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Sample records for interfacial tryptophan residues

  1. Interfacial residual thermal strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasen, M.; Santoyo, R.

    A method has been developed for assessing the influence of polymer chemical composition and of processing parameters on the magnitude of residual stress developed in glass-fibre-reinforced composites subjected to various cure cycles and subsequently cooled to cryogenic temperatures. The test method was applied to nine resin types, including epoxy, vinyl ester, polyester, cyanate ester and phenolic formulations. Results suggest that polyester resin develops substantially less overall residual strain than do the other resin systems.

  2. Is There a Preferential Interaction between Cholesterol and Tryptophan Residues in Membrane Proteins?†

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Andrea; de Almeida, Rodrigo F. M.; Nyholm, Thomas K. M.; Loura, Luís M. S.; Daily, Anna E.; Staffhorst, Rutger W. H. M.; Rijkers, Dirk T. S.; Koeppe, Roger E.; Prieto, Manuel; Killian, J. Antoinette

    2008-01-01

    Recently, several indications have been found that suggest a preferential interaction between cholesterol and tryptophan residues located near the membrane–water interface. The aim of this study was to investigate by direct methods how tryptophan and cholesterol interact with each other and what the possible consequences are for membrane organization. For this purpose, we used cholesterol-containing model membranes of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) in which a transmembrane model peptide with flanking tryptophans [acetyl-GWW(LA)8LWWA-amide], called WALP23, was incorporated to mimic interfacial tryptophans of membrane proteins. These model systems were studied with two complementary methods. (1) Steady-state and time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments employing the fluorescent cholesterol analogue dehydroergosterol (DHE) in combination with a competition experiment with cholesterol were used to obtain information about the distribution of cholesterol in the bilayer in the presence of WALP23. The results were consistent with a random distribution of cholesterol which indicates that cholesterol and interfacial tryptophans are not preferentially located next to each other in these bilayer systems. (2) Solid-state 2H NMR experiments employing either deuterated cholesterol or indole ring-deuterated WALP23 peptides were performed to study the orientation and dynamics of both molecules. The results showed that the quadrupolar splittings of labeled cholesterol were not affected by an interaction with tryptophan-flanked peptides and, vice versa, that the quadrupolar splittings of labeled indole rings in WALP23 are not significantly influenced by addition of cholesterol to the bilayer. Therefore, both NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy results independently show that, at least in the model systems studied here, there is no evidence for a preferential interaction between cholesterol and tryptophans located at the bilayer interface. PMID

  3. Identification of Two Novel Modifications at Tryptophan Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shuzhen; Zhang, Kai; Tian, Shanshan; He, Xiwen; Zhang, Yukui

    2015-08-01

    Protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) play important roles in cellular physiology. Mass spectrometry (MS) has been developed into a powerful tool to identify all possible protein modifications. Herein, we describe our efforts to deduce the structures of two unknown modifications at tryptophan (Trp) residues (W + 92 Da and W + 108 Da). The two modifications were further confirmed by aligning the MS/MS fragmentation of synthetic peptide with in-vivo peptide identified. Finally, the mimic experiment elucidated how two Trp modifications occur. This study, therefore, expands current knowledge of Trp modifications.

  4. Tryptophan

    MedlinePlus

    The body uses tryptophan to help make niacin and serotonin. Serotonin is thought to produce healthy sleep and a stable mood. In order for tryptophan in the diet to be changed into niacin, the body needs to have enough: Iron Riboflavin Vitamin B6

  5. Resolution of the fluorescence decay of the two tryptophan residues of lac repressor using single tryptophan mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Royer, C A; Gardner, J A; Beechem, J M; Brochon, J C; Matthews, K S

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the time-resolved intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the lac repressor (a symmetric tetramer containing two tryptophan residues per monomer) and two single-tryptophan mutant repressors obtained by site-directed mutagenesis, lac W201Y and lac W220Y. These mutant repressor proteins have tyrosine substituted for tryptophan at positions 201 and 220, respectively, leaving a single tryptophan residue per monomeric subunit at position 220 for the W201Y mutant and at position 201 in the W220Y mutant. It was found that the two decay rates recovered from the analysis of the wild type data do not correspond to the rates recovered from the analysis of the decays of the mutant proteins. Each of these residues in the mutant repressors displays at least two decay rates. Global analysis of the multiwavelength data from all three proteins, however, yielded results consistent with the fluorescence decay of the wild type lac repressor corresponding simply to the weighted linear combination of the decays from the mutant proteins. The effect of ligation by the antagonistic ligands, inducer and operator DNA, was similar for all three proteins. The binding of the inducer sugar resulted in a quenching of the long-lived species, while binding by the operator decreased the lifetime of the short components. Investigation of the time-resolved anisotropy of the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence in these three proteins revealed that the depolarization of fluorescence resulted from a fast motion and the global tumbling of the macromolecule. Results from the simultaneous global analysis of the frequency domain data sets from the three proteins revealed anisotropic rotations for the macromolecule, consistent with the known elongated shape of the repressor tetramer. In addition, it appears that the excited-state dipole of tryptophan 220 is alighed with the long axis of the repressor. PMID:2207244

  6. Detection of water proximity to tryptophan residues in proteins by single photon radioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Bicknese, S; Zimet, D; Park, J; van Hoek, A N; Shohet, S B; Verkman, A S

    1995-05-01

    We recently developed a single photon radioluminescence (SPR) technique to measure submicroscopic distances in biological samples [Bicknese et al., and Shahrokh et al., Biophys. J., 63 (1992) 1256-1279]. SPR arises from the excitation of a fluorophore by the energy deposited from a slowing beta decay electron. The purpose of this study was to detect 3H2O molecules near tryptophan residues in proteins by tryptophan SPR. To detect small SPR signals, a sample compartment with reflective ellipsoidal optics was constructed, and amplified signals from a cooled photomultiplier were resolved by pulse-height analysis. A Monte Carlo calculation was carried out to quantify the relationship between SPR signal and 3H2O-tryptophan proximity. Measurements of tryptophan SPR were made on aqueous tryptophan; dissolved melittin (containing a single tryptophan); native and denatured aldolase; dissolved aldolase, monellin, and human serum albumin; and the integral membrane proteins CHIP28 (containing a putative aqueous pore) and MIP26 using 3H2O or the aqueous-phase probe 3H-3-O-methylglucose (OMG). After subtraction of a Bremsstrahlung background signal, the SPR signal from aqueous tryptophan (cps.microCi-1 mumol-1 +/- SE) was 8.6 +/- 0.2 with 3H2O and 7.8 +/- 0.3 with 3HOMG (n = 8). With 3H2O as donor, the SPR signal (cps.microCi-1 mumol-1) was 9.0 +/- 0.3 for monomeric melittin in low salt (trytophan exposed) and 4.6 +/- 0.8 (n = 9) for tetrameric melittin in high salt (tryptophans buried away from aqueous solution). The ratio of SPR signal obtained for aldolase under denaturing conditions of 8 M urea (fluorophores exposed) versus non-denaturing buffer (fluorophores buried) was 1.53 +/- 0.07 (n = 6). Ratios of SPR signals normalized to fluorescence intensities for monellin, aldolase, and human serum albumin, relative to that for d-tryptophan, were 1.42, 1.09, and 1.04, indicating that the cross-section for excitation of fluorophores in proteins is greater than that for tryptophan in

  7. The functions of tryptophan residues in membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, M.; Chang, C.H.; Stevens, F.J.

    1994-08-01

    Membrane proteins in general have a significantly higher Trp content than do soluble proteins. This is especially true for the M and L subunits of the photosynthetic reaction center from purple bacteria. The Trp residues are located mostly in the segments that connect the transmembrane helices. Further, they are concentrated at the periplasmic side of the complex. Within the protein subunits, many form hydrogen bonds with carbonyl oxygens of the main chain, thereby stabilizing the protein. On the surface of the molecule, they are correctly positioned to form hydrogen bonds with the lipid head groups while their hydrophobic rings are immersed in the lipid part of the bilayer. We suggest that Trp residues are involved in the translocation of protein through the membrane and that following translocation, Trp residues serve as anchors on the periplasmic side of the membrane.

  8. Organization and dynamics of tryptophan residues in brain spectrin: novel insight into conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Madhurima; Chaudhuri, Arunima; Patra, Malay; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali; Chakrabarti, Abhijit; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2015-05-01

    Brain spectrin enjoys overall structural and sequence similarity with erythroid spectrin, but less is known about its function. We utilized the fluorescence properties of tryptophan residues to monitor their organization and dynamics in brain spectrin. Keeping in mind the functional relevance of hydrophobic binding sites in brain spectrin, we monitored the organization and dynamics of brain spectrin bound to PRODAN. Results from red edge excitation shift (REES) indicate that the organization of tryptophans in brain spectrin is maintained to a considerable extent even after denaturation. These results are supported by acrylamide quenching experiments. To the best of our knowledge, these results constitute the first report of the presence of residual structure in urea-denatured brain spectrin. We further show from REES and time-resolved emission spectra that PRODAN bound to brain spectrin is characterized by motional restriction. These results provide useful information on the differences between erythroid spectrin and brain spectrin. PMID:25835748

  9. Nanosecond segmental mobilities of tryptophan residues in proteins observed by lifetime-resolved fluorescence anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Lakowiz, J.R.; Weber, G.

    1980-10-01

    Steady-state and lifetime-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements of protein fluorescence were used to investigate the depolarizing motions of tryptophan residues in proteins. Lifetime resolution was achieved by oxygen quenching. The proteins investigated were carbonic anhydrase, carboxypeptidase A, ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin, trypsin, pepsin, and bovine and human serum albumin. When corrected for overall protein rotation, the steady state anisotropies indicate that, on the average, the tryptophan residues in these proteins rotate 29/sup 0/ +- 6/sup 0/ during the unquenched excited state lifetimes of these proteins, which range from 1.7 to 6.1 ns. The lifetime-resolved anisotropies reveal correlation times for these displacements ranging from 1 to 12 ns. On the average these correlation times are tenfold shorter than that expected for overall protein rotation. We conclude that the tryptophan residues in these proteins display remarkable freedom of motion within the protein matrix, which implies that these matrices are highly flexible on the nanosecond time scale.

  10. Membrane Organization and Dynamics of ‘Inner Pair’ and ‘Outer Pair’ Tryptophan Residues in Gramicidin Channels

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Sourav; Chaudhuri, Arunima; Gu, Hong; Koeppe, Roger E.; Kombrabail, Mamata; Krishnamoorthy, G.; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2012-01-01

    The linear ion channel peptide gramicidin serves as an excellent prototype for monitoring the organization, dynamics and function of membrane-spanning channels. The tryptophan residues in gramicidin channels are crucial for establishing and maintaining the structure and function of the channel in the membrane bilayer. In order to address the basis of differential importance of tryptophan residues in gramicidin channel, we monitored the effects of pairwise substitution of two of the four gramicidin tryptophans, the inner pair (Trp-9 and -11) and the outer pair (Trp-13 and -15), using a combination of steady state and time-resolved fluorescence approaches and circular dichroism spectroscopy. We show here that these double tryptophan gramicidin analogs adopt different conformations in membranes, suggesting that the conformational preference of double tryptophan gramicidin analogs is dictated by the positions of the tryptophans in the sequence. These results assume significance in the context of recent observations that the inner pair of tryptophans (Trp-9 and -11) is more important for gramicidin channel formation and channel conductance. These results could be potentially useful in analyzing the effect of tryptophan substitution on the functioning of ion channels and membrane proteins. PMID:22892073

  11. Functional and fluorescence analyses of tryptophan residues in H+-pyrophosphatase of Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Wei; Lee, Ching-Hung; Huang, Yun-Tzu; Pan, Yih-Jiuan; Lin, Shih-Ming; Lo, Yueh-Yu; Lee, Chien-Hsien; Huang, Lin-Kun; Huang, Yu-Fen; Hsu, Yu-Di; Pan, Rong-Long

    2014-04-01

    Homodimeric proton-translocating pyrophosphatase (H+-PPase; EC 3.6.1.1) maintains the cytoplasmic pH homeostasis of many bacteria and higher plants by coupling pyrophosphate (PPi) hydrolysis and proton translocation. H+-PPase accommodates several essential motifs involved in the catalytic mechanism, including the PPi binding motif and Acidic I and II motifs. In this study, 3 intrinsic tryptophan residues, Trp-75, Trp-365, and Trp-602, in H+-PPase from Clostridium tetani were used as internal probes to monitor the local conformational state of the periplasm domain, transmembrane region, and cytoplasmic domain, respectively. Upon binding of the substrate analog Mg-imidodiphosphate (Mg-IDP), local structural changes prevented the modification of tryptophan residues by N-bromosuccinimide (NBS), especially at Trp-602. Following Mg-Pi binding, Trp-75 and Trp-365, but not Trp-602, were slightly protected from structural modifications by NBS. These results reveal the conformation of H+-PPase is distinct in the presence of different ligands. Moreover, analyses of the Stern-Volmer relationship and steady-state fluorescence anisotropy also indicate that the local structure around Trp-602 is more exposed to solvent and varied under different environments. In addition, Trp-602 was identified to be a crucial residue in the H+-PPase that may potentially be involved in stabilizing the structure of the catalytic region by site-directed mutagenesis analysis. PMID:24121937

  12. Contribution of tryptophan residues to the combining site of a monoclonal anti dinitrophenyl spin-label antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Anglister, J.; Bond, M.W.; Frey, T.; Leahy, D.; Levitt, M.; McConnell, H.M.; Rule, G.S.; Tomasello, J.; Whittaker, M.

    1987-09-22

    Two Fab fragments of the monoclonal anti dinitrophenyl (DNP) spin-label antibody AN02 were prepared by recombination of specifically deuterated heavy and light chains. In the recombinant H(I)L(II) all the tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated as were the tryptophan residues of the heavy chain. In the recombinant H(II)L(I) all the tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated as were the tryptophan residues of the light chain. Saturation of three resonances of H(I)L(II), assigned to tryptophan protons of the light chain, resulted in magnetization transfer to the aromatic proton at position 6 of the DNP ring and to the CH2 protons of the glycines linked to the DNP in a diamagnetic hapten (DNP-DG). Saturation of three resonances of H(II)L(I) assigned to tryptophan protons of the heavy chain resulted in magnetization transfer to the CH2 protons of the glycines in DNP-DG. From the dependence of the magnetization transfer on the irradiation time, the cross relaxation rates between the involved protons were estimated. The inferred distances between these protons of the hapten and certain tryptophan protons are 3-4 A. It is concluded that in the combining site of AN02 there is one tryptophan from the light chain and one tryptophan from the heavy chain that are very near the hapten. When all tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated and all tryptophan aromatic protons were deuterated except for the protons at positions 2 and 5, titration of the Fab fragments with variable amounts of paramagnetic hapten showed that one proton from the light chain tryptophan is near (less than 7 A) the unpaired electron and that three other protons are significantly closer than 15 A.

  13. Impact of interfacial tension on residual CO2 clusters in porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fei; Tsuji, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    We develop a numerical simulation that uses the lattice Boltzmann method to directly calculate the characteristics of residual nonwetting-phase clusters to quantify capillary trapping mechanisms in real sandstone. For this purpose, a digital-rock-pore model reconstructed from micro-CT-scanned images of Berea sandstone is filtered and segmented into a binary file. The residual-cluster distribution is generated following simulation of the drainage and imbibition processes. The characteristics of the residual cluster in terms of size distribution, major length, interfacial area, and sphericity are investigated under conditions of different interfacial tension (IFT). Our results indicate that high interfacial tension increases the residual saturation and leads to a large size distribution of residual clusters. However, low interfacial tension results in a larger interfacial area, which is beneficial for dissolution and reaction processes during geological carbon storage. Analysis of the force balance acting on the residual clusters demonstrates that trapping stability is higher in high interfacial tension case, and the interfacial tension should be a controlling factor for the trapping stability in addition to the pore geometry and connectivity. The proposed numerical method can handle the complex displacement of multicomponent systems in porous media. By using this method, we can obtain residual-cluster distributions under different conditions for optimizing the storage capacity of carbon-storage projects.

  14. Tryptophan and tyrosine to terbium fluorescence resonance energy transfer as a method to 'map' aromatic residues and monitor docking

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, John E.; McLendon, George L. . E-mail: george.mclendon@duke.edu

    2006-11-03

    Fluorescent lanthanide ions, with large Stokes shifts and narrow emission bands, are excellent tools for the development of FRET-based assays. In this work, a terbium ion is tethered to a peptide which binds to the BIR3 domain of XIAP, an anti-apoptotic protein. Excitation of tryptophan and tyrosine residues in the BIR3 domain causes the peptide bound terbium ion to fluoresce relative to its distance from these aromatic residues. By developing ligands with terbium ions tethered at different residues, the relative terbium emission can be used to 'map' the aromatic residues within the ligand binding pocket.

  15. Detection and characterization of in vivo nitration and oxidation of tryptophan residues in proteins.

    PubMed

    Bregere, Catherine; Rebrin, Igor; Sohal, Rajindar S

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen and nitrogen centered reactive species can cause specific structural modifications in amino acids and proteins, such as the addition of a nitro group onto aromatic residues. Heretofore, studies on protein nitration have mainly focused on the in vitro and in vivo nitro addition to tyrosine residues (3-nitrotyrosine or 3NT), whereas the formation of nitrotryptophan in proteins in vivo and/or its functional significance has remained quite obscure. A novel structural modification, involving the addition of nitro and hydroxy groups to tryptophan, has been detected in the mitochondrial protein succinyl-CoA:3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) in rat heart. Modified SCOT accumulated progressively with age, which was associated with an elevation of its activity. The specific biochemical properties of this novel amino acid were characterized by a combination of HPLC-electrochemical detection and mass spectrometric analysis. This chapter describes the experimental steps involved in the characterizations and a procedure for the synthesis of nitrohydroxytryptophan. Similar methodology can be applied to the identification of nitrohydroxytryptophan in other proteins. PMID:18554544

  16. Structure-function studies on bacteriorhodopsin. IX. Substitutions of tryptophan residues affect protein-retinal interactions in bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Mogi, T.; Marti, T.; Khorana, H.G. )

    1989-08-25

    Bacteriorhodopsin contains 8 tryptophan residues distributed across the membrane-embedded helices. To study their possible functions, we have replaced them one at a time by phenylalanine; in addition, Trp-137 and -138 have been replaced by cysteine. The mutants were prepared by cassette mutagenesis of the synthetic bacterio-opsin gene, expression and purification of the mutant apoproteins, renaturation, and chromophore regeneration. The replacement of Trp-10, Trp-12 (helix A), Trp-80 (helix C), and Trp-138 (helix E) by phenylalanine and of Trp-137 and Trp-138 by cysteine did not significantly alter the absorption spectra or affect their proton pumping. However, substitution of the remaining tryptophans by phenylalanine had the following effects. (1) Substitution of Trp-86 (helix C) and Trp-137 gave chromophores blue-shifted by 20 nm and resulted in reduced proton pumping to about 30%. (2) As also reported previously, substitution of Trp-182 and Trp-189 (helix F) caused large blue shifts (70 and 40 nm, respectively) in the chromophore and affected proton pumping. (3) The substitution of Trp-86 and Trp-182 by phenylalanine conferred acid instability on these mutants. The spectral shifts indicate that Trp-86, Trp-182, Trp-189, and possibly Trp-137 interact with retinal. It is proposed that these tryptophans, probably along with Tyr-57 (helix B) and Tyr-185 (helix F), form a retinal binding pocket. We discuss the role of tryptophan residues that are conserved in bacteriorhodopsin, halorhodopsin, and the related family of opsin proteins.

  17. Selective deuteration of tryptophan and methionine residues in maltose binding protein: a model system for neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Laux, Valerie; Callow, Phil; Svergun, Dmitri I; Timmins, Peter A; Forsyth, V Trevor; Haertlein, Michael

    2008-07-01

    We describe methods that have been developed within the ILL-EMBL Deuteration Laboratory for the production of maltose binding protein (MBP) that has been selectively labelled either with deuterated tryptophan or deuterated methionine (single labelling), or both (double labelling). MBP is used as an important model system for biophysical studies, and selective labelling can be helpful in the analysis of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) data, neutron reflection (NR) data, and high-resolution neutron diffraction data. The selective labelling was carried out in E. coli high-cell density cultures using auxotrophic mutants in minimal medium containing the required deuterated precursors. Five types of sample were prepared and studied: (1) unmodified hydrogenated MBP (H-MBP), (2) perdeuterated MBP (D-MBP), (3) singly labelled MBP with the tryptophan residues deuterated (D-trp MBP), (4) singly labelled MBP with methionine residues deuterated (D-met MBP) and (5) doubly labelled MBP with both tryptophan and methionine residues deuterated (D-trp/met MBP). Labelled samples were characterised by size exclusion chromatography, gel electrophoresis, light scattering and mass spectroscopy. Preliminary small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments have also been carried out and show measurable differences between the SANS data recorded for the various labelled analogues. More detailed SANS experiments using these labelled MBP analogues are planned; the degree to which such data could enhance structure determination by SANS is discussed. PMID:18274740

  18. Resolution of fluorescence intensity decays of the two tryptophan residues in glutamine-binding protein from Escherichia coli using single tryptophan mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Axelsen, P H; Bajzer, Z; Prendergast, F G; Cottam, P F; Ho, C

    1991-01-01

    Time correlated single photon counting measurements of tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence intensity decay and other spectroscopic studies were performed on glutamine-binding protein (GlnBP) from Escherichia coli. Using site-specifically mutated forms of the protein in which tyrosine (Tyr) and phenylalanine (Phe) substitute for the Trp residues at positions 32 and 220, we have examined whether wild-type (Wtyp) intensity decay components may be assigned to specific Trp residues. Results indicate that: (a) two exponential intensity decay components are recovered from the Wtyp protein (6.16 ns, 0.46 ns); (b) the long decay component arises from Trp-220 and comprises greater than 90% of the total fluorescence emission; (c) the short component arises from Trp-32 and is highly quenched; (d) all four single-Trp mutants exhibit multiexponential intensity decays, yet equimolar mixtures of two single-Trp mutants yield only two decay components which are virtually indistinguishable from the Wtyp protein; (e) the recovery of additional components in protein mixtures is obscured by statistical noise inherent in the technique of photon counting; (f) various spectroscopic measurements suggest that Trp-Trp interactions occur in the Wtyp protein, but the Wtyp intensity decay may be closely approximated by a linear combination of intensity decays from single-Trp mutants; and (g) inferences derived independently from fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy which pertain to the presence of Trp-Trp interactions and the relative solvent exposure of the two Trp residues are in agreement. PMID:1932553

  19. Gramicidin conformational changes during riboflavin photosensitized oxidation in solution and the effect of N-methylation of tryptophan residues.

    PubMed

    Fuentealba, Denis; López, Jhon J; Palominos, Marco; Salas, Cristian O; Soto-Arriaza, Marco A

    2015-04-01

    In the present work, we evaluated the role of gramicidin conformation in its photosensitized oxidation in organic solvents when irradiated in the presence of riboflavin. Gramicidin conformation has been described as monomeric in trifluoroethanol and as an intertwined dimer in methanol. Gramicidin showed extensive photo-oxidation upon irradiation in the presence of riboflavin in both solvents, and tryptophan residues were identified to be involved. We synthesized a gramicidin derivative methylated at position 1 of the indole ring of tryptophan to assess its effect on gramicidin conformation and photo-oxidation. Methylated gramicidin showed very similar absorption and emission spectra to gramicidin, but different conformations were identified by circular dichroism spectra. Upon irradiation, N-methylated tryptophan residues in the gramicidin derivative were not easily photo-oxidized by riboflavin compared to gramicidin. Circular dichroism spectra for gramicidin in methanol changed significantly upon irradiation in the presence of riboflavin indicating a change in conformation, while in trifluoroethanol no such changes were observed. Time-resolved fluorescence and anisotropy studies showed that oxidized gramicidin in methanol had shorter fluorescence lifetimes and a shorter rotational correlation time compared to non-irradiated gramicidin. Additionally, SDS-PAGE analysis showed a marked change in the electrophoretic pattern, whereas the high-molecular-weight bands disappeared upon irradiation. We interpret all these results in terms of a riboflavin photosensitized shift in gramicidin conformation from intertwined to monomeric. PMID:25611022

  20. Luffa acutangula agglutinin: Primary structure determination and identification of a tryptophan residue involved in its carbohydrate-binding activity using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gnanesh; Mishra, Padmanabh; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2015-12-01

    A lectin from phloem exudates of Luffa acutangula (ridge gourd) was purified on chitin affinity chromatography and characterized for its amino acid sequence and to study the role of tryptophan in its activity. The purified lectin was subjected to various proteolytic digestions, and the resulting peptides were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometer. The peptide precursor ions were fragmented by collision-induced dissociation or electron transfer dissociation experiments, and a manual interpretation of MS/MS was performed to deduce amino acid sequence. This gave rise to almost complete sequence coverage of the lectin which showed high-sequence similarity with deduced sequences of phloem lectins present in the database. Chemical modification of lysine, tyrosine, histidine, arginine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid residues did not inhibit the hemagglutinating activity. However, the modification of tryptophan residues using N-bromosuccinimide showed the loss of hemagglutinating activity. Additionally, the mapping of tryptophan residues was performed to determine the extent and number of residues modified, which revealed that six residues per molecule were oxidized suggesting their accessibility. The retention of the lectin activity was seen when the modifications were performed in the presence of chitooligosaccharides due to protection of a tryptophan residue (W102) in the protein. These studies taken together have led to the identification of a particular tryptophan residue (W102) in the activity of the lectin. PMID:26597132

  1. Mechanistic Examination of Cβ–Cγ Bond Cleavages of Tryptophan Residues during Dissociations of Molecular Peptide Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Ma, Ching-Yung; Chu, Ivan K.; Siu, Chi-Kit; Laskin, Julia

    2013-02-14

    In this study, we used collision-induced dissociation (CID) to examine the gas-phase fragmentations of [GnW]•+ (n = 2-4) and [GXW]•+ (X = C, S, L, F, Y, Q) species. The Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage of a C-terminal decarboxylated tryptophan residue ([M - CO2]•+) can generate [M - CO2 - 116]+, [M - CO2 - 117]•+, and [1H-indole]•+ (m/z 117) species as possible product ions. Competition between the formation of [M - CO2 - 116]+ and [1H-indole]•+ systems implies the existence of a proton-bound dimer formed between the indole ring and peptide backbone. Formation of such a proton-bound dimer is facile via a protonation of the tryptophan γ-carbon atom as suggested by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations also suggested the initially formed ion 2--the decarboxylated species that is active against Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage -can efficiently isomerize to form a more-stable -radical isomer (ion 9) as supported by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling. The Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage of a tryptophan residue also can occur directly from peptide radical cations containing a basic residue. CID of [WGnR]•+ (n = 1-3) radical cations consistently resulted in predominant formation of [M-116]+ product ions. It appears that the basic arginine residue tightly sequesters the proton and allows the charge-remote Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage to prevail over the charge-directed one. DFT calculations predicted the barrier for the former is 6.2 kcal mol -1 lower than that of the latter. Furthermore, the pathway involving a salt-bridge intermediate also was accessible during such a bond cleavage event.

  2. Two-photon circular dichroism of molecular structures simulating L-tryptophan residues in proteins with secondary structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesga, Yuly; Diaz, Carlos; Higgs, Mary; Hernandez, Florencio E.

    2014-05-01

    Herein, we report on the calculation and the comparative analysis of the theoretical two-photon circular dichroism (TPCD) spectra of L-tryptophan (Trp) residues in proteins with secondary structures (α-helix, β-strand and random coil) conformation, down to the far-UV region (FUV). The examination of the TPCD spectra of the different conformers in each configuration reveals distinctive fingerprints in the FUV, a dark spectral region for electronic circular dichroism (ECD). Our results show the potential of FUV-TPCD to identify and study protein structures in a region never assessed before but filled with important structural information.

  3. Analysis of the Role of the Active Site Residue Arg98 in the Flavoprotein Tryptophan 2-Monooxygenase, a Member of the l-Amino Oxidase Family†

    PubMed Central

    Sobrado, Pablo; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2006-01-01

    The flavoprotein tryptophan 2-monooxygenase catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of tryptophan to indoleacetamide. We have previously identified tryptophan 2-monooxygenase as a homologue of l-amino acid oxidase [Sobrado, P., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2002) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 402, 24–30]. On the basis of the sequence comparisons of the different LAAO family members, Arg98 of tryptophan 2-monooxygenase can be identified as an active site residue which interacts with the carboxylate of the amino acid substrate. The catalytic properties of R98K and R98A tryptophan 2-monooxygenase have been characterized to evaluate the role of this residue. Mutation of Arg98 to lysine decreases the first-order rate constant for flavin reduction by 180-fold and the second-order rate constant for flavin oxidation by 26-fold, has no significant effect on the Kd value for tryptophan or the Ki value for the competitive inhibitor indoleacetamide, and increases the Ki value for indolepyruvate less than 2-fold. Mutation of this residue to alanine decreases the rate constants for reduction and oxidation an additional 5- and 2-fold, respectively, and increases the Kd value for tryptophan and the Ki value for indolepyruvate by 31- and 17-fold, respectively, while having an only 2-fold effect on the Ki value for indoleacetamide. Both mutations increase the value of the primary deuterium isotope effect with tryptophan as a substrate, consistent with a later transition state. Both mutant enzymes catalyze a simple oxidase reaction, producing indolepyruvate and hydrogen peroxide. The pH dependences of the V/Ktrp values for the mutant enzymes show that the anionic form of the substrate is preferred but that the zwitterionic form is a substrate. The results are consistent with the interaction between Arg98 and the carboxylate of the amino acid substrate being critical for correct positioning of the substrate in the active site for efficient catalysis. PMID:14636049

  4. Conserved residues Asp16 and Pro24 of TnaC-tRNAPro participate in tryptophan induction of Tna operon expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Vera, Luis R; Yanofsky, Charles

    2008-07-01

    In Escherichia coli, interactions between the nascent TnaC-tRNA(Pro) peptidyl-tRNA and the translating ribosome create a tryptophan binding site in the ribosome where bound tryptophan inhibits TnaC-tRNA(Pro) cleavage. This inhibition delays ribosome release, thereby inhibiting Rho factor binding and action, resulting in increased tna operon transcription. Replacing Trp12 of TnaC with any other amino acid residue was previously shown to prevent tryptophan binding and induction of tna operon expression. Genome-wide comparisons of TnaC amino acid sequences identify Asp16 and Pro24, as well as Trp12, as highly conserved TnaC residues. Replacing these residues with other residues was previously shown to influence tryptophan induction of tna operon expression. In this study, in vitro analyses were performed to examine the potential roles of Asp16 and Pro24 in tna operon induction. Replacing Asp16 or Pro24 of TnaC of E. coli with other amino acids established that these residues are essential for free tryptophan binding and inhibition of TnaC-tRNA(Pro) cleavage at the peptidyl transferase center. Asp16 and Pro24 are in fact located in spatial positions corresponding to critical residues of AAP, another ribosome regulatory peptide. Sparsomycin-methylation protection studies further suggested that segments of 23S RNA were arranged differently in ribosomes bearing TnaCs with either the Asp16Ala or the Pro24Ala change. Thus, features of the amino acid sequence of TnaC of the nascent TnaC-tRNA(Pro) peptidyl-tRNA, in addition to the presence of Trp12, are necessary for the nascent peptide to create a tryptophan binding/inhibition site in the translating ribosome. PMID:18424524

  5. Optimization of residual stresses in MMC's through the variation of interfacial layer architectures and processing parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this work was the development of efficient, user-friendly computer codes for optimizing fabrication-induced residual stresses in metal matrix composites through the use of homogeneous and heterogeneous interfacial layer architectures and processing parameter variation. To satisfy this objective, three major computer codes have been developed and delivered to the NASA-Lewis Research Center, namely MCCM, OPTCOMP, and OPTCOMP2. MCCM is a general research-oriented code for investigating the effects of microstructural details, such as layered morphology of SCS-6 SiC fibers and multiple homogeneous interfacial layers, on the inelastic response of unidirectional metal matrix composites under axisymmetric thermomechanical loading. OPTCOMP and OPTCOMP2 combine the major analysis module resident in MCCM with a commercially-available optimization algorithm and are driven by user-friendly interfaces which facilitate input data construction and program execution. OPTCOMP enables the user to identify those dimensions, geometric arrangements and thermoelastoplastic properties of homogeneous interfacial layers that minimize thermal residual stresses for the specified set of constraints. OPTCOMP2 provides additional flexibility in the residual stress optimization through variation of the processing parameters (time, temperature, external pressure and axial load) as well as the microstructure of the interfacial region which is treated as a heterogeneous two-phase composite. Overviews of the capabilities of these codes are provided together with a summary of results that addresses the effects of various microstructural details of the fiber, interfacial layers and matrix region on the optimization of fabrication-induced residual stresses in metal matrix composites.

  6. Atomic mutations at the single tryptophan residue of human recombinant annexin V: effects on structure, stability, and activity.

    PubMed

    Minks, C; Huber, R; Moroder, L; Budisa, N

    1999-08-17

    The single tryptophan residue (Trp187) of human recombinant annexin V, containing 320 residues and 5328 atoms, was replaced with three different isosteric analogues where hydrogen atoms at positions 4, 5, and 6 in the indole ring were exchanged with fluorine. Such single atom exchanges of H --> F represent atomic mutations that result in slightly increased covalent bond lengths and inverted polarities in the residue side-chain structure. These minimal changes in the local geometry do not affect the secondary and tertiary structures of the mutants, which were identical to those of wild-type protein in the crystal form. But the mutants exhibit significant differences in stability, folding cooperativity, biological activity, and fluorescence properties if compared to the wild-type protein. These rather large global effects, resulting from the minimal local changes, have to be attributed either to the relatively strong changes in polar interactions of the indole ring or to differences in the van der Waals radii or to a combination of both facts. The changes in local geometry that are below resolution of protein X-ray crystallographic studies are probably of secondary importance in comparison to the strong electronegativity introduced by the fluorine atom. Correspondingly, these types of mutations provide an interesting approach to study cooperative functions of integrated residues and modulation of particular physicochemical properties, in the present case of electronegativity, in a uniquely structured and hierarchically organized protein molecule. PMID:10451359

  7. Recombinant expression, antimicrobial activity and mechanism of action of tritrpticin analogs containing fluoro-tryptophan residues.

    PubMed

    Arias, Mauricio; Hoffarth, Elesha R; Ishida, Hiroaki; Aramini, James M; Vogel, Hans J

    2016-05-01

    The increase in antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections has prompted significant academic research into new therapeutic agents targeted against these pathogens. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) appear as promising candidates, due their potent antimicrobial activity and their ubiquitous presence in almost all organisms. Tritrpticin is a member of this family of peptides and has been shown to exert a strong antimicrobial activity against several bacterial strains. Tritrpticin's main structural characteristic is the presence of three consecutive Trp residues at the center of the peptide. These residues play an important role in the activity of tritrpticin against Escherichia coli. In this work, a recombinant version of tritrpticin was produced in E. coli using calmodulin as a fusion protein expression tag to overcome the toxicity of the peptide. When used in combination with glyphosate, an inhibitor of the endogenous synthesis of aromatic amino acids, this expression system allowed for the incorporation of fluorinated Trp analogs at very high levels (>90%). The antimicrobial activity of the 4-, 5- and 6-fluoro-Trp-containing tritrpticins against E. coli was as strong as the activity of the native peptide. Similarly, the tritrpticin analogs exhibited comparable abilities to perturb and permeabilize synthetic lipid bilayers as well as the outer and inner membrane of E. coli. Furthermore, the use of 19F NMR spectroscopy established that each individual fluoro-Trp residue interacts differently with SDS micelles, supporting the idea that each Trp in the original tritrpticin plays a different role in the perturbing/permeabilizing activity of the peptide. Moreover, our work demonstrates that the use of fluoro-Trp in solvent perturbation 19F NMR experiments provides detailed site-specific information on the insertion of the Trp residues in biological membrane mimetics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai

  8. Assignment of ozone-sensitive tryptophan residue in tryptophanase by a dual-monitoring high-performance liquid chromatography system

    SciTech Connect

    Ida, N.; Tokushige, M.

    1985-02-01

    Tryptophanase purified from Escherichia coli B/1t7-A is inactivated by mild ozonization following pseudo-first-order kinetics. Previous data from the authors suggest that one out of two tryptophan residues (Trp's) in the enzyme subunit is preferentially oxidized concomitant with the ozone inactivation and has a direct interaction with the coenzyme, pyridoxal phosphate. To determine which Trp is more susceptible to ozonization and interacts with PLP, the native and ozonized enzyme proteins were cleaved by trypsin and the two Trp-containing peptides were analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC equipped with a dual-monitoring system consisting of an uv and a fluorescence monitor connected in tandem for selective detection of Trp-containing peptides. This device facilitated rapid detection and quantitation of the Trp-containing peptides which decreased upon ozonization. The results showed that Trp preferentially oxidized upon ozonization and involved in the interaction with PLP was the one in peptide T-15 rather than that in T-23, which Kagamiyama et al. originally designated.

  9. Chemical fragmentation by o-iodosobenzoic acid of. cap alpha. -chain of histidine decarboxylase from Micrococcus sp. n. at tryptophan residues

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseeva, E.A.; Grebenshchikova, O.G.; Prozorovskii, V.N.

    1987-02-10

    The carboxymethylated ..cap alpha..-chain of histidine decarboxylase from Micrococcus sp. n., which contains four tryptophan residues, was cleaved by o-iodosobenzoic acid. Five fragments were isolated in homogeneous form by means of gel filtration on Sephadex, rechromatography, and high-voltage paper electrophoresis. The molecular weight, amino acid composition, and N-terminal amino acid sequence were determined for all the peptides isolated.

  10. A novel post-translational modification involving bromination of tryptophan. Identification of the residue, L-6-bromotryptophan, in peptides from Conus imperialis and Conus radiatus venom.

    PubMed

    Craig, A G; Jimenez, E C; Dykert, J; Nielsen, D B; Gulyas, J; Abogadie, F C; Porter, J; Rivier, J E; Cruz, L J; Olivera, B M; McIntosh, J M

    1997-02-21

    We report a novel post-translational modification involving halogenation of tryptophan in peptides recovered from the venom of carnivorous marine cone snails (Conus). The residue, L-6-bromotryptophan, was identified in the sequence of a heptapeptide, isolated from Conus imperialis, a worm-hunting cone. This peptide does not elicit gross behavioral symptoms when injected centrally or peripherally in mice. L-6-Bromotryptophan was also identified in a 33-amino acid peptide from Conus radiatus; this peptide has been shown to induce a sleep-like state in mice of all ages and is referred to as bromosleeper peptide. The sequences of the two peptides and were determined using a combination of mass spectrometry, amino acid, and chemical sequence analyses, where Pca = pyroglutamic acid, Hyp = hydroxyproline, Gla = gamma-carboxyglutamate, and Trp* = L-6-bromotryptophan. The precise structure and stereochemistry of the modified residue were determined as L-6-bromotryptophan by synthesis, co-elution, and enzymatic hydrolysis experiments. To our knowledge this is the first documentation of tryptophan residues in peptides/proteins being modified in a eukaryotic system and the first report of halogenation of tryptophan in vivo. PMID:9030520

  11. Understanding the roles of strictly conserved tryptophan residues in O2 producing chlorite dismutases

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Beatrice; Rodgers, Kenton R.

    2013-01-01

    The chlorite dismutases (Clds) degrade ClO2− to O2 and Cl− in perchlorate respiring bacteria, and they serve still poorly defined cellular roles in other diverse microbes. These proteins share 3 highly conserved Trp residues, W155, W156, and W227, on the proximal side of the heme. The Cld from Dechloromonas aromatica (DaCld) has been shown to form protein-based radicals in its reactions with ClO2− and peracetic acid. The roles of the conserved Trp residues in radical generation and in enzymatic function were assessed via spectroscopic and kinetic analysis of their Phe mutants. The W155F mutant was the most dramatically affected, appearing to lose the characteristic pentameric oligomerization state, secondary structure, and heme binding properties of the WT protein. The W156F mutant initially retains many features of the WT protein but over time acquires many of the features of W155F. Conversion to an inactive, heme-free form is accelerated by dilution, suggesting loss of the protein’s pentameric state. Hence, both W155 and W156 are important for heme binding and maintenance of the protein’s reactive pentameric structure. W227F by contrast retains many properties of the WT protein. Important differences are noted in the transient kinetic reactions with peracetic acid (PAA), where W227F appears to form an [Fe(IV)=O]-containing intermediate, which subsequently converts to an uncoupled [Fe(IV)=O + AA+.] system in a [PAA]-dependent manner. This is in contrast to the peroxidase-like formation of [Fe(IV)=O] coupled to a porphyrin π-cation radical in the WT protein, which decays in a [PAA]-independent manner. These observations and the lack of redox protection for the heme in any of the Trp mutants suggests a tendency for protein radical formation in DaCld that is independent of any of these conserved active site residues. PMID:23241559

  12. Interfacial partitioning of a loop hinge residue contributes to diacylglycerol affinity of conserved region 1 domains.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Mikaela D; Cole, Taylor R; Igumenova, Tatyana I

    2014-10-01

    Conventional and novel isoenzymes of PKC are activated by the membrane-embedded second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG) through its interactions with the C1 regulatory domain. The affinity of C1 domains to DAG varies considerably among PKCs. To gain insight into the origin of differential DAG affinities, we conducted high-resolution NMR studies of C1B domain from PKCδ (C1Bδ) and its W252Y variant. The W252Y mutation was previously shown to render C1Bδ less responsive to DAG (Dries, D. R., Gallegos, L. L., and Newton, A. C. (2007) A single residue in the C1 domain sensitizes novel protein kinase C isoforms to cellular diacylglycerol production. J. Biol. Chem. 282, 826-830) and thereby emulate the behavior of C1B domains from conventional PKCs that have a conserved Tyr at the equivalent position. Our data revealed that W252Y mutation did not perturb the conformation of C1Bδ in solution but significantly reduced its propensity to partition into a membrane-mimicking environment in the absence of DAG. Using detergent micelles doped with a paramagnetic lipid, we determined that both the residue identity at position 252 and complexation with diacylglycerol influence the geometry of C1Bδ-micelle interactions. In addition, we identified the C-terminal helix α1 of C1Bδ as an interaction site with the head groups of phosphatidylserine, a known activator of PKCδ. Taken together, our studies (i) reveal the identities of C1Bδ residues involved in interactions with membrane-mimicking environment, DAG, and phosphatidylserine, as well as the affinities associated with each event and (ii) suggest that the initial ligand-independent membrane recruitment of C1B domains, which is greatly facilitated by the interfacial partitioning of Trp-252, is responsible, at least in part, for the differential DAG affinities. PMID:25124034

  13. Interfacial Partitioning of a Loop Hinge Residue Contributes to Diacylglycerol Affinity of Conserved Region 1 Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Mikaela D.; Cole, Taylor R.; Igumenova, Tatyana I.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional and novel isoenzymes of PKC are activated by the membrane-embedded second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG) through its interactions with the C1 regulatory domain. The affinity of C1 domains to DAG varies considerably among PKCs. To gain insight into the origin of differential DAG affinities, we conducted high-resolution NMR studies of C1B domain from PKCδ (C1Bδ) and its W252Y variant. The W252Y mutation was previously shown to render C1Bδ less responsive to DAG (Dries, D. R., Gallegos, L. L., and Newton, A. C. (2007) A single residue in the C1 domain sensitizes novel protein kinase C isoforms to cellular diacylglycerol production. J. Biol. Chem. 282, 826–830) and thereby emulate the behavior of C1B domains from conventional PKCs that have a conserved Tyr at the equivalent position. Our data revealed that W252Y mutation did not perturb the conformation of C1Bδ in solution but significantly reduced its propensity to partition into a membrane-mimicking environment in the absence of DAG. Using detergent micelles doped with a paramagnetic lipid, we determined that both the residue identity at position 252 and complexation with diacylglycerol influence the geometry of C1Bδ-micelle interactions. In addition, we identified the C-terminal helix α1 of C1Bδ as an interaction site with the head groups of phosphatidylserine, a known activator of PKCδ. Taken together, our studies (i) reveal the identities of C1Bδ residues involved in interactions with membrane-mimicking environment, DAG, and phosphatidylserine, as well as the affinities associated with each event and (ii) suggest that the initial ligand-independent membrane recruitment of C1B domains, which is greatly facilitated by the interfacial partitioning of Trp-252, is responsible, at least in part, for the differential DAG affinities. PMID:25124034

  14. Involvement of tryptophan residues at the coenzyme A binding site of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, T; Kumar, G K; Wood, H G

    1988-08-23

    Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) from Clostridium thermoaceticum plays a central role in the newly discovered acetyl-CoA pathway [Wood, H.G., Ragsdale, S.W., & Pezacka, E. (1986) FEMS Microbiol. Rev. 39, 345-362]. The enzyme catalyzes the formation of acetyl-CoA from methyl, carbonyl, and CoA groups, and it has specific binding sites for these moieties. In this study, we have determined the role of tryptophans at these subsites. N-Bromosuccinimide (NBS) oxidation of the exposed and reactive tryptophans (5 out of a total of approximately 20) of CODH at pH 5.5 results in the partial inactivation of the exchange reaction (approximately 50%) involving carbon monoxide and the carbonyl group of the acetyl-CoA. Also, about 70% of the acetyl-CoA synthesis was abolished as a result of NBS modification. The presence of CoA (10 microM) produced complete protection against the partial inhibition of the exchange activity and the overall synthesis of acetyl-CoA caused by NBS. Additionally, none of the exposed tryptophans of CODH was modified in the presence of CoA. Ligands such as the methyl or the carbonyl groups did not afford protection against these inactivations or the modification of the exposed tryptophans. A significant fraction of the accessible fluorescence of CODH was shielded in the presence of CoA against acrylamide quenching. On the basis of these observations, it appears that certain tryptophans are involved at or near the CoA binding site of CODH. PMID:3219350

  15. A MOTIF-BASED METHOD FOR PREDICTING INTERFACIAL RESIDUES IN BOTH THE RNA AND PROTEIN COMPONENTS OF PROTEIN-RNA COMPLEXES

    PubMed Central

    MANN, CARLA M.; DOBBS, DRENA

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to predict interfacial residues in protein-RNA complexes have largely focused on predicting RNA-binding residues in proteins. Computational methods for predicting protein-binding residues in RNA sequences, however, are a problem that has received relatively little attention to date. Although the value of sequence motifs for classifying and annotating protein sequences is well established, sequence motifs have not been widely applied to predicting interfacial residues in macromolecular complexes. Here, we propose a novel sequence motif-based method for “partner-specific” interfacial residue prediction. Given a specific protein-RNA pair, the goal is to simultaneously predict RNA binding residues in the protein sequence and protein-binding residues in the RNA sequence. In 5-fold cross validation experiments, our method, PS-PRIP, achieved 92% Specificity and 61% Sensitivity, with a Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.58 in predicting RNA-binding sites in proteins. The method achieved 69% Specificity and 75% Sensitivity, but with a low MCC of 0.13 in predicting protein binding sites in RNAs. Similar performance results were obtained when PS-PRIP was tested on two independent “blind” datasets of experimentally validated protein-RNA interactions, suggesting the method should be widely applicable and valuable for identifying potential interfacial residues in protein-RNA complexes for which structural information is not available. The PS-PRIP webserver and datasets are available at: http://pridb.gdcb.iastate.edu/PSPRIP/. PMID:26776208

  16. Inactivation of influenza virus haemagglutinin by chlorine dioxide: oxidation of the conserved tryptophan 153 residue in the receptor-binding site.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Norio

    2012-12-01

    Airborne influenza virus infection of mice can be prevented by gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)). This study demonstrated that ClO(2) abolished the function of the haemagglutinin (HA) of influenza A virus (H1N1) in a concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent manner. The IC(50) during a 2 min reaction with ClO(2) at 25 °C was 13.7 µM, and the half-life time of HA with 100 µM ClO(2) at 25 °C was 19.5 s. Peptides generated from a tryptic digest of ClO(2)-treated virus were analysed by mass spectrometry. An HA fragment, (150)NLLWLTGK(157) was identified in which the tryptophan residue (W153) was 32 mass units greater than expected. The W153 residue of this peptide, which is derived from the central region of the receptor-binding site of HA, is highly conserved. It was shown that W153 was oxidized to N-formylkynurenine in ClO(2)-treated virus. It was concluded that the inactivation of influenza virus by ClO(2) is caused by oxidation of W153 in HA, thereby abolishing its receptor-binding ability. PMID:22933663

  17. Role of the tryptophan residues in proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT-SLC46A1) function.

    PubMed

    Najmi, Mitra; Zhao, Rongbao; Fiser, Andras; Goldman, I David

    2016-07-01

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) mediates folate absorption across the brush-border membrane of the proximal small intestine and is required for folate transport across the choroid plexus into the cerebrospinal fluid. In this study, the functional role and accessibility of the seven PCFT Trp residues were assessed by the substituted-cysteine accessibility method. Six Trp residues at a lipid-aqueous interface tolerated Cys substitution in terms of protein stability and function. W85C, W202C, and W213C were accessible to N-biotinyl aminoethylmethanethiosulfonate; W48C and W299C were accessible only after treatment with dithiotreitol (DTT), consistent with modification of these residues by an endogenous thiol-reacting molecule and their extracellular location. Neither W107C nor W333C was accessible (even after DTT) consistent with their cytoplasmic orientation. Biotinylation was blocked by pemetrexed only for the W48C (after DTT), W85C, W202C residues. Function was impaired only for the W299C PCFT mutant located in the 4th external loop between the 7th and 8th transmembrane helices. Despite its aqueous location, function could only be fully preserved with Phe and, to a lesser extent, Ala substitutions. There was a 6.5-fold decrease in the pemetrexed influx Vmax and a 3.5- and 6-fold decrease in the influx Kt and Ki, respectively, for the W299S PCFT. The data indicate that the hydrophobicity of the W299 residue is important for function suggesting that during the transport cycle this residue interacts with the lipid membrane thereby impacting on the oscillation of the carrier and, indirectly, on the folate binding pocket. PMID:27251438

  18. Structural Analysis of the Streptomyces avermitilis CYP107W1-Oligomycin A Complex and Role of the Tryptophan 178 Residue.

    PubMed

    Han, Songhee; Pham, Tan-Viet; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Lim, Young-Ran; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Cha, Gun-Su; Yun, Chul-Ho; Chun, Young-Jin; Kang, Lin-Woo; Kim, Donghak

    2016-03-31

    CYP107W1 from Streptomyces avermitilis is a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of macrolide oligomycin A. A previous study reported that CYP107W1 regioselectively hydroxylated C12 of oligomycin C to produce oligomycin A, and the crystal structure of ligand free CYP107W1 was determined. Here, we analyzed the structural properties of the CYP107W1-oligomycin A complex and characterized the functional role of the Trp178 residue in CYP107W1. The crystal structure of the CYP107W1 complex with oligomycin A was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Oligomycin A is bound in the substrate access channel on the upper side of the prosthetic heme mainly by hydrophobic interactions. In particular, the Trp178 residue in the active site intercalates into the large macrolide ring, thereby guiding the substrate into the correct binding orientation for a productive P450 reaction. A Trp178 to Gly mutation resulted in the distortion of binding titration spectra with oligomycin A, whereas binding spectra with azoles were not affected. The Gly178 mutant's catalytic turnover number for the 12-hydroxylation reaction of oligomycin C was highly reduced. These results indicate that Trp178, located in the open pocket of the active site, may be a critical residue for the productive binding conformation of large macrolide substrates. PMID:26883908

  19. Structural Analysis of the Streptomyces avermitilis CYP107W1-Oligomycin A Complex and Role of the Tryptophan 178 Residue

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songhee; Pham, Tan-Viet; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Lim, Young-Ran; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Cha, Gun-Su; Yun, Chul-Ho; Chun, Young-Jin; Kang, Lin-Woo; Kim, Donghak

    2016-01-01

    CYP107W1 from Streptomyces avermitilis is a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of macrolide oligomycin A. A previous study reported that CYP107W1 regioselectively hydroxylated C12 of oligomycin C to produce oligomycin A, and the crystal structure of ligand free CYP107W1 was determined. Here, we analyzed the structural properties of the CYP107W1-oligomycin A complex and characterized the functional role of the Trp178 residue in CYP107W1. The crystal structure of the CYP107W1 complex with oligomycin A was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Oligomycin A is bound in the substrate access channel on the upper side of the prosthetic heme mainly by hydrophobic interactions. In particular, the Trp178 residue in the active site intercalates into the large macrolide ring, thereby guiding the substrate into the correct binding orientation for a productive P450 reaction. A Trp178 to Gly mutation resulted in the distortion of binding titration spectra with oligomycin A, whereas binding spectra with azoles were not affected. The Gly178 mutant’s catalytic turnover number for the 12-hydroxylation reaction of oligomycin C was highly reduced. These results indicate that Trp178, located in the open pocket of the active site, may be a critical residue for the productive binding conformation of large macrolide substrates. PMID:26883908

  20. Photooxidation of Tryptophan and Tyrosine Residues in Human Serum Albumin Sensitized by Pterin: A Model for Globular Protein Photodamage in Skin.

    PubMed

    Reid, Lara O; Roman, Ernesto A; Thomas, Andrés H; Dántola, M Laura

    2016-08-30

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant protein in the circulatory system. Oxidized albumin was identified in the skin of patients suffering from vitiligo, a depigmentation disorder in which the protection against ultraviolet (UV) radiation fails because of the lack of melanin. Oxidized pterins, efficient photosensitizers under UV-A irradiation, accumulate in the skin affected by vitiligo. In this work, we have investigated the ability of pterin (Ptr), the parent compound of oxidized pterins, to induce structural and chemical changes in HSA under UV-A irradiation. Our results showed that Ptr is able to photoinduce oxidation of the protein in at least two amino acid residues: tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine (Tyr). HSA undergoes oligomerization, yielding protein structures whose molecular weight increases with irradiation time. The protein cross-linking, due to the formation of dimers of Tyr, does not significantly affect the secondary and tertiary structures of HSA. Trp is consumed in the photosensitized process, and N-formylkynurenine was identified as one of its oxidation products. The photosensitization of HSA takes place via a purely dynamic process, which involves the triplet excited state of Ptr. The results presented in this work suggest that protein photodamage mediated by endogenous photosensitizers can significantly contribute to the harmful effects of UV-A radiation on the human skin. PMID:27500308

  1. Mechanical and interfacial properties of poly(vinyl chloride) based composites reinforced by cassava stillage residue with different surface treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanjuan; Gan, Tao; Li, Qian; Su, Jianmei; Lin, Ye; Wei, Yongzuo; Huang, Zuqiang; Yang, Mei

    2014-09-01

    Cassava stillage residue (CSR), a kind of agro-industrial plant fiber, was modified by coupling agent (CA), mechanical activation (MA), and MA-assisted CA (MACA) surface treatments, respectively. The untreated and different surface treated CSRs were used to prepare plant fibers/polymer composites (PFPC) with poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) as polymer matrix, and the properties of these CSR/PVC composites were compared. Surface treated CSR/PVC composites possessed better mechanical properties, water resistance and dimensional stability compared with the untreated CSR/PVC composite, attributing to the improvement of interfacial properties between CSR and PVC matrix. MACA-treated CSR was the best reinforcement among four types of CSRs (untreated, MA-treated, CA-treated, and MACA-treated CSRs) because MACA treatment led to the significant improvement of dispersion, interfacial adhesion and compatibility between CSR and PVC. MACA treatment could be considered as an effective and green method for enhancing reinforcement efficiency of plant fibers and the properties of PFPC.

  2. Accurate prediction of interfacial residues in two-domain proteins using evolutionary information: implications for three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Bhaskara, Ramachandra M; Padhi, Amrita; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-07-01

    With the preponderance of multidomain proteins in eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to recognize the constituent domains and their functions. Often function involves communications across the domain interfaces, and the knowledge of the interacting sites is essential to our understanding of the structure-function relationship. Using evolutionary information extracted from homologous domains in at least two diverse domain architectures (single and multidomain), we predict the interface residues corresponding to domains from the two-domain proteins. We also use information from the three-dimensional structures of individual domains of two-domain proteins to train naïve Bayes classifier model to predict the interfacial residues. Our predictions are highly accurate (∼85%) and specific (∼95%) to the domain-domain interfaces. This method is specific to multidomain proteins which contain domains in at least more than one protein architectural context. Using predicted residues to constrain domain-domain interaction, rigid-body docking was able to provide us with accurate full-length protein structures with correct orientation of domains. We believe that these results can be of considerable interest toward rational protein and interaction design, apart from providing us with valuable information on the nature of interactions. PMID:24375512

  3. The stacking tryptophan of galactose oxidase: a second coordination sphere residue that has profound effects on tyrosyl radical behavior and enzyme catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Melanie S.; Tyler, Ejan M.; Akyumani, Nana; Kurtis, Christian R.; Spooner, R. Kate; Deacon, Sarah E.; Tamber, Sunita; Firbank, Susan J.; Mahmoud, Khaled; Knowles, Peter F.; Phillips, Simon E. V.; McPherson, Michael J.; Dooley, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The function of the stacking tryptophan, W290, a second coordination sphere residue in galactose oxidase has been investigated via steady-state kinetics measurements, absorption, CD and EPR spectroscopy, and x -ray crystallography of the W290F, W290G, and W290H variants. Enzymatic turnover is significantly lower in the W290 variants. The Km for D-galactose for W290H is similar to wild type, whereas the Km is greatly elevated in W290G and W290F, suggesting a role for W290 in substrate binding/positioning via the –NH group of the indole ring. Hydrogen bonding between W290 and azide in the wild type-azide crystal structure are consistent with this function. W290 modulates the properties and reactivity of the redox-active tyrosine radical; the Y272 tyrosyl radical in both the W290G and W290H variants have elevated redox potentials and are highly unstable compared to the radical in W290F, which has similar properties to the wild type tyrosyl radical. W290 restricts the accessibility of the Y272 radical site to solvent. Crystal structures show that Y272 is significantly more solvent exposed in W290G variant but that W290F limits solvent access comparable to the wild-type indole side chain. Spectroscopic studies indicate that the Cu(II) ground states in the semi-reduced W290 variants are very similar to that of the wild-type protein. In addition, the electronic structures of W290X-azide complexes the variants are also closely similar to the wild type electronic structure. Azide binding and azide-mediated proton uptake by Y495 are perturbed in the variants, indicating that tryptophan also modulates the function of the catalytic base (Y495) in the wild-type enzyme. Thus, W290 plays multiple critical roles in enzyme catalysis, affecting substrate binding, the tyrosyl radical redox potential and stability, and the axial tyrosine function. PMID:17385891

  4. Primary structural response in tryptophan residues of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin to photochromic reactions of the retinal chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Seisuke; Mizuno, Misao; Kato, Yoshitaka; Kawanabe, Akira; Kandori, Hideki; Wei, Zhengrong; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2013-06-01

    Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR) is a microbial rhodopsin found in eubacteria and functions as a photosensor. The photoreaction of ASR is photochromic between all-trans, 15-anti (ASRAT), and 13-cis, 15-syn (ASR13C) isomers. To understand primary protein dynamics in the photoreaction starting in ASRAT and ASR13C, picosecond time-resolved ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra were obtained. In the intermediate state appearing in the picosecond temporal region, spectral changes of Trp bands were observed. For both ASRAT and ASR13C, the intensities of the Trp bands were bleached within the instrumental response time and recovered with a time constant of 30 ps. This suggests that the rates of structural changes in the Trp residue in the vicinity of the chromophore do not depend on the direction of the isomerization of retinal. A comparison between spectra of the wild-type and Trp mutants indicates that the structures of Trp76 and Trp46 change upon the primary photoreaction of retinal.

  5. Tryptophan glycoconjugates in food and human urine.

    PubMed Central

    Gutsche, B; Grun, C; Scheutzow, D; Herderich, M

    1999-01-01

    Evaluating the formation of tryptophan glycoconjugates other than well-established Amadori rearrangement products, HPLC-tandem MS (MS/MS) analysis of human urine collected from several healthy individuals proved the presence of one distinct tryptophan C-glycosyl compound [Horiuchi, Yonekawa, Iwahara, Kanno, Kurihara and Fujise (1994) J. Biochem. (Tokyo) 115, 362-366]. After isolation, unambiguous identification of this novel tryptophan metabolite as 2-(alpha-mannopyranosyl)-l-tryptophan was achieved by tandem MS combined with NMR spectroscopy including homonuclear COSY, heteronuclear multiple-bond connectivity and (1)H-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence experiments. Remarkably, a thorough evaluation of vicinal proton-proton coupling constants in different solvents and nuclear Overhauser effect experiments demonstrate the predominant axial orientation of the hydroxymethyl group of the hexopyranosyl residue. Likewise this spatial arrangement indicates that the respective alpha-anomeric C-mannosylhexopyranose is preferentially adopting a (1)C(4) conformation in acidic methanol. Whereas only one distinct tryptophan mannoconjugate could be observed in human urine, HPLC-MS/MS analysis of food samples for the first time led to the identification of numerous N(1)-(beta-d-hexopyranosyl)-l-tryptophan, 2-(beta-d-hexopyranosyl)-l-tryptophan and 1-(1,2,3,4,5-pentahyd- roxypent-1-yl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid derivatives derived from the condensation of tryptophan with aldohexoses. Taking into consideration the significant differences between profiles and configurations of tryptophan glycoconjugates originating from dietary sources and human urine, C-2 mannosylation of tryptophan residues [de Beer, Vliegenthart, Loeffler and Hofsteenge (1995) Biochemistry 34, 11785-11789] represents a novel enzymic pathway in tryptophan metabolism in humans. PMID:10493906

  6. Detection of DNA damage: effect of thymidine glycol residues on the thermodynamic, substrate and interfacial acoustic properties of oligonucleotide duplexes.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Romanova, E; Kubareva, E; Dolinnaya, N; Gajdos, V; Burenina, O; Fedotova, E; Ellis, J S; Oretskaya, T; Hianik, T; Thompson, M

    2009-01-01

    Thymidine glycol residues in DNA are biologically active oxidative molecular damage sites caused by ionizing radiation and other factors. One or two thymidine glycol residues were incorporated in 19- to 31-mer DNA fragments during automatic oligonucleotide synthesis. These oligonucleotide models were used to estimate the effect of oxidized thymidines on the thermodynamic, substrate and interfacial acoustic properties of DNA. UV-monitoring melting data revealed that modified residues in place of thymidines destabilize the DNA double helix by 8-22 degrees C, depending on the number of lesions, the length of oligonucleotide duplexes and their GC-content. The diminished hybridizing capacity of modified oligonucleotides is presumably due to the loss of aromaticity and elevated hydrophilicity of thymine glycol in comparison to the thymine base. According to circular dichroism (CD) data, the modified DNA duplexes retain B-form geometry, and the thymidine glycol residue introduces only local perturbations limited to the lesion site. The rate of DNA hydrolysis by restriction endonucleases R.MvaI, R.Bst2UI, R.MspR9I and R.Bme1390I is significantly decreased as the thymidine glycol is located in the central position of the double-stranded recognition sequences 5'-CC / WGG-3' (W = A, T) or 5'-CC / NGG-3' (N = A, T, G, C) adjacent to the cleavage site. On the other hand, the catalytic properties of enzymes R.Psp6I and R.BstSCI recognizing the similar sequence are not changed dramatically, since their cleavage site is separated from the point of modification by several base-pairs. Data obtained by gel-electrophoretic analysis of radioactive DNA substrates were confirmed by direct spectrophotometric assay developed by the authors. The effect of thymidine glycol was also observed on DNA hybridization at the surface of a thickness-shear mode acoustic wave device. A 1.9-fold decrease in the rate of duplex formation was noted for oligonucleotides carrying one or two thymidine glycol

  7. Optimization of Residual Stresses in MMC's Using Compensating/Compliant Interfacial Layers. Part 2: OPTCOMP User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.; Williams, Todd O.

    1994-01-01

    A user's guide for the computer program OPTCOMP is presented in this report. This program provides a capability to optimize the fabrication or service-induced residual stresses in uni-directional metal matrix composites subjected to combined thermo-mechanical axisymmetric loading using compensating or compliant layers at the fiber/matrix interface. The user specifies the architecture and the initial material parameters of the interfacial region, which can be either elastic or elastoplastic, and defines the design variables, together with the objective function, the associated constraints and the loading history through a user-friendly data input interface. The optimization procedure is based on an efficient solution methodology for the elastoplastic response of an arbitrarily layered multiple concentric cylinder model that is coupled to the commercial optimization package DOT. The solution methodology for the arbitrarily layered cylinder is based on the local-global stiffness matrix formulation and Mendelson's iterative technique of successive elastic solutions developed for elastoplastic boundary-value problems. The optimization algorithm employed in DOT is based on the method of feasible directions.

  8. Structural features of interfacial tyrosine residue in ROBO1 fibronectin domain-antibody complex: Crystallographic, thermodynamic, and molecular dynamic analyses

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Taisuke; Mizohata, Eiichi; Yamashita, Takefumi; Nagatoishi, Satoru; Nakakido, Makoto; Iwanari, Hiroko; Mochizuki, Yasuhiro; Kado, Yuji; Yokota, Yuki; Satoh, Reiko; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Fujitani, Hideaki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Hamakubo, Takao; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    ROBO1, fibronectin Type-III domain (Fn)-containing protein, is a novel immunotherapeutic target for hepatocellular carcinoma in humans. The crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment (Fab) of B2212A, the monoclonal antibody against the third Fn domain (Fn3) of ROBO1, was determined in pursuit of antibody drug for hepatocellular carcinoma. This effort was conducted in the presence or absence of the antigen, with the chemical features being investigated by determining the affinity of the antibody using molecular dynamics (MD) and thermodynamics. The structural comparison of B2212A Fab between the complex and the free form revealed that the interfacial TyrL50 (superscripts L, H, and F stand for the residues in the light chain, heavy chain, and Fn3, respectively) played important roles in Fn3 recognition. That is, the aromatic ring of TyrL50 pivoted toward PheF68, forming a CH/π interaction and a new hydrogen bond with the carbonyl O atom of PheF68. MD simulations predicted that the TyrL50-PheF68 interaction almost entirely dominated Fab-Fn3 binding, and Ala-substitution of TyrL50 led to a reduced binding of the resultant complex. On the contrary, isothermal titration calorimetry experiments underscored that Ala-substitution of TyrL50 caused an increase of the binding enthalpy between B2212A and Fn3, but importantly, it induced an increase of the binding entropy, resulting in a suppression of loss in the Gibbs free energy in total. These results suggest that mutation analysis considering the binding entropy as well as the binding enthalpy will aid in the development of novel antibody drugs for hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25492858

  9. Evaluation of the interfacial shear strength and residual stress of TiAlN coating on ZIRLO™ fuel cladding using a modified shear-lag model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Bhamji, I.; Withers, P. J.; Wolfe, D. E.; Motta, A. T.; Preuss, M.

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the residual stresses and interfacial shear strength of a TiAlN coating on Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe alloy (ZIRLO™) substrate designed to improve corrosion resistance of fuel cladding used in water-cooled nuclear reactors, both during normal and exceptional conditions, e.g. a loss of coolant event (LOCA). The distribution and maximum value of the interfacial shear strength has been estimated using a modified shear-lag model. The parameters critical to this analysis were determined experimentally. From these input parameters the interfacial shear strength between the TiAlN coating and ZIRLO™ substrate was inferred to be around 120 MPa. It is worth noting that the apparent strength of the coating is high (∼3.4 GPa). However, this is predominantly due to the large compressive residuals stress (3 GPa in compression), which must be overcome for the coating to fail in tension, which happens at a load just 150 MPa in excess of this.

  10. Dimer Structure of an Interfacially Impaired Phosphatidylinositol-Specific Pholpholipase C

    SciTech Connect

    Shao,C.; Shi, X.; Wehbi, H.; Zambonelli, C.; Head, J.; Seaton, B.; Roberts, M,.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of the W47A/W242A mutant of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Bacillus thuringiensis has been solved to 1.8{angstrom} resolution. The W47A/W242A mutant is an interfacially challenged enzyme, and it has been proposed that one or both tryptophan side chains serve as membrane interfacial anchors (Feng, J., Wehbi, H., and Roberts, M. F. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 19867-19875). The crystal structure supports this hypothesis. Relative to the crystal structure of the closely related (97% identity) wild-type PI-PLC from Bacillus cereus, significant conformational differences occur at the membrane-binding interfacial region rather than the active site. The Trp {yields} Ala mutations not only remove the membrane-partitioning aromatic side chains but also perturb the conformations of the so-called helix B and rim loop regions, both of which are implicated in interfacial binding. The crystal structure also reveals a homodimer, the first such observation for a bacterial PI-PLC, with pseudo-2-fold symmetry. The symmetric dimer interface is stabilized by hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions, contributed primarily by a central swath of aromatic residues arranged in a quasiherringbone pattern. Evidence that interfacially active wild-type PI-PLC enzymes may dimerize in the presence of phosphatidylcholine vesicles is provided by fluorescence quenching of PI-PLC mutants with pyrene-labeled cysteine residues. The combined data suggest that wild-type PI-PLC can form similar homodimers, anchored to the interface by the tryptophan and neighboring membrane-partitioning residues.

  11. L-tryptophan

    MedlinePlus

    L-tryptophan is an amino acid, a protein building block that can be found in many plant and animal proteins. L-tryptophan is called an “essential” amino acid because the body can’t make it. It ...

  12. Oxidation of the Tryptophan 32 Residue of Human Superoxide Dismutase 1 Caused by Its Bicarbonate-dependent Peroxidase Activity Triggers the Non-amyloid Aggregation of the Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Fernando R.; Iqbal, Asif; Linares, Edlaine; Silva, Daniel F.; Lima, Filipe S.; Cuccovia, Iolanda M.; Augusto, Ohara

    2014-01-01

    The role of oxidative post-translational modifications of human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathology is an attractive hypothesis to explore based on several lines of evidence. Among them, the remarkable stability of hSOD1WT and several of its ALS-associated mutants suggests that hSOD1 oxidation may precede its conversion to the unfolded and aggregated forms found in ALS patients. The bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity of hSOD1 causes oxidation of its own solvent-exposed Trp32 residue. The resulting products are apparently different from those produced in the absence of bicarbonate and are most likely specific for simian SOD1s, which contain the Trp32 residue. The aims of this work were to examine whether the bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity of hSOD1 (hSOD1WT and hSOD1G93A mutant) triggers aggregation of the enzyme and to comprehend the role of the Trp32 residue in the process. The results showed that Trp32 residues of both enzymes are oxidized to a similar extent to hSOD1-derived tryptophanyl radicals. These radicals decayed to hSOD1-N-formylkynurenine and hSOD1-kynurenine or to a hSOD1 covalent dimer cross-linked by a ditryptophan bond, causing hSOD1 unfolding, oligomerization, and non-amyloid aggregation. The latter process was inhibited by tempol, which recombines with the hSOD1-derived tryptophanyl radical, and did not occur in the absence of bicarbonate or with enzymes that lack the Trp32 residue (bovine SOD1 and hSOD1W32F mutant). The results support a role for the oxidation products of the hSOD1-Trp32 residue, particularly the covalent dimer, in triggering the non-amyloid aggregation of hSOD1. PMID:25237191

  13. Liquid chromatography-fluorescence and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry detection of tryptophan degradation products of a recombinant monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Christine; Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Cheng, Guilong; Kita, Adriana; Neill, Alyssa; Kori, Yekaterina; Liu, Hongcheng

    2016-03-01

    Light exposure is one of several conditions used to study the degradation pathways of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Tryptophan is of particular interest among the 20 amino acids because it is the most photosensitive. Tryptophan degradation forms several products, including an even stronger photosensitizer and several reactive oxygen species. The current study reports a specific peptide mapping procedure to monitor tryptophan degradation. Instead of monitoring peptides using UV 214 nm, fluorescence detection with an excitation wavelength of 295 nm and an emission wavelength of 350 nm was used to enable specific detection of tryptophan-containing peptides. Peaks that decreased in area over time are likely to contain susceptible tryptophan residues. This observation can allow further liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis to focus only on those peaks to confirm tryptophan degradation products. After confirmation of tryptophan degradation, susceptibility of tryptophan residues can be compared based on the peak area decrease. PMID:26717898

  14. Optimization of Residual Stresses in MMC's through Process Parameter Control and the use of Heterogeneous Compensating/Compliant Interfacial Layers. OPTCOMP2 User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.

