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Sample records for interactive identification key

  1. Illustrated Plant Identification Keys: An Interactive Tool to Learn Botany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Helena; Pinho, Rosa; Lopes, Lisia; Nogueira, Antonio J. A.; Silveira, Paulo

    2011-01-01

    An Interactive Dichotomous Key (IDK) for 390 "taxa" of vascular plants from the Ria de Aveiro, available on a website, was developed to help teach botany to school and universitary students. This multimedia tool includes several links to Descriptive and Illustrated Glossaries. Questionnaires answered by high-school and undergraduate students about…

  2. ChiloKey, an interactive identification tool for the geophilomorph centipedes of Europe (Chilopoda, Geophilomorpha)

    PubMed Central

    Bonato, Lucio; Minelli, Alessandro; Lopresti, Massimo; Cerretti, Pierfilippo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract ChiloKey is a matrix-based, interactive key to all 179 species of Geophilomorpha (Chilopoda) recorded from Europe, including species of uncertain identity and those whose morphology is known partially only. The key is intended to assist in identification of subadult and adult specimens, by means of microscopy and simple dissection techniques whenever necessary. The key is freely available through the web at: http://www.biologia.unipd.it/chilokey/ and at http://www.interactive-keys.eu/chilokey/. PMID:25349493

  3. Interactive identification protocol based on a quantum public-key cryptosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chenmiao; Yang, Li

    2014-11-01

    We propose two interactive identification protocols based on a general construction of quantum public-key cryptosystem. Basic protocol contains set-up phase and authentication phase. Participants do operation with quantum computing of Boolean function in two-round transmission of authentication phase. Basic one only ensures completeness and soundness, but leaks information about private-key. We modify basic protocol with random string and random Boolean permutation. After modification, both transmitted states in two-round transmission can be proved to be ultimate mixed states. No participant or attacker will get useful information about private-key by measuring such states. Modified protocol achieves property of zero-knowledge.

  4. Development and validation of IIKC: an interactive identification key for Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) females from the Western Palaearctic region

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and methods The appearance of bluetongue virus (BTV) in 2006 within northern Europe exposed a lack of expertise and resources available across this region to enable the accurate morphological identification of species of Culicoides Latreille biting midges, some of which are the major vectors of this pathogen. This work aims to organise extant Culicoides taxonomic knowledge into a database and to produce an interactive identification key for females of Culicoides in the Western Palaearctic (IIKC: Interactive identification key for Culicoides). We then validated IIKC using a trial carried out by six entomologists based in this region with variable degrees of experience in identifying Culicoides. Results The current version of the key includes 98 Culicoides species with 10 morphological variants, 61 descriptors and 837 pictures and schemes. Validation was carried out by six entomologists as a blind trial with two users allocated to three classes of expertise (beginner, intermediate and advanced). Slides were identified using a median of seven steps and seven minutes and user confidence in the identification varied from 60% for failed identifications to a maximum of 80% for successful ones. By user class, the beginner group successfully identified 44.6% of slides, the intermediate 56.8% and the advanced 74.3%. Conclusions Structured as a multi-entry key, IIKC is a powerful database for the morphological identification of female Culicoides from the Western Palaearctic region. First developed for use as an interactive identification key, it was revealed to be a powerful back-up tool for training new taxonomists and to maintain expertise level. The development of tools for arthropod involvement in pathogen transmission will allow clearer insights into the ecology and dynamics of Culicoides and in turn assist in understanding arbovirus epidemiology. PMID:22776566

  5. Afrotropical Ophioninae (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae): an update of Gauld and Mitchell's revision, including two new species and an interactive matrix identification key.

    PubMed

    Rousse, Pascal; van Noort, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The revision of the Afrotropical Ophioninae is updated, based on the examination of about 800-900 individuals in the South African and European museum collections. A robust interactive matrix key was built to provide quick and reliable identifications. The key is available online at http://www.waspweb.org. Two new species are described: Dicamptusmaxipol sp. n. and Enicospilusgauldetmitchellorum sp. n. Numerous new distribution and biological records are provided, and noticeable morphological intra-specific variations are detailed. Enicospilusbatus Gauld & Mitchell, syn. n. is considered as a junior synonym of Enicospilusluebberti (Enderlein). PMID:25709521

  6. Afrotropical Ophioninae (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae): an update of Gauld and Mitchell’s revision, including two new species and an interactive matrix identification key

    PubMed Central

    Rousse, Pascal; van Noort, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The revision of the Afrotropical Ophioninae is updated, based on the examination of about 800–900 individuals in the South African and European museum collections. A robust interactive matrix key was built to provide quick and reliable identifications. The key is available online at http://www.waspweb.org. Two new species are described: Dicamptus maxipol sp. n. and Enicospilus gauldetmitchellorum sp. n. Numerous new distribution and biological records are provided, and noticeable morphological intra-specific variations are detailed. Enicospilus batus Gauld & Mitchell, syn. n. is considered as a junior synonym of Enicospilus luebberti (Enderlein). PMID:25709521

  7. Identification of Key Barriers in Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect

    2008-03-31

    This report documents the identification of key barriers in the development of an adequate national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project, being performed under a Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration grant. Many barriers exist that prevent the development of an adequate number of propertly trained national security personnel. Some barriers can be eliminated in a short-term manner, whereas others will involve a long-term strategy that takes into account public policy.

  8. Species identification key of Korean mammal hair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunok; Choi, Tae-Young; Woo, Donggul; Min, Mi-Sook; Sugita, Shoei; Lee, Hang

    2014-05-01

    The hair microstructures of Korean terrestrial mammals from 23 species (22 wild and one domestic) were analyzed using light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to construct a hair identification key. The hairs were examined using the medulla structures and cuticular scales of guard hairs from the dorsal regions of mature adult animals. All cuticular scale structures in the hair of Rodentia, Lagomorpha, Carnivora and Insectivora showed the petal pattern, and those of Artiodactyla and Chiroptera showed the wave pattern and coronal pattern, respectively. Rodentia, Lagomorpha and Carnivora showed multicellular, and Insectivora and Artiodactyla showed unicellular regular, mesh or columnar in the medulla structures, respectively. Chiroptera did not show the medulla structures in their hair. We found that it is possible to distinguish between species and order based on general appearance, medulla structures and cuticular scales. Thus, we constructed a hair identification key with morphological characteristics from each species. This study suggests that hair identification keys could be useful in fields, such as forensic science, food safety and foraging ecology. PMID:24451929

  9. Simple Web-based interactive key development software (WEBiKEY) and an example key for Kuruna (Poaceae: Bambusoideae)1

    PubMed Central

    Attigala, Lakshmi; De Silva, Nuwan I.; Clark, Lynn G.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Programs that are user-friendly and freely available for developing Web-based interactive keys are scarce and most of the well-structured applications are relatively expensive. WEBiKEY was developed to enable researchers to easily develop their own Web-based interactive keys with fewer resources. Methods and Results: A Web-based multiaccess identification tool (WEBiKEY) was developed that uses freely available Microsoft ASP.NET technologies and an SQL Server database for Windows-based hosting environments. WEBiKEY was tested for its usability with a sample data set, the temperate woody bamboo genus Kuruna (Poaceae). Conclusions: WEBiKEY is freely available to the public and can be used to develop Web-based interactive keys for any group of species. The interactive key we developed for Kuruna using WEBiKEY enables users to visually inspect characteristics of Kuruna and identify an unknown specimen as one of seven possible species in the genus. PMID:27144109

  10. Identification and structural mechanism for a novel interaction between a ubiquitin ligase WWP1 and Nogo-A, a key inhibitor for central nervous system regeneration.

    PubMed

    Qin, Haina; Pu, Helen X; Li, Minfen; Ahmed, Sohail; Song, Jianxing

    2008-12-23

    Nogo-A has been extensively demonstrated to play key roles in inhibiting central nervous system regeneration, regulating endoplasmic reticulum formation, and maintaining the integrity of the neuromuscular junction. In this study, an E3 ubiquitin ligase WWP1 was first identified to be a novel interacting partner for Nogo-A both in vitro and in vivo. By using CD, ITC, and NMR, we have further conducted extensive studies on all four WWP1 WW domains and their interactions with a Nogo-A peptide carrying the only PPxY motif. The results lead to several striking findings. (1) Despite containing an unstructured region, the 186-residue WWP1 fragment containing all four WW domains is able to interact with the Nogo-A(650-666) peptide with a high affinity, with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 1.68 microM. (2) Interestingly, four isolated WW domains show differential structural properties in the free states. WW1 and WW2 are only partially folded, while WW4 is well-folded. Nevertheless, they all become well-folded upon binding to Nogo-A(650-666), with K(d) values ranging from 1.03 to 3.85 microM. (3) The solution structure of the best-folded WW4 domain is determined, and the binding-perturbed residues were derived for both WW4 and Nogo-A(650-666) by NMR HSQC titrations. Moreover, on the basis of the NMR data, the complex model is constructed by HADDOCK 2.0. This study provides rationales as well as a template Nogo-A(650-666) for further design of molecules to intervene in the WWP1-Nogo-A interaction which may regulate the Nogo-A protein level by controlling its ubiquitination. PMID:19035836

  11. Identification Schemes from Key Encapsulation Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anada, Hiroaki; Arita, Seiko

    We propose a generic conversion from a key encapsulation mechanism (KEM) to an identification (ID) scheme. The conversion derives the security for ID schemes against concurrent man-in-the-middle (cMiM) attacks from the security for KEMs against adaptive chosen ciphertext attacks on one-wayness (one-way-CCA2). Then, regarding the derivation as a design principle of ID schemes, we develop a series of concrete one-way-CCA2 secure KEMs. We start with El Gamal KEM and prove it secure against non-adaptive chosen ciphertext attacks on one-wayness (one-way-CCA1) in the standard model. Then, we apply a tag framework with the algebraic trick of Boneh and Boyen to make it one-way-CCA2 secure based on the Gap-CDH assumption. Next, we apply the CHK transformation or a target collision resistant hash function to exit the tag framework. And finally, as it is better to rely on the CDH assumption rather than the Gap-CDH assumption, we apply the Twin DH technique of Cash, Kiltz and Shoup. The application is not “black box” and we do it by making the Twin DH technique compatible with the algebraic trick. The ID schemes obtained from our KEMs show the highest performance in both computational amount and message length compared with previously known ID schemes secure against concurrent man-in-the-middle attacks.

  12. Session 2 summary and key issues identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robey, Judith

    1990-01-01

    Identification of specific areas for the technology development; payload/facility requirements; crew safety as the highest priority for the space station; identification of preliminary operational constraints (facilities/experiments requiring specialized equipment and/or procedures, and crew limitations and protective gear requirements); frame of reference of baseline of applicable waste handling experience; use of the workshop as a basis for assessing the current and applicable space station requirements; provision of an educational, and informational forum for government employees, contractors, experimental facility developers, and potential hardware suppliers involved with the Space Station program; and documentation of workshop results and follow-on study issues are examined.

  13. A visual identification key utilizing both gestalt and analytic approaches to identification of Carices present in North America (Plantae, Cyperaceae)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Images are a critical part of the identification process because they enable direct, immediate and relatively unmediated comparisons between a specimen being identified and one or more reference specimens. The Carices Interactive Visual Identification Key (CIVIK) is a novel tool for identification of North American Carex species, the largest vascular plant genus in North America, and two less numerous closely-related genera, Cymophyllus and Kobresia. CIVIK incorporates 1288 high-resolution tiled image sets that allow users to zoom in to view minute structures that are crucial at times for identification in these genera. Morphological data are derived from the earlier Carex Interactive Identification Key (CIIK) which in turn used data from the Flora of North America treatments. In this new iteration, images can be viewed in a grid or histogram format, allowing multiple representations of data. In both formats the images are fully zoomable. PMID:24723777

  14. Temporal Dynamics and the Identification of Musical Key

    PubMed Central

    Farbood, Morwaread Mary; Marcus, Gary; Poeppel, David

    2013-01-01

    A central process in music cognition involves the identification of key, however little is known about how listeners accomplish this task in real time. This study derives from work that suggests overlap between the neural and cognitive resources underlying the analyses of both music and speech, and is the first to explore the timescales at which the brain infers musical key. We investigated the temporal psychophysics of key-finding over a wide range of tempi using melodic sequences with strong structural cues, where statistical information about overall key profile was ambiguous. Listeners were able to provide robust judgments within specific limits, at rates as high as 400 beats per minute (~7 Hz) and as low as 30 bpm (0.5 Hz), but not outside those bounds. These boundaries on reliable performance show that the process of key-finding is restricted to timescales that are closely aligned with beat induction and speech processing. PMID:23317116

  15. Temporal dynamics and the identification of musical key.

    PubMed

    Farbood, Morwaread Mary; Marcus, Gary; Poeppel, David

    2013-08-01

    A central process in music cognition involves the identification of key; however, little is known about how listeners accomplish this task in real time. This study derives from work that suggests overlap between the neural and cognitive resources underlying the analyses of both music and speech and is the first, to our knowledge, to explore the timescales at which the brain infers musical key. We investigated the temporal psychophysics of key-finding over a wide range of tempi using melodic sequences with strong structural cues, where statistical information about overall key profile was ambiguous. Listeners were able to provide robust judgments within specific limits, at rates as high as 400 beats per minute (bpm; ∼7 Hz) and as low as 30 bpm (0.5 Hz), but not outside those bounds. These boundaries on reliable performance show that the process of key-finding is restricted to timescales that are closely aligned with beat induction and speech processing. PMID:23317116

  16. Interaction: The Key to Successful Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Al

    This paper discusses the impediments to distance education (DE) programs and the critical value of interaction and dialog in DE learning environments. The types of interaction to be considered when designing a DE program are listed, including interaction to increase learning, to increase participation, to develop communication, to receive…

  17. Key Results of Interaction Models with Centering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afshartous, David; Preston, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the effect on estimation of simultaneous variable centering and interaction effects in linear regression. We technically define, review, and amplify many of the statistical issues for interaction models with centering in order to create a useful and compact reference for teachers, students, and applied researchers. In addition, we…

  18. Identification of key recombinants in multiplex SMA families

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Steege, G.; Cobben, J.M.; Osinga, J.

    1994-07-01

    Recent reports have provided evidence that a major gene for autosomal recessive proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) resides in a small genetic interval in bands q12-q13 of chromosome 5, a 4-cM region proximally flanked by D5S125 (EF(TG/AG)n) and distally by MAP1B/D5S112 or a 0.7-cM interval (range 0.1-2.1 cM) flanked by D5S435 proximally and MAP1B/D5S112 distally. The authors present the identification of key recombinants between SMA and the closest flanking DNA-markers in an analysis of Dutch and Italian SMA families. These crossovers may serve as reference points for new markers in this region and may thus be instrumental in a further refined mapping of the SMA gene. Two markers, D5S351 (I105) and D5S357 (Mfd151), could be mapped distally to SMA in the interval SMA-D5S112. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Decoding time for the identification of musical key.

    PubMed

    Farbood, Morwaread M; Rowland, Jess; Marcus, Gary; Ghitza, Oded; Poeppel, David

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the decoding times at which the brain processes structural information in music and compares them to timescales implicated in recent work on speech. Combining an experimental paradigm based on Ghitza and Greenberg (Phonetica, 66(1-2), 113-126, 2009) for speech with the approach of Farbood et al. (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 39(4), 911-918, 2013) for musical key-finding, listeners were asked to judge the key of short melodic sequences that were presented at a highly a compressed rate with varying durations of silence inserted in a periodic manner in the audio signal. The distorted audio signals comprised signal-silence alternations showing error rate curves that identify peak performance centered around an event rate of 5-7 Hz (143-200 ms interonset interval; 300-420 beats/min), where event rate is defined as the average rate of pitch change. The data support the hypothesis that the perceptual analysis of music entails the processes of parsing the signal into chunks of the appropriate temporal granularity and decoding the signal for recognition. The music-speech comparison points to similarities in how auditory processing builds on the specific temporal structure of the input, and how that structure interacts with the internal temporal dynamics of the neural mechanisms underpinning perception. PMID:25487869

  20. Decoding Time for the Identification of Musical Key

    PubMed Central

    Farbood, Morwaread M.; Rowland, Jess; Marcus, Gary; Ghitza, Oded; Poeppel, David

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the decoding time at which the brain processes structural information in music and compares them to timescales implicated in recent work on speech. Combining an experimental paradigm based on Ghitza and Greenberg (2009) for speech with the approach of Farbood et al. (2013) for musical key-finding, listeners were asked to judge the key of short melodic sequences that were presented at a highly a compressed rate with varying durations of silence inserted in a periodic manner in the audio signal. The distorted audio signals comprised of signal-silence alternations show error rate curves that identify peak performance centered around an event rate of 5–7 Hz (143–200 ms interonset interval; 300–420 beats per minute), where event rate is defined as the average rate of pitch change. The data support the hypothesis that the perceptual analysis of music entails the processes of parsing the signal into chunks of the appropriate temporal granularity and decoding the signal for recognition. The music-speech comparison points to similarities in how auditory processing builds on the specific temporal structure of the input, and how that structure interacts with the internal temporal dynamics of the neural mechanisms underpinning perception. PMID:25487869

  1. Identification of key target genes and pathways in laryngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Du, Jintao; Liu, Jun; Wen, Bei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to screen the key genes associated with laryngeal carcinoma and to investigate the molecular mechanism of laryngeal carcinoma progression. The gene expression profile of GSE10935 [Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) accession number], including 12 specimens from laryngeal papillomas and 12 specimens from normal laryngeal epithelia controls, was downloaded from the GEO database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened in laryngeal papillomas compared with normal controls using Limma package in R language, followed by Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis and pathway enrichment analysis. Furthermore, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of DEGs was constructed using Cytoscape software and modules were analyzed using MCODE plugin from the PPI network. Furthermore, significant biological pathway regions (sub-pathway) were identified by using iSubpathwayMiner analysis. A total of 67 DEGs were identified, including 27 up-regulated genes and 40 down-regulated genes and they were involved in different GO terms and pathways. PPI network analysis revealed that Ras association (RalGDS/AF-6) domain family member 1 (RASSF1) was a hub protein. The sub-pathway analysis identified 9 significantly enriched sub-pathways, including glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and nitrogen metabolism. Genes such as phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1), carbonic anhydrase II (CA2), and carbonic anhydrase XII (CA12) whose node degrees were >10 were identified in the disease risk sub-pathway. Genes in the sub-pathway, such as RASSF1, PGK1, CA2 and CA12 were presumed to serve critical roles in laryngeal carcinoma. The present study identified DEGs and their sub-pathways in the disease, which may serve as potential targets for treatment of laryngeal carcinoma. PMID:27446427

  2. Classification and the Dichotomous Key: Tools for Teaching Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Sandy; Miller, Ted

    2009-01-01

    Classification is a vital science-process skill for all students to master. Understanding dichotomous keys as a means of classification enables students to better comprehend large amounts of information and understand how to organize, compare and contrast, and analyze that information. To biology students, mastering the dichotomous key provides an…

  3. Statistical mechanics approach to lock-key supramolecular chemistry interactions.

    PubMed

    Odriozola, Gerardo; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo

    2013-03-01

    In the supramolecular chemistry field, intuitive concepts such as molecular complementarity and molecular recognition are used to explain the mechanism of lock-key associations. However, these concepts lack a precise definition, and consequently this mechanism is not well defined and understood. Here we address the physical basis of this mechanism, based on formal statistical mechanics, through Monte Carlo simulation and compare our results with recent experimental data for charged or uncharged lock-key colloids. We find that, given the size range of the molecules involved in these associations, the entropy contribution, driven by the solvent, rules the interaction, over that of the enthalpy. A universal behavior for the uncharged lock-key association is found. Based on our results, we propose a supramolecular chemistry definition. PMID:23521272

  4. Identification of the Key Fields and Their Key Technical Points of Oncology by Patent Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Chen, Juan; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Background This paper aims to identify the key fields and their key technical points of oncology by patent analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings Patents of oncology applied from 2006 to 2012 were searched in the Thomson Innovation database. The key fields and their key technical points were determined by analyzing the Derwent Classification (DC) and the International Patent Classification (IPC), respectively. Patent applications in the top ten DC occupied 80% of all the patent applications of oncology, which were the ten fields of oncology to be analyzed. The number of patent applications in these ten fields of oncology was standardized based on patent applications of oncology from 2006 to 2012. For each field, standardization was conducted separately for each of the seven years (2006–2012) and the mean of the seven standardized values was calculated to reflect the relative amount of patent applications in that field; meanwhile, regression analysis using time (year) and the standardized values of patent applications in seven years (2006–2012) was conducted so as to evaluate the trend of patent applications in each field. Two-dimensional quadrant analysis, together with the professional knowledge of oncology, was taken into consideration in determining the key fields of oncology. The fields located in the quadrant with high relative amount or increasing trend of patent applications are identified as key ones. By using the same method, the key technical points in each key field were identified. Altogether 116,820 patents of oncology applied from 2006 to 2012 were retrieved, and four key fields with twenty-nine key technical points were identified, including “natural products and polymers” with nine key technical points, “fermentation industry” with twelve ones, “electrical medical equipment” with four ones, and “diagnosis, surgery” with four ones. Conclusions/Significance The results of this study could provide guidance on the development

  5. Using Web-Based Key Character and Classification Instruction for Teaching Undergraduate Students Insect Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golick, Douglas A.; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M.; Steckelberg, Allen L.; Brooks, David. W.; Higley, Leon G.; Fowler, David

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether undergraduate students receiving web-based instruction based on traditional, key character, or classification instruction differed in their performance of insect identification tasks. All groups showed a significant improvement in insect identifications on pre- and post-two-dimensional picture specimen quizzes. The study also determined student performance on insect identification tasks was not as good as for family-level identification as compared to broader insect orders and arthropod classification identification tasks. Finally, students erred significantly more by misidentification than misspelling specimen names on prepared specimen quizzes. Results of this study support that short web-based insect identification exercises can improve insect identification performance. Also included is a discussion of how these results can be used in teaching and future research on biological identification.

  6. A Key for the Identification of Eighteen Common Timbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    Dichotomous key for 18 woods in common domestic and architectural use in Britain is provided. It is based upon structures visible with the naked eye and a hand-lens. Descriptions of the necessary anatomy and terminology are given. Timbers include yew, pine, spruce, oak, sweet chestnut, elm, ash, teak, cherry, walnut, mahogany, box, beech,…

  7. Using Web-Based Key Character and Classification Instruction for Teaching Undergraduate Students Insect Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golick, Douglas A.; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M.; Steckelberg, Allen L.; Brooks, David. W.; Higley, Leon G.; Fowler, David

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether undergraduate students receiving web-based instruction based on traditional, key character, or classification instruction differed in their performance of insect identification tasks. All groups showed a significant improvement in insect identifications on pre- and post-two-dimensional picture…

  8. Functional module identification in protein interaction networks by interaction patterns

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yijie; Qian, Xiaoning

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying functional modules in protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks may shed light on cellular functional organization and thereafter underlying cellular mechanisms. Many existing module identification algorithms aim to detect densely connected groups of proteins as potential modules. However, based on this simple topological criterion of ‘higher than expected connectivity’, those algorithms may miss biologically meaningful modules of functional significance, in which proteins have similar interaction patterns to other proteins in networks but may not be densely connected to each other. A few blockmodel module identification algorithms have been proposed to address the problem but the lack of global optimum guarantee and the prohibitive computational complexity have been the bottleneck of their applications in real-world large-scale PPI networks. Results: In this article, we propose a novel optimization formulation LCP2 (low two-hop conductance sets) using the concept of Markov random walk on graphs, which enables simultaneous identification of both dense and sparse modules based on protein interaction patterns in given networks through searching for LCP2 by random walk. A spectral approximate algorithm SLCP2 is derived to identify non-overlapping functional modules. Based on a bottom-up greedy strategy, we further extend LCP2 to a new algorithm (greedy algorithm for LCP2) GLCP2 to identify overlapping functional modules. We compare SLCP2 and GLCP2 with a range of state-of-the-art algorithms on synthetic networks and real-world PPI networks. The performance evaluation based on several criteria with respect to protein complex prediction, high level Gene Ontology term prediction and especially sparse module detection, has demonstrated that our algorithms based on searching for LCP2 outperform all other compared algorithms. Availability and implementation: All data and code are available at http://www.cse.usf.edu/∼xqian/fmi/slcp2hop

  9. A Dichotomous Key for the Identification of Common British Wild Flower Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Piers

    2004-01-01

    This article argues the need for, and provides, a dichotomous single access key for the identification of common British wild flower families. A minimum of technical vocabulary is used while at the same time retaining most of the recent botanical names of families. The key provides a user-friendly opportunity for school pupils to become familiar…

  10. Dichotomous Identification Keys: A Ladder to Higher Order Knowledge about the Human Body

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorgo, Andrej

    2006-01-01

    We tried to enrich teaching human anatomy in high school biology lessons. Students construct dichotomous identification keys to the cells, tissues, organs, or body parts. By doing this, students have achieved higher-order cognitive levels of knowledge because construction of such keys is based on analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Students found…

  11. Identification of the Key Enzyme of Roseoflavin Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Julia; Konjik, Valentino; Jankowitsch, Frank; Sandhoff, Roger; Mack, Matthias

    2016-05-10

    The bacteria Streptomyces davawensis and Streptomyces cinnabarinus produce roseoflavin, the only known natural riboflavin (vitamin B2 ) analogue with antibiotic activity. Roseoflavin can be considered a natural antimetabolite and has been postulated to be biosynthesized from riboflavin via the key intermediate 8-demethyl-8-aminoriboflavin (AF). The required site-specific substitution of one of the methyl groups on the dimethylbenzene ring of riboflavin by an amino group (to give AF) is challenging. The pathway from riboflavin to AF has remained elusive, and the corresponding enzyme/s was/were unknown. Herein, we show by systematic gene deletion, heterologous gene expression, and biochemical studies that the enzyme specified by the gene BN159_7989 from S. davawensis is able to carry out a whole set of chemical reactions starting from riboflavin-5'-phosphate to give the final product 8-demethyl-8-aminoriboflavin-5'-phosphate (AFP). PMID:27062037

  12. Identification of key genes in glioblastoma-associated stromal cells using bioinformatics analysis

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, CHENGYONG; SUN, CHONG; TANG, DONG; YANG, GUANGCHENG; ZHOU, XUANJUN; WANG, DONGHAI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify key genes and pathways in glioblastoma-associated stromal cells (GASCs) using bioinformatics. The expression profile of microarray GSE24100 was obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, which included the expression profile of 4 GASC samples and 3 control stromal cell samples. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using limma software in R language, and Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis of DEGs were performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery software. In addition, a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed. Subsequently, a sub-network was constructed to obtain additional information on genes identified in the PPI network using CFinder software. In total, 502 DEGs were identified in GASCs, including 331 upregulated genes and 171 downregulated genes. Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), cyclin A2, mitotic checkpoint serine/threonine kinase (BUB1), cell division cycle 20 (CDC20), polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), and transcription factor breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) were identified from the PPI network, and sub-networks revealed these genes as hub genes that were involved in significant pathways, including mitotic, cell cycle and p53 signaling pathways. In conclusion, CDK1, BUB1, CDC20, PLK1 and BRCA1 may be key genes that are involved in significant pathways associated with glioblastoma. This information may lead to the identification of the mechanism of glioblastoma tumorigenesis. PMID:27313730

  13. Macroscopic hotspots identification: A Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction approach.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ni; Huang, Helai; Lee, Jaeyoung; Gao, Mingyun; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    This study proposes a Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction approach for hotspot identification by applying the full Bayesian (FB) technique in the context of macroscopic safety analysis. Compared with the emerging Bayesian spatial and temporal approach, the Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction model contributes to a detailed understanding of differential trends through analyzing and mapping probabilities of area-specific crash trends as differing from the mean trend and highlights specific locations where crash occurrence is deteriorating or improving over time. With traffic analysis zones (TAZs) crash data collected in Florida, an empirical analysis was conducted to evaluate the following three approaches for hotspot identification: FB ranking using a Poisson-lognormal (PLN) model, FB ranking using a Bayesian spatial and temporal (B-ST) model and FB ranking using a Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction (B-ST-I) model. The results show that (a) the models accounting for space-time effects perform better in safety ranking than does the PLN model, and (b) the FB approach using the B-ST-I model significantly outperforms the B-ST approach in correctly identifying hotspots by explicitly accounting for the space-time variation in addition to the stable spatial/temporal patterns of crash occurrence. In practice, the B-ST-I approach plays key roles in addressing two issues: (a) how the identified hotspots have evolved over time and (b) the identification of areas that, whilst not yet hotspots, show a tendency to become hotspots. Finally, it can provide guidance to policy decision makers to efficiently improve zonal-level safety. PMID:27110645

  14. Multi-shot person re-identification approach based key frame selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadj Hassen, Yousra; Ayedi, Walid; Ouni, Tarek; Jallouli, Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to solve the problem of person re-identification in non-overlapping camera views. We propose an appearance based method for person re-identification that condenses a set of frames of the same individual into the multi-class classifier SVM (Support Vector Machine). Still, the choice of different and most expressive frames for each target is very challenging. Besides, efficient person re-identification algorithms are computationally expensive due to the big amount of data used. One of the originalities of our method is how to select different shots during person tracking within each camera to guaranty efficient person re-identification. We evaluate our approach on the publicly available PRID 2011 multi-shot re-identification dataset and demonstrate some performance in comparison with the elimination of the proposed key frames selection.

  15. Bioactive nanofibers enable the identification of thrombospondin 2 as a key player in enamel regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhan; Newcomb, Christina J.; Lei, Yaping; Zhou, Yan; Bornstein, Paul; Amendt, Brad A.; Stupp, Samuel I.; Snead, Malcolm L.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue regeneration and development involves highly synchronized signals both between cells and with the extracellular environment. Biomaterials can be tuned to mimic specific biological signals and control cell response(s). As a result, these materials can be used as tools to elucidate cell signaling pathways and candidate molecules involved with cellular processes. In this work, we explore enamel-forming cells, ameloblasts, which have a limited regenerative capacity. By exposing undifferentiated cells to a self-assembling matrix bearing RGDS epitopes, we elicited a regenerative signal at will that subsequently led to the identification of thrombospondin 2 (TSP2), an extracellular matrix protein that has not been previously recognized as a key player in enamel development and regeneration. Targeted disruption of the thrombospondin 2 gene (Thbs2) resulted in enamel formation with a disordered architecture that was highly susceptible to wear compared to their wild-type counterparts. To test the regenerative capacity, we injected the bioactive matrix into the enamel organ and discovered that the enamel organic epithelial cells in TSP-null mice failed to polarize on the surface of the artificial matrix, greatly reducing integrin β1 and Notch1 expression levels, which represent signaling pathways known to be associated with TSP2. These results suggest TSP2 plays an important role in regulating cell-matrix interactions during enamel formation. Exploiting the signaling pathways activated by biomaterials can provide insight into native signaling mechanisms crucial for tooth development and cell-based strategies for enamel regeneration. PMID:26004236

  16. A Molecular Key for the Identification of Blow Flies in Southeastern Nebraska

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The identification of blow flies (Calliphoridae) (typically the first colonizers of cadavers) is difficult, especially in the earlier instars because of their small size, similarity and simplicity in external morphology. We consider how taxonomic keys based on molecular genetic data facilitate accur...

  17. Bacteria and Archaea in acidic environments and a key to morphological identification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, E.I.

    2000-01-01

    Natural and anthropogenic acidic environments are dominated by bacteria and Archaea. As many as 86 genera or species have been identified or isolated from pH <4.5 environments. This paper reviews the worldwide literature and provide tables of morphological characteristics, habitat information and a key for light microscope identification for the non-microbiologist.

  18. Image use in field guides and identification keys: review and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Leggett, Roxanne; Kirchoff, Bruce K.

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims Although illustrations have played an important role in identification keys and guides since the 18th century, their use has varied widely. Some keys lack all illustrations, while others are heavily illustrated. Even within illustrated guides, the way in which images are used varies considerably. Here, we review image use in paper and electronic guides, and establish a set of best practices for image use in illustrated keys and guides. Scope Our review covers image use in both paper and electronic guides, though we only briefly cover apps for mobile devices. With this one exception, we cover the full range of guides, from those that consist only of species descriptions with no keys, to lavishly illustrated technical keys. Emphasis is placed on how images are used, not on the operation of the guides and key, which has been reviewed by others. We only deal with operation when it impacts image use. Main points Few illustrated keys or guides use images in optimal ways. Most include too few images to show taxonomic variation or variation in characters and character states. The use of multiple images allows easier taxon identification and facilitates the understanding of characters. Most images are usually not standardized, making comparison between images difficult. Although some electronic guides allow images to be enlarged, many do not. Conclusions The best keys and guides use standardized images, displayed at sizes that are easy to see and arranged in a standardized manner so that similar images can be compared across species. Illustrated keys and glossaries should contain multiple images for each character state so that the user can judge variation in the state. Photographic backgrounds should not distract from the subject and, where possible, should be of a standard colour. When used, drawings should be prepared by professional botanical illustrators, and clearly labelled. Electronic keys and guides should allow images to be enlarged so that

  19. Identification of Inhibitors of Biological Interactions Involving Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Marasco, Daniela; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina Liana

    2015-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions involving disordered partners have unique features and represent prominent targets in drug discovery processes. Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) are involved in cellular regulation, signaling and control: they bind to multiple partners and these high-specificity/low-affinity interactions play crucial roles in many human diseases. Disordered regions, terminal tails and flexible linkers are particularly abundant in DNA-binding proteins and play crucial roles in the affinity and specificity of DNA recognizing processes. Protein complexes involving IDPs are short-lived and typically involve short amino acid stretches bearing few “hot spots”, thus the identification of molecules able to modulate them can produce important lead compounds: in this scenario peptides and/or peptidomimetics, deriving from structure-based, combinatorial or protein dissection approaches, can play a key role as hit compounds. Here, we propose a panoramic review of the structural features of IDPs and how they regulate molecular recognition mechanisms focusing attention on recently reported drug-design strategies in the field of IDPs. PMID:25849651

  20. Bryophytes for Beginners: The Usability of a Printed Dichotomous Key versus a Multi-Access Computer-Based Key for Bryophyte Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stagg, Bethan C.; Donkin, Maria E.; Smith, Alison M.

