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Sample records for interfacial shear modeling

  1. Interfacial shear modeling in two-phase annular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Edwards, D.P.

    1996-07-01

    A new interfacial shear stress model called the law of the interface model, based on the law of the wall approach in turbulent flows, has been developed and locally applied in a fully developed, adiabatic, two-phase annular flow in a duct. Numerical results have been obtained using this model in conjunction with other models available in the literature that are required for the closure of the continuity and momentum equations. These results have been compared with droplet velocity data (using laser Doppler velocimetry and hot film anemometry), void fraction data (using gamma densitometry) and pressure drop data obtained in a R-134A refrigerant test facility. Droplet velocity results match the experimental data well, however, the prediction of the void fraction is less accurate. The poor prediction of void fraction, especially for the low void fraction cases, appears to be due to the lack of a good mechanistic model for entrainment.

  2. Interfacial shear modeling and flow predictions for internal film condesation flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narain, A.

    1992-01-01

    Internal flow of pure vapor experiencing film condesation on the walls of a straight duct is studied. The commonly occuring case of turbulent (or laminar) vapor flow in the core and laminar flow of the liquid condensate-with or without waves on the interface-is emphasized. We propose and implement a new first principle methodolgy which model interfacial shear with the help of reliable experimental data on heat transfer rates. Other details of the flow are predicted with the help of this model. These predictions are shown to be in agreement with relevant experimental data. Correlations for film thickness and heat transfer rates are also given.

  3. Interfacial shear stress distribution in model composites. I - A Kevlar 49 fibre in an epoxy matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Jahankhani, H.; Galiotis, C. )

    1991-05-01

    The technique of Laser Raman Spectroscopy has been applied in the study of aramid fibers, such as Kevlar 49, and aramid/epoxy interfaces. A linear relationship has been found between Raman frequencies and strain upon loading a single Kevlar 49 filament in air. Model composites of single Kevlar 49 fibers embedded in epoxy resins have been fabricated and subjected to various degrees of mechanical deformation. The transfer lengths for reinforcement have been measured at various levels of applied tensile load and the dependence of transfer length upon applied matrix strain has been established. Finally, by balancing the tensile and the shear forces acting along the interface, the interfacial shear stress (ISS) distribution along the embedded fiber was obtained. 52 refs.

  4. Evaluation of the interfacial shear strength and residual stress of TiAlN coating on ZIRLO™ fuel cladding using a modified shear-lag model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Bhamji, I.; Withers, P. J.; Wolfe, D. E.; Motta, A. T.; Preuss, M.

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the residual stresses and interfacial shear strength of a TiAlN coating on Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe alloy (ZIRLO™) substrate designed to improve corrosion resistance of fuel cladding used in water-cooled nuclear reactors, both during normal and exceptional conditions, e.g. a loss of coolant event (LOCA). The distribution and maximum value of the interfacial shear strength has been estimated using a modified shear-lag model. The parameters critical to this analysis were determined experimentally. From these input parameters the interfacial shear strength between the TiAlN coating and ZIRLO™ substrate was inferred to be around 120 MPa. It is worth noting that the apparent strength of the coating is high (∼3.4 GPa). However, this is predominantly due to the large compressive residuals stress (3 GPa in compression), which must be overcome for the coating to fail in tension, which happens at a load just 150 MPa in excess of this.

  5. Elastic shear moduli of brittle matrix composites with interfacial debonding

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, F.G.; Pagano, N.J.

    1994-12-31

    Elastic shear moduli of brittle matrix composites with interfacial debonding are studied. Compatibility displacement boundary conditions between representative volume elements are imposed through finite element analyses. Comparisons of the moduli between the full RVE model and quarter cell model are made. Parametric studies assessing the effect of the debonding, the shear moduli ratios in the constituents and the fiber volume fractions on the composite shear moduli are also presented. Results show that the commonly used quarter cell model overestimate the moduli. The disparity increases as the rigidity of the fibers or fiber volume fraction increases.

  6. Interfacial Shear Strength Evaluation of Jute/Poly(Lactic Acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Tatsuro; Nakai, Asami

    In order to evaluate the interfacial shear strength between fiber bundle and matrix of jute/poly(lactic acid) (PLA), a fiber bundle pull-out test method is proposed. Shear stress distribution was calculated based on the parabolic shear-lag analysis. Fiber bundle pull-out tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of molding condition on the interfacial shear strength. The interfacial shear strength increased with increasing molding temperature up to 185°C. Then gradual decrease in the interfacial shear strength with molding temperature was observed. Similar tendency was also observed in the effect of molding time, whereas the interfacial shear strength decreased with increasing molding pressure. Comparing the result of the tensile tests in the previous study, interfacial shear strength has corelations with tensile strength.

  7. Shear Wave Propagation Across Filled Joints with the Effect of Interfacial Shear Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Liu, T. T.; Li, H. B.; Liu, Y. Q.; Liu, B.; Xia, X.

    2015-07-01

    The thin-layer interface model for filled joints is extended to analyze shear wave propagation across filled rock joints when the interfacial shear strength between the filling material and the rocks is taken into account. During the wave propagation process, the two sides of the filled joint are welded with the adjacent rocks first and slide on each other when the shear stress on the joint is greater than the interfacial shear strength. By back analysis, the relation between the shear stress and the relative tangential deformation of the filled joints is obtained from the present approach, which is shown as a cycle parallelogram. Comparison between the present approach and the existing method based on the zero-thickness interface model indicates that the present approach is efficient to analyze shear wave propagation across rock joints with slippery behavior. The calculation results show that the slippery behavior of joints is related to the interfacial failure. In addition, the interaction between the shear stress wave and the two sides of the filling joint influences not only the wave propagation process but also the dynamic response of the filled joint.

  8. The influence of size, structure and hydrophilicity of model surfactants on the adsorption of lysozyme to oil-water interface--interfacial shear measurements.

    PubMed

    Baldursdottir, Stefania G; Jorgensen, Lene

    2011-10-01

    The flexibility and aggregation of proteins can cause adsorption to oil-water interfaces and thereby create challenges during formulation and processing. Protein adsorption is a complex process and the presence of surfactants further complicates the system, in which additional parameters need to be considered. The purpose of this study is to scrutinize the influence of surfactants on protein adsorption to interfaces, using lysozyme as a model protein and sorbitan monooleate 80 (S80), polysorbate 80 (T80), polyethylene-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PE-PEG) and polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PG-PR) as model surfactants. Rheological properties, measured using a TA AR-G2 rheometer equipped with a double wall ring (DWR) geometry, were used to compare the efficacy of the surfactant in hindering lysozyme adsorption. The system consists of a ring and a Delrin® trough with a circular channel (interfacial area=1882.6 mm(2)). Oscillatory shear measurements were conducted at a constant frequency of 0.1 Hz, a temperature of 25°C, and with strain set to 1%. The adsorption of lysozyme to the oil-water interface results in the formation of a viscoelastic film. This can be prevented by addition of surfactants, in a manner depending on the concentration and the type of surfactant. The more hydrophilic surfactants are more effective in hindering lysozyme adsorption to oil-water interfaces. Additionally, the larger surfactants are more persistent in preventing film formation, whereas the smaller ones eventually give space for the lysozyme on the interface. The addition of a mixture of two different surfactants was only beneficial when the two hydrophilic surfactants were mixed, in which case a delay in the multilayer formation was detected. The method is able to detect the interfacial adsorption of lysozyme and thus the hindering of film formation by model surfactants. It can therefore aid in processing of any delivery systems for proteins in which the protein is introduced to oil

  9. Longitudinal interfacial shearing of a unidirectional fiber composite

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.; Kurth, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    In this work, longitudinal interfacial shearing of a unidirectional fiber composite which sustains slippage at the interface between fiber and matrix is analyzed. Based on the experimental work on the fiber pull-out, the interface between the fiber and the matrix can be divided as three regions, depending on the longitudinal shear stress. These three regions are the bonded region, frictional slip regions, and the free-friction slid region. The problem is formulated as a nonlinear system of singular integral equations and solved numerically. It has been shown that when the longitudinal shear stress is less than a critical value, the fiber and the matrix can be assumed to be bonded perfectly. When the longitudinal shear stress is greater than this critical value, the slippage at the interface between the fiber and the interface takes place. From the recent fiber pull-out test, the phenomena of fiber frictional slip followed by free slide has been observed and analyzed. Thus, there are three stages for the deformation of interfacial shearing of a unidirectional fiber composite under longitudinal shearing. The first stage occurs when the applied longitudinal shear stress is less than the critical value corresponding to the onset of slippage. In the second stage, the interface is divided into two regions, namely, the bonded region and the frictional slip region in which the shear stress is either assumed to be constant or governed by a friction law. The third stage occurs when the longitudinal shear stress is greater than the critical value corresponding to free sliding or when the friction limit is exceeded. In the third stage, the interface between the fiber and the matrix can be divided into three regions, depending on the longitudinal shear stress. These three regions are the bonded region, the frictional slip regions, and the free-friction slide region in which the shear stress is neglected.

  10. Use of self assembled monolayers at variable coverage to control interface bonding in a model study of interfacial fracture: Pure shear loading

    SciTech Connect

    KENT,MICHAEL S.; YIM,HYUN; MATHESON,AARON J.; COGDILL,C.; NELSON,GERALD C.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID

    2000-05-16

    The relationships between fundamental interfacial interactions, energy dissipation mechanisms, and fracture stress or fracture toughness in a glassy thermoset/inorganic solid joint are not well understood. This subject is addressed with a model system involving an epoxy adhesive on a polished silicon wafer containing its native oxide. The proportions of physical and chemical interactions at the interface, and the in-plane distribution, are varied using self-assembling monolayers of octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODTS). The epoxy interacts strongly with the bare silicon oxide surface, but forms only a very weak interface with the methylated tails of the ODTS monolayer. The fracture stress is examined as a function of ODTS coverage in the napkin-ring (pure shear) loading geometry. The relationship between fracture stress and ODTS coverage is catastrophic, with a large change in fracture stress occurring over a narrow range of ODTS coverage. This transition in fracture stress does not correspond to a wetting transition of the epoxy. Rather, the transition in fracture stress corresponds to the onset of deformation in the epoxy, or the transition from brittle to ductile fracture. The authors postulate that the transition in fracture stress occurs when the local stress that the interface can support becomes comparable to the yield stress of the epoxy. The fracture results are independent of whether the ODTS deposition occurs by island growth (T{sub dep} = 10 C) or by homogeneous growth (T{sub dep} = 24 C).

  11. Interfacial shear stress in stratified flow in a horizontal rectangular duct

    SciTech Connect

    Lorencez, C.; Kawaji, M.; Murao, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Interfacial shear stress has been experimentally examined for both cocurrent and countercurrent stratified wavy flows in a horizontal interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress values at high gas flow rates which could be attributed to the assumptions and procedures involved in each method. The interfacial waves and secondary motions were also found to have significant effects on the accuracy of Reynolds stress and turbulence kinetic energy extrapolation methods.

  12. Fiber pushout and interfacial shear in metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koss, Donald A.; Hellmann, John R.; Kallas, M. N.

    1993-01-01

    Recent thin-slice pushout tests have suggested that MMC matrix-fiber interface failure processes depend not only on such intrinsic factors as bond strength and toughness, and matrix plasticity, but such extrinsic factors as specimen configuration, thermally-induced residual stresses, and the mechanics associated with a given test. After detailing the contrasts in fiber-pullout and fiber-pushout mechanics, attention is given to selected aspects of thin-slice fiber pushout behavior illustrative of the physical nature of interfacial shear response and its dependence on both intrinsic and extrinsic factors.

  13. Fibrillization kinetics of insulin solution in an interfacial shearing flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaraj, Vignesh; McBride, Samantha; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Although the association of fibril plaques with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's is well established, in-depth understanding of the roles played by various physical factors in seeding and growth of fibrils is far from well known. Of the numerous factors affecting this complex phenomenon, the effect of fluid flow and shear at interfaces is paramount as it is ubiquitous and the most varying factor in vivo. Many amyloidogenic proteins have been found to denature upon contact at hydrophobic interfaces due to the self-assembling nature of protein in its monomeric state. Here, fibrillization kinetics of insulin solution is studied in an interfacial shearing flow. The transient surface rheological response of the insulin solution to the flow and its effect on the bulk fibrillization process has been quantified. Minute differences in hydrophobic characteristics between two variants of insulin- Human recombinant and Bovine insulin are found to result in very different responses. Results presented will be in the form of fibrillization assays, images of fibril plaques formed, and changes in surface rheological properties of the insulin solution. The interfacial velocity field, measured from images (via Brewster Angle Microscopy), is compared with computations. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  14. Interfacial shear rheology of DPPC under physiologically relevant conditions.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Eline; Vermant, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Lipids, and phosphatidylcholines in particular, are major components in cell membranes and in human lung surfactant. Their ability to encapsulate or form stable layers suggests a significant role of the interfacial rheological properties. In the present work we focus on the surface rheological properties of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). Literature results are confusing and even contradictory; viscosity values have been reported differ by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, even both purely viscous and gel-like behaviours have been described. Assessing the literature critically, a limited experimental window has been explored correctly, which however does not yet include conditions relevant for the physiological state of DPPC in vivo. A complete temperature and surface pressure analysis of the interfacial shear rheology of DPPC is performed, showing that the monolayer behaves as a viscoelastic liquid with a domain structure. At low frequencies and for a thermally structured monolayer, the interaction of the molecules within the domains can be probed. The low frequency limit of the complex viscosity is measured over a wide range of temperatures and surface pressures. The effects of temperature and surface pressure on the low frequency viscosity can be analysed in terms of the effects of free molecular area. However, at higher frequencies or following a preshear at high shear rates, elasticity becomes important; most probably elasticity due to defects at the edge of the domains in the layer is probed. Preshearing refines the structure and induces more defects. As a result, disagreeing interfacial rheology results in various publications might be due to different pre-treatments of the interface. The obtained dataset and scaling laws enable us to describe the surface viscosity, and its dependence under physiological conditions of DPPC. The implications on functioning of lung surfactants and lung surfactant replacements will be discussed. PMID:24651838

  15. Interfacial shear behavior of sapphire-reinforced NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moose, C. A.; Koss, D. A.; Hellmann, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    The interfacial shear behavior in near-equiatomic NiAl reinforced by sapphire filaments has been examined at room temperature using a fiber pushout test technique. The load-displacement data indicate a large variability in the initial interface failure stress, although reverse push behavior indicates a comparatively constant interfacial sliding friction stress. The observed behavior suggests that the presence of asperities on the fiber surfaces and nonuniformities in fiber diameter require constrained plastic flow within the NiAl matrix in order for interfacial shear to occur. The location, shape, severity, and distribution of fiber asperities as well as the uniformity of fiber diameter are critical to the interfacial shear process.

  16. Interfacial shear-stress effects on transient capillary wedge flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Song-Kai; Lai, Chun-Liang

    2004-06-01

    The effects on the transient capillary flow in a wedge due to the interfacial shear-stress distribution S along the flow direction z is studied theoretically. With the assumptions of a slender liquid column and negligible gravitational and inertia effects, the problem is reduced to finding the axial velocity distribution at any cross section. The propagation of the liquid column h(z,t) and the tip location l(t) are then solved with the aid of the continuity equation. When the half-wedge angle α, the contact angle θ, and the shear-stress distribution on the free surface S are constant, analytic solutions exist. Otherwise, numerical simulation has to be applied. The results indicate that when S(z) is acting in the flow direction, the flow is strengthened and the liquid column propagates faster. When S(z) is opposing the flow direction, reverse flow may exist near the free surface and the propagation speed of the liquid column is reduced. Moreover, for a capillary flow in a wedge with constant α, θ, and S, both the analytic solutions and the numerical simulation predict that l(t)∝t3/5 for the constant-flow-rate stage and l(t)∝t1/2 for the constant-height flow stage. When S is a function of the flow direction z, the above functional relationship between l and t becomes no longer valid; it varies as the liquid column propagates along the wedge.

  17. Interfacial shear stress between a single-walled carbon nanotube and a gold surface after different physical treatments.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huiyan; Wu, Yu-Chiao; Adams, George G; McGruer, Nicol E

    2015-06-01

    The interfacial shear stress between gold and dielectrophoretically assembled single-walled carbon nanotubes can be increased by annealing in N2, by e-beam irradiation, or by e-beam deposition of carbon. For the first time this increase has been measured, using a technique developed by this group that is based on NEMS cantilever measurements combined with modeling. Annealing increases the shear stress by more than a factor of 3 over its value of 87MPa for untreated gold surfaces, while e-beam irradiation increases the shear stress by more than a factor of 2 and carbon deposition increases the shear stress by a smaller amount. PMID:25700215

  18. Interfacial Shear Strength of Oxide Scale and SS 441 Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-05-01

    Recent developments on decreasing the operating temperature for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) have enabled the use of high temperature ferritic alloys as interconnect materials. Oxide scale will inevitably grow on the ferritic interconnects in a high temperature oxidation environment of SOFCs. The growth of the oxide scale induces growth stresses in the scale layer and on the scale/substrate interface. These growth stresses combined with the thermal stresses induced upon stacking cooling by the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the oxide scale and the substrate may lead to scale delamination/buckling and eventual spallation, which may lead to serious cell performance degradation. Hence the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the substrate is crucial to the reliability and durability of the metallic interconnect in SOFC operating environments. In this paper, we applied an integrated experimental/modeling methodology to quantify the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the SS 441 metallic interconnect. The predicted interfacial strength is discussed in details.

  19. Effect of viscosity and shear flow on the nonlinear two fluid interfacial structures

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Rahul

    2012-12-15

    A nonlinear formulation is presented to deal with the combined action of Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities as well as combined Ricthmyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at the two fluid interface under the influence of viscosity and consequent shear flow. Using Layzer's model, the development of the interfacial structures like bubbles is investigated analytically and numerically. It is found that the growth and normal velocity of the structures are dependent on the relative velocity shear and the kinematic coefficient of viscosity of both the fluids. Both the bubble growth and growth rate are reduced significantly for fluids of higher viscosity coefficient with small velocity shear difference. It is also observed that, for viscous fluids, the transverse velocity of the perturbed interface becomes slower under certain conditions.

  20. Estimation of Liquid Wall and Interfacial Shear Stress in Horizontal Stratified Gas-liquid Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiping; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Jing

    2007-06-01

    A modified two-phase shear stress calculation method for pipe flow problems is explored. A force balance has been set up on the control volume of liquid phase to determine the interfacial friction factor by employing both the measured pressure gradient and liquid height. The gradient of height of liquid layer has been taken into account, which is suitable for the case where the interface may be smooth, rippled or wavy. The correlation of model indicates that the careful estimation for liquid-wall shear stress is necessary, and the assumption of a stationary liquid element is not applicable for the case of higher gas flow rates. The interfacial friction factor evaluated indirectly from experimental liquid height and pressure loss measurements, which are obtained in 50mm ID pipeline for air and water in cocurrent stratified flow, is used to achieve its correlation with the combination of characteristic parameters. The evaluation of new correlation has been conducted by the comparison of the predicted pressure drop with the experimental data. The performance of correlation depends on the form of the gas-liquid interface.

  1. Parametric evaluation of shear sensitivity in piezoresistive interfacial force sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benfield, David; Lou, Edmond; Moussa, Walied A.

    2011-04-01

    A three-axis load detector has been designed and manufactured utilizing four piezoresistive sensors on a flexible silicon membrane. The detector was prototyped using bulk microfabrication techniques on a single-crystal silicon wafer and was designed to detect normal and shear loadings applied to the membrane. Finite element analysis and experimental calibration methods have been used to determine the shear and normal sensitivity values. Device parameters were modified with emphasis on increasing the absolute shear to normal sensitivity ratio of the sensors without reducing their ultimate strength. It was determined that the shear to normal sensitivity ratio greater than 0.5 would allow detection of shear loads considering experimental error present. For devices with square membranes having 1000 µm edge lengths and 65 µm thicknesses, this amount of shear sensitivity was achievable using a mesa with a height of at least 150 µm.

  2. Mechanical interaction between cells and fluid for bone tissue engineering scaffold: modulation of the interfacial shear stress.

    PubMed

    Blecha, L D; Rakotomanana, L; Razafimahery, F; Terrier, A; Pioletti, D P

    2010-03-22

    An analytical model of the fluid/cell mechanical interaction was developed. The interfacial shear stress, due to the coupling between the fluid and the cell deformation, was characterized by a new dimensionless number N(fs). For N(fs) above a critical value, the fluid/cell interaction had a damping effect on the interfacial shear stress. Conversely, for N(fs) below this critical value, interfacial shear stress was amplified. As illustration, the role of the dynamic fluid/cell mechanical coupling was studied in a specific biological situation involving cells seeded in a bone scaffold. For the particular bone scaffold chosen, the dimensionless number N(fs) was higher than the critical value. In this case, the dynamic shear stress at the fluid/cell interface is damped for increasing excitation frequency. Interestingly, this damping effect is correlated to the pore diameter of the scaffold, furnishing thus target values in the design of the scaffold. Correspondingly, an efficient cell stimulation might be achieved with a scaffold of pore size larger than 300 microm as no dynamic damping effect is likely to take place. The analytical model proposed in this study, while being a simplification of a fluid/cell mechanical interaction, brings complementary insights to numerical studies by analyzing the effect of different physical parameters. PMID:20004397

  3. Modeling interfacial fracture in Sierra.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Arthur A.; Ohashi, Yuki; Lu, Wei-Yang; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Foulk, James W.,; Reedy, Earl David,; Austin, Kevin N.; Margolis, Stephen B.

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes computational efforts to model interfacial fracture using cohesive zone models in the SIERRA/SolidMechanics (SIERRA/SM) finite element code. Cohesive surface elements were used to model crack initiation and propagation along predefined paths. Mesh convergence was observed with SIERRA/SM for numerous geometries. As the funding for this project came from the Advanced Simulation and Computing Verification and Validation (ASC V&V) focus area, considerable effort was spent performing verification and validation. Code verification was performed to compare code predictions to analytical solutions for simple three-element simulations as well as a higher-fidelity simulation of a double-cantilever beam. Parameter identification was conducted with Dakota using experimental results on asymmetric double-cantilever beam (ADCB) and end-notched-flexure (ENF) experiments conducted under Campaign-6 funding. Discretization convergence studies were also performed with respect to mesh size and time step and an optimization study was completed for mode II delamination using the ENF geometry. Throughout this verification process, numerous SIERRA/SM bugs were found and reported, all of which have been fixed, leading to over a 10-fold increase in convergence rates. Finally, mixed-mode flexure experiments were performed for validation. One of the unexplained issues encountered was material property variability for ostensibly the same composite material. Since the variability is not fully understood, it is difficult to accurately assess uncertainty when performing predictions.

  4. Effects of environmental exposure on fiber/epoxy interfacial shear strength

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, U.; Miller, B. )

    1990-08-01

    A microbond technique for direct determination of fiber/resin interfacial shear strength in composites (Miller et al., 1987) has been used to investigate the influence of environmental conditions on adhesive bonding in certain systems. The small dimensions involved in the method facilitate uniform exposure and short exposure times. Significant changes in both average shear strength and in shear strength distributions are observed on exposing aramid/epoxy and glass/epoxy microbond assemblies to steam or hot water. Shear strength drops to a plateau value in both cases, the reduction being more drastic with the glass fiber. Vacuum drying restores shear strength completely in aramid/epoxy microassemblies, even when the surface of the aramid fiber has been chemically modified, but there is only partial regeneration of bond strength with the glass/epoxy system. 15 refs.

  5. Incorporating interfacial phenomena in solidification models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, Christoph; Wang, Chao Yang

    1994-01-01

    A general methodology is available for the incorporation of microscopic interfacial phenomena in macroscopic solidification models that include diffusion and convection. The method is derived from a formal averaging procedure and a multiphase approach, and relies on the presence of interfacial integrals in the macroscopic transport equations. In a wider engineering context, these techniques are not new, but their application in the analysis and modeling of solidification processes has largely been overlooked. This article describes the techniques and demonstrates their utility in two examples in which microscopic interfacial phenomena are of great importance.

  6. Interfacial Shear Strength of Cast and Directionally Solidified Nial-Sapphire Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Asthana, R.; Noebe, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating intermetallic NiAl-sapphire fiber composites by casting and zone directional solidification has been examined. The fiber-matrix interfacial shear strengths measured using a fiber push-out technique in both cast and directionally solidified composites are greater than the strengths reported for composites fabricated by powder cloth process using organic binders. Microscopic examination of fibers extracted from cast, directionally solidified (DS), and thermally cycled composites, and the high values of interfacial shear strengths suggest that the fiber-matrix interface does not degrade due to casting and directional solidification. Sapphire fibers do not pin grain boundaries during directional solidification, suggesting that this technique can be used to fabricate sapphire fiber reinforced NiAl composites with single crystal matrices.

  7. Investigation of interfacial shear strength in SiC/Si3N4 composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Bhatt, R. T.; Kiser, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber push-out technique was used to determine fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength (ISS) for silicon carbide fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SiC/RBSN) composites in the as-fabricated condition and after consolidation by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). In situ video microscopy and acoustic emission detection greatly aided the interpretation of push-out load/displacement curves.

  8. Bulk flow coupled to a viscous interfacial film sheared by a rotating knife edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunandan, Aditya; Rasheed, Fayaz; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    The measurement of the interfacial properties of highly viscous biofilms, such as DPPC (the primary component of lung surfactant), present on the surface of liquids (bulk phase) continues to attract significant attention. Most measurement techniques rely on shearing the interfacial film and quantifying its viscous response in terms of a surface (excess) viscosity at the air-liquid interface. The knife edge viscometer offers a significant advantage over other approaches used to study highly viscous films as the film is directly sheared by a rotating knife edge in direct contact with the film. However, accurately quantifying the viscous response is non-trivial and involves accounting for the coupled interfacial and bulk phase flows. Here, we examine the nature of the viscous response of water insoluble DPPC films sheared in a knife edge viscometer over a range of surface packing, and its influence on the strength of the coupled bulk flow. Experimental results, obtained via Particle Image Velocimetry in the bulk and at the surface (via Brewster Angle Microscopy), are compared with numerical flow predictions to quantify the coupling across hydrodynamic flow regimes, from the Stokes flow limit to regimes where flow inertia is significant. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  9. Effect of interfacial species on shear strength of metal-sapphire contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1979-01-01

    The interfacial shear strength of the metal-insulator system has been studied by means of the coefficient of static friction of copper, nickel, or gold contacts on sapphire in ultrahigh vacuum. The effect on contact strength of adsorbed oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, and carbon monoxide on the metal surfaces is reported. It was found that exposures as low as 1 L of O2 on Ni produced observable increases in contact strength, whereas exposures of 3 L of Cl2 lead to a decrease in contact strength. These results imply that submonolayer concentrations of these species at the interface of a thin Ni film on Al2O3 should affect film adhesion similarly. The atomic mechanism by which these surface or interface phases affect interfacial strength is not yet understood.

  10. Sorption and Interfacial Rheology Study of Model Asphaltene Compounds.

    PubMed

    Pradilla, Diego; Simon, Sébastien; Sjöblom, Johan; Samaniuk, Joseph; Skrzypiec, Marta; Vermant, Jan

    2016-03-29

    The sorption and rheological properties of an acidic polyaromatic compound (C5PeC11), which can be used to further our understanding of the behavior of asphaltenes, are determined experimentally. The results show that C5PeC11 exhibits the type of pH-dependent surface activity and interfacial shear rheology observed in C6-asphaltenes with a decrease in the interfacial tension concomitant with the elastic modulus when the pH increases. Surface pressure-area (Π-A) isotherms show evidence of aggregation behavior and π-π stacking at both the air/water and oil/water interfaces. Similarly, interactions between adsorbed C5PeC11 compounds are evidenced through desorption experiments at the oil/water interface. Contrary to indigenous asphaltenes, adsorption is reversible, but desorption is slower than for noninteracting species. The reversibility enables us to create layers reproducibly, whereas the presence of interactions between the compounds enables us to mimic the key aspects of interfacial activity in asphaltenes. Shear and dilatational rheology show that C5PeC11 forms a predominantly elastic film both at the liquid/air and the liquid/liquid interfaces. Furthermore, a soft glassy rheology model (SGR) fits the data obtained at the liquid/liquid interface. However, it is shown that the effective noise temperature determined from the SGR model for C5PeC11 is higher than for indigenous asphaltenes measured under similar conditions. Finally, from a colloidal and rheological standpoint, the results highlight the importance of adequately addressing the distinction between the material functions and true elasticity extracted from a shear measurement and the apparent elasticity measured in dilatational-pendant drop setups. PMID:26949974

  11. Probing model tumor interfacial properties using piezoelectric cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Yegingil, Hakki; Shih, Wan Y; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2010-09-01

    Invasive malignant breast cancers are typically branchy and benign breast tumors are typically smooth. It is of interest to characterize tumor branchiness (roughness) to differentiate invasive malignant breast cancer from noninvasive ones. In this study, we examined the shear modulus (G) to elastic modulus (E) ratio, G/E, as a quantity to describe model tumor interfacial roughness using a piezoelectric cantilever capable of measuring both tissue elastic modulus and tissue shear modulus. The piezoelectric cantilever used had two lead zirconate titanate layers to facilitate all-electrical elastic (shear) modulus measurements using one single device. We constructed model tissues with tumors by embedding one-dimensional (1D) corrugated inclusions and three-dimensional (3D) spiky-ball inclusions made of modeling clay in gelatin. We showed that for smooth inclusions, G/E was 0.3 regardless of the shear direction. In contrast, for a 1D corrugated rough inclusion G/E was 0.3 only when the shear was parallel to corrugation and G/E increased with an increasing angle between the shear direction and the corrugation. When the shear was perpendicular to corrugation, G/E became >0.7. For 3D isotropic spiky-ball inclusions we showed that the G/E depended on the degree of the roughness. Using the ratio s/r of the spike length (s) to the overall inclusion radius (r) as a roughness parameter, we showed that for inclusions with s/r larger than or equal to 0.28, the G/E ratio over the inclusions was larger than 0.7 whereas for inclusions with s/r less than 0.28, the G/E decreased with decreasing s/r to around 0.3 at s/r=0. In addition, we showed that the depth limit of the G/E measurement is twice the width of the probe area of the piezoelectric cantilever. PMID:20887005

  12. Effect of coating thickness on interfacial shear behavior of zirconia-coated sapphire fibers in a polycrystalline alumina matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Hellmann, J.R.; Chou, Y.S.

    1995-10-01

    The effect of zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) interfacial coatings on the interfacial shear behavior in sapphire reinforced alumina was examined in this study. Zirconia coatings of thicknesses ranging from 0.15 to 1.45 {mu}m were applied to single crystal sapphire (Saphikon) fibers using a particulate loaded sol dipping technique. After calcining at 1,100 C in air, the coated fibers were incorporated into a polycrystalline alumina matrix via hot pressing. Interfacial shear strength and sliding behavior of the coated fibers was examined using thin-slice indentation fiber pushout and pushback techniques. In all cases, debonding and sliding occurred at the interface between the fibers and the coating. The coatings exhibited a dense microstructure and led to a higher interfacial shear strength (> 240 MPa) and interfacial sliding stress (> 75 MPa) relative to previous studies on the effect of a porous interphase on interfacial properties. The interfacial shear strength decreased with increasing fiber coating thickness (from 389 {+-} 59 to 241 {+-} 43 MPa for 0.15 to 1.45 {micro}m thick coatings, respectively). Sliding behavior exhibited load modulation with increasing displacement during fiber sliding which is characteristic of fiber roughness-induced stick-slip. The high interfacial shear strengths and sliding stresses measured in this study, as well as the potentially strength degrading surface reconstruction observed on the coated fibers after hot pressing and heat treatment, indicate that dense zirconia coatings are not suitable candidates for optimizing composite toughness and strength in the sapphire fiber reinforced alumina system.

  13. Oxidation and temperature effects on the interfacial shear strength in SCS-6 fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Guermazi, M.

    1995-01-01

    The fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength of Textron SCS-6 SiC-fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (RBSN) was studied as a function of temperature after oxidation for 24 h at 600 C. Fiber push-out experiments were conducted using a diamond indenter in a high-temperature microhardness tester under vacuum. The interfacial shear strength increased with temperature because of the relief of residual tensile stresses arising from the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between the fiber and the matrix. Most of sublayer 2 of the fiber outer coating, which mainly consisted of carbon in the form of BSU (basic structure unit) aggregates, had disappeared after the heat treatment of the composite. Oxidation resulted in severe changes in the fiber outer coating and caused a lower interfacial shear strength with respect to that of the unoxidized composite.