    1996-01-01

    A user's guide for the computer program OPTCOMP2 is presented in this report. This program provides a capability to optimize the fabrication or service-induced residual stresses in unidirectional metal matrix composites subjected to combined thermomechanical axisymmetric loading by altering the processing history, as well as through the microstructural design of interfacial fiber coatings. The user specifies the initial architecture of the composite and the load history, with the constituent materials being elastic, plastic, viscoplastic, or as defined by the 'user-defined' constitutive model, in addition to the objective function and constraints, through a user-friendly data input interface. The optimization procedure is based on an efficient solution methodology for the inelastic response of a fiber/interface layer(s)/matrix concentric cylinder model where the interface layers can be either homogeneous or heterogeneous. The response of heterogeneous layers is modeled using Aboudi's three-dimensional method of cells micromechanics model. The commercial optimization package DOT is used for the nonlinear optimization problem. The solution methodology for the arbitrarily layered cylinder is based on the local-global stiffness matrix formulation and Mendelson's iterative technique of successive elastic solutions developed for elastoplastic boundary-value problems. The optimization algorithm employed in DOT is based on the method of feasible directions.

  15. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching by alkaline earth metal cations in deionized bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Wang, A J; Hu, K S

    2000-12-01

    Tryptophan quenching by the addition of alkaline earth metal cations to deionized bacteriorhodopsin suspensions was determined. The results show that the addition of cation primarily quenches fluorescence from surface tryptophan residues. The quenched intensity exhibits a 1/R dependence, where R is the ionic radius of the corresponding metal ion. This observation results from a stronger energy transfer coupling between the tryptophan and the retinal. The membrane curvature may be involved as a result of cations motion and correlated conformational changes. PMID:11332888

  16. Amphipathic solvation of indole: implications for the role of tryptophan in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Andrew J; Zhang, Yapei Rosie; Busch, Sebastian; Pardo, Luis Carlos; Imberti, Silvia; McLain, Sylvia E

    2015-05-14

    The microscopic structure of the tryptophan side chain, indole, in an amphiphilic environment has been investigated using a combination of neutron diffraction measurements and simulations in solution. The results show that indole is preferentially solvated by hydrogen bonding interactions between water and alcohol -OH groups rather than the interaction being dominated by indole-methyl interactions. This has implications for understanding how tryptophan interacts with the amphipathic membrane environment to anchor proteins into membranes, where the results here suggest that the benzene ring of tryptophan interacts directly with the interfacial water at the membrane surface rather than being buried into the hydrophobic regions of the membrane bilayer. PMID:25893741

  17. Rotational spectrum of tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, M. Eugenia Cabezas, Carlos Mata, Santiago Alonso, Josè L.

    2014-05-28

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed for the first time using a combination of laser ablation, molecular beams, and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Independent analysis of the rotational spectra of individual conformers has conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The analysis of the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants is of particular significance since it allows discrimination between structures, thus providing structural information on the orientation of the amino group. Both observed conformers are stabilized by an O–H···N hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N–H···π interaction forming a chain that reinforce the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  18. Effects of oxygen plasma treatment on interfacial shear strength and post-peak residual strength of a PLGA fiber-reinforced brushite cement.

    PubMed

    Maenz, Stefan; Hennig, Max; Mühlstädt, Mike; Kunisch, Elke; Bungartz, Matthias; Brinkmann, Olaf; Bossert, Jörg; Kinne, Raimund W; Jandt, Klaus D

    2016-04-01

    Biodegradable calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are promising materials for minimally invasive treatment of bone defects. However, CPCs have low mechanical strength and fracture toughness. One approach to overcome these limitations is the modification of the CPC with reinforcing fibers. The matrix-fiber interfacial shear strength (ISS) is pivotal for the biomechanical properties of fiber-reinforced CPCs. The aim of the current study was to control the ISS between a brushite-forming CPC and degradable PLGA fibers by oxygen plasma treatment and to analyze the impact of the ISS alterations on its bulk mechanical properties. The ISS between CPC matrix and PLGA fibers, tested in a single-fiber pull-out test, increased up to 2.3-fold to max. 3.22±0.92MPa after fiber oxygen plasma treatment (100-300W, 1-10min), likely due to altered surface chemistry and morphology of the fibers. This ISS increase led to more efficient crack bridging and a subsequent increase of the post-peak residual strength at biomechanically relevant, moderate strains (up to 1%). At the same time, the work of fracture significantly decreased, possibly due to an increased proportion of fractured fibers unable to further absorb energy by frictional sliding. Flexural strength and flexural modulus were not affected by the oxygen plasma treatment. This study shows for the first time that the matrix-fiber ISS and some of the resulting mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced CPCs can be improved by chemical modifications such as oxygen plasma treatment, generating the possibility of avoiding catastrophic failures at the implant site and thus enhancing the applicability of biodegradable CPCs for the treatment of (load-bearing) bone defects. PMID:26875148

  19. Structural consequences of two methyl additions in the E. coli trp repressor L-tryptophan binding pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, C.L.

    1995-12-01

    The flexibility and specificity of the L-tryptophan corepressor binding pocket of E coli trp repressor are being investigated by high-resolution crystallographic examination of aporepressor/corepressor analog complexes. While addition of a methyl group on the corepressor indole (5-methyl-tryptophan) results in a small but measurable shift in the position of that functional group introduction of a methyl group on a nearby residue in the binding pocket (Val 58 {yields} Ile) leaves the indole position of L-tryptophan essentially unchanged. Careful alignment of these structures with aporepressor/L-tryptophan/operator-DNA complexes reveal why 5-methyltryptophan is a better corepressor than L-tryptophan.

  20. Tryptophan catabolism in Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed Central

    Bouknight, R R; Sadoff, H L

    1975-01-01

    Bacillus megaterium grows in a medium containing L-tryptophan as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. Kynurenine, anthranilic acid, and catechol are metabolic intermediates, suggesting that this organism used the anthranilic acid pathway for tryptophan degradation. Cells that grow on L-tryptophan oxidize kynurenine, alanine, and anthranilic acid and the presence of tryptophan oxygenase (EC 1.13.1.12), kynureninase (EC 3.7.1.3), and catechol oxygenase (EC 1.13.1.1) in cell extracts provide additional evidence for the degradative pathway in B. megaterium. Tryptophan oxygenase is inhibited by sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and hydroxylamine, indicating that the enzyme has a functional heme group. D-Tryptophan is not a substrate for tryptophan oxygenase, and the D-isomer does not inhibit this enzyme. Formamidase (EC 3.5.1.9) and anthranilate hydroxylase are not detectable in extracts. Tryptophan catabolism is inducible in B megaterium and is subject to catabolite repression by glucose and glutamate. Arginine does not cause repression, and kynurenine induces both tryptophan oxygenase and kynureninase. PMID:803956

  1. Emulsions for interfacial filtration.

    SciTech Connect

    Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

  2. Regulation of tryptophan operon expression in the archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yunwei; Reeve, John N

    2005-09-01

    Conserved trp genes encode enzymes that catalyze tryptophan biosynthesis in all three biological domains, and studies of their expression in Bacteria and eukaryotes have revealed a variety of different regulatory mechanisms. The results reported here provide the first detailed description of an archaeal trp gene regulatory system. We have established that the trpEGCFBAD operon in Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus is transcribed divergently from a gene (designated trpY) that encodes a tryptophan-sensitive transcription regulator. TrpY binds to TRP box sequences (consensus, TGTACA) located in the overlapping promoter regions between trpY and trpE, inhibiting trpY transcription in the absence of tryptophan and both trpY and trpEGCFBAD transcription in the presence of tryptophan. TrpY apparently inhibits trpY transcription by blocking RNA polymerase access to the site of trpY transcription initiation and represses trpEGCFBAD transcription by preventing TATA box binding protein (TBP) binding to the TATA box sequence. Given that residue 2 (W2) is the only tryptophan in TrpY and in TrpY homologues in other Euryarchaea and that there is only one tryptophan codon in the entire trpEGCFBAD operon (trpB encodes W175), expression of the trp operon may also be regulated in vivo by the supply of charged tRNA(Trp) available to translate the second codon of the trpY mRNA. PMID:16159776

  3. Circadian periodicity of tryptophan metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Morton I.; Beisel, William R.

    1968-01-01

    Rhythmicity of tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway has been demonstrated in man. Normal subjects given 3 g of tryptophan at 0900 hours excreted almost three times the quantity of kynurenine, kynurenic acid, and xanthurenic acid than did subjects given the same dose at 2100 hours. Other metabolites of the kynurenine pathway varied in the same fashion but with lesser magnitude. In contrast, indican, a tryptophan metabolite not in the kynurenine pathway, varied inversely with the other metabolites measured. The data suggest that the liver enzyme tryptophan pyrrolase has a circadian rhythm in man similar to that already described in mice in a previous study. Tryptophan tolerance tests in the future should be controlled relative to time of amino acid administration. PMID:5641628

  4. Tryptophan Metabolism in Allergic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Gostner, Johanna M; Becker, Katrin; Kofler, Heinz; Strasser, Barbara; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis, as well the early phase of atopic dermatitis, are characterized by a Th2-skewed immune environment. Th2-type cytokines are upregulated in allergic inflammation, whereas there is downregulation of the Th1-type immune response and related cytokines, such as interferon-x03B3; (IFN-x03B3;). The latter is a strong inducer of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO-1), which degrades the essential amino acid tryptophan, as part of an antiproliferative strategy of immunocompetent cells to halt the growth of infected and malignant cells, and also of T cells - an immunoregulatory intervention to avoid overactivation of the immune system. Raised serum tryptophan concentrations have been reported in patients with pollen allergy compared to healthy blood donors. Moreover, higher baseline tryptophan concentrations have been associated with a poor response to specific immunotherapy. It has been shown that the increase in tryptophan concentrations in patients with pollen allergy only exists outside the pollen season, and not during the season. Interestingly, there is only a minor alteration of the kynurenine to tryptophan ratio (Kyn/Trp, an index of tryptophan breakdown). The reason for the higher tryptophan concentrations in patients with pollen allergy outside the season remains a matter of discussion. To this regard, the specific interaction of nitric oxide (NO∙) with the tryptophan-degrading enzyme IDO-1 could be important, because an enhanced formation of NO∙ has been reported in patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis. Importantly, NO∙ suppresses the activity of the heme enzyme IDO-1, which could explain the higher tryptophan levels. Thus, inhibitors of inducible NO∙ synthase should be reconsidered as candidates for antiallergic therapy out of season that may abrogate the arrest of IDO-1 by decreasing the production of NO∙. Considering its association with the pathophysiology of atopic disease, tryptophan metabolism may

  5. Tryptophan promotes charitable donating

    PubMed Central

    Steenbergen, Laura; Sellaro, Roberta; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2014-01-01

    The link between serotonin (5-HT) and one of the most important elements of prosocial behavior, charity, has remained largely uninvestigated. In the present study, we tested whether charitable donating can be promoted by administering the food supplement L-Tryptophan (TRP), the biochemical precursor of 5-HT. Participants were compared with respect to the amount of money they donated when given the opportunity to make a charitable donation. As expected, compared to a neutral placebo, TRP appears to increase the participants’ willingness to donate money to a charity. This result supports the idea that the food we eat may act as a cognitive enhancer modulating the way we think and perceive the world and others. PMID:25566132

  6. Nutritional Aspect of Tryptophan Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Shibata, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Mammals, including humans, can synthesize the vitamin nicotinamide from tryptophan in the liver. The resultant nicotinamide is distributed to non-hepatic tissues. We have studied the effects of changes in tryptophan–nicotinamide metabolism on niacin nutritional status. The liver plays a critical role in nicotinamide supply. Animal studies showed that the tryptophan–nicotinamide pathway is affected by physiological conditions, the presence of disease, nutrients, hormones, and chemicals. Human studies have shown that 1 mg of nicotinamide is produced from 67 mg of tryptophan intake, and that the conversion ratio of tryptophan to nicotinamide is enhanced from mid to late pregnancy. These findings have contributed to the determination of dietary reference intakes for niacin recommended in the Dietary Reference Intakes for Japanese 2010. Our findings suggest that the conversion of nicotinamide from tryptophan is important in maintaining niacin nutrition. PMID:23922498

  7. Fluorescence studies on the role of tryptophan in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles of HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schenkel, J; Appel, I; Schwarzwald, R; Bautz, E k; Wolfrum, J; Greulich, K O

    1989-01-01

    The 40 S heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) particles from HeLa cells reveal tryptophan fluorescence with a bi-exponential decay, indicating that only a few of the 'core' proteins contain tryptophan residues. The presence of tryptophan residues distinguishes hnRNP particles from nucleosomes, with which they otherwise share a number of properties. This difference, however, is not essential for protein-RNA binding, as the fluorescence decay remains unchanged when hnRNP particles are dissociated into protein and RNA. However, the Stern-Volmer quenching constant is doubled upon salt dissociation, i.e. tryptophan residues become more accessible to solvent. Thus tryptophan quenching is a useful parameter for monitoring protein-protein interactions in hnRNP particles. PMID:2604698

  8. Novel Cβ-Cγ Bond Cleavages of Tryptophan-Containing Peptide Radical Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Hao, Qiang; Law, Chun-Hin; Siu, Chi-Kit; Chu, Ivan K.

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we observed unprecedented cleavages of the Cβ-Cγ bonds of tryptophan residue side chains in a series of hydrogen-deficient tryptophan-containing peptide radical cations (M•+) during low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). We used CID experiments and theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the mechanism of this bond cleavage, which forms [M - 116]+ ions. The formation of an α-carbon radical intermediate at the tryptophan residue for the subsequent Cβ-Cγ bond cleavage is analogous to that occurring at leucine residues, producing the same product ions; this hypothesis was supported by the identical product ion spectra of [LGGGH - 43]+ and [WGGGH - 116]+, obtained from the CID of [LGGGH]•+ and [WGGGH]•+, respectively. Elimination of the neutral 116-Da radical requires inevitable dehydrogenation of the indole nitrogen atom, leaving the radical centered formally on the indole nitrogen atom ([Ind]•-2), in agreement with the CID data for [WGGGH]•+ and [W1-CH3GGGH]•+; replacing the tryptophan residue with a 1-methyltryptophan residue results in a change of the base peak from that arising from a neutral radical loss (116 Da) to that arising from a molecule loss (131 Da), both originating from Cβ-Cγ bond cleavage. Hydrogen atom transfer or proton transfer to the γ-carbon atom of the tryptophan residue weakens the Cβ-Cγ bond and, therefore, decreases the dissociation energy barrier dramatically.

  9. Incorporation of tryptophan analogues into the lantibiotic nisin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Shao, Jinfeng; Li, Qian; van Heel, Auke J; de Vries, Marcel P; Broos, Jaap; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2016-05-01

    Lantibiotics are posttranslationally modified peptides with efficient inhibitory activity against various Gram-positive bacteria. In addition to the original modifications, incorporation of non-canonical amino acids can render new properties and functions to lantibiotics. Nisin is the most studied lantibiotic and contains no tryptophan residues. In this study, a system was constructed to incorporate tryptophan analogues into nisin, which included the modification machinery (NisBTC) and the overexpression of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS). Tryptophan and three different tryptophan analogues (5-fluoroTrp (5FW), 5-hydroxyTrp (5HW) and 5-methylTrp (5MeW)) were successfully incorporated at four different positions of nisin (I1W, I4W, M17W and V32W). The incorporation efficiency of tryptophan analogues into mutants I1W, M17W and V32W was over 97 %, while the mutant I4W showed relatively low incorporation efficiency (69-93 %). The variants with 5FW showed relatively higher production yield, while 5MeW-containing variants showed the lowest yield. The dehydration efficiency of serines or threonines was affected by the tryptophan mutants of I4W and V32W. The affinity of the peptides for the cation-ion exchange and reverse phase chromatography columns was significantly reduced when 5HW was incorporated. The antimicrobial activity of IIW and its 5FW analogue both decreased two times compared to that of nisin, while that of its 5HW analogue decreased four times. The 5FW analogue of I4W also showed two times decreased activity than nisin. However, the mutant M17W and its 5HW analogue both showed 32 times reduced activity relative to that of nisin. PMID:26872656

  10. Second harmonic generation from tryptophan-rich short peptides: W(n)K(m) and gramicidin A.

    PubMed

    Duboisset, J; Matar, G; Besson, F; Ficheux, D; Benichou, E; Russier-Antoine, I; Jonin, Ch; Brevet, P F

    2014-09-01

    We report the first hyperpolarizability of a series of tryptophan-rich short peptides with the respective sequence KWK, KWWK, KWWWK, KWWKWWK, where W and K stand for tryptophan and lysine. The measurements were performed with the technique of hyper-Rayleigh scattering in the bulk of an aqueous Tris buffer solution at a pH of 8.5 and a salt concentration of 150 mM at the non-resonant fundamental wavelength of 784 nm. The first hyperpolarizability of the different peptides follows a simple additive model scaling with the number of tryptophan residues contained in the peptide. However, it appears that the first hyperpolarizability response of a single tryptophan residue in the peptide strongly differs from that of an isolated tryptophan. Hence, it is therefore demonstrated that the local environment of the tryptophan residues within the peptide strongly influences its nonlinear optical response. A comparison with the first hyperpolarizability of the natural peptide gramicidin A measured in trifluoroethanol (TFE) further confirms the key role of the local environment on the first hyperpolarizability of tryptophan residues in peptides. PMID:25144248

  11. Single Tryptophan and Tyrosine Comparisons in the N-terminal and C-terminal Interface Regions of Transmembrane GWALP Peptides†

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, Nicholas J.; Greathouse, Denise V.; Grant, Christopher V.; Opella, Stanley J.; Koeppe, Roger E.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophobic membrane-spanning helices often are flanked by interfacial aromatic or charged residues. In this paper we compare the consequences of single Trp → Tyr substitutions at each interface for the properties of a defined transmembrane helix, in the absence of charged residues. The choice of molecular framework is critical for these single-residue experiments, because the presence of “too many” aromatic residues (more than one at either membrane-water interface) introduces excess dynamic averaging of solid-state NMR observables. To this end, we compare the outcomes when changing W5 or W19, or both of them, to tyrosine in the well characterized transmembrane peptide acetyl-GGALW5(LA)6LW19LAGA-amide (“GWALP23”). By means of solid-state 2H and 15N NMR experiments, we find that Y19GW5ALP23 displays similar magnitudes of peptide helix tilt as Y5GW19ALP23 and responds similarly to changes in bilayer thickness, from DLPC to DMPC to DOPC. The presence of Y19 changes the azimuthal rotation angle ρ (about the helix axis) to a similar extent as Y5, but in the opposite direction. When tyrosines are substituted for both tryptophans to yield GY5, 19ALP23, the helix tilt angle is again of comparable magnitude, and furthermore the preferred azimuthal rotation angle ρ is relatively unchanged from that of GW5,19ALP23. The extent of dynamic averaging increases marginally when Tyr replaces Trp. Yet, importantly, all members of the peptide family having single Tyr or Trp residues near each interface exhibit only moderate and not highly extensive dynamic averaging. The results provide important benchmarks for evaluating conformational and dynamic control of membrane protein function. PMID:24111589

  12. A kinetic and fluorimetric investigation of papain modified at tryptophan-69 and -177 by N-bromosuccinimide

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Gordon; Whitworth, Alan S.

    1974-01-01

    A systematic study of the modification of papain (its thiol group protected as a disulphide with mercaptoethanol) by N-bromosuccinimide, showed that 2 molar equiv. modified tryptophan-69 and 4 molar equiv. modified tryptophan-69 and -177. The Michaelis parameters for the catalysed hydrolysis of N-benzyloxycarbonylglycine p-nitrophenyl ester by these modified enzymes were determined. The enzymic activity of the modified enzymes was not seriously impaired, but modification of tryptophan-177 raised the apparent pKa of the acidic limb of the pH profile by more than 1 pH unit for both kcat. and kcat./Km. The fluorescence spectra (excitation at 288nm) of the modified enzymes showed that tryptophan-69 contributed about 8% to the fluorescence intensity, whereas tryptophan-177 contributed about 46% at neutral pH. However, the contribution of tryptophan-177 was quenched at low pH and its fluorescence intensity showed sigmoidal pH-dependence, with an apparent pKa of 4.2. Histidine-159, which is in close contact with tryptophan-177, is considered to be the residue responsible for the fluorescence quenching. When tryptophan-177 was modified, presumably generating a less hydrophobic micro-environment, the apparent pKa determined kinetically was raised to about 5.4. By comparing the Michaelis parameters of native papain, papain modified at tryptophan-69 and papain modified at tryptophan-69 and -177 with N-benzyloxycarbonylglycylglycine amide and N-benzyloxycarbonylglycyltryptophan amide, tryptophan-69 and tryptophan-177 were shown to be structural features of the S2 and S1′ subsites respectively. PMID:4455219

  13. Evaluating the efficacy of tryptophan fluorescence and absorbance as a selection tool for identifying protein crystals.

    PubMed

    Gill, Harindarpal S

    2010-03-01

    The environment of individual tryptophans in known protein structures and the effectiveness of four commercial robotic UV microscopes to illuminate tryptophan-containing protein crystals by either tryptophan fluorescence (epi-illumination) or absorbance (transmission) are evaluated. In agreement with other studies, tryptophan residues are found on average to be largely buried in protein structures (with approximately 84% of their surface area buried) and to be surrounded by partially polar microenvironments (with approximately 43% of their surface area covered by polar residues), which suggests an inherent degree of fluorescence signal quenching. In bacterial genomes, up to one-third (approximately 18.5% on average) of open reading frames are deficient in tryptophan. In the laboratory, because of the attenuation of UV light by the media commonly used in sitting-drop and hanging-drop crystallization trials, it was often necessary to simplify the light path by manually removing or inverting the supporting media. Prolonged exposure (minutes) to UV light precipitates some protein samples. The absorbance spectra of many commercially available media in crystallization trials are presented. The advantages of using tryptophan absorbance over fluorescence for characterizing crystals are discussed. PMID:20208182

  14. Tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Proctor, A R; Kloos, W E

    1973-04-01

    Tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes were assayed in various tryptophan mutants of Staphylococcus aureus strain 655 and the wild-type parent. All mutants, except trpB mutants, lacked only the activity corresponding to the particular biosynthetic block, as suggested previously by analysis of accumulated intermediates and auxonography. Tryptophan synthetase A was not detected in extracts of either trpA or trpB mutants but appeared normal in other mutants. Mutants in certain other classes exhibited partial loss of another particular tryptophan enzyme activity. Tryptophan synthetase B activity was not detected in cell extract preparations but was detected in whole cells. The original map order proposed for the S. aureus tryptophan gene cluster was clarified by the definition of trpD (phosphoribosyl transferase(-)) and trpF (phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase(-)) mutants. These mutants were previously unresolved and designated as trp(DF) mutants (anthranilate accumulators). Phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase and indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthetase enzymes were separable by molecular sieve chromatography, suggesting that these functions are coded by separate loci. Molecular sieve chromatography failed to reveal aggregates involving anthranilate synthetase, phosphoribosyl transferase, phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase, and indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthetase, and this procedure provided an estimate of the molecular weights of these enzymes. Tryptophan was shown to repress synthesis of all six tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes, and derepression of all six activities was incident upon tryptophan starvation. Tryptophan inhibited the activity of anthranilate synthetase, the first enzyme of the pathway. PMID:4698207

  15. Solution structure by site directed tryptophan fluorescence in tear lipocalin.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, O K; Abduragimov, A R; Yusifov, T N; Glasgow, B J

    1997-10-01

    The solution structure of the G strand of human tear lipocalin was deduced by site directed tryptophan fluorescence (SDTF). The fluorescent amino acid, tryptophan, was sequentially substituted for each native amino acid in the sequence of the G strand. The fluorescent properties resolved alternating periodicity as predicted for beta sheet structure, twists in the beta sheet, strand orientation in the lipocalin cavity, and the relative depth of residues in the cavity. A distribution of microstates with various orientations of dipoles in the side chain environments of the G strand revealed mobility on the nanosecond time scale. SDTF is broadly applicable to most proteins and will complement x-ray crystallography, site directed spin labeling by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in the determination of solution structure. PMID:9345294

  16. Tryptophan inhibits Proteus vulgaris TnaC leader peptide elongation, activating tna operon expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Vera, Luis R; Yang, Rui; Yanofsky, Charles

    2009-11-01

    Expression of the tna operon of Escherichia coli and of Proteus vulgaris is induced by L-tryptophan. In E. coli, tryptophan action is dependent on the presence of several critical residues (underlined) in the newly synthesized TnaC leader peptide, WFNIDXXL/IXXXXP. These residues are conserved in TnaC of P. vulgaris and of other bacterial species. TnaC of P. vulgaris has one additional feature, distinguishing it from TnaC of E. coli; it contains two C-terminal lysine residues following the conserved proline residue. In the present study, we investigated L-tryptophan induction of the P. vulgaris tna operon, transferred on a plasmid into E. coli. Induction was shown to be L-tryptophan dependent; however, the range of induction was less than that observed for the E. coli tna operon. We compared the genetic organization of both operons and predicted similar folding patterns for their respective leader mRNA segments. However, additional analyses revealed that L-tryptophan action in the P. vulgaris tna operon involves inhibition of TnaC elongation, following addition of proline, rather than inhibition of leader peptide termination. Our findings also establish that the conserved residues in TnaC of P. vulgaris are essential for L-tryptophan induction, and for inhibition of peptide elongation. TnaC synthesis is thus an excellent model system for studies of regulation of both peptide termination and peptide elongation, and for studies of ribosome recognition of the features of a nascent peptide. PMID:19767424

  17. Tryptophan Inhibits Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S.; Rodriguez, Karien J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Schurr, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been implicated in the pathology of chronic wounds. Both the d and l isoforms of tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on tissue culture plates, with an equimolar ratio of d and l isoforms producing the greatest inhibitory effect. Addition of d-/l-tryptophan to existing biofilms inhibited further biofilm growth and caused partial biofilm disassembly. Tryptophan significantly increased swimming motility, which may be responsible in part for diminished biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. PMID:23318791

  18. Molecular dynamics of tryptophan in ribonuclease-T1. I. Simulation strategies and fluorescence anisotropy decay.

    PubMed Central

    Axelsen, P H; Haydock, C; Prendergast, F G

    1988-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of Ribonuclease-T1 (RNAse-T1) were performed using x-ray crystal coordinates for the enzyme and various simulation strategies. From each of the simulations, a predicted fluorescence anisotropy decay for the single-tryptophan residue was derived and compared with experimental values for the limiting anisotropy of this protein. Simulations conducted in vacuo demonstrated large displacements among some of the residues adjacent to the tryptophan side chain. As a consequence, the ring system rotates relatively unhindered through an angle far in excess of that implied by experimental data. In contrast, the explicit simulation of solvent within a stochastic boundary led to excellent agreement between simulation and experiment. In the case of RNAse-T1, the experimentally-determined limiting anisotropy is useful as a criterion of simulation accuracy in the vicinity of the tryptophan side chain. PMID:3145038

  19. Could tyrosine and tryptophan serve multiple roles in biological redox processes?

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Jay R.; Gray, Harry B.

    2015-01-01

    Single-step electron tunnelling reactions can transport charges over distances of 15–20 Åin proteins. Longer-range transfer requires multi-step tunnelling processes along redox chains, often referred to as hopping. Long-range hopping via oxidized radicals of tryptophan and tyrosine, which has been identified in several natural enzymes, has been demonstrated in artificial constructs of the blue copper protein azurin. Tryptophan and tyrosine serve as hopping way stations in high-potential charge transport processes. It may be no coincidence that these two residues occur with greater-than-average frequency in O2- and H2O2-reactive enzymes. We suggest that appropriately placed tyrosine and/or tryptophan residues prevent damage from high-potential reactive intermediates by reduction followed by transfer of the oxidizing equivalent to less harmful sites or out of the protein altogether. PMID:25666062

  20. Ultrafast quenching of tryptophan fluorescence in proteins: Interresidue and intrahelical electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Weihong; Li, Tanping; Zhang, Luyuan; Yang, Yi; Kao, Ya-Ting; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2008-06-01

    Quenching of tryptophan fluorescence in proteins has been critical to the understanding of protein dynamics and enzyme reactions using tryptophan as a molecular optical probe. We report here our systematic examinations of potential quenching residues with more than 40 proteins. With site-directed mutation, we placed tryptophan to desired positions or altered its neighboring residues to screen quenching groups among 20 amino acid residues and of peptide backbones. With femtosecond resolution, we observed the ultrafast quenching dynamics within 100 ps and identified two ultrafast quenching groups, the carbonyl- and sulfur-containing residues. The former is glutamine and glutamate residues and the later is disulfide bond and cysteine residue. The quenching by the peptide-bond carbonyl group as well as other potential residues mostly occurs in longer than 100 ps. These ultrafast quenching dynamics occur at van der Waals distances through intraprotein electron transfer with high directionality. Following optimal molecular orbital overlap, electron jumps from the benzene ring of the indole moiety in a vertical orientation to the LUMO of acceptor quenching residues. Molecular dynamics simulations were invoked to elucidate various correlations of quenching dynamics with separation distances, relative orientations, local fluctuations and reaction heterogeneity. These unique ultrafast quenching pairs, as recently found to extensively occur in high-resolution protein structures, may have significant biological implications.

  1. Room temperature phosphorescence study on the structural flexibility of single tryptophan containing proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska-Baron, Agnieszka; Gałęcki, Krystian; Wysocki, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have undertaken efforts to find correlation between phosphorescence lifetimes of single tryptophan containing proteins and some structural indicators of protein flexibility/rigidity, such as the degree of tryptophan burial or its exposure to solvent, protein secondary and tertiary structure of the region of localization of tryptophan as well as B factors for tryptophan residue and its immediate surroundings. Bearing in mind that, apart from effective local viscosity of the protein/solvent matrix, the other factor that concur in determining room temperature tryptophan phosphorescence (RTTP) lifetime in proteins is the extent of intramolecular quenching by His, Cys, Tyr and Trp side chains, the crystallographic structures derived from the Brookhaven Protein Data Bank were also analyzed concentrating on the presence of potentially quenching amino acid side chains in the close proximity of the indole chromophore. The obtained results indicated that, in most cases, the phosphorescence lifetimes of tryptophan containing proteins studied tend to correlate with the above mentioned structural indicators of protein rigidity/flexibility. This correlation is expected to provide guidelines for the future development of phosphorescence lifetime-based method for the prediction of structural flexibility of proteins, which is directly linked to their biological function.

  2. Structure and Activity of an Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase that Charges tRNA with Nitro-Tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    Buddha,M.; Crane, B.

    2005-01-01

    The most divergent of two tryptophanyl tRNA synthetases (TrpRS II) found in Deinococcus radiodurans interacts with a nitric oxide synthase protein that produces 4-nitro-tryptophan (4-NRP). TrpRS II efficiently charges transfer RNATrp with 4-NRP and 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (5-HRP). The crystal structures of TrpRS II bound to tryptophan and 5-HRP reveal residue substitutions that accommodate modified indoles. A class of auxiliary bacterial TrpRSs conserve this capacity to charge tRNA with nonstandard amino acids.

  3. Tryptophan Transport in Neurospora crassa: a Tryptophan-Binding Protein Released by Cold Osmotic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, W. R.

    1970-01-01

    Osmotic shock treatment of germinated conidia of Neurospora reduced the capacity for tryptophan transport in these cells approximately 90% without an appreciable loss of cell viability. Tryptophan-binding proteins and alkaline phosphatase were consistently released into the osmotic shock fluid by this treatment. Four lines of evidence suggest that the binding protein may be related to the tryptophan transport system. (i) It appears to be located on or near the cell surface. (ii) a decreased capacity for binding tryptophan was observed in shock fluids from cells repressed for tryptophan uptake; reduced or altered binding capacity was released from a transport-negative mutant. (iii) The specificity of tryptophan binding was similar to that observed in the in vivo transport system. (iv) The dissociation constant for binding, as measured by equilibrium dialysis, was approximately the same as the Km for tryptophan transport. PMID:5474881

  4. Novel Cβ-Cγ bond cleavages of tryptophan-containing peptide radical cations.

    PubMed

    Song, Tao; Hao, Qiang; Law, Chun-Hin; Siu, Chi-Kit; Chu, Ivan K

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we observed unprecedented cleavages of the C(β)-C(γ) bonds of tryptophan residue side chains in a series of hydrogen-deficient tryptophan-containing peptide radical cations (M(•+)) during low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). We used CID experiments and theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the mechanism of this bond cleavage, which forms [M - 116](+) ions. The formation of an α-carbon radical intermediate at the tryptophan residue for the subsequent C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage is analogous to that occurring at leucine residues, producing the same product ions; this hypothesis was supported by the identical product ion spectra of [LGGGH - 43](+) and [WGGGH - 116](+), obtained from the CID of [LGGGH](•+) and [WGGGH](•+), respectively. Elimination of the neutral 116-Da radical requires inevitable dehydrogenation of the indole nitrogen atom, leaving the radical centered formally on the indole nitrogen atom ([Ind](•)-2), in agreement with the CID data for [WGGGH](•+) and [W(1-CH3)GGGH](•+); replacing the tryptophan residue with a 1-methyltryptophan residue results in a change of the base peak from that arising from a neutral radical loss (116 Da) to that arising from a molecule loss (131 Da), both originating from C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage. Hydrogen atom transfer or proton transfer to the γ-carbon atom of the tryptophan residue weakens the C(β)-C(γ) bond and, therefore, decreases the dissociation energy barrier dramatically. PMID:22135037

  5. Thermodynamics of tryptophan-mediated activation of the trp RNA-binding attenuation protein.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Craig A; Manfredo, Amanda; Gollnick, Paul; Foster, Mark P

    2006-06-27

    The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) functions in many bacilli to control the expression of the tryptophan biosynthesis genes. Transcription of the trp operon is controlled by TRAP through an attenuation mechanism, in which competition between two alternative secondary-structural elements in the 5' leader sequence of the nascent mRNA is influenced by tryptophan-dependent binding of TRAP to the RNA. Previously, NMR studies of the undecamer (11-mer) suggested that tryptophan-dependent control of RNA binding by TRAP is accomplished through ligand-induced changes in protein dynamics. We now present further insights into this ligand-coupled event from hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Scanning calorimetry showed tryptophan dissociation to be independent of global protein unfolding, while analysis of the temperature dependence of the binding enthalpy by ITC revealed a negative heat capacity change larger than expected from surface burial, a hallmark of binding-coupled processes. Analysis of this excess heat capacity change using parameters derived from protein folding studies corresponds to the ordering of 17-24 residues per monomer of TRAP upon tryptophan binding. This result is in agreement with qualitative analysis of residue-specific broadening observed in TROSY NMR spectra of the 91 kDa oligomer. Implications for the mechanism of ligand-mediated TRAP activation through a shift in a preexisting conformational equilibrium and an induced-fit conformational change are discussed. PMID:16784236

  6. Applications of room-temperature tryptophan phosphorescence to the study of protein structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mersol, Joseph V.; Gershenson, Anne; Steel, Duncan G.; Gafni, Ari

    1992-04-01

    Most proteins are capable of emitting tryptophan phosphorescence at room temperature in deoxygenated aqueous solutions. Like fluorescence, phosphorescence intensities and lifetimes are useful for studying protein structure. Phosphorescence differs from fluorescence, however, in several ways. Phosphorescence occurs on a time-scale of msec-sec, while fluorescence decays in nanoseconds. Second, the phosphorescence decay of a single tryptophan is nearly monoexponential, making assignments of decay components to individual residues possible. Finally, phosphorescence is a more sensitive probe of the local tryptophan environment, as the lifetime can change by orders of magnitude depending on site rigidity and other factors. The authors describe applications of phosphorescence spectroscopy for protein study. In particular, tryptophan phosphorescence quenching by resonance energy transfer to freely diffusing acceptors was used to show that Trp 109 is the origin of phosphorescence in E. coli alkaline phosphatase (AP). By following changes in the emissive lifetime of this deeply buried residue, the presence of an enzymatically active but structurally modified intermediate state is detected in the unfolding of AP in high concentrations of Guanidine:HCl, and followed the kinetics of the decline in activity upon further unfolding. In addition to the new understanding of AP, the results of these experiments show that room temperature tryptophan phosphorescence is a powerful tool for the study of proteins.

  7. Quenching of Tryptophan Fluorescence in Unfolded Cytochrome "c": A Biophysics Experiment for Physical Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Kats, Dina I.; Kim, Judy E.

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory experiments that focus on protein folding provide excellent opportunities for undergraduate students to learn important topics in the expanding interdisciplinary field of biophysics. Here, we describe the use of Stern-Volmer plots to determine the extent of solvent accessibility of the single tryptophan residue (trp-59) in unfolded and…

  8. Tryptophan Scanning Reveals Dense Packing of Connexin Transmembrane Domains in Gap Junction Channels Composed of Connexin32*

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Matthew J.; Karcz, Jennifer; Vaughn, Nicholas R.; Woolwine-Cunningham, Yvonne; DePriest, Adam D.; Escalona, Yerko; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Skerrett, I. Martha

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan was substituted for residues in all four transmembrane domains of connexin32. Function was assayed using dual cell two-electrode voltage clamp after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Tryptophan substitution was poorly tolerated in all domains, with the greatest impact in TM1 and TM4. For instance, in TM1, 15 substitutions were made, six abolished coupling and five others significantly reduced function. Only TM2 and TM3 included a distinct helical face that lacked sensitivity to tryptophan substitution. Results were visualized on a comparative model of Cx32 hemichannel. In this model, a region midway through the membrane appears highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution and includes residues Arg-32, Ile-33, Met-34, and Val-35. In the modeled channel, pore-facing regions of TM1 and TM2 were highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution, whereas the lipid-facing regions of TM3 and TM4 were variably tolerant. Residues facing a putative intracellular water pocket (the IC pocket) were also highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution. Although future studies will be required to separate trafficking-defective mutants from those that alter channel function, a subset of interactions important for voltage gating was identified. Interactions important for voltage gating occurred mainly in the mid-region of the channel and focused on TM1. To determine whether results could be extrapolated to other connexins, TM1 of Cx43 was scanned revealing similar but not identical sensitivity to TM1 of Cx32. PMID:25969535

  9. Tryptophan Scanning Reveals Dense Packing of Connexin Transmembrane Domains in Gap Junction Channels Composed of Connexin32.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Matthew J; Karcz, Jennifer; Vaughn, Nicholas R; Woolwine-Cunningham, Yvonne; DePriest, Adam D; Escalona, Yerko; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Skerrett, I Martha

    2015-07-10

    Tryptophan was substituted for residues in all four transmembrane domains of connexin32. Function was assayed using dual cell two-electrode voltage clamp after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Tryptophan substitution was poorly tolerated in all domains, with the greatest impact in TM1 and TM4. For instance, in TM1, 15 substitutions were made, six abolished coupling and five others significantly reduced function. Only TM2 and TM3 included a distinct helical face that lacked sensitivity to tryptophan substitution. Results were visualized on a comparative model of Cx32 hemichannel. In this model, a region midway through the membrane appears highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution and includes residues Arg-32, Ile-33, Met-34, and Val-35. In the modeled channel, pore-facing regions of TM1 and TM2 were highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution, whereas the lipid-facing regions of TM3 and TM4 were variably tolerant. Residues facing a putative intracellular water pocket (the IC pocket) were also highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution. Although future studies will be required to separate trafficking-defective mutants from those that alter channel function, a subset of interactions important for voltage gating was identified. Interactions important for voltage gating occurred mainly in the mid-region of the channel and focused on TM1. To determine whether results could be extrapolated to other connexins, TM1 of Cx43 was scanned revealing similar but not identical sensitivity to TM1 of Cx32. PMID:25969535

  10. Injected tryptophan increases brain but not plasma tryptophan levels more in ethanol treated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Haleem, D.J. )

    1990-01-01

    In the present study ethanol treatment given for two weeks decreased hepatic apo-tryptophan pyrrolase but not total tryptophan pyrrolase activity in rats. Tryptophan levels in plasma and brain did not increase significantly. But there was a marked increase of 5-HT but not 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) concentration in brain, suggesting a possible increase in the activity of tryptophan hydroxylase. The effect of a tryptophan load on brain 5-HT metabolism was therefore compared in controls and ethanol treated rats. One hour after tryptophan injection plasma concentrations of total and free tryptophan were identical in controls and ethanol treated rats, but the increases of brain tryptophan 5-HT and 5-HIAA were considerably greater in the latter group. The results are consistent with long term ethanol treatment enhancing brain serotonin metabolism and show that brain uptake/utilization of exogenous tryptophan is increased in ethanol treated rats and may be useful to understand the role and possible mechanism of tryptophan/serotonin involvement in mood regulation.

  11. Dynamic Allostery Mediated by a Conserved Tryptophan in the Tec Family Kinases.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Nikita; Wales, Thomas E; Joseph, Raji E; Boyken, Scott E; Engen, John R; Jernigan, Robert L; Andreotti, Amy H

    2016-03-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a Tec family non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a critical role in immune signaling and is associated with the immunological disorder X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). Our previous findings showed that the Tec kinases are allosterically activated by the adjacent N-terminal linker. A single tryptophan residue in the N-terminal 17-residue linker mediates allosteric activation, and its mutation to alanine leads to the complete loss of activity. Guided by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results, we have employed Molecular Dynamics simulations, Principal Component Analysis, Community Analysis and measures of node centrality to understand the details of how a single tryptophan mediates allostery in Btk. A specific tryptophan side chain rotamer promotes the functional dynamic allostery by inducing coordinated motions that spread across the kinase domain. Either a shift in the rotamer population, or a loss of the tryptophan side chain by mutation, drastically changes the coordinated motions and dynamically isolates catalytically important regions of the kinase domain. This work also identifies a new set of residues in the Btk kinase domain with high node centrality values indicating their importance in transmission of dynamics essential for kinase activation. Structurally, these node residues appear in both lobes of the kinase domain. In the N-lobe, high centrality residues wrap around the ATP binding pocket connecting previously described Catalytic-spine residues. In the C-lobe, two high centrality node residues connect the base of the R- and C-spines on the αF-helix. We suggest that the bridging residues that connect the catalytic and regulatory architecture within the kinase domain may be a crucial element in transmitting information about regulatory spine assembly to the catalytic machinery of the catalytic spine and active site. PMID:27010561

  12. Dynamic Allostery Mediated by a Conserved Tryptophan in the Tec Family Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Nikita; Wales, Thomas E.; Joseph, Raji E.; Boyken, Scott E.; Engen, John R.; Jernigan, Robert L.; Andreotti, Amy H.

    2016-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a Tec family non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a critical role in immune signaling and is associated with the immunological disorder X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). Our previous findings showed that the Tec kinases are allosterically activated by the adjacent N-terminal linker. A single tryptophan residue in the N-terminal 17-residue linker mediates allosteric activation, and its mutation to alanine leads to the complete loss of activity. Guided by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results, we have employed Molecular Dynamics simulations, Principal Component Analysis, Community Analysis and measures of node centrality to understand the details of how a single tryptophan mediates allostery in Btk. A specific tryptophan side chain rotamer promotes the functional dynamic allostery by inducing coordinated motions that spread across the kinase domain. Either a shift in the rotamer population, or a loss of the tryptophan side chain by mutation, drastically changes the coordinated motions and dynamically isolates catalytically important regions of the kinase domain. This work also identifies a new set of residues in the Btk kinase domain with high node centrality values indicating their importance in transmission of dynamics essential for kinase activation. Structurally, these node residues appear in both lobes of the kinase domain. In the N-lobe, high centrality residues wrap around the ATP binding pocket connecting previously described Catalytic-spine residues. In the C-lobe, two high centrality node residues connect the base of the R- and C-spines on the αF-helix. We suggest that the bridging residues that connect the catalytic and regulatory architecture within the kinase domain may be a crucial element in transmitting information about regulatory spine assembly to the catalytic machinery of the catalytic spine and active site. PMID:27010561

  13. Serotonin release varies with brain tryptophan levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines directly the effects on serotonin release of varying brain tryptophan levels within the physiologic range. It also addresses possible interactions between tryptophan availability and the frequency of membrane depolarization in controlling serotonin release. We demonstrate that reducing tryptophan levels in rat hypothalamic slices (by superfusing them with medium supplemented with 100 microM leucine) decreases tissue serotonin levels as well as both the spontaneous and the electrically-evoked serotonin release. Conversely, elevating tissue tryptophan levels (by superfusing slices with medium supplemented with 2 microM tryptophan) increases both the tissue serotonin levels and the serotonin release. Serotonin release was found to be affected independently by the tryptophan availability and the frequency of electrical field-stimulation (1-5 Hz), since increasing both variables produced nearly additive increases in release. These observations demonstrate for the first time that both precursor-dependent elevations and reductions in brain serotonin levels produce proportionate changes in serotonin release, and that the magnitude of the tryptophan effect is unrelated to neuronal firing frequency. The data support the hypothesis that serotonin release is proportionate to intracellular serotonin levels.

  14. [Tryptophan metabolism and oligophrenia (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Grimm, U; Knapp, A; Schmitz, W; Smetan, M; Schmitz, K W; Reddemann, H; Schulz, M; Schlenzka, K

    1978-04-01

    After dealing with the biochemistry of tryptophan metabolism the most important results obtained in humans are presented. Special emphasis is given to the hereditary defects of tryptophan metabolism associated with mental retardation and convulsions due to lack of pyridoxine. The author's findings demonstrate the existence of a hereditary disturbance of the tryptophan metabolism via kynurenine in a certain part of oligophrenic patients. This metabolic defect can be controlled by high doses of vitamin B6. Furthermore investigations conducted with a view to interpreting these results are discussed, especially the determination of kynureninase activity, serotonin blood levels and pyridine nucleotide synthesis. PMID:147846

  15. Energetics of Photoinduced Charge Migration within the Tryptophan Tetrad of an Animal (6-4) Photolyase.

    PubMed

    Cailliez, Fabien; Müller, Pavel; Firmino, Thiago; Pernot, Pascal; de la Lande, Aurélien

    2016-02-17

    Cryptochromes and photolyases are flavoproteins that undergo cascades of electron/hole transfers after excitation of the flavin cofactor. It was recently discovered that animal (6-4) photolyases, as well as animal cryptochromes, feature a chain of four tryptophan residues, while other members of the family contain merely a tryptophan triad. Transient absorption spectroscopy measurements on Xenopus laevis (6-4) photolyase have shown that the fourth residue is effectively involved in photoreduction but at the same time could not unequivocally ascertain the final redox state of this residue. In this article, polarizable molecular dynamics simulations and constrained density functional theory calculations are carried out to reveal the energetics of charge migration along the tryptophan tetrad. Migration toward the fourth tryptophan is found to be thermodynamically favorable. Electron transfer mechanisms are sought either through an incoherent hopping mechanism or through a multiple sites tunneling process. The Jortner-Bixon formulation of electron transfer (ET) theory is employed to characterize the hopping mechanism. The interplay between electron transfer and relaxation of protein and solvent is analyzed in detail. Our simulations confirm that ET in (6-4) photolyase proceeds out of equilibrium. Multiple site tunneling is modeled with the recently proposed flickering resonance mechanism. Given the position of energy levels and the distribution of electronic coupling values, tunneling over three tryptophan residues may become competitive in some cases, although a hopping mechanism is likely to be the dominant channel. For both reactive channels, computed rates are very sensitive to the starting protein configuration, suggesting that both can take place and eventually be mixed, depending on the state of the system when photoexcitation takes place. PMID:26765169

  16. Problem-solving test: Tryptophan operon mutants.

    PubMed

    Szeberényi, József

    2010-09-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: tryptophan, operon, operator, repressor, inducer, corepressor, promoter, RNA polymerase, chromosome-polysome complex, regulatory gene, cis-acting element, trans-acting element, plasmid, transformation. PMID:21567855

  17. Tryptophan auxotrophs were obtained by random transposon insertions in the Methanococcus maripaludis tryptophan operon.

    PubMed

    Porat, Iris; Whitman, William B

    2009-08-01

    Methanococcus maripaludis is an anaerobic, methane-producing archaeon that utilizes H(2) or formate for the reduction of CO(2) to methane. Tryptophan auxotrophs were constructed by in vitro insertions of the Tn5 transposon into the tryptophan operon, followed by transformation into M. maripaludis. This method could serve for rapid insertions into large cloned DNA regions. PMID:19566682

  18. Copper(I) stabilization by cysteine/tryptophan motif in the extracellular domain of Ctr4.

    PubMed

    Okada, Mariko; Miura, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Copper transporter Ctr4 of fission yeast has a quasi-palindromic sequence rich in cysteine and aromatic amino acid residues, CX4YWNWYX4C (where X represents any amino acid), in the N-terminal extracellular domain. A 24-mer peptide comprising this sequence is bound to Cu(I) through the cysteine thiolate coordination. Luminescence, UV absorption and resonance Raman spectra of the Cu(I)-peptide complex show that at least one of the two tryptophan side chains is located in close proximity to the thiolate-Cu(I) center and interacts with the Cu(I) ion via π-electrons of the indole ring. Although the thiolates and Cu(I) are oxidized to disulfide and Cu(II), respectively, only very slowly in air-saturated solutions, replacements of the tryptophan residues to phenylalanine significantly accelerate the oxidation reactions. The results obtained indicate that the interaction between Cu(I) and tryptophan via π-electrons plays a significant role in protecting the thiolate-Cu(I) center against the oxidation. The cysteine- and tryptophan-rich quasi-palindromic sequence may be a metal binding motif that stabilizes Cu(I) in the oxidizing extracellular environment. PMID:26908286

  19. Reorientation of the helix of the tryptophan-rich gp41W peptide from HIV-1 at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Matar, Gladys; Benichou, Emmanuel; Nasir, Mehmet Nail; El Harfouch, Yara; Brevet, Pierre-François; Besson, Françoise

    2013-12-14

    The glycoprotein gp41 from the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) has an amino acid sequence enriched in tryptophan residues, the so-called gp41W peptide (i.e., KWASLWNWFNITNWLWYIK) and plays a crucial role in HIV-1 host cell infection. Using the coupling of Second Harmonic Generation targeting the tryptophan residues with lateral surface tension measurements, we investigate the interaction of gp41W with a neat air∕water and a lipid∕water interfaces. At the air∕water interface, gp41W presents a well-defined orientation and this orientation is strongly modified at the lipid∕water interface, depending on the surface pressure. These results show that this strategy is well suited to monitor tryptophan containing α-helices orientation at lipid∕water interfaces. PMID:24329097

  20. Reorientation of the helix of the tryptophan-rich gp41W peptide from HIV-1 at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Gladys; Benichou, Emmanuel; Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Harfouch, Yara El; Brevet, Pierre-François; Besson, Françoise

    2013-12-01

    The glycoprotein gp41 from the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) has an amino acid sequence enriched in tryptophan residues, the so-called gp41W peptide (i.e., KWASLWNWFNITNWLWYIK) and plays a crucial role in HIV-1 host cell infection. Using the coupling of Second Harmonic Generation targeting the tryptophan residues with lateral surface tension measurements, we investigate the interaction of gp41W with a neat air/water and a lipid/water interfaces. At the air/water interface, gp41W presents a well-defined orientation and this orientation is strongly modified at the lipid/water interface, depending on the surface pressure. These results show that this strategy is well suited to monitor tryptophan containing α-helices orientation at lipid/water interfaces.

  1. Correlation of tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay parameters with sup 1 H NMR-determined rotamer conformations: (tryptophan sup 2 )oxytocin

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.B.A.; Schwartz, G.P.; Laws, W.R. ); Wyssbrod, H.R.; Porter, R.A. ); Michaels, C.A. )

    1992-02-18

    While the fluorescence decay kinetics of tyrosine model compounds can be explained in terms of heterogeneity derived from the three ground-state {chi}{sup 1} rotamers, a similar correlation has yet to be directly observed for a tryptophan residue. In addition, the asymmetric indole ring might also lead to heterogeneity from {chi}{sup 2} rotations. In this paper, the time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence properties of (tryptophan{sup 2})oxytocin at pH 3 are presented and compared with {sup 1}H NMR results. According to the unrestricted analyses of individual fluorescence decay curves taken as a function of emission wavelength-independent decay constants, only three exponential terms are required. In addition, the preexponential weighting factors (amplitudes) have the same relative relationship (weights) as the {sup 1}H NMR-determined {chi}{sup 1} rotamer populations of the indole side chain. {sup 15}N was used in heteronuclear coupling experiments to confirm the rotamer assignments. Inclusion of a linked function restricting the decay amplitudes to the {chi}{sup 1} rotamer populations in the individual decay curve analyses and in the global analysis confirms this correlation. According to qualitative nuclear Overhauser data, there are two {chi}{sup 2} populations.

  2. L-Tryptophan L-tryptophanium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazaryan, V. V.; Fleck, M.; Petrosyan, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    L-Tryptophan L-tryptophanium chloride is a new salt with (A⋯A+) type dimeric cation. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system (space group P21, Z = 2). The asymmetric unit contains one zwitterionic L-tryptophan molecule, one L-tryptophanium cation and one chloride anion. The dimeric cation is formed by a Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond with the O⋯O distance equal to 2.5556(18) Å. The infrared and Raman spectra of the crystal are studied and compared with the spectra of L-tryptophanium chloride.

  3. On the role of helix 0 of the tryptophan synthetase alpha chain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yee, M C; Horn, V; Yanofsky, C

    1996-06-21

    The role of helix 0 of the alpha chain (TrpA) of the tryptophan synthetase alpha2beta2 multi-functional enzyme complex of Escherichia coli was examined by deleting amino-terminal residues 2-6, 2-11, or 2-19 of TrpA. Selected substitutions were also introduced at TrpA positions 2-6. The altered genes encoding these polypeptides were overexpressed from a foreign promoter on a multicopy plasmid and following insertion at their normal chromosomal location. Each deletion polypeptide was functional in vivo. However all appeared to be somewhat more labile and insoluble and less active enzymatically than wild type TrpA. The deletion polypeptides were overproduced and solubilized from cell debris by denaturation and refolding. Several were partially purified and assayed in various reactions in the presence of tryptophan synthetase beta2 (TrpB). The purified TrpADelta2-6 and TrpADelta2-11 deletion polypeptides had low activity in both the indole + serine --> tryptophan reaction and the indoleglycerol phosphate + serine --> tryptophan reaction. Poor activity in each reaction was partly due to reduced association of TrpA with TrpB. The addition of the TrpA ligands, alpha-glycerophosphate or indoleglycerol phosphate, during catalysis of the indole + serine --> tryptophan reaction increased association and activity. These findings suggest that removal of helix 0 of TrpA decreases TrpA-TrpB association as well as the activity of the TrpA active site. Alignment of the TrpA sequences from different species indicates that several lack part or all of helix 0. In some of these polypeptides, extra residues at the carboxyl end may substitute for helix 0. PMID:8662916

  4. T4 phage lysozyme: a protein designed for understanding tryptophan photophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Bruce S.; Harris, Dan

    1990-05-01

    Bacteriophage T4 lysozyme in its wild type form contains three tryptophan residues (at sequence postions 126, 138 and 158). These three residues are in rather different environments in the protein: 126 and 158 are near the protein surface while residue 138 is more buried. T4 lysozyme has been genetically engineered to prepare all possible variants in which one or more of the tryptophan residues have been replaced by tyrosine. The available data supports the hypothesis that this substitution has, at most, a very minor effect on the structure of the protein. The three species with single tryptophan residues have been investigated in detail. The surface location of residue 126 compared to the buried location of residue 138 is reflected in the difference in collisional quenching observed with added potassium iodide. It is found that the spectral and radiative properties of the three proteins are very similar but that their radiationless decay properties are quite distinct. This is apparently due to short-range collisional quenching by neighboring side chains. Comparison with solution quenching measurements permits the identification of the specific quenching groups involved for each tryptophan residue and provides a semi-quantitative rationale for the radiationless decay rate. This collisional quenching interpretation is supported by mutational effects on fluorescence quantum yield. This simple picture of the behavior of these single-tryptophan proteins is clearly revealed in this particular case because of the unambiguous choice of collisional quenching groups. The time dependence of the fluorescence decay of each of these single-tryptophan proteins is quite complex. Several methods of analysis are presented and discussed in terms of their underlying physical basis. Internal collisional quenching, as suggested from the comparative studies, is expected to lead to non-exponential behavior. This is consistent with the observed time dependence. Analysis of the temporal

  5. Tryptophan orientation in model lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Esbjoerner, Elin K.

    2007-09-28

    Tryptophans in membrane proteins display strong preference for the lipid membrane interface and are important for anchoring proteins at the proper longitudinal level. Linear dichroism spectroscopy on indoles in shear-deformed liposomes has been used to show that this positioning is accompanied by an intrinsically adopted orientation, also observed for tryptophans in membrane-bound peptides. Similarities in orientation of different indoles suggest that tryptophan will adopt this orientation independent of the protein it is part of. From the orientation of indole electronic transition moments L{sub a}, L{sub b} and B{sub b}, a binding model is proposed where the indole long axis is {approx}60-65 deg. from the membrane normal and the indole plane is at an oblique angle. We propose that dipole-dipole interactions and steric constraints in the membrane hydrocarbon region determine positioning and orientation of tryptophans whereas hydrogen bonding and cation-{pi} interactions with lipid head-groups, though contributing to the membrane affinity of indoles, are less important.

  6. 21 CFR 582.5915 - Tryptophane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tryptophane. 582.5915 Section 582.5915 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  7. Tryptophan and kynurenines: continuing to court controversy.

    PubMed

    Stone, Trevor W

    2016-08-01

    The role of the amino acid tryptophan in the generation of 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT) has been expanded over the past 30 years with recognition that its oxidation by indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) results in the formation of kynurenine and metabolites which regulate neuronal excitability, psychiatric status, immune cell activity and balance, and probably implantation and the development of embryos. While the amount of work on this kynurenine pathway continues to accelerate, it is important that disagreements about results, differences of interpretation or problems with technical issues are presented openly and discussed thoroughly so that new research is not mis-led in ways that could have been foreseen. In this issue of Clinical Science, Badawy et al. discuss in depth two opposing views of how changes in tryptophan availability or utilisation bring about their effects on cell function. The original concept that local depletion of tryptophan is responsible seems to be less attractive than the view that kynurenine and its metabolites have direct, potent actions on cells. This conclusion not only clarifies our understanding of the importance of tryptophan metabolism to kynurenine but also raises the possibility that the actions of those metabolites could be novel targets for the development of agonists and antagonists with a range of medical implications. PMID:27358029

  8. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for continuous fiber ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Bleier, A.; Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    1995-08-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites mechanical behavior are influenced by the bonding characteristics between the fiber and the matrix. Finite modeling studies suggest that a low-modulus interfacial coating material will be effective in reducing the residual thermal stresses that are generated upon cooling from processing temperatures. Nicalon{trademark}/SiC composites with carbon, alumina and mullite interfacial coatings were fabricated with the SiC matrix deposited using a forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process. Composites with mullite interfacial coatings exhibited considerable fiber pull-out even after oxidation and have potential as a composite system.

  9. The Effects of Dietary Tryptophan on Affective Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lindseth, Glenda; Helland, Brian; Caspers, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Using a randomized crossover study design, 25 healthy young adults were examined for differences in anxiety, depression, and mood after consuming a high tryptophan and a low tryptophan diet for four days each. There was a two week washout between the diets. A within-subjects analysis of the participants’ mood indicated significantly (p < .01) more positive affect scores after consuming a high tryptophan diet as compared to a low tryptophan diet. Negative affect differences between the diets were not statistically significant (p > .05). Also, consuming more dietary tryptophan resulted in (p < .05) less depressive symptoms and decreased anxiety. PMID:25858202

  10. Tryptophan Transport in Human Fibroblast Cells—A Functional Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Vumma, Ravi; Johansson, Jessica; Lewander, Tommy; Venizelos, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    There are indications that serotonergic neurotransmission is disturbed in several psychiatric disorders. One explanation may be disturbed transport of tryptophan (precursor for serotonin synthesis) across cell membranes. Human fibroblast cells offer an advantageous model to study the transport of amino acids across cell membranes, since they are easy to propagate and the environmental factors can be controlled. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize tryptophan transport and to identify the main transporters of tryptophan in fibroblast cell lines from healthy controls. Tryptophan kinetic parameters (Vmax and Km) at low and high concentrations were measured in fibroblasts using the cluster tray method. Uptake of 3H (5)-L-tryptophan at different concentrations in the presence and absence of excess concentrations of inhibitors or combinations of inhibitors of amino acid transporters were also measured. Tryptophan transport at high concentration (0.5 mM) had low affinity and high Vmax and the LAT1 isoform of system-L was responsible for approximately 40% of the total uptake of tryptophan. In comparison, tryptophan transport at low concentration (50 nM) had higher affinity, lower Vmax and approximately 80% of tryptophan uptake was transported by system-L with LAT1 as the major isoform. The uptake of tryptophan at the low concentration was mainly sodium (Na+) dependent, while uptake at high substrate concentration was mainly Na+ independent. A series of different transporter inhibitors had varying inhibitory effects on tryptophan uptake. This study indicates that tryptophan is transported by multiple transporters that are active at different substrate concentrations in human fibroblast cells. The tryptophan transport trough system-L was mainly facilitated by the LAT1 isoform, at both low and high substrate concentrations of tryptophan. PMID:22084600

  11. Resolution of the fluorescence equilibrium unfolding profile of trp aporepressor using single tryptophan mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Royer, C. A.; Mann, C. J.; Matthews, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    Single tryptophan mutants of the trp aporepressor, tryptophan 19-->phenylalanine (W19F) and tryptophan 99-->phenylalanine (W99F), were used in this study to resolve the individual steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence urea unfolding profiles of the two tryptophan residues in this highly intertwined, dimeric protein. The wild-type protein exhibits a large increase in fluorescence intensity and lifetime, as well as a large red shift in the steady-state fluorescence emission spectrum, upon unfolding by urea (Lane, A.N. & Jardetsky, O., 1987, Eur. J. Biochem. 164, 389-396; Gittelman, M.S. & Matthews, C.R., 1990, Biochemistry 29, 7011-7020; Fernando, T. & Royer, C.A., 1992, Biochemistry 31, 6683-6691). Unfolding of the W19F mutant demonstrated that Trp 99 undergoes a large increase in intensity and a red shift upon exposure to solvent. Lifetime studies revealed that the contribution of the dominant 0.5-ns component of this tryptophan tends toward zero with increasing urea, whereas the longer lifetime components increase in importance. This lifting of the quenching of Trp 99 may be due to disruption of the interaction between the two subunits upon denaturation, which abolishes the interaction of Trp 99 on one subunit with the amide quenching group of Asn 32 on the other subunit (Royer, C.A., 1992, Biophys. J. 63, 741-750). On the other hand, Trp 19 is quenched in response to unfolding in the W99F mutant. Exposure to solvent of Trp 19, which is buried at the hydrophobic dimer interface in the native protein, results in a large red shift of the average steady-state emission.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8268795

  12. A synergistic effect between cholesterol and tryptophan-flanked transmembrane helices modulates membrane curvature.

    PubMed

    van Duyl, Bianca Y; Meeldijk, Hans; Verkleij, Arie J; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Chupin, Vladimir; de Kruijff, Ben; Killian, J Antoinette

    2005-03-22

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into the structural consequences of hydrophobic mismatch for membrane proteins in lipid bilayers that contain cholesterol. For this purpose, tryptophan-flanked peptides, designed to mimic transmembrane segments of membrane proteins, were incorporated in model membranes of unsaturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers of varying thickness and containing varying amounts of cholesterol. Analysis of the lipid organization by (31)P NMR and cryo-TEM demonstrated the formation of an isotropic phase, most likely representing a cubic phase, which occurred exclusively in mixtures containing lipids with relatively long acyl chains. Formation of this phase was inhibited by incorporation of lysophosphatidylcholine. These results indicate that the isotropic phase is formed as a consequence of negative hydrophobic mismatch and that its formation is related to a negative membrane curvature. When either peptide or cholesterol was omitted from the mixture, isotropic-phase formation did not occur, not even when the concentrations of these compounds were significantly increased. This suggests that formation of the isotropic phase is the result of a synergistic effect between the peptides and cholesterol. Interestingly, isotropic-phase formation was not observed when the tryptophans in the peptide were replaced by either lysines or histidines. We propose a model for the mechanism of this synergistic effect, in which its dependence on the flanking residues is explained by preferential interactions between cholesterol and tryptophan residues. PMID:15766283

  13. Fluorescence Quenching of (Dimethylamino)naphthalene Dyes Badan and Prodan by Tryptophan in Cytochromes P450 and Micelles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence of 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)-6-propionylnaphthalene dyes Badan and Prodan is quenched by tryptophan in Brij 58 micelles as well as in two cytochrome P450 proteins (CYP102, CYP119) with Badan covalently attached to a cysteine residue. Formation of nonemissive complexes between a dye molecule and tryptophan accounts for about 76% of the fluorescence intensity quenching in micelles, the rest is due to diffusive encounters. In the absence of tryptophan, fluorescence of Badan-labeled cytochromes decays with triexponential kinetics characterized by lifetimes of about 100 ps, 700–800 ps, and 3 ns. Site mutation of a histidine residue in the vicinity of the Badan label by tryptophan results in shortening of all three decay lifetimes. The relative amplitude of the fastest component increases at the expense of the two slower ones. The average quenching rate constants are 4.5 × 108 s–1 (CYP102) and 3.7 × 108 s–1 (CYP119), at 288 K. Cyclic voltammetry of Prodan in MeCN shows a reversible reduction peak at −1.85 V vs NHE that becomes chemically irreversible and shifts positively upon addition of water. A quasireversible reduction at −0.88 V was observed in an aqueous buffer (pH 7.3). The excited-state reduction potential of Prodan (and Badan) is estimated to vary from about +0.6 V (vs NHE) in polar aprotic media (MeCN) to approximately +1.6 V in water. Tryptophan quenching of Badan/Prodan fluorescence in CYPs and Brij 58 micelles is exergonic by ≤0.5 V and involves tryptophan oxidation by excited Badan/Prodan, coupled with a fast reaction between the reduced dye and water. Photoreduction is a new quenching mechanism for 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)-6-propionylnaphthalene dyes that are often used as solvatochromic polarity probes, FRET donors and acceptors, as well as reporters of solvation dynamics. PMID:25079965

  14. Tryptophan-induced eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Criswell, L. A.; Sack, K. E.

    1990-01-01

    Eight patients who became ill while taking tryptophan had myalgia, fatigue, rash, fever, edema, alopecia, arthralgias, diminished joint motion, skin tightening, muscle cramping, and distal paresthesias. Three had shortness of breath, and one had pulmonary hypertension. Laboratory abnormalities included peripheral eosinophilia, leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and elevated serum levels of aldolase, lactate dehydrogenase, and liver enzymes. Of 4 chest radiographs, 3 were abnormal. Of 5 skin and muscle biopsies, 4 showed sclerosis or mixed inflammatory cell infiltration of the dermis, subcutis, and fascia. Eosinophils were often present, but vasculitis was absent. Muscle inflammation was minimal. We conclude that the "eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome" is related to the ingestion of tryptophan and that abnormalities in the secretion of lymphokines may be important in its pathogenesis. PMID:2219890

  15. Synthesis of constrained analogues of tryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Negrato, Marco; Abbiati, Giorgio; Dell’Acqua, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Summary A Lewis acid-catalysed diastereoselective [4 + 2] cycloaddition of vinylindoles and methyl 2-acetamidoacrylate, leading to methyl 3-acetamido-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocarbazole-3-carboxylate derivatives, is described. Treatment of the obtained cycloadducts under hydrolytic conditions results in the preparation of a small library of compounds bearing the free amino acid function at C-3 and pertaining to the class of constrained tryptophan analogues. PMID:26664620

  16. Tandem transcription and translation regulatory sensing of uncharged tryptophan tRNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangnan; Yanofsky, Charles

    2003-07-11

    The Bacillus subtilis AT (anti-TRAP) protein inhibits the regulatory protein TRAP (trp RNA-binding attenuation protein), thereby eliminating transcription termination in the leader region of the trp operon. Transcription of the AT operon is activated by uncharged tryptophan transfer RNA (tRNATrp). Here we show that translation of AT also is regulated by uncharged tRNATrp. A 10-residue coding region containing three consecutive tryptophan codons is located immediately preceding the AT structural gene. Completion of translation of this coding region inhibits AT synthesis, whereas incomplete translation increases AT production. Tandem sensing of uncharged tRNATrp therefore regulates synthesis of AT, which in turn regulates TRAP's ability to inhibit trp operon expression. PMID:12855807

  17. Catalytic Roles of βLys87 in Tryptophan Synthase: 15N Solid State NMR Studies

    PubMed Central

    Caulkins, Bethany G.; Yang, Chen; Hilario, Eduardo; Fan, Li; Dunn, Michael F.; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2015-01-01

    The proposed mechanism for tryptophan synthase shows βLys87 playing multiple catalytic roles: it bonds to the PLP cofactor, activates C4′ for nucleophilic attack via a protonated Schiff base nitrogen, and abstracts and returns protons to PLP-bound substrates (i.e. acid-base catalysis). ε-15N-lysine TS was prepared to access the protonation state of βLys87 using 15N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy for three quasi-stable intermediates along the reaction pathway. These experiments establish that the protonation state of the ε-amino group switches between protonated and neutral states as the β-site undergoes conversion from one intermediate to the next during catalysis, corresponding to mechanistic steps where this lysine residue has been anticipated to play alternating acid and base catalytic roles that help steer reaction specificity in tryptophan synthase catalysis. PMID:25688830

  18. Dynamics of a membrane-bound tryptophan analog in environments of varying hydration: a fluorescence approach.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Amitabha; Arora, Ajuna; Kelkar, Devaki A

    2005-12-01

    Tryptophan octyl ester (TOE) represents an important model for membrane-bound tryptophan residues. In this article, we have employed a combination of wavelength-selective fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies to monitor the effect of varying degrees of hydration on the dynamics of TOE in reverse micellar environments formed by sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) in isooctane. Our results show that TOE exhibits red edge excitation shift (REES) and other wavelength-selective fluorescence effects when bound to reverse micelles of AOT. Fluorescence parameters such as intensity, emission maximum, anisotropy, and lifetime of TOE in reverse micelles of AOT depend on [water]/[surfactant] molar ratio (w (o)). These results are relevant and potentially useful for analyzing dynamics of proteins or peptides bound to membranes or membrane-mimetic media under conditions of changing hydration. PMID:16184387

  19. Tryptophan-to-heme electron transfer in ferrous myoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Monni, Roberto; Al Haddad, André; van Mourik, Frank; Auböck, Gerald; Chergui, Majed

    2015-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that in ferric myoglobins (Mb) the fluorescence quenching of the photoexcited tryptophan 14 (*Trp14) residue is in part due to an electron transfer to the heme porphyrin (porph), turning it to the ferrous state. However, the invariance of *Trp decay times in ferric and ferrous Mbs raises the question as to whether electron transfer may also be operative in the latter. Using UV pump/visible probe transient absorption, we show that this is indeed the case for deoxy-Mb. We observe that the reduction generates (with a yield of about 30%) a low-valence Fe–porphyrin π [FeII(porph●−)] -anion radical, which we observe for the first time to our knowledge under physiological conditions. We suggest that the pathway for the electron transfer proceeds via the leucine 69 (Leu69) and valine 68 (Val68) residues. The results on ferric Mbs and the present ones highlight the generality of Trp–porphyrin electron transfer in heme proteins. PMID:25902517

  20. Interfacial bonding stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerio, J.

    1984-01-01

    Interfacial bonding stability by in situ ellipsometry was investigated. It is found that: (1) gamma MPS is an effective primer for bonding ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) to aluminum; (2) ellipsometry is an effective in situ technique for monitoring the stability of polymer/metal interfaces; (3) the aluminized back surface of silicon wafers contain significant amounts of silicon and may have glass like properties.

