Science.gov

Sample records for interfering rna increases

  1. NBS1 knockdown by small interfering RNA increases ionizing radiation mutagenesis and telomere association in human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ying; Lim, Chang U K.; Williams, Eli S.; Zhou, Junqing; Zhang, Qinming; Fox, Michael H.; Bailey, Susan M.; Liber, Howard L.

    2005-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations which lead to decreased function of the NBS1 gene are responsible for Nijmegen breakage syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disorder that imparts an increased predisposition to development of malignancy. The NBS1 protein is a component of the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex that plays a critical role in cellular responses to DNA damage and the maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Using small interfering RNA transfection, we have knocked down NBS1 protein levels and analyzed relevant phenotypes in two closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines with different p53 status, namely wild-type TK6 and mutated WTK1. Both TK6 and WTK1 cells showed an increased level of ionizing radiation-induced mutation at the TK and HPRT loci, impaired phosphorylation of H2AX (gamma-H2AX), and impaired activation of the cell cycle checkpoint regulating kinase, Chk2. In TK6 cells, ionizing radiation-induced accumulation of p53/p21 and apoptosis were reduced. There was a differential response to ionizing radiation-induced cell killing between TK6 and WTK1 cells after NBS1 knockdown; TK6 cells were more resistant to killing, whereas WTK1 cells were more sensitive. NBS1 deficiency also resulted in a significant increase in telomere association that was independent of radiation exposure and p53 status. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that NBS1 deficiency in human cells leads to hypermutability and telomere associations, phenotypes that may contribute to the cancer predisposition seen among patients with this disease.

  2. Polymers in Small-Interfering RNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Singha, Kaushik; Namgung, Ran

    2011-01-01

    This review will cover the current strategies that are being adopted to efficiently deliver small interfering RNA using nonviral vectors, including the use of polymers such as polyethylenimine, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), polypeptides, chitosan, cyclodextrin, dendrimers, and polymers-containing different nanoparticles. The article will provide a brief and concise account of underlying principle of these polymeric vectors and their structural and functional modifications which were intended to serve different purposes to affect efficient therapeutic outcome of small-interfering RNA delivery. The modifications of these polymeric vectors will be discussed with reference to stimuli-responsiveness, target specific delivery, and incorporation of nanoconstructs such as carbon nanotubes, gold nanoparticles, and silica nanoparticles. The emergence of small-interfering RNA as the potential therapeutic agent and its mode of action will also be mentioned in a nutshell. PMID:21749290

  3. Unzipping and binding of small interfering RNA with single walled carbon nanotube: A platform for small interfering RNA delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santosh, Mogurampelly; Panigrahi, Swati; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Sood, A. K.; Maiti, Prabal K.

    2012-02-01

    In an effort to design efficient platform for siRNA delivery, we combine all atom classical and quantum simulations to study the binding of small interfering RNA (siRNA) by pristine single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Our results show that siRNA strongly binds to SWCNT surface via unzipping its base-pairs and the propensity of unzipping increases with the increase in the diameter of the SWCNTs. The unzipping and subsequent wrapping events are initiated and driven by van der Waals interactions between the aromatic rings of siRNA nucleobases and the SWCNT surface. However, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of double strand DNA (dsDNA) of the same sequence show that the dsDNA undergoes much less unzipping and wrapping on the SWCNT in the simulation time scale of 70 ns. This interesting difference is due to smaller interaction energy of thymidine of dsDNA with the SWCNT compared to that of uridine of siRNA, as calculated by dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT) methods. After the optimal binding of siRNA to SWCNT, the complex is very stable which serves as one of the major mechanisms of siRNA delivery for biomedical applications. Since siRNA has to undergo unwinding process with the effect of RNA-induced silencing complex, our proposed delivery mechanism by SWCNT possesses potential advantages in achieving RNA interference.

  4. Small interfering RNA delivery through positively charged polymer nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoni, Luca; Ferrari, Raffaele; Lupi, Monica; Cesana, Alberto; Falcetta, Francesca; Ubezio, Paolo; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Morbidelli, Massimo; Moscatelli, Davide

    2016-03-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is receiving increasing attention with regard to the treatment of many genetic diseases, both acquired and hereditary, such as cancer and diabetes. Being a high molecular weight (MW) polyanion, siRNA is not able to cross a cell membrane, and in addition it is unstable in physiological conditions. Accordingly, a biocompatible nanocarrier able to deliver siRNA into cells is needed. In this work, we synthesized biocompatible positively charged nanoparticles (NPs) following a two-step process that involves ring opening polymerization (ROP) and emulsion free radical polymerization (EFRP). Firstly, we proved the possibility of fine tuning the NPs’ characteristics (e.g. size and surface charge) by changing the synthetic process parameters. Then the capability in loading and delivering undamaged siRNA into a cancer cell cytoplasm has been shown. This latter process occurs through the biodegradation of the polymer constituting the NPs, whose kinetics can be tuned by adjusting the polymer’s MW. Finally, the ability of NPs to carry siRNA inside the cells in order to inhibit their target gene has been demonstrated using green flourescent protein positive cells.

  5. Therapeutic potential of small interfering RNAs/micro interfering RNA in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Farra, Rossella; Grassi, Mario; Grassi, Gabriele; Dapas, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the predominant form of primary liver cancer and represents the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Current available therapeutic approaches are poorly effective, especially for the advanced forms of the disease. In the last year, short double stranded RNA molecules termed small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and micro interfering RNAs (miRNA), emerged as interesting molecules with potential therapeutic value for HCC. The practical use of these molecules is however limited by the identification of optimal molecular targets and especially by the lack of effective and targeted HCC delivery systems. Here we focus our discussion on the most recent advances in the identification of siRNAs/miRNAs molecular targets and on the development of suitable siRNA/miRNAs delivery systems. PMID:26290628

  6. Delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) using the sleeping beauty transposon.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Bradley S

    2010-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionarily conserved process that silences gene expression through double-stranded RNA species in a sequence-specific manner. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can promote sequence-specific degradation and/or translational repression of target RNA by activation of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Traditionally, silencing in mammalian cells had been achieved by transfection of synthetically derived siRNA duplexes, resulting in transient gene suppression of the target sequence. As the technology was advanced, inhibitory short-hairpin-shaped RNAs (shRNAs) could be produced by transcription from RNA polymerase-III (pol-III)-driven promoters, such as H1, U6, or cytomegalovirus (CMV)-enhanced pol III promoters. Following transcription, the shRNAs are processed by the enzyme Dicer into active siRNA. This approach allows for the continuous production of siRNA within cells using a DNA template and offers increased options for delivery of the pol-III-driven transcriptional units. A number of different viral vectors, as well as plasmid DNAs, have been utilized to deliver shRNA to mammalian cells. Here, the Tc1/mariner DNA transposon Sleeping Beauty (SB) is used as a tool to deliver shRNA-encoding transcriptional units. The SB transposon system uses a "cut-and-paste" mechanism to insert the transposon into random TA dinucleotides within the target genome. The shRNAs are then processed and used for gene knockdown. PMID:21041394

  7. Functional Nanostructures for Effective Delivery of Small Interfering RNA Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Cheol Am; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2014-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has proved to be a powerful tool for target-specific gene silencing via RNA interference (RNAi). Its ability to control targeted gene expression gives new hope to gene therapy as a treatment for cancers and genetic diseases. However, siRNA shows poor pharmacological properties, such as low serum stability, off-targeting, and innate immune responses, which present a significant challenge for clinical applications. In addition, siRNA cannot cross the cell membrane for RNAi activity because of its anionic property and stiff structure. Therefore, the development of a safe, stable, and efficient system for the delivery of siRNA therapeutics into the cytoplasm of targeted cells is crucial. Several nanoparticle platforms for siRNA delivery have been developed to overcome the major hurdles facing the therapeutic uses of siRNA. This review covers a broad spectrum of non-viral siRNA delivery systems developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and discusses their characteristics and opportunities for clinical applications of therapeutic siRNA. PMID:25285170

  8. Pulmonary administration of small interfering RNA: The route to go?

    PubMed

    Ruigrok, M J R; Frijlink, H W; Hinrichs, W L J

    2016-08-10

    Ever since the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi), which is a post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism, researchers have been studying the therapeutic potential of using small interfering RNA (siRNA) to treat diseases that are characterized by excessive gene expression. Excessive gene expression can be particularly harmful if it occurs in a vulnerable organ such as the lungs as they are essential for physiological respiration. Consequently, RNAi could offer an approach to treat such lung diseases. Parenteral administration of siRNA has been shown to be difficult due to degradation by nucleases in the systemic circulation and excretion by the kidneys. To avoid these issues and to achieve local delivery and local effects, pulmonary administration has been proposed as an alternative administration route. Regarding this application, various animal studies have been conducted over the past few years. Therefore, this review presents a critical analysis of publications where pulmonary administration of siRNA in animals has been reported. Such an analysis is necessary to determine the feasibility of this administration route and to define directions for future research. First, we provide background information on lungs, pulmonary administration, and delivery vectors. Thereafter, we present and discuss relevant animal studies. Though nearly all publications reported positive outcomes, several reoccurring challenges were identified. They relate to 1) the necessity, efficacy, and safety of delivery vectors, 2) the biodistribution of siRNA in tissues other than the lungs, 3) the poor correlation between in vitro and in vivo models, and 4) the long-term effects upon (repeated) administration of siRNA. Finally, we present recommendations for future research to define the route to go: towards safer and more effective pulmonary administration of siRNA. PMID:27235976

  9. Short interfering RNA guide strand modifiers from computational screening.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Harrison, Jason G; Ball-Jones, Alexi A; Ibarra-Soza, José M; Zheng, Yuxuan; Ly, Diana; Lam, Walter; Mac, Stephanie; Tantillo, Dean J; Beal, Peter A

    2013-11-13

    Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are promising drug candidates for a wide range of targets including those previously considered "undruggable". However, properties associated with the native RNA structure limit drug development, and chemical modifications are necessary. Here we describe the structure-guided discovery of functional modifications for the guide strand 5'-end using computational screening with the high-resolution structure of human Ago2, the key nuclease on the RNA interference pathway. Our results indicate the guide strand 5'-end nucleotide need not engage in Watson-Crick (W/C) H-bonding but must fit the general shape of the 5'-end binding site in MID/PIWI domains of hAgo2 for efficient knockdown. 1,2,3-Triazol-4-yl bases formed from the CuAAC reaction of azides and 1-ethynylribose, which is readily incorporated into RNA via the phosphoramidite, perform well at the guide strand 5'-end. In contrast, purine derivatives with modified Hoogsteen faces or N2 substituents are poor choices for 5'-end modifications. Finally, we identified a 1,2,3-triazol-4-yl base incapable of W/C H-bonding that performs well at guide strand position 12, where base pairing to target was expected to be important. This work expands the repertoire of functional nucleotide analogues for siRNAs. PMID:24152142

  10. Short Interfering RNA Guide Strand Modifiers from Computational Screening

    PubMed Central

    Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Harrison, Jason G.; Ball-Jones, Alexi A.; Ibarra-Soza, José M.; Zheng, Yuxuan; Ly, Diana; Lam, Walter; Mac, Stephanie; Tantillo, Dean J.; Beal, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are promising drug candidates for a wide range of targets including those previously considered “undruggable”. However, properties associated with the native RNA structure limit drug development and chemical modifications are necessary. Here we describe the structure-guided discovery of functional modifications for the guide strand 5’ end using computational screening with the high resolution structure of human Ago2, the key nuclease on the RNA interference pathway. Our results indicate the guide strand 5’-end nucleotide need not engage in Watson-Crick (W/C) H-bonding but must fit the general shape of the 5’-end binding site in MID/PIWI domains of hAgo2 for efficient knockdown. 1,2,3-Triazol-4-yl bases formed from the CuAAC reaction of azides and 1-ethynylribose, which is readily incorporated into RNA via the phosphoramidite, perform well at the guide strand 5’-end. In contrast, purine derivatives with modified Hoogsteen faces or N2 substituents are poor choices for 5’-end modifications. Finally, we identified a 1,2,3-triazol-4-yl base incapable of W/C H-bonding that performs well at guide strand position 12, where base pairing to target was expected to be important. This work expands the repertoire of functional nucleotide analogs for siRNAs. PMID:24152142

  11. Characterization of defective interfering RNAs associated with RNA plant viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, T.J. . School of Biological Sciences); Jackson, A.O. . Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1993-01-01

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since the original observation with TBSV, we discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), and many other reports have now appeared characterizing DI and DI-like RNAs in other plant viral infections. We are seeking to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of DI generation and the precise nature of the RNA sequences necessary for DI replication and encapsidation. We also want to address the nature of the DI mediated symptom attenuation and interference effects in plants, and to determine the feasibility of using transgenic plants constitutively expressing DI RNAs for disease control. The progress made on each of these objectives is summarized along with the proposed experiments for the continuation period.

  12. Interfering cancer with polymeric siRNA nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Tiram, Galia; Scomparin, Anna; Ofek, Paula; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit

    2014-01-01

    The ability to specifically silence genes using RNA interference (RNAi) has wide therapeutic applications for the treatment of disease. Numerous studies have demonstrated global gene and protein signatures distinguishing malignant and nonmalignant tissues. This worldwide pursuit of optimal cancer targets has so far provided a wide list of potential targets for each cancer type and for each patient, for which RNAi-based therapies can be applied. Nevertheless, due to poor stability of RNAi molecules in physiological conditions and their inability to cross cellular membranes, the delivery of siRNA and microRNA (miRNA) in vivo holds a great challenge and remains a crucial issue for their therapeutic success. Supramolecular carriers are often used in order to improve the physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties of RNAi. Nano-sized delivery systems enable the accumulation of drugs and oligonucleotides (ONTs) in angiogenesis-dependent areas due to the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, and are able to cross cellular membranes and release the siRNA/miRNA only inside the target cell. In addition, a targeting moiety can increase the selectivity and specific uptake in the target tissue. Several vehicles (dendrimers, nanoparticles, liposomes, polyplex, lipoplex, polymeric nanoconjugates) are being developed for siRNA/miRNA delivery. These vehicles provide an important tool for exploiting the full potential of ONTs as therapeutic agents. In this review we will focus on the polymer-based approaches to deliver siRNA to cancer in vivo. PMID:24724498

  13. Colored petri net modeling of small interfering RNA-mediated messenger RNA degradation

    PubMed Central

    Nickaeen, Niloofar; Moein, Shiva; Heidary, Zarifeh; Ghaisari, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mathematical modeling of biological systems is an attractive way for studying complex biological systems and their behaviors. Petri Nets, due to their ability to model systems with various levels of qualitative information, have been wildly used in modeling biological systems in which enough qualitative data may not be at disposal. These nets have been used to answer questions regarding the dynamics of different cell behaviors including the translation process. In one stage of the translation process, the RNA sequence may be degraded. In the process of degradation of RNA sequence, small-noncoding RNA molecules known as small interfering RNA (siRNA) match the target RNA sequence. As a result of this matching, the target RNA sequence is destroyed. Materials and Methods: In this context, the process of matching and destruction is modeled using Colored Petri Nets (CPNs). The model is constructed using CPNs which allow tokens to have a value or type on them. Thus, CPN is a suitable tool to model string structures in which each element of the string has a different type. Using CPNs, long RNA, and siRNA strings are modeled with a finite set of colors. The model is simulated via CPN Tools. Results: A CPN model of the matching between RNA and siRNA strings is constructed in CPN Tools environment. Conclusion: In previous studies, a network of stoichiometric equations was modeled. However, in this particular study, we modeled the mechanism behind the silencing process. Modeling this kind of mechanisms provides us with a tool to examine the effects of different factors such as mutation or drugs on the process. PMID:27376039

  14. Short interfering RNA induced generation and translation of stable 5' mRNA cleavage intermediates.

    PubMed

    Singhania, Richa; Pavey, Sandra; Payne, Elizabeth; Gu, Wenyi; Clancy, Jennifer; Jubair, Luqman; Preiss, Thomas; Saunders, Nicholas; McMillan, Nigel A J

    2016-08-01

    Sequence-specific degradation of homologous mRNA is the main mechanism by which short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) suppress gene expression. Generally, it is assumed that the mRNA fragments resulting from Ago2 cleavage are rapidly degraded, thus making the transcript translation-incompetent. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the post-cleavage mRNA decay are not completely understood and the fate of cleavage intermediates has been poorly studied. Using specific siRNAs and short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) we show that the 5' and 3' mRNA cleavage fragments of human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) E6/7 mRNA, over-expressed in cervical malignancies, are unevenly degraded. Intriguingly, the 5' mRNA fragment was more abundant and displayed a greater stability than the corresponding 3' mRNA fragment in RNAi-treated cells. Further analysis revealed that the 5' mRNA fragment was polysome-associated, indicating its active translation, and this was further confirmed by using tagged E7 protein to show that C-terminally truncated proteins were produced in treated cells. Overall, our findings provide new insight into the degradation of siRNA-targeted transcripts and show that RNAi can alter protein expression in cells as a result of preferential stabilization and translation of the 5' cleavage fragment. These results challenge the current model of siRNA-mediated RNAi and provide a significant step forward towards understanding non-canonical pathways of siRNA gene silencing. PMID:27321990

  15. Targeted delivery of small interfering RNA to colon cancer cells using chitosan and PEGylated chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rudzinski, Walter E; Palacios, Adriana; Ahmed, Abuzar; Lane, Michelle A; Aminabhavi, Tejraj M

    2016-08-20

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules specifically target messenger RNA species, decreasing intracellular protein levels. β-Catenin protein concentrations are increased in 70-80% of colon tumors, promoting tumor progression. Chitosan exhibits low levels of toxicity and can be transported across mucosal membranes; therefore, our objective was to develop chitosan and poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted (PEGylated) chitosan nanoparticles, 100-150nm in diameter, encapsulating anti-β-catenin siRNA for transfection into colon cancer cells. Encapsulation efficiencies up to 97% were observed. Confocal microscopy visualized the entry of fluorescently-tagged siRNA into cells. Western blot analysis showed that both chitosan and PEGylated chitosan nanoparticles containing anti-β-catenin siRNA decreased β-catenin protein levels in cultured colon cancer cells. These results indicate that nanoparticles made with chitosan and PEGylated chitosan can successfully enter colon cancer cells and decrease the level of a protein that promotes tumor progression. These or similar nanoparticles may prove beneficial for the treatment of colon cancer in humans. PMID:27178938

  16. Detection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) by mass spectrometry procedures in doping controls.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andreas; Walpurgis, Katja; Delahaut, Philippe; Kohler, Maxie; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Uncovering manipulation of athletic performance via small interfering (si)RNA is an emerging field in sports drug testing. Due to the potential to principally knock down every target gene in the organism by means of the RNA interference pathway, this facet of gene doping has become a realistic scenario. In the present study, two distinct model siRNAs comprising 21 nucleotides were designed as double strands which were perfect counterparts to a sequence of the respective messenger RNA coding the muscle regulator myostatin of Rattus norvegicus. Several modified nucleotides were introduced in both the sense and the antisense strand comprising phosphothioates, 2'-O-methylation, 2'-fluoro-nucleotides, locked nucleic acids and a cholesterol tag at the 3'-end. The model siRNAs were applied to rats at 1 mg/kg (i.v.) and blood as well as urine samples were collected. After isolation of the RNA by means of a RNA purification kit, the target analytes were detected by liquid chromatography - high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Analytes were detected as modified nucleotides after alkaline hydrolysis, as intact oligonucleotide strands (top-down) and by means of denaturing SDS-PAGE analysis. The gel-separated siRNA was further subjected to in-gel hydrolysis with different RNases and subsequent identification of the fragments by untargeted LC-HRMS analysis (bottom-up, 'experimental RNomics'). Combining the results of all approaches, the identification of several 3'-truncated urinary metabolites was accomplished and target analytes were detected up to 24 h after a single administration. Simultaneously collected blood samples yielded no promising results. The methods were validated and found fit-for-purpose for doping controls. PMID:23913913

  17. Current preclinical small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based conjugate systems for RNA therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Hyeon; Kang, Yoon Young; Jang, Hyo-Eun; Mok, Hyejung

    2016-09-01

    Recent promising clinical results of RNA therapeutics have drawn big attention of academia and industries to RNA therapeutics and their carrier systems. To improve their feasibility in clinics, systemic evaluations of currently available carrier systems under clinical trials and preclinical studies are needed. In this review, we focus on recent noticeable preclinical studies and clinical results regarding siRNA-based conjugates for clinical translations. Advantages and drawbacks of siRNA-based conjugates are discussed, compared to particle-based delivery systems. Then, representative siRNA-based conjugates with aptamers, peptides, carbohydrates, lipids, polymers, and nanostructured materials are introduced. To improve feasibility of siRNA conjugates in preclinical studies, several considerations for the rational design of siRNA conjugates in terms of cleavability, immune responses, multivalent conjugations, and mechanism of action are also presented. Lastly, we discuss lessons from previous preclinical and clinical studies related to siRNA conjugates and perspectives of their clinical applications. PMID:26514375

  18. Delivery of small interfering RNA for inhibition of endothelial cell apoptosis by hypoxia and serum deprivation

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Seung-Woo; Hartle, Lauren; Son, Sun Mi; Yang, Fan; Goldberg, Michael; Xu, Qiaobing; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2008-11-07

    RNA interference (RNAi) for anti-angiogenic or pro-apoptotic factors in endothelial cells (ECs) has great potential for the treatment of ischemic diseases by promoting angiogenesis or inhibiting apoptosis. Here, we report the utility of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in inhibiting EC apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}). siRNA was designed and synthesized targeting tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} receptor-1 (TNFR-1) and Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1). Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured under in vitro hypoxic and serum-deprived conditions to simulate in vivo ischemic conditions. Two days after liposomal delivery of siRNA targeting TNFR-1 and SHP-1, significant silencing of each target (TNFR-1; 76.5% and SHP-1; 97.2%) was detected. Under serum-deprived hypoxic (1% oxygen) conditions, TNF-{alpha} expression in HUVECs increased relative to normoxic (20% oxygen) and serum-containing conditions. Despite enhanced TNF-{alpha} expression, suppression of TNFR-1 or SHP-1 by siRNA delivery not only enhanced expression of angiogenic factors (KDR/Flk-1 and eNOS) and anti-apoptotic factor (Bcl-xL) but also reduced expression of a pro-apoptotic factor (Bax). Transfection of TNFR-1 or SHP-1 siRNA significantly decreased the HUVEC apoptosis while significantly enhancing HUVEC proliferation and capillary formation. The present study demonstrates that TNFR-1 and SHP-1 may be useful targets for the treatment of myocardial or hindlimb ischemia.

  19. Mutant p53 inhibits miRNA biogenesis by interfering with the microprocessor complex.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, F; Falcone, E; Trisciuoglio, D; Colombo, T; Lisek, K; Walerych, D; Del Sal, G; Paci, P; Bossi, G; Piaggio, G; Gurtner, A

    2016-07-21

    Downregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is commonly observed in cancers and promotes tumorigenesis suggesting that miRNAs may function as tumor suppressors. However, the mechanism through which miRNAs are regulated in cancer, and the connection between oncogenes and miRNA biogenesis remain poorly understood. The TP53 tumor-suppressor gene is mutated in half of human cancers resulting in an oncogene with gain-of-function activities. Here we demonstrate that mutant p53 (mutp53) oncoproteins modulate the biogenesis of a subset of miRNAs in cancer cells inhibiting their post-transcriptional maturation. Interestingly, among these miRNAs several are also downregulated in human tumors. By confocal, co-immunoprecipitation and RNA-chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, we show that endogenous mutp53 binds and sequesters RNA helicases p72/82 from the microprocessor complex, interfering with Drosha-pri-miRNAs association. In agreement with this, the overexpression of p72 leads to an increase of mature miRNAs levels. Moreover, functional experiments demonstrate the oncosuppressive role of mutp53-dependent miRNAs (miR-517a, -519a, -218, -105). Our study highlights a previously undescribed mechanism by which mutp53 interferes with Drosha-p72/82 association leading, at least in part, to miRNA deregulation observed in cancer. PMID:26996669

  20. Short interfering RNA-mediated gene silencing in Globodera pallida and Meloidogyne incognita infective stage juveniles.

    PubMed

    Dalzell, Johnathan J; McMaster, Steven; Fleming, Colin C; Maule, Aaron G

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of gene function through RNA interference (RNAi)-based reverse genetics in plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs) remains inexplicably reliant on the use of long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) silencing triggers; a practice inherently disadvantageous due to the introduction of superfluous dsRNA sequence, increasing chances of aberrant or off-target gene silencing through interactions between nascent short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and non-cognate mRNA targets. Recently, we have shown that non-nematode, long dsRNAs have a propensity to elicit profound impacts on the phenotype and migrational abilities of both root knot and cyst nematodes. This study presents, to our knowledge for the first time, gene-specific knockdown of FMRFamide-like peptide (flp) transcripts, using discrete 21bp siRNAs in potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida, and root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita infective (J2) stage juveniles. Both knockdown at the transcript level through quantitative (q)PCR analysis and functional data derived from migration assay, indicate that siRNAs targeting certain areas of the FMRFamide-like peptide (FLP) transcripts are potent and specific in the silencing of gene function. In addition, we present a method of manipulating siRNA activity through the management of strand thermodynamics. Initial evaluation of strand thermodynamics as a determinant of RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) strand selection (inferred from knockdown efficacy) in the siRNAs presented here suggested that the purported influence of 5' stand stability on guide incorporation may be somewhat promiscuous. However, we have found that on strategically incorporating base mismatches in the sense strand of a G. pallida-specific siRNA, we could specifically increase or decrease the knockdown of its target (specific to the antisense strand), presumably through creating more favourable thermodynamic profiles for incorporation of either the sense (non-target-specific) or antisense (target

  1. Synthetic protection short interfering RNA screen reveals glyburide as a novel radioprotector.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianfei; McDonald, Peter R; Dixon, Tracy M; Franicola, Darcy; Zhang, Xichen; Nie, Suhua; Epperly, Laura D; Huang, Zhentai; Kagan, Valerian E; Lazo, John S; Epperly, Michael W; Greenberger, Joel S

    2009-10-01

    To assist in screening existing drugs for use as potential radioprotectors, we used a human unbiased 16,560 short interfering RNA (siRNA) library targeting the druggable genome. We performed a synthetic protection screen that was designed to identify genes that, when silenced, protected human glioblastoma T98G cells from gamma-radiation-induced cell death. We identified 116 candidate protective genes, then identified 10 small molecule inhibitors of 13 of these candidate gene products and tested their radioprotective effects. Glyburide, a clinically used second-generation hypoglycemic drug, effectively decreased radiation-induced cell death in several cell lines including T98G, glioblastoma U-87 MG, and normal lung epithelial BEAS-2B and in primary cultures of astrocytes. Glyburide significantly increased the survival of 32D cl3 murine hematopoietic progenitor cells when administrated before irradiation. Glyburide was radioprotective in vivo (90% of C57BL/6NHsd female mice pretreated with 10 mg/kg glyburide survived 9.5 Gy total-body irradiation compared to 42% of irradiated controls, P = 0.0249). These results demonstrate the power of unbiased siRNA synthetic protection screening with a druggable genome library to identify new radioprotectors. PMID:19772462

  2. Small interfering RNA delivery by polyethylenimine-functionalised porous silicon nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hasanzadeh Kafshgari, M; Alnakhli, M; Delalat, B; Apostolou, S; Harding, F J; Mäkilä, E; Salonen, J J; Kuss, B J; Voelcker, N H

    2015-12-01

    In this study, thermally hydrocarbonised porous silicon nanoparticles (THCpSiNPs) capped with polyethylenimine (PEI) were fabricated, and their potential for small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery was investigated in an in vitro glioblastoma model. PEI coating following siRNA loading enhanced the sustained release of siRNA, and suppressed burst release effects. The positively-charged surface improved the internalisation of the nanoparticles across the cell membrane. THCpSiNP-mediated siRNA delivery reduced mRNA expression of the MRP1 gene, linked to the resistence of glioblastoma to chemotherapy, by 63% and reduced MRP1-protein levels by 70%. MRP1 siRNA loaded nanoparticles did not induce cytotoxicity in glioblastoma cells, but markedly reduced cell proliferation. In summary, the results demonstrated that non-cytotoxic cationic THCpSiNPs are promising vehicles for therapeutic siRNA delivery. PMID:26343506

  3. A nanoparticle system specifically designed to deliver short interfering RNA inhibits tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Nobuhiro; Manabe, Ichiro; Tottori, Tsuneaki; Ishihara, Atsushi; Ogata, Fusa; Kim, Jong Heon; Nishimura, Satoshi; Fujiu, Katsuhito; Oishi, Yumiko; Itaka, Keiji; Kato, Yasuki; Yamauchi, Masahiro; Nagai, Ryozo

    2009-08-15

    Use of short interfering RNA (siRNA) is a promising new approach thought to have a strong potential to lead to rapid development of gene-oriented therapies. Here, we describe a newly developed, systemically injectable siRNA vehicle, the "wrapsome" (WS), which contains siRNA and a cationic lipofection complex in a core that is fully enveloped by a neutral lipid bilayer and hydrophilic polymers. WS protected siRNA from enzymatic digestion, providing a long half-life in the systemic circulation. Moreover, siRNA/WS leaked from blood vessels within tumors into the tumor tissue, where it accumulated and was subsequently transfected into the tumor cells. Because the transcription factor KLF5 is known to play a role in tumor angiogenesis, we designed KLF5-siRNA to test the antitumor activity of siRNA/WS. KLF5-siRNA/WS exhibited significant antitumor activity, although neither WS containing control scrambled-siRNA nor saline containing KLF5-siRNA affected tumor growth. KLF5-siRNA/WS inhibited Klf5 expression within tumors at both mRNA and protein levels, significantly reducing angiogenesis, and we detected no significant acute or long-term toxicity. Our findings support the idea that siRNA/WS can be used to knock down specific genes within tumors and thereby exert therapeutic effects against cancers. PMID:19654315

  4. Chitosan/interfering RNA nanoparticle mediated gene silencing in disease vector mosquito larvae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Mysore, Keshava; Flannery, Ellen; Michel, Kristin; Severson, David W.; Zhu, Kun Yan

    2015-01-01

    SHORT ABSTRACT Here we describe a procedure for inhibiting gene function in disease vector mosquitoes through the use of chitosan/interfering RNA nanoparticles that are ingested by larvae. LONG ABSTRACT Vector mosquitoes inflict more human suffering than any other organism—and kill more than one million people each year. The mosquito genome projects facilitated research in new facets of mosquito biology, including functional genetic studies in the primary African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae and the dengue and yellow fever vector Aedes aegypti. RNA interference- (RNAi-) mediated gene silencing has been used to target genes of interest in both of these disease vector mosquito species. Here, we describe a procedure for preparation of chitosan/interfering RNA nanoparticles that are combined with food and ingested by larvae. This technically straightforward, high-throughput, and relatively inexpensive methodology, which is compatible with long double stranded RNA (dsRNA) or small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules, has been used for the successful knockdown of a number of different genes in A. gambiae and A. aegypti larvae. Following larval feedings, knockdown, which is verified through qRT-PCR or in situ hybridization, can persist at least through the late pupal stage. This methodology may be applicable to a wide variety of mosquito and other insect species, including agricultural pests, as well as other non-model organisms. In addition to its utility in the research laboratory, in the future, chitosan, an inexpensive, non-toxic and biodegradable polymer, could potentially be utilized in the field. PMID:25867635

  5. Interfering passages of Sindbis virus: concomitant appearance of interference, morphological variants, and trucated viral RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, R E; Tovell, D R; Brown, D T; Faulkner, P

    1975-01-01

    Serial passage of Sindbis at high multiplicities of infection resulted in cyclical variations in virus titer. Decreases in virus titer were correlated with the appearance of smaller-sized virions, interference and truncated viral RNA. The smaller particles were 37 nm in diameter, exclusive of the hemagglutinin spikes as compared with a diameter of 50 nm for standard virions. Passages which contained 37-nm partilces also interfered with infectious center formation by standard, plaque-purified virus. Polyacrylamide gel analysis of RNA isolated from virions present in interfering passages demonstrated the sequential appearance of three RNA species smaller than standard RNA with approximate molecular weights of 3.3 X 106, 2.7 X 106, and 2.2 X 106. The 3.3 X 106 RNA was evident in passage 5, by passage 8 both the 3.3 X 106 and 2.7 X 106 RNAs were present, and by passage 13 all three were present with the 2.2 X 106 RNA predominating. Images PMID:1165599

  6. Characterization of homologous defective interfering RNA during persistent infection of Vero cells with Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung Wook; Lee, Sang-Yong; Won, Sung-Yong; Park, Sun-Hee; Park, Soo-Young; Jeong, Yong Seok

    2006-02-28

    It has been suggested that defective interfering (DI) RNA contributes to the persistence of Japanese en-cephalitis virus (JEV). In this study, we characterized molecular and biological aspects of the DI RNA and its relation to viral persistence. We identified a homolo-gous DI virus intimately associated with JEV persis-tence in Vero cells. The production of DI RNA during undiluted serial passages of JEV coincided with the appearance of cells refractory to acute infection with JEV. We also established a Vero cell clone with a per-sistent JEV infection in which the DI RNA co-replicated efficiently at the expense of helper virus. The infectious virus yield of the clone fluctuated dur-ing its growth depending upon the amount of DI RNA accumulated in the previous replication cycle. Identifi-cation of the corresponding negative-sense RNA of the DI RNA indicated that the DI RNA functioned as a replication unit. Most of the DI RNA molecules re-tained their open reading frames despite a large dele-tion, encompassing most of the prM, the entire E, and the 5' half of the NS1 gene. Taken together, these ob-servations suggest that the generation of homologous DI RNA during successive JEV acute infections in Vero cells probably participates actively in persistent JEV infection. PMID:16511353

  7. Systematic coarse-grained modeling of complexation between small interfering RNA and polycations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zonghui; Luijten, Erik

    2015-12-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations can provide insight into the properties of polymeric gene-delivery carriers by elucidating their interactions and detailed binding patterns with nucleic acids. However, to explore nanoparticle formation through complexation of these polymers and nucleic acids and study their behavior at experimentally relevant time and length scales, a reliable coarse-grained model is needed. Here, we systematically develop such a model for the complexation of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and grafted polyethyleneimine copolymers, a promising candidate for siRNA delivery. We compare the predictions of this model with all-atom simulations and demonstrate that it is capable of reproducing detailed binding patterns, charge characteristics, and water release kinetics. Since the coarse-grained model accelerates the simulations by one to two orders of magnitude, it will make it possible to quantitatively investigate nanoparticle formation involving multiple siRNA molecules and cationic copolymers.

  8. Development of a software tool and criteria evaluation for efficient design of small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Aparna; Srivastava, Sonam; Garg, Sanjeev

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference can be used as a tool for gene silencing mediated by small interfering RNAs (siRNA). The critical step in effective and specific RNAi processing is the selection of suitable constructs. Major design criteria, i.e., Reynolds's design rules, thermodynamic stability, internal repeats, immunostimulatory motifs were emphasized and implemented in the siRNA design tool. The tool provides thermodynamic stability score, GC content and a total score based on other design criteria in the output. The viability of the tool was established with different datasets. In general, the siRNA constructs produced by the tool had better thermodynamic score and positional properties. Comparable thermodynamic scores and better total scores were observed with the existing tools. Moreover, the results generated had comparable off-target silencing effect. Criteria evaluations with additional criteria were achieved in WEKA. PMID:21145307

  9. Systematic coarse-grained modeling of complexation between small interfering RNA and polycations

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zonghui; Luijten, Erik

    2015-12-28

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations can provide insight into the properties of polymeric gene-delivery carriers by elucidating their interactions and detailed binding patterns with nucleic acids. However, to explore nanoparticle formation through complexation of these polymers and nucleic acids and study their behavior at experimentally relevant time and length scales, a reliable coarse-grained model is needed. Here, we systematically develop such a model for the complexation of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and grafted polyethyleneimine copolymers, a promising candidate for siRNA delivery. We compare the predictions of this model with all-atom simulations and demonstrate that it is capable of reproducing detailed binding patterns, charge characteristics, and water release kinetics. Since the coarse-grained model accelerates the simulations by one to two orders of magnitude, it will make it possible to quantitatively investigate nanoparticle formation involving multiple siRNA molecules and cationic copolymers.

  10. Recent In Vivo Evidences of Particle-Based Delivery of Small-Interfering RNA (siRNA) into Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Small-interfering RNA (siRNA) is both a powerful tool in research and a promising therapeutic platform to modulate expression of disease-related genes. Malignant tumors are attractive disease targets for nucleic acid-based therapies. siRNA directed against oncogenes, and genes driving metastases or angiogenesis have been evaluated in animal models and in some cases, in humans. The outcomes of these studies indicate that drug delivery is a significant limiting factor. This review provides perspectives on in vivo validated nanoparticle-based siRNA delivery systems. Results of recent advances in liposomes and polymeric and inorganic formulations illustrate the need for mutually optimized attributes for performance in systemic circulation, tumor interstitial space, plasma membrane, and endosomes. Physiochemical properties conducive to efficient siRNA delivery are summarized and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:25221632

  11. Plasma exosomes can deliver exogenous short interfering RNA to monocytes and lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wahlgren, Jessica; Karlson, Tanya De L.; Brisslert, Mikael; Vaziri Sani, Forugh; Telemo, Esbjörn; Sunnerhagen, Per; Valadi, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Despite the promise of RNA interference (RNAi) and its potential, e.g. for use in cancer therapy, several technical obstacles must first be overcome. The major hurdle of RNAi-based therapeutics is to deliver nucleic acids across the cell’s plasma membrane. This study demonstrates that exosome vesicles derived from humans can deliver short interfering RNA (siRNA) to human mononuclear blood cells. Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles of endocytic origin that are involved in cell-to-cell communication, i.e. antigen presentation, tolerance development and shuttle RNA (mainly mRNA and microRNA). Having tested different strategies, an optimized method (electroporation) was used to introduce siRNA into human exosomes of various origins. Plasma exosomes (exosomes from peripheral blood) were used as gene delivery vector (GDV) to transport exogenous siRNA to human blood cells. The vesicles effectively delivered the administered siRNA into monocytes and lymphocytes, causing selective gene silencing of mitogen-activated protein kinase 1. These data suggest that human exosomes can be used as a GDV to provide cells with heterologous nucleic acids such as therapeutic siRNAs. PMID:22618874

  12. An efficient intrathecal delivery of small interfering RNA to the spinal cord and peripheral neurons

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Miaw-Chyi; Zhang, Dong-Qin; Ma, Shou-Wu; Huang, Yuan-Yuan; Shuster, Sam J; Porreca, Frank; Lai, Josephine

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a highly effective method for in vivo gene silencing in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) by a cationic lipid facilitated delivery of synthetic, small interfering RNA (siRNA). A siRNA to the delta opioid receptor (DOR), or a mismatch RNA, was mixed with the transfection reagent, i-Fect™ (vehicle), and delivered as repeated daily bolus doses (0.5 μg to 4 μg) via implanted intrathecal catheter to the lumbar spinal cord of rats. Twenty-four hours after the last injection, rats were tested for antinociception by the DOR selective agonist, [D-Ala2, Glu4]deltorphin II (DELT), or the mu opioid receptor (MOR) selective agonist, [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5]enkephalin (DAMGO). Pretreatment with the siRNA, but not the mismatch RNA or vehicle alone, blocked DELT antinociception dose-dependently. The latter was concomitant with a reduction in the spinal immunoreactivity and receptor density of DOR, and in DOR transcripts in the lumbar DRG and spinal dorsal horn. Neither siRNA nor mismatch RNA pretreatment altered spinal immunoreactivity of MOR or antinociception by spinal DAMGO, and had no effect on the baseline thermal nociceptive threshold. The inhibition of function and expression of DOR by siRNA was reversed by 72 hr after the last RNA injection. The uptake of fluorescence-tagged siRNA was detected in both DRG and spinal cord. The low effective dose of siRNA/i-Fect™ complex reflects an efficient delivery of the siRNA to peripheral and spinal neurons, produced no behavioral signs of toxicity. This delivery method may be optimized for other gene targets. PMID:16191203

  13. Optimized In Vivo Transfer of Small Interfering RNA Targeting Dermal Tissue Using In Vivo Surface Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Kate E; Chan, Amy; Lin, Feng; Shen, Xuefei; Kichaev, Gleb; Khan, Amir S; Aubin, Justin; Zimmermann, Tracy S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.

    2012-01-01

    Electroporation (EP) of mammalian tissue is a technique that has been used successfully in the clinic for the delivery of genetic-based vaccines in the form of DNA plasmids. There is great interest in platforms which efficiently deliver RNA molecules such as messenger RNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) to mammalian tissue. However, the in vivo delivery of RNA enhanced by EP has not been extensively characterized. This paper details the optimization of electrical parameters for a novel low-voltage EP method to deliver oligonucleotides (both DNA and RNA) to dermal tissue in vivo. Initially, the electrical parameters were optimized for dermal delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) using this novel surface dermal EP device. While all investigated parameters resulted in visible transfection, voltage parameters in the 10 V range elicited the most robust signal. The parameters optimized for DNA, were then assessed for translation of successful electrotransfer of siRNA into dermal tissue. Robust tagged-siRNA transfection in skin was detected. We then assessed whether these parameters translated to successful transfer of siRNA resulting in gene knockdown in vivo. Using a reporter gene construct encoding GFP and tagged siRNA targeting the GFP message, we show simultaneous transfection of the siRNA to the skin via EP and the concomitant knockdown of the reporter gene signal. The siRNA delivery was accomplished with no evidence of injection site inflammation or local tissue damage. The minimally invasive low-voltage EP method is thus capable of efficiently delivering both DNA and RNA molecules to dermal tissue in a tolerable manner. PMID:23344722

  14. Optimized in vivo transfer of small interfering RNA targeting dermal tissue using in vivo surface electroporation.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Kate E; Chan, Amy; Lin, Feng; Shen, Xuefei; Kichaev, Gleb; Khan, Amir S; Aubin, Justin; Zimmermann, Tracy S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2012-01-01

    Electroporation (EP) of mammalian tissue is a technique that has been used successfully in the clinic for the delivery of genetic-based vaccines in the form of DNA plasmids. There is great interest in platforms which efficiently deliver RNA molecules such as messenger RNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) to mammalian tissue. However, the in vivo delivery of RNA enhanced by EP has not been extensively characterized. This paper details the optimization of electrical parameters for a novel low-voltage EP method to deliver oligonucleotides (both DNA and RNA) to dermal tissue in vivo. Initially, the electrical parameters were optimized for dermal delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) using this novel surface dermal EP device. While all investigated parameters resulted in visible transfection, voltage parameters in the 10 V range elicited the most robust signal. The parameters optimized for DNA, were then assessed for translation of successful electrotransfer of siRNA into dermal tissue. Robust tagged-siRNA transfection in skin was detected. We then assessed whether these parameters translated to successful transfer of siRNA resulting in gene knockdown in vivo. Using a reporter gene construct encoding GFP and tagged siRNA targeting the GFP message, we show simultaneous transfection of the siRNA to the skin via EP and the concomitant knockdown of the reporter gene signal. The siRNA delivery was accomplished with no evidence of injection site inflammation or local tissue damage. The minimally invasive low-voltage EP method is thus capable of efficiently delivering both DNA and RNA molecules to dermal tissue in a tolerable manner. PMID:23344722

  15. Comparison of small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery into bovine monocyte-derived macrophages by transfection and electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kirsty; Anderson, Jennifer A.; Glass, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    The manipulation of the RNA interference pathway using small interfering RNA (siRNA) has become the most frequently used gene silencing method. However, siRNA delivery into primary cells, especially primary macrophages, is often considered challenging. Here we report the investigation of the suitability of two methodologies: transient transfection and electroporation, to deliver siRNA targeted against the putative immunomodulatory gene Mediterranean fever (MEFV) into primary bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (bMDM). Eleven commercial transfection reagents were investigated with variable results with respect to siRNA uptake, target gene knock-down, cell toxicity and type I interferon (IFN) response induction. Three transfection reagents: Lipofectamine 2000, Lipofectamine RNAiMAX and DharmaFECT 3, were found to consistently give the best results. However, all the transfection reagents tested induced an IFN response in the absence of siRNA, which could be minimized by reducing the transfection reagent incubation period. In addition, optimized siRNA delivery into bMDM by electroporation achieved comparable levels of target gene knock-down as transient transfection, without a detectable IFN response, but with higher levels of cell toxicity. The optimized transient transfection and electroporation methodologies may provide a starting point for optimizing siRNA delivery into macrophages derived from other species or other cells considered difficult to investigate with siRNA. PMID:24598124

  16. Adenovirus Virus-Associated RNA Is Processed to Functional Interfering RNAs Involved in Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, Oscar; Razquin, Nerea; Zaratiegui, Mikel; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Fortes, Puri

    2006-01-01

    Posttranscriptional gene silencing allows sequence-specific control of gene expression. Specificity is guaranteed by small antisense RNAs such as microRNAs (miRNAs) or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Functional miRNAs derive from longer double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules that are cleaved to pre-miRNAs in the nucleus and are transported by exportin 5 (Exp 5) to the cytoplasm. Adenovirus-infected cells express virus-associated (VA) RNAs, which are dsRNA molecules similar in structure to pre-miRNAs. VA RNAs are also transported by Exp 5 to the cytoplasm, where they accumulate. Here we show that small RNAs derived from VA RNAs (svaRNAs), similar to miRNAs, can be found in adenovirus-infected cells. VA RNA processing to svaRNAs requires neither viral replication nor viral protein expression, as evidenced by the fact that svaRNA accumulation can be detected in cells transfected with VA sequences. svaRNAs are efficiently bound by Argonaute 2, the endonuclease of the RNA-induced silencing complex, and behave as functional siRNAs, in that they inhibit the expression of reporter genes with complementary sequences. Blocking svaRNA-mediated inhibition affects efficient adenovirus production, indicating that svaRNAs are required for virus viability. Thus, svaRNA-mediated silencing could represent a novel mechanism used by adenoviruses to control cellular or viral gene expression. PMID:16415015

  17. Establishing an Infrastructure for High-Throughput Short-Interfering RNA Screening.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hongwei; Sereduk, Chris; Tang, Nanyun

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a readily available research tool that can be used to accelerate the identification and functional validation of a multitude of new candidate drug targets by experimentally perturbing gene expression and function. High-throughput RNAi technology using libraries of short-interfering RNA (siRNA) makes it possible to rapidly identify genes and biomarkers associated with biological processes such as diseases or a cellular response to therapy. Thus, RNAi-based screening is an extremely powerful technology that can provide tremendous insights into the mechanisms of action and contexts of vulnerability of a particular drug treatment. This chapter describes the infrastructure requirements needed to successfully perform HT-RNAi screening. Information on the methodology, instrumentation, experimental design, and workflow aspects is provided, as well as insights on how to successfully implement a high-throughput RNAi screen. PMID:27581280

  18. Targeted Delivery of Small Interfering RNA Using Reconstituted High-Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticles12

    PubMed Central

    Shahzad, Mian MK; Mangala, Lingegowda S; Han, Hee Dong; Lu, Chunhua; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Nishimura, Masato; Mora, Edna M; Lee, Jeong-Won; Stone, Rebecca L; Pecot, Chad V; Thanapprapasr, Duangmani; Roh, Ju-Won; Gaur, Puja; Nair, Maya P; Park, Yun-Yong; Sabnis, Nirupama; Deavers, Michael T; Lee, Ju-Seog; Ellis, Lee M; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; McConathy, Walter J; Prokai, Laszlo; Lacko, Andras G; Sood, Anil K

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference holds tremendous potential as a therapeutic approach, especially in the treatment of malignant tumors. However, efficient and biocompatible delivery methods are needed for systemic delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA). To maintain a high level of growth, tumor cells scavenge high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles by overexpressing its receptor: scavenger receptor type B1 (SR-B1). In this study, we exploited this cellular characteristic to achieve efficient siRNA delivery and established a novel formulation of siRNA by incorporating it into reconstituted HDL (rHDL) nanoparticles. Here, we demonstrate that rHDL nanoparticles facilitate highly efficient systemic delivery of siRNA in vivo, mediated by the SR-B1. Moreover, in therapeutic proof-of-concept studies, these nanoparticles were effective in silencing the expression of two proteins that are key to cancer growth and metastasis (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and focal adhesion kinase) in orthotopic mouse models of ovarian and colorectal cancer. These data indicate that an rHDL nanoparticle is a novel and highly efficient siRNA carrier, and therefore, this novel technology could serve as the foundation for new cancer therapeutic approaches. PMID:21472135

  19. High Density Lipoproteins for the Systemic Delivery of short interfering RNA

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Kaylin M.; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful mechanism for gene silencing with the potential to greatly impact the development of new therapies for many human diseases. Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) may be the ideal molecules for therapeutic RNAi. However, therapeutic siRNAs face significant challenges that must be overcome prior to widespread clinical use. Many efforts have been made to overcome the hurdles associated with systemic administration of siRNA; however, current approaches are still limited. As such, there is an urgent need to develop new strategies for siRNA delivery that have the potential to impact a broad spectrum of systemic diseases. Areas covered This review focuses on the promise of siRNA therapies and highlights current siRNA delivery methods. With an eye toward new strategies, this review first introduces high density lipoproteins (HDL) and their natural functions, and then transitions into how HDLs may provide significant opportunities as next generation siRNA delivery vehicles. Importantly, this review describes how synthetic HDLs leverage the natural ability of HDL to stabilize and deliver siRNAs. Expert Opinion HDLs are natural nanoparticles that are critical to understanding the systemic delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids, like siRNA. Methods to synthesize biomimetic HDLs are being explored and data demonstrate that this type of delivery vehicle may be highly beneficial for targeted and efficacious systemic delivery of siRNAs. PMID:24313310

  20. A cis-acting function for the coronavirus leader in defective interfering RNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, R Y; Hofmann, M A; Sethna, P B; Brian, D A

    1994-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the 65-nucleotide (nt) leader on subgenomic mRNAs suffices as a 5'-terminal cis-acting signal for RNA replication, a corollary to the notion that coronavirus mRNAs behave as replicons, synthetic RNA transcripts of a cloned, reporter-containing N mRNA (mRNA 7) of the bovine coronavirus with a precise 5' terminus and a 3' poly(A) of 68 nt were tested for replication after being transfected into helper virus-infected cells. No replication was observed, but synthetic transcripts of a cloned reporter-containing defective interfering (DI) RNA differing from the N mRNA construct by 433 nt of continuous 5'-proximal genomic sequence between the leader and the N open reading frame did replicate and become packaged, indicating the insufficiency of the leader alone as a 5' signal for replication of transfected RNA molecules. The leader was shown to be a necessary part of the cis-acting signal for DI RNA replication, however, since removal of terminal bases that destroyed a predicted intraleader stem-loop also destroyed replicating ability. Surprisingly, when the same stem-loop was disrupted by base substitutions, replication appeared only minimally impaired and the leader was found to have rapidly reverted to wild type during DI RNA replication, a phenomenon reminiscent of high-frequency leader switching in the mouse hepatitis coronavirus. These results suggest that once a minimal structural requirement for leader is fulfilled for initiation of DI RNA replication, the wild-type leader is strongly preferred for subsequent replication. They also demonstrate that, in contrast to reported natural mouse hepatitis coronavirus DI RNAs, the DI RNA of the bovine coronavirus does not require sequence elements originating from discontinuous downstream regions within the polymerase gene for replication or for packaging. Images PMID:7966615

  1. Subcellular distribution of small interfering RNA: directed delivery through RNA polymerase III expression cassettes and localization by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Paul, Cynthia P

    2005-01-01

    Reduction in the expression of specific genes through small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is dependent on the colocalization of siRNAs with other components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathways within the cell. The expression of siRNAs within cells from cassettes that are derived from genes transcribed by RNA polymerase III (pol III) and provide for selective subcellular distribution of their products can be used to direct siRNAs to the cellular pathways. Expression from the human U6 promoter, resulting in siRNA accumulation in the nucleus, is effective in reducing gene expression, whereas cytoplasmic and nucleolar localization of the siRNA when expressed from the 5S or 7 SL promoters is not effective. The distribution of siRNA within the cell is determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Although the long uninterrupted duplex of siRNA makes it difficult to detect with DNA oligonucleotide probes, labeled oligonucleotide probes with 2'-O-methyl RNA backbones provide the stability needed for a strong signal. These methods contribute to studies of the interconnected cellular RNAi pathways and are useful in adapting RNAi as a tool to determine gene function and develop RNA-based therapeutics. PMID:15644179

  2. A novel albumin nanocomplex containing both small interfering RNA and gold nanorods for synergetic anticancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin-Ha; Hwang, Hai-Jin; Shin, Seung Won; Choi, Jeong-Woo; Um, Soong Ho; Oh, Byung-Keun

    2015-05-01

    Therapeutic nanocomplexes have been extensively developed for the effective treatment of aggressive cancers because of their outstanding versatility, easy manipulation, and low cytotoxicity. In this study, we describe the synthesis of a novel bovine serum albumin (BSA)-based nanocomplex harboring both Bcl-2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) and gold (Au) nanorods (siRNA and rods encapsulated in BSA; SREB) with the aim of developing a targeted breast cancer therapeutic. The SREB complexes contained 2 × 105 siRNA molecules and eight Au nanorods per BSA complex and were successively functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and anti-ErbB-2 antibodies to facilitate active targeting. The synergetic therapeutic activity originating from the two components effectively induced cell death (~80% reduction in viability compared with control cells) in target breast cancer cells after a single dose of laser irradiation. Intracellular SREB nanocomplex decomposition by proteolytic enzymes resulted in simultaneous RNA interference and thermal ablation, thus leading to apoptosis in the targeted cancer cells. Moreover, these therapeutic effects were sustained for approximately 72 hours. The intrinsic biocompatibility, multifunctionality, and potent in vitro anticancer properties of these SREB nanocomplexes indicate that they have great therapeutic potential for in vivo targeted cancer therapy, in addition to other areas of nanomedicine.Therapeutic nanocomplexes have been extensively developed for the effective treatment of aggressive cancers because of their outstanding versatility, easy manipulation, and low cytotoxicity. In this study, we describe the synthesis of a novel bovine serum albumin (BSA)-based nanocomplex harboring both Bcl-2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) and gold (Au) nanorods (siRNA and rods encapsulated in BSA; SREB) with the aim of developing a targeted breast cancer therapeutic. The SREB complexes contained 2 × 105 siRNA molecules and eight Au

  3. Intravaginal gene silencing using biodegradable polymer nanoparticles densely loaded with small-interfering RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodrow, Kim A.; Cu, Yen; Booth, Carmen J.; Saucier-Sawyer, Jennifer K.; Wood, Monica J.; Mark Saltzman, W.

    2009-06-01

    Vaginal instillation of small-interfering RNA (siRNA) using liposomes has led to silencing of endogenous genes in the genital tract and protection against challenge from infectious disease. Although siRNA lipoplexes are easily formulated, several of the most effective transfection agents available commercially may be toxic to the mucosal epithelia and none are able to provide controlled or sustained release. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach using nanoparticles composed entirely of FDA-approved materials. To render these materials effective for gene silencing, we developed novel approaches to load them with high amounts of siRNA. A single dose of siRNA-loaded nanoparticles to the mouse female reproductive tract caused efficient and sustained gene silencing. Knockdown of gene expression was observed proximal (in the vaginal lumen) and distal (in the uterine horns) to the site of topical delivery. In addition, nanoparticles penetrated deep into the epithelial tissue. This is the first report demonstrating that biodegradable polymer nanoparticles are effective delivery vehicles for siRNA to the vaginal mucosa.