  14. Towards the role of interfacial shear in shock-induced intermetallic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collinson, Mark; Chapman, David; Williamson, David; Burchell, Mark; Eakins, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Shock-induced intermetallic reactions have previously been shown to occur on a nanosecond timescale, within the rise time of the applied shock wave. Work in this area to date has however concentrated on continuum scale measurements, raising questions as to the processes occurring at micro and meso scales. Mass transfer due to inter-facial shear at material interfaces has been suggested as a possible explanation. We will present initial work examining the role of friction on this mass mixing process across a binary interface. This work includes plate impact experiments on an inert stainless steel - aluminum friction pair, employing spatially resolved interferometry. Results from a series of metal ball-on-angled plate impact experiments at 1-2 km/s will also be presented, supported by high-speed imaging and target recovery.

  15. Interfacial models of nerve fiber cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Malev, V V; Gromov, D B; Komissarchik YaYu; Brudnaya, M S

    1992-01-01

    A new approach, basing on a resemblance between cytoskeleton structures associated with plasma membranes and interfacial layers of coexisting phases, is proposed. In particular, a lattice model, similar to those of the theory of surface properties of pure liquids and nonelectrolyte solutions (Ono, S., and S. Kondo. 1960. Handbuch der Physik.), has been developed to describe nerve fiber cytoskeleton. The preliminary consideration of the model shows the existence of submembrane cytoskeleton having increased peripheral densities of microtubules (compared with the bulk density) which is in qualitative agreement with the data in literature. Some additional possibilities of the approach proposed are briefly discussed. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:1420929

  16. Estimation of interfacial shear strength between superconducting oxides and silver sheath from multiple-fracture phenomenon of the oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ochiai, Shojiro; Hayasi, Kenji; Osamura, Kozo )

    1994-02-01

    The influence of interfacial shear strength superconducting Y-Ba-Cu-O and silver and that between Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and silver on the multiple fracture of the oxides embedded in silver-sheathed composite wires, prepared by a powder-in-tube method, on the multiple fracture of the oxides was analyzed. The stress distribution in the oxide was calculated based on the proposed method, and the multiple-fracture phenomenon was simulated by means of a Monte Carlo simulation method. From the comparison of the experimental results with those obtained by the simulation, the interfacial shear strength between Y-Ba-Cu-O and silver and that between Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and silver were estimated to be nearly 30 and 40 MPa, respectively.

  17. Tailoring of interfacial mechanical shear strength by surface chemical modification of silicon microwires embedded in Nafion membranes.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Betar M; Gu, X Wendy; Chen, David Z; Greer, Julia R; Lewis, Nathan S

    2015-05-26

    The interfacial shear strength between Si microwires and a Nafion membrane has been tailored through surface functionalization of the Si. Acidic (-COOH-terminated) or basic (-NH2-terminated) surface-bound functionality was introduced by hydrosilylation reactions to probe the interactions between the functionalized Si microwires and hydrophilic ionically charged sites in the Nafion polymeric side chains. Surfaces functionalized with SiOx, Si-H, or Si-CH3 were also synthesized and investigated. The interfacial shear strength between the functionalized Si microwire surfaces and the Nafion matrix was quantified by uniaxial wire pull-out experiments in an in situ nanomechanical instrument that allowed simultaneous collection of mechanical data and visualization of the deformation process. In this process, an axial load was applied to the custom-shaped top portions of individual wires until debonding occurred from the Nafion matrix. The shear strength obtained from the nanomechanical measurements correlated with the chemical bond strength and the functionalization density of the molecular layer, with values ranging from 7 MPa for Si-CH3 surfaces to ∼16-20 MPa for oxygen-containing surface functionalities. Hence surface chemical control can be used to influence the mechanical adhesion forces at a Si-Nafion interface. PMID:25872455

  18. Carboxyl functionalization of carbon fibers via aryl diazonium reaction in molten urea to enhance interfacial shear strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuwei; Meng, Linghui; Fan, Liquan; Wu, Guangshun; Ma, Lichun; Zhao, Min; Huang, Yudong

    2016-01-01

    Using molten urea as the solvent, carbon fibers were functionalized with carboxylic acid groups via aryl diazonium reaction in 15 min to improve their interfacial bonding with epoxy resin. The surface functionalization was quantified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which showed that the relative surface coverage of carboxylic acid groups increased from an initial percentage of 3.17-10.41%. Mechanical property test results indicated that the aryl diazonium reaction in this paper could improve the interfacial shear strength by 66%. Meanwhile, the technique did not adopt any pre-oxidation step to produce functional groups prior to grafting and was shown to maintain the tensile strength of the fibers. This methodology provided a rapid, facile and economically viable route to produce covalently functionalized carbon fibers in large quantities with an eco-friendly method.

  19. Interfacial Micromechanics in Fibrous Composites: Design, Evaluation, and Models

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Zhenkun; Li, Xuan; Qin, Fuyong; Qiu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances of interfacial micromechanics in fiber reinforced composites using micro-Raman spectroscopy are given. The faced mechanical problems for interface design in fibrous composites are elaborated from three optimization ways: material, interface, and computation. Some reasons are depicted that the interfacial evaluation methods are difficult to guarantee the integrity, repeatability, and consistency. Micro-Raman study on the fiber interface failure behavior and the main interface mechanical problems in fibrous composites are summarized, including interfacial stress transfer, strength criterion of interface debonding and failure, fiber bridging, frictional slip, slip transition, and friction reloading. The theoretical models of above interface mechanical problems are given. PMID:24977189

  20. Modeling of shear localization in materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.; LeBlanc, M.; Riddle, B.; Jorgensen, B.

    1998-02-11

    The deformation response of a Ti alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, has been studied during shear localization. The study has involved well-controlled laboratory tests involving a double-notch shear sample. The results have been used to provide a comparison between experiment and the predicted response using DYNA2D and two material models (the Johnson-Cook model and an isotropic elastic-plastic-hydrodynamic model). The work will serve as the basis for the development of a new material model which represents the different deformation mechanisms active during shear localization.

  1. Stress diffusion in models for shear banding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masnada, Elian; Olmsted, Peter

    Understanding shear banding is of utmost importance from both theoretical and experimental point of view and consequently it has been studied for several decades. Despite this study numerous aspects of shear banding remains poorly understood. Because of the intrinsic inhomogeneity in the shear banded state, applicable constitutive models must be include spatial inhomogeneities, leading to a so-called 'diffusive' term in the equation of motion for the slow variables that carry stress. Such terms are also vital in describing the interaction of bulk shear banding flows with walls and incorporation of wall slip. In this work, we consider different sources of 'diffusion' in polymer models in which concentration degrees of freedom are negligible. The simplest models used are consistent with diffusive terms whose origin is intrinsically dissipative, such as due to hydrodynamic interactions. By contrast, models in which elastic effects such as finite chain stiffness contribute to stress diffusion are inconsistent with simple diffusive models, and we propose alternative consistent models

  2. Hydrogen bonds, interfacial stiffness moduli, and the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, John H.

    2015-03-15

    The chemical treatment of carbon fibers used in carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites greatly affects the fraction of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed at the fiber-matrix interface. The H-bonds are major contributors to the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength and play a direct role in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of the composite. The H-bond contributions τ to the ILSS and magnitudes K{sub N} of the fiber-matrix interfacial stiffness moduli of seven carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites, subjected to different fiber surface treatments, are calculated from the Morse potential for the interactions of hydroxyl and carboxyl acid groups formed on the carbon fiber surfaces with epoxy receptors. The τ calculations range from 7.7 MPa to 18.4 MPa in magnitude, depending on fiber treatment. The K{sub N} calculations fall in the range (2.01 – 4.67) ×10{sup 17} N m{sup −3}. The average ratio K{sub N}/|τ| is calculated to be (2.59 ± 0.043) × 10{sup 10} m{sup −1} for the seven composites, suggesting a nearly linear connection between ILSS and H-bonding at the fiber-matrix interfaces. The linear connection indicates that τ may be assessable nondestructively from measurements of K{sub N} via a technique such as angle beam ultrasonic spectroscopy.

  3. Hydrogen bonds, interfacial stiffness moduli, and the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2015-03-01

    The chemical treatment of carbon fibers used in carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites greatly affects the fraction of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed at the fiber-matrix interface. The H-bonds are major contributors to the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength and play a direct role in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of the composite. The H-bond contributions τ to the ILSS and magnitudes KN of the fiber-matrix interfacial stiffness moduli of seven carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites, subjected to different fiber surface treatments, are calculated from the Morse potential for the interactions of hydroxyl and carboxyl acid groups formed on the carbon fiber surfaces with epoxy receptors. The τ calculations range from 7.7 MPa to 18.4 MPa in magnitude, depending on fiber treatment. The KN calculations fall in the range (2.01 - 4.67) ×1017 N m-3. The average ratio KN/|τ| is calculated to be (2.59 ± 0.043) × 1010 m-1 for the seven composites, suggesting a nearly linear connection between ILSS and H-bonding at the fiber-matrix interfaces. The linear connection indicates that τ may be assessable nondestructively from measurements of KN via a technique such as angle beam ultrasonic spectroscopy.

  4. Steel shear walls, behavior, modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Astaneh-Asl, Abolhassan

    2008-07-08

    In recent years steel shear walls have become one of the more efficient lateral load resisting systems in tall buildings. The basic steel shear wall system consists of a steel plate welded to boundary steel columns and boundary steel beams. In some cases the boundary columns have been concrete-filled steel tubes. Seismic behavior of steel shear wall systems during actual earthquakes and based on laboratory cyclic tests indicates that the systems are quite ductile and can be designed in an economical way to have sufficient stiffness, strength, ductility and energy dissipation capacity to resist seismic effects of strong earthquakes. This paper, after summarizing the past research, presents the results of two tests of an innovative steel shear wall system where the boundary elements are concrete-filled tubes. Then, a review of currently available analytical models of steel shear walls is provided with a discussion of capabilities and limitations of each model. We have observed that the tension only 'strip model', forming the basis of the current AISC seismic design provisions for steel shear walls, is not capable of predicting the behavior of steel shear walls with length-to-thickness ratio less than about 600 which is the range most common in buildings. The main reasons for such shortcomings of the AISC seismic design provisions for steel shear walls is that it ignores the compression field in the shear walls, which can be significant in typical shear walls. The AISC method also is not capable of incorporating stresses in the shear wall due to overturning moments. A more rational seismic design procedure for design of shear walls proposed in 2000 by the author is summarized in the paper. The design method, based on procedures used for design of steel plate girders, takes into account both tension and compression stress fields and is applicable to all values of length-to-thickness ratios of steel shear walls. The method is also capable of including the effect of

  5. Sheared Ising models in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hucht, Alfred; Angst, Sebastian

    2013-03-01

    The nonequilibrium phase transition in sheared three-dimensional Ising models is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations in two different geometries corresponding to different shear normals [A. Hucht and S. Angst, EPL 100, 20003 (2012)]. We demonstrate that in the high shear limit both systems undergo a strongly anisotropic phase transition at exactly known critical temperatures Tc which depend on the direction of the shear normal. Using dimensional analysis, we determine the anisotropy exponent θ = 2 as well as the correlation length exponents ν∥ = 1 and ν⊥ = 1 / 2 . These results are verified by simulations, though considerable corrections to scaling are found. The correlation functions perpendicular to the shear direction can be calculated exactly and show Ornstein-Zernike behavior. Supported by CAPES-DAAD through PROBRAL as well as by the German Research Society (DFG) through SFB 616 ``Energy Dissipation at Surfaces.''

  6. Wind shear modeling for aircraft hazard definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Camp, D. W.; Wang, S. T.

    1978-01-01

    Mathematical models of wind profiles were developed for use in fast time and manned flight simulation studies aimed at defining and eliminating these wind shear hazards. A set of wind profiles and associated wind shear characteristics for stable and neutral boundary layers, thunderstorms, and frontal winds potentially encounterable by aircraft in the terminal area are given. Engineering models of wind shear for direct hazard analysis are presented in mathematical formulae, graphs, tables, and computer lookup routines. The wind profile data utilized to establish the models are described as to location, how obtained, time of observation and number of data points up to 500 m. Recommendations, engineering interpretations and guidelines for use of the data are given and the range of applicability of the wind shear models is described.

  7. Analytical and numerical modeling of non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziyin; Nagy, Peter B; Hassan, Waled

    2016-02-01

    Non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface between two solids can be exploited for nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of bond quality. In this study we developed two analytical models for nonlinear imperfect interfaces. The first model uses a finite nonlinear interfacial stiffness representation of an imperfect interface of vanishing thickness, while the second model relies on a thin nonlinear interphase layer to represent an imperfect interface region. The second model is actually a derivative of the first model obtained by calculating the equivalent interfacial stiffness of a thin isotropic nonlinear interphase layer in the quasi-static approximation. The predictions of both analytical models were numerically verified by comparison to COMSOL finite element simulations. These models can accurately predict the additional nonlinearity caused by interface imperfections based on the strength of the reflected and transmitted mixed longitudinal waves produced by them under non-collinear shear wave interrogation. PMID:26482394

  8. Analytical and numerical modeling of non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ziyin; Nagy, Peter B.; Hassan, Waled

    2016-02-01

    Non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface between two solids can be exploited for nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of bond quality. In this study we developed two analytical models for nonlinear imperfect interfaces. The first model uses a finite nonlinear interfacial stiffness representation of an imperfect interface of vanishing thickness, while the second model relies on a thin nonlinear interphase layer to represent an imperfect interface region. The second model is actually a derivative of the first model obtained by calculating the equivalent interfacial stiffness of a thin isotropic nonlinear interphase layer in the quasi-static approximation. The predictions of both analytical models were numerically verified by comparison to COMSOL finite element simulations. These models can accurately predict the excess nonlinearity caused by interface imperfections based on the strength of the reflected and transmitted mixed longitudinal waves produced by them under non-collinear shear wave interrogation.

  9. Modeling interfacial area transport in multi-fluid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbro, S.L.

    1996-11-01

    Many typical chemical engineering operations are multi-fluid systems. They are carried out in distillation columns (vapor/liquid), liquid-liquid contactors (liquid/liquid) and other similar devices. An important parameter is interfacial area concentration, which determines the rate of interfluid heat, mass and momentum transfer and ultimately, the overall performance of the equipment. In many cases, the models for determining interfacial area concentration are empirical and can only describe the cases for which there is experimental data. In an effort to understand multiphase reactors and the mixing process better, a multi-fluid model has been developed as part of a research effort to calculate interfacial area transport in several different types of in-line static mixers. For this work, the ensemble-averaged property conservation equations have been derived for each fluid and for the mixture. These equations were then combined to derive a transport equation for the interfacial area concentration. The final, one-dimensional model was compared to interfacial area concentration data from two sizes of Kenics in-line mixer, two sizes of concurrent jet and a Tee mixer. In all cases, the calculated and experimental data compared well with the highest scatter being with the Tee mixer comparison.

  10. Modelling temperature and concentration dependent solid/liquid interfacial energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippmann, Stephanie; Jung, In-Ho; Paliwal, Manas; Rettenmayr, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Models for the prediction of the solid/liquid interfacial energy in pure substances and binary alloys, respectively, are reviewed and extended regarding the temperature and concentration dependence of the required thermodynamic entities. A CALPHAD-type thermodynamic database is used to introduce temperature and concentration dependent melting enthalpies and entropies for multicomponent alloys in the temperature range between liquidus and solidus. Several suitable models are extended and employed to calculate the temperature and concentration dependent interfacial energy for Al-FCC with their respective liquids and compared with experimental data.

  11. Extreme model reduction of shear layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qawasmeh, Bashar Rafee

    The aim of this research is to develop nonlinear low-dimensional models (LDMs) to describe vortex dynamics in shear layers. A modified Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD)/Galerkin projection method is developed to obtain models at extremely low dimension for shear layers. The idea is to dynamically scale the shear layer along y direction to factor out the shear layer growth and capture the dynamics by only a couple of modes. The models are developed for two flows, incompressible spatially developing and weakly compressible temporally developing shear layers, respectively. To capture basic dynamics, the low-dimensional models require only two POD modes for each wavenumber/frequency. Thus, a two-mode model is capable of representing single-wavenumber/frequency dynamics such as vortex roll-up, and a four-mode model is capable of representing the nonlinear dynamics involving a fundamental wavenumber/frequency and its subharmonic, such as vortex pairing/merging. Most of the energy is captured by the first mode of each wavenumber/frequency, the second POD mode, however, plays a critical role and needs to be included. In the thesis, we first apply the approach on temporally developing weakly compressible shear layers. In compressible flows, the thermodynamic variables are dynamically important, and must be considered. We choose isentropic Navier-Stokes equations for simplicity, and choose a proper inner product to present both kinetic energy and thermal energy. Two cases of convective Mach numbers are studied for low compressibility and moderate compressibility. Moreover, we study the sensitivity of the compressible four-mode model to several flow parameters: Mach number, the strength of initial perturbations of the fundamental and its subharmonic, and Reynolds number. Secondly we apply the approach on spatially developing incompressible shear layers with periodicity in time. We consider a streamwise parabolic form of the Navier-Stokes equations. When we add arbitrary

  12. Influence of interfacial shear strength on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of fiber/matrix interface microstructure and interfacial shear strength on the mechanical properties of a fiber-reinforced ceramic composite was evaluated. The composite consisted of approximately 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 microns diameter SiC fibers (Textron SCS-6) in a reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix (SiC/RBSN). The interface microstructure was varied by controlling the composite fabrication conditions and by heat treating the composite in an oxidizing environment. Interfacial shear strength was determined by the matrix crack spacing method. The results of microstructural examination indicate that the carbon-rich coating provided with the as-produced SiC fibers was stable in composites fabricated at 1200 C in a nitrogen or in a nitrogen plus 4 percent hydrogen mixture for 40 hr. However this coating degraded in composites fabricated at 1350 C in N2 + 4 percent H2 for 40 and 72 hr and also in composites heat treated in an oxidizing environment at 600 C for 100 hr after fabrication at 1200 C in a nitrogen. It was determined that degradation occurred by carbon removal which in turn had a strong influence on interfacial shear strength and other mechanical properties. Specifically, as the carbon coating was removed, the composite interfacial shear strength, primary elastic modulus, first matrix cracking stress, and ultimate tensile strength decreased, but the first matrix cracking strain remained nearly the same.

  13. Modeling of Turbulent Free Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Dennis A.; DeBonis, James R.; Georgiadis, Nicolas J.

    2013-01-01

    The modeling of turbulent free shear flows is crucial to the simulation of many aerospace applications, yet often receives less attention than the modeling of wall boundary layers. Thus, while turbulence model development in general has proceeded very slowly in the past twenty years, progress for free shear flows has been even more so. This paper highlights some of the fundamental issues in modeling free shear flows for propulsion applications, presents a review of past modeling efforts, and identifies areas where further research is needed. Among the topics discussed are differences between planar and axisymmetric flows, development versus self-similar regions, the effect of compressibility and the evolution of compressibility corrections, the effect of temperature on jets, and the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers for reacting shear flows. Large eddy simulation greatly reduces the amount of empiricism in the physical modeling, but is sensitive to a number of numerical issues. This paper includes an overview of the importance of numerical scheme, mesh resolution, boundary treatment, sub-grid modeling, and filtering in conducting a successful simulation.

  14. Fundamental studies of interfacial rheology at multilayered model polymers for coextrusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huagui; Lamnawar, Khalid; Maazouz, Abderrahim

    2015-05-01

    Fundamental studies have been devoted to the interfacial phenomena at multilayered systems based on two model compatible polymers of PVDF and PMMA with varying molar masses. Linear and nonlinear rheology are demonstrated to be sensitive to the presence of diffuse interphase triggered at polymer/polymer interface. Firstly, the interdiffusion kinetics as well as the interphase development have been investigated using SAOS measurements with results analyzed under Doi-Edwards theory. The PMMA/PVDF mixture, has been examined to own close component monomeric friction coefficients. Based on this physics, a new rheological model was developed to quantify the interdiffusion coefficients. Thereby, rheological and geometrical properties of the interphase have been quantified, as validated by SEM-EDX. Secondly, step strain, shear and uniaxial extension startup were carried out to investigate their sensitivity to the diffuse interphase. An original model was proposed for the stress relaxation of multilayer and that of the interphase. Entanglement lack and weak entanglement intensity at the interface/diffuse interphase make them to be subsequently readily to suffer from interfacial yielding under large deformations. Finally, the interphase development coupled to flow in coextrusion has been considered. Net result between negative effect of chain orientation and favorable effect of flow has been shown to broaden the interphase. Its presence during coextrusion process was demonstrated to significantly weaken the interfacial instabilities.

  15. Compressible homogeneous shear: Simulation and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.; Erlebacher, G.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Compressibility effects were studied on turbulence by direct numerical simulation of homogeneous shear flow. A primary observation is that the growth of the turbulent kinetic energy decreases with increasing turbulent Mach number. The sinks provided by compressible dissipation and the pressure dilatation, along with reduced Reynolds shear stress, are shown to contribute to the reduced growth of kinetic energy. Models are proposed for these dilatational terms and verified by direct comparison with the simulations. The differences between the incompressible and compressible fields are brought out by the examination of spectra, statistical moments, and structure of the rate of strain tensor.

  16. Foam rheology: A model of viscous effects in shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.; Reinelt, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Foams consisting of gas bubbles dispersed in a continuous network of thin liquid films display a remarkable range of rheological characteristics that include a finite shear modulus, yield stress, non-Newtonian viscosity, and slip at the wall. Progress in developing micromechanical theories to describe foam rheology has depended upon two-dimensional models, which in most cases are assumed to have perfectly ordered structure. Princen accounted for surface tension and geometrical effects, and analyzed the nonlinear elastic response of a spatially periodic foam in simple shear. His analysis has been extended to account for more general deformations. Khan and Armstrong and Kraynik and Hansen have proposed ad hoc models for viscous effects in foam rheology. Their models capture numerous qualitative phenomena but incorporate relaxation mechanisms based upon overly simplified assumptions of liquid flow in the thin films. Mysels, Shinoda, and Frankel considered soap films with interfaces that are inextensible due to the presence of surfactants. They analyzed the primary flow that occurs when such films are slowly withdrawn from or recede into essentially static junction regions such as the Plateau borders in a foam. Adopting this mechanism, Schwartz and Princen considered small periodic deformations of a foam and calculated the energy dissipation due to viscous flow in the thin films. In the following, we also adopt the basic interfacial and viscous mechanisms introduced by Mysels et al. and analyze simple shearing deformations of finite amplitude. The configuration and effective stress of the foam are determined. Under these deformation conditions, the foam is a nonlinear viscoelastic material. Results for the uniform expansion of a foam are also presented. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Flocculation of model algae under shear.

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Flint; Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2010-11-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of the flocculation of model algae particles under shear. We study the evolution of the cluster size distribution as well as the steady-state distribution as a function of shear rates and algae interaction parameters. Algal interactions are modeled through a DLVO-type potential, a combination of a HS colloid potential (Everaers) and a yukawa/colloid electrostatic potential. The effect of hydrodynamic interactions on aggregation is explored. Cluster strucuture is determined from the algae-algae radial distribution function as well as the structure factor. DLVO parameters including size, salt concentration, surface potential, initial volume fraction, etc. are varied to model different species of algae under a variety of environmental conditions.

  18. Multidimensional mechanistic modeling of interfacial heat and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Shaver, D. R.; Antal, S. P.; Podowski, M. Z.

    2012-07-01

    A combined theoretical and computational study in modeling multidimensional, diabatic vapor/liquid flows is presented. Models have been developed governing kinematic aspects of multiphase flow as well as interfacial mass and heat transfer for flows of condensable gas (vapor) and liquids. The modeling formulation is based on the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) type multi-field approach which utilizes a complete set of conservation equations for each fluid component 1. The modeled interfacial interactions include energy, mass, and momentum transfer. Emphasis in the model development work has been placed on the mechanisms governing coupled interfacial heat and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor fields (condensation and/or boiling). A method for tracking changes in bubble size is presented and tested. Locally based models of multidimensional effects have been analyzed, including distributions of fluid temperatures and volume fractions. The overall model accounts for both kinematic and thermodynamic nonequilibrium between the component fluids including superheated vapor. The model has been implemented in the NPHASE-CMFD computer code. Results from the kinematic model are compared to experimental data and good agreement is demonstrated. The heat and mass transfer model is parametrically tested to show the multidimensional effects on the rate of heat and mass transfer. These effects are explained in terms of local characteristics of the two-phase flow. The model is applied to a scenario of saturated vapor injected into a subcooled flow through a heated, porous wall. This provides a reasonable approximation to subcooled boiling. The results are found to be dependent on the partitioning of the wall heat flux between direct liquid heating and vapor generation. However, the observed dependencies are explained and the modeling is considered consistent. (authors)

  19. Modeling and characterization of interfacial adhesion and fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Qizhou

    2000-09-01

    The loss of interfacial adhesion is mostly seen in the failure of polymer adhesive joints. In addition to the intrinsic physical attraction across the interface, the interfacial adhesion strength is believed to highly depend on a number of factors, such as adhesive chemistry/structure, surface topology, fracture pattern, thermal and elastic mismatch across the interface. The fracture failure of an adhesive joint involves basically three aspects, namely, the intrinsic interfacial strength, the driving force for fracture and other energy dissipation. One may define the intrinsic interfacial strength as the maximum value of the intrinsic interfacial adhesion. The total work done by external forces to the component that contains the interface is partitioned into two parts. The first part is consumed by all other energy dissipation mechanisms (plasticity, heat generation, viscosity, etc.). The second part is used to debond the interface. This amount should equal to the intrinsic adhesion of the interface according to the laws of conservation of energy. It is clear that in order to understand the fundamental physics of adhesive joint failure, one must be able to characterize the intrinsic interfacial adhesion and be able to identify all the major energy dissipation mechanisms involved in the debonding process. In this study, both physical and chemical adhesion mechanisms were investigated for an aluminum-epoxy interface. The physical bonding energy was estimated by computing the Van de Waals forces across the interface. A hydration model was proposed and the associated chemical bonding energy was calculated through molecular simulations. Other energy dissipation mechanisms such as plasticity and thermal residual stresses were also identified and investigated for several four-point bend specimens. In particular, a micromechanics based model was developed to estimate the adhesion enhancement due to surface roughness. It is found that for this Al-epoxy system the major

  20. Interfacial Microstructure Evolution and Shear Strength of Titanium Sandwich Structures Fabricated by Brazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wentao; Fan, Minyu; Li, Jinlong; Tao, Jie

    2016-03-01

    The corrugated sandwich structure, consisting of a CP Ti (commercially pure titanium) core between two Ti-6Al-4V face sheets, was brazed using pasty Ti-37.5Zr-15Cu-10Ni as filler alloy, at the temperature of 870°C for 5, 10, 20, and 30 min. The effect of brazing time on the microstructure and elemental distribution of the brazed joints was examined by means of SEM, EDS, and XRD analyses. It was found that various intermetallic phases were formed in the brazed joints, following a brazing time of 5 min, and their contents were decreased by the increment of brazing time, while prolonged brazing time resulted in a fine, acicular Widmanstätten microstructure throughout the entire joint. In addition, shear testing was performed in the brazed corrugated specimens in order to indirectly assess the quality of the joints. The debonding between CP Ti and Ti-6Al-4V was observed in the specimen brazed for 5 min and the fracture of the CP Ti corrugated core occurred after 30 min of brazing time. Additionally, when brazed for 10 min or 20 min, brittle intermetallic compounds in the joints and the grain growth of the base metal were controllable. Therefore, the sandwich structures failed without debonding in the joints or fracture within the base metal, demonstrating a good combination of strength and ductility.

  1. Effects of reaction layer on interfacial shear properties and strength of fiber in silicon-carbide (SiC) fiber-reinforced titanium alloy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Kagawa, Yutaka; Masuda, Chitoshi; Fujiwara, Chikara; Fukushima, Akira

    1996-12-31

    The effect of the interfacial thickness of the reaction layer on the interfacial shear properties and the tensile strength of double carbon-coated SCS-6 SiC fiber in Ti-15Mo-5Zr-3Al alloy matrix composite was examined. The major reaction layer thickness, that is, titanium-carbide (TiC) layer thickness, varied with heat-exposure temperature and time, respectively, and the resultant mean thickness of the reaction layer of the composite ranged from 0.4 to 1.7 {micro}m. The critical interfacial toughness, G{sub i}{sup c}, and the mean shear sliding resistance, {tau}{sub s}, were evaluated by the thin specimen pushout technique. Tensile strength of the silicon-carbide (SiC) fiber extracted from the titanium alloy matrix before and after the heat exposure was determined in relationship to the thickness of the reaction layer. The critical interface toughness, G{sub i}{sup c}, for the failure of the root of the reaction layer was {approx}4 J/m{sup 2}, and the average shear sliding resistance of the interface, {tau}{sub s}, was 102 to 118 MPa. The interfacial shear mechanical properties were adequate to prevent failure of the fiber due to the stress concentration caused by cracks that formed first in the reaction layer. The results showed that when the growth of reaction layer was within 1.7 {micro}m, the mean strength of the extracted fiber was unaffected by the existence of the reaction layer because of weak bonding between it and the fiber. However, with the increase of the reaction layer thickness, the strength distribution of the extracted fiber tended to Weibull bimodal distribution.

  2. Modelling interfacial cracking with non-matching cohesive interface elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Vinh Phu; Nguyen, Chi Thanh; Bordas, Stéphane; Heidarpour, Amin

    2016-07-01

    Interfacial cracking occurs in many engineering problems such as delamination in composite laminates, matrix/interface debonding in fibre reinforced composites etc. Computational modelling of these interfacial cracks usually employs compatible or matching cohesive interface elements. In this paper, incompatible or non-matching cohesive interface elements are proposed for interfacial fracture mechanics problems. They allow non-matching finite element discretisations of the opposite crack faces thus lifting the constraint on the compatible discretisation of the domains sharing the interface. The formulation is based on a discontinuous Galerkin method and works with both initially elastic and rigid cohesive laws. The proposed formulation has the following advantages compared to classical interface elements: (i) non-matching discretisations of the domains and (ii) no high dummy stiffness. Two and three dimensional quasi-static fracture simulations are conducted to demonstrate the method. Our method not only simplifies the meshing process but also it requires less computational demands, compared with standard interface elements, for problems that involve materials/solids having a large mismatch in stiffnesses.

  3. Influence of Cr and W alloying on the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength in cast and directionally solidified sapphire NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, R.; Tiwari, R.; Tewari, S. N.

    1995-01-01

    Sapphire-reinforced NiAl matrix composites with chromium or tungsten as alloying additions were synthesized using casting and zone directional solidification (DS) techniques and characterized by a fiber pushout test as well as by microhardness measurements. The sapphire-NiAl(Cr) specimens exhibited an interlayer of Cr rich eutectic at the fiber-matrix interface and a higher interfacial shear strength compared to unalloyed sapphire-NiAl specimens processed under identical conditions. In contrast, the sapphire-NiAl(W) specimens did not show interfacial excess of tungsten rich phases, although the interfacial shear strength was high and comparable to that of sapphire-NiAl(Cr). The postdebond sliding stress was higher in sapphire-NiAl(Cr) than in sapphire-NiAl(W) due to interface enrichment with chromium particles. The matrix microhardness progressively decreased with increasing distance from the interface in both DS NiAl and NiAl(Cr) specimens. The study highlights the potential of casting and DS techniques to improve the toughness and strength of NiAl by designing dual-phase microstructures in NiAl alloys reinforced with sapphire fibers.

  4. Two-phase power-law modeling of pipe flows displaying shear-thinning phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Jianmin; Lyczkowski, R.W.; Sha, W.T.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes work in modeling concentrated liquid-solids flows in pipes. COMMIX-M, a three-dimensional transient and steady-state computer program developed at Argonne National Laboratory, was used to compute velocities and concentrations. Based on the authors` previous analyses, some concentrated liquid-solids suspension flows display shear-thinning rather than Newtonian phenomena. Therefore, they developed a two-phase non-Newtonian power-law model that includes the effect of solids concentration on solids viscosity. With this new two-phase power-law solids-viscosity model, and with constitutive relationships for interfacial drag, virtual mass effect, shear lift force, and solids partial-slip boundary condition at the pipe walls, COMMIX-M is capable of analyzing concentrated three-dimensional liquid-solids flows.