  1. Tryptophan availability modulates serotonin release from rat hypothalamic slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the tryptophan availability and serononin release from rat hypothalamus was investigated using a new in vitro technique for estimating rates at which endogenous serotonin is released spontaneously or upon electrical depolarization from hypothalamic slices superfused with a solution containing various amounts of tryptophan. It was found that the spontaneous, as well as electrically induced, release of serotonin from the brain slices exhibited a dose-dependent relationship with the tryptophan concentration of the superfusion medium.

  2. Tryptophan Metabolism and White Matter Integrity in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chiappelli, Joshua; Postolache, Teodor T; Kochunov, Peter; Rowland, Laura M; Wijtenburg, S Andrea; Shukla, Dinesh K; Tagamets, Malle; Du, Xiaoming; Savransky, Anya; Lowry, Christopher A; Can, Adem; Fuchs, Dietmar; Hong, L Elliot

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with abnormalities in the structure and functioning of white matter, but the underlying neuropathology is unclear. We hypothesized that increased tryptophan degradation in the kynurenine pathway could be associated with white matter microstructure and biochemistry, potentially contributing to white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia. To test this, fasting plasma samples were obtained from 37 schizophrenia patients and 38 healthy controls and levels of total tryptophan and its metabolite kynurenine were assessed. The ratio of kynurenine to tryptophan was used as an index of tryptophan catabolic activity in this pathway. White matter structure and function were assessed by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Tryptophan levels were significantly lower (p<0.001), and kynurenine/tryptophan ratios were correspondingly higher (p=0.018) in patients compared with controls. In patients, lower plasma tryptophan levels corresponded to lower structural integrity (DTI fractional anisotropy) (r=0.347, p=0.038). In both patients and controls, the kynurenine/tryptophan ratio was inversely correlated with frontal white matter glutamate level (r=-0.391 and -0.350 respectively, p=0.024 and 0.036). These results provide initial evidence implicating abnormal tryptophan/kynurenine pathway activity in changes to white matter integrity and white matter glutamate in schizophrenia. PMID:27143602

  3. Contributions of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase to the conversion of D-tryptophan to nicotinamide analyzed by using tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Maeta, Akihiro; Sano, Mitsue; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Shibata, Katsumi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the contribution percentage of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) to the conversion of D-tryptophan to nicotinamide in TDO-knockout mice. The calculated percentage conversions indicated that TDO and IDO oxidized 70 and 30%, respectively, of the dietary L-tryptophan. These results indicate that both TDO and IDO biosynthesize nicotinamide from D-tryptophan and L-tryptophan in mice. PMID:25035993

  4. Iridium Interfacial Stack (IRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An iridium interfacial stack ("IrIS") and a method for producing the same are provided. The IrIS may include ordered layers of TaSi.sub.2, platinum, iridium, and platinum, and may be placed on top of a titanium layer and a silicon carbide layer. The IrIS may prevent, reduce, or mitigate against diffusion of elements such as oxygen, platinum, and gold through at least some of its layers.

  5. Interfacial behavior of asphaltenes.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Dominique; Argillier, Jean-François

    2016-07-01

    We review the existing literature on asphaltenes at various types of interfaces: oil-water, air-water, gas-oil and solid-liquid, with more emphasis on the oil-water interfaces. We address the role of asphaltene aggregation, recently clarified for asphaltenes in bulk by the Yen-Mullins model. We discuss the questions of adsorption reversibility and interfacial rheology, especially in connection with emulsion stability. PMID:26498501

  6. Electron-impact-induced tryptophan molecule fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamuliene, Jelena; Romanova, Liudmila G.; Vukstich, Vasyl S.; Papp, Alexander V.; Snegursky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    The fragmentation of a gas-phase tryptophan molecule by a low-energy (<70 eV) electron impact was studied both experimentally and theoretically. Various positively charged fragments were observed and analyzed. A special attention was paid to the energy characteristics of the ionic fragment yield. The geometrical parameters of the initial molecule rearrangement were also analyzed. The fragmentation observed was due to either a simple bond cleavage or more complex reactions involving molecular rearrangements. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Elementary Processes with Atoms and Molecules in Isolated and Aggregated States", edited by Friedrich Aumayr, Bratislav Marinkovic, Stefan Matejcik, John Tanis and Kurt H. Becker.

  7. Localization and environment of tryptophans in soluble and membrane-bound states of a pore-forming toxin from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Raja, S M; Rawat, S S; Chattopadhyay, A; Lala, A K

    1999-01-01

    The location and environment of tryptophans in the soluble and membrane-bound forms of Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin were monitored using intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. Fluorescence quenching of the toxin monomer in solution indicated varying degrees of tryptophan burial within the protein interior. N-Bromosuccinimide readily abolished 80% of the fluorescence in solution. The residual fluorescence of the modified toxin showed a blue-shifted emission maximum, a longer fluorescence lifetime as compared to the unmodified and membrane-bound alpha-toxin, and a 5- to 6-nm red edge excitation shift, all indicating a restricted tryptophan environment and deeply buried tryptophans. In the membrane-bound form, the fluorescence of alpha-toxin was quenched by iodide, indicating a conformational change leading to exposure of some tryptophans. A shorter average lifetime of tryptophans in the membrane-bound alpha-toxin as compared to the native toxin supported the conclusions based on iodide quenching of the membrane-bound toxin. Fluorescence quenching of membrane-bound alpha-toxin using brominated and spin-labeled fatty acids showed no quenching of fluorescence using brominated lipids. However, significant quenching was observed using 5- and 12-doxyl stearic acids. An average depth calculation using the parallax method indicated that the doxyl-quenchable tryptophans are located at an average depth of 10 A from the center of the bilayer close to the membrane interface. This was found to be in striking agreement with the recently described structure of the membrane-bound form of alpha-toxin. PMID:10049328

  8. Tryptophan degradation increases with stage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schroecksnadel, Katharina; Winkler, Christiana; Duftner, Christian; Wirleitner, Barbara; Schirmer, Michael; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2006-05-01

    Immune system activation is known to be involved in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The proinflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma in various cells, including monocytes, induces the enzyme indoleamine (2,3)-dioxygenase (IDO), which converts tryptophan to kynurenine. In sera of 22 patients (17 women and 5 men) with RA stages 1 to 4 according to Steinbrocker, the concentrations of tryptophan and kynurenine were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. To estimate IDO activity, the kynurenine to tryptophan ratio (kyn/trp) was calculated. In parallel, concentrations of the macrophage activation marker neopterin were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Tryptophan concentrations were lower in patients with RA, and the decrease in serum tryptophan correlated with increase in stage (p<0.05). Kyn/trp correlated well with neopterin concentrations, which were elevated in most patients. Whereas higher C-reactive protein concentrations and erythrocyte sedimentation rates were observed in patients with greater disease activity, tryptophan and neopterin concentrations did not differ between patients with different subjective disease activity graded by the physician. Deficiency of the essential amino acid tryptophan in patients with RA most likely results from immune activation involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. It could also be relevant for the mood of patients, as tryptophan is the precursor of serotonin. PMID:16261283

  9. Tryptophan Predicts the Risk for Future Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianlu; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Ma, Xiaojing; Bao, Yuqian; Ni, Yan; Hu, Cheng; Rajani, Cynthia; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5 amino acids were identified and verified as important metabolites highly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. This report aims to assess the association of tryptophan with the development of T2D and to evaluate its performance with existing amino acid markers. A total of 213 participants selected from a ten-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS) were examined in two ways: 1) 51 subjects who developed diabetes and 162 individuals who remained metabolically healthy in 10 years; 2) the same 51 future diabetes and 23 strictly matched ones selected from the 162 healthy individuals. Baseline fasting serum tryptophan concentrations were quantitatively measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry. First, serum tryptophan level was found significantly higher in future T2D and was positively and independently associated with diabetes onset risk. Patients with higher tryptophan level tended to present higher degree of insulin resistance and secretion, triglyceride and blood pressure. Second, the prediction potential of tryptophan is non-inferior to the 5 existing amino acids. The predictive performance of the combined score improved after taking tryptophan into account. Our findings unveiled the potential of tryptophan as a new marker associated with diabetes risk in Chinese populations. The addition of tryptophan provided complementary value to the existing amino acid predictors. PMID:27598004

  10. Complete Phenotypic Recovery of an Alzheimer's Disease Model by a Quinone-Tryptophan Hybrid Aggregation Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer-Attali, Roni; Pellarin, Riccardo; Convertino, Marino; Frydman-Marom, Anat; Egoz-Matia, Nirit; Peled, Sivan; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Shalev, Deborah E.; Caflisch, Amedeo; Gazit, Ehud; Segal, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The rational design of amyloid oligomer inhibitors is yet an unmet drug development need. Previous studies have identified the role of tryptophan in amyloid recognition, association and inhibition. Furthermore, tryptophan was ranked as the residue with highest amyloidogenic propensity. Other studies have demonstrated that quinones, specifically anthraquinones, can serve as aggregation inhibitors probably due to the dipole interaction of the quinonic ring with aromatic recognition sites within the amyloidogenic proteins. Here, using in vitro, in vivo and in silico tools we describe the synthesis and functional characterization of a rationally designed inhibitor of the Alzheimer's disease-associated β-amyloid. This compound, 1,4-naphthoquinon-2-yl-L-tryptophan (NQTrp), combines the recognition capacities of both quinone and tryptophan moieties and completely inhibited Aβ oligomerization and fibrillization, as well as the cytotoxic effect of Aβ oligomers towards cultured neuronal cell line. Furthermore, when fed to transgenic Alzheimer's disease Drosophila model it prolonged their life span and completely abolished their defective locomotion. Analysis of the brains of these flies showed a significant reduction in oligomeric species of Aβ while immuno-staining of the 3rd instar larval brains showed a significant reduction in Aβ accumulation. Computational studies, as well as NMR and CD spectroscopy provide mechanistic insight into the activity of the compound which is most likely mediated by clamping of the aromatic recognition interface in the central segment of Aβ. Our results demonstrate that interfering with the aromatic core of amyloidogenic peptides is a promising approach for inhibiting various pathogenic species associated with amyloidogenic diseases. The compound NQTrp can serve as a lead for developing a new class of disease modifying drugs for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:20559435

  11. Complete phenotypic recovery of an Alzheimer's disease model by a quinone-tryptophan hybrid aggregation inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Scherzer-Attali, Roni; Pellarin, Riccardo; Convertino, Marino; Frydman-Marom, Anat; Egoz-Matia, Nirit; Peled, Sivan; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Shalev, Deborah E; Caflisch, Amedeo; Gazit, Ehud; Segal, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The rational design of amyloid oligomer inhibitors is yet an unmet drug development need. Previous studies have identified the role of tryptophan in amyloid recognition, association and inhibition. Furthermore, tryptophan was ranked as the residue with highest amyloidogenic propensity. Other studies have demonstrated that quinones, specifically anthraquinones, can serve as aggregation inhibitors probably due to the dipole interaction of the quinonic ring with aromatic recognition sites within the amyloidogenic proteins. Here, using in vitro, in vivo and in silico tools we describe the synthesis and functional characterization of a rationally designed inhibitor of the Alzheimer's disease-associated beta-amyloid. This compound, 1,4-naphthoquinon-2-yl-L-tryptophan (NQTrp), combines the recognition capacities of both quinone and tryptophan moieties and completely inhibited Abeta oligomerization and fibrillization, as well as the cytotoxic effect of Abeta oligomers towards cultured neuronal cell line. Furthermore, when fed to transgenic Alzheimer's disease Drosophila model it prolonged their life span and completely abolished their defective locomotion. Analysis of the brains of these flies showed a significant reduction in oligomeric species of Abeta while immuno-staining of the 3(rd) instar larval brains showed a significant reduction in Abeta accumulation. Computational studies, as well as NMR and CD spectroscopy provide mechanistic insight into the activity of the compound which is most likely mediated by clamping of the aromatic recognition interface in the central segment of Abeta. Our results demonstrate that interfering with the aromatic core of amyloidogenic peptides is a promising approach for inhibiting various pathogenic species associated with amyloidogenic diseases. The compound NQTrp can serve as a lead for developing a new class of disease modifying drugs for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:20559435

  12. Fate of Dietary Tryptophan in Young Japanese Women

    PubMed Central

    Hiratsuka, Chiaki; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Shibata, Katsumi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, using the high-performance liquid chromatographic methods recently modified by us, the fate of dietary tryptophan in 17 healthy female Japanese adults who ate self-selected food. The experimental period was 22 days. The habitual intake of tryptophan was 3328.4 μmol/day. 24-hour urine samples were collected at the beginning of the experiment and then once per week. Blood was collected at the beginning and end of the experiment. Levels of tryptophan and its metabolites were measured in blood and urine. Tryptophan, nicotinamide and 2-oxoadipic acid were the major compounds of the blood. The urinary excretion amounts of tryptophan, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, kynurenine, anthranilic acid, kynurenic acid, 3-hydroxykynurenine, xanthurenic acid, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid and quinolinic acid were about 40, 20, 4, 1, 10, 4, 3, 5 and 20 μmol/day, respectively. PMID:23150724

  13. Tryptophan-binding sites on nuclear envelopes of rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Kurl, R.; Verney, E.; Sidransky, H.

    1986-03-05

    Tryptophan (TRP), an essential amino acid, has been demonstrated to affect certain cellular processes including transcriptional and translational events in the liver. These events are presumed to be mediated at the nuclear level possibly via binding of TRP to nuclei. In an effort to delineate the role of TRP on these metabolic processes, the nuclear location of these binding sites was investigated. Incubation of isolated, intact, hepatic nuclei with (/sup 3/H)TRP followed by fractionation revealed the presence of about 60% of specific TRP binding to nuclear membranes. This binding reached equilibrium by 2 hours after incubation at room temperature. Scatchard analysis revealed two classes of binding sites: (1) high affinity (K/sub D/ of about 10/sup -10/M) and (2) low affinity (K/sub D/ of about 10/sup -8/M). The inhibition of binding by treatment with either ..beta..-galactosidase or concanavalin A suggested that the binding entity was a glycoprotein. However, treatment with neuraminidase resulted in an increase in binding which suggested that terminal sialic acid residues play a role, possibly an inhibitory one, on TRP binding. The function of these binding sites on the mechanism of TRP action is being investigated.

  14. Resolution of ligand positions by site-directed tryptophan fluorescence in tear lipocalin.

    PubMed Central

    Gasymov, O. K.; Abduragimov, A. R.; Yusifov, T. N.; Glasgow, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    The lipocalin superfamily of proteins functions in the binding and transport of a variety of important hydrophobic molecules. Tear lipocalin is a promiscuous lipid binding member of the family and serves as a paradigm to study the molecular determinants of ligand binding. Conserved regions in the lipocalins, such as the G strand and the F-G loop, may play an important role in ligand binding and delivery. We studied structural changes in the G strand of holo- and apo-tear lipocalin using spectroscopic methods including circular dichroism analysis and site-directed tryptophan fluorescence. Apo-tear lipocalin shows the same general structural characteristics as holo-tear lipocalin including alternating periodicity of a beta-strand, orientation of amino acid residues 105, 103, 101, and 99 facing the cavity, and progressive depth in the cavity from residues 105 to 99. For amino acid residues facing the internal aspect of cavity, the presence of a ligand is associated with blue shifted spectra. The collisional rate constants indicate that these residues are not less exposed to solvent in holo-tear lipocalin than in apo-tear lipocalin. Rather the spectral blue shifts may be accounted for by a ligand induced rigidity in holo-TL. Amino acid residues 94 and 95 are consistent with positions in the F-G loop and show greater exposure to solvent in the holo- than the apo-proteins. These findings are consistent with the general hypothesis that the F-G loop in the holo-proteins of the lipocalin family is available for receptor interactions and delivery of ligands to specific targets. Site-directed tryptophan fluorescence was used in combination with a nitroxide spin labeled fatty acid analog to elucidate dynamic ligand interactions with specific amino acid residues. Collisional quenching constants of the nitroxide spin label provide evidence that at least three amino acids of the G strand residues interact with the ligand. Stern-Volmer plots are inconsistent with a ligand that is

  15. Resolution of ligand positions by site-directed tryptophan fluorescence in tear lipocalin.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, O K; Abduragimov, A R; Yusifov, T N; Glasgow, B J

    2000-02-01

    The lipocalin superfamily of proteins functions in the binding and transport of a variety of important hydrophobic molecules. Tear lipocalin is a promiscuous lipid binding member of the family and serves as a paradigm to study the molecular determinants of ligand binding. Conserved regions in the lipocalins, such as the G strand and the F-G loop, may play an important role in ligand binding and delivery. We studied structural changes in the G strand of holo- and apo-tear lipocalin using spectroscopic methods including circular dichroism analysis and site-directed tryptophan fluorescence. Apo-tear lipocalin shows the same general structural characteristics as holo-tear lipocalin including alternating periodicity of a beta-strand, orientation of amino acid residues 105, 103, 101, and 99 facing the cavity, and progressive depth in the cavity from residues 105 to 99. For amino acid residues facing the internal aspect of cavity, the presence of a ligand is associated with blue shifted spectra. The collisional rate constants indicate that these residues are not less exposed to solvent in holo-tear lipocalin than in apo-tear lipocalin. Rather the spectral blue shifts may be accounted for by a ligand induced rigidity in holo-TL. Amino acid residues 94 and 95 are consistent with positions in the F-G loop and show greater exposure to solvent in the holo- than the apo-proteins. These findings are consistent with the general hypothesis that the F-G loop in the holo-proteins of the lipocalin family is available for receptor interactions and delivery of ligands to specific targets. Site-directed tryptophan fluorescence was used in combination with a nitroxide spin labeled fatty acid analog to elucidate dynamic ligand interactions with specific amino acid residues. Collisional quenching constants of the nitroxide spin label provide evidence that at least three amino acids of the G strand residues interact with the ligand. Stern-Volmer plots are inconsistent with a ligand that is

  16. Characterisation of the tryptophan synthase alpha subunit in maize

    PubMed Central

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Weigang, Linda; Fießelmann, Andreas; Letzel, Thomas; Frey, Monika; Gierl, Alfons; Glawischnig, Erich

    2008-01-01

    Background In bacteria, such as Salmonella typhimurium, tryptophan is synthesized from indole-3-glycerole phosphate (IGP) by a tryptophan synthase αββα heterotetramer. Plants have evolved multiple α (TSA) and β (TSB) homologs, which have probably diverged in biological function and their ability of subunit interaction. There is some evidence for a tryptophan synthase (TS) complex in Arabidopsis. On the other hand maize (Zea mays) expresses the TSA-homologs BX1 and IGL that efficiently cleave IGP, independent of interaction with TSB. Results In order to clarify, how tryptophan is synthesized in maize, two TSA homologs, hitherto uncharacterized ZmTSA and ZmTSAlike, were functionally analyzed. ZmTSA is localized in plastids, the major site of tryptophan biosynthesis in plants. It catalyzes the tryptophan synthase α-reaction (cleavage of IGP), and forms a tryptophan synthase complex with ZmTSB1 in vitro. The catalytic efficiency of the α-reaction is strongly enhanced upon complex formation. A 160 kD tryptophan synthase complex was partially purified from maize leaves and ZmTSA was identified as native α-subunit of this complex by mass spectrometry. ZmTSAlike, for which no in vitro activity was detected, is localized in the cytosol. ZmTSAlike, BX1, and IGL were not detectable in the native tryptophan synthase complex in leaves. Conclusion It was demonstrated in vivo and in vitro that maize forms a tryptophan synthase complex and ZmTSA functions as α-subunit in this complex. PMID:18430213

  17. Interfacial solvation thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-10-19

    Previous studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the interplay of cavity formation, polarizability, desolvation, and surface capillary waves in driving the interfacial adsorptions of ions and molecules at air-water interfaces. Here we revisit these questions by combining exact potential distribution results with linear response theory and other physically motivated approximations. The results highlight both exact and approximate compensation relations pertaining to direct (solute-solvent) and indirect (solvent-solvent) contributions to adsorption thermodynamics, of relevance to solvation at air-water interfaces, as well as a broader class of processes linked to the mean force potential between ions, molecules, nanoparticles, proteins, and biological assemblies. PMID:27545849

  18. Modifications to surfactant protein B structure and lipid interactions under respiratory distress conditions: consequences of tryptophan oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Muzaddid; Rose, Jarratt; McDonald, Mark; Morrow, Michael R; Booth, Valerie

    2011-01-11

    These studies detail the altered structure-function relationships caused by oxidation of surfactant protein B (SP-B), a mode of damage thought to be important in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a common and frequently fatal condition. An 18-residue fragment comprising the N-terminal helix of SP-B was investigated in oxidized and unmodified forms by solution and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Taken together, the results indicate that tryptophan oxidation causes substantial disruptions in helical structure and lipid interactions. The structural modifications induced by tryptophan oxidation were severe, with a reduction in helical extent from approximately three helical turns to, at most, one turn, and were observed in a variety of solvent environments, including sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles, dodecyl phosphocholine (DPC) micelles, and a 40% hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP) aqueous solution. The unmodified peptide takes on an orientation within lipid bilayers that is tilted approximately 30° away from an in-plane position. Tryptophan oxidation causes significant modifications to the peptide-lipid interactions, and the peptide likely shifts to a more in-plane orientation within the lipids. Interestingly, the character of the disruptions to peptide-lipid interactions caused by tryptophan oxidation was highly dependent on the charge of the lipid headgroup. PMID:21128671

  19. Measuring Air-Water Interfacial Area via the Interfacial Partitioning Tracer Test Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ouni, A.; Zhong, H.; Mainhagu, J.; Araujo, J. B.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT) are one method available for measuring air-water interfacial area (Aa-w). Two variations of the aqueous IPTT method are compared. One involves the standard approach comprising tracer injection under steady unsaturated-flow conditions with a uniform water-saturation distribution within the column. The other involves tracer injection under steady saturated-flowconditions in the presence of trapped residual air. Sodium dodecylbezenesulfonate (SDBS) and pentafluorobenzoic acid (PFBA) were used as the partitioning andnonreactive tracers, respectively. A sandy soil with a median grain diameter of 0.234 mm was used as the porous medium. Initial water saturation, Sw,was approximately 80%. Water saturation was monitored gravimetrically during the experiments. The results of the experiments will be assessed and compared to those of prior studies.

  20. Effect of nanoscale patterned interfacial roughness on interfacial toughness.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mook, William M.; Kennedy, Marian S.; Bahr, David F.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    The performance and the reliability of many devices are controlled by interfaces between thin films. In this study we investigated the use of patterned, nanoscale interfacial roughness as a way to increase the apparent interfacial toughness of brittle, thin-film material systems. The experimental portion of the study measured the interfacial toughness of a number of interfaces with nanoscale roughness. This included a silicon interface with a rectangular-toothed pattern of 60-nm wide by 90-nm deep channels fabricated using nanoimprint lithography techniques. Detailed finite element simulations were used to investigate the nature of interfacial crack growth when the interface is patterned. These simulations examined how geometric and material parameter choices affect the apparent toughness. Atomistic simulations were also performed with the aim of identifying possible modifications to the interfacial separation models currently used in nanoscale, finite element fracture analyses. The fundamental nature of atomistic traction separation for mixed mode loadings was investigated.

  1. Tryptophan and tryptophan-like substances in cloud water: Occurrence and photochemical fate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Angelica; Passananti, Monica; Deguillaume, Laurent; Mailhot, Gilles; Brigante, Marcello

    2016-07-01

    This work investigates the occurrence and photochemical behaviour of tryptophan (TRP) in the cloud aqueous phase. The concentrations of tryptophan, TRYptophan LIke Substances (TRYLIS) and HUmic LIke Substances (HULIS) in real cloud water, collected between October 2013 and November 2014 at the top of the puy de Dôme station, were determined using the Excitation-Emission-Matrix (EEM) technique. The amount of free and complexed tryptophan (TRP) up to 10-7 M in cloud aqueous phase was quantified by HPLC-UV-fluorescence analysis, and its photoreactivity under sun-simulated conditions was investigated in synthetic water samples mimicking cloud aqueous phase compositions (oceanic and continental origins). TRP undergoes direct photolysis, and its degradation is enhanced in the presence of naturally occurring species able to photo-generate hydroxyl radicals (HOrad). The polychromatic quantum yield of TRP (ϕ290-340 nm TRP) is estimated to be 8.37 × 10-4 between 290 and 340 nm, corresponding to the degradation rate (RTRPd) of 1.29 × 10-11 M s-1 under our irradiation conditions. The degradation is accelerated up to 3.65 × 10-10 and 8.26 × 10-10 M s-1 in synthetic oceanic and continental cloud water samples doped with 100 μM hydrogen peroxide, respectively. Hydroxyl radical-mediated transformation leads to the generation of different functionalized and oxidized products, as well as small carboxylic acids, such as formate and acetate. Moreover, fluorescent signals of irradiated solutions indicate the formation of HULIS.

  2. Tryptophan and tryptophan-like substances in cloud water: Occurrence and photochemical fate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Angelica; Passananti, Monica; Deguillaume, Laurent; Mailhot, Gilles; Brigante, Marcello

    2016-07-01

    This work investigates the occurrence and photochemical behaviour of tryptophan (TRP) in the cloud aqueous phase. The concentrations of tryptophan, TRYptophan LIke Substances (TRYLIS) and HUmic LIke Substances (HULIS) in real cloud water, collected between October 2013 and November 2014 at the top of the puy de Dôme station, were determined using the Excitation-Emission-Matrix (EEM) technique. The amount of free and complexed tryptophan (TRP) up to 10-7 M in cloud aqueous phase was quantified by HPLC-UV-fluorescence analysis, and its photoreactivity under sun-simulated conditions was investigated in synthetic water samples mimicking cloud aqueous phase compositions (oceanic and continental origins). TRP undergoes direct photolysis, and its degradation is enhanced in the presence of naturally occurring species able to photo-generate hydroxyl radicals (HOrad). The polychromatic quantum yield of TRP (ϕ290-340 nmTRP) is estimated to be 8.37 × 10-4 between 290 and 340 nm, corresponding to the degradation rate (RTRPd) of 1.29 × 10-11 M s-1 under our irradiation conditions. The degradation is accelerated up to 3.65 × 10-10 and 8.26 × 10-10 M s-1 in synthetic oceanic and continental cloud water samples doped with 100 μM hydrogen peroxide, respectively. Hydroxyl radical-mediated transformation leads to the generation of different functionalized and oxidized products, as well as small carboxylic acids, such as formate and acetate. Moreover, fluorescent signals of irradiated solutions indicate the formation of HULIS.

  3. Mutagenesis of tryptophan199 suggests that hopping is required for MauG-dependent tryptophan tryptophylquinone biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tarboush, Nafez Abu; Jensen, Lyndal M.R.; Yukl, Erik T.; Geng, Jiafeng; Liu, Aimin; Wilmot, Carrie M.; Davidson, Victor L.

    2011-12-07

    The diheme enzyme MauG catalyzes the posttranslational modification of the precursor protein of methylamine dehydrogenase (preMADH) to complete biosynthesis of its protein-derived tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) cofactor. Catalysis proceeds through a high valent bis-Fe(IV) redox state and requires long-range electron transfer (ET), as the distance between the modified residues of preMADH and the nearest heme iron of MauG is 19.4 {angstrom}. Trp199 of MauG resides at the MauG-preMADH interface, positioned midway between the residues that are modified and the nearest heme. W199F and W199K mutations did not affect the spectroscopic and redox properties of MauG, or its ability to stabilize the bis-Fe(IV) state. Crystal structures of complexes of W199F/K MauG with preMADH showed no significant perturbation of the MauG-preMADH structure or protein interface. However, neither MauG variant was able to synthesize TTQ from preMADH. In contrast, an ET reaction from diferrous MauG to quinone MADH, which does not require the bis-Fe(IV) intermediate, was minimally affected by the W199F/K mutations. W199F/K MauGs were able to oxidize quinol MADH to form TTQ, the putative final two-electron oxidation of the biosynthetic process, but with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values approximately 10% that of wild-type MauG. The differential effects of the W199F/K mutations on these three different reactions are explained by a critical role for Trp199 in mediating multistep hopping from preMADH to bis-Fe(IV) MauG during the long-range ET that is required for TTQ biosynthesis.

  4. A membrane transporter for tryptophan composed of RNA

    PubMed Central

    JANAS, TERESA; JANAS, TADEUSZ; YARUS, MICHAEL

    2004-01-01

    We have incorporated an RNA binding site for the biological amino acid tryptophan within an RNA complex with affinity for phospholipid bilayer membranes. The resulting RNA (9:10Trp) creates a selective route through the bilayer for the amino acid. Binding and enhanced tryptophan permeability are nonlinear in RNA concentration, suggesting that RNA aggregation is required for both. Tryptophan permeability saturates with increased concentration, though at ~1000-fold greater level than when binding a free aptamer. The RNA (9:10Trp) complex, bound at a mean of two per liposome, halves the activation energy for tryptophan transport (to 46 kJ/mole), specifically increasing tryptophan entry to a maximal velocity of 0.5 sec-1 per liposome with little or no accompanying increase in general permeability. Individual RNAs turn over tens of thousands of times at high tryptophan concentration. Thus, a specific passive membrane transporter whose properties overlap those of single-molecule transporter proteins, can be made of RNA alone. Permeability changes probably rely on disturbances in lipid conformation as well as on an advantageous low free energy position for tryptophan at the membrane. Other RNA activities may yield other RNA-membrane nanosystems via this route. PMID:15383677

  5. Stabilization of lignin peroxidases in white rot fungi by tryptophan.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, P J; Field, J A; Teunissen, P; Dobson, A D

    1997-01-01

    Supplementation of various cultures of white rot fungi with tryptophan was found to have a large stimulatory effect on lignin peroxidase activity levels. This enhancement was greater than that observed in the presence of the lignin peroxidase recycling agent veratryl alcohol. Using reverse transcription-PCR, we found that tryptophan does not act to induce lignin peroxidase expression at the level of gene transcription. Instead, the activity enhancement observed is likely to result from the protective effect of tryptophan against H2O2 inactivation. In experiments using a partially purified lignin peroxidase preparation, tryptophan and its derivative indole were determined to function in the same way as veratryl alcohol in converting compound II, an oxidized form of lignin peroxidase, to ferric enzyme, thereby completing the catalytic cycle. Furthermore, tryptophan was found to be a better substrate for lignin peroxidase than veratryl alcohol. Inclusion of either tryptophan or indole enhanced the oxidation of the azo dyes methyl orange and Eriochrome blue black. Stimulation of azo dye oxidations by veratryl alcohol has previously been shown to be due to its enzyme recycling function. Our data allow us to propose that tryptophan stabilizes lignin peroxidase by acting as a reductant for the enzyme. PMID:9212404

  6. Fluorescence of tryptophan in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyan; Zhang, Hairong; Jin, Bing

    2013-04-01

    In this work, the absorption and emission spectra of Tryptophan (Trp) in aqueous solution were studied. Moreover, a hydrogen-bonded zwitterionic Trpsbnd (H2O)9 model was proposed and its ground-state and excited-state properties were investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) and the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) methods, respectively. All spectroscopic data in our experiments can be well explained by the hydrogen bond strengthening in the excited state of the model complex. The delocalization of electron density between indole moiety and neighboring H2O molecules in fluorescent state was proposed to be facilitated by the strengthened hydrogen-bond chain, and thus resulting in the large red-shift fluorescence of Trp in aqueous solution.

  7. Tryptophan supplementation modulates social behavior: A review.

    PubMed

    Steenbergen, Laura; Jongkees, Bryant J; Sellaro, Roberta; Colzato, Lorenza S

    2016-05-01

    Tryptophan (TRP), the precursor of serotonin (5-HT), is one of the most investigated amino-acids. TRP supplementation can increase 5-HT levels in the brain and for this reason numerous studies have investigated whether administration of TRP can positively influence social behavior that relies on serotonergic function. Here we review the available studies on TRP, to clarify if and under what circumstances TRP supplementation might modulate social behavior. TRP supplementation seems to improve control over social behavior in patients and individuals suffering from disorders or behaviors associated with dysfunctions in serotonergic functioning. In contrast, in healthy humans TRP supplementation seems to promote social behavior. Although more research is needed to disentangle and understand the relations between individual differences, TRP effectivity, 5-HT functioning, social interactions, and context, we conclude TRP can be a promising tool for modulating social behavior. PMID:26987640

  8. Plant phenolics affect oxidation of tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Hanna; Heinonen, Marina

    2008-08-27

    The effect of berry phenolics such as anthocyanins, ellagitannins, and proanthocyanidins from raspberry (Rubus idaeus), black currant (Ribes nigrum), and cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccus) and byproducts of deoiling processes rich in phenolics such as rapeseed (Brassica rapa L.), camelina (Camelina sativa), and soy (Glycine max L.) as well as scots pine bark (Pinus sylvestris) was investigated in an H2O2-oxidized tryptophan (Trp) solution. The oxidation of Trp was analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography using both fluorescence and diode array detection of Trp and its oxidation products. Mechanisms of antioxidative action of the phenolic compounds toward the oxidation of Trp were different as the pattern of Trp oxidation products varied with different phenolic compounds. The antioxidant protection toward oxidation of Trp was best provided with pine bark phenolics, black currant anthocyanins, and camelina meal phenolics as well as cranberry proanthocyanidins. PMID:18646765

  9. Interfacial insert for electrical connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macavay, D.

    1975-01-01

    The development of interfacial inserts for improved electric connectors is discussed. The inserts were manufactured from epoxy resins. The design features of the inserts and the manufacturing equipment are described. The reliability test program is reported. Drawings of the interfacial inserts are provided.

  10. More About Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Del Signore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents additional discussion of technique for measuring interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Technique described in "Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids" (LEW-15855).

  11. Chemical rescue of the distal histidine mutants of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jiafeng; Dornevil, Kednerlin; Liu, Aimin

    2012-07-25

    Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) is a heme-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative degradation of L-tryptophan (L-Trp) to N-formylkynurenine (NFK). A highly conserved histidine residue in the distal heme pocket has attracted great attention in the mechanistic studies of TDO. However, a consensus has not been reached regarding whether and how this distal histidine plays a catalytic role after substrate binding. In this study, three mutant proteins, H72S, H72N, and Q73F were generated to investigate the function of the distal histidine residue in Cupriavidus metallidurans TDO (cmTDO). Spectroscopic characterizations, enzymatic kinetic analysis, and chemical rescue assays were employed to study the biochemical properties of the wild-type enzyme and the mutant proteins. Rapid kinetic methods were utilized to explore the molecular basis for the observed stimulation of catalytic activity by 2-methylimidazole in the His72 variants. The results indicate that the distal histidine plays multiple roles in cmTDO. First, His72 contributes to but is not essential for substrate binding. In addition, it shields the heme center from nonproductive binding of exogenous small ligand molecules (i.e., imidazole and its analogs) via steric hindrance. Most importantly, His72 participates in the subsequent chemical catalytic steps after substrate binding possibly by providing H-bonding interactions to the heme-bound oxygen. PMID:22742206

  12. Direct measurement of the tryptophan-mediated photocleavage kinetics of a protein disulfide bond.

    PubMed

    Abaskharon, Rachel M; Gai, Feng

    2016-04-14

    Disulfide cleavage is one of the major causes underlying ultraviolet (UV) light-induced protein damage. While previous studies have provided strong evidence to support the notion that this process is mediated by photo-induced electron transfer from the excited state of an aromatic residue (e.g., tryptophan) to the disulfide bond, many mechanistic details are still lacking. For example, we do not know how quickly this process occurs in a protein environment. Herein, we design an experiment, which uses the unfolding kinetics of a protein as an observable, to directly assess the kinetics and mechanism of photo-induced disulfide cleavage. Our results show that this disulfide bond cleavage event takes place in ∼2 μs via a mechanism involving electron transfer from the triplet state of a tryptophan (Trp) residue to the disulfide bond. Furthermore, we find that one of the photoproducts of this reaction, a Trp-SR adduct, is formed locally, thus preventing the protein from re-cross-linking. Taken together, these findings suggest that a Trp-disulfide pair could be used as a photo-trigger to initiate protein folding dynamics and control the biological activities of disulfide-containing peptides. PMID:26997094

  13. On the self-assembly of a tryptophan labeled deoxycholic acid.

    PubMed

    Travaglini, Leana; Gubitosi, Marta; di Gregorio, Maria Chiara; Pavel, Nicolae Viorel; D'Annibale, Andrea; Giustini, Mauro; Soto Tellini, Victor Hugo; Vázquez Tato, José; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Bayati, Solmaz; Galantini, Luciano

    2014-09-28

    Self-assembly of peptides and bile acids has been widely investigated because of their biological role and their potential as a tool for the preparation of nanostructured biomaterials. We herein report both the synthesis and the self-association behavior of a compound that combines the aggregation properties of bile acid- and amino acid-based molecules. The derivative has been prepared by introducing a L-tryptophan residue into the C-3 position of the deoxycholic acid skeleton and resulted in an amphoteric fluorescent labeled bile acid that shows a pH-dependent self-assembly. Under alkaline conditions it assembles into 28 nm diameter tubules, thus showing a completely different behavior compared to the precursor bile acid, which forms micelles under similar conditions. Upon heating the tubules break and turn into micelles, leading to an increase in the exposure to water of the tryptophan residue. On the other hand, in acidic solutions it aggregates into elongated micelles that further self-assemble forming a gel network, when an electrolyte is added. PMID:25103526

  14. pH-Dependent conformational changes in tear lipocalin by site-directed tryptophan fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, Oktay K; Abduragimov, Adil R; Glasgow, Ben J

    2010-01-26

    Tear lipocalin (TL), a major protein of human tears, binds a broad array of endogenous ligands. pH-dependent ligand binding in TL may have functional implications in tears. Previously, conformational selections of the AB and GH loops have been implicated in ligand binding by site-directed tryptophan fluorescence (SDTF). In this study, SDTF was applied to the AB and GH loops to investigate pH-driven conformational changes relevant to ligand binding. Both loops demonstrate significant but distinct conformational rearrangements over a wide pH range. In the low-pH transition, from 7.3 to 3.0, residues of the GH loop exhibit decreased solvent accessibilities. In acrylamide quenching experiments, the average quenching rate constant (k(q), accessibility parameter) of the residues in the GH loop is decreased approximately 38%, from 2.1 x 10(9) to 1.3 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). However, despite the significant changes in accessibilities for some residues in the AB loop, the average accessibility per residue remained unchanged (average k(q) = 1.2 M(-1) s(-1)). Accordingly, the low-pH transition induces conformational changes that reshuffle the accessibility profiles of the residues in the AB loop. A significant difference in the titration curves between the holo and apo forms of the W28 mutant suggests that the protonation states of the residues around position 28 modulate conformational switches of the AB loop relevant to ligand binding. PMID:20025287

  15. PH-dependent Conformational Changes in Tear Lipocalin by Site Directed Tryptophan Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Gasymov, Oktay K.; Abduragimov, Adil R.; Glasgow, Ben J.

    2010-01-01

    Tear lipocalin (TL), a major protein of human tears, binds a broad array of endogenous ligands. PH-dependent ligand binding in TL may have functional implications in tears. Previously, conformational selections of the loops AB and GH have been implicated in ligand binding by site-directed tryptophan fluorescence (SDTF). In this study, SDTF was applied on the loops AB and GH to investigate pH-driven conformational changes relevant to ligand binding. Both loops demonstrate significant but distinct conformational rearrangements over a wide pH range. In the low pH transition, from 7.3 to 3.0, residues of the loop GH show the decreased solvent accessibilities. In acrylamide quenching experiments, the average quenching rate constant (kq, accessibility parameter) of the residues in the loop GH is decreased about 38%, from 2.1×109 M−1s−1 to 1.3×109 M−1s−1. However, despite the significant changes in accessibilities for some residues in the loop AB, the average accessibility per residue remained unchanged (average kq= 1.2 M−1s−1). Accordingly, low pH transition induces conformational changes that reshuffle accessibility profiles of the residues in the loop AB. A significant difference in the titration curves between holo- and apo-forms of W28 mutant suggests that the protonation states of the residues around the position 28 modulate conformational switches of the loop AB relevant to ligand binding. PMID:20025287

  16. Nanosecond dynamics of influenza A/M2TM and an amantadine resistant mutant probed by time-dependent red shifts of a native tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, Vikas; Cristian, Lidia; Toptygin, Dmitri; Brand, Ludwig; DeGrado, William F.

    2013-08-01

    Proteins involved in functions such as electron transfer or ion transport must be capable of stabilizing transient charged species on time scales ranging from picoseconds to microseconds. We study the influenza A M2 proton channel, containing a tryptophan residue that serves as an essential part of the proton conduction pathway. We induce a transition dipole in tryptophan by photoexcitation, and then probe the dielectric stabilization of its excited state. The magnitude of the stabilization over this time regime was larger than that generally found for tryptophan in membrane or protein environments. M2 achieves a water-like stabilization over a 25 ns time scale, slower than that of bulk water, but sufficiently rapid to contribute to stabilization of charge as protons diffuse through the channel. These measurements should stimulate future MD studies to clarify the role of sidechain versus non-bulk water in defining the process of relaxation.

  17. Mechanobiology of interfacial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletta, P.; Preziosi, L.; Maugin, G. A.

    2013-03-01

    A multiscale analysis integrating biomechanics and mechanobiology is today required for deciphering the crosstalk between biochemistry, geometry and elasticity in living materials. In this paper we derive a unified thermomechanical theory coupling growth processes with mass transport phenomena across boundaries and/or material interfaces. Inside a living system made by two contiguous bodies with varying volumes, an interfacial growth mechanism is considered to force fast but continuous variations of the physical fields inside a narrow volume across the material interface. Such a phenomenon is modelled deriving homogenized surface fields on a growing non-material discontinuity, possibly including a singular edge line. A number of balance laws is derived for imposing the conservation of the thermomechanical properties of the biological system. From thermodynamical arguments we find that the normal displacement of the non-material interface is governed by the jump of a new form of material mechanical-energy flux, also involving the kinetic energies and the mass fluxes. Furthermore, the configurational balance indicates that the surface Eshelby tensor is the tangential stress measure driving the material inhomogeneities on the non-material interface. Accordingly, stress-dependent evolution laws for bulk and interfacial growth processes are derived for both volume and surface fields. The proposed thermomechanical theory is finally applied to three biological system models. The first two examples are focused on stress-free growth problems, concerning the morphogenesis of animal horns and of seashells. The third application finally deals with the stress-driven surface evolution of avascular tumours with heterogeneous structures. The results demonstrate that the proposed theory can successfully model those biological systems where growth and mass transport phenomena interact at different length-scales. Coupling biological, mechanical and geometrical factors, the proposed

  18. Tryptophan and ATTO 590: Mutual Fluorescence Quenching and Exciplex Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Ujjal; Beck, Christie; Winter, Arthur; Wells, Carson; Petrich, Jacob W

    2014-07-24

    Investigation of fluorescence quenching of probes, such as ATTO dyes, is becoming an increasingly important topic owing to the use of these dyes in super-resolution microscopies and in single-molecule studies. Photoinduced electron transfer is their most important nonradiative pathway. Because of the increasing frequency of the use of ATTO and related dyes to investigate biological systems, studies are presented for inter- and intramolecular quenching of ATTO 590 with tryptophan. In order to examine intramolecular quenching, an ATTO 590–tryptophan conjugate was synthesized. It was determined that tryptophan is efficiently quenching ATTO 590 fluorescence by excited-state charge transfer and two charge transfer complexes are forming. In addition, it was discovered that an exciplex (whose lifetime is 5.6 ns) can be formed between tryptophan and ATTO 590, and it is suggested that the possibility of such exciplex formation should be taken into account when protein fluorescence is monitored in a system tagged with ATTO dyes.

  19. Spectral and metal-binding properties of three single-point tryptophan mutants of the human transferrin N-lobe.

    PubMed Central

    He, Q Y; Mason, A B; Lyons, B A; Tam, B M; Nguyen, V; MacGillivray, R T; Woodworth, R C

    2001-01-01

    Human serum transferrin N-lobe (hTF/2N) contains three conserved tryptophan residues, Trp(8), Trp(128) and Trp(264), located in three different environments. The present report addresses the different contributions of the three tryptophan residues to the UV-visible, fluorescence and NMR spectra of hTF/2N and the effect of the mutations at each tryptophan residue on the iron-binding properties of the protein. Trp(8) resides in a hydrophobic box containing a cluster of three phenylalanine side chains and is H bonded through the indole N to an adjacent water cluster lying between two beta-sheets containing Trp(8) and Lys(296) respectively. The fluorescence of Trp(8) may be quenched by the benzene rings. The apparent increase in the rate of iron release from the Trp(8)-->Tyr mutant could be due to the interference of the mutation with the H-bond linkage resulting in an effect on the second shell network. The partial quenching in the fluorescence of Trp(128) results from the nearby His(119) residue. Difference-fluorescence spectra reveal that any protein containing Trp(128) shows a blue shift upon binding metal ion, and the NMR signal of Trp(128) broadens out and disappears upon the binding of paramagnetic metals to the protein. These data imply that Trp(128) is a major fluorescent and NMR reporter group for metal binding, and possibly for cleft closure in hTF/2N. Trp(264) is located on the surface of the protein and does not connect to any functional residues. This explains the facts that Trp(264) is the major contributor to both the absorbance and fluorescence spectra, has a strong NMR signal and the mutation at Trp(264) has little effect on the iron-binding and release behaviours of the protein. PMID:11171122

  20. Saturation mutagenesis on Arg244 of the tryptophan C4-prenyltransferase FgaPT2 leads to enhanced catalytic ability and different preferences for tryptophan-containing cyclic dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Fan, Aili; Li, Shu-Ming

    2016-06-01

    FgaPT2 from Aspergillus fumigatus catalyzes a Friedel-Crafts alkylation at C-4 of L-tryptophan and is involved in the biosynthesis of the ergot alkaloids fumigaclavines. Several tryptophan-containing cyclic dipeptides had also been prenylated by FgaPT2, but the turnover rate (k cat) was low. Here, we report the generation of FgaPT2 mutants by saturation mutagenesis at the amino acid residue Arg244 to improve its catalytic efficiency toward cyclic dipeptides. Thirteen mutated enzymes demonstrated up to 76-fold higher turnover number toward seven cyclic dipeptides than the non-mutated FgaPT2. More importantly, the mutated enzymes exhibited different preferences toward these substrates. This study provides a convenient approach for creation of new biocatalysts for production of C4-prenylated cyclic dipeptides. PMID:26875876

  1. Efficient Asymmetric Synthesis of Tryptophan Analogues Having Useful Photophysical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Talukder, Poulami; Chen, Shengxi; Arce, Pablo M.

    2014-01-01

    Two new fluorescent probes of protein structure and dynamics have been prepared by concise asymmetric syntheses using the Schöllkopf chiral auxiliary. The site-specific incorporation of one probe into dihydrofolate reductase is reported. The utility of these tryptophan derivatives lies in their absorption and emission maxima which differ from those of tryptophan, as well as in their large Stokes shifts and high molar absorptivities. PMID:24392870

  2. Tryptophan Biosynthesis in Cell Cultures of Nicotiana tabacum1

    PubMed Central

    Delmer, Deborah P.; Mills, S. E.

    1968-01-01

    Some of the general features of the pathway for l-tryptophan biosynthesis in cell cultures of Nicotiana tabccum var. Wisc. 38 have been investigated. The results of both isotope competition and direct-labeling experiments show that shikimic acid, anthranilic acid, indoleglycerol phosphate, and indole can serve as precursors to l-tryptophan in these cells, indicating that, in terms of its biochemical intermediates, the pathway is similar to that described for the bacteria and fungi. PMID:16656741

  3. Complexity in regulation of tryptophan biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Gollnick, Paul; Babitzke, Paul; Antson, Alfred; Yanofsky, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis uses novel regulatory mechanisms in controlling expression of its genes of tryptophan synthesis and transport. These mechanisms respond to changes in the intracellular concentrations of free tryptophan and uncharged tRNA(Trp). The major B. subtilis protein that regulates tryptophan biosynthesis is the tryptophan-activated RNA-binding attenuation protein, TRAP. TRAP is a ring-shaped molecule composed of 11 identical subunits. Active TRAP binds to unique RNA segments containing multiple trinucleotide (NAG) repeats. Binding regulates both transcription termination and translation in the trp operon, and translation of other coding regions relevant to tryptophan metabolism. When there is a deficiency of charged tRNA(Trp), B. subtilis forms an anti-TRAP protein, AT. AT antagonizes TRAP function, thereby increasing expression of all the genes regulated by TRAP. Thus B. subtilis and Escherichia coli respond to identical regulatory signals, tryptophan and uncharged tRNA(Trp), yet they employ different mechanisms in regulating trp gene expression. PMID:16285852

  4. Fluorescence quenching of (dimethylamino)naphthalene dyes Badan and Prodan by tryptophan in cytochromes P450 and micelles.

    PubMed

    Pospíšil, Petr; Luxem, Katja E; Ener, Maraia; Sýkora, Jan; Kocábová, Jana; Gray, Harry B; Vlček, Antonín; Hof, Martin

    2014-08-28

    Fluorescence of 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)-6-propionylnaphthalene dyes Badan and Prodan is quenched by tryptophan in Brij 58 micelles as well as in two cytochrome P450 proteins (CYP102, CYP119) with Badan covalently attached to a cysteine residue. Formation of nonemissive complexes between a dye molecule and tryptophan accounts for about 76% of the fluorescence intensity quenching in micelles, the rest is due to diffusive encounters. In the absence of tryptophan, fluorescence of Badan-labeled cytochromes decays with triexponential kinetics characterized by lifetimes of about 100 ps, 700-800 ps, and 3 ns. Site mutation of a histidine residue in the vicinity of the Badan label by tryptophan results in shortening of all three decay lifetimes. The relative amplitude of the fastest component increases at the expense of the two slower ones. The average quenching rate constants are 4.5 × 10(8) s(-1) (CYP102) and 3.7 × 10(8) s(-1) (CYP119), at 288 K. Cyclic voltammetry of Prodan in MeCN shows a reversible reduction peak at -1.85 V vs NHE that becomes chemically irreversible and shifts positively upon addition of water. A quasireversible reduction at -0.88 V was observed in an aqueous buffer (pH 7.3). The excited-state reduction potential of Prodan (and Badan) is estimated to vary from about +0.6 V (vs NHE) in polar aprotic media (MeCN) to approximately +1.6 V in water. Tryptophan quenching of Badan/Prodan fluorescence in CYPs and Brij 58 micelles is exergonic by ≤0.5 V and involves tryptophan oxidation by excited Badan/Prodan, coupled with a fast reaction between the reduced dye and water. Photoreduction is a new quenching mechanism for 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)-6-propionylnaphthalene dyes that are often used as solvatochromic polarity probes, FRET donors and acceptors, as well as reporters of solvation dynamics. PMID:25079965

  5. Investigation of the structural determinants of the intrinsic fluorescence emission of the trp repressor using single tryptophan mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Royer, C A

    1992-01-01

    The fluorescence decay properties of wild-type trp repressor (TR) have been characterized by carrying out a multi-emission wavelength study of the frequency response profiles. The decay is best analyzed in terms of a single exponential decay near 0.5 ns and a distribution of lifetimes centered near 3-4 ns. By comparing the recovered decay associated spectra and lifetime values with the structure of the repressor, tentative assignments of the two decay components recovered from the analysis to the two tryptophan residues, W19 and W99, of the protein have been made. These assignments consist of linking the short, red emitting component to emission from W99 and most of the longer bluer emitting lifetime distribution to emission from W19. Next, single tryptophan mutants of the repressor in which one of each of the tryptophan residues was substituted by phenylalanine were used to confirm the preliminary assignments, inasmuch as the 0.5-ns component is clearly due to emission from tryptophan 99, and much of the decay responsible for the recovered distribution emanates from tryptophan 19. The data demonstrate, however, that the decay of the wild-type protein is not completely resolvable due both to the large number of components in the wild-type emission (at least five) as well as to the fact that three of the five lifetime components are very close in value. The fluorescence decay of the wild-type decay is well described as a combination of the components found in each of the mutants. However, whereas the linear combination analysis of the 15 data sets (5 from the wild-type and each mutant) yields a good fit for the components recovered previously for the two mutants, the amplitudes of these components in the wild-type are not recovered in the expected ratios. Because of the dominance of the blue shifted emission in the wild-type protein, it is most likely that subtle structural differences in the wild-type as compared with the mutants, rather than energy transfer from

  6. Carboxyl terminal deletion analysis of tryptophan hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Mockus, S M; Kumer, S C; Vrana, K E

    1997-10-17

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of serotonin and participates (in a non-rate-limiting fashion) in melatonin biosynthesis. In rabbit, TPH exists as a tetramer of four identical 51007 dalton (444 amino acids) protein subunits. An intersubunit binding domain responsible for tetramer formation of TPH was identified by assessing the role of a carboxyl terminal leucine heptad and 4-3 hydrophobic repeat. These repeats are conserved in all of the aromatic amino acid hydroxylases and have been shown to be required for the assembly of tyrosine hydroxylase tetramers. Polymerase chain reaction was utilized to create three TPH carboxyl terminal deletions (C delta8, C delta12 and C delta17) that sequentially remove members of the leucine heptad and 4-3 hydrophobic repeat. Each deletion and full-length recombinant TPH was expressed in bacteria to obtain soluble enzyme extracts for subsequent activity and structural analysis. It was found that removal of 8, 12 or 17 amino acids from the carboxyl terminus of TPH did not significantly alter enzymatic activity when compared to full-length recombinant TPH. However, the macromolecular structure of the deletions was dramatically affected as determined by dimeric and monomeric profiles on size exclusion chromatography. It can be concluded that amino acids 428-444 (the C-terminal 17 amino acids) comprise an intersubunit binding domain that is required for tetramer formation of TPH, but that tetramer assembly is not essential for full enzymatic activity. PMID:9392522

  7. Fluorescence studies with malate dehydrogenase from rhizobium japonicum 3I1B-143 bacteroids: a two-tryptophan containing protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiron, Camillo A.; Eftink, Maurice R.; Waters, James K.; Emerich, David W.

    1990-05-01

    A number of fluorescence studies, both of trp residues and bound NADH, have been reported for porcine MDH. The large number of trp residues (6) complicates the interpretation of some studies. To circumvent this we have performed studies with a two tryptophan (per subunit) MDH from Rhizobium japonicum 311B-143 bacteroids. We have performed phase/modulation fluorescence lifetime measurements, as a function of temperature and added quencher KI, in order to resolved the 1.3 ns (blue) and 6.6 ns (red) contributions from the two classes of trp residues. Anisotropy decay studies have also been performed. The binding of NADH dynamically quenches the fluorescence of both tip residues, but, unlike mammalian cytoplasmic and mitochondrial MDH, there is not a large enhancement in fluorescence of bound NADH upon forming a ternary complex with either tartronic acid or D-malonate.

  8. Interfacial failure under thermal fatigue loading in multilayered MEMS structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maligno, A. R.; Whalley, D.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2010-06-01

    The reliability of MEMS, and in particular of RF MEMS switches, might be increased by the use of a Physics of Failure (PoF) methodology. A numerical study, based on the finite element method (FEM) and on the representative volume element (RVE) approach was performed to examine the effects of temperature dependent materials properties, temperature variations on failure (e.g. yielding of metals) and to predict interfacial damage in multilayered MEMS structures. The effect of residual stresses, due to electroplating processes of the metal layers was considered in these studies to investigate their effects on MEMS reliability. Numerical results have shown that interfacial damage is mainly concentrated at the plating-base/substrate interface and it is strongly influenced by the temperature dependent material properties and by the presence of residual stresses.

  9. Electronic structure analysis of glycine oligopeptides and glycine-tryptophan oligopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Yu, Shuai; Yang, Mengshi; Xu, Can; Wang, Yu; Chen, Liang

    2014-03-01

    Using the density functional theory (DFT), we have studied the energy gap, charge distribution, density of states and chemical activity of glycine (Gn) oligopeptides and glycine-tryptophan (GWn) oligopeptides. The results show that: (1) with the increasing of Gn residues, the chemical activity of Gn oligopeptides focuses on the terminal amino and carboxyl groups, which may be the main cause of self-assembly behaviors in Gn oligopeptide chains; (2) the chemical reaction activity has size effect. The size effect disappears when the residue number exceeds 7. The Gn oligopeptides with 7 residues is the shortest chain which has the same reaction activity as that of longer size peptide; (3) the activity of GWn oligopeptides presents size effect and odd-even effect. However, the size effect and odd-even effect both vanish when the chain of GWn oligopeptides is longer than 12 residues. (4) It is difficult in self-assembly for GWn oligopeptide chains, because its activity mainly focuses on the indole ring and the Gn residues at the end of oligopeptides. (5) The big side groups result in the very near energy level of LUMO and LUMO+1 of GWn oligopeptide chains. It shows that the electron-accepting ability of oligopeptide chainsis composed of two orbitals addition. The results in the paper may help us understand the changes of physical and chemical properties of peptide synthesis process.

  10. Dynamics of interfacial pattern formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1983-01-01

    A phenomenological model of dendritic solidification incorporating interfacial kinetics, crystalline anisotropy, and a local approximation for the dynamics of the thermal diffusion field is proposed. The preliminary results are in qualitative agreement with natural dendrite-like pattern formation.

  11. Characterization of F-Actin Tryptophan Phosphorescence in the Presence and Absence of Tryptophan-Free Myosin Motor Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bódis, Emöke; Strambini, Giovanni B.; Gonnelli, Margherita; Málnási-Csizmadia, András; Somogyi, Béla

    2004-01-01

    The effect of binding the Trp-free motor domain mutant of Dictyostelium discoideum, rabbit skeletal muscle myosin S1, and tropomyosin on the dynamics and conformation of actin filaments was characterized by an analysis of steady-state tryptophan phosphorescence spectra and phosphorescence decay kinetics over a temperature range of 140–293 K. The binding of the Trp-free motor domain mutant of D. discoideum to actin caused red shifts in the phosphorescence spectrum of two internal Trp residues of actin and affected the intrinsic lifetime of each emitter, decreasing by roughly twofold the short phosphorescence lifetime components (τ1 and τ2) and increasing by ∼20% the longest component (τ3). The alteration of actin phosphorescence by the motor protein suggests that i), structural changes occur deep down in the core of actin and that ii), subtle changes in conformation appear also on the surface but in regions distant from the motor domain binding site. When actin formed complexes with skeletal S1, an extra phosphorescence lifetime component appeared (τ4, twice as long as τ3) in the phosphorescence decay that is absent in the isolated proteins. The lack of this extra component in the analogous actin-Trp-free motor domain mutant of D. discoideum complex suggests that it should be assigned to Trps in S1 that in the complex attain a more compact local structure. Our data indicated that the binding of tropomyosin to actin filaments had no effect on the structure or flexibility of actin observable by this technique. PMID:15298917

  12. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  13. Structural basis for the binding of tryptophan-based motifs by δ-COP

    PubMed Central

    Suckling, Richard J.; Poon, Pak Phi; Travis, Sophie M.; Majoul, Irina V.; Hughson, Frederick M.; Evans, Philip R.; Duden, Rainer; Owen, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Coatomer consists of two subcomplexes: the membrane-targeting, ADP ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1):GTP-binding βγδζ-COP F-subcomplex, which is related to the adaptor protein (AP) clathrin adaptors, and the cargo-binding αβ’ε-COP B-subcomplex. We present the structure of the C-terminal μ-homology domain of the yeast δ-COP subunit in complex with the WxW motif from its binding partner, the endoplasmic reticulum-localized Dsl1 tether. The motif binds at a site distinct from that used by the homologous AP μ subunits to bind YxxΦ cargo motifs with its two tryptophan residues sitting in compatible pockets. We also show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Arf GTPase-activating protein (GAP) homolog Gcs1p uses a related WxxF motif at its extreme C terminus to bind to δ-COP at the same site in the same way. Mutations designed on the basis of the structure in conjunction with isothermal titration calorimetry confirm the mode of binding and show that mammalian δ-COP binds related tryptophan-based motifs such as that from ArfGAP1 in a similar manner. We conclude that δ-COP subunits bind Wxn(1–6)[WF] motifs within unstructured regions of proteins that influence the lifecycle of COPI-coated vesicles; this conclusion is supported by the observation that, in the context of a sensitizing domain deletion in Dsl1p, mutating the tryptophan-based motif-binding site in yeast causes defects in both growth and carboxypeptidase Y trafficking/processing. PMID:26578768

  14. Relationship Between Casting Distortion, Mold Filling, and Interfacial Heat Transfer in Sand Molds

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Parker; K. A. Woodbury; T. S. Piwonka; Y. Owusu

    1999-09-30

    This project sought to determine the relationship between casting dimensions and interfacial heat transfer in aluminum alloy sand castings. The program had four parts; measurement of interfacial heat transfer coefficients in resin bonded and green sand molds, the measurement of gap formation in these molds, the analysis of castings made in varying gatings, orientations and thicknesses, and the measurement of residual stresses in castings in the as-cast and gate removed condition. New values for interfacial heat transfer coefficients were measured, a novel method for gap formation was developed, and the variation of casting dimensions with casting method, gating, and casting orientation in the mold was documented.

  15. Disturbed Tryptophan Metabolism in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mangge, H.; Stelzer, I.; Reininghaus, E.; Weghuber, D.; Postolache, T.T.; Fuchs, D.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS), a major pathologic consequence of obesity, is the main etiological factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is the most common cause of death in the western world. A systemic chronic low grade immune-mediated inflammation (scLGI) is substantially implicated in AS and its consequences. In particular, pro-inflammatory cytokines play a major role, with Th1-type cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) being a key mediator. Among various other molecular and cellular effects, IFN- γ activates the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in monocyte-derived macrophages, dendritic, and other cells, which, in turn, decreases serum levels of the essential amino acid tryptophan (TRP). Thus, people with CVD often have increased serum kynurenine to tryptophan ratios (KYN/TRP), a result of an increased TRP breakdown. Importantly, increased KYN/TRP is associated with a higher likelihood of fatal cardiovascular events. A scLGI with increased production of the proinflammatory adipokine leptin, in combination with IFN-γ and interleukin-6 (IL-6), represents another central link between obesity, AS, and CVD. Leptin has also been shown to contribute to Th1-type immunity shifting, with abdominal fat being thus a direct contributor to KYN/TRP ratio. However, TRP is not only an important source for protein production but also for the generation of one of the most important neurotransmitters, 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin), by the tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent TRP 5-hydroxylase. In prolonged states of scLGI, availability of free serum TRP is strongly diminished, affecting serotonin synthesis, particularly in the brain. Additionally, accumulation of neurotoxic KYN metabolites such as quinolinic acid produced by microglia, can contribute to the development of depression via NMDA glutamatergic stimulation. Depression had been reported to be associated with CVD endpoints, but it most likely represents only a secondary loop connecting excess adipose tissue, scLGI and

  16. Comparison of fractal dimension and Shannon entropy in myocytes from rats treated with histidine-tryptophan-glutamate and histidine-tryptophan cetoglutarate

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; dos Santos, Carlos Alberto; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseni; Cortez, José Luís Lasso; de Godoy, Moacir Fernandes; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Solutions that cause elective cardiac arrest are constantly evolving, but the ideal compound has not yet been found. The authors compare a new cardioplegic solution with histidine-tryptophan-glutamate (Group 2) and other one with histidine-tryptophan-cetoglutarate (Group 1) in a model of isolated rat heart. Objective To quantify the fractal dimension and Shannon entropy in rat myocytes subjected to cardioplegia solution using histidine-tryptophan with glutamate in an experimental model, considering the caspase markers, IL-8 and KI-67. Methods Twenty male Wistar rats were anesthetized and heparinized. The chest was opened, the heart was withdrawn and 40 ml/kg of cardioplegia (with histidine-tryptophan-cetoglutarate or histidine-tryptophan-glutamate solution) was infused. The hearts were kept for 2 hours at 4ºC in the same solution, and thereafter placed in the Langendorff apparatus for 30 min with Ringer-Locke solution. Analyzes were performed for immunohistochemical caspase, IL-8 and KI-67. Results The fractal dimension and Shannon entropy were not different between groups histidine-tryptophan-glutamate and histidine-tryptophan-acetoglutarate. Conclusion The amount of information measured by Shannon entropy and the distribution thereof (given by fractal dimension) of the slices treated with histidine-tryptophan-cetoglutarate and histidine-tryptophan-glutamate were not different, showing that the histidine-tryptophan-glutamate solution is as good as histidine-tryptophan-acetoglutarate to preserve myocytes in isolated rat heart. PMID:25140464

  17. Tryptophan metabolism, disposition and utilization in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Abdulla A.-B.

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) requirements in pregnancy are several-fold: (1) the need for increased protein synthesis by mother and for fetal growth and development; (2) serotonin (5-HT) for signalling pathways; (3) kynurenic acid (KA) for neuronal protection; (4) quinolinic acid (QA) for NAD+ synthesis (5) other kynurenines (Ks) for suppressing fetal rejection. These goals could not be achieved if maternal plasma [Trp] is depleted. Although plasma total (free + albumin-bound) Trp is decreased in pregnancy, free Trp is elevated. The above requirements are best expressed in terms of a Trp utilization concept. Briefly, Trp is utilized as follows: (1) In early and mid-pregnancy, emphasis is on increased maternal Trp availability to meet the demand for protein synthesis and fetal development, most probably mediated by maternal liver Trp 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) inhibition by progesterone and oestrogens. (2) In mid- and late pregnancy, Trp availability is maintained and enhanced by the release of albumin-bound Trp by albumin depletion and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) elevation, leading to increased flux of Trp down the K pathway to elevate immunosuppressive Ks. An excessive release of free Trp could undermine pregnancy by abolishing T-cell suppression by Ks. Detailed assessment of parameters of Trp metabolism and disposition and related measures (free and total Trp, albumin, NEFA, K and its metabolites and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in maternal blood and, where appropriate, placental and fetal material) in normal and abnormal pregnancies may establish missing gaps in our knowledge of the Trp status in pregnancy and help identify appropriate intervention strategies. PMID:26381576

  18. Smart interfacial bonding alloys

    SciTech Connect

    R. Q. Hwang; J. C. Hamilton; J. E. Houston

    1999-04-01

    The goal of this LDRD was to explore the use of the newly discovered strain-stabilized 2-D interfacial alloys as smart interface bonding alloys (SIBA). These materials will be used as templates for the heteroepitaxial growth of metallic thin films. SIBA are formed by two metallic components which mix at an interface to relieve strain and prevent dislocations from forming in subsequent thin film growth. The composition of the SIBA is determined locally by the amount of strain, and therefore can react smartly to areas of the highest strain to relieve dislocations. In this way, SIBA can be used to tailor the dislocation structure of thin films. This project included growth, characterization and modeling of films grown using SIBA templates. Characterization will include atomic imaging of the dislocations structure, measurement of the mechanical properties of the film using interface force microscopy (IFM) and the nanoindenter, and measurement of the electronic structure of the SIBA with synchrotron photoemission. Resistance of films to sulfidation and oxidation will also be examined. The Paragon parallel processing computer will be used to calculate the structure of the SIBA and thin films in order to develop ability to predict and tailor SIBA and thin film behavior. This work will lead to the possible development of a new class of thin film materials with properties tailored by varying the composition of the SIBA, serving as a buffer layer to relieve the strain between the substrate and the thin film. Such films will have improved mechanical and corrosion resistance allowing application as protective barriers for weapons applications. They will also exhibit enhanced electrical conductivity and reduced electromigration making them particularly suitable for application as interconnects and other electronic needs.

  19. Surface geometry of tryptophan adsorbed on gold colloidal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Shafqat; Pang, Yoonsoo

    2015-09-01

    Two distinct surface-enhanced Raman (SER) spectra of tryptophan depending on the surface adsorption geometry were obtained by using colloidal gold nanoparticles reduced by borohydride and citrate ions. According to the vibrational assignments based on DFT simulations, the SER spectra of tryptamine and 3-indolepropionic acid, and the pH dependence of tryptophan SER spectrum, we found that some indole ring vibrations are very sensitive to the surface adsorption geometry of the molecules. With citrate-reduced gold colloids, tryptophan and related molecules mainly adsorb via the protonated amine group while maintaining a perpendicular geometry of the indole ring to the surface. However, a flat geometry of the indole ring to the surface is preferred on the borohydride-reduced gold colloids where the surface adsorption occurs mainly through the indole ring π electrons. By comparing our results with previous reports on the SER spectra of tryptophan on various silver and gold surfaces, we propose a general adsorption model of tryptophan on metal nanosurfaces.

  20. Tryptophan-Catabolizing Enzymes – Party of Three

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Helen J.; Jusof, Felicita F.; Bakmiwewa, Supun M.; Hunt, Nicholas H.; Yuasa, Hajime J.

