin by viable cells was mainly based on adsorption or degradation, depending on the specific strain. The adsorption abilities were widely increased by NaOH and esterification pre-treatments, and reduced by trypsin, lipase, iodate, and periodate pre-treatments. Additionally, the adsorption abilities were almost maintained at pH 2.2–4.0, and enhanced significantly at pH 4.0–6.0. The effects of sodium and magnesium ions on the adsorption abilities at pH 4 were slight and strain-specific. A lower proportion of patulin was released from the strain with higher adsorption ability. Analyses revealed that the physical structure of peptidoglycan was not a principal factor. Vicinal OH and carboxyl groups were not involved in patulin adsorption, while alkaline amino acids, thiol and ester compounds were important for patulin adsorption. Additionally, besides hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction also participated in patulin adsorption, which was enhanced with the increase in pH (4.0–6.0). PMID:26581099

  8. Identification of Crew-Systems Interactions and Decision Related Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Sharon Monica; Evans, Joni K.; Reveley, Mary S.; Withrow, Colleen A.; Ancel, Ersin; Barr, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    NASA Vehicle System Safety Technology (VSST) project management uses systems analysis to identify key issues and maintain a portfolio of research leading to potential solutions to its three identified technical challenges. Statistical data and published safety priority lists from academic, industry and other government agencies were reviewed and analyzed by NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) systems analysis personnel to identify issues and future research needs related to one of VSST's technical challenges, Crew Decision Making (CDM). The data examined in the study were obtained from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Aviation Accident and Incident Data System, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Accident/Incident Data System and the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS). In addition, this report contains the results of a review of safety priority lists, information databases and other documented references pertaining to aviation crew systems issues and future research needs. The specific sources examined were: Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST) Safety Enhancements Reserved for Future Implementation (SERFIs), Flight Deck Automation Issues (FDAI) and NTSB Most Wanted List and Open Recommendations. Various automation issues taxonomies and priority lists pertaining to human factors, automation and flight design were combined to create a list of automation issues related to CDM.

  9. "Key Interactions" as Agency and Empowerment: Providing a Sense of the Possible to Marginalized, Mexican-Descent Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Reynaldo, III

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how key interactions between community members, teachers, and Latino counselors and advisers were integral in providing support, knowledge, and agency to marginalized, Mexican-descent students in their 1st year of college. Findings show that particular types of discourse and narrative exchanged between integral adult figures…

  10. Large-scale identification of potential drug targets based on the topological features of human protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhan-Chao; Zhong, Wen-Qian; Liu, Zhi-Qing; Huang, Meng-Hua; Xie, Yun; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiao-Yong

    2015-04-29

    Identifying potential drug target proteins is a crucial step in the process of drug discovery and plays a key role in the study of the molecular mechanisms of disease. Based on the fact that the majority of proteins exert their functions through interacting with each other, we propose a method to recognize target proteins by using the human protein-protein interaction network and graph theory. In the network, vertexes and edges are weighted by using the confidence scores of interactions and descriptors of protein primary structure, respectively. The novel network topological features are defined and employed to characterize protein using existing databases. A widely used minimum redundancy maximum relevance and random forests algorithm are utilized to select the optimal feature subset and construct model for the identification of potential drug target proteins at the proteome scale. The accuracies of training set and test set are 89.55% and 85.23%. Using the constructed model, 2127 potential drug target proteins have been recognized and 156 drug target proteins have been validated in the database of drug target. In addition, some new drug target proteins can be considered as targets for treating diseases of mucopolysaccharidosis, non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, Bernard-Soulier syndrome and pseudo-von Willebrand, etc. It is anticipated that the proposed method may became a powerful high-throughput virtual screening tool of drug target. PMID:25847157

  11. A prototype framework for models of socio-hydrology: identification of key feedback loops and parameterisation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshafei, Y.; Sivapalan, M.; Tonts, M.; Hipsey, M. R.

    2014-06-01

    It is increasingly acknowledged that, in order to sustainably manage global freshwater resources, it is critical that we better understand the nature of human-hydrology interactions at the broader catchment system scale. Yet to date, a generic conceptual framework for building models of catchment systems that include adequate representation of socioeconomic systems - and the dynamic feedbacks between human and natural systems - has remained elusive. In an attempt to work towards such a model, this paper outlines a generic framework for models of socio-hydrology applicable to agricultural catchments, made up of six key components that combine to form the coupled system dynamics: namely, catchment hydrology, population, economics, environment, socioeconomic sensitivity and collective response. The conceptual framework posits two novel constructs: (i) a composite socioeconomic driving variable, termed the Community Sensitivity state variable, which seeks to capture the perceived level of threat to a community's quality of life, and acts as a key link tying together one of the fundamental feedback loops of the coupled system, and (ii) a Behavioural Response variable as the observable feedback mechanism, which reflects land and water management decisions relevant to the hydrological context. The framework makes a further contribution through the introduction of three macro-scale parameters that enable it to normalise for differences in climate, socioeconomic and political gradients across study sites. In this way, the framework provides for both macro-scale contextual parameters, which allow for comparative studies to be undertaken, and catchment-specific conditions, by way of tailored "closure relationships", in order to ensure that site-specific and application-specific contexts of socio-hydrologic problems can be accommodated. To demonstrate how such a framework would be applied, two socio-hydrological case studies, taken from the Australian experience, are presented and the parameterisation approach that would be taken in each case is discussed. Preliminary findings in the case studies lend support to the conceptual theories outlined in the framework. It is envisioned that the application of this framework across study sites and gradients will aid in developing our understanding of the fundamental interactions and feedbacks in such complex human-hydrology systems, and allow hydrologists to improve social-ecological systems modelling through better representation of human feedbacks on hydrological processes.

  12. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SEMICONDUCTOR MANUFACTURING, VOL. 24, NO. 2, MAY 2011 237 Cycle-Time Key Factor Identification and Prediction

    E-print Network

    Lerner, Boaz

    Factor Identification and Prediction in Semiconductor Manufacturing Using Machine Learning and Data of other machine learning and statistical models, such as a decision tree, a neural network, data mining, machine learning, production management, semiconductor manufacturing. I. Introduction

  13. Identification of brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 as an interaction partner of glutaminase interacting protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zencir, Sevil; Ovee, Mohiuddin; Dobson, Melanie J.; Banerjee, Monimoy; Topcu, Zeki; Mohanty, Smita

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2) is a new partner protein for GIP. {yields} BAI2 interaction with GIP was revealed by yeast two-hybrid assay. {yields} Binding of BAI2 to GIP was characterized by NMR, CD and fluorescence. {yields} BAI2 and GIP binding was mediated through the C-terminus of BAI2. -- Abstract: The vast majority of physiological processes in living cells are mediated by protein-protein interactions often specified by particular protein sequence motifs. PDZ domains, composed of 80-100 amino acid residues, are an important class of interaction motif. Among the PDZ-containing proteins, glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), also known as Tax Interacting Protein TIP-1, is unique in being composed almost exclusively of a single PDZ domain. GIP has important roles in cellular signaling, protein scaffolding and modulation of tumor growth and interacts with a number of physiological partner proteins, including Glutaminase L, {beta}-Catenin, FAS, HTLV-1 Tax, HPV16 E6, Rhotekin and Kir 2.3. To identify the network of proteins that interact with GIP, a human fetal brain cDNA library was screened using a yeast two-hybrid assay with GIP as bait. We identified brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2), a member of the adhesion-G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), as a new partner of GIP. BAI2 is expressed primarily in neurons, further expanding GIP cellular functions. The interaction between GIP and the carboxy-terminus of BAI2 was characterized using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy assays. These biophysical analyses support the interaction identified in the yeast two-hybrid assay. This is the first study reporting BAI2 as an interaction partner of GIP.

  14. Identification of protein disulfide isomerase 1 as a key isomerase for disulfide bond formation in apolipoprotein B100

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyu; Park, Shuin; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Han, Jaeseok; Yip, Theresa; Chen, Zhouji; Davidson, Nicholas O.; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) B is an obligatory component of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), and its cotranslational and posttranslational modifications are important in VLDL synthesis, secretion, and hepatic lipid homeostasis. ApoB100 contains 25 cysteine residues and eight disulfide bonds. Although these disulfide bonds were suggested to be important in maintaining apoB100 function, neither the specific oxidoreductase involved nor the direct role of these disulfide bonds in apoB100-lipidation is known. Here we used RNA knockdown to evaluate both MTP-dependent and -independent roles of PDI1 in apoB100 synthesis and lipidation in McA-RH7777 cells. Pdi1 knockdown did not elicit any discernible detrimental effect under normal, unstressed conditions. However, it decreased apoB100 synthesis with attenuated MTP activity, delayed apoB100 oxidative folding, and reduced apoB100 lipidation, leading to defective VLDL secretion. The oxidative folding–impaired apoB100 was secreted mainly associated with LDL instead of VLDL particles from PDI1-deficient cells, a phenotype that was fully rescued by overexpression of wild-type but not a catalytically inactive PDI1 that fully restored MTP activity. Further, we demonstrate that PDI1 directly interacts with apoB100 via its redox-active CXXC motifs and assists in the oxidative folding of apoB100. Taken together, these findings reveal an unsuspected, yet key role for PDI1 in oxidative folding of apoB100 and VLDL assembly. PMID:25518935

  15. Project 01. Interactive Key Construction. 25 points, due March 9, at the beginning of class. Minus 10% for every increment of < 24 hr late.

    E-print Network

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    1 Project 01. Interactive Key Construction. 25 points, due March 9, at the beginning of class. Minus 10% for every increment of key to me via email as a PC-compatible zip file containing a single functioning folder (i.e., when I unzip your folder, the key should work). Also

  16. Multiple prey traits, multiple predators: keys to understanding complex species interactions 

    E-print Network

    Langerhans, Randall Brian

    2002-01-01

    effects, where interactions between two species depend on intermediary species. In this thesis, I examined constraints on the evolution of phenotypic plasticity and addressed its potential significance in community dynamics. I further reviewed concepts...

  17. Identification of vancomycin interaction with Enterococcus faecalis within 30 min of interaction time using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Assmann, Cora; Kirchhoff, Johanna; Beleites, Claudia; Hey, Jessica; Kostudis, Sophia; Pfister, Wolfgang; Schlattmann, Peter; Popp, Jürgen; Neugebauer, Ute

    2015-11-01

    Vancomycin is an important glycopeptide antibiotic which is used to treat serious infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria. However, during the last years, a tremendous rise in vancomycin resistances, especially among Enterococci, was reported, making fast diagnostic methods inevitable. In this contribution, we apply Raman spectroscopy to systematically characterize vancomycin-enterococci interactions over a time span of 90 min using a sensitive Enterococcus faecalis strain and two different vancomycin concentrations above the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). Successful action of the drug on the pathogen could be observed already after 30 min of interaction time. Characteristic spectral changes are visualized with the help of multivariate statistical analysis (linear discriminant analysis and partial least squares regressions). Those changes were employed to train a statistical model to predict vancomycin treatment based on the Raman spectra. The robustness of the model was tested using data recorded by an independent operator. Classification accuracies of >90 % were obtained for vancomycin concentrations in the lower range of a typical trough serum concentration recommended for most patients during appropriate vancomycin therapy. Characterization of drug-pathogen interactions by means of label-free spectroscopic methods, such as Raman spectroscopy, can provide the knowledge base for innovative and fast susceptibility tests which could speed up microbiological analysis as well as finding applications in novel antibiotic screenings assays. Graphical Abstract E. faecalis is incubated with vancomycin and characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy after different time points. Characteristic spectral changes reveal efficient vancomycin-enterococci-interaction. PMID:26231687

  18. Quantification of cytosolic interactions identifies Ede1 oligomers as key organizers of endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Boeke, Dominik; Trautmann, Susanne; Meurer, Matthias; Wachsmuth, Malte; Godlee, Camilla; Knop, Michael; Kaksonen, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is a highly conserved intracellular trafficking pathway that depends on dynamic protein–protein interactions between up to 60 different proteins. However, little is known about the spatio-temporal regulation of these interactions. Using fluorescence (cross)-correlation spectroscopy in yeast, we tested 41 previously reported interactions in vivo and found 16 to exist in the cytoplasm. These detected cytoplasmic interactions included the self-interaction of Ede1, homolog of mammalian Eps15. Ede1 is the crucial scaffold for the organization of the early stages of endocytosis. We show that oligomerization of Ede1 through its central coiled coil domain is necessary for its localization to the endocytic site and we link the oligomerization of Ede1 to its function in locally concentrating endocytic adaptors and organizing the endocytic machinery. Our study sheds light on the importance of the regulation of protein–protein interactions in the cytoplasm for the assembly of the endocytic machinery in vivo. PMID:25366307

  19. Coordinate Control of Virulence Gene Expression in Francisella tularensis Involves Direct Interaction between Key Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Rohlfing, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    In Francisella tularensis, the putative DNA-binding protein PigR works in concert with the SspA protein family members MglA and SspA to control the expression of genes that are essential for the intramacrophage growth and survival of the organism. MglA and SspA form a complex that interacts with RNA polymerase (RNAP), and this interaction between the MglA-SspA complex and RNAP is thought to be critical to its regulatory function. How PigR works in concert with the MglA-SspA complex is not known; previously published findings differ over whether PigR interacts with the MglA-SspA complex, leading to disparate models for how PigR and the MglA-SspA complex exert their regulatory effects. Here, using a combination of genetic assays, we identify mutants of MglA and SspA that are specifically defective for interaction with PigR. Analysis of the MglA and SspA mutants in F. tularensis reveals that interaction between PigR and the MglA-SspA complex is essential in order for PigR to work coordinately with MglA and SspA to positively regulate the expression of virulence genes. Our findings uncover a surface of the MglA-SspA complex that is important for interaction with PigR and support the idea that PigR exerts its regulatory effects through an interaction with the RNAP-associated MglA-SspA complex. PMID:25070738

  20. Three New Bat Ectoparasite Species of the Genus Macronyssus from Western Siberia (with an Identification Key for Females of the Genus Macronyssus from the Palearctic Boreal Zone).

    PubMed

    Orlova, M V; Zhigalin, A V

    2015-06-01

    Three new gamasid mite species belonging to the genus Macronyssus Kolenati, 1858 (Acari: Macronyssidae), namely, Macronyssus sibiricus n. sp., Macronyssus stanyukovichi n. sp., and Macronyssus tigirecus n. sp., are described (females only; males, protonymphs, and larvae remain unknown). All species are known from Western Siberia and belong to the Siberian-Far Eastern bat ectoparasite fauna complex. The parasite hosts are the eastern water bat Myotis petax Hollister, 1912, and Hilgendorf's tube-nosed bat Murina hilgendorfi Peters, 1880 (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae). An identification key for females of the genus Macronyssus Kolenati, 1858, in the boreal Palearctic region is presented. PMID:25674831

  1. A disease of freshwater fishes caused by Tetrahymena corlissi Thompson, 1955, and a key for identification of holotrich ciliates of freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, G L; Landolt, M; Camper, J E; Coats, D W; Stookey, J L; Burek, J D

    1975-04-01

    Tetrahymena corlissi, a free-living protozoan, apparently caused the death of large number of guppies (Poecilia reticulatus) and occasionally other fishes, in aquaria and hatcheries at several locations. Apparently the disease occurs when the fish and protozoan populations are both at a high level of density. The signs include white spots and epidermal damage. Histologically, T. corlissi could be seen in skin, muscle, and viscera; in some there was marked inflammation, in others there was little tissue reaction. A key is presented for the identification of invasive fish ciliates: Chilodonella, Hemiophrys, Ichthyophthirius, Ophryoglena, and Tetrahymena. PMID:805228

  2. Identification of Protein-Protein Interactions and Topologies in Living Cells with Chemical Cross-linking and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske, Gerhard R.; Tolic, Nikola; Anderson, Gordon A.; Bruce, James E.

    2009-03-01

    We present results from a novel strategy that enables concurrent identification of protein-protein interactions and topologies in living cells without specific antibodies or genetic manipulations for immuno/affinity purifications. The strategy consists of: (i) chemical cross-linking reaction: intact cell labeling with a novel class of chemical cross-linkers, protein interaction reporters (PIRs); (ii) two-stage mass spectrometric analysis: stage 1 identification of PIR-labeled proteins and construction of a restricted database by 2D-LC/MS/MS; and stage 2 analysis of PIR-labeled peptides by multiplexed LC/FTICR-MS; (iii) data analysis: identification of cross-linked peptides and proteins of origin using accurate mass and other constraints. The primary advantage of the PIR approach and distinction from current technology is that protein interactions together with topologies are detected in native biological systems by stabilizing protein complexes with new covalent bonds while the proteins are present in the original cellular environment. Thus, weak or transient interactions or interactions that require properly folded, localized, or membrane-bound proteins can be labeled and identified through the PIR approach. This strategy was applied to S. oneidensis bacterial cells and initial studies resulted in identification of a set of protein-protein interactions and their contact/binding regions. Furthermore, most identified interactions involved membrane proteins, suggesting the PIR approach is particularly suited for studies of membrane protein-protein interactions, an area under-represented with current widely-used approaches.

  3. Phosphotransferase protein EIIANtr interacts with SpoT, a key enzyme of the stringent response, in Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Karstens, Katja; Zschiedrich, Christopher P; Bowien, Botho; Stülke, Jörg; Görke, Boris

    2014-04-01

    EIIA(Ntr) is a member of a truncated phosphotransferase (PTS) system that serves regulatory functions and exists in many Proteobacteria in addition to the sugar transport PTS. In Escherichia coli, EIIA(Ntr) regulates K(+) homeostasis through interaction with the K(+) transporter TrkA and sensor kinase KdpD. In the ?-Proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16, EIIA(Ntr) influences formation of the industrially important bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB). PHB accumulation is controlled by the stringent response and induced under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. Knockout of EIIA(Ntr) increases the PHB content. In contrast, absence of enzyme I or HPr, which deliver phosphoryl groups to EIIA(Ntr), has the opposite effect. To clarify the role of EIIA(Ntr) in PHB formation, we screened for interacting proteins that co-purify with Strep-tagged EIIA(Ntr) from R. eutropha cells. This approach identified the bifunctional ppGpp synthase/hydrolase SpoT1, a key enzyme of the stringent response. Two-hybrid and far-Western analyses confirmed the interaction and indicated that only non-phosphorylated EIIA(Ntr) interacts with SpoT1. Interestingly, this interaction does not occur between the corresponding proteins of E. coli. Vice versa, interaction of EIIA(Ntr) with KdpD appears to be absent in R. eutropha, although R. eutropha EIIA(Ntr) can perfectly substitute its homologue in E. coli in regulation of KdpD activity. Thus, interaction with KdpD might be an evolutionary 'ancient' task of EIIA(Ntr) that was subsequently replaced by interaction with SpoT1 in R. eutropha. In conclusion, EIIA(Ntr) might integrate information about nutritional status, as reflected by its phosphorylation state, into the stringent response, thereby controlling cellular PHB content in R. eutropha. PMID:24515609

  4. Hydrophobic Interactions Are Key To Drive the Association of Tapasin with Peptide Transporter Subunit TAP2.

    PubMed

    Rufer, Elke; Kägebein, Danny; Leonhardt, Ralf M; Knittler, Michael R

    2015-12-01

    The transporter associated with Ag processing (TAP) translocates proteasomally derived cytosolic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum. TAP is a central component of the peptide-loading complex (PLC), to which tapasin (TPN) recruits MHC class I (MHC I) and accessory chaperones. The PLC functions to facilitate and optimize MHC I-mediated Ag presentation. The heterodimeric peptide transporter consists of two homologous subunits, TAP1 and TAP2, each of which contains an N-terminal domain (N-domain) in addition to a conserved transmembrane (TM) core segment. Each N-domain binds to the TM region of a single TPN molecule, which recruits one MHC I molecule to TAP1 and/or TAP2. Although both N-domains act as TPN-docking sites, various studies suggest a functional asymmetry within the PLC resulting in greater significance of the TAP2/TPN interaction for MHC loading. In this study, we demonstrate that the leucine-rich hydrophobic sequence stretches (with the central leucine residues L20 and L66) in the first and second TM helix of TAP2 form a functional unit acting as a docking site for optimal TPN/MHC I recruitment, whereas three distinct highly conserved arginine and/or aspartate residues inside or flanking these TM helices are dispensable. Moreover, we show that the physical interaction between TAP2 and TPN is disrupted by benzene, a compound known to interfere with hydrophobic interactions, such as those between pairing leucine zippers. No such effects were observed for the TAP1/TAP2 interaction or the complex formation between TPN and MHC I. We propose that TAP/TPN complex formation is driven by hydrophobic interactions via leucine zipper-like motifs. PMID:26519531

  5. The phospholipid code: a key component of dying cell recognition, tumor progression and host-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Baxter, A A; Hulett, M D; Poon, I Kh

    2015-12-01

    A significant effort is made by the cell to maintain certain phospholipids at specific sites. It is well described that proteins involved in intracellular signaling can be targeted to the plasma membrane and organelles through phospholipid-binding domains. Thus, the accumulation of a specific combination of phospholipids, denoted here as the 'phospholipid code', is key in initiating cellular processes. Interestingly, a variety of extracellular proteins and pathogen-derived proteins can also recognize or modify phospholipids to facilitate the recognition of dying cells, tumorigenesis and host-microbe interactions. In this article, we discuss the importance of the phospholipid code in a range of physiological and pathological processes. PMID:26450453

  6. A proof-of-concept model for the identification of the key events in the infection process with specific reference to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in corneal infections

    PubMed Central

    Soumpasis, Ilias; Knapp, Laura; Pitt, Tyrone

    2015-01-01

    Background It is a common medical practice to characterise an infection based on the causative agent and to adopt therapeutic and prevention strategies targeting the agent itself. However, from an epidemiological perspective, exposure to a microbe can be harmless to a host as a result of low-level exposure or due to host immune response, with opportunistic infection only occurring as a result of changes in the host, pathogen, or surrounding environment. Methods We have attempted to review systematically the key host, pathogen, and environmental factors that may significantly impact clinical outcomes of exposure to a pathogen, using Pseudomonas aeruginosa eye infection as a case study. Results and discussion Extended contact lens wearing and compromised hygiene may predispose users to microbial keratitis, which can be a severe and vision-threatening infection. P. aeruginosa has a wide array of virulence-associated genes and sensing systems to initiate and maintain cell populations at the corneal surface and beyond. We have adapted the well-known concept of the epidemiological triangle in combination with the classic risk assessment framework (hazard identification, characterisation, and exposure) to develop a conceptual pathway-based model that demonstrates the overlapping relationships between the host, the pathogen, and the environment; and to illustrate the key events in P. aeruginosa eye infection. Conclusion This strategy differs from traditional approaches that consider potential risk factors in isolation, and hopefully will aid the identification of data and models to inform preventive and therapeutic measures in addition to risk assessment. Furthermore, this may facilitate the identification of knowledge gaps to direct research in areas of greatest impact to avert or mitigate adverse outcomes of infection. PMID:26546946

  7. Revision of the new world genus Crassomicrodus Ashmead (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Agathidinae), with an identification key to species

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, José Isaac; Sharkey, Michael Joseph; Nápoles, Jesus Romero; García, José Antonio Sánchez; Martínez, Ana Mabel; López-Martínez, Victor; Pineda, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A key to species and descriptions are presented for 14 species of the New World genus Crassomicrodus Ashmead. Seven new species, Crassomicrodus azteca, Crassomicrodus clypealis, Crassomicrodus costaricensis, Crassomicrodus jalisciensis, Crassomicrodus mariae, Crassomicrodus oaxaquensis,and Crassomicrodus olgae are described. Crassomicrodus fenestratus (Viereck) is synonymized with Crassomicrodus nigriceps (Cresson). Crassomicrodus melanopleurus (Ashmead) is recognized as a valid species. PMID:22144862

  8. Identification of key residues in Debaryomyces hansenii carbonyl reductase for highly productive preparation of (S)-aryl halohydrins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guo-Chao; Shang, Yue-Peng; Yu, Hui-Lei; Xu, Jian-He

    2015-11-01

    Key residues of Debaryomyces hansenii carbonyl reductase in the determination of the reducing activity towards aryl haloketones were identified through combinatorial mutation of conserved residues. This study provides a green and efficient biocatalyst for the synthesis of (S)-aryl halohydrins. PMID:26364768

  9. Identification of AFB1-interacting proteins and interactions between RPSA and AFB1.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Zhenhong; Huang, Yaling; Yang, Yanling; Wang, Shihua

    2016-01-15

    A method using immobilized affinity chromatography (IAC) was developed to screen for aflatoxin B1 (AFB1)-binding proteins. AFB1 and bovine serum albumin (BSA) coupled protein (BSA-AFB1) was prepared using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride. The resulting coupled compound was immobilized onto PVDF transfer membranes, which were then incubated with total protein from mouse liver. AFB1-binding proteins were eluted, after non-specific washing, by specific elution, and the eluted proteins were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two candidate AFB1-binding proteins were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry as the 40S ribosomal protein SA (RPSA) and a putative uncharacterized protein. RPSA and AFB1 interactions were further analyzed by ELISA in vitro and laser confocal immunofluorescence analysis in vivo. The results from ELISA and immunofluorescence showed that RPSA efficiently bound AFB1 in vitro and in vivo. This study's conclusion laid the foundation for further exploration of the role of AFB1-binding proteins in AFB1 toxicology towards hepatocytes and the entry pathway of AFB1 into hepatocytes. PMID:26372695

  10. The plasma-wall interaction region: a key low temperature plasma for controlled fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Counsell, G. F.

    2002-08-01

    The plasma-wall interaction region of a fusion device provides the interface between the hot core plasma and the material surfaces. To obtain acceptably low levels of erosion from these surfaces requires most of the power leaving the core to be radiated. This is accomplished in existing devices by encouraging plasma detachment, in which the hot plasma arriving in the region is cooled by volume recombination and ion-neutral momentum transfer with a dense population of neutrals recycled from the surface. The result is a low temperature (1 eV1019 m-3) but weakly ionized (n0>1020 m-3, ne/n0<0.1) plasma found nowhere else in the fusion environment. This plasma provides many of the conditions found in industrial plasmas exploiting plasma chemistry and the presence of carbon in the region (in the form of carbon-fibre composite used in the plasma facing materials) can result in the formation of deposited hydrocarbon films. The plasma-wall interaction region is therefore among the most difficult in fusion to model, requiring an understanding of atomic, molecular and surface physics issues.

  11. Essential protein identification based on essential protein-protein interaction prediction by Integrated Edge Weights.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuexu; Wang, Yan; Pang, Wei; Chen, Liang; Sun, Huiyan; Liang, Yanchun; Blanzieri, Enrico

    2015-07-15

    Essential proteins play a crucial role in cellular survival and development process. Experimentally, essential proteins are identified by gene knockouts or RNA interference, which are expensive and often fatal to the target organisms. Regarding this, an alternative yet important approach to essential protein identification is through computational prediction. Existing computational methods predict essential proteins based on their relative densities in a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. Degree, betweenness, and other appropriate criteria are often used to measure the relative density. However, no matter what criterion is used, a protein is actually ordered by the attributes of this protein per se. In this research, we presented a novel computational method, Integrated Edge Weights (IEW), to first rank protein-protein interactions by integrating their edge weights, and then identified sub PPI networks consisting of those highly-ranked edges, and finally regarded the nodes in these sub networks as essential proteins. We evaluated IEW on three model organisms: Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae), Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). The experimental results showed that IEW achieved better performance than the state-of-the-art methods in terms of precision-recall and Jackknife measures. We had also demonstrated that IEW is a robust and effective method, which can retrieve biologically significant modules by its highly-ranked protein-protein interactions for S. cerevisiae, E. coli, and C. elegans. We believe that, with sufficient data provided, IEW can be used to any other organisms' essential protein identification. A website about IEW can be accessed from http://digbio.missouri.edu/IEW/index.html. PMID:25892709

  12. The diaphanous Gene of Drosophila Interacts Antagonistically with multiple wing hairs and Plays a Key Role in Wing Hair Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiuheng; Adler, Paul N.

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila wing is covered by an array of distally pointing hairs that has served as a key model system for studying planar cell polarity (PCP). The adult cuticular hairs are formed in the pupae from cell extensions that contain extensive actin filaments and microtubules. The importance of the actin cytoskeleton for hair growth and morphogenesis is clear from the wide range of phenotypes seen in mutations in well-known actin regulators. Formin proteins promote the formation of long actin filaments of the sort thought to be important for hair growth. We report here that the formin encoding diaphanous (dia) gene plays a key role in hair morphogenesis. Both loss of function mutations and the expression of a constitutively active Dia led to cells forming both morphologically abnormal hairs and multiple hairs. The conserved frizzled (fz)/starry night (stan) PCP pathway functions to restrict hair initiation and activation of the cytoskeleton to the distal most part of wing cells. It also ensures the formation of a single hair per cell. Our data suggest that the localized inhibition of Dia activity may be part of this mechanism. We found the expression of constitutively active Dia greatly expands the region for activation of the cytoskeleton and that dia functions antagonistically with multiple wing hairs (mwh), the most downstream member of the fz/stan pathway. Further we established that purified fragments of Dia and Mwh could be co-immunoprecipitated suggesting the genetic interaction could reflect a direct physical interaction. PMID:25730111

  13. Microbial Glycan Microarrays Define Key Features of Host-Microbial Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Stowell, Sean R.; Arthur, Connie M.; McBride, Ryan; Berger, Oren; Razi, Nahid; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Rodrigues, Lilian C.; Gourdine, Jean-Philippe; Noll, Alexander J.; von Gunten, Stephan; Smith, David F.; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Paulson, James C.; Cummings, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic approaches continue to provide unprecedented insight into the microbiome, yet host immune interactions with diverse microbiota can be difficult to study. We therefore generated a microbial microarray containing defined antigens isolated from a broad range of microbial flora to examine adaptive and innate immunity. Serological studies with this microarray show that immunoglobulins from multiple mammalian species exhibit unique patterns of reactivity, while exposure of animals to distinct microbes induces specific serological recognition. While adaptive immunity exhibited plasticity toward microbial antigens, immunological tolerance limits reactivity toward self. We discovered that several innate immune galectins exhibit specific recognition of microbes that express self-like antigens, leading to direct killing of a broad range of gram negative and positive microbes. Thus, host protection against microbes appears to represent a balance between adaptive and innate immunity to defend against evolving antigenic determinants while protecting against molecular mimicry. PMID:24814672

  14. A bridge between liquids and socio-economic systems: the key role of interaction strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2005-03-01

    One distinctive and pervasive aspect of social systems is the fact that they involve several kinds of agents. Thus, in order to draw parallels with physical systems one is led to consider binary (or multi-component) compounds. Recent views about the mixing of liquids in solutions gained from neutron and X-ray scattering show these systems to have a number of similarities with socio-economic systems. It appears that such phenomena as rearrangement of bonds in a solution, gas condensation, and selective evaporation of molecules can be transposed in a natural way to some socio-economic phenomena. These connections provide with a novel perspective for looking at social systems which we illustrate through examples. For instance, we interpret suicide as an escape phenomenon and in order to test this interpretation we consider social systems characterized by very low levels of social interaction. For these systems suicide rates are found to be 10 to 100 times higher than in the general population. Another interesting parallel concerns the phase transition that occurs when locusts gather together to form swarms which may contain several billion insects. What hinders the thorough investigation of such cases from the standpoint of collective phenomena that we advocate is the lack or inadequacy of statistical data; up to now socio-economic data were collected for completely different purposes. Most essential, for further progress, are the statistics which would permit to estimate the strength of social ties and interactions. Once adequate data become available, rapid advancement may be expected. At the end of the paper, we will discuss whether or not the ergodic principle applies to social systems.

  15. Information flow between interacting human brains: Identification, validation, and relationship to social expertise

    PubMed Central

    Bilek, Edda; Ruf, Matthias; Schäfer, Axel; Akdeniz, Ceren; Calhoun, Vince D.; Schmahl, Christian; Demanuele, Charmaine; Tost, Heike; Kirsch, Peter; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Social interactions are fundamental for human behavior, but the quantification of their neural underpinnings remains challenging. Here, we used hyperscanning functional MRI (fMRI) to study information flow between brains of human dyads during real-time social interaction in a joint attention paradigm. In a hardware setup enabling immersive audiovisual interaction of subjects in linked fMRI scanners, we characterize cross-brain connectivity components that are unique to interacting individuals, identifying information flow between the sender’s and receiver’s temporoparietal junction. We replicate these findings in an independent sample and validate our methods by demonstrating that cross-brain connectivity relates to a key real-world measure of social behavior. Together, our findings support a central role of human-specific cortical areas in the brain dynamics of dyadic interactions and provide an approach for the noninvasive examination of the neural basis of healthy and disturbed human social behavior with minimal a priori assumptions. PMID:25848050

  16. SimSphere model sensitivity analysis towards establishing its use for deriving key parameters characterising land surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulos, G. P.; Griffiths, H. M.; Carlson, T. N.; Ioannou-Katidis, P.; Holt, T.

    2014-09-01

    Being able to accurately estimate parameters characterising land surface interactions is currently a key scientific priority due to their central role in the Earth's global energy and water cycle. To this end, some approaches have been based on utilising the synergies between land surface models and Earth observation (EO) data to retrieve relevant parameters. One such model is SimSphere, the use of which is currently expanding, either as a stand-alone application or synergistically with EO data. The present study aimed at exploring the effect of changing the atmospheric sounding profile on the sensitivity of key variables predicted by this model assuming different probability distribution functions (PDFs) for its inputs/outputs. To satisfy this objective and to ensure consistency and comparability to analogous studies conducted previously on the model, a sophisticated, cutting-edge sensitivity analysis (SA) method adopting Bayesian theory was implemented on SimSphere. Our results did not show dramatic changes in the nature or ranking of influential model inputs in comparison to previous studies. Model outputs examined using SA were sensitive to a small number of the inputs; a significant amount of first-order interactions between the inputs was also found, suggesting strong model coherence. Results showed that the assumption of different PDFs for the model inputs/outputs did not have an important bearing on mapping the most responsive model inputs and interactions, but only the absolute SA measures. This study extends our understanding of SimSphere's structure and further establishes its coherence and correspondence to that of a natural system's behaviour. Consequently, the present work represents a significant step forward in the global efforts on SimSphere verification, especially those focusing on the development of global operational products from the model synergy with EO data.

  17. SimSphere model sensitivity analysis towards establishing its use for deriving key parameters characterising land surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulos, G. P.; Griffiths, H. M.; Carlson, T. N.; Ioannou-Katidis, P.; Holt, T.

    2014-01-01

    Being able to accurately estimate parameters characterising land surface interactions is of key scientific priority today due to their central role in the Earth's global energy and water cycle. To this end, some approaches have been based on utilising the synergies between land surface models and Earth Observation (EO) data to retrieve relevant parameters. One such model is SimSphere, the use of which is currently expanding, either as a stand-alone application or synergistically with EO data. The present study aims at exploring the effect of changing the atmospheric sounding profile to the sensitivity of key variables predicted by this model assuming different probability distribution functions (PDFs) for its inputs/outputs. To satisfy this objective and to ensure consistency and comparability to analogous studies conducted previously on the model, a sophisticated, cutting edge sensitivity analysis (SA) method adopting Bayesian theory is implemented herein on SimSphere. Our results did not show dramatic changes in the nature or ranking of influential model inputs in comparison to previous studies. Model outputs of which the SA was examined were sensitive to a small number of the inputs; a significant amount of first order interactions between the inputs was also found, suggesting strong model coherence. Results obtained suggest that the assumption of different PDFs for the model inputs/outputs did not have significant bearing on mapping the most responsive model inputs and interactions, but only the absolute SA measures. All in all, this study extends our understanding of SimSphere's structure and further establishes its coherence and correspondence to that of a natural system's behaviour. Consequently, the present work represents a significant step forward in the efforts globally on SimSphere verification, especially those focusing towards the development of global operational products from the synergy of SimSphere with EO data.

  18. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks’ robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance.

  19. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks’ robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance. PMID:26582089

  20. Network Understanding of Herb Medicine via Rapid Identification of Ingredient-Target Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Pan, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Chi; Ji, Nan; Wang, Hao; Ji, Zhi-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Today, herb medicines have become the major source for discovery of novel agents in countermining diseases. However, many of them are largely under-explored in pharmacology due to the limitation of current experimental approaches. Therefore, we proposed a computational framework in this study for network understanding of herb pharmacology via rapid identification of putative ingredient-target interactions in human structural proteome level. A marketing anti-cancer herb medicine in China, Yadanzi (Brucea javanica), was chosen for mechanistic study. Total 7,119 ingredient-target interactions were identified for thirteen Yadanzi active ingredients. Among them, about 29.5% were estimated to have better binding affinity than their corresponding marketing drug-target interactions. Further Bioinformatics analyses suggest that simultaneous manipulation of multiple proteins in the MAPK signaling pathway and the phosphorylation process of anti-apoptosis may largely answer for Yadanzi against non-small cell lung cancers. In summary, our strategy provides an efficient however economic solution for systematic understanding of herbs' power.

  1. Network understanding of herb medicine via rapid identification of ingredient-target interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Pan, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Chi; Ji, Nan; Wang, Hao; Ji, Zhi-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Today, herb medicines have become the major source for discovery of novel agents in countermining diseases. However, many of them are largely under-explored in pharmacology due to the limitation of current experimental approaches. Therefore, we proposed a computational framework in this study for network understanding of herb pharmacology via rapid identification of putative ingredient-target interactions in human structural proteome level. A marketing anti-cancer herb medicine in China, Yadanzi (Brucea javanica), was chosen for mechanistic study. Total 7,119 ingredient-target interactions were identified for thirteen Yadanzi active ingredients. Among them, about 29.5% were estimated to have better binding affinity than their corresponding marketing drug-target interactions. Further Bioinformatics analyses suggest that simultaneous manipulation of multiple proteins in the MAPK signaling pathway and the phosphorylation process of anti-apoptosis may largely answer for Yadanzi against non-small cell lung cancers. In summary, our strategy provides an efficient however economic solution for systematic understanding of herbs' power. PMID:24429698

  2. Identification and prediction of dynamic systems using an interactively recurrent self-evolving fuzzy neural network.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yang-Yin; Chang, Jyh-Yeong; Lin, Chin-Teng

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents a novel recurrent fuzzy neural network, called an interactively recurrent self-evolving fuzzy neural network (IRSFNN), for prediction and identification of dynamic systems. The recurrent structure in an IRSFNN is formed as an external loops and internal feedback by feeding the rule firing strength of each rule to others rules and itself. The consequent part in the IRSFNN is composed of a Takagi-Sugeno-Kang (TSK) or functional-link-based type. The proposed IRSFNN employs a functional link neural network (FLNN) to the consequent part of fuzzy rules for promoting the mapping ability. Unlike a TSK-type fuzzy neural network, the FLNN in the consequent part is a nonlinear function of input variables. An IRSFNNs learning starts with an empty rule base and all of the rules are generated and learned online through a simultaneous structure and parameter learning. An on-line clustering algorithm is effective in generating fuzzy rules. The consequent update parameters are derived by a variable-dimensional Kalman filter algorithm. The premise and recurrent parameters are learned through a gradient descent algorithm. We test the IRSFNN for the prediction and identification of dynamic plants and compare it to other well-known recurrent FNNs. The proposed model obtains enhanced performance results. PMID:24808284

  3. Parasitoids of Monochamus galloprovincialis (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae), vector of the pine wood nematode, with identification key for the Palaearctic region

    PubMed Central

    Petersen-Silva, Ricardo; Pujade-Villar, Juli; Naves, Pedro; Edmundo Sousa; Belokobylskij,  Sergey

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The parasitoid complex associated with Monochamus galloprovincialis (Olivier), vector of the pine wood nematode, is discussed. Four species of the family Braconidae and one Ichneumonidae were found associated with Monochamus galloprovincialis in Portugal, namely Atanycolus denigrator (Linnaeus), Atanycolus ivanowi (Kokujev), Cyanopterus flavator (Fabricius), Doryctes striatellus (Nees) (Braconidae), and Xorides depressus (Holmgren) (Ichneumonidae). Atanycolus ivanowi, Atanycolus denigrator, Doryctes striatellus and Xorides depressus are new species for Portugal fauna, and Monochamus galloprovincialis is recorded as a new host of Xorides depressus. A key for determination of the ichneumonoid parasitoids of the pine sawyer is provided for the Palaearctic fauna. PMID:23378807

  4. Parasitoids of Monochamus galloprovincialis (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae), vector of the pine wood nematode, with identification key for the Palaearctic region.

    PubMed

    Petersen-Silva, Ricardo; Pujade-Villar, Juli; Naves, Pedro; Edmundo Sousa; Belokobylskij, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    The parasitoid complex associated with Monochamus galloprovincialis (Olivier), vector of the pine wood nematode, is discussed. Four species of the family Braconidae and one Ichneumonidae were found associated with Monochamus galloprovincialis in Portugal, namely Atanycolus denigrator (Linnaeus), Atanycolus ivanowi (Kokujev), Cyanopterus flavator (Fabricius), Doryctes striatellus (Nees) (Braconidae), and Xorides depressus (Holmgren) (Ichneumonidae). Atanycolus ivanowi, Atanycolus denigrator, Doryctes striatellus and Xorides depressus are new species for Portugal fauna, and Monochamus galloprovincialis is recorded as a new host of Xorides depressus. A key for determination of the ichneumonoid parasitoids of the pine sawyer is provided for the Palaearctic fauna. PMID:23378807

  5. New species and new records of freshwater Heterolepidoderma (Gastrotricha: Chaetonotidae) from Brazil with an identification key to the genus.

    PubMed

    Garraffoni, André R S; Melchior, Marina P

    2015-01-01

    A new species of freshwater Heterolepidoderma (Gastrotricha) was found in Brazil. Heterolepidoderma mariae sp. nov. is unique in possessing a three-lobed head, three types of dorsal keeled scales, a thin band of cilia on the head, connecting the two bands of ventral cilia, and an interciliary area with elliptical keeled scales with short spines. Heterolepidoderma famaillense Grosso & Drahg, 1991 is reported for the first time outside the type locality in Argentina, and we make some initial remarks on H. aff. majus Remane, 1927, a possible undescribed species. A dichotomous key for all freshwater species of Heterolepidoderma , with distributional data, is also provided. PMID:26701498

  6. Identification of cyclin D3 as a new interaction partner of lamin A/C

    SciTech Connect

    Mariappan, Indumathi; Gurung, Ritika; Thanumalayan, Subramonian; Parnaik, Veena K. . E-mail: veenap@ccmb.res.in

    2007-04-20

    Lamin A/C is a major component of the nuclear lamina. An intact nuclear lamina has been proposed to be necessary for muscle differentiation. Cyclin D3 is known to be upregulated in differentiated muscle cells and to form insoluble complexes with cell-cycle regulatory factors in these cells. We have examined the possibility of direct binding interactions between lamin A/C and cyclin D3 by in vitro binding assays and co-immunoprecipitation studies with muscle cells. Our results indicate that cyclin D3 binds specifically to amino acid residues 383-474 of lamin A/C and associates with lamin A/C in muscle cells. The identification of cyclin D3 as a novel binding partner of lamin A/C has important implications for a role for lamin A/C in muscle differentiation.

  7. Citrus tristeza virus p23: a unique protein mediating key virus-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ricardo; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Soler, Nuria; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús; Fagoaga, Carmen; López, Carmelo; Navarro, Luis; Moreno, Pedro; Peña, Leandro

    2013-01-01

    The large RNA genome of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV; ca. 20 kb) contains 12 open reading frames, with the 3'-terminal one corresponding to a protein of 209 amino acids (p23) that is expressed from an abundant subgenomic RNA. p23, an RNA-binding protein with a putative zinc-finger domain and some basic motifs, is unique to CTV because no homologs have been found in other closteroviruses, including the type species of the genus Beet yellows virus (despite both viruses having many homologous genes). Consequently, p23 might have evolved for the specific interaction of CTV with its citrus hosts. From a functional perspective p23 has been involved in many roles: (i) regulation of the asymmetrical accumulation of CTV RNA strands, (ii) induction of the seedling yellows syndrome in sour orange and grapefruit, (iii) intracellular suppression of RNA silencing, (iv) elicitation of CTV-like symptoms when expressed ectopically as a transgene in several Citrus spp., and (v) enhancement of systemic infection (and virus accumulation) in sour orange and CTV release from the phloem in p23-expressing transgenic sweet and sour orange. Moreover, transformation of Mexican lime with intron-hairpin constructs designed for the co-inactivation of p23 and the two other CTV silencing suppressors results in complete resistance against the homologous virus. From a cellular point of view, recent data indicate that p23 accumulates preferentially in the nucleolus, being the first closterovirus protein with such a subcellular localization, as well as in plasmodesmata. These major accumulation sites most likely determine some of the functional roles of p23. PMID:23653624

  8. Research on Key Factors and Their Interaction Effects of Electromagnetic Force of High-Speed Solenoid Valve

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Liyun; Xu, De; Ma, Xiuzhen; Song, Enzhe

    2014-01-01

    Analysis consisting of numerical simulations along with lab experiments of interaction effects between key parameters on the electromagnetic force based on response surface methodology (RSM) has been also proposed to optimize the design of high-speed solenoid valve (HSV) and improve its performance. Numerical simulation model of HSV has been developed in Ansoft Maxwell environment and its accuracy has been validated through lab experiments. Effect of change of core structure, coil structure, armature structure, working air gap, and drive current on the electromagnetic force of HSV has been analyzed through simulation model and influence rules of various parameters on the electromagnetic force have been established. The response surface model of the electromagnetic force has been utilized to analyze the interaction effect between major parameters. It has been concluded that six interaction factors including working air gap with armature radius, drive current with armature thickness, coil turns with side pole radius, armature thickness with its radius, armature thickness with side pole radius, and armature radius with side pole radius have significant influence on the electromagnetic force. Optimal match values between coil turns and side pole radius; armature thickness and side pole radius; and armature radius and side pole radius have also been determined. PMID:25243217

  9. Uncertainties in Biologically-Based Modeling of Formaldehyde-Induced Respiratory Cancer Risk: Identification of Key Issues

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Ravi P.; Chen, Chao; Crump, Kenny S.; DeVoney, Danielle; Fox, John F.; Portier, Christopher J.; Schlosser, Paul M.; Thompson, Chad M.; White, Paul

    2009-01-01

    In a series of articles and a health-risk assessment report, scientists at the CIIT Hamner Institutes developed a model (CIIT model) for estimating respiratory cancer risk due to inhaled formaldehyde within a conceptual framework incorporating extensive mechanistic information and advanced computational methods at the toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic levels. Several regulatory bodies have utilized predictions from this model; on the other hand, upon detailed evaluation the California EPA has decided against doing so. In this article, we study the CIIT model to identify key biological and statistical uncertainties that need careful evaluation if such two-stage clonal expansion models are to be used for extrapolation of cancer risk from animal bioassays to human exposure. Broadly, these issues pertain to the use and interpretation of experimental labeling index and tumor data, the evaluation and biological interpretation of estimated parameters, and uncertainties in model specification, in particular that of initiated cells. We also identify key uncertainties in the scale-up of the CIIT model to humans, focusing on assumptions underlying model parameters for cell replication rates and formaldehyde-induced mutation. We discuss uncertainties in identifying parameter values in the model used to estimate and extrapolate DNA protein cross-link levels. The authors of the CIIT modeling endeavor characterized their human risk estimates as “conservative in the face of modeling uncertainties.” The uncertainties discussed in this article indicate that such a claim is premature. PMID:18564991

  10. Uncertainties in biologically-based modeling of formaldehyde-induced respiratory cancer risk: identification of key issues.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Ravi P; Chen, Chao; Crump, Kenny S; Devoney, Danielle; Fox, John F; Portier, Christopher J; Schlosser, Paul M; Thompson, Chad M; White, Paul

    2008-08-01

    In a series of articles and a health-risk assessment report, scientists at the CIIT Hamner Institutes developed a model (CIIT model) for estimating respiratory cancer risk due to inhaled formaldehyde within a conceptual framework incorporating extensive mechanistic information and advanced computational methods at the toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic levels. Several regulatory bodies have utilized predictions from this model; on the other hand, upon detailed evaluation the California EPA has decided against doing so. In this article, we study the CIIT model to identify key biological and statistical uncertainties that need careful evaluation if such two-stage clonal expansion models are to be used for extrapolation of cancer risk from animal bioassays to human exposure. Broadly, these issues pertain to the use and interpretation of experimental labeling index and tumor data, the evaluation and biological interpretation of estimated parameters, and uncertainties in model specification, in particular that of initiated cells. We also identify key uncertainties in the scale-up of the CIIT model to humans, focusing on assumptions underlying model parameters for cell replication rates and formaldehyde-induced mutation. We discuss uncertainties in identifying parameter values in the model used to estimate and extrapolate DNA protein cross-link levels. The authors of the CIIT modeling endeavor characterized their human risk estimates as "conservative in the face of modeling uncertainties." The uncertainties discussed in this article indicate that such a claim is premature. PMID:18564991

  11. An annotated key to the identification of commonly occurring and dominant genera of algae observed in the phytoplankton of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greeson, Phillip E.

    1982-01-01

    In early 1979, a retrieval was made for all phytoplankton data contained in the computerized data file of the U. S. Geological Survey. The retrieval revealed the analytical results of 17,959 samples collected and processed between October 1973 and October 1978. Of the approximately 500 genera of freshwater algae reported in the United States, the U.S. Geological Survey observed 321 genera in the phytoplankton. Fifty-two genera were considered to be commonly occurring and 42 genera were considered to be community dominants. The report lists, describes, and provides a detailed taxonomic key to the identification of 58 genera of algae considered either commonly occurring or dominant. Also included is a summary of environmental conditions under which each algal genus was observed, as well as a glossary and an extensive list of selected references.

  12. Identification of people with disabilities using participatory rural appraisal and key informants: A pragmatic approach with action potential promoting validity and low cost

    PubMed Central

    GONA, JOSEPH K.; XIONG, TENGBIN; MUHIT, MOHAMMAD A.; NEWTON, CHARLES R.; HARTLEY, SALLY

    2011-01-01

    Background Surveys have been the conventional methods used for identification of people with disabilities; however, they have been observed to be expensive and time-consuming that may not be affordable or practical. As a result, the participatory rural appraisal (PRA) and key informant (KI) approaches have been developed and increasingly used in the resource-poor countries. Objective To investigate the strengths and weaknesses of PRA and KI approaches in the identification of people with disability in resource-poor countries. Method A review of published related papers was performed by searching electronic databases including PubMed, Scirus, Health on the Net (HON), Ovid Medline and SOURCE disability database. Results A total of 11 relevant papers were identified from the literature that used PRA or KI methods or both. The PRA and KI approaches were not only consistently less expensive than conventional surveys, but also observed to be simple and fast for identifying disabilities according to local perceptions, although they were less sensitive. The evidence showed that PRA and KI processes had the benefit of engaging and developing long-term partnerships with the local communities and so the likelihood of positive long-term impact on the community. Conclusions The PRA and KI approaches could be fast and cost-effective methods for identifying people with disabilities as an alternative to surveys. They are especially useful when identification is related to subsequent development of community-based services for persons with disabilities. However, surveys were shown to be more sensitive and therefore more accurate for establishing prevalence rates of impairment. PMID:19925280

  13. Revalidation and redescription of Triatoma brasiliensis macromelasoma Galvão, 1956 and an identification key for the Triatoma brasiliensis complex (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae)

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Jane; Correia, Nathália Cordeiro; Neiva, Vanessa Lima; Gonçalves, Teresa Cristina Monte; Felix, Márcio

    2013-01-01

    Triatoma brasiliensis macromelasoma is revalidated based on the results of previous multidisciplinary studies on the Triatoma brasiliensis complex, consisting of crossing experiments and morphological, biological, ecological and molecular analyses. These taxonomic tools showed the closest relationship between T. b. macromelasoma and Triatoma brasiliensis brasiliensis. T. b. macromelasoma is redescribed based on specimens collected in the type locality and specimens from a F1 colony. The complex now comprises T. b. brasiliensis, T. b. macromelasoma, Triatoma melanica, Triatoma juazeirensis and Triatoma sherlocki. An identification key for all members of the complex is presented. This detailed comparative study of the morphological features of T. b. macromelasoma and the remaining members of the complex corroborates results from multidisciplinary analyses, suggesting that the subspecific status is applicable. This subspecies can be distinguished by the following combination of features: a pronotum with 1+1 narrow brownish-yellow stripes on the submedian carinae, not attaining its apex, hemelytra with membrane cells darkened on the central portion and legs with an incomplete brownish-yellow ring on the apical half of the femora. Because the T. brasiliensis complex is of distinct epidemiological importance throughout its geographic distribution, a precise identification of its five members is important for monitoring and controlling actions against Chagas disease transmission. PMID:24037202

  14. A new species of jumping spider Neonella Gertsch, with notes on the genus and male identification key (Araneae, Salticidae)

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Gonzalo D.; Argañaraz, Carina I.; Gleiser, Raquel M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The American genus Neonella Gertsch, 1936 consists of very small jumping spiders whose biology is not well known. The genus currently includes eleven valid species, of which eight are known from both sexes and two are only known from one sex. This paper describes and illustrates a new species Neonella acostae sp. n., demonstrates male palpal variation in Neonella montana Galiano, 1988, and provides some information on the ecology of three sympatric species. New records of Neonella montana and Neonella minuta Galiano, 1965 are reported. Because the previously described species of Neonella were well illustrated and diagnosed, a dichotomous key to males is given along with genital illustrations of both sexes for all known species. PMID:26692804

  15. 1 | P a g e Summary of Fish-Barge Interaction Research and Fixed Dual Frequency Identification Sonar

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    1 | P a g e Summary of Fish-Barge Interaction Research and Fixed Dual Frequency Identification of Engineers (USACE) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) have conducted laboratory and field in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) and the resulting impacts to fish behavior. The experiments

  16. Discovery of novel interacting partners of PSMD9, a proteasomal chaperone: Role of an Atypical and versatile PDZ-domain motif interaction and identification of putative functional modules

    PubMed Central

    Sangith, Nikhil; Srinivasaraghavan, Kannan; Sahu, Indrajit; Desai, Ankita; Medipally, Spandana; Somavarappu, Arun Kumar; Verma, Chandra; Venkatraman, Prasanna

    2014-01-01

    PSMD9 (Proteasome Macropain non-ATPase subunit 9), a proteasomal assembly chaperone, harbors an uncharacterized PDZ-like domain. Here we report the identification of five novel interacting partners of PSMD9 and provide the first glimpse at the structure of the PDZ-domain, including the molecular details of the interaction. We based our strategy on two propositions: (a) proteins with conserved C-termini may share common functions and (b) PDZ domains interact with C-terminal residues of proteins. Screening of C-terminal peptides followed by interactions using full-length recombinant proteins, we discovered hnRNPA1 (an RNA binding protein), S14 (a ribosomal protein), CSH1 (a growth hormone), E12 (a transcription factor) and IL6 receptor as novel PSMD9-interacting partners. Through multiple techniques and structural insights, we clearly demonstrate for the first time that human PDZ domain interacts with the predicted Short Linear Sequence Motif (SLIM) at the C-termini of the client proteins. These interactions are also recapitulated in mammalian cells. Together, these results are suggestive of the role of PSMD9 in transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing and editing, hormone and receptor activity and protein translation. Our proof-of-principle experiments endorse a novel and quick method for the identification of putative interacting partners of similar PDZ-domain proteins from the proteome and for discovering novel functions. PMID:25009770

  17. Identification of a Novel Muscle A-type Lamin-interacting Protein (MLIP)*

    PubMed Central

    Ahmady, Elmira; Deeke, Shelley A.; Rabaa, Seham; Kouri, Lara; Kenney, Laura; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Burgon, Patrick G.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the A-type lamin (LMNA) gene are associated with age-associated degenerative disorders of mesenchymal tissues, such as dilated cardiomyopathy, Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. The molecular mechanisms that connect mutations in LMNA with different human diseases are poorly understood. Here, we report the identification of a Muscle-enriched A-type Lamin-interacting Protein, MLIP (C6orf142 and 2310046A06rik), a unique single copy gene that is an innovation of amniotes (reptiles, birds, and mammals). MLIP encodes alternatively spliced variants (23–57 kDa) and possesses several novel structural motifs not found in other proteins. MLIP is expressed ubiquitously and most abundantly in heart, skeletal, and smooth muscle. MLIP interacts directly and co-localizes with lamin A and C in the nuclear envelope. MLIP also co-localizes with promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies within the nucleus. PML, like MLIP, is only found in amniotes, suggesting that a functional link between the nuclear envelope and PML bodies may exist through MLIP. Down-regulation of lamin A/C expression by shRNA results in the up-regulation and mislocalization of MLIP. Given that MLIP is expressed most highly in striated and smooth muscle, it is likely to contribute to the mesenchymal phenotypes of laminopathies. PMID:21498514

  18. Identification of unique SUN-interacting nuclear envelope proteins with diverse functions in plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao; Graumann, Katja; Wirthmueller, Lennart; Jones, Jonathan D.G.