    2015-01-01

    Bryophytes are a rewarding study group in field biology and the UK bryophyte flora has international importance to biodiversity conservation. We designed an identification key to common woodland moss species and compared the usability of two formats, web-based multi-access and printed dichotomous key, with undergraduate students. The rate of…

  1. Identification of key residues involved in Si transport by the aquaglyceroporins.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Gabriel A; Garneau, Alexandre P; Marcoux, Andrée-Anne; Noël, Micheline; Frenette-Cotton, Rachelle; Isenring, Paul

    2016-09-01

    We recently demonstrated that the aquaglyceroporins (AQGPs) could act as potent transporters for orthosilicic acid (H4SiO4). Although interesting, this finding raised the question of whether water and H4SiO4, the transportable form of Si, permeate AQGPs by interacting with the same region of the pore, especially in view of the difference in molecular radius between the two substrates. Here, our goal was to identify residues that endow the AQGPs with the ability to facilitate Si diffusion by examining the transport characteristics of mutants in which residues were interchanged between a water-permeable but Si-impermeable channel (aquaporin 1 [AQP1]) and a Si-permeable but water-impermeable channel (AQP10). Our results indicate that the composition of the arginine filter (XX/R), known to include three residues that play an important role in water transport, may also be involved in Si selectivity. Interchanging the identities of the nonarginine residues within this filter causes Si transport to increase by approximately sevenfold in AQP1 and to decrease by approximately threefold in AQP10, whereas water transport and channel expression remain unaffected. Our results further indicate that two additional residues in the AQP arginine filter may be involved in substrate selectivity: replacing one of the residues has a profound effect on water permeability, and replacing the other has a profound effect on Si permeability. This study has thus led to the identification of residues that could play a key role in Si transport by the AQGPs and shown that substrate selectivity is likely ensured by more than one checkpoint within or near the pore. PMID:27527099

  2. Interactive Pictures: Low-Key Multimedia (New Media Literacy).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, William

    1994-01-01

    Describes "builds" and "filters," two simple forms to interactive media that the viewer can control to reveal new layers of information and that often save resources by replacing many separate graphics. (SR)

  3. Communication via Interactive Media: Communication in a New Key?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carveth, Rod

    1996-01-01

    Explores the use of the World Wide Web as an advertising medium--many companies are having difficulties seeing exactly how the Web will fit into their media strategies. Argues that media decision makers need to realize that interactive media are different from traditional media in terms of form and content. (PA)

  4. Understanding Dengue Virus Capsid Protein Interaction with Key Biological Targets

    PubMed Central

    Faustino, André F.; Martins, Ivo C.; Carvalho, Filomena A.; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Santos, Nuno C.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes over 500,000 hospitalizations and 20,000 deaths worldwide every year. Dengue epidemics now reach temperate regions due to globalization of trade and travel and climate changes. Currently, there are no successful therapeutic or preventive approaches. We previously developed a peptide drug lead, pep14-23, that inhibits the biologically relevant interaction of DENV capsid (C) protein with lipid droplets (LDs). Surprisingly, pep14-23 also inhibits DENV C interaction with very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). We thus investigated the similarity between the proposed DENV C molecular targets in LDs and VLDL, respectively, the proteins perilipin 3 (PLIN3) and apolipoprotein E (APOE). APOE N-terminal and PLIN3 C-terminal regions are remarkably similar, namely APOE α-helix 4 (APOEα4) and PLIN3 α-helix 5 (PLIN3α5) sequences, which are also highly superimposable structurally. Interestingly, APOE α-helical N-terminal sequence and structure superimposes with DENV C α-helices α1 and α2. Moreover, the DENV C hydrophobic cleft can accommodate the structurally analogous APOEα4 and PLIN3α5 helical regions. Mirroring DENV C-LDs interaction (previously shown experimentally to require PLIN3), we experimentally demonstrated that DENV C-VLDL interaction requires APOE. Thus, the results fit well with previous data and suggest future drug development strategies targeting the above mentioned α-helical structures. PMID:26161501

  5. Conceptual response distance and intervening keys distinguish action goals in the Stroop color-identification task.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Proctor, Robert W

    2014-10-01

    In previous studies, a physical response-distance effect was found in the two-choice Stroop color-identification task, with the Stroop effect being larger when the two response keys were physically close together than when they were far apart. In the present study, we found a conceptual response-distance effect, with the Stroop effect being larger when the response keys were conceptually close (labeled as "5" and "6") than when they were conceptually far (labeled as "1" and "9"). Moreover, a response-distance effect due to pure physical distance was not evident; rather, the effect was found only when additional keys were placed between the two far response keys. These results are in agreement with a view that response keys are coded as action goals, with farther conceptual distance and additional keys helping distinguish the action goals. The results are difficult to reconcile with accounts that place emphasis on the physical separation of the effectors or their inanimate extensions. PMID:24578092

  6. Nymphs of the genus Amblyomma (Acari: Ixodidae) of Brazil: descriptions, redescriptions, and identification key.

    PubMed

    Martins, Thiago F; Onofrio, Valeria C; Barros-Battesti, Darci M; Labruna, Marcelo B

    2010-06-01

    Together with the larval stage, the nymphal stage of ticks of the genus Amblyomma are the most aggressive ticks for humans entering areas inhabited by wildlife and some domestic animals in Brazil. However, due to the absence of morphological descriptions of the nymphal stage of most Brazilian Amblyomma species, plus the lack of an identification key, little or nothing is known about the life history of Amblyomma spp. nymphs in the country. In the present study, morphological description of the nymphal stage, illustrating important external characters through scanning electron microscopy, is provided for nymphs of 15 Amblyomma species that occur in Brazil, for which the nymphal stage had never been described: A. aureolatum, A. auricularium, A. calcaratum, A. coelebs, A. fuscum, A. humerale, A. incisum, A. latepunctatum, A. naponense, A. nodosum, A. ovale, A. pacae, A. pseudoconcolor, A. scalpturatum, A. varium. In addition, the nymphal stage of 12 Amblyomma species, which had been previously described, are redescribed: A. brasiliense, A. cajennense, A. dissimile, A. dubitatum, A. longirostre, A. oblongoguttatum, A. parkeri, A. parvum, A. romitii, A. rotundatum, A. tigrinum, A. triste. The descriptions and redescriptions totalized 27 species. Only 2 species (A. geayi, A. goeldii) out of the 29 Amblyomma species established in Brazil are not included in the present study. A dichotomous identification key is included to support taxonomic identification of the nymphal stage of 27 Amblyomma species established in Brazil. PMID:21771514

  7. Interaction of key pathways in sorafenib-treated hepatocellular carcinoma based on a PCR-array

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Wang, Ping; Li, Shijie; Yin, Linan; Shen, Haiyang; Liu, Ruibao

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the key pathways and to explore the mechanism of sorafenib in inhibiting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The gene expression profile of GSE33621, including 6 sorafenib treated group and 6 control samples, was downloaded from the GEO (Gene Expression Omnibus) database. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in HCC samples were screened using the ΔΔCt method with the homogenized internal GAPDH. Also, the functions and pathways of DEGs were analyzed using the DAVID. Moreover, the significant pathways of DEGs that involved in HCC were analyzed based on the Latent pathway identification analysis (LPIA). A total of 44 down-regulated DEGs were selected in HCC samples. Also, there were 84 biological pathways that these 44 DEGs involved in. Also, LPIA showed that Osteoclast differentiation and hsa04664-Fc epsilon RI signaling pathway was the most significant interaction pathways. Moreover, Apoptosis, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, Chagas disease, and T cell receptor signaling pathway were the significant pathways that interacted with hsa04664. In addition, DEGs such as AKT1 (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1), TNF (tumor necrosis factor), SYK (spleen tyrosine kinase), and PIK3R1 (phosphoinositide-3-kinase, regulatory subunit 1 (alpha)) were the common genes that involved in the significant pathways. Several pathway interaction pairs that caused by several downregulated genes such as SYK, PI3K, AKT1, and TNF, were identified play curial role in sorafenib treated HCC. Sorafenib played important inhibition roles in HCC by affecting a complicate pathway interaction network. PMID:26045814

  8. THE IDENTIFICATION AND TESTING OF INTERACTION PATTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a method for identifying and assessing the significance of interaction patterns among various chemicals and chemical classes of importance to regulatory toxicologists. To this end, efforts were made to assemble and evaluate experimental data on toxicologically...

  9. Key interactions of surfactants in therapeutic protein formulations: A review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tarik A; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Kishore, Ravuri S K

    2015-11-01

    Proteins as amphiphilic, surface-active macromolecules, demonstrate substantial interfacial activity, which causes considerable impact on their multifarious applications. A commonly adapted measure to prevent interfacial damage to proteins is the use of nonionic surfactants. Particularly in biotherapeutic formulations, the use of nonionic surfactants is ubiquitous in order to prevent the impact of interfacial stress on drug product stability. The scope of this review is to convey the current understanding of interactions of nonionic surfactants with proteins both at the interface and in solution, with specific focus to their effects on biotherapeutic formulations. PMID:26435336

  10. Identification of species D, a new member of the Anopheles quadrimaculatus species complex: a biochemical key.

    PubMed

    Narang, S K; Kaiser, P E; Seawright, J A

    1989-09-01

    Sibling species D, a new member of the Anopheles quadrimaculatus species complex was identified in collections from Pickwick Lake, Tishomingo County, Mississippi and Choctawhatchee, Bay County, in West Florida. This species occurred sympatrically with the previously described species, A, B and C. Evidence for identification of species D includes diagnostic allozymes, a lack of polytene chromosomes in the ovarian nurse cells, and inviability of F1 progeny and lack of sperm transfer in hybridization crosses. An electrophoretic taxonomic key for distinguishing species D from A, B and C is presented. PMID:2584966

  11. Emotional Identification with Teacher Identities in Student Teachers' Narrative Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Marie

    2013-01-01

    The paper suggests that narrative interaction in student teacher peer groups is an important context for emotional identification with culturally available teacher identities. It addresses issues pointed out as problematic in research on teacher identity formation: focus on the individual and the underestimation of context. A positioning analysis…

  12. Quantum Key Distribution Based on Interferometry and Interaction-Free Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Bing; Xu, Sheng-Wei; Wang, Qing-Le; Liu, Fang; Wan, Zong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    We propose a quantum key distribution based on Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometry and interaction-free measurement on single photon. The raw key comes from the photons on which MZ interferometry happened. And the interaction-free measurements are used to detect eavesdroppers. The analysis indicates that the protocol is secure, and can prevent some familiar attacks, such as photon number splitting (PNS) attack. This scheme is easy to be realized in current experiments.

  13. Data publication and dissemination of interactive keys under the open access model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concepts of publication, citation and dissemination of interactive keys and other online keys are discussed and illustrated by a sample paper published in the present issue (doi: 10.3897/zookeys.21.271). The present model is based on previous experience with several existing examples of publishi...

  14. New records of Protura (Entognatha, Arthropoda) from Romania, with an identification key to the Romanian species

    PubMed Central

    Shrubovych, Julia; Fiera, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Romanian Protura were studied based on 175 specimens collected from Romania, along with bibliographic data. The main publication on the Romanian proturans was written by M.A. Ionescu (1951), who described 13 species mainly from soil and forest litter from 15 collecting points. The current paper represents the first study at a national level. Faunal data on Protura were obtained from 22 sites, mostly from forests of the Romanian Carpathians and also from a peri-urban area of Bucharest, which had not been studied before. As a result, the Romanian Protura fauna now consists of 27 known taxa in 6 genera and 4 families. Of the 27 taxa, 15 species are new records for Romanian fauna. An identification key to the Romanian Protura species is provided. PMID:26865814

  15. New records of Protura (Entognatha, Arthropoda) from Romania, with an identification key to the Romanian species.

    PubMed

    Shrubovych, Julia; Fiera, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The Romanian Protura were studied based on 175 specimens collected from Romania, along with bibliographic data. The main publication on the Romanian proturans was written by M.A. Ionescu (1951), who described 13 species mainly from soil and forest litter from 15 collecting points. The current paper represents the first study at a national level. Faunal data on Protura were obtained from 22 sites, mostly from forests of the Romanian Carpathians and also from a peri-urban area of Bucharest, which had not been studied before. As a result, the Romanian Protura fauna now consists of 27 known taxa in 6 genera and 4 families. Of the 27 taxa, 15 species are new records for Romanian fauna. An identification key to the Romanian Protura species is provided. PMID:26865814

  16. A new species of Spelaeogammarus (Amphipoda: Bogidielloidea: Artesiidae) with an identification key for the genus.

    PubMed

    Bastos-Pereira, Rafaela; Ferreira, Rodrigo L

    2015-01-01

    There are five described species of the cave-dwelling amphipods of the genus Spelaeogammarus, all of them inhabiting caves on the Brazilian state of Bahia. A new species of this genus is here described, which is closely related to the already known species S. santanensis and S. titan. Spelaeogammarus sanctus sp. nov. differs from its congeneric species basically by the presence of more than 18 bifid setae on the dorsal margin of uropod 3 outer ramus and telson with one apical and two subapical stout setae, while the other species generally present less setae on the third uropod and more setae on telson. An identification key and an updated table of the Spelaeogammarus species diagnosis are provided, as well as a multivariate statistical approach of morphological variations among the species. PMID:26624139

  17. Identification of Protein–Excipient Interaction Hotspots Using Computational Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Barata, Teresa S.; Zhang, Cheng; Dalby, Paul A.; Brocchini, Steve; Zloh, Mire

    2016-01-01

    Protein formulation development relies on the selection of excipients that inhibit protein–protein interactions preventing aggregation. Empirical strategies involve screening many excipient and buffer combinations using force degradation studies. Such methods do not readily provide information on intermolecular interactions responsible for the protective effects of excipients. This study describes a molecular docking approach to screen and rank interactions allowing for the identification of protein–excipient hotspots to aid in the selection of excipients to be experimentally screened. Previously published work with Drosophila Su(dx) was used to develop and validate the computational methodology, which was then used to determine the formulation hotspots for Fab A33. Commonly used excipients were examined and compared to the regions in Fab A33 prone to protein–protein interactions that could lead to aggregation. This approach could provide information on a molecular level about the protective interactions of excipients in protein formulations to aid the more rational development of future formulations. PMID:27258262

  18. Raman spectroscopic identification of scytonemin and its derivatives as key biomarkers in stressed environments.

    PubMed

    Varnali, Tereza; Edwards, Howell G M

    2014-12-13

    Raman spectroscopy has been identified as an important first-pass analytical technique for deployment on planetary surfaces as part of a suite of instrumentation in projected remote space exploration missions to detect extant or extinct extraterrestrial life signatures. Aside from the demonstrable advantages of a non-destructive sampling procedure and an ability to record simultaneously the molecular signatures of biological, geobiological and geological components in admixture in the geological record, the interrogation and subsequent interpretation of spectroscopic data from these experiments will be critically dependent upon the recognition of key biomolecular markers indicative of life existing or having once existed in extreme habitats. A comparison made with the characteristic Raman spectral wavenumbers obtained from standards is not acceptable because of shifts that can occur in the presence of other biomolecules and their host mineral matrices. In this paper, we identify the major sources of difficulty experienced in the interpretation of spectroscopic data centring on a key family of biomarker molecules, namely scytonemin and its derivatives; the parent scytonemin has been characterized spectroscopically in cyanobacterial colonies inhabiting some of the most extreme terrestrial environments and, with the support of theoretical calculations, spectra have been predicted for the characterization of several of its derivatives which could occur in novel extraterrestrial environments. This work will form the foundation for the identification of novel biomarkers and for their Raman spectroscopic discrimination, an essential step in the interpretation of potentially complex and hitherto unknown biological radiation protectants based on the scytoneman and scytonin molecular skeletons which may exist in niche geological scenarios in the surface and subsurface of planets and their satellites in our Solar System. PMID:25368346

  19. Identification of Key Proteins in Human Epithelial Cells Responding to Bystander Signals From Irradiated Trout Skin

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard; Wang, Jiaxi; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel; Howe, Orla

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander signaling has been found to occur in live rainbow trout fish (Oncorhynchus mykiss). This article reports identification of key proteomic changes in a bystander reporter cell line (HaCaT) grown in low-dose irradiated tissue-conditioned media (ITCM) from rainbow trout fish. In vitro explant cultures were generated from the skin of fish previously exposed to low doses (0.1 and 0.5 Gy) of X-ray radiation in vivo. The ITCM was harvested from all donor explant cultures and placed on recipient HaCaT cells to observe any change in protein expression caused by the bystander signals. Proteomic methods using 2-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and mass spectroscopy were employed to screen for novel proteins expressed. The proteomic changes measured in HaCaT cells receiving the ITCM revealed that exposure to 0.5 Gy induced an upregulation of annexin A2 and cingulin and a downregulation of Rho-GDI2, F-actin-capping protein subunit beta, microtubule-associated protein RP/EB family member, and 14-3-3 proteins. The 0.1 Gy dose also induced a downregulation of Rho-GDI2, hMMS19, F-actin-capping protein subunit beta, and microtubule-associated protein RP/EB family member proteins. The proteins reported may influence apoptotic signaling, as the results were suggestive of an induction of cell communication, repair mechanisms, and dysregulation of growth signals. PMID:26673684

  20. Identification of key nitrous oxide production pathways in aerobic partial nitrifying granules.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Satoshi; Song, Yanjun; Rathnayake, Lashitha; Tumendelger, Azzaya; Satoh, Hisashi; Toyoda, Sakae; Yoshida, Naohiro; Okabe, Satoshi

    2014-10-01

    The identification of the key nitrous oxide (N2O) production pathways is important to establish a strategy to mitigate N2O emission. In this study, we combined real-time gas-monitoring analysis, (15)N stable isotope analysis, denitrification functional gene transcriptome analysis and microscale N2O concentration measurements to identify the main N2O producers in a partial nitrification (PN) aerobic granule reactor, which was fed with ammonium and acetate. Our results suggest that heterotrophic denitrification was the main contributor to N2O production in our PN aerobic granule reactor. The heterotrophic denitrifiers were probably related to Rhodocyclales bacteria, although different types of bacteria were active in the initial and latter stages of the PN reaction cycles, most likely in response to the presence of acetate. Hydroxylamine oxidation and nitrifier denitrification occurred, but their contribution to N2O emission was relatively small (20-30%) compared with heterotrophic denitrification. Our approach can be useful to quantitatively examine the relative contributions of the three pathways (hydroxylamine oxidation, nitrifier denitrification and heterotrophic denitrification) to N2O emission in mixed microbial populations. PMID:24650173

  1. The Identification of Key Issues in the Development of Sustainable e-Learning and Virtual Campus Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Mark; Connolly, Thomas; Cartelli, Antonio; Jimoyiannis, Athanassios; Magalhaes, Hugo; Maillet, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores a number of key issues that have been identified as being important in the identification and evaluation of best practice within the context of e-learning and virtual campuses. The "Promoting Best Practice in Virtual Campuses" (PBP-VC) project is a two year European Commission Education Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency…

  2. Identification of Protein Interactions Involved in Cellular Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Westermarck, Jukka; Ivaska, Johanna; Corthals, Garry L.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions drive biological processes. They are critical for all intra- and extracellular functions, and the technologies to analyze them are widely applied throughout the various fields of biological sciences. This study takes an in-depth view of some common principles of cellular regulation and provides a detailed account of approaches required to comprehensively map signaling protein-protein interactions in any particular cellular system or condition. We provide a critical review of the benefits and disadvantages of the yeast two-hybrid method and affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometric procedures for identification of signaling protein-protein interactions. In particular, we emphasize the quantitative and qualitative differences between tandem affinity and one-step purification (such as FLAG and Strep tag) methods. Although applicable to all types of interaction studies, a special section is devoted in this review to aspects that should be considered when attempting to identify signaling protein interactions that often are transient and weak by nature. Finally, we discuss shotgun and quantitative information that can be gleaned by MS-coupled methods for analysis of multiprotein complexes. PMID:23481661

  3. Freshness-preserving non-interactive hierarchical key agreement protocol over WHMS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsung

    2014-01-01

    The digitization of patient health information (PHI) for wireless health monitoring systems (WHMSs) has brought many benefits and challenges for both patients and physicians. However, security, privacy and robustness have remained important challenges for WHMSs. Since the patient's PHI is sensitive and the communication channel, i.e., the Internet, is insecure, it is important to protect them against unauthorized entities, i.e., attackers. Otherwise, failure to do so will not only lead to the compromise of a patient's privacy, but will also put his/her life at risk. This paper proposes a freshness-preserving non-interactive hierarchical key agreement protocol (FNKAP) for WHMSs. The FNKAP is based on the concept of the non-interactive identity-based key agreement for communication efficiency. It achieves patient anonymity between a patient and physician, session key secrecy and resistance against various security attacks, especially including replay attacks. PMID:25513824

  4. Freshness-Preserving Non-Interactive Hierarchical Key Agreement Protocol over WHMS

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunsung

    2014-01-01

    The digitization of patient health information (PHI) for wireless health monitoring systems (WHMSs) has brought many benefits and challenges for both patients and physicians. However, security, privacy and robustness have remained important challenges for WHMSs. Since the patient's PHI is sensitive and the communication channel, i.e., the Internet, is insecure, it is important to protect them against unauthorized entities, i.e., attackers. Otherwise, failure to do so will not only lead to the compromise of a patient's privacy, but will also put his/her life at risk. This paper proposes a freshness-preserving non-interactive hierarchical key agreement protocol (FNKAP) for WHMSs. The FNKAP is based on the concept of the non-interactive identity-based key agreement for communication efficiency. It achieves patient anonymity between a patient and physician, session key secrecy and resistance against various security attacks, especially including replay attacks. PMID:25513824

  5. Identification of coupling direction: Application to cardiorespiratory interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblum, Michael G.; Cimponeriu, Laura; Bezerianos, Anastasios; Patzak, Andreas; Mrowka, Ralf

    2002-04-01

    We consider the problem of experimental detection of directionality of weak coupling between two self-sustained oscillators from bivariate data. We further develop the method introduced by Rosenblum and Pikovsky [Phys. Rev. E 64, 045202 (2001)], suggesting an alternative approach. Next, we consider another framework for identification of directionality, based on the idea of mutual predictability. Our algorithms provide directionality index that shows whether the coupling between the oscillators is unidirectional or bidirectional, and quantifies the asymmetry of bidirectional coupling. We demonstrate the efficiency of three different algorithms in determination of directionality index from short and noisy data. These techniques are then applied to analysis of cardiorespiratory interaction in healthy infants. The results reveal that the direction of coupling between cardiovascular and respiratory systems varies with the age within the first 6 months of life. We find a tendency to change from nearly symmetric bidirectional interaction to nearly unidirectional one (from respiration to the cardiovascular system).

  6. A Teaching Exercise for the Identification of Bacteria Using An Interactive Computer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Trevor N.; Smith, John E.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an interactive Fortran computer program which provides an exercise in the identification of bacteria. Provides a way of enhancing a student's approach to systematic bacteriology and numerical identification procedures. (Author/MA)

  7. The mosquitoes (Diptera: Culidae) of Seychelles: taxonomy, ecology, vectorial importance, and identification keys

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    and Ur. pandani) and one subspecies (Ae. vigilax vansomerenae) are considered as endemic. Two illustrated identification keys, one for adult females and the other for larval stages, are presented. Conclusions The knowledge of the culicidian fauna in the Seychelles has been notably updated. The number of mosquito species is relatively large with regards to land surface and distances to continental Africa, although the anophelines are totally lacking. The complex natural history of mosquitoes in the Seychelles provides examples of both vicariance- and dispersal-mediated divergences. They present superb examples for theoretical and applied island biology. PMID:22999320

  8. Identification of key peptidoglycan hydrolases for morphogenesis, autolysis, and peptidoglycan composition of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lactobacillus plantarum is commonly used in industrial fermentation processes. Selected strains are also marketed as probiotics for their health beneficial effects. Although the functional role of peptidoglycan-degrading enzymes is increasingly documented to be important for a range of bacterial processes and host-microbe interactions, little is known about their functional roles in lactobacilli. This knowledge holds important potential for developing more robust strains resistant to autolysis under stress conditions as well as peptidoglycan engineering for a better understanding of the contribution of released muramyl-peptides as probiotic immunomodulators. Results Here, we explored the functional role of the predicted peptidoglycan hydrolase (PGH) complement encoded in the genome of L. plantarum by systematic gene deletion. From twelve predicted PGH-encoding genes, nine could be individually inactivated and their corresponding mutant strains were characterized regarding their cell morphology, growth, and autolysis under various conditions. From this analysis, we identified two PGHs, the predicted N-acetylglucosaminidase Acm2 and NplC/P60 D,L-endopeptidase LytA, as key determinants in the morphology of L. plantarum. Acm2 was demonstrated to be required for the ultimate step of cell separation of daughter cells, whereas LytA appeared to be required for cell shape maintenance and cell-wall integrity. We also showed by autolysis experiments that both PGHs are involved in the global autolytic process with a dominant role for Acm2 in all tested conditions, identifying Acm2 as the major autolysin of L. plantarum WCFS1. In addition, Acm2 and the putative N-acetylmuramidase Lys2 were shown to play redundant roles in both cell separation and autolysis under stress conditions. Finally, the analysis of the peptidoglycan composition of Acm2- and LytA-deficient derivatives revealed their potential hydrolytic activities by the disappearance of specific cleavage

  9. A Linnaeus NG (TM) interactive key to the Lithocolletinae of North-West Europe aimed at accelerating the accumulation of reliable biodiversity data (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae).

    PubMed

    Doorenweerd, Camiel; van Haren, Merel M; Schermer, Maarten; Pieterse, Sander; van Nieukerken, Erik J

    2014-01-01

    We present an interactive key that is available online through any web browser without the need to install any additional software, making it an easily accessible tool for the larger public. The key can be found at http://identify.naturalis.nl/lithocolletinae. The key includes all 86 North-West European Lithocolletinae, a subfamily of smaller moths ("micro-moths") that is commonly not treated in field guides. The user can input data on several external morphological character systems in addition to distribution, host plant and even characteristics of the larval feeding traces to reach an identification. We expect that this will enable more people to contribute with reliable observation data on this group of moths and alleviate the workload of taxonomic specialists, allowing them to focus on other new keys or taxonomic work. PMID:25061390

  10. A Linnaeus NG TM interactive key to the Lithocolletinae of North-West Europe aimed at accelerating the accumulation of reliable biodiversity data (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae)

    PubMed Central

    Doorenweerd, Camiel; van Haren, Merel M.; Schermer, Maarten; Pieterse, Sander; van Nieukerken, Erik J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We present an interactive key that is available online through any web browser without the need to install any additional software, making it an easily accessible tool for the larger public. The key can be found at http://identify.naturalis.nl/lithocolletinae. The key includes all 86 North-West European Lithocolletinae, a subfamily of smaller moths (“micro-moths”) that is commonly not treated in field guides. The user can input data on several external morphological character systems in addition to distribution, host plant and even characteristics of the larval feeding traces to reach an identification. We expect that this will enable more people to contribute with reliable observation data on this group of moths and alleviate the workload of taxonomic specialists, allowing them to focus on other new keys or taxonomic work. PMID:25061390

  11. Identification of key neoculin residues responsible for the binding and activation of the sweet taste receptor

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Taichi; Terada, Tohru; Nakajima, Ken-ichiro; Kojima, Masaki; Koshiba, Seizo; Matsumura, Yoshitaka; Kaneda, Kohei; Asakura, Tomiko; Shimizu-Ibuka, Akiko; Abe, Keiko; Misaka, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Neoculin (NCL) is a heterodimeric protein isolated from the edible fruit of Curculigo latifolia. It exerts a taste-modifying activity by converting sourness to sweetness. We previously demonstrated that NCL changes its action on the human sweet receptor hT1R2-hT1R3 from antagonism to agonism as the pH changes from neutral to acidic values, and that the histidine residues of NCL molecule play critical roles in this pH-dependent functional change. Here, we comprehensively screened key amino acid residues of NCL using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and alanine scanning mutagenesis. We found that the mutations of Arg48, Tyr65, Val72 and Phe94 of NCL basic subunit increased or decreased both the antagonist and agonist activities. The mutations had only a slight effect on the pH-dependent functional change. These residues should determine the affinity of NCL for the receptor regardless of pH. Their locations were separated from the histidine residues responsible for the pH-dependent functional change in the tertiary structure. From these results, we concluded that NCL interacts with hT1R2-hT1R3 through a pH-independent affinity interface including the four residues and a pH-dependent activation interface including the histidine residues. Thus, the receptor activation is induced by local structural changes in the pH-dependent interface. PMID:26263392

  12. Computational Identification of Key Regulators in Two Different Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wlochowitz, Darius; Haubrock, Martin; Arackal, Jetcy; Bleckmann, Annalen; Wolff, Alexander; Beißbarth, Tim; Wingender, Edgar; Gültas, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are gene regulatory proteins that are essential for an effective regulation of the transcriptional machinery. Today, it is known that their expression plays an important role in several types of cancer. Computational identification of key players in specific cancer cell lines is still an open challenge in cancer research. In this study, we present a systematic approach which combines colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines, namely 1638N-T1 and CMT-93, and well-established computational methods in order to compare these cell lines on the level of transcriptional regulation as well as on a pathway level, i.e., the cancer cell-intrinsic pathway repertoire. For this purpose, we firstly applied the Trinity platform to detect signature genes, and then applied analyses of the geneXplain platform to these for detection of upstream transcriptional regulators and their regulatory networks. We created a CRC-specific position weight matrix (PWM) library based on the TRANSFAC database (release 2014.1) to minimize the rate of false predictions in the promoter analyses. Using our proposed workflow, we specifically focused on revealing the similarities and differences in transcriptional regulation between the two CRC cell lines, and report a number of well-known, cancer-associated TFs with significantly enriched binding sites in the promoter regions of the signature genes. We show that, although the signature genes of both cell lines show no overlap, they may still be regulated by common TFs in CRC. Based on our findings, we suggest that canonical Wnt signaling is activated in 1638N-T1, but inhibited in CMT-93 through cross-talks of Wnt signaling with the VDR signaling pathway and/or LXR-related pathways. Furthermore, our findings provide indication of several master regulators being present such as MLK3 and Mapk1 (ERK2) which might be important in cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of 1638N-T1 and CMT-93, respectively. Taken together, we provide

  13. Computational Identification of Key Regulators in Two Different Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Wlochowitz, Darius; Haubrock, Martin; Arackal, Jetcy; Bleckmann, Annalen; Wolff, Alexander; Beißbarth, Tim; Wingender, Edgar; Gültas, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are gene regulatory proteins that are essential for an effective regulation of the transcriptional machinery. Today, it is known that their expression plays an important role in several types of cancer. Computational identification of key players in specific cancer cell lines is still an open challenge in cancer research. In this study, we present a systematic approach which combines colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines, namely 1638N-T1 and CMT-93, and well-established computational methods in order to compare these cell lines on the level of transcriptional regulation as well as on a pathway level, i.e., the cancer cell-intrinsic pathway repertoire. For this purpose, we firstly applied the Trinity platform to detect signature genes, and then applied analyses of the geneXplain platform to these for detection of upstream transcriptional regulators and their regulatory networks. We created a CRC-specific position weight matrix (PWM) library based on the TRANSFAC database (release 2014.1) to minimize the rate of false predictions in the promoter analyses. Using our proposed workflow, we specifically focused on revealing the similarities and differences in transcriptional regulation between the two CRC cell lines, and report a number of well-known, cancer-associated TFs with significantly enriched binding sites in the promoter regions of the signature genes. We show that, although the signature genes of both cell lines show no overlap, they may still be regulated by common TFs in CRC. Based on our findings, we suggest that canonical Wnt signaling is activated in 1638N-T1, but inhibited in CMT-93 through cross-talks of Wnt signaling with the VDR signaling pathway and/or LXR-related pathways. Furthermore, our findings provide indication of several master regulators being present such as MLK3 and Mapk1 (ERK2) which might be important in cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of 1638N-T1 and CMT-93, respectively. Taken together, we provide

  14. Identification of novel CBP interacting proteins in embryonic orofacial tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Xiaolong; Warner, Dennis R.; Roberts, Emily A.; Pisano, M. Michele; Greene, Robert M. . E-mail: greene@louisville.edu

    2005-04-15

    cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) plays an important role as a general co-integrator of multiple signaling pathways and interacts with a large number of transcription factors and co-factors, through its numerous protein-binding domains. To identify nuclear factors associated with CBP in developing orofacial tissue, a yeast two-hybrid screen of a cDNA library derived from orofacial tissue from gestational day 11 to 13 mouse embryos was conducted. Using the carboxy terminus (amino acid residues 1676-2441) of CBP as bait, several novel proteins that bind CBP were identified, including an Msx-interacting-zinc finger protein, CDC42 interaction protein 4/thyroid hormone receptor interactor 10, SH3-domain GRB2-like 1, CCR4-NOT transcription complex subunit 3, adaptor protein complex AP-1 {beta}1 subunit, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B subunit 1 ({alpha}), and cyclin G-associated kinase. Results of the yeast two-hybrid screen were confirmed by glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays. The identification of these proteins as novel CBP-binding partners allows exploration of new mechanisms by which CBP regulates and integrates diverse cell signaling pathways.

  15. Why and how might genetic and phylogenetic diversity be reflected in the identification of key biodiversity areas?

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, T. M.; Cuttelod, A.; Faith, D. P.; Garcia-Moreno, J.; Langhammer, P.; Pérez-Espona, S.