    2014-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) are tryptophan-degrading enzymes that have independently evolved to catalyze the first step in tryptophan catabolism via the kynurenine pathway (KP). The depletion of tryptophan and formation of KP metabolites modulates the activity of the mammalian immune, reproductive, and central nervous systems. IDO and TDO enzymes can have overlapping or distinct functions depending on their expression patterns. The expression of TDO and IDO enzymes in mammals differs not only by tissue/cellular localization but also by their induction by distinct stimuli. To add to the complexity, these genes also have undergone duplications in some organisms leading to multiple isoforms of IDO or TDO. For example, many vertebrates, including all mammals, have acquired two IDO genes via gene duplication, although the IDO1-like gene has been lost in some lower vertebrate lineages. Gene duplications can allow the homologs to diverge and acquire different properties to the original gene. There is evidence for IDO enzymes having differing enzymatic characteristics, signaling properties, and biological functions. This review analyzes the evolutionary convergence of IDO and TDO enzymes as tryptophan-catabolizing enzymes and the divergent evolution of IDO homologs to generate an enzyme family with diverse characteristics not possessed by TDO enzymes, with an emphasis on the immune system. PMID:25346733

  1. Chemically defined media modifications to lower tryptophan oxidation of biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hazeltine, Laurie B; Knueven, Kristine M; Zhang, Yan; Lian, Zhirui; Olson, Donald J; Ouyang, Anli

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of biopharmaceuticals is a major product quality issue with potential impacts on activity and immunogenicity. At Eli Lilly and Company, high tryptophan oxidation was observed for two biopharmaceuticals in development produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells. A switch from historical hydrolysate-containing media to chemically defined media with a reformulated basal powder was thought to be responsible, so mitigation efforts focused on media modification. Shake flask studies identified that increasing tryptophan, copper, and manganese and decreasing cysteine concentrations were individual approaches to lower tryptophan oxidation. When amino acid and metal changes were combined, the modified formulation had a synergistic impact that led to substantially less tryptophan oxidation for both biopharmaceuticals. Similar results were achieved in shake flasks and benchtop bioreactors, demonstrating the potential to implement these modifications at manufacturing scale. The modified formulation did not negatively impact cell growth and viability, product titer, purity, charge variants, or glycan profile. A potential mechanism of action is presented for each amino acid or metal factor based on its role in oxidation chemistry. This work served not only to mitigate the tryptophan oxidation issue in two Lilly biopharmaceuticals in development, but also to increase our knowledge and appreciation for the impact of media components on product quality. PMID:26560440

  2. NADP(+) binding effects tryptophan accessibility, folding and stability of recombinant B. malayi G6PD.

    PubMed

    Verma, Anita; Chandra, Sharat; Suthar, Manish Kumar; Doharey, Pawan Kumar; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Saxena, Jitendra Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Brugia malayi Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase apoenzyme (BmG6PD) was expressed and purified by affinity chromatography to study the differences in kinetic properties of enzyme and the effect of the cofactor NADP(+) binding on enzyme stability. The presence of cofactor NADP(+) influenced the tertiary structure of enzyme due to significant differences in the tryptophan microenvironment. However, NADP(+) binding have no effect on secondary structure of the enzyme. Quenching with acrylamide indicated that two or more tryptophan residues became accessible upon cofactor binding. Unfolding and cross linking study of BmG6PD showed that NADP(+) stabilized the protein in presence of high concentration of urea/GdmCl. A homology model of BmG6PD constructed using human G6PD (PDB id: 2BH9) as a template indicated 34% α-helix, 19% β-sheet and 47% random coil conformations in the predicted model of the enzyme. In the predicted model binding of NADP(+) to BmG6PD was less tight with the structural sites (-10.96kJ/mol binding score) as compared with the coenzyme site (-15.47kJ/mol binding score). PMID:26763177

  3. Molecular Insights into Substrate Recognition and Catalysis by Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Forouhar,F.; Ross Anderson, J.; Mowat, C.; Vorobiev, S.; Hussain, A.; Abashidze, M.; Bruckmann, C.; Thackray, S.; Seetharaman, J.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) constitute an important, yet relatively poorly understood, family of heme-containing enzymes. Here, we report extensive structural and biochemical studies of the Xanthomonas campestris TDO and a related protein SO4414 from Shewanella oneidensis, including the structure at 1.6-{angstrom} resolution of the catalytically active, ferrous form of TDO in a binary complex with the substrate l-Trp. The carboxylate and ammonium moieties of tryptophan are recognized by electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions with the enzyme and a propionate group of the heme, thus defining the l-stereospecificity. A second, possibly allosteric, l-Trp-binding site is present at the tetramer interface. The sixth coordination site of the heme-iron is vacant, providing a dioxygen-binding site that would also involve interactions with the ammonium moiety of l-Trp and the amide nitrogen of a glycine residue. The indole ring is positioned correctly for oxygenation at the C2 and C3 atoms. The active site is fully formed only in the binary complex, and biochemical experiments confirm this induced-fit behavior of the enzyme. The active site is completely devoid of water during catalysis, which is supported by our electrochemical studies showing significant stabilization of the enzyme upon substrate binding.

  4. Catalytic roles of βLys87 in tryptophan synthase: (15)N solid state NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Caulkins, Bethany G; Yang, Chen; Hilario, Eduardo; Fan, Li; Dunn, Michael F; Mueller, Leonard J

    2015-09-01

    The proposed mechanism for tryptophan synthase shows βLys87 playing multiple catalytic roles: it bonds to the PLP cofactor, activates C4' for nucleophilic attack via a protonated Schiff base nitrogen, and abstracts and returns protons to PLP-bound substrates (i.e. acid-base catalysis). ε-¹⁵N-lysine TS was prepared to access the protonation state of βLys87 using ¹⁵N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy for three quasi-stable intermediates along the reaction pathway. These experiments establish that the protonation state of the ε-amino group switches between protonated and neutral states as the β-site undergoes conversion from one intermediate to the next during catalysis, corresponding to mechanistic steps where this lysine residue has been anticipated to play alternating acid and base catalytic roles that help steer reaction specificity in tryptophan synthase catalysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications. Guest Editors: Andrea Mozzarelli and Loredano Pollegioni. PMID:25688830

  5. Importance of Tryptophan in Transforming an Amphipathic Peptide into a Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Targeted Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xin; Ma, Zhi; Wang, Jiajun; Chou, Shuli; Shan, Anshan

    2014-01-01

    Here, we found that simple substitution of amino acids in the middle position of the hydrophobic face of an amphipathic peptide RI16 with tryptophan (T9W) considerably transformed into an antimicrobial peptide specifically targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) results demonstrated that T9W had a strong and specifically antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa, including antibiotic-resistant strains, but was not active against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphyfococcus epidermidis. Fluorescent spectroscopic assays indicated that T9W interacted with the membrane of P. aeruginosa, depolarizing the outer and the inner membrane of bacterial cells. Salt susceptibility assay showed that T9W still maintained its strong anti-pseudomonas activity in the presence of salts at physiological concentrations, and in hemolytic and MTT assays T9W also showed no toxicity against human blood cells and macrophages. In vivo assay demonstrated that T9W also displayed no toxicity to Chinese Kun Ming (KM) mice. Furthermore, the strong antibiofilm activity was also observed with the peptide T9W, which decreased the percentage of biomass formation in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, these findings indicated that design of single-pathogen antimicrobial agents can be achieved by simple amino acid mutation in naturally occurring peptide sequences and this study suggested a model of optimization/design of anti-pseudomonas drugs in which the tryptophan residue was a conserved element. PMID:25494332

  6. Evidence of energy transfer from tryptophan to BSA/HSA protected gold nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, Sangram; Chib, Rahul; Butler, Susan; Borejdo, Julian; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2014-09-01

    This work reports on the chromophores interactions within protein-protected gold nanoclusters. We conducted spectroscopic studies of fluorescence emissions originated from gold nanoclusters and intrinsic tryptophan (Trp) in BSA or HSA proteins. Both steady state fluorescence and lifetime measurements showed a significant Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) from Trp to the gold nanocluster. Tryptophan lifetimes in the case of protein-protected gold nanoclusters are 2.6 ns and 2.3 ns for BSA and HSA Au clusters while 5.8 ns for native BSA and 5.6 for native HSA. The apparent distances from Trp to gold nanocluster emission center, we estimated as 24.75 Å for BSA and 23.80 Å for HSA. We also studied a potassium iodide (KI) quenching of protein-protected gold nanoclusters and compared with the quenching of BSA and HSA alone. The rates of Trp quenching were smaller in BSA-Au and HSA-Au nanoclusters than in the case of free proteins, which is consistent with shorter lifetime of quenched Trp(s) and lower accessibility for KI. While Trp residues were quenched by KI, the emissions originated from nanoclusters were practically unquenched. In summary, for BSA and HSA Au clusters, we found 55% and 59% energy transfer efficiency respectively from tryoptophan to gold clusters. We believe this interaction can be used to our advantage in terms of developing resonance energy transfer based sensing applications.

  7. The location of tryptophan, N-acetyltryptophan and alpha-chymotrypsin in reverse micelles of AOT: a fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Andrade, S M; Costa, S M

    2000-10-01

    The spectroscopic properties of alpha-chymotrypsin (alpha-Chym), L-tryptophan (Trp) and N-acetyl-L-tryptophan (NAT) solubilized in hydrated reverse micelles of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate in iso-octane were followed by fluorescence as a function of the amount of intramicellar water and initial pH. The lack of pH dependence observed for Trp in these systems, as opposed to what occurs in bulk water, and the similarities found for the protein in both media foresee different locations of these probes. In reverse micelles, fluorescence quenching studies using acrylamide emphasize the existence of structural alterations within the protein when its global charge changes from positive (pH = 7) to negative (pH = 10). The ensemble of the data points to an interfacial location of the zwitterionic Trp, an intermediate region of less tightly bound water for the location of the anionic Trp and NAT and an almost bulk water environment for alpha-Chym. PMID:11045712

  8. Tryptophan hydroxylase-1 regulates immune tolerance and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Elizabeth C; de Vries, Victor C; Wasiuk, Anna; Ahonen, Cory; Bennett, Kathryn A; Le Mercier, Isabelle; Ha, Dae-Gon; Noelle, Randolph J

    2012-10-22

    Nutrient deprivation based on the loss of essential amino acids by catabolic enzymes in the microenvironment is a critical means to control inflammatory responses and immune tolerance. Here we report the novel finding that Tph-1 (tryptophan hydroxylase-1), a synthase which catalyses the conversion of tryptophan to serotonin and exhausts tryptophan, is a potent regulator of immunity. In models of skin allograft tolerance, tumor growth, and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, Tph-1 deficiency breaks allograft tolerance, induces tumor remission, and intensifies neuroinflammation, respectively. All of these effects of Tph-1 deficiency are independent of its downstream product serotonin. Because mast cells (MCs) appear to be the major source of Tph-1 and restoration of Tph-1 in the MC compartment in vivo compensates for the defect, these experiments introduce a fundamentally new mechanism of MC-mediated immune suppression that broadly impacts multiple arms of immunity. PMID:23008335

  9. Synthesis of β-Branched Tryptophan Analogues Using an Engineered Subunit of Tryptophan Synthase.

    PubMed

    Herger, Michael; van Roye, Paul; Romney, David K; Brinkmann-Chen, Sabine; Buller, Andrew R; Arnold, Frances H

    2016-07-13

    We report that l-threonine may substitute for l-serine in the β-substitution reaction of an engineered subunit of tryptophan synthase from Pyrococcus furiosus, yielding (2S,3S)-β-methyltryptophan (β-MeTrp) in a single step. The trace activity of the wild-type β-subunit on this substrate was enhanced more than 1000-fold by directed evolution. Structural and spectroscopic data indicate that this increase is correlated with stabilization of the electrophilic aminoacrylate intermediate. The engineered biocatalyst also reacts with a variety of indole analogues and thiophenol for diastereoselective C-C, C-N, and C-S bond-forming reactions. This new activity circumvents the 3-enzyme pathway that produces β-MeTrp in nature and offers a simple and expandable route to preparing derivatives of this valuable building block. PMID:27355405

  10. Tryptophan Supplementation and Postoperative Delirium – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Thomas N.; Dunn, Christina L.; Adams, Jill C.; Hawkins, Carrie L.; Tran, Zung V.; Raeburn, Christopher D.; Moss, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Tryptophan deficiency has been associated with increased incidence of postoperative delirium. Therefore, we hypothesized that the post-operative administration of tryptophan would be beneficial for elderly surgical patients who are at higher risk of developing post-operative delirium. Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial. Setting: Participants A total of 325 individuals aged 60 years and older undergoing major elective operations requiring a postoperative intensive care unit admission. Intervention L-tryptophan, 1 gram orally, three times daily or placebo was started following the operation and continued for up to three days postoperatively. Measurements Delirium and its motor subtypes were measured using the Confusion Assessment Method-ICU and the Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale. The primary outcome for between groups comparison was the incidence of excitatory (mixed and hyperactive) postoperative delirium. The secondary outcomes for comparison were the incidence and duration of overall postoperative delirium. Results The overall incidence of postoperative delirium was 39% (116) (95% confidence interval 34% to 44%). The percentages of patients with excitatory delirium in the tryptophan and placebo groups were 17% and 9% (p=0.176), and the duration of excitatory delirium was 3.3±1.7 and 3.1±1.9 days (p=0.741). The percentage of patients with overall delirium in the tryptophan and placebo groups was 40% and 37% (p=0.597), and the duration of overall delirium was 2.9±1.8 and 2.4±1.6 days (p=0.167). Conclusion Postoperative tryptophan supplementation in older adults undergoing major elective operations requiring postoperative intensive care unit admission demonstrated no efficacy in reducing the incidence of postoperative excitatory delirium or overall delirium, and the duration of excitatory or overall delirium. PMID:25112175

  11. Maintenance valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan requirements for poultry.

    PubMed

    de Lima, M B; Sakomura, N K; Dorigam, J C P; da Silva, E P; Ferreira, N T; Fernandes, J B K

    2016-04-01

    Poultry maintenance requirements for valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan were measured by nitrogen balance using different unit systems. The nitrogen balance trial lasted 5 d with 48 h of fasting (with roosters receiving only water+sucrose) and the last 72 h for feeding and excreta collection. Forty grams of each diet first-limiting in valine, isoleucine, or tryptophan was fed by tube each day (3 d) to give a range of intakes from 0 to 101, 0 to 119, and 0 to 34 mg/kg BW d of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan, respectively. A nitrogen-free diet containing energy, vitamins, and minerals, meeting the rooster requirements, was offered ad libitum during these three d. To confirm that the amino acids studied were limiting, a treatment was added with a control diet formulated by adding 0.24 g/kg of L-valine, 0.21 g/kg of L-isoleucine, and 0.10 g/kg of L-tryptophan to the diets with lower amino acid level. Excreta were collected during the last 3 d of the balance period and the nitrogen content of the excreta was analyzed. For each amino acid, a linear regression between nitrogen retention (NR) and amino acid intake was performed. The equations from linear regression were: NR=-98.6 (±10.1)+2.4 (±0.2)×Val, NR=-46.9 (±7.1)+2.3 (±0.1)×Ile, NR=-39.5 (±7.7)+7.3 (±0.4)×Trp; where Val, Ile, and Trp are the intakes of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan in mg/kg body weight per d, respectively. The valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan required to maintain the body at zero NR were calculated to be 41, 20, and 5 mg/kg body weight per d, respectively. For the system unit mg per kg of metabolic weight, the intake of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan was 59, 32, and 9, respectively. Considering the degree of maturity of the animal and body protein content (BPm (0.73)×u), the amounts of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan required for maintenance were calculated to be 247, 134, and 37 mg per unit of maintenance protein (BPm (0.73)×u) per d. Maintenance requirement is more

  12. Dynamic behavior in mathematical models of the tryptophan operon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillán, Moisés; Mackey, Michael C.

    2001-03-01

    This paper surveys the general theory of operon regulation as first formulated by Goodwin and Griffith, and then goes on to consider in detail models of regulation of tryptophan production by Bliss, Sinha, and Santillán and Mackey, and the interrelationships between them. We further give a linear stability analysis of the Santillán and Mackey model for wild type E. coli as well as three different mutant strains that have been previously studied in the literature. This stability analysis indicates that the tryptophan production systems should be stable, which is in accord with our numerical results.

  13. Time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence in photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godik, V. I.; Blankenship, R. E.; Causgrove, T. P.; Woodbury, N.

    1993-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence of reaction centers isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, both stationary and time-resolved, was studied. Fluorescence kinetics were found to fit best a sum of four discrete exponential components. Half of the initial amplitude was due to a component with a lifetime of congruent to 60 ps, belonging to Trp residues, capable of efficient transfer of excitation energy to bacteriochlorophyll molecules of the reaction center. The three other components seem to be emitted by Trp ground-state conformers, unable to participate in such a transfer. Under the influence of intense actinic light, photooxidizing the reaction centers, the yield of stationary fluorescence diminished by congruent to 1.5 times, while the number of the kinetic components and their life times remained practically unchanged. Possible implications of the observed effects for the primary photosynthesis events are considered.

  14. Features of MotA proton channel structure revealed by tryptophan-scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, L L; Zhou, J; Blair, D F

    1995-01-01

    The MotA protein of Escherichia coli is a component of the flagellar motors that functions in transmembrane proton conduction. Here, we report several features of MotA structure revealed by use of a mutagenesis-based approach. Single tryptophan residues were introduced at many positions within the four hydrophobic segments of MotA, and the effects on function were measured. Function was disrupted according to a periodic pattern that implies that the membrane-spanning segments are alpha-helices and that identifies the lipid-facing parts of each helix. The results support a hypothesis for MotA structure and mechanism in which water molecules form most of the proton-conducting pathway. The success of this approach in studying MotA suggests that it could be useful in structure-function studies of other integral membrane proteins. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7644518

  15. Properties of the Mechanosensitive Channel MscS Pore Revealed by Tryptophan Scanning Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial mechanosensitive channels gate when the transmembrane turgor rises to levels that compromise the structural integrity of the cell wall. Gating creates a transient large diameter pore that allows hydrated solutes to pass from the cytoplasm at rates close to those of diffusion. In the closed conformation, the channel limits transmembrane solute movement, even that of protons. In the MscS crystal structure (Protein Data Bank entry 2oau), a narrow, hydrophobic opening is visible in the crystal structure, and it has been proposed that a vapor lock created by the hydrophobic seals, L105 and L109, is the barrier to water and ions. Tryptophan scanning mutagenesis has proven to be a highly valuable tool for the analysis of channel structure. Here Trp residues were introduced along the pore-forming TM3a helix and in selected other parts of the protein. Mutants were investigated for their expression, stability, and activity and as fluorescent probes of the physical properties along the length of the pore. Most Trp mutants were expressed at levels similar to that of the parent (MscS YFF) and were stable as heptamers in detergent in the presence and absence of urea. Fluorescence data suggest a long hydrophobic region with low accessibility to aqueous solvents, extending from L105/L109 to G90. Steady-state fluorescence anisotropy data are consistent with significant homo-Förster resonance energy transfer between tryptophan residues from different subunits within the narrow pore. The data provide new insights into MscS structure and gating. PMID:26126964

  16. Application of Time-Resolved Tryptophan Phosphorescence Spectroscopy to Protein Folding Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Vinod

    This thesis presents studies of the protein folding problem, one of the most significant questions in contemporary biophysics. Sensitive biophysical techniques, including room temperature tryptophan phosphorescence, which reports on the local environment of the residue, and the lability of proteins to denaturation, a global parameter, were used to assess the validity of the traditional assumption that the biologically active state of a protein is the 'native' state, and to determine whether the pathways of folding in vitro lead to the folded state achieved in vivo. Phosphorescence techniques have also been extended to study, for the first time, emission from tryptophan residues engineered into specific positions as reporters of protein structure. During in vitro refolding of E. coli alkaline phosphatase and bovine 13-lactoglobulin, significant differences were found between the refolded proteins and the native conformations, which have no apparent effect on the biological functions. Slow conformational transitions, termed 'annealing,' that occur long after the return of enzyme activity of alkaline phosphatase are manifested in the retarded recovery of phosphorescence intensity, lifetime, and protein lability. While 'annealing' is not observed for beta -lactoglobulin, both phosphorescence and lability experiments reveal changes in the structure of the refolded protein, even though its biological activity, retinol binding, is fully recovered. This result suggests that the pathways of folding in vitro need not lead to the structure formed in vivo. We have used phosphorescence techniques to study the refolding of ribonuclease T1, which exhibits slow kinetics characteristic of proline isomerization. Furthermore, the ability to extract structural information from phosphorescent tryptophan probes engineered into selected regions represents an important advance in studying protein structure; we have reported the first such results from a mutant staphylococcal nuclease. The

  17. Evaluation of the interfacial mechanical properties in fiber-reinforced ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ferber, M.K.; Wereszczak, A.A.; Riester, L.; Lowden, R.A.; Chawla, K.K.

    1993-06-01

    The present study examined the application of a micro-indentation technique to the measurement of interfacial properties in fiber reinforced ceramic composites. Specific fiber/matrix systems included SiC/glass, SiC/macro-defect-free (MDF) cement, SiC/SiC, and mullite/glass. The effect of fiber coatings upon the interfacial properties was also investigated. These properties, which included the debond strength, interfacial shear stress, and residual axial fiber stress, were evaluated by measuring the force-displacement curves generated during load-unload cycles. Estimates of these three stress values were obtained by matching the experimental force-displacement curves with data predicted from an existing model. In general the SiC/glass composites exhibited the lowest values of the interfacial shear and debond stresses. The sliding characteristics of the SiC/MDF cement and SiC/SiC composites were strongly influenced by the residual axial stress and the nature of the fiber coating. In the case of the mullite/glass composite, the high values of the interfacial shear and debond stresses reduced the measurement sensitivity, thereby increasing the uncertainty in the estimates of the interfacial properties. 17 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab.

  18. Modeling operon dynamics: the tryptophan and lactose operons as paradigms.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Michael C; Santillán, Moisés; Yildirim, Necmettin

    2004-03-01

    Understanding the regulation of gene control networks and their ensuing dynamics will be a critical component in the understanding of the mountain of genomic data being currently collected. This paper reviews recent mathematical modeling work on the tryptophan and lactose operons which are, respectively, the classical paradigms for repressible and inducible operons. PMID:15127892

  19. Association between Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 Gene Polymorphism and Completed Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fudalej, Sylwia; Ilgen, Mark; Fudalej, Marcin; Kostrzewa, Grazyna; Barry, Kristen; Wojnar, Marcin; Krajewski, Pawel; Blow, Frederic; Ploski, Rafal

    2010-01-01

    The association between suicide and a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs1386483) was examined in the recently identified tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) gene. Blood samples of 143 suicide victims and 162 age- and sex-matched controls were examined. The frequency of the TT genotype in the TPH2 polymorphism was higher in suicide victims than in…

  20. Tryptophan-based Fluorophores for Studying Protein Conformational Changes

    PubMed Central

    Talukder, Poulami; Chen, Shengxi; Liu, C. Tony; Baldwin, Edwin A.; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Hecht, Sidney M.

    2014-01-01

    With the continuing interest in deciphering the interplay between protein function and conformational changes, small fluorescence probes will be especially useful for tracking changes in the crowded protein interior space. Presently, we describe the potential utility of six unnatural amino acid fluorescence donors structurally related to tryptophan and show how they can be efficiently incorporated into a protein as fluorescence probes. We also examine the various photophysical properties of the new Trp analogues, which are significantly redshifted in their fluorescence spectra relative to tryptophan. In general, the Trp analogues were well tolerated when inserted into E. coli DHFR, and did not perturb enzyme activity, although substitution for Trp22 did result in a diminution in DHFR activity. Further, it was demonstrated that D and E at position 37 formed efficient FRET pairs with acridon-2-ylalanine (Acd) at position 17. The same was also true for a DHFR construct containing E at position 79 and Acd at position 17. Together, these findings demonstrate that these tryptophan analogues can be introduced into DHFR with minimal disruption of function, and that they can be employed for the selective study of targeted conformational or electrostatic changes in proteins, even in the presence of unmodified tryptophans. PMID:25284250

  1. Formation and Characterization of Marigranules from Tryptophan and Sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagawa, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Yoko

    1984-12-01

    We found that molecular oxygen and aromatic amino acids such as tryptophan, tyrosine and phenylalanine were essential for the formation of marigranules. Among aromatic amino acids, tryptophan gave the best yield of marigranules. Among indole derivatives, kynurenine gave the best yield of marigranules. Large marigranules (0.3 3 μm in diameter) were formed from tryptophan in the presence of Ca2+ and Mg2+, and small marigranules (0.2 0.6 μm in diameter) were produced in the absence of such divalent metal ions. Marigranules formed from tryptophan were partially solubilized with methanol and completely solubilized with dimethyl sulfoxide and dimethyl-formamide. The solubilized marigranules consisted of polymers with molecular weights of 2×103 and 105 107 daltons. The methanol-soluble fraction provided well-defined vesicles upon sonication. Marigranule-like particles were formed from D,L-glyceraldehyde, D-erythrose and D-ribose but they were not formed from glycolaldehyde, L-arabinose and D-glucose. Among sugars, D-erythrose gave the best yield of the particles.

  2. Elevated tryptophan levels in post-withdrawal alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Farren, C K; Dinan, T G

    1996-12-01

    Changes in serotonin function and disturbances in tryptophan availability have been implicated in many psychiatric disorders, including alcoholism. In the present study we took serum free tryptophan samples from 31 healthy volunteer controls and from 42 DSM-III-R alcohol-dependent subjects who had abstained from alcohol for at least 2.5 weeks (range 2.5-104 weeks). We also measured the basal serum cortisol level at 09.00 hours for the same subjects and controls. There was a significant increase in the serum tryptophan level of the alcoholic subjects, by 43.7 mumol l-1 (range 29-63 mumol l-1), regardless of age of onset of alcoholism, family history of alcoholism or sociopathic traits, compared to the controls (33.0 mumol l-1, range 19-60 mumol l-1). There was also an increase in the basal serum cortisol level in the alcoholic subjects compared to the controls, but this was not related to the increase in tryptophan levels. These findings indicate a disturbance in serotonin precursor availability in post-withdrawal alcoholics, and contribute to the evidence for involvement of the serotonin system in alcoholism. PMID:9021001

  3. Zebrafish tyrosine hydroxylase 2 gene encodes tryptophan hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Ren, Guiqi; Li, Song; Zhong, Hanbing; Lin, Shuo

    2013-08-01

    The primary pathological hallmark of Parkinson disease (PD) is the profound loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. To facilitate the understanding of the underling mechanism of PD, several zebrafish PD models have been generated to recapitulate the characteristics of dopaminergic (DA) neuron loss. In zebrafish studies, tyrosine hydroxylase 1 (th1) has been frequently used as a molecular marker of DA neurons. However, th1 also labels norepinephrine and epinephrine neurons. Recently, a homologue of th1, named tyrosine hydroxylase 2 (th2), was identified based on the sequence homology and subsequently used as a novel marker of DA neurons. In this study, we present evidence that th2 co-localizes with serotonin in the ventral diencephalon and caudal hypothalamus in zebrafish embryos. In addition, knockdown of th2 reduces the level of serotonin in the corresponding th2-positive neurons. This phenotype can be rescued by both zebrafish th2 and mouse tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1) mRNA as well as by 5-hydroxytryptophan, the product of tryptophan hydroxylase. Moreover, the purified Th2 protein has tryptophan hydroxylase activity comparable with that of the mouse TPH1 protein in vitro. Based on these in vivo and in vitro results, we conclude that th2 is a gene encoding for tryptophan hydroxylase and should be used as a marker gene of serotonergic neurons. PMID:23754283

  4. Probing the active site tryptophan of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin with an analog

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Markus; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Wang, Yane-Shih; Eiler, Daniel; Söll, Dieter; Guo, Li-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded non-canonical amino acids are powerful tools of protein research and engineering; in particular they allow substitution of individual chemical groups or atoms in a protein of interest. One such amino acid is the tryptophan (Trp) analog 3-benzothienyl-l-alanine (Bta) with an imino-to-sulfur substitution in the five-membered ring. Unlike Trp, Bta is not capable of forming a hydrogen bond, but preserves other properties of a Trp residue. Here we present a pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase-derived, engineered enzyme BtaRS that enables efficient and site-specific Bta incorporation into proteins of interest in vivo. Furthermore, we report a 2.1 Å-resolution crystal structure of a BtaRS•Bta complex to show how BtaRS discriminates Bta from canonical amino acids, including Trp. To show utility in protein mutagenesis, we used BtaRS to introduce Bta to replace the Trp28 residue in the active site of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin. This experiment showed that not the hydrogen bond between residues Trp28 and Asp58, but the bulky aromatic side chain of Trp28 is important for active site maintenance. Collectively, our study provides a new and robust tool for checking the function of Trp in proteins. PMID:26582921

  5. Hole hopping through tyrosine/tryptophan chains protects proteins from oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Harry B.; Winkler, Jay R.

    2015-01-01

    Living organisms have adapted to atmospheric dioxygen by exploiting its oxidizing power while protecting themselves against toxic side effects. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species formed during oxidative stress, as well as high-potential reactive intermediates formed during enzymatic catalysis, could rapidly and irreversibly damage polypeptides were protective mechanisms not available. Chains of redox-active tyrosine and tryptophan residues can transport potentially damaging oxidizing equivalents (holes) away from fragile active sites and toward protein surfaces where they can be scavenged by cellular reductants. Precise positioning of these chains is required to provide effective protection without inhibiting normal function. A search of the structural database reveals that about one third of all proteins contain Tyr/Trp chains composed of three or more residues. Although these chains are distributed among all enzyme classes, they appear with greatest frequency in the oxidoreductases and hydrolases. Consistent with a redox-protective role, approximately half of the dioxygen-using oxidoreductases have Tyr/Trp chain lengths ≥3 residues. Among the hydrolases, long Tyr/Trp chains appear almost exclusively in the glycoside hydrolases. These chains likely are important for substrate binding and positioning, but a secondary redox role also is a possibility. PMID:26195784

  6. Interfacial behavior of polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, John; Kerr, John B.; Han, Yong Bong; Liu, Gao; Reeder, Craig; Xie, Jiangbing; Sun, Xiaoguang

    2003-06-03

    Evidence is presented concerning the effect of surfaces on the segmental motion of PEO-based polymer electrolytes in lithium batteries. For dry systems with no moisture the effect of surfaces of nano-particle fillers is to inhibit the segmental motion and to reduce the lithium ion transport. These effects also occur at the surfaces in composite electrodes that contain considerable quantities of carbon black nano-particles for electronic connection. The problem of reduced polymer mobility is compounded by the generation of salt concentration gradients within the composite electrode. Highly concentrated polymer electrolytes have reduced transport properties due to the increased ionic cross-linking. Combined with the interfacial interactions this leads to the generation of low mobility electrolyte layers within the electrode and to loss of capacity and power capability. It is shown that even with planar lithium metal electrodes the concentration gradients can significantly impact the interfacial impedance. The interfacial impedance of lithium/PEO-LiTFSI cells varies depending upon the time elapsed since current was turned off after polarization. The behavior is consistent with relaxation of the salt concentration gradients and indicates that a portion of the interfacial impedance usually attributed to the SEI layer is due to concentrated salt solutions next to the electrode surfaces that are very resistive. These resistive layers may undergo actual phase changes in a non-uniform manner and the possible role of the reduced mobility polymer layers in dendrite initiation and growth is also explored. It is concluded that PEO and ethylene oxide-based polymers are less than ideal with respect to this interfacial behavior.

  7. The tryptophan repressor sequence is highly conserved among the Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Arvidson, D N; Arvidson, C G; Lawson, C L; Miner, J; Adams, C; Youderian, P

    1994-01-01

    Tryptophan biosynthesis in Escherichia coli is regulated by the product of the trpR gene, the tryptophan (Trp) repressor. Trp aporepressor binds the corepressor, L-tryptophan, to form a holorepressor complex, which binds trp operator DNA tightly, and inhibits transcription of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon. The conservation of trp operator sequences among enteric Gram-negative bacteria suggests that trpR genes from other bacterial species can be cloned by complementation in E. coli. To clone trpR homologues, a deletion of the E. coli trpR gene, delta trpR504, was made on a plasmid by site-directed mutagenesis, then crossed onto the E. coli genome. Plasmid clones of the trpR genes of Enterobacter aerogenes and Enterobacter cloacae were isolated by complementation of the delta trpR504 allele, scored as the ability to repress beta-galactosidase synthesis from a prophage-borne trpE-lacZ gene fusion. The predicted amino acid sequences of four enteric TrpR proteins show differences, clustered on the backside of the folded repressor, opposite the DNA-binding helix-turn-helix substructures. These differences are predicted to have little effect on the interactions of the aporepressor with tryptophan, holorepressor with operator DNA, or tandemly bound holorepressor dimers with one another. Although there is some variation observed at the dimer interface, interactions predicted to stabilize the interface are conserved. The phylogenetic relationships revealed by the TrpR amino acid sequence alignment agree with the results of others. PMID:8208606

  8. L-Tryptophan prevents Escherichia coli biofilm formation and triggers biofilm degradation.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Junji; Furukawa, Soichi; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2012-03-23

    The effect of deletion of trp operon and tna operon on the Escherichia coli biofilm formation was investigated in order to elucidate the role of L-tryptophan metabolism in biofilm formation. trp operon deletion mutants ΔtrpC, ΔtrpD and ΔtrpE deficient in L-tryptophan biosynthesis showed higher biofilm formation. In addition, ΔtnaC with increased L-tryptophan degradation activity showed higher biofilm formation. On the contrary, ΔtnaA deletion mutant which lost L-tryptophan degradation activity showed low biofilm formation. From these results, it was suggested that decrease of intracellular L-tryptophan level induced biofilm formation and increase of L-tryptophan repressed biofilm formation. So the effect of the addition of L-tryptophan to the medium on the E. coli biofilm formation was investigated. L-Tryptophan addition at starting culture decreased biofilm formation and furthermore L-tryptophan addition after 16 h culture induced the degradation of preformed biofilm. From the above results, it was suggested that maintenance of high intracellular L-tryptophan concentration prevents E. coli biofilm formation and elevation of intracellular L-tryptophan concentration triggers degradation of matured biofilm. PMID:22386992

  9. Characterization of cyclo-Acetoacetyl-L-Tryptophan Dimethylallyltransferase in Cyclopiazonic Acid Biosynthesis: Substrate Promiscuity and Site Directed Mutagenesis Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyu; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2009-01-01

    The fungal neurotoxin α-cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), a nanomolar inhibitor of Ca2+-ATPase with a unique pentacyclic indole tetramic acid scaffold is assembled by a three enzyme pathway CpaS, CpaD and CpaO in Aspergillus sp. We recently characterized the first pathway-specific enzyme CpaS, a hybrid two module polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS) that generates cyclo-acetoacetyl-L-tryptophan (cAATrp). Here we report the characterization of the second pathway-specific enzyme CpaD that regiospecifically dimethylallylates cAATrp to form β-cyclopiazonic acid. By exploring the tryptophan and tetramate moieties of cAATrp, we demonstrate that CpaD discriminates against free Trp but accepts tryptophan-containing thiohydantoins, diketopiperazines and linear peptides as substrates for C4-prenylation and also acts as regiospecific O-dimethylallyltransferase (DMAT) on a tyrosine-derived tetramic acid. Comparative evaluation of CpaDs from A. oryzae RIB40 and A. flavus NRRL3357 indicated the importance of the N-terminal region for its activity. Sequence alignment of CpaD with eleven homologous fungal Trp-DMATs revealed five regions of conservation suggesting the presense of critical motifs that could be diagonostic for discovering additional Trp-DMATs. Subsequent site-directed mutagenesis studies identified five polar/charged residues and five tyrosine residues within these motifs that are critical for CpaD activity. This motif characerization will enable a gene probe-based approach to discover additional biosynthetic Trp-DMATs. PMID:19877600

  10. Inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase abolishes fatigue induced by central tryptophan in exercising rats.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, L M S; Guimarães, J B; Wanner, S P; La Guardia, R B; Miranda, R M; Marubayashi, U; Soares, D D

    2014-02-01

    Fatigue during prolonged exercise is related to brain monoamines concentrations, but the mechanisms underlying this relationship have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the effects of increased central tryptophan (TRP) availability on physical performance and thermoregulation in running rats that were pretreated with parachlorophenylalanine (p-CPA), an inhibitor of the conversion of TRP to serotonin. On the 3 days before the experiment, adult male Wistar rats were treated with intraperitoneal (ip) injections of saline or p-CPA. On the day of the experiment, animals received intracerebroventricular (icv) injections of either saline or TRP (20.3 μM) and underwent a submaximal exercise test until fatigue. Icv TRP-treated rats that received ip saline presented higher heat storage rate and a 69% reduction in time to fatigue compared with the control animals. Pretreatment with ip p-CPA blocked the effects of TRP on thermoregulation and performance. Moreover, ip p-CPA administration accelerated cutaneous heat dissipation when compared with saline-pretreated rats. We conclude that an elevated availability of central TRP interferes with fatigue mechanisms of exercising rats. This response is modulated by serotonergic pathways, because TRP effects were blocked in the presence of p-CPA. Our data also support that a depletion of brain serotonin facilitates heat loss mechanisms during exercise. PMID:22540893

  11. Tryptophan Metabolism in Rat Liver After Administration of Tryptophan, Kynurenine Metabolites, and Kynureninase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Abdulla A.-B.; Bano, Samina

    2016-01-01

    Rat liver tryptophan (Trp), kynurenine pathway metabolites, and enzymes deduced from product/substrate ratios were assessed following acute and/or chronic administration of kynurenic acid (KA), 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK), 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3-HAA), Trp, and the kynureni-nase inhibitors benserazide (BSZ) and carbidopa (CBD). KA activated Trp 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), possibly by increasing liver 3-HAA, but inhibited kynurenine aminotransferase (KAT) and kynureninase activities with 3-HK as substrate. 3-HK inhibited kynureninase activity from 3-HK. 3-HAA stimulated TDO, but inhibited kynureninase activity from K and 3-HK. Trp (50 mg/kg) increased kynurenine metabolite concentrations and KAT from K, and exerted a temporary stimulation of TDO. The kynureninase inhibitors BSZ and CBD also inhibited KAT, but stimulated TDO. BSZ abolished or strongly inhibited the Trp-induced increases in liver Trp and kynurenine metabolites. The potential effects of these changes in conditions of immune activation, schizophrenia, and other disease states are discussed. PMID:27547037

  12. Distinctive structure and interfacial activity of the human apolipoprotein A-IV 347S isoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Richard B.; Cook, Victoria R.

    2010-01-01

    The T347S polymorphism in the human apolipoprotein (apo) A-IV gene is present at high frequencies among all the world's populations. Carriers of a 347S allele exhibit faster clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, greater adiposity, and increased risk for developing atherosclerosis, which suggests that this conservative amino acid substitution alters the structure of apo A-IV. Herein we have used spectroscopic and surface chemistry techniques to examine the structure, stability, and interfacial properties of the apo A-IV 347S isoprotein. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the 347S isoprotein has similar α-helical structure but lower thermodynamic stability than the 347T isoprotein. Fluorescence spectroscopy found that the 347S isoprotein exhibits an enhanced tyrosine emission and reduced tyrosine→tryptophan energy transfer, and second derivative UV absorption spectra noted increased tyrosine exposure, suggesting that the 347S isoprotein adopts a looser tertiary conformation. Surface chemistry studies found that although the 347S isoprotein bound rapidly to the lipid interface, it has a lower interfacial exclusion pressure and lower elastic modulus than the 347T isoprotein. Together, these observations establish that the T347S substitution alters the conformation of apo A-IV and lowers its interfacial activity—changes that could account for the effect of this polymorphism on postprandial lipid metabolism. PMID:20554794

  13. Alanine Scanning Mutagenesis of Anti-TRAP (AT) Reveals Residues Involved in Binding to TRAP

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanling; Gollnick, Paul

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) regulates expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic (trp) genes in response to changes in intracellular levels of free L-tryptophan in many gram positive bacteria. When activated by binding tryptophan, TRAP binds to the mRNAs of several genes involved in tryptophan metabolism, and down-regulates transcription or translation of these genes. Anti-TRAP (AT) is an antagonist of TRAP that binds to tryptophan-activated TRAP and prevents it from binding to its RNA targets, and thereby up-regulates trp gene expression. The crystal structure shows that AT is a cone-shaped trimer (AT3) with the N-terminal residues of the three subunits assembled at the apex of the cone and that these trimers can further assemble into a dodecameric (AT12) structure. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis we found four residues, all located on the “top” region of AT3, which are essential for binding to TRAP. Fluorescent labeling experiments further suggest that the top region of AT is in close juxtaposition to TRAP in the AT-TRAP complex. In vivo studies confirmed the importance of these residues on the top of AT in regulating TRAP mediated gene regulation. PMID:18334255

  14. Elastocapillary-mediated interfacial assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur

    2015-11-01

    Particles confined to an interface are present in a large number of industrial applications and ubiquitous in cellular biophysics. Interactions mediated by the interface, such as capillary effects in the presence of surface tension, give rise to rafts and aggregates whose structure is ultimately determined by geometric characteristics of these adsorbed particles. A common strategy for assembling interfacial structures relies on exploiting these interactions by tuning particle anisotropy, either by constructing rigid particles with heterogeneous wetting properties or fabricating particles that have a naturally anisotropic shape. Less explored, however, is the scenario where the interface causes the particles to deform. In this talk I will discuss the implications for interfacial assembly using elastocapillary-mediated interactions. The competition between surface energy and elasticity can wrinkle and buckle adsorbed soft particles, leading to complicated (but programmable) aggregates.

  15. Interfacial sliding stress in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/BN fibrous monoliths.

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.; Goretta, K. C.; Richardson,, J. W., Jr.; de Arellano-Lopez, A. R.; Energy Technology; Univ. de Sevilla

    2002-05-24

    Pushout tests of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} cells in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/BN fibrous monoliths yielded values for debond and sliding stresses of 45{+-}8 and 25{+-}7 MPa, respectively. The sliding stress was consistent with estimates of residual stresses and the interfacial friction coefficient.

  16. Tryptophan Codon-Dependent Transcription in Chlamydia pneumoniae during Gamma Interferon-Mediated Tryptophan Limitation.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Scot P; Rueden, Kelsey J; Rucks, Elizabeth A

    2016-09-01

    In evolving to an obligate intracellular niche, Chlamydia has streamlined its genome by eliminating superfluous genes as it relies on the host cell for a variety of nutritional needs like amino acids. However, Chlamydia can experience amino acid starvation when the human host cell in which the bacteria reside is exposed to interferon gamma (IFN-γ), which leads to a tryptophan (Trp)-limiting environment via induction of the enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). The stringent response is used to respond to amino acid starvation in most bacteria but is missing from Chlamydia Thus, how Chlamydia, a Trp auxotroph, responds to Trp starvation in the absence of a stringent response is an intriguing question. We previously observed that C. pneumoniae responds to this stress by globally increasing transcription while globally decreasing translation, an unusual response. Here, we sought to understand this and hypothesized that the Trp codon content of a given gene would determine its transcription level. We quantified transcripts from C. pneumoniae genes that were either rich or poor in Trp codons and found that Trp codon-rich transcripts were increased, whereas those that lacked Trp codons were unchanged or even decreased. There were exceptions, and these involved operons or large genes with multiple Trp codons: downstream transcripts were less abundant after Trp codon-rich sequences. These data suggest that ribosome stalling on Trp codons causes a negative polar effect on downstream sequences. Finally, reassessing previous C. pneumoniae microarray data based on codon content, we found that upregulated transcripts were enriched in Trp codons, thus supporting our hypothesis. PMID:27400720

  17. Fiber pushout and interfacial shear in metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koss, Donald A.; Hellmann, John R.; Kallas, M. N.

    1993-01-01

    Recent thin-slice pushout tests have suggested that MMC matrix-fiber interface failure processes depend not only on such intrinsic factors as bond strength and toughness, and matrix plasticity, but such extrinsic factors as specimen configuration, thermally-induced residual stresses, and the mechanics associated with a given test. After detailing the contrasts in fiber-pullout and fiber-pushout mechanics, attention is given to selected aspects of thin-slice fiber pushout behavior illustrative of the physical nature of interfacial shear response and its dependence on both intrinsic and extrinsic factors.

  18. Tryptophan Scanning Mutagenesis Identifies the Molecular Determinants of Distinct Barttin Functions.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Daniel; Fischer, Martin; Fahlke, Christoph

    2015-07-24

    CLC-K chloride channels are expressed in the kidney and in the inner ear and require the accessory subunit barttin for proper function and membrane insertion. Barttin exerts multiple functions on CLC-proteins: it modifies protein stability and intracellular trafficking as well as channel activity, ion conduction, and gating. So far, the molecular determinants of these distinct barttin functions have remained elusive. Here we performed serial perturbation mutagenesis to identify the sequence determinants of barttin function. Barttin consists of two transmembrane helices followed by a long intracellular carboxyl terminus, and earlier work demonstrated that the transmembrane core of barttin suffices for most effects on the α-subunit. We individually substituted every amino acid of the predicted transmembrane core (amino acids 9-26 and 35-55) with tryptophan, co-expressed mutant barttin with hClC-Ka or V166E rClC-K1, and characterized CLC-K/barttin channels by patch clamp techniques, biochemistry, and confocal microscopy. The majority of mutations left the chaperone function of barttin, i.e. the effects on endoplasmic reticulum exit and surface membrane insertion, unaffected. In contrast, tryptophan insertion at multiple positions resulted in impaired activity of hClC-Ka/barttin and changes in gating of V166E rClC-K1/barttin. These results demonstrate that mutations in a cluster of hydrophobic residues within transmembrane domain 1 affect barttin-CLC-K interaction and impair gating modification by the accessory subunit. Whereas tight interaction is necessary for functional modification, even impaired association of barttin and CLC-K suffices for normal intracellular trafficking. Our findings allow definition of a likely interaction surface and clarify the mechanisms underlying CLC-K channel modification by barttin. PMID:26063802

  19. A chimeric tyrosine/tryptophan hydroxylase. The tyrosine hydroxylase regulatory domain serves to stabilize enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Mockus, S M; Kumer, S C; Vrana, K E

    1997-08-01

    The neurotransmitter biosynthetic enzymes, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) are each composed of an amino-terminal regulatory domain and a carboxyl-terminal catalytic domain. A chimeric hydroxylase was generated by coupling the regulatory domain of TH (TH-R) to the catalytic domain of TPH (TPH-C) and expressing the recombinant enzyme in bacteria. The chimeric junction was created at proline 165 in TH and proline 106 in TPH because this residue is within a conserved five amino-acid span (ValProTrpPhePro) that defines the beginning of the highly homologous catalytic domains of TH and TPH. Radioenzymatic activity assays demonstrated that the TH-R/TPH-C chimera hydroxylates tryptophan, but not tyrosine. Therefore, the regulatory domain does not confer substrate specificity. Although the TH-R/TPH-C enzyme did serve as a substrate for protein kinase (PKA), activation was not observed following phosphorylation. Phosphorylation studies in combination with kinetic data provided evidence that TH-R does not exert a dominant influence on TPH-C. Stability assays revealed that, whereas TH exhibited a t1/2 of 84 min at 37 degrees C, TPH was much less stable (t1/2 = 28.3 min). The stability profile of TH-R/TPH-C, however, was superimposable on that of TH. Removal of the regulatory domain (a deletion of 165 amino acids from the N-terminus) of TH rendered the catalytic domain highly unstable, as demonstrated by a t1/2 of 14 min. The authors conclude that the regulatory domain of TH functions as a stabilizer of enzyme activity. As a corollary, the well-characterized instability of TPH may be attributed to the inability of its regulatory domain to stabilize the catalytic domain. PMID:9356925

  20. The In Situ Tryptophan Analogue Probes the Conformational Dynamics in Asparaginase Isozymes.

    PubMed

    Chao, Wei-Chih; Shen, Jiun-Yi; Yang, Cheng-Han; Lan, Yi-Kang; Yuan, Jui-Hung; Lin, Li-Ju; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Wee, Kevin; Chen, You-Hua; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2016-04-26

    Dynamic water solvation is crucial to protein conformational reorganization and hence to protein structure and functionality. We report here the characterization of water dynamics on the L-asparaginase structural homology isozymes L-asparaginases I (AnsA) and II (AnsB), which are shown via fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamics in combination with molecular dynamics simulation to have distinct catalytic activity. By use of the tryptophan (Trp) analog probe 2,7-diaza-tryptophan ((2,7-aza)Trp), which exhibits unique water-catalyzed proton-transfer properties, AnsA and AnsB are shown to have drastically different local water environments surrounding the single Trp. In AnsA, (2,7-aza)Trp exhibits prominent green N(7)-H emission resulting from water-catalyzed excited-state proton transfer. In stark contrast, the N(7)-H emission is virtually absent in AnsB, which supports a water-accessible and a water-scant environment in the proximity of Trp for AnsA and AnsB, respectively. In addition, careful analysis of the emission spectra and corresponding relaxation dynamics, together with the results of molecular dynamics simulations, led us to propose two structural states associated with the rearrangement of the hydrogen-bond network in the vicinity of Trp for the two Ans. The water molecules revealed in the proximity of the Trp residue have semiquantitative correlation with the observed emission spectral variations of (2,7-aza)Trp between AnsA and AnsB. Titration of aspartate, a competitive inhibitor of Ans, revealed an increase in N(7)-H emission intensity in AnsA but no obvious spectral changes in AnsB. The changes in the emission profiles reflect the modulation of structural states by locally confined environment and trapped-water collective motions. PMID:27119634

  1. Elementary processes during collisions of ions with tryptophan molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrosimov, V. V.; Basalaev, A. A.; Kuz'michev, V. V.; Panov, M. N.; Smirnov, O. V.

    2016-03-01

    The relative cross sections of elementary processes occurring in single collisions of tryptophan molecules in the gaseous phase with He2+ ions with energy 4 keV/u are measured using time-of-flight mass spectrometry for studying the mechanism of radiation damage of amino acid molecules. The fragmentation channels for intermediate singly and doubly charged tryptophan molecular ions formed during one-electron capture, two-electron capture, and electron capture with ionization are investigated. Significant difference is observed in the mass spectra of fragmentation of intermediate doubly charged ions formed during the capture with ionization and double capture, which is associated with different energies of excitation of {C11H12N2O2}2+* ions.

  2. Investigation of Fragmentation of Tryptophan Nitrogen Radical Cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatkivskyi, Andrii; Happ, Marshall; Lau, Justin Kai-Chi; Siu, K. W. Michael; Hopkinson, Alan C.; Ryzhov, Victor

    2015-08-01

    This work describes investigation of the fragmentation mechanism of tryptophan N-indolyl radical cation, H3N+-TrpN• ( m/ z 204) studied via DFT calculations and several gas-phase experimental techniques. The main fragment ion at m/ z 131, shown to be a mixture of up to four isomers including 3-methylindole (3MI) π-radical cation, was found to undergo further loss of an H atom to yield one of the two isomeric m/ z 130 ions. 3-Methylindole radical cation generated independently (via CID of [CuII(terpy)3MI]•2+) displayed gas-phase reactivity partially similar to that of the m/ z 131 fragment, further confirming our proposed mechanism. CID of deuterated tryptophan N-indolyl radical cation ( m/ z 208) suggested that up to six H atoms are involved in the pathway to formation of the m/ z 131 ion, consistent with hydrogen atom scrambling during CID of protonated Trp.

  3. Photodissociation dynamics of tryptophan and the implication of asymmetric photolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Chien-Ming; Dyakov, Yuri A.; Huang, Huai Ching; Huang, Kuan Yu; Lee, Yuan T.; Ni, Chi-Kung; Chiang, Su-Yu

    2010-08-21

    Photodissociation of amino acid tryptophan in a molecular beam at wavelengths of 212.8 and 193 nm, corresponding to excitation to the second and third absorption bands, was investigated using multimass ion imaging techniques. The respective wavelengths also represent excitation to the edge of a positive circular dichroism band and the center of a negative circular dichroism band of L-tryptophan. Only one dissociation channel was observed at both photolysis wavelengths: C{sub 8}NH{sub 6}CH{sub 2}CHNH{sub 2}COOH{yields}C{sub 8}NH{sub 6}CH{sub 2}+CHNH{sub 2}COOH. Dissociation rates were found to be 1.3x10{sup 6} and 5x10{sup 6} s{sup -1} at the respective wavelengths. Comparison to theoretical calculation indicates that dissociation occurs on the ground state after internal conversion. Implication of asymmetric photolysis is discussed.

  4. Archetypal tryptophan-rich antimicrobial peptides: properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Shagaghi, Nadin; Palombo, Enzo A; Clayton, Andrew H A; Bhave, Mrinal

    2016-02-01

    Drug-resistant microorganisms ('superbugs') present a serious challenge to the success of antimicrobial treatments. Subsequently, there is a crucial need for novel bio-control agents. Many antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) show a broad-spectrum activity against bacteria, fungi or viruses and are strong candidates to complement or substitute current antimicrobial agents. Some AMPs are also effective against protozoa or cancer cells. The tryptophan (Trp)-rich peptides (TRPs) are a subset of AMPs that display potent antimicrobial activity, credited to the unique biochemical properties of tryptophan that allow it to insert into biological membranes. Further, many Trp-rich AMPs cross bacterial membranes without compromising their integrity and act intracellularly, suggesting interactions with nucleic acids and enzymes. In this work, we overview some archetypal TRPs derived from natural sources, i.e., indolicidin, tritrpticin and lactoferricin, summarising their biochemical properties, structures, antimicrobial activities, mechanistic studies and potential applications. PMID:26748808

  5. Thiostrepton tryptophan methyltransferase expands the chemistry of radical SAM enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Stéphane; Guillot, Alain; Benjdia, Alhosna; Sandström, Corine; Langella, Philippe; Berteau, Olivier

    2012-12-01

    Methylation is among the most widespread chemical modifications encountered in biomolecules and has a pivotal role in many major biological processes. In the biosynthetic pathway of the antibiotic thiostrepton A, we identified what is to our knowledge the first tryptophan methyltransferase. We show that it uses unprecedented chemistry to methylate inactivated sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms, despite being predicted to be a radical SAM enzyme. PMID:23064318

  6. Structure and Mechanistic Implications of a Tryptophan Synthase Quinonoid Intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Barends,T.; Domratcheva, T.; Kulik, V.; Blumenstein, L.; Niks, D.; Dunn, M.; Schlichting, I.

    2008-01-01

    Quinonoid intermediates play a key role in the catalytic mechanism of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes. Whereas structures of other PLP-bound reaction intermediates have been determined, a high-quality structure of a quinonoid species has not been reported. We present the crystal structure of the indoline quinonoid intermediate of tryptophan synthase (see figure) and discuss its implications for the enzymatic mechanism and allosteric regulation.

  7. Crystal Structure and Mechanism of Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase, a Heme Enzyme Involved in Tryptophan Catabolism and in Quinolinate Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,Y.; Kang, S.; Mukherjee, T.; Bale, S.; Crane, B.; Begley, T.; Ealick, S.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) from Ralstonia metallidurans was determined at 2.4 {angstrom}. TDO catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of L-tryptophan to N-formyl kynurenine, which is the initial step in tryptophan catabolism. TDO is a heme-containing enzyme and is highly specific for its substrate L-tryptophan. The structure is a tetramer with a heme cofactor bound at each active site. The monomeric fold, as well as the heme binding site, is similar to that of the large domain of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, an enzyme that catalyzes the same reaction except with a broader substrate tolerance. Modeling of the putative (S)-tryptophan hydroperoxide intermediate into the active site, as well as substrate analogue and mutagenesis studies, are consistent with a Criegee mechanism for the reaction.

  8. Concurrent quantification of tryptophan and its major metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Lesniak, Wojciech G.; Jyoti, Amar; Mishra, Manoj K.; Louissaint, Nicolette; Romero, Roberto; Chugani, Diane C.; Kannan, Sujatha; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2014-01-01

    An imbalance in tryptophan (TRP) metabolites is associated with several neurological and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, analytical methods allowing for simultaneous quantification of TRP and its major metabolites would be highly desirable, and may be valuable as potential biomarkers. We have developed a HPLC method for concurrent quantitative determination of tryptophan, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, kynurenine, and kynurenic acid in tissue and fluids. The method utilizes the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of TRP and its metabolites that enable UV absorbance and fluorescence detection by HPLC, without additional labeling. The origin of the peaks related to analytes of interest was confirmed by UV–Vis spectral patterns using a PDA detector and mass spectrometry. The developed methods were validated in rabbit fetal brain and amniotic fluid at gestational day 29. Results are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature for the same regions. This method allows for rapid quantification of tryptophan and four of its major metabolites concurrently. A change in the relative ratios of these metabolites can provide important insights in predicting the presence and progression of neuroinflammation in disorders such as cerebral palsy, autism, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and schizophrenia. PMID:24036037

  9. Diradical intermediate within the context of tryptophan tryptophylquinone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yukl, Erik T.; Liu, Fange; Krzystek, J.; Shin, Sooim; Jensen, Lyndal M. R.; Davidson, Victor L.; Wilmot, Carrie M.; Liu, Aimin

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of tryptophan (Trp) radicals in biology, very few radicals have been trapped and characterized in a physiologically meaningful context. Here we demonstrate that the diheme enzyme MauG uses Trp radical chemistry to catalyze formation of a Trp-derived tryptophan tryptophylquinone cofactor on its substrate protein, premethylamine dehydrogenase. The unusual six-electron oxidation that results in tryptophan tryptophylquinone formation occurs in three discrete two-electron catalytic steps. Here the exact order of these oxidation steps in the processive six-electron biosynthetic reaction is determined, and reaction intermediates are structurally characterized. The intermediates observed in crystal structures are also verified in solution using mass spectrometry. Furthermore, an unprecedented Trp-derived diradical species on premethylamine dehydrogenase, which is an intermediate in the first two-electron step, is characterized using high-frequency and -field electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and UV-visible absorbance spectroscopy. This work defines a unique mechanism for radical-mediated catalysis of a protein substrate, and has broad implications in the areas of applied biocatalysis and understanding of oxidative protein modification during oxidative stress. PMID:23487750

  10. L-Tryptophan L-tryptophanium bromide: Anhydrous and monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazaryan, V. V.; Giester, G.; Fleck, M.; Petrosyan, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    L-Tryptophan L-tryptophanium bromide (I) and L-tryptophan L-tryptophanium bromide monohydrate (II) are new salts with (A⋯A+) type dimeric cation. The salt (I) crystallizes in the monoclinic system (space group P21, Z = 2) and is isostructural with respective chloride (V.V. Ghazaryan et al., Spectrochim. Acta A 136(2015) 743-750), while the salt (II) was obtained previously (T. Takigawa et al., Bull. Chem. Soc. Jap. 39(1966) 2369-2378) and described as hemyhydrate without structure determination. The salt (II) crystallizes in orthorhombic system (space group P212121, Z = 4). The dimeric cations in (I) and (II) are formed by O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds with the O⋯O distances equal to 2.538(3) Å and 2.481(3) Å respectively. The infrared and Raman spectra of the crystals are studied and compared with the spectra of L-tryptophan L-tryptophanium chloride and L-tryptophanium bromide.

  11. Rational design of tryptophan-rich antimicrobial peptides with enhanced antimicrobial activities and specificities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-Yuan; Huang, Kuo-Chun; Yip, Bak-Sau; Tu, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Heng-Li; Cheng, Hsi-Tsung; Cheng, Jya-Wei

    2010-11-01

    Trp-rich antimicrobial peptides play important roles in the host innate defense mechanism of many plants and animals. A series of short Trp-rich peptides derived from the C-terminal region of Bothrops asper myothoxin II, a Lys49 phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), were found to reproduce the antimicrobial activities of their parent molecule. Of these peptides, KKWRWWLKALAKK-designated PEM-2-was found to display improved activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. To improve the antimicrobial activity of PEM-2 for potential clinical applications further, we determined the solution structure of PEM-2 bound to membrane-mimetic dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles by two-dimensional NMR methods. The DPC micelle-bound structure of PEM-2 adopts an α-helical conformation and the positively charged residues are clustered together to form a hydrophilic patch. The surface electrostatic potential map indicates that two of the three tryptophan residues are packed against the peptide backbone and form a hydrophobic face with Leu7, Ala9, and Leu10. A variety of biophysical and biochemical experiments, including circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, and microcalorimetry, were used to show that PEM-2 interacted with negatively charged phospholipid vesicles and efficiently induced dye release from these vesicles, suggesting that the antimicrobial activity of PEM-2 could be due to interactions with bacterial membranes. Potent analogues of PEM-2 with enhanced antimicrobial and less pronounced hemolytic activities were designed with the aid of these structural studies. PMID:20865718

  12. Interfacial thiol-ene photoclick reactions for forming multilayer hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Shih, Han; Fraser, Andrew K; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2013-03-13

    Interfacial visible light-mediated thiol-ene photoclick reactions were developed for preparing step-growth hydrogels with multilayer structures. The effect of a noncleavage type photoinitiator eosin-Y on visible-light-mediated thiol-ene photopolymerization was first characterized using in situ photorheometry, gel fraction, and equilibrium swelling ratio. Next, spectrophotometric properties of eosin-Y in the presence of various relevant macromer species were evaluated using ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) spectrometry. It was determined that eosin-Y was able to reinitiate the thiol-ene photoclick reaction, even after light exposure. Because of its small molecular weight, most eosin-Y molecules readily leached out from the hydrogels. The diffusion of residual eosin-Y from preformed hydrogels was exploited for fabricating multilayer step-growth hydrogels. Interfacial hydrogel coating was formed via the same visible-light-mediated gelation mechanism without adding fresh initiator. The thickness of the thiol-ene gel coating could be easily controlled by adjusting visible light exposure time, eosin-Y concentration initially loaded in the core gel, or macromer concentration in the coating solution. The major benefits of this interfacial thiol-ene coating system include its simplicity and cytocompatibility. The formation of thiol-ene hydrogels and coatings neither requires nor generates any cytotoxic components. This new gelation chemistry may have great utilities in controlled release of multiple sensitive growth factors and encapsulation of multiple cell types for tissue regeneration. PMID:23384151

  13. Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Delsignore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Glass capillary tube technique measures interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Yields useful data over fairly wide range of interfacial tensions, both for pairs of liquids having equal densities and pairs of liquids having unequal densities. Data on interfacial tensions important in diverse industrial chemical applications, including enhanced extraction of oil; printing; processing foods; and manufacture of paper, emulsions, foams, aerosols, detergents, gel encapsulants, coating materials, fertilizers, pesticides, and cosmetics.

  14. Interfacial reactions between titanium and borate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Brow, R.K.; Saha, S.K.; Goldstein, J.I.

    1992-12-31

    Interfacial reactions between melts of several borate glasses and titanium have been investigated by analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A thin titanium boride interfacial layer is detected by XPS after short (30 minutes) thermal treatments. ASEM analyses after longer thermal treatments (8--120 hours) reveal boron-rich interfacial layers and boride precipitates in the Ti side of the interface.

  15. Modeling and characterization of interfacial adhesion and fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Qizhou

    2000-09-01

    The loss of interfacial adhesion is mostly seen in the failure of polymer adhesive joints. In addition to the intrinsic physical attraction across the interface, the interfacial adhesion strength is believed to highly depend on a number of factors, such as adhesive chemistry/structure, surface topology, fracture pattern, thermal and elastic mismatch across the interface. The fracture failure of an adhesive joint involves basically three aspects, namely, the intrinsic interfacial strength, the driving force for fracture and other energy dissipation. One may define the intrinsic interfacial strength as the maximum value of the intrinsic interfacial adhesion. The total work done by external forces to the component that contains the interface is partitioned into two parts. The first part is consumed by all other energy dissipation mechanisms (plasticity, heat generation, viscosity, etc.). The second part is used to debond the interface. This amount should equal to the intrinsic adhesion of the interface according to the laws of conservation of energy. It is clear that in order to understand the fundamental physics of adhesive joint failure, one must be able to characterize the intrinsic interfacial adhesion and be able to identify all the major energy dissipation mechanisms involved in the debonding process. In this study, both physical and chemical adhesion mechanisms were investigated for an aluminum-epoxy interface. The physical bonding energy was estimated by computing the Van de Waals forces across the interface. A hydration model was proposed and the associated chemical bonding energy was calculated through molecular simulations. Other energy dissipation mechanisms such as plasticity and thermal residual stresses were also identified and investigated for several four-point bend specimens. In particular, a micromechanics based model was developed to estimate the adhesion enhancement due to surface roughness. It is found that for this Al-epoxy system the major

  16. Proton transfer in histidine-tryptophan heterodimers embedded in helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellina, Bruno; Merthe, Daniel J.; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2015-03-01

    We used cold helium droplets as nano-scale reactors to form and ionize, by electron bombardment and charge transfer, aromatic amino acid heterodimers of histidine with tryptophan, methyl-tryptophan, and indole. The molecular interaction occurring through an N-H ṡ ṡ ṡ N hydrogen bond leads to a proton transfer from the indole group of tryptophan to the imidazole group of histidine in a radical cationic environment.

  17. Proton transfer in histidine-tryptophan heterodimers embedded in helium droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Bellina, Bruno; Merthe, Daniel J.; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2015-03-21

    We used cold helium droplets as nano-scale reactors to form and ionize, by electron bombardment and charge transfer, aromatic amino acid heterodimers of histidine with tryptophan, methyl-tryptophan, and indole. The molecular interaction occurring through an N–H ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ N hydrogen bond leads to a proton transfer from the indole group of tryptophan to the imidazole group of histidine in a radical cationic environment.

  18. Circumvention of defective neutral amino acid transport in Hartnup disease using tryptophan ethyl ester.

    PubMed

    Jonas, A J; Butler, I J

    1989-07-01

    Tryptophan ethyl ester, a lipid-soluble tryptophan derivative, was used to bypass defective gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport in a child with Hartnup disease. The child's baseline tryptophan concentrations in serum (20 +/- 6 microM) and cerebrospinal fluid (1.0 +/- 0.2 microM) were persistently less than 50% of normal values. Cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), a serotonin metabolite, was also less than 50% of normal (21 +/- 2 ng/ml). Serum tryptophan concentrations increased only modestly and briefly after an oral challenge with 200 mg/kg of oral L-tryptophan, reflecting the absorptive defect. An oral challenge with 200 mg/kg of tryptophan ethyl ester resulted in a prompt increase in serum tryptophan to a peak of 555 microM. Sustained treatment with 20 mg/kg q6h resulted in normalization of serum (66 +/- 15 microM) and cerebrospinal fluid tryptophan concentrations (mean = 2.3 microM). Cerebrospinal fluid 5-HIAA increased to more normal concentrations (mean = 33 ng/ml). No toxicity was observed over an 8-mo period of treatment, chronic diarrhea resolved, and body weight, which had remained unchanged for 7 mo before ester therapy, increased by approximately 26%. We concluded that tryptophan ethyl ester is effective at circumventing defective gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport and may be useful in the treatment of Hartnup disease. PMID:2472426

  19. Circumvention of defective neutral amino acid transport in Hartnup disease using tryptophan ethyl ester.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, A J; Butler, I J

    1989-01-01

    Tryptophan ethyl ester, a lipid-soluble tryptophan derivative, was used to bypass defective gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport in a child with Hartnup disease. The child's baseline tryptophan concentrations in serum (20 +/- 6 microM) and cerebrospinal fluid (1.0 +/- 0.2 microM) were persistently less than 50% of normal values. Cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), a serotonin metabolite, was also less than 50% of normal (21 +/- 2 ng/ml). Serum tryptophan concentrations increased only modestly and briefly after an oral challenge with 200 mg/kg of oral L-tryptophan, reflecting the absorptive defect. An oral challenge with 200 mg/kg of tryptophan ethyl ester resulted in a prompt increase in serum tryptophan to a peak of 555 microM. Sustained treatment with 20 mg/kg q6h resulted in normalization of serum (66 +/- 15 microM) and cerebrospinal fluid tryptophan concentrations (mean = 2.3 microM). Cerebrospinal fluid 5-HIAA increased to more normal concentrations (mean = 33 ng/ml). No toxicity was observed over an 8-mo period of treatment, chronic diarrhea resolved, and body weight, which had remained unchanged for 7 mo before ester therapy, increased by approximately 26%. We concluded that tryptophan ethyl ester is effective at circumventing defective gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport and may be useful in the treatment of Hartnup disease. PMID:2472426

  20. Probing the role of tryptophan-derived secondary metabolism in defense responses against Bipolaris oryzae infection in rice leaves by a suicide substrate of tryptophan decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Atsushi; Nakao, Takahito; Mashimo, Yuko; Murai, Masatoshi; Ichimaru, Naoya; Tanaka, Chihiro; Nakajima, Hiromitsu; Wakasa, Kyo; Miyagawa, Hisashi

    2011-01-01

    Tryptophan-derived secondary metabolites, including serotonin and its hydroxycinnamic acid amides, markedly accumulate in rice leaves in response to pathogen attack. These compounds have been implicated in the physical defense system against pathogen invasion by being deposited in cell walls. Serotonin is biosynthesized from tryptophan via tryptamine, and tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) catalyzes the first committed reaction. In this study, (S)-α-(fluoromethyl)tryptophan (S-αFMT) was utilized to investigate the effects of the inhibition of TDC on the defense responses of rice leaves. S-αFMT, enantiospecifically synthesized from L-tryptophan, effectively inhibited TDC activity extracted from rice leaves infected by Bipolaris oryzae. The inhibition rate increased dependently on the incubation time, indicating that S-αFMT served as a suicide substrate. Treatment of rice seedlings with S-αFMT suppressed accumulation of serotonin, tryptamine, and hydroxycinnamic acid amides of serotonin in a dose-dependent manner in B. oryzae-inoculated leaves. The lesions formed on seedlings treated with S-αFMT lacked deposition of brown materials, and those leaves were severely damaged in comparison with leaves without S-αFMT treatment. Administrating tryptamine to S-αFMT-treated leaves restored accumulation of tryptophan-derived secondary metabolites as well as deposition of brown material. In addition, tryptamine administration reduced damage caused by fungal infection. Accordingly, the accumulation of tryptophan-derived secondary metabolites was suggested to be part of the effective defense mechanism of rice. PMID:21112065

  1. Wavebreaking of Interfacial Stokes Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiden, Michelle; Lowman, Nicholas; Anderson, Dalton; Hoefer, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Viscous fluid conduits provide a versatile system for the study of dissipationless, dispersive hydrodynamics. A dense, viscous fluid serves as the background media through which a less dense, less viscous fluid buoyantly rises. If fluid is continuously injected into the exterior fluid, an interface forms that behaves like a deformable pipe. Conservation of mass implies that the interfacial dynamics are conservative, i.e., they behave like a superfluid. Through buoyancy, high viscosity contrast, and a long wave assumption, conduit interfacial dynamics can be modeled by a scalar, nonlinear, dispersive wave equation with no assumption on amplitude. Experiments involving solitons, wavebreaking leading to dispersive shock waves (DSWs), and their interactions will be presented. The results include the refraction and absorption of a soliton by a DSW and the refraction of a DSW by a second DSW, resulting in two-phase behavior. Excellent agreement between nonlinear wave (Whitham) averaging, numerics, and laboratory experiments will be presented. The nonlinear wave dynamics observed in this model system have implications for a broad range of other conservative dispersive hydrodynamic systems. Support provided by NSF CAREER DMS-1255422, NSF GRFP.

  2. Protein interfacial structure and nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John W.; Perriman, Adam W.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Lin, Jhih-Min

    2009-02-01

    Here we briefly recapitulate the use of X-ray and neutron reflectometry at the air-water interface to find protein structures and thermodynamics at interfaces and test a possibility for understanding those interactions between nanoparticles and proteins which lead to nanoparticle toxicology through entry into living cells. Stable monomolecular protein films have been made at the air-water interface and, with a specially designed vessel, the substrate changed from that which the air-water interfacial film was deposited. This procedure allows interactions, both chemical and physical, between introduced species and the monomolecular film to be studied by reflectometry. The method is briefly illustrated here with some new results on protein-protein interaction between β-casein and κ-casein at the air-water interface using X-rays. These two proteins are an essential component of the structure of milk. In the experiments reported, specific and directional interactions appear to cause different interfacial structures if first, a β-casein monolayer is attacked by a κ-casein solution compared to the reverse. The additional contrast associated with neutrons will be an advantage here. We then show the first results of experiments on the interaction of a β-casein monolayer with a nanoparticle titanium oxide sol, foreshadowing the study of the nanoparticle "corona" thought to be important for nanoparticle-cell wall penetration.

  3. Sinusoidal Forcing of Interfacial Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Fayaz; Raghunandan, Aditya; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Fluid transport, in vivo, is accomplished via pumping mechanisms of the heart and lungs, which results in biological fluids being subjected to oscillatory shear. Flow is known to influence biological macromolecules, but predicting the effect of shear is incomplete without also accounting for the influence of complex interfaces ubiquitous throughout the body. Here, we investigated the oscillatory response of the structure of aqueous interfacial films using a cylindrical knife edge viscometer. Vitamin K1 was used as a model monolayer because its behaviour has been thoroughly quantified and it doesn't show any measurable hysteresis. The monolayer was subjected to sinusoidal forcing under varied conditions of surface concentrations, periodic frequencies, and knife edge amplitudes. Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) data was collected using Brewster Angle Microscopy(BAM), revealing the influence of oscillatory interfacial shear stress on the monolayer. Insights were gained as to how the velocity profile dampens at specific distances from the knife edge contact depending on the amplitude, frequency, and concentration of Vitamin K1. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  4. Time-resolved room temperature protein phosphorescence: nonexponential decay from single emitting tryptophans.

