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Sample records for interfacial shear modeling

  1. Interfacial shear modeling in two-phase annular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Edwards, D.P.

    1996-07-01

    A new interfacial shear stress model called the law of the interface model, based on the law of the wall approach in turbulent flows, has been developed and locally applied in a fully developed, adiabatic, two-phase annular flow in a duct. Numerical results have been obtained using this model in conjunction with other models available in the literature that are required for the closure of the continuity and momentum equations. These results have been compared with droplet velocity data (using laser Doppler velocimetry and hot film anemometry), void fraction data (using gamma densitometry) and pressure drop data obtained in a R-134A refrigerant test facility. Droplet velocity results match the experimental data well, however, the prediction of the void fraction is less accurate. The poor prediction of void fraction, especially for the low void fraction cases, appears to be due to the lack of a good mechanistic model for entrainment.

  2. Interfacial shear modeling and flow predictions for internal film condesation flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narain, A.

    1992-01-01

    Internal flow of pure vapor experiencing film condesation on the walls of a straight duct is studied. The commonly occuring case of turbulent (or laminar) vapor flow in the core and laminar flow of the liquid condensate-with or without waves on the interface-is emphasized. We propose and implement a new first principle methodolgy which model interfacial shear with the help of reliable experimental data on heat transfer rates. Other details of the flow are predicted with the help of this model. These predictions are shown to be in agreement with relevant experimental data. Correlations for film thickness and heat transfer rates are also given.

  3. Interfacial shear stress distribution in model composites. I - A Kevlar 49 fibre in an epoxy matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Jahankhani, H.; Galiotis, C. )

    1991-05-01

    The technique of Laser Raman Spectroscopy has been applied in the study of aramid fibers, such as Kevlar 49, and aramid/epoxy interfaces. A linear relationship has been found between Raman frequencies and strain upon loading a single Kevlar 49 filament in air. Model composites of single Kevlar 49 fibers embedded in epoxy resins have been fabricated and subjected to various degrees of mechanical deformation. The transfer lengths for reinforcement have been measured at various levels of applied tensile load and the dependence of transfer length upon applied matrix strain has been established. Finally, by balancing the tensile and the shear forces acting along the interface, the interfacial shear stress (ISS) distribution along the embedded fiber was obtained. 52 refs.

  4. Evaluation of the interfacial shear strength and residual stress of TiAlN coating on ZIRLO™ fuel cladding using a modified shear-lag model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Bhamji, I.; Withers, P. J.; Wolfe, D. E.; Motta, A. T.; Preuss, M.

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the residual stresses and interfacial shear strength of a TiAlN coating on Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe alloy (ZIRLO™) substrate designed to improve corrosion resistance of fuel cladding used in water-cooled nuclear reactors, both during normal and exceptional conditions, e.g. a loss of coolant event (LOCA). The distribution and maximum value of the interfacial shear strength has been estimated using a modified shear-lag model. The parameters critical to this analysis were determined experimentally. From these input parameters the interfacial shear strength between the TiAlN coating and ZIRLO™ substrate was inferred to be around 120 MPa. It is worth noting that the apparent strength of the coating is high (∼3.4 GPa). However, this is predominantly due to the large compressive residuals stress (3 GPa in compression), which must be overcome for the coating to fail in tension, which happens at a load just 150 MPa in excess of this.

  5. Elastic shear moduli of brittle matrix composites with interfacial debonding

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, F.G.; Pagano, N.J.

    1994-12-31

    Elastic shear moduli of brittle matrix composites with interfacial debonding are studied. Compatibility displacement boundary conditions between representative volume elements are imposed through finite element analyses. Comparisons of the moduli between the full RVE model and quarter cell model are made. Parametric studies assessing the effect of the debonding, the shear moduli ratios in the constituents and the fiber volume fractions on the composite shear moduli are also presented. Results show that the commonly used quarter cell model overestimate the moduli. The disparity increases as the rigidity of the fibers or fiber volume fraction increases.

  6. Interfacial Shear Strength Evaluation of Jute/Poly(Lactic Acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Tatsuro; Nakai, Asami

    In order to evaluate the interfacial shear strength between fiber bundle and matrix of jute/poly(lactic acid) (PLA), a fiber bundle pull-out test method is proposed. Shear stress distribution was calculated based on the parabolic shear-lag analysis. Fiber bundle pull-out tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of molding condition on the interfacial shear strength. The interfacial shear strength increased with increasing molding temperature up to 185°C. Then gradual decrease in the interfacial shear strength with molding temperature was observed. Similar tendency was also observed in the effect of molding time, whereas the interfacial shear strength decreased with increasing molding pressure. Comparing the result of the tensile tests in the previous study, interfacial shear strength has corelations with tensile strength.

  7. Shear Wave Propagation Across Filled Joints with the Effect of Interfacial Shear Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Liu, T. T.; Li, H. B.; Liu, Y. Q.; Liu, B.; Xia, X.

    2015-07-01

    The thin-layer interface model for filled joints is extended to analyze shear wave propagation across filled rock joints when the interfacial shear strength between the filling material and the rocks is taken into account. During the wave propagation process, the two sides of the filled joint are welded with the adjacent rocks first and slide on each other when the shear stress on the joint is greater than the interfacial shear strength. By back analysis, the relation between the shear stress and the relative tangential deformation of the filled joints is obtained from the present approach, which is shown as a cycle parallelogram. Comparison between the present approach and the existing method based on the zero-thickness interface model indicates that the present approach is efficient to analyze shear wave propagation across rock joints with slippery behavior. The calculation results show that the slippery behavior of joints is related to the interfacial failure. In addition, the interaction between the shear stress wave and the two sides of the filling joint influences not only the wave propagation process but also the dynamic response of the filled joint.

  8. The influence of size, structure and hydrophilicity of model surfactants on the adsorption of lysozyme to oil-water interface--interfacial shear measurements.

    PubMed

    Baldursdottir, Stefania G; Jorgensen, Lene

    2011-10-01

    The flexibility and aggregation of proteins can cause adsorption to oil-water interfaces and thereby create challenges during formulation and processing. Protein adsorption is a complex process and the presence of surfactants further complicates the system, in which additional parameters need to be considered. The purpose of this study is to scrutinize the influence of surfactants on protein adsorption to interfaces, using lysozyme as a model protein and sorbitan monooleate 80 (S80), polysorbate 80 (T80), polyethylene-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PE-PEG) and polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PG-PR) as model surfactants. Rheological properties, measured using a TA AR-G2 rheometer equipped with a double wall ring (DWR) geometry, were used to compare the efficacy of the surfactant in hindering lysozyme adsorption. The system consists of a ring and a Delrin® trough with a circular channel (interfacial area=1882.6 mm(2)). Oscillatory shear measurements were conducted at a constant frequency of 0.1 Hz, a temperature of 25°C, and with strain set to 1%. The adsorption of lysozyme to the oil-water interface results in the formation of a viscoelastic film. This can be prevented by addition of surfactants, in a manner depending on the concentration and the type of surfactant. The more hydrophilic surfactants are more effective in hindering lysozyme adsorption to oil-water interfaces. Additionally, the larger surfactants are more persistent in preventing film formation, whereas the smaller ones eventually give space for the lysozyme on the interface. The addition of a mixture of two different surfactants was only beneficial when the two hydrophilic surfactants were mixed, in which case a delay in the multilayer formation was detected. The method is able to detect the interfacial adsorption of lysozyme and thus the hindering of film formation by model surfactants. It can therefore aid in processing of any delivery systems for proteins in which the protein is introduced to oil

  9. Longitudinal interfacial shearing of a unidirectional fiber composite

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.; Kurth, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    In this work, longitudinal interfacial shearing of a unidirectional fiber composite which sustains slippage at the interface between fiber and matrix is analyzed. Based on the experimental work on the fiber pull-out, the interface between the fiber and the matrix can be divided as three regions, depending on the longitudinal shear stress. These three regions are the bonded region, frictional slip regions, and the free-friction slid region. The problem is formulated as a nonlinear system of singular integral equations and solved numerically. It has been shown that when the longitudinal shear stress is less than a critical value, the fiber and the matrix can be assumed to be bonded perfectly. When the longitudinal shear stress is greater than this critical value, the slippage at the interface between the fiber and the interface takes place. From the recent fiber pull-out test, the phenomena of fiber frictional slip followed by free slide has been observed and analyzed. Thus, there are three stages for the deformation of interfacial shearing of a unidirectional fiber composite under longitudinal shearing. The first stage occurs when the applied longitudinal shear stress is less than the critical value corresponding to the onset of slippage. In the second stage, the interface is divided into two regions, namely, the bonded region and the frictional slip region in which the shear stress is either assumed to be constant or governed by a friction law. The third stage occurs when the longitudinal shear stress is greater than the critical value corresponding to free sliding or when the friction limit is exceeded. In the third stage, the interface between the fiber and the matrix can be divided into three regions, depending on the longitudinal shear stress. These three regions are the bonded region, the frictional slip regions, and the free-friction slide region in which the shear stress is neglected.

  10. Use of self assembled monolayers at variable coverage to control interface bonding in a model study of interfacial fracture: Pure shear loading

    SciTech Connect

    KENT,MICHAEL S.; YIM,HYUN; MATHESON,AARON J.; COGDILL,C.; NELSON,GERALD C.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID

    2000-05-16

    The relationships between fundamental interfacial interactions, energy dissipation mechanisms, and fracture stress or fracture toughness in a glassy thermoset/inorganic solid joint are not well understood. This subject is addressed with a model system involving an epoxy adhesive on a polished silicon wafer containing its native oxide. The proportions of physical and chemical interactions at the interface, and the in-plane distribution, are varied using self-assembling monolayers of octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODTS). The epoxy interacts strongly with the bare silicon oxide surface, but forms only a very weak interface with the methylated tails of the ODTS monolayer. The fracture stress is examined as a function of ODTS coverage in the napkin-ring (pure shear) loading geometry. The relationship between fracture stress and ODTS coverage is catastrophic, with a large change in fracture stress occurring over a narrow range of ODTS coverage. This transition in fracture stress does not correspond to a wetting transition of the epoxy. Rather, the transition in fracture stress corresponds to the onset of deformation in the epoxy, or the transition from brittle to ductile fracture. The authors postulate that the transition in fracture stress occurs when the local stress that the interface can support becomes comparable to the yield stress of the epoxy. The fracture results are independent of whether the ODTS deposition occurs by island growth (T{sub dep} = 10 C) or by homogeneous growth (T{sub dep} = 24 C).

  11. Interfacial shear stress in stratified flow in a horizontal rectangular duct

    SciTech Connect

    Lorencez, C.; Kawaji, M.; Murao, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Interfacial shear stress has been experimentally examined for both cocurrent and countercurrent stratified wavy flows in a horizontal interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress values at high gas flow rates which could be attributed to the assumptions and procedures involved in each method. The interfacial waves and secondary motions were also found to have significant effects on the accuracy of Reynolds stress and turbulence kinetic energy extrapolation methods.

  12. Fiber pushout and interfacial shear in metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koss, Donald A.; Hellmann, John R.; Kallas, M. N.

    1993-01-01

    Recent thin-slice pushout tests have suggested that MMC matrix-fiber interface failure processes depend not only on such intrinsic factors as bond strength and toughness, and matrix plasticity, but such extrinsic factors as specimen configuration, thermally-induced residual stresses, and the mechanics associated with a given test. After detailing the contrasts in fiber-pullout and fiber-pushout mechanics, attention is given to selected aspects of thin-slice fiber pushout behavior illustrative of the physical nature of interfacial shear response and its dependence on both intrinsic and extrinsic factors.

  13. Fibrillization kinetics of insulin solution in an interfacial shearing flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaraj, Vignesh; McBride, Samantha; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Although the association of fibril plaques with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's is well established, in-depth understanding of the roles played by various physical factors in seeding and growth of fibrils is far from well known. Of the numerous factors affecting this complex phenomenon, the effect of fluid flow and shear at interfaces is paramount as it is ubiquitous and the most varying factor in vivo. Many amyloidogenic proteins have been found to denature upon contact at hydrophobic interfaces due to the self-assembling nature of protein in its monomeric state. Here, fibrillization kinetics of insulin solution is studied in an interfacial shearing flow. The transient surface rheological response of the insulin solution to the flow and its effect on the bulk fibrillization process has been quantified. Minute differences in hydrophobic characteristics between two variants of insulin- Human recombinant and Bovine insulin are found to result in very different responses. Results presented will be in the form of fibrillization assays, images of fibril plaques formed, and changes in surface rheological properties of the insulin solution. The interfacial velocity field, measured from images (via Brewster Angle Microscopy), is compared with computations. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  14. Interfacial shear rheology of DPPC under physiologically relevant conditions.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Eline; Vermant, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Lipids, and phosphatidylcholines in particular, are major components in cell membranes and in human lung surfactant. Their ability to encapsulate or form stable layers suggests a significant role of the interfacial rheological properties. In the present work we focus on the surface rheological properties of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). Literature results are confusing and even contradictory; viscosity values have been reported differ by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, even both purely viscous and gel-like behaviours have been described. Assessing the literature critically, a limited experimental window has been explored correctly, which however does not yet include conditions relevant for the physiological state of DPPC in vivo. A complete temperature and surface pressure analysis of the interfacial shear rheology of DPPC is performed, showing that the monolayer behaves as a viscoelastic liquid with a domain structure. At low frequencies and for a thermally structured monolayer, the interaction of the molecules within the domains can be probed. The low frequency limit of the complex viscosity is measured over a wide range of temperatures and surface pressures. The effects of temperature and surface pressure on the low frequency viscosity can be analysed in terms of the effects of free molecular area. However, at higher frequencies or following a preshear at high shear rates, elasticity becomes important; most probably elasticity due to defects at the edge of the domains in the layer is probed. Preshearing refines the structure and induces more defects. As a result, disagreeing interfacial rheology results in various publications might be due to different pre-treatments of the interface. The obtained dataset and scaling laws enable us to describe the surface viscosity, and its dependence under physiological conditions of DPPC. The implications on functioning of lung surfactants and lung surfactant replacements will be discussed. PMID:24651838

  15. Interfacial shear behavior of sapphire-reinforced NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moose, C. A.; Koss, D. A.; Hellmann, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    The interfacial shear behavior in near-equiatomic NiAl reinforced by sapphire filaments has been examined at room temperature using a fiber pushout test technique. The load-displacement data indicate a large variability in the initial interface failure stress, although reverse push behavior indicates a comparatively constant interfacial sliding friction stress. The observed behavior suggests that the presence of asperities on the fiber surfaces and nonuniformities in fiber diameter require constrained plastic flow within the NiAl matrix in order for interfacial shear to occur. The location, shape, severity, and distribution of fiber asperities as well as the uniformity of fiber diameter are critical to the interfacial shear process.

  16. Interfacial shear-stress effects on transient capillary wedge flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Song-Kai; Lai, Chun-Liang

    2004-06-01

    The effects on the transient capillary flow in a wedge due to the interfacial shear-stress distribution S along the flow direction z is studied theoretically. With the assumptions of a slender liquid column and negligible gravitational and inertia effects, the problem is reduced to finding the axial velocity distribution at any cross section. The propagation of the liquid column h(z,t) and the tip location l(t) are then solved with the aid of the continuity equation. When the half-wedge angle α, the contact angle θ, and the shear-stress distribution on the free surface S are constant, analytic solutions exist. Otherwise, numerical simulation has to be applied. The results indicate that when S(z) is acting in the flow direction, the flow is strengthened and the liquid column propagates faster. When S(z) is opposing the flow direction, reverse flow may exist near the free surface and the propagation speed of the liquid column is reduced. Moreover, for a capillary flow in a wedge with constant α, θ, and S, both the analytic solutions and the numerical simulation predict that l(t)∝t3/5 for the constant-flow-rate stage and l(t)∝t1/2 for the constant-height flow stage. When S is a function of the flow direction z, the above functional relationship between l and t becomes no longer valid; it varies as the liquid column propagates along the wedge.

  17. Interfacial shear stress between a single-walled carbon nanotube and a gold surface after different physical treatments.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huiyan; Wu, Yu-Chiao; Adams, George G; McGruer, Nicol E

    2015-06-01

    The interfacial shear stress between gold and dielectrophoretically assembled single-walled carbon nanotubes can be increased by annealing in N2, by e-beam irradiation, or by e-beam deposition of carbon. For the first time this increase has been measured, using a technique developed by this group that is based on NEMS cantilever measurements combined with modeling. Annealing increases the shear stress by more than a factor of 3 over its value of 87MPa for untreated gold surfaces, while e-beam irradiation increases the shear stress by more than a factor of 2 and carbon deposition increases the shear stress by a smaller amount. PMID:25700215

  18. Interfacial Shear Strength of Oxide Scale and SS 441 Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-05-01

    Recent developments on decreasing the operating temperature for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) have enabled the use of high temperature ferritic alloys as interconnect materials. Oxide scale will inevitably grow on the ferritic interconnects in a high temperature oxidation environment of SOFCs. The growth of the oxide scale induces growth stresses in the scale layer and on the scale/substrate interface. These growth stresses combined with the thermal stresses induced upon stacking cooling by the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the oxide scale and the substrate may lead to scale delamination/buckling and eventual spallation, which may lead to serious cell performance degradation. Hence the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the substrate is crucial to the reliability and durability of the metallic interconnect in SOFC operating environments. In this paper, we applied an integrated experimental/modeling methodology to quantify the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the SS 441 metallic interconnect. The predicted interfacial strength is discussed in details.

  19. Effect of viscosity and shear flow on the nonlinear two fluid interfacial structures

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Rahul

    2012-12-15

    A nonlinear formulation is presented to deal with the combined action of Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities as well as combined Ricthmyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at the two fluid interface under the influence of viscosity and consequent shear flow. Using Layzer's model, the development of the interfacial structures like bubbles is investigated analytically and numerically. It is found that the growth and normal velocity of the structures are dependent on the relative velocity shear and the kinematic coefficient of viscosity of both the fluids. Both the bubble growth and growth rate are reduced significantly for fluids of higher viscosity coefficient with small velocity shear difference. It is also observed that, for viscous fluids, the transverse velocity of the perturbed interface becomes slower under certain conditions.

  20. Estimation of Liquid Wall and Interfacial Shear Stress in Horizontal Stratified Gas-liquid Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiping; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Jing

    2007-06-01

    A modified two-phase shear stress calculation method for pipe flow problems is explored. A force balance has been set up on the control volume of liquid phase to determine the interfacial friction factor by employing both the measured pressure gradient and liquid height. The gradient of height of liquid layer has been taken into account, which is suitable for the case where the interface may be smooth, rippled or wavy. The correlation of model indicates that the careful estimation for liquid-wall shear stress is necessary, and the assumption of a stationary liquid element is not applicable for the case of higher gas flow rates. The interfacial friction factor evaluated indirectly from experimental liquid height and pressure loss measurements, which are obtained in 50mm ID pipeline for air and water in cocurrent stratified flow, is used to achieve its correlation with the combination of characteristic parameters. The evaluation of new correlation has been conducted by the comparison of the predicted pressure drop with the experimental data. The performance of correlation depends on the form of the gas-liquid interface.

  1. Parametric evaluation of shear sensitivity in piezoresistive interfacial force sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benfield, David; Lou, Edmond; Moussa, Walied A.

    2011-04-01

    A three-axis load detector has been designed and manufactured utilizing four piezoresistive sensors on a flexible silicon membrane. The detector was prototyped using bulk microfabrication techniques on a single-crystal silicon wafer and was designed to detect normal and shear loadings applied to the membrane. Finite element analysis and experimental calibration methods have been used to determine the shear and normal sensitivity values. Device parameters were modified with emphasis on increasing the absolute shear to normal sensitivity ratio of the sensors without reducing their ultimate strength. It was determined that the shear to normal sensitivity ratio greater than 0.5 would allow detection of shear loads considering experimental error present. For devices with square membranes having 1000 µm edge lengths and 65 µm thicknesses, this amount of shear sensitivity was achievable using a mesa with a height of at least 150 µm.

  2. Mechanical interaction between cells and fluid for bone tissue engineering scaffold: modulation of the interfacial shear stress.

    PubMed

    Blecha, L D; Rakotomanana, L; Razafimahery, F; Terrier, A; Pioletti, D P

    2010-03-22

    An analytical model of the fluid/cell mechanical interaction was developed. The interfacial shear stress, due to the coupling between the fluid and the cell deformation, was characterized by a new dimensionless number N(fs). For N(fs) above a critical value, the fluid/cell interaction had a damping effect on the interfacial shear stress. Conversely, for N(fs) below this critical value, interfacial shear stress was amplified. As illustration, the role of the dynamic fluid/cell mechanical coupling was studied in a specific biological situation involving cells seeded in a bone scaffold. For the particular bone scaffold chosen, the dimensionless number N(fs) was higher than the critical value. In this case, the dynamic shear stress at the fluid/cell interface is damped for increasing excitation frequency. Interestingly, this damping effect is correlated to the pore diameter of the scaffold, furnishing thus target values in the design of the scaffold. Correspondingly, an efficient cell stimulation might be achieved with a scaffold of pore size larger than 300 microm as no dynamic damping effect is likely to take place. The analytical model proposed in this study, while being a simplification of a fluid/cell mechanical interaction, brings complementary insights to numerical studies by analyzing the effect of different physical parameters. PMID:20004397

  3. Modeling interfacial fracture in Sierra.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Arthur A.; Ohashi, Yuki; Lu, Wei-Yang; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Foulk, James W.,; Reedy, Earl David,; Austin, Kevin N.; Margolis, Stephen B.

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes computational efforts to model interfacial fracture using cohesive zone models in the SIERRA/SolidMechanics (SIERRA/SM) finite element code. Cohesive surface elements were used to model crack initiation and propagation along predefined paths. Mesh convergence was observed with SIERRA/SM for numerous geometries. As the funding for this project came from the Advanced Simulation and Computing Verification and Validation (ASC V&V) focus area, considerable effort was spent performing verification and validation. Code verification was performed to compare code predictions to analytical solutions for simple three-element simulations as well as a higher-fidelity simulation of a double-cantilever beam. Parameter identification was conducted with Dakota using experimental results on asymmetric double-cantilever beam (ADCB) and end-notched-flexure (ENF) experiments conducted under Campaign-6 funding. Discretization convergence studies were also performed with respect to mesh size and time step and an optimization study was completed for mode II delamination using the ENF geometry. Throughout this verification process, numerous SIERRA/SM bugs were found and reported, all of which have been fixed, leading to over a 10-fold increase in convergence rates. Finally, mixed-mode flexure experiments were performed for validation. One of the unexplained issues encountered was material property variability for ostensibly the same composite material. Since the variability is not fully understood, it is difficult to accurately assess uncertainty when performing predictions.

  4. Effects of environmental exposure on fiber/epoxy interfacial shear strength

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, U.; Miller, B. )

    1990-08-01

    A microbond technique for direct determination of fiber/resin interfacial shear strength in composites (Miller et al., 1987) has been used to investigate the influence of environmental conditions on adhesive bonding in certain systems. The small dimensions involved in the method facilitate uniform exposure and short exposure times. Significant changes in both average shear strength and in shear strength distributions are observed on exposing aramid/epoxy and glass/epoxy microbond assemblies to steam or hot water. Shear strength drops to a plateau value in both cases, the reduction being more drastic with the glass fiber. Vacuum drying restores shear strength completely in aramid/epoxy microassemblies, even when the surface of the aramid fiber has been chemically modified, but there is only partial regeneration of bond strength with the glass/epoxy system. 15 refs.

  5. Incorporating interfacial phenomena in solidification models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, Christoph; Wang, Chao Yang

    1994-01-01

    A general methodology is available for the incorporation of microscopic interfacial phenomena in macroscopic solidification models that include diffusion and convection. The method is derived from a formal averaging procedure and a multiphase approach, and relies on the presence of interfacial integrals in the macroscopic transport equations. In a wider engineering context, these techniques are not new, but their application in the analysis and modeling of solidification processes has largely been overlooked. This article describes the techniques and demonstrates their utility in two examples in which microscopic interfacial phenomena are of great importance.

  6. Interfacial Shear Strength of Cast and Directionally Solidified Nial-Sapphire Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Asthana, R.; Noebe, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating intermetallic NiAl-sapphire fiber composites by casting and zone directional solidification has been examined. The fiber-matrix interfacial shear strengths measured using a fiber push-out technique in both cast and directionally solidified composites are greater than the strengths reported for composites fabricated by powder cloth process using organic binders. Microscopic examination of fibers extracted from cast, directionally solidified (DS), and thermally cycled composites, and the high values of interfacial shear strengths suggest that the fiber-matrix interface does not degrade due to casting and directional solidification. Sapphire fibers do not pin grain boundaries during directional solidification, suggesting that this technique can be used to fabricate sapphire fiber reinforced NiAl composites with single crystal matrices.

  7. Investigation of interfacial shear strength in SiC/Si3N4 composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Bhatt, R. T.; Kiser, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber push-out technique was used to determine fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength (ISS) for silicon carbide fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SiC/RBSN) composites in the as-fabricated condition and after consolidation by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). In situ video microscopy and acoustic emission detection greatly aided the interpretation of push-out load/displacement curves.

  8. Bulk flow coupled to a viscous interfacial film sheared by a rotating knife edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunandan, Aditya; Rasheed, Fayaz; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    The measurement of the interfacial properties of highly viscous biofilms, such as DPPC (the primary component of lung surfactant), present on the surface of liquids (bulk phase) continues to attract significant attention. Most measurement techniques rely on shearing the interfacial film and quantifying its viscous response in terms of a surface (excess) viscosity at the air-liquid interface. The knife edge viscometer offers a significant advantage over other approaches used to study highly viscous films as the film is directly sheared by a rotating knife edge in direct contact with the film. However, accurately quantifying the viscous response is non-trivial and involves accounting for the coupled interfacial and bulk phase flows. Here, we examine the nature of the viscous response of water insoluble DPPC films sheared in a knife edge viscometer over a range of surface packing, and its influence on the strength of the coupled bulk flow. Experimental results, obtained via Particle Image Velocimetry in the bulk and at the surface (via Brewster Angle Microscopy), are compared with numerical flow predictions to quantify the coupling across hydrodynamic flow regimes, from the Stokes flow limit to regimes where flow inertia is significant. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  9. Effect of interfacial species on shear strength of metal-sapphire contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1979-01-01

    The interfacial shear strength of the metal-insulator system has been studied by means of the coefficient of static friction of copper, nickel, or gold contacts on sapphire in ultrahigh vacuum. The effect on contact strength of adsorbed oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, and carbon monoxide on the metal surfaces is reported. It was found that exposures as low as 1 L of O2 on Ni produced observable increases in contact strength, whereas exposures of 3 L of Cl2 lead to a decrease in contact strength. These results imply that submonolayer concentrations of these species at the interface of a thin Ni film on Al2O3 should affect film adhesion similarly. The atomic mechanism by which these surface or interface phases affect interfacial strength is not yet understood.

  10. Sorption and Interfacial Rheology Study of Model Asphaltene Compounds.

    PubMed

    Pradilla, Diego; Simon, Sébastien; Sjöblom, Johan; Samaniuk, Joseph; Skrzypiec, Marta; Vermant, Jan

    2016-03-29

    The sorption and rheological properties of an acidic polyaromatic compound (C5PeC11), which can be used to further our understanding of the behavior of asphaltenes, are determined experimentally. The results show that C5PeC11 exhibits the type of pH-dependent surface activity and interfacial shear rheology observed in C6-asphaltenes with a decrease in the interfacial tension concomitant with the elastic modulus when the pH increases. Surface pressure-area (Π-A) isotherms show evidence of aggregation behavior and π-π stacking at both the air/water and oil/water interfaces. Similarly, interactions between adsorbed C5PeC11 compounds are evidenced through desorption experiments at the oil/water interface. Contrary to indigenous asphaltenes, adsorption is reversible, but desorption is slower than for noninteracting species. The reversibility enables us to create layers reproducibly, whereas the presence of interactions between the compounds enables us to mimic the key aspects of interfacial activity in asphaltenes. Shear and dilatational rheology show that C5PeC11 forms a predominantly elastic film both at the liquid/air and the liquid/liquid interfaces. Furthermore, a soft glassy rheology model (SGR) fits the data obtained at the liquid/liquid interface. However, it is shown that the effective noise temperature determined from the SGR model for C5PeC11 is higher than for indigenous asphaltenes measured under similar conditions. Finally, from a colloidal and rheological standpoint, the results highlight the importance of adequately addressing the distinction between the material functions and true elasticity extracted from a shear measurement and the apparent elasticity measured in dilatational-pendant drop setups. PMID:26949974

  11. Probing model tumor interfacial properties using piezoelectric cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Yegingil, Hakki; Shih, Wan Y; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2010-09-01

    Invasive malignant breast cancers are typically branchy and benign breast tumors are typically smooth. It is of interest to characterize tumor branchiness (roughness) to differentiate invasive malignant breast cancer from noninvasive ones. In this study, we examined the shear modulus (G) to elastic modulus (E) ratio, G/E, as a quantity to describe model tumor interfacial roughness using a piezoelectric cantilever capable of measuring both tissue elastic modulus and tissue shear modulus. The piezoelectric cantilever used had two lead zirconate titanate layers to facilitate all-electrical elastic (shear) modulus measurements using one single device. We constructed model tissues with tumors by embedding one-dimensional (1D) corrugated inclusions and three-dimensional (3D) spiky-ball inclusions made of modeling clay in gelatin. We showed that for smooth inclusions, G/E was 0.3 regardless of the shear direction. In contrast, for a 1D corrugated rough inclusion G/E was 0.3 only when the shear was parallel to corrugation and G/E increased with an increasing angle between the shear direction and the corrugation. When the shear was perpendicular to corrugation, G/E became >0.7. For 3D isotropic spiky-ball inclusions we showed that the G/E depended on the degree of the roughness. Using the ratio s/r of the spike length (s) to the overall inclusion radius (r) as a roughness parameter, we showed that for inclusions with s/r larger than or equal to 0.28, the G/E ratio over the inclusions was larger than 0.7 whereas for inclusions with s/r less than 0.28, the G/E decreased with decreasing s/r to around 0.3 at s/r=0. In addition, we showed that the depth limit of the G/E measurement is twice the width of the probe area of the piezoelectric cantilever. PMID:20887005

  12. Effect of coating thickness on interfacial shear behavior of zirconia-coated sapphire fibers in a polycrystalline alumina matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Hellmann, J.R.; Chou, Y.S.

    1995-10-01

    The effect of zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) interfacial coatings on the interfacial shear behavior in sapphire reinforced alumina was examined in this study. Zirconia coatings of thicknesses ranging from 0.15 to 1.45 {mu}m were applied to single crystal sapphire (Saphikon) fibers using a particulate loaded sol dipping technique. After calcining at 1,100 C in air, the coated fibers were incorporated into a polycrystalline alumina matrix via hot pressing. Interfacial shear strength and sliding behavior of the coated fibers was examined using thin-slice indentation fiber pushout and pushback techniques. In all cases, debonding and sliding occurred at the interface between the fibers and the coating. The coatings exhibited a dense microstructure and led to a higher interfacial shear strength (> 240 MPa) and interfacial sliding stress (> 75 MPa) relative to previous studies on the effect of a porous interphase on interfacial properties. The interfacial shear strength decreased with increasing fiber coating thickness (from 389 {+-} 59 to 241 {+-} 43 MPa for 0.15 to 1.45 {micro}m thick coatings, respectively). Sliding behavior exhibited load modulation with increasing displacement during fiber sliding which is characteristic of fiber roughness-induced stick-slip. The high interfacial shear strengths and sliding stresses measured in this study, as well as the potentially strength degrading surface reconstruction observed on the coated fibers after hot pressing and heat treatment, indicate that dense zirconia coatings are not suitable candidates for optimizing composite toughness and strength in the sapphire fiber reinforced alumina system.

  13. Oxidation and temperature effects on the interfacial shear strength in SCS-6 fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Guermazi, M.

    1995-01-01

    The fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength of Textron SCS-6 SiC-fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (RBSN) was studied as a function of temperature after oxidation for 24 h at 600 C. Fiber push-out experiments were conducted using a diamond indenter in a high-temperature microhardness tester under vacuum. The interfacial shear strength increased with temperature because of the relief of residual tensile stresses arising from the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between the fiber and the matrix. Most of sublayer 2 of the fiber outer coating, which mainly consisted of carbon in the form of BSU (basic structure unit) aggregates, had disappeared after the heat treatment of the composite. Oxidation resulted in severe changes in the fiber outer coating and caused a lower interfacial shear strength with respect to that of the unoxidized composite.

  14. Towards the role of interfacial shear in shock-induced intermetallic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collinson, Mark; Chapman, David; Williamson, David; Burchell, Mark; Eakins, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Shock-induced intermetallic reactions have previously been shown to occur on a nanosecond timescale, within the rise time of the applied shock wave. Work in this area to date has however concentrated on continuum scale measurements, raising questions as to the processes occurring at micro and meso scales. Mass transfer due to inter-facial shear at material interfaces has been suggested as a possible explanation. We will present initial work examining the role of friction on this mass mixing process across a binary interface. This work includes plate impact experiments on an inert stainless steel - aluminum friction pair, employing spatially resolved interferometry. Results from a series of metal ball-on-angled plate impact experiments at 1-2 km/s will also be presented, supported by high-speed imaging and target recovery.

  15. Interfacial models of nerve fiber cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Malev, V V; Gromov, D B; Komissarchik YaYu; Brudnaya, M S

    1992-01-01

    A new approach, basing on a resemblance between cytoskeleton structures associated with plasma membranes and interfacial layers of coexisting phases, is proposed. In particular, a lattice model, similar to those of the theory of surface properties of pure liquids and nonelectrolyte solutions (Ono, S., and S. Kondo. 1960. Handbuch der Physik.), has been developed to describe nerve fiber cytoskeleton. The preliminary consideration of the model shows the existence of submembrane cytoskeleton having increased peripheral densities of microtubules (compared with the bulk density) which is in qualitative agreement with the data in literature. Some additional possibilities of the approach proposed are briefly discussed. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:1420929

  16. Estimation of interfacial shear strength between superconducting oxides and silver sheath from multiple-fracture phenomenon of the oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ochiai, Shojiro; Hayasi, Kenji; Osamura, Kozo )

    1994-02-01

    The influence of interfacial shear strength superconducting Y-Ba-Cu-O and silver and that between Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and silver on the multiple fracture of the oxides embedded in silver-sheathed composite wires, prepared by a powder-in-tube method, on the multiple fracture of the oxides was analyzed. The stress distribution in the oxide was calculated based on the proposed method, and the multiple-fracture phenomenon was simulated by means of a Monte Carlo simulation method. From the comparison of the experimental results with those obtained by the simulation, the interfacial shear strength between Y-Ba-Cu-O and silver and that between Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and silver were estimated to be nearly 30 and 40 MPa, respectively.

  17. Tailoring of interfacial mechanical shear strength by surface chemical modification of silicon microwires embedded in Nafion membranes.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Betar M; Gu, X Wendy; Chen, David Z; Greer, Julia R; Lewis, Nathan S

    2015-05-26

    The interfacial shear strength between Si microwires and a Nafion membrane has been tailored through surface functionalization of the Si. Acidic (-COOH-terminated) or basic (-NH2-terminated) surface-bound functionality was introduced by hydrosilylation reactions to probe the interactions between the functionalized Si microwires and hydrophilic ionically charged sites in the Nafion polymeric side chains. Surfaces functionalized with SiOx, Si-H, or Si-CH3 were also synthesized and investigated. The interfacial shear strength between the functionalized Si microwire surfaces and the Nafion matrix was quantified by uniaxial wire pull-out experiments in an in situ nanomechanical instrument that allowed simultaneous collection of mechanical data and visualization of the deformation process. In this process, an axial load was applied to the custom-shaped top portions of individual wires until debonding occurred from the Nafion matrix. The shear strength obtained from the nanomechanical measurements correlated with the chemical bond strength and the functionalization density of the molecular layer, with values ranging from 7 MPa for Si-CH3 surfaces to ∼16-20 MPa for oxygen-containing surface functionalities. Hence surface chemical control can be used to influence the mechanical adhesion forces at a Si-Nafion interface. PMID:25872455

  18. Carboxyl functionalization of carbon fibers via aryl diazonium reaction in molten urea to enhance interfacial shear strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuwei; Meng, Linghui; Fan, Liquan; Wu, Guangshun; Ma, Lichun; Zhao, Min; Huang, Yudong

    2016-01-01

    Using molten urea as the solvent, carbon fibers were functionalized with carboxylic acid groups via aryl diazonium reaction in 15 min to improve their interfacial bonding with epoxy resin. The surface functionalization was quantified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which showed that the relative surface coverage of carboxylic acid groups increased from an initial percentage of 3.17-10.41%. Mechanical property test results indicated that the aryl diazonium reaction in this paper could improve the interfacial shear strength by 66%. Meanwhile, the technique did not adopt any pre-oxidation step to produce functional groups prior to grafting and was shown to maintain the tensile strength of the fibers. This methodology provided a rapid, facile and economically viable route to produce covalently functionalized carbon fibers in large quantities with an eco-friendly method.

  19. Interfacial Micromechanics in Fibrous Composites: Design, Evaluation, and Models

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Zhenkun; Li, Xuan; Qin, Fuyong; Qiu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances of interfacial micromechanics in fiber reinforced composites using micro-Raman spectroscopy are given. The faced mechanical problems for interface design in fibrous composites are elaborated from three optimization ways: material, interface, and computation. Some reasons are depicted that the interfacial evaluation methods are difficult to guarantee the integrity, repeatability, and consistency. Micro-Raman study on the fiber interface failure behavior and the main interface mechanical problems in fibrous composites are summarized, including interfacial stress transfer, strength criterion of interface debonding and failure, fiber bridging, frictional slip, slip transition, and friction reloading. The theoretical models of above interface mechanical problems are given. PMID:24977189

  20. Modeling of shear localization in materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.; LeBlanc, M.; Riddle, B.; Jorgensen, B.

    1998-02-11

    The deformation response of a Ti alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, has been studied during shear localization. The study has involved well-controlled laboratory tests involving a double-notch shear sample. The results have been used to provide a comparison between experiment and the predicted response using DYNA2D and two material models (the Johnson-Cook model and an isotropic elastic-plastic-hydrodynamic model). The work will serve as the basis for the development of a new material model which represents the different deformation mechanisms active during shear localization.

  1. Stress diffusion in models for shear banding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masnada, Elian; Olmsted, Peter

    Understanding shear banding is of utmost importance from both theoretical and experimental point of view and consequently it has been studied for several decades. Despite this study numerous aspects of shear banding remains poorly understood. Because of the intrinsic inhomogeneity in the shear banded state, applicable constitutive models must be include spatial inhomogeneities, leading to a so-called 'diffusive' term in the equation of motion for the slow variables that carry stress. Such terms are also vital in describing the interaction of bulk shear banding flows with walls and incorporation of wall slip. In this work, we consider different sources of 'diffusion' in polymer models in which concentration degrees of freedom are negligible. The simplest models used are consistent with diffusive terms whose origin is intrinsically dissipative, such as due to hydrodynamic interactions. By contrast, models in which elastic effects such as finite chain stiffness contribute to stress diffusion are inconsistent with simple diffusive models, and we propose alternative consistent models

  2. Hydrogen bonds, interfacial stiffness moduli, and the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, John H.

    2015-03-15

    The chemical treatment of carbon fibers used in carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites greatly affects the fraction of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed at the fiber-matrix interface. The H-bonds are major contributors to the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength and play a direct role in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of the composite. The H-bond contributions τ to the ILSS and magnitudes K{sub N} of the fiber-matrix interfacial stiffness moduli of seven carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites, subjected to different fiber surface treatments, are calculated from the Morse potential for the interactions of hydroxyl and carboxyl acid groups formed on the carbon fiber surfaces with epoxy receptors. The τ calculations range from 7.7 MPa to 18.4 MPa in magnitude, depending on fiber treatment. The K{sub N} calculations fall in the range (2.01 – 4.67) ×10{sup 17} N m{sup −3}. The average ratio K{sub N}/|τ| is calculated to be (2.59 ± 0.043) × 10{sup 10} m{sup −1} for the seven composites, suggesting a nearly linear connection between ILSS and H-bonding at the fiber-matrix interfaces. The linear connection indicates that τ may be assessable nondestructively from measurements of K{sub N} via a technique such as angle beam ultrasonic spectroscopy.

  3. Hydrogen bonds, interfacial stiffness moduli, and the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2015-03-01

    The chemical treatment of carbon fibers used in carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites greatly affects the fraction of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed at the fiber-matrix interface. The H-bonds are major contributors to the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength and play a direct role in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of the composite. The H-bond contributions τ to the ILSS and magnitudes KN of the fiber-matrix interfacial stiffness moduli of seven carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites, subjected to different fiber surface treatments, are calculated from the Morse potential for the interactions of hydroxyl and carboxyl acid groups formed on the carbon fiber surfaces with epoxy receptors. The τ calculations range from 7.7 MPa to 18.4 MPa in magnitude, depending on fiber treatment. The KN calculations fall in the range (2.01 - 4.67) ×1017 N m-3. The average ratio KN/|τ| is calculated to be (2.59 ± 0.043) × 1010 m-1 for the seven composites, suggesting a nearly linear connection between ILSS and H-bonding at the fiber-matrix interfaces. The linear connection indicates that τ may be assessable nondestructively from measurements of KN via a technique such as angle beam ultrasonic spectroscopy.

  4. Steel shear walls, behavior, modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Astaneh-Asl, Abolhassan

    2008-07-08

    In recent years steel shear walls have become one of the more efficient lateral load resisting systems in tall buildings. The basic steel shear wall system consists of a steel plate welded to boundary steel columns and boundary steel beams. In some cases the boundary columns have been concrete-filled steel tubes. Seismic behavior of steel shear wall systems during actual earthquakes and based on laboratory cyclic tests indicates that the systems are quite ductile and can be designed in an economical way to have sufficient stiffness, strength, ductility and energy dissipation capacity to resist seismic effects of strong earthquakes. This paper, after summarizing the past research, presents the results of two tests of an innovative steel shear wall system where the boundary elements are concrete-filled tubes. Then, a review of currently available analytical models of steel shear walls is provided with a discussion of capabilities and limitations of each model. We have observed that the tension only 'strip model', forming the basis of the current AISC seismic design provisions for steel shear walls, is not capable of predicting the behavior of steel shear walls with length-to-thickness ratio less than about 600 which is the range most common in buildings. The main reasons for such shortcomings of the AISC seismic design provisions for steel shear walls is that it ignores the compression field in the shear walls, which can be significant in typical shear walls. The AISC method also is not capable of incorporating stresses in the shear wall due to overturning moments. A more rational seismic design procedure for design of shear walls proposed in 2000 by the author is summarized in the paper. The design method, based on procedures used for design of steel plate girders, takes into account both tension and compression stress fields and is applicable to all values of length-to-thickness ratios of steel shear walls. The method is also capable of including the effect of

  5. Sheared Ising models in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hucht, Alfred; Angst, Sebastian

    2013-03-01

    The nonequilibrium phase transition in sheared three-dimensional Ising models is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations in two different geometries corresponding to different shear normals [A. Hucht and S. Angst, EPL 100, 20003 (2012)]. We demonstrate that in the high shear limit both systems undergo a strongly anisotropic phase transition at exactly known critical temperatures Tc which depend on the direction of the shear normal. Using dimensional analysis, we determine the anisotropy exponent θ = 2 as well as the correlation length exponents ν∥ = 1 and ν⊥ = 1 / 2 . These results are verified by simulations, though considerable corrections to scaling are found. The correlation functions perpendicular to the shear direction can be calculated exactly and show Ornstein-Zernike behavior. Supported by CAPES-DAAD through PROBRAL as well as by the German Research Society (DFG) through SFB 616 ``Energy Dissipation at Surfaces.''

  6. Wind shear modeling for aircraft hazard definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Camp, D. W.; Wang, S. T.

    1978-01-01

    Mathematical models of wind profiles were developed for use in fast time and manned flight simulation studies aimed at defining and eliminating these wind shear hazards. A set of wind profiles and associated wind shear characteristics for stable and neutral boundary layers, thunderstorms, and frontal winds potentially encounterable by aircraft in the terminal area are given. Engineering models of wind shear for direct hazard analysis are presented in mathematical formulae, graphs, tables, and computer lookup routines. The wind profile data utilized to establish the models are described as to location, how obtained, time of observation and number of data points up to 500 m. Recommendations, engineering interpretations and guidelines for use of the data are given and the range of applicability of the wind shear models is described.

  7. Analytical and numerical modeling of non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziyin; Nagy, Peter B; Hassan, Waled

    2016-02-01

    Non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface between two solids can be exploited for nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of bond quality. In this study we developed two analytical models for nonlinear imperfect interfaces. The first model uses a finite nonlinear interfacial stiffness representation of an imperfect interface of vanishing thickness, while the second model relies on a thin nonlinear interphase layer to represent an imperfect interface region. The second model is actually a derivative of the first model obtained by calculating the equivalent interfacial stiffness of a thin isotropic nonlinear interphase layer in the quasi-static approximation. The predictions of both analytical models were numerically verified by comparison to COMSOL finite element simulations. These models can accurately predict the additional nonlinearity caused by interface imperfections based on the strength of the reflected and transmitted mixed longitudinal waves produced by them under non-collinear shear wave interrogation. PMID:26482394

  8. Analytical and numerical modeling of non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ziyin; Nagy, Peter B.; Hassan, Waled

    2016-02-01

    Non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface between two solids can be exploited for nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of bond quality. In this study we developed two analytical models for nonlinear imperfect interfaces. The first model uses a finite nonlinear interfacial stiffness representation of an imperfect interface of vanishing thickness, while the second model relies on a thin nonlinear interphase layer to represent an imperfect interface region. The second model is actually a derivative of the first model obtained by calculating the equivalent interfacial stiffness of a thin isotropic nonlinear interphase layer in the quasi-static approximation. The predictions of both analytical models were numerically verified by comparison to COMSOL finite element simulations. These models can accurately predict the excess nonlinearity caused by interface imperfections based on the strength of the reflected and transmitted mixed longitudinal waves produced by them under non-collinear shear wave interrogation.

  9. Modeling interfacial area transport in multi-fluid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbro, S.L.

    1996-11-01

    Many typical chemical engineering operations are multi-fluid systems. They are carried out in distillation columns (vapor/liquid), liquid-liquid contactors (liquid/liquid) and other similar devices. An important parameter is interfacial area concentration, which determines the rate of interfluid heat, mass and momentum transfer and ultimately, the overall performance of the equipment. In many cases, the models for determining interfacial area concentration are empirical and can only describe the cases for which there is experimental data. In an effort to understand multiphase reactors and the mixing process better, a multi-fluid model has been developed as part of a research effort to calculate interfacial area transport in several different types of in-line static mixers. For this work, the ensemble-averaged property conservation equations have been derived for each fluid and for the mixture. These equations were then combined to derive a transport equation for the interfacial area concentration. The final, one-dimensional model was compared to interfacial area concentration data from two sizes of Kenics in-line mixer, two sizes of concurrent jet and a Tee mixer. In all cases, the calculated and experimental data compared well with the highest scatter being with the Tee mixer comparison.

  10. Modelling temperature and concentration dependent solid/liquid interfacial energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippmann, Stephanie; Jung, In-Ho; Paliwal, Manas; Rettenmayr, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Models for the prediction of the solid/liquid interfacial energy in pure substances and binary alloys, respectively, are reviewed and extended regarding the temperature and concentration dependence of the required thermodynamic entities. A CALPHAD-type thermodynamic database is used to introduce temperature and concentration dependent melting enthalpies and entropies for multicomponent alloys in the temperature range between liquidus and solidus. Several suitable models are extended and employed to calculate the temperature and concentration dependent interfacial energy for Al-FCC with their respective liquids and compared with experimental data.

  11. Extreme model reduction of shear layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qawasmeh, Bashar Rafee

    The aim of this research is to develop nonlinear low-dimensional models (LDMs) to describe vortex dynamics in shear layers. A modified Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD)/Galerkin projection method is developed to obtain models at extremely low dimension for shear layers. The idea is to dynamically scale the shear layer along y direction to factor out the shear layer growth and capture the dynamics by only a couple of modes. The models are developed for two flows, incompressible spatially developing and weakly compressible temporally developing shear layers, respectively. To capture basic dynamics, the low-dimensional models require only two POD modes for each wavenumber/frequency. Thus, a two-mode model is capable of representing single-wavenumber/frequency dynamics such as vortex roll-up, and a four-mode model is capable of representing the nonlinear dynamics involving a fundamental wavenumber/frequency and its subharmonic, such as vortex pairing/merging. Most of the energy is captured by the first mode of each wavenumber/frequency, the second POD mode, however, plays a critical role and needs to be included. In the thesis, we first apply the approach on temporally developing weakly compressible shear layers. In compressible flows, the thermodynamic variables are dynamically important, and must be considered. We choose isentropic Navier-Stokes equations for simplicity, and choose a proper inner product to present both kinetic energy and thermal energy. Two cases of convective Mach numbers are studied for low compressibility and moderate compressibility. Moreover, we study the sensitivity of the compressible four-mode model to several flow parameters: Mach number, the strength of initial perturbations of the fundamental and its subharmonic, and Reynolds number. Secondly we apply the approach on spatially developing incompressible shear layers with periodicity in time. We consider a streamwise parabolic form of the Navier-Stokes equations. When we add arbitrary

  12. Influence of interfacial shear strength on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of fiber/matrix interface microstructure and interfacial shear strength on the mechanical properties of a fiber-reinforced ceramic composite was evaluated. The composite consisted of approximately 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 microns diameter SiC fibers (Textron SCS-6) in a reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix (SiC/RBSN). The interface microstructure was varied by controlling the composite fabrication conditions and by heat treating the composite in an oxidizing environment. Interfacial shear strength was determined by the matrix crack spacing method. The results of microstructural examination indicate that the carbon-rich coating provided with the as-produced SiC fibers was stable in composites fabricated at 1200 C in a nitrogen or in a nitrogen plus 4 percent hydrogen mixture for 40 hr. However this coating degraded in composites fabricated at 1350 C in N2 + 4 percent H2 for 40 and 72 hr and also in composites heat treated in an oxidizing environment at 600 C for 100 hr after fabrication at 1200 C in a nitrogen. It was determined that degradation occurred by carbon removal which in turn had a strong influence on interfacial shear strength and other mechanical properties. Specifically, as the carbon coating was removed, the composite interfacial shear strength, primary elastic modulus, first matrix cracking stress, and ultimate tensile strength decreased, but the first matrix cracking strain remained nearly the same.

  13. Modeling of Turbulent Free Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Dennis A.; DeBonis, James R.; Georgiadis, Nicolas J.

    2013-01-01

    The modeling of turbulent free shear flows is crucial to the simulation of many aerospace applications, yet often receives less attention than the modeling of wall boundary layers. Thus, while turbulence model development in general has proceeded very slowly in the past twenty years, progress for free shear flows has been even more so. This paper highlights some of the fundamental issues in modeling free shear flows for propulsion applications, presents a review of past modeling efforts, and identifies areas where further research is needed. Among the topics discussed are differences between planar and axisymmetric flows, development versus self-similar regions, the effect of compressibility and the evolution of compressibility corrections, the effect of temperature on jets, and the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers for reacting shear flows. Large eddy simulation greatly reduces the amount of empiricism in the physical modeling, but is sensitive to a number of numerical issues. This paper includes an overview of the importance of numerical scheme, mesh resolution, boundary treatment, sub-grid modeling, and filtering in conducting a successful simulation.

  14. Fundamental studies of interfacial rheology at multilayered model polymers for coextrusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huagui; Lamnawar, Khalid; Maazouz, Abderrahim

    2015-05-01

    Fundamental studies have been devoted to the interfacial phenomena at multilayered systems based on two model compatible polymers of PVDF and PMMA with varying molar masses. Linear and nonlinear rheology are demonstrated to be sensitive to the presence of diffuse interphase triggered at polymer/polymer interface. Firstly, the interdiffusion kinetics as well as the interphase development have been investigated using SAOS measurements with results analyzed under Doi-Edwards theory. The PMMA/PVDF mixture, has been examined to own close component monomeric friction coefficients. Based on this physics, a new rheological model was developed to quantify the interdiffusion coefficients. Thereby, rheological and geometrical properties of the interphase have been quantified, as validated by SEM-EDX. Secondly, step strain, shear and uniaxial extension startup were carried out to investigate their sensitivity to the diffuse interphase. An original model was proposed for the stress relaxation of multilayer and that of the interphase. Entanglement lack and weak entanglement intensity at the interface/diffuse interphase make them to be subsequently readily to suffer from interfacial yielding under large deformations. Finally, the interphase development coupled to flow in coextrusion has been considered. Net result between negative effect of chain orientation and favorable effect of flow has been shown to broaden the interphase. Its presence during coextrusion process was demonstrated to significantly weaken the interfacial instabilities.

  15. Compressible homogeneous shear: Simulation and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.; Erlebacher, G.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Compressibility effects were studied on turbulence by direct numerical simulation of homogeneous shear flow. A primary observation is that the growth of the turbulent kinetic energy decreases with increasing turbulent Mach number. The sinks provided by compressible dissipation and the pressure dilatation, along with reduced Reynolds shear stress, are shown to contribute to the reduced growth of kinetic energy. Models are proposed for these dilatational terms and verified by direct comparison with the simulations. The differences between the incompressible and compressible fields are brought out by the examination of spectra, statistical moments, and structure of the rate of strain tensor.

  16. Foam rheology: A model of viscous effects in shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.; Reinelt, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Foams consisting of gas bubbles dispersed in a continuous network of thin liquid films display a remarkable range of rheological characteristics that include a finite shear modulus, yield stress, non-Newtonian viscosity, and slip at the wall. Progress in developing micromechanical theories to describe foam rheology has depended upon two-dimensional models, which in most cases are assumed to have perfectly ordered structure. Princen accounted for surface tension and geometrical effects, and analyzed the nonlinear elastic response of a spatially periodic foam in simple shear. His analysis has been extended to account for more general deformations. Khan and Armstrong and Kraynik and Hansen have proposed ad hoc models for viscous effects in foam rheology. Their models capture numerous qualitative phenomena but incorporate relaxation mechanisms based upon overly simplified assumptions of liquid flow in the thin films. Mysels, Shinoda, and Frankel considered soap films with interfaces that are inextensible due to the presence of surfactants. They analyzed the primary flow that occurs when such films are slowly withdrawn from or recede into essentially static junction regions such as the Plateau borders in a foam. Adopting this mechanism, Schwartz and Princen considered small periodic deformations of a foam and calculated the energy dissipation due to viscous flow in the thin films. In the following, we also adopt the basic interfacial and viscous mechanisms introduced by Mysels et al. and analyze simple shearing deformations of finite amplitude. The configuration and effective stress of the foam are determined. Under these deformation conditions, the foam is a nonlinear viscoelastic material. Results for the uniform expansion of a foam are also presented. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Flocculation of model algae under shear.

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Flint; Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2010-11-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of the flocculation of model algae particles under shear. We study the evolution of the cluster size distribution as well as the steady-state distribution as a function of shear rates and algae interaction parameters. Algal interactions are modeled through a DLVO-type potential, a combination of a HS colloid potential (Everaers) and a yukawa/colloid electrostatic potential. The effect of hydrodynamic interactions on aggregation is explored. Cluster strucuture is determined from the algae-algae radial distribution function as well as the structure factor. DLVO parameters including size, salt concentration, surface potential, initial volume fraction, etc. are varied to model different species of algae under a variety of environmental conditions.

  18. Multidimensional mechanistic modeling of interfacial heat and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Shaver, D. R.; Antal, S. P.; Podowski, M. Z.

    2012-07-01

    A combined theoretical and computational study in modeling multidimensional, diabatic vapor/liquid flows is presented. Models have been developed governing kinematic aspects of multiphase flow as well as interfacial mass and heat transfer for flows of condensable gas (vapor) and liquids. The modeling formulation is based on the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) type multi-field approach which utilizes a complete set of conservation equations for each fluid component 1. The modeled interfacial interactions include energy, mass, and momentum transfer. Emphasis in the model development work has been placed on the mechanisms governing coupled interfacial heat and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor fields (condensation and/or boiling). A method for tracking changes in bubble size is presented and tested. Locally based models of multidimensional effects have been analyzed, including distributions of fluid temperatures and volume fractions. The overall model accounts for both kinematic and thermodynamic nonequilibrium between the component fluids including superheated vapor. The model has been implemented in the NPHASE-CMFD computer code. Results from the kinematic model are compared to experimental data and good agreement is demonstrated. The heat and mass transfer model is parametrically tested to show the multidimensional effects on the rate of heat and mass transfer. These effects are explained in terms of local characteristics of the two-phase flow. The model is applied to a scenario of saturated vapor injected into a subcooled flow through a heated, porous wall. This provides a reasonable approximation to subcooled boiling. The results are found to be dependent on the partitioning of the wall heat flux between direct liquid heating and vapor generation. However, the observed dependencies are explained and the modeling is considered consistent. (authors)

  19. Modeling and characterization of interfacial adhesion and fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Qizhou

    2000-09-01

    The loss of interfacial adhesion is mostly seen in the failure of polymer adhesive joints. In addition to the intrinsic physical attraction across the interface, the interfacial adhesion strength is believed to highly depend on a number of factors, such as adhesive chemistry/structure, surface topology, fracture pattern, thermal and elastic mismatch across the interface. The fracture failure of an adhesive joint involves basically three aspects, namely, the intrinsic interfacial strength, the driving force for fracture and other energy dissipation. One may define the intrinsic interfacial strength as the maximum value of the intrinsic interfacial adhesion. The total work done by external forces to the component that contains the interface is partitioned into two parts. The first part is consumed by all other energy dissipation mechanisms (plasticity, heat generation, viscosity, etc.). The second part is used to debond the interface. This amount should equal to the intrinsic adhesion of the interface according to the laws of conservation of energy. It is clear that in order to understand the fundamental physics of adhesive joint failure, one must be able to characterize the intrinsic interfacial adhesion and be able to identify all the major energy dissipation mechanisms involved in the debonding process. In this study, both physical and chemical adhesion mechanisms were investigated for an aluminum-epoxy interface. The physical bonding energy was estimated by computing the Van de Waals forces across the interface. A hydration model was proposed and the associated chemical bonding energy was calculated through molecular simulations. Other energy dissipation mechanisms such as plasticity and thermal residual stresses were also identified and investigated for several four-point bend specimens. In particular, a micromechanics based model was developed to estimate the adhesion enhancement due to surface roughness. It is found that for this Al-epoxy system the major

  20. Interfacial Microstructure Evolution and Shear Strength of Titanium Sandwich Structures Fabricated by Brazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wentao; Fan, Minyu; Li, Jinlong; Tao, Jie

    2016-03-01

    The corrugated sandwich structure, consisting of a CP Ti (commercially pure titanium) core between two Ti-6Al-4V face sheets, was brazed using pasty Ti-37.5Zr-15Cu-10Ni as filler alloy, at the temperature of 870°C for 5, 10, 20, and 30 min. The effect of brazing time on the microstructure and elemental distribution of the brazed joints was examined by means of SEM, EDS, and XRD analyses. It was found that various intermetallic phases were formed in the brazed joints, following a brazing time of 5 min, and their contents were decreased by the increment of brazing time, while prolonged brazing time resulted in a fine, acicular Widmanstätten microstructure throughout the entire joint. In addition, shear testing was performed in the brazed corrugated specimens in order to indirectly assess the quality of the joints. The debonding between CP Ti and Ti-6Al-4V was observed in the specimen brazed for 5 min and the fracture of the CP Ti corrugated core occurred after 30 min of brazing time. Additionally, when brazed for 10 min or 20 min, brittle intermetallic compounds in the joints and the grain growth of the base metal were controllable. Therefore, the sandwich structures failed without debonding in the joints or fracture within the base metal, demonstrating a good combination of strength and ductility.

  1. Effects of reaction layer on interfacial shear properties and strength of fiber in silicon-carbide (SiC) fiber-reinforced titanium alloy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Kagawa, Yutaka; Masuda, Chitoshi; Fujiwara, Chikara; Fukushima, Akira

    1996-12-31

    The effect of the interfacial thickness of the reaction layer on the interfacial shear properties and the tensile strength of double carbon-coated SCS-6 SiC fiber in Ti-15Mo-5Zr-3Al alloy matrix composite was examined. The major reaction layer thickness, that is, titanium-carbide (TiC) layer thickness, varied with heat-exposure temperature and time, respectively, and the resultant mean thickness of the reaction layer of the composite ranged from 0.4 to 1.7 {micro}m. The critical interfacial toughness, G{sub i}{sup c}, and the mean shear sliding resistance, {tau}{sub s}, were evaluated by the thin specimen pushout technique. Tensile strength of the silicon-carbide (SiC) fiber extracted from the titanium alloy matrix before and after the heat exposure was determined in relationship to the thickness of the reaction layer. The critical interface toughness, G{sub i}{sup c}, for the failure of the root of the reaction layer was {approx}4 J/m{sup 2}, and the average shear sliding resistance of the interface, {tau}{sub s}, was 102 to 118 MPa. The interfacial shear mechanical properties were adequate to prevent failure of the fiber due to the stress concentration caused by cracks that formed first in the reaction layer. The results showed that when the growth of reaction layer was within 1.7 {micro}m, the mean strength of the extracted fiber was unaffected by the existence of the reaction layer because of weak bonding between it and the fiber. However, with the increase of the reaction layer thickness, the strength distribution of the extracted fiber tended to Weibull bimodal distribution.

  2. Modelling interfacial cracking with non-matching cohesive interface elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Vinh Phu; Nguyen, Chi Thanh; Bordas, Stéphane; Heidarpour, Amin

    2016-07-01

    Interfacial cracking occurs in many engineering problems such as delamination in composite laminates, matrix/interface debonding in fibre reinforced composites etc. Computational modelling of these interfacial cracks usually employs compatible or matching cohesive interface elements. In this paper, incompatible or non-matching cohesive interface elements are proposed for interfacial fracture mechanics problems. They allow non-matching finite element discretisations of the opposite crack faces thus lifting the constraint on the compatible discretisation of the domains sharing the interface. The formulation is based on a discontinuous Galerkin method and works with both initially elastic and rigid cohesive laws. The proposed formulation has the following advantages compared to classical interface elements: (i) non-matching discretisations of the domains and (ii) no high dummy stiffness. Two and three dimensional quasi-static fracture simulations are conducted to demonstrate the method. Our method not only simplifies the meshing process but also it requires less computational demands, compared with standard interface elements, for problems that involve materials/solids having a large mismatch in stiffnesses.

  3. Influence of Cr and W alloying on the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength in cast and directionally solidified sapphire NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, R.; Tiwari, R.; Tewari, S. N.

    1995-01-01

    Sapphire-reinforced NiAl matrix composites with chromium or tungsten as alloying additions were synthesized using casting and zone directional solidification (DS) techniques and characterized by a fiber pushout test as well as by microhardness measurements. The sapphire-NiAl(Cr) specimens exhibited an interlayer of Cr rich eutectic at the fiber-matrix interface and a higher interfacial shear strength compared to unalloyed sapphire-NiAl specimens processed under identical conditions. In contrast, the sapphire-NiAl(W) specimens did not show interfacial excess of tungsten rich phases, although the interfacial shear strength was high and comparable to that of sapphire-NiAl(Cr). The postdebond sliding stress was higher in sapphire-NiAl(Cr) than in sapphire-NiAl(W) due to interface enrichment with chromium particles. The matrix microhardness progressively decreased with increasing distance from the interface in both DS NiAl and NiAl(Cr) specimens. The study highlights the potential of casting and DS techniques to improve the toughness and strength of NiAl by designing dual-phase microstructures in NiAl alloys reinforced with sapphire fibers.

  4. Two-phase power-law modeling of pipe flows displaying shear-thinning phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Jianmin; Lyczkowski, R.W.; Sha, W.T.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes work in modeling concentrated liquid-solids flows in pipes. COMMIX-M, a three-dimensional transient and steady-state computer program developed at Argonne National Laboratory, was used to compute velocities and concentrations. Based on the authors` previous analyses, some concentrated liquid-solids suspension flows display shear-thinning rather than Newtonian phenomena. Therefore, they developed a two-phase non-Newtonian power-law model that includes the effect of solids concentration on solids viscosity. With this new two-phase power-law solids-viscosity model, and with constitutive relationships for interfacial drag, virtual mass effect, shear lift force, and solids partial-slip boundary condition at the pipe walls, COMMIX-M is capable of analyzing concentrated three-dimensional liquid-solids flows.

  5. Interfacial separation of a mature biofilm from a glass surface - A combined experimental and cohesive zone modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Safari, Ashkan; Tukovic, Zeljko; Cardiff, Philip; Walter, Maik; Casey, Eoin; Ivankovic, Alojz

    2016-02-01

    A good understanding of the mechanical stability of biofilms is essential for biofouling management, particularly when mechanical forces are used. Previous biofilm studies lack a damage-based theoretical model to describe the biofilm separation from a surface. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the interfacial separation of a mature biofilm from a rigid glass substrate using a combined experimental and numerical modelling approach. In the current work, the biofilm-glass interfacial separation process was investigated under tensile and shear stresses at the macroscale level, known as modes I and II failure mechanisms respectively. The numerical simulations were performed using a Finite Volume (FV)-based simulation package (OpenFOAM®) to predict the separation initiation using the cohesive zone model (CZM). Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based retraction curve was used to obtain the separation properties between the biofilm and glass colloid at microscale level, where the CZM parameters were estimated using the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model. In this study CZM is introduced as a reliable method for the investigation of interfacial separation between a biofilm and rigid substrate, in which a high local stress at the interface edge acts as an ultimate stress at the crack tip.This study demonstrated that the total interfacial failure energy measured at the macroscale, was significantly higher than the pure interfacial separation energy obtained by AFM at the microscale, indicating a highly ductile deformation behaviour within the bulk biofilm matrix. The results of this study can significantly contribute to the understanding of biofilm detachments. PMID:26474034

  6. Numerical modeling of shear band formation in PBX-9501

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, T.N.; Kamm, J.R.