    2015-01-01

    Key biodiversity areas' are defined as sites contributing significantly to the global persistence of biodiversity. The identification of these sites builds from existing approaches based on measures of species and ecosystem diversity and process. Here, we therefore build from the work of Sgró et al. (2011 Evol. Appl. 4, 326–337. (doi:10.1111/j.1752-4571.2010.00157.x)) to extend a framework for how components of genetic diversity might be considered in the identification of key biodiversity areas. We make three recommendations to inform the ongoing process of consolidating a key biodiversity areas standard: (i) thresholds for the threatened species criterion currently consider a site's share of a threatened species' population; expand these to include the proportion of the species' genetic diversity unique to a site; (ii) expand criterion for ‘threatened species' to consider ‘threatened taxa’ and (iii) expand the centre of endemism criterion to identify as key biodiversity areas those sites holding a threshold proportion of the compositional or phylogenetic diversity of species (within a taxonomic group) whose restricted ranges collectively define a centre of endemism. We also recommend consideration of occurrence of EDGE species (i.e. threatened phylogenetic diversity) in key biodiversity areas to prioritize species-specific conservation actions among sites. PMID:25561678

  16. Why and how might genetic and phylogenetic diversity be reflected in the identification of key biodiversity areas?

    PubMed

    Brooks, T M; Cuttelod, A; Faith, D P; Garcia-Moreno, J; Langhammer, P; Pérez-Espona, S

    2015-02-19

    'Key biodiversity areas' are defined as sites contributing significantly to the global persistence of biodiversity. The identification of these sites builds from existing approaches based on measures of species and ecosystem diversity and process. Here, we therefore build from the work of Sgró et al. (2011 Evol. Appl. 4, 326-337. (doi:10.1111/j.1752-4571.2010.00157.x)) to extend a framework for how components of genetic diversity might be considered in the identification of key biodiversity areas. We make three recommendations to inform the ongoing process of consolidating a key biodiversity areas standard: (i) thresholds for the threatened species criterion currently consider a site's share of a threatened species' population; expand these to include the proportion of the species' genetic diversity unique to a site; (ii) expand criterion for 'threatened species' to consider 'threatened taxa' and (iii) expand the centre of endemism criterion to identify as key biodiversity areas those sites holding a threshold proportion of the compositional or phylogenetic diversity of species (within a taxonomic group) whose restricted ranges collectively define a centre of endemism. We also recommend consideration of occurrence of EDGE species (i.e. threatened phylogenetic diversity) in key biodiversity areas to prioritize species-specific conservation actions among sites. PMID:25561678

  17. Identification of protein interacting partners using tandem affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Dalan; Urena, Luis; Thorne, Lucy; Goodfellow, Ian

    2012-01-01

    A critical and often limiting step in understanding the function of host and viral proteins is the identification of interacting cellular or viral protein partners. There are many approaches that allow the identification of interacting partners, including the yeast two hybrid system, as well as pull down assays using recombinant proteins and immunoprecipitation of endogenous proteins followed by mass spectrometry identification(1). Recent studies have highlighted the utility of double-affinity tag mediated purification, coupled with two specific elution steps in the identification of interacting proteins. This approach, termed Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP), was initially used in yeast(2,3) but more recently has been adapted to use in mammalian cells(4-8). As proof-of-concept we have established a tandem affinity purification (TAP) method using the well-characterized eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E(9,10).The cellular translation factor eIF4E is a critical component of the cellular eIF4F complex involved in cap-dependent translation initiation(10). The TAP tag used in the current study is composed of two Protein G units and a streptavidin binding peptide separated by a Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease cleavage sequence. The TAP tag used in the current study is composed of two Protein G units and a streptavidin binding peptide separated by a Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease cleavage sequence(8). To forgo the need for the generation of clonal cell lines, we developed a rapid system that relies on the expression of the TAP-tagged bait protein from an episomally maintained plasmid based on pMEP4 (Invitrogen). Expression of tagged murine eIF4E from this plasmid was controlled using the cadmium chloride inducible metallothionein promoter. Lysis of the expressing cells and subsequent affinity purification via binding to rabbit IgG agarose, TEV protease cleavage, binding to streptavidin linked agarose and subsequent biotin elution identified numerous

  18. Interactive Effects of Work Group and Organizational Identification on Job Satisfaction and Extra-Role Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Dick, Rolf; van Knippenberg, Daan; Kerschreiter, Rudolf; Hertel, Guido; Wieseke, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Past research has focused on the differential relationships of organizational and work group identification with attitudes and behavior. However, no systematic effort has been undertaken yet to explore interactive effects "between" these foci of identification. We predicted that in cases of positive overlap of identifications (i.e. high work group…

  19. Identification of key residues involved in the activation and signaling properties of dopamine D3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Kota, Kokila; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V; Afrasiabi, Milad; Lacy, Brett; Kontoyianni, Maria; Crider, A Michael; Song, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor exhibits agonist-dependent tolerance and slow response termination (SRT) signaling properties that distinguish it from the closely-related D2 receptors. While amino acid residues important for D3 receptor ligand binding have been identified, the residues involved in activation of D3 receptor signaling and induction of signaling properties have not been determined. In this paper, we used cis and trans isomers of a novel D3 receptor agonist, 8-OH-PBZI, and site-directed mutagenesis to identify key residues involved in D3 receptor signaling function. Our results show that trans-8-OH-PBZI, but not cis-8-OH-PBZI, elicit the D3 receptor tolerance and SRT properties. We show that while both agonists require a subset of residues in the orthosteric binding site of D3 receptors for activation of the receptor, the ability of the two isomers to differentially induce tolerance and SRT is mediated by interactions with specific residues in the sixth transmembrane helix and third extracellular loop of the D3 receptor. We also show that unlike cis-8-OH-PBZI, which is a partial agonist at the dopamine D2S receptor and full agonist at dopamine D2L receptor, trans-8-OH-PBZI is a full agonist at both D2S and D2L receptors. The different effect of the two isomers on D3 receptor signaling properties and D2S receptor activation correlated with differential effects of the isomers on agonist-induced mouse locomotor activity. The two isomers of 8-OH-PBZI represent novel pharmacological tools for in silico D3 and D2 receptor homology modeling and for determining the role of D3 receptor tolerance and SRT properties in signaling and behavior. PMID:26116441

  20. Modeling and analysis of PM2.5 generation for key factors identification in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Dehong; Jiang, Binfan; Xie, Yulei

    2016-06-01

    Recently, the PM2.5 pollution in China has occurred frequently and caused widely concern. In order to identify the key factors for PM2.5 generation, the formation characteristics of PM2.5 would be revealed. A property of electric neutrality of PM2.5 was proposed under the least-energy principle and verified through electricity-charge calculation in this paper. It indicated that PM2.5 is formed by the effect of electromagnetic force, including the effect of ionic bond, hydrogen bond and polarization. According to the analysis of interactive forces among different chemical components, a simulation model is developed for describing the random process of PM2.5 generation. In addition, an orthogonal test with two levels and four factors has been designed and carried out through the proposed model. From the text analysis, PM2.5 would be looser and suspend longer in atmosphere due to Organic Compound (OC) existing (OC can reduce about 67% of PM2.5 density). Considering that NH4+ is the only cation in the main chemical components of PM2.5, it would be vital for anions (such as SO42- and NO3-) to aggregate together for facilitating PM2.5 growing. Therefore, in order to relieve PM2.5 pollution, control strategies for OC and NH4+ would be enhanced by government through improving the quality of oils and solvent products, decreasing the amount of nitrogenous fertilizer utilization, or changing the fertilizing environment from dry condition to wet condition.

  1. Rapid identification of chemical genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dilworth, David; Nelson, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Determining the mode of action of bioactive chemicals is of interest to a broad range of academic, pharmaceutical, and industrial scientists. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or budding yeast, is a model eukaryote for which a complete collection of ~6,000 gene deletion mutants and hypomorphic essential gene mutants are commercially available. These collections of mutants can be used to systematically detect chemical-gene interactions, i.e. genes necessary to tolerate a chemical. This information, in turn, reports on the likely mode of action of the compound. Here we describe a protocol for the rapid identification of chemical-genetic interactions in budding yeast. We demonstrate the method using the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which has a well-defined mechanism of action. Our results show that the nuclear TRAMP RNA exosome and DNA repair enzymes are needed for proliferation in the presence of 5-FU, which is consistent with previous microarray based bar-coding chemical genetic approaches and the knowledge that 5-FU adversely affects both RNA and DNA metabolism. The required validation protocols of these high-throughput screens are also described. PMID:25867090

  2. An interactive multi-entry key to the species of Megalostomis Chevrolat, with description of a new species from Paraguay (Chrysomelidae, Cryptocephalinae)

    PubMed Central

    Agrain, Federico A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The main goal of this contribution is to release an interactive multi-entry key to all known species of the genus Megalostomis Chevrolat. This key constitutes a new tool created to aid the identification of the species of this diverse genus, which occasionally may be difficult to identify to the species-level, due to the lack of reference collections for most countries within its distribution range, and to the presence of intra-specific variation and secondary sexual characters. It is expected that this on-line key will facilitate future periodic updates, and will benefit all those persons interested in identifying these taxa. The present paper also includes the description of Megalostomis juanenrique sp. n., a new species from Paraguay. In addition, Megalostomis gigas Lacordaire, and Megalostomis robustipes Monrós are newly cited for the fauna of Paraguay. The online interactive Lucid key is available at http://keys.lucidcentral.org/keys/v3/megalostomis. Offline Lucid data files in LIF and SDD formats are also available at doi: 10.3897/zookeys.425.7631.app1 and doi: 10.3897/zookeys.425.7631.app2. PMID:25147449

  3. Guide and keys for the identification of Syllidae (Annelida, Phyllodocida) from the British Isles (reported and expected species)

    PubMed Central

    San Martín, Guillermo; Worsfold, Tim M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In November 2012, a workshop was carried out on the taxonomy and systematics of the family Syllidae (Annelida: Phyllodocida) at the Dove Marine Laboratory, Cullercoats, Tynemouth, UK for the National Marine Biological Analytical Quality Control (NMBAQC) Scheme. Illustrated keys for subfamilies, genera and species found in British and Irish waters were provided for participants from the major national agencies and consultancies involved in benthic sample processing. After the workshop, we prepared updates to these keys, to include some additional species provided by participants, and some species reported from nearby areas. In this paper, we provide the revised keys to enable rapid identification of Syllidae from the seas around Britain and Ireland. One new combination, Palposyllis propeweismanni, is proposed. PMID:25878521

  4. Some Factors in Children's Identification of Key Words in Written Passages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruning, Roger; Kennedy, Dale

    For this study of children's selection of key words, children in the first, third, sixth, ninth and twelfth grades were asked to identify which words, in their judgment, were key words in written materials. Relationship of these choices to skilled readers, to words derived from passage analysis, and to random selections of hypothetical subjects…

  5. Hypermedia in the Plant Sciences: The Weed Key and Identification System/Videodisc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragan, Lawrence C.

    1991-01-01

    In cooperation with a university educational technology unit, an agronomy professor used hypercard and videodisk technology to develop a computer program for identification of 181 weed species based on user-selected characteristics. This solution was found during a search for a way to organize course content in a concise, manageable system. (MSE)

  6. MOLECULAR TAXONOMIC KEYS – ARE THEY THE SOLUTION FOR SPECIES IDENTIFICATION IN FORENSIC ENTOMOLOGY?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A functional diagnostic technique must have the ability to unambiguously identify and differentiate insect species. Insect species developing in cadavers are often used to estimate the time since death or postmortem interval (PMI). Accurate identification of the species involved is essential, but ex...

  7. Identification of key transcription factors in caerulein-induced pancreatitis through expression profiling data.

    PubMed

    Qi, Dachuan; Wu, Bo; Tong, Danian; Pan, Ye; Chen, Wei

    2015-08-01

    The current study aimed to isolate key transcription factors (TFs) in caerulein-induced pancreatitis, and to identify the difference between wild type and Mist1 knockout (KO) mice, in order to elucidate the contribution of Mist1 to pancreatitis. The gene profile of GSE3644 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database then analyzed using the t-test. The isolated differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were mapped into a transcriptional regulatory network derived from the Integrated Transcription Factor Platform database and in the network, the interaction pairs involving at least one DEG were screened. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze the functional enrichment of the target genes. A total of 1,555 and 3,057 DEGs were identified in the wild type and Mist1KO mice treated with caerulein, respectively. DEGs screened in Mist1KO mice were predominantly enriched in apoptosis, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and other cancer-associated pathways. A total of 188 and 51 TFs associated with pathopoiesis were isolated in Mist1KO and wild type mice, respectively. Out of the top 10 TFs (ranked by P-value), 7 TFs, including S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2); minichromosome maintenance complex component 3 (Mcm3); cell division cycle 6 (Cdc6); cyclin B1 (Ccnb1); mutS homolog 6 (Msh6); cyclin A2 (Ccna2); and cyclin B2 (Ccnb2), were expressed in the two types of mouse. These TFs were predominantly involved in phosphorylation, DNA replication, cell division and DNA mismatch repair. In addition, specific TFs, including minichromosome maintenance complex component 7 (Mcm7); lymphoid-specific helicase (Hells); and minichromosome maintenance complex component 6 (Mcm6), that function in the unwinding of DNA were identified to participate in Mist1KO pancreatitis. The DEGs, including Cdc6, Mcm6, Msh6 and Wdr1 are closely associated with the regulation of caerulein-induced pancreatitis. Furthermore, other identified TFs were also involved in this type of

  8. Key role of hydrazine to the interaction between oxaloacetic against phosphoenolpyruvic carboxykinase (PEPCK): ONIOM calculations.

    PubMed

    Prajongtat, Pongthep; Phromyothin, Darinee Sae-Tang; Hannongbua, Supa

    2013-08-01

    The interactions between oxaloacetic (OAA) and phosphoenolpyruvic carboxykinase (PEPCK) binding pocket in the presence and absence of hydrazine were carried out using quantum chemical calculations, based on the two-layered ONIOM (ONIOM2) approach. The complexes were partially optimized by ONIOM2 (B3LYP/6-31G(d):PM6) method while the interaction energies between OAA and individual residues surrounding the pocket were performed at the MP2/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The calculated interaction energies (INT) indicated that Arg87, Gly237, Ser286, and Arg405 are key residues for binding to OAA with the INT values of -1.93, -2.06, -2.47, and -3.16 kcal mol(-1), respectively. The interactions are mainly due to the formation of hydrogen bonding interactions with OAA. Moreover, using ONIOM2 (B3LYP/6-31G(d):PM6) applied on the PEPCKHS complex, two proton transfers were observed; first, the proton was transferred from the carboxylic group of OAA to hydrazine while the second one was from Asp311 to Lys244. Such reactions cause the generation of binding strength of OAA to the pocket via electrostatic interaction. The orientations of Lys243, Lys244, His264, Asp311, Phe333, and Arg405 were greatly deviated after hydrazine incorporation. These indicate that hydrazine plays an important role in terms of not only changing the conformation of the binding pocket, but is also tightly bound to OAA resulting in its conformation change in the pocket. The understanding of such interaction can be useful for the design of hydrazine-based inhibitor for antichachexia agents. PMID:23624997

  9. Interaction of deep and shallow convection is key to Madden-Julian Oscillation simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guang J.; Song, Xiaoliang

    2009-05-01

    This study investigates the role of the interaction between deep and shallow convection in MJO simulation using the NCAR CAM3. Two simulations were performed, one using a revised Zhang-McFarlane convection scheme for deep convection and the Hack scheme for shallow convection, and the other disallowing shallow convection below 700 mb in the tropical belt. The two simulations produce dramatically different MJO characteristics. While the control simulation produces realistic MJOs, the simulation without shallow convection has very weak MJO signals in the Indian Ocean and western Pacific. Composite analysis finds that shallow convection serves to precondition the lower troposphere by moistening it ahead of deep convection. It also produces enhanced low-level mass convergence below 850 mb ahead of deep convection. This work, together with previous studies, suggests that a correct simulation of the interaction between deep and shallow convection is key to MJO simulation in global climate models.

  10. Ex vivo identification of protein-protein interactions involving the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Hadlock, Gregory C; Nelson, Chad C; Baucum, Anthony J; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2011-03-30

    The dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) is a key regulator of dopaminergic signaling as it mediates the reuptake of extrasynaptic DA and thereby terminates dopaminergic signaling. Emerging evidence indicates that DAT function is influenced through interactions with other proteins. The current report describes a method to identify such interactions following DAT immunoprecipitation from a rat striatal synaptosomal preparation. This subcellular fraction was selected since DAT function is often determined ex vivo by measuring DA uptake in this preparation and few reports investigating DAT-protein interactions have utilized this preparation. Following SDS-PAGE and colloidal Coomassie staining, selected protein bands from a DAT-immunoprecipitate were excised, digested with trypsin, extracted, and analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). From the analysis of the tryptic peptides, several proteins were identified including DAT, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) β, CaMKII δ, protein kinase C (PKC) β, and PKC γ. Co-immunoprecipitation of PKC, CaMKII, and protein interacting with C kinase-1 with DAT was confirmed by Western blotting. Thus, the present study highlights a method to immunoprecipitate DAT and to identify co-immunoprecipitating proteins using LC/MS/MS and Western blotting. This method can be utilized to evaluate DAT protein-protein interactions but also to assess interactions involving other synaptic proteins. Ex vivo identification of protein-protein interactions will provide new insight into the function and regulation of a variety of synaptic, membrane-associated proteins, including DAT. PMID:21291912

  11. High-definition NMR structure of PED/PEA-15 death effector domain reveals details of key polar side chain interactions.

    PubMed

    Twomey, Edward C; Wei, Yufeng

    2012-07-20

    Death effector domain (DED) proteins constitute a subfamily of the large death domain superfamily that is primarily involved in apoptosis pathways. DED structures have characteristic side chain-side chain interactions among polar residues on the protein surface, forming a network of hydrogen bonds and salt bridges. The polar interaction network is functionally important in promoting protein-protein interactions by maintaining optimal side chain orientations. We have refined the solution DED structure of the PED/PEA-15 protein, a representative member of DED subfamily, using traditional NMR restraints with the addition of residual dipolar coupling (RDC) restraints from two independent alignment media, and employed the explicit solvent refinement protocol. The newly refined DED structure of PED/PEA-15 possesses higher structural quality as indicated by WHAT IF Z-scores, with most significant improvement in the backbone conformation normality quality factor. This higher quality DED structure of PED/PEA-15 leads to the identification of a number of key polar side chain interactions, which are not typically observed in NMR protein structures. The elucidation of polar side chain interactions is a key step towards the understanding of protein-protein interactions involving the death domain superfamily. The NMR structures with extensive details of protein structural features are thereby termed high-definition (HD) NMR structures. PMID:22732408

  12. Apoxyria hirtuosa (Wiedemann, 1821) comb. n., lectotype designation, redescription and identification key to species of Apoxyria Schiner, 1866 (Asilidae, Laphriinae)

    PubMed Central

    Alvim, Edgar; Ale-Rocha, Rosaly; Bravo, Freddy

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The type specimens of Neodiogmites hirtuosus (Wiedemann, 1821), two males and one female, deposited at the Museum für Naturkunde der Humboldt-Universität (ZMHB), Berlin were examined. The specimens show the diagnostic characters of Apoxyria Schiner, 1866: face strongly pronounced, swollen and curved hind tibia, and terminalia with epandrium large and hypandrium short and obtuse. A new combination is suggested, Apoxyria hirtuosa (Wiedemann, 1821), and lectotype and paralectotypes are designated. The species is redescribed, the male terminalia is described and illustrated for the first time, and an identification key to Apoxyria is presented. PMID:21998537

  13. Taxonomy of Atopsyche Banks (Trichoptera: Hydrobiosidae) from Brazil: New species, distributional notes and identification key.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Victor; Calor, Adolfo Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Three new species of Atopsyche Banks 1905 are described and illustrated from Brazil: Atopsyche diamantina n. sp., A. kamakan n. sp., and A. muelleri n. sp. New records of A. apurimac Schmid 1989, A. sanctipauli Flint 1974, A. serica Ross 1953, and A. zernyi Flint 1974 are included, as well as the first records to states of Bahia, Goiás, and Rio Grande do Sul. Atopsche rinconi Holzenthal & Cressa 2002 is recorded from Brazil for the first time. An identification key is also provided for species of the genus from Brazil. Moreover additional characters and illustrations of A. sanctipauli and A. zernyi are presented. PMID:27470785

  14. Automatic and Interactive Key Posture Design by Combing the PIK with Parametric Posture Splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shilei; Wu, Bing; Liang, Jiahong; Su, Jiongming

    Key posture design is commonly needed in computer animation. This paper presents an automatic and interactive whole body posture designing technique by combining the PIK (prioritized inverse kinematics) with the proposed parametric human posture splicing technique. The key feature of PIK is that the user can design a posture by adding high level constraints with different priorities. However, the PIK is essentially a numerical IK algorithm which relies on the iterative optimization starting from a good enough initial posture to get the final result. To speed up the running efficiency and ensure the lifelikeness of the final posture, the parametric posture splicing technique is proposed to generate the initial guess of the PIK. According to the set of the high level constraints, the whole body is divided into some partial parts, whose postures are then generated by the parametric posture synthesis from a single posture database. Then an initial posture guess with some main characteristics of the finally acceptable posture can be generated approximately by splicing these partial body postures together. Starting from this initial guess and with all constraints considered at different priority levels, the PIK can be initialized with a bias defined by this particularly initial guess and iterated step by step to get a final posture. The total process of the whole body posture generation is automatic and interactive. The experimental results show that this combination method can not only improve the computation efficiency of the PIK but also can simultaneously ensure the naturalness of the final posture.

  15. An Identification Key to Rodent Prey in Owl Pellets from the Northwestern and Southeastern United States: Employing Incisor Size to Distinguish among Genera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Stephen B.; Cosentino, Bradley J.

    2006-01-01

    We present an identification key to the common rodent prey found in owl pellets from the Northwestern (NW) and Southeastern (SE) United States that is based on differences in incisor size (arc diameter) among genera.

  16. Argentine Hydrellia Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera, Ephydridae): new species and key to identification.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Júnior, Francisco De Assis; Mathis, Wayne Nielsen; Hauser, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hydrellia egeriae sp. nov., a new species of Hydrellia from Campana (34 14' 04 S, 58 52' 32 W) and Hurlingham (3435'14 S, 5838'27 W), Buenos Aires province, Argentina is described. A key to the Argentine Hydrellia species is presented. PMID:26249060

  17. New Records and an Annotated Key for the Identification of Graphis Adans. in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Santosh; Jayalal, Udeni; Oh, Soon-Ok; Park, Jung Shin

    2013-01-01

    The following new species for the lichen genus Graphis in Korea are reported: G. chlorotica, G. nanodes and G. tenuirima. A brief description of these species, together with their distribution, ecology, and illustrations are provided. A key to all known species of this genus from Korea is also presented. PMID:23874128

  18. Identification of key residues for protein conformational transition using elastic network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ji Guo; Jin Xu, Xian; Hua Li, Chun; Chen, Wei Zu; Wang, Cun Xin

    2011-11-01

    Proteins usually undergo conformational transitions between structurally disparate states to fulfill their functions. The large-scale allosteric conformational transitions are believed to involve some key residues that mediate the conformational movements between different regions of the protein. In the present work, a thermodynamic method based on the elastic network model is proposed to predict the key residues involved in protein conformational transitions. In our method, the key functional sites are identified as the residues whose perturbations largely influence the free energy difference between the protein states before and after transition. Two proteins, nucleotide binding domain of the heat shock protein 70 and human/rat DNA polymerase β, are used as case studies to identify the critical residues responsible for their open-closed conformational transitions. The results show that the functionally important residues mainly locate at the following regions for these two proteins: (1) the bridging point at the interface between the subdomains that control the opening and closure of the binding cleft; (2) the hinge region between different subdomains, which mediates the cooperative motions between the corresponding subdomains; and (3) the substrate binding sites. The similarity in the positions of the key residues for these two proteins may indicate a common mechanism in their conformational transitions.

  19. DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION THRESHOLD VALUES FOR KEY FLAVOR COMPONENTS IN AN ORANGE JUICE MATRIX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the complex nature of orange juice, threshold values for key flavor components could differ significantly from those values reported in simpler systems, like water. In order to provide the citrus industry with reference values closer to the real situation in orange juice, different orange ju...

  20. Plant identification through images: Using feature extraction of key points on leaf contours1

    PubMed Central

    Gwo, Chih-Ying; Wei, Chia-Hung

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Because plant identification demands extensive knowledge and complex terminologies, even professional botanists require significant time in the field for mastery of the subject. As plant leaves are normally regarded as possessing useful characteristics for species identification, leaf recognition through images can be considered an important research issue for plant recognition. • Methods: This study proposes a feature extraction method for leaf contours, which describes the lines between the centroid and each contour point on an image. A length histogram is created to represent the distribution of distances in the leaf contour. Thereafter, a classifier is applied from a statistical model to calculate the matching score of the template and query leaf. • Results: The experimental results show that the top value achieves 92.7% and the first two values can achieve 97.3%. In the scale invariance test, those 45 correlation coefficients fall between the minimal value of 0.98611 and the maximal value of 0.99992. Like the scale invariance test, the rotation invariance test performed 45 comparison sets. The correlation coefficients range between 0.98071 and 0.99988. • Discussion: This study shows that the extracted features from leaf images are invariant to scale and rotation because those features are close to positive correlation in terms of coefficient correlation. Moreover, the experimental results indicated that the proposed method outperforms two other methods, Zernike moments and curvature scale space. PMID:25202493

  1. The Undecided Have the Key: Interaction-Driven Opinion Dynamics in a Three State Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The effects of interpersonal interactions on individual’s agreements result in a social aggregation process which is reflected in the formation of collective states, as for instance, groups of individuals with a similar opinion about a given issue. This field, which has been a longstanding concern of sociologists and psychologists, has been extended into an area of experimental social psychology, and even has attracted the attention of physicists and mathematicians. In this article, we present a novel model of opinion formation in which agents may either have a strict preference for a choice, or be undecided. The opinion shift emerges, in a threshold process, as a consequence of a cumulative persuasion for either one of the two opinions in repeated interactions. There are two main ingredients which play key roles in determining the steady states: the initial fraction of undecided agents and the change in agents’ persuasion after each interaction. As a function of these two parameters, the model presents a wide range of solutions, among which there are consensus of each opinion and bi-polarization. We found that a minimum fraction of undecided agents is not crucial for reaching consensus only, but also to determine a dominant opinion in a polarized situation. In order to gain a deeper comprehension of the dynamics, we also present the theoretical framework of the model. The master equations are of special interest for their nontrivial properties and difficulties in being solved analytically. PMID:26436421

  2. The Undecided Have the Key: Interaction-Driven Opinion Dynamics in a Three State Model.

    PubMed

    Balenzuela, Pablo; Pinasco, Juan Pablo; Semeshenko, Viktoriya

    2015-01-01

    The effects of interpersonal interactions on individual's agreements result in a social aggregation process which is reflected in the formation of collective states, as for instance, groups of individuals with a similar opinion about a given issue. This field, which has been a longstanding concern of sociologists and psychologists, has been extended into an area of experimental social psychology, and even has attracted the attention of physicists and mathematicians. In this article, we present a novel model of opinion formation in which agents may either have a strict preference for a choice, or be undecided. The opinion shift emerges, in a threshold process, as a consequence of a cumulative persuasion for either one of the two opinions in repeated interactions. There are two main ingredients which play key roles in determining the steady states: the initial fraction of undecided agents and the change in agents' persuasion after each interaction. As a function of these two parameters, the model presents a wide range of solutions, among which there are consensus of each opinion and bi-polarization. We found that a minimum fraction of undecided agents is not crucial for reaching consensus only, but also to determine a dominant opinion in a polarized situation. In order to gain a deeper comprehension of the dynamics, we also present the theoretical framework of the model. The master equations are of special interest for their nontrivial properties and difficulties in being solved analytically. PMID:26436421

  3. Identification of Key Odorants in Withering-Flavored Green Tea by Aroma Extract Dilution Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukami, Yuzo; Yamaguchi, Yuichi

    This research aims to identify key odorants in withering-flavored green tea. Application of the aroma extract dilution analysis using the volatile fraction of green tea and withering-flavored green tea revealed 25 and 35 odor-active peaks with the flavor dilution factors of≥4, respectively. 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one, (E)-2-nonenal, linalool, (E,Z)-2,6-nonadienal and 3-methylnonane-2,4-dione were key odorants in green tea with the flavor dilution factor of≥16. As well as these 5 odorants, 1-octen-3-one, β-damascenone, geraniol, β-ionone, (Z)-methyljasmonate, indole and coumarine contributed to the withering flavor of green tea.

  4. Approach to key technologies identification for rocket powered single stage to orbit vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Deneu, F.; Terrenoire, P.

    1996-03-01

    A reusable vertical take off, vertical landing rocket powered single stage to orbit vehicle has been studied as a part of the A{acute e}rospatiale future launchers systematic study policy. The main goal of this study is to investigate the key points of this kind of configurations, especially identify, classify and quantify the specific problems, key technologies, tools and test facilities needed and the development costs and schedule. Concurrent engineering techniques were used to take into account all the viewpoints (such as RAMS, abort, operations viewpoints) from the very beginning of this study in order to perform a multidisciplinary conceptual design. The configuration presented here is a conical shape, 60 m long, 1200 ton gross lift-off weight vehicle which delivers to and is able to bring back from a space station a 10 ton payload. This paper presents the study methodology, the systems requirements taken into account and the reference vehicle. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Identification and expression of isoflavone synthase, the key enzyme for biosynthesis of isoflavones in legumes.

    PubMed

    Jung, W; Yu, O; Lau, S M; O'Keefe, D P; Odell, J; Fader, G; McGonigle, B

    2000-02-01

    Isoflavones have drawn much attention because of their benefits to human health. These compounds, which are produced almost exclusively in legumes, have natural roles in plant defense and root nodulation. Isoflavone synthase catalyzes the first committed step of isoflavone biosynthesis, a branch of the phenylpropanoid pathway. To identify the gene encoding this enzyme, we used a yeast expression assay to screen soybean ESTs encoding cytochrome P450 proteins. We identified two soybean genes encoding isoflavone synthase, and used them to isolate homologous genes from other leguminous species including red clover, white clover, hairy vetch, mung bean, alfalfa, lentil, snow pea, and lupine, as well as from the nonleguminous sugarbeet. We expressed soybean isoflavone synthase in Arabidopsis thaliana, which led to production of the isoflavone genistein in this nonlegume plant. Identification of the isoflavone synthase gene should allow manipulation of the phenylpropanoid pathway for agronomic and nutritional purposes. PMID:10657130

  6. Plant microRNAs: key regulators of root architecture and biotic interactions.

    PubMed

    Couzigou, Jean-Malo; Combier, Jean-Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Contents 22 I. 22 II. 24 III. 25 IV. 27 V. 29 VI. 10 31 References 32 SUMMARY: Plants have evolved a remarkable faculty of adaptation to deal with various and changing environmental conditions. In this context, the roots have taken over nutritional aspects and the root system architecture can be modulated in response to nutrient availability or biotic interactions with soil microorganisms. This adaptability requires a fine tuning of gene expression. Indeed, root specification and development are highly complex processes requiring gene regulatory networks involved in hormonal regulations and cell identity. Among the different molecular partners governing root development, microRNAs (miRNAs) are key players for the fast regulation of gene expression. miRNAs are small RNAs involved in most developmental processes and are required for the normal growth of organisms, by the negative regulation of key genes, such as transcription factors and hormone receptors. Here, we review the known roles of miRNAs in root specification and development, from the embryonic roots to the establishment of root symbioses, highlighting the major roles of miRNAs in these processes. PMID:27292927

  7. Lipidomics as an important key for the identification of beer-spoilage bacteria.

    PubMed

    Řezanka, T; Matoulková, D; Benada, O; Sigler, K

    2015-06-01

    Electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) was used for characterizing intact plasmalogen phospholipid molecules in beer-spoilage bacteria. Identification of intact plasmalogens was carried out using collision-induced dissociation and the presence of suitable marker molecular species, both qualitative and quantitative, was determined in samples containing the anaerobic bacteria Megasphaera and Pectinatus. Using selected ion monitoring (SIM), this method had a limit of detection at 1 pg for the standard, i.e. 1-(1Z-octadecenyl)-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine and be linear in the range of four orders of magnitude from 2 pg to 20 ng. This technique was applied to intact plasmalogen extracts from the samples of contaminated and uncontaminated beer without derivatization and resulted in the identification of contamination of beer by Megasphaera and Pectinatus bacteria. The limit of detection was about 830 cells of anaerobic bacteria, i.e. bacteria containing natural cyclopropane plasmalogenes (c-p-19:0/15:0), which is the majority plasmalogen located in both Megasphaera and Pectinatus. The SIM ESI-MS method has been shown to be useful for the analysis of low concentration of plasmalogens in all biological samples, which were contaminated with anaerobic bacteria, e.g. juice, not only in beer. Significance and impact of the study: Electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) using collision-induced dissociation was used to characterize intact plasmalogen phospholipid molecules in beer-spoilage anaerobic bacteria Megasphaera and Pectinatus. Using selected ion monitoring (SIM), this method has a detection limit of 1 pg for the standard 1-(1Z-octadecenyl)-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine and is linear within four orders of magnitude (2 pg to 20 ng). The limit of detection was about 830 cells of bacteria containing natural cyclopropane plasmalogen (c-p-19:0/15:0). SIM ESI-MS method is useful for analyzing low

  8. Key role of Dkk3 protein in inhibition of cancer cell proliferation: An in silico identification.

    PubMed

    Mohammadpour, Hemn; Pourfathollah, Ali Akbar; Nikougoftar Zarif, Mahin; Khalili, Saeed

    2016-03-21

    Dkk3 is a member of Dkk family proteins, regulating Wnt signaling. Dkk3 plays different roles in human and mouse tumors. Dkk3 predominantly act as a tumor suppressor, however several reports revealed that Dkk3 could accelerate cancer cell proliferation. Herein, we aimed at launching an in silico study to determine Dkk3 structure and its interactions with Kremen and LRP as Wnt signaling receptors as well as EGF receptor. Using various softwares a model was built for Dkk3 molecule. Different protein modeling approaches along with model refinement processes were employed to arrive at the final model. To achieve the final complex of Dkk3 with Kremen, LRP and EGFR molecules protein-protein docking servers were employed. Model assessment softwares indicated the high quality of the finally refined Dkk3 3D structure, indicating the accuracy of modeling and refinement process. Our results revealed that Dkk3 is capable of interacting with Kremen, LRP and EGFR with comparable binding energies. Dkk3 efficiently interacts with LRP, Kremen and EGF receptor and may be a promising protein in cancer therapy by blocking Wnt and EGFR downstream signaling. PMID:26780644

  9. Identification of key genes involved in root development of tomato using expressed sequence tag analysis.

    PubMed

    Kalidhasan, N; Joshi, Deepti; Bhatt, Tarun Kumar; Gupta, Aditya Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Root system of plants are actually fascinating structures, not only critical for plant development, but also important for storage and conduction. Due to its agronomic importance, identification of genes involved in root development has been a subject of intense study. Tomato is the one of the most consumed vegetables in the world. Tomato has been used as model system for dicot plants because of its small genome, well-established transformation techniques and well-constructed physical map. The present study is targeted to identify of root specific genes expressed temporally and also gene(s) involved in lateral root and profuse root development. A total of 890 ESTs were identified from five EST libraries constructed using SSH approach which included temporal gene regulation (early and late) and genes involved in morphogenetic traits (lateral and profuse rooting). One hundred sixty-one unique ESTs identified from various libraries were categorized based on their putative functions and deposited in NCBI-dbEST database. In addition, 36 ESTs were selected for validation of their expression by RT-PCR. The present findings will help in shedding light to the unexplored developmental process of root growth in tomato and plant in general. PMID:26600676

  10. Identification and Characterization of Key Human Performance Issues and Research in the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Paul U.; Sheridan, Tom; Poage, james L.; Martin, Lynne Hazel; Jobe, Kimberly K.

    2010-01-01

    This report identifies key human-performance-related issues associated with Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) research in the NASA NextGen-Airspace Project. Four Research Focus Areas (RFAs) in the NextGen-Airspace Project - namely Separation Assurance (SA), Airspace Super Density Operations (ASDO), Traffic Flow Management (TFM), and Dynamic Airspace Configuration (DAC) - were examined closely. In the course of the research, it was determined that the identified human performance issues needed to be analyzed in the context of NextGen operations rather than through basic human factors research. The main gaps in human factors research in NextGen were found in the need for accurate identification of key human-systems related issues within the context of specific NextGen concepts and better design of the operational requirements for those concepts. By focusing on human-system related issues for individual concepts, key human performance issues for the four RFAs were identified and described in this report. In addition, mixed equipage airspace with components of two RFAs were characterized to illustrate potential human performance issues that arise from the integration of multiple concepts.

  11. Visible Wavelength Spectroscopy of Ferric Minerals: A Key Tool for Identification of Ancient Martian Aqueous Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murchie, Scott L.; Bell, J. F., III; Morris, Richard V.