  4. Development of a software tool and criteria evaluation for efficient design of small interfering RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, Aparna; Srivastava, Sonam; Garg, Sanjeev

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} The developed tool predicted siRNA constructs with better thermodynamic stability and total score based on positional and other criteria. {yields} Off-target silencing below score 30 were observed for the best siRNA constructs for different genes. {yields} Immunostimulation and cytotoxicity motifs considered and penalized in the developed tool. {yields} Both positional and compositional criteria were observed to be important. -- Abstract: RNA interference can be used as a tool for gene silencing mediated by small interfering RNAs (siRNA). The critical step in effective and specific RNAi processing is the selection of suitable constructs. Major design criteria, i.e., Reynolds's design rules, thermodynamic stability, internal repeats, immunostimulatory motifs were emphasized and implemented in the siRNA design tool. The tool provides thermodynamic stability score, GC content and a total score based on other design criteria in the output. The viability of the tool was established with different datasets. In general, the siRNA constructs produced by the tool had better thermodynamic score and positional properties. Comparable thermodynamic scores and better total scores were observed with the existing tools. Moreover, the results generated had comparable off-target silencing effect. Criteria evaluations with additional criteria were achieved in WEKA.

  5. The hub protein loquacious connects the microRNA and short interfering RNA pathways in mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Haac, Mary Etna; Anderson, Michelle A.E.; Eggleston, Heather; Myles, Kevin M.; Adelman, Zach N.

    2015-01-01

    Aedes aegypti mosquitoes vector several arboviruses of global health significance, including dengue viruses and chikungunya virus. RNA interference (RNAi) plays an important role in antiviral immunity, gene regulation and protection from transposable elements. Double-stranded RNA binding proteins (dsRBPs) are important for efficient RNAi; in Drosophila functional specialization of the miRNA, endo-siRNA and exo-siRNA pathway is aided by the dsRBPs Loquacious (Loqs-PB, Loqs-PD) and R2D2, respectively. However, this functional specialization has not been investigated in other dipterans. We were unable to detect Loqs-PD in Ae. aegypti; analysis of other dipteran genomes demonstrated that this isoform is not conserved outside of Drosophila. Overexpression experiments and small RNA sequencing following depletion of each dsRBP revealed that R2D2 and Loqs-PA cooperate non-redundantly in siRNA production, and that these proteins exhibit an inhibitory effect on miRNA levels. Conversely, Loqs-PB alone interacted with mosquito dicer-1 and was essential for full miRNA production. Mosquito Loqs interacted with both argonaute 1 and 2 in a manner independent of its interactions with dicer. We conclude that the functional specialization of Loqs-PD in Drosophila is a recently derived trait, and that in other dipterans, including the medically important mosquitoes, Loqs-PA participates in both the miRNA and endo-siRNA based pathways. PMID:25765650

  6. Rapid delivery of small interfering RNA by biosurfactant MEL-A-containing liposomes.

    PubMed

    Inoh, Yoshikazu; Furuno, Tadahide; Hirashima, Naohide; Kitamoto, Dai; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2011-10-28

    The downregulation of gene expression by RNA interference holds great potential for genetic analysis and gene therapy. However, a more efficient delivery system for small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the target cells is required for wide fields such as cell biology, physiology, and clinical application. Non-viral vectors are stronger candidates than viral vectors because they are safer and easier to prepare. We have previously used a new method for gene transfection by combining cationic liposomes with the biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A). The novel MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes rapidly delivered DNA (plasmids and oligonucleotides) into the cytosol and nucleus through membrane fusion between liposomes and the plasma membrane, and consequently, enhanced the gene transfection efficiency. In this study, we determined the efficiency of MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes for siRNA delivery. We observed that exogenous and endogenous protein expression was suppressed by approximately 60% at 24h after brief (30 min) incubation of target cells with MEL-A-containing cationic liposome/siRNA complexes. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that suppression of protein expression was caused by rapid siRNA delivery into the cytosol. We found that the MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes directly delivered siRNA into the cytoplasm by the membrane fusion in addition to endocytotic pathway whereas Lipofectamine RNAiMax delivered siRNA only by the endocytotic pathway. It seems that the ability to rapidly and directly deliver siRNA into the cytosol using MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes is able to reduce immune responses, cytotoxicity, and other side effects caused by viral vectors in clinical applications. PMID:22001930

  7. Octamer 4 small interfering RNA results in cancer stem cell-like cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tingsong; Liu, Shanrong; Breiter, Deborah R; Wang, Fang; Tang, Ying; Sun, Shuhan

    2008-08-15

    Octamer 4 (Oct4), a member of the POU family of transcription factors, plays a key role in the maintenance of pluripotency and proliferation potential of embryonic stem cells. Cancer stem cell-like cells (CSCLC) are reported to be a minor population in tumors or even in tumor cell lines which also express Oct4. The role of Oct4 in CSCLCs still remains to be defined. In our study, we show that, in vitro, almost all murine Lewis lung carcinoma 3LL cells and human breast cancer MCF7 cells express Oct4 at high levels. This expression of Oct4 is successfully reduced by small interfering RNA, which eventually results in cell apoptosis. The signal pathway Oct4/Tcl1/Akt1 has been observed to be involved in this event. The repression of Oct4 reduces Tcl1 expression and further down-regulates the level of p-Ser.473-Akt1. In vivo, only approximately 5% of tumor cells were detected to express Oct4 in established 3LL and MCF7 tumor models, respectively. Small interfering RNA against Oct4 successfully decreases the CSCLCs and markedly inhibits tumor growth. In summary, we show that Oct4 might maintain the survival of CSCLCs partly through Oct4/Tcl1/Akt1 by inhibiting apoptosis, which strongly indicates that targeting Oct4 may have important clinical applications in cancer therapy. PMID:18701476

  8. Functional Specialization of the Small Interfering RNA Pathway in Response to Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Joao Trindade; Wang, Ji-Ping; Wang, Xiaohong; de Oliveira, Karla Pollyanna Vieira; Gao, Catherine; Aguiar, Eric Roberto Guimaraes Rocha; Jafari, Nadereh; Carthew, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila, post-transcriptional gene silencing occurs when exogenous or endogenous double stranded RNA (dsRNA) is processed into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) by Dicer-2 (Dcr-2) in association with a dsRNA-binding protein (dsRBP) cofactor called Loquacious (Loqs-PD). siRNAs are then loaded onto Argonaute-2 (Ago2) by the action of Dcr-2 with another dsRBP cofactor called R2D2. Loaded Ago2 executes the destruction of target RNAs that have sequence complementarity to siRNAs. Although Dcr-2, R2D2, and Ago2 are essential for innate antiviral defense, the mechanism of virus-derived siRNA (vsiRNA) biogenesis and viral target inhibition remains unclear. Here, we characterize the response mechanism mediated by siRNAs against two different RNA viruses that infect Drosophila. In both cases, we show that vsiRNAs are generated by Dcr-2 processing of dsRNA formed during viral genome replication and, to a lesser extent, viral transcription. These vsiRNAs seem to preferentially target viral polyadenylated RNA to inhibit viral replication. Loqs-PD is completely dispensable for silencing of the viruses, in contrast to its role in silencing endogenous targets. Biogenesis of vsiRNAs is independent of both Loqs-PD and R2D2. R2D2, however, is required for sorting and loading of vsiRNAs onto Ago2 and inhibition of viral RNA expression. Direct injection of viral RNA into Drosophila results in replication that is also independent of Loqs-PD. This suggests that triggering of the antiviral pathway is not related to viral mode of entry but recognition of intrinsic features of virus RNA. Our results indicate the existence of a vsiRNA pathway that is separate from the endogenous siRNA pathway and is specifically triggered by virus RNA. We speculate that this unique framework might be necessary for a prompt and efficient antiviral response. PMID:24009507

  9. Safe and effective delivery of small interfering RNA with polymer- and liposomes-based complexes.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yukinobu; Harauchi, Satoe; Kawanabe, Saki; Ichikawa, Nobuhiro; Nakagawa, Hiroo; Muro, Takahiro; Higuchi, Norihide; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Kitahara, Takashi; Sasaki, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    We developed binary and ternary complexes based on polymers and liposomes for safe and effective delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA). Anti-luciferase siRNA was used as a model of nucleic acid medicine. The binary complexes of siRNA were prepared with cationic polymers and cationic liposomes such as polyethylenimine (PEI), polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer, poly-L-arginine (PLA), trimethyl[2,3-(dioleoxy)-propyl]ammonium chloride (DOTMA), and cholesteryl 3β-N-(dimetylaminnoethyl)carbamate hydrochloride (DC-Chol). The ternary complexes were constructed by the addition of γ-polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA) to the binary complexes. The complexes were approximately 54-153 nm in particle size. The binary complexes showed a cationic surface charge although an anionic surface charge was observed in the ternary complexes. The polymer-based complexes did not show a silencing effect in the mouse colon carcinoma cell line expressing luciferase regularly (Colon26/Luc cells). The binary complexes based on liposomes and their ternary complexes coated by γ-PGA showed a significant silencing effect. The binary complexes showed significant cytotoxicity although the ternary complexes coated by γ-PGA did not show significant cytotoxicity. The ternary complexes coated by γ-PGA suppressed luciferase activity in the tumor after their direct injection into the tumors of mice bearing Colon26/Luc cells. Thus, we have newly identified safe and efficient ternary complexes of siRNA for clinical use. PMID:23727920

  10. Inhibition of pathologic immunoglobulin free light chain production by small interfering RNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Jonathan E.; Kestler, Daniel P.; Foster, James S.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Donnell, Robert; Weiss, Deborah T.; Solomon, Alan; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Morbidity and mortality occurring in patients with multiple myeloma, AL amyloidosis, and light chain deposition disease can result from the pathologic deposition of monoclonal Ig light chains (LCs) in kidneys and other organs. To reduce synthesis of such components, therapy for these disorders typically has involved anti-plasma cell agents; however, this approach is not always effective and can have adverse consequences. We have investigated another means to achieve this objective; namely, RNA interference (RNAi). Materials and Methods SP2/O mouse myeloma cells were stably transfected with a construct encoding a λ6 LC (Wil) under control of the CMV promoter, while λ2-producing myeloma cell line RPMI 8226 was purchased from the ATCC. Both were treated with small interfering RNA (siRNA) directed specifically to the V, J, or C portions of the molecules and then analyzed by ELISA, flow cytometry and real time PCR. Results Transfected cells were found to constitutively express detectable quantities of mRNA and protein Wil and, after exposure to siRNAs, an ~40% reduction in mRNA and LC production was evidenced at 48 hours. An even greater effect was seen with the 8226 cells. Conclusion Our results have shown that RNAi can markedly reduce LC synthesis and provide the basis for testing the therapeutic potential of this strategy using in vivo experimental models of multiple myeloma. PMID:20637260

  11. Failure of the Tomato Trans-Acting Short Interfering RNA Program to Regulate AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR3 and ARF4 Underlies the Wiry Leaf Syndrome[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Yifhar, Tamar; Pekker, Irena; Peled, Dror; Friedlander, Gilgi; Pistunov, Anna; Sabban, Moti; Wachsman, Guy; Alvarez, John Paul; Amsellem, Ziva; Eshed, Yuval

    2012-01-01

    Interfering with small RNA production is a common strategy of plant viruses. A unique class of small RNAs that require microRNA and short interfering (siRNA) biogenesis for their production is termed trans-acting short interfering RNAs (ta-siRNAs). Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) wiry mutants represent a class of phenotype that mimics viral infection symptoms, including shoestring leaves that lack leaf blade expansion. Here, we show that four WIRY genes are involved in siRNA biogenesis, and in their corresponding mutants, levels of ta-siRNAs that regulate AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR3 (ARF3) and ARF4 are reduced, while levels of their target ARFs are elevated. Reducing activity of both ARF3 and ARF4 can rescue the wiry leaf lamina, and increased activity of either can phenocopy wiry leaves. Thus, a failure to negatively regulate these ARFs underlies tomato shoestring leaves. Overexpression of these ARFs in Arabidopsis thaliana, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), and potato (Solanum tuberosum) failed to produce wiry leaves, suggesting that the dramatic response in tomato is exceptional. As negative regulation of orthologs of these ARFs by ta-siRNA is common to land plants, we propose that ta-siRNA levels serve as universal sensors for interference with small RNA biogenesis, and changes in their levels direct species-specific responses. PMID:23001036

  12. Rapid delivery of small interfering RNA by biosurfactant MEL-A-containing liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Inoh, Yoshikazu; Furuno, Tadahide; Hirashima, Naohide; Kitamoto, Dai; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes for siRNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes can efficiently and rapidly deliver siRNA into the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rapid delivery of siRNA is due to the membrane fusion between liposomes and plasma membrane. -- Abstract: The downregulation of gene expression by RNA interference holds great potential for genetic analysis and gene therapy. However, a more efficient delivery system for small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the target cells is required for wide fields such as cell biology, physiology, and clinical application. Non-viral vectors are stronger candidates than viral vectors because they are safer and easier to prepare. We have previously used a new method for gene transfection by combining cationic liposomes with the biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A). The novel MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes rapidly delivered DNA (plasmids and oligonucleotides) into the cytosol and nucleus through membrane fusion between liposomes and the plasma membrane, and consequently, enhanced the gene transfection efficiency. In this study, we determined the efficiency of MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes for siRNA delivery. We observed that exogenous and endogenous protein expression was suppressed by approximately 60% at 24 h after brief (30 min) incubation of target cells with MEL-A-containing cationic liposome/siRNA complexes. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that suppression of protein expression was caused by rapid siRNA delivery into the cytosol. We found that the MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes directly delivered siRNA into the cytoplasm by the membrane fusion in addition to endocytotic pathway whereas Lipofectamine Trade-Mark-Sign RNAiMax delivered siRNA only by the endocytotic pathway. It seems that the ability to rapidly and directly deliver siRNA into the cytosol using MEL-A-containing cationic

  13. Nanoparticle-based delivery of small interfering RNA: challenges for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Miele, Evelina; Spinelli, Gian Paolo; Miele, Ermanno; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Tomao, Silverio; Gulino, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    During recent decades there have been remarkable advances and profound changes in cancer therapy. Many therapeutic strategies learned at the bench, including monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors, have been used at the bedside, leading to important successes. One of the most important advances in biology has been the discovery that small interfering RNA (siRNA) is able to regulate the expression of genes, by a phenomenon known as RNA interference (RNAi). RNAi is one of the most rapidly growing fields of research in biology and therapeutics. Much research effort has gone into the application of this new discovery in the treatment of various diseases, including cancer. However, even though these molecules may have potential and strong utility, some limitations make their clinical application difficult, including delivery problems, side effects due to off-target actions, disturbance of physiological functions of the cellular machinery involved in gene silencing, and induction of the innate immune response. Many researchers have attempted to overcome these limitations and to improve the safety of potential RNAi-based therapeutics. Nanoparticles, which are nanostructured entities with tunable size, shape, and surface, as well as biological behavior, provide an ideal opportunity to modify current treatment regimens in a substantial way. These nanoparticles could be designed to surmount one or more of the barriers encountered by siRNA. Nanoparticle drug formulations afford the chance to improve drug bioavailability, exploiting superior tissue permeability, payload protection, and the “stealth” features of these entities. The main aims of this review are: to explain the siRNA mechanism with regard to potential applications in siRNA-based cancer therapy; to discuss the possible usefulness of nanoparticle-based delivery of certain molecules for overcoming present therapeutic limitations; to review the ongoing relevant clinical research with its pitfalls and

  14. Small interfering RNA suppression of polyamine analog-induced spermidine/spermine n1-acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Kramer, Debora L; Jell, Jason; Vujcic, Slavoljub; Porter, Carl W

    2003-11-01

    N1,N11-diethylnorspermine (DENSPM) is a polyamine analog that down-regulates polyamine biosynthesis and potently upregulates the polyamine catabolic enzyme spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT). In certain cells, such as SKMEL-28 human melanoma cells, induction of SSAT is associated with rapid apoptosis. In this study, we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) to examine the role of SSAT induction in mediating polyamine pool depletion and apoptosis. siRNA duplexes were designed to target three independent sites in the SSAT mRNA coding region (siSSAT). When transfected under nontoxic conditions, two of the duplexes selectively reduced basal SSAT mRNA in HEK-293 cells by >80% and prevented DENSPM-induced SSAT mRNA by 95% in SK-MEL-28 cells. Treatment of SK-MEL-28 cells with 10 muM DENSPM in the presence of 83 nM siSSAT selectively prevented the 1400-fold induction of SSAT activity by approximately 90% and, in turn, prevented analog depletion of spermine (Spm) pools by approximately 35%. siSSAT also prevented DENSPM-induced cytochrome c release and caspase-3 cleavage at 36 h and apoptosis at 48 h as measured by annexin V staining. Overall, the data directly link analog induction of SSAT to Spm pool depletion and to caspase-dependent apoptosis in DENSPM-treated SK-MEL-28 cells. This represents the first use of siRNA technology directed toward a polyamine gene and the first unequivocal demonstration that SSAT induction initiates events leading to polyamine analog-induced apoptosis. PMID:14573765

  15. Phytophthora Have Distinct Endogenous Small RNA Populations That Include Short Interfering and microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Fahlgren, Noah; Bollmann, Stephanie R.; Kasschau, Kristin D.; Cuperus, Josh T.; Press, Caroline M.; Sullivan, Christopher M.; Chapman, Elisabeth J.; Hoyer, J. Steen; Gilbert, Kerrigan B.; Grünwald, Niklaus J.; Carrington, James C.

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20-30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focused on plant and animal RNA silencing systems. Phytophthora species belong to a phylogenetically distinct group of economically important plant pathogens that cause billions of dollars in yield losses annually as well as ecologically devastating outbreaks. We analyzed the small RNA-generating components of the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum using bioinformatics, genetic, phylogenetic and high-throughput sequencing-based methods. Each species produces two distinct populations of small RNAs that are predominantly 21- or 25-nucleotides long. The 25-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from loci encoding transposable elements and we propose that these small RNAs define a pathway of short-interfering RNAs that silence repetitive genetic elements. The 21-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from inverted repeats, including a novel microRNA family that is conserved among the three species, and several gene families, including Crinkler effectors and type III fibronectins. The Phytophthora microRNA is predicted to target a family of amino acid/auxin permeases, and we propose that 21-nucleotide small RNAs function at the post-transcriptional level. The functional significance of microRNA-guided regulation of amino acid/auxin permeases and the association of 21-nucleotide small RNAs with Crinkler effectors remains unclear, but this work provides a framework for testing the role of small RNAs in Phytophthora biology and pathogenesis in future work. PMID:24204767

  16. Characterization of a defective interfering RNA that contains a mosaic of a plant viral genome

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, T.J.; Jackson, A.O.

    1991-01-01

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since then, we have also discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), a virus structurally related to TBSV. We proposed a thorough characterization of this unique class of symptom modulating RNAs with the overall objective of identifying viral RNA nucleotide, sequences involved in such fundamental processes as virus replication and encapsidation as well as the degree of symptom expression resulting from the viral-DI-host interaction. The proposed research focused on the molecular characterization of the DI RNAs and the helper virus. We had demonstrated that the DIs were collinear deletion mutants of the genome of a cherry strain of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV). We had also shown that these low molecular weight RNAs interfered with the helper plant virus and modulated disease expression by preventing the development of a lethal necrotic disease in susceptible host plants. We also suggested that by exploring the mechanisms associated with the symptom attenuation effect, we might be able to devise novel strategies useful for engineering viral disease resistance.

  17. Delivery of antiviral small interfering RNA with gold nanoparticles inhibits dengue virus infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Amber M.; Shi, Yongliang; Acharya, Dhiraj; Douglas, Jessica R.; Cooley, Amanda; Anderson, John F.; Huang, Faqing

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection in humans can cause flu-like illness, life-threatening haemorrhagic fever or even death. There is no specific anti-DENV therapeutic or approved vaccine currently available, partially due to the possibility of antibody-dependent enhancement reaction. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that target specific viral genes are considered a promising therapeutic alternative against DENV infection. However, in vivo, siRNAs are vulnerable to degradation by serum nucleases and rapid renal excretion due to their small size and anionic character. To enhance siRNA delivery and stability, we complexed anti-DENV siRNAs with biocompatible gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and tested them in vitro. We found that cationic AuNP–siRNA complexes could enter Vero cells and significantly reduce DENV serotype 2 (DENV-2) replication and infectious virion release under both pre- and post-infection conditions. In addition, RNase-treated AuNP–siRNA complexes could still inhibit DENV-2 replication, suggesting that AuNPs maintained siRNA stability. Collectively, these results demonstrated that AuNPs were able to efficiently deliver siRNAs and control infection in vitro, indicating a novel anti-DENV strategy. PMID:24828333

  18. Suppression of Breast Cancer Cell Migration by Small Interfering RNA Delivered by Polyethylenimine-Functionalized Graphene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuan-Pin; Hung, Chao-Ming; Hsu, Yi-Chiang; Zhong, Cai-Yan; Wang, Wan-Rou; Chang, Chi-Chang; Lee, Mon-Juan

    2016-05-01

    The carbon-based nanomaterial graphene can be chemically modified to associate with various molecules such as chemicals and biomolecules and developed as novel carriers for drug and gene delivery. In this study, a nonviral gene transfection reagent was produced by functionalizing graphene oxide (GO) with a polycationic polymer, polyethylenimine (PEI), to increase the biocompatibility of GO and to transfect small interfering RNA (siRNA) against C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), a biomarker associated with cancer metastasis, into invasive breast cancer cells. PEI-functionalized GO (PEI-GO) was a homogeneous aqueous solution that remained in suspension during storage at 4 °C for at least 6 months. The particle size of PEI-GO was 172 ± 4.58 and 188 ± 5.00 nm at 4 and 25 °C, respectively, and increased slightly to 262 ± 17.6 nm at 37 °C, but remained unaltered with time. Binding affinity of PEI-GO toward siRNA was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), in which PEI-GO and siRNA were completely associated at a PEI-GO:siRNA weight ratio of 2:1 and above. The invasive breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, was transfected with PEI-GO in complex with siRNAs against CXCR4 (siCXCR4). Suppression of the mRNA and protein expression of CXCR4 by the PEI-GO/siCXCR4 complex was confirmed by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. In addition, the metastatic potential of MDA-MB-231 cells was attenuated by the PEI-GO/siCXCR4 complex as demonstrated in wound healing assay. Our results suggest that PEI-GO is effective in the delivery of siRNA and may contribute to targeted gene therapy to suppress cancer metastasis.

  19. Codelivery of paclitaxel and small interfering RNA by octadecyl quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan-modified cationic liposome for combined cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ran; Wang, Shi-Bin; Chen, Ai-Zheng; Chen, Wei-Guang; Liu, Yuan-Gang; Wu, Wen-Guo; Kang, Yong-Qiang; Ye, Shi-Fu

    2015-09-01

    Conventional therapeutic approaches for cancer are limited by cancer cell resistance, which has impeded their clinical applications. The main goal of this work was to investigate the combined antitumor effect of paclitaxel with small interfering RNA modified by cationic liposome formed from modified octadecyl quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan. The cationic liposome was composed of 3β-[N-(N', N'-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl]-cholesterol, dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine, and octadecyl quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan. The cationic liposome properties were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and gel retardation assay. The cationic liposome exhibited good properties, such as a small particle size, a narrow particle size distribution, a good spherical shape, a smooth surface, and a good binding ability with small interfering RNA. Most importantly, when combined with paclitaxel and small interfering RNA, the composite cationic liposome induced a great enhancement in the antitumor activity, which showed a significantly higher in vitro cytotoxicity in Bcap-37 cells than liposomal paclitaxel or small interfering RNA alone. In conclusion, the results indicate that cationic liposome could be further developed as a codelivery system for chemotherapy drugs and therapeutic small interfering RNAs. PMID:25838353

  20. Trans-acting small interfering RNA4: key to nutraceutical synthesis in 1 grape development?

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Christopher D.

    2013-01-01

    The facility and versatility of microRNAs (miRNAs) to evolve and change likely underlies how they have become dominant constituents of eukaryotic genomes. In this opinion article I propose that trans-acting small interfering RNA gene 4 (TAS4) evolution may be important for biosynthesis of polyphenolics, arbuscular symbiosis, and bacterial pathogen etiologies. Expression-based and phylogenetic evidence shows that TAS4 targets two novel grape (Vitis vinifera L.) MYB transcription factors (VvMYBA6, VvMYBA7) that spawn phased siRNAs and likely function in nutraceutical bioflavonoid biosynthesis and fruit development. Characterization of the molecular mechanisms of TAS4 control of plant development and integration into biotic and abiotic stress- and nutrient signaling regulatory networks has applicability to molecular breeding and development of strategies for engineering healthier foods. PMID:23993483

  1. Nanotechnologies and controlled release systems for the delivery of antisense oligonucleotides and small interfering RNA

    PubMed Central

    Fattal, Elias; Barratt, Gillian

    2009-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides and small interfering RNA have enormous potential for the treatment of a number of diseases, including cancer. However, several impediments to their widespread use as drugs still have to be overcome: in particular their lack of stability in physiological fluids and their poor penetration into cells. Association with or encapsulation within nano-and microsized drug delivery systems could help to solve these problems. In this review, we describe the progress that has been made using delivery systems composed of natural or synthetic polymers in the form of complexes, nanoparticles or microparticles. This article is part of a themed section on Vector Design and Drug Delivery. For a list of all articles in this section see the end of this paper, or visit: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=200 PMID:19366348

  2. Characterization of defective interfering RNAs associated with RNA plant viruses. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, T.J.; Jackson, A.O.

    1993-04-01

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since the original observation with TBSV, we discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), and many other reports have now appeared characterizing DI and DI-like RNAs in other plant viral infections. We are seeking to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of DI generation and the precise nature of the RNA sequences necessary for DI replication and encapsidation. We also want to address the nature of the DI mediated symptom attenuation and interference effects in plants, and to determine the feasibility of using transgenic plants constitutively expressing DI RNAs for disease control. The progress made on each of these objectives is summarized along with the proposed experiments for the continuation period.

  3. Coarse-grained Simulation of Complexation between Small Interfering RNA and Polycations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zonghui; Ren, Yong; Williford, John-Michael; Mao, Hai-Quan; Luijten, Erik; Northwestern University Collaboration; Johns Hopkins University Collaboration

    Nanoparticles formed through self-assembly of polycations and nucleic acids are promising systems for gene delivery. A full understanding of the behavior of these particles in physiological context requires detailed knowledge of their physical properties. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations can provide insight into the interaction of polymeric carriers with genomic material, but only at limited time and length scales. To overcome these limitations and explore the full complexation process, a reliable coarse-grained model is needed. Here, we systematically develop such a model for a system comprised of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and polyethyleneimine-based carriers, and evaluate the quality of the coarse-grained model through comparison with all-atom simulations. We show that our coarse-grained model provides a reliable description of detailed binding pictures, charge characteristics, and water dynamics, while accelerating the simulations by two orders of magnitude. This makes it possible to quantitatively investigate nanoparticle formation involving multiple siRNA molecules and cationic copolymers.

  4. Silencing of uncoupling protein 2 by small interfering RNA aggravates mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiomyocytes under septic conditions

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, GUILANG; LYU, JUANJUAN; LIU, SHU; HUANG, JINDA; LIU, CUI; XIANG, DAN; XIE, MEIYAN; ZENG, QIYI

    2015-01-01

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) regulates the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cellular energy transduction under physiological or pathological conditions. In this study, we aimed to determine whether mitochondrial UCP2 plays a protective role in cardiomyocytes under septic conditions. In order to mimic the septic condition, rat embryonic cardiomyoblast-derived H9C2 cells were cultured in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus peptidoglycan G (PepG) and small interfering RNA (siRNA) against UCP2 (siUCP2) was used to suppress UCP2 expression. Reverse transcription quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), western blot analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), confocal microscopy and flow cytometry (FCM) were used to detect the mRNA levels, protein levels, mitochondrial morphology and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP or ΔΨm) in qualitative and quantitative analyses, respectively. Indicators of cell damage [lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK), interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the culture supernatant] and mitochondrial function [ROS, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)] were detected. Sepsis enhanced the mRNA and protein expression of UCP2 in the H9C2 cells, damaged the mitochondrial ultrastructure, increased the forward scatter (FSC)/side scatter (SSC) ratio, increased the CK, LDH, TNF-α and IL-6 levels, and lead to the dissipation of MMP, as well as the overproduction of ROS; in addition, the induction of sepsis led to a decrease in ATP levels and the deletion of mtDNA. The silencing of UCP2 aggravated H9C2 cell damage and mitochondrial dysfunction. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that mitochondrial morphology and funtion are damaged in cardiomyocytes under septic conditions, while the silencing of UCP2 using siRNA aggravated this process, indicating that UCP2 may play a protective role in cardiomyocytes under septic conditions. PMID:25873251

  5. MicroRNA superfamilies descended from miR390 and their roles in secondary small interfering RNA Biogenesis in Eudicots.

    PubMed

    Xia, Rui; Meyers, Blake C; Liu, Zhongchi; Beers, Eric P; Ye, Songqing; Liu, Zongrang

    2013-05-01

    Trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs) are a major class of small RNAs performing essential biological functions in plants. The first reported tasiRNA pathway, that of miR173-TAS1/2, produces tasiRNAs regulating a set of pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) genes and has been characterized only in Arabidopsis thaliana to date. Here, we demonstrate that the microRNA (miRNA)-trans-acting small interfering RNA gene (TAS)-pentatricopeptide repeat-containing gene (PPR)-small interfering RNA pathway is a highly dynamic and widespread feature of eudicots. Nine eudicot plants, representing six different plant families, have evolved similar tasiRNA pathways to initiate phased small interfering RNA (phasiRNA) production from PPR genes. The PPR phasiRNA production is triggered by different 22-nucleotide miRNAs, including miR7122, miR1509, and fve-PPRtri1/2, and through distinct mechanistic strategies exploiting miRNA direct targeting or indirect targeting through TAS-like genes (TASL), one-hit or two-hit, or even two layers of tasiRNA-TASL interactions. Intriguingly, although those miRNA triggers display high sequence divergence caused by the occurrence of frequent point mutations and splicing shifts, their corresponding MIRNA genes show pronounced identity to the Arabidopsis MIR173, implying a common origin of this group of miRNAs (super-miR7122). Further analyses reveal that super-miR7122 may have evolved from a newly defined miR4376 superfamily, which probably originated from the widely conserved miR390. The elucidation of this evolutionary path expands our understanding of the course of miRNA evolution, especially for relatively conserved miRNA families. PMID:23695981

  6. Caenorhabditis elegans RSD-2 and RSD-6 promote germ cell immortality by maintaining small interfering RNA populations.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Aisa; Sarkies, Peter; Simon, Matt; Doebley, Anna-Lisa; Goldstein, Leonard D; Hedges, Ashley; Ikegami, Kohta; Alvares, Stacy M; Yang, Liwei; LaRocque, Jeannine R; Hall, Julie; Miska, Eric A; Ahmed, Shawn

    2014-10-14

    Germ cells are maintained in a pristine non-aging state as they proliferate over generations. Here, we show that a novel function of the Caenorhabditis elegans RNA interference proteins RNAi spreading defective (RSD)-2 and RSD-6 is to promote germ cell immortality at high temperature. rsd mutants cultured at high temperatures became progressively sterile and displayed loss of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that target spermatogenesis genes, simple repeats, and transposons. Desilencing of spermatogenesis genes occurred in late-generation rsd mutants, although defective spermatogenesis was insufficient to explain the majority of sterility. Increased expression of repetitive loci occurred in both germ and somatic cells of late-generation rsd mutant adults, suggesting that desilencing of many heterochromatic segments of the genome contributes to sterility. Nuclear RNAi defective (NRDE)-2 promotes nuclear silencing in response to exogenous double-stranded RNA, and our data imply that RSD-2, RSD-6, and NRDE-2 function in a common transgenerational nuclear silencing pathway that responds to endogenous siRNAs. We propose that RSD-2 and RSD-6 promote germ cell immortality at stressful temperatures by maintaining transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of endogenous siRNA populations that promote genome silencing. PMID:25258416

  7. Identification of Druggable Targets for Radiation Mitigation Using a Small Interfering RNA Screening Assay

    PubMed Central

    Zellefrow, Crystal D.; Sharlow, Elizabeth R.; Epperly, Michael W.; Reese, Celeste E.; Shun, Tongying; Lira, Ana; Greenberger, Joel S.; Lazo, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, there is a serious absence of pharmaceutically attractive small molecules that mitigate the lethal effects of an accidental or intentional public exposure to toxic doses of ionizing radiation. Moreover, cellular systems that emulate the radiobiologically relevant cell populations and that are suitable for high-throughput screening have not been established. Therefore, we examined two human pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cell lines for use in an unbiased phenotypic small interfering RNA (siRNA) assay to identify proteins with the potential of being drug targets for the protection of human cell populations against clinically relevant ionizing radiation doses that cause acute radiation syndrome. Of the two human cell lines tested, NCCIT cells had optimal growth characteristics in a 384 well format, exhibited radiation sensitivity (D0 = 1.3 ± 0.1 Gy and ñ = 2.0 ± 0.6) comparable to the radiosensitivity of stem cell populations associated with human death within 30 days after total-body irradiation. Moreover, they internalized siRNA after 4 Gy irradiation enabling siRNA library screening. Therefore, we used the human NCCIT cell line for the radiation mitigation study with a siRNA library that silenced 5,520 genes known or hypothesized to be potential therapeutic targets. Exploiting computational methodologies, we identified 113 siRNAs with potential radiomitigative properties, which were further refined to 29 siRNAs with phosphoinositide-3-kinase regulatory subunit 1 (p85α) being among the highest confidence candidate gene products. Colony formation assays revealed radiation mitigation when the phosphoinositide-3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 was given after irradiation of 32D cl 3 cells (D0 = 1.3 ± 0.1 Gy and ñ = 2.3 ± 0.3 for the vehicle control treated cells compared to D0 = 1.2 ± 0.1 Gy and ñ = 6.0 ± 0.8 for the LY294002 treated cells, P = 0.0004). LY294002 and two other PI3K inhibitors, PI 828 and GSK 1059615, also mitigated radiation

  8. Identification of druggable targets for radiation mitigation using a small interfering RNA screening assay.

    PubMed

    Zellefrow, Crystal D; Sharlow, Elizabeth R; Epperly, Michael W; Reese, Celeste E; Shun, Tongying; Lira, Ana; Greenberger, Joel S; Lazo, John S

    2012-09-01

    Currently, there is a serious absence of pharmaceutically attractive small molecules that mitigate the lethal effects of an accidental or intentional public exposure to toxic doses of ionizing radiation. Moreover, cellular systems that emulate the radiobiologically relevant cell populations and that are suitable for high-throughput screening have not been established. Therefore, we examined two human pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cell lines for use in an unbiased phenotypic small interfering RNA (siRNA) assay to identify proteins with the potential of being drug targets for the protection of human cell populations against clinically relevant ionizing radiation doses that cause acute radiation syndrome. Of the two human cell lines tested, NCCIT cells had optimal growth characteristics in a 384 well format, exhibited radiation sensitivity (D(0) = 1.3 ± 0.1 Gy and ñ = 2.0 ± 0.6) comparable to the radiosensitivity of stem cell populations associated with human death within 30 days after total-body irradiation. Moreover, they internalized siRNA after 4 Gy irradiation enabling siRNA library screening. Therefore, we used the human NCCIT cell line for the radiation mitigation study with a siRNA library that silenced 5,520 genes known or hypothesized to be potential therapeutic targets. Exploiting computational methodologies, we identified 113 siRNAs with potential radiomitigative properties, which were further refined to 29 siRNAs with phosphoinositide-3-kinase regulatory subunit 1 (p85α) being among the highest confidence candidate gene products. Colony formation assays revealed radiation mitigation when the phosphoinositide-3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 was given after irradiation of 32D cl 3 cells (D(0) = 1.3 ± 0.1 Gy and ñ = 2.3 ± 0.3 for the vehicle control treated cells compared to D(0) = 1.2 ± 0.1 Gy and ñ = 6.0 ± 0.8 for the LY294002 treated cells, P = 0.0004). LY294002 and two other PI3K inhibitors, PI 828 and GSK 1059615, also mitigated radiation

  9. MicroRNA Superfamilies Descended from miR390 and Their Roles in Secondary Small Interfering RNA Biogenesis in Eudicots[W

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Rui; Meyers, Blake C.; Liu, Zhongchi; Beers, Eric P.; Ye, Songqing; Liu, Zongrang

    2013-01-01

    Trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs) are a major class of small RNAs performing essential biological functions in plants. The first reported tasiRNA pathway, that of miR173-TAS1/2, produces tasiRNAs regulating a set of pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) genes and has been characterized only in Arabidopsis thaliana to date. Here, we demonstrate that the microRNA (miRNA)-trans-acting small interfering RNA gene (TAS)-pentatricopeptide repeat-containing gene (PPR)-small interfering RNA pathway is a highly dynamic and widespread feature of eudicots. Nine eudicot plants, representing six different plant families, have evolved similar tasiRNA pathways to initiate phased small interfering RNA (phasiRNA) production from PPR genes. The PPR phasiRNA production is triggered by different 22-nucleotide miRNAs, including miR7122, miR1509, and fve-PPRtri1/2, and through distinct mechanistic strategies exploiting miRNA direct targeting or indirect targeting through TAS-like genes (TASL), one-hit or two-hit, or even two layers of tasiRNA–TASL interactions. Intriguingly, although those miRNA triggers display high sequence divergence caused by the occurrence of frequent point mutations and splicing shifts, their corresponding MIRNA genes show pronounced identity to the Arabidopsis MIR173, implying a common origin of this group of miRNAs (super-miR7122). Further analyses reveal that super-miR7122 may have evolved from a newly defined miR4376 superfamily, which probably originated from the widely conserved miR390. The elucidation of this evolutionary path expands our understanding of the course of miRNA evolution, especially for relatively conserved miRNA families. PMID:23695981

  10. Non-Viral Nanoparticle Delivers Small Interfering RNA to Macrophages In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei; Gao, Yunxiang; Caja, Kevin; Zhao, Bocheng; Kim, Julian A.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are increasingly being viewed as therapeutic target for various cancers and many inflammatory diseases. Sequence specific gene reduction by siRNA represents an attractive approach to modulate macrophage function. However, delivery of the therapeutic siRNA into macrophages by non-viral nanoparticles has been a major technical challenge. In this study, we developed a glucan-based siRNA carrier system (BG34-10-Re-I) and demonstrated that the BG34-10-Re-I can effectively assemble siRNA into uniformly distributed nanoparticles of the novel core-shell structure. The BG34-10-Re-I/siRNA nanoparticles effectively reduced gene expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in primary macrophages at both protein and mRNA level. The nanoparticles also mediated a sustained reduction of MIF within primary macrophages. Moreover, systemic injection of the nanoparticles into the Balb/c mice bearing 4T1 mammary tumors resulted in the MIF reduction in tumor-associated macrophages. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the glucan-shell and the siRNA-core structure contribute to the effective delivery of MIF siRNA to macrophages both in vitro and in vivo. This study represents the first development of the primary macrophage MIF gene targeted non-viral nanoparticle system for both in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:25799489

  11. Arabidopsis RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and dicer-like proteins in antiviral defense and small interfering RNA biogenesis during Turnip Mosaic Virus infection.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ruiz, Hernan; Takeda, Atsushi; Chapman, Elisabeth J; Sullivan, Christopher M; Fahlgren, Noah; Brempelis, Katherine J; Carrington, James C

    2010-02-01

    Plants respond to virus infections by activation of RNA-based silencing, which limits infection at both the single-cell and system levels. Viruses encode RNA silencing suppressor proteins that interfere with this response. Wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana is immune to silencing suppressor (HC-Pro)-deficient Turnip mosaic virus, but immunity was lost in the absence of DICER-LIKE proteins DCL4 and DCL2. Systematic analysis of susceptibility and small RNA formation in Arabidopsis mutants lacking combinations of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR) and DCL proteins revealed that the vast majority of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were dependent on DCL4 and RDR1, although full antiviral defense also required DCL2 and RDR6. Among the DCLs, DCL4 was sufficient for antiviral silencing in inoculated leaves, but DCL2 and DCL4 were both involved in silencing in systemic tissues (inflorescences). Basal levels of antiviral RNA silencing and siRNA biogenesis were detected in mutants lacking RDR1, RDR2, and RDR6, indicating an alternate route to form double-stranded RNA that does not depend on the three previously characterized RDR proteins. PMID:20190077

  12. Suppression of Breast Cancer Cell Migration by Small Interfering RNA Delivered by Polyethylenimine-Functionalized Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuan-Pin; Hung, Chao-Ming; Hsu, Yi-Chiang; Zhong, Cai-Yan; Wang, Wan-Rou; Chang, Chi-Chang; Lee, Mon-Juan

    2016-12-01

    The carbon-based nanomaterial graphene can be chemically modified to associate with various molecules such as chemicals and biomolecules and developed as novel carriers for drug and gene delivery. In this study, a nonviral gene transfection reagent was produced by functionalizing graphene oxide (GO) with a polycationic polymer, polyethylenimine (PEI), to increase the biocompatibility of GO and to transfect small interfering RNA (siRNA) against C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), a biomarker associated with cancer metastasis, into invasive breast cancer cells. PEI-functionalized GO (PEI-GO) was a homogeneous aqueous solution that remained in suspension during storage at 4 °C for at least 6 months. The particle size of PEI-GO was 172 ± 4.58 and 188 ± 5.00 nm at 4 and 25 °C, respectively, and increased slightly to 262 ± 17.6 nm at 37 °C, but remained unaltered with time. Binding affinity of PEI-GO toward siRNA was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), in which PEI-GO and siRNA were completely associated at a PEI-GO:siRNA weight ratio of 2:1 and above. The invasive breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, was transfected with PEI-GO in complex with siRNAs against CXCR4 (siCXCR4). Suppression of the mRNA and protein expression of CXCR4 by the PEI-GO/siCXCR4 complex was confirmed by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. In addition, the metastatic potential of MDA-MB-231 cells was attenuated by the PEI-GO/siCXCR4 complex as demonstrated in wound healing assay. Our results suggest that PEI-GO is effective in the delivery of siRNA and may contribute to targeted gene therapy to suppress cancer metastasis. PMID:27173676

  13. One-pot synthesis of pH-responsive hybrid nanogel particles for the intracellular delivery of small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Sm Z; Cevenini, Armando; Yazdi, Iman K; Parodi, Alessandro; Evangelopoulos, Michael; Corbo, Claudia; Scaria, Shilpa; Hu, Ye; Haddix, Seth G; Corradetti, Bruna; Salvatore, Francesco; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-05-01

    This report describes a novel, one-pot synthesis of hybrid nanoparticles formed by a nanostructured inorganic silica core and an organic pH-responsive hydrogel shell. This easy-to-perform, oil-in-water emulsion process synthesizes fluorescently-doped silica nanoparticles wrapped within a tunable coating of cationic poly(2-diethylaminoethyl methacrylate) hydrogel in one step. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis demonstrated that the hydrogel-coated nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in the aqueous phase. The formation of covalent chemical bonds between the silica and the polymer increases the stability of the organic phase around the inorganic core as demonstrated by thermogravimetric analysis. The cationic nature of the hydrogel is responsible for the pH buffering properties of the nanostructured system and was evaluated by titration experiments. Zeta-potential analysis demonstrated that the charge of the system was reversed when transitioned from acidic to basic pH and vice versa. Consequently, small interfering RNA (siRNA) can be loaded and released in an acidic pH environment thereby enabling the hybrid particles and their payload to avoid endosomal sequestration and enzymatic degradation. These nanoparticles, loaded with specific siRNA molecules directed towards the transcript of the membrane receptor CXCR4, significantly decreased the expression of this protein in a human breast cancer cell line (i.e., MDA-MB-231). Moreover, intravenous administration of siRNA-loaded nanoparticles demonstrated a preferential accumulation at the tumor site that resulted in a reduction of CXCR4 expression. PMID:26901429

  14. Effective Small Interfering RNA Therapy to Treat CLCN7-dependent Autosomal Dominant Osteopetrosis Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Capulli, Mattia; Maurizi, Antonio; Ventura, Luca; Rucci, Nadia; Teti, Anna

    2015-01-01

    In about 70% of patients affected by autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type 2 (ADO2), osteoclast activity is reduced by heterozygous mutations of the CLCN7 gene, encoding the ClC-7 chloride/hydrogen antiporter. CLCN7G215R-, CLCN7R767W-, and CLCN7R286W-specific siRNAs silenced transfected mutant mRNA/EGFP in HEK293 cells, in RAW264.7 cells and in human osteoclasts, with no change of CLCN7WT mRNA and no effect of scrambled siRNA on the mutant transcripts. Osteoclasts from Clcn7G213R ADO2 mice showed reduced bone resorption, a condition rescued by Clcn7G213R-specific siRNA. Treatment of ADO2 mice with Clcn7G213R-specific siRNA induced increase of bone resorption variables and decrease of trabecular bone mass, leading to an overall improvement of the osteopetrotic bone phenotype. Treatment did not induce overt adverse effects and was effective also with siRNAs specific for other mutants. These results demonstrate that a siRNA-based experimental treatment of ADO2 is feasible, and underscore a translational impact for future strategy to cure this therapeutically neglected form of osteopetrosis. PMID:26325626

  15. Small interfering RNA pathway modulates persistent infection of a plant virus in its insect vector

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Hanhong; Wang, Haitao; Chen, Qian; Chen, Hongyan; Jia, Dongsheng; Mao, Qianzhuo; Wei, Taiyun

    2016-01-01

    Plant reoviruses, rhabdoviruses, tospoviruses, and tenuiviruses are transmitted by insect vectors in a persistent-propagative manner. How such persistent infection of plant viruses in insect vectors is established and maintained remains poorly understood. In this study, we used rice gall dwarf virus (RGDV), a plant reovirus, and its main vector leafhopper Recilia dorsalis as a virus–insect system to determine how the small interference (siRNA) pathway modulates persistent infection of a plant virus in its insect vector. We showed that a conserved siRNA antiviral response was triggered by the persistent replication of RGDV in cultured leafhopper cells and in intact insects, by appearance of virus-specific siRNAs, primarily 21-nt long, and the increased expression of siRNA pathway core components Dicer-2 and Argonaute-2. Silencing of Dicer-2 using RNA interference strongly suppressed production of virus-specific siRNAs, promoted viral accumulation, and caused cytopathological changes in vitro and in vivo. When the viral accumulation level rose above a certain threshold of viral genome copy (1.32 × 1014 copies/μg insect RNA), the infection of the leafhopper by RGDV was lethal rather than persistent. Taken together, our results revealed a new finding that the siRNA pathway in insect vector can modulate persistent infection of plant viruses. PMID:26864546

  16. DICER-LIKE 4 functions in trans-acting small interfering RNA biogenesis and vegetative phase change in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhixin; Allen, Edwards; Wilken, April; Carrington, James C

    2005-09-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana contains four DICER-LIKE (DCL) genes with specialized functions in small RNA biogenesis for RNA interference-related processes. A mutant with defects in DCL4 was identified and analyzed for microRNA- and endogenous, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-related functions. The dcl4-2 mutant contained normal or near-normal levels of microRNAs (21 nt) and heterochromatin-associated siRNAs (24 nt). In contrast, this mutant lacked each of three families of 21-nt trans-acting siRNAs (ta-siRNAs) and possessed elevated levels of ta-siRNA target transcripts. The dcl4-2 mutant resembled an rna-dependent RNA polymerase 6 mutant in that both mutants lacked ta-siRNAs and displayed heterochronic defects in which vegetative phase change was accelerated. Double mutant analyses with dcl2-1, dcl3-1, and dcl4-2 alleles revealed hierarchical redundancy among DCL activities, leading to alternative processing of ta-siRNA precursors in the absence of DCL4. These data support the concept that plants have specialized and compartmentalized DCL functions for biogenesis of distinct small RNA classes. PMID:16129836

  17. Effect of Interleukin-8 Gene Silencing With Liposome-Encapsulated Small Interfering RNA on Ovarian Cancer Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, William M.; Lin, Yvonne G.; Spannuth, Whitney A.; Fletcher, Mavis S.; Kamat, Aparna A.; Han, Liz Y.; Landen, Charles N.; Jennings, Nicholas; De Geest, Koen; Langley, Robert R.; Villares, Gabriel; Sanguino, Angela; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Bar-Eli, Menashe M.; Sood, Anil K.

    2009-01-01

    Background Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a proangiogenic cytokine that is overexpressed in many human cancers. We investigated the clinical and biologic significance of IL-8 in ovarian carcinoma using human samples and orthotopic mouse models. Methods Tumor expression of IL-8 was assessed by immunohistochemistry among ovarian cancer patients (n = 102) with available clinical and survival data. We examined the effect of IL-8 gene silencing with small interfering RNAs incorporated into neutral liposomes (siRNA-DOPCs), alone and in combination with docetaxel, on in vivo tumor growth, angiogenesis (microvessel density), and tumor cell proliferation in mice (n = 10 per treatment group) bearing orthotopic taxane-sensitive (HeyA8 and SKOV3ip1) and taxane-resistant (SKOV3ip2.TR) ovarian tumors. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Of the 102 cancer specimens, 43 (42%) had high IL-8 expression and 59 (58%) had low or no IL-8 expression; high IL-8 expression was associated with advanced tumor stage (P = .019), high tumor grade (P = .031), and worse survival (median survival for patients with high vs low IL-8 expression: 1.62 vs 3.79 years; P < .001). Compared with empty liposomes, IL-8 siRNA-DOPC reduced the mean tumor weight by 32% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 14% to 50%; P = .03) and 52% (95% CI = 27% to 78%; P = .03) in the HeyA8 and SKOV3ip1 mouse models, respectively. In all three mouse models, treatment with IL-8 siRNA-DOPC plus the taxane docetaxel reduced tumor growth the most compared with empty liposomes (77% to 98% reduction in tumor growth; P < .01 for all). In the HeyA8 and SKOV3ip1 models, tumors from mice treated with IL-8 siRNA-DOPC alone had lower microvessel density than tumors from mice treated with empty liposomes (HeyA8: 34% lower, 95% CI = 32% to 36% lower [P = .002]; SKOV3ip1: 39% lower, 95% CI = 34% to 44% lower [P = .007]). Compared with empty liposomes, IL-8 siRNA-DOPC plus docetaxel reduced tumor cell proliferation by 35% (95% CI = 25% to 44

  18. In silico reconstruction of viral genomes from small RNAs improves virus-derived small interfering RNA profiling.

    PubMed

    Vodovar, Nicolas; Goic, Bertsy; Blanc, Hervé; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2011-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is the essential component of antiviral immunity in invertebrates and plants. One of the landmarks of the antiviral RNAi response is the production of virus-derived small interfering RNA (vsiRNA) from viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). vsiRNAs constitute a fragmented image of the viral genome sequence that results from Dicer cleavage. vsiRNA sequence profiling is used extensively as a surrogate to study the antiviral RNAi response by determining the nature of the viral dsRNA molecules exposed to and processed by the RNAi machinery. The accuracy of these profiles depends on the actual viral genome sequence used as a reference to align vsiRNA reads, and the interpretation of inaccurate profiles can be misleading. Using Flock house virus and Drosophila melanogaster as a model RNAi-competent organism, we show accurate reconstruction of full-length virus reference sequence from vsiRNAs and prediction of the structure of defective interfering particles (DIs). We developed a Perl script, named Paparazzi, that reconstitutes viral genomes through an iterative alignment/consensus call procedure using a related reference sequence as scaffold. As prevalent DI-derived reads introduce artifacts during reconstruction, Paparazzi eliminates DI-specific reads to improve the quality of the reconstructed genome. Paparazzi constitutes a promising alternative to Sanger sequencing in this context and an effective tool to study antiviral RNAi mechanisms by accurately quantifying vsiRNA along the replicating viral genome. We further discuss Paparazzi as a companion tool for virus discovery as it provides full-length genome sequences and corrects for potential artifacts of assembly. PMID:21880776

  19. In Silico Reconstruction of Viral Genomes from Small RNAs Improves Virus-Derived Small Interfering RNA Profiling ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Vodovar, Nicolas; Goic, Bertsy; Blanc, Hervé; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is the essential component of antiviral immunity in invertebrates and plants. One of the landmarks of the antiviral RNAi response is the production of virus-derived small interfering RNA (vsiRNA) from viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). vsiRNAs constitute a fragmented image of the viral genome sequence that results from Dicer cleavage. vsiRNA sequence profiling is used extensively as a surrogate to study the antiviral RNAi response by determining the nature of the viral dsRNA molecules exposed to and processed by the RNAi machinery. The accuracy of these profiles depends on the actual viral genome sequence used as a reference to align vsiRNA reads, and the interpretation of inaccurate profiles can be misleading. Using Flock house virus and Drosophila melanogaster as a model RNAi-competent organism, we show accurate reconstruction of full-length virus reference sequence from vsiRNAs and prediction of the structure of defective interfering particles (DIs). We developed a Perl script, named Paparazzi, that reconstitutes viral genomes through an iterative alignment/consensus call procedure using a related reference sequence as scaffold. As prevalent DI-derived reads introduce artifacts during reconstruction, Paparazzi eliminates DI-specific reads to improve the quality of the reconstructed genome. Paparazzi constitutes a promising alternative to Sanger sequencing in this context and an effective tool to study antiviral RNAi mechanisms by accurately quantifying vsiRNA along the replicating viral genome. We further discuss Paparazzi as a companion tool for virus discovery as it provides full-length genome sequences and corrects for potential artifacts of assembly. PMID:21880776

  20. Effect of small interfering RNA against Paracin 1.7 bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus paracasei HD1-7.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jingping; Wang, Yang; Gao, Dongni; Ping, Wenxiang

    2015-09-01

    Lactobacillus paracasei HD1-7 (CCTCCM 205015), isolated from Chinese sauerkraut fermentation broth, contains the bacteriocin Paracin 1.7 which possesses broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. The gene-silencing effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a potential strategy for further understanding the mechanism of production of Paracin 1.7 by L. paracasei HD1-7. In this study, the effect of siRNA on the expression of the most important proteins in the production of Paracin 1.7, sensor kinase (prcK) and response regulator (prcR), was investigated. SiRNA were designed against prcK and prcR, and qRT-PCR was performed to examine the expression of prcK and prcR mRNA. The efficacy of siRNA was determined by comparing the level of antimicrobial activity of the strains. qRT-PCR showed that siRNA-K4 and siRNA-K5 significantly inhibited the expression of prcK mRNA, and siRNA-R4 and siRNA-R6 significantly inhibited the expression of prcR mRNA. The proteins levels and antibacterial activities of mutant strains were lower than the original and control groups, respectively. The results demonstrate that siRNA inhibited both mRNA expression and the production of Paracin 1.7 in L. paracasei HD1-7. Targeting of prcK and prcR with siRNA appears to be a novel strategy for researching the mechanism of Paracin 1.7 production by L. paracasei HD1-7. PMID:26011063

  1. Small Interfering RNA Targeted to ASPP2 Promotes Progression of Experimental Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yu-Jing; Huang, Lv-Zhen; Li, Xiao-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is vital in proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) development. Apoptosis-stimulating proteins of p53 (ASPP2) have recently been reported to participate in EMT. However, the role of ASPP2 in PVR pathogenesis has not been identified. Methods. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the expression of ASPP2 in epiretinal membranes of PVR patients. ARPE-19 cells were transfected with ASPP2-siRNA, followed with measurement of cell cytotoxicity, proliferation, and migration ability. EMT markers and related inflammatory and fibrosis cytokines were measured by western blot or flow cytometry. Additionally, PVR rat models were induced by intravitreal injection of ARPE-19 cells transfected with ASPP2-siRNA and evaluated accordingly. Results. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed less intense expression of ASPP2 in PVR membranes. ASPP2 knockdown facilitated the proliferation and migration of RPE cells and enhanced the expression of mesenchymal markers such as alpha smooth muscle actin, fibronectin, and ZEB1. Meanwhile, ASPP2-siRNA increased EMT-related and inflammatory cytokines, including TGF-β, CTGF, VEGF, TNF-α, and interleukins. PVR severities were more pronounced in the rat models with ASPP2-siRNA treatment. Conclusions. ASPP2 knockdown promoted EMT of ARPE-19 cells in vitro and exacerbated the progression of experimental PVR in vivo, possibly via inflammatory and fibrosis cytokines. PMID:27378826

  2. Small interfering RNA targeting m2 gene induces effective and long term inhibition of influenza A virus replication.

    PubMed

    Sui, Hong-Yan; Zhao, Guang-Yu; Huang, Jian-Dong; Jin, Dong-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) provides a powerful new means to inhibit viral infection specifically. However, the selection of siRNA-resistant viruses is a major concern in the use of RNAi as antiviral therapeutics. In this study, we conducted a lentiviral vector with a H1-short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression cassette to deliver small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) into mammalian cells. Using this vector that also expresses enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) as surrogate marker, stable shRNA-expressing cell lines were successfully established and the inhibition efficiencies of rationally designed siRNAs targeting to conserved regions of influenza A virus genome were assessed. The results showed that a siRNA targeting influenza M2 gene (siM2) potently inhibited viral replication. The siM2 was not only effective for H1N1 virus but also for highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1. In addition to its M2 inhibition, the siM2 also inhibited NP mRNA accumulation and protein expression. A long term inhibition effect of the siM2 was demonstrated and the emergence of siRNA-resistant mutants in influenza quasispecies was not observed. Taken together, our study suggested that M2 gene might be an optimal RNAi target for antiviral therapy. These findings provide useful information for the development of RNAi-based prophylaxis and therapy for human influenza virus infection. PMID:19479060

  3. Biodistribution of Small Interfering RNA at the Organ and Cellular Levels after Lipid Nanoparticle-mediated Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bin; Keough, Ed; Matter, Andrea; Leander, Karen; Young, Stephanie; Carlini, Ed; Sachs, Alan B.; Tao, Weikang; Abrams, Marc; Howell, Bonnie; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Chemically stabilized small interfering RNA (siRNA) can be delivered systemically by intravenous injection of lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) in rodents and primates. The biodistribution and kinetics of LNP–siRNA delivery in mice at organ and cellular resolution have been studied using immunofluorescence (IF) staining and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). At 0.5 and 2 hr post tail vein injection of Cy5-labeled siRNA encapsulated in LNP, the organ rank-order of siRNA levels is liver > spleen > kidney, with only negligible accumulation in duodenum, lung, heart, and brain. Similar conclusions were drawn by using qPCR to measure tissue siRNA levels as a secondary end point. siRNA levels in these tissues decreased by more than 10-fold after 24 hr. Within the liver, LNPs delivered siRNA to hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, and sinusoids in a time-dependent manner, as revealed by IF staining and signal quantitation methods established using OPERA/Columbus software. siRNA first accumulated in liver sinusoids and trafficked to hepatocytes by 2 hr post dose, corresponding to the onset of target mRNA silencing. Fluorescence in situ hybridization methods were used to detect both strands of siRNA in fixed tissues. Collectively, the authors have implemented a platform to evaluate biodistribution of siRNA across cell types and across tissues in vivo, with the objective of elucidating the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationship to guide optimization of delivery vehicles. PMID:21804077

  4. Structural features of microRNA (miRNA) precursors and their relevance to miRNA biogenesis and small interfering RNA/short hairpin RNA design.