    1998-12-31

    Adiabatic shear bands in explosives may be a source of ignition and lead to detonation. Three possible mechanisms leading to shear banding are (1) thermal softening, (2) mechanical softening due to microcracking, and (3) quasi-granular constitutive response. The latter two mechanisms can lead to shear band formation in PBXs at nominal strains much smaller than those required for the thermal softening mechanism. The authors study formation of shear bands with models including the latter two mechanisms under unconfined compression. Statistical variation of numerical results is similar to that observed in some experiments. However, the commonly used methods of calibrating constitutive models can be misleading because of effects due to shear band formation. One model currently being used for studies of shear band formation and ignition in PBX 9501 was calibrated in this way and may need re-examination.

  7. Case history of FAA/SRI wind shear models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlickenmaier, Herbert

    1987-01-01

    In order to understand the development of the FAA/SRI wind fields, it is important to understand the operating philosophy of the FAA's Wind Shear Program Office. The goal of the office was to ensure an integrated solution to the wind shear problem which addressed three area: ground based equipment and coordination; airborne systems and procedures; and weather prediction. This triply addressed goal was central to the development of the wind fields. The primary user of the wind shear modeling during the FAA's program was airborne simulation. The project requirement was to use wind shear models that resulted from accidents so that effective procedures and/or equipment could be found for hazardous wind shear encounters. The wind shear model development is discussed in detail.

  8. Modulating DNA configuration by interfacial traction: an elastic rod model to characterize DNA folding and unfolding.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zaixing

    2011-01-01

    As a continuum model of DNA, a thin elastic rod subjected to interfacial interactions is used to investigate the equilibrium configuration of DNA in intracellular solution. The interfacial traction between the rod and the solution environment is derived in detail. Kirchhoff's theory of elastic rods is used to analyze the equilibrium configuration of a DNA segment under the action of the interfacial traction. The influences of the interfacial energy factor and bending stiffness on the toroidal spool formation of the DNA segment are discussed. The results show that the equilibrium configuration of DNA is mainly determined by competition between the interfacial energy and elastic strain energy of the DNA itself, and the interfacial traction is one of the forces that drives DNA folding and unfolding. PMID:22210963

  9. Interfacial area measurement and transport modeling in air-water two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xinyu

    In two-fluid model, the interfacial area concentration (IAC) is an important parameter that characterizes the interaction of two-phases at the interface. The accuracy of IAC modeling and local measurements largely affects the efficiency of designing and assessing two-phase flow systems. The prediction of the dynamical evolution of IAC is one of the most challenging tasks in research and application. This thesis is focused on developing advanced local measurement techniques to obtain reliable two-phase parameters and implementing efficient theoretical models for IAC source and sink terms in a two-group interfacial area transport equation based on experiments. In this study, an advanced local measurement technique using a four-sensor conductivity probe has been presented for obtaining IAC in air-water flows. It extends the existing conductivity probe method to slug and churn-turbulent flows with a unified probe design and comprehensive signal processing system. Sophisticated algorithm and software have been implemented that is robust in handling most practical conditions with high reliability. Systematic analyses on the issues of probe applications and benchmarks have been performed. The improved four-sensor method has also been applied to flow conditions with significant local recirculation, which was considered the most challenging situation for local measurement in two-phase flow. Using the well-established instrumentation, solid databases for a two-inch air-water loop have been built with sufficient information on the axial development and the radial distribution of the local parameters. Mechanistic models of major fluid particle interaction phenomena involving two bubble groups have been proposed, including the shearing-off of small bubbles from slug/cap bubbles, the wake entrainment of group-1 bubble into group-2 bubble, the wake acceleration and coalescence between group-2 bubbles, and the breakup of group-2 bubbles due to surface instability. Prediction of

  10. Molecular-orbital model for metal-sapphire interfacial strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. H.; Pepper, S. V.

    1982-01-01

    Self-consistent-field X-Alpha scattered-wave cluster molecular-orbital models have been constructed for transition and noble metals (Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ag) in contact with a sapphire (Al2O3) surface. It is found that a chemical bond is established between the metal d-orbital electrons and the nonbonding 2p-orbital electrons of the oxygen anions on the Al2O3 surface. An increasing number of occupied metal-sapphire antibonding molecular orbitals explains qualitatively the observed decrease of contact shear strength through the series Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ag.

  11. Cold welding of organic light emitting diode: Interfacial and contact models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asare, J.; Adeniji, S. A.; Oyewole, O. K.; Agyei-Tuffour, B.; Du, J.; Arthur, E.; Fashina, A. A.; Zebaze Kana, M. G.; Soboyejo, W. O.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the results of an analytical and computational study of the contacts and interfacial fracture associated with the cold welding of Organic Light Emitting diodes (OLEDs). The effects of impurities (within the possible interfaces) are explored for contacts and interfacial fracture between layers that are relevant to model OLEDs. The models are used to study the effects of adhesion, pressure, thin film layer thickness and dust particle modulus (between the contacting surfaces) on contact profiles around impurities between cold-welded thin films. The lift-off stage of thin films (during cold welding) is then modeled as an interfacial fracture process. A combination of adhesion and interfacial fracture theories is used to provide new insights for the design of improved contact and interfacial separation during cold welding. The implications of the results are discussed for the design and fabrication of cold welded OLED structures.

  12. A model of Barchan dunes including lateral shear stress.

    PubMed

    Schwämmle, V; Herrmann, H J

    2005-01-01

    Barchan dunes are found where sand availability is low and wind direction quite constant. The two dimensional shear stress of the wind field and the sand movement by saltation and avalanches over a barchan dune are simulated. The model with one dimensional shear stress is extended including surface diffusion and lateral shear stress. The resulting final shape is compared to the results of the model with a one dimensional shear stress and confirmed by comparison to measurements. We found agreement and improvements with respect to the model with one dimensional shear stress. Additionally, a characteristic edge at the center of the windward side is discovered which is also observed for big barchans. Diffusion effects reduce this effect for small dunes. PMID:15688141

  13. Conjugate-shear folding: A model for the relationships between foliations, folds and shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerden, Domingo G. A. M.; Sayab, Mohammad; Bouybaouene, Mohamed L.

    2010-08-01

    Microstructural mapping of whole thin sections cut from two samples of micaschist containing cm-scale folds plus garnet porphyroblasts has provided new insight in the relationships between folding, shearing and foliation development. The garnets exhibit coherent inclusion-trail patterns that place important constraints on the kinematic development of both samples, which are shown to be representative of coaxial versus non-coaxial deformation in rocks containing a pre-existing schistosity. A comparison of crenulations-cleavages geometries in both samples and a review of the geometry of natural and experimental multilayer folds leads to the conclusion that folding involves conjugate shearing at different scales. At microscopic scales, crenulation cleavages nucleate as conjugate-kink or shear instabilities and develop further as a function of the macroscopic partitioning of deformation. In fold-hinge domains, bulk-coaxial deformation results in equal development of conjugate crenulations that progressively coalescence into symmetrical crenulation patterns so that, macroscopically, parallelism is achieved between foliation, fold-axial planes and long axes of strain ellipses. Fold-limb domains represent a system of conjugate-shear zones where single sets of crenulation instabilities with synthetic shearing component preferentially develop producing oblique relationships between the aforementioned elements. Cleavage fanning is inferred as a direct consequence of this conjugate-shear origin of folds. The model implies that crenulation cleavages and S-C fabrics in shear zones form by analogous processes, in both cases involving a component of shearing along foliation planes. The development of conjugate sets of foliation planes surrounding porphyroblasts during early, relatively coaxial stages of deformation explains continued "gyrostatic" behaviour during more advanced non-coaxial stages, as indicated by consistently oriented inclusion trails in the studied samples.

  14. Effect of mineral-collagen interfacial behavior on the microdamage progression in bone using a probabilistic cohesive finite element model.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qing; Nakade, Rugved; Dong, Xuanliang; Rong, Qiguo; Wang, Xiaodu

    2011-10-01

    The interactions between mineral and collagen phases in the ultrastructural level play an important role in determining the mechanical properties of bone tissue. Three types of mineral-collagen interaction (i.e., ionic interactions, hydrogen/van der Waals bonds, and van der Waals/viscous shear in opening/sliding mode, respectively) have been simulated in this study, using cohesive zone-modeling techniques. Considering the inhomogeneity of bone, a probabilistic failure analysis approach has been also employed to account for the effect of mineral-collagen interfacial behavior on microdamage accumulation in lamellar bone tissues. The results of this study suggested that different interfacial behaviors cause different types of microdamage accumulation. The ionic interactions between the mineral and collagen phases lead to the formation of linear microcracks, while the van der Waals/viscous shear interactions may facilitate the formation of diffuse damage. In the case of hydrogen/van der Waals bonds, a transitional behavior of microdamage accumulation in bone was observed. The findings of this study may help in understanding the mechanisms of mineral-collagen interactions and its effects on the failure mechanism of bone. PMID:21783104

  15. Mechanical modeling of shear localization in foliated media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pourhiet, L.; Huet, B.; Agard, P.

    2009-12-01

    Crustal rocks have generally an anisotropic behavior at scale that largely exceeds the mineral/grain size. In the upper crust, the bedding of the sediments causes this anisotropy. In the middle crust, towards the base of the sismogenic zone, the rocks usually present a penetrative foliation, which also results in an anisotropic behavior. In order to better understand the response of foliated rocks to simple shear, we perform mechanical numerical model. The set up of the model consist of a layered media made of a weak and a strong phase submitted to simple shear. The parameters of the analysis are the initial angle formed by the bedding and the simple shear direction and the relative thickness of the strong and weak layers. Those layers are both isotropic. The anisotropy introduced explicitly through the geometry. In both case, we use visco-elasto-plastic material. The plastic part of the strain is modeled with Mohr Coulomb plasticity and elastic moduli are identical in the weak and strong phase. We neglect the effect of gravity and temperature. The numerical experiments are run until the global shear of the model reach γ=2. However, locally the shear may be of one to two orders of magnitude higher. In general, shear banding occurs when the layering of the sample of the sample forms a 30° angle with the shear direction. Therefore the results of the experiments may be tiled into to end member cases. In the first one, the shear bands form a large (more than 90°) angle to the shear sense. Those experiments show very long phase of passive rotation and stretching of the strong layer during which the average strength of the media decreases slowly. However, once, the angle of 90° is passed, the strength of the media increase again until shear banding occurs resulting in a rapid drop of the strength. In the second end member case, the sample strength tends to increase right away before the occurrence of the first shear band. We finally study the geometry of the sheared

  16. History of wind shear turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cusimano, Lou

    1987-01-01

    The Office of Flight Operations, Flight Technical Programs Div., at the FAA Headquarters, interfaces with industry, R&D communities and air carriers during the introduction of new types of equipment into operational services. A brief highlight of the need which FAA operations sees for new wind shear and turbulence data sets from the viewpoint of equipment certification and simulation is presented.

  17. Laboratory model of flight through wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1985-01-01

    The simulation of an aircraft flying through a downdraft or microburst is presented. The simulation was performed under the conditions of constant takeoff thrust. The resulting wind shear conditions were filmed and examined for possible pilot corrective action in the future.

  18. Numerical Modeling of Shear Bands and Dynamic Fracture in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuliffe, Colin James

    Understanding the failure of metals at high strain rate is of utmost importance in the design of a broad range of engineering systems. Numerical methods offer the ability to analyze such complex physics and aid the design of structural systems. The objective of this research will be to develop reliable finite element models for high strain rate failure modelling, incorporating shear bands and fracture. Shear band modelling is explored first, and the subsequent developments are extended to incorporate fracture. Mesh sensitivity, the spurious dependence of failure on the discretization, is a well known hurdle in achieving reliable numerical results for shear bands and fracture, or any other strain softening model. Mesh sensitivity is overcome by regularization, and while details of regularization techniques may differ, all are similar in that a length scale is introduced which serves as a localization limiter. This dissertation contains two main contributions, the first of which presents several developments in shear band modeling. The importance of using a monolithic nonlinear solver in combination with a PDE model accounting for thermal diffusion is demonstrated. In contrast, excluding one or both of these components leads to unreliable numerical results. The Pian-Sumihara stress interpolants are also employed in small and finite deformation and shown to significantly improve the computational cost of shear band modelling. This is partly due to the fact that fewer unknowns than an irreducible discretization result from the same mesh, and more significantly, the fact that convergence of numerical results upon mesh refinement is improved drastically. This means coarser meshes are adequate to resolve shear bands, alleviating some of the computational cost of numerical modelling, which are notoriously significant. Since extremely large deformations are present during shear banding, a mesh to mesh transfer algorithm is presented for the Pian Sumihara element and used as

  19. Modeling and analysis of electrorheological suspensions in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Youngwook P.; Chua, Wei Huan; Seo, Yongsok

    2015-05-01

    A new rheological model was applied to the analysis of the electrorheological behavior of a fluid containing silica nanoparticle-decorated polyaniline nanofibers. A model's predictions were compared with the experimental data, revealing that the proposed model correctly predicted the shear stress behavior both quantitatively and qualitatively. The shear stress data of the electrorheological fluid showing aligned fibers' structural reformation as a function of the shear rate agreed well with the new model which required fewer parameters than the CCJ (Cho-Choi-Jhon) model. The static yield stress was found to be quadratically dependent on the field strength, in agreement with the predictions of the polarization model. A scaling function was used to model the yield stress behavior of the electrorheological fluid over a range of electric fields, and it correctly predicted the static yield stress behavior both quantitatively and qualitatively.

  20. Two-Fluid Models and Interfacial Area Transport in Microgravity Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, Mamoru; Sun, Xiao-Dong; Vasavada, Shilp

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to develop a two-fluid model formulation with interfacial area transport equation applicable for microgravity conditions. The new model is expected to make a leapfrog improvement by furnishing the constitutive relations for the interfacial interaction terms with the interfacial area transport equation, which can dynamically model the changes of the interfacial structures. In the first year of this three-year project supported by the U.S. NASA, Office of Biological and Physics Research, the primary focus is to design and construct a ground-based, microgravity two-phase flow simulation facility, in which two immiscible fluids with close density will be used. In predicting the two-phase flow behaviors in any two-phase flow system, the interfacial transfer terms are among the most essential factors in the modeling. These interfacial transfer terms in a two-fluid model specify the rate of phase change, momentum exchange, and energy transfer at the interface between the two phases. For the two-phase flow under the microgravity condition, the stability of the fluid particle interface and the interfacial structures are quite different from those under normal gravity condition. The flow structure may not reach an equilibrium condition and the two fluids may be loosely coupled such that the inertia terms of each fluid should be considered separately by use of the two-fluid model. Previous studies indicated that, unless phase-interaction terms are accurately modeled in the two-fluid model, the complex modeling does not necessarily warrant an accurate solution.

  1. Combined PIV, PLIF, and laser focal displacement measurements (LFDM) to quantify gas-liquid interfacial shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Ian; Hann, David; Hewakandamby, Buddhika; Azzopardi, Barry

    2015-11-01

    Simultaneous Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence imaging (PLIF), using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser alongside a specially design optical system to produce a pair of very fine light sheets. This equipment, coupled a dual set of high speed synchronized camera, and a combination of reflective seeding particles, fluorescent dye and tracers were used to calculate the shear stress at the gas -liquid interface by determining the velocity vectors in both phases. These quantities, along with the position and profile of the interface were found at a number of different inlet conditions. These conditions related to various flow pattern regimes commonly discussed within the literature. These regimes; stratified, stratified- wavy, 2-D and 3-D waves are seen at various liquid and gas Reynolds values, with increasing complexity occurring as higher Reynolds numbers. Validation of the results was done via computing the shear stress in a number of different ways, and also compared with result of temporal film thickness taken using the LFDM. Results from these tests show good agreement with one another and those found in literature, with determination of gas-liquid shear stress found for regimes not previously investigated in this manner. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  2. A Deterministic Interfacial Cyclic Oxidation Spalling Model. Part 1; Model Development and Parametric Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2002-01-01

    An equation has been developed to model the iterative scale growth and spalling process that occurs during cyclic oxidation of high temperature materials. Parabolic scale growth and spalling of a constant surface area fraction have been assumed. Interfacial spallation of the only the thickest segments was also postulated. This simplicity allowed for representation by a simple deterministic summation series. Inputs are the parabolic growth rate constant, the spall area fraction, oxide stoichiometry, and cycle duration. Outputs include the net weight change behavior, as well as the total amount of oxygen and metal consumed, the total amount of oxide spalled, and the mass fraction of oxide spalled. The outputs all follow typical well-behaved trends with the inputs and are in good agreement with previous interfacial models.

  3. Model for Heat Pinch in Reversed Magnetic Shear Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xiao-ming; X, Qiu M.; Wang, Ai-ke

    1998-10-01

    A simple model is proposed to explain the recent experiment in TFTR and the more recent one in JT-60U. In the model the significant reduction of effective thermal diffusivities of ions and electrons (χieff and χeeff) is attributed to the inward flows of drift wave energy, induced by the synergistic effects of the reversed magnetic shear and E × B velocity shear, where E is due to ion pressure gradient. Numerical results demonstrate the predictions of the present model, in particular, the numerical results for χieff are in good agreement with experimental trents.

  4. Direct Numerical Simulation of Surfactant-Stabilized Emulsions Morphology and Shear Viscosity in Starting Shear Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Roar Skartlien; Espen Sollum; Andreas Akselsen; Paul Meakin

    2012-07-01

    A 3D lattice Boltzmann model for two-phase flow with amphiphilic surfactant was used to investigate the evolution of emulsion morphology and shear stress in starting shear flow. The interfacial contributions were analyzed for low and high volume fractions and varying surfactant activity. A transient viscoelastic contribution to the emulsion rheology under constant strain rate conditions was attributed to the interfacial stress. For droplet volume fractions below 0.3 and an average capillary number of about 0.25, highly elliptical droplets formed. Consistent with affine deformation models, gradual elongation of the droplets increased the shear stress at early times and reduced it at later times. Lower interfacial tension with increased surfactant activity counterbalanced the effect of increased interfacial area, and the net shear stress did not change significantly. For higher volume fractions, co-continuous phases with a complex topology were formed. The surfactant decreased the interfacial shear stress due mainly to advection of surfactant to higher curvature areas. Our results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data for polymer blends in terms of transient interfacial stresses and limited enhancement of the emulsion viscosity at larger volume fractions where the phases are co-continuous.

  5. A Method of Modeling Fabric Shear using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichani, Swapnil; Guha, Anirban

    2015-04-01

    Fabric modeling may be attempted by modeling fibres or yarns or small fabric units. The first is computationally intensive while the third does not allow relationships between the fabric's structure and its mechanical properties to be predicted. The second approach has been the most widely used so far. Out of the various ways in which this has been attempted, the finite element approach offers high flexibility while allowing the procedure to be relatively simple because of the availability of user-friendly softwares. This work explores a two-step finite element approach for modeling in-plane fabric shear. A major innovation of the modeling process was that the path of yarns in the fabric was allowed to evolve through the modeling process rather than being pre-defined. The relationship between shear angle and shear stress predicted by this model was compared with that obtained from a picture frame shear experiment. It was found that modeling the yarn with a set of anisotropic properties, gave very good correlation with experimental results.

  6. A Predictive Model of High Shear Thrombus Growth.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Marmar; Casa, Lauren D C; Aidun, Cyrus K; Ku, David N

    2016-08-01

    The ability to predict the timescale of thrombotic occlusion in stenotic vessels may improve patient risk assessment for thrombotic events. In blood contacting devices, thrombosis predictions can lead to improved designs to minimize thrombotic risks. We have developed and validated a model of high shear thrombosis based on empirical correlations between thrombus growth and shear rate. A mathematical model was developed to predict the growth of thrombus based on the hemodynamic shear rate. The model predicts thrombus deposition based on initial geometric and fluid mechanic conditions, which are updated throughout the simulation to reflect the changing lumen dimensions. The model was validated by comparing predictions against actual thrombus growth in six separate in vitro experiments: stenotic glass capillary tubes (diameter = 345 µm) at three shear rates, the PFA-100(®) system, two microfluidic channel dimensions (heights = 300 and 82 µm), and a stenotic aortic graft (diameter = 5.5 mm). Comparison of the predicted occlusion times to experimental results shows excellent agreement. The model is also applied to a clinical angiography image to illustrate the time course of thrombosis in a stenotic carotid artery after plaque cap rupture. Our model can accurately predict thrombotic occlusion time over a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. PMID:26795978

  7. Experimental assessment of wall shear flow in models.

    PubMed

    Affeld, K; Kertzscher, U; Goubergrits, L

    2002-01-01

    The blood flow immediately adjacent to the wall of a blood vessel or an artificial surface is of great interest. This flow defines the shear stress at the wall and is known to have a great physiological importance. The use of models is a viable method to investigate this flow. However, even in models the shear stress at the wall is difficult to assess. A new optical method is based on transparent models and uses particles in the model fluid, which are only visible near the wall. This is achieved with a model fluid having a defined opacity. This fluid obscures particles in the center of the models, but permits the observation and recording of particles close to the wall. The method has been applied for Hagen-Poiseuille flow and for the likewise well researched flow in a tube with a sudden expansion. PMID:12122270

  8. A phenomenological model of coating/substrate adhesion and interfacial bimetallic peeling stress in composite mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, Paul M.; Lawson, Daniel D.

    1990-01-01

    Adhesion and interfacial stress between metal films and structural composite material substrates is discussed. A theoretical and conceptual basis for selecting coating materials for composite mirror substrates is described. A phenomenological model that interrelates cohesive tensile strength of thin film coatings and interfacial peeling stresses is presented. The model serves as a basis in determining gradiated materials response and compatibility of composite substrate and coating combinations. Parametric evaluation of material properties and geometrical factors such as coating thickness are used to determine the threshold stress levels for maintaining adhesion at the different interfaces.

  9. A theoretical model of sheath fold morphology in simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reber, Jacqueline E.; Dabrowski, Marcin; Galland, Olivier; Schmid, Daniel W.

    2013-04-01

    Sheath folds are highly non-cylindrical structures often associated with shear zones. The geometry of sheath folds, especially cross-sections perpendicular to the stretching direction that display eye-patterns, have been used in the field to deduce kinematic information such as shear sense and bulk strain type. However, how sheath folds form and how they evolve with increasing strain is still a matter of debate. We investigate the formation of sheath folds around a weak inclusion acting as a slip surface in simple shear by means of an analytical model. We systematically vary the slip surface orientation and shape and evaluate the impact on the evolving eye-pattern. In addition we compare our results to existing classifications. Based on field observations it has been suggested that the shear sense of a shear zone can be determined by knowing the position of the center of an eye-pattern and the closing direction of the corresponding sheath fold. In our modeled sheath folds we can observe for a given strain that the center of the eye-structure is subject to change in height with respect to the upper edge of the outermost closed contour for different cross-sections perpendicular to the shear direction. This results in a large variability in layer thickness, questioning the usefulness of sheath folds as shear sense indicators. The location of the center of the eye structure, however, is largely invariant to the initial configurations of the slip surface as well as to strain. It has been suggested that the ratio of the aspect ratio of the innermost and outermost closed contour in eye-patterns could be linked to the bulk strain type based on filed observations. We apply this classification to our modeled sheath folds and we observe that the values of the aspect ratios of the closed contours within the eye-pattern are dependent on the strain and the cross-section location. The ratio (R') of the aspect ratios of the outermost closed contour (Ryz) and the innermost closed

  10. Shear mechanical properties of the spleen: experiment and analytical modelling.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, S; Noguer, L; Palierne, J-F

    2012-05-01

    This paper aims at providing the first shear mechanical properties of spleen tissue. Rheometric tests on porcine splenic tissues were performed in the linear and nonlinear regime, revealing a weak frequency dependence of the dynamic moduli in linear regime and a distinct strain-hardening effect in nonlinear regime. These behaviours are typical of soft tissues such as kidney and liver, with however a less pronounced strain-hardening for the spleen. An analytical model based on power laws is then proposed to describe the general shear viscoelastic behaviour of the spleen. PMID:22498291

  11. Tests Of Shear-Flow Model For Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrot, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1992-01-01

    Tests described in report conducted to validate two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determination of acoustic impedance of acoustic liner in grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment by use of infinite-waveguide method. Tests successful for both upstream and downstream propagations. Work has potential for utility in testing of engine ducts in commercial aircraft.

  12. Material characterization and modeling with shear ography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Callahan, Virginia

    1993-01-01

    Shearography has emerged as a useful technique for nondestructible evaluation and materials characterization of aerospace materials. A suitable candidate for the technique is to determine the response of debonds on foam-metal interfaces such as the TPS system on the External Tank. The main thrust is to develop a model which allows valid interpretation of shearographic information on TPS type systems. Confirmation of the model with shearographic data will be performed.

  13. Nonlinear Reynolds stress model for turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, J. Michael; Rubinstein, R.; Kirtley, K. R.

    1991-01-01

    A nonlinear algebraic Reynolds stress model, derived using the renormalization group, is applied to equilibrium homogeneous shear flow and fully developed flow in a square duct. The model, which is quadratically nonlinear in the velocity gradients, successfully captures the large-scale inhomogeneity and anisotropy of the flows studied. The ratios of normal stresses, as well as the actual magnitudes of the stresses are correctly predicted for equilibrium homogeneous shear flow. Reynolds normal stress anisotropy and attendant turbulence driven secondary flow are predicted for a square duct. Profiles of mean velocity and normal stresses are in good agreement with measurements. Very close to walls, agreement with measurements diminishes. The model has the benefit of containing no arbitrary constants; all values are determined directly from the theory. It seems that near wall behavior is influenced by more than the large scale anisotropy accommodated in the current model. More accurate near wall calculations may well require a model for anisotropic dissipation.

  14. An Air-water Interfacial Area Based Variable Tortuosity Model for Unsaturated Sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleel, R.; Saripalli, P.

    2005-12-01

    A new variable tortuosity definition is introduced that is based on the immiscible fluid (air-water) interfacial area. Unsaturated media tortuosity (τa) is defined as the ratio of aaw to aaw,o where aaw is the estimated air-water interfacial area in a real unsaturated medium (i.e., a soil sample), and aaw,o is the same variable for the corresponding, idealized capillary bundle. We establish equivalence between the real and the idealized media by letting the laboratory-measured retention curve calculate the distribution of capillary tubes, thereby resulting in an identical pore-size distribution but a new retention curve for the idealized medium. The air-water interfacial area for both real and idealized media is directly proportional to the area under their respective retention curves. With τ being the saturated tortuosity, we relate the variable tortuosity ratio (ττa) to the Seɛ term in Mualem's (ɛ=0.5) and Burdine's (ɛ=2) pore-size distribution models. Thus, instead of using tortuosity and/or pore connectivity formulations that have empirical exponents of either 0.5 or 2, the new model depends on variable interfacial area for varying saturation and soil texture, as reflected in the measured retention data. We tested the new definition of tortuosity for 22 repacked Hanford sediments that are comprised of mostly coarse and fine sands but some also contain a sizeable fraction (as high as 27%) of fines (silt and clay). Replacing the Se2 term in van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM) model by the new interfacial area based variable tortuosity ratio, and still using saturated conductivity and retention parameters, as used in the conventional approach, we obtain interfacial area based K(θ) predictions that are nearly identical to the conventional VGM model predictions. We also compare the interfacial area based K(θ) predictions with the standard Brooks-Corey-Burdine (BCB) model predictions. Compared to the VGM model predictions, interfacial area based BCB K(θ) predictions

  15. Interfacial free energy adjustable phase field crystal model for homogeneous nucleation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Huang, Yunhao

    2016-05-18

    To describe the homogeneous nucleation process, an interfacial free energy adjustable phase-field crystal model (IPFC) was proposed by reconstructing the energy functional of the original phase field crystal (PFC) methodology. Compared with the original PFC model, the additional interface term in the IPFC model effectively can adjust the magnitude of the interfacial free energy, but does not affect the equilibrium phase diagram and the interfacial energy anisotropy. The IPFC model overcame the limitation that the interfacial free energy of the original PFC model is much less than the theoretical results. Using the IPFC model, we investigated some basic issues in homogeneous nucleation. From the viewpoint of simulation, we proceeded with an in situ observation of the process of cluster fluctuation and obtained quite similar snapshots to colloidal crystallization experiments. We also counted the size distribution of crystal-like clusters and the nucleation rate. Our simulations show that the size distribution is independent of the evolution time, and the nucleation rate remains constant after a period of relaxation, which are consistent with experimental observations. The linear relation between logarithmic nucleation rate and reciprocal driving force also conforms to the steady state nucleation theory. PMID:27117814

  16. Evaluation of Shear-Induced Platelet Activation Models Under Constant and Dynamic Shear Stress Loading Conditions Relevant to Devices

    PubMed Central

    Sheriff, Jawaad; Soares, João Silva; Xenos, Michalis; Jesty, Jolyon; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-01-01

    The advent of implantable blood-recirculating devices such as left ventricular assist devices and prosthetic heart valves provides a viable therapy for patients with end-stage heart failure and valvular disease. However, device-generated pathological flow patterns result in thromboembolic complications that require complex and lifelong anticoagulant therapy, which entails hemorrhagic risks and is not appropriate for certain patients. Optimizing the thrombogenic performance of such devices utilizing numerical simulations requires the development of predictive platelet activation models that account for variations in shear-loading rates characterizing blood flow through such devices. Platelets were exposed in vitro to both dynamic and constant shear stress conditions emulating those found in blood-recirculating devices in order to determine their shear-induced activation and sensitization response. Both these behaviors were found to be dependent on the shear loading rates, in addition to shear stress magnitude and exposure time. We then critically examined several current models and evaluated their predictive capabilities using these results. Shear loading rate terms were then included to account for dynamic aspects that are either ignored or partially considered by these models, and model parameters were optimized. Independent optimization for each of the two types of shear stress exposure conditions tested resulted in different sets of best-fit constants, indicating that universal optimization may not be possible. Inherent limitations of the current models require a paradigm shift from these integral-based discretized power law models to better address the dynamic conditions encountered in blood-recirculating devices. PMID:23400312

  17. An identification algorithm of model kinetic parameters of the interfacial layer growth in fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubov, V.; Lurie, S.; Solyaev, Y.

    2016-04-01

    This paper considers the identification algorithm of parameters included in a parabolic law that is often used to predict the time dependence of the thickness of the interfacial layers in the structure of composite materials based on a metal matrix. The incubation period of the process and the speed of reaction and pressure are taken into account. The proposed algorithm of identification is based on the introduction of a minimized objective function of a special kind. The problem of identification of unknown parameters in the parabolic law is formulated in a variational form. The authors of the paper have determined the desired parameters, under which the objective function has a minimum value. It is shown that on the basis of four known experimental values of the interfacial layer thickness, corresponding to different values of temperature, pressure and the time of the interfacial layer growth, it is possible to identified four model parameters. They are the activation energy, a pre-exponential parameter, the delay time of the start of the interfacial layer formation, and the parameter determining the pressure effect on the rate of interfacial layer growth. The stability of the proposed identification algorithm is also studied.

  18. Transient shear flow of model lithium lubricating greases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, M. A.; Franco, J. M.; Valencia, C.; Kuhn, E.; Gallegos, C.

    2009-03-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of the transient shear flow behavior of lithium lubricating greases differing in soap concentration and base oil viscosity. The shear-induced evolution of grease microstructure has been studied by means of stress-growth experiments. With this aim, different lubricating grease formulations were manufactured by modifying the concentration of lithium 12-hydroxystearate and the viscosity of the base oil, according to a RSM statistical design. Moreover, atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations were carried out. The transient stress response can be successfully described by the generalized Leider-Bird model based on two exponential terms. Different rheological parameters, related to both the elastic response and the structural breakdown of greases, have been analysed. In this sense, it has been found that the elastic properties of lithium lubricating greases were highly influenced by soap concentration and oil viscosity. The stress overshoot, τ max , depends linearly on both variables in the whole shear rate range studied, although the effect of base oil viscosity on this parameter is opposite at low and high shear rates. Special attention has been given to the first part of the stress-growth curve. In this sense, it can be deduced that the “yielding” energy density not only depends on grease composition, but also on shear rate. Moreover, an interesting asymptotic tendency has been found for both the “yielding” energy density and the stress overshoot by increasing shear rate. The asymptotic values of these parameters have been correlated to the friction coefficient obtained in a ball-disc tribometer.

  19. Characterizing and Modeling Brittle Bi-material Interfaces Subjected to Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anyfantis, Konstantinos N.; Berggreen, Christian

    2014-12-01

    This work is based on the investigation, both experimentally and numerically, of the Mode II fracture process and bond strength of bondlines formed in co-cured composite/metal joints. To this end, GFRP-to-steel double strap joints were tested in tension, so that the bi-material interface was subjected to shear with debonding occurring under Mode II conditions. The study of the debonding process and thus failure of the joints was based both on stress and energy considerations. Analytical formulas were utilized for the derivation of the respective shear strength and fracture toughness measures which characterize the bi-material interface, by considering the joint's failure load, geometry and involved materials. The derived stress and toughness magnitudes were further utilized as the parameters of an extrinsic cohesive law, applied in connection with the modeling the bi-material interface in a finite element simulation environment. It was concluded that interfacial fracture in the considered joints was driven by the fracture toughness and not by strength considerations, and that LEFM is well suited to analyze the failure of the joint. Additionally, the double strap joint geometry was identified and utilized as a characterization test for measuring the Mode II fracture toughness of brittle bi-material interfaces.

  20. A new method for modeling rough membrane surface and calculation of interfacial interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Leihong; Zhang, Meijia; He, Yiming; Chen, Jianrong; Hong, Huachang; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Membrane fouling control necessitates the establishment of an effective method to assess interfacial interactions between foulants and rough surface membrane. This study proposed a new method which includes a rigorous mathematical equation for modeling membrane surface morphology, and combination of surface element integration (SEI) method and the composite Simpson's approach for assessment of interfacial interactions. The new method provides a complete solution to quantitatively calculate interfacial interactions between foulants and rough surface membrane. Application of this method in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) showed that, high calculation accuracy could be achieved by setting high segment number, and moreover, the strength of three energy components and energy barrier was remarkably impaired by the existence of roughness on the membrane surface, indicating that membrane surface morphology exerted profound effects on membrane fouling in the MBR. Good agreement between calculation prediction and fouling phenomena was found, suggesting the feasibility of this method. PMID:26519696

  1. A Model for the Interfacial Kinetics of Phospholipase D Activity on Long-Chain Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Majd, Sheereen; Yusko, Erik C.; Yang, Jerry; Sept, David; Mayer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The membrane-active enzyme phospholipase D (PLD) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond in phospholipids and plays a critical role in cell signaling. This catalytic reaction proceeds on lipid-water interfaces and is an example of heterogeneous catalysis in biology. Recently we showed that planar lipid bilayers, a previously unexplored model membrane for these kinetic studies, can be used for monitoring interfacial catalytic reactions under well-defined experimental conditions with chemical and electrical access to both sides of the lipid membrane. Employing an assay that relies on the conductance of the pore-forming peptide gramicidin A to monitor PLD activity, the work presented here reveals the kinetics of hydrolysis of long-chain phosphatidylcholine lipids in situ. We have developed an extension of a basic kinetic model for interfacial catalysis that includes product activation and substrate depletion. This model describes the kinetic behavior very well and reveals two kinetic parameters, the specificity constant and the interfacial quality constant. This approach results in a simple and general model to account for product accumulation in interfacial enzyme kinetics. PMID:23823233

  2. Interfacial instability of thin liquid films at the walls of a parallel-plate channel, sheared by pressure-driven gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vécsei, Miklós; Dietzel, Mathias; Hardt, Steffen

    2015-11-01

    Gas flow between liquid films is a commonly used model system for flows in the respiratory system and is also present during flow boiling in microchannels. The emergence of long-wavelength interfacial instabilities due to viscous stresses is a well-known property of these systems. We show that its description is often reducible to two coupled partial differential equations. Thus the characteristic quantities, such as the most unstable wavelength and the marginally stable wavenumber, can be obtained in a straightforward manner from the linear stability analysis. The analysis of the weakly nonlinear equations shows that if the material properties of the liquid films and their undisturbed thicknesses are identical, their interfaces should only be destabilized by the inertial forces. Moreover, for this configuration the emerging patterns on the two interfaces are found to be identical in the long-time limit. A different setup, where the liquid films have identical material properties, but their undisturbed thicknesses differ, is studied numerically. The results show that even for this configuration the interfacial deformations of the two films remain closely correlated for a broad range of parameters.

  3. Shear-free anisotropic cosmological models in {f (R)} gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abebe, Amare; Momeni, Davood; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2016-04-01

    We study a class of shear-free, homogeneous but anisotropic cosmological models with imperfect matter sources in the context of f( R) gravity. We show that the anisotropic stresses are related to the electric part of the Weyl tensor in such a way that they balance each other. We also show that within the class of orthogonal f( R) models, small perturbations of shear are damped, and that the electric part of the Weyl tensor and the anisotropic stress tensor decay with the expansion as well as the heat flux of the curvature fluid. Specializing in locally rotationally symmetric spacetimes in orthonormal frames, we examine the late-time behaviour of the de Sitter universe in f( R) gravity. For the Starobinsky model of f( R), we study the evolutionary behavior of the Universe by numerically integrating the Friedmann equation, where the initial conditions for the expansion, acceleration and jerk parameters are taken from observational data.

  4. A model for flash heating in sheared fault gouge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Jean; Elbanna, Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    We develop a model for sheared gouge layers that accounts for the local increase in temperature at the grain contacts during sliding. We use the shear transformation zone (STZ) theory, a statistical thermodynamic theory, to describe irreversible macroscopic plastic deformations due to local rearrangements of the gouge particles. We track the temperature evolution at the grain contacts using a one dimensional heat diffusion equation. Our model predicts a logarithmic rate dependence of the steady state shear stress in the quasi-static regime. In the dense flow regime the frictional strength decreases rapidly with increasing slip rate due to thermal softening at the granular interfaces. The transient response following a step in strain rate includes a direct effect and a following evolution effect, both of which depend on the magnitude and direction of the velocity step. In addition to frictional heat, the energy budget includes an additional energy sink representing the fraction of external work consumed in increasing local disorder. The model links low-speed and high-speed frictional response of gouge layers, and provides an essential ingredient for multiscale modeling of earthquake ruptures with enhanced coseismic weakening.

  5. Effects of oxygen plasma treatment on interfacial shear strength and post-peak residual strength of a PLGA fiber-reinforced brushite cement.

    PubMed

    Maenz, Stefan; Hennig, Max; Mühlstädt, Mike; Kunisch, Elke; Bungartz, Matthias; Brinkmann, Olaf; Bossert, Jörg; Kinne, Raimund W; Jandt, Klaus D

    2016-04-01

    Biodegradable calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are promising materials for minimally invasive treatment of bone defects. However, CPCs have low mechanical strength and fracture toughness. One approach to overcome these limitations is the modification of the CPC with reinforcing fibers. The matrix-fiber interfacial shear strength (ISS) is pivotal for the biomechanical properties of fiber-reinforced CPCs. The aim of the current study was to control the ISS between a brushite-forming CPC and degradable PLGA fibers by oxygen plasma treatment and to analyze the impact of the ISS alterations on its bulk mechanical properties. The ISS between CPC matrix and PLGA fibers, tested in a single-fiber pull-out test, increased up to 2.3-fold to max. 3.22±0.92MPa after fiber oxygen plasma treatment (100-300W, 1-10min), likely due to altered surface chemistry and morphology of the fibers. This ISS increase led to more efficient crack bridging and a subsequent increase of the post-peak residual strength at biomechanically relevant, moderate strains (up to 1%). At the same time, the work of fracture significantly decreased, possibly due to an increased proportion of fractured fibers unable to further absorb energy by frictional sliding. Flexural strength and flexural modulus were not affected by the oxygen plasma treatment. This study shows for the first time that the matrix-fiber ISS and some of the resulting mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced CPCs can be improved by chemical modifications such as oxygen plasma treatment, generating the possibility of avoiding catastrophic failures at the implant site and thus enhancing the applicability of biodegradable CPCs for the treatment of (load-bearing) bone defects. PMID:26875148

  6. Mathematical Modeling of Intravascular Blood Coagulation under Wall Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rukhlenko, Oleksii S.; Dudchenko, Olga A.; Zlobina, Ksenia E.; Guria, Georgy Th.

    2015-01-01

    Increased shear stress such as observed at local stenosis may cause drastic changes in the permeability of the vessel wall to procoagulants and thus initiate intravascular blood coagulation. In this paper we suggest a mathematical model to investigate how shear stress-induced permeability influences the thrombogenic potential of atherosclerotic plaques. Numerical analysis of the model reveals the existence of two hydrodynamic thresholds for activation of blood coagulation in the system and unveils typical scenarios of thrombus formation. The dependence of blood coagulation development on the intensity of blood flow, as well as on geometrical parameters of atherosclerotic plaque is described. Relevant parametric diagrams are drawn. The results suggest a previously unrecognized role of relatively small plaques (resulting in less than 50% of the lumen area reduction) in atherothrombosis and have important implications for the existing stenting guidelines. PMID:26222505

  7. Horizontal shear zones: physical modeling of formation and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokun, A. N.

    2009-11-01

    On examples of ductile viscous materials (pastes), which demonstrated the deformational type of coagulation behavior and the reproduced zones of the horizontal shear of a brittle fracture, ductile flow, and intermediate types. The formation of coagulation agglomerates appeared well organized, both in terms of time and structurally. The found systems of fractures revealed a sequential course of the deformation process and the contribution of each system in the total structural transformation was established. By virtue of rheological analysis of coagulation structures, the basic parameters (yield strength, viscosity), and their input into the model of the deformational response (brittle, ductile), were determined. The substantial composition and its deformational properties of the material under question appeared to dictate the structure of shear zones and their general mutual organization. The rheological analysis of coagulation clusters of model materials allowed for the justified interpretation of experimental data to regulate deformation processes effectively and predict their results.

  8. A numerical reduced model for thin liquid films sheared by a gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavalle, G.; Vila, J.-P.; Blanchard, G.; Laurent, C.; Charru, F.

    2015-11-01

    The non-linear dynamics of thin liquid films sheared by a laminar gas flow in a channel is investigated. Such a two-layer flow is driven by pressure gradient and possibly by the gravity force. We describe the liquid phase with a long-wave integral model, with the aim to save computational cost with respect to the full Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations. We derive this long-wave model by the integration of the Navier-Stokes equations over the film thickness, and by an asymptotic expansion up to the first order in terms of a long-wave parameter. These depth-integrated (or shallow water) equations are discretized by means of an augmented system, which holds an evolution equation for the surface tension in order to avoid numerical instabilities of classical upwind and centered schemes. On the other side, we study the gas phase with compressible Navier-Stokes equations, and we discretize them by means of a low-Mach scheme, accounting also for moving meshes (ALE). In order to analyze liquid-gas interactions, we introduce then a coupling methodology between depth-integrated equations and Navier-Stokes equations. This approach represents a compromise between the two existing methods: the full DNS, and the full long-wave model applied to both phases. In order to validate this approach, we present comparisons with DNS, showing a good agreement of spatio-temporal evolutions of the film thickness and the stress field. Furthermore, interfacial shear stress and pressure gradient evolutions are shown to be in accordance with those provided by two-layer second-order low-dimensional models.

  9. A local eddy viscosity model for turbulent shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortwerth, P. J.; Rabe, D. C.; Mcerlean, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    In the model described, the eddy viscosity is assumed to be a fluid property dependent on the state of the fluid locally, namely the local density, turbulent kinetic energy, turbulence scale, and Mach number. An empirical law was found which related eddy viscosity to these properties satisfactorily for free jets. This law is used without modification for a set of test cases in free shear layers, free-jet decay, coaxial mixing, and wakes. The scale of turbulence is taken as a constant at any axial location equal to the width of the shear layer. By utilizing the boundary-layer order-of-magnitude analysis, a coupled set of fluid dynamic equations is formulated, which of necessity includes the equation for the production of turbulent kinetic energy.

  10. A Computational Model of Deformable Cell Rolling in Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleton, Charles; Jadhav, Sameer

    2005-03-01

    Selectin-mediated rolling of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) on activated endothelium is critical to their recruitment to sites of inflammation. The cell rolling velocity is influenced by bond interactions on the molecular scale that oppose hydrodynamic forces at the mesoscale. Recent studies have shown that PMN rolling velocity on selectin-coated surfaces in shear flow is significantly slower compared to that of microspheres bearing a similar density of selectin ligands. To investigate whether cell deformability is responsible for these differences, we developed a 3-D computational model which simulates rolling of a deformable cell on a selectin-coated surface under shear flow with a stochastic description of receptor-ligand bond interaction. We observed that rolling velocity increases with increasing membrane stiffness and this effect is larger at high shear rates. The average bond lifetime, number of receptor-ligand bonds and the cell-substrate contact area decreased with increasing membrane stiffness. This study shows that cellular properties along with the kinetics of selectin-ligand interactions affect leukocyte rolling on selectin-coated surfaces.

  11. A review of Reynolds stress models for turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed review of recent developments in Reynolds stress modeling for incompressible turbulent shear flows is provided. The mathematical foundations of both two-equation models and full second-order closures are explored in depth. It is shown how these models can be systematically derived for two-dimensional mean turbulent flows that are close to equilibrium. A variety of examples are provided to demonstrate how well properly calibrated versions of these models perform for such flows. However, substantial problems remain for the description of more complex turbulent flows where there are large departures from equilibrium. Recent efforts to extend Reynolds stress models to nonequilibrium turbulent flows are discussed briefly along with the major modeling issues relevant to practical naval hydrodynamics applications.

  12. Application and improvement of Raupach's shear stress partitioning model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, B. A.; Lehning, M.; Gromke, C.

    2012-12-01

    Aeolian processes such as the entrainment, transport and redeposition of sand, soil or snow are able to significantly reshape the earth's surface. In times of increasing desertification and land degradation, often driven by wind erosion, investigations of aeolian processes become more and more important in environmental sciences. The reliable prediction of the sheltering effect of vegetation canopies against sediment erosion, for instance, is a clear practical application of such investigations to identify suitable and sustainable counteractive measures against wind erosion. This study presents an application and improvement of a theoretical model presented by Raupach (Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 1992, Vol.60, 375-395 and Journal of Geophysical Research, 1993, Vol.98, 3023-3029) which allows for quantifying the sheltering effect of vegetation against sediment erosion. The model predicts the shear stress ratios τS'/τ and τS''/τ. Here, τS is the part of the total shear stress τ that acts on the ground beneath the plants. The spatial peak τS'' of the surface shear stress is responsible for the onset of particle entrainment whereas the spatial mean τS' can be used to quantify particle mass fluxes. The precise and accurate prediction of these quantities is essential when modeling wind erosion. Measurements of the surface shear stress distributions τS(x,y) on the ground beneath live vegetation canopies (plant species: lolium perenne) were performed in a controlled wind tunnel environment to determine the model parameters and to evaluate the model performance. Rigid, non-porous wooden blocks instead of the plants were additionally tested for the purpose of comparison, since previous wind tunnel studies used exclusively artificial plant imitations for their experiments on shear stress partitioning. The model constant c, which is needed to determine the total stress τ for a canopy of interest and which remained rather unspecified to date, was found to be c ≈ 0

  13. Sinusoidal Forcing of Interfacial Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Fayaz; Raghunandan, Aditya; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Fluid transport, in vivo, is accomplished via pumping mechanisms of the heart and lungs, which results in biological fluids being subjected to oscillatory shear. Flow is known to influence biological macromolecules, but predicting the effect of shear is incomplete without also accounting for the influence of complex interfaces ubiquitous throughout the body. Here, we investigated the oscillatory response of the structure of aqueous interfacial films using a cylindrical knife edge viscometer. Vitamin K1 was used as a model monolayer because its behaviour has been thoroughly quantified and it doesn't show any measurable hysteresis. The monolayer was subjected to sinusoidal forcing under varied conditions of surface concentrations, periodic frequencies, and knife edge amplitudes. Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) data was collected using Brewster Angle Microscopy(BAM), revealing the influence of oscillatory interfacial shear stress on the monolayer. Insights were gained as to how the velocity profile dampens at specific distances from the knife edge contact depending on the amplitude, frequency, and concentration of Vitamin K1. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  14. Pore invasion dynamics during fluid front displacement - an interfacial front model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, F.; Or, D.

    2013-12-01

    The dynamics of fluid fronts in porous media shape subsequent phase distribution and the transport properties of the partially saturated region with implications ranging from gaseous transport to plant roots to extraction or injection of fluids to petroleum reservoirs. What macroscopically seems as a smooth and continuous motion of a displacement fluid front, involves numerous rapid pore-scale interfacial jumps often resembling avalanches of invasion events. We present a 2D model for simulating interfacial front displacement that was developed to study details of invasion dynamics at the front and to systematically study effects of boundary conditions on the resulting macroscopic properties after passage of a front. The interfacial front is represented by hydraulically connected sinusoidal capillaries allowing for redistribution and capillary pressure relaxation through exchange with neighboring interfaces. The model focuses on processes at the front and neglects interfacial redistribution left behind the front as well as saturated fluid flow below the front. The description of the dynamics of the rapid non-wetting fluid invasions induced by constant wetting fluid withdrawal includes capillary, viscous and hydrostatic component and inertia. Results show that the additional inertial force (not considered in previous studies) does significantly affect invasion pathways such as the hypothesized 'consecutive jumps'. The menisci jump velocities show a strong relation to geometrical throat dimensions that reflect local capillary gradients. The front model further enables to link boundary conditions (macroscopic Capillary number, throat size distribution) effects on pore invasion sequences and impact on residual wetting phase entrapment and front morphology. A limited comparison of model predictions with experimental results from sintered glass-beads micro-models will be presented.

  15. Recent numerical and algorithmic advances within the volume tracking framework for modeling interfacial flows

    SciTech Connect

    François, Marianne M.

    2015-05-28

    A review of recent advances made in numerical methods and algorithms within the volume tracking framework is presented. The volume tracking method, also known as the volume-of-fluid method has become an established numerical approach to model and simulate interfacial flows. Its advantage is its strict mass conservation. However, because the interface is not explicitly tracked but captured via the material volume fraction on a fixed mesh, accurate estimation of the interface position, its geometric properties and modeling of interfacial physics in the volume tracking framework remain difficult. Several improvements have been made over the last decade to address these challenges. In this study, the multimaterial interface reconstruction method via power diagram, curvature estimation via heights and mean values and the balanced-force algorithm for surface tension are highlighted.

  16. Recent numerical and algorithmic advances within the volume tracking framework for modeling interfacial flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    François, Marianne M.

    2015-05-28

    A review of recent advances made in numerical methods and algorithms within the volume tracking framework is presented. The volume tracking method, also known as the volume-of-fluid method has become an established numerical approach to model and simulate interfacial flows. Its advantage is its strict mass conservation. However, because the interface is not explicitly tracked but captured via the material volume fraction on a fixed mesh, accurate estimation of the interface position, its geometric properties and modeling of interfacial physics in the volume tracking framework remain difficult. Several improvements have been made over the last decade to address these challenges.more » In this study, the multimaterial interface reconstruction method via power diagram, curvature estimation via heights and mean values and the balanced-force algorithm for surface tension are highlighted.« less

  17. Elastic response of DNA molecules under the action of interfacial traction and stretching: An elastic thin rod model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ye; Huang, Zaixing; Qiang, Lei; Gao, Jun

    2015-11-01

    In a multivalent salt solution, a segment of DNA is modeled as an elastic rod subjected to the interfacial traction. The shooting method is used to calculate the equilibrium configurations of condensed DNA under the action of the longitudinal end-force and interfacial traction simultaneously. The results show that the shapes of DNA are mainly determined by the competition between the interfacial energy and elastic strain energy of stretching. The change of end-to-end distance with the longitudinal end-force is consistent with the worm-like chain (WLC) model. The higher the concentration is, the stronger the condensation of DNA.

  18. Spatiotemporal Oscillations and Rheochaos in a Simple Model of Shear Banding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, S. M.; Olmsted, P. D.

    2004-02-01

    We study a simple model of shear banding in which the flow-induced phase is destabilized by coupling between flow and microstructure (wormlike micellar length). By varying the strength of instability and the applied shear rate, we find a rich variety of oscillatory and chaotic shear banded flows. At low shear and weak instability, the induced phase pulsates next to one wall of the flow cell. For stronger instability, high shear pulses ricochet across the cell. At high shear we see oscillating bands on either side of central defects. We discuss our results in the context of recent experiments.

  19. Spatiotemporal oscillations and rheochaos in a simple model of shear banding.

    PubMed

    Fielding, S M; Olmsted, P D

    2004-02-27

    We study a simple model of shear banding in which the flow-induced phase is destabilized by coupling between flow and microstructure (wormlike micellar length). By varying the strength of instability and the applied shear rate, we find a rich variety of oscillatory and chaotic shear banded flows. At low shear and weak instability, the induced phase pulsates next to one wall of the flow cell. For stronger instability, high shear pulses ricochet across the cell. At high shear we see oscillating bands on either side of central defects. We discuss our results in the context of recent experiments. PMID:14995780

  20. The microstructure and rheology of a model, thixotropic nanoparticle gel under steady shear and large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS)

    SciTech Connect

    Min Kim, Jung; Kate Gurnon, A.; Wagner, Norman J.; Eberle, Aaron P. R.; Porcar, Lionel

    2014-09-01

    The microstructure-rheology relationship for a model, thermoreversible nanoparticle gel is investigated using a new technique of time-resolved neutron scattering under steady and time-resolved large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) flows. A 21 vol. % gel is tested with varying strength of interparticle attraction. Shear-induced structural anisotropy is observed as butterfly scattering patterns and quantified through an alignment factor. Measurements in the plane of flow show significant, local anisotropy develops with alignment along the compressional axis of flow, providing new insights into how gels flow. The microstructure-rheology relationship is analyzed through a new type of structure-Lissajous plot that shows how the anisotropic microstructure is responsible for the observed LAOS response, which is beyond a response expected for a purely viscous gel with constant structure. The LAOS shear viscosities are observed to follow the “Delaware-Rutgers” rule. Rheological and microstructural data are successfully compared across a broad range of conditions by scaling the shear rate by the strength of attraction, providing a method to compare behavior between steady shear and LAOS experiments. However, important differences remain between the microstructures measured at comparatively high frequency in LAOS experiments and comparable steady shear experiments that illustrate the importance of measuring the microstructure to properly interpret the nonlinear, dynamic rheological response.

  1. Interfacial Pressures and Shocks in a Multiphase Flow mix Model

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, D E

    2004-10-01

    Multiphase flow models have been proposed for use in situations which have combined Rayleigh-Taylor (RTI) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RMI) instabilities [2, 3]. Such an approach works poorly for the case of a heavy to light shock incidence on a developed interface. I suggest that this difficulty can be overcome by adding an additional source to the turbulence kinetic energy equation. A variety of constraints on such a source are considered. In this context it is observed that a new constraint on closures arises. This occurs because of the discontinuity within the shock responsible for the RMI. The proposed model (Shock Scattering) is shown to give useful results.

  2. Microstructural evolution of a model, shear-banding micellar solution during shear startup and cessation.

    PubMed

    López-Barrón, Carlos R; Gurnon, A Kate; Eberle, Aaron P R; Porcar, Lionel; Wagner, Norman J

    2014-04-01

    We present direct measurements of the evolution of the segmental-level microstructure of a stable shear-banding polymerlike micelle solution during flow startup and cessation in the plane of flow. These measurements provide a definitive, quantitative microstructural understanding of the stages observed during flow startup: an initial elastic response with limited alignment that yields with a large stress overshoot to a homogeneous flow with associated micellar alignment that persists for approximately three relaxation times. This transient is followed by a shear (kink) band formation with a flow-aligned low-viscosity band that exhibits shear-induced concentration fluctuations and coexists with a nearly isotropic band of homogenous, highly viscoelastic micellar solution. Stable, steady banding flow is achieved only after approximately two reptation times. Flow cessation from this shear-banded state is also found to be nontrivial, exhibiting an initial fast relaxation with only minor structural relaxation, followed by a slower relaxation of the aligned micellar fluid with the equilibrium fluid's characteristic relaxation time. These measurements resolve a controversy in the literature surrounding the mechanism of shear banding in entangled wormlike micelles and, by means of comparison to existing literature, provide further insights into the mechanisms driving shear-banding instabilities in related systems. The methods and instrumentation described should find broad use in exploring complex fluid rheology and testing microstructure-based constitutive equations. PMID:24827245

  3. A new energy transfer model for turbulent free shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.-W.

    1992-01-01

    A new model for the energy transfer mechanism in the large-scale turbulent kinetic energy equation is proposed. An estimate of the characteristic length scale of the energy containing large structures is obtained from the wavelength associated with the structures predicted by a weakly nonlinear analysis for turbulent free shear flows. With the inclusion of the proposed energy transfer model, the weakly nonlinear wave models for the turbulent large-scale structures are self-contained and are likely to be independent flow geometries. The model is tested against a plane mixing layer. Reasonably good agreement is achieved. Finally, it is shown by using the Liapunov function method, the balance between the production and the drainage of the kinetic energy of the turbulent large-scale structures is asymptotically stable as their amplitude saturates. The saturation of the wave amplitude provides an alternative indicator for flow self-similarity.

  4. Congruence of 3-D Whole Mantle Models of Shear Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziewonski, A. M.; Lekic, V.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    The range of shear velocity anomalies in published whole mantle models is considerable. This impedes drawing conclusions of importance for geodynamic modeling and for interpretation of mineral physics results. However, if one considers only the models that were built using data that are sensitive to mantle structure at all depths, these models show robust features in their power spectra as a function of depth. On this basis we propose that there are five depth intervals with distinct spectral characteristics. 1. Heterosphere (Moho - 300 km) is characterized by strong power spectrum relatively flat up to degree 6. With lateral shear wavespeed variations as large as 15%, this zone accounts for more than 50% of the entire heterogeneity in the mantle. Differences among models for different tectonic regions decrease rapidly below 300 km depth. 2. Upper mantle buffer zone (300- 500 km) has a flat spectrum and the overall power of heterogeneity drops by an order of magnitude compared to the region above. There may be still weak difference between continents and oceans, but the oceanic regions lose their age dependence. The spectral characteristics do not change across the 410 km discontinuity. 3. Transition zone (500 - 650 km) The degree 2 anomaly becomes dominant. There are long wavelength anomalies in regions of the fastest plate subduction during the last 15-20 Ma, suggesting slab ponding above the 650 km discontinuity. Several slower-than-average anomalies of unknown origin are present in this depth range. 4. Lower mantle buffer zone (650 - 2300 km) has a weak, flat spectrum without long wavelength velocity anomalies that could be interpreted as unfragmented subducted slabs. However, there are three relatively narrow and short high velocity anomalies under Peru, Tonga and Indonesia that may indicate limited slab penetration. 5 Abyssal layer (2300 - CMB) Strong spectrum dominated by degrees 2 and 3. The amplitude is the largest at the CMB and decreases rapidly up to

  5. Masked Areas in Shear Peak Statistics: A Forward Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, D.; Kratochvil, J. M.; Dawson, W.

    2016-03-01

    The statistics of shear peaks have been shown to provide valuable cosmological information beyond the power spectrum, and will be an important constraint of models of cosmology in forthcoming astronomical surveys. Surveys include masked areas due to bright stars, bad pixels etc., which must be accounted for in producing constraints on cosmology from shear maps. We advocate a forward-modeling approach, where the impacts of masking and other survey artifacts are accounted for in the theoretical prediction of cosmological parameters, rather than correcting survey data to remove them. We use masks based on the Deep Lens Survey, and explore the impact of up to 37% of the survey area being masked on LSST and DES-scale surveys. By reconstructing maps of aperture mass the masking effect is smoothed out, resulting in up to 14% smaller statistical uncertainties compared to simply reducing the survey area by the masked area. We show that, even in the presence of large survey masks, the bias in cosmological parameter estimation produced in the forward-modeling process is ≈1%, dominated by bias caused by limited simulation volume. We also explore how this potential bias scales with survey area and evaluate how much small survey areas are impacted by the differences in cosmological structure in the data and simulated volumes, due to cosmic variance.

  6. Shear modeling: thermoelasticity at high temperature and pressure for tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Orlikowski, D; Soderlind, P; Moriarty, J A

    2004-12-06

    For large-scale constitutive strength models the shear modulus is typically assumed to be linearly dependent on temperature. However, for materials compressed beyond the Hugoniot or in regimes where there is very little experimental data, accurate and validated models must be used. To this end, we present here a new methodology that fully accounts for electron- and ion-thermal contributions to the elastic moduli over broad ranges of temperature (<20,000 K) and pressure (<10 Mbar). In this approach, the full potential linear muffin-tin orbital (FP-LMTO) method for the cold and electron-thermal contributions is closely coupled with ion-thermal contributions. For the latter two separate approaches are used. In one approach, the quasi-harmonic, ion-thermal contribution is obtained through a Brillouin zone sum of strain derivatives of the phonons, and in the other a full anharmonic ion-thermal contribution is obtained directly through Monte Carlo (MC) canonical distribution averages of strain derivatives on the multi-ion potential itself. Both approaches use quantum-based interatomic potentials derived from model generalized pseudopotential theory (MGPT). For tantalum, the resulting elastic moduli are compared to available ultrasonic measurements and diamond-anvil-cell compression experiments. Over the range of temperature and pressure considered, the results are then used in a polycrystalline averaging for the shear modulus to assess the linear temperature dependence for Ta.

  7. Additional interfacial force in lattice Boltzmann models for incompressible multiphase flows.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Luo, K H; Gao, Y J; He, Y L

    2012-02-01

    The existing lattice Boltzmann models for incompressible multiphase flows are mostly constructed with two distribution functions: one is the order parameter distribution function, which is used to track the interface between different phases, and the other is the pressure distribution function for solving the velocity field. In this paper, it is shown that in these models the recovered momentum equation is inconsistent with the target one: an additional force is included in the recovered momentum equation. The additional force has the following features. First, it is proportional to the macroscopic velocity. Second, it is zero in every single-phase region but is nonzero in the interface. Therefore it can be interpreted as an interfacial force. To investigate the effects of the additional interfacial force, numerical simulations are carried out for the problem of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, droplet splashing on a thin liquid film, and the evolution of a falling droplet under gravity. Numerical results demonstrate that, with the increase of the velocity or the Reynolds number, the additional interfacial force will gradually have an important influence on the interface and affect the numerical accuracy. PMID:22463354

  8. Modeling of Interfacial Modification Effects on Thermal Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of functionalization of carbon nanotubes on the thermal conductivity of nanocomposites has been studied using a multi-scale modeling approach. These results predict that grafting linear hydrocarbon chains to the surface of a single wall carbon nanotube with covalent chemical bonds should result in a significant increase in the thermal conductivity of these nanocomposites. This is due to the decrease in the interfacial thermal (Kapitza) resistance between the single wall carbon nanotube and the surrounding polymer matrix upon chemical functionalization. The nanocomposites studied here consist of single wall carbon nanotubes in a bulk poly(ethylene vinyl acetate) matrix. The nanotubes are functionalized by end-grafting linear hydrocarbon chains of varying length to the surface of the nanotube. The effect which this functionalization has on the interfacial thermal resistance is studied by molecular dynamics simulation. Interfacial thermal resistance values are calculated for a range of chemical grafting densities and with several chain lengths. These results are subsequently used in an analytical model to predict the resulting effect on the bulk thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite.

  9. An air-water interfacial area based variable tortuosity model for unsaturated sands

    SciTech Connect

    Khaleel, Raziuddin; Saripalli, Prasad

    2006-05-01

    Based on Kozeny-Carman equation for saturated media permeability, a new model is developed for the prediction of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, K as a function of moisture content, ?. The K(???) estimates are obtained using laboratory measurements of moisture retention and saturated hydraulic conductivity, and a saturation-dependent tortuosity based on the immiscible fluid (air-water) interfacial area. Tortuosity (?a) for unsaturated media is defined as aaw/aaw,o (ratio of the specific air-water interfacial area of a real and the corresponding idealized porous medium). A correspondence between the real and idealized media is established by using the laboratory-measured soil moisture retention curve to calculate the interfacial area. The general trend in prediction of ?a as a function water saturation is in agreement with similar recent predictions based on diffusion theory. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivities measured for a number of coarse-textured, repacked Hanford sediments agree well with predictions based on the modified Kozeny-Carman relation. Because of the use of saturated hydraulic conductivity, a slight bias is apparent in measured and predicted K at low ?. While the modified Kozeny-Carman relation was found to be reasonably accurate in predicting K(??) for the repacked, sandy soils considered in this study, a further testing of the new model for undisturbed sediments and other soil textures would be useful.

  10. Interfacial properties in a discrete model for tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moglia, Belén; Guisoni, Nara; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2013-03-01

    We propose and study, by means of Monte Carlo numerical simulations, a minimal discrete model for avascular tumor growth, which can also be applied for the description of cell cultures in vitro. The interface of the tumor is self-affine and its width can be characterized by the following exponents: (i) the growth exponent β=0.32(2) that governs the early time regime, (ii) the roughness exponent α=0.49(2) related to the fluctuations in the stationary regime, and (iii) the dynamic exponent z=α/β≃1.49(2), which measures the propagation of correlations in the direction parallel to the interface, e.g., ξ∝t1/z, where ξ is the parallel correlation length. Therefore, the interface belongs to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class, in agreement with recent experiments of cell cultures in vitro. Furthermore, density profiles of the growing cells are rationalized in terms of traveling waves that are solutions of the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation. In this way, we achieved excellent agreement between the simulation results of the discrete model and the continuous description of the growth front of the culture or tumor.

  11. Shear viscosity of a model for confined granular media.

    PubMed

    Soto, Rodrigo; Risso, Dino; Brito, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    The shear viscosity in the dilute regime of a model for confined granular matter is studied by simulations and kinetic theory. The model consists on projecting into two dimensions the motion of vibrofluidized granular matter in shallow boxes by modifying the collision rule: besides the restitution coefficient that accounts for the energy dissipation, there is a separation velocity that is added in each collision in the normal direction. The two mechanisms balance on average, producing stationary homogeneous states. Molecular dynamics simulations show that in the steady state the distribution function departs from a Maxwellian, with cumulants that remain small in the whole range of inelasticities. The shear viscosity normalized with stationary temperature presents a clear dependence with the inelasticity, taking smaller values compared to the elastic case. A Boltzmann-like equation is built and analyzed using linear response theory. It is found that the predictions show an excellent agreement with the simulations when the correct stationary distribution is used but a Maxwellian approximation fails in predicting the inelasticity dependence of the viscosity. These results confirm that transport coefficients depend strongly on the mechanisms that drive them to stationary states. PMID:25615082

  12. Shear viscosity of a model for confined granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Rodrigo; Risso, Dino; Brito, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    The shear viscosity in the dilute regime of a model for confined granular matter is studied by simulations and kinetic theory. The model consists on projecting into two dimensions the motion of vibrofluidized granular matter in shallow boxes by modifying the collision rule: besides the restitution coefficient that accounts for the energy dissipation, there is a separation velocity that is added in each collision in the normal direction. The two mechanisms balance on average, producing stationary homogeneous states. Molecular dynamics simulations show that in the steady state the distribution function departs from a Maxwellian, with cumulants that remain small in the whole range of inelasticities. The shear viscosity normalized with stationary temperature presents a clear dependence with the inelasticity, taking smaller values compared to the elastic case. A Boltzmann-like equation is built and analyzed using linear response theory. It is found that the predictions show an excellent agreement with the simulations when the correct stationary distribution is used but a Maxwellian approximation fails in predicting the inelasticity dependence of the viscosity. These results confirm that transport coefficients depend strongly on the mechanisms that drive them to stationary states.