    2000-01-01

    The mineralogic signatures of past aqueous alteration of a basaltic Martian crust may include iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, zeolites, carbonates, phyllosilicates, and silica. The identities, relative abundances, and crystallinities of the phases formed in a particular environment depend on physicochemical conditions. At one extreme, hot spring environments may be characterized by smectite-chlorite to talc-kaolinite silicate assemblages, plus crystalline ferric oxides dominated by hematite. However, most environments, including cold springs, pedogenic layers, and ponded surface water, are expected to deposit iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, carbonates, and smectite-dominated phyllosilicates. A substantial fraction of the ferric iron is expected to occur in nanophase form, with the exact mineralogy strongly influenced by Eh-pH conditions. Detection of these phases has been an objective of a large body of terrestrial telescopic, Mars orbital, and landed spectral investigations and in situ compositional measurements. However, clear identifications of many of these phases is lacking. Neither carbonate nor silica has been unequivocally detected by any method. Although phyllosilicates may occur near the limit of detection by remote sensing, in general they appear to occur in only poorly crystalline form. In contrast, compelling evidence for ferric iron minerals has been gathered by recent telescopic investigations, the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP), and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). These data yield two crucial findings: (1) In the global, high spatial resolution TES data set, highly crystalline ferric iron (as coarse-grained 'gray' hematite) has been recognized but with only very limited spatial occurrence and (2) Low-resolution telescopic reflectance spectroscopy, very limited orbital reflectance spectroscopy, and landed multispectral imaging provide strong indications that at least two broad classes of ferric iron minerals

  12. New Genus and species of Heteroxyidae from Brazil (Axinellida: Demospongiae: Porifera), with a revised identification key for the family.

    PubMed

    Santos, George Garcia; Pinheiro, Ulisses; Hajdu, Eduardo; Soest, Rob Van

    2016-01-01

    Alveospongia sinuosclera gen. nov. sp. nov. is described from shallow-waters off Canavieiras (Bahia, Brazil). The species bears an unusual morphology, combining saccular or alveolar, evenly perforated habit, and sinuous spiny microrhabdose microscleres. This sponge is tentatively classified within the Heteroxyidae Dendy (1905), on the basis of its confused choanosomal architecture of styles, and possession of spiny microrhabdose microscleres. Assays to generate DNA sequences from this material were unsuccessful. We emended the diagnosis of the family to include species bearing saccular/alveolar shape, microrhabdose acanthomicrostrongyles and styles/strongyles with modifications at the ends. The proposed new genus is compared to the remaining heteroxyid genera, as well as Crella (Crellidae), Batzella (Chondropsidae), Goreauiella (Astroscleridae) and Sceptrintus (Podospongiidae). A revised key for identification of Heteroxyidae genera is provided. PMID:27615873

  13. Checklist and Simple Identification Key for Frogs and Toads from District IV of The MADA Scheme, Kedah, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Ibrahim; Chai, Teoh Chia; Sah, Shahrul Anuar Mohd; Akil, Mohd Abdul Muin Md.

    2009-01-01

    A survey was conducted to catalogue the diversity of anurans in District IV of the Muda Agriculture Development Authority Scheme (MADA) in Kedah Darul Aman, Malaysia, from July 1996 to January 1997. Eight species of anurans from three families were present in the study area. Of these, the Common Grass Frog (Fejevarya limnocharis) was the most abundant, followed by Mangrove Frog (Fejevarya cancrivora), Long-legged Frog (Hylarana macrodactyla), and Common Toad (Duttaphrynus melanostictus). Puddle Frog (Occidozyga lima), Taiwanese Giant Frog (Hoplobatrachus rugulosus), and Banded Bullfrog (Kaluola pulchra) were rare during the sampling period, and only one Paddy Frog (Hylarana erythraea) was captured. A simple identification key for the anurans of this area is included for use by scientists and laymen alike. PMID:24575178

  14. Checklist and Simple Identification Key for Frogs and Toads from District IV of The MADA Scheme, Kedah, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Ibrahim; Chai, Teoh Chia; Sah, Shahrul Anuar Mohd; Akil, Mohd Abdul Muin Md

    2009-12-01

    A survey was conducted to catalogue the diversity of anurans in District IV of the Muda Agriculture Development Authority Scheme (MADA) in Kedah Darul Aman, Malaysia, from July 1996 to January 1997. Eight species of anurans from three families were present in the study area. Of these, the Common Grass Frog (Fejevarya limnocharis) was the most abundant, followed by Mangrove Frog (Fejevarya cancrivora), Long-legged Frog (Hylarana macrodactyla), and Common Toad (Duttaphrynus melanostictus). Puddle Frog (Occidozyga lima), Taiwanese Giant Frog (Hoplobatrachus rugulosus), and Banded Bullfrog (Kaluola pulchra) were rare during the sampling period, and only one Paddy Frog (Hylarana erythraea) was captured. A simple identification key for the anurans of this area is included for use by scientists and laymen alike. PMID:24575178

  15. Anaerobic digestion of biowaste under extreme ammonia concentration: Identification of key microbial phylotypes.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Simon; Desmond-Le Quéméner, Elie; Madigou, Céline; Bouchez, Théodore; Chapleur, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Ammonia inhibition represents a major operational issue for anaerobic digestion (AD). In order to get more insights into AD microbiota resistance, anaerobic batch reactors performances were investigated under a wide range of Total Ammonia Nitrogen (TAN) concentrations up to 50.0g/L at 35°C. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value was determined to be 19.0g/L. Microbial community dynamics revealed that above a TAN concentration of 10.0g/L, remarkable modifications within archaeal and bacterial communities occurred. 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis showed a gradual methanogenic shift between two OTUs from genus Methanosarcina when TAN concentration increased up to 25.0g/L. Proportion of potential syntrophic microorganisms such as Methanoculleus and Treponema progressively raised with increasing TAN up to 10.0 and 25.0g/L respectively, while Syntrophomonas and Ruminococcus groups declined. In 25.0g/L assays, Caldicoprobacter were dominant. This study highlights the emergence of AD key phylotypes at extreme ammonia concentrations. PMID:26874221

  16. The Cassava Mealybug (Phenacoccus manihoti) in Asia: First Records, Potential Distribution, and an Identification Key

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, Soroush; Kondo, Takumasa; Winotai, Amporn

    2012-01-01

    Phenacoccus manihoti Matile-Ferrero (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), one of the most serious pests of cassava worldwide, has recently reached Asia, raising significant concern over its potential spread throughout the region. To support management decisions, this article reports recent distribution records, and estimates the climatic suitability for its regional spread using a CLIMEX distribution model. The article also presents a taxonomic key that separates P. manihoti from all other mealybug species associated with the genus Manihot. Model predictions suggest P. manihoti imposes an important, yet differential, threat to cassava production in Asia. Predicted risk is most acute in the southern end of Karnataka in India, the eastern end of the Ninh Thuan province in Vietnam, and in most of West Timor in Indonesia. The model also suggests P. manihoti is likely to be limited by cold stress across Vietnam's northern regions and in the entire Guangxi province in China, and by high rainfall across the wet tropics in Indonesia and the Philippines. Predictions should be particularly important to guide management decisions for high risk areas where P. manihoti is absent (e.g., India), or where it has established but populations remain small and localized (e.g., South Vietnam). Results from this article should help decision-makers assess site-specific risk of invasion, and develop proportional prevention and surveillance programs for early detection and rapid response. PMID:23077659

  17. Integrated omics for the identification of key functionalities in biological wastewater treatment microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Narayanasamy, Shaman; Muller, Emilie E L; Sheik, Abdul R; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Biological wastewater treatment plants harbour diverse and complex microbial communities which prominently serve as models for microbial ecology and mixed culture biotechnological processes. Integrated omic analyses (combined metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics) are currently gaining momentum towards providing enhanced understanding of community structure, function and dynamics in situ as well as offering the potential to discover novel biological functionalities within the framework of Eco-Systems Biology. The integration of information from genome to metabolome allows the establishment of associations between genetic potential and final phenotype, a feature not realizable by only considering single ‘omes’. Therefore, in our opinion, integrated omics will become the future standard for large-scale characterization of microbial consortia including those underpinning biological wastewater treatment processes. Systematically obtained time and space-resolved omic datasets will allow deconvolution of structure–function relationships by identifying key members and functions. Such knowledge will form the foundation for discovering novel genes on a much larger scale compared with previous efforts. In general, these insights will allow us to optimize microbial biotechnological processes either through better control of mixed culture processes or by use of more efficient enzymes in bioengineering applications. PMID:25678254

  18. Reduced and oxidised scytonemin: Theoretical protocol for Raman spectroscopic identification of potential key biomolecules for astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnali, Tereza; Edwards, Howell G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Scytonemin is an important UV-radiation protective biomolecule synthesised by extremophilic cyanobacteria in stressed terrestrial environments. Scytonemin and its reduced form have been both isolated experimentally and the Raman spectrum for scytonemin has been assigned and characterised experimentally both in extracts and in living extremophilic cyanobacterial colonies. Scytonemin is recognised as a key biomarker molecule for terrestrial organisms in stressed environments. We propose a new, theoretically plausible structure for oxidised scytonemin which has not been mentioned in the literature hitherto. DFT calculations for scytonemin, reduced scytonemin and the new structure modelled and proposed for oxidised scytonemin are reported along with their Raman spectroscopic data and λmax UV-absorption data obtained theoretically. Comparison of the vibrational spectroscopic assignments allows the three forms of scytonemin to be detected and identified and assist not only in the clarification of the major features in the experimentally observed Raman spectral data for the parent scytonemin but also support a protocol proposed for their analytical discrimination. The results of this study provide a basis for the search for molecules of this type in future astrobiological missions of exploration and the search for extinct and extant life terrestrially.

  19. Identification of the key genes connected with plasma cells of multiple myeloma using expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kefeng; Xu, Zhongyang; Sun, Zhaoyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To uncover the potential regulatory mechanisms of the relevant genes that contribute to the prognosis and prevention of multiple myeloma (MM). Methods Microarray data (GSE13591) were downloaded, including five plasma cell samples from normal donors and 133 plasma cell samples from MM patients. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by Student’s t-test. Functional enrichment analysis was performed for DEGs using the Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases. Transcription factors and tumor-associated genes were also explored by mapping genes in the TRANSFAC, the tumor suppressor gene (TSGene), and tumor-associated gene (TAG) databases. A protein–protein interaction (PPI) network and PPI subnetworks were constructed by Cytoscape software using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes (STRING) database. Results A total of 63 DEGs (42 downregulated, 21 upregulated) were identified. Functional enrichment analysis showed that HLA-DRB1 and VCAM1 might be involved in the positive regulation of immune system processes, and HLA-DRB1 might be related to the intestinal immune network for IgA production pathway. The genes CEBPD, JUND, and ATF3 were identified as transcription factors. The top ten nodal genes in the PPI network were revealed including HLA-DRB1, VCAM1, and TFRC. In addition, genes in the PPI subnetwork, such as HLA-DRB1 and VCAM1, were enriched in the cell adhesion molecules pathway, whereas CD4 and TFRC were both enriched in the hematopoietic cell pathway. Conclusion Several crucial genes correlated to MM were identified, including CD4, HLA-DRB1, TFRC, and VCAM1, which might exert their roles in MM progression via immune-mediated pathways. There might be certain regulatory correlations between HLA-DRB1, CD4, and TFRC. PMID:26229487

  20. Identification of key aerosol populations through their size and composition resolved spectral scattering and absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costabile, F.; Barnaba, F.; Angelini, F.; Gobbi, G. P.

    2013-03-01

    Characterizing chemical and physical aerosol properties is important to understand their sources, effects, and feedback mechanisms in the atmosphere. This study proposes a scheme to classify aerosol populations based on their spectral optical properties (absorption and scattering). The scheme is obtained thanks to the outstanding set of information on particle size and composition these properties contain. The spectral variability of the aerosol single scattering albedo (dSSA), and the extinction, scattering and absorption Angstrom exponents (EAE, SAE and AAE, respectively) were observed on the basis of two-year measurements of aerosol optical properties (scattering and absorption coefficients at blue, green and red wavelengths) performed in the suburbs of Rome (Italy). Optical measurements of various aerosol types were coupled to measurements of particle number size distributions and relevant optical properties simulations (Mie theory). These latter allowed the investigation of the role of the particle size and composition in the bulk aerosol properties observed. The combination of simulations and measurements suggested a general "paradigm" built on dSSA, SAE and AAE to optically classify aerosols. The paradigm proved suitable to identify the presence of key aerosol populations, including soot, biomass burning, organics, dust and marine particles. The work highlights that (i) aerosol populations show distinctive combinations of SAE and dSSA times AAE, these variables being linked by a linear inverse relation varying with varying SSA; (ii) fine particles show EAE > 1.5, whilst EAE < 2 is found for both coarse particles and ultrafine soot-rich aerosols; (iii) fine and coarse particles both show SSA > 0.8, whilst ultrafine urban Aitken mode and soot particles show SSA < 0.8. The proposed paradigm agrees with aerosol observations performed during past major field campaigns, this indicating that relations concerning the paradigm have a general validity.

  1. Identification of Key Contributory Factors Responsible for Vascular Dysfunction in Idiopathic Recurrent Spontaneous Miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Mainak; Subramani, Elavarasan; Khalpada, Jaydeep; RoyChoudhury, Sourav; Chakravarty, Baidyanath; Chaudhury, Koel

    2013-01-01

    Poor endometrial perfusion during implantation window is reported to be one of the possible causes of idiopathic recurrent spontaneous miscarriage (IRSM). We have tested the hypothesis that certain angiogenic and vasoactive factors are associated with vascular dysfunction during implantation window in IRSM and, therefore, could play a contributory role in making the endometrium unreceptive in these women. This is a prospective case-controlled study carried out on 66 women with IRSM and age and BMI matched 50 fertile women serving as controls. Endometrial expression of pro-inflammatory (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ, TGF-β1), anti-inflammatory (IL-4, -10), angiogenesis-associated cytokines (IL-2, -6, -8), angiogenic and vasoactive factors including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), nitric oxide (NO) and adrenomedullin (ADM) were measured during implantation window by ELISA. Subendometrial blood flow (SEBF) was assessed by color Doppler ultrasonography. Multivariate analysis was used to identify the significant factor(s) responsible for vascular dysfunction in IRSM women during window of implantation and further correlated with vascular dysfunction. Endometrial expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and PGE2 were up-regulated and anti-inflammatory and angiogenesis-associated cytokines down-regulated in IRSM women as compared with controls. Further, the angiogenic and vasoactive factors including VEGF, eNOS, NO and ADM were found to be down-regulated and SEBF grossly affected in these women. Multivariate analysis identified IL-10, followed by VEGF and eNOS as the major factors contributing towards vascular dysfunction in IRSM women. Moreover, these factors strongly correlated with blood flow impairment. This study provides an understanding that IL-10, VEGF and eNOS are the principal key components having a contributory role in endometrial vascular dysfunction in women with IRSM. Down-regulation of

  2. Identification of Transcriptional Factors and Key Genes in Primary Osteoporosis by DNA Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wengui; Ji, Lixin; Zhao, Teng; Gao, Pengfei

    2015-01-01

    Background A number of genes have been identified to be related with primary osteoporosis while less is known about the comprehensive interactions between regulating genes and proteins. We aimed to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and regulatory effects of transcription factors (TFs) involved in primary osteoporosis. Material/Methods The gene expression profile GSE35958 was obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus database, including 5 primary osteoporosis and 4 normal bone tissues. The differentially expressed genes between primary osteoporosis and normal bone tissues were identified by the same package in R language. The TFs of these DEGs were predicted with the Essaghir A method. DAVID (The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery) was applied to perform the GO (Gene Ontology) and KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway enrichment analysis of DEGs. After analyzing regulatory effects, a regulatory network was built between TFs and the related DEGs. Results A total of 579 DEGs was screened, including 310 up-regulated genes and 269 down-regulated genes in primary osteoporosis samples. In GO terms, more up-regulated genes were enriched in transcription regulator activity, and secondly in transcription factor activity. A total 10 significant pathways were enriched in KEGG analysis, including colorectal cancer, Wnt signaling pathway, Focal adhesion, and MAPK signaling pathway. Moreover, total 7 TFs were enriched, of which CTNNB1, SP1, and TP53 regulated most up-regulated DEGs. Conclusions The discovery of the enriched TFs might contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of primary osteoporosis. Further research on genes and TFs related to the WNT signaling pathway and MAPK pathway is urgent for clinical diagnosis and directing treatment of primary osteoporosis. PMID:25957414

  3. Identification of key genes associated with gastric cancer based on DNA microarray data

    PubMed Central

    SUN, HUI

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify genes with a differential pattern of expression in gastric cancer (GC), and to find novel molecular biomarkers for GC diagnosis and therapeutic treatment. The gene expression profile of GSE19826, including 12 GC samples and 15 normal controls, was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) were screened in the GC samples compared with the normal controls. Two-way hierarchical clustering of DEGs was performed to distinguish the normal controls from the GC samples. The co-expression coefficient was analyzed among the DEGs using the data from COXPRESdb. The gene co-expression network was constructed based on the DEGs using Cytoscape software, and modules in the network were analyzed by ClusterOne and Bingo. Furthermore, enrichment analysis of the DEGs in the modules was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. In total, 596 DEGs in the GC samples and 57 co-expression gene pairs were identified. A total of 7 genes were enriched in the same module, for which the function was phosphate transport and which was annotated to participate in the extracellular matrix-receptor interaction pathway. These genes were collagen, type VI, α3 (COL6A3), COL1A2, COL1A1, COL5A2, thrombospondin 2, COL11A1 and COL5A1. Overall, the present study identified several biomarkers for GC using the gene expression profiling of human GC samples. The COL family is a promising prognostic marker for GC. Gene expression products represent candidate biomarkers endowed with great potential for the early screening and therapy of GC patients. PMID:26870242

  4. Identification of key pathways and genes in colorectal cancer using bioinformatics analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bin; Li, Chunning; Zhao, Jianying

    2016-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common malignant tumor of digestive system. The aim of this study was to identify gene signatures during CRC and uncover their potential mechanisms. The gene expression profiles of GSE21815 were downloaded from GEO database. The GSE21815 dataset contained 141 samples, including 132 CRC and 9 normal colon epitheliums. The gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway (KEGG) enrichment analyses were performed, and protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) was constructed by Cytoscape software. In total, 3500 DEGs were identified in CRC, including 1370 up-regulated genes and 2130 down-regulated genes. GO analysis results showed that up-regulated DEGs were significantly enriched in biological processes (BP), including cell cycle, cell division, and cell proliferation; the down-regulated DEGs were significantly enriched in biological processes, including immune response, intracellular signaling cascade and defense response. KEGG pathway analysis showed the up-regulated DEGs were enriched in cell cycle and DNA replication, while the down-regulated DEGs were enriched in drug metabolism, metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450, and retinol metabolism pathways. The top 10 hub genes, GNG2, AGT, SAA1, ADCY5, LPAR1, NMU, IL8, CXCL12, GNAI1, and CCR2 were identified from the PPI network, and sub-networks revealed these genes were involved in significant pathways, including G protein-coupled receptors signaling pathway, gastrin-CREB signaling pathway via PKC and MAPK, and extracellular matrix organization. In conclusion, the present study indicated that the identified DEGs and hub genes promote our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of CRC, and might be used as molecular targets and diagnostic biomarkers for the treatment of CRC. PMID:27581154

  5. Identification of key residues that confer Rhodobacter sphaeroides LPS activity at horse TLR4/MD-2.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Katherine L; Gangloff, Monique; Walsh, Catherine M; Spring, David R; Gay, Nicholas J; Bryant, Clare E

    2014-01-01

    The molecular determinants underpinning how hexaacylated lipid A and tetraacylated precursor lipid IVa activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) are well understood, but how activation is induced by other lipid A species is less clear. Species specificity studies have clarified how TLR4/MD-2 recognises different lipid A structures, for example tetraacylated lipid IVa requires direct electrostatic interactions for agonism. In this study, we examine how pentaacylated lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RSLPS) antagonises human TLR4/MD-2 and activates the horse receptor complex using a computational approach and cross-species mutagenesis. At a functional level, we show that RSLPS is a partial agonist at horse TLR4/MD-2 with greater efficacy than lipid IVa. These data suggest the importance of the additional acyl chain in RSLPS signalling. Based on docking analysis, we propose a model for positioning of the RSLPS lipid A moiety (RSLA) within the MD-2 cavity at the TLR4 dimer interface, which allows activity at the horse receptor complex. As for lipid IVa, RSLPS agonism requires species-specific contacts with MD-2 and TLR4, but the R2 chain of RSLA protrudes from the MD-2 pocket to contact the TLR4 dimer in the vicinity of proline 442. Our model explains why RSLPS is only partially dependent on horse TLR4 residue R385, unlike lipid IVa. Mutagenesis of proline 442 into a serine residue, as found in human TLR4, uncovers the importance of this site in RSLPS signalling; horse TLR4 R385G/P442S double mutation completely abolishes RSLPS activity without its counterpart, human TLR4 G384R/S441P, being able to restore it. Our data highlight the importance of subtle changes in ligand positioning, and suggest that TLR4 and MD-2 residues that may not participate directly in ligand binding can determine the signalling outcome of a given ligand. This indicates a cooperative binding mechanism within the receptor complex, which is becoming increasingly important in TLR

  6. Identification of Key Residues That Confer Rhodobacter sphaeroides LPS Activity at Horse TLR4/MD-2

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Catherine M.; Spring, David R.; Gay, Nicholas J.; Bryant, Clare E.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular determinants underpinning how hexaacylated lipid A and tetraacylated precursor lipid IVa activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) are well understood, but how activation is induced by other lipid A species is less clear. Species specificity studies have clarified how TLR4/MD-2 recognises different lipid A structures, for example tetraacylated lipid IVa requires direct electrostatic interactions for agonism. In this study, we examine how pentaacylated lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RSLPS) antagonises human TLR4/MD-2 and activates the horse receptor complex using a computational approach and cross-species mutagenesis. At a functional level, we show that RSLPS is a partial agonist at horse TLR4/MD-2 with greater efficacy than lipid IVa. These data suggest the importance of the additional acyl chain in RSLPS signalling. Based on docking analysis, we propose a model for positioning of the RSLPS lipid A moiety (RSLA) within the MD-2 cavity at the TLR4 dimer interface, which allows activity at the horse receptor complex. As for lipid IVa, RSLPS agonism requires species-specific contacts with MD-2 and TLR4, but the R2 chain of RSLA protrudes from the MD-2 pocket to contact the TLR4 dimer in the vicinity of proline 442. Our model explains why RSLPS is only partially dependent on horse TLR4 residue R385, unlike lipid IVa. Mutagenesis of proline 442 into a serine residue, as found in human TLR4, uncovers the importance of this site in RSLPS signalling; horse TLR4 R385G/P442S double mutation completely abolishes RSLPS activity without its counterpart, human TLR4 G384R/S441P, being able to restore it. Our data highlight the importance of subtle changes in ligand positioning, and suggest that TLR4 and MD-2 residues that may not participate directly in ligand binding can determine the signalling outcome of a given ligand. This indicates a cooperative binding mechanism within the receptor complex, which is becoming increasingly important in TLR

  7. Identification of key genes for laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma using weighted co-expression network analysis

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIAO-TIAN

    2016-01-01

    Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is the most common malignant tumor in the head and neck, and can seriously affect the daily life of patients. To study the mechanisms of LSCC, the microarray of GSE51958 was analyzed in the present study. GSE51958 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus, and included a collection of LSCC tissue samples and matched adjacent non-cancerous tissue samples from 10 patients. Differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using limma package. Next, a weighted co-expression network was constructed for the DEGs by WGCNA package in R. Modules of the weighted co-expression network were obtained through constructing a hierarchical clustering tree using the hybrid dynamic shear tree method. Using the clusterProfiler package, the potential functions of DEGs in the modules correlated with LSCC were predicted by pathway enrichment analysis. In total, 959 DEGs were screened from the LSCC samples compared with the adjacent non-cancerous samples, including 553 upregulated and 406 downregulated genes. The appointed black, brown, gray, pink and yellow modules were screened for the DEGs in the weighted co-expression network. For the DEGs in the brown and yellow modules, the enriched pathways were cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and metabolic pathways, respectively. The DEGs in the pink module were involved in the majority of pathways. With high connectivity degrees in the pink module, TPX2, microtubule-associated (TPX2; degree, 25), minichromosome maintenance complex component 2 (MCM2; degree, 25), ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 1 (UHRF1; degree, 22), cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2; degree, 20) and protein regulator of cytokinesis 1 (PRC1; degree, 20) may be involved in LSCC. Overall, In conclusion, from the integrated bioinformatics analysis of genes that may be associated with LSCC, 959 DEGs were obtained from LSCC samples compared with adjacent non-cancerous samples, and TPX2, MCM2, UHRF1, CDK2 and PRC1 were

  8. Compulsory citizenship behavior and organizational citizenship behavior: the role of organizational identification and perceived interactional justice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongdan; Peng, Zhenglong; Chen, Hsiu-Kuei

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the psychological mechanism underlying the relationship between compulsory citizenship behavior (CCB) and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) by developing a moderated mediation model. The model focuses on the mediating role of organizational identification and the moderating role of interactional justice in influencing the mediation. Using a time-lagged research design, the authors collected two waves of data from 388 supervisor-subordinate dyads in 67 teams to test the moderated mediation model. Results revealed that CCB negatively influenced OCB via impairing organizational identification. Moreover, interactional justice moderated the strength of the indirect effect of CCB on OCB (through organizational identification), such that the mediated relationship was stronger under low interactional justice than under high interactional justice. PMID:24684078

  9. Molecular Identification of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus, Scombridae) Larvae and Development of a DNA Character-Based Identification Key for Mediterranean Scombrids.

    PubMed

    Puncher, Gregory Neils; Arrizabalaga, Haritz; Alemany, Francisco; Cariani, Alessia; Oray, Isik K; Karakulak, F Saadet; Basilone, Gualtiero; Cuttitta, Angela; Mazzola, Salvatore; Tinti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    The Atlantic bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus, is a commercially important species that has been severely over-exploited in the recent past. Although the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean stock is now showing signs of recovery, its current status remains very uncertain and as a consequence their recovery is dependent upon severe management informed by rigorous scientific research. Monitoring of early life history stages can inform decision makers about the health of the species based upon recruitment and survival rates. Misidentification of fish larvae and eggs can lead to inaccurate estimates of stock biomass and productivity which can trigger demands for increased quotas and unsound management conclusions. Herein we used a molecular approach employing mitochondrial and nuclear genes (CO1 and ITS1, respectively) to identify larvae (n = 188) collected from three spawning areas in the Mediterranean Sea by different institutions working with a regional fisheries management organization. Several techniques were used to analyze the genetic sequences (sequence alignments using search algorithms, neighbour joining trees, and a genetic character-based identification key) and an extensive comparison of the results is presented. During this process various inaccuracies in related publications and online databases were uncovered. Our results reveal important differences in the accuracy of the taxonomic identifications carried out by different ichthyoplanktologists following morphology-based methods. While less than half of larvae provided were bluefin tuna, other dominant taxa were bullet tuna (Auxis rochei), albacore (Thunnus alalunga) and little tunny (Euthynnus alletteratus). We advocate an expansion of expertise for a new generation of morphology-based taxonomists, increased dialogue between morphology-based and molecular taxonomists and increased scrutiny of public sequence databases. PMID:26147931

  10. Molecular Identification of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus, Scombridae) Larvae and Development of a DNA Character-Based Identification Key for Mediterranean Scombrids

    PubMed Central

    Puncher, Gregory Neils; Arrizabalaga, Haritz; Alemany, Francisco; Cariani, Alessia; Oray, Isik K.; Karakulak, F. Saadet; Basilone, Gualtiero; Cuttitta, Angela; Mazzola, Salvatore; Tinti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    The Atlantic bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus, is a commercially important species that has been severely over-exploited in the recent past. Although the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean stock is now showing signs of recovery, its current status remains very uncertain and as a consequence their recovery is dependent upon severe management informed by rigorous scientific research. Monitoring of early life history stages can inform decision makers about the health of the species based upon recruitment and survival rates. Misidentification of fish larvae and eggs can lead to inaccurate estimates of stock biomass and productivity which can trigger demands for increased quotas and unsound management conclusions. Herein we used a molecular approach employing mitochondrial and nuclear genes (CO1 and ITS1, respectively) to identify larvae (n = 188) collected from three spawning areas in the Mediterranean Sea by different institutions working with a regional fisheries management organization. Several techniques were used to analyze the genetic sequences (sequence alignments using search algorithms, neighbour joining trees, and a genetic character-based identification key) and an extensive comparison of the results is presented. During this process various inaccuracies in related publications and online databases were uncovered. Our results reveal important differences in the accuracy of the taxonomic identifications carried out by different ichthyoplanktologists following morphology-based methods. While less than half of larvae provided were bluefin tuna, other dominant taxa were bullet tuna (Auxis rochei), albacore (Thunnus alalunga) and little tunny (Euthynnus alletteratus). We advocate an expansion of expertise for a new generation of morphology-based taxonomists, increased dialogue between morphology-based and molecular taxonomists and increased scrutiny of public sequence databases. PMID:26147931

  11. Flat Mites of the World interactive identification key for economically important species in the family Tenuipalpidae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several flat mite species associated with fruit and crop trees, and ornamentals are commonly intercepted at U.S. ports-of-entry. These species complex are also the most complicated and part of the most diverse group in the flat mite family. Three of the most economically important species in the fa...

  12. Large-Scale Identification and Analysis of Suppressive Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cokol, Murat; Weinstein, Zohar B.; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Tasan, Murat; Doak, Allison; Cansever, Dilay; Mutlu, Beste; Li, Siyang; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Guvenek, Aysegul; Cokol, Melike; Cetiner, Selim; Giaever, Guri; Iossifov, Ivan; Nislow, Corey; Shoichet, Brian; Roth, Frederick P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY One drug may suppress the effects of another. Although knowledge of drug suppression is vital to avoid efficacy-reducing drug interactions or discover countermeasures for chemical toxins, drug-drug suppression relationships have not been systematically mapped. Here, we analyze the growth response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to anti-fungal compound (“drug”) pairs. Among 440 ordered drug pairs, we identified 94 suppressive drug interactions. Using only pairs not selected on the basis of their suppression behavior, we provide an estimate of the prevalence of suppressive interactions between anti-fungal compounds as 17%. Analysis of the drug suppression network suggested that Bromopyruvate is a frequently suppressive drug and Staurosporine is a frequently suppressed drug. We investigated potential explanations for suppressive drug interactions, including chemogenomic analysis, coaggregation, and pH effects, allowing us to explain the interaction tendencies of Bromopyruvate. PMID:24704506

  13. Large-scale identification and analysis of suppressive drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Cokol, Murat; Weinstein, Zohar B; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Tasan, Murat; Doak, Allison; Cansever, Dilay; Mutlu, Beste; Li, Siyang; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Guvenek, Aysegul; Cokol, Melike; Cetiner, Selim; Giaever, Guri; Iossifov, Ivan; Nislow, Corey; Shoichet, Brian; Roth, Frederick P

    2014-04-24

    One drug may suppress the effects of another. Although knowledge of drug suppression is vital to avoid efficacy-reducing drug interactions or discover countermeasures for chemical toxins, drug-drug suppression relationships have not been systematically mapped. Here, we analyze the growth response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to anti-fungal compound ("drug") pairs. Among 440 ordered drug pairs, we identified 94 suppressive drug interactions. Using only pairs not selected on the basis of their suppression behavior, we provide an estimate of the prevalence of suppressive interactions between anti-fungal compounds as 17%. Analysis of the drug suppression network suggested that Bromopyruvate is a frequently suppressive drug and Staurosporine is a frequently suppressed drug. We investigated potential explanations for suppressive drug interactions, including chemogenomic analysis, coaggregation, and pH effects, allowing us to explain the interaction tendencies of Bromopyruvate. PMID:24704506

  14. Integrative framework for identification of key cell identity genes uncovers determinants of ES cell identity and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Cinghu, Senthilkumar; Yellaboina, Sailu; Freudenberg, Johannes M; Ghosh, Swati; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Oldfield, Andrew J; Lackford, Brad L; Zaykin, Dmitri V; Hu, Guang; Jothi, Raja

    2014-04-22

    Identification of genes associated with specific biological phenotypes is a fundamental step toward understanding the molecular basis underlying development and pathogenesis. Although RNAi-based high-throughput screens are routinely used for this task, false discovery and sensitivity remain a challenge. Here we describe a computational framework for systematic integration of published gene expression data to identify genes defining a phenotype of interest. We applied our approach to rank-order all genes based on their likelihood of determining ES cell (ESC) identity. RNAi-mediated loss-of-function experiments on top-ranked genes unearthed many novel determinants of ESC identity, thus validating the derived gene ranks to serve as a rich and valuable resource for those working to uncover novel ESC regulators. Underscoring the value of our gene ranks, functional studies of our top-hit Nucleolin (Ncl), abundant in stem and cancer cells, revealed Ncl's essential role in the maintenance of ESC homeostasis by shielding against differentiation-inducing redox imbalance-induced oxidative stress. Notably, we report a conceptually novel mechanism involving a Nucleolin-dependent Nanog-p53 bistable switch regulating the homeostatic balance between self-renewal and differentiation in ESCs. Our findings connect the dots on a previously unknown regulatory circuitry involving genes associated with traits in both ESCs and cancer and might have profound implications for understanding cell fate decisions in cancer stem cells. The proposed computational framework, by helping to prioritize and preselect candidate genes for tests using complex and expensive genetic screens, provides a powerful yet inexpensive means for identification of key cell identity genes. PMID:24711389

  15. Identification of Redox and Glucose-Dependent Txnip Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Neuharth, Skyla; Kim, Dae In; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Roux, Kyle J.

    2016-01-01

    Thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) acts as a negative regulator of thioredoxin function and is a critical modulator of several diseases including, but not limited to, diabetes, ischemia-reperfusion cardiac injury, and carcinogenesis. Therefore, Txnip has become an attractive therapeutic target to alleviate disease pathologies. Although Txnip has been implicated with numerous cellular processes such as proliferation, fatty acid and glucose metabolism, inflammation, and apoptosis, the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are largely unknown. The objective of these studies was to identify Txnip interacting proteins using the proximity-based labeling method, BioID, to understand differential regulation of pleiotropic Txnip cellular functions. The BioID transgene fused to Txnip expressed in HEK293 identified 31 interacting proteins. Many protein interactions were redox-dependent and were disrupted through mutation of a previously described reactive cysteine (C247S). Furthermore, we demonstrate that this model can be used to identify dynamic Txnip interactions due to known physiological regulators such as hyperglycemia. These data identify novel Txnip protein interactions and demonstrate dynamic interactions dependent on redox and glucose perturbations, providing clarification to the pleiotropic cellular functions of Txnip. PMID:27437069

  16. Identification of the key regulating genes of diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) by network and gene ontology analysis.

    PubMed

    Pashaiasl, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2016-09-01

    Diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) is one of the reasons for infertility that not only affects both older and young women. Ovarian reserve assessment can be used as a new prognostic tool for infertility treatment decision making. Here, up- and down-regulated gene expression profiles of granulosa cells were analysed to generate a putative interaction map of the involved genes. In addition, gene ontology (GO) analysis was used to get insight intol the biological processes and molecular functions of involved proteins in DOR. Eleven up-regulated genes and nine down-regulated genes were identified and assessed by constructing interaction networks based on their biological processes. PTGS2, CTGF, LHCGR, CITED, SOCS2, STAR and FSTL3 were the key nodes in the up-regulated networks, while the IGF2, AMH, GREM, and FOXC1 proteins were key in the down-regulated networks. MIRN101-1, MIRN153-1 and MIRN194-1 inhibited the expression of SOCS2, while CSH1 and BMP2 positively regulated IGF1 and IGF2. Ossification, ovarian follicle development, vasculogenesis, sequence-specific DNA binding transcription factor activity, and golgi apparatus are the major differential groups between up-regulated and down-regulated genes in DOR. Meta-analysis of publicly available transcriptomic data highlighted the high coexpression of CTGF, connective tissue growth factor, with the other key regulators of DOR. CTGF is involved in organ senescence and focal adhesion pathway according to GO analysis. These findings provide a comprehensive system biology based insight into the aetiology of DOR through network and gene ontology analyses. PMID:27324248

  17. Calcaridorylaimus castaneae sp. n. (Nematoda, Dorylaimidae) from Bulgaria with an identification key to the species of the genus.