    2014-01-01

    Although a plethora of nuclear envelope (NE) transmembrane proteins (NETs) have been identified in opisthokonts, plant NETs are largely unknown. The only known NET homologues in plants are Sad1/UNC-84 (SUN) proteins, which bind Klarsicht/ANC-1/Syne-1 homology (KASH) proteins. Therefore, de novo identification of plant NETs is necessary. Based on similarities between opisthokont KASH proteins and the only known plant KASH proteins, WPP domain–interacting proteins, we used a computational method to identify the KASH subset of plant NETs. Ten potential plant KASH protein families were identified, and five candidates from four of these families were verified for their NE localization, depending on SUN domain interaction. Of those, Arabidopsis thaliana SINE1 is involved in actin-dependent nuclear positioning in guard cells, whereas its paralogue SINE2 contributes to innate immunity against an oomycete pathogen. This study dramatically expands our knowledge of plant KASH proteins and suggests that plants and opisthokonts have recruited different KASH proteins to perform NE regulatory functions. PMID:24891605

  19. Identification and characterization of interactions between abscisic acid and human heat shock protein 70 family members.

    PubMed

    Kharenko, Olesya A; Polichuk, Devin; Nelson, Ken M; Abrams, Suzanne R; Loewen, Michele C

    2013-10-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a stress-inducible plant hormone comprising an inevitable component of the human diet. Recently, stress-induced accumulation of autocrine ABA was shown in humans, as well as ABA-mediated modulation of a number of disease-associated systems. Now, the application of a chemical proteomics approach to gain further insight into ABA mechanisms of action in mammalian cells is reported. An ABA mimetic photoaffinity probe was applied to intact mammalian insulinoma and embryonic cells, leading to the identification of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) family members, (including GRP78 and HSP70-2) as putative human ABA-binding proteins. In vitro characterization of the ABA-HSP70 interactions yielded K(d)s in the 20-60 µM range, which decreased several fold in the presence of co-chaperone. However, ABA was found to have only variable- and co-chaperone-independent effects on the ATPase activity of these proteins. The potential implications of these ABA-HSP70 interactions are discussed with respect to the intracellular protein folding and extracellular receptor-like activities of these stress-inducible proteins. While mechanistic and functional relevance remain enigmatic, we conclude that ABA can bind to human HSP70 family members with physiologically relevant affinities and in a co-chaperone-dependent manner. PMID:23975754

  20. Identification of a key residue in Kv7.1 potassium channel essential for sensing external potassium ions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenying; Flores, Maria Cristina Perez; Sihn, Choong-Ryoul; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Zhang, Yinuo; Doyle, Karen J.; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2015-01-01

    Kv7.1 voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels are present in the apical membranes of marginal cells of the stria vascularis of the inner ear, where they mediate K+ efflux into the scala media (cochlear duct) of the cochlea. As such, they are exposed to the K+-rich (?150 mM of external K+ (K+e)) environment of the endolymph. Previous studies have shown that Kv7.1 currents are substantially suppressed by high K+e (independent of the effects of altering the electrochemical gradient). However, the molecular basis for this inhibition, which is believed to involve stabilization of an inactivated state, remains unclear. Using sequence alignment of S5-pore linkers of several Kv channels, we identified a key residue, E290, found in only a few Kv channels including Kv7.1. We used substituted cysteine accessibility methods and patch-clamp analysis to provide evidence that the ability of Kv7.1 to sense K+e depends on E290, and that the charge at this position is essential for Kv7.1’s K+e sensitivity. We propose that Kv7.1 may use this feedback mechanism to maintain the magnitude of the endocochlear potential, which boosts the driving force to generate the receptor potential of hair cells. The implications of our findings transcend the auditory system; mutations at this position also result in long QT syndrome in the heart. PMID:25712016

  1. Phalangopsidae crickets from Tropical Africa (Orthoptera, Grylloidea), with descriptions of new taxa and an identification key for African genera.

    PubMed

    Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure

    2015-01-01

    New Phalangopsidae crickets are described from tropical Africa, including three new genera and ten new species: Afrophaloria Desutter-Grandcolas, n.gen., Afrophaloria amani Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., type species, Afrophaloria apiariensis Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Afrophaloria hempae Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Kameruloria gabonensis Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Kameruloria nigricornis Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Kameruloria trimaculata Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Paragryllodes amani Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Phasmagryllus Desutter-Grandcolas, n.gen., Phasmagryllus elegans Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., type species, Upupagryllus Desutter-Grandcolas, n.gen., Upupagryllus subalatus Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., type species, and Upupagryllus alatus Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp. All these taxa, except Paragryllodes amani Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., belong to the subfamily Phaloriinae. The subfamily is redefined, to take into account their morphological (apterous taxa) and ecological (straminicolous taxa) diversity. A key for phalangopsid African genera is proposed, and the status of Larandeicus Chopard, 1937 briefly discussed. PMID:25947784

  2. A key gene of the small RNA pathway in the flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus: identification and functional characterization of dicer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuanshuai; Zhang, Junling; Shi, Zhiyi; Wang, Guyue; Li, Wejuan; Jia, Liang

    2015-10-01

    Dicer is critical for producing mature microRNAs (miRNAs) from precursor molecules and small interfering RNAs and plays an important role in controlling development and metabolism. In the present study, we cloned the flounder dicer gene, which is 6585 nucleotides (nt), including a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 231 nt, a 3'-UTR of 663 nt and an open reading frame of 5691 nt encoding a polypeptide of 1897 amino acids, and analyzed the conservation and expression pattern of dicer. The tissue distribution analysis indicated that dicer is abundantly expressed in the brain, heart, liver, spleen, stomach, kidney, gill, muscle, intestine and gonad of adult fish. Temporal expression analysis indicated that dicer mRNA is highly expressed during the embryonic and early larval stages, and exhibits low expression during the metamorphic stages. Treatment with thyroid hormone (TH) or thiourea indirectly or directly up-regulated dicer mRNA levels at 17 and 23 dph, whereas treatment with TH down-regulated dicer mRNA levels at 36 dph. The dicer-specific siRNA significantly down-regulated dicer mRNA and pol-let-7d levels, while pol-let-7d precursor levels were not differentially changed compared with the control (NC). These results demonstrated that dicer plays a key role in development and metabolism through the production of mature miRNAs, providing basic information for further studies concerning the role of dicer in Paralichthys olivaceus development. PMID:26045159

  3. CH3-? interaction of explosives with cavity of a TPE macrocycle: the key cause for highly selective detection of TNT.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jin-Hua; Zheng, Yan-Song

    2014-11-26

    The identification of explosives is critical for analyzing the background of terrorism activities and the origin of pollution aroused by the explosives, but it is a challenge to discriminate the explosives with a very similar structure. Herein we report a series of TPE-based macrocycles with an AIE effect for the 0.2-4 ppb level detection of TNT among a number of nitro-aromatic compounds through fluorescence quenching in natural water sources, whereas the contact mode approach using portable paper sensors exhibited a high sensitivity for the detection of TNT at 1.0 × 10(-13) M level. The reliability of the quantitative analysis has been confirmed by HPLC. Our findings demonstrate that the TPE-based macrocycles have great potential as excellent sensors for TNT. Moreover, it was found for the first time that the macrocycles could selectively recognize nitroaromatics explosives bearing methyl group through a CH3-? interactions, and even exhibit a sole selectivity for TNT among the very difficultly differentiating nitroaromatics including trinitrophenol and trinitrobenzene. PMID:25319016

  4. Design of optimal food-based complementary feeding recommendations and identification of key "problem nutrients" using goal programming.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Elaine L; Darmon, Nicole; Fahmida, Umi; Fitriyanti, Suci; Harper, Timothy B; Premachandra, Inguruwatte M

    2006-09-01

    The WHO is urging countries to promote improved complementary feeding practices to ensure optimal health, growth, and development of young children. To help achieve this, a rigorous 4-phase approach for designing optimal population- specific food-based complementary feeding recommendations (CFRs) was developed and is illustrated here. In phase I, an optimized diet is selected, using goal programming (Model #1), which aims to provide a desired nutrient content with respect to habitual diet patterns and cost. Based on its food patterns, a set of draft CFRs is designed. In phase II, their success for ensuring a nutritionally adequate diet is assessed via linear programming (Model type #2) by sequentially minimizing and maximizing the level of each nutrient (i.e., worst and best-case scenarios) while respecting the CFRs. For nutrients that are <70% of desired levels, the best food sources are identified via linear programming in phase III (Model #3). Different combinations of these foods are incorporated into the original draft of the CFRs to produce alternative CFRs, which are then compared on the basis of their cost, flexibility, and "worst-case scenario" nutrient levels (Model type #2) to select, in phase IV, a final set of CFRs. A hypothetical example is used to illustrate this approach. Outcomes include a set of optimal, population-specific CFRs and practical information regarding key "problem nutrients" in the local diet. Such information is valuable for nutrition promotion, as well as nutrition program planning and advocacy, to help achieve global initiatives for improving the complementary feeding practices of young children living in disadvantaged environments. PMID:16920861

  5. STRUCTURES OF A KEY INTERACTION PROTEIN FROM THE TRYPANOSOMA BRUCEI EDITOSOME IN COMPLEX WITH SINGLE DOMAIN ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meiting; Park, Young-jun; Pardon, Els; Turley, Stewart; Hayhurst, Andrew; Deng, Junpeng; Steyaert, Jan; Hol, Wim G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Several major global diseases are caused by single-cell parasites called trypanosomatids. These organisms exhibit many unusual features including a unique and essential U-insertion-deletion RNA editing process in their single mitochondrion. Many key RNA editing steps occur in ~ 20S editosomes, which have a core of 12 proteins. Among these, the “interaction protein” KREPA6 performs a central role in maintaining the integrity of the editosome core and also binds to ssRNA. The use of llama single domain antibodies (VHH domains) accelerated crystal growth of KREPA6 from Trypanosoma brucei dramatically. All three structures obtained are heterotetramers with a KREPA6 dimer in the center, and one VHH domain bound to each KREPA6 subunit. Two of the resultant heterotetramers use complementarity determining region 2 (CDR2) and framework residues to form a parallel pair of beta strands with KREPA6 – a mode of interaction not seen before in VHH domain-antigen complexes. The third type of VHH domain binds in a totally different manner to KREPA6. Intriguingly, while KREPA6 forms tetramers in solution adding either one of the three VHH domains results in the formation of a heterotetramer in solution, in perfect agreement with the crystal structures. Biochemical solution studies indicate that the C-terminal tail of KREPA6 is involved in the dimerization of KREPA6 dimers to form tetramers. The implications of these crystallographic and solution studies for possible modes of interaction of KREPA6 with its many binding partners in the editosome are discussed. PMID:20969962

  6. Genome-wide identification of non-coding RNAs interacted with microRNAs in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Chu-Yu; Xu, Hao; Shen, Enhui; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yu; Shen, Yifei; Qiu, Jie; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Fan, Longjiang

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of RNA species interacting with microRNAs (miRNAs) form a complex gene regulation network and play vital roles in diverse biological processes. In this study, we performed a genome-wide identification of endogenous target mimics (eTMs) for miRNAs and phased-siRNA-producing loci (PHAS) in soybean with a focus on those involved in lipid metabolism. The results showed that a large number of eTMs and PHAS genes could be found in soybean. Additionally, we found that lipid metabolism related genes were potentially regulated by 28 miRNAs, and nine of them were potentially further regulated by a number of eTMs with expression evidence. Thirty-three miRNAs were found to trigger production of phasiRNAs from 49 PHAS genes, which were able to target lipid metabolism related genes. Degradome data supported miRNA- and/or phasiRNA-mediated cleavage of genes involved in lipid metabolism. Most eTMs for miRNAs involved in lipid metabolism and phasiRNAs targeting lipid metabolism related genes showed a tissue-specific expression pattern. Our bioinformatical evidences suggested that lipid metabolism in soybean is potentially regulated by a complex non-coding network, including miRNAs, eTMs, and phasiRNAs, and the results extended our knowledge on functions of non-coding RNAs. PMID:25566308

  7. RELIC - a bioinformatics server for combinatorial peptide analysis and identification of protein-ligand interaction sites.

    SciTech Connect

    Mandava, S.; Makowski, L.; Devarapalli, S.; Uzubell, J.; Rodi, D.; Biosciences Division; Tek Systems

    2004-05-01

    Phage display technology provides a versatile tool for exploring the interactions between proteins, peptides and small molecule ligands. Quantitative analysis of peptide population sequence diversity and bias patterns has the power to significantly enhance the impact of these methods. We have developed a suite of computational tools for the analysis of peptide populations and made them accessible by integrating fifteen software programs for the analysis of combinatorial peptide sequences into the REceptor LIgand Contacts (RELIC) relational database and web-server. These programs have been developed for the analysis of statistical properties of peptide populations; identification of weak consensus sequences within these populations; and the comparison of these peptide sequences to those of naturally occurring proteins. RELIC is particularly suited to the analysis of peptide populations affinity selected with a small molecule ligand such as a drug or metabolite. Within this functional context, the ability to identify potential small molecule binding proteins using combinatorial peptide screening will accelerate as more ligands are screened and more genome sequences become available. The broader impact of this work is the addition of a novel means of analyzing peptide populations to the phage display community.

  8. Identification of Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the HuR/RNA Interaction Using a Fluorescence Polarization Screening Assay Followed by NMR Validation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhonghua; Bhattacharya, Akash; Ivanov, Dmitri N.

    2015-01-01

    The human antigen R (HuR) stabilizes many mRNAs of proto-oncogene, transcription factors, cytokines and growth factors by recognizing AU-rich elements (AREs) presented in their 3’ or 5’ untranslated region (UTR). Multiple lines of experimental evidence suggest that this process plays a key role in cancer development. Thus, destabilizing HuR/RNA interaction by small molecules presents an opportunity for cancer treatment/prevention. Here we present an integrated approach to identify inhibitors of HuR/RNA interaction using a combination of fluorescence-based and NMR-based high throughput screening (HTS). The HTS assay with fluorescence polarization readout and Z’-score of 0.8 was used to perform a screen of the NCI diversity set V library in a 384 well plate format. An NMR-based assay with saturation transfer difference (STD) detection was used for hits validation. Protein NMR spectroscopy was used to demonstrate that some hit compounds disrupt formation of HuR oligomer, whereas others block RNA binding. Thus, our integrated high throughput approach provides a new avenue for identification of small molecules targeting HuR/RNA interaction. PMID:26390015

  9. CR6-interacting factor 1 is a key regulator in A?-induced mitochondrial disruption and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Byun, J; Son, S M; Cha, M-Y; Shong, M; Hwang, Y J; Kim, Y; Ryu, H; Moon, M; Kim, K-S; Mook-Jung, I

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, often characterized by massive fission and other morphological abnormalities, is a well-known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). One causative mechanism underlying AD-associated mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to be amyloid-? (A?), yet the pathways between A? and mitochondrial dysfunction remain elusive. In this study, we report that CR6-interacting factor 1 (Crif1), a mitochondrial inner membrane protein, is a key player in A?-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Specifically, we found that Crif1 levels were downregulated in the pathological regions of Tg6799 mice brains, wherein overexpressed A? undergoes self-aggregation. Downregulation of Crif1 was similarly observed in human AD brains as well as in SH-SY5Y cells treated with A?. In addition, knockdown of Crif1, using RNA interference, induced mitochondrial dysfunction with phenotypes similar to those observed in A?-treated cells. Conversely, Crif1 overexpression prevented A?-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. Finally, we show that A?-induced downregulation of Crif1 is mediated by enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-dependent sumoylation of the transcription factor specificity protein 1 (Sp1). These results identify the ROS-Sp1-Crif1 pathway to be a new mechanism underlying A?-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and suggest that ROS-mediated downregulation of Crif1 is a crucial event in AD pathology. We propose that Crif1 may serve as a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of AD. PMID:25361083

  10. Identification of protein-protein interaction and topologies in living cells by chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske, Gerhard R.; Tolic, Nikola; Anderson, Gordon A.; Bruce, James E.

    2008-10-20

    Current chemical cross-linking methods are commonly employed for mapping sites of interaction and three-dimensional structure in purified, known protein complexes. When applied in vivo in combination of co-immunoprecipitation methods, information on the sites of interaction between proteins are unattainable due to overwhelming sample complexity. We present results from a novel cross-linking strategy that allow simultaneous protein-protein interaction and surface topology measurement in vivo without any prior knowledge of the system. The strategy consists of: (i) cross-linking reaction: intact cell labeling with protein interaction reporters (PIRs); (ii) two-stage mass spectrometric analysis: stage 1 identification of PIR-labeled proteins and construction of a restricted database by 2D-LC/MS/MS; and stage 2 analysis of PIR-labeled peptides by multiplexed LC/FTICR-MS; (iii) data analysis: identification of cross-linked peptides and proteins of origin using accurate mass and other constraints. This strategy was applied to Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 bacterial cells and successfully identified a protein-protein interaction between SecA and a small outer membrane lipoprotein as well as their sites of interaction in vivo.

  11. Aircraft Abnormal Conditions Detection, Identification, and Evaluation Using Innate and Adaptive Immune Systems Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Azzawi, Dia

    Abnormal flight conditions play a major role in aircraft accidents frequently causing loss of control. To ensure aircraft operation safety in all situations, intelligent system monitoring and adaptation must rely on accurately detecting the presence of abnormal conditions as soon as they take place, identifying their root cause(s), estimating their nature and severity, and predicting their impact on the flight envelope. Due to the complexity and multidimensionality of the aircraft system under abnormal conditions, these requirements are extremely difficult to satisfy using existing analytical and/or statistical approaches. Moreover, current methodologies have addressed only isolated classes of abnormal conditions and a reduced number of aircraft dynamic parameters within a limited region of the flight envelope. This research effort aims at developing an integrated and comprehensive framework for the aircraft abnormal conditions detection, identification, and evaluation based on the artificial immune systems paradigm, which has the capability to address the complexity and multidimensionality issues related to aircraft systems. Within the proposed framework, a novel algorithm was developed for the abnormal conditions detection problem and extended to the abnormal conditions identification and evaluation. The algorithm and its extensions were inspired from the functionality of the biological dendritic cells (an important part of the innate immune system) and their interaction with the different components of the adaptive immune system. Immunity-based methodologies for re-assessing the flight envelope at post-failure and predicting the impact of the abnormal conditions on the performance and handling qualities are also proposed and investigated in this study. The generality of the approach makes it applicable to any system. Data for artificial immune system development were collected from flight tests of a supersonic research aircraft within a motion-based flight simulator. The abnormal conditions considered in this work include locked actuators (stabilator, aileron, rudder, and throttle), structural damage of the wing, horizontal tail, and vertical tail, malfunctioning sensors, and reduced engine effectiveness. The results of applying the proposed approach to this wide range of abnormal conditions show its high capability in detecting the abnormal conditions with zero false alarms and very high detection rates, correctly identifying the failed subsystem and evaluating the type and severity of the failure. The results also reveal that the post-failure flight envelope can be reasonably predicted within this framework.

  12. Three new species of Trigonospila Pokorny (Diptera: Tachinidae), from Area de Conservación Guanacaste, northwestern Costa Rica, with a key for their identification

    PubMed Central

    Wood, D. Monty; Janzen, Daniel H; Hallwachs, Winnie; Smith, M. Alex

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We describe three new species of Trigonospila Pokorny (Tachinidae: Blondeliini) from Area de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG), northwestern Costa Rica. All were reared from ­various species of ACG caterpillars during an ongoing inventory of caterpillars, their food plants and their parasitoids in dry forest, rain forest and cloud forest. By coupling morphology, photographic documentation, life history and molecular data, we provide a clear and concise description of each species. All species published as new, are known to be previously undescribed as a result of careful study of the genus by DMW. This study builds on the current knowledge of the genus by adding three new species to the current 7 described in the New World. Trigonospila edwinbermudezi sp. n., Trigonospila uniformis sp. n., and Trigonospila josemariamoragai sp. n. are all authored and described as new by Fleming and Wood, with a key to their identification. The authors also offer a new record and description of the previously unknown male of Trigonospila panamensis (Townsend), reared from ACG caterpillars. PMID:26379456

  13. Three new species of Trigonospila Pokorny (Diptera: Tachinidae), from Area de Conservación Guanacaste, northwestern Costa Rica, with a key for their identification.

    PubMed

    Fleming, A J; Wood, D Monty; Janzen, Daniel H; Hallwachs, Winnie; Smith, M Alex

    2015-01-01

    We describe three new species of Trigonospila Pokorny (Tachinidae: Blondeliini) from Area de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG), northwestern Costa Rica. All were reared from -various species of ACG caterpillars during an ongoing inventory of caterpillars, their food plants and their parasitoids in dry forest, rain forest and cloud forest. By coupling morphology, photographic documentation, life history and molecular data, we provide a clear and concise description of each species. All species published as new, are known to be previously undescribed as a result of careful study of the genus by DMW. This study builds on the current knowledge of the genus by adding three new species to the current 7 described in the New World. Trigonospila edwinbermudezi sp. n., Trigonospila uniformis sp. n., and Trigonospila josemariamoragai sp. n. are all authored and described as new by Fleming and Wood, with a key to their identification. The authors also offer a new record and description of the previously unknown male of Trigonospila panamensis (Townsend), reared from ACG caterpillars. PMID:26379456

  14. Detection, quantitation and identification of enteroviruses from surface waters and sponge tissue from the Florida Keys using real-time RT-PCR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donaldson, K.A.; Griffin, Dale W.; Paul, J.H.

    2002-01-01

    A method was developed for the quantitative detection of pathogenic human enteroviruses from surface waters in the Florida Keys using Taqman (R) one-step Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR with the Model 7700 ABI Prism (R) Sequence Detection System. Viruses were directly extracted from unconcentrated grab samples of seawater, from seawater concentrated by vortex flow filtration using a 100kD filter and from sponge tissue. Total RNA was extracted from the samples, purified and concentrated using spin-column chromatography. A 192-196 base pair portion of the 5??? untranscribed region was amplified from these extracts. Enterovirus concentrations were estimated using real-time RT-PCR technology. Nine of 15 sample sites or 60% were positive for the presence of pathogenic human enteroviruses. Considering only near-shore sites, 69% were positive with viral concentrations ranging from 9.3viruses/ml to 83viruses/g of sponge tissue (uncorrected for extraction efficiency). Certain amplicons were selected for cloning and sequencing for identification. Three strains of waterborne enteroviruses were identified as Coxsackievirus A9, Coxsackievirus A16, and Poliovirus Sabin type 1. Time and cost efficiency of this one-step real-time RT-PCR methodology makes this an ideal technique to detect, quantitate and identify pathogenic enteroviruses in recreational waters. Copyright ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. Identification of key active constituents of Buchang Naoxintong capsules with therapeutic effects against ischemic stroke by using an integrative pharmacology-based approach.

    PubMed

    Haiyu, Xu; Yang, Shi; Yanqiong, Zhang; Qiang, Jia; Defeng, Li; Yi, Zhang; Feng, Liu; Hongjun, Yang

    2015-12-15

    Integrative pharmacology has been used to identify the key active constituents (KACs) of Buchang Naoxintong capsules (BNCs), a traditional Chinese medical preparation; this approach involves the evaluation of the content profiles and drug-like properties of the BNC constituents and development of an ingredient-target network. In this study, we used a sensitive analytical method to simultaneously identify and quantify 16 constituents of BNCs. Metabolism of these constituents by gut microbiota and human oral bioavailability were predicted using an in silico approach, followed by construction of networks to analyze the interactions between BNC constituents, their molecular targets, and proteins known to be the molecular targets for Food and Drug Administration-approved colitis medication. Finally, an animal model of ischemic stroke was used to verify the therapeutic effects of the KACs of BNCs. Amygdalin and paeoniflorin were identified as the KACs because they were the 2 most abundant BNC constituents, having appropriate drug-like properties, and produced therapeutic effects against cerebral ischemia. Amygdalin produced an anti-cerebral ischemia effect, likely by interacting with the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) and serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade C (antithrombin), member 1 (SERPINC1). These results form the basis for conducting studies to identify KACs in traditional medicinal preparations; such studies might improve quality control and allow the in vivo evaluation of synergistic interactions between the complex mixtures of compounds. PMID:26588440

  16. Crayfish fossil burrows, a key tool for identification of terrestrial environments in tide-dominated sequence, Upper Eocene, Sirt Basin, Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouessa, Ashour; Duringer, Philippe; Schuster, Mathieu; Pelletier, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    The majority of decapod crustaceans are defined as marine organisms. Crayfish are one of the relatively few known exceptions. They are freshwater-environment adapted decapods that build characteristically large, simple and branched cylindrical morphotype traces in fluvial plains. Their burrows bear lots of special features that make them different from other burrows. Consequently, the identification of true crayfish burrows in the sedimentary record is crucial for the interpretation of depositional environment. The studied interval (45 m thick, exposed in the Dur At Talah escarpment southern Sirt Basin; Fig. 1) represents a case-study which is previously believed to be purely tidal. In this interval, the identification of the crayfish burrows provides a reliable tool for distinguishing terrestrial environments. The crayfish burrows of Dur At Talah are characterized by dimensional, morphological, and especially behavioral aspects that combined, cannot be ascribed to another burrow makers. Essential criteria used to attribute these burrows to the crayfish include: Their length (the depth of penetration into the sediments), their regularly circular cross-sectional area, the presence of mid-way enlargement chamber along the burrow vertical axis, as well as the subtle preservation of the burrow chimney. More importantly, these morphological features allow the recognition of some of the crayfish diagnostic behavioral habits. Most significant of these is the one deduced from the interaction of the burrow with the seasonal fluctuation of the paleo groundwater level. Supplementary indications that restrict the studied burrows to terrestrial organism include their occurrences within pedogenically altered strata that bear evident features of prolonged emersion. Of these features, mud cracks and burrows that are filled with continental fossil are the clearest. Few horizons with termite fungus comb are also distinguishable. Although other burrows of the classically known thalassinoide morphotypes are common in the studied outcrop, this article focuses essentially on the relatively (several orders of magnitude) larger cylindrical morphotypes. This study is based on comparing the field data concerning the studied burrows with those morphometrically similar modern and ancient documented cases.

  17. Plant microRNA-Target Interaction Identification Model Based on the Integration of Prediction Tools and Support Vector Machine

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jun; Shi, Lin; Luan, Yushi

    2014-01-01

    Background Confident identification of microRNA-target interactions is significant for studying the function of microRNA (miRNA). Although some computational miRNA target prediction methods have been proposed for plants, results of various methods tend to be inconsistent and usually lead to more false positive. To address these issues, we developed an integrated model for identifying plant miRNA–target interactions. Results Three online miRNA target prediction toolkits and machine learning algorithms were integrated to identify and analyze Arabidopsis thaliana miRNA-target interactions. Principle component analysis (PCA) feature extraction and self-training technology were introduced to improve the performance. Results showed that the proposed model outperformed the previously existing methods. The results were validated by using degradome sequencing supported Arabidopsis thaliana miRNA-target interactions. The proposed model constructed on Arabidopsis thaliana was run over Oryza sativa and Vitis vinifera to demonstrate that our model is effective for other plant species. Conclusions The integrated model of online predictors and local PCA-SVM classifier gained credible and high quality miRNA-target interactions. The supervised learning algorithm of PCA-SVM classifier was employed in plant miRNA target identification for the first time. Its performance can be substantially improved if more experimentally proved training samples are provided. PMID:25051153

  18. "Key to Freshwater Algae": A Web-Based Tool to Enhance Understanding of Microscopic Biodiversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shayler, Hannah A.; Siver, Peter A.

    2006-01-01

    The Freshwater Ecology Laboratory at Connecticut College has developed an interactive, Web-based identification key to freshwater algal genera using the Lucid Professional and Lucid 3 software developed by the Centre for Biological Information Technology at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. The "Key to Freshwater Algae" was funded…

  19. Proteomic identification of dysferlin-interacting protein complexes in human vascular endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Cleo; Utokaparch, Soraya; Sharma, Arpeeta; Yu, Carol; Abraham, Thomas; Borchers, Christoph; University of Victoria - Genome BC Proteomics Centre, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia ; Bernatchez, Pascal; University of Victoria - Genome BC Proteomics Centre, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bi-directional (inward and outward) movement of GFP-dysferlin in COS-7 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dysferlin interacts with key signaling proteins for transcytosis in EC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dysferlin mediates trafficking of vesicles carrying protein cargos in EC. -- Abstract: Dysferlin is a membrane-anchored protein known to facilitate membrane repair in skeletal muscles following mechanical injury. Mutations of dysferlin gene impair sarcolemma integrity, a hallmark of certain forms of muscular dystrophy in patients. Dysferlin contains seven calcium-dependent C2 binding domains, which are required to promote fusion of intracellular membrane vesicles. Emerging evidence reveal the unexpected expression of dysferlin in non-muscle, non-mechanically active tissues, such as endothelial cells, which cast doubts over the belief that ferlin proteins act exclusively as membrane repair proteins. We and others have shown that deficient trafficking of membrane bound proteins in dysferlin-deficient cells, suggesting that dysferlin might mediate trafficking of client proteins. Herein, we describe the intracellular trafficking and movement of GFP-dysferlin positive vesicles in unfixed reconstituted cells using live microscopy. By performing GST pull-down assays followed by mass spectrometry, we identified dysferlin binding protein complexes in human vascular endothelial cells. Together, our data further support the claims that dysferlin not only mediates membrane repair but also trafficking of client proteins, ultimately, help bridging dysferlinopathies to aberrant membrane signaling.

  20. A prototype framework for models of socio-hydrology: identification of key feedback loops with application to two Australian case-studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshafei, Y.; Sivapalan, M.; Tonts, M.; Hipsey, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    It is increasingly acknowledged that, in order to sustainably manage global freshwater resources, it is critical that we better understand the nature of human-hydrology interactions at the broader catchment system-scale. Yet to date, a generic conceptual framework for building models of catchment systems that include adequate representation of socioeconomic systems - and the dynamic feedbacks between human and natural systems - has remained elusive. In an attempt to work towards such a model, this paper outlines a generic framework for a model of socio-hydrology that posits a novel construct, a composite Community Sensitivity state variable, as a key link to elucidate the drivers of behavioural response in a hydrological context. The framework provides for both macro-scale contextual parameters, which allow it to be applied across climate, socioeconomic and political gradients, and catchment-specific conditions, by way of tailored "closure relationships", in order to ensure that site-specific and application-specific contexts of socio-hydrologic problems can be accommodated. To demonstrate how such a framework would be applied, two different socio-hydrological case studies, taken from the Australian experience, are presented and discussed. It is envisioned that the application of this framework across study sites and gradients will aid in developing our understanding of the fundamental interactions and feedbacks in such complex human-hydrology systems, and allow hydrologists to participate in the growing field of social-ecological systems modelling.

  1. An annotated list of the species of Gangesia Woodland, 1924 (Cestoda: Proteocephalidea), parasites of catfishes in Asia, with new synonyms and a key to their identification.

    PubMed

    Ash, Anirban; de Chambrier, Alain; Shimazu, Takeshi; Ermolenko, Alexey; Scholz, Tomáš

    2015-05-01

    An annotated list of tapeworms of the genus Gangesia Woodland, 1924 (Cestoda: Proteocephalidea), parasites of siluriform fishes in Asia, is provided. Based on the morphological examination of museum specimens and newly collected material from China, Japan and Russia, as well as the results of a previous revision of the Indomalayan species, only eight of more than 50 nominal taxa are considered to be valid. These are: from India and neighbouring countries, Gangesia bengalensis (Southwell, 1913) (type-species), G. agraensis Verma, 1928, both from Wallago attu (Bloch & Schneider) (Siluridae), G. macrones Woodland, 1924 from Sperata seenghala (Sykes) (Bagridae) and G. vachai (Gupta & Parmar, 1988) from different catfishes (type-host Eutropiichthys vacha (Hamilton); Schilbeidae), and, from the Palaearctic, G. margolisi Shimazu, 1994, a parasite of Silurus biwaensis (Tomoda) (Siluridae) in Japan, G. oligonchis Roitman & Freze, 1964 from Tachysurus fulvidraco (Richardson) (Bagridae) in Russia, and G. parasiluri Yamaguti, 1934 and G. polyonchis Roitman & Freze, 1964, both from Silurus asotus L. (Siluridae) in Japan and Russia, respectively. The poorly known G. oligonchis is redescribed. Seven new synonyms are proposed: G. chauhani Mathur & Srivastav, 2000, G. wallaguae Pradhan, Kulkarni, Kale & Wakle, 2010 and G. shivajiraoi Dhole, Waghmare & Chavan, 2012 are synonymised with G. agraensis; G. striatusii Bhure & Nanaware, 2012 and Silurotaenia govindii Sawarkar, 2013 with G. macrones; G. spasskajae Demshin, 1987 with G. polyonchis; and Silurotaenia spinula Chen, 1984 with Postgangesia orientalis Akhmerov, 1969. Gangesia pseudobagrae Chen, 1962 is considered to be a species inquirenda, whereas G. chauhani Mathur, 1992 and G. dineshei Jaysingpure, 2002 are recognised as unavailable names. An amended generic diagnosis of Gangesia and a key to the identification of its recognised species are also provided. PMID:25862030

  2. Identification of critical genes and gene interaction networks that mediate osteosarcoma metastasis to the lungs

    PubMed Central

    LIU, KEGUI; HE, QUNHUI; LIAO, GUANGJUN; HAN, JIAN

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most commonly diagnosed bone tumor in young adults under the age of 20. Metastasis is considered an important factor underlying cancer-associated morbidity and mortality, and, as a result, the survival rate of patients with metastatic OS is low. In spite of this, the mechanisms underlying metastasis in OS are currently not well understood. The present study compared gene expression levels between five non-metastatic and four metastatic OS tumor samples, using an Affymetrix microarray. A total of 282 genes were differentially expressed in the metastatic samples, as compared with the non-metastatic samples. Of these differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 212 were upregulated and 70 were downregulated. The following DEGs were associated with metastasis: Homeobox only protein; lysosomal-associated membrane protein-3; chemokine (C-C motif) ligand-18; carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-6; keratin-19; prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2; clusterin; and nucleoside diphosphate kinase-1. Subsequently, Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) enrichment pathway analyses were conducted, which identified 529 biological processes (P<0.01) and 10 KEGG pathways (P<0.05) that were significantly over-represented in the metastatic samples, as compared with the non-metastatic samples. Interaction networks for the DEGs were constructed using the corresponding GO terms and KEGG pathways, and these identified numerous genes that may contribute to OS metastasis. Among the enriched biological processes, four DEGs were consistently over-represented: Jun proto-oncogene, caveolin-1, nuclear factor-?B-inhibitor-? and integrin alpha-4; thus suggesting that they may have key roles in OS metastasis, and may be considered potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of patients with OS.

  3. Insights into the key interactions between human protein phosphatase 5 and cantharidin using molecular dynamics and site-directed mutagenesis bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ji-Yuan; Chen, Xi-En; Zhang, Ya-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is a promising novel target for anticancer therapies. This work aims to uncover the key interactions at the atomic level between PP5 and three inhibitors (cantharidin, norcantharidin and endothall). We found that, unlike previous report, Arg 100 contributes less to PP5-inhibitor binding, and the residues His 69, Asn 128, His 129, Arg 225, His 252 and Arg 250 are of importance to PP5-inhibitor binding. The hydrophobic interactions established between the residues Val 254, Phe 271 and Tyr 276, especially Glu 253, are very important to enhance the inhibitive interaction. We suggested that, to increase the inhibitory activity, the interactions of inhibitor with three negatively charged unfavorable interaction residues, Asp 99, Glu 130 and Asp 213, should be avoided. However, the interactions of inhibitor with favorable interaction residue Arg 250 could enhance the inhibitory activity. The Manganese ion 2 (MN2) unfavorably contribute to the total interaction free energies. The coordination between MN2 and chemical group of inhibitor should be eliminated. This work provides insight into how cantharidin and its analogs bind to PP5c at the atomic level and will facilitate modification of cantharidin-like chemicals to rationally develop more specific and less cytotoxic anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26190207

  4. Revolving SEM images visualising 3D taxonomic characters: application to six species of the millipede genus Ommatoiulus Latzel, 1884, with description of seven new species and an interactive key to the Tunisian members of the genus (Diplopoda, Julida, Julidae).

    PubMed

    Akkari, Nesrine; Cheung, David Koon-Bong; Enghoff, Henrik; Stoev, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    A novel illustration technique based on scanning electron microscopy is used for the first time to enhance taxonomic descriptions. The male genitalia (gonopods) of six species of millipedes are used for construction of interactive imaging models. Each model is a compilation of a number of SEM images taken consecutively while rotating the SEM stage 360°, which allows the structure in question to be seen from all angles of view in one plane. Seven new species of the genus Ommatoiulus collected in Tunisia are described: Ommatoiulus chambiensis, Ommatoiulus crassinigripes, Ommatoiulus kefi, Ommatoiulus khroumiriensis, Ommatoiulus xerophilus, Ommatoiulus xenos, and Ommatoiulus zaghouani spp. n. Size differences between syntopic adult males of Ommatoiulus chambiensis and Ommatoiulus xerophilus spp. n. from Châambi Mountain are illustrated using scatter diagrams. A similar diagram is used to illustrate size differences in Ommatoiulus crassinigripes, Ommatoiulus khroumiriensis spp. n. and Ommatoiulus punicus (Brölemann, 1894). In addition to morphological differences, the latter three species display allopatric distribution and different habitat preferences. A dichotomous interactive key with a high visual impact and an intuitive user interface is presented to serve identification of the 12 Ommatoiulus species so far known from Tunisia. Updates on the North African Ommatoiulus fauna in general are presented. PMID:24146546

  5. Identification of Protein-Protein Interactions and Topologies in Living Cells with Chemical Cross-linking and Mass Spectrometry*S?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haizhen; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske, Gerhard R.; Tolic, Nikola; Anderson, Gordon A.; Bruce, James E.

    2009-01-01

    We present results from a novel strategy that enables concurrent identification of protein-protein interactions and topologies in living cells without specific antibodies or genetic manipulations for immuno-/affinity purifications. The strategy consists of (i) a chemical cross-linking reaction: intact cell labeling with a novel class of chemical cross-linkers, protein interaction reporters (PIRs); (ii) two-stage mass spectrometric analysis: stage 1 identification of PIR-labeled proteins and construction of a restricted database by two-dimensional LC/MSMS and stage 2 analysis of PIR-labeled peptides by multiplexed LC/FTICR-MS; and (iii) data analysis: identification of cross-linked peptides and proteins of origin using accurate mass and other constraints. The primary advantage of the PIR approach and distinction from current technology is that protein interactions together with topologies are detected in native biological systems by stabilizing protein complexes with new covalent bonds while the proteins are present in the original cellular environment. Thus, weak or transient interactions or interactions that require properly folded, localized, or membrane-bound proteins can be labeled and identified through the PIR approach. This strategy was applied to Shewanella oneidensis bacterial cells, and initial studies resulted in identification of a set of protein-protein interactions and their contact/binding regions. Furthermore most identified interactions involved membrane proteins, suggesting that the PIR approach is particularly suited for studies of membrane protein-protein interactions, an area under-represented with current widely used approaches. PMID:18936057

  6. Identification of a redox-modulatory interaction between selenoprotein W and 14-3-3 protein.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yeong Ha; Ko, Kwan Young; Lee, Jea Hwang; Park, Ki Jun; Jang, Jun Ki; Kim, Ick Young

    2016-01-01

    Selenoprotein W (SelW) contains a selenocysteine (Sec, U) in a conserved CXXU motif corresponding to the CXXC redox motif of thioredoxin, suggesting a putative redox function of SelW. We have previously reported that the binding of 14-3-3 protein to its target proteins, including CDC25B, Rictor and TAZ, is inhibited by the interaction of 14-3-3 protein with SelW. However, the binding mechanism is unclear. In this study, we sought to determine the binding site of SelW to understand the regulatory mechanism of the interaction between SelW and 14-3-3 and its biological effects. Phosphorylated Ser(pS) or Thr(pT) residues in RSXpSXP or RXXXp(S/T)XP motifs are well-known common 14-3-3-binding sites, but Thr41, Ser59, and T69 of SelW, which are computationally predicted to serve are phosphorylation sites, were neither phosphorylation sites nor sites involved in the interaction. A mutant SelW in which Sec13 is changed to Ser (U13S) was unable to interact with 14-3-3 protein and thus did not inhibit the interaction of 14-3-3 to other target proteins. However, other Cys mutants of SelW(C10S, C33S and C37S) normally interacted with 14-3-3 protein. The interaction of SelW to 14-3-3 protein was enhanced by diamide or H2O2 and decreased by dithiothreitol (DTT). Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the Sec of SelW is involved in its interaction with 14-3-3 protein and that this interaction is increased under oxidative stress conditions. Thus, SelW may have a regulatory function in redox cell signaling by interacting with 14-3-3 protein. PMID:26474786

  7. Key Factors for the Development of a Culturally Appropriate Interactive Multimedia Informative Program for Aboriginal Health Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Sayed, Faeka; Soar, Jeffrey; Wang, Zoe

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to create and evaluate a model for a culturally appropriate, interactive, multimedia and informative health program for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers that aims to improve the capacity to independently control their learning within an attractive learning environment. The research also aims to provide…

  8. Enacting Teaching and Learning in the Interaction Process: "Keys" for Developing Skills in Piano Lessons through Four-Hand Improvisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laroche, Julien; Kaddouch, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Embodied mind theories underline the role of the body in the act of knowing. According to the enactive approach, we learn to perceive and to know through our bodily interactions with the world (Varela, Thompson & Rosch, 1991). However, such an approach remains incomplete as long as sociality is not taken into account (Froese & Di Paolo,…

  9. Association between the Interaction of Key Genes Involved in Effector T-Cell Pathways and Susceptibility to Developallergic Rhinitis: A Population-Based Case-Control Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Li, Jingyun; Wang, Chengshuo; Zhang, Luo

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that interaction between key genes mediating signaling and transcriptional networks involving effector T-cell responses may influence an individual’s susceptibility to develop allergic rhinitis(AR). Objective The aim of this study was todetermine whether specific interactions between key genes involved in effector T-cell pathways are associated with an individual’s susceptibility to develop AR in Han Chinese subjects. Method A cohort of 489 patients with AR and 421 healthy controls was enrolled from the Han Chinese population in Beijing, China. AR was established by questionnaire and clinical examination, and peripheral blood was drawn from all subjects for DNA extraction. A total of 96 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 26 reprehensive candidate genes involved in T helper 1 (Th1), Th2, Th17, Th9 and T regulatory cell pathways were selected from the International Haplotype Mappingdatabase for Han Chinese in Beijing (CHB) population, and IlluminaGoldenGate assay was conducted for SNP genotyping. The PLINK software package was used to perform statistical analyses. Results Simple SNP-phenotype association analysis using logistic regression showed SNP rs8193036 in IL17A gene, rs2569254 in IL-12 and rs1898413 in ROR? weresignificantlyassociatedwith AR.Simple SNP-phenotype association analysis with genetic models demonstrated thatrs2569254 in IL-12, rs1031508 in STAT4, and rs3741809 in IL-26 were likely to be recessive, rs8193036 in IL17A allelic, rs897200in STAT4 genotypic, and rs1898413 in ROR? dominant. Epistasis analyses exhibited that 83 SNPs in 23 genes were significantly interactive; of which 59 interactions/SNP pairs demonstrated OR values higher than 2 or lower than 0.5, and 12 interactions/SNP pairs OR values higher than 4 or lower than 0.25. STAT3, ROR? and IL-26, involved in Th17 pathway,were the mostfrequentlyinteractive genes. Conclusion This study suggests that interactions between several SNPs in key genes involved in effector T-cell pathways are likely to influence an individual’s susceptibility to develop AR. PMID:26196693

  10. Identification of a key recombinant narrows the CADASIL gene region to 8 cM and argues against allelism of CADASIL and familial hemiplegic migraine

    SciTech Connect

    Dichgans, M.; Mayer, M.; Straube, A.

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on new information regarding the genetic mapping of the human CADASIL gene region. Previously, the gene had been mapped to human chromosome 19q12. Using the identification of a chromosomal crossover, the region has been refined to an 8-cM interval. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Identification and measurement of intermolecular interaction in polyester/polystyrene blends by FTIR-photoacoustic spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectrometry was used to reveal and identify n-p type intermolecular interaction formed in plastic comprising binary blends of polystyrene and a biodegradable polymer, either polylactic acid, polycaprolactone or poly(tetramethyleneadipate-co-terephthalate)....

  12. Identification of Protein Complexes by Comparative Analysis of Yeast and Bacterial Protein Interaction Data

    E-print Network

    Sharan, Roded

    available for yeast and bacteria and detected 11 significantly conserved complexes. Several- teins. By identifying a conserved complex whose yeast pro- teins function predominantly in the nuclear Algorithms, experimentation. Keywords Protein interaction network, comparative analysis, yeast, bacteria

  13. Identification of HIV-1 Vif Regions Required for CBF-? Interaction and APOBEC3 Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Li, Zhaolong; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Wenyan

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vif requires core binding factor ? (CBF-?) to degrade the host APOBEC3 restriction factors. Although a minimum domain and certain amino acids of HIV-1 Vif, including hydrophobic residues at the N-terminal, have been identified as critical sites for binding with CBF-?, other regions that potentially mediate this interaction need to be further investigated. Here, we mapped two new regions of HIV-1 Vif that are required for interaction with CBF-? by generating a series of single-site or multiple-site Vif mutants and testing their effect on the suppression of APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3F (A3F). A number of the mutants, including G84A/SIEW86-89AAAA (84/86–89), E88A/W89A (88/89), G84A, W89A, L106S and I107S in the 84GxSIEW89 and L102ADQLI107 regions, affected Vif function by disrupting CBF-? binding. These Vif mutants also had altered interactions with CUL5, since CBF-? is known to facilitate the binding of Vif to CUL5. We further showed that this effect was not due to misfolding or conformational changes in Vif, as the mutants still maintained their interactions with other factors such as ElonginB, A3G and A3F. Notably, G84D and D104A had stronger effects on the Vif-CUL5 interaction than on the Vif-CBF-? interaction, indicating that they mainly influenced the CUL5 interaction and implying that the interaction of Vif with CUL5 contributes to the binding of Vif to CBF-?. These new binding interfaces with CBF-? in HIV-1 Vif provide novel targets for the development of HIV-1 inhibitors. PMID:24810617

  14. Target Identification by Chromatographic Co-elution: Monitoring of Drug-Protein Interactions without Immobilization or Chemical Derivatization*

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Janet N. Y.; Vuckovic, Dajana; Sleno, Lekha; Olsen, Jonathan B.; Pogoutse, Oxana; Havugimana, Pierre; Hewel, Johannes A.; Bajaj, Navgeet; Wang, Yale; Musteata, Marcel F.; Nislow, Corey; Emili, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Bioactive molecules typically mediate their biological effects through direct physical association with one or more cellular proteins. The detection of drug-target interactions is therefore essential for the characterization of compound mechanism of action and off-target effects, but generic label-free approaches for detecting binding events in biological mixtures have remained elusive. Here, we report a method termed target identification by chromatographic co-elution (TICC) for routinely monitoring the interaction of drugs with cellular proteins under nearly physiological conditions in vitro based on simple liquid chromatographic separations of cell-free lysates. Correlative proteomic analysis of drug-bound protein fractions by shotgun sequencing is then performed to identify candidate target(s). The method is highly reproducible, does not require immobilization or derivatization of drug or protein, and is applicable to diverse natural products and synthetic compounds. The capability of TICC to detect known drug-protein target physical interactions (Kd range: micromolar to nanomolar) is demonstrated both qualitatively and quantitatively. We subsequently used TICC to uncover the sterol biosynthetic enzyme Erg6p as a novel putative anti-fungal target. Furthermore, TICC identified Asc1 and Dak1, a core 40 S ribosomal protein that represses gene expression, and dihydroxyacetone kinase involved in stress adaptation, respectively, as novel yeast targets of a dopamine receptor agonist. PMID:22357554

  15. Fatty Acid-binding Proteins Interact with Comparative Gene Identification-58 Linking Lipolysis with Lipid Ligand Shuttling*

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Peter; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Jaeger, Doris; Feiler, Ursula; Arthanari, Haribabu; Mayer, Nicole; Zehender, Fabian; Rechberger, Gerald; Oberer, Monika; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim; Haemmerle, Guenter; Breinbauer, Rolf; Zechner, Rudolf; Preiss-Landl, Karina

    2015-01-01

    The coordinated breakdown of intracellular triglyceride (TG) stores requires the exquisitely regulated interaction of lipolytic enzymes with regulatory, accessory, and scaffolding proteins. Together they form a dynamic multiprotein network designated as the “lipolysome.” Adipose triglyceride lipase (Atgl) catalyzes the initiating step of TG hydrolysis and requires comparative gene identification-58 (Cgi-58) as a potent activator of enzyme activity. Here, we identify adipocyte-type fatty acid-binding protein (A-Fabp) and other members of the fatty acid-binding protein (Fabp) family as interaction partners of Cgi-58. Co-immunoprecipitation, microscale thermophoresis, and solid phase assays proved direct protein/protein interaction between A-Fabp and Cgi-58. Using nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments and site-directed mutagenesis, we located a potential contact region on A-Fabp. In functional terms, A-Fabp stimulates Atgl-catalyzed TG hydrolysis in a Cgi-58-dependent manner. Additionally, transcriptional transactivation assays with a luciferase reporter system revealed that Fabps enhance the ability of Atgl/Cgi-58-mediated lipolysis to induce the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. Our studies identify Fabps as crucial structural and functional components of the lipolysome. PMID:25953897

  16. Fatty Acid-binding Proteins Interact with Comparative Gene Identification-58 Linking Lipolysis with Lipid Ligand Shuttling.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Peter; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Jaeger, Doris; Feiler, Ursula; Arthanari, Haribabu; Mayer, Nicole; Zehender, Fabian; Rechberger, Gerald; Oberer, Monika; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim; Haemmerle, Guenter; Breinbauer, Rolf; Zechner, Rudolf; Preiss-Landl, Karina

    2015-07-24

    The coordinated breakdown of intracellular triglyceride (TG) stores requires the exquisitely regulated interaction of lipolytic enzymes with regulatory, accessory, and scaffolding proteins. Together they form a dynamic multiprotein network designated as the "lipolysome." Adipose triglyceride lipase (Atgl) catalyzes the initiating step of TG hydrolysis and requires comparative gene identification-58 (Cgi-58) as a potent activator of enzyme activity. Here, we identify adipocyte-type fatty acid-binding protein (A-Fabp) and other members of the fatty acid-binding protein (Fabp) family as interaction partners of Cgi-58. Co-immunoprecipitation, microscale thermophoresis, and solid phase assays proved direct protein/protein interaction between A-Fabp and Cgi-58. Using nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments and site-directed mutagenesis, we located a potential contact region on A-Fabp. In functional terms, A-Fabp stimulates Atgl-catalyzed TG hydrolysis in a Cgi-58-dependent manner. Additionally, transcriptional transactivation assays with a luciferase reporter system revealed that Fabps enhance the ability of Atgl/Cgi-58-mediated lipolysis to induce the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. Our studies identify Fabps as crucial structural and functional components of the lipolysome. PMID:25953897

  17. Identification and characterization of cellular proteins interacting with Hepatitis E virus untranslated regions.

    PubMed

    Paingankar, Mandar S; Arankalle, Vidya A

    2015-10-01

    Lack of robust cell culture systems for Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has hampered understanding of HEV biology. We attempted to identify the host cellular factors that interact with HEV 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) by RNA affinity chromatography followed by mass spectrometry analysis. Hepatitis E virus genotype-1 (HEV-1) and Hepatitis E virus genotype-4 (HEV-4) and three cell lines (HepG2/C3A, A549 and Caco2) were employed to understand the UTR-host protein interaction. RNA pull-down and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight (MALDI TOF/TOF) analysis revealed that DHX9, PTK-7, DIS3 and TCR E chain (CD3?) of all the three cell lines interacted with HEV 3'UTR while RAD50 and TLE-4 interacted with HEV 5'UTR. RNA immuno-precipitation studies further confirmed the interaction of DHX9, DIS3 and TCR E chain. The expression changes in genes associated with the identified proteins were quantitated in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of Hepatitis E patients during acute and recovery phases. The data revealed that HEV infection influences the exosomes, T cell receptor signalling and Wnt signalling pathways. Interactions of DIS3 with HEV UTRs suggest that exosomes might have important implication in HEV life cycle. PMID:26087402

  18. Reliable Identification of Cross-Linked Products in Protein Interaction Studies by 13C-Labeled p-Benzoylphenylalanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettelkau, Jens; Ihling, Christian H.; Frohberg, Petra; van Werven, Lars; Jahn, Olaf; Sinz, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    We describe the use of the 13C-labeled artificial amino acid p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine (Bpa) to improve the reliability of cross-linked product identification. Our strategy is exemplified for two protein-peptide complexes. These studies indicate that in many cases the identification of a cross-link without additional stable isotope labeling would result in an ambiguous assignment of cross-linked products. The use of a 13C-labeled photoreactive amino acid is considered to be preferred over the use of deuterated cross-linkers as retention time shifts in reversed phase chromatography can be ruled out. The observation of characteristic fragment ions additionally increases the reliability of cross-linked product assignment. Bpa possesses a broad reactivity towards different amino acids and the derived distance information allows mapping of spatially close amino acids and thus provides more solid structural information of proteins and protein complexes compared to the longer deuterated amine-reactive cross-linkers, which are commonly used for protein 3D-structure analysis and protein-protein interaction studies.