    PubMed Central

    Schlyer, B D; Schauerte, J A; Steel, D G; Gafni, A

    1994-01-01

    The single room temperature phosphorescent (RTP) residue of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH). Trp-314, and of alkaline phosphatase (AP), Trp-109, show nonexponential phosphorescence decays when the data are collected to a high degree of precision. Using the maximum entropy method (MEM) for the analysis of these decays, it is shown that AP phosphorescence decay is dominated by a single Gaussian distribution, whereas for LADH the data reveal two amplitude packets. The lifetime-normalized width of the MEM distribution for both proteins is larger than that obtained for model monoexponential chromophores (e.g., terbium in water and pyrene in cyclohexane). Experiments show that the nonexponential decay is fundamental; i.e., an intrinsic property of the pure protein. Because phosphorescence reports on the state of the emitting chromophore, such nonexponential behavior could be caused by the presence of excited state reactions. However, it is also well known that the phosphorescence lifetime of a tryptophan residue is strongly dependent on the local flexibility around the indole moiety. Hence, the nonexponential phosphorescence decay may also be caused by the presence of at least two states of different local rigidity (in the vicinity of the phosphorescing tryptophan) corresponding to different ground state conformers. The observation that in the chemically homogeneous LADH sample the phosphorescence decay kinetics depends on the excitation wavelength further supports this latter interpretation. This dependence is caused by the wavelength-selective excitation of Trp-314 in a subensemble of LADH molecules with differing hydrophobic and rigid environments. With this interpretation, the data show that interconversion of these states occurs on a time scale long compared with the phosphorescence decay (0.1-1.0 s). Further experiments reveal that with increasing temperature the distributed phosphorescence decay rates for both AP and LADH broaden, thus indicating that

  5. Interfacial engineering of microstructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poda, Aimee

    The tribological behavior of octadecyltrichlorosilane self assembled monolayers (OTS-SAMs) has been successfully exploited to reduce energy losses and to produce adequate adhesion barrier properties on many MEMS surfaces. Unfortunately, performance discrepancies are reported in the literature between films produced on smooth surfaces as compared to typical MEMS surfaces maintaining topographical roughness. Rational explanations in terms of reproducibility issues, production considerations, and the scale of measurement technique have been introduced to account for some of the variation. The tribological phenomena at the micro-scale are complicated by the fact that rather than inertial effects, the forces associated with the surface become dominant factors influencing the mechanical behavior of contacting components. In MEMS, real mechanical contacts typically consist of a few nanometer scale asperities. Furthermore, various surface topographies exist for MEMS device fabrication and their corresponding asperity profiles can vary drastically based on the production process. This dissertation presents research focusing on the influence of topographical asperities on OTS film properties of relevance for efficient tribological improvement. A fundamental approach has been taken to carefully examine the factors that contribute to high quality film formation, specifically formation temperature and the role of interfacial water layer associated with the sample surface. As evidenced on smooth surfaces, the characteristics for successful tribological performance of OTS films are strongly dependent on the lateral packing density and molecular orientation of the monolayer. Limited information is available on how monolayers associate on topographical asperities and whether these topographical asperities influence the interfacial reactivity of MEMS surfaces. A silica film produced from a low temperature, vapor-phase hydrolysis of tetrachlorosilane with a tunable topography is

  6. Thermodynamic analysis of protein folding and stability using a tryptophan modification protocol.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingrong; Strickland, Erin C; Fitzgerald, Michael C

    2014-07-15

    Described here is the development of a mass spectrometry-based covalent labeling protocol that utilizes the reaction of dimethyl(2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl)sulfonium bromide (HNSB) with tryptophan (Trp) residues to measure protein folding free energies (ΔG(f) values). In the protocol, the chemical denaturant dependence of the rate at which globally protected Trp residues in a protein react with HNSB is evaluated using either a matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analysis of the intact protein or a quantitative, bottom-up proteomics analysis using isobaric mass tags. In the proof-of-principle studies performed here, the protocol yielded accurate ΔG(f) values for the two-state folding proteins, lysozyme and cytochrome c. The protocol also yielded an accurate measure of the dissociation constant (K(d) value) for the binding of N,N',N″-triacetylchitotriose to lysozyme, and it successfully detected the binding of brinzolamide to BCA II, a non-two-state folding protein. The HNSB protocol can be used in combination with SPROX (stability of proteins from rates of oxidation), a previously reported technique that exploits the hydrogen peroxide oxidation of methionine (Met) residues in proteins to make ΔG(f) value measurements. Incorporating the HNSB protocol into SPROX increased the peptide and protein coverage in proteome-wide SPROX experiments by 50% and 25%, respectively. As part of this work, the precision of proteome-wide ΔG(f) value measurements using the combined HNSB and SPROX protocol is also evaluated. PMID:24896224

  7. Tryptophan 415 Is Critical for the Cholesterol Transport Functions of Scavenger Receptor BI.

    PubMed

    Holme, Rebecca L; Miller, James J; Nicholson, Kay; Sahoo, Daisy

    2016-01-12

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) are anti-atherogenic particles, primarily due to their role in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway whereby HDL delivers cholesteryl esters (CE) to the liver for excretion upon interaction with its receptor, scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI). We designed experiments to test the hypothesis that one or more of the eight highly conserved tryptophan (Trp; W) residues in SR-BI are critical for mediating function. We created a series of Trp-to-phenylalanine (Phe, F) mutant receptors, as well as Trp-less SR-BI (ΔW-SR-BI), and assessed their ability to mediate cholesterol transport. Wild-type (WT) or mutant SR-BI receptors were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells, and cell surface expression was confirmed. Next, we showed that Trp-less- and W415F-SR-BI had significantly decreased abilities to bind HDL and promote selective uptake of HDL-CE, albeit with higher selective uptake efficiency as compared to WT-SR-BI. Interestingly, only Trp-less-, but not W415F-SR-BI, showed an impaired ability to mediate efflux of free cholesterol (FC). Furthermore, both W415F- and Trp-less-SR-BI were unable to reorganize plasma membrane pools of FC based on lack of sensitivity to exogenous cholesterol oxidase. Restoration of Trp 415 into the Trp-less-SR-BI background was unable to rescue Trp-less-SR-BI's impaired functions, suggesting that Trp 415 is critical, but not sufficient for full receptor function. Furthermore, with the exception of Trp 262, restoration of individual extracellular Trp residues, in combination with Trp 415, into the Trp-less-SR-BI background partially rescued SR-BI function, indicating that Trp 415 must be present in combination with other Trp residues for proper cholesterol transport functions. PMID:26652912

  8. Binding studies of tear lipocalin: the role of the conserved tryptophan in maintaining structure, stability and ligand affinity.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, O K; Abduragimov, A R; Yusifov, T N; Glasgow, B J

    1999-08-17

    The principal lipid binding protein in tears, tear lipocalin (TL), binds acid and the fluorescent fatty acid analogs, DAUDA and 16-AP at one site TL compete for this binding site. A fluorescent competitive binding assay revealed that apo-TL has a high affinity for phospholipids and stearic acid (Ki) of 1.2 microM and 1.3 microM, respectively, and much less affinity for cholesterol (Ki) of 15.9 of the hydrocarbon chain. TL binds most strongly the least soluble lipids permitting these lipids to exceed their maximum solubility in aqueous solution. These data implicate TL in solubilizing and transporting lipids in the tear film. Phenylalanine, tyrosine and cysteine+ were substituted for TRP 17, the only invariant residue throughout the lipocalin superfamily. Cysteine substitution resulted in some loss os secondary structure, relaxation of aromatic side chain rigidity, decreased binding affinity for DAUDA and destabilization of structure. Mutants of TL, W17Y, and W17F showed a higher binding affinity for DAUDA than wild-type TL. Comparison of the results of the tryptophan 17 substitution in lipocalin with those of tryptophan 19 substitution in beta-lactoglobulin revealed important differences in binding characteristics that reflect the functional heterogeneity within the lipocalin family. PMID:10515687

  9. A tyrosine–tryptophan dyad and radical-based charge transfer in a ribonucleotide reductase-inspired maquette

    PubMed Central

    Pagba, Cynthia V.; McCaslin, Tyler G.; Veglia, Gianluigi; Porcelli, Fernando; Yohannan, Jiby; Guo, Zhanjun; McDaniel, Miranda; Barry, Bridgette A.

    2015-01-01

    In class 1a ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), a substrate-based radical is generated in the α2 subunit by long-distance electron transfer involving an essential tyrosyl radical (Y122O·) in the β2 subunit. The conserved W48 β2 is ∼10 Å from Y122OH; mutations at W48 inactivate RNR. Here, we design a beta hairpin peptide, which contains such an interacting tyrosine–tryptophan dyad. The NMR structure of the peptide establishes that there is no direct hydrogen bond between the phenol and the indole rings. However, electronic coupling between the tyrosine and tryptophan occurs in the peptide. In addition, downshifted ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) frequencies are observed for the radical state, reproducing spectral downshifts observed for β2. The frequency downshifts of the ring and CO bands are consistent with charge transfer from YO· to W or another residue. Such a charge transfer mechanism implies a role for the β2 Y-W dyad in electron transfer. PMID:26627888

  10. Room temperature fluorescence and phosphorescence study on the interactions of iodide ions with single tryptophan containing serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Gałęcki, Krystian; Kowalska-Baron, Agnieszka

    2016-12-01

    In this study, the influence of heavy-atom perturbation, induced by the addition of iodide ions, on the fluorescence and phosphorescence decay parameters of some single tryptophan containing serum albumins isolated from: human (HSA), equine (ESA) and leporine (LSA) has been studied. The obtained results indicated that, there exist two distinct conformations of the proteins with different exposure to the quencher. In addition, the Stern-Volmer plots indicated saturation of iodide ions in the binding region. Therefore, to determine quenching parameter, we proposed alternative quenching model and we have performed a global analysis of each conformer to define the effect of iodide ions in the cavity by determining the value of the association constant. The possible quenching mechanism may be based on long-range through-space interactions between the buried chromophore and quencher in the aqueous phase. The discrepancies of the decay parameters between the albumins studied may be related with the accumulation of positive charge at the main and the back entrance to the Drug Site 1 where tryptophan residue is located. PMID:27303942

  11. Large scale dynamics of the Michaelis complex in Bacillus stearothermophilus lactate dehydrogenase revealed by a single-tryptophan mutant study.

    PubMed

    Nie, Beining; Deng, Hua; Desamero, Ruel; Callender, Robert

    2013-03-19

    Large scale dynamics within the Michaelis complex mimic of Bacillus stearothermophilus thermophilic lactate dehydrogenase, bsLDH·NADH·oxamate, were studied with site specific resolution by laser-induced temperature jump relaxation spectroscopy with a time resolution of 20 ns. NADH emission and Trp emission from the wild type and a series of single-tryptophan bsLDH mutants, with the tryptophan positions different distances from the active site, were used as reporters of evolving structure in response to the rapid change in temperature. Several distinct dynamical events were observed on the millisecond to microsecond time scale involving motion of atoms spread over the protein, some occurring concomitantly or nearly concomitantly with structural changes at the active site. This suggests that a large portion of the protein-substrate complex moves in a rather concerted fashion to bring about catalysis. The catalytically important surface loop undergoes two distinct movements, both needed for a competent enzyme. Our results also suggest that what is called "loop motion" is not just localized to the loop and active site residues. Rather, it involves the motion of atoms spread over the protein, even some quite distal from the active site. How these results bear on the catalytic mechanism of bsLDH is discussed. PMID:23428201

  12. Interfacial material for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Baozhen, Li; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1999-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells having improved low-temperature operation are disclosed. In one embodiment, an interfacial layer of terbia-stabilized zirconia is located between the air electrode and electrolyte of the solid oxide fuel cell. The interfacial layer provides a barrier which controls interaction between the air electrode and electrolyte. The interfacial layer also reduces polarization loss through the reduction of the air electrode/electrolyte interfacial electrical resistance. In another embodiment, the solid oxide fuel cell comprises a scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte having high electrical conductivity. The scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte may be provided as a very thin layer in order to reduce resistance. The scandia-stabilized electrolyte is preferably used in combination with the terbia-stabilized interfacial layer. The solid oxide fuel cells are operable over wider temperature ranges and wider temperature gradients in comparison with conventional fuel cells.

  13. Involvement of tryptophan metabolism in the body color of crustacea.

    PubMed

    Negishi, S; Hasegawa, Y; Naito, J; Nagamura, Y; Ishiguro, I

    1999-01-01

    The terrestrial isopod, Armadillidium vulgare is usually grey or black in color, however, red ones are occasionally found in the field. This is caused by the mutation of the ommochrome genesis in the integument. We focused our experiments on the mechanism of pigment genesis in which tryptophan metabolism had been expected to be different from the grey or black wild types. We obtained the result that 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid content was significantly higher in the red phenotype than in the wild type, and kynureninase activity was also higher in the red phenotype. PMID:10721114

  14. Gallium uptake in tryptophan-related pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.M.; Park, C.H.; Intenzo, C.M.; Patel, R. )

    1991-02-01

    We describe a patient who developed fever, fatigue, muscle weakness, dyspnea, skin rash, and eosinophilia after taking high doses of tryptophan for insomnia for two years. A gallium-67 scan revealed diffuse increased uptake in the lung and no abnormal uptake in the muscular distribution. Bronchoscopy and biopsy confirmed inflammatory reactions with infiltration by eosinophils, mast cells, and lymphocytes. CT scan showed an interstitial alveolar pattern without fibrosis. EMG demonstrated diffuse myopathy. Muscle biopsy from the right thigh showed an inflammatory myositis with eosinophilic and lymphocytic infiltrations.

  15. Interfacial behaviours of smart composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Chi-Kin

    The success of conventional fiber reinforced composites (FRC) relies on the quality of bonding between fibers and matrix. A review of literatures shows that there is a lack of theoretical models and experimental findings on the interfacial behaviours of the SMA-composites. In the past, the operation limit as well as the ideal actuation condition of SMA inclusions could not be predicted accurately during the design stage and the SMA-composite structures may therefore suffer a potential risk of sudden failure due to overloading or over-actuation. The theoretical models developed in this research provide a study basis for the prediction of internal stresses and interfacial strength of the SMA-composites. Martensite volume fraction is considered as a critical parameter which determines the material properties and shape memory effect (SME) of the SMA inclusions. The proposed model reproduce the SMA behaviour inside a substrate, evolutions of martensite volume fraction and elastic modulus of SMA, and the internal stresses along the embedded length in different loading and actuation scenarios. The concepts of 'constant martensite volume fraction region (CMR)' and 'constant axial stress region (CASR)' are proposed to justify the desired SMA actuation. In addition, substantial improvement of the initial debond stress is predicted with the increase of the actuation temperature. The 'Optimum Actuation Condition (OAC)' that ensures the reinforcement of SMA composite but avoids the failure of composite interface due to over-actuation is also defined to optimize the application of SME in the composite structure within a safety actuation limit. A simplified OAC (SOAC) is also developed to provide an analytical solution of OAC and thus the ideal actuation temperature for achieving such specific actuation condition can be estimated more easily. Single fiber pullout test and finite element analysis (FEA) are employed to evaluate the interfacial behaviours and analyze the stress

  16. Interfacial instabilities in vibrated fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier

    2016-07-01

    Vibrations induce a range of different interfacial phenomena in fluid systems depending on the frequency and orientation of the forcing. With gravity, (large) interfaces are approximately flat and there is a qualitative difference between vertical and horizontal forcing. Sufficient vertical forcing produces subharmonic standing waves (Faraday waves) that extend over the whole interface. Horizontal forcing can excite both localized and extended interfacial phenomena. The vibrating solid boundaries act as wavemakers to excite traveling waves (or sloshing modes at low frequencies) but they also drive evanescent bulk modes whose oscillatory pressure gradient can parametrically excite subharmonic surface waves like cross-waves. Depending on the magnitude of the damping and the aspect ratio of the container, these locally generated surfaces waves may interact in the interior resulting in temporal modulation and other complex dynamics. In the case where the interface separates two fluids of different density in, for example, a rectangular container, the mass transfer due to vertical motion near the endwalls requires a counterflow in the interior region that can lead to a Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability and a ``frozen wave" pattern. In microgravity, the dominance of surface forces favors non-flat equilibrium configurations and the distinction between vertical and horizontal applied forcing can be lost. Hysteresis and multiplicity of solutions are more common, especially in non-wetting systems where disconnected (partial) volumes of fluid can be established. Furthermore, the vibrational field contributes a dynamic pressure term that competes with surface tension to select the (time averaged) shape of the surface. These new (quasi-static) surface configurations, known as vibroequilibria, can differ substantially from the hydrostatic state. There is a tendency for the interface to orient perpendicular to the vibrational axis and, in some cases, a bulge or cavity is induced

  17. Interfacial adhesion of zirconia/veneer bilayers with different thermal characteristics.

    PubMed

    Freifrau Von Maltzahn, Nadine; Kleibe, Martin; Stiesch, Meike; Hübsch, Christoph; Kohorst, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how changes in the thermal characteristics of veneer ceramics with almost identical chemical and mechanical properties but with different coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) can modify their interfacial adhesion to zirconia. 48 bilayers made of one Y-TZP ceramic and four veneer ceramics were fabricated (n=12). Thermal residual stresses were calculated on the basis of the CTE and glass transition temperatures. After defined notching all specimens were loaded in a four-point bending test and the critical loads were recorded which induced stable crack extension at the adhesion interface. The strain energy release rate (G, J/m(2)) was calculated and was taken as a measure of interfacial adhesion. The CTE of the veneer ceramics were significantly correlated with their adhesion to Y-TZP (p<0.001). Interfacial adhesion in zirconia/veneer bilayers is predominantly affected by the thermal characteristics of the veneer ceramic. PMID:24786347

  18. Interfacial instabilities and Kapitsa pendula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, Madison

    2015-11-01

    Determining the critera for onset and amplitude growth of instabilities is one of the central problems of fluid mechanics. We develop a parallel between the Kapitsa effect, in which a pendulum subject to high-frequency low-amplitude vibrations becomes stable in the inverted position, and interfaces separating fluids of different density. It has long been known that such interfaces can be stabilized by vibrations, even when the denser fluid is on top. We demonstrate that the stability diagram for these fluid interfaces is identical to the stability diagram for an appopriate Kapitsa pendulum. We expand the robust, ``dictionary''-type relationship between Kapitsa pendula and interfacial instabilities by considering the classical Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz and Plateau instabilities, as well as less-canonical examples ranging in scale from the micron to the width of a galaxy.

  19. Interfacial adhesion - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Banerjea, Amitava; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along with recommendations for future progress and needs.

  20. Interfacial adhesion: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.; Banerjea, Amitava

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along wiith recommendations for future progress and needs.

  1. Chirality sensitive binding of tryptophan enantiomers with pristine single wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Tamoghna; Roy, Sarita; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr

    2014-07-28

    We report the differential binding nature of pristine single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with tryptophan enantiomers. The differential co-operative response between the pristine SWNTs (topologically chiral) and L- and D-tryptophan (geometrically chiral) provides the insight that geometrical chirality itself manifests with topological chirality in a complex way. PMID:24921981

  2. Kinetic determination of tryptophan by using the B-Z oscillating chemical system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinzhang; Qu, Jie; Yang, Wu; Wei, Xiaoxia; Dai, Hongxia; Lv, Dongyu; Ren, Jie; Chen, Hua

    2009-03-01

    A simple and rapid method was devised for determination of tryptophan, based on the Belousov-Zhabotinskii (B-Z) oscillating chemical system. Changes in oscillating period and amplitude were linearly proportional to the negative logarithm of L-tryptophan concentration over the range of 6.44 x 10(-7)-2.55 x 10(-4) M, with the regression coefficients of near unity and a lower detection limit of 6.5 x 10(-8) M. D-tryptophan was also examined although it is rarely found in most biological fluids, and perhaps not at all in natural proteins. The change of period against to negative logarithm of D-tryptophan concentration over the range of 4.9 x 10(-5)-8.24 x 10(-4) M is linear. Because the optimum conditions for determination of L- and D-tryptophan are not the same, a little amount of D-tryptophan does not affect the determination of L-tryptophan. Various influences were studied and a possible mechanism of perturbation to the B-Z oscillator by tryptophan was also discussed. Spectrophotometry and fluorescence spectrophotofluorimetry were used for comparison and confirmation of the results. PMID:18491028

  3. Tryptophan content for monitoring breast cancer cell aggressiveness by native fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Pu, Yang; Xue, Jianpeng; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Xu, Baogang; Achilefu, Samuel; Alfano, R. R.

    2014-03-01

    This study shows tryptophan as the key native marker in cells to determine the level of aggressive cancer in breast cell lines using native fluorescence spectroscopy. An algorithm based on the ratio of tryptophan fluorescence intensity at 340 nm to intensity at 460 nm is associated with aggressiveness of the cancer cells. The higher the ratio is, the more aggressive the tumor towards metastasis.

  4. NF-Y activates mouse tryptophan hydroxylase transcription.

    PubMed

    Reed, G E; Kirchner, J E; Carr, L G

    1995-06-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase catalyses the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of serotonin, a neurotransmitter which has been implicated in the etiologies of clinically important psychiatric illnesses. Tryptophan hydroxylase is expressed in a tissue-specific manner, but little is known about its transcriptional regulation. By analysing transcriptional activities of a set 5'-deletion constructs of promoter-reporter plasmids in P815-HTR mastocytoma cells, we found that transcription was activated by sequences between nucleotides -343 and -21. DNase I footprint analysis, using nuclear protein extracts from P815-HTR cells, revealed a protein-DNA interaction between nucleotides -77 and -46. A double stranded oligonucleotide, representing this binding site, specifically bound nuclear protein in a gel shift assay. Methylation interference analysis of this complex revealed that nuclear protein interacted with an inverted GGCCAAT element, which is a high-affinity binding motif for the transcription factor NF-Y (also known as CP1 or CBF). An NF-Y specific antibody abolished protein binding in a gel shift assay. Mutagenesis of specific base pairs abolished protein binding in vitro, and mutagenesis of the same base pairs in a reporter gene construct resulted in a 65% decrease in transcriptional activity. Our results suggest that the transcription factor NF-Y binds to a GGCCAAT motif in the tph proximal promoter and activates transcription. PMID:7552299

  5. A model for multiexponential tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bajzer, Z; Prendergast, F G

    1993-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay in proteins is modeled by multiexponential functions characterized by lifetimes and preexponential factors. Commonly, multiple conformations of the protein are invoked to explain the recovery of two or more lifetimes from the experimental data. However, in many proteins the structure seems to preclude the possibility of multiple conformers sufficiently different from one another to justify such an inference. We present here another plausible multiexponential model based on the assumption that an energetically excited donor surrounded by N acceptor molecules decays by specific radiative and radiationless relaxation processes, and by transferring its energy to acceptors present in or close to the protein matrix. If interactions between the acceptors themselves and back energy transfer are neglected, we show that the intensity decay function contain 2N exponential components characterized by the unperturbed donor lifetime, by energy transfer rates and a probability of occurrence for the corresponding process. We applied this model to the fluorescence decay of holo- and apoazurin, ribonuclease T1, and the reduced single tryptophan mutant (W28F) of thioredoxin. Use of a multiexponential model for the analysis of the fluorescence intensity decay can therefore be justified, without invoking multiple protein conformations. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8312471

  6. Tryptophan Biochemistry: Structural, Nutritional, Metabolic, and Medical Aspects in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Palego, Lionella; Betti, Laura; Rossi, Alessandra; Giannaccini, Gino

    2016-01-01

    L-Tryptophan is the unique protein amino acid (AA) bearing an indole ring: its biotransformation in living organisms contributes either to keeping this chemical group in cells and tissues or to breaking it, by generating in both cases a variety of bioactive molecules. Investigations on the biology of Trp highlight the pleiotropic effects of its small derivatives on homeostasis processes. In addition to protein turn-over, in humans the pathways of Trp indole derivatives cover the synthesis of the neurotransmitter/hormone serotonin (5-HT), the pineal gland melatonin (MLT), and the trace amine tryptamine. The breakdown of the Trp indole ring defines instead the “kynurenine shunt” which produces cell-response adapters as L-kynurenine, kynurenic and quinolinic acids, or the coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). This review aims therefore at tracing a “map” of the main molecular effectors in human tryptophan (Trp) research, starting from the chemistry of this AA, dealing then with its biosphere distribution and nutritional value for humans, also focusing on some proteins responsible for its tissue-dependent uptake and biotransformation. We will thus underscore the role of Trp biochemistry in the pathogenesis of human complex diseases/syndromes primarily involving the gut, neuroimmunoendocrine/stress responses, and the CNS, supporting the use of -Omics approaches in this field. PMID:26881063

  7. Tryptophan Biochemistry: Structural, Nutritional, Metabolic, and Medical Aspects in Humans.

    PubMed

    Palego, Lionella; Betti, Laura; Rossi, Alessandra; Giannaccini, Gino

    2016-01-01

    L-Tryptophan is the unique protein amino acid (AA) bearing an indole ring: its biotransformation in living organisms contributes either to keeping this chemical group in cells and tissues or to breaking it, by generating in both cases a variety of bioactive molecules. Investigations on the biology of Trp highlight the pleiotropic effects of its small derivatives on homeostasis processes. In addition to protein turn-over, in humans the pathways of Trp indole derivatives cover the synthesis of the neurotransmitter/hormone serotonin (5-HT), the pineal gland melatonin (MLT), and the trace amine tryptamine. The breakdown of the Trp indole ring defines instead the "kynurenine shunt" which produces cell-response adapters as L-kynurenine, kynurenic and quinolinic acids, or the coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)). This review aims therefore at tracing a "map" of the main molecular effectors in human tryptophan (Trp) research, starting from the chemistry of this AA, dealing then with its biosphere distribution and nutritional value for humans, also focusing on some proteins responsible for its tissue-dependent uptake and biotransformation. We will thus underscore the role of Trp biochemistry in the pathogenesis of human complex diseases/syndromes primarily involving the gut, neuroimmunoendocrine/stress responses, and the CNS, supporting the use of -Omics approaches in this field. PMID:26881063

  8. Tryptophan autofluorescence imaging of neoplasms of the human colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Bhaskar; Renkoski, Timothy; Graves, Logan R.; Rial, Nathaniel S.; Tsikitis, Vassiliki Liana; Nfonsom, Valentine; Pugh, Judith; Tiwari, Piyush; Gavini, Hemanth; Utzinger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Detection of flat neoplasia is a major challenge in colorectal cancer screening, as missed lesions can lead to the development of an unexpected `incident' cancer prior to the subsequent endoscopy. The use of a tryptophan-related autofluorescence has been reported to be increased in murine intestinal dysplasia. The emission spectra of cells isolated from human adenocarcinoma and normal mucosa of the colon were studied and showed markedly greater emission intensity from cancerous cells compared to cells obtained from the surrounding normal mucosa. A proto-type multispectral imaging system optimized for ultraviolet macroscopic imaging of tissue was used to obtain autofluorescence images of surgical specimens of colonic neoplasms and normal mucosa after resection. Fluorescence images did not display the expected greater emission from the tumor as compared to the normal mucosa, most probably due to increased optical absorption and scattering in the tumors. Increased fluorescence intensity in neoplasms was observed however, once fluorescence images were corrected using reflectance images. Tryptophan fluorescence alone may be useful in differentiating normal and cancerous cells, while in tissues its autofluorescence image divided by green reflectance may be useful in displaying neoplasms.

  9. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  10. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  11. Proton affinity of the histidine-tryptophan cluster motif from the influenza A virus from ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankura, Arindam; Klein, Michael L.; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2013-08-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations have been used to compare and contrast the deprotonation reaction of a histidine residue in aqueous solution with the situation arising in a histidine-tryptophan cluster. The latter is used as a model of the proton storage unit present in the pore of the M2 proton conducting ion channel. We compute potentials of mean force for the dissociation of a proton from the Nδ and Nɛ positions of the imidazole group to estimate the pKas. Anticipating our results, we will see that the estimated pKa for the first protonation event of the M2 channel is in good agreement with experimental estimates. Surprisingly, despite the fact that the histidine is partially desolvated in the M2 channel, the affinity for protons is similar to that of a histidine in aqueous solution. Importantly, the electrostatic environment provided by the indoles is responsible for the stabilization of the charged imidazolium.

  12. Starvation Induces Vacuolar Targeting and Degradation of the Tryptophan Permease in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Thomas; Schmidt, Anja; Hall, Michael N.

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, amino acid permeases are divided into two classes. One class, represented by the general amino acid permease GAP1, contains permeases regulated in response to the nitrogen source. The other class, including the high affinity tryptophan permease, TAT2, consists of the so-called constitutive permeases. We show that TAT2 is regulated at the level of protein stability. In exponentially growing cells, TAT2 is in the plasma membrane and also accumulates in internal compartments of the secretory pathway. Upon nutrient deprivation or rapamycin treatment, TAT2 is transported to and degraded in the vacuole. The ubiquitination machinery and lysine residues within the NH2-terminal 31 amino acids of TAT2 mediate ubiquitination and degradation of the permease. Starvation-induced degradation of internal TAT2 is blocked in sec18, sec23, pep12, and vps27 mutants, but not in sec4, end4, and apg1 mutants, suggesting that, upon nutrient limitation, internal TAT2 is diverted from the late secretory pathway to the vacuolar pathway. Furthermore, our results suggest that TAT2 stability and sorting are controlled by the TOR signaling pathway, and regulated inversely to that of GAP1. PMID:10491387

  13. Comparison of the solution of histidine-tryptophan-alfacetoglutarate with histidine-tryptophan-glutamate as cardioplegic agents in isolated rat hearts: an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza; Ferreira, Lívia Carvalho; Zuccari, Débora Aparecida Pires de Campos; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; dos Santos, Carlos Alberto; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseni; Petrucci, Orlando; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac arrest during heart surgery is a common procedure and allows the surgeon to perform surgical procedures in an environment free of blood and movement. Using a model of isolated rat heart, the authors compare a new cardioplegic solution containing histidine-tryptophan-glutamate (group 2) with the histidine-tryptophan-alphacetoglutarate (group 1) routinely used by some cardiac surgeons. Objective To assess caspase, IL-8 and KI-67 in isolated rat hearts using immunohistochemistry. Methods 20 Wistar male rats were anesthetized and heparinized. The chest was opened, cardioctomy was performed and 40 ml/kg of the appropriate cardioplegic solution was infused. The hearts were kept for 2 hours at 4ºC in the same solution, and thereafter, placed in the Langendorff apparatus for 30 minutes with Ringer-Locke solution. Immunohistochemistry analysis of caspase, IL-8, and KI-67 were performed. Results The concentration of caspase was lower in group 2 and Ki-67 was higher in group 2, both P<0.05. There was no statistical difference between the values of IL-8 between the groups. Conclusion Histidine-tryptophan-glutamate solution was better than histidine-tryptophan-alphacetoglutarate solution because it reduced caspase (apoptosis), increased KI-67 (cell proliferation), and showed no difference in IL-8 levels compared to group 1. This suggests that the histidine-tryptophan-glutamate solution was more efficient than the histidine-tryptophan-alphacetoglutarate for the preservation of hearts of rat cardiomyocytes. PMID:24896167

  14. Chemical modification of the functional arginine residues of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, T; Kumar, G K; Shenoy, B C; Wood, H G

    1989-08-22

    Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) is the key enzyme of autotrophic growth with CO or CO2 and H2 by the acetyl-CoA pathway. The enzyme from Clostridium thermoaceticum catalyzes the formation of acetyl-CoA from the methyl, carbonyl, and CoA groups and has separate binding sites for these moieties. In this study, we have determined the role of arginine residues in binding of CoA by CODH. Phenylglyoxal, an arginine-specific reagent, inactivated CODH, and CoA afforded about 80-85% protection against this inactivation. The other ligands, such as the carbonyl and the methyl groups, gave no protection. By circular dichroism, it was shown that the loss of activity is not due to extensive structural changes in CODH. Earlier, we showed that tryptophan residues are located at the CoA binding site of CODH [Shanmugasundaram, T., Kumar, G. K., & Wood, H. G. (1988) Biochemistry 27, 6499-6503]. A comparison of the fluorescence spectra of the native and phenylglyoxal-modified enzymes indicates that the reactive arginine residues appear to be located close to fluorescing tryptophans. Fluorescence spectral studies with CoA analogues or its components showed that CoA interacts with the tryptophan(s) of CODH through its adenine moiety. In addition, evidence is presented that the arginines interact with the pyrophosphate moiety of CoA. PMID:2819052

  15. TRYPTOPHAN: EFFECTS ON NEUTOTRANSMITTERS, BEHAVIOR, MEAT QUALITY, AND THE RESULTS OF CURRENT REQUIREMENT STUDIES IN NURSERY PIGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tryptophan is one of most interesting and complex amino acids. The lack of sensitive methods for tryptophan determination in proteins and biological fluids, low content in common feedstuffs, low product availability, high cost of crystalline tryptophan, and the high degree of variability associated...

  16. Incorporating interfacial phenomena in solidification models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, Christoph; Wang, Chao Yang

    1994-01-01

    A general methodology is available for the incorporation of microscopic interfacial phenomena in macroscopic solidification models that include diffusion and convection. The method is derived from a formal averaging procedure and a multiphase approach, and relies on the presence of interfacial integrals in the macroscopic transport equations. In a wider engineering context, these techniques are not new, but their application in the analysis and modeling of solidification processes has largely been overlooked. This article describes the techniques and demonstrates their utility in two examples in which microscopic interfacial phenomena are of great importance.

  17. Dissecting the Catalytic Mechanism of Betaine-Homocysteine S-Methyltransferase Using Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence and Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, C.; Gratson, A.A.; Evans, J.C.; Jiracek, J.; Collinsova, M.; Ludwig, M.L.; Garrow, T.A.

    2010-03-05

    Betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) is a zinc-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from glycine betaine (Bet) to homocysteine (Hcy) to form dimethylglycine (DMG) and methionine (Met). Previous studies in other laboratories have indicated that catalysis proceeds through the formation of a ternary complex, with a transition state mimicked by the inhibitor S-({delta}-carboxybutyl)-l-homocysteine (CBHcy). Using changes in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence to determine the affinity of human BHMT for substrates, products, or CBHcy, we now demonstrate that the enzyme-substrate complex reaches its transition state through an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which Hcy is the first substrate to bind and Met is the last product released. Hcy, Met, and CBHcy bind to the enzyme to form binary complexes with K{sub d} values of 7.9, 6.9, and 0.28 {micro}M, respectively. Binary complexes with Bet and DMG cannot be detected with fluorescence as a probe, but Bet and DMG bind tightly to BHMT-Hcy to form ternary complexes with K{sub d} values of 1.1 and 0.73 {micro}M, respectively. Mutation of each of the seven tryptophan residues in human BHMT provides evidence that the enzyme undergoes two distinct conformational changes that are reflected in the fluorescence of the enzyme. The first is induced when Hcy binds, and the second, when Bet binds. As predicted by the crystal structure of BHMT, the amino acids Trp44 and Tyr160 are involved in binding Bet, and Glu159 in binding Hcy. Replacing these residues by site-directed mutagenesis significantly reduces the catalytic efficiency (V{sub max}/K{sub m}) of the enzyme. Replacing Tyr77 with Phe abolishes enzyme activity.

  18. Another Role of Proline: Stabilization Interactions in Proteins and Protein Complexes Concerning Proline and Tryptophane

    SciTech Connect

    Biedermannova, Lada; Riley, Kevin E.; Berka, Karel; Hobza, Pavel; Vondrasek, Jiri

    2008-09-11

    Proline–tryptophan complexes derived from experimental structures are investigated by quantum chemical procedures known to properly describe the London dispersion energy. We study two geometrical arrangements: the “L-shaped”, stabilized by an H-bond, and the “stacked-like”, where the two residues are in parallel orientation without any H-bond. Interestingly, the interaction energies in both cases are comparable and very large (~7 kcal mol⁻¹). The strength of stabilization in the stacked arrangement is rather surprising considering the fact that only one partner has an aromatic character. The interaction energy decomposition using the SAPT method further demonstrates the very important role of dispersion energy in such arrangement. To elucidate the structural features responsible for this unexpectedly large stabilization we examined the role of the nitrogen heteroatom and the importance of the cyclicity of the proline residue. We show that the electrostatic interaction due to the presence of the dipole, caused by the nitrogen heteroatom, contributes largely to the strength of the interaction. Nevertheless, the cyclic arrangement of proline, which allows for the largest amount of dispersive contact with the aromatic partner, also has a notable-effect. Geometry optimizations carried out for the “stackedlike” complexes show that the arrangements derived from protein structure are close to their gas phase optimum geometry, suggesting that the environment has only a minor effect on the geometry of the interaction. We conclude that the strength of proline non-covalent interactions, combined with this residue’s rigidity, might be the explanation for its prominent role in protein stabilization and recognition processes.

  19. Interfacial sliding near a free surface in a fibrous or layered composite during thermal cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, B. N.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a simple shear lag model of interfacial sliding at a free surface in a layered or continuous fiber composite. The interface is characterized by a critical interfacial shear stress, tau0, which might represent the critical stress for frictional sliding at a weakly bonded interface, or the shear flow stress of a thin ductile interface layer at a well bonded interface. The history, during heating and cooling, of the relative normal displacement of the reinforcing inclusions and the matrix on a free surface cut normal to the inclusions is calculated and shown to depend on both the absolute value and the temperature dependence of tau0, as well as on the magnitudes of the bulk residual stresses. The variety of possible displacement histories suggests that they are a rich source of information about tau0 and the residual stresses.

  20. Interfacial fracture toughness of alumina/niobium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, M.G. ); O'Dowd, N.P.; Shih, C.F. . Div. of Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    The interfacial fracture toughness of an alumina/niobium composite has been measured as a function of phase angle. The interface was formed by solid-state bonding bulk Coor's AD-999 fine-grain alumina with a commercial purity niobium at 1600{degrees}C for 0.5 hr under a pressure of 10.5 MPa. The alumina/niobium system has a number of features which makes it ideal for an investigation of interfacial fracture toughness. From HREM data we estimate that the width of the interface is no more than 10 atomic planes. Furthermore the thermal expansion coefficients of the two materials differ by less than 5% so residual stresses due to the bonding process are small. Using symmetric and asymmetric four point bend specimens we have measured the fracture toughness of homogenous alumina and that of the alumina/niobium bimaterial in combinations of in-plane shear and tension. The fracture toughness of the homogenous alumina is relatively insensitive to the loading phase. The measured fracture toughness K{sub c} of the interface, however, depended strongly on phase angle. We were unable to obtain valid alumina/niobium interfacial toughness data at negative phase angles as the fracture initiates in the alumina and not at the interface. In symmetric bending at a phase angle {approx}5{degrees}, we measured a nominal interface toughness of 4.0 MPa{radical}m, comparable to the homogeneous alumina. We found that the toughness increased with loading phase angle to a value of K{sub c} {approx} 9 MPa{radical}m at a phase between 25{degrees} and 40{degrees}. Preliminary calculations and experiments suggest that this effect is due to an asymmetric stress distribution, with respect to the interface, and plastic deformation in the niobium. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, H.K.; Babcock, W.C.; Friensen, D.T.; Smith, K.L.; Johnson, B.M.; Wamser, C.C.

    1990-08-14

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclosed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers. 3 figs.

  2. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, Harold K.; Babcock, Walter C.; Friensen, Dwayne T.; Smith, Kelly L.; Johnson, Bruce M.; Wamser, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclsoed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers.

  3. Cantilever based optical interfacial force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonander, Jeremy R.; Kim, Byung I.

    2008-03-01

    We developed a cantilever based optical interfacial force microscopy (COIFM) that employs a microactuated silicon cantilever and optical detection method to establish the measurement of the single molecular interactions using the force feedback technique. Through the direct measurement of the COIFM force-distance curves, we have demonstrated that the COIFM is capable of unveiling structural and mechanical information on interfacial water at the single molecular level over all distances between two hydrophilic surfaces.

  4. Modeling interfacial fracture in Sierra.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Arthur A.; Ohashi, Yuki; Lu, Wei-Yang; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Foulk, James W.,; Reedy, Earl David,; Austin, Kevin N.; Margolis, Stephen B.

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes computational efforts to model interfacial fracture using cohesive zone models in the SIERRA/SolidMechanics (SIERRA/SM) finite element code. Cohesive surface elements were used to model crack initiation and propagation along predefined paths. Mesh convergence was observed with SIERRA/SM for numerous geometries. As the funding for this project came from the Advanced Simulation and Computing Verification and Validation (ASC V&V) focus area, considerable effort was spent performing verification and validation. Code verification was performed to compare code predictions to analytical solutions for simple three-element simulations as well as a higher-fidelity simulation of a double-cantilever beam. Parameter identification was conducted with Dakota using experimental results on asymmetric double-cantilever beam (ADCB) and end-notched-flexure (ENF) experiments conducted under Campaign-6 funding. Discretization convergence studies were also performed with respect to mesh size and time step and an optimization study was completed for mode II delamination using the ENF geometry. Throughout this verification process, numerous SIERRA/SM bugs were found and reported, all of which have been fixed, leading to over a 10-fold increase in convergence rates. Finally, mixed-mode flexure experiments were performed for validation. One of the unexplained issues encountered was material property variability for ostensibly the same composite material. Since the variability is not fully understood, it is difficult to accurately assess uncertainty when performing predictions.

  5. Electric Field Induced Interfacial Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusner, Robert E.; Min, Kyung Yang; Wu, Xiao-Lun; Onuki, Akira

    1996-01-01

    The study of the interface in a charge-free, nonpolar, critical and near-critical binary fluid in the presence of an externally applied electric field is presented. At sufficiently large fields, the interface between the two phases of the binary fluid should become unstable and exhibit an undulation with a predefined wavelength on the order of the capillary length. As the critical point is approached, this wavelength is reduced, potentially approaching length-scales such as the correlation length or critical nucleation radius. At this point the critical properties of the system may be affected. In zero gravity, the interface is unstable at all long wavelengths in the presence of a field applied across it. It is conjectured that this will cause the binary fluid to break up into domains small enough to be outside the instability condition. The resulting pattern formation, and the effects on the critical properties as the domains approach the correlation length are of acute interest. With direct observation, laser light scattering, and interferometry, the phenomena can be probed to gain further understanding of interfacial instabilities and the pattern formation which results, and dimensional crossover in critical systems as the critical fluctuations in a particular direction are suppressed by external forces.

  6. Crop residues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop residues [e.g., corn (Zea mays) stover and small grain straw] are sometimes excluded when discussing cellulosic energy crops per se, but because of the vast area upon which they are grown and their current role in the development of cellulosic energy systems. This chapter focuses on current cor...

  7. Interfacial area transport in bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; Revankar, S.T.

    1997-12-31

    In order to close the two-fluid model for two-phase flow analyses, the interfacial area concentration needs to be modeled as a constitutive relation. In this study, the focus was on the investigation of the interfacial area concentration transport phenomena, both theoretically and experimentally. The interfacial area concentration transport equation for air-water bubbly up-flow in a vertical pipe was developed, and the models for the source and sink terms were provided. The necessary parameters for the experimental studies were identified, including the local time-averaged void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble interfacial velocity, liquid velocity and turbulent intensity. Experiments were performed with air-water mixture at atmospheric pressure. Double-sensor conductivity probe and hot-film probe were employed to measure the identified parameters. With these experimental data, the preliminary model evaluation was carried out for the simplest form of the developed interfacial area transport equation, i.e., the one-dimensional transport equation.

  8. Failure of dietary leucine to influence the tryptophan-niacin pathway in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Penz, A M; Clifford, A J; Rogers, Q R; Kratzer, F H

    1984-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted with young chicks to determine whether dietary leucine affects the conversion of tryptophan to niacin. Either tryptophan or niacin improved growth and reduced perosis when chicks were fed a purified diet marginal in tryptophan and deficient in niacin. Addition of 4.8% L-leucine to the diet did not alter the growth and perosis prevention response obtained with tryptophan. Liver weight was slightly increased by the addition of 5.4% L-leucine to the diet. Plasma insulin was slightly reduced by leucine and by isoleucine and valine. Picolinic carboxylase in the kidney was reduced in chicks fed 0.2% tryptophan with no niacin and was also reduced when isoleucine and valine were added to the diets. Liver picolinic carboxylase activity was not influenced by diet. Plasma isoleucine and valine were reduced by the addition of leucine to the diet and were increased again when isoleucine and valine were added to the diet. Plasma leucine was increased by the addition of leucine but was not altered by valine and isoleucine. Plasma tryptophan was not influenced by dietary supplements of leucine or isoleucine and valine. The results show that in the chick there is no evidence for an effect of leucine on the tryptophan to niacin pathway. PMID:6693983

  9. Was the Chlamydial Adaptative Strategy to Tryptophan Starvation an Early Determinant of Plastid Endosymbiosis?

    PubMed Central

    Cenci, Ugo; Ducatez, Mathieu; Kadouche, Derifa; Colleoni, Christophe; Ball, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydiales were recently proposed to have sheltered the future cyanobacterial ancestor of plastids in a common inclusion. The intracellular pathogens are thought to have donated those critical transporters that triggered the efflux of photosynthetic carbon and the consequent onset of symbiosis. Chlamydiales are also suspected to have encoded glycogen metabolism TTS (Type Three Secretion) effectors responsible for photosynthetic carbon assimilation in the eukaryotic cytosol. We now review the reasons underlying other chlamydial lateral gene transfers evidenced in the descendants of plastid endosymbiosis. In particular we show that half of the genes encoding enzymes of tryptophan synthesis in Archaeplastida are of chlamydial origin. Tryptophan concentration is an essential cue triggering two alternative modes of replication in Chlamydiales. In addition, sophisticated tryptophan starvation mechanisms are known to act as antibacterial defenses in animal hosts. We propose that Chlamydiales have donated their tryptophan operon to the emerging plastid to ensure increased synthesis of tryptophan by the plastid ancestor. This would have allowed massive expression of the tryptophan rich chlamydial transporters responsible for symbiosis. It would also have allowed possible export of this valuable amino-acid in the inclusion of the tryptophan hungry pathogens. Free-living single cell cyanobacteria are devoid of proteins able to transport this amino-acid. We therefore investigated the phylogeny of the Tyr/Trp transporters homologous to E. coli TyrP/Mre and found yet another LGT from Chlamydiales to Archaeplastida thereby considerably strengthening our proposal. PMID:27446814

  10. In Vivo Function of Tryptophans in the Arabidopsis UV-B Photoreceptor UVR8[W

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Andrew; Jenkins, Gareth I.

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) is a photoreceptor specifically for UV-B light that initiates photomorphogenic responses in plants. UV-B exposure causes rapid conversion of UVR8 from dimer to monomer, accumulation in the nucleus, and interaction with CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1), which functions with UVR8 in UV-B responses. Studies in yeast and with purified UVR8 implicate several tryptophan amino acids in UV-B photoreception. However, their roles in UV-B responses in plants, and the functional significance of all 14 UVR8 tryptophans, are not known. Here we report the functions of the UVR8 tryptophans in vivo. Three tryptophans in the β-propeller core are important in maintaining structural stability and function of UVR8. However, mutation of three other core tryptophans and four at the dimeric interface has no apparent effect on function in vivo. Mutation of three tryptophans implicated in UV-B photoreception, W233, W285, and W337, impairs photomorphogenic responses to different extents. W285 is essential for UVR8 function in plants, whereas W233 is important but not essential for function, and W337 has a lesser role. Ala mutants of these tryptophans appear monomeric and constitutively bind COP1 in plants, but their responses indicate that monomer formation and COP1 binding are not sufficient for UVR8 function. PMID:23012433

  11. A tryptophan responsive fluorescent and wettable dual-signal switch.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Li, Jing; Feng, Ningmei; Luo, Li; Dai, Zhen; Yang, Li; Tian, Demei; Li, Haibing

    2014-09-21

    A new fluorescent dianthracene calix[4]arene (C4DA) was designed and synthesized via coupling the fluorescent anthracene units and calix[4]arene units. Then it was used to form self-assembled monolayers (C4DA-SAMs) by the simple click reaction to give the first fluorescent and wettable dual-signal switch for tryptophan (Trp) on a micro- and nano-structured silicon surface. The switch for Trp on the C4DA functional surface was confirmed by contact angle (CA) measurements and fluorescent spectroscopy (FL). Furthermore, the wettability-responsive C4DA functional interface can be re-used for six cycles. The responsive switch can potentially be applied in many fields including nanodevices and intelligent microfluidic switching. PMID:24992098

  12. Antitumour agents as inhibitors of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Pantouris, Georgios; Mowat, Christopher G

    2014-01-01

    The involvement of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) in cancer biology has recently been described, with the enzyme playing an immunomodulatory role, suppressing antitumour immune responses and promoting tumour cell survival and proliferation. This finding reinforces the need for specific inhibitors of TDO that may potentially be developed for therapeutic use. In this work we have screened ~2800 compounds from the library of the National Cancer Institute USA and identified seven potent inhibitors of TDO with inhibition constants in the nanomolar or low micromolar range. All seven have antitumour properties, killing various cancer cell lines. For comparison, the inhibition potencies of these compounds were tested against IDO and their inhibition constants are reported. Interestingly, this work reveals that NSC 36398 (dihydroquercetin, taxifolin), with an in vitro inhibition constant of ~16 μM, is the first TDO-selective inhibitor reported. PMID:24269239

  13. Structure and Activity of Tryptophan-rich TSPO Translocator Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Youzhong; Kalathur, Ravi C.; Liu, Qun; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Ginter, Christopher; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2015-01-01

    TSPO translocator proteins bind steroids and porphyrins, and they are implicated in many human diseases, for which they serve as biomarkers and therapeutic targets. TSPOs have tryptophan-rich sequences that are fhighly conserved from bacteria to mammals. We report crystal structures for Bacillus cereus TSPO (BcTSPO) down to 1.7Å resolution, including a complex with the benzodiazepine-like inhibitor PK11195. We also describe BcTSPO-mediated protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) reactions, including catalytic degradation to a previously undescribed heme derivative. We used structure-inspired mutations to investigate reaction mechanisms, and we showed that TSPOs from Xenopus and man have similar PpIX-directed activities. Although TSPOs have been regarded as transporters, the catalytic activity in PpIX degradation suggests physiological importance for TSPOs in protection against oxidative stress. PMID:25635100

  14. Discovery of acyl guanidine tryptophan hydroxylase-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Daniel R; De Lombaert, Stéphane; Aiello, Robert; Bourassa, Patricia; Barucci, Nicole; Zhang, Qing; Paralkar, Vishwas; Stein, Adam J; Valentine, Jim; Zavadoski, William

    2016-06-15

    An increasing number of diseases have been linked to a dysfunctional peripheral serotonin system. Given that tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1) is the rate limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis off serotonin, it represents an attractive target to regulate peripheral serotonin. Following up to our first disclosure, we report a new chemotype of TPH1 inhibitors where-by the more common central planar heterocycle has been replaced with an open-chain, acyl guanidine surrogate. Through our work, we found that compounds of this nature provide highly potent TPH1 inhibitors with favorable physicochemical properties that were effective in reducing murine intestinal 5-HT in vivo. Furthermore, we obtained a high resolution (1.90Å) X-ray structure crystal structure of one of these inhibitors (compound 51) that elucidated the active conformation along with revealing a dimeric form of TPH1 for the first time. PMID:27146606

  15. Transition Metal-Free Tryptophan-Selective Bioconjugation of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yohei; Ishiyama, Takashi; Sasaki, Daisuke; Abe, Junpei; Sohma, Youhei; Oisaki, Kounosuke; Kanai, Motomu

    2016-08-31

    Chemical modifications of native proteins can facilitate production of supernatural protein functions that are not easily accessible by complementary methods relying on genetic manipulations. However, accomplishing precise control over selectivity while maintaining structural integrity and homogeneity still represents a formidable challenge. Herein, we report a transition metal-free method for tryptophan-selective bioconjugation of proteins that is based on an organoradical and operates under ambient conditions. This method exhibits low levels of cross-reactivity and leaves higher-order structures of the protein and various functional groups therein unaffected. The strategy to target less abundant amino acids contributes to the formation of structurally homogeneous conjugates, which may even be suitable for protein crystallography. The absence of toxic metals and biochemically incompatible conditions allows a rapid functional modulation of native proteins such as antibodies and pathogenic aggregative proteins, and this method may thus easily find therapeutic applications. PMID:27534812

  16. Molecular basis for the substrate stereoselectivity in Tryptophan Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Capece, Luciana; Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Marti, Marcelo A.; Estrin, Dario A.; Yeh, Syun-Ru

    2011-01-01

    Tryptophan dioxygenase (TDO) and Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) are the only two heme-proteins that catalyze the oxidation reaction of tryptophan (Trp) to N-formylkynurenine (NFK). While human IDO (hIDO) is able to oxidize both L and D-Trp, human TDO (hTDO) displays a major specificity towards L-Trp. In this work we aim to interrogate the molecular basis for the substrate stereoselectivity of hTDO. Our previous molecular dynamics simulation studies of Xanthomonas campestris TDO (xcTDO) showed that an H-bond between T254 (T342 in hTDO) and the ammonium group of the substrate is present in the L-Trp-bound enzyme, but not in the D-Trp bound enzyme. The fact that this is the only notable structural alteration induced by the change in the stereo structure of the substrate prompted us to produce and characterize the T342A mutant of hTDO to evaluate the structural role of T342 in controlling the substrate stereoselectivity of the enzyme. The experimental results indicate that the mutation only slightly perturbs the global structural properties of the enzyme, but it totally abolishes the substrate stereoselectivity. Molecular Dynamics simulations of xcTDO show that T254 controls the substrate stereoselectivity of the enzyme by (i) modulating the H-bonding interaction between the NH3+ group and epoxide oxygen of the ferryl/indole 2,3-epoxide intermediate of the enzyme, and (ii) regulating the dynamics of two active site loops, loop250–260 and loop117–130, critical for substrate-binding. PMID:22082147

  17. Serotonin, tryptophan metabolism and the brain-gut-microbiome axis.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, S M; Clarke, G; Borre, Y E; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2015-01-15

    The brain-gut axis is a bidirectional communication system between the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract. Serotonin functions as a key neurotransmitter at both terminals of this network. Accumulating evidence points to a critical role for the gut microbiome in regulating normal functioning of this axis. In particular, it is becoming clear that the microbial influence on tryptophan metabolism and the serotonergic system may be an important node in such regulation. There is also substantial overlap between behaviours influenced by the gut microbiota and those which rely on intact serotonergic neurotransmission. The developing serotonergic system may be vulnerable to differential microbial colonisation patterns prior to the emergence of a stable adult-like gut microbiota. At the other extreme of life, the decreased diversity and stability of the gut microbiota may dictate serotonin-related health problems in the elderly. The mechanisms underpinning this crosstalk require further elaboration but may be related to the ability of the gut microbiota to control host tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway, thereby simultaneously reducing the fraction available for serotonin synthesis and increasing the production of neuroactive metabolites. The enzymes of this pathway are immune and stress-responsive, both systems which buttress the brain-gut axis. In addition, there are neural processes in the gastrointestinal tract which can be influenced by local alterations in serotonin concentrations with subsequent relay of signals along the scaffolding of the brain-gut axis to influence CNS neurotransmission. Therapeutic targeting of the gut microbiota might be a viable treatment strategy for serotonin-related brain-gut axis disorders. PMID:25078296

  18. Advances in the molecular characterization of tryptophan hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Mockus, S M; Vrana, K E

    1998-06-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin has been implicated in numerous physiological functions and pathophysiological disorders. The hydroxylation of the aromatic amino acid tryptophan is rate-limiting in the synthesis of serotonin. Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), as the rate-limiting enzyme, determines the concentrations of serotonin in vivo. Relative serotonin concentrations are clearly important in neural transmission, but serotonin has also been reported to function as a local antioxidant. Identification of the mechanisms regulating TPH activity has been hindered by its low levels in tissues and the instability of the enzyme. Several TPH expression systems have been developed to circumvent these problems. In addition, eukaryotic expressions systems are currently being developed and represent a new avenue of research for identifying TPH regulatory mechanisms. Recombinant DNA technology has enabled the synthesis of TPH deletions, chimeras, and point mutations that have served as tools for identifying structural and functional domains within TPH. Notably, the experiments have proven long-held hypotheses that TPH is organized into N-terminal regulatory and C-terminal catalytic domains, that serine-58 is a site for PKA-mediated phosphorylation, and that a C-terminal leucine zipper is involved in formation of the tetrameric holoenzyme. Several new findings have also emerged regarding regulation of TPH activity by posttranslational phosphorylation, kinetic inhibition, and covalent modification. Inhibition of TPH by L-DOPA may have implications for depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. In addition, TPH inactivation by nitric oxide may be involved in amphetamine-induced toxicity. These regulatory concepts, in conjunction with new systems for studying TPH activity, are the focus of this article. PMID:9770640

  19. Phosphodiesterase 2 and 5 inhibition attenuates the object memory deficit induced by acute tryptophan depletion.

    PubMed

    van Donkelaar, Eva L; Rutten, Kris; Blokland, Arjan; Akkerman, Sven; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Prickaerts, Jos

    2008-12-14

    The underlying mechanism of short-term memory improvement after inhibition of specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs) is still poorly understood. The present study aimed to reveal the ability of PDE5 and PDE2 inhibitors, that increase cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and both cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cGMP, respectively, to reverse an object recognition deficit induced by acute tryptophan depletion. Acute tryptophan depletion is a pharmacological challenge tool to lower central serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) levels by depleting the availability of its dietary precursor tryptophan. Short-term object memory was tested in male Wistar rats by exposing them to the object recognition task. First, the effects of acute tryptophan depletion upon object recognition 2 h after administration of the nutritional mixture were established. Subsequently, acute tryptophan depletion was combined with the PDE5 inhibitor vardenafil (1, 3 and 10 mg/kg) or with the PDE2 inhibitor BAY 60-7550 (0.3, 1 and 3 mg/kg), 30 min prior to testing. Acute tryptophan depletion significantly lowered plasma tryptophan levels and impaired object recognition performance. Vardenafil (3 and 10 mg/kg) and BAY 60-7550 (3 mg/kg) were able to attenuate the acute tryptophan depletion induced object recognition impairment. Thus, both PDE5 and PDE2 inhibition improved short-term object recognition performance after an acute tryptophan depletion induced deficit. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood and further studies are needed to determine whether the present findings can be explained by a direct effect of enhanced cAMP and cGMP levels upon 5-HT activity, or even other neurotransmitter systems, and possibly an interaction with synthesis of nitric oxide or effects upon cerebral blood flow function. PMID:18957291

  20. Weighing graphene with QCM to monitor interfacial mass changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakenov, Nurbek; Balci, Osman; Salihoglu, Omer; Hur, Seung Hyun; Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun

    2016-08-01

    In this Letter, we experimentally determined the mass density of graphene using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) as a mechanical resonator. We developed a transfer printing technique to integrate large area single-layer graphene on QCM. By monitoring the resonant frequency of an oscillating quartz crystal loaded with graphene, we were able to measure the mass density of graphene as ˜118 ng/cm2, which is significantly larger than the ideal graphene (˜76 ng/cm2) mainly due to the presence of wrinkles and organic/inorganic residues on graphene sheets. High sensitivity of the quartz crystal resonator allowed us to determine the number of graphene layers in a particular sample. Additionally, we extended our technique to probe interfacial mass variation during adsorption of biomolecules on graphene surface and plasma-assisted oxidation of graphene.

  1. A bio-aerosol detection technique based on tryptophan intrinsic fluorescence measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shuyao; Zhang, Pei; Zhu, Linglin; Zhao, Yongkai; Huang, Huijie

    2011-12-01

    Based on the measurement of intrinsic fluorescence, a set of bio-aerosol including virus aerosols detection instrument is developed, with which a method of calibration is proposed using tryptophan as the target. The experimental results show a good linear relationship between the fluorescence voltage of the instrument and the concentration of the tryptophan aerosol. An excellent correlation (R2>=0.99) with the sensitivity of 4000PPL is obtained. The research demonstrates the reliability of the bio-aerosol detection by measuring the content of tryptophan. Further more the feasibility of prejudgment to the species of bio-aerosol particles with the multi-channel fluorescence detection technology is discussed.

  2. Interfacial phase-change memory.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R E; Fons, P; Kolobov, A V; Fukaya, T; Krbal, M; Yagi, T; Tominaga, J

    2011-08-01

    Phase-change memory technology relies on the electrical and optical properties of certain materials changing substantially when the atomic structure of the material is altered by heating or some other excitation process. For example, switching the composite Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) (GST) alloy from its covalently bonded amorphous phase to its resonantly bonded metastable cubic crystalline phase decreases the resistivity by three orders of magnitude, and also increases reflectivity across the visible spectrum. Moreover, phase-change memory based on GST is scalable, and is therefore a candidate to replace Flash memory for non-volatile data storage applications. The energy needed to switch between the two phases depends on the intrinsic properties of the phase-change material and the device architecture; this energy is usually supplied by laser or electrical pulses. The switching energy for GST can be reduced by limiting the movement of the atoms to a single dimension, thus substantially reducing the entropic losses associated with the phase-change process. In particular, aligning the c-axis of a hexagonal Sb(2)Te(3) layer and the 〈111〉 direction of a cubic GeTe layer in a superlattice structure creates a material in which Ge atoms can switch between octahedral sites and lower-coordination sites at the interface of the superlattice layers. Here we demonstrate GeTe/Sb(2)Te(3) interfacial phase-change memory (IPCM) data storage devices with reduced switching energies, improved write-erase cycle lifetimes and faster switching speeds. PMID:21725305

  3. Interfacial Engineering of Molecular Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Steven Wade

    One of the most worthy pursuits in the field of organic solar cells is that of discovering ways to more effectively harvest charge generated by light absorption. The measure of the efficacy of this process is the external quantum efficiency (EQE). It is determined by the efficiency of incident light absorption, exciton diffusion, exciton splitting and charge transfer, and charge collection. Enhanced EQE can be realized by engineering interfaces between materials in the device to allow for smoother charge transfer throughout the extent of the device, which is usually between 10 and 200 nanometers. Improvements in charge transport are vitally important because the photogenerated excitons in electron donating polymers and small molecules typically only diffuse between 5 and 10 nanometers. These excitons must reach the interface between the electron donor and electron acceptor in order to be split so that the resulting electron and hole can be harvested at the cathode and anode, respectively. The aim of much of this dissertation is to describe a method by which the donor-acceptor interfacial area can be augmented using nanoimprint lithography, first with a single donor and then with multiple donors. Nanoimprint lithography is introduced as a simple embossing technique that can create features in a single component donor with dimensions as small as 20 nm. Solution-processable small molecules are of interest for their ease of synthesis and fabrication. I continue the discussion of nanoimprint lithography by offering candidates for a two-component donor combination. A two-component donor can extend the absorption range across a broader portion of the solar spectrum than just one donor to improve energy harvesting. After considering ways of optimizing the donor-acceptor interface, I describe the use of a charge selective layer for better charge transport and collection. When incorporated into a bilayer solar cell and an inverted solar cell, these two molecules markedly

  4. Interfacial and near interfacial crack growth phenomena in metal bonded alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzic, Jamie Joseph

    2002-03-01

    Metal/ceramic interfaces can be found in many engineering applications including microelectronic packaging, multi-layered films, coatings, joints, and composite materials. In order to design reliable engineering systems that contain metal/ceramic interfaces, a comprehensive understanding of interfacial and near interfacial failure mechanisms is necessary.

  5. The role of tryptophan 97 of cytochrome P450 BM3 from Bacillus megaterium in catalytic function. Evidence against the 'covalent switching' hypothesis of P-450 electron transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Munro, A W; Malarkey, K; McKnight, J; Thomson, A J; Kelly, S M; Price, N C; Lindsay, J G; Coggins, J R; Miles, J S

    1994-01-01

    The 'Covalent Switching' hypothesis suggests that a strongly conserved tryptophan residue acts as a mediator of electron-transfer flow between redox partners in cytochrome P-450 systems [Baldwin, Morris and Richards (1991) Proc. R. Soc. London B 245, 43-51]. We have investigated the effect of alteration of the conserved tryptophan (Trp-97) in cytochrome P-450 BM3 (P-450 102) from Bacillus megaterium. Replacement of Trp-97 with Ala, Phe or Tyr results in a decrease in the natural haem content and alters the resting spin state of the remaining haem in the purified mutant enzymes. However, kinetic analyses indicate that the mutant enzymes retain high levels of catalytic activity. C.d. and e.p.r. spectroscopy also reveal little alteration in secondary structure or change in the pattern of haem ligation. These findings cast doubt on the covalent switching mechanism of intermolecular electron flow in the P-450s, but indicate that this residue plays a role in the association of the haem prosthetic group. PMID:7980400

  6. Interfacial area and interfacial transfer in two-phase systems. DOE final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Mamoru; Hibiki, T.; Revankar, S.T.; Kim, S.; Le Corre, J.M.

    2002-07-01

    In the two-fluid model, the field equations are expressed by the six conservation equations consisting of mass, momentum and energy equations for each phase. The existence of the interfacial transfer terms is one of the most important characteristics of the two-fluid model formulation. The interfacial transfer terms are strongly related to the interfacial area concentration and to the local transfer mechanisms such as the degree of turbulence near interfaces. This study focuses on the development of a closure relation for the interfacial area concentration. A brief summary of several problems of the current closure relation for the interfacial area concentration and a new concept to overcome the problem are given.

  7. Infrared multiple-photon dissociation spectroscopy of tripositive ions: lanthanum-tryptophan complexes.

    PubMed

    Verkerk, Udo H; Zhao, Junfang; Saminathan, Irine S; Lau, Justin Kai-Chi; Oomens, Jos; Hopkinson, Alan C; Siu, K W Michael

    2012-04-16

    Collision-induced charge disproportionation limits the stability of triply charged metal ion complexes and has thus far prevented successful acquisition of their gas-phase IR spectra. This has curtailed our understanding of the structures of triply charged metal complexes in the gas phase and in biological environments. Herein we report the first gas-phase IR spectra of triply charged La(III) complexes with a derivative of tryptophan (N-acetyl tryptophan methyl ester), and an unusual dissociation product, a lanthanum amidate. These spectra are compared with those predicted using density functional theory. The best structures are those of the lowest energies that differ by details in the π-interaction between La(3+) and the indole rings. Other binding sites on the tryptophan derivative are the carbonyl oxygens. In the lanthanum amidate, La(3+) replaces an H(+) in the amide bond of the tryptophan derivative. PMID:22455512

  8. Synthesis of indoles and tryptophan derivatives via photoinduced nitrene C-H insertion.

    PubMed

    Junk, Lukas; Kazmaier, Uli

    2016-03-14

    Functionalized indoles and tryptophans can be obtained from stannylated alkenes and o-iodoanilines via Stille coupling. Subsequent azidation and photochemical nitrene generation results in the formation of the heterocyclic ring systems via C-H insertion. PMID:26869211

  9. The structure of tryptophan 7-halogenase (PrnA) suggests a mechanism for regioselective chlorination

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Changjiang; Flecks, Silvana; Unversucht, Susanne; Haupt, Caroline; van Pée, Karl-Heinz; Naismith, James H

    2012-01-01

    Chlorinated natural products include vancomycin and cryptophycin A. Their biosyntheses involves regioselective chlorination by flavin-dependent halogenases. We report the structural characterization of tryptophan 7-halogenase (PrnA), which regioselectively chlorinates tryptophan. Tryptophan and FAD are separated by a 10Å-long tunnel and bound by distinct enzyme modules. The FAD module is conserved in halogenases and is related to flavin-dependent monooxygenases. Based on biochemical studies, crystal structures and by analogy with monooxygenases, we predict FADH2 reacts with O2 making peroxy-flavin which is decomposed by Cl−. The resulting HOCl is guided through the tunnel, to tryptophan, where it is activated to participate in electrophilic aromatic substitution. PMID:16195462

  10. A simplified HPLC method for determination of tryptophan in some cereals and legumes.

    PubMed

    Çevikkalp, Senem A; Löker, Gül B; Yaman, Mustafa; Amoutzopoulos, Birdem

    2016-02-15

    In the present study, a simple analytical method is proposed for determining tryptophan, and method is validated on some cereal and legume samples. In the method alkaline hydrolysis of proteins was used due to the destruction of tryptophan structure during acid hydrolysis. Following alkaline hydrolysis (120°C for 12h), hydrolysates are filtered through ashless filter paper and pH values are adjusted with hydrochloric acid solution. Separation and detection of tryptophan are performed on a reversed-phase column with fluorescence detection within 10min by using a mobile phase of acetonitrile and acetate buffer of pH 6.3 (1:9, v/v). For determination of tryptophan content, the procedure described in the study offers an alternative analysis method by enabling high speed analysis and the use of simple extraction process to the other available methods. PMID:26433283

  11. Electrochemical Sensor for Tryptophan Determination Based on Copper-cobalt Hexacyanoferrate Film Modified Graphite Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingju; Xu, Li

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the development of a tryptophan sensor and its application to milk are described. The mixed metal (copper and cobalt) hexacynoferrates are electrodeposited on the graphite electrode, and this film exhibits an electrocatalytic activity towards for the oxidation of tryptophan. The experimental conditions, including the scan cycles, the ratio of copper(II) and cobalt(II), pH value, applied potential, are investigated in detail. At the optimal conditions, the eletctrocatalytic response is a linear relationship with the concentration of tryptophan in the range of 10 μM and 900 μM, with a detection limit of about 6 μM. This modified electrode was also successfully used to detect the tryptophan concentration in milk.

  12. Fluorescence lifetimes of jet-cooled tryptophan: elimination of complications from 1La emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuhui; Arnold, Steven; Sulkes, Mark

    1994-08-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements can be made on the decay of individual 'frozen' conformers of tryptophan analogs in supersonic gas expansions. These measurements have shown differences in single exponential lifetimes among conformers of a given analog, results which are strongly consistent with the presence of conformation-dependent charge transfer quenching. For jet cooled tryptophan, however, one of the conformers emits from 1La, thereby complicating any interpretation of the results. To remove this problem we considered tryptophan analogs with C-5 substituents, in which all the jet cooled conformers emit from 1Lb. We observed differences in conformer lifetimes similar to cases considered earlier. In the course of this work we discovered that, in contrast to tryptophan, 5- methoxytryptophan shows single exponential decay in solution. Based on additional data for jet cooled samples, we propose the most likely explanation to be substituent induced changes in conformer geometries and populations.

  13. Probing Interfacial Emulsion Stability Controls using Electrorheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiuyu; Brandvik, Amy; Alvarado, Vladimir

    2010-11-01

    The stability of water-in-oil emulsions is controlled by interfacial mechanisms that include oil film rheology of approaching drops and the strength of drop interfaces. Film drainage is mainly a function of the continuous phase rheology. Temperature is used to regulate the viscosity of the continuous phase and hence determine its effect on emulsion stability through film drainage, in contrast with interfacial strength. In this study, one crude oil is used to formulate water-in-oil emulsions. Oil-water interfacial tension is measured to gauge other interfacial changes with temperature. The critical field value, used as proxy of emulsion stability, approaches a plateau value for each crude oil- aqueous solution pair, at sufficiently high temperature (50 ^oC), which is interpreted to reflect the intrinsic drop-coating film resistance to coalescence. Interfacial tension does vary significantly with either aqueous phase composition or temperature. From comparison with previous results, we speculate that drop coating film is composed of a fraction of asphaltic compunds.

  14. Interfacial roughness in ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jero, P.D.; Parthasarathy, T.A.; Kerans, R.J.