    PubMed

    Krol, Jacek; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Wilczynska, Urszula; Drath, Maria; Jasinska, Anna; Kaczynska, Danuta; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2004-10-01

    We have established the structures of 10 human microRNA (miRNA) precursors using biochemical methods. Eight of these structures turned out to be different from those that were computer-predicted. The differences localized in the terminal loop region and at the opposite side of the precursor hairpin stem. We have analyzed the features of these structures from the perspectives of miRNA biogenesis and active strand selection. We demonstrated the different thermodynamic stability profiles for pre-miRNA hairpins harboring miRNAs at their 5'- and 3'-sides and discussed their functional implications. Our results showed that miRNA prediction based on predicted precursor structures may give ambiguous results, and the success rate is significantly higher for the experimentally determined structures. On the other hand, the differences between the predicted and experimentally determined structures did not affect the stability of termini produced through "conceptual dicing." This result confirms the value of thermodynamic analysis based on mfold as a predictor of strand section by RNAi-induced silencing complex (RISC). PMID:15292246

  5. Inhibition of PARP1 by small interfering RNA enhances docetaxel activity against human prostate cancer PC3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenqi; Kong, Zhenzhen; Duan, Xiaolu; Zhu, Hanliang; Li, Shujue; Zeng, Shaohua; Liang, Yeping; Iliakis, George; Gui, Zhiming; Yang, Dong

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •PARP1 siRNA enhances docetaxel’s activity against PC3 cells. •PARP1 siRNA enhances docetaxel’s activity against EGFR/Akt/FOXO1 pathway. •PARP1 siRNA and PARP1 inhibitor differently affect the phosphorylation and expression of FOXO1. -- Abstract: Though poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitors have benefits in combination with radiotherapy in prostate cancers, few is known about the exactly role and underlying mechanism of PARP1 in combination with chemotherapy agents. Here our data revealed that inhibition of PARP1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) could enhance docetaxel’s activity against PC3 cells, which is associated with an accelerate repression of EGF/Akt/FOXO1 signaling pathway. Our results provide a novel role of PARP1 in transcription regulation of EGFR/Akt/FOXO1 signaling pathway and indicate that PARP1 siRNA combined with docetaxel can be an innovative treatment strategy to potentially improve outcomes in CRPC patients.

  6. Host-virus interaction: the antiviral defense function of small interfering RNAs can be enhanced by host microRNA-7 in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Liu, Dongyun; Zhang, Sheng; Wei, Xiujuan; Song, Jie; Zhang, Yupei; Jin, Min; Shen, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xinwei; Feng, Zhichun; Li, Junwen

    2015-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) directed against poliovirus (PV) and other viruses effectively inhibit viral replication and have been developed as antiviral agents. Here, we demonstrate that a specific siRNA targeting the region between nucleotides 100–125 (siRNA-100) from the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of PV plays a critical role in inhibiting PV replication. Our data demonstrate that siRNA-100 treatment can greatly reduce PV titers, resulting in up-regulation of host microRNA-7 (miR-7), which in turn, leads to enhance inhibition of PV infection further. Moreover, our results suggest that siRNA-100 can also impair the spread of PV to uninfected cells by increasing host resistance to PV, resulting in decreasing necrosis and cytopathic effects (CPE) levels, as well as prolonging the survival of infected cells. Indeed, the active antiviral effect of siRNA-100 was potentially supplemented by the activity of miR-7, and both of them can serve as stabilizing factors for maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Results of this study identify a molecular mechanism of RNAi for antiviral defense, and extend our knowledge of the complex interplay between host and PV, which will provide a basis for the development of effective RNAi-based therapies designed to inhibit PV replication and protect host cells. PMID:26067353

  7. P-SAMS: a web site for plant artificial microRNA and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNA design

    PubMed Central

    Fahlgren, Noah; Hill, Steven T.; Carrington, James C.; Carbonell, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The Plant Small RNA Maker Site (P-SAMS) is a web tool for the simple and automated design of artificial miRNAs (amiRNAs) and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNAs (syn-tasiRNAs) for efficient and specific targeted gene silencing in plants. P-SAMS includes two applications, P-SAMS amiRNA Designer and P-SAMS syn-tasiRNA Designer. The navigation through both applications is wizard-assisted, and the job runtime is relatively short. Both applications output the sequence of designed small RNA(s), and the sequence of the two oligonucleotides required for cloning into ‘B/c’ compatible vectors. Availability and implementation: The P-SAMS website is available at http://p-sams.carringtonlab.org. Contact: acarbonell@ibmcp.upv.es or nfahlgren@danforthcenter.org PMID:26382195

  8. The p122 Subunit of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Replicase Is a Potent Silencing Suppressor and Compromises both Small Interfering RNA- and MicroRNA-Mediated Pathways▿

    PubMed Central

    Csorba, Tibor; Bovi, Aurelie; Dalmay, Tamás; Burgyán, József

    2007-01-01

    One of the functions of RNA silencing in plants is to defend against molecular parasites, such as viruses, retrotransposons, and transgenes. Plant viruses are inducers, as well as targets, of RNA silencing-based antiviral defense. Replication intermediates or folded viral RNAs activate RNA silencing, generating small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which are the key players in the antiviral response. Viruses are able to counteract RNA silencing by expressing silencing-suppressor proteins. It has been shown that many of the identified silencing-suppressor proteins bind long double-stranded RNA or siRNAs and thereby prevent assembly of the silencing effector complexes. In this study, we show that the 122-kDa replicase subunit (p122) of crucifer-infecting Tobacco mosaic virus (cr-TMV) is a potent silencing-suppressor protein. We found that the p122 protein preferentially binds to double-stranded 21-nucleotide (nt) siRNA and microRNA (miRNA) intermediates with 2-nt 3′ overhangs inhibiting the incorporation of siRNA and miRNA into silencing-related complexes (e.g., RNA-induced silencing complex [RISC]) both in vitro and in planta but cannot interfere with previously programmed RISCs. In addition, our results also suggest that the virus infection and/or sequestration of the siRNA and miRNA molecules by p122 enhances miRNA accumulation despite preventing its methylation. However, the p122 silencing suppressor does not prevent the methylation of certain miRNAs in hst-15 mutants, in which the nuclear export of miRNAs is compromised. PMID:17715232

  9. The p122 subunit of Tobacco Mosaic Virus replicase is a potent silencing suppressor and compromises both small interfering RNA- and microRNA-mediated pathways.

    PubMed

    Csorba, Tibor; Bovi, Aurelie; Dalmay, Tamás; Burgyán, József

    2007-11-01

    One of the functions of RNA silencing in plants is to defend against molecular parasites, such as viruses, retrotransposons, and transgenes. Plant viruses are inducers, as well as targets, of RNA silencing-based antiviral defense. Replication intermediates or folded viral RNAs activate RNA silencing, generating small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which are the key players in the antiviral response. Viruses are able to counteract RNA silencing by expressing silencing-suppressor proteins. It has been shown that many of the identified silencing-suppressor proteins bind long double-stranded RNA or siRNAs and thereby prevent assembly of the silencing effector complexes. In this study, we show that the 122-kDa replicase subunit (p122) of crucifer-infecting Tobacco mosaic virus (cr-TMV) is a potent silencing-suppressor protein. We found that the p122 protein preferentially binds to double-stranded 21-nucleotide (nt) siRNA and microRNA (miRNA) intermediates with 2-nt 3' overhangs inhibiting the incorporation of siRNA and miRNA into silencing-related complexes (e.g., RNA-induced silencing complex [RISC]) both in vitro and in planta but cannot interfere with previously programmed RISCs. In addition, our results also suggest that the virus infection and/or sequestration of the siRNA and miRNA molecules by p122 enhances miRNA accumulation despite preventing its methylation. However, the p122 silencing suppressor does not prevent the methylation of certain miRNAs in hst-15 mutants, in which the nuclear export of miRNAs is compromised. PMID:17715232

  10. Small interfering RNA targeting S100A4 sensitizes non-small-cell lung cancer cells (A549) to radiation treatment

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ruixue; Qiao, Tiankui; Zhuang, Xibing

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the impact of S100A4-small interfering RNA (S100A4-siRNA) on apoptosis and enhanced radiosensitivity in non-small-cell lung cancer (A549) cells. We also explored the mechanisms of radiosensitization and identified a new target to enhance radiosensitivity and gene therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods RNA interference is a powerful tool for gene silencing. In this study, we constructed an effective siRNA to knock down S100A4. A549 cells were randomly divided into three groups: blank, negative control, and S100A4-siRNA. To investigate the effect of S100A4-siRNA, the expression of S100A4, E-cadherin, and p53 proteins and their messenger RNA (mRNA) was detected by Western blot and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Transwell chambers were used to assess cell invasion. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Radiosensitivity was determined by colony formation ability. Results Our results demonstrate that S100A4-siRNA effectively silenced the S100A4 gene. When siRNA against S100A4 was used, S100A4 protein expression was downregulated, whereas the expressions of E-cadherin and p53 were upregulated. In addition, a clear reduction in S100A4 mRNA levels was noted compared with the blank and negative control groups, whereas E-cadherin and p53 mRNA levels increased. Transfection with S100A4-siRNA significantly reduced the invasiveness of A549 cells. S100A4 silencing induced immediate G2/M arrest in cell cycle studies and increased apoptosis rates in A549 cells. In clonogenic assays, we used a multitarget, single-hit model to detect radiosensitivity after S100A4 knockdown. All parameters (D0, Dq, α, β) indicated that the downregulation of S100A4 enhanced radiosensitivity in A549 cells. Furthermore, S100A4-siRNA upregulated p53 expression, suggesting that S100A4 may promote A549 cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis by regulating the expression of other proteins. Therefore, siRNA

  11. Zwitterionic Poly(carboxybetaine)-based Cationic Liposomes for Effective Delivery of Small Interfering RNA Therapeutics without Accelerated Blood Clearance Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Liu, Ruiyuan; Shi, Yuanjie; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    For efficient delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to the target diseased site in vivo, it is important to design suitable vehicles to control the blood circulation of siRNA. It has been shown that surface modification of cationic liposome/siRNA complexes (lipoplexes) with polyethylene glycol (PEG) could enhance the circulation time of lipoplexes. However, the first injection of PEGylated lipoplexes in vivo induces accelerated blood clearance and enhances hepatic accumulation of the following injected PEGylated lipoplexes, which is known as the accelerated blood clearance (ABC) phenomenon. Herein, we developed zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine) (PCB) modified lipoplexes for the delivery of siRNA therapeutics, which could avoid protein adsorption and enhance the stability of lipoplexes as that for PEG. Quite different from the PEGylation, the PCBylated lipoplexes could avoid ABC phenomenon, which extended the blood circulation time and enhanced the tumor accumulation of lipoplexes in vivo. After accumulation in tumor site, the PCBylation could promote the cellular uptake and endosomal/lysosomal escape of lipoplexes due to its unique chemical structure and pH-sensitive ability. With excellent tumor accumulation, cellular uptake and endosomal/lysosomal escape abilities, the PCBylated lipoplexes significantly inhibited tumor growth and induced tumor cell apoptosis. PMID:25825598

  12. Zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine)-based cationic liposomes for effective delivery of small interfering RNA therapeutics without accelerated blood clearance phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Liu, Ruiyuan; Shi, Yuanjie; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    For efficient delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to the target diseased site in vivo, it is important to design suitable vehicles to control the blood circulation of siRNA. It has been shown that surface modification of cationic liposome/siRNA complexes (lipoplexes) with polyethylene glycol (PEG) could enhance the circulation time of lipoplexes. However, the first injection of PEGylated lipoplexes in vivo induces accelerated blood clearance and enhances hepatic accumulation of the following injected PEGylated lipoplexes, which is known as the accelerated blood clearance (ABC) phenomenon. Herein, we developed zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine) (PCB) modified lipoplexes for the delivery of siRNA therapeutics, which could avoid protein adsorption and enhance the stability of lipoplexes as that for PEG. Quite different from the PEGylation, the PCBylated lipoplexes could avoid ABC phenomenon, which extended the blood circulation time and enhanced the tumor accumulation of lipoplexes in vivo. After accumulation in tumor site, the PCBylation could promote the cellular uptake and endosomal/lysosomal escape of lipoplexes due to its unique chemical structure and pH-sensitive ability. With excellent tumor accumulation, cellular uptake and endosomal/lysosomal escape abilities, the PCBylated lipoplexes significantly inhibited tumor growth and induced tumor cell apoptosis. PMID:25825598

  13. Phytophthora have distinct endogenous small RNA populations that include short interfering and microRNAs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20–30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focuse...

  14. Cloned Defective Interfering Influenza RNA and a Possible Pan-Specific Treatment of Respiratory Virus Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dimmock, Nigel J.; Easton, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Defective interfering (DI) genomes are characterised by their ability to interfere with the replication of the virus from which they were derived, and other genetically compatible viruses. DI genomes are synthesized by nearly all known viruses and represent a vast natural reservoir of antivirals that can potentially be exploited for use in the clinic. This review describes the application of DI virus to protect from virus-associated diseases in vivo using as an example a highly active cloned influenza A DI genome and virus that protects broadly in preclinical trials against different subtypes of influenza A and against non-influenza A respiratory viruses. This influenza A-derived DI genome protects by two totally different mechanisms: molecular interference with influenza A replication and by stimulating innate immunity that acts against non-influenza A viruses. The review considers what is needed to develop DI genomes to the point of entry into clinical trials. PMID:26184282

  15. Characterization of a defective interfering RNA that contains a mosaic of a plant viral genome. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, T.J.; Jackson, A.O.

    1991-12-31

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since then, we have also discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), a virus structurally related to TBSV. We proposed a thorough characterization of this unique class of symptom modulating RNAs with the overall objective of identifying viral RNA nucleotide, sequences involved in such fundamental processes as virus replication and encapsidation as well as the degree of symptom expression resulting from the viral-DI-host interaction. The proposed research focused on the molecular characterization of the DI RNAs and the helper virus. We had demonstrated that the DIs were collinear deletion mutants of the genome of a cherry strain of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV). We had also shown that these low molecular weight RNAs interfered with the helper plant virus and modulated disease expression by preventing the development of a lethal necrotic disease in susceptible host plants. We also suggested that by exploring the mechanisms associated with the symptom attenuation effect, we might be able to devise novel strategies useful for engineering viral disease resistance.

  16. Comprehensive Annotation of Physcomitrella patens Small RNA Loci Reveals That the Heterochromatic Short Interfering RNA Pathway Is Largely Conserved in Land Plants[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Coruh, Ceyda; Cho, Sung Hyun; Shahid, Saima; Liu, Qikun; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Axtell, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Many plant small RNAs are sequence-specific negative regulators of target mRNAs and/or chromatin. In angiosperms, the two most abundant endogenous small RNA populations are usually 21-nucleotide microRNAs (miRNAs) and 24-nucleotide heterochromatic short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Heterochromatic siRNAs are derived from repetitive regions and reinforce DNA methylation at targeted loci. The existence and extent of heterochromatic siRNAs in other land plant lineages has been unclear. Using small RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) of the moss Physcomitrella patens, we identified 1090 loci that produce mostly 23- to 24-nucleotide siRNAs. These loci are mostly in intergenic regions with dense DNA methylation. Accumulation of siRNAs from these loci depends upon P. patens homologs of DICER-LIKE3 (DCL3), RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE2, and the largest subunit of DNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE IV, with the largest subunit of a Pol V homolog contributing to expression at a smaller subset of the loci. A MINIMAL DICER-LIKE (mDCL) gene, which lacks the N-terminal helicase domain typical of DCL proteins, is specifically required for 23-nucleotide siRNA accumulation. We conclude that heterochromatic siRNAs, and their biogenesis pathways, are largely identical between angiosperms and P. patens, with the notable exception of the P. patens-specific use of mDCL to produce 23-nucleotide siRNAs. PMID:26209555

  17. Small interfering RNA targeting of Recepteur d'Origine Nantais induces apoptosis via modulation of nuclear factor-kappaB and Bcl-2 family in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Sun; Park, Ji Hye; Lee, Soong; Joo, Young Eun; Jung, Young Do

    2010-09-01

    The abnormal accumulation and activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase, Recepteur d'Origine Nantais (RON), has been implicated in tumorigenesis and metastasis in epithelial tumors including gastric cancer. This study examined whether the sequence-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) suppression of the RON expression could induce apoptotic cell death, and investigated the involved molecular mechanisms. Sequence-specific siRNA effectively suppressed the RON expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Silencing of the RON expression significantly inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in a time-dependent manner. The induction of apoptosis was confirmed by the ladder-patterned DNA fragmentation, the presence of cleaved and condensed nuclear chromatin and the increased number of annexin V-positive cells. RON-targeted siRNA effectively inhibited the constitutive nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation as revealed by an altered electrophoretic mobility shift. In agreement with this, silencing of the RON expression resulted in a decrease in the nuclear level of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB. The transfection of siRNA, which blocked the RON expression, also caused a change in the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 in a manner that favored apoptosis. The siRNA silencing of RON induced cytochrome c release and the activation of caspase-8 and caspase-9. These results indicate that RON-targeted siRNA could be therapeutically efficacious by inducing cell apoptosis through the modulation of the NF-kappaB and Bcl-2 family in gastric cancer cells. PMID:20664977

  18. In vitro evaluation of inhibitory effect of nuclear factor-kappaB activity by small interfering RNA on pro-tumor characteristics of M2-like macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kono, Yusuke; Kawakami, Shigeru; Higuchi, Yuriko; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have an alternatively activated macrophage phenotype (M2) and promote cancer cell proliferation, angiogenesis and metastasis. Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) is one of the master regulators of macrophage polarization. Here, we investigated the effect of inhibition of NF-κB activity by small interfering RNA (siRNA) on the pro-tumor response of macrophages located in the tumor microenvironment in vitro. We used mouse peritoneal macrophages cultured in conditioned medium from colon-26 cancer cells as an in vitro TAM model (M2-like macrophages). Transfection of NF-κB (p50) siRNA into M2-like macrophages resulted in a significant decrease in the secretion of interleukin (IL)-10 (a T helper 2 (Th2) cytokine) and a significant increase of T helper 1 (Th1) cytokine production (IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-6). Furthermore, vascular endothelial growth factor production and matrix metalloproteinase-9 mRNA expression in M2-like macrophages were suppressed by inhibition of NF-κB expression with NF-κB (p50) siRNA. In addition, there was a reduction of arginase mRNA expression and increase in nitric oxide production. The cytokine secretion profiles of macrophages cultured in conditioned medium from either B16BL6 or PAN-02 cancer cells were also converted from M2 to classically activated (M1) macrophages by transfection of NF-κB (p50) siRNA. These results suggest that inhibition of NF-κB activity in M2-like macrophages alters their phenotype toward M1. PMID:24141263

  19. Targeting melanoma growth and metastasis with systemic delivery of liposome-incorporated protease-activated receptor-1 small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Villares, Gabriel J; Zigler, Maya; Wang, Hua; Melnikova, Vladislava O; Wu, Hong; Friedman, Ran; Leslie, Michael C; Vivas-Mejia, Pablo E; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2008-11-01

    The thrombin receptor [protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1)] is overexpressed in highly metastatic melanoma cell lines and in patients with metastatic lesions. Activation of PAR-1 leads to cell signaling and up-regulation of genes involved in adhesion, invasion, and angiogenesis. Herein, we stably silence PAR-1 through the use of lentiviral short hairpin RNA and found significant decreases in both tumor growth (P < 0.01) and metastasis (P < 0.001) of highly metastatic melanoma cell lines in vivo. The use of viruses for therapy is not ideal as it can induce toxic immune responses and possible gene alterations following viral integration. Therefore, we also used systemic delivery of PAR-1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) incorporated into neutral liposomes [1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC)] to decrease melanoma growth and metastasis in vivo. Significant decreases in tumor growth, weight, and metastatic lung colonies (P < 0.001 for all) were found in mice treated with PAR-1 siRNA-DOPC. The in vivo effects of PAR-1 on invasion and angiogenesis were analyzed via immunohistochemistry. Concomitant decreases in vascular endothelial growth factor, interleukin-8, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression levels, as well as decreased blood vessel density (CD31), were found in tumor samples from PAR-1 siRNA-treated mice, suggesting that PAR-1 is a regulator of melanoma cell growth and metastasis by affecting angiogenic and invasive factors. We propose that siRNA incorporated into DOPC nanoparticles could be delivered systemically and used as a new modality for melanoma treatment. PMID:18974154

  20. Interference of hepatitis C virus RNA replication by short interfering RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapadia, Sharookh B.; Brideau-Andersen, Amy; Chisari, Francis V.

    2003-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease, which can lead to the development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Current therapy of patients with chronic HCV infection includes treatment with IFN in combination with ribavirin. Because most treated patients do not resolve the infection, alternative treatment is essential. RNA interference (RNAi) is a recently discovered antiviral mechanism present in plants and animals that induces double-stranded RNA degradation. Using a selectable subgenomic HCV replicon cell culture system, we have shown that RNAi can specifically inhibit HCV RNA replication and protein expression in Huh-7 cells that stably replicate the HCV genome, and that this antiviral effect is independent of IFN. These results suggest that RNAi may represent a new approach for the treatment of persistent HCV infection.

  1. Identification of genes required for Cf-dependent hypersensitive cell death by combined proteomic and RNA interfering analyses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiu-Fang; Cheng, Wei-Shun; Zhang, Zhi-Xin; Xu, You-Ping; Zhou, Xue-Ping; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Identification of hypersensitive cell death (HCD) regulators is essential to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying plant disease resistance. In this study, combined proteomic and RNA interfering (RNAi) analyses were employed to identify genes required for the HCD conferred by the tomato resistance gene Cf-4 and the Cladosporium fulvum avirulence gene Avr4. Forty-nine proteins differentially expressed in the tomato seedlings mounting and those not mounting Cf-4/Avr4-dependent HCD were identified through proteomic analysis. Among them were a variety of defence-related proteins including a cysteine protease, Pip1, an operative target of another C. fulvum effector, Avr2. Additionally, glutathione-mediated antioxidation is a major response to Cf-4/Avr4-dependent HCD. Functional analysis through tobacco rattle virus-induced gene silencing and transient RNAi assays of the chosen 16 differentially expressed proteins revealed that seven genes, which encode Pip1 homologue NbPip1, a SIPK type MAP kinase Nbf4, an asparagine synthetase NbAsn, a trypsin inhibitor LeMir-like protein NbMir, a small GTP-binding protein, a late embryogenesis-like protein, and an ASR4-like protein, were required for Cf-4/Avr4-dependent HCD. Furthermore, the former four genes were essential for Cf-9/Avr9-dependent HCD; NbPip1, NbAsn, and NbMir, but not Nbf4, affected a nonadaptive bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae-induced HCD in Nicotiana benthamiana. These data demonstrate that Pip1 and LeMir may play a general role in HCD and plant immunity and that the application of combined proteomic and RNA interfering analyses is an efficient strategy to identify genes required for HCD, disease resistance, and probably other biological processes in plants. PMID:22275387

  2. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral.

    PubMed

    Smith, Claire M; Scott, Paul D; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Easton, Andrew J; Dimmock, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Defective interfering (DI) viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8) was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1); it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral. PMID:27556481

  3. Automated parallel synthesis of 5'-triphosphate oligonucleotides and preparation of chemically modified 5'-triphosphate small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Zlatev, Ivan; Lackey, Jeremy G; Zhang, Ligang; Dell, Amy; McRae, Kathy; Shaikh, Sarfraz; Duncan, Richard G; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Manoharan, Muthiah

    2013-02-01

    A fully automated chemical method for the parallel and high-throughput solid-phase synthesis of 5'-triphosphate and 5'-diphosphate oligonucleotides is described. The desired full-length oligonucleotides were first constructed using standard automated DNA/RNA solid-phase synthesis procedures. Then, on the same column and instrument, efficient implementation of an uninterrupted sequential cycle afforded the corresponding unmodified or chemically modified 5'-triphosphates and 5'-diphosphates. The method was readily translated into a scalable and high-throughput synthesis protocol compatible with the current DNA/RNA synthesizers yielding a large variety of unique 5'-polyphosphorylated oligonucleotides. Using this approach, we accomplished the synthesis of chemically modified 5'-triphosphate oligonucleotides that were annealed to form small-interfering RNAs (ppp-siRNAs), a potentially interesting class of novel RNAi therapeutic tools. The attachment of the 5'-triphosphate group to the passenger strand of a siRNA construct did not induce a significant improvement in the in vitro RNAi-mediated gene silencing activity nor a strong specific in vitro RIG-I activation. The reported method will enable the screening of many chemically modified ppp-siRNAs, resulting in a novel bi-functional RNAi therapeutic platform. PMID:23260577

  4. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Claire M.; Scott, Paul D.; O’Callaghan, Christopher; Easton, Andrew J.; Dimmock, Nigel J.

    2016-01-01

    Defective interfering (DI) viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8) was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1); it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral. PMID:27556481

  5. A small interfering RNA targeting Lnk accelerates bone fracture healing with early neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yohei; Ii, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Kawamoto, Atsuhiko; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Akimaru, Hiroshi; Mifune, Yutaka; Shoji, Taro; Fukui, Tomoaki; Asahi, Michio; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Asahara, Takayuki

    2013-09-01

    Lnk, an intracellular adapter protein, is expressed in hematopoietic cell lineages, which has recently been proved as an essential inhibitory signaling molecule for stem cell self-renewal in the stem cell factor-c-Kit signaling pathway with enhanced hematopoietic and osteogenic reconstitution in Lnk-deficient mice. Moreover, the therapeutic potential of hematopoietic stem/endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) for fracture healing has been demonstrated with mechanistic insight into vasculogenesis/angiogenesis and osteogenesis enhancement in the fracture sites. We report here, Lnk siRNA-transfected endothelial commitment of c-kit+/Sca-1+/lineage- subpopulations of bone marrow cells have high EPC colony-forming capacity exhibiting endothelial markers, VE-Cad, VEGF and Ang-1. Lnk siRNA-transfected osteoblasts also show highly osteoblastic capacity. In vivo, locally transfected Lnk siRNA could successfully downregulate the expression of Lnk at the fracture site up to 1 week, and radiological and histological examination showed extremely accelerated fracture healing in Lnk siRNA-transfected mice. Moreover, Lnk siRNA-transfected mice exhibited sufficient therapeutic outcomes with intrinstic enhancement of angiogenesis and osteogenesis, specifically, the mice demonstrated better blood flow recovery in the sites of fracture. In our series of experiments, we clarified that a negatively regulated Lnk system contributed to a favorable circumstance for fracture healing by enhancing vasculogenesis/angiogenesis and osteogenesis. These findings suggest that downregulation of Lnk system may have the clinical potential for faster fracture healing, which contributes to the reduction of delayed unions or non-unions. PMID:23897412

  6. Efficient delivery of small interfering RNA into injured spinal cords in rats by photomechanical waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Toyooka, Terushige; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2011-03-01

    In the central nervous system, lack of axonal regeneration leads to permanent functional disabilities. In spinal cord injury (SCI), the over-expressions of intermediate filament (IF) proteins, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, are mainly involved in glial scar formation; these proteins work as both physical and biochemical barriers to axonal regeneration. Thus, silencing of these IF proteins would be an attractive strategy to treat SCI. In this study, we first attempted to deliver fluorescent probe-labeled siRNAs into injured spinal cords in rats by applying photomechanical waves (PMWs) to examine the capability of PMWs as a tool for siRNA delivery. Intense fluorescence from siRNAs was observed in much broader regions in the spinal cords with PMW application when compared with those with siRNA injection alone. Based on this result, we delivered siRNAs for GFAP and vimentin into injured spinal tissues in rats by applying PMWs. The treatment resulted in efficient silencing of the proteins at five days after SCI and a decrease of the cavity area in the injured tissue at three weeks after SCI when compared with those with siRNA injection alone. These results demonstrate the capability of PMWs for efficient delivery of siRNAs into injured spinal cords and treatment of SCIs.

  7. Mu opioid receptor knockdown in the substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area by synthetic small interfering RNA blocks the rewarding and locomotor effects of heroin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Landthaler, Markus; Schlussman, Stefan D.; Yuferov, Vadim; Ho, Ann; Tuschl, Thomas; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    Mu opioid receptors (MOP-r) play an important role in the rewarding and locomotor stimulatory effects of heroin. The aim of the current study was to determine whether infusion of small interfering RNAs (siRNA) targeting MOP-r into the midbrain could knock down MOP-r mRNA and affect heroin-induced locomotor activity or heroin-induced conditioned place preference. Ten week old male C57BL/6J mice were surgically implanted bilaterally with guide cannulae directed between the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. After 4 days recovery, mice were infused bilaterally with siRNAs that target the MOP-r (2mM × 0.75 μl/side/day for 3 days) or control siRNA. Seven days after the last infusion, a procedure for conditioned place preference was begun with four heroin (3mg/kg i.p.) administration sessions alternating with four saline sessions. While heroin induced an increase in locomotor activity in all groups, siRNAs targeting specific regions of MOP-r significantly attenuated this effect. Of particular interest, mice infused with specific siRNAs targeting the MOP-r failed to develop and express conditioned place preference to heroin, or showed a significantly attenuated preference. These alterations in reward related behaviors are likely due to the reduction in MOP-r mRNA and protein, shown in separate studies by in situ hybridization and autoradiography using the same MOP-r- siRNA infusions. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the utility of siRNA in the neurobiological study of specific components of the reward system and should contribute to the study of other complex behaviors. PMID:18938225

  8. Ribozyme-enhanced single-stranded Ago2-processed interfering RNA triggers efficient gene silencing with fewer off-target effects

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Renfu; Zhang, Fengjuan; Xu, Beiying; Xi, Hairui; Zhang, Xue; Wang, Weihua; Wu, Ligang

    2015-01-01

    Short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) are widely used to produce small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) for gene silencing. Here we design an alternative siRNA precursor, named single-stranded, Argonaute 2 (Ago2)-processed interfering RNA (saiRNA), containing a 16–18 bp stem and a loop complementary to the target transcript. The introduction of a self-cleaving ribozyme derived from hepatitis delta virus to the 3′ end of the transcribed saiRNA dramatically improves its silencing activity by generating a short 3′ overhang that facilitates the efficient binding of saiRNA to Ago2. The same ribozyme also enhances the activity of Dicer-dependent shRNAs. Unlike a classical shRNA, the strand-specific cleavage of saiRNA by Ago2 during processing eliminates the passenger strand and prevents the association of siRNA with non-nucleolytic Ago proteins. As a result, off-target effects are reduced. In addition, saiRNA exhibits less competition with the biogenesis of endogenous miRNAs. Therefore, ribozyme-enhanced saiRNA provides a reliable tool for RNA interference applications. PMID:26455506

  9. Novel epithelial cell adhesion molecule antibody conjugated polyethyleneimine-capped gold nanoparticles for enhanced and targeted small interfering RNA delivery to retinoblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Moutushy; Kandalam, Mallikarjuna; Rangasamy, Judith; Shankar, Balaji; Maheswari, Uma K.; Swaminathan, Sethuraman

    2013-01-01

    Background Several nanoconjugates have been designed to deliver nucleic acids such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) and DNA to cells to study silencing and expression efficacies. In the present study, we prepared novel epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) monoclonal antibody conjugated polyethyleneimine (PEI) capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) loaded with EpCAM-specific siRNA molecules to knock-down the EpCAM gene in retinoblastoma (RB) cells. We chose EpCAM as a target moiety to deliver siRNA because this molecule is highly expressed in various epithelial cancers and is an ideal target as it is highly expressed in the apical surface of tumor cells while showing basolateral expression in normal cells. Methods The EpCAM antibody was conjugated to AuNP-PEI loaded with siRNA molecules to specifically deliver siRNA to EpCAM-expressing RB cells. Conjugation efficiencies were confirmed with ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and agarose and SDS–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The size and zeta potential were measured using a Zeta sizer analyzer. Nanoparticle internalization and uptake were studied using fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Gene silencing efficacy was monitored with western blot analysis and real-time quantitative PCR. Results Optimal size and neutral zeta potential properties of the AuNP-PEI- EpCAM antibody (EpAb) antibody were achieved for the transfection studies. The AuNP-PEI nanoparticles did not show any cytotoxicity to the cells, which means these nanomaterials are suitable for intracellular delivery of siRNA for therapeutic interventions. With EpCAM antibody conjugation, PEI-capped AuNPs loaded with EpCAM siRNA were significantly internalized in the Y79 cells as observed with fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry and induced a highly significant reduction in the cell viability of the Y79 cells. Through increased binding of EpCAM antibody–conjugated AuNP-PEI nanoparticles

  10. Distinct mechanisms determine transposon inheritance and methylation via small interfering RNA and histone modification.

    PubMed

    Lippman, Zachary; May, Bruce; Yordan, Cristy; Singer, Tatjana; Martienssen, Rob

    2003-12-01

    Heritable, but reversible, changes in transposable element activity were first observed in maize by Barbara McClintock in the 1950s. More recently, transposon silencing has been associated with DNA methylation, histone H3 lysine-9 methylation (H3mK9), and RNA interference (RNAi). Using a genetic approach, we have investigated the role of these modifications in the epigenetic regulation and inheritance of six Arabidopsis transposons. Silencing of most of the transposons is relieved in DNA methyltransferase (met1), chromatin remodeling ATPase (ddm1), and histone modification (sil1) mutants. In contrast, only a small subset of the transposons require the H3mK9 methyltransferase KRYPTONITE, the RNAi gene ARGONAUTE1, and the CXG methyltransferase CHROMOMETHYLASE3. In crosses to wild-type plants, epigenetic inheritance of active transposons varied from mutant to mutant, indicating these genes differ in their ability to silence transposons. According to their pattern of transposon regulation, the mutants can be divided into two groups, which suggests that there are distinct, but interacting, complexes or pathways involved in transposon silencing. Furthermore, different transposons tend to be susceptible to different forms of epigenetic regulation. PMID:14691539

  11. A Short Open Reading Frame Encompassing the MicroRNA173 Target Site Plays a Role in trans-Acting Small Interfering RNA Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Manabu; Iki, Taichiro; Numa, Hisataka; Miyashita, Kyoko; Meshi, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2016-05-01

    trans-Acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs) participate in the regulation of organ morphogenesis and determination of developmental timing in plants by down-regulating target genes through mRNA cleavage. The production of tasiRNAs is triggered by microRNA173 (miR173) and other specific microRNA-mediated cleavage of 5'-capped and 3'-polyadenylated primary TAS transcripts (pri-TASs). Although pri-TASs are not thought to encode functional proteins, they contain multiple short open reading frames (ORFs). For example, the primary TAS2 transcript (pri-TAS2) contains 11 short ORFs, and the third ORF from the 5' terminus (ORF3) encompasses the miR173 target site. Here, we show that nonsense mutations in ORF3 of pri-TAS2 upstream of the miR173 recognition site suppress tasiRNA accumulation and that ORF3 is translated in vitro. Glycerol gradient centrifugation analysis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plant extracts revealed that pri-TAS2 and its miR173-cleaved 5' and 3' fragments are fractionated together in the polysome fractions. These and previous results suggest that the 3' fragment of pri-TAS2, which is a source of tasiRNAs, forms a huge complex containing SGS3, miR173-programmed AGO1 RNA-induced silencing complex, the 5' fragment, and ribosomes. This complex overaccumulated, moderately accumulated, and did not accumulate in rdr6, sde5, and sgs3 mutants, respectively. The sgs3 sde5 and rdr6 sde5 double mutants showed phenotypes similar to those of sgs3 and sde5 single mutants, respectively, with regard to the TAS2-related RNA accumulation, suggesting that the complex is formed in an SGS3-dependent manner, somehow modified and stabilized by SDE5, and becomes competent for RDR6 action. Ribosomes in this complex likely play an important role in this process. PMID:26966170

  12. SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBE–MEDIATED SMALL INTERFERING RNA DELIVERY AND SILENCING GASTRIN-RELEASING PEPTIDE RECEPTOR IN HUMAN NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jingbo; Hong, Tu; Guo, Honglian; Xu, Ya-Qiong; Chung, Dai H.

    2015-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has the potential to influence expression with a high degree of target gene specificity. However, the clinical application of siRNA therapeutics has proven to be less promising as evidenced by poor intracellular uptake, instability in vivo, and non-specific immune stimulations. Recently, we have demonstrated that single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-mediated siRNA delivery can enhance the efficiency of siRNA-mediated gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R) gene silencing by stabilizing siRNA while selectively targeting tumor tissues. Based on our recent findings, we introduce a novel technique to silence specific gene(s) in human neuroblastoma through SWNT-mediated siRNA delivery in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23749575

  13. A genome-wide survey of small interfering RNA and micro RNA pathway genes in a galling insect

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mayetiola destructor (Say), Hessian fly, is a significant pest of wheat in most production regions worldwide. Deployment of resistance (R) genes is the most effective control for this pest; however, deployment of R genes results in an increased frequency of pest genotypes that display virulence to t...

  14. Novel and Recently Evolved MicroRNA Clusters Regulate Expansive F-BOX Gene Networks through Phased Small Interfering RNAs in Wild Diploid Strawberry1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Rui; Ye, Songqing; Liu, Zongrang; Meyers, Blake C.; Liu, Zhongchi

    2015-01-01

    The wild strawberry (Fragaria vesca) has recently emerged as an excellent model for cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) as well as other Rosaceae fruit crops due to its short seed-to-fruit cycle, diploidy, and sequenced genome. Deep sequencing and parallel analysis of RNA ends were used to identify F. vesca microRNAs (miRNAs) and their target genes, respectively. Thirty-eight novel and 31 known miRNAs were identified. Many known miRNAs targeted not only conserved mRNA targets but also developed new target genes in F. vesca. Significantly, two new clusters of miRNAs were found to collectively target 94 F-BOX (FBX) genes. One of the miRNAs in the new cluster is 22 nucleotides and triggers phased small interfering RNA production from six FBX genes, which amplifies the silencing to additional FBX genes. Comparative genomics revealed that the main novel miRNA cluster evolved from duplications of FBX genes. Finally, conserved trans-acting siRNA pathways were characterized and confirmed with distinct features. Our work identified novel miRNA-FBX networks in F. vesca and shed light on the evolution of miRNAs/phased small interfering RNA networks that regulate large gene families in higher plants. PMID:26143249

  15. Novel and Recently Evolved MicroRNA Clusters Regulate Expansive F-BOX Gene Networks through Phased Small Interfering RNAs in Wild Diploid Strawberry.

    PubMed

    Xia, Rui; Ye, Songqing; Liu, Zongrang; Meyers, Blake C; Liu, Zhongchi

    2015-09-01

    The wild strawberry (Fragaria vesca) has recently emerged as an excellent model for cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) as well as other Rosaceae fruit crops due to its short seed-to-fruit cycle, diploidy, and sequenced genome. Deep sequencing and parallel analysis of RNA ends were used to identify F. vesca microRNAs (miRNAs) and their target genes, respectively. Thirty-eight novel and 31 known miRNAs were identified. Many known miRNAs targeted not only conserved mRNA targets but also developed new target genes in F. vesca. Significantly, two new clusters of miRNAs were found to collectively target 94 F-BOX (FBX) genes. One of the miRNAs in the new cluster is 22 nucleotides and triggers phased small interfering RNA production from six FBX genes, which amplifies the silencing to additional FBX genes. Comparative genomics revealed that the main novel miRNA cluster evolved from duplications of FBX genes. Finally, conserved trans-acting siRNA pathways were characterized and confirmed with distinct features. Our work identified novel miRNA-FBX networks in F. vesca and shed light on the evolution of miRNAs/phased small interfering RNA networks that regulate large gene families in higher plants. PMID:26143249

  16. A small interfering RNA targeting vascular endothelial growth factor efficiently inhibits growth of VX2 cells and VX2 tumor model of hepatocellular carcinoma in rabbit by transarterial embolization-mediated siRNA delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yu; Guo, Chuan-Gen; Yang, Zheng-Gang; Sun, Jun-Hui; Zhang, Min-Ming; Fu, Cai-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatocellular carcinoma is currently the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with an increasing incidence. Objective The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of vascular endothelial growth factor small interfering RNA (VEGF-siRNA) on rabbit VX2 carcinoma cell viability in vitro and the effect of transarterial embolization (TAE)-mediated VEGF-siRNA delivery on the growth of rabbit VX2 liver-transplanted model in vivo. Methods Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blot technologies were used to detect the expression level of VEGF. TAE and computed tomography scan were used to deliver the VEGF-siRNA and detect the tumor volume in vivo, respectively. Microvessel density was detected by immunohistochemistry with CD34 antibody. A biochemical autoanalyzer was used to evaluate the hepatic and renal toxicity. Results The designed VEGF-siRNAs could effectively decrease the expression levels of VEGF mRNA and protein in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, the viability of rabbit VX2 carcinoma cells was reduced by 38.5%±7.3% (VEGF-siRNA no 1) and 30.0%±5.8% (VEGF-siRNA no 3) at 48 hours after transfection. Moreover, in rabbit VX2 liver-transplanted model, the growth ratios of tumors at 28 days after TAE-mediated siRNA delivery were 155.18%±19.42% in the control group, 79.67%±19.63% in the low-dose group, and 36.09%±15.73% in the high-dose group, with significant differences among these three groups. Microvessel density dropped to 34.22±4.01 and 22.63±4.07 in the low-dose group and high-dose group, respectively, compared with the control group (57.88±5.67), with significant differences among these three groups. Furthermore, inoculation of VX2 tumor into the liver itself at later stage induced significant increase in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, indicating an obvious damage of liver functions, while treatment of VX2 tumor via TAE

  17. Insights into the therapeutic potential of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α small interfering RNA in malignant melanoma delivered via folate-decorated cationic liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhongjian; Zhang, Tianpeng; Wu, Baojian; Zhang, Xingwang

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma (MM) represents the most dangerous form of skin cancer, and its incidence is expected to rise in the coming time. However, therapy for MM is limited by low topical drug concentration and multidrug resistance. This article aimed to develop folate-decorated cationic liposomes (fc-LPs) for hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) small interfering (siRNA) delivery, and to evaluate the potential of such siRNA/liposome complexes in MM therapy. HIF-1α siRNA-loaded fc-LPs (siRNA-fc-LPs) were prepared by a film hydration method followed by siRNA incubation. Folate decoration of liposomes was achieved by incorporation of folate/oleic acid-diacylated oligochitosans. The resulting siRNA-fc-LPs were 95.3 nm in size with a ζ potential of 2.41 mV. The liposomal vectors exhibited excellent loading capacity and protective effect toward siRNA. The in vitro cell transfection efficiency was almost parallel to the commercially available Lipofectamine™ 2000. Moreover, the anti-melanoma activity of HIF-1α siRNA was significantly enhanced through fc-LPs. Western blot analysis and apoptosis test demonstrated that siRNA-fc-LPs substantially reduced the production of HIF-1α-associated protein and induced the apoptosis of hypoxia-tolerant melanoma cells. Our designed liposomal vectors might be applicable as siRNA delivery vehicle to systemically or topically treat MM. PMID:27042054

  18. [Corrigendum] Transient transfection of macrophage migration inhibitory factor small interfering RNA disrupts the biological behavior of oral squamous carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jie; Quan, Jingjing; Xia, Xuefeng

    2016-07-01

    Due to an inability to contact various of the contributors to this study at the time of submission and a desire to publish this work, the published article did not include the full complement of authors who should have been credited on the paper. All of the existing authors have agreed that the following authors, whose names were omitted, should also have been included as co-authors: Professor Jin Gao (now at the School of Dentistry and Oral Health, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia), who was involved with project design and revisions of the manuscript; Dr Shuyu Luo (now at the School and Hospital of Stomatology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China), who was involved in project development, data collection (Figs 3 and 6) and manuscript writing; and Dr Jianming Zhang (now at the Department of Stomatology, General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China), who was involved in project development, data collection and analysis (Fig. 4) The full author list for this paper is presented below, showing the corrected order of the authors as they should have appeared on the paper. We regret the omission of the three aforementioned authors on the published article. Note that Professor Jin Gao should be considered as the co-corresponding author (with Xuefeng Xia), and Jie Zeng and Shuyu Luo contributed equally to this study. [the original article was published in the Molecular Medicine Reports 13: 174‑180, 2015; DOI: 10.3892/mmr.2015.4525] Transient transfection of macrophage migration inhibitory factor small interfering RNA disrupts the biological behavior of oral squamous carcinoma cells Jie Zeng1*, Shuyu Luo2*, Jianming Zhang3, Jingjing Quan4, Xuefeng Xia1 and Jin Gao5 1The Third Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510150; 2School and Hospital of Stomatology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, 3Department of Stomatology, General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300052; 4Guanghua

  19. Short interfering RNA against STAT1 attenuates cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in the rat by suppressing inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, T; Mukherjea, D; Sheehan, K; Jajoo, S; Rybak, L P; Ramkumar, V

    2011-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used for treating various solid tumors. However, this drug produces dose-limiting ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity, which significantly reduce the quality of life of cancer patients. While nephrotoxicity could be alleviated by diuresis, there is currently no approved treatment for hearing loss. Previous studies show that the ROS and inflammation are major contributors to cisplatin-induced hearing loss. In this study, we show that ROS trigger the inflammatory process in the cochlea by activating signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1). Activation of STAT1 activation was dependent on ROS generation through NOX3 NADPH oxidase, knockdown of which by siRNA reduced STAT1 activation. Moreover, STAT1 siRNA protected against activation of p53, reduced apoptosis, reduced damage to OHCs and preserved hearing in rats. STAT1 siRNA attenuated the increase in inflammatory mediators, such as TNF-α, inhibition of which protected cells from cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. Finally, we showed that trans-tympanic administration of etanercept, a TNF-α antagonist, protected against OHC damage and cisplatin-induced hearing loss. These studies suggest that controlling inflammation by inhibition of STAT1-dependent pathways in the cochlea could serve as an effective approach to treat cisplatin ototoxicity and improve the overall quality of life for cancer patients. PMID:21776018

  20. Topical Anti-Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Small Interfering RNA with Functional Peptides Containing Sericin-Based Hydrogel for Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kanazawa, Takanori; Shizawa, Yuki; Takeuchi, Mayu; Tamano, Kuniko; Ibaraki, Hisako; Seta, Yasuo; Takashima, Yuuki; Okada, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The small interfering RNA (siRNA) is suggested to offer a novel means of treating atopic dermatitis (AD) because it allows the specific silencing of genes related to AD pathogenesis. In our previous study, we found that siRNA targeted against RelA, an important nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) subdomain, with functional peptides, showed therapeutic effects in a mouse model of AD. In the present study, to develop a topical skin application against AD, we prepared a hydrogel containing anti-RelA siRNA and functional peptides and determined the intradermal permeation and the anti-AD effects in an AD mouse model. We selected the silk protein, sericin (SC), which is a versatile biocompatible biomaterial to prepare hydrogel as an aqueous gel base. We found that the siRNA was more widely delivered to the site of application in AD-induced ear skin of mice after topical application via the hydrogel containing functional peptides than via the preparation without functional peptides. In addition, the ear thickness and clinical skin severity of the AD-induced mice treated with hydrogel containing anti-RelA siRNA with functional peptides improved more than that of mice treated with the preparation formulated with negative siRNA. PMID:26371030

  1. Topical Anti-Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Small Interfering RNA with Functional Peptides Containing Sericin-Based Hydrogel for Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Takanori; Shizawa, Yuki; Takeuchi, Mayu; Tamano, Kuniko; Ibaraki, Hisako; Seta, Yasuo; Takashima, Yuki; Okada, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The small interfering RNA (siRNA) is suggested to offer a novel means of treating atopic dermatitis (AD) because it allows the specific silencing of genes related to AD pathogenesis. In our previous study, we found that siRNA targeted against RelA, an important nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) subdomain, with functional peptides, showed therapeutic effects in a mouse model of AD. In the present study, to develop a topical skin application against AD, we prepared a hydrogel containing anti-RelA siRNA and functional peptides and determined the intradermal permeation and the anti-AD effects in an AD mouse model. We selected the silk protein, sericin (SC), which is a versatile biocompatible biomaterial to prepare hydrogel as an aqueous gel base. We found that the siRNA was more widely delivered to the site of application in AD-induced ear skin of mice after topical application via the hydrogel containing functional peptides than via the preparation without functional peptides. In addition, the ear thickness and clinical skin severity of the AD-induced mice treated with hydrogel containing anti-RelA siRNA with functional peptides improved more than that of mice treated with the preparation formulated with negative siRNA. PMID:26371030

  2. PACT- and RIG-I-Dependent Activation of Type I Interferon Production by a Defective Interfering RNA Derived from Measles Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ting-Hin; Kew, Chun; Lui, Pak-Yin; Chan, Chi-Ping; Satoh, Takashi; Akira, Shizuo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The live attenuated measles virus vaccine is highly immunostimulatory. Identification and characterization of its components that activate the innate immune response might provide new strategies and agents for the rational design and development of chemically defined adjuvants. In this study, we report on the activation of type I interferon (IFN) production by a defective interfering (DI) RNA isolated from the Hu-191 vaccine strain of measles virus. We found that the Hu-191 virus induced IFN-β much more potently than the Edmonston strain. In the search for IFN-inducing species in Hu-191, we identified a DI RNA specifically expressed by this strain. This DI RNA, which was of the copy-back type, was predicted to fold into a hairpin structure with a long double-stranded stem region of 206 bp, and it potently induced the expression of IFN-β. Its IFN-β-inducing activity was further enhanced when both cytoplasmic RNA sensor RIG-I and its partner, PACT, were overexpressed. On the contrary, this activity was abrogated in cells deficient in PACT or RIG-I. The DI RNA was found to be associated with PACT in infected cells. In addition, both the 5′-di/triphosphate end and the double-stranded stem region on the DI RNA were essential for its activation of PACT and RIG-I. Taken together, our findings support a model in which a viral DI RNA is sensed by PACT and RIG-I to initiate an innate antiviral response. Our work might also provide a foundation for identifying physiological PACT ligands and developing novel adjuvants or antivirals. IMPORTANCE The live attenuated measles virus vaccine is one of the most successful human vaccines and has largely contained the devastating impact of a highly contagious virus. Identifying the components in this vaccine that stimulate the host immune response and understanding their mechanism of action might help to design and develop better adjuvants, vaccines, antivirals, and immunotherapeutic agents. We identified and characterized