  13. Mathematical model for self-propelled droplets driven by interfacial tension.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Ken H; Tachibana, Kunihito; Tobe, Yuta; Kazama, Masaki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Omata, Seiro; Nagayama, Masaharu

    2016-03-21

    We propose a model for the spontaneous motion of a droplet induced by inhomogeneity in interfacial tension. The model is derived from a variation of the Lagrangian of the system and we use a time-discretized Morse flow scheme to perform its numerical simulations. Our model can naturally simulate the dynamics of a single droplet, as well as that of multiple droplets, where the volume of each droplet is conserved. We reproduced the ballistic motion and fission of a droplet, and the collision of two droplets was also examined numerically. PMID:27004893

  14. Mathematical model for self-propelled droplets driven by interfacial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Ken H.; Tachibana, Kunihito; Tobe, Yuta; Kazama, Masaki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Omata, Seiro; Nagayama, Masaharu

    2016-03-01

    We propose a model for the spontaneous motion of a droplet induced by inhomogeneity in interfacial tension. The model is derived from a variation of the Lagrangian of the system and we use a time-discretized Morse flow scheme to perform its numerical simulations. Our model can naturally simulate the dynamics of a single droplet, as well as that of multiple droplets, where the volume of each droplet is conserved. We reproduced the ballistic motion and fission of a droplet, and the collision of two droplets was also examined numerically.

  15. Thermodynamic Model for Fluid-Fluid Interfacial Areas in Porous Media for Arbitrary Drainage-Imbibition Sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Schroth, Martin H.; Oostrom, Mart; Dobson, Richard; Zeyer, Josef

    2008-08-01

    Fluid/fluid interfacial areas are important in controlling the rate of mass and energy transfer between fluid phases in porous media. We present a modified thermodynamically based model (TBM) to predict fluid/fluid interfacial areas in porous media for arbitrary drainage/imbibition sequences. The TBM explicitly distinguishes between interfacial areas associated with continuous (free) and isolated (entrapped) nonwetting fluids. The model is restricted to two-fluid systems in which (1) no significant conversion of mechanical work into heat occurs, (2) the wetting fluid completely wets the porous medium’s solid surfaces, and (3) no changes in interfacial area due to mass transfer between phases occur. We show example calculations for two different drainage/imbibition sequences in two porous media: a highly uniform silica sand and a well-graded silt. The TBM’s predictions for interfacial area associated with free nonwetting-fluid are identical to those of a previously published geometry-based model (GBM). However, predictions for interfacial area associated with entrapped nonwetting-fluid are consistently larger in the TBM than in the GBM. Although a comparison of model predictions with experimental data is currently only possible to a limited extent, good general agreement was found for the TBM. As required model parameters are commonly used as inputs for or tracked during multifluid-flow simulations, the modified TBM may be easily incorporated in numerical codes.

  16. Shear transmission mechanical model of circular plate MR clutch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Huang, J. W.; Yang, Y.; Liu, J. N.

    2003-09-01

    The operational principle of a circular plate magnetorheological (MR) clutch is introduced. The Bingham model is used to describe the constitutive characteristics of the MR fluids between two circular plates subject to an applied magnetic field. Associated with geometric shape and applied magnetic field onto the clutch, the mathematical model to transmit the torque is established. The expressions of the torque and the output speed are derived to provide the theoretical foundation for the analysis of the clutch. The numerical results indicate that the MR clutch transmits the torque by the shear stress of the fluid. The torque and the output speed can be controlled continuously by changing the strength of the applied magnetic field. With the increase of the gap between two circular plates, the torque decreases.

  17. Effect of Pd Thickness on the Interfacial Reaction and Shear Strength in Solder Joints Between Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu Solder and Electroless Nickel/Electroless Palladium/Immersion Gold (ENEPIG) Surface Finish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Min; Park, Jin-Young; Kim, Young-Ho

    2012-04-01

    Intermetallic compound formation at the interface between Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu (SAC) solders and electroless nickel/electroless palladium/immersion gold (ENEPIG) surface finish and the mechanical strength of the solder joints were investigated at various Pd thicknesses (0 μm to 0.5 μm). The solder joints were fabricated on the ENEPIG surface finish with SAC solder via reflow soldering under various conditions. The (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 phase formed at the SAC/ENEPIG interface after reflow in all samples. When samples were reflowed at 260°C for 5 s, only (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 was observed at the solder interfaces in samples with Pd thicknesses of 0.05 μm or less. However, the (Pd,Ni)Sn4 phase formed on (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 when the Pd thickness increased to 0.1 μm or greater. A thick and continuous (Pd,Ni)Sn4 layer formed over the (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 layer, especially when the Pd thickness was 0.3 μm or greater. High-speed ball shear test results showed that the interfacial strengths of the SAC/ENEPIG solder joints decreased under high strain rate due to weak interfacial fracture between (Pd,Ni)Sn4 and (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 interfaces when the Pd thickness was greater than 0.3 μm. In the samples reflowed at 260°C for 20 s, only (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 formed at the solder interfaces and the (Pd,Ni)Sn4 phase was not observed in the solder interfaces, regardless of Pd thickness. The shear strength of the SAC/ENIG solder joints was the lowest of the joints, and the mechanical strength of the SAC/ENEPIG solder joints was enhanced as the Pd thickness increased to 0.1 μm and maintained a nearly constant value when the Pd thickness was greater than 0.1 μm. No adverse effect on the shear strength values was observed due to the interfacial fracture between (Pd,Ni)Sn4 and (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 since the (Pd,Ni)Sn4 phase was already separated from the (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 interface. These results indicate that the interfacial microstructures and mechanical strength of solder joints strongly depend on the Pd thickness and reflow conditions.

  18. Biomolecular motor-driven microtubule translocation in the presence of shear flow: modeling microtubule deflection due to shear.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taesung; Meyhöfer, Edgar; Hasselbrink, Ernest F

    2007-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that shear flow aligns microtubules moving on kinesin-coated microchannels with the flow direction, and statistically analyzed the rate of microtubule alignment under different concentrations of kinesin as well as strengths of shear flow. These data qualitatively support the hypothesis that the alignment results from the leading ends of translocating microtubules bending into the direction of the flow due to viscous drag force. Here, we present a cantilever-beam model that quantitatively shows agreement between this hypothesis and observation. Specifically, the model couples the exact nonlinear solution for cantilever-beam deflection with drag coefficients determined by numerical simulations of microtubules in the presence of shear flow near a wall. Coupled with flexural rigidity results of our previous study (which used electric fields), the established model successfully predicts new experimental data for microtubule bending in response to shear flow, further supporting our hypothesis for the mechanism of microtubule alignment. We expect that the newly-calculated drag coefficients and beam-bending model may be useful for biophysical studies as well as interpretation of in vivo data and the design of kinesin/microtubule-based devices. PMID:17522979

  19. Draft: Modeling Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media Including Fluid-Fluid Interfacial Area

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Niessner, Jennifer; Hassanizadeh, S Majid

    2008-01-01

    We present a new numerical model for macro-scale twophase flow in porous media which is based on a physically consistent theory of multi-phase flow.The standard approach for modeling the flow of two fluid phases in a porous medium consists of a continuity equation for each phase, an extended form of Darcy’s law as well as constitutive relationships for relative permeability and capillary pressure. This approach is known to have a number of important shortcomings and, in particular, it does not account for the presence and role of fluid - fluid interfaces. An alternative is to use an extended model which is founded on thermodynamic principles and is physically consistent. In addition to the standard equations, the model uses a balance equation for specific interfacial area. The constitutive relationship for capillary pressure involves not only saturation, but also specific interfacial area. We show how parameters can be obtained for the alternative model using experimental data from a new kind of flow cell and present results of a numerical modeling study

  20. Critical transition for the edge shear layer formation: Comparison of model and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B. A.; Garcia, L.; Pedrosa, M. A.; Hidalgo, C.

    2006-12-15

    The experimental results for the emergence of the plasma edge shear flow layer in TJ-II [C. Alehaldre et al.Fusion Technol. 17, 131 (1990)] can be explained using a simple model for a second-order transition based on the sheared flow amplification by Reynolds stress and turbulence suppression by shearing. In the dynamics of the model, the resistive interchange instability is used. This model gives power dependence on density gradients before and after the transition, consistent with experiment.

  1. New charged shear-free relativistic models with heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyonyi, Y.; Maharaj, S. D.; Govinder, K. S.

    2013-11-01

    We study shear-free spherically symmetric relativistic gravitating fluids with heat flow and electric charge. The solution to the Einstein-Maxwell system is governed by the generalised pressure isotropy condition which contains a contribution from the electric field. This condition is a highly nonlinear partial differential equation. We analyse this master equation using Lie's group theoretic approach. The Lie symmetry generators that leave the equation invariant are found. The first generator is independent of the electromagnetic field. The second generator depends critically on the form of the charge, which is determined explicitly in general. We provide exact solutions to the gravitational potentials using the symmetries admitted by the equation. Our new exact solutions contain earlier results without charge. We show that other charged solutions, related to the Lie symmetries, may be generated using the algorithm of Deng. This leads to new classes of charged Deng models which are generalisations of conformally flat metrics.

  2. Investigation of interfacial shear strength in a SiC fibre/Ti-24Al-11Nb composite by a fibre push-out technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Brindley, P. K.

    1989-01-01

    A fiber push-out technique applied at several sample thicknesses was used to determine both the debond shear stress and the frictional shear stress at the fiber-matrix interface at room temperautre for a unidirectional SiC fiber-reinforced T-24Al-11Nb (in at. pct) composite prepared by a powder cloth technique. The push-out technique measures the separate contributions of bond strength and friction to the mechanical shear strength at the fiber-matrix interface. It was found that the fiber-matrix bond shear strength of this material is significantly higher than the fiber-matrix frictional shear stress (119.2 and 47.8 MPa, respectively).

  3. Exploiting similarity in turbulent shear flows for turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David F.; Harris, Julius E.; Hassan, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that current k-epsilon models cannot predict the flow over a flat plate and its wake. In an effort to address this issue and other issues associated with turbulence closure, a new approach for turbulence modeling is proposed which exploits similarities in the flow field. Thus, if we consider the flow over a flat plate and its wake, then in addition to taking advantage of the log-law region, we can exploit the fact that the flow becomes self-similar in the far wake. This latter behavior makes it possible to cast the governing equations as a set of total differential equations. Solutions of this set and comparison with measured shear stress and velocity profiles yields the desired set of model constants. Such a set is, in general, different from other sets of model constants. The rational for such an approach is that if we can correctly model the flow over a flat plate and its far wake, then we can have a better chance of predicting the behavior in between. It is to be noted that the approach does not appeal, in any way, to the decay of homogeneous turbulence. This is because the asymptotic behavior of the flow under consideration is not representative of the decay of homogeneous turbulence.

  4. Notes on shear viscosity bound violation in anisotropic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, XianHui

    2016-03-01

    The shear viscosity bound violation in Einstein gravity for anisotropic black branes is discussed, with the aim of constraining the deviation of the shear viscosity-entropy density ratio from the shear viscosity bound using causality and thermodynamics analysis. The results show that no stringent constraints can be imposed. The diffusion bound in anisotropic phases is also studied. Ultimately, it is concluded that shear viscosity violation always occurs in cases where the equation of motion of the metric fluctuations cannot be written in a form identical to that of the minimally coupled massless scalar fields.

  5. Multiscale model for predicting shear zone structure and permeability in deforming rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Paul W.; Pereira, Gerald G.; Lemiale, Vincent; Piane, Claudio Delle; Clennell, M. Ben

    2016-04-01

    A novel multiscale model is proposed for the evolution of faults in rocks, which predicts their internal properties and permeability as strain increases. The macroscale model, based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), predicts system scale deformation by a pressure-dependent elastoplastic representation of the rock and shear zone. Being a continuum method, SPH contains no intrinsic information on the grain scale structure or behaviour of the shear zone, so a series of discrete element method microscale shear cell models are embedded into the macroscale model at specific locations. In the example used here, the overall geometry and kinematics of a direct shear test on a block of intact rock is simulated. Deformation is imposed by a macroscale model where stresses and displacement rates are applied at the shear cell walls in contact with the rock. Since the microscale models within the macroscale block of deforming rock now include representations of the grains, the structure of the shear zone, the evolution of the size and shape distribution of these grains, and the dilatancy of the shear zone can all be predicted. The microscale dilatancy can be used to vary the macroscale model dilatancy both spatially and temporally to give a full two-way coupling between the spatial scales. The ability of this model to predict shear zone structure then allows the prediction of the shear zone permeability using the Lattice-Boltzmann method.

  6. Surface temperatures and glassy state investigations in tribology, part 3. [limiting shear stress rheological model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, S.; Winer, W. O.

    1980-01-01

    Research related to the development of the limiting shear stress rheological model is reported. Techniques were developed for subjecting lubricants to isothermal compression in order to obtain relevant determinations of the limiting shear stress and elastic shear modulus. The isothermal compression limiting shear stress was found to predict very well the maximum traction for a given lubricant. Small amounts of side slip and twist incorporated in the model were shown to have great influence on the rising portion of the traction curve at low slide-roll ratio. The shear rheological model was also applied to a Grubin-like elastohydrodynamic inlet analysis for predicting film thicknesses when employing the limiting shear stress model material behavior.

  7. A Model for Shear Layer Effects on Engine Noise Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Farassat, F.; Pope, D. Stuart; Vatsa, V.

    2004-01-01

    Prediction of aircraft engine noise is an important aspect of addressing the issues of community noise and cabin noise control. The development of physics based methodologies for performing such predictions has been a focus of Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA). A recent example of code development in this area is the ducted fan noise propagation and radiation code CDUCT-LaRC. Included within the code is a duct radiation model that is based on the solution of FfowcsWilliams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation with a penetrable data surface. Testing of this equation for many acoustic problems has shown it to provide generally better results than the Kirchhoff formula for moving surfaces. Currently, the data surface is taken to be the inlet or exhaust plane for inlet or aft-fan cases, respectively. While this provides reasonable results in many situations, these choices of data surface location lead to a few limitations. For example, the shear layer between the bypass ow and external stream can refract the sound waves radiated to the far field. Radiation results can be improved by including this effect, as well as the rejection of the sound in the bypass region from the solid surface external to the bypass duct surrounding the core ow. This work describes the implementation, and possible approximation, of a shear layer boundary condition within CDUCT-LaRC. An example application also illustrates the improvements that this extension offers for predicting noise radiation from complex inlet and bypass duct geometries, thereby providing a means to evaluate external treatments in the vicinity of the bypass duct exhaust plane.

  8. Energy dissipation due to interfacial slip in nanocomposites reinforced with aligned carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gardea, Frank; Glaz, Bryan; Riddick, Jaret; Lagoudas, Dimitris C; Naraghi, Mohammad

    2015-05-13

    Interfacial slip mechanisms of strain energy dissipation and vibration damping of highly aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced polymer composites were studied through experimentation and complementary micromechanics modeling. Experimentally, we have developed CNT-polystyrene (PS) composites with a high degree of CNT alignment via a combination of twin-screw extrusion and hot-drawing. The aligned nanocomposites enabled a focused study of the interfacial slip mechanics associated with shear stress concentrations along the CNT-PS interface induced by the elastic mismatch between the filler and matrix. The variation of storage and loss modulus suggests the initiation of the interfacial slip occurs at axial strains as low as 0.028%, primarily due to shear stress concentration along the CNT-PS interface. Through micromechanics modeling and by matching the model with the experimental results at the onset of slip, the interfacial shear strength was evaluated. The model was then used to provide additional insight into the experimental observations by showing that the nonlinear variation of damping with dynamic strain can be attributed to slip-stick behavior. The dependence of the interfacial load-transfer reversibility on the dynamic strain history and characteristic time scale was experimentally investigated to demonstrate the relative contribution of van der Waals (vdW) interactions, mechanical interlocking, and covalent bonding to shear interactions. PMID:25905718

  9. Size effect model on kinetics of interfacial reaction between Sn-xAg-yCu solders and Cu substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M. L.; Yang, F.

    2014-11-01

    The downsizing of solder balls results in larger interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) grains and less Cu substrate consumption in lead-free soldering on Cu substrates. This size effect on the interfacial reaction is experimentally demonstrated and theoretically analyzed using Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu and Sn-3.5Ag solder balls. The interfacial reaction between the Sn-xAg-yCu solders and Cu substrates is a dynamic response to a combination of effects of interfacial IMC growth, Cu substrate consumption and composition variation in the interface zone. A concentration gradient controlled (CGC) kinetics model is proposed to explain the combined effects. The concentration gradient of Cu at the interface, which is a function of solder volume, initial Cu concentration and reaction time, is the root cause of the size effect. We found that a larger Cu concentration gradient results in smaller Cu6Sn5 grains and more consumption of Cu substrate. According to our model, the growth kinetics of interfacial Cu6Sn5 obeys a t1/3 law when the molten solder has approached the solution saturation, and will be slower otherwise due to the interfering dissolution mechanism. The size effect introduced in this model is supported by a good agreement between theoretical and experimental results. Finally, the scope of application of this model is discussed.

  10. Size effect model on kinetics of interfacial reaction between Sn-xAg-yCu solders and Cu substrate

    PubMed Central

    Huang, M. L.; Yang, F.

    2014-01-01

    The downsizing of solder balls results in larger interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) grains and less Cu substrate consumption in lead-free soldering on Cu substrates. This size effect on the interfacial reaction is experimentally demonstrated and theoretically analyzed using Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu and Sn-3.5Ag solder balls. The interfacial reaction between the Sn-xAg-yCu solders and Cu substrates is a dynamic response to a combination of effects of interfacial IMC growth, Cu substrate consumption and composition variation in the interface zone. A concentration gradient controlled (CGC) kinetics model is proposed to explain the combined effects. The concentration gradient of Cu at the interface, which is a function of solder volume, initial Cu concentration and reaction time, is the root cause of the size effect. We found that a larger Cu concentration gradient results in smaller Cu6Sn5 grains and more consumption of Cu substrate. According to our model, the growth kinetics of interfacial Cu6Sn5 obeys a t1/3 law when the molten solder has approached the solution saturation, and will be slower otherwise due to the interfering dissolution mechanism. The size effect introduced in this model is supported by a good agreement between theoretical and experimental results. Finally, the scope of application of this model is discussed. PMID:25408359

  11. Size effect model on kinetics of interfacial reaction between Sn-xAg-yCu solders and Cu substrate.

    PubMed

    Huang, M L; Yang, F

    2014-01-01

    The downsizing of solder balls results in larger interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) grains and less Cu substrate consumption in lead-free soldering on Cu substrates. This size effect on the interfacial reaction is experimentally demonstrated and theoretically analyzed using Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu and Sn-3.5Ag solder balls. The interfacial reaction between the Sn-xAg-yCu solders and Cu substrates is a dynamic response to a combination of effects of interfacial IMC growth, Cu substrate consumption and composition variation in the interface zone. A concentration gradient controlled (CGC) kinetics model is proposed to explain the combined effects. The concentration gradient of Cu at the interface, which is a function of solder volume, initial Cu concentration and reaction time, is the root cause of the size effect. We found that a larger Cu concentration gradient results in smaller Cu(6)Sn(5) grains and more consumption of Cu substrate. According to our model, the growth kinetics of interfacial Cu(6)Sn(5) obeys a t(1/3) law when the molten solder has approached the solution saturation, and will be slower otherwise due to the interfering dissolution mechanism. The size effect introduced in this model is supported by a good agreement between theoretical and experimental results. Finally, the scope of application of this model is discussed. PMID:25408359

  12. Turbulence modeling of free shear layers for high performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondak, Douglas

    1993-01-01

    In many flowfield computations, accuracy of the turbulence model employed is frequently a limiting factor in the overall accuracy of the computation. This is particularly true for complex flowfields such as those around full aircraft configurations. Free shear layers such as wakes, impinging jets (in V/STOL applications), and mixing layers over cavities are often part of these flowfields. Although flowfields have been computed for full aircraft, the memory and CPU requirements for these computations are often excessive. Additional computer power is required for multidisciplinary computations such as coupled fluid dynamics and conduction heat transfer analysis. Massively parallel computers show promise in alleviating this situation, and the purpose of this effort was to adapt and optimize CFD codes to these new machines. The objective of this research effort was to compute the flowfield and heat transfer for a two-dimensional jet impinging normally on a cool plate. The results of this research effort were summarized in an AIAA paper titled 'Parallel Implementation of the k-epsilon Turbulence Model'. Appendix A contains the full paper.

  13. Effects of vertical shear in modelling horizontal oceanic dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanotte, A. S.; Corrado, R.; Palatella, L.; Pizzigalli, C.; Schipa, I.; Santoleri, R.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of vertical shear on the horizontal dispersion properties of passive tracer particles on the continental shelf of the South Mediterranean is investigated by means of observation and model data. In situ current measurements reveal that vertical gradients of horizontal velocities in the upper mixing layer decorrelate quite fast ( ˜ 1 day), whereas an eddy-permitting ocean model, such as the Mediterranean Forecasting System, tends to overestimate such decorrelation time because of finite resolution effects. Horizontal dispersion, simulated by the Mediterranean sea Forecasting System, is mostly affected by: (1) unresolved scale motions, and mesoscale motions that are largely smoothed out at scales close to the grid spacing; (2) poorly resolved time variability in the profiles of the horizontal velocities in the upper layer. For the case study we have analysed, we show that a suitable use of deterministic kinematic parametrizations is helpful to implement realistic statistical features of tracer dispersion in two and three dimensions. The approach here suggested provides a functional tool to control the horizontal spreading of small organisms or substance concentrations, and is thus relevant for marine biology, pollutant dispersion as well as oil spill applications.

  14. Interfacial friction based quasi-continuum hydrodynamical model for nanofluidic transport of water.

    PubMed

    Bhadauria, Ravi; Sanghi, Tarun; Aluru, N R

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we formulate a one-dimensional isothermal hydrodynamic transport model for water, which is an extension to our recently proposed hydrodynamic model for Lennard-Jones type fluid [R. Bhadauria and N. R. Aluru, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074109 (2013)]. Viscosity variations in confinement are incorporated by the local average density method. Dirichlet boundary conditions are provided in the form of slip velocity that depends upon the macroscopic interfacial friction coefficient. The value of this friction coefficient is computed using a novel generalized Langevin equation formulation that eliminates the use of equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation. Gravity driven flows of SPC/E water confined between graphene and silicon slit shaped nanochannels are considered as examples for low and high friction cases. The proposed model yields good quantitative agreement with the velocity profiles obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:26547177

  15. Interfacial friction based quasi-continuum hydrodynamical model for nanofluidic transport of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadauria, Ravi; Sanghi, Tarun; Aluru, N. R.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we formulate a one-dimensional isothermal hydrodynamic transport model for water, which is an extension to our recently proposed hydrodynamic model for Lennard-Jones type fluid [R. Bhadauria and N. R. Aluru, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074109 (2013)]. Viscosity variations in confinement are incorporated by the local average density method. Dirichlet boundary conditions are provided in the form of slip velocity that depends upon the macroscopic interfacial friction coefficient. The value of this friction coefficient is computed using a novel generalized Langevin equation formulation that eliminates the use of equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation. Gravity driven flows of SPC/E water confined between graphene and silicon slit shaped nanochannels are considered as examples for low and high friction cases. The proposed model yields good quantitative agreement with the velocity profiles obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

  16. Modeling Shear Instabilities With Block Sliders: Brittle and Ductile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, M. R.

    2003-12-01

    Block slider-type models have been succesfully used for almost 35 years to describe the spatio-temporal development of shear instabilities in the brittle crust (Burridge & Knopoff, 1967; Olami et al., 1992). More recently, increasing attention is paid on the extension of the classical Burridge-Knopoff model (based on a pure Mohr-Coulomb rheology) with a viscous component, either to include depth-dependent properties into the model or aiming at a more accurate description of fore- and aftershock sequences of a main earthquake event (e.g. Hainzl et al., 1999). On the other hand, viscous feedback mechanisms of various types have become an increasingly attractive mechanism for the generation of intermediate-depth and deep-focus earthquakes in the ductile mantle lithosphere (e.g. Wiens & Snider, 2001). Heat generated during viscous deformation provides a positive feedback to creep and eventually faulting under high pressure (Karato et al., 2001, Bercovici & Karato, 2003). The present paper discusses the specific properties of block slider-type models that are extended with a viscous component and compare their behaviour with the pure brittle ("classical") case. Block slider-type models for ductile instabilities are numerically much less demanding than solutions based on the corresponding, thermal-mechanically coupled, continuum equations. They allow for the inclusion of possible non-equilibrium effects associated with mineral phase transformations in a subducting slab (kinetic overshoot, grainsize reduction, latent heat release) in a straightforward manner. They may therefore serve as an effective tool to study the coupling of viscous heating, temperature-dependent viscosity and brittle stress transfer that are thought to cause the specific spatial-temporal clustering of intermediate-depth and deep-focus eartquakes. References D. Bercovici and S. Karato "Theoretical Analysis of Shear Localization in the Lithosphere", in: Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry 51, eds. S

  17. A compressive failure model for anisotropic plates with a cutout under compressive and shear loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurdal, Z.; Haftka, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    The paper introduces a failure model for laminated composite plates with a cutout under combined compressive and shear loads. The model is based on kinking failure of the load-carrying fibers around a cutout, and includes the effect of local shearing and compressive stresses. Comparison of predictions of the model with available experimental results for quasi-isotropic and orthotropic plates with a circular hole indicated a good agreement. Predictions for orthotropic plates under combined loading are compared with the predictions of a point-stress model. The present model indicates significant reductions in axial load-carrying capacity due to shearing loads for plates with principal axis of orthotropy oriented along the axial load direction. A gain in strength is achieved by rotating the axis of orthotropy to counteract the shearing stress, or by eliminating the compressive-shear deformation coupling.

  18. Shear Modulus for Nonisotropic, Open-Celled Foams Using a General Elongated Kelvin Foam Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2008-01-01

    An equation for the shear modulus for nonisotropic, open-celled foams in the plane transverse to the elongation (rise) direction is derived using an elongated Kelvin foam model with the most general geometric description. The shear modulus was found to be a function of the unit cell dimensions, the solid material properties, and the cell edge cross-section properties. The shear modulus equation reduces to the relation derived by others for isotropic foams when the unit cell is equiaxed.

  19. A test of the double-shearing model of flow for granular materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Lockner, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    The double-shearing model of flow attributes plastic deformation in granular materials to cooperative slip on conjugate Coulomb shears (surfaces upon which the Coulomb yield condition is satisfied). The strict formulation of the double-shearing model then requires that the slip lines in the material coincide with the Coulomb shears. Three different experiments that approximate simple shear deformation in granular media appear to be inconsistent with this strict formulation. For example, the orientation of the principal stress axes in a layer of sand driven in steady, simple shear was measured subject to the assumption that the Coulomb failure criterion was satisfied on some surfaces (orientation unspecified) within the sand layer. The orientation of the inferred principal compressive axis was then compared with the orientations predicted by the double-shearing model. The strict formulation of the model [Spencer, 1982] predicts that the principal stress axes should rotate in a sense opposite to that inferred from the experiments. A less restrictive formulation of the double-shearing model by de Josselin de Jong [1971] does not completely specify the solution but does prescribe limits on the possible orientations of the principal stress axes. The orientations of the principal compression axis inferred from the experiments are probably within those limits. An elastoplastic formulation of the double-shearing model [de Josselin de Jong, 1988] is reasonably consistent with the experiments, although quantitative agreement was not attained. Thus we conclude that the double-shearing model may be a viable law to describe deformation of granular materials, but the macroscopic slip surfaces will not in general coincide with the Coulomb shears.

  20. Modelling and analytic studies of sheared flow effects on tearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, D.; Thyagaraja, A.; Sen, A.; Ham, C. J.; Hender, T. C.; Hastie, R. J.; Connor, J. W.; Kaw, P.; Mendonca, J.

    2015-05-01

    The effects of flow shear on the stability of a (2,1) tearing mode are examined using numerical and analytic studies on a number of model systems. For a cylindrical reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, linear computations using the CUTIE code show that sheared axial flows have a destabilizing effect, while sheared poloidal flows tend to reduce the growth rate of the mode. These effects are independent of the direction of the flow. For helical flows the sign of the shear in the flow matters. This symmetry breaking is also seen in the nonlinear regime where the island saturation level is found to depend on the sign of the flows. In the absence of flow, the CUTIE simulations show that the linear mode is more stable in a two fluid as compared to a single fluid model. However, in the presence of sheared axial flows a negative sheared flow is more destabilizing while a positive sheared flow is more stabilizing, compared to the single fluid model. In contrast to the cylindrical model, simulations in a toroidal model, using the MHD code NEAR, always show a stabilizing effect in the presence of a sheared toroidal flow. This is understood analytically in terms of a flow induced ‘Shafranov’ like shift in the profiles of the equilibrium current that results in a stabilizing change in Δ‧ and the saturated island size.

  1. Modelling study of challenges in sinkhole detection with shear wave reflection seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burschil, Thomas; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2016-04-01

    The detection of cavities with reflection seismics is a difficult task even if high impedance contrasts are assumed. Especially the shear wave reflection method with a higher resolution potential trough lower velocities and short wavelength has come into focus of investigation. But shear wave propagation fails if material exists that partially has no shear strength. The shear wave does not propagate into or through those voids. Here, we evaluate the influence of a possible fracture zone above a cavity. We simulate shear wave propagation with finite difference modelling for two reference models, with and without cavity, and various sets of input models with a fracture zone above the cavity. Reflections and multiples of the reference models image the subsidence structure and the cavity. For the fracture input models, we implemented a fracture network, derived from numerical crack propagation modelling (Schneider-Löbens et al., 2015). The cracks possess the minimum possible aperture of one grid point (i.e. 0.1 m) and no shear stiffness. The seismic modelling exhibits that the shear wave does not pass through the fracture zone and shadows the subjacent cavity. Sequences of randomly discontinuous cracks, cf. displacement discontinuity model with zero crack stiffness, approximate partially seismic connected rock on both sides of the crack. The amount of these seismic pathways determines whether a reflection of the cavity can be detected at the surface or not. Cracks with higher aperture, e.g. two or three grid points, need a higher amount of intact rock/defective cracks, since more connected grid points are necessary to create seismic pathways. Furthermore, it turns out that the crack filling is important for shear wave transmission. While a mineralized fracture zone, implemented with high velocity, facilitate shear wave propagation, water or air-filled cracks avoid shear wave transmission. Crack orientation affects the shear wave propagation through the geometry. A

  2. Modelling the effects of horizontal and vertical shear in stratified turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umlauf, Lars

    2005-05-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) and model results from a number of one-point turbulence models are compared for homogeneous, stably stratified flows. Because of their wide spread use in numerical ocean modelling, only explicit algebraic second-moment models are investigated. Considered are two types of shear flows with either purely vertical or purely horizontal shear. The dissipation rate is evaluated from the observation that the shear-number becomes independent of stratification for low to moderate Richardson numbers as soon as the flow approaches self-similarity. For the cases with vertical shear, it is found that all statistical models essentially reproduced the DNS results, though with different accuracy. In contrast, only the most recent model was able to predict the salient features of horizontally sheared flows, i.e. a steady-state Richardson number that is about an order of magnitude larger and a vertical mixing efficiency that is about twice as large compared to the case with vertical shear. This model also reproduced other key parameters like the turbulent Froude number and the turbulent Prandtl number with good accuracy, but it failed to predict quantitatively the reduction of the shear anisotropy with increasing stratification. For strong stratification, none of the models was able to describe the rapid decrease of the mixing efficiency associated with the collapse and fossilisation of turbulence.

  3. On interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran: Atomistic and coarse-grained models from molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, J. M.; Algaba, J.; Míguez, J. M.; Mendiboure, B.; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I.; Piñeiro, M. M.; Blas, F. J.

    2016-04-01

    We have determined the interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran (THF) from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. The molecules are modeled using six different molecular models, three of them based on the united-atom approach and the other three based on a coarse-grained (CG) approach. In the first case, THF is modeled using the transferable parameters potential functions approach proposed by Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen [J. Chem. Phys. 77, 5073 (1982)] and a new parametrization of the TraPPE force fields for cyclic alkanes and ethers [S. J. Keasler et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 115, 11234 (2012)]. In both cases, dispersive and coulombic intermolecular interactions are explicitly taken into account. In the second case, THF is modeled as a single sphere, a diatomic molecule, and a ring formed from three Mie monomers according to the SAFT-γ Mie top-down approach [V. Papaioannou et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 054107 (2014)]. Simulations were performed in the molecular dynamics canonical ensemble and the vapor-liquid surface tension is evaluated from the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor along the simulation box. In addition to the surface tension, we have also obtained density profiles, coexistence densities, critical temperature, density, and pressure, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying special attention to the comparison between the estimations obtained from different models and literature experimental data. The simulation results obtained from the three CG models as described by the SAFT-γ Mie approach are able to predict accurately the vapor-liquid phase envelope of THF, in excellent agreement with estimations obtained from TraPPE model and experimental data in the whole range of coexistence. However, Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen model presents significant deviations from experimental results. We also compare the predictions for surface tension as obtained from simulation results for all the models with

  4. On interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran: Atomistic and coarse-grained models from molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J M; Algaba, J; Míguez, J M; Mendiboure, B; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A I; Piñeiro, M M; Blas, F J

    2016-04-14

    We have determined the interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran (THF) from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. The molecules are modeled using six different molecular models, three of them based on the united-atom approach and the other three based on a coarse-grained (CG) approach. In the first case, THF is modeled using the transferable parameters potential functions approach proposed by Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen [J. Chem. Phys. 77, 5073 (1982)] and a new parametrization of the TraPPE force fields for cyclic alkanes and ethers [S. J. Keasler et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 115, 11234 (2012)]. In both cases, dispersive and coulombic intermolecular interactions are explicitly taken into account. In the second case, THF is modeled as a single sphere, a diatomic molecule, and a ring formed from three Mie monomers according to the SAFT-γ Mie top-down approach [V. Papaioannou et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 054107 (2014)]. Simulations were performed in the molecular dynamics canonical ensemble and the vapor-liquid surface tension is evaluated from the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor along the simulation box. In addition to the surface tension, we have also obtained density profiles, coexistence densities, critical temperature, density, and pressure, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying special attention to the comparison between the estimations obtained from different models and literature experimental data. The simulation results obtained from the three CG models as described by the SAFT-γ Mie approach are able to predict accurately the vapor-liquid phase envelope of THF, in excellent agreement with estimations obtained from TraPPE model and experimental data in the whole range of coexistence. However, Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen model presents significant deviations from experimental results. We also compare the predictions for surface tension as obtained from simulation results for all the models with

  5. Surface and interfacial creases in a bilayer tubular soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Mir Jalil; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-08-01

    Surface and interfacial creases induced by biological growth are common types of instability in soft biological tissues. This study focuses on the criteria for the onset of surface and interfacial creases as well as their morphological evolution in a growing bilayer soft tube within a confined environment. Critical growth ratios for triggering surface and interfacial creases are investigated both analytically and numerically. Analytical interpretations provide preliminary insights into critical stretches and growth ratios for the onset of instability and formation of both surface and interfacial creases. However, the analytical approach cannot predict the evolution pattern of the model after instability; therefore nonlinear finite element simulations are carried out to replicate the poststability morphological patterns of the structure. Analytical and computational simulation results demonstrate that the initial geometry, growth ratio, and shear modulus ratio of the layers are the most influential factors to control surface and interfacial crease formation in this soft tubular bilayer. The competition between the stretch ratios in the free and interfacial surfaces is one of the key driving factors to determine the location of the first crease initiation. These findings may provide some fundamental understanding in the growth modeling of tubular biological tissues such as esophagi and airways as well as offering useful clues into normal and pathological functions of these tissues.

  6. Effect of interfacial roughness parameters on the fiber pushout behavior of a model composite

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathy, T.A. ); Barlage, D.R. . Dept. of Engineering); Jero, P.D.; Kerans, R.J. )

    1994-12-01

    The effect of interfacial roughness on the frictional sliding in composites has been studied using fiber pushout and pushback tests on a model composite of Plexiglas rods in an epoxy matrix. Different extents of roughness were introduced on the Plexiglas rods and the resulting roughness profiles measured. The roughness profiles were characterized using six different roughness parameters. An attempt was made to find a correlation between the sliding resistance and the selected roughness parameters. A parameter defined as the maximum coefficient in the Fourier transform of the roughness profile was found to yield the best correlation. If the roughness introduced is periodic, then the pushout traces exhibit periodic dips, but the magnitude of this periodic dip is significantly smaller than the seating drop obtained from pushback tests.

  7. Interfacial Chemical Interactions in the (Alumina/Graphite/Al Alloys) System: Thermodynamic Modeling and Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelbstein, M.; Edry, I.; Froumin, N.; Frage, N.

    2009-04-01

    The stability of alumina-coated graphite couples in liquid Al is investigated in the 1373 to 1573 K temperature range. A thermodynamic model was carried out to determine the mechanisms controlling the couple stability and the effect of alloying Al with high melting point element for instance U (up to 3 at. pct). It was established that the dissolved uranium dose not play any role in the interfacial interactions and that the couple stability is governed by the interactions with Al resulting in the release of gaseous products. The experiments focused on wetting kinetics under conditions allowing for an in-situ reduction of the alumina coating by the liquid Al. The experimental results confirm the predictions of the thermodynamic analysis.

  8. Atomistic simulation of surface functionalization on the interfacial properties of graphene-polymer nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. C.; Lai, Z. B.; Galpaya, D.; Yan, C.; Hu, N.; Zhou, L. M.

    2014-03-28

    Graphene has been increasingly used as nano sized fillers to create a broad range of nanocomposites with exceptional properties. The interfaces between fillers and matrix play a critical role in dictating the overall performance of a composite. However, the load transfer mechanism along graphene-polymer interface has not been well understood. In this study, we conducted molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the influence of surface functionalization and layer length on the interfacial load transfer in graphene-polymer nanocomposites. The simulation results show that oxygen-functionalized graphene leads to larger interfacial shear force than hydrogen-functionalized and pristine ones during pull-out process. The increase of oxygen coverage and layer length enhances interfacial shear force. Further increase of oxygen coverage to about 7% leads to a saturated interfacial shear force. A model was also established to demonstrate that the mechanism of interfacial load transfer consists of two contributing parts, including the formation of new surface and relative sliding along the interface. These results are believed to be useful in development of new graphene-based nanocomposites with better interfacial properties.

  9. Evaluation of the interfacial mechanical properties in fiber-reinforced ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ferber, M.K.; Wereszczak, A.A.; Riester, L.; Lowden, R.A.; Chawla, K.K.

    1993-06-01

    The present study examined the application of a micro-indentation technique to the measurement of interfacial properties in fiber reinforced ceramic composites. Specific fiber/matrix systems included SiC/glass, SiC/macro-defect-free (MDF) cement, SiC/SiC, and mullite/glass. The effect of fiber coatings upon the interfacial properties was also investigated. These properties, which included the debond strength, interfacial shear stress, and residual axial fiber stress, were evaluated by measuring the force-displacement curves generated during load-unload cycles. Estimates of these three stress values were obtained by matching the experimental force-displacement curves with data predicted from an existing model. In general the SiC/glass composites exhibited the lowest values of the interfacial shear and debond stresses. The sliding characteristics of the SiC/MDF cement and SiC/SiC composites were strongly influenced by the residual axial stress and the nature of the fiber coating. In the case of the mullite/glass composite, the high values of the interfacial shear and debond stresses reduced the measurement sensitivity, thereby increasing the uncertainty in the estimates of the interfacial properties. 17 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab.

  10. Dividing phases in two-phase flow and modeling of interfacial drag

    SciTech Connect

    Narumo, T.; Rajamaeki, M.

    1997-07-01

    Different models intended to describe one-dimensional two-phase flow are considered in this paper. The following models are introduced: conventional six-equation model, conventional model equipped with terms taking into account nonuniform transverse velocity distribution of the phases, several virtual mass models and a model in which the momentum equations have been derived by using the principles of Separation of the Flow According to Velocity (SFAV). The dynamics of the models have been tested by comparing their characteristic velocities to each other and against experimental data. The results show that the SFAV-model makes a hyperbolic system and predicts the propagation velocities of disturbances with the same order of accuracy as the best tested virtual mass models. Furthermore, the momentum interaction terms for the SFAV-model are considered. These consist of the wall friction terms and the interfacial friction term. The authors model wall friction with two independent terms describing the effect of each fluid on the wall separately. In the steady state, a relationship between the slip velocity and friction coefficients can be derived. Hence, the friction coefficients for the SFAV-model can be calculated from existing correlations, viz. from a drift-flux correlation and a wall friction correlation. The friction model was tested by searching steady-state distributions in a partial BWR fuel channel and comparing the relaxed values with the drift-flux correlation, which agreed very well with each other. In addition, response of the flow to a sine-wave disturbance in the water inlet flux was calculated as function of frequency. The results of the models differed from each other already with frequency of order 5 Hz, while the time constant for the relaxation, obtained from steady-state distribution calculation, would have implied significant differences appear not until with frequency of order 50 Hz.

  11. Experimental investigation and kinetic-theory-based model of a rapid granular shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, R. D.; Martin, T. W.; Huntley, J. M.; Jenkins, J. T.; Viswanathan, H.; Fen, X.; Parker, D. J.

    An experimental investigation of an idealized rapidly sheared granular flow was performed to test the predictions of a model based on the kinetic theory of dry granular media. Glass ballotini beads were placed in an annular shear cell and the lower boundary rotated to induce a shearing motion in the bed. A single particle was tracked using the positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) technique, a method that determines the location of a particle through the triangulation of gamma photons emitted by a radioactive tracer particle. The packing fraction and velocity fields within the three-dimensional flow were measured and compared to the predictions of a model developed using the conservation and balance equations applicable to dissipative systems, and solved incorporating constitutive relations derived from kinetic theory. The comparison showed that kinetic theory is able to capture the general features of a rapid shear flow reasonably well over a wide range of shear rates and confining pressures.

  12. DEM analyses of shear behaviour of rock joints by a novel bond contact model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, M. J.; Liu, J.; Sun, C.; Chen, H.

    2015-09-01

    The failure of rock joints is one of the potential causes for the local and general rock instability, which may trigger devastating geohazards such as landslide. In this paper, the Distinct Element Method (DEM) featured by a novel bond contact model was utilized to simulate shear behaviour of centre/non-coplanar rock joints. The DEM results show that the complete shear behaviour of jointed rock includes four stages: elastic shearing phase, crack propagation, the failure of rock bridges and the through-going discontinuity. The peak shear strength of centre joint increases as the joint connectivity rate decreases. For intermittent noncoplanar rock joints, as the inclination of the rock joints increases, its shear capacity decreases when the inclination angle is negative while increase when positive. Comparison with the experimental results proves the capability of this DEM model in capturing the mechanical properties of the jointed rocks.

  13. Solution of the complete Curtiss-Bird model for polymeric liquids subjected to simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephanou, Pavlos S.; Kröger, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The complete kinetic theory model for concentrated polymer solutions and melts proposed by Curtiss and Bird is solved for shear flow: (a) analytically by providing a solution for the single-link (or configurational) distribution function as a real basis spherical harmonics expansion and then calculating the materials functions in shear flow up to second order in the dimensionless shear rate and, (b) numerically via the execution of Brownian dynamics simulations. These two methods are actually complementary to each other as the former is accurate only for small dimensionless shear rates where the latter produces results with increasingly large uncertainties. The analytical expansions of the material functions with respect to the dimensionless shear rate reduce to those of the extensively studied, simplified Curtiss-Bird model when ɛ' = 0, and to the rigid rod when ɛ' = 1. It is known that the power-law behavior at high shear rates is very different for these two extremal cases. We employ Brownian dynamics simulation to not only recover the limiting cases but to find a gradual variation of the power-law behaviors at large dimensionless shear rates upon varying ɛ'. The fact that experimental data are usually located between these two extremes strongly advocates the significance of studying the solution of the Curtiss-Bird model. This is exemplified in this work by comparing the solution of this model with available rheological data for semiflexible biological systems that are clearly not captured by the original Doi-Edwards or simplified Curtiss-Bird models.

  14. Solution of the complete Curtiss-Bird model for polymeric liquids subjected to simple shear flow.

    PubMed

    Stephanou, Pavlos S; Kröger, Martin

    2016-03-28

    The complete kinetic theory model for concentrated polymer solutions and melts proposed by Curtiss and Bird is solved for shear flow: (a) analytically by providing a solution for the single-link (or configurational) distribution function as a real basis spherical harmonics expansion and then calculating the materials functions in shear flow up to second order in the dimensionless shear rate and, (b) numerically via the execution of Brownian dynamics simulations. These two methods are actually complementary to each other as the former is accurate only for small dimensionless shear rates where the latter produces results with increasingly large uncertainties. The analytical expansions of the material functions with respect to the dimensionless shear rate reduce to those of the extensively studied, simplified Curtiss-Bird model when ε' = 0, and to the rigid rod when ε' = 1. It is known that the power-law behavior at high shear rates is very different for these two extremal cases. We employ Brownian dynamics simulation to not only recover the limiting cases but to find a gradual variation of the power-law behaviors at large dimensionless shear rates upon varying ε'. The fact that experimental data are usually located between these two extremes strongly advocates the significance of studying the solution of the Curtiss-Bird model. This is exemplified in this work by comparing the solution of this model with available rheological data for semiflexible biological systems that are clearly not captured by the original Doi-Edwards or simplified Curtiss-Bird models. PMID:27036477

  15. An unload-induced direct-shear model for granular gouge friction in rock discontinuities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Zou, Yang; Li, Xing; Zhao, Jian

    2014-09-01

    The experimental study introduces an unload-induced direct-shear model to investigate the frictional slip of a layer of simulated granular gouges induced by the combination of a decreasing normal stress and a constant shear stress. A frictional equilibrium state of the gouge layer is initially established under fixed normal and shear stresses. The normal stress is proposed to decrease at a constant unloading rate to induce the frictional slip of the gouge layer, and the shear stress is proposed to keep a constant value during the test. A displacement meter and load cells synchronously measure the slip displacement and the applied normal and shear stresses, respectively. The normal and shear stresses sharply decrease with the frictional slip, owing to damage of gouge contacts. The frictional slip is then gradually arrested with new formation of gouge contacts. A greater initial shear stress induces larger normal and shear stress reductions and a smaller slip displacement. The strain energy stored in the discontinuous system before the frictional slip is found to affect the slip displacement. The advantages and the limitations of this model are discussed at the end. PMID:25273734

  16. Spontaneous formation of permanent shear bands in a mesoscopic model of flowing disordered matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Kirsten; Bocquet, Lydéric; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2012-02-01

    In this presentation we propose a coherent scenario of the formation of permanent shear bands in the flow of yield stress materials. Within a minimalistic mesoscopic model we investigate the spatial organisation of plasticity. The most important parameter is the typical time needed to regain the original structure after a local rearrangement. In agreement with a recent mean field study [Coussot et al., Eur. Phys. J. E, 2010, 33, 183] we observe a spontaneous formation of permanent shear bands, when this restructuring time is large compared to the typical stress release time in a rearrangement. This heterogeneous flow behaviour is different in nature from the transient dynamical heterogeneities that one observes in the small shear rate limit in flow without shear-banding [Martens et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2011, 106, 156001]. We analyse the dependence of the shear bands on system size, shear rate and restructuring time. Further we rationalise the scenario within a mean field version of the model, that explains the instability of the homogeneous flow below a critical shear rate. Our study therefore strongly supports the idea that the characteristic time scales involved in the local dynamics are at the physical origin of permanent shear bands.

  17. Computational modeling and simulation of spall fracture in polycrystalline solids by an atomistic-based interfacial zone model

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liqiang; Zeng, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this work is to investigate spall fracture in polycrystalline materials under high-speed impact loading by using an atomistic-based interfacial zone model. We illustrate that for polycrystalline materials, increases in the potential energy ratio between grain boundaries and grains could cause a fracture transition from intergranular to transgranular mode. We also found out that the spall strength increases when there is a fracture transition from intergranular to transgranular. In addition, analysis of grain size, crystal lattice orientation and impact speed reveals that the spall strength increases as grain size or impact speed increases. PMID:26435546

  18. A simple model to understand the effect of membrane shear elasticity and stress-free shape on the motion of red blood cells in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Dupire, Jules; Abkarian, Manouk; Viallat, Annie

    2015-11-14

    An analytical model was proposed by Keller and Skalak in 1982 to understand the motion of red blood cells in shear flow. The cell was described as a fluid ellipsoid of fixed shape. This model was extended in 2007 to introduce shear elasticity of the red blood cell membrane. Here, this model is further extended to take into account that the cell discoid shape physiologically observed is not a stress-free shape. The model shows that spheroid stress-free shapes allow us to fit the experimental data with the values of shear elasticity typical to that found with micropipette and optical tweezer experiments. In the range of moderate shear rates (for which RBCs keep their discoid shape) this model enables us to quantitatively determine (i) an effective cell viscosity, which combines membrane and hemoglobin viscosities and (ii) an effective shear modulus of the membrane that combines the shear modulus and the stress-free shape. This model can also be used to determine RBC mechanical parameters not only in the tanktreading regime when cells are suspended in medium of high viscosity but also in the tumbling regime characteristic of cells suspended in media of low viscosity. In this regime, a transition is predicted between a rigid-like tumbling motion and a fluid-like tumbling motion above a critical shear rate, which is directly related to the mechanical parameters of the cell. PMID:26352875

  19. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography.

    PubMed

    Hashemiyan, Z; Packo, P; Staszewski, W J; Uhl, T

    2016-01-01

    Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort. PMID:26884808

  20. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Packo, P.; Staszewski, W. J.; Uhl, T.

    2016-01-01

    Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort. PMID:26884808

  1. Shear deformation in granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bardenhagen, S.G.; Brackbill, J.U.; Sulsky, D.L.

    1998-12-31

    An investigation into the properties of granular materials is undertaken via numerical simulation. These simulations highlight that frictional contact, a defining characteristic of dry granular materials, and interfacial debonding, an expected deformation mode in plastic bonded explosives, must be properly modeled. Frictional contact and debonding algorithms have been implemented into FLIP, a particle in cell code, and are described. Frictionless and frictional contact are simulated, with attention paid to energy and momentum conservation. Debonding is simulated, with attention paid to the interfacial debonding speed. A first step toward calculations of shear deformation in plastic bonded explosives is made. Simulations are performed on the scale of the grains where experimental data is difficult to obtain. Two characteristics of deformation are found, namely the intermittent binding of grains when rotation and translation are insufficient to accommodate deformation, and the role of the binder as a lubricant in force chains.

  2. Dynamics of model blood cells in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorski, Thomas; Callens, Natacha; Minetti, Christophe; Coupier, Gwennou; Dubois, Frank; Misbah, Chaouqi

    The dynamics of a vesicle suspension in shear flow was investigated by digital holographic microscopy [1] in parabolic flights and in the MASER 11 sounding rocket. Vesicles are lipid membranes which mimic the mechanical behaviour of cells, such as red blood cells in flow. In a simple shear flow between parallel walls, a lift force of purely viscous origin pushes vesicles away from walls. Our parabolic flight experiments [2] reveal that the lift velocity in a dilute suspen-sion is well described by theoretical predictions by Olla. As vesicles gather near the center of the flow chamber due to lift forces from both walls, one expects hydrodynamic interactions of pairs of vesicles to result in shear induced diffusion in the suspension. The BIOMICS experi-ment in the MASER 11 sounding rocket revealed a complex spatial structure of a polydisperse vesicle suspension due to the interplay between lift forces from the walls and hydrodynamic interactions. These phenomena have a strong impact on the structure and rheology of blood in small vessels, and a precise knowledge of the dynamics of migration and diffusion of soft particles in flow can lead to alternative ways to separate and sort blood cells. 1. Dubois, F., Schockaert, C., Callens, N., Yourrassowsky, C., "Focus plane detection criteria in digital holography microscopy by amplitude analysis", Opt. Express, Vol. 14, pp 5895-5908, 2006 2. Callens, N., Minetti, C., Coupier, G., Mader, M.-A., Dubois, F., Misbah, C., Podgorski, T., "Hydrodynamics lift of vesicles under shear flow in microgravity", Europhys. Lett., Vol. 83, p. 24002, 2008

  3. Simulating interfacial anisotropy in thin-film growth using an extended Cahn-Hilliard model.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Solmaz; Lowengrub, John

    2012-04-01

    We present an extended Cahn-Hilliard model for simulating interfacial anisotropy in thin-film dynamics by incorporating high-order terms in the energy from an expansion of the energy about an equilibrium state, following earlier work by Abinandanan and Haider [Philos. Mag. Sect. A 81, 2457 (2001)]. For example, to simulate SiGe/Si thin films, where diamond cubic symmetry is needed, fourth order derivatives are included in the energy. This results in a sixth order evolution equation for the order parameter. For less symmetric crystals, one needs to add terms of higher order than fourth order. One advantage of this approach is its intrinsic regularized behavior. In particular, even for strongly anisotropic surface energy, sharp corners will not form and the extended anisotropic Cahn-Hilliard equations are well-posed. For this system we develop an energy-stable numerical scheme in which the energy decreases for any time step. We present two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) numerical results using an adaptive, nonlinear multigrid finite-difference method. We find excellent agreement between the computed equilibrium shapes using the new model and results from an analysis associated with a Wulff construction for energy minimization. The model predictions also compare well with experimental results for silicon voids. In the context of thin films, we observe the formation of interconnected ridges, wires, and fortresses similar to those observed in SiGe/Si thin films. PMID:22680484

  4. A multiscale transport model for Lennard-Jones binary mixtures based on interfacial friction.

    PubMed

    Bhadauria, Ravi; Aluru, N R

    2016-08-21

    We propose a one-dimensional isothermal hydrodynamic transport model for non-reacting binary mixtures in slit shaped nanochannels. The coupled species momentum equations contain viscous dissipation and interspecies friction term of Maxwell-Stefan form. Species partial viscosity variations in the confinement are modeled using the van der Waals one fluid approximation and the local average density method. Species specific macroscopic friction coefficient based Robin boundary conditions are provided to capture the species wall slip effects. The value of this friction coefficient is computed using a species specific generalized Langevin formulation. Gravity driven flow of methane-hydrogen and methane-argon mixtures confined between graphene slit shaped nanochannels are considered as examples. The proposed model yields good quantitative agreement with the velocity profiles obtained from the non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The mixtures considered are observed to behave as single species pseudo fluid, with the interfacial friction displaying linear dependence on molar composition of the mixture. The results also indicate that the different species have different slip lengths, which remain unchanged with the channel width. PMID:27544095

  5. A simple model to understand the role of membrane shear elasticity and stress-free shape on the motion of red blood cells in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallat, Annie; Abkarian, Manouk; Dupire, Jules

    2015-11-01

    The analytical model presented by Keller and Skalak on the dynamics of red blood cells in shear flow described the cell as a fluid ellipsoid of fixed shape. It was extended to introduce shear elasticity of the cell membrane. We further extend the model when the cell discoid physiological shape is not a stress-free shape. We show that spheroid stress-free shapes enables fitting experimental data with values of shear elasticity typical to that found with micropipettes and optical tweezers. For moderate shear rates (when RBCs keep their discoid shape) this model enables to quantitatively determine an effective cell viscosity, that combines membrane and hemoglobin viscosities and an effective shear modulus of the membrane that combines shear modulus and stress-free shape. This model allows determining RBC mechanical parameters both in the tanktreading regime for cells suspended in a high viscosity medium, and in the tumbling regime for cells suspended in a low viscosity medium. In this regime,a transition is predicted between a rigid-like tumbling motion and a fluid-like tumbling motion above a critical shear rate, which is directly related to the mechanical parameters of the cell. A*MIDEX (n ANR-11-IDEX-0001-02) funded by the ''Investissements d'Avenir'', Region Languedoc-Roussillon, Labex NUMEV (ANR-10-LABX-20), BPI France project DataDiag.

  6. Mapping between atomistic simulations and Eshelby inclusions in the shear deformation of an amorphous silicon model.

    PubMed

    Albaret, T; Tanguy, A; Boioli, F; Rodney, D

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we perform quasistatic shear simulations of model amorphous silicon bulk samples with Stillinger-Weber-type potentials. Local plastic rearrangements identified based on local energy variations are fitted through their displacement fields on collections of Eshelby spherical inclusions, allowing determination of their transformation strain tensors. The latter are then used to quantitatively reproduce atomistic stress-strain curves, in terms of both shear and pressure components. We demonstrate that our methodology is able to capture the plastic behavior predicted by different Stillinger-Weber potentials, in particular, their different shear tension coupling. These calculations justify the decomposition of plasticity into shear transformations used so far in mesoscale models and provide atomic-scale parameters that can be used to limit the empiricism needed in such models up to now. PMID:27300968

  7. Mapping between atomistic simulations and Eshelby inclusions in the shear deformation of an amorphous silicon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albaret, T.; Tanguy, A.; Boioli, F.; Rodney, D.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we perform quasistatic shear simulations of model amorphous silicon bulk samples with Stillinger-Weber-type potentials. Local plastic rearrangements identified based on local energy variations are fitted through their displacement fields on collections of Eshelby spherical inclusions, allowing determination of their transformation strain tensors. The latter are then used to quantitatively reproduce atomistic stress-strain curves, in terms of both shear and pressure components. We demonstrate that our methodology is able to capture the plastic behavior predicted by different Stillinger-Weber potentials, in particular, their different shear tension coupling. These calculations justify the decomposition of plasticity into shear transformations used so far in mesoscale models and provide atomic-scale parameters that can be used to limit the empiricism needed in such models up to now.

  8. Interface shear strength and fracture behaviour of porous glass-fibre-reinforced composite implant and bone model material.

    PubMed

    Nganga, Sara; Ylä-Soininmäki, Anne; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2011-11-01

    Glass-fibre-reinforced composites (FRCs) are under current investigation to serve as durable bone substitute materials in load-bearing orthopaedic implants and bone implants in the head and neck area. The present form of biocompatible FRCs consist of non-woven E-glass-fibre tissues impregnated with varying amounts of a non-resorbable photopolymerisable bifunctional polymer resin with equal portions of both bis-phenyl-A-glycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA) and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA). FRCs with a total porosity of 10-70 vol% were prepared, more than 90 vol% of which being functional (open pores), and the rest closed. The pore sizes were greater than 100 μm. In the present study, the push-out test was chosen to analyse the shear strength of the interface between mechanically interlocked gypsum and a porous FRC implant structure. Gypsum was used as a substitute material for natural bone. The simulative in vitro experiments revealed a significant rise of push-out forces to the twofold level of 1147 ± 271 N for an increase in total FRC porosity of 43%. Pins, intended to model the initial mechanical implant fixation, did not affect the measured shear strength of the gypsum-FRC interface, but led to slightly more cohesive fracture modes. Fractures always occurred inside the gypsum, it having lower compressive strength than the porous FRC structures. Therefore, the largest loads were restricted by the brittleness of the gypsum. Increases of the FRC implant porosity tended to lead to more cohesive fracture modes and higher interfacial fracture toughness. Statistical differences were confirmed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. The differences between the modelled configuration showing gypsum penetration into all open pores and the real clinical situation with gradual bone ingrowth has to be considered. PMID:22098879

  9. Multiple Size Group Modeling of Polydispersed Bubbly Flow in the Mold: An Analysis of Turbulence and Interfacial Force Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Qi, Fengsheng; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2015-04-01

    An inhomogeneous Multiple Size Group (MUSIG) model based on the Eulerian-Eulerian approach has been developed to describe the polydispersed bubbly flow inside the continuous-casting mold. A laboratory scale mold has been simulated using four different turbulence closure models (modified k - ɛ, RNG k - ɛ, k - ω, and SST) with the purpose of critically comparing their predictions of bubble Sauter mean diameter distribution with previous experimental data. Furthermore, the influences of all the interfacial momentum transfer terms including drag force, lift force, virtual mass force, wall lubrication force, and turbulent dispersion force are investigated. The breakup and coalescence effects of the bubbles are modeled according to the bubble breakup by the impact of turbulent eddies while for bubble coalescence by the random collisions driven by turbulence and wake entrainment. It has been found that the modified k - ɛ model shows better agreement than other models in predicting the bubble Sauter mean diameter profiles. Further, simulations have also been performed to understand the sensitivity of different interfacial forces. The appropriate drag force coefficient, lift force coefficient, virtual mass force coefficient, and turbulent dispersion force coefficient are chosen in accordance with measurements of water model experiments. However, the wall lubrication force does not have much effect on the current polydispersed bubbly flow system. Finally, the MUSIG model is then used to estimate the argon bubble diameter in the molten steel of the mold. The argon bubble Sauter mean diameter generated in molten steel is predicted to be larger than air bubbles in water for the similar conditions.

  10. Two-phase interfacial area and flow regime modeling in FLOWTRAN-TF code

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.G. III; Lee, S.Y.; Flach, G.P.; Hamm, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    FLOWTRAN-TF is a new two-component, two-phase thermal-hydraulics code to capture the detailed assembly behavior associated with loss-of-coolant accident analyses in multichannel assemblies of the SRS reactors. The local interfacial area of the two-phase mixture is computed by summing the interfacial areas contributed by each of three flow regimes. For smooth flow regime transitions, the code uses an interpolation technique in terms of component void fraction for each basic flow regime.

  11. Two-phase interfacial area and flow regime modeling in FLOWTRAN-TF code

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.G. III; Lee, S.Y.; Flach, G.P.; Hamm, L.L.

    1992-12-31

    FLOWTRAN-TF is a new two-component, two-phase thermal-hydraulics code to capture the detailed assembly behavior associated with loss-of-coolant accident analyses in multichannel assemblies of the SRS reactors. The local interfacial area of the two-phase mixture is computed by summing the interfacial areas contributed by each of three flow regimes. For smooth flow regime transitions, the code uses an interpolation technique in terms of component void fraction for each basic flow regime.

  12. Asymmetric magnetic reconnection with out-of-plane shear flows in a two dimensional hybrid model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Xian-Qu; Liu, Yue

    2015-05-15

    Effects of out-of-plane shear flows on asymmetric magnetic reconnect are investigated in a two-dimensional (2D) hybrid model with an initial Harris sheet equilibrium. It is found that the out-of-plane flow with an in-plane shear can significantly change the asymmetric reconnection process as well as the related geometry. The magnetic flux, out-of-plane magnetic field, in-plane flow vorticity, plasma density, and the reconnection rate are discussed in detail. The results are in comparison with the cases without the shear flows to further understand the effect.

  13. Modeling phase transitions during the crystallization of a multicomponent fat under shear

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Idziak, Stefan H.J.

    2005-04-01

    The crystallization of multicomponent systems involves several competing physicochemical processes that depend on composition, temperature profiles, and shear rates applied. Research on these mechanisms is necessary in order to understand how natural materials form crystalline structures. Palm oil was crystallized in a Couette cell at 17 and 22 deg. C under shear rates ranging from 0 to 2880 s{sup -1} at a synchrotron beamline. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction patterns were captured at short time intervals during the crystallization process. Radial analysis of these patterns showed shear-induced acceleration of the phase transition from {alpha} to {beta}{sup '}. This effect can be explained by a simple model where the {alpha} phase nucleates from the melt, a process which occurs independently of shear rate. The {alpha} phase grows according to an Avrami growth model. The {beta}{sup '} phase nucleates on the {alpha} crystallites, with the amount of {beta}{sup '} crystal formation dependent on the rate of transformation of {alpha} to {beta}{sup '} as well as the growth rate of the {beta}{sup '} phase from the melt. The shear induced {alpha}-{beta}{sup '} phase transition acceleration occurs because under shear, the {alpha} nuclei form many distinct small crystallites which can easily transform to the {beta}{sup '} form, while at lower shear rates, the {alpha} nuclei tend to aggregate, thus retarding the nucleation of the {beta}{sup '} crystals. The displacement of the diffraction peak positions revealed that increased shear rate promotes the crystallization of the higher melting fraction, affecting the composition of the crystallites. Crystalline orientation was observed only at shear rates above 180 s{sup -1} at 17 deg. C and 720 s{sup -1} at 22 deg. C.

  14. Shear Moduli for Non-Isotropic, Open Cell Foams Using a General Elongated Kelvin Foam Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2009-01-01

    Equations for calculating the shear modulus of non-isotropic, open cell foams in the plane perpendicular to the rise direction and in a plane parallel to the rise direction are derived using an elongated Kelvin foam model. This Kelvin foam model is more general than that employed by previous authors as the size and shape of the unit cell are defined by specifying three independent cell dimensions. The equations for the shear compliances are derived as a function of three unit cell dimensions and the section properties of the cell edges. From the compliance equations, the shear modulus equations are obtained and written as a function of the relative density and two unit cell shape parameters. The dependence of the two shear moduli on the relative density and the two shape parameters is demonstrated.

  15. Probabilistic model of waiting times between large failures in sheared media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkman, Braden A. W.; LeBlanc, Michael P.; Uhl, Jonathan T.; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Dahmen, Karin A.

    2016-01-01

    Using a probabilistic approximation of a mean-field mechanistic model of sheared systems, we analytically calculate the statistical properties of large failures under slow shear loading. For general shear F (t ) , the distribution of waiting times between large system-spanning failures is a generalized exponential distribution, ρT(t ) =λ ( F (t ) ) P ( F (t ) ) exp[-∫0td τ λ ( F (τ ) ) P ( F (τ ) ) ] , where λ ( F (t )) is the rate of small event occurrences at stress F (t ) and P ( F (t )) is the probability that a small event triggers a large failure. We study the behavior of this distribution as a function of fault properties, such as heterogeneity or shear rate. Because the probabilistic model accommodates any stress loading F (t ) , it is particularly useful for modeling experiments designed to understand how different forms of shear loading or stress perturbations impact the waiting-time statistics of large failures. As examples, we study how periodic perturbations or fluctuations on top of a linear shear stress increase impact the waiting-time distribution.