  19. Inverse Material Identification in Coupled Acoustic-Structure Interaction using a Modified Error in Constitutive Equation Functional

    PubMed Central

    Warner, James E.; Diaz, Manuel I.; Aquino, Wilkins; Bonnet, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This work focuses on the identification of heterogeneous linear elastic moduli in the context of frequency-domain, coupled acoustic-structure interaction (ASI), using either solid displacement or fluid pressure measurement data. The approach postulates the inverse problem as an optimization problem where the solution is obtained by minimizing a modified error in constitutive equation (MECE) functional. The latter measures the discrepancy in the constitutive equations that connect kinematically admissible strains and dynamically admissible stresses, while incorporating the measurement data as additional quadratic error terms. We demonstrate two strategies for selecting the MECE weighting coefficient to produce regularized solutions to the ill-posed identification problem: 1) the discrepancy principle of Morozov, and 2) an error-balance approach that selects the weight parameter as the minimizer of another functional involving the ECE and the data misfit. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed methodology can successfully recover elastic parameters in 2D and 3D ASI systems from response measurements taken in either the solid or fluid subdomains. Furthermore, both regularization strategies are shown to produce accurate reconstructions when the measurement data is polluted with noise. The discrepancy principle is shown to produce nearly optimal solutions, while the error-balance approach, although not optimal, remains effective and does not need a priori information on the noise level. PMID:25339790

  20. Inverse material identification in coupled acoustic-structure interaction using a modified error in constitutive equation functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, James E.; Diaz, Manuel I.; Aquino, Wilkins; Bonnet, Marc

    2014-09-01

    This work focuses on the identification of heterogeneous linear elastic moduli in the context of frequency-domain, coupled acoustic-structure interaction (ASI), using either solid displacement or fluid pressure measurement data. The approach postulates the inverse problem as an optimization problem where the solution is obtained by minimizing a modified error in constitutive equation (MECE) functional. The latter measures the discrepancy in the constitutive equations that connect kinematically admissible strains and dynamically admissible stresses, while incorporating the measurement data as additional quadratic error terms. We demonstrate two strategies for selecting the MECE weighting coefficient to produce regularized solutions to the ill-posed identification problem: 1) the discrepancy principle of Morozov, and 2) an error-balance approach that selects the weight parameter as the minimizer of another functional involving the ECE and the data misfit. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed methodology can successfully recover elastic parameters in 2D and 3D ASI systems from response measurements taken in either the solid or fluid subdomains. Furthermore, both regularization strategies are shown to produce accurate reconstructions when the measurement data is polluted with noise. The discrepancy principle is shown to produce nearly optimal solutions, while the error-balance approach, although not optimal, remains effective and does not need a priori information on the noise level.

  1. Examination of the folding pathway of the antigenomic hepatitis delta virus ribozyme reveals key interactions of the L3 loop

    PubMed Central

    Reymond, Cédric; Ouellet, Jonathan; Bisaillon, Martin; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    With the goal of gaining insight into the tertiary structure of the hepatitis delta virus ribozyme, cross-linking experiments using 4-thiouridine residues introduced in either the 5?-end portion of the substrate, or at seven strategic positions within the ribozyme, were performed. Mapping of the newly formed covalent bonds in cross-linked species obtained under various conditions, as well as using several mutated ribozymes, permitted monitoring of the formation of the ribozyme–substrate complex as the ribozyme proceeded along the folding pathway. In order to aid visualization of the tertiary structure transformation, an in silico animation of the “on” folding pathway was developed. In combination with those of the cleavage assays of structured substrates, these data shed light on the key contribution of the L3 loop in the formation of an active tertiary complex. PMID:17105991

  2. Identification of New Genetic Susceptibility Loci for Breast Cancer Through Consideration of Gene-Environment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schoeps, Anja; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Dunning, Alison M.; Milne, Roger L.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Andrulis, Irene; Brenner, Hermann; Behrens, Sabine; Orr, Nicholas; Jones, Michael; Ashworth, Alan; Li, Jingmei; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Knight, Julia; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna M.; Dumont, Martine; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Moisse, Matthieu; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Spurdle, Amanda; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Malats, Núria; Arias Perez, JoséI.; Benítez, Javier; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Truong, Théresè; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Häberle, Lothar; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Braaf, Linde; Atsma, Femke; van den Broek, Alexandra J.; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Southey, Melissa C.; Cox, Angela; Simard, Jacques; Giles, Graham G.; Lambrechts, Diether; Mannermaa, Arto; Brauch, Hiltrud; Guénel, Pascal; Peto, Julian; Fasching, Peter A.; Hopper, John; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Couch, Fergus; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Genes that alter disease risk only in combination with certain environmental exposures may not be detected in genetic association analysis. By using methods accounting for gene-environment (G × E) interaction, we aimed to identify novel genetic loci associated with breast cancer risk. Up to 34,475 cases and 34,786 controls of European ancestry from up to 23 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were included. Overall, 71,527 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), enriched for association with breast cancer, were tested for interaction with 10 environmental risk factors using three recently proposed hybrid methods and a joint test of association and interaction. Analyses were adjusted for age, study, population stratification, and confounding factors as applicable. Three SNPs in two independent loci showed statistically significant association: SNPs rs10483028 and rs2242714 in perfect linkage disequilibrium on chromosome 21 and rs12197388 in ARID1B on chromosome 6. While rs12197388 was identified using the joint test with parity and with age at menarche (P-values = 3 × 10?07), the variants on chromosome 21 q22.12, which showed interaction with adult body mass index (BMI) in 8,891 postmenopausal women, were identified by all methods applied. SNP rs10483028 was associated with breast cancer in women with a BMI below 25 kg/m2 (OR = 1.26, 95% CI 1.15–1.38) but not in women with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or higher (OR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.72–1.11, P for interaction = 3.2 × 10?05). Our findings confirm comparable power of the recent methods for detecting G × E interaction and the utility of using G × E interaction analyses to identify new susceptibility loci. PMID:24248812

  3. Identification and Mechanistic Investigation of Drug-Drug Interactions Associated with Myopathy – A Translational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xu; Quinney, Sara K.; Wang, Zhiping; Zhang, Pengyue; Duke, Jon; Desta, Zeruesenay; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S.; Flockhart, David A.; Li, L

    2015-01-01

    Myopathy is a group of muscle diseases that can be induced or exacerbated by drug-drug interactions (DDIs). We sought to identify clinically important myopathic DDIs and elucidate their underlying mechanisms. Five DDIs were found to increase the risk of myopathy based on analysis of observational data from the Indiana Network of Patient Care. Loratadine interacted with simvastatin (relative risk 95% CI = [1.39, 2.06]), alprazolam (1.50, 2.31), ropinirole (2.06, 5.00) and omeprazole (1.15, 1.38). Promethazine interacted with tegaserod (1.94, 4.64). In vitro investigation showed that these DDIs were unlikely to result from inhibition of drug metabolism by CYP450 enzymes or from inhibition of hepatic uptake via the membrane transporter OATP1B1/1B3. However, we did observe in vitro synergistic myotoxicity of simvastatin and desloratadine, suggesting a role in loratadine-simvastatin interaction. This interaction was epidemiologically confirmed (odds ratio 95% CI = [2.02, 3.65]) using the data from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System. PMID:25975815

  4. Identification and Characterization of the Interaction Site between cFLIPL and Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Bingqian; Pellegrini, Maria; Mierke, Dale F.

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of the cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein (cFLIP) has been reported in a number of tumor types. As an inactive procaspase-8 homologue, cFLIP is recruited to the intracellular assembly known as the Death Inducing Signaling Complex (DISC) where it inhibits apoptosis, leading to cancer cell proliferation. Here we characterize the molecular details of the interaction between cFLIPL and calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium sensing protein. By expressing the individual domains of cFLIPL, we demonstrate that the interaction with calmodulin is mediated by the N-terminal death effector domain (DED1) of cFLIPL. Additionally, we mapped the interaction to a specific region of the C-terminus of DED1, referred to as DED1 R4. By designing DED1/DED2 chimeric constructs in which the homologous R4 regions of the two domains were swapped, calmodulin binding properties were transferred to DED2 and removed from DED1. Furthermore, we show that the isolated DED1 R4 peptide binds to calmodulin and solve the structure of the peptide-protein complex using NMR and computational refinement. Finally, we demonstrate an interaction between cFLIPL and calmodulin in cancer cell lysates. In summary, our data implicate calmodulin as a potential player in DISC-mediated apoptosis and provide evidence for a specific interaction with the DED1 of cFLIPL. PMID:26529318

  5. Identification and Mechanistic Investigation of Drug-Drug Interactions Associated With Myopathy: A Translational Approach.

    PubMed

    Han, X; Quinney, S K; Wang, Z; Zhang, P; Duke, J; Desta, Z; Elmendorf, J S; Flockhart, D A; Li, L

    2015-09-01

    Myopathy is a group of muscle diseases that can be induced or exacerbated by drug-drug interactions (DDIs). We sought to identify clinically important myopathic DDIs and elucidate their underlying mechanisms. Five DDIs were found to increase the risk of myopathy based on analysis of observational data from the Indiana Network of Patient Care. Loratadine interacted with simvastatin (relative risk 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?[1.39, 2.06]), alprazolam (1.50, 2.31), ropinirole (2.06, 5.00), and omeprazole (1.15, 1.38). Promethazine interacted with tegaserod (1.94, 4.64). In vitro investigation showed that these DDIs were unlikely to result from inhibition of drug metabolism by CYP450 enzymes or from inhibition of hepatic uptake via the membrane transporter OATP1B1/1B3. However, we did observe in vitro synergistic myotoxicity of simvastatin and desloratadine, suggesting a role in loratadine-simvastatin interaction. This interaction was epidemiologically confirmed (odds ratio 95% CI =?[2.02, 3.65]) using the data from the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System. PMID:25975815

  6. The Dictyostelium discoideum cellulose synthase: Structure/function analysis and identification of interacting proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Richard L. Blanton

    2004-02-19

    OAK-B135 The major accomplishments of this project were: (1) the initial characterization of dcsA, the gene for the putative catalytic subunit of cellulose synthase in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum; (2) the detection of a developmentally regulated event (unidentified, but perhaps a protein modification or association with a protein partner) that is required for cellulose synthase activity (i.e., the dcsA product is necessary, but not sufficient for cellulose synthesis); (3) the continued exploration of the developmental context of cellulose synthesis and DcsA; (4) the isolation of a GFP-DcsA-expressing strain (work in progress); and (5) the identification of Dictyostelium homologues for plant genes whose products play roles in cellulose biosynthesis. Although our progress was slow and many of our results negative, we did develop a number of promising avenues of investigation that can serve as the foundation for future projects.

  7. Identification of new interacting partners of the shuttling protein ubinuclein (Ubn-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Lupo, Julien; CHU de Grenoble, BP217, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 ; Conti, Audrey; Sueur, Charlotte; CHU de Grenoble, BP217, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 ; Coly, Pierre-Alain; Coute, Yohann; INSERM, U1038, F-38054 Grenoble; Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble 1, F-38000 Grenoble Cedex 09 ; Hunziker, Walter; Burmeister, Wim P.; Germi, Raphaelle; CHU de Grenoble, BP217, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 ; Manet, Evelyne; Gruffat, Henri; Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 France; Universite Lyon1, F-69007, Lyon ; and others

    2012-03-10

    We have previously characterized ubinuclein (Ubn-1) as a NACos (Nuclear and Adherent junction Complex components) protein which interacts with viral or cellular transcription factors and the tight junction (TJ) protein ZO-1. The purpose of the present study was to get more insights on the binding partners of Ubn-1, notably those present in the epithelial junctions. Using an in vivo assay of fluorescent protein-complementation assay (PCA), we demonstrated that the N-terminal domains of the Ubn-1 and ZO-1 proteins triggered a functional interaction inside the cell. Indeed, expression of both complementary fragments of venus fused to the N-terminal parts of Ubn-1 and ZO-1 was able to reconstitute a fluorescent venus protein. Furthermore, nuclear expression of the chimeric Ubn-1 triggered nuclear localization of the chimeric ZO-1. We could localize this interaction to the PDZ2 domain of ZO-1 using an in vitro pull-down assay. More precisely, a 184-amino acid region (from amino acids 39 to 223) at the N-terminal region of Ubn-1 was responsible for the interaction with the PDZ2 domain of ZO-1. Co-imunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy experiments also revealed the tight junction protein cingulin as a new interacting partner of Ubn-1. A proteomic approach based on mass spectrometry analysis (MS) was then undertaken to identify further binding partners of GST-Ubn-1 fusion protein in different subcellular fractions of human epithelial HT29 cells. LYRIC (Lysine-rich CEACAM1-associated protein) and RACK-1 (receptor for activated C-kinase) proteins were validated as bona fide interacting partners of Ubn-1. Altogether, these results suggest that Ubn-1 is a scaffold protein influencing protein subcellular localization and is involved in several processes such as cell-cell contact signalling or modulation of gene activity.

  8. Site-directed mutagenesis of the ? subunit of DNA polymerase III and single-stranded DNA-binding protein of E. coli reveals key residues for their interaction.

    PubMed

    Naue, Natalie; Fedorov, Roman; Pich, Andreas; Manstein, Dietmar J; Curth, Ute

    2011-03-01

    During DNA replication in Escherichia coli, single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) protects single-stranded DNA from nuclease action and hairpin formation. It is known that the highly conserved C-terminus of SSB contacts the ? subunit of DNA polymerase III. However, there only exists a theoretical model in which the 11 C-terminal amino acids of SSB have been docked onto the surface of ?. In order to refine this model of SSB/? interaction, we exchanged amino acids in ? and SSB by site-directed mutagenesis that are predicted to be of key importance. Detailed characterization of the interaction of these mutants by analytical ultracentrifugation shows that the interaction area is correctly predicted by the model; however, the SSB C-terminus binds in a different orientation to the ? surface. We show that evolutionary conserved residues of ? form a hydrophobic pocket to accommodate the ultimate two amino acids of SSB, P176 and F177. This pocket is surrounded by conserved basic residues, important for the SSB/? interaction. Mass spectrometric analysis of ? protein cross-linked to a C-terminal peptide of SSB reveals that K132 of ? and D172 of SSB are in close contact. The proposed SSB-binding site resembles those described for RecQ and exonuclease?I. PMID:20972214

  9. Mechanism of conformational coupling in SecA: Key role of hydrogen-bonding networks and water interactions.

    PubMed

    Milenkovic, Stefan; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta

    2016-02-01

    SecA uses the energy yielded by the binding and hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to push secretory pre-proteins across the plasma membrane in bacteria. Hydrolysis of ATP occurs at the nucleotide-binding site, which contains the conserved carboxylate groups of the DEAD-box helicases. Although crystal structures provide valuable snapshots of SecA along its reaction cycle, the mechanism that ensures conformational coupling between the nucleotide-binding site and the other domains of SecA remains unclear. The observation that SecA contains numerous hydrogen-bonding groups raises important questions about the role of hydrogen-bonding networks and hydrogen-bond dynamics in long-distance conformational couplings. To address these questions, we explored the molecular dynamics of SecA from three different organisms, with and without bound nucleotide, in water. By computing two-dimensional hydrogen-bonding maps we identify networks of hydrogen bonds that connect the nucleotide-binding site to remote regions of the protein, and sites in the protein that respond to specific perturbations. We find that the nucleotide-binding site of ADP-bound SecA has a preferred geometry whereby the first two carboxylates of the DEAD motif bridge via hydrogen-bonding water. Simulations of a mutant with perturbed ATP hydrolysis highlight the water-bridged geometry as a key structural element of the reaction path. PMID:26607006

  10. The Impact of Nonlinear Smoking Effects on the Identification of Gene-by-Smoking Interactions in COPD Genetics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Castaldi, P.J.; Demeo, D.L; Hersh, C.P.; Lomas, D.A.; Soerheim, I.C.; Gulsvik, A.; Bakke, P.; Rennard, Stephen; Pare, Peter; Vestbo, Jørgen; Silverman, E.K.

    2012-01-01

    Background The identification of gene-by-environment interactions is important to understand the genetic basis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Many COPD genetic association analyses assume a linear relationship between pack-years of smoking exposure and FEV1; however, this assumption has not been evaluated empirically in cohorts with a wide spectrum of COPD severity. Methods We examined the relationship between FEV1 and pack-years of smoking exposure in 4 large cohorts assembled for the purpose of identifying genetic associations with COPD. Using data from the Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Genetic Modifiers Study, we compared the accuracy and power of two different approaches to model smoking by performing a simulation study of a genetic variant with a range of gene-by-smoking interaction effects. Results We identified nonlinear relationships between smoking and FEV1 in 4 large cohorts. We demonstrated that in most situations where the relationship between pack-years and FEV1 is nonlinear, a piecewise-linear approach to model smoking and gene-by-smoking interactions is preferable to the commonly used total pack-years approach. We applied the piecewise linear approach to a genetic association analysis of the PI*Z allele in the Norway case-control cohort and identified a potential PI*Z-by-smoking interaction (p=0.03 for FEV1 analysis, p= 0.01 for COPD susceptibility analysis). Conclusion In study samples with subjects having a wide range of COPD severity, a nonlinear relationship between pack-years of smoking and FEV1 is likely. In this setting, approaches that account for this nonlinearity can be more powerful and less-biased than the commonly-used approach of using total pack-years to model the smoking effect. PMID:21163806

  11. Identification of karyopherin ?1 and ?7 interacting proteins in porcine tissue.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Eun; Inerowicz, H Dorota; Wang, Xin; Li, Yanfang; Koser, Stephanie; Cabot, Ryan A

    2012-01-01

    Specialized trafficking systems in eukaryotic cells serve a critical role in partitioning intracellular proteins between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic proteins (including chromatin remodeling enzymes and transcription factors) must gain access to the nucleus to exert their functions to properly program fundamental cellular events ranging from cell cycle progression to gene transcription. Knowing that nuclear import mediated by members of the karyopherin ? family of transport receptors plays a critical role in regulating development and differentiation, we wanted to determine the identity of proteins that are trafficked by this karyopherin ? pathway. To this end, we performed a GST pull-down assay using porcine orthologs of karyopherin ?1 (KPNA1) and karyopherin ?7 (KPNA7) and prey protein derived from porcine fibroblast cells and used a liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) approach to determine the identity of KPNA1 and KPNA7 interacting proteins. Our screen revealed that the proteins that interact with KPNA1 and KPNA7 are generally nuclear proteins that possess nuclear localization signals. We further validated two candidate proteins from this screen and showed that they are able to be imported into the nucleus in vivo and also interact with members of the karyopherin ? family of proteins in vitro. Our results also reveal the utility of using a GST pull-down approach coupled with LC-MS/MS to screen for protein interaction partners in a non-traditional model system. PMID:22720010

  12. Computational identification of gene–social environment interaction at the human IL6 locus

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Takahashi, Rie; Sloan, Erica K.; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Sood, Anil K.; Sheridan, John F.; Seeman, Teresa E.

    2010-01-01

    To identify genetic factors that interact with social environments to impact human health, we used a bioinformatic strategy that couples expression array–based detection of environmentally responsive transcription factors with in silico discovery of regulatory polymorphisms to predict genetic loci that modulate transcriptional responses to stressful environments. Tests of one predicted interaction locus in the human IL6 promoter (SNP rs1800795) verified that it modulates transcriptional response to ?-adrenergic activation of the GATA1 transcription factor in vitro. In vivo validation studies confirmed links between adverse social conditions and increased transcription of GATA1 target genes in primary neural, immune, and cancer cells. Epidemiologic analyses verified the health significance of those molecular interactions by documenting increased 10-year mortality risk associated with late-life depressive symptoms that occurred solely for homozygous carriers of the GATA1-sensitive G allele of rs1800795. Gating of depression-related mortality risk by IL6 genotype pertained only to inflammation-related causes of death and was associated with increased chronic inflammation as indexed by plasma C-reactive protein. Computational modeling of molecular interactions, in vitro biochemical analyses, in vivo animal modeling, and human molecular epidemiologic analyses thus converge in identifying ?-adrenergic activation of GATA1 as a molecular pathway by which social adversity can alter human health risk selectively depending on individual genetic status at the IL6 locus. PMID:20176930

  13. Identification of a Small Molecule That Modulates Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-von Willebrand Factor Interaction*

    PubMed Central

    Broos, Katleen; Trekels, Mieke; Jose, Rani Alphonsa; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Vandenbulcke, Aline; Vandeputte, Nele; Venken, Tom; Egle, Brecht; De Borggraeve, Wim M.; Deckmyn, Hans; De Maeyer, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The von Willebrand factor (VWF) A1-glycoprotein (GP) Ib? interaction is of major importance during thrombosis mainly at sites of high shear stress. Inhibitors of this interaction prevent platelet-dependent thrombus formation in vivo, without major bleeding complications. However, the size and/or protein nature of the inhibitors currently in development limit oral bioavailability and clinical development. We therefore aimed to search for a small molecule protein-protein interaction inhibitor interfering with the VWF-GPIb? binding. After determination of putative small molecule binding pockets on the surface of VWF-A1 and GPIb? using site-finding algorithms and molecular dynamics, high throughput molecular docking was performed on both binding partners. A selection of compounds showing good in silico docking scores into the predicted pockets was retained for testing their in vitro effect on VWF-GPIb? complex formation, by which we identified a compound that surprisingly stimulated the VWF-GPIb? binding in a ristocetin cofactor ELISA and increased platelet adhesion in whole blood to collagen under arterial shear rate but in contrast inhibited ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation. The selected compound adhering to the predicted binding partner GPIb? could be confirmed by saturation transfer difference NMR spectroscopy. We thus clearly identified a small molecule that modulates VWF-GPIb? binding and that will now serve as a starting point for further studies and chemical modifications to fully characterize the interaction and to manipulate specific activity of the compound. PMID:22232560

  14. Identification of Cellular Proteins That Interact with the Adeno-Associated Virus Rep Protein?

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Kevin; Chen, Weijun; Salganik, Max; Muzyczka, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) codes for four related nonstructural Rep proteins. AAV both replicates and assembles in the nucleus and requires coinfection with a helper virus, either adenovirus (Ad) or herpesvirus, for a productive infection. Like other more complex DNA viruses, it is believed that AAV interacts or modifies host cell proteins to carry out its infection cycle. To date, relatively little is known about the host proteins that interact with the viral Rep proteins, which are known to be directly involved in DNA replication, control of viral and cellular transcription, splicing, and protein translation. In this study, we used affinity-tagged Rep protein to purify cellular protein complexes that were associated with Rep in cells that had been infected with Ad and AAV. In all, we identified 188 cellular proteins from 16 functional categories, including 14 transcription factors, 6 translation factors, 15 potential splicing proteins, 5 proteins involved in protein degradation, and 13 proteins involved in DNA replication or repair. This dramatically increases the number of potential interactions over the current number of approximately 26. Twelve of the novel proteins found were further tested by coimmunoprecipitation or colocalization using confocal immunomicroscopy. Of these, 10 were confirmed as proteins that formed complexes with Rep, including proteins of the MCM complex (DNA replication), RCN1 (membrane transport), SMC2 (chromatin dynamics), EDD1 (ubiquitin ligase), IRS4 (signal transduction), and FUS (splicing). Computer analysis suggested that 45 and 28 of the 188 proteins could be placed in a pathway of interacting proteins involved in DNA replication and protein synthesis, respectively. Of the proteins involved in DNA replication, all of the previously identified proteins involved in AAV DNA replication were found, except Ad DBP. The only Ad protein found to interact with Rep was the E1b55K protein. In addition, we confirmed that Rep interacts with Ku70/80 helicase. In vitro DNA synthesis assays demonstrated that although Ku helicase activity could substitute for MCM to promote strand displacement synthesis, its presence was not essential. Our study suggests that the interaction of AAV with cellular proteins is much more complex than previously suspected and provides a resource for further studies of the AAV life cycle. PMID:18971280

  15. Palmitoylation as a key factor to modulate SP-C-lipid interactions in lung surfactant membrane multilayers.

    PubMed

    Roldan, Nuria; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; Garcia-Alvarez, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) has been regarded as the most specific protein linked to development of mammalian lungs, and great efforts have been done to understand its structure-function relationships. Previous evidence has outlined the importance of SP-C palmitoylation to sustain the proper dynamics of lung surfactant, but the mechanism by which this posttranslational modification aids SP-C to stabilize the interfacial surfactant film along the compression-expansion breathing cycles, is still unrevealed. In this work we have compared the structure, orientation and lipid-protein interactions of a native palmitoylated SP-C with those of a non-palmitoylated recombinant SP-C (rSP-C) form in air-exposed multilayer membrane environments, by means of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Palmitoylation does not affect the secondary structure of the protein, which exhibits a full ?-helical conformation in partly dehydrated phospholipid multilayer films. However, differences between the Amide I band of the IR spectrum of palmitoylated and non-palmitoylated proteins suggest subtle differences affecting the environment of their helical component. These differences are accompanied by differential effects on the IR bands from phospholipid phosphates, indicating that palmitoylation modulates lipid-protein interactions at the headgroup region of phospholipid layers. On the other hand, the relative dichroic absorption of polarized IR has allowed calculating that the palmitoylated protein adopts a more tilted transmembrane orientation than the non-palmitoylated SP-C, likely contributing to more compact, dehydrated and possibly stable multilayer lipid-protein films. As a whole, the behavior of multilayer films containing palmitoylated SP-C may reflect favorable structural properties for surfactant reservoirs at the air-liquid respiratory interface. PMID:25306965

  16. Proteomic-Based Identification of CD4-Interacting Proteins in Human Primary Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Raposo, Rui André Saraiva; Thomas, Benjamin; Ridlova, Gabriela; James, William

    2011-01-01

    Background Human macrophages (M?) express low levels of CD4 glycoprotein, which is constitutively recycled, and 40–50% of its localization is intracellular at steady-state. Although CD4-interacting proteins in lymphoid cells are well characterised, little is known about the CD4 protein interaction-network in human M?, which notably lack LCK, a Src family protein tyrosine kinase believed to stabilise CD4 at the surface of T cells. As CD4 is the main cellular receptor used by HIV-1, knowledge of its molecular interactions is important for the understanding of viral infection strategies. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed large-scale anti-CD4 immunoprecipitations in human primary M? followed by high-resolution mass spectrometry analysis to elucidate the protein interaction-network involved in induced CD4 internalization and degradation. Proteomic analysis of CD4 co-immunoisolates in resting M? showed CD4 association with a range of proteins found in the cellular cortex, membrane rafts and components of clathrin-adaptor proteins, whereas in induced internalization and degradation CD4 is associated with components of specific signal transduction, transport and the proteasome. Conclusions/Significance This is the first time that the anti-CD4 co-immunoprecipitation sub-proteome has been analysed in human primary M?. Our data have identified important M? cell surface CD4-interacting proteins, as well as regulatory proteins involved in internalization and degradation. The data give valuable insights into the molecular pathways involved in the regulation of CD4 expression in M? and provide candidates/targets for further biochemical studies. PMID:21533244

  17. Identification of Biomarker and Co-Regulatory Motifs in Lung Adenocarcinoma Based on Differential Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Zhiqiang; Li, Kening; Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Yuanshuai; Qiu, Fujun; Han, Xiaole; Xu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Changes in intermolecular interactions (differential interactions) may influence the progression of cancer. Specific genes and their regulatory networks may be more closely associated with cancer when taking their transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels and dynamic and static interactions into account simultaneously. In this paper, a differential interaction analysis was performed to detect lung adenocarcinoma-related genes. Furthermore, a miRNA-TF (transcription factor) synergistic regulation network was constructed to identify three kinds of co-regulated motifs, namely, triplet, crosstalk and joint. Not only were the known cancer-related miRNAs and TFs (let-7, miR-15a, miR-17, TP53, ETS1, and so on) were detected in the motifs, but also the miR-15, let-7 and miR-17 families showed a tendency to regulate the triplet, crosstalk and joint motifs, respectively. Moreover, several biological functions (i.e., cell cycle, signaling pathways and hemopoiesis) associated with the three motifs were found to be frequently targeted by the drugs for lung adenocarcinoma. Specifically, the two 4-node motifs (crosstalk and joint) based on co-expression and interaction had a closer relationship to lung adenocarcinoma, and so further research was performed on them. A 10-gene biomarker (UBC, SRC, SP1, MYC, STAT3, JUN, NR3C1, RB1, GRB2 and MAPK1) was selected from the joint motif, and a survival analysis indicated its significant association with survival. Among the ten genes, JUN, NR3C1 and GRB2 are our newly detected candidate lung adenocarcinoma-related genes. The genes, regulators and regulatory motifs detected in this work will provide potential drug targets and new strategies for individual therapy. PMID:26402252

  18. Identification of TgAtg8-TgAtg3 interaction in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Lin, Jiaxin; Liu, Yangyang; Li, Xiangzhi; Chen, Gaozhi; Hua, Qianqian; Nie, Qinqin; Hu, Xin; Tan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process in eukaryotic cells involved in the targeted degradation of cellular organelles and the cytoplasm. Recent works in Toxoplasma gondii suggest that the autophagy processes may serve as an important pathway in modulating parasite survival or death. As an important modulator of Atg8 lipidation and autophagy, Atg8-Atg3 interaction has been attracting increasing attention. However, there is no direct evidence that TgAtg8-TgAtg3 interaction occurs in the parasite. In this study, we firstly found TgAtg8 partially colocalized with TgAtg3 in GFP-TgAtg8 transgenic strains using IFA. Then, lysates from GFP-TgAtg8 tachyzoites were directly subject to large-scale tandem affinity purification with anti-GFP antibody. Western blot and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis determined the interaction between TgAtg8 and TgAtg3. Additionally, we performed real-time interaction analysis with a surface plasmon resonance biosensor using BIAcore system. As expected, the result demonstrated a concentration-dependent increases in resonance signals and indicated the TgAtg8 could bind directly TgAtg3 in vitro. Noteworthily, A KD of 34.9nM obtained from TgAtg8-TgAtg3 interaction indicate a high-affinity between Atg8-Atg3 in Toxoplasma. Furthermore, homology modeling and sequence alignment showed that TgAtg8 has greatest sequence and structural conservation. Within TgAtg3, this protein possesses the core E2 enzymatic activity structure and a truncated handle region which may contain AIM sequence. Taken together, our findings would help elucidate the formation mechanism of autophagosome in Toxoplasma and provide a possibility for looking into parasitic drug targets. PMID:26407821

  19. In Vivo Identification of the Outer Membrane Protein OmcA-MtrC Interaction Network in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Cells Using Novel Hydrophobic Chemical Cross-Linkers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske, Gerhard R.; Zakharova, Natalia L.; Yang, Li; Zheng, Chunxiang; Wolff, Meagan A.; Tolic, Nikola; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bruce, James E.

    2008-04-01

    Outer membrane (OM) cytochromes OmcA (SO1779) and MtrC (SO1778) are the integral components of electron transfer used by Shewanella oneidensis for anaerobic respiration of metal (hydr)oxides. Here the OmcA-MtrC interaction was identified in vivo using a novel hydrophobic chemical cross-linker (MRN) combined with immunoprecipitation techniques. In addition, identification of other OM proteins from the cross-linked complexes allows first visualization of the OmcA-MtrC interaction network. Further experiments on omcA and mtrC mutant cells showed OmcA plays a central role in the network interaction. For comparison, two commercial cross-linkers were also used in parallel and both resulted in fewer OM protein identifications, indicating the superior properties of MRN for identification of membrane protein interactions. Finally, comparison experiments of in vivo cross-linking and cell lysate cross-linking resulted in significantly different protein interaction data, demonstrating the importance of in vivo cross-linking for study of protein-protein interactions in cells.

  20. Identification of C(2)M interacting proteins by yeast two-hybrid screening.

    PubMed

    Shanshan, Yue; Laixin, Xia

    2015-11-20

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a huge structure which assembles between the homologous chromosomes during meiotic prophase I. Drosophila germ cell-specific nucleoprotein C(2)M clustering at chromosomes can induce SC formation. To further study the molecular function and mechanism of C(2)M in meiosis, we constructed a bait vector for C(2)M and used the yeast two-hybrid system to identify C(2)M interacting proteins. Forty interacting proteins were obtained, including many DNA and histone binding proteins, ATP synthases and transcription factors. Gene silencing assays in Drosophila showed that two genes, wech and Psf1, may delay the disappearance of SC. These results indicate that Wech and Psf1 may form a complex with C(2)M to participate in the formation or stabilization of the SC complex. PMID:26582530

  1. Data integration and exploration for the identification of molecular mechanisms in tumor-immune cells interaction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Cancer progression is a complex process involving host-tumor interactions by multiple molecular and cellular factors of the tumor microenvironment. Tumor cells that challenge immune activity may be vulnerable to immune destruction. To address this question we have directed major efforts towards data integration and developed and installed a database for cancer immunology with more than 1700 patients and associated clinical data and biomolecular data. Mining of the database revealed novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of tumor-immune cell interaction. In this paper we present the computational tools used to analyze integrated clinical and biomolecular data. Specifically, we describe a database for heterogenous data types, the interfacing bioinformatics and statistical tools including clustering methods, survival analysis, as well as visualization methods. Additionally, we discuss generic issues relevant to the integration of clinical and biomolecular data, as well as recent developments in integrative data analyses including biomolecular network reconstruction and mathematical modeling. PMID:20158878

  2. Identification and Plant Interaction of a Phyllobacterium sp., a Predominant Rhizobacterium of Young Sugar Beet Plants

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Bart; Joos, Henk; Dierickx, Sabine; Vantomme, Robert; Swings, Jean; Kersters, Karel; Van Montagu, Marc

    1990-01-01

    The second most abundant bacterium on the root surface of young sugar beet plants was identified as a Phyllobacterium sp. (Rhizobiaceae) based on a comparison of the results of 39 conventional identification tests, 167 API tests, 30 antibiotic susceptibility tests, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic fingerprints of total cellular proteins with type strains of Phyllobacterium myrsinacearum and Phyllobacterium rubiacearum. It was found on 198 of 1,100 investigated plants between the 2nd and 10th leaf stage on three different fields in Belgium and one field in Spain. Densities ranged from 2 × 104 to 2 × 108 CFU/g of root. Five isolates exerted a broad-spectrum in vitro antifungal activity. DNA-DNA hybridizations showed that Phyllobacterium sp. does not contain DNA sequences that are homologous with the attachment genes chvA, chvB, the transferred-DNA (T-DNA) hormone genes iaaH and ipt from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, iaaM from A. tumefaciens and Pseudomonas savastanoi, or the nitrogenase genes nifHDK from Klebsiella pneumoniae. Phyllobacterium sp. produces indolylacetic acid in in vitro cultures and induces auxinlike effects when cocultivated with callus tissue of tobacco. When Phyllobacterium sp. was transformed with a Ti plasmid derivative, it gained the capacity to induce tumors on Kalanchoe daigremontiana. The potential role of Phyllobacterium sp. in this newly recognized niche is discussed. Images PMID:16348158

  3. Rotor blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise source identification and correlation with rotor wake predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.; Martin, Ruth M.

    1987-10-01

    An acoustic source localization scheme applicable to noncompact moving sources is developed and applied to the blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise data of a 40-percent scale BO-105 model rotor. A generalized rotor wake code is employed to predict possible VBI locations on the rotor disk and is found quite useful in interpreting the acoustic localization results. The highly varying directivity patterns of different BVI impulses generated at the same test condition are explained by both the localization results and predicted tip vortex trajectories. The effects of rotor tip-path-plane angle and advance ratio on the BVI source positions is studied. Decreasing tip-path-plane angle (at constant advance ratio) moves the general interaction region upwind on the rotor disk, significantly changing the interaction geometry. Increasing advance ratio (at constant tip-path-plane angle) shifts the general source region downwind on the rotor disk with the increased convection of the vortices until about 60 deg azimuth, where the BVI sources appear to become acoustically less effective. The region of strongest BVI sources lies between 60 and 70 deg azimuth and 80 and 90 percent radius for the moderate range of advance ratios studied.

  4. Jointly They Edit: Examining the Impact of Community Identification on Political Interaction in Wikipedia

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Jessica J.; Laniado, David; Kappler, Karolin E.; Volkovich, Yana; Aragón, Pablo; Kaltenbrunner, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Background In their 2005 study, Adamic and Glance coined the memorable phrase ‘divided they blog’, referring to a trend of cyberbalkanization in the political blogosphere, with liberal and conservative blogs tending to link to other blogs with a similar political slant, and not to one another. As political discussion and activity increasingly moves online, the power of framing political discourses is shifting from mass media to social media. Methodology/Principal Findings Continued examination of political interactions online is critical, and we extend this line of research by examining the activities of political users within the Wikipedia community. First, we examined how users in Wikipedia choose to display their political affiliation. Next, we analyzed the patterns of cross-party interaction and community participation among those users proclaiming a political affiliation. In contrast to previous analyses of other social media, we did not find strong trends indicating a preference to interact with members of the same political party within the Wikipedia community. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that users who proclaim their political affiliation within the community tend to proclaim their identity as a ‘Wikipedian’ even more loudly. It seems that the shared identity of ‘being Wikipedian’ may be strong enough to triumph over other potentially divisive facets of personal identity, such as political affiliation. PMID:23573269

  5. Proteomic allergen-peptide/protein interaction assay for the identification of human skin sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Lisa; Kinzebach, Sven; Ohnesorge, Stefanie; Franke, Bastian; Goette, Irina; Koenig-Gressel, Dieter; Thierse, Hermann-Josef

    2013-04-01

    Modification of proteins by skin sensitizers is a pivotal step in T cell mediated allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). In this process small reactive chemicals interact covalently or non-covalently with cellular or extracellular skin self-proteins or self-peptides to become recognized by the human immune system. Aiming to develop a novel non-animal in vitro test system for predicting sensitization potential of small reactive chemicals in human skin the allergen-peptide/protein interaction assay (APIA) has been developed. By applying modern proteomic technologies together with a target peptide containing all amino acids, the assay permits the profiling of all amino acid specific allergen-peptide interactions. Moreover, potentially crucial allergen-specific Cys-modifications are qualitatively monitored by mass spectrometry and confirmed by a dual peptide approach. Assay conditions chosen mimic the distinct human epidermal reactivity compartments of the skin surface (pH 5.5), stratum basale (pH 6.8), and typical physiological conditions (pH 7.4). An extreme as well as a moderate human contact sensitizer produced Cys-specific mass shifts, whereas a skin irritant did not. Our data indicate that MALDI-MS based and skin-related in vitro technology platforms - like the APIA - are promising tools in developing alternative non-animal allergen assays. This will assist in chemical classification and next generation risk assessment strategies, including REACH and experimental immunotoxicology. PMID:22926046

  6. Identification of interactions in fractional-order systems with high dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Xiaoxi; Wu, Yu; Sheng, Wenbo; Lin, Wei; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Data Science, LMNS, and Shanghai Center for Mathematical Sciences, Shanghai 200433

    2014-06-15

    This article proposes an approach to identify fractional-order systems with sparse interaction structures and high dimensions when observation data are supposed to be experimentally available. This approach includes two steps: first, it is to estimate the value of the fractional order by taking into account the solution properties of fractional-order systems; second, it is to identify the interaction coefficients among the system variables by employing the compressed sensing technique. An error analysis is provided analytically for this approach and a further improved approach is also proposed. Moreover, the applicability of the proposed approach is fully illustrated by two examples: one is to estimate the mutual interactions in a complex dynamical network described by fractional-order systems, and the other is to identify a high fractional-order and homogeneous sequential differential equation, which is frequently used to describe viscoelastic phenomena. All the results demonstrate the feasibility of figuring out the system mechanisms behind the data experimentally observed in physical or biological systems with viscoelastic evolution characters.

  7. Label-Free Proteomic Identification of Endogenous, Insulin-Stimulated Interaction Partners of Insulin Receptor Substrate-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geetha, Thangiah; Langlais, Paul; Luo, Moulun; Mapes, Rebekka; Lefort, Natalie; Chen, Shu-Chuan; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Yi, Zhengping

    2011-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key to most cellular processes. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS)-based proteomics combined with co-immunoprecipitation (CO-IP) has emerged as a powerful approach for studying protein complexes. However, a majority of systematic proteomics studies on protein-protein interactions involve the use of protein overexpression and/or epitope-tagged bait proteins, which might affect binding stoichiometry and lead to higher false positives. Here, we report an application of a straightforward, label-free CO-IP-MS/MS method, without the use of protein overexpression or protein tags, to the investigation of changes in the abundance of endogenous proteins associated with a bait protein, which is in this case insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), under basal and insulin stimulated conditions. IRS-1 plays a central role in the insulin signaling cascade. Defects in the protein-protein interactions involving IRS-1 may lead to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analyses identified eleven novel endogenous insulin-stimulated IRS-1 interaction partners in L6 myotubes reproducibly, including proteins play an important role in protein dephosphorylation [protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A, (PPP1R12A)], muscle contraction and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and protein folding, as well as protein synthesis. This novel application of label-free CO-IP-MS/MS quantification to assess endogenous interaction partners of a specific protein will prove useful for understanding how various cell stimuli regulate insulin signal transduction.

  8. Identification of human hnRNP C1/C2 as a dengue virus NS1-interacting protein

    SciTech Connect

    Noisakran, Sansanee; Sengsai, Suchada; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Sinchaikul, Supachok; Chen, Shui-Tein; Puttikhunt, Chunya

    2008-07-18

    Dengue virus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a key glycoprotein involved in the production of infectious virus and the pathogenesis of dengue diseases. Very little is known how NS1 interacts with host cellular proteins and functions in dengue virus-infected cells. This study aimed at identifying NS1-interacting host cellular proteins in dengue virus-infected cells by employing co-immunoprecipitation, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Using lysates of dengue virus-infected human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293T), immunoprecipitation with an anti-NS1 monoclonal antibody revealed eight isoforms of dengue virus NS1 and a 40-kDa protein, which was subsequently identified by quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS/MS) as human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) C1/C2. Further investigation by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization confirmed the association of hnRNP C1/C2 and dengue virus NS1 proteins in dengue virus-infected cells. Their interaction may have implications in virus replication and/or cellular responses favorable to survival of the virus in host cells.

  9. PAR-CLIP: A Method for Transcriptome-Wide Identification of RNA Binding Protein Interaction Sites.

    PubMed

    Danan, Charles; Manickavel, Sudhir; Hafner, Markus

    2016-01-01

    During post-transcriptional gene regulation (PTGR), RNA binding proteins (RBPs) interact with all classes of RNA to control RNA maturation, stability, transport, and translation. Here, we describe Photoactivatable-Ribonucleoside-Enhanced Crosslinking and Immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP), a transcriptome-scale method for identifying RBP binding sites on target RNAs with nucleotide-level resolution. This method is readily applicable to any protein directly contacting RNA, including RBPs that are predicted to bind in a sequence- or structure-dependent manner at discrete RNA recognition elements (RREs), and those that are thought to bind transiently, such as RNA polymerases or helicases. PMID:26463383

  10. Key & Building Card Access Request Form Revision: Jan. 2014

    E-print Network

    Su, Xiao

    Key & Building Card Access Request Form Revision: Jan. 2014 *Emails will be sent to Key Holder when keys are ready for pick up. Keys will be available for 30 days from time of communication. Section 1: Identification ­ Enter information of the Key Holder requesting key(s) / card access credential(s) Instructions

  11. Identification of Adenovirus Serotype 5 Hexon Regions That Interact with Scavenger Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, Reeti; Reddy, Vijay S.; Nemerow, Glen R.; Barry, Michael A.

    2012-05-04

    Most of an intravenous dose of species C adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is destroyed by liver Kupffer cells. In contrast, another species C virus, Ad6, evades these cells to mediate more efficient liver gene delivery. Given that this difference in Kupffer cell interaction is mediated by the hypervariable (HVR) loops of the virus hexon protein, we genetically modified each of the seven HVRs of Ad5 with a cysteine residue to enable conditional blocking of these sites with polyethylene glycol (PEG). We show that these modifications do not affect in vitro virus transduction. In contrast, after intravenous injection, targeted PEGylation at HVRs 1, 2, 5, and 7 increased viral liver transduction up to 20-fold. Elimination or saturation of liver Kupffer cells did not significantly affect this increase in the liver transduction. In vitro, PEGylation blocked uptake of viruses via the Kupffer cell scavenger receptor SRA-II. These data suggest that HVRs 1, 2, 5, and 7 of Ad5 may be involved in Kupffer cell recognition and subsequent destruction. These data also demonstrate that this conditional genetic-chemical mutation strategy is a useful tool for investigating the interactions of viruses with host tissues.

  12. Identification of Odorant-Receptor Interactions by Global Mapping of the Human Odorome

    PubMed Central

    Audouze, Karine; Tromelin, Anne; Le Bon, Anne Marie; Belloir, Christine; Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Kristiansen, Karsten; Brunak, Søren; Taboureau, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The human olfactory system recognizes a broad spectrum of odorants using approximately 400 different olfactory receptors (hORs). Although significant improvements of heterologous expression systems used to study interactions between ORs and odorant molecules have been made, screening the olfactory repertoire of hORs remains a tremendous challenge. We therefore developed a chemical systems level approach based on protein-protein association network to investigate novel hOR-odorant relationships. Using this new approach, we proposed and validated new bioactivities for odorant molecules and OR2W1, OR51E1 and OR5P3. As it remains largely unknown how human perception of odorants influence or prevent diseases, we also developed an odorant-protein matrix to explore global relationships between chemicals, biological targets and disease susceptibilities. We successfully experimentally demonstrated interactions between odorants and the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR?). Overall, these results illustrate the potential of integrative systems chemical biology to explore the impact of odorant molecules on human health, i.e. human odorome. PMID:24695519

  13. Identification of odorant-receptor interactions by global mapping of the human odorome.

    PubMed

    Audouze, Karine; Tromelin, Anne; Le Bon, Anne Marie; Belloir, Christine; Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Kristiansen, Karsten; Brunak, Søren; Taboureau, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The human olfactory system recognizes a broad spectrum of odorants using approximately 400 different olfactory receptors (hORs). Although significant improvements of heterologous expression systems used to study interactions between ORs and odorant molecules have been made, screening the olfactory repertoire of hORs remains a tremendous challenge. We therefore developed a chemical systems level approach based on protein-protein association network to investigate novel hOR-odorant relationships. Using this new approach, we proposed and validated new bioactivities for odorant molecules and OR2W1, OR51E1 and OR5P3. As it remains largely unknown how human perception of odorants influence or prevent diseases, we also developed an odorant-protein matrix to explore global relationships between chemicals, biological targets and disease susceptibilities. We successfully experimentally demonstrated interactions between odorants and the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR?). Overall, these results illustrate the potential of integrative systems chemical biology to explore the impact of odorant molecules on human health, i.e. human odorome. PMID:24695519

  14. Identification of weakly interacting massive particles through a combined measurement of axial and scalar couplings.

    PubMed

    Bertone, G; Cerdeño, D G; Collar, J I; Odom, B

    2007-10-12

    We study the prospects for detecting weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in a number of phenomenological scenarios, with a detector composed of a target simultaneously sensitive to both spin-dependent and spin-independent couplings, as is the case of COUPP (Chicagoland Observatory for Underground Particle Physics). First, we show that sensitivity to both couplings optimizes chances of initial WIMP detection. Second, we demonstrate that, in case of detection, a comparison of the signal on two complementary targets, such as in COUPP CF3I and C4F10 bubble chambers, allows a significantly more precise determination of the dark matter axial and scalar couplings. This strategy would provide crucial information on the nature of the WIMPs and possibly allow discrimination between neutralino and Kaluza-Klein dark matter. PMID:17995155

  15. Peptide labeling with photoactivatable trifunctional cadaverine derivative and identification of interacting partners by biotin transfer.

    PubMed

    App, Christine; Knop, Jana; Huff, Thomas; Seebahn, Angela; Becker, Cord-Michael; Iavarone, Federica; Castagnola, Massimo; Hannappel, Ewald

    2014-07-01

    A new photoactivatable trifunctional cross-linker, cBED (cadaverine-2-[6-(biotinamido)-2-(p-azidobenzamido) hexanoamido]ethyl-1,3'-dithiopropionate), was synthesized by chemical conversion of sulfo-SBED (sulfosuccinimidyl-2-[6-(biotinamido)-2-(p-azidobenzamido) hexanoamido]ethyl-1,3'-dithiopropionate) with cadaverine. This cross-linker was purified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and characterized using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis. cBED is based on sulfo-SBED that has a photoactivatable azido group, a cleavable disulfide bond for label transfer methods, and a biotin moiety for highly sensitive biotin/avidin detection. By ultraviolet (UV) light, the azido group is converted to a reactive nitrene, transforming transient bindings of interacting structures to covalent bonds. In contrast to the sulfo-N-hydroxysuccinimide (sulfo-NHS) moiety of sulfo-SBED, which attaches quite unspecifically to amino groups, cBED includes a cadaverine moiety that can be attached by transglutaminase more specifically to certain glutamine residues. For instance, thymosin ?4 can be labeled with cBED using tissue transglutaminase. By high-resolution HPLC/ESI-MS (electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry) and tandem MS (MS/MS) of the trypsin digest, it was established that glutamine residues at positions 23 and 36 were labeled, whereas Q39 showed no reactivity. The covalent binding of cBED to thymosin ?4 did not influence its G-actin sequestering activity, and the complex could be used to identify new interaction partners. Therefore, cBED can be used to better understand the multifunctional role of thymosin ?4 as well as of other proteins and peptides. PMID:24732115

  16. Identification of the Mind Bomb1 Interaction Domain in Zebrafish DeltaD

    PubMed Central

    Palardy, Gregory; Chitnis, Ajay B.