  3. Controlled Delivery of T-box21 Small Interfering RNA Ameliorates Autoimmune Alopecia (Alopecia Areata) in a C3H/HeJ Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Motonobu; Jo, Jun-ichiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune alopecia (alopecia areata) is considered to be triggered by a collapse of immune privilege in hair follicles. Here we confirmed that infiltrating CD4 T lymphocytes around hair follicles of patients with alopecia areata were primarily CCR5-positive with few CCR4-positive cells, suggesting a dominant role of Th1 cells in the alopecic lesion. Given this finding, we sought to elucidate the effect of cytokine therapy in C3H/HeJ mice, a mouse model of alopecia areata, by applying recombinant interleukin-4 and neutralizing anti-interferon-γ antibody. We found that local injections of both interleukin-4 and neutralizing anti-interferon-γ antibody effectively treated alopecia in C3H/HeJ mice. Results from immunohistochemistry and semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that intralesional injection of interleukin-4 suppressed CD8 T cell infiltrates around the hair follicles and repressed enhanced interferon-γ mRNA expression in the affected alopecic skin. Furthermore, Th1 transcription factor T-box21 small interfering RNAs conjugated to cationized gelatin showed mitigating effects on alopecia in C3H/HeJ mice, resulting in the restoration of hair shaft elongation. Taken together, the use of gelatin–small interfering RNA conjugates promises to be a novel, efficient, and safe tool as an alternative gene therapy for the treatment of various human diseases. To our knowledge, this is the first report of effective controlled delivery of small interfering RNA using biodegradable cationized gelatin microspheres in an animal model of disease. PMID:18245811

  4. Controlled delivery of T-box21 small interfering RNA ameliorates autoimmune alopecia (Alopecia Areata) in a C3H/HeJ mouse model.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Motonobu; Jo, Jun-ichiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2008-03-01

    Autoimmune alopecia (alopecia areata) is considered to be triggered by a collapse of immune privilege in hair follicles. Here we confirmed that infiltrating CD4 T lymphocytes around hair follicles of patients with alopecia areata were primarily CCR5-positive with few CCR4-positive cells, suggesting a dominant role of Th1 cells in the alopecic lesion. Given this finding, we sought to elucidate the effect of cytokine therapy in C3H/HeJ mice, a mouse model of alopecia areata, by applying recombinant interleukin-4 and neutralizing anti-interferon-gamma antibody. We found that local injections of both interleukin-4 and neutralizing anti-interferon-gamma antibody effectively treated alopecia in C3H/HeJ mice. Results from immunohistochemistry and semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that intralesional injection of interleukin-4 suppressed CD8 T cell infiltrates around the hair follicles and repressed enhanced interferon-gamma mRNA expression in the affected alopecic skin. Furthermore, Th1 transcription factor T-box21 small interfering RNAs conjugated to cationized gelatin showed mitigating effects on alopecia in C3H/HeJ mice, resulting in the restoration of hair shaft elongation. Taken together, the use of gelatin-small interfering RNA conjugates promises to be a novel, efficient, and safe tool as an alternative gene therapy for the treatment of various human diseases. To our knowledge, this is the first report of effective controlled delivery of small interfering RNA using biodegradable cationized gelatin microspheres in an animal model of disease. PMID:18245811

  5. Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus in Mice by a Small Interfering RNA Targeting a Highly Conserved Sequence in Viral IRES Pseudoknot.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jae-Su; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Eun-Jung; Cho, Hee; Lee, Wooseong; Kim, Geon-Woo; Park, Hyun-Ji; Cho, Seung-Woo; Lee, Choongho; Oh, Jong-Won

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that directs cap-independent viral translation is a primary target for small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based HCV antiviral therapy. However, identification of potent siRNAs against HCV IRES by bioinformatics-based siRNA design is a challenging task given the complexity of HCV IRES secondary and tertiary structures and association with multiple proteins, which can also dynamically change the structure of this cis-acting RNA element. In this work, we utilized siRNA tiling approach whereby siRNAs were tiled with overlapping sequences that were shifted by one or two nucleotides over the HCV IRES stem-loop structures III and IV spanning nucleotides (nts) 277-343. Based on their antiviral activity, we mapped a druggable region (nts 313-343) where the targets of potent siRNAs were enriched. siIE22, which showed the greatest anti-HCV potency, targeted a highly conserved sequence across diverse HCV genotypes, locating within the IRES subdomain IIIf involved in pseudoknot formation. Stepwise target shifting toward the 5' or 3' direction by 1 or 2 nucleotides reduced the antiviral potency of siIE22, demonstrating the importance of siRNA accessibility to this highly structured and sequence-conserved region of HCV IRES for RNA interference. Nanoparticle-mediated systemic delivery of the stability-improved siIE22 derivative gs_PS1 siIE22, which contains a single phosphorothioate linkage on the guide strand, reduced the serum HCV genome titer by more than 4 log10 in a xenograft mouse model for HCV replication without generation of resistant variants. Our results provide a strategy for identifying potent siRNA species against a highly structured RNA target and offer a potential pan-HCV genotypic siRNA therapy that might be beneficial for patients resistant to current treatment regimens. PMID:26751678

  6. Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus in Mice by a Small Interfering RNA Targeting a Highly Conserved Sequence in Viral IRES Pseudoknot

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Jung; Cho, Hee; Lee, Wooseong; Kim, Geon-Woo; Park, Hyun-Ji; Cho, Seung-Woo; Lee, Choongho; Oh, Jong-Won

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that directs cap-independent viral translation is a primary target for small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based HCV antiviral therapy. However, identification of potent siRNAs against HCV IRES by bioinformatics-based siRNA design is a challenging task given the complexity of HCV IRES secondary and tertiary structures and association with multiple proteins, which can also dynamically change the structure of this cis-acting RNA element. In this work, we utilized siRNA tiling approach whereby siRNAs were tiled with overlapping sequences that were shifted by one or two nucleotides over the HCV IRES stem-loop structures III and IV spanning nucleotides (nts) 277–343. Based on their antiviral activity, we mapped a druggable region (nts 313–343) where the targets of potent siRNAs were enriched. siIE22, which showed the greatest anti-HCV potency, targeted a highly conserved sequence across diverse HCV genotypes, locating within the IRES subdomain IIIf involved in pseudoknot formation. Stepwise target shifting toward the 5′ or 3′ direction by 1 or 2 nucleotides reduced the antiviral potency of siIE22, demonstrating the importance of siRNA accessibility to this highly structured and sequence-conserved region of HCV IRES for RNA interference. Nanoparticle-mediated systemic delivery of the stability-improved siIE22 derivative gs_PS1 siIE22, which contains a single phosphorothioate linkage on the guide strand, reduced the serum HCV genome titer by more than 4 log10 in a xenograft mouse model for HCV replication without generation of resistant variants. Our results provide a strategy for identifying potent siRNA species against a highly structured RNA target and offer a potential pan-HCV genotypic siRNA therapy that might be beneficial for patients resistant to current treatment regimens. PMID:26751678

  7. Cytoskeleton-Dependent Transport as a Potential Target for Interfering with Post-transcriptional HuR mRNA Regulons.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Wolfgang; Badawi, Amel; Biyanee, Abhiruchi; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous mRNA binding protein human antigen R (HuR), a member of the embryonal lethal abnormal vision protein family has a critical impact on the post-transcriptional control of AU-rich element bearing mRNA regulons implied in inflammation, senescence, and carcinogenesis. HuR in addition to mRNA stability can affect many other aspects of mRNA processing including splicing, polyadenylation, translation, modulation of miRNA repression, and intracellular mRNA trafficking. Since many of the identified HuR mRNA targets ("HuR mRNA regulons") encode tumor-related proteins, HuR is not only discussed as an useful biomarker but also as promising therapeutic target for treatment of various human cancers. HuR which is most abundantly localized in the nucleus is translocated to the cytoplasm which is fundamental for most of the described HuR functions on target mRNAs. Accordingly, an elevation in cytoplasmic HuR was found in many tumors and correlated with a high grade of malignancy and a poor prognosis of patients. Therefore, direct interference with the intracellular trafficking of HuR offers an attractive approach to intervene with pathologically deregulated HuR functions. Data from several laboratories implicate that the integrity of the cytoskeleton is critical for HuR-mediated intracellular mRNA localization and translation. This review will particularly focus on drugs which have proven a direct inhibitory effect on HuR translocation. Based on the results from those studies, we will also discuss on the principle value of targeting cytoskeleton-dependent transport of HuR by natural or synthetic inhibitors as a potential therapeutic avenue for interfering with dysregulated post-transcriptional HuR mRNA regulons and related tumor cell functions. In spite of that, interfering with cytoplasmic HuR transport could highlight a so far underestimated action of microtubule inhibitors clinically used for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27582706

  8. Cytoskeleton-Dependent Transport as a Potential Target for Interfering with Post-transcriptional HuR mRNA Regulons

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Wolfgang; Badawi, Amel; Biyanee, Abhiruchi; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous mRNA binding protein human antigen R (HuR), a member of the embryonal lethal abnormal vision protein family has a critical impact on the post-transcriptional control of AU-rich element bearing mRNA regulons implied in inflammation, senescence, and carcinogenesis. HuR in addition to mRNA stability can affect many other aspects of mRNA processing including splicing, polyadenylation, translation, modulation of miRNA repression, and intracellular mRNA trafficking. Since many of the identified HuR mRNA targets (“HuR mRNA regulons”) encode tumor-related proteins, HuR is not only discussed as an useful biomarker but also as promising therapeutic target for treatment of various human cancers. HuR which is most abundantly localized in the nucleus is translocated to the cytoplasm which is fundamental for most of the described HuR functions on target mRNAs. Accordingly, an elevation in cytoplasmic HuR was found in many tumors and correlated with a high grade of malignancy and a poor prognosis of patients. Therefore, direct interference with the intracellular trafficking of HuR offers an attractive approach to intervene with pathologically deregulated HuR functions. Data from several laboratories implicate that the integrity of the cytoskeleton is critical for HuR-mediated intracellular mRNA localization and translation. This review will particularly focus on drugs which have proven a direct inhibitory effect on HuR translocation. Based on the results from those studies, we will also discuss on the principle value of targeting cytoskeleton-dependent transport of HuR by natural or synthetic inhibitors as a potential therapeutic avenue for interfering with dysregulated post-transcriptional HuR mRNA regulons and related tumor cell functions. In spite of that, interfering with cytoplasmic HuR transport could highlight a so far underestimated action of microtubule inhibitors clinically used for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27582706

  9. A novel betapartitivirus RnPV6 from Rosellinia necatrix tolerates host RNA silencing but is interfered by its defective RNAs.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Sotaro; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Kondo, Hideki; Kanematsu, Satoko; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-07-01

    The family Partitiviridae comprises of five genera with bi-segmented dsRNA genomes that accommodate members infecting plants, fungi or protists. All partitiviruses with only a few exceptions cause asymptomatic infections. We report the characterization of a novel betapartitivirus termed Rosellinia necatrix partitivirus 6 (RnPV6) from a field isolate of a plant pathogenic fungus, white root rot fungus. RnPV6 has typical partitivirus features: dsRNA1 and dsRNA2 are 2462 and 2499bps in length encoding RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and capsid protein. Purified particles are spherical with a diameter of 30nm. Taking advantage of infectivity as virions, RnPV6 was introduced into a model filamentous fungal host, chestnut blight fungus to investigate virus/host interactions. Unlike other partitiviruses tested previously, RnPV6 induced profound phenotypic alterations with symptoms characterized by a reduced growth rate and enhanced pigmentation and was tolerant to host RNA silencing. In addition, a variety of defective RNAs derived from dsRNA1 appear after virion transfection. These sub-viral RNAs were shown to interfere with RnPV6 replication, at least for that of cognate segment dsRNA1. Presence of these sub-viral elements resulted in reduced symptom expression by RnPV6, suggesting their nature as defective-interfering RNAs. The features of RnPV6 are similar to but distinct from those of a previously reported alphapartitivirus, Rosellinia necatrix partitivirus 2 that is susceptible to RNA silencing. PMID:26494168

  10. Arabidopsis RNASE THREE LIKE2 Modulates the Expression of Protein-Coding Genes via 24-Nucleotide Small Interfering RNA-Directed DNA Methylation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hachet, Mélanie; Comella, Pascale; Zytnicki, Matthias; Vaucheret, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    RNaseIII enzymes catalyze the cleavage of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and have diverse functions in RNA maturation. Arabidopsis thaliana RNASE THREE LIKE2 (RTL2), which carries one RNaseIII and two dsRNA binding (DRB) domains, is a unique Arabidopsis RNaseIII enzyme resembling the budding yeast small interfering RNA (siRNA)-producing Dcr1 enzyme. Here, we show that RTL2 modulates the production of a subset of small RNAs and that this activity depends on both its RNaseIII and DRB domains. However, the mode of action of RTL2 differs from that of Dcr1. Whereas Dcr1 directly cleaves dsRNAs into 23-nucleotide siRNAs, RTL2 likely cleaves dsRNAs into longer molecules, which are subsequently processed into small RNAs by the DICER-LIKE enzymes. Depending on the dsRNA considered, RTL2-mediated maturation either improves (RTL2-dependent loci) or reduces (RTL2-sensitive loci) the production of small RNAs. Because the vast majority of RTL2-regulated loci correspond to transposons and intergenic regions producing 24-nucleotide siRNAs that guide DNA methylation, RTL2 depletion modifies DNA methylation in these regions. Nevertheless, 13% of RTL2-regulated loci correspond to protein-coding genes. We show that changes in 24-nucleotide siRNA levels also affect DNA methylation levels at such loci and inversely correlate with mRNA steady state levels, thus implicating RTL2 in the regulation of protein-coding gene expression. PMID:26764378

  11. Silencing tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) with short interfering RNA reveals a role for TIMP-1 in hepatic stellate cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Fowell, Andrew J.; Collins, Jane E.; Duncombe, Dale R.; Pickering, Judith A.; Rosenberg, William M.C.; Benyon, R. Christopher

    2011-04-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Myofibroblastic, activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) play a pivotal role in the development of liver fibrosis. {yields} We used short interfering RNA (siRNA) to investigate the effects of autocrine TIMP-1 and -2 on HSC proliferation. {yields} Specific silencing of TIMP-1, but not TIMP-2, significantly reduces HSC proliferation and is associated with reduced Akt phosphorylation. {yields} TIMP-1 is localised in part to the HSC nucleus. {yields} TIMP-1 might promote liver fibrosis by means other than its previously described anti-apoptotic effect on HSC. -- Abstract: Myofibroblastic, activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) play a pivotal role in the development of liver fibrosis through the secretion of fibrillar collagens and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and -2. TIMPs are believed to promote hepatic fibrosis by inhibiting both matrix degradation and apoptosis of HSC. In other cell types, there is evidence that TIMP-1 has effects on proliferation, however the role of TIMPs in the regulation of HSC proliferation remains unexplored. Therefore, we have used short interfering RNA (siRNA) to investigate the effects of autocrine TIMP-1 and -2 on HSC proliferation. TIMP-1 and -2 siRNA were highly effective, producing peak target protein knockdown compared to negative control siRNA of 92% and 63%, respectively. Specific silencing of TIMP-1, using siRNA, significantly reduced HSC proliferation. TIMP-1 was localised in part to the HSC nucleus and TIMP-1 siRNA resulted in loss of both cytoplasmic and nuclear TIMP-1. Attenuated proliferation was associated with reduced Akt phosphorylation and was partially rescued by addition of recombinant TIMP-1. We have revealed a novel autocrine mitogenic effect of TIMP-1 on HSC, which may involve Akt-dependent and specific nuclear mechanisms of action. We suggest that TIMP-1 might promote liver fibrosis by means other than its previously described anti-apoptotic effect on HSC. Moreover

  12. Endogenous MCM7 MicroRNA Cluster as a Novel Platform to Multiplex Small Interfering and Nucleolar RNAs for Combinational HIV-1 Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Janet; Zhang, Jane; Li, Haitang; Ouellet, Dominique L.; DiGiusto, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Combinational therapy with small RNA inhibitory agents against multiple viral targets allows efficient inhibition of viral production by controlling gene expression at critical time points. Here we explore combinations of different classes of therapeutic anti-HIV-1 RNAs expressed from within the context of an intronic MCM7 (minichromosome maintenance complex component-7) platform that naturally harbors 3 microRNAs (miRNAs). We replaced the endogenous miRNAs with anti-HIV small RNAs, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting HIV-1 tat and rev messages that function to induce post-transcriptional gene silencing by the RNA interference pathway, a nucleolar-localizing RNA ribozyme that targets the conserved U5 region of HIV-1 transcripts for degradation, and finally nucleolar trans-activation response (TAR) and Rev-binding element (RBE) RNA decoys designed to sequester HIV-1 Tat and Rev proteins inside the nucleolus. We demonstrate the versatility of the MCM7 platform in expressing and efficiently processing the siRNAs as miRNA mimics along with nucleolar small RNAs. Furthermore, three of the combinatorial constructs tested potently suppressed viral replication during a 1-month HIV challenge, with greater than 5-log inhibition compared with untransduced, HIV-1-infected CEM T lymphocytes. One of the most effective constructs contains an anti-HIV siRNA combined with a nucleolar-localizing U5 ribozyme and TAR decoy. This represents the first efficacious example of combining Drosha-processed siRNAs with small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein (snoRNP)-processed nucleolar RNA chimeras from a single intron platform for effective inhibition of viral replication. Moreover, we demonstrated enrichment/selection for cells expressing levels of the antiviral RNAs that provide optimal inhibition under the selective pressure of HIV. The combinations of si/snoRNAs represent a new paradigm for combinatorial RNA-based gene therapy applications. PMID:22834872

  13. Upregulation of microRNA-22 contributes to myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury by interfering with the mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Du, Jian-Kui; Cong, Bin-Hai; Yu, Qing; Wang, He; Wang, Long; Wang, Chang-Nan; Tang, Xiao-Lu; Lu, Jian-Qiang; Zhu, Xiao-Yan; Ni, Xin

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative damage is critically involved in cardiac ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury. MicroRNA-22 (miR-22) has been predicted to potentially target sirtuin-1 (Sirt1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC1α), both of which are known to provide protection against mitochondrial oxidative injury. The present study aims to investigate whether miR-22 is involved in the regulation of cardiac I/R injury by regulation of mitochondrial function. We found that miR-22 level was significantly increased in rat hearts subjected to I/R injury, as compared with the sham group. Intra-myocardial injection of 20 ug miR-22 inhibitor reduced I/R injury as evidenced by significant decreases in cardiac infarct size, serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) levels and the number of apoptotic cardiomyocytes. H9c2 cardiomyocytes exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) insult exhibited an increase in miR-22 expression, which was blocked by reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger and p53 inhibitor. In addition, miR-22 inhibitor attenuated, whereas miR-22 mimic aggravated H/R-induced injury in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. MiR-22 inhibitor per se had no significant effect on cardiac mitochondrial function. Mitochondria from rat receiving miR-22 inhibitor 48h before ischemia were found to have a significantly less mitochondrial superoxide production and greater mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production as compared with rat receiving miR control. In H9c2 cardiomyocyte, it was found that miR-22 mimic aggravated, whilst miR-22 inhibitor significantly attenuated H/R-induced mitochondrial damage. By using real time PCR, western blot and dual-luciferase reporter gene analyses, we identified Sirt1 and PGC1α as miR-22 targets in cardiomyocytes. It was found that silencing of Sirt1 abolished the protective effect of miR-22 inhibitor against H/R-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell injury in cardiomyocytes. Taken together, our

  14. Design of cyclic RGD-conjugated Aib-containing amphipathic helical peptides for targeted delivery of small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Wada, Shun-Ichi; Iwata, Masashi; Ozaki, Yuka; Ozaki, Takashi; Hayashi, Junsuke; Urata, Hidehito

    2016-09-15

    To achieve the targeted delivery of siRNA, five conjugates of Aib-containing amphipathic helical peptides with mono-, di-, and trivalent cRGDfC [cyclo(-Arg-Gly-Asp-d-Phe-Cys-)], which is known to bind to αVβ3 integrin, at several positions of the amphipathic helical peptide were designed and synthesized. Among the five conjugates, the monovalent cRGDfC conjugating at position 20 of the amino acid sequence of the helical peptide through the formation of a disulfide bond (PI) and the divalent cRGDfC conjugating at positions 2 and 14 of the amino acid sequence of the helical peptide through the formation of disulfide bonds (PIII) significantly enhanced the delivery of fluorescence-labeled siRNA into A549 cells as the peptide/siRNA complex formed by electrostatic interaction. The cellular uptake of the PI/siRNA complex was mediated by both endocytic and non-endocytic pathways, whereas that of the PIII/siRNA complex was enabled by endocytosis. Furthermore, the cellular uptake of the PI/siRNA complex might involve specific interactions of the RGD group with the αVβ3 integrin receptor. Next, the RNAi effect of the peptide/siRNA complex on luciferase expression in A549-Luc cells was examined. Luciferase expression was significantly decreased in the presence of the complex at the concentration of 1.0μM PI/10nM siRNA. In contrast, the PIII/siRNA complex did not show the RNAi effect under the same conditions. However, extending the incubation time led to the suppression of the luciferase expression in the presence of the PIII/siRNA complex. Considering that the cellular uptake of the PIII/siRNA complex is mediated by the endocytic pathway, the release of siRNA from the endosome into the cytosol might require a long time. We present herein a useful and unique tool for the delivery of siRNA. PMID:27480031

  15. In vivo study of Dicer-2-mediated immune response of the small interfering RNA pathway upon systemic infections of virulent and avirulent viruses in Bombus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jinzhi; Smagghe, Guy; De Coninck, Dieter I M; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter; Meeus, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies suggest a potent role of the small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway in the control of bee viruses and its usefulness to tackle these viral diseases. However, the involvement of the siRNA pathway in the defense against different bee viruses is still poorly understood. Therefore, in this report, we comprehensively analyzed the response of the siRNA pathway in bumblebees of Bombus terrestris to systemic infections of the virulent Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) and the avirulent slow bee paralysis virus (SBPV). Our results showed that IAPV and SBPV infections induced the expression of Dicer-2. IAPV infections also triggered the production of predominantly 22 nt-long virus-derived siRNAs (vsiRNAs). Intriguingly, these 22 nt-long vsiRNAs showed a high proportion of antigenomic IAPV sequences. Conversely, these predominantly 22 nt-long vsiRNAs of SBPV were not detected in SBPV infected bees. Furthermore, an "RNAi-of-RNAi" experiment on Dicer-2 did not result in altered genome copy numbers of IAPV (n = 17-18) and also not of SBPV (n = 11-12). Based on these results, we can speculate about the importance of the siRNA pathway in bumblebees for the antiviral response. During infection of IAPV, this pathway is probably recruited but it might be insufficient to control viral infection in our experimental setup. The host can control SBPV infection, but aside from the induction of Dicer-2 expression, no further evidence of the antiviral activity of the siRNA pathway was observed. This report may also enhance the current understanding of the siRNA pathway in the innate immunity of non-model insects upon different viral infections. PMID:26711439

  16. Inhibition of Dengue Virus Infections in Cell Cultures and in AG129 Mice by a Small Interfering RNA Targeting a Highly Conserved Sequence ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stein, David A.; Perry, Stuart T.; Buck, Michael D.; Oehmen, Christopher S.; Fischer, Matthew A.; Poore, Elizabeth; Smith, Jessica L.; Lancaster, Alissa M.; Hirsch, Alec J.; Slifka, Mark K.; Nelson, Jay A.; Shresta, Sujan; Früh, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    The dengue viruses (DENVs) exist as numerous genetic strains that are grouped into four antigenically distinct serotypes. DENV strains from each serotype can cause severe disease and threaten public health in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. No licensed antiviral agent to treat DENV infections is currently available, and there is an acute need for the development of novel therapeutics. We found that a synthetic small interfering RNA (siRNA) (DC-3) targeting the highly conserved 5′ cyclization sequence (5′CS) region of the DENV genome reduced, by more than 100-fold, the titers of representative strains from each DENV serotype in vitro. To determine if DC-3 siRNA could inhibit DENV in vivo, an “in vivo-ready” version of DC-3 was synthesized and tested against DENV-2 by using a mouse model of antibody-dependent enhancement of infection (ADE)-induced disease. Compared with the rapid weight loss and 5-day average survival time of the control groups, mice receiving the DC-3 siRNA had an average survival time of 15 days and showed little weight loss for approximately 12 days. DC-3-treated mice also contained significantly less virus than control groups in several tissues at various time points postinfection. These results suggest that exogenously introduced siRNA combined with the endogenous RNA interference processing machinery has the capacity to prevent severe dengue disease. Overall, the data indicate that DC-3 siRNA represents a useful research reagent and has potential as a novel approach to therapeutic intervention against the genetically diverse dengue viruses. PMID:21795337

  17. Gene silencing in primary and metastatic tumors by small interfering RNA delivery in mice: quantitative analysis using melanoma cells expressing firefly and sea pansy luciferases.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuki; Nishikawa, Makiya; Kobayashi, Naoki; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2005-07-20

    Silencing of oncogenes or other genes contributing to tumor malignancy or progression by RNA interference (RNAi) offers a promising approach to treating tumor patients. To achieve RNAi-based tumor therapy, a small interfering RNA (siRNA) or siRNA-expressing vector needs to be delivered to tumor cells, but little information about its in vivo delivery has been reported. In this study, we examined whether the expression of the target gene in tumor cells can be suppressed by the delivery of RNAi effectors to primary and metastatic tumor cells. To quantitatively evaluate the RNAi effects in tumor cells, mouse melanoma B16-BL6 cells were stably transfected with both firefly (a model target gene) and sea pansy (an internal standard gene) luciferase genes to obtain B16-BL6/dual Luc cells. The target gene expression in subcutaneous primary tumors of B16-BL6/dual Luc cells was significantly suppressed by direct injection of the RNAi effectors followed by electroporation. The expression in metastatic hepatic tumors was also significantly reduced by an intravenous injection of either RNAi effector by the hydrodynamics-based procedure. These results indicate that the both RNAi effectors have a potential to silence target gene in tumor cells in vivo when successfully delivered to tumor cells. PMID:15936841

  18. Effects of brain IKKβ gene silencing by small interfering RNA on P-glycoprotein expression and brain damage in the rat kainic acid-induced seizure model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nian; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Yan-Fang; Su, Ling-Ying; Liu, Xin-Hong; Li, Le-Chao; Hao, Jin-Bo; Huang, Xian-Jing; Di, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by over-expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in brain is an important mechanism accounting for the drug-therapy failure in epilepsy. Over-expression of P-gp in epilepsy rat brain may be regulated by inflammation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Inhibitory κ B kinase subunit β (IKKβ) is an up-stream molecular controlling NF-κB activation. With the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique and kainic acid (KA)-induced rat epileptic seizure model, the present study was aimed to further evaluate the role of NF-κB inhibition, via blocking IKKβ gene transcription, in the epileptic brain P-gp over-expression, seizure susceptibility, and post-seizure brain damage. siRNA targeting IKKβ was administered to rats via intracerebroventricular injection before seizure induction by KA microinjection; scrambled siRNA was used as control. Brain mRNA and protein levels of IKKβ and P-gp were detected by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. NF-κB activity was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Latency to grade III or V seizure onset was recorded, brain damage was evaluated by neuronal cell counting and epileptiform activity was monitored by electroencephalography. IKKβ siRNA pre-treatment inhibited NF-κB activation and abolished P-gp over-expression in KA-induced epileptic rat brain, accompanied by decreased seizure susceptibility. These findings suggested that epileptogenic-induced P-gp over-expression could be regulated by IKKβ through the NF-κB pathway. PMID:24040792

  19. Silencing expression of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase by small interfering RNA sensitizes human cells for radiation-induced chromosome damage, cell killing, and mutation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Yuanlin; Zhang, Qinming; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Liber, Howard L.; Bedford, Joel S.

    2002-01-01

    Targeted gene silencing in mammalian cells by RNA interference (RNAi) using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) was recently described by Elbashir et al. (S. M. Elbashir et al., Nature (Lond.), 411: 494-498, 2001). We have used this methodology in several human cell strains to reduce expression of the Prkdc (DNA-PKcs) gene coding for the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) that is involved in the nonhomologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. We have also demonstrated a radiosensitization for several phenotypic endpoints of radiation damage. In low-passage normal human fibroblasts, siRNA knock-down of DNA-PKcs resulted in a reduced capacity for restitution of radiation-induced interphase chromosome breaks as measured by premature chromosome condensation, an increased yield of acentric chromosome fragments at the first postirradiation mitosis, and an increased radiosensitivity for cell killing. For three strains of related human lymphoblasts, DNA-PKcs-targeted siRNA transfection resulted in little or no increase in radiosensitivity with respect to cell killing, a 1.5-fold decrease in induced mutant yield in TK6- and p53-null NH32 cells, but about a 2-fold increase in induced mutant yield in p53-mutant WTK1 cells at both the hypoxanthine quanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) and the thymidine kinase loci.

  20. Small interfering RNA targeting ILK inhibits metastasis in human tongue cancer cells through repression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Yu; Qi, Jin; Deng, Shixiong; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Luyu; Chen, Junxia

    2013-08-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a multifunctional serine/threonine kinase. Accumulating evidences suggest that ILK are involved in cell–matrix interactions, cell proliferation, invasion, migration, angiogenesis and Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. EMT has been postulated as a prerequisite for metastasis. The reports have demonstrated that EMT was implicated in metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinomas. Therefore, here we further postulate that ILK might participate in EMT of tongue cancer. We showed that ILK siRNA inhibited EMT with low N-cadherin, Vimentin, Snail, Slug and Twist as well as high E-cadherin expression in vivo and in vitro. We found that knockdown of ILK inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion as well as changed cell morphology. We also demonstrated that ILK siRNA inhibited phosphorylation of downstream signaling targets Akt and GSK3β as well as reduced expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Furthermore, we found that the tongue tumor with high metastasis capability showed higher ILK, Vimentin, Snail, Slug and Twist as well as lower E-cadherin expression in clinical specimens. Finally, ILK siRNA led to the suppression for tumorigenesis and metastasis in vivo. Our findings suggest that ILK could be a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for tongue cancer. Highlights: • ILK siRNA influences cell morphology, cell cycle, migration and invasion. • ILK siRNA affects the expression of proteins associated with EMT. • ILK expression is related to EMT in clinical human tongue tumors. • ILK siRNA inhibits metastasis of the tongue cancer cells through suppressing EMT.

  1. Self-assembled Micelle Interfering RNA for Effective and Safe Targeting of Dysregulated Genes in Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Pyoung Oh; Park, Jin Wook; Lee, Chang-Min; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Han-Na; Ko, Youngho; Bae, Seon Joo; Yun, Sungil; Park, Jun Hong; Kwon, Taewoo; Kim, Woo Seok; Lee, Jiyoung; Lu, Qing; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Cho, Won-Kyung; Elias, Jack A; Yang, Joo-Sung; Park, Han-Oh; Lee, Kyuhong; Lee, Chun Geun

    2016-03-18

    The siRNA silencing approach has long been used as a method to regulate the expression of specific target genes in vitro and in vivo. However, the effectiveness of delivery and the nonspecific immune-stimulatory function of siRNA are the limiting factors for therapeutic applications of siRNAs. To overcome these limitations, we developed self-assembled micelle inhibitory RNA (SAMiRNA) nanoparticles made of individually biconjugated siRNAs with a hydrophilic polymer and lipid on their ends and characterized their stability, immune-stimulatory function, and in vivo silencing efficacy. SAMiRNAs form very stable nanoparticles with no significant degradation in size distribution and polydispersity index over 1 year. Overnight incubation of SAMiRNAs (3 μm) on murine peripheral blood mononuclear cells did not cause any significant elaboration of innate immune cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-12, or IL-6, whereas unmodified siRNAs or liposomes or liposome complexes significantly stimulated the expression of these cytokines. Last, the in vivo silencing efficacy of SAMiRNAs was evaluated by targeting amphiregulin and connective tissue growth factor in bleomycin or TGF-β transgenic animal models of pulmonary fibrosis. Intratracheal or intravenous delivery two or three times of amphiregulin or connective tissue growth factor SAMiRNAs significantly reduced the bleomycin- or TGF-β-stimulated collagen accumulation in the lung and substantially restored the lung function of TGF-β transgenic mice. This study demonstrates that SAMiRNA nanoparticle is a less toxic, stable siRNA silencing platform for efficient in vivo targeting of genes implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26817844

  2. Silencing tumor necrosis factor-alpha in vitro from small interfering RNA-decorated titanium nanotube array can facilitate osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenlin; Hu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Dawei; Zhuo, Mengchuan; Cheng, Jiwei; Xu, Xingping; Xing, Yongming; Fan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Titanium implants are known for their bone bonding ability. However, the osseointegration may be severely disturbed in the inflammation environment. In order to enhance osseointegration of the implant in an inflamed environment, the small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was used to functionalize titanium surface for gene silencing. The chitosan–tripolyphosphate–hyaluronate complexes were used to formulate nanoparticles (NPs) with siRNA, which were adsorbed directly by the anodized titanium surface. The surface characterization was analyzed by scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy, as well as contact angle measurement. The fluorescence microscope was used to monitor the degradation of the layer. The coculture system was established with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) grown directly on functionalized titanium surface and RAW264.7 cells (preactivated by lipopolysaccharide) grown upside in a transwell chamber. The transfection and knockdown efficiency of TNF-α in RAW264.7 cells were determined by fluorescence microscope, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The cytoskeleton and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs were also analyzed. Regular vertical aligned nanotubes (~100 nm diameter and ~300 nm length) were generated after anodization of polished titanium. After loading with NPs, the nanotubes were filled and covered by a layer of amorphous particles. The surface topography changed and wettability decreased after covering with NPs. As expected, a burst degradation of the film was observed, which could provide sufficient NPs in the released supernatant and result in transfection and knockdown effects in RAW264.7 cells. The cytoskeleton arrangement of MSCs was elongated and the osteogenic differentiation was also significantly improved on NPs loading surface. In conclusion, the siRNA decorated titanium implant could simultaneously suppress inflammation and improve

  3. Genome-Wide Small Interfering RNA Screens Reveal VAMP3 as a Novel Host Factor Required for Uukuniemi Virus Late Penetration

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Roger; Franceschini, Andrea; Horvath, Peter; Tetard, Marilou; Mancini, Roberta; von Mering, Christian; Helenius, Ari

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Bunyaviridae constitute a large family of enveloped animal viruses, many of which are important emerging pathogens. How bunyaviruses enter and infect mammalian cells remains largely uncharacterized. We used two genome-wide silencing screens with distinct small interfering RNA (siRNA) libraries to investigate host proteins required during infection of human cells by the bunyavirus Uukuniemi virus (UUKV), a late-penetrating virus. Sequence analysis of the libraries revealed that many siRNAs in the screens inhibited infection by silencing not only the intended targets but additional genes in a microRNA (miRNA)-like manner. That the 7-nucleotide seed regions in the siRNAs can cause a perturbation in infection was confirmed by using synthetic miRNAs (miRs). One of the miRs tested, miR-142-3p, was shown to interfere with the intracellular trafficking of incoming viruses by regulating the v-SNARE VAMP3, a strong hit shared by both siRNA screens. Inactivation of VAMP3 by the tetanus toxin led to a block in infection. Using fluorescence-based techniques in fixed and live cells, we found that the viruses enter VAMP3+ endosomal vesicles 5 min after internalization and that colocalization was maximal 15 min thereafter. At this time, LAMP1 was associated with the VAMP3+ virus-containing endosomes. In cells depleted of VAMP3, viruses were mainly trapped in LAMP1-negative compartments. Together, our results indicated that UUKV relies on VAMP3 for penetration, providing an indication of added complexity in the trafficking of viruses through the endocytic network. IMPORTANCE Bunyaviruses represent a growing threat to humans and livestock globally. Unfortunately, relatively little is known about these emerging pathogens. We report here the first human genome-wide siRNA screens for a bunyavirus. The screens resulted in the identification of 562 host cell factors with a potential role in cell entry and virus replication. To demonstrate the robustness of our approach, we

  4. Design and validation of small interfering RNA on respiratory syncytial virus M2-2 gene: A potential approach in RNA interference on viral replication.

    PubMed

    Chin, V K; Atika Aziz, Nur A; Hudu, Shuaibu A; Harmal, Nabil S; Syahrilnizam, A; Jalilian, Farid A; Zamberi, S

    2016-10-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants and young children globally and is a significant pathogen of the elderly and immunocompromised. The M2-2 protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is particularly important in regulation of viral RNA transcription and replication that could be a potential anti-viral candidate against RSV infection. In this study, we designed and validated siRNAs that specifically target the RSV M2-2 gene. Four siRNAs targeting different regions of the M2-2 gene were designed using web tool. In-vitro evaluation of silencing effect was performed by using RSV infected Vero cell line. Viral M2-2 linked GFP recombinant plasmid was co-transfected with non-targeted siRNA, Pooled siRNA, siRNA 1, siRNA 2, siRNA 3 and siRNA 4 using synthetic cationic polymer. The silencing effect of M2-2 gene at the protein level was measured both qualitatively and quantitatively by using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Meanwhile, the silencing effect at the mRNA level was assessed by using RT-qPCR. This study showed that all four designed siRNAs can effectively and efficiently silence M2-2 gene. siRNA 2 showed the highest (98%) silencing effect on protein level and siRNA 4 with 83.1% at the mRNA level. The viral assay showed no significant cytopathic effects observed after 6days post-infection with siRNAs. In conclusion, this study showed the effectiveness of siRNA in silencing M2-2 gene both at the protein and mRNA level which could potentially be used as a novel therapeutic agent in the treatment of RSV infection. However, further study is warranted to investigate the silencing effect of M2-2 protein and inhibition of RSV infection. PMID:27432115

  5. Synergistic suppression of prostatic cancer cells by coexpression of both murine double minute 2 small interfering RNA and wild-type p53 gene in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ji, Kun; Wang, Bo; Shao, Yue-Ting; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Ya-Nan; Shao, Chen; Li, Xiao-Jie; Li, Xin; Hu, Jia-di; Zhao, Xue-Jian; Xu, De-Qi; Li, Yang; Cai, Lu

    2011-07-01

    Our objective was to evaluate cell growth and death effects by inhibiting Murine Double Minute 2 (MDM2) expression in human prostate cancer cells overexpressing the wild-type (WT) p53 gene. Prostate PC-3 tumor cells were transfected with a plasmid containing either mdm2 small interfering (Si-mdm2) or the WT p53 gene (Pp53) alone, or both (Pmp53), using Lipofectamine in vitro and attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi vaccine strain Ty21a (Salmonella Typhi Ty21a) in vivo. Cell growth, apoptosis, and the expression of related genes and proteins were examined in vitro and in vivo by flow cytometry and Western blot assays. We demonstrated that human prostate tumors had increased expression of MDM2 and mutant p53 proteins. Transfection of the PC-3 cells with the Pmp53 plasmid in vitro offered significant inhibition of cell growth and an increase in apoptotic cell death compared with that of the Si-mdm2 or Pp53 group. These effects were associated with up-regulation of p21 and down-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α expression in Pmp53-transfected cells. To validate the in vitro findings, the nude mice implanted with PC-3 cells were treated with attenuated Salmonella Typhi Ty21a carrying the plasmids, which showed that the Pmp53 plasmid significantly inhibited the tumor growth rate in vivo compared with that of the Si-mdm2 or Pp53 plasmid alone. Tumor tissues from mice treated with the Pmp53 plasmid showed increased expression of p21 and decreased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α proteins, with an increased apoptotic effect. These results suggest that knockdown of mdm2 expression by its specific small interfering RNA with overexpression of the WT p53 gene offers synergistic inhibition of prostate cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21444629

  6. Shock-induced poration, cholesterol flip-flop and small interfering RNA transfection in a phospholipid membrane: Multimillion atom, microsecond molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Amit

    performing a 15 mus all-atom MD simulation of a DPPC-CHOL bilayer. We find that the CHOL flip-flop rates are on the sub microsecond timescale. These results are verified by performing various independent parallel replica (PR) simulations. Our PR simulations provide significant boost in sampling of the flip-flop events. We observe that the CHOL flip-flop can induce membrane order, regulate membrane-bending energy, and facilitate membrane relaxation. The rapid flip-flop rates reported here have important implications for the role of CHOL in mechanical properties of cell membranes, formation of domains, and maintaining CHOL concentration asymmetry in plasma membrane. Our PR approach can reach submillisecond time scales and bridge the gap between MD simulations and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments on CHOL flip-flop dynamics in membranes. The last project deals with transfection barriers encountered by a bare small interfering RNA (siRNA) in a phospholipid bilayer. SiRNA molecules play a pivotal role in therapeutic applications. A key limitation to the widespread implementation of siRNA-based therapeutics is the difficulty of delivering siRNA-based drugs to cells. We have examined structural and mechanical barriers to siRNA passage across a phospholipid bilayer using all-atom MD simulations. We find that the electrostatic interaction between the anionic siRNA and head groups of phospholipid molecules induces a phase transformation from the liquid crystalline to ripple phase. Steered MD simulations reveal that the siRNA transfection through the ripple phase requires a force of ˜ 1.5 nN.

  7. A Genome-wide Small Interfering RNA (siRNA) Screen Reveals Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB)-independent Regulators of NOD2-induced Interleukin-8 (IL-8) Secretion*

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Neil; Burberry, Aaron; Pliakas, Maria; McDonald, Christine; Núñez, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    NOD2 encodes an intracellular multidomain pattern recognition receptor that is the strongest known genetic risk factor in the pathogenesis of Crohn disease (CD), a chronic relapsing inflammatory disorder of the intestinal tract. NOD2 functions as a sensor for bacterial cell wall components and activates proinflammatory and antimicrobial signaling pathways. Here, using a genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen, we identify numerous genes that regulate secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 in response to NOD2 activation. Moreover, many of the identified IL-8 regulators are linked by protein-protein interactions, revealing subnetworks of highly connected IL-8 regulators implicated in processes such as vesicle formation, mRNA stability, and protein ubiquitination and trafficking. A TNFα counterscreen to induce IL-8 secretion in an NOD2-independent manner reveals that the majority of the identified regulators affect IL-8 secretion irrespective of the initiating stimuli. Using immortalized macrophages, we validate the ubiquitin protease, USP8, and the endosomal sorting protein, VPS28, as negative regulators of NOD2-induced cytokine secretion. Interestingly, several genes that affect NOD2-induced IL-8 secretion are present in loci associated with CD risk by genome-wide association studies, supporting a role for the NOD2/IL-8 pathway, and not just NOD2, in the pathogenesis of CD. Overall, this screen provides a valuable resource in the advancement of our understanding of the genes that regulate the secretion of IL-8. PMID:25170077

  8. A genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen reveals nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-independent regulators of NOD2-induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion.

    PubMed

    Warner, Neil; Burberry, Aaron; Pliakas, Maria; McDonald, Christine; Núñez, Gabriel

    2014-10-10

    NOD2 encodes an intracellular multidomain pattern recognition receptor that is the strongest known genetic risk factor in the pathogenesis of Crohn disease (CD), a chronic relapsing inflammatory disorder of the intestinal tract. NOD2 functions as a sensor for bacterial cell wall components and activates proinflammatory and antimicrobial signaling pathways. Here, using a genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen, we identify numerous genes that regulate secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 in response to NOD2 activation. Moreover, many of the identified IL-8 regulators are linked by protein-protein interactions, revealing subnetworks of highly connected IL-8 regulators implicated in processes such as vesicle formation, mRNA stability, and protein ubiquitination and trafficking. A TNFα counterscreen to induce IL-8 secretion in an NOD2-independent manner reveals that the majority of the identified regulators affect IL-8 secretion irrespective of the initiating stimuli. Using immortalized macrophages, we validate the ubiquitin protease, USP8, and the endosomal sorting protein, VPS28, as negative regulators of NOD2-induced cytokine secretion. Interestingly, several genes that affect NOD2-induced IL-8 secretion are present in loci associated with CD risk by genome-wide association studies, supporting a role for the NOD2/IL-8 pathway, and not just NOD2, in the pathogenesis of CD. Overall, this screen provides a valuable resource in the advancement of our understanding of the genes that regulate the secretion of IL-8. PMID:25170077

  9. Exponential increases of RNA virus fitness during large population transmissions.

    PubMed Central

    Novella, I S; Duarte, E A; Elena, S F; Moya, A; Domingo, E; Holland, J J

    1995-01-01

    The great adaptability shown by RNA viruses is a consequence of their high mutation rates. Here we investigate the kinetics of virus fitness gains during repeated transfers of large virus populations in cell culture. Results always show that fitness increases exponentially. Low fitness clones exhibit regular increases observed as biphasic periods of exponential evolutionary improvement, while neutral clones show monophasic kinetics. These results are significant for RNA virus epidemiology, optimal handling of attenuated live virus vaccines, and routine laboratory procedures. PMID:7597039

  10. Epidermal growth factor increases the interaction between nucleolin and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K/poly(C) binding protein 1 complex to regulate the gastrin mRNA turnover.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pin-Tse; Liao, Pao-Chi; Chang, Wen-Chang; Tseng, Joseph T

    2007-12-01

    Gastrin, a gastrointestinal hormone responsible for gastric acid secretion, has been confirmed as a growth factor for gastrointestinal tract malignancies. High expression of gastrin mRNA was observed in pancreatic and colorectal cancer; however, the mechanism is unclear. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) was found to increase gastrin mRNA stability, indicating mRNA turnover regulation mechanism is involved in the control of gastrin mRNA expression. Using biotin-labeled RNA probe pull-down assay combined with mass spectrometry analysis, we identified the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) and poly(C) binding protein 1 (PCBP1) bound with the C-rich region in gastrin mRNA 3' untranslated region. Nucleolin bound with the AGCCCU motif and interacted with hnRNP K were also demonstrated. Under EGF treatment, we observed the amount of nucleolin interacting with hnRNP K and gastrin mRNA increased. Using small interfering RNA technology to define their functional roles, we found hnRNP K, PCBP1, and nucleolin were all responsible for stabilizing gastrin mRNA. Moreover, nucleolin plays a crucial role in mediating the increased gastrin mRNA stability induced by EGF signaling. Besides, we also observed hnRNP K/PCBP1 complex bound with the C-rich region in the gastrin mRNA increased nucleolin binding with gastrin mRNA. Finally, a novel binding model was proposed. PMID:17928403

  11. Effects of 5‑fluorouracil and class III phosphoinositide 3‑kinase small interfering RNA combination therapy on SGC7901 human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bao-Song; Sun, Jia-Lei; Gong, Wei; Zhang, Xing-Ding; Wu, Yong-You; Xing, Chun-Gen

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of small interfering RNA‑mediated inhibition of Class III phosphoinositide 3‑kinase (PI3K) signal transduction on the proliferation, apoptosis and autophagy of SGC7901 gastric cancer cells. The present study also aimed to examine the contribution of autophagic inhibition to the antitumor effects of 5‑fluorouracil (5‑FU). A PI3K(III)‑RNA interference (i)‑green fluorescent protein (GFP) recombinant replication adenovirus (AD) and the negative control (NC)‑RNAi‑GFP control AD were constructed and infected into SGC7901 cells. A methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay was used to determine the growth rate of the SGC7901 cells. Immunofluorescent staining was used to detect microtubule‑associated protein 1 light chain 3 expression. The mitochondrial membrane potential was measured using the JC‑1 fluorescent probe. Autophagic expression was monitored with MDC staining and transmission electron microscopy. The results revealed that following combination treatment of the SGC7901 gastric cancer cells with 5‑FU + PI3K(III)‑RNAi‑AD, the optical density absorbance values at 24, 48 and 72 h were 0.17 ± 1.64, 0.13 ± 4.64 and 0.11 ± 3.56%, respectively, with cell viability inhibition ratios of 45.89 ± 6.67, 72.57 ± 9.48 and 87.51 ± 4.65%, respectively. As compared with the other treatment groups, the inhibition rate in the combined treatment group was significantly higher (P<0.05). The percentages of the cells with green fluorescence in the combined treatment group were 74.4 ± 3.86 (24 h), 82.3 ± 1.84 (48 h) and 92.5 ± 1.1% (72 h), which were larger than those of the other groups. The percentage of cells with green fluorescence became larger, which indicated that the mitochondrion membrane potential had been reduced to a greater extent. MDC staining revealed that the number of autophagic vacuoles in the cells (measured at 24, 48 and 72 h) decreased gradually with time, with more autophagic

  12. siRNA-induced caveolin-1 knockdown in mice increases lung vascular permeability via the junctional pathway.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki-Shimizu, Kayo; Predescu, Dan; Shimizu, Jun; Broman, Michael; Predescu, Sanda; Malik, Asrar B

    2006-02-01

    Caveolin-1, the principal integral membrane protein of caveolae, has been implicated in regulating the structural integrity of caveolae, vesicular trafficking, and signal transduction. Although the functions of caveolin-1 are beginning to be explored in caveolin-1-/- mice, these results are confounded by unknown compensatory mechanisms and the development of pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and lung fibrosis. To address the role of caveolin-1 in regulating lung vascular permeability, in the present study we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) to knock down caveolin-1 expression in mouse lung endothelia in vivo. Intravenous injection of siRNA against caveolin-1 mRNA incorporated in liposomes selectively reduced the expression of caveolin-1 by approximately 90% within 96 h of injection compared with wild-type mice. We observed the concomitant disappearance of caveolae in lung vessel endothelia and dilated interendothelial junctions (IEJs) as well as increased lung vascular permeability to albumin via IEJs. The reduced caveolin-1 expression also resulted in increased plasma nitric oxide concentration. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, in part, blocked the increased vascular albumin permeability. These morphological and functional effects of caveolin-1 knockdown were reversible within 168 h after siRNA injection, corresponding to the restoration of caveolin-1 expression. Thus our results demonstrate the essential requirement of caveolin-1 in mediating the formation of caveolae in endothelial cells in vivo and in negatively regulating IEJ permeability. PMID:16183667

  13. Lettuce chlorosis virus P23 Suppresses RNA Silencing and Induces Local Necrosis with Increased Severity at Raised Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Kenji; Ng, James C K

    2016-06-01

    RNA silencing functions as an antivirus defense strategy in plants, one that plant viruses counter by producing viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs). VSRs have been identified in three members of the genus Crinivirus but they do not all share identical suppression mechanisms. Here, we used Agrobacterium co-infiltration assays to investigate the suppressor activity of proteins encoded by Lettuce chlorosis virus (LCV). Of 7 LCV proteins (1b, P23, HSP70 homolog, P60, CP, CPm, and P27) tested for the suppression of silencing of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in wild-type Nicotiana benthamiana plants, only P23 suppressed the onset of local silencing. Small-interfering (si)RNA accumulation was reduced in leaves co-infiltrated with P23, suggesting that P23 inhibited the accumulation or enhanced the degradation of siRNA. P23 also inhibited the cell-to-cell and systemic movement of RNA silencing in GFP-expressing transgenic N. benthamiana plants. Expression of P23 via agroinfiltration of N. benthamiana leaves induced local necrosis that increased in severity at elevated temperatures, a novelty given that a direct temperature effect on necrosis severity has not been reported for the other crinivirus VSRs. These results further affirm the sophistication of crinivirus VSRs in mediating the evasion of host's antiviral defenses and in symptom modulation. PMID:26828232

  14. Estimation of HIV-1 DNA Level Interfering with Reliability of HIV-1 RNA Quantification Performed on Dried Blood Spots Collected from Successfully Treated Patients.

    PubMed

    Zida, Sylvie; Tuaillon, Edouard; Barro, Makoura; Kwimatouo Lekpa Franchard, Arnaud; Kagoné, Thérèse; Nacro, Boubacar; Ouedraogo, Abdoul Salam; Bolloré, Karine; Sanosyan, Armen; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Meda, Nicolas; Sangaré, Lassana; Rouzioux, Christine; Rouet, François; Kania, Dramane

    2016-06-01

    The impact of HIV-1 DNA coamplification during HIV-1 RNA quantification on dried blood spots (DBS) was explored. False-positive HIV RNA detection (22/62, 35%) was associated with high HIV-1 DNA levels. Specificity of HIV-1 RNA assays on DBS should be evaluated following manufacturer protocols on samples with HIV-1 DNA levels of ≥1,000 copies/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:27008874

  15. Local Applications of Myostatin-siRNA with Atelocollagen Increase Skeletal Muscle Mass and Recovery of Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Emi; Kawai, Nobuhiko; Kinouchi, Nao; Mori, Hiroyo; Ohsawa, Yutaka; Ishimaru, Naozumi; Sunada, Yoshihide; Noji, Sumihare; Tanaka, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    Background Growing evidence suggests that small-interfering RNA (siRNA) can promote gene silencing in mammalian cells without induction of interferon synthesis or nonspecific gene suppression. Recently, a number of highly specific siRNAs targeted against disease-causing or disease-promoting genes have been developed. In this study, we evaluate the effectiveness of atelocollagen (ATCOL)-mediated application of siRNA targeting myostatin (Mst), a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth, into skeletal muscles of muscular dystrophy model mice. Methods and Findings We injected a nanoparticle complex containing myostatin-siRNA and ATCOL (Mst-siRNA/ATCOL) into the masseter muscles of mutant caveolin-3 transgenic (mCAV-3Tg) mice, an animal model for muscular dystrophy. Scrambled (scr) -siRNA/ATCOL complex was injected into the contralateral muscles as a control. Two weeks after injection, the masseter muscles were dissected for histometric analyses. To investigate changes in masseter muscle activity by local administration of Mst-siRNA/ATCOL complex, mouse masseter electromyography (EMG) was measured throughout the experimental period via telemetry. After local application of the Mst-siRNA/ATCOL complex, masseter muscles were enlarged, while no significant change was observed on the contralateral side. Histological analysis showed that myofibrils of masseter muscles treated with the Mst-siRNA/ATCOL complex were significantly larger than those of the control side. Real-time PCR analysis revealed a significant downregulation of Mst expression in the treated masseters of mCAV-3Tg mice. In addition, expression of myogenic transcription factors was upregulated in the Mst-siRNA-treated masseter muscle, while expression of adipogenic transcription factors was significantly downregulated. EMG results indicate that masseter muscle activity in mCAV-3Tg mice was increased by local administration of the Mst-siRNA/ATCOL complex. Conclusion These data suggest local administration of

  16. MicroRNA overexpression increases cortical neuronal vulnerability to injury

    PubMed Central

    Truettner, Jessie S.; Motti, Dario; Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2013-01-01

    Previously we reported that several microRNAs (miRNA) are upregulated following experimentally induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) using both in vivo and in vitro approaches. Specific miRNAs were found to be sensitive to therapeutic hypothermia and may therefore be important targets for neuroprotective strategies. In this study we developed plasmid constructs that overexpress temperature sensitive miRNAs: miR-34a, miR-451, and miR-874. These constructs were transfected into cultured cortical neurons that were subjected to stretch injury using a cell injury controller device. Levels of expression of genes associated with stress, inflammation, apoptosis and transcriptional regulation were measured by qRT-PCR. mRNA levels of cytokines interleukin 1-β (IL1-β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) as well as heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and Caspase 11 were found to be increased up to 24 fold higher than controls in cells overexpressing these miRNAs. After moderate stretch injury, the expression of IL1-β, TNF-α, HSP70 and Caspase 11 all increased over control levels found in uninjured cells suggesting that overexpression of these miRNAs increases cellular vulnerability. miR-34a directly inhibits Bcl2 and XIAP, both anti-apoptotic proteins. The observed increase in Caspase 11 with over-expression of miR-34a indicates that miR-34a may be inducing apoptosis by reducing the levels of antiapoptotic proteins. miR-34a is predicted to inhibit Jun, which was seen to decrease in cells overexpressing this miRNA along with Fos. Over expression of several miRNAs found to be induced by TBI in vivo (miR-34a, miR-451 and miR-874) leads to increased vulnerability in transfected neurons. Therapeutic hypothermia blunts the expression of these miRNAs in vivo and antisense silencing could be a potential therapeutic approach to targeting the consequences of TBI. PMID:23948100

  17. Suppression of ITGB4 Gene Expression in PC-3 Cells with Short Interfering RNA Induces Changes in the Expression of β-Integrins Associated with RGD-Receptors.