    PubMed

    Nedelchev, Sevdan; Elshishka, Milka; Lazarova, Stela; Radoslavov, Georgi; Hristov, Peter; Peneva, Vlada

    2014-01-01

    An unknown species belonging to the genusCalcaridorylaimus Andrássy, 1986 was collected from the litter of broadleaf forests dominated by Castanea sativa Mill. and mixed with Quercus daleshampii Ten. and Fagus sylvatica L. on Belasitsa Mountain, south-western Bulgaria. Calcaridorylaimus castaneae sp. n. is characterised by its long body (1.4-2.1 mm), lip region practically not offset, vulva transverse, short odontostyle (14.5-16 μm) and tail (75.5-110.5 μm, c=14.7-23.6; c'=2.9-4.4) in females and 38-46 μm long spicules with small spur before their distant end in males. It is most similar to C. andrassyi Ahmad & Shaheen, 2004, but differs in having transverse vs pore-like vulva and shorter spicules (38-46 μm vs 52-57 μm). An identification key to the species of the genus Calcaridorylaimus is proposed. Phylogenetic analyses were performed on 18S and D2-D3 expansion domains of 28S rRNA genes by Neighbor-Joining, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference methods. The phylograms inferred from 18S sequences showed closest relationships of the new species with some species belonging to the genus Mesodorylaimus. However, insufficient molecular data for members of both genera do not allow the phylogenetic relationships of Calcaridorylaimus and the new species described herein to be elucidated. PMID:24899849

  18. A review of scuttle fly genera of Israel (Diptera: Phoridae), with new records and an identification key.

    PubMed

    Mostovski, Mike B

    2016-01-01

    A brief review of Israeli scuttle flies is given. The following genera are new records for the country: Arabiphora, Billotia, Chonocephalus, Menozziola, Phalacrotophora, Pseudacteon, Psyllomyia, and Puliciphora. Eighteen species-Arabiphora tenuifemorata, Chonocephalus depressus, Conicera floricola, Conicera similis, Gymnophora integralis, Gymnophora perpropinqua, Megaselia scalaris, Megaselia stigmatica, Menozziola schmitzi, Metopina formicomendicula, Phalacrotophora beuki, Phalacrotophora fasciata, Phora limpida, Phora tincta, Psyllomyia braunsi, Puliciphora rufipes, Spiniphora bergenstammi, and Tubicera lichtwardi-are added to the list of 56 phorid species previously known from Israel. Two species, Conicera similis and Megaselia scalaris, are recorded in association with the summer truffle Tuber aestivum commercially grown in northern Israel. The status of the Afrotropical Phora congolensis Beyer, 1965 is designated as nomen dubium. A lapsius calami, which led to an erroneous generic attribution of Metopina braueri in the paper on Israeli Metopina (Mostovski, 2016), is noted here. An identification key to the Israeli genera of scuttle flies, as well as notes on recognition and/or biology of individual species, are provided. PMID:27395741

  19. Identification of Novel Interacting Partners of Sirtuin6

    PubMed Central

    Polyakova, Oxana; Borman, Satty; Grimley, Rachel; Vamathevan, Jessica; Hayes, Brian; Solari, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    SIRT6 is a member of the Sirtuin family of histone deacetylases that has been implicated in inflammatory, aging and metabolic pathways. Some of its actions have been suggested to be via physical interaction with NFκB and HIF1α and transcriptional regulation through its histone deacetylase activity. Our previous studies have investigated the histone deacetylase activity of SIRT6 and explored its ability to regulate the transcriptional responses to an inflammatory stimulus such as TNFα. In order to develop a greater understanding of SIRT6 function we have sought to identify SIRT6 interacting proteins by both yeast-2-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation studies. We report a number of interacting partners which strengthen previous findings that SIRT6 functions in base excision repair (BER), and novel interactors which suggest a role in nucleosome and chromatin remodeling, the cell cycle and NFκB biology. PMID:23240041

  20. Host associations and incidence of Diuraphis spp. in the Rocky Mountain region of the United States, and pictorial key for their identification.

    PubMed

    Puterka, Gary J; Hammon, Robert W; Burd, John D; Peairs, Frank B; Randolph, Terri; Cooper, W Rodney

    2010-10-01

    The Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia Kurdjumov, is an introduced species first identified in 1986 into the United States. It has since become a major pest of wheat, Triticum aestivum L., and other small grains in the western United States. Three other Diuraphis species, Diuraphis frequens (Walker), Diuraphis mexicana (McVicar Baker), and Diuraphis tritici (Gillette), were already endemic to the United States before the introduction of D. noxia. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence and host associations of these four Diuraphis spp. in the Rocky Mountain region that borders the western Great Plains to better understand their distribution and ecological interactions. In addition, a key to these species with photographs of live or fresh preparations of specimens is presented to aid in their identification. D. noxia was the most widely distributed species in the study area spanning the Rocky Mountain areas of Wyoming, New Mexico, Utah, and Colorado. This species was most common in the cereal-producing areas of the Colorado Plateau ecoregion. D. frequens was found to be the predominant species in the Alpine/Aspen Mountain areas of the South Central Rockies and Colorado Rockies ecoregions. The other Diuraphis species were rarely encountered even though their plant hosts occurred in the ecoregions sampled. D. noxia shared common hosts and was found co-infesting grasses with other Diuraphis species. Therefore, the potential exists for D. noxia to impact the other native Diuraphis species. PMID:21061992

  1. Stochastic Identification of Stability of Competitive Interactions in Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Vach, Marek; Vachová, Pavla

    2016-01-01

    The problem of finding an optimum within a set of possibilities that represent the varying successfulness of numerous subjects competing with one another is highly relevant in the field of ecosystem interactions. We propose a method for solving this problem by the application of the Nash equilibrium concept, which is frequently used in ecology. The proposed model is based on the transformation of the initial payoff vectors of subjects that interact in different situations into a statistical set of symmetrical game matrices that consist of permutations of payoff values. The equilibrium solution is expressed as values of the probability of Nash equilibrium occurrence with uniform distribution over all possible permutations based on uncertainty of positions of payoff values in the matrix. We assume that this equilibrium solution provides information on the distribution of the degree of stability among individual situations and interacting subjects. In this paper, we validate this assumption and demonstrate its application to a dataset that represents interspecies interactions in plant ecology. We propose that the use of the Nash equilibrium in the analysis of datasets formalized according to the Pareto optimality scheme is applicable in numerous other contexts. PMID:27171283

  2. Interaction Effects of Campus Racial Composition and Student Racial Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Ghazaleh, Nabil; Hoffman, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Drawing upon a sample of 13,025 students who attended the nine majority minority colleges of the Los Angeles Community College District, this study examined the interaction effects of the racial composition of the colleges on student persistence. Special attention was given to variables that paired students' race to the racial demography of the…

  3. Stochastic Identification of Stability of Competitive Interactions in Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Vach, Marek; Vachová, Pavla

    2016-01-01

    The problem of finding an optimum within a set of possibilities that represent the varying successfulness of numerous subjects competing with one another is highly relevant in the field of ecosystem interactions. We propose a method for solving this problem by the application of the Nash equilibrium concept, which is frequently used in ecology. The proposed model is based on the transformation of the initial payoff vectors of subjects that interact in different situations into a statistical set of symmetrical game matrices that consist of permutations of payoff values. The equilibrium solution is expressed as values of the probability of Nash equilibrium occurrence with uniform distribution over all possible permutations based on uncertainty of positions of payoff values in the matrix. We assume that this equilibrium solution provides information on the distribution of the degree of stability among individual situations and interacting subjects. In this paper, we validate this assumption and demonstrate its application to a dataset that represents interspecies interactions in plant ecology. We propose that the use of the Nash equilibrium in the analysis of datasets formalized according to the Pareto optimality scheme is applicable in numerous other contexts. PMID:27171283

  4. MAX--An Interactive Computer Program for Teaching Identification of Clay Minerals by X-ray Diffraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohut, Connie K.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses MAX, an interactive computer program for teaching identification of clay minerals based on standard x-ray diffraction characteristics. The program provides tutorial-type exercises for identification of 16 clay standards, self-evaluation exercises, diffractograms of 28 soil clay minerals, and identification of nonclay minerals. (MDH)

  5. Identification of Global Ferredoxin Interaction Networks in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Peden, Erin A.; Boehm, Marko; Mulder, David W.; Davis, ReAnna; Old, William M.; King, Paul W.; Ghirardi, Maria L.; Dubini, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Ferredoxins (FDXs) can distribute electrons originating from photosynthetic water oxidation, fermentation, and other reductant-generating pathways to specific redox enzymes in different organisms. The six FDXs identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are not fully characterized in terms of their biological function. In this report, we present data from the following: (a) yeast two-hybrid screens, identifying interaction partners for each Chlamydomonas FDX; (b) pairwise yeast two-hybrid assays measuring FDX interactions with proteins from selected biochemical pathways; (c) affinity pulldown assays that, in some cases, confirm and even expand the interaction network for FDX1 and FDX2; and (d) in vitro NADP+ reduction and H2 photo-production assays mediated by each FDX that verify their role in these two pathways. Our results demonstrate new potential roles for FDX1 in redox metabolism and carbohydrate and fatty acid biosynthesis, for FDX2 in anaerobic metabolism, and possibly in state transition. Our data also suggest that FDX3 is involved in nitrogen assimilation, FDX4 in glycolysis and response to reactive oxygen species, and FDX5 in hydrogenase maturation. Finally, we provide experimental evidence that FDX1 serves as the primary electron donor to two important biological pathways, NADPH and H2 photo-production, whereas FDX2 is capable of driving these reactions at less than half the rate observed for FDX1. PMID:24100040

  6. Identification and Comparison of Aberrant Key Regulatory Networks in Breast, Colon, Liver, Lung, and Stomach Cancers through Methylome Database Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byungtak; Kang, Seongeun; Jeong, Gookjoo; Park, Sung-Bin; Kim, Sun Jung

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant methylation of specific CpG sites at the promoter is widely responsible for genesis and development of various cancer types. Even though the microarray-based methylome analyzing techniques have contributed to the elucidation of the methylation change at the genome-wide level, the identification of key methylation markers or top regulatory networks appearing common in highly incident cancers through comparison analysis is still limited. In this study, we in silico performed the genome-wide methylation analysis on each 10 sets of normal and cancer pairs of five tissues: breast, colon, liver, lung, and stomach. The methylation array covers 27,578 CpG sites, corresponding to 14,495 genes, and significantly hypermethylated or hypomethylated genes in the cancer were collected (FDR adjusted p-value <0.05; methylation difference >0.3). Analysis of the dataset confirmed the methylation of previously known methylation markers and further identified novel methylation markers, such as GPX2, CLDN15, and KL. Cluster analysis using the methylome dataset resulted in a diagram with a bipartite mode distinguishing cancer cells from normal cells regardless of tissue types. The analysis further revealed that breast cancer was closest with lung cancer, whereas it was farthest from colon cancer. Pathway analysis identified that either the “cancer” related network or the “cancer” related bio-function appeared as the highest confidence in all the five cancers, whereas each cancer type represents its tissue-specific gene sets. Our results contribute toward understanding the essential abnormal epigenetic pathways involved in carcinogenesis. Further, the novel methylation markers could be applied to establish markers for cancer prognosis. PMID:24842468

  7. Revisiting cobalt chloride preconditioning to prevent hypobaric hypoxia-induced damage: identification of global proteomic alteration and key networks.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Yasmin; Mishra, Shalini; Arya, Adtiya; Paul, Subhojit; Sharma, Manish; Prasad, Jyotsna; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have supported the hypoxia mimetic roles and cytoprotective properties of cobalt chloride in vitro and in vivo. However, a clear understanding of biological process-based mechanism that integrates the available information remains unknown. This study was aimed to explore the potential mechanism of cobalt chloride deciphering its benefits and well-known physiological challenge caused by hypobaric hypoxia that reportedly affects nearly 24 % of the global population. In order to explore the mechanism of CoCl2, we used global proteomic and systems biology approach in rat model to provide a deeper insight into molecular mechanisms of preconditioning. Furthermore, key conclusions were drawn based on biological network analysis and their enrichment with ontological overlaps. The study was further strengthened by consistent identification of validation of proteins using immunoblotting. CoCl2-pretreated animals exposed to hypoxia showed two significant networks, one lipid metabolism and other cell cycle associated, with a total score of 23 and eight focus molecules. In this study, we delineated two primary routes: one, by direct modulation of reactive oxygen species metabolism and, second, by regulation of lipid metabolism which was not known until now. The previously known benefits of cobalt chloride during physiological challenge by hypobaric hypoxia are convincing and could be explained by some basic set of metabolic and molecular reorganization within the hypoxia model. Interestingly, we also observed some of the completely unknown roles of cobalt chloride such as regulation of lipid that could undulate the translational roles of cobalt chloride supplementation beyond hypoxia preconditioning. PMID:26882918

  8. Calcaridorylaimus castaneae sp. n. (Nematoda, Dorylaimidae) from Bulgaria with an identification key to the species of the genus

    PubMed Central

    Nedelchev, Sevdan; Elshishka, Milka; Lazarova, Stela; Radoslavov, Georgi; Hristov, Peter; Peneva, Vlada

    2014-01-01

    Abstract An unknown species belonging to the genusCalcaridorylaimus Andrássy, 1986 was collected from the litter of broadleaf forests dominated by Castanea sativa Mill. and mixed with Quercus daleshampii Ten. and Fagus sylvatica L. on Belasitsa Mountain, south-western Bulgaria. Calcaridorylaimus castaneae sp. n. is characterised by its long body (1.4–2.1 mm), lip region practically not offset, vulva transverse, short odontostyle (14.5–16 μm) and tail (75.5–110.5 μm, c=14.7–23.6; c’=2.9–4.4) in females and 38–46 μm long spicules with small spur before their distant end in males. It is most similar to C. andrassyi Ahmad & Shaheen, 2004, but differs in having transverse vs pore-like vulva and shorter spicules (38–46 μm vs 52–57 μm). An identification key to the species of the genus Calcaridorylaimus is proposed. Phylogenetic analyses were performed on 18S and D2-D3 expansion domains of 28S rRNA genes by Neighbor-Joining, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference methods. The phylograms inferred from 18S sequences showed closest relationships of the new species with some species belonging to the genus Mesodorylaimus. However, insufficient molecular data for members of both genera do not allow the phylogenetic relationships of Calcaridorylaimus and the new species described herein to be elucidated. PMID:24899849

  9. Key Considerations and Methods in the Study of Gene-Environment Interactions.

    PubMed

    Simon, Paul H G; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Tremblay, Johanne; Hamet, Pavel

    2016-08-01

    With increased involvement of genetic data in most epidemiological investigations, gene-environment (G × E) interactions now stand as a topic, which must be meticulously assessed and thoroughly understood. The level, mode, and outcomes of interactions between environmental factors and genetic traits have the capacity to modulate disease risk. These must, therefore, be carefully evaluated as they have the potential to offer novel insights on the "missing heritability problem", reaching beyond our current limitations. First, we review a definition of G × E interactions. We then explore how concepts such as the early manifestation of the genetic components of a disease, the heterogeneity of complex traits, the clear definition of epidemiological strata, and the effect of varying physiological conditions can affect our capacity to detect (or miss) G × E interactions. Lastly, we discuss the shortfalls of regression models to study G × E interactions and how other methods such as the ReliefF algorithm, pattern recognition methods, or the LASSO (Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator) method can enable us to more adequately model G × E interactions. Overall, we present the elements to consider and a path to follow when studying genetic determinants of disease in order to uncover potential G × E interactions. PMID:27037711

  10. Identification of Crew-Systems Interactions and Decision Related Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Sharon Monica; Evans, Joni K.; Reveley, Mary S.; Withrow, Colleen A.; Ancel, Ersin; Barr, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    NASA Vehicle System Safety Technology (VSST) project management uses systems analysis to identify key issues and maintain a portfolio of research leading to potential solutions to its three identified technical challenges. Statistical data and published safety priority lists from academic, industry and other government agencies were reviewed and analyzed by NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) systems analysis personnel to identify issues and future research needs related to one of VSST's technical challenges, Crew Decision Making (CDM). The data examined in the study were obtained from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Aviation Accident and Incident Data System, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Accident/Incident Data System and the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS). In addition, this report contains the results of a review of safety priority lists, information databases and other documented references pertaining to aviation crew systems issues and future research needs. The specific sources examined were: Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST) Safety Enhancements Reserved for Future Implementation (SERFIs), Flight Deck Automation Issues (FDAI) and NTSB Most Wanted List and Open Recommendations. Various automation issues taxonomies and priority lists pertaining to human factors, automation and flight design were combined to create a list of automation issues related to CDM.

  11. Quantification of cytosolic interactions identifies Ede1 oligomers as key organizers of endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Boeke, Dominik; Trautmann, Susanne; Meurer, Matthias; Wachsmuth, Malte; Godlee, Camilla; Knop, Michael; Kaksonen, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is a highly conserved intracellular trafficking pathway that depends on dynamic protein–protein interactions between up to 60 different proteins. However, little is known about the spatio-temporal regulation of these interactions. Using fluorescence (cross)-correlation spectroscopy in yeast, we tested 41 previously reported interactions in vivo and found 16 to exist in the cytoplasm. These detected cytoplasmic interactions included the self-interaction of Ede1, homolog of mammalian Eps15. Ede1 is the crucial scaffold for the organization of the early stages of endocytosis. We show that oligomerization of Ede1 through its central coiled coil domain is necessary for its localization to the endocytic site and we link the oligomerization of Ede1 to its function in locally concentrating endocytic adaptors and organizing the endocytic machinery. Our study sheds light on the importance of the regulation of protein–protein interactions in the cytoplasm for the assembly of the endocytic machinery in vivo. PMID:25366307

  12. Identification of proteins interacting with ammodytoxins in Vipera ammodytes ammodytes venom by immuno-affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Brgles, Marija; Kurtović, Tihana; Kovačič, Lidija; Križaj, Igor; Barut, Miloš; Lang Balija, Maja; Allmaier, Günter; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Halassy, Beata

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform their function, proteins frequently interact with other proteins. Various methods are used to reveal protein interacting partners, and affinity chromatography is one of them. Snake venom is composed mostly of proteins, and various protein complexes in the venom have been found to exhibit higher toxicity levels than respective components separately. Complexes can modulate envenomation activity of a venom and/or potentiate its effect. Our previous data indicate that the most toxic components of the Vipera ammodytes ammodytes (Vaa) venom isolated so far-ammodytoxins (Atxs)-are contributing to the venom's toxicity only moderately; therefore, we aimed to explore whether they have some interacting partner(s) potentiating toxicity. For screening of possible interactions, immuno-affinity chromatography combined with identification by mass spectrometry was used. Various chemistries (epoxy, carbonyldiimidazole, ethylenediamine) as well as protein G functionality were used to immobilize antibodies on monolith support, a Convective Interaction Media disk. Monoliths have been demonstrated to better suit the separation of large biomolecules. Using such approach, several proteins were indicated as potential Atx-binding proteins. Among these, the interaction of Atxs with a Kunitz-type inhibitor was confirmed by far-Western dot-blot and surface plasmon resonance measurement. It can be concluded that affinity chromatography on monolithic columns combined with mass spectrometry identification is a successful approach for screening of protein interactions and it resulted with detection of the interaction of Atx with Kunitz-type inhibitor in Vaa venom for the first time. PMID:24217948

  13. Connecting with The Biggest Loser: an extended model of parasocial interaction and identification in health-related reality TV shows.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yan; Yoo, Jina H

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates audience responses to health-related reality TV shows in the setting of The Biggest Loser. It conceptualizes a model for audience members' parasocial interaction and identification with cast members and explores antecedents and outcomes of parasocial interaction and identification. Data analysis suggests the following direct relationships: (1) audience members' exposure to the show is positively associated with parasocial interaction, which in turn is positively associated with identification, (2) parasocial interaction is positively associated with exercise self-efficacy, whereas identification is negatively associated with exercise self-efficacy, and (3) exercise self-efficacy is positively associated with exercise behavior. Indirect effects of parasocial interaction and identification on exercise self-efficacy and exercise behavior are also significant. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings. PMID:24579692

  14. Key intermolecular interactions in the E. coli 70S ribosome revealed by coarse-grained analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y; Voth, Gregory A

    2011-10-26

    The ribosome is a very large complex that consists of many RNA and protein molecules and plays a central role in protein biosynthesis in all organisms. Extensive interactions between different molecules are critical to ribosomal functional dynamics. In this work, intermolecular interactions in the Escherichia coli 70S ribosome are investigated by coarse-grained (CG) analysis. CG models are defined to preserve dynamic domains in RNAs and proteins and to capture functional motions in the ribosome, and then the CG sites are connected by harmonic springs, and spring constants are obtained by matching the computed fluctuations to those of an all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Those spring constants indicate how strong the interactions are between the ribosomal components, and they are in good agreement with various experimental data. Nearly all the bridges between the small and large ribosomal subunits are indicated by CG interactions with large spring constants. The head of the small subunit is very mobile because it has minimal CG interactions with the rest of the subunit; however, a large number of small subunit proteins bind to maintain the internal structure of the head. The results show a clear connection between the intermolecular interactions and the structural and functional properties of the ribosome because of the reduced complexity in domain-based CG models. The present approach also provides a useful strategy to map interactions between molecules within large biomolecular complexes since it is not straightforward to investigate these by either atomistic MD simulations or residue-based elastic network models. PMID:21910449

  15. A prototype framework for models of socio-hydrology: identification of key feedback loops and parameterisation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshafei, Y.; Sivapalan, M.; Tonts, M.; Hipsey, M. R.

    2014-06-01

    It is increasingly acknowledged that, in order to sustainably manage global freshwater resources, it is critical that we better understand the nature of human-hydrology interactions at the broader catchment system scale. Yet to date, a generic conceptual framework for building models of catchment systems that include adequate representation of socioeconomic systems - and the dynamic feedbacks between human and natural systems - has remained elusive. In an attempt to work towards such a model, this paper outlines a generic framework for models of socio-hydrology applicable to agricultural catchments, made up of six key components that combine to form the coupled system dynamics: namely, catchment hydrology, population, economics, environment, socioeconomic sensitivity and collective response. The conceptual framework posits two novel constructs: (i) a composite socioeconomic driving variable, termed the Community Sensitivity state variable, which seeks to capture the perceived level of threat to a community's quality of life, and acts as a key link tying together one of the fundamental feedback loops of the coupled system, and (ii) a Behavioural Response variable as the observable feedback mechanism, which reflects land and water management decisions relevant to the hydrological context. The framework makes a further contribution through the introduction of three macro-scale parameters that enable it to normalise for differences in climate, socioeconomic and political gradients across study sites. In this way, the framework provides for both macro-scale contextual parameters, which allow for comparative studies to be undertaken, and catchment-specific conditions, by way of tailored "closure relationships", in order to ensure that site-specific and application-specific contexts of socio-hydrologic problems can be accommodated. To demonstrate how such a framework would be applied, two socio-hydrological case studies, taken from the Australian experience, are presented

  16. Identification of Posttranslational Modification-Dependent Protein Interactions Using Yeast Surface Displayed Human Proteome Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact specifically with posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation is often necessary to understand cellular signaling pathways. Numerous methods for identifying proteins that interact with posttranslational modifications have been utilized, including affinity-based purification and analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and tethered catalysis. Although these techniques have been used successfully, each has limitations. Recently, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries have been utilized to identify protein fragments with affinity for various target molecules, including phosphorylated peptides. When coupled with fluorescently activated cell sorting and high throughput methods for the analysis of selection outputs, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries can rapidly and efficiently identify protein fragments with affinity for any soluble ligand that can be fluorescently detected, including posttranslational modifications. In this review we compare the use of yeast surface display libraries to other methods for the identification of interactions between proteins and posttranslational modifications and discuss future applications of the technology. PMID:26060076

  17. Identification of Posttranslational Modification-Dependent Protein Interactions Using Yeast Surface Displayed Human Proteome Libraries.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact specifically with posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation is often necessary to understand cellular signaling pathways. Numerous methods for identifying proteins that interact with posttranslational modifications have been utilized, including affinity-based purification and analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and tethered catalysis. Although these techniques have been used successfully, each has limitations. Recently, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries have been utilized to identify protein fragments with affinity for various target molecules, including phosphorylated peptides. When coupled with fluorescently activated cell sorting and high throughput methods for the analysis of selection outputs, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries can rapidly and efficiently identify protein fragments with affinity for any soluble ligand that can be fluorescently detected, including posttranslational modifications. In this review we compare the use of yeast surface display libraries to other methods for the identification of interactions between proteins and posttranslational modifications and discuss future applications of the technology. PMID:26060076

  18. Identification of Proteins Interacting with GTP Cyclohydrolase I

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jianhai; Xu, Hao; Wei, Na; Wakim, Bassam; Halligan, Brian; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.; Shi, Yang

    2009-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH-1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, an essential cofactor for nitric oxide synthase and aromatic amino acid hydroxylase. To explore the interactome of GCH-1, we established a HEK293 cell line stably expressing tetracycline-inducible FLAG-GCH-1. FLAG-GCH-1 and associated proteins were immunoprecipitated and analyzed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Twenty-nine proteins, derived from different subcellular components such as cytosol, membranes, nucleus and mitochondria were identified to interact with GCH-1. Cell fractionation studies also showed that GCH-1 was present in the cytosol, membranes and nucleus. Gene ontology analysis revealed that GCH-1 interactome was involved in a variety of biological processes such as signal transduction, apoptosis, metabolism, transport and cell organization. To our knowledge, this study is the first to provide a comprehensive analysis of the GCH-1 interactome. Findings expand the number and diversity of proteins that are known to associate with GCH-1. PMID:19442649

  19. Identification of Key Factors Involved in the Biosorption of Patulin by Inactivated Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Zhouli; Yuan, Yahong; Cai, Rui; Niu, Chen; Yue, Tianli

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the key factors involved in patulin adsorption by heat-inactivated lactic acid bacteria (LAB) cells. For preventing bacterial contamination, a sterilization process was involved in the adsorption process. The effects of various physical, chemical, and enzymatic pre-treatments, simultaneous treatments, and post-treatments on the patulin adsorption performances of six LAB strains were evaluated. The pre-treated cells were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the removal of patulin by viable cells was mainly based on adsorption or degradation, depending on the specific strain. The adsorption abilities were widely increased by NaOH and esterification pre-treatments, and reduced by trypsin, lipase, iodate, and periodate pre-treatments. Additionally, the adsorption abilities were almost maintained at pH 2.2–4.0, and enhanced significantly at pH 4.0–6.0. The effects of sodium and magnesium ions on the adsorption abilities at pH 4 were slight and strain-specific. A lower proportion of patulin was released from the strain with higher adsorption ability. Analyses revealed that the physical structure of peptidoglycan was not a principal factor. Vicinal OH and carboxyl groups were not involved in patulin adsorption, while alkaline amino acids, thiol and ester compounds were important for patulin adsorption. Additionally, besides hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction also participated in patulin adsorption, which was enhanced with the increase in pH (4.0–6.0). PMID:26581099

  20. Detection and identification of protein interactions of S100 proteins by ProteinChip technology.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Roland; Melle, Christian; Escher, Niko; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to establish an approach for identification of protein interactions. This assay used an anti-S100A8 antibody coupled on beads and incubated with cell extract. The bead eluates were analyzed using ProteinChip technology and subsequently subjected to an appropriate digestion. Molecular masses of digestion fragments were determined by SELDI-MS, and database analysis revealed S100A10 as interacting protein. This result was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and immunocapturing. Using S100A10 as new bait, a specific interaction with S100A7 was detectable. PMID:16212425

  1. Arrestin2/Clathrin Interaction is Regulated by Key N- and C-terminal Regions in Arrestin2+

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Ronald C.; Kang, Dong Soo; Benovic, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of non-visual arrestins with clathrin is an important step in mediating the endocytosis of cell surface receptors. Previous studies have shown that mutation of the clathrin-binding box in arrestin leads to severe defects in arrestin mediated trafficking. However, little is known about how arrestin/clathrin interaction is regulated. Here we show that both the N- and C-terminal regions of arrestin2 function to inhibit basal interaction with clathrin. Truncation analysis revealed that clathrin binding increases as the C-tail of arrestin2 is shortened while site-directed mutagenesis identified Glu-404, Glu-405, and Glu-406 as being primarily responsible for this inhibition. Mutagenesis also identified Lys-4, Arg-7, Lys-10, and Lys-11 within the N-terminus as playing a key role regulating clathrin binding. Based on similarities with visual arrestin, Lys-10 and Lys-11 likely function as phospho-sensors in arrestin2 to initially discriminate the phosphorylation status of target receptors. Analysis of the arrestin2 structure reveals that Arg-7, Lys-10 and Lys-11 are in close proximity to Glu-389 and Asp-390, suggesting that these residues may form intramolecular interactions. In fact, simultaneous mutation of Glu-389 and Asp-390 also leads to enhanced clathrin binding. These results reveal that multiple intramolecular interactions coordinately regulate arrestin2 interaction with clathrin, highlighting this interaction as a critical step in regulating receptor trafficking. PMID:19555118

  2. Simple Protein Complex Purification and Identification Method Suitable for High- throughput Mapping of Protein Interaction Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Markillie, Lye Meng; Lin, Chiann Tso; Adkins, Joshua N.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Hill, Eric A.; Hooker, Brian S.; Moore, Priscilla A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Shi, Liang; Wiley, H. S.; Kery, Vladimir

    2005-04-11

    Most of the current methods for purification and identification of protein complexes use endogenous expression of affinity tagged bait, tandem affinity tag purification of protein complexes followed by specific elution of complexes from beads, gel separation, in-gel digestion and mass spectrometric analysis of protein interactors. We propose a single affinity tag in vitro pulldown assay with denaturing elution, trypsin digestion in organic solvent and LC ESI MS/MS protein identification using SEQUEST analysis. Our method is simple, easy to scale up and automate thus suitable for high throughput mapping of protein interaction networks and functional proteomics.

  3. Key role of asymmetric interactions in low-dimensional heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shunda; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Jiao; Zhao, Hong

    2016-03-01

    We study the heat current autocorrelation function (HCAF) in one-dimensional, momentum-conserving lattices. In particular, we explore if there is any link between the decaying characteristics of the HCAF and asymmetric interparticle interactions. The Lennard-Jones model is investigated intensively in view of its significance to applications. It is found that, in the time range accessible to numerical simulations, the HCAF decays faster than power-law manners, and in some cases it decays even exponentially. Following the Green-Kubo formula, fast decay of the HCAF implies convergence of the heat conductivity, which is also corroborated by simulations. In addition, with a comparison to the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-β model of symmetric interactions, the HCAF of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-α-β model of asymmetric interactions is also investigated. The results of all these studies lead to that, in certain ranges of parameters, fast decaying of the HCAF can be observed and correlated to the asymmetry degree of interactions.

  4. Electrostatic Interactions Are Key to C═O n-π* Shifts: An Experimental Proof.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Tapas; Bagchi, Sayan

    2016-06-16

    Carbonyl n-π* transitions are known to undergo blue shift in polar and hydrogen-bonding solvents. Using semiempirical expressions, previous studies hypothesized several factors like change in dipole moment and hydrogen-bond strength upon excitation to cause the blue shift. Theoretically, ground-state electrostatics has been predicted to be the key to the observed shifts, however, an experimental proof has been lacking. Our experimental results demonstrate a consistent linear correlation between IR (ground-state phenomenon) and n-π* frequency shifts (involves both ground and excited electronic-states) of carbonyls in hydrogen-bonded and non-hydrogen-bonded environments. The carbonyl hydrogen-bonding status is experimentally verified from deviation in n-π*/fluorescence correlation. The IR/n-π* correlation validates the key role of electrostatic stabilization of the ground state toward n-π* shifts and demonstrates the electrostatic nature of carbonyl hydrogen bonds. n-π* shifts show linear sensitivity to calculated electrostatic fields on carbonyls. Our results portray the potential for n-π* absorption to estimate local polarity in biomolecules and to probe chemical reactions involving carbonyl activation/stabilization. PMID:27249517

  5. Gene–environment interactions: key to unraveling the mystery of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui-Ming; Hong, Jau-shyong

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease. The gradual, irreversible loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra isthe signature lesion of PD. Clinical symptoms of PD become apparent when 50–60% of nigral dopamine neurons are lost. PD progresses insidiously for 5–7 years (preclinical period) and then continues to worsen even under the symptomatic treatment. To determine what triggers the disease onset and what drives the chronic, self-propelling neurodegenerative process becomes critical and urgent, since lack of such knowledge impedes the discovery of effective treatments to retard PD progression. At present, available therapeutics only temporarily relieve PD symptoms. While the identification of causative gene defects in familial PD uncovers important genetic influences in this disease, the majority of PD cases are sporadic and idiopathic. The current consensus suggests that PD develops from multiple risk factors including aging, genetic predisposition, and environmental exposure. Here, we briefly review research on the genetic and environmental causes of PD. We also summarize very recent genome-wide association studies on risk gene polymorphisms in the emergence of PD. We highlight the new converging evidence on gene-environment interplay in the development of PD with an emphasis on newly developed multiple-hit PD models involving both genetic lesions and environmental triggers. PMID:21439347

  6. Identification of brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 as an interaction partner of glutaminase interacting protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zencir, Sevil; Ovee, Mohiuddin; Dobson, Melanie J.; Banerjee, Monimoy; Topcu, Zeki; Mohanty, Smita

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2) is a new partner protein for GIP. {yields} BAI2 interaction with GIP was revealed by yeast two-hybrid assay. {yields} Binding of BAI2 to GIP was characterized by NMR, CD and fluorescence. {yields} BAI2 and GIP binding was mediated through the C-terminus of BAI2. -- Abstract: The vast majority of physiological processes in living cells are mediated by protein-protein interactions often specified by particular protein sequence motifs. PDZ domains, composed of 80-100 amino acid residues, are an important class of interaction motif. Among the PDZ-containing proteins, glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), also known as Tax Interacting Protein TIP-1, is unique in being composed almost exclusively of a single PDZ domain. GIP has important roles in cellular signaling, protein scaffolding and modulation of tumor growth and interacts with a number of physiological partner proteins, including Glutaminase L, {beta}-Catenin, FAS, HTLV-1 Tax, HPV16 E6, Rhotekin and Kir 2.3. To identify the network of proteins that interact with GIP, a human fetal brain cDNA library was screened using a yeast two-hybrid assay with GIP as bait. We identified brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2), a member of the adhesion-G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), as a new partner of GIP. BAI2 is expressed primarily in neurons, further expanding GIP cellular functions. The interaction between GIP and the carboxy-terminus of BAI2 was characterized using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy assays. These biophysical analyses support the interaction identified in the yeast two-hybrid assay. This is the first study reporting BAI2 as an interaction partner of GIP.