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitylation promotes endocytosis of the Notch ligands like Delta and Serrate and is essential for them to effectively activate Notch in a neighboring cell. The RING E3 ligase Mind bomb1 (Mib1) ubiquitylates DeltaD to facilitate Notch signaling in zebrafish. We have identified a domain in the intracellular part of the zebrafish Notch ligand DeltaD that is essential for effective interactions with Mib1. We show that elimination of the Mind bomb1 Interaction Domain (MID) or mutation of specific conserved motifs in this domain prevents effective Mib1-mediated ubiquitylation and internalization of DeltaD. Lateral inhibition mediated by Notch signaling regulates early neurogenesis in zebrafish. In this context, Notch activation suppresses neurogenesis, while loss of Notch-mediated lateral inhibition results in a neurogenic phenotype, where too many cells are allowed to become neurons. While Mib1-mediated endocytosis of DeltaD is essential for effective activation of Notch in a neighboring cell (in trans) it is not required for DeltaD to inhibit function of Notch receptors in the same cell (in cis). As a result, forms of DeltaD that have the MID can activate Notch in trans and suppress early neurogenesis when mRNA encoding it is ectopically expressed in zebrafish embryos. On the other hand, when the MID is eliminated/mutated in DeltaD, its ability to activate Notch in trans fails but ability to inhibit in cis is retained. As a result, ectopic expression of DeltaD lacking an effective MID results in a failure of Notch-mediated lateral inhibition and a neurogenic phenotype. PMID:26020642

  17. Stability of the Transthyretin Molecule as a Key Factor in the Interaction with A-Beta Peptide - Relevance in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Carlos A.; Saraiva, Maria João; Cardoso, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) protects against A-Beta toxicity by binding the peptide thus inhibiting its aggregation. Previous work showed different TTR mutations interact differently with A-Beta, with increasing affinities correlating with decreasing amyloidogenecity of the TTR mutant; this did not impact on the levels of inhibition of A-Beta aggregation, as assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Our work aimed at probing differences in binding to A-Beta by WT, T119M and L55P TTR using quantitative assays, and at identifying factors affecting this interaction. We addressed the impact of such factors in TTR ability to degrade A-Beta. Using a dot blot approach with the anti-oligomeric antibody A11, we showed that A-Beta formed oligomers transiently, indicating aggregation and fibril formation, whereas in the presence of WT and T119M TTR the oligomers persisted longer, indicative that these variants avoided further aggregation into fibrils. In contrast, L55PTTR was not able to inhibit oligomerization or to prevent evolution to aggregates and fibrils. Furthermore, apoptosis assessment showed WT and T119M TTR were able to protect against A-Beta toxicity. Because the amyloidogenic potential of TTR is inversely correlated with its stability, the use of drugs able to stabilize TTR tetrameric fold could result in increased TTR/A-Beta binding. Here we showed that iododiflunisal, 3-dinitrophenol, resveratrol, [2-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)amino] (DCPA) and [4-(3,5-difluorophenyl)] (DFPB) were able to increase TTR binding to A-Beta; however only DCPA and DFPB improved TTR proteolytic activity. Thyroxine, a TTR ligand, did not influence TTR/A-Beta interaction and A-Beta degradation by TTR, whereas RBP, another TTR ligand, not only obstructed the interaction but also inhibited TTR proteolytic activity. Our results showed differences between WT and T119M TTR, and L55PTTR mutant regarding their interaction with A-Beta and prompt the stability of TTR as a key factor in this interaction, which may be relevant in AD pathogenesis and for the design of therapeutic TTR-based therapies. PMID:23028965

  18. Crystal Structure and Identification of Two Key Amino Acids Involved in AI-2 Production and Biofilm Formation in Streptococcus suis LuxS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Yi, Li; Wang, Shaohui; Fan, Hongjie; Ding, Chan; Mao, Xiang; Lu, Chengping

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus suis has emerged as an important zoonotic pathogen that causes meningitis, arthritis, septicemia and even sudden death in pigs and humans. Quorum sensing is the signaling network for cell-to-cell communication that bacterial cells can use to monitor their own population density through production and exchange of signal molecules. S-Ribosylhomocysteinase (LuxS) is the key enzyme involved in the activated methyl cycle. Autoinducer 2 (AI-2) is the adduct of borate and a ribose derivative and is produced from S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH). AI-2 can mediate interspecies communication and in some species facilitate the bacterial behavior regulation such as biofilm formation and virulence in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we reported the overexpression, purification and crystallographic structure of LuxS from S. suis. Our results showed the catalytically active LuxS exists as a homodimer in solution. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) revealed the presence of Zn2+ in LuxS. Although the core structure shares the similar topology with LuxS proteins from other bacterial species, structural analyses and comparative amino acid sequence alignments identified two key amino acid differences in S. suis LuxS, Phe80 and His87, which are located near the substrate binding site. The results of site-directed mutagenesis and enzymology studies confirmed that these two residues affect the catalytic activity of the enzyme. These in vitro results were corroborated in vivo by expression of the LuxS variants in a S. suis ?luxS strain. The single and two amino acid of LuxS variant decreased AI-2 production and biofilm formation significantly compared to that of the parent strain. Our findings highlight the importance of key LuxS residues that influence the AI-2 production and biofilm formation in S.suis. PMID:26484864

  19. Identification of Microcystis aeruginosa Peptides Responsible for Allergic Sensitization and Characterization of Functional Interactions between Cyanobacterial Toxins and Immunogenic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Geh, Esmond N.; Ghosh, Debajyoti; McKell, Melanie; de la Cruz, Armah A.; Stelma, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Background The cyanobacterium species Microcystis aeruginosa produces microcystin and an array of diverse metabolites believed responsible for their toxicity and/or immunogenicity. Previously, chronic rhinitis patients were demonstrated to elicit a specific IgE response to nontoxic strains of M. aeruginosa by skin-prick testing, indicating that cyanobacteria allergenicity resides in a non-toxin–producing component of the organism. Objectives We sought to identify and characterize M. aeruginosa peptide(s) responsible for allergic sensitization in susceptible individuals, and we investigated the functional interactions between cyanobacterial toxins and their coexpressed immunogenic peptides. Methods Sera from patients and extracts from M. aeruginosa toxic [MC(+)] and nontoxic [MC(–)] strains were used to test IgE-specific reactivity by direct and indirect ELISAs; 2D gel electrophoresis, followed by immunoblots and mass spectrometry (MS), was performed to identify the relevant sensitizing peptides. Cytotoxicity and mediator release assays were performed using the MC(+) and MC(–) lysates. Results We found specific IgE to be increased more in response to the MC(–) strain than the MC(+) strain. This response was inhibited by preincubation of MC(–) lysate with increasing concentrations of microcystin. MS revealed that phycocyanin and the core-membrane linker peptide are the responsible allergens, and MC(–) extracts containing these proteins induced ?-hexosaminidase release in rat basophil leukemia cells. Conclusions Phycobiliprotein complexes in M. aeruginosa have been identified as the relevant sensitizing proteins. Our finding that allergenicity is inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by microcystin toxin suggests that further investigation is warranted to understand the interplay between immunogenicity and toxicity of cyanobacteria under diverse environmental conditions. Citation Geh EN, Ghosh D, McKell M, de la Cruz AA, Stelma G, Bernstein JA. 2015. Identification of Microcystis aeruginosa peptides responsible for allergic sensitization and characterization of functional interactions between cyanobacterial toxins and immunogenic peptides. Environ Health Perspect 123:1159–1166;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409065 PMID:25902363

  20. Investigation of Antioxidant Interactions between Radix Astragali and Cimicifuga foetida and Identification of Synergistic Antioxidant Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Zhao, Shancang; Li, Feng; Zhang, Bo; Qu, Yi; Sun, Tianlei; Luo, Ting; Li, Dapeng

    2014-01-01

    The medicinal plants of Huang-qi (Radix Astragali) and Sheng-ma (Cimicifuga foetida) demonstrate significantly better antioxidant effects when used in combination than when used alone. However, the bioactive components and interactional mechanism underlying this synergistic action are still not well understood. In the present study, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay was employed to investigate the antioxidant capacity of single herbs and their combination with the purpose of screening synergistic antioxidant compounds from them. Chromatographic isolation was performed on silica gel, Sephadex LH-20 columns and HPLC, and consequently to yield formononetin, calycosin, ferulic acid and isoferulic acid, which were identified by their retention time, UV ?max, MS and MS/MS data. The combination of isoferulic acid and calycosin at a dose ratio of 1?1 resulted in significant synergy in scavenging DPPH radicals and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. Furthermore, the protective effects of these four potential synergistic compounds were examined using H2O2-induced HepG2 Cells bioassay. Results revealed that the similar synergy was observed in the combination of isoferulic acid and calycosin. These findings might provide some theoretical basis for the purported synergistic efficiency of Huang-qi and Sheng-ma as functional foods, dietary supplements and medicinal drugs. PMID:24498048

  1. Investigation of antioxidant interactions between Radix Astragali and Cimicifuga foetida and identification of synergistic antioxidant compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Zhao, Shancang; Li, Feng; Zhang, Bo; Qu, Yi; Sun, Tianlei; Luo, Ting; Li, Dapeng

    2014-01-01

    The medicinal plants of Huang-qi (Radix Astragali) and Sheng-ma (Cimicifuga foetida) demonstrate significantly better antioxidant effects when used in combination than when used alone. However, the bioactive components and interactional mechanism underlying this synergistic action are still not well understood. In the present study, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay was employed to investigate the antioxidant capacity of single herbs and their combination with the purpose of screening synergistic antioxidant compounds from them. Chromatographic isolation was performed on silica gel, Sephadex LH-20 columns and HPLC, and consequently to yield formononetin, calycosin, ferulic acid and isoferulic acid, which were identified by their retention time, UV ?max, MS and MS/MS data. The combination of isoferulic acid and calycosin at a dose ratio of 1?1 resulted in significant synergy in scavenging DPPH radicals and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. Furthermore, the protective effects of these four potential synergistic compounds were examined using H2O2-induced HepG2 Cells bioassay. Results revealed that the similar synergy was observed in the combination of isoferulic acid and calycosin. These findings might provide some theoretical basis for the purported synergistic efficiency of Huang-qi and Sheng-ma as functional foods, dietary supplements and medicinal drugs. PMID:24498048

  2. Identification of novel PTEN-binding partners: PTEN interaction with fatty acid binding protein FABP4.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, O; Panayotou, G; Zhyvoloup, A; Volkova, D; Gout, I; Filonenko, V

    2010-04-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor with dual protein and lipid-phosphatase activity, which is frequently deleted or mutated in many human advanced cancers. Recent studies have also demonstrated that PTEN is a promising target in type II diabetes and obesity treatment. Using C-terminal PTEN sequence in pEG202-NLS as bait, yeast two-hybrid screening on Mouse Embryo, Colon Cancer, and HeLa cDNA libraries was carried out. Isolated positive clones were validated by mating assay and identified through automated DNA sequencing and BLAST database searches. Sequence analysis revealed a number of PTEN-binding proteins linking this phosphatase to a number of different signaling cascades, suggesting that PTEN may perform other functions besides tumor-suppressing activity in different cell types. In particular, the interplay between PTEN function and adipocyte-specific fatty-acid-binding protein FABP4 is of notable interest. The demonstrable tautology of PTEN to FABP4 suggested a role for this phosphatase in the regulation of lipid metabolism and adipocyte differentiation. This interaction was further studied using coimmunoprecipitation and gel-filtration assays. Finally, based on Biacore assay, we have calculated the K(D) of PTEN-FABP4 complex, which is around 2.8 microM. PMID:19911253

  3. Identification of FUSE-binding proteins as interacting partners of TIA proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, Francoise; Gueydan, Cyril; Bellefroid, Eric; Huez, Georges; Kruys, Veronique . E-mail: vkruys@ulb.ac.be

    2006-04-28

    TIA-1 and TIAR are closely related RNA-binding proteins involved in several mechanisms of RNA metabolism, including alternative hnRNA splicing and mRNA translation regulation. In particular, TIA-1 represses tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mRNA translation by binding to the AU-rich element (ARE) present in the mRNA 3' untranslated region. Here, we demonstrate that TIA proteins interact with FUSE-binding proteins (FBPs) and that fbp genes are co-expressed with tia genes during Xenopus embryogenesis. FBPs participate in various steps of RNA processing and degradation. In Cos cells, FBPs co-localize with TIA proteins in the nucleus and migrate into TIA-enriched cytoplasmic granules upon oxidative stress. Overexpression of FBP2-KH3 RNA-binding domain fused to EGFP induces the specific sequestration of TIA proteins in cytoplasmic foci, thereby precluding their nuclear accumulation. In cytosolic RAW 264.7 macrophage extracts, FBPs are found associated in EMSA to the TIA-1/TNF-ARE complex. Together, our results indicate that TIA and FBP proteins may thus be relevant biological involved in common events of RNA metabolism occurring both in the nucleus and the cytoplasm.

  4. Strontium isotopic identification of water-rock interaction and ground water mixing.

    PubMed

    Frost, Carol D; Toner, Rachel N

    2004-01-01

    87Sr/86Sr ratios of ground waters in the Bighorn and Laramie basins' carbonate and carbonate-cemented aquifer systems, Wyoming, United States, reflect the distinctive strontium isotope signatures of the minerals in their respective aquifers. Well water samples from the Madison Aquifer (Bighorn Basin) have strontium isotopic ratios that match their carbonate host rocks. Casper Aquifer ground waters (Laramie Basin) have strontium isotopic ratios that differ from the bulk host rock; however, stepwise leaching of Casper Sandstone indicates that most of the strontium in Casper Aquifer ground waters is acquired from preferential dissolution of carbonate cement. Strontium isotope data from both Bighorn and Laramie basins, along with dye tracing experiments in the Bighorn Basin and tritium data from the Laramie Basin, suggest that waters in carbonate or carbonate-cemented aquifers acquire their strontium isotope composition very quickly--on the order of decades. Strontium isotopes were also used successfully to verify previously identified mixed Redbeds-Casper ground waters in the Laramie Basin. The strontium isotopic compositions of ground waters near Precambrian outcrops also suggest previously unrecognized mixing between Casper and Precambrian aquifers. These results demonstrate the utility of strontium isotopic ratio data in identifying ground water sources and aquifer interactions. PMID:15161158

  5. Identification of Links Between Cellular Pathways by Genetic Interaction Mapping (GIM).

    PubMed

    Malabat, Christophe; Saveanu, Cosmin

    2016-01-01

    The yeast systematic deletion collection offered the basis for a number of different strategies that establish functional links between genes by analyzing the phenotype of cells that combine two different deletions or mutations. A distinguishing feature of the collection is the presence of molecular barcodes at each deleted locus, which can be used to quantify the presence and abundance of cells bearing a given allele in a complex mix. As a result, a large number of mutants can be tested in batch cultures, replacing tedious manipulation of thousands of individual strains with a barcode microarray readout. Barcode-based genetic screens like Genetic Interaction Mapping (GIM) thus require little investment in terms of specific equipment, are fast to perform, and allow precise measurements of double mutant growth rates for both aggravating (synthetic sick) and alleviating (epistatic) effects. We describe here protocols for preparing the pools of haploid double mutant S. cerevisiae cells, testing their composition with barcode microarrays, and analyzing the results to extract useful functional information. PMID:26483030

  6. Computer-assisted identification and volumetric quantification of dynamic contrast enhancement in brain MRI: an interactive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shandong; Avgeropoulos, Nicholas G.; Rippe, David J.

    2013-03-01

    We present a dedicated segmentation system for tumor identification and volumetric quantification in dynamic contrast brain magnetic resonance (MR) scans. Our goal is to offer a practically useful tool at the end of clinicians in order to boost volumetric tumor assessment. The system is designed to work in an interactive mode such that maximizes the integration of computing capacity and clinical intelligence. We demonstrate the main functions of the system in terms of its functional flow and conduct preliminary validation using a representative pilot dataset. The system is inexpensive, user-friendly, easy to deploy and integrate with picture archiving and communication systems (PACS), and possible to be open-source, which enable it to potentially serve as a useful assistant for radiologists and oncologists. It is anticipated that in the future the system can be integrated into clinical workflow so that become routine available to help clinicians make more objective interpretations of treatment interventions and natural history of disease to best advocate patient needs.

  7. Identification of Genetic Modules Mediating the Jekyll and Hyde Interaction of Dinoroseobacter shibae with the Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Tomasch, Jürgen; Michael, Victoria; Bhuju, Sabin; Jarek, Michael; Petersen, Jörn; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The co-cultivation of the alphaproteobacterium Dinoroseobacter shibae with the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum is characterized by a mutualistic phase followed by a pathogenic phase in which the bacterium kills aging algae. Thus it resembles the “Jekyll-and-Hyde” interaction that has been proposed for other algae and Roseobacter. Here, we identified key genetic components of this interaction. Analysis of the transcriptome of D. shibae in co-culture with P. minimum revealed growth phase dependent changes in the expression of quorum sensing, the CtrA phosphorelay, and flagella biosynthesis genes. Deletion of the histidine kinase gene cckA which is part of the CtrA phosphorelay or the flagella genes fliC or flgK resulted in complete lack of growth stimulation of P. minimum in co-culture with the D. shibae mutants. By contrast, pathogenicity was entirely dependent on one of the extrachromosomal elements of D. shibae, the 191 kb plasmid. The data show that flagella and the CtrA phosphorelay are required for establishing mutualism and prove a cell density dependent killing effect of D. shibae on P. minimum which is mediated by an unknown factor encoded on the 191 kb plasmid. PMID:26617596

  8. Identification of ORC1/CDC6-Interacting Factors in Trypanosoma brucei Reveals Critical Features of Origin Recognition Complex Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Tiengwe, Calvin; Marcello, Lucio; Farr, Helen; Gadelha, Catarina; Burchmore, Richard; Barry, J. David; Bell, Stephen D.; McCulloch, Richard

    2012-01-01

    DNA Replication initiates by formation of a pre-replication complex on sequences termed origins. In eukaryotes, the pre-replication complex is composed of the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC), Cdc6 and the MCM replicative helicase in conjunction with Cdt1. Eukaryotic ORC is considered to be composed of six subunits, named Orc1–6, and monomeric Cdc6 is closely related in sequence to Orc1. However, ORC has been little explored in protists, and only a single ORC protein, related to both Orc1 and Cdc6, has been shown to act in DNA replication in Trypanosoma brucei. Here we identify three highly diverged putative T. brucei ORC components that interact with ORC1/CDC6 and contribute to cell division. Two of these factors are so diverged that we cannot determine if they are eukaryotic ORC subunit orthologues, or are parasite-specific replication factors. The other we show to be a highly diverged Orc4 orthologue, demonstrating that this is one of the most widely conserved ORC subunits in protists and revealing it to be a key element of eukaryotic ORC architecture. Additionally, we have examined interactions amongst the T. brucei MCM subunits and show that this has the conventional eukaryotic heterohexameric structure, suggesting that divergence in the T. brucei replication machinery is limited to the earliest steps in origin licensing. PMID:22412905

  9. A high-resolution atlas of the infrared spectrum of the Sun and the Earth atmosphere from space. Volume 3: Key to identification of solar features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Murray

    1992-01-01

    During the period April 29 through May 2, 1985, the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment was operated as part of the Spacelab-3 (SL-3) payload on the shuttle Challenger. The instrument, a Fourier transform spectrometer, recorded over 2000 infrared solar spectra from an altitude of 360 km. Although the majority of the spectra were taken through the limb of the Earth's atmosphere in order to better understand its composition, several hundred of the 'high-sun' spectra were completely free from telluric absorption. These high-sun spectra recorded from space are, at the present time, the only high-resolution infrared spectra ever taken of the Sun free from absorptions due to constituents in the Earth's atmosphere. Volumes 1 and 2 of this series provide a compilation of these spectra arranged in a format suitable for quick-look reference purposes and are the first record of the continuous high-resolution infrared spectrum of the Sun and the Earth's atmosphere from space. In the Table of Identifications, which constitutes the main body of this volume, each block of eight wavenumbers is given a separate heading and corresponds to a page of two panels in Volume 1 of this series. In addition, three separate blocks of data available from ATMOS from 622-630 cm(exp -1), 630-638 cm(exp -1) and 638-646 cm(exp -1), excluded from Volume 1 because of the low signal-to-noise ratio, have been included due to the certain identification of several OH and NH transitions. In the first column of the table, the corrected frequency is given. The second column identifies the molecular species. The third and fourth columns represent the assigned transition. The fifth column gives the depth of the molecular line in millimeters. Also included in this column is a notation to indicate whether the line is a blend or lies on the shoulder(s) of another line(s). The final column repeats a question mark if the line is unidentified.

  10. Taxonomy of the hyper-diverse ant genus Tetramorium Mayr in the Malagasy region (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, Myrmicinae) – first record of the T. setigerum species group and additions to the Malagasy species groups with an updated illustrated identification key

    PubMed Central

    Hita Garcia, Francisco; Fisher, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this study we provide an update to the taxonomy of the ant genus Tetramorium Mayr in Madagascar. We report the first record of the Tetramorium setigerum species group in Madagascar and describe the only Malagasy representative as Tetramorium cavernicola sp. n., which is known only from a cave in Ankarana. In addition, we provide an overview of the 19 proposed Malagasy species groups, and discuss their zoogeography and relationships to other groups and larger lineages within the hyper-diverse genus Tetramorium. At present, we recognise a highly unique Malagasy Tetramorium fauna with 113 species endemic to the island of Madagascar out of a total of 125 translating into an endemism rate of 93%. We hypothesise that this fauna is based on one or a few colonisation events from the Afrotropical region, with subsequent adaptive radiation in Madagascar. Furthermore, we present an updated and illustrated identification key to the Tetramorium species groups in the Malagasy region. PMID:26257564

  11. Identification of Interactions between Abscisic Acid and Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Galka, Marek M.; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Buhrow, Leann M.; Nelson, Ken M.; Switala, Jacek; Cutler, Adrian J.; Palmer, David R. J.; Loewen, Peter C.; Abrams, Suzanne R.; Loewen, Michele C.

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid ((+)-ABA) is a phytohormone involved in the modulation of developmental processes and stress responses in plants. A chemical proteomics approach using an ABA mimetic probe was combined with in vitro assays, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), x-ray crystallography and in silico modelling to identify putative (+)-ABA binding-proteins in crude extracts of Arabidopsis thaliana. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was identified as a putative ABA-binding protein. Radiolabelled-binding assays yielded a Kd of 47 nM for (+)-ABA binding to spinach Rubisco, which was validated by ITC, and found to be similar to reported and experimentally derived values for the native ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) substrate. Functionally, (+)-ABA caused only weak inhibition of Rubisco catalytic activity (Ki of 2.1 mM), but more potent inhibition of Rubisco activation (Ki of ~ 130 ?M). Comparative structural analysis of Rubisco in the presence of (+)-ABA with RuBP in the active site revealed only a putative low occupancy (+)-ABA binding site on the surface of the large subunit at a location distal from the active site. However, subtle distortions in electron density in the binding pocket and in silico docking support the possibility of a higher affinity (+)-ABA binding site in the RuBP binding pocket. Overall we conclude that (+)-ABA interacts with Rubisco. While the low occupancy (+)-ABA binding site and weak non-competitive inhibition of catalysis may not be relevant, the high affinity site may allow ABA to act as a negative effector of Rubisco activation. PMID:26197050

  12. Optical key system

    DOEpatents

    Hagans, Karla G. (Livermore, CA); Clough, Robert E. (Danville, CA)

    2000-01-01

    An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

  13. Optical key system

    SciTech Connect

    Hagans, K.G.; Clough, R.E.

    2000-04-25

    An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

  14. Scale Insects, edition 2, a tool for the identification of potential pest scales at U.S.A. ports-of-entry (Hemiptera, Sternorrhyncha, Coccoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglass R.; Rung, Alessandra; Parikh, Grishma

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We provide a general overview of features and technical specifications of an online, interactive tool for the identification of scale insects of concern to the U.S.A. ports-of-entry. Full lists of terminal taxa included in the keys (of which there are four), a list of features used in them, and a discussion of the structure of the tool are provided. We also briefly discuss the advantages of interactive keys for the identification of potential scale insect pests. The interactive key is freely accessible on http://idtools.org/id/scales/index.php PMID:25152668

  15. Identification of key amino acid differences between Cyrtorhinus lividipennis and Nilaparvata lugens nAChR ?8 subunits contributing to neonicotinoid sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Beina; Zhang, Yixi; Meng, Xiangkun; Bao, Haibo; Fang, Jichao; Liu, Zewen

    2015-03-01

    High sensitivity to neonicotinoid insecticides have been reported in the miridbug Cyrtorhinus lividipennis, an important predatory enemy of rice planthoppers, such as Nilaparvata lugens (brown planthopper). In the present study, the sensitivity of neonicotinoid insecticides between C. lividipennis and N. lugens were detected and compared. The results showed that neonicotinoid insecticides were much more toxic to the miridbug than to the brown planthopper. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit was cloned from the miridbug and denoted as ?8 subunit (Cl?8) according to sequence similarities and important functional motifs. Key amino acid differences were found in specific loops from ?8 subunits between C. lividipennis (Cl?8) and N. lugens (Nl?8). In order to understand the roles of key amino acid differences in insecticide sensitivities, the different amino acid residues in specific loops of Nl?8 were introduced into the corresponding sites in Cl?8 to construct several subunit mutants. Cl?8 or subunit mutants were co-expressed with rat ?2 to obtain the functional receptors in Xenopus oocytes. The single mutation N191F in loop B reduced imidacloprid sensitivity, with EC50 value in Cl?8(N191F)/?2 of 15.21?M and 5.74?M in Cl?8/?2. Interestingly, although the single mutation E240T in loop C did not cause the significant change in imidacloprid sensitivity, it could enhance the effects of N191F and cause more decrease in imidacloprid sensitivity. The results indicated that E240T might contribute to neonicotinoid sensitivity in an indirect way. PMID:25613467

  16. Detecting Protein-Protein Interactions with a Green Fluorescent Protein Fragment Reassembly Trap: Scope and

    E-print Network

    Regan, Lynne

    of comaintained Escherichia coli plasmids for the facile subcloning of fusions to the green fluorescent protein-mail: lynne.regan@yale.edu Abstract: Identification of protein binding partners is one of the key challenges to the function of an unknown protein is the identification of molecules with which it interacts. Computational

  17. A reappraisal of the Pleurotus eryngii complex - new species and taxonomic combinations based on the application of a polyphasic approach, and an identification key to Pleurotus taxa associated with Apiaceae plants.

    PubMed

    Zervakis, Georgios I; Ntougias, Spyridon; Gargano, Maria Letizia; Besi, Maria I; Polemis, Elias; Typas, Milton A; Venturella, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The Pleurotus eryngii species-complex comprises choice edible mushrooms growing on roots and lower stem residues of Apiaceae (umbellifers) plants. Material deriving from extensive sampling was studied by mating compatibility, morphological and ecological criteria, and through analysis of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and IGS1 rRNA sequences. Results revealed that P. eryngii sensu stricto forms a diverse and widely distributed aggregate composed of varieties elaeoselini, eryngii, ferulae, thapsiae, and tingitanus. Pleurotuseryngii subsp. tuoliensis comb. nov. is a phylogenetically sister group to the former growing only on various Ferula species in Asia. The existence of Pleurotusnebrodensis outside of Sicily (i.e., in Greece) is reported for the first time on the basis of molecular data, while P. nebrodensis subsp. fossulatus comb. nov. is a related Asiatic taxon associated with the same plant (Prangos ferulacea). Last, Pleurotusferulaginis sp. nov. grows on Ferulago campestris in northeast Italy, Slovenia and Hungary; it occupies a distinct phylogenetic position accompanied with significant differences in spore size and mating incompatibility versus other Pleurotus populations. Coevolution with umbellifers and host/substrate specificity seem to play key roles in speciation processes within this fungal group. An identification key to the nine Pleurotus taxa growing in association with Apiaceae plants is provided. PMID:25209640

  18. Analytical and sensorial characterization of the aroma of wines produced with sour rotten grapes using GC-O and GC-MS: identification of key aroma compounds.

    PubMed

    Barata, André; Campo, Eva; Malfeito-Ferreira, Manuel; Loureiro, Virgílio; Cacho, Juan; Ferreira, Vicente

    2011-03-23

    In the present work, the aroma profiles of wines elaborated from sound and sour rot-infected grapes as raw material have been studied by sensory analysis, gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O), and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), with the aim of determining the odor volatiles most likely associated with this disease. The effect of sour rot was tested in monovarietal wines produced with the Portuguese red grape variety Trincadeira and in blends of Cabernet Sauvignon and sour rotten Trincadeira grapes. Wines produced from damaged berries exhibited clear honey-like notes not evoked by healthy samples. Ethyl phenylacetate (EPhA) and phenylacetic acid (PAA), both exhibiting sweet honey-like aromas, emerged as key aroma compounds of sour rotten wines. Their levels were 1 order of magnitude above those found in controls and reached 304 and 1668 ?g L(-1) of EPhA and PAA, respectively, well above the corresponding odor thresholds. Levels of ?-nonalactone also increased by a factor 3 in sour rot samples. Results also suggest that sour rot exerts a great effect on the secondary metabolism of yeast, decreasing the levels of volatiles related to fatty acids and amino acid synthesis. The highest levels of ?-decalactone of up to 405 ?g L(-1) were also found in all of the samples, suggesting that this could be a relevant aroma compound in Trincadeira wine aroma. PMID:21348497

  19. Morphological and molecular differentiation of two new species of Pseudoacanthocephalus Petrochenko, 1958 (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) from amphibians and reptiles in the Philippines, with identification key for the genus.

    PubMed

    Tkach, Vasyl V; Lisitsyna, Olga I; Crossley, Janna L; Binh, Tran Thi; Bush, Sarah E

    2013-05-01

    The genus Pseudoacanthocephalus Petrochenko, 1958 currently includes 14 species of acanthocephalans parasitic in amphibians and reptiles worldwide. This work describes two new species of Pseudoacanthocephalus from amphibians and reptiles collected in several localities on Luzon Island, Philippines. Pseudoacanthocephalus nickoli n. sp. was found in two species of frogs, Rana luzonensis Boulenger and Rana similis (Günther), and Pseudoacanthocephalus smalesi n. sp. was found in a scincid lizard, Sphenomorphus abdictus Brown & Alcala. Differential diagnoses of the two new species of Pseudoacanthocephalus from their congeners are provided. Comparative analysis of nuclear ribosomal rRNA sequences encompassing the 3' end of 18S nuclear rDNA gene, internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1+5.8S+ITS2), and 5' end of the 28S gene strongly corroborated the morphological evidence and demonstrated significant differences between the two new species as well as between these species and closely related species from continental China and Vietnam. No intraspecific sequence variability was detected among different individuals representing each of the examined species. This is the first report of Pseudoacanthocephalus in the Philippines. A key to known species of Pseudoacanthocephalus is provided. PMID:23595488

  20. Identification and clarification of the role of key active site residues in bacterial glutathione S-transferase zeta/maleylpyruvate isomerase

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Ti; Li, De-Feng; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Application of site-directed mutagenesis to probe the active site residues of glutathione-dependent maleylpyruvate isomerase. {yields} Two conserved residues, Arg8 and Arg176, in zeta class glutathione S-transferases are critical for maleylpyruvate orientation and enolization. {yields} Arg109, found exclusively in NagL, participates in k{sub cat} regulation. {yields} The T11A mutant exhibited a significantly decreased K{sub m} value for glutathione with little impact on maleylpyruvate kinetics. {yields} The Thr11 residue appears to have significance in the evolution of glutathione S-transferase classes. -- Abstract: The maleylpyruvate isomerase NagL from Ralstonia sp. strain U2, which has been structurally characterized previously, catalyzes the isomerization of maleylpyruvate to fumarylpyruvate. It belongs to the class zeta glutathione S-transferases (GSTZs), part of the cytosolic GST family (cGSTs). In this study, site-directed mutagenesis was conducted to probe the functions of 13 putative active site residues. Steady-state kinetic information for mutants in the reduced glutathione (GSH) binding site, suggested that (a) Gln64 and Asp102 interact directly with the glutamyl moiety of glutathione, (b) Gln49 and Gln64 are involved in a potential electron-sharing network that influences the ionization of the GSH thiol. The information also suggests that (c) His38, Asn108 and Arg109 interact with the GSH glycine moiety, (d) His104 has a role in the ionization of the GSH sulfur and the stabilization of the maleyl terminal carboxyl group in the reaction intermediate and (e) Arg110 influences the electron distribution in the active site and therefore the ionization of the GSH thiolate. Kinetic data for mutants altered in the substrate-binding site imply that (a) Arg8 and Arg176 are critical for maleylpyruvate orientation and enolization, and (b) Arg109 (exclusive to NagL) participates in k{sub cat} regulation. Surprisingly, the T11A mutant had a decreased GSH K{sub m} value, whereas little impact on maleylpyruvate kinetics was observed, suggesting that this residue plays an important role in GSH binding. An evolutionary trend in this residue appears to have developed not only in prokaryotic and eukaryotic GSTZs, but also among the wider class of cGSTs.

  1. The nucleotide exchange factor MGE exerts a key function in the ATP-dependent cycle of mt-Hsp70-Tim44 interaction driving mitochondrial protein import.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, H C; Westermann, B; Neupert, W; Brunner, M

    1996-01-01

    Import of preproteins into the mitochondrial matrix is driven by the ATP-dependent interaction of mt-Hsp70 with the peripheral inner membrane import protein Tim44 and the preprotein in transit. We show that Mge1p, a co-chaperone of mt-Hsp70, plays a key role in the ATP-dependent import reaction cycle in yeast. Our data suggest a cycle in which the mt-Hsp70-Tim44 complex forms with ATP: Mge1p promotes assembly of the complex in the presence of ATP. Hydrolysis of ATP by mt-Hsp70 occurs in complex with Tim44. Mge1p is then required for the dissociation of the ADP form of mt-Hsp70 from Tim44 after release of inorganic phosphate but before release of ADP. ATP hydrolysis and complex dissociation are accompanied by tight binding of mt-Hsp70 to the preprotein in transit. Subsequently, the release of mt-Hsp70 from the polypeptide chain is triggered by Mge1p which promotes release of ADP from mt-Hsp70. Rebinding of ATP to mt-Hsp70 completes the reaction cycle. Images PMID:8918457

  2. WITNESSING THE KEY EARLY PHASE OF QUASAR EVOLUTION: AN OBSCURED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS PAIR IN THE INTERACTING GALAXY IRAS 20210+1121

    SciTech Connect

    Piconcelli, Enrico; Fiore, Fabrizio; Maiolino, Roberto; Nicastro, Fabrizio; Vignali, Cristian; Bianchi, Stefano; Mathur, Smita; Guainazzi, Matteo; Lanzuisi, Giorgio

    2010-10-20

    We report the discovery of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) pair in the interacting galaxy system IRAS 20210+1121 at z = 0.056. An XMM-Newton observation reveals the presence of an obscured (N {sub H} {approx} 5 x 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}), Seyfert-like (L {sub 2-10keV} = 4.7 x 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}) nucleus in the northern galaxy, which lacks unambiguous optical AGN signatures. Our spectral analysis also provides strong evidence that the IR-luminous southern galaxy hosts a Type 2 quasar embedded in a bright starburst emission. In particular, the X-ray primary continuum from the nucleus appears totally depressed in the XMM-Newton band as expected in the case of a Compton-thick absorber, and only the emission produced by Compton scattering ('reflection') of the continuum from circumnuclear matter is seen. As such, IRAS 20210+1121 seems to provide an excellent opportunity to witness a key, early phase in the quasar evolution predicted by the theoretical models of quasar activation by galaxy collisions.

  3. Identification of key factors governing chemistry in groundwater near the water course recharged by reclaimed water at Miyun County, Northern China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yilei; Song, Xianfang; Zhang, Yinghua; Zheng, Fandong; Liang, Ji; Han, Dongmei; Ma, Ying; Bu, Hongmei

    2013-09-01

    Reclaimed water was successfully used to recover the dry Chaobai River in Northern China, but groundwater may be polluted. To ensure groundwater protection, it is therefore critical to identify the governing factors of groundwater chemistry. Samples of reclaimed water, river and groundwater were collected monthly at Chaobai River from January to September in 2010. Fifteen water parameters were analyzed. Two kinds of reclaimed water were different in type (Na-Ca-Mg-Cl-HCO3 or Na-Ca-Cl-HCO3) and concentration of nitrogen. The ionic concentration and type in river were similar to reclaimed water. Some shallow wells near the river bed had the same type (Na-Ca-Mg-Cl-HCO3) and high concentration as reclaimed water, but others were consistent with the deep wells (Ca-Mg-HCO3). Using cluster analysis, the 9 months were divided into two periods (dry and wet seasons), and all samples were grouped into several spatial clusters, indicating different controlling mechanisms. Principal component analysis and conventional ionic plots showed that calcium, magnesium and bicarbonate were controlled by water-rock interaction in all deep and some shallow wells. This included the dissolution of calcite and carbonate weathering. Sodium, potassium, chloride and sulfate in river and some shallow wells recharged by river were governed by evaporation crystallization and mixing of reclaimed water. But groundwater chemistry was not controlled by precipitation. During the infiltration of reclaimed water, cation exchange took place between (sodium, potassium) and (calcium, magnesium). Nitrification and denitrification both happened in most shallow groundwater, but only denitrification in deep groundwater. PMID:24520717

  4. Identification of microRNA-mRNA functional interactions in UVB-induced senescence of human diploid fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cellular senescence can be induced by a variety of extrinsic stimuli, and sustained exposure to sunlight is a key factor in photoaging of the skin. Accordingly, irradiation of skin fibroblasts by UVB light triggers cellular senescence, which is thought to contribute to extrinsic skin aging, although molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we addressed molecular mechanisms underlying UVB induced senescence of human diploid fibroblasts. Results We observed a parallel activation of the p53/p21WAF1 and p16INK4a/pRb pathways. Using genome-wide transcriptome analysis, we identified a transcriptional signature of UVB-induced senescence that was conserved in three independent strains of human diploid fibroblasts (HDF) from skin. In parallel, a comprehensive screen for microRNAs regulated during UVB-induced senescence was performed which identified five microRNAs that are significantly regulated during the process. Bioinformatic analysis of miRNA-mRNA networks was performed to identify new functional mRNA targets with high confidence for miR-15a, miR-20a, miR-20b, miR-93, and miR-101. Already known targets of these miRNAs were identified in each case, validating the approach. Several new targets were identified for all of these miRNAs, with the potential to provide new insight in the process of UVB-induced senescence at a genome-wide level. Subsequent analysis was focused on miR-101 and its putative target gene Ezh2. We confirmed that Ezh2 is regulated by miR-101 in human fibroblasts, and found that both overexpression of miR-101 and downregulation of Ezh2 independently induce senescence in the absence of UVB irradiation. However, the downregulation of miR-101 was not sufficient to block the phenotype of UVB-induced senescence, suggesting that other UVB-induced processes induce the senescence response in a pathway redundant with upregulation of miR-101. Conclusion We performed a comprehensive screen for UVB-regulated microRNAs in human diploid fibroblasts, and identified a network of miRNA-mRNA interactions mediating UVB-induced senescence. In addition, miR-101 and Ezh2 were identified as key players in UVB-induced senescence of HDF. PMID:23557329

  5. A combined database related and de novo MS-identification of yeast mannose-1-phosphate guanyltransferase PSA1 interaction partners at different phases of batch cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parviainen, Ville; Joenväärä, Sakari; Peltoniemi, Hannu; Mattila, Pirkko; Renkonen, Risto

    2009-04-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomic research has become one of the main methods in protein-protein interaction research. Several high throughput studies have established an interaction landscape of exponentially growing Baker's yeast culture. However, many of the protein-protein interactions are likely to change in different environmental conditions. In order to examine the dynamic nature of the protein interactions we isolated the protein complexes of mannose-1-phosphate guanyltransferase PSA1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae at four different time points during batch cultivation. We used the tandem affinity purification (TAP)-method to purify the complexes and subjected the tryptic peptides to LC-MS/MS. The resulting peak lists were analyzed with two different methods: the database related protein identification program X!Tandem and the de novo sequencing program Lutefisk. We observed significant changes in the interactome of PSA1 during the batch cultivation and identified altogether 74 proteins interacting with PSA1 of which only six were found to interact during all time points. All the other proteins showed a more dynamic nature of binding activity. In this study we also demonstrate the benefit of using both database related and de novo methods in the protein interaction research to enhance both the quality and the quantity of observations.

  6. Florida Keys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Florida Keys are a chain of islands, islets and reefs extending from Virginia Key to the Dry Tortugas for about 309 kilometers (192 miles). The keys are chiefly limestone and coral formations. The larger islands of the group are Key West (with its airport), Key Largo, Sugarloaf Key, and Boca Chica Key. A causeway extends from the mainland to Key West.

    This image was acquired on October 28, 2001, by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort to understand and protect our home planet. Through the study of Earth, NASA will help to provide sound science to policy and economic decision-makers so as to better life here, while developing the technologies needed to explore the universe and search for life beyond our home planet.

    Size: 51.6 by 29.7 kilometers ( 32.0 by 18.4 miles) Location: 24.7 degrees North latitude, 81.5 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 1, 2, and 3 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49.2 feet) Date Acquired: October 28, 2001

  7. Key Nutrients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Extension Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Lessons written to help trainer agents prepare aides for work with families in the Food and Nutrition Program are presented in this booklet. The key nutrients discussed in the 10 lessons are protein, carbohydrates, fat, calcium, iron, iodine, and Vitamins A, B, C, and D. the format of each lesson is as follows: Purpose, Presentation, Application…

  8. Magnetic hyperthermia properties of nanoparticles inside lysosomes using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations: Influence of key parameters and dipolar interactions, and evidence for strong spatial variation of heating power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, R. P.; Carrey, J.; Respaud, M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the influence of dipolar interactions in magnetic hyperthermia experiments is of crucial importance for fine optimization of nanoparticle (NP) heating power. In this study we use a kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm to calculate hysteresis loops that correctly account for both time and temperature. This algorithm is shown to correctly reproduce the high-frequency hysteresis loop of both superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic NPs without any ad hoc or artificial parameters. The algorithm is easily parallelizable with a good speed-up behavior, which considerably decreases the calculation time on several processors and enables the study of assemblies of several thousands of NPs. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of magnetic NPs dispersed inside spherical lysosomes is studied as a function of several key parameters: volume concentration, applied magnetic field, lysosome size, NP diameter, and anisotropy. The influence of these parameters is illustrated and comprehensively explained. In summary, magnetic interactions increase the coercive field, saturation field, and hysteresis area of major loops. However, for small amplitude magnetic fields such as those used in magnetic hyperthermia, the heating power as a function of concentration can increase, decrease, or display a bell shape, depending on the relationship between the applied magnetic field and the coercive/saturation fields of the NPs. The hysteresis area is found to be well correlated with the parallel or antiparallel nature of the dipolar field acting on each particle. The heating power of a given NP is strongly influenced by a local concentration involving approximately 20 neighbors. Because this local concentration strongly decreases upon approaching the surface, the heating power increases or decreases in the vicinity of the lysosome membrane. The amplitude of variation reaches more than one order of magnitude in certain conditions. This transition occurs on a thickness corresponding to approximately 1.3 times the mean distance between two neighbors. The amplitude and sign of this variation is explained. Finally, implications of these various findings are discussed in the framework of magnetic hyperthermia optimization. It is concluded that feedback on two specific points from biology experiments is required for further advancement of the optimization of magnetic NPs for magnetic hyperthermia. The present simulations will be an advantageous tool to optimize magnetic NPs heating power and interpret experimental results.

  9. Identification of module biomarkers from the dysregulated ceRNA-ceRNA interaction network in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shao, Tingting; Wu, Aiwei; Chen, Juan; Chen, Hong; Lu, Jianping; Bai, Jing; Li, Yongsheng; Xu, Juan; Li, Xia

    2015-10-13

    Competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA) represents a novel layer of gene regulation that plays important roles in the physiology and development of diseases such as cancer and its dysregulation could contribute to cancer pathogenesis. Here, we have proposed a computational method to systematically identify genome-wide dysregulated ceRNA-ceRNA interactions by integrating microRNA regulation with expression profiles in cancer and normal tissues by RNA sequencing, as well as considering the details of how the behavior of ceRNAs has changed. These gain or loss dysregulations further assemble into a dysregulated ceRNA-ceRNA network; lncRNAs and pseudogenes are also considered. After applying the method to lung adenocarcinoma, we found that most dysregulations are connected together and formed a lung adenocarcinoma dysregulated ceRNA-ceRNA network (LDCCNet). Our analyses found that ceRNA pairs with gain regulations have consistent expression in cancer, otherwise for loss regulation, it is not necessary. Moreover, ceRNAs with more significant gain regulations (gain ceRNAs) undergo stronger regulation in cancer; thus their expression is more likely to decrease in cancer, while the expression of loss ceRNAs displays a rising trend. Additionally, we found that gain and loss ceRNAs as topological key nodes are implicated in the development of cancer. Finally, dysregulated ceRNA modules were identified, which are significantly enriched with known lung cancer microRNAs. We further found that several modules have the power as diagnostic biomarkers even in three independent datasets. For example, the module with lncRNA RP11-457M11.2 as a center is involved in the epithelial cell morphogenesis process and provides the average AUC values of 0.95. Our study about LDCCNet opens up the possibility of a new biological mechanism in cancer that could serve as a biomarker for diagnosis. PMID:26325208

  10. Experimental identification of the lateral human-structure interaction mechanism and assessment of the inverted-pendulum biomechanical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, S. P.; Owen, J. S.; Hussein, M. F. M.

    2014-10-01

    Within the context of crowd-induced lateral bridge vibration, human-structure interaction (HSI) is a widely studied phenomenon. Central to this study is the self-excited component of the ground reaction force (GRF). This force harmonic, induced by a walking pedestrian, resonates with lateral deck motion, irrespective of the pedestrian's pacing frequency. Its presence can lead to positive feedback between pedestrian GRFs and structural motion. Characterisation of the self-excited force as equivalent structural mass and damping has greatly improved the understanding of HSI and its role in developing lateral dynamic instability. However, despite this evolving understanding, a key question has remained unanswered; what are the features of a pedestrian's balance response to base motion that gives rise to the self-excited force? The majority of the literature has focussed on the effects of HSI with the underlying mechanism receiving comparatively little attention. This paper presents data from experimental testing in which 10 subjects walked individually on a laterally oscillating treadmill. Lateral deck motion as well as the GRFs imposed by the subject was recorded. Three-dimensional motion capture equipment was used to track the position of visual markers mounted on the subject. Thus whole body response to base motion was captured in addition to the GRFs generated. The data presented herein supports the authors' previous findings that the self-excited force is a frequency sideband harmonic resulting from amplitude modulation of the lateral GRF. The gait behaviour responsible for this amplitude modulation is a periodic modulation of stride width in response to a sinusoidally varying inertia force induced by deck motion. In a separate analysis the validity of the passive inverted pendulum model, stabilised by active control of support placement was confirmed. This was established through comparison of simulated and observed frontal plane CoM motion. Despite the relative simplicity of this biomechanical model, remarkable agreement was observed.

  11. Identification of entomopathogenic fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter provides essential assistance for the identification of the most important genera (and main species) of fungal pathogens affecting insects, mites, and spiders. The key allows identifications regardless of which major spore types might be present with the specimen. The phylogenetic affi...

  12. Key bioactive reaction products of the NO/H2S interaction are S/N-hybrid species, polysulfides, and nitroxyl.

    PubMed

    Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Kuhnle, Gunter G C; Dyson, Alex; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Grman, Marian; DuMond, Jenna F; Barrow, Mark P; McLeod, George; Nakagawa, Hidehiko; Ondrias, Karol; Nagy, Péter; King, S Bruce; Saavedra, Joseph E; Keefer, Larry K; Singer, Mervyn; Kelm, Malte; Butler, Anthony R; Feelisch, Martin

    2015-08-25

    Experimental evidence suggests that nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) signaling pathways are intimately intertwined, with mutual attenuation or potentiation of biological responses in the cardiovascular system and elsewhere. The chemical basis of this interaction is elusive. Moreover, polysulfides recently emerged as potential mediators of H2S/sulfide signaling, but their biosynthesis and relationship to NO remain enigmatic. We sought to characterize the nature, chemical biology, and bioactivity of key reaction products formed in the NO/sulfide system. At physiological pH, we find that NO and sulfide form a network of cascading chemical reactions that generate radical intermediates as well as anionic and uncharged solutes, with accumulation of three major products: nitrosopersulfide (SSNO(-)), polysulfides, and dinitrososulfite [N-nitrosohydroxylamine-N-sulfonate (SULFI/NO)], each with a distinct chemical biology and in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. SSNO(-) is resistant to thiols and cyanolysis, efficiently donates both sulfane sulfur and NO, and potently lowers blood pressure. Polysulfides are both intermediates and products of SSNO(-) synthesis/decomposition, and they also decrease blood pressure and enhance arterial compliance. SULFI/NO is a weak combined NO/nitroxyl donor that releases mainly N2O on decomposition; although it affects blood pressure only mildly, it markedly increases cardiac contractility, and formation of its precursor sulfite likely contributes to NO scavenging. Our results unveil an unexpectedly rich network of coupled chemical reactions between NO and H2S/sulfide, suggesting that the bioactivity of either transmitter is governed by concomitant formation of polysulfides and anionic S/N-hybrid species. This conceptual framework would seem to offer ample opportunities for the modulation of fundamental biological processes governed by redox switching and sulfur trafficking. PMID:26224837

  13. Key bioactive reaction products of the NO/H2S interaction are S/N-hybrid species, polysulfides, and nitroxyl

    PubMed Central

    Cortese-Krott, Miriam M.; Kuhnle, Gunter G. C.; Dyson, Alex; Fernandez, Bernadette O.; Grman, Marian; DuMond, Jenna F.; Barrow, Mark P.; McLeod, George; Nakagawa, Hidehiko; Ondrias, Karol; Nagy, Péter; King, S. Bruce; Saavedra, Joseph E.; Keefer, Larry K.; Singer, Mervyn; Kelm, Malte; Butler, Anthony R.; Feelisch, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) signaling pathways are intimately intertwined, with mutual attenuation or potentiation of biological responses in the cardiovascular system and elsewhere. The chemical basis of this interaction is elusive. Moreover, polysulfides recently emerged as potential mediators of H2S/sulfide signaling, but their biosynthesis and relationship to NO remain enigmatic. We sought to characterize the nature, chemical biology, and bioactivity of key reaction products formed in the NO/sulfide system. At physiological pH, we find that NO and sulfide form a network of cascading chemical reactions that generate radical intermediates as well as anionic and uncharged solutes, with accumulation of three major products: nitrosopersulfide (SSNO?), polysulfides, and dinitrososulfite [N-nitrosohydroxylamine-N-sulfonate (SULFI/NO)], each with a distinct chemical biology and in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. SSNO? is resistant to thiols and cyanolysis, efficiently donates both sulfane sulfur and NO, and potently lowers blood pressure. Polysulfides are both intermediates and products of SSNO? synthesis/decomposition, and they also decrease blood pressure and enhance arterial compliance. SULFI/NO is a weak combined NO/nitroxyl donor that releases mainly N2O on decomposition; although it affects blood pressure only mildly, it markedly increases cardiac contractility, and formation of its precursor sulfite likely contributes to NO scavenging. Our results unveil an unexpectedly rich network of coupled chemical reactions between NO and H2S/sulfide, suggesting that the bioactivity of either transmitter is governed by concomitant formation of polysulfides and anionic S/N-hybrid species. This conceptual framework would seem to offer ample opportunities for the modulation of fundamental biological processes governed by redox switching and sulfur trafficking. PMID:26224837

  14. Ferenczi's concept of identification with the aggressor: understanding dissociative structure with interacting victim and abuser self-states.

    PubMed

    Howell, Elizabeth F

    2014-03-01

    No one has described more passionately than Ferenczi the traumatic induction of dissociative trance with its resulting fragmentation of the personality. Ferenczi introduced the concept and term, identification with the aggressor in his seminal "Confusion of Tongues" paper, in which he described how the abused child becomes transfixed and robbed of his senses. Having been traumatically overwhelmed, the child becomes hypnotically transfixed by the aggressor's wishes and behavior, automatically identifying by mimicry rather than by a purposeful identification with the aggressor's role. To expand upon Ferenczi's observations, identification with the aggressor can be understood as a two-stage process. The first stage is automatic and initiated by trauma, but the second stage is defensive and purposeful. While identification with the aggressor begins as an automatic organismic process, with repeated activation and use, gradually it becomes a defensive process. Broadly, as a dissociative defense, it has two enacted relational parts, the part of the victim and the part of the aggressor. This paper describes the intrapersonal aspects (how aggressor and victim self-states interrelate in the internal world), as well as the interpersonal aspects (how these become enacted in the external). This formulation has relevance to understanding the broad spectrum of the dissociative structure of mind, borderline personality disorder, and dissociative identity disorder. PMID:24603172

  15. Identification of a Novel LXXLL Motif in -Actinin 4-spliced Isoform That Is Critical for Its Interaction with Estrogen

    E-print Network

    Yang, Sichun

    Interaction with Estrogen Receptor and Co-activators*S Received for publication,July 14, 2012, and in revised activity and directly interact with estrogen receptor , although ACTN4 (Iso) binds ER more strongly. We-independent and the ligand-dependent activa- tion domains of estrogen receptor . Although ACTN4 (Iso) interacts efficiently

  16. Identification of Molecular Fingerprints in Human Heat Pain Thresholds by Use of an Interactive Mixture Model R Toolbox (AdaptGauss).

    PubMed

    Ultsch, Alfred; Thrun, Michael C; Hansen-Goos, Onno; Lötsch, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical data obtained during cell experiments, laboratory animal research, or human studies often display a complex distribution. Statistical identification of subgroups in research data poses an analytical challenge. Here were introduce an interactive R-based bioinformatics tool, called "AdaptGauss". It enables a valid identification of a biologically-meaningful multimodal structure in the data by fitting a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to the data. The interface allows a supervised selection of the number of subgroups. This enables the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm to adapt more complex GMM than usually observed with a noninteractive approach. Interactively fitting a GMM to heat pain threshold data acquired from human volunteers revealed a distribution pattern with four Gaussian modes located at temperatures of 32.3, 37.2, 41.4, and 45.4 °C. Noninteractive fitting was unable to identify a meaningful data structure. Obtained results are compatible with known activity temperatures of different TRP ion channels suggesting the mechanistic contribution of different heat sensors to the perception of thermal pain. Thus, sophisticated analysis of the modal structure of biomedical data provides a basis for the mechanistic interpretation of the observations. As it may reflect the involvement of different TRP thermosensory ion channels, the analysis provides a starting point for hypothesis-driven laboratory experiments. PMID:26516852

  17. Identification of Molecular Fingerprints in Human Heat Pain Thresholds by Use of an Interactive Mixture Model R Toolbox (AdaptGauss)

    PubMed Central

    Ultsch, Alfred; Thrun, Michael C.; Hansen-Goos, Onno; Lötsch, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical data obtained during cell experiments, laboratory animal research, or human studies often display a complex distribution. Statistical identification of subgroups in research data poses an analytical challenge. Here were introduce an interactive R-based bioinformatics tool, called “AdaptGauss”. It enables a valid identification of a biologically-meaningful multimodal structure in the data by fitting a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to the data. The interface allows a supervised selection of the number of subgroups. This enables the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm to adapt more complex GMM than usually observed with a noninteractive approach. Interactively fitting a GMM to heat pain threshold data acquired from human volunteers revealed a distribution pattern with four Gaussian modes located at temperatures of 32.3, 37.2, 41.4, and 45.4 °C. Noninteractive fitting was unable to identify a meaningful data structure. Obtained results are compatible with known activity temperatures of different TRP ion channels suggesting the mechanistic contribution of different heat sensors to the perception of thermal pain. Thus, sophisticated analysis of the modal structure of biomedical data provides a basis for the mechanistic interpretation of the observations. As it may reflect the involvement of different TRP thermosensory ion channels, the analysis provides a starting point for hypothesis-driven laboratory experiments. PMID:26516852

  18. Identification of a novel nuclear localization signal and speckle-targeting sequence of tuftelin-interacting protein 11, a splicing factor involved in spliceosome disassembly

    SciTech Connect

    Tannukit, Sissada; Crabb, Tara L.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Wen, Xin; Jans, David A.; Paine, Michael L.

    2009-12-18

    Tuftelin-interacting protein 11 (TFIP11) is a protein component of the spliceosome complex that promotes the release of the lariat-intron during late-stage splicing through a direct recruitment and interaction with DHX15/PRP43. Expression of TFIP11 is essential for cell and organismal survival. TFIP11 contains a G-patch domain, a signature motif of RNA-processing proteins that is responsible for TFIP11-DHX15 interactions. No other functional domains within TFIP11 have been described. TFIP11 is localized to distinct speckled regions within the cell nucleus, although excluded from the nucleolus. In this study sequential C-terminal deletions and mutational analyses have identified two novel protein elements in mouse TFIP11. The first domain covers amino acids 701-706 (VKDKFN) and is an atypical nuclear localization signal (NLS). The second domain is contained within amino acids 711-735 and defines TFIP11's distinct speckled nuclear localization. The identification of a novel TFIP11 nuclear speckle-targeting sequence (TFIP11-STS) suggests that this domain directly interacts with additional spliceosomal components. These data help define the mechanism of nuclear/nuclear speckle localization of the splicing factor TFIP11, with implications for it's function.

  19. Identification of a novel nuclear localization signal and speckle-targeting sequence of tuftelin-interacting protein 11, a splicing factor involved in spliceosome disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Tannukit, Sissada; Crabb, Tara L.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Wen, Xin; Jans, David A.; Paine, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Tuftelin-interacting protein 11 (TFIP11) is a protein component of the spliceosome complex that promotes the release of the lariat-intron during late-stage splicing through a direct recruitment and interaction with DHX15/PRP43. Expression of TFIP11 is essential for cell and organismal survival. TFIP11 contains a G-patch domain, a signature motif of RNA-processing proteins that is responsible for TFIP11-DHX15 interactions. No other functional domains within TFIP11 have been described. TFIP11 is localized to distinct speckled regions within the cell nucleus, although excluded from the nucleolus. In this study sequential C-terminal deletions and mutational analyses have identified two novel protein elements in mouse TFIP11. The first domain covers amino acids 701–706 (VKDKFN) and is an atypical nuclear localization signal (NLS). The second domain is contained within amino acids 711–735 and defines TFIP11’s distinct speckled nuclear localization. The identification of a novel TFIP11 nuclear speckle targeting sequence (TFIP11-STS) suggests that this domain directly interacts with additional spliceosomal components. These data help define the mechanism of nuclear/nuclear speckle localization of the splicing factor TFIP11, with implications for it’s function. PMID:19857462

  20. Interactions among Dendrolimus punctatus cypovirus proteins and identification of the genomic segment encoding its A-spike.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chuangang; Shao, Yunpeng; Su, Lan; Zhou, Yin; Sun, Xiulian

    2014-07-01

    Revealing the interactions among cypovirus proteins would facilitate our understanding of the replication and assembly of this virus. In the present study, interactions among proteins encoded by the 10 segments of Dendrolimus punctatus cypovirus (DpCPV) were identified using yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) and far-Western blotting assays. In total, 24 pairs of interactions were detected. Twelve pairs of one-direction interactions, four pairs of binary interactions and four pairs of self-associations were identified in the Y2H assays. Another four pairs of interactions were identified by far-Western blotting. The interactions between the methyltransferase domain of the turret protein (VP3) and VP4 as well as between polyhedrin and VP4 were further confirmed by far-Western blotting and pull-down assays, respectively. In addition, immunogold labelling showed that the A-spike of DpCPV is formed by VP4. In conclusion, we obtained a protein-protein interaction network of DpCPV and showed that its A-spike is formed by VP4 encoded by genomic segment 6. PMID:24700101

  1. Identification of a host 14-3-3 Protein that Interacts with Xanthomonas effector AvrRxv

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AvrRxv is a member of a family of pathogen effectors from both plant and mammalian pathogens. Using a yeast two hybrid screen, we identified a 14-3-3 protein from tomato that interacts with AvrRxv called AvrRxv Interactor 1 (ARI1). The interaction was confirmed in vitro with affinity chromatograph...