    PubMed

    Knyazev, E N; Nyushko, K M; Alekseev, B Ya; Samatov, T R; Shkurnikov, M Yu

    2015-08-01

    We studied the effect of transfection of PC-3 prostate cancer cells with a plasmid encoding shRNA complimentary to a fragment of integrin β4 (ITGB4). The results attest to considerable changes in the transcriptome of transfected cells. For instance, compensatory changes in the expression of integrin family genes were found. PMID:26395630

  18. Analysis of the small interfering RNA profiles of randomly inserted pTRM-TRI6 Fusarium graminearum mutants and their DON related phenotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) production by Fusarium graminearum requires activation of the trichothecene pathway in which TRI5 catalyzes the first step of trichothecene synthesis and TRI6 is a transcription factor activates the pathway. RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a useful fungal genetics tool f...

  19. Inducible and reversible suppression of Npm1 gene expression using stably integrated small interfering RNA vector in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Beibei; Lu Rui; Wang Weicheng; Jin Ying . E-mail: yjin@sibs.ac.cn

    2006-09-08

    The tetracycline (Tc)-inducible small interference RNA (siRNA) is a powerful tool for studying gene function in mammalian cells. However, the system is infrequently utilized in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here, we present First application of the Tc-inducible, stably integrated plasmid-based siRNA system in mouse ES cells to down-regulate expression of Npm1, an essential gene for embryonic development. The physiological role of Npm1 in ES cells has not been defined. Our data show that the knock-down of Npm1 expression by this siRNA system was not only highly efficient, but also Tc- dose- and induction time-dependent. Particularly, the down-regulation of Npm1 expression was reversible. Importantly, suppression of Npm1 expression in ES cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation. Taken together, this system allows for studying gene function in a highly controlled manner, otherwise difficult to achieve in ES cells. Moreover, our results demonstrate that Npm1 is essential for ES cell proliferation.

  20. Nucleolin mediates microRNA-directed CSF-1 mRNA deadenylation but increases translation of CSF-1 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Woo, Ho-Hyung; Baker, Terri; Laszlo, Csaba; Chambers, Setsuko K

    2013-06-01

    CSF-1 mRNA 3'UTR contains multiple unique motifs, including a common microRNA (miRNA) target in close proximity to a noncanonical G-quadruplex and AU-rich elements (AREs). Using a luciferase reporter system fused to CSF-1 mRNA 3'UTR, disruption of the miRNA target region, G-quadruplex, and AREs together dramatically increased reporter RNA levels, suggesting important roles for these cis-acting regulatory elements in the down-regulation of CSF-1 mRNA. We find that nucleolin, which binds both G-quadruplex and AREs, enhances deadenylation of CSF-1 mRNA, promoting CSF-1 mRNA decay, while having the capacity to increase translation of CSF-1 mRNA. Through interaction with the CSF-1 3'UTR miRNA common target, we find that miR-130a and miR-301a inhibit CSF-1 expression by enhancing mRNA decay. Silencing of nucleolin prevents the miRNA-directed mRNA decay, indicating a requirement for nucleolin in miRNA activity on CSF-1 mRNA. Downstream effects followed by miR-130a and miR-301a inhibition of directed cellular motility of ovarian cancer cells were found to be dependent on nucleolin. The paradoxical effects of nucleolin on miRNA-directed CSF-1 mRNA deadenylation and on translational activation were explored further. The nucleolin protein contains four acidic stretches, four RNA recognition motifs (RRMs), and nine RGG repeats. All three domains in nucleolin regulate CSF-1 mRNA and protein levels. RRMs increase CSF-1 mRNA, whereas the acidic and RGG domains decrease CSF-1 protein levels. This suggests that nucleolin has the capacity to differentially regulate both CSF-1 RNA and protein levels. Our finding that nucleolin interacts with Ago2 indirectly via RNA and with poly(A)-binding protein C (PABPC) directly suggests a nucleolin-Ago2-PABPC complex formation on mRNA. This complex is in keeping with our suggestion that nucleolin may work with PABPC as a double-edged sword on both mRNA deadenylation and translational activation. Our findings underscore the complexity of

  1. Acid-Sensitive Sheddable PEGylated PLGA Nanoparticles Increase the Delivery of TNF-α siRNA in Chronic Inflammation Sites.

    PubMed

    Aldayel, Abdulaziz M; Naguib, Youssef W; O'Mary, Hannah L; Li, Xu; Niu, Mengmeng; Ruwona, Tinashe B; Cui, Zhengrong

    2016-01-01

    There has been growing interest in utilizing small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific to pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α ( TNF-α), in chronic inflammation therapy. However, delivery systems that can increase the distribution of the siRNA in chronic inflammation sites after intravenous administration are needed. Herein we report that innovative functionalization of the surface of siRNA-incorporated poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles significantly increases the delivery of the siRNA in the chronic inflammation sites in a mouse model. The TNF-α siRNA incorporated PLGA nanoparticles were prepared by the standard double emulsion method, but using stearoyl-hydrazone-polyethylene glycol 2000, a unique acid-sensitive surface active agent, as the emulsifying agent, which renders (i) the nanoparticles PEGylated and (ii) the PEGylation sheddable in low pH environment such as that in chronic inflammation sites. In a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide-induced chronic inflammation, the acid-sensitive sheddable PEGylated PLGA nanoparticles showed significantly higher accumulation or distribution in chronic inflammation sites than PLGA nanoparticles prepared with an acid-insensitive emulsifying agent (i.e., stearoyl-amide-polyethylene glycol 2000) and significantly increased the distribution of the TNF-α siRNA incorporated into the nanoparticles in inflamed mouse foot. PMID:27434685

  2. Function and Evolution of a MicroRNA That Regulates a Ca2+-ATPase and Triggers the Formation of Phased Small Interfering RNAs in Tomato Reproductive Growth[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Itaya, Asuka; Zhong, Xuehua; Wu, Yang; Zhang, Jianfeng; van der Knaap, Esther; Olmstead, Richard; Qi, Yijun; Ding, Biao

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate a wide variety of biological processes in most eukaryotes. We investigated the function and evolution of miR4376 in the family Solanaceae. We report that the 22-nucleotide miR4376 regulates the expression of an autoinhibited Ca2+-ATPase, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) ACA10, which plays a critical role in tomato reproductive growth. Deep phylogenetic mapping suggested (1) an evolution course of MIR4376 loci and posttranscriptional processing of pre-miR4376 as a likely limiting step for the evolution of miR4376, (2) an independent phylogenetic origin of the miR4376 target site in ACA10 homologs, and (3) alternative splicing as a possible mechanism of eliminating such a target in some ACA10 homologs. Furthermore, miR4376 triggers the formation of phased small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) from Sl ACA10 and its Solanum tuberosum homolog. Together, our data provide experimental evidence of miRNA-regulated expression of universally important Ca2+-ATPases. The miR4376-regulated expression of ACA10 itself, and possibly also the associated formation of phased siRNAs, may function as a novel layer of molecular mechanisms underlying tomato reproductive growth. Finally, our data suggest that the stochastic emergence of a miRNA-target gene combination involves multiple molecular events at the genomic, transcriptional, and posttranscriptional levels that may vary drastically in even closely related species. PMID:21917547

  3. Measles Virus Defective Interfering RNAs Are Generated Frequently and Early in the Absence of C Protein and Can Be Destabilized by Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA-1-Like Hypermutations

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, Christian K.; Mastorakos, George M.; Matchett, William E.; Ma, Xiao; Samuel, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Defective interfering RNAs (DI-RNAs) of the viral genome can form during infections of negative-strand RNA viruses and outgrow full-length viral genomes, thereby modulating the severity and duration of infection. Here we document the frequent de novo generation of copy-back DI-RNAs from independent rescue events both for a vaccine measles virus (vac2) and for a wild-type measles virus (IC323) as early as passage 1 after virus rescue. Moreover, vaccine and wild-type C-protein-deficient (C-protein-knockout [CKO]) measles viruses generated about 10 times more DI-RNAs than parental virus, suggesting that C enhances the processivity of the viral polymerase. We obtained the nucleotide sequences of 65 individual DI-RNAs, identified breakpoints and reinitiation sites, and predicted their structural features. Several DI-RNAs possessed clusters of A-to-G or U-to-C transitions. Sequences flanking these mutation sites were characteristic of those favored by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA-1 (ADAR1), which catalyzes in double-stranded RNA the C-6 deamination of adenosine to produce inosine, which is recognized as guanosine, a process known as A-to-I RNA editing. In individual DI-RNAs the transitions were of the same type and occurred on both sides of the breakpoint. These patterns of mutations suggest that ADAR1 edits unencapsidated DI-RNAs that form double-strand RNA structures. Encapsidated DI-RNAs were incorporated into virus particles, which reduced the infectivity of virus stocks. The CKO phenotype was dominant: DI-RNAs derived from vac2 with a CKO suppressed the replication of vac2, as shown by coinfections of interferon-incompetent lymphatic cells with viruses expressing different fluorescent reporter proteins. In contrast, coinfection with a C-protein-expressing virus did not counteract the suppressive phenotype of DI-RNAs. IMPORTANCE Recombinant measles viruses (MVs) are in clinical trials as cancer therapeutics and as vectored vaccines for HIV-AIDS and

  4. Chitosan nanoparticles for siRNA delivery: optimizing formulation to increase stability and efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ragelle, H; Riva, R; Vandermeulen, G; Naeye, B; Pourcelle, V; Le Duff, C S; D'Haese, C; Nysten, B; Braeckmans, K; De Smedt, S C; Jérôme, C; Préat, V

    2014-02-28

    This study aims at developing chitosan-based nanoparticles suitable for an intravenous administration of small interfering RNA (siRNA) able to achieve (i) high gene silencing without cytotoxicity and (ii) stability in biological media including blood. Therefore, the influence of chitosan/tripolyphosphate ratio, chitosan physicochemical properties, PEGylation of chitosan as well as the addition of an endosomal disrupting agent and a negatively charged polymer was assessed. The gene silencing activity and cytotoxicity were evaluated on B16 melanoma cells expressing luciferase. We monitored the integrity and the size behavior of siRNA nanoparticles in human plasma using fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy and single particle tracking respectively. The presence of PEGylated chitosan and poly(ethylene imine) was essential for high levels of gene silencing in vitro. Chitosan nanoparticles immediately released siRNA in plasma while the inclusion of hyaluronic acid and high amount of poly(ethylene glycol) in the formulation improved the stability of the particles. The developed formulations of PEGylated chitosan-based nanoparticles that achieve high gene silencing in vitro, low cytotoxicity and high stability in plasma could be promising for intravenous delivery of siRNA. PMID:24389132

  5. Induction of CML28-specific cytotoxic T cell responses using co-transfected dendritic cells with CML28 DNA vaccine and SOCS1 small interfering RNA expression vector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Hongsheng; Zhang Donghua . E-mail: hanson2008@gmail.com; Wang Yaya; Dai Ming; Zhang Lu; Liu Wenli; Liu Dan; Tan Huo; Huang Zhenqian

    2006-08-18

    CML28 is an attractive target for antigen-specific immunotherapy. SOCS1 represents an inhibitory control mechanism for DC antigen presentation and the magnitude of adaptive immunity. In this study, we evaluated the potential for inducing CML28-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) responses by dendritic cells (DCs)-based vaccination. We constructed a CML28 DNA vaccine and a SOCS1 siRNA vector and then cotransfect monocyte-derived DCs. Flow cytometry analysis showed gene silencing of SOCS1 resulted in higher expressions of costimulative moleculars in DCs. Mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) indicated downregulation of SOCS1 stronger capability to stimulate proliferation of responder cell in DCs. The CTL assay revealed transfected DCs effectively induced autologous CML28-specific CTL responses and the lytic activities induced by SOCS1-silenced DCs were significantly higher compared with those induced by SOCS1-expressing DCs. These results in our study indicates gene silencing of SOCS1 remarkably enhanced the cytotoxicity efficiency of CML28 DNA vaccine in DCs.

  6. Engineering WT1-Encoding mRNA to Increase Translational Efficiency in Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Benteyn, Daphné; Heirman, Carlo; Thielemans, Kris; Bonehill, Aude

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the orchestrators of the immune system and are frequently used in clinical trials in order to boost the immune system in cancer patients. Among several available techniques for DC modification, mRNA electroporation is an interesting technique due to the favorable characteristics of mRNA. Antigen expression level and duration can be increased by multiple optimizations of an antigen-encoding mRNA template. Here, we describe different molecular modifications to a WT1-encoding mRNA construct in order to increase antigen expression and the subsequent introduction of mRNA into DCs. PMID:27236795

  7. Blocking miRNA Biogenesis in Adult Forebrain Neurons Enhances Seizure Susceptibility, Fear Memory, and Food Intake by Increasing Neuronal Responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Fiorenza, Anna; Lopez-Atalaya, Jose P; Rovira, Victor; Scandaglia, Marilyn; Geijo-Barrientos, Emilio; Barco, Angel

    2016-04-01

    The RNase Dicer is essential for the maturation of most microRNAs, a molecular system that plays an essential role in fine-tuning gene expression. To gain molecular insight into the role of Dicer and the microRNA system in brain function, we conducted 2 complementary RNA-seq screens in the hippocampus of inducible forebrain-restricted Dicer1 mutants aimed at identifying the microRNAs primarily affected by Dicer loss and their targets, respectively. Functional genomics analyses predicted the main biological processes and phenotypes associated with impaired microRNA maturation, including categories related to microRNA biology, signal transduction, seizures, and synaptic transmission and plasticity. Consistent with these predictions, we found that, soon after recombination, Dicer-deficient mice exhibited an exaggerated seizure response, enhanced induction of immediate early genes in response to different stimuli, stronger and more stable fear memory, hyperphagia, and increased excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the long term, we also observed slow and progressive excitotoxic neurodegeneration. Overall, our results indicate that interfering with microRNA biogenesis causes an increase in neuronal responsiveness and disrupts homeostatic mechanisms that protect the neuron against overactivation, which may explain both the initial and late phenotypes associated with the loss of Dicer in excitatory neurons. PMID:25595182

  8. Calpain expression in lymphoid cells. Increased mRNA and protein levels after cell activation.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, R V; Goust, J M; Chakrabarti, A K; Barbosa, E; Hogan, E L; Banik, N L

    1995-02-10

    Although calpain is ubiquitously present in human tissues and is thought to play a role in demyelination, its activity is very low in resting normal lymphocytes. To determine the nature of calpain expression at the mRNA and protein levels in human lymphoid cells, we studied human T lymphocytic, B lymphocytic, and monocytic lines as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Stimulation of cells with the phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate and the calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in increased calpain mRNA and protein expression. Calpain mRNA expression is also increased in human T cells stimulated with anti-CD3. A dissociation between the increases of RNA and protein suggested that calpain could be released from the cells; the subsequent experiments showed its presence in the extracellular environment. 5,6-Dichloro-1b-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a reversible inhibitor of mRNA synthesis, reduced calpain mRNA levels by 50-67% and protein levels by 72-91%. Its removal resulted in resumption of both calpain mRNA and protein synthesis. Cycloheximide, a translational inhibitor, reduced calpain protein levels by 77-81% and calpain mRNA levels by 96% in activated THP-1 cells. Interferon-gamma induced calpain mRNA and protein in U-937 and THP-1 cells. Dexamethasone increased mRNA expression in THP-1 cells. Our results indicate that activation of lymphoid cells results in de novo synthesis and secretion of calpain. PMID:7852311

  9. Coupling Aptamers to Short Interfering RNAs as Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Cerchia, Laura; Esposito, Carla Lucia; Camorani, Simona; Catuogno, Silvia; de Franciscis, Vittorio

    2011-01-01

    RNA-based approaches are among the most promising strategies aimed at developing safer and more effective therapeutics. RNA therapeutics include small non-coding miRNAs, small interfering RNA, RNA aptamers and more recently, small activating RNAs. However, major barriers exist to the use of RNAs as therapeutics such as resistance to nucleases present in biological fluids, poor chemical stability, need of specific cell targeted delivery and easy entry into the cell. Such issues have been addressed by several recent reports that show the possibility of introducing chemical modifications in small RNAs to stabilize the molecular conformation and increase by several fold their integrity, while still preserving the functional activity. Further, several aptamers have been developed as excellent candidates for the specific recognition of cell surface targets. In the last few years, by taking advantage of recent advances in the small RNA field, molecular bioconjugates have been designed that permit specific targeting and may act as cargoes for cell internalization of small RNAs acting on gene expression that will be discussed in this review.

  10. Low-Fidelity Polymerases of Alphaviruses Recombine at Higher Rates To Overproduce Defective Interfering Particles

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Enzo Z.; Mounce, Bryan C.; Rozen-Gagnon, Kathryn; Hooikaas, Peter Jan; Stapleford, Kenneth A.; Moratorio, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Low-fidelity RNA-dependent RNA polymerases for many RNA virus mutators have been shown to confer attenuated phenotypes, presumably due to increased mutation rates. Additionally, for many RNA viruses, replication to high titers results in the production of defective interfering particles (DIs) that also attenuate infection. We hypothesized that fidelity, recombination, and DI production are tightly linked. We show that a Sindbis virus mutator replicating at a high multiplicity of infection manifests an earlier and greater accumulation of DIs than its wild-type counterpart. The isolated DIs interfere with the replication of full-length virus in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, the ability of the mutator virus to overproduce DIs could be linked to an increased recombination frequency. These data confirm that RNA-dependent RNA polymerase fidelity and recombination are inversely correlated for this mutator. Our findings suggest that defective interference resulting from higher recombination rates may be more detrimental to RNA virus mutators than the increase in mutational burden. IMPORTANCE Replication, adaptation, and evolution of RNA viruses rely in large part on their low-fidelity RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Viruses artificially modified in their polymerases to decrease fidelity (mutator viruses) are attenuated in vivo, demonstrating the important role of fidelity in viral fitness. However, attenuation was attributed solely to the modification of the viral mutation rate and the accumulation of detrimental point mutations. In this work, we described an additional phenotype of mutator viruses: an increased recombination rate leading to defective interfering particle (DI) overproduction. Because DIs are known for their inhibitory effect on viral replication, our work suggests that fidelity variants may be attenuated in vivo via several mechanisms. This has important implications in the development of fidelity variants as live attenuated vaccine strains

  11. MicroRNA-21 Increases Proliferation and Cisplatin Sensitivity of Osteosarcoma-Derived Cells.

    PubMed

    Vanas, Vanita; Haigl, Barbara; Stockhammer, Verena; Sutterlüty-Fall, Hedwig

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor and poor prognosis for osteosarcoma patients is mainly due to chemotherapy resistance. MicroRNAs are important to maintain pathophysiological mechanisms of cancer and influence cell sensitivity to chemotherapy. In this study, we tested the functions of microRNA-21 for malignant features as well as for drug resistance of osteosarcoma. We used Northern blot to measure microRNA-21 levels in osteosarcoma-derived cell lines. MicroRNA-21 activity was modulated by either expressing a sponge to decrease its activity in an osteosarcoma-derived cell line expressing high levels of microRNA-21 or by introducing pri-microRNA-21 in a cell line with low endogenous levels. Cell migration was determined in a scratch assay and cell proliferation was measured by performing growth curve analysis. Sensitivity of the cells towards chemotherapeutics was investigated by performing cell viability assays and calculating the IC50 values. While cell migration was unaffected by modulated microRNA-21 levels, microRNA-21 inhibition slowed proliferation and exogenously expressed microRNA-21 promoted this process. Modulated microRNA-21 activity failed to effect sensitivity of osteosarcoma-derived cell lines to doxorubicin or methotrexate. Contrarily, reduction of microRNA-21 activity resulted in enhanced resistance towards cisplatin while ectopic expression of microRNA-21 showed the opposite effect. Increased microRNA-21 levels repressed the expression of Sprouty2 and ectopic expression of Sprouty2 was able to largely rescue the observed effects of microRNA-21 in osteosarcoma. In summary, our data indicate that in osteosarcoma microRNA-21 expression is an important component for regulation of cell proliferation and for determining sensitivity to cisplatin. PMID:27513462

  12. MicroRNA-21 Increases Proliferation and Cisplatin Sensitivity of Osteosarcoma-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vanas, Vanita; Haigl, Barbara; Stockhammer, Verena; Sutterlüty-Fall, Hedwig

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor and poor prognosis for osteosarcoma patients is mainly due to chemotherapy resistance. MicroRNAs are important to maintain pathophysiological mechanisms of cancer and influence cell sensitivity to chemotherapy. In this study, we tested the functions of microRNA-21 for malignant features as well as for drug resistance of osteosarcoma. We used Northern blot to measure microRNA-21 levels in osteosarcoma-derived cell lines. MicroRNA-21 activity was modulated by either expressing a sponge to decrease its activity in an osteosarcoma-derived cell line expressing high levels of microRNA-21 or by introducing pri-microRNA-21 in a cell line with low endogenous levels. Cell migration was determined in a scratch assay and cell proliferation was measured by performing growth curve analysis. Sensitivity of the cells towards chemotherapeutics was investigated by performing cell viability assays and calculating the IC50 values. While cell migration was unaffected by modulated microRNA-21 levels, microRNA-21 inhibition slowed proliferation and exogenously expressed microRNA-21 promoted this process. Modulated microRNA-21 activity failed to effect sensitivity of osteosarcoma-derived cell lines to doxorubicin or methotrexate. Contrarily, reduction of microRNA-21 activity resulted in enhanced resistance towards cisplatin while ectopic expression of microRNA-21 showed the opposite effect. Increased microRNA-21 levels repressed the expression of Sprouty2 and ectopic expression of Sprouty2 was able to largely rescue the observed effects of microRNA-21 in osteosarcoma. In summary, our data indicate that in osteosarcoma microRNA-21 expression is an important component for regulation of cell proliferation and for determining sensitivity to cisplatin. PMID:27513462

  13. RNA-Based Methods Increase the Detection of Fecal Bacteria and Fecal Identifiers in Environmental Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated the use of qPCR RNA-based methods in the detection of fecal bacteria in environmental waters. We showed that RNA methods can increase the detection of fecal bacteria in multiple water matrices. The data suggest that this is a viable alternative for the detection of a...

  14. 5, 8, 11, 14-eicosatetraynoic acid suppresses CCL2/MCP-1 expression in IFN-γ-stimulated astrocytes by increasing MAPK phosphatase-1 mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α activator, 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), is an arachidonic acid analog. It is reported to inhibit up-regulation of pro-inflammatory genes; however, its underlying mechanism of action is largely unknown. In the present study, we focused on the inhibitory action of ETYA on the expression of the chemokine, CCL2/MCP-1, which plays a key role in the initiation and progression of inflammation. Methods To determine the effect of ETYA, primary cultured rat astrocytes and microglia were stimulated with IFN-γ in the presence of ETYA and then, expression of CCL2/MCP-1 and MAPK phosphatase (MKP-1) were determined using RT-PCR and ELISA. MKP-1 mRNA stability was evaluated by treating actinomycin D. The effect of MKP-1 and human antigen R (HuR) was analyzed by using specific siRNA transfection system. The localization of HuR was analyzed by immunocytochemistry and subcellular fractionation experiment. Results We found that ETYA suppressed CCL2/MCP-1 transcription and secretion of CCL2/MCP-1 protein through up-regulation of MKP-1mRNA levels, resulting in suppression of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and activator protein 1 (AP1) activity in IFN-γ-stimulated brain glial cells. Moreover, these effects of ETYA were independent of PPAR-α. Experiments using actinomycin D revealed that the ETYA-induced increase in MKP-1 mRNA levels reflected an increase in transcript stability. Knockdown experiments using small interfering RNA demonstrated that this increase in MKP-1 mRNA stability depended on HuR, an RNA-binding protein known to promote enhanced mRNA stability. Furthermore, ETYA-induced, HuR-mediated mRNA stabilization resulted from HuR-MKP-1 nucleocytoplasmic translocation, which served to protect MKP-1 mRNA from the mRNA degradation machinery. Conclusion ETYA induces MKP-1 through HuR at the post-transcriptional level in a receptor-independent manner. The mechanism revealed here suggests

  15. Post-transcriptional regulation tends to attenuate the mRNA noise and to increase the mRNA gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Changhong; Wang, Shuqiang; Zhou, Tianshou; Jiang, Yiguo

    2015-10-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation is ubiquitous in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, but how it impacts gene expression remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze a simple gene model in which we assume that mRNAs are produced in a constitutive manner but are regulated post-transcriptionally by a decapping enzyme that switches between the active state and the inactive state. We derive the analytical mRNA distribution governed by a chemical master equation, which can be well used to analyze the mechanism of how post-transcription regulation influences the mRNA expression level including the mRNA noise. We demonstrate that the mean mRNA level in the stochastic case is always higher than that in the deterministic case due to the stochastic effect of the enzyme, but the size of the increased part depends mainly on the switching rates between two enzyme states. More interesting is that we find that in contrast to transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional regulation tends to attenuate noise in mRNA. Our results provide insight into the role of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling the transcriptional noise.

  16. Defective Interfering Particles of Poliovirus I. Isolation and Physical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Charles N.; Smoler, Donna; Wimmer, Eckard; Baltimore, David

    1971-01-01

    A class of defective interfering (DI) poliovirus particles has been identified. The first was found as a contaminant of a viral stock; others have been isolated by serial passage at a high multiplicity of infection. The DI particles are less dense than standard virus and sediment more slowly. Their ribonucleic acid (RNA) sediments more slowly than standard RNA and has a higher electrophoretic mobility. Competition hybridization experiments with double-stranded viral RNA indicate that DI RNA is 80 to 90% of the length of standard RNA. The proteins of DI particles are indistinguishable from those of standard poliovirus. PMID:4329564

  17. Heat shock increases lifetime of a small RNA and induces its accumulation in cells.

    PubMed

    Tatosyan, Karina A; Kramerov, Dmitri A

    2016-08-01

    4.5SH and 4.5SI RNA are two abundant small non-coding RNAs specific for several related rodent families including Muridae. These RNAs have a number of common characteristics such as the short length (about 100nt), transcription by RNA polymerase III, and origin from Short Interspersed Elements (SINEs). However, their stabilities in cells substantially differ: the half-life of 4.5SH RNA is about 20min, while that of 4.5SI RNA is 22h. Here we studied the influence of cell stress such as heat shock or viral infection on these two RNAs. We found that the level of 4.5SI RNA did not change in stressed cells; whereas heat shock increased the abundance of 4.5SH RNA 3.2-10.5 times in different cell lines; and viral infection, 5 times. Due to the significant difference in the turnover rates of these two RNAs, a similar activation of their transcription by heat shock increases the level of the short-lived 4.5SH RNA and has minor effect on the level of the long-lived 4.5SI RNA. In addition, the accumulation of 4.5SH RNA results not only from the induction of its transcription but also from a substantial retardation of its decay. To our knowledge, it is the first example of a short-lived non-coding RNA whose elongated lifetime contributes significantly to its accumulation in stressed cells. PMID:27085482

  18. Epstein-Barr Virus MicroRNA Expression Increases Aggressiveness of Solid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Deep; Mariani, Marisa; He, Shiquan; Andreoli, Mirko; Spennato, Manuela; Dowell-Martino, Candice; Fiedler, Paul; Ferlini, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) microRNA (miRNA) initiative has revealed a pivotal role for miRNAs in cancer. Utilizing the TCGA raw data, we performed the first mapping of viral miRNA sequences within cancer and adjacent normal tissues. Results were integrated with TCGA RNA-seq to link the expression of viral miRNAs to the phenotype. Using clinical data and viral miRNA mapping results we also performed outcome analysis. Three lines of evidence lend credence to an active role of viral miRNAs in solid malignancies. First, expression of viral miRNA is consistently higher in cancerous compared to adjacent noncancerous tissues. Second, viral miRNA expression is associated with significantly worse clinical outcome among patients with early stage malignancy. These patients are also featured by increased expression of PD1/PD-L1, a pathway implicated in tumors escaping immune destruction. Finally, a particular cluster of EBV-miRNA (miR-BART2, miR-BART4, miR-BART5, miR-BART18, and miR-BART22) is associated with expression of cytokines known to inhibit host response to cancer. Quantification of specific viral miRNAs may help identify patients who are at risk of poor outcome. These patients may be candidates for novel therapeutic strategies incorporating antiviral agents and/or inhibitors of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway. PMID:26375401

  19. MicroRNA Gene Polymorphisms and Environmental Factors Increase Patient Susceptibility to Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yin-Hung; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Chiou, Hui-Ling; Liou, Yi-Sheng; Yang, Chen-Chieh; Yang, Shun-Fa; Kuo, Wu-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Background Micro RNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA fragments that naturally exist in the human body. Through various physiological mechanisms, miRNAs can generate different functions for regulating RNA protein levels and balancing abnormalities. Abnormal miRNA expression has been reported to be highly related to several diseases and cancers. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNAs have been reported to increase patient susceptibility and affect patient prognosis and survival. We adopted a case-control research design to verify the relationship between miRNAs and hepatocellular carcinoma. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 525 subjects, including 377 controls and 188 hepatocellular carcinoma patients, were selected. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and real-time PCR were used to analyze miRNA146a (rs2910164), miRNA149 (rs2292832), miRNA196 (rs11614913), and miRNA499 (rs3746444) genetic polymorphisms between the control group and the case group. The results indicate that people who carry the rs3746444 CT or CC genotypes may have a significantly increased susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.88–4.30). In addition, when combined with environmental risk factors, such as smoking and alcohol consumption, interaction effects were observed between gene polymorphisms and environmental factors (odds ratio [OR] = 4.69, 95% CI = 2.52–8.70; AOR = 3.38, 95% CI = 1.68–6.80). Conclusions These results suggest that a significant association exists between miRNA499 SNPs and hepatocellular carcinoma. Gene-environment interactions of miRNA499 polymorphisms, smoking, and alcohol consumption might alter hepatocellular carcinoma susceptibility. PMID:24587132

  20. Adaptive antenna arrays for weak interfering signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, I. J.

    1985-01-01

    The interference protection provided by adaptive antenna arrays to an Earth station or satellite receive antenna system is studied. The case where the interference is caused by the transmission from adjacent satellites or Earth stations whose signals inadverently enter the receiving system and interfere with the communication link is considered. Thus, the interfering signals are very weak. To increase the interference suppression, one can either decrease the thermal noise in the feedback loops or increase the gain of the auxiliary antennas in the interfering signal direction. Both methods are examined. It is shown that one may have to reduce the noise correlation to impractically low values and if directive auxiliary antennas are used, the auxiliary antenna size may have to be too large. One can, however, combine the two methods to achieve the specified interference suppression with reasonable requirements of noise decorrelation and auxiliary antenna size. Effects of the errors in the steering vector on the adaptive array performance are studied.

  1. T3 acutely increases GH mRNA translation rate and GH secretion in hypothyroid rats.

    PubMed

    Silva, F Goulart da; Giannocco, G; Luchessi, A D; Curi, R; Nunes, M T

    2010-04-12

    Cytoskeleton controls the stability of transcripts, by mechanisms that involve mRNAs and eEF1A attachment to it. Besides, it plays a key role in protein synthesis and secretion, which seems to be impaired in somatotrophs of hypothyroid rats, whose cytoskeleton is disarranged. This study investigated the: eEF1A and GH mRNA binding to cytoskeleton plus GH mRNA translation rate and GH secretion, in sham-operated and thyroidectomized rats treated with T3 or saline, and killed 30min thereafter. Thyroidectomy reduced: (a) pituitary F-actin content, and eEF1A plus GH mRNA binding to it; (b) GH mRNA recruitment to polysome; and (c) liver IGF-I mRNA expression, indicating that GH mRNA stability and translation rate, as well as GH secretion were impaired. T3 acutely reversed all these changes, which points toward a nongenomic action of T3 on cytoskeleton rearrangement, which might contribute to the increase on GH mRNA translation rate and GH secretion. PMID:20015464

  2. Prefrontal microRNA-221 Mediates Environmental Enrichment-Induced Increase of Locomotor Sensitivity to Nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Adrian M.; Altomare, Diego; Sun, Wei-Lun; Midde, Narasimha M.; Ji, Hao; Shtutman, Michael; Turner, Jill R.; Creek, Kim E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Environmental enrichment alters susceptibility in developing drug addiction. We have demonstrated that rats raised in an enriched condition are more sensitive than rats raised in an impoverished condition to nicotine-induced locomotor activity, and this is associated with alterations of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 within the prefrontal cortex. This study determined the impact of microRNA-221 in the prefrontal cortex on phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and the enriched environment-dependent behavioral changes in response to nicotine. Methods: A microRNA array was conducted to profile microRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex of enriched condition and impoverished condition rats in response to repeated nicotine (0.35mg/kg, s.c.) administration. microRNA-221 in the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and striatum was further verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Lentiviral-mediated overexpression of microRNA-221 in PC12 cells and the medial prefrontal cortex was performed to determine the effects of microRNA-221 on nicotine-mediated phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, phosphorylated cAMP-response element-binding protein, and locomotor activity. Results: microRNA-221 was profoundly upregulated in the prefrontal cortex but not in nucleus accumbens and striatum of enriched condition rats relative to impoverished condition rats following repeated administration of nicotine. Overexpression of lentiviral-microRNA-221 attenuated nicotine-induced increase in phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in PC12 cells. Lentiviral-microRNA-221 overexpression in the medial prefrontal cortex further increased locomotor activity in impoverished condition but not in enriched condition rats in response to repeated nicotine administration. Accordingly, lentiviral-microRNA-221 attenuated nicotine-induced increases in phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum stress increases AT1R mRNA expression via TIA-1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Backlund, Michael; Paukku, Kirsi; Kontula, Kimmo K; Lehtonen, Jukka Y A

    2016-04-20

    As the formation of ribonucleoprotein complexes is a major mechanism of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) regulation, we sought to identify novel AT1R mRNA binding proteins. By affinity purification and mass spectroscopy, we identified TIA-1. This interaction was confirmed by colocalization of AT1R mRNA and TIA-1 by FISH and immunofluorescence microscopy. In immunoprecipitates of endogenous TIA- 1, reverse transcription-PCR amplified AT1R mRNA. TIA-1 has two binding sites within AT1R 3'-UTR. The binding site proximal to the coding region is glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)-dependent whereas the distal binding site is not. TIA-1 functions as a part of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response leading to stress granule (SG) formation and translational silencing. We and others have shown that AT1R expression is increased by ER stress-inducing factors. In unstressed cells, TIA-1 binds to AT1R mRNA and decreases AT1R protein expression. Fluorescence microscopy shows that ER stress induced by thapsigargin leads to the transfer of TIA-1 to SGs. In FISH analysis AT1R mRNA remains in the cytoplasm and no longer colocalizes with TIA-1. Thus, release of TIA-1-mediated suppression by ER stress increases AT1R protein expression. In conclusion, AT1R mRNA is regulated by TIA-1 in a ER stress-dependent manner. PMID:26681690

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress increases AT1R mRNA expression via TIA-1-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Backlund, Michael; Paukku, Kirsi; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Lehtonen, Jukka Y.A.

    2016-01-01

    As the formation of ribonucleoprotein complexes is a major mechanism of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) regulation, we sought to identify novel AT1R mRNA binding proteins. By affinity purification and mass spectroscopy, we identified TIA-1. This interaction was confirmed by colocalization of AT1R mRNA and TIA-1 by FISH and immunofluorescence microscopy. In immunoprecipitates of endogenous TIA- 1, reverse transcription-PCR amplified AT1R mRNA. TIA-1 has two binding sites within AT1R 3′-UTR. The binding site proximal to the coding region is glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)-dependent whereas the distal binding site is not. TIA-1 functions as a part of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response leading to stress granule (SG) formation and translational silencing. We and others have shown that AT1R expression is increased by ER stress-inducing factors. In unstressed cells, TIA-1 binds to AT1R mRNA and decreases AT1R protein expression. Fluorescence microscopy shows that ER stress induced by thapsigargin leads to the transfer of TIA-1 to SGs. In FISH analysis AT1R mRNA remains in the cytoplasm and no longer colocalizes with TIA-1. Thus, release of TIA-1-mediated suppression by ER stress increases AT1R protein expression. In conclusion, AT1R mRNA is regulated by TIA-1 in a ER stress-dependent manner. PMID:26681690

  5. Dextromethorphan increases tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in the mesencephalon of adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T Y; Jahng, J W; Kim, D G

    2001-08-24

    Dextromethorphan (DM), an antitussive widely available in over-the-counter, has been abused mostly in teenage groups at high doses. To examine effects of DM on the reward pathway, we injected a high dose of DM (40 mg/kg; intraperitoneally) into the adolescent rat and measured tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA by in situ hybridization in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the substantia nigra (SN). Remarkable increases in the level of TH mRNA were observed in the VTA and SN 2 h after DM injection. Stereotyped behavior and ataxia increased, and rearing decreased by DM administration. These results suggest that DM-induced increase in TH mRNA expression in mesencephalon contribute to the reinforcing property and the behavioral effects of DM. PMID:11502351

  6. Developmental expression of chicken antithrombin III is regulated by increased RNA abundance and intracellular processing.

    PubMed

    Amrani, D L; Rosenberg, J; Samad, F; Bergtrom, G; Banfield, D K

    1993-01-23

    We isolated and sequenced a 432 bp cDNA to cAT-III, that encoded 115 nucleotides of 5' untranslated sequence, a 17 amino acid long signal peptide and residues 1-88 of the mature protein, and used it to prepare a probe for measuring and correlating the developmental changes of steady-state cAT-III mRNA levels with known changes in antigen levels. Densitometric analysis of nuclease protection (n = 2), Northern blot (n = 4), and slot blots (n = 3) of total RNA from chick livers of 16-day-old embryos to 6-day-old chicks showed a 2.6 +/- 0.5-fold increase in steady-state cAT-III mRNA levels. Assay of functional mRNA levels by in vitro translation of poly(A)+ RNA and specific immunoprecipitation of 35S-Met-labelled cAT-III was comparable to RNA analysis (16-day-old embryos vs. 10-day-old hatchlings). We evaluated whether there were developmental differences in post-translational secretion which may also contribute to the regulation of the circulating level of this protein. Pulse-chase studies of freshly-isolated hepatocytes from 16-day-old embryos and 10-day-old hatchlings maintained in suspension demonstrated a approx. 5.0-5.5-fold increase in cAT-III levels at steady-state secretion. The above findings indicate that changes in circulating cAT-III levels during late embryonic development are primarily due to increased abundance of cAT-III mRNA. In addition, we postulate that post-translational intracellular processing may account for further differences in circulating protein levels. PMID:8424948

  7. Acidic Residues in the Hfq Chaperone Increase the Selectivity of sRNA Binding and Annealing.

    PubMed

    Panja, Subrata; Santiago-Frangos, Andrew; Schu, Daniel J; Gottesman, Susan; Woodson, Sarah A

    2015-11-01

    Hfq facilitates gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), thereby affecting bacterial attributes such as biofilm formation and virulence. Escherichia coli Hfq recognizes specific U-rich and AAN motifs in sRNAs and target mRNAs, after which an arginine patch on the rim promotes base pairing between their complementary sequences. In the cell, Hfq must discriminate between many similar RNAs. Here, we report that acidic amino acids lining the sRNA binding channel between the inner pore and rim of the Hfq hexamer contribute to the selectivity of Hfq's chaperone activity. RNase footprinting, in vitro binding and stopped-flow fluorescence annealing assays showed that alanine substitution of D9, E18 or E37 strengthened RNA interactions with the rim of Hfq and increased annealing of non-specific or U-tailed RNA oligomers. Although the mutants were less able than wild-type Hfq to anneal sRNAs with wild-type rpoS mRNA, the D9A mutation bypassed recruitment of Hfq to an (AAN)4 motif in rpoS, both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that acidic residues normally modulate access of RNAs to the arginine patch. We propose that this selectivity limits indiscriminate target selection by E. coli Hfq and enforces binding modes that favor genuine sRNA and mRNA pairs. PMID:26196441

  8. Pseudogene-derived small interfering RNAs regulate gene expression in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Tam, Oliver H; Aravin, Alexei A; Stein, Paula; Girard, Angelique; Murchison, Elizabeth P; Cheloufi, Sihem; Hodges, Emily; Anger, Martin; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Schultz, Richard M; Hannon, Gregory J

    2008-05-22

    Pseudogenes populate the mammalian genome as remnants of artefactual incorporation of coding messenger RNAs into transposon pathways. Here we show that a subset of pseudogenes generates endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs) in mouse oocytes. These endo-siRNAs are often processed from double-stranded RNAs formed by hybridization of spliced transcripts from protein-coding genes to antisense transcripts from homologous pseudogenes. An inverted repeat pseudogene can also generate abundant small RNAs directly. A second class of endo-siRNAs may enforce repression of mobile genetic elements, acting together with Piwi-interacting RNAs. Loss of Dicer, a protein integral to small RNA production, increases expression of endo-siRNA targets, demonstrating their regulatory activity. Our findings indicate a function for pseudogenes in regulating gene expression by means of the RNA interference pathway and may, in part, explain the evolutionary pressure to conserve argonaute-mediated catalysis in mammals. PMID:18404147

  9. Pseudogene-derived small interfering RNAs regulate gene expression in mouse oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Oliver H.; Aravin, Alexei A.; Stein, Paula; Girard, Angelique; Murchison, Elizabeth P.; Cheloufi, Sihem; Hodges, Emily; Anger, Martin; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Schultz, Richard M.; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Pseudogenes populate the mammalian genome as remnants of artefactual incorporation of coding messenger RNAs into transposon pathways1. Here we show that a subset of pseudogenes generates endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs) in mouse oocytes. These endo-siRNAs are often processed from double-stranded RNAs formed by hybridization of spliced transcripts from protein-coding genes to antisense transcripts from homologous pseudogenes. An inverted repeat pseudogene can also generate abundant small RNAs directly. A second class of endo-siRNAs may enforce repression of mobile genetic elements, acting together with Piwi-interacting RNAs. Loss of Dicer, a protein integral to small RNA production, increases expression of endo-siRNA targets, demonstrating their regulatory activity. Our findings indicate a function for pseudogenes in regulating gene expression by means of the RNA interference pathway and may, in part, explain the evolutionary pressure to conserve argonaute-mediated catalysis in mammals. PMID:18404147

  10. Small interfering RNAs targeting the rabies virus nucleoprotein gene.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Jiao; Zhao, Ping-Sen; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Hua-Lei; Liang, Hong-Ru; Zhao, Li-Li; Wu, Hong-Xia; Wang, Tie-Cheng; Yang, Song-Tao; Xia, Xian-Zhu

    2012-10-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) infection continues to be a global threat to human and animal health, yet no curative therapy has been developed. RNA interference (RNAi) therapy, which silences expression of specific target genes, represents a promising approach for treating viral infections in mammalian hosts. We designed six small interfering (si)RNAs (N473, N580, N783, N796, N799 and N1227) that target the conserved region of the RABV challenge virus standard (CVS)-11 strain nucleoprotein (N) gene. Using a plasmid-based transient expression model, we demonstrated that N796, N580 and N799 were capable of significantly inhibiting viral replication in vitro and in vivo. These three siRNAs effectively suppressed RABV expression in infected baby hamster kidney-21 (BHK-21) cells, as evidenced by direct immunofluorescence assay, viral titer measurements, real-time PCR, and Western blotting. In addition, liposome-mediated siRNA expression plasmid delivery to RABV-infected mice significantly increased survival, compared to a non-liposome-mediated delivery method. Collectively, our results showed that the three siRNAs, N796, N580 and N799, targeting the N gene could potently inhibit RABV CVS-11 reproduction. These siRNAs have the potential to be developed into new and effective prophylactic anti-RABV drugs. PMID:22884777

  11. Internal 6-methyladenine residues increase the in vitro translation efficiency of dihydrofolate reductase messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Heilman, K L; Leach, R A; Tuck, M T

    1996-07-01

    N6-Methyladenosine (m6A) is found internally in a number of mRNA molecules from higher eucaryotic cells. In these investigations, it was found that the presence of m6A residues increase the in vitro translation efficiency of capped T7 transcripts of mouse dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) mRNA. Using an in vitro rabbit reticulocyte translation system, the formation of internal m6A residues in the DHFR transcripts resulted in a 1.5-fold increase in translated DHFR compared to transcripts void of internal m6A residues. Translation in a wheat germ system, however, resulted in no increase in translation efficiency upon m6A formation, suggesting that the mechanism may be species-specific. PMID:8925412

  12. RNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darnell, James E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) converts genetic information into protein and usually must be processed to serve its function. RNA types, chemical structure, protein synthesis, translation, manufacture, and processing are discussed. Concludes that the first genes might have been spliced RNA and that humans might be closer than bacteria to primitive…

  13. Increased N6-methyladenosine in Human Sperm RNA as a Risk Factor for Asthenozoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Huang, Wei; Huang, Jing-Tao; Shen, Fan; Xiong, Jun; Yuan, Er-Feng; Qin, Shan-shan; Zhang, Ming; Feng, Yu-Qi; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Liu, Song-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Male infertility is a worldwide medical problem. Asthenozoospermia is a common cause of infertility. Epigenetic modifications of DNA and histones have been shown to influence human infertility, but no research has explored whether N6-methyladenosine (m6A) level in RNA is associated with asthenozoospermia. Here, we collected a total of 52 semen samples, including 20 asthenozoospermia patients and 32 healthy controls. An LC-ESI-MS/MS method was used to detect m6A contents in sperm RNA, and real-time PCR was performed to determine the mRNA expression of demethylase (FTO, ALKBH5), methyltransferase (METTL3, METTL14, WTAP) and an m6A-selective-binding protein (YTHDF2). We found that m6A content (p = 0.033) and the mRNA expression of METTL3 (p = 0.016) and METTL14 (p = 0.025) in asthenozoospermia patients were significantly higher than those of controls. Increased m6A content was a risk factor for asthenozoospermia (odds ratio (OR) 3.229, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.178 – 8.853, p = 0.023). Moreover, m6A content was correlated with the expression of METTL3 (r = 0.303, p = 0.032) and with sperm motility (progressive motility: r = −0.288, p = 0.038; non-progressive motility: r = −0.293, p = 0.037; immotility: r = 0.387, p = 0.005). Our data suggest that increased m6A content is a risk factor for asthenozoospermia and affects sperm motility. Methyltransferases, particularly METTL3, play key roles in increasing m6A contents in sperm RNA. PMID:27072590

  14. Acute alcohol intoxication increases atrogin-1 and MuRF1 mRNA without increasing proteolysis in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vary, Thomas C.; Frost, Robert A.; Lang, Charles H.

    2008-01-01

    Acute alcohol intoxication decreases muscle protein synthesis, but there is a paucity of data on the ability of alcohol to regulate muscle protein degradation. Furthermore, various types of atrophic stimuli appear to regulate ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent proteolysis by increasing the muscle-specific E3 ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF1 (i.e., “atrogenes”). Therefore, the present study was designed to test the hypothesis that acute alcohol intoxication increases atrogene expression leading to an elevated rate of muscle protein breakdown. In male rats, the intraperitoneal injection of alcohol dose- and time-dependently increased atrogin-1 and MuRF1 mRNA in gastrocnemius, the latter of which was most pronounced. A comparable change was absent in the soleus and heart. The ability of in vivo-administered ethanol to increase atrogene expression was independent of the route of alcohol administration (intraperitoneal vs. oral), as well as of nutritional status (fed vs. fasted) and gender (male vs. female). The increase in atrogin-1 and MuRF1 was independent of alcohol metabolism, and the overproduction of endogenous glucocorticoids and could not be prevented by maintaining the circulating concentration of insulin-like growth factor-I. Despite marked changes in atrogene expression, acute alcohol in vivo did not alter the release of either 3-methylhistidine (MH) or tyrosine from the isolated perfused hindlimb, suggesting that the rate of muscle proteolysis remains unchanged. Moreover, alcohol did not increase the directly determined rate of protein degradation in isolated epitrochlearis muscles or cultured myocytes. Finally, no increase in atrogene expression or 3-MH release was detected in muscle from rats fed an alcohol-containing diet. Our results indicate that although acute alcohol intoxication increases atrogin-1 and MuRF1 mRNA preferentially in fast-twitch skeletal muscle, this change was not associated with increased rates of muscle proteolysis. Therefore, the loss

  15. RNA Viruses: RNA Roles in Pathogenesis, Coreplication and Viral Load

    PubMed Central

    Poltronieri, Palmiro; Sun, Binlian; Mallardo, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The review intends to present and recapitulate the current knowledge on the roles and importance of regulatory RNAs, such as microRNAs and small interfering RNAs, RNA binding proteins and enzymes processing RNAs or activated by RNAs, in cells infected by RNA viruses. The review focuses on how non-coding RNAs are involved in RNA virus replication, pathogenesis and host response, especially in retroviruses HIV, with examples of the mechanisms of action, transcriptional regulation, and promotion of increased stability of their targets or their degradation. PMID:27047253

  16. Increased DNA and RNA damage by oxidation in patients with bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, A S; Vinberg, M; Poulsen, H E; Kessing, L V; Munkholm, K

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying bipolar disorder (BD) and the associated medical burden are unclear. Damage generated by oxidation of nucleosides may be implicated in BD pathophysiology; however, evidence from in vivo studies is limited and the extent of state-related alterations is unclear. This prospective study investigated for we believe the first time the damage generated by oxidation of DNA and RNA strictly in patients with type I BD in a manic or mixed state and subsequent episodes and remission compared with healthy control subjects. Urinary excretion of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and 8-oxo-guanosine (8-oxoGuo), valid markers of whole-body DNA and RNA damage by oxidation, respectively, was measured in 54 patients with BD I and in 35 healthy control subjects using a modified ultraperformance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry assay. Repeated measurements were evaluated in various affective phases during a 6- to 12-month period and compared with repeated measurements in healthy control subjects. Independent of lifestyle and demographic variables, a 34% (P<0.0001) increase in RNA damage by oxidation across all affective states, including euthymia, was found in patients with BD I compared with healthy control subjects. Increases in DNA and RNA oxidation of 18% (P<0.0001) and 8% (P=0.02), respectively, were found in manic/hypomanic states compared with euthymia, and levels of 8-oxodG decreased 15% (P<0.0001) from a manic or mixed episode to remission. The results indicate a role for DNA and RNA damage by oxidation in BD pathophysiology and a potential for urinary 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGuo to function as biological markers of diagnosis, state and treatment response in BD. PMID:27505230

  17. Metformin-mediated increase in DICER1 regulates microRNA expression and cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Noren Hooten, Nicole; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; Dluzen, Douglas F; Zhang, Yongqing; Bernier, Michel; Zonderman, Alan B; Becker, Kevin G; Gorospe, Myriam; de Cabo, Rafael; Evans, Michele K

    2016-06-01

    Metformin, an oral hypoglycemic agent, has been used for decades to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. Recent studies indicate that mice treated with metformin live longer and have fewer manifestations of age-related chronic disease. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenotype are unknown. Here, we show that metformin treatment increases the levels of the microRNA-processing protein DICER1 in mice and in humans with diabetes mellitus. Our results indicate that metformin upregulates DICER1 through a post-transcriptional mechanism involving the RNA-binding protein AUF1. Treatment with metformin altered the subcellular localization of AUF1, disrupting its interaction with DICER1 mRNA and rendering DICER1 mRNA stable, allowing DICER1 to accumulate. Consistent with the role of DICER1 in the biogenesis of microRNAs, we found differential patterns of microRNA expression in mice treated with metformin or caloric restriction, two proven life-extending interventions. Interestingly, several microRNAs previously associated with senescence and aging, including miR-20a, miR-34a, miR-130a, miR-106b, miR-125, and let-7c, were found elevated. In agreement with these findings, treatment with metformin decreased cellular senescence in several senescence models in a DICER1-dependent manner. Metformin lowered p16 and p21 protein levels and the abundance of inflammatory cytokines and oncogenes that are hallmarks of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). These data lead us to hypothesize that changes in DICER1 levels may be important for organismal aging and to propose that interventions that upregulate DICER1 expression (e.g., metformin) may offer new pharmacotherapeutic approaches for age-related disease. PMID:26990999

  18. Increased RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) Activity Contributes to Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byoung Kwon; Santhekadur, Prasanna K.; Gredler, Rachel; Chen, Dong; Emdad, Luni; Bhutia, Sujit; Pannell, Lewis; Fisher, Paul B.; Sarkar, Devanand

    2011-01-01

    There is virtually no effective treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and novel targets need to be identified to develop effective treatment. We recently documented that the oncogene Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) plays a seminal role in hepatocarcinogenesis. Employing yeast two-hybrid assay and co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry we identified Staphylococcal nuclease domain containing 1 (SND1), a nuclease in the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) facilitating RNAi-mediated gene silencing, as an AEG-1 interacting protein. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies confirmed that AEG-1 is also a component of RISC and both AEG-1 and SND1 are required for optimum RISC activity facilitating siRNA and miRNA-mediated silencing of luciferase reporter gene. In 109 human HCC samples SND1 was overexpressed in ∼74% cases compared to normal liver. Correspondingly, significantly higher RISC activity was observed in human HCC cells compared to immortal normal hepatocytes. Increased RISC activity, conferred by AEG-1 or SND1, resulted in increased degradation of tumor suppressor mRNAs that are target of oncomiRs. Inhibition of enzymatic activity of SND1 significantly inhibited proliferation of human HCC cells. As a corollary, stable overexpression of SND1 augmented and siRNA-mediated inhibition of SND1 abrogated growth of human HCC cells in vitro and in vivo thus revealing a potential role of SND1 in hepatocarcinogenesis. Conclusion We unravel a novel mechanism that overexpression of AEG-1 and SND1 leading to increased RISC activity might contribute to hepatocarcinogenesis. Targeted inhibition of SND1 enzymatic activity might be developed as an effective therapy for HCC. PMID:21520169

  19. Hypoxia-upregulated microRNA-630 targets Dicer, leading to increased tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Ivan, Cristina; Yang, Da; Gharpure, Kshipra M.; Wu, Sherry Y.; Pecot, Chad V.; Previs, Rebecca A.; Nagaraja, Archana S.; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N; McGuire, Michael; Pradeep, Sunila; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Huang, Li; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Zhang, Wei; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Calin, George A.; Sood, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules that affect cellular processes by controlling gene expression. Recent studies have shown that hypoxia downregulates Drosha and Dicer, key enzymes in miRNA biogenesis, causing a decreased pool of miRNAs in cancer, and resulting in increased tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we demonstrate a previously unrecognized mechanism by which hypoxia downregulates Dicer. We found that miR-630, which is upregulated under hypoxic conditions, targets and downregulates Dicer expression. In an orthotopic mouse model of ovarian cancer, delivery of miR-630 using DOPC nanoliposomes resulted in increased tumor growth and metastasis and decreased Dicer expression. Treatment with the combination of anti-miR-630 and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody in mice resulted in rescue of Dicer expression and significantly decreased tumor growth and metastasis. These results indicate that targeting miR-630 is a promising approach to overcome Dicer deregulation in cancer. As demonstrated in the study, use of DOPC nanoliposomes for anti-miR delivery serves as a better alternative approach to cell line based overexpression of sense or anti-sense miRNAs, while avoiding potential in vitro selection effects. Findings from this study provide a new understanding of miRNA biogenesis downregulation observed under hypoxia and suggest therapeutic avenues to target this dysregulation in cancer. PMID:26725326

  20. Hypoxia-upregulated microRNA-630 targets Dicer, leading to increased tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Rupaimoole, R; Ivan, C; Yang, D; Gharpure, K M; Wu, S Y; Pecot, C V; Previs, R A; Nagaraja, A S; Armaiz-Pena, G N; McGuire, M; Pradeep, S; Mangala, L S; Rodriguez-Aguayo, C; Huang, L; Bar-Eli, M; Zhang, W; Lopez-Berestein, G; Calin, G A; Sood, A K

    2016-08-18

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules that affect cellular processes by controlling gene expression. Recent studies have shown that hypoxia downregulates Drosha and Dicer, key enzymes in miRNA biogenesis, causing a decreased pool of miRNAs in cancer and resulting in increased tumor growth and metastasis. Here we demonstrate a previously unrecognized mechanism by which hypoxia downregulates Dicer. We found that miR-630, which is upregulated under hypoxic conditions, targets and downregulates Dicer expression. In an orthotopic mouse model of ovarian cancer, delivery of miR-630 using 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) nanoliposomes resulted in increased tumor growth and metastasis, and decreased Dicer expression. Treatment with the combination of anti-miR-630 and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody in mice resulted in rescue of Dicer expression and significantly decreased tumor growth and metastasis. These results indicate that targeting miR-630 is a promising approach to overcome Dicer deregulation in cancer. As demonstrated in the study, use of DOPC nanoliposomes for anti-miR delivery serves as a better alternative approach to cell line-based overexpression of sense or antisense miRNAs, while avoiding potential in vitro selection effects. Findings from this study provide a new understanding of miRNA biogenesis downregulation observed under hypoxia and suggest therapeutic avenues to target this dysregulation in cancer. PMID:26725326

  1. Acute exercise induces biphasic increase in respiratory mRNA in skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Shin-ichi; Kizaki, Takako; Haga, Shukoh; Ohno, Hideki; Takemasa, Tohru

    2008-04-04

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) promotes the expression of oxidative enzymes in skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that activation of the p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) in response to exercise was associated with exercise-induced PGC-1{alpha} and respiratory enzymes expression and aimed to demonstrate this under the physiological level. We subjected mice to a single bout of treadmill running and found that the exercise induced a biphasic increase in the expression of respiratory enzymes mRNA. The second phase of the increase was accompanied by an increase in PGC-1{alpha} protein, but the other was not. Administration of SB203580 (SB), an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suppressed the increase in PGC-1{alpha} expression and respiratory enzymes mRNA in both phases. These data suggest that p38 MAPK is associated with the exercise-induced expression of PGC-1{alpha} and biphasic increase in respiratory enzyme mRNAs in mouse skeletal muscle under physiological conditions.