  5. Interfacial separation of a mature biofilm from a glass surface - A combined experimental and cohesive zone modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Safari, Ashkan; Tukovic, Zeljko; Cardiff, Philip; Walter, Maik; Casey, Eoin; Ivankovic, Alojz

    2016-02-01

    A good understanding of the mechanical stability of biofilms is essential for biofouling management, particularly when mechanical forces are used. Previous biofilm studies lack a damage-based theoretical model to describe the biofilm separation from a surface. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the interfacial separation of a mature biofilm from a rigid glass substrate using a combined experimental and numerical modelling approach. In the current work, the biofilm-glass interfacial separation process was investigated under tensile and shear stresses at the macroscale level, known as modes I and II failure mechanisms respectively. The numerical simulations were performed using a Finite Volume (FV)-based simulation package (OpenFOAM®) to predict the separation initiation using the cohesive zone model (CZM). Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based retraction curve was used to obtain the separation properties between the biofilm and glass colloid at microscale level, where the CZM parameters were estimated using the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model. In this study CZM is introduced as a reliable method for the investigation of interfacial separation between a biofilm and rigid substrate, in which a high local stress at the interface edge acts as an ultimate stress at the crack tip.This study demonstrated that the total interfacial failure energy measured at the macroscale, was significantly higher than the pure interfacial separation energy obtained by AFM at the microscale, indicating a highly ductile deformation behaviour within the bulk biofilm matrix. The results of this study can significantly contribute to the understanding of biofilm detachments. PMID:26474034

  6. Case history of FAA/SRI wind shear models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlickenmaier, Herbert

    1987-01-01

    In order to understand the development of the FAA/SRI wind fields, it is important to understand the operating philosophy of the FAA's Wind Shear Program Office. The goal of the office was to ensure an integrated solution to the wind shear problem which addressed three area: ground based equipment and coordination; airborne systems and procedures; and weather prediction. This triply addressed goal was central to the development of the wind fields. The primary user of the wind shear modeling during the FAA's program was airborne simulation. The project requirement was to use wind shear models that resulted from accidents so that effective procedures and/or equipment could be found for hazardous wind shear encounters. The wind shear model development is discussed in detail.

  7. Numerical modeling of shear band formation in PBX-9501

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, T.N.; Kamm, J.R.

    1998-12-31

    Adiabatic shear bands in explosives may be a source of ignition and lead to detonation. Three possible mechanisms leading to shear banding are (1) thermal softening, (2) mechanical softening due to microcracking, and (3) quasi-granular constitutive response. The latter two mechanisms can lead to shear band formation in PBXs at nominal strains much smaller than those required for the thermal softening mechanism. The authors study formation of shear bands with models including the latter two mechanisms under unconfined compression. Statistical variation of numerical results is similar to that observed in some experiments. However, the commonly used methods of calibrating constitutive models can be misleading because of effects due to shear band formation. One model currently being used for studies of shear band formation and ignition in PBX 9501 was calibrated in this way and may need re-examination.

  8. Modulating DNA configuration by interfacial traction: an elastic rod model to characterize DNA folding and unfolding.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zaixing

    2011-01-01

    As a continuum model of DNA, a thin elastic rod subjected to interfacial interactions is used to investigate the equilibrium configuration of DNA in intracellular solution. The interfacial traction between the rod and the solution environment is derived in detail. Kirchhoff's theory of elastic rods is used to analyze the equilibrium configuration of a DNA segment under the action of the interfacial traction. The influences of the interfacial energy factor and bending stiffness on the toroidal spool formation of the DNA segment are discussed. The results show that the equilibrium configuration of DNA is mainly determined by competition between the interfacial energy and elastic strain energy of the DNA itself, and the interfacial traction is one of the forces that drives DNA folding and unfolding. PMID:22210963

  9. Interfacial area measurement and transport modeling in air-water two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xinyu

    In two-fluid model, the interfacial area concentration (IAC) is an important parameter that characterizes the interaction of two-phases at the interface. The accuracy of IAC modeling and local measurements largely affects the efficiency of designing and assessing two-phase flow systems. The prediction of the dynamical evolution of IAC is one of the most challenging tasks in research and application. This thesis is focused on developing advanced local measurement techniques to obtain reliable two-phase parameters and implementing efficient theoretical models for IAC source and sink terms in a two-group interfacial area transport equation based on experiments. In this study, an advanced local measurement technique using a four-sensor conductivity probe has been presented for obtaining IAC in air-water flows. It extends the existing conductivity probe method to slug and churn-turbulent flows with a unified probe design and comprehensive signal processing system. Sophisticated algorithm and software have been implemented that is robust in handling most practical conditions with high reliability. Systematic analyses on the issues of probe applications and benchmarks have been performed. The improved four-sensor method has also been applied to flow conditions with significant local recirculation, which was considered the most challenging situation for local measurement in two-phase flow. Using the well-established instrumentation, solid databases for a two-inch air-water loop have been built with sufficient information on the axial development and the radial distribution of the local parameters. Mechanistic models of major fluid particle interaction phenomena involving two bubble groups have been proposed, including the shearing-off of small bubbles from slug/cap bubbles, the wake entrainment of group-1 bubble into group-2 bubble, the wake acceleration and coalescence between group-2 bubbles, and the breakup of group-2 bubbles due to surface instability. Prediction of

  10. Molecular-orbital model for metal-sapphire interfacial strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. H.; Pepper, S. V.

    1982-01-01

    Self-consistent-field X-Alpha scattered-wave cluster molecular-orbital models have been constructed for transition and noble metals (Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ag) in contact with a sapphire (Al2O3) surface. It is found that a chemical bond is established between the metal d-orbital electrons and the nonbonding 2p-orbital electrons of the oxygen anions on the Al2O3 surface. An increasing number of occupied metal-sapphire antibonding molecular orbitals explains qualitatively the observed decrease of contact shear strength through the series Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ag.

  11. Cold welding of organic light emitting diode: Interfacial and contact models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asare, J.; Adeniji, S. A.; Oyewole, O. K.; Agyei-Tuffour, B.; Du, J.; Arthur, E.; Fashina, A. A.; Zebaze Kana, M. G.; Soboyejo, W. O.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the results of an analytical and computational study of the contacts and interfacial fracture associated with the cold welding of Organic Light Emitting diodes (OLEDs). The effects of impurities (within the possible interfaces) are explored for contacts and interfacial fracture between layers that are relevant to model OLEDs. The models are used to study the effects of adhesion, pressure, thin film layer thickness and dust particle modulus (between the contacting surfaces) on contact profiles around impurities between cold-welded thin films. The lift-off stage of thin films (during cold welding) is then modeled as an interfacial fracture process. A combination of adhesion and interfacial fracture theories is used to provide new insights for the design of improved contact and interfacial separation during cold welding. The implications of the results are discussed for the design and fabrication of cold welded OLED structures.

  12. A model of Barchan dunes including lateral shear stress.

    PubMed

    Schwämmle, V; Herrmann, H J

    2005-01-01

    Barchan dunes are found where sand availability is low and wind direction quite constant. The two dimensional shear stress of the wind field and the sand movement by saltation and avalanches over a barchan dune are simulated. The model with one dimensional shear stress is extended including surface diffusion and lateral shear stress. The resulting final shape is compared to the results of the model with a one dimensional shear stress and confirmed by comparison to measurements. We found agreement and improvements with respect to the model with one dimensional shear stress. Additionally, a characteristic edge at the center of the windward side is discovered which is also observed for big barchans. Diffusion effects reduce this effect for small dunes. PMID:15688141

  13. Conjugate-shear folding: A model for the relationships between foliations, folds and shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerden, Domingo G. A. M.; Sayab, Mohammad; Bouybaouene, Mohamed L.

    2010-08-01

    Microstructural mapping of whole thin sections cut from two samples of micaschist containing cm-scale folds plus garnet porphyroblasts has provided new insight in the relationships between folding, shearing and foliation development. The garnets exhibit coherent inclusion-trail patterns that place important constraints on the kinematic development of both samples, which are shown to be representative of coaxial versus non-coaxial deformation in rocks containing a pre-existing schistosity. A comparison of crenulations-cleavages geometries in both samples and a review of the geometry of natural and experimental multilayer folds leads to the conclusion that folding involves conjugate shearing at different scales. At microscopic scales, crenulation cleavages nucleate as conjugate-kink or shear instabilities and develop further as a function of the macroscopic partitioning of deformation. In fold-hinge domains, bulk-coaxial deformation results in equal development of conjugate crenulations that progressively coalescence into symmetrical crenulation patterns so that, macroscopically, parallelism is achieved between foliation, fold-axial planes and long axes of strain ellipses. Fold-limb domains represent a system of conjugate-shear zones where single sets of crenulation instabilities with synthetic shearing component preferentially develop producing oblique relationships between the aforementioned elements. Cleavage fanning is inferred as a direct consequence of this conjugate-shear origin of folds. The model implies that crenulation cleavages and S-C fabrics in shear zones form by analogous processes, in both cases involving a component of shearing along foliation planes. The development of conjugate sets of foliation planes surrounding porphyroblasts during early, relatively coaxial stages of deformation explains continued "gyrostatic" behaviour during more advanced non-coaxial stages, as indicated by consistently oriented inclusion trails in the studied samples.

  14. Effect of mineral-collagen interfacial behavior on the microdamage progression in bone using a probabilistic cohesive finite element model.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qing; Nakade, Rugved; Dong, Xuanliang; Rong, Qiguo; Wang, Xiaodu

    2011-10-01

    The interactions between mineral and collagen phases in the ultrastructural level play an important role in determining the mechanical properties of bone tissue. Three types of mineral-collagen interaction (i.e., ionic interactions, hydrogen/van der Waals bonds, and van der Waals/viscous shear in opening/sliding mode, respectively) have been simulated in this study, using cohesive zone-modeling techniques. Considering the inhomogeneity of bone, a probabilistic failure analysis approach has been also employed to account for the effect of mineral-collagen interfacial behavior on microdamage accumulation in lamellar bone tissues. The results of this study suggested that different interfacial behaviors cause different types of microdamage accumulation. The ionic interactions between the mineral and collagen phases lead to the formation of linear microcracks, while the van der Waals/viscous shear interactions may facilitate the formation of diffuse damage. In the case of hydrogen/van der Waals bonds, a transitional behavior of microdamage accumulation in bone was observed. The findings of this study may help in understanding the mechanisms of mineral-collagen interactions and its effects on the failure mechanism of bone. PMID:21783104

  15. Mechanical modeling of shear localization in foliated media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pourhiet, L.; Huet, B.; Agard, P.

    2009-12-01

    Crustal rocks have generally an anisotropic behavior at scale that largely exceeds the mineral/grain size. In the upper crust, the bedding of the sediments causes this anisotropy. In the middle crust, towards the base of the sismogenic zone, the rocks usually present a penetrative foliation, which also results in an anisotropic behavior. In order to better understand the response of foliated rocks to simple shear, we perform mechanical numerical model. The set up of the model consist of a layered media made of a weak and a strong phase submitted to simple shear. The parameters of the analysis are the initial angle formed by the bedding and the simple shear direction and the relative thickness of the strong and weak layers. Those layers are both isotropic. The anisotropy introduced explicitly through the geometry. In both case, we use visco-elasto-plastic material. The plastic part of the strain is modeled with Mohr Coulomb plasticity and elastic moduli are identical in the weak and strong phase. We neglect the effect of gravity and temperature. The numerical experiments are run until the global shear of the model reach γ=2. However, locally the shear may be of one to two orders of magnitude higher. In general, shear banding occurs when the layering of the sample of the sample forms a 30° angle with the shear direction. Therefore the results of the experiments may be tiled into to end member cases. In the first one, the shear bands form a large (more than 90°) angle to the shear sense. Those experiments show very long phase of passive rotation and stretching of the strong layer during which the average strength of the media decreases slowly. However, once, the angle of 90° is passed, the strength of the media increase again until shear banding occurs resulting in a rapid drop of the strength. In the second end member case, the sample strength tends to increase right away before the occurrence of the first shear band. We finally study the geometry of the sheared

  16. Laboratory model of flight through wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1985-01-01

    The simulation of an aircraft flying through a downdraft or microburst is presented. The simulation was performed under the conditions of constant takeoff thrust. The resulting wind shear conditions were filmed and examined for possible pilot corrective action in the future.

  17. History of wind shear turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cusimano, Lou

    1987-01-01

    The Office of Flight Operations, Flight Technical Programs Div., at the FAA Headquarters, interfaces with industry, R&D communities and air carriers during the introduction of new types of equipment into operational services. A brief highlight of the need which FAA operations sees for new wind shear and turbulence data sets from the viewpoint of equipment certification and simulation is presented.

  18. Numerical Modeling of Shear Bands and Dynamic Fracture in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuliffe, Colin James

    Understanding the failure of metals at high strain rate is of utmost importance in the design of a broad range of engineering systems. Numerical methods offer the ability to analyze such complex physics and aid the design of structural systems. The objective of this research will be to develop reliable finite element models for high strain rate failure modelling, incorporating shear bands and fracture. Shear band modelling is explored first, and the subsequent developments are extended to incorporate fracture. Mesh sensitivity, the spurious dependence of failure on the discretization, is a well known hurdle in achieving reliable numerical results for shear bands and fracture, or any other strain softening model. Mesh sensitivity is overcome by regularization, and while details of regularization techniques may differ, all are similar in that a length scale is introduced which serves as a localization limiter. This dissertation contains two main contributions, the first of which presents several developments in shear band modeling. The importance of using a monolithic nonlinear solver in combination with a PDE model accounting for thermal diffusion is demonstrated. In contrast, excluding one or both of these components leads to unreliable numerical results. The Pian-Sumihara stress interpolants are also employed in small and finite deformation and shown to significantly improve the computational cost of shear band modelling. This is partly due to the fact that fewer unknowns than an irreducible discretization result from the same mesh, and more significantly, the fact that convergence of numerical results upon mesh refinement is improved drastically. This means coarser meshes are adequate to resolve shear bands, alleviating some of the computational cost of numerical modelling, which are notoriously significant. Since extremely large deformations are present during shear banding, a mesh to mesh transfer algorithm is presented for the Pian Sumihara element and used as

  19. Modeling and analysis of electrorheological suspensions in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Youngwook P.; Chua, Wei Huan; Seo, Yongsok

    2015-05-01

    A new rheological model was applied to the analysis of the electrorheological behavior of a fluid containing silica nanoparticle-decorated polyaniline nanofibers. A model's predictions were compared with the experimental data, revealing that the proposed model correctly predicted the shear stress behavior both quantitatively and qualitatively. The shear stress data of the electrorheological fluid showing aligned fibers' structural reformation as a function of the shear rate agreed well with the new model which required fewer parameters than the CCJ (Cho-Choi-Jhon) model. The static yield stress was found to be quadratically dependent on the field strength, in agreement with the predictions of the polarization model. A scaling function was used to model the yield stress behavior of the electrorheological fluid over a range of electric fields, and it correctly predicted the static yield stress behavior both quantitatively and qualitatively.

  20. Two-Fluid Models and Interfacial Area Transport in Microgravity Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, Mamoru; Sun, Xiao-Dong; Vasavada, Shilp

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to develop a two-fluid model formulation with interfacial area transport equation applicable for microgravity conditions. The new model is expected to make a leapfrog improvement by furnishing the constitutive relations for the interfacial interaction terms with the interfacial area transport equation, which can dynamically model the changes of the interfacial structures. In the first year of this three-year project supported by the U.S. NASA, Office of Biological and Physics Research, the primary focus is to design and construct a ground-based, microgravity two-phase flow simulation facility, in which two immiscible fluids with close density will be used. In predicting the two-phase flow behaviors in any two-phase flow system, the interfacial transfer terms are among the most essential factors in the modeling. These interfacial transfer terms in a two-fluid model specify the rate of phase change, momentum exchange, and energy transfer at the interface between the two phases. For the two-phase flow under the microgravity condition, the stability of the fluid particle interface and the interfacial structures are quite different from those under normal gravity condition. The flow structure may not reach an equilibrium condition and the two fluids may be loosely coupled such that the inertia terms of each fluid should be considered separately by use of the two-fluid model. Previous studies indicated that, unless phase-interaction terms are accurately modeled in the two-fluid model, the complex modeling does not necessarily warrant an accurate solution.

  1. Combined PIV, PLIF, and laser focal displacement measurements (LFDM) to quantify gas-liquid interfacial shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Ian; Hann, David; Hewakandamby, Buddhika; Azzopardi, Barry

    2015-11-01

    Simultaneous Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence imaging (PLIF), using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser alongside a specially design optical system to produce a pair of very fine light sheets. This equipment, coupled a dual set of high speed synchronized camera, and a combination of reflective seeding particles, fluorescent dye and tracers were used to calculate the shear stress at the gas -liquid interface by determining the velocity vectors in both phases. These quantities, along with the position and profile of the interface were found at a number of different inlet conditions. These conditions related to various flow pattern regimes commonly discussed within the literature. These regimes; stratified, stratified- wavy, 2-D and 3-D waves are seen at various liquid and gas Reynolds values, with increasing complexity occurring as higher Reynolds numbers. Validation of the results was done via computing the shear stress in a number of different ways, and also compared with result of temporal film thickness taken using the LFDM. Results from these tests show good agreement with one another and those found in literature, with determination of gas-liquid shear stress found for regimes not previously investigated in this manner. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  2. A Deterministic Interfacial Cyclic Oxidation Spalling Model. Part 1; Model Development and Parametric Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2002-01-01

    An equation has been developed to model the iterative scale growth and spalling process that occurs during cyclic oxidation of high temperature materials. Parabolic scale growth and spalling of a constant surface area fraction have been assumed. Interfacial spallation of the only the thickest segments was also postulated. This simplicity allowed for representation by a simple deterministic summation series. Inputs are the parabolic growth rate constant, the spall area fraction, oxide stoichiometry, and cycle duration. Outputs include the net weight change behavior, as well as the total amount of oxygen and metal consumed, the total amount of oxide spalled, and the mass fraction of oxide spalled. The outputs all follow typical well-behaved trends with the inputs and are in good agreement with previous interfacial models.

  3. Model for Heat Pinch in Reversed Magnetic Shear Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xiao-ming; X, Qiu M.; Wang, Ai-ke

    1998-10-01

    A simple model is proposed to explain the recent experiment in TFTR and the more recent one in JT-60U. In the model the significant reduction of effective thermal diffusivities of ions and electrons (χieff and χeeff) is attributed to the inward flows of drift wave energy, induced by the synergistic effects of the reversed magnetic shear and E × B velocity shear, where E is due to ion pressure gradient. Numerical results demonstrate the predictions of the present model, in particular, the numerical results for χieff are in good agreement with experimental trents.

  4. Direct Numerical Simulation of Surfactant-Stabilized Emulsions Morphology and Shear Viscosity in Starting Shear Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Roar Skartlien; Espen Sollum; Andreas Akselsen; Paul Meakin

    2012-07-01

    A 3D lattice Boltzmann model for two-phase flow with amphiphilic surfactant was used to investigate the evolution of emulsion morphology and shear stress in starting shear flow. The interfacial contributions were analyzed for low and high volume fractions and varying surfactant activity. A transient viscoelastic contribution to the emulsion rheology under constant strain rate conditions was attributed to the interfacial stress. For droplet volume fractions below 0.3 and an average capillary number of about 0.25, highly elliptical droplets formed. Consistent with affine deformation models, gradual elongation of the droplets increased the shear stress at early times and reduced it at later times. Lower interfacial tension with increased surfactant activity counterbalanced the effect of increased interfacial area, and the net shear stress did not change significantly. For higher volume fractions, co-continuous phases with a complex topology were formed. The surfactant decreased the interfacial shear stress due mainly to advection of surfactant to higher curvature areas. Our results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data for polymer blends in terms of transient interfacial stresses and limited enhancement of the emulsion viscosity at larger volume fractions where the phases are co-continuous.

  5. A Method of Modeling Fabric Shear using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichani, Swapnil; Guha, Anirban

    2015-04-01

    Fabric modeling may be attempted by modeling fibres or yarns or small fabric units. The first is computationally intensive while the third does not allow relationships between the fabric's structure and its mechanical properties to be predicted. The second approach has been the most widely used so far. Out of the various ways in which this has been attempted, the finite element approach offers high flexibility while allowing the procedure to be relatively simple because of the availability of user-friendly softwares. This work explores a two-step finite element approach for modeling in-plane fabric shear. A major innovation of the modeling process was that the path of yarns in the fabric was allowed to evolve through the modeling process rather than being pre-defined. The relationship between shear angle and shear stress predicted by this model was compared with that obtained from a picture frame shear experiment. It was found that modeling the yarn with a set of anisotropic properties, gave very good correlation with experimental results.

  6. A Predictive Model of High Shear Thrombus Growth.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Marmar; Casa, Lauren D C; Aidun, Cyrus K; Ku, David N

    2016-08-01

    The ability to predict the timescale of thrombotic occlusion in stenotic vessels may improve patient risk assessment for thrombotic events. In blood contacting devices, thrombosis predictions can lead to improved designs to minimize thrombotic risks. We have developed and validated a model of high shear thrombosis based on empirical correlations between thrombus growth and shear rate. A mathematical model was developed to predict the growth of thrombus based on the hemodynamic shear rate. The model predicts thrombus deposition based on initial geometric and fluid mechanic conditions, which are updated throughout the simulation to reflect the changing lumen dimensions. The model was validated by comparing predictions against actual thrombus growth in six separate in vitro experiments: stenotic glass capillary tubes (diameter = 345 µm) at three shear rates, the PFA-100(®) system, two microfluidic channel dimensions (heights = 300 and 82 µm), and a stenotic aortic graft (diameter = 5.5 mm). Comparison of the predicted occlusion times to experimental results shows excellent agreement. The model is also applied to a clinical angiography image to illustrate the time course of thrombosis in a stenotic carotid artery after plaque cap rupture. Our model can accurately predict thrombotic occlusion time over a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. PMID:26795978

  7. Experimental assessment of wall shear flow in models.

    PubMed

    Affeld, K; Kertzscher, U; Goubergrits, L

    2002-01-01

    The blood flow immediately adjacent to the wall of a blood vessel or an artificial surface is of great interest. This flow defines the shear stress at the wall and is known to have a great physiological importance. The use of models is a viable method to investigate this flow. However, even in models the shear stress at the wall is difficult to assess. A new optical method is based on transparent models and uses particles in the model fluid, which are only visible near the wall. This is achieved with a model fluid having a defined opacity. This fluid obscures particles in the center of the models, but permits the observation and recording of particles close to the wall. The method has been applied for Hagen-Poiseuille flow and for the likewise well researched flow in a tube with a sudden expansion. PMID:12122270

  8. A theoretical model of sheath fold morphology in simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reber, Jacqueline E.; Dabrowski, Marcin; Galland, Olivier; Schmid, Daniel W.

    2013-04-01

    Sheath folds are highly non-cylindrical structures often associated with shear zones. The geometry of sheath folds, especially cross-sections perpendicular to the stretching direction that display eye-patterns, have been used in the field to deduce kinematic information such as shear sense and bulk strain type. However, how sheath folds form and how they evolve with increasing strain is still a matter of debate. We investigate the formation of sheath folds around a weak inclusion acting as a slip surface in simple shear by means of an analytical model. We systematically vary the slip surface orientation and shape and evaluate the impact on the evolving eye-pattern. In addition we compare our results to existing classifications. Based on field observations it has been suggested that the shear sense of a shear zone can be determined by knowing the position of the center of an eye-pattern and the closing direction of the corresponding sheath fold. In our modeled sheath folds we can observe for a given strain that the center of the eye-structure is subject to change in height with respect to the upper edge of the outermost closed contour for different cross-sections perpendicular to the shear direction. This results in a large variability in layer thickness, questioning the usefulness of sheath folds as shear sense indicators. The location of the center of the eye structure, however, is largely invariant to the initial configurations of the slip surface as well as to strain. It has been suggested that the ratio of the aspect ratio of the innermost and outermost closed contour in eye-patterns could be linked to the bulk strain type based on filed observations. We apply this classification to our modeled sheath folds and we observe that the values of the aspect ratios of the closed contours within the eye-pattern are dependent on the strain and the cross-section location. The ratio (R') of the aspect ratios of the outermost closed contour (Ryz) and the innermost closed

  9. Shear mechanical properties of the spleen: experiment and analytical modelling.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, S; Noguer, L; Palierne, J-F

    2012-05-01

    This paper aims at providing the first shear mechanical properties of spleen tissue. Rheometric tests on porcine splenic tissues were performed in the linear and nonlinear regime, revealing a weak frequency dependence of the dynamic moduli in linear regime and a distinct strain-hardening effect in nonlinear regime. These behaviours are typical of soft tissues such as kidney and liver, with however a less pronounced strain-hardening for the spleen. An analytical model based on power laws is then proposed to describe the general shear viscoelastic behaviour of the spleen. PMID:22498291

  10. A phenomenological model of coating/substrate adhesion and interfacial bimetallic peeling stress in composite mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, Paul M.; Lawson, Daniel D.

    1990-01-01

    Adhesion and interfacial stress between metal films and structural composite material substrates is discussed. A theoretical and conceptual basis for selecting coating materials for composite mirror substrates is described. A phenomenological model that interrelates cohesive tensile strength of thin film coatings and interfacial peeling stresses is presented. The model serves as a basis in determining gradiated materials response and compatibility of composite substrate and coating combinations. Parametric evaluation of material properties and geometrical factors such as coating thickness are used to determine the threshold stress levels for maintaining adhesion at the different interfaces.

  11. Tests Of Shear-Flow Model For Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrot, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1992-01-01

    Tests described in report conducted to validate two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determination of acoustic impedance of acoustic liner in grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment by use of infinite-waveguide method. Tests successful for both upstream and downstream propagations. Work has potential for utility in testing of engine ducts in commercial aircraft.

  12. Material characterization and modeling with shear ography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Callahan, Virginia

    1993-01-01

    Shearography has emerged as a useful technique for nondestructible evaluation and materials characterization of aerospace materials. A suitable candidate for the technique is to determine the response of debonds on foam-metal interfaces such as the TPS system on the External Tank. The main thrust is to develop a model which allows valid interpretation of shearographic information on TPS type systems. Confirmation of the model with shearographic data will be performed.

  13. Nonlinear Reynolds stress model for turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, J. Michael; Rubinstein, R.; Kirtley, K. R.

    1991-01-01

    A nonlinear algebraic Reynolds stress model, derived using the renormalization group, is applied to equilibrium homogeneous shear flow and fully developed flow in a square duct. The model, which is quadratically nonlinear in the velocity gradients, successfully captures the large-scale inhomogeneity and anisotropy of the flows studied. The ratios of normal stresses, as well as the actual magnitudes of the stresses are correctly predicted for equilibrium homogeneous shear flow. Reynolds normal stress anisotropy and attendant turbulence driven secondary flow are predicted for a square duct. Profiles of mean velocity and normal stresses are in good agreement with measurements. Very close to walls, agreement with measurements diminishes. The model has the benefit of containing no arbitrary constants; all values are determined directly from the theory. It seems that near wall behavior is influenced by more than the large scale anisotropy accommodated in the current model. More accurate near wall calculations may well require a model for anisotropic dissipation.

  14. An Air-water Interfacial Area Based Variable Tortuosity Model for Unsaturated Sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleel, R.; Saripalli, P.

    2005-12-01

    A new variable tortuosity definition is introduced that is based on the immiscible fluid (air-water) interfacial area. Unsaturated media tortuosity (τa) is defined as the ratio of aaw to aaw,o where aaw is the estimated air-water interfacial area in a real unsaturated medium (i.e., a soil sample), and aaw,o is the same variable for the corresponding, idealized capillary bundle. We establish equivalence between the real and the idealized media by letting the laboratory-measured retention curve calculate the distribution of capillary tubes, thereby resulting in an identical pore-size distribution but a new retention curve for the idealized medium. The air-water interfacial area for both real and idealized media is directly proportional to the area under their respective retention curves. With τ being the saturated tortuosity, we relate the variable tortuosity ratio (ττa) to the Seɛ term in Mualem's (ɛ=0.5) and Burdine's (ɛ=2) pore-size distribution models. Thus, instead of using tortuosity and/or pore connectivity formulations that have empirical exponents of either 0.5 or 2, the new model depends on variable interfacial area for varying saturation and soil texture, as reflected in the measured retention data. We tested the new definition of tortuosity for 22 repacked Hanford sediments that are comprised of mostly coarse and fine sands but some also contain a sizeable fraction (as high as 27%) of fines (silt and clay). Replacing the Se2 term in van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM) model by the new interfacial area based variable tortuosity ratio, and still using saturated conductivity and retention parameters, as used in the conventional approach, we obtain interfacial area based K(θ) predictions that are nearly identical to the conventional VGM model predictions. We also compare the interfacial area based K(θ) predictions with the standard Brooks-Corey-Burdine (BCB) model predictions. Compared to the VGM model predictions, interfacial area based BCB K(θ) predictions

  15. Interfacial free energy adjustable phase field crystal model for homogeneous nucleation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Huang, Yunhao

    2016-05-18

    To describe the homogeneous nucleation process, an interfacial free energy adjustable phase-field crystal model (IPFC) was proposed by reconstructing the energy functional of the original phase field crystal (PFC) methodology. Compared with the original PFC model, the additional interface term in the IPFC model effectively can adjust the magnitude of the interfacial free energy, but does not affect the equilibrium phase diagram and the interfacial energy anisotropy. The IPFC model overcame the limitation that the interfacial free energy of the original PFC model is much less than the theoretical results. Using the IPFC model, we investigated some basic issues in homogeneous nucleation. From the viewpoint of simulation, we proceeded with an in situ observation of the process of cluster fluctuation and obtained quite similar snapshots to colloidal crystallization experiments. We also counted the size distribution of crystal-like clusters and the nucleation rate. Our simulations show that the size distribution is independent of the evolution time, and the nucleation rate remains constant after a period of relaxation, which are consistent with experimental observations. The linear relation between logarithmic nucleation rate and reciprocal driving force also conforms to the steady state nucleation theory. PMID:27117814

  16. Evaluation of Shear-Induced Platelet Activation Models Under Constant and Dynamic Shear Stress Loading Conditions Relevant to Devices

    PubMed Central

    Sheriff, Jawaad; Soares, João Silva; Xenos, Michalis; Jesty, Jolyon; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-01-01

    The advent of implantable blood-recirculating devices such as left ventricular assist devices and prosthetic heart valves provides a viable therapy for patients with end-stage heart failure and valvular disease. However, device-generated pathological flow patterns result in thromboembolic complications that require complex and lifelong anticoagulant therapy, which entails hemorrhagic risks and is not appropriate for certain patients. Optimizing the thrombogenic performance of such devices utilizing numerical simulations requires the development of predictive platelet activation models that account for variations in shear-loading rates characterizing blood flow through such devices. Platelets were exposed in vitro to both dynamic and constant shear stress conditions emulating those found in blood-recirculating devices in order to determine their shear-induced activation and sensitization response. Both these behaviors were found to be dependent on the shear loading rates, in addition to shear stress magnitude and exposure time. We then critically examined several current models and evaluated their predictive capabilities using these results. Shear loading rate terms were then included to account for dynamic aspects that are either ignored or partially considered by these models, and model parameters were optimized. Independent optimization for each of the two types of shear stress exposure conditions tested resulted in different sets of best-fit constants, indicating that universal optimization may not be possible. Inherent limitations of the current models require a paradigm shift from these integral-based discretized power law models to better address the dynamic conditions encountered in blood-recirculating devices. PMID:23400312

  17. An identification algorithm of model kinetic parameters of the interfacial layer growth in fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubov, V.; Lurie, S.; Solyaev, Y.

    2016-04-01

    This paper considers the identification algorithm of parameters included in a parabolic law that is often used to predict the time dependence of the thickness of the interfacial layers in the structure of composite materials based on a metal matrix. The incubation period of the process and the speed of reaction and pressure are taken into account. The proposed algorithm of identification is based on the introduction of a minimized objective function of a special kind. The problem of identification of unknown parameters in the parabolic law is formulated in a variational form. The authors of the paper have determined the desired parameters, under which the objective function has a minimum value. It is shown that on the basis of four known experimental values of the interfacial layer thickness, corresponding to different values of temperature, pressure and the time of the interfacial layer growth, it is possible to identified four model parameters. They are the activation energy, a pre-exponential parameter, the delay time of the start of the interfacial layer formation, and the parameter determining the pressure effect on the rate of interfacial layer growth. The stability of the proposed identification algorithm is also studied.

  18. Transient shear flow of model lithium lubricating greases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, M. A.; Franco, J. M.; Valencia, C.; Kuhn, E.; Gallegos, C.

    2009-03-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of the transient shear flow behavior of lithium lubricating greases differing in soap concentration and base oil viscosity. The shear-induced evolution of grease microstructure has been studied by means of stress-growth experiments. With this aim, different lubricating grease formulations were manufactured by modifying the concentration of lithium 12-hydroxystearate and the viscosity of the base oil, according to a RSM statistical design. Moreover, atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations were carried out. The transient stress response can be successfully described by the generalized Leider-Bird model based on two exponential terms. Different rheological parameters, related to both the elastic response and the structural breakdown of greases, have been analysed. In this sense, it has been found that the elastic properties of lithium lubricating greases were highly influenced by soap concentration and oil viscosity. The stress overshoot, τ max , depends linearly on both variables in the whole shear rate range studied, although the effect of base oil viscosity on this parameter is opposite at low and high shear rates. Special attention has been given to the first part of the stress-growth curve. In this sense, it can be deduced that the “yielding” energy density not only depends on grease composition, but also on shear rate. Moreover, an interesting asymptotic tendency has been found for both the “yielding” energy density and the stress overshoot by increasing shear rate. The asymptotic values of these parameters have been correlated to the friction coefficient obtained in a ball-disc tribometer.