  16. Tomography from the next generation of cosmic shear experiments for viable f(R) models

    SciTech Connect

    Camera, Stefano; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Cardone, Vincenzo F. E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it

    2011-07-01

    We present the cosmic shear signal predicted by two viable cosmological models in the framework of modified-action f(R) theories. We use f(R) models where the current accelerated expansion of the Universe is a direct consequence of the modified gravitational Lagrangian rather than Dark Energy (DE), either in the form of vacuum energy/cosmological constant or of a dynamical scalar field (e.g. quintessence). We choose Starobinsky's (St) and Hu and Sawicki's (HS) f(R) models, which are carefully designed to pass the Solar System gravity tests. In order to further support — or rule out — f(R) theories as alternative candidates to the DE hypothesis, we exploit the power of weak gravitational lensing, specifically of cosmic shear. We calculate the tomographic shear matrix as it would be measured by the upcoming ESA Cosmic Vision Euclid satellite. We find that in the St model the cosmic shear signal is almost completely degenerate with ΛCDM, but it is easily distinguishable in the HS model. Moreover, we compute the corresponding Fisher matrix for both the St and HS models, thus obtaining forecasts for their cosmological parameters. Finally, we show that the Bayes factor for cosmic shear will definitely favour the HS model over ΛCDM if Euclid measures a value larger than ∼ 0.02 for the extra HS parameter n{sub HS}.

  17. Generic Role of Polymer Supports in the Fine Adjustment of Interfacial Interactions between Solid Substrates and Model Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Fernanda F; Schneck, Emanuel; Fragneto, Giovanna; Konovalov, Oleg V; Tanaka, Motomu

    2015-04-21

    To understand the generic role of soft, hydrated biopolymers in adjusting interfacial interactions at biological interfaces, we designed a defined model of the cell-extracellular matrix contacts based on planar lipid membranes deposited on polymer supports (polymer-supported membranes). Highly uniform polymer supports made out of regenerated cellulose allow for the control of film thickness without changing the surface roughness and without osmotic dehydration. The complementary combination of specular neutron reflectivity and high-energy specular X-ray reflectivity yields the equilibrium membrane-substrate distances, which can quantitatively be modeled by computing the interplay of van der Waals interaction, hydration repulsion, and repulsion caused by the thermal undulation of membranes. The obtained results help to understand the role of a biopolymer in the interfacial interactions of cell membranes from a physical point of view and also open a large potential to generally bridge soft, biological matter and hard inorganic materials. PMID:25794040

  18. The effects of neutron irradiation on shear properties of monolayered PyC and multilayered PyC/SiC interfaces of SiC/SiC composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, T.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.

    2007-08-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties at the fiber/matrix interface of SiC/SiC composites was evaluated. The materials investigated were Hi-Nicalon™ Type-S fiber reinforced chemically vapor infiltrated SiC matrix composites with varied interphases: monolayered pyrolytic carbon (PyC) or multilayered PyC/SiC. The neutron fluence was 7.7 × 10 25 n/m 2 ( E > 0.1 MeV), and the irradiation temperature was 800 °C. Interfacial shear properties were evaluated by the fiber push-out test method. A modified shear-lag model was applied to analyze the interfacial shear parameters. Test results indicate that the interfacial debond shear strength and the interfacial friction stress for the multilayer composites were significantly degraded by irradiation. Nevertheless, the multilayer composites retained sufficient interfacial shear properties so that overall composite strength after neutron irradiation was unaffected. The actual mechanism of interphase property decrease for the multilayer composites is unknown. The interfacial shear properties of the irradiated monolayer composites appear unaffected.

  19. Water-in-model oil emulsions studied by small-angle neutron scattering: interfacial film thickness and composition.

    PubMed

    Verruto, Vincent J; Kilpatrick, Peter K

    2008-11-18

    The ever-increasing worldwide demand for energy has led to the upgrading of heavy crude oil and asphaltene-rich feedstocks becoming viable refining options for the petroleum industry. Traditional problems associated with these feedstocks, particularly stable water-in-petroleum emulsions, are drawing increasing attention. Despite considerable research on the interfacial assembly of asphaltenes, resins, and naphthenic acids, much about the resulting interfacial films is not well understood. Here, we describe the use of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to elucidate interfacial film properties from model emulsion systems. Modeling the SANS data with both a polydisperse core/shell form factor as well as a thin sheet approximation, we have deduced the film thickness and the asphaltenic composition within the stabilizing interfacial films of water-in-model oil emulsions prepared in toluene, decalin, and 1-methylnaphthalene. Film thicknesses were found to be 100-110 A with little deviation among the three solvents. By contrast, asphaltene composition in the film varied significantly, with decalin leading to the most asphaltene-rich films (30% by volume of the film), while emulsions made in toluene and methylnaphthalene resulted in lower asphaltenic contents (12-15%). Through centrifugation and dilatational rheology, we found that trends of decreasing water resolution (i.e., increasing emulsion stability) and increasing long-time dilatational elasticity corresponded with increasing asphaltene composition in the film. In addition to the asphaltenic composition of the films, here we also deduce the film solvent and water content. Our analyses indicate that 1:1 (O/W) emulsions prepared with 3% (w/w) asphaltenes in toluene and 1 wt % NaCl aqueous solutions at pH 7 and pH 10 resulted in 80-90 A thick films, interfacial areas around 2600-3100 cm (2)/mL, and films that were roughly 25% (v/v) asphaltenic, 60-70% toluene, and 8-12% water. The increased asphaltene and water film

  20. A New Model to Calculate Friction Coefficients and Shear Stresses in Thermal Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian

    2008-01-01

    A new analytical model for thermal drilling (also known as friction drilling) has been developed. The model distinguishes itself from recent work of other investigators by improving on two aspects: (1) the new model defines material plastic flow in terms of the yield in shear rather than the yield in compression, and (2) it uses a single, variable friction coefficient instead of assuming two unrelated friction coefficients in fixed values. The time dependence of the shear stress and friction coefficient at the hole walls, which cannot be measured directly in thermal drilling, can be calculated using this model from experimentally-measured values of the instantaneous thrust force and torque. Good matches between the calculated shear strengths and the handbook values for thermally drilling low carbon steel confirm the model's validity.

  1. Yield shear stress model of magnetorheological fluids based on exponential distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chu-wen; Chen, Fei; Meng, Qing-rui; Dong, Zi-xin

    2014-06-01

    The magnetic chain model that considers the interaction between particles and the external magnetic field in a magnetorheological fluid has been widely accepted. Based on the chain model, a yield shear stress model of magnetorheological fluids was proposed by introducing the exponential distribution to describe the distribution of angles between the direction of magnetic field and the chain formed by magnetic particles. The main influencing factors were considered in the model, such as magnetic flux density, intensity of magnetic field, particle size, volume fraction of particles, the angle of magnetic chain, and so on. The effect of magnetic flux density on the yield shear stress was discussed. The yield stress of aqueous Fe3O4 magnetreological fluids with volume fraction of 7.6% and 16.2% were measured by a device designed by ourselves. The results indicate that the proposed model can be used for calculation of yield shear stress with acceptable errors.

  2. Variable aspect ratio method in the Xu-White model for shear-wave velocity estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jun-Yu; Yue, Cheng-Qi; Liang, Yi-Qiang; Song, Zhi-Xiang; Ling, Su; Zhang, Yang; Wu, Wei

    2013-06-01

    Shear-wave velocity logs are useful for various seismic interpretation applications, including bright spot analyses, amplitude-versus-offset analyses and multicomponent seismic interpretations. This paper presents a method for predicting the shear-wave velocity of argillaceous sandstone from conventional log data and experimental data, based on Gassmann's equations and the Xu-White model. This variable aspect ratio method takes into account all the influences of the matrix nature, shale content, porosity size and pore geometry, and the properties of pore fluid of argillaceous sandstone, replacing the fixed aspect ratio assumption in the conventional Xu-White model. To achieve this, we first use the Xu-White model to derive the bulk and shear modulus of dry rock in a sand-clay mixture. Secondly, we use Gassmann's equations to calculate the fluid-saturated elastic properties, including compressional and shear-wave velocities. Finally, we use the variable aspect ratio method to estimate the shear-wave velocity. The numerical results indicate that the variable aspect ratio method provides an important improvement in the application of the Xu-White model for sand-clay mixtures and allows for a variable aspect ratio log to be introduced into the Xu-White model instead of the constant aspect ratio assumption. This method shows a significant improvement in predicting velocities over the conventional Xu-White model.

  3. Kinetic Approaches to Shear-Driven Magnetic Reconnection for Multi-Scale Modeling of CME Initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, C.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C.; Germaschewski, K.; Karpen, J. T.

    2013-12-01

    In the standard model for coronal mass ejections (CME) and/or solar flares, the free energy for the event resides in the strongly sheared magnetic field of a filament channel. The pre-eruption force balance, consisting of an upward force due to the magnetic pressure of the sheared field balanced by a downward tension due to overlying un-sheared field, is widely believed to be disrupted by magnetic reconnection. Therefore, understanding initiation of solar explosive phenomena requires a true multi-scale model of reconnection onset driven by the buildup of magnetic shear. While the application of magnetic-field shear is a trivial matter in MHD simulations, it is a significant challenge in a PIC code. The driver must be implemented in a self-consistent manner and with boundary conditions that avoid the generation of waves that destroy the applied shear. In this work, we describe drivers for 2.5D, aperiodic, PIC systems and discuss the implementation of driver-consistent boundary conditions that allow a net electric current to flow through the walls. Preliminary tests of these boundaries with a MHD equilibrium are shown. This work was supported, in part, by the NASA Living With a Star TR&T Program.

  4. A Kinetic Approach to Shear Driven Magnetic Reconnection for Multi-Scale Modeling of CME Initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Carrie; Antiochos, Spiro; DeVore, Rick; Germaschewski, Kai; Karpen, Judy

    2013-10-01

    In the standard model for coronal mass ejections (CME) and/or solar flares, the free energy for the event resides in the strongly sheared magnetic field of a filament channel. The pre-eruption force balance consisting of an upward force due to the magnetic pressure of the sheared field balanced by a downward tension due to overlying, un-sheared field is widely believed to be disrupted by magnetic reconnection. Therefore, understanding initiation of solar explosive phenomena requires a true multi-scale model of reconnection onset driven by the buildup of magnetic shear. While, the application of a magnetic field shear is a trivial matter in MHD simulations, it is significantly challenging to do so in a PIC code. The driver must be implemented in a self-consistent manner and with boundary conditions that avoid the generation of waves that destroy the applied shear. In this work, we describe such a driver for 2.5D, aperiodic, PIC system and discuss the implementation of driver consistent boundary conditions that allow a net electric current to flow through the walls. Preliminary tests of these boundaries with a MHD equilibrium are shown.

  5. Reduction of Water/Oil Interfacial Tension by Model Asphaltenes: The Governing Role of Surface Concentration.

    PubMed

    Jian, Cuiying; Poopari, Mohammad Reza; Liu, Qingxia; Zerpa, Nestor; Zeng, Hongbo; Tang, Tian

    2016-06-30

    In this work, pendant drop techniques and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the effect of asphaltene concentrations on the interfacial tension (IFT) of the oil/water interface. Here, oil and asphaltene were represented by, respectively, common organic solvents and Violanthrone-79, and two types of concentration, i.e., bulk concentration and surface concentration, were examined. Correlations between the IFTs from experiments and MD simulations revealed that surface concentration, rather than the commonly used bulk concentration, determines the reduction of oil/water IFTs. Through analyzing the hydrogen bonding, the underlying mechanism for the IFT reduction was proposed. Our discussions here not only enable the direct comparison between experiments and MD simulations on the IFTs but also help with future interfacial studies using combined experimental and simulation approaches. The methodologies used in this work can be extended to many other oil/water interfaces in the presence of interfacially active compounds. PMID:27268710

  6. Perspective: The Asakura Oosawa model: A colloid prototype for bulk and interfacial phase behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Kurt; Virnau, Peter; Statt, Antonia

    2014-10-01

    In many colloidal suspensions, the micrometer-sized particles behave like hard spheres, but when non-adsorbing polymers are added to the solution a depletion attraction (of entropic origin) is created. Since 60 years the Asakura-Oosawa model, which simply describes the polymers as ideal soft spheres, is an archetypical description for the statistical thermodynamics of such systems, accounting for many features of real colloid-polymer mixtures very well. While the fugacity of the polymers (which controls their concentration in the solution) plays a role like inverse temperature, the size ratio of polymer versus colloid radii acts as a control parameter to modify the phase diagram: when this ratio is large enough, a vapor-liquid like phase separation occurs at low enough colloid packing fractions, up to a triple point where a liquid-solid two-phase coexistence region takes over. For smaller size ratios, the critical point of the phase separation and the triple point merge, resulting in a single two-phase coexistence region between fluid and crystalline phases (of "inverted swan neck"-topology, with possibly a hidden metastable phase separation). Furthermore, liquid-crystalline ordering may be found if colloidal particles of non-spherical shape (e.g., rod like) are considered. Also interactions of the particles with solid surfaces should be tunable (e.g., walls coated by polymer brushes), and interfacial phenomena are particularly interesting experimentally, since fluctuations can be studied in the microscope on all length scales, down to the particle level. Due to its simplicity this model has become a workhorse for both analytical theory and computer simulation. Recently, generalizations addressing dynamic phenomena (phase separation, crystal nucleation, etc.) have become the focus of studies.

  7. Perspective: The Asakura Oosawa model: A colloid prototype for bulk and interfacial phase behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Kurt; Virnau, Peter; Statt, Antonia

    2014-10-14

    In many colloidal suspensions, the micrometer-sized particles behave like hard spheres, but when non-adsorbing polymers are added to the solution a depletion attraction (of entropic origin) is created. Since 60 years the Asakura-Oosawa model, which simply describes the polymers as ideal soft spheres, is an archetypical description for the statistical thermodynamics of such systems, accounting for many features of real colloid-polymer mixtures very well. While the fugacity of the polymers (which controls their concentration in the solution) plays a role like inverse temperature, the size ratio of polymer versus colloid radii acts as a control parameter to modify the phase diagram: when this ratio is large enough, a vapor-liquid like phase separation occurs at low enough colloid packing fractions, up to a triple point where a liquid-solid two-phase coexistence region takes over. For smaller size ratios, the critical point of the phase separation and the triple point merge, resulting in a single two-phase coexistence region between fluid and crystalline phases (of “inverted swan neck”-topology, with possibly a hidden metastable phase separation). Furthermore, liquid-crystalline ordering may be found if colloidal particles of non-spherical shape (e.g., rod like) are considered. Also interactions of the particles with solid surfaces should be tunable (e.g., walls coated by polymer brushes), and interfacial phenomena are particularly interesting experimentally, since fluctuations can be studied in the microscope on all length scales, down to the particle level. Due to its simplicity this model has become a workhorse for both analytical theory and computer simulation. Recently, generalizations addressing dynamic phenomena (phase separation, crystal nucleation, etc.) have become the focus of studies.

  8. Shear-flexible finite-element models of laminated composite plates and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Mathers, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Several finite-element models are applied to the linear static, stability, and vibration analysis of laminated composite plates and shells. The study is based on linear shallow-shell theory, with the effects of shear deformation, anisotropic material behavior, and bending-extensional coupling included. Both stiffness (displacement) and mixed finite-element models are considered. Discussion is focused on the effects of shear deformation and anisotropic material behavior on the accuracy and convergence of different finite-element models. Numerical studies are presented which show the effects of increasing the order of the approximating polynomials, adding internal degrees of freedom, and using derivatives of generalized displacements as nodal parameters.

  9. A method for three-dimensional modeling of wind-shear environments for flight simulator applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    A computational method for modeling severe wind shears of the type that have been documented during severe convective atmospheric conditions is offered for use in research and training flight simulation. The procedure was developed with the objectives of operational flexibility and minimum computer load. From one to five, simple down burst wind models can be configured and located to produce the wind field desired for specific simulated flight scenarios. A definition of related turbulence parameters is offered as an additional product of the computations. The use of the method to model several documented examples of severe wind shear is demonstrated.

  10. Modeling transversely isotropic, viscoelastic, incompressible tissue-like materials with application in ultrasound shear wave elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Bo; Brigham, John C.; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F.; Zhang, Xiaoming; Urban, Matthew W.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to model the shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic, viscoelastic and incompressible media. The targeted application is ultrasound-based shear wave elastography for viscoelasticity measurements in anisotropic tissues such as the kidney and skeletal muscles. The proposed model predicts that if the viscoelastic parameters both across and along fiber directions can be characterized as a Voigt material, then the spatial phase velocity at any angle is also governed by a Voigt material model. Further, with the aid of Taylor expansions, it is shown that the spatial group velocity at any angle is close to a Voigt type for weakly attenuative materials within a certain bandwidth. The model is implemented in a finite element code by a time domain explicit integration scheme and shear wave simulations are conducted. The results of the simulations are analyzed to extract the shear wave elasticity and viscosity for both the spatial phase and group velocities. The estimated values match well with theoretical predictions. The proposed theory is further verified by an ex vivo tissue experiment measured in a porcine skeletal muscle by an ultrasound shear wave elastography method. The applicability of the Taylor expansion to analyze the spatial velocities is also discussed. We demonstrate that the approximations from the Taylor expansions are subject to errors when the viscosities across or along the fiber directions are large or the maximum frequency considered is beyond the bandwidth defined by radii of convergence of the Taylor expansions.

  11. Modeling Transversely Isotropic, Viscoelastic, Incompressible Tissue-like Materials with Application in Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Bo; Brigham, John C.; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F.; Zhang, Xiaoming; Urban, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to model the shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic, viscoelastic and incompressible media. The targeted application is ultrasound-based shear wave elastography for viscoelasticity measurements in anisotropic tissues such as the kidney and skeletal muscles. The proposed model predicts that if the viscoelastic parameters both across and along fiber directions can be characterized as a Voigt material, then the spatial phase velocity at any angle is also governed by a Voigt material model. Further, with the aid of Taylor expansions, it is shown that the spatial group velocity at any angle is close to a Voigt type for weakly attenuative materials within a certain bandwidth. The model is implemented in a finite element code by a time domain explicit integration scheme and shear wave simulations are conducted. The results of the simulations are analyzed to extract the shear wave elasticity and viscosity for both the spatial phase and group velocities. The estimated values match well with theoretical predictions. The proposed theory is further verified by an ex vivo tissue experiment measured in a porcine skeletal muscle by an ultrasound shear wave elastography method. The applicability of the Taylor expansion to analyze the spatial velocities is also discussed. We demonstrate that the approximations from the Taylor expansions are subject to errors when the viscosities across or along the fiber directions are large or the maximum frequency considered is beyond the bandwidth defined by radii of convergence of the Taylor expansions. PMID:25591921

  12. Modeling of the blood rheology in steady-state shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolidis, Alex J.; Beris, Antony N.

    2014-05-15

    We undertake here a systematic study of the rheology of blood in steady-state shear flows. As blood is a complex fluid, the first question that we try to answer is whether, even in steady-state shear flows, we can model it as a rheologically simple fluid, i.e., we can describe its behavior through a constitutive model that involves only local kinematic quantities. Having answered that question positively, we then probe as to which non-Newtonian model best fits available shear stress vs shear-rate literature data. We show that under physiological conditions blood is typically viscoplastic, i.e., it exhibits a yield stress that acts as a minimum threshold for flow. We further show that the Casson model emerges naturally as the best approximation, at least for low and moderate shear-rates. We then develop systematically a parametric dependence of the rheological parameters entering the Casson model on key physiological quantities, such as the red blood cell volume fraction (hematocrit). For the yield stress, we base our description on its critical, percolation-originated nature. Thus, we first determine onset conditions, i.e., the critical threshold value that the hematocrit has to have in order for yield stress to appear. It is shown that this is a function of the concentration of a key red blood cell binding protein, fibrinogen. Then, we establish a parametric dependence as a function of the fibrinogen and the square of the difference of the hematocrit from its critical onset value. Similarly, we provide an expression for the Casson viscosity, in terms of the hematocrit and the temperature. A successful validation of the proposed formula is performed against additional experimental literature data. The proposed expression is anticipated to be useful not only for steady-state blood flow modeling but also as providing the starting point for transient shear, or more general flow modeling.

  13. Modeling the adaptive permeability response of porcine iliac arteries to acute changes in mural shear.

    PubMed

    Hazel, A L; Grzybowski, D M; Friedman, M H

    2003-04-01

    The hypothesis that much of the uptake of macromolecules by the vascular wall takes place while the endothelial lining is adapting to changes in its hemodynamic environment is being tested by a series of in vivo measurements of the uptake of Evans-blue-dye-labeled albumin by porcine iliac arteries subjected to acute changes in blood flow. The uptake data are interpreted through an ad hoc model of the dynamic permeability response that is proposed to accompany alterations in mural shear. The model is able to correlate, with a single set of parameters, the vascular response to a variety of experimental protocols, including sustained step increases and decreases in shear, and alternations in shear of various periods. The best-fit parameters of the model suggest that the adaptive response to an increase in shear proceeds with a latency of approximately 1.5 min and a time constant of approximately 90 min that is substantially shorter than the response to a decrease in shear. PMID:12723682

  14. Magnetic Field Shear in Kinetic Models Steps Toward Understanding Magnetic Reconnection Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Carrie; Antiochos, Spiro; DeVore, Rick; Karpen, Judith

    2015-11-01

    In the standard model for coronal mass ejections (CME) and/or solar flares, the free energy for the eruptive event resides in a strongly sheared magnetic. A pre-eruption force balance consists of an upward force due to the magnetic pressure of the sheared field and a downward tension due to overlying unsheared field. Magnetic reconnection disrupts this force balance; therefore, it is critical for understanding CME/flare initiation, to model the onset of reconnection driven by the build-up of magnetic shear. In MHD simulations, the application of a magnetic-field shear is a trivial matter. However, kinetic effects are dominant in the diffusion region and thus, it is important to examine this process with PIC simulations as well. The implementation of such a driver in PIC methods is challenging, however, and indicates the necessity of a true multiscale model for such processes in the solar environment. The field must be sheared self-consistently and indirectly to prevent the generation of waves that destroy the desired system. Plasma instabilities can arise nonetheless. Here, we show that we can control this instability and generate a predicted out-of-plane magnetic flux. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Award No. AGS-1331356.

  15. Dynamic interfacial properties of human tear-lipid films and their interactions with model-tear proteins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Svitova, Tatyana F; Lin, Meng C

    2016-07-01

    This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding interfacial properties of very complex biological colloids, specifically, human meibum and tear lipids, and their interactions with proteins similar to the proteins found in aqueous part of human tears. Tear lipids spread as thin films over the surface of tear-film aqueous and play crucial roles in tear-film stability and overall ocular-surface health. The vast majority of papers published to date report interfacial properties of meibum-lipid monolayers spread on various aqueous sub-phases, often containing model proteins, in Langmuir trough. However, it is well established that natural human ocular tear lipids exist as multilayered films with a thickness between 30 and 100nm, that is very much disparate from 1 to 2nm thick meibum monolayers. We employed sessile-bubble tensiometry to study the dynamic interfacial and rheological properties of reconstituted multilayered human tear-lipid films. Small amounts (0.5-1μg) of human tear lipids were deposited on an air-bubble surface to produce tear-lipid films in thickness range 30-100nm corresponding to ocular lipid films. Thus, we were able to overcome major Langmuir-trough method limitations because ocular tear lipids can be safely harvested only in minute, sub-milligram quantities, insufficient for Langmuir through studies. Sessile-bubble method is demonstrated to be a versatile tool for assessing conventional synthetic surfactants adsorption/desorption dynamics at an air-aqueous solution interface. (Svitova T., Weatherbee M., Radke C.J. Dynamics of surfactant sorption at the air/water interface: continuous-flow tensiometry. J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 2003;261:1170-179). The augmented flow-sessile-bubble setup, with step-strain relaxation module for dynamic interfacial rheological properties and high-precision syringe pump to generate larger and slow interfacial area expansions-contractions, was developed and employed in our studies. We established that

  16. Modeling spin transport in electrostatically-gated lateral-channel silicon devices: Role of interfacial spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2011-10-01

    Using a two-dimensional finite-differences scheme to model spin transport in silicon devices with lateral geometry, we simulate the effects of spin relaxation at interfacial boundaries, i.e., the exposed top surface and at an electrostatically-controlled backgate with a SiO2 dielectric. These gate-voltage-dependent simulations are compared to previous experimental results and show that strong spin relaxation, due to extrinsic effects, yields a Si/SiO2 interfacial spin lifetime of ≈1ns, orders of magnitude lower than lifetimes in the bulk Si. Relaxation at the top surface plays no substantial role. Hall effect measurements on ballistically injected electrons gated in the transport channel yield the carrier mobility directly and suggest that this reduction in spin lifetime is only partially due to enhanced interfacial momentum scattering, which induces random spin flips as in the Elliott effect. Therefore, other extrinsic mechanisms, such as those caused by paramagnetic defects should also be considered in order to explain the dramatic enhancement in spin relaxation at the gate interface over bulk values.

  17. Thermoelectric conductivities, shear viscosity, and stability in an anisotropic linear axion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xian-Hui; Ling, Yi; Niu, Chao; Sin, Sang-Jin

    2015-11-01

    We study thermoelectric conductivities and shear viscosities in a holographically anisotropic model, which is dual to a spatially anisotropic N =4 super-Yang-Mills theory at finite chemical potential. Momentum relaxation is realized through perturbing the linear axion field. Ac conductivity exhibits a coherent/incoherent metal transition. Deviations from the Wiedemann-Franz law are also observed in our model. The longitudinal shear viscosity for prolate anisotropy violates the bound conjectured by Kovtun-Son-Starinets. We also find that thermodynamic and dynamical instabilities are not always equivalent by examining the Gubser-Mitra conjecture.

  18. Simulations of free shear layers using a compressible kappa-epsilon model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, S. T.; Chang, C. T.; Marek, C. J.

    1991-01-01

    A two-dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes equation with a k-epsilon turbulence model is solved numerically to simulate the flow of a compressible free shear layer. The appropriate form of k and epsilon equations for compressible flow is discussed. Sarkar's modeling is adopted to simulate the compressibility effects in the k and epsilon equations. The numerical results show that the spreading rate of the shear layers decreases with increasing convective Mach number. In addition, favorable comparison was found between the calculated results and experimental data.

  19. Oscillatory shear response of dilute ferrofluids: predictions from rotational Brownian dynamics simulations and ferrohydrodynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Soto-Aquino, D; Rosso, D; Rinaldi, C

    2011-11-01

    Ferrofluids are colloidal suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles that exhibit normal liquid behavior in the absence of magnetic fields but respond to imposed magnetic fields by changing their viscosity without loss of fluidity. The response of ferrofluids to constant shear and magnetic fields has received a lot of attention, but the response of ferrofluids to oscillatory shear remains largely unexplored. In the present work we used rotational Brownian dynamics to study the dynamic properties of ferrofluids with thermally blocked nanoparticles under oscillatory shear and constant magnetic fields. Comparisons between simulations and modeling using the ferrohydrodynamics equations were also made. Simulation results show that, for small rotational Péclet number, the in-phase and out-of-phase components of the complex viscosity depend on the magnitude of the magnetic field and frequency of the shear, following a Maxwell-like model with field-dependent viscosity and characteristic time equal to the field-dependent transverse magnetic relaxation time of the nanoparticles. Comparison between simulations and the numerical solution of the ferrohydrodynamic equations shows that the oscillatory rotational magnetoviscosity for an oscillating shear field obtained using the kinetic magnetization relaxation equation quantitatively agrees with simulations for a wide range of Péclet number and Langevin parameter but has quantitative deviations from the simulations at high values of the Langevin parameter. These predictions indicate an apparent elastic character to the rheology of these suspensions, even though we are considering the infinitely dilute limit in which there are negligible particle-particle interactions and, as such, chains do not form. Additionally, an asymptotic analytical solution of the ferrohydrodynamics equations, valid for Pe<2, was used to demonstrate that the Cox-Merz rule applies for dilute ferrofluids under conditions of small shear rates. At higher shear

  20. Interfacial sliding near a free surface in a fibrous or layered composite during thermal cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, B. N.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a simple shear lag model of interfacial sliding at a free surface in a layered or continuous fiber composite. The interface is characterized by a critical interfacial shear stress, tau0, which might represent the critical stress for frictional sliding at a weakly bonded interface, or the shear flow stress of a thin ductile interface layer at a well bonded interface. The history, during heating and cooling, of the relative normal displacement of the reinforcing inclusions and the matrix on a free surface cut normal to the inclusions is calculated and shown to depend on both the absolute value and the temperature dependence of tau0, as well as on the magnitudes of the bulk residual stresses. The variety of possible displacement histories suggests that they are a rich source of information about tau0 and the residual stresses.

  1. A finite element method for shear stresses calculation in composite blade models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluch, B.

    1991-09-01

    A finite-element method is developed for accurately calculating shear stresses in helicopter blade models, induced by torsion and shearing forces. The method can also be used to compute the equivalent torsional stiffness of the section, their transverse shear coefficient, and the position of their center of torsion. A grid generator method which is a part of the calculation program is also described and used to discretize the sections quickly and to condition the grid data reliably. The finite-element method was validated on a few sections composed of isotropic materials and was then applied to a blade model sections made of composite materials. Good agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental data.

  2. Modelling of peak-flow wall shear stress in major airways of the lung.

    PubMed

    Green, A S

    2004-05-01

    Some respiratory diseases result in the inflammation of the lung airway epithelium. An associated chronic cough, as found in many cases of asthma and in long-term smokers, can exacerbate damage to the epithelial layer. It has been proposed that wall shear stresses, created by peak expiratory flow-rates during a coughing episode, are responsible. The work here uses a computational fluid dynamics technique to model peak expiratory flow in the trachea and major lung bronchi. Calculated wall shear stress values are compared to a limited set of published measurements taken from a physical model. The measurements are discussed in the context of a flow study of a complex bronchial network. A more complete picture is achieved by the calculation method, indicating, in some cases, higher maximum wall shear stresses than measured, confirming the original findings of the experimental work. Recommendations are made as to where further work would be beneficial to medical applications. PMID:15046995

  3. A Conceptual Model for Shear-Induced Phase Behavior in Crystallizing Cocoa Butter

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzanti,G.; Guthrie, S.; Marangoni, A.; Idziak, S.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a conceptual model to explain the quantitative data from synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments on the shear-induced phase behavior of cocoa butter, the main structural component of chocolate. We captured two-dimensional diffraction patterns from cocoa butter at crystallization temperatures of 17.5, 20.0, and 22.5 {sup o}C under shear rates from 45 to 1440 s{sup -1} and under static conditions. From the simultaneous analysis of the integrated intensity, correlation length, lamellar thickness, and crystalline orientation, we postulate a conceptual model to provide an explanation for the distribution of phases II, IV, V, and X and the kinetics of the process. As previously proposed in the literature, we assume that the crystallites grow layer upon layer of slightly different composition. The shear rate and temperature applied define these compositions. Simultaneously, the shear and temperature define the crystalline interface area available for secondary nucleation by promoting segregation and affecting the size distribution of the crystallites. The combination of these factors (composition, area, and size distribution) favors dramatically the early onset of phase V under shear and determines the proportions of phases II, IV, V, and X after the transition. The experimental observations, the methodology used, and the proposed explanation are of fundamental and industrial interest, since the structural properties of crystalline networks are determined by their microstructure and polymorphic crystalline state. Different proportions of the phases will thus result in different characteristics of the final material.

  4. Modeling shear flow and postsunset stability in the equatorial F region ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysell, D.; Larsen, M.; Swenson, C.; Wheeler, T.

    2005-12-01

    Sounding rocket and Altair radar data taken during the NASA EQUIS-II campaign on Kwajalein in August, 2004, are incorporated into a computational model of the electrodynamics of the low-latitude ionosphere. The purpose is to understand and quantify sources of the strong shear flow observed in the bottomside F region around and after sunset and to assess its influence on postsunset stability and the production of equatorial spread F. Possible sources of shear include 1) zonal electric fields on flux tubes with significant Hall conductivity, as are responsible for driving the equatorial electrojet, 2) zonal winds on flux tubes with significant Pedersen conductivity, as drive the E and F region dynamos, 3) vertical winds, a largely unknown quantity, and 4) vertical boundary currents forced from above or below the flux tube in question. The model solves for the electrostatic potential in three dimensions as a function of the background conductivity, background electric field, and the winds. We do not assume equipotential field lines but instead solve for the potential exactly using a multigridded solver. Shear flow may destabilize the postsunset ionosphere through a collisional shear instability related to electrostatic Kelvin Helmholtz [ Hysell and Kudeki, 2004]. Assessing the viability of the instability requires us to identify and rank in importance the sources of the shear.

  5. Sandwich beam model for free vibration analysis of bilayer graphene nanoribbons with interlayer shear effect

    SciTech Connect

    Nazemnezhad, Reza E-mail: rnazemnezhad@du.ac.ir; Shokrollahi, Hassan; Hosseini-Hashemi, Shahrokh

    2014-05-07

    In this study, sandwich beam model (SM) is proposed for free vibration analysis of bilayer graphene nanoribbons (BLGNRs) with interlayer shear effect. This model also takes into account the intralayer (in-plane) stretch of graphene nanoribbons. The molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the software LAMMPS and Adaptive Intermolecular Reactive Empirical Bond Order (AIREBO) potential are done to validate the accuracy of the sandwich model results. The MD simulation results include the two first frequencies of cantilever BLGNRs with different lengths and two interlayer shear moduli, i.e., 0.25 and 4.6 GPa. These two interlayer shear moduli, 0.25 and 4.6 GPa, can be obtained by sliding a small flake of graphene on a large graphene substrate when the parameter of E-LJ term in AIREBO potential, epsilon-CC, is set to be 2.84 and 45.44 meV, respectively. The SM results for a wide range of bending rigidity values show that the proposed model, i.e., the SM, predicts much better than the previous beam model in which the intralayer stretch is ignored. In addition, it is observed that the model can properly predict the natural frequencies of BLGNRs for various values of the bending rigidity and the interlayer shear modulus.

  6. Granular Shear Zone Formation: Acoustic Emission Measurements and Fiber-bundle Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Or, Dani

    2013-04-01

    We couple the acoustic emissions method with conceptual models of granular material behavior for investigation of granular shear zone formation and to assess eminence of landslide hazard. When granular materials are mechanically loaded or sheared, they tend to produce discrete events of force network restructuring, and frictional interaction at grain contacts. Such abrupt perturbations within the granular lattice release part of the elastic energy stored in the strained material. Elastic waves generated by such events can be measured as acoustic emissions (AE) and may be used as surrogates for intermittent structural transitions associated with shear zone formation. To experimentally investigate the connection between granular shearing and acoustic signals we performed an array of strain-controlled shear-frame tests using glass beads. AE were measured with two different systems operating at two frequency ranges. High temporal resolution measurements of the shear stresses revealed the presence of small fluctuations typically associated with low-frequency (< 20 kHz) acoustic bursts. Shear stress jumps and linked acoustic signals give account of discrete events of grain network rearrangements and obey characteristic exponential frequency-size distributions. We found that statistical features of force jumps and AE events depend on mechanical boundary conditions and evolve during the straining process. Activity characteristics of high-frequency (> 30 kHz) AE events is linked to friction between grains. To interpret failure associated AE signals, we adapted a conceptual fiber-bundle model (FBM) that describes some of the salient statistical features of failure and associated energy production. Using FBMs for the abrupt mechanical response of the granular medium and an associated grain and force chain AE generation model provides us with a full description of the mechanical-acoustical granular shearing process. Highly resolved AE may serve as a diagnostic tool not only

  7. A comparative study of the hypoplasticity and the fabric-dependent dilatant double shearing models for granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Mehrabadi, M.; Massoudi, M.

    2007-04-25

    In this paper, we consider the mechanical response of granular materials and compare the predictions of a hypoplastic model with that of a recently developed dilatant double shearing model which includes the effects of fabric. We implement the constitutive relations of the dilatant double shearing model and the hypoplastic model in the finite element program ABACUS/Explicit and compare their predictions in the triaxial compression and cyclic shear loading tests. Although the origins and the constitutive relations of the double shearing model and the hypoplastic model are quite different, we find that both models are capable of capturing typical behaviours of granular materials. This is significant because while hypoplasticity is phenomenological in nature, the double shearing model is based on a kinematic hypothesis and microstructural considerations, and can easily be calibrated through standard tests.

  8. A priori evaluation of the Pantano and Sarkar model in compressible homogeneous shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlifi, Hechmi; Abdallah, J.; Aïcha, H.; Taïeb, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a Reynolds stress closure, including the Pantano and Sarkar model of the mean part of the pressure-strain correlation is used for the computation of compressible homogeneous at high-speed shear flow. Several studies concerning the compressible homogeneous shear flow show that the changes of the turbulence structures are principally due to the structural compressibility effects which significantly affect the pressure field and then the pressure-strain correlation. Eventually, this term appears as the main term responsible for the changes in the magnitude of the Reynolds stress anisotropies. The structure of the gradient Mach number is similar to that of turbulence, therefore this parameter may be appropriate to study the changes in turbulence structures that arise from structural compressibility effects. Thus, the incompressible model of the pressure strain correlation and its corrected form by using the turbulent Mach turbulent only, fail to correctly evaluate the compressibility effects at high shear flow. An extension of the widely used incompressible Launder, Reece and Rodi model on compressible homogeneous shear flow is the major aim of the present work. From this extension, the standard coefficients C become a function of the extra compressibility parameters (the turbulent Mach number M and the gradient Mach number M) through the Pantano and Sarkar model. Application of the model on compressible homogeneous shear flow by considering various initial conditions shows reasonable agreement with the DNS results of Simone et al. and Sarkar. The observed trend of the dramatic increase in the normal Reynolds stress anisotropies, the significant decrease in the Reynolds shear stress anisotropy and the increase of the turbulent kinetic energy amplification rate with increasing the gradient Mach number are well predicted by the model. The ability of the model to predict the equilibrium states for the flow in cases A to A from DNS results of Sarkar is

  9. Nature of stress accommodation in sheared granular material: Insights from 3D numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, Karen; Hazzard, James F.

    2007-07-01

    Active faults often contain distinct accumulations of granular wear material. During shear, this granular material accommodates stress and strain in a heterogeneous manner that may influence fault stability. We present new work to visualize the nature of contact force distributions during 3D granular shear. Our 3D discrete numerical models consist of granular layers subjected to normal loading and direct shear, where gouge particles are simulated by individual spheres interacting at points of contact according to simple laws. During shear, we observe the transient microscopic processes and resulting macroscopic mechanical behavior that emerge from interactions of thousands of particles. We track particle translations and contact forces to determine the nature of internal stress accommodation with accumulated slip for different initial configurations. We view model outputs using novel 3D visualization techniques. Our results highlight the prevalence of transient directed contact force networks that preferentially transmit enhanced stresses across our granular layers. We demonstrate that particle size distribution (psd) controls the nature of the force networks. Models having a narrow (i.e. relatively uniform) psd exhibit discrete pipe-like force clusters with a dominant and focussed orientation oblique to but in the plane of shear. Wider psd models (e.g. power law size distributions D = 2.6) also show a directed contact force network oblique to shear but enjoy a wider range of orientations and show more out-of-plane linkages perpendicular to shear. Macroscopic friction level, is insensitive to these distinct force network morphologies, however, force network evolution appears to be linked to fluctuations in macroscopic friction. Our results are consistent with predictions, based on recent laboratory observations, that force network morphologies are sensitive to grain characteristics such as particle size distribution of a sheared granular layer. Our numerical

  10. Evaluation of the viscosities of a liquid crystal model system by shear flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarman, Sten; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2009-09-01

    The three Miesowicz viscosities of a liquid crystal model system consisting of the Gay-Berne fluid have been obtained by shear flow simulations. The viscosities along an isochore have been followed starting in the nematic phase at high temperatures across the nematic-smectic A phase transition down to low temperatures in the smectic A phase. The relative magnitudes of the viscosities as a function of the structure of the liquid crystal are discussed. The viscosities obtained by the shear flow simulations agree very well with those obtained by Green-Kubo relations in a previous work.

  11. Diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity of rigid water models.

    PubMed

    Tazi, Sami; Boţan, Alexandru; Salanne, Mathieu; Marry, Virginie; Turq, Pierre; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2012-07-18

    We report the diffusion coefficient and viscosity of popular rigid water models: two non-polarizable ones (SPC/E with three sites, and TIP4P/2005 with four sites) and a polarizable one (Dang-Chang, four sites). We exploit the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the system size (Yeh and Hummer 2004 J. Phys. Chem. B 108 15873) to obtain the size-independent value. This also provides an estimate of the viscosity of all water models, which we compare to the Green-Kubo result. In all cases, a good agreement is found. The TIP4P/2005 model is in better agreement with the experimental data for both diffusion and viscosity. The SPC/E and Dang-Chang models overestimate the diffusion coefficient and underestimate the viscosity. PMID:22739097

  12. Cluster-based reduced-order modelling of shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Eurika; Noack, Bernd R.; Cordier, Laurent; Spohn, Andreas; Segond, Marc; Abel, Markus; Daviller, Guillaume; Morzyński, Marek; Östh, Jan; Krajnović, Siniša; Niven, Robert K.

    2014-12-01

    Cluster-based reduced-order modelling (CROM) builds on the pioneering works of Gunzburger's group in cluster analysis [1] and Eckhardt's group in transition matrix models [2] and constitutes a potential alternative to reduced-order models based on a proper-orthogonal decomposition (POD). This strategy frames a time-resolved sequence of flow snapshots into a Markov model for the probabilities of cluster transitions. The information content of the Markov model is assessed with a Kullback-Leibler entropy. This entropy clearly discriminates between prediction times in which the initial conditions can be inferred by backward integration and the predictability horizon after which all information about the initial condition is lost. This approach is exemplified for a class of fluid dynamical benchmark problems like the periodic cylinder wake, the spatially evolving incompressible mixing layer, the bi-modal bluff body wake, and turbulent jet noise. For these examples, CROM is shown to distil nontrivial quasi-attractors and transition processes. CROM has numerous potential applications for the systematic identification of physical mechanisms of complex dynamics, for comparison of flow evolution models, and for the identification of precursors to desirable and undesirable events.

  13. A model for the generation of strongly nonlinear, weakly nonhydrostatic interfacial waves in a rotating ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar-González, Borja; Gerkema, Theo

    2015-04-01

    We derive a new two-fluid layer model consisting of a set of forced rotation-modified Boussinesq equations for studying the generation and evolution of strongly nonlinear weakly nonhydrostatic dispersive interfacial waves in a rotating ocean. The forcing for internal tide generation is due to tide-topography interaction (an oscillating non-flat bottom mimicking a barotropic tidal flow over topography). The resulting model forms a generalization of the Miyata-Choi-Camassa (MCC) equations, to which we add topography, tidal forcing and Coriolis dispersion due to Earth's rotation. Solitons are generated by disintegration of the first-mode of the internal tide. Because of strong non-linearity, they can attain a table-shaped form. Our moving (accelerating) topography is not an inertial frame and, hence, the transformation to a frame at rest is not simply a Galilean transformation. The effect of this transformation is discussed and is shown to be slight for the parameters under consideration. The set of equations is solved numerically using finite-difference methods. Numerical experiments using these equations are a useful tool for exploring and interpreting the conditions under which full nonlinearity becomes important for soliton generation. In particular, this is the case for table-top solitons when approaching the theoretical maximum amplitude and the appearance of nonlinearities when the two-layer system consists of two layers of equal thickness. At the early stage of the strongly nonlinear disintegration of an internal tide into table-top solitons, we observe that the low mode internal tide splits up into two different groups of rank-ordered solitons: a train of depressions on the leading edge and a train of elevations, after the former packet, with initially smaller amplitudes. Evolving in time, the largest elevations reach the smaller depressions in the train ahead, and three leading solitons at the front attain almost equal amplitudes. The table-top soliton

  14. A continuum model with a percolation threshold and tunneling-assisted interfacial conductivity for carbon nanotube-based nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yang; Weng, George J.; Meguid, Shaker A.; Hamouda, Abdel Magid

    2014-05-21

    A continuum model that possesses several desirable features of the electrical conduction process in carbon-nanotube (CNT) based nanocomposites is developed. Three basic elements are included: (i) percolation threshold, (ii) interface effects, and (iii) tunneling-assisted interfacial conductivity. We approach the first one through the selection of an effective medium theory. We approach the second one by the introduction of a diminishing layer of interface with an interfacial conductivity to build a 'thinly coated' CNT. The third one is introduced through the observation that interface conductivity can be enhanced by electron tunneling which in turn can be facilitated with the formation of CNT networks. We treat this last issue in a continuum fashion by taking the network formation as a statistical process that can be represented by Cauchy's probability density function. The outcome is a simple and yet widely useful model that can simultaneously capture all these fundamental characteristics. It is demonstrated that, without considering the interface effect, the predicted conductivity would be too high, and that, without accounting for the additional contribution from the tunneling-assisted interfacial conductivity, the predicted conductivity beyond the percolation threshold would be too low. It is with the consideration of all three elements that the theory can fully account for the experimentally measured data. We further use the developed model to demonstrate that, despite the anisotropy of the intrinsic CNT conductivity, it is its axial component along the CNT direction that dominates the overall conductivity. This theory is also proved that, even with a totally insulating matrix, it is still capable of delivering non-zero conductivity beyond the percolation threshold.

  15. Effect of nanoscale patterned interfacial roughness on interfacial toughness.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mook, William M.; Kennedy, Marian S.; Bahr, David F.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    The performance and the reliability of many devices are controlled by interfaces between thin films. In this study we investigated the use of patterned, nanoscale interfacial roughness as a way to increase the apparent interfacial toughness of brittle, thin-film material systems. The experimental portion of the study measured the interfacial toughness of a number of interfaces with nanoscale roughness. This included a silicon interface with a rectangular-toothed pattern of 60-nm wide by 90-nm deep channels fabricated using nanoimprint lithography techniques. Detailed finite element simulations were used to investigate the nature of interfacial crack growth when the interface is patterned. These simulations examined how geometric and material parameter choices affect the apparent toughness. Atomistic simulations were also performed with the aim of identifying possible modifications to the interfacial separation models currently used in nanoscale, finite element fracture analyses. The fundamental nature of atomistic traction separation for mixed mode loadings was investigated.

  16. The role of interfacial layers in the enhanced thermal conductivity of nanofluids : a renovated Hamilton-Crosser model.

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; Choi, S. U.-S.; Energy Technology

    2004-08-01

    We previously developed a renovated Maxwell model for the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids and determined that the solid/liquid interfacial layers play an important role in the enhanced thermal conductivity of nanofluids. However, this renovated Maxwell model is limited to suspensions with spherical particles. Here, we extend the Hamilton--Crosser model for suspensions of nonspherical particles to include the effect of a solid/liquid interface. The solid/liquid interface is described as a confocal ellipsoid with a solid particle. The new model for the three-phase suspensions is mathematically expressed in terms of the equivalent thermal conductivity and equivalent volume fraction of anisotropic complex ellipsoids, as well as an empirical shape factor. With a generalized empirical shape factor, the renovated Hamilton-Crosser model correctly predicts the magnitude of the thermal conductivity of nanotube-in-oil nanofluids. At present, this new model is not able to predict the nonlinear behavior of the nanofluid thermal conductivity.

  17. Development of turbulence models for shear flows by a double expansion technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakhot, V.; Thangam, S.; Gatski, T. B.; Orszag, S. A.; Speziale, C. G.

    1991-01-01

    Turbulence models are developed by supplementing the renormalization group (RNG) approach of Yakhot and Orszag with scale expansions for the Reynolds stress and production of dissipation terms. The additional expansion parameter (eta) is the ratio of the turbulent to mean strain time scale. While low-order expansions appear to provide an adequate description of the Reynolds stress, no finite truncation of the expansion for the production of dissipation term in powers of eta suffices - terms of all orders must be retained. Based on these ideas, a new two-equation model and Reynolds stress transport model are developed for turbulent shear flows. The models are tested for homogeneous shear flow and flow over a backward facing step. Comparisons between the model predictions and experimental data are excellent.

  18. Mechanisms of shear failure in artificial fractures of sandstone and their implication for models of hydromechanical coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, J. P.; de Freitas, M. H.

    1993-07-01

    Direct shear tests, in which the behaviour of the rock surfaces during shear could be continuously observed, were used to study the shear failure of a profiled and clean discontinuity artificially prepared from natural sandstone. Displacement transducers were used to measure the normal and shear displacements. A series of strain gauges glued on the sides of the upper block provided information on the change of the stress field occurring close to the discontinuities whilst shear displacement increased, and these changes were then compared with the behaviour of the profiled surface. The results of the laboratory tests, the sequence of photographs taken for most of them, and the results conducted with a sample of similar shape made from the same rock material and tested in a rotary shear machine, allowed several stages and mechanisms of failure to be defined: static friction and mobilization of initial shear stiffness; mobilization of sliding; mobilization of brittle fracture; post-peak failure of the teeth; descent of the teeth; gliding and ploughing; commencement of second cycle of shearing. In many respects these stages are similar to those occurring between sliding surfaces of metal and suggest that the analyses developed in tribology may be relevant to the development of constitutive models for predicting the hydromechanical coupled behaviour of a discontinuity with shear displacement. Such models will have to consider these different stages of shear, because the original discontinuity changes its geometry with displacement and is filled with gouge which changes its grain size with displacement.

  19. Strong tangential discontinuity modeling of shear bands using the extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshyar, Alireza; Mohammadi, Soheil

    2013-11-01

    A method is developed for modeling of shear band with strong tangential discontinuity by means of cohesive surfaces within the extended finite element method (XFEM). A rate-independent non-associated plasticity model is incorporated along the strong discontinuity to consider the highly localized regions. Once the localization is occurred, tangential enrichment degrees of freedom are added to the localized elements, and the discontinuity is captured regardless of mesh resolution and alignment. By introducing the tangential enrichment function, the discontinuity is only imposed in the tangential direction, while the continuity across the shear band is automatically fulfilled. Adopting bilinear quadrilateral elements within the context of XFEM allows for the plastic deformation of shear band to be obtained with quadratic distribution within an enriched element. Since the strong discontinuity approach is employed, the singularity of strain field at the position of displacement jump is attained through a Dirac delta distribution. By means of this singularity, the cohesive shear traction is derived for the J2 plasticity model and is applied onto the band interfaces in order to reproduce the dissipative mechanism of the band. Several numerical examples are analyzed to assess the accuracy and robustness of the proposed approach.

  20. Experimental and modeling study of viscoelastic behaviors of magneto-rheological shear thickening fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Gang Rou; Li, Weihua; Tian, Tong Fei; Ding, Jie; Nakano, Masami

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, both Magneto-rheological Fluid (MRF) and Shear Thickening Fluid (STF) have separately attracted considerable interest due to the fast reversible response to either external magnetic field or abrupt shearing loading. In this paper, we fabricated a combined phase of Magneto-rheological Shear Thickening Fluid (MRSTF), where the 25 wt% STF is applied as medium phase with the addition of varied fractions of iron particle. The investigation of the dynamic behavior of this novel material under oscillatory shear was launched in a parallel-plate rheometer. The relevance of the dynamic behavior to strain amplitude, frequency and external magnetic field were investigated and discussed. A four-parameter viscoelastic model was applied to reconstruct the mechanical behavior of the MRSTF under different working conditions, and the parameters were identified within the Matlab optimization algorithm. The comparison between the experimental data and the model prediction results indicated that the four-parameter model could predict viscoelastic material with desired accuracy. The MRSTF exhibits features of both components, while prone more to MRF with the inception of external field excitations.

  1. Error propagation for velocity and shear stress prediction using 2D models for environmental management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternack, Gregory B.; Gilbert, Andrew T.; Wheaton, Joseph M.; Buckland, Evan M.

    2006-08-01

    SummaryResource managers, scientists, government regulators, and stakeholders are considering sophisticated numerical models for managing complex environmental problems. In this study, observations from a river-rehabilitation experiment involving gravel augmentation and spawning habitat enhancement were used to assess sources and magnitudes of error in depth, velocity, and shear velocity predictions made at the 1-m scale with a commercial two-dimensional (depth-averaged) model. Error in 2D model depth prediction averaged 21%. This error was attributable to topographic survey resolution, which at 1 pt per 1.14 m 2, was inadequate to resolve small humps and depressions influencing point measurements. Error in 2D model velocity prediction averaged 29%. More than half of this error was attributable to depth prediction error. Despite depth and velocity error, 56% of tested 2D model predictions of shear velocity were within the 95% confidence limit of the best field-based estimation method. Ninety percent of the error in shear velocity prediction was explained by velocity prediction error. Multiple field-based estimates of shear velocity differed by up to 160%, so the lower error for the 2D model's predictions suggests such models are at least as accurate as field measurement. 2D models enable detailed, spatially distributed estimates compared to the small number measurable in a field campaign of comparable cost. They also can be used for design evaluation. Although such numerical models are limited to channel types adhering to model assumptions and yield predictions only accurate to ˜20-30%, they can provide a useful tool for river-rehabilitation design and assessment, including spatially diverse habitat heterogeneity as well as for pre- and post-project appraisal.

  2. Analysis of the mixed nonlinear model for turbulence with mean shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneveau, Charles; Li, Yi

    2003-11-01

    We consider the mixed nonlinear subgrid model for LES of turbulent flow, with the objective of quantifying analytically the two model coefficients from knowledge about the turbulent energy spectrum. Specifically we use the condition that the model reproduce both the correct energy dissipation (as in Lilly 1976), and the subgrid-scale contribution to the Reynolds stress, i.e. the mean SGS stress. Using a recently proposed model for anisotropic velocity spectrum in homogeneous sheared turbulence (Ishihara, Yoshida and Kaneda, PRL 88, 2002) we derive expressions for the Smagorinsky and the nonlinear model coefficients as function of shear number S*=ɛ-1/3Δ^2/3 l S, where ɛ is the dissipation rate of kinetic energy, Δ is the filter size, and l S is the mean applied shear magnitude. We find that as S* increases, the contribution from the Smagorinsky term is reduced, while that of the nonlinear term is increased. However, the coefficient of the nonlinear model term derived from the presently used statistical condition of balance of dissipation and mean stress is significantly lower than typical values found earlier in the literature. These were based on results from LES using the dynamic mixed model, from various Taylor-series or deconvolution approximations of the similarity model, or from a-priori tests. We discuss the implications of these results.

  3. Meshless analysis of shear deformable shells: the linear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Jorge C.; Tiago, Carlos M.; Pimenta, Paulo M.

    2013-10-01

    This work develops a kinematically linear shell model departing from a consistent nonlinear theory. The initial geometry is mapped from a flat reference configuration by a stress-free finite deformation, after which, the actual shell motion takes place. The model maintains the features of a complete stress-resultant theory with Reissner-Mindlin kinematics based on an inextensible director. A hybrid displacement variational formulation is presented, where the domain displacements and kinematic boundary reactions are independently approximated. The resort to a flat reference configuration allows the discretization using 2-D Multiple Fixed Least-Squares (MFLS) on the domain. The consistent definition of stress resultants and consequent plane stress assumption led to a neat formulation for the analysis of shells. The consistent linear approximation, combined with MFLS, made possible efficient computations with a desired continuity degree, leading to smooth results for the displacement, strain and stress fields, as shown by several numerical examples.

  4. Steady shear rheometry of dissipative particle dynamics models of polymer fluids in reverse Poiseuille flow

    PubMed Central

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Karniadakis, George Em; Caswell, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Polymer fluids are modeled with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) as undiluted bead-spring chains and their solutions. The models are assessed by investigating their steady shear-rate properties. Non-Newtonian viscosity and normal stress coefficients, for shear rates from the lower to the upper Newtonian regimes, are calculated from both plane Couette and plane Poiseuille flows. The latter is realized as reverse Poiseuille flow (RPF) generated from two Poiseuille flows driven by uniform body forces in opposite directions along two-halves of a computational domain. Periodic boundary conditions ensure the RPF wall velocity to be zero without density fluctuations. In overlapping shear-rate regimes the RPF properties are confirmed to be in good agreement with those calculated from plane Couette flow with Lees–Edwards periodic boundary conditions (LECs), the standard virtual rheometer for steady shear-rate properties. The concentration and the temperature dependence of the properties of the model fluids are shown to satisfy the principles of concentration and temperature superposition commonly employed in the empirical correlation of real polymer-fluid properties. The thermodynamic validity of the equation of state is found to be a crucial factor for the achievement of time-temperature superposition. With these models, RPF is demonstrated to be an accurate and convenient virtual rheometer for the acquisition of steady shear-rate rheological properties. It complements, confirms, and extends the results obtained with the standard LEC configuration, and it can be used with the output from other particle-based methods, including molecular dynamics, Brownian dynamics, smooth particle hydrodynamics, and the lattice Boltzmann method. PMID:20405981

  5. An analysis of a joint shear model for jointed media with orthogonal joint sets; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Koteras, J.R.

    1991-10-01

    This report describes a joint shear model used in conjunction with a computational model for jointed media with orthogonal joint sets. The joint shear model allows nonlinear behavior for both joint sets. Because nonlinear behavior is allowed for both joint sets, a great many cases must be considered to fully describe the joint shear behavior of the jointed medium. An extensive set of equations is required to describe the joint shear stress and slip displacements that can occur for all the various cases. This report examines possible methods for simplifying this set of equations so that the model can be implemented efficiently form a computational standpoint. The shear model must be examined carefully to obtain a computationally efficient implementation that does not lead to numerical problems. The application to fractures in rock is discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  6. On the limits of the interfacial yield model for fragmentation testing of brittle films on polymer substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Aidan Arthur; Cordill, Megan Jo; Dehm, Gerhard

    2012-09-01

    Fragmentation testing is frequently used to probe film fracture strain and the interfacial properties of thin brittle films on compliant substrates. A model based upon complete yield of the film/substrate interface is frequently used to analyse data after cracking has saturated. Additionally, the film is either assumed to have a single-valued failure stress or a distribution of strengths described by Weibull statistics. Recent work by the authors showed that consideration of film thickness variations and the application of neighbour ratio analysis brought 96% of the data for an Al x O y /Cu film/substrate system into compliance with the predictions for a film with a single-valued failure stress. In the present work Cr/PI (polyimide) and Cr/PET (polyethylene teraphthalate) systems are analysed according to the same methodology. The Cr films on polymer substrates crack such that the neighbour ratios considerably exceed the predicted limit of 2. The influence of the relative thickness of the film and substrate and the strain rate of the test is investigated. A deviation from the idealised mechanical model due to the large difference in elastic moduli of film and substrate is put forward as a possible cause of the observed behaviour. The importance of these results to the application of the interfacial yield model is discussed.

  7. Turbulence modeling in aerodynamic shear flows - Status and problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper briefly summarizes the status and problems of turbulence modeling for aerodynamical applications. For complex flows the 'approach of choice' is (increasingly) full second-order (Reynolds stress equation) closure. These closures have not yet developed to anywhere near their full potential, significant further research is required especially regarding length-scale equations, representation of pressure-strain correlations, and wall region treatments. Recent developments in computer capability, algorithms, numerical simulations, theory and quantitative flow visualization should assist in and hasten this research. Several problem areas such as shock interaction and discrete dynamic instabilities of turbulent flows may require mega-to-large eddy simulation or theoretical adjuncts.

  8. Modeling bed shear-stress fluctuations in a shallow tidal channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, R.; Marusic, I.; Cabrit, O.; Jones, N. L.; Ivey, G. N.

    2014-05-01

    Recently, Mathis et al. (2013) developed a model for predicting the instantaneous fluctuations of the wall shear-stress in turbulent boundary layers. This model is based on an inner-outer scale interaction mechanism, incorporating superposition, and amplitude-modulation effects, and the only input required for the model is a time series measurement of the streamwise velocity signal taken in the logarithmic region of the flow. The present study applies this new approach for the first time to environmental flows, for which the near-bed information is typically inaccessible. The data used here are acoustic Doppler velocimeter time series measurements from a shallow tidal channel (Suisun Slough in North San Francisco Bay). We first extract segments of data sharing properties with canonical turbulent boundary layers. The wall (bed) shear-stress model is then applied to these selected data. Statistical and spectral analysis demonstrates that the field data predictions are consistent with laboratory and DNS results. The model is also applied to the whole available data set to demonstrate, even for situations far from the canonical boundary layer case, its ability to preserve the overall Reynolds number trend. The predicted instantaneous bed stress is highly skewed and amplitude modulated with the variations in the large-scale streamwise velocity. Finally, the model is compared to conventional methods employed to predict the bed shear-stress. A large disparity is observed, but the present model is the only one able to predict both the correct spectral content and the probability density function.

  9. Mesoscale modeling of shear-thinning polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Santos de Oliveira, I S; Fitzgerald, B W; den Otter, W K; Briels, W J

    2014-03-14

    We simulate the linear and nonlinear rheology of two different viscoelastic polymer solutions, a polyisobutylene solution in pristane and an aqueous solution of hydroxypropylcellulose, using a highly coarse-grained approach known as Responsive Particle Dynamics (RaPiD) model. In RaPiD, each polymer has originally been depicted as a spherical particle with the effects of the eliminated degrees of freedom accounted for by an appropriate free energy and transient pairwise forces. Motivated by the inability of this spherical particle representation to entirely capture the nonlinear rheology of both fluids, we extended the RaPiD model by introducing a deformable particle capable of elongation. A Finite-Extensible Non-Linear Elastic potential provides a free energy penalty for particle elongation. Upon disentangling, this deformability allows more time for particles to re-entangle with neighbouring particles. We show this process to be integral towards recovering the experimental nonlinear rheology, obtaining excellent agreement. We show that the nonlinear rheology is crucially dependent upon the maximum elongation and less so on the elasticity of the particles. In addition, the description of the linear rheology has been retained in the process. PMID:24628201

  10. Mesoscale modeling of shear-thinning polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos de Oliveira, I. S.; Fitzgerald, B. W.; den Otter, W. K.; Briels, W. J.

    2014-03-01

    We simulate the linear and nonlinear rheology of two different viscoelastic polymer solutions, a polyisobutylene solution in pristane and an aqueous solution of hydroxypropylcellulose, using a highly coarse-grained approach known as Responsive Particle Dynamics (RaPiD) model. In RaPiD, each polymer has originally been depicted as a spherical particle with the effects of the eliminated degrees of freedom accounted for by an appropriate free energy and transient pairwise forces. Motivated by the inability of this spherical particle representation to entirely capture the nonlinear rheology of both fluids, we extended the RaPiD model by introducing a deformable particle capable of elongation. A Finite-Extensible Non-Linear Elastic potential provides a free energy penalty for particle elongation. Upon disentangling, this deformability allows more time for particles to re-entangle with neighbouring particles. We show this process to be integral towards recovering the experimental nonlinear rheology, obtaining excellent agreement. We show that the nonlinear rheology is crucially dependent upon the maximum elongation and less so on the elasticity of the particles. In addition, the description of the linear rheology has been retained in the process.

  11. A shear-wave velocity model of the European upper mantle from automated inversion of seismic shear and surface waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, C.; Meier, T.; Lebedev, S.; Friederich, W.; Viereck-Götte, L.

    2012-04-01

    Broadband waveforms recorded at stations in Europe and surrounding regions were inverted for shear-wave velocity of the European upper mantle. For events between 1995 and 2007 seismograms were collected from all permanent stations for which data are available via the data centers ORFEUS, GEOFON, ReNaSs and IRIS. In addition, we incorporated data from temporary experiments, including SVEKALAPKO, TOR, Eifel Plume, EGELADOS and other projects. Automated Multimode Inversion of surface and S-wave forms was applied to extract structural information from the seismograms, in the form of linear equations with uncorrelated uncertainties. Successful waveform fits for about 70,000 seismograms yielded over 300,000 independent linear equations that were solved together for a three-dimensional tomographic model. Resolution of the imaging is particularly high in the mantle lithosphere and asthenosphere. The highest velocities in the mantle lithosphere of the East European Craton are found at about 150 km depth. There are no indications for a large scale deep cratonic root below about 330 km depth. Lateral variations within the cratonic mantle lithosphere are resolved by our model as well. The locations of diamond bearing kimberlites correlate with reduced S-wave velocities in the cratonic mantle lithosphere. This anomaly is present in regions of both Proterozoic and Archean crust, pointing to an alteration of the mantle lithosphere after the formation of the craton. Strong lateral changes in S-wave velocity are found at the western margin of the East European Craton and hint to erosion of cratonic mantle lithosphere beneath the Scandes by hot asthenosphere. The mantle lithosphere beneath Western Europe and between the Tornquist-Teyissere Zone and the Elbe Line shows moderately high velocities and is of an intermediate character, between cratonic lithosphere and the thin lithosphere of central Europe. In central Europe, Caledonian and Variscian sutures are not associated with

  12. Modeling the relaxation of polymer glasses under shear and elongational loads.

    PubMed

    Fielding, S M; Moorcroft, R L; Larson, R G; Cates, M E

    2013-03-28

    Glassy polymers show "strain hardening": at constant extensional load, their flow first accelerates, then arrests. Recent experiments under such loading have found this to be accompanied by a striking dip in the segmental relaxation time. This can be explained by a minimal nonfactorable model combining flow-induced melting of a glass with the buildup of stress carried by strained polymers. Within this model, liquefaction of segmental motion permits strong flow that creates polymer-borne stress, slowing the deformation enough for the segmental (or solvent) modes then to re-vitrify. Here, we present new results for the corresponding behavior under step-stress shear loading, to which very similar physics applies. To explain the unloading behavior in the extensional case requires introduction of a "crinkle factor" describing a rapid loss of segmental ordering. We discuss in more detail here the physics of this, which we argue involves non-entropic contributions to the polymer stress, and which might lead to some important differences between shear and elongation. We also discuss some fundamental and possibly testable issues concerning the physical meaning of entropic elasticity in vitrified polymers. Finally, we present new results for the startup of steady shear flow, addressing the possible role of transient shear banding. PMID:23556755

  13. Modeling the relaxation of polymer glasses under shear and elongational loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, S. M.; Moorcroft, R. L.; Larson, R. G.; Cates, M. E.