    1992-08-01

    Recent work using push-out and push-back tests has shown that interfacial roughness contributes substantially to the sliding friction in at least some ceramic matrix composites (CMC's). Other work examining frictional heating of CMC's during cyclic fatigue has shown the important role that interfacial friction plays, and further that the interface is degraded upon extended cycling. From this it is apparent that interfacial roughness may play a key role in determining composite behavior. Although the observation of a seating drop during fiber push-back gives some information about the amplitude and spatial extent of the interfacial roughness, actual measurement of the roughness has proven difficult due to its extremely fine scale. In the present work, a laser interferometer has been used to examine the roughness of composite interfaces (both fiber and matrix) as well as virgin fibers. In addition, long range (mm scale) push-out tests have been followed by interferometric characterization to examine the severity and rate of interfacial degradation associated with fiber sliding. 4 refs.

  15. Effects of Exhaustive Aerobic Exercise on Tryptophan-Kynurenine Metabolism in Trained Athletes.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Barbara; Geiger, Daniela; Schauer, Markus; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Exhaustive exercise can cause a transient depression of immune function. Data indicate significant effects of immune activation cascades on the biochemistry of monoamines and amino acids such as tryptophan. Tryptophan can be metabolized through different pathways, a major route being the kynurenine pathway, which is often systemically up-regulated when the immune response is activated. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of exhaustive aerobic exercise on biomarkers of immune activation and tryptophan metabolism in trained athletes. After a standardized breakfast 2 h prior to exercise, 33 trained athletes (17 women, 16 men) performed an incremental cycle ergometer exercise test at 60 rpm until exhaustion. After a 20 min rest phase, the participants performed a 20 min maximal time-trial on a cycle ergometer (RBM Cyclus 2, Germany). During the test, cyclists were strongly encouraged to choose a maximal pedalling rate that could be maintained for the respective test duration. Serum concentrations of amino acids tryptophan, kynurenine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine were determined by HPLC and immune system biomarker neopterin by ELISA at rest and immediately post exercise. Intense exercise was associated with a strong increase in neopterin concentrations (p<0.001), indicating increased immune activation following intense exercise. Exhaustive exercise significantly reduced tryptophan concentrations by 12% (p<0.001) and increased kynurenine levels by 6% (p = 0.022). Also phenylalanine to tyrosine ratios were lower after exercise as compared with baseline (p<0.001). The kynurenine to tryptophan ratio correlated with neopterin (r = 0.560, p<0.01). Thus, increased tryptophan catabolism by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase appears likely. Peak oxygen uptake correlated with baseline tryptophan and kynurenine concentrations (r = 0.562 and r = 0.511, respectively, both p<0.01). Findings demonstrate that exhaustive aerobic exercise is associated with increased immune

  16. Effects of Exhaustive Aerobic Exercise on Tryptophan-Kynurenine Metabolism in Trained Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Barbara; Geiger, Daniela; Schauer, Markus; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Exhaustive exercise can cause a transient depression of immune function. Data indicate significant effects of immune activation cascades on the biochemistry of monoamines and amino acids such as tryptophan. Tryptophan can be metabolized through different pathways, a major route being the kynurenine pathway, which is often systemically up-regulated when the immune response is activated. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of exhaustive aerobic exercise on biomarkers of immune activation and tryptophan metabolism in trained athletes. After a standardized breakfast 2 h prior to exercise, 33 trained athletes (17 women, 16 men) performed an incremental cycle ergometer exercise test at 60 rpm until exhaustion. After a 20 min rest phase, the participants performed a 20 min maximal time-trial on a cycle ergometer (RBM Cyclus 2, Germany). During the test, cyclists were strongly encouraged to choose a maximal pedalling rate that could be maintained for the respective test duration. Serum concentrations of amino acids tryptophan, kynurenine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine were determined by HPLC and immune system biomarker neopterin by ELISA at rest and immediately post exercise. Intense exercise was associated with a strong increase in neopterin concentrations (p<0.001), indicating increased immune activation following intense exercise. Exhaustive exercise significantly reduced tryptophan concentrations by 12% (p<0.001) and increased kynurenine levels by 6% (p = 0.022). Also phenylalanine to tyrosine ratios were lower after exercise as compared with baseline (p<0.001). The kynurenine to tryptophan ratio correlated with neopterin (r = 0.560, p<0.01). Thus, increased tryptophan catabolism by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase appears likely. Peak oxygen uptake correlated with baseline tryptophan and kynurenine concentrations (r = 0.562 and r = 0.511, respectively, both p<0.01). Findings demonstrate that exhaustive aerobic exercise is associated with increased immune

  17. Effects of tryptophan depletion and a simulated alcohol binge on impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Donald M; Mullen, Jillian; Hill-Kapturczak, Nathalie; Liang, Yuanyuan; Karns, Tara E; Lake, Sarah L; Mathias, Charles W; Roache, John D

    2015-04-01

    Researchers have suggested binge drinkers experience disproportionate increases in impulsivity during the initial period of drinking, leading to a loss of control over further drinking, and that serotonergic mechanisms may underlie such effects. We examined the effects of a simulated alcohol binge and tryptophan depletion on 3 types of impulsivity-response initiation (immediate memory task [IMT]), response inhibition (GoStop task), and delay discounting (single key impulsivity paradigm [SKIP])-and tested whether observed effects were related to real-world binging. Adults (N = 179) with diverse drinking histories completed a within-subject crossover design over 4 experimental days. Each day, participants underwent 1 of 4 test conditions: tryptophan depletion/alcohol, tryptophan depletion/placebo, tryptophan-balanced control/alcohol, or tryptophan-balanced control/placebo. The simulated binge involved consuming 0.3 g/kg of alcohol at 5, 6, and 7 hr after consuming the tryptophan-depletion/balanced mixture. Impulsivity was measured before and after each drink. Relative to the placebo beverage condition, when alcohol was consumed, impulsive responding was increased at moderate and high levels of intoxication on the IMT and the GoStop but only at high levels of intoxication on the SKIP. Tryptophan depletion had no effect on impulsivity. Effects of alcohol and tryptophan manipulations on impulsivity were unrelated to patterns of binge drinking outside the laboratory. The effects of alcohol consumption on impulsivity depend on the component of impulsivity and the dose of alcohol consumed. Such effects do not appear to be a result of reduced serotonin synthesis. In addition, real-world binge drinking behaviors were unrelated to behavioral changes observed in the laboratory. PMID:25730415

  18. Influence of acute tryptophan depletion on mood and immune measures in healthy males.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, A V; Griffiths, J; Merali, Z; Knott, V J; Anisman, H

    1999-01-01

    Depressive illness has been associated with variations of several aspects of immune functioning, as well as alterations of cytokine production in stimulated lymphocytes. In the present investigation we sought to determine whether pharmacologically-induced reductions of mood in healthy, male subjects would be associated with alterations in the levels of circulating IL-1 beta or IL-6 or to in vitro lymphocyte proliferation in response to T cell mitogens, PHA and Con A. Lowering tryptophan levels by means of a tryptophan-deficient amino acid mixture, which reduced plasma tryptophan and serotonin (5-HT) levels, produced a lowering of mood in a subset of male subjects (that had no personal or family history of depression) relative to subjects that received a balanced amino acid mixture. Correlational analyses revealed that the change of mood (particularly depression and anger) in subjects that received the tryptophan-free mixture was related to the extent of the tryptophan or 5-HT reductions. However, while fenfluramine administration resulted in recovery of tryptophan and 5-HT levels, this was not accompanied by recovery of mood. Furthermore, it was observed that the lowering of tryptophan levels and the reduced mood were not accompanied by variations of the cytokine levels or cell proliferation. Evidently, transient and modest alterations of 5-HT or mood induced by a tryptophan-free amino acid mixture were insufficient to promote variations of immune activity or circulating IL-1 beta or IL-6 levels. Even if depression were related to immune disturbances, the mood and 5-HT alterations associated with this type of manipulation may be too brief to promote immune changes comparable with those ordinarily associated with severe or chronic depressive illness. PMID:10098222

  19. Study of interfacial crack propagation in flip chip assemblies with nano-filled underfill materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalingam, Sakethraman

    No-flow underfill materials that cure during the solder reflow process is a relatively new technology. Although there are several advantages in terms of cost, time and processing ease, there are several reliability challenges associated with no-flow underfill materials. When mum-sized filler particles are introduced in no-flow underfills to enhance the solder bump reliability, such filler particles could prevent the solder bumps making reliable electrical contacts with the substrate pads during solder reflow, and therefore, the assembly yield would be adversely affected. The use of nano-sized filler particles can potentially improve assembly yield while offering the advantages associated with filled underfill materials. The objective of this thesis is to study the thermo-mechanical reliability of nano-filled epoxy underfills (NFU) through experiments and theoretical modeling. In this work, the thermo-mechanical properties of NFU's with 20-nm filler particles have been measured. An innovative residual stress test method has been developed to measure the interfacial fracture toughness. Using the developed residual stress method and the single-leg bending test, the mode-mixity-dependent fracture toughness for NFU-SiN interface has been determined. In addition to such monotonic interfacial fracture characterization, the interface crack propagation under thermo-mechanical fatigue loading has been experimentally characterized, and a model for fatigue interface crack propagation has been developed. A test vehicle comprising of several flip chips was assembled using the NFU material and the reliability of the flip-chip assemblies was assessed under thermal shock cycles between -40°C and 125°C. The NFU-SiN interfacial delamination propagation and the solder bump reliability were monitored. In parallel, numerical models were developed to study the interfacial delamination propagation in the flip chip assembly using conventional interfacial fracture mechanics as well as

  20. L-Tryptophan Production in Escherichia coli Improved by Weakening the Pta-AckA Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lina; Duan, Xuguo; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Acetate accumulation during the fermentation process of Escherichia coli FB-04, an L-tryptophan production strain, is detrimental to L-tryptophan production. In an initial attempt to reduce acetate formation, the phosphate acetyltransferase gene (pta) from E. coli FB-04 was deleted, forming strain FB-04(Δpta). Unfortunately, FB-04(Δpta) exhibited a growth defect. Therefore, pta was replaced with a pta variant (pta1) from E. coli CCTCC M 2016009, forming strain FB-04(pta1). Pta1 exhibits lower catalytic capacity and substrate affinity than Pta because of a single amino acid substitution (Pro69Leu). FB-04(pta1) lacked the growth defect of FB-04(Δpta) and showed improved fermentation performance. Strain FB-04(pta1) showed a 91% increase in L-tryptophan yield in flask fermentation experiments, while acetate production decreased by 35%, compared with its parent FB-04. Throughout the fed-batch fermentation process, acetate accumulation by FB-04(pta1) was slower than that by FB-04. The final L-tryptophan titer of FB-04(pta1) reached 44.0 g/L, representing a 15% increase over that of FB-04. Metabolomics analysis showed that the pta1 genomic substitution slightly decreased carbon flux through glycolysis and significantly increased carbon fluxes through the pentose phosphate and common aromatic pathways. These results indicate that this strategy enhances L-tryptophan production and decreases acetate accumulation during the L-tryptophan fermentation process. PMID:27348810

  1. Delaying aging and the aging-associated decline in protein homeostasis by inhibition of tryptophan degradation.

    PubMed

    van der Goot, Annemieke T; Zhu, Wentao; Vázquez-Manrique, Rafael P; Seinstra, Renée I; Dettmer, Katja; Michels, Helen; Farina, Francesca; Krijnen, Jasper; Melki, Ronald; Buijsman, Rogier C; Ruiz Silva, Mariana; Thijssen, Karen L; Kema, Ido P; Neri, Christian; Oefner, Peter J; Nollen, Ellen A A

    2012-09-11

    Toxicity of aggregation-prone proteins is thought to play an important role in aging and age-related neurological diseases like Parkinson and Alzheimer's diseases. Here, we identify tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (tdo-2), the first enzyme in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation, as a metabolic regulator of age-related α-synuclein toxicity in a Caenorhabditis elegans model. Depletion of tdo-2 also suppresses toxicity of other heterologous aggregation-prone proteins, including amyloid-β and polyglutamine proteins, and endogenous metastable proteins that are sensors of normal protein homeostasis. This finding suggests that tdo-2 functions as a general regulator of protein homeostasis. Analysis of metabolite levels in C. elegans strains with mutations in enzymes that act downstream of tdo-2 indicates that this suppression of toxicity is independent of downstream metabolites in the kynurenine pathway. Depletion of tdo-2 increases tryptophan levels, and feeding worms with extra L-tryptophan also suppresses toxicity, suggesting that tdo-2 regulates proteotoxicity through tryptophan. Depletion of tdo-2 extends lifespan in these worms. Together, these results implicate tdo-2 as a metabolic switch of age-related protein homeostasis and lifespan. With TDO and Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase as evolutionarily conserved human orthologs of TDO-2, intervening with tryptophan metabolism may offer avenues to reducing proteotoxicity in aging and age-related diseases. PMID:22927396

  2. Delaying aging and the aging-associated decline in protein homeostasis by inhibition of tryptophan degradation

    PubMed Central

    van der Goot, Annemieke T.; Zhu, Wentao; Vázquez-Manrique, Rafael P.; Seinstra, Renée I.; Dettmer, Katja; Michels, Helen; Farina, Francesca; Krijnen, Jasper; Melki, Ronald; Buijsman, Rogier C.; Ruiz Silva, Mariana; Thijssen, Karen L.; Kema, Ido P.; Neri, Christian; Oefner, Peter J.; Nollen, Ellen A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Toxicity of aggregation-prone proteins is thought to play an important role in aging and age-related neurological diseases like Parkinson and Alzheimer’s diseases. Here, we identify tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (tdo-2), the first enzyme in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation, as a metabolic regulator of age-related α-synuclein toxicity in a Caenorhabditis elegans model. Depletion of tdo-2 also suppresses toxicity of other heterologous aggregation-prone proteins, including amyloid-β and polyglutamine proteins, and endogenous metastable proteins that are sensors of normal protein homeostasis. This finding suggests that tdo-2 functions as a general regulator of protein homeostasis. Analysis of metabolite levels in C. elegans strains with mutations in enzymes that act downstream of tdo-2 indicates that this suppression of toxicity is independent of downstream metabolites in the kynurenine pathway. Depletion of tdo-2 increases tryptophan levels, and feeding worms with extra l-tryptophan also suppresses toxicity, suggesting that tdo-2 regulates proteotoxicity through tryptophan. Depletion of tdo-2 extends lifespan in these worms. Together, these results implicate tdo-2 as a metabolic switch of age-related protein homeostasis and lifespan. With TDO and Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase as evolutionarily conserved human orthologs of TDO-2, intervening with tryptophan metabolism may offer avenues to reducing proteotoxicity in aging and age-related diseases. PMID:22927396

  3. L-Tryptophan Production in Escherichia coli Improved by Weakening the Pta-AckA Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lina; Duan, Xuguo; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Acetate accumulation during the fermentation process of Escherichia coli FB-04, an L-tryptophan production strain, is detrimental to L-tryptophan production. In an initial attempt to reduce acetate formation, the phosphate acetyltransferase gene (pta) from E. coli FB-04 was deleted, forming strain FB-04(Δpta). Unfortunately, FB-04(Δpta) exhibited a growth defect. Therefore, pta was replaced with a pta variant (pta1) from E. coli CCTCC M 2016009, forming strain FB-04(pta1). Pta1 exhibits lower catalytic capacity and substrate affinity than Pta because of a single amino acid substitution (Pro69Leu). FB-04(pta1) lacked the growth defect of FB-04(Δpta) and showed improved fermentation performance. Strain FB-04(pta1) showed a 91% increase in L-tryptophan yield in flask fermentation experiments, while acetate production decreased by 35%, compared with its parent FB-04. Throughout the fed-batch fermentation process, acetate accumulation by FB-04(pta1) was slower than that by FB-04. The final L-tryptophan titer of FB-04(pta1) reached 44.0 g/L, representing a 15% increase over that of FB-04. Metabolomics analysis showed that the pta1 genomic substitution slightly decreased carbon flux through glycolysis and significantly increased carbon fluxes through the pentose phosphate and common aromatic pathways. These results indicate that this strategy enhances L-tryptophan production and decreases acetate accumulation during the L-tryptophan fermentation process. PMID:27348810

  4. Flexible enantioselectivity of tryptophanase attributable to benzene ring in heterocyclic moiety of d-tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Akihiko; Ozaki, Haruka

    2012-01-01

    The invariance principle of enzyme enantioselectivity must be absolute because it is absolutely essential to the homochiral biological world. Most enzymes are strictly enantioselective, and tryptophanase is one of the enzymes with extreme absolute enantioselectivity for L-tryptophan. Contrary to conventional knowledge about the principle, tryptophanase becomes flexible to catalyze D-tryptophan in the presence of diammonium hydrogenphosphate. Since D-amino acids are ordinarily inert or function as inhibitors even though they are bound to the active site, the inhibition behavior of D-tryptophan and several inhibitors involved in this process was examined in terms of kinetics to explain the reason for this flexible enantioselectivity in the presence of diammonium hydrogenphosphate. Diammonium hydrogenphosphate gave tryptophanase a small conformational change so that D-tryptophan could work as a substrate. As opposed to other D-amino acids, D-tryptophan is a very bulky amino acid with a benzene ring in its heterocyclic moiety, and so we suggest that this structural feature makes the catalysis of D-tryptophan degradation possible, consequently leading to the flexible enantioselectivity. The present results not only help to understand the mechanism of enzyme enantioselectivity, but also shed light on the origin of homochirality. PMID:25382167

  5. L-Tryptophan's effects on brain chemistry and sleep in cats and rats: a review.

    PubMed

    Radulovacki, M

    1982-01-01

    In this review I shall discuss published and unpublished work from my laboratory dealing with L-tryptophan's effects on brain monoamines and sleep in cats and rats. From our work it appears that normal animals may not be suitable subjects for testing sleep-inducing effect of tryptophan since their slow-wave sleep (SWS) latency is relatively short. In polyphasic sleepers like cats, we did not observe tryptophan's hypnotic effect with any dosage used (10, 30 or 135 mg/kg). However, we found small, but statistically significant, sleep-inducing effect of tryptophan (30 mg/kg, IP) in normal rats. We have tried, therefore, to create insomniac cats with long sleep latencies by using methysergide, a serotonin receptor blocker. The results show that in insomniac cats hypnotic effect of tryptophan, a precursor to brain serotonin, was observed. It involved not only reduction of sleep latencies but also an increase in SWS. It seems likely that tryptophan's partial reversal of methysergide's effect in cats occurred via a dual mechanism of serotonergic activation and catecholaminergic deactivation, while its sleep-inducing effect in normal rats may have been due to the attenuation of the activity of brain catecholamines. PMID:6184659

  6. Electrochemical investigation of tryptophan at gold nanoparticles modified electrode in the presence of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunya; Ya, Yu; Zhan, Guoqing

    2010-03-01

    Glassy carbon electrode modified with gold nanoparticles was prepared using electrodeposition at constant potential of -0.20V, and characterized with scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical techniques. Voltammetry was employed to study the electrochemical behaviors of tryptophan at the Au nanoparticles modified electrode in the presence of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate. The results showed that the Au nanoparticles modified electrode had good performance for the electrochemical oxidation of tryptophan. Compared with the unmodified electrode, the Au nanoparticles modified electrode improved the adsorption of tryptophan on the nanointerface and amplified its current response. The oxidation peak potential showed a negative shift of 50mV in the presence of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate indicating that the electron transfer between the electrode and bulk solution of tryptophan was facilitated. Experimental parameters for tryptophan determination, such as deposition time, pH value, and accumulation conditions have been optimized. The oxidation peak current was linearly dependent on the tryptophan concentration and a calibration curve was obtained in the concentration range of 9.0x10(-8)molL(-1) to 5.0x10(-5)molL(-1) with detection limit of 8.0x10(-8)molL(-1) (S/N=3). PMID:20015621

  7. L-Tryptophan: Basic Metabolic Functions, Behavioral Research and Therapeutic Indications

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Dawn M; Dawes, Michael A; Mathias, Charles W; Acheson, Ashley; Hill-Kapturczak, Nathalie; Dougherty, Donald M

    2009-01-01

    An essential component of the human diet, L-tryptophan is critical in a number of metabolic functions and has been widely used in numerous research and clinical trials. This review provides a brief overview of the role of L-tryptophan in protein synthesis and a number of other metabolic functions. With emphasis on L-tryptophan’s role in synthesis of brain serotonin, details are provided on the research uses of L-tryptophan, particularly L-tryptophan depletion, and on clinical trials that have been conducted using L-tryptophan supplementation. The ability to change the rates of serotonin synthesis in the brain by manipulating concentrations of serum tryptophan is the foundation of much research. As the sole precursor of serotonin, experimental research has shown that L-tryptophan’s role in brain serotonin synthesis is an important factor involved in mood, behavior, and cognition. Furthermore, clinical trials have provided some initial evidence of L-tryptophan’s efficacy for treatment of psychiatric disorders, particularly when used in combination with other therapeutic agents. PMID:20651948

  8. 5-Fluoroindole Resistance Identifies Tryptophan Synthase Beta Subunit Mutants in Arabidopsis Thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Barczak, A. J.; Zhao, J.; Pruitt, K. D.; Last, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    A study of the biochemical genetics of the Arabidopsis thaliana tryptophan synthase beta subunit was initiated by characterization of mutants resistant to the inhibitor 5-fluoroindole. Thirteen recessive mutations were recovered that are allelic to trp2-1, a mutation in the more highly expressed of duplicate tryptophan synthase beta subunit genes (TSB1). Ten of these mutations (trp2-2 through trp2-11) cause a tryptophan requirement (auxotrophs), whereas three (trp2-100 through trp2-102) remain tryptophan prototrophs. The mutations cause a variety of changes in tryptophan synthase beta expression. For example, two mutations (trp2-5 and trp2-8) cause dramatically reduced accumulation of TSB mRNA and immunologically detectable protein, whereas trp2-10 is associated with increased mRNA and protein. A correlation exists between the quantity of mutant beta and wild-type alpha subunit levels in the trp2 mutant plants, suggesting that the synthesis of these proteins is coordinated or that the quantity or structure of the beta subunit influences the stability of the alpha protein. The level of immunologically detectable anthranilate synthase alpha subunit protein is increased in the trp2 mutants, suggesting the possibility of regulation of anthranilate synthase levels in response to tryptophan limitation. PMID:7635295

  9. Microfluidic ultralow interfacial tensiometry with magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Scott S H; Wexler, Jason S; Wan, Jiandi; Stone, Howard A

    2013-01-01

    We describe a technique that measures ultralow interfacial tensions using paramagnetic spheres in a co-flow microfluidic device designed with a magnetic section. Our method involves tuning the distance between the co-flowing interface and the magnet's center, and observing the behavior of the spheres as they approach the liquid-liquid interface-the particles either pass through or are trapped by the interface. Using threshold values of the magnet-to-interface distance, we make estimates of the two-fluid interfacial tension. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique for measuring very low interfacial tensions, O(10(-6)-10(-5)) N m(-1), by testing solutions of different surfactant concentrations, and we show that our results are comparable with measurements made using a spinning drop tensiometer. PMID:23154819

  10. Magneto-ionic control of interfacial magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Uwe; Yao, Lide; Tan, Aik Jun; Agrawal, Parnika; Emori, Satoru; Tuller, Harry L.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2015-02-01

    In metal/oxide heterostructures, rich chemical, electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties can emerge from interfacial chemistry and structure. The possibility to dynamically control interface characteristics with an electric field paves the way towards voltage control of these properties in solid-state devices. Here, we show that electrical switching of the interfacial oxidation state allows for voltage control of magnetic properties to an extent never before achieved through conventional magneto-electric coupling mechanisms. We directly observe in situ voltage-driven O2- migration in a Co/metal-oxide bilayer, which we use to toggle the interfacial magnetic anisotropy energy by >0.75 erg cm-2 at just 2 V. We exploit the thermally activated nature of ion migration to markedly increase the switching efficiency and to demonstrate reversible patterning of magnetic properties through local activation of ionic migration. These results suggest a path towards voltage-programmable materials based on solid-state switching of interface oxygen chemistry.

  11. Interfacial Slip in Polymer Blends with Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Joseph; Jaber, Eihab; Gersappe, Dilip

    2010-03-01

    The interfacial region in polymer blends has been identified as a low viscosity region in which considerable slip can occur when the blend is subjected to shear forces. Here we use Molecular Dynamics simulations to establish the role that added nanoparticle fillers play in modifying the interfacial rheology. By choosing conditions under which the fillers are localized, either in the two phases or at the interface, we can look at the interplay between the strengthening capability of nanoparticles and the change in the interfacial slip behavior. We examine particle size, attraction between the particle and the polymer component, and the amount of filler in the material. Our studies are performed both above and below the point at which the filler particles form a transient network in the blend.

  12. Interfacial Slip in Polymer Blends with Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Joseph; Jaber, Eihab; Gersappe, Dilip

    2009-03-01

    The interfacial region in polymer blends has been identified as a low viscosity region in which considerable slip can occur when the blend is subjected to shear forces. Here we use Molecular Dynamics simulations to establish the role that added nanoparticle fillers play in modifying the interfacial rheology. By choosing conditions under which the fillers are localized, either in the two phases or at the interface, we can look at the interplay between the strengthening capability of nanoparticles and the change in the interfacial slip behavior. We examine particle size, attraction between the particle and the polymer component, and the amount of filler in the material. Our studies are performed both above and below the point at which the filler particles form a transient network in the blend.

  13. Interfacial slip in polymer blends with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Joseph; Jaber, Eihab; Gersappe, Dilip

    2008-03-01

    The interfacial region in polymer blends has been identified as a low viscosity region in which considerable slip can occur when the blend is subjected to shear forces. Here, we use Molecular Dynamics simulations to establish the role that added nanofiller particles play in modifying the interfacial rheology. By choosing conditions under which the fillers are localized either in the two phases, or at the interface we can look at the interplay between the strengthening capability of nanoparticles, and the change in the interfacial slip behavior. We examine particle size, attraction between the particle and the polymer component and the amount of filler in the material. Our studies are performed both above and below the point at which the filler particles form a transient network in the blend.

  14. Efficient Delivery of Cell Impermeable Phosphopeptides by a Cyclic Peptide Amphiphile Containing Tryptophan and Arginine

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Amir Nasrolahi; Tiwari, Rakesh Kumar; Oh, Donghoon; Banerjee, Antara; Yadav, Arpita; Parang, Keykavous

    2013-01-01

    Phosphopeptides are valuable reagent probes for studying protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions. The cellular delivery of phosphopeptides is challenging because of the presence of the negatively charged phosphate group. The cellular uptake of a number of fluorescent-labeled phosphopeptides, including F′-GpYLPQTV, F′-NEpYTARQ, F′-AEEEIYGEFEAKKKK, F′-PEpYLGLD, F′-pYVNVQN-NH2, and F′-GpYEEI (F′ = fluorescein) was evaluated in the presence or absence of a [WR]4, a cyclic peptide containing alternative arginine (R) and tryptophan (W) residues, in human leukemia cells (CCRF-CEM) after 2 h incubation using flow cytometry. [WR]4 improved significantly the cellular uptake of all phosphopeptides. PEpYLGLD is a sequence that mimics the pTyr1246 of ErbB2 that is responsible for binding to the Chk SH2 domain. The cellular uptake of F′-PEpYLGLD was enhanced dramatically by 27-fold in the presence of [WR]4 and was found to be time-dependent. Confocal microscopy of a mixture of F′-PEpYLGLD and [WR]4 in live cells exhibited intracellular localization and significantly higher cellular uptake compared to that of F′-PEpYLGLD alone. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Isothermal Calorimetric (ITC) were used to study the interaction of PEpYLGLD and [WR]4. TEM results showed that the mixture of PEpYLGLD and [WR]4 formed noncircular nanosized structures with width and height of 125 and 60 nm, respectively. ITC binding studies confirmed the interaction between [WR]4 and PEpYLGLD. The binding isotherm curves, derived from sequential binding models, showed an exothermic interaction driven by entropy. These studies suggest that amphiphilic peptide [WR]4 can be used as a cellular delivery tool of cell-impermeable negatively charged phosphopeptides. PMID:23537165

  15. Intracavitary ligand distribution in tear lipocalin by site-directed tryptophan fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, Oktay K; Abduragimov, Adil R; Glasgow, Ben J

    2009-08-01

    Site-directed tryptophan fluorescence has been successfully used to determine the solution structure of tear lipocalin. Here, the technique is extended to measure the binding energy landscape. Single Trp mutants of tear lipocalin are bound to the native ligand and an analogue tagged with a quencher group to both populate and discriminate the excited protein states. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching data reveal the intracavitary state of the ligand. The static components of fluorescence quenching identify the residues where nonfluorescence complexes form. An asymmetric distribution of the ligand within the cavity reflects the complex energy landscape of the excited protein states. These findings suggest that the excited protein states are not unique but consist of many substates. The roughness of the binding energy landscape is about 2.5kBT. The excited protein states originate primarily from conformational selections of loops AB and GH, a portal region. In contrast to static quenching, the dynamic components of fluorescence quenching by the ligand are relevant to both local side chain and ligand dynamics. Apparent bimolecular rate constants for collisional quenching of Trp by the nitroxide moiety are approximately 1 / 5 x 10(12) M(-1) s(-1). Estimations made for effective ligand concentrations establish actual rate constants on the order of 12 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). Prior to exit from the cavity of the protein, ligands explore binding sites in nanoseconds. Although microsecond fluctuations are rate-limiting processes in ligand binding for many proteins, accompanying nanosecond motion may be necessary for propagation of ligand binding. PMID:19586017

  16. Picosecond fluorescence dynamics of tryptophan and 5-fluorotryptophan in monellin: slow water-protein relaxation unmasked.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianhua; Chen, Binbin; Callis, Patrik; Muiño, Pedro L; Rozeboom, Henriëtte; Broos, Jaap; Toptygin, Dmitri; Brand, Ludwig; Knutson, Jay R

    2015-03-19

    Time dependent fluorescence Stokes (emission wavelength) shifts (TDFSS) from tryptophan (Trp) following sub-picosecond excitation are increasingly used to investigate protein dynamics, most recently enabling active research interest into water dynamics near the surface of proteins. Unlike many fluorescence probes, both the efficiency and the wavelength of Trp fluorescence in proteins are highly sensitive to microenvironment, and Stokes shifts can be dominated by the well-known heterogeneous nature of protein structure, leading to what we call pseudo-TDFSS: shifts that arise from differential decay rates of subpopulations. Here we emphasize a novel, general method that obviates pseudo-TDFSS by replacing Trp by 5-fluorotryptophan (5Ftrp), a fluorescent analogue with higher ionization potential and greatly suppressed electron-transfer quenching. 5FTrp slows and suppresses pseudo-TDFSS, thereby providing a clearer view of genuine relaxation caused by solvent and protein response. This procedure is applied to the sweet-tasting protein monellin which has uniquely been the subject of ultrafast studies in two different laboratories (Peon, J.; et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2002, 99, 10964; Xu, J.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2006, 128, 1214) that led to disparate interpretations of a 20 ps transient. They differed because of the pseudo-TDFSS present. The current study exploiting special properties of 5FTrp strongly supports the conclusion that both lifetime heterogeneity-based TDFSS and environment relaxation-based TDFSS are present in monellin and 5FTrp-monellin. The original experiments on monellin were most likely dominated by pseudo-TDFSS, whereas, in the present investigation of 5FTrp-monellin, the TDFSS is dominated by relaxation and any residual pseudo-TDFSS is overwhelmed and/or slowed to irrelevance. PMID:25710196

  17. Amino-terminal analysis of tryptophan hydroxylase: protein kinase phosphorylation occurs at serine-58.

    PubMed

    Kumer, S C; Mockus, S M; Rucker, P J; Vrana, K E

    1997-10-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) catalyzes the rate-limiting and committed step in serotonin biosynthesis. Within this enzyme, two distinct domains have been hypothesized to exist, an amino-terminal regulatory domain and a carboxyl-terminal catalytic domain. In the present experiments, the functional boundary between the putative domains was defined using deletion mutagenesis. A full-length cDNA clone for rabbit TPH was engineered for expression in bacteria. Five amino-terminal deletions were constructed using PCR, i.e., Ndelta50, Ndelta60, Ndelta90, Ndelta106, and Ndelta116 (referring to the number of amino acids deleted from the amino terminus). Enzymatic activity was determined for each mutant after expression in bacteria. Whereas deletion of 116 amino acids (Ndelta116) abolished enzyme activity, all of the other amino-terminal deletions exhibited increased specific activity relative to the recombinant wild-type TPH. The ability of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) to phosphorylate members of the deletion series was also examined. Deletion of the first 60 amino-terminal residues abolished the ability of the enzyme to serve as a substrate for PKA, yet the native and Ndelta50 enzymes were phosphorylated. Moreover, a serine-58 point mutant (S58A) was not phosphorylated by PKA. In conclusion, the first 106 amino acids comprise a regulatory domain that is phosphorylated by PKA at serine-58. In addition, the boundary between regulatory and catalytic domains is analogous to the domain structure observed for the related enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase. PMID:9326303

  18. Identification of amino-terminal sequences contributing to tryptophan hydroxylase tetramer formation.

    PubMed

    Yohrling, G J; Mockus, S M; Vrana, K E

    1999-02-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of serotonin. In the rabbit, TPH exists as a tetramer of four identical 51-kDa subunits comprised of 444 amino acids each. The enzyme consists of an amino-terminal regulatory domain and a carboxyl-terminal catalytic domain. Previous studies demonstrated that within the carboxyl-terminus of TPH, there resides an intersubunit binding domain (a leucine zipper) that is essential for tetramer formation. However, it is hypothesized that a 4,3-hydrophobic repeat identified within the regulatory domain of TPH (residues 21-41) may also be involved in macromolecular assembly. To test this hypothesis, a series of amino-terminal deletions (Ndelta15, 30, 41, and 90) were created and assessed for macromolecular structure using size-exclusion chromatography. The amino-terminal deletion Ndelta15, upstream from the 4,3-hydrophobic repeat, was capable of forming tetramers. However, when a portion of the 4,3-hydrophobic repeat was deleted (Ndelta30), a heterogeneous elution pattern of tetramers, dimers, and monomers was observed. Complete removal of the 4,3-hydrophobic repeat (Ndelta41) rendered the enzyme incapable of forming tetramers; a monomeric form predominated. In addition, a double-point mutation (V28R-L31R) was created in the hydrophobic region of the enzyme. The introduction of two arginines (R) at positions 28 and 31 respectively, in the helix disrupted the native tetrameric state of TPH. According to size-exclusion chromatography analysis, the double-point mutant (V28R-L31R) formed dimers of 127 kDa. Thus, it is concluded that there is information within the amino-terminus that is necessary for tetramer formation of TPH. This additional intersubunit binding domain in the amino-terminus is similar to that found in the carboxyl-terminus. PMID:10636468

  19. Characterization of a slow folding reaction for the alpha subunit of tryptophan synthase.

    PubMed

    Hurle, M R; Michelotti, G A; Crisanti, M M; Matthews, C R

    1987-01-01

    The equilibria and kinetics of urea-induced unfolding and refolding of the alpha subunit of tryptophan synthase of E. coli have been examined for their dependences on viscosity, pH, and temperature in order to investigate the properties of one of the rate-limiting steps, domain association. A viscosity enhancer, 0.58 M sucrose, was found to slow unfolding and accelerate refolding. This apparently anomalous result was shown to be due to the stabilizing effect of sucrose on the folding reaction. After accounting for this stabilization effect by using linear free-energy plots, the unfolding and refolding kinetics were found to have a viscosity dependence. A decrease in pH was found to stabilize the domain association reaction by increasing the refolding rate and decreasing the unfolding rate. This effect was accounted for by protonation of a single residue with a pK value of 8.8 in the native state and 7.1 in the intermediate, in which the two domains are not yet associated. The activation energy of unfolding is 4.8 kcal/mol, close to the diffusion limit. The negative activation entropy of unfolding, -47 cal/deg-mol, which controls this reaction, may result from ordering of solvent about the newly exposed domain interface of the transition state. These results may provide information on the types of noncovalent interactions involved in domain association and improve the ability to interpret the folding of mutants with single amino-acid substitutions at the interface. PMID:3328859

  20. Carbon Fiber—Vinyl Ester Interfacial Adhesion Improvement by the Use of an Epoxy Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautard, Frederic; Xu, Lanhong; Drzal, Lawrence T.

    With the use of composites expanding into larger structural applications, vinyl ester matrices which are not dependent on an autoclave cure and are more environmentally resistant to water absorption are being investigated. The degree of adhesion between the fiber and matrix has been recognized to be a critical factor in determining the performance of fiber-reinforced composites. The mechanical properties of carbon fiber-vinyl ester composites are low compared to carbon fiber-epoxy composites, partly because of lower interfacial adhesion. The origins of this limitation were investigated. The influence of preferential adsorption of the matrix constituents on the interfacial adhesion was not significant. However, the high cure volume shrinkage was found to be an important factor. An engineered interphase consisting of a partially cross-linked epoxy sizing that could chemically bond to the carbon fiber and form an interpenetrating network with the vinyl ester matrix was found to sharply improve the interfacial adhesion. The mechanisms involved in that improvement were investigated. The diffusion of styrene in the epoxy coating decreased the residual stress induced by the volume shrinkage of the vinyl ester matrix. The optimal value of the thickness was found to be a dominant factor in increasing the value of the interfacial shear strength according to a 2D non-linear finite element model.

  1. Novel methods for measuring air-water interfacial area in unsaturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Brusseau, Mark L; El Ouni, Asma; Araujo, Juliana B; Zhong, Hua

    2015-05-01

    Interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT) are used to measure air-water interfacial area for unsaturated porous media. The standard IPTT method involves conducting tests wherein an aqueous surfactant solution is introduced into a packed column under unsaturated flow conditions. Surfactant-induced drainage has been observed to occur for this method in some cases, which can complicate data analysis and impart uncertainty to the measured values. Two novel alternative approaches for conducting IPTTs are presented herein that are designed in part to prevent surfactant-induced drainage. The two methods are termed the dual-surfactant IPTT (IPTT-DS) and the residual-air IPTT (IPTT-RA). The two methods were used to measure air-water interfacial areas for two natural porous media. System monitoring during the tests revealed no measurable surfactant-induced drainage. The measured interfacial areas compared well to those obtained with the standard IPTT method conducted in such a manner that surfactant-induced drainage was prevented. PMID:25732632

  2. NOVEL METHODS FOR MEASURING AIR-WATER INTERFACIAL AREA IN UNSATURATED POROUS MEDIA

    PubMed Central

    Brusseau, Mark L.; Ouni, Asma El; Araujo, Juliana B.; Zhong, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT) are used to measure air-water interfacial area for unsaturated porous media. The standard IPTT method involves conducting tests wherein an aqueous surfactant solution is introduced into a packed column under unsaturated flow conditions. Surfactant-induced drainage has been observed to occur for this method in some cases, which can complicate data analysis and impart uncertainty to the measured values. Two novel alternative approaches for conducting IPTTs are presented herein that are designed in part to prevent surfactant-induced drainage. The two methods are termed the dual-surfactant IPTT (IPTT-DS) and the residual-air IPTT (IPTT-RA). The two methods were used to measure air-water interfacial areas for two natural porous media. System monitoring during the tests revealed no measurable surfactant-induced drainage. The measured interfacial areas compared well to those obtained with the standard IPTT method conducted in such a manner that surfactant-induced drainage was prevented. PMID:25732632

  3. The role of tryptophans in the UV-B absorption of a UVR8 photoreceptor--a computational study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Huang, Bolong; Niehaus, T A; Yang, Xiaojing; Fan, Jun; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2015-04-28

    Arabidopsis thaliana UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) has been identified as a photoreceptor for ultraviolet-B (UV-B). Tryptophan (Trp) residues have been shown to play a critical role in the response to UV-B irradiation in UVR8. In this work, we explore the spectroscopic behaviors of Trps in different protein environments of the UVR8 structure using the time-dependent density functional tight-binding (TD-DFTB) scheme. We show that W233 exhibits the longest absorption wavelength, highlighting its potential as a terminal Trp chromophore in the UV-B harvesting antenna. Our electronic and optical property analyses using various amino acid models support the important roles of W285 and W233 in sensing UV-B light at longer absorption wavelengths (∼290 nm). We also provide evidence for the specific function of W94 in absorption at the longest wavelengths (305.8 nm in cluster II and 304.5 nm in cluster III). To these findings, we also add information about the influence of the arginine and aspartic acid residues surrounding the Trp pyramid on the particular absorption bands (280-300 nm) that are characteristic of the UV-B photoreceptor. PMID:25811850

  4. Interfacial friction in cocurrent upward annular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossfeld, L. M.; Bharathan, D.; Wallis, G. B.; Richter, H. J.

    1982-03-01

    Cocurrent upward annular flow is investigated, with an emphasis on correlating and predicting pressure drop. Attention is given to the characteristics of the liquid flow in the film, and the interaction of the core with the film. Alternate approaches are discussed for correlating suitably defined interfacial friction factors. Both approaches are dependent on knowledge of the entrainment in order to make predictions. Dimensional analysis is used to define characteristic parameters of the flow and an effort is made to determine, to the extent possible, the influences of these parameters on the interfacial friction factor.

  5. Molecularly imprinted silica-silver nanowires for tryptophan recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Faes López, T.; Díaz-García, M. E.; Badía-Laíño, R.

    2014-10-01

    We report on silver nanowires (AgNWs) coated with molecularly imprinted silica (MIP SiO2) for recognition of tryptophan (Trp). The use of AgNWs as a template confers an imprinted material with adequate mechanical strength and with a capability of recognizing Trp due to its nanomorphology when compared to spherical microparticles with a similar surface-to-volume ratio. Studies on adsorption isotherms showed the MIP-SiO2-AgNWs to exhibit homogeneous affinity sites with narrow affinity distribution. This suggests that the synthesized material behaves as a 1D nanomaterial with a large area and small thickness with very similar affinity sites. Trp release from MIP-SiO2-AgNWs was demonstrated to be dominated by the diffusion rate of Trp as controlled by the specific interactions with the imprinted silica shell. Considering these results and the lack of toxicity of silica sol-gel materials, the material offers potential in the field of drug or pharmaceutical controlled delivery, but also in optoelectronic devices, electrodes and sensors.

  6. Species and cell types difference in tryptophan metabolism.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yuki; Saito, Kuniaki

    2013-01-01

    L-Tryptophan (L-TRP) is a nutritionally essential amino acid and the kynurenine (KYN) pathway is the major route of L-TRP catabolism. Besides being synthesized for proteins, L-TRP and its metabolites have critical roles for the functions of nervous and immune systems. Many researches show that optimal amounts of L-TRP in diets depend on species, developmental stages, environmental factors and health status. We have shown that KYN pathway-related enzyme activities vary among species, tissue and cell types in physiological conditions. Furthermore, the response of these enzyme activities to systemic and/or central nervous system immune activation and inflammation depends on species and cell types. Thus, it is very important to choose appropriate animal species and cell types in which to evaluate the physiologic and pathologic effects of increased KYN pathway metabolism. We believe that understanding L-TRP metabolism among species and cell types provides a better idea for analysis of human pathological condition. PMID:23922502

  7. Intersubunit binding domains within tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Yohrling, G J; Jiang, G C; Mockus, S M; Vrana, K E

    2000-08-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) belongs to the aromatic amino acid hydroxylase superfamily, which includes phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). The crystal structures for both PAH and TH have been reported, but a crystallographic model of TPH remains elusive. For this reason, we have utilized the information presented in the TH crystal structure in combination with primary sequence alignments to design point mutations in potential structural domains of the TPH protein. Mutation of a TH salt bridge (K170E) was sufficient to alter enzyme macromolecular assembly. We found that the disruption of the cognate intersubunit dimerization salt bridge (K111-E223) in TPH, however, did not affect the macromolecular assembly of TPH. Enzyme peaks representing only tetramers were observed with size exclusion chromatography. By contrast, a single-point mutation within the tetramerization domain of TPH (L435A) was sufficient to disrupt the normal homotetrameric assembly of TPH. These studies indicate that, although the proposed salt bridge dimerization interface of TH is conserved in TPH, this hypothetical TPH intersubunit binding domain, K111-E223, is not required for the proper macromolecular assembly of the protein. However, leucine 435 within the tetramerization domain is necessary for the proper macromolecular assembly of TPH. PMID:10900078

  8. Tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase do not form heterotetramers.

    PubMed

    Mockus, S M; Yohrling, G J; Vrana, K E

    1998-02-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) both contain a C-terminal tetramerization domain composed of a leucine heptad repeat embedded within a 4,3-hydrophobic repeat. Previous mutagenesis experiments and X-ray crystallographic studies have demonstrated that these repeats are required for tetramer assembly of the hydroxylase enzymes via coiled-coil interactions. The specificity of these particular C-terminal intersubunit binding motifs was investigated by determining if TH and TPH can form heterotetramers when coexpressed in bacteria. Bacterial cells were contransformed with TH and TPH expression plasmids under kanamycin and ampicillin selection, respectively. Immunoprecipitation of induced bacterial supernatants with a TPH monoclonal antibody demonstrated that, unlike the human TH isoforms, TH and TPH do not form heterotetramers. The data suggest that specificity of oligomerization of the aromatic amino acid hydroxylases may be partially determined by polar amino acids interspersed within the coiled-coil. This finding should be influential in the development of eukaryotic expression systems and ultimately in gene therapy approaches. PMID:9589369

  9. Tryptophan Catabolism in Chronic Viral Infections: Handling Uninvited Guests

    PubMed Central

    Mehraj, Vikram; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    l-Tryptophan (l-Trp) is an essential amino acid that possesses diverse metabolic, neurological, and immunological roles spanning from the synthesis of proteins, neurotransmitter serotonin, and neurohormone melatonin, to its degradation into immunosuppressive catabolites by indoleamine-2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) in the kynurenine pathway (KP). Trp catabolites, by activating aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), play an important role in antimicrobial defense and immune regulation. IDO/AhR acts as a double-edged sword by both depleting l-Trp to starve the invaders and by contributing to the state of immunosuppression with microorganisms that were not cleared during acute infection. Pathogens experiencing Trp deprivation by IDO-mediated degradation include certain bacteria, parasites, and less likely viruses. However, chronic viral infections highjack the host immune response to create a state of disease tolerance via kynurenine catabolites. This review covers the latest data involving chronic viral infections such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), herpes, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) and their cellular interplay with Trp catabolites. Strategies developed by viruses to escape immune control also represent new avenues for therapeutic interventions based on Trp metabolism. PMID:26309411

  10. Immunochemical characterization of brain and pineal tryptophan hydroxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Y. I.; Park, D. H.; Kim, M.; Baker, H.; Joh, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    Recombinant mouse tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) was expressed in Escherichia coli, using a bacterial expression vector and has been purified to homogeneity by sonication followed by Sepharose 4B column chromatography and native slab gel electrophoresis. This purified enzymatically active TPH protein was used for production of a specific antiserum. This antiserum identified the predicted TPH band (molecular weight, 54 kDa) on Western blot of crude extracts from the rat and mouse dorsal raphe, and the rat pineal gland. However, this antiserum recognized an additional protein band of lower molecular weight (48 kDa) in pineal extract. It is not clear whether the 48 kDa TPH band represents an isozyme or a protease cleavage product of TPH. Since the pineal gland contains higher TPH mRNA and lower TPH activity when it is compared with dorsal raphe nucleus enzyme, this lower molecular weight TPH may participate in the reduced TPH specific activity. In addition, there are no specific TPH inhibitors in the pineal gland and this lower molecular weight TPH is inactive or has a very low specific activity. This antiserum specifically immunostained serotonergic cell bodies in the dorsal raphe nuclei, some large caliber serotonergic processes in the dorsal raphe area as well as terminals in the olfactory bulb. It also immunolabeled the pineal gland and immunoprecipitated equally well TPH protein from the dorsal raphe nucleus and the pineal gland in a concentration-dependent manner. PMID:11511796

  11. Acute Tryptophan Depletion and Sweet Food Consumption by Overweight Adults

    PubMed Central

    Pagoto, Sherry L.; Spring, Bonnie; McChargue, Dennis; Hitsman, Brian; Smith, Malaina; Appelhans, Bradley; Hedeker, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Serotonergic involvement has been implicated in preferential consumption of treat foods. We tested the effect of acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) on food consumption by overweight and lean adults with and without a history of recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD). ATD and taste-matched placebo challenges were administered double-blind in counter-balanced order. Participants were classified as lean (n = 36) or overweight (n=19) on the basis of body mass index (BMI). Total calorie, carbohydrate, protein, and sweet food consumption were assessed via a test meal 8-hours following ATD. Four food items of comparable palatability were offered as a part of the test: two sweet (one carbohydrate-rich, and one protein-rich) and two non-sweet (one carbohydrate-rich, and one protein-rich). As compared to the placebo challenge, ATD significantly increased sweet calorie intake among overweight participants and increased their propensity to consume sweet food first before any other type of food. Lean participants’ sweet calorie intake and food preference were unaffected by ATD. Findings suggest serotonergic involvement in the sweet food consumption by overweight individuals. PMID:19171315

  12. Antitumour agents as inhibitors of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Pantouris, Georgios; Mowat, Christopher G.

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •∼2800 National Cancer Institute USA compounds have been screened as potential inhibitors of TDO and/or IDO. •Seven compounds with anti-tumour properties have been identified as potent inhibitors. •NSC 36398 (taxifolin, dihydroquercetin) is selective for TDO with a K{sub i} of 16 M. •This may help further our understanding of the role of TDO in cancer. -- Abstract: The involvement of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) in cancer biology has recently been described, with the enzyme playing an immunomodulatory role, suppressing antitumour immune responses and promoting tumour cell survival and proliferation. This finding reinforces the need for specific inhibitors of TDO that may potentially be developed for therapeutic use. In this work we have screened ∼2800 compounds from the library of the National Cancer Institute USA and identified seven potent inhibitors of TDO with inhibition constants in the nanomolar or low micromolar range. All seven have antitumour properties, killing various cancer cell lines. For comparison, the inhibition potencies of these compounds were tested against IDO and their inhibition constants are reported. Interestingly, this work reveals that NSC 36398 (dihydroquercetin, taxifolin), with an in vitro inhibition constant of ∼16 μM, is the first TDO-selective inhibitor reported.

  13. Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 Gene and Alcohol Use among College Students

    PubMed Central

    Gacek, Paul; Conner, Tamlin S.; Tennen, Howard; Kranzler, Henry R.; Covault, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Objective Genes that regulate serotonin activity are regarded as promising predictors of heavy alcohol use. Tryptophan Hydroxylase (TPH2) plays an important role in serotonergic neurotransmission by serving as the rate-limiting enzyme for serotonin biosynthesis in the midbrain and serotonergic neurons. Despite the link between TPH2 and serotonergic function, TPH2’s role in the pathogenesis of alcohol use disorders remains unclear. The goal of this study was to examine whether variation in the TPH2 gene is associated with risky alcohol consumption. Specifically, this study examined whether the TPH2 G-703T polymorphism predicted alcohol consumption among college students. Methods In two successive years, 351 undergraduates were asked to record their alcohol use each day for 30 days using an internet-based electronic diary. Participants’ DNA was collected and polymerase chain reaction genotyping was performed. Results Alcohol consumption was not associated with the TPH2 G-703T polymorphism alone, or the interaction of TPH2 with two other candidate polymorphisms (TPH1 C218A, and the SLC6A4 tri-allelic 5-HTTLPR) or negative life events. Conclusions This study supports recent null findings relating TPH2 to drinking outcomes. It also extends these findings by showing null interactions with the TPH1 C218A polymorphism, the SLC6A4 tri-allelic 5-HTTLPR polymorphism, and environmental stressors in predicting sub-clinical alcohol use among Caucasian American young adults. PMID:18782386

  14. Interfacial bond strength of electrophoretically deposited hydroxyapatite coatings on metals.

    PubMed

    Wei, M; Ruys, A J; Swain, M V; Kim, S H; Milthorpe, B K; Sorrell, C C

    1999-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings were deposited onto substrates of metal biomaterials (Ti, Ti6Al4V, and 316L stainless steel) by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Only ultra-high surface area HAp powder, prepared by the metathesis method 10Ca(NO3)2 + 6(NH4)2HPO4 + 8NH4OH), could produce dense coatings when sintered at 875-1000degreesC. Single EPD coatings cracked during sintering owing to the 15-18% sintering shrinkage, but the HAp did not decompose. The use of dual coatings (coat, sinter, coat, sinter) resolved the cracking problem. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) inspection revealed that the second coating filled in the "valleys" in the cracks of the first coating. The interfacial shear strength of the dual coatings was found, by ASTM F1044-87, to be approximately 12 MPa on a titanium substrate and approximately 22 MPa on 316L stainless steel, comparing quite favorably with the 34 MPa benchmark (the shear strength of bovine cortical bone was found to be 34 MPa). Stainless steel gave the better result since -316L (20.5 microm mK(-1)) > alpha-HAp (approximately 14 microm mK(-1)), resulting in residual compressive stresses in the coating, whereas alpha-titanium (approximately 10.3 microm mK(-1)) < alpha-HAp, resulting in residual tensile stresses in the coating. PMID:15348125

  15. Occurrence of N-Formylkynurenine in Extracts of Neurospora crassa: Evidence for the Activity of Tryptophan Pyrrolase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, James; Matchett, William H.

    1974-01-01

    N-formylkynurenine and kynurenine have been detected in extracts of tryptophan-grown Neurospora crassa. When the mycelia were grown in medium supplemented with l-[2-14C]tryptophan, the radioactivity was detected in N-formylkynurenine and N-formylanthranilic acid; with l-[β-14C]tryptophan, radioactivity was detected in N-formylkynurenine, kynurenine, kynurenic acid, and xanthurenic acid. The occurrence of N-formylkynurenine in extracts of tryptophan-grown Neurospora is interpreted as direct evidence for the activity of tryptophan pyrrolase in this organism. The presence of this enzyme was expected on the basis of several earlier studies, but its activity in vitro has so far escaped detection. The in vivo evidence presented here suggests its presence and contributes importantly to our understanding of the tryptophan-anthranilic acid cycle. PMID:4275312

  16. Enthalpy characteristics of dissolution of L-tryptophan in water + formamides binary solvents at 298.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, V. I.; Badelin, V. G.

    2013-07-01

    Enthalpies of dissolution of L-tryptophan in aqueous solutions of formamide (FA), N-methylformamide (MFA), and N, N-dimethylformamide (DMF) are measured according to calorimetry at the concentration of amides x 2 = 0-0.4 mole fraction. Standard values of enthalpies of dissolution and transfer Δtr H o of L-tryptophan from water to binary solvent, as well as enthalpy coefficients of pair-wise interactions h xy of L-tryptophan with formamide molecules are calculated. The effect the composition of a waterorganic mixture has on the enthalpy characteristics of L-tryptophan is considered. The relation of Δtr H o of L-tryptophan with the structure of amides is shown. A quantitative estimation of the contributions to the energy of L-tryptophan-formamide pair-wise interactions determined by polarity/polarizability, acidity, and basicity of organic solvent is performed using the four-parameter Kamlet-Taft correlation equation.

  17. Tryptophanase-catalyzed L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine in the presence of diammonium hydrogen phosphate.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Akihiko; Ozaki, Haruka; Saito, Takeshi; Noriko, Fujii

    2009-06-01

    Tryptophanase, an enzyme with extreme absolute stereospecificity for optically active stereoisomers, catalyzes the synthesis of l-tryptophan from l-serine and indole through a beta-substitution mechanism of the ping-pong type, and has no activity on d-serine. We previously reported that tryptophanase changed its stereospecificity to degrade d-tryptophan in highly concentrated diammonium hydrogen phosphate, (NH(4))(2)HPO(4) solution. The present study provided the same stereospecific change seen in the d-tryptophan degradation reaction also occurs in tryptophan synthesis from d-serine. Tryptophanase became active to d-serine to synthesize l-tryptophan in the presence of diammonium hydrogen phosphate. This reaction has never been reported before. d-serine seems to undergo beta-replacement via an enzyme-bonded alpha-aminoacylate intermediate to yield l-tryptophan. PMID:19582219

  18. Residual Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    10 May 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a summertime view of the south polar residual cap of Mars. In this image, mesas composed largely of solid carbon dioxide are separated from one another by irregularly-shaped depressions. The variation in brightness across this scene is a function of several factors including, but not limited to, varying proportions of dust and solid carbon dioxide, undulating topography, and differences in the roughness of the slopes versus the flat surfaces.

    Location near: 86.7oS, 343.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  19. The Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment - Interfacial Flow Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundan, Akshay; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Plawsky, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Internal heat transfer coefficient of the CVB correlated to the presence of the interfacial flow region. Competition between capillary and Marangoni flow caused Flooding and not a Dry-out region. Interfacial flow region growth is arrested at higher power inputs. 1D heat model confirms the presence of interfacial flow region. 1D heat model confirms the arresting phenomena of interfacial flow region Visual observations are essential to understanding.

  20. Oxidation and temperature effects on the interfacial shear strength in SCS-6 fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Guermazi, M.

    1995-01-01

    The fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength of Textron SCS-6 SiC-fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (RBSN) was studied as a function of temperature after oxidation for 24 h at 600 C. Fiber push-out experiments were conducted using a diamond indenter in a high-temperature microhardness tester under vacuum. The interfacial shear strength increased with temperature because of the relief of residual tensile stresses arising from the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between the fiber and the matrix. Most of sublayer 2 of the fiber outer coating, which mainly consisted of carbon in the form of BSU (basic structure unit) aggregates, had disappeared after the heat treatment of the composite. Oxidation resulted in severe changes in the fiber outer coating and caused a lower interfacial shear strength with respect to that of the unoxidized composite.

  1. 13C-tryptophan breath test detects increased catabolic turnover of tryptophan along the kynurenine pathway in patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Teraishi, Toshiya; Hori, Hiroaki; Sasayama, Daimei; Matsuo, Junko; Ogawa, Shintaro; Ota, Miho; Hattori, Kotaro; Kajiwara, Masahiro; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Altered tryptophan–kynurenine (KYN) metabolism has been implicated in major depressive disorder (MDD). The l-[1-13C]tryptophan breath test (13C-TBT) is a noninvasive, stable-isotope tracer method in which exhaled 13CO2 is attributable to tryptophan catabolism via the KYN pathway. We included 18 patients with MDD (DSM-IV) and 24 age- and sex-matched controls. 13C-tryptophan (150 mg) was orally administered and the 13CO2/12CO2 ratio in the breath was monitored for 180 min. The cumulative recovery rate during the 180-min test (CRR0–180; %), area under the Δ13CO2-time curve (AUC; %*min), and the maximal Δ13CO2 (Cmax; %) were significantly higher in patients with MDD than in the controls (p = 0.004, p = 0.008, and p = 0.002, respectively). Plasma tryptophan concentrations correlated negatively with Cmax in both the patients and controls (p = 0.020 and p = 0.034, respectively). Our results suggest that the 13C-TBT could be a novel biomarker for detecting a subgroup of MDD with increased tryptophan–KYN metabolism. PMID:26524975

  2. The first step of the dioxygenation reaction carried out by tryptophan dioxygenase and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase as revealed by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical studies

    PubMed Central

    Capece, Luciana; Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Batabyal, Dipanwita; Di Russo, Natali; Estrin, Dario A.

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan dioxygenase (TDO) and indole-amine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) are two heme-containing enzymes which catalyze the conversion of L-tryptophan to N-formylkynurenine (NFK). In mammals, TDO is mostly expressed in liver and is involved in controlling homeostatic serum tryptophan concentrations, whereas IDO is ubiquitous and is involved in modulating immune responses. Previous studies suggested that the first step of the dioxygenase reaction involves the deprotonation of the indoleamine group of the substrate by an evolutionarily conserved distal histidine residue in TDO and the heme-bound dioxygen in IDO. Here, we used classical molecular dynamics and hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical methods to evaluate the base-catalyzed mechanism. Our data suggest that the deprotonation of the indoleamine group of the substrate by either histidine in TDO or heme-bound dioxygen in IDO is not energetically favorable. Instead, the dioxygenase reaction can be initiated by a direct attack of heme-bound dioxygen on the C2=C3 bond of the indole ring, leading to a protein-stabilized 2,3-alkylperoxide transition state and a ferryl epoxide intermediate, which subsequently recombine to generate NFK. The novel sequential two-step oxygen addition mechanism is fully supported by our recent resonance Raman data that allowed identification of the ferryl intermediate (Lewis-Ballester et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 106:17371–17376, 2009). The results reveal the subtle differences between the TDO and IDO reactions and highlight the importance of protein matrix in modulating stereoelectronic factors for oxygen activation and the stabilization of both transition and intermediate states. PMID:20361220

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of interaction of ligands with Streptococcus faecium dihydrofolate reductase labeled with (. gamma. -/sup 13/C)tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.E.; Groff, J.P.; Cocco, L.; Blakley, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase from Streptococcus faecium has been labeled with (..gamma..-/sup 13/C)tryptophan. We have determined changes occurring in the chemical shifts and line widths of the four resonances of the /sup 13/C NMR spectrum of the labeled enzyme, due to its interaction with various ligands. These include the coenzyme, NPDPH and related nucleotides, folate and its polyglutamate derivatives, and many inhibitors including methotrexate and trimethoprim. In addition, paramagnetic relaxation effects produced by a bound spin-labeled analogue of 2'-phosphoadenosine-5'-diphosphoribose on the tryptophan C/sup ..gamma../ carbons have been measured. Distances calculated from the relaxation data have been compared with corresponding distances in the crystallographic model of the NADPH-methotrexate ternary complex of Lactobacillus casei reductase. The paramagnetic relaxation data indicate that the two downfield resonances (1 and 2) correspond to tryptophans (W/sub A/ and W/sub B/) that are more remote from the catalytic site, and from the crystallographic model these are seen to be Trp-115 and Trp-160. The upfield resonances (3 and 4) that show broadening due to chemical exchange correspond to closer residues (W/sub C/ and W/sub D/), and these are identified with Trp-6 and Trp-22. However, the relaxation data do not permit specific assignments within the nearer and farther pairs. Although resonance 3, which is split due to chemical exchange, was formerly assigned to Trp-6, data obtained for the enzyme in the presence of various ligands are better interpreted if resonance 3 is assigned to Trp-22, which is located on a loop that joins elements of secondary structure and forms one side of the ligand-binding cavity.

  4. Interfacial structure in thin water layers formed by forced dewetting on self-assembled monolayers of omega-terminated alkanethiols on Ag.

    PubMed

    Tiani, Domenic J; Yoo, Heemin; Mudalige, Anoma; Pemberton, Jeanne E

    2008-12-01

    A method for the spectroscopic characterization of interfacial fluid molecular structure near solid substrates is reported. The thickness and interfacial molecular structure of residual ultrathin D20 films remaining after forced dewetting on alkanethiolate self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 11 1-mercaptoundecanoic acid (11-MUA), 11-mercaptoundecanol (11-MUD), and undecanethiol (UDT) on Ag are investigated using ellipsometry and surface Raman spectroscopy. The residual film thickness left after withdrawal is greater on hydrophilic SAMs than on hydrophobic SAMs. This behavior is rationalized on the basis of differing degrees of fluid slip within the interfacial region due to different interfacial molecular structure. The v(O-D) regions of surface Raman spectra clearly indicate unique interfacial molecular properties within these films that differ from bulk D20. Although the residual films are created by shear forces and Marangoni flow at the three-phase line during the forced dewetting process, the nature of the films sampled optically must also be considered from the standpoint of thin film stability after dewetting. Thus, the resulting D20 films exist in vastly different morphologies depending on the nature of the water-SAM interactions. Residual D20 is proposed to exist as small nanodroplets on UDT surfaces due tospontaneous rupture of the film after dewetting. In contrast, on 11-MUD and 11-MUA surfaces, these films exist in a metastable state that retains their conformal nature on the underlying modified surface. Analysis of the peak intensity ratios of the so-called "ice-like" to "liquid-like" v(O-D) modes suggests more ice-like D20 character near 11-MUD surfaces, but more liquid-like character near 11-MUA and UDT surfaces. The creation of residual ultrathin films by forced dewetting is thus demonstrated to be a powerful method for characterizing interfacial molecular structure of fluids near a solid substrate under ambient conditions of temperature and

  5. Exchange bias mediated by interfacial nanoparticles (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, A. E.; Sinha, S. K.; Fullerton, E. E.; Smith, D. J.

    2015-05-07

    The objective of this study on the iconic exchange-bias bilayer Permalloy/CoO has been to identify those elements of the interfacial microstructure and accompanying magnetic properties that are responsible for the exchange-bias and hysteretic properties of this bilayer. Both epitaxial and polycrystalline samples were examined. X-ray and neutron reflectometry established that there existed an interfacial region, of width ∼1 nm, whose magnetic properties differed from those of Py or CoO. A model was developed for the interfacial microstructure that predicts all the relevant properties of this system; namely; the temperature and Permalloy thickness dependence of the exchange-bias, H{sub EX}, and coercivity, H{sub C}; the much smaller measured values of H{sub EX} from what was nominally expected; the different behavior of H{sub EX} and H{sub C} in epitaxial and polycrystalline bilayers. A surprising result is that the exchange-bias does not involve direct exchange-coupling between Permalloy and CoO, but rather is mediated by CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in the interfacial region.

  6. Tryptophan rotamer distribution revealed for the α-helix in tear lipocalin by site-directed tryptophan fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, Oktay K; Abduragimov, Adil R; Glasgow, Ben J

    2012-11-15

    Rotamer libraries are a valuable tool for protein structure determination, modeling, and design. Site-directed tryptophan fluorescence (SDTF) was used in combination with the rotamer model for the fluorescence intensity decays to solve α-helical conformations of proteins in solution. Single Trp mutations located in an α-helical segment of human tear lipocalin were explored for structure assignment. Along with fluorescence λ(max) values, the rotamer model assignment of fluorescence lifetimes fits the backbone conformation. Typically, Trp fluorescence in proteins shows three lifetimes. However, for the α-helix, two lifetimes assigned to t and g(-) rotamers were satisfactory to describe Trp fluorescence intensity decays. The g(+) rotamer is not feasible in the α-helix due to steric restriction. Trp rotamer distributions obtained by fluorescence were compared with the rotamer library derived from X-ray crystallography data of proteins. The Trp rotamer distributions vary for solvent exposed and buried (tertiary interaction) sites. A new strategy using the rotamer distribution with SDTF (RD-SDTF) removes the limitation of regular SDTF and other labeling techniques, in which site-specific differences, e.g., accessibility, are presumed. The RD-SDTF technique does not rely on environmental differences of side chains and is able to detect α-helical structure where all side chains are exposed to solvent. Potentially, this technique is applicable to various proteins including membrane proteins, which are rich in α-helix motif. PMID:23088798

  7. Tryptophan Rotamer Distribution Revealed for the Alpha-Helix in Tear Lipocalin by Site Directed Tryptophan Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Gasymov, Oktay K.; Abduragimov, Adil R.; Glasgow, Ben J.