  19. Characterizing and Modeling Brittle Bi-material Interfaces Subjected to Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anyfantis, Konstantinos N.; Berggreen, Christian

    2014-12-01

    This work is based on the investigation, both experimentally and numerically, of the Mode II fracture process and bond strength of bondlines formed in co-cured composite/metal joints. To this end, GFRP-to-steel double strap joints were tested in tension, so that the bi-material interface was subjected to shear with debonding occurring under Mode II conditions. The study of the debonding process and thus failure of the joints was based both on stress and energy considerations. Analytical formulas were utilized for the derivation of the respective shear strength and fracture toughness measures which characterize the bi-material interface, by considering the joint's failure load, geometry and involved materials. The derived stress and toughness magnitudes were further utilized as the parameters of an extrinsic cohesive law, applied in connection with the modeling the bi-material interface in a finite element simulation environment. It was concluded that interfacial fracture in the considered joints was driven by the fracture toughness and not by strength considerations, and that LEFM is well suited to analyze the failure of the joint. Additionally, the double strap joint geometry was identified and utilized as a characterization test for measuring the Mode II fracture toughness of brittle bi-material interfaces.

  20. A new method for modeling rough membrane surface and calculation of interfacial interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Leihong; Zhang, Meijia; He, Yiming; Chen, Jianrong; Hong, Huachang; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Membrane fouling control necessitates the establishment of an effective method to assess interfacial interactions between foulants and rough surface membrane. This study proposed a new method which includes a rigorous mathematical equation for modeling membrane surface morphology, and combination of surface element integration (SEI) method and the composite Simpson's approach for assessment of interfacial interactions. The new method provides a complete solution to quantitatively calculate interfacial interactions between foulants and rough surface membrane. Application of this method in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) showed that, high calculation accuracy could be achieved by setting high segment number, and moreover, the strength of three energy components and energy barrier was remarkably impaired by the existence of roughness on the membrane surface, indicating that membrane surface morphology exerted profound effects on membrane fouling in the MBR. Good agreement between calculation prediction and fouling phenomena was found, suggesting the feasibility of this method. PMID:26519696

  1. A Model for the Interfacial Kinetics of Phospholipase D Activity on Long-Chain Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Majd, Sheereen; Yusko, Erik C.; Yang, Jerry; Sept, David; Mayer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The membrane-active enzyme phospholipase D (PLD) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond in phospholipids and plays a critical role in cell signaling. This catalytic reaction proceeds on lipid-water interfaces and is an example of heterogeneous catalysis in biology. Recently we showed that planar lipid bilayers, a previously unexplored model membrane for these kinetic studies, can be used for monitoring interfacial catalytic reactions under well-defined experimental conditions with chemical and electrical access to both sides of the lipid membrane. Employing an assay that relies on the conductance of the pore-forming peptide gramicidin A to monitor PLD activity, the work presented here reveals the kinetics of hydrolysis of long-chain phosphatidylcholine lipids in situ. We have developed an extension of a basic kinetic model for interfacial catalysis that includes product activation and substrate depletion. This model describes the kinetic behavior very well and reveals two kinetic parameters, the specificity constant and the interfacial quality constant. This approach results in a simple and general model to account for product accumulation in interfacial enzyme kinetics. PMID:23823233

  2. Interfacial instability of thin liquid films at the walls of a parallel-plate channel, sheared by pressure-driven gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vécsei, Miklós; Dietzel, Mathias; Hardt, Steffen

    2015-11-01

    Gas flow between liquid films is a commonly used model system for flows in the respiratory system and is also present during flow boiling in microchannels. The emergence of long-wavelength interfacial instabilities due to viscous stresses is a well-known property of these systems. We show that its description is often reducible to two coupled partial differential equations. Thus the characteristic quantities, such as the most unstable wavelength and the marginally stable wavenumber, can be obtained in a straightforward manner from the linear stability analysis. The analysis of the weakly nonlinear equations shows that if the material properties of the liquid films and their undisturbed thicknesses are identical, their interfaces should only be destabilized by the inertial forces. Moreover, for this configuration the emerging patterns on the two interfaces are found to be identical in the long-time limit. A different setup, where the liquid films have identical material properties, but their undisturbed thicknesses differ, is studied numerically. The results show that even for this configuration the interfacial deformations of the two films remain closely correlated for a broad range of parameters.

  3. Shear-free anisotropic cosmological models in {f (R)} gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abebe, Amare; Momeni, Davood; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2016-04-01

    We study a class of shear-free, homogeneous but anisotropic cosmological models with imperfect matter sources in the context of f( R) gravity. We show that the anisotropic stresses are related to the electric part of the Weyl tensor in such a way that they balance each other. We also show that within the class of orthogonal f( R) models, small perturbations of shear are damped, and that the electric part of the Weyl tensor and the anisotropic stress tensor decay with the expansion as well as the heat flux of the curvature fluid. Specializing in locally rotationally symmetric spacetimes in orthonormal frames, we examine the late-time behaviour of the de Sitter universe in f( R) gravity. For the Starobinsky model of f( R), we study the evolutionary behavior of the Universe by numerically integrating the Friedmann equation, where the initial conditions for the expansion, acceleration and jerk parameters are taken from observational data.

  4. A model for flash heating in sheared fault gouge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Jean; Elbanna, Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    We develop a model for sheared gouge layers that accounts for the local increase in temperature at the grain contacts during sliding. We use the shear transformation zone (STZ) theory, a statistical thermodynamic theory, to describe irreversible macroscopic plastic deformations due to local rearrangements of the gouge particles. We track the temperature evolution at the grain contacts using a one dimensional heat diffusion equation. Our model predicts a logarithmic rate dependence of the steady state shear stress in the quasi-static regime. In the dense flow regime the frictional strength decreases rapidly with increasing slip rate due to thermal softening at the granular interfaces. The transient response following a step in strain rate includes a direct effect and a following evolution effect, both of which depend on the magnitude and direction of the velocity step. In addition to frictional heat, the energy budget includes an additional energy sink representing the fraction of external work consumed in increasing local disorder. The model links low-speed and high-speed frictional response of gouge layers, and provides an essential ingredient for multiscale modeling of earthquake ruptures with enhanced coseismic weakening.

  5. Effects of oxygen plasma treatment on interfacial shear strength and post-peak residual strength of a PLGA fiber-reinforced brushite cement.

    PubMed

    Maenz, Stefan; Hennig, Max; Mühlstädt, Mike; Kunisch, Elke; Bungartz, Matthias; Brinkmann, Olaf; Bossert, Jörg; Kinne, Raimund W; Jandt, Klaus D

    2016-04-01

    Biodegradable calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are promising materials for minimally invasive treatment of bone defects. However, CPCs have low mechanical strength and fracture toughness. One approach to overcome these limitations is the modification of the CPC with reinforcing fibers. The matrix-fiber interfacial shear strength (ISS) is pivotal for the biomechanical properties of fiber-reinforced CPCs. The aim of the current study was to control the ISS between a brushite-forming CPC and degradable PLGA fibers by oxygen plasma treatment and to analyze the impact of the ISS alterations on its bulk mechanical properties. The ISS between CPC matrix and PLGA fibers, tested in a single-fiber pull-out test, increased up to 2.3-fold to max. 3.22±0.92MPa after fiber oxygen plasma treatment (100-300W, 1-10min), likely due to altered surface chemistry and morphology of the fibers. This ISS increase led to more efficient crack bridging and a subsequent increase of the post-peak residual strength at biomechanically relevant, moderate strains (up to 1%). At the same time, the work of fracture significantly decreased, possibly due to an increased proportion of fractured fibers unable to further absorb energy by frictional sliding. Flexural strength and flexural modulus were not affected by the oxygen plasma treatment. This study shows for the first time that the matrix-fiber ISS and some of the resulting mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced CPCs can be improved by chemical modifications such as oxygen plasma treatment, generating the possibility of avoiding catastrophic failures at the implant site and thus enhancing the applicability of biodegradable CPCs for the treatment of (load-bearing) bone defects. PMID:26875148

  6. Horizontal shear zones: physical modeling of formation and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokun, A. N.

    2009-11-01

    On examples of ductile viscous materials (pastes), which demonstrated the deformational type of coagulation behavior and the reproduced zones of the horizontal shear of a brittle fracture, ductile flow, and intermediate types. The formation of coagulation agglomerates appeared well organized, both in terms of time and structurally. The found systems of fractures revealed a sequential course of the deformation process and the contribution of each system in the total structural transformation was established. By virtue of rheological analysis of coagulation structures, the basic parameters (yield strength, viscosity), and their input into the model of the deformational response (brittle, ductile), were determined. The substantial composition and its deformational properties of the material under question appeared to dictate the structure of shear zones and their general mutual organization. The rheological analysis of coagulation clusters of model materials allowed for the justified interpretation of experimental data to regulate deformation processes effectively and predict their results.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Intravascular Blood Coagulation under Wall Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rukhlenko, Oleksii S.; Dudchenko, Olga A.; Zlobina, Ksenia E.; Guria, Georgy Th.

    2015-01-01

    Increased shear stress such as observed at local stenosis may cause drastic changes in the permeability of the vessel wall to procoagulants and thus initiate intravascular blood coagulation. In this paper we suggest a mathematical model to investigate how shear stress-induced permeability influences the thrombogenic potential of atherosclerotic plaques. Numerical analysis of the model reveals the existence of two hydrodynamic thresholds for activation of blood coagulation in the system and unveils typical scenarios of thrombus formation. The dependence of blood coagulation development on the intensity of blood flow, as well as on geometrical parameters of atherosclerotic plaque is described. Relevant parametric diagrams are drawn. The results suggest a previously unrecognized role of relatively small plaques (resulting in less than 50% of the lumen area reduction) in atherothrombosis and have important implications for the existing stenting guidelines. PMID:26222505

  8. A numerical reduced model for thin liquid films sheared by a gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavalle, G.; Vila, J.-P.; Blanchard, G.; Laurent, C.; Charru, F.

    2015-11-01

    The non-linear dynamics of thin liquid films sheared by a laminar gas flow in a channel is investigated. Such a two-layer flow is driven by pressure gradient and possibly by the gravity force. We describe the liquid phase with a long-wave integral model, with the aim to save computational cost with respect to the full Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations. We derive this long-wave model by the integration of the Navier-Stokes equations over the film thickness, and by an asymptotic expansion up to the first order in terms of a long-wave parameter. These depth-integrated (or shallow water) equations are discretized by means of an augmented system, which holds an evolution equation for the surface tension in order to avoid numerical instabilities of classical upwind and centered schemes. On the other side, we study the gas phase with compressible Navier-Stokes equations, and we discretize them by means of a low-Mach scheme, accounting also for moving meshes (ALE). In order to analyze liquid-gas interactions, we introduce then a coupling methodology between depth-integrated equations and Navier-Stokes equations. This approach represents a compromise between the two existing methods: the full DNS, and the full long-wave model applied to both phases. In order to validate this approach, we present comparisons with DNS, showing a good agreement of spatio-temporal evolutions of the film thickness and the stress field. Furthermore, interfacial shear stress and pressure gradient evolutions are shown to be in accordance with those provided by two-layer second-order low-dimensional models.

  9. A local eddy viscosity model for turbulent shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortwerth, P. J.; Rabe, D. C.; Mcerlean, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    In the model described, the eddy viscosity is assumed to be a fluid property dependent on the state of the fluid locally, namely the local density, turbulent kinetic energy, turbulence scale, and Mach number. An empirical law was found which related eddy viscosity to these properties satisfactorily for free jets. This law is used without modification for a set of test cases in free shear layers, free-jet decay, coaxial mixing, and wakes. The scale of turbulence is taken as a constant at any axial location equal to the width of the shear layer. By utilizing the boundary-layer order-of-magnitude analysis, a coupled set of fluid dynamic equations is formulated, which of necessity includes the equation for the production of turbulent kinetic energy.

  10. A Computational Model of Deformable Cell Rolling in Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleton, Charles; Jadhav, Sameer

    2005-03-01

    Selectin-mediated rolling of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) on activated endothelium is critical to their recruitment to sites of inflammation. The cell rolling velocity is influenced by bond interactions on the molecular scale that oppose hydrodynamic forces at the mesoscale. Recent studies have shown that PMN rolling velocity on selectin-coated surfaces in shear flow is significantly slower compared to that of microspheres bearing a similar density of selectin ligands. To investigate whether cell deformability is responsible for these differences, we developed a 3-D computational model which simulates rolling of a deformable cell on a selectin-coated surface under shear flow with a stochastic description of receptor-ligand bond interaction. We observed that rolling velocity increases with increasing membrane stiffness and this effect is larger at high shear rates. The average bond lifetime, number of receptor-ligand bonds and the cell-substrate contact area decreased with increasing membrane stiffness. This study shows that cellular properties along with the kinetics of selectin-ligand interactions affect leukocyte rolling on selectin-coated surfaces.

  11. A review of Reynolds stress models for turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed review of recent developments in Reynolds stress modeling for incompressible turbulent shear flows is provided. The mathematical foundations of both two-equation models and full second-order closures are explored in depth. It is shown how these models can be systematically derived for two-dimensional mean turbulent flows that are close to equilibrium. A variety of examples are provided to demonstrate how well properly calibrated versions of these models perform for such flows. However, substantial problems remain for the description of more complex turbulent flows where there are large departures from equilibrium. Recent efforts to extend Reynolds stress models to nonequilibrium turbulent flows are discussed briefly along with the major modeling issues relevant to practical naval hydrodynamics applications.

  12. Application and improvement of Raupach's shear stress partitioning model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, B. A.; Lehning, M.; Gromke, C.

    2012-12-01

    Aeolian processes such as the entrainment, transport and redeposition of sand, soil or snow are able to significantly reshape the earth's surface. In times of increasing desertification and land degradation, often driven by wind erosion, investigations of aeolian processes become more and more important in environmental sciences. The reliable prediction of the sheltering effect of vegetation canopies against sediment erosion, for instance, is a clear practical application of such investigations to identify suitable and sustainable counteractive measures against wind erosion. This study presents an application and improvement of a theoretical model presented by Raupach (Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 1992, Vol.60, 375-395 and Journal of Geophysical Research, 1993, Vol.98, 3023-3029) which allows for quantifying the sheltering effect of vegetation against sediment erosion. The model predicts the shear stress ratios τS'/τ and τS''/τ. Here, τS is the part of the total shear stress τ that acts on the ground beneath the plants. The spatial peak τS'' of the surface shear stress is responsible for the onset of particle entrainment whereas the spatial mean τS' can be used to quantify particle mass fluxes. The precise and accurate prediction of these quantities is essential when modeling wind erosion. Measurements of the surface shear stress distributions τS(x,y) on the ground beneath live vegetation canopies (plant species: lolium perenne) were performed in a controlled wind tunnel environment to determine the model parameters and to evaluate the model performance. Rigid, non-porous wooden blocks instead of the plants were additionally tested for the purpose of comparison, since previous wind tunnel studies used exclusively artificial plant imitations for their experiments on shear stress partitioning. The model constant c, which is needed to determine the total stress τ for a canopy of interest and which remained rather unspecified to date, was found to be c ≈ 0

  13. Sinusoidal Forcing of Interfacial Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Fayaz; Raghunandan, Aditya; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Fluid transport, in vivo, is accomplished via pumping mechanisms of the heart and lungs, which results in biological fluids being subjected to oscillatory shear. Flow is known to influence biological macromolecules, but predicting the effect of shear is incomplete without also accounting for the influence of complex interfaces ubiquitous throughout the body. Here, we investigated the oscillatory response of the structure of aqueous interfacial films using a cylindrical knife edge viscometer. Vitamin K1 was used as a model monolayer because its behaviour has been thoroughly quantified and it doesn't show any measurable hysteresis. The monolayer was subjected to sinusoidal forcing under varied conditions of surface concentrations, periodic frequencies, and knife edge amplitudes. Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) data was collected using Brewster Angle Microscopy(BAM), revealing the influence of oscillatory interfacial shear stress on the monolayer. Insights were gained as to how the velocity profile dampens at specific distances from the knife edge contact depending on the amplitude, frequency, and concentration of Vitamin K1. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  14. Pore invasion dynamics during fluid front displacement - an interfacial front model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, F.; Or, D.

    2013-12-01

    The dynamics of fluid fronts in porous media shape subsequent phase distribution and the transport properties of the partially saturated region with implications ranging from gaseous transport to plant roots to extraction or injection of fluids to petroleum reservoirs. What macroscopically seems as a smooth and continuous motion of a displacement fluid front, involves numerous rapid pore-scale interfacial jumps often resembling avalanches of invasion events. We present a 2D model for simulating interfacial front displacement that was developed to study details of invasion dynamics at the front and to systematically study effects of boundary conditions on the resulting macroscopic properties after passage of a front. The interfacial front is represented by hydraulically connected sinusoidal capillaries allowing for redistribution and capillary pressure relaxation through exchange with neighboring interfaces. The model focuses on processes at the front and neglects interfacial redistribution left behind the front as well as saturated fluid flow below the front. The description of the dynamics of the rapid non-wetting fluid invasions induced by constant wetting fluid withdrawal includes capillary, viscous and hydrostatic component and inertia. Results show that the additional inertial force (not considered in previous studies) does significantly affect invasion pathways such as the hypothesized 'consecutive jumps'. The menisci jump velocities show a strong relation to geometrical throat dimensions that reflect local capillary gradients. The front model further enables to link boundary conditions (macroscopic Capillary number, throat size distribution) effects on pore invasion sequences and impact on residual wetting phase entrapment and front morphology. A limited comparison of model predictions with experimental results from sintered glass-beads micro-models will be presented.

  15. Recent numerical and algorithmic advances within the volume tracking framework for modeling interfacial flows

    SciTech Connect

    François, Marianne M.

    2015-05-28

    A review of recent advances made in numerical methods and algorithms within the volume tracking framework is presented. The volume tracking method, also known as the volume-of-fluid method has become an established numerical approach to model and simulate interfacial flows. Its advantage is its strict mass conservation. However, because the interface is not explicitly tracked but captured via the material volume fraction on a fixed mesh, accurate estimation of the interface position, its geometric properties and modeling of interfacial physics in the volume tracking framework remain difficult. Several improvements have been made over the last decade to address these challenges. In this study, the multimaterial interface reconstruction method via power diagram, curvature estimation via heights and mean values and the balanced-force algorithm for surface tension are highlighted.

  16. Recent numerical and algorithmic advances within the volume tracking framework for modeling interfacial flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    François, Marianne M.

    2015-05-28

    A review of recent advances made in numerical methods and algorithms within the volume tracking framework is presented. The volume tracking method, also known as the volume-of-fluid method has become an established numerical approach to model and simulate interfacial flows. Its advantage is its strict mass conservation. However, because the interface is not explicitly tracked but captured via the material volume fraction on a fixed mesh, accurate estimation of the interface position, its geometric properties and modeling of interfacial physics in the volume tracking framework remain difficult. Several improvements have been made over the last decade to address these challenges.more » In this study, the multimaterial interface reconstruction method via power diagram, curvature estimation via heights and mean values and the balanced-force algorithm for surface tension are highlighted.« less

  17. Elastic response of DNA molecules under the action of interfacial traction and stretching: An elastic thin rod model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ye; Huang, Zaixing; Qiang, Lei; Gao, Jun

    2015-11-01

    In a multivalent salt solution, a segment of DNA is modeled as an elastic rod subjected to the interfacial traction. The shooting method is used to calculate the equilibrium configurations of condensed DNA under the action of the longitudinal end-force and interfacial traction simultaneously. The results show that the shapes of DNA are mainly determined by the competition between the interfacial energy and elastic strain energy of stretching. The change of end-to-end distance with the longitudinal end-force is consistent with the worm-like chain (WLC) model. The higher the concentration is, the stronger the condensation of DNA.

  18. Spatiotemporal Oscillations and Rheochaos in a Simple Model of Shear Banding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, S. M.; Olmsted, P. D.

    2004-02-01

    We study a simple model of shear banding in which the flow-induced phase is destabilized by coupling between flow and microstructure (wormlike micellar length). By varying the strength of instability and the applied shear rate, we find a rich variety of oscillatory and chaotic shear banded flows. At low shear and weak instability, the induced phase pulsates next to one wall of the flow cell. For stronger instability, high shear pulses ricochet across the cell. At high shear we see oscillating bands on either side of central defects. We discuss our results in the context of recent experiments.

  19. Spatiotemporal oscillations and rheochaos in a simple model of shear banding.

    PubMed

    Fielding, S M; Olmsted, P D

    2004-02-27

    We study a simple model of shear banding in which the flow-induced phase is destabilized by coupling between flow and microstructure (wormlike micellar length). By varying the strength of instability and the applied shear rate, we find a rich variety of oscillatory and chaotic shear banded flows. At low shear and weak instability, the induced phase pulsates next to one wall of the flow cell. For stronger instability, high shear pulses ricochet across the cell. At high shear we see oscillating bands on either side of central defects. We discuss our results in the context of recent experiments. PMID:14995780

  20. The microstructure and rheology of a model, thixotropic nanoparticle gel under steady shear and large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS)

    SciTech Connect

    Min Kim, Jung; Kate Gurnon, A.; Wagner, Norman J.; Eberle, Aaron P. R.; Porcar, Lionel

    2014-09-01

    The microstructure-rheology relationship for a model, thermoreversible nanoparticle gel is investigated using a new technique of time-resolved neutron scattering under steady and time-resolved large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) flows. A 21 vol. % gel is tested with varying strength of interparticle attraction. Shear-induced structural anisotropy is observed as butterfly scattering patterns and quantified through an alignment factor. Measurements in the plane of flow show significant, local anisotropy develops with alignment along the compressional axis of flow, providing new insights into how gels flow. The microstructure-rheology relationship is analyzed through a new type of structure-Lissajous plot that shows how the anisotropic microstructure is responsible for the observed LAOS response, which is beyond a response expected for a purely viscous gel with constant structure. The LAOS shear viscosities are observed to follow the “Delaware-Rutgers” rule. Rheological and microstructural data are successfully compared across a broad range of conditions by scaling the shear rate by the strength of attraction, providing a method to compare behavior between steady shear and LAOS experiments. However, important differences remain between the microstructures measured at comparatively high frequency in LAOS experiments and comparable steady shear experiments that illustrate the importance of measuring the microstructure to properly interpret the nonlinear, dynamic rheological response.

  1. Interfacial Pressures and Shocks in a Multiphase Flow mix Model

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, D E

    2004-10-01

    Multiphase flow models have been proposed for use in situations which have combined Rayleigh-Taylor (RTI) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RMI) instabilities [2, 3]. Such an approach works poorly for the case of a heavy to light shock incidence on a developed interface. I suggest that this difficulty can be overcome by adding an additional source to the turbulence kinetic energy equation. A variety of constraints on such a source are considered. In this context it is observed that a new constraint on closures arises. This occurs because of the discontinuity within the shock responsible for the RMI. The proposed model (Shock Scattering) is shown to give useful results.

  2. Microstructural evolution of a model, shear-banding micellar solution during shear startup and cessation.

    PubMed

    López-Barrón, Carlos R; Gurnon, A Kate; Eberle, Aaron P R; Porcar, Lionel; Wagner, Norman J

    2014-04-01

    We present direct measurements of the evolution of the segmental-level microstructure of a stable shear-banding polymerlike micelle solution during flow startup and cessation in the plane of flow. These measurements provide a definitive, quantitative microstructural understanding of the stages observed during flow startup: an initial elastic response with limited alignment that yields with a large stress overshoot to a homogeneous flow with associated micellar alignment that persists for approximately three relaxation times. This transient is followed by a shear (kink) band formation with a flow-aligned low-viscosity band that exhibits shear-induced concentration fluctuations and coexists with a nearly isotropic band of homogenous, highly viscoelastic micellar solution. Stable, steady banding flow is achieved only after approximately two reptation times. Flow cessation from this shear-banded state is also found to be nontrivial, exhibiting an initial fast relaxation with only minor structural relaxation, followed by a slower relaxation of the aligned micellar fluid with the equilibrium fluid's characteristic relaxation time. These measurements resolve a controversy in the literature surrounding the mechanism of shear banding in entangled wormlike micelles and, by means of comparison to existing literature, provide further insights into the mechanisms driving shear-banding instabilities in related systems. The methods and instrumentation described should find broad use in exploring complex fluid rheology and testing microstructure-based constitutive equations. PMID:24827245

  3. A new energy transfer model for turbulent free shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.-W.

    1992-01-01

    A new model for the energy transfer mechanism in the large-scale turbulent kinetic energy equation is proposed. An estimate of the characteristic length scale of the energy containing large structures is obtained from the wavelength associated with the structures predicted by a weakly nonlinear analysis for turbulent free shear flows. With the inclusion of the proposed energy transfer model, the weakly nonlinear wave models for the turbulent large-scale structures are self-contained and are likely to be independent flow geometries. The model is tested against a plane mixing layer. Reasonably good agreement is achieved. Finally, it is shown by using the Liapunov function method, the balance between the production and the drainage of the kinetic energy of the turbulent large-scale structures is asymptotically stable as their amplitude saturates. The saturation of the wave amplitude provides an alternative indicator for flow self-similarity.

  4. Congruence of 3-D Whole Mantle Models of Shear Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziewonski, A. M.; Lekic, V.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    The range of shear velocity anomalies in published whole mantle models is considerable. This impedes drawing conclusions of importance for geodynamic modeling and for interpretation of mineral physics results. However, if one considers only the models that were built using data that are sensitive to mantle structure at all depths, these models show robust features in their power spectra as a function of depth. On this basis we propose that there are five depth intervals with distinct spectral characteristics. 1. Heterosphere (Moho - 300 km) is characterized by strong power spectrum relatively flat up to degree 6. With lateral shear wavespeed variations as large as 15%, this zone accounts for more than 50% of the entire heterogeneity in the mantle. Differences among models for different tectonic regions decrease rapidly below 300 km depth. 2. Upper mantle buffer zone (300- 500 km) has a flat spectrum and the overall power of heterogeneity drops by an order of magnitude compared to the region above. There may be still weak difference between continents and oceans, but the oceanic regions lose their age dependence. The spectral characteristics do not change across the 410 km discontinuity. 3. Transition zone (500 - 650 km) The degree 2 anomaly becomes dominant. There are long wavelength anomalies in regions of the fastest plate subduction during the last 15-20 Ma, suggesting slab ponding above the 650 km discontinuity. Several slower-than-average anomalies of unknown origin are present in this depth range. 4. Lower mantle buffer zone (650 - 2300 km) has a weak, flat spectrum without long wavelength velocity anomalies that could be interpreted as unfragmented subducted slabs. However, there are three relatively narrow and short high velocity anomalies under Peru, Tonga and Indonesia that may indicate limited slab penetration. 5 Abyssal layer (2300 - CMB) Strong spectrum dominated by degrees 2 and 3. The amplitude is the largest at the CMB and decreases rapidly up to

  5. Shear modeling: thermoelasticity at high temperature and pressure for tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Orlikowski, D; Soderlind, P; Moriarty, J A

    2004-12-06

    For large-scale constitutive strength models the shear modulus is typically assumed to be linearly dependent on temperature. However, for materials compressed beyond the Hugoniot or in regimes where there is very little experimental data, accurate and validated models must be used. To this end, we present here a new methodology that fully accounts for electron- and ion-thermal contributions to the elastic moduli over broad ranges of temperature (<20,000 K) and pressure (<10 Mbar). In this approach, the full potential linear muffin-tin orbital (FP-LMTO) method for the cold and electron-thermal contributions is closely coupled with ion-thermal contributions. For the latter two separate approaches are used. In one approach, the quasi-harmonic, ion-thermal contribution is obtained through a Brillouin zone sum of strain derivatives of the phonons, and in the other a full anharmonic ion-thermal contribution is obtained directly through Monte Carlo (MC) canonical distribution averages of strain derivatives on the multi-ion potential itself. Both approaches use quantum-based interatomic potentials derived from model generalized pseudopotential theory (MGPT). For tantalum, the resulting elastic moduli are compared to available ultrasonic measurements and diamond-anvil-cell compression experiments. Over the range of temperature and pressure considered, the results are then used in a polycrystalline averaging for the shear modulus to assess the linear temperature dependence for Ta.

  6. Masked Areas in Shear Peak Statistics: A Forward Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, D.; Kratochvil, J. M.; Dawson, W.

    2016-03-01

    The statistics of shear peaks have been shown to provide valuable cosmological information beyond the power spectrum, and will be an important constraint of models of cosmology in forthcoming astronomical surveys. Surveys include masked areas due to bright stars, bad pixels etc., which must be accounted for in producing constraints on cosmology from shear maps. We advocate a forward-modeling approach, where the impacts of masking and other survey artifacts are accounted for in the theoretical prediction of cosmological parameters, rather than correcting survey data to remove them. We use masks based on the Deep Lens Survey, and explore the impact of up to 37% of the survey area being masked on LSST and DES-scale surveys. By reconstructing maps of aperture mass the masking effect is smoothed out, resulting in up to 14% smaller statistical uncertainties compared to simply reducing the survey area by the masked area. We show that, even in the presence of large survey masks, the bias in cosmological parameter estimation produced in the forward-modeling process is ≈1%, dominated by bias caused by limited simulation volume. We also explore how this potential bias scales with survey area and evaluate how much small survey areas are impacted by the differences in cosmological structure in the data and simulated volumes, due to cosmic variance.

  7. Additional interfacial force in lattice Boltzmann models for incompressible multiphase flows.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Luo, K H; Gao, Y J; He, Y L

    2012-02-01

    The existing lattice Boltzmann models for incompressible multiphase flows are mostly constructed with two distribution functions: one is the order parameter distribution function, which is used to track the interface between different phases, and the other is the pressure distribution function for solving the velocity field. In this paper, it is shown that in these models the recovered momentum equation is inconsistent with the target one: an additional force is included in the recovered momentum equation. The additional force has the following features. First, it is proportional to the macroscopic velocity. Second, it is zero in every single-phase region but is nonzero in the interface. Therefore it can be interpreted as an interfacial force. To investigate the effects of the additional interfacial force, numerical simulations are carried out for the problem of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, droplet splashing on a thin liquid film, and the evolution of a falling droplet under gravity. Numerical results demonstrate that, with the increase of the velocity or the Reynolds number, the additional interfacial force will gradually have an important influence on the interface and affect the numerical accuracy. PMID:22463354

  8. Modeling of Interfacial Modification Effects on Thermal Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of functionalization of carbon nanotubes on the thermal conductivity of nanocomposites has been studied using a multi-scale modeling approach. These results predict that grafting linear hydrocarbon chains to the surface of a single wall carbon nanotube with covalent chemical bonds should result in a significant increase in the thermal conductivity of these nanocomposites. This is due to the decrease in the interfacial thermal (Kapitza) resistance between the single wall carbon nanotube and the surrounding polymer matrix upon chemical functionalization. The nanocomposites studied here consist of single wall carbon nanotubes in a bulk poly(ethylene vinyl acetate) matrix. The nanotubes are functionalized by end-grafting linear hydrocarbon chains of varying length to the surface of the nanotube. The effect which this functionalization has on the interfacial thermal resistance is studied by molecular dynamics simulation. Interfacial thermal resistance values are calculated for a range of chemical grafting densities and with several chain lengths. These results are subsequently used in an analytical model to predict the resulting effect on the bulk thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite.

  9. An air-water interfacial area based variable tortuosity model for unsaturated sands

    SciTech Connect

    Khaleel, Raziuddin; Saripalli, Prasad

    2006-05-01

    Based on Kozeny-Carman equation for saturated media permeability, a new model is developed for the prediction of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, K as a function of moisture content, ?. The K(???) estimates are obtained using laboratory measurements of moisture retention and saturated hydraulic conductivity, and a saturation-dependent tortuosity based on the immiscible fluid (air-water) interfacial area. Tortuosity (?a) for unsaturated media is defined as aaw/aaw,o (ratio of the specific air-water interfacial area of a real and the corresponding idealized porous medium). A correspondence between the real and idealized media is established by using the laboratory-measured soil moisture retention curve to calculate the interfacial area. The general trend in prediction of ?a as a function water saturation is in agreement with similar recent predictions based on diffusion theory. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivities measured for a number of coarse-textured, repacked Hanford sediments agree well with predictions based on the modified Kozeny-Carman relation. Because of the use of saturated hydraulic conductivity, a slight bias is apparent in measured and predicted K at low ?. While the modified Kozeny-Carman relation was found to be reasonably accurate in predicting K(??) for the repacked, sandy soils considered in this study, a further testing of the new model for undisturbed sediments and other soil textures would be useful.

  10. Interfacial properties in a discrete model for tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moglia, Belén; Guisoni, Nara; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2013-03-01

    We propose and study, by means of Monte Carlo numerical simulations, a minimal discrete model for avascular tumor growth, which can also be applied for the description of cell cultures in vitro. The interface of the tumor is self-affine and its width can be characterized by the following exponents: (i) the growth exponent β=0.32(2) that governs the early time regime, (ii) the roughness exponent α=0.49(2) related to the fluctuations in the stationary regime, and (iii) the dynamic exponent z=α/β≃1.49(2), which measures the propagation of correlations in the direction parallel to the interface, e.g., ξ∝t1/z, where ξ is the parallel correlation length. Therefore, the interface belongs to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class, in agreement with recent experiments of cell cultures in vitro. Furthermore, density profiles of the growing cells are rationalized in terms of traveling waves that are solutions of the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation. In this way, we achieved excellent agreement between the simulation results of the discrete model and the continuous description of the growth front of the culture or tumor.