    2013-03-01

    Glassy polymers show "strain hardening": at constant extensional load, their flow first accelerates, then arrests. Recent experiments under such loading have found this to be accompanied by a striking dip in the segmental relaxation time. This can be explained by a minimal nonfactorable model combining flow-induced melting of a glass with the buildup of stress carried by strained polymers. Within this model, liquefaction of segmental motion permits strong flow that creates polymer-borne stress, slowing the deformation enough for the segmental (or solvent) modes then to re-vitrify. Here, we present new results for the corresponding behavior under step-stress shear loading, to which very similar physics applies. To explain the unloading behavior in the extensional case requires introduction of a "crinkle factor" describing a rapid loss of segmental ordering. We discuss in more detail here the physics of this, which we argue involves non-entropic contributions to the polymer stress, and which might lead to some important differences between shear and elongation. We also discuss some fundamental and possibly testable issues concerning the physical meaning of entropic elasticity in vitrified polymers. Finally, we present new results for the startup of steady shear flow, addressing the possible role of transient shear banding.

  14. Calculation of reattaching shear layers in divergent channel with a multiple-time-scale turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical calculations of turbulent reattaching shear layers in a divergent channel are presented. The turbulence is described by a multiple-time-scale turbulence model. The turbulent flow equations are solved by a control-volume based finite difference method. The computational results are compared with those obtained using k-epsilon turbulence models and algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence models. It is shown that the multiple-time-scale turbulence model yields significantly improved computational results than the other turbulence models in the region where the turbulence is in a strongly inequilibrium state.

  15. A two-scale model for sheared fault gouge: Competition between macroscopic disorder and local viscoplasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbanna, A. E.; Carlson, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    We develop a model for sheared gouge layers that accounts for the local increase in temperature at the grain contacts during sliding. We use the shear transformation zone theory, a statistical thermodynamic theory, to describe irreversible macroscopic plastic deformations due to local rearrangements of the gouge particles. We track the temperature evolution at the grain contacts using a one-dimensional heat diffusion equation. At low temperatures, the strength of the asperities is limited by the flow strength, as predicted by dislocation creep models. At high temperatures, some of the constituents of the grains may melt leading to the degradation of the asperity strength. Our model predicts a logarithmic rate dependence of the steady state shear stress in the quasistatic regime. In the dense flow regime the frictional strength decreases rapidly with increasing slip rate due to thermal softening at the granular interfaces. The transient response following a step in strain rate includes a direct effect and a following evolution effect, both of which depend on the magnitude and direction of the velocity step. In addition to frictional heat, the energy budget includes an additional energy sink representing the fraction of external work consumed in increasing local disorder. The model links low-speed and high-speed frictional response of gouge layers and provides an essential ingredient for multiscale modeling of earthquake ruptures with enhanced coseismic weakening.

  16. Dynamics of interfacial pattern formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1983-01-01

    A phenomenological model of dendritic solidification incorporating interfacial kinetics, crystalline anisotropy, and a local approximation for the dynamics of the thermal diffusion field is proposed. The preliminary results are in qualitative agreement with natural dendrite-like pattern formation.

  17. A Pian-Sumihara type element for modeling shear bands at finite deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuliffe, Colin; Waisman, Haim

    2014-05-01

    A monolithic numerical solution of a partial differential equation (PDE) model for shear bands, which includes a thermal softening rate dependent plastic flow rule and finite thermal conductivity, is presented. The formulation accounts for large deformation kinematics and includes incrementally objective treatment of the hypoplastic constitutive relations. Regularization is achieved by including finite thermal conductivity, which informs the PDE system of a length scale, governed by competition between shear heating and thermal diffusion. The monolithic solution scheme is then used to eliminate splitting errors during the solution of the discretized system. The scheme is presented in a general, mixed formulation, which allows for many choices of shape functions. We study and compare two elements, which have been implemented with the monolithic nonlinear solver: the Irreducible Shear Band Quad (ISBQ) and the Pian Sumihara Shear Band Quad (PSSBQ). ISBQ employs the same interpolation as an irreducible four node quad while PSSBQ is a mixed, assumed stress element. The algorithmic approximations to the Lie derivative and Jaumann rate of Kirchhoff stress are available in the literature for ISBQ type elements, and are derived in this paper for the PSSBQ. These expressions are used to achieve an incrementally objective formulation. It is found that the PSSBQ converges faster than the ISBQ with mesh refinement, and that the convergence of the ISBQ can be improved with a remeshing procedure.

  18. A Deterministic Interfacial Cyclic Oxidation Spalling Model. Part 2; Algebraic Approximation, Descriptive Parameters, and Normalized Universal Curve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2002-01-01

    A cyclic oxidation interfacial spalling model has been developed in Part 1. The governing equations have been simplified here by substituting a new algebraic expression for the series (Good-Smialek approximation). This produced a direct relationship between cyclic oxidation weight change and model input parameters. It also allowed for the mathematical derivation of various descriptive parameters as a function of the inputs. It is shown that the maximum in weight change varies directly with the parabolic rate constant and cycle duration and inversely with the spall fraction, all to the 1/2 power. The number of cycles to reach maximum and zero weight change vary inversely with the spall fraction, and the ratio of these cycles is exactly 1:3 for most oxides. By suitably normalizing the weight change and cycle number, it is shown that all cyclic oxidation weight change model curves can be represented by one universal expression for a given oxide scale.

  19. Identification of microstructural characteristics in lightweight aggregate concretes by micromechanical modelling including the interfacial transition zone (ITZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Y.; Ortola, S.; Beaucour, A.L.; Dumontet, H.

    2010-11-15

    An approach which combines both experimental techniques and micromechanical modelling is developed in order to characterise the elastic behaviour of lightweight aggregate concretes (LWAC). More than three hundred LWAC specimens with various lightweight aggregate types (5) of several volume ratios and three different mortar matrices (normal, HP, VHP) are tested. The modelling is based on iterative homogenisation process and includes the ITZ specificities experimentally observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In agreement with experimental measurements, the effects of mix design parameters as well as of the interfacial transition zone (ITZ) on concrete mechanical performances are quantitatively analysed. Confrontations with experimental results allow identifying the elastic moduli of LWA which are difficult to determine experimentally. Whereas the traditional empirical formulas are not sufficiently precise, predictions of LWAC elastic behaviours computed with the micromechanical models appear in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  20. "a" interfacial parameter in Nicolais-Narkis model for yield strength of polymer particulate nanocomposites as a function of material and interphase properties.

    PubMed

    Zare, Yasser

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, "a" interfacial parameter in Nicolais-Narkis model is expressed by thickness "ri" and strength "σi" of interphase between polymer and nanoparticles as well as material properties. "a" parameter is connected to "B1" interfacial parameter in modified Pukanszky model and the effects of "ri" and "σi" on "a" are explained. The negligible difference between "a" values calculated by fitting the experimental results to Nicolais-Narkis model and also, by "B1" results confirms the accurateness of the suggested relation between "a" and "B1" parameters. Additionally, an inverse relation is found between "a" and "B1" parameters for nanocomposites containing spherical nanoparticles. The results demonstrate that the slight levels of "ri" and "σi" data give a large value of "a" which indicates the poor interfacial adhesion. PMID:26955000

  1. Modeling flow and shear stress fields over unsteady three dimensional dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Richard; Parsons, Dan; Ashworth, Phil; Reesink, Arjan; Best, Jim

    2014-05-01

    The flow field over dunes has been extensively measured in laboratory conditions and there is general understanding on the nature of the flow over dunes formed under equilibrium flow conditions. This has allowed an understanding of bed shear stress to be derived and the development of morpho-dynamic models. However, fluvial systems typically experience unsteady flow and therefore the sediment-water interface is constantly responding and reorganizing to these unsteady flows and stresses, over a range of both spatial and temporal scales. This is primarily through the adjustment of bed forms (including ripples, dunes and bar forms) which then subsequently alter the flow field. This paper investigates, through the application of a numerical model, the influence of these roughness elements on the overall flow and bed shear stress. A series of physical experiments were undertaken in a flume, 16m long and 2m wide, where a fine sand (D50 of 239µm) was water worked under a range of unsteady hydraulic conditions to generate a series of quasi-equilibrium three dimensional bed forms. During the experiments flow was measured with acoustic Doppler velocimeters, (aDv's). On four occasions the flume was drained and the bed topography measured with terrestrial LiDAR to create digital elevation models. This data provide the necessary boundary conditions and validation data for a numerical three dimensional flow model. The prediction of flow over the four static beds demonstrates the spatial distribution of shear stress and the potential sediment transport paths between the dune crests. These appear to be associated with coherent flow structures formed by localized shear flow. These flow predictions are currently being used to develop a fully three dimensional morphodynamic model to further understand dune dynamics under unsteady flow conditions.

  2. Analogue modelling of inclined, brittle-ductile transpression: Testing analytical models through natural shear zones (external Betics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcos, L.; Díaz-Azpiroz, M.; Balanyá, J. C.; Expósito, I.; Jiménez-Bonilla, A.; Faccenna, C.

    2016-07-01

    The combination of analytical and analogue models gives new opportunities to better understand the kinematic parameters controlling the evolution of transpression zones. In this work, we carried out a set of analogue models using the kinematic parameters of transpressional deformation obtained by applying a general triclinic transpression analytical model to a tabular-shaped shear zone in the external Betic Chain (Torcal de Antequera massif). According to the results of the analytical model, we used two oblique convergence angles to reproduce the main structural and kinematic features of structural domains observed within the Torcal de Antequera massif (α = 15° for the outer domains and α = 30° for the inner domain). Two parallel inclined backstops (one fixed and the other mobile) reproduce the geometry of the shear zone walls of the natural case. Additionally, we applied digital particle image velocimetry (PIV) method to calculate the velocity field of the incremental deformation. Our results suggest that the spatial distribution of the main structures observed in the Torcal de Antequera massif reflects different modes of strain partitioning and strain localization between two domain types, which are related to the variation in the oblique convergence angle and the presence of steep planar velocity - and rheological - discontinuities (the shear zone walls in the natural case). In the 15° model, strain partitioning is simple and strain localization is high: a single narrow shear zone is developed close and parallel to the fixed backstop, bounded by strike-slip faults and internally deformed by R and P shears. In the 30° model, strain partitioning is strong, generating regularly spaced oblique-to-the backstops thrusts and strike-slip faults. At final stages of the 30° experiment, deformation affects the entire model box. Our results show that the application of analytical modelling to natural transpressive zones related to upper crustal deformation

  3. Separated shear-layer instability reproduction by a Reynolds stress model of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakirlic, Suad; Maduta, Robert

    2013-11-01

    A boundary layer separating from a solid wall transforms into a `separated shear layer' exhibiting a broader frequency range. Such a highly-unsteady shear layer separating the mean stream from the flow reversal is dominated by the organized, large-scale coherent structures, influencing to a large extent the overall flow behavior. Unlike in the case of a flat-plate boundary layer separating at a fixed point characterizing a backward-facing step geometry, which can be reasonably well captured by a statistical model of turbulence, the separation process pertinent to continuous curved surfaces as well as some fence- or rib-shaped configurations is beyond the reach of any RANS (Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes) model independent of the modeling level. The latter issue motivated the present work, dealing with an appropriate extension of a near-wall Second-Moment Closure (SMC) model towards an instability-sensitive formulation. The production term in the corresponding scale-supplying equation is selectively enhanced through introduction of the ratio of the first to the second derivative of the velocity field, the latter representing the integral part of the von Karman length scale, enabling appropriate capturing of the fluctuating turbulence and accordingly the reproduction of the separated shear-layer instability. The analysis is performed by simulating the flow separated from a fence, an axisymmetric hill and a cylinder configuration.

  4. Experimental validation of a two-dimensional shear-flow model for determining acoustic impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    Tests were conducted to validate a two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determining the acoustic impedance of a liner test specimen in a grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment. The tests were limited to a test specimen chosen to exhibit minimal effects of grazing flow so that the results obtained by using the shear-flow analytical model would be expected to match those obtained from normal-incidence impedance measurements. Impedances for both downstream and upstream sound propagation were generally consistent with those from normal-incidence measurements. However, sensitivity of the grazing-incidence impedance to small measurement or systematic errors in propagation constant varied dramatically over the range of test frequencies.

  5. Modelling the role of graphite in development of a mineralised mid-crustal shear zone, Macraes mine, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upton, Phaedra; Craw, Dave

    2008-02-01

    The Hyde-Macraes Shear Zone (HMSZ) is a mineralised low-angle shear within the Otago Schist traceable for ˜ 30 km with a NW strike. It is being actively mined along 12 km of this strike, producing > 6 Moz of gold. The shear zone formed under lower greenschist facies conditions as the host schist was uplifted through the brittle-ductile transition. Sheared rocks consist of greenschist facies schists with mineralogy only subtly different from that of the host schist. Pervasive fluid flow has occurred along grain boundaries and within microshears whose development has been enhanced by the deposition of hydrothermal graphite. We model the development of these microshears using a three-dimensional numerical code. For an inhomogeneous initial rock with lithostatic fluid pressures and a dynamic permeability deformed under dextral non-coaxial flow, deformation is distributed into weak shear bands. Graphite deposition and associated reaction-softening have a dramatic effect on the development of model shear zones. Graphite is deposited into a shear band, weakening it and further localising the deformation into that shear band, producing an anastomosing and interconnected shear zone structure such as observed in the HMSZ. The degrees of graphite precipitation and graphite-induced weakening are varied in the models. Graphite precipitation with a low degree of reaction-softening results in more diffuse shear bands. In contrast less graphite deposition but with a high degree of reaction-softening leads to the development of more focused shear bands. Graphite deposition has clearly controlled the formation of the HMSZ structure, and is an important indicator of potentially mineralised mid-crustal structures elsewhere.

  6. Low-Shear modeled microgravity alters the Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium stress response in an RpoS-independent manner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James W.; Ott, C. Mark; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Pierson, Duane L.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2002-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that low-shear modeled microgravity (low-shear MMG) serves to enhance the virulence of a bacterial pathogen, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The Salmonella response to low-shear MMG involves a signaling pathway that we have termed the low-shear MMG stimulon, though the identities of the low-shear MMG stimulon genes and regulatory factors are not known. RpoS is the primary sigma factor required for the expression of genes that are induced upon exposure to different environmental-stress signals and is essential for virulence in mice. Since low-shear MMG induces a Salmonella acid stress response and enhances Salmonella virulence, we reasoned that RpoS would be a likely regulator of the Salmonella low-shear MMG response. Our results demonstrate that low-shear MMG provides cross-resistance to several environmental stresses in both wild-type and isogenic rpoS mutant strains. Growth under low-shear MMG decreased the generation time of both strains in minimal medium and increased the ability of both strains to survive in J774 macrophages. Using DNA microarray analysis, we found no evidence of induction of the RpoS regulon by low-shear MMG but did find that other genes were altered in expression under these conditions in both the wild-type and rpoS mutant strains. Our results indicate that, under the conditions of these studies, RpoS is not required for transmission of the signal that induces the low-shear MMG stimulon. Moreover, our studies also indicate that low-shear MMG can be added to a short list of growth conditions that can serve to preadapt an rpoS mutant for resistance to multiple environmental stresses.

  7. Dynamic and Thermal Turbulent Time Scale Modelling for Homogeneous Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwab, John R.; Lakshminarayana, Budugur

    1994-01-01

    A new turbulence model, based upon dynamic and thermal turbulent time scale transport equations, is developed and applied to homogeneous shear flows with constant velocity and temperature gradients. The new model comprises transport equations for k, the turbulent kinetic energy; tau, the dynamic time scale; k(sub theta), the fluctuating temperature variance; and tau(sub theta), the thermal time scale. It offers conceptually parallel modeling of the dynamic and thermal turbulence at the two equation level, and eliminates the customary prescription of an empirical turbulent Prandtl number, Pr(sub t), thus permitting a more generalized prediction capability for turbulent heat transfer in complex flows and geometries. The new model also incorporates constitutive relations, based upon invariant theory, that allow the effects of nonequilibrium to modify the primary coefficients for the turbulent shear stress and heat flux. Predictions of the new model, along with those from two other similar models, are compared with experimental data for decaying homogeneous dynamic and thermal turbulence, homogeneous turbulence with constant temperature gradient, and homogeneous turbulence with constant temperature gradient and constant velocity gradient. The new model offers improvement in agreement with the data for most cases considered in this work, although it was no better than the other models for several cases where all the models performed poorly.

  8. A hydrodynamical model of shear flow over semi-infinite barriers with application to density currents

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A. )

    1992-12-01

    Vertically sheared airflow over semi-infinite barriers is investigated with a simple hydrodynamical model. The idealized flow is steady, two-dimensional, neutrally buoyant, and inviscid, bounded on the bottom by a semi-infinite impermeable barrier and on the top by a rigid tropopause lid. With attention further restricted to an exponentially decreasing wind shear, the equations of motion (Euler's equations) reduce, without approximation, to a modified Poisson equation for a pseudo streamfunction and a formula for the Exner function. The free parameters characterizing the model's environment are the tropopause height, the density scale height, the wind speed at ground level, and the wind speed at tropopause level. Additional parameters characterize the barrier geometry. Exact solutions of the equations of motion are obtained for semi-infinite plateau barriers and for a barrier qualitatively resembling the shallow density current associated with some thunderstorm outflows. These solutions are noteworthy in that the reduction of a certain nondimensional shear parameter (through negative values) results in greater vertical parcel displacements over the barrier despite a corresponding reduction in the vertical velocity. This steepening tendency culminates in overturning motions associated with both upstream and down-stream steering levels. In this latter case the low-level inflow impinging on the barrier participates in a mixed jump and overturning updraft reminiscent of updrafts simulated in numerical convective models. Conversely, for large values of the nondimensional shear parameter, parcels undergo small vertical parcel displacements over the barrier despite large vertical velocities. This latter behavior may account for the finding that strong convergence along the leading edge of storm outflows does not always trigger deep convection even in unstable environments.

  9. Recalibration of the Shear Stress Transport Model to Improve Calculation of Shock Separated Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Yoder, Dennis A.

    2013-01-01

    The Menter Shear Stress Transport (SST) k . turbulence model is one of the most widely used two-equation Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence models for aerodynamic analyses. The model extends Menter s baseline (BSL) model to include a limiter that prevents the calculated turbulent shear stress from exceeding a prescribed fraction of the turbulent kinetic energy via a proportionality constant, a1, set to 0.31. Compared to other turbulence models, the SST model yields superior predictions of mild adverse pressure gradient flows including those with small separations. In shock - boundary layer interaction regions, the SST model produces separations that are too large while the BSL model is on the other extreme, predicting separations that are too small. In this paper, changing a1 to a value near 0.355 is shown to significantly improve predictions of shock separated flows. Several cases are examined computationally and experimental data is also considered to justify raising the value of a1 used for shock separated flows.

  10. Mathematical modeling of liquid/liquid hollow fiber membrane contactor accounting for interfacial transport phenomena: Extraction of lanthanides as a surrogate for actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.D.

    1994-08-04

    This report is divided into two parts. The second part is divided into the following sections: experimental protocol; modeling the hollow fiber extractor using film theory; Graetz model of the hollow fiber membrane process; fundamental diffusive-kinetic model; and diffusive liquid membrane device-a rigorous model. The first part is divided into: membrane and membrane process-a concept; metal extraction; kinetics of metal extraction; modeling the membrane contactor; and interfacial phenomenon-boundary conditions-applied to membrane transport.

  11. Theoretical modeling of CHF for near-saturated pool boiling and flow boiling from short heaters using the interfacial lift-off criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Mudawar, I.; Galloway, J.E.; Gersey, C.O.

    1995-12-31

    Pool boiling and flow boiling were examined for near-saturated bulk conditions in order to determine the critical heat flux (CHF) trigger mechanism for each. Photographic studies of the wall region revealed features common to both situations. At fluxes below CHF, the vapor coalesces into a wavy layer which permits wetting only in wetting fronts, the portions of the liquid-vapor interface which contact the wall as a result of the interfacial waviness. Close examination of the interfacial features revealed the waves are generated from the lower edge of the heater in pool boiling and the heater`s upstream region in flow boiling. Wavelengths follow predictions based upon the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability criterion. Critical heat flux in both cases occurs when the pressure force exerted upon the interface due to interfacial curvature, which tends to preserve interfacial contact with the wall prior to CHF, is overcome by the momentum of vapor at the site of the first wetting front, causing the interface to lift away from the wall. It is shown this interfacial lift-off criterion facilitates accurate theoretical modeling of CHF in pool boiling and in flow boiling in both straight and curved channels.

  12. Interfacial behavior of asphaltenes.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Dominique; Argillier, Jean-François

    2016-07-01

    We review the existing literature on asphaltenes at various types of interfaces: oil-water, air-water, gas-oil and solid-liquid, with more emphasis on the oil-water interfaces. We address the role of asphaltene aggregation, recently clarified for asphaltenes in bulk by the Yen-Mullins model. We discuss the questions of adsorption reversibility and interfacial rheology, especially in connection with emulsion stability. PMID:26498501

  13. A coupled map lattice model for rheological chaos in sheared nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Kamil, S M; Menon, Gautam I; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2010-12-01

    A variety of complex fluids under shear exhibit complex spatiotemporal behavior, including what is now termed rheological chaos, at moderate values of the shear rate. Such chaos associated with rheological response occurs in regimes where the Reynolds number is very small. It must thus arise as a consequence of the coupling of the flow to internal structural variables describing the local state of the fluid. We propose a coupled map lattice model for such complex spatiotemporal behavior in a passively sheared nematic liquid crystal using local maps constructed so as to accurately describe the spatially homogeneous case. Such local maps are coupled diffusively to nearest and next-nearest neighbors to mimic the effects of spatial gradients in the underlying equations of motion. We investigate the dynamical steady states obtained as parameters in the map and the strength of the spatial coupling are varied, studying local temporal properties at a single site as well as spatiotemporal features of the extended system. Our methods reproduce the full range of spatiotemporal behavior seen in earlier one-dimensional studies based on partial differential equations. We report results for both the one- and two-dimensional cases, showing that spatial coupling favors uniform or periodically time-varying states, as intuitively expected. We demonstrate and characterize regimes of spatiotemporal intermittency out of which chaos develops. Our work indicates that similar simplified lattice models of the dynamics of complex fluids under shear should provide useful ways to access and quantify spatiotemporal complexity in such problems, in addition to representing a fast and numerically tractable alternative to continuum representations. PMID:21198093

  14. Development and Experimental Validation of Morphology Predictive Model for Compatibilized Ternary Polymer Blends I. Effect of Interfacial Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokoohi, Shirin; Naderi, Ghasem

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the prediction reliability of conventional morphology predicting models, polypropylene (PP)/polyamide6 (PA6)/ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) (70/15/15) ternary polymer blends compatibilized with Maleic-anhydride grafted EPDM (EPDM-g-MA) were prepared through melt blending using a twin screw extruder (TSE). Different EPDM/EPDM-g-MA ratios i.e. 100/0, 75/25, 50/50, 25/75 and 0/100 were used to prepare the ternery blend PP/(EPDM-g-MA + EPDM)/PA6 samples. The effects of compatibilizer content on the microstructures and consequently mechanical properties of prepared ternary blends were studied. Direct microstructural observations were compared to the predictions of conventional phenomenological models including spreading coefficient, minimum relative free energy, and dynamic interfacial energy. A comparison depicted the relative inaccuracy of the existing models in predicting the morphology of the present ternary system due to the ignorance of some effective parameters and/or discomfit of model assumptions. A novel predictive model was developed considering parameters ignored in conventional models. A thorough investigation of the model's validation results showed a reasonable agreement between model predictions and direct microstructural observations.

  15. Modeling the influence of tectonic extrusion and volume loss on the geometry, displacement, vorticity, and strain compatibility of ductile shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Graham B.; Hudleston, Peter J.

    2007-10-01

    Oblate strains are often observed in meso-scale ductile shear zones and this is generally taken to indicate narrowing across the shear zone during formation. Volume loss is one mechanism that could produce shear zone narrowing. However, not all shear zones display characteristics consistent with volume loss, and in such cases, the narrowing must be accomplished by the extrusion of material from within the shear zone. To explore the relationship between shear zone geometry, volume loss, and extrusion, shear zones were mathematically modeled. Results demonstrate the important influence of pure shear and volume loss on controlling the geometry, displacement, and vorticity of ductile shear zones. Further, volume loss does not preclude extrusion unless, for a given volume loss, the strain is of a specific geometry. Extrusion is a likely mechanism important in shear zone development, even if volume loss occurs. Extrusion presents strain compatibility problems because, unlike crustal-scale shear zones, meso-scale ductile shear zones do not possess a free surface. If extrusion occurs, bulk strain compatibility can be maintained if shear zones interlink in anastomosing arrays or change in thickness, though not all shear zone systems display such characteristics. Modeling results elucidate the deformation style of shear zone in the northwest Adirondacks in NY and in the Kebnekaise region in northern Sweden.

  16. Models for viscosity and shear localization in bubble-rich magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vona, Alessandro; Ryan, Amy G.; Russell, James K.; Romano, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    Bubble content influences magma rheology and, thus, styles of volcanic eruption. Increasing magma vesicularity affects the bulk viscosity of the bubble-melt suspension and has the potential to promote non-Newtonian behavior in the form of shear localization or brittle failure. Here, we present a series of high temperature uniaxial deformation experiments designed to investigate the effect of bubbles on the magma bulk viscosity. The starting materials are cores of natural rhyolitic obsidian synthesized to have variable vesicularity (ϕ = 0- 66%). The foamed cores were deformed isothermally (T = 750 °C) at atmospheric conditions using a high-temperature uniaxial press under constant displacement rates (strain rates between 0.5- 1 ×10-4 s-1) and to total strains of 10-40%. The viscosity of the bubble-free melt (η0) was measured by micropenetration and parallel plate methods to establish a baseline for experiments on the vesicle rich cores. At the experimental conditions, rising vesicle content produces a marked decrease in bulk viscosity that is best described by a two-parameter empirical equation: log10 ⁡ηBulk =log10 ⁡η0 - 1.47[ ϕ / (1 - ϕ) ] 0.48. Our parameterization of the bubble-melt rheology is combined with Maxwell relaxation theory to map the potential onset of non-Newtonian behavior (shear localization) in magmas as a function of melt viscosity, vesicularity, and strain rate. For low degrees of strain (i.e. as in our study), the rheological properties of vesicular magmas under different flow types (pure vs. simple shear) are indistinguishable. For high strain or strain rates where simple and pure shear viscosity values may diverge, our model represents a maximum boundary condition. Vesicular magmas can behave as non-Newtonian fluids at lower strain rates than unvesiculated melts, thereby, promoting shear localization and (explosive or non-explosive) magma fragmentation. The extent of shear localization in magma influences outgassing efficiency

  17. Models for viscosity and shear localization in bubble-rich magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vona, Alessandro; Ryan, Amy G.; Russell, James K.; Romano, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    Bubble content influences magma rheology and, thus, styles of volcanic eruption. Increasing magma vesicularity affects the bulk viscosity of the bubble-melt suspension and has the potential to promote non-Newtonian behavior in the form of shear localization or brittle failure. Here, we present a series of high temperature uniaxial deformation experiments designed to investigate the effect of bubbles on the magma bulk viscosity. The starting materials are cores of natural rhyolitic obsidian synthesized to have variable vesicularity (ϕ = 0- 66%). The foamed cores were deformed isothermally (T = 750 °C) at atmospheric conditions using a high-temperature uniaxial press under constant displacement rates (strain rates between 0.5- 1 ×10-4 s-1) and to total strains of 10-40%. The viscosity of the bubble-free melt (η0) was measured by micropenetration and parallel plate methods to establish a baseline for experiments on the vesicle rich cores. At the experimental conditions, rising vesicle content produces a marked decrease in bulk viscosity that is best described by a two-parameter empirical equation: log10 ⁡ηBulk =log10 ⁡η0 - 1.47[ ϕ / (1 - ϕ) ] 0.48. Our parameterization of the bubble-melt rheology is combined with Maxwell relaxation theory to map the potential onset of non-Newtonian behavior (shear localization) in magmas as a function of melt viscosity, vesicularity, and strain rate. For low degrees of strain (i.e. as in our study), the rheological properties of vesicular magmas under different flow types (pure vs. simple shear) are indistinguishable. For high strain or strain rates where simple and pure shear viscosity values may diverge, our model represents a maximum boundary condition. Vesicular magmas can behave as non-Newtonian fluids at lower strain rates than unvesiculated melts, thereby, promoting shear localization and (explosive or non-explosive) magma fragmentation. The extent of shear localization in magma influences outgassing efficiency

  18. The mode III crack problem in bonded materials with a nonhomogeneous interfacial zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Joseph, P. F.; Kaya, A. C.

    1991-01-01

    The mode 3 crack problem for two bonded homogeneous half planes was considered. The interfacial zone was modelled by a nonhomogeneous strip in such a way that the shear modulus is a continuous function throughout the composite medium and has discontinuous derivatives along the boundaries of the interfacial zone. The problem was formulated for cracks perpendicular to the nominal interface and was solved for various crack locations in and around the interfacial region. The asymptotic stress field near the tip of a crack terminating at an interface was examined and it was shown that, unlike the corresponding stress field in piecewise homogeneous materials, in this case the stresses have the standard square root singularity and their angular variation was identical to that of a crack in a homogeneous medium. With application to the subcritical crack growth process in mind, the results given include mostly the stress intensity factors for some typical crack geometries and various material combinations.

  19. The mode 3 crack problem in bonded materials with a nonhomogeneous interfacial zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, Fazil; Kaya, A. C.; Joseph, P. F.

    1988-01-01

    The mode 3 crack problem for two bonded homogeneous half planes was considered. The interfacial zone was modelled by a nonhomogeneous strip in such a way that the shear modulus is a continuous function throughout the composite medium and has discontinuous derivatives along the boundaries of the interfacial zone. The problem was formulated for cracks perpendicular to the nominal interface and was solved for various crack locations in and around the interfacial region. The asymptotic stress field near the tip of a crack terminating at an interface was examined and it was shown that, unlike the corresponding stress field in piecewise homogeneous materials, in this case the stresses have the standard square root singularity and their angular variation was identical to that of a crack in a homogeneous medium. With application to the subcritical crack growth process in mind, the results given include mostly the stress intensity factors for some typical crack geometries and various material combinations.

  20. Modeling of Wall-Bounded Complex Flows and Free Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Zhu, Jiang; Lumley, John L.

    1994-01-01

    Various wall-bounded flows with complex geometries and free shear flows have been studied with a newly developed realizable Reynolds stress algebraic equation model. The model development is based on the invariant theory in continuum mechanics. This theory enables us to formulate a general constitutive relation for the Reynolds stresses. Pope was the first to introduce this kind of constitutive relation to turbulence modeling. In our study, realizability is imposed on the truncated constitutive relation to determine the coefficients so that, unlike the standard k-E eddy viscosity model, the present model will not produce negative normal stresses in any situations of rapid distortion. The calculations based on the present model have shown an encouraging success in modeling complex turbulent flows.

  1. An analysis of RNG based turbulence models for homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Gatski, Thomas B.; Fitzmaurice, Nessan

    1991-01-01

    In a recent paper, the authors compared the performance of a variety of turbulence models including the k-epsilon model and the second-order closure model based on Renormalization Group (RNG) Methods. The performance of these RNG models in homogeneous turbulent shear flow was found to be quite poor, apparently due to the value of the constant C(sub epsilon1) in the modeled dissipation rate equation which was substantially lower than its traditional value. However, recently a correction has been made in the RNG based calculation of C(sub epsilon1). It is shown that with the new value of C(sub epsilon1), the performance of the RNG k-epsilon model is substantially improved. On the other hand, while the predictions of the revised RNG second-order closure model are better, some lingering problems still remain which can be easily remedied by the addition of higher order terms.

  2. Reconciling viscoelastic models of postseismic and interseismic deformation: Effects of viscous shear zones and finite length ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, Elizabeth H.; Thatcher, Wayne R.

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a suite of earthquake cycle models for strike-slip faults to investigate how finite ruptures and lithosphere-scale viscous shear zones affect interseismic deformation. In particular, we assess whether localized and stationary interseismic deformation and large-scale, rapidly decaying postseismic transients may be explained with models incorporating either or both of these features. Models incorporating viscous shear zones give more stationary interseismic deformation than layered half-space, Maxwell viscoelastic models producing similar early postseismic deformation in the near field. This tendency is accentuated when the effective viscosity per unit width of the shear zone increases either with depth or with interseismic time. Models with finite (200 km long) ruptures produce time-dependent deformation similar to that from models with infinitely long ruptures, though with smaller-magnitude and somewhat more localized surface velocity fluctuations. Models incorporating a stiff lithosphere, a low-viscosity mantle asthenosphere, and a crust- to lithosphere-scale viscous shear zone can replicate postseismic and interseismic deformation typical of large, strike-slip earthquakes. Such models require depth-dependent, power law, or transient rheologies for the viscous shear zone material in the crust, as long as the effective viscosity per unit shear zone width is approximately 1015 Pa s/m at crustal depths during the postseismic interval. Below the Moho, the shear zone effective viscosity per unit width must be higher throughout the seismic cycle, at least over a short depth interval. For example, if shear zone viscosity per unit width is 5×1016 Pa s/m in the mantle lithosphere, a model with a 50 km thick lithosphere and asthenosphere effective viscosities of 1 to 5×1018 Pa s can reproduce reference velocity profiles for both postseismic and later interseismic deformation.

  3. Experimental Tests and FEM Model for SFRC Beams under Flexural and Shear Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Colajanni, Piero; Spinella, Nino; La Mendola, Lidia; Priolo, Salvatore

    2008-07-08

    The complete load-vs-displacement curves obtained by four-point-bending tests on Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete (SFRC) beams are predicted by using a nonlinear finite element code based on the Modified Compression Field Theory (MCFT) and the Disturbed Stress Field Model (DSFM) suitably adapted for SFRC elements. The effect of fibers on the shear-flexure response is taken into account, mainly incorporating tensile stress-strain analytical relationship for SFRC. The numerical results show the effectiveness of the model for prediction of the behavior of the tested specimens reinforced with light amount of stirrups or with fibers only.

  4. Experimental Tests and FEM Model for SFRC Beams under Flexural and Shear Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colajanni, Piero; La Mendola, Lidia; Priolo, Salvatore; Spinella, Nino

    2008-07-01

    The complete load-vs-displacement curves obtained by four-point-bending tests on Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete (SFRC) beams are predicted by using a nonlinear finite element code based on the Modified Compression Field Theory (MCFT) and the Disturbed Stress Field Model (DSFM) suitably adapted for SFRC elements. The effect of fibers on the shear-flexure response is taken into account, mainly incorporating tensile stress-strain analytical relationship for SFRC. The numerical results show the effectiveness of the model for prediction of the behavior of the tested specimens reinforced with light amount of stirrups or with fibers only.

  5. Effects of f(R) Model on Dynamics of Axial Shear-Free Dissipative Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Zunaira, Nasir

    2016-04-01

    We present a general analysis on non-static axial system with dissipative shear-free anisotropic fluid using polynomial inflationary f(R) model. We study the effects of dissipation on the dynamics of geodesic matter distribution. This leads the system either to rotation-free or expansion-free but not both simultaneously under geodesic condition. It is found that the system preserves its symmetry in both cases. For the rotation-free case, when there is no dissipation and Ricci scalar is constant, the axial system reduces to FRW universe model. This is exactly the same result obtained in general relativity.

  6. Pore Fluid Effects on Shear Modulus in a Model of Heterogeneous Rocks, Reservoirs, and Granular Media

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2005-03-23

    To provide quantitative measures of the importance of fluid effects on shear waves in heterogeneous reservoirs, a model material called a ''random polycrystal of porous laminates'' is introduced. This model poroelastic material has constituent grains that are layered (or laminated), and each layer is an isotropic, microhomogeneous porous medium. All grains are composed of exactly the same porous constituents, and have the same relative volume fractions. The order of lamination is not important because the up-scaling method used to determine the transversely isotropic (hexagonal) properties of the grains is Backus averaging, which--for quasi-static or long-wavelength behavior--depends only on the volume fractions and layer properties. Grains are then jumbled together totally at random, filling all space, and producing an overall isotropic poroelastic medium. The poroelastic behavior of this medium is then analyzed using the Peselnick-Meister-Watt bounds (of Hashin-Shtrikman type). We study the dependence of the shear modulus on pore fluid properties and determine the range of behavior to be expected. In particular we compare and contrast these results to those anticipated from Gassmann's fluid substitution formulas, and to the predictions of Mavko and Jizba for very low porosity rocks with flat cracks. This approach also permits the study of arbitrary numbers of constituents, but for simplicity the numerical examples are restricted here to just two constituents. This restriction also permits the use of some special exact results available for computing the overall effective stress coefficient in any two-component porous medium. The bounds making use of polycrystalline microstructure are very tight. Results for the shear modulus demonstrate that the ratio of compliance differences R (i.e., shear compliance changes over bulk compliance changes when going from drained to undrained behavior, or vice versa) is usually nonzero and can take a wide range of values, both

  7. Non contact probing of interfacial stiffnesses between two plates by zero-group velocity Lamb modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezil, Sylvain; Laurent, Jérôme; Royer, Daniel; Prada, Claire

    2014-07-01

    A non contact technique using zero-group velocity (ZGV) Lamb modes is developed to probe the bonding between two solid plates coupled by a thin layer. The layer thickness is assumed to be negligible compared with the plate thickness and the acoustic wavelength. The coupling layer is modeled by a normal and a tangential spring to take into account the normal and shear interfacial stresses. Theoretical ZGV frequencies are determined for a symmetrical bi-layer structure and the effect of the interfacial stiffnesses on the cut-off and ZGV frequencies are evaluated. Experiments are conducted with two glass plates bonded by a drop of water, oil, or salol, leading to a few micrometer thick layer. An evaluation of normal and shear stiffnesses is obtained using ZGV resonances locally excited and detected with laser ultrasonic techniques.

  8. Turbulence modeling of free shear layers for high-performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondak, Douglas L.

    1993-01-01

    The High Performance Aircraft (HPA) Grand Challenge of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) program involves the computation of the flow over a high performance aircraft. A variety of free shear layers, including mixing layers over cavities, impinging jets, blown flaps, and exhaust plumes, may be encountered in such flowfields. Since these free shear layers are usually turbulent, appropriate turbulence models must be utilized in computations in order to accurately simulate these flow features. The HPCC program is relying heavily on parallel computers. A Navier-Stokes solver (POVERFLOW) utilizing the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model was developed and tested on a 128-node Intel iPSC/860. Algebraic turbulence models run very fast, and give good results for many flowfields. For complex flowfields such as those mentioned above, however, they are often inadequate. It was therefore deemed that a two-equation turbulence model will be required for the HPA computations. The k-epsilon two-equation turbulence model was implemented on the Intel iPSC/860. Both the Chien low-Reynolds-number model and a generalized wall-function formulation were included.

  9. Statistical shear lag model - unraveling the size effect in hierarchical composites.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoding; Filleter, Tobin; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2015-05-01

    Numerous experimental and computational studies have established that the hierarchical structures encountered in natural materials, such as the brick-and-mortar structure observed in sea shells, are essential for achieving defect tolerance. Due to this hierarchy, the mechanical properties of natural materials have a different size dependence compared to that of typical engineered materials. This study aimed to explore size effects on the strength of bio-inspired staggered hierarchical composites and to define the influence of the geometry of constituents in their outstanding defect tolerance capability. A statistical shear lag model is derived by extending the classical shear lag model to account for the statistics of the constituents' strength. A general solution emerges from rigorous mathematical derivations, unifying the various empirical formulations for the fundamental link length used in previous statistical models. The model shows that the staggered arrangement of constituents grants composites a unique size effect on mechanical strength in contrast to homogenous continuous materials. The model is applied to hierarchical yarns consisting of double-walled carbon nanotube bundles to assess its predictive capabilities for novel synthetic materials. Interestingly, the model predicts that yarn gauge length does not significantly influence the yarn strength, in close agreement with experimental observations. PMID:25684701

  10. Shearing a glass and the role of pinning delay in models of interface depinning.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, Stefanos

    2016-03-01

    When a disordered solid is sheared, yielding is followed by the onset of intermittent response that is characterized by slip in local regions usually labeled shear-transformation zones. Such intermittent response resembles the behavior of earthquakes or contact depinning, where a well-defined landscape of pinning disorder prohibits the deformation of an elastic medium. Nevertheless, a disordered solid is evidently different in that pinning barriers of particles are due to neighbors that are also subject to motion. Microscopic yielding leads to destruction of the local microstructure and local heating. It is natural to assume that locally a liquid emerges for a finite timescale before cooling down to a transformed configuration. For including this characteristic transient in glass depinning models, we propose a general mechanism that involves a "pinning delay" time T(pd), during which each region that slipped evolves as a fluid. The new timescale can be as small as a single avalanche time step. This is a local, effective, and dynamical in nature mechanism that may be thought as dynamical softening. We demonstrate that the inclusion of this mechanism causes a drift of the critical exponents toward higher values for the slip sizes τ, until a transition to permanent shear-banding behavior happens causing almost oscillatory, stick-slip response. Moreover, it leads to a proliferation of large events that are highly inhomogeneous and resemble sharp slip band formation. PMID:27078417

  11. Shearing a glass and the role of pinning delay in models of interface depinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolaou, Stefanos

    2016-03-01

    When a disordered solid is sheared, yielding is followed by the onset of intermittent response that is characterized by slip in local regions usually labeled shear-transformation zones. Such intermittent response resembles the behavior of earthquakes or contact depinning, where a well-defined landscape of pinning disorder prohibits the deformation of an elastic medium. Nevertheless, a disordered solid is evidently different in that pinning barriers of particles are due to neighbors that are also subject to motion. Microscopic yielding leads to destruction of the local microstructure and local heating. It is natural to assume that locally a liquid emerges for a finite timescale before cooling down to a transformed configuration. For including this characteristic transient in glass depinning models, we propose a general mechanism that involves a "pinning delay" time Tpd, during which each region that slipped evolves as a fluid. The new timescale can be as small as a single avalanche time step. This is a local, effective, and dynamical in nature mechanism that may be thought as dynamical softening. We demonstrate that the inclusion of this mechanism causes a drift of the critical exponents toward higher values for the slip sizes τ , until a transition to permanent shear-banding behavior happens causing almost oscillatory, stick-slip response. Moreover, it leads to a proliferation of large events that are highly inhomogeneous and resemble sharp slip band formation.

  12. A 3-D Computational Model of Cell Rolling Under Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhav, Sameer; Eggleton, Charles; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2004-11-01

    Selectin-mediated rolling of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) on activated endothelium is critical to their recruitment to sites of inflammation. Recent studies have shown that PMN rolling velocity on selectin-coated surfaces in shear flow is significantly slower compared to that of microspheres bearing a similar density of selectin ligands. To investigate whether cell deformability is responsible for the aforementioned differences, we developed a three-dimensional computational model based on the immersed boundary method which simulates rolling of a deformable cell on a selectin-coated surface under shear flow with a stochastic description of receptor-ligand bond interaction. We observed that rolling velocity increases with increasing membrane stiffness and this effect is larger at high shear rates. The bond lifetime, number of receptor-ligand bonds and the contact area between cell and substrate decreased with increasing membrane stiffness. This study shows that cellular properties along with the kinetics of selectin-ligand interactions affect leukocyte rolling on selectin-coated surfaces.

  13. Modeling Nanoparticle Targeting to a Vascular Surface in Shear Flow Through Diffusive Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bei; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Yihua; Yang, Longxiang; Zhang, Guocheng; Liu, Yaling

    2015-05-01

    Nanoparticles are regarded as promising carriers for targeted drug delivery and imaging probes. A fundamental understanding of the dynamics of polymeric nanoparticle targeting to receptor-coated vascular surfaces is therefore of great importance to enhance the design of nanoparticles toward improving binding ability. Although the effects of particle size and shear flow on the binding of nanoparticles to a vessel wall have been studied at the particulate level, a computational model to investigate the details of the binding process at the molecular level has not been developed. In this research, dissipative particle dynamics simulations are used to study nanoparticles with diameters of several nanometers binding to receptors on vascular surfaces under shear flow. Interestingly, shear flow velocities ranging from 0 to 2000 s-1 had no effect on the attachment process of nanoparticles very close to the capillary wall. Increased binding energy between the ligands and wall caused a corresponding linear increase in bonding ability. Our simulations also indicated that larger nanoparticles and those of rod shape with a higher aspect ratio have better binding ability than those of smaller size or rounder shape.

  14. Application of MMC model on simulation of shearing process of thick hot-rolled high strength steel plate

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Liang; Li, Shuhui; Yang, Bing; Gao, Yongsheng

    2013-12-16

    Shear operation is widely used as the first step in sheet metal forming to cut the sheet or plate into the required size. The shear of thick hot-rolled High Strength Steel (HSS) requires large shearing force and the sheared edge quality is relatively poor because of the large thickness and high strength compared with the traditional low carbon steel. Bad sheared edge quality will easily lead to edge cracking during the post-forming process. This study investigates the shearing process of thick hot-rolled HSS plate metal, which is generally exploited as the beam of heavy trucks. The Modified Mohr-Coulomb fracture criterion (MMC) is employed in numerical simulation to calculate the initiation and propagation of cracks during the process evolution. Tensile specimens are designed to obtain various stress states in tension. Equivalent fracture strains are measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC) equipment to constitute the fracture locus. Simulation of the tension test is carried out to check the fracture model. Then the MMC model is applied to the simulation of the shearing process, and the simulation results show that the MMC model predicts the ductile fracture successfully.

  15. Basal shear stress under alpine glaciers: insights from experiments using the iSOSIA and Elmer/Ice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brædstrup, C. F.; Egholm, D. L.; Ugelvig, S. V.; Pedersen, V. K.

    2016-02-01

    Shear stress at the base of glaciers exerts a significant control on basal sliding and hence also glacial erosion in arctic and high-altitude areas. However, the inaccessible nature of glacial beds complicates empirical studies of basal shear stress, and little is therefore known of its spatial and temporal distribution. In this study we seek to improve our understanding of basal shear stress using a higher-order numerical ice model (iSOSIA). In order to test the validity of the higher-order model, we first compare the detailed distribution of basal shear stress in iSOSIA and in a three-dimensional full-Stokes model (Elmer/Ice). We find that iSOSIA and Elmer/Ice predict similar first-order stress and velocity patterns, and that differences are restricted to local variations at length scales of the order of the grid resolution. In addition, we find that subglacial shear stress is relatively uniform and insensitive to subtle changes in local topographic relief. Following the initial comparison studies, we use iSOSIA to investigate changes in basal shear stress as a result of landscape evolution by glacial erosion. The experiments with landscape evolution show that subglacial shear stress decreases as glacial erosion transforms preglacial V-shaped valleys into U-shaped troughs. These findings support the hypothesis that glacial erosion is most efficient in the early stages of glacial landscape development.

  16. Basal shear stress under alpine glaciers: Insights from experiments using the iSOSIA and Elmer/ICE models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brædstrup, C. F.; Egholm, D. L.; Ugelvig, S. V.; Pedersen, V. K.

    2015-10-01

    Shear stress at the base of glaciers controls basal sliding and is therefore immensely important for glacial erosion and landscape evolution in arctic and high-altitude areas. However, the inaccessible nature of glacial beds complicates empirical studies of basal shear stress, and little is therefore known of its spatial and temporal distribution. In this study we seek to improve our understanding of basal shear stress using a higher-order numerical ice model (iSOSIA). In order to test the validity of the higher-order model, we first compare the detailed distribution of basal shear stress in iSOSIA and in a three-dimensional full-Stokes model (Elmer/ICE). We find that iSOSIA and Elmer/ICE predict similar first-order stress and velocity patterns, and that differences are restricted to local variations over length-scales on the order of the grid resolution. In addition, we find that subglacial shear stress is relatively uniform and insensitive to suble changes in local topographic relief. Following these initial stress benchmark experiments, we use iSOSIA to investigate changes in basal shear stress as a result of landscape evolution by glacial erosion. The experiments with landscape evolution show that subglacial shear stress decreases as glacial erosion transforms preglacial V-shaped valleys into U-shaped troughs. These findings support the hypothesis that glacial erosion is most efficient in the early stages of glacial landscape development.

  17. Application of MMC model on simulation of shearing process of thick hot-rolled high strength steel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Liang; Li, Shuhui; Yang, Bing; Gao, Yongsheng

    2013-12-01

    Shear operation is widely used as the first step in sheet metal forming to cut the sheet or plate into the required size. The shear of thick hot-rolled High Strength Steel (HSS) requires large shearing force and the sheared edge quality is relatively poor because of the large thickness and high strength compared with the traditional low carbon steel. Bad sheared edge quality will easily lead to edge cracking during the post-forming process. This study investigates the shearing process of thick hot-rolled HSS plate metal, which is generally exploited as the beam of heavy trucks. The Modified Mohr-Coulomb fracture criterion (MMC) is employed in numerical simulation to calculate the initiation and propagation of cracks during the process evolution. Tensile specimens are designed to obtain various stress states in tension. Equivalent fracture strains are measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC) equipment to constitute the fracture locus. Simulation of the tension test is carried out to check the fracture model. Then the MMC model is applied to the simulation of the shearing process, and the simulation results show that the MMC model predicts the ductile fracture successfully.

  18. Structure, viscoelasticity, and interfacial dynamics of a model polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Robert J; Gillard, Timothy M; Irwin, Matthew T; Lodge, Timothy P; Bates, Frank S

    2016-01-01

    We have systematically studied the equilibrium structure and dynamics of a polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion (BμE) composed of poly(cyclohexylethylene) (PCHE), poly(ethylene) (PE), and a volumetrically symmetric PCHE-PE diblock copolymer, using dynamic mechanical spectroscopy, small angle X-ray and neutron scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The BμE was investigated over an 80 °C temperature range, revealing a structural evolution and a rheological response not previously recognized in such systems. As the temperature is reduced below the point associated with the lamellar-disorder transition at compositions adjacent to the microemulsion channel, the interfacial area per chain of the BμE approaches that of the neat (undiluted) lamellar diblock copolymer. With increasing temperature, the diblock-rich interface swells through homopolymer infiltration. Time-temperature-superposed linear dynamic data obtained as a function of frequency show that the viscoelastic response of the BμE is strikingly similar to that of the fluctuating pure diblock copolymer in the disordered state, which we associate with membrane undulations and the breaking and reforming of interfaces. This work provides new insights into the structure and dynamics that characterize thermodynamically stable BμEs in the limits of relatively weak and strong segregation. PMID:26439750

  19. Effect of Shear Deformation and Continuity on Delamination Modelling with Plate Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, E. H.; Riddell, W. T.; Raju, I. S.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of several critical assumptions and parameters on the computation of strain energy release rates for delamination and debond configurations modeled with plate elements have been quantified. The method of calculation is based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT), and models that model the upper and lower surface of the delamination or debond with two-dimensional (2D) plate elements rather than three-dimensional (3D) solid elements. The major advantages of the plate element modeling technique are a smaller model size and simpler geometric modeling. Specific issues that are discussed include: constraint of translational degrees of freedom, rotational degrees of freedom or both in the neighborhood of the crack tip; element order and assumed shear deformation; and continuity of material properties and section stiffness in the vicinity of the debond front, Where appropriate, the plate element analyses are compared with corresponding two-dimensional plane strain analyses.

  20. Investigation of the logarithmic model applied to bed shear stresses in the swash zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allis, M.; Blenkinsopp, C. E.; Turner, I. L.; Baldock, T. E.; Puleo, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate understanding of beach face sediment transport in the swash zone is essential to improve existing models for predicting beach morphological changes. In the swash zone, bed shear stresses are the dominant driving mechanism of both bed-load and suspended-load sediment transport. A detailed comparison is presented of swash zone bed shear stresses obtained from direct measurements and velocimetry derived estimates, as measured in the large-scale GWK wave flume facility in Hannover, Germany. Bed shear stresses were measured directly by flush mounted shear plates and estimated using the logarithmic model for velocity profiles obtained from Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profilers (ADVP). The swashes measured were generated by large-scale (H > 0.9m, T > 8s) monochromatic and solitary waves on a planar fixed-bed beach with a rough surface (d50 = 4.6mm). The logarithmic model and its application to swash flows are investigated in detail for the ensemble and individual swash events. The results confirm the concerns of others about log-law suitability in the swash zone and extend the prior works to fully prototype scale. The logarithmic model proves reasonably valid in uprush but increasing invalid through backwash where there is clear evidence of a systematic departure from log-law theory. The cause of the disparity is investigated and considered to be the result of unsteady hydrodynamics, free-surface pressure gradients and complex boundary layer evolution. In the latter stages of backwash the boundary layer becomes emergent further disrupting the flow, re-aerating and tending towards more complex turbulent sheet-flow behaviour. Adjustment to the depth-averaged void fraction cannot account for the magnitude of the discrepancy, indicating that the formulation of the logarithmic model itself is decreasingly valid as the flow thins and decelerates throughout backwash. Though it is conceptually appealing and relatively simple to apply, the results further confirm the

  1. Azide functional monolayers grafted to a germanium surface: model substrates for ATR-IR studies of interfacial click reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuo; Koberstein, Jeffrey T

    2012-01-10

    High-quality azide-functional substrates are prepared by a low temperature reaction of 11-bromoundecyltrichlorosilane with UV-ozone-treated germanium ATR-IR plates followed by nucleophilic substitution of the terminal bromine by addition of sodium azide. The resulting monolayer films are characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), and ellipsometry. XPS and ellipsometric thickness data correspond well to the results of molecular model calculations confirming the formation of a densely packed azide-functional monolayer. These azide-functional substrates enable interfacial "click" reactions with complementary alkyne-functional molecules to be studied in situ by ATR-IR. To illustrate their potential utility for kinetic studies we show that, in the presence of copper(I) catalyst, the azide-modified surfaces react rapidly and quantitatively with 5-chloro-pentyne to form triazoles via a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Time-resolved ATR-IR measurements indicate that the interfacial click reaction is initially first order in azide concentration as expected from the reaction mechanism, with a rate constant of 0.034 min(-1), and then transitions to apparent second order dependence, with a rate constant of 0.017 min(-1)/(chains/nm(2)), when the surface azide and triazole concentrations become similar, as predicted by Oyama et al. The reaction achieves an ultimate conversion of 50% consistent with the limit expected due to steric hindrance of the 5-chloro-pentyne reactant at the surface. PMID:22081885

  2. A new analytical model for vibration of a cylindrical shell and cardboard liner with focus on interfacial distributed damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plattenburg, Joseph; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a new analytical model for a thin cylindrical shell that utilizes a homogeneous cardboard liner to increase modal damping. Such cardboard liners are frequently used as noise and vibration control devices for cylindrical shell-like structures in automotive drive shafts. However, most prior studies on such lined structures have only investigated the associated damping mechanisms in an empirical manner. Only finite element models and experimental methods have been previously used for characterization, whereas no analytical studies have addressed sliding friction interaction at the shell-liner interface. The proposed theory, as an extension of a prior experimental study, uses the Rayleigh-Ritz method and incorporates material structural damping along with frequency-dependent viscous and Coulomb interfacial damping formulations for the shell-liner interaction. Experimental validation of the proposed model, using a thin cylindrical shell with three different cardboard liner thicknesses, is provided to validate the new model, and to characterize the damping parameters. Finally, the model is used to investigate the effect of the liner and the damping parameters on the modal attenuation of the shell vibration, in particular for the higher-order coupled shell modes.

  3. Computational modeling of shear forces and experimental validation of endothelial cell responses in an orbital well shaker system.

    PubMed

    Filipovic, Nenad; Ghimire, Kedar; Saveljic, Igor; Milosevic, Zarko; Ruegg, Curzio

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are continuously exposed to hemodynamic shear stress. Intensity and type of shear stress are highly relevant to vascular physiology and pathology. Here, we modeled shear stress distribution in a tissue culture well (R = 17.5 mm, fill volume 2 ml) under orbital translation using computational fluid dynamics with the finite element method. Free surface distribution, wall shear stress, inclination angle, drag force, and oscillatory index on the bottom surface were modeled. Obtained results predict nonuniform shear stress distribution during cycle, with higher oscillatory shear index, higher drag force values, higher circular component, and larger inclination angle of the shear stress at the periphery of the well compared with the center of the well. The oscillatory index, inclination angle, and drag force are new quantitative parameters modeled in this system, which provide a better understanding of the hydrodynamic conditions experienced and reflect the pulsatile character of blood flow in vivo. Validation experiments revealed that endothelial cells at the well periphery aligned under flow and increased Kruppel-like Factor 4 (KLF-4), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation. In contrast, endothelial cells at the center of the well did not show clear directional alignment, did not induce the expression of KLF-4 and COX-2 nor increased eNOS phosphorylation. In conclusion, this improved computational modeling predicts that the orbital shaker model generates different hydrodynamic conditions at the periphery versus the center of the well eliciting divergent endothelial cell responses. The possibility of generating different hydrodynamic conditions in the same well makes this model highly attractive to study responses of distinct regions of the same endothelial monolayer to different types of shear stresses thereby better reflecting in vivo conditions. PMID:26096592

  4. What Supergranule Flow Models Tell Us About the Sun's Surface Shear Layer and Magnetic Flux Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David

    2011-01-01

    Models of the photospheric flows due to supergranulation are generated using an evolving spectrum of vector spherical harmonics up to spherical harmonic wavenumber l1500. Doppler velocity data generated from these models are compared to direct Doppler observations from SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI. The models are adjusted to match the observed spatial power spectrum as well as the wavenumber dependence of the cell lifetimes, differential rotation velocities, meridional flow velocities, and relative strength of radial vs. horizontal flows. The equatorial rotation rate as a function of wavelength matches the rotation rate as a function of depth as determined by global helioseismology. This leads to the conclusions that the cellular structures are anchored at depths equal to their widths, that the surface shear layer extends to at least 70 degrees latitude, and that the poleward meridional flow decreases in amplitude and reverses direction at the base of the surface shear layer (approx.35 Mm below the surface). Using the modeled flows to passively transport magnetic flux indicates that the observed differential rotation and meridional flow of the magnetic elements are directly related to the differential rotation and meridional flow of the convective pattern itself. The magnetic elements are transported by the evolving boundaries of the supergranule pattern (where the convective flows converge) and are unaffected by the weaker flows associated with the differential rotation or meridional flow of the photospheric plasma.

  5. A stochastic model for the formation of turbulent liquid sprays in free shear flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, David Joseph

    The formation and dispersion of turbulent liquid sprays in an axisymmetric jet was investigated numerically via a coupled, three-dimensional, joint Lagrangian-Eulerian stochastic method. The liquid spray is modeled as a series of continuously injected droplets into the turbulent flow which issues from an axisymmetric atomizer nozzle. Motions of nondeforming spherical liquid droplets and deforming ellipsoidal droplets are examined. Equations of motion for the translation and rotation of deforming and nondeforming spherical, and ellipsoidal droplets, which include effects of nonlinear Stokes drag and a three-dimensional modification of the shear-induced Saffman lift force are presented. The evaporation rate of a nonspherical droplet is discussed. Physical models for the deformation and breakup of liquid droplets in the presence of flow shear and pressure gradient are proposed. The instantaneous fluid velocity and velocity gradient of the continuous carrier phase is simulated with the use of an advanced Navier-Stokes based Lagrangian Probability Density Function (PDF) stochastic model. Cases for air assisted and non-air assisted dilute sprays are considered. Ensembles of 10,000 simultaneous sample trajectories were generated for estimates of particle velocity and dispersion characteristics. Simulation results for large droplets were found to correctly predict the overall spray angle and dispersion pattern for all spray cases considered. Interactions between particles and the shear flows are also examined for a range of Stokes numbers. For spherical particles, maximum dispersion is found for Stokes numbers of order unity. In addition, the single point joint velocity-velocity gradient PDF described in the present study correctly predicts all lower single point statistical moments for simulated carrier-phase turbulence. The described methodology provides a computationally efficient way to simulate the overall features of a turbulent spray system.

  6. Simple kinematic models for the environmental interaction of tropical cyclones in vertical wind shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemer, M.; Montgomery, M. T.

    2011-09-01

    A major impediment to the intensity forecast of tropical cyclones (TCs) is believed to be associated with the interaction of TCs with dry environmental air. However, the conditions under which pronounced TC-environment interaction takes place are not well understood. As a step towards improving our understanding of this problem, we analyze here the flow topology of a TC immersed in an environment of vertical wind shear in an idealized, three-dimensional, convection-permitting numerical experiment. A set of distinct streamlines, the so-called manifolds, can be identified under the assumptions of steady and layer-wise horizontal flow. The manifolds are shown to divide the flow around the TC into distinct regions. The manifold structure in our numerical experiment is more complex than the well-known manifold structure of a non-divergent point vortex in uniform background flow. In particular, one manifold spirals inwards and ends in a limit cycle, a meso-scale dividing streamline encompassing the eyewall above the layer of strong inflow associated with surface friction and below the outflow layer in the upper troposphere. From the perspective of a steady and layer-wise horizontal flow model, the eyewall is well protected from the intrusion of environmental air. In order for the environmental air to intrude into the inner-core convection, time-dependent and/or vertical motions, which are prevalent in the TC inner-core, are necessary. Air with the highest values of moist-entropy resides within the limit cycle. This "moist envelope" is distorted considerably by the imposed vertical wind shear, and the shape of the moist envelope is closely related to the shape of the limit cycle. In a first approximation, the distribution of high- and low-θe air around the TC at low to mid-levels is governed by the stirring of convectively modified air by the steady, horizontal flow. Motivated by the results from the idealized numerical experiment, an analogue model based on a weakly

  7. Modeling shear instability and fracture in dynamically deformed Al/W granular composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olney, Karl; Benson, David; Nesterenko, Vitali F.

    2012-03-01

    Aluminum/Tungsten granular composites are materials which combine high density and strength with bulk distributed fracture of Al matrix into small particles under impact or shock loading. They are processed using cold and hot isostatic pressing of W particles/rods in the matrix of Al powder. Numerical models were used to elucidate the dynamic behavior of these materials under dynamic conditions simulating low velocity high energy impact in drop weight test (10 m/s). It was demonstrated that arrangement of W components and bonding between Al particles dramatically affect the samples shear localization and mode of fracture of the Al matrix in agreement with experiments.

  8. Magnetic fabric of sheared till: A strain indicator for evaluating the bed deformation model of glacier flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooyer, T.S.; Iverson, N.R.; Lagroix, F.; Thomason, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    Wet-based portions of ice sheets may move primarily by shearing their till beds, resting in high sediment fluxes and the development of subglacial landforms. This model of glacier movement, which requires high bed shear strains, can be tested using till microstructural characteristics that evolve during till deformation. Here we examine the development of magnetic fabric using a ring shear device to defom two Wisconsin-age basal tills to shear strains as high as 70. Hysteresis experiments and the dependence of magnetic susceptibility of these tills on temperature demonstrate that anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) develops during shear due to the rotation of primarily magnetite particles that are silt sized or smaller. At moderate shear strains (???6-25), principal axes of maximum magnetic susceptibility develop a strong fabric (S1 eignevalues of 0.83-0.96), without further strengthening at higher strains, During deformation, directions of maximum susceptibility cluster strongly in the direction of shear and plunge 'up-glacier,' consistent with the behavior of pebbles and sand particles studied in earlier experiments. In contrast, the magnitude of AMS does not vary systematically with strain and is small relative to its variability among samples; this is because most magnetite grains are contained as inclusions in larger particles and hence do not align during shear. Although processes other than pervasive bed deformation may result in strong flow parallel fabrics, AMS fabrics provide a rapid and objective means of identifying basal tills that have not been sheared sufficiently to be compatible with the bed deformation model. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Normal and Fibrotic Rat Livers Demonstrate Shear Strain Softening and Compression Stiffening: A Model for Soft Tissue Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xuan; van Oosten, Anne; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Janmey, Paul A.; Wells, Rebecca G.

    2016-01-01

    Tissues including liver stiffen and acquire more extracellular matrix with fibrosis. The relationship between matrix content and stiffness, however, is non-linear, and stiffness is only one component of tissue mechanics. The mechanical response of tissues such as liver to physiological stresses is not well described, and models of tissue mechanics are limited. To better understand the mechanics of the normal and fibrotic rat liver, we carried out a series of studies using parallel plate rheometry, measuring the response to compressive, extensional, and shear strains. We found that the shear storage and loss moduli G’ and G” and the apparent Young's moduli measured by uniaxial strain orthogonal to the shear direction increased markedly with both progressive fibrosis and increasing compression, that livers shear strain softened, and that significant increases in shear modulus with compressional stress occurred within a range consistent with increased sinusoidal pressures in liver disease. Proteoglycan content and integrin-matrix interactions were significant determinants of liver mechanics, particularly in compression. We propose a new non-linear constitutive model of the liver. A key feature of this model is that, while it assumes overall liver incompressibility, it takes into account water flow and solid phase compressibility. In sum, we report a detailed study of non-linear liver mechanics under physiological strains in the normal state, early fibrosis, and late fibrosis. We propose a constitutive model that captures compression stiffening, tension softening, and shear softening, and can be understood in terms of the cellular and matrix components of the liver. PMID:26735954

  10. Normal and Fibrotic Rat Livers Demonstrate Shear Strain Softening and Compression Stiffening: A Model for Soft Tissue Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Perepelyuk, Maryna; Chin, LiKang; Cao, Xuan; van Oosten, Anne; Shenoy, Vivek B; Janmey, Paul A; Wells, Rebecca G

    2016-01-01

    Tissues including liver stiffen and acquire more extracellular matrix with fibrosis. The relationship between matrix content and stiffness, however, is non-linear, and stiffness is only one component of tissue mechanics. The mechanical response of tissues such as liver to physiological stresses is not well described, and models of tissue mechanics are limited. To better understand the mechanics of the normal and fibrotic rat liver, we carried out a series of studies using parallel plate rheometry, measuring the response to compressive, extensional, and shear strains. We found that the shear storage and loss moduli G' and G" and the apparent Young's moduli measured by uniaxial strain orthogonal to the shear direction increased markedly with both progressive fibrosis and increasing compression, that livers shear strain softened, and that significant increases in shear modulus with compressional stress occurred within a range consistent with increased sinusoidal pressures in liver disease. Proteoglycan content and integrin-matrix interactions were significant determinants of liver mechanics, particularly in compression. We propose a new non-linear constitutive model of the liver. A key feature of this model is that, while it assumes overall liver incompressibility, it takes into account water flow and solid phase compressibility. In sum, we report a detailed study of non-linear liver mechanics under physiological strains in the normal state, early fibrosis, and late fibrosis. We propose a constitutive model that captures compression stiffening, tension softening, and shear softening, and can be understood in terms of the cellular and matrix components of the liver. PMID:26735954

  11. Material Models to Study the Bauschinger Effect on an Aluminum Shear Test Specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, Rui P. R.; Gracio, Jose J.; Yoon, Jeong-Whan

    2007-05-17

    Sheet metal forming processes generally involve complex loadings and nonlinear material models. Combinations of drawing, re-drawing and/or reverse drawing operations commonly induce cyclic loads with non-proportional strain paths, leading to Bauschinger effects that can not be predicted by conventional isotropic hardening laws. In order to properly represent this effect, it is also required to accommodate an appropriate kinematic hardening model along with an anisotropic yield function. In this work, two different approaches will be used to predict the Bauschinger effect for an Aluminum shear test specimen: the rate dependent crystal plasticity model and a new combined isotropic/kinematic hardening model based on the two yield surfaces approach (loading and boundary yield surfaces), as recently proposed.