  2. Identification of a Male-Specific RNA Binding Protein That Regulates Sex-Specific Splicing of Bmdsx by Increasing RNA Binding Activity of BmPSI▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka G.; Imanishi, Shigeo; Dohmae, Naoshi; Asanuma, Miwako; Matsumoto, Shogo

    2010-01-01

    Bmdsx is a sex-determining gene in the silkworm and is alternatively spliced in males and females. CE1 is a splicing silencer element responsible for the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx. To identify sex-specific factors implicated in the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx, we performed RNA affinity chromatography using CE1 RNA as a ligand. We have identified BmIMP, a Bombyx homolog of IGF-II mRNA binding protein (IMP), as a male-specific factor that specifically binds to CE1. The gene encoding BmIMP is localized on the Z chromosome and is male-specifically expressed in various tissues. Antisense inhibition of BmIMP expression increased female-specific splicing of Bmdsx pre-mRNA. Coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown analyses demonstrated that BmIMP physically interacts with BmPSI, which has been identified as a factor implicated in the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx, through the KH domains of BmIMP. The functional consequence of this interaction was examined using RNA mobility shift analysis. BmIMP increased BmPSI-CE1 RNA binding activity by decreasing the rate of BmPSI dissociation from CE1 RNA. Truncation analysis of BmIMP suggested that the KH domains are responsible for enhancing BmPSI-CE1 RNA binding activity. These results suggest that BmIMP may enhance the male-specific splicing of Bmdsx pre-mRNA by increasing RNA binding activity of BmPSI. PMID:20956562

  3. Calmodulin antagonists increase the amount of mRNA for the low-density-lipoprotein receptor in skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Eckardt, H; Filipovic, I; Hasilik, A; Buddecke, E

    1988-01-01

    The effects of calmodulin antagonists on the amount of LDL receptor (LDL-R) mRNA in cultured human fibroblasts was examined by hybridization with a fragment of LDL-R cDNA. In a 'Northern' blot the fragment hybridized to a 5.3-kilobase RNA, as expected for LDL-R mRNA. The concentration of this RNA was increased in preparations from cells that were treated with trifluoperazine or W-7 [N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloronaphthalene-1-sulphonamide]. The selectivity of the increase was established by using a probe for beta-actin mRNA. In dot-blot hybridization it was observed that the calmodulin antagonists cause 2-4-fold relative increase in the amount of LDL-R mRNA. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3421929

  4. Optimized PCR Conditions and Increased shRNA Fold Representation Improve Reproducibility of Pooled shRNA Screens

    PubMed Central

    Strezoska, Žaklina; Licon, Abel; Haimes, Josh; Spayd, Katie Jansen; Patel, Kruti M.; Sullivan, Kevin; Jastrzebski, Katarzyna; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Leake, Devin; van Brabant Smith, Anja; Vermeulen, Annaleen

    2012-01-01

    RNAi screening using pooled shRNA libraries is a valuable tool for identifying genetic regulators of biological processes. However, for a successful pooled shRNA screen, it is imperative to thoroughly optimize experimental conditions to obtain reproducible data. Here we performed viability screens with a library of ∼10 000 shRNAs at two different fold representations (100- and 500-fold at transduction) and report the reproducibility of shRNA abundance changes between screening replicates determined by microarray and next generation sequencing analyses. We show that the technical reproducibility between PCR replicates from a pooled screen can be drastically improved by ensuring that PCR amplification steps are kept within the exponential phase and by using an amount of genomic DNA input in the reaction that maintains the average template copies per shRNA used during library transduction. Using these optimized PCR conditions, we then show that higher reproducibility of biological replicates is obtained by both microarray and next generation sequencing when screening with higher average shRNA fold representation. shRNAs that change abundance reproducibly in biological replicates (primary hits) are identified from screens performed with both 100- and 500-fold shRNA representation, however a higher percentage of primary hit overlap between screening replicates is obtained from 500-fold shRNA representation screens. While strong hits with larger changes in relative abundance were generally identified in both screens, hits with smaller changes were identified only in the screens performed with the higher shRNA fold representation at transduction. PMID:22870320

  5. Exercise training does not increase muscle FNDC5 protein or mRNA expression in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fain, John N.; Company, Joseph M.; Booth, Frank W.; Laughlin, M. Harold; Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Bahouth, Suleiman W.; Sacks, Harold S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Exercise training elevates circulating irisin and induces the expression of the FNDC5 gene in skeletal muscles of mice. Our objective was to determine whether exercise training also increases FNDC5 protein or mRNA expression in the skeletal muscles of pigs as well as plasma irisin. Methods Castrated male pigs of the Rapacz familial hypercholesterolemic (FHM) strain and normal (Yucatan miniature) pigs were sacrificed after 16–20 weeks of exercise training. Samples of cardiac muscle, deltoid and triceps brachii muscle, subcutaneous and epicardial fat were obtained and FNDC5 mRNA, along with that of 6 other genes, was measured in all tissues of FHM pigs by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. FNDC protein in deltoid and triceps brachii was determined by Western blotting in both FHM and normal pigs. Citrate synthase activity was measured in the muscle samples of all pigs as an index of exercise training. Irisin was measured by an ELISA assay. Results There was no statistically significant effect of exercise training on FNDC5 gene expression in epicardial or subcutaneous fat, deltoid muscle, triceps brachii muscle or heart muscle. Exercise-training elevated circulating levels of irisin in the FHM pigs and citrate synthase activity in deltoid and triceps brachii muscle. A similar increase in citrate synthase activity was seen in muscle extracts of exercise-trained normal pigs but there was no alteration in circulating irisin. Conclusion Exercise training in pigs does not increase FNDC5 mRNA or protein in the deltoid or triceps brachii of FHM or normal pigs while increasing circulating irisin only in the FHM pigs. These data indicate that the response to exercise training in normal pigs is not comparable to that seen in mice. PMID:23831442

  6. Increased expression of the long noncoding RNA CRNDE-h indicates a poor prognosis in colorectal cancer, and is positively correlated with IRX5 mRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tong; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Yong-mei; Du, Lu-tao; Wang, Chuan-xin

    2016-01-01

    Background The long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) colorectal neoplasia differentially expressed – h (CRNDE-h) plays important roles in the early stages of human development and cancer progression. We investigated the expression and clinical significance of lncRNA CRNDE-h in colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods The expression level of lncRNA CRNDE-h was analyzed in 142 CRC tissues and 142 paired adjacent nontumorous tissues, along with 21 inflammatory bowel diseases, 69 hyperplastic polyp, and 73 colorectal adenoma samples, using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The association between lncRNA CRNDE-h, and Iroquois homeobox protein 5 (IRX5) mRNA was examined in the same 142 CRC tissues. Results We found that lncRNA CRNDE-h level was elevated in the CRC and adenoma groups compared with the other groups (all at P<0.001). In CRC, upregulation of lncRNA CRNDE-h was significantly correlated with large tumor size, positive regional lymph node metastasis, and distant metastasis (all at P<0.05). Area under the curve for lncRNA CRNDE-h showed diagnostic capability for distinguishing CRC from other groups. Patients with CRC with high lncRNA CRNDE-h expression level had poorer overall survival than those with low lncRNA CRNDE-h expression (log-rank test, P<0.001). Further, multivariable Cox regression analysis suggested that increased expression of lncRNA CRNDE-h was an independent prognostic indicator for CRC (hazard ratio [HR]=2.173; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.282–3.684, P=0.004). Furthermore, lncRNA CRNDE-h expression was positively correlated with IRX5 mRNA in CRC tissues. Conclusions Our data offers convincing evidence for the first time that lncRNA CRNDE-h is associated with adverse clinical characteristics and poor prognosis, which suggests that it might play an important role in CRC development and progression and might have clinical potential as a useful prognostic predictor. PMID:27042112

  7. Increased microRNA-34c abundance in Alzheimer's disease circulating blood plasma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Shephali; Chertkow, Howard; Schipper, Hyman M.; Yuan, Zongfei; Shetty, Vikranth; Jenkins, Samantha; Jones, Timothy; Wang, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs, present either in the cellular component, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), or in cell-free plasma, have emerged as biomarkers for age-dependent systemic, disease-associated changes in many organs. Previously, we have shown that microRNA (miR)-34a is increased in circulating PBMC of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. In the present study, we show that this microRNA's sister, miR-34c, exhibits even greater increase in both cellular and plasma components of AD circulating blood samples, compared to normal age-matched controls. Statistical analysis shows the accuracy of levels of miR-34c assayed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis: the area under the curve is 0.99 (p < 0.0001) and the 95% confidence level extends from 0.97 to 1. Pearson correlation between miR-34c levels and mild and moderate AD, as defined by the mini-mental state examination (MMSE), shows an r-value of −0.7, suggesting a relatively strong inverse relationship between the two parameters. These data show that plasma levels of microRNA 34c are much more prominent in AD than those of its sister, miR-34a, or than its own level in PBMC. Transfection studies show that miR-34c, as does its sister miR-34a, represses the expression of several selected genes involved in cell survival and oxidative defense pathways, such as Bcl2, SIRT1, and others, in cultured cells. Taken together, our results indicate that increased levels of miR-34c in both PBMC and plasma may reflect changes in circulating blood samples in AD patients, compared to age-matched normal controls. PMID:24550773

  8. Increased microRNA-155 expression in the serum and peripheral monocytes in chronic HCV infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), a single stranded RNA virus, affects millions of people worldwide and leads to chronic infection characterized by chronic inflammation in the liver and in peripheral immune cells. Chronic liver inflammation leads to progressive liver damage. MicroRNAs (miRNA) regulate inflammation (miR-155, -146a and -125b) as well as hepatocyte function (miR-122). Methods Here we hypothesized that microRNAs are dysregulated in chronic HCV infection. We examined miRNAs in the circulation and in peripheral monocytes of patients with chronic HCV infection to evaluate if specific miRNA expression correlated with HCV infection. Results We found that monocytes from chronic HCV infected treatment-naïve (cHCV) but not treatment responder patients showed increased expression of miR-155, a positive regulator of TNFα, and had increased TNFα production compared to monocytes of normal controls. After LPS stimulation, miR-155 levels were higher in monocytes from cHCV patients compared to controls. MiR-125b, which has negative regulatory effects on inflammation, was decreased in cHCV monocytes compared to controls. Stimulation of normal monocytes with TLR4 and TLR8 ligands or HCV core, NS3 and NS5 recombinant proteins induced a robust increase in both miR-155 expression and TNFα production identifying potential mechanisms for in vivo induction of miR-155. Furthermore, we found increased serum miR-155 levels in HCV patients compared to controls. Serum miR-125b and miR-146a levels were also increased in HCV patients. Serum levels of miR-122 were elevated in cHCV patients and correlated with increased ALT and AST levels and serum miR-155 levels. Conclusion In conclusion, our novel data demonstrate that miR-155, a positive regulator of inflammation, is upregulated both in monocytes and in the serum of patients with chronic HCV infection. Our study suggests that HCV core, NS3, and NS5 proteins or TLR4 and TLR8 ligands can mediate increased miR-155 and TNF

  9. Thyroid sialyltransferase mRNA level and activity are increased in Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Kiljański, Jacek; Ambroziak, Michał; Pachucki, Janusz; Jazdzewski, Krystian; Wiechno, Wieslaw; Stachlewska, Elzbieta; Górnicka, Barbara; Bogdańska, Magdalena; Nauman, Janusz; Bartoszewicz, Zbigniew

    2005-07-01

    Sialylation of cell components is an important immunomodulating mechanism affecting cell response to hormones and adhesion molecules. To study alterations in sialic acid metabolism in Graves' disease (GD) we measured the following parameters in various human thyroid tissues: lipid-bound sialic acid (LBSA) content, ganglioside profile, total sialyltransferase activity, and the two major sialyltransferase mRNAs for sialyltransferase-1 (ST6Gal I) and for sialyltransferase-4A (ST3Gal I). Fragments of toxic thyroid nodules (TN), nontoxic thyroid nodules (NN) and nontumorous tissue from patients with nodular goiter or thyroid cancer were used as a control (C). The LBSA content and sialyltransferase activity were the highest in the GD group (164 +/- 4.44 versus 120 +/- 2.00 nmoL/g, p = 0.005 and 1625 +/- 283.5 versus 324 +/- 54.2 cpm/mg of protein, p < 0.005 compared to control group C). Ganglioside profile in the GD group was similar to that in control tissues. Sialyltransferase- 1 mRNA and sialyltransferase-4A mRNA levels were significantly higher in the GD group than in the control group (12.52 +/- 6.90 versus 2.54 +/- 1.24 arbitrary units, p < 0.005 and 2,49 +/- 1.16 versus 1.23 +/- 0.46 arbitrary units, p < 0.05, respectively). There was a positive correlation between the increased sialyltransferase-1 mRNA level and the TSH-receptor antibody titer determined by the TRAK test. These results indicate that sialyltransferases expression and activity are increased in GD. Exact mechanism of this upregulation remains unknown, though one of possible explanations is the activation of the thyrotropin (TSH) receptor. PMID:16053379

  10. MicroRNA-30a increases tight junction protein expression to suppress the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis by targeting Slug in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Wei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien; Yao, Chung-Chin; Chao, Jui-I; Chen, Po-Ming; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yen; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Chu, Hou-Wei; Shen, Chen-Yang; Cheng, Chun-Wen

    2016-03-29

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) transition is a prerequisite for conferring metastatic potential during tumor progression. microRNA-30a (miR-30a) expression was significantly lower in aggressive breast cancer cell lines compared with non-invasive breast cancer and non-malignant mammary epithelial cell lines. In contrast, miR-30a overexpression reversed the mesenchymal appearance of cancer cells to result in a cobblestone-like epithelial phenotype. We identified Slug, one of the master regulators of EMT, as a target of miR-30a using in silico prediction. Reporter assays indicated that miR-30a could bind to the 3'-untranslted region of Slug mRNA. Furthermore, we linked miR-30a to increased expression of claudins, a family of tight junction transmembrane proteins. An interaction between Slug and E-box in the claudin promoter sequences was reduced upon miR-30a overexpression, further leading to reduction of filopodia formation and decreased invasiveness/metastasis capabilities of breast cancer cells. Consistently, delivery of miR-30a in xenografted mice decreased tumor invasion and migration. In patients with breast cancer, a significantly elevated risk of the miR-30alow/CLDN2low/FSCNhigh genotype was observed, linking to a phenotypic manifestation of larger tumor size, lymph node metastasis, and advanced tumor stage among patients. In conclusion, the miR-30a/Slug axis inhibits mesenchymal tumor development by interfering with metastatic cancer cell programming and may be a potential target for therapy in breast cancer. PMID:26918943

  11. MicroRNA-30a increases tight junction protein expression to suppress the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis by targeting Slug in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Wei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien; Yao, Chung-Chin; Chao, Jui-I; Chen, Po-Ming; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yen; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Chu, Hou-Wei; Shen, Chen-Yang; Cheng, Chun-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) transition is a prerequisite for conferring metastatic potential during tumor progression. microRNA-30a (miR-30a) expression was significantly lower in aggressive breast cancer cell lines compared with non-invasive breast cancer and non-malignant mammary epithelial cell lines. In contrast, miR-30a overexpression reversed the mesenchymal appearance of cancer cells to result in a cobblestone-like epithelial phenotype. We identified Slug, one of the master regulators of EMT, as a target of miR-30a using in silico prediction. Reporter assays indicated that miR-30a could bind to the 3′-untranslted region of Slug mRNA. Furthermore, we linked miR-30a to increased expression of claudins, a family of tight junction transmembrane proteins. An interaction between Slug and E-box in the claudin promoter sequences was reduced upon miR-30a overexpression, further leading to reduction of filopodia formation and decreased invasiveness/metastasis capabilities of breast cancer cells. Consistently, delivery of miR-30a in xenografted mice decreased tumor invasion and migration. In patients with breast cancer, a significantly elevated risk of the miR-30alow/CLDN2low/FSCNhigh genotype was observed, linking to a phenotypic manifestation of larger tumor size, lymph node metastasis, and advanced tumor stage among patients. In conclusion, the miR-30a/Slug axis inhibits mesenchymal tumor development by interfering with metastatic cancer cell programming and may be a potential target for therapy in breast cancer. PMID:26918943

  12. Spinal muscular atrophy phenotype is ameliorated in human motor neurons by SMN increase via different novel RNA therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Dametti, Sara; Salani, Sabrina; Ulzi, Gianna; Pagliarani, Serena; Rizzo, Federica; Frattini, Emanuele; Pagani, Franco; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo; Corti, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a primary genetic cause of infant mortality due to mutations in the Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) 1 gene. No cure is available. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) aimed at increasing SMN levels from the paralogous SMN2 gene represent a possible therapeutic strategy. Here, we tested in SMA human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and iPSC-differentiated motor neurons, three different RNA approaches based on morpholino antisense targeting of the ISSN-1, exon-specific U1 small nuclear RNA (ExSpeU1), and Transcription Activator-Like Effector-Transcription Factor (TALE-TF). All strategies act modulating SMN2 RNA: ASO affects exon 7 splicing, TALE-TF increase SMN2 RNA acting on the promoter, while ExSpeU1 improves pre-mRNA processing. These approaches induced up-regulation of full-length SMN mRNA and differentially affected the Delta-7 isoform: ASO reduced this isoform, while ExSpeU1 and TALE-TF increased it. All approaches upregulate the SMN protein and significantly improve the in vitro SMA motor neurons survival. Thus, these findings demonstrate that therapeutic tools that act on SMN2 RNA are able to rescue the SMA disease phenotype. Our data confirm the feasibility of SMA iPSCs as in vitro disease models and we propose novel RNA approaches as potential therapeutic strategies for treating SMA and other genetic neurological disorders. PMID:26123042

  13. Permissive effect of dexamethasone on the increase of proenkephalin mRNA induced by depolarization of chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Naranjo, J.R.; Mocchetti, I.; Schwartz, J.P.; Costa, E.

    1986-03-01

    In cultured bovine chromaffin cells, changes in the dynamic state of enkephalin stores elicited experimentally were studied by measuring cellular proenkephalin mRNA, as well as enkephalin precursors and authentic enkephalin content of cells and culture media. In parallel, tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and catecholamine cell content were also determined. Low concentrations (0.5-100 pM) of dexamethasone increased the cell contents of proenkephalin mRNA and enkephalin-containing peptides. High concentrations of the hormone(1 ..mu..M) were required to increase the cell contents of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and catecholamines. Depolarization of the cells with 10 ..mu..M veratridine resulted in a depletion of enkephalin and catecholamine stores after 24 hr. The enkephalin, but not the catecholamine, content was restored by 48 hr. An increase in proenkephalin mRNA content might account for the recovery; this increase was curtailed by tetrodotoxin and enhanced by 10 pM dexamethasone. Tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA content was not significantly modified by depolarization, even in the presence of 1 ..mu..M dexamethasone. Aldosterone, progesterone, testosterone, or estradiol (1 ..mu..M) failed to change proenkephalin mRNA. Hence, dexamethasone appears to exert a specific permissive action on the stimulation of the proenkephalin gene elicited by depolarization. Though the catecholamines and enkephalins are localized in the same chromaffin granules and are coreleased by depolarization, the genes coding for the processes that are rate limiting in the production of these neuromodulators can be differentially regulated.

  14. Herpes simplex virus virion stimulatory protein mRNA leader contains sequence elements which increase both virus-induced transcription and mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Blair, E D; Blair, C C; Wagner, E K

    1987-08-01

    To investigate the role of 5' noncoding leader sequence of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) mRNA in infected cells, the promoter for the 65,000-dalton virion stimulatory protein (VSP), a beta-gamma polypeptide, was introduced into plasmids bearing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene together with various lengths of adjacent viral leader sequences. Plasmids containing longer lengths of leader sequence gave rise to significantly higher levels of CAT enzyme in transfected cells superinfected with HSV-1. RNase T2 protection assays of CAT mRNA showed that transcription was initiated from an authentic viral cap site in all VSP-CAT constructs and that CAT mRNA levels corresponded to CAT enzyme levels. Use of cis-linked simian virus 40 enhancer sequences demonstrated that the effect was virus specific. Constructs containing 12 and 48 base pairs of the VSP mRNA leader gave HSV infection-induced CAT activities intermediate between those of the leaderless construct and the VSP-(+77)-CAT construct. Actinomycin D chase experiments demonstrated that the longest leader sequences increased hybrid CAT mRNA stability at least twofold in infected cells. Cotransfection experiments with a cosmid bearing four virus-specified transcription factors (ICP4, ICP0, ICP27, and VSP-65K) showed that sequences from -3 to +77, with respect to the viral mRNA cap site, also contained signals responsive to transcriptional activation. PMID:3037112

  15. Positive AMPA receptor modulation rapidly stimulates BDNF release and increases dendritic mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Jourdi, Hussam; Hsu, Yu-Tien; Zhou, Miou; Qin, Qingyu; Bi, Xiaoning; Baudry, Michel

    2009-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) stimulates local dendritic mRNA translation and is involved in formation and consolidation of memory. 2H,3H,6aH-pyrrolidino[2'',1''-3',2']1,3-oxazino[6',5'-5,4]-benzo[e]1,4-dioxan-10-one (CX614), one of the best-studied positive AMPA receptor modulators (also known as ampakines), increases BDNF mRNA and protein and facilitates long-term potentiation (LTP) induction. Several other ampakines also improve performance in various behavioral and learning tasks. Since local dendritic protein synthesis has been implicated in LTP stabilization and in memory consolidation, this study investigated whether CX614 could influence synaptic plasticity by upregulating dendritic protein translation. CX614 treatment of primary neuronal cultures and acute hippocampal slices rapidly activated the translation machinery and increased local dendritic protein synthesis. CX614-induced activation of translation was blocked by K252a [(9S,10R,12R)-2,3,9,10,11,12-hexahydro-10-hydroxy-9-methyl-1-oxo-9,12-epoxy-1H-diindolo[1,2,3-fg:3',2',1'-kl]pyrrolo[3,4-i][1,6]benzodiazocine-10-carboxylic acid methyl ester], CNQX, APV, and TTX, and was inhibited in the presence of an extracellular BDNF scavenger, TrkB-Fc. The acute effect of CX614 on translation was mediated by increased BDNF release as demonstrated with a BDNF scavenging assay using TrkB-Fc during CX614 treatment of cultured primary neurons and was blocked by nifedipine, ryanodine, and lack of extracellular Ca(2+) in acute hippocampal slices. Finally, CX614, like BDNF, rapidly increased dendritic translation of an exogenous translation reporter. Together, our results demonstrate that positive modulation of AMPA receptors rapidly stimulates dendritic translation, an effect mediated by BDNF secretion and TrkB receptor activation. They also suggest that increased BDNF secretion and stimulation of local protein synthesis contribute to the effects of ampakines on synaptic plasticity. PMID:19587275

  16. Haem is necessary for a continued increase in ferrochelatase mRNA in murine erythroleukaemia cells during erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Y; Fujita, H; Taketani, S; Sassa, S

    1993-12-01

    The level of mRNA encoding ferrochelatase (FeC) was examined in two murine erythroleukaemia (MEL) clones, DS and DR, a DMSO-sensitive, and a DMSO-resistant clone, respectively. DS cells undergo erythroid differentiation by DMSO treatment with a marked increase in haem synthesis, while DR cells fail to do so due to the lack of the erythroid-specific delta-aminolaevulinate synthase (ALAS-E). Both DS and DR cells showed an increase in the level of FeC mRNA within 18 h of DMSO treatment. The level of FeC mRNA in DR cells was then decreased, while that in DS cells continued to increase for 72 h. Treatment with haemin significantly increased FeC mRNA in DR cells. When cells were treated with both DMSO and haemin, the level of FeC mRNA in DR cells increased to a level comparable to that in DS cells. These findings suggest that the failure to maintain increased FeC mRNA DR cells after DMSO treatment may be due to a deficiency of haem in these cells. PMID:7918029

  17. Increased cytoplasmic TARDBP mRNA in affected spinal motor neurons in ALS caused by abnormal autoregulation of TDP-43

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Akihide; Sugai, Akihiro; Kato, Taisuke; Ishihara, Tomohiko; Shiga, Atsushi; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Koyama, Misaki; Konno, Takuya; Hirokawa, Sachiko; Yokoseki, Akio; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Onodera, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disorder. In motor neurons of ALS, TAR DNA binding protein-43 (TDP-43), a nuclear protein encoded by TARDBP, is absent from the nucleus and forms cytoplasmic inclusions. TDP-43 auto-regulates the amount by regulating the TARDBP mRNA, which has three polyadenylation signals (PASs) and three additional alternative introns within the last exon. However, it is still unclear how the autoregulatory mechanism works and how the status of autoregulation in ALS motor neurons without nuclear TDP-43 is. Here we show that TDP-43 inhibits the selection of the most proximal PAS and induces splicing of multiple alternative introns in TARDBP mRNA to decrease the amount of cytoplasmic TARDBP mRNA by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. When TDP-43 is depleted, the TARDBP mRNA uses the most proximal PAS and is increased in the cytoplasm. Finally, we have demonstrated that in ALS motor neurons—especially neurons with mislocalized TDP-43—the amount of TARDBP mRNA is increased in the cytoplasm. Our observations indicate that nuclear TDP-43 contributes to the autoregulation and suggests that the absence of nuclear TDP-43 induces an abnormal autoregulation and increases the amount of TARDBP mRNA. The vicious cycle might accelerate the disease progression of ALS. PMID:27257061

  18. Reduced hnRNPA3 increases C9orf72 repeat RNA levels and dipeptide-repeat protein deposition.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kohji; Nihei, Yoshihiro; Arzberger, Thomas; Zhou, Qihui; Mackenzie, Ian R; Hermann, Andreas; Hanisch, Frank; Kamp, Frits; Nuscher, Brigitte; Orozco, Denise; Edbauer, Dieter; Haass, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Intronic hexanucleotide (G4C2) repeat expansions in C9orf72 are genetically associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The repeat RNA accumulates within RNA foci but is also translated into disease characterizing dipeptide repeat proteins (DPR). Repeat-dependent toxicity may affect nuclear import. hnRNPA3 is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, which specifically binds to the G4C2 repeat RNA We now report that a reduction of nuclear hnRNPA3 leads to an increase of the repeat RNA as well as DPR production and deposition in primary neurons and a novel tissue culture model that reproduces features of the C9orf72 pathology. In fibroblasts derived from patients carrying extended C9orf72 repeats, nuclear RNA foci accumulated upon reduction of hnRNPA3. Neurons in the hippocampus of C9orf72 patients are frequently devoid of hnRNPA3. Reduced nuclear hnRNPA3 in the hippocampus of patients with extended C9orf72 repeats correlates with increased DPR deposition. Thus, reduced hnRNPA3 expression in C9orf72 cases leads to increased levels of the repeat RNA as well as enhanced production and deposition of DPR proteins and RNA foci. PMID:27461252

  19. Increased cytoplasmic TARDBP mRNA in affected spinal motor neurons in ALS caused by abnormal autoregulation of TDP-43.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Akihide; Sugai, Akihiro; Kato, Taisuke; Ishihara, Tomohiko; Shiga, Atsushi; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Koyama, Misaki; Konno, Takuya; Hirokawa, Sachiko; Yokoseki, Akio; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Onodera, Osamu

    2016-07-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disorder. In motor neurons of ALS, TAR DNA binding protein-43 (TDP-43), a nuclear protein encoded by TARDBP, is absent from the nucleus and forms cytoplasmic inclusions. TDP-43 auto-regulates the amount by regulating the TARDBP mRNA, which has three polyadenylation signals (PASs) and three additional alternative introns within the last exon. However, it is still unclear how the autoregulatory mechanism works and how the status of autoregulation in ALS motor neurons without nuclear TDP-43 is. Here we show that TDP-43 inhibits the selection of the most proximal PAS and induces splicing of multiple alternative introns in TARDBP mRNA to decrease the amount of cytoplasmic TARDBP mRNA by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. When TDP-43 is depleted, the TARDBP mRNA uses the most proximal PAS and is increased in the cytoplasm. Finally, we have demonstrated that in ALS motor neurons-especially neurons with mislocalized TDP-43-the amount of TARDBP mRNA is increased in the cytoplasm. Our observations indicate that nuclear TDP-43 contributes to the autoregulation and suggests that the absence of nuclear TDP-43 induces an abnormal autoregulation and increases the amount of TARDBP mRNA. The vicious cycle might accelerate the disease progression of ALS. PMID:27257061

  20. Increased P-glycoprotein messenger RNA stability in rat liver tumors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, C H; Bradley, G; Ling, V

    1998-10-01

    P-glycoproteins (Pgp) are comprised of a small family of plasma membrane proteins whose abundance in cultured cells is often associated with the multidrug resistance phenotype. Overexpression of Pgp has been observed in many types of human cancers, but the molecular basis for this overexpression has not been established. We have used primary monolayer cultures of adult rat hepatocytes and a stepwise model of rat liver carcinogenesis to study the regulation of Pgp gene expression. We observed a marked overexpression of Pgp, specifically the class II Pgp, in both systems. In addition, we observed that a number of unrelated genes including alpha-tubulin, beta-actin, gamma-actin, cytokeratin 8, cytokeratin 18, and c-myc are overexpressed in cultured hepatocytes, and they are also overexpressed during liver carcinogenesis and in transplantable tumors. Nuclear run-on assays showed no increase in the transcriptional activity of Pgp genes in transplantable liver tumors compared to normal liver. Studies of in vivo mRNA stability, however, revealed that all three Pgp mRNAs were relatively stable in transplantable liver tumors (t(1/2) > 12 h), in contrast to what was found in normal liver (t(1/2) < 2 h). In addition, mRNA for several other genes, including alpha-tubulin, c-myc, and cyclin D1, all appear to be stabilized in the tumors. These findings suggest that the overexpression of Pgp genes in rat liver tumors may be the result of a mechanism involving stabilization of a diverse group of mRNAs. PMID:9731740

  1. Increased neutrophil adherence and adhesion molecule mRNA expression in endothelial cells during selenium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Maddox, J F; Aherne, K M; Reddy, C C; Sordillo, L M

    1999-05-01

    Leukocyte aggregation and activation on endothelial cells (EC) are important preliminary events in leukocyte migration into tissue and subsequent inflammation. Thus, an increase in leukocyte adherence has the potential to affect inflammatory disease outcome. Selenium (Se) is an integral part of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and plays an important role in the maintenance of the redox state of a cell. Se supplementation in the bovine has been shown to improve the outcome of acute mastitis caused by coliform bacteria, in part by enhancing the speed of neutrophil migration into the affected mammary gland. However, the mechanisms by which Se modulates neutrophil migration have not been elucidated. Therefore, an in vitro model of Se deficiency in primary bovine mammary artery EC was used to examine the impact of Se status on the adhesive properties of EC. The effect of Se on functional activities was examined by measuring neutrophil adherence to Se-deficient and Se-supplemented EC. Se-deficient EC showed significantly enhanced neutrophil adherence when stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) for 4 or 24 h, interleukin-1 for 12 h, or H2O2 for 20 min (P < 0.05). To determine the mechanisms underlying these changes in neutrophil adherence, the expression of EC adhesion molecules, ICAM-1, E-selectin, and P-selectin were examined at the molecular level by a competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results revealed higher mRNA expression for E-selectin and ICAM-1 in Se-deficient EC stimulated with TNF-alpha for 3 and 6 h, and greater expression of P-selectin mRNA in Se-supplemented EC with 3-h TNF-alpha stimulation. These studies provide new information to establish the role of Se nutrition in the initiation of leukocyte adherence to endothelium. PMID:10331495

  2. Increased B-type-natriuretic peptide promotes myocardial cell apoptosis via the B-type-natriuretic peptide/long non-coding RNA LSINCT5/caspase-1/interleukin 1β signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIAN; SHA, MINGLEI; YAO, YUTING; DA, JIA; JING, DADAO

    2015-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is the final stage of various heart diseases, and is increasingly recognized as a major health problem in the elderly. Previous studies demonstrated that B-type-natriuretic peptide (BNP) is an established biomarker of CHF. Furthermore, BNP also regulates cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Recent evidence has revealed that BNP affects myocardial cell apoptosis during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as novel molecular compounds involved in gene regulation, and have important roles in numerous human diseases. However, the mechanism underlying the BNP and lncRNA-induced regulation of myocardial cell apoptosis remains to be elucidated. The present study reported that lncRNA LSINCT5, upregulated by BNP, is able to regulate myocardial cell apoptosis via the activation of the caspase-1/interleukin (IL)-1β signaling pathway. BNP-induced apoptosis of HCM cells was observed using flow cytometry, and involved caspase-1. In addition, expression profiling using a human lncRNA polymerase chain reaction array revealed that LSINCT5 was highly expressed in BNP-treated myocardial cells, as compared with untreated cells. The role of lncRNA LSINCT5 in HCM cell apoptosis was also investigated. The results of the present study indicated that LSINCT5 silencing by small interfering RNA inhibits caspase-1/IL-1β signaling, and suppresses apoptosis in BNP-treated HCM cells. Therefore, high expression levels of BNP promote the apoptosis of myocardial cells through the lncRNA LSINCT5 mediator, which activates the caspase-1/IL-1β signaling pathway. These findings uncovered a novel pathogenic mechanism, and provided a potential therapeutic target for CHF. PMID:26323562

  3. Increased keratinocyte proliferation initiated through downregulation of desmoplakin by RNA interference

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Hong . E-mail: hong.wan@cancer.org.uk; South, Andrew P.; Hart, Ian R.

    2007-07-01

    The intercellular adhesive junction desmosomes are essential for the maintenance of tissue structure and integrity in skin. Desmoplakin (Dp) is a major obligate plaque protein which plays a fundamental role in anchoring intermediate filaments to desmosomal cadherins. Evidence from hereditary human disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding Dp, e.g. Dp haploinsufficiency, suggests that alterations in Dp expression result not only in the disruption of tissue structure and integrity but also could evoke changes in keratinocyte proliferation. We have used transient RNA interference (RNAi) to downregulate Dp specifically in HaCaT keratinocytes. We showed that this Dp downregulation also caused reduced expression of several other desmosomal proteins. Increased cell proliferation and enhanced G{sub 1}-to-S-phase entry in the cell cycle, as monitored by colonial cellular density and BrdU incorporation, were seen in Dp RNAi-treated cells. These proliferative changes were associated with elevated phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-Akt levels. Furthermore, this increase in phospho-ERK/1/2 and phospho-Akt levels was sustained in Dp RNAi-treated cells at confluence whereas in control cells there was a significant reduction in phosphorylation of ERK1/2. This study indicates that Dp may participate in the regulation of keratinocyte cell proliferation by, in part at least, regulating cell cycle progression.

  4. 5-Azacytidine and RNA secondary structure increase the retrovirus mutation rate.

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, V K; Temin, H M

    1992-01-01

    A broad spectrum of mutations occurs at a high rate during a single round of retrovirus replication (V.K. Pathak and H. M. Temin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87:6019-6023, 1990). We have now determined that this high rate of spontaneous mutation can be further increased by 5-azacytidine (AZC) treatment or by regions of potential RNA secondary structure. We found a 13-fold increase in the mutation rate after AZC treatment of retrovirus-producing cells and target cells. The AZC-induced substitutions were located at the same target sites as previously identified spontaneous substitutions. The concordance of the AZC-induced and spontaneous substitutions indicates the presence of reverse transcription "pause sites," where the growing point is error prone. An analysis of nucleotides that neighbored substitutions revealed that transversions occur primarily by transient template misalignment, whereas transitions occur primarily by misincorporation. We also introduced a 34-bp potential stem-loop structure as an in-frame insertion within a lacZ alpha gene that was inserted in the long terminal repeat (LTR) U3 region and determined whether this potential secondary structure increased the rate of retrovirus mutations. We found a threefold increase in the retrovirus mutation rate. Fifty-seven of 96 mutations were deletions associated with the potential stem-loop. We also determined that these deletion mutations occurred primarily during minus-strand DNA synthesis by comparing the frequencies of mutations in recovered provirus plasmids containing both LTRs and in provirus plasmids containing only one LTR. PMID:1373201

  5. Acute intermittent morphine increases preprodynorphin and kappa opioid receptor mRNA levels in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, X M; Zhou, Y; Spangler, R; Ho, A; Han, J S; Kreek, M J

    1999-03-20

    We determined the effects of morphine on mRNA levels for the opioid ligands preprodynorphin (PPD) and preproenkephalin (PPE) and the kappa opioid receptor (KOR). Rats received six injections of morphine (6.25 mg/kg/injection) every 2 h, and were sacrificed 30 min later. mRNA levels were measured in brain tissue after removal of the cortex, cerebellum and brainstem. There were increases in PPD and KOR mRNA levels (P<0.05 and P<0.005, respectively), with no alteration of PPE. These alterations in the kappa/dynorphin system may counter morphine-induced effects on the brain. PMID:10095091

  6. The group A Streptococcus small regulatory RNA FasX enhances streptokinase activity by increasing the stability of the ska mRNA transcript

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Peña, Esmeralda; Treviño, Jeanette; Liu, Zhuyun; Perez, Nataly; Sumby, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Summary Small RNA molecules play key regulatory roles in many bacterial species. However, little mechanistic data exists for the action of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) in the human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS). Here, we analyzed the relationship between a putative GAS sRNA and production of the secreted virulence factor streptokinase (SKA). SKA promotes GAS dissemination by activating conversion of host plasminogen into the fibrin-degrading protease plasmin. Homologues of the putative sRNA-encoding gene fibronectin/fibrinogen-binding/hemolytic-activity/streptokinase-regulator-X (fasX) were identified in four different pyogenic streptococcal species. However, despite 79% fasX nucleotide identity, a fasX allele from the animal pathogen Streptococcus zooepidemicus failed to complement a GAS fasX mutant. Using a series of precisely-constructed fasX alleles we discovered that FasX is a bona-fide sRNA that post-transcriptionally regulates SKA production in GAS. By base-pairing to the 5’ end of ska mRNA, FasX enhances ska transcript stability, resulting in a ~10-fold increase in SKA activity. Our data provide new insights into the mechanisms used by sRNAs to activate target mRNAs, and enhances our understanding of the regulation of a key GAS virulence factor. PMID:21143309

  7. Delivery of Small Interfering RNAs to Cells via Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Wahlgren, Jessica; Statello, Luisa; Skogberg, Gabriel; Telemo, Esbjörn; Valadi, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane bound vesicles between 30 and 100 nm in diameter of endocytic origin that are secreted into the extracellular environment by many different cell types. Exosomes play a role in intercellular communication by transferring proteins, lipids, and RNAs to recipient cells.Exosomes from human cells could be used as vectors to provide cells with therapeutic RNAs. Here we describe how exogenous small interfering RNAs may successfully be introduced into various kinds of human exosomes using electroporation and subsequently delivered to recipient cells. Methods used to confirm the presence of siRNA inside exosomes and cells are presented, such as flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, and Northern blot. PMID:26472446

  8. Lack of the Delta Subunit of RNA Polymerase Increases Virulence Related Traits of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaoli; Sztajer, Helena; Buddruhs, Nora; Petersen, Jörn; Rohde, Manfred; Talay, Susanne R.; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2011-01-01

    The delta subunit of the RNA polymerase, RpoE, maintains the transcriptional specificity in Gram-positive bacteria. Lack of RpoE results in massive changes in the transcriptome of the human dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. In this study, we analyzed traits of the ΔrpoE mutant which are important for biofilm formation and interaction with oral microorganisms and human cells and performed a global phenotypic analysis of its physiological functions. The ΔrpoE mutant showed higher self-aggregation compared to the wild type and coaggregated with other oral bacteria and Candida albicans. It formed a biofilm with a different matrix structure and an altered surface attachment. The amount of the cell surface antigens I/II SpaP and the glucosyltransferase GtfB was reduced. The ΔrpoE mutant displayed significantly stronger adhesion to human extracellular matrix components, especially to fibronectin, than the wild type. Its adhesion to human epithelial cells HEp-2 was reduced, probably due to the highly aggregated cell mass. The analysis of 1248 physiological traits using phenotype microarrays showed that the ΔrpoE mutant metabolized a wider spectrum of carbon sources than the wild type and had acquired resistance to antibiotics and inhibitory compounds with various modes of action. The reduced antigenicity, increased aggregation, adherence to fibronection, broader substrate spectrum and increased resistance to antibiotics of the ΔrpoE mutant reveal the physiological potential of S. mutans and show that some of its virulence related traits are increased. PMID:21625504

  9. Increases of CCK mRNA and peptide in different brain areas following acute and chronic administration of morphine.

    PubMed

    Ding, X Z; Bayer, B M

    1993-10-15

    The present study examined whether either acute or chronic administration of morphine resulted in changes in the content of CCK mRNA and CCK immunoactive peptide in selective areas of the rat brain and spinal cord. Two hours after a single injection of morphine (10 mg/kg, s.c.), CCK mRNA significantly increased in the hypothalamus (0.8-fold) and spinal cord (2-fold) relative to the CCK mRNA content in saline-injected controls. No significant differences in CCK mRNA were observed in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, midbrain or brainstem. There were no significant alterations in CCK immunoreactivity in any brain regions and spinal cord after the acute treatment with morphine. Upon repeated morphine administration, the content of CCK mRNA in both the hypothalamus and the spinal cord was further elevated by at least 3-fold. A significant increase of CCK mRNA content in brain stem (2.8-fold) was also observed following chronic morphine administration. In contrast to the acute exposure to morphine, chronic administration resulted in significant increases in CCK immunoactive peptide in hypothalamus (2.6-fold), spinal cord (2.1-fold) and brainstem (1.6-fold), but not in the other brain areas. These results demonstrate that morphine, especially following repeated administrations, stimulates endogenous CCK biosynthesis in selective brain regions. PMID:8242392

  10. Heat shock protein 90 stabilizes nucleolin to increase mRNA stability in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-An; Li, Hao-Yi; Hsu, Tsung-I; Chen, Shu-Hui; Wu, Chin-Jen; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2011-12-23

    Most studies on heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) have focused on the involvement of Hsp90 in the interphase, whereas the role of this protein in the nucleus during mitosis remains largely unclear. In this study, we found that the level of the acetylated form of Hsp90 decreased dramatically during mitosis, which indicates more chaperone activity during mitosis. We thus probed proteins that interacted with Hsp90 by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and found that nucleolin was one of those interacting proteins during mitosis. The nucleolin level decreased upon geldanamycin treatment, and Hsp90 maintained the cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) activity to phosphorylate nucleolin at Thr-641/707. Mutation of Thr-641/707 resulted in the destabilization of nucleolin in mitosis. We globally screened the level of mitotic mRNAs and found that 229 mRNAs decreased during mitosis in the presence of geldanamycin. Furthermore, a bioinformatics tool and an RNA immunoprecipitation assay found that 16 mRNAs, including cadherin and Bcl-xl, were stabilized through the recruitment of nucleolin to the 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs) of those genes. Overall, strong correlations exist between the up-regulation of Hsp90, nucleolin, and the mRNAs related to tumorigenesis of the lung. Our findings thus indicate that nucleolin stabilized by Hsp90 contributes to the lung tumorigenesis by increasing the level of many tumor-related mRNAs during mitosis. PMID:21998300

  11. Increased serum hepcidin-25 level and increased tumor expression of hepcidin mRNA are associated with metastasis of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Hepcidin has an important role in iron metabolism. We investigated whether hepcidin was involved in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods We measured serum hepcidin-25 levels in 32 patients by liquid chromatograpy (LC)-mass spectrometry (MS)/MS, and assessed hepcidin mRNA expression in paired tumor and non-tumor tissue samples from the surgical specimens of 53 consecutive patients with RCC by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results The serum hepcidin-25 level was higher in patients with metastatic RCC than nonmetastatic RCC (P < 0.0001), and was positively correlated with the serum interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein levels (P < 0.001). Expression of hepcidin mRNA was lower in tumor tissues than in non-tumor tissues (P < 0.0001). The serum hepcidin-25 level was not correlated with the expression of hepcidin mRNA in the corresponding tumor tissue specimens from 32 patients. Hepcidin mRNA expression in tumor tissue was correlated with metastatic potential, but not with histological differentiation or tumor stage. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that over expression of hepcidin mRNA was related to shorter overall survival in RCC patients. Univariate analysis (Cox proportional hazards model) showed that the hepcidin mRNA level was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival. Conclusion Our findings suggest that a high serum hepcidin-25 level may indicate the progression of RCC, and that upregulation of hepcidin mRNA expression in tumor tissue may be related to increased metastatic potential. PMID:19656379

  12. Ethanol blocks the cold-induced increase in thyrotropin-releasing hormone mRNA in paraventricular nuclei but not the cold-induced increase in thyrotropin.