  11. Shear viscosity of a model for confined granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Rodrigo; Risso, Dino; Brito, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    The shear viscosity in the dilute regime of a model for confined granular matter is studied by simulations and kinetic theory. The model consists on projecting into two dimensions the motion of vibrofluidized granular matter in shallow boxes by modifying the collision rule: besides the restitution coefficient that accounts for the energy dissipation, there is a separation velocity that is added in each collision in the normal direction. The two mechanisms balance on average, producing stationary homogeneous states. Molecular dynamics simulations show that in the steady state the distribution function departs from a Maxwellian, with cumulants that remain small in the whole range of inelasticities. The shear viscosity normalized with stationary temperature presents a clear dependence with the inelasticity, taking smaller values compared to the elastic case. A Boltzmann-like equation is built and analyzed using linear response theory. It is found that the predictions show an excellent agreement with the simulations when the correct stationary distribution is used but a Maxwellian approximation fails in predicting the inelasticity dependence of the viscosity. These results confirm that transport coefficients depend strongly on the mechanisms that drive them to stationary states.

  12. Shear viscosity of a model for confined granular media.

    PubMed

    Soto, Rodrigo; Risso, Dino; Brito, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    The shear viscosity in the dilute regime of a model for confined granular matter is studied by simulations and kinetic theory. The model consists on projecting into two dimensions the motion of vibrofluidized granular matter in shallow boxes by modifying the collision rule: besides the restitution coefficient that accounts for the energy dissipation, there is a separation velocity that is added in each collision in the normal direction. The two mechanisms balance on average, producing stationary homogeneous states. Molecular dynamics simulations show that in the steady state the distribution function departs from a Maxwellian, with cumulants that remain small in the whole range of inelasticities. The shear viscosity normalized with stationary temperature presents a clear dependence with the inelasticity, taking smaller values compared to the elastic case. A Boltzmann-like equation is built and analyzed using linear response theory. It is found that the predictions show an excellent agreement with the simulations when the correct stationary distribution is used but a Maxwellian approximation fails in predicting the inelasticity dependence of the viscosity. These results confirm that transport coefficients depend strongly on the mechanisms that drive them to stationary states. PMID:25615082

  13. Mathematical model for self-propelled droplets driven by interfacial tension.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Ken H; Tachibana, Kunihito; Tobe, Yuta; Kazama, Masaki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Omata, Seiro; Nagayama, Masaharu

    2016-03-21

    We propose a model for the spontaneous motion of a droplet induced by inhomogeneity in interfacial tension. The model is derived from a variation of the Lagrangian of the system and we use a time-discretized Morse flow scheme to perform its numerical simulations. Our model can naturally simulate the dynamics of a single droplet, as well as that of multiple droplets, where the volume of each droplet is conserved. We reproduced the ballistic motion and fission of a droplet, and the collision of two droplets was also examined numerically. PMID:27004893

  14. Mathematical model for self-propelled droplets driven by interfacial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Ken H.; Tachibana, Kunihito; Tobe, Yuta; Kazama, Masaki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Omata, Seiro; Nagayama, Masaharu

    2016-03-01

    We propose a model for the spontaneous motion of a droplet induced by inhomogeneity in interfacial tension. The model is derived from a variation of the Lagrangian of the system and we use a time-discretized Morse flow scheme to perform its numerical simulations. Our model can naturally simulate the dynamics of a single droplet, as well as that of multiple droplets, where the volume of each droplet is conserved. We reproduced the ballistic motion and fission of a droplet, and the collision of two droplets was also examined numerically.

  15. Thermodynamic Model for Fluid-Fluid Interfacial Areas in Porous Media for Arbitrary Drainage-Imbibition Sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Schroth, Martin H.; Oostrom, Mart; Dobson, Richard; Zeyer, Josef

    2008-08-01

    Fluid/fluid interfacial areas are important in controlling the rate of mass and energy transfer between fluid phases in porous media. We present a modified thermodynamically based model (TBM) to predict fluid/fluid interfacial areas in porous media for arbitrary drainage/imbibition sequences. The TBM explicitly distinguishes between interfacial areas associated with continuous (free) and isolated (entrapped) nonwetting fluids. The model is restricted to two-fluid systems in which (1) no significant conversion of mechanical work into heat occurs, (2) the wetting fluid completely wets the porous medium’s solid surfaces, and (3) no changes in interfacial area due to mass transfer between phases occur. We show example calculations for two different drainage/imbibition sequences in two porous media: a highly uniform silica sand and a well-graded silt. The TBM’s predictions for interfacial area associated with free nonwetting-fluid are identical to those of a previously published geometry-based model (GBM). However, predictions for interfacial area associated with entrapped nonwetting-fluid are consistently larger in the TBM than in the GBM. Although a comparison of model predictions with experimental data is currently only possible to a limited extent, good general agreement was found for the TBM. As required model parameters are commonly used as inputs for or tracked during multifluid-flow simulations, the modified TBM may be easily incorporated in numerical codes.

  16. Shear transmission mechanical model of circular plate MR clutch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Huang, J. W.; Yang, Y.; Liu, J. N.

    2003-09-01

    The operational principle of a circular plate magnetorheological (MR) clutch is introduced. The Bingham model is used to describe the constitutive characteristics of the MR fluids between two circular plates subject to an applied magnetic field. Associated with geometric shape and applied magnetic field onto the clutch, the mathematical model to transmit the torque is established. The expressions of the torque and the output speed are derived to provide the theoretical foundation for the analysis of the clutch. The numerical results indicate that the MR clutch transmits the torque by the shear stress of the fluid. The torque and the output speed can be controlled continuously by changing the strength of the applied magnetic field. With the increase of the gap between two circular plates, the torque decreases.

  17. Effect of Pd Thickness on the Interfacial Reaction and Shear Strength in Solder Joints Between Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu Solder and Electroless Nickel/Electroless Palladium/Immersion Gold (ENEPIG) Surface Finish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Min; Park, Jin-Young; Kim, Young-Ho

    2012-04-01

    Intermetallic compound formation at the interface between Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu (SAC) solders and electroless nickel/electroless palladium/immersion gold (ENEPIG) surface finish and the mechanical strength of the solder joints were investigated at various Pd thicknesses (0 μm to 0.5 μm). The solder joints were fabricated on the ENEPIG surface finish with SAC solder via reflow soldering under various conditions. The (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 phase formed at the SAC/ENEPIG interface after reflow in all samples. When samples were reflowed at 260°C for 5 s, only (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 was observed at the solder interfaces in samples with Pd thicknesses of 0.05 μm or less. However, the (Pd,Ni)Sn4 phase formed on (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 when the Pd thickness increased to 0.1 μm or greater. A thick and continuous (Pd,Ni)Sn4 layer formed over the (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 layer, especially when the Pd thickness was 0.3 μm or greater. High-speed ball shear test results showed that the interfacial strengths of the SAC/ENEPIG solder joints decreased under high strain rate due to weak interfacial fracture between (Pd,Ni)Sn4 and (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 interfaces when the Pd thickness was greater than 0.3 μm. In the samples reflowed at 260°C for 20 s, only (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 formed at the solder interfaces and the (Pd,Ni)Sn4 phase was not observed in the solder interfaces, regardless of Pd thickness. The shear strength of the SAC/ENIG solder joints was the lowest of the joints, and the mechanical strength of the SAC/ENEPIG solder joints was enhanced as the Pd thickness increased to 0.1 μm and maintained a nearly constant value when the Pd thickness was greater than 0.1 μm. No adverse effect on the shear strength values was observed due to the interfacial fracture between (Pd,Ni)Sn4 and (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 since the (Pd,Ni)Sn4 phase was already separated from the (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 interface. These results indicate that the interfacial microstructures and mechanical strength of solder joints strongly depend on the Pd thickness and reflow conditions.

  18. Biomolecular motor-driven microtubule translocation in the presence of shear flow: modeling microtubule deflection due to shear.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taesung; Meyhöfer, Edgar; Hasselbrink, Ernest F

    2007-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that shear flow aligns microtubules moving on kinesin-coated microchannels with the flow direction, and statistically analyzed the rate of microtubule alignment under different concentrations of kinesin as well as strengths of shear flow. These data qualitatively support the hypothesis that the alignment results from the leading ends of translocating microtubules bending into the direction of the flow due to viscous drag force. Here, we present a cantilever-beam model that quantitatively shows agreement between this hypothesis and observation. Specifically, the model couples the exact nonlinear solution for cantilever-beam deflection with drag coefficients determined by numerical simulations of microtubules in the presence of shear flow near a wall. Coupled with flexural rigidity results of our previous study (which used electric fields), the established model successfully predicts new experimental data for microtubule bending in response to shear flow, further supporting our hypothesis for the mechanism of microtubule alignment. We expect that the newly-calculated drag coefficients and beam-bending model may be useful for biophysical studies as well as interpretation of in vivo data and the design of kinesin/microtubule-based devices. PMID:17522979

  19. Draft: Modeling Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media Including Fluid-Fluid Interfacial Area

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Niessner, Jennifer; Hassanizadeh, S Majid

    2008-01-01

    We present a new numerical model for macro-scale twophase flow in porous media which is based on a physically consistent theory of multi-phase flow.The standard approach for modeling the flow of two fluid phases in a porous medium consists of a continuity equation for each phase, an extended form of Darcy’s law as well as constitutive relationships for relative permeability and capillary pressure. This approach is known to have a number of important shortcomings and, in particular, it does not account for the presence and role of fluid - fluid interfaces. An alternative is to use an extended model which is founded on thermodynamic principles and is physically consistent. In addition to the standard equations, the model uses a balance equation for specific interfacial area. The constitutive relationship for capillary pressure involves not only saturation, but also specific interfacial area. We show how parameters can be obtained for the alternative model using experimental data from a new kind of flow cell and present results of a numerical modeling study

  20. Critical transition for the edge shear layer formation: Comparison of model and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B. A.; Garcia, L.; Pedrosa, M. A.; Hidalgo, C.

    2006-12-15

    The experimental results for the emergence of the plasma edge shear flow layer in TJ-II [C. Alehaldre et al.Fusion Technol. 17, 131 (1990)] can be explained using a simple model for a second-order transition based on the sheared flow amplification by Reynolds stress and turbulence suppression by shearing. In the dynamics of the model, the resistive interchange instability is used. This model gives power dependence on density gradients before and after the transition, consistent with experiment.

  1. New charged shear-free relativistic models with heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyonyi, Y.; Maharaj, S. D.; Govinder, K. S.

    2013-11-01

    We study shear-free spherically symmetric relativistic gravitating fluids with heat flow and electric charge. The solution to the Einstein-Maxwell system is governed by the generalised pressure isotropy condition which contains a contribution from the electric field. This condition is a highly nonlinear partial differential equation. We analyse this master equation using Lie's group theoretic approach. The Lie symmetry generators that leave the equation invariant are found. The first generator is independent of the electromagnetic field. The second generator depends critically on the form of the charge, which is determined explicitly in general. We provide exact solutions to the gravitational potentials using the symmetries admitted by the equation. Our new exact solutions contain earlier results without charge. We show that other charged solutions, related to the Lie symmetries, may be generated using the algorithm of Deng. This leads to new classes of charged Deng models which are generalisations of conformally flat metrics.

  2. Investigation of interfacial shear strength in a SiC fibre/Ti-24Al-11Nb composite by a fibre push-out technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Brindley, P. K.

    1989-01-01

    A fiber push-out technique applied at several sample thicknesses was used to determine both the debond shear stress and the frictional shear stress at the fiber-matrix interface at room temperautre for a unidirectional SiC fiber-reinforced T-24Al-11Nb (in at. pct) composite prepared by a powder cloth technique. The push-out technique measures the separate contributions of bond strength and friction to the mechanical shear strength at the fiber-matrix interface. It was found that the fiber-matrix bond shear strength of this material is significantly higher than the fiber-matrix frictional shear stress (119.2 and 47.8 MPa, respectively).

  3. Exploiting similarity in turbulent shear flows for turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David F.; Harris, Julius E.; Hassan, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that current k-epsilon models cannot predict the flow over a flat plate and its wake. In an effort to address this issue and other issues associated with turbulence closure, a new approach for turbulence modeling is proposed which exploits similarities in the flow field. Thus, if we consider the flow over a flat plate and its wake, then in addition to taking advantage of the log-law region, we can exploit the fact that the flow becomes self-similar in the far wake. This latter behavior makes it possible to cast the governing equations as a set of total differential equations. Solutions of this set and comparison with measured shear stress and velocity profiles yields the desired set of model constants. Such a set is, in general, different from other sets of model constants. The rational for such an approach is that if we can correctly model the flow over a flat plate and its far wake, then we can have a better chance of predicting the behavior in between. It is to be noted that the approach does not appeal, in any way, to the decay of homogeneous turbulence. This is because the asymptotic behavior of the flow under consideration is not representative of the decay of homogeneous turbulence.

  4. Notes on shear viscosity bound violation in anisotropic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, XianHui

    2016-03-01

    The shear viscosity bound violation in Einstein gravity for anisotropic black branes is discussed, with the aim of constraining the deviation of the shear viscosity-entropy density ratio from the shear viscosity bound using causality and thermodynamics analysis. The results show that no stringent constraints can be imposed. The diffusion bound in anisotropic phases is also studied. Ultimately, it is concluded that shear viscosity violation always occurs in cases where the equation of motion of the metric fluctuations cannot be written in a form identical to that of the minimally coupled massless scalar fields.

  5. Multiscale model for predicting shear zone structure and permeability in deforming rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Paul W.; Pereira, Gerald G.; Lemiale, Vincent; Piane, Claudio Delle; Clennell, M. Ben

    2016-04-01

    A novel multiscale model is proposed for the evolution of faults in rocks, which predicts their internal properties and permeability as strain increases. The macroscale model, based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), predicts system scale deformation by a pressure-dependent elastoplastic representation of the rock and shear zone. Being a continuum method, SPH contains no intrinsic information on the grain scale structure or behaviour of the shear zone, so a series of discrete element method microscale shear cell models are embedded into the macroscale model at specific locations. In the example used here, the overall geometry and kinematics of a direct shear test on a block of intact rock is simulated. Deformation is imposed by a macroscale model where stresses and displacement rates are applied at the shear cell walls in contact with the rock. Since the microscale models within the macroscale block of deforming rock now include representations of the grains, the structure of the shear zone, the evolution of the size and shape distribution of these grains, and the dilatancy of the shear zone can all be predicted. The microscale dilatancy can be used to vary the macroscale model dilatancy both spatially and temporally to give a full two-way coupling between the spatial scales. The ability of this model to predict shear zone structure then allows the prediction of the shear zone permeability using the Lattice-Boltzmann method.

  6. Surface temperatures and glassy state investigations in tribology, part 3. [limiting shear stress rheological model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, S.; Winer, W. O.

    1980-01-01

    Research related to the development of the limiting shear stress rheological model is reported. Techniques were developed for subjecting lubricants to isothermal compression in order to obtain relevant determinations of the limiting shear stress and elastic shear modulus. The isothermal compression limiting shear stress was found to predict very well the maximum traction for a given lubricant. Small amounts of side slip and twist incorporated in the model were shown to have great influence on the rising portion of the traction curve at low slide-roll ratio. The shear rheological model was also applied to a Grubin-like elastohydrodynamic inlet analysis for predicting film thicknesses when employing the limiting shear stress model material behavior.

  7. A Model for Shear Layer Effects on Engine Noise Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Farassat, F.; Pope, D. Stuart; Vatsa, V.

    2004-01-01

    Prediction of aircraft engine noise is an important aspect of addressing the issues of community noise and cabin noise control. The development of physics based methodologies for performing such predictions has been a focus of Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA). A recent example of code development in this area is the ducted fan noise propagation and radiation code CDUCT-LaRC. Included within the code is a duct radiation model that is based on the solution of FfowcsWilliams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation with a penetrable data surface. Testing of this equation for many acoustic problems has shown it to provide generally better results than the Kirchhoff formula for moving surfaces. Currently, the data surface is taken to be the inlet or exhaust plane for inlet or aft-fan cases, respectively. While this provides reasonable results in many situations, these choices of data surface location lead to a few limitations. For example, the shear layer between the bypass ow and external stream can refract the sound waves radiated to the far field. Radiation results can be improved by including this effect, as well as the rejection of the sound in the bypass region from the solid surface external to the bypass duct surrounding the core ow. This work describes the implementation, and possible approximation, of a shear layer boundary condition within CDUCT-LaRC. An example application also illustrates the improvements that this extension offers for predicting noise radiation from complex inlet and bypass duct geometries, thereby providing a means to evaluate external treatments in the vicinity of the bypass duct exhaust plane.

  8. Energy dissipation due to interfacial slip in nanocomposites reinforced with aligned carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gardea, Frank; Glaz, Bryan; Riddick, Jaret; Lagoudas, Dimitris C; Naraghi, Mohammad

    2015-05-13

    Interfacial slip mechanisms of strain energy dissipation and vibration damping of highly aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced polymer composites were studied through experimentation and complementary micromechanics modeling. Experimentally, we have developed CNT-polystyrene (PS) composites with a high degree of CNT alignment via a combination of twin-screw extrusion and hot-drawing. The aligned nanocomposites enabled a focused study of the interfacial slip mechanics associated with shear stress concentrations along the CNT-PS interface induced by the elastic mismatch between the filler and matrix. The variation of storage and loss modulus suggests the initiation of the interfacial slip occurs at axial strains as low as 0.028%, primarily due to shear stress concentration along the CNT-PS interface. Through micromechanics modeling and by matching the model with the experimental results at the onset of slip, the interfacial shear strength was evaluated. The model was then used to provide additional insight into the experimental observations by showing that the nonlinear variation of damping with dynamic strain can be attributed to slip-stick behavior. The dependence of the interfacial load-transfer reversibility on the dynamic strain history and characteristic time scale was experimentally investigated to demonstrate the relative contribution of van der Waals (vdW) interactions, mechanical interlocking, and covalent bonding to shear interactions. PMID:25905718

  9. Size effect model on kinetics of interfacial reaction between Sn-xAg-yCu solders and Cu substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M. L.; Yang, F.

    2014-11-01

    The downsizing of solder balls results in larger interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) grains and less Cu substrate consumption in lead-free soldering on Cu substrates. This size effect on the interfacial reaction is experimentally demonstrated and theoretically analyzed using Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu and Sn-3.5Ag solder balls. The interfacial reaction between the Sn-xAg-yCu solders and Cu substrates is a dynamic response to a combination of effects of interfacial IMC growth, Cu substrate consumption and composition variation in the interface zone. A concentration gradient controlled (CGC) kinetics model is proposed to explain the combined effects. The concentration gradient of Cu at the interface, which is a function of solder volume, initial Cu concentration and reaction time, is the root cause of the size effect. We found that a larger Cu concentration gradient results in smaller Cu6Sn5 grains and more consumption of Cu substrate. According to our model, the growth kinetics of interfacial Cu6Sn5 obeys a t1/3 law when the molten solder has approached the solution saturation, and will be slower otherwise due to the interfering dissolution mechanism. The size effect introduced in this model is supported by a good agreement between theoretical and experimental results. Finally, the scope of application of this model is discussed.

  10. Size effect model on kinetics of interfacial reaction between Sn-xAg-yCu solders and Cu substrate

    PubMed Central

    Huang, M. L.; Yang, F.

    2014-01-01

    The downsizing of solder balls results in larger interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) grains and less Cu substrate consumption in lead-free soldering on Cu substrates. This size effect on the interfacial reaction is experimentally demonstrated and theoretically analyzed using Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu and Sn-3.5Ag solder balls. The interfacial reaction between the Sn-xAg-yCu solders and Cu substrates is a dynamic response to a combination of effects of interfacial IMC growth, Cu substrate consumption and composition variation in the interface zone. A concentration gradient controlled (CGC) kinetics model is proposed to explain the combined effects. The concentration gradient of Cu at the interface, which is a function of solder volume, initial Cu concentration and reaction time, is the root cause of the size effect. We found that a larger Cu concentration gradient results in smaller Cu6Sn5 grains and more consumption of Cu substrate. According to our model, the growth kinetics of interfacial Cu6Sn5 obeys a t1/3 law when the molten solder has approached the solution saturation, and will be slower otherwise due to the interfering dissolution mechanism. The size effect introduced in this model is supported by a good agreement between theoretical and experimental results. Finally, the scope of application of this model is discussed. PMID:25408359

  11. Size effect model on kinetics of interfacial reaction between Sn-xAg-yCu solders and Cu substrate.

    PubMed

    Huang, M L; Yang, F

    2014-01-01

    The downsizing of solder balls results in larger interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) grains and less Cu substrate consumption in lead-free soldering on Cu substrates. This size effect on the interfacial reaction is experimentally demonstrated and theoretically analyzed using Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu and Sn-3.5Ag solder balls. The interfacial reaction between the Sn-xAg-yCu solders and Cu substrates is a dynamic response to a combination of effects of interfacial IMC growth, Cu substrate consumption and composition variation in the interface zone. A concentration gradient controlled (CGC) kinetics model is proposed to explain the combined effects. The concentration gradient of Cu at the interface, which is a function of solder volume, initial Cu concentration and reaction time, is the root cause of the size effect. We found that a larger Cu concentration gradient results in smaller Cu(6)Sn(5) grains and more consumption of Cu substrate. According to our model, the growth kinetics of interfacial Cu(6)Sn(5) obeys a t(1/3) law when the molten solder has approached the solution saturation, and will be slower otherwise due to the interfering dissolution mechanism. The size effect introduced in this model is supported by a good agreement between theoretical and experimental results. Finally, the scope of application of this model is discussed. PMID:25408359

  12. Turbulence modeling of free shear layers for high performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondak, Douglas

    1993-01-01

    In many flowfield computations, accuracy of the turbulence model employed is frequently a limiting factor in the overall accuracy of the computation. This is particularly true for complex flowfields such as those around full aircraft configurations. Free shear layers such as wakes, impinging jets (in V/STOL applications), and mixing layers over cavities are often part of these flowfields. Although flowfields have been computed for full aircraft, the memory and CPU requirements for these computations are often excessive. Additional computer power is required for multidisciplinary computations such as coupled fluid dynamics and conduction heat transfer analysis. Massively parallel computers show promise in alleviating this situation, and the purpose of this effort was to adapt and optimize CFD codes to these new machines. The objective of this research effort was to compute the flowfield and heat transfer for a two-dimensional jet impinging normally on a cool plate. The results of this research effort were summarized in an AIAA paper titled 'Parallel Implementation of the k-epsilon Turbulence Model'. Appendix A contains the full paper.

  13. Effects of vertical shear in modelling horizontal oceanic dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanotte, A. S.; Corrado, R.; Palatella, L.; Pizzigalli, C.; Schipa, I.; Santoleri, R.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of vertical shear on the horizontal dispersion properties of passive tracer particles on the continental shelf of the South Mediterranean is investigated by means of observation and model data. In situ current measurements reveal that vertical gradients of horizontal velocities in the upper mixing layer decorrelate quite fast ( ˜ 1 day), whereas an eddy-permitting ocean model, such as the Mediterranean Forecasting System, tends to overestimate such decorrelation time because of finite resolution effects. Horizontal dispersion, simulated by the Mediterranean sea Forecasting System, is mostly affected by: (1) unresolved scale motions, and mesoscale motions that are largely smoothed out at scales close to the grid spacing; (2) poorly resolved time variability in the profiles of the horizontal velocities in the upper layer. For the case study we have analysed, we show that a suitable use of deterministic kinematic parametrizations is helpful to implement realistic statistical features of tracer dispersion in two and three dimensions. The approach here suggested provides a functional tool to control the horizontal spreading of small organisms or substance concentrations, and is thus relevant for marine biology, pollutant dispersion as well as oil spill applications.

  14. Interfacial friction based quasi-continuum hydrodynamical model for nanofluidic transport of water.

    PubMed

    Bhadauria, Ravi; Sanghi, Tarun; Aluru, N R

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we formulate a one-dimensional isothermal hydrodynamic transport model for water, which is an extension to our recently proposed hydrodynamic model for Lennard-Jones type fluid [R. Bhadauria and N. R. Aluru, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074109 (2013)]. Viscosity variations in confinement are incorporated by the local average density method. Dirichlet boundary conditions are provided in the form of slip velocity that depends upon the macroscopic interfacial friction coefficient. The value of this friction coefficient is computed using a novel generalized Langevin equation formulation that eliminates the use of equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation. Gravity driven flows of SPC/E water confined between graphene and silicon slit shaped nanochannels are considered as examples for low and high friction cases. The proposed model yields good quantitative agreement with the velocity profiles obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:26547177

  15. Interfacial friction based quasi-continuum hydrodynamical model for nanofluidic transport of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadauria, Ravi; Sanghi, Tarun; Aluru, N. R.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we formulate a one-dimensional isothermal hydrodynamic transport model for water, which is an extension to our recently proposed hydrodynamic model for Lennard-Jones type fluid [R. Bhadauria and N. R. Aluru, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074109 (2013)]. Viscosity variations in confinement are incorporated by the local average density method. Dirichlet boundary conditions are provided in the form of slip velocity that depends upon the macroscopic interfacial friction coefficient. The value of this friction coefficient is computed using a novel generalized Langevin equation formulation that eliminates the use of equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation. Gravity driven flows of SPC/E water confined between graphene and silicon slit shaped nanochannels are considered as examples for low and high friction cases. The proposed model yields good quantitative agreement with the velocity profiles obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

  16. Modeling Shear Instabilities With Block Sliders: Brittle and Ductile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, M. R.

    2003-12-01

    Block slider-type models have been succesfully used for almost 35 years to describe the spatio-temporal development of shear instabilities in the brittle crust (Burridge & Knopoff, 1967; Olami et al., 1992). More recently, increasing attention is paid on the extension of the classical Burridge-Knopoff model (based on a pure Mohr-Coulomb rheology) with a viscous component, either to include depth-dependent properties into the model or aiming at a more accurate description of fore- and aftershock sequences of a main earthquake event (e.g. Hainzl et al., 1999). On the other hand, viscous feedback mechanisms of various types have become an increasingly attractive mechanism for the generation of intermediate-depth and deep-focus earthquakes in the ductile mantle lithosphere (e.g. Wiens & Snider, 2001). Heat generated during viscous deformation provides a positive feedback to creep and eventually faulting under high pressure (Karato et al., 2001, Bercovici & Karato, 2003). The present paper discusses the specific properties of block slider-type models that are extended with a viscous component and compare their behaviour with the pure brittle ("classical") case. Block slider-type models for ductile instabilities are numerically much less demanding than solutions based on the corresponding, thermal-mechanically coupled, continuum equations. They allow for the inclusion of possible non-equilibrium effects associated with mineral phase transformations in a subducting slab (kinetic overshoot, grainsize reduction, latent heat release) in a straightforward manner. They may therefore serve as an effective tool to study the coupling of viscous heating, temperature-dependent viscosity and brittle stress transfer that are thought to cause the specific spatial-temporal clustering of intermediate-depth and deep-focus eartquakes. References D. Bercovici and S. Karato "Theoretical Analysis of Shear Localization in the Lithosphere", in: Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry 51, eds. S

  17. A compressive failure model for anisotropic plates with a cutout under compressive and shear loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurdal, Z.; Haftka, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    The paper introduces a failure model for laminated composite plates with a cutout under combined compressive and shear loads. The model is based on kinking failure of the load-carrying fibers around a cutout, and includes the effect of local shearing and compressive stresses. Comparison of predictions of the model with available experimental results for quasi-isotropic and orthotropic plates with a circular hole indicated a good agreement. Predictions for orthotropic plates under combined loading are compared with the predictions of a point-stress model. The present model indicates significant reductions in axial load-carrying capacity due to shearing loads for plates with principal axis of orthotropy oriented along the axial load direction. A gain in strength is achieved by rotating the axis of orthotropy to counteract the shearing stress, or by eliminating the compressive-shear deformation coupling.

  18. Shear Modulus for Nonisotropic, Open-Celled Foams Using a General Elongated Kelvin Foam Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2008-01-01

    An equation for the shear modulus for nonisotropic, open-celled foams in the plane transverse to the elongation (rise) direction is derived using an elongated Kelvin foam model with the most general geometric description. The shear modulus was found to be a function of the unit cell dimensions, the solid material properties, and the cell edge cross-section properties. The shear modulus equation reduces to the relation derived by others for isotropic foams when the unit cell is equiaxed.

  19. A test of the double-shearing model of flow for granular materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Lockner, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    The double-shearing model of flow attributes plastic deformation in granular materials to cooperative slip on conjugate Coulomb shears (surfaces upon which the Coulomb yield condition is satisfied). The strict formulation of the double-shearing model then requires that the slip lines in the material coincide with the Coulomb shears. Three different experiments that approximate simple shear deformation in granular media appear to be inconsistent with this strict formulation. For example, the orientation of the principal stress axes in a layer of sand driven in steady, simple shear was measured subject to the assumption that the Coulomb failure criterion was satisfied on some surfaces (orientation unspecified) within the sand layer. The orientation of the inferred principal compressive axis was then compared with the orientations predicted by the double-shearing model. The strict formulation of the model [Spencer, 1982] predicts that the principal stress axes should rotate in a sense opposite to that inferred from the experiments. A less restrictive formulation of the double-shearing model by de Josselin de Jong [1971] does not completely specify the solution but does prescribe limits on the possible orientations of the principal stress axes. The orientations of the principal compression axis inferred from the experiments are probably within those limits. An elastoplastic formulation of the double-shearing model [de Josselin de Jong, 1988] is reasonably consistent with the experiments, although quantitative agreement was not attained. Thus we conclude that the double-shearing model may be a viable law to describe deformation of granular materials, but the macroscopic slip surfaces will not in general coincide with the Coulomb shears.

  20. Modelling and analytic studies of sheared flow effects on tearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, D.; Thyagaraja, A.; Sen, A.; Ham, C. J.; Hender, T. C.; Hastie, R. J.; Connor, J. W.; Kaw, P.; Mendonca, J.

    2015-05-01

    The effects of flow shear on the stability of a (2,1) tearing mode are examined using numerical and analytic studies on a number of model systems. For a cylindrical reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, linear computations using the CUTIE code show that sheared axial flows have a destabilizing effect, while sheared poloidal flows tend to reduce the growth rate of the mode. These effects are independent of the direction of the flow. For helical flows the sign of the shear in the flow matters. This symmetry breaking is also seen in the nonlinear regime where the island saturation level is found to depend on the sign of the flows. In the absence of flow, the CUTIE simulations show that the linear mode is more stable in a two fluid as compared to a single fluid model. However, in the presence of sheared axial flows a negative sheared flow is more destabilizing while a positive sheared flow is more stabilizing, compared to the single fluid model. In contrast to the cylindrical model, simulations in a toroidal model, using the MHD code NEAR, always show a stabilizing effect in the presence of a sheared toroidal flow. This is understood analytically in terms of a flow induced ‘Shafranov’ like shift in the profiles of the equilibrium current that results in a stabilizing change in Δ‧ and the saturated island size.

  1. Modelling study of challenges in sinkhole detection with shear wave reflection seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burschil, Thomas; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2016-04-01

    The detection of cavities with reflection seismics is a difficult task even if high impedance contrasts are assumed. Especially the shear wave reflection method with a higher resolution potential trough lower velocities and short wavelength has come into focus of investigation. But shear wave propagation fails if material exists that partially has no shear strength. The shear wave does not propagate into or through those voids. Here, we evaluate the influence of a possible fracture zone above a cavity. We simulate shear wave propagation with finite difference modelling for two reference models, with and without cavity, and various sets of input models with a fracture zone above the cavity. Reflections and multiples of the reference models image the subsidence structure and the cavity. For the fracture input models, we implemented a fracture network, derived from numerical crack propagation modelling (Schneider-Löbens et al., 2015). The cracks possess the minimum possible aperture of one grid point (i.e. 0.1 m) and no shear stiffness. The seismic modelling exhibits that the shear wave does not pass through the fracture zone and shadows the subjacent cavity. Sequences of randomly discontinuous cracks, cf. displacement discontinuity model with zero crack stiffness, approximate partially seismic connected rock on both sides of the crack. The amount of these seismic pathways determines whether a reflection of the cavity can be detected at the surface or not. Cracks with higher aperture, e.g. two or three grid points, need a higher amount of intact rock/defective cracks, since more connected grid points are necessary to create seismic pathways. Furthermore, it turns out that the crack filling is important for shear wave transmission. While a mineralized fracture zone, implemented with high velocity, facilitate shear wave propagation, water or air-filled cracks avoid shear wave transmission. Crack orientation affects the shear wave propagation through the geometry. A

  2. Modelling the effects of horizontal and vertical shear in stratified turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umlauf, Lars

    2005-05-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) and model results from a number of one-point turbulence models are compared for homogeneous, stably stratified flows. Because of their wide spread use in numerical ocean modelling, only explicit algebraic second-moment models are investigated. Considered are two types of shear flows with either purely vertical or purely horizontal shear. The dissipation rate is evaluated from the observation that the shear-number becomes independent of stratification for low to moderate Richardson numbers as soon as the flow approaches self-similarity. For the cases with vertical shear, it is found that all statistical models essentially reproduced the DNS results, though with different accuracy. In contrast, only the most recent model was able to predict the salient features of horizontally sheared flows, i.e. a steady-state Richardson number that is about an order of magnitude larger and a vertical mixing efficiency that is about twice as large compared to the case with vertical shear. This model also reproduced other key parameters like the turbulent Froude number and the turbulent Prandtl number with good accuracy, but it failed to predict quantitatively the reduction of the shear anisotropy with increasing stratification. For strong stratification, none of the models was able to describe the rapid decrease of the mixing efficiency associated with the collapse and fossilisation of turbulence.