    2012-01-01

    Rotamer libraries are a valuable tool for protein structure determination, modeling and design. Site-directed tryptophan fluorescence (SDTF) was used in combination with the rotamer model for the fluorescence intensity decays to solve α-helical conformations of proteins in solution. Single Trp mutations located in an α-helical segment of human tear lipocalin were explored for structure assignment. Along with fluorescence λmax values, the rotamer model assignment of fluorescence lifetimes fits the backbone conformation. Typically Trp fluorescence in proteins shows three lifetimes. However, for the α-helix, two lifetimes assigned to t and g− rotamers were satisfactory to describe Trp fluorescence intensity decays. The g+ rotamer is not feasible in the α-helix due to steric restriction. Trp rotamer distributions obtained by fluorescence were compared with the rotamer library derived from X-ray crystallography data of proteins. The Trp rotamer distributions vary for solvent exposed and buried (tertiary interaction) sites. A new strategy using the rotamer distribution with SDTF (RD-SDTF) removes the limitation of regular SDTF and other labeling techniques, in which site specific differences, e.g. accessibility, are presumed. The RD-SDTF technique does not rely on environmental differences of side chains and is able to detect α-helical structure where all side chains are exposed to solvent. Potentially this technique is applicable to various proteins including membrane proteins, which are rich in α-helix motif. PMID:23088798

  8. Lack of evidence for reduced prefrontal cortical serotonin and dopamine efflux after acute tryptophan depletion

    PubMed Central

    Meerkerk, Dorie (T). J.; Lieben, Cindy K. J.; Blokland, Arjan; Feenstra, Matthijs G. P.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) is a widely used method to study the role of serotonin (5-HT) in affect and cognition. ATD results in a strong but transient decrease in plasma tryptophan and central 5-HT synthesis and availability. Although its use is widespread, the evidence that the numerous functional effects of ATD are caused by actual changes in 5-HT neuronal release is not very strong. Thus far, decreases in 5-HT efflux (thought to reflect synaptic release) were only reported after chronic tryptophan depletion or when ATD was combined with blockade of 5-HT reuptake. Objective With the current experiment, we aimed to study the validity of the method of ATD by measuring the extent to which it reduces the efflux of 5-HT (and dopamine) in the prefrontal cortex in the absence of reuptake blockage. Materials and methods We simultaneously measured in freely moving animals plasma tryptophan via a catheter in the jugular vein and 5-HT and DA efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex through microdialysis after ATD treatment. Results ATD reduced plasma tryptophan to less than 30% of control, without affecting 5-HT or DA efflux in the prefrontal cortex, indicating that even strong reductions of plasma tryptophan do not necessarily result in decreases in central 5-HT efflux. Conclusion The present experiment showed that reductions in plasma tryptophan, similar to values associated with behavioural effects, do not necessarily reduce 5-HT efflux and suggest that the cognitive and behavioural effects of ATD may not be (exclusively) due to alterations in 5-HT release. PMID:17713760

  9. Characterization of tryptophan transport in human placental brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, M E; Leibach, F H; Mahesh, V B; Howard, J C; Devoe, L D; Ganapathy, V

    1986-01-01

    The characteristics of tryptophan uptake in isolated human placental brush-border membrane vesicles were investigated. Tryptophan uptake in these vesicles was predominantly Na+-independent. Uptake of tryptophan as measured with short incubations occurred exclusively by a carrier-mediated process, but significant binding of this amino acid to the membrane vesicles was observed with longer incubations. The carrier-mediated system obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with an apparent affinity constant of 12.7 +/- 1.0 microM and a maximal velocity of 91 +/- 5 pmol/15 s per mg of protein. The kinetic constants were similar in the presence and absence of a Na+ gradient. Competition experiments showed that tryptophan uptake was effectively inhibited by many neutral amino acids except proline, hydroxyproline and 2-(methylamino)isobutyric acid. The inhibitory amino acids included aromatic amino acids as well as other system-1-specific amino acids (system 1 refers to the classical L system, according to the most recent nomenclature of amino acid transport systems). The transport system showed very low affinity for D-isomers, was not affected by phloretin or glucose but was inhibited by p-azidophenylalanine and N-ethylmaleimide. The uptake rates were only minimally affected by change in pH over the range 4.5-8.0. Tryptophan uptake markedly responded to trans-stimulation, and the amino acids capable of causing trans-stimulation included all amino acids with system-1-specificity. The patterns of inhibition of uptake of tryptophan and leucine by various amino acids were very similar. We conclude that system t, which is specific for aromatic amino acids, is absent from human placenta and that tryptophan transport in this tissue occurs via system 1, which has very broad specificity. PMID:3800932

  10. IDO inhibits a tryptophan sufficiency signal that stimulates mTOR: A novel IDO effector pathway targeted by D-1-methyl-tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Metz, Richard; Rust, Sonja; Duhadaway, James B; Mautino, Mario R; Munn, David H; Vahanian, Nicholas N; Link, Charles J; Prendergast, George C

    2012-12-01

    Tryptophan catabolism by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) alters inflammation and favors T-cell tolerance in cancer, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. The integrated stress response kinase GCN2, a sensor of uncharged tRNA that is activated by amino acid deprivation, is recognized as an important effector of the IDO pathway. However, in a mouse model of inflammatory carcinogenesis, ablation of Gcn2 did not promote resistance against tumor development like the absence of IDO does, implying the existence of additional cancer-relevant pathways that operate downstream of IDO. Addressing this gap in knowledge, we report that the IDO-mediated catabolism of tryptophan also inhibits the immunoregulatory kinases mTOR and PKC-Θ, along with the induction of autophagy. These effects were relieved specifically by tryptophan but also by the experimental agent 1-methyl-D-tryptophan (D-1MT, also known as NLG8189), the latter of which reversed the inhibitory signals generated by IDO with higher potency. Taken together, our results implicate mTOR and PKC-Θ in IDO-mediated immunosuppressive signaling, and they provide timely insights into the unique mechanism of action of D-1MT as compared with traditional biochemical inhibitors of IDO. These findings are important translationally, because they suggest broader clinical uses for D-1MT against cancers that overexpress any tryptophan catabolic enzyme (IDO, IDO2 or TDO). Moreover, they define mTOR and PKC-Θ as candidate pharmacodynamic markers for D-1MT responses in patients recruited to ongoing phase IB/II cancer trials, addressing a current clinical need. PMID:23264892

  11. N-acetyl-l-tryptophan, but not N-acetyl-d-tryptophan, rescues neuronal cell death in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sirianni, Ana C; Jiang, Jiying; Zeng, Jiang; Mao, Lilly L; Zhou, Shuanhu; Sugarbaker, Peter; Zhang, Xinmu; Li, Wei; Friedlander, Robert M; Wang, Xin

    2015-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive motor neuron loss. Evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, oxidative stress, inflammation, glutamate excitotoxicity, and proteasomal dysfunction are all responsible for ALS pathogenesis. N-acetyl-tryptophan has been identified as an inhibitor of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and therefore is a potential neuroprotective agent. By quantifying cell death, we demonstrate that N-acetyl-l-tryptophan (L-NAT) and N-acetyl-DL-tryptophan are neuroprotective in NSC-34 motor neuron-like cells and/or primary motor neurons, while their isomer N-acetyl-d-tryptophan has no protective effect. These findings are consistent with energy minimization and molecular modeling analysis, confirming that L-NAT generates the most stable complex with the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R). L-NAT inhibits the secretion of Substance P and IL-1β (Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay and/or dot blots) and mitochondrial dysfunction by effectively inhibiting the release of cytochrome c/Smac/AIF from mitochondria into the cytoplasm and activation of apoptotic pathways, including the activation of caspase-1, -9, and -3, as well as proteasomal dysfunction through restoring chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like proteasome activity. These data provide insight into the molecular mechanisms by which L-NAT offers neuroprotection in models of ALS and suggest its potential as a novel therapeutic strategy for ALS. We demonstrate that L-NAT (N-acetyl-l-tryptophan), but not D-NAT, rescues NSC-34 cells and primary motor neurons from cell death. L-NAT inhibits the secretion of Substance P and IL-1β, and caspase-1 activation, the release of cytochrome c/Smac/AIF, and the activation of caspase -9, and -3, as well as proteasomal dysfunction. The data suggest the potential of L-NAT as a novel therapeutic strategy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). AIF, apoptosis-inducing factor. PMID

  12. Interfacial self-assembly of a bacterial hydrophobin

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, Keith M.; Morris, Ryan J.; Hobley, Laura; Brandani, Giovanni; Gillespie, Rachel M. C.; McCluskey, Matthew; Zachariae, Ulrich; Marenduzzo, Davide; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R.; MacPhee, Cait. E.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of bacteria in the natural environment live within the confines of a biofilm. The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis forms biofilms that exhibit a characteristic wrinkled morphology and a highly hydrophobic surface. A critical component in generating these properties is the protein BslA, which forms a coat across the surface of the sessile community. We recently reported the structure of BslA, and noted the presence of a large surface-exposed hydrophobic patch. Such surface patches are also observed in the class of surface-active proteins known as hydrophobins, and are thought to mediate their interfacial activity. However, although functionally related to the hydrophobins, BslA shares no sequence nor structural similarity, and here we show that the mechanism of action is also distinct. Specifically, our results suggest that the amino acids making up the large, surface-exposed hydrophobic cap in the crystal structure are shielded in aqueous solution by adopting a random coil conformation, enabling the protein to be soluble and monomeric. At an interface, these cap residues refold, inserting the hydrophobic side chains into the air or oil phase and forming a three-stranded β-sheet. This form then self-assembles into a well-ordered 2D rectangular lattice that stabilizes the interface. By replacing a hydrophobic leucine in the center of the cap with a positively charged lysine, we changed the energetics of adsorption and disrupted the formation of the 2D lattice. This limited structural metamorphosis represents a previously unidentified environmentally responsive mechanism for interfacial stabilization by proteins. PMID:25870300

  13. From tryptophan to hydroxytryptophan: reflections on a busy life.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Given the very difficult odyssey of my early years, who could have imagined the incredible and successful journey that constituted my life path after age 13? I was born into a Jewish family in Breslau, Germany, right before the rise of Nazism and Hitler's election. After Kristallnacht, when my father was taken to Buchenwald Concentration Camp, we had to leave Germany as soon as possible. The first opportunity came in May of 1939, when we boarded the SS St. Louis bound for Havana, Cuba. Almost all passengers were denied entrance into Cuba, and the ship had to go back to Europe, where I ended up in France. In December of 1939, during World War II, I was fortunate to be able to leave France. This time I made it to Cuba, where my father was already in residence. A year later, my entire family was allowed into the United States. I took advantage of all the educational resources in this land of opportunity. I graduated valedictorian of my high school class and earned a four-year scholarship to Rutgers University, where I obtained a Bachelor of Science degree. I went on to earn a Master's degree from the University of Connecticut and finally a PhD from the University of Illinois. Within two months after graduating from Illinois, I was hired as an assistant professor of nutritional biochemistry at Rutgers, where I enjoyed a most productive research and teaching career. My PhD research involved tryptophan and niacin metabolism in the chick, and upon arrival at Rutgers I continued amino acid studies with the goal of assessing the essential amino acid requirements for egg production. This research was crowned with success and was followed with amino acid requirement studies for maintenance and for growth in rabbits, and ultimately with a reevaluation of requirements in adult humans. An outgrowth of the maintenance requirements led to a series of investigations into the metabolism of histidine, histamine, and carnosine (a histidine-containing dipeptide). Histamine, we found

  14. Tryptophan supplementation and the response to unfairness in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Cerit, Hilâl; Schuur, Rachel J.; de Bruijn, Ellen R. A.; Van der Does, Willem

    2015-01-01

    Experimental manipulation of serotonin (5-HT) availability has been shown to modulate social behavior. For instance, serotonin depletion increased the rejection rates of unfair offers in the ultimatum game (UG), whereas a single dose of the serotonin reuptake inhibitor (citalopram) decreased rejection rates. These effects were observed immediately after the manipulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prolonged tryptophan (TRP) supplementation on UG performance in healthy individuals. A randomized double-blind placebo (PLC)-controlled design was used. Healthy volunteers (N = 47) completed the UG before and after a 6-day intervention of TRP (2.8 g/day) or PLC. Impulsivity was measured with a Go-Stop task. The overall analyses showed that TRP supplementation had no significant effect on UG scores, but the direction of the effect was opposite from expectations. Because repeated performance of the UG may lead to unwanted learning effects or strategical changes, additional analyses were conducted in which participants (N = 7) who accepted all offers on the second measurement were excluded. These analyses revealed that the TRP-group rejected very unfair offers more often than the PLC group. The groups did not differ on impulsivity. Increasing serotonin through TRP supplements increased the rejection of very unfair offers. The direction of our findings is inconsistent with earlier studies that showed that increasing 5-HT availability results in less rejection of unfair offers. The current findings thus importantly suggest that effects of acute vs. prolonged enhancement of 5-HT availability may differ. Also, the outcomes show that the UG is a complex task and participants’ decisions may depend on context, e.g., prior experience with the task. PMID:26236273

  15. Glycerol effects on protein flexibility: a tryptophan phosphorescence study.

    PubMed Central

    Gonnelli, M.; Strambini, G. B.

    1993-01-01

    In exploring the dynamic properties of protein structure, numerous studies have focussed on the dependence of structural fluctuations on solvent viscosity, but the emerging picture is still not well defined. Exploiting the sensitivity of the phosphorescence lifetime of tryptophan to the viscosity of its environment we have used the delayed emission as an intrinsic probe of protein flexibility and investigated the effects of glycerol as a viscogenic cosolvent. The phosphorescence lifetime of alcohol dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, apoazurin and RNase T1, as a function of glycerol concentration was studied at various temperatures. Flexibility data, which refer to rather rigid sites of the globular structures, point out that, for some concentration ranges glycerol, effects on the rate of structural fluctuations of alcohol dehydrogenase and RNase T1 do not obey Kramers' a power law on solvent viscosity and emphasize that cosolvent-induced structural changes can be important, even for inner cores of the macromolecule. When the data is analyzed in terms of Kramers' model, for the temperature range 0-30 degrees C one derives frictional coefficients that are relatively large (0.6-0.7) for RNase T1, where the probe is in a flexible region near the surface of the macromolecule and much smaller, less than 0.2, for the rigid sites of the other proteins. For the latter sites the frictional coefficient rises sharply between 40 and 60 degrees C, and its value correlates weakly with molecular parameters such as the depth of burial or the rigidity of a particular site. For RNase T1, coupling to solvent viscosity increases at subzero temperatures, with the coefficient becoming as large as 1 at -20 degrees C. Temperature effects were interpreted by proposing that solvent damping of internal protein motions is particularly effective for low frequency, large amplitude, structural fluctuations yielding highly flexible conformers of the macromolecule. PMID:8369422

  16. Coordinate regulation of the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway and indolic phytoalexin accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, J; Last, R L

    1996-01-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms that couple regulation of secondary metabolic pathways to the synthesis of primary metabolic precursors. Camalexin, an indolic secondary metabolite, appears to be the major phytoalexin in Arabidopsis. It was previously shown that camalexin accumulation is caused by infection with plant pathogens, by abiotic elicitors, and in spontaneous lesions in the accelerated cell death mutant acd2. We demonstrate that the accumulation of this phytoalexin is accompanied by the induction of the mRNAs and proteins for all of the tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes tested. A strong correlation was observed between the magnitude of camalexin accumulation and the induction of tryptophan biosynthetic proteins, indicating coordinate regulation of these processes. Production of disease symptoms is not sufficient for the response because systemic infection with cauliflower mosaic virus or cucumber mosaic virus did not induce the tryptophan pathway enzymes or camalexin accumulation. Salicylic acid appears to be required, but unlike other documented pathogenesis-related proteins, it is not sufficient for the coordinate induction. Results with trp mutants suggest that the tryptophan pathway is not rate limiting for camalexin accumulation. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the regulation of the tryptophan pathway in plants responds to needs for biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. PMID:8989880

  17. Lignans from Carthamus tinctorius suppress tryptophan breakdown via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Kuehnl, Susanne; Schroecksnadel, Sebastian; Temml, Veronika; Gostner, Johanna M; Schennach, Harald; Schuster, Daniela; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M; Fuchs, Dietmar; Stuppner, Hermann

    2013-10-15

    Seed extracts of Carthamus tinctorius L. (Asteraceae), safflower, have been traditionally used to treat coronary disease, thrombotic disorders, and menstrual problems but also against cancer and depression. A possible effect of C. tinctorius compounds on tryptophan-degrading activity of enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) could explain many of its activities. To test for an effect of C. tinctorius extracts and isolated compounds on cytokine-induced IDO activity in immunocompetent cells in vitro methanol and ethylacetate seed extracts were prepared from cold pressed seed cakes of C. tinctorius and three lignan derivatives, trachelogenin, arctigenin and matairesinol were isolated. The influence on tryptophan breakdown was investigated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Effects were compared to neopterin production in the same cellular assay. Both seed extracts suppressed tryptophan breakdown in stimulated PBMC. The three structurally closely related isolates exerted differing suppressive activity on PBMC: arctigenin (IC50 26.5μM) and trachelogenin (IC50 of 57.4μM) showed higher activity than matairesinol (IC50 >200μM) to inhibit tryptophan breakdown. Effects on neopterin production were similar albeit generally less strong. Data show an immunosuppressive property of compounds which slows down IDO activity. The in vitro results support the view that some of the anti-inflammatory, anticancer and antidepressant properties of C. tinctorius lignans might relate to their suppressive influence on tryptophan breakdown. PMID:23867649

  18. Double tryptophan exciton probe to gauge proximal side chains in proteins: augmentation at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, Oktay K; Abduragimov, Adil R; Glasgow, Ben J

    2015-03-12

    The circular dichroic (CD) exciton couplet between tryptophans and/or tyrosines offers the potential to probe distances within 10 Å in proteins. The exciton effect has been used with native chromophores in critical positions in a few proteins. Here, site-directed mutagenesis created double tryptophan probes for key sites of a protein (tear lipocalin). For tear lipocalin, the crystal and solution structures are concordant in both apo- and holo-forms. Double tryptophan substitutions were performed at sites that could probe conformation and were likely within 10 Å. Far-UV CD spectra of double Trp mutants were performed with controls that had noninteracting substituted tryptophans. Low temperature (77 K) was tested for augmentation of the exciton signal. Exciton coupling appeared with tryptophan substitutions at positions within loop A-B (28 and 31, 33), between loop A-B (28) and strand G (103 and 105), as well as between the strands B (35) and C (56). The CD exciton couplet signals were amplified 3-5-fold at 77 K. The results were concordant with close distances in crystal and solution structures. The exciton couplets had functional significance and correctly assigned the holo-conformation. The methodology creates an effective probe to identify proximal amino acids in a variety of motifs. PMID:25693116

  19. Double Tryptophan Exciton Probe to Gauge Proximal Side Chains in Proteins- Augmentation at Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Gasymov, Oktay K.; Abduragimov, Adil R.; Glasgow, Ben J.

    2015-01-01

    The circular dichroic (CD) exciton couplet between tryptophans and/or tyrosines offers the potential to probe distances within 10Å in proteins. The exciton effect has been used with native chromophores in critical positions in a few proteins. Here, site-directed mutagenesis created double tryptophan probes for key sites of a protein (tear lipocalin). For tear lipocalin the crystal and solution structures are concordant in both apo- and holo-forms. Double tryptophan substitutions were performed at sites that could probe conformation and were likely within 10 Å. Far-UV CD spectra of double Trp mutants were performed with controls that had non-interacting substituted tryptophans. Low temperature (77K) was tested for augmentation of the exciton signal. Exciton coupling appeared with tryptophan substitutions at positions within loop A-B (28 and 31, 33), between loop A-B (28) and strand G (103 and 105), as well as between the strands B (35) and C (56). The CD exciton couplet signals were amplified 3–5 fold at 77K. The results were concordant with close distances in crystal and solution structures. The exciton couplets had functional significance and correctly assigned the holo-conformation. The methodology creates an effective probe to identify proximal amino acids in a variety of motifs. PMID:25693116

  20. Using tryptophan fluorescence to measure the stability of membrane proteins folded in liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Moon, C. Preston; Fleming, Karen G.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate measurements of the thermodynamic stability of folded membrane proteins require methods for monitoring their conformation that are free of experimental artifacts. For tryptophan fluorescence emission experiments with membrane proteins folded into liposomes, there are two significant sources of artifacts: the first is light scattering by the liposomes; the second is the nonlinear relationship of some tryptophan spectral parameters with changes in protein conformation. Both of these sources of error can interfere with the method of determining the reversible equilibrium thermodynamic stability of proteins using titrations of chemical denaturants. Here, we present methods to manage light scattering by liposomes for tryptophan emission experiments and to properly monitor tryptophan spectra as a function of protein conformation. Our methods are tailored to the titrations of membrane proteins using common chemical denaturants. One of our recommendations is to collect and analyze the right-angle light scattering peak that occurs around the excitation wave- length in a fluorescence experiment. Another recommendation is to use only those tryptophan spectral parameters that are linearly proportional to the protein conformational population. We show that other commonly used spectral commonly used parameters lead to errors in protein stability measurements. PMID:21333792

  1. Induction of cytochrome P-450 1A2 by oxidized tryptophan in Hepa lclc7 cells.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, R K; Mitsuhashi, M; Kikkawa, Y

    2000-03-01

    Recent studies from this laboratory have demonstrated that L-tryptophan, after oxidation either by UV-irradiation or ozone, induces aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation and binding of the liganded AhR complex to its specific DNA recognition site, thereby initiating transcription of the cytochrome P-450 1a1 (Cyp1a1) gene with concomitant increase of CYP1A1 protein and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity in wild-type mouse hepatoma cells, Hepa lclc7 (Hepa-1), in culture. Temporary inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide resulted in superinduction of oxidized tryptophan-inducible CYP1A1 mRNA, protein, and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity in Hepa-1 cells. In the present communication, the results obtained by immunoblot analyses with monoclonal CYP1A1/1A2 antibody (NIH 1-7-1) demonstrate that both UV- or ozone-oxidized tryptophan also induce CYP1A2 protein in Hepa-1 cells. CYP1A2 mRNA, detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, was markedly induced in the UV- or ozone-oxidized tryptophan-treated cells. Temporary inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide further induced oxidized tryptophan-inducible CYP1A2 mRNA as well as the protein in Hepa-1 cells. This is the first report demonstrating the induction of CYP1A2 mRNA and protein in Hepa-1 cells. PMID:10688617

  2. The improved L-tryptophan production in recombinant Escherichia coli by expressing the polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Gu, Pengfei; Kang, Junhua; Yang, Fan; Wang, Qian; Liang, Quanfeng; Qi, Qingsheng

    2013-05-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), the best known polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) has been believed to change intracellular metabolic flow and oxidation/reduction state, as well as enhance stress resistance of the host. In this study, a PHB biosynthesis pathway, which contains phaCAB operon genes from Ralstonia eutropha, was introduced into an L-tryptophan producing Escherichia coli strain GPT1002. The expression of the PHB biosynthesis genes resulted in PHB accumulation inside the cells and improved the L-tryptophan production. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the transcription of tryptophan operon genes in GPT2000 increased by 1.9 to 4.3 times compared with the control, indicating that PHB biosynthesis in engineered E. coli changed the physiological state of the host. Xylose was added into the medium as co-substrate to enhance the precursor supply for PHB biosynthesis. The addition of xylose improved both extracellular L-tryptophan production and intracellular PHB accumulation. Moreover, we obtained 14.4 g l(-1) L-tryptophan production and 9.7 % PHB (w/w) accumulation in GPT2000 via fed-batch cultivation. PMID:23321909

  3. Lignans from Carthamus tinctorius suppress tryptophan breakdown via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Kuehnl, Susanne; Schroecksnadel, Sebastian; Temml, Veronika; Gostner, Johanna M.; Schennach, Harald; Schuster, Daniela; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Fuchs, Dietmar; Stuppner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Seed extracts of Carthamus tinctorius L. (Asteraceae), safflower, have been traditionally used to treat coronary disease, thrombotic disorders, and menstrual problems but also against cancer and depression. A possible effect of C. tinctorius compounds on tryptophan-degrading activity of enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) could explain many of its activities. To test for an effect of C. tinctorius extracts and isolated compounds on cytokine-induced IDO activity in immunocompetent cells in vitro methanol and ethylacetate seed extracts were prepared from cold pressed seed cakes of C. tinctorius and three lignan derivatives, trachelogenin, arctigenin and matairesinol were isolated. The influence on tryptophan breakdown was investigated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Effects were compared to neopterin production in the same cellular assay. Both seed extracts suppressed tryptophan breakdown in stimulated PBMC. The three structurally closely related isolates exerted differing suppressive activity on PBMC: arctigenin (IC50 26.5 μM) and trachelogenin (IC50 of 57.4 μM) showed higher activity than matairesinol (IC50 >200 μM) to inhibit tryptophan breakdown. Effects on neopterin production were similar albeit generally less strong. Data show an immunosuppressive property of compounds which slows down IDO activity. The in vitro results support the view that some of the anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and antidepressant properties of C. tinctorius lignans might relate to their suppressive influence on tryptophan breakdown. PMID:23867649

  4. Glycine as a regulator of tryptophan-dependent pigment synthesis in Malassezia furfur.

    PubMed

    Barchmann, Thorsten; Hort, Wiebke; Krämer, Hans-Joachim; Mayser, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The effects of the addition of different amino nitrogens on growth, morphology and secondary metabolism of Malassezia furfur were investigated. After primary culture on Dixon agar, M. furfur CBS 1878 was transferred into a fluid medium together with the nitrogen sources, glycine (Gly) or tryptophan (Trp), or a combination of both. Growth was measured by means of a direct cell counting method and pigment synthesis was photometrically assessed. Addition of glycine resulted in an exponential increase in biomass, but not in pigment production. Tryptophan as the sole nitrogen source caused distinct brown staining of the medium, without increasing biomass. Simultaneous equimolar addition of both amino acids resulted in an initial increase in biomass as a sign of preferential metabolism of glycine, followed by a growth plateau and pigment production which, caused by higher biomass, occurred more rapidly than after addition of tryptophan alone. The yeast-cell morphology changed from round to oval. Addition of glycine to the tryptophan-containing liquid culture stopped pigment formation with simultaneous growth induction. These in vitro on-off phenomena depending on the nitrogen source might be significant in the pathogenesis of pityriasis versicolor: hyperhidrosis followed by preferential consumption of individual nitrogen sources such as glycine with exponential growth and thereafter transamination of tryptophan and TRP-dependent pigment synthesis. PMID:19702622

  5. Mechanistic Insights into Radical-Mediated Oxidation of Tryptophan from ab Initio Quantum Chemistry Calculations and QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Wood, Geoffrey P F; Sreedhara, Alavattam; Moore, Jamie M; Wang, John; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2016-05-12

    An assessment of the mechanisms of (•)OH and (•)OOH radical-mediated oxidation of tryptophan was performed using density functional theory calculations and ab initio plane-wave Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations. For the (•)OH reactions, addition to the pyrrole ring at position 2 is the most favored site with a barrierless reaction in the gas phase. The subsequent degradation of this adduct through a H atom transfer to water was intermittently observed in aqueous-phase molecular dynamics simulations. For the (•)OOH reactions, addition to the pyrrole ring at position 2 is the most favored pathway, in contrast to the situation in the model system ethylene, where concerted addition to the double bond is preferred. From the (•)OOH position 2 adduct QM/MM simulations show that formation of oxy-3-indolanaline occurs readily in an aqueous environment. The observed transformation starts from an initial rupture of the O-O bond followed by a H atom transfer with the accompanying loss of an (•)OH radical to solution. Finally, classical molecular dynamics simulations were performed to equate observed differential oxidation rates of various tryptophan residues in monoclonal antibody fragments. It was found that simple parameters derived from simulation correlate well with the experimental data. PMID:27082439

  6. Structure of the cyclic peptide [W8S]contryphan Vn: effect of the tryptophan/serine substitution on trans-cis proline isomerization.

    PubMed

    Nepravishta, Ridvan; Mandaliti, Walter; Melino, Sonia; Eliseo, Tommaso; Paci, Maurizio

    2014-12-01

    The structural characterization of [W8S]contryphan Vn, an analogue of Contryphan Vn with tryptophan 8 substituted with a serine residue (W8S), was performed by NMR spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulations and fluorescence spectroscopy. Contryphan Vn, a bioactive cyclic peptide from the venom of the cone snail Conus ventricosus, contains an S-S bridge between two cysteines and a D-tryptophan. Like other Contryphans, [W8S]contryphan Vn has proline 7 isomerized trans, while the proline 4 has nearly equivalent populations of cis and trans configurations. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the trans-cis isomerization of proline 4 were measured. The isomers of [W8S]contryphan Vn with proline 4 in cis and trans show structural differences. The absence of the salt bridge between the same Asp2 and Lys6, present in Contryphan Vn, may be attributed to the lack of the hydrophobic side chain of Trp8 where it likely protects the electrostatic interactions. These results may contribute to identifying, in these cyclic peptides, the structural determinants of the mechanism of proline trans-cis isomerization, this being also an important step in protein folding. PMID:25261131

  7. Structure and biosynthesis of a macrocyclic peptide containing an unprecedented lysine-to-tryptophan crosslink

    PubMed Central

    Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcal bacteria use peptide signals as a means of intraspecies communication. These peptides can contain unusual post-translational modifications providing opportunities for expanding our understanding of Nature's chemical and biosynthetic repertoires. Herein we have combined tools from natural products discovery and mechanistic enzymology to report the structure and biosynthesis of streptide, a streptococcal macrocyclic peptide. We show that streptide bears an unprecedented post-translational modification involving a covalent linkage between two unactivated carbons within the side chains of lysine and tryptophan. The biosynthesis of streptide was addressed by genetic and biochemical studies. The former implicated a new SPASM domain-containing radical SAM enzyme, StrB, while the latter revealed that StrB contains two [4Fe-4S] clusters and installs the unusual lysine-to-tryptophan crosslink in a single step. By intramolecularly stitching together the side chains of lysine and tryptophan, StrB provides a new route for biosynthesizing macrocyclic peptides. PMID:25901822

  8. Dosimetry of D- and L-enantiomers of /sup 11/C-labeled tryptophan and valine

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, L.C.; Byrd, B.L.; Sun, T.T.; Crook, J.E.; Hubner, K.F.; Coffey, J.L.; Watson, E.E.

    1985-01-01

    We have previously reported the radiation dosimetry of /sup 11/C-labeled DL-tryptophan and DL-valine, as well as clinical pancreatic imaging studies with these agents. Because of significant uptake in both normal pancreas and in pancreatic tumors (thought to be due to the presence of the D-enantiomer), differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma was not feasible. High-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods were developed for rapid resolution of /sup 11/C-labeled DL-tryptophan and DL-valine. Radiation dose estimates to the various organs in man were calculated for the D- and L-enantiomers of /sup 11/C-labeled tryptophan and valine, based on tissue distribution data in rats. The dose estimates were sufficiently low that 20-mCi doses of each of the enantiomeric amino acids were approved by the FDA for intravenous administration to humans. 21 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. Structure and biosynthesis of a macrocyclic peptide containing an unprecedented lysine-to-tryptophan crosslink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramma, Kelsey R.; Bushin, Leah B.; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R.

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcal bacteria use peptide signals as a means of intraspecies communication. These peptides can contain unusual post-translational modifications, providing opportunities for expanding our understanding of nature's chemical and biosynthetic repertoires. Here, we have combined tools from natural products discovery and mechanistic enzymology to elucidate the structure and biosynthesis of streptide, a streptococcal macrocyclic peptide. We show that streptide bears an unprecedented post-translational modification involving a covalent linkage between two unactivated carbons within the side chains of lysine and tryptophan. The biosynthesis of streptide was addressed by genetic and biochemical studies. The former implicated a new SPASM-domain-containing radical SAM enzyme StrB, while the latter revealed that StrB contains two [4Fe-4S] clusters and installs the unusual lysine-to-tryptophan crosslink in a single step. By intramolecularly stitching together the side chains of lysine and tryptophan, StrB provides a new route for biosynthesizing macrocyclic peptides.

  10. Mass-spectrometric study of the electron-impact-induced fragmentation of the tryptophan molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukstich, V. S.; Romanova, L. G.; Megela, I. G.; Snegursky, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    The formation of ion products upon single and dissociative electron-impact ionization of the tryptophan (C11H12N2O2) molecule has been studied using mass-spectrometric techniques. The mass-spectrum of tryptophan has been obtained and interpreted, and the near-threshold ion yields from the initial molecule and the main products of its electron-impact ionization have been measured. The absolute values of ionization energy of the initial tryptophan molecule and the appearance potentials of its main fragment ions have been determined. The influence of exposure to a high-energy beam of accelerated electrons on the resulting mass spectra of initial molecule has been studied.

  11. [Research Progress on role of Abnormal Tryptophan Metabolism in Immune Thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao-Jian; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Xu, Jun-Qing; Chu, Xiao-Xia

    2015-12-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a common acquired autoimmune hematological disorders. Platelet autoantibodies lead to the decrease of platelet production and (or) increase of its destruction. The latest researches showed that the abnormal tryptophan metabolism mediated by indoleamine-2, 3-dioxygenase(IDO) is related with the pathogenesis of ITP. The patients with ITP show less expression of IDO, reduction of Treg cells and increase of autoreactive T cells and autoantibodies. CTLA-4-Ig can improve the expression of IDO in the patients with ITP, which also can inhibit the proliferation and activation of self-reactive T cells. Thus, clarifying the abnormal tryptophan metabolism mediated by IDO may provide a new idea for improving the understand of the pathogenesis and treatment of ITP. This review focuses on reasearch progress of the tryptophan metabolism mediated by IDO and ITP. PMID:26708916

  12. Decreased tryptophan and increased kynurenine levels in mastocytosis associated with digestive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Georgin-Lavialle, S; Launay, J-M; Côté, F; Soucié, E; Soria, A; Damaj, G; Moura, D S; Canioni, D; Hanssens, K; Chandesris, M-O; Barète, S; Dubreuil, P; Lortholary, O; Hermine, O; Sokol, H

    2016-03-01

    The main metabolism pathway of tryptophan is protein formation, but it can also be metabolized into serotonin and kynurenine. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is the enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of tryptophan into kynurenine. Mastocytosis is a heterogeneous disease characterized by mast cell accumulation in various tissues with 57% of patients having gastrointestinal involvement. We studied tryptophan metabolism in mastocytosis patients displaying or not gastrointestinal features and healthy subjects (n = 26 in each group). Mastocytosis patients with digestive symptoms displayed significantly increased kynurenine level and IDO activity as compared to healthy controls and mastocytosis patients without digestive symptoms. This could be linked to mast cell-mediated digestive inflammation among patients with mastocytosis. This work is the first focusing on kynurenine pathway in a mast cell disease and could help to understand the pathogenesis of digestive features in mastocytosis as well as in other mast cell-mediated diseases. PMID:26841279

  13. The radiolysis of tryptophan and leucine with P-32 beta-radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, N. E.; Bonner, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The paper extends earlier experiments on the radiolysis of DL-tryptophan using P-32 beta-radiation to longer reaction times, observing complete destruction of tryptophan by secondary, nonradiolytic processes. In addition DL-leucine is irradiated with P-32 beta-irradiation at -196 C, leading to radiolyses to the extents of about 20-30%, but observing no concomitant asymmetric bias. The complete absence of asymmetric bias in the present and earlier (Bonner et al., 1979) radiolyses of aqueous tryptophan at -25 C and the present radiolyses of water-free leucine at -196 C using P-32 beta-radiation and its accompanying bremsstrahlung leave it an open question whether or not the Vester-Ulbricht beta-decay/bremsstrahlung mechanism for the origin of optical activity is a viable one.

  14. GPR142 Controls Tryptophan-Induced Insulin and Incretin Hormone Secretion to Improve Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Efanov, Alexander M.; Fang, Xiankang; Beavers, Lisa S.; Wang, Xuesong; Wang, Jingru; Gonzalez Valcarcel, Isabel C.; Ma, Tianwei

    2016-01-01

    GPR142, a putative amino acid receptor, is expressed in pancreatic islets and the gastrointestinal tract, but the ligand affinity and physiological role of this receptor remain obscure. In this study, we show that in addition to L-Tryptophan, GPR142 signaling is also activated by L-Phenylalanine but not by other naturally occurring amino acids. Furthermore, we show that Tryptophan and a synthetic GPR142 agonist increase insulin and incretin hormones and improve glucose disposal in mice in a GPR142-dependent manner. In contrast, Phenylalanine improves in vivo glucose disposal independently of GPR142. Noteworthy, refeeding-induced elevations in insulin and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide are blunted in Gpr142 null mice. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate GPR142 is a Tryptophan receptor critically required for insulin and incretin hormone regulation and suggest GPR142 agonists may be effective therapies that leverage amino acid sensing pathways for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27322810

  15. RNAi-induced silencing of embryonic tryptophan oxygenase in the Pyralid moth, Plodia interpunctella

    PubMed Central

    Fabrick, Jeffrey A.; Kanost, Michael R.; Baker, James E.

    2004-01-01

    Gene silencing through the introduction of double-stranded RNA (RNA interference, RNAi) provides a powerful tool for the elucidation of gene function in many systems, including those where genomics and proteomics are incomplete. The use of RNAi technology for gene silencing in Lepidoptera has lacked significant attention compared to other systems. To demonstrate that RNAi can be utilized in the lepidopteran, Plodia interpunctella, we cloned a cDNA for tryptophan oxygenase, and showed that silencing of tryptophan oxygenase through RNAi during embryonic development resulted in loss of eye-color pigmentation. The complete amino acid sequence of Plodia tryptophan oxygenase can be accessed through NCBI Protein Database under NCBI Accession # AY427951. Abbreviation RNAi RNA interference PCR polymerase chain reaction RT-PCR reverse transcription-PCR PMID:15861231

  16. Two-stages of chiral selectivity in the molecular self-assembly of tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guisinger, Nathan

    Both chirality and molecular assembly are essential and key components to life. In this study we explore the molecular assembly of the amino acid tryptophan (both L- and D- chiralities) on Cu(111). Our investigation utilizes low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to observe resulting assemblies at the molecular scale. We find that depositing a racemic mixture of both L- and D- tryptophan results in the assembly of basic 6 molecule ``Lego'' structures that are enantiopure. These enantiopure ``Legos'' further assemble into 1-dimensional chains one block at a time. These resulting chains are also enantiopure with chiral selectivity occurring at two stages of assembly. Utilizing scanning tunneling spectroscopy we are able to probe the electronic structure of the chiral Legos that give insight into the root of the observed selectivity. Two-stages of chiral selectivity in the molecular self-assembly of tryptophan.

  17. Mesoscale Interfacial Dynamics in Magnetoelectric Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Shashank, Priya

    2009-12-14

    Biphasic composites are the key towards achieving enhanced magnetoelectric response. In order understand the control behavior of the composites and resultant symmetry of the multifunctional product tensors, we need to synthesized model material systems with the following features (i) interface formation through either deposition control or natural decomposition; (ii) a very high interphase-interfacial area, to maximize the ME coupling; and (iii) an equilibrium phase distribution and morphology, resulting in preferred crystallographic orientation relations between phases across the interphase-interfacial boundaries. This thought process guided the experimental evolution in this program. We initiated the research with the co-fired composites approach and then moved on to the thin film laminates deposited through the rf-magnetron sputtering and pulsed laser deposition process

  18. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Wycislo, Kathryn L.; Fan, Timothy M.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis.

  19. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A; Wycislo, Kathryn L; Fan, Timothy M; Kilian, Kristopher A

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis. PMID:27043781

  20. The contact area dependent interfacial thermal conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chenhan; Wei, Zhiyong; Bi, Kedong; Yang, Juekuan; Chen, Yunfei; Wang, Jian

    2015-12-15

    The effects of the contact area on the interfacial thermal conductance σ are investigated using the atomic Green’s function method. Different from the prediction of the heat diffusion transport model, we obtain an interesting result that the interfacial thermal conductance per unit area Λ is positively dependent on the contact area as the area varies from a few atoms to several square nanometers. Through calculating the phonon transmission function, it is uncovered that the phonon transmission per unit area increases with the increased contact area. This is attributed to that each atom has more neighboring atoms in the counterpart of the interface with the increased contact area, which provides more channels for phonon transport.

  1. Interfacial thermodynamics of micro heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, L.W. ); Peterson, G.P. )

    1995-02-01

    Successful analysis and modeling of micro heat pipes requires a complete understanding of the vapor-liquid interface. A thermodynamic model of the vapor-liquid interface in micro heat pipes has been formulated that includes axial pressure and temperature differences, changes in local interfacial curvature, Marangoni effects, and the disjoining pressure. Relationships were developed for the interfacial mass flux in an extended meniscus, the heat transfer rate in the intrinsic meniscus, the 'thermocapillary' heat-pipe limitation, as well as the nonevaporating superheated liquid film thickness that exists between adjacent menisci and occurs during liquid dry out in the evaporator. These relationships can be used to define quantitative restrictions and/or requirements necessary for proper operation of micro heat pipes. They also provide fundamental insight into the critical mechanisms required for proper heat pipe operation. 29 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Hydrophilicity and the viscosity of interfacial water.

    PubMed

    Goertz, Matthew P; Houston, J E; Zhu, X-Y

    2007-05-01

    We measure the viscosity of nanometer-thick water films at the interface with an amorphous silica surface. We obtain viscosity values from three different measurements: friction force in a water meniscus formed between an oxide-terminated W tip and the silica surface under ambient conditions; similar measurements for these interfaces under water; and the repulsive "drainage" force as the two surfaces approach at various speeds in water. In all three cases, we obtain effective viscosities that are approximately 10(6) times greater than that of bulk water for nanometer-scale interfacial separations. This enhanced viscosity is not observed when we degrade the hydrophilicity of the surface by terminating it with -H or -CH3. In view of recent results from other interfaces, we conclude that the criterion for the formation of a viscous interphase is the degree of hydrophilicity of the interfacial pair. PMID:17408290

  3. Frontiers of interfacial water research :workshop report.

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, Randall Timothy; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2005-10-01

    Water is the critical natural resource of the new century. Significant improvements in traditional water treatment processes require novel approaches based on a fundamental understanding of nanoscale and atomic interactions at interfaces between aqueous solution and materials. To better understand these critical issues and to promote an open dialog among leading international experts in water-related specialties, Sandia National Laboratories sponsored a workshop on April 24-26, 2005 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The ''Frontiers of Interfacial Water Research Workshop'' provided attendees with a critical review of water technologies and emphasized the new advances in surface and interfacial microscopy, spectroscopy, diffraction, and computer simulation needed for the development of new materials for water treatment.

  4. Interfacial transport in lithium-ion conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaofei, Wang; Liquan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Physical models of ion diffusion at different interfaces are reviewed. The use of impedance spectroscopy (IS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) techniques are also discussed. The diffusion of ions is fundamental to the operation of lithium-ion batteries, taking place not only within the grains but also across different interfaces. Interfacial ion transport usually contributes to the majority of the resistance in lithium-ion batteries. A greater understanding of the interfacial diffusion of ions is crucial to improving battery performance. Project supported by the Beijing S&T Project, China (Grant No. Z13111000340000), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51325206 and 11234013) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB932900).

  5. Pigment Production on L-Tryptophan Medium by Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Chaskes, Stuart; Cammer, Michael; Nieves, Edward; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years strains previously grouped within Cryptococcus neoformans have been divided into two species C. neoformans and C. gattii, with Cryptococcus neoformans comprising serotypes A, D, and AD and C. gattii comprising serotypes B and C. Cryptococcus neoformans have also been subdivided into two varieties C. neoformans var. grubii, serotype A, and C. neoformans var. neoformans, serotype D. We analyzed the growth and pigment production characteristics of 139 strains of Cryptococcus spp. in L-tryptophan containing media. Nearly all strains of Cryptococcus, including each variety and serotype tested produced a pink water-soluble pigment (molecular weight of 535.2 Da) from L-tryptophan. Consequently, the partial separation of the species was based on whether the pink pigment was secreted into the medium (extracellular) or retained as an intracellular pigment. On L-tryptophan medium C. neoformans var. grubii and serotype AD produced a pink extracellular pigment. In contrast, for C. gattii, the pink pigment was localized intracellularly and masked by heavy production of brown pigments. Pigment production by C. neoformans var. neoformans was variable with some strains producing the pink extracellular pigment and others retained the pink pigment intracellularly. The pink intracellular pigment produced by strains of C. neoformans var. neoformans was masked by production of brown pigments. Cryptococcus laccase mutants failed to produce pigments from L-tryptophan. This is the first report that the enzyme laccase is involved in tryptophan metabolism. Prior to this report Cryptococcus laccase produced melanin or melanin like-pigments from heterocyclic compounds that contained ortho or para diphenols, diaminobenzenes and aminophenol compounds. The pigments produced from L-tryptophan were not melanin. PMID:24736553

  6. Pigment production on L-tryptophan medium by Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Chaskes, Stuart; Cammer, Michael; Nieves, Edward; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years strains previously grouped within Cryptococcus neoformans have been divided into two species C. neoformans and C. gattii, with Cryptococcus neoformans comprising serotypes A, D, and AD and C. gattii comprising serotypes B and C. Cryptococcus neoformans have also been subdivided into two varieties C. neoformans var. grubii, serotype A, and C. neoformans var. neoformans, serotype D. We analyzed the growth and pigment production characteristics of 139 strains of Cryptococcus spp. in L-tryptophan containing media. Nearly all strains of Cryptococcus, including each variety and serotype tested produced a pink water-soluble pigment (molecular weight of 535.2 Da) from L-tryptophan. Consequently, the partial separation of the species was based on whether the pink pigment was secreted into the medium (extracellular) or retained as an intracellular pigment. On L-tryptophan medium C. neoformans var. grubii and serotype AD produced a pink extracellular pigment. In contrast, for C. gattii, the pink pigment was localized intracellularly and masked by heavy production of brown pigments. Pigment production by C. neoformans var. neoformans was variable with some strains producing the pink extracellular pigment and others retained the pink pigment intracellularly. The pink intracellular pigment produced by strains of C. neoformans var. neoformans was masked by production of brown pigments. Cryptococcus laccase mutants failed to produce pigments from L-tryptophan. This is the first report that the enzyme laccase is involved in tryptophan metabolism. Prior to this report Cryptococcus laccase produced melanin or melanin like-pigments from heterocyclic compounds that contained ortho or para diphenols, diaminobenzenes and aminophenol compounds. The pigments produced from L-tryptophan were not melanin. PMID:24736553

  7. New insights into tryptophan and its metabolites in the regulation of bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Michalowska, M; Znorko, B; Kaminski, T; Oksztulska-Kolanek, E; Pawlak, D

    2015-12-01

    Osteoporosis, a debilitating disease caused by an imbalance between the action of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, is becoming an increasing problem in today's aging population. Although many advances in this field have addressed certain aspects of disease progression and pain management, new approaches to treatment are required. This review focuses on the influence of tryptophan, its metabolites and their influence on bone remodeling. Tryptophan is a precursor to serotonin, melatonin, kynurenines and niacin. Changes of tryptophan levels were noticed in bone metabolic diseases. Moreover, some works indicate that tryptophan plays a role in osteoblastic differentiation. Serotonin can exert different effects on bones, which depend on site of serotonin synthesis. Gut-derived serotonin inhibits bone formation, whereas brain-derived serotonin enhances bone formation and decreases bone resorption. Melatonin, increased differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblastic cell lineage. Results of melatonin action on bone are anabolic and antiresorptive. Activation of the second tryptophan metabolic pathway, the kynurenine pathway, is associated with osteoblastogenesis and can be implicated in the occurrence of bone diseases. Oxidation products like kynurenine stopped proliferation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. This may result in inhibition of osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation. Kynurenic acid acts as an antagonist at glutamate receptors, which are expressed on osteoclasts. Quinolinic acid activates N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid exhibits pro-oxidant and antioxidant activity. Decreased concentration of 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid can be one of the causes of osteoporosis. 3-hydroxykynurenine reduced the viability of osteoblast-like cells. Picolinic acid exerted osteogenic effect in vitro. Kynurenine derivatives exert various effects on bones. Discovery of the exact mechanism of action of tryptophan metabolites on

  8. Interfacial chemistry and structure in ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Saenz, N.T.; Schilling, C.H.

    1990-09-01

    The interfacial chemistry and structure of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) play a major role in the properties of these materials. Fiber-matrix interfaces chemistries are vitally important in the fracture strength, fracture toughness, and fracture resistance of ceramic composites because they influence fiber loading and fiber pullout. Elevated-temperature properties are also linked to the interfacial characteristics through the chemical stability of the interface in corrosive environments and the creep/pullout behavior of the interface. Physical properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity are also dependent on the interface. Fiber-matrix interfaces containing a 1-{mu}m-thick multilayered interface with amorphous and graphitic C to a 1-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer can result from sintering operations for some composite systems. Fibers coated with C, BN, C/BC/BN, and Si are also used to produce controlled interface chemistries and structures. Growth interfaces within the matrix resulting from processing of CMCs can also be crucial to the behavior of these materials. Evaluation of the interfacial chemistry and structure of CMCs requires the use of a variety of analytical tools, including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. A review of the interfacial chemistry and structure of SiC whisker- and fiber-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC/SiC materials is presented. Where possible, correlations with fracture properties and high-temperature stability are made. 94 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Intrinsic interfacial phenomena in manganite heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, C. A. F.; Walker, F. J.; Ahn, C. H.; Ismail-Beigi, S.

    2015-04-01

    We review recent advances in our understanding of interfacial phenomena that emerge when dissimilar materials are brought together at atomically sharp and coherent interfaces. In particular, we focus on phenomena that are intrinsic to the interface and review recent work carried out on perovskite manganites interfaces, a class of complex oxides whose rich electronic properties have proven to be a useful playground for the discovery and prediction of novel phenomena.

  10. Microstructural Evolution Based on Fundamental Interfacial Properties

    SciTech Connect

    A. D. Rollett; D. J. Srolovitz; A. Karma

    2003-07-11

    This first CMSN project has been operating since the summer of 1999. The main achievement of the project was to bring together a community of materials scientists, physicists and mathematicians who share a common interest in the properties of interfaces and the impact of those properties on microstructural evolution. Six full workshops were held at Carnegie Mellon (CMU), Northwestern (NWU), Santa Fe, Northeastern University (NEU), National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST), Ames Laboratory, and at the University of California in San Diego (UCSD) respectively. Substantial scientific results were obtained through the sustained contact between the members of the project. A recent issue of Interface Science (volume 10, issue 2/3, July 2002) was dedicated to the output of the project. The results include: the development of methods for extracting anisotropic boundary energy and mobility from molecular dynamics simulations of solid/liquid interfaces in nickel; the extraction of anisotropic energies and mobilities in aluminum from similar MD simulations; the application of parallel computation to the calculation of interfacial properties; the development of a method to extract interfacial properties from the fluctuations in interface position through consideration of interfacial stiffness; the use of anisotropic interface properties in studies of abnormal grain growth; the discovery of abnormal grain growth from random distributions of orientation in subgrain networks; the direct comparison at the scale of individual grains between experimentally observed grain growth and simulations, which confirmed the importance of including anisotropic interfacial properties in the simulations; the classification of a rich variety of dendritic morphologies based on slight variations in the anisotropy of the solid-liquid interface; development of phase field methods that permit both solidification and grain growth to be simulated within the same framework.

  11. L-tryptophan suppresses rise in blood glucose and preserves insulin secretion in type-2 diabetes mellitus rats.

    PubMed

    Inubushi, Tomoko; Kamemura, Norio; Oda, Masataka; Sakurai, Jun; Nakaya, Yutaka; Harada, Nagakatsu; Suenaga, Midori; Matsunaga, Yoichi; Ishidoh, Kazumi; Katunuma, Nobuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Ample evidence indicates that a high-protein/low-carbohydrate diet increases glucose energy expenditure and is beneficial in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The present study was designed to investigate the effects of L-tryptophan in T2DM. Blood glucose was measured by the glucose dehydrogenase assay and serum insulin was measured with ELISA in both normal and hereditary T2DM rats after oral glucose administration with or without L-D-tryptophan and tryptamine. The effect of tryptophan on glucose absorption was examined in the small intestine of rats using the everted-sac method. Glucose incorporation in adipocytes was assayed with [(3)H]-2-deoxy-D-glucose using a liquid scintillation counter. Indirect computer-regulated respiratory gas-assay calorimetry was applied to assay energy expenditure in rats. L-Tryptophan suppressed both serum glucose and insulin levels after oral glucose administration and inhibited glucose absorption from the intestine. Tryptamine, but not L-tryptophan, enhanced insulin-stimulated [(3)H]-glucose incorporation into differentiated adipocytes. L-Tryptophan increased glucose-associated energy expenditure in rats in vivo. L-Tryptophan-rich chow consumed from a young age preserved the secretion of insulin and delayed the progression of T2DM in hereditary diabetic rats. The results suggested that L-tryptophan suppresses the elevation of blood glucose and lessens the burden associated with insulin secretion from β-cells. PMID:23419400

  12. The pH-Dependent Stucture and Properties of Au and Ag Nanoparticles Produced by Tryptophan Reduction.

    PubMed

    Mukha, Iuliia; Vityuk, Nadiia; Severynovska, Olga; Eremenko, Anna; Smirnova, Nataliia

    2016-12-01

    In the work, an attempt was made to combine different experimental conditions to obtain stable gold and silver nanoparticles in the presence of amino acid tryptophan. The pH-dependent properties of gold and silver nanoparticles were studied. UV/visible spectroscopy and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry data confirm kynurenine pathway for tryptophan conversion in such systems. PMID:26909781

  13. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saye, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of "gauge freedom" to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  14. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Saye, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of “gauge freedom” to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  15. Formation of Lenses by Liquid Interfacial Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Charlotte; Cerjan, Benjamin; Baylor, Martha-Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we examined the geometry of polymer lenses formed by liquid interfacial surfaces. We formed lenses by dropping hydrophobic photo-curable monomer on the surface of various hydrophilic liquid substrates. Due to intermolecular forces between the monomer and the substrate liquid, the interface is pulled into a curved shape. Upon exposure to UV light, the monomer solidifies while maintaining the boundary interface. The result is a plano-convex, optically-smooth polymer lens. The interfacial surface tension is manipulated by altering the amount of thin film present on the surface of the hydrophilic liquid, producing lenses of different curvatures. The lens curvature is further modified by using various salts that change the polarity of the substrate solution. We will present data demonstrating modification of the lens shape due to specific changes made to the physical and chemical properties of the hydrophilic liquid. We believe this liquid interfacial fabrication technique offers an alternative to current molding techniques for forming polymer lenses.

  16. Enzymatic synthesis of S-phenyl-L-cysteine from keratin hydrolysis industries wastewater with tryptophan synthase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lisheng; Wang, Zhiyuan; Mao, Pingting; Liu, Junzhong; Zhang, Hongjuan; Liu, Qian; Jiao, Qing-Cai

    2013-04-01

    An economical method for production of S-phenyl-L-cysteine from keratin acid hydrolysis wastewater (KHW) containing L-serine was developed by recombinant tryptophan synthase. This study provides us with an alternative KHW utilization strategy to synthesize S-phenyl-L-cysteine. Tryptophan synthase could efficiently convert L-serine contained in KHW to S-phenyl-L-cysteine at pH 9.0, 40°C and Trion X-100 of 0.02%. In a scale up study, L-serine conversion rate reach 97.1% with a final S-phenyl-L-cysteine concentration of 38.6 g l(-1). PMID:23478091

  17. Tryptophan-ethylester, the false (unveiled) melatonin isomer in red wine.

    PubMed

    Iriti, Marcello; Vigentini, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    Among the food plants, the presence of melatonin in grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) deserves particular attention because of the production of wine, an alcoholic beverage of economic relevance and with putative healthy effects. Furthermore, melatonin isomers have been detected in wine too. Recently, one of these isomers has been identified as tryptophan-ethylester, a compound with the same molecular weight of melatonin. In this Commentary, we briefly comment the source(s) of tryptophan-ethylester in wine and the putative nutritional role(s). PMID:25922582

  18. Comparison of tryptophan biosynthetic operon regulation in different Gram-positive bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Preciado, Ana; Yanofsky, Charles; Merino, Enrique

    2007-09-01

    The tryptophan biosynthetic operon has been widely used as a model system for studying transcription regulation. In Bacillus subtilis, the trp operon is primarily regulated by a tryptophan-activated RNA-binding protein, TRAP. Here we show that in many other Gram-positive species the trp operon is regulated differently, by tRNA(Trp) sensing by the RNA-based T-box mechanism, with T-boxes arranged in tandem. Our analyses reveal an apparent relationship between trp operon organization and the specific regulatory mechanism(s) used. PMID:17555843

  19. Tryptophan-Ethylester, the False (Unveiled) Melatonin Isomer in Red Wine

    PubMed Central

    Iriti, Marcello; Vigentini, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    Among the food plants, the presence of melatonin in grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) deserves particular attention because of the production of wine, an alcoholic beverage of economic relevance and with putative healthy effects. Furthermore, melatonin isomers have been detected in wine too. Recently, one of these isomers has been identified as tryptophan-ethylester, a compound with the same molecular weight of melatonin. In this Commentary, we briefly comment the source(s) of tryptophan-ethylester in wine and the putative nutritional role(s). PMID:25922582

  20. Substratum interfacial energetic effects on the attachment of marine bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ista, Linnea Kathryn

    attachment of bacteria to a substratum. We use VCG to model DeltaGadh and interfacial tensions as they relate to model bacterial attachment on SAMs that accumulate cells to different degrees. Even with the more complex interactions measured by VCG, surface energy of the attachment substratum alone was insufficient to predict attachment. VCG was then employed to model attachment of C. marina to a series of SAMs varying systematically in the number of ethylene glycol residues present in the molecule; an identical series has been previously shown to vary dramatically in the number of cells attached as a function of ethylene glycols present. Our results indicate that while VCG adequately models the interfacial tension between water and ethylene glycol SAMs in a manner that predicts bacterial attachment, DeltaGadh as calculated by VCG neither qualitatively nor quantitatively reflects the attachment data. The VCG model, thus, fails to capture specific information regarding the interactions between the attaching bacteria, water, and the SAM. We show that while hydrogen-bond accepting interactions are very well captured by this model, the ability for SAMs and bacteria to donate hydrogen bonds is not adequately described as the VCG model is currently applied. We also describe ways in which VCG fails to capture two specific biological aspects that may be important in bacterial attachment to surfaces:1.) specific interactions between molecules on the surface and bacteria and 2.) bacterial cell surface heterogeneities that may be important in differential attachment to different substrata.

  1. Role of Lipid Composition on the Interaction between a Tryptophan-Rich Protein and Model Bacterial Membranes.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Michael R; Clifton, Luke A; Frazier, Richard A; Green, Rebecca J

    2016-03-01

    The interaction between tryptophan-rich puroindoline proteins and model bacterial membranes at the air-liquid interface has been investigated by FTIR spectroscopy, surface pressure measurements, and Brewster angle microscopy. The role of different lipid constituents on the interactions between lipid membrane and protein was studied using wild type (Pin-b) and mutant (Trp44 to Arg44 mutant, Pin-bs) puroindoline proteins. The results show differences in the lipid selectivity of the two proteins in terms of preferential binding to specific lipid head groups in mixed lipid systems. Pin-b wild type was able to penetrate mixed layers of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) head groups more deeply compared to the mutant Pin-bs. Increasing saturation of the lipid tails increased penetration and adsorption of Pin-b wild type, but again the response of the mutant form differed. The results provide insight as to the role of membrane architecture, lipid composition, and fluidity on antimicrobial activity of proteins. Data show distinct differences in the lipid binding behavior of Pin-b as a result of a single residue mutation, highlighting the importance of hydrophobic and charged amino acids in antimicrobial protein and peptide activity. PMID:26813886

  2. Time-resolved fluorescence of thioredoxin single-tryptophan mutants: modeling experimental results with minimum perturbation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Norberto D., Jr.; Haydock, Christopher; Prendergast, Franklyn G.

    1994-08-01

    The time-resolved fluorescence decay of single tryptophan (Trp) proteins is typically described using either a distribution of lifetimes or a sum of two or more exponential terms. A possible interpretation for this fluorescence decay heterogeneity is the existence of different isomeric conformations of Trp about its (chi) +1) and (chi) +2) dihedral angles. Are multiple Trp conformations compatible with the remainder of the protein in its crystallographic configuration or do they require repacking of neighbor side chains? It is conceivable that isomers of the neighbor side chains interconvert slowly on the fluorescence timescale and contribute additional lifetime components to the fluorescence intensity. We have explored this possibility by performing minimum perturbation mapping simulations of Trp 28 and Trp 31 in thioredoxin (TRX) using CHARMm 22. Mappings of Trp 29 and Trp 31 give the TRX Trp residue energy landscape as a function of (chi) +1) and (chi) +2) dihedral angles. Time-resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy decay of mutant TRX (W28F and W31F) are measured and interpreted in light of the above simulations. Relevant observables, like order parameters and isomerization rates, can be derived from the minimum perturbation maps and compared with experiment.

  3. Molecular dynamics of tryptophan in ribonuclease-T1. II. Correlations with fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Axelsen, P H; Prendergast, F G

    1989-07-01

    The interactions of tryptophan-59 (TRP-59) and its protein environment in ribonuclease-T1 (RNAse-T1) were examined in a 50-ps molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation used was previously shown to demonstrate a fluorescence anisotropy decay that closely agreed with the experimentally determined limiting anisotropy for RNAse-T1 (Axelsen, P. H., C. Haydock, and F. G. Prendergast. 1988. Biophys. J. 54:249-258). Further characterization of TRP-59 side chain dynamics and its protein environment has now been completed and correlated to other photophysical properties of this protein. Angular fluctuations of the side chain occur at rates of 1-10 cycles/ps and are limited to +/- 0.3 radians in all directions. Side chain motions are primarily limited by nonpolar collisions, although most side chain atoms have some collisional contact with polar atoms in the adjacent protein matrix or water. The steric relationship between PRO-39 and TRP-59 changes abruptly at 16 ps into the simulation. Two types of interaction with water are observed. First, a structural water appears to H-bond with the greater than N-H group of TRP-59. Second, water frequently contacts the six-atom ring. The electrostatic field experienced by the TRP-59 rings appears to be relatively constant and featureless regardless of ring orientation. We make the following interferences from our data: The fluorescent emission of TRP-59 may be red-shifted relative to TRP in nonpolar solvents either as a result of specific interactions with the structural water or relaxations of proximal bulk water and polar protein moieties. The quenching efficiency of polar interactions with TRP-59 must be extremely low given their frequency and the high quantum yield of RNAse-T1. This low efficiency may be due to restricted and unfavorable interaction geometries. PRO-39 is located near two titratable HIS residues in RNAse-T1 and may be involved in pH-dependent fluorescence phenomena by virtue of a metastable interaction with TRP

  4. Rheology and interfacial tension of biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandadai, Madhuvanthi A.

    The rheology and interfacial tension of biomaterials are important factors governing their potential use in biomedical applications. This dissertation presents a study of the rheology and interfacial tension of three very different biomaterials: (1) A hydrophobically modified Hyaluronic acid (HA) with polypeptide side chains, (2) Actin fibers and (3) a highly hydrophobic fluoroalkane, Perfluoropentane, and the effect of various surfactants and their mixtures on lowering its interfacial tension in an aqueous interface. In Chapter 1, we present a description of the properties and applications of these materials and a detailed literature review relevant to our studies to better understand the motivation of our work. In Chapter 2 we describe the techniques used for our studies. In Chapter 3, we present our studies on the hydrophobically modified HA with polyleucine side chains and compare them to unmodified HA of same or similar backbone molecular weights. We found a significantly enhanced viscosity for the modified HA compared to unmodified HA at the same concentration. We also found a viscoelastic behavior that was dependent on the concentration of the solution and grafting ratio of the hydrophobic side chains. The associative thickening properties of modified HA investigated with various rheological experiments and simulation results are presented in this chapter. In Chapter 4, we present our studies on the properties of actin fibers. We used a novel microrheometer VROC(TM) (Viscometer-rheometer-on-a-chip) for studying actin fibers at very high shear rates. We show that at very high shear rats, the actin filaments show irreversible network breakdown. We also studied the surface tension of actin filaments and monomer solutions at the interface with air and report induction times of these materials. In Chapter 5, we study the interfacial tension of a highly hydrophobic fluoroalkane, Perfluoropentane, in the presence of different surfactants and their mixtures. The

  5. Key amino acid residues for the endo-processive activity of GH74 xyloglucanase.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Saito, Yuji; Yaoi, Katsuro

    2014-05-01

    Unlike endo-dissociative-xyloglucanases, Paenibacillus XEG74 is an endo-processive xyloglucanase that contains four unique tryptophan residues in the negative subsites (W61 and W64) and the positive subsites (W318 and W319), as indicated by three-dimensional homology modelling. Selective replacement of the positive subsite residues with alanine mutations reduced the degree of processive activity and resulted in the more endo-dissociative-activity. The results showed that W318 and W319, which are found in the positive subsites, are essential for processive degradation and are responsible for maintaining binding interactions with xyloglucan polysaccharide through a stacking effect. PMID:24657616

  6. Tryptophan oxidation in proteins exposed to thiocyanate-derived oxidants.

    PubMed

    Bonifay, Vincent; Barrett, Tessa J; Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J; Hawkins, Clare L; Ashby, Michael T

    2014-12-15

    Human defensive peroxidases, including lactoperoxidase (LPO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO), are capable of catalyzing the oxidation of halides (X(-)) by H2O2 to give hypohalous acids (HOX) for the purpose of cellular defense. Substrate selectivity depends upon the relative abundance of the halides, but the pseudo-halide thiocyanate (SCN(-)) is a major substrate, and sometimes the exclusive substrate, of all defensive peroxidases in most physiologic fluids. The resulting hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN) has been implicated in cellular damage via thiol oxidation. While thiols are believed to be the primary target of HOSCN in vivo, Trp residues have also been implicated as targets for HOSCN. However, the mechanism involved in HOSCN-mediated Trp oxidation was not established. Trp residues in proteins appeared to be susceptible to oxidation by HOSCN, whereas free Trp and Trp residues in small peptides were found to be unreactive. We show that HOSCN-induced Trp oxidation is dependent on pH, with oxidation of free Trp, and Trp-containing peptides observed when the pH is below 2. These conditions mimic those employed previously to precipitate proteins after treatment with HOSCN, which accounts for the discrepancy in the results reported for proteins versus free Trp and small peptides. The reactant in these cases may be thiocyanogen ((SCN)2), which is produced by comproportionation of HOSCN and SCN(-) at low pH. Reaction of thiocyanate-derived oxidants with protein Trp residues at low pH results in the formation of a number of oxidation products, including mono- and di-oxygenated derivatives, which are also formed with other hypohalous acids. Our data suggest that significant modification of Trp by HOSCN in vivo is likely to have limited biological relevance. PMID:25172223

  7. Interfacial fracture between highly crosslinked polymer networks and a solid surface: Effect of interfacial bond density

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-03-23

    For highly crosslinked, polymer networks bonded to a solid surface, the effect of interfacial bond density as well as system size on interfacial fracture is studied molecular dynamics simulations. The correspondence between the stress-strain curve and the sequence of molecular deformations is obtained. The failure strain for a fully bonded surface is equal to the strain necessary to make taut the average minimal path through the network from the bottom solid surface to the top surface. At bond coverages less than full, nanometer scale cavities form at the surface yielding an inhomogeneous strain profile. The failure strain and stress are linearly proportional to the number of bonds at the interface unless the number of bonds is so few that van der Waals interactions dominate. The failure is always interfacial due to fewer bonds at the interface than in the bulk.

  8. Selective recognition of D-tryptophan from d/l-tryptophan mixtures in the presence of Cu(II) by electropolymerized L-lysine film.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Gong, Wencheng; Wang, Lili; Chen, Zilin

    2016-01-01

    Selective recognition of D-tryptophan (D-Trp) in the presence of Cu(II) was investigated at poly-L-lysine (p-l-Lys) film using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). p-l-Lys film was immobilized on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by cyclic voltammetry between 0.0 and 1.9 V in 20 mM phosphate buffer solution (pH 8.6). After the p-l-Lys/GCE electrode was incubated with D-Trp solution containing Cu(II) ions, obvious enhancement of electron transfer resistance and decrease of voltammetric current could be observed. If D-Trp was replaced by L-tryptophan (l-Trp), there was no apparent resistance and current changes. Moreover, no resistance and current changes could be found in the absence of Cu(II). It may be due to the formation of Cu complex with L-lysine and D-tryptophan. Finally, this method was successfully applied to monitoring enantiomeric composition of the D-Trp and l-Trp mixtures. PMID:26364949

  9. Site-directed tryptophan fluorescence reveals the solution structure of tear lipocalin: evidence for features that confer promiscuity in ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, O K; Abduragimov, A R; Yusifov, T N; Glasgow, B J

    2001-12-11

    The solution structure of human TL was deduced from the position of the emission peaks after site-directed tryptophan fluorescence (SDTF). The fluorescent amino acid tryptophan was sequentially substituted for each native amino acid in the sequence. Characteristic periodicities for eight beta-strands that comprise the beta-barrel and three alpha-helices were identified. The putative beta-strand I was relatively exposed to solvent, suggesting it does not participate in the formation of the beta-barrel. The beta-strands A and F contain beta-bulges. The average lambda(max) of emission maxima reveals that strand D is at the edge of the barrel and beta-strand H interacts with the main alpha-helical domain. On the basis of the SDTF data, a 3D homology model was constructed for TL and compared to the known crystallographic structures of RBP and beta-lactoglobulin. The small size and splayed open configuration of the E-F hairpin facilitate access of ligands into the cavity mouth of TL as compared to that of RBP with a long overhanging loop that restricts access. In the model of TL, four alanine residues are positioned in the binding site as compared to bulkier residues in the corresponding positions of beta-lactoglobulin. Substitution of A51, A66, A86 to Trp results in a 3-4-fold decrease in binding affinity. The data suggest that the smaller side chains of Ala provide more capacity in the cavity of TL than the bulkier side chains (I56, I71, V92) in the cavity of beta-lactoglobulin. The structural features provide an explanation for the promiscuous binding characteristics exhibited by TL. SDTF provides a general approach for determining the solution structure of many proteins and enhances homology modeling in the absence of high sequence identity. PMID:11732894

  10. X-ray evidence of a native state with increased compactness populated by tryptophan-less B. licheniformis β-lactamase.

    PubMed

    Risso, Valeria A; Acierno, Juan P; Capaldi, Stefano; Monaco, Hugo L; Ermácora, Mario R

    2012-07-01

    β-lactamases confer antibiotic resistance, one of the most serious world-wide health problems, and are an excellent theoretical and experimental model in the study of protein structure, dynamics and evolution. Bacillus licheniformis exo-small penicillinase (ESP) is a Class-A β-lactamase with three tryptophan residues located in the protein core. Here, we report the 1.7-Å resolution X-ray structure, catalytic parameters, and thermodynamic stability of ESP(ΔW), an engineered mutant of ESP in which phenylalanine replaces the wild-type tryptophan residues. The structure revealed no qualitative conformational changes compared with thirteen previously reported structures of B. licheniformis β-lactamases (RMSD = 0.4-1.2 Å). However, a closer scrutiny showed that the mutations result in an overall more compact structure, with most atoms shifted toward the geometric center of the molecule. Thus, ESP(ΔW) has a significantly smaller radius of gyration (R(g)) than the other B. licheniformis β-lactamases characterized so far. Indeed, ESP(ΔW) has the smallest R(g) among 126 Class-A β-lactamases in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Other measures of compactness, like the number of atoms in fixed volumes and the number and average of noncovalent distances, confirmed the effect. ESP(ΔW) proves that the compactness of the native state can be enhanced by protein engineering and establishes a new lower limit to the compactness of the Class-A β-lactamase fold. As the condensation achieved by the native state is a paramount notion in protein folding, this result may contribute to a better understanding of how the sequence determines the conformational variability and thermodynamic stability of a given fold. PMID:22496053

  11. X-ray evidence of a native state with increased compactness populated by tryptophan-less B. licheniformis β-lactamase

    PubMed Central

    Risso, Valeria A; Acierno, Juan P; Capaldi, Stefano; Monaco, Hugo L; Ermácora, Mario R

    2012-01-01

    β-lactamases confer antibiotic resistance, one of the most serious world-wide health problems, and are an excellent theoretical and experimental model in the study of protein structure, dynamics and evolution. Bacillus licheniformis exo-small penicillinase (ESP) is a Class-A β-lactamase with three tryptophan residues located in the protein core. Here, we report the 1.7-Å resolution X-ray structure, catalytic parameters, and thermodynamic stability of ESPΔW, an engineered mutant of ESP in which phenylalanine replaces the wild-type tryptophan residues. The structure revealed no qualitative conformational changes compared with thirteen previously reported structures of B. licheniformis β-lactamases (RMSD = 0.4–1.2 Å). However, a closer scrutiny showed that the mutations result in an overall more compact structure, with most atoms shifted toward the geometric center of the molecule. Thus, ESPΔW has a significantly smaller radius of gyration (Rg) than the other B. licheniformis β-lactamases characterized so far. Indeed, ESPΔW has the smallest Rg among 126 Class-A β-lactamases in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Other measures of compactness, like the number of atoms in fixed volumes and the number and average of noncovalent distances, confirmed the effect. ESPΔW proves that the compactness of the native state can be enhanced by protein engineering and establishes a new lower limit to the compactness of the Class-A β-lactamase fold. As the condensation achieved by the native state is a paramount notion in protein folding, this result may contribute to a better understanding of how the sequence determines the conformational variability and thermodynamic stability of a given fold. PMID:22496053

  12. Interfacial thiol-ene photo-click reactions for forming multilayer hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Han; Fraser, Andrew K.; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Interfacial visible light-mediated thiol-ene photo-click reactions were developed for preparing step-growth hydrogels with multilayer structures. The effect of a non-cleavage type photoinitiator eosin-Y on visible light-mediated thiol-ene photopolymerization was first characterized using in situ photo-rheometry, gel fraction, and equilibrium swelling ratio. Next, spectrophotometric properties of eosin-Y in the presence of various relevant macromer species were evaluated using UV/Vis spectrometry. It was determined that eosin-Y was able to re-initiate thiol-ene photo-click reaction even after light exposure. Due to its small molecular weight, most eosin-Y molecules readily leached out from the hydrogels. The diffusion of residual eosin-Y from pre-formed hydrogels was exploited for fabricating multilayer step-growth hydrogels. Interfacial hydrogel coating was formed via the same visible light-mediated gelation mechanism without adding fresh initiator. The thickness of the thiol-ene gel coating could be easily controlled by adjusting visible light exposure time, eosin-Y concentration initially loaded in the core gel, or macromer concentration in the coating solution. The major benefits of this interfacial thiol-ene coating system include its simplicity and cytocompatibility. The formation of thiol-ene hydrogels and coatings neither requires nor generates any cytotoxic components. This new gelation chemistry may have great utilities in controlled release of multiple sensitive growth factors and encapsulation of multiple cell types for tissue regeneration. PMID:23384151

  13. Role of tryptophan-388 of GLUT1 glucose transporter in glucose-transport activity and photoaffinity-labelling with forskolin.

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, H; Asano, T; Ishihara, H; Lin, J L; Inukai, K; Shanahan, M F; Tsukuda, K; Kikuchi, M; Yazaki, Y; Oka, Y

    1993-01-01

    GLUT1 glucose-transporter cDNA was modified to substitute leucine for Trp-388 and transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells using the expression vector termed pMTHneo. This tryptophan residue is conserved among most of the facilitative glucose-transporter isoforms and has been proposed to be the photolabelling site of forskolin, a competitive inhibitor of glucose transport. In addition, this residue is located on membrane-spanning helix 10 which is suggested to contain the dynamic segment of the transporter. The mutated glucose transporter was expressed and inserted into the plasma membrane in a fashion similar to the wild-type. Unexpectedly, this mutation did not abolish photolabelling with forskolin. However, the mutation induced a marked decrease in 2-deoxyglucose uptake with a 4-fold decrease in turnover number and a 1.25-fold increase in Km compared with the wild-type GLUT1. A similar decrease in zero-trans influx activity was also observed for 3-O-methylglucose. In contrast, no apparent decrease was observed in zero trans efflux activity for 3-O-methylglucose. The mutation decreased the turnover number of the glucose transporter in equilibrium exchange influx for 3-O-methylglucose by 33% without any change in Km. These results indicate that (1) Trp-388 is not the photolabelling site for forskolin, if we assume that the labelling occurs at a single site and (2) Trp-388 is more likely to be involved in interconversion between the inward-facing and outward-facing conformers of GLUT1 than binding of glucose, and thus, substitution of leucine for Trp-388 in this dynamic segment would decrease the rate of alternating conformation, which would preferentially affect the influx activity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8489512

  14. Interfacial Shear Strength Evaluation of Jute/Poly(Lactic Acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Tatsuro; Nakai, Asami

    In order to evaluate the interfacial shear strength between fiber bundle and matrix of jute/poly(lactic acid) (PLA), a fiber bundle pull-out test method is proposed. Shear stress distribution was calculated based on the parabolic shear-lag analysis. Fiber bundle pull-out tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of molding condition on the interfacial shear strength. The interfacial shear strength increased with increasing molding temperature up to 185°C. Then gradual decrease in the interfacial shear strength with molding temperature was observed. Similar tendency was also observed in the effect of molding time, whereas the interfacial shear strength decreased with increasing molding pressure. Comparing the result of the tensile tests in the previous study, interfacial shear strength has corelations with tensile strength.