    PubMed

    Zoeller, R T; Rudeen, P K

    1992-05-01

    The effects of a single intraperitoneal injection of ethanol (3 g/kg b.wt.) on the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid system was explored as a possible explanation of the hypothermic effect of ethanol. Serum thyroid hormones were significantly reduced by ethanol injection, but ethanol did not affect the cold-induced increase in serum thyroid hormones or thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Since cold-exposure stimulates serum levels of TSH and thyroid hormones by stimulating thyroid-releasing hormone (TRH) release from neurons of the PVN, these findings demonstrate that ethanol did not block pituitary response to TRH or thyroid response to TSH. Paradoxically, ethanol increased cellular levels of TRH mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and blocked the cold-induced increase in TRH mRNA, suggesting that ethanol uncouples the regulation of TRH gene expression from the regulation of TRH release specifically in neurons of the PVN. Measurements of the effects of ethanol on TRH mRNA in thalamus, and beta-actin, vasopressin, somatostatin and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNAs in the PVN in addition to TRH mRNA revealed very specific effects of ethanol on the TRH neuronal system. PMID:1352612

  13. The number of preproghrelin mRNA expressing cells is increased in mice with activity-based anorexia.

    PubMed

    François, Marie; Barde, Swapnali; Achamrah, Najate; Breton, Jonathan; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Coëffier, Moïse; Hökfelt, Tomas; Déchelotte, Pierre; Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2015-06-01

    Plasma levels of ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide, are increased during conditions of chronic starvation, such as in patients with anorexia nervosa. However, it is not known whether such increase can be related to the number of preproghrelin mRNA-expressing cells in the stomach, and if chronic starvation may activate a tentative central ghrelin production. In this work, in situ hybridization technique was used to analyze the presence and number of preproghrelin mRNA-expressing cells in the stomach and the hypothalamus of mice with activity-based anorexia (ABA) induced by the combination of running wheel activity with progressive, during 10 days, feeding-time restriction (FTR) and compared with sedentary FTR, ABA pair-fed (PF) and ad libitum-fed control mice. All food-restricted mice lost more than 20% of body weight. Body weight loss was similar in ABA and PF mice, but it was more pronounced than in FTR mice. Food intake was also lower in ABA than in FTR mice. Preproghrelin mRNA-expressing cells in the stomach were increased proportionally to the body weight loss in all food-restricted groups with the highest number in ABA mice. No preproghrelin mRNA-producing cells were detectable in the hypothalamus of either control or food-restricted mice. Thus, the increased number of gastric preproghrelin mRNA-producing cells during chronic starvation proportionally to the body weight loss and reduced food intake may underlie increased plasma ghrelin. Hyperactivity-induced anorexia appears to further increase the number of preproghrelin mRNA-producing cells in the stomach. No evidence was found for ghrelin expression in the hypothalamus, not even in any of the present experimental models. PMID:25963530

  14. Adverse early life experience and social stress during adulthood interact to increase serotonin transporter mRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Katherine L.; Hale, Matthew W.; Lightman, Stafford L.; Plotsky, Paul M.; Lowry, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, depression and animal models of vulnerability to a depression-like syndrome have been associated with dysregulation of serotonergic systems in the brain. To evaluate the effects of early life experience, adverse experiences during adulthood, and potential interactions between these factors on serotonin transporter (slc6a4) mRNA expression, we investigated in rats the effects of maternal separation (180 min/day from days 2–14 of life; MS180), neonatal handing (15 min/day from days 2–14 of life; MS15), or normal animal facility rearing control conditions (AFR) with or without subsequent exposure to adult social defeat on slc6a4 mRNA expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) and caudal linear nucleus. At the level of specific subdivisions of the DR, there were no differences in slc6a4 mRNA expression between MS15 and AFR rats. Among rats exposed to a novel cage control condition, increased slc6a4 mRNA expression was observed in the dorsal part of the DR in MS180 rats, relative to AFR control rats. In contrast, MS180 rats exposed to social defeat as adults had increased slc6a4 mRNA expression throughout the DR compared to both MS15 and AFR controls. Social defeat increased slc6a4 mRNA expression, but only in MS180 rats and only in the “lateral wings” of the DR. Overall these data demonstrate that early life experience and stressful experience during adulthood interact to determine slc6a4 mRNA expression. These data support the hypothesis that early life experience and major stressful life events contribute to dysregulation of serotonergic systems in stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:19781533

  15. Mechanical stretch of human uterine smooth muscle cells increases IL-8 mRNA expression and peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Loudon, J A Z; Sooranna, S R; Bennett, P R; Johnson, M R

    2004-12-01

    Labour is associated with increased synthesis of interleukin-8 (IL-8) by the fetal membranes and myometrium, which leads to an inflammatory infiltrate. Stretch has been shown to increase the expression of contraction-associated proteins in animal models of labour and in human myocytes in vitro. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that mechanical stretch of human myometrial cells increases IL-8 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression. We isolated myocytes from non-pregnant women undergoing hysterectomy and pregnant women undergoing Caesarean section before and after the onset of labour. Myocytes in culture were subjected to stretch of varying intensity (6-16%) and duration (1 or 6 h) using the Flexercell system. IL-8 mRNA expression was lowest in myocytes from pregnant women not in labour, intermediate in those from non-pregnant women and greatest in those from pregnant women in labour. Stretch increased IL-8 mRNA expression independent of reproductive state. The stretch-induced increase in IL-8 mRNA expression was associated with higher IL-8 levels in the culture supernatant and enhanced promoter activity. These data suggest that stretch contributes to the increase in myometrial IL-8 synthesis associated with the onset of labour in humans. PMID:15489245

  16. Long noncoding RNA Saf and splicing factor 45 increase soluble Fas and resistance to apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Riberdy, Janice M.; Persons, Derek A.; Wilber, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, cell growth and differentiation is controlled in part by programmed cell death or apoptosis. One major apoptotic pathway is triggered by Fas receptor (Fas)-Fas ligand (FasL) interaction. Neoplastic cells are frequently resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis, evade Fas signals through down regulation of Fas and produce soluble Fas proteins that bind FasL thereby blocking apoptosis. Soluble Fas (sFas) is an alternative splice product of Fas pre-mRNA, commonly created by exclusion of transmembrane spanning sequences encoded within exon 6 (FasΔEx6). Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) interact with other RNAs, DNA, and proteins to regulate gene expression. One lncRNA, Fas-antisense or Saf, was shown to participate in alternative splicing of Fas pre-mRNA through unknown mechanisms. We show that Saf is localized in the nucleus where it interacts with Fas receptor pre-mRNA and human splicing factor 45 (SPF45) to facilitate alternative splicing and exclusion of exon 6. The product is a soluble Fas protein that protects cells against FasL-induced apoptosis. Collectively, these studies reveal a novel mechanism to modulate this critical cell death program by an lncRNA and its protein partner. PMID:26885613

  17. Long noncoding RNA Saf and splicing factor 45 increase soluble Fas and resistance to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Olga; Chambers, Christopher B; Riberdy, Janice M; Persons, Derek A; Wilber, Andrew

    2016-03-22

    In multicellular organisms, cell growth and differentiation is controlled in part by programmed cell death or apoptosis. One major apoptotic pathway is triggered by Fas receptor (Fas)-Fas ligand (FasL) interaction. Neoplastic cells are frequently resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis, evade Fas signals through down regulation of Fas and produce soluble Fas proteins that bind FasL thereby blocking apoptosis. Soluble Fas (sFas) is an alternative splice product of Fas pre-mRNA, commonly created by exclusion of transmembrane spanning sequences encoded within exon 6 (FasΔEx6). Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) interact with other RNAs, DNA, and proteins to regulate gene expression. One lncRNA, Fas-antisense or Saf, was shown to participate in alternative splicing of Fas pre-mRNA through unknown mechanisms. We show that Saf is localized in the nucleus where it interacts with Fas receptor pre-mRNA and human splicing factor 45 (SPF45) to facilitate alternative splicing and exclusion of exon 6. The product is a soluble Fas protein that protects cells against FasL-induced apoptosis. Collectively, these studies reveal a novel mechanism to modulate this critical cell death program by an lncRNA and its protein partner. PMID:26885613

  18. Chimeric DNA-RNA hammerhead ribozymes have enhanced in vitro catalytic efficiency and increased stability in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, N R; Kaplan, B E; Swiderski, P; Li, H; Rossi, J J

    1992-01-01

    Subsequent to the discovery that RNA can have site specific cleavage activity, there has been a great deal of interest in the design and testing of trans-acting catalytic RNAs as both surrogate genetic tools and as therapeutic agents. We have been developing catalytic RNAs or ribozymes with target specificity for HIV-1 RNA and have been exploring chemical synthesis as one method for their production. To this end, we have chemically synthesized and experimentally analyzed chimeric catalysts consisting of DNA in the non-enzymatic portions, and RNA in the enzymatic core of hammerhead type ribozymes. Substitutions of DNA for RNA in the various stems of a hammerhead ribozyme have been analyzed in vitro for kinetic efficiency. One of the chimeric ribozymes used in this study, which harbors 24 bases of DNA capable of base-pairing interactions with an HIV-1 gag target, but maintains RNA in the catalytic center and in stem-loop II, has a sixfold greater kcat value than the all RNA counterpart. This increased activity appears to be the direct result of enhanced product dissociation. Interestingly, a chimeric ribozyme in which stem-loop II (which divides the catalytic core) is comprised of DNA, exhibited a marked reduction in cleavage activity, suggesting that DNA in this region of the ribozyme can impart a negative effect on the catalytic function of the ribozyme. DNA-RNA chimeric ribozymes transfected by cationic liposomes into human T-lymphocytes are more stable than their all-RNA counterparts. Enhanced catalytic turnover and stability in the absence of a significant effect on Km make chimeric ribozymes favorable candidates for therapeutic agents. Images PMID:1408757

  19. Chronic neonatal nicotine exposure increases mRNA expression of neurotrophic factors in the postnatal rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Son, Jong-Hyun; Winzer-Serhan, Ursula H

    2009-06-30

    Nicotine, the psychoactive ingredient in tobacco, can be neuroprotective but the mechanism is unknown. In the adult hippocampus, chronic nicotine can increase expression of growth factors which could contribute to nicotine's neuroprotective effects. During development, nicotine could also increase expression of neurotrophic factors. Therefore, we determined whether chronic neonatal nicotine (CNN) exposure increased mRNA expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve-growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Nicotine (6 mg/kg/day in milk formula) or milk formula (controls) were delivered in three daily doses via oral gastric intubation to rat pups from postnatal day (P)1 to P8, and then sacrificed. Brains were processed for in situ hybridization using specific (35)S-labeled cRNA probes. At P8, CNN had a significant stimulant treatment effect on the expression of BDNF, FGF-2, NT-3 and IGF-1 [p<0.01], but not NGF. Specifically, BDNF mRNA expression, detected in CA1, CA3 stratum (s.) pyramidal and granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus (DG), was increased by 27.4%, 23.26% and 27.3%, respectively. FGF-2 mRNA expression, detected in neurons and astrocytes in CA1 s. radiatum, CA2 and CA3 s. pyramidale, and molecular layer of the DG, was increased by 34.0%, 8.9%, 31.0% and 23.1%, respectively. NT-3 mRNA expression in CA2 s. pyramidale was increased by 80.0%, and CNN increased the number of IGF-1-expressing cells in CA1 (18.0%), CA3 (20.9%) and DG (17.7%). Thus, nicotine exposure during early postnatal development differentially up-regulated expression of neurotrophic factor mRNAs in the hippocampus, which could increase neurotrophic tone and alter developmental processes. PMID:19410565

  20. Sulindac increases the expression of APC mRNA in malignant colonic epithelial cells: an in vitro study.

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzler, M; Dwight, T; Robinson, B G

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Sulindac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug which induces regression of colonic polyps in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis. Animal and in vitro studies have shown that both the sulphide metabolite of sulindac, which is able to inhibit cyclo-oxygenase, and the sulphone metabolite, which lacks this ability, are able to inhibit the growth of colonic carcinoma cells. The exact mechanism by which these effects occurs is not known. AIMS--To examine the effect of sulindac sulphide and sulindac sulphone on the expression of APC messenger RNA (mRNA), and on the proliferation of colonic carcinoma cells in vitro. METHODS--The colonic carcinoma cell line LIM 1215 was treated with sulindac sulphide and sulindac sulphone (10 microM or 100 microM) for 24 hours. Total RNA was extracted and APC mRNA was quantitated using competitive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Measurements of cell number, cell proliferation, and prostaglandin E2 concentrations were also made. RESULTS--A significant increase in APC mRNA was observed after treatment with 10 microM of both sulindac sulphide and sulindac sulphone (control: 37.2 (19.7); 10 microM sulindac sulphide: 129 (112.8); 10 microM sulindac sulphone: 207.7 (102.9) pg/(g total RNA) (p < 0.05). Prostaglandin E2 concentrations were significantly reduced after treatment with sulindac sulphide, but not after sulindac sulphone. Both agents produced a dose dependent reduction in cell numbers and cell proliferation, which was more noticeable after treatment with sulindac sulphide. CONCLUSIONS--Both sulindac sulphide and sulindac sulphone inhibit the growth of carcinoma cells in vitro and cause an increase in APC mRNA. The effect of these agents on colonic carcinogenesis is not mediated entirely by means of an inhibition of prostaglandin biosynthesis. Images Figure 1 PMID:8707116

  1. Increase in plasma leptin and Lep mRNA concentrations by food intake is dependent on insulin.

    PubMed

    Patel, B K; Koenig, J I; Kaplan, L M; Hooi, S C

    1998-05-01

    Obese (Lep) gene expression and leptin secretion are regulated by changes in food intake. However, the mechanism by which leptin concentrations are altered by fasting and feeding is unclear. Since these changes occur in parallel with changes in plasma insulin, it is possible that the changes observed are mediated by insulin. To test this hypothesis, we studied the role of insulin in the regulation of Lep gene expression in epididymal fat and leptin secretion during feeding. As shown previously, fasted animals showed significant reductions in Lep mRNA, plasma leptin, and plasma insulin concentrations. Conversely, feeding increased plasma insulin, Lep mRNA, and plasma leptin. In streptozotocin (STZ)-treated animals, plasma insulin concentrations were low. This was associated with low Lep mRNA and plasma leptin concentrations. Changes in food intake, whether fasting or feeding, did not significantly alter plasma insulin levels in STZ-treated animals. Under these circumstances, Lep mRNA and plasma leptin concentrations also remained low. Our results demonstrate that the decrease in Lep mRNA and plasma leptin during fasting and the increase with feeding are dependent on changes in the plasma insulin concentration. PMID:9591754

  2. Brain-derived peptides increase blood-brain barrier GLUT1 glucose transporter gene expression via mRNA stabilization.

    PubMed

    Boado, R J

    1998-10-23

    The present investigation studied the effect of the brain-derived peptide preparation Cerebrolysin (CI, EBEWE, Austria) on the turnover rate and gene expression of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) GLUT1 glucose transporter mRNA. Studies were performed in brain endothelial cultured cells transfected with the human (h) GLUT1 transcript. In control cells, the full length 2.8 Kb hGLUT1 mRNA was rapidly degraded following transfection, and the abundance of this transcript at 4 and 6 h was comparable to background mRNA levels seen in cells transfected without hGLUT1 mRNA. On the contrary, the decay of the hGLUT1 mRNA was stabilized in CI-treated cells resulting in a marked reduction in the fractional turnover rate (72.4 and 4.0%/h, control and CI, respectively). In parallel experiments, CI induced a significant increase in the levels of immunoreactive GLUT1 protein measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In conclusion, data presented here demonstrate that factors in CI increase BBB-GLUT1 transcript stability, and that this is associated with an induction of BBB-GLUT1 gene expression in brain endothelial cultured cells. PMID:9832194

  3. Interactions between PTB RRMs induce slow motions and increase RNA binding affinity

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Caroline M

    2010-01-01

    Polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) participates in a variety of functions in eukaryotic cells, including alternative splicing, mRNA stabilization, and internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) mediated translation initiation. Its mechanism of RNA recognition is determined in part by the novel geometry of its two C-terminal RNA Recognition Motifs (RRM3 and RRM4), which interact with each other to form a stable complex (PTB1:34). This complex itself is unusual among RRMs, suggesting that it performs a specific function for the protein. In order to understand the advantage it provides to PTB, the fundamental properties of PTB1:34 are examined here as a comparative study of the complex and its two constituent RRMs. Both RRM3 and RRM4 adopt folded structures that NMR data show to be similar to their structure in PRB1:34. The RNA binding properties of the domains differ dramatically. The affinity of each separate RRM for polypyrimidine tracts is far weaker than that of PTB1:34, and simply mixing the two RRMs does not create an equivalent binding platform. 15N-NMR relaxation experiments show that PTB1:34 has slow, microsecond motions throughout both RRMs including the interdomain linker. This is in contrast to the individual domains, RRM3 and RRM4, where only a few backbone amides are flexible on this timescale. The slow backbone dynamics of PTB1:34, induced by packing of RRM3 and RRM4, could be essential for high affinity binding to a flexible polypyrimidine tract RNA and also provide entropic compensation for its own formation. PMID:20080103

  4. Lactobacillus acidophilus Increases the Anti-apoptotic Micro RNA-21 and Decreases the Pro-inflammatory Micro RNA-155 in the LPS-Treated Human Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kalani, Mehdi; Hodjati, Hossein; Sajedi Khanian, Mahdi; Doroudchi, Mehrnoosh

    2016-06-01

    Given the anti-inflammatory and protective role of probiotics in atherosclerosis and the regulatory role of micro RNA (miRNA) in endothelial cell (dys) functions, this study aimed to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus (La) on cellular death and the expression of miRNA-21, 92a, 155, and 663 in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (Ec-LPS). LPS-treated and untreated HUVECs were cultured in the presence of different La conditions such as La-conditioned media (LaCM), La water extract (LaWE), La culture-filtered (LaFS) and unfiltered supernatants (LaUFS). After 24 h, apoptosis, necrosis and the levels of the mentioned miRNAs were measured using flow cytometry and real-time PCR methods, respectively. LaCM decreased apoptosis, necrosis and inflammatory miR-155 and conversely increased anti-apoptotic miR-21 in Ec-LPS-treated HUVECs. Association analysis revealed negative correlations between necrosis and the levels of miR-21, miR-92a, and miR-155. The beneficial effects of L. acidophilus on the ECs death and expression of atherosclerosis related miRNAs in these cells imply a new aspect of its regulation in cardiovascular diseases rather than previously described ones and suggest this probiotic bacterium as a candidate in the preventative therapy of atherosclerosis. PMID:27107761

  5. Systemic oxidative DNA and RNA damage are not increased during early phases of psychosis: A case control study.

    PubMed

    Nordholm, Dorte; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Randers, Lasse; Nielsen, Mette Ø; Wulff, Sanne; Krakauer, Kristine; Nørbak-Emig, Henrik; Henriksen, Trine; Glenthøj, Birte; Nordentoft, Merete

    2016-07-30

    It has been suggested that patients with schizophrenia develop higher levels of oxidative stress, which may contribute to deteriorating mental illness. In order to examine oxidative stress in the early stages of severe mental illness, we examined the levels of systemic Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) and Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) oxidation, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine, perceived stress and recent life events in patients at ultra high-risk (UHR) of developing psychosis, in antipsychotic naïve patients with first-episode schizophrenia (FES), and in healthy controls. We included 41 UHR patients, 35 FES patients, and 29 healthy controls. There was no difference in the level of DNA/RNA oxidative damage between UHR patients and FES patients compared with healthy controls. We found no association between levels of DNA/RNA oxidative damage and perceived stress/life events. Based on the results, we suggest that DNA and RNA oxidative markers are not increased during the early stages of illness, but further longitudinal studies in first-episode psychosis should be carried out to examine whether DNA and RNA oxidative damage are potential markers of severe illness. PMID:27183105

  6. Chronic anemic hypoxemia increases plasma glucagon and hepatic PCK1 mRNA in late-gestation fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Culpepper, Christine; Wesolowski, Stephanie R; Benjamin, Joshua; Bruce, Jennifer L; Brown, Laura D; Jonker, Sonnet S; Wilkening, Randall B; Hay, William W; Rozance, Paul J

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic glucose production (HGP) normally begins just prior to birth. Prolonged fetal hypoglycemia, intrauterine growth restriction, and acute hypoxemia produce an early activation of fetal HGP. To test the hypothesis that prolonged hypoxemia increases factors which regulate HGP, studies were performed in fetuses that were bled to anemic conditions (anemic: n = 11) for 8.9 ± 0.4 days and compared with control fetuses (n = 7). Fetal arterial hematocrit and oxygen content were 32% and 50% lower, respectively, in anemic vs. controls (P < 0.005). Arterial plasma glucose was 15% higher in the anemic group (P < 0.05). Hepatic mRNA expression of phosphonenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) was twofold higher in the anemic group (P < 0.05). Arterial plasma glucagon concentrations were 70% higher in anemic fetuses compared with controls (P < 0.05), and they were positively associated with hepatic PCK1 mRNA expression (P < 0.05). Arterial plasma cortisol concentrations increased 90% in the anemic fetuses (P < 0.05), but fetal cortisol concentrations were not correlated with hepatic PCK1 mRNA expression. Hepatic glycogen content was 30% lower in anemic vs. control fetuses (P < 0.05) and was inversely correlated with fetal arterial plasma glucagon concentrations. In isolated primary fetal sheep hepatocytes, incubation in low oxygen (3%) increased PCK1 mRNA threefold compared with incubation in normal oxygen (21%). Together, these results demonstrate that glucagon and PCK1 may potentiate fetal HGP during chronic fetal anemic hypoxemia. PMID:27170658

  7. Small interfering ribonucleic acid induces liquid-to-ripple phase transformation in a phospholipid membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Choubey, Amit; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2014-09-15

    Small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) molecules play a pivotal role in silencing gene expression via the RNA interference mechanism. A key limitation to the widespread implementation of siRNA therapeutics is the difficulty of delivering siRNA-based drugs to cells. Here, we examine changes in the structure and dynamics of a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer in the presence of a siRNA molecule and mechanical barriers to siRNA transfection in the bilayer. Our all-atom molecular dynamics simulation shows that siRNA induces a liquid crystalline-to-ripple phase transformation in the bilayer. The ripple phase consists of a major region of non-interdigitated and a minor region of interdigitated lipid molecules with an intervening kink. In the ripple phase, hydrocarbon chains of lipid molecules have large compressive stresses, which present a considerable barrier to siRNA transfection.

  8. Nanostructures created by interfered femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Chang, Yun-Ching; Yao, Jimmy; Luo, Claire; Yin, Shizhuo; Ruffin, Paul; Brantley, Christina; Edwards, Eugene

    2011-10-01

    The method by applying the interfered femtosecond laser to create nanostructured copper (Cu) surface has been studied. The nanostructure created by direct laser irradiation is also realized for comparison. Results show that more uniform and finer nanostructures with sphere shape and feature size around 100 nm can be induced by the interfered laser illumination comparing with the direct laser illumination. This offers an alternative fabrication approach that the feature size and the shape of the laser induced metallic nanostructures can be highly controlled, which can extremely improve its performance in related application such as the colorized metal, catalyst, SERS substrate, and etc.

  9. Elevated Intracellular Calcium Increases Ferritin H Expression Through an NFAT-Independent Posttranscriptional Mechanism Involving mRNA Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, Elizabeth L.; Tsuji, Yoshiaki

    2009-01-01

    An increase in intracellular Ca2+ is one of the initiating events in T cell activation. A calcium-mediated signaling cascade in T cells involves activation of calcineurin and the dephosphorylation and translocation of Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT), resulting in the transcriptional activation of target genes such as IL-2. In the present study, we found that increased intracellular calcium leads to induction of the antioxidant protein ferritin H. We previously reported that the ferritin H gene is transcriptionally activated under oxidative stress conditions through an antioxidant responsive element (ARE). The facts that the ferritin H ARE contains a composite AP1 site, and that NFAT collaborates with AP1 transcription factors, led us to test whether calcium-activated NFAT is involved in the ferritin H induction through the ARE. Treatment of Jurkat T cells with the calcium ionophore, ionomycin, increased ferritin H mRNA and protein expression. Though NFAT translocated to the nucleus and bound a consensus NFAT sequence located in the IL-2 promoter following ionomycin treatment, it did not activate ferritin H transcription despite the presence of a putative NFAT binding sequence in the ferritin H ARE. In addition, the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin A treatment blocked ionomycin-mediated NFAT nuclear translocation but failed to abrogate the increase in ferritin H mRNA. Analysis of mRNA stability following actinomycin D treatment revealed that ionomycin prolongs ferritin H mRNA half-life. Taken together, these results suggest that ionomycin-mediated induction of ferritin H may occur in an NFAT-independent manner but through posttranscriptional stabilization of the ferritin H mRNA. PMID:18076382

  10. Cholesterol-based cationic liposome increases dsRNA protection of yellow head virus infection in Penaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Sanitt, Poohrawind; Apiratikul, Nuttapon; Niyomtham, Nattisa; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-Ek; Assavalapsakul, Wanchai; Panyim, Sakol; Udomkit, Apinunt

    2016-06-20

    Protection of shrimp from yellow head virus (YHV) infection has been demonstrated by injection and oral delivery of dsRNA-YHV protease gene (dsYHV) or shrimp endogenous gene (dsRab7). However, to achieve complete viral suppression and to prolong dsRNA activity, the development of an effective dsRNA delivery system is required. In this study, four cationic liposomes were synthesized and tested for their ability to increase dsRNA efficiency. The results demonstrated that entrapping dsYHV in a cholesterol-based cationic liposome gave the best protection against YHV infection when compared with other cationic lipids. The cholesterol-based cationic liposome-dsYHV (Chol-dsYHV) complex conferred YHV protection in a dose-dependent manner. Injection with Chol-dsYHV at 0.05μg dsYHV/g shrimp could give comparable level of YHV protection to the injection with 1.25μg naked dsYHV/g shrimp. The shrimp injected with Chol- dsYHV at 1.25μg dsRNA/g shrimp showed only 50% mortality at 60days post injection whereas the naked dsYHV at the same concentration gave 90% mortality. Thus, the liposome-entrapped dsYHV could lower an effective dsRNA concentration in viral protection and prolong dsRNA activity. In addition, encapsulating dsRab7 in the cholesterol-based cationic liposome could protect the dsRab7 from enzymatic digestion, and continuous feeding the shrimp with the diet formulated with the liposome-entrapped dsRab7 for 4days in the total of 960μg dsRab7/g shrimp could enhance YHV protection efficiency compared with the naked dsRab7. Our studies reveal that cholesterol-based cationic liposome is a promising dsRNA carrier to enhance dsRNA efficiency in both injection and oral delivery systems. PMID:27140871

  11. Conflicting Selection Pressures Will Constrain Viral Escape from Interfering Particles: Principles for Designing Resistance-Proof Antivirals.

    PubMed

    Rast, Luke I; Rouzine, Igor M; Rozhnova, Ganna; Bishop, Lisa; Weinberger, Ariel D; Weinberger, Leor S

    2016-05-01

    The rapid evolution of RNA-encoded viruses such as HIV presents a major barrier to infectious disease control using conventional pharmaceuticals and vaccines. Previously, it was proposed that defective interfering particles could be developed to indefinitely control the HIV/AIDS pandemic; in individual patients, these engineered molecular parasites were further predicted to be refractory to HIV's mutational escape (i.e., be 'resistance-proof'). However, an outstanding question has been whether these engineered interfering particles-termed Therapeutic Interfering Particles (TIPs)-would remain resistance-proof at the population-scale, where TIP-resistant HIV mutants may transmit more efficiently by reaching higher viral loads in the TIP-treated subpopulation. Here, we develop a multi-scale model to test whether TIPs will maintain indefinite control of HIV at the population-scale, as HIV ('unilaterally') evolves toward TIP resistance by limiting the production of viral proteins available for TIPs to parasitize. Model results capture the existence of two intrinsic evolutionary tradeoffs that collectively prevent the spread of TIP-resistant HIV mutants in a population. First, despite their increased transmission rates in TIP-treated sub-populations, unilateral TIP-resistant mutants are shown to have reduced transmission rates in TIP-untreated sub-populations. Second, these TIP-resistant mutants are shown to have reduced growth rates (i.e., replicative fitness) in both TIP-treated and TIP-untreated individuals. As a result of these tradeoffs, the model finds that TIP-susceptible HIV strains continually outcompete TIP-resistant HIV mutants at both patient and population scales when TIPs are engineered to express >3-fold more genomic RNA than HIV expresses. Thus, the results provide design constraints for engineering population-scale therapies that may be refractory to the acquisition of antiviral resistance. PMID:27152856

  12. Conflicting Selection Pressures Will Constrain Viral Escape from Interfering Particles: Principles for Designing Resistance-Proof Antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Rast, Luke I.; Rouzine, Igor M.; Rozhnova, Ganna; Bishop, Lisa; Weinberger, Ariel D.; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid evolution of RNA-encoded viruses such as HIV presents a major barrier to infectious disease control using conventional pharmaceuticals and vaccines. Previously, it was proposed that defective interfering particles could be developed to indefinitely control the HIV/AIDS pandemic; in individual patients, these engineered molecular parasites were further predicted to be refractory to HIV’s mutational escape (i.e., be ‘resistance-proof’). However, an outstanding question has been whether these engineered interfering particles—termed Therapeutic Interfering Particles (TIPs)—would remain resistance-proof at the population-scale, where TIP-resistant HIV mutants may transmit more efficiently by reaching higher viral loads in the TIP-treated subpopulation. Here, we develop a multi-scale model to test whether TIPs will maintain indefinite control of HIV at the population-scale, as HIV (‘unilaterally’) evolves toward TIP resistance by limiting the production of viral proteins available for TIPs to parasitize. Model results capture the existence of two intrinsic evolutionary tradeoffs that collectively prevent the spread of TIP-resistant HIV mutants in a population. First, despite their increased transmission rates in TIP-treated sub-populations, unilateral TIP-resistant mutants are shown to have reduced transmission rates in TIP-untreated sub-populations. Second, these TIP-resistant mutants are shown to have reduced growth rates (i.e., replicative fitness) in both TIP-treated and TIP-untreated individuals. As a result of these tradeoffs, the model finds that TIP-susceptible HIV strains continually outcompete TIP-resistant HIV mutants at both patient and population scales when TIPs are engineered to express >3-fold more genomic RNA than HIV expresses. Thus, the results provide design constraints for engineering population-scale therapies that may be refractory to the acquisition of antiviral resistance. PMID:27152856

  13. Repeated transient mRNA bursts precede increases in transcriptional and mitochondrial proteins during training in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Christopher G R; Lally, James; Holloway, Graham P; Heigenhauser, George J F; Bonen, Arend; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2010-01-01

    Exercise training induces mitochondrial biogenesis, but the time course of molecular sequelae that accompany repetitive training stimuli remains to be determined in human skeletal muscle. Therefore, throughout a seven-session, high-intensity interval training period that increased (12%), we examined the time course of responses of (a) mitochondrial biogenesis and fusion and fission proteins, and (b) selected transcriptional and mitochondrial mRNAs and proteins in human muscle. Muscle biopsies were obtained 4 and 24 h after the 1st, 3rd, 5th and 7th training session. PGC-1α mRNA was increased >10-fold 4 h after the 1st session and returned to control within 24 h. This ‘saw-tooth’ pattern continued until the 7th bout, with smaller increases after each bout. In contrast, PGC-1α protein was increased 24 h after the 1st bout (23%) and plateaued at +30–40% between the 3rd and 7th bout. Increases in PGC-1β mRNA and protein were more delayed and smaller, and did not persist. Distinct patterns of increases were observed in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and γ protein (1 session), PPAR β/δ mRNA and protein (5 sessions) and nuclear respiratory factor-2 protein (3 sessions) while no changes occurred in mitochondrial transcription factor A protein. Citrate synthase (CS) and β-HAD mRNA were rapidly increased (1 session), followed 2 sessions later (session 3) by increases in CS and β-HAD activities, and mitochondrial DNA. Changes in COX-IV mRNA (session 3) and protein (session 5) were more delayed. Training also increased mitochondrial fission proteins (fission protein-1, >2-fold; dynamin-related protein-1, 47%) and the fusion protein mitofusin-1 (35%) but not mitofusin-2. This study has provided the following novel information: (a) the training-induced increases in transcriptional and mitochondrial proteins appear to result from the cumulative effects of transient bursts in their mRNAs, (b) training-induced mitochondrial biogenesis appears to

  14. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Caifeng; Chen, Jinfeng; Chen, Nuoqi

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is implicated in liver cell proliferation. However, its role in hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of MALAT1 on hepatic lipid accumulation and its potential targets. As expected, MALAT1 expression is increased in hepatocytes exposed to palmitate and livers of ob/ob mice. Knockdown of MALAT1 expression dramatically suppressed palmitate-induced lipid accumulation and the increase of nuclear SREBP-1c protein in HepG2 cells. In addition, RNA immunoprecipitation and RNA pull-down assay confirmed that MALAT1 interacted with SREBP-1c to stabilize nuclear SREBP-1c protein. Finally, injection of si-MALAT1 prevented hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance in ob/ob mice. In conclusion, our observations suggest that MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability. PMID:26935028

  15. Global Analyses of Small Interfering RNAs from Sour Orange seedlings Infected with Different Citrus tristeza virus Genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA silencing is a sequence-specific regulatory mechanism in development and maintenance of genome integrity and functions in plant antiviral defense mechanisms. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are key mediators of RNA silencing. To study CTV-host interactions and disease expression, profiles of v...

  16. The efficiency of RNA interference for conferring stable resistance to Plum Pox Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plum transformed with an intron hairpin RNA CP (ihRNA-CP) were resistant to PPV infection through the specific process of RNA silencing involving both small interfering -RNA interfering (siRNA) and a methylated virus transgene. This recognition process specifically targeted the triggered PPV genome...

  17. Increased Litter Size and Suckling Intensity Stimulate mRNA of RFamide-related Peptide in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Noroozi, Atefeh; Jafarzadeh Shirazi, Mohammad Reza; Tamadon, Amin; Moghadam, Ali; Niazi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP-3) inhibits gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in rats. This study evaluates the effects of litter size and suckling intensity on RFRP mRNA expression in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) of rats. Materials and Methods A total of 32 pregnant and 4 non-lactating ovariectomized (control group) Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this experimental study. Lactating rats were allotted to 8 equal groups. In 3 groups, the litter size was adjusted to 5, 10, or 15 pups upon parturition. Dams were allowed to suckle their pups continuously until 8 days postpartum. In the other 3 groups, the litter size was adjusted to 5 pups following birth. These pups were separated from the dams for 6 hours on day 8 postpartum, after which the pups were allowed to suckle for 2.5, 5, or 7.5 minutes prior to killing the dams. In 2 groups, lactating rats with 10 and 15 pups were separated from their pups for 6 hours on day 8 postpartum. In these groups, the pups were allowed to suckle their dams for 5 minutes before the dams were killed. All rats were killed on day 8 postpartum and the DMH was removed from each rat. We evaluated RFRP mRNA expression using realtime polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results The expression of RFRP mRNA in the DMH increased with increased litter size and suckling intensity compared to the controls. The effect of suckling intensity on the expression of RFRP mRNA was more pronounced compared to the litter size. Conclusion Increased litter size and suckling intensity stimulated RFRP mRNA expression in the DMH which might contribute to lactation anestrus in rats. PMID:26644862

  18. Interfering with Gendered Development: A Timely Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaise, Mindy

    2014-01-01

    Instead of relying on colonial and Western developmental logic to understand and research gender, this paper proposes interfering as a strategy toward generating gender knowledges that are more inclusive to other-than-Western concepts and contexts. This paper shows how post-developmental perspectives interfere with psychological and biological…

  19. Increased expression of C5a receptor (CD88) mRNA in canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Hezmee, Mohd Noor Mohd; Kyaw-Tanner, Myat; Lee, Jia Yu Peppermint; Shiels, Ian A; Rolfe, Barbara; Woodruff, Trent; Mills, Paul C

    2011-01-01

    Mammary tumors are among the most common neoplastic conditions in dogs, and there is evidence that inflammation plays a role in the development of some tumor types in dogs. The complement system is a major participant in the inflammatory process and the complement activation component, C5a, is a potent inflammatory peptide. This study investigated the mRNA expression of the major receptor for C5a (C5aR; CD88) in histopathological samples of canine mammary tumors by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) using canine-specific primers for CD88. A total of seven canine mammary tumors (four malignant carcinomas, two benign mixed mammary tumors, and one myoepithelioma) and eight normal mammary glands were analysed. All the tumor samples expressed low levels of CD88 mRNA, while none of the normal mammary tissues showed any detectable expression. These preliminary results suggest that C5a-CD88 interaction may play a contributory role in the inflammatory response associated with mammary tumor development in dogs. Further studies investigating the mechanisms behind complement activation and C5a receptor expression in canine mammary tumors are warranted. PMID:20846729

  20. Isothermic and fixed-intensity heat acclimation methods elicit equal increases in Hsp72 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Gibson, O R; Mee, J A; Taylor, L; Tuttle, J A; Watt, P W; Maxwell, N S

    2015-06-01

    Thermotolerance, to which heat shock protein-72 (Hsp72) contributes, is an acquired state achieved following heat acclimation (HA), eliciting cellular adaption and protection against thermal stress. Optimal HA methods achieving the greatest heat shock response (HSR) are equivocal; therefore, investigation of methods provoking the greatest sustained HSR is required to optimize cellular adaptation. Twenty-four males performed short-term HA (STHA; five sessions) and long-term HA (LTHA; STHA plus further five sessions) utilizing fixed-intensity (FIXED; workload = 50% V ˙ O 2 p e a k ), continuous isothermic HA [ISOCONT ; target rectal temperature (Trec ) = 38.5 °C], or progressive isothermic HA (ISOPROG ; target Trec  = 38.5 °C for STHA then target Trec  = 39.0 °C for LTHA). Leukocyte Hsp72 mRNA was measured pre- and post day 1, day 5, and day 10 of HA via reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction to determine the HSR. Hsp72 mRNA increased (P < 0.05) pre- to post day 1, pre- to post day 5, and pre to post day 10 in FIXED, ISOCONT , and ISOPROG , but no differences were observed between methods (P > 0.05). The equal Hsp72 mRNA increases occurring from consistent, reduced, or increased endogenous strain following STHA and LTHA suggest that transcription occurs following attainment of sufficient endogenous criteria. These data give confidence that all reported HA methods increase Hsp72 mRNA and are capable of eliciting adaptations toward thermotolerance. PMID:25943677

  1. Acetylcholine receptor-inducing factor from chicken brain increases the level of mRNA encoding the receptor. alpha. subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.A.; Falls, D.L.; Dill-Devor, R.M.; Fischbach, G.D. )

    1988-03-01

    A 42-kDa glycoprotein isolated from chicken brain, referred to as acetylcholine receptor-inducing activity (ARIA), that stimulates the rate of incorporation of acetylcholine receptors into the surface of chicken myotubes may play a role in the nerve-induced accumulation of receptors at developing neuromuscular synapses. Using nuclease-protection assays, the authors have found that ARIA causes a 2- to 16-fold increase in the level of mRNA encoding the {alpha} subunit of the receptor, with little or no change in the levels of {gamma}- and {delta}-subunit messengers. ARIA also increases the amount of a putative nuclear precursor of {alpha}-subunit mRNA, consistent with an activation of gene transcription. These results suggest that the concentration of {alpha} subunit may limit the rate of biosynthesis of the acetylcholine receptors in chicken myotubes. They also indicate that neuronal factors can regulate the expression of receptor subunit genes in a selective manner. Tetrodotoxin, 8-bromo-cAMP, and forskolin also increase the amount of {alpha}-subunit mRNA, with little change in the amount of {gamma}- and {delta}-subunit mRNAs. Unlike ARIA, however, these agents have little effect on the concentration of the {alpha}-subunit nuclear precursor.

  2. Increase of microRNA-210, Decrease of Raptor Gene Expression and Alteration of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Regulated Proteins following Mithramycin Treatment of Human Erythroid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Nicoletta; Finotti, Alessia; Ferracin, Manuela; Lampronti, Ilaria; Zuccato, Cristina; Breveglieri, Giulia; Brognara, Eleonora; Fabbri, Enrica; Borgatti, Monica; Negrini, Massimo; Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Expression and regulation of microRNAs is an emerging issue in erythroid differentiation and globin gene expression in hemoglobin disorders. In the first part of this study microarray analysis was performed both in mithramycin-induced K562 cells and erythroid precursors from healthy subjects or β-thalassemia patients producing low or high levels of fetal hemoglobin. We demonstrated that: (a) microRNA-210 expression is higher in erythroid precursors from β-thalassemia patients with high production of fetal hemoglobin; (b) microRNA-210 increases as a consequence of mithramycin treatment of K562 cells and human erythroid progenitors both from healthy and β-thalassemia subjects; (c) this increase is associated with erythroid induction and elevated expression of γ-globin genes; (d) an anti-microRNA against microRNA-210 interferes with the mithramycin-induced changes of gene expression. In the second part of the study we have obtained convergent evidences suggesting raptor mRNA as a putative target of microRNA-210. Indeed, microRNA-210 binding sites of its 3’-UTR region were involved in expression and are targets of microRNA-210-mediated modulation in a luciferase reporter assays. Furthermore, (i) raptor mRNA and protein are down-regulated upon mithramycin-induction both in K562 cells and erythroid progenitors from healthy and β-thalassemia subjects. In addition, (ii) administration of anti-microRNA-210 to K562 cells decreased endogenous microRNA-210 and increased raptor mRNA and protein expression. Finally, (iii) treatment of K562 cells with premicroRNA-210 led to a decrease of raptor mRNA and protein. In conclusion, microRNA-210 and raptor are involved in mithramycin-mediated erythroid differentiation of K562 cells and participate to the fine-tuning and control of γ-globin gene expression in erythroid precursor cells. PMID:25849663

  3. siRNA-induced silencing of hypoxia-inducible factor 3α (HIF3α) increases endurance capacity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gavenauskas, B; Drevytska, T; Nosar, V; Nagibin, V; Mankovska, I; Dosenko, V

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms of adaptation to exercise despite a large number of studies remain unclear. One of the crucial factors in this process is hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) that regulates transcription of many target genes encoding proteins that are implicated in molecular adaptation to hypoxia. Experiments were conducted on 24 adult male Fisher rats. Real-time PCR analysis was performed for quantitative evaluation of Hif3α, Igf1, Glut-4 and Pdk-1 in m. gastrocnemius, m. soleus, in lung and heart tissues. Mitochondrial respiratory function and electron microscopy were performed. Knockdown of Hif3α using siRNA increases time of swimming to exhaustion by 1.5 times. Level of mitochondrial NAD- and FAD-dependent oxidative pathways is decreased, however efficiency of phosphorylation is increased after Hif3α siRNA treatment. Expression of HIF target genes in muscles was not changed significantly, except for increasing of Pdk-1 expression in m. soleus by 2.1 times. More prominent changes were estimated in lung and heart: Igf1 gene expression was increased by 32.5 and 37.5 times correspondingly. Glut4 gene expression in lungs was increased from undetected level till 0.3 rel. units and by 84.2 times in heart. Level of Pdk1 gene expression was increased by 249.2 in lungs and by 35.1 times in hearts, correspondingly. Some destructive changes in muscle tissue were detected in animals with siRNA-inducing silencing of Hif3α. PMID:27274101

  4. siRNA-induced silencing of hypoxia-inducible factor 3α (HIF3α) increases endurance capacity in rats.

    PubMed

    Drozdovska, S; Gavenauskas, B; Drevytska, T; Nosar, V; Nagibin, V; Mankovska, I; Dosenko, V

    2016-06-01

    Molecular mechanisms of adaptation to exercise despite a large number of studies remain unclear. One of the crucial factors in this process is hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) that regulates transcription of many target genes encoding proteins that are implicated in molecular adaptation to hypoxia. Experiments were conducted on 24 adult male Fisher rats. Real-time PCR analysis was performed for quantitative evaluation of Hif3α, Igf1, Glut-4 and Pdk-1 in m. gastrocnemius, m. soleus, in lung and heart tissues. Mitochondrial respiratory function and electron microscopy were performed. Knockdown of Hif3α using siRNA increases time of swimming to exhaustion by 1.5 times. Level of mitochondrial NAD- and FAD-dependent oxidative pathways is decreased, however efficiency of phosphorylation is increased after Hif3α siRNA treatment. Expression of HIF target genes in muscles was not changed significantly, except for increasing of Pdk-1 expression in m. soleus by 2.1 times. More prominent changes were estimated in lung and heart: Igf1 gene expression was increased by 32.5 and 37.5 times correspondingly. Glut4 gene expression in lungs was increased from undetected level till 0.3 rel. units and by 84.2 times in heart. Level of Pdk1 gene expression was increased by 249.2 in lungs and by 35.1 times in hearts, correspondingly. Some destructive changes in muscle tissue were detected in animals with siRNA-inducing silencing of Hif3α. PMID:27274101

  5. Multifunctional RNA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Our recent advancements in RNA nanotechnology introduced novel nanoscaffolds (nanorings); however, the potential of their use for biomedical applications was never fully revealed. As presented here, besides functionalization with multiple different short interfering RNAs for combinatorial RNA interference (e.g., against multiple HIV-1 genes), nanorings also allow simultaneous embedment of assorted RNA aptamers, fluorescent dyes, proteins, as well as recently developed RNA–DNA hybrids aimed to conditionally activate multiple split functionalities inside cells. PMID:25267559

  6. Increased brain radioactivity by intranasal 32P-labeled siRNA dendriplexes within in situ-forming mucoadhesive gels

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Ana Paula; Mundiña-Weilenmann, Cecilia; Romero, Eder Lilia; Morilla, Maria Jose

    2012-01-01

    Background Molecules taken up by olfactory and trigeminal nerve neurons directly access the brain by the nose-to-brain pathway. In situ-forming mucoadhesive gels would increase the residence time of intranasal material, favoring the nose-to-brain delivery. In this first approach, brain radioactivity after intranasal administration of 32P-small interference RNA (siRNA) complexed with poly(amidoamine) G7 dendrimers (siRNA dendriplexes) within in situ-forming mucoadhesive gels, was determined. Materials 32P-siRNA dendriplexes were incorporated into in situ-forming mucoadhesive gels prepared by blending thermosensitive poloxamer (23% w/w) with mucoadhesive chitosan (1% w/w, PxChi) or carbopol (0.25% w/w, PxBCP). Rheological properties, radiolabel release profile, and local toxicity in rat nasal mucosa were determined. The best-suited formulation was intranasally administered to rats, and blood absorption and brain distribution of radioactivity were measured. Results The gelation temperature of both formulations was 23°C. The PxChi liquid showed non-Newtonian pseudoplastic behavior of high consistency and difficult manipulation, and the gel retained 100% of radiolabel after 150 minutes. The PxCBP liquid showed a Newtonian behavior of low viscosity and easy manipulation, while in the gel phase showed apparent viscosity similar to that of the mucus but higher than that of aqueous solution. The gel released 35% of radiolabel and the released material showed silencing activity in vitro. Three intranasal doses of dendriplexes in PxCBP gel did not damage the rat nasal mucosa. A combination of 32P-siRNA complexation with dendrimers, incorporation of the dendriplexes into PxCBP gel, and administration of two intranasal doses was necessary to achieve higher brain radioactivity than that achieved by intravenous dendriplexes or intranasal naked siRNA. Conclusion The increased radioactivity within the olfactory bulb suggested that the combination above mentioned favored the

  7. In situ hybridization of nucleus basalis neurons shows increased. beta. -amyloid mRNA in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.L.; Golde, T.E.; Usiak, M.F.; Younkin, L.H.; Younkin, S.G.

    1988-02-01

    To determine which cells within the brain produce ..beta..-amyloid mRNA and to assess expression of the ..beta..-amyloid gene in Alzheimer disease, the authors analyzed brain tissue from Alzheimer and control patients by in situ hybridization. The results demonstrate that ..beta..-amyloid mRNA is produced by neurons in the nucleus basalis of Meynert and cerebral cortex and that nuclues basalis perikarya from Alzheimer patients consistently hybridize more ..beta..-amyloid probe than those from controls. These observations support the hypothesis that increased expression of the ..beta..-amyloid gene plays an important role in the deposition of amyloid in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease.

  8. [Increased efficiency of recombinant proteins production in plants due to optimized translation of RNA of viral vector].

    PubMed

    Mardanova, E S; Kotliarov, R Iu; Ravin, N V

    2009-01-01

    One of the most efficient methods for fast and efficient production of the target proteins in plants is based on the use of self-replicating recombinant viral vectors. We constructed phytoviral vector based on the genome of potato X virus containing the sequence of 5'-untranslated region of RNA 4 of alfalfa mosaic virus immediately upstream of the target gene. We demonstrated that incorporation of this sequence into the viral vector results in 3-4 fold elevation of the level of production of the target protein in plant due to increased efficiency of translation of viral subgenomic RNA comprising the target gene. The new vector may be used for production of recombinant proteins in plants. PMID:19548543

  9. Evaluation of short-interfering RNAs treatment in experimental rabies due to wild-type virus.

    PubMed

    Appolinario, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Fonseca, Clovis Reynaldo; Vicente, Acacia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo Azevedo de Paula; Pantoja, José Carlos Figueiredo; Megid, Jane

    2015-01-01

    We have evaluated the efficacy of short-interfering RNAs targeting the nucleoprotein gene and also the brain immune response in treated and non-treated infected mice. Mice were inoculated with wild-type virus, classified as dog (hv2) or vampire bat (hv3) variants and both groups were treated or left as controls. No difference was observed in the lethality rate between treated and non-treated groups, although clinical evaluation of hv2 infected mice showed differences in the severity of clinical disease (p=0.0006). Evaluation of brain immune response 5 days post-inoculation in treated hv2 group showed no difference among the analyzed genes, whereas after 10 days post-inoculation there was increased expression of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 12, interferon gamma, and C-X-C motif chemokine 10 associated with higher expression of N gene in the same period (p<0.0001). In hv2 non-treated group only higher interferon beta expression was found at day 5. The observed differences in results of the immune response genes between treated and non-treated groups is not promising as they had neither impact on mortality nor even a reduction in the expression of N gene in siRNA treated animals. This finding suggests that the use of pre-designed siRNA alone may not be useful in rabies treatment. PMID:26254692

  10. Dimeric tRNA gene arrangement in Schizosaccharomyces pombe allows increased expression of the downstream gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hottinger-Werlen, A; Schaack, J; Lapointe, J; Mao, J; Nichols, M; Söll, D

    1985-01-01

    Three Schizosaccharomyces pombe dimeric tRNA genes, consisting of a tRNASer gene encoding a minor species with an intervening sequence followed by a tRNAMeti gene, have been described [Mao et al. (1980) Cell 21, 509-516; Hottinger et al. (1982) Mol. Gen. Genet. 188, 219-224; Willis et al. (1984) EMBO J. 3, 1573-1580]. We have examined the reason for the dimeric structure by comparing the transcriptional efficiencies and competitive abilities of the genes subcloned from the dimeric arrangement. Both of the subcloned genes are active in vivo in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but only the tRNASer gene is efficiently transcribed in vitro. The tRNASer gene competes efficiently for transcription factors, while the tRNAMeti gene does so only weakly. Thus, it appears that the dimeric arrangement is required to support expression of the tRNAMeti gene. S. pombe genes encoding major species of tRNASer are transcribed considerably less efficiently than are the minor genes from the dimers, so coupling of the tRNAMeti gene to the minor species genes should lead to efficient production of tRNAMeti. Images PMID:3936021

  11. Slow-growing cells within isogenic populations have increased RNA polymerase error rates and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, David; Dhar, Riddhiman; Missarova, Alsu M; Espinar, Lorena; Blevins, William R; Lehner, Ben; Carey, Lucas B

    2015-01-01

    Isogenic cells show a large degree of variability in growth rate, even when cultured in the same environment. Such cell-to-cell variability in growth can alter sensitivity to antibiotics, chemotherapy and environmental stress. To characterize transcriptional differences associated with this variability, we have developed a method--FitFlow--that enables the sorting of subpopulations by growth rate. The slow-growing subpopulation shows a transcriptional stress response, but, more surprisingly, these cells have reduced RNA polymerase fidelity and exhibit a DNA damage response. As DNA damage is often caused by oxidative stress, we test the addition of an antioxidant, and find that it reduces the size of the slow-growing population. More generally, we find a significantly altered transcriptome in the slow-growing subpopulation that only partially resembles that of cells growing slowly due to environmental and culture conditions. Slow-growing cells upregulate transposons and express more chromosomal, viral and plasmid-borne transcripts, and thus explore a larger genotypic--and so phenotypic--space. PMID:26268986

  12. Slow-growing cells within isogenic populations have increased RNA polymerase error rates and DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, David; Dhar, Riddhiman; Missarova, Alsu M.; Espinar, Lorena; Blevins, William R.; Lehner, Ben; Carey, Lucas B.

    2015-01-01

    Isogenic cells show a large degree of variability in growth rate, even when cultured in the same environment. Such cell-to-cell variability in growth can alter sensitivity to antibiotics, chemotherapy and environmental stress. To characterize transcriptional differences associated with this variability, we have developed a method—FitFlow—that enables the sorting of subpopulations by growth rate. The slow-growing subpopulation shows a transcriptional stress response, but, more surprisingly, these cells have reduced RNA polymerase fidelity and exhibit a DNA damage response. As DNA damage is often caused by oxidative stress, we test the addition of an antioxidant, and find that it reduces the size of the slow-growing population. More generally, we find a significantly altered transcriptome in the slow-growing subpopulation that only partially resembles that of cells growing slowly due to environmental and culture conditions. Slow-growing cells upregulate transposons and express more chromosomal, viral and plasmid-borne transcripts, and thus explore a larger genotypic—and so phenotypic — space. PMID:26268986

  13. The RNA Polymerase II CTD: The Increasing Complexity of a Low-Complexity Protein Domain.

    PubMed

    Jeronimo, Célia; Collin, Pierre; Robert, François

    2016-06-19

    The largest subunit of RNA polymerase II contains a C-terminal domain (CTD) that plays key roles in coordinating transcription with co-transcriptional events. The heptapeptide repeats that form the CTD are dynamically phosphorylated on serine, tyrosine and threonine residues during the various steps of transcription, thereby regulating the recruitment of various proteins involved in gene expression. In this "Perspective," we review the recent literature related to the function of the CTD, to CTD kinases (Kin28, CDK7, CDK9, CDK12, ERK1/2 and DYRK1A) and to CTD phosphatases (Rtr1, RPAP2, Ssu72, Fcp1 and Gcl7). We discuss unresolved and controversial issues and try to provide constructive suggestions. This review also highlights emerging themes in the CTD field, such as crosstalk and feedback mechanisms, as well as gene-specific and tissue-specific functions of the CTD. Finally, promising therapeutic avenues for a recently developed CTD kinase inhibitor are discussed. PMID:26876604

  14. Stochastic and nonstochastic post-transcriptional silencing of chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase genes involves increased RNA turnover-possible role for ribosome-independent RNA degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Holtorf, H; Schöb, H; Kunz, C; Waldvogel, R; Meins, F

    1999-01-01

    Stochastic and nonstochastic post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) in Nicotiana sylvestris plants carrying tobacco class I chitinase (CHN) and beta-1,3-glucanase transgenes differs in incidence, stability, and pattern of expression. Measurements with inhibitors of RNA synthesis (cordycepin, actinomycin D, and alpha-amanitin) showed that both forms of PTGS are associated with increased sequence-specific degradation of transcripts, suggesting that increased RNA turnover may be a general feature of PTGS. The protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide and verrucarin A did not inhibit degradation of CHN RNA targeted for PTGS, confirming that PTGS-related RNA degradation does not depend on ongoing protein synthesis. Because verrucarin A, unlike cycloheximide, dissociates mRNA from ribosomes, our results also suggest that ribosome-associated RNA degradation pathways may not be involved in CHN PTGS. PMID:10072405

  15. Is the Efficiency of RNA Silencing Evolutionarily Regulated?

    PubMed Central

    Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2016-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression in a sequence-specific manner. Genes with partial complementarity to siRNA/miRNA sequences in their 3′-untranslated regions (UTRs) are suppressed by a mechanism referred to as the siRNA off-target effect or miRNA-mediated RNA silencing. However, the determinants of such RNA silencing efficiency are poorly understood. Previously, I and co-workers reported that the efficiency of RNA silencing is strongly correlated with the thermodynamic stability of base pairing in the duplex formed within an siRNA/miRNA and between the seed region and its target mRNA. In this review, I first summarize our previous studies that identified the thermodynamic parameter to estimate the silencing efficiency using the calculated base pairing stability: siRNAs downregulate the expression of off-target genes depending on the stability of binding between the siRNA seed region (nucleotides 2–8) and off-target mRNAs, and miRNAs downregulate target mRNA expression depending on the stability of the duplex formed between the 5′ terminus of the miRNA and its target mRNA. I further discuss the possibility that such thermodynamic features of silencing efficiency may have arisen during evolution with increasing body temperature in various organisms. PMID:27187367

  16. Is the Efficiency of RNA Silencing Evolutionarily Regulated?

    PubMed

    Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2016-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression in a sequence-specific manner. Genes with partial complementarity to siRNA/miRNA sequences in their 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs) are suppressed by a mechanism referred to as the siRNA off-target effect or miRNA-mediated RNA silencing. However, the determinants of such RNA silencing efficiency are poorly understood. Previously, I and co-workers reported that the efficiency of RNA silencing is strongly correlated with the thermodynamic stability of base pairing in the duplex formed within an siRNA/miRNA and between the seed region and its target mRNA. In this review, I first summarize our previous studies that identified the thermodynamic parameter to estimate the silencing efficiency using the calculated base pairing stability: siRNAs downregulate the expression of off-target genes depending on the stability of binding between the siRNA seed region (nucleotides 2-8) and off-target mRNAs, and miRNAs downregulate target mRNA expression depending on the stability of the duplex formed between the 5' terminus of the miRNA and its target mRNA. I further discuss the possibility that such thermodynamic features of silencing efficiency may have arisen during evolution with increasing body temperature in various organisms. PMID:27187367

  17. Advances in Systemic siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Qixin; Woodle, Martin C; Lu, Patrick Y; Mixson, A James

    2009-01-01

    Sequence-specific gene silencing with small interfering RNA (siRNA) has transformed basic science research, and the efficacy of siRNA therapeutics toward a variety of diseases is now being evaluated in pre-clinical and clinical trials. Despite its potential value, the highly negatively charged siRNA has the classic delivery problem of requiring transport across cell membranes to the cytosol. Consequently, carrier development for siRNA delivery is one of the most important problems to solve before siRNA can achieve widespread clinical use. An assortment of non-viral carriers including liposomes, peptides, polymers, and aptamers are being evaluated for their ability to shepherd siRNA to the target tissue and cross the plasma membrane barrier into the cell. Several promising carriers with low toxicity and increased specificity for disease targets have emerged for siRNA-based therapeutics. This review will discuss non-viral approaches for siRNA therapeutics, with particular focus on synthetic carriers for in vivo systemic delivery of siRNA. PMID:20161621

  18. Recent advances in plant-virus interaction with emphasis on small interfering RNAs (siRNAs).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Namisha; Sahu, Pranav Pankaj; Puranik, Swati; Prasad, Manoj

    2013-09-01

    Regulation of several biological functions in plants has now been known to involve diverse RNA silencing pathways. These vital pathways involve various components such as dsRNA, Dicer, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and Argonaute proteins, which lead to the production of several small RNAs (sRNAs) varying in their sizes. These sRNAs have significant role in the regulation of gene expression at transcriptional and translational levels. Among them, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs; majorly 21, 22 and 24 nt) have been shown to play an important role in plants' resistance against many viruses by inhibiting the viral gene expression. Furthermore, it has also been highlighted that siRNA-mediated methylation of viral DNA confers resistance to various plant DNA viruses. In this review, we have outlined the recent advances made using the siRNA-mediated antiviral strategy, along with methylation-based epigenetic defensive mechanisms as a protective measure against diverse plant viruses. PMID:23086491

  19. Miconia sp. Increases mRNA Levels of PPAR Gamma and Inhibits Alpha Amylase and Alpha Glucosidase

    PubMed Central

    Ortíz-Martinez, David Mizael; Rivas-Morales, Catalina; de la Garza-Ramos, Myriam Angelica; Verde-Star, Maria Julia; Nuñez-Gonzalez, Maria Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a public health problem worldwide. For this reason, ethanolic extract of Miconia sp. from Oaxaca, Mexico, was selected in search of an alternative against this disease. The effect of Miconia sp. on mRNA expression of PPARγ on cell line 3T3-L1, its effect on alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase, lipid accumulation during adipogenesis, and cell viability on VERO cells were evaluated. The mRNA levels of PPARγ increased on 1.393 ± 0.008 folds, lipid accumulation was increased by 29.55% with Miconia sp. extract and 34.57% with rosiglitazone, and α-amylase and α-glycosidase were inhibited with IC50 values from 28.23 ± 2.15 μg/mL and 1.95 ± 0.15 μg/mL, respectively; the IC50 on antiproliferative activity on VERO cells was 314.54 ± 45.40 μg/mL. In case of α-amylase and α-glycosidase assays, IC50 (inhibitory concentration 50) refers to necessary extract amounts to inhibit 50% of enzymatic activity. On the other hand, on antiproliferative activity, IC50 (inhibitory concentration 50) refers to necessary extract amounts to inhibit 50% of cell proliferation. It was concluded that the compounds present in Miconia sp. ethanolic extract increase mRNA expression of PPARγ, inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase, and increase lipid accumulation. It constitutes an alternative as adjuvant in diabetes mellitus treatment; therefore, we recommend continuing identifying the compounds responsible for its promising in vivo antidiabetic activity. PMID:27478477

  20. Miconia sp. Increases mRNA Levels of PPAR Gamma and Inhibits Alpha Amylase and Alpha Glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Ortíz-Martinez, David Mizael; Rivas-Morales, Catalina; de la Garza-Ramos, Myriam Angelica; Verde-Star, Maria Julia; Nuñez-Gonzalez, Maria Adriana; Leos-Rivas, Catalina

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a public health problem worldwide. For this reason, ethanolic extract of Miconia sp. from Oaxaca, Mexico, was selected in search of an alternative against this disease. The effect of Miconia sp. on mRNA expression of PPARγ on cell line 3T3-L1, its effect on alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase, lipid accumulation during adipogenesis, and cell viability on VERO cells were evaluated. The mRNA levels of PPARγ increased on 1.393 ± 0.008 folds, lipid accumulation was increased by 29.55% with Miconia sp. extract and 34.57% with rosiglitazone, and α-amylase and α-glycosidase were inhibited with IC50 values from 28.23 ± 2.15 μg/mL and 1.95 ± 0.15 μg/mL, respectively; the IC50 on antiproliferative activity on VERO cells was 314.54 ± 45.40 μg/mL. In case of α-amylase and α-glycosidase assays, IC50 (inhibitory concentration 50) refers to necessary extract amounts to inhibit 50% of enzymatic activity. On the other hand, on antiproliferative activity, IC50 (inhibitory concentration 50) refers to necessary extract amounts to inhibit 50% of cell proliferation. It was concluded that the compounds present in Miconia sp. ethanolic extract increase mRNA expression of PPARγ, inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase, and increase lipid accumulation. It constitutes an alternative as adjuvant in diabetes mellitus treatment; therefore, we recommend continuing identifying the compounds responsible for its promising in vivo antidiabetic activity. PMID:27478477

  1. Does acute, intense stimulation of oxytocin neurones in the supraoptic nucleus increase their content of oxytocin mRNA?