  3. On interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran: Atomistic and coarse-grained models from molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, J. M.; Algaba, J.; Míguez, J. M.; Mendiboure, B.; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I.; Piñeiro, M. M.; Blas, F. J.

    2016-04-01

    We have determined the interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran (THF) from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. The molecules are modeled using six different molecular models, three of them based on the united-atom approach and the other three based on a coarse-grained (CG) approach. In the first case, THF is modeled using the transferable parameters potential functions approach proposed by Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen [J. Chem. Phys. 77, 5073 (1982)] and a new parametrization of the TraPPE force fields for cyclic alkanes and ethers [S. J. Keasler et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 115, 11234 (2012)]. In both cases, dispersive and coulombic intermolecular interactions are explicitly taken into account. In the second case, THF is modeled as a single sphere, a diatomic molecule, and a ring formed from three Mie monomers according to the SAFT-γ Mie top-down approach [V. Papaioannou et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 054107 (2014)]. Simulations were performed in the molecular dynamics canonical ensemble and the vapor-liquid surface tension is evaluated from the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor along the simulation box. In addition to the surface tension, we have also obtained density profiles, coexistence densities, critical temperature, density, and pressure, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying special attention to the comparison between the estimations obtained from different models and literature experimental data. The simulation results obtained from the three CG models as described by the SAFT-γ Mie approach are able to predict accurately the vapor-liquid phase envelope of THF, in excellent agreement with estimations obtained from TraPPE model and experimental data in the whole range of coexistence. However, Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen model presents significant deviations from experimental results. We also compare the predictions for surface tension as obtained from simulation results for all the models with

  4. On interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran: Atomistic and coarse-grained models from molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J M; Algaba, J; Míguez, J M; Mendiboure, B; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A I; Piñeiro, M M; Blas, F J

    2016-04-14

    We have determined the interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran (THF) from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. The molecules are modeled using six different molecular models, three of them based on the united-atom approach and the other three based on a coarse-grained (CG) approach. In the first case, THF is modeled using the transferable parameters potential functions approach proposed by Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen [J. Chem. Phys. 77, 5073 (1982)] and a new parametrization of the TraPPE force fields for cyclic alkanes and ethers [S. J. Keasler et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 115, 11234 (2012)]. In both cases, dispersive and coulombic intermolecular interactions are explicitly taken into account. In the second case, THF is modeled as a single sphere, a diatomic molecule, and a ring formed from three Mie monomers according to the SAFT-γ Mie top-down approach [V. Papaioannou et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 054107 (2014)]. Simulations were performed in the molecular dynamics canonical ensemble and the vapor-liquid surface tension is evaluated from the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor along the simulation box. In addition to the surface tension, we have also obtained density profiles, coexistence densities, critical temperature, density, and pressure, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying special attention to the comparison between the estimations obtained from different models and literature experimental data. The simulation results obtained from the three CG models as described by the SAFT-γ Mie approach are able to predict accurately the vapor-liquid phase envelope of THF, in excellent agreement with estimations obtained from TraPPE model and experimental data in the whole range of coexistence. However, Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen model presents significant deviations from experimental results. We also compare the predictions for surface tension as obtained from simulation results for all the models with

  5. Surface and interfacial creases in a bilayer tubular soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Mir Jalil; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-08-01

    Surface and interfacial creases induced by biological growth are common types of instability in soft biological tissues. This study focuses on the criteria for the onset of surface and interfacial creases as well as their morphological evolution in a growing bilayer soft tube within a confined environment. Critical growth ratios for triggering surface and interfacial creases are investigated both analytically and numerically. Analytical interpretations provide preliminary insights into critical stretches and growth ratios for the onset of instability and formation of both surface and interfacial creases. However, the analytical approach cannot predict the evolution pattern of the model after instability; therefore nonlinear finite element simulations are carried out to replicate the poststability morphological patterns of the structure. Analytical and computational simulation results demonstrate that the initial geometry, growth ratio, and shear modulus ratio of the layers are the most influential factors to control surface and interfacial crease formation in this soft tubular bilayer. The competition between the stretch ratios in the free and interfacial surfaces is one of the key driving factors to determine the location of the first crease initiation. These findings may provide some fundamental understanding in the growth modeling of tubular biological tissues such as esophagi and airways as well as offering useful clues into normal and pathological functions of these tissues.

  6. Interfacial Chemical Interactions in the (Alumina/Graphite/Al Alloys) System: Thermodynamic Modeling and Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelbstein, M.; Edry, I.; Froumin, N.; Frage, N.

    2009-04-01

    The stability of alumina-coated graphite couples in liquid Al is investigated in the 1373 to 1573 K temperature range. A thermodynamic model was carried out to determine the mechanisms controlling the couple stability and the effect of alloying Al with high melting point element for instance U (up to 3 at. pct). It was established that the dissolved uranium dose not play any role in the interfacial interactions and that the couple stability is governed by the interactions with Al resulting in the release of gaseous products. The experiments focused on wetting kinetics under conditions allowing for an in-situ reduction of the alumina coating by the liquid Al. The experimental results confirm the predictions of the thermodynamic analysis.

  7. Effect of interfacial roughness parameters on the fiber pushout behavior of a model composite

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathy, T.A. ); Barlage, D.R. . Dept. of Engineering); Jero, P.D.; Kerans, R.J. )

    1994-12-01

    The effect of interfacial roughness on the frictional sliding in composites has been studied using fiber pushout and pushback tests on a model composite of Plexiglas rods in an epoxy matrix. Different extents of roughness were introduced on the Plexiglas rods and the resulting roughness profiles measured. The roughness profiles were characterized using six different roughness parameters. An attempt was made to find a correlation between the sliding resistance and the selected roughness parameters. A parameter defined as the maximum coefficient in the Fourier transform of the roughness profile was found to yield the best correlation. If the roughness introduced is periodic, then the pushout traces exhibit periodic dips, but the magnitude of this periodic dip is significantly smaller than the seating drop obtained from pushback tests.

  8. Atomistic simulation of surface functionalization on the interfacial properties of graphene-polymer nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. C.; Lai, Z. B.; Galpaya, D.; Yan, C.; Hu, N.; Zhou, L. M.

    2014-03-28

    Graphene has been increasingly used as nano sized fillers to create a broad range of nanocomposites with exceptional properties. The interfaces between fillers and matrix play a critical role in dictating the overall performance of a composite. However, the load transfer mechanism along graphene-polymer interface has not been well understood. In this study, we conducted molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the influence of surface functionalization and layer length on the interfacial load transfer in graphene-polymer nanocomposites. The simulation results show that oxygen-functionalized graphene leads to larger interfacial shear force than hydrogen-functionalized and pristine ones during pull-out process. The increase of oxygen coverage and layer length enhances interfacial shear force. Further increase of oxygen coverage to about 7% leads to a saturated interfacial shear force. A model was also established to demonstrate that the mechanism of interfacial load transfer consists of two contributing parts, including the formation of new surface and relative sliding along the interface. These results are believed to be useful in development of new graphene-based nanocomposites with better interfacial properties.

  9. Evaluation of the interfacial mechanical properties in fiber-reinforced ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ferber, M.K.; Wereszczak, A.A.; Riester, L.; Lowden, R.A.; Chawla, K.K.

    1993-06-01

    The present study examined the application of a micro-indentation technique to the measurement of interfacial properties in fiber reinforced ceramic composites. Specific fiber/matrix systems included SiC/glass, SiC/macro-defect-free (MDF) cement, SiC/SiC, and mullite/glass. The effect of fiber coatings upon the interfacial properties was also investigated. These properties, which included the debond strength, interfacial shear stress, and residual axial fiber stress, were evaluated by measuring the force-displacement curves generated during load-unload cycles. Estimates of these three stress values were obtained by matching the experimental force-displacement curves with data predicted from an existing model. In general the SiC/glass composites exhibited the lowest values of the interfacial shear and debond stresses. The sliding characteristics of the SiC/MDF cement and SiC/SiC composites were strongly influenced by the residual axial stress and the nature of the fiber coating. In the case of the mullite/glass composite, the high values of the interfacial shear and debond stresses reduced the measurement sensitivity, thereby increasing the uncertainty in the estimates of the interfacial properties. 17 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab.

  10. Dividing phases in two-phase flow and modeling of interfacial drag

    SciTech Connect

    Narumo, T.; Rajamaeki, M.

    1997-07-01

    Different models intended to describe one-dimensional two-phase flow are considered in this paper. The following models are introduced: conventional six-equation model, conventional model equipped with terms taking into account nonuniform transverse velocity distribution of the phases, several virtual mass models and a model in which the momentum equations have been derived by using the principles of Separation of the Flow According to Velocity (SFAV). The dynamics of the models have been tested by comparing their characteristic velocities to each other and against experimental data. The results show that the SFAV-model makes a hyperbolic system and predicts the propagation velocities of disturbances with the same order of accuracy as the best tested virtual mass models. Furthermore, the momentum interaction terms for the SFAV-model are considered. These consist of the wall friction terms and the interfacial friction term. The authors model wall friction with two independent terms describing the effect of each fluid on the wall separately. In the steady state, a relationship between the slip velocity and friction coefficients can be derived. Hence, the friction coefficients for the SFAV-model can be calculated from existing correlations, viz. from a drift-flux correlation and a wall friction correlation. The friction model was tested by searching steady-state distributions in a partial BWR fuel channel and comparing the relaxed values with the drift-flux correlation, which agreed very well with each other. In addition, response of the flow to a sine-wave disturbance in the water inlet flux was calculated as function of frequency. The results of the models differed from each other already with frequency of order 5 Hz, while the time constant for the relaxation, obtained from steady-state distribution calculation, would have implied significant differences appear not until with frequency of order 50 Hz.

  11. Experimental investigation and kinetic-theory-based model of a rapid granular shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, R. D.; Martin, T. W.; Huntley, J. M.; Jenkins, J. T.; Viswanathan, H.; Fen, X.; Parker, D. J.

    An experimental investigation of an idealized rapidly sheared granular flow was performed to test the predictions of a model based on the kinetic theory of dry granular media. Glass ballotini beads were placed in an annular shear cell and the lower boundary rotated to induce a shearing motion in the bed. A single particle was tracked using the positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) technique, a method that determines the location of a particle through the triangulation of gamma photons emitted by a radioactive tracer particle. The packing fraction and velocity fields within the three-dimensional flow were measured and compared to the predictions of a model developed using the conservation and balance equations applicable to dissipative systems, and solved incorporating constitutive relations derived from kinetic theory. The comparison showed that kinetic theory is able to capture the general features of a rapid shear flow reasonably well over a wide range of shear rates and confining pressures.

  12. DEM analyses of shear behaviour of rock joints by a novel bond contact model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, M. J.; Liu, J.; Sun, C.; Chen, H.

    2015-09-01

    The failure of rock joints is one of the potential causes for the local and general rock instability, which may trigger devastating geohazards such as landslide. In this paper, the Distinct Element Method (DEM) featured by a novel bond contact model was utilized to simulate shear behaviour of centre/non-coplanar rock joints. The DEM results show that the complete shear behaviour of jointed rock includes four stages: elastic shearing phase, crack propagation, the failure of rock bridges and the through-going discontinuity. The peak shear strength of centre joint increases as the joint connectivity rate decreases. For intermittent noncoplanar rock joints, as the inclination of the rock joints increases, its shear capacity decreases when the inclination angle is negative while increase when positive. Comparison with the experimental results proves the capability of this DEM model in capturing the mechanical properties of the jointed rocks.

  13. Solution of the complete Curtiss-Bird model for polymeric liquids subjected to simple shear flow.

    PubMed

    Stephanou, Pavlos S; Kröger, Martin

    2016-03-28

    The complete kinetic theory model for concentrated polymer solutions and melts proposed by Curtiss and Bird is solved for shear flow: (a) analytically by providing a solution for the single-link (or configurational) distribution function as a real basis spherical harmonics expansion and then calculating the materials functions in shear flow up to second order in the dimensionless shear rate and, (b) numerically via the execution of Brownian dynamics simulations. These two methods are actually complementary to each other as the former is accurate only for small dimensionless shear rates where the latter produces results with increasingly large uncertainties. The analytical expansions of the material functions with respect to the dimensionless shear rate reduce to those of the extensively studied, simplified Curtiss-Bird model when ε' = 0, and to the rigid rod when ε' = 1. It is known that the power-law behavior at high shear rates is very different for these two extremal cases. We employ Brownian dynamics simulation to not only recover the limiting cases but to find a gradual variation of the power-law behaviors at large dimensionless shear rates upon varying ε'. The fact that experimental data are usually located between these two extremes strongly advocates the significance of studying the solution of the Curtiss-Bird model. This is exemplified in this work by comparing the solution of this model with available rheological data for semiflexible biological systems that are clearly not captured by the original Doi-Edwards or simplified Curtiss-Bird models. PMID:27036477

  14. Solution of the complete Curtiss-Bird model for polymeric liquids subjected to simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephanou, Pavlos S.; Kröger, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The complete kinetic theory model for concentrated polymer solutions and melts proposed by Curtiss and Bird is solved for shear flow: (a) analytically by providing a solution for the single-link (or configurational) distribution function as a real basis spherical harmonics expansion and then calculating the materials functions in shear flow up to second order in the dimensionless shear rate and, (b) numerically via the execution of Brownian dynamics simulations. These two methods are actually complementary to each other as the former is accurate only for small dimensionless shear rates where the latter produces results with increasingly large uncertainties. The analytical expansions of the material functions with respect to the dimensionless shear rate reduce to those of the extensively studied, simplified Curtiss-Bird model when ɛ' = 0, and to the rigid rod when ɛ' = 1. It is known that the power-law behavior at high shear rates is very different for these two extremal cases. We employ Brownian dynamics simulation to not only recover the limiting cases but to find a gradual variation of the power-law behaviors at large dimensionless shear rates upon varying ɛ'. The fact that experimental data are usually located between these two extremes strongly advocates the significance of studying the solution of the Curtiss-Bird model. This is exemplified in this work by comparing the solution of this model with available rheological data for semiflexible biological systems that are clearly not captured by the original Doi-Edwards or simplified Curtiss-Bird models.

  15. An unload-induced direct-shear model for granular gouge friction in rock discontinuities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Zou, Yang; Li, Xing; Zhao, Jian

    2014-09-01

    The experimental study introduces an unload-induced direct-shear model to investigate the frictional slip of a layer of simulated granular gouges induced by the combination of a decreasing normal stress and a constant shear stress. A frictional equilibrium state of the gouge layer is initially established under fixed normal and shear stresses. The normal stress is proposed to decrease at a constant unloading rate to induce the frictional slip of the gouge layer, and the shear stress is proposed to keep a constant value during the test. A displacement meter and load cells synchronously measure the slip displacement and the applied normal and shear stresses, respectively. The normal and shear stresses sharply decrease with the frictional slip, owing to damage of gouge contacts. The frictional slip is then gradually arrested with new formation of gouge contacts. A greater initial shear stress induces larger normal and shear stress reductions and a smaller slip displacement. The strain energy stored in the discontinuous system before the frictional slip is found to affect the slip displacement. The advantages and the limitations of this model are discussed at the end. PMID:25273734

  16. Spontaneous formation of permanent shear bands in a mesoscopic model of flowing disordered matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Kirsten; Bocquet, Lydéric; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2012-02-01

    In this presentation we propose a coherent scenario of the formation of permanent shear bands in the flow of yield stress materials. Within a minimalistic mesoscopic model we investigate the spatial organisation of plasticity. The most important parameter is the typical time needed to regain the original structure after a local rearrangement. In agreement with a recent mean field study [Coussot et al., Eur. Phys. J. E, 2010, 33, 183] we observe a spontaneous formation of permanent shear bands, when this restructuring time is large compared to the typical stress release time in a rearrangement. This heterogeneous flow behaviour is different in nature from the transient dynamical heterogeneities that one observes in the small shear rate limit in flow without shear-banding [Martens et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2011, 106, 156001]. We analyse the dependence of the shear bands on system size, shear rate and restructuring time. Further we rationalise the scenario within a mean field version of the model, that explains the instability of the homogeneous flow below a critical shear rate. Our study therefore strongly supports the idea that the characteristic time scales involved in the local dynamics are at the physical origin of permanent shear bands.

  17. Computational modeling and simulation of spall fracture in polycrystalline solids by an atomistic-based interfacial zone model

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liqiang; Zeng, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this work is to investigate spall fracture in polycrystalline materials under high-speed impact loading by using an atomistic-based interfacial zone model. We illustrate that for polycrystalline materials, increases in the potential energy ratio between grain boundaries and grains could cause a fracture transition from intergranular to transgranular mode. We also found out that the spall strength increases when there is a fracture transition from intergranular to transgranular. In addition, analysis of grain size, crystal lattice orientation and impact speed reveals that the spall strength increases as grain size or impact speed increases. PMID:26435546

  18. A simple model to understand the effect of membrane shear elasticity and stress-free shape on the motion of red blood cells in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Dupire, Jules; Abkarian, Manouk; Viallat, Annie

    2015-11-14

    An analytical model was proposed by Keller and Skalak in 1982 to understand the motion of red blood cells in shear flow. The cell was described as a fluid ellipsoid of fixed shape. This model was extended in 2007 to introduce shear elasticity of the red blood cell membrane. Here, this model is further extended to take into account that the cell discoid shape physiologically observed is not a stress-free shape. The model shows that spheroid stress-free shapes allow us to fit the experimental data with the values of shear elasticity typical to that found with micropipette and optical tweezer experiments. In the range of moderate shear rates (for which RBCs keep their discoid shape) this model enables us to quantitatively determine (i) an effective cell viscosity, which combines membrane and hemoglobin viscosities and (ii) an effective shear modulus of the membrane that combines the shear modulus and the stress-free shape. This model can also be used to determine RBC mechanical parameters not only in the tanktreading regime when cells are suspended in medium of high viscosity but also in the tumbling regime characteristic of cells suspended in media of low viscosity. In this regime, a transition is predicted between a rigid-like tumbling motion and a fluid-like tumbling motion above a critical shear rate, which is directly related to the mechanical parameters of the cell. PMID:26352875

  19. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography.

    PubMed

    Hashemiyan, Z; Packo, P; Staszewski, W J; Uhl, T

    2016-01-01

    Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort. PMID:26884808

  20. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Packo, P.; Staszewski, W. J.; Uhl, T.

    2016-01-01

    Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort. PMID:26884808

  1. Shear deformation in granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bardenhagen, S.G.; Brackbill, J.U.; Sulsky, D.L.

    1998-12-31

    An investigation into the properties of granular materials is undertaken via numerical simulation. These simulations highlight that frictional contact, a defining characteristic of dry granular materials, and interfacial debonding, an expected deformation mode in plastic bonded explosives, must be properly modeled. Frictional contact and debonding algorithms have been implemented into FLIP, a particle in cell code, and are described. Frictionless and frictional contact are simulated, with attention paid to energy and momentum conservation. Debonding is simulated, with attention paid to the interfacial debonding speed. A first step toward calculations of shear deformation in plastic bonded explosives is made. Simulations are performed on the scale of the grains where experimental data is difficult to obtain. Two characteristics of deformation are found, namely the intermittent binding of grains when rotation and translation are insufficient to accommodate deformation, and the role of the binder as a lubricant in force chains.

  2. Dynamics of model blood cells in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorski, Thomas; Callens, Natacha; Minetti, Christophe; Coupier, Gwennou; Dubois, Frank; Misbah, Chaouqi

    The dynamics of a vesicle suspension in shear flow was investigated by digital holographic microscopy [1] in parabolic flights and in the MASER 11 sounding rocket. Vesicles are lipid membranes which mimic the mechanical behaviour of cells, such as red blood cells in flow. In a simple shear flow between parallel walls, a lift force of purely viscous origin pushes vesicles away from walls. Our parabolic flight experiments [2] reveal that the lift velocity in a dilute suspen-sion is well described by theoretical predictions by Olla. As vesicles gather near the center of the flow chamber due to lift forces from both walls, one expects hydrodynamic interactions of pairs of vesicles to result in shear induced diffusion in the suspension. The BIOMICS experi-ment in the MASER 11 sounding rocket revealed a complex spatial structure of a polydisperse vesicle suspension due to the interplay between lift forces from the walls and hydrodynamic interactions. These phenomena have a strong impact on the structure and rheology of blood in small vessels, and a precise knowledge of the dynamics of migration and diffusion of soft particles in flow can lead to alternative ways to separate and sort blood cells. 1. Dubois, F., Schockaert, C., Callens, N., Yourrassowsky, C., "Focus plane detection criteria in digital holography microscopy by amplitude analysis", Opt. Express, Vol. 14, pp 5895-5908, 2006 2. Callens, N., Minetti, C., Coupier, G., Mader, M.-A., Dubois, F., Misbah, C., Podgorski, T., "Hydrodynamics lift of vesicles under shear flow in microgravity", Europhys. Lett., Vol. 83, p. 24002, 2008

  3. Simulating interfacial anisotropy in thin-film growth using an extended Cahn-Hilliard model.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Solmaz; Lowengrub, John

    2012-04-01

    We present an extended Cahn-Hilliard model for simulating interfacial anisotropy in thin-film dynamics by incorporating high-order terms in the energy from an expansion of the energy about an equilibrium state, following earlier work by Abinandanan and Haider [Philos. Mag. Sect. A 81, 2457 (2001)]. For example, to simulate SiGe/Si thin films, where diamond cubic symmetry is needed, fourth order derivatives are included in the energy. This results in a sixth order evolution equation for the order parameter. For less symmetric crystals, one needs to add terms of higher order than fourth order. One advantage of this approach is its intrinsic regularized behavior. In particular, even for strongly anisotropic surface energy, sharp corners will not form and the extended anisotropic Cahn-Hilliard equations are well-posed. For this system we develop an energy-stable numerical scheme in which the energy decreases for any time step. We present two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) numerical results using an adaptive, nonlinear multigrid finite-difference method. We find excellent agreement between the computed equilibrium shapes using the new model and results from an analysis associated with a Wulff construction for energy minimization. The model predictions also compare well with experimental results for silicon voids. In the context of thin films, we observe the formation of interconnected ridges, wires, and fortresses similar to those observed in SiGe/Si thin films. PMID:22680484

  4. A multiscale transport model for Lennard-Jones binary mixtures based on interfacial friction.

    PubMed

    Bhadauria, Ravi; Aluru, N R

    2016-08-21

    We propose a one-dimensional isothermal hydrodynamic transport model for non-reacting binary mixtures in slit shaped nanochannels. The coupled species momentum equations contain viscous dissipation and interspecies friction term of Maxwell-Stefan form. Species partial viscosity variations in the confinement are modeled using the van der Waals one fluid approximation and the local average density method. Species specific macroscopic friction coefficient based Robin boundary conditions are provided to capture the species wall slip effects. The value of this friction coefficient is computed using a species specific generalized Langevin formulation. Gravity driven flow of methane-hydrogen and methane-argon mixtures confined between graphene slit shaped nanochannels are considered as examples. The proposed model yields good quantitative agreement with the velocity profiles obtained from the non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The mixtures considered are observed to behave as single species pseudo fluid, with the interfacial friction displaying linear dependence on molar composition of the mixture. The results also indicate that the different species have different slip lengths, which remain unchanged with the channel width. PMID:27544095

  5. A simple model to understand the role of membrane shear elasticity and stress-free shape on the motion of red blood cells in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallat, Annie; Abkarian, Manouk; Dupire, Jules

    2015-11-01

    The analytical model presented by Keller and Skalak on the dynamics of red blood cells in shear flow described the cell as a fluid ellipsoid of fixed shape. It was extended to introduce shear elasticity of the cell membrane. We further extend the model when the cell discoid physiological shape is not a stress-free shape. We show that spheroid stress-free shapes enables fitting experimental data with values of shear elasticity typical to that found with micropipettes and optical tweezers. For moderate shear rates (when RBCs keep their discoid shape) this model enables to quantitatively determine an effective cell viscosity, that combines membrane and hemoglobin viscosities and an effective shear modulus of the membrane that combines shear modulus and stress-free shape. This model allows determining RBC mechanical parameters both in the tanktreading regime for cells suspended in a high viscosity medium, and in the tumbling regime for cells suspended in a low viscosity medium. In this regime,a transition is predicted between a rigid-like tumbling motion and a fluid-like tumbling motion above a critical shear rate, which is directly related to the mechanical parameters of the cell. A*MIDEX (n ANR-11-IDEX-0001-02) funded by the ''Investissements d'Avenir'', Region Languedoc-Roussillon, Labex NUMEV (ANR-10-LABX-20), BPI France project DataDiag.

  6. Mapping between atomistic simulations and Eshelby inclusions in the shear deformation of an amorphous silicon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albaret, T.; Tanguy, A.; Boioli, F.; Rodney, D.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we perform quasistatic shear simulations of model amorphous silicon bulk samples with Stillinger-Weber-type potentials. Local plastic rearrangements identified based on local energy variations are fitted through their displacement fields on collections of Eshelby spherical inclusions, allowing determination of their transformation strain tensors. The latter are then used to quantitatively reproduce atomistic stress-strain curves, in terms of both shear and pressure components. We demonstrate that our methodology is able to capture the plastic behavior predicted by different Stillinger-Weber potentials, in particular, their different shear tension coupling. These calculations justify the decomposition of plasticity into shear transformations used so far in mesoscale models and provide atomic-scale parameters that can be used to limit the empiricism needed in such models up to now.

  7. Mapping between atomistic simulations and Eshelby inclusions in the shear deformation of an amorphous silicon model.

    PubMed

    Albaret, T; Tanguy, A; Boioli, F; Rodney, D

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we perform quasistatic shear simulations of model amorphous silicon bulk samples with Stillinger-Weber-type potentials. Local plastic rearrangements identified based on local energy variations are fitted through their displacement fields on collections of Eshelby spherical inclusions, allowing determination of their transformation strain tensors. The latter are then used to quantitatively reproduce atomistic stress-strain curves, in terms of both shear and pressure components. We demonstrate that our methodology is able to capture the plastic behavior predicted by different Stillinger-Weber potentials, in particular, their different shear tension coupling. These calculations justify the decomposition of plasticity into shear transformations used so far in mesoscale models and provide atomic-scale parameters that can be used to limit the empiricism needed in such models up to now. PMID:27300968

  8. Interface shear strength and fracture behaviour of porous glass-fibre-reinforced composite implant and bone model material.

    PubMed

    Nganga, Sara; Ylä-Soininmäki, Anne; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2011-11-01

    Glass-fibre-reinforced composites (FRCs) are under current investigation to serve as durable bone substitute materials in load-bearing orthopaedic implants and bone implants in the head and neck area. The present form of biocompatible FRCs consist of non-woven E-glass-fibre tissues impregnated with varying amounts of a non-resorbable photopolymerisable bifunctional polymer resin with equal portions of both bis-phenyl-A-glycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA) and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA). FRCs with a total porosity of 10-70 vol% were prepared, more than 90 vol% of which being functional (open pores), and the rest closed. The pore sizes were greater than 100 μm. In the present study, the push-out test was chosen to analyse the shear strength of the interface between mechanically interlocked gypsum and a porous FRC implant structure. Gypsum was used as a substitute material for natural bone. The simulative in vitro experiments revealed a significant rise of push-out forces to the twofold level of 1147 ± 271 N for an increase in total FRC porosity of 43%. Pins, intended to model the initial mechanical implant fixation, did not affect the measured shear strength of the gypsum-FRC interface, but led to slightly more cohesive fracture modes. Fractures always occurred inside the gypsum, it having lower compressive strength than the porous FRC structures. Therefore, the largest loads were restricted by the brittleness of the gypsum. Increases of the FRC implant porosity tended to lead to more cohesive fracture modes and higher interfacial fracture toughness. Statistical differences were confirmed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. The differences between the modelled configuration showing gypsum penetration into all open pores and the real clinical situation with gradual bone ingrowth has to be considered. PMID:22098879

  9. Multiple Size Group Modeling of Polydispersed Bubbly Flow in the Mold: An Analysis of Turbulence and Interfacial Force Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Qi, Fengsheng; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2015-04-01

    An inhomogeneous Multiple Size Group (MUSIG) model based on the Eulerian-Eulerian approach has been developed to describe the polydispersed bubbly flow inside the continuous-casting mold. A laboratory scale mold has been simulated using four different turbulence closure models (modified k - ɛ, RNG k - ɛ, k - ω, and SST) with the purpose of critically comparing their predictions of bubble Sauter mean diameter distribution with previous experimental data. Furthermore, the influences of all the interfacial momentum transfer terms including drag force, lift force, virtual mass force, wall lubrication force, and turbulent dispersion force are investigated. The breakup and coalescence effects of the bubbles are modeled according to the bubble breakup by the impact of turbulent eddies while for bubble coalescence by the random collisions driven by turbulence and wake entrainment. It has been found that the modified k - ɛ model shows better agreement than other models in predicting the bubble Sauter mean diameter profiles. Further, simulations have also been performed to understand the sensitivity of different interfacial forces. The appropriate drag force coefficient, lift force coefficient, virtual mass force coefficient, and turbulent dispersion force coefficient are chosen in accordance with measurements of water model experiments. However, the wall lubrication force does not have much effect on the current polydispersed bubbly flow system. Finally, the MUSIG model is then used to estimate the argon bubble diameter in the molten steel of the mold. The argon bubble Sauter mean diameter generated in molten steel is predicted to be larger than air bubbles in water for the similar conditions.

  10. Two-phase interfacial area and flow regime modeling in FLOWTRAN-TF code

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.G. III; Lee, S.Y.; Flach, G.P.; Hamm, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    FLOWTRAN-TF is a new two-component, two-phase thermal-hydraulics code to capture the detailed assembly behavior associated with loss-of-coolant accident analyses in multichannel assemblies of the SRS reactors. The local interfacial area of the two-phase mixture is computed by summing the interfacial areas contributed by each of three flow regimes. For smooth flow regime transitions, the code uses an interpolation technique in terms of component void fraction for each basic flow regime.

  11. Two-phase interfacial area and flow regime modeling in FLOWTRAN-TF code

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.G. III; Lee, S.Y.; Flach, G.P.; Hamm, L.L.

    1992-12-31

    FLOWTRAN-TF is a new two-component, two-phase thermal-hydraulics code to capture the detailed assembly behavior associated with loss-of-coolant accident analyses in multichannel assemblies of the SRS reactors. The local interfacial area of the two-phase mixture is computed by summing the interfacial areas contributed by each of three flow regimes. For smooth flow regime transitions, the code uses an interpolation technique in terms of component void fraction for each basic flow regime.

  12. Asymmetric magnetic reconnection with out-of-plane shear flows in a two dimensional hybrid model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Xian-Qu; Liu, Yue

    2015-05-15

    Effects of out-of-plane shear flows on asymmetric magnetic reconnect are investigated in a two-dimensional (2D) hybrid model with an initial Harris sheet equilibrium. It is found that the out-of-plane flow with an in-plane shear can significantly change the asymmetric reconnection process as well as the related geometry. The magnetic flux, out-of-plane magnetic field, in-plane flow vorticity, plasma density, and the reconnection rate are discussed in detail. The results are in comparison with the cases without the shear flows to further understand the effect.

  13. Modeling phase transitions during the crystallization of a multicomponent fat under shear

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Idziak, Stefan H.J.