  2. Identification of Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors Targeting Vaccinia Virus Processivity Factor for Development of Antiviral Agents ? †

    PubMed Central

    Schormann, Norbert; Sommers, Charnell Inglis; Prichard, Mark N.; Keith, Kathy A.; Noah, James W.; Nuth, Manunya; Ricciardi, Robert P.; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2011-01-01

    Poxvirus uracil DNA glycosylase D4 in association with A20 and the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase forms the processive polymerase complex. The binding of D4 and A20 is essential for processive polymerase activity. Using an AlphaScreen assay, we identified compounds that inhibit protein-protein interactions between D4 and A20. Effective interaction inhibitors exhibited both antiviral activity and binding to D4. These results suggest that novel antiviral agents that target the protein-protein interactions between D4 and A20 can be developed for the treatment of infections with poxviruses, including smallpox. PMID:21844323

  3. Identification of Hsp90 as a species independent H5N1 avian influenza A virus PB2 interacting protein.

    PubMed

    Jirakanwisal, Krit; Srisutthisamphan, Kanjana; Thepparit, Chutima; Suptawiwat, Ornpreya; Auewarakul, Prasert; Paemanee, Atchara; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Smith, Duncan R

    2015-12-01

    The avian influenza polymerase protein PB2 subunit is an important mediator of cross species adaptation and adaptation to mammalian cells is strongly but not exclusively associated with an adaptive mutation of the codon at position 627 of the PB2 protein which alters the glutamate normally found at this position to a lysine. This study sought to identify host cell factors in both mammalian and avian cells that interacted in a species specific or species independent manner. Two PB2 fusion proteins differing only in codon 627 were generated and transfected into mammalian and avian cells and interacting proteins identified through co-immunoprecipitation. A number of proteins including Hsp90 were identified and further investigation showed that Hsp90 interacted with both isoforms of PB2 in both mammalian and avian cells. Hsp90 is thus identified as a species independent interacting protein, further confirming that this protein may be a suitable target for anti-influenza drug development. PMID:26616658

  4. Computational identification of post-translational modification-based nuclear import regulations by characterizing nuclear localization signal-import receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jhih-Rong; Liu, Zhonghao; Hu, Jianjun

    2014-10-01

    The binding affinity between a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and its import receptor is closely related to corresponding nuclear import activity. PTM-based modulation of the NLS binding affinity to the import receptor is one of the most understood mechanisms to regulate nuclear import of proteins. However, identification of such regulation mechanisms is challenging due to the difficulty of assessing the impact of PTM on corresponding nuclear import activities. In this study we proposed NIpredict, an effective algorithm to predict nuclear import activity given its NLS, in which molecular interaction energy components (MIECs) were used to characterize the NLS-import receptor interaction, and the support vector regression machine (SVR) was used to learn the relationship between the characterized NLS-import receptor interaction and the corresponding nuclear import activity. Our experiments showed that nuclear import activity change due to NLS change could be accurately predicted by the NIpredict algorithm. Based on NIpredict, we developed a systematic framework to identify potential PTM-based nuclear import regulations for human and yeast nuclear proteins. Application of this approach has identified the potential nuclear import regulation mechanisms by phosphorylation of two nuclear proteins including SF1 and ORC6. PMID:25043850

  5. Key Indistinguishability vs. Strong Key Indistinguishability

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    1 Key Indistinguishability vs. Strong Key Indistinguishability for Hierarchical Key Assignment Schemes Arcangelo Castiglione, Alfredo De Santis and Barbara Masucci Abstract A hierarchical key assignment scheme is a method to assign some private information and encryption keys to a set of classes

  6. NMR identification of endogenous metabolites interacting with fatted and non-fatted human serum albumin in blood plasma: Fatty acids influence the HSA-metabolite interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jupin, Marc; Michiels, Paul J.; Girard, Frederic C.; Spraul, Manfred; Wijmenga, Sybren S.

    2013-03-01

    Metabolites and their concentrations are direct reporters on body biochemistry. Thanks to technical developments metabolic profiling of body fluids, such as blood plasma, by for instance NMR has in the past decade become increasingly accurate enabling successful clinical diagnostics. Human Serum Albumin (HSA) is the main plasma protein (˜60% of all plasma protein) and responsible for the transport of endogenous (e.g. fatty acids) and exogenous metabolites, which it achieves thanks to its multiple binding sites and its flexibility. HSA has been extensively studied with regard to its binding of drugs (exogenous metabolites), but only to a lesser extent with regard to its binding of endogenous (non-fatty acid) metabolites. To obtain correct NMR measured metabolic profiles of blood plasma and/or potentially extract information on HSA and fatty acids content, it is necessary to characterize these endogenous metabolite/plasma protein interactions. Here, we investigate these metabolite-HSA interactions in blood plasma and blood plasma mimics. The latter contain the roughly twenty metabolites routinely detected by NMR (also most abundant) in normal relative concentrations with fatted or non-fatted HSA added or not. First, we find that chemical shift changes are small and seen only for a few of the metabolites. In contrast, a significant number of the metabolites display reduced resonance integrals and reduced free concentrations in the presence of HSA or fatted HSA. For slow-exchange (or strong) interactions, NMR resonance integrals report the free metabolite concentration, while for fast exchange (weak binding) the chemical shift reports on the binding. Hence, these metabolites bind strongly to HSA and/or fatted HSA, but to a limited degree because for most metabolites their concentration is smaller than the HSA concentration. Most interestingly, fatty acids decrease the metabolite-HSA binding quite significantly for most of the interacting metabolites. We further find that competition between the metabolites for binding is absent for most of these metabolites. These mappings in plasma mimics may thus open new opportunities for improved metabolic profiling of blood plasma. For instance, correct metabolite concentrations can be determined for the non-interacting metabolites and/or concentration corrections made for interacting metabolites. Secondly, the interacting metabolites could be used to act as reporters on HSA and fatty acid concentration in plasma, and thus potentially act as biomarker in diagnostic studies of trauma or cardiovascular diseases. Finally, we find in the blood plasma mimics that after ultrafiltration, commonly used to remove the protein from plasma, the measured concentration equals the total metabolite concentration, except for the strongest binding metabolite citrate.

  7. Identification of New Potential Interaction Partners for Human Cytoplasmic Copper Chaperone Atox1: Roles in Gene Regulation?

    PubMed

    Öhrvik, Helena; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2015-01-01

    The human copper (Cu) chaperone Atox1 delivers Cu to P1B type ATPases in the Golgi network, for incorporation into essential Cu-dependent enzymes. Atox1 homologs are found in most organisms; it is a 68-residue ferredoxin-fold protein that binds Cu in a conserved surface-exposed Cys-X-X-Cys (CXXC) motif. In addition to its well-documented cytoplasmic chaperone function, in 2008 Atox1 was suggested to have functionality in the nucleus. To identify new interactions partners of Atox1, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen with a large human placenta library of cDNA fragments using Atox1 as bait. Among 98 million fragments investigated, 25 proteins were found to be confident interaction partners. Nine of these were uncharacterized proteins, and the remaining 16 proteins were analyzed by bioinformatics with respect to cell localization, tissue distribution, function, sequence motifs, three-dimensional structures and interaction networks. Several of the hits were eukaryotic-specific proteins interacting with DNA or RNA implying that Atox1 may act as a modulator of gene regulation. Notably, because many of the identified proteins contain CXXC motifs, similarly to the Cu transport reactions, interactions between these and Atox1 may be mediated by Cu. PMID:26213915

  8. Identification and Expression Analysis of a Novel HbCIPK2-Interacting Ferredoxin from Halophyte H. brevisubulatum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Ge, Rongchao; Zhang, Junwen; Chen, Yajuan; Wang, Hongzhi; Wei, Jianhua; Li, Ruifen

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxin is a small iron-sulfer protein involved in various one-eletron transfer pathways. Little is known about how ferredoxin is regulated to distribute electron under abiotic stress. Our previous study has showed that HbCIPK2 conferred salinity and drought tolerance. Thus, we hypothesized that HbCIPK2 could mediate the activities of interacting partners as a signal transducer. In this report, we identified a novel HbCIPK2-interacting ferredoxin (HbFd1) from halophyte Hordeum brevisubulatum by yeast two-hybrid screens, confirmed this interaction by BiFC in vivo and CoIP in vitro, and presented the expression pattern of HbFd1. HbFd1 was down-regulated under salinity and cold stress but up-regulated under PEG stress, its expression showed tissue-specific, mainly in shoot chloroplast, belonging to leaf-type subgroup. Moreover, HbCIPK2 could recruit HbFd1 to the nucleus for their interaction. The C-terminal segment in HbFd1 protein was involved in the interaction with HbCIPK2. These results provided insight into the connection between CBL-CIPK signaling network and Fd-dependent metabolic pathways. PMID:26636581

  9. Co-immunoprecipitation-based identification of putative BAX INHIBITOR-1-interacting proteins involved in cell death regulation and plant-powdery mildew interactions.

    PubMed

    Weis, Corina; Pfeilmeier, Sebastian; Glawischnig, Erich; Isono, Erika; Pachl, Fiona; Hahne, Hannes; Kuster, Bernhard; Eichmann, Ruth; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2013-10-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident BAX INHIBITOR-1 (BI-1) protein is one of a few cell death suppressors known to be conserved in animals and plants. The function of BI-1 proteins in response to various biotic and abiotic stress factors is well established. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. We conducted co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) experiments to identify Arabidopsis thaliana?BI-1-interacting proteins to obtain a potentially better understanding of how BI-1 functions during plant-pathogen interactions and as a suppressor of cell death. Liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identified 95 proteins co-immunoprecipitated with green fluorescing protein (GFP)-tagged BI-1. Five selected candidate proteins, a RIBOPHORIN II (RPN2) family protein, VACUOLAR ATP SYNTHASE SUBUNIT A (VHA-A), cytochrome P450 83A1 (CYP83A1), H(+) -ATPASE 1 (AHA1) and PROHIBITIN 2 (PHB2), were further investigated with regard to their role in BI-1-associated processes. To this end, we analysed a set of Arabidopsis mutants in the interaction with the adapted powdery mildew fungus Erysiphe cruciferarum and on cell death-inducing treatments. Two independent rpn2 knock-down mutants tended to better support powdery mildew, and a phb2 mutant showed altered responses to cell death-inducing Alternaria alternata f.sp. lycopersici (AAL) toxin treatment. Two independent cyp83a1 mutants showed a strong powdery mildew resistance phenotype and enhanced sensitivity to AAL toxin. Moreover, co-localization studies and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments suggested a direct interaction of BI-1 with CYP83A1 at the ER. PMID:23782494

  10. Genome-scale identification of miRNA-mRNA and miRNA-lncRNA interactions in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Li, A; Zhang, J; Zhou, Z; Wang, L; Sun, X; Liu, Y

    2015-12-01

    Domestic animals show considerable genetic diversity. Previous studies suggested that animal phenotypes were affected by miRNA-mRNA interplay, but these studies focused mainly on the analysis of one or several miRNA-mRNA interactions. However, in this study, we investigated miRNA-mRNA and miRNA-lncRNA interactions on a genomic scale using miranda and targetscan algorithms. There has been strong directional artificial selection practiced during the domestication of animals. Thus, we investigated SNPs that were located in miRNAs and miRNA binding sites and found that several SNPs located in 3'-UTRs of mRNAs had the potential to affect miRNA-mRNA interactions. In addition, a database, named miRBond, was developed to provide visualization, analysis and downloading of the resulting datasets. Our results open the way to further experimental verification of miRNA-mRNA and miRNA-lncRNA interactions as well as the influence of SNPs upon such interplay. PMID:26360131

  11. Enhancements to the Rosetta Energy Function Enable Improved Identification of Small Molecules that Inhibit Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Karanicolas, John

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are among today’s most exciting and promising targets for therapeutic intervention. To date, identifying small-molecules that selectively disrupt these interactions has proven particularly challenging for virtual screening tools, since these have typically been optimized to perform well on more “traditional” drug discovery targets. Here, we test the performance of the Rosetta energy function for identifying compounds that inhibit protein interactions, when these active compounds have been hidden amongst pools of “decoys.” Through this virtual screening benchmark, we gauge the effect of two recent enhancements to the functional form of the Rosetta energy function: the new “Talaris” update and the “pwSHO” solvation model. Finally, we conclude by developing and validating a new weight set that maximizes Rosetta’s ability to pick out the active compounds in this test set. Looking collectively over the course of these enhancements, we find a marked improvement in Rosetta’s ability to identify small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. PMID:26484863

  12. Alcohol-induced sedation and synergistic interactions between alcohol and morphine: A key mechanistic role for Toll-Like Receptors and MyD88-dependent signalling

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Frances; Wu, Yue; Tuke, Jonathan; Coller, Janet K.; Rice, Kenner C.; Diener, Kerrilyn R.; Hayball, John D.; Watkins, Linda R.; Somogyi, Andrew A.; Hutchinson, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates induction of proinflammatory Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 signaling by morphine and, TLR4 signaling by alcohol; thus indicating a common site of drug action and a potential novel innate immune-dependent hypothesis for opioid and alcohol drug interactions. Hence, the current study aimed to assess the role of TLR2, TLR4, MyD88 (as a critical TLR-signalling participant), NF-?B, Interleukin-1? (IL-1?; as a downstream proinflammatory effector molecule) and the µ opioid receptor (MOR; as a classical site for morphine action) in acute alcohol-induced sedation (4.5 g/kg) and alcohol (2.5 g/kg) interaction with morphine (5 mg/kg) by assessing the loss of righting reflex (LORR) as a measure of sedation. Wild-type male Balb/c mice and matched genetically-deficient TLR2, TLR4, and MyD88 strains were utilized, together with pharmacological manipulation of MOR, NF-?B, TLR4 and Interleukin-1?. Alcohol induced significant LORR in wild-type mice; this was halved by MyD88 and TLR4 deficiency, and surprisingly nearly completely eliminated by TLR2 deficiency. In contrast, the interaction between morphine and alcohol was found to be MOR-, NF-?B-, TLR2- and MyD88-dependent, but did not involve TLR4 or Interleukin-1?. Morphine-alcohol interactions caused acute elevations in microglial cell counts and NF-?B-p65 positive cells in the motor cortex in concordance with wild-type and TLR2 deficient mouse behavioral data, implicating neuroimmunopharmacological signaling as a pivotal mechanism in this clinically problematic drug-drug interaction. PMID:25542736

  13. Pharmacophore mapping based inhibitor selection and molecular interaction studies for identification of potential drugs on calcium activated potassium channel blockers, tamulotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R. Barani; Suresh, M. Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tamulotoxin (TmTx) from Buthus tamulus was found to be a highly venomous toxin which accelerates the neurotransmitter release that directly affects the cardiovascular tissues and the respiratory system leading to death. TmTx from red Indian scorpion is a crucial inhibitor for Ca2+ activated K+ channel in humans. Objective: The study is aimed at the identification of potential inhibitors of TmTx through pharmacophore based inhibitor screening and understanding the molecular level interactions. Materials and Method: The potential inhibitors for TmTx were identified using pharmacophore model based descriptor information present in existing drugs with the analysis of pharmacokinetic properties. The compounds with good ADMET (Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion and Toxicity) descriptors were subjected to molecular interaction studies. The stability of bound toxin-inhibitor complex was studied using molecular dynamics simulation over a period of one nanosecond. Results: From a dataset of 3406 compounds, few compounds were selected as potential inhibitors based on the generated best pharmacophore models, pharmacokinetic analysis, molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies. Conclusion: In conclusion, two compounds containing better inhibition properties against TmTx are suggested to be better lead molecules for drug development in future and this study will help us to explore more inhibitors from natural origin against tamulotoxin. PMID:23772102

  14. Identification of a Small Molecule That Modifies MglA/SspA Interaction and Impairs Intramacrophage Survival of Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Wrench, Algevis P.; Gardner, Christopher L.; Gonzalez, Claudio F.; Lorca, Graciela L.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factors MglA and SspA of Francisella tularensis form a heterodimer complex and interact with the RNA polymerase to regulate the expression of the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI) genes. These genes are essential for this pathogen’s virulence and survival within host cells. In this study, we used a small molecule screening to identify quinacrine as a thermal stabilizing compound for F. tularensis SCHU S4 MglA and SspA. A bacterial two-hybrid system was used to analyze the in vivo effect of quinacrine on the heterodimer complex. The results show that quinacrine affects the interaction between MglA and SspA, indicated by decreased ?-galactosidase activity. Further in vitro analyses, using size exclusion chromatography, indicated that quinacrine does not disrupt the heterodimer formation, however, changes in the alpha helix content were confirmed by circular dichroism. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicated that quinacrine makes contact with amino acid residues Y63 in MglA, and K97 in SspA, both located in the “cleft” of the interacting surfaces. In F. tularensis subsp. novicida, quinacrine decreased the transcription of the FPI genes, iglA, iglD, pdpD and pdpA. As a consequence, the intramacrophage survival capabilities of the bacteria were affected. These results support use of the MglA/SspA interacting surface, and quinacrine’s chemical scaffold, for the design of high affinity molecules that will function as therapeutics for the treatment of Tularemia. PMID:23372736

  15. Identification of novel GAPDH-derived antimicrobial peptides secreted by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and involved in wine microbial interactions.

    PubMed

    Branco, Patrícia; Francisco, Diana; Chambon, Christophe; Hébraud, Michel; Arneborg, Nils; Almeida, Maria Gabriela; Caldeira, Jorge; Albergaria, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a primordial role in alcoholic fermentation and has a vast worldwide application in the production of fuel-ethanol, food and beverages. The dominance of S. cerevisiae over other microbial species during alcoholic fermentations has been traditionally ascribed to its higher ethanol tolerance. However, recent studies suggested that other phenomena, such as microbial interactions mediated by killer-like toxins, might play an important role. Here we show that S. cerevisiae secretes antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) during alcoholic fermentation that are active against a wide variety of wine-related yeasts (e.g. Dekkera bruxellensis) and bacteria (e.g. Oenococcus oeni). Mass spectrometry analyses revealed that these AMPs correspond to fragments of the S. cerevisiae glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) protein. The involvement of GAPDH-derived peptides in wine microbial interactions was further sustained by results obtained in mixed cultures performed with S. cerevisiae single mutants deleted in each of the GAPDH codifying genes (TDH1-3) and also with a S. cerevisiae mutant deleted in the YCA1 gene, which codifies the apoptosis-involved enzyme metacaspase. These findings are discussed in the context of wine microbial interactions, biopreservation potential and the role of GAPDH in the defence system of S. cerevisiae. PMID:24292082

  16. Identification of Amino Acids that Account for Long-Range Interactions in Two Triosephosphate Isomerases from Pathogenic Trypanosomes

    SciTech Connect

    García-Torres, Itzhel; Cabrera, Nallely; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Bolaños, Mónica; Díaz-Mazariegos, Selma; Gómez-Puyou, Armando; Perez-Montfort, Ruy

    2012-04-02

    For a better comprehension of the structure-function relationship in proteins it is necessary to identify the amino acids that are relevant for measurable protein functions. Because of the numerous contacts that amino acids establish within proteins and the cooperative nature of their interactions, it is difficult to achieve this goal. Thus, the study of protein-ligand interactions is usually focused on local environmental structural differences. Here, using a pair of triosephosphate isomerase enzymes with extremely high homology from two different organisms, we demonstrate that the control of a seventy-fold difference in reactivity of the interface cysteine is located in several amino acids from two structurally unrelated regions that do not contact the cysteine sensitive to the sulfhydryl reagent methylmethane sulfonate, nor the residues in its immediate vicinity. The change in reactivity is due to an increase in the apparent pKa of the interface cysteine produced by the mutated residues. Our work, which involved grafting systematically portions of one protein into the other protein, revealed unsuspected and multisite long-range interactions that modulate the properties of the interface cysteines and has general implications for future studies on protein structure-function relationships.

  17. Identification and characterization of Alix/AIP1 interacting proteins from the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Sangsuriya, P; Rojtinnakorn, J; Senapin, S; Flegel, T W

    2010-07-01

    Apoptosis is proposed to be a major cause of death in shrimp viral infections. From our previous study, an apoptosis-related gene, Pm-Alix, was identified from the black tiger shrimp. Its expression was high in defence-related tissues including haemocytes and the lymphoid organ. To clarify its possible role in shrimp, we used Pm-Alix as bait in a yeast two-hybrid analysis to search for Alix interacting proteins in shrimp. Two cDNA sequences discovered had homology to a predicted ubiquitin C of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, and to a guanylyl cyclase of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii. In vitro pull-down assays confirmed positive interaction between Pm-Alix and both proteins. Tissue distribution analysis revealed that Pm-Alix and the two binding partners were widely expressed in various tissues but more highly expressed in haemocytes. However, no significant positive or negative correlation was found in the expression of these genes as shrimp approached morbidity and death after challenge with white spot syndrome virus. Thus, the results suggested that Alix and its interacting partners did not play a direct role related to shrimp death. PMID:20412359

  18. An intrastrand three-DNA-base interaction is a key specificity determinant of F transfer initiation and of F TraI relaxase DNA recognition and cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Hekman, Katherine; Guja, Kip; Larkin, Chris; Schildbach, Joel F.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation, transfer of a single conjugative plasmid strand between bacteria, diversifies prokaryotic genomes and disseminates antibiotic resistance genes. As a prerequisite for transfer, plasmid-encoded relaxases bind to and cleave the transferred plasmid strand with sequence specificity. The crystal structure of the F TraI relaxase domain with bound single-stranded DNA suggests binding specificity is partly determined by an intrastrand three-way base-pairing interaction. We showed previously that single substitutions for the three interacting bases could significantly reduce binding. Here we examine the effect of single and double base substitutions at these positions on plasmid mobilization. Many substitutions reduce transfer, although the detrimental effects of some substitutions can be partially overcome by substitutions at a second site. We measured the affinity of the F TraI relaxase domain for several DNA sequence variants. While reduced transfer generally correlates with reduced binding affinity, some oriT variants transfer with an efficiency different than expected from their binding affinities, indicating ssDNA binding and cleavage do not correlate absolutely. Oligonucleotide cleavage assay results suggest the essential function of the three-base interaction may be to position the scissile phosphate for cleavage, rather than to directly contribute to binding affinity. PMID:18611948

  19. The Identification of Maize and Arabidopsis Type I FLAVONE SYNTHASEs Links Flavones with Hormones and Biotic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Falcone Ferreyra, María Lorena; Emiliani, Julia; Rodriguez, Eduardo José; Campos-Bermudez, Valeria Alina; Grotewold, Erich; Casati, Paula

    2015-10-01

    Flavones are a major group of flavonoids with diverse functions and are extensively distributed in land plants. There are two different classes of FLAVONE SYNTHASE (FNS) enzymes that catalyze the conversion of the flavanones into flavones. The FNSI class comprises soluble Fe(2+)/2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, and FNSII enzymes are oxygen- and NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450 membrane-bound monooxygenases. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of FNSI enzymes from maize (Zea mays) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In maize, ZmFNSI-1 is expressed at significantly higher levels in silks and pericarps expressing the 3-deoxy flavonoid R2R3-MYB regulator P1, suggesting that ZmFNSI-1 could be the main enzyme for the synthesis of flavone O-glycosides. We also show here that DOWNY MILDEW RESISTANT6 (AtDMR6), the Arabidopsis homologous enzyme to ZmFNSI-1, has FNSI activity. While dmr6 mutants show loss of susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae, transgenic dmr6 plants expressing ZmFNSI-1 show similar susceptibility to wild-type plants, demonstrating that ZmFNSI-1 can complement the mutant phenotype. AtDMR6 expression analysis showed a tissue- and developmental stage-dependent pattern, with high expression in cauline and senescing leaves. Finally, we show that Arabidopsis cauline and senescing leaves accumulate apigenin, demonstrating that Arabidopsis plants have an FNSI activity involved in the biosynthesis of flavones. The results presented here also suggest cross talk between the flavone and salicylic acid pathways in Arabidopsis; in this way, pathogens would induce flavones to decrease salicylic acid and, hence, increase susceptibility. PMID:26269546

  20. The Identification of Maize and Arabidopsis Type I FLAVONE SYNTHASEs Links Flavones with Hormones and Biotic Interactions1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Falcone Ferreyra, María Lorena; Emiliani, Julia; Rodriguez, Eduardo José; Campos-Bermudez, Valeria Alina; Grotewold, Erich; Casati, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Flavones are a major group of flavonoids with diverse functions and are extensively distributed in land plants. There are two different classes of FLAVONE SYNTHASE (FNS) enzymes that catalyze the conversion of the flavanones into flavones. The FNSI class comprises soluble Fe2+/2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, and FNSII enzymes are oxygen- and NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450 membrane-bound monooxygenases. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of FNSI enzymes from maize (Zea mays) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In maize, ZmFNSI-1 is expressed at significantly higher levels in silks and pericarps expressing the 3-deoxy flavonoid R2R3-MYB regulator P1, suggesting that ZmFNSI-1 could be the main enzyme for the synthesis of flavone O-glycosides. We also show here that DOWNY MILDEW RESISTANT6 (AtDMR6), the Arabidopsis homologous enzyme to ZmFNSI-1, has FNSI activity. While dmr6 mutants show loss of susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae, transgenic dmr6 plants expressing ZmFNSI-1 show similar susceptibility to wild-type plants, demonstrating that ZmFNSI-1 can complement the mutant phenotype. AtDMR6 expression analysis showed a tissue- and developmental stage-dependent pattern, with high expression in cauline and senescing leaves. Finally, we show that Arabidopsis cauline and senescing leaves accumulate apigenin, demonstrating that Arabidopsis plants have an FNSI activity involved in the biosynthesis of flavones. The results presented here also suggest cross talk between the flavone and salicylic acid pathways in Arabidopsis; in this way, pathogens would induce flavones to decrease salicylic acid and, hence, increase susceptibility. PMID:26269546

  1. Identification and characterization of a bovine sperm acrosomal matrix protein and its mechanism of interaction with acrosomal hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Nagdas, Subir K; Smith, Linda; Mcnamara, Allen; Hernandez-Encarnacion, Luisa; Medina-Ortiz, Ilza

    2015-12-01

    Fertilization, the union of male and female gametes to create offspring, is an intricate biological process dependent upon several biochemical and physiological events. Our understanding of the functions of protein constituents of the outer acrosomal membrane-associated matrix complex (OMC) is limited. A highly purified OMC fraction isolated from bovine cauda sperm heads comprised 54, 50, 45, and 38-19 kDa polypeptides. The objective of this study is to identify and characterize the 45 kDa (OMC45) polypeptide, to define its role in binding acrosomal hydrolases, and to examine the fate of OMC45 polypeptide during the acrosome reaction. We isolated OMC45 polypeptide from the high-pH insoluble fraction of OMC. Proteomic analysis of OMC45 by MALDI-TOF-TOF yielded eight peptides that matched the NCBI database sequence of Tektin 3 (TEKT3). Triton X-100-permeabilized cauda sperm exhibited intense staining of the acrosomal segment with anti-OMC45 and anti-TEKT3. The OMC45 polypeptide was solubilized by radio-immunoprecipitation assay buffer extraction. The solubilized fraction was subjected to immunoprecipitation analysis. The OMC45 polypeptide was recovered in the anti-OMC45 immunoprecipitation pellet. An identical blot stained with anti-TEKT3 exhibited the presence of TEKT3 polypeptide in the anti-OMC45 pellet. Our immunofluorescence and biochemical studies confirm the proteomics identification of OMC45 polypeptide and that it exhibits a sequence similarity to TEKT3. OMC45 glycoprotein possesses both N-linked and O-linked oligosaccharides. Deglycosylated OMC45 revealed a significant reduction in both acrosin and N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGA) binding in comparison with acrosin and NAGA binding to a native OMC45 polypeptide, demonstrating the important role of oligosaccharides in hydrolase binding. OMC45 polypeptide is not released during the acrosome reaction but remains in the particulate cell subfraction, associated with the hybrid membrane complex. PMID:26268136

  2. Optimizing Requirements Decisions with KEYS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalali, Omid; Menzies, Tim; Feather, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Recent work with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has allowed for external access to five of JPL's real-world requirements models, anonymized to conceal proprietary information, but retaining their computational nature. Experimentation with these models, reported herein, demonstrates a dramatic speedup in the computations performed on them. These models have a well defined goal: select mitigations that retire risks which, in turn, increases the number of attainable requirements. Such a non-linear optimization is a well-studied problem. However identification of not only (a) the optimal solution(s) but also (b) the key factors leading to them is less well studied. Our technique, called KEYS, shows a rapid way of simultaneously identifying the solutions and their key factors. KEYS improves on prior work by several orders of magnitude. Prior experiments with simulated annealing or treatment learning took tens of minutes to hours to terminate. KEYS runs much faster than that; e.g for one model, KEYS ran 13,000 times faster than treatment learning (40 minutes versus 0.18 seconds). Processing these JPL models is a non-linear optimization problem: the fewest mitigations must be selected while achieving the most requirements. Non-linear optimization is a well studied problem. With this paper, we challenge other members of the PROMISE community to improve on our results with other techniques.

  3. Identification of a small-molecule inhibitor of influenza virus via disrupting the subunits interaction of the viral polymerase.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuofeng; Chu, Hin; Zhao, Hanjun; Zhang, Ke; Singh, Kailash; Chow, Billy K C; Kao, Richard Y T; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Assembly of the heterotrimeric influenza virus polymerase complex from the individual subunits PB1, PA, and PB2 is a prerequisite for viral replication, in which the interaction between the C terminal of PA (PAC) and the N-terminal of PB1 (PB1N) may be a desired target for antiviral development. In this study, we compared the feasibility of high throughput screening by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and fluorescence polarization assay. Among the two, ELISA was demonstrated to own broader dynamic range so that it was used for screening inhibitors that blocked PAC and PB1N interaction. Several binding inhibitors of PAC-PB1N were identified and subsequently tested for the antiviral efficacy. Apparently, 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-6-ethyl-7-methyl[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyrimidin-5-ol, designated ANA-1, was found to be a strong inhibitor of viral polymerase activity and act as a potent antiviral agent against the infections of multiple subtypes of influenza A virus, including H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9 and H9N2 subtypes, in cell cultures. Intranasal administration of ANA-1 protected mice from lethal challenge and reduced lung viral loads in H1N1 virus infected BALB/c mice. Docking analyses predicted that ANA-1 bound to an allosteric site of PAC, which might cause conformational changes thereby disrupting the PAC-PB1N interaction. Overall, our study has identified a novel compound with potential to be developed as an anti-influenza drug. PMID:26593979

  4. Identification of electrostatic interaction sites between the regulatory and catalytic subunits of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, R. M.; Ji-Buechler, Y.; Taylor, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    Two classes of molecules inhibit the catalytic subunit (C) of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (cAPK), the heat-stable protein kinase inhibitors (PKIs) and the regulatory (R) subunits. Basic sites on C, previously identified as important for R/C interaction in yeast TPK1 and corresponding to Lys213, Lys217, and Lys189 in murine C alpha, were replaced with either Ala or Thr and characterized for their kinetic properties and ability to interact with RI and PKI. rC(K213A) and rC(K217A) were both defective in forming holoenzyme with RI but were inhibited readily with PKI. This contrasts with rC(R133A), which is defective in binding PKI but not RI (Wen & Taylor, 1994). Thus, the C-subunit employs two distinct electrostatic surfaces to achieve high-affinity binding with these two types of inhibitory molecules even though all inhibitors share a common consensus site that occupies the active site cleft. Unlike TPK1, mutation of Lys189 had no effect. The mutant C subunits that were defective in binding RI, rC(K213A) and rC(K217A), were then paired with three RI mutants, rRI(D140A), rRI(E143A), and rRI(D258A), shown previously to be defective in recognition of C. Although the mutations at Asp140 and Asp258 in RI were additive with respect to the C mutations. rC(K213A) and rRI(E143A) were compensatory, thus identifying a specific electrostatic interaction site between RI and C. The results are discussed in terms of the RI and C crystal structures and the sequence homology between the yeast and mammalian enzymes. PMID:9300482

  5. Considering interactive effects in the identification of influential regions with extremely rare variants via fixed bin approach.

    PubMed

    Agne, Michael; Huang, Chien-Hsun; Hu, Inchi; Wang, Haitian; Zheng, Tian; Lo, Shaw-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we analyze the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 (GAW18) data to identify regions of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which significantly influence hypertension status among individuals. We have studied the marginal impact of these regions on disease status in the past, but we extend the method to deal with environmental factors present in data collected over several exam periods. We consider the respective interactions between such traits as smoking status and age with the genetic information and hope to augment those genetic regions deemed influential marginally with those that contribute via an interactive effect. In particular, we focus only on rare variants and apply a procedure to combine signal among rare variants in a number of "fixed bins" along the chromosome. We extend the procedure in Agne et al [1] to incorporate environmental factors by dichotomizing subjects via traits such as smoking status and age, running the marginal procedure among each respective category (i.e., smokers or nonsmokers), and then combining their scores into a score for interaction. To avoid overlap of subjects, we examine each exam period individually. Out of a possible 629 fixed-bin regions in chromosome 3, we observe that 11 show up in multiple exam periods for gene-smoking score. Fifteen regions exhibit significance for multiple exam periods for gene-age score, with 4 regions deemed significant for all 3 exam periods. The procedure pinpoints SNPs in 8 "answer" genes, with 5 of these showing up as significant in multiple testing schemes (Gene-Smoking, Gene-Age for Exams 1, 2, and 3). PMID:25519400

  6. Alignment editing and identification of consensus secondary structures for nucleic acid sequences: interactive use of dot matrix representations.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J P; Janji?, N; Pribnow, D; Zichi, D A

    1995-01-01

    We present a computer-aided approach for identifying and aligning consensus secondary structure within a set of functionally related oligonucleotide sequences aligned by sequence. The method relies on visualization of secondary structure using a generalization of the dot matrix representation appropriate for consensus sequence data sets. An interactive computer program implementing such a visualization of consensus structure has been developed. The program allows for alignment editing, data and display filtering and various modes of base pair representation, including co-variation. The utility of this approach is demonstrated with four sample data sets derived from in vitro selection experiments and one data set comprising tRNA sequences. Images PMID:7501472

  7. Identification of a Skp1-Like Protein Interacting with SFB, the Pollen S Determinant of the Gametophytic Self-Incompatibility in Prunus1[W

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Daiki; Yamane, Hisayo; Abe, Kazuyuki; Tao, Ryutaro

    2012-01-01

    Many species in Rosaceae, Solanaceae, and Plantaginaceae exhibit S-RNase-based self-incompatibility (SI). In this system, the pistil and pollen specificities are determined by S-RNase and the S locus F-box protein, respectively. The pollen S determinant F-box protein in Prunus (Rosaceae) is referred to by two different terms, SFB (for S-haplotype-specific F-box protein) and SLF (for S locus F box), whereas it is called SLF in Solanaceae and Plantaginaceae. Prunus SFB is thought to be a molecule indispensable for its cognate S-RNase to exert cytotoxicity and to arrest pollen tube growth in incompatible reactions. Although recent studies have demonstrated the molecular function of SCFSLF in the SI reaction of Solanaceae and Plantaginaceae, how SFB participates in the Prunus SI mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here we report the identification of sweet cherry (Prunus avium) SFB (PavSFB)-interacting Skp1-like1 (PavSSK1) using a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid screening against the pollen cDNA library. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PavSSK1 belongs to the same clade as Antirrhinum hispanicum SLF-interacting Skp1-like1 and Petunia hybrida SLF-interacting Skp1-like1 (PhSSK1). In yeast, PavSSK1 interacted not only with PavSFBs from different S haplotypes and Cullin1-likes (PavCul1s), but also with S-locus F-box-likes. A pull-down assay confirmed the interactions between PavSSK1 and PavSFB and between PavSSK1 and PavCul1s. These results collectively indicate that PavSSK1 could be a functional component of the SCF complex and that PavSFB may function as a component of the SCF complex. We discuss the molecular function of PavSFB in self-/nonself-recognition in the gametophytic SI of Prunus. PMID:22548785

  8. Identification and characterization of Csh3 as an SH3 protein that interacts with fission yeast Cap1.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takaharu; Kobayashi-Ooka, Yasuyo; Zhou, Guo-Lei; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cap1 has been identified as the (adenylyl) cyclase-associated protein. Cap1 was able to bind Cap1 itself and actin. Cap1 localized at the growing tip, and this localization was dependent on the Cap1 P2 region. In a two-hybrid screening using cap1 as bait, we isolated csh3, which encodes a protein of 296 amino acids with an SH3 domain and a proline/glutamine-rich region. The binding of Csh3 and Cap1 was confirmed by in vivo pull down assays. Cooperative functions of Csh3 and Cap1 were observed. Deletion of both csh3 and cap1 resulted in heightened sensitivity to CaCl2, while disruption of either gene alone did not have any effect in this regard. In addition, over-expression of csh3 or cap1 alone did not affect cell growth, while over-expression of both genes resulted in growth retardation. Finally, while Csh3-GFP localized to the cytoplasm in wild-type cells, its localization was altered in cap1? cells, suggesting that the interaction between Csh3 and Cap1 controls the cellular localization of Csh3. These results demonstrate that Cap1 in Schizo. pombe is a multifunctional protein that functions through interaction with Cap1 itself and other proteins including adenylyl cyclase, actin and Csh3. PMID:26542710

  9. Identification and characterization of a novel protein ISOC2 that interacts with p16{sup INK4a}

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaoyi; Shi, Zhongcheng; Wang, Wei; Bai, Jing; Chen, Zhenghua; Xu, Jiujin; Zhang, Dekai; Fu, Songbin . E-mail: Fusb@ems.hrbmu.edu.cn

    2007-09-21

    p16{sup INK4a} is a multiple tumor suppressor, playing an important role in proliferation and tumorigenesis. To screen the p16{sup INK4a}-associated proteins, we performed a yeast two-hybrid assay and identified a novel protein isochorismatase domain containing 2 (ISOC2). ISOC2 conserves in different species, and encodes 205 and 210 amino acids in human and mouse, respectively. The expression of ISOC2 in mouse is universal but predominantly in uterus, stomach, and urinary tract system. Interaction between ISOC2 and p16{sup INK4a} was verified using in vitro pull-down assays and in vivo co-immunoprecipitation. Confocal microscopy studies using green and cyan fluorescent fusion proteins determined that ISOC2 co-localizes with p16{sup INK4a}. Over-expressed ISOC2 is able to inhibit p16{sup INK4a} in dose-dependent manner. Our data indicated that ISOC2 is a novel functional protein, which is able to bind and co-localize with a tumor suppressor gene p16{sup INK4a}. Over-expressed ISOC2 inhibits the expression of p16{sup INK4a}, suggesting that this novel gene may play a role during the tumor development by interacting with p16{sup INK4a}.

  10. Identification of NTF2, a cytosolic factor for nuclear import that interacts with nuclear pore complex protein p62

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Protein import into the nucleus is a multistep process that requires the activities of several cytosolic factors. In this study we have purified a cytosolic factor that interacts with the nuclear pore complex glycoprotein p62. Isolation involved biochemical complementation of cytosol depleted of this activity by preadsorption with recombinant p62 and the use of a novel flow cytometry-based assay for quantitation of nuclear import. The purified activity (NTF2) is an apparent dimer of approximately 14-kD subunits and is present at approximately 10(6) copies per cell. We obtained a cDNA encoding NTF2 and showed that the recombinant protein restores transport activity to p62-pretreated cytosol. Our data suggest that NTF2 acts at a relatively late stage of nuclear protein import, subsequent to the initial docking of nuclear import ligand at the nuclear envelope. NTF2 interacts with at least one additional cytosolic transport activity, indicating that it could be part of a multicomponent system of cytosolic factors that assemble at the pore complex during nuclear import. PMID:7744965

  11. Identification of polyproline II regions derived from the proline-rich nuclear receptor coactivators PNRC and PNRC2: new insights for ER? coactivator interactions.

    PubMed

    Byrne, C; Miclet, E; Broutin, I; Gallo, D; Pelekanou, V; Kampa, M; Castanas, E; Leclercq, G; Jacquot, Y

    2013-10-01

    Protein-protein interactions are crucial for signal transductions required for cell differentiation and proliferation. Their modulation is therefore key to the development of therapeutic alternatives, particularly in the context of cancer. According to literature data, the polyproline-rich nuclear receptor coactivators PNRC and PNRC2 interact with estrogen receptor (ER?) through their PxxP SH3-binding motifs. In a search to identify the molecular features governing this interaction, we explored using electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) calculations, the capacity of a range of putative biologically active peptides derived from these proteins and containing this PxxP motif(s) to form polyproline II (PPII) domains. An additional more exhaustive structural study on a lead PPII peptide was also performed using 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. With the exception of one of all the investigated peptides (PNRC-D), binding assays failed to detect any affinity for Grb2 SH3 domains, suggesting that PPII motifs issued from Grb2 antagonists have a binding mode distinct from those derived from Grb2 agonists. Instead, the peptides revealed a competitive binding ability against a synthetic peptide (ER?17p) with a putative PPII-cognate domain located within a coregulator recruitment region of ER? (AF-2 site). Our work, which constitutes the first structure-related interaction study concerning PNRC and PNRC2, supports not only the existence of PxxP-induced PPII sequences in these coregulators, but also confirms the presence of a PPII recognition site in the AF-2 of the steroid receptor ER?, a region important for transcription regulation. PMID:23925889

  12. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of dye-sensitized solar cells: identification of the dye-electrolyte interaction.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Hanna; Leandri, Valentina; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit; Bergquist, Jonas; Shevchenko, Denys

    2015-05-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have great potential to provide sustainable electricity from sunlight. The photoanode in DSCs consists of a dye-sensitized metal oxide film deposited on a conductive substrate. This configuration makes the photoanode a perfect sample for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). We applied LDI-MS for the study of molecular interactions between a dye and electrolyte on the surface of a TiO2 photoanode. We found that a dye containing polyoxyethylene groups forms complexes with alkali metal cations from the electrolyte, while a dye substituted with alkoxy groups does not. Guanidinium ion forms adducts with neither of the two dyes. PMID:26259656

  13. Identification of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 3 as a new interaction partner of cyclin D3

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Maoyun; Wei Yuanyan; Yao Luyang; Xie Jianhui; Chen Xiaoning; Wang Hanzhou; Jiang Jianhai; Gu Jianxin . E-mail: jxgu@shmu.edu.cn

    2006-02-03

    Cyclin D3, like cyclin D1 and D2 isoforms, is a crucial component of the core cell cycle machinery in mammalian cells. It also exhibits its unique properties in many other physiological processes. In the present study, using yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified ERK3, an atypical mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), as a cyclin D3 binding partner. GST pull-down assays showed that cyclin D3 interacts directly and specifically with ERK3 in vitro. The binding of cyclin D3 and ERK3 was further confirmed in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation assay and confocal microscopic analysis. Moreover, carboxy-terminal extension of ERK3 was responsible for its association with intact cyclin D3. These findings further expand distinct roles of cyclin D3 and suggest the potential activity of ERK3 in cell proliferation.

  14. Separation and identification of oligonucleotides by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS)

    PubMed Central

    Easter, Renee N.; Kröning, Karolin K.; Caruso, Joseph A.; Limbach, Patrick A.

    2012-01-01

    A method for the separation and detection of oligonucleotides utilizing hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) is described. Polythymidilic acids of various lengths (10, 15, 20 and 30 nucleotides) were separated under gradient HILIC conditions. Selective detection of oligonucleotides was possible through monitoring m/z 47, corresponding to 31P16O+, using ICPMS. Oxygen was used as a reaction gas in the collision/reaction cell to produce PO+ by reacting with phosphorus in the gas phase, thereby effectively eliminating the interferences for phosphorus normally seen at m/z 31. Limits of detection (LODs) were determined to be 1.69 pmol, 1.21 pmol, 1.0 pmol and 0.55 pmol loaded on column for the 10, 15, 20 and 30-mer, respectively. PMID:20830328

  15. Identification of candidate genes that underlie the QTL on chromosome 1 that mediates genetic differences in stress-ethanol interactions.

    PubMed

    Cook, Melloni N; Baker, Jessica A; Heldt, Scott A; Williams, Robert W; Hamre, Kristin M; Lu, Lu

    2015-08-01

    Alcoholism, stress, and anxiety are strongly interacting heritable, polygenetic traits. In a previous study, we identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL) on murine chromosome (Chr) 1 between 23.0 and 31.5 Mb that modulates genetic differences in the effects of ethanol on anxiety-related phenotypes. The goal of the present study was to extend the analysis of this locus with a focus on identifying candidate genes using newly available data and tools. Anxiety-like behavior was evaluated with an elevated zero maze following saline or ethanol injections (1.8 g/kg) in C57BL/6J, DBA2J, and 72 BXD strains. We detected significant effects of strain and treatment and their interaction on anxiety-related behaviors, although surprisingly, sex was not a significant factor. The Chr1 QTL is specific to the ethanol-treated cohort. Candidate genes in this locus were evaluated using now standard bioinformatic criteria. Collagen 19a1 (Col19a1) and family sequence 135a (Fam135a) met most criteria but have lower expression levels and lacked biological verification and, therefore, were considered less likely candidates. In contrast, two other genes, the prenylated protein tyrosine phosphate family member Ptp4a1 (protein tyrosine phosphate 4a1) and the zinc finger protein Phf3 (plant homeoDomain finger protein 3) met each of our bioinformatic criteria and are thus strong candidates. These findings are also of translational relevance because both Ptp4a1 and Phf3 have been nominated as candidates genes for alcohol dependence in a human genome-wide association study. Our findings support the hypothesis that variants in one or both of these genes modulate heritable differences in the effects of ethanol on anxiety-related behaviors. PMID:25991709

  16. Identification of Colorectal Cancer Related Genes with mRMR and Shortest Path in Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Cai, Yu-Dong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important and challenging problems in biomedicine and genomics is how to identify the disease genes. In this study, we developed a computational method to identify colorectal cancer-related genes based on (i) the gene expression profiles, and (ii) the shortest path analysis of functional protein association networks. The former has been used to select differentially expressed genes as disease genes for quite a long time, while the latter has been widely used to study the mechanism of diseases. With the existing protein-protein interaction data from STRING (Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes), a weighted functional protein association network was constructed. By means of the mRMR (Maximum Relevance Minimum Redundancy) approach, six genes were identified that can distinguish the colorectal tumors and normal adjacent colonic tissues from their gene expression profiles. Meanwhile, according to the shortest path approach, we further found an additional 35 genes, of which some have been reported to be relevant to colorectal cancer and some are very likely to be relevant to it. Interestingly, the genes we identified from both the gene expression profiles and the functional protein association network have more cancer genes than the genes identified from the gene expression profiles alone. Besides, these genes also had greater functional similarity with the reported colorectal cancer genes than the genes identified from the gene expression profiles alone. All these indicate that our method as presented in this paper is quite promising. The method may become a useful tool, or at least plays a complementary role to the existing method, for identifying colorectal cancer genes. It has not escaped our notice that the method can be applied to identify the genes of other diseases as well. PMID:22496748

  17. A Cys-Gly-Cys triad in the dehydrogenase region of Nox2 plays a key role in the interaction with p67phox.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Iris; Smith, Susan M E; Pick, Edgar

    2015-11-01

    p67(phox) is the paramount cytosolic regulator of the superoxide-generating Nox of phagocytes, by controlling the conformation of the catalytic component, Nox2. The initiating event of this process is a protein-protein interaction between p67(phox) and the part of Nox2 protruding into the cytosol, known as the dehydrogenase region. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize region(s) in Nox2 acting as binding site(s) for p67(phox). For this purpose, we measured the binding of recombinant p67(phox) to an array of 91 overlapping synthetic pentadecapeptides covering the length of the dehydrogenase region (residues 288-570). We found that: 1) p67(phox) binds to a site corresponding to residues 357-383, represented by a cluster of 5 peptides (Nos. 24-28); 2) maximal binding was to peptides 24 (357-371) and 28 (369-383); 3) these shared a (369)Cys-Gly-Cys(371) triad, found to be responsible for binding; 4) the Cys-Gly-Cys triad was present in Nox2 of mammals, birds, and amphibians but was absent in other Nox; 5) substituting a Nox4 or Nox1 sequence for the Nox2 sequence in peptide 24 abolished binding; 6) replacing (369)Cys by Arg in peptide 24 (mimicking a mutation in chronic granulomatous disease) abolished binding; 7) the same replacement in peptide 28 did not affect binding, indicating the existence of an additional binding site. Our results reveal an essential role for the Cys-Gly-Cys triad in Nox2 in binding p67(phox), seconded by an additional binding region, comprising residues C terminal to Cys-Gly-Cys. The 2 regions interact with distinct partner sites in p67(phox). PMID:26160850

  18. Key Findings from Preclinical and Clinical Drug Interaction Studies Presented in New Drug and Biological License Applications Approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2014.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingjing; Ritchie, Tasha K; Zhou, Zhu; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory approval documents contain valuable information, often not published, to assess the drug-drug interaction (DDI) profile of newly marketed drugs. This analysis aimed to systematically review all drug metabolism, transport, pharmacokinetics, and DDI data available in the new drug applications and biologic license applications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2014, using the University of Washington Drug Interaction Database, and to highlight the significant findings. Among the 30 new drug applications and 11 biologic license applications reviewed, 35 new molecular entities (NMEs) were well characterized with regard to drug metabolism, transport, and/or organ impairment and were fully analyzed in this review. In vitro, a majority of the NMEs were found to be substrates or inhibitors/inducers of at least one drug metabolizing enzyme or transporter. In vivo, when NMEs were considered as victim drugs, 16 NMEs had at least one in vivo DDI study with a clinically significant change in exposure (area under the time-plasma concentration curve or Cmax ratio ?2 or ?0.5), with 6 NMEs shown to be sensitive substrates of cytochrome P450 enzymes (area under the time-plasma concentration curve ratio ?5 when coadministered with potent inhibitors): paritaprevir and naloxegol (CYP3A), eliglustat (CYP2D6), dasabuvir (CYP2C8), and tasimelteon and pirfenidone (CYP1A2). As perpetrators, seven NMEs showed clinically significant inhibition involving both enzymes and transporters, although no clinically significant induction was observed. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and pharmacogenetics studies were used for six and four NMEs, respectively, to optimize dosing recommendations in special populations and/or multiple impairment situations. In addition, the pharmacokinetic evaluations in patients with hepatic or renal impairment provided useful quantitative information to support drug administration in these fragile populations. PMID:26424199

  19. A reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay for rapid identification of protein–protein interactions reveals the existence of an interaction network involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis in the plant Golgi apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Christian H.; Bromley, Jennifer R.; Stenbæk, Anne; Rasmussen, Randi E.; Scheller, Henrik V.; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that protein–protein interactions (PPIs) occur amongst glycosyltransferases (GTs) required for plant glycan biosynthesis (e.g. cell wall polysaccharides and N-glycans) in the Golgi apparatus, and may control the functions of these enzymes. However, identification of PPIs in the endomembrane system in a relatively fast and simple fashion is technically challenging, hampering the progress in understanding the functional coordination of the enzymes in Golgi glycan biosynthesis. To solve the challenges, we adapted and streamlined a reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay (Rluc-PCA), originally reported for use in human cells, for transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We tested Rluc-PCA and successfully identified luminescence complementation amongst Golgi-localizing GTs known to form a heterodimer (GAUT1 and GAUT7) and those which homooligomerize (ARAD1). In contrast, no interaction was shown between negative controls (e.g. GAUT7, ARAD1, IRX9). Rluc-PCA was used to investigate PPIs amongst Golgi-localizing GTs involved in biosynthesis of hemicelluloses. Although no PPI was identified among six GTs involved in xylan biosynthesis, Rluc-PCA confirmed three previously proposed interactions and identified seven novel PPIs amongst GTs involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis. Notably, three of the novel PPIs were confirmed by a yeast-based split-ubiquitin assay. Finally, Gateway-enabled expression vectors were generated, allowing rapid construction of fusion proteins to the Rluc reporters and epitope tags. Our results show that Rluc-PCA coupled with transient expression in N. benthamiana is a fast and versatile method suitable for analysis of PPIs between Golgi resident proteins in an easy and mid-throughput fashion in planta. PMID:25326916

  20. Identification of Open Stomata1-Interacting Proteins Reveals Interactions with Sucrose Non-fermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 and with Type 2A Protein Phosphatases That Function in Abscisic Acid Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Waadt, Rainer; Manalansan, Bianca; Rauniyar, Navin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Booker, Matthew A.; Brandt, Benjamin; Waadt, Christian; Nusinow, Dmitri A.; Kay, Steve A.; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Schumacher, Karin; DeLong, Alison; Yates, John R.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) controls growth and development and regulates plant water status through an established signaling pathway. In the presence of ABA, pyrabactin resistance/regulatory component of ABA receptor proteins inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs). This, in turn, enables the activation of Sucrose Nonfermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 (SnRK2). Open Stomata1 (OST1)/SnRK2.6/SRK2E is a major SnRK2-type protein kinase responsible for mediating ABA responses. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing an epitope-tagged OST1 in the recessive ost1-3 mutant background was used for the copurification and identification of OST1-interacting proteins after osmotic stress and ABA treatments. These analyses, which were confirmed using bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation, unexpectedly revealed homo- and heteromerization of OST1 with SnRK2.2, SnRK2.3, OST1, and SnRK2.8. Furthermore, several OST1-complexed proteins were identified as type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A) subunits and as proteins involved in lipid and galactolipid metabolism. More detailed analyses suggested an interaction network between ABA-activated SnRK2-type protein kinases and several PP2A-type protein phosphatase regulatory subunits. pp2a double mutants exhibited a reduced sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and stomatal closure and an enhanced ABA sensitivity in root growth regulation. These analyses add PP2A-type protein phosphatases as another class of protein phosphatases to the interaction network of SnRK2-type protein kinases. PMID:26175513

  1. Interactive effects of climate change with nutrients, mercury, and freshwater acidification on key taxa in the North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative region.