    PubMed

    Sumner, B E; Kawata, M; Russell, J A

    1989-06-12

    We investigated whether a sustained increase in oxytocin secretion, with or without enhanced electrical activity of the cell-bodies of oxytocin neurones, leads to a rapid increase in oxytocin mRNA content in these neurones. To stimulate oxytocin release, naloxone (2.5 mg/kg i.v. twice, 30 min apart) was given to urethane-anaesthetized female rats after intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) morphine or vehicle infusion for 5 days; in the latter, naloxone acts on the neurohypophysis to increase oxytocin release without affecting the electrical activity of oxytocin neurone cell-bodies, but in the former, naloxone acts both on the neucohypophysis and on the cell-bodies to excite them electrically. Oxytocin content in peripheral plasma was measured intermittently by radioimmunoassay for 4 h after i.v. naloxone or vehicle, then the brain was removed and cryostat sections were cut through the supraoptic nucleus (SON). Oxytocin mRNA content in individual neurones (25-50 per rat) was measured semiquantitatively by in situ hybridisation histochemistry, using a tritiated synthetic cDNA 25-mer oligonucleotide probe, autoradiographical visualisation, and computer-assisted image-analysis to measure silver grain density. Nalaxone increased oxytocin content in plasma 7-fold for at least 40 min in i.c.v. vehicle-infused rats, and 40-fold for at least 40 min in i.c.v. morphine-infused rats. Naloxone had no significant effect on the oxytocin mRNA content in labelled cells in the SON, and no effect on the proportion of labelled cells, in either the i.c.v. morphine- or i.c.v. vehicle-infused rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2743158

  2. Transforming growth factor beta mRNA increases during liver regeneration: a possible paracrine mechanism of growth regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, L; Mead, J E; Panzica, M; Mikumo, R; Bell, G I; Fausto, N

    1988-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a growth factor with multiple biological properties including stimulation and inhibition of cell proliferation. To determine whether TGF-beta is involved in hepatocyte growth responses in vivo, we measured the levels of TGF-beta mRNA in normal liver and during liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in rats. TGF-beta mRNA increases in the regenerating liver and reaches a peak (about 8 times higher than basal levels) after the major wave of hepatocyte cell division and mitosis have taken place and after the peak expression of the ras protooncogenes. Although hepatocytes from normal and regenerating liver respond to TGF-beta, they do not synthesize TGF-beta mRNA. Instead, the message is present in liver nonparenchymal cells and is particularly abundant in cell fractions enriched for endothelial cells. TGF-beta inhibits epidermal growth factor-induced DNA synthesis in vitro in hepatocytes from normal or regenerating liver, although the dose-response curves vary according to the culture medium used. We conclude that TGF-beta may function as the effector of an inhibitory paracrine loop that is activated during liver regeneration, perhaps to prevent uncontrolled hepatocyte proliferation. Images PMID:3422749

  3. RNA therapeutics targeting osteoclast-mediated excessive bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuwei; Grainger, David W

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a sequence-specific post-transcriptional gene silencing technique developed with dramatically increasing utility for both scientific and therapeutic purposes. Short interfering RNA (siRNA) is currently exploited to regulate protein expression relevant to many therapeutic applications, and commonly used as a tool for elucidating disease-associated genes. Osteoporosis and their associated osteoporotic fragility fractures in both men and women are rapidly becoming a global healthcare crisis as average life expectancy increases worldwide. New therapeutics are needed for this increasing patient population. This review describes the diversity of molecular targets suitable for RNAi-based gene knock-down in osteoclasts to control osteoclast-mediated excessive bone resorption. We identify strategies for developing targeted siRNA delivery and efficient gene silencing, and describe opportunities and challenges of introducing siRNA as a therapeutic approach to hard and connective tissue disorders. PMID:21945356

  4. Increased microRNA-155 and decreased microRNA-146a may promote ocular inflammation and proliferation in Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Kaijun; Du, Yi; Jiang, Ben-Li; He, Jian-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy is an inflammatory autoimmune disease of the orbit, characterized by inflammation and proliferation of the orbital tissue caused by CD4+T cells and orbital fibroblasts. Despite recent substantial findings regarding its cellular and molecular foundations, the pathogenesis of Graves' ophthalmopathy remains unclear. Accumulating data suggest that microRNAs play important roles in the pathophysiology of autoimmunity and proliferation. Specifically, microRNA-155 (miR-155) can promote autoimmune inflammation by enhancing inflammatory T cell development. In contrast to miR-155, microRNA-146a (miR-146a) can inhibit the immune response by suppressing T cell activation. Furthermore, miR-155 and miR-146a are involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and many other life processes. Thus, miR-155 and miR-146a, with opposite impacts on inflammatory responses carried out by T lymphocytes, appear to have multiple targets in the pathogenesis of Graves' ophthalmopathy. Our previous work showed that the expression of miR-146a was significantly decreased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Graves' ophthalmopathy patients compared with normal subjects. Accordingly, we proposed that the expression of miR-155 increased and the expression of miR-146a decreased in the target cells (CD4+T cells and orbital fibroblasts), thus promoting ocular inflammation and proliferation in Graves' ophthalmopathy. The proposed hypothesis warrants further investigation of the function of the differentially expressed microRNAs, which may shed new light on the pathogenesis of Graves' ophthalmopathy and lead to new strategies for its management. PMID:24743332

  5. Translocation and encapsulation of siRNA inside carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogurampelly, Santosh; Maiti, Prabal K.

    2013-01-01

    We report spontaneous translocation of small interfering RNA (siRNA) inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of various diameters and chirality using all atom molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent. We use umbrella sampling method to calculate the free energy landscape of the siRNA entry and translocation event. Free energy profiles show that siRNA gains free energy while translocating inside CNT, and barrier for siRNA exit from CNT ranges from 40 to 110 kcal/mol depending on CNT chirality and salt concentration. The translocation time τ decreases with the increase of CNT diameter with a critical diameter of 24 Å for the translocation. In contrast, double strand DNA of the same sequence does not translocate inside CNT due to large free energy barrier for the translocation. This study helps in understanding the nucleic acid transport through nanopores at microscopic level and may help designing carbon nanotube based sensor for siRNA.

  6. Trimetazidine protects against hypoxia-reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis by increasing microRNA-21 expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiong; Yang, Kan; Li, An-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial tissue injury caused by ischemia and hypoxia is a major cause of fatal diseases, including coronary atherosclerosis resulting from myocardial infarction and stroke. Trimetazidine (TMZ), as an anti-ischemic and antioxidant agent, has been demonstrated to preventing ischemia/reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. However, the anti-apoptosis mechanism of TMZ has not been fully elucidated. The present study demonstrated that miR-21 involved trimetazidine-induced anti-apoptosis during H/R injury in H9C2 cell. In this study, TMZ increased miR-21 expression which further upregulated the Akt signaling activity via suppressing the expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in H/R H9C2 cell. The increased activity of Akt signaling decreased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and the expression of caspase-3 and inhibited H/R induced apoptosis. In conclusion, this study revealed the mechanism that TMZ up-regulated miR-21 expression, then miR-21 targeted PTEN increasing the PI3K pathway and finally the activation of this pathway counteracted the apoptotic effect of hypoxia/reperfusion. PMID:26097555

  7. Trimetazidine protects against hypoxia-reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis by increasing microRNA-21 expression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiong; Yang, Kan; Li, An-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial tissue injury caused by ischemia and hypoxia is a major cause of fatal diseases, including coronary atherosclerosis resulting from myocardial infarction and stroke. Trimetazidine (TMZ), as an anti-ischemic and antioxidant agent, has been demonstrated to preventing ischemia/reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. However, the anti-apoptosis mechanism of TMZ has not been fully elucidated. The present study demonstrated that miR-21 involved trimetazidine-induced anti-apoptosis during H/R injury in H9C2 cell. In this study, TMZ increased miR-21 expression which further upregulated the Akt signaling activity via suppressing the expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in H/R H9C2 cell. The increased activity of Akt signaling decreased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and the expression of caspase-3 and inhibited H/R induced apoptosis. In conclusion, this study revealed the mechanism that TMZ up-regulated miR-21 expression, then miR-21 targeted PTEN increasing the PI3K pathway and finally the activation of this pathway counteracted the apoptotic effect of hypoxia/reperfusion. PMID:26097555

  8. Hypothalamic Npy mRNA is correlated with increased wheel running and decreased body fat in calorie-restricted rats.

    PubMed

    Ruegsegger, Gregory N; Speichinger, Katherine R; Manier, Jacob B; Younger, Kyle M; Childs, Thomas E; Booth, Frank W

    2016-04-01

    The neuro-molecular mechanisms that regulate the relationship between physical activity level, energy homeostasis regulation, and body fat are unclear. Thus, we aimed to investigate the relationship between mRNAs in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) related to energy homeostasis, wheel running distance, and body fat in ad lib (AL) and calorie-restricted (CR) growing rats. We hypothesized that changes in select mRNAs (Pomc, Cart, Agrp, Npy, Lepr, Insr, Mc4r, Ampk, Sirt1, Sirt3) in CR would be associated with decreases in body fat percentage and increased wheel running behavior. Male Wistar rats were given access to voluntary running wheels at 4 weeks of age and randomized into AL (n=8) and CR (70% of AL; n=7) groups at 5 weeks of age until study termination at 12 weeks of age. Body composition, serum leptin, insulin, and adiponectin, and ARC mRNA expression in AL and CR rats were assessed and correlated with week-12 running distance to examine potential relationships that may exist. By 12 weeks of age, wheel running was increased ∼3.3-fold (p=0.03) while body fat percentage was ∼2-fold lower in CR compared to AL (p=0.001). Compared to AL, ARC Npy mRNA expression was ∼2-fold greater in CR (p=0.02), while Lepr, Insr, Ampk, and Sirt1 mRNA were additionally increased in CR (p<0.05). Significant correlations existed between ARC Npy mRNA levels versus week-12 wheel running distance (r=0.81, p=0.03), body fat (r=-0.93, p<0.01), and between body fat and wheel running (r=-0.83, p=0.02) in CR, but not in AL. These results reveal possible mechanisms by which fat-brain crosstalk may influence physical activity during energy deficit. These data suggest that below a 'threshold' fat content, body fat may drive activity levels, potentially through hypothalamic Npy action. PMID:26921453

  9. Increased expression of circulating miRNA-93 in women with polycystic ovary syndrome may represent a novel, non-invasive biomarker for diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Sathyapalan, T.; David, R.; Gooderham, N. J.; Atkin, S. L.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are a novel class of small noncoding single-stranded RNA molecules that regulate gene expression. There is increasing evidence of their importance in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The objective was to determine if miRNA-93 and miRNA-223 are differentially expressed in the circulation of women with PCOS compared to age matched women. A case–control study comparing women with PCOS (n = 25) to age and weight matched controls (n = 24) without PCOS was performed. MiRNA-93 and miRNA-223 were determined by total RNA reverse transcription. Both miRNA-93 and miRNA-223 were significantly increased relative to the control group (p < 0.01, p = 0.029 respectively). In both groups there was no correlation of either miRNA-93 or miRNA-223 with insulin, HOMA-IR, HOMA-β or testosterone levels. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve for miR-223 and miR-93 was 0.66 and 0.72 respectively, suggesting miR-93 is a more efficient biomarker than miR-223 for diagnosis of PCOS. The combination of the two miRNAs together, tested using multiple logistic regression analysis, did not improve the diagnostic potential. In conclusion, circulating miRNA-93 and miRNA-223 were higher in women with PCOS compared to age and weight matched controls independent of insulin resistance and testosterone levels, and miR-93 may represent a novel diagnostic biomarker for PCOS. PMID:26582398

  10. Increased expression of circulating miRNA-93 in women with polycystic ovary syndrome may represent a novel, non-invasive biomarker for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sathyapalan, T; David, R; Gooderham, N J; Atkin, S L

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are a novel class of small noncoding single-stranded RNA molecules that regulate gene expression. There is increasing evidence of their importance in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The objective was to determine if miRNA-93 and miRNA-223 are differentially expressed in the circulation of women with PCOS compared to age matched women. A case-control study comparing women with PCOS (n = 25) to age and weight matched controls (n = 24) without PCOS was performed. MiRNA-93 and miRNA-223 were determined by total RNA reverse transcription. Both miRNA-93 and miRNA-223 were significantly increased relative to the control group (p < 0.01, p = 0.029 respectively). In both groups there was no correlation of either miRNA-93 or miRNA-223 with insulin, HOMA-IR, HOMA-β or testosterone levels. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve for miR-223 and miR-93 was 0.66 and 0.72 respectively, suggesting miR-93 is a more efficient biomarker than miR-223 for diagnosis of PCOS. The combination of the two miRNAs together, tested using multiple logistic regression analysis, did not improve the diagnostic potential. In conclusion, circulating miRNA-93 and miRNA-223 were higher in women with PCOS compared to age and weight matched controls independent of insulin resistance and testosterone levels, and miR-93 may represent a novel diagnostic biomarker for PCOS. PMID:26582398

  11. Increasing hepatitis C virus RNA levels in hemophiliacs: relationship to human immunodeficiency virus infection and liver disease. Multicenter Hemophilia Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Eyster, M E; Fried, M W; Di Bisceglie, A M; Goedert, J J

    1994-08-15

    We have previously observed an increased frequency of liver failure in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected hemophiliacs. The purpose of this study was to quantitate hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels in serial samples from HIV-seropositive (HIV+) and HIV-seronegative (HIV-) hemophiliacs before and after HIV seroconversion, and to examine the relationship of HCV RNA levels to CD4 cell counts and to hepatic dysfunction over time. HCV RNA levels were measured on serial samples of serum stored frozen from 17 HCV+/HIV+ and 17 HCV+/HIV- subjects matched within 5 years of their birth dates. All were HCV+ before study entry. HCV RNA levels were quantitated by a branched DNA-enhanced label amplification (bDNA) assay. For samples less than the cut off, HCV RNA was measured by the nested polymerase chain reaction. Individual changes over time, clinical groups, and mean values within predetermined time windows were compared with Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Mean HCV RNA levels increased from 2.76 (standard error [SE] 1.33) x 10(5) to 2.84 (SE 1.39) x 10(6) eq/mL during the first 2 years after HIV seroconversion (P = .006). Baseline HCV RNA levels in the pre-HIV seroconversion group were not significantly different from the baseline levels in those who remained HIV (P = .79). Over the entire period of study, HCV RNA levels increased nearly threefold in those who remained HIV- (mean 9.47 [SE 4.78] x 10(5) to 2.81 [SE 1.13] x 10(6)/mL; P = .02). Among those who became HIV+, HCV RNA levels increased 58-fold (mean 2.85 [SE 1.26] x 10(5) to 1.66 [SE 0.57] x 10(7) eq/mL; P = .0001). The rate of increase in HCV RNA levels was eightfold faster for HIV+ subjects than for subjects who remained HIV- (P = .009). HCV RNA levels increased twofold higher in 5 subjects who developed liver failure compared with the 12 who did not (P = .43). HCV RNA levels correlated significantly with CD4 counts (R = -.33, P = .01) and serum aspartate aminotransferase levels (AST) (R = .36, P = .007). We

  12. Enterostatin decreases postprandial pancreatic UCP2 mRNA levels and increases plasma insulin and amylin.

    PubMed

    Arsenijevic, Denis; Gallmann, Eva; Moses, William; Lutz, Thomas; Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte; Langhans, Wolfgang

    2005-07-01

    This study investigated the chronic effect of enterostatin on body weight and some of the associated changes in postprandial metabolism. Rats were adapted to 6 h of food access/day and a choice of low-fat and high-fat (HF) food and then given enterostatin or vehicle by an intraperitoneally implanted minipump delivering 160 nmol enterostatin/h continuously over a 5-day infusion period. Enterostatin resulted in a slight but significant reduction of HF intake and body weight. After the last 6-h food access period, enterostatin-treated animals had lower plasma triglyceride and free fatty acid but higher plasma glucose and lactate levels than control animals. Enterostatin infusion resulted in increased uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) expression in various tissues, including epididymal fat and liver. UCP2 was reduced in the pancreas of enterostatin-treated animals, and this was associated with increased plasma levels of insulin and amylin. Whether these two hormones are involved in the observed decreased food intake due to enterostatin remains to be determined. As lipid metabolism appeared to be altered by enterostatin, we measured peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) expression in tissues and observed that PPARalpha, -beta, -gamma1, and -gamma2 expression were modified by enterostatin in epididymal fat, pancreas, and liver. This further links altered lipid metabolism with body weight loss. Our data suggest that alterations in UCP2 and PPARgamma2 play a role in the control of insulin and amylin release from the pancreas. This implies that enterostatin changes lipid and carbohydrate metabolic pathways in addition to its effects on food intake and energy expenditure. PMID:15713687

  13. The vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tract is unusually long and increases during stimulation of vasopressin gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Carrazana, E J; Pasieka, K B; Majzoub, J A

    1988-01-01

    We developed a method, termed an H-blot, by which the poly(A) tract of any specific mRNA may be detected by RNA filter hybridization after its removal from the body of the mRNA by a RNase H-catalyzed endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region. Using this method, we studied the modulation of the length of the poly(A) tract of rat vasopressin mRNA in vivo during changes in the levels of this mRNA resulting from a physiologic stimulus, osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract of hypothalamic vasopressin mRNA in hydrated rats was, quite remarkably, approximately 250 nucleotides in length, in contrast to that of somatostatin mRNA, which was approximately 30 nucleotides long. Vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tail length increased progressively from approximately 250 to approximately 400 nucleotides with the application of the hyperosmotic stimulus and declined to base line after its removal; somatostatin mRNA poly(A) tail length did not change during osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract length of total hypothalamic mRNA was between 35 and 140 nucleotides and also did not change with osmotic stress. Modulation of poly(A) tract length of specific mRNAs during stimulation of gene expression may provide an additional level of genetic regulation. Images PMID:2841576

  14. The vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tract is unusually long and increases during stimulation of vasopressin gene expression in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Carrazana, E.J.; Pasieka, K.B.; Majzoub, J.A.

    1988-06-01

    The authors developed a method, termed an H-blot, by which the poly(A) tract of any specific mRNA may be detected by RNA filter hybridization after its removal from the body of the mRNA by a RNase H-catalyzed endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region. Using this method, they studied the modulation of the length of the poly(A) tract of rat vasopressin mRNA in vivo during changes in the levels of this mRNA resulting from a physiologic stimulus, osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract of hypothalamic vasopressin mRNA in hydrated rats was, quite remarkably, --250 nucleotides in length, in contrast to that of somatostatin mRNA, which was --30 nucleotides long. Vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tail length increased progressively from --250 to --400 nucleotides with the application of the hyperosmotic stimulus and declined to base line after its removal; somatostatin mRNA poly(A) tail length did not change during osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract length of total hypothalamic mRNA was between 35 and 140 nucleotides and also did not change with osmotic stress. Modulation of poly(A) tract length of specific mRNAs during stimulation of gene expression may provide an additional level of genetic regulation.

  15. Type 2 Diabetes Monocyte MicroRNA and mRNA Expression: Dyslipidemia Associates with Increased Differentiation-Related Genes but Not Inflammatory Activation

    PubMed Central

    Baldeón R., Lucy; Weigelt, Karin; de Wit, Harm; Ozcan, Behiye; van Oudenaren, Adri; Sempértegui, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric; Grosse, Laura; van Zonneveld, Anton-Jan; Drexhage, Hemmo A.; Leenen, Pieter J. M.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that inflammatory macrophages in adipose tissue are involved in insulin resistance of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Due to a relative paucity of data on circulating monocytes in T2D, it is unclear whether the inflammatory changes of adipose tissue macrophages are reflected in these easily accessible cells. Objective To study the expression pattern of microRNAs and mRNAs related to inflammation in T2D monocytes. Design A microRNA finding study on monocytes of T2D patients and controls using array profiling was followed by a quantitative Real Time PCR (qPCR) study on monocytes of an Ecuadorian validation cohort testing the top over/under-expressed microRNAs. In addition, monocytes of the validation cohort were tested for 24 inflammation-related mRNAs and 2 microRNAs previously found deregulated in (auto)-inflammatory monocytes. Results In the finding study, 142 significantly differentially expressed microRNAs were identified, 15 having the strongest power to discriminate T2D patients from controls (sensitivity 66%, specificity 90%). However, differences in expression of these microRNAs between patients and controls were small. On the basis of >1.4 or <0.6-fold change expression 5 microRNAs were selected for further validation. One microRNA (miR-34c-5p) was validated as significantly over-expressed in T2D monocytes. In addition, we found over expression of 3 mRNAs (CD9, DHRS3 and PTPN7) in the validation cohort. These mRNAs are important for cell morphology, adhesion, shape change, and cell differentiation. Classical inflammatory genes (e.g. TNFAIP3) were only over-expressed in monocytes of patients with normal serum lipids. Remarkably, in dyslipidemia, there was a reduction in the expression of inflammatory genes (e.g. ATF3, DUSP2 and PTGS2). Conclusions The expression profile of microRNAs/mRNAs in monocytes of T2D patients indicates an altered adhesion, differentiation, and shape change potential. Monocyte inflammatory activation was only found

  16. Membrane binding of Escherichia coli RNase E catalytic domain stabilizes protein structure and increases RNA substrate affinity

    PubMed Central

    Murashko, Oleg N.; Kaberdin, Vladimir R.; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2012-01-01

    RNase E plays an essential role in RNA processing and decay and tethers to the cytoplasmic membrane in Escherichia coli; however, the function of this membrane–protein interaction has remained unclear. Here, we establish a mechanistic role for the RNase E–membrane interaction. The reconstituted highly conserved N-terminal fragment of RNase E (NRne, residues 1–499) binds specifically to anionic phospholipids through electrostatic interactions. The membrane-binding specificity of NRne was confirmed using circular dichroism difference spectroscopy; the dissociation constant (Kd) for NRne binding to anionic liposomes was 298 nM. E. coli RNase G and RNase E/G homologs from phylogenetically distant Aquifex aeolicus, Haemophilus influenzae Rd, and Synechocystis sp. were found to be membrane-binding proteins. Electrostatic potentials of NRne and its homologs were found to be conserved, highly positive, and spread over a large surface area encompassing four putative membrane-binding regions identified in the “large” domain (amino acids 1–400, consisting of the RNase H, S1, 5′-sensor, and DNase I subdomains) of E. coli NRne. In vitro cleavage assay using liposome-free and liposome-bound NRne and RNA substrates BR13 and GGG-RNAI showed that NRne membrane binding altered its enzymatic activity. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed no obvious thermotropic structural changes in membrane-bound NRne between 10 and 60 °C, and membrane-bound NRne retained its normal cleavage activity after cooling. Thus, NRne membrane binding induced changes in secondary protein structure and enzymatic activation by stabilizing the protein-folding state and increasing its binding affinity for its substrate. Our results demonstrate that RNase E–membrane interaction enhances the rate of RNA processing and decay. PMID:22509045

  17. Membrane binding of Escherichia coli RNase E catalytic domain stabilizes protein structure and increases RNA substrate affinity.

    PubMed

    Murashko, Oleg N; Kaberdin, Vladimir R; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2012-05-01

    RNase E plays an essential role in RNA processing and decay and tethers to the cytoplasmic membrane in Escherichia coli; however, the function of this membrane-protein interaction has remained unclear. Here, we establish a mechanistic role for the RNase E-membrane interaction. The reconstituted highly conserved N-terminal fragment of RNase E (NRne, residues 1-499) binds specifically to anionic phospholipids through electrostatic interactions. The membrane-binding specificity of NRne was confirmed using circular dichroism difference spectroscopy; the dissociation constant (K(d)) for NRne binding to anionic liposomes was 298 nM. E. coli RNase G and RNase E/G homologs from phylogenetically distant Aquifex aeolicus, Haemophilus influenzae Rd, and Synechocystis sp. were found to be membrane-binding proteins. Electrostatic potentials of NRne and its homologs were found to be conserved, highly positive, and spread over a large surface area encompassing four putative membrane-binding regions identified in the "large" domain (amino acids 1-400, consisting of the RNase H, S1, 5'-sensor, and DNase I subdomains) of E. coli NRne. In vitro cleavage assay using liposome-free and liposome-bound NRne and RNA substrates BR13 and GGG-RNAI showed that NRne membrane binding altered its enzymatic activity. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed no obvious thermotropic structural changes in membrane-bound NRne between 10 and 60 °C, and membrane-bound NRne retained its normal cleavage activity after cooling. Thus, NRne membrane binding induced changes in secondary protein structure and enzymatic activation by stabilizing the protein-folding state and increasing its binding affinity for its substrate. Our results demonstrate that RNase E-membrane interaction enhances the rate of RNA processing and decay. PMID:22509045

  18. HMGN5 blockade by siRNA enhances apoptosis, suppresses invasion and increases chemosensitivity to temozolomide in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    He, Jing; Liu, Chaoyang; Wang, Bin; Li, Na; Zuo, Guoqin; Gao, Dewei

    2015-10-01

    The high-mobility group nucleosome-binding protein-5 (HMGN5) is frequently overexpressed in various malignant cancers. However, the potential correlation between HMGN5 and prognosis in patients with meningiomas remains unknown. In the present study, we explored the expression of HMGN5 in meningiomas with immunohistochemistry and correlated the results to the patient outcome. Potential effects of HMGN5 on tumor growth, apoptosis and invasion were also examined in representative cell lines (IOMM-Lee and CH157) by downregulating HMGN5 with RNA interference (siRNA). We demonstrate that there is a positive association between HMGN5 expression and meningioma histological grade. Statistical analysis reveals that lower HMGN5 expression predict lower meningioma recurrence. In addition, downregulation of HMGN5 inhibits IOMM-Lee and CH157 cell proliferation, enhances cell apoptosis and suppresses tumor invasion. Our results further revealed that HMGN5 inhibition decreased P-glycoprotein (MDR-1) expression without affecting multidrug resistance associated proteins 1 (MRP-1) expression to increase chemosensitivity to temozolomide (TMZ) of meningioma cells. Collectively, this study indicates that HMGN5 is a novel target for developing effective therapeutic strategies for malignant meningiomas. PMID:26315299

  19. Interfering EZH2 Expression Reverses the Cisplatin Resistance in Human Ovarian Cancer by Inhibiting Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Jin, Long; Liu, Jia-Hua; Sui, Yu-Xia; Han, Li-Li; Shen, Xiao-Li

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to determine the effects of the inhibition of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) gene expression on the cisplatin resistance of the human ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV3/DDP, and to identify the underlying mechanisms. SKOV3/DDP cells were stably transfected with pSUPER-EZH2 (EZH2 RNA interference plasmid) or pcDNA3.1-EZH2 (EZH2 gene overexpression plasmid) using the lipofection method. Real-time fluorescence quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blotting confirmed that EZH2 expression was downregulated in pSUPER-EZH2-transfected cells. Flow cytometry revealed that EZH2 inhibition did not induce apoptosis, but significantly inhibited autophagy. In addition, it significantly increased the expression of the cellular senescence-signaling proteins p14(ARF), p16(INK4a), p53, pRb, and p21, and significantly decreased the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)1, CDK2, and H3K27me3. Cellular senescence was characterized by a significant increase in the G0/G1 ratio and the restoration of sensitivity to cisplatin in the drug-resistant cells. These findings suggest that interfering with EZH2 expression can inhibit SKOV3/DDP cell autophagy and reverse resistance to cisplatin. The underlying mechanisms could be associated with the regulation of the cellular senescence-signaling pathway. PMID:27610467

  20. Hypoxia increases rate of transcription and stability of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Furnari, B A; Lawson, E E; Millhorn, D E

    1994-01-01

    Reduced arterial oxygen tension (i.e. hypoxia) is a powerful physiological stimulus that induces synthesis and release of dopamine from O2-sensitive (type I) cells in the mammalian carotid bodies. We reported recently that hypoxia stimulates gene expression for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine synthesis in type I cells of the carotid body. Efforts to identify the mechanisms regulating TH gene expression in O2-sensitive cells during hypoxia have been hampered by the lack of an appropriate model cell culture system. Here we report that TH gene expression in the rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12) is regulated during hypoxia in a manner similar to that measured in carotid body type I cells. PC12 cells might therefore be useful as an experimental model for identifying the molecular mechanisms that regulate TH gene expression during hypoxia. Nuclear runoff assays revealed that transcription of the wild type TH gene was enhanced during exposures to hypoxia lasting 12 h. Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays with constructs that contained different fragments of TH promoter revealed that the regulatory sequences that mediate the hypoxia-induced increase in transcription are located between bases -272 and +27 of the TH gene. Findings from experiments in which transcription was inhibited either with actinomycin D or 5,6-dichloro-1-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, as well as pulse-chase experiments using 4-thiouridine showed that the half-life of TH mRNA was substantially increased during hypoxia. Thus, in the present paper we show that TH gene expression in PC12 cells during hypoxia is regulated by increases in both the rate of TH gene transcription and TH mRNA stability. PMID:7903970

  1. Essential amino acids increase microRNA-499, -208b, and -23a and downregulate myostatin and myocyte enhancer factor 2C mRNA expression in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Micah J; Glynn, Erin L; Fry, Christopher S; Dhanani, Shaheen; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2009-12-01

    Essential amino acids (EAA) stimulate muscle protein synthesis in humans. However, little is known about whether microRNAs (miRNA) and genes associated with muscle growth are expressed differently following EAA ingestion. Our purpose in this experiment was to determine whether miRNA and growth-related mRNA expressed in skeletal muscle are up- or downregulated in humans following the ingestion of EAA. We hypothesized that EAA would alter miRNA expression in skeletal muscle as well as select growth-related genes. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis of 7 young adult participants (3 male, 4 female) before and 3 h after ingesting 10 g of EAA. Muscle samples were analyzed for muscle miRNA (miR-499, -208b, -23a, -1, -133a, and -206) and muscle-growth related genes [MyoD1, myogenin, myostatin, myocyte enhancer factor C (MEF2C), follistatin-like-1 (FSTL1), histone deacytylase 4, and serum response factor mRNA] before and after EAA ingestion using real-time PCR. Following EAA ingestion, miR-499, -208b, -23a, -1, and pri-miR-206 expression increased (P < 0.05). The muscle-growth genes MyoD1 and FSTL1 mRNA expression increased (P < 0.05), and myostatin and MEF2C mRNA were downregulated following EAA ingestion (P < 0.05). We conclude that miRNA and growth-related genes expressed in skeletal muscle are rapidly altered within hours following EAA ingestion. Further work is needed to determine whether these miRNA are post-transcriptional regulators of growth-related genes following an anabolic stimulus. PMID:19828686

  2. MicroRNA Variants Increase the Risk of HPV-Associated Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx in Never Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Sturgis, Erich M.; Jin, Lei; Wang, Zhongqiu; Zhang, Caiyun; Wei, Qingyi; Li, Guojun

    2013-01-01

    Background Both microRNAs and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection play an important role in the development and progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In addition, microRNAs affect all facets of the immune/inflammation responses to infection, which may control HPV clearance. We thus hypothesized that microRNA polymorphisms modify the association between HPV16 seropositivity and OSCC risk. Methods Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms in microRNAs were genotyped and HPV16 serology was determined in 325 cases and 335 matched controls. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using univariate and multivariable logistic regression models. Results Overall, each polymorphism had no significant main effect on OSCC risk. Compared with the risk among individuals with both miR146 rs2910164 GG genotype and HPV16 seronegativity, risk of OSCC was increased among those with CG or CC genotype and HPV16 seronegativity (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.9–1.8), GG genotype and HPV16 seropositivity (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.8–5.0), and CG or CC genotype and HPV16 seropositivity (OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 2.3–9.4). Similar results were found for miR149 rs2292832, miR196 rs11614913, and miR499 rs3746444. Analyses stratified by tumor sites and smoking status showed that each polymorphism significantly increased the risk of HPV16-associated squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx (SCCOP), and such effect modification was particularly prominent in never smokers. Conclusions Our results indicate that microRNA polymorphisms modify the risk of OSCC associated with HPV16 seropositivity, particularly in patients with SCCOP and never smokers. Larger studies are needed to verify our findings. PMID:23457596

  3. Increased abundance of aromatase and follicle stimulating hormone receptor mRNA and decreased insulin-like growth factor-2 receptor mRNA in small ovarian follicles of cattle selected for twin births.

    PubMed

    Echternkamp, S E; Aad, P Y; Eborn, D R; Spicer, L J

    2012-07-01

    Cattle genetically selected for twin ovulations and births (Twinner) exhibit increased ovarian follicular development, increased ovulation rate, and greater blood and follicular fluid IGF-1 concentrations compared with contemporary cattle not selected for twins (Control). Experimental objectives were to 1) assess relationships among aromatase (CYP19A1), IGF-1 (IGF1), IGF-2 receptor (IGF2R), and FSH receptor (FSHR) mRNA expression in small (≤5 mm) antral follicles and 2) determine their association with increased numbers of developing follicles in ovaries of Twinner females. Ovaries were collected from mature, cyclic (d 3 to 6) Twinner (n = 11), and Control (n = 12) cows at slaughter and pieces of cortical tissue were fixed and embedded in paraffin. Expression of mRNA was evaluated by in situ hybridization using (35)S-UTP-labeled antisense and sense probes for CYP19A1, FSHR, IGF1, and IGF2R mRNA. Silver grain density was quantified within the granulosa and theca cells of individual follicles (2 to 7 follicles/cow) by Bioquant image analysis. Follicles of Twinners tended to be smaller in diameter than Controls (1.9 ± 0.1 vs. 2.3 ± 0.1 mm; P = 0.08), but thickness of granulosa layer did not differ (P > 0.1) by genotype. Relative abundance of CYP19A1 (P < 0.01) and FSHR (P < 0.05) mRNA was greater in granulosa cells of Twinners vs. Controls, respectively, whereas IGF2R mRNA expression was less in both granulosa (P < 0.01) and theca (P < 0.05) cells in follicles of Twinners vs. Controls, respectively. Abundance of CYP19A1 mRNA in granulosa cells was correlated negatively with IGF2R mRNA expression in both granulosa (r = -0.33; P < 0.01) and theca (r = -0.21; P = 0.05) cells. Expression of IGF1 mRNA was primarily in granulosa cells, including cumulus cells, and its expression did not differ between Twinners vs. Controls (P > 0.10). Detected increases in CYP19A1 and FSHR, but not IGF1, mRNA expression along with decreases in IGF2R mRNA expression in individual

  4. Transforming growth factor-β1 induces cholesterol synthesis by increasing HMG-CoA reductase mRNA expression in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Takumi; Muramatsu, Aimi; Shimura, Mari; Kobayashi-Hattori, Kazuo; Oishi, Yuichi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of TGF-β1 on cholesterol synthesis in human keratinocytes. TGF-β1 increased the level of cholesterol and the mRNA level of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in human keratinocytes. These results show that TGF-β1 induces cholesterol synthesis by increasing HMG-CoA reductase mRNA expression in human keratinocytes. PMID:26932266

  5. Glucose-6-phosphatase mRNA and activity are increased to the same extent in kidney and liver of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Mithieux, G; Vidal, H; Zitoun, C; Bruni, N; Daniele, N; Minassian, C

    1996-07-01

    Using Northern blot with a specific glucose-6-phosphatase (Glc6Pase) cDNA probe and enzymatic activity determination, we studied the effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on Glc6Pase in rat gluconeogenic tissues. The Glc6Pase mRNA abundance was increased four to five times in both the liver and kidney of diabetic rats. This was correlated with a concomitant 130% increase in Glc6Pase catalytic subunit in both tissues. The elevated level of Glc6Pase mRNA was significantly corrected in both the liver and kidney of diabetic rats after a 12-h insulin treatment. We also studied Glc6Pase mRNA and activity in gluconeogenic tissues during the fed-fasted and fasted-refed transitions in normal rats. In the liver, the abundance of Glc6Pase mRNA was sharply increased about four times after 24 or 48 h of fasting. In the kidney, the Glc6Pase mRNA level was gradually increased some three and five times after 24 and 48 h of fasting, respectively. The increase of Glc6Pase mRNA in both organs was matched with a doubling of the activity of Glc6Pase catalytic subunit: rapid in the liver and gradual in the kidney. The liver Glc6Pase mRNA abundance in 48-h fasted rats was acutely and importantly decreased upon refeeding. The kidney Glc6Pase mRNA level was also significantly lowered under these conditions, albeit less rapidly. These data demonstrate that efficient control of Glc6Pase takes place in both gluconeogenic organs at the pretranslational level and suggest that insulin might play an important role in this control. In addition, using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Northern blot, we report that Glc6Pase mRNA is not detectable in several other tissues previously assumed to express the enzyme. PMID:8666139

  6. Increased Plasma miRNA-30a as a Biomarker for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ling; Chen, Yifan; Su, Qiaoli; Tang, Xiaoju; Liang, Yasha; Che, Guowei; Luo, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNA (miRNA) is a small, non-coding RNA molecule which plays a role in the carcinogenesis and progression of cancers. Abnormal expression of miRNA in plasma has been found in some patients with malignant tumors. Material/Methods This study was conducted to investigate the expression of miRNA-30a in plasma of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The plasma miRNA-30a in 87 patients with NSCLC, 20 patients with benign lung diseases, and 76 healthy subjects were measured by real-time PCR. The diagnostic value of miRNA-30a in NSCLC was evaluated via the ROC curve method. Results Plasma miRNA-30a level was significantly higher in the NSCLC group compared with benign control and healthy control groups (P<0.01). No statistically significant difference was found in the expression level of miRNA-30a among various clinical pathologic features in NSCLC. ROC curve analysis showed that the specificity and sensitivity cut-off points were at 61.0% and 84.3% for NSCLC. The specificity and sensitivity values were 54.9% and 94.4%, respectively, in the analysis based on in-patients only. Conclusions All these results suggest that plasma miRNA-30a measurement may be a novel and noninvasive method for NSCLC preliminary screening and differential diagnosis. PMID:26918265

  7. Transient down-regulation of the RNA silencing machinery increases efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bilichak, Andriy; Yao, Youli; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2014-06-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a plant pathogen that is widely used in plant transformation. As the process of transgenesis includes the delivery of single-stranded T-DNA molecule, we hypothesized that transformation rate may negatively correlate with the efficiency of the RNA-silencing machinery. Using mutants compromised in either the transcriptional or post-transcriptional gene-silencing pathways, two inhibitors of stable transformation were revealed-AGO2 and NRPD1a. Furthermore, an immunoprecipitation experiment has shown that NRPD1, a subunit of Pol IV, directly interacts with Agrobacterium T-DNA in planta. Using the Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)--based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) technique, we demonstrated that the transient down-regulation of the expression of either AGO2 or NRPD1a genes in reproductive organs of Arabidopsis, leads to an increase in transformation rate. We observed a 6.0- and 3.5-fold increase in transformation rate upon transient downregulation of either AGO2 or NRPD1a genes, respectively. This is the first report demonstrating the increase in the plant transformation rate via VIGS-mediated transient down-regulation of the components of epigenetic machinery in reproductive tissue. PMID:24472037

  8. The adipokine leptin increases skeletal muscle mass and significantly alters skeletal muscle miRNA expression profile in aged mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hamrick, Mark W.; Herberg, Samuel; Arounleut, Phonepasong; He, Hong-Zhi; Shiver, Austin; Qi, Rui-Qun; Zhou, Li; Isales, Carlos M.; and others

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Aging is associated with muscle atrophy and loss of muscle mass, known as the sarcopenia of aging. {yields} We demonstrate that age-related muscle atrophy is associated with marked changes in miRNA expression in muscle. {yields} Treating aged mice with the adipokine leptin significantly increased muscle mass and the expression of miRNAs involved in muscle repair. {yields} Recombinant leptin therapy may therefore be a novel approach for treating age-related muscle atrophy. -- Abstract: Age-associated loss of muscle mass, or sarcopenia, contributes directly to frailty and an increased risk of falls and fractures among the elderly. Aged mice and elderly adults both show decreased muscle mass as well as relatively low levels of the fat-derived hormone leptin. Here we demonstrate that loss of muscle mass and myofiber size with aging in mice is associated with significant changes in the expression of specific miRNAs. Aging altered the expression of 57 miRNAs in mouse skeletal muscle, and many of these miRNAs are now reported to be associated specifically with age-related muscle atrophy. These include miR-221, previously identified in studies of myogenesis and muscle development as playing a role in the proliferation and terminal differentiation of myogenic precursors. We also treated aged mice with recombinant leptin, to determine whether leptin therapy could improve muscle mass and alter the miRNA expression profile of aging skeletal muscle. Leptin treatment significantly increased hindlimb muscle mass and extensor digitorum longus fiber size in aged mice. Furthermore, the expression of 37 miRNAs was altered in muscles of leptin-treated mice. In particular, leptin treatment increased the expression of miR-31 and miR-223, miRNAs known to be elevated during muscle regeneration and repair. These findings suggest that aging in skeletal muscle is associated with marked changes in the expression of specific miRNAs, and that nutrient

  9. RNA interference-mediated targeting of DKK1 gene expression in Ishikawa endometrial carcinoma cells causes increased tumor cell invasion and migration

    PubMed Central

    YI, NUO; LIAO, QIN-PING; LI, ZHEN-HUA; XIE, BAO-JIANG; HU, YU-HONG; YI, WEI; LIU, MIN

    2013-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays an essential role in tumor invasion and migration. DKK1 functions as an important inhibitor of the pathway and represents a promising target for cancer therapy. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of DKK1 in endometrial carcinoma (EC) cell invasion and migration using RNA interference (RNAi) technology. Ishikawa EC cells were transfected at high efficiency with specific DKK1 siRNA. RT-PCR and western blot analysis were used to determine the mRNA and protein levels of DKK1, β-catenin and metalloproteinase 14 (MMP14) in siRNA-treated and -untreated cells. In addition, the invasion and migration of the EC cells were detected by invasion and migration assays. Transient transfection of DKK1 siRNA significantly inhibited the mRNA and protein levels of DKK1. Markedly increased cell invasion and migration was observed following treatment with DKK1 siRNA when compared with the negative control siRNA-treated and siRNA-untreated cells. The knockdown of DKK1 also elevated the mRNA and protein levels of β-catenin and MMP14 involved in the Wnt signaling pathway, indicating that targeting this gene may promote intracellular Wnt signal transduction and thus, accelerate EC cell invasion and migration in vitro. The RNAi-mediated targeting of DKK1 gene expression in Ishikawa EC cells resulted in increased tumor cell invasion and migration. DKK1 was identified as an inhibitor of EC cell invasion and migration via its novel role in the Wnt signaling pathway. Targeting DKK1 may therefore represent an effective anti-invasion and -migration strategy for the treatment of EC. PMID:24137406

  10. Second phase HCV RNA decline during telaprevir based therapy increases with drug effectiveness: implications for treatment duration

    PubMed Central

    Guedj, Jeremie; Perelson, Alan S.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA decay during antiviral therapy is characterized by a rapid first phase followed by a slower second phase. The current understanding of viral kinetics attributes the magnitude of the first phase decay to the treatment effectiveness, whereas the second phase decay is attributed to the progressive loss of infected cells. Here we analyzed data from 44 patients treated with telaprevir, a potent HCV protease inhibitor. Using a viral kinetic model that accounts for the pharmacokinetics of telaprevir, we found that the second phase slope of viral decline to be strongly correlated with the treatment effectiveness and to be roughly four-fold more rapid than has been reported with interferon-based therapies. Since telaprevir is not known to increase the death rate of infected cells, our results suggest the second phase slope of viral decline is driven not only by the death of infected cells but may also involve other mechanisms, such as a treatment effectiveness-dependent degradation of intracellular viral RNA. As a consequence of the enhanced viral decay caused by the high antiviral effectiveness of telaprevir, we predict that if drug resistance could be avoided by using an appropriate combination of antiviral agents, treatment duration needed to clear HCV might be dramatically shortened. Indeed, we predict that in 95% of fully compliant patients, the last virus particle should be eliminated by week 7 of therapy. If the remaining infected hepatocytes act as a potential reservoir for the renewal of infection, no more than 10 weeks of treatment should be sufficient to clear the infection in 95% of fully compliant patients. However, if patients miss doses, treatment duration would need to be extended. PMID:21384401

  11. Albumin pre-coating enhances intracellular siRNA delivery of multifunctional amphiphile/siRNA nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kummitha, China M; Malamas, Anthony S; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Nonspecific association of serum molecules with short-interfering RNA (siRNA) nanoparticles can change their physiochemical characteristics, and results in reduced cellular uptake in the target tissue during the systemic siRNA delivery process. Serum albumin is the most abundant protein in the body and has been used to modify the surface of nanoparticles, to inhibit association of other serum molecules. Here, we hypothesized that surface modification of lipid-based nanoparticular siRNA delivery systems with albumin could prevent their interaction with serum proteins, and improve intracellular uptake. In this study, we investigated the influence of albumin on the stability and intracellular siRNA delivery of the targeted siRNA nanoparticles of a polymerizable and pH-sensitive multifunctional surfactant N-(1-aminoethyl) iminobis[N-(oleoylcysteinylhistinyl-1-aminoethyl)propionamide] (EHCO) in serum. Serum resulted in a significant increase in the size of targeted EHCO/siRNA nanoparticles and inhibited cellular uptake of the nanoparticles. Coating of targeted EHCO/siRNA nanoparticles with bovine serum albumin at 9.4 μM prior to cell transfection improved cellular uptake and gene silencing efficacy of EHCO/siRNA targeted nanoparticles in serum-containing media, as compared with the uncoated nanoparticles. At a proper concentration, albumin has the potential to minimize interactions of serum proteins with siRNA nanoparticles for effective systemic in vivo siRNA delivery. PMID:23055731

  12. Hippocampal damage and kainic acid injection induce a rapid increase in mRNA for BDNF and NGF in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ballarín, M; Ernfors, P; Lindefors, N; Persson, H

    1991-10-01

    In situ hybridization and Northern blots were used to study expression of mRNAs for members of the nerve growth factor family in the rat brain following an excitatory stimulus. One hour after a unilateral needle insertion or saline injection into the dorsal hippocampus, the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA increased markedly in granular neurons of the dentate gyrus and in the piriform cortex ipsilateral to the injection. The same treatment also increased the level of NGF mRNA in granular neurons of the ipsilateral dentate gyrus. The rapid increase in BDNF and NGF mRNA after a needle insertion or injection of saline was transient and preceded by an increase in c-fos mRNA in the same brain regions. In contrast to a needle insertion per se or a saline injection, 7 h after a unilateral injection of kainic acid into the dorsal hippocampus, the level of BDNF mRNA was dramatically increased in the ipsilateral hippocampus, as well as in the ipsilateral frontoparietal, piriform and perihinal cortex, the amygdaloid complex, claustrum, and ventromedial hypothalamus. A less pronounced increase was also seen in these brain areas on the contralateral side. Northern blots revealed that the level of BDNF mRNA increased 5- and 40-fold in the contra- and ipsilateral hippocampus, respectively, compared to sham-operated control animals. In contrast to BDNF and NGF, the level of hippocampus-derived neurotrophic factor/neurotrohin-3 (HDNF/NT-3) mRNA was not altered by either needle insertion or injection of saline or kainic acid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1915733

  13. Discrimination against interfering signals at the Poker Flat MST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Several on line and off line data processing techniques are used to remove interfering signals due to ground clutter, aircraft, instrumental effects, and external transmissions from the desired atmospheric echoes of Mesosphere Stratosphere, Troposphere (MST) radar. The on line, real time techniques are necessarily simple in order to minimize processing delays. This algorithm examines the individual Doppler spectra which are computed every two to four seconds (for oblique antenna beams). The total spectral power in each individual spectrum is computed by summing all the spectral points. If this integrated power increases from one spectrum to the next by a factor greater than a preselected threshold, then that spectrum is not added to the spectral sum. Succeeding spectra are compared to the last acceptable spectrum. Only a certain maximum number of spectra are allowed to be rejected in succession.

  14. The effect of pre-pulse on the gratings coded by two interfered femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yanhua; Fan, Guanghua; Qu, Shiliang

    2016-07-01

    The effect of pre-pulse on the gratings coded with two interfered femtosecond pulses is studied on silica glass. The results show that the modulation depth of the gratings is deeper than that in absence of pre-pulse, and decreases with increased arrival time of pre-pulse. For the arrival time within 120-200 fs, the free electrons produced by pre-pulse can act as seed electrons for the subsequent interfered pulses to multiply, thus deepening the depth of the gratings. With the arrival time beyond 200 fs, the self-trapped excitons can provide seed electrons for the subsequent pulse multiplying, thus deepening the gratings.

  15. 32 CFR 1903.8 - Interfering with Agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interfering with Agency functions. 1903.8 Section 1903.8 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY CONDUCT ON AGENCY INSTALLATIONS § 1903.8 Interfering with Agency functions. The following are...

  16. 32 CFR 1903.8 - Interfering with Agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Interfering with Agency functions. 1903.8 Section 1903.8 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY CONDUCT ON AGENCY INSTALLATIONS § 1903.8 Interfering with Agency functions. The following are...

  17. 32 CFR 1903.8 - Interfering with Agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interfering with Agency functions. 1903.8 Section 1903.8 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY CONDUCT ON AGENCY INSTALLATIONS § 1903.8 Interfering with Agency functions. The following are...

  18. 32 CFR 1903.8 - Interfering with Agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Interfering with Agency functions. 1903.8 Section 1903.8 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY CONDUCT ON AGENCY INSTALLATIONS § 1903.8 Interfering with Agency functions. The following are...

  19. 32 CFR 1903.8 - Interfering with Agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Interfering with Agency functions. 1903.8 Section 1903.8 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY CONDUCT ON AGENCY INSTALLATIONS § 1903.8 Interfering with Agency functions. The following are...

  20. 32 CFR 234.6 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 234.6 Section 234.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CONDUCT ON THE PENTAGON RESERVATION § 234.6 Interfering with agency functions. The following...

  1. 32 CFR 234.6 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 234.6 Section 234.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CONDUCT ON THE PENTAGON RESERVATION § 234.6 Interfering with agency functions. The following...

  2. 32 CFR 234.6 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 234.6 Section 234.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CONDUCT ON THE PENTAGON RESERVATION § 234.6 Interfering with agency functions. The following...

  3. 32 CFR 234.6 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 234.6 Section 234.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CONDUCT ON THE PENTAGON RESERVATION § 234.6 Interfering with agency functions. The following...

  4. 32 CFR 234.6 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 234.6 Section 234.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CONDUCT ON THE PENTAGON RESERVATION § 234.6 Interfering with agency functions. The following...

  5. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) increases the steady-state mRNA levels of collagenase/MMP-1 in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Brenneisen, P; Briviba, K; Wlaschek, M; Wenk, J; Scharffetter-Kochanek, K

    1997-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to be important messenger molecules in the induction of several genes. In human dermal fibroblasts the herbicide paraquat (PQ2+) was used to induce intracellular oxidative stress that was modulated by the inhibition of copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu,ZnSOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), catalase, and blocking of the Fenton reaction. Interstitial collagenase (MMP-1) mRNA increased time dependently for up to 72 h following paraquat treatment. A correlation with the translation of MMP-1 could, however, only be detected up to 24 h, indicating an uncoupling of transcription and translation. Interleukin-1 alpha and beta mRNA showed two peaks at 6 h and 72 h. The inhibition of catalase by aminotriazol (ATZ), inhibition of GSHPx by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), and blocking the Fenton reaction by the iron chelator desferrioxamine (DFO) in concert led to an increase in steady-state MMP-1 mRNA levels, possibly dependent on intracellular H2O2 increase. This combined treatment potentiated MMP-1 mRNA induction up to 6.5-fold compared to paraquat treated controls. Furthermore, exogenously added H2O2 caused an increase in MMP-1 mRNA levels. In contrast, inhibition of Cu,ZnSOD by diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC), leading to diminished H2O2 production from O2.-, decreased MMP-1 mRNA induction. Collectively, our data provide evidence that H2O2 is an important intermediate in the downstream signalling pathway finally leading to the induction of increased steady state MMP-1 mRNA levels. The synthesis of MMPs may contribute to connective tissue damage in vivo related to photoaging, inflammatory diseases, and tumor invasion. PMID:8981044

  6. RNA therapeutics: RNAi and antisense mechanisms and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Chery, Jessica; Näär, Anders

    2016-01-01

    RNA therapeutics refers to the use of oligonucleotides to target primarily ribonucleic acids (RNA) for therapeutic efforts or in research studies to elucidate functions of genes. Oligonucleotides are distinct from other pharmacological modalities, such as small molecules and antibodies that target mainly proteins, due to their mechanisms of action and chemical properties. Nucleic acids come in two forms: deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) and ribonucleic acids (RNA). Although DNA is more stable, RNA offers more structural variety ranging from messenger RNA (mRNA) that codes for protein to non-coding RNAs, microRNA (miRNA), transfer RNA (tRNA), short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). As our understanding of the wide variety of RNAs deepens, researchers have sought to target RNA since >80% of the genome is estimated to be transcribed. These transcripts include non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs and siRNAs that function in gene regulation by playing key roles in the transfer of genetic information from DNA to protein, the final product of the central dogma in biology1. Currently there are two main approaches used to target RNA: double stranded RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) and antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). Both approaches are currently in clinical trials for targeting of RNAs involved in various diseases, such as cancer and neurodegeneration. In fact, ASOs targeting spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown positive results in clinical trials2. Advantages of ASOs include higher affinity due to the development of chemical modifications that increase affinity, selectivity while decreasing toxicity due to off-target effects. This review will highlight the major therapeutic approaches of RNA medicine currently being applied with a focus on RNAi and ASOs. PMID:27570789

  7. Synthesis of small interfering RNAs containing acetal-type nucleoside analogs at their 3'-ends and analysis of their silencing activity and their ability to bind to the Argonaute2 PAZ domain.

    PubMed

    Inada, Natsumi; Nakamoto, Kosuke; Yokogawa, Takashi; Ueno, Yoshihito

    2015-10-20

    In this study, we aimed to create small