  15. High Sensitivity Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Detection of Tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandakkathara, Archana

    Raman spectroscopy has the capability of providing detailed information about molecular structure, but the extremely small cross section of Raman scattering prevents this technique from applications requiring high sensitivity. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on the other hand provides strongly increased Raman signal from molecules attached to metallic nanostructures. SERS is thus a promising technique for high sensitivity analytical applications. One particular area of interest is the application of such techniques for the analysis of the composition of biological cells. However, there are issues which have to be addressed in order to make SERS a reliable technique such as the optimization of conditions for any given analyte, understanding the kinetic processes of binding of the target molecules to the nanostructures and understanding the evolution and coagulation of the nanostructures, in the case of colloidal solutions. The latter processes introduce a delay time for the observation of maximum enhancement factors which must be taken into account for any given implementation of SERS. In the present thesis the goal was to develop very sensitive SERS techniques for the measurement of biomolecules of interest for analysis of the contents of cells. The techniques explored could be eventually be applicable to microfluidic systems with the ultimate goal of analyzing the molecular constituents of single cells. SERS study of different amino acids and organic dyes were performed during the course of this thesis. A high sensitivity detection system based on SERS has been developed and spectrum from tryptophan (Trp) amino acid at very low concentration (10-8 M) has been detected. The concentration at which good quality SERS spectra could be detected from Trp is 4 orders of magnitude smaller than that previously reported in literature. It has shown that at such low concentrations the SERS spectra of Trp are qualitatively distinct from the spectra commonly reported in

  16. The impact of interfacial tension on multiphase flow in the CO2-brine-sandstone system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, C. A.; Blunt, M. J.; Krevor, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Two dominant controls on continuum scale multiphase flow properties are interfacial tension (IFT) and wetting. In hydrocarbon-brine systems, relative permeability is known to increase with decreasing IFT, while residual trapping is controlled by the wetting properties of a permeable rock and the hysteresis between drainage and imbibtion (Amaefule & Handy, 1982; Bardon & Longeron, 1980; Juanes et al., 2006). Fluid properties of the CO2-brine system, such as viscosity, density and interfacial tension, are well characterised and have known dependencies on temperature, pressure and brine salinity. Interest in this particular fluid system is motivated by CO2 storage and enhanced oil recovery. Despite increased interest in CO2 storage, the response of the CO2-brine relative permeability to varying IFT has yet to be comprehensively evaluated. Additionally the wide range of thermophysical properties (density, viscosity etc.) that exist across a relatively small range of pressures and temperatures makes it an ideal system with which to investigate the physics of multiphase flow in general. This is the first systematic study to investigate the impact of IFT on drainage and imbibition relative permeability for the CO2-brine-sandstone system. The experimental design has been adapted from a traditional steady state core flood in two ways. First, while conditions may be easily selected to obtain a range of interfacial tensions, isolating the independent impact of interfacial tension on relative permeability is less simple. Thus experimental conditions are selected so as to vary interfacial tension, while minimising the variation in viscosity ratio between CO2 and brine. Second, in order to attribute the impacts of changing conditions, it is necessary to have precise results such that small shifts in observations can be identified. Multiphase flow theory is used to both design the conditions of the test and interpret the observations, leading to a much higher precision in

  17. Study of Interaction Between Tryptophan, Tyrosine, and Phenylalanine Separately with Silver Nanoparticles by Fluorescence Quenching Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S.; Das, T. K.

    2015-09-01

    Using the spectroscopic method, the individual interaction of the three biochemically important amino acids, which are constituents of protein, namely, tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine with biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles has been investigated. The obtained UV-Vis spectra show the formation of ground-state complexes between tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine with silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles possess the ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of the aforesaid amino acids by a dynamic quenching process. The binding constant, number of binding sites, and corresponding thermodynamic parameters (Δ H, Δ S, and Δ G) based on the interaction system were calculated for 293, 303, and 313 K. In the case of tryptophan and phenylalanine, with increase in temperature, the binding constant K was found to decrease; conversely, it was found to increase with increase in temperature in the case of tyrosine. The thermodynamic results revealed that the binding process was spontaneous; hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interaction were the predominant forces responsible for the complex stabilization in the case of tryptophan and phenylalanine, respectively, whereas in the case of tyrosine, hydrophobic interaction was the sole force conferring stability. Moreover, the Förster non-radiation energy transfer theory has been applied to calculate the average binding distance among the above amino acids and silver nanoparticles. The results show a binding distance of <7 nm, which ensures that energy transfer does occur between the said amino acids and silver nanoparticles.

  18. Rapid Phytotransformation of Benzotriazole Generates Synthetic Tryptophan and Auxin Analogs in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    LeFevre, Gregory H; Müller, Claudia E; Li, Russell Jingxian; Luthy, Richard G; Sattely, Elizabeth S

    2015-09-15

    Benzotriazoles (BTs) are xenobiotic contaminants widely distributed in aquatic environments and of emerging concern due to their polarity, recalcitrance, and common use. During some water reclamation activities, such as stormwater bioretention or crop irrigation with recycled water, BTs come in contact with vegetation, presenting a potential exposure route to consumers. We discovered that BT in hydroponic systems was rapidly (approximately 1-log per day) assimilated by Arabidopsis plants and metabolized to novel BT metabolites structurally resembling tryptophan and auxin plant hormones; <1% remained as parent compound. Using LC-QTOF-MS untargeted metabolomics, we identified two major types of BT transformation products: glycosylation and incorporation into the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway. BT amino acid metabolites are structurally analogous to tryptophan and the storage forms of auxin plant hormones. Critical intermediates were synthesized (authenticated by (1)H/(13)C NMR) for product verification. In a multiple-exposure temporal mass balance, three major metabolites accounted for >60% of BT. Glycosylated BT was excreted by the plants into the hydroponic medium, a phenomenon not observed previously. The observed amino acid metabolites are likely formed when tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes substitute synthetic BT for native indolic molecules, generating potential phytohormone mimics. These results suggest that BT metabolism by plants could mask the presence of BT contamination in the environment. Furthermore, BT-derived metabolites are structurally related to plant auxin hormones and should be evaluated for undesirable biological effects. PMID:26301449

  19. Internal Energies of Ion-Sputtered Neutral Tryptophan and Thymine Molecules Determined by Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jia; Takahashi, Lynelle; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-11

    Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization coupled to secondary neutral mass spectrometry (VUV-SNMS) of deposited tryptophan and thymine films are performed at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline. The resulting mass spectra show that while the intensity of the VUV-SNMS signal is lower than the corresponding secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) signal, the mass spectra are significantly simplified in VUV-SNMS. A detailed examination of tryptophan and thymine neutral molecules sputtered by 25 keV Bi3 + indicates that the ion-sputtered parent molecules have ~;;2.5 eV of internal energy. While this internal energy shifts the appearance energy of the photofragment ions for both tryptophan and thymine, it does not change the characteristic photoionizaton efficiency (PIE) curves of thymine versus photon energy. Further analysis of the mass spectral signals indicate that approximately 80 neutral thymine molecules and 400 tryptophan molecules are sputtered per incident Bi3 + ion. The simplified mass spectra and significant characteristic ion contributions to the VUV-SNMS spectra indicate the potential power of the technique for organic molecule surface analysis.

  20. Adipogenesis and aldosterone: a study in lean tryptophan-depleted rats.

    PubMed

    Pokusa, Michal; Hlavacova, Natasa; Csanova, Agnesa; Franklin, Michael; Zorad, Stefan; Jezova, Daniela

    2016-07-01

    Next to epithelial tissues, mineralocorticoid receptors are also expressed in adipose tissue and are involved in the process of adipogenesis. Mineralocorticoid receptors in adipose tissue are likely to be activated mainly by glucocorticoids. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the processes related to adipogenesis are modified under the conditions associated with high circulating aldosterone. We have made advantage of a model of depression based on tryptophan depletion in which we have previously demonstrated that the elevation of serum aldosterone precedes that of corticosterone. Sixty adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a low tryptophan diet or control diet for 4 (elevation of aldosterone only), 7 and 14 days (broader neuroendocrine activation) respectively. Gene expression of several adipogenic factors, CD31, interleukin-6, adiponectin, resistin and leptin were evaluated. Levels of mRNAs coding for adipogenic, angiogenic and inflammatory factors in adipose tissue were elevated at 4 and 7 days of tryptophan depletion. Additionally, gene expression of aldosterone sensing 11-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 and mineralocorticoid receptors were elevated. All changes disappeared at 14 days of tryptophan depletion. Synchronously an increase of adipose tissue mass was observed. Although direct evidence is not provided, observed changes in gene expression may be related to the action of aldosterone on mineralocorticoid receptors. Our findings represent the first data on any changes in gene expression in adipose tissue in animal models of depression. PMID:27253873

  1. Problem-Solving Test: Attenuation--A Mechanism to Regulate Bacterial Tryptophan Biosynthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: tryptophan, transcription unit, operon, "trp" repressor, corepressor, operator, promoter, palindrome, initiation, elongation, and termination of transcription, open reading frame, coupled transcription/translation, chromosome-polysome complex. (Contains 2 figures and 1 footnote.)

  2. Problem-solving test: Attenuation: a mechanism to regulate bacterial tryptophan biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Szeberényi, József

    2010-11-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: tryptophan, transcription unit, operon, trp repressor, corepressor, operator, promoter, palindrome, initiation, elongation, and termination of transcription, open reading frame, coupled transcription/translation, chromosome-polysome complex. PMID:21567872

  3. Monitoring of tryptophan as a biomarker for cancerous cells in Terahertz (THz) sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altan, Hakan; Simsek Ozek, Nihal; Gok, Seher; Ozyurt, Ipek; Severcan, Feride

    2016-03-01

    Tryptophan is an extremely important amino acid for a variety of biological functions in living organisms. Changes in the concentration of this amino acid can point to identification of cancerous tissues or even confirm symptoms of depression in patients. Therefore it is extremely important to identify and quantify tryptophan concentrations in human blood as well as in in-vivo diagnostic studies. Here a reflection based terahertz pulsed spectroscopy system was used to study the interaction of THz pulses with cancerous cells to gauge the possibility of using L-tryptophan as a biomarker for THz sensing of diseases. Initial measurements were performed on human colon adenocarcinoma cells and human breast cancer cells cultivated on glass slides. The glass slides utilized in the growth process limited the measurements not only to reflection based geometries but also limited the analysis of the samples in the frequency domain due to the highly absorbing nature of glass in the THz region. The useful bandwidth was limited to frequencies below 0.6THz which prohibited us from investigating the effects of L-tryptophan in these samples. Even with the limited frequency range the measurements show that there are slight differences in the transmission of the THz pulse through different samples.

  4. Internal energies of ion-sputtered neutral tryptophan and thymine molecules determined by vacuum ultraviolet photoionization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Takahashi, Lynelle K; Wilson, Kevin R; Leone, Stephen R; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-05-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization coupled to secondary neutral mass spectrometry (VUV-SNMS) of deposited tryptophan and thymine films are performed at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline. The resulting mass spectra show that while the intensity of the VUV-SNMS signal is lower than the corresponding secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) signal, the mass spectra are significantly simplified in VUV-SNMS. A detailed examination of tryptophan and thymine neutral molecules sputtered by 25 keV Bi(3)(+) indicates that the ion-sputtered parent molecules have approximately 2.5 eV of internal energy. While this internal energy shifts the appearance energy of the photofragment ions for both tryptophan and thymine, it does not change the characteristic photoionizaton efficiency (PIE) curves of thymine versus photon energy. Further analysis of the mass spectral signals indicate that approximately 80 neutral thymine molecules and 400 tryptophan molecules are sputtered per incident Bi(3)(+) ion. The simplified mass spectra and significant characteristic ion contributions to the VUV-SNMS spectra indicate the potential power of the technique for organic molecule surface analysis. PMID:20353160

  5. Central fatigue and nycthemeral change of serum tryptophan and serotonin in the athletic horse

    PubMed Central

    Piccione, Giuseppe; Assenza, Anna; Fazio, Francesco; Percipalle, Maurizio; Caola, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Background The serotonergic system is associated with numerous brain functions, including the resetting of the mammalian circadian clock. The synthesis and metabolism of 5-HT in the brain increases in response to exercise and is correlated with high levels of blood-borne tryptophan (TRP). The present investigation was aimed at testing the existence of a daily rhythm of TRP and 5-HT in the blood of athletic horses. Methods Blood samples from 5 Thoroughbred mares were collected at 4-hour intervals for 48 hours (starting at 08:00 hours on day 1 and finishing at 4:00 on day 2) via an intravenous cannula inserted into the jugular vein. Tryptophan and serotonin concentrations were assessed by HPLC. Data analysis was conducted by one-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and by the single cosinor method. Results ANOVA showed a highly significant influence of time both on tryptophan and on serotonin, in all horses, on either day, with p values < 0.0001. Cosinor analysis identified the periodic parameters and their acrophases (expressed in hours) during the 2 days of monitoring. Both parameters studied showed evening acrophases. Conclusion The results showed that serotonin and tryptophan blood levels undergo nycthemeral variation with typical evening acrophases. These results enhance the understanding of the athlete horse's chronoperformance and facilitate the establishment of training programs that take into account the nycthemeral pattern of aminoacids deeply involved in the onset of central fatigue. PMID:15860131

  6. Suppression of ethanol intake in chickens by fenfluramine and dietary tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Fisher, H; Hsu, H C; Wagner, G C

    1991-12-01

    Two groups of 10-week-old White Leghorn cockerels were fed a commercial grower diet with or without an L-tryptophan (0.5%) supplement. After a 24-hr water deprivation and 13 to 14 hr without food, the birds were randomly injected with 0 (saline) 4, 8, or 12 mg of fenfluramine/kg body weight. Thirty minutes after injections, water or a 5% ethanol solution was offered, no choice, to the birds and fluid consumption as well as skin and rectal temperature before and after fluid availability were measured. The ethanol solution in otherwise untreated animals was consumed in similar amounts as water was. Fenfluramine (8 mg/kg) significantly reduced ethanol consumption and tryptophan further significantly reduced ethanol intake. At 12 mg/kg fenfluramine, both water and ethanol intake were sharply reduced. Ethanol decreased body temperature, an effect that was reversed by both tryptophan alone and fenfluramine + tryptophan in a dose-dependent manner. These observations are discussed in reference to the effects of central serotonergic manipulations and ethanol consumption. PMID:1789381

  7. Phasor approaches simplify the analysis of tryptophan fluorescence data in protein denaturation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Arjen N.; Visser, Nina V.; van Amerongen, Herbert; Visser, Antonie J. W. G.

    2014-12-01

    The intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan is frequently used to investigate the structure of proteins. The analysis of tryptophan fluorescence data is challenging: fluorescence (anisotropy) decays typically have multiple lifetime (correlation time) components and fluorescence spectra are broad and exhibit only minor shifts. In this work, we show that phasor approaches can substantially simplify tryptophan fluorescence analysis. To demonstrate this, we re-analyse previously recorded datasets of the denaturant (guanidinium hydrochloride, GuHCl) induced unfolding of a single-tryptophan-containing variant of apoflavodoxin from Azotobacter vinelandii. For three methods—(1) time-resolved fluorescence, (2) time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy and (3) steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy—we show that the phasor analysis can readily identify the presence of a folding intermediate. Moreover, the fractional contributions of protein states at various stages of unfolding and the values of the free energy difference of the unfolding process ≤ft(Δ G\\text{UN}0\\right) are obtained. The outcomes are compared to the global analysis results published previously.

  8. Effect of a B-vitamin on tryptophan metabolism in South African Bantu with pellagra

    SciTech Connect

    Hankes, L.V.; Jansen, C.R.; DeBruin, E.P.; Schmaeler, M.

    1983-01-01

    The metabolism of kynurenine, a metabolite in the tryptophan-niacin pathway, before and after vitamin B6 therapy was studied in pellagra patients. The patients given vitamin B6 showed a higher metabolism of L-kynurenine-keto-/sup 14/C than the patients without vitamin B6. (ACR)

  9. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of NADH and tryptophan in intact ischemic, intact rabbit myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, Adrian; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Sommers, Keith

    1999-07-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury is the leading cause of early dysfunction following transplantation. Currently, there are no techniques available to accurately measure ischemic changes during organ storage. Therefore, the interest exists in developing non-invasive monitoring techniques. We used NADH and tryptophan as fluorescent markers, since both are intrinsic fluorophores and excellent indicators for levels of hypoxia and protein denaturation, respectively.

  10. Direct handling of sharp interfacial energy for microstructural evolution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hernández–Rivera, Efraín; Tikare, Veena; Noirot, Laurence; Wang, Lumin

    2014-08-24

    In this study, we introduce a simplification to the previously demonstrated hybrid Potts–phase field (hPPF), which relates interfacial energies to microstructural sharp interfaces. The model defines interfacial energy by a Potts-like discrete interface approach of counting unlike neighbors, which we use to compute local curvature. The model is compared to the hPPF by studying interfacial characteristics and grain growth behavior. The models give virtually identical results, while the new model allows the simulator more direct control of interfacial energy.

  11. The association of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism with acute brain dysfunction during critical illness*

    PubMed Central

    Adams Wilson, Jessica R.; Morandi, Alessandro; Girard, Timothy D.; Thompson, Jennifer L.; Boomershine, Chad S.; Shintani, Ayumi K.; Ely, E. Wesley; Pandharipande, Pratik P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Plasma tryptophan levels are associated with delirium in critically ill patients. Although tryptophan has been linked to the pathogenesis of other neurocognitive diseases through metabolism to neurotoxins via the kynurenine pathway, a role for kynurenine pathway activity in intensive care unit brain dysfunction (delirium and coma) remains unknown. This study examined the association between kynurenine pathway activity as determined by plasma kynurenine concentrations and kynurenine/tryptophan ratios and presence or absence of acute brain dysfunction (defined as delirium/coma-free days) in intensive care unit patients. Design, Setting, and Patients This was a prospective cohort study that utilized patient data and blood samples from the Maximizing Efficacy of Targeted Sedation and Reducing Neurologic Dysfunction trial, which compared sedation with dexmedetomidine vs. lorazepam in mechanically ventilated patients. Measurements and Main Results Baseline plasma kynurenine and tryptophan concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with or without tandem mass spectrometry. Delirium was assessed daily using the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit. Linear regression examined associations between kynurenine pathway activity and delirium/coma-free days after adjusting for sedative exposure, age, and severity of illness. Among 84 patients studied, median age was 60 yrs and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 28.5. Elevated plasma kynurenine and kynurenine/tryptophan ratio were both independently associated with significantly fewer delirium/coma-free days (i.e., fewer days without acute brain dysfunction). Specifically, patients with plasma kynurenine or kynurenine/tryptophan ratios at the 75th percentile of our population had an average of 1.8 (95% confidence interval 0.6–3.1) and 2.1 (95% confidence interval 1.0–3.2) fewer delirium/coma-free days than those patients with values at the 25

  12. Interfacial welding of dynamic covalent network polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kai; Shi, Qian; Li, Hao; Jabour, John; Yang, Hua; Dunn, Martin L.; Wang, Tiejun; Qi, H. Jerry

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic covalent network (or covalent adaptable network) polymers can rearrange their macromolecular chain network by bond exchange reactions (BERs) where an active unit replaces a unit in an existing bond to form a new bond. Such macromolecular events, when they occur in large amounts, can attribute to unusual properties that are not seen in conventional covalent network polymers, such as shape reforming and surface welding; the latter further enables the important attributes of material malleability and powder-based reprocessing. In this paper, a multiscale modeling framework is developed to study the surface welding of thermally induced dynamic covalent network polymers. At the macromolecular network level, a lattice model is developed to describe the chain density evolution across the interface and its connection to bulk stress relaxation due to BERs. The chain density evolution rule is then fed into a continuum level interfacial model that takes into account surface roughness and applied pressure to predict the effective elastic modulus and interfacial fracture energy of welded polymers. The model yields particularly accessible results where the moduli and interfacial strength of the welded samples as a function of temperature and pressure can be predicted with four parameters, three of which can be measured directly. The model identifies the dependency of surface welding efficiency on the applied thermal and mechanical fields: the pressure will affect the real contact area under the consideration of surface roughness of dynamic covalent network polymers; the chain density increment on the real contact area of interface is only dependent on the welding time and temperature. The modeling approach shows good agreement with experiments and can be extended to other types of dynamic covalent network polymers using different stimuli for BERs, such as light and moisture etc.

  13. Interfacial Characterization of Rigid Polymer Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeNolf, Garret C.

    In order to enhance the performance and durability of today's polymer coatings it is pivotal to be able to characterize their mechanical and chemical properties, with emphasized importance on coating-substrate interfaces which are common points of material failure. The purpose of this thesis was to develop and demonstrate novel characterization methods to measure the interfacial and bulk properties of these polymer films and improve the overall understanding of these materials. The first portion of this thesis explores a new peel test technique to measure the adhesion between substrates and coatings. The employed method examines the effect of processing conditions and substrate treatment on the adhesion of polyurethane coatings. This technique successfully quantifies the adhesion of polyurethane coatings to a variety of treated substrates and at multiple curing temperatures. The second thrust of this thesis involves the utilization of a quartz crystal microbalance instrument to characterize the bulk rheological properties of polymer films and coatings in situ. This novel method enables the examination of the effect of temperature and mixing stoichiometry on the rheological properties of curing polyurethane coatings and polymer films. This analysis is extended to measure the curing and aging of paint systems relevant to the art conservation scientific community. The final portion of this thesis focuses on understanding the effect of pH on the interfacial swelling of polymer films in aqueous environments. The quartz crystal microbalance is used to characterize the swelling of interfacial polymer films as water reaches the interface, and the corresponding permeability and osmotic pressure provides insight into the mechanisms of delamination and adhesive failure of coatings attached to metal surfaces. The novel methods and calculations established in this thesis enable precise measurements of coating interfaces and rheological properties and have considerable potential

  14. Pore invasion dynamics during fluid front displacement - an interfacial front model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, F.; Or, D.

    2013-12-01

    The dynamics of fluid fronts in porous media shape subsequent phase distribution and the transport properties of the partially saturated region with implications ranging from gaseous transport to plant roots to extraction or injection of fluids to petroleum reservoirs. What macroscopically seems as a smooth and continuous motion of a displacement fluid front, involves numerous rapid pore-scale interfacial jumps often resembling avalanches of invasion events. We present a 2D model for simulating interfacial front displacement that was developed to study details of invasion dynamics at the front and to systematically study effects of boundary conditions on the resulting macroscopic properties after passage of a front. The interfacial front is represented by hydraulically connected sinusoidal capillaries allowing for redistribution and capillary pressure relaxation through exchange with neighboring interfaces. The model focuses on processes at the front and neglects interfacial redistribution left behind the front as well as saturated fluid flow below the front. The description of the dynamics of the rapid non-wetting fluid invasions induced by constant wetting fluid withdrawal includes capillary, viscous and hydrostatic component and inertia. Results show that the additional inertial force (not considered in previous studies) does significantly affect invasion pathways such as the hypothesized 'consecutive jumps'. The menisci jump velocities show a strong relation to geometrical throat dimensions that reflect local capillary gradients. The front model further enables to link boundary conditions (macroscopic Capillary number, throat size distribution) effects on pore invasion sequences and impact on residual wetting phase entrapment and front morphology. A limited comparison of model predictions with experimental results from sintered glass-beads micro-models will be presented.

  15. Effect of pendent chains on the interfacial properties of thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) networks.

    PubMed

    Landherr, Lucas J T; Cohen, Claude; Archer, Lynden A

    2011-05-17

    The interfacial properties of end-linked polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films on silicon are examined. Thin cross-linked PDMS films (∼10 μm thick) were synthesized over a self-assembled monolayer supported on a silicon wafer. By systematically varying the concentration of monofunctional PDMS in a mixture with telechelic precursor molecules, structures ranging from near-ideal elastic networks to poorly cross-linked networks composed of a preponderance of dangling/pendent chains were synthesized. Lateral force microscopy (LFM) employing bead probes was used to quantify the effect of network structure on the interfacial friction coefficient and residual force. Indentation measurements employing an AFM in force mode were used to characterize the elastic modulus and the pull-off force for the films as a function of pendent chain content. These measurements were complemented with conventional mechanical rheometry measurements on similar thick network films to determine their bulk rheological properties. All networks studied manifested interfacial friction coefficients substantially lower than that of bare silicon. PDMS networks with the lowest pendent chain content displayed friction coefficients close to 1 order of magnitude lower than that of bare silicon, whereas networks with the highest pendent chain content manifested friction coefficients about 3 times lower than that of bare silicon. At intermediate sliding velocities, a crossover in the interfacial friction coefficient was observed, wherein cross-linked PDMS films with the least amount of pendent chains exhibit the highest friction coefficient. These observations are discussed in terms of the structure of the films and relaxation dynamics of elastic strands and dangling chains in tethered network films. PMID:21495649

  16. Interfacial Molecular Searching Using Forager Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserud, Jon H.; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2016-03-01

    Many biological and technological systems employ efficient non-Brownian intermittent search strategies where localized searches alternate with long flights. Coincidentally, molecular species exhibit intermittent behavior at the solid-liquid interface, where periods of slow motion are punctuated by fast flights through the liquid phase. Single-molecule tracking was used here to observe the interfacial search process of DNA for complementary DNA. Measured search times were qualitatively consistent with an intermittent-flight model, and ˜10 times faster than equivalent Brownian searches, suggesting that molecular searches for reactive sites benefit from similar efficiencies as biological organisms.

  17. Weak links and interfacial chemistry in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.S.; Hirschon, A.S.; Green, T.K.

    1989-12-31

    It has been estimated that the ultrafine mineral component in coal can be up to 15% of the total mineral content (ref 6), and the similarity of our results with coal to those for oil shale suggest that the reactive mineral/organic interfacial volume in coal could be substantial. While the mechanisms for reactions within the interphase are yet to be developed, our results suggest that attention be applied to this feature of coal in considerations of structure effects on both liquefaction and coal pyrolysis.

  18. Weak links and interfacial chemistry in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.S.; Hirschon, A.S.; Green, T.K.

    1989-01-01

    It has been estimated that the ultrafine mineral component in coal can be up to 15% of the total mineral content (ref 6), and the similarity of our results with coal to those for oil shale suggest that the reactive mineral/organic interfacial volume in coal could be substantial. While the mechanisms for reactions within the interphase are yet to be developed, our results suggest that attention be applied to this feature of coal in considerations of structure effects on both liquefaction and coal pyrolysis.

  19. Rheology of interfacial protein-polysaccharide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.

    2013-05-01

    The morphology and mechanical properties of protein adsorption layers can significantly be altered by the presence of surfactants, lipids, particles, other proteins, and polysaccharides. In food emulsions, polysaccharides are primarily considered as bulk thickener but can under appropriate environmental conditions stabilize or destabilize the protein adsorption layer and, thus, the entire emulsion system. Despite their ubiquitous usage as stabilization agent, relatively few investigations focus on the interfacial rheology of composite protein/polysaccharide adsorption layers. The manuscript provides a brief review on both main stabilization mechanisms, thermodynamic phase separation and electrostatic interaction and discusses the rheological response in light of the environmental conditions such as ionic strength and pH.

  20. Viscosity of interfacial water regulates ice nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kaiyong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qiaolan; Zhang, Yifan; Xu, Shun; Zhou, Xin; Cui, Dapeng; Wang, Jianjun Song, Yanlin

    2014-03-10

    Ice formation on solid surfaces is an important phenomenon in many fields, such as cloud formation and atmospheric icing, and a key factor for applications in preventing freezing. Here, we report temperature-dependent nucleation rates of ice for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The results show that hydrophilic surface presents a lower ice nucleation rate. We develop a strategy to extract the thermodynamic parameters, J{sub 0} and Γ, in the context of classical nucleation theory. From the extracted J{sub 0} and Γ, we reveal the dominant role played by interfacial water. The results provide an insight into freezing mechanism on solid surfaces.

  1. Interfacial models of nerve fiber cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Malev, V V; Gromov, D B; Komissarchik YaYu; Brudnaya, M S

    1992-01-01

    A new approach, basing on a resemblance between cytoskeleton structures associated with plasma membranes and interfacial layers of coexisting phases, is proposed. In particular, a lattice model, similar to those of the theory of surface properties of pure liquids and nonelectrolyte solutions (Ono, S., and S. Kondo. 1960. Handbuch der Physik.), has been developed to describe nerve fiber cytoskeleton. The preliminary consideration of the model shows the existence of submembrane cytoskeleton having increased peripheral densities of microtubules (compared with the bulk density) which is in qualitative agreement with the data in literature. Some additional possibilities of the approach proposed are briefly discussed. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:1420929

  2. Identification of essential amino acid residues of an alpha-amylase inhibitor from Phaseolus vulgaris white kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Hiramoto, S; Wato, S; Nishimoto, T; Wada, Y; Nagai, K; Yamaguchi, H

    1999-11-01

    Kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitors, which are bivalent inhibitors with the subunit stoichiometry of (alphabeta)(2) complex, have been inferred to contain unique arginine, tryptophan, and tyrosine residues essential for the inhibitory activity. To test the validity of this inference, an attempt was made to identify the essential amino acid residues of a white kidney bean (P. vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitor (PHA-I) by using the chemical modification technique combined with amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. Exhaustive modification of the arginine residues by phenylglyoxal did not lead to a marked loss of activity, suggesting that no arginine residue is directly associated with the inhibitory activity. N-Bromosuccinimide treatment of PHA-I in the presence or absence of a substrate alpha-amylase revealed the involvement of two tryptophan residues in alpha-amylase inhibition, and they were identified as Trp188 of the beta-subunit by amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry of lysylendopeptidase peptides. Further, two tyrosine residues were preferentially modified either by N-acetylimidazole or by tetranitromethane, resulting in a concomitant loss of most of the PHA-I activity. Amino acid sequencing of the lysylendopeptidase peptides from a tetranitromethane-modified PHA-I identified Tyr186 of the beta-subunit as an essential residue. PMID:10544275

  3. l-tryptophan and dipeptide derivatives for supercoiled plasmid DNA purification.

    PubMed

    Santos, Tiago; Carvalho, Josué; Corvo, Marta C; Cabrita, Eurico J; Queiroz, J A; Cruz, C

    2016-06-01

    The present study focus on the preparation of chromatography supports for affinity-based chromatography of supercoiled plasmid purification. Three l-tryptophan based supports are prepared through immobilization on epoxy-activated Sepharose and characterized by HR-MAS NMR. The SPR is employed for a fast screening of l-tryptophan derivatives, as potential ligands for the biorecognition of supercoiled isoform, as well as, to establish the suitable experimental conditions for the chromatography. The results reveal that the overall affinity is high (KD=10(-9) and 10(-8)M) and the conditions tested show that the use of HEPES 100mM enables the separation and purification of supercoiled at T=10°C. The STD-NMR is performed to accomplish the epitope mapping of the 5'-mononucleotides bound to l-tryptophan derivatives supports. The data shows that the interactions between the three supports and the 5'-mononucleotides are mainly hydrophobic and π-π stacking. The chromatography experiments are performed with l-tryptophan support and plasmids pVAX-LacZ and pPH600. The supercoiled isoform separation is achieved at T=10°C by decreasing the concentration of (NH4)2SO4 from 2.7 to 0M in HEPES for pVAX-LacZ and 2.65M to 0M in HEPES for pPH600. Overall, l-tryptophan derivatives can be a promising strategy to purify supercoiled for pharmaceutical applications. PMID:26952704

  4. Quantifying the photothermal efficiency of gold nanoparticles using tryptophan as an in situ fluorescent thermometer.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ming-Jui; Chu, Li-Kang

    2015-07-14

    The photothermal efficiencies, denoting the efficiency of transducing incident light to heat, of gold nanoparticles of different diameters (∅ = 22-86 nm) were quantified upon exposure at 532 nm. The fluorescence of tryptophan at 300-450 nm upon 280 nm excitation serves as an in situ fluorescent thermometer to illustrate the evolution of the average temperature change in the heating volume of the nanoparticle solution. The fluorescence intensity decreases as the temperature increases, having a linear gradient of 2.05% fluorescence decrease per degree Celsius increment from 20 to 45 °C. The presence of gold nanoparticles at the nM level does not perturb the temperature-dependent fluorescence of tryptophan in terms of fluorescence contour and temperature response. The heating volume was defined by overlapping the collimated 532 nm laser (∅ = 0.83 mm) for exciting the nanoparticles and the 280 nm continuous-wave beam (∅ = 0.81 mm) for exciting tryptophan in a 2 mm × 2 mm square tube, and the fluorescence was collected perpendicularly to the collinear alignment. This method has satisfactory reproducibility and a sufficient temperature detectivity of 0.2 °C. The profiles of the average temperature evolution of the mixtures containing nanoparticles and tryptophan were derived from the evolution of fluorescence and analyzed using collective energy balancing. The relative photothermal efficiencies for different sizes of gold nanoparticles with respect to the 22 nm nanoparticle agree with those predicted using Mie theory. The employment of tryptophan as a fluorescent thermometer not only provides an in situ tool to monitor the photothermal effect of nanostructures but is also applicable to thermal imaging in biological applications. PMID:26068797

  5. Metabolomic analysis of amino acid and fat metabolism in rats with L-tryptophan supplementation.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Zheng; Yang, Yuhui; Wen, Yanmei; Zhou, Yan; Fu, Xiaofang; Ding, Sheng; Liu, Gang; Yao, Kang; Wu, Xin; Deng, Zeyuan; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2014-12-01

    Tryptophan (TRP) is an important precursor for several neurotransmitters and metabolic regulators, which play a vital role in regulating nutrient metabolism. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of tryptophan supplementation on the biochemical profiles, intestinal structure, liver structure and serum metabolome in rats. Rats received daily intragastric administration of either tryptophan at doses of 200 mg/kg body weight per day or saline (control group) for 7 days. TRP supplementation had a tendency to decrease the body weight of rats (P > 0.05). The levels of urea and CHO in serum were decreased in the TRP-supplemented group rats compared with control group rats (P < 0.05). TRP supplementation increased the villus height and the ratio of villus height to crypt depth in the jejunum compared to control group rats (P < 0.05). Metabolic effects of tryptophan supplementation include: (1) increases in the serum concentrations of lysine, glycine, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, citrulline, methionine, tyrosine, 1-methylhistidine, and albumin, and decreases in the concentrations of serum branched-chain amino acid (isoleucine, valine and leucine); (2) decreases in the serum concentrations of formate and nitrogenous products (trimethylamine, TMAO, methylamine and dimethylamine), and in the contraction of trimethylamine in feces; (3) decreases in serum levels of lipids, low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein, together with the elevated ratio of acetoacetate to β-hydroxybutyrate. The results indicate that tryptophan supplementation reduced the catabolism of dietary amino acids and promoted protein synthesis in rats, promoted the oxidation of fatty acid and reduced fat deposition in the body of rats. PMID:25139634

  6. Tryptophan for the sleeping disorder and mental symptom of new-type drug dependence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongming; Li, Wenzhen; Xiao, Yang; He, Wulong; Wei, Weiquan; Yang, Longyu; Yu, Jincong; Song, Fujian; Wang, Zengzhen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: New-type drugs are popular with adolescents and could lead to psychiatry disorders, but no medications have been proven to be effective for these disorders of new-type drug dependence. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of tryptophan on sleeping disorders and mental symptoms in detoxified individuals with new-type drug dependence. Methods: This randomized, placebo-controlled trial included 80 detoxified individuals with new-type drug dependence, recruited successively from a Compulsory Residential Drug Abstinence Institution in Wuhan, China, from April 2012 to November 2012. Eligible participants were randomly allocated to be treated with tryptophan (1000 mg/d, n = 40) or placebo (n = 40) for 2 weeks. The sleeping disorders and mental symptoms were assessed using Athens Insomnia Scale and Symptom Check-List-90 at baseline and 2 weeks. Results were analyzed according to the “intention-to-treat” approach. Results: Forty-five participants completed the 2-week study, 24 in the tryptophan group and 21 in the placebo group. There were no statistically significant differences in baseline characteristics between groups and the treatment adherence was similar between groups. The reduction in the Athens Insomnia Scale score in the tryptophan group was significantly greater than that in the placebo group (P = 0.017). However, no significant differences were found in Symptom Check-List-90 scores (either by individual dimension or the overall score) between groups (all P > 0.05). The frequency of adverse events was similar and no serious adverse events were reported during the study. Conclusion: Tryptophan was unlikely to be effective for mental symptoms, but could alleviate sleep disorders in short term among detoxified individuals with new-type drug dependence. Future large-scale trials are required to confirm findings from this study. PMID:27428201

  7. Tryptophan depletion as a mechanism of gamma interferon-mediated chlamydial persistence.

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, W L; Belanger, T A; Desai, A A; Morrison, R P; Byrne, G I

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the immune-regulated cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) activates host cells to restrict intracellular growth of the bacterial pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis by induction of the tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Recently, subinhibitory levels of IFN-gamma were used to generate an in vitro persistent chlamydial infection characterized by large aberrant, noninfectious reticulate bodies from which infectious progeny could be recovered following the removal of IFN-gamma. Studies were done to determine if the mechanism functioning to induce chlamydiae to enter a persistent state in the presence of low levels of IFN-gamma was similar to that reported to inhibit chlamydial growth. Host cells treated with levels of IFN-gamma required to induce persistence were assessed for IDO activity by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of tryptophan and its catabolic products. Substantial tryptophan catabolism was detected in acid-soluble cellular pools, indicating that the intracellular availability of this essential amino acid was limited under these conditions. In addition, a mutant cell line responsive to IFN-gamma but deficient in IDO activity was shown to support C. trachomatis growth, but aberrant organisms were not induced in response to IFN-gamma treatment. Analyses of infected cells cultured in medium with incremental levels of exogenous tryptophan indicated that persistent growth was induced by reducing the amount of this essential amino acid. These studies confirmed that nutrient deprivation by IDO-mediated tryptophan catabolism was the mechanism by which IFN-gamma mediates persistent growth of C. trachomatis. Images PMID:8063385

  8. Fluorescence imaging of tryptophan and collagen cross-links to evaluate wound closure ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Farinelli, Bill; Anderson, R. R.; Franco, Walfre

    2016-02-01

    Wound size is a key parameter in monitoring healing. Current methods to measure wound size are often subjective, time-consuming and marginally invasive. Recently, we developed a non-invasive, non-contact, fast and simple but robust fluorescence imaging (u-FEI) method to monitor the healing of skin wounds. This method exploits the fluorescence of native molecules to tissue as functional and structural markers. The objective of the present study is to demonstrate the feasibility of using variations in the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan and cross-links of collagen to evaluate proliferation of keratinocyte cells and quantitate size of wound during healing, respectively. Circular dermal wounds were created in ex vivo human skin and cultured in different media. Two serial fluorescence images of tryptophan and collagen cross-links were acquired every two days. Histology and immunohistology were used to validate correlation between fluorescence and epithelialization. Images of collagen cross-links show fluorescence of the exposed dermis and, hence, are a measure of wound area. Images of tryptophan show higher fluorescence intensity of proliferating keratinocytes forming new epithelium, as compared to surrounding keratinocytes not involved in epithelialization. These images are complementary since collagen cross-links report on structure while tryptophan reports on function. HE and immunohistology show that tryptophan fluorescence correlates with newly formed epidermis. We have established a fluorescence imaging method for studying epithelialization processes during wound healing in a skin organ culture model, our approach has the potential to provide a non-invasive, non-contact, quick, objective and direct method for quantitative measurements in wound healing in vivo.

  9. The role of two Pseudomonas aeruginosa anthranilate synthases in tryptophan and quorum signal production

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Gregory C.; Jorth, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that causes infections in the lungs of individuals with the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Density-dependent production of toxic factors regulated by the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone; PQS) have been proposed to be involved in P. aeruginosa virulence. PQS biosynthesis requires conversion of the central metabolite chorismate to anthranilate by anthranilate synthase. This reaction is also the first step in tryptophan biosynthesis. P. aeruginosa possesses two functional anthranilate synthases, TrpEG and PhnAB, and these enzymes are not functionally redundant, as trpEG mutants are tryptophan auxotrophs but produce PQS while mutants in phnAB are tryptophan prototrophs but do not produce PQS in minimal media. The goal of the work described in this paper was to determine the mechanism for this lack of functional complementation of TrpEG and PhnAB. Our results reveal that overexpression of either enzyme compensates for tryptophan auxotrophy and PQS production in the trpEG and phnAB mutants respectively, leading to the hypothesis that differential regulation of these genes is responsible for the lack of functional complementation. In support of this hypothesis, trpEG was shown to be expressed primarily during low-density growth while phnAB was expressed primarily at high density. Furthermore, dysregulation of phnAB expression eliminated tryptophan auxotrophy in the P. aeruginosa trpEG mutant. Based on these data, we propose a model for anthranilate sequestration by differential transcriptional regulation of the two P. aeruginosa anthranilate synthase enzymes. PMID:23449919

  10. Uptake and incorporation of labeled tryptophan isomers into IAA in the jsR sub 1 mutant of Lemna gibba

    SciTech Connect

    Baldi, B.G.; Maher, B.R.; Cohen, J.D. )

    1989-04-01

    Analyses of the IAA-overproducing mutant of Lemna have been initiated in order to study in vivo biosynthesis of IAA. Using radiolabelled tryptophan isomers prepared from commercial sources of {sup 14}C-D,L tryptophan by chiral separation kinetics of uptake of L and D tryptophan were determined for sterile cultures of individual jsR{sub 1} four-frond colonies. Over a 24 h period, about 50% of the radioactivity from {sup 14}C-L-TRP in media, or about 25% from {sup 14}C-D-TRP, was found in the plant tissue. Maximal rates of uptake were seen in the first six hors for both isomers. Endogenous levels of tryptophan determined in jsR{sub 1} as measures of pool sizes in vivo show 5 to 10 ug/g FW total tryptophan with less than 1% in the D isomer form. Information on uptake and endogenous pool sizes of tryptophan isomers is being used for feeding of stable isotope labeled tryptophan ({sup 13}C, {sup 14}N) to jsR{sub 1} at physiological levels. Analyses of incorporation of label into IAA using GC-MS and high resolution mass spectrometry are currently underway.

  11. Interfacial Layer Control by Dry Cleaning Technology for Polycrystalline and Single Crystalline Silicon Growth.

    PubMed

    Im, Dong-Hyun; Kong-Soo Lee; Kang, Yoongoo; Jeong, Myoungho; Park, Kwang Wuk; Lee, Soon-Gun; Ma, Jin-Won; Kim, Youngseok; Kim, Bonghyun; Im, Ki-Vin; Lim, Hanjin; Lee, Jeong Yong

    2016-05-01

    Native oxide removal prior to poly-Si contact and epitaxial growth of Si is the most critical technology to ensure process and device performances of poly-Si plugs and selective epitaxial growth (SEG) layers for DRAM, flash memory, and logic device. Recently, dry cleaning process for interfacial oxide removal has attracted a world-wide attention due to its superior passivation properties to conventional wet cleaning processes. In this study, we investigated the surface states of Si substrate during and after dry cleaning process, and the role of atomic elements including fluorine and hydrogen on the properties of subsequent deposited silicon layer using SIMS, XPS, and TEM analysis. The controlling of residual fluorine on the Si surface after dry cleaning is a key factor for clean interface. The mechanism of native oxide re-growth caused by residual fluorine after dry cleaning is proposed based on analytical results. PMID:27483844

  12. Synchrotron X-Ray Microtomography and Interfacial Partitioning Tracer Test Measurements of Napl-Water Interfacial Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusseau, M. L.; Janousek, H.; Murao, A.; Schnaar, G.

    2007-12-01

    Interfacial areas between an immiscible organic liquid (NAPL) and water were measured for two natural porous media using two methods, aqueous-phase interfacial partitioning tracer tests and synchrotron X-ray microtomography. The interfacial areas measured with the tracer tests were similar to previously reported values obtained with the method. The values were, however, significantly larger than those obtained from microtomography. Analysis of microtomography data collected before and after introduction of the interfacial tracer solution indicated that the surfactant tracer had minimal impact on fluid-phase configuration and interfacial areas under conditions associated with typical laboratory application. The disparity between the tracer-test and microtomography values is attributed primarily to the inability of the microtomography method to resolve interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. This hypothesis is consistent with results recently reported for a comparison of microtomographic analysis and interfacial tracer tests conducted for an air-water system. The tracer-test method provides a measure of effective, total (capillary and film) interfacial area, whereas microtomography can be used to determine separately both capillary-associated and film-associated interfacial areas. Both methods appear to provide useful information for given applications. A key to their effective use is recognizing the specific nature of the information provided by each, as well as associated limitations.

  13. A Brief Historic Overview of Clinical Disorders Associated with Tryptophan: The Relevance to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and Fibromyalgia (FM).

    PubMed

    Blankfield, Adele

    2012-01-01

    Last century there was a short burst of interest in the tryptophan related disorders of pellagra and related abnormalities that are usually presented in infancy.1,2 Nutritional physiologists recognized that a severe human dietary deficiency of either tryptophan or the B group vitamins could result in central nervous system (CNS) sequelae such as ataxia, cognitive dysfunction and dysphoria, accompanied by skin hyperpigmentation.3,4 The current paper will focus on the emerging role of tryptophan in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia (FM). PMID:23032646

  14. Inhibitor of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase 1-methyl-D-tryptophan can stimulate the growth of immunogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Vasil'eva, E D; Nikolin, V P; Popova, N A; Lushnikova, E L; Kaledin, V I

    2010-10-01

    We studied the effect of 1-methyl-D-tryptophan, an inhibitor of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase, on the growth of transplanted hepatocarcinoma-29 in C3HA mice. Hepatocarcinoma-29 transplanted into the thigh muscles undergoes immunological rejection in more than 50% non-syngeneic recipients. Chronic local administration of 1-methyl-D-tryptophan promotes progressive growth of the tumor in recipient mice leading to 100% animal death. The stimulating effect of 1-methyl-D-tryptophan on tumor growth is discussed. PMID:21165403

  15. A Brief Historic Overview of Clinical Disorders Associated with Tryptophan: The Relevance to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and Fibromyalgia (FM)

    PubMed Central

    Blankfield, Adele

    2012-01-01

    Last century there was a short burst of interest in the tryptophan related disorders of pellagra and related abnormalities that are usually presented in infancy.1,2 Nutritional physiologists recognized that a severe human dietary deficiency of either tryptophan or the B group vitamins could result in central nervous system (CNS) sequelae such as ataxia, cognitive dysfunction and dysphoria, accompanied by skin hyperpigmentation.3,4 The current paper will focus on the emerging role of tryptophan in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia (FM). PMID:23032646

  16. Interfacial adsorption and aggregation of amphiphilic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, David

    2012-02-01

    The adsorption and aggregation on liquid interfaces of proteins is important in many biological contexts, such as the formation of aerial structures, immune response, and catalysis. Likewise the adsorption of proteins onto interfaces has applications in food technology, drug delivery, and in personal care products. As such there has been much interest in the study of a wide range of biomolecules at liquid interfaces. One class of proteins that has attracted particular attention are hydrophobins, small, fungal proteins with a distinct, amphiphilic surface structure. This makes these proteins highly surface active and they recently attracted much interest. In order to understand their potential applications a microscopic description of their interfacial and self-assembly is necessary and molecular simulation provides a powerful tool for providing this. In this presentation I will describe some recent work using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to study the interfacial and aggregation behaviour of hydrophobins. Specifically this will present the calculation of their adsorption strength at oil-water and air-water interfaces, investigate the stability of hydrophobin aggregates in solution and their interaction with surfactants.

  17. Preface: Special Topic on Interfacial and Confined Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinero, Valeria; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-11-01

    This special topic on the chemical physics of interfacial and confined water contains a collection of original research papers that showcase recent theoretical and experimental advances in the field. These papers provide a timely discussion of fundamental aspects of interfacial and confined water that are important in both natural environments and engineered applications.

  18. Preface: Special Topic on Interfacial and Confined Water

    SciTech Connect

    Molinero, Valeria; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-11-14

    This Special Topic on the Chemical Physics of Interfacial and Confined Water contains a collection of original research papers that showcase recent theoretical and experimental advances in the field. These papers provide a timely discussion of fundamental aspects of interfacial and confined water that are important in both natural environments and engineered applications.

  19. Mechanisms dependent on tryptophan catabolism regulate immune responses in primary Sjögren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pertovaara, M; Raitala, A; Uusitalo, H; Pukander, J; Helin, H; Oja, SS; Hurme, M

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the possible role of tryptophan metabolism in immune regulation of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) the serum concentrations of tryptophan and its metabolite kynurenine were measured by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in 103 patients with pSS, 56 patients with sicca symptoms and 309 healthy blood donors. The kynurenine per tryptophan ratio (kyn/trp), which reflects the activity of the indoleamine-pyrrole 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) enzyme involved in tryptophan catabolism, was calculated. Both female and male patients with pSS had significantly higher serum kynurenine concentrations and kyn/trp than subjects with sicca symptoms or healthy blood donors. The median (quartile range) concentration of kynurenine in female patients with pSS was 2·41 µmol/l (1·86–3·26) compared with 1·85 µmol/l (1·58–2·38, P < 0·0001) in subjects with sicca symptoms and 1·96 µmol/l (1·65–2·27, P < 0·0001) in healthy blood donors. Their kyn/trp × 1000 was 34·0 (25·1–44·3) compared with 25·3 (21·1–31·5, P < 0·0001) in subjects with sicca symptoms and 24·3 (21·0–28·9, P < 0·0001) in healthy blood donors. Female pSS patients with high IDO activity (kyn/trp × 1000 ≥ 34·0) had significantly higher ESR, serum C-reactive protein, serum IgA and serum beta-2 microglobulin concentrations as well as higher serum creatinine levels, and they had positive antinuclear antibodies more frequently and presented with more American-European consensus group criteria than those with low IDO activity (kyn/trp × 1000 < 34·0). These data suggest that mechanisms dependent on tryptophan catabolism regulate immune responses in pSS. Tryptophan degradation is enhanced in patients with pSS, and high IDO activity is associated with severity of pSS. PMID:16178870

  20. Oxidation of Methionine Residues in Polypeptide Ions Via Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilo, Alice L.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2014-06-01

    The gas-phase oxidation of methionine residues is demonstrated here using ion/ion reactions with periodate anions. Periodate anions are observed to attach in varying degrees to all polypeptide ions irrespective of amino acid composition. Direct proton transfer yielding a charge-reduced peptide ion is also observed. In the case of methionine and, to a much lesser degree, tryptophan-containing peptide ions, collisional activation of the complex ion generated by periodate attachment yields an oxidized peptide product (i.e., [M + H + O]+), in addition to periodic acid detachment. Detachment of periodic acid takes place exclusively for peptides that do not contain either a methionine or tryptophan side chain. In the case of methionine-containing peptides, the [M + H + O]+ product is observed at a much greater abundance than the proton transfer product (viz., [M + H]+). Collisional activation of oxidized Met-containing peptides yields a signature loss of 64 Da from the precursor and/or product ions. This unique loss corresponds to the ejection of methanesulfenic acid from the oxidized methionine side chain and is commonly used in solution-phase proteomics studies to determine the presence of oxidized methionine residues. The present work shows that periodate anions can be used to `label' methionine residues in polypeptides in the gas phase. The selectivity of the periodate anion for the methionine side chain suggests several applications including identification and location of methionine residues in sequencing applications.

  1. Fine-tuning of a radical-based reaction by radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine tryptophan lyase.

    PubMed

    Sicoli, Giuseppe; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Zeppieri, Laura; Amara, Patricia; Martin, Lydie; Barra, Anne-Laure; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Gambarelli, Serge; Nicolet, Yvain

    2016-03-18

    The radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine tryptophan lyase NosL converts L-tryptophan into 3-methylindolic acid, which is a precursor in the synthesis of the thiopeptide antibiotic nosiheptide. Using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and multiple L-tryptophan isotopologues, we trapped and characterized radical intermediates that indicate a carboxyl fragment migration mechanism for NosL. This is in contrast to a proposed fragmentation-recombination mechanism that implied Cα-Cβ bond cleavage of L-tryptophan. Although NosL resembles related tyrosine lyases, subtle substrate motions in its active site are responsible for a fine-tuned radical chemistry, which selects the Cα-C bond for disruption. This mechanism highlights evolutionary adaptation to structural constraints in proteins as a route to alternative enzyme function. PMID:26989252

  2. The different roles of tryptophan transfer RNA in regulating trp operon expression in E. coli versus B. subtilis.

    PubMed

    Yanofsky, Charles

    2004-08-01

    Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis use different mechanisms of sensing and responding to tryptophan and uncharged tRNA(Trp) as regulatory signals. In E. coli, tryptophan activates a repressor that binds to the trp promoter- operator, inhibiting transcription initiation. In B. subtilis, tryptophan activates an RNA-binding protein, TRAP, which binds to the trp operon leader RNA, causing transcription termination. In E. coli uncharged tRNA(Trp) accumulation stalls the ribosome attempting translation of tandem Trp codons in the leader-peptide coding region of the operon. This stalling permits the formation of an RNA antiterminator structure, preventing transcription termination. In B. subtilis uncharged tRNA(Trp) accumulation activates transcription and translation of the at operon. AT protein inhibits tryptophan-activated TRAP, thereby preventing TRAP-mediated transcription termination. These differences might reflect the unique organizational features of the respective trp operons and their ancestry. PMID:15262409

  3. Robust stability analysis and design under consideration of multiple feedback loops of the tryptophan regulatory network of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Baese, A; Theis, F; Emmett, M R

    2010-01-01

    The tryptophan system present in Escherichia coli represents an important regulatory unit described by multiple feedback loops. The role of these feedback loops is crucial for the analysis of the dynamical behavior of the tryptophan synthesis. We analyze the robust stability of this system which models the dynamics of both fast state, such as transcription and synthesis of free operator, and slow state, such as translation and tryptophan synthesis under consideration of nonlinear uncertainties. In addition, we analyze the role of these feedback loops as key design components of this regulatory unit responsible for its physiological performance. The range of allowed parameter perturbations and the conditions that ensure the existence of asymptotically stable equilibria of the perturbed system are determined. We also analyze two important alternate regulatory designs for the tryptophan synthesis pathway and derive the stability conditions. PMID:20865501

  4. Family exhibiting cerebellar-like ataxia, photosensitivity and shortness of stature - a new inborn error of tryptophan metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, D A; Wilkinson, J D; Toseland, P A

    1983-01-01

    Two cases in a brother and sister of a previously undescribed hereditary syndrome are reported. The features, which include shortness of stature, photosensitivity and cerebellar-like ataxia, are attributed to a new inborn error of tryptophan metabolism. PMID:6620277

  5. Differences in fluorescence profiles from breast cancer tissues due to changes in relative tryptophan content via energy transfer: tryptophan content correlates with histologic grade and tumor size but not with lymph node metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Laura A.; Sordillo, Peter P.; Budansky, Yury; Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-12-01

    The correlation between histologic grade, an increasingly important measure of prognosis for patients with breast cancer, and tryptophan levels from tissues of 15 breast carcinoma patients was investigated. Changes in the relative content of key native organic biomolecule tryptophan were seen from the fluorescence spectra of cancerous and paired normal tissues with excitation wavelengths of 280 and 300 nm. Due to a large spectral overlap and matching excitation-emission spectra, fluorescence resonance energy transfer from tryptophan-donor to reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides-acceptor was noted. We used the ratios of fluorescence intensities at their spectral emission peaks, or spectral fingerprint peaks, at 340, 440, and 460 nm. Higher ratios correlated strongly with high histologic grade, while lower-grade tumors had low ratios. Large tumor size also correlated with high ratios, while the number of lymph node metastases, a major factor in staging, was not correlated with tryptophan levels. High histologic grade correlates strongly with increased content of tryptophan in breast cancer tissues and suggests that measurement of tryptophan content may be useful as a part of the evaluation of these patients.

  6. Mechanical implications of interfacial defects between femoral hip implants and cement: a finite element analysis of interfacial gaps and interfacial porosity.

    PubMed

    Scheerlinck, T; Broos, J; Janssen, D; Verdonschot, N

    2008-10-01

    Two types of defect between femoral hip implants and cement have been identified. Interfacial porosity arises from cement shrinkage during curing and presents as pores randomly located along the stem. Interfacial gaps are much larger stem-cement separations caused by air introduced during stem insertion. To investigate the mechanical consequences of both types of defect, a finite element analysis model was created on the basis of a computed tomography image of a Charnley-Kerboul stem, and alternating torsional and transverse loads were applied. The propagation of fatigue cracks within the cement and the rotational stability of the stem were assessed in models simulating increasing amounts of interfacial gaps and pores. Anterior gaps covering at least 30 per cent of the implant surface promoted cement cracks and destabilized the stem. Anterolateral gaps were less destabilizing, but had more potential to promote cracks. In both cases, cracks occurred mainly outside gap regions, in areas where the stem contacted the cement during cyclic loading. Although random interfacial pores did not destabilize the implant, they acted as crack initiators even at low fractions (10 per cent). In conclusion, random interfacial pores were more harmful for the cement mantle integrity than were larger regions of interfacial gaps, although gaps were more detrimental for the rotational stability of the stem. PMID:19024152

  7. Inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-mediated tryptophan catabolism accelerates collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Szántó, Sándor; Koreny, Tamás; Mikecz, Katalin; Glant, Tibor T; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Varga, John

    2007-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is one of the initial and rate-limiting enzymes involved in the catabolism of the essential amino acid tryptophan. In cultured cells, the induction of IDO leads to depletion of tryptophan and tryptophan starvation. Recent studies suggest that modulation of tryptophan concentration via IDO plays a fundamental role in innate immune responses. Induction of IDO by interferon-gamma in macrophages and dendritic cells results in tryptophan depletion and suppresses the immune-mediated activation of fibroblasts and T, B, and natural killer cells. To assess the role of IDO in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a model of rheumatoid arthritis characterized by a primarily Th1-like immune response, activity of IDO was inhibited by 1-methyl-tryptophan (1-MT) in vivo. The results showed significantly increased incidence and severity of CIA in mice treated with 1-MT. Activity of IDO, as determined by measuring the levels of kynurenine/tryptophan ratio in the sera, was increased in the acute phase of arthritis and was higher in collagen-immunized mice that did not develop arthritis. Treatment with 1-MT resulted in an enhanced cellular and humoral immune response and a more dominant polarization to Th1 in mice with arthritis compared with vehicle-treated arthritic mice. The results demonstrated that development of CIA was associated with increased IDO activity and enhanced tryptophan catabolism in mice. Blocking IDO with 1-MT aggravated the severity of arthritis and enhanced the immune responses. These findings suggest that IDO may play an important and novel role in the negative feedback of CIA and possibly in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:17511858

  8. A pilot investigation of the effect of tryptophan manipulation on the affective state of male chronic alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Martin, C R; Bonner, A B

    2000-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted to investigate the hypothesis that dietary tryptophan manipulation would influence self-report affective status in alcoholic males. No significant effect of dietary manipulation was observed on the tryptophan/large neutral amino acids ratio or psychological indices of affect. The notion that dietary manipulation may be utilized in improving mood state in alcoholic males was not supported. PMID:10684776

  9. Attempt to control the interfacial strength

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.; Subramanian, R.

    1997-11-01

    Composites consisting of a B2 iron aluminide matrix and 40 vol.% of TiB{sub 2} particles were processed by liquid phase sintering. In order to encourage segregation of B or Ti at the FeAl/TiB{sub 2} interfaces, the iron aluminide matrix was microalloyed with B or Ti, respectively. Additions of Ti degraded the mechanical properties. However, for composites microalloyed with B, room temperature flexure tests show slight increases in the maximum strength (from 1250 to 1380 MPa) and the fracture toughness. Interfacial segregation of B may have contributed to this result. Significantly improved processing of the composites would be required in order to verify the effect of B conclusively. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Oscillatory interfacial instability between miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Gaponenko, Yuri; Mialdun, Aliaksandr; Torregrosa, Marita; Yasnou, Viktar

    Interfacial instabilities occurring between two fluids are of fundamental interest in fluid dynamics, biological systems and engineering applications such as liquid storage, solvent extraction, oil recovery and mixing. Horizontal vibrations applied to stratified layers of immiscible liquids may generate spatially periodic waving of the interface, stationary in the reference frame of the vibrated cell, referred to as a "frozen wave". We present experimental evidence that frozen wave instability exists between two ordinary miscible liquids of similar densities and viscosities. At the experiments and at the numerical model, two superimposed layers of ordinary liquids, water-alcohol of different concentrations, are placed in a closed cavity in a gravitationally stable configuration. The density and viscosity of these fluids are somewhat similar. Similar to the immiscible fluids this instability has a threshold. When the value of forcing is increased the amplitudes of perturbations grow continuously displaying a saw-tooth structure. The decrease of gravity drastically changes the structure of frozen waves.

  11. Interfacial Widths of Conjugated Polymer Bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    NCSU; UC Berkeley; UCSB; Advanced Light Source; Garcia, Andres; Yan, Hongping; Sohn, Karen E.; Hexemer, Alexander; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Kramer, Edward J.; Ade, Harald

    2009-08-13

    The interfaces of conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE)/poly[2-methoxy-5-(2{prime}-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) bilayers cast from differential solvents are shown by resonant soft X-ray reflectivity (RSoXR) to be very smooth and sharp. The chemical interdiffusion due to casting is limited to less than 0.6 nm, and the interface created is thus nearly 'molecularly' sharp. These results demonstrate for the first time and with high precision that the nonpolar MEH-PPV layer is not much disturbed by casting the CPE layer from a polar solvent. A baseline is established for understanding the role of interfacial structure in determining the performance of CPE-based polymer light-emitting diodes. More broadly, we anticipate further applications of RSoXR as an important tool in achieving a deeper understanding of other multilayer organic optoelectronic devices, including multilayer photovoltaic devices.

  12. Orientational anisotropy and interfacial transport in polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, M. M.; Rickman, J. M.; Harmer, M. P.; Chan, H. M.

    2016-04-01

    Interfacial diffusion is governed to a large degree by geometric parameters that are determined by crystallographic orientation. In this study, we assess the impact of orientational anisotropy on mass transport at internal interfaces, focusing on the role of preferred crystallographic orientation (i.e., texture) on mass diffusion in a polycrystal. More specifically, we perform both numerical and analytical studies of steady-state diffusion for polycrystals having various grain-orientation distributions. By relating grain misorientation to grain-boundary energies and, via the Borisov relation, to the diffusivity, we link microstructure variability to kinetics. Our aim is to correlate shape features of the orientation distribution, such as the location and shapes of peaks, with the calculated effective diffusivity. Finally, we discuss the role of crystallographic constraints, such as those associated with grain junctions, in determining the effective diffusivity of a polycrystal.

  13. Mapping interfacial excess in atom probe data.

    PubMed

    Felfer, Peter; Scherrer, Barbara; Demeulemeester, Jelle; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Cairney, Julie M

    2015-12-01

    Using modern wide-angle atom probes, it is possible to acquire atomic scale 3D data containing 1000 s of nm(2) of interfaces. It is therefore possible to probe the distribution of segregated species across these interfaces. Here, we present techniques that allow the production of models for interfacial excess (IE) mapping and discuss the underlying considerations and sampling statistics. We also show, how the same principles can be used to achieve thickness mapping of thin films. We demonstrate the effectiveness on example applications, including the analysis of segregation to a phase boundary in stainless steel, segregation to a metal-ceramic interface and the assessment of thickness variations of the gate oxide in a fin-FET. PMID:26346774

  14. Control of interfacial instabilities using flow geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Housseiny, Talal T.; Tsai, Peichun A.; Stone, Howard A.

    2012-10-01

    The displacement of one fluid by another is one of the most common processes involving interfacial instabilities. It is universally accepted that, in a uniform medium, flow displacement is unstable when a low-viscosity fluid invades a fluid of higher viscosity: the classical viscous fingering instability. Consequently, once fluid properties are specified, opportunities for control become very limited. However, real systems where displacement instabilities occur, such as porous structures, lung airways and printing devices, are rarely uniform. We find that the simplest heterogeneity--a gradient in the flow passage--can lead to fundamentally different displacement behaviours. We use this finding to either inhibit or trigger an instability and, hence, to devise a strategy to manipulate instabilities in fluid-fluid systems. The control setting we identify has a wide spectrum of applications ranging from small-scale technologies such as microfluidics to large-scale operations such as enhanced oil recovery.

  15. Surfactants and interfacial phenomena, 2nd Ed

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen

    1989-01-01

    The second edition of this monograph on surfactants has been updated to reflect recent advances in our knowledge of theory and practices. New applications run the gamut from microelectronics and magnetic recording, to biotechnology and nonconventional energy conversion. There is a new chapter on the interactions between surfactants. New sections have been added, and original sections expanded, on such topics as ultralow liquid-liquid interfacial tension; microemulsions, miniemulsions, and multiple emulsions; liquid crystal formation; hydrotropy; and steric forces in the stabilization of dispersions. There is also new material on lime soap dispersing agents; fabric softeners, adsorption and wetting of solid surfaces, both equilibrium and none-equilibrium; the relationship between adsorption and micellation in aqueous solutions and its effect on surface tension reduction; and factors determining micellar structure and shape.

  16. Nucleation and interfacial adsorption in ternary systems.

    PubMed

    Philippe, T

    2015-03-01

    Nucleation is studied in incompressible ternary fluids by examining the topology of the overall landscape of the energy surface. Minimum free energy paths for nucleation (MFEPs) of a single nucleus in an infinite matrix are computed with the string method in the framework of the continuum theory of nucleation for the regular solution. Properties of the critical nucleus are compared with the predictions of the classical nucleation theory. MFEPs are found to exhibit complex nucleation pathways with non-monotonic variations of compositions in the interfacial region, specifically adsorption of a component. In the symmetric regular solution, the minority component is found to segregate at the interface during nucleation with a concomitant depletion of the nucleus core, resulting in unpredicted partition of the non-selective component. Despite increasing the gradient energy, such inhomogeneity in composition is shown to lower the nucleation barrier. PMID:25747088

  17. Wear and interfacial transport of material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Bonding across the interface for two solids in contact and the subsequent transfer of material from one surface to another is a direct result of the interfacial bonds being stronger than the cohesive bonds in either of the two solids. Surface tools such as LEED, Auger emission spectroscopy, field ion microscopy, and the atom probe are used to examine adhesive contacts and to determine the direction, nature, quantity of material transfer and properties of the solids which effect transfer and wear. The electronic nature, cohesive binding energies, surface structure, lattice disregistry and distribution of species in surface layers are all found to effect adhesion and transfer or transport for clean surfaces in solid state contact. The influence of adsorbed and reacted surface films from fractions of a monolayer to multilayer reactive films are considered. It is shown that even fractions of a monolayer of surface active species such as oxygen and sulfur can markedly inhibit adhesion and transport.

  18. Interfacial functionalization and engineering of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang

    The intense research interest in nanoscience and nanotechnology is largely fueled by the unique properties of nanoscale materials. In this dissertation, the research efforts are focused on surface functionalization and interfacial engineering of functional nanoparticles in the preparation of patchy nanoparticles (e.g., Janus nanoparticles and Neapolitan nanoparticles) such that the nanoparticle structures and properties may be manipulated to an unprecedented level of sophistication. Experimentally, Janus nanoparticles were prepared by an interfacial engineering method where one hemisphere of the originally hydrophobic nanoparticles was replaced with hydrophilic ligands at the air|liquid or solid|liquid interface. The amphiphilic surface characters of the Janus nanoparticles were verified by contact angle measurements, as compared to those of the bulk-exchange counterparts where the two types of ligands were distributed rather homogeneously on the nanoparticle surface. In a further study, a mercapto derivative of diacetylene was used as the hydrophilic ligands to prepare Janus nanoparticles by using hydrophobic hexanethiolate-protected gold nanoparticles as the starting materials. Exposure to UV irradiation led to effective covalent cross-linking between the diacetylene moieties of neighboring ligands and hence marked enhancement of the structural integrity of the Janus nanoparticles, which was attributable to the impeded surface diffusion of the thiol ligands on the nanoparticle surface, as manifested in fluorescence measurements of aged nanoparticles. More complicated bimetallic AgAu Janus nanoparticles were prepared by interfacial galvanic exchange reactions of a Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer of 1-hexanethiolate-passivated silver nanoparticles on a glass slide with gold(I)-mercaptopropanediol complex in a water/ethanol solution. The resulting nanoparticles exhibited an asymmetrical distribution not only of the organic capping ligands on the nanoparticle surface but

  19. Liquid-liquid interfacial nanoparticle assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Emrick, Todd S.; Russell, Thomas P.; Dinsmore, Anthony; Skaff, Habib; Lin, Yao

    2008-12-30

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles at the interface between two fluids, and methods to control such self-assembly process, e.g., the surface density of particles assembling at the interface; to utilize the assembled nanoparticles and their ligands in fabrication of capsules, where the elastic properties of the capsules can be varied from soft to tough; to develop capsules with well-defined porosities for ultimate use as delivery systems; and to develop chemistries whereby multiple ligands or ligands with multiple functionalities can be attached to the nanoparticles to promote the interfacial segregation and assembly of the nanoparticles. Certain embodiments use cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles, since the photoluminescence of the particles provides a convenient means by which the spatial location and organization of the particles can be probed. However, the systems and methodologies presented here are general and can, with suitable modification of the chemistries, be adapted to any type of nanoparticle.

  20. Stable isotope labeling, in vivo, of D- and L-tryptophan pools in lemna gibba and the low incorporation of label into indole-3-acetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Baldi, B.G. ); Maher, B.R. ); Slovin, J.P.; Cohen, J.D. Univ. of Maryland, College Park )

    1991-04-01

    The authors present evidence that the role of tryptophan and other potential intermediates in the pathways that could lead to indole derivatives needs to be reexamined. Two lines of Lemna gibba were tested for uptake of ({sup 15}N-indole)-labeled tryptophan isomers and incorporation of that label into free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Both lines required levels of L-({sup 15}N)tryptophan 2 to 3 orders of magnitude over endogenous levels in order to obtain measurable incorporation of label into IAA. Labeled L-tryptophan was extractable from plant tissue after feeding and showed no measurable isomerization into D-tryptophan. D-({sup 15}N)trytophan supplied to Lemna at rates of approximately 400 times excess of endogenous D-tryptophan levels (to yield an isotopic enrichment equal to that which allowed detection of the incorporation of L-tryptophan into IAA), did not result in measurable incorporation of label into free IAA. These results demonstrate that L-tryptophan is a more direct precursor to IAA than the D isomer and suggest (a) that the availability of tryptophan in vivo is not a limiting factor in the biosynthesis of IAA, thus implying that other regulatory mechanisms are in operation and (b) that L-tryptophan also may not be a primary precursor to IAA in plants.