    2005-04-01

    The crystallization of multicomponent systems involves several competing physicochemical processes that depend on composition, temperature profiles, and shear rates applied. Research on these mechanisms is necessary in order to understand how natural materials form crystalline structures. Palm oil was crystallized in a Couette cell at 17 and 22 deg. C under shear rates ranging from 0 to 2880 s{sup -1} at a synchrotron beamline. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction patterns were captured at short time intervals during the crystallization process. Radial analysis of these patterns showed shear-induced acceleration of the phase transition from {alpha} to {beta}{sup '}. This effect can be explained by a simple model where the {alpha} phase nucleates from the melt, a process which occurs independently of shear rate. The {alpha} phase grows according to an Avrami growth model. The {beta}{sup '} phase nucleates on the {alpha} crystallites, with the amount of {beta}{sup '} crystal formation dependent on the rate of transformation of {alpha} to {beta}{sup '} as well as the growth rate of the {beta}{sup '} phase from the melt. The shear induced {alpha}-{beta}{sup '} phase transition acceleration occurs because under shear, the {alpha} nuclei form many distinct small crystallites which can easily transform to the {beta}{sup '} form, while at lower shear rates, the {alpha} nuclei tend to aggregate, thus retarding the nucleation of the {beta}{sup '} crystals. The displacement of the diffraction peak positions revealed that increased shear rate promotes the crystallization of the higher melting fraction, affecting the composition of the crystallites. Crystalline orientation was observed only at shear rates above 180 s{sup -1} at 17 deg. C and 720 s{sup -1} at 22 deg. C.

  14. Shear Moduli for Non-Isotropic, Open Cell Foams Using a General Elongated Kelvin Foam Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2009-01-01

    Equations for calculating the shear modulus of non-isotropic, open cell foams in the plane perpendicular to the rise direction and in a plane parallel to the rise direction are derived using an elongated Kelvin foam model. This Kelvin foam model is more general than that employed by previous authors as the size and shape of the unit cell are defined by specifying three independent cell dimensions. The equations for the shear compliances are derived as a function of three unit cell dimensions and the section properties of the cell edges. From the compliance equations, the shear modulus equations are obtained and written as a function of the relative density and two unit cell shape parameters. The dependence of the two shear moduli on the relative density and the two shape parameters is demonstrated.

  15. Probabilistic model of waiting times between large failures in sheared media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkman, Braden A. W.; LeBlanc, Michael P.; Uhl, Jonathan T.; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Dahmen, Karin A.

    2016-01-01

    Using a probabilistic approximation of a mean-field mechanistic model of sheared systems, we analytically calculate the statistical properties of large failures under slow shear loading. For general shear F (t ) , the distribution of waiting times between large system-spanning failures is a generalized exponential distribution, ρT(t ) =λ ( F (t ) ) P ( F (t ) ) exp[-∫0td τ λ ( F (τ ) ) P ( F (τ ) ) ] , where λ ( F (t )) is the rate of small event occurrences at stress F (t ) and P ( F (t )) is the probability that a small event triggers a large failure. We study the behavior of this distribution as a function of fault properties, such as heterogeneity or shear rate. Because the probabilistic model accommodates any stress loading F (t ) , it is particularly useful for modeling experiments designed to understand how different forms of shear loading or stress perturbations impact the waiting-time statistics of large failures. As examples, we study how periodic perturbations or fluctuations on top of a linear shear stress increase impact the waiting-time distribution.

  16. Tomography from the next generation of cosmic shear experiments for viable f(R) models

    SciTech Connect

    Camera, Stefano; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Cardone, Vincenzo F. E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it

    2011-07-01

    We present the cosmic shear signal predicted by two viable cosmological models in the framework of modified-action f(R) theories. We use f(R) models where the current accelerated expansion of the Universe is a direct consequence of the modified gravitational Lagrangian rather than Dark Energy (DE), either in the form of vacuum energy/cosmological constant or of a dynamical scalar field (e.g. quintessence). We choose Starobinsky's (St) and Hu and Sawicki's (HS) f(R) models, which are carefully designed to pass the Solar System gravity tests. In order to further support — or rule out — f(R) theories as alternative candidates to the DE hypothesis, we exploit the power of weak gravitational lensing, specifically of cosmic shear. We calculate the tomographic shear matrix as it would be measured by the upcoming ESA Cosmic Vision Euclid satellite. We find that in the St model the cosmic shear signal is almost completely degenerate with ΛCDM, but it is easily distinguishable in the HS model. Moreover, we compute the corresponding Fisher matrix for both the St and HS models, thus obtaining forecasts for their cosmological parameters. Finally, we show that the Bayes factor for cosmic shear will definitely favour the HS model over ΛCDM if Euclid measures a value larger than ∼ 0.02 for the extra HS parameter n{sub HS}.

  17. Generic Role of Polymer Supports in the Fine Adjustment of Interfacial Interactions between Solid Substrates and Model Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Fernanda F; Schneck, Emanuel; Fragneto, Giovanna; Konovalov, Oleg V; Tanaka, Motomu

    2015-04-21

    To understand the generic role of soft, hydrated biopolymers in adjusting interfacial interactions at biological interfaces, we designed a defined model of the cell-extracellular matrix contacts based on planar lipid membranes deposited on polymer supports (polymer-supported membranes). Highly uniform polymer supports made out of regenerated cellulose allow for the control of film thickness without changing the surface roughness and without osmotic dehydration. The complementary combination of specular neutron reflectivity and high-energy specular X-ray reflectivity yields the equilibrium membrane-substrate distances, which can quantitatively be modeled by computing the interplay of van der Waals interaction, hydration repulsion, and repulsion caused by the thermal undulation of membranes. The obtained results help to understand the role of a biopolymer in the interfacial interactions of cell membranes from a physical point of view and also open a large potential to generally bridge soft, biological matter and hard inorganic materials. PMID:25794040

  18. The effects of neutron irradiation on shear properties of monolayered PyC and multilayered PyC/SiC interfaces of SiC/SiC composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, T.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.

    2007-08-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties at the fiber/matrix interface of SiC/SiC composites was evaluated. The materials investigated were Hi-Nicalon™ Type-S fiber reinforced chemically vapor infiltrated SiC matrix composites with varied interphases: monolayered pyrolytic carbon (PyC) or multilayered PyC/SiC. The neutron fluence was 7.7 × 10 25 n/m 2 ( E > 0.1 MeV), and the irradiation temperature was 800 °C. Interfacial shear properties were evaluated by the fiber push-out test method. A modified shear-lag model was applied to analyze the interfacial shear parameters. Test results indicate that the interfacial debond shear strength and the interfacial friction stress for the multilayer composites were significantly degraded by irradiation. Nevertheless, the multilayer composites retained sufficient interfacial shear properties so that overall composite strength after neutron irradiation was unaffected. The actual mechanism of interphase property decrease for the multilayer composites is unknown. The interfacial shear properties of the irradiated monolayer composites appear unaffected.

  19. Water-in-model oil emulsions studied by small-angle neutron scattering: interfacial film thickness and composition.

    PubMed

    Verruto, Vincent J; Kilpatrick, Peter K

    2008-11-18

    The ever-increasing worldwide demand for energy has led to the upgrading of heavy crude oil and asphaltene-rich feedstocks becoming viable refining options for the petroleum industry. Traditional problems associated with these feedstocks, particularly stable water-in-petroleum emulsions, are drawing increasing attention. Despite considerable research on the interfacial assembly of asphaltenes, resins, and naphthenic acids, much about the resulting interfacial films is not well understood. Here, we describe the use of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to elucidate interfacial film properties from model emulsion systems. Modeling the SANS data with both a polydisperse core/shell form factor as well as a thin sheet approximation, we have deduced the film thickness and the asphaltenic composition within the stabilizing interfacial films of water-in-model oil emulsions prepared in toluene, decalin, and 1-methylnaphthalene. Film thicknesses were found to be 100-110 A with little deviation among the three solvents. By contrast, asphaltene composition in the film varied significantly, with decalin leading to the most asphaltene-rich films (30% by volume of the film), while emulsions made in toluene and methylnaphthalene resulted in lower asphaltenic contents (12-15%). Through centrifugation and dilatational rheology, we found that trends of decreasing water resolution (i.e., increasing emulsion stability) and increasing long-time dilatational elasticity corresponded with increasing asphaltene composition in the film. In addition to the asphaltenic composition of the films, here we also deduce the film solvent and water content. Our analyses indicate that 1:1 (O/W) emulsions prepared with 3% (w/w) asphaltenes in toluene and 1 wt % NaCl aqueous solutions at pH 7 and pH 10 resulted in 80-90 A thick films, interfacial areas around 2600-3100 cm (2)/mL, and films that were roughly 25% (v/v) asphaltenic, 60-70% toluene, and 8-12% water. The increased asphaltene and water film

  20. A New Model to Calculate Friction Coefficients and Shear Stresses in Thermal Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian

    2008-01-01

    A new analytical model for thermal drilling (also known as friction drilling) has been developed. The model distinguishes itself from recent work of other investigators by improving on two aspects: (1) the new model defines material plastic flow in terms of the yield in shear rather than the yield in compression, and (2) it uses a single, variable friction coefficient instead of assuming two unrelated friction coefficients in fixed values. The time dependence of the shear stress and friction coefficient at the hole walls, which cannot be measured directly in thermal drilling, can be calculated using this model from experimentally-measured values of the instantaneous thrust force and torque. Good matches between the calculated shear strengths and the handbook values for thermally drilling low carbon steel confirm the model's validity.

  1. Yield shear stress model of magnetorheological fluids based on exponential distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chu-wen; Chen, Fei; Meng, Qing-rui; Dong, Zi-xin

    2014-06-01

    The magnetic chain model that considers the interaction between particles and the external magnetic field in a magnetorheological fluid has been widely accepted. Based on the chain model, a yield shear stress model of magnetorheological fluids was proposed by introducing the exponential distribution to describe the distribution of angles between the direction of magnetic field and the chain formed by magnetic particles. The main influencing factors were considered in the model, such as magnetic flux density, intensity of magnetic field, particle size, volume fraction of particles, the angle of magnetic chain, and so on. The effect of magnetic flux density on the yield shear stress was discussed. The yield stress of aqueous Fe3O4 magnetreological fluids with volume fraction of 7.6% and 16.2% were measured by a device designed by ourselves. The results indicate that the proposed model can be used for calculation of yield shear stress with acceptable errors.

  2. Variable aspect ratio method in the Xu-White model for shear-wave velocity estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jun-Yu; Yue, Cheng-Qi; Liang, Yi-Qiang; Song, Zhi-Xiang; Ling, Su; Zhang, Yang; Wu, Wei

    2013-06-01

    Shear-wave velocity logs are useful for various seismic interpretation applications, including bright spot analyses, amplitude-versus-offset analyses and multicomponent seismic interpretations. This paper presents a method for predicting the shear-wave velocity of argillaceous sandstone from conventional log data and experimental data, based on Gassmann's equations and the Xu-White model. This variable aspect ratio method takes into account all the influences of the matrix nature, shale content, porosity size and pore geometry, and the properties of pore fluid of argillaceous sandstone, replacing the fixed aspect ratio assumption in the conventional Xu-White model. To achieve this, we first use the Xu-White model to derive the bulk and shear modulus of dry rock in a sand-clay mixture. Secondly, we use Gassmann's equations to calculate the fluid-saturated elastic properties, including compressional and shear-wave velocities. Finally, we use the variable aspect ratio method to estimate the shear-wave velocity. The numerical results indicate that the variable aspect ratio method provides an important improvement in the application of the Xu-White model for sand-clay mixtures and allows for a variable aspect ratio log to be introduced into the Xu-White model instead of the constant aspect ratio assumption. This method shows a significant improvement in predicting velocities over the conventional Xu-White model.

  3. Kinetic Approaches to Shear-Driven Magnetic Reconnection for Multi-Scale Modeling of CME Initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, C.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C.; Germaschewski, K.; Karpen, J. T.

    2013-12-01

    In the standard model for coronal mass ejections (CME) and/or solar flares, the free energy for the event resides in the strongly sheared magnetic field of a filament channel. The pre-eruption force balance, consisting of an upward force due to the magnetic pressure of the sheared field balanced by a downward tension due to overlying un-sheared field, is widely believed to be disrupted by magnetic reconnection. Therefore, understanding initiation of solar explosive phenomena requires a true multi-scale model of reconnection onset driven by the buildup of magnetic shear. While the application of magnetic-field shear is a trivial matter in MHD simulations, it is a significant challenge in a PIC code. The driver must be implemented in a self-consistent manner and with boundary conditions that avoid the generation of waves that destroy the applied shear. In this work, we describe drivers for 2.5D, aperiodic, PIC systems and discuss the implementation of driver-consistent boundary conditions that allow a net electric current to flow through the walls. Preliminary tests of these boundaries with a MHD equilibrium are shown. This work was supported, in part, by the NASA Living With a Star TR&T Program.

  4. A Kinetic Approach to Shear Driven Magnetic Reconnection for Multi-Scale Modeling of CME Initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Carrie; Antiochos, Spiro; DeVore, Rick; Germaschewski, Kai; Karpen, Judy

    2013-10-01

    In the standard model for coronal mass ejections (CME) and/or solar flares, the free energy for the event resides in the strongly sheared magnetic field of a filament channel. The pre-eruption force balance consisting of an upward force due to the magnetic pressure of the sheared field balanced by a downward tension due to overlying, un-sheared field is widely believed to be disrupted by magnetic reconnection. Therefore, understanding initiation of solar explosive phenomena requires a true multi-scale model of reconnection onset driven by the buildup of magnetic shear. While, the application of a magnetic field shear is a trivial matter in MHD simulations, it is significantly challenging to do so in a PIC code. The driver must be implemented in a self-consistent manner and with boundary conditions that avoid the generation of waves that destroy the applied shear. In this work, we describe such a driver for 2.5D, aperiodic, PIC system and discuss the implementation of driver consistent boundary conditions that allow a net electric current to flow through the walls. Preliminary tests of these boundaries with a MHD equilibrium are shown.

  5. Perspective: The Asakura Oosawa model: A colloid prototype for bulk and interfacial phase behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Kurt; Virnau, Peter; Statt, Antonia

    2014-10-01

    In many colloidal suspensions, the micrometer-sized particles behave like hard spheres, but when non-adsorbing polymers are added to the solution a depletion attraction (of entropic origin) is created. Since 60 years the Asakura-Oosawa model, which simply describes the polymers as ideal soft spheres, is an archetypical description for the statistical thermodynamics of such systems, accounting for many features of real colloid-polymer mixtures very well. While the fugacity of the polymers (which controls their concentration in the solution) plays a role like inverse temperature, the size ratio of polymer versus colloid radii acts as a control parameter to modify the phase diagram: when this ratio is large enough, a vapor-liquid like phase separation occurs at low enough colloid packing fractions, up to a triple point where a liquid-solid two-phase coexistence region takes over. For smaller size ratios, the critical point of the phase separation and the triple point merge, resulting in a single two-phase coexistence region between fluid and crystalline phases (of "inverted swan neck"-topology, with possibly a hidden metastable phase separation). Furthermore, liquid-crystalline ordering may be found if colloidal particles of non-spherical shape (e.g., rod like) are considered. Also interactions of the particles with solid surfaces should be tunable (e.g., walls coated by polymer brushes), and interfacial phenomena are particularly interesting experimentally, since fluctuations can be studied in the microscope on all length scales, down to the particle level. Due to its simplicity this model has become a workhorse for both analytical theory and computer simulation. Recently, generalizations addressing dynamic phenomena (phase separation, crystal nucleation, etc.) have become the focus of studies.

  6. Perspective: The Asakura Oosawa model: A colloid prototype for bulk and interfacial phase behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Kurt; Virnau, Peter; Statt, Antonia

    2014-10-14

    In many colloidal suspensions, the micrometer-sized particles behave like hard spheres, but when non-adsorbing polymers are added to the solution a depletion attraction (of entropic origin) is created. Since 60 years the Asakura-Oosawa model, which simply describes the polymers as ideal soft spheres, is an archetypical description for the statistical thermodynamics of such systems, accounting for many features of real colloid-polymer mixtures very well. While the fugacity of the polymers (which controls their concentration in the solution) plays a role like inverse temperature, the size ratio of polymer versus colloid radii acts as a control parameter to modify the phase diagram: when this ratio is large enough, a vapor-liquid like phase separation occurs at low enough colloid packing fractions, up to a triple point where a liquid-solid two-phase coexistence region takes over. For smaller size ratios, the critical point of the phase separation and the triple point merge, resulting in a single two-phase coexistence region between fluid and crystalline phases (of “inverted swan neck”-topology, with possibly a hidden metastable phase separation). Furthermore, liquid-crystalline ordering may be found if colloidal particles of non-spherical shape (e.g., rod like) are considered. Also interactions of the particles with solid surfaces should be tunable (e.g., walls coated by polymer brushes), and interfacial phenomena are particularly interesting experimentally, since fluctuations can be studied in the microscope on all length scales, down to the particle level. Due to its simplicity this model has become a workhorse for both analytical theory and computer simulation. Recently, generalizations addressing dynamic phenomena (phase separation, crystal nucleation, etc.) have become the focus of studies.

  7. Reduction of Water/Oil Interfacial Tension by Model Asphaltenes: The Governing Role of Surface Concentration.

    PubMed

    Jian, Cuiying; Poopari, Mohammad Reza; Liu, Qingxia; Zerpa, Nestor; Zeng, Hongbo; Tang, Tian

    2016-06-30

    In this work, pendant drop techniques and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the effect of asphaltene concentrations on the interfacial tension (IFT) of the oil/water interface. Here, oil and asphaltene were represented by, respectively, common organic solvents and Violanthrone-79, and two types of concentration, i.e., bulk concentration and surface concentration, were examined. Correlations between the IFTs from experiments and MD simulations revealed that surface concentration, rather than the commonly used bulk concentration, determines the reduction of oil/water IFTs. Through analyzing the hydrogen bonding, the underlying mechanism for the IFT reduction was proposed. Our discussions here not only enable the direct comparison between experiments and MD simulations on the IFTs but also help with future interfacial studies using combined experimental and simulation approaches. The methodologies used in this work can be extended to many other oil/water interfaces in the presence of interfacially active compounds. PMID:27268710

  8. A method for three-dimensional modeling of wind-shear environments for flight simulator applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    A computational method for modeling severe wind shears of the type that have been documented during severe convective atmospheric conditions is offered for use in research and training flight simulation. The procedure was developed with the objectives of operational flexibility and minimum computer load. From one to five, simple down burst wind models can be configured and located to produce the wind field desired for specific simulated flight scenarios. A definition of related turbulence parameters is offered as an additional product of the computations. The use of the method to model several documented examples of severe wind shear is demonstrated.

  9. Shear-flexible finite-element models of laminated composite plates and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Mathers, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Several finite-element models are applied to the linear static, stability, and vibration analysis of laminated composite plates and shells. The study is based on linear shallow-shell theory, with the effects of shear deformation, anisotropic material behavior, and bending-extensional coupling included. Both stiffness (displacement) and mixed finite-element models are considered. Discussion is focused on the effects of shear deformation and anisotropic material behavior on the accuracy and convergence of different finite-element models. Numerical studies are presented which show the effects of increasing the order of the approximating polynomials, adding internal degrees of freedom, and using derivatives of generalized displacements as nodal parameters.

  10. Modeling transversely isotropic, viscoelastic, incompressible tissue-like materials with application in ultrasound shear wave elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Bo; Brigham, John C.; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F.; Zhang, Xiaoming; Urban, Matthew W.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to model the shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic, viscoelastic and incompressible media. The targeted application is ultrasound-based shear wave elastography for viscoelasticity measurements in anisotropic tissues such as the kidney and skeletal muscles. The proposed model predicts that if the viscoelastic parameters both across and along fiber directions can be characterized as a Voigt material, then the spatial phase velocity at any angle is also governed by a Voigt material model. Further, with the aid of Taylor expansions, it is shown that the spatial group velocity at any angle is close to a Voigt type for weakly attenuative materials within a certain bandwidth. The model is implemented in a finite element code by a time domain explicit integration scheme and shear wave simulations are conducted. The results of the simulations are analyzed to extract the shear wave elasticity and viscosity for both the spatial phase and group velocities. The estimated values match well with theoretical predictions. The proposed theory is further verified by an ex vivo tissue experiment measured in a porcine skeletal muscle by an ultrasound shear wave elastography method. The applicability of the Taylor expansion to analyze the spatial velocities is also discussed. We demonstrate that the approximations from the Taylor expansions are subject to errors when the viscosities across or along the fiber directions are large or the maximum frequency considered is beyond the bandwidth defined by radii of convergence of the Taylor expansions.

  11. Modeling Transversely Isotropic, Viscoelastic, Incompressible Tissue-like Materials with Application in Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Bo; Brigham, John C.; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F.; Zhang, Xiaoming; Urban, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to model the shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic, viscoelastic and incompressible media. The targeted application is ultrasound-based shear wave elastography for viscoelasticity measurements in anisotropic tissues such as the kidney and skeletal muscles. The proposed model predicts that if the viscoelastic parameters both across and along fiber directions can be characterized as a Voigt material, then the spatial phase velocity at any angle is also governed by a Voigt material model. Further, with the aid of Taylor expansions, it is shown that the spatial group velocity at any angle is close to a Voigt type for weakly attenuative materials within a certain bandwidth. The model is implemented in a finite element code by a time domain explicit integration scheme and shear wave simulations are conducted. The results of the simulations are analyzed to extract the shear wave elasticity and viscosity for both the spatial phase and group velocities. The estimated values match well with theoretical predictions. The proposed theory is further verified by an ex vivo tissue experiment measured in a porcine skeletal muscle by an ultrasound shear wave elastography method. The applicability of the Taylor expansion to analyze the spatial velocities is also discussed. We demonstrate that the approximations from the Taylor expansions are subject to errors when the viscosities across or along the fiber directions are large or the maximum frequency considered is beyond the bandwidth defined by radii of convergence of the Taylor expansions. PMID:25591921

  12. Modeling of the blood rheology in steady-state shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolidis, Alex J.; Beris, Antony N.

    2014-05-15

    We undertake here a systematic study of the rheology of blood in steady-state shear flows. As blood is a complex fluid, the first question that we try to answer is whether, even in steady-state shear flows, we can model it as a rheologically simple fluid, i.e., we can describe its behavior through a constitutive model that involves only local kinematic quantities. Having answered that question positively, we then probe as to which non-Newtonian model best fits available shear stress vs shear-rate literature data. We show that under physiological conditions blood is typically viscoplastic, i.e., it exhibits a yield stress that acts as a minimum threshold for flow. We further show that the Casson model emerges naturally as the best approximation, at least for low and moderate shear-rates. We then develop systematically a parametric dependence of the rheological parameters entering the Casson model on key physiological quantities, such as the red blood cell volume fraction (hematocrit). For the yield stress, we base our description on its critical, percolation-originated nature. Thus, we first determine onset conditions, i.e., the critical threshold value that the hematocrit has to have in order for yield stress to appear. It is shown that this is a function of the concentration of a key red blood cell binding protein, fibrinogen. Then, we establish a parametric dependence as a function of the fibrinogen and the square of the difference of the hematocrit from its critical onset value. Similarly, we provide an expression for the Casson viscosity, in terms of the hematocrit and the temperature. A successful validation of the proposed formula is performed against additional experimental literature data. The proposed expression is anticipated to be useful not only for steady-state blood flow modeling but also as providing the starting point for transient shear, or more general flow modeling.

  13. Magnetic Field Shear in Kinetic Models Steps Toward Understanding Magnetic Reconnection Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Carrie; Antiochos, Spiro; DeVore, Rick; Karpen, Judith

    2015-11-01

    In the standard model for coronal mass ejections (CME) and/or solar flares, the free energy for the eruptive event resides in a strongly sheared magnetic. A pre-eruption force balance consists of an upward force due to the magnetic pressure of the sheared field and a downward tension due to overlying unsheared field. Magnetic reconnection disrupts this force balance; therefore, it is critical for understanding CME/flare initiation, to model the onset of reconnection driven by the build-up of magnetic shear. In MHD simulations, the application of a magnetic-field shear is a trivial matter. However, kinetic effects are dominant in the diffusion region and thus, it is important to examine this process with PIC simulations as well. The implementation of such a driver in PIC methods is challenging, however, and indicates the necessity of a true multiscale model for such processes in the solar environment. The field must be sheared self-consistently and indirectly to prevent the generation of waves that destroy the desired system. Plasma instabilities can arise nonetheless. Here, we show that we can control this instability and generate a predicted out-of-plane magnetic flux. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Award No. AGS-1331356.

  14. Modeling the adaptive permeability response of porcine iliac arteries to acute changes in mural shear.

    PubMed

    Hazel, A L; Grzybowski, D M; Friedman, M H

    2003-04-01

    The hypothesis that much of the uptake of macromolecules by the vascular wall takes place while the endothelial lining is adapting to changes in its hemodynamic environment is being tested by a series of in vivo measurements of the uptake of Evans-blue-dye-labeled albumin by porcine iliac arteries subjected to acute changes in blood flow. The uptake data are interpreted through an ad hoc model of the dynamic permeability response that is proposed to accompany alterations in mural shear. The model is able to correlate, with a single set of parameters, the vascular response to a variety of experimental protocols, including sustained step increases and decreases in shear, and alternations in shear of various periods. The best-fit parameters of the model suggest that the adaptive response to an increase in shear proceeds with a latency of approximately 1.5 min and a time constant of approximately 90 min that is substantially shorter than the response to a decrease in shear. PMID:12723682

  15. Dynamic interfacial properties of human tear-lipid films and their interactions with model-tear proteins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Svitova, Tatyana F; Lin, Meng C

    2016-07-01

    This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding interfacial properties of very complex biological colloids, specifically, human meibum and tear lipids, and their interactions with proteins similar to the proteins found in aqueous part of human tears. Tear lipids spread as thin films over the surface of tear-film aqueous and play crucial roles in tear-film stability and overall ocular-surface health. The vast majority of papers published to date report interfacial properties of meibum-lipid monolayers spread on various aqueous sub-phases, often containing model proteins, in Langmuir trough. However, it is well established that natural human ocular tear lipids exist as multilayered films with a thickness between 30 and 100nm, that is very much disparate from 1 to 2nm thick meibum monolayers. We employed sessile-bubble tensiometry to study the dynamic interfacial and rheological properties of reconstituted multilayered human tear-lipid films. Small amounts (0.5-1μg) of human tear lipids were deposited on an air-bubble surface to produce tear-lipid films in thickness range 30-100nm corresponding to ocular lipid films. Thus, we were able to overcome major Langmuir-trough method limitations because ocular tear lipids can be safely harvested only in minute, sub-milligram quantities, insufficient for Langmuir through studies. Sessile-bubble method is demonstrated to be a versatile tool for assessing conventional synthetic surfactants adsorption/desorption dynamics at an air-aqueous solution interface. (Svitova T., Weatherbee M., Radke C.J. Dynamics of surfactant sorption at the air/water interface: continuous-flow tensiometry. J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 2003;261:1170-179). The augmented flow-sessile-bubble setup, with step-strain relaxation module for dynamic interfacial rheological properties and high-precision syringe pump to generate larger and slow interfacial area expansions-contractions, was developed and employed in our studies. We established that

  16. Thermoelectric conductivities, shear viscosity, and stability in an anisotropic linear axion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xian-Hui; Ling, Yi; Niu, Chao; Sin, Sang-Jin

    2015-11-01

    We study thermoelectric conductivities and shear viscosities in a holographically anisotropic model, which is dual to a spatially anisotropic N =4 super-Yang-Mills theory at finite chemical potential. Momentum relaxation is realized through perturbing the linear axion field. Ac conductivity exhibits a coherent/incoherent metal transition. Deviations from the Wiedemann-Franz law are also observed in our model. The longitudinal shear viscosity for prolate anisotropy violates the bound conjectured by Kovtun-Son-Starinets. We also find that thermodynamic and dynamical instabilities are not always equivalent by examining the Gubser-Mitra conjecture.

  17. Simulations of free shear layers using a compressible kappa-epsilon model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, S. T.; Chang, C. T.; Marek, C. J.

    1991-01-01

    A two-dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes equation with a k-epsilon turbulence model is solved numerically to simulate the flow of a compressible free shear layer. The appropriate form of k and epsilon equations for compressible flow is discussed. Sarkar's modeling is adopted to simulate the compressibility effects in the k and epsilon equations. The numerical results show that the spreading rate of the shear layers decreases with increasing convective Mach number. In addition, favorable comparison was found between the calculated results and experimental data.

  18. Modeling spin transport in electrostatically-gated lateral-channel silicon devices: Role of interfacial spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2011-10-01

    Using a two-dimensional finite-differences scheme to model spin transport in silicon devices with lateral geometry, we simulate the effects of spin relaxation at interfacial boundaries, i.e., the exposed top surface and at an electrostatically-controlled backgate with a SiO2 dielectric. These gate-voltage-dependent simulations are compared to previous experimental results and show that strong spin relaxation, due to extrinsic effects, yields a Si/SiO2 interfacial spin lifetime of ≈1ns, orders of magnitude lower than lifetimes in the bulk Si. Relaxation at the top surface plays no substantial role. Hall effect measurements on ballistically injected electrons gated in the transport channel yield the carrier mobility directly and suggest that this reduction in spin lifetime is only partially due to enhanced interfacial momentum scattering, which induces random spin flips as in the Elliott effect. Therefore, other extrinsic mechanisms, such as those caused by paramagnetic defects should also be considered in order to explain the dramatic enhancement in spin relaxation at the gate interface over bulk values.

  19. Oscillatory shear response of dilute ferrofluids: predictions from rotational Brownian dynamics simulations and ferrohydrodynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Soto-Aquino, D; Rosso, D; Rinaldi, C

    2011-11-01

    Ferrofluids are colloidal suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles that exhibit normal liquid behavior in the absence of magnetic fields but respond to imposed magnetic fields by changing their viscosity without loss of fluidity. The response of ferrofluids to constant shear and magnetic fields has received a lot of attention, but the response of ferrofluids to oscillatory shear remains largely unexplored. In the present work we used rotational Brownian dynamics to study the dynamic properties of ferrofluids with thermally blocked nanoparticles under oscillatory shear and constant magnetic fields. Comparisons between simulations and modeling using the ferrohydrodynamics equations were also made. Simulation results show that, for small rotational Péclet number, the in-phase and out-of-phase components of the complex viscosity depend on the magnitude of the magnetic field and frequency of the shear, following a Maxwell-like model with field-dependent viscosity and characteristic time equal to the field-dependent transverse magnetic relaxation time of the nanoparticles. Comparison between simulations and the numerical solution of the ferrohydrodynamic equations shows that the oscillatory rotational magnetoviscosity for an oscillating shear field obtained using the kinetic magnetization relaxation equation quantitatively agrees with simulations for a wide range of Péclet number and Langevin parameter but has quantitative deviations from the simulations at high values of the Langevin parameter. These predictions indicate an apparent elastic character to the rheology of these suspensions, even though we are considering the infinitely dilute limit in which there are negligible particle-particle interactions and, as such, chains do not form. Additionally, an asymptotic analytical solution of the ferrohydrodynamics equations, valid for Pe<2, was used to demonstrate that the Cox-Merz rule applies for dilute ferrofluids under conditions of small shear rates. At higher shear

  20. A finite element method for shear stresses calculation in composite blade models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluch, B.

    1991-09-01

    A finite-element method is developed for accurately calculating shear stresses in helicopter blade models, induced by torsion and shearing forces. The method can also be used to compute the equivalent torsional stiffness of the section, their transverse shear coefficient, and the position of their center of torsion. A grid generator method which is a part of the calculation program is also described and used to discretize the sections quickly and to condition the grid data reliably. The finite-element method was validated on a few sections composed of isotropic materials and was then applied to a blade model sections made of composite materials. Good agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental data.

  1. Modelling of peak-flow wall shear stress in major airways of the lung.

    PubMed

    Green, A S

    2004-05-01

    Some respiratory diseases result in the inflammation of the lung airway epithelium. An associated chronic cough, as found in many cases of asthma and in long-term smokers, can exacerbate damage to the epithelial layer. It has been proposed that wall shear stresses, created by peak expiratory flow-rates during a coughing episode, are responsible. The work here uses a computational fluid dynamics technique to model peak expiratory flow in the trachea and major lung bronchi. Calculated wall shear stress values are compared to a limited set of published measurements taken from a physical model. The measurements are discussed in the context of a flow study of a complex bronchial network. A more complete picture is achieved by the calculation method, indicating, in some cases, higher maximum wall shear stresses than measured, confirming the original findings of the experimental work. Recommendations are made as to where further work would be beneficial to medical applications. PMID:15046995

  2. Interfacial sliding near a free surface in a fibrous or layered composite during thermal cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, B. N.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a simple shear lag model of interfacial sliding at a free surface in a layered or continuous fiber composite. The interface is characterized by a critical interfacial shear stress, tau0, which might represent the critical stress for frictional sliding at a weakly bonded interface, or the shear flow stress of a thin ductile interface layer at a well bonded interface. The history, during heating and cooling, of the relative normal displacement of the reinforcing inclusions and the matrix on a free surface cut normal to the inclusions is calculated and shown to depend on both the absolute value and the temperature dependence of tau0, as well as on the magnitudes of the bulk residual stresses. The variety of possible displacement histories suggests that they are a rich source of information about tau0 and the residual stresses.