    PubMed

    Pinkney, Alfred E; Driscoll, Charles T; Evers, David C; Hooper, Michael J; Horan, Jeffrey; Jones, Jess W; Lazarus, Rebecca S; Marshall, Harold G; Milliken, Andrew; Rattner, Barnett A; Schmerfeld, John; Sparling, Donald W

    2015-07-01

    The North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative LCC (NA LCC) is a public-private partnership that provides information to support conservation decisions that may be affected by global climate change (GCC) and other threats. The NA LCC region extends from southeast Virginia to the Canadian Maritime Provinces. Within this region, the US National Climate Assessment documented increases in air temperature, total precipitation, frequency of heavy precipitation events, and rising sea level, and predicted more drastic changes. Here, we synthesize literature on the effects of GCC interacting with selected contaminant, nutrient, and environmental processes to adversely affect natural resources within this region. Using a case study approach, we focused on 3 stressors with sufficient NA LCC region-specific information for an informed discussion. We describe GCC interactions with a contaminant (Hg) and 2 complex environmental phenomena-freshwater acidification and eutrophication. We also prepared taxa case studies on GCC- and GCC-contaminant/nutrient/process effects on amphibians and freshwater mussels. Several avian species of high conservation concern have blood Hg concentrations that have been associated with reduced nesting success. Freshwater acidification has adversely affected terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in the Adirondacks and other areas of the region that are slowly recovering due to decreased emissions of N and sulfur oxides. Eutrophication in many estuaries within the region is projected to increase from greater storm runoff and less denitrification in riparian wetlands. Estuarine hypoxia may be exacerbated by increased stratification. Elevated water temperature favors algal species that produce harmful algal blooms (HABs). In several of the region's estuaries, HABs have been associated with bird die-offs. In the NA LCC region, amphibian populations appear to be declining. Some species may be adversely affected by GCC through higher temperatures and more frequent droughts. GCC may affect freshwater mussel populations via altered stream temperatures and increased sediment loading during heavy storms. Freshwater mussels are sensitive to un-ionized ammonia that more toxic at higher temperatures. We recommend studying the interactive effects of GCC on generation and bioavailability of methylmercury and how GCC-driven shifts in bird species distributions will affect avian exposure to methylmercury. Research is needed on how decreases in acid deposition concurrent with GCC will alter the structure and function of sensitive watersheds and surface waters. Studies are needed to determine how GCC will affect HABs and avian disease, and how more severe and extensive hypoxia will affect fish and shellfish populations. Regarding amphibians, we suggest research on 1) thermal tolerance and moisture requirements of species of concern, 2) effects of multiple stressors (temperature, desiccation, contaminants, nutrients), and 3) approaches to mitigate impacts of increased temperature and seasonal drought. We recommend studies to assess which mussel species and populations are vulnerable and which are resilient to rising stream temperatures, hydrological shifts, and ionic pollutants, all of which are influenced by GCC. PMID:25556986

  2. Identification and Characterisation of the RalA-ERp57 Interaction: Evidence for GDI Activity of ERp57

    PubMed Central

    Berven, Leise A.; van Dam, Ellen M.; Roufogalis, Basil D.; Robinson, Phillip J.

    2012-01-01

    RalA is a membrane-associated small GTPase that regulates vesicle trafficking. Here we identify a specific interaction between RalA and ERp57, an oxidoreductase and signalling protein. ERp57 bound specifically to the GDP-bound form of RalA, but not the GTP-bound form, and inhibited the dissociation of GDP from RalA in vitro. These activities were inhibited by reducing agents, but no disulphide bonds were detected between RalA and ERp57. Mutation of all four of ERp57’s active site cysteine residues blocked sensitivity to reducing agents, suggesting that redox-dependent conformational changes in ERp57 affect binding to RalA. Mutations in the switch II region of the GTPase domain of RalA specifically reduced or abolished binding to ERp57, but did not block GTP-specific binding to known RalA effectors, the exocyst and RalBP1. Oxidative treatment of A431 cells with H2O2 inhibited cellular RalA activity, and the effect was exacerbated by expression of recombinant ERp57. The oxidative treatment significantly increased the amount of RalA localised to the cytosol. These findings suggest that ERp57 regulates RalA signalling by acting as a redox-sensitive guanine-nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (RalGDI). PMID:23226417

  3. Identification of Purines and 7-Deazapurines as Potent and Selective Type I Inhibitors of Troponin I-Interacting Kinase (TNNI3K).

    PubMed

    Lawhorn, Brian G; Philp, Joanne; Zhao, Yongdong; Louer, Christopher; Hammond, Marlys; Cheung, Mui; Fries, Harvey; Graves, Alan P; Shewchuk, Lisa; Wang, Liping; Cottom, Joshua E; Qi, Hongwei; Zhao, Huizhen; Totoritis, Rachel; Zhang, Guofeng; Schwartz, Benjamin; Li, Hu; Sweitzer, Sharon; Holt, Dennis A; Gatto, Gregory J; Kallander, Lara S

    2015-09-24

    A series of cardiac troponin I-interacting kinase (TNNI3K) inhibitors arising from 3-((9H-purin-6-yl)amino)-N-methyl-benzenesulfonamide (1) is disclosed along with fundamental structure-function relationships that delineate the role of each element of 1 for TNNI3K recognition. An X-ray structure of 1 bound to TNNI3K confirmed its Type I binding mode and is used to rationalize the structure-activity relationship and employed to design potent, selective, and orally bioavailable TNNI3K inhibitors. Identification of the 7-deazapurine heterocycle as a superior template (vs purine) and its elaboration by introduction of C4-benzenesulfonamide and C7- and C8-7-deazapurine substituents produced compounds with substantial improvements in potency (>1000-fold), general kinase selectivity (10-fold improvement), and pharmacokinetic properties (>10-fold increase in poDNAUC). Optimal members of the series have properties suitable for use in in vitro and in vivo experiments aimed at elucidating the role of TNNI3K in cardiac biology and serve as leads for developing novel heart failure medicines. PMID:26355916

  4. Identification and mapping of leaf, stem and stripe rust resistance quantitative trait loci and their interactions in durum wheat.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Pandey, M P; Singh, A K; Knox, R E; Ammar, K; Clarke, J M; Clarke, F R; Singh, R P; Pozniak, C J; Depauw, R M; McCallum, B D; Cuthbert, R D; Randhawa, H S; Fetch, T G

    2013-02-01

    Leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks.), stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. tritici Eriks.) and stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) cause major production losses in durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. var. durum). The objective of this research was to identify and map leaf, stripe and stem rust resistance loci from the French cultivar Sachem and Canadian cultivar Strongfield. A doubled haploid population from Sachem/Strongfield and parents were phenotyped for seedling reaction to leaf rust races BBG/BN and BBG/BP and adult plant response was determined in three field rust nurseries near El Batan, Obregon and Toluca, Mexico. Stripe rust response was recorded in 2009 and 2011 nurseries near Toluca and near Njoro, Kenya in 2010. Response to stem rust was recorded in field nurseries near Njoro, Kenya, in 2010 and 2011. Sachem was resistant to leaf, stripe and stem rust. A major leaf rust quantitative trait locus (QTL) was identified on chromosome 7B at Xgwm146 in Sachem. In the same region on 7B, a stripe rust QTL was identified in Strongfield. Leaf and stripe rust QTL around DArT marker wPt3451 were identified on chromosome 1B. On chromosome 2B, a significant leaf rust QTL was detected conferred by Strongfield, and at the same QTL, a Yr gene derived from Sachem conferred resistance. Significant stem rust resistance QTL were detected on chromosome 4B. Consistent interactions among loci for resistance to each rust type across nurseries were detected, especially for leaf rust QTL on 7B. Sachem and Strongfield offer useful sources of rust resistance genes for durum rust breeding. PMID:23396999

  5. Male Phyllotreta striolata (F.) produce an aggregation pheromone: identification of male-specific compounds and interaction with host plant volatiles.

    PubMed

    Beran, Franziska; Mewis, Inga; Srinivasan, Ramasamy; Svoboda, Ji?í; Vial, Christian; Mosimann, Hervé; Boland, Wilhelm; Büttner, Carmen; Ulrichs, Christian; Hansson, Bill S; Reinecke, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The chrysomelid beetle Phyllotreta striolata is an important pest of Brassicaceae in Southeast Asia and North America. Here, we identified the aggregation pheromone of a population of P. striolata from Taiwan, and host plant volatiles that interact with the pheromone. Volatiles emitted by feeding male P. striolata attracted males and females in the field. Headspace volatile analyses revealed that six sesquiterpenes were emitted specifically by feeding males. Only one of these, however, elicited an electrophysiological response from antennae of both sexes. A number of host plant volatiles, e.g., 1-hexanol, (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol, and the glucosinolate hydrolysis products allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), 3-butenyl isothiocyanate, and 4-pentenyl isothiocyanate also elicited clear responses from the antenna. The active male-specific compound was identified as (+)-(6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene by chiral stationary phase gas-chromatography with coupled mass spectrometry, and by comparison with reference samples from Abies nordmanniana, which is known to produce the corresponding enantiomer. The pheromone compound was synthesized starting from (-)-?-himachalene isolated from Cedrus atlantica. Under field conditions, the activity of the synthetic pheromone required concomitant presence of the host plant volatile allyl isothiocyanate. However, both synthetic (+)-(6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene alone and in combination with AITC were attractive in a two-choice laboratory assay devoid of other natural olfactory stimuli. We hypothesize that P. striolata adults respond to the pheromone only if specific host volatiles are present. In the same laboratory set up, more beetles were attracted by feeding males than by the synthetic stimuli. Thus, further research will be necessary to reveal the components of a more complex blend of host or male-produced semiochemicals that might enhance trap attractiveness in the field. PMID:21181241

  6. Identification of factors that cause genotype by environment interaction between herds of Holstein cattle in seventeen countries.

    PubMed

    Zwald, N R; Weigel, K A; Fikse, W F; Rekaya, R

    2003-03-01

    Currently, the International Bull Evaluation Service calculates international dairy sire evaluations using the multiple-trait across country evaluation procedure. This method depends implicitly on political boundaries between countries, because the input data are national evaluations from each participating country. Therefore, different countries are treated as different production environments. The goal of this study was to identify factors that describe the production system on each farm. Such factors could be used to group herds across countries for borderless genetic evaluations. First lactation milk records of Holstein cows calving between January 1, 1990 and December 31, 1997 in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, The Netherlands, New Zealand, South Africa, Switzerland, and the USA were used in this study. Thirteen genetic, management, and climatic variables were considered as potential indicators of production environments: peak milk yield, persistency, herd size, age at first calving, seasonality of calving, standard deviation of milk yield, culling rate, days to peak yield, fat to protein ratio, sire PTA milk, percentage of North American Holstein genes, maximum monthly temperature, and annual rainfall. Herds were grouped into quintiles based on herd averages for each of these variables. Genetic correlations for lactation milk yield between quintiles were significantly less than one for maximum monthly temperature, sire PTA milk, percent North American Holstein genes, herd size, and peak milk yield. The variables can be used to group herds into similar production environments, regardless of country borders, for the purpose of accounting for genotype by environment interaction in international dairy sire evaluation. PMID:12703638

  7. Assessing Effects and interactions among key variables affecting the growth of mixotrophic microalgae: pH, inoculum volume, and growth medium composition.

    PubMed

    Ale, M T; Pinelo, M; Meyer, A S

    2014-01-01

    A 2(3) + 3 full factorial experimental design was used to evaluate growth rate and biomass productivity of four selected, high-biomass-yielding microalgae species,namely, Chlorella vulgaris (CV), Scenedesmus acutus (SA), Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CR), and Chlamydomonas debaryana (CD), in mixtures of growth medium (MWC) and wastewater at different proportions (from 20 to 50% of MWC) and at different pH (from 7 to 9). Multilinear regression analysis of the biomass productivity data showed that for SA and CD the biomass productivity was independent of the proportion of medium (MWC), while the growth of CV and CR slowed down in mixtures with high proportions of wastewater. However, the biomass productivity of SA was dependent on pH, while the growth of the other microalgae was independent of pH (7-9). When evaluating the influence of pH and proportion of medium, CD appeared most robust among the algae species, despite its lower biomass productivity. All the four species reduced 80-90% of the nitrate [Formula: see text] and 60-70% of the ammonia [Formula: see text] initially present in the wastewater:medium mixture, although the extent of the reduction was dependent on the initial [Formula: see text] ratio. Both SA and CV reduced ?20-25% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) contained in the wastewater. This study shows the remarkable influence of certain variables that are often ignored in the search for optimal conditions of microalgal growth and also reveals the importance of considering interactions among growth variables in potential applications at large scale, particularly in the field of bioremediation. PMID:24274013

  8. NblA, a key protein of phycobilisome degradation, interacts with ClpC, a HSP100 chaperone partner of a cyanobacterial Clp protease.

    PubMed

    Karradt, Anne; Sobanski, Johanna; Mattow, Jens; Lockau, Wolfgang; Baier, Kerstin

    2008-11-21

    When cyanobacteria are starved for nitrogen, expression of the NblA protein increases and thereby induces proteolytic degradation of phycobilisomes, light-harvesting complexes of pigmented proteins. Phycobilisome degradation leads to a color change of the cells from blue-green to yellow-green, referred to as bleaching or chlorosis. As reported previously, NblA binds via a conserved region at its C terminus to the alpha-subunits of phycobiliproteins, the main components of phycobilisomes. We demonstrate here that a highly conserved stretch of amino acids in the N-terminal helix of NblA is essential for protein function in vivo. Affinity purification of glutathione S-transferase-tagged NblA, expressed in a Nostoc sp. PCC7120 mutant lacking wild-type NblA, resulted in co-precipitation of ClpC, encoded by open reading frame alr2999 of the Nostoc chromosome. ClpC is a HSP100 chaperone partner of the Clp protease. ATP-dependent binding of NblA to ClpC was corroborated by in vitro pull-down assays. Introducing amino acid exchanges, we verified that the conserved N-terminal motif of NblA mediates the interaction with ClpC. Further results indicate that NblA binds phycobiliprotein subunits and ClpC simultaneously, thus bringing the proteins into close proximity. Altogether these results suggest that NblA may act as an adaptor protein that guides a ClpC.ClpP complex to the phycobiliprotein disks in the rods of phycobilisomes, thereby initiating the degradation process. PMID:18818204

  9. Advances in metabolite identification.

    PubMed

    Wishart, David S

    2011-08-01

    One of the central challenges to metabolomics is metabolite identification. Regardless of whether one uses so-called 'targeted' or 'untargeted' metabolomics, eventually all paths lead to the requirement of identifying (and quantifying) certain key metabolites. Indeed, without metabolite identification, the results of any metabolomic analysis are biologically and chemically uninterpretable. Given the chemical diversity of most metabolomes and the character of most metabolomic data, metabolite identification is intrinsically difficult. Consequently a great deal of effort in metabolomics over the past decade has been focused on making metabolite identification better, faster and cheaper. This review describes some of the newly emerging techniques or technologies in metabolomics that are making metabolite identification easier and more robust. In particular, it focuses on advances in metabolite identification that have occurred over the past 2 to 3 years concerning the technologies, methodologies and software as applied to NMR, MS and separation science. The strengths and limitations of some of these approaches are discussed along with some of the important trends in metabolite identification. PMID:21827274

  10. Key Reference Agilent Technologies

    E-print Network

    Anlage, Steven

    Key Reference Agilent Technologies E8257D/67D PSG Signal Generators This guide applies Procedures · Safety and Regulatory Information Key Reference · Key function description #12;1 1 Key Reference #12;2 Key Reference Symbols Symbols # of Carriers Supported E8267D with Option 601 or 602 This softkey

  11. Exploiting likely-positive and unlabeled data to improve the identification of protein-protein interaction articles

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han; Hung, Hsi-Chuan; Dai, Hong-Jie; Lin, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2008-01-01

    Background Experimentally verified protein-protein interactions (PPI) cannot be easily retrieved by researchers unless they are stored in PPI databases. The curation of such databases can be made faster by ranking newly-published articles' relevance to PPI, a task which we approach here by designing a machine-learning-based PPI classifier. All classifiers require labeled data, and the more labeled data available, the more reliable they become. Although many PPI databases with large numbers of labeled articles are available, incorporating these databases into the base training data may actually reduce classification performance since the supplementary databases may not annotate exactly the same PPI types as the base training data. Our first goal in this paper is to find a method of selecting likely positive data from such supplementary databases. Only extracting likely positive data, however, will bias the classification model unless sufficient negative data is also added. Unfortunately, negative data is very hard to obtain because there are no resources that compile such information. Therefore, our second aim is to select such negative data from unlabeled PubMed data. Thirdly, we explore how to exploit these likely positive and negative data. And lastly, we look at the somewhat unrelated question of which term-weighting scheme is most effective for identifying PPI-related articles. Results To evaluate the performance of our PPI text classifier, we conducted experiments based on the BioCreAtIvE-II IAS dataset. Our results show that adding likely-labeled data generally increases AUC by 3~6%, indicating better ranking ability. Our experiments also show that our newly-proposed term-weighting scheme has the highest AUC among all common weighting schemes. Our final model achieves an F-measure and AUC 2.9% and 5.0% higher than those of the top-ranking system in the IAS challenge. Conclusion Our experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of integrating unlabeled and likely labeled data to augment a PPI text classification system. Our mixed model is suitable for ranking purposes whereas our hierarchical model is better for filtering. In addition, our results indicate that supervised weighting schemes outperform unsupervised ones. Our newly-proposed weighting scheme, TFBRF, which considers documents that do not contain the target word, avoids some of the biases found in traditional weighting schemes. Our experiment results show TFBRF to be the most effective among several other top weighting schemes. PMID:18315856

  12. A Quantum Cipher with Near Optimal Key-Recycling

    E-print Network

    Salvail, Louis

    A Quantum Cipher with Near Optimal Key-Recycling Ivan Damg°ard, Thomas Brochmann Pedersen an arbitrary number of message bits, independently of the length of the initial key. Moreover, the key-recycling of interaction and more communication. Key-words: quantum cryptography, key-recycling, unconditional security

  13. UserSureandSafe Key Retrieval Daniel R. L. Brown #

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    User­Sure­and­Safe Key Retrieval Daniel R. L. Brown # April 28, 2008 Abstract In a key retrieval scheme, a human user interacts with a client computer to retrieve a key. A scheme is user­sure if any adversary without access to the the user cannot distinguish the retrieved key from a random key. A scheme

  14. Team building: key to executive success.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen-Webb, M L

    1985-02-01

    The key to executive success is management of the information overload provided by today's high technology era. Team building, through identification of behavioral styles, helps to enhance self-esteem, utilize inherent skills of individuals, and maximize decision making. The style of the team leader who shares leadership promotes communication patterns that lead to participatory management and harmony within institutions. PMID:3844447

  15. Escherichia Coli--Key to Modern Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bregegere, Francois

    1982-01-01

    Mid-nineteenth century work by Mendel on plant hybrids and by Pasteur on fermentation gave birth by way of bacterial genetics to modern-day molecular biology. The bacterium Escherichia Coli has occupied a key position in genetic studies leading from early gene identification with DNA to current genetic engineering using recombinant DNA technology.…

  16. Key amino acid residues involved in multi-point binding interactions between brazzein, a sweet protein, and the T1R2-T1R3 human sweet receptor.

    PubMed

    Assadi-Porter, Fariba M; Maillet, Emeline L; Radek, James T; Quijada, Jeniffer; Markley, John L; Max, Marianna

    2010-05-14

    The sweet protein brazzein [recombinant protein with sequence identical with the native protein lacking the N-terminal pyroglutamate (the numbering system used has Asp2 as the N-terminal residue)] activates the human sweet receptor, a heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptor composed of subunits Taste type 1 Receptor 2 (T1R2) and Taste type 1 Receptor 3 (T1R3). In order to elucidate the key amino acid(s) responsible for this interaction, we mutated residues in brazzein and each of the two subunits of the receptor. The effects of brazzein mutations were assayed by a human taste panel and by an in vitro assay involving receptor subunits expressed recombinantly in human embryonic kidney cells; the effects of the receptor mutations were assayed by in vitro assay. We mutated surface residues of brazzein at three putative interaction sites: site 1 (Loop43), site 2 (N- and C-termini and adjacent Glu36, Loop33), and site 3 (Loop9-19). Basic residues in site 1 and acidic residues in site 2 were essential for positive responses from each assay. Mutation of Y39A (site 1) greatly reduced positive responses. A bulky side chain at position 54 (site 2), rather than a side chain with hydrogen-bonding potential, was required for positive responses, as was the presence of the native disulfide bond in Loop9-19 (site 3). Results from mutagenesis and chimeras of the receptor indicated that brazzein interacts with both T1R2 and T1R3 and that the Venus flytrap module of T1R2 is important for brazzein agonism. With one exception, all mutations of receptor residues at putative interaction sites predicted by wedge models failed to yield the expected decrease in brazzein response. The exception, hT1R2 (human T1R2 subunit of the sweet receptor):R217A/hT1R3 (human T1R3 subunit of the sweet receptor), which contained a substitution in lobe 2 at the interface between the two subunits, exhibited a small selective decrease in brazzein activity. However, because the mutation was found to increase the positive cooperativity of binding by multiple ligands proposed to bind both T1R subunits (brazzein, monellin, and sucralose) but not those that bind to a single subunit (neotame and cyclamate), we suggest that this site is involved in subunit-subunit interaction rather than in direct brazzein binding. Results from this study support a multi-point interaction between brazzein and the sweet receptor by some mechanism other than the proposed wedge models. PMID:20302879

  17. Key amino acid residues involved in multi-point binding interactions between brazzein, a sweet protein, and the T1R2-T1R3 human sweet receptor

    PubMed Central

    Assadi-Porter, Fariba M.; Maillet, Emeline L.; Radek, James T.; Quijada, Jeniffer; Markley, John L.; Max, Marianna

    2010-01-01

    The sweet protein brazzein activates the human sweet receptor, a heterodimeric G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) composed of subunits T1R2 and T1R3. In order to elucidate the key amino acid(s) responsible for this interaction, we mutated residues in brazzein and each of the two subunits of the receptor. The effects of brazzein mutations were assayed by a human taste panel and by an in vitro assay involving receptor subunits expressed recombinantly in human embryonic kidney cells; the effects of the receptor mutations were assayed by the in vitro assay. We mutated surface residues of brazzein at three putative interaction sites: Site 1 (Loop43), Site 2 (N- and C-terminus and adjacent Glu36, Loop33), and Site 3 (Loop9–19). Basic residues in Site 1 and acidic residues in Site 2 were essential for positive responses from each assay. Mutation of Y39A (Site 1) greatly reduced positive responses. A bulky side chain at position 54 (Site 2), rather than a side chain with hydrogen bonding potential, was required for positive responses as was the presence of the native disulfide bond in Loop 9–19 (Site 3). Results from mutagenesis and chimeras of the receptor indicated that brazzein interacts with both T1R2 and T1R3 and that the Venus fly trap module of T1R2 is important for brazzein agonism. With one exception, all mutations of receptor residues at putative interaction sites predicted by wedge models failed to yield the expected decrease in the brazzein response. The exception, hT1R2:R217A-hT1R3, which contained a substitution in lobe 2 at the interface between the two subunits, exhibited a small selective decrease in brazzein activity. However, because the mutation was found to increase the positive cooperativity of binding by multiple ligands proposed to bind both T1R subunits (brazzein, monellin, and sucralose) but not those that bind to a single subunit (neotame and cyclamate), we suggest that this site in involved in subunit-subunit interaction rather than direct brazzein binding. Results from this study support a multipoint interaction between brazzein and the sweet receptor by some mechanism other than the proposed wedge models. PMID:20302879

  18. Bunch identification module

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    This module provides bunch identification and timing signals for the PEP Interaction areas. Timing information is referenced to the PEP master oscillator, and adjusted in phase as a function of region. Identification signals are generated in a manner that allows observers in all interaction regions to agree on an unambiguous bunch identity. The module provides bunch identification signals via NIM level logic, upon CAMAC command, and through LED indicators. A front panel ''region select'' switch allows the same module to be used in all regions. The module has two modes of operation: a bunch identification mode and a calibration mode. In the identification mode, signals indicate which of the three bunches of electrons and positrons are interacting, and timing information about beam crossing is provided. The calibration mode is provided to assist experimenters making time of flight measurements. In the calibration mode, three distinct gating signals are referenced to a selected bunch, allowing three timing systems to be calibrated against a common standard. Physically, the bunch identifier is constructed as a single width CAMAC module. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Key Request (Last) (First)

    E-print Network

    Shlizerman, Eli

    Key Request Form Name: (Last) (First) Contact Info Keys Cardswipe UW Email: Hitchcock Exterior Door Signatures Bring your completed form to the Biology Administrative Office (KIN 106). A deposit of $10 per key/card is required and payable by check or cash (exact change required). By signing the Key Request Form you agree

  20. Identification of a new biocontrol gene in Trichoderma atroviride: the role of an ABC transporter membrane pump in the interaction with different plant-pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, Michelina; Lanzuise, Stefania; Vinale, Francesco; Marra, Roberta; Turrà, David; Woo, Sheridan Lois; Lorito, Matteo

    2009-03-01

    Successful biocontrol interactions often require that the beneficial microbes involved are resistant or tolerant to a variety of toxicants, including antibiotics produced by themselves or phytopathogens, plant antimicrobial compounds, and synthetic chemicals or contaminants. The ability of Trichoderma spp., the most widely applied biocontrol fungi, to withstand different chemical stresses, including those associated with mycoparasitism, is well known. In this work, we identified an ATP-binding cassette transporter cell membrane pump as an important component of the above indicated resistance mechanisms that appears to be supported by an extensive and powerful cell detoxification system. The encoding gene, named Taabc2, was cloned from a strain of Trichoderma atroviride and characterized. Its expression was found to be upregulated in the presence of pathogen-secreted metabolites, specific mycotoxins and some fungicides, and in conditions that stimulate the production in Trichoderma spp. of antagonism-related factors (toxins and enzymes). The key role of this gene in antagonism and biocontrol was demonstrated by the characterization of the obtained deletion mutants. They suffered an increased susceptibility to inhibitory compounds either secreted by pathogenic fungi or possibly produced by the biocontrol microbe itself and lost, partially or entirely, the ability to protect tomato plants from Pythium ultimum and Rhizoctonia solani attack. PMID:19245323

  1. Crystal structures of resorcin[4]arene and pyrogallol[4]arene complexes with DL-pipecolinic acid. Model compounds for the recognition of the pipecolinyl ring, a key fragment of FK506, through C-H⋯? interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Ikuhide; Kitamura, Yuji; Kato, Ryo; Murayama, Kazutaka; Aoki, Katsuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Resorcin[4]arene (resorcinol cyclic tetramer, abbreviated as RCT) or pyrogallol[4]arene (pyrogallol cyclic tetramer, PCT) form host-guest 1:1 complexes with DL-pipecolinic acid (DL-pipeH), RCT·DL-pipeH·EtOH·8H2O (1), PCT DL-pipeH·EtOH·4H2O (2), and PCT·DL-pipeH·3H2O (3), whose crystal structures have been determined. In each complex, the pipeH ligand is incorporated into the bowl-shaped cavity of the RCT or PCT host molecules through C-H⋯? interactions between alkyl protons of the piperidine ring of pipeH and ?-rings of RCT or PCT, forming an [(RCT/PCT)·pipeH] structural fragment. In 1 and 3, two [(RCT/PCT) pipeH] fragments self-associate across an inversion center to form a guest-mediated, obliquely declined dimeric structure [(RCT/PCT)·L-pipeH·D-pipeH (RCT/PCT)]. In 2, each PCT-capped pipeH ligand bridges to two adjacent PCT molecules to form guest-mediated, optically-discrete helical polymers [PCT·L-pipeH]n or [PCT·D-pipeH]n. An 1H NMR experiment shows that the complexation through C-H⋯? interaction between the piperidine ring of pipeH and ?-rings of RCT or PCT occurs also in solution, with the binding constants of 9.7 ± 0.6 M-1 for RCT and 26.5 ± 1.5 M-1 for PCT. These complexes provide a synthetic model for the recognition of the pipecolinyl-ring moiety, a key constituent of immunosuppressant drugs such as FK506, FK520 or rapamycin, by their binding proteins through C-H⋯? interaction.

  2. Master Key Secured Quantum Key Distribution

    E-print Network

    Tabish Qureshi; Tabish Shibli; Aditi Sheel

    2013-01-17

    A new scheme of Quantum Key Distribution is proposed using three entangled particles in a GHZ state. Alice holds a 3-particle source and sends two particles to Bob, keeping one with herself. Bob uses one particle to generate a secure key, and the other to generate a master-key. This scheme should prove to be harder to break in non-ideal situations as compared to the standard protocols BB84 and Eckert. The scheme uses the concept of Quantum Disentanglement Eraser. Extension to multi-partite scheme has also been investigated.

  3. How Is This Flower Pollinated? A Polyclave Key to Use in Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyrrell, Lucy

    1989-01-01

    Presents an identification method which uses the process of elimination to identify pollination systems. Provides the polyclave key, methodology for using the key, a sample worksheet, and abbreviation codes for pollination systems. (MVL)

  4. Group key management

    SciTech Connect

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  5. Construction of a High-Quality Yeast Two-Hybrid Library and Its Application in Identification of Interacting Proteins with Brn1 in Curvularia lunata

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jin-Xin; Jing, Jing; Yu, Chuan-Jin; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Curvularia lunata is an important maize foliar fungal pathogen that distributes widely in maize growing area in China, and several key pathogenic factors have been isolated. An yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) library is a very useful platform to further unravel novel pathogenic factors in C. lunata. To construct a high-quality full length-expression cDNA library from the C. lunata for application to pathogenesis-related protein-protein interaction screening, total RNA was extracted. The SMART (Switching Mechanism At 5? end of the RNA Transcript) technique was used for cDNA synthesis. Double-stranded cDNA was ligated into the pGADT7-Rec vector with Herring Testes Carrier DNA using homologous recombination method. The ligation mixture was transformed into competent yeast AH109 cells to construct the primary cDNA library. Eventually, a high qualitative library was successfully established according to an evaluation on quality. The transformation efficiency was about 6.39 ×105 transformants/3 ?g pGADT7-Rec. The titer of the primary cDNA library was 2.5×108 cfu/mL. The numbers for the cDNA library was 2.46×105. Randomly picked clones show that the recombination rate was 88.24%. Gel electrophoresis results indicated that the fragments ranged from 0.4 kb to 3.0 kb. Melanin synthesis protein Brn1 (1,3,8-hydroxynaphthalene reductase) was used as a “bait” to test the sufficiency of the Y2H library. As a result, a cDNA clone encoding VelB protein that was known to be involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including control of secondary metabolism containing melanin and toxin production in many filamentous fungi was identified. Further study on the exact role of the VelB gene is underway. PMID:26060429

  6. Construction of a High-Quality Yeast Two-Hybrid Library and Its Application in Identification of Interacting Proteins with Brn1 in Curvularia lunata.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jin-Xin; Jing, Jing; Yu, Chuan-Jin; Chen, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Curvularia lunata is an important maize foliar fungal pathogen that distributes widely in maize growing area in China, and several key pathogenic factors have been isolated. An yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) library is a very useful platform to further unravel novel pathogenic factors in C. lunata. To construct a high-quality full length-expression cDNA library from the C. lunata for application to pathogenesis-related protein-protein interaction screening, total RNA was extracted. The SMART (Switching Mechanism At 5' end of the RNA Transcript) technique was used for cDNA synthesis. Double-stranded cDNA was ligated into the pGADT7-Rec vector with Herring Testes Carrier DNA using homologous recombination method. The ligation mixture was transformed into competent yeast AH109 cells to construct the primary cDNA library. Eventually, a high qualitative library was successfully established according to an evaluation on quality. The transformation efficiency was about 6.39 ×10(5) transformants/3 ?g pGADT7-Rec. The titer of the primary cDNA library was 2.5×10(8) cfu/mL. The numbers for the cDNA library was 2.46×10(5). Randomly picked clones show that the recombination rate was 88.24%. Gel electrophoresis results indicated that the fragments ranged from 0.4 kb to 3.0 kb. Melanin synthesis protein Brn1 (1,3,8-hydroxynaphthalene reductase) was used as a "bait" to test the sufficiency of the Y2H library. As a result, a cDNA clone encoding VelB protein that was known to be involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including control of secondary metabolism containing melanin and toxin production in many filamentous fungi was identified. Further study on the exact role of the VelB gene is underway. PMID:26060429

  7. Public Key Cryptography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapson, Frank

    1996-01-01

    Describes public key cryptography, also known as RSA, which is a system using two keys, one used to put a message into cipher and another used to decipher the message. Presents examples using small prime numbers. (MKR)

  8. The Key to Security.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Provides tips on using low-tech, traditional key and lock systems for effectively securing university and college facilities. Discusses providing keys with utility patents as well as the need to design doors that offer greater deterrence to vandalism. (GR)

  9. Keys to Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Terri

    2011-01-01

    Up ahead, a foreboding wooden door showing wear from passage of earlier travelers is spotted. As the old porch light emits a pale yellow glow, a key ring emerges from deep inside the coat pocket. Searching for just the right key, the voyager settles on one that also shows age. As the key enters its receptacle and begins to turn, a clicking noise…

  10. Key Reference Agilent Technologies

    E-print Network

    Anlage, Steven

    Key Reference Agilent Technologies PSG Signal Generators This guide applies to the following signal documentation. Please send us an E-mail at sources_manuals@am.exch.agilent.com. #12;1 Key Reference Symbols enables you to define the number of points in a step sweep. When you press this key, the current value

  11. Quantum dense key distribution

    E-print Network

    I. P. Degiovanni; I. Ruo Berchera; S. Castelletto; M. L. Rastello; F. A. Bovino; A. M. Colla; G. Castagnoli

    2003-12-15

    This paper proposes a new protocol for quantum dense key distribution. This protocol embeds the benefits of a quantum dense coding and a quantum key distribution and is able to generate shared secret keys four times more efficiently than BB84 one. We hereinafter prove the security of this scheme against individual eavesdropping attacks, and we present preliminary experimental results, showing its feasibility.

  12. Work Keys USA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work Keys USA, 1998

    1998-01-01

    "Work Keys" is a comprehensive program for assessing and teaching workplace skills. This serial "special issue" features 18 first-hand reports on Work Keys projects in action in states across North America. They show how the Work Keys is helping businesses and educators solve the challenge of building a world-class work force. The reports are as…

  13. Identification of a putative cognate sensor kinase for the two-component response regulator HrpG, a key regulator controlling the expression of the hrp genes in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui-Fang; Lu, Guang-Tao; Li, Lei; Su, Hui-Zhao; Feng, Guo-fang; Chen, Ya; He, Yong-Qiang; Jiang, Bo-Le; Tang, Dong-Jie; Tang, Ji-Liang

    2014-07-01

    The bacterial phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) relies on the hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) genes to cause disease and induce hypersensitive response (HR). The hrp genes of bacterial phytopathogens are divided into two groups. Xcc hrp genes belong to group II. It has long been known that the group II hrp genes are activated by an AraC-type transcriptional regulator whose expression is controlled by a two-component system (TCS) response regulator (named HrpG in Xcc). However, no cognate sensor kinase has yet been identified. Here, we present evidence showing that the Xcc open-reading frame XC_3670 encodes a TCS sensor kinase (named HpaS). Mutation of hpaS almost completely abolished the HR induction and virulence. Bacterial two-hybrid and protein pull-down assays revealed that HpaS physically interacted with HrpG. Phos-tag™ SDS-PAGE analysis showed that mutation in hpaS reduced markedly the phosphorylation of HrpG?in vivo. These data suggest that HpaS and HrpG are most likely to form a TCS. We also showed that XC_3669 (named hpaR2), which is adjacent to hpaS and encodes a putative TCS response regulator, is required for full virulence but not HR induction. HpaR2 also physically interacted with HpaS, suggesting that HpaS may also form another TCS with HpaR2. PMID:23906314

  14. An Ultra-Efficient Key Recovery Attack on the Lightweight Stream Cipher A2U2

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    implementation) proposed so far for low-cost Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags. Our attack can fully Identification (RFID), which enables au- tomatic remote identification of objects, is one of the most promising on a Thinkpad T410 laptop. Index Terms--Stream Cipher, Key Recovery, RFID I. INTRODUCTION Radio Frequency

  15. Identification of a putative voltage-gated Ca2+ channel as a key regulator of elicitor-induced hypersensitive cell death and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in rice.

    PubMed

    Kurusu, Takamitsu; Yagala, Toshikazu; Miyao, Akio; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki

    2005-06-01

    Elicitor-triggered transient membrane potential changes and Ca2+ influx through the plasma membrane are thought to be important during defense signaling in plants. However, the molecular bases for the Ca2+ influx and its regulation remain largely unknown. Here we tested effects of overexpression as well as retrotransposon (Tos17)-insertional mutagenesis of the rice two-pore channel 1 (OsTPC1), a putative voltage-gated Ca(2+)-permeable channel, on a proteinaceous fungal elicitor-induced defense responses in rice cells. The overexpressor showed enhanced sensitivity to the elicitor to induce oxidative burst, activation of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), OsMPK2, as well as hypersensitive cell death. On the contrary, a series of defense responses including the cell death and activation of the MAPK were severely suppressed in the insertional mutant, which was complemented by overexpression of the wild-type gene. These results suggest that the putative Ca(2+)-permeable channel determines sensitivity to the elicitor and plays a role as a key regulator of elicitor-induced defense responses, activation of MAPK cascade and hypersensitive cell death. PMID:15941394

  16. Active site mapping of 2-deoxy-scyllo-inosose synthase, the key starter enzyme for the biosynthesis of 2-deoxystreptamine. Mechanism-based inhibition and identification of lysine-141 as the entrapped nucleophile.

    PubMed

    Nango, Eriko; Eguchi, Tadashi; Kakinuma, Katsumi

    2004-02-01

    A key enzyme in the biosynthesis of clinically important aminoglycoside antibiotics including neomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, etc. is 2-deoxy-scyllo-inosose synthase (DOIS), which catalyzes the carbocycle formation from d-glucose-6-phosphate to 2-deoxy-scyllo-inosose (DOI). To clarify its precise reaction mechanism and crucial amino acid residues in the active site, we took advantage of a mechanism-based inhibitor carbaglucose-6-phosphate (pseudo-dl-glucose, C-6-P) with anticipation of its conversion to a reactive alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl intermediate. It turned out that C-6-P clearly showed time- and concentration-dependent inhibition against DOIS, and the molecular mass of the resulting modified-DOIS with C-6-P was 160 mass units larger than that of native DOIS. Thus, the expected alpha,beta-unsaturated intermediate appeared to trap a specific nucleophilic group in the active site through the Michael-type 1,4-addition. The covalently modified amino acid residue was determined to be Lys-141 by means of enzymatic digestion and subsequent LC/MS and LC/MS/MS of the digest. Also discussed are the role of Lys-141 in the substrate recognition and the reaction pathway and comparison with evolutionary related dehydroquinate synthase. PMID:14750780

  17. The "Key" Method of Identifying Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks in Introductory Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eves, Robert Leo; Davis, Larry Eugene

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that identification keys provide an orderly strategy for the identification of igneous and metamorphic rocks in an introductory geology course. Explains the format employed in the system and includes the actual key guides for both igneous and metamorphic rocks. (ML)

  18. Identification of epicatechin as one of the key bioactive constituents of polyphenol-enriched extracts that demonstrate an anti-allergic effect in a murine model of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anurag; Demont, Audrey; Actis-Goretta, Lucas; Holvoet, Sébastien; Lévêques, Antoine; Lepage, Melissa; Nutten, Sophie; Mercenier, Annick

    2014-08-14

    Polyphenols are naturally derived bioactive compounds with numerous reported health benefits. We have previously reported on the beneficial effect of a polyphenol-enriched apple extract in a murine model of food allergy. The objectives of the present study were to elucidate the class of bioactive polyphenols that exhibit a beneficial anti-allergic effect and to assess whether the protective effect matches the in vivo bioavailable metabolite concentrations. Female BALB/c mice were sensitised to ovalbumin (OVA) following the protocol of a well-established murine model of food allergy. They were fed diets containing polyphenol-enriched extracts or purified epicatechin for 8 d after the last sensitisation. The sensitised mice were orally challenged with OVA after the intervention. The allergy symptoms, in addition to allergen-specific serum Ig concentrations and gene expression profiles in the intestine, of the control and treated mice were compared. Plasma samples were collected to compare the concentrations of bioavailable epicatechin metabolites in the treatment groups. Polyphenol-enriched fruit extracts containing epicatechin exhibited a significant anti-allergic effect in vivo. This effect was unambiguously attributed to epicatechin, as oral administration of this purified polyphenol to sensitised mice by inclusion in their diet modulated allergy symptoms in a dose-dependent manner. Immune parameters were also affected by the administration of epicatechin. Bioavailability measurements in plasma indicated that the attenuation of allergy symptoms could be due to the higher concentrations of bioavailable epicatechin metabolites. In conclusion, epicatechin is a key bioactive polyphenol that has the ability to modulate allergy outcomes in sensitised mice. PMID:24854295

  19. Quantum dense key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Degiovanni, I.P.; Ruo Berchera, I.; Castelletto, S.; Rastello, M.L.; Bovino, F.A.; Colla, A.M.; Castagnoli, G.

    2004-03-01

    This paper proposes a protocol for quantum dense key distribution. This protocol embeds the benefits of a quantum dense coding and a quantum key distribution and is able to generate shared secret keys four times more efficiently than the Bennet-Brassard 1984 protocol. We hereinafter prove the security of this scheme against individual eavesdropping attacks, and we present preliminary experimental results, showing its feasibility.

  20. Unstructured quantum key distribution

    E-print Network

    Patrick J. Coles; Eric M. Metodiev; Norbert Lütkenhaus

    2015-10-05

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows for communication between distant parties with security guaranteed by quantum theory. The main theoretical problem in QKD is to calculate the secret key rate for a given protocol. Analytical formulas for the key rate are known for protocols that have a high degree of symmetry, such as the BB84 and six-state protocols. However, experimental imperfections tend to break symmetries. Since symmetry is exploited in theoretical treatments, the effect of experimental imperfections on key rates is difficult to estimate. Furthermore, it is an interesting question whether (intentionally) asymmetric protocols could offer an advantage over their symmetric counterparts. In this work, we develop a robust numerical approach for calculating the key rate for arbitrary discrete-variable QKD protocols. Ultimately this approach will allow researchers to investigate the security of ``unstructured'' protocols, i.e., those that lack symmetry. Our approach relies on transforming the key rate calculation to the dual optimization problem, which can be solved efficiently with significantly fewer parameters than the primal problem, and gives reliable lower bounds on the key rate. We illustrate our method by giving tight lower bounds for some unstructured protocols for which the key rate was previously unknown.

  1. Atsena Otie Key Island

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Atsena Otie Key is one of thirteen islands on Florida's Gulf Coast that make up Cedar Keys National Wildlife Refuge. Nearby waters support a multi-million dollar clam-farming industry. USGS documented pre-oil coastal conditions near the Refuge with baseline petrochemical measurements and aerial phot...

  2. Identification and determination of trapping parameters as key site parameters for CO2 storage for the active CO2 storage site in Ketzin (Germany) - Comparison of different experimental approaches and analysis of field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemke, Kornelia; Liebscher, Axel

    2015-04-01

    Petrophysical properties like porosity and permeability are key parameters for a safe long-term storage of CO2 but also for the injection operation itself. The accurate quantification of residual trapping is difficult, but very important for both storage containment security and storage capacity; it is also an important parameter for dynamic simulation. The German CO2 pilot storage in Ketzin is a Triassic saline aquifer with initial conditions of the target sandstone horizon of 33.5 ° C/6.1 MPa at 630 m. One injection and two observation wells were drilled in 2007 and nearly 200 m of core material was recovered for site characterization. From June 2008 to September 2013, slightly more than 67 kt food-grade CO2 has been injected and continuously monitored. A fourth observation well has been drilled after 61 kt injected CO2 in summer 2012 at only 25 m distance to the injection well and new core material was recovered that allow study CO2 induced changes in petrophysical properties. The observed only minor differences between pre-injection and post-injection petrophysical parameters of the heterogeneous formation have no severe consequences on reservoir and cap rock integrity or on the injection behavior. Residual brine saturation for the Ketzin reservoir core material was estimated by different methods. Brine-CO2 flooding experiments for two reservoir samples resulted in 36% and 55% residual brine saturation (Kiessling, 2011). Centrifuge capillary pressure measurements (pc = 0.22 MPa) yielded the smallest residual brine saturation values with ~20% for the lower part of the reservoir sandstone and ~28% for the upper part (Fleury, 2010). The method by Cerepi (2002), which calculates the residual mercury saturation after pressure release on the imbibition path as trapped porosity and the retracted mercury volume as free porosity, yielded unrealistic low free porosity values of only a few percent, because over 80% of the penetrated mercury remained in the samples after pressure release to atmospheric pressure. The results from the centrifuge capillary pressure measurements were then used for calibrating the cutoff time of NMR T2 relaxation (average value 8 ms) to differentiate between the mobile and immobile water fraction (standard for clean sandstone 33 ms). Following Norden (2010) a cutoff time of 10 ms was applied to estimate the residual saturation as Bound Fluid Volume for the Ketzin core materials and to estimate NMR permeability after Timur-Coates. This adapted cutoff value is also consistent with results from RST logging after injection. The maximum measured CO2 saturation corresponds to the effective porosity for the upper most CO2 filled sandstone horizon. The directly measured values and the estimated residual brine saturations from NMR measurements with the adapted cutoff time of 10 ms are within the expected range compared to the literature data with a mean residual brine saturation of 53%. A. Cerepi et al., 2002, Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering 35. M. Fleury et al., 2011, SCA2010-06. D. Kiessling et al., 2010, International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 4. B. Norden et al. 2010, SPE Reservoir Evaluation & Engineering 13. .

  3. Identification of subunit-subunit interaction sites in ?A-WT crystallin and mutant ?A-G98R crystallin using isotope-labeled cross-linker and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Rama; Santhoshkumar, Puttur; Mooney, Brian P; Sharma, K Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Cataract is characterized by progressive protein aggregation and loss of vision. ?-Crystallins are the major proteins in the lens responsible for maintaining transparency. They exist in the lens as highly polydisperse oligomers with variable numbers of subunits, and mutations in ?-crystallin are associated with some forms of cataract in humans. Because the stability of proteins is dependent on optimal subunit interactions, the structural transformations and aggregation of mutant proteins that underlie cataract formation can be understood best by identifying the residue-specific inter- and intra-subunit interactions. Chemical crosslinking combined with mass spectrometry is increasingly used to provide structural insights into intra- and inter-protein interactions. We used isotope-labeled cross-linker in combination with LC-MS/MS to determine the subunit-subunit interaction sites in cataract-causing mutant ?A-G98R crystallin. Peptides cross-linked by isotope-labeled (heavy and light forms) cross-linkers appear as doublets in mass spectra, thus facilitating the identification of cross-linker-containing peptides. In this study, we cross-linked wild-type (?A-WT) and mutant (?A-G98R) crystallins using the homobifunctional amine-reactive, isotope-labeled (d? and d?) cross-linker-BS²G (bis[sulfosuccinimidyl]glutarate). Tryptic in-solution digest of cross-linked complexes generates a wide array of peptide mixtures. Cross-linked peptides were enriched using strong cation exchange (SCX) chromatography followed by both MS and MS/MS to identify the cross-linked sites. We identified a distinct intermolecular interaction site between K88-K99 in the ?5 strand of the mutant ?A-G98R crystallin that is not found in wild-type ?A-crystallin. This interaction could explain the conformational instability and aggregation nature of the mutant protein that results from incorrect folding and assembly. PMID:23755258

  4. Robust Key-Evolving Public Key Encryption Schemes

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Robust Key-Evolving Public Key Encryption Schemes #3; Wen-Guey Tzeng, Zhi-Jia Tzeng Department-mail:ftzeng,zjtzengg@cis.nctu.edu.tw Abstract We propose a key-evolving paradigm to deal with the key exposure problem of public key encryption schemes. The key evolving paradigm is like the one used for forward-secure digital signature schemes. Let

  5. Parsing Key Word Grammars

    E-print Network

    Martin, William

    1969-03-01

    Key word grammars are defined to be the same as context free grammars, except that a production may specify a string of arbitrary symbols. These grammars define languages similar to those used in the programs CARPS and ...

  6. Norovirus Illness: Key Facts

    MedlinePLUS

    Norovirus Illness: Key Facts Norovirus—the stomach bug Norovirus is a highly contagious virus. Norovirus infection causes gastroenteritis (inflammation ... leads to diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach pain. Norovirus illness is often called by other names, such as ...

  7. Public Key FPGA Software

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-25

    The Public Key (PK) FPGA software performs asymmetric authentication using the 163-bit Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm (ECDSA) on an embedded FPGA platform. A digital signature is created on user-supplied data, and communication with a host system is performed via a Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) bus. Software includes all components necessary for signing, including custom random number generator for key creation and SHA-256 for data hashing.

  8. Entity Authentication and Authenticated Key Exchange with Tree Parity Machines

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    key exchange in the framework of Tree Parity Machines (TPMs). The interaction of TPMs has been but outside the concept using TPMs. A simple and consequent implicit entity authentication from within the key, the currently known at­ tacks on the non­authenticated symmetric key exchange principle using TPMs can provably

  9. On the Key Exposure Problem in Chameleon Hashes Giuseppe Ateniese

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    On the Key Exposure Problem in Chameleon Hashes Giuseppe Ateniese Department of Computer Science-transferability. However, that first construction employs a chameleon hash that suffers from a key exposure problem information, and greater need for interaction, an identity-based scheme was proposed in [1], while a fully key-exposure

  10. Identification of CHIP, a novel tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein that interacts with heat shock proteins and negatively regulates chaperone functions.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, C A; Connell, P; Wu, Y; Hu, Z; Thompson, L J; Yin, L Y; Patterson, C

    1999-06-01

    The chaperone function of the mammalian 70-kDa heat shock proteins Hsc70 and Hsp70 is modulated by physical interactions with four previously identified chaperone cofactors: Hsp40, BAG-1, the Hsc70-interacting protein Hip, and the Hsc70-Hsp90-organizing protein Hop. Hip and Hop interact with Hsc70 via a tetratricopeptide repeat domain. In a search for additional tetratricopeptide repeat-containing proteins, we have identified a novel 35-kDa cytoplasmic protein, carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP). CHIP is highly expressed in adult striated muscle in vivo and is expressed broadly in vitro in tissue culture. Hsc70 and Hsp70 were identified as potential interaction partners for this protein in a yeast two-hybrid screen. In vitro binding assays demonstrated direct interactions between CHIP and both Hsc70 and Hsp70, and complexes containing CHIP and Hsc70 were identified in immunoprecipitates of human skeletal muscle cells in vivo. Using glutathione S-transferase fusions, we found that CHIP interacted with the carboxy-terminal residues 540 to 650 of Hsc70, whereas Hsc70 interacted with the amino-terminal residues 1 to 197 (containing the tetratricopeptide domain and an adjacent charged domain) of CHIP. Recombinant CHIP inhibited Hsp40-stimulated ATPase activity of Hsc70 and Hsp70, suggesting that CHIP blocks the forward reaction of the Hsc70-Hsp70 substrate-binding cycle. Consistent with this observation, both luciferase refolding and substrate binding in the presence of Hsp40 and Hsp70 were inhibited by CHIP. Taken together, these results indicate that CHIP decreases net ATPase activity and reduces chaperone efficiency, and they implicate CHIP in the negative regulation of the forward reaction of the Hsc70-Hsp70 substrate-binding cycle. PMID:10330192

  11. Identification of five B-type response regulators as members of a multistep phosphorelay system interacting with histidine-containing phosphotransfer partners of Populus osmosensor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In plants, the multistep phosphorelay signaling pathway mediates responses to environmental factors and plant hormones. This system is composed of three successive partners: hybrid Histidine-aspartate Kinases (HKs), Histidine-containing Phosphotransfer proteins (HPts), and Response Regulators (RRs). Among the third partners, B-type RR family members are the final output elements of the pathway; they act as transcription factors and clearly play a pivotal role in the early response to cytokinin in Arabidopsis. While interactions studies between partners belonging to the multistep phosphorelay system are mainly focused on protagonists involved in cytokinin or ethylene pathways, very few reports are available concerning partners of osmotic stress signaling pathway. Results In Populus, we identified eight B-type RR proteins, RR12-16, 19, 21 and 22 in the Dorskamp genotype. To assess HPt/B-type RR interactions and consequently determine potential third partners in the osmosensing multistep phosphorelay system, we performed global yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) assays in combination with Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) assays in plant cells. We found that all B-type RRs are able to interact with HPt predominant partners (HPt2, 7 and 9) of HK1, which is putatively involved in the osmosensing pathway. However, different profiles of interaction are observed depending on the studied HPt. HPt/RR interactions displayed a nuclear localization, while the nuclear and cytosolic localization of HPt and nuclear localization of RR proteins were validated. Although the nuclear localization of HPt/RR interaction was expected, this work constitutes the first evidence of such an interaction in plants. Furthermore, the pertinence of this partnership is reinforced by highlighting a co-expression of B-type RR transcripts and the other partners (HK1 and HPts) belonging to a potential osmosensing pathway. Conclusion Based on the interaction studies between identified B-type RR and HPt proteins, and the co-expression analysis of transcripts of these potential partners in poplar organs, our results favor the model that RR12, 13, 14, 16 and 19 are able to interact with the main partners of HK1, HPt2, 7 and 9, and this HPt/RR interaction occurs within the nucleus. On the whole, the five B-type RRs of interest could be third protagonists putatively involved in the osmosensing signaling pathway in Populus. PMID:23253553

  12. Identification and characterization of protein interactions in the mammalian mRNA processing body using a novel two-hybrid assay

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, Donald B. Nobre, Rita A.; Bernstein, Gillian A.; Yang, Wei-Hong

    2011-09-10

    Components of the mRNA processing body (P-body) regulate critical steps in mRNA storage, transport, translation and degradation. At the core of the P-body is the decapping complex, which removes the 5' cap from de-adenylated mRNAs and mediates an irreversible step in mRNA degradation. The assembly of P-bodies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana and Drosophila melanogaster has been previously described. Less is known about the assembly of mammalian P-bodies. To investigate the interactions that occur between components of mammalian P-bodies, we developed a fluorescence-based, two-hybrid assay system. The assay depends on the ability of one P-body component, fused to an exogenous nuclear localization sequence (NLS), to recruit other P-body components to the nucleus. The assay was used to investigate interactions between P-body components Ge-1, DCP2, DCP1, EDC3, RAP55, and RCK. The results of this study show that the modified two-hybrid assay can be used to identify protein interactions that occur in a macromolecular complex. The assay can also be used to efficiently detect protein interaction domains. The results provide important insights into mammalian P-body assembly and demonstrate similarities, and critical differences, between P-body assembly in mammalian cells compared with that of other species. -- Research highlights: {yields} A two-hybrid assay was developed to study interactions in macromolecular complexes. {yields} The assay was applied to interactions between components of mRNA P-bodies. {yields} The assay effectively and efficiently identified protein interaction domains. {yields} P-body assembly in mammalian cells differs from that in other species.

  13. Weed Identification: Using Plant Structures as a Key 

    E-print Network

    Baumann, Paul A.

    2002-04-15

    is an extension of the leaf blade that terminates at thenode. The areas between the nodes are referred to as internodes. Some grass plants may have extensions of the sheath called auricles. A sedge, however , generally does not have a ligule or an auricle. l e... a f b l a d e l i g u l e a u r i c l e l e a f c o l l a r s h e a t h n o d e Plant Parts 4 The cross-sections of grasses may be eitherround or oval (flattened), compared to a sedge, which exhibits a triangular shape. The sheath of a grass...