  12. X-Ray Scattering Investigation of Molecular Orientation During Shear Flow in Model Thermotropic Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugaz, V. M.; Burghardt, W. R.

    1998-03-01

    We describe the use of in-situ x-ray scattering techniques to directly measure the influence of flow on molecular orientation in two different model thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs). These model materials, one a polyester and the other a polyether, are both composed of rigid mesogens randomly copolymerized with flexible spacer chains of two different lengths. This architecture provides both LCPs with an accessible isotropic transition temperature, thereby allowing a well-defined thermal history to be established prior to application of shear flow. We present measurements of molecular orientation in steady shear flow, during relaxation after cessation of shear flow, and in the transient periods during shear flow inception and reversal. These results are then compared with corresponding rheological data, providing a unique opportunity to directly correlate structural and rheological behavior in each material as well as between materials.

  13. Comparison of lumped-element and transmission-line models for thickness-shear-mode quartz resonator sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Cernosek, R.W.; Martin, S.J.; Hillman, A.R.

    1997-08-01

    Both a transmission-line model and its simpler variant, a lumped-element model, can be used to predict the responses of a thickness-shear-mode quartz resonator sensor. Relative deviations in the parameters computed by the two models (shifts in resonant frequency and motional resistance) do not exceed 3% for most practical sensor configurations operating at the fundamental resonance. If the ratio of the load surface mechanical impedance to the quartz shear characteristic impedance does not exceed 0.1, the lumped-element model always predicts responses within 1% of those for the transmission-line model.

  14. A simple lattice model for the effect of voids on slip avalanches in sheared granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, K.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Uhl, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    It is well known that densely packed granular materials respond to slow shear with slip avalanches. Experiments and simulations show that the avalanche statistics depend strongly on the granular volume fraction v and grain shape related properties [1]. Previous studies have focused on force chain properties [2-6]. Here we use a mean field technique to construct an analytic model of the universal (i.e. detail-independent) slip avalanche statistics. For large v, and small frictional weakening ɛ, the model predicts solid-like behavior, with power-law avalanche size distributions and universal exponents and scaling functions. For large v and large ɛ it predicts mode switching between stick slip behavior and power law avalanche size distributions. For small v it predicts fluid-like flow. The results are presented in a (v, ɛ) phase diagram. They agree with published experiments [6-10] and simulations [2-4]. They complement recent studies on static properties, such as the shear modulus as a function of v near the jamming transition [2-4,7-10]. References: [1] V. Frette et al., “Avalanche Dynamics in a Pile of Rice”, Nature 379, 49-52 (1996). [2] E. Aharonov and D. Sparks, “Rigidity phase transition in granular packings”, Phys. Rev E, 60, 6890-6896 (1999). [3] E. Aharonov and D. Sparks, “Stick-slip motion in simulated granular layers”, J. Geophys. Res, 109, B09306 (2004). [4] E. Aharonov and D. Sparks, “Shear profiles and localization in simulations of granular materials”, Phys. Rev. E 65, 051302/1-12 (2002). [5] M.E. Cates, J.P. Wittmer, J.-P. Bouchaud, and P. Claudin, “Jamming, Force Chains, and Fragile Matter”, Phys. Rev. Lett., 81, 1841 (1998) and references therein. [6

  15. Non-Newtonian rheological properties of shearing nematic liquid crystal model systems based on the Gay-Berne potential.

    PubMed

    Sarman, Sten; Wang, Yong-Lei; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2015-07-01

    The viscosities and normal stress differences of various liquid crystal model systems based on the Gay-Berne potential have been obtained as functions of the shear rate in the non-Newtonian regime. Various molecular shapes such as regular convex calamitic and discotic ellipsoids and non-convex shapes such as bent core molecules and soft ellipsoid strings have been examined. The isotropic phases were found to be shear thinning with the shear rate dependence of the viscosity following a power law in the same way as alkanes and other non-spherical molecules. The nematic phases turned out to be shear thinning but the logarithm of the viscosity proved to be an approximately linear function of the square root of the shear rate. The normal stress differences were found to display a more or less parabolic dependence on the shear rate in the isotropic phase whereas this dependence was linear at low to intermediate shear rates in the nematic phase. PMID:26055543

  16. Crossover between entropic and interfacial elasticity and osmotic pressure in uniform disordered emulsions.

    PubMed

    Mason, Thomas G; Scheffold, Frank

    2014-09-28

    We develop a simple predictive model of the osmotic pressure Π and linear shear elastic modulus G of uniform disordered emulsions that includes energetic contributions from entropy and interfacial deformation. This model yields a smooth crossover between an entropically dominated G ∼ kBT/a(3) for droplet volume fractions ϕ below a jamming threshold for spheres, ϕc, and an interfacially dominated G ∼ σ/a for ϕ above ϕc, where a and σ are the undeformed radius and interfacial tension, respectively, of a droplet and T is the temperature. We show that this model reduces to the known ϕ-dependent jamming behavior G(ϕ) ∼ (σ/a)ϕ(ϕ - ϕc) as T → 0 for ϕ > ϕc of disordered uniform emulsions, and it also produces the known divergence for disordered hard spheres G(ϕ) ∼ (kBT/a(3))ϕ/(ϕc - ϕ) for ϕ < ϕc when σ → ∞. We compare predictions of this model to data for disordered uniform microscale emulsion droplets, corrected for electrostatic repulsions. The smooth crossover captures the observed trends in G and Π below ϕc better than existing analytic models of disordered emulsions, which do not make predictions below ϕc. Moreover, the model predicts that entropic contributions to the shear modulus can become more significant for nanoemulsions as compared to microscale emulsions. PMID:25111129

  17. Effects of shear and rotation on the spherical collapse model for clustering dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Francesco; Batista, Ronaldo C.; Del Popolo, Antonino

    2014-11-01

    In the framework of the spherical collapse model, we study the influence of shear and rotation terms for dark matter fluid in clustering dark energy models. We evaluate, for different equations of state, the effects of these terms on the linear overdensity threshold parameter, δc, and on the virial overdensity, ΔV. The evaluation of their effects on δc allows us to infer the modifications occurring on the mass function. Due to ambiguities in the definition of the halo mass in the case of clustering dark energy, we consider two different situations: the first is the classical one where the mass is of the dark matter halo only, while the second one is given by the sum of the mass of dark matter and dark energy. As previously found, the spherical collapse model becomes mass dependent and the two additional terms oppose the collapse of the perturbations, especially on galactic scales, with respect to the spherical non-rotating model, while on cluster scales the effects of shear and rotation become negligible. The values for δc and ΔV are higher than the standard spherical model. Regarding the effects of the additional non-linear terms on the mass function, we evaluate the number density of haloes. As expected, major differences appear at high masses and redshifts. In particular, quintessence (phantom) models predict more (less) objects with respect to the Λ colddarkmatter model, and the mass correction due to the contribution of the dark energy component has negligible effects on the overall number of structures.

  18. Turbulence Modeling Effects on the Prediction of Equilibrium States of Buoyant Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, C. Y.; So, R. M. C.; Gatski, T. B.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of turbulence modeling on the prediction of equilibrium states of turbulent buoyant shear flows were investigated. The velocity field models used include a two-equation closure, a Reynolds-stress closure assuming two different pressure-strain models and three different dissipation rate tensor models. As for the thermal field closure models, two different pressure-scrambling models and nine different temperature variance dissipation rate, Epsilon(0) equations were considered. The emphasis of this paper is focused on the effects of the Epsilon(0)-equation, of the dissipation rate models, of the pressure-strain models and of the pressure-scrambling models on the prediction of the approach to equilibrium turbulence. Equilibrium turbulence is defined by the time rate (if change of the scaled Reynolds stress anisotropic tensor and heat flux vector becoming zero. These conditions lead to the equilibrium state parameters. Calculations show that the Epsilon(0)-equation has a significant effect on the prediction of the approach to equilibrium turbulence. For a particular Epsilon(0)-equation, all velocity closure models considered give an equilibrium state if anisotropic dissipation is accounted for in one form or another in the dissipation rate tensor or in the Epsilon(0)-equation. It is further found that the models considered for the pressure-strain tensor and the pressure-scrambling vector have little or no effect on the prediction of the approach to equilibrium turbulence.

  19. Extending the ΛCDM model through shear-free anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Thiago S.; Pabon, Davincy T.

    2016-07-01

    If the spacetime metric has anisotropic spatial curvature, one can still expand the universe as if it were isotropic, provided that the energy-momentum tensor satisfies a certain constraint. This leads to the so-called shear-free (SF) metrics, which have the interesting property of violating the cosmological principle while still preserving the isotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. In this work, we show that SF cosmologies correspond to an attractor solution in the space of models with anisotropic spatial curvature. Through a rigorous definition of linear perturbation theory in these spacetimes, we show that SF models represent a viable alternative to explain the large-scale evolution of the universe, leading, in particular to a kinematically equivalent Sachs-Wolfe (SW) effect. Alternatively, we discuss some specific signatures that SF models would imprint on the temperature spectrum of CMB.

  20. Bifurcation and stability in a model of moist convection in a shearing environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirer, H. N.

    1980-01-01

    The truncated spectral system (model I) of shallow moist two-dimensional convection discussed by Shirer and Dutton (1979) is expanded to eleven coefficients (model II) in order to include a basic wind. Cloud streets, the atmospheric analog of the solutions to model II, are typically observed in an environment containing a shearing basic motion field. Analysis of the branching behavior of solutions to mode II shows that, if the basic wind direction varies with height, very complex temporal behavior is possible as the modified Rayleigh number HR is increased sufficiently. The first convective solution is periodic, corresponding to a cloud band that propagates downwind; but secondary branching to a two-dimensional torus can occur for larger values of HR. Orientation band formulas are derived whose predictions generally agree with the results of previous studies.

  1. The effect of shear flow on nanoparticle agglomeration and deposition in in vitro dynamic flow models.

    PubMed

    Grabinski, Christin; Sharma, Monita; Maurer, Elizabeth; Sulentic, Courtney; Mohan Sankaran, R; Hussain, Saber

    2016-01-01

    Traditional in vitro toxicity experiments typically involve exposure of a mono- or co-culture of cells to nanoparticles (NPs) in static conditions with the assumption of 100% deposition (i.e. dose) of well-dispersed particles. However, cellular dose can be affected by agglomeration and the unique transport kinetics of NPs in biological media. We hypothesize that shear flow can address these issues and achieve more predictable dosage. Here, we compare the behavior of gold NPs with diameters of 5, 10 and 30 nm in static and dynamic in vitro models. We also utilize transport modeling to approximate the shear rate experienced by the cells in dynamic conditions to evaluate physiological relevance. The transport kinetics show that NP behavior is governed by both gravity and diffusion forces in static conditions and only diffusion in dynamic conditions. Our results reveal that dynamic systems are capable of producing a more predictable dose compared to static systems, which has strong implications for improving repeatability in nanotoxicity assessments. PMID:25961858

  2. Constitutive model for shear yield stress of magnetorheological fluid based on the concept of state transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela-Jiménez, M. I.; Vargas Luna, J. L.; Cortés-Ramírez, J. A.; Song, G.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetorheological fluid (MRF) is a smart material whose rheological properties can be varied by a magnetic field; it has been applied in the development of semiactive dampers for a variety of applications. The material essentially consists of a suspension of magnetic particles in a nonmagnetic carrier fluid. It is important to understand the magnetic response of MRF and its dependence on several parameters for improving and designing MRF devices. The purpose of this work is to develop a constitutive model that describes the behavior of the shear yield stress of the material as function of the magnetic field and composition. Taking into account that the material changes its rheology and apparent viscosity according to magnetic field, a magnetically induced state transition is proposed; by the use of a state transition equation, a constitutive model for shear yield stress is defined, consisting of an expression that relates composition of the material and the stimulus applied, it also associates the volume fraction of particles, magnetic field and the material that composes the particles.

  3. Microarray analysis identifies Salmonella genes belonging to the low-shear modeled microgravity regulon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James W.; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Hammond, Timothy; Allen, Pat; Ott, C. Mark; Pierson, Duane L.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2002-01-01

    The low-shear environment of optimized rotation suspension culture allows both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells to assume physiologically relevant phenotypes that have led to significant advances in fundamental investigations of medical and biological importance. This culture environment has also been used to model microgravity for ground-based studies regarding the impact of space flight on eukaryotic and prokaryotic physiology. We have previously demonstrated that low-shear modeled microgravity (LSMMG) under optimized rotation suspension culture is a novel environmental signal that regulates the virulence, stress resistance, and protein expression levels of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. However, the mechanisms used by the cells of any species, including Salmonella, to sense and respond to LSMMG and identities of the genes involved are unknown. In this study, we used DNA microarrays to elucidate the global transcriptional response of Salmonella to LSMMG. When compared with identical growth conditions under normal gravity (1 x g), LSMMG differentially regulated the expression of 163 genes distributed throughout the chromosome, representing functionally diverse groups including transcriptional regulators, virulence factors, lipopolysaccharide biosynthetic enzymes, iron-utilization enzymes, and proteins of unknown function. Many of the LSMMG-regulated genes were organized in clusters or operons. The microarray results were further validated by RT-PCR and phenotypic analyses, and they indicate that the ferric uptake regulator is involved in the LSMMG response. The results provide important insight about the Salmonella LSMMG response and could provide clues for the functioning of known Salmonella virulence systems or the identification of uncharacterized bacterial virulence strategies.

  4. Use of self-assembled monolayers to control interface bonding in a model study of interfacial fracture

    SciTech Connect

    KENT,MICHAEL S.; YIM,HYUN; MATHESON,AARON J.; COGDILL,C.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID

    2000-03-02

    The relationship between the nature and spatial distribution of fundamental interfacial interactions and fracture stress/fracture toughness of a glassy adhesive-inorganic solid joint is not understood. This relationship is important from the standpoint of designing interfacial chemistry sufficient to provide the level of mechanical strength required for a particular application. In addition, it is also important for understanding the effects of surface contamination. Different types of contamination, or different levels of contamination, likely impact joint strength in different ways. Furthermore, the relationship is also important from the standpoint of aging. If interfacial chemical bonds scission over time due to the presence of a contaminant such as water, or exposure to UV, etc, the relationship between joint strength/fracture toughness and interface strength is important for predicting reliability with time. A fundamental understanding of the relationship between joint strength and fundamental interfacial interactions will give insight into these issues.

  5. A robust macroscopic model for normal–shear coupling, asymmetric and anisotropic behaviors of polycrystalline SMAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodaghi, M.; Damanpack, A. R.; Liao, W. H.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this article is to develop a robust macroscopic bi-axial model to capture self-accommodation, martensitic transformation/orientation/reorientation, normal–shear deformation coupling and asymmetric/anisotropic strain generation in polycrystalline shape memory alloys. By considering the volume fraction of martensite and its preferred direction as scalar and directional internal variables, constitutive relations are derived to describe basic mechanisms of accommodation, transformation and orientation/reorientation of martensite variants. A new definition is introduced for maximum recoverable strain, which allows the model to capture the effects of tension–compression asymmetry and transformation anisotropy. Furthermore, the coupling effects between normal and shear deformation modes are considered by merging inelastic strain components together. By introducing a calibration approach, material and kinetic parameters of the model are recast in terms of common quantities that characterize a uniaxial phase kinetic diagram. The solution algorithm of the model is presented based on an elastic-predictor inelastic-corrector return mapping process. In order to explore and demonstrate capabilities of the proposed model, theoretical predictions are first compared with existing experimental results on uniaxial tension, compression, torsion and combined tension–torsion tests. Afterwards, experimental results of uniaxial tension, compression, pure bending and buckling tests on {{NiTi}} rods and tubes are replicated by implementing a finite element method along with the Newton–Raphson and Riks techniques to trace non-linear equilibrium path. A good qualitative and quantitative correlation is observed between numerical and experimental results, which verifies the accuracy of the model and the solution procedure.

  6. Large Eddy simulation of turbulence: A subgrid scale model including shear, vorticity, rotation, and buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.

    1994-06-01

    The Reynolds numbers that characterize geophysical and astrophysical turbulence (Re approximately equals 108 for the planetary boundary layer and Re approximately equals 1014 for the Sun's interior) are too large to allow a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the fundamental Navier-Stokes and temperature equations. In fact, the spatial number of grid points N approximately Re9/4 exceeds the computational capability of today's supercomputers. Alternative treatments are the ensemble-time average approach, and/or the volume average approach. Since the first method (Reynolds stress approach) is largely analytical, the resulting turbulence equations entail manageable computational requirements and can thus be linked to a stellar evolutionary code or, in the geophysical case, to general circulation models. In the volume average approach, one carries out a large eddy simulation (LES) which resolves numerically the largest scales, while the unresolved scales must be treated theoretically with a subgrid scale model (SGS). Contrary to the ensemble average approach, the LES+SGS approach has considerable computational requirements. Even if this prevents (for the time being) a LES+SGS model to be linked to stellar or geophysical codes, it is still of the greatest relevance as an 'experimental tool' to be used, inter alia, to improve the parameterizations needed in the ensemble average approach. Such a methodology has been successfully adopted in studies of the convective planetary boundary layer. Experienc e with the LES+SGS approach from different fields has shown that its reliability depends on the healthiness of the SGS model for numerical stability as well as for physical completeness. At present, the most widely used SGS model, the Smagorinsky model, accounts for the effect of the shear induced by the large resolved scales on the unresolved scales but does not account for the effects of buoyancy, anisotropy, rotation, and stable stratification. The latter phenomenon

  7. Avalanche weak layer shear fracture parameters from the cohesive crack model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClung, David

    2014-05-01

    Dry slab avalanches release by mode II shear fracture within thin weak layers under cohesive snow slabs. The important fracture parameters include: nominal shear strength, mode II fracture toughness and mode II fracture energy. Alpine snow is not an elastic material unless the rate of deformation is very high. For natural avalanche release, it would not be possible that the fracture parameters can be considered as from classical fracture mechanics from an elastic framework. The strong rate dependence of alpine snow implies that it is a quasi-brittle material (Bažant et al., 2003) with an important size effect on nominal shear strength. Further, the rate of deformation for release of an avalanche is unknown, so it is not possible to calculate the fracture parameters for avalanche release from any model which requires the effective elastic modulus. The cohesive crack model does not require the modulus to be known to estimate the fracture energy. In this paper, the cohesive crack model was used to calculate the mode II fracture energy as a function of a brittleness number and nominal shear strength values calculated from slab avalanche fracture line data (60 with natural triggers; 191 with a mix of triggers). The brittleness number models the ratio of the approximate peak value of shear strength to nominal shear strength. A high brittleness number (> 10) represents large size relative to fracture process zone (FPZ) size and the implications of LEFM (Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics). A low brittleness number (e.g. 0.1) represents small sample size and primarily plastic response. An intermediate value (e.g. 5) implies non-linear fracture mechanics with intermediate relative size. The calculations also implied effective values for the modulus and the critical shear fracture toughness as functions of the brittleness number. The results showed that the effective mode II fracture energy may vary by two orders of magnitude for alpine snow with median values ranging from 0

  8. Using Local Second Gradient Model and Shear Strain Localisation to Model the Excavation Damaged Zone in Unsaturated Claystone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoen, Benoît; Levasseur, Séverine; Collin, Frédéric

    2015-03-01

    The drilling of galleries induces damage propagation in the surrounding medium and creates, around them, the excavation damaged zone (EDZ). The prediction of the extension and fracture structure of this zone remains a major issue, especially in the context of underground nuclear waste storage. Experimental studies on geomaterials indicate that localised deformation in shear band mode usually appears prior to fractures. Thus, the excavation damaged zone can be modelled by considering the development of shear strain localisation bands. In the classical finite element framework, strain localisation suffers a mesh-dependency problem. Therefore, an enhanced model with a regularisation method is required to correctly model the strain localisation behaviour. Among the existing methods, we choose the coupled local second gradient model. We extend it to unsaturated conditions and we include the solid grain compressibility. Furthermore, air ventilation inside underground galleries engenders a rock-atmosphere interaction that could influence the damaged zone. This interaction has to be investigated in order to predict the damaged zone behaviour. Finally, a hydro-mechanical modelling of a gallery excavation in claystone is presented and leads to a fairly good representation of the EDZ. The main objectives of this study are to model the fractures by considering shear strain localisation bands, and to investigate if an isotropic model accurately reproduces the in situ measurements. The numerical results provide information about the damaged zone extension, structure and behaviour that are in very good agreement with in situ measurements and observations. For instance, the strain localisation bands that develop in chevron pattern during the excavation and rock desaturation, due to air ventilation, are observed close to the gallery.

  9. Anisotropic shear-wave velocity structure of the Earth's mantle: A global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustowski, B.; EkströM, G.; DziewońSki, A. M.

    2008-06-01

    We combine a new, large data set of surface wave phase anomalies, long-period waveforms, and body wave travel times to construct a three-dimensional model of the anisotropic shear wave velocity in the Earth's mantle. Our modeling approach is improved and more comprehensive compared to our earlier studies and involves the development and implementation of a new spherically symmetric reference model, simultaneous inversion for velocity and anisotropy, as well as discontinuity topographies, and implementation of nonlinear crustal corrections for waveforms. A comparison of our new three-dimensional model, S362ANI, with two other models derived from comparable data sets but using different techniques reveals persistent features: (1) strong, ˜200-km-thick, high-velocity anomalies beneath cratons, likely representing the continental lithosphere, underlain by weaker, fast anomalies extending below 250 km, which may represent continental roots, (2) weak velocity heterogeneity between 250 and 400 km depths, (3) fast anomalies extending horizontally up to 2000-3000 km in the mantle transition zone beneath subduction zones, (4) lack of strong long-wavelength heterogeneity below 650 km suggesting inhibiting character of the upper mantle-lower mantle boundary, and (5) slow-velocity superplumes beneath the Pacific and Africa. The shear wave radial anisotropy is strongest at 120 km depth, in particular beneath the central Pacific. Lateral anisotropic variations appreciably improve the fit to data that are predominantly sensitive to the uppermost and lowermost mantle but not to the waveforms that control the transition zone and midmantle depths. Tradeoffs between lateral variations in velocity and anisotropy are negligible in the uppermost mantle but noticeable at the bottom of the mantle.

  10. [Modeling formation of aerobic granule and influence of hydrodynamic shear forces on granule diameter].

    PubMed

    Dong, Feng; Zhang, Han-Min; Yang, Feng-Lin

    2012-01-01

    A one-dimension aerobic granule mathematical model was established, basing on mathematical biofilm model and activated sludge model. The model was used to simulate simple aerobic granule process such as nutrients removal, granule diameter evolution, cycle performance as well as depth profiles of DO and biomass. The effluent NH4(+) -N concentration decreased as the modeling processed. The simulation effluent NO3(-)-N concentration decreased to 3 mg x L(-1) as the granules grew. While the granule diameter increased from 1.1 mm on day 30 to 2.5 mm on day 100, the TN removal efficiency increased from less than 10% to 91%. The denitrification capacity was believed to enhance because the anoxic zone would be enlarged with the increasing granule diameter. The simultaneous nitrification and denitrification occurred inside the big aerobic granules. The oxygen permeating depth increased with the consumption of substrate. It was about 100-200 microm at the beginning of the aeration phase, and it turned to near 800 microm at the end of reaction. The autotrophs (AOB and NOB) were mostly located at the out layer where the DO concentration was high. The heterotrophic bacteria were distributed through the whole granule. As hydrodynamic shear coefficient k(de) increased from 0.25 (m x d)(-1) to 5 (m x d)(-1), the granule diameter under steady state decreased form 3.5 mm to 1.8 mm. The granule size under the dynamic steady-state decreased with the increasing hydrodynamic shear force. The granule size could be controlled by adjusting aeration intensity. PMID:22452208

  11. Pore-Scale Modeling of Non-Newtonian Shear-Thinning Fluids in Blood Oxygenator Design.

    PubMed

    Low, Kenny W Q; van Loon, Raoul; Rolland, Samuel A; Sienz, Johann

    2016-05-01

    This paper reviews and further develops pore-scale computational flow modeling techniques used for creeping flow through orthotropic fiber bundles used in blood oxygenators. Porous model significantly reduces geometrical complexity by taking a homogenization approach to model the fiber bundles. This significantly simplifies meshing and can avoid large time-consuming simulations. Analytical relationships between permeability and porosity exist for Newtonian flow through regular arrangements of fibers and are commonly used in macroscale porous models by introducing a Darcy viscous term in the flow momentum equations. To this extent, verification of analytical Newtonian permeability-porosity relationships has been conducted for parallel and transverse flow through square and staggered arrangements of fibers. Similar procedures are then used to determine the permeability-porosity relationship for non-Newtonian blood. The results demonstrate that modeling non-Newtonian shear-thinning fluids in porous media can be performed via a generalized Darcy equation with a porous medium viscosity decomposed into a constant term and a directional expression through least squares fitting. This concept is then investigated for various non-Newtonian blood viscosity models. The proposed methodology is conducted with two different porous model approaches, homogeneous and heterogeneous, and validated against a high-fidelity model. The results of the heterogeneous porous model approach yield improved pressure and velocity distribution which highlights the importance of wall effects. PMID:26902524

  12. A Threshold Shear Force for Calcium Influx in an Astrocyte Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Maneshi, Mohammad Mehdi; Sachs, Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) refers to brain damage resulting from external mechanical force, such as a blast or crash. Our current understanding of TBI is derived mainly from in vivo studies that show measurable biological effects on neurons sampled after TBI. Little is known about the early responses of brain cells during stimuli and which features of the stimulus are most critical to cell injury. We generated defined shear stress in a microfluidic chamber using a fast pressure servo and examined the intracellular Ca2+ levels in cultured adult astrocytes. Shear stress increased intracellular Ca2+ depending on the magnitude, duration, and rise time of the stimulus. Square pulses with a fast rise time (∼2 ms) caused transient increases in intracellular Ca2+, but when the rise time was extended to 20 ms, the response was much less. The threshold for a response is a matrix of multiple parameters. Cells can integrate the effect of shear force from repeated challenges: A pulse train of 10 narrow pulses (11.5 dyn/cm2 and 10 ms wide) resulted in a 4-fold increase in Ca2+ relative to a single pulse of the same amplitude 100 ms wide. The Ca2+ increase was eliminated in Ca2+-free media, but was observed after depleting the intracellular Ca2+ stores with thapsigargin suggesting the need for a Ca2+ influx. The Ca2+ influx was inhibited by extracellular Gd3+, a nonspecific inhibitor of mechanosensitive ion channels, but it was not affected by the more specific inhibitor, GsMTx4. The voltage-gated channel blockers, nifedipine, diltiazem, and verapamil, were also ineffective. The data show that the mechanically induced Ca2+ influx commonly associated with neuron models for TBI is also present in astrocytes, and there is a viscoelastic/plastic coupling of shear stress to the Ca2+ influx. The site of Ca2+ influx has yet to be determined. PMID:25442327

  13. Auriferous mineralization in some shear-zones: A three-stage model of metallogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnemaison, M.; Marcoux, E.

    1990-05-01

    Studies of numerous shear zones hosting auriferous quartz veins suggest a three-stage model of formation for such veins. These stages are indicative of the progressive increase of the gold concentration with the evolution of the shear zone and comprise an early stage with “invisible” gold, an intermediate stage with finegrained gold, and a late stage with gold nuggets. The early stage, consisting of two consecutive episodes, comprises the development of the shear zone sensu stricto which results in the formation of a structure characterized by mylonite. This structure subsequently acts as a drain for hydrothermal fluids. Under the combined action of deformation and hydrothermal circulation, the rocks in this structure undergo mineralogical transformations that depend on the initial composition of the rock. These phenomena occur with increasing intensity towards the cores of the structures, the sites of substantial silicification and sulfidation. Gold is first fixed in the crystal lattice of pyrrhotite (up to 30 ppm of gold), disseminated throughout the structure as a whole. In the core, it is destabilized to pyrite-marcasite during the second episode of this early stage and the gold thus freed is trapped in the lattice of locally abundant ferriferous sulfides: pyrite, arsenopyrite (up to 1.6 wt% gold), and berthierite. At the intermediate stage, again consisting of two consecutive episodes, the shear zone can generate openings, allowing the emplacement of lenses and veins of milky white quartz. When these various veins are in turn crushed by continuing tectonic activity, microsaccharoidal quartz forms by cataclasis, and acts as a “receptacle” for the gold mineralization. Therefore textbook “auriferous quartz veins” are only one particular aspect of this stage, characterized by the appearance of visible native gold caused by destabilization of the auriferous sulfides of the early stage. This gold is generally very fine-grained (several micrometres) and

  14. Comparative growth, cross stress resistance, transcriptomics of Streptococcus pyogenes cultured under low shear modeled microgravity and normal gravity

    PubMed Central

    Kalpana, Duraisamy; Im, Chanki; Lee, Yang Soo

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is commonly found on pharynx, mouth and rarely on skin, lower gastrointestinal tract. It is a potential pathogen causing tonsillitis, pneumonia, endocarditis. The present study was undertaken to study the effects of low shear modeled microgravity on growth, morphology, antibiotic resistance, cross-stress resistance to various stresses and alteration in gene expression of S. pyogenes. The growth analysis performed using UV–Visible spectroscopy indicated decrease in growth of S. pyogenes under low shear modeled microgravity. Morphological analysis by Bio-transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Bio-scanning electron microscopy (SEM) did not reveal much difference between normal and low shear modeled microgravity grown S. pyogenes. The sensitivity of S. pyogenes to antibiotics ampicillin, penicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, hygromycin, rifampicin indicates that the bacterium is resistant to hygromycin. Further S. pyogenes cultured under low shear modeled microgravity was found to be more sensitive to ampicillin and rifampicin as compared with normal gravity grown S. pyogenes. The bacteria were tested for the acid, osmotic, temperature and oxidative cross stress resistances. The gene expression of S. pyogenes under low shear modeled microgravity analyzed by microarray revealed upregulation of 26 genes and down regulation of 22 genes by a fold change of 1.5. PMID:26858535

  15. Mimicking mussel adhesion to improve interfacial properties in composites

    PubMed Central

    Hamming, L. M.; Fan, X. W.; Messersmith, P. B.; Brinson, L. C.

    2009-01-01

    The macroscale properties of polymer-matrix composites depend immensely on the quality of the interaction between the reinforcement phase and the bulk polymer. This work presents a method to improve the interfacial adhesion between metal-oxides and a polymer matrix by performing surface-initiated polymerization (SIP) by way of a biomimetic initiator. The initiator was modeled after 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (dopa), an amino acid that is highly concentrated in mussel foot adhesive proteins. Mechanical pull out tests of NiTi and Ti-6Al-4V wires from poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were performed to directly test the interfacial adhesion. These tests demonstrated improvements in maximum interfacial shear stress of 116% for SIP-modified NiTi wires and 60% for SIP-modified Ti-6Al-4V wires over unmodified specimens. Polymer chain growth from the metal oxides was validated using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), ellipsometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and contact angle analysis. PMID:19578545

  16. Interfacial stress transfer in a graphene nanosheet toughened hydroxyapatite composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. G.; Chen, Y.; Su, J. N.; Liu, W. W.; Zhang, T. H.; Qi, F.; Wang, Y. G.

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, graphene has emerged as potential reinforcing nanofiller in the composites for structural engineering due to its extraordinary high elastic modulus and mechanical strength. As recognized, the transfer of stress from a low modulus matrix to a high-modulus reinforcing graphene and the interfacial behavior at a graphene-matrix interface is the fundamental issue in these composites. In the case of graphene nanosheet (GNS) reinforced hydroxyapatite (HA) composite, this research presented analytical models and simulated that the number of graphene layers of GNSs has little effect on the maximum axial stress (˜0.35 GPa) and the maximum shear stress (˜0.14 GPa) at a GNS-HA interface, and the energy dissipation by GNS pull-out decreases with increasing the number of graphene layers due to weak bonding between them. Also, GNS-HA interfacial delamination and/or GNS rupture were also indentified to be the two key failure mechanisms. The computed results are expected to facilitate a better understanding of the interfacial behavior at a GNS-ceramic interface and to achieve tough ceramics reinforced with GNSs.

  17. Estimation of shear stress in counter-current gas-liquid annular two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Yutaka; Akimoto, Hajime; Murao, Yoshio

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy of the correlations of the friction factor is important for the counter-current flow (CCF) analysis with two-fluid model. However, existing two fluid model codes use the correlations of friction factors for co-current flow or correlation developed based on the assumption of no wall shear stress. The assessment calculation for two fluid model code with those existing correlations of friction factors shows the falling water flow rate is overestimated. Analytical model is developed to calculate the shear stress distribution in water film at CCF in order to get the information on the shear stress at the interface and the wall. The analytical results with the analysis model and Bharathan's CCF data shows that the wall shear stress acting on the falling water film is almost the same order as the interfacial shear stress and the correlations for co-current flow cannot be applied to the counter-current flow. Tentative correlations of the interfacial and the wall friction factors are developed based on the results of the present study.

  18. Channel flow of a tensorial shear-thinning Maxwell model: Lattice Boltzmann simulations.

    PubMed

    Papenkort, S; Voigtmann, Th

    2014-04-28

    We discuss pressure-driven channel flow for a model of shear-thinning glass-forming fluids, employing a modified lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulation scheme. The model is motivated by a recent microscopic approach to the nonlinear rheology of colloidal suspensions and captures a nonvanishing dynamical yield stress and the appearance of normal-stress differences and a flow-induced pressure contribution. The standard LB algorithm is extended to deal with tensorial, nonlinear constitutive equations of this class. The new LB scheme is tested in 2D pressure-driven channel flow and reproduces the analytical steady-state solution. The transient dynamics after startup and removal of the pressure gradient reproduce a finite stopping time for the cessation flow of yield-stress fluids in agreement with previous analytical estimates. PMID:24784287

  19. Computational and Experimental Models of Cancer Cell Response to Fluid Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Michael J.; King, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    It has become evident that mechanical forces play a key role in cancer metastasis, a complex series of steps that is responsible for the majority of cancer-related deaths. One such force is fluid shear stress, exerted on circulating tumor cells by blood flow in the vascular microenvironment, and also on tumor cells exposed to slow interstitial flows in the tumor microenvironment. Computational and experimental models have the potential to elucidate metastatic behavior of cells exposed to such forces. Here, we review the fluid-generated forces that tumor cells are exposed to in the vascular and tumor microenvironments, and discuss recent computational and experimental models that have revealed mechanotransduction phenomena that may play a role in the metastatic process. PMID:23467856

  20. Shear wave dispersion behaviors of soft, vascularized tissues from the microchannel flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, K. J.; Ormachea, J.; McAleavey, S. A.; Wood, R. W.; Carroll-Nellenback, J. J.; Miller, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    The frequency dependent behavior of tissue stiffness and the dispersion of shear waves in tissue can be measured in a number of ways, using integrated imaging systems. The microchannel flow model, which considers the effects of fluid flow in the branching vasculature and microchannels of soft tissues, makes specific predictions about the nature of dispersion. In this paper we introduce a more general form of the 4 parameter equation for stress relaxation based on the microchannel flow model, and then derive the general frequency domain equation for the complex modulus. Dispersion measurements in liver (ex vivo) and whole perfused placenta (post-delivery) correspond to the predictions from theory, guided by independent stress relaxation measurements and consideration of the vascular tree structure.

  1. Shear wave dispersion behaviors of soft, vascularized tissues from the microchannel flow model.

    PubMed

    Parker, K J; Ormachea, J; McAleavey, S A; Wood, R W; Carroll-Nellenback, J J; Miller, R K

    2016-07-01

    The frequency dependent behavior of tissue stiffness and the dispersion of shear waves in tissue can be measured in a number of ways, using integrated imaging systems. The microchannel flow model, which considers the effects of fluid flow in the branching vasculature and microchannels of soft tissues, makes specific predictions about the nature of dispersion. In this paper we introduce a more general form of the 4 parameter equation for stress relaxation based on the microchannel flow model, and then derive the general frequency domain equation for the complex modulus. Dispersion measurements in liver (ex vivo) and whole perfused placenta (post-delivery) correspond to the predictions from theory, guided by independent stress relaxation measurements and consideration of the vascular tree structure. PMID:27280434

  2. Modeling of the competition between shear yielding and crazing in glassy polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estevez, R.; Tijssens, M. G. A.; Van der Giessen, E.

    2000-12-01

    Fracture in amorphous glassy polymers involves two mechanisms of localized deformations: shear yielding and crazing. We here investigate the competition between these two mechanisms and its consequence on the material's fracture toughness. The mechanical response of the homogeneous glassy polymer is described by a constitutive law that accounts for its characteristic softening upon yielding and the subsequent progressive orientational strain hardening. The small scale yielding, boundary layer approach is adopted to model the local finite-deformation process in front of a mode I crack. The concept of cohesive surfaces is used to represent crazes and the traction-separation law incorporates craze initiation, widening and breakdown leading to the creation of a microcrack. Depending on the craze initiation sensitivity of the material, crazing nucleates at the crack tip during the elastic regime or ahead of the crack. As the crazes extend, plasticity develops until an unstable crack propagation takes place when craze fibrils start to break down. Thus, the critical width of a craze appears to be a key feature in the toughness of glassy polymers. Moreover, the opening rate of the craze governs the competition between shear yielding and brittle failure by crazing.

  3. Protein denaturation by combined effect of shear and air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Maa, Y F; Hsu, C C

    1997-06-20

    The effect of shear alone on the aggregation of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase) has been found to be insignificant. This study focused on the synergetic effect of shear and gas-liquid interface on these two model proteins. Two shearing systems, the concentric-cylinder shear device (CCSD) and the rotor/stator homogenizer, were used to generate high shear (> 10(6)) in aqueous solutions in the presence of air. High shear in the presence of an air-liquid interface had no major effect on rhDNase but caused rhGH to form noncovalent aggregates. rhGH aggregation was induced by the air-liquid interface and was found to increase with increasing protein concentration and the air-liquid interfacial area. The aggregation was irreversible and exhibited a first-order kinetics with respect to the protein concentration and air-liquid interfacial area. Shear and shear rate enhanced the interaction because of its continuous generation of new air-liquid interfaces. In the presence of a surfactant, aggregation could be delayed or prevented depending upon the type and the concentration of the surfactant. The effect of air-liquid interface on proteins at low shear was examined using a nitrogen bubbling method. We found that foaming is very detrimental to rhGH even though the shear involved is low. The use of anti-foaming materials could prevent rhGH aggregation during bubbling. The superior stability exhibited by rhDNase may be linked to the higher surface tension and lower foaming tendency of its aqueous solution. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 54: 503-512, 1997. PMID:18636406

  4. Investigation of high-speed free shear flows using improved pressure-strain correlated Reynolds stress turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Lakshmanan, B.

    1993-01-01

    A high-speed shear layer is studied using compressibility corrected Reynolds stress turbulence model which employs newly developed model for pressure-strain correlation. MacCormack explicit prediction-corrector method is used for solving the governing equations and the turbulence transport equations. The stiffness arising due to source terms in the turbulence equations is handled by a semi-implicit numerical technique. Results obtained using the new model show a sharper reduction in growth rate with increasing convective Mach number. Some improvements were also noted in the prediction of the normalized streamwise stress and Reynolds shear stress. The computed results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  5. Turbulence Modeling for the Simulation of Transition in Wall Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    Our research involves study of the behavior of k-epsilon turbulence models for simulation of bypass-level transition over flat surfaces and turbine blades. One facet of the research has been to assess the performance of a multitude of k-epsilon models in what we call "natural transition", i.e. no modifications to the k-e models. The study has been to ascertain what features in the dynamics of the model affect the start and end of the transition. Some of the findings are in keeping with those reported by others (e.g. ERCOFTAC). A second facet of the research has been to develop and benchmark a new multi-time scale k-epsilon model (MTS) for use in simulating bypass-level transition. This model has certain features of the published MTS models by Hanjalic, Launder, and Schiestel, and by Kim and his coworkers. The major new feature of our MTS model is that it can be used to compute wall shear flows as a low-turbulence Reynolds number type of model, i.e. there is no required partition with patching a one-equation k model in the near-wall region to a two-equation k-epsilon model in the outer part of the flow. Our MTS model has been studied extensively to understand its dynamics in predicting the onset of transition and the end-stage of the transition. Results to date indicate that it far superior to the standard unmodified k-epsilon models. The effects of protracted pressure gradients on the model behavior are currently being investigated.

  6. Accurate prediction of interfacial residues in two-domain proteins using evolutionary information: implications for three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Bhaskara, Ramachandra M; Padhi, Amrita; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-07-01

    With the preponderance of multidomain proteins in eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to recognize the constituent domains and their functions. Often function involves communications across the domain interfaces, and the knowledge of the interacting sites is essential to our understanding of the structure-function relationship. Using evolutionary information extracted from homologous domains in at least two diverse domain architectures (single and multidomain), we predict the interface residues corresponding to domains from the two-domain proteins. We also use information from the three-dimensional structures of individual domains of two-domain proteins to train naïve Bayes classifier model to predict the interfacial residues. Our predictions are highly accurate (∼85%) and specific (∼95%) to the domain-domain interfaces. This method is specific to multidomain proteins which contain domains in at least more than one protein architectural context. Using predicted residues to constrain domain-domain interaction, rigid-body docking was able to provide us with accurate full-length protein structures with correct orientation of domains. We believe that these results can be of considerable interest toward rational protein and interaction design, apart from providing us with valuable information on the nature of interactions. PMID:24375512

  7. A grillage model for predicting wrinkles in annular graphene under circular shearing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Duan, W. H.; Wang, C. M.

    2013-01-07

    This paper is concerned with a Timoshenko grillage model for modeling the wrinkling phenomenon in annular graphene under circular shearing applied at its inner edge. By calibrating the grillage model results against the molecular mechanics (MM) results, the grillage model comprising beams of elliptical cross-section orientated along the carbon-carbon bond has section dimensions of 0.06 nm for the major axis length and 0.036 nm for the minor axis length. Moreover, the beams are connected to one another at 0.00212 nm from the geometric centric. This eccentric connection of beams allows the proposed grillage model to cater for the cross-couplings among bonds that produce the out-of-plane wrinkling pattern. The out-of-plane to in-plane bending stiffnesses' ratio is 0.36, and the cross bending stiffness provided by the ellipse eccentricity is 0.025 times that of the in-plane bending stiffness. Besides furnishing identical wave numbers as well as amplitudes and wavelengths that are in good agreement with MM results, the grillage model can capture wrinkling patterns with a boundary layer, whereas plate and membrane models could not mimic the boundary layer.

  8. The Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment - Interfacial Flow Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundan, Akshay; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Plawsky, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Internal heat transfer coefficient of the CVB correlated to the presence of the interfacial flow region. Competition between capillary and Marangoni flow caused Flooding and not a Dry-out region. Interfacial flow region growth is arrested at higher power inputs. 1D heat model confirms the presence of interfacial flow region. 1D heat model confirms the arresting phenomena of interfacial flow region Visual observations are essential to understanding.

  9. Wall and interfacial friction terms of a dynamic whole-range two-fluid model

    SciTech Connect

    Narumo, T.; Rajamaeki, M.

    1996-12-31

    The friction terms of a six-equation two-fluid model in which the momentum equations have been derived using the separation of the flow according to velocity (SFAV) approach have been considered primarily for application in boiling water reactor (BWR) vertical flow conditions. In the SFAV model, only the momentum equations differ from the conventional six-equation model for one-dimensional two-phase flow, which enables the authors to use existing correlations for the source terms appearing in the mass and energy equations. The model has been shown to form a hyperbolic partial differential equation system in any flow conditions without using a separate virtual mass term. Also, the dynamics of the model have been shown to behave correctly by calculating the propagation velocities of small disturbances.

  10. Development of DPD coarse-grained models: From bulk to interfacial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano Canchaya, José G.; Dequidt, Alain; Goujon, Florent; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2016-08-01

    A new Bayesian method was recently introduced for developing coarse-grain (CG) force fields for molecular dynamics. The CG models designed for dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) are optimized based on trajectory matching. Here we extend this method to improve transferability across thermodynamic conditions. We demonstrate the capability of the method by developing a CG model of n-pentane from constant-NPT atomistic simulations of bulk liquid phases and we apply the CG-DPD model to the calculation of the surface tension of the liquid-vapor interface over a large range of temperatures. The coexisting densities, vapor pressures, and surface tensions calculated with different CG and atomistic models are compared to experiments. Depending on the database used for the development of the potentials, it is possible to build a CG model which performs very well in the reproduction of the surface tension on the orthobaric curve.

  11. Development of DPD coarse-grained models: From bulk to interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Solano Canchaya, José G; Dequidt, Alain; Goujon, Florent; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2016-08-01

    A new Bayesian method was recently introduced for developing coarse-grain (CG) force fields for molecular dynamics. The CG models designed for dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) are optimized based on trajectory matching. Here we extend this method to improve transferability across thermodynamic conditions. We demonstrate the capability of the method by developing a CG model of n-pentane from constant-NPT atomistic simulations of bulk liquid phases and we apply the CG-DPD model to the calculation of the surface tension of the liquid-vapor interface over a large range of temperatures. The coexisting densities, vapor pressures, and surface tensions calculated with different CG and atomistic models are compared to experiments. Depending on the database used for the development of the potentials, it is possible to build a CG model which performs very well in the reproduction of the surface tension on the orthobaric curve. PMID:27497539

  12. Rheological assessment of a polymeric spherical structure using a three-dimensional shear wave scattering model in dynamic spectroscopy elastography.

    PubMed

    Montagnon, Emmanuel; Hadj-Henni, Anis; Schmitt, Cédric; Cloutier, Guy

    2014-02-01

    With the purpose of assessing localized rheological behavior of pathological tissues using ultrasound dynamic elastography, an analytical shear wave scattering model was used in an inverse problem framework. The proposed method was adopted to estimate the complex shear modulus of viscoelastic spheres from 200 to 450 Hz. The inverse problem was formulated and solved in the frequency domain, allowing assessment of the complex viscoelastic shear modulus at discrete frequencies. A representative rheological model of the spherical obstacle was determined by comparing storage and loss modulus behaviors with Kelvin-Voigt, Maxwell, Zener, and Jeffrey models. The proposed inversion method was validated by using an external vibrating source and acoustic radiation force. The estimation of viscoelastic properties of three-dimensional spheres made softer or harder than surrounding tissues did not require a priori rheological assumptions. The proposed method is intended to be applied in the context of breast cancer imaging. PMID:24474134

  13. Validation of recent shear wave velocity models in the United States with full-wave simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Haiying; Shen, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Interpretations of dynamic processes and the thermal and chemical structure of the Earth depend on the accuracy of Earth models. With the growing number of velocity models constructed with different tomographic methods and seismic data sets, there is an increasing need for a systematic way to validate model accuracy and resolution. This study selects five shear wave velocity models in the U.S. and simulates full-wave propagation within the 3-D structures. Surface-wave signals extracted from ambient seismic noise and regional earthquakes are compared with synthetic waveforms at multiple-frequency bands. Phase delays and cross-correlation coefficients between observed and synthetic waveforms allow us to compare and validate these models quantitatively. In general, measurements from regional earthquakes are consistent with ambient noise results, but appear more scattered, which may result from uncertainty of the earthquake source location, origin time, and moment tensor. Our results show the improvement of model prediction with the increase of seismic data sets and implement of advanced methods. There exists a positive linear trend between phase delay and interstation distance for three models, indicating that on average, these models are faster than the real Earth structure. The phase delays from the jointly inverted model of ambient noise and receiver function have negative means at all periods while without obvious dependence on the interstation distance. The full-wave ambient noise tomographic model predicts more accurate phase arrivals compared to other models. This study suggests a need for an integrated model constructed with multiple seismic waveforms and consideration of anisotropy and attenuation.

  14. Computer modeling of the mechanical behavior of composites -- Interfacial cracks in fiber-reinforced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schmauder, S.; Haake, S. |; Mueller, W.H. |

    1996-06-15

    Computer modeling of materials and especially modeling the mechanical behavior of composites became increasingly popular in the past few years. Among them are examples of micromechanical modeling of real structures as well as idealized model structures of linear elastic and elasto-plastic material response. In this paper, Erdogan`s Integral Equation Method (IEM) is chosen as an example for a powerful method providing principle insight into elastic fracture mechanical situations. IEM or, alternatively, complex function techniques sometimes even allow for deriving analytical solutions such as in the case of a circumferential crack along a fiber/matrix interface. The analytical formulae of this interface crack will be analyzed numerically and typical results will be presented graphically.

  15. Finite Element Modeling of Impulsive Excitation and Shear Wave Propagation in an Incompressible, Transversely Isotropic Medium

    PubMed Central

    Rouze, Ned C.; Wang, Michael H.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Nightingale, Kathy R.

    2013-01-01

    Elastic properties of materials can be measured by observing shear wave propagation following localized, impulsive excitations and relating the propagation velocity to a model of the material. However, characterization of anisotropic materials is difficult because of the number of elasticity constants in the material model and the complex dependence of propagation velocity relative to the excitation axis, material symmetries, and propagation directions. In this study, we develop a model of wave propagation following impulsive excitation in an incompressible, transversely isotropic (TI) material such as muscle. Wave motion is described in terms of three propagation modes identified by their polarization relative to the material symmetry axis and propagation direction. Phase velocities for these propagation modes are expressed in terms of five elasticity constants needed to describe a general TI material, and also in terms of three constants after the application of two constraints that hold in the limit of an incompressible material. Group propagation velocities are derived from the phase velocities to describe the propagation of wave packets away from the excitation region following localized excitation. The theoretical model is compared to the results of finite element (FE) simulations performed using a nearly incompressible material model with the five elasticity constants chosen to preserve the essential properties of the material in the incompressible limit. Propagation velocities calculated from the FE displacement data show complex structure that agrees quantitatively with the theoretical model and demonstrates the possibility of measuring all three elasticity constants needed to characterize an incompressible, TI material. PMID:24094454

  16. Estimation of critical shear stress for erosion in the Changjiang Estuary: A synergy research of observation, GOCI sensing and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jianzhong; Shen, Fang; Guo, Wenyun; Chen, Changsheng; Ding, Pingxing

    2015-12-01

    Simulating the sediment transport in a high-turbidity region with spatially varying bed properties is challenging. A comprehensive strategy that integrates multiple methods is applied here to retrieve the critical shear stress for erosion, which plays a major role in suspended sediment dynamics in the Changjiang Estuary (CE). Time-series of sea surface suspended sediment concentration (SSC) were retrieved from the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) satellite data at hourly intervals (for 8 h each day) and combined with hydrodynamic modeling of high-resolution CE Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (CE-FVCOM) to estimate the near-bed critical shear stress in the clay-dominated bed region (plasticity index > 7%). An experimental algorithm to determine the in situ critical shear stress via the plasticity index method was also used to verify the GOCI-derived critical shear stress. Implemented with this new critical shear stress, the sediment transport model significantly improved the simulation of the distribution and spatial variability of the SSC during the spring and neap tidal cycles in the CE. The results suggest that a significant lateral water exchange between channels and shoals occurred during the spring flood tide, which led to a broader high-SSC area in the CE throughout the water column.

  17. A multiphase interfacial model for the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerden, James L.; Frey, Kurt; Ebert, William

    2015-07-01

    The Fuel Matrix Dissolution Model (FMDM) is an electrochemical reaction/diffusion model for the dissolution of spent uranium oxide fuel. The model was developed to provide radionuclide source terms for use in performance assessment calculations for various types of geologic repositories. It is based on mixed potential theory and consists of a two-phase fuel surface made up of UO2 and a noble metal bearing fission product phase in contact with groundwater. The corrosion potential at the surface of the dissolving fuel is calculated by balancing cathodic and anodic reactions occurring at the solution interfaces with UO2 and NMP surfaces. Dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide generated by radiolysis of the groundwater are the major oxidizing agents that promote fuel dissolution. Several reactions occurring on noble metal alloy surfaces are electrically coupled to the UO2 and can catalyze or inhibit oxidative dissolution of the fuel. The most important of these is the oxidation of hydrogen, which counteracts the effects of oxidants (primarily H2O2 and O2). Inclusion of this reaction greatly decreases the oxidation of U(IV) and slows fuel dissolution significantly. In addition to radiolytic hydrogen, large quantities of hydrogen can be produced by the anoxic corrosion of steel structures within and near the fuel waste package. The model accurately predicts key experimental trends seen in literature data, the most important being the dramatic depression of the fuel dissolution rate by the presence of dissolved hydrogen at even relatively low concentrations (e.g., less than 1 mM). This hydrogen effect counteracts oxidation reactions and can limit fuel degradation to chemical dissolution, which results in radionuclide source term values that are four or five orders of magnitude lower than when oxidative dissolution processes are operative. This paper presents the scientific basis of the model, the approach for modeling used fuel in a disposal system, and preliminary

  18. Higher-dimensional charged shear-free relativistic models with heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyonyi, Y.; Maharaj, S. D.; Govinder, K. S.

    2014-07-01

    We analyze shear-free spherically symmetric relativistic models of gravitating fluids with heat flow and electric charge defined on higher-dimensional manifolds. The solution to the Einstein-Maxwell system is governed by the pressure isotropy condition, which depends on the space-time dimension. We study this highly nonlinear partial differential equation using Lie's group theoretic approach. The Lie symmetry generators that leave the equation invariant are determined. We provide exact solutions to the gravitational potentials using the first symmetry admitted by the equation. Our new exact solutions contain the earlier results for the four-dimensional case. Using the other Lie generators, we are able to provide solutions to the gravitational potentials or reduce the order of the master equation to a first order nonlinear differential equation. We also find expressions for the causal and Eckart temperatures and show their dependence on the dimension.

  19. Turbulent transport model of wind shear in thunderstorm gust fronts and warm fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, W. S.; Teske, M. E.; Segur, H. C. O.

    1978-01-01

    A model of turbulent flow in the atmospheric boundary layer was used to simulate the low-level wind and turbulence profiles associated with both local thunderstorm gust fronts and synoptic-scale warm fronts. Dimensional analyses of both type fronts provided the physical scaling necessary to permit normalized simulations to represent fronts for any temperature jump. The sensitivity of the thunderstorm gust front to five different dimensionless parameters as well as a change from axisymmetric to planar geometry was examined. The sensitivity of the warm front to variations in the Rossby number was examined. Results of the simulations are discussed in terms of the conditions which lead to wind shears which are likely to be most hazardous for aircraft operations.

  20. Modeling shear instability and fracture in dynamically deformed Al/W granular composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olney, Karl; Benson, David; Nesterenko, Vitali

    2011-06-01

    Aluminum/Tungsten granular composites are materials which combine high density and strength with bulk distributed fracture of Al matrix into small particles under impact or shock loading. They are processed using cold and hot isostatic pressing of W particles/rods in the matrix of Al powder. The presentation will describe modeling of these materials under dynamic conditions simulating low velocity high energy impact in drop weight test (10 m/s) and also behavior following impact with velocities up to 1200 m/s. It will be demonstrated that morphology of W component and bonding between Al particles dramatically affects their strength, shear localization and mode of fracture of Al matrix. The support for this project provided by the Office of Naval Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative Award N00014-07-1-0740 (Program Officer Dr. Clifford Bedford).

  1. One-dimensional mixing layer model for a shear Hele-Shaw flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovtunenko, P. V.

    2016-06-01

    A shear flow of a viscosity-stratified fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell is considered. The long-wave approximation is applied to the governing equations. To describe the evolution of the mixing layer, a special flow with a three-layered structure is considered. A one-dimensional model is derived by averaging the motion equations over the cell width, taking into account the flow structure. For a stationary flow, solutions of motion equations are constructed. The influence of viscosity on the mixing layer evolution is investigated by performing a numerical experiment for a flow with different viscosities in the layers and for a flow with always zero viscosity. It is shown that viscosity has a significant influence on the flow evolution.

  2. Shear mechanical properties of the porcine pancreas: experiment and analytical modelling.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, S; Noguer, L; Palierne, J-F

    2013-10-01

    We provide the first account of the shear mechanical properties of porcine pancreas using a rheometer both in linear oscillatory tests and in constant strain-rate tests reaching the non-linear sub-failure regime. Our results show that pancreas has a low and weakly frequency-dependent dynamic modulus and experiences a noticeable strain-hardening beyond 20% strain. In both linear and non-linear regime, the viscoelastic behaviour of porcine pancreas follows a four-parameter bi-power model that has been validated on kidney, liver and spleen. Among the four solid organs of the abdomen, pancreas proves to be the most compliant and the most viscous one. PMID:23820244

  3. Random vibrations of laminated plates modeled within the first order shear deformation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cederbaum, G.; Librescu, L.; Elishakoff, I.

    1989-01-01

    This paper deals with the dynamic response of anisotropic laminated composite plates to stationary random excitation. The theory of laminated plates used here includes shear deformation and rotary inertia effects in the same manner as Mindlin's theory for isotropic homogeneous plates. Two cases of random pressure fields are considered in this analysis. In the first case, it is modeled as a uniformly distributed load, random in time with an exponential decaying correlation function, while in the second one as a jet noise, fully correlated in one direction and homogeneous in the perpendicular one. The analysis presented herein, as well as the obtained response characteristics, expressed in terms of mean-squares and angle-dependent mean-squares, may be useful in the design of composite plates subjected to random pressure fields and in the evaluation of their reliability.

  4. Chemical equilibrium model for interfacial activity of crude oil in aqueous alkaline solution: the effects of pH, alkali and salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.; Yen, T.F.

    1980-11-01

    A chemical equilibrium model for interfacial activity of crude in aqueous alkaline solution is proposed. The model predicts the observed effects of pH and concentrations of alkali and salt on the interfacial tension (IFT). The model proposed was shown to describe the observed effects of acid content, pH, and sodium ions on the interfacial activity of crude oil in water. Once the pH of the interface reaches the pKa of the acids, sometimes with the help of addition of some salt, the IFT experiences a sudden steep drop to the range of 10/sup -2/ dynes/cm. After that, further addition of sodium either in the form of NaOH or NaCl is going to increase the IFT due to a shift of equilibriumn to the formation of undissociated soap. This was confirmed by the difference in the observed effect of sodium on the IFT of the extracted soap molecules which are dissociated easily and those which are associated highly and precipitated easily. These soap molecules have dissociation constant values ranging from below 10/sup -2/ to above one. 13 references.

  5. Interfacial characteristics of propylene carbonate and validation of simulation models for electrochemical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Xinli

    Supercapacitors have occupy an indispensable role in today's energy storage systems due to their high power density and long life. The introduction of car- bon nanotube (CNT) forests as electrode offers the possibility of nano-scale design and high capacitance. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations on a CNT forest-based electrochemical double-layer capacitor (EDLC) and a widely used electrolyte solution (tetra-ethylammonium tetra-fluoroborate in propylene carbonate, TEABF4 /PC). We compare corresponding primitive model and atomically detailed model of TEABF4 /P, emphasizing the significance of ion clustering in electrolytes. The molecular dynamic simulation results suggests that the arrangement of closest neigh- bors leads to the formation of cation-anion chains or rings. Fuoss's discussion of ion-pairing model provides the approximation for a primitive model of 1-1 electrolyte is not broadly satisfactory for both primitive and atomically detailed cases. A more general Poisson statistical assumption is shown to be satisfactory when coordina- tion numbers are low, as is likely to be the case when ion-pairing initiates. We examined the Poisson-based model over a range of concentrations for both models of TEABF4 /P, and the atomically detailed model results identified solvent-separated nearest-neighbor ion-pairs. Large surface areas plays an essential role in nanomaterial properties, which calls for an accurate description of interfaces through modeling. We studied propylene carbonate, a widely used solvent in EDLC systems. PC wets graphite with a contact angle of 31°. The MD simulation model reproduced this contact angle after reduction 40% of the strength of graphite-C atom Lennard-Jones interactions with the solvent. The critical temperature of PC was accurately evaluated by extrapolating the PC liquid-vapor surface tensions. PC molecules tend to lie flat on the PC liquid-vapor surface, and project the propyl carbon toward the vapor phase. Liquid PC

  6. Bridging the gap between the nanostructural organization and macroscopic interfacial rheology of amyloid fibrils at liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Jordens, Sophia; Rühs, Patrick A; Sieber, Christine; Isa, Lucio; Fischer, Peter; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2014-08-26

    The interfacial behavior of proteins and protein aggregates such as fibrils influences the bulk behavior of multiphase systems in foods, pharmaceuticals, and other technological applications. Additionally, it is an important factor in some biological processes such as the accumulation of amyloid fibrils at biological membranes in neurodegenerative diseases. Here, using β-lactoglobulin fibrils as a model system, we cover a large range of characteristic measuring length scales by combining atomic force microscopy, passive probe particle tracking, tensiometry, interfacial shear, and dilatational rheology in order to correlate the intricate structure of fibril-laden interfaces with their macroscopic adsorption kinetics and viscoelasticity. A subtle change in solution pH provokes pronounced changes in interfacial properties such as alignment, entanglement, multilayer formation, and fibril fracture, which can be resolved and linked across the various length scales involved. PMID:25100189

  7. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pierce, Eric M.; Frugier, Pierre; Criscenti, Louise J.; Kwon, Kideok D.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2014-07-12

    Describing the reactions that occur at the glass-water interface and control the development of the altered layer constitutes one of the main scientific challenges impeding existing models from providing accurate radionuclide release estimates. Radionuclide release estimates are a critical component of the safety basis for geologic repositories. The altered layer (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products) represents a complex region, both physically and chemically, sandwiched between two distinct boundaries pristine glass surface at the inner most interface and aqueous solution at the outer most interface. Computational models, spanning different length and time-scales, are currently being developed tomore » improve our understanding of this complex and dynamic process with the goal of accurately describing the pore-scale changes that occur as the system evolves. These modeling approaches include geochemical simulations [i.e., classical reaction path simulations and glass reactivity in allowance for alteration layer (GRAAL) simulations], Monte Carlo simulations, and Molecular Dynamics methods. Finally, in this manuscript, we discuss the advances and limitations of each modeling approach placed in the context of the glass-water reaction and how collectively these approaches provide insights into the mechanisms that control the formation and evolution of altered layers.« less

  8. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.; Frugier, Pierre; Criscenti, Louise J.; Kwon, Kideok D.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2014-07-12

    Describing the reactions that occur at the glass-water interface and control the development of the altered layer constitutes one of the main scientific challenges impeding existing models from providing accurate radionuclide release estimates. Radionuclide release estimates are a critical component of the safety basis for geologic repositories. The altered layer (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products) represents a complex region, both physically and chemically, sandwiched between two distinct boundaries pristine glass surface at the inner most interface and aqueous solution at the outer most interface. Computational models, spanning different length and time-scales, are currently being developed to improve our understanding of this complex and dynamic process with the goal of accurately describing the pore-scale changes that occur as the system evolves. These modeling approaches include geochemical simulations [i.e., classical reaction path simulations and glass reactivity in allowance for alteration layer (GRAAL) simulations], Monte Carlo simulations, and Molecular Dynamics methods. Finally, in this manuscript, we discuss the advances and limitations of each modeling approach placed in the context of the glass-water reaction and how collectively these approaches provide insights into the mechanisms that control the formation and evolution of altered layers.

  9. Interfacial Slip in Polymer Blends with Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Joseph; Jaber, Eihab; Gersappe, Dilip

    2010-03-01

    The interfacial region in polymer blends has been identified as a low viscosity region in which considerable slip can occur when the blend is subjected to shear forces. Here we use Molecular Dynamics simulations to establish the role that added nanoparticle fillers play in modifying the interfacial rheology. By choosing conditions under which the fillers are localized, either in the two phases or at the interface, we can look at the interplay between the strengthening capability of nanoparticles and the change in the interfacial slip behavior. We examine particle size, attraction between the particle and the polymer component, and the amount of filler in the material. Our studies are performed both above and below the point at which the filler particles form a transient network in the blend.

  10. Interfacial Slip in Polymer Blends with Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Joseph; Jaber, Eihab; Gersappe, Dilip

    2009-03-01

    The interfacial region in polymer blends has been identified as a low viscosity region in which considerable slip can occur when the blend is subjected to shear forces. Here we use Molecular Dynamics simulations to establish the role that added nanoparticle fillers play in modifying the interfacial rheology. By choosing conditions under which the fillers are localized, either in the two phases or at the interface, we can look at the interplay between the strengthening capability of nanoparticles and the change in the interfacial slip behavior. We examine particle size, attraction between the particle and the polymer component, and the amount of filler in the material. Our studies are performed both above and below the point at which the filler particles form a transient network in the blend.

  11. Interfacial slip in polymer blends with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Joseph; Jaber, Eihab; Gersappe, Dilip

    2008-03-01

    The interfacial region in polymer blends has been identified as a low viscosity region in which considerable slip can occur when the blend is subjected to shear forces. Here, we use Molecular Dynamics simulations to establish the role that added nanofiller particles play in modifying the interfacial rheology. By choosing conditions under which the fillers are localized either in the two phases, or at the interface we can look at the interplay between the strengthening capability of nanoparticles, and the change in the interfacial slip behavior. We examine particle size, attraction between the particle and the polymer component and the amount of filler in the material. Our studies are performed both above and below the point at which the filler particles form a transient network in the blend.

  12. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.; Frugier, Pierre; Criscenti, Louise J.; Kwon, K. D.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2014-07-12

    The altered layer (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products)represents a complex region, both physically and chemically, sandwiched between two distinct boundaries - pristine glass surface at the inner most interface and aqueous solution at the outer most. The physico-chemical processes that control the development of this region have a significant impact on the long-term glass-water reaction. Computational models, spanning different length and time-scales, are currently being developed to improve our understanding of this complex and dynamic process with the goal of accurately describing the pore-scale changes that occur as the system evolves. These modeling approaches include Geochemical Reaction Path simulations, Glass Reactivity in Allowance for Alteration Layer simulations, Monte Carlo simulations, and Molecular Dynamics methods. Discussed in this manuscript are the advances and limitations of each modeling approach placed in the context of the glass water reaction and how collectively these approaches provide insights into the mechanisms that control the formation and evolution of altered layers; thus providing the fundamental data needed to develop pore-scale equations that enable more accurate predictions of nuclear waste glass corrosion in a geologic repository.