  7. Phosphotransferase protein EIIANtr interacts with SpoT, a key enzyme of the stringent response, in Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Karstens, Katja; Zschiedrich, Christopher P; Bowien, Botho; Stülke, Jörg; Görke, Boris

    2014-04-01

    EIIA(Ntr) is a member of a truncated phosphotransferase (PTS) system that serves regulatory functions and exists in many Proteobacteria in addition to the sugar transport PTS. In Escherichia coli, EIIA(Ntr) regulates K(+) homeostasis through interaction with the K(+) transporter TrkA and sensor kinase KdpD. In the β-Proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16, EIIA(Ntr) influences formation of the industrially important bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB). PHB accumulation is controlled by the stringent response and induced under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. Knockout of EIIA(Ntr) increases the PHB content. In contrast, absence of enzyme I or HPr, which deliver phosphoryl groups to EIIA(Ntr), has the opposite effect. To clarify the role of EIIA(Ntr) in PHB formation, we screened for interacting proteins that co-purify with Strep-tagged EIIA(Ntr) from R. eutropha cells. This approach identified the bifunctional ppGpp synthase/hydrolase SpoT1, a key enzyme of the stringent response. Two-hybrid and far-Western analyses confirmed the interaction and indicated that only non-phosphorylated EIIA(Ntr) interacts with SpoT1. Interestingly, this interaction does not occur between the corresponding proteins of E. coli. Vice versa, interaction of EIIA(Ntr) with KdpD appears to be absent in R. eutropha, although R. eutropha EIIA(Ntr) can perfectly substitute its homologue in E. coli in regulation of KdpD activity. Thus, interaction with KdpD might be an evolutionary 'ancient' task of EIIA(Ntr) that was subsequently replaced by interaction with SpoT1 in R. eutropha. In conclusion, EIIA(Ntr) might integrate information about nutritional status, as reflected by its phosphorylation state, into the stringent response, thereby controlling cellular PHB content in R. eutropha. PMID:24515609

  8. Identification of protein disulfide isomerase 1 as a key isomerase for disulfide bond formation in apolipoprotein B100.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiyu; Park, Shuin; Kodali, Vamsi K; Han, Jaeseok; Yip, Theresa; Chen, Zhouji; Davidson, Nicholas O; Kaufman, Randal J

    2015-02-15

    Apolipoprotein (apo) B is an obligatory component of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), and its cotranslational and posttranslational modifications are important in VLDL synthesis, secretion, and hepatic lipid homeostasis. ApoB100 contains 25 cysteine residues and eight disulfide bonds. Although these disulfide bonds were suggested to be important in maintaining apoB100 function, neither the specific oxidoreductase involved nor the direct role of these disulfide bonds in apoB100-lipidation is known. Here we used RNA knockdown to evaluate both MTP-dependent and -independent roles of PDI1 in apoB100 synthesis and lipidation in McA-RH7777 cells. Pdi1 knockdown did not elicit any discernible detrimental effect under normal, unstressed conditions. However, it decreased apoB100 synthesis with attenuated MTP activity, delayed apoB100 oxidative folding, and reduced apoB100 lipidation, leading to defective VLDL secretion. The oxidative folding-impaired apoB100 was secreted mainly associated with LDL instead of VLDL particles from PDI1-deficient cells, a phenotype that was fully rescued by overexpression of wild-type but not a catalytically inactive PDI1 that fully restored MTP activity. Further, we demonstrate that PDI1 directly interacts with apoB100 via its redox-active CXXC motifs and assists in the oxidative folding of apoB100. Taken together, these findings reveal an unsuspected, yet key role for PDI1 in oxidative folding of apoB100 and VLDL assembly. PMID:25518935

  9. The plasma-wall interaction region: a key low temperature plasma for controlled fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Counsell, G. F.

    2002-08-01

    The plasma-wall interaction region of a fusion device provides the interface between the hot core plasma and the material surfaces. To obtain acceptably low levels of erosion from these surfaces requires most of the power leaving the core to be radiated. This is accomplished in existing devices by encouraging plasma detachment, in which the hot plasma arriving in the region is cooled by volume recombination and ion-neutral momentum transfer with a dense population of neutrals recycled from the surface. The result is a low temperature (1 eV1019 m-3) but weakly ionized (n0>1020 m-3, ne/n0<0.1) plasma found nowhere else in the fusion environment. This plasma provides many of the conditions found in industrial plasmas exploiting plasma chemistry and the presence of carbon in the region (in the form of carbon-fibre composite used in the plasma facing materials) can result in the formation of deposited hydrocarbon films. The plasma-wall interaction region is therefore among the most difficult in fusion to model, requiring an understanding of atomic, molecular and surface physics issues.

  10. Interactive voice response systems for medication identification requests: poison or cure?

    PubMed

    Benson, Blaine E

    2011-11-01

    Interactive voice response systems (IVR) have traditionally been used by banking and credit card industries to rapidly process information requests for their customers. Today IVR technology is being used in clinical medicine to randomize patients in clinical studies, to collect patient data, and to follow-up on recently discharged patients. Use of IVR systems by poison centers is relatively new. This commentary explores the advantages and disadvantages of applying IVR technology to the medication identification requests in poison centers. PMID:22077245

  11. Establishment of a Protein Frequency Library and Its Application in the Reliable Identification of Specific Protein Interaction Partners*

    PubMed Central

    Boulon, Séverine; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Verheggen, Céline; Cobley, Andy; Gregor, Peter; Bertrand, Edouard; Whitehorn, Mark; Lamond, Angus I.

    2010-01-01

    The reliable identification of protein interaction partners and how such interactions change in response to physiological or pathological perturbations is a key goal in most areas of cell biology. Stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based mass spectrometry has been shown to provide a powerful strategy for characterizing protein complexes and identifying specific interactions. Here, we show how SILAC can be combined with computational methods drawn from the business intelligence field for multidimensional data analysis to improve the discrimination between specific and nonspecific protein associations and to analyze dynamic protein complexes. A strategy is shown for developing a protein frequency library (PFL) that improves on previous use of static “bead proteomes.” The PFL annotates the frequency of detection in co-immunoprecipitation and pulldown experiments for all proteins in the human proteome. It can provide a flexible and objective filter for discriminating between contaminants and specifically bound proteins and can be used to normalize data values and facilitate comparisons between data obtained in separate experiments. The PFL is a dynamic tool that can be filtered for specific experimental parameters to generate a customized library. It will be continuously updated as data from each new experiment are added to the library, thereby progressively enhancing its utility. The application of the PFL to pulldown experiments is especially helpful in identifying either lower abundance or less tightly bound specific components of protein complexes that are otherwise lost among the large, nonspecific background. PMID:20023298

  12. Large-scale identification of potential drug targets based on the topological features of human protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhan-Chao; Zhong, Wen-Qian; Liu, Zhi-Qing; Huang, Meng-Hua; Xie, Yun; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiao-Yong

    2015-04-29

    Identifying potential drug target proteins is a crucial step in the process of drug discovery and plays a key role in the study of the molecular mechanisms of disease. Based on the fact that the majority of proteins exert their functions through interacting with each other, we propose a method to recognize target proteins by using the human protein-protein interaction network and graph theory. In the network, vertexes and edges are weighted by using the confidence scores of interactions and descriptors of protein primary structure, respectively. The novel network topological features are defined and employed to characterize protein using existing databases. A widely used minimum redundancy maximum relevance and random forests algorithm are utilized to select the optimal feature subset and construct model for the identification of potential drug target proteins at the proteome scale. The accuracies of training set and test set are 89.55% and 85.23%. Using the constructed model, 2127 potential drug target proteins have been recognized and 156 drug target proteins have been validated in the database of drug target. In addition, some new drug target proteins can be considered as targets for treating diseases of mucopolysaccharidosis, non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, Bernard-Soulier syndrome and pseudo-von Willebrand, etc. It is anticipated that the proposed method may became a powerful high-throughput virtual screening tool of drug target. PMID:25847157

  13. Dynamic Transcription Factor Activity Profiles Reveal Key Regulatory Interactions During Megakaryocytic and Erythroid Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Mark T.; Shin, Seungjin; Wu, Jia J.; Mays, Zachary; Weng, Stanley; Bagheri, Neda; Miller, William M.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2014-01-01

    The directed differentiation toward erythroid (E) or megakaryocytic (MK) lineages by the MK-E progenitor (MEP) could enhance the ex vivo generation of red blood cells and platelets for therapeutic transfusions. The lineage choice at the MEP bifurcation is controlled in large part by activity within the intracellular signal transduction network, the output of which determines the activity of transcription factors (TFs) and ultimately gene expression. Although many TFs have been implicated, E or MK differentiation is a complex process requiring multiple days, and the dynamics of TF activities during commitment and terminal maturation are relatively unexplored. Herein, we applied a living cell array for the large-scale, dynamic quantification of TF activities during MEP bifurcation. A panel of hematopoietic TFs (GATA-1, GATA-2, SCL/TAL1, FLI-1, NF-E2, PU.1, c-Myb) was characterized during E and MK differentiation of bipotent K562 cells. Dynamic TF activity profiles associated with differentiation towards each lineage were identified, and validated with previous reports. From these activity profiles, we show that GATA-1 is an important hub during early hemin- and PMA-induced differentiation, and reveal several characteristic TF interactions for E and MK differentiation that confirm regulatory mechanisms documented in the literature. Additionally, we highlight several novel TF interactions at various stages of E and MK differentiation. Furthermore, we investigated the mechanism by which nicotinamide (NIC) promoted terminal MK maturation using an MK-committed cell line, CHRF-288-11 (CHRF). Concomitant with its enhancement of ploidy, NIC strongly enhanced the activity of three TFs with known involvement in terminal MK maturation: FLI-1, NF-E2, and p53. Dynamic profiling of TF activity represents a novel tool to complement traditional assays focused on mRNA and protein expression levels to understand progenitor cell differentiation. PMID:24853077

  14. A bridge between liquids and socio-economic systems: the key role of interaction strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2005-03-01

    One distinctive and pervasive aspect of social systems is the fact that they involve several kinds of agents. Thus, in order to draw parallels with physical systems one is led to consider binary (or multi-component) compounds. Recent views about the mixing of liquids in solutions gained from neutron and X-ray scattering show these systems to have a number of similarities with socio-economic systems. It appears that such phenomena as rearrangement of bonds in a solution, gas condensation, and selective evaporation of molecules can be transposed in a natural way to some socio-economic phenomena. These connections provide with a novel perspective for looking at social systems which we illustrate through examples. For instance, we interpret suicide as an escape phenomenon and in order to test this interpretation we consider social systems characterized by very low levels of social interaction. For these systems suicide rates are found to be 10 to 100 times higher than in the general population. Another interesting parallel concerns the phase transition that occurs when locusts gather together to form swarms which may contain several billion insects. What hinders the thorough investigation of such cases from the standpoint of collective phenomena that we advocate is the lack or inadequacy of statistical data; up to now socio-economic data were collected for completely different purposes. Most essential, for further progress, are the statistics which would permit to estimate the strength of social ties and interactions. Once adequate data become available, rapid advancement may be expected. At the end of the paper, we will discuss whether or not the ergodic principle applies to social systems.

  15. Dynamic transcription factor activity profiles reveal key regulatory interactions during megakaryocytic and erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Mark T; Shin, Seungjin; Wu, Jia J; Mays, Zachary; Weng, Stanley; Bagheri, Neda; Miller, William M; Shea, Lonnie D

    2014-10-01

    The directed differentiation toward erythroid (E) or megakaryocytic (MK) lineages by the MK-E progenitor (MEP) could enhance the ex vivo generation of red blood cells and platelets for therapeutic transfusions. The lineage choice at the MEP bifurcation is controlled in large part by activity within the intracellular signal transduction network, the output of which determines the activity of transcription factors (TFs) and ultimately gene expression. Although many TFs have been implicated, E or MK differentiation is a complex process requiring multiple days, and the dynamics of TF activities during commitment and terminal maturation are relatively unexplored. Herein, we applied a living cell array for the large-scale, dynamic quantification of TF activities during MEP bifurcation. A panel of hematopoietic TFs (GATA-1, GATA-2, SCL/TAL1, FLI-1, NF-E2, PU.1, c-Myb) was characterized during E and MK differentiation of bipotent K562 cells. Dynamic TF activity profiles associated with differentiation towards each lineage were identified, and validated with previous reports. From these activity profiles, we show that GATA-1 is an important hub during early hemin- and PMA-induced differentiation, and reveal several characteristic TF interactions for E and MK differentiation that confirm regulatory mechanisms documented in the literature. Additionally, we highlight several novel TF interactions at various stages of E and MK differentiation. Furthermore, we investigated the mechanism by which nicotinamide (NIC) promoted terminal MK maturation using an MK-committed cell line, CHRF-288-11 (CHRF). Concomitant with its enhancement of ploidy, NIC strongly enhanced the activity of three TFs with known involvement in terminal MK maturation: FLI-1, NF-E2, and p53. Dynamic profiling of TF activity represents a novel tool to complement traditional assays focused on mRNA and protein expression levels to understand progenitor cell differentiation. PMID:24853077

  16. The Prediction of Key Cytoskeleton Components Involved in Glomerular Diseases Based on a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Wenjun; Li, Xuejuan; Li, Shao; Ding, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of the physiological morphologies of different types of cells and tissues is essential for the normal functioning of each system in the human body. Dynamic variations in cell and tissue morphologies depend on accurate adjustments of the cytoskeletal system. The cytoskeletal system in the glomerulus plays a key role in the normal process of kidney filtration. To enhance the understanding of the possible roles of the cytoskeleton in glomerular diseases, we constructed the Glomerular Cytoskeleton Network (GCNet), which shows the protein-protein interaction network in the glomerulus, and identified several possible key cytoskeletal components involved in glomerular diseases. In this study, genes/proteins annotated to the cytoskeleton were detected by Gene Ontology analysis, and glomerulus-enriched genes were selected from nine available glomerular expression datasets. Then, the GCNet was generated by combining these two sets of information. To predict the possible key cytoskeleton components in glomerular diseases, we then examined the common regulation of the genes in GCNet in the context of five glomerular diseases based on their transcriptomic data. As a result, twenty-one cytoskeleton components as potential candidate were highlighted for consistently down- or up-regulating in all five glomerular diseases. And then, these candidates were examined in relation to existing known glomerular diseases and genes to determine their possible functions and interactions. In addition, the mRNA levels of these candidates were also validated in a puromycin aminonucleoside(PAN) induced rat nephropathy model and were also matched with existing Diabetic Nephropathy (DN) transcriptomic data. As a result, there are 15 of 21 candidates in PAN induced nephropathy model were consistent with our predication and also 12 of 21 candidates were matched with differentially expressed genes in the DN transcriptomic data. By providing a novel interaction network and prediction, GCNet

  17. The phospholipid code: a key component of dying cell recognition, tumor progression and host-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Baxter, A A; Hulett, M D; Poon, I K H

    2015-12-01

    A significant effort is made by the cell to maintain certain phospholipids at specific sites. It is well described that proteins involved in intracellular signaling can be targeted to the plasma membrane and organelles through phospholipid-binding domains. Thus, the accumulation of a specific combination of phospholipids, denoted here as the 'phospholipid code', is key in initiating cellular processes. Interestingly, a variety of extracellular proteins and pathogen-derived proteins can also recognize or modify phospholipids to facilitate the recognition of dying cells, tumorigenesis and host-microbe interactions. In this article, we discuss the importance of the phospholipid code in a range of physiological and pathological processes. PMID:26450453

  18. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks’ robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance.

  19. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks’ robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance. PMID:26582089

  20. Blind identification of the Millikan Library from earthquake data considering soil–structure interaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ghahari, S. F.; Abazarsa, F.; Avci, O.; Celebi, Mehmet; Taciroglu, E.

    2016-01-01

    The Robert A. Millikan Library is a reinforced concrete building with a basement level and nine stories above the ground. Located on the campus of California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena California, it is among the most densely instrumented buildings in the U.S. From the early dates of its construction, it has been the subject of many investigations, especially regarding soil–structure interaction effects. It is well accepted that the structure is significantly interacting with the surrounding soil, which implies that the true foundation input motions cannot be directly recorded during earthquakes because of inertial effects. Based on this limitation, input–output modal identification methods are not applicable to this soil–structure system. On the other hand, conventional output-only methods are typically based on the unknown input signals to be stationary whitenoise, which is not the case for earthquake excitations. Through the use of recently developed blind identification (i.e. output-only) methods, it has become possible to extract such information from only the response signals because of earthquake excitations. In the present study, we employ such a blind identification method to extract the modal properties of the Millikan Library. We present some modes that have not been identified from force vibration tests in several studies to date. Then, to quantify the contribution of soil–structure interaction effects, we first create a detailed Finite Element (FE) model using available information about the superstructure; and subsequently update the soil–foundation system's dynamic stiffnesses at each mode such that the modal properties of the entire soil–structure system agree well with those obtained via output-only modal identification.

  1. The diaphanous Gene of Drosophila Interacts Antagonistically with multiple wing hairs and Plays a Key Role in Wing Hair Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiuheng; Adler, Paul N.

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila wing is covered by an array of distally pointing hairs that has served as a key model system for studying planar cell polarity (PCP). The adult cuticular hairs are formed in the pupae from cell extensions that contain extensive actin filaments and microtubules. The importance of the actin cytoskeleton for hair growth and morphogenesis is clear from the wide range of phenotypes seen in mutations in well-known actin regulators. Formin proteins promote the formation of long actin filaments of the sort thought to be important for hair growth. We report here that the formin encoding diaphanous (dia) gene plays a key role in hair morphogenesis. Both loss of function mutations and the expression of a constitutively active Dia led to cells forming both morphologically abnormal hairs and multiple hairs. The conserved frizzled (fz)/starry night (stan) PCP pathway functions to restrict hair initiation and activation of the cytoskeleton to the distal most part of wing cells. It also ensures the formation of a single hair per cell. Our data suggest that the localized inhibition of Dia activity may be part of this mechanism. We found the expression of constitutively active Dia greatly expands the region for activation of the cytoskeleton and that dia functions antagonistically with multiple wing hairs (mwh), the most downstream member of the fz/stan pathway. Further we established that purified fragments of Dia and Mwh could be co-immunoprecipitated suggesting the genetic interaction could reflect a direct physical interaction. PMID:25730111

  2. Identification of essential proteins based on ranking edge-weights in protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Sun, Huiyan; Du, Wei; Blanzieri, Enrico; Viero, Gabriella; Xu, Ying; Liang, Yanchun

    2014-01-01

    Essential proteins are those that are indispensable to cellular survival and development. Existing methods for essential protein identification generally rely on knock-out experiments and/or the relative density of their interactions (edges) with other proteins in a Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) network. Here, we present a computational method, called EW, to first rank protein-protein interactions in terms of their Edge Weights, and then identify sub-PPI-networks consisting of only the highly-ranked edges and predict their proteins as essential proteins. We have applied this method to publicly-available PPI data on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Yeast) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) for essential protein identification, and demonstrated that EW achieves better performance than the state-of-the-art methods in terms of the precision-recall and Jackknife measures. The highly-ranked protein-protein interactions by our prediction tend to be biologically significant in both the Yeast and E. coli PPI networks. Further analyses on systematically perturbed Yeast and E. coli PPI networks through randomly deleting edges demonstrate that the proposed method is robust and the top-ranked edges tend to be more associated with known essential proteins than the lowly-ranked edges. PMID:25268881

  3. A survey of electronic drug information resources and identification of problems associated with the differing vocabularies used to key them.

    PubMed Central

    Gnassi, J. A.; Barnett, G. O.

    1993-01-01

    Drug information resources are increasingly becoming electronically available. They differ in scope, granularity, and purpose. These considerations have shaped the selection of dissimilar drug name keys, complicating access. An abbreviated and simplified historical context of the development of official controlled vocabularies and their relationships is followed by a review of the kinds of information available in several electronic drug information resources. The key vocabularies used are discussed with examples. Problems using the differing terms of the resource vocabularies are identified. PMID:8130551

  4. Information flow between interacting human brains: Identification, validation, and relationship to social expertise.

    PubMed

    Bilek, Edda; Ruf, Matthias; Schäfer, Axel; Akdeniz, Ceren; Calhoun, Vince D; Schmahl, Christian; Demanuele, Charmaine; Tost, Heike; Kirsch, Peter; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2015-04-21

    Social interactions are fundamental for human behavior, but the quantification of their neural underpinnings remains challenging. Here, we used hyperscanning functional MRI (fMRI) to study information flow between brains of human dyads during real-time social interaction in a joint attention paradigm. In a hardware setup enabling immersive audiovisual interaction of subjects in linked fMRI scanners, we characterize cross-brain connectivity components that are unique to interacting individuals, identifying information flow between the sender's and receiver's temporoparietal junction. We replicate these findings in an independent sample and validate our methods by demonstrating that cross-brain connectivity relates to a key real-world measure of social behavior. Together, our findings support a central role of human-specific cortical areas in the brain dynamics of dyadic interactions and provide an approach for the noninvasive examination of the neural basis of healthy and disturbed human social behavior with minimal a priori assumptions. PMID:25848050

  5. The tandem affinity purification method: an efficient system for protein complex purification and protein interaction identification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoli; Song, Yuan; Li, Yuhua; Chang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Hua; An, Lizhe

    2010-08-01

    Isolation and identification of protein partners in multi-protein complexes are important in gaining further insights into the cellular roles of proteins and determining the possible mechanisms by which proteins have an effect in the molecular environment. The tandem affinity purification (TAP) method was originally developed in yeast for the purification of protein complexes and identification of protein-protein interactions. With modifications to this method and many variations in the original tag made over the past few years, the TAP system could be applied in mammalian, plant, bacteria and other systems for protein complex analysis. In this review, we describe the application of the TAP method in various organisms, the modification in the tag, the disadvantages, the developments and the future prospects of the TAP method. PMID:20399864

  6. Research on Key Factors and Their Interaction Effects of Electromagnetic Force of High-Speed Solenoid Valve

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Liyun; Xu, De; Ma, Xiuzhen; Song, Enzhe

    2014-01-01

    Analysis consisting of numerical simulations along with lab experiments of interaction effects between key parameters on the electromagnetic force based on response surface methodology (RSM) has been also proposed to optimize the design of high-speed solenoid valve (HSV) and improve its performance. Numerical simulation model of HSV has been developed in Ansoft Maxwell environment and its accuracy has been validated through lab experiments. Effect of change of core structure, coil structure, armature structure, working air gap, and drive current on the electromagnetic force of HSV has been analyzed through simulation model and influence rules of various parameters on the electromagnetic force have been established. The response surface model of the electromagnetic force has been utilized to analyze the interaction effect between major parameters. It has been concluded that six interaction factors including working air gap with armature radius, drive current with armature thickness, coil turns with side pole radius, armature thickness with its radius, armature thickness with side pole radius, and armature radius with side pole radius have significant influence on the electromagnetic force. Optimal match values between coil turns and side pole radius; armature thickness and side pole radius; and armature radius and side pole radius have also been determined. PMID:25243217

  7. Addressing key concepts in physical geography through interactive learning activities in an online geo-ICT environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, Gert; Steegen, An; Martens, Lotte

    2016-04-01

    The increasing number of geospatial datasets and free online geo-ICT tools offers new opportunities for education in Earth Sciences. Geospatial technology indeed provides an environment through which interactive learning can be introduced in Earth Sciences curricula. However, the effectiveness of such e-learning approaches in terms of learning outcomes has rarely been addressed. Here, we present our experience with the implementation of digital interactive learning activities within an introductory Physical Geography course attended by 90 undergraduate students in Geography, Geology, Biology and Archaeology. Two traditional lectures were replaced by interactive sessions (each 2 h) in a flexible classroom where students had to work both in team and individually in order to explore some key concepts through the integrated use of geospatial data within Google EarthTM. A first interactive lesson dealt with the classification of river systems and aimed to examine the conditions under which rivers tend to meander or to develop a braided pattern. Students were required to collect properties of rivers (river channel pattern, channel slope, climate, discharge, lithology, vegetation, etc). All these data are available on a global scale and have been added as separate map layers in Google EarthTM. Each student collected data for at least two rivers and added this information to a Google Drive Spreadsheet accessible to the entire group. This resulted in a database of more than one hundred rivers spread over various environments worldwide. In a second phase small groups of students discussed the potential relationships between river channel pattern and its controlling factors. Afterwards, the findings of each discussion group were presented to the entire audience. The same set-up was followed in a second interactive session to explore spatial variations in ecosystem properties such as net primary production and soil carbon content. The qualitative evaluation of both interactive

  8. Interactions between the transmembrane domains of CD39: identification of interacting residues by yeast selection

    PubMed Central

    Paavilainen, Sari; Guidotti, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Rat CD39, a membrane-bound ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase that hydrolyzes extracellular nucleoside tri- and diphosphates, is anchored to the membrane by two transmembrane domains at the two ends of the molecule. The transmembrane domains are important for enzymatic activity, as mutants lacking one or both of these domains have a fraction of the enzymatic activity of the wild-type CD39. We investigated the interactions between the transmembrane domains by using a strain of yeast that requires surface expression of CD39 for growth. Random mutagenesis of selected amino acid residues in the N-terminal transmembrane domain revealed that the presence of charged amino acids at these positions prevents expression of functional protein. Rescue of the growth of these mutants by complementary mutations on selected residues of the C-terminal transmembrane domain indicates that there is contact between particular faces of the transmembrane domains. PMID:26258004

  9. Revision of the new world genus Crassomicrodus Ashmead (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Agathidinae), with an identification key to species

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, José Isaac; Sharkey, Michael Joseph; Nápoles, Jesus Romero; García, José Antonio Sánchez; Martínez, Ana Mabel; López-Martínez, Victor; Pineda, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A key to species and descriptions are presented for 14 species of the New World genus Crassomicrodus Ashmead. Seven new species, Crassomicrodus azteca, Crassomicrodus clypealis, Crassomicrodus costaricensis, Crassomicrodus jalisciensis, Crassomicrodus mariae, Crassomicrodus oaxaquensis,and Crassomicrodus olgae are described. Crassomicrodus fenestratus (Viereck) is synonymized with Crassomicrodus nigriceps (Cresson). Crassomicrodus melanopleurus (Ashmead) is recognized as a valid species. PMID:22144862

  10. The crane fly genus Libnotes Westwood, 1876 (Diptera: Limoniidae) for Korea including two new species and an identification key.

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas

    2016-01-01

    Two new species of crane flies, Libnotes (Libnotes) charlesyoungi n. sp. and L. (L.) jirisana n. sp. are described. Libnotes (Afrolimonia) plutonis (Alexander, 1924) is described for the first time on the Korean Peninsula. A key for all Korean Libnotes spp. is presented. PMID:27615875

  11. Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis adherence-mediating components: a review of key methods to confirm adhesin function

    PubMed Central

    Ramsugit, Saiyur; Pillay, Manormoney

    2016-01-01

    Anti-adhesion therapy represents a potentially promising avenue for the treatment and prevention of tuberculosis in a post-antibiotic era. Adhesins are surface-exposed microbial structures or molecules that enable pathogenic organisms to adhere to host surfaces, a fundamental step towards host infection. Although several Mycobacterium tuberculosis adhesins have been identified, it is predicted that numerous additional adherence-mediating components contribute to the virulence and success of this pathogen. Significant further research to discern and characterize novel M. tuberculosis adhesins is, therefore, required to gain a holistic account of M. tuberculosis adhesion to the host. This would enable the identification of potential drug and vaccine targets for attenuating M. tuberculosis adherence and infectivity. Several methods have been successfully applied to the study and identification of M. tuberculosis adhesins. In this manuscript, we review these methods, which include adherence assays that utilize wild-type and gene knockout mutant strains, epitope masking and competitive inhibition analyses, extracellular matrix protein binding assays, microsphere adhesion assays, M. tuberculosis auto-aggregation assays, and in silico analyses. PMID:27482337

  12. Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis adherence-mediating components: a review of key methods to confirm adhesin function.

    PubMed

    Ramsugit, Saiyur; Pillay, Manormoney

    2016-06-01

    Anti-adhesion therapy represents a potentially promising avenue for the treatment and prevention of tuberculosis in a post-antibiotic era. Adhesins are surface-exposed microbial structures or molecules that enable pathogenic organisms to adhere to host surfaces, a fundamental step towards host infection. Although several Mycobacterium tuberculosis adhesins have been identified, it is predicted that numerous additional adherence-mediating components contribute to the virulence and success of this pathogen. Significant further research to discern and characterize novel M. tuberculosis adhesins is, therefore, required to gain a holistic account of M. tuberculosis adhesion to the host. This would enable the identification of potential drug and vaccine targets for attenuating M. tuberculosis adherence and infectivity. Several methods have been successfully applied to the study and identification of M. tuberculosis adhesins. In this manuscript, we review these methods, which include adherence assays that utilize wild-type and gene knockout mutant strains, epitope masking and competitive inhibition analyses, extracellular matrix protein binding assays, microsphere adhesion assays, M. tuberculosis auto-aggregation assays, and in silico analyses. PMID:27482337

  13. Identification of AFB1-interacting proteins and interactions between RPSA and AFB1.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Zhenhong; Huang, Yaling; Yang, Yanling; Wang, Shihua

    2016-01-15

    A method using immobilized affinity chromatography (IAC) was developed to screen for aflatoxin B1 (AFB1)-binding proteins. AFB1 and bovine serum albumin (BSA) coupled protein (BSA-AFB1) was prepared using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride. The resulting coupled compound was immobilized onto PVDF transfer membranes, which were then incubated with total protein from mouse liver. AFB1-binding proteins were eluted, after non-specific washing, by specific elution, and the eluted proteins were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two candidate AFB1-binding proteins were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry as the 40S ribosomal protein SA (RPSA) and a putative uncharacterized protein. RPSA and AFB1 interactions were further analyzed by ELISA in vitro and laser confocal immunofluorescence analysis in vivo. The results from ELISA and immunofluorescence showed that RPSA efficiently bound AFB1 in vitro and in vivo. This study's conclusion laid the foundation for further exploration of the role of AFB1-binding proteins in AFB1 toxicology towards hepatocytes and the entry pathway of AFB1 into hepatocytes. PMID:26372695

  14. Identification of Small-Molecule Frequent Hitters of Glutathione S-Transferase-Glutathione Interaction.

    PubMed

    Brenke, Jara K; Salmina, Elena S; Ringelstetter, Larissa; Dornauer, Scarlett; Kuzikov, Maria; Rothenaigner, Ina; Schorpp, Kenji; Giehler, Fabian; Gopalakrishnan, Jay; Kieser, Arnd; Gul, Sheraz; Tetko, Igor V; Hadian, Kamyar

    2016-07-01

    In high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns, the binding of glutathione S-transferase (GST) to glutathione (GSH) is used for detection of GST-tagged proteins in protein-protein interactions or enzyme assays. However, many false-positives, so-called frequent hitters (FH), arise that either prevent GST/GSH interaction or interfere with assay signal generation or detection. To identify GST-FH compounds, we analyzed the data of five independent AlphaScreen-based screening campaigns to classify compounds that inhibit the GST/GSH interaction. We identified 53 compounds affecting GST/GSH binding but not influencing His-tag/Ni(2+)-NTA interaction and general AlphaScreen signals. The structures of these 53 experimentally identified GST-FHs were analyzed in chemoinformatic studies to categorize substructural features that promote interference with GST/GSH binding. Here, we confirmed several existing chemoinformatic filters and more importantly extended them as well as added novel filters that specify compounds with anti-GST/GSH activity. Selected compounds were also tested using different antibody-based GST detection technologies and exhibited no interference clearly demonstrating specificity toward their GST/GSH interaction. Thus, these newly described GST-FH will further contribute to the identification of FH compounds containing promiscuous substructures. The developed filters were uploaded to the OCHEM website (http://ochem.eu) and are publicly accessible for analysis of future HTS results. PMID:27044684

  15. Computational Method for the Systematic Identification of Analog Series and Key Compounds Representing Series and Their Biological Activity Profiles.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-08-25

    A computational methodology is introduced for detecting all unique series of analogs in large compound data sets, regardless of chemical relationships between analogs. No prior knowledge of core structures or R-groups is required, which are automatically determined. The approach is based upon the generation of retrosynthetic matched molecular pairs and analog networks from which distinct series are isolated. The methodology was applied to systematically extract more than 17 000 distinct series from the ChEMBL database. For comparison, analog series were also isolated from screening compounds and drugs. Known biological activities were mapped to series from ChEMBL, and in more than 13 000 of these series, key compounds were identified that represented substitution sites of all analogs within a series and its complete activity profile. The analog series, key compounds, and activity profiles are made freely available as a resource for medicinal chemistry applications. PMID:27501131

  16. Chemical profiles and identification of key compound caffeine in marine-derived traditional Chinese medicine Ostreae concha.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue; Zhou, Shi-Lu; Ma, Ai-Cui; Xu, Hai-Tao; Guan, Hua-Shi; Liu, Hong-Bing

    2012-05-01

    To compare the chemical differences between the medicinal and cultured oyster shells, their chemical profiles were investigated. Using the ultra performance liquid chromatography-electron spraying ionization-mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS), combined with principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), the discrimination of the chemical characteristics among the medicinal and cultured oyster shells was established. Moreover, the chemometric analysis revealed some potential key compounds. After a large-scale extraction and isolation, one target key compound was unambiguously identified as caffeine based on extensive spectroscopic data analysis (1D and 2D NMR, MS, and UV) and comparison with literature data. PMID:22822365

  17. Chemical Profiles and Identification of Key Compound Caffeine in Marine-Derived Traditional Chinese Medicine Ostreae concha

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue; Zhou, Shi-Lu; Ma, Ai-Cui; Xu, Hai-Tao; Guan, Hua-Shi; Liu, Hong-Bing

    2012-01-01

    To compare the chemical differences between the medicinal and cultured oyster shells, their chemical profiles were investigated. Using the ultra performance liquid chromatography-electron spraying ionization-mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS), combined with principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), the discrimination of the chemical characteristics among the medicinal and cultured oyster shells was established. Moreover, the chemometric analysis revealed some potential key compounds. After a large-scale extraction and isolation, one target key compound was unambiguously identified as caffeine (1) based on extensive spectroscopic data analysis (1D and 2D NMR, MS, and UV) and comparison with literature data. PMID:22822365

  18. Additional records of the laomediid mud-shrimp genus Naushonia Kingsley, 1897 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Gebiidea), with a revised identification key.