  14. MOLECULAR ENTOMOLOGY Molecular Identification Key for Pest Species of Scirtothrips

    E-print Network

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    Þcation of exotic and potentially invasive taxa that may cause high economic losses or envi- ronmental damage sinensis L (Mound and Palmer 1981). Scirtothrips species typically feed on and damage young, growing leaves, Nakahara 1997) and weeds (Morris and Mound 2004). After translocation to new areas outside of the home

  15. Bilateral Unknown Key-Share Attacks in Key Agreement Protocols

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Bilateral Unknown Key-Share Attacks in Key Agreement Protocols Liqun Chen Hewlett Unknown Key-Share (UKS) resilience is a basic security attribute in authenticated key agreement protocols, whereby two entities A and B should not be able to be coerced into sharing a key between them when in fact

  16. Quantum Key Distribution in the Classical Authenticated Key Exchange Framework

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Quantum Key Distribution in the Classical Authenticated Key Exchange Framework Michele Mosca1 of the protocol. We describe a security model for quantum key distribution based on traditional classical authenti: quantum key distribution, authenticated key exchange, cryptographic protocols, secu- rity models 1

  17. Comparison is key.

    PubMed

    Stone, Mark H; Stenner, A Jackson

    2014-01-01

    Several concepts from Georg Rasch's last papers are discussed. The key one is comparison because Rasch considered the method of comparison fundamental to science. From the role of comparison stems scientific inference made operational by a properly developed frame of reference producing specific objectivity. The exact specifications Rasch outlined for making comparisons are explicated from quotes, and the role of causality derived from making comparisons is also examined. Understanding causality has implications for what can and cannot be produced via Rasch measurement. His simple examples were instructive, but the implications are far reaching upon first establishing the key role of comparison. PMID:24518579

  18. Input from Key Stakeholders in the National Security Technology Incubator

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-31

    This report documents the input from key stakeholders of the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI) in developing a new technology incubator and related programs for southern New Mexico. The technology incubator is being developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), funded by a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. This report includes identification of key stakeholders as well as a description and analysis of their input for the development of an incubator.

  19. Hazard identification for contaminants.

    PubMed

    Iscan, Mümtaz

    2004-12-15

    In recent years, the recognition of generation of large quantities of toxicants and their by-products due to the industrial and/or cultural activities and transport and their persistence in the environment and biological activities brings out the necessity and importance of their assessment of risk they pose to the ecosystems (e.g. aquatic environment-coastal waters, rivers, lakes and ground water). Indeed, understanding the impacts of contaminants on the environment, including the organisms which live in it, is rather complicated. Nevertheless, the need for protection of the scarce natural resources in the environment and wiser use of them brings the necessity and importance of focusing more attention to the issue. Accordingly the process of ecological risk assessment (ERA) has evolved rapidly since the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a framework for ecological risk assessment in 1992. The ecological risk assessment involves three stages in a continuous process: (1) problem formulation (problem identification-hazard identification), (2) the analysis of exposure and effects and (3) risk characterisation. Risk management follows the risk characterisation. Of these stages, problem identification is the most critical one which establishes the direction and scope of the ecological risk assessment. The stage involves identifying the actual environmental value(s) to be protected (assessment endpoints) and selecting ways in which these can be measured and evaluated (measurement endpoints). The accuracy of the risk estimation is largely based on the availability of the key information about the contaminant characteristics, ecosystem at risk and ecological effects and the less uncertainty associated with them. The key information required during this phase of the risk assessment process are as follows: (a) potential/actual contaminant of concern, (b) source of contaminant; current and historic use, (c) mode of action of the contaminant, (d) contaminant characteristics (e.g. physical/chemical properties and environmental behaviour, persistence in the ecosystem, transformation products and bioaccumulation), (e) ecosystem potentially at risk and (f) areas of uncertainty. Finally based on these information a conceptual model has to be developed to define the possible exposure and assessment scenarios. Herein, the aforementioned key issues concerning the problem-hazard identification stage of ecological risk assessment for contaminants have been briefly reviewed. PMID:15464629

  20. Cryptographic Key Management System

    SciTech Connect

    No, author

    2014-02-21

    This report summarizes the outcome of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-OE0000543, requesting the design of a Cryptographic Key Management System (CKMS) for the secure management of cryptographic keys for the energy sector infrastructure. Prime contractor Sypris Electronics, in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Valicore Technologies, and Purdue University's Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS) and Smart Meter Integration Laboratory (SMIL), has designed, developed and evaluated the CKMS solution. We provide an overview of the project in Section 3, review the core contributions of all contractors in Section 4, and discuss bene#12;ts to the DOE in Section 5. In Section 6 we describe the technical construction of the CKMS solution, and review its key contributions in Section 6.9. Section 7 describes the evaluation and demonstration of the CKMS solution in different environments. We summarize the key project objectives in Section 8, list publications resulting from the project in Section 9, and conclude with a discussion on commercialization in Section 10 and future work in Section 11.

  1. Key Competencies. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, David; Browne, Geoff

    Key competencies (or generic skills) have been specified in four sources: Further Education Unit (FEU), United Kingdom (1987); Finn Report (1991) and Mayer Committee (1992), Australia; U.S. Labor Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS) (June 1991); and Butterworth and Lovell (1983), New South Wales. A comparison of the four…

  2. Mangrove Key Islets

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Beyond the mangrove key islets that make up the Ten Thousand Islands, lies the Gulf of Mexico. The Ten Thousand Islands are comprised of hundreds of mangrove islands that extend northward from the northwest corner of Everglades National Park. These uninhabited islands stretch for 60-miles al...

  3. Identification of Youngsters with Emotional Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carl R.

    A clarification of the identification process for emotionally disturbed children is presented. Traditional definitions of emotional disturbance (ED) are explored and four behavioral clusters within traditional definitions are presented. The four are withdrawal from social interaction (autism), unsatisfactory interpersonal relationships,…

  4. RAPID PHASE IDENTIFICATION OF MIXED CRYSTALLINE SOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The identification of crystal phases and crystal chemistry can be critical to understanding the mechanisms of waste material interaction with native soils. nderstanding these mechanisms can suggest correct methods for remediation and treatment. rogram is outlined and examples are...

  5. Identification of bZIP interaction partners of viral proteins HBZ, MEQ, BZLF1, and K-bZIP using coiled-coil arrays

    E-print Network

    Reinke, Aaron Wade

    Basic-region leucine-zipper transcription factors (bZIPs) contain a segment rich in basic amino acids that can bind DNA, followed by a leucine zipper that can interact with other leucine zippers to form coiled-coil homo- ...

  6. Identification of a cytoplasmic interaction partner of the large regulatory proteins Rep78/Rep68 of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2)

    SciTech Connect

    Weger, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.weger@charite.de; Hammer, Eva; Goetz, Anne; Heilbronn, Regine

    2007-05-25

    Through yeast two-hybrid analysis and coimmunoprecipitation studies, we have identified a novel cellular AAV-2 Rep78/Rep68 interaction partner located predominantly in the cytoplasm. In public databases, it has been assigned as KCTD5, because of a region of high similarity to the cytoplasmic tetramerization domain of voltage-gated potassium channels. Whereas Rep/KCTD5 interaction relied on the region surrounding the Rep nuclear localization signal, nuclear accumulation of Rep was not required. Wildtype Rep78/Rep68 proteins induced the translocation of large portions of KCTD5 into the nucleus pointing to functional interactions both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. In line with an anticipated functional interference in the cytoplasm, KCTD5 overexpression completely abrogated Rep68-mediated posttranscriptional activation of a HIV-LTR driven luciferase reporter gene. Our study expands the panel of already identified nuclear Rep interaction partners to a cytoplasmic protein, which raises the awareness that important steps in the AAV life cycle may be regulated in this compartment.

  7. UNCW KEY REQUEST FORM INSTRUCTIONS

    E-print Network

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    UNCW KEY REQUEST FORM INSTRUCTIONS 1. 2. 3. 4. New Employee Lost key(s) NOTE: Police report must: Account to be charged: Name (print) Extension: · Key Level Two: Department master suites used by more than, Physical Plant Director, Dean, Division AVC, Facilities AVC · Key Level Three: Great Grand Masters

  8. Computational prediction of secretion systems and secretomes of Brucella: identification of novel type IV effectors and their interaction with the host.

    PubMed

    Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Vishnu, Udayakumar S; Dinakaran, Vasudevan; Sridhar, Jayavel; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2016-01-15

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular pathogens that cause brucellosis in various mammals including humans. Brucella survive inside the host cells by forming vacuoles and subverting host defence systems. This study was aimed to predict the secretion systems and the secretomes of Brucella spp. from 39 complete genome sequences available in the databases. Furthermore, an attempt was made to identify the type IV secretion effectors and their interactions with host proteins. We predicted the secretion systems of Brucella by the KEGG pathway and SecReT4. Brucella secretomes and type IV effectors (T4SEs) were predicted through genome-wide screening using JVirGel and S4TE, respectively. Protein-protein interactions of Brucella T4SEs with their hosts were analyzed by HPIDB 2.0. Genes coding for Sec and Tat pathways of secretion and type I (T1SS), type IV (T4SS) and type V (T5SS) secretion systems were identified and they are conserved in all the species of Brucella. In addition to the well-known VirB operon coding for the type IV secretion system (T4SS), we have identified the presence of additional genes showing homology with T4SS of other organisms. On the whole, 10.26 to 14.94% of total proteomes were found to be either secreted (secretome) or membrane associated (membrane proteome). Approximately, 1.7 to 3.0% of total proteomes were identified as type IV secretion effectors (T4SEs). Prediction of protein-protein interactions showed 29 and 36 host-pathogen specific interactions between Bos taurus (cattle)-B. abortus and Ovis aries (sheep)-B. melitensis, respectively. Functional characterization of the predicted T4SEs and their interactions with their respective hosts may reveal the secrets of host specificity of Brucella. PMID:26575364

  9. Identification and mapping in spring wheat of genetic factors controlling stem rust resistance and the study of their epistatic interactions across multiple environments.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Knox, R E; DePauw, R M; Singh, A K; Cuthbert, R D; Campbell, H L; Singh, D; Bhavani, S; Fetch, T; Clarke, F

    2013-08-01

    Stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) is responsible for major production losses in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) around the world. The spread of stem rust race Ug99 and variants is a threat to worldwide wheat production and efforts are ongoing to identify and incorporate resistance. The objectives of this research were to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) and to study their epistatic interactions for stem rust resistance in a population derived from the Canadian wheat cultivars AC Cadillac and Carberry. A doubled haploid (DH) population was developed and genotyped with DArT(®) and SSR markers. The parents and DH lines were phenotyped for stem rust severity and infection response to Ug99 and variant races in 2009, 2010 and 2011 in field rust nurseries near Njoro, Kenya, and to North American races in 2011 and 2012 near Swift Current, SK, Canada. Seedling infection type to race TTKSK was assessed in a bio-containment facility in 2009 and 2012 near Morden, MB. Eight QTL for stem rust resistance and three QTL for pseudo-black chaff on nine wheat chromosomes were identified. The phenotypic variance (PV) explained by the stem rust resistance QTL ranged from 2.4 to 48.8 %. AC Cadillac contributed stem rust resistance QTL on chromosomes 2B, 3B, 5B, 6D, 7B and 7D. Carberry contributed resistance QTL on 4B and 5A. Epistatic interactions were observed between loci on 4B and 5B, 4B and 7B, 6D and 3B, 6D and 5B, and 6D and 7B. The stem rust resistance locus on 6D interacted synergistically with 5B to improve the disease resistance through both crossover and non-crossover interactions depending on the environment. Results from this study will assist in planning breeding for stem rust resistance by maximizing QTL main effects and epistatic interactions. PMID:23649649

  10. Limitations and Extensions of the Lock-and-Key Principle: Differences between Gas State, Solution and Solid State Structures

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Hans-Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The lock-and-key concept is discussed with respect to necessary extensions. Formation of supramolecular complexes depends not only, and often not even primarily on an optimal geometric fit between host and guest. Induced fit and allosteric interactions have long been known as important modifications. Different binding mechanisms, the medium used and pH effects can exert a major influence on the affinity. Stereoelectronic effects due to lone pair orientation can lead to variation of binding constants by orders of magnitude. Hydrophobic interactions due to high-energy water inside cavities modify the mechanical lock-and-key picture. That optimal affinities are observed if the cavity is only partially filled by the ligand can be in conflict with the lock-and-key principle. In crystals other forces than those between host and guest often dominate, leading to differences between solid state and solution structures. This is exemplified in particular with calixarene complexes, which by X-ray analysis more often than other hosts show guest molecules outside their cavity. In view of this the particular problems with the identification of weak interactions in crystals is discussed. PMID:25815592

  11. High-Throughput Screening of One-Bead-One-Compound Libraries: Identification of Cyclic Peptidyl Inhibitors against Calcineurin/NFAT Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Qian, Ziqing; Xiao, Qing; Pei, Dehua

    2011-01-01

    One-bead-one-compound (OBOC) libraries provide a powerful tool for drug discovery as well as biomedical research. However, screening a large number of beads/compounds (>1 million) and rank ordering the initial hits (which are covalently attached to a solid support) according to their potencies still post significant technical challenges. In this work, we have integrated some of the latest technical advances from our own as well as other laboratories to develop a general methodology for rapidly screening large OBOC libraries. The methodology has been applied to synthesize and screen a cyclic peptide library that features: (1) spatially segregated beads containing cyclic peptides on the surface layer and linear encoding peptides in their interior; (2) rapid on-bead screening of the library (>1 million) by a multi-stage procedure (magnetic bead sorting, enzyme-linked assay, and fluorescence based screening); (3) selective release of cyclic peptides from single positive beads for solution-phase determination of their binding affinities; and (4) hit identification by partial Edman degradation/mass spectrometry (PED/MS). Screening of the library against protein phosphatase calcineurin (Cn) identified a series of cyclic peptides that bind to the substrate-docking site for nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) with KD values of ~1 ?M. Further improvement of the affinity and specificity of these compounds may lead to a new class of immunosuppressive agents that are more selective and therefore less toxic than cyclosporine A and FK506. PMID:21848276

  12. Key Interactions for Clathrin Coat Stability Till Bo cking,1,4,* Franc ois Aguet,1 Iris Rapoport,1,3 Manuel Banzhaf,1,3 Anan Yu,1,3,5 Jean Christophe Zeeh,1,3

    E-print Network

    Kirchhausen, Tomas

    : Department of Molecular Biosciences, Rice Institute for Biomedical Research, Northwestern University conformation and binds to clathrin with fast on-rate and low affinity. ATP hydrolysis, triggered by interaction

  13. Identification of protein arginine N-methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) as a novel interacting protein with the tumor suppressor protein RASSF1A.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Nobuya; Saito, Yumiko; Fujiwara, Yoko; Shiraki, Takashi; Imanishi, Yorihisa; Koshimizu, Taka-Aki; Shibata, Katsushi

    2015-11-27

    The candidate tumor suppressor gene RASSF1A (Ras-association domain family 1, isoform A) is inactivated in many types of adult and childhood cancers. However, the mechanisms by which RASSF1A exerts tumor suppressive functions have yet to be elucidated. In this report, we sought to identify candidate proteins that interact with RASSF1A using proteomic screening. Using peptide mass fingerprinting, we identified protein arginine N-methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5), a type II protein arginine N-methyltransferase that monomethylates and symmetrically dimethylates arginine residues, as a novel protein that interacts with RASSF1A. The association between the two proteins was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence staining. Co-expressing RASSF1A and PRMT5 led to a redistribution of PRMT5 from the cytosol to stabilized microtubules, where RASSF1A and PRMT5 became co-localized. Our results demonstrate that PRMT5 translocates to bundled microtubules on stabilization by RASSF1A expression. Our results show that the tumor suppressor RASSF1A interacts with PRMT5 in vivo and in vitro. Notably, this is the first demonstration of RASSF1A-dependent microtubule recruitment of PRMT5, suggesting a novel role for RASSF1A in the anchoring of cytosolic PRMT5 to microtubules. PMID:26482848

  14. Distribution of Key Variables

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content Home   |   Data   |   Statistics   |   Tools   |   Collaborations   |   Work with Us   |   Publications   |   About   |   Links Distribution of Key Variables Women Exam year 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 381,827 499,159 622,446 638,678 650,759 657,167 699,081 667,762 669,994 566,657 498,019 500,055 498,798 502,488 Unique

  15. Identification of a genetic interaction between the tumor suppressor EAF2 and the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) signaling pathway in C. elegans and prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Liquan; Wang, Dan; Fisher, Alfred L.; Wang, Zhou

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • RNAi screen identified genetic enhancers for the C. elegans homolog of EAF2. • EAF2 and RBBP4 proteins physically bind to each other and alter transcription. • Overexpression of EAF2 and RBBP4 induces the cell death in prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: The tumor suppressor EAF2 is regulated by androgen signaling and associated with prostate cancer. While EAF2 and its partner ELL have been shown to be members of protein complexes involved in RNA polymerase II transcriptional elongation, the biologic roles for EAF2 especially with regards to the development of cancer remains poorly understood. We have previously identified the eaf-1 gene in Caenorhabditiselegans as the ortholog of EAF2, and shown that eaf-1 interacts with the ELL ortholog ell-1 to control development and fertility in worms. To identify genetic pathways that interact with eaf-1, we screened RNAi libraries consisting of transcription factors, phosphatases, and chromatin-modifying factors to identify genes which enhance the effects of eaf-1(tm3976) on fertility. From this screen, we identified lin-53, hmg-1.2, pha-4, ruvb-2 and set-6 as hits. LIN-53 is the C. elegans ortholog of human retinoblastoma binding protein 4/7 (RBBP 4/7), which binds to the retinoblastoma protein and inhibits the Ras signaling pathway. We find that lin-53 showed a synthetic interaction with eaf-1(tm3976) where knockdown of lin-53 in an eaf-1(tm3976) mutant resulted in sterile worms. This phenotype may be due to cell death as the treated worms contain degenerated embryos with increased expression of the ced-1:GFP cell death marker. Further we find that the interaction between eaf-1 and lin-53/RBBP4/7 also exists in vertebrates, which is reflected by the formation of a protein complex between EAF2 and RBBP4/7. Finally, overexpression of either human EAF2 or RBBP4 in LNCaP cells induced the cell death while knockdown of EAF2 in LNCaP enhanced cell proliferation, indicating an important role of EAF2 in controlling the growth and survival of prostate cancer cells. Together these findings identify a novel physical and functional interaction between EAF2 and the Rb pathway.

  16. Identification of nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) as an interacting partner of plant ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) and a positive regulator of rDNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Shin, Yun-Jeong; Kim, Woo-Young; Koh, Hee-Jong; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2015-09-18

    The ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) is a downstream component of the signaling mediated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase that acts as a central regulator of the key metabolic processes, such as protein translation and ribosome biogenesis, in response to various environmental cues. In our previous study, we identified a novel role of plant RPS6, which negatively regulates rDNA transcription, forming a complex with a plant-specific histone deacetylase, AtHD2B. Here we report that the Arabidopsis RPS6 interacts additionally with a histone chaperone, nucleosome assembly protein 1(AtNAP1;1). The interaction does not appear to preclude the association of RPS6 with AtHD2B, as the AtNAP1 was also able to interact with AtHD2B as well as with an RPS6-AtHD2B fusion protein in the BiFC assay and pulldown experiment. Similar to a positive effect of the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) on rDNA transcription observed in this study, overexpression or down regulation of the AtNAP1;1 resulted in concomitant increase and decrease, respectively, in rDNA transcription suggesting a positive regulatory role played by AtNAP1 in plant rDNA transcription, possibly through derepression of the negative effect of the RPS6-AtHD2B complex. PMID:26241676

  17. Quantum Key Distribution Protocol with Private-Public Key

    E-print Network

    Eduin H. Serna

    2012-05-12

    A quantum cryptographic protocol based in public key cryptography combinations and private key cryptography is presented. Unlike the BB84 protocol [1] and its many variants [2,3] two quantum channels are used. The present research does not make reconciliation mechanisms of information to derive the key. A three related system of key distribution are described.

  18. Photo interpretation key to Michigan land cover/use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enslin, W. R.; Hudson, W. D.; Lusch, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    A set of photo interpretation keys is presented to provide a structured approach to the identification of land cover/use categories as specified in the Michigan Resource Inventory Act. The designated categories are urban and; built up lands; agricultural lands; forest land; nonforested land; water bodies; wetlands; and barren land. The keys were developed for use with medium scale (1:20,000 to 1:24,000) color infrared aerial photography. Although each key is generalized in that it relies only upon the most distinguishing photo characteristics in separating the various land cover/use categories, additional interpretation characteristics, distinguishing features and background material are given.

  19. Key Separation and Key Reuse Practice: Key Reuse in EMV Theory: Joint Security of Combined Signature and Encryption Theory & Practice: Joint Secur Key Reuse in Public Key Cryptography

    E-print Network

    Paterson, Kenny

    Key Separation and Key Reuse Practice: Key Reuse in EMV Theory: Joint Security of Combined Signature and Encryption Theory & Practice: Joint Secur Key Reuse in Public Key Cryptography: Theory, Nigel P. Smart, Martijn Stam, Mario Strefler, Susan Thomson EuroPKI 2012 Kenny Paterson | Key Reuse

  20. Data Analysis Strategies for Protein Modification Identification.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics provides a powerful tool for large-scale analysis of protein modifications. Statistical and computational analysis of mass spectrometry data is a key step in protein modification identification. This chapter presents common and advanced data analysis strategies for modification identification, including variable modification search, unrestrictive approaches for modification discovery, false discovery rate estimation and control methods, and tools for modification site localization. PMID:26519183

  1. Anonymous-key quantum cryptography and unconditionally secure quantum bit commitment

    E-print Network

    Horace P. Yuen

    2000-09-27

    A new cryptographic tool, anonymous quantum key technique, is introduced that leads to unconditionally secure key distribution and encryption schemes that can be readily implemented experimentally in a realistic environment. If quantum memory is available, the technique would have many features of public-key cryptography; an identification protocol that does not require a shared secret key is provided as an illustration. The possibility is also indicated for obtaining unconditionally secure quantum bit commitment protocols with this technique.

  2. Identification of unique interactions between the flexible linker and the RecA-like domains of DEAD-box helicase Mss116

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuan; Palla, Mirkó; Sun, Andrew; Liao, Jung-Chi

    2013-09-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicases are ATP-dependent proteins implicated in nearly all aspects of RNA metabolism. The yeast DEAD-box helicase Mss116 is unique in its functions of splicing group I and group II introns and activating mRNA translation, but the structural understanding of why it performs these unique functions remains unclear. Here we used sequence analysis and molecular dynamics simulation to identify residues in the flexible linker specific for yeast Mss116, potentially associated with its unique functions. We first identified residues that are 100% conserved in Mss116 of different species of the Saccharomycetaceae family. The amino acids of these conserved residues were then compared with the amino acids of the corresponding residue positions of other RNA helicases to identify residues that have distinct amino acids from other DEAD-box proteins. Four residues in the flexible linker, i.e. N334, E335, P336 and H339, are conserved and Mss116-specific. Molecular dynamics simulation was conducted for the wild-type Mss116 structure and mutant models to examine mutational effects of the linker on the conformational equilibrium. Relatively short MD simulation runs (within 20 ns) were enough for us to observe mutational effects, suggesting serious structural perturbations by these mutations. The mutation of E335 depletes the interactions between E335 and K95 in domain 1. The interactions between N334/P336 and N496/I497 of domain 2 are also abolished by mutation. Our results suggest that tight interactions between the Mss116-specific flexible linker and the two RecA-like domains may be mechanically required to crimp RNA for the unique RNA processes of yeast Mss116.

  3. Identification of stepped changes of binding affinity during interactions between the disintegrin rhodostomin and integrin ?IIb?3 in living cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chia-Fen; Chang, Bo-Jui; Pai, Chyi-Huey; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Chi, Sien; Hsu, Long; Tsai, Jin-Wu; Lin, Chi-Hung

    2004-10-01

    Integrin receptors serve as both mechanical links and signal transduction mediators between the cell and its environment. Experimental evidence demonstrates that conformational changes and lateral clustering of the integrin proteins may affect their binding to ligands and regulate downstream cellular responses; however, experimental links between the structural and functional correlations of the ligand-receptor interactions are not yet elucidated. In the present report, we utilized optical tweezers to measure the dynamic binding between the snake venom rhodostomin, coated on a microparticle and functioned as a ligand, and the membrane receptor integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3) expressed on a Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell. A progressive increase of total binding affinity was found between the bead and CHO cell in the first 300 sec following optical tweezers-guided contact. Further analysis of the cumulative data revealed the presence of "unit binding force" presumably exerted by a single rhodostomin-integrin pair. Interestingly, two such units were found. Among the measurements of less total binding forces, presumably taken at the early stage of ligand-receptor interactions, a unit of 4.15 pN per molecule pair was derived. This unit force dropped to 2.54 pN per molecule pair toward the later stage of interactions when the total binding forces were relatively large. This stepped change of single molecule pair binding affinity was not found when mutant rhodostomin proteins were used as ligands (a single unit of 1.81 pN per pair was found). These results were interpreted along with the current knowledge about the conformational changes of integrins during the "molecule activation" process.

  4. Identification of distinctive interdomain interactions among ZP-N, ZP-C and other domains of zona pellucida glycoproteins underlying association of chicken egg-coat matrix

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Hiroki; Sato, Takahiro; Sakuma, Rio; Fukushima, Hideaki; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Ujita, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate egg coat, including mammalian zona pellucida, is an oocyte-specific extracellular matrix comprising two to six zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins. The egg coat plays important roles in fertilization, especially in species-specific interactions with sperm to induce the sperm acrosome reaction and to form the block to polyspermy. It is suggested that the physiological functions of the egg coat are mediated and/or regulated coordinately by peptide and carbohydrate moieties of the ZP glycoproteins that are spatially arranged in the egg coat, whereas a comprehensive understanding of the architecture of vertebrate egg-coat matrix remains elusive. Here, we deduced the orientations and/or distributions of chicken ZP glycoproteins, ZP1, ZP3 and ZPD, in the egg-coat matrix by confocal immunofluorescent microscopy, and in the ZP1–ZP3 complexes generated in vitro by co-immunoprecipitation assays. We further confirmed interdomain interactions of the ZP glycoproteins by far-Western blot analyses of the egg-coat proteins and pull-down assays of ZP1 in the serum, using recombinant domains of ZP glycoproteins as probes. Our results suggest that the ZP1 and ZP3 bind through their ZP-C domains to form the ZP1–ZP3 complexes and fibrils, which are assembled into bundles through interactions between the repeat domains of ZP1 to form the ZP1–ZP3 matrix, and that the ZPD molecules self-associate and bind to the ZP1–ZP3 matrix through its ZP-N and ZP-C domains to form the egg-coat matrix. Based on these results, we propose a tentative model for the architecture of the chicken egg-coat matrix that might be applicable to other vertebrate ones. PMID:26106520

  5. Identification of an interactive effect of beta3- and alpha2b-adrenoceptor gene polymorphisms on fat mass in Caucasian women.

    PubMed

    Dionne, I J; Turner, A N; Tchernof, A; Pollin, T I; Avrithi, D; Gray, D; Shuldiner, A R; Poehlman, E T

    2001-01-01

    Several adrenoceptor subtypes are expressed in adipocytes, which together exert their influence on adipocyte metabolism. Therefore, we specifically examined the interactive effect of Trp64Arg (beta3) and Glu12/Glu9 (alpha2b) adrenoceptor (AR) polymorphisms on energy metabolism and body composition in healthy women with a wide range of body habitus. We genotyped 909 unrelated women (age 55 +/- 12 [mean +/- SD] years, range 19-87; body weight 88 +/- 22 kg, range 40-167; and BMI 33 +/- 8 kg/m2, range 16-64) for Trp64Arg beta3AR and Glu12/Glu9 alpha2bAR variants. We examined the independent effect of the Glu12/Glu9 alpha2bAR variant on body composition and energy balance, in a large cohort of Caucasian women (n = 909). A second goal was to examine the interaction effect of Glu12/Glu9 alpha2bAR and Trp64Arg beta3AR on the same phenotypes. The obesity-related phenotypes studied were as follows: body weight, BMI, fat mass, visceral fat, fat-free mass, resting metabolic rate (RMR), VO2max, leisure time physical activity, and daily energy intake. Body composition and body fat distribution were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and radiographic imagery, VO2max by a treadmill test to exhaustion, and RMR by indirect calorimetry. An analysis of covariance indicated that in the entire cohort, there was no significant difference between Glu12/Glu9 alpha2bAR carriers and control subjects for any of the obesity-related phenotypes that were examined. However, we observed a significant interaction effect of the Trp64Arg and Glu12/Glu9 variants on fat mass (P = 0.009) and percent fat (P = 0.016). Age, height, body weight, BMI, fat-free mass, visceral fat, energy expenditure, respiratory quotient, physical fitness, and energy intake were not different among groups. Collectively, these findings support an interaction effect of the two adrenoceptor variants on body fatness in Caucasian women, although the physiological mechanism by which they exert this effect remains to be determined. PMID:11147800

  6. Identification of artery wall stiffness: in vitro validation and in vivo results of a data assimilation procedure applied to a 3D fluid-structure interaction model.

    PubMed

    Bertoglio, Cristóbal; Barber, David; Gaddum, Nicholas; Valverde, Israel; Rutten, Marcel; Beerbaum, Philipp; Moireau, Philippe; Hose, Rodney; Gerbeau, Jean-Frédéric

    2014-03-21

    We consider the problem of estimating the stiffness of an artery wall using a data assimilation method applied to a 3D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model. Recalling previous works, we briefly present the FSI model, the data assimilation procedure and the segmentation algorithm. We present then two examples of the procedure using real data. First, we estimate the stiffness distribution of a silicon rubber tube from image data. Second, we present the estimation of aortic wall stiffness from real clinical data. PMID:24529756

  7. Complex interactions between dioxin-like and non-dioxin-like compounds for in vitro cellular responses: implications for the identification of dioxin exposure biomarkers.

    PubMed

    O'Kane, Anthony A; Elliott, Chris T; Mooney, Mark H

    2014-02-17

    Despite considerable advances in reducing the production of dioxin-like toxicants in recent years, contamination of the food chain still occasionally occurs resulting in huge losses to the agri-food sector and risk to human health through exposure. Dioxin-like toxicity is exhibited by a range of stable and bioaccumulative compounds including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs), produced by certain types of combustion, and man-made coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), as found in electrical transformer oils. While dioxinergic compounds act by a common mode of action making exposure detection biomarker based techniques a potentially useful tool, the influence of co-contaminating toxicants on such approaches needs to be considered. To assess the impact of possible interactions, the biological responses of H4IIE cells to challenge by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in combination with PCB-52 and benzo-a-pyrene (BaP) were evaluated by a number of methods in this study. Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) induction in TCDD exposed cells was suppressed by increasing concentrations of PCB-52, PCB-153, or BaP up to 10 ?M. BaP levels below 1 ?M suppressed TCDD stimulated EROD induction, but at higher concentrations, EROD induction was greater than the maximum observed when cells were treated with TCDD alone. A similar biphasic interaction of BaP with TCDD co-exposure was noted in the AlamarBlue assay and to a lesser extent with PCB-52. Surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF) profiling of peptidomic responses of cells exposed to compound combinations was compared. Cells co-exposed to TCDD in the presence of BaP or PCB-52 produced the most differentiated spectra with a substantial number of non-additive interactions observed. These findings suggest that interactions between dioxin and other toxicants create novel, additive, and non-additive effects, which may be more indicative of the types of responses seen in exposed animals than those of single exposures to the individual compounds. PMID:24397434

  8. Identification of N-(4-piperidinyl)-4-(2,6-dichlorobenzoylamino)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AT7519), a novel cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor using fragment-based X-ray crystallography and structure based drug design.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Paul G; Woodhead, Andrew J; Berdini, Valerio; Boulstridge, John A; Carr, Maria G; Cross, David M; Davis, Deborah J; Devine, Lindsay A; Early, Theresa R; Feltell, Ruth E; Lewis, E Jonathan; McMenamin, Rachel L; Navarro, Eva F; O'Brien, Michael A; O'Reilly, Marc; Reule, Matthias; Saxty, Gordon; Seavers, Lisa C A; Smith, Donna-Michelle; Squires, Matt S; Trewartha, Gary; Walker, Margaret T; Woolford, Alison J-A

    2008-08-28

    The application of fragment-based screening techniques to cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) identified multiple (>30) efficient, synthetically tractable small molecule hits for further optimization. Structure-based design approaches led to the identification of multiple lead series, which retained the key interactions of the initial binding fragments and additionally explored other areas of the ATP binding site. The majority of this paper details the structure-guided optimization of indazole (6) using information gained from multiple ligand-CDK2 cocrystal structures. Identification of key binding features for this class of compounds resulted in a series of molecules with low nM affinity for CDK2. Optimisation of cellular activity and characterization of pharmacokinetic properties led to the identification of 33 (AT7519), which is currently being evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of human cancers. PMID:18656911

  9. Identification of the First Inhibitor of the GBP1:PIM1 Interaction. Implications for the Development of a New Class of Anticancer Agents against Paclitaxel Resistant Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Class III ?-tubulin plays a prominent role in the development of drug resistance to paclitaxel by allowing the incorporation of the GBP1 GTPase into microtubules. Once in the cytoskeleton, GBP1 binds to prosurvival kinases such as PIM1 and initiates a signaling pathway that induces resistance to paclitaxel. Therefore, the inhibition of the GBP1:PIM1 interaction could potentially revert resistance to paclitaxel. A panel of 44 4-azapodophyllotoxin derivatives was screened in the NCI-60 cell panel. The result is that 31 are active and the comparative analysis demonstrated specific activity in paclitaxel-resistant cells. Using surface plasmon resonance, we were able to prove that NSC756093 is a potent in vitro inhibitor of the GBP1:PIM1 interaction and that this property is maintained in vivo in ovarian cancer cells resistant to paclitaxel. Through bioinformatics, molecular modeling, and mutagenesis studies, we identified the putative NSC756093 binding site at the interface between the helical and the LG domain of GBP1. According to our results by binding to this site, the NSC756093 compound is able to stabilize a conformation of GBP1 not suitable for binding to PIM1. PMID:25211704

  10. Identification and characterization of Schizosaccharomyces pombe asp1(+), a gene that interacts with mutations in the Arp2/3 complex and actin.

    PubMed Central

    Feoktistova, A; McCollum, D; Ohi, R; Gould, K L

    1999-01-01

    The Arp2/3 complex is an essential component of the actin cytoskeleton in yeast and is required for the movement of actin patches. In an attempt to identify proteins that interact with this complex in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we sought high-copy suppressors of the S. pombe arp3-c1 mutant, and have identified one, which we have termed asp1(+). The asp1(+) open reading frame (ORF) predicts a highly conserved protein of 921 amino acids with a molecular mass of 106 kD that does not contain motifs of known function. Neither asp1(+) nor its apparent Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog, VIP1, are essential genes. However, disruption of asp1(+) leads to altered morphology and growth properties at elevated temperatures and defects in polarized growth. The asp1 disruption strain also is hypersensitive to Ca+ ions and to low pH conditions. Although Asp1p is not stably associated with the Arp2/3 complex nor localized in any discrete structure within the cytoplasm, the asp1 disruption mutant was synthetically lethal with mutations in components of the Arp2/3 complex, arp3-c1 and sop2-1, as well as with a mutation in actin, act1-48. Moreover, the vip1 disruption strain showed a negative genetic interaction with a las17Delta strain. We conclude that Asp1p/Vip1p is important for the function of the cortical actin cytoskeleton. PMID:10388810

  11. Identification of mud crab reovirus VP12 and its interaction with the voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein of mud crab Scylla paramamosain.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hai-Dong; Su, Hong-Jun; Zou, Wei-Bin; Liu, Shan-Shan; Yan, Wen-Rui; Wang, Qian-Qian; Yuan, Li-Li; Chan, Siuming Francis; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; He, Jian-Guo; Weng, Shao-Ping

    2015-05-01

    Mud crab reovirus (MCRV) is the causative agent of a severe disease in cultured mud crab (Scylla paramamosain), which has caused huge economic losses in China. MCRV is a double-stranded RNA virus with 12 genomic segments. In this paper, SDS-PAGE, mass spectrometry and Western blot analyses revealed that the VP12 protein encoded by S12 gene is a structural protein of MCRV. Immune electron microscopy assay indicated that MCRV VP12 is a component of MCRV outer shell capsid. Yeast two hybrid cDNA library of mud crab was constructed and mud crab voltage-dependent anion-selective channel (mcVDAC) was obtained by MCRV VP12 screening. The full length of mcVDAC was 1180 bp with an open reading frame (ORF) of 849 bp encoding a 282 amino acid protein. The mcVDAC had a constitutive expression pattern in different tissues of mud crab. The interaction between MCRV VP12 and mcVDAC was determined by co-immunoprecipitation assay. The results of this study have provided an insight on the mechanisms of MCRV infection and the interactions between the virus and mud crab. PMID:25542377

  12. Dose-Response Analysis in the Joint Action of Two Effectors. A New Approach to Simulation, Identification and Modelling of Some Basic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Murado García, Miguel Anxo; Prieto Lage, Miguel Ángel

    2013-01-01

    In systems with several effectors, the results of dose-response (DR) experiments are usually assessed by checking them against two hypotheses: independent action (IA) and concentration addition (CA). Both are useful simplifications, but do not represent the only possible responses, and avoid to a large extent the analysis of the interactions that are possible in the system. In addition, these are often applied in such a way that they produce insufficient descriptions of the problem that raises them, frequent inconclusive cases and doubtful decisions. In this work a generative approach is attempted, starting from some simple mechanisms necessarily underlying the response of an elementary biological entity to an effector agent. A set of simulations is formulated next through an equally simple system of logical rules, and several families of virtual responses are thus generated. These families include typical responses of IA and CA modes of action, other ones not less probable from a physiological point of view, and even other derived from common and expectable forms of interactions. The analysis of these responses enabled, firstly, to relate some phenomenological regularities with some general mechanistic principles, and to detect several causes by which the IA-CA dualism is necessarily ambiguous. Secondly, it allowed identifying different forms of synergy and antagonism that contribute to explain some controversial aspects of these notions. Finally, it led to propose two sets of explicit algebraic equations that describe accurately a wide diversity of possible and realistic responses. PMID:23637825

  13. Studies of the Interaction between Isoimperatorin and Human Serum Albumin by Multispectroscopic Method: Identification of Possible Binding Site of the Compound Using Esterase Activity of the Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Samira; Shokoohinia, Yalda; Ghobadi, Sirous; Gholamzadeh, Saeed; Moradi, Nastaran; Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Aghaei, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Isoimperatorin is one of the main components of Prangos ferulacea as a linear furanocoumarin and used as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antispasmodic, and anticancer drug. Human serum albumin (HSA) is a principal extracellular protein with a high concentration in blood plasma and carrier for many drugs to different molecular targets. Since the carrying of drug by HSA may affect on its structure and action, we decided to investigate the interaction between HSA and isoimperatorin using fluorescence and UV spectroscopy. Fluorescence data indicated that isoimperatorin quenches the intrinsic fluorescence of the HSA via a static mechanism and hydrophobic interaction play the major role in the drug binding. The binding average distance between isoimperatorin and Trp 214 of HSA was estimated on the basis of the theory of Förster energy transfer. Decrease of protein surface hydrophobicity (PSH) was also documented upon isoimperatorin binding. Furthermore, the synchronous fluorescence spectra show that the microenvironment of the tryptophan residues does not have obvious changes. Site marker compettive and fluorescence experiments revealed that the binding of isoimperatorin to HSA occurred at or near site I. Finally, the binding details between isoimperatorin and HSA were further confirmed by molecular docking and esterase activity inhibition studies which revealed that drug was bound at subdomain IIA. PMID:24319355

  14. Susceptibility of Vibrio aestuarianus 01/032 to the antibacterial activity of Mytilus haemolymph: identification of a serum opsonin involved in mannose-sensitive interactions.

    PubMed

    Pezzati, Elisabetta; Canesi, Laura; Damonte, Gianluca; Salis, Annalisa; Marsano, Francesco; Grande, Chiara; Vezzulli, Luigi; Pruzzo, Carla

    2015-11-01

    The interactions of Vibrio aestuarianus 01/032 with haemolymph of the bivalves Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas were investigated to understand if haemolymph components (haemocytes and soluble factors) could be involved in the higher resistance to microbial infection shown by mussels in comparison with oysters. Although 01/032 bacteria adhered to haemocytes of both bivalves, they were sensitive to the bactericidal activity of whole haemolymph from mussel, but not from oyster; in addition, adhesion to mussel (but not oyster) haemocytes was affected by D-mannose. Mussel serum opsonins directed towards D-mannose-binding bacterial ligands were purified by affinity chromatography and were shown to mediate 01/032 interactions with M.?galloprovincialis haemocytes. Nano-High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis showed that the purified opsonin matched the protein precursor of Mytilus edulis extrapallial protein (EP). In the presence of M.?galloprovincialis?EP protein (MgEP), C.?gigas haemocytes killed V.?aestuarianus 01/032 almost as efficiently as mussel phagocytes. These findings suggest that the different sensitivity of 01/032 strain to the antibacterial activity of oyster and mussel haemolymph might partly depend on the fact that C.?gigas serum lacks MgEP-like opsonins. These results represent the basis for understanding the different sensitivity to microbial infections shown by the two bivalve species. PMID:25655520

  15. Identification of the Replication Origins from Cyanothece ATCC 51142 and Their Interactions with the DnaA Protein: From In Silico to In Vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Song, Cheng-Cheng; Yang, Zhi-Liang; Dong, Yan; Hu, Yao-Zhong; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Based on the complete genome of Cyanothece ATCC 51142, the oriCs of both the circular and linear chromosomes in Cyanothece ATCC 51142 have been predicted by utilizing a web-based system Ori-Finder. Here, we provide experimental support for the results of Ori-Finder to identify the replication origins of Cyanothece ATCC 51142 and their interactions with the initiator protein, DnaA. The two replication origins are composed of three characteristically arranged DnaA boxes and an AT-rich stretch, and the oriC in the circular chromosome is followed by the dnaN gene. The dnaA gene is located downstream of the origin of the circular chromosome and it expresses a typical DnaA protein that is divided into four domains (I, II, III, IV), as with other members of the DnaA protein family. We purify DnaA (IV) and characterize the interaction of the purified protein with the replication origins, so as to offer experimental support for the prediction. The results of the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and DNase I footprint assay demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of the DnaA protein from Cyanothece ATCC 51142 specifically binds the oriCs of both the circular and linear chromosomes, and the DNase I footprint assay demonstrates that DnaA (IV) exhibits hypersensitive affinity with DnaA boxes in both oriCs. PMID:26696980

  16. UNCW KEY RETURN FORM INSTRUCTIONS

    E-print Network

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    UNCW KEY RETURN FORM INSTRUCTIONS 1. 2. 3. Level 2 and Level 3 keys must be delivered to WCA in person; Level 1 keys may be sent via campus mail or other delivery service. 4. WCA will notify Locksmith Services of the returned keys; LS will retrieve same and update Shop records accordingly. 5. Department

  17. Key & Electronic Access Request Application

    E-print Network

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    Key & Electronic Access Request Application UNIVERSITY STAFF ARE TO COMPLETE A REQUEST FOR KEY: Work Phone: Mobile Phone: Student Type: Justification for Access: Details of Key & Access Required Newcastle Campuses Central Coast Campus Building: Room Description Door Number: Key Time Number: Building

  18. Key recycling in authentication

    E-print Network

    Christopher Portmann

    2014-09-29

    In their seminal work on authentication, Wegman and Carter propose that to authenticate multiple messages, it is sufficient to reuse the same hash function as long as each tag is encrypted with a one-time pad. They argue that because the one-time pad is perfectly hiding, the hash function used remains completely unknown to the adversary. Since their proof is not composable, we revisit it using a composable security framework. It turns out that the above argument is insufficient: if the adversary learns whether a corrupted message was accepted or rejected, information about the hash function is leaked, and after a bounded finite amount of rounds it is completely known. We show however that this leak is very small: Wegman and Carter's protocol is still $\\epsilon$-secure, if $\\epsilon$-almost strongly universal$_2$ hash functions are used. This implies that the secret key corresponding to the choice of hash function can be reused in the next round of authentication without any additional error than this $\\epsilon$. We also show that if the players have a mild form of synchronization, namely that the receiver knows when a message should be received, the key can be recycled for any arbitrary task, not only new rounds of authentication.

  19. Identification of a Protein Network Interacting with TdRF1, a Wheat RING Ubiquitin Ligase with a Protective Role against Cellular Dehydration1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Davide; Mastrangelo, Anna Maria; Lopez-Torrejon, Gema; Marzin, Stephan; Schweizer, Patrick; Stanca, Antonio Michele; del Pozo, Juan Carlos; Cattivelli, Luigi; Mazzucotelli, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    Plants exploit ubiquitination to modulate the proteome with the final aim to ensure environmental adaptation and developmental plasticity. Ubiquitination targets are specifically driven to degradation through the action of E3 ubiquitin ligases. Genetic analyses have indicated wide functions of ubiquitination in plant life; nevertheless, despite the large number of predicted E3s, only a few of them have been characterized so far, and only a few ubiquitination targets are known. In this work, we characterized durum wheat (Triticum durum) RING Finger1 (TdRF1) as a durum wheat nuclear ubiquitin ligase. Moreover, its barley (Hordeum vulgare) homolog was shown to protect cells from dehydration stress. A protein network interacting with TdRF1 has been defined. The transcription factor WHEAT BEL1-TYPE HOMEODOMAIN1 (WBLH1) was degraded in a TdRF1-dependent manner through the 26S proteasome in vivo, the mitogen-activated protein kinase TdWNK5 [for Triticum durum WITH NO LYSINE (K)5] was able to phosphorylate TdRF1 in vitro, and the RING-finger protein WHEAT VIVIPAROUS-INTERACTING PROTEIN2 (WVIP2) was shown to have a strong E3 ligase activity. The genes coding for the TdRF1 interactors were all responsive to cold and/or dehydration stress, and a negative regulative function in dehydration tolerance was observed for the barley homolog of WVIP2. A role in the control of plant development was previously known, or predictable based on homology, for wheat BEL1-type homeodomain1(WBLH1). Thus, TdRF1 E3 ligase might act regulating the response to abiotic stress and remodeling plant development in response to environmental constraints. PMID:22167118

  20. Functional Analysis of KSRP Interaction with the AU-Rich Element of Interleukin-8 and Identification of Inflammatory mRNA Targets? †

    PubMed Central

    Winzen, Reinhard; Thakur, Basant Kumar; Dittrich-Breiholz, Oliver; Shah, Meera; Redich, Natalie; Dhamija, Sonam; Kracht, Michael; Holtmann, Helmut

    2007-01-01

    mRNA stability is a major determinant of inflammatory gene expression. Rapid degradation of interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA is imposed by a bipartite AU-rich element (ARE) in the 3? untranslated region (R. Winzen et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 24:4835-4847, 2004). Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of the ARE-binding protein KSRP resulted in stabilization of IL-8 mRNA or of a ?-globin reporter mRNA containing the IL-8 ARE. Rapid deadenylation was impaired, indicating a crucial role for KSRP in this step of mRNA degradation. The two IL-8 ARE domains both contribute to interaction with KSRP, corresponding to the importance of both domains for rapid degradation. Exposure to the inflammatory cytokine IL-1 has been shown to stabilize IL-8 mRNA through p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and MK2. IL-1 treatment impaired the interaction of KSRP with the IL-8 ARE in a manner dependent on p38 MAP kinase but apparently independent of MK2. Instead, evidence that TTP, a target of MK2, can also destabilize the IL-8 ARE reporter mRNA is presented. In a comprehensive approach to identify mRNAs controlled by KSRP, two criteria were evaluated by microarray analysis of (i) association of mRNAs with KSRP in pulldown assays and (ii) increased amounts in KSRP knockdown cells. According to both criteria, a group of 100 mRNAs is controlled by KSRP, many of which are unstable and encode proteins involved in inflammation. These results indicate that KSRP functions as a limiting factor in inflammatory gene expression. PMID:17908789

  1. Person identification in TV programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongge; Wei, Gang; Sethi, Ishwar K.; Dimitrova, Nevenka

    2001-10-01

    In this article, we report a study on the problem of person identification in TV programs, such as situation comedy shows. A person identification system is constructed based on the joint use of visual and audio information. The system consists of two modules, namely, the analysis and the fusion modules. The analysis module contains a visual analysis component responsible for detection, tracking, and recognition of faces in video, and the audio analysis component, which operates by speaker identification. Both components have their advantages under different circumstances and we studied how to exploit the interaction between them for improved performance. Two fusion strategies are compared in our research. In the first strategy, the audio-verify-visual fusion strategy, speaker identification is used to verify the face recognition result. The second strategy, the visual-aid-audio fusion strategy, consists of using face recognition and tracking to supplement speaker identification results. By comparing the output from our system with our ground truth database, we evaluate the performance of each individual analysis component and their fusion. The results show that while the audio-verify-visual fusion strategy has slightly lower recall than the original face recognition system, it achieves the best identification precision among different algorithms. This suggests that such a strategy is suitable for applications where precision is much more critical than recall (e.g., security systems). The visual- aid-audio fusion strategy, on the other hand, generates the best overall identification performance. It outperforms either of the individual analysis components greatly in both precision and recall. This strategy is suitable to more general applications, such as, in our case, person identification in TV programs.

  2. Negated bio-events: analysis and identification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Negation occurs frequently in scientific literature, especially in biomedical literature. It has previously been reported that around 13% of sentences found in biomedical research articles contain negation. Historically, the main motivation for identifying negated events has been to ensure their exclusion from lists of extracted interactions. However, recently, there has been a growing interest in negative results, which has resulted in negation detection being identified as a key challenge in biomedical relation extraction. In this article, we focus on the problem of identifying negated bio-events, given gold standard event annotations. Results We have conducted a detailed analysis of three open access bio-event corpora containing negation information (i.e., GENIA Event, BioInfer and BioNLP’09 ST), and have identified the main types of negated bio-events. We have analysed the key aspects of a machine learning solution to the problem of detecting negated events, including selection of negation cues, feature engineering and the choice of learning algorithm. Combining the best solutions for each aspect of the problem, we propose a novel framework for the identification of negated bio-events. We have evaluated our system on each of the three open access corpora mentioned above. The performance of the system significantly surpasses the best results previously reported on the BioNLP’09 ST corpus, and achieves even better results on the GENIA Event and BioInfer corpora, both of which contain more varied and complex events. Conclusions Recently, in the field of biomedical text mining, the development and enhancement of event-based systems has received significant interest. The ability to identify negated events is a key performance element for these systems. We have conducted the first detailed study on the analysis and identification of negated bio-events. Our proposed framework can be integrated with state-of-the-art event extraction systems. The resulting systems will be able to extract bio-events with attached polarities from textual documents, which can serve as the foundation for more elaborate systems that are able to detect mutually contradicting bio-events. PMID:23323936

  3. Key to Freshwater Algae: A Web-based Tool to Enhance Understanding of Microscopic Biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayler, Hannah A.; Siver, Peter A.

    2006-10-01

    The Freshwater Ecology Laboratory at Connecticut College has developed an interactive, Web-based identification key to freshwater algal genera using the Lucid Professional and Lucid 3 software developed by the Centre for Biological Information Technology at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. The Key to Freshwater Algae was funded by the National Science Foundation (Award #CCLI-0229531) to encourage awareness of microscopic diversity through a creative, investigative approach to learning. Users may answer questions in any order to quickly and efficiently narrow down the list of taxa to only those that match the characteristics they have chosen. All characters and terms are clearly explained for ease of use by those unfamiliar with the algae. This non-hierarchical, user-friendly key is linked to Web pages containing a wealth of resources, including images, movies, and information about the morphology, ecology, and reproduction of each organism. These materials are especially well suited for classroom use in conjunction with cultures purchased from the Carolina Biological Supply Company, a popular distributor of biological materials. Cultures from the Carolina Biological Supply Company representing nearly 75 freshwater genera from a variety of algal groups were observed and photographed using high resolution digital imaging to fully document cellular structure and highlight distinguishing features. High quality video footage of each taxon incorporating titles, diagrams, and structural terminology was outputted as QuickTime movies, on DVD, and on VHS cassettes. The Key to Freshwater Algae and supplemental materials are available online at http://silicasecchidisk.conncoll.edu to provide an innovative alternative to traditional dichotomous keys that is particularly appropriate for introducing students in undergraduate life science courses to the algal groups and genera.

  4. Whale Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    R:BASE for DOS, a computer program developed under NASA contract, has been adapted by the National Marine Mammal Laboratory and the College of the Atlantic to provide and advanced computerized photo matching technique for identification of humpback whales. The program compares photos with stored digitized descriptions, enabling researchers to track and determine distribution and migration patterns. R:BASE is a spinoff of RIM (Relational Information Manager), which was used to store data for analyzing heat shielding tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. It is now the world's second largest selling line of microcomputer database management software.

  5. Genome-wide identification of translationally inhibited and degraded miR-155 targets using RNA-interacting protein-IP

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Jan; Hovestadt, Volker; Zapatka, Marc; Pscherer, Armin; Lichter, Peter; Seiffert, Martina

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded, small, non-coding RNAs, which fine-tune protein expression by degrading and/or translationally inhibiting mRNAs. Manipulation of miRNA expression in animal models frequently results in severe phenotypes indicating their relevance in controlling cellular functions, most likely by interacting with multiple targets. To better understand the effect of miRNA activities, genome-wide analysis of their targets are required. MicroRNA profiling as well as transcriptome analysis upon enforced miRNA expression were frequently used to investigate their relevance. However, these approaches often fail to identify relevant miRNAs targets. Therefore, we tested the precision of RNA-interacting protein immunoprecipitation (RIP) using AGO2-specific antibodies, a core component of the “RNA-induced silencing complex” (RISC), followed by RNA sequencing (Seq) in a defined cellular system, the HEK293T cells with stable, ectopic expression of miR-155. Thereby, we identified 100 AGO2-associated mRNAs in miR-155-expressing cells, of which 67 were in silico predicted miR-155 target genes. An integrated analysis of the corresponding expression profiles indicated that these targets were either regulated by mRNA decay or by translational repression. Of the identified miR-155 targets, 17 were related to cell cycle control, suggesting their involvement in the observed increase in cell proliferation of HEK293T cells upon miR-155 expression. Additional, secondary changes within the gene expression profile were detected and might contribute to this phenotype as well. Interestingly, by analyzing RIP-Seq data of HEK-293T cells and two B-cell lines we identified a recurrent disproportional enrichment of several miRNAs, including miR-155 and miRNAs of the miR-17-92 cluster, in the AGO2-associated precipitates, suggesting discrepancies in miRNA expression and activity. PMID:23673373

  6. Identification and Targeting of an Interaction between a Tyrosine Motif within Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein and AP2M1 Essential for Viral Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ziv-Av, Amotz; Gerber, Doron; Jacob, Yves; Einav, Shirit

    2012-01-01

    Novel therapies are urgently needed against hepatitis C virus infection (HCV), a major global health problem. The current model of infectious virus production suggests that HCV virions are assembled on or near the surface of lipid droplets, acquire their envelope at the ER, and egress through the secretory pathway. The mechanisms of HCV assembly and particularly the role of viral-host protein-protein interactions in mediating this process are, however, poorly understood. We identified a conserved heretofore unrecognized YXX? motif (? is a bulky hydrophobic residue) within the core protein. This motif is homologous to sorting signals within host cargo proteins known to mediate binding of AP2M1, the ? subunit of clathrin adaptor protein complex 2 (AP-2), and intracellular trafficking. Using microfluidics affinity analysis, protein-fragment complementation assays, and co-immunoprecipitations in infected cells, we show that this motif mediates core binding to AP2M1. YXX? mutations, silencing AP2M1 expression or overexpressing a dominant negative AP2M1 mutant had no effect on HCV RNA replication, however, they dramatically inhibited intra- and extracellular infectivity, consistent with a defect in viral assembly. Quantitative confocal immunofluorescence analysis revealed that core's YXX? motif mediates recruitment of AP2M1 to lipid droplets and that the observed defect in HCV assembly following disruption of core-AP2M1 binding correlates with accumulation of core on lipid droplets, reduced core colocalization with E2 and reduced core localization to trans-Golgi network (TGN), the presumed site of viral particles maturation. Furthermore, AAK1 and GAK, serine/threonine kinases known to stimulate binding of AP2M1 to host cargo proteins, regulate core-AP2M1 binding and are essential for HCV assembly. Last, approved anti-cancer drugs that inhibit AAK1 or GAK not only disrupt core-AP2M1 binding, but also significantly inhibit HCV assembly and infectious virus production. These results validate viral-host interactions essential for HCV assembly and yield compounds for pharmaceutical development. PMID:22916011

  7. Pathogens and polymers: Microbe–host interactions illuminate the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Haglund, Cat M.