  13. Modelling the interfacial behaviour of dilute light-switching surfactant solutions.

    PubMed

    Herdes, Carmelo; Santiso, Erik E; James, Craig; Eastoe, Julian; Müller, Erich A

    2015-05-01

    The direct molecular modelling of an aqueous surfactant system at concentrations below the critical micelle concentration (pre-cmc) conditions is unviable in terms of the presently available computational power. Here, we present an alternative that combines experimental information with tractable simulations to interrogate the surface tension changes with composition and the structural behaviour of surfactants at the water-air interface. The methodology is based on the expression of the surface tension as a function of the surfactant surface excess, both in the experiments and in the simulations, allowing direct comparisons to be made. As a proof-of-concept a coarse-grained model of a light switching non-ionic surfactant bearing a photosensitive azobenzene group is considered at the air-water interface at 298 K. Coarse-grained molecular dynamic simulations are detailed based on the use of the SAFT force field with parameters tuned specifically for this purpose. An excellent agreement is obtained between the simulation predictions and experimental observations; furthermore, the molecular model allows the rationalization of the macroscopic behaviour in terms of the different conformations of the cis and trans surfactants at the surface. PMID:25594882

  14. Finite Element Modeling of Dynamic Shear Rupture Experiments Along Non-Planar Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, E. L.; Baudet, A.; Bhat, H. S.; Rice, J. R.

    2004-12-01

    The study of dynamically propagating shear cracks along weak paths like faults is of great interest for the study of earthquakes. We adapted the ABAQUS/Explicit dynamic finite element program to analyze the nucleation and propagation of shear cracks along a non-planar, kinked, weak path corresponding to the one that was used in recent laboratory fracture studies by Rousseau and Rosakis [JGR, 2003]. Their experiments involved impact loading of thin plates of Homalite-100, a photoelastically sensitive brittle polymer, which had been cut along a kinked path and then weakly glued back together everywhere except along a starter notch near the impact site. Under different conditions, propagation speeds were observed in both the sub-Rayleigh and intersonic (supershear) regimes. Strain gage recordings and high speed photography of isochromatic lines (lines of constant difference between the in-plane principal strains) provided characterization of the transient deformation fields associated with the impact and fracture propagation. For the finite element analyses, we implemented a slip-weakening failure model through an option in the ABAQUS program allowing user defined constitutive relations. The analyses of impact loading and of rupture nucleation and propagation were then carried out in the 2D framework of plane stress. In a first set of studies of nucleation and propagation of rupture along a straight fault, we determined after some trial and error an appropriate CFL number, and examined different element types and layouts, finding that the most acceptable results were obtained for low order elements. We used constant strain triangles, arrayed in groups of four to effectively form four-sided elements with corner nodes and one internal node. The studies also showed that to obtain representations of slip rate and shear stress near the propagating rupture tip that were relatively free from numerical oscillations, it was necessary to have element side lengths of order Ro/50

  15. A coupled damage-plasticity model for the cyclic behavior of shear-loaded interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, P.; De Lorenzis, L.

    2015-12-01

    The present work proposes a novel thermodynamically consistent model for the behavior of interfaces under shear (i.e. mode-II) cyclic loading conditions. The interface behavior is defined coupling damage and plasticity. The admissible states' domain is formulated restricting the tangential interface stress to non-negative values, which makes the model suitable e.g. for interfaces with thin adherends. Linear softening is assumed so as to reproduce, under monotonic conditions, a bilinear mode-II interface law. Two damage variables govern respectively the loss of strength and of stiffness of the interface. The proposed model needs the evaluation of only four independent parameters, i.e. three defining the monotonic mode-II interface law, and one ruling the fatigue behavior. This limited number of parameters and their clear physical meaning facilitate experimental calibration. Model predictions are compared with experimental results on fiber reinforced polymer sheets externally bonded to concrete involving different load histories, and an excellent agreement is obtained.

  16. Predictive modeling of interfacial damage in substructured steels: application to martensitic microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maresca, F.; Kouznetsova, V. G.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2016-02-01

    Metallic composite phases, like martensite present in conventional steels and new generation high strength steels exhibit microscale, locally lamellar microstructures characterized by alternating layers of phases or crystallographic variants. The layers can be sub-micron down to a few nanometers thick, and they are often characterized by high contrasts in plastic properties. As a consequence, fracture in these lamellar microstructures generally occurs along the layer interfaces or within one of the layers, typically parallel to the interface. This paper presents a computational framework that addresses the lamellar nature of these microstructures, by homogenizing the plastic deformation at the mesoscale by using the microscale response of the laminates. Failure is accounted for by introducing a family of damaging planes that are parallel to the layer interface. Mode I, mode II and mixed-mode opening are incorporated. The planes along which failure occurs are captured using a smeared damage approach. Coupling of damage with isotropic or anisotropic plasticity models, like crystal plasticity, is straightforward. The damaging planes and directions do not need to correspond to crystalline slip planes, and normal opening is also included. Focus is given on rate-dependent formulations of plasticity and damage, i.e. converged results can be obtained without further regularization techniques. The validation of the model using experimental observations in martensite-austenite lamellar microstructures in steels reveals that the model correctly predicts the main features of the onset of failure, e.g. the necking point, the failure initiation region and the failure mode. Finally, based on the qualitative results obtained, some material design guidelines are provided for martensitic and multi-phase steels.

  17. Modeling of Long-Term Fate of Mobilized Fines due to Dam-Embankment Interfacial Dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glascoe, L. G.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Kanarska, Y.; Lomov, I.; Antoun, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Transverse cracks in embankment dams can develop as a result of post-construction settlements, earthquake deformations, or anthropogenic loads such as emplaced explosives. During these dislocations, fine particles are released from the damaged zones and can create unwanted inertial erosion and piping through the transverse cracks. These processes are equally critical to the overall stability of the dam. We present numerical results related to the problem of the fluid flow, transport, and filtration of particulates from damaged zones between the concrete sections of a gravity dam and the embankment wraparound sections. The model solves simultaneously the flow, attachment, and washout of fine particles within a wraparound heterogeneous porous media. We used a state-of-the-art finite element method with adaptive mesh refinement to capture 1) the interface between water dense with fines and clear water, and 2) the non-linearity of the free surface itself. A few scenarios of sediment entrapment in the filter layers of a gravity dam were considered. Several parameterizations of the filtration model and constitutive laws of soil behavior were also investigated. Through these analyses, we concluded that the attachment kinetic isotherm is the key function of the model. More parametric studies need to be conducted to assess the sensitivity of the kinetic isotherm parameters on the overall stability of the embankment. These kinetic parameters can be obtained, for example, through numerical micro- and meso-scale studies. It is worth mentioning that the current model, for the more realistic non-linear kinetic isotherms, has predicted a self-rehabilitation of the breached core with retention of 50% of the mobilized fines using a very conservative filtration length. A more realistic value should exceed the assumed one, resulting in a retention exceeding 50%. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under

  18. Kinetics and transport at AMTEC electrodes. I - The interfacial impedance model. [alkali metal thermoelectric converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Loveland, M. E.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Underwood, M. L.; Bankston, C. P.; Leduc, H.; Kummer, J. T.

    1990-01-01

    Mixed mass-transport and kinetic control of sodium ion reduction at porous inert electrodes on sodium beta-double-prime alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) ceramic in a high-temperature electrochemical cell has been observed and modeled. The high ionic conductivity of BASE and the reversibility of the liquid sodium/BASE anodic half-cell led to assignment of potential-dependent (nonohmic) resistances to kinetic and mass-transport processes associated with the porous electrode. The morphology of these electrodes and typical sodium gas pressures are consistent with Knudsen, or free-molecular, flow through the electrode.

  19. Physical test of a particle simulation model in a sheared granular system

    SciTech Connect

    Rycroft, Chris; Orpe, Ashish; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2009-01-15

    We report a detailed comparison of a slow gravity driven sheared granular flow with a computational model performed with the Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS). To our knowledge, this is the first thorough test of the LAMMPS model with a laboratory granular flow. In the experiments, grains flow inside a silo with a rectangular cross-section, and are sheared by a rough boundary on one side and smooth boundaries on the other sides. Individual grain position and motion are measured using a particle index matching imaging technique where a fluorescent dye is added to the interstitial liquid which has the same refractive index as the glass beads. The boundary imposes a packing order, and the grains are observed to flow in layers which get progressively more disordered with distance from the walls. The computations use a Cundall--Strack contact model between the grains, using contact parameters that have been used in many other previous studies, and ignore the hydrodynamic effects of the interstitial liquid. Computations are performed to understand the effect of particle coefficient of friction, elasticity, contact model, and polydispersity on mean flow properties. After appropriate scaling, we find that the mean velocity of the grains and the number density as a function of flow cross-section observed in the experiments and the simulations are in excellent agreement. The mean flow profile is observed to be unchanged over a broad range of coefficient of friction, except near the smooth wall. We show that the flow profile is not sensitive to atleast 10\\percent polydispersity in particle size. Because the grain elasticity used is smaller in the computations as compared with glass grains, wave-like features can be noted over short time scales in the mean velocity and the velocity auto-correlations measured in the simulations. These wave features occur over an intermediate timescale larger than the particle interaction but smaller than the

  20. Finite-difference modelling to evaluate seismic P-wave and shear-wave field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burschil, T.; Beilecke, T.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution reflection seismic methods are an established non-destructive tool for engineering tasks. In the near surface, shear-wave reflection seismic measurements usually offer a higher spatial resolution in the same effective signal frequency spectrum than P-wave data, but data quality varies more strongly. To discuss the causes of these differences, we investigated a P-wave and a SH-wave seismic reflection profile measured at the same location on the island of Föhr, Germany and applied seismic reflection processing to the field data as well as finite-difference modelling of the seismic wave field. The simulations calculated were adapted to the acquisition field geometry, comprising 2 m receiver distance (1 m for SH wave) and 4 m shot distance along the 1.5 km long P-wave and 800 m long SH-wave profiles. A Ricker wavelet and the use of absorbing frames were first-order model parameters. The petrophysical parameters to populate the structural models down to 400 m depth were taken from borehole data, VSP (vertical seismic profile) measurements and cross-plot relations. The simulation of the P-wave wave-field was based on interpretation of the P-wave depth section that included a priori information from boreholes and airborne electromagnetics. Velocities for 14 layers in the model were derived from the analysis of five nearby VSPs (vP =1600-2300 m s-1). Synthetic shot data were compared with the field data and seismic sections were created. Major features like direct wave and reflections are imaged. We reproduce the mayor reflectors in the depth section of the field data, e.g. a prominent till layer and several deep reflectors. The SH-wave model was adapted accordingly but only led to minor correlation with the field data and produced a higher signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, we suggest to consider for future simulations additional features like intrinsic damping, thin layering, or a near-surface weathering layer. These may lead to a better understanding of

  1. Exploring German Bight coastal morphodynamics based on modelled bed shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kösters, Frank; Winter, Christian

    2014-02-01

    The prediction of large-scale coastal and estuarine morphodynamics requires a sound understanding of the relevant driving processes and forcing factors. Data- and process-based methods and models suffer from limitations when applied individually to investigate these systems and, therefore, a combined approach is needed. The morphodynamics of coastal environments can be assessed in terms of a mean bed elevation range (BER), which is the difference of the lowest to highest seabed elevation occurring within a defined time interval. In this study of the coastal sector of the German Bight, North Sea, the highly variable distribution of observed BER for the period 1984-2006 is correlated to local bed shear stresses based on hindcast simulations with a well-validated high-resolution (typically 1,000 m in coastal settings) process-based numerical model of the North Sea. A significant correlation of the 95th percentile of bed shear stress and BER was found, explaining between 49 % and 60 % of the observed variance of the BER under realistic forcing conditions. The model then was applied to differentiate the effects of three main hydrodynamic drivers, i.e. tides, wind-induced currents, and waves. Large-scale mapping of these model results quantify previous qualitative suggestions: tides act as main drivers of the East Frisian coast, whereas waves are more relevant for the morphodynamics of the German west coast. Tidal currents are the main driver of the very high morphological activity of the tidal channels of the Ems, Weser and Elbe estuaries, the Jade Bay, and tidal inlets between the islands. This also holds for the backbarrier tidal flats of the North Frisian Wadden Sea. The morphodynamics of the foreshore areas of the barrier island systems are mainly wave-driven; in the deeper areas tides, waves and wind-driven currents have a combined effect. The open tidal flats (outer Ems, Neuwerker Watt, Dithmarschen Bight) are affected by a combination of tides, wind

  2. Stably stratified shear turbulence: A new model for the energy dissipation length scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Y.; Canuto, V. M.

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented to compute the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation length scale l(sub epsilon) in a stably stratified shear flow. The expression for l(sub epsilon) is derived from solving the spectral balance equation for the turbulent kinetic energy. The buoyancy spectrum entering such equation is constructed using a Lagrangian timescale with modifications due to stratification. The final result for l(sub epsilon) is given in algebraic form as a function of the Froude number Fr and the flux Richardson number R(sub f), l(sub epsilon) = l(sub epsilon)(Fr, R(sub f). The model predicts that for R(sub f) less than R(sub fc), l(sub epsilon) decreases with stratification. An attractive feature of the present model is that it encompasses, as special cases, some seemingly different models for l(sub epsilon) that have been proposed in the past by Deardorff, Hunt et al., Weinstock, and Canuto and Minotti. An alternative form for the dissipation rate epsilon is also discussed that may be useful when one uses a prognostic equation for the heat flux. The present model is applicable to subgrid-scale models, which are needed in large eddy simulations (LES), as well as to ensemble average models. The model is applied to predict the variation of l(sub epsilon) with height z in the planetary boundary layer. The resulting l(sub epsilon) versus z profile reproduces very closely the nonmonotonic profile of l(sub epsilon) exhibited by many LES calculations, beginning with the one by Deardorff in 1974.

  3. Modeling and analysis of a tunable piezoelectric structure for transverse shear wave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenagani, Shiva S.; Roy Mahapatra, D.

    2008-03-01

    An analytical investigation of the transverse shear wave mode tuning with a resonator mass (packing mass) on a Lead Zirconium Titanate (PZT) crystal bonded together with a host plate and its equivalent electric circuit parameters are presented. The energy transfer into the structure for this type of wave modes are much higher in this new design. The novelty of the approach here is the tuning of a single wave mode in the thickness direction using a resonator mass. First, a one-dimensional constitutive model assuming the strain induced only in the thickness direction is considered. As the input voltage is applied to the PZT crystal in the thickness direction, the transverse normal stress distribution induced into the plate is assumed to have parabolic distribution, which is presumed as a function of the geometries of the PZT crystal, packing mass, substrate and the wave penetration depth of the generated wave. For the PZT crystal, the harmonic wave guide solution is assumed for the mechanical displacement and electric fields, while for the packing mass, the former is solved using the boundary conditions. The electromechanical characteristics in terms of the stress transfer, mechanical impedance, electrical displacement, velocity and electric field are analyzed. The analytical solutions for the aforementioned entities are presented on the basis of varying the thickness of the PZT crystal and the packing mass. The results show that for a 25% increase in the thickness of the PZT crystal, there is ~38% decrease in the first resonant frequency, while for the same change in the thickness of the packing mass, the decrease in the resonant frequency is observed as ~35%. Most importantly the tuning of the generated wave can be accomplished with the packing mass at lower frequencies easily. To the end, an equivalent electric circuit, for tuning the transverse shear wave mode is analyzed.

  4. Low-shear modelled microgravity environment maintains morphology and differentiated functionality of primary porcine hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Leonard J; Walker, Simon W; Hayes, Peter C; Plevris, John N

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocytes cultured in conventional static culture rapidly lose polarity and differentiated function. This could be explained by gravity-induced sedimentation, which prevents formation of complete three-dimensional (3D) cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions and disrupts integrin-mediated signals (including the most abundant hepatic integrin alpha(5)beta(1)), important for cellular polarity and differentiation. Cell culture in a low fluid shear modelled microgravity (about 10(-2) g) environment promotes spatial colocation/self-aggregation of dissociated cells and induction of 3D differentiated liver morphology. Previously, we demonstrated the utility of a NASA rotary bioreactor in maintaining key metabolic functions and 3D aggregate formation of high-density primary porcine hepatocyte cultures over 21 days. Using serum-free chemically defined medium, without confounding interactions of exogenous bioscaffolding or bioenhancing surface materials, we investigated features of hepatic cellular polarity and differentiated functionality, including expression of hepatic integrin alpha(5), as markers of functional morphology. We report here that in the absence of exogenous biomatrix scaffolding, hepatocytes cultured in serum-free chemically defined medium in a microgravity environment rapidly (<24 h) form macroscopic (2-5 mm), compacted 3D hepatospheroid structures consisting of a shell of glycogen-positive viable cells circumscribing a core of eosinophilic cells. The spheroid shell layers exhibited ultrastructural, morphological and functional features of differentiated, polarized hepatic tissue including strong expression of the integrin alpha(5) subunit, functional bile canaliculi, albumin synthesis, and fine ultrastructure reminiscent of in vivo hepatic tissue. The low fluid shear microgravity environment may promote tissue-like self-organization of dissociated cells, and offer advantages over spheroids cultured in conventional formats to delineate optimal conditions for

  5. Challenges in Modelling of Lightning-Induced Delamination; Effect of Temperature-Dependent Interfacial Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naghipour, P.; Pineda, E. J.; Arnold, S.

    2014-01-01

    Lightning is a major cause of damage in laminated composite aerospace structures during flight. Due to the dielectric nature of Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs), the high energy induced by lightning strike transforms into extreme, localized surface temperature accompanied with a high-pressure shockwave resulting in extensive damage. It is crucial to develop a numerical tool capable of predicting the damage induced from a lightning strike to supplement extremely expensive lightning experiments. Delamination is one of the most significant failure modes resulting from a lightning strike. It can be extended well beyond the visible damage zone, and requires sophisticated techniques and equipment to detect. A popular technique used to model delamination is the cohesive zone approach. Since the loading induced from a lightning strike event is assumed to consist of extreme localized heating, the cohesive zone formulation should additionally account for temperature effects. However, the sensitivity to this dependency remains unknown. Therefore, the major focus point of this work is to investigate the importance of this dependency via defining various temperature dependency profiles for the cohesive zone properties, and analyzing the corresponding delamination area. Thus, a detailed numerical model consisting of multidirectional composite plies with temperature-dependent cohesive elements in between is subjected to lightning (excessive amount of heat and pressure) and delamination/damage expansion is studied under specified conditions.

  6. Modeling Spatial Structure of Rock Fracture Surfaces Before and After Shear Test: A Method for Estimating Morphology of Damaged Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babanouri, Nima; Karimi Nasab, Saeed

    2015-05-01

    This paper deals with the structural analysis of rock fracture roughness, and accordingly, a method is developed for estimating/predicting the post-shearing 3D geometry of the fracture surface. For this purpose, surfaces of three natural rock fractures were digitized and studied before and after the direct shear test. The variogram analysis of the surfaces indicated a strong non-linear trend in the topography data. Hence, the spatial variability of the rock fracture surfaces was decomposed to: one deterministic component, characterized by a high-order polynomial representing the large-scale undulations, and one stochastic component, described by the variogram of residuals representing the small-scale roughness. Using an image-processing technique, a total of 343 damage zones with different sizes, shapes, initial roughness characteristics, local stress fields, and/or asperity strength values were spatially located and clustered. In order to characterize the overall spatial structure of the degraded zones, the concept of the `pseudo-zonal variogram' was introduced. The results showed that the spatial continuity at the damage zones increases due to the asperity degradation. The increase in the variogram range is anisotropic and tends to be higher along the shearing. Consequently, the direction of maximum continuity rotates towards the shear direction. After modeling the evolution of the spatial structure with shearing and detecting boundaries of the degraded areas, a methodology was presented to provide a regression-kriging estimate of the morphology of sheared surfaces. The proposed method can be considered as a cost-free and reasonably accurate alternative to expensive techniques of scanning the rock fracture surface after the shear test.

  7. Ericksen number and Deborah number cascade predictions of a model for liquid crystalline polymers for simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, D. Harley; Leal, L. Gary; García-Cervera, Carlos J.; Ceniceros, Hector D.

    2007-02-01

    We consider the behavior of the Doi-Marrucci-Greco (DMG) model for nematic liquid crystalline polymers in planar shear flow. We found the DMG model to exhibit dynamics in both qualitative and quantitative agreement with experimental observations reported by Larson and Mead [Liq. Cryst. 15, 151 (1993)] for the Ericksen number and Deborah number cascades. For increasing shear rates within the Ericksen number cascade, the DMG model displays three distinct regimes: stable simple shear, stable roll cells, and irregular structure accompanied by disclination formation. In accordance with experimental observations, the model predicts both ±1 and ±1/2 disclinations. Although ±1 defects form via the ridge-splitting mechanism first identified by Feng, Tao, and Leal [J. Fluid Mech. 449, 179 (2001)], a new mechanism is identified for the formation of ±1/2 defects. Within the Deborah number cascade, with increasing Deborah number, the DMG model exhibits a streamwise banded texture, in the absence of disclinations and roll cells, followed by a monodomain wherein the mean orientation lies within the shear plane throughout the domain.

  8. Modelling the impulse diffraction field of shear waves in transverse isotropic viscoelastic medium.

    PubMed

    Chatelin, Simon; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Bernal, Miguel; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-05-01

    The generation of shear waves from an ultrasound focused beam has been developed as a major concept for remote palpation using shear wave elastography (SWE). For muscular diagnostic applications, characteristics of the shear wave profile will strongly depend on characteristics of the transducer as well as the orientation of muscular fibers and the tissue viscoelastic properties. The numerical simulation of shear waves generated from a specific probe in an anisotropic viscoelastic medium is a key issue for further developments of SWE in fibrous soft tissues. In this study we propose a complete numerical tool allowing 3D simulation of a shear wave front in anisotropic viscoelastic media. From the description of an ultrasonic transducer, the shear wave source is simulated by using Field's II software and shear wave propagation described by using the Green's formalism. Finally, the comparison between simulations and experiments are successively performed for both shear wave velocity and dispersion profile in a transverse isotropic hydrogel phantom, in vivo forearm muscle and in vivo biceps brachii. PMID:25880794

  9. Modelling the impulse diffraction field of shear waves in transverse isotropic viscoelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelin, Simon; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Bernal, Miguel; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-05-01

    The generation of shear waves from an ultrasound focused beam has been developed as a major concept for remote palpation using shear wave elastography (SWE). For muscular diagnostic applications, characteristics of the shear wave profile will strongly depend on characteristics of the transducer as well as the orientation of muscular fibers and the tissue viscoelastic properties. The numerical simulation of shear waves generated from a specific probe in an anisotropic viscoelastic medium is a key issue for further developments of SWE in fibrous soft tissues. In this study we propose a complete numerical tool allowing 3D simulation of a shear wave front in anisotropic viscoelastic media. From the description of an ultrasonic transducer, the shear wave source is simulated by using Field’s II software and shear wave propagation described by using the Green’s formalism. Finally, the comparison between simulations and experiments are successively performed for both shear wave velocity and dispersion profile in a transverse isotropic hydrogel phantom, in vivo forearm muscle and in vivo biceps brachii.

  10. How does interfacial rheology govern soap bubble cluster dynamics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Addad, Sylvie; Biance, Anne-Laure; Hohler, Reinhard

    2009-11-01

    Aqueous foams are concentrated dispersions of gas bubbles in a soapy solution. These complex fluids exhibit solid-like or liquid-like mechanical behaviors, depending on the applied shear. When it is increased beyond a yield strain, neighbor switching bubble rearrangements called T1 events are triggered and plastic flow sets in. We study experimentally the dynamics of such strain induced T1s in 3D bubble clusters that we consider as model systems of 3D foams. To determine the hydrodynamics and physico-chemistry that set the duration of T1s, we use foaming solutions of a wide range of well characterized bulk and interfacial rheological properties. At low shear rates, the T1 duration is set by a balance between surface tension and surface viscous forces in qualitative agreement with previous studies of T1s in 2D foams [1] and we present a simple physical model that explains our 3D findings. Moreover, above a characteristic shear rate, rearrangement dynamics are driven by the applied strain. By combining all our results, we link the transition from intermittent to continous flow dynamics in foams to the rheology of the gas-liquid interfaces. [4pt] [1] M. Durand, H. A. Stone, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 2226101 (2006).

  11. Molecular modeling studies of interfacial reactions in wet supercritical CO2.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glezakou, V.; McGrail, B. P.; Windisch, C. F.; Schaef, H. T.; Martin, P.

    2011-12-01

    In the recent years, Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) technologies have gained considerable momentum in a globally organized effort to mitigate greenhouse emissions and adverse climate change. Co-sequestration refers to the capture and geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide and minor contaminants (sulfur compounds, NOx, Hg, etc.) in subsurface formations. Cosequestration offers the potential to make carbon management more economically acceptable to industry relative to sequestration of pure CO2. This may be achieved through significant savings in plant (and retrofit) capital cost, operating cost, and energy savings as well by eliminating the need for one or more individual pollutant capture systems (such as SO2 scrubbers). The latter point is important because co-sequestration may result in a net positive impact to the environment through avoided loss of power generation capacity from parasitic loads and reduced fuel needs. This paper will discuss our research on modeling, imaging and characterization of cosequestration processes and reactivity at a fundamental level. Our work examines the interactions of CO2-rich fluids with metal and mineral surfaces, and how these are affected by the presence of other gas components (e.g. SO2, H2O or NOx) commonly present in the CO2 streams. We have found that reactivity is also affected by the composition of the surface or, less obviously, by the surface exposed, for example, (104) vs (100 )of carbonate minerals. We combine experimental techniques such as XRD and Raman spectroscopy, which can detect and follow reactive processes, with ab initio modeling methods based on density functional theory, to establish a reliable correspondence between theory and experiment with predictive capability. Analysis of our molecular dynamics simulations, reveals structural information and vibrational density of states that can directly compare with XRD measurements and vibrational spectroscopy. While reactivity in CO2-containing

  12. A model of the interfacial processes inhibiting the environmental degradation of Al-Cu alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, Jeffery Robert

    (Cr(Ill)-Fe-CN6) was found in the CCC bulk not just at the outermost surface. A new model for CCC on Al-Cr alloys is proposed. The model is based on the sol-gel-like nascent CCC that limits the transport of IMC dissolution products.

  13. Simulations of a stretching bar using a plasticity model from the shear transformation zone theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rycroft, Chris H.; Gibou, Frederic

    2010-06-05

    An Eulerian simulation is developed to study an elastoplastic model of amorphous materials that is based upon the shear transformation zone theory developed by Langer and coworkers. In this theory, plastic deformation is controlled by an effective temperature that measures the amount of configurational disorder in the material. The simulation is used to model ductile fracture in a stretching bar that initially contains a small notch, and the effects of many of the model parameters are examined. The simulation tracks the shape of the bar using the level set method. Within the bar, a finite difference discretization is employed that makes use of the essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) scheme. The system of equations is moderately stiff due to the presence of large elastic constants, and one of the key numerical challenges is to accurately track the level set and construct extrapolated field values for use in boundary conditions. A new approach to field extrapolation is discussed that is second order accurate and requires a constant amount of work per gridpoint.

  14. Recapitulating physiological and pathological shear stress and oxygen to model vasculature in health and disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Shen, Yu-I.; Tan, Scott; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-05-01

    Studying human vascular disease in conventional cell cultures and in animal models does not effectively mimic the complex vascular microenvironment and may not accurately predict vascular responses in humans. We utilized a microfluidic device to recapitulate both shear stress and O2 levels in health and disease, establishing a microfluidic vascular model (μVM). Maintaining human endothelial cells (ECs) in healthy-mimicking conditions resulted in conversion to a physiological phenotype namely cell elongation, reduced proliferation, lowered angiogenic gene expression and formation of actin cortical rim and continuous barrier. We next examined the responses of the healthy μVM to a vasotoxic cancer drug, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), in comparison with an in vivo mouse model. We found that 5-FU does not induce apoptosis rather vascular hyperpermeability, which can be alleviated by Resveratrol treatment. This effect was confirmed by in vivo findings identifying a vasoprotecting strategy by the adjunct therapy of 5-FU with Resveratrol. The μVM of ischemic disease demonstrated the transition of ECs from a quiescent to an activated state, with higher proliferation rate, upregulation of angiogenic genes, and impaired barrier integrity. The μVM offers opportunities to study and predict human ECs with physiologically relevant phenotypes in healthy, pathological and drug-treated environments.

  15. Simulations of a stretching bar using a plasticity model from the shear transformation zone theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rycroft, Chris H.; Gibou, Frédéric

    2012-03-01

    An Eulerian simulation framework is developed to study an elastoplastic model of amorphous materials that is based upon the shear transformation zone (STZ) theory developed by Langer and coworkers [1]. In this theory, plastic deformation is controlled by an effective temperature that measures the amount of configurational disorder in the material. The simulation is used to model ductile fracture in a stretching bar that initially contains a small notch, and the effects of many of the model parameters are examined. The simulation tracks the shape of the bar using the level set method. Within the bar, a finite difference discretization is employed that makes use of the essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) scheme. The system of equations is moderately stiff due to the presence of large elastic constants, and one of the key numerical challenges is to accurately track the level set and construct extrapolated field values for use in boundary conditions. A new approach to field extrapolation is discussed that is second-order accurate and requires a constant amount of work per grid point.

  16. Nonequilibrium transport in the Anderson-Holstein model with interfacial screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfetto, Enrico; Stefanucci, Gianluca

    Image charge effects in nanoscale junctions with strong electron-phonon coupling open the way to unexplored physical scenarios. Here we present a comprehensive study of the transport properties of the Anderson-Holstein model in the presence of dot-lead repulsion. We propose an accurate many-body approach to deal with the simultaneous occurrence of the Franck-Condon blockade and the screening-induced enhancement of the polaron mobility. Remarkably, we find that a novel mechanism of negative differential conductance origins from the competition between the charge blocking due to the electron-phonon interaction and the charge deblocking due to the image charges. An experimental setup to observe this phenomenon is discussed. References [1]E. Perfetto, G. Stefanucci and M. Cini, Phys. Rev. B 85, 165437 (2012). [2] E. Perfetto and G. Stefanucci, Phys. Rev. B 88, 245437 (2013). [3] E. Perfetto and G. Stefanucci, Journal of Computational Electronics 14, 352 (2015). E.P. and G.S. acknowledge funding by MIUR FIRB Grant No. RBFR12SW0J.

  17. Modeling the shear rate and pressure drop in a hydrodynamic cavitation reactor with experimental validation based on KI decomposition studies.

    PubMed

    Badve, Mandar P; Alpar, Tibor; Pandit, Aniruddha B; Gogate, Parag R; Csoka, Levente

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model describing the shear rate and pressure variation in a complex flow field created in a hydrodynamic cavitation reactor (stator and rotor assembly) has been depicted in the present study. The design of the reactor is such that the rotor is provided with surface indentations and cavitational events are expected to occur on the surface of the rotor as well as within the indentations. The flow characteristics of the fluid have been investigated on the basis of high accuracy compact difference schemes and Navier-Stokes method. The evolution of streamlining structures during rotation, pressure field and shear rate of a Newtonian fluid flow have been numerically established. The simulation results suggest that the characteristics of shear rate and pressure area are quite different based on the magnitude of the rotation velocity of the rotor. It was observed that area of the high shear zone at the indentation leading edge shrinks with an increase in the rotational speed of the rotor, although the magnitude of the shear rate increases linearly. It is therefore concluded that higher rotational speeds of the rotor, tends to stabilize the flow, which in turn results into less cavitational activity compared to that observed around 2200-2500RPM. Experiments were carried out with initial concentration of KI as 2000ppm. Maximum of 50ppm of iodine liberation was observed at 2200RPM. Experimental as well as simulation results indicate that the maximum cavitational activity can be seen when rotation speed is around 2200-2500RPM. PMID:24924259

  18. A spatial model of wind shear and turbulence for flight simulation. Ph.D. Thesis - Colorado State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. W.

    1984-01-01

    A three dimensional model which combines measurements of wind shear in the real atmosphere with three dimensional Monte Carlo simulated turbulence was developed. The wind field over the body of an aircraft can be simulated and all aerodynamic loads and moments calculated.

  19. Transformation of a Foucault shadowgram into the geometrical model of a shear interferogram by means of isophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhevlakov, A. P.; Zatsepina, M. E.; Kirillovskii, V. K.

    2014-06-01

    The principles of transformation of a Foucault shadowgram into a quantitative map of wave-front deformation based on creation of a system of isophotes are unveiled. The presented studies and their results prove that there is a high degree of correspondence between a Foucault shadowgram and the geometrical model of a shear interferogram with respect to displaying wave-front deformations.

  20. On the influence of interfacial properties to the bending rigidity of layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shenyou; Wei, Yujie

    2016-07-01

    Layered structures are ubiquitous, from one-atom thick layers in two-dimensional materials, to nanoscale lipid bi-layers, and to micro and millimeter thick layers in composites. The mechanical behavior of layered structures heavily depends on the interfacial properties and is of great interest in engineering practice. In this work, we give an analytical solution of the bending rigidity of bilayered structures as a function of the interfacial shear strength. Our results show that while the critical bending stiffness when the interface starts to slide plastically is proportional to the interfacial shear strength, there is a strong nonlinearity between the rigidity and the applied bending after interfacial plastic shearing. We further give semi-analytical solutions to the bending of bilayers when both interfacial shearing and pre-existing crack are present in the interface of rectangular and circular bilayers. The analytical solutions are validated by using finite element simulations. Our analysis suggests that interfacial shearing resistance, interfacial stiffness and preexisting cracks dramatically influence the bending rigidity of bilayers. The results can be utilized to understand the significant stiffness difference in typical biostructures and novel materials, and may also be used for non-destructive detection of interfacial crack in composites when stiffness can be probed through vibration techniques.

  1. Parallel shear flow instabilities in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids: A comparison of generalized hydrodynamic model and molecular dynamics results

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwin, J.; Ganesh, R.

    2010-10-15

    Using a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model, the growth rate spectra of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability has been obtained analytically for a step shear profile in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids. The class of shear flows studied is assumed to be incompressible in nature. The growth rate spectra calculated exhibit viscous damping at high mode numbers, destabilization at stronger coupling, and in the limit {tau}{sub m} (viscoelastic relaxation time){yields}0, reduce to the regular Navier-Stokes growth rate spectra. A direct comparison is made with previous molecular dynamics (MD) simulations [Ashwin J. and R. Ganesh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 215003 (2010)] of KH instability. We find that for a given value of Reynolds number R and coupling parameter 1<{Gamma}<100, the GH and MD growth rates are in a qualitative agreement. The inclusion of the effect of shear heating as an effective coupling parameter {Gamma}{sub e} appears to improve the quantitative comparison as well.

  2. AFM probing of polymer/nanofiller interfacial adhesion and its correlation with bulk mechanical properties in a poly(ethylene terephthalate) nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Shigeru; Park, Yong Tae; Macosko, Christopher W; Ougizawa, Toshiaki; Haugstad, Greg

    2014-11-01

    The interfacial adhesion between polymer and nanofiller plays an important role in affecting the properties of nanocomposites. The detailed relationship between interfacial adhesion and bulk properties, however, is unclear. In this work, we developed an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based abrasive scanning methodology, as applied to model laminate systems, to probe the strength of interfacial adhesion relevant to poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET)/graphene or clay nanocomposites. Graphite and mica substrates covered with ∼2 nm thick PET films were abrasively sheared by an AFM tip as a model measurement of interfacial strength between matrix PET and dispersed graphene and clay, respectively. During several abrasive raster-scan cycles, PET was shear-displaced from the scanned region. At temperatures below the PET glass transition, PET on graphite exhibited abrupt delamination (i.e., full adhesive failure), whereas PET on mica did not; rather, it exhibited a degree of cohesive failure within the shear-displaced layer. Moreover, 100-fold higher force scanning procedures were required to abrade through an ultimate "precursor" layer of PET only ∼0.2-0.5 nm thick, which must be largely disentangled from the matrix polymer. Thus, the adhesive interface of relevance to the strength of clay-filler nanocomposites is between matrix polymer and strongly bound polymer. At 90 °C, above the bulk PET glass transition temperature, the PET film exhibited cohesive failure on both graphite and mica. Our results suggest that there is little difference in the strength of the relevant interfacial adhesion in the two nanocomposites within the rubbery dynamic regime. Further, the bulk mechanical properties of melt mixed PET/graphene and PET/clay nanocomposites were evaluated by dynamic mechanical analysis. The glassy dynamic storage modulus of the PET/clay nanocomposite was higher than that of PET/graphene, correlating with the differences in interfacial adhesion probed by AFM. PMID

  3. Investigation of the interfacial condition between bioceramic coatings and metallic substrates using guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffari, Nader; Ong, Chuon-Szen

    2001-04-01

    The work reported here is on the characterization of the interfacial properties between plasma-sprayed Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium substrates as used in cement-less hip orthopaedic implants. The phase velocity dispersion for the first Rayleigh-type mode for the coating-substrate system has been shown to be sensitive to the interfacial stiffness. Different interfacial conditions between the coating and substrate have been obtained by cyclic loading of the specimens in a four-point bend fatigue machine. The measured interfacial stiffness is then correlated with the interfacial fracture strength obtained by standard destructive shear tests.

  4. Rock physics model-based prediction of shear wave velocity in the Barnett Shale formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhiqi; Li, Xiang-Yang

    2015-06-01

    Predicting S-wave velocity is important for reservoir characterization and fluid identification in unconventional resources. A rock physics model-based method is developed for estimating pore aspect ratio and predicting shear wave velocity Vs from the information of P-wave velocity, porosity and mineralogy in a borehole. Statistical distribution of pore geometry is considered in the rock physics models. In the application to the Barnett formation, we compare the high frequency self-consistent approximation (SCA) method that corresponds to isolated pore spaces, and the low frequency SCA-Gassmann method that describes well-connected pore spaces. Inversion results indicate that compared to the surroundings, the Barnett Shale shows less fluctuation in the pore aspect ratio in spite of complex constituents in the shale. The high frequency method provides a more robust and accurate prediction of Vs for all the three intervals in the Barnett formation, while the low frequency method collapses for the Barnett Shale interval. Possible causes for this discrepancy can be explained by the fact that poor in situ pore connectivity and low permeability make well-log sonic frequencies act as high frequencies and thus invalidate the low frequency assumption of the Gassmann theory. In comparison, for the overlying Marble Falls and underlying Ellenburger carbonates, both the high and low frequency methods predict Vs with reasonable accuracy, which may reveal that sonic frequencies are within the transition frequencies zone due to higher pore connectivity in the surroundings.

  5. Low-shear modelled microgravity alters expression of virulence determinants of Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, Helena; Doyle, Marie; Hinds, Jason; Taylor, Peter W.

    2010-02-01

    Microbiological monitoring of air and surfaces within the ISS indicate that bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus are found with high frequency. Staphylococcus aureus, an opportunistic pathogen with the capacity to cause severe debilitating infection, constitutes a significant proportion of these isolates. Experiments conducted during short-term flight suggest that growth in microgravity leads to increases in bacterial antibiotic resistance and to cell wall changes. Growth under low-shear modelled microgravity (LSMMG) indicated that a reduced gravitational field acts as an environmental signal for expression of enhanced bacterial virulence in gram-negative pathogens. We therefore examined the effect of simulated microgravity on parameters of antibiotic susceptibility and virulence in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates RF1, RF6 and RF11; these strains were grown in a high aspect ratio vessel under LSMMG and compared with cells grown under normal gravity (NG). There were no significant differences in antibiotic susceptibility of staphylococci grown under LSMMG compared to NG. LSMMG-induced reductions in synthesis of the pigment staphyloxanthin and the major virulence determinant α-toxin were noted. Significant changes in global gene expression were identified by DNA microarray analysis; with isolate RF6, the expression of hla and genes of the regulatory system saeR/saeS were reduced approximately two-fold. These data provide strong evidence that growth of S. aureus under modelled microgravity leads to a reduction in expression of virulence determinants.

  6. Observation and modeling of mixing-layer development in HED blast-wave-driven shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Stefano, Carlos

    2013-10-01

    This talk describes work exploring the sensitivity to initial conditions of hydrodynamic mixing-layer growth due to shear flow in the high-energy-density regime. This work features an approach in two parts, experimental and theoretical. First, an experiment, conducted at the OMEGA-60 laser facility, seeks to measure the development of such a mixing layer. This is accomplished by placing a layer of low-density (initially of either 0.05 or 0.1 g/cm3, to vary the system's Atwood number) carbon foam against a layer of higher-density (initially 1.4 g/cm3) polyamide-imide that has been machined to a nominally-flat surface at its interface with the foam. Inherent roughness of this surface's finish is precisely measured and varied from piece to piece. Ten simultaneous OMEGA beams, comprising a 4.5 kJ, 1-ns pulse focused to a roughly 1-mm-diameter spot, irradiate a thin polycarbonate ablator, driving a blast wave into the foam, parallel to its interface with the polyamide-imide. The ablator is framed by a gold washer, such that the blast wave is driven only into the foam, and not into the polyamide-imide. The subsequent forward motion of the shocked foam creates the desired shear effect, and the system is imaged by X-ray radiography 35 ns after the beginning of the driving laser pulse. Second, a simulation is performed, intending to replicate the flow observed in the experiment as closely as possible. Using the resulting simulated flow parameters, an analytical model can be used to predict the evolution of the mixing layer, as well as track the motion of the fluid in the experiment prior to the snapshot seen in the radiograph. The ability of the model to predict growth of the mixing layer under the various conditions observed in the experiment is then examined. This work is funded by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52- 08NA28616, by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE

  7. Mechanobiology of interfacial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletta, P.; Preziosi, L.; Maugin, G. A.

    2013-03-01

    A multiscale analysis integrating biomechanics and mechanobiology is today required for deciphering the crosstalk between biochemistry, geometry and elasticity in living materials. In this paper we derive a unified thermomechanical theory coupling growth processes with mass transport phenomena across boundaries and/or material interfaces. Inside a living system made by two contiguous bodies with varying volumes, an interfacial growth mechanism is considered to force fast but continuous variations of the physical fields inside a narrow volume across the material interface. Such a phenomenon is modelled deriving homogenized surface fields on a growing non-material discontinuity, possibly including a singular edge line. A number of balance laws is derived for imposing the conservation of the thermomechanical properties of the biological system. From thermodynamical arguments we find that the normal displacement of the non-material interface is governed by the jump of a new form of material mechanical-energy flux, also involving the kinetic energies and the mass fluxes. Furthermore, the configurational balance indicates that the surface Eshelby tensor is the tangential stress measure driving the material inhomogeneities on the non-material interface. Accordingly, stress-dependent evolution laws for bulk and interfacial growth processes are derived for both volume and surface fields. The proposed thermomechanical theory is finally applied to three biological system models. The first two examples are focused on stress-free growth problems, concerning the morphogenesis of animal horns and of seashells. The third application finally deals with the stress-driven surface evolution of avascular tumours with heterogeneous structures. The results demonstrate that the proposed theory can successfully model those biological systems where growth and mass transport phenomena interact at different length-scales. Coupling biological, mechanical and geometrical factors, the proposed

  8. In vitro blood flow model with physiological wall shear stress for hemocompatibility testing-An example of coronary stent testing.

    PubMed

    Engels, Gerwin Erik; Blok, Sjoerd Leendert Johannes; van Oeveren, Willem

    2016-01-01

    Hemocompatibility of blood contacting medical devices has to be evaluated before their intended application. To assess hemocompatibility, blood flow models are often used and can either consist of in vivo animal models or in vitro blood flow models. Given the disadvantages of animal models, in vitro blood flow models are an attractive alternative. The in vitro blood flow models available nowadays mostly focus on generating continuous flow instead of generating a pulsatile flow with certain wall shear stress, which has shown to be more relevant in maintaining hemostasis. To address this issue, the authors introduce a blood flow model that is able to generate a pulsatile flow and wall shear stress resembling the physiological situation, which the authors have coined the "Haemobile." The authors have validated the model by performing Doppler flow measurements to calculate velocity profiles and (wall) shear stress profiles. As an example, the authors evaluated the thrombogenicity of two drug eluting stents, one that was already on the market and one that was still under development. After identifying proper conditions resembling the wall shear stress in coronary arteries, the authors compared the stents with each other and often used reference materials. These experiments resulted in high contrast between hemocompatible and incompatible materials, showing the exceptional testing capabilities of the Haemobile. In conclusion, the authors have developed an in vitro blood flow model which is capable of mimicking physiological conditions of blood flow as close as possible. The model is convenient in use and is able to clearly discriminate between hemocompatible and incompatible materials, making it suitable for evaluating the hemocompatible properties of medical devices. PMID:27435456

  9. Experimental characterization and constitutive modeling of the mechanical behavior of molybdenum under electromagnetically applied compression-shear ramp loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. S.; Ding, J. L.; Asay, J. R.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetically applied pressure-shear (MAPS) is a new experimental technique that provides a platform for direct measurement of material strength at extreme pressures. The technique employs an imposed quasi-static magnetic field and a pulsed power generator that produces an intense current on a planar driver panel, which in turn generates high amplitude magnetically induced longitudinal compression and transverse shear waves into a planar sample mounted on the drive panel. In order to apply sufficiently high shear traction to the test sample, a high strength material must be used for the drive panel. Molybdenum is a potential driver material for the MAPS experiment because of its high yield strength and sufficient electrical conductivity. To properly interpret the results and gain useful information from the experiments, it is critical to have a good understanding and a predictive capability of the mechanical response of the driver. In this work, the inelastic behavior of molybdenum under uniaxial compression and biaxial compression-shear ramp loading conditions is experimentally characterized. It is observed that an imposed uniaxial magnetic field ramped to approximately 10 T through a period of approximately 2500 μs and held near the peak for about 250 μs before being tested appears to anneal the molybdenum panel. In order to provide a physical basis for model development, a general theoretical framework that incorporates electromagnetic loading and the coupling between the imposed field and the inelasticity of molybdenum was developed. Based on this framework, a multi-axial continuum model for molybdenum under electromagnetic loading is presented. The model reasonably captures all of the material characteristics displayed by the experimental data obtained from various experimental configurations. In addition, data generated from shear loading provide invaluable information not only for validating but also for guiding the development of the material model for

  10. Experimental characterization and constitutive modeling of the mechanical behavior of molybdenum under electromagnetically applied compression-shear ramp loading

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alexander, C. Scott; Ding, Jow -Lian; Asay, James Russell

    2016-03-09

    Magnetically applied pressure-shear (MAPS) is a new experimental technique that provides a platform for direct measurement of material strength at extreme pressures. The technique employs an imposed quasi-static magnetic field and a pulsed power generator that produces an intense current on a planar driver panel, which in turn generates high amplitude magnetically induced longitudinal compression and transverse shear waves into a planar sample mounted on the drive panel. In order to apply sufficiently high shear traction to the test sample, a high strength material must be used for the drive panel. Molybdenum is a potential driver material for the MAPSmore » experiment because of its high yield strength and sufficient electrical conductivity. To properly interpret the results and gain useful information from the experiments, it is critical to have a good understanding and a predictive capability of the mechanical response of the driver. In this work, the inelastic behavior of molybdenum under uniaxial compression and biaxial compression-shear ramp loading conditions is experimentally characterized. It is observed that an imposed uniaxial magnetic field ramped to approximately 10 T through a period of approximately 2500 μs and held near the peak for about 250 μs before being tested appears to anneal the molybdenum panel. In order to provide a physical basis for model development, a general theoretical framework that incorporates electromagnetic loading and the coupling between the imposed field and the inelasticity of molybdenum was developed. Based on this framework, a multi-axial continuum model for molybdenum under electromagnetic loading is presented. The model reasonably captures all of the material characteristics displayed by the experimental data obtained from various experimental configurations. Additionally, data generated from shear loading provide invaluable information not only for validating but also for guiding the development of the material

  11. Incorporating Plasticity of the Interfibrillar Matrix in Shear Lag Models is Necessary to Replicate the Multiscale Mechanics of Tendon Fascicles

    PubMed Central

    Szczesny, Spencer E.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite current knowledge of tendon structure, the fundamental deformation mechanisms underlying tendon mechanics and failure are unknown. We recently showed that a shear lag model, which explicitly assumed plastic interfibrillar load transfer between discontinuous fibrils, could explain the multiscale fascicle mechanics, suggesting that fascicle yielding is due to plastic deformation of the interfibrillar matrix. However, it is unclear whether alternative physical mechanisms, such as elastic interfibrillar deformation or fibril yielding, also contribute to fascicle mechanical behavior. The objective of the current work was to determine if plasticity of the interfibrillar matrix is uniquely capable of explaining the multiscale mechanics of tendon fascicles including the tissue post-yield behavior. This was examined by comparing the predictions of a continuous fibril model and three separate shear lag models incorporating an elastic, plastic, or elastoplastic interfibrillar matrix with multiscale experimental data. The predicted effects of fibril yielding on each of these models were also considered. The results demonstrated that neither the continuous fibril model nor the elastic shear lag model can successfully predict the experimental data, even if fibril yielding is included. Only the plastic or elastoplastic shear lag models were capable of reproducing the multiscale tendon fascicle mechanics. Differences between these two models were small, although the elastoplastic model did improve the fit of the experimental data at low applied tissue strains. These findings suggest that while interfibrillar elasticity contributes to the initial stress response, plastic deformation of the interfibrillar matrix is responsible for tendon fascicle post-yield behavior. This information sheds light on the physical processes underlying tendon failure, which is essential to improve our understanding of tissue pathology and guide the development of successful repair. PMID:25262202

  12. Analysis of shear stress distribution in pushout process of fiber-reinforced ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, Kouichi; Kagawa, Yutaka

    1995-04-01

    The interfacial shear stress distribution of a thin specimen of SiC fiber-reinforced glass matrix composite (fiber volume fraction of 0.1, 0.5, and 0.7) during a fiber pushout process was subjected to finite element analysis using a three concentric axisymmetrical model which consisted of fiber, matrix, and composite. A stress criterion was used to determine interface debonding. Effects of thermally-induced stress and a post debond sliding process at the interface were also included in the analysis. The analytical result showed that shear stress near the specimen surface was introduced during the specimen preparation process. Before the interfacial debonding, the distribution of shear stress during the pushout test was affected by the existence of thermally-induced stress in the specimen. The interfacial shear debonding initiated {approximately}30 {mu}m below the pushing surface and the sliding at the debonded interface proceeded in the direction of both the pushing surface and back surface from the peak shear position; the debonding from the back surface initiated just before the complete debonding of the interface. The pushout load-displacement curve near the origin was straight, however, after the existence of interface sliding at the debonded interface, the curve exhibited non-linearity with the increase in applied load up to the complete debonding at the interface. This debonding process was essentially independent of the fiber volume fraction. The results indicate that the total of thermally-induced stress in the specimen and shear stress distribution generated by applied load are important for the initiation of debonding and the frictional sliding process of the thin specimen pushout test.

  13. The development of a tensile-shear punch correlation for yield properties of model austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hankin, G.L.; Faulkner, R.G.; Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A.

    1997-08-01

    The effective shear yield and maximum strengths of a set of neutron-irradiated, isotopically tailored austentic alloys were evaluated using the shear punch test. The dependence on composition and neutron dose showed the same trends as were observed in the corresponding miniature tensile specimen study conducted earlier. A single tensile-shear punch correlation was developed for the three alloys in which the maximum shear stress or Tresca criterion was successfully applied to predict the slope. The correlation will predict the tensile yield strength of the three different austenitic alloys tested to within {+-}53 MPa. The accuracy of the correlation improves with increasing material strength, to within {+-} MPa for predicting tensile yield strengths in the range of 400-800 MPa.

  14. Novel shear mechanism in nanolayered composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mara, Nathan; Bhattacharyya, Dhriti; Hirth, John P; Dickerson, Patricia O; Misra, Amit

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that two-phase nanocomposite materials with semicoherent interfaces exhibit enhanced strength, deformability, and radiation damage resistance. The remarkable behavior exhibited by these materials has been attributed to the atomistic structure of the bi-metal interface that results in interfaces with low shear strength and hence, strong barriers for slip transmission due to dislocation core spreading along the weak interfaces. In this work, the low interfacial shear strength of Cu/Nb nanoscale multilayers dictates a new mechanism for shear banding and strain softening during micropillar compression. Previous work investigating shear band formation in nanocrystalline materials has shown a connection between insufficient strain hardening and the onset of shear banding in Fe and Fe-10% Cu, but has also shown that hardening does not necessarily offset shear banding in Pd nanomaterials. Therefore, the mechanisms behind shear localization in nanocrystalline materials are not completely understood. Our findings, supported by molecular dynamics simulations, provide insight on the design of nanocomposites with tailored interface structures and geometry to obtain a combination of high strength and deformability. High strength is derived from the ability of the interfaces to trap dislocations through relative ease of interfacial shear, while deformability can be maximized by controlling the effects of loading geometry on shear band formation.

  15. Multiscale Modeling of the Effect of Pressure on the Interfacial Tension and Other Cohesion Parameters in Binary Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mayoral, E; Nahmad-Achar, E

    2016-03-10

    We study and predict the interfacial tension, solubility parameters, and Flory-Huggins parameters of binary mixtures as functions of pressure and temperature, using multiscale numerical simulation. A mesoscopic approach is proposed for simulating the pressure dependence of the interfacial tension for binary mixtures, at different temperatures, using classical dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). The thermodynamic properties of real systems are reproduced via the parametrization of the repulsive interaction parameters as functions of pressure and temperature via molecular dynamics simulations. Using this methodology, we calculate and analyze the cohesive energy density and the solubility parameters of different species obtaining excellent agreement with reported experimental behavior. The pressure- and temperature-dependent Flory-Huggins and repulsive DPD interaction parameters for binary mixtures are also obtained and validated against experimental data. This multiscale methodology offers the benefit of being applicable for any species and under difficult or nonfeasible experimental conditions, at a relatively low computational cost. PMID:26840645

  16. Effect of Low Shear Modeled Microgravity (LSMMG) on the Probiotic Lactobacillus Acidophilus ATCC 4356

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, S.; Voorhies, A.; Lorenzi, H.; Castro-Wallace, S.; Douglas, G.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) probiotic microbes into the spaceflight food system has the potential for use as a safe, non-invasive, daily countermeasure to crew microbiome and immune dysregulation. However, the microgravity effects on the stress tolerances and genetic expression of probiotic bacteria must be determined to confirm translation of strain benefits and to identify potential for optimization of growth, survival, and strain selection for spaceflight. The work presented here demonstrates the translation of characteristics of a GRAS probiotic bacteria to a microgravity analog environment. Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 was grown in the low shear modeled microgravity (LSMMG) orientation and the control orientation in the rotating wall vessel (RWV) to determine the effect of LSMMG on the growth, survival through stress challenge, and gene expression of the strain. No differences were observed between the LSMMG and control grown L. acidophilus, suggesting that the strain will behave similarly in spaceflight and may be expected to confer Earth-based benefits.

  17. Shear-lag model of diffusion-induced buckling of core–shell nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Kai; Zheng, Bailin; Yang, Fuqian

    2016-07-01

    The lithiation and de-lithiation during the electrochemical cycling of lithium–ion batteries (LIBs) can introduce local deformation in the active materials of electrodes, resulting in the evolution of local stress and strain in the active materials. Understanding the structural degradation associated with lithiation-induced deformation in the active materials is one of the important steps towards structural optimization of the active materials used in LIBs. There are various degradation modes, including swelling, cracking, and buckling especially for the nanowires and nanorods used in LIBs. In this work, a shear-lag model and the theory of diffusion-induced stress are used to investigate diffusion-induced buckling of core–shell nanowires during lithiation. The critical load for the onset of the buckling of a nanowire decreases with the increase of the nanowire length. The larger the surface current density, the less the time is to reach the critical load for the onset of the buckling of the nanowire.

  18. MHD modeling of atlas experiments to study transverse shear interface interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, F. L.; Hammerberg, J. E.; Keinigs, R. K.; Faehl, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    The transverse shear established at the interface of two solids moving at differential velocities on the order of the sound speed is being studied in experiments on the ATLAS capacitor bank at Los Alamos. The ATLAS bank has finished certification tests and has demonstrated peak currents of 27.5 MA into an inductive load with a risetime of 5 microseconds. One- and two-dimensional MHD calculations have been performed in support of these 'friction-like' ATLAS experiments. Current flowing along the outer surface of a thick aluminum liner, 10 mm thick at impact with the interaction target, accelerates the liner to velocities of {approx}1.0-1.5 km/s. This cylindrically imploding liner impacts a target assembly composed of alternating disks of high- and low-density materials. Different shock speeds in the two materials leads to a differential velocity along the interface. Shock heating, elastic-plastic flow, and stress transport are included in the calculations. Material strength properties are modeled with a Steinburg-Guinan treatment in these first studies. Various design configurations for the ATLAS experiments are now being considered and will be presented.

  19. Supersonic Shear Wave Elastography of Response to Anti-cancer Therapy in a Xenograft Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Chamming's, Foucauld; Le-Frère-Belda, Marie-Aude; Latorre-Ossa, Heldmuth; Fitoussi, Victor; Redheuil, Alban; Assayag, Franck; Pidial, Laetitia; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Cuénod, Charles-André; Fournier, Laure S

    2016-04-01

    Our objective was to determine if supersonic shear wave elastography (SSWE) can detect changes in stiffness of a breast cancer model under therapy. A human invasive carcinoma was implanted in 22 mice. Eleven were treated with an anti-angiogenic therapy and 11 with glucose for 24 d. Tumor volume and stiffness were assessed during 2 wk before treatment and 0, 7, 12, 20 and 24 d after the start of therapy using SSWE. Pathology was assessed after 12 and 24 d of treatment. We found that response to therapy was associated with early softening of treated tumors only, resulting in a significant difference from non-treated tumors after 12 d of treatment (p = 0.03). On pathology, large areas of necrosis were observed at 12 d in treated tumors. Although treatment was still effective, treated tumors subsequently stiffened during a second phase of the treatment (days 12-24), with a small amount of necrosis observed on pathology on day 24. In conclusion, SSWE was able to measure changes in the stiffness of tumors in response to anti-cancer treatment. However, stiffness changes associated with good response to treatment may change over time, and increased stiffness may also reflect therapy efficacy. PMID:26746382

  20. A micromechanics constitutive model of transformation plasticity with shear and dilatation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Q. P.; Hwang, K. C.; Yu, S. W.

    B ASED on micromechanics, thermodynamics and microscale t → m transformation mechanism considerations a micromechanics constitutive model which takes into account both the dilatation and shear effects of the transformation is proposed to describe the plastic, pseudoelastic and shape memory behaviors of structural ceramics during transformation under different temperatures. In the derivation, a constitutive element (representative material sample) was used which contains many of the transformed m-ZrO 2 grains or precipitates as the second phase inclusions embedded in an elastic matrix. Under some basic assumptions, analytic expressions for the Helmholtz and complementary free energy of the constitutive element are derived in a self-consistent manner by using the Mori-Tanaka method which takes into account the interaction between the transformed inclusions. The derived free energy is a function of externally applied macroscopic stress (or strain), temperature, volume fraction of transformed phase and the averaged stressfree transformation strain (eigenstrain) of all the transformed inclusions in the constitutive element, the latter two quantities being considered to be the internal variables describing the micro-structural rearrangement in the constitutive element. In the framework of the Hill-Rice internal variable constitutive theory, the transformation yield function and incremental stress strain relations, in analogy to the theory of metal plasticity, for proportional and non-proportional loading histories are derived, respectively. The theoretical predictions are compared with the available experimental data of Mg-PSZ and Ce-TZP polycrystalline toughening ceramics.

  1. Weibull models of fracture strengths and fatigue behavior of dental resins in flexure and shear.

    PubMed

    Baran, G R; McCool, J I; Paul, D; Boberick, K; Wunder, S

    1998-01-01

    In estimating lifetimes of dental restorative materials, it is useful to have available data on the fatigue behavior of these materials. Current efforts at estimation include several untested assumptions related to the equivalence of flaw distributions sampled by shear, tensile, and compressive stresses. Environmental influences on material properties are not accounted for, and it is unclear if fatigue limits exist. In this study, the shear and flexural strengths of three resins used as matrices in dental restorative composite materials were characterized by Weibull parameters. It was found that shear strengths were lower than flexural strengths, liquid sorption had a profound effect on characteristic strengths, and the Weibull shape parameter obtained from shear data differed for some materials from that obtained in flexure. In shear and flexural fatigue, a power law relationship applied for up to 250,000 cycles; no fatigue limits were found, and the data thus imply only one flaw population is responsible for failure. Again, liquid sorption adversely affected strength levels in most materials (decreasing shear strengths and flexural strengths by factors of 2-3) and to a greater extent than did the degree of cure or material chemistry. PMID:9730059

  2. Wall shear stress distributions in a model of normal and constricted small airways.

    PubMed

    Evans, David J; Green, Anthony S; Thomas, Nicholas K

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have highlighted flow shear stress as a possible damage mechanism for small airways, in particular those liable to constriction through disease or injury due to mechanical ventilation. Flow experiments in vitro have implicated shear stress as a relevant factor for mechanotransduction pathways with respect to airway epithelial cell function. Using computational fluid dynamics analysis, this study reports velocity profiles and calculations for wall shear stress distributions in a three-generation, asymmetric section of the small airways subjected to a steady, inspiratory flow. The results show distal variation of wall shear stress distributions due to velocity gradients on the carina side of each daughter airway branch. The maximum wall shear stresses in both normal and constricted small airways are shown to exceed those calculated using data from previous simpler one-dimensional experimental analyses. These findings have implications for lung cell flow experiments involving shear stress in the consideration of both normal airway function and pathology due to mechanotransduction mechanisms. PMID:24618983

  3. Atomistic simulations of crystal-melt interfaces in a model binary alloy: Interfacial free energies, adsorption coefficients, and excess entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, C. A.; Olmsted, D. L.; Asta, M.; Hoyt, J. J.; Foiles, S. M.

    2009-02-01

    Monte Carlo and molecular-dynamics simulations are employed in a study of the equilibrium structural and thermodynamic properties of crystal-melt interfaces in a model binary alloy system described by Lennard-Jones interatomic interactions with zero size mismatch, a ratio of interaction strengths equal to 0.75, and interspecies interactions given by Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules. This alloy system features a simple lens-type solid-liquid phase diagram at zero pressure, with nearly ideal solution thermodynamics in the solid and liquid solution phases. Equilibrium density profiles are computed for (100)-oriented crystal-melt interfaces and are used to derive the magnitudes of the relative adsorption coefficients (Γi(j)) at six temperatures along the solidus/liquidus boundary. The values for Γ1(2) , the relative adsorption of the lower melting-point species (1) with respect to the higher melting point species (2), are found to vary monotonically with temperature, with values that are positive and in the range of a few atomic percent per interface site. By contrast, values of Γ2(1) display a much more complex temperature dependence with a large peak in the magnitude of the relative adsorption more than ten times larger than those found for Γ1(2) . The capillary fluctuation method is used to compute the temperature dependence of the magnitudes and anisotropies of the crystal-melt interfacial free energy (γ) . At all temperatures we obtain the ordering γ100>γ110>γ111 for the high-symmetry (100), (110), and (111) interface orientations. The values of γ monotonically decrease with decreasing temperature (i.e., increasing concentration of the lower melting-point species). Using the calculated temperature-dependent values of γ and Γ1(2) in the Gibbs adsorption theorem, we estimate that roughly 25% of the temperature dependence of γ for the alloys can be attributed to interface adsorption, while the remaining contribution arises from the relative excess entropy

  4. Numerical modelling of a healthy/malaria-infected erythrocyte in shear flow using dissipative particle dynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Ting; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Cheong Khoo, Boo; Teck Lim, Chwee

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper, the dynamics of healthy and malaria-infected erythrocytes in the shear flow are investigated using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), a particle-based method. A discrete model is developed, where the computational domain is discretized into a set of particles to represent the suspending liquid, as well as erythrocytes as suspended deformable particles. The particles on an erythrocyte surface are connected into a triangular network to represent the membrane. The interaction between any two particles is modelled by the DPD method, which conserves both mass and momentum. In order to validate this model, the deformation of a spherical capsule in the shear flow is firstly simulated, and a good agreement is found with previously published works. Then, the dynamics of a healthy biconcave erythrocyte in a shear flow is investigated. The results demonstrate that a healthy erythrocyte undergoes a tank-treading motion at a high capillary number, and a tumbling motion at a low capillary number or at a high viscosity ratio, internal (erythrocyte) to external fluids. Two other types of trembling motions, breathing with tumbling and swinging with tank-treading, are also found at an intermediate capillary number or viscosity ratio. Finally, the dynamics of malaria-infected erythrocyte in a shear flow is studied. At the same shear rate, if the healthy erythrocyte undergoes a tumbling motion, the malaria-infected one will exhibit a tumbling motion only. If the healthy erythrocyte undergoes a trembling motion, the malaria-infected one cannot exhibit tank-treading motion. If the healthy erythrocyte undergoes a tank-treading motion, the malaria-infected one will exhibit one of three dynamic motions: tumbling, trembling or tank-treading motion.

  5. Carbon Fiber—Vinyl Ester Interfacial Adhesion Improvement by the Use of an Epoxy Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautard, Frederic; Xu, Lanhong; Drzal, Lawrence T.

    With the use of composites expanding into larger structural applications, vinyl ester matrices which are not dependent on an autoclave cure and are more environmentally resistant to water absorption are being investigated. The degree of adhesion between the fiber and matrix has been recognized to be a critical factor in determining the performance of fiber-reinforced composites. The mechanical properties of carbon fiber-vinyl ester composites are low compared to carbon fiber-epoxy composites, partly because of lower interfacial adhesion. The origins of this limitation were investigated. The influence of preferential adsorption of the matrix constituents on the interfacial adhesion was not significant. However, the high cure volume shrinkage was found to be an important factor. An engineered interphase consisting of a partially cross-linked epoxy sizing that could chemically bond to the carbon fiber and form an interpenetrating network with the vinyl ester matrix was found to sharply improve the interfacial adhesion. The mechanisms involved in that improvement were investigated. The diffusion of styrene in the epoxy coating decreased the residual stress induced by the volume shrinkage of the vinyl ester matrix. The optimal value of the thickness was found to be a dominant factor in increasing the value of the interfacial shear strength according to a 2D non-linear finite element model.