    PubMed

    Komai, Tomoyuki; Anker, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Six species of the peculiar mud-shrimp genus Naushonia Kingsley, 1897 (Laomediidae) from various localities in the world are treated in this study: N. carinata Dworschak, Marin & Anker, 2006 (newly recorded from Japan); N. japonica Komai, 2004 (second record since the original description); N. lactoalbida Berggren, 1992 (newly recorded from Papua New Guinea); N. portoricensis (Rathbun, 1901) (newly recorded from the French Antilles); N. serratipalma Komai & Anker, 2010 (newly recorded from Saudi Arabia); and N. draconis Anker, 2014 (newly recorded from Cuba). A detailed description and new illustrations are provided for N. portoricensis, a species for which a modern description was hitherto unavailable. Gill formula was re-examined in all six species. Colour photographs of living or fresh specimens are provided for most species. A revised key to all known species of Naushonia is presented, a eliminating misinterpretation of an important character in previous keys. PMID:26249909

  19. A proof-of-concept model for the identification of the key events in the infection process with specific reference to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in corneal infections

    PubMed Central

    Soumpasis, Ilias; Knapp, Laura; Pitt, Tyrone

    2015-01-01

    Background It is a common medical practice to characterise an infection based on the causative agent and to adopt therapeutic and prevention strategies targeting the agent itself. However, from an epidemiological perspective, exposure to a microbe can be harmless to a host as a result of low-level exposure or due to host immune response, with opportunistic infection only occurring as a result of changes in the host, pathogen, or surrounding environment. Methods We have attempted to review systematically the key host, pathogen, and environmental factors that may significantly impact clinical outcomes of exposure to a pathogen, using Pseudomonas aeruginosa eye infection as a case study. Results and discussion Extended contact lens wearing and compromised hygiene may predispose users to microbial keratitis, which can be a severe and vision-threatening infection. P. aeruginosa has a wide array of virulence-associated genes and sensing systems to initiate and maintain cell populations at the corneal surface and beyond. We have adapted the well-known concept of the epidemiological triangle in combination with the classic risk assessment framework (hazard identification, characterisation, and exposure) to develop a conceptual pathway-based model that demonstrates the overlapping relationships between the host, the pathogen, and the environment; and to illustrate the key events in P. aeruginosa eye infection. Conclusion This strategy differs from traditional approaches that consider potential risk factors in isolation, and hopefully will aid the identification of data and models to inform preventive and therapeutic measures in addition to risk assessment. Furthermore, this may facilitate the identification of knowledge gaps to direct research in areas of greatest impact to avert or mitigate adverse outcomes of infection. PMID:26546946

  20. The Arabidopsis NRG2 Protein Mediates Nitrate Signaling and Interacts with and Regulates Key Nitrate Regulators[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lufei; Zhang, Chengfei; Li, Zehui; Lei, Zhao; Liu, Fei; Guan, Peizhu; Crawford, Nigel M.

    2016-01-01

    We show that NITRATE REGULATORY GENE2 (NRG2), which we identified using forward genetics, mediates nitrate signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. A mutation in NRG2 disrupted the induction of nitrate-responsive genes after nitrate treatment by an ammonium-independent mechanism. The nitrate content in roots was lower in the mutants than in the wild type, which may have resulted from reduced expression of NRT1.1 (also called NPF6.3, encoding a nitrate transporter/receptor) and upregulation of NRT1.8 (also called NPF7.2, encoding a xylem nitrate transporter). Genetic and molecular data suggest that NRG2 functions upstream of NRT1.1 in nitrate signaling. Furthermore, NRG2 directly interacts with the nitrate regulator NLP7 in the nucleus, but nuclear retention of NLP7 in response to nitrate is not dependent on NRG2. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that genes involved in four nitrogen-related clusters including nitrate transport and response to nitrate were differentially expressed in the nrg2 mutants. A nitrogen compound transport cluster containing some members of the NRT/PTR family was regulated by both NRG2 and NRT1.1, while no nitrogen-related clusters showed regulation by both NRG2 and NLP7. Thus, NRG2 plays a key role in nitrate regulation in part through modulating NRT1.1 expression and may function with NLP7 via their physical interaction. PMID:26744214

  1. Bcl-2 is a novel interacting partner for the 2-oxoglutarate carrier and a key regulator of mitochondrial glutathione.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Heather M; Marquardt, Kristin; Lash, Lawrence H; Linseman, Daniel A

    2012-01-15

    Despite making up only a minor fraction of the total cellular glutathione, recent studies indicate that the mitochondrial glutathione pool is essential for cell survival. Selective depletion of mitochondrial glutathione is sufficient to sensitize cells to mitochondrial oxidative stress (MOS) and intrinsic apoptosis. Glutathione is synthesized exclusively in the cytoplasm and must be actively transported into mitochondria. Therefore, regulation of mitochondrial glutathione transport is a key factor in maintaining the antioxidant status of mitochondria. Bcl-2 resides in the outer mitochondrial membrane where it acts as a central regulator of the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. In addition, Bcl-2 displays an antioxidant-like function that has been linked experimentally to the regulation of cellular glutathione content. We have previously demonstrated a novel interaction between recombinant Bcl-2 and reduced glutathione (GSH), which was antagonized by either Bcl-2 homology-3 domain (BH3) mimetics or a BH3-only protein, recombinant Bim. These previous findings prompted us to investigate if this novel Bcl-2/GSH interaction might play a role in regulating mitochondrial glutathione transport. Incubation of primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) with the BH3 mimetic HA14-1 induced MOS and caused specific depletion of the mitochondrial glutathione pool. Bcl-2 was coimmunoprecipitated with GSH after chemical cross-linking in CGNs and this Bcl-2/GSH interaction was antagonized by preincubation with HA14-1. Moreover, both HA14-1 and recombinant Bim inhibited GSH transport into isolated rat brain mitochondria. To further investigate a possible link between Bcl-2 function and mitochondrial glutathione transport, we next examined if Bcl-2 associated with the 2-oxoglutarate carrier (OGC), an inner mitochondrial membrane protein known to transport glutathione in liver and kidney. After cotransfection of CHO cells, Bcl-2 was coimmunoprecipitated with OGC and this novel

  2. Bcl-2 is a novel interacting partner for the 2-oxoglutarate carrier and a key regulator of mitochondrial glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Heather M.; Marquardt, Kristin; Lash, Lawrence H.; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite making up only a minor fraction of the total cellular glutathione, recent studies indicate that the mitochondrial glutathione pool is essential for cell survival. Selective depletion of mitochondrial glutathione is sufficient to sensitize cells to mitochondrial oxidative stress (MOS)1 and intrinsic apoptosis. Glutathione is synthesized exclusively in the cytoplasm and must be actively transported into mitochondria. Therefore, regulation of mitochondrial glutathione transport is a key factor in maintaining the antioxidant status of mitochondria. Bcl-2 is resident in the outer mitochondrial membrane where it acts as a central regulator of the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. In addition, Bcl-2 displays an antioxidant-like function that has been linked experimentally to the regulation of cellular glutathione content. We have previously demonstrated a novel interaction between recombinant Bcl-2 and reduced glutathione (GSH) which was antagonized by either Bcl-2 homology-3 domain (BH3) mimetics or a BH3-only protein, recombinant Bim. These previous findings prompted us to investigate if this novel Bcl-2/GSH interaction might play a role in regulating mitochondrial glutathione transport. Incubation of primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) with the BH3 mimetic, HA14-1, induced MOS and caused specific depletion of the mitochondrial glutathione pool. Bcl-2 was co-immunoprecipitated with GSH following chemical cross-linking in CGNs and this Bcl-2/GSH interaction was antagonized by pre-incubation with HA14-1. Moreover, both HA14-1 and recombinant Bim inhibited GSH transport into isolated rat brain mitochondria. To further investigate a possible link between Bcl-2 function and mitochondrial glutathione transport, we next examined if Bcl-2 associated with the 2-oxoglutarate carrier (OGC), an inner mitochondrial membrane protein known to transport glutathione in liver and kidney. Following co-transfection of CHO cells, Bcl-2 was co-immunoprecipitated with OGC

  3. A gallery of the key characters to ease identification of Dermanyssus gallinae (Acari: Gamasida: Dermanyssidae) and allow differentiation from Ornithonyssus sylviarum (Acari: Gamasida: Macronyssidae)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dermanyssus gallinae (poultry red mite) is a major threat for the poultry industry and is of significant interest for public health. Identification of D. gallinae can be difficult for scientists not familiar with mite morphology and terminology especially when trying to use identification keys. Moreover, this species may easily be confused with another dermanyssoid mite, Ornithonyssus sylviarum (northern fowl mite), which often shares the same hosts and environment. Methods Specimens of D. gallinae were collected at poultry farms in the Puglia and performed for light and scanning electron microscopy observations, identification and micrographs. Moreover specimens of O. sylviarum were collected separately macerated and mounted on slides for light microscopy observations, identification and pictures. Results The micrographs used in this study, based on LM and SEM observations, highlight the following important identifying characters of D. gallinae: the prominent shoulders of the dorsal shield and the jagged edges of the shield reticulations, the position of setae j1, s1 and the epigynal pores, and the presence on tibia IV pl of one seta. Additional micrographs highlighting the shape of the dorsal (abruptly narrowed posteriorly) and epigynal (narrowly rounded posteriorly) shields and the chelicera (elongate, with distinct digits) of O. sylviarum enable its differentiation from D.gallinae. Conclusion The photographic support provided here (both LM and SEM pictures) can be considered a practical tool for scientists who are not well acquainted with the morphology of D.gallinae, and who are involved with classical and molecular systematics, veterinary and human health aspects of poultry red mites. PMID:22647594

  4. A new species of the genus Asthenara Förster, 1869 (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae) from Mexico with identification key.

    PubMed

    Reshchikov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The genus Asthenara Förster, 1869, belonging to the tribe Pionini of the subfamily Ctenopelmatinae (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae), comprises eight described species (Yu et al. 2012). Two of them are distributed in the Palaearctic Region, and six in the Neotropical region. One Neotropical species is known from Costa Rica (Gauld et al. 1997), the remaining five from Mexico (Kasparyan 2006). Kasparyan (2006) provided a key to the species from the Mexico. To date, no species of the genus have been described from Nearctic region or south of Costa Rica. In this article a new species belonging to Asthenara, collected in the Mexican state of Jalisco is described. PMID:27615834

  5. New species and new records of freshwater Heterolepidoderma (Gastrotricha: Chaetonotidae) from Brazil with an identification key to the genus.

    PubMed

    Garraffoni, André R S; Melchior, Marina P

    2015-01-01

    A new species of freshwater Heterolepidoderma (Gastrotricha) was found in Brazil. Heterolepidoderma mariae sp. nov. is unique in possessing a three-lobed head, three types of dorsal keeled scales, a thin band of cilia on the head, connecting the two bands of ventral cilia, and an interciliary area with elliptical keeled scales with short spines. Heterolepidoderma famaillense Grosso & Drahg, 1991 is reported for the first time outside the type locality in Argentina, and we make some initial remarks on H. aff. majus Remane, 1927, a possible undescribed species. A dichotomous key for all freshwater species of Heterolepidoderma , with distributional data, is also provided. PMID:26701498

  6. Uncertainties in Biologically-Based Modeling of Formaldehyde-Induced Respiratory Cancer Risk: Identification of Key Issues

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Ravi P.; Chen, Chao; Crump, Kenny S.; DeVoney, Danielle; Fox, John F.; Portier, Christopher J.; Schlosser, Paul M.; Thompson, Chad M.; White, Paul

    2009-01-01

    In a series of articles and a health-risk assessment report, scientists at the CIIT Hamner Institutes developed a model (CIIT model) for estimating respiratory cancer risk due to inhaled formaldehyde within a conceptual framework incorporating extensive mechanistic information and advanced computational methods at the toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic levels. Several regulatory bodies have utilized predictions from this model; on the other hand, upon detailed evaluation the California EPA has decided against doing so. In this article, we study the CIIT model to identify key biological and statistical uncertainties that need careful evaluation if such two-stage clonal expansion models are to be used for extrapolation of cancer risk from animal bioassays to human exposure. Broadly, these issues pertain to the use and interpretation of experimental labeling index and tumor data, the evaluation and biological interpretation of estimated parameters, and uncertainties in model specification, in particular that of initiated cells. We also identify key uncertainties in the scale-up of the CIIT model to humans, focusing on assumptions underlying model parameters for cell replication rates and formaldehyde-induced mutation. We discuss uncertainties in identifying parameter values in the model used to estimate and extrapolate DNA protein cross-link levels. The authors of the CIIT modeling endeavor characterized their human risk estimates as “conservative in the face of modeling uncertainties.” The uncertainties discussed in this article indicate that such a claim is premature. PMID:18564991

  7. Identification of the interaction between vimentin and nucleocapsid protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Shi, HongYan; Chen, JianFei; Shi, Da; Dong, Hui; Feng, Li

    2015-03-16

    Nucleocapsid (N) protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) packages viral RNA genome to form a ribonucleoprotein complex. In addition to its function as a structural protein, N protein is involved in cell apoptosis or cell-cycle regulation. N protein possibly interacts with host factors to modulate cellular functions. To identify cellular proteins that interacted with N protein of TGEV, methods of GST pull-down and Co-IP were utilized to precipitate cellular proteins of swine testicular (ST). Bound cellular proteins were resolved by SDS-PAGE. Analysis of interacting proteins by mass spectrometry allowed identification of 15 cellular protein bands representative of 12 cellular proteins including vimentin that bound to N protein. Furthermore, the function of vimentin cytoskeleton in ST cells during TGEV infection was examined. Vimentin cytoskeleton was required for virus replication. The present study thus provides protein-related information about interaction of TGEV N protein with host cell that should be useful for understanding host cell response to coronavirus pathogenesis infection and the underlying mechanism of coronavirus replication. PMID:25533531

  8. Promyelocytic leukemia zinc-finger induction signs mesenchymal stem cell commitment: identification of a key marker for stemness maintenance?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for cartilage and bone tissue engineering given their ability to differentiate into chondrocytes and osteoblasts. However, the common origin of these two specialized cell types raised the question about the identification of regulatory pathways determining the differentiation fate of MSCs into chondrocyte or osteoblast. Methods Chondrogenesis, osteoblastogenesis, and adipogenesis of human and mouse MSC were induced by using specific inductive culture conditions. Expression of promyelocytic leukemia zinc-finger (PLZF) or differentiation markers in MSCs was determined by RT-qPCR. PLZF-expressing MSC were implanted in a mouse osteochondral defect model and the neotissue was analyzed by routine histology and microcomputed tomography. Results We found out that PLZF is not expressed in MSCs and its expression at early stages of MSC differentiation is the mark of their commitment toward the three main lineages. PLZF acts as an upstream regulator of both Sox9 and Runx2, and its overexpression in MSC enhances chondrogenesis and osteogenesis while it inhibits adipogenesis. In vivo, implantation of PLZF-expressing MSC in mice with full-thickness osteochondral defects resulted in the formation of a reparative tissue resembling cartilage and bone. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that absence of PLZF is required for stemness maintenance and its expression is an early event at the onset of MSC commitment during the differentiation processes of the three main lineages. PMID:24564963

  9. Essential protein identification based on essential protein-protein interaction prediction by Integrated Edge Weights.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuexu; Wang, Yan; Pang, Wei; Chen, Liang; Sun, Huiyan; Liang, Yanchun; Blanzieri, Enrico

    2015-07-15

    Essential proteins play a crucial role in cellular survival and development process. Experimentally, essential proteins are identified by gene knockouts or RNA interference, which are expensive and often fatal to the target organisms. Regarding this, an alternative yet important approach to essential protein identification is through computational prediction. Existing computational methods predict essential proteins based on their relative densities in a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. Degree, betweenness, and other appropriate criteria are often used to measure the relative density. However, no matter what criterion is used, a protein is actually ordered by the attributes of this protein per se. In this research, we presented a novel computational method, Integrated Edge Weights (IEW), to first rank protein-protein interactions by integrating their edge weights, and then identified sub PPI networks consisting of those highly-ranked edges, and finally regarded the nodes in these sub networks as essential proteins. We evaluated IEW on three model organisms: Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae), Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). The experimental results showed that IEW achieved better performance than the state-of-the-art methods in terms of precision-recall and Jackknife measures. We had also demonstrated that IEW is a robust and effective method, which can retrieve biologically significant modules by its highly-ranked protein-protein interactions for S. cerevisiae, E. coli, and C. elegans. We believe that, with sufficient data provided, IEW can be used to any other organisms' essential protein identification. A website about IEW can be accessed from http://digbio.missouri.edu/IEW/index.html. PMID:25892709

  10. [Seed germination and key to seedling identification for six native tree species of wetlands from Southeast Mexico].

    PubMed

    Zamora-Cornelio, Luis Felipe; Ochoa-Gaona, Susana; Vargas Simón, Georgina; Castellanos Albores, Jorge; Jong, Bernardus H J de

    2010-06-01

    Wetland tree species are of importance for economic and restoration purposes. We describe the germination process and seedling morphology of six arboreal native species typical of Southeastern Mexico: Annona glabra, Ceiba pentandra, Pachira aquatica, Haematoxylum campechianum, Coccoloba barbadensis and Crataeva tapia. A total of 300 seeds per species were planted in a mixture of sand, cocoa plant husk and black soil (1:1:1), and maintained in a tree nursery with 30% artificial shade, from February to November of 2007. We carried out the morphological characterization, and elaborated a key to seedlings based on: 1) germination type 2) seedling axis and 3) leaf elements. P. aquatica has cryptocotylar hypogeal germination, the others have phanerocotylar epigeal germination. Germination rates were high (>86%), except for C. barbadensis (69%). PMID:20527471

  11. A new species of jumping spider Neonella Gertsch, with notes on the genus and male identification key (Araneae, Salticidae)

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Gonzalo D.; Argañaraz, Carina I.; Gleiser, Raquel M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The American genus Neonella Gertsch, 1936 consists of very small jumping spiders whose biology is not well known. The genus currently includes eleven valid species, of which eight are known from both sexes and two are only known from one sex. This paper describes and illustrates a new species Neonella acostae sp. n., demonstrates male palpal variation in Neonella montana Galiano, 1988, and provides some information on the ecology of three sympatric species. New records of Neonella montana and Neonella minuta Galiano, 1965 are reported. Because the previously described species of Neonella were well illustrated and diagnosed, a dichotomous key to males is given along with genital illustrations of both sexes for all known species. PMID:26692804

  12. A new player in X identification: the CLAMP protein is a key factor in Drosophila dosage compensation

    PubMed Central

    Soruco, Marcela M. L.

    2016-01-01

    Dosage compensation adjusts the expression levels of genes on one or both targeted sex chromosomes in heterogametic species. This process results in the normalized transcriptional output of important and essential gene families encoded on multiple chromosomes. The mechanisms of dosage compensation have been studied in many model organisms, including Drosophila melanogaster (fly), Caenorhabditis elegans (worm), and Mus musculus (mouse). Although the mechanisms of dosage compensations differ among these species, all of these processes rely on the initial discrimination of the X chromosome from autosomes. Recently, a new paradigm for how the X chromosome is targeted for regulation was identified in Drosophila. This mechanism involves a newly identified zinc finger protein, CLAMP. Here, we review important factors involved in dosage compensation across species with special focus on the fly. Understanding how the newly identified CLAMP protein is involved in X targeting in the fly could provide key insights into how the X chromosome is initially identified across species. PMID:25102930

  13. Transcription profile of soybean-root-knot nematode interaction reveals a key role of phythormones in the resistance reaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Root-knot nematodes (RKN– Meloidogyne genus) present extensive challenges to soybean crop. The soybean line (PI 595099) is known to be resistant against specific strains and races of nematode species, thus its differential gene expression analysis can lead to a comprehensive gene expression profiling in the incompatible soybean-RKN interaction. Even though many disease resistance genes have been studied, little has been reported about phytohormone crosstalk on modulation of ROS signaling during soybean-RKN interaction. Results Using 454 technology to explore the common aspects of resistance reaction during both parasitism and resistance phases it was verified that hormone, carbohydrate metabolism and stress related genes were consistently expressed at high levels in infected roots as compared to mock control. Most noteworthy genes include those encoding glycosyltransferases, peroxidases, auxin-responsive proteins and gibberellin-regulated genes. Our data analysis suggests the key role of glycosyltransferases, auxins and components of gibberellin signal transduction, biosynthesis and deactivation pathways in the resistance reaction and their participation in jasmonate signaling and redox homeostasis in mediating aspects of plant growth and responses to biotic stress. Conclusions Based on this study we suggest a reasonable model regarding to the complex mechanisms of crosstalk between plant hormones, mainly gibberellins and auxins, which can be crucial to modulate the levels of ROS in the resistance reaction to nematode invasion. The model also includes recent findings concerning to the participation of DELLA-like proteins and ROS signaling controlling plant immune or stress responses. Furthermore, this study provides a dataset of potential candidate genes involved in both nematode parasitism and resistance, which can be tested further for their role in this biological process using functional genomics approaches. PMID:23663436

  14. Identification of SFR6, a key component in cold acclimation acting post-translationally on CBF function.

    PubMed

    Knight, Heather; Mugford, Sarah G; Ulker, Bekir; Gao, Dahai; Thorlby, Glenn; Knight, Marc R

    2009-04-01

    The sfr6-1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana was identified previously on the basis of its failure to undergo acclimation to freezing temperatures following exposure to low positive temperatures. This failure is attributed to a defect in the pathway leading to cold on-regulated (COR) gene expression via CBF (C-box binding factor) transcription factors. We identified a region of chromosome 4 containing SFR6 by positional mapping. Fine mapping of the sfr6-1 mutation proved impossible as the locus resides very close to the centromere. Therefore, we screened 380 T-DNA lines with insertions in genes within the large region to which sfr6-1 mapped. This resulted in the identification of two further mutant alleles of SFR6 (sfr6-2 and sfr6-3); like the original sfr6-1 mutation, these disrupt freezing tolerance and COR gene expression. To determine the protein sequence, we cloned an SFR6 cDNA based on the predicted coding sequence, but this offered no indication as to the mechanism by which SFR6 acts. The SFR6 gene itself is not strongly regulated by cold, thus discounting regulation of SFR6 activity at the transcriptional level. We show that over-expression of CBF1 or CBF2 transcription factors, which constitutively activate COR genes in the wild-type, cannot do so in sfr6-1. We demonstrate that CBF protein accumulates to wild-type levels in response to cold in sfr6-1. These results indicate a role for the SFR6 protein in the CBF pathway -downstream of CBF translation. The fact that the SFR6 protein is targeted to the nucleus may suggest a direct role in modulating gene expression. PMID:19067974

  15. Information flow between interacting human brains: Identification, validation, and relationship to social expertise

    PubMed Central

    Bilek, Edda; Ruf, Matthias; Schäfer, Axel; Akdeniz, Ceren; Calhoun, Vince D.; Schmahl, Christian; Demanuele, Charmaine; Tost, Heike; Kirsch, Peter; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Social interactions are fundamental for human behavior, but the quantification of their neural underpinnings remains challenging. Here, we used hyperscanning functional MRI (fMRI) to study information flow between brains of human dyads during real-time social interaction in a joint attention paradigm. In a hardware setup enabling immersive audiovisual interaction of subjects in linked fMRI scanners, we characterize cross-brain connectivity components that are unique to interacting individuals, identifying information flow between the sender’s and receiver’s temporoparietal junction. We replicate these findings in an independent sample and validate our methods by demonstrating that cross-brain connectivity relates to a key real-world measure of social behavior. Together, our findings support a central role of human-specific cortical areas in the brain dynamics of dyadic interactions and provide an approach for the noninvasive examination of the neural basis of healthy and disturbed human social behavior with minimal a priori assumptions. PMID:25848050

  16. The structure of the human RNase H2 complex defines key interaction interfaces relevant to enzyme function and human disease.

    PubMed

    Reijns, Martin A M; Bubeck, Doryen; Gibson, Lucien C D; Graham, Stephen C; Baillie, George S; Jones, E Yvonne; Jackson, Andrew P

    2011-03-25

    Ribonuclease H2 (RNase H2) is the major nuclear enzyme involved in the degradation of RNA/DNA hybrids and removal of ribonucleotides misincorporated in genomic DNA. Mutations in each of the three RNase H2 subunits have been implicated in a human auto-inflammatory disorder, Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome (AGS). To understand how mutations impact on RNase H2 function we determined the crystal structure of the human heterotrimer. In doing so, we correct several key regions of the previously reported murine RNase H2 atomic model and provide biochemical validation for our structural model. Our results provide new insights into how the subunits are arranged to form an enzymatically active complex. In particular, we establish that the RNASEH2A C terminus is a eukaryotic adaptation for binding the two accessory subunits, with residues within it required for enzymatic activity. This C-terminal extension interacts with the RNASEH2C C terminus and both are necessary to form a stable, enzymatically active heterotrimer. Disease mutations cluster at this interface between all three subunits, destabilizing the complex and/or impairing enzyme activity. Altogether, we locate 25 out of 29 residues mutated in AGS patients, establishing a firm basis for future investigations into disease pathogenesis and function of the RNase H2 enzyme. PMID:21177854

  17. CR6-interacting factor 1 is a key regulator in Aβ-induced mitochondrial disruption and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Byun, J; Son, S M; Cha, M-Y; Shong, M; Hwang, Y J; Kim, Y; Ryu, H; Moon, M; Kim, K-S; Mook-Jung, I

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, often characterized by massive fission and other morphological abnormalities, is a well-known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). One causative mechanism underlying AD-associated mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to be amyloid-β (Aβ), yet the pathways between Aβ and mitochondrial dysfunction remain elusive. In this study, we report that CR6-interacting factor 1 (Crif1), a mitochondrial inner membrane protein, is a key player in Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Specifically, we found that Crif1 levels were downregulated in the pathological regions of Tg6799 mice brains, wherein overexpressed Aβ undergoes self-aggregation. Downregulation of Crif1 was similarly observed in human AD brains as well as in SH-SY5Y cells treated with Aβ. In addition, knockdown of Crif1, using RNA interference, induced mitochondrial dysfunction with phenotypes similar to those observed in Aβ-treated cells. Conversely, Crif1 overexpression prevented Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. Finally, we show that Aβ-induced downregulation of Crif1 is mediated by enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-dependent sumoylation of the transcription factor specificity protein 1 (Sp1). These results identify the ROS-Sp1-Crif1 pathway to be a new mechanism underlying Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and suggest that ROS-mediated downregulation of Crif1 is a crucial event in AD pathology. We propose that Crif1 may serve as a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of AD. PMID:25361083

  18. Revision of the genus Soricinia Spassky & Spasskaja, 1954 (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea: Hymenolepididae) with redescriptions of three species, an amended generic diagnosis and an identification key to species.

    PubMed

    Kornienko, Svetlana; Binkienė, Rasa; Tkach, Vasyl V

    2016-06-01

    Redescriptions of three species of Soricinia Spassky & Spasskaja, 1954 are provided. The type-species of the genus, Soricinia soricis (Baer, 1925), is redescribed on the basis of the holotype from the Alpine shrew Sorex alpinus Schinz collected in Salève Mountain, France. Since the type-material of Soricinia infirma (Żarnowski, 1955) has apparently been lost, a neotype from the type-host Sorex araneus L. and from a region reasonably close to the type-locality (Poltavska Oblast' in the Ukraine), is designated. The type-material of Soricinia quarta (Karpenko, 1983) Karpenko, 1999 from Sorex isodon Turov in Khabarovsk Kray (Russia) is redescribed. A taxonomic revision and an overview of the geographical distribution of species of the genus Soricinia are presented. An amended generic diagnosis and a key to identification of Soricinia spp. are also presented. PMID:27220999

  19. An annotated key to the identification of commonly occurring and dominant genera of algae observed in the phytoplankton of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greeson, Phillip E.

    1982-01-01

    In early 1979, a retrieval was made for all phytoplankton data contained in the computerized data file of the U. S. Geological Survey. The retrieval revealed the analytical results of 17,959 samples collected and processed between October 1973 and October 1978. Of the approximately 500 genera of freshwater algae reported in the United States, the U.S. Geological Survey observed 321 genera in the phytoplankton. Fifty-two genera were considered to be commonly occurring and 42 genera were considered to be community dominants. The report lists, describes, and provides a detailed taxonomic key to the identification of 58 genera of algae considered either commonly occurring or dominant. Also included is a summary of environmental conditions under which each algal genus was observed, as well as a glossary and an extensive list of selected references.

  20. Identification of Critical Paraoxonase 1 Residues Involved in High Density Lipoprotein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaodong; Huang, Ying; Levison, Bruce S; Gerstenecker, Gary; DiDonato, Anthony J; Hazen, Leah B; Lee, Joonsue; Gogonea, Valentin; DiDonato, Joseph A; Hazen, Stanley L

    2016-01-22

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a high density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated protein with atherosclerosis-protective and systemic anti-oxidant functions. We recently showed that PON1, myeloperoxidase, and HDL bind to one another in vivo forming a functional ternary complex (Huang, Y., Wu, Z., Riwanto, M., Gao, S., Levison, B. S., Gu, X., Fu, X., Wagner, M. A., Besler, C., Gerstenecker, G., Zhang, R., Li, X. M., Didonato, A. J., Gogonea, V., Tang, W. H., et al. (2013) J. Clin. Invest. 123, 3815-3828). However, specific residues on PON1 involved in the HDL-PON1 interaction remain unclear. Unambiguous identification of protein residues involved in docking interactions to lipid surfaces poses considerable methodological challenges. Here we describe a new strategy that uses a novel synthetic photoactivatable and click chemistry-taggable phospholipid probe, which, when incorporated into HDL, was used to identify amino acid residues on PON1 that directly interact with the lipoprotein phospholipid surface. Several specific PON1 residues (Leu-9, Tyr-185, and Tyr-293) were identified through covalent cross-links with the lipid probes using affinity isolation coupled to liquid chromatography with on-line tandem mass spectrometry. Based upon the crystal structure for PON1, the identified residues are all localized in relatively close proximity on the surface of PON1, defining a domain that binds to the HDL lipid surface. Site-specific mutagenesis of the identified PON1 residues (Leu-9, Tyr-185, and Tyr-293), coupled with functional studies, reveals their importance in PON1 binding to HDL and both PON1 catalytic activity and stability. Specifically, the residues identified on PON1 provide important structural insights into the PON1-HDL interaction. More generally, the new photoactivatable and affinity-tagged lipid probe developed herein should prove to be a valuable tool for identifying contact sites supporting protein interactions with lipid interfaces such as found on cell membranes

  1. Identification of tissue-specific cis-regulatory modules based on interactions between transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xueping; Lin, Jimmy; Zack, Donald J; Qian, Jiang

    2007-01-01

    Background Evolutionary conservation has been used successfully to help identify cis-acting DNA regions that are important in regulating tissue-specific gene expression. Motivated by increasing evidence that some DNA regulatory regions are not evolutionary conserved, we have developed an approach for cis-regulatory region identification that does not rely upon evolutionary sequence conservation. Results The conservation-independent approach is based on an empirical potential energy between interacting transcription factors (TFs). In this analysis, the potential energy is defined as a function of the number of TF interactions in a genomic region and the strength of the interactions. By identifying sets of interacting TFs, the analysis locates regions enriched with the binding sites of these interacting TFs. We applied this approach to 30 human tissues and identified 6232 putative cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) regulating 2130 tissue-specific genes. Interestingly, some genes appear to be regulated by different CRMs in different tissues. Known regulatory regions are highly enriched in our predicted CRMs. In addition, DNase I hypersensitive sites, which tend to be associated with active regulatory regions, significantly overlap with the predicted CRMs, but not with more conserved regions. We also find that conserved and non-conserved CRMs regulate distinct gene groups. Conserved CRMs control more essential genes and genes involved in fundamental cellular activities such as transcription. In contrast, non-conserved CRMs, in general, regulate more non-essential genes, such as genes related to neural activity. Conclusion These results demonstrate that identifying relevant sets of binding motifs can help in the mapping of DNA regulatory regions, and suggest that non-conserved CRMs play an important role in gene regulation. PMID:17996093

  2. Identification of a key residue in Kv7.1 potassium channel essential for sensing external potassium ions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenying; Flores, Maria Cristina Perez; Sihn, Choong-Ryoul; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Zhang, Yinuo; Doyle, Karen J.; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2015-01-01

    Kv7.1 voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels are present in the apical membranes of marginal cells of the stria vascularis of the inner ear, where they mediate K+ efflux into the scala media (cochlear duct) of the cochlea. As such, they are exposed to the K+-rich (∼150 mM of external K+ (K+e)) environment of the endolymph. Previous studies have shown that Kv7.1 currents are substantially suppressed by high K+e (independent of the effects of altering the electrochemical gradient). However, the molecular basis for this inhibition, which is believed to involve stabilization of an inactivated state, remains unclear. Using sequence alignment of S5-pore linkers of several Kv channels, we identified a key residue, E290, found in only a few Kv channels including Kv7.1. We used substituted cysteine accessibility methods and patch-clamp analysis to provide evidence that the ability of Kv7.1 to sense K+e depends on E290, and that the charge at this position is essential for Kv7.1’s K+e sensitivity. We propose that Kv7.1 may use this feedback mechanism to maintain the magnitude of the endocochlear potential, which boosts the driving force to generate the receptor potential of hair cells. The implications of our findings transcend the auditory system; mutations at this position also result in long QT syndrome in the heart. PMID:25712016

  3. Identification of key performance indicators for on-farm animal welfare incidents: possible tools for early warning and prevention

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to describe aspects of case study herds investigated by the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (DAFF) in which animal welfare incidents occurred and to identify key performance indicators (KPIs) that can be monitored to enhance the Early Warning System (EWS). Despite an EWS being in place for a number of years, animal welfare incidents continue to occur. Questionnaires regarding welfare incidents were sent to Superintending Veterinary Inspectors (SVIs), resulting in 18 herds being chosen as case study herds, 12 of which had a clearly defined welfare incident date. For each study herd, data on six potential KPIs were extracted from DAFF databases. The KPIs for those herds with a clearly defined welfare incident date were studied for a consecutive four year window, with the fourth year being the 'incident year', when the welfare incident was disclosed. For study herds without a clearly defined welfare incident date, the KPIs were determined on a yearly basis between 2001 and 2009. Results We found that the late registration of calves, the use of on-farm burial as a method of carcase disposal, an increasing number of moves to knackeries over time and records of animals moved to 'herd unknown' were notable on the case farms. Conclusion Four KPIs were prominent on the case study farms and warrant further investigation in control herds to determine their potential to provide a framework for refining current systems of early warning and prevention. PMID:21982340

  4. Ruguo key genes and tumor driving factors identification of bladder cancer based on the RNA-seq profile

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Minglei; Li, Hongyan; Zou, Di; Gao, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Aim This study aimed to select several signature genes associated with bladder cancer, thus to investigate the possible mechanism in bladder cancer. Methods The mRNA expression profile data of GSE31614, including ten bladder tissues and ten control samples, was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in bladder cancer samples compared with the control samples were screened using the Student’s t-test method. Functional analysis for the DEGs was analyzed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery from the Gene Ontology database, followed by the transcription function annotation of DEGs from Tumor-Associated Gene database. Motifs of genes that had transcription functions in promoter region were analyzed using the Seqpos. Results A total of 1,571 upregulated and 1,507 downregulated DEGs in the bladder cancer samples were screened. ELF3 and MYBL2 involved in cell cycle and DNA replication were tumor suppressors. MEG3, APEX1, and EZH2 were related with the cell epigenetic regulation in bladder cancer. Moreover, HOXB9 and EN1 that have their own motif were the transcription factors. Conclusion Our study has identified several key genes involved in bladder cancer. ELF3 and MYBL2 are tumor suppressers, HOXB9 and EN1 are the main regulators, while MEG3, APEX1, and EZH2 are driving factors for bladder cancer progression. PMID:27217782

  5. Network understanding of herb medicine via rapid identification of ingredient-target interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Pan, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Chi; Ji, Nan; Wang, Hao; Ji, Zhi-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Today, herb medicines have become the major source for discovery of novel agents in countermining diseases. However, many of them are largely under-explored in pharmacology due to the limitation of current experimental approaches. Therefore, we proposed a computational framework in this study for network understanding of herb pharmacology via rapid identification of putative ingredient-target interactions in human structural proteome level. A marketing anti-cancer herb medicine in China, Yadanzi (Brucea javanica), was chosen for mechanistic study. Total 7,119 ingredient-target interactions were identified for thirteen Yadanzi active ingredients. Among them, about 29.5% were estimated to have better binding affinity than their corresponding marketing drug-target interactions. Further Bioinformatics analyses suggest that simultaneous manipulation of multiple proteins in the MAPK signaling pathway and the phosphorylation process of anti-apoptosis may largely answer for Yadanzi against non-small cell lung cancers. In summary, our strategy provides an efficient however economic solution for systematic understanding of herbs' power. PMID:24429698

  6. Network Understanding of Herb Medicine via Rapid Identification of Ingredient-Target Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Pan, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Chi; Ji, Nan; Wang, Hao; Ji, Zhi-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Today, herb medicines have become the major source for discovery of novel agents in countermining diseases. However, many of them are largely under-explored in pharmacology due to the limitation of current experimental approaches. Therefore, we proposed a computational framework in this study for network understanding of herb pharmacology via rapid identification of putative ingredient-target interactions in human structural proteome level. A marketing anti-cancer herb medicine in China, Yadanzi (Brucea javanica), was chosen for mechanistic study. Total 7,119 ingredient-target interactions were identified for thirteen Yadanzi active ingredients. Among them, about 29.5% were estimated to have better binding affinity than their corresponding marketing drug-target interactions. Further Bioinformatics analyses suggest that simultaneous manipulation of multiple proteins in the MAPK signaling pathway and the phosphorylation process of anti-apoptosis may largely answer for Yadanzi against non-small cell lung cancers. In summary, our strategy provides an efficient however economic solution for systematic understanding of herbs' power.