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens subvert the host cell cytoskeleton to promote their own survival, replication, and dissemination. Study of these microbes has led to many discoveries about host cell biology, including the identification of cytoskeletal proteins, regulatory pathways, and mechanisms of cytoskeletal function. Actin is a common target of bacterial pathogens, but recent work also highlights the use of microtubules, cytoskeletal motors, intermediate filaments, and septins. The study of pathogen interactions with the cytoskeleton has illuminated key cellular processes such as phagocytosis, macropinocytosis, membrane trafficking, motility, autophagy, and signal transduction. PMID:21969466

  8. Identification of interacting partners of Human Mpv17-like protein with a mitigating effect of mitochondrial dysfunction through mtDNA damage.

    PubMed

    Iida, Reiko; Ueki, Misuzu; Yasuda, Toshihiro

    2015-10-01

    Human Mpv17-like protein (M-LPH) has been suggested to participate in mitochondrial function. In this study, we investigated the proteins that interact with M-LPH, and identified four: H2A histone family, member X (H2AX), ribosomal protein S14 (RPS14), ribosomal protein S3 (RPS3) and B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (Bap31). Immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation studies revealed that M-LPH is localized predominantly in the nucleus, to some extent in a subset of mitochondria, and marginally in the cytosol. Mitochondrial M-LPH appeared as punctate foci, and these were co-localized with a subset of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mtDNA, indicating that M-LPH is localized in or in close proximity to mitochondrial nucleoids. RNAi-mediated knockdown of M-LPH resulted in an increase of mtDNA damage and reduced the expression of mtDNA-encoded genes. A ROS inducer, antimycin A, caused an increase in both the number and size of the mitochondrial M-LPH foci, and these foci were co-localized with two enzymes, DNA polymerase ? (POLG) and DNA ligase III (LIG3), both involved in mtDNA repair. Furthermore, knockdown of M-LPH hampered mitochondrial localization of these enzymes. Taken together, these observations suggest that M-LPH is involved in the maintenance of mtDNA and protects cells from mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26165189

  9. Identification of the guanosine interacting peptide of the GTP binding site of. beta. -tubulin using 8N/sub 3/GTP

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.; Ponstingl, H.; Haley, B.E.

    1987-05-01

    It has been shown earlier that 8N/sub 3/GTP is an effective biological mimic of GTP in that it interacts at the exchangeable GTP binding site and causes tubulin to polymerize in a fashion quite similar to GTP. Also, using ..cap alpha.. and ..gamma..(/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP it is now possible to selectively and effectively photolabel the ..beta..-subunit. A complete sequence of the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta..-subunits of porcine brain tubulin has been reported. They now report on conditions which optimize the photoinsertion of (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP selectively into the ..beta..-subunit of tubulin and the use of cation-exchange column chromatography to assist in the purification of the photolabeled peptide. Using two slightly different procedures they have isolated the 8N/sub 3/GTP photolabeled peptide and identified its partial sequence as A-I-L-V-D-L-E-P-G-T which agrees with the highly conserved region of residues 63-72 of ..beta..-tubulin.

  10. Identification of the interaction of VP1 with GM130 which may implicate in the pathogenesis of CVB3-induced acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuzhen; Xia, Yanhua; Huang, Shengping; Liu, Fadi; Ying, Ying; Xu, Qiufang; Liu, Xin; Jin, Guili; Papasian, Christopher J.; Chen, Jack; Fu, Mingui; Huang, Xiaotian

    2015-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a causative agent of viral myocarditis, pancreatitis, and meningitis in humans. Although the susceptibility of CVB3-induced acute pancreatitis is age-dependent, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we identified the host factor Golgi matrix protein 130 (GM130) as a novel target of CVB3 during CVB3-induced acute pancreatitis. The viral protein VP1 interacted with GM130, disrupted GM130-GRASP65 complexes, and caused GM130 degradation, which may lead to disruption of the Golgi ribbon and development of acute pancreatitis in mice. Interestingly, the expression level of GM130 in mouse pancreas was age-dependent, which was nicely correlated with the age-associated susceptibility of CVB3-induced acute pancreatitis. Furthermore, interference RNA-mediated knockdown of GM130 significantly reduced CVB3 replication in HeLa cells. Taken together, the study identified GM130 as a novel target of CVB3, which may implicate in the pathogenesis of CVB3-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:26314804

  11. Mass spectrometric identification of lysine residues of heme oxygenase-1 that are involved in its interaction with NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase

    PubMed Central

    Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Sugishima, Masakazu; Sato, Hideaki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Fukuyama, Keiichi; Palmer, Graham; Noguchi, Masato

    2008-01-01

    The lysine residues of rat heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were acetylated by acetic anhydride in the absence and presence of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) or biliverdin reductase (BVR). Nine acetylated peptides were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry in the tryptic fragments obtained from HO-1 acetylated without the reductases (referred to as the fully acetylated HO-1). The presence of CPR prevented HO-1 from acetylation of lysine residues, Lys-149 and Lys-153, located in the F-helix. The heme degradation activity of the fully acetylated HO-1 in the NADPH/CPR-supported system was significantly reduced, whereas almost no inactivation was detected in HO-1 in the presence of CPR, which prevented acetylation of Lys-149 and Lys-153. On the other hand, the presence of BVR showed no protective effect on the acetylation of HO-1. The interaction of HO-1 with CPR or BVR is discussed based on the acetylation pattern and on molecular modeling. PMID:18194664

  12. Identification of rice cultivars with low brown rice mixed cadmium and lead contents and their interactions with the micronutrients iron, zinc, nickel and manganese.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Wang, Xun; Qi, Xiaoli; Huang, Lu; Ye, Zhihong

    2012-01-01

    Paddy fields in mining areas are usually co-contaminated by a cocktail of mixed toxic heavy metals (e.g., Cd and Pb in Pb/Zn mines). However, previous studies on rice cultivars screened for effective metal exclusion have mostly focused on individual metals, and have been conducted under pot-trial or hydroponic solution conditions. This study identified rice cultivars with both low Cd and Pb accumulation under Cd- and Pb-contaminated field conditions, and the interactions of the toxic elements Cd and Pb with the micronutrient elements Fe, Zn, Mn and Ni were also studied. Among 32 rice cultivars tested, there were significant differences in Cd (0.06-0.59 mg/kg) and Pb (0.25-3.15 mg/kg) levels in their brown rice, and similar results were also found for the micronutrient elements. Significant decreases in concentrations of Fe and Mn were detected with increasing Cd concentrations and a significant elevation in Fe, Mn and Ni with increasing Pb concentrations. A similar result was also shown by Cd and Ni. Three cultivars were identified with a combination of low brown rice Cd and Pb, high micronutrient and grain yield (Wufengyou 2168, Tianyou 196 and Guinongzhan). Present results suggest that it is possible to breed rice cultivars with low mixed toxic element (Cd, Pb) and high micronutrient contents along with high grain yields, thus ensuring food safety and quality. PMID:23520849

  13. Regulation of expression of avirulence gene avrRxv and identification of a family of host interaction factors by sequence analysis of avrBsT.

    PubMed

    Ciesiolka, L D; Hwin, T; Gearlds, J D; Minsavage, G V; Saenz, R; Bravo, M; Handley, V; Conover, S M; Zhang, H; Caporgno, J; Phengrasamy, N B; Toms, A O; Stall, R E; Whalen, M C

    1999-01-01

    Resistance in tomato line Hawaii 7998 as well as in several nonhost plants to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria tomato strain (XcvT) is mediated in part by the avirulence gene avrRxv. Analysis of growth of wild-type and avrRxv deletion strains indicates that avrRxv plays a crucial role in the ability of XcvT 92-14 to induce resistance on Hawaii 7998. We used avrRxv reporter gene fusions and Northern (RNA) blot analysis to test several growth environments for inductive potential. We found that avrRxv is constitutively expressed at high levels and that growth in planta, in tobacco conditioned medium, and in hrp-inductive medium XVM2 did not affect the high levels of expression. In addition, hrp structural and regulatory mutant backgrounds had no effect. We mutated the bipartite plant inducible promoter (PIP)-box sequence and found that avrRxv activity appears to be independent of an intact PIP-box element. We present the sequence of the avrRxv homologue called avrBsT and align the six AvrRxv host interaction factor family members including mammalian pathogen virulence factors YopJ and YopP from Yersinia spp. and AvrA from Salmonella typhimurium, and open reading frame Y4LO with unknown function from the symbiont Rhizobium sp. PMID:9885191

  14. Extremely secure identification documents

    SciTech Connect

    Tolk, K.M.; Bell, M.

    1997-09-01

    The technology developed in this project uses biometric information printed on the document and public key cryptography to ensure that an adversary cannot issue identification documents to unauthorized individuals or alter existing documents to allow their use by unauthorized individuals. This process can be used to produce many types of identification documents with much higher security than any currently in use. The system is demonstrated using a security badge as an example. This project focused on the technologies requiring development in order to make the approach viable with existing badge printing and laminating technologies. By far the most difficult was the image processing required to verify that the picture on the badge had not been altered. Another area that required considerable work was the high density printed data storage required to get sufficient data on the badge for verification of the picture. The image processing process was successfully tested, and recommendations are included to refine the badge system to ensure high reliability. A two dimensional data array suitable for printing the required data on the badge was proposed, but testing of the readability of the array had to be abandoned due to reallocation of the budgeted funds by the LDRD office.

  15. The hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL)-mediated lipid mobilization and enhances the ATGL interaction with comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58) and lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Camus, Gregory; Schweiger, Martina; Herker, Eva; Harris, Charles; Kondratowicz, Andrew S; Tsou, Chia-Lin; Farese, Robert V; Herath, Kithsiri; Previs, Stephen F; Roddy, Thomas P; Pinto, Shirly; Zechner, Rudolf; Ott, Melanie

    2014-12-26

    Liver steatosis is a common health problem associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and an important risk factor for the development of liver fibrosis and cancer. Steatosis is caused by triglycerides (TG) accumulating in lipid droplets (LDs), cellular organelles composed of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids. The HCV nucleocapsid core localizes to the surface of LDs and induces steatosis in cultured cells and mouse livers by decreasing intracellular TG degradation (lipolysis). Here we report that core at the surface of LDs interferes with the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the key lipolytic enzyme in the first step of TG breakdown. Expressing core in livers or mouse embryonic fibroblasts of ATGL(-/-) mice no longer decreases TG degradation as observed in LDs from wild-type mice, supporting the model that core reduces lipolysis by engaging ATGL. Core must localize at LDs to inhibit lipolysis, as ex vivo TG hydrolysis is impaired in purified LDs coated with core but not when free core is added to LDs. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that core does not directly interact with the ATGL complex but, unexpectedly, increased the interaction between ATGL and its activator CGI-58 as well as the recruitment of both proteins to LDs. These data link the anti-lipolytic activity of the HCV core protein with altered ATGL binding to CGI-58 and the enhanced association of both proteins with LDs. PMID:25381252

  16. Few-key Text Entry Revisited: Mnemonic Gestures on Four Keys

    E-print Network

    Wobbrock, Jacob O.

    and Brandon Rothrock Human-Computer Interaction Institute Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA. The study includes an evaluation of the 4-key method without any on-screen visualization-- an impossible more errors. Interestingly, removing a visualization of the gestures being made causes no detriment

  17. Getting a feel for parameters: using interactive parallel plots as a tool for parameter identification in the new rainfall-runoff model WALRUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Claudia; Torfs, Paul; Teuling, Ryan; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2015-04-01

    Recently, we developed the Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS) to fill the gap between complex, spatially distributed models often used in lowland catchments and simple, parametric models which have mostly been developed for mountainous catchments (Brauer et al., 2014ab). This parametric rainfall-runoff model can be used all over the world in both freely draining lowland catchments and polders with controlled water levels. The open source model code is implemented in R and can be downloaded from www.github.com/ClaudiaBrauer/WALRUS. The structure and code of WALRUS are simple, which facilitates detailed investigation of the effect of parameters on all model variables. WALRUS contains only four parameters requiring calibration; they are intended to have a strong, qualitative relation with catchment characteristics. Parameter estimation remains a challenge, however. The model structure contains three main feedbacks: (1) between groundwater and surface water; (2) between saturated and unsaturated zone; (3) between catchment wetness and (quick/slow) flowroute division. These feedbacks represent essential rainfall-runoff processes in lowland catchments, but increase the risk of parameter dependence and equifinality. Therefore, model performance should not only be judged based on a comparison between modelled and observed discharges, but also based on the plausibility of the internal modelled variables. Here, we present a method to analyse the effect of parameter values on internal model states and fluxes in a qualitative and intuitive way using interactive parallel plotting. We applied WALRUS to ten Dutch catchments with different sizes, slopes and soil types and both freely draining and polder areas. The model was run with a large number of parameter sets, which were created using Latin Hypercube Sampling. The model output was characterised in terms of several signatures, both measures of goodness of fit and statistics of internal model variables (such as the percentage of rain water travelling through the quickflow reservoir). End users can then eliminate parameter combinations with unrealistic outcomes based on expert knowledge using interactive parallel plots. In these plots, for instance, ranges can be selected for each signature and only model runs which yield signature values in these ranges are highlighted. The resulting selection of realistic parameter sets can be used for ensemble simulations. C.C. Brauer, A.J. Teuling, P.J.J.F. Torfs, R. Uijlenhoet (2014a): The Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS): a lumped rainfall-runoff model for catchments with shallow groundwater, Geoscientific Model Development, 7, 2313-2332, www.geosci-model-dev.net/7/2313/2014/gmd-7-2313-2014.pdf C.C. Brauer, P.J.J.F. Torfs, A.J. Teuling, R. Uijlenhoet (2014b): The Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS): application to the Hupsel Brook catchment and Cabauw polder, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 18, 4007-4028, www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/18/4007/2014/hess-18-4007-2014.pdf

  18. Identification of a functional interaction of HMGB1 with Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products in a model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Allette, Yohance M; Due, Michael R; Wilson, Sarah M; Feldman, Polina; Ripsch, Matthew S; Khanna, Rajesh; White, Fletcher A

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that the release of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) following nerve injury may play a central role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. HMGB1 is known to influence cellular responses within the nervous system via two distinct receptor families; the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products (RAGE) and Toll-like receptors (TLRs). The degree to which HMGB1 activates a receptor is thought to be dependent upon the oxidative state of the ligand, resulting in the functional isoforms of all-thiol HMGB1 (at-HMGB1) acting through RAGE, and disufide HMGB1 (ds-HMGB1) interacting with TLR4. Though it is known that dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons exposed to HMGB1 and TLR4 agonists can influence excitation, the degree to which at-HMGB1 signaling through neuronal RAGE contributes to neuropathic pain is unknown. Here we demonstrate that at-HMGB1 activation of nociceptive neurons is dependent on RAGE and not TLR4. To distinguish the possible role of RAGE on neuropathic pain, we characterized the changes in RAGE mRNA expression up to one month after tibial nerve injury (TNI). RAGE mRNA expression in lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is substantially increased by post-injury day (PID) 28 when compared with sham injured rodents. Protein expression at PID28 confirms this injury-induced event in the DRG. Moreover, a single exposure to monoclonal antibody to RAGE (RAGE Ab) failed to abrogate pain behavior at PID 7, 14 and 21. However, RAGE Ab administration produced reversal of mechanical hyperalgesia on PID28. Thus, at-HMGB1 activation through RAGE may be responsible for sensory neuron sensitization and mechanical hyperalgesia associated with chronic neuropathic pain states. PMID:25014009

  19. Identification of shared and unique susceptibility pathways among cancers of the lung, breast, and prostate from genome-wide association studies and tissue-specific protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Qian, David C; Byun, Jinyoung; Han, Younghun; Greene, Casey S; Field, John K; Hung, Rayjean J; Brhane, Yonathan; Mclaughlin, John R; Fehringer, Gordon; Landi, Maria Teresa; Rosenberger, Albert; Bickeböller, Heike; Malhotra, Jyoti; Risch, Angela; Heinrich, Joachim; Hunter, David J; Henderson, Brian E; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Eeles, Rosalind A; Easton, Douglas F; Seminara, Daniela; Amos, Christopher I

    2015-12-20

    Results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have indicated that strong single-gene effects are the exception, not the rule, for most diseases. We assessed the joint effects of germline genetic variations through a pathway-based approach that considers the tissue-specific contexts of GWAS findings. From GWAS meta-analyses of lung cancer (12 160 cases/16 838 controls), breast cancer (15 748 cases/18 084 controls) and prostate cancer (14 160 cases/12 724 controls) in individuals of European ancestry, we determined the tissue-specific interaction networks of proteins expressed from genes that are likely to be affected by disease-associated variants. Reactome pathways exhibiting enrichment of proteins from each network were compared across the cancers. Our results show that pathways associated with all three cancers tend to be broad cellular processes required for growth and survival. Significant examples include the nerve growth factor (P = 7.86 × 10(-33)), epidermal growth factor (P = 1.18 × 10(-31)) and fibroblast growth factor (P = 2.47 × 10(-31)) signaling pathways. However, within these shared pathways, the genes that influence risk largely differ by cancer. Pathways found to be unique for a single cancer focus on more specific cellular functions, such as interleukin signaling in lung cancer (P = 1.69 × 10(-15)), apoptosis initiation by Bad in breast cancer (P = 3.14 × 10(-9)) and cellular responses to hypoxia in prostate cancer (P = 2.14 × 10(-9)). We present the largest comparative cross-cancer pathway analysis of GWAS to date. Our approach can also be applied to the study of inherited mechanisms underlying risk across multiple diseases in general. PMID:26483192

  20. Smooth Phase Interpolated Keying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borah, Deva K.

    2007-01-01

    Smooth phase interpolated keying (SPIK) is an improved method of computing smooth phase-modulation waveforms for radio communication systems that convey digital information. SPIK is applicable to a variety of phase-shift-keying (PSK) modulation schemes, including quaternary PSK (QPSK), octonary PSK (8PSK), and 16PSK. In comparison with a related prior method, SPIK offers advantages of better performance and less complexity of implementation. In a PSK scheme, the underlying information waveform that one seeks to convey consists of discrete rectangular steps, but the spectral width of such a waveform is excessive for practical radio communication. Therefore, the problem is to smooth the step phase waveform in such a manner as to maintain power and bandwidth efficiency without incurring an unacceptably large error rate and without introducing undesired variations in the amplitude of the affected radio signal. Although the ideal constellation of PSK phasor points does not cause amplitude variations, filtering of the modulation waveform (in which, typically, a rectangular pulse is converted to a square-root raised cosine pulse) causes amplitude fluctuations. If a power-efficient nonlinear amplifier is used in the radio communication system, the fluctuating-amplitude signal can undergo significant spectral regrowth, thus compromising the bandwidth efficiency of the system. In the related prior method, one seeks to solve the problem in a procedure that comprises two major steps: phase-value generation and phase interpolation. SPIK follows the two-step approach of the related prior method, but the details of the steps are different. In the phase-value-generation step, the phase values of symbols in the PSK constellation are determined by a phase function that is said to be maximally smooth and that is chosen to minimize the spectral spread of the modulated signal. In this step, the constellation is divided into two groups by assigning, to information symbols, phase values that result in equal numbers of clockwise and counter-clockwise phase rotations for equally likely symbols. The purpose served by assigning phase values in this way is to prevent unnecessary generation of spectral lines and prevent net shifts of the carrier signal. In the phase-interpolation step, the smooth phase values are interpolated over a number, n, of consecutive symbols (including the present symbol) by means of an unconventional spline curve fit.

  1. Key Workplace Documents Federal Publications

    E-print Network

    Key Workplace Documents Federal Publications Cornell University ILR School Year 2008 International This paper is posted at DigitalCommons@ILR. http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/key workplace/524 #12;Order

  2. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives

    Cancer.gov

    Skip Navigation Twitter Multimedia Home About Key Initiatives Funding Resources Tools Cancer Control & Population Sciences Home Behavioral Research Program Home Process of Care Research Branch Process of Care Research Branch (PCRB) Key Initiatives The

  3. DCCPS: BRP: HCIRB: Key Initiatives

    Cancer.gov

    Skip Navigation Twitter Multimedia Home About Key Initiatives Funding Resources Tools Cancer Control & Population Sciences Home Behavioral Research Program Home Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch Key Initiatives Centers of Excellence

  4. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives

    Cancer.gov

    Twitter Multimedia Home About Key Initiatives Funding Resources Tools Cancer Control & Population Sciences Home Behavioral Research Program Home Process of Care Research Branch Process of Care Research Branch (PCRB) Key Initiatives Priority Areas for

  5. Robert Keys Jr Oral History

    E-print Network

    Keys, Robert Jr; Nelson, Ben

    2009-12-07

    Oral history interview with Robert Keys, Jr., conducted by Ben Nelson on December 7, 2009. In this interview, Robert Keys, Jr., a member of the Topeka Bible Church congregation, describes his experiences growing up attending ...

  6. DCCPS: BRP: HBRB: Key Initiatives

    Cancer.gov

    Skip Navigation Twitter Multimedia Home About Key Initiatives Funding Resources Tools Cancer Control & Population Sciences Home Behavioral Research Program Home Health Behaviors Research Branch Health Behaviors Research Branch (HBRB) Key Initiatives Transdisciplinary

  7. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  8. “We Do Science Here”: Underrepresented Students’ Interactions with Faculty in Different College Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado, Sylvia; Eagan, M. Kevin; Tran, Minh C.; Newman, Christopher B.; Chang, Mitchell J.; Velasco, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Faculty members play a key role in the identification and training of the next generation of scientific talent. In the face of the need to advance and diversify the scientific workforce, we examine whether and how specific institutional contexts shape student interactions with faculty. We conducted a mixed methods study to understand institutional contextual differences in the experiences of aspiring scientists. Data from a qualitative five-campus case study and a quantitative longitudinal study of students from over 117 higher education institutions were analyzed to determine how aspiring scientists interact with faculty and gain access to resources that will help them achieve their educational goals. Findings indicate that important structural differences exist between institutions in shaping students’ interactions with faculty. For example, students at more selective institutions typically have less frequent, less personal interactions with faculty whereas Black students at HBCUs report having more support and frequent interactions with faculty. PMID:23503924

  9. Key Concepts in Informatics: Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szlávi, Péter; Zsakó, László

    2014-01-01

    "The system of key concepts contains the most important key concepts related to the development tasks of knowledge areas and their vertical hierarchy as well as the links of basic key concepts of different knowledge areas." (Vass 2011) One of the most important of these concepts is the algorithm. In everyday life, when learning or…

  10. Unidirectional Key Distribution Across Time and Space with Applications to RFID Security

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Unidirectional Key Distribution Across Time and Space with Applications to RFID Security Ari Juels problem, however, is that of practical key management in RFID (Radio-Frequency IDentification) systems. We describe the application of our techniques to RFID-enabled supply chains and a prototype privacy

  11. Modelling and pathway identification involving the transport mechanism of a complex metabolic system in batch culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinlong; Zhang, Xu; Zhu, Xi; Feng, Enmin; Yin, Hongchao; Xiu, Zhilong

    2014-06-01

    The bio-dissimilation of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) by Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) can be characterized by a complex metabolic system of interactions among biochemical fluxes, metabolic compounds, key enzymes and genetic regulation. In this paper, in consideration of the fact that the transport ways of 1,3-PD and glycerol with different weights across cell membrane are still unclear in batch culture, we consider 121 possible metabolic pathways and establish a novel mathematical model which is represented by a complex metabolic system. Taking into account the difficulty in accurately measuring the concentration of intracellular substances and the absence of equilibrium point for the metabolic system of batch culture, the novel approach used here is to define quantitatively biological robustness of the intracellular substance concentrations for the overall process of batch culture. To determine the most possible metabolic pathway, we take the defined biological robustness as cost function and establish an identification model, in which 1452 system parameters and 484 pathway parameters are involved. Simultaneously, the identification model is subject to the metabolic system, continuous state constraints and parameter constraints. As such, solving the identification model by a serial program is a very complicated task. We propose a parallel migration particle swarm optimization algorithm (MPSO) capable of solving the identification model in conjunction with the constraint transcription and smoothing approximation techniques. Numerical results show that the most possible metabolic pathway and the corresponding metabolic system can reasonably describe the process of batch culture.

  12. The contextualized self: how team-member exchange leads to coworker identification and helping OCB.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Steven M; Van Dyne, Linn; Kamdar, Dishan

    2015-03-01

    This article develops the argument that team-member exchange (TMX) relationships operate at both between- and within-group levels of analysis to influence an employee's sense of identification with coworkers in the group and their helping organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) directed at coworkers. Specifically, we propose that relatively higher quality TMX relationships of an employee as compared with other members of the group influence an employee's sense of positive uniqueness, whereas higher average level of TMX quality in the group creates a greater sense of belonging. Multilevel modeling analysis of field data from 236 bank managers and their subordinates supports the hypotheses and demonstrates 3 key findings. First, team members identify more with their coworkers when they have high relative TMX quality compared with other group members and are also embedded in groups with higher average TMX. Second, identification with coworkers is positively related to helping OCB directed toward team members. Finally, identification with coworkers mediates the interactive effect of relative TMX quality and group average TMX quality on helping. When TMX group relations allow individuals to feel a valued part of the group, but still unique, they engage in higher levels of helping. Overall moderated mediation analysis demonstrates that the mediated relationship linking relative TMX quality with helping OCB via identification with coworkers is stronger when group average TMX is high, but not present when group average TMX is low. We discuss theoretical and practical implications and recommend future research on multilevel conceptualizations of TMX. PMID:25111250

  13. Identification of Chinese Personal Names in Unrestricted Texts. Lawrence CHEUNG, Benjamin K. TSOU

    E-print Network

    Identification of Chinese Personal Names in Unrestricted Texts. Lawrence CHEUNG, Benjamin K. TSOU Automatic identification of Chinese personal names in unrestricted texts is a key task in Chinese word, if it is not properly addressed. This paper (1) demonstrates the problems of Chinese personal name identification

  14. Tag Content Access Control with Identity-based Key Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liang; Rong, Chunming

    2010-09-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology that used to identify objects and users has been applied to many applications such retail and supply chain recently. How to prevent tag content from unauthorized readout is a core problem of RFID privacy issues. Hash-lock access control protocol can make tag to release its content only to reader who knows the secret key shared between them. However, in order to get this shared secret key required by this protocol, reader needs to communicate with a back end database. In this paper, we propose to use identity-based secret key exchange approach to generate the secret key required for hash-lock access control protocol. With this approach, not only back end database connection is not needed anymore, but also tag cloning problem can be eliminated at the same time.

  15. Secure key storage and distribution

    DOEpatents

    Agrawal, Punit

    2015-06-02

    This disclosure describes a distributed, fault-tolerant security system that enables the secure storage and distribution of private keys. In one implementation, the security system includes a plurality of computing resources that independently store private keys provided by publishers and encrypted using a single security system public key. To protect against malicious activity, the security system private key necessary to decrypt the publication private keys is not stored at any of the computing resources. Rather portions, or shares of the security system private key are stored at each of the computing resources within the security system and multiple security systems must communicate and share partial decryptions in order to decrypt the stored private key.

  16. Limitations on quantum key repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol.

  17. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    PubMed

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol. PMID:25903096

  18. Nonparametric identification experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Yeung

    1988-01-01

    The following constitutes a summary of this paper: on-orbit identification methodology starts with nonparametric techniques for a priori system identification; development of the nonparametric identification and model determination experiment software has been completed; the validation experiments to be performed on the JPL Control and Identification Technology Validation Laboratory have been designed.

  19. Quality Management and Key Performance Indicators in Oncologic Esophageal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gockel, Ines; Ahlbrand, Constantin Johannes; Arras, Michael; Schreiber, Elke Maria; Lang, Hauke

    2015-12-01

    Ranking systems and comparisons of quality and performance indicators will be of increasing relevance for complex "high-risk" procedures such as esophageal cancer surgery. The identification of evidence-based standards relevant for key performance indicators in esophageal surgery is essential for establishing monitoring systems and furthermore a requirement to enhance treatment quality. In the course of this review, we analyze the key performance indicators case volume, radicality of resection, and postoperative morbidity and mortality, leading to continuous quality improvement. Ranking systems established on this basis will gain increased relevance in highly complex procedures within the national and international comparison and furthermore improve the treatment of patients with esophageal carcinoma. PMID:26177703

  20. PINS chemical identification software

    DOEpatents

    Caffrey, Augustine J.; Krebs, Kennth M.

    2004-09-14

    An apparatus and method for identifying a chemical compound. A neutron source delivers neutrons into the chemical compound. The nuclei of chemical elements constituting the chemical compound emit gamma rays upon interaction with the neutrons. The gamma rays are characteristic of the chemical elements constituting the chemical compound. A spectrum of the gamma rays is generated having a detection count and an energy scale. The energy scale is calibrated by comparing peaks in the spectrum to energies of pre-selected chemical elements in the spectrum. A least-squares fit completes the calibration. The chemical elements constituting the chemical compound can be readily determined, which then allows for identification of the chemical compound.

  1. A novel family of katanin-like 2 protein isoforms (KATNAL2), interacting with nucleotide-binding proteins Nubp1 and Nubp2, are key regulators of different MT-based processes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ververis, Antonis; Christodoulou, Andri; Christoforou, Maria; Kamilari, Christina; Lederer, Carsten W; Santama, Niovi

    2016-01-01

    Katanins are microtubule (MT)-severing AAA proteins with high phylogenetic conservation throughout the eukaryotes. They have been functionally implicated in processes requiring MT remodeling, such as spindle assembly in mitosis and meiosis, assembly/disassembly of flagella and cilia and neuronal morphogenesis. Here, we uncover a novel family of katanin-like 2 proteins (KATNAL2) in mouse, consisting of five alternatively spliced isoforms encoded by the Katnal2 genomic locus. We further demonstrate that in vivo these isoforms are able to interact with themselves, with each other and moreover directly and independently with MRP/MinD-type P-loop NTPases Nubp1 and Nubp2, which are integral components of centrioles, negative regulators of ciliogenesis and implicated in centriole duplication in mammalian cells. We find KATNAL2 localized on interphase MTs, centrioles, mitotic spindle, midbody and the axoneme and basal body of sensory cilia in cultured murine cells. shRNAi of Katnal2 results in inefficient cytokinesis and severe phenotypes of enlarged cells and nuclei, increased numbers of centrioles and the manifestation of aberrant multipolar mitotic spindles, mitotic defects, chromosome bridges, multinuclearity, increased MT acetylation and an altered cell cycle pattern. Silencing or stable overexpression of KATNAL2 isoforms drastically reduces ciliogenesis. In conclusion, KATNAL2s are multitasking enzymes involved in the same cell type in critically important processes affecting cytokinesis, MT dynamics, and ciliogenesis and are also implicated in cell cycle progression. PMID:26153462

  2. A KEY AND COMPENDIUM TO THE SPECIES OF THE GENUS MERLINIUS SIDDIQI, 1970, WITH DESCRIPTION OF ONE NEW SPECIES PARASITIZING DATE PALM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An identification key to 32 valid species of stunt nematodes (Merlinius spp.) is given. A compendium of the most important diagnostic characters for use in identification of species is included as a practical alternative and supplement to the key. The diagnosis of Merlinius is emended, and a list of...

  3. Research on Key Technology and Applications for Internet of Things

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xian-Yi; Jin, Zhi-Gang

    The Internet of Things (IOT) has been paid more and more attention by the academe, industry, and government all over the world. The concept of IOT and the architecture of IOT are discussed. The key technologies of IOT, including Radio Frequency Identification technology, Electronic Product Code technology, and ZigBee technology are analyzed. The framework of digital agriculture application based on IOT is proposed.

  4. Authoring Interactive Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayeski, Diane; Williams, David V.

    1984-01-01

    This guide to using computer authoring aids to develop interactive instructional programs covers types of aids, languages, costs, mainframes, and key considerations. A sampling of resources with manufacturers' names and addresses is included. (SK)

  5. Key Role of CRF in the Skin Stress Response System

    PubMed Central

    Zmijewski, Michal A.; Zbytek, Blazej; Tobin, Desmond J.; Theoharides, Theoharis C.; Rivier, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) or CRH defining the upper regulatory arm of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, along with the identification of the corresponding receptors (CRFRs 1 and 2), represents a milestone in our understanding of central mechanisms regulating body and local homeostasis. We focused on the CRF-led signaling systems in the skin and offer a model for regulation of peripheral homeostasis based on the interaction of CRF and the structurally related urocortins with corresponding receptors and the resulting direct or indirect phenotypic effects that include regulation of epidermal barrier function, skin immune, pigmentary, adnexal, and dermal functions necessary to maintain local and systemic homeostasis. The regulatory modes of action include the classical CRF-led cutaneous equivalent of the central HPA axis, the expression and function of CRF and related peptides, and the stimulation of pro-opiomelanocortin peptides or cytokines. The key regulatory role is assigned to the CRFR-1? receptor, with other isoforms having modulatory effects. CRF can be released from sensory nerves and immune cells in response to emotional and environmental stressors. The expression sequence of peptides includes urocortin/CRF?pro-opiomelanocortin?ACTH, MSH, and ?-endorphin. Expression of these peptides and of CRFR-1? is environmentally regulated, and their dysfunction can lead to skin and systemic diseases. Environmentally stressed skin can activate both the central and local HPA axis through either sensory nerves or humoral factors to turn on homeostatic responses counteracting cutaneous and systemic environmental damage. CRF and CRFR-1 may constitute novel targets through the use of specific agonists or antagonists, especially for therapy of skin diseases that worsen with stress, such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. PMID:23939821

  6. Key role of CRF in the skin stress response system.

    PubMed

    Slominski, Andrzej T; Zmijewski, Michal A; Zbytek, Blazej; Tobin, Desmond J; Theoharides, Theoharis C; Rivier, Jean

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) or CRH defining the upper regulatory arm of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, along with the identification of the corresponding receptors (CRFRs 1 and 2), represents a milestone in our understanding of central mechanisms regulating body and local homeostasis. We focused on the CRF-led signaling systems in the skin and offer a model for regulation of peripheral homeostasis based on the interaction of CRF and the structurally related urocortins with corresponding receptors and the resulting direct or indirect phenotypic effects that include regulation of epidermal barrier function, skin immune, pigmentary, adnexal, and dermal functions necessary to maintain local and systemic homeostasis. The regulatory modes of action include the classical CRF-led cutaneous equivalent of the central HPA axis, the expression and function of CRF and related peptides, and the stimulation of pro-opiomelanocortin peptides or cytokines. The key regulatory role is assigned to the CRFR-1? receptor, with other isoforms having modulatory effects. CRF can be released from sensory nerves and immune cells in response to emotional and environmental stressors. The expression sequence of peptides includes urocortin/CRF?pro-opiomelanocortin?ACTH, MSH, and ?-endorphin. Expression of these peptides and of CRFR-1? is environmentally regulated, and their dysfunction can lead to skin and systemic diseases. Environmentally stressed skin can activate both the central and local HPA axis through either sensory nerves or humoral factors to turn on homeostatic responses counteracting cutaneous and systemic environmental damage. CRF and CRFR-1 may constitute novel targets through the use of specific agonists or antagonists, especially for therapy of skin diseases that worsen with stress, such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. PMID:23939821

  7. Identifying tier one key suppliers.

    PubMed

    Wicks, Steve

    2013-01-01

    In today's global marketplace, businesses are becoming increasingly reliant on suppliers for the provision of key processes, activities, products and services in support of their strategic business goals. The result is that now, more than ever, the failure of a key supplier has potential to damage reputation, productivity, compliance and financial performance seriously. Yet despite this, there is no recognised standard or guidance for identifying a tier one key supplier base and, up to now, there has been little or no research on how to do so effectively. This paper outlines the key findings of a BCI-sponsored research project to investigate good practice in identifying tier one key suppliers, and suggests a scalable framework process model and risk matrix tool to help businesses effectively identify their tier one key supplier base. PMID:23615061

  8. DPS Quantum Key Distribution System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Kyo

    Differential-phase-shift (DPS) quantum key distribution (QKD) is one scheme of quantum key distribution whose security is based on the quantum nature of lightwave. This protocol features simplicity, a high key creation rate, and robustness against photon-number-splitting attacks. We describe DPS-QKD in this paper, including its setup and operation, eavesdropping against DPS-QKD, system performance, and modified systems to improve the system performance.

  9. Key / Card Requisition Keys & Cards are available in the Physical Plant Office

    E-print Network

    Martin, Jeff

    Key / Card Requisition Keys & Cards are available in the Physical Plant Office PLEASE COMPLETE ALL REASON FOR REQUESTING KEY(S) REASON FOR REQUESTING KEY(S) / CARD Lost Key/Card re-issue? YES NO (Note: Replacement fees are in effect for lost keys/cards. See reverse.) KEYS REQUESTED KEY REQUESTED / ACCESS

  10. 1. Nomenclature C-key Hold the 'Control key' down while hitting

    E-print Network

    Militzer, Burkhard

    1. Nomenclature C-key Hold the 'Control key' down while hitting "key" A-key Hold the "Alt Key" down while hitting "key". On Windows, you can use the "Alt Key" or "Escape Key" and on Solaris you use Hold the "Alt" Key down while hit- ting the "x" key, then type the command shown Spacebar 2

  11. Quantum Key Distribution in the Classical Authenticated Key Exchange Framework

    E-print Network

    Michele Mosca; Douglas Stebila; Berkant Ustaoglu

    2012-06-27

    Key establishment is a crucial primitive for building secure channels: in a multi-party setting, it allows two parties using only public authenticated communication to establish a secret session key which can be used to encrypt messages. But if the session key is compromised, the confidentiality of encrypted messages is typically compromised as well. Without quantum mechanics, key establishment can only be done under the assumption that some computational problem is hard. Since digital communication can be easily eavesdropped and recorded, it is important to consider the secrecy of information anticipating future algorithmic and computational discoveries which could break the secrecy of past keys, violating the secrecy of the confidential channel. Quantum key distribution (QKD) can be used generate secret keys that are secure against any future algorithmic or computational improvements. QKD protocols still require authentication of classical communication, however, which is most easily achieved using computationally secure digital signature schemes. It is generally considered folklore that QKD when used with computationally secure authentication is still secure against an unbounded adversary, provided the adversary did not break the authentication during the run of the protocol. We describe a security model for quantum key distribution based on traditional classical authenticated key exchange (AKE) security models. Using our model, we characterize the long-term security of the BB84 QKD protocol with computationally secure authentication against an eventually unbounded adversary. By basing our model on traditional AKE models, we can more readily compare the relative merits of various forms of QKD and existing classical AKE protocols. This comparison illustrates in which types of adversarial environments different quantum and classical key agreement protocols can be secure.

  12. Twenty-six key research questions in urban stream ecology: an assessment of the state of the science

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although urban streams have been the focus of much research activity in recent years, there remain many unanswered questions about the mechanisms driving the “urban stream syndrome.” Identification of these key research questions is an important step toward effective, efficient ...

  13. Rationalizing Tight Ligand Binding through Cooperative Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Small modifications of the molecular structure of a ligand sometimes cause strong gains in binding affinity to a protein target, rendering a weakly active chemical series suddenly attractive for further optimization. Our goal in this study is to better rationalize and predict the occurrence of such interaction hot-spots in receptor binding sites. To this end, we introduce two new concepts into the computational description of molecular recognition. First, we take a broader view of noncovalent interactions and describe protein–ligand binding with a comprehensive set of favorable and unfavorable contact types, including for example halogen bonding and orthogonal multipolar interactions. Second, we go beyond the commonly used pairwise additive treatment of atomic interactions and use a small world network approach to describe how interactions are modulated by their environment. This approach allows us to capture local cooperativity effects and considerably improves the performance of a newly derived empirical scoring function, ScorpionScore. More importantly, however, we demonstrate how an intuitive visualization of key intermolecular interactions, interaction networks, and binding hot-spots supports the identification and rationalization of tight ligand binding. PMID:22087588

  14. Equation of state of an interacting pion gas with realistic pi-pi interactions 

    E-print Network

    Rapp, Ralf; Wambach, J.

    1996-01-01

    interaction pathways and interaction probabilities for all likely radionuclide production in the Z-machine were tabulated and radionuclides with production pathways matching those of iron-55 production were noted. For purposes of nuclide identification...

  15. Public Key Cryptography Shai Simonson

    E-print Network

    Simonson, Shai

    Public Key Cryptography Shai Simonson Stonehill College Introduction When teaching mathematics methods are a part of every computer scientist's education. In public-key cryptography, also called trapdoor or one-way cryptography, the encoding scheme is public, yet the decoding scheme remains secret

  16. Secret Public Key Protocols Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hoon Wei; Paterson, Kenneth G.

    Password-based protocols are important and popular means of providing human-to-machine authentication. The concept of secret public keys was proposed more than a decade ago as a means of securing password-based authentication protocols against off-line password guessing attacks, but was later found vulnerable to various attacks. In this paper, we revisit the concept and introduce the notion of identity-based secret public keys. Our new identity-based approach allows secret public keys to be constructed in a very natural way using arbitrary random strings, eliminating the structure found in, for example, RSA or ElGamal keys. We examine identity-based secret public key protocols and give informal security analyses, indicating that they are secure against off-line password guessing and other attacks.

  17. An adaptive identification and control scheme for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, J. V.

    1988-01-01

    A unified identification and control scheme capable of achieving space at form performance objectives under nominal or failure conditions is described. Preliminary results are also presented, showing that the methodology offers much promise for effective robust control of large space structures. The control method is a multivariable, adaptive, output predictive controller called Model Predictive Control (MPC). MPC uses a state space model and input reference trajectories of set or tracking points to adaptively generate optimum commands. For a fixed model, MPC processes commands with great efficiency, and is also highly robust. A key feature of MPC is its ability to control either nonminimum phase or open loop unstable systems. As an output controller, MPC does not explicitly require full state feedback, as do most multivariable (e.g., Linear Quadratic) methods. Its features are very useful in LSS operations, as they allow non-collocated actuators and sensors. The identification scheme is based on canonical variate analysis (CVA) of input and output data. The CVA technique is particularly suited for the measurement and identification of structural dynamic processes - that is, unsteady transient or dynamically interacting processes such as between aerodynamics and structural deformation - from short, noisy data. CVA is structured so that the identification can be done in real or near real time, using computationally stable algorithms. Modeling LSS dynamics in 1-g laboratories has always been a major impediment not only to understanding their behavior in orbit, but also to controlling it. In cases where the theoretical model is not confirmed, current methods provide few clues concerning additional dynamical relationships that are not included in the theoretical models. CVA needs no a priori model data, or structure; all statistically significant dynamical states are determined using natural, entropy-based methods. Heretofore, a major limitation in applying adaptive controllers to LSS problems has been the requirement for accurate models. We feel that MPC coupled with the CVA identification scheme will resolve this limitation. The results are based on research performed under an SBIR grant, administered by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  18. Quantum key distribution with key extracted from basis information

    E-print Network

    Xiongfeng Ma

    2014-10-20

    In conventional quantum key distribution protocols, the secure key is normally extracted from the measurement outcomes of the system. Here, a different approach is proposed, where the secure key is extracted from the measurement bases, rather than outcomes. Compared to the original Bennett-Brassard-1984 protocol, the proposed protocol involves no hardware change but modifications in data postprocessing. We show that this protocol is more robust against detector efficiency attacks and photon-number-splitting attacks when practical detectors and photon sources are used.

  19. System Identification of Civil Engineering Structures through Wireless Structural Monitoring and Subspace System Identification Methods

    E-print Network

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    System Identification of Civil Engineering Structures through Wireless Structural Monitoring of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Civil Engineering) in The University of Michigan 2011 engineers; amazingly, there were many keys which unlocked many civil engineering problems. All achievements

  20. Identification of Terrestrial Reflectance From Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Nolf, Scott R.; Stacy, Kathryn (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Correcting for atmospheric effects is an essential part of surface-reflectance recovery from radiance measurements. Model-based atmospheric correction techniques enable an accurate identification and classification of terrestrial reflectances from multi-spectral imagery. Successful and efficient removal of atmospheric effects from remote-sensing data is a key factor in the success of Earth observation missions. This report assesses the performance, robustness and sensitivity of two atmospheric-correction and reflectance-recovery techniques as part of an end-to-end simulation of hyper-spectral acquisition, identification and classification.

  1. What are the Benefits of Interacting with Nature?

    PubMed Central

    Keniger, Lucy E.; Gaston, Kevin J.; Irvine, Katherine N.; Fuller, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    There is mounting empirical evidence that interacting with nature delivers measurable benefits to people. Reviews of this topic have generally focused on a specific type of benefit, been limited to a single discipline, or covered the benefits delivered from a particular type of interaction. Here we construct novel typologies of the settings, interactions and potential benefits of people-nature experiences, and use these to organise an assessment of the benefits of interacting with nature. We discover that evidence for the benefits of interacting with nature is geographically biased towards high latitudes and Western societies, potentially contributing to a focus on certain types of settings and benefits. Social scientists have been the most active researchers in this field. Contributions from ecologists are few in number, perhaps hindering the identification of key ecological features of the natural environment that deliver human benefits. Although many types of benefits have been studied, benefits to physical health, cognitive performance and psychological well-being have received much more attention than the social or spiritual benefits of interacting with nature, despite the potential for important consequences arising from the latter. The evidence for most benefits is correlational, and although there are several experimental studies, little as yet is known about the mechanisms that are important for delivering these benefits. For example, we do not know which characteristics of natural settings (e.g., biodiversity, level of disturbance, proximity, accessibility) are most important for triggering a beneficial interaction, and how these characteristics vary in importance among cultures, geographic regions and socio-economic groups. These are key directions for future research if we are to design landscapes that promote high quality interactions between people and nature in a rapidly urbanising world. PMID:23466828

  2. Preprint Version Distributed Target Identification in Robotic Swarms

    E-print Network

    Preprint Version Distributed Target Identification in Robotic Swarms Paolo Stegagno Max Planck of a multi-robot team able to interact with the environment. In most existing systems, the identification systems, constituted by a multitude of small robots with limited sensing and computational capa- bilities

  3. Finite key analysis for symmetric attacks in quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Tim; Kampermann, Hermann; Kleinmann, Matthias; Bruss, Dagmar

    2006-10-15

    We introduce a constructive method to calculate the achievable secret key rate for a generic class of quantum key distribution protocols, when only a finite number n of signals is given. Our approach is applicable to all scenarios in which the quantum state shared by Alice and Bob is known. In particular, we consider the six state protocol with symmetric eavesdropping attacks, and show that for a small number of signals, i.e., below n{approx}10{sup 4}, the finite key rate differs significantly from the asymptotic value for n{yields}{infinity}. However, for larger n, a good approximation of the asymptotic value is found. We also study secret key rates for protocols using higher-dimensional quantum systems.

  4. Atypical Forensic Dental Identifications.

    PubMed

    Cardoza, Anthony R; Wood, James D

    2015-06-01

    Forensic dental identification specialists are typically the last conventional option for postmortem identification. Forensic dental identification is most often accomplished by comparing radiographs of the decedent's teeth with the dental radiographs obtained from the dentist of the suspected victim. Unfortunately, antemortem dental radiographs are not always available. When presented with this challenge, the authors of this article have been successful in completing identifications using means other than dental radiographic comparison. PMID:26126345

  5. Obtaining material identification with cosmic ray radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C. L.; Borozdin, Konstantin; Bacon, Jeffrey; Chen, Elliott; Lukic, Zarija; Milner, Edward; Miyadera, Haruo; Perry, John; Schwellenbach, Dave; Aberle, Derek; Dreesen, Wendi; Green, J. Andrew; McDuff, George G.; Nagamine, Kanetada; Sossong, Michael; Spore, Candace; Toleman, Nathan

    2012-12-15

    The passage of muons through matter is dominated by the Coulomb interaction with electrons and nuclei in the matter. The muon interaction with the electrons leads to continuous energy loss and stopping of the muons. The muon interaction with nuclei leads to angular diffusion. Using both stopped muons and angle diffusion interactions allows us to determine density and identify materials. Here we demonstrate material identification using data taken at Los Alamos with a particle tracker built from a set of sealed drift tubes with commercial electronics and software, the Mini Muon Tracker (MMT).

  6. Security of Quantum Key Distribution

    E-print Network

    Renato Renner

    2006-01-11

    We propose various new techniques in quantum information theory, including a de Finetti style representation theorem for finite symmetric quantum states. As an application, we give a proof for the security of quantum key distribution which applies to arbitrary protocols.

  7. DCCPS: BRP: TCRB: Key Initiatives

    Cancer.gov

    Twitter Multimedia Home About Key Initiatives Funding Resources Tools Cancer Control & Population Sciences Home Behavioral Research Program Home Tobacco Control Research Branch Research Topics: Special Populations and Tobacco Special Issue of the American

  8. DCCPS: BRP: TCRB: Key Initiatives

    Cancer.gov

    Twitter Multimedia Home About Key Initiatives Funding Resources Tools Cancer Control & Population Sciences Home Behavioral Research Program Home Tobacco Control Research Branch Research Topics: Special Populations and Tobacco Tobacco and Health of Women

  9. DCCPS: BRP: BBPSB: Key Initiatives

    Cancer.gov

    Skip Navigation Twitter Multimedia Home About Key Initiatives Funding Resources Tools Cancer Control & Population Sciences Home Behavioral Research Program Home Basic Biobehavioral and Psychological Sciences Branch Basic Biobehavioral and Psychological

  10. 37 Keys to Laboratory Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruys, Theodorus

    1969-01-01

    Flexibility, adaptability, and expandability are requirements for good laboratory design. This report contains suggestions for improving laboratory planning, construction, and utilization in certain key areas. Special attention is given to incorporating safety equipment and special nonreactive materials. (RA)

  11. DCCPS: BRP: TCRB: Key Initiatives

    Cancer.gov

    Skip Navigation Twitter Multimedia Home About Key Initiatives Funding Resources Tools Cancer Control & Population Sciences Home Behavioral Research Program Home Tobacco Control Research Branch Research Topics: Secondhand Smoke Exposure to secondhand

  12. DCCPS: BRP: TCRB: Key Initiatives

    Cancer.gov

    Twitter Multimedia Home About Key Initiatives Funding Resources Tools Cancer Control & Population Sciences Home Behavioral Research Program Home Tobacco Control Research Branch American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) NCI Tobacco Control Monograph

  13. Ideas for project topics: Quantum key distribution

    E-print Network

    Safronova, Marianna

    Ideas for project topics: Quantum key distribution BB84 protocol for quantum key distribution Ekert protocol for quantum key distribution Quantum cryptography and eavesdropping Quantum key distribution with practical equipment: attacks and solutions Adiabatic quantum computing Topological quantum computing Quantum

  14. `Circular type' quantum key distribution

    E-print Network

    Tsuyoshi Nishioka; Hirokazu Ishizuka; Toshio Hasegawa

    2001-06-15

    `Circular type' interferometric system for quantum key distribution is proposed. The system has naturally self-alignment and compensation of birefringence and also has enough efficiency against polarisation dependence. Moreover it is easily applicable to multi-party. Key creation with 0.1 photon per pulse at a rate of 1.2KHz with a 5.4% QBER over a 200m fiber was realized.

  15. COMMUNICATION Computational and Biochemical Identification of a

    E-print Network

    Lichtarge, Olivier

    of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 USA Nuclear transport carriers interact with proteins of the nuclear poreCOMMUNICATION Computational and Biochemical Identification of a Nuclear Pore Complex Binding Site on the Nuclear Transport Carrier NTF2 Ian Cushman1 *, Brian R. Bowman2 , Mathew E. Sowa3 , Olivier Lichtarge4

  16. Introduction Interactive visualizations are a key aspect for

    E-print Network

    Pajarola, Renato B.

    be expressed in mathematical form. - Number of categories (e.g. votable parties) are limited to the graphics. Most of the time, these devices are limited in graphics memory but with increasing parallelism

  17. Haptics: A Key to Fast Paced Interactivity Vincent Hayward

    E-print Network

    Hayward, Vincent

    because their fundamental function is to take advantage of mechanical signals to provide for communication in the form of structured discontinuities created by lay- Human Friendly Mechatronics. Selected Papers. Next, consider a computer screen with graphics capabilities. It can be programmed to display

  18. INTERACTIVITY IS THE KEY William Hibbard and David Santek

    E-print Network

    Martin, Jonathan E.

    pleased with the results, they all express a desire to change the animations with quicker response of images. These may lie on some two-dimensional surface through three-dimensional space, or each pixel may integrate along a ray though space. Each pixel may have multiple components, for different spectra

  19. Case Study 1: Determining Key Binding Interactions Between the Neurotransmitter

    E-print Network

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) Acetylcholine (ACh) O N+ CH3 CH3 CH3 O Nicotine N+ N CH3 H The natural ligand Recognition at Serotonergic (5-HT3A) and Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors. The Anomalous Binding Properties at the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor, Amanda L. Cashin, E. James Petersson, Henry A. Lester, and Dennis A

  20. Secretome identification of immune cell factors mediating metastatic cell homing

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Wu, Jia J.; Azarin, Samira M.; Nanavati, Dhaval; Rao, Shreyas S.; Bushnell, Grace G.; Medicherla, Chaitanya B.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cell homing is a complex process mediated in part by diffusible factors secreted from immune cells found at a pre-metastatic niche. We report on connecting secretomics and TRanscriptional Activity CEll aRray (TRACER) data to identify functional paracrine interactions between immune cells and metastatic cells as novel mediators of homing. Metastatic breast cancer mouse models were used to generate a diseased splenocyte conditioned media (D-SCM) containing immune cell secreted factors. MDA-MB-231 metastatic cell activity including cell invasion, migration, transendothelial migration, and proliferation were increased in D-SCM relative to control media. Our D-SCM secretome analysis yielded 144 secreted factor candidates that contribute to increased metastatic cell activity. The functional mediators of homing were identified using MetaCore software to determine interactions between the immune cell secretome and the TRACER-identified active transcription factors within metastatic cells. Among the 5 candidate homing factors identified, haptoglobin was selected and validated in vitro and in vivo as a key mediator of homing. Our studies demonstrate a novel systems biology approach to identify functional signaling factors associated with a cellular phenotype, which provides an enabling tool that complements large-scale protein identification provided by proteomics. PMID:26634905