  6. Time-dependent behavior of RC beams strengthened with externally bonded FRP plates: interfacial stresses analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyoucef, S.; Tounsi, A.; Benrahou, K. H.; Adda Bedia, E. A.

    2007-12-01

    External bonding of fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites has becomes a popular technique for strengthening concrete structures all over the world. An important failure mode of such strengthened members is the debonding of the FRP plate from the concrete due to high interfacial stresses near the plate ends. For correctly installed FRP plate, failure will occur within the concrete. Accurate predictions of the interfacial stresses are prerequisite for designing against debonding failures. In particular, the interfacial stresses between a beam and soffit plate within the linear elastic range have been addressed by numerous analytical investigations. In this study, the time-dependent behavior of RC beams bonded with thin composite plate was investigated theoretically by including the effect of the adherend shear deformations. The time effects considered here are those that arise from shrinkage and creep deformations of the concrete. This paper presents an analytical model for the interfacial stresses between RC beam and a thin FRP plate bonded to its soffit. The influence of creep and shrinkage effect relative to the time of the casting and the time of the loading of the beams is taken into account. Numerical results from the present analysis are presented to illustrate the significance of time-dependent of adhesive stresses.

  7. Interfacial structure and dynamics of fatty alcohols: Effects of chain branching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, Rachel Elana

    The interfacial and bulk dynamic properties of fatty alcohol materials are of great interest as subjects of research and for a range of practical applications. One example is the use of surfactants to stabilize systems such as emulsions and foams. Interfacial viscoelasticity impacts the transport properties of the system. This thesis describes an investigation into interfacial phenomena: straight- and branched-chain hexadecanol and eicosanol mixtures. In this study, the rheology of Langmuir films of hexadecanol and eicosanol straight and branched mixtures was examined. Surface pressure vs. area isotherms, interfacial rheology, Brewster angle microscopy, and X-ray diffraction and reflectivity were all used to elucidate the behavior and structure of the fatty alcohol systems as a function of branched concentration. It was found that for eicosanol below a surface pressure of 25 mN/m, the branched chains are in the monolayer, yet phase-separated from the straight chains. At higher surface pressures, the branched chains are expelled, and presumably form micelles in the subphase. In contrast, the hexadecanol branched chains are not in the monolayer at any surface pressure. These different behaviors are explained in terms of straight-chain flexibility. The effect of the monolayer structure on the surface shear viscosity will be discussed. These studies provide a deeper understanding of the structure and behavior of amphiphilic mixtures, and will ultimately aid in developing models for lipids, micelle formation, and other important biological functions.

  8. Finite difference modelling to evaluate seismic P wave and shear wave field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burschil, T.; Beilecke, T.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2014-08-01

    High-resolution reflection seismic methods are an established non-destructive tool for engineering tasks. In the near surface, shear wave reflection seismic measurements usually offer a higher spatial resolution in the same effective signal frequency spectrum than P wave data, but data quality varies more strongly. To discuss the causes of these differences, we investigated a P wave and a SH wave reflection seismic profile measured at the same location on Föhr island, and applied reflection seismic processing to the field data as well as finite difference modelling of the seismic wavefield (SOFI FD-code). The simulations calculated were adapted to the acquisition field geometry, comprising 2 m receiver distance and 4 m shot distance along the 1.5 km long P wave and 800 m long SH wave profiles. A Ricker-Wavelet and the use of absorbing frames were first order model parameters. The petrophysical parameters to populate the structural models down to 400 m depth are taken from borehole data, VSP measurements and cross-plot relations. The first simulation of the P wave wavefield was based on a simplified hydrogeological model of the survey location containing six lithostratigraphic units. Single shot data were compared and seismic sections created. Major features like direct wave, refracted waves and reflections are imaged, but the reflectors describing a prominent till layer at ca. 80 m depth was missing. Therefore, the P wave input model was refined and 16 units assigned. These define a laterally more variable velocity model (vP = 1600-2300 m s-1) leading to a much better reproduction of the field data. The SH wave model was adapted accordingly but only led to minor correlation with the field data and produced a higher signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, we suggest to consider for future simulations additional features like intrinsic damping, thin layering, or a near surface weathering layer. These may lead to a better understanding of key parameters determining the

  9. Hysteresis model of shape memory alloy wire-based laminated rubber bearing under compression and unidirectional shear loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayati Dezfuli, F.; Shahria Alam, M.

    2015-06-01

    Smart lead rubber bearings (LRBs), in which a shape memory alloy (SMA) is used in the form of wires, are a new generation of elastomeric isolators with improved performance in terms of recentering capability and energy dissipation capacity. It is of great interest to implement SMA wire-based lead rubber bearings (SMA-LRBs) in bridges; however, currently there is no appropriate hysteresis model for accurately simulating the behavior of such isolators. A constitutive model for SMA-LRBs is proposed in this study. An LRB is equipped with a double cross configuration of SMA wires (DC-SMAW) and subjected to compression and unidirectional shear loadings. Due to the complexity of the shear behavior of the SMA-LRB, a hysteresis model is developed for the DC-SMAWs and then combined with the bilinear kinematic hardening model, which is assumed for the LRB. Comparing the hysteretic response of decoupled systems with that of the SMA-LRB shows that the high recentering capability of the DC-SMAW model with zero residual deformation could noticeably reduce the residual deformation of the LRB. The developed constitutive model for DC-SMAWs is characterized by three stiffnesses when the shear strain exceeds a starting limit at which the SMA wires are activated due to phase transformation. An important point is that the shear hysteresis of the DC-SMAW model looks different from the flag-shaped hysteresis of the SMA because of the specific arrangement of wires and its effect on the resultant forces transferred from the wires to the rubber bearing.

  10. Particle-laden interfaces: direct calculation of interfacial stress from a discrete particle simulation of a pendant drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Chuan; Botto, Lorenzo

    2015-11-01

    The adsorption of solid particles to fluid interfaces is exploited in several multiphase flow technologies, and plays a fundamental role in the dynamics of particle-laden drops. A fundamental question is how the particles modify the effective mechanical properties of the interface. Using a fast Eulerian-Lagrangian model for interfacial colloids, we have simulated a pendant drop whose surface is covered with spherical particles having short-range repulsion. The interface curvature induces non-uniform and anisotropic interfacial stresses, which we calculate by an interfacial extension of the Irving-Kirkwood formula. The isotropic component of this stress, related to the effective surface tension, is in good agreement with that calculated by fitting the drop shape to the Young-Laplace equation. The anisotropic component, related to the interfacial shear elasticity, is highly non uniform: small at the drop apex, significant along the drop sides. The reduction in surface tension can be substantial even below maximum surface packing. We illustrate this point by simulating phase-coarsening of a two-phase mixture in which the presence of interfacial particles ``freezes'' the coarsening process, for surface coverage well below maximum packing This work is supported by the EU through the Marie Curie Grant FLOWMAT (618335).

  11. Two-group interfacial area transport equation in large diameter pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Todd Ryan

    2002-01-01

    The closure relations for the two-group interfacial area transport equation (LATE) by which the changes of interfacial area concentration can be dynamically modeled are set forth in this thesis for the case of large diameter pipes. In the two-group formulation, the sources and sink terms are established by mechanistic modeling of the intra-group and inter-group transport of the bubbles based on five major bubble interaction mechanisms. These mechanisms are bubble coalescence as a result of random collision, RC, wake entrainment, WE, bubble break-up due to turbulent impact, TI, small bubble shearing-off of large bubbles, SO, and bubble break-up due to surface instability for large bubbles, SI. The models developed are supported by experiments using a four-sensor conductivity probe in large diameter test sections, 10.16 cm and 15.24 cm in diameter. A total of 31 different flow conditions under atmospheric pressure are examined in the bubbly to churn-turbulent flow regimes. The local flow parameters measured by the multi-sensor conductivity probe include the local time-averaged void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble Sauter mean diameter, interfacial velocity, and interface frequency for the two groups of bubbles. The model is evaluated against the extensive database and good agreement is obtained between the model predictions and the experimental data. The average error based on the total interfacial area concentration is around 7.0% for interfacial area concentration in both test sections. Recirculation in the large pipes is given special treatment in the measurement analysis. Using upwards and downwards facing probes, information on the missing bubble signals is obtained which is used to correct the local data by either the Effective Bubble Number or Intrusiveness Factor Method. The correction to void fraction is found to be about a 12% increase in the local area averaged value, while interfacial area concentration may increase upwards of 60% in the

  12. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  13. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  14. A study of the second and third order closure models of turbulence for prediction of separated shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amano, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    The hybrid model of the Reynolds-stress turbulence closure is tested for the computation of the flows over a step and disk. Here it is attempted to improve the redistributive action of the turbulence energy among the Reynolds stresses. By evaluating the existing models for the pressure-strain correlation, better coefficients are obtained for the prediction of separating shear flows. Furthermore, the diffusion rate of the Reynolds stresses is reevaluated adopting several algebraic correlations for the triple-velocity products. The models of Cormack et al., Daly-Harlow, Hanjalic-Launder, and Shir were tested for the reattaching shear flows. It was generally observed that all these algebraic models give considerably low values of the triple-velocity products. This is attributed to the fact that none of the algebraic models can take the convective effect of the triple-velocity products into account in the separating shear flows, thus resulting in much lower diffusion rate than Reynolds stresses. In order to improve the evaluation of these quantities correction factors are introduced based on the comparison with some experimental data.

  15. Contribution to the modeling of the shear viscosity of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6): Comparative study of some representative models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boned, C.; Galliero, G.; Bazile, J. P.; Magrini, W.

    2013-09-01

    Three recent physically based models (Lennard-Jones, free volume, thermodynamic scaling) for representing the viscosity of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) are discussed together with two models (friction theory and Enskog 2σ) that have been recently applied to this fluid. The experimental database employed for adjustment (1562 data points) considers a large temperature (225.18 to 473.15 K) and pressure intervals (0.0264 to 51.21 MPa). The absolute average deviation is 3.8% for the Lennard-Jones model (one parameter), 1.7% for the free volume model (three parameters) and 1.5% for the thermodynamic scaling model (six parameters). Thus, it is shown that when physically based approaches are employed, a limited number of parameters is sufficient to represent accurately the shear viscosity of SF6. Furthermore it has been confirmed, using the thermodynamic scaling approach, that the repulsive steepness of the SF6 interaction potential is higher than usually found for fluids composed by non polar spherical molecule.

  16. Observation and modeling of mixing-layer development in high-energy-density, blast-wave-driven shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Di Stefano, C. A. Kuranz, C. C.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.; Malamud, G.; Henry de Frahan, M. T.; Johnsen, E.; Shimony, A.; Shvarts, D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Martinez, D.

    2014-05-15

    In this work, we examine the hydrodynamics of high-energy-density (HED) shear flows. Experiments, consisting of two materials of differing density, use the OMEGA-60 laser to drive a blast wave at a pressure of ∼50 Mbar into one of the media, creating a shear flow in the resulting shocked system. The interface between the two materials is Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable, and a mixing layer of growing width develops due to the shear. To theoretically analyze the instability's behavior, we rely on two sources of information. First, the interface spectrum is well-characterized, which allows us to identify how the shock front and the subsequent shear in the post-shock flow interact with the interface. These observations provide direct evidence that vortex merger dominates the evolution of the interface structure. Second, simulations calibrated to the experiment allow us to estimate the time-dependent evolution of the deposition of vorticity at the interface. The overall result is that we are able to choose a hydrodynamic model for the system, and consequently examine how well the flow in this HED system corresponds to a classical hydrodynamic description.

  17. Inducing rostrum interfacial waves by fluid-solid coupling in a Chinese river dolphin (Lipotes vexillifer )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhongchang; Zhang, Yu; Wei, Chong; Wang, Xianyan

    2016-01-01

    Through numerically solving the appropriate wave equations, propagation of biosonar signals in a Chinese river dolphin (baiji) was studied. The interfacial waves along the rostrum-tissue interfaces, including both compressional (longitudinal) and shear (transverse) waves in the solid rostrum through fluid-solid coupling were examined. The baiji's rostrum was found to effect acoustic beam formation not only as an interfacial wave generator but also as a sound reflector. The wave propagation patterns in the solid rostrum were found to significantly change the wave movement through the bone. Vibrations in the rostrum, expressed in solid displacement, initially increased but eventually decreased from posterior to anterior sides, indicating a complex physical process. Furthermore, the comparisons among seven cases, including the combination of (1) the rostrum, melon, and air sacs; (2) rostrum-air sacs; (3) rostrum-melon; (4) only rostrum; (5) air sacs-melon; (6) only air sacs; and (7) only melon revealed that the cases including the rostrum were better able to approach the complete system by inducing rostrum-tissue interfacial waves and reducing the differences in main beam angle and -3 dB beam width. The interfacial waves in the rostrum were considered complementary with reflection to determine the obbligato role of the rostrum in the baiji's biosonar emission. The far-field beams formed from complete fluid-solid models and non-fluid-solid models were compared to reveal the effects brought by the consideration of shear waves of the solid structures of the baiji. The results may provide useful information for further understanding the role of the rostrum in this odontocete species.

  18. Inducing rostrum interfacial waves by fluid-solid coupling in a Chinese river dolphin (Lipotesvexillifer).

    PubMed

    Song, Zhongchang; Zhang, Yu; Wei, Chong; Wang, Xianyan

    2016-01-01

    Through numerically solving the appropriate wave equations, propagation of biosonar signals in a Chinese river dolphin (baiji) was studied. The interfacial waves along the rostrum-tissue interfaces, including both compressional (longitudinal) and shear (transverse) waves in the solid rostrum through fluid-solid coupling were examined. The baiji's rostrum was found to effect acoustic beam formation not only as an interfacial wave generator but also as a sound reflector. The wave propagation patterns in the solid rostrum were found to significantly change the wave movement through the bone. Vibrations in the rostrum, expressed in solid displacement, initially increased but eventually decreased from posterior to anterior sides, indicating a complex physical process. Furthermore, the comparisons among seven cases, including the combination of (1) the rostrum, melon, and air sacs; (2) rostrum-air sacs; (3) rostrum-melon; (4) only rostrum; (5) air sacs-melon; (6) only air sacs; and (7) only melon revealed that the cases including the rostrum were better able to approach the complete system by inducing rostrum-tissue interfacial waves and reducing the differences in main beam angle and -3 dB beam width. The interfacial waves in the rostrum were considered complementary with reflection to determine the obbligato role of the rostrum in the baiji's biosonar emission. The far-field beams formed from complete fluid-solid models and non-fluid-solid models were compared to reveal the effects brought by the consideration of shear waves of the solid structures of the baiji. The results may provide useful information for further understanding the role of the rostrum in this odontocete species. PMID:26871105

  19. Interfacial area and interfacial transfer in two-phase systems. DOE final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Mamoru; Hibiki, T.; Revankar, S.T.; Kim, S.; Le Corre, J.M.

    2002-07-01

    In the two-fluid model, the field equations are expressed by the six conservation equations consisting of mass, momentum and energy equations for each phase. The existence of the interfacial transfer terms is one of the most important characteristics of the two-fluid model formulation. The interfacial transfer terms are strongly related to the interfacial area concentration and to the local transfer mechanisms such as the degree of turbulence near interfaces. This study focuses on the development of a closure relation for the interfacial area concentration. A brief summary of several problems of the current closure relation for the interfacial area concentration and a new concept to overcome the problem are given.

  20. A global tomographic model of shear attenuation in the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, B.

    1995-07-01

    We present a global three-dimensional model of shear attenuation in the upper mantle, based on the measurement of amplitudes of low-frequency (100-300s) Rayleigh waves observed at stations of the Geoscope and Iris networks. Attenuation coefficients are measured on R1 and R2 paths using a method which minimizes the effects of focussing due to propagation in a three-dimensional elastic Earth. Through a series of tests which, in particular, involve the computation of synthetic models of attenuation and focussing, we demonstrate that long wavelength lateral variations in attenuation in the first 400-500 km of the mantle can indeed be resolved. The model is obtained in a two-step procedure. The first step consists in the computation of maps of Rayleigh wave attenuation at different periods, using an inversion method without a priori parametrisation, which involves the introduction of a correlation length, chosen here at 3000 km to optimize the trade-off between resolution and variance in the model. In the second step, after corrections for shallow structure, an inversion with depth is performed, assuming lateral heterogeneity is confined to depths between 80 and 650 km. The resulting model presents lateral variations in Qβ that are correlated with tectonic features, in particular ridges and shields in the first 250 km of the upper mantle. Below that depth the pattern shifts and becomes correlated with the hotspot distribution, particularly so if the buoyancy strength of hotspots is taken into account. Two major low-velocity zones appear to be located in the central pacific and beneath northern Africa, in the depth range 300-500 km. This pattern seems to continue at greater depth, but resolution becomes insufficient below 500 km to draw definitive conclusions. The smooth lateral variations retrieved are on the order of ±50% down to 400 km. We propose an interpretation in terms of plume/lithosphere/ridge interaction in the upper mantle, arguing for deflection of the

  1. Modeling Periodic Adiabatic Shear Bands Evolution in a 304L Stainless Steel Thick-Walled Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingtao; Hu, Haibo; Fan, Cheng; Tang, Tiegang

    2015-06-01

    The self-organization of multiple shear bands in a 304L stainless steel thick-walled cylinder (TWC) was numerically studied. The microstructures of material lead to the non-uniform distribution of local yield stress, which plays a key role in the formation of spontaneous shear localization. We introduced a probability factor satisfied Gauss distribution into the macroscopic constitutive relationship to describe the non-uniformity of local yield stress. Using the probability factor, the initiation and propagation of multiple shear bands in TWC were numerically replicated in our 2D FEM simulation. Experimental results in the literature indicate that the machined surface at the internal boundary of a 304L stainless steel cylinder provides a work-hardened layer (about 20 μm) which has significantly different microstructures from base material. The work-hardened layer leads to the phenomenon that most shear bands are in clockwise or counterclockwise direction. In our simulation, periodic oriented perturbations were applied to describe the grain orientation in the work-hardened layer, and the spiral pattern of shear bands was successfully replicated.

  2. Disturbed flow mediated modulation of shear forces on endothelial plane: A proposed model for studying endothelium around atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguru, Uma Maheswari; Sundaresan, Lakshmikirupa; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Majunathan, Reji; Mani, Krishnapriya; Swaminathan, Akila; Venkatesan, Saravanakumar; Kasiviswanathan, Dharanibalan; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-06-01

    Disturbed fluid flow or modulated shear stress is associated with vascular conditions such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and aneurysm. In vitro simulation of the fluid flow around the plaque micro-environment remains a challenging approach. Currently available models have limitations such as complications in protocols, high cost, incompetence of co-culture and not being suitable for massive expression studies. Hence, the present study aimed to develop a simple, versatile model based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Current observations of CFD have shown the regions of modulated shear stress by the disturbed fluid flow. To execute and validate the model in real sense, cell morphology, cytoskeletal arrangement, cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) profile, nitric oxide production and disturbed flow markers under the above condition were assessed. Endothelium at disturbed flow region which had been exposed to low shear stress and swirling flow pattern showed morphological and expression similarities with the pathological disturbed flow environment reported previously. Altogether, the proposed model can serve as a platform to simulate the real time micro-environment of disturbed flow associated with eccentric plaque shapes and the possibilities of studying its downstream events.

  3. Disturbed flow mediated modulation of shear forces on endothelial plane: A proposed model for studying endothelium around atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Balaguru, Uma Maheswari; Sundaresan, Lakshmikirupa; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Majunathan, Reji; Mani, Krishnapriya; Swaminathan, Akila; Venkatesan, Saravanakumar; Kasiviswanathan, Dharanibalan; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-01-01

    Disturbed fluid flow or modulated shear stress is associated with vascular conditions such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and aneurysm. In vitro simulation of the fluid flow around the plaque micro-environment remains a challenging approach. Currently available models have limitations such as complications in protocols, high cost, incompetence of co-culture and not being suitable for massive expression studies. Hence, the present study aimed to develop a simple, versatile model based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Current observations of CFD have shown the regions of modulated shear stress by the disturbed fluid flow. To execute and validate the model in real sense, cell morphology, cytoskeletal arrangement, cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) profile, nitric oxide production and disturbed flow markers under the above condition were assessed. Endothelium at disturbed flow region which had been exposed to low shear stress and swirling flow pattern showed morphological and expression similarities with the pathological disturbed flow environment reported previously. Altogether, the proposed model can serve as a platform to simulate the real time micro-environment of disturbed flow associated with eccentric plaque shapes and the possibilities of studying its downstream events. PMID:27255968

  4. On mixed and displacement finite element models of a refined shear deformation theory for laminated anisotropic plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    An improved plate theory that accounts for the transverse shear deformation is presented, and mixed and displacement finite element models of the theory are developed. The theory is based on an assumed displacement field in which the inplane displacements are expanded in terms of the thickness coordinate up to the cubic term and the transverse deflection is assumed to be independent of the thickness coordinate. The governing equations of motion for the theory are derived from the Hamilton's principle. The theory eliminates the need for shear correction factors because the transverse shear stresses are represented parabolically. A mixed finite element model that uses independent approximations of the displacements and moments, and a displacement model that uses only displacements as degrees of freedom are developed. A comparison of the numerical results for bending with the exact solutions of the new theory and the three-dimensional elasticity theory shows that the present theory (and hence the finite element models) is more accurate than other plate-theories of the same order.

  5. Disturbed flow mediated modulation of shear forces on endothelial plane: A proposed model for studying endothelium around atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Balaguru, Uma Maheswari; Sundaresan, Lakshmikirupa; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Majunathan, Reji; Mani, Krishnapriya; Swaminathan, Akila; Venkatesan, Saravanakumar; Kasiviswanathan, Dharanibalan; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-01-01

    Disturbed fluid flow or modulated shear stress is associated with vascular conditions such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and aneurysm. In vitro simulation of the fluid flow around the plaque micro-environment remains a challenging approach. Currently available models have limitations such as complications in protocols, high cost, incompetence of co-culture and not being suitable for massive expression studies. Hence, the present study aimed to develop a simple, versatile model based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Current observations of CFD have shown the regions of modulated shear stress by the disturbed fluid flow. To execute and validate the model in real sense, cell morphology, cytoskeletal arrangement, cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) profile, nitric oxide production and disturbed flow markers under the above condition were assessed. Endothelium at disturbed flow region which had been exposed to low shear stress and swirling flow pattern showed morphological and expression similarities with the pathological disturbed flow environment reported previously. Altogether, the proposed model can serve as a platform to simulate the real time micro-environment of disturbed flow associated with eccentric plaque shapes and the possibilities of studying its downstream events. PMID:27255968

  6. Interfacial-tension-force model for the wavy stratified liquid-liquid flow pattern transition: The usage of two different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Marcelo Souza; Rodriguez, Oscar Mauricio Hernandez

    2016-06-01

    The study of the hydrodynamic stability of flow patterns is important in the design of equipment and pipelines for multiphase flows. The maintenance of a particular flow pattern becomes important in many applications, e.g., stratified flow pattern in heavy oil production avoiding the formation of emulsions because of the separation of phases and annular flow pattern in heat exchangers which increases the heat transfer coefficient. Flow maps are drawn to orientate engineers which flow pattern is present in a pipeline, for example. The ways how these flow maps are drawn have changed from totally experimental work, to phenomenological models, and then to stability analysis theories. In this work an experimental liquid-liquid flow map, with water and viscous oil as work fluids, drawn via subjective approach with high speed camera was used to compare to approaches of the same theory: the interfacial-tension-force model. This theory was used to drawn the wavy stratified flow pattern transition boundary. This paper presents a comparison between the two approaches of the interfacial-tension-force model for transition boundaries of liquid-liquid flow patterns: (i) solving the wave equation for the wave speed and using average values for wave number and wave speed; and (ii) solving the same equation for the wave number and then using a correlation for the wave speed. The results show that the second approach presents better results.

  7. Bioinspired design and interfacial failure of biomedical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbar, Nima

    The deformation mechanism of nacre as a model biological material is studied in this project. A numerical model is presented which consists of tensile pillars, shear pillars, asperities and aragonite platelets. It has been shown that the tensile pillars are the main elements that control the global stiffness of the nacre structure. Meanwhile, ultimate strength of the nacre structure is controlled by asperities and their behavior and the ratio of L/2D which is itself a function of the geometry of the platelets. Protein/shear pillars provide the glue which holds the assembly of entire system together, particularly in the direction normal to the platelets main axis. This dissertation also presents the results of a combined theoretical/computational and experimental effort to develop crack resistant dental multilayers that are inspired by the functionally graded dento-enamel junction (DEJ) structure that occurs between dentin and enamel in natural teeth. The complex structures of natural teeth and ceramic crowns are idealized using at layered configurations. The potential effects of occlusal contact are then modeled using finite element simulations of Hertzian contact. The resulting stress distributions are compared for a range of possible bioinspired, functionally graded architecture. The computed stress distributions show that the highest stress concentrations in the top ceramic layer of crown structures are reduced significantly by the use of bioinspired functionally graded architectures. The reduced stresses are shown to be associated with significant improvements (30%) in the pop-in loads over a wide range of clinically-relevant loading rates. The implications of the results are discussed for the design of bioinspired dental ceramic crown structures. The results of a combined experimental and computational study of mixed mode fracture in glass/cement and zirconia/cement interfaces that are relevant to dental restorations is also presented. The interfacial fracture

  8. Isotropic and anisotropic shear velocity model of the NA upper mantle using EarthScope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiva, J.; Clouzet, P.; French, S. W.; Yuan, H.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope TA deployment has provided dense array coverage across the continental US and with it, the opportunity for high resolution 3D seismic velocity imaging of both lithosphere and asthenosphere in the continent. Building upon our previous work, we present a new 3D isotropic, radially and azimuthally anisotropic shear wave model of the North American (NA) lithospheric mantle, using full waveform tomography and shorter-period (40 s) waveform data. Our isotropic velocity model exhibits pronounced spatial correlation between major tectonic localities of the eastern NA continent, as evidenced in the geology, and seismic anomalies, suggesting recurring episodes of tectonic events not only are well exposed at the surface, but also leave persistent scars in the continental lithosphere mantle, marked by isotropic and radially anisotropic velocity anomalies that reach as deep as 100-150 km. In eastern North America, our Vs images distinguish the fast velocity cratonic NA from the deep rooted large volume high velocity blocks which are east of the continent rift margin and extend 200-300 km offshore into Atlantic. In between is a prominent narrow band of low velocities that roughly follows the south and eastern Laurentia rift margin and extends into New England. The lithosphere associated with this low velocity band is thinned likely due to combined effects of repeated rifting processes along the rift margin and northward extension of the Bermuda low-velocity channel across the New England region. Deep rooted high velocity blocks east of the Laurentia margin are proposed to represent the Proterozoic Gondwanian terranes of pan-African affinity, which were captured during the Rodinia formation but left behind during the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. The anisotropy model takes advantage of the up-to-date SKS compilation in the continent and new splitting results from Greenland. The new joint waveform and SKS splitting data inversion is carried out with a 2

  9. Interfacial area transport equation for bubbly to cap-bubbly transition flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worosz, Theodore S.

    To fully realize the benefit of the two-group interfacial area transport equation (IATE) as a constitutive model for the interfacial area concentration in the two-fluid model, it is imperative that models be developed to dynamically transition from one-group to two-group flows. With this in mind, the two-group IATE is derived in detail to establish new expansion source terms that correctly account for the effects of intergroup bubble transport. In addition to this theoretical effort, the state-of-the-art four-sensor conductivity probe is used to establish a reliable experimental database of local two-phase flow parameters to characterize one-group to two-group transition flows and to support model development. The experiments are performed in verticalupward air-water two-phase flow in a 5.08cm pipe. Additionally, the local conductivity probe is improved through systematic studies into: 1) signal "ghosting" electrical interference among probe sensors, 2) sampling frequency sensitivity, 3) measurement duration sensitivity, and 4) probe sensor orientation. Wake-dominated bubble transport characterizes the transition from onegroup to two-group flows. Therefore, the necessary intergroup and intragroup wake entrainment source terms that are required for two-group interfacial area transport in transition flows are developed. Furthermore, an approach is developed to initiate the shearing-off source and reduce the one-group interaction mechanisms as an established two-group flow develops. The new interfacial area transport model for one-group to two-group transition flows is evaluated against the experimental database. The model accurately captures the exchange of void fraction and interfacial area concentration between group-I and group-II in transition flows. Overall, the group-I void fraction and interfacial area concentration are predicted within +/-6% and +/-4%, respectively, of the experimental data. The group-II void fraction and interfacial area concentration are

  10. Constitutive modeling of large inelastic deformation of amorphous polymers: Free volume and shear transformation zone dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyiadjis, George Z.; Samadi-Dooki, Aref

    2016-06-01

    Due to the lack of the long-range order in their molecular structure, amorphous polymers possess a considerable free volume content in their inter-molecular space. During finite deformation, these free volume holes serve as the potential sites for localized permanent plastic deformation inclusions which are called shear transformation zones (STZs). While the free volume content has been experimentally shown to increase during the course of plastic straining in glassy polymers, thermal analysis of stored energy due to the deformation shows that the STZ nucleation energy decreases at large plastic strains. The evolution of the free volume, and the STZs number density and nucleation energy during the finite straining are formulated in this paper in order to investigate the uniaxial post-yield softening-hardening behavior of the glassy polymers. This study shows that the reduction of the STZ nucleation energy, which is correlated with the free volume increase, brings about the post-yield primary softening of the amorphous polymers up to the steady-state strain value; and the secondary hardening is a result of the increased number density of the STZs, which is required for large plastic strains, while their nucleation energy is stabilized beyond the steady-state strain. The evolutions of the free volume content and STZ nucleation energy are also used to demonstrate the effect of the strain rate, temperature, and thermal history of the sample on its post-yield behavior. The obtained results from the model are compared with the experimental observations on poly(methyl methacrylate) which show a satisfactory consonance.

  11. Interfacial area transport in bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; Revankar, S.T.

    1997-12-31

    In order to close the two-fluid model for two-phase flow analyses, the interfacial area concentration needs to be modeled as a constitutive relation. In this study, the focus was on the investigation of the interfacial area concentration transport phenomena, both theoretically and experimentally. The interfacial area concentration transport equation for air-water bubbly up-flow in a vertical pipe was developed, and the models for the source and sink terms were provided. The necessary parameters for the experimental studies were identified, including the local time-averaged void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble interfacial velocity, liquid velocity and turbulent intensity. Experiments were performed with air-water mixture at atmospheric pressure. Double-sensor conductivity probe and hot-film probe were employed to measure the identified parameters. With these experimental data, the preliminary model evaluation was carried out for the simplest form of the developed interfacial area transport equation, i.e., the one-dimensional transport equation.

  12. Multiscale modeling of the effect of the interfacial transition zone on the modulus of elasticity of fiber-reinforced fine concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. L.; Liu, X.; Yuan, Y.; Mang, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    A multiscale model of fiber-reinforced fine concrete is developed, with special emphasis on the interfacial transition zone (ITZ). It does not only allow the prediction of the modulus of elasticity but also permits the determination of the strain and stress field. The model is based on the mathematical homogenization method and implemented in the frame of the finite element method. A comparison of model predictions with experimental results taken from the literature validates the model's effectiveness for prediction of the elasticity modulus. The effect of the thickness and of the elasticity modulus of the ITZ on the elasticity modulus of the homogenized material as well as the influence of the strength of the ITZ on the elastic limit of the homogenized material, are investigated numerically. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis is carried out to evaluate the influence of fine-scale factors on the elasticity modulus of ultra-high performance concrete.

  13. Time-Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements with Wall Shear Stress and Uncertainty Quantification for the FDA Nozzle Model.

    PubMed

    Raben, Jaime S; Hariharan, Prasanna; Robinson, Ronald; Malinauskas, Richard; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2016-03-01

    We present advanced particle image velocimetry (PIV) processing, post-processing, and uncertainty estimation techniques to support the validation of computational fluid dynamics analyses of medical devices. This work is an extension of a previous FDA-sponsored multi-laboratory study, which used a medical device mimicking geometry referred to as the FDA benchmark nozzle model. Experimental measurements were performed using time-resolved PIV at five overlapping regions of the model for Reynolds numbers in the nozzle throat of 500, 2000, 5000, and 8000. Images included a twofold increase in spatial resolution in comparison to the previous study. Data was processed using ensemble correlation, dynamic range enhancement, and phase correlations to increase signal-to-noise ratios and measurement accuracy, and to resolve flow regions with large velocity ranges and gradients, which is typical of many blood-contacting medical devices. Parameters relevant to device safety, including shear stress at the wall and in bulk flow, were computed using radial basis functions. In addition, in-field spatially resolved pressure distributions, Reynolds stresses, and energy dissipation rates were computed from PIV measurements. Velocity measurement uncertainty was estimated directly from the PIV correlation plane, and uncertainty analysis for wall shear stress at each measurement location was performed using a Monte Carlo model. Local velocity uncertainty varied greatly and depended largely on local conditions such as particle seeding, velocity gradients, and particle displacements. Uncertainty in low velocity regions in the sudden expansion section of the nozzle was greatly reduced by over an order of magnitude when dynamic range enhancement was applied. Wall shear stress uncertainty was dominated by uncertainty contributions from velocity estimations, which were shown to account for 90-99% of the total uncertainty. This study provides advancements in the PIV processing methodologies over

  14. Micromechanical analysis of fiber-reinforced composites with interfacial phenomena. I - Modeling and analysis of discontinuous fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Kenji; Iwamoto, Masaharu; Araki, Shigetoshi; Yano, Tadayoshi

    1992-04-01

    A mechanical analysis is presented of fiber-reinforced composite material exhibiting matrix cracking and/or interface sliding between a fiber and a matrix, i.e., the problem of a bridging fiber, by the method of micromechanics. In the case where there are many kinds of inhomogeneities, the interaction between the inhomogeneities, which are neglected in Eshelby's (1961) generally used method, must be taken into consideration. The present method is the extension of the method of Taya and Chou (1981) to the analysis of fiber-reinforced composites with interfacial sliding.

  15. Direct handling of sharp interfacial energy for microstructural evolution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hernández–Rivera, Efraín; Tikare, Veena; Noirot, Laurence; Wang, Lumin

    2014-08-24

    In this study, we introduce a simplification to the previously demonstrated hybrid Potts–phase field (hPPF), which relates interfacial energies to microstructural sharp interfaces. The model defines interfacial energy by a Potts-like discrete interface approach of counting unlike neighbors, which we use to compute local curvature. The model is compared to the hPPF by studying interfacial characteristics and grain growth behavior. The models give virtually identical results, while the new model allows the simulator more direct control of interfacial energy.

  16. To Polarize or Not to Polarize? Charge-on-Spring versus KBFF Models for Water and Methanol Bulk and Vapor-Liquid Interfacial Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ploetz, Elizabeth A; Rustenburg, Ariën S; Geerke, Daan P; Smith, Paul E

    2016-05-10

    Simulations of water and methanol mixtures using polarizable force fields (FFs) for methanol (COS/M and CPC) and water (COS/G2) were performed and compared to experiment and also to a nonpolarizable methanol (KBFF) model with SPC/E water in an effort to quantify the importance of explicit electronic polarization effects in bulk liquid mixtures and vapor-liquid interfaces. The bulk liquid mixture properties studied included the center of mass radial distribution functions, Kirkwood-Buff integrals (KBIs), volumetric properties, isothermal compressibility, enthalpy of mixing, dielectric constant, and diffusion coefficients. The vapor-liquid interface properties investigated included the relative surface probability distributions, surface tension, excess surface adsorption, preferred surface molecule orientations, and the surface dipole. None of the three FFs tested here was clearly superior for all of the properties examined. All the force fields typically reproduced the correct trends with composition for both the bulk and interfacial system properties; the differences between the force fields were primarily quantitative. The overall results suggest that the polarizable FFs are not, at the present stage of development, inherently better able to reproduce the studied bulk and interfacial properties-despite the added degree of explicit transferability that is, by definition, built into the polarizable models. Indeed, the specific parametrization of the FF appears to be just as important as the class of FF. PMID:27045390

  17. Ultrasonic assessment of interfacial oxidation damage in ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Y. C.; Rokhlin, S. I.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1993-01-01

    A new approach to characterizing oxidation damage in ceramic matrix composites using ultrasonic techniques is proposed. In this approach, the elastic constants of the composite are determined nondestructively by measuring the angular dependence of both longitudinal and transverse wave velocities. A micromechanical model for composites with anisotropic constituents is used to find the anisotropic properties of an effective fiber, which is a combination of the fiber and the interface. Interfacial properties are extracted from the properties of this effective fiber by analyzing the difference between effective and actual fiber properties. Unidirectional /0/28 SiC/Si3N4 composites with 30 percent fiber volume fraction and 30 percent matrix porosity are used. The samples are exposed in a flowing oxygen environment at elevated temperatures, up to 1400 C, for 100 hours and then measured by ultrasonic methods at room temperature. The Young's modulus in the fiber direction of the sample oxidized at 600 C decreased significantly but it was unchanged for samples oxidized at temperatures above 1200 C. The transverse moduli obtained from ultrasonic measurements decrease continuously up to 1200 C. The shear stiffnesses show behavior similar to the transverse moduli. The effective elastic moduli of the interfacial carbon coating are determined from the experimental data, and their change due to thermal oxidation is discussed.

  18. Are windshear training aid recommendations appropriate for other than large jet transports? Pilot procedures: Shear models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Information is given in vugraph form on pilot procedures in windshear, typical winds in a downburst, a downburst encounter at takeoff by a large jet transport and a light turboprop twin, and a comparison of pitch algorithms in an approach encounter with downburst shear. It is observed that the light turboprop appears no less tolerant of a downburst encounter than the large jet.

  19. Basal shear stress below elastic crust of the Tibetan plateau inferred from three-dimensional finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Xiao, J.; Pan, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Associated with northward convergence of the India continent, the surface motion of the Tibetan plateau, documented mainly by dense geodetic GPS measurements, changes greatly both on magnitude and on direction in different tectonic units. The most remarkable discordance of surface motion is around the eastern Himalayan syntaxis, where GPS velocity field is rotated gradually to oppositional direction near the southeastern Tibetan plateau with respect to the northward convergence of the India continent. Such a velocity field could be result from lateral boundary conditions, since the strength of lithosphere is probably weaker in the Tibetan plateau than in the surrounding regions. However, whether the surface motion of the Tibetan plateau is affected by basal shear at base of the elastic crust, that could exist if the coupling condition between the elastic and the viscous crust were changed, is unclear. Here, we developed a large-scale three-dimensional finite element model to explore the possible existence of basal shear below the Tibetan plateau and the surrounding regions. In the model, the lateral boundaries are specified with far-field boundary condition; the blocks surrounding the Tibetan plateaulike the Tarim, the Ordos, and the South China are treat as rigid blocks; and the mean thickness of elastic crust is assumed about 25km. Then, the magnitude and distribution of basal shear stress is automatically searchedin numerical calculation to fit surface (GPS) motion of the Tibetan plateau. We find that to better fit surface motion of the Tibetan plateau, negligible basal shear stress on the base of elastic crust is needed below majority of the western and the central Tibetan plateau; Whereas, around the eastern and the southeastern Tibetan plateau, especially between the Xianshuhestrike-slip fault and the eastern Himalayan syntaxis, at least ~1.5-3.0 Mpaof basal shear stress is needed to cause rotational surface motion as GPS measurements documented. This

  20. An analysis of interfacial waves and air ingestion mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimov, Azat

    This research was focused on developing analytical methods with which to derive the functional forms of the various interfacial forces in two-fluid models [Galimov et al., 2004], and on the Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of traveling breaking waves and plunging liquid jets. Analytical results are presented for a stable stratified wavy two-phase flow and the associated interfacial force densities of a two-fluid model. In particular, the non-drag interfacial force density [Drew & Passman, 1998], the Reynolds stress tensor, and the term ( p˜cli -pcl)∇alphacl, which drives surface waves, were derived, where p˜cli is interfacial average pressure, pcl is the average pressure, and alphacl is the volume fraction of the continuous liquid phase. These functional forms are potentially useful for developing two-fluid model closure relations for computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) numerical solvers. Moreover, it appears that this approach can be generalized to other flow regimes (e.g., annular flows). A comparison of the analytical and ensemble-averaged DNS results show good agreement, and it appears that this approach can be used to develop phenomenological flow-regime-specific closure laws for two-fluid models [Lahey & Drew, 2004], [Lahey, 2005]. A successful 2-D DNS of breaking traveling waves was performed. These calculations had periodic boundary conditions and the physical parameters for air/water flow at atmospheric pressure, including a liquid/gas density ratio of 1,000 and representative surface tension and viscosities. Detailed 3-D DNS was also made for a plunging liquid jet. The processes of forming the liquid jet, the associated air cavity, capturing an initial large donut-shaped air bubble, and developing and breaking-up this bubble into smaller bubbles due to liquid shear, were shown. These simulations showed that the inertia of the liquid jet initially depressed the pool's surface and the toroidal liquid eddy formed subsequently resulted in air

  1. Ocean Turbulence. Paper 2; One-Point Closure Model Momentum, Heat and Salt Vertical Diffusivities in the Presence of Shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A.; Cheng, Y.; Dubovikov, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    We develop and test a 1-point closure turbulence model with the following features: 1) we include the salinity field and derive the expression for the vertical turbulent diffusivities of momentum K(sub m) , heat K(sub h) and salt K(sub s) as a function of two stability parameters: the Richardson number R(sub i) (stratification vs. shear) and the Turner number R(sub rho) (salinity gradient vs. temperature gradient). 2) to describe turbulent mixing below the mixed layer (ML), all previous models have adopted three adjustable "background diffusivities" for momentum, heat and salt. We propose a model that avoids such adjustable diffusivities. We assume that below the ML, the three diffusivities have the same functional dependence on R( sub i) and R(sub rho) as derived from the turbulence model. However, in order to compute R(sub i) below the ML, we use data of vertical shear due to wave-breaking.measured by Gargett et al. The procedure frees the model from adjustable background diffusivities and indeed we employ the same model throughout the entire vertical extent of the ocean. 3) in the local model, the turbulent diffusivities K(sub m,h,s) are given as analytical functions of R(sub i) and R(sub rho). 5) the model is used in an O-GCM and several results are presented to exhibit the effect of double diffusion processes. 6) the code is available upon request.

  2. SP12RTS: a degree-12 model of shear- and compressional-wave velocity for Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelemeijer, P.; Ritsema, J.; Deuss, A.; van Heijst, H.-J.

    2016-02-01

    We present the new model SP12RTS of isotropic shear-wave (VS) and compressional-wave (VP) velocity variations in the Earth's mantle. SP12RTS is derived using the same methods as employed in the construction of the shear-wave velocity models S20RTS and S40RTS, and the same data types. SP12RTS includes additional traveltime measurements of P-waves and new splitting measurements: 33 normal modes with sensitivity to the compressional-wave velocity and 9 Stoneley modes with sensitivity primarily to the lowermost mantle. Contrary to S20RTS and S40RTS, variations in VS and VP are determined without invoking scaling relationships. Lateral velocity variations in SP12RTS are parametrised using spherical harmonics up to degree 12, to focus on long-wavelength features of VS and VP and their ratio R. Large-low-velocity provinces (LLVPs) are observed for both VS and VP. SP12RTS also features an increase of R up to 2500 km depth, followed by a decrease towards the core-mantle boundary. A negative correlation between the shear-wave and bulk-sound velocity variations is observed for both the LLVPs and the surrounding mantle. These characteristics can be explained by the presence of post-perovskite or large-scale chemical heterogeneity in the lower mantle.

  3. Effect of bidirectional internal flow on fluid-structure interaction dynamics of conveying marine riser model subject to shear current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zheng-Shou; Kim, Wu-Joan

    2012-03-01

    This article presents a numerical investigation concerning the effect of two kinds of axially progressing internal flows (namely, upward and downward) on fluid-structure interaction (FSI) dynamics about a marine riser model which is subject to external shear current. The CAE technology behind the current research is a proposed FSI solution, which combines structural analysis software with CFD technology together. Efficiency validation for the CFD software was carried out first. It has been proved that the result from numerical simulations agrees well with the observation from relating model test cases in which the fluidity of internal flow is ignorable. After verifying the numerical code accuracy, simulations are conducted to study the vibration response that attributes to the internal progressive flow. It is found that the existence of internal flow does play an important role in determining the vibration mode (/dominant frequency) and the magnitude of instantaneous vibration amplitude. Since asymmetric curvature along the riser span emerges in the case of external shear current, the centrifugal and Coriolis accelerations owing to up- and downward internal progressive flows play different roles in determining the fluid-structure interaction response. The discrepancy between them becomes distinct, when the velocity ratio of internal flow against external shear current is relatively high.

  4. A rational approach to the use of Prandtl's mixing length model in free turbulent shear flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudy, D. H.; Bushnell, D. M.

    1973-01-01

    Prandtl's basic mixing length model was used to compute 22 test cases on free turbulent shear flows. The calculations employed appropriate algebraic length scale equations and single values of mixing length constant for planar and axisymmetric flows, respectively. Good agreement with data was obtained except for flows, such as supersonic free shear layers, where large sustained sensitivity changes occur. The inability to predict the more gradual mixing in these flows is tentatively ascribed to the presence of a significant turbulence-induced transverse static pressure gradient which is neglected in conventional solution procedures. Some type of an equation for length scale development was found to be necessary for successful computation of highly nonsimilar flow regions such as jet or wake development from thick wall flows.

  5. CO{sub 2} corrosion model for carbon steel including a wall shear stress model for multiphase flow and limits for production rate to avoid mesa attack

    SciTech Connect

    Halvorsen, A.M.K.; Santvedt, T.

    1999-11-01

    A corrosion rate model is developed for carbon steel in water containing CO{sub 2} at different temperatures, pH`s, CO{sub 2} fugacities and wall shear stresses. The model is based on loop experiments at temperatures from 20--160 C. The data are taken from a database containing more than 2,400 data points at various temperatures, CO{sub 2} fugacities, pH`s and wall shear stresses. To find the best fit of the data, data for each temperature present in the data base was evaluated separately to find typical trends for the change in corrosion rate versus CO{sub 2} fugacity, wall shear stress and pH. To facilitate use of the corrosion model a simplified method for calculating wall shear stress in multiphase flow is included. This model includes a viscosity model for dispersions and is developed for oil wet and water wet flow. Criteria for the maximum production rate to avoid mesa attach in straight sections and behind welds is also included.

  6. A study of the dispersed flow interfacial heat transfer model of RELAP5/MOD2.5 and RELAP5/MOD3

    SciTech Connect

    Andreani, M.; Analytis, G.T.; Aksan, S.N.

    1995-09-01

    The model of interfacial heat transfer for the dispersed flow regime used in the RELAP5 computer codes is investigated in the present paper. Short-transient calculations of two low flooding rate tube reflooding experiments have been performed, where the hydraulic conditions and the heat input to the vapour in the post-dryout region were controlled for the predetermined position of the quench front. Both RELAP5/MOD2.5 and RELAP5/MOD3 substantially underpredicted the exit vapour temperature. The mass flow rate and quality, however, were correct and the heat input to the vapour was larger than the actual one. As the vapour superheat at the tube exit depends on the balance between the heat input from the wall and the heat exchange with the droplets, the discrepancy between the calculated and the measured exit vapour temperature suggested that the inability of both codes to predict the vapour superheat in the dispersed flow region is due to the overprediction of the interfacial heat transfer rate.

  7. Hemodynamic analysis in an idealized artery tree: differences in wall shear stress between Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood models.

    PubMed

    Weddell, Jared C; Kwack, JaeHyuk; Imoukhuede, P I; Masud, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Development of many conditions and disorders, such as atherosclerosis and stroke, are dependent upon hemodynamic forces. To accurately predict and prevent these conditions and disorders hemodynamic forces must be properly mapped. Here we compare a shear-rate dependent fluid (SDF) constitutive model, based on the works by Yasuda et al in 1981, against a Newtonian model of blood. We verify our stabilized finite element numerical method with the benchmark lid-driven cavity flow problem. Numerical simulations show that the Newtonian model gives similar velocity profiles in the 2-dimensional cavity given different height and width dimensions, given the same Reynolds number. Conversely, the SDF model gave dissimilar velocity profiles, differing from the Newtonian velocity profiles by up to 25% in velocity magnitudes. This difference can affect estimation in platelet distribution within blood vessels or magnetic nanoparticle delivery. Wall shear stress (WSS) is an important quantity involved in vascular remodeling through integrin and adhesion molecule mechanotransduction. The SDF model gave a 7.3-fold greater WSS than the Newtonian model at the top of the 3-dimensional cavity. The SDF model gave a 37.7-fold greater WSS than the Newtonian model at artery walls located immediately after bifurcations in the idealized femoral artery tree. The pressure drop across arteries reveals arterial sections highly resistive to flow which correlates with stenosis formation. Numerical simulations give the pressure drop across the idealized femoral artery tree with the SDF model which is approximately 2.3-fold higher than with the Newtonian model. In atherosclerotic lesion models, the SDF model gives over 1 Pa higher WSS than the Newtonian model, a difference correlated with over twice as many adherent monocytes to endothelial cells from the Newtonian model compared to the SDF model. PMID:25897758

  8. Hemodynamic Analysis in an Idealized Artery Tree: Differences in Wall Shear Stress between Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Blood Models

    PubMed Central

    Weddell, Jared C.; Kwack, JaeHyuk; Imoukhuede, P. I.; Masud, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Development of many conditions and disorders, such as atherosclerosis and stroke, are dependent upon hemodynamic forces. To accurately predict and prevent these conditions and disorders hemodynamic forces must be properly mapped. Here we compare a shear-rate dependent fluid (SDF) constitutive model, based on the works by Yasuda et al in 1981, against a Newtonian model of blood. We verify our stabilized finite element numerical method with the benchmark lid-driven cavity flow problem. Numerical simulations show that the Newtonian model gives similar velocity profiles in the 2-dimensional cavity given different height and width dimensions, given the same Reynolds number. Conversely, the SDF model gave dissimilar velocity profiles, differing from the Newtonian velocity profiles by up to 25% in velocity magnitudes. This difference can affect estimation in platelet distribution within blood vessels or magnetic nanoparticle delivery. Wall shear stress (WSS) is an important quantity involved in vascular remodeling through integrin and adhesion molecule mechanotransduction. The SDF model gave a 7.3-fold greater WSS than the Newtonian model at the top of the 3-dimensional cavity. The SDF model gave a 37.7-fold greater WSS than the Newtonian model at artery walls located immediately after bifurcations in the idealized femoral artery tree. The pressure drop across arteries reveals arterial sections highly resistive to flow which correlates with stenosis formation. Numerical simulations give the pressure drop across the idealized femoral artery tree with the SDF model which is approximately 2.3-fold higher than with the Newtonian model. In atherosclerotic lesion models, the SDF model gives over 1 Pa higher WSS than the Newtonian model, a difference correlated with over twice as many adherent monocytes to endothelial cells from the Newtonian model compared to the SDF model. PMID:25897758

  9. Near Surface Shear Wave Velocity Model of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuler, S.; Craig, M. S.; Hayashi, K.; Galvin, J. L.; Deqiang, C.; Jones, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface wave measurements (MASW) and microtremor array measurements (MAM) were performed at twelve sites across the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to obtain high resolution shear wave velocity (VS) models. Deeper surveys were performed at four of the sites using the two station spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method. For the MASW and MAM surveys, a 48-channel seismic system with 4.5 Hz geophones was used with a 10-lb sledgehammer and a metal plate as a source. Surveys were conducted at various locations on the crest of levees, the toe of the levees, and off of the levees. For MASW surveys, we used a record length of 2.048 s, a sample interval of 1 ms, and 1 m geophone spacing. For MAM, ambient noise was recorded for 65.536 s with a sampling interval of 4 ms and 1 m geophone spacing. VS was determined to depths of ~ 20 m using the MASW method and ~ 40 m using the MAM method. Maximum separation between stations in the two-station SPAC surveys was typically 1600 m to 1800 m, providing coherent signal with wavelengths in excess of 5 km and depth penetration of as much as 2000 m. Measured values of VS30 in the study area ranged from 97 m/s to 257 m/s, corresponding to NEHRP site classifications D and E. Comparison of our measured velocity profiles with available geotechnical logs, including soil type, SPT, and CPT, reveals the existence of a small number of characteristic horizons within the upper 40m in the Delta: levee fill material, peat, transitional silty sand, and eolian sand at depth. Sites with a peat layer at the surface exhibited extremely low values of VS. Based on soil borings, the thickness of peat layers were approximately 0 m to 8 m. The VS for the peat layers ranged from 42 m/s to 150 m/s while the eolian sand layer exhibited VS ranging from of 220 m/s to 370 m/s. Soft near surface soils present in the region pose an increased earthquake hazard risk due to the potential for high ground accelerations.

  10. Dynamics of a one-dimensional model for the emergence of the plasma edge shear flow layer with momentum-conserving Reynolds stress

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, I.; Carreras, B. A.

    2007-10-15

    A one-dimensional version of the second-order transition model based on the sheared flow amplification by Reynolds stress and turbulence suppression by shearing is presented. The model discussed in this paper includes a form of the Reynolds stress which explicitly conserves momentum. A linear stability analysis of the critical point is performed. Then, it is shown that the dynamics of weakly unstable states is determined by a reduced equation for the shear flow. In the case in which the flow damping term is diffusive, the stationary solutions are those of the real Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  11. Infiltration kinetics and interfacial bond strength of metal-matrix composites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, G.R.; Olson, D.L.

    1992-07-01

    The research accomplishments for this three-year metal matrix composite research program centered upon three areas: infiltration kinetics, wettability studies and predictions of interfacial properties. A pre-conditioning reaction model was hypothesized to explain the incubation period observed to precede the liquid metal infiltration of SiC particulate, and a rate equation for pre-conditioning was experimentally established for the infiltration of SiC particulate by liquid aluminum. Experimental wettability studies were completed for aluminum--silicon, aluminum--magnesium, and aluminum--lithium alloys in contact with SiC by utilizing a capillary rise apparatus. The oxide layers on the ceramic substrate and on the molten metal surface were observed to strongly influence wetting behavior. Differential optical reflectance was used to measure the optical transitions in aluminum and its alloys. Interfacial bond energies were estimated using a work of decohesion model. Punch shear tests then provided relative estimates of bond strengths for several aluminum alloys in contact with silicon carbide. Concepts from surface science and thermodynamics were coupled to theoretically predict wettability. Wetting was treated as a surface phenomenon, in which a surface reaction monolayer was sufficient to cause wetting. Aluminum matrix composite processing using the liquid metal route is complicated by the oxide barrier formed on the liquid metal. A transport model was used to explain the observed interfacial reaction behavior.

  12. A comparative study of several compressibility corrections to turbulence models applied to high-speed shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viegas, John R.; Rubesin, Morris W.

    1991-01-01

    Several recently published compressibility corrections to the standard k-epsilon turbulence model are used with the Navier-Stokes equations to compute the mixing region of a large variety of high speed flows. These corrections, specifically developed to address the weakness of higher order turbulence models to accurately predict the spread rate of compressible free shear flows, are applied to two stream flows of the same gas mixing under a large variety of free stream conditions. Results are presented for two types of flows: unconfined streams with either (1) matched total temperatures and static pressures, or (2) matched static temperatures and pressures, and a confined stream.

  13. The Effects of Realistic Geological Heterogeneity on Seismic Modeling: Applications in Shear Wave Generation and Near-Surface Tunnel Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Christopher Scott

    Naturally occurring geologic heterogeneity is an important, but often overlooked, aspect of seismic wave propagation. This dissertation presents a strategy for modeling the effects of heterogeneity using a combination of geostatistics and Finite Difference simulation. In the first chapter, I discuss my motivations for studying geologic heterogeneity and seis- mic wave propagation. Models based upon fractal statistics are powerful tools in geophysics for modeling heterogeneity. The important features of these fractal models are illustrated using borehole log data from an oil well and geomorphological observations from a site in Death Valley, California. A large part of the computational work presented in this disserta- tion was completed using the Finite Difference Code E3D. I discuss the Python-based user interface for E3D and the computational strategies for working with heterogeneous models developed over the course of this research. The second chapter explores a phenomenon observed for wave propagation in heteroge- neous media - the generation of unexpected shear wave phases in the near-source region. In spite of their popularity amongst seismic researchers, approximate methods for modeling wave propagation in these media, such as the Born and Rytov methods or Radiative Trans- fer Theory, are incapable of explaining these shear waves. This is primarily due to these method's assumptions regarding the coupling of near-source terms with the heterogeneities and mode conversion. To determine the source of these shear waves, I generate a suite of 3D synthetic heterogeneous fractal geologic models and use E3D to simulate the wave propaga- tion for a vertical point force on the surface of the models. I also present a methodology for calculating the effective source radiation patterns from the models. The numerical results show that, due to a combination of mode conversion and coupling with near-source hetero- geneity, shear wave energy on the order of 10% of the

  14. Bayesian decision and mixture models for AE monitoring of steel-concrete composite shear walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhidzadeh, Alireza; Epackachi, Siamak; Salamone, Salvatore; Whittaker, Andrew S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an approach based on an acoustic emission technique for the health monitoring of steel-concrete (SC) composite shear walls. SC composite walls consist of plain (unreinforced) concrete sandwiched between steel faceplates. Although the use of SC system construction has been studied extensively for nearly 20 years, little-to-no attention has been devoted to the development of structural health monitoring techniques for the inspection of damage of the concrete behind the steel plates. In this work an unsupervised pattern recognition algorithm based on probability theory is proposed to assess the soundness of the concrete infill, and eventually provide a diagnosis of the SC wall’s health. The approach is validated through an experimental study on a large-scale SC shear wall subjected to a displacement controlled reversed cyclic loading.

  15. Establishment of a model predicting tensile shear strength and fracture portion of laser-welded lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusako, Seiji; Miyazaki, Yasunobu; Hashimoto, Koji; Kobayashi, Junichi

    2003-03-01

    This study was aimed at establishment of a model that can predict tensile shear strength and fracture portion laser-welded lap joints in the tensile test. To clear influence of the bead length and width on them, the joints employed steel sheets with a thickness in the range of 0.8 mm to 1.2 mm were evaluated. It was found that the tensile shear strength increased with the bead size, and the fracture occurred at base metal (BM), weld metal (WM) or portion between them with a curvature (referred to as portion R). Also to clarify rotational deformation process around WM during the tensile test, joint cross-sections were observed at some applied load levels in the test. This observation derived the relationship between the radius, Ri, at the inner plane of portion R and the rotational angle, θ, of the center of sheet thickness, and the relationship between Ri and applied load. A plastic analysis based on these functions and assumptions that the joint consists of BM, WM and R, which are under simplified stress mode respectively, could estimate the tensile shear strength and the fracture portion of the joints. This estimation made good accord with experimental results.

  16. Low-shear modeled microgravity: a global environmental regulatory signal affecting bacterial gene expression, physiology, and pathogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Ott, C. Mark; Wilson, James W.; Ramamurthy, Rajee; LeBlanc, Carly L.; Honer zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Hammond, Timothy; Pierson, Duane L.

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria inhabit an impressive variety of ecological niches and must adapt constantly to changing environmental conditions. While numerous environmental signals have been examined for their effect on bacteria, the effects of mechanical forces such as shear stress and gravity have only been investigated to a limited extent. However, several important studies have demonstrated a key role for the environmental signals of low shear and/or microgravity in the regulation of bacterial gene expression, physiology, and pathogenesis [Chem. Rec. 1 (2001) 333; Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 54 (2000) 33; Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63 (1997) 4090; J. Ind. Microbiol. 18 (1997) 22; Curr. Microbiol. 34(4) (1997) 199; Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 56(3-4) (2001) 384; Infect Immun. 68(6) (2000) 3147; Cell 109(7) (2002) 913; Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 68(11) (2002) 5408; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 99(21) (2002) 13807]. The response of bacteria to these environmental signals, which are similar to those encountered during prokaryotic life cycles, may provide insight into bacterial adaptations to physiologically relevant conditions. This review focuses on the current and potential future research trends aimed at understanding the effect of the mechanical forces of low shear and microgravity analogues on different bacterial parameters. In addition, this review also discusses the use of microgravity technology to generate physiologically relevant human tissue models for research in bacterial pathogenesis.

  17. Ab Initio Modeling of Fe(II) Adsorption and Interfacial Electron Transfer at Goethite (α-FeOOH) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Vitali Y.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Goethite (α-FeOOH) surfaces represent one of the most ubiquitous redox-active interfaces in the environment, playing an important role in biogeochemical metal cycling and contaminant residence in the subsurface. Fe(II)-catalyzed recrystallization of goethite is a fundamental process in this context, but the proposed Fe(II)aq-Fe(III)goethite electron and iron atom exchange mechanism of recrystallization remains poorly understood at the atomic level. We examine the adsorption of aqueous Fe(II) and subsequent interfacial electron transfer (ET) between adsorbed Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) at the (110) and (021) goethite surfaces using density functional theory calculations including Hubbard U corrections (DFT+U) aided by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We investigate various surface sites for the adsorption of Fe2+(H2O)6 in different coordination environments. Calculated energies for adsorbed complexes at both surfaces favor monodentate complexes with reduced 4- and 5-fold coordination over higher-dentate structures and 6- fold coordination. The hydrolysis of H2O ligands is observed for some pre-ET adsorbed Fe(II) configurations. ET from the adsorbed Fe(II) into the goethite lattice is calculated to be energetically uphill always, but simultaneous proton transfer from H2O ligands of the adsorbed complexes to the surface oxygen species stabilizes post-ET states. We find that surface defects such as oxygen vacancies near the adsorption site also can stabilize post-ET states, enabling the Fe(II)aq-Fe(III)goethite interfacial electron transfer reaction implied from experiments to proceed.

  18. A coupled global-local shell model with continuous interlaminar shear stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruttmann, F.; Wagner, W.; Knust, G.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper layered composite shells subjected to static loading are considered. The theory is based on a multi-field functional, where the associated Euler-Lagrange equations include besides the global shell equations formulated in stress resultants, the local in-plane equilibrium in terms of stresses and a constraint which enforces the correct shape of warping through the thickness. Within a four-node element the warping displacements are interpolated with layerwise cubic functions in thickness direction and constant shape throughout the element reference surface. Elimination of stress, warping and Lagrange parameters on element level leads to a mixed hybrid shell element with 5 or 6 nodal degrees of freedom. The implementation in a finite element program is simple. The computed interlaminar shear stresses are automatically continuous at the layer boundaries. Also the stress boundary conditions at the outer surfaces are fulfilled and the integrals of the shear stresses coincide exactly with the independently interpolated shear forces without introduction of further constraints. The essential feature of the element formulation is the fact that it leads to usual shell degrees of freedom, which allows application of standard boundary or symmetry conditions and computation of shell structures with intersections.

  19. Flow visualization and wall shear stress of a flapping model hummingbird wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanton, Erik W. M.; Vanier, Blake A.; Mohseni, Kamran

    2010-09-01

    The unsteady low Reynolds number aerodynamics of flapping flight was investigated experimentally through flow visualization by suspended particle imagery and wall shear stress measurement from micro-array hot-film anemometry. In conjunction, a mechanism was developed to create a flapping motion with three degrees of freedom and adjustable flapping frequency. The flapping kinematics and wing shape were selected for dynamic similarity to a hummingbird during hovering flight. Flow visualization was used to validate the anemometry observations of leading edge vortex (LEV) characteristics and to investigate the necessity of spanwise flow in LEV stability. The shear sensors determined LEV characteristics throughout the translation section of the stroke period for various wing speeds. It was observed that a minimum frequency between 2 and 3.5 Hz is required for the formation and stabilization of a LEV. The vortex strength peaked around 30% of the flapping cycle (corresponding to just past the translation midpoint), which agrees with results from previous studies conducted by others. The shear sensors also indicated a mild growth in LEV size during translation sections of the wing’s motion. This growth magnitude was nearly constant through a range of operating frequencies.

  20. Study of the flow field in the magnetic rod interfacial stress rheometer.

    PubMed

    Verwijlen, Tom; Moldenaers, Paula; Stone, Howard A; Vermant, Jan

    2011-08-01

    Several technological applications, consumer products, and biological systems derive their functioning from the presence of a complex fluid interface with viscoelastic interfacial rheological properties. Measurements of the "excess" rheological properties of such an interface are complicated by the intimate coupling of the bulk and interfacial flows. In the present work, analytical, numerical, and experimental results of the interfacial flow fields in a magnetic rod interfacial stress rheometer (ISR) are presented. Mathematical solutions are required to correct the experimentally determined apparent interfacial shear moduli and phase angles for the drag exerted by the surrounding phases, especially at low Boussinesq numbers. Starting from the Navier-Stokes equations and using the generalized Boussinesq-Scriven equation as a suitable boundary condition, the problem is solved both analytically and numerically. In addition, experimental data of the interfacial flow field are reported, obtained by following the trajectories of tracer particles at the interface with time. Good agreement is found between the three methods, indicating that both the analytical solution and the numerical simulations give an adequate description of the flow field and the resulting local interfacial shear rate at the rod. Based on these results, an algorithm to correct the experimental data of the ISR is proposed and evaluated, which can be extended to different types of interfacial shear rheometers and geometries. An increased accuracy is obtained and the measurement range of the ISR is expanded toward viscosities and elastic moduli of smaller magnitude. PMID:21696160

  1. Fabric Transitions in Quartz via Visco-Plastic Self-Consistent Modelling: Axial Compression and Simple Shear under Constant Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, L. F. G.; Lloyd, G. E.; Mainprice, D.

    2014-12-01

    Quartz is a common crustal mineral that deforms plastically in a wide range of temperatures and pressures, leading to the development of different types of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) patterns. In this contribution we present the results of an extensive modelling of quartz fabric transitions via visco-plastic self- consistent (VPSC) approach. For that, we have performed systematic simulations using different sets of relative critical resolved shear stress of the main quartz slip systems. We have performed these simulations in axial compression and simple shear regimes under constant Von Mises equivalent strain of 100% (γ=1.73), assuming that the aggregates deformed exclusively by dislocation glide. Some of the predicted CPOs patterns are similar to those observed in naturally and experimentally deformed quartz. Nevertheless, some classical CPO patterns usually interpreted as resulting from dislocation glide (e.g. Y-maxima due to prism slip) are clearly not developed in the simulated conditions. In addition we report potentially new preferred orientation patterns that might develop in high temperature conditions, both in axial compression and simple shear. We have demonstrated that CPOs generated under axial compression are usually stronger that those predicted under simple shear, due to the continuous rotation observed in the later simulations. The fabric strength depends essentially on the dominant active slip system, and normally the stronger CPOs result