  3. A Conceptual Model for Shear-Induced Phase Behavior in Crystallizing Cocoa Butter

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzanti,G.; Guthrie, S.; Marangoni, A.; Idziak, S.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a conceptual model to explain the quantitative data from synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments on the shear-induced phase behavior of cocoa butter, the main structural component of chocolate. We captured two-dimensional diffraction patterns from cocoa butter at crystallization temperatures of 17.5, 20.0, and 22.5 {sup o}C under shear rates from 45 to 1440 s{sup -1} and under static conditions. From the simultaneous analysis of the integrated intensity, correlation length, lamellar thickness, and crystalline orientation, we postulate a conceptual model to provide an explanation for the distribution of phases II, IV, V, and X and the kinetics of the process. As previously proposed in the literature, we assume that the crystallites grow layer upon layer of slightly different composition. The shear rate and temperature applied define these compositions. Simultaneously, the shear and temperature define the crystalline interface area available for secondary nucleation by promoting segregation and affecting the size distribution of the crystallites. The combination of these factors (composition, area, and size distribution) favors dramatically the early onset of phase V under shear and determines the proportions of phases II, IV, V, and X after the transition. The experimental observations, the methodology used, and the proposed explanation are of fundamental and industrial interest, since the structural properties of crystalline networks are determined by their microstructure and polymorphic crystalline state. Different proportions of the phases will thus result in different characteristics of the final material.

  4. Modeling shear flow and postsunset stability in the equatorial F region ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysell, D.; Larsen, M.; Swenson, C.; Wheeler, T.

    2005-12-01

    Sounding rocket and Altair radar data taken during the NASA EQUIS-II campaign on Kwajalein in August, 2004, are incorporated into a computational model of the electrodynamics of the low-latitude ionosphere. The purpose is to understand and quantify sources of the strong shear flow observed in the bottomside F region around and after sunset and to assess its influence on postsunset stability and the production of equatorial spread F. Possible sources of shear include 1) zonal electric fields on flux tubes with significant Hall conductivity, as are responsible for driving the equatorial electrojet, 2) zonal winds on flux tubes with significant Pedersen conductivity, as drive the E and F region dynamos, 3) vertical winds, a largely unknown quantity, and 4) vertical boundary currents forced from above or below the flux tube in question. The model solves for the electrostatic potential in three dimensions as a function of the background conductivity, background electric field, and the winds. We do not assume equipotential field lines but instead solve for the potential exactly using a multigridded solver. Shear flow may destabilize the postsunset ionosphere through a collisional shear instability related to electrostatic Kelvin Helmholtz [ Hysell and Kudeki, 2004]. Assessing the viability of the instability requires us to identify and rank in importance the sources of the shear.

  5. Sandwich beam model for free vibration analysis of bilayer graphene nanoribbons with interlayer shear effect

    SciTech Connect

    Nazemnezhad, Reza E-mail: rnazemnezhad@du.ac.ir; Shokrollahi, Hassan; Hosseini-Hashemi, Shahrokh

    2014-05-07

    In this study, sandwich beam model (SM) is proposed for free vibration analysis of bilayer graphene nanoribbons (BLGNRs) with interlayer shear effect. This model also takes into account the intralayer (in-plane) stretch of graphene nanoribbons. The molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the software LAMMPS and Adaptive Intermolecular Reactive Empirical Bond Order (AIREBO) potential are done to validate the accuracy of the sandwich model results. The MD simulation results include the two first frequencies of cantilever BLGNRs with different lengths and two interlayer shear moduli, i.e., 0.25 and 4.6 GPa. These two interlayer shear moduli, 0.25 and 4.6 GPa, can be obtained by sliding a small flake of graphene on a large graphene substrate when the parameter of E-LJ term in AIREBO potential, epsilon-CC, is set to be 2.84 and 45.44 meV, respectively. The SM results for a wide range of bending rigidity values show that the proposed model, i.e., the SM, predicts much better than the previous beam model in which the intralayer stretch is ignored. In addition, it is observed that the model can properly predict the natural frequencies of BLGNRs for various values of the bending rigidity and the interlayer shear modulus.

  6. Granular Shear Zone Formation: Acoustic Emission Measurements and Fiber-bundle Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Or, Dani

    2013-04-01

    We couple the acoustic emissions method with conceptual models of granular material behavior for investigation of granular shear zone formation and to assess eminence of landslide hazard. When granular materials are mechanically loaded or sheared, they tend to produce discrete events of force network restructuring, and frictional interaction at grain contacts. Such abrupt perturbations within the granular lattice release part of the elastic energy stored in the strained material. Elastic waves generated by such events can be measured as acoustic emissions (AE) and may be used as surrogates for intermittent structural transitions associated with shear zone formation. To experimentally investigate the connection between granular shearing and acoustic signals we performed an array of strain-controlled shear-frame tests using glass beads. AE were measured with two different systems operating at two frequency ranges. High temporal resolution measurements of the shear stresses revealed the presence of small fluctuations typically associated with low-frequency (< 20 kHz) acoustic bursts. Shear stress jumps and linked acoustic signals give account of discrete events of grain network rearrangements and obey characteristic exponential frequency-size distributions. We found that statistical features of force jumps and AE events depend on mechanical boundary conditions and evolve during the straining process. Activity characteristics of high-frequency (> 30 kHz) AE events is linked to friction between grains. To interpret failure associated AE signals, we adapted a conceptual fiber-bundle model (FBM) that describes some of the salient statistical features of failure and associated energy production. Using FBMs for the abrupt mechanical response of the granular medium and an associated grain and force chain AE generation model provides us with a full description of the mechanical-acoustical granular shearing process. Highly resolved AE may serve as a diagnostic tool not only

  7. A comparative study of the hypoplasticity and the fabric-dependent dilatant double shearing models for granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Mehrabadi, M.; Massoudi, M.

    2007-04-25

    In this paper, we consider the mechanical response of granular materials and compare the predictions of a hypoplastic model with that of a recently developed dilatant double shearing model which includes the effects of fabric. We implement the constitutive relations of the dilatant double shearing model and the hypoplastic model in the finite element program ABACUS/Explicit and compare their predictions in the triaxial compression and cyclic shear loading tests. Although the origins and the constitutive relations of the double shearing model and the hypoplastic model are quite different, we find that both models are capable of capturing typical behaviours of granular materials. This is significant because while hypoplasticity is phenomenological in nature, the double shearing model is based on a kinematic hypothesis and microstructural considerations, and can easily be calibrated through standard tests.

  8. A priori evaluation of the Pantano and Sarkar model in compressible homogeneous shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlifi, Hechmi; Abdallah, J.; Aïcha, H.; Taïeb, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a Reynolds stress closure, including the Pantano and Sarkar model of the mean part of the pressure-strain correlation is used for the computation of compressible homogeneous at high-speed shear flow. Several studies concerning the compressible homogeneous shear flow show that the changes of the turbulence structures are principally due to the structural compressibility effects which significantly affect the pressure field and then the pressure-strain correlation. Eventually, this term appears as the main term responsible for the changes in the magnitude of the Reynolds stress anisotropies. The structure of the gradient Mach number is similar to that of turbulence, therefore this parameter may be appropriate to study the changes in turbulence structures that arise from structural compressibility effects. Thus, the incompressible model of the pressure strain correlation and its corrected form by using the turbulent Mach turbulent only, fail to correctly evaluate the compressibility effects at high shear flow. An extension of the widely used incompressible Launder, Reece and Rodi model on compressible homogeneous shear flow is the major aim of the present work. From this extension, the standard coefficients C become a function of the extra compressibility parameters (the turbulent Mach number M and the gradient Mach number M) through the Pantano and Sarkar model. Application of the model on compressible homogeneous shear flow by considering various initial conditions shows reasonable agreement with the DNS results of Simone et al. and Sarkar. The observed trend of the dramatic increase in the normal Reynolds stress anisotropies, the significant decrease in the Reynolds shear stress anisotropy and the increase of the turbulent kinetic energy amplification rate with increasing the gradient Mach number are well predicted by the model. The ability of the model to predict the equilibrium states for the flow in cases A to A from DNS results of Sarkar is

  9. Nature of stress accommodation in sheared granular material: Insights from 3D numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, Karen; Hazzard, James F.

    2007-07-01

    Active faults often contain distinct accumulations of granular wear material. During shear, this granular material accommodates stress and strain in a heterogeneous manner that may influence fault stability. We present new work to visualize the nature of contact force distributions during 3D granular shear. Our 3D discrete numerical models consist of granular layers subjected to normal loading and direct shear, where gouge particles are simulated by individual spheres interacting at points of contact according to simple laws. During shear, we observe the transient microscopic processes and resulting macroscopic mechanical behavior that emerge from interactions of thousands of particles. We track particle translations and contact forces to determine the nature of internal stress accommodation with accumulated slip for different initial configurations. We view model outputs using novel 3D visualization techniques. Our results highlight the prevalence of transient directed contact force networks that preferentially transmit enhanced stresses across our granular layers. We demonstrate that particle size distribution (psd) controls the nature of the force networks. Models having a narrow (i.e. relatively uniform) psd exhibit discrete pipe-like force clusters with a dominant and focussed orientation oblique to but in the plane of shear. Wider psd models (e.g. power law size distributions D = 2.6) also show a directed contact force network oblique to shear but enjoy a wider range of orientations and show more out-of-plane linkages perpendicular to shear. Macroscopic friction level, is insensitive to these distinct force network morphologies, however, force network evolution appears to be linked to fluctuations in macroscopic friction. Our results are consistent with predictions, based on recent laboratory observations, that force network morphologies are sensitive to grain characteristics such as particle size distribution of a sheared granular layer. Our numerical

  10. Evaluation of the viscosities of a liquid crystal model system by shear flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarman, Sten; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2009-09-01

    The three Miesowicz viscosities of a liquid crystal model system consisting of the Gay-Berne fluid have been obtained by shear flow simulations. The viscosities along an isochore have been followed starting in the nematic phase at high temperatures across the nematic-smectic A phase transition down to low temperatures in the smectic A phase. The relative magnitudes of the viscosities as a function of the structure of the liquid crystal are discussed. The viscosities obtained by the shear flow simulations agree very well with those obtained by Green-Kubo relations in a previous work.

  11. Diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity of rigid water models.

    PubMed

    Tazi, Sami; Boţan, Alexandru; Salanne, Mathieu; Marry, Virginie; Turq, Pierre; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2012-07-18

    We report the diffusion coefficient and viscosity of popular rigid water models: two non-polarizable ones (SPC/E with three sites, and TIP4P/2005 with four sites) and a polarizable one (Dang-Chang, four sites). We exploit the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the system size (Yeh and Hummer 2004 J. Phys. Chem. B 108 15873) to obtain the size-independent value. This also provides an estimate of the viscosity of all water models, which we compare to the Green-Kubo result. In all cases, a good agreement is found. The TIP4P/2005 model is in better agreement with the experimental data for both diffusion and viscosity. The SPC/E and Dang-Chang models overestimate the diffusion coefficient and underestimate the viscosity. PMID:22739097

  12. Cluster-based reduced-order modelling of shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Eurika; Noack, Bernd R.; Cordier, Laurent; Spohn, Andreas; Segond, Marc; Abel, Markus; Daviller, Guillaume; Morzyński, Marek; Östh, Jan; Krajnović, Siniša; Niven, Robert K.

    2014-12-01

    Cluster-based reduced-order modelling (CROM) builds on the pioneering works of Gunzburger's group in cluster analysis [1] and Eckhardt's group in transition matrix models [2] and constitutes a potential alternative to reduced-order models based on a proper-orthogonal decomposition (POD). This strategy frames a time-resolved sequence of flow snapshots into a Markov model for the probabilities of cluster transitions. The information content of the Markov model is assessed with a Kullback-Leibler entropy. This entropy clearly discriminates between prediction times in which the initial conditions can be inferred by backward integration and the predictability horizon after which all information about the initial condition is lost. This approach is exemplified for a class of fluid dynamical benchmark problems like the periodic cylinder wake, the spatially evolving incompressible mixing layer, the bi-modal bluff body wake, and turbulent jet noise. For these examples, CROM is shown to distil nontrivial quasi-attractors and transition processes. CROM has numerous potential applications for the systematic identification of physical mechanisms of complex dynamics, for comparison of flow evolution models, and for the identification of precursors to desirable and undesirable events.

  13. A model for the generation of strongly nonlinear, weakly nonhydrostatic interfacial waves in a rotating ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar-González, Borja; Gerkema, Theo

    2015-04-01

    We derive a new two-fluid layer model consisting of a set of forced rotation-modified Boussinesq equations for studying the generation and evolution of strongly nonlinear weakly nonhydrostatic dispersive interfacial waves in a rotating ocean. The forcing for internal tide generation is due to tide-topography interaction (an oscillating non-flat bottom mimicking a barotropic tidal flow over topography). The resulting model forms a generalization of the Miyata-Choi-Camassa (MCC) equations, to which we add topography, tidal forcing and Coriolis dispersion due to Earth's rotation. Solitons are generated by disintegration of the first-mode of the internal tide. Because of strong non-linearity, they can attain a table-shaped form. Our moving (accelerating) topography is not an inertial frame and, hence, the transformation to a frame at rest is not simply a Galilean transformation. The effect of this transformation is discussed and is shown to be slight for the parameters under consideration. The set of equations is solved numerically using finite-difference methods. Numerical experiments using these equations are a useful tool for exploring and interpreting the conditions under which full nonlinearity becomes important for soliton generation. In particular, this is the case for table-top solitons when approaching the theoretical maximum amplitude and the appearance of nonlinearities when the two-layer system consists of two layers of equal thickness. At the early stage of the strongly nonlinear disintegration of an internal tide into table-top solitons, we observe that the low mode internal tide splits up into two different groups of rank-ordered solitons: a train of depressions on the leading edge and a train of elevations, after the former packet, with initially smaller amplitudes. Evolving in time, the largest elevations reach the smaller depressions in the train ahead, and three leading solitons at the front attain almost equal amplitudes. The table-top soliton

  14. A continuum model with a percolation threshold and tunneling-assisted interfacial conductivity for carbon nanotube-based nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yang; Weng, George J.; Meguid, Shaker A.; Hamouda, Abdel Magid

    2014-05-21

    A continuum model that possesses several desirable features of the electrical conduction process in carbon-nanotube (CNT) based nanocomposites is developed. Three basic elements are included: (i) percolation threshold, (ii) interface effects, and (iii) tunneling-assisted interfacial conductivity. We approach the first one through the selection of an effective medium theory. We approach the second one by the introduction of a diminishing layer of interface with an interfacial conductivity to build a 'thinly coated' CNT. The third one is introduced through the observation that interface conductivity can be enhanced by electron tunneling which in turn can be facilitated with the formation of CNT networks. We treat this last issue in a continuum fashion by taking the network formation as a statistical process that can be represented by Cauchy's probability density function. The outcome is a simple and yet widely useful model that can simultaneously capture all these fundamental characteristics. It is demonstrated that, without considering the interface effect, the predicted conductivity would be too high, and that, without accounting for the additional contribution from the tunneling-assisted interfacial conductivity, the predicted conductivity beyond the percolation threshold would be too low. It is with the consideration of all three elements that the theory can fully account for the experimentally measured data. We further use the developed model to demonstrate that, despite the anisotropy of the intrinsic CNT conductivity, it is its axial component along the CNT direction that dominates the overall conductivity. This theory is also proved that, even with a totally insulating matrix, it is still capable of delivering non-zero conductivity beyond the percolation threshold.

  15. The role of interfacial layers in the enhanced thermal conductivity of nanofluids : a renovated Hamilton-Crosser model.

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; Choi, S. U.-S.; Energy Technology

    2004-08-01

    We previously developed a renovated Maxwell model for the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids and determined that the solid/liquid interfacial layers play an important role in the enhanced thermal conductivity of nanofluids. However, this renovated Maxwell model is limited to suspensions with spherical particles. Here, we extend the Hamilton--Crosser model for suspensions of nonspherical particles to include the effect of a solid/liquid interface. The solid/liquid interface is described as a confocal ellipsoid with a solid particle. The new model for the three-phase suspensions is mathematically expressed in terms of the equivalent thermal conductivity and equivalent volume fraction of anisotropic complex ellipsoids, as well as an empirical shape factor. With a generalized empirical shape factor, the renovated Hamilton-Crosser model correctly predicts the magnitude of the thermal conductivity of nanotube-in-oil nanofluids. At present, this new model is not able to predict the nonlinear behavior of the nanofluid thermal conductivity.

  16. Effect of nanoscale patterned interfacial roughness on interfacial toughness.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mook, William M.; Kennedy, Marian S.; Bahr, David F.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    The performance and the reliability of many devices are controlled by interfaces between thin films. In this study we investigated the use of patterned, nanoscale interfacial roughness as a way to increase the apparent interfacial toughness of brittle, thin-film material systems. The experimental portion of the study measured the interfacial toughness of a number of interfaces with nanoscale roughness. This included a silicon interface with a rectangular-toothed pattern of 60-nm wide by 90-nm deep channels fabricated using nanoimprint lithography techniques. Detailed finite element simulations were used to investigate the nature of interfacial crack growth when the interface is patterned. These simulations examined how geometric and material parameter choices affect the apparent toughness. Atomistic simulations were also performed with the aim of identifying possible modifications to the interfacial separation models currently used in nanoscale, finite element fracture analyses. The fundamental nature of atomistic traction separation for mixed mode loadings was investigated.

  17. Development of turbulence models for shear flows by a double expansion technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakhot, V.; Thangam, S.; Gatski, T. B.; Orszag, S. A.; Speziale, C. G.

    1991-01-01

    Turbulence models are developed by supplementing the renormalization group (RNG) approach of Yakhot and Orszag with scale expansions for the Reynolds stress and production of dissipation terms. The additional expansion parameter (eta) is the ratio of the turbulent to mean strain time scale. While low-order expansions appear to provide an adequate description of the Reynolds stress, no finite truncation of the expansion for the production of dissipation term in powers of eta suffices - terms of all orders must be retained. Based on these ideas, a new two-equation model and Reynolds stress transport model are developed for turbulent shear flows. The models are tested for homogeneous shear flow and flow over a backward facing step. Comparisons between the model predictions and experimental data are excellent.

  18. Mechanisms of shear failure in artificial fractures of sandstone and their implication for models of hydromechanical coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, J. P.; de Freitas, M. H.

    1993-07-01

    Direct shear tests, in which the behaviour of the rock surfaces during shear could be continuously observed, were used to study the shear failure of a profiled and clean discontinuity artificially prepared from natural sandstone. Displacement transducers were used to measure the normal and shear displacements. A series of strain gauges glued on the sides of the upper block provided information on the change of the stress field occurring close to the discontinuities whilst shear displacement increased, and these changes were then compared with the behaviour of the profiled surface. The results of the laboratory tests, the sequence of photographs taken for most of them, and the results conducted with a sample of similar shape made from the same rock material and tested in a rotary shear machine, allowed several stages and mechanisms of failure to be defined: static friction and mobilization of initial shear stiffness; mobilization of sliding; mobilization of brittle fracture; post-peak failure of the teeth; descent of the teeth; gliding and ploughing; commencement of second cycle of shearing. In many respects these stages are similar to those occurring between sliding surfaces of metal and suggest that the analyses developed in tribology may be relevant to the development of constitutive models for predicting the hydromechanical coupled behaviour of a discontinuity with shear displacement. Such models will have to consider these different stages of shear, because the original discontinuity changes its geometry with displacement and is filled with gouge which changes its grain size with displacement.

  19. Strong tangential discontinuity modeling of shear bands using the extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshyar, Alireza; Mohammadi, Soheil

    2013-11-01

    A method is developed for modeling of shear band with strong tangential discontinuity by means of cohesive surfaces within the extended finite element method (XFEM). A rate-independent non-associated plasticity model is incorporated along the strong discontinuity to consider the highly localized regions. Once the localization is occurred, tangential enrichment degrees of freedom are added to the localized elements, and the discontinuity is captured regardless of mesh resolution and alignment. By introducing the tangential enrichment function, the discontinuity is only imposed in the tangential direction, while the continuity across the shear band is automatically fulfilled. Adopting bilinear quadrilateral elements within the context of XFEM allows for the plastic deformation of shear band to be obtained with quadratic distribution within an enriched element. Since the strong discontinuity approach is employed, the singularity of strain field at the position of displacement jump is attained through a Dirac delta distribution. By means of this singularity, the cohesive shear traction is derived for the J2 plasticity model and is applied onto the band interfaces in order to reproduce the dissipative mechanism of the band. Several numerical examples are analyzed to assess the accuracy and robustness of the proposed approach.

  20. Experimental and modeling study of viscoelastic behaviors of magneto-rheological shear thickening fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Gang Rou; Li, Weihua; Tian, Tong Fei; Ding, Jie; Nakano, Masami

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, both Magneto-rheological Fluid (MRF) and Shear Thickening Fluid (STF) have separately attracted considerable interest due to the fast reversible response to either external magnetic field or abrupt shearing loading. In this paper, we fabricated a combined phase of Magneto-rheological Shear Thickening Fluid (MRSTF), where the 25 wt% STF is applied as medium phase with the addition of varied fractions of iron particle. The investigation of the dynamic behavior of this novel material under oscillatory shear was launched in a parallel-plate rheometer. The relevance of the dynamic behavior to strain amplitude, frequency and external magnetic field were investigated and discussed. A four-parameter viscoelastic model was applied to reconstruct the mechanical behavior of the MRSTF under different working conditions, and the parameters were identified within the Matlab optimization algorithm. The comparison between the experimental data and the model prediction results indicated that the four-parameter model could predict viscoelastic material with desired accuracy. The MRSTF exhibits features of both components, while prone more to MRF with the inception of external field excitations.

  1. Error propagation for velocity and shear stress prediction using 2D models for environmental management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternack, Gregory B.; Gilbert, Andrew T.; Wheaton, Joseph M.; Buckland, Evan M.

    2006-08-01

    SummaryResource managers, scientists, government regulators, and stakeholders are considering sophisticated numerical models for managing complex environmental problems. In this study, observations from a river-rehabilitation experiment involving gravel augmentation and spawning habitat enhancement were used to assess sources and magnitudes of error in depth, velocity, and shear velocity predictions made at the 1-m scale with a commercial two-dimensional (depth-averaged) model. Error in 2D model depth prediction averaged 21%. This error was attributable to topographic survey resolution, which at 1 pt per 1.14 m 2, was inadequate to resolve small humps and depressions influencing point measurements. Error in 2D model velocity prediction averaged 29%. More than half of this error was attributable to depth prediction error. Despite depth and velocity error, 56% of tested 2D model predictions of shear velocity were within the 95% confidence limit of the best field-based estimation method. Ninety percent of the error in shear velocity prediction was explained by velocity prediction error. Multiple field-based estimates of shear velocity differed by up to 160%, so the lower error for the 2D model's predictions suggests such models are at least as accurate as field measurement. 2D models enable detailed, spatially distributed estimates compared to the small number measurable in a field campaign of comparable cost. They also can be used for design evaluation. Although such numerical models are limited to channel types adhering to model assumptions and yield predictions only accurate to ˜20-30%, they can provide a useful tool for river-rehabilitation design and assessment, including spatially diverse habitat heterogeneity as well as for pre- and post-project appraisal.

  2. Analysis of the mixed nonlinear model for turbulence with mean shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneveau, Charles; Li, Yi

    2003-11-01

    We consider the mixed nonlinear subgrid model for LES of turbulent flow, with the objective of quantifying analytically the two model coefficients from knowledge about the turbulent energy spectrum. Specifically we use the condition that the model reproduce both the correct energy dissipation (as in Lilly 1976), and the subgrid-scale contribution to the Reynolds stress, i.e. the mean SGS stress. Using a recently proposed model for anisotropic velocity spectrum in homogeneous sheared turbulence (Ishihara, Yoshida and Kaneda, PRL 88, 2002) we derive expressions for the Smagorinsky and the nonlinear model coefficients as function of shear number S*=ɛ-1/3Δ^2/3 l S, where ɛ is the dissipation rate of kinetic energy, Δ is the filter size, and l S is the mean applied shear magnitude. We find that as S* increases, the contribution from the Smagorinsky term is reduced, while that of the nonlinear term is increased. However, the coefficient of the nonlinear model term derived from the presently used statistical condition of balance of dissipation and mean stress is significantly lower than typical values found earlier in the literature. These were based on results from LES using the dynamic mixed model, from various Taylor-series or deconvolution approximations of the similarity model, or from a-priori tests. We discuss the implications of these results.

  3. Meshless analysis of shear deformable shells: the linear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Jorge C.; Tiago, Carlos M.; Pimenta, Paulo M.

    2013-10-01

    This work develops a kinematically linear shell model departing from a consistent nonlinear theory. The initial geometry is mapped from a flat reference configuration by a stress-free finite deformation, after which, the actual shell motion takes place. The model maintains the features of a complete stress-resultant theory with Reissner-Mindlin kinematics based on an inextensible director. A hybrid displacement variational formulation is presented, where the domain displacements and kinematic boundary reactions are independently approximated. The resort to a flat reference configuration allows the discretization using 2-D Multiple Fixed Least-Squares (MFLS) on the domain. The consistent definition of stress resultants and consequent plane stress assumption led to a neat formulation for the analysis of shells. The consistent linear approximation, combined with MFLS, made possible efficient computations with a desired continuity degree, leading to smooth results for the displacement, strain and stress fields, as shown by several numerical examples.

  4. Steady shear rheometry of dissipative particle dynamics models of polymer fluids in reverse Poiseuille flow

    PubMed Central

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Karniadakis, George Em; Caswell, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Polymer fluids are modeled with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) as undiluted bead-spring chains and their solutions. The models are assessed by investigating their steady shear-rate properties. Non-Newtonian viscosity and normal stress coefficients, for shear rates from the lower to the upper Newtonian regimes, are calculated from both plane Couette and plane Poiseuille flows. The latter is realized as reverse Poiseuille flow (RPF) generated from two Poiseuille flows driven by uniform body forces in opposite directions along two-halves of a computational domain. Periodic boundary conditions ensure the RPF wall velocity to be zero without density fluctuations. In overlapping shear-rate regimes the RPF properties are confirmed to be in good agreement with those calculated from plane Couette flow with Lees–Edwards periodic boundary conditions (LECs), the standard virtual rheometer for steady shear-rate properties. The concentration and the temperature dependence of the properties of the model fluids are shown to satisfy the principles of concentration and temperature superposition commonly employed in the empirical correlation of real polymer-fluid properties. The thermodynamic validity of the equation of state is found to be a crucial factor for the achievement of time-temperature superposition. With these models, RPF is demonstrated to be an accurate and convenient virtual rheometer for the acquisition of steady shear-rate rheological properties. It complements, confirms, and extends the results obtained with the standard LEC configuration, and it can be used with the output from other particle-based methods, including molecular dynamics, Brownian dynamics, smooth particle hydrodynamics, and the lattice Boltzmann method. PMID:20405981

  5. An analysis of a joint shear model for jointed media with orthogonal joint sets; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Koteras, J.R.

    1991-10-01

    This report describes a joint shear model used in conjunction with a computational model for jointed media with orthogonal joint sets. The joint shear model allows nonlinear behavior for both joint sets. Because nonlinear behavior is allowed for both joint sets, a great many cases must be considered to fully describe the joint shear behavior of the jointed medium. An extensive set of equations is required to describe the joint shear stress and slip displacements that can occur for all the various cases. This report examines possible methods for simplifying this set of equations so that the model can be implemented efficiently form a computational standpoint. The shear model must be examined carefully to obtain a computationally efficient implementation that does not lead to numerical problems. The application to fractures in rock is discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Turbulence modeling in aerodynamic shear flows - Status and problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper briefly summarizes the status and problems of turbulence modeling for aerodynamical applications. For complex flows the 'approach of choice' is (increasingly) full second-order (Reynolds stress equation) closure. These closures have not yet developed to anywhere near their full potential, significant further research is required especially regarding length-scale equations, representation of pressure-strain correlations, and wall region treatments. Recent developments in computer capability, algorithms, numerical simulations, theory and quantitative flow visualization should assist in and hasten this research. Several problem areas such as shock interaction and discrete dynamic instabilities of turbulent flows may require mega-to-large eddy simulation or theoretical adjuncts.

  7. On the limits of the interfacial yield model for fragmentation testing of brittle films on polymer substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Aidan Arthur; Cordill, Megan Jo; Dehm, Gerhard

    2012-09-01

    Fragmentation testing is frequently used to probe film fracture strain and the interfacial properties of thin brittle films on compliant substrates. A model based upon complete yield of the film/substrate interface is frequently used to analyse data after cracking has saturated. Additionally, the film is either assumed to have a single-valued failure stress or a distribution of strengths described by Weibull statistics. Recent work by the authors showed that consideration of film thickness variations and the application of neighbour ratio analysis brought 96% of the data for an Al x O y /Cu film/substrate system into compliance with the predictions for a film with a single-valued failure stress. In the present work Cr/PI (polyimide) and Cr/PET (polyethylene teraphthalate) systems are analysed according to the same methodology. The Cr films on polymer substrates crack such that the neighbour ratios considerably exceed the predicted limit of 2. The influence of the relative thickness of the film and substrate and the strain rate of the test is investigated. A deviation from the idealised mechanical model due to the large difference in elastic moduli of film and substrate is put forward as a possible cause of the observed behaviour. The importance of these results to the application of the interfacial yield model is discussed.

  8. Modeling bed shear-stress fluctuations in a shallow tidal channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, R.; Marusic, I.; Cabrit, O.; Jones, N. L.; Ivey, G. N.

    2014-05-01

    Recently, Mathis et al. (2013) developed a model for predicting the instantaneous fluctuations of the wall shear-stress in turbulent boundary layers. This model is based on an inner-outer scale interaction mechanism, incorporating superposition, and amplitude-modulation effects, and the only input required for the model is a time series measurement of the streamwise velocity signal taken in the logarithmic region of the flow. The present study applies this new approach for the first time to environmental flows, for which the near-bed information is typically inaccessible. The data used here are acoustic Doppler velocimeter time series measurements from a shallow tidal channel (Suisun Slough in North San Francisco Bay). We first extract segments of data sharing properties with canonical turbulent boundary layers. The wall (bed) shear-stress model is then applied to these selected data. Statistical and spectral analysis demonstrates that the field data predictions are consistent with laboratory and DNS results. The model is also applied to the whole available data set to demonstrate, even for situations far from the canonical boundary layer case, its ability to preserve the overall Reynolds number trend. The predicted instantaneous bed stress is highly skewed and amplitude modulated with the variations in the large-scale streamwise velocity. Finally, the model is compared to conventional methods employed to predict the bed shear-stress. A large disparity is observed, but the present model is the only one able to predict both the correct spectral content and the probability density function.

  9. Mesoscale modeling of shear-thinning polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Santos de Oliveira, I S; Fitzgerald, B W; den Otter, W K; Briels, W J

    2014-03-14

    We simulate the linear and nonlinear rheology of two different viscoelastic polymer solutions, a polyisobutylene solution in pristane and an aqueous solution of hydroxypropylcellulose, using a highly coarse-grained approach known as Responsive Particle Dynamics (RaPiD) model. In RaPiD, each polymer has originally been depicted as a spherical particle with the effects of the eliminated degrees of freedom accounted for by an appropriate free energy and transient pairwise forces. Motivated by the inability of this spherical particle representation to entirely capture the nonlinear rheology of both fluids, we extended the RaPiD model by introducing a deformable particle capable of elongation. A Finite-Extensible Non-Linear Elastic potential provides a free energy penalty for particle elongation. Upon disentangling, this deformability allows more time for particles to re-entangle with neighbouring particles. We show this process to be integral towards recovering the experimental nonlinear rheology, obtaining excellent agreement. We show that the nonlinear rheology is crucially dependent upon the maximum elongation and less so on the elasticity of the particles. In addition, the description of the linear rheology has been retained in the process. PMID:24628201

  10. Mesoscale modeling of shear-thinning polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos de Oliveira, I. S.; Fitzgerald, B. W.; den Otter, W. K.; Briels, W. J.

    2014-03-01

    We simulate the linear and nonlinear rheology of two different viscoelastic polymer solutions, a polyisobutylene solution in pristane and an aqueous solution of hydroxypropylcellulose, using a highly coarse-grained approach known as Responsive Particle Dynamics (RaPiD) model. In RaPiD, each polymer has originally been depicted as a spherical particle with the effects of the eliminated degrees of freedom accounted for by an appropriate free energy and transient pairwise forces. Motivated by the inability of this spherical particle representation to entirely capture the nonlinear rheology of both fluids, we extended the RaPiD model by introducing a deformable particle capable of elongation. A Finite-Extensible Non-Linear Elastic potential provides a free energy penalty for particle elongation. Upon disentangling, this deformability allows more time for particles to re-entangle with neighbouring particles. We show this process to be integral towards recovering the experimental nonlinear rheology, obtaining excellent agreement. We show that the nonlinear rheology is crucially dependent upon the maximum elongation and less so on the elasticity of the particles. In addition, the description of the linear rheology has been retained in the process.