  7. Revalidation and redescription of Triatoma brasiliensis macromelasoma Galvão, 1956 and an identification key for the Triatoma brasiliensis complex (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae)

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Jane; Correia, Nathália Cordeiro; Neiva, Vanessa Lima; Gonçalves, Teresa Cristina Monte; Felix, Márcio

    2013-01-01

    Triatoma brasiliensis macromelasoma is revalidated based on the results of previous multidisciplinary studies on the Triatoma brasiliensis complex, consisting of crossing experiments and morphological, biological, ecological and molecular analyses. These taxonomic tools showed the closest relationship between T. b. macromelasoma and Triatoma brasiliensis brasiliensis. T. b. macromelasoma is redescribed based on specimens collected in the type locality and specimens from a F1 colony. The complex now comprises T. b. brasiliensis, T. b. macromelasoma, Triatoma melanica, Triatoma juazeirensis and Triatoma sherlocki. An identification key for all members of the complex is presented. This detailed comparative study of the morphological features of T. b. macromelasoma and the remaining members of the complex corroborates results from multidisciplinary analyses, suggesting that the subspecific status is applicable. This subspecies can be distinguished by the following combination of features: a pronotum with 1+1 narrow brownish-yellow stripes on the submedian carinae, not attaining its apex, hemelytra with membrane cells darkened on the central portion and legs with an incomplete brownish-yellow ring on the apical half of the femora. Because the T. brasiliensis complex is of distinct epidemiological importance throughout its geographic distribution, a precise identification of its five members is important for monitoring and controlling actions against Chagas disease transmission. PMID:24037202

  8. Overcoming asymmetric goals in teams: the interactive roles of team learning orientation and team identification.

    PubMed

    Pearsall, Matthew J; Venkataramani, Vijaya

    2015-05-01

    Although members of teams share a common, ultimate objective, they often have asymmetric or conflicting individual goals that shape the way they contribute to, and pursue, the shared goal of the team. Compounding this problem, they are frequently unaware of the nature of these goal asymmetries or even the fact that such differences exist. Drawing on, and integrating, social interdependence and representational gaps theories, we identify 2 emergent states that combine interactively to enable teams to overcome asymmetric goals: team identification and team learning orientation. Using data from long-term, real-life teams that engaged in a computer simulation designed to create both asymmetric goals and representational gaps about those goals, we found that teams were most effective when they had a high learning orientation coupled with high team identification and that this effect was mediated by teams' ability to form more accurate team goal mental models and engage in effective planning processes. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. PMID:25384202

  9. Structure and functioning of Mediterranean lagoon fish assemblages: A key for the identification of water body types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Anita; Franzoi, Piero; Torricelli, Patrizia

    2008-09-01

    Knowledge on the structure and functioning variability of transitional water fish assemblages may help in finding out the main descriptors for identifying different water body types for which specific biological reference conditions can be reliably derived. Fish assemblages from 19 Mediterranean lagoons were therefore investigated by evaluating the variability of their structure and functioning, and by relating it to the lagoons' environmental features. Fish assemblage structure was measured by its species richness. Functioning was measured by categorizing fish species into functional categories (or guilds) according to their use of lagoon habitat, feeding and reproduction, and by defining the functional structure of fish assemblages as the relative number of species per guild in each lagoon. Mediterranean lagoons' fish assemblages were found to be more similar to each other in their functional structure than in the taxonomical composition, thus confirming a shared functional role of these environments for biological communities. Lagoon local features, such as the lagoon area, its habitat heterogeneity and average salinity, significantly affected the total species richness and the different use that fish make of the lagoon environment, hence playing a primary role in the assessment of these water body types. Latitude also influenced the variability of fish assemblages in the Mediterranean lagoons investigated, with particular regard to their functioning as feeding and reproductive grounds for fish. These results are compared with previous studies and, although this limited the investigation to structural aspects only, were found to confirm in part the previous results and also added new insights about the key factors affecting the functioning of transitional water systems.

  10. Identification and Functional Analysis of Delta-9 Desaturase, a Key Enzyme in PUFA Synthesis, Isolated from the Oleaginous Diatom Fistulifera

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Masaki; Kubota, Chihiro; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Satoh, Akira; Matsumoto, Mitsufumi; Yoshino, Tomoko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Oleaginous microalgae are one of the promising resource of nonedible biodiesel fuel (BDF) feed stock alternatives. Now a challenge task is the decrease of the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) content affecting on the BDF oxidative stability by using gene manipulation techniques. However, only the limited knowledge has been available concerning the fatty acid and PUFA synthesis pathways in microalgae. Especially, the function of Δ9 desaturase, which is a key enzyme in PUFA synthesis pathway, has not been determined in diatom. In this study, 4 Δ9 desaturase genes (fD9desA, fD9desB, fD9desC and fD9desD) from the oleaginous diatom Fistulifera were newly isolated and functionally characterized. The putative Δ9 acyl-CoA desaturases in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) showed 3 histidine clusters that are well-conserved motifs in the typical Δ9 desaturase. Furthermore, the function of these Δ9 desaturases was confirmed in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ole1 gene deletion mutant (Δole1). All the putative Δ9 acyl-CoA desaturases showed Δ9 desaturation activity for C16∶0 fatty acids; fD9desA and fD9desB also showed desaturation activity for C18∶0 fatty acids. This study represents the first functional analysis of Δ9 desaturases from oleaginous microalgae and from diatoms as the first enzyme to introduce a double bond in saturated fatty acids during PUFA synthesis. The findings will provide beneficial insights into applying metabolic engineering processes to suppressing PUFA synthesis in this oleaginous microalgal strain. PMID:24039966

  11. Evidence-based identification of key beliefs explaining adult male circumcision motivation in Zimbabwe: targets for behavior change messaging.

    PubMed

    Montaño, Daniel E; Kasprzyk, Danuta; Hamilton, Deven T; Tshimanga, Mufuta; Gorn, Gerald

    2014-05-01

    Male circumcision (MC) reduces HIV acquisition among men, leading WHO/UNAIDS to recommend a goal to circumcise 80 % of men in high HIV prevalence countries. Significant investment to increase MC capacity in priority countries was made, yet only 5 % of the goal has been achieved in Zimbabwe. The integrated behavioral model (IBM) was used as a framework to investigate the factors affecting MC motivation among men in Zimbabwe. A survey instrument was designed based on elicitation study results, and administered to a representative household-based sample of 1,201 men aged 18-30 from two urban and two rural areas in Zimbabwe. Multiple regression analysis found all five IBM constructs significantly explained MC Intention. Nearly all beliefs underlying the IBM constructs were significantly correlated with MC Intention. Stepwise regression analysis of beliefs underlying each construct respectively found that 13 behavioral beliefs, 5 normative beliefs, 4 descriptive norm beliefs, 6 efficacy beliefs, and 10 control beliefs were significant in explaining MC Intention. A final stepwise regression of the five sets of significant IBM construct beliefs identified 14 key beliefs that best explain Intention. Similar analyses were carried out with subgroups of men by urban-rural and age. Different sets of behavioral, normative, efficacy, and control beliefs were significant for each sub-group, suggesting communication messages need to be targeted to be most effective for sub-groups. Implications for the design of effective MC demand creation messages are discussed. This study demonstrates the application of theory-driven research to identify evidence-based targets for intervention messages to increase men's motivation to get circumcised and thereby improve demand for male circumcision. PMID:24443147

  12. Functional identification of APIP as human mtnB, a key enzyme in the methionine salvage pathway.

    PubMed

    Mary, Camille; Duek, Paula; Salleron, Lisa; Tienz, Petra; Bumann, Dirk; Bairoch, Amos; Lane, Lydie

    2012-01-01

    The methionine salvage pathway is widely distributed among some eubacteria, yeast, plants and animals and recycles the sulfur-containing metabolite 5-methylthioadenosine (MTA) to methionine. In eukaryotic cells, the methionine salvage pathway takes place in the cytosol and usually involves six enzymatic activities: MTA phosphorylase (MTAP, EC 2.4.2.28), 5'-methylthioribose-1-phosphate isomerase (mtnA, EC 5.3.1.23), 5'-methylthioribulose-1-phosphate dehydratase (mtnB, EC: 4.2.1.109), 2,3-dioxomethiopentane-1-phosphate enolase/phosphatase (mtnC, EC 3.1.3.77), aci-reductone dioxygenase (mtnD, EC 1.13.11.54) and 4-methylthio-2-oxo-butanoate (MTOB) transaminase (EC 2.6.1.-). The aim of this study was to complete the available information on the methionine salvage pathway in human by identifying the enzyme responsible for the dehydratase step. Using a bioinformatics approach, we propose that a protein called APIP could perform this role. The involvement of this protein in the methionine salvage pathway was investigated directly in HeLa cells by transient and stable short hairpin RNA interference. We show that APIP depletion specifically impaired the capacity of cells to grow in media where methionine is replaced by MTA. Using a Shigella mutant auxotroph for methionine, we confirm that the knockdown of APIP specifically affects the recycling of methionine. We also show that mutation of three potential phosphorylation sites does not affect APIP activity whereas mutation of the potential zinc binding site completely abrogates it. Finally, we show that the N-terminal region of APIP that is missing in the short isoform is required for activity. Together, these results confirm the involvement of APIP in the methionine salvage pathway, which plays a key role in many biological functions like cancer, apoptosis, microbial proliferation and inflammation. PMID:23285211

  13. Functional Identification of APIP as Human mtnB, a Key Enzyme in the Methionine Salvage Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mary, Camille; Duek, Paula; Salleron, Lisa; Tienz, Petra; Bumann, Dirk; Bairoch, Amos; Lane, Lydie

    2012-01-01

    The methionine salvage pathway is widely distributed among some eubacteria, yeast, plants and animals and recycles the sulfur-containing metabolite 5-methylthioadenosine (MTA) to methionine. In eukaryotic cells, the methionine salvage pathway takes place in the cytosol and usually involves six enzymatic activities: MTA phosphorylase (MTAP, EC 2.4.2.28), 5′-methylthioribose-1-phosphate isomerase (mtnA, EC 5.3.1.23), 5′-methylthioribulose-1-phosphate dehydratase (mtnB, EC: 4.2.1.109), 2,3-dioxomethiopentane-1-phosphate enolase/phosphatase (mtnC, EC 3.1.3.77), aci-reductone dioxygenase (mtnD, EC 1.13.11.54) and 4-methylthio-2-oxo-butanoate (MTOB) transaminase (EC 2.6.1.-). The aim of this study was to complete the available information on the methionine salvage pathway in human by identifying the enzyme responsible for the dehydratase step. Using a bioinformatics approach, we propose that a protein called APIP could perform this role. The involvement of this protein in the methionine salvage pathway was investigated directly in HeLa cells by transient and stable short hairpin RNA interference. We show that APIP depletion specifically impaired the capacity of cells to grow in media where methionine is replaced by MTA. Using a Shigella mutant auxotroph for methionine, we confirm that the knockdown of APIP specifically affects the recycling of methionine. We also show that mutation of three potential phosphorylation sites does not affect APIP activity whereas mutation of the potential zinc binding site completely abrogates it. Finally, we show that the N-terminal region of APIP that is missing in the short isoform is required for activity. Together, these results confirm the involvement of APIP in the methionine salvage pathway, which plays a key role in many biological functions like cancer, apoptosis, microbial proliferation and inflammation. PMID:23285211

  14. Identification of Diurnal, Seasonal and Inter-Annual Variability Across SE Asian Field Observations of key Water Cycle Variables: Rainfall, net Radiation, Total Evaporation and River Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solera García, M. A.; Tych, W.; Chappell, N.

    2007-12-01

    The identification of periodic patterns in water cycle variables is critical to the understanding of land-atmosphere interactions, climate change and the evaluation of General Circulation Model (GCM) output. SE Asia in particular plays a very important role on the global climate because it is a large source of energy and water fluxes into the upper atmosphere. Cycle identification is carried out following the Data Based Mechanistic (DBM) philosophy, which focuses on the use of parsimonious, rigorous models which are characterised by lack of a priori assumptions, built in uncertainty analysis and final model acceptance dependent on the physical interpretation of the results. The DBM tool used here is the Unobserved Component - Dynamic Harmonic Regression (UC-DHR) model, which is a statistical method that allows the identification of variability in time series by introducing Time Variable Parameter (TVP) estimation of harmonic components. UC-DHR is not scale dependent and was thus applied to both hourly (to investigate diurnal variation) and fortnightly datasets (for intra- and inter-annual variability). The data used in the analysis has been gathered from existing catchment datasets for three regions of tropical SE Asia, namely Northern Thailand, Central Peninsular Malaysia and Northeast Borneo. These regions were chosen because they represent the hydro-climatic gradient (seasonal to equatorial) present within the tropics and because SE Asia has the most extensive set of catchment/plot studies within the humid tropics. Results show modeling tools were able to quantify the main patterns present in the observations throughout different time scales (diurnal, intra-annual and inter-annual) and the strength of the correlation pattern between the four hydro-climatic variables. The subsequent discussion focuses on the physical processes behind those patterns (e.g. diurnal variability caused by local convection due to solar heating; impact of El Niño Southern Oscillation

  15. Discovery of novel interacting partners of PSMD9, a proteasomal chaperone: Role of an Atypical and versatile PDZ-domain motif interaction and identification of putative functional modules

    PubMed Central

    Sangith, Nikhil; Srinivasaraghavan, Kannan; Sahu, Indrajit; Desai, Ankita; Medipally, Spandana; Somavarappu, Arun Kumar; Verma, Chandra; Venkatraman, Prasanna

    2014-01-01

    PSMD9 (Proteasome Macropain non-ATPase subunit 9), a proteasomal assembly chaperone, harbors an uncharacterized PDZ-like domain. Here we report the identification of five novel interacting partners of PSMD9 and provide the first glimpse at the structure of the PDZ-domain, including the molecular details of the interaction. We based our strategy on two propositions: (a) proteins with conserved C-termini may share common functions and (b) PDZ domains interact with C-terminal residues of proteins. Screening of C-terminal peptides followed by interactions using full-length recombinant proteins, we discovered hnRNPA1 (an RNA binding protein), S14 (a ribosomal protein), CSH1 (a growth hormone), E12 (a transcription factor) and IL6 receptor as novel PSMD9-interacting partners. Through multiple techniques and structural insights, we clearly demonstrate for the first time that human PDZ domain interacts with the predicted Short Linear Sequence Motif (SLIM) at the C-termini of the client proteins. These interactions are also recapitulated in mammalian cells. Together, these results are suggestive of the role of PSMD9 in transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing and editing, hormone and receptor activity and protein translation. Our proof-of-principle experiments endorse a novel and quick method for the identification of putative interacting partners of similar PDZ-domain proteins from the proteome and for discovering novel functions. PMID:25009770

  16. Identification and validation of protein-protein interactions by combining co-immunoprecipitation, antigen competition, and stable isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Frederik; Mühlhaus, Timo; Hemme, Dorothea; Veyel, Daniel; Schroda, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Co-immunoprecipitation (coIP) in combination with mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful tool to identify potential protein-protein interactions. However, unspecifically precipitated proteins usually result in large numbers of false-positive identifications. Here we describe a detailed protocol particularly useful in plant sciences that is based on (15)N stable isotope labeling of cells, (14)N antigen titration, and coIP/MS to distinguish true from false protein-protein interactions. PMID:25059616

  17. Heuristic Identification of Biological Architectures for Simulating Complex Hierarchical Genetic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jason H; Amos, Ryan; Kiralis, Jeff; Andrews, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Simulation plays an essential role in the development of new computational and statistical methods for the genetic analysis of complex traits. Most simulations start with a statistical model using methods such as linear or logistic regression that specify the relationship between genotype and phenotype. This is appealing due to its simplicity and because these statistical methods are commonly used in genetic analysis. It is our working hypothesis that simulations need to move beyond simple statistical models to more realistically represent the biological complexity of genetic architecture. The goal of the present study was to develop a prototype genotype–phenotype simulation method and software that are capable of simulating complex genetic effects within the context of a hierarchical biology-based framework. Specifically, our goal is to simulate multilocus epistasis or gene–gene interaction where the genetic variants are organized within the framework of one or more genes, their regulatory regions and other regulatory loci. We introduce here the Heuristic Identification of Biological Architectures for simulating Complex Hierarchical Interactions (HIBACHI) method and prototype software for simulating data in this manner. This approach combines a biological hierarchy, a flexible mathematical framework, a liability threshold model for defining disease endpoints, and a heuristic search strategy for identifying high-order epistatic models of disease susceptibility. We provide several simulation examples using genetic models exhibiting independent main effects and three-way epistatic effects. PMID:25395175

  18. Identification of unique SUN-interacting nuclear envelope proteins with diverse functions in plants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao; Graumann, Katja; Wirthmueller, Lennart; Jones, Jonathan D G; Meier, Iris

    2014-06-01

    Although a plethora of nuclear envelope (NE) transmembrane proteins (NETs) have been identified in opisthokonts, plant NETs are largely unknown. The only known NET homologues in plants are Sad1/UNC-84 (SUN) proteins, which bind Klarsicht/ANC-1/Syne-1 homology (KASH) proteins. Therefore, de novo identification of plant NETs is necessary. Based on similarities between opisthokont KASH proteins and the only known plant KASH proteins, WPP domain-interacting proteins, we used a computational method to identify the KASH subset of plant NETs. Ten potential plant KASH protein families were identified, and five candidates from four of these families were verified for their NE localization, depending on SUN domain interaction. Of those, Arabidopsis thaliana SINE1 is involved in actin-dependent nuclear positioning in guard cells, whereas its paralogue SINE2 contributes to innate immunity against an oomycete pathogen. This study dramatically expands our knowledge of plant KASH proteins and suggests that plants and opisthokonts have recruited different KASH proteins to perform NE regulatory functions. PMID:24891605

  19. Building Empathy through Identification and Expression of Emotions: A Review of Interactive Tools for Children with Social Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Angelina S.; Monk, Jessica D.; Booker, Kimberly Wilson

    2011-01-01

    This article is a review of available interactive aids designed to enhance the identification and expression of feelings in children. These skills are part of the overall development of empathy. The development of empathy, in turn, is crucial for social competence, social relatedness, and prosocial behavior. Improving these skills is likely to…

  20. Identification of Cell Cycle Dependent Interaction Partners of the Septins by Quantitative Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Renz, Christian; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Grinhagens, Sören; Warscheid, Bettina; Johnsson, Nils; Gronemeyer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The septins are a conserved family of GTP-binding proteins that, in the baker's yeast, assemble into a highly ordered array of filaments at the mother bud neck. These filaments undergo significant structural rearrangements during the cell cycle. We aimed at identifying key components that are involved in or regulate the transitions of the septins. By combining cell synchronization and quantitative affinity-purification mass-spectrometry, we performed a screen for specific interaction partners of the septins at three distinct stages of the cell cycle. A total of 83 interaction partners of the septins were assigned. Surprisingly, we detected DNA-interacting/nuclear proteins and proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis and protein synthesis predominantly present in alpha-factor arrested that do not display an assembled septin structure. Furthermore, two distinct sets of regulatory proteins that are specific for cells at S-phase with a stable septin collar or at mitosis with split septin rings were identified. Complementary methods like SPLIFF and immunoprecipitation allowed us to more exactly define the spatial and temporal characteristics of selected hits of the AP-MS screen. PMID:26871441

  1. Effective Identification of Akt Interacting Proteins by Two-Step Chemical Crosslinking, Co-Immunoprecipitation and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bill X.; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Akt is a critical protein for cell survival and known to interact with various proteins. However, Akt binding partners that modulate or regulate Akt activation have not been fully elucidated. Identification of Akt-interacting proteins has been customarily achieved by co-immunoprecipitation combined with western blot and/or MS analysis. An intrinsic problem of the method is loss of interacting proteins during procedures to remove non-specific proteins. Moreover, antibody contamination often interferes with the detection of less abundant proteins. Here, we developed a novel two-step chemical crosslinking strategy to overcome these problems which resulted in a dramatic improvement in identifying Akt interacting partners. Akt antibody was first immobilized on protein A/G beads using disuccinimidyl suberate and allowed to bind to cellular Akt along with its interacting proteins. Subsequently, dithiobis[succinimidylpropionate], a cleavable crosslinker, was introduced to produce stable complexes between Akt and binding partners prior to the SDS-PAGE and nanoLC-MS/MS analysis. This approach enabled identification of ten Akt partners from cell lysates containing as low as 1.5 mg proteins, including two new potential Akt interacting partners. None of these but one protein was detectable without crosslinking procedures. The present method provides a sensitive and effective tool to probe Akt-interacting proteins. This strategy should also prove useful for other protein interactions, particularly those involving less abundant or weakly associating partners. PMID:23613850

  2. Crayfish fossil burrows, a key tool for identification of terrestrial environments in tide-dominated sequence, Upper Eocene, Sirt Basin, Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouessa, Ashour; Duringer, Philippe; Schuster, Mathieu; Pelletier, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    The majority of decapod crustaceans are defined as marine organisms. Crayfish are one of the relatively few known exceptions. They are freshwater-environment adapted decapods that build characteristically large, simple and branched cylindrical morphotype traces in fluvial plains. Their burrows bear lots of special features that make them different from other burrows. Consequently, the identification of true crayfish burrows in the sedimentary record is crucial for the interpretation of depositional environment. The studied interval (45 m thick, exposed in the Dur At Talah escarpment southern Sirt Basin; Fig. 1) represents a case-study which is previously believed to be purely tidal. In this interval, the identification of the crayfish burrows provides a reliable tool for distinguishing terrestrial environments. The crayfish burrows of Dur At Talah are characterized by dimensional, morphological, and especially behavioral aspects that combined, cannot be ascribed to another burrow makers. Essential criteria used to attribute these burrows to the crayfish include: Their length (the depth of penetration into the sediments), their regularly circular cross-sectional area, the presence of mid-way enlargement chamber along the burrow vertical axis, as well as the subtle preservation of the burrow chimney. More importantly, these morphological features allow the recognition of some of the crayfish diagnostic behavioral habits. Most significant of these is the one deduced from the interaction of the burrow with the seasonal fluctuation of the paleo groundwater level. Supplementary indications that restrict the studied burrows to terrestrial organism include their occurrences within pedogenically altered strata that bear evident features of prolonged emersion. Of these features, mud cracks and burrows that are filled with continental fossil are the clearest. Few horizons with termite fungus comb are also distinguishable. Although other burrows of the classically known

  3. New findings and a new species of the genus Ammothea (Pycnogonida, Ammotheidae), with an updated identification key to all Antarctic and sub-Antarctic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano-Sánchez, E.; López-González, P. J.

    2014-03-01

    Specimens of the pycnogonid genus Ammothea collected during the Polarstern cruise XXIII/8 (23 November 2006-30 January 2007) were studied. Nine species were recognized in this collection: Ammothea bentartica, A. bicorniculata, A. carolinensis, A. clausi, A. longispina, A. minor, A. spinosa, A. striata and A. tibialis. Three of them ( A. bentartica, A. bicorniculata and A. tibialis) are reported for the second time, enlarging their known geographical and bathymetric range. In the present contribution, the observed morphological variability of all collected Ammothea species is described and discussed. For the identification and description of the material, different museum specimens were consulted. Among them, we have consulted part of the Discovery collection housed at the Natural History Museum in London. That material was initially identified by Isabella Gordon, a reputed author in the field of pycnogonid taxonomy. A new species, based on a museum specimen previously highly confused in the literature, is proposed in the present contribution as Ammothea isabellae n. sp. The new taxon is compared with its closest congeners, especially with A. longispina and A. stylirostris. Finally, we propose an updated dichotomous key to species covering all currently known Antarctic and sub-Antarctic Ammothea species.

  4. Detection, quantitation and identification of enteroviruses from surface waters and sponge tissue from the Florida Keys using real-time RT-PCR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donaldson, K.A.; Griffin, Dale W.; Paul, J.H.

    2002-01-01

    A method was developed for the quantitative detection of pathogenic human enteroviruses from surface waters in the Florida Keys using Taqman (R) one-step Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR with the Model 7700 ABI Prism (R) Sequence Detection System. Viruses were directly extracted from unconcentrated grab samples of seawater, from seawater concentrated by vortex flow filtration using a 100kD filter and from sponge tissue. Total RNA was extracted from the samples, purified and concentrated using spin-column chromatography. A 192-196 base pair portion of the 5??? untranscribed region was amplified from these extracts. Enterovirus concentrations were estimated using real-time RT-PCR technology. Nine of 15 sample sites or 60% were positive for the presence of pathogenic human enteroviruses. Considering only near-shore sites, 69% were positive with viral concentrations ranging from 9.3viruses/ml to 83viruses/g of sponge tissue (uncorrected for extraction efficiency). Certain amplicons were selected for cloning and sequencing for identification. Three strains of waterborne enteroviruses were identified as Coxsackievirus A9, Coxsackievirus A16, and Poliovirus Sabin type 1. Time and cost efficiency of this one-step real-time RT-PCR methodology makes this an ideal technique to detect, quantitate and identify pathogenic enteroviruses in recreational waters. Copyright ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  5. Cebrennus Simon, 1880 (Araneae: Sparassidae): a revisionary up-date with the description of four new species and an updated identification key for all species.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The spider genus Cebrennus Simon, 1880 is revised again after thirteen years. Four new species are described: Cebrennus atlas spec. nov. from Morocco (female), C. flagellatus spec. nov. from Afghanistan (male), C. laurae spec. nov. from Canary Islands (male), and C. rechenbergi spec. nov. from Morocco (male and female). Cebrennus clercki (Audouin, 1826) comb. nov. is transferred from Philodromidae to Sparassidae and considered a nomen dubium. The holotype of C. aethiopicus Simon, 1880 is illustrated for the first time. Cebrennus tunetanus Simon, 1885 is re-described by illustrating its copulatory organs and some somatic characters, the internal duct system is shown for the first time supporting its placement in Cebrennus. An updated identification key for all species is provided. New records of Cebrennus species are listed: C. wagae (Simon, 1874) is recorded from Libya and Malta for the first time, the latter representing the first record for the entire genus from Europe. C. kochi (O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1872) is recorded from Syria, C. aethiopicus from Sudan for the first time. Records from the Canary Islands and from Afghanistan extend the known generic distribution range further to the West and East. Behavioural aspects (burrowing, escaping, mating) of C. rechenbergi and partly of C. villosus (Jézéquel & Junqua, 1966) are described. Photographs of this behaviour as well as of the habitus of several species are provided. PMID:24869871

  6. Homodimeric Intrinsic Membrane Proteins. Identification and Modulation of Interactions between Mitochondrial Transporter (Carrier) Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Wohlrab, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    Transporter (carrier) proteins of the inner mitochondrial membrane link metabolic pathways within the matrix and the cytosol with transport/exchange of metabolites and inorganic ions. Their strict control of these fluxes is required for oxidative phosphorylation. Understanding the ternary complex transport mechanism with which most of these transporters function requires an accounting of the number and interactions of their subunits. The phosphate transporter (PTP, Mir1p) subunit readily forms homodimers with intersubunit affinities changeable by mutations. Cys28, likely at the subunit interface, is a site for mutations yielding transport inhibition or a channel-like transport mode. Such mutations yield a small increase or decrease in affinity between the subunits. The PTP inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide decreases subunit affinity by a small amount. PTP mutations that yield the highest (40%) and the lowest (2%) liposome incorporation efficiencies (LIE) are clustered near Cys28. Such mutant subunits show the lowest and highest subunit affinities respectively. The oxaloacetate transporter (Oac1p) subunit has an almost 2-fold lower affinity than the PTP subunit. The Oac1p, dicarboxylate (Dic1p) and PTP transporter subunits form heterodimers with even lower affinities. These results form a firm basis for detailed studies to establish the effect of subunit affinities on transport mode and activity and for the identification of the mechanism that prevents formation of heterodimers that surely will negatively impact oxidative phosphorylation and ATP levels with serious consequences for the cell. PMID:20171189

  7. Identification of Chemical-Genetic Interactions via Parallel Analysis of Barcoded Yeast Strains.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Sundari; Schlecht, Ulrich; Xu, Weihong; Miranda, Molly; Davis, Ronald W; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; St Onge, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    The Yeast Knockout Collection is a complete set of gene deletion strains for the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae In each strain, one of approximately 6000 open-reading frames is replaced with a dominant selectable marker flanked by two DNA barcodes. These barcodes, which are unique to each gene, allow the growth of thousands of strains to be individually measured from a single pooled culture. The collection, and other resources that followed, has ushered in a new era in chemical biology, enabling unbiased and systematic identification of chemical-genetic interactions (CGIs) with remarkable ease. CGIs link bioactive compounds to biological processes, and hence can reveal the mechanism of action of growth-inhibitory compounds in vivo, including those of antifungal, antibiotic, and anticancer drugs. The chemogenomic profiling method described here measures the sensitivity induced in yeast heterozygous and homozygous deletion strains in the presence of a chemical inhibitor of growth (termed haploinsufficiency profiling and homozygous profiling, respectively, or HIPHOP). The protocol is both scalable and amenable to automation. After competitive growth of yeast knockout collection cultures, with and without chemical inhibitors, CGIs can be identified and quantified using either array- or sequencing-based approaches as described here. PMID:27587778

  8. Aircraft Abnormal Conditions Detection, Identification, and Evaluation Using Innate and Adaptive Immune Systems Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Azzawi, Dia

    Abnormal flight conditions play a major role in aircraft accidents frequently causing loss of control. To ensure aircraft operation safety in all situations, intelligent system monitoring and adaptation must rely on accurately detecting the presence of abnormal conditions as soon as they take place, identifying their root cause(s), estimating their nature and severity, and predicting their impact on the flight envelope. Due to the complexity and multidimensionality of the aircraft system under abnormal conditions, these requirements are extremely difficult to satisfy using existing analytical and/or statistical approaches. Moreover, current methodologies have addressed only isolated classes of abnormal conditions and a reduced number of aircraft dynamic parameters within a limited region of the flight envelope. This research effort aims at developing an integrated and comprehensive framework for the aircraft abnormal conditions detection, identification, and evaluation based on the artificial immune systems paradigm, which has the capability to address the complexity and multidimensionality issues related to aircraft systems. Within the proposed framework, a novel algorithm was developed for the abnormal conditions detection problem and extended to the abnormal conditions identification and evaluation. The algorithm and its extensions were inspired from the functionality of the biological dendritic cells (an important part of the innate immune system) and their interaction with the different components of the adaptive immune system. Immunity-based methodologies for re-assessing the flight envelope at post-failure and predicting the impact of the abnormal conditions on the performance and handling qualities are also proposed and investigated in this study. The generality of the approach makes it applicable to any system. Data for artificial immune system development were collected from flight tests of a supersonic research aircraft within a motion-based flight

  9. Identification of protein-protein interaction and topologies in living cells by chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske, Gerhard R.; Tolic, Nikola; Anderson, Gordon A.; Bruce, James E.

    2008-10-20

    Current chemical cross-linking methods are commonly employed for mapping sites of interaction and three-dimensional structure in purified, known protein complexes. When applied in vivo in combination of co-immunoprecipitation methods, information on the sites of interaction between proteins are unattainable due to overwhelming sample complexity. We present results from a novel cross-linking strategy that allow simultaneous protein-protein interaction and surface topology measurement in vivo without any prior knowledge of the system. The strategy consists of: (i) cross-linking reaction: intact cell labeling with protein interaction reporters (PIRs); (ii) two-stage mass spectrometric analysis: stage 1 identification of PIR-labeled proteins and construction of a restricted database by 2D-LC/MS/MS; and stage 2 analysis of PIR-labeled peptides by multiplexed LC/FTICR-MS; (iii) data analysis: identification of cross-linked peptides and proteins of origin using accurate mass and other constraints. This strategy was applied to Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 bacterial cells and successfully identified a protein-protein interaction between SecA and a small outer membrane lipoprotein as well as their sites of interaction in vivo.

  10. Insights into the key interactions between human protein phosphatase 5 and cantharidin using molecular dynamics and site-directed mutagenesis bioassays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji-Yuan; Chen, Xi-En; Zhang, Ya-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is a promising novel target for anticancer therapies. This work aims to uncover the key interactions at the atomic level between PP5 and three inhibitors (cantharidin, norcantharidin and endothall). We found that, unlike previous report, Arg 100 contributes less to PP5-inhibitor binding, and the residues His 69, Asn 128, His 129, Arg 225, His 252 and Arg 250 are of importance to PP5-inhibitor binding. The hydrophobic interactions established between the residues Val 254, Phe 271 and Tyr 276, especially Glu 253, are very important to enhance the inhibitive interaction. We suggested that, to increase the inhibitory activity, the interactions of inhibitor with three negatively charged unfavorable interaction residues, Asp 99, Glu 130 and Asp 213, should be avoided. However, the interactions of inhibitor with favorable interaction residue Arg 250 could enhance the inhibitory activity. The Manganese ion 2 (MN2) unfavorably contribute to the total interaction free energies. The coordination between MN2 and chemical group of inhibitor should be eliminated. This work provides insight into how cantharidin and its analogs bind to PP5c at the atomic level and will facilitate modification of cantharidin-like chemicals to rationally develop more specific and less cytotoxic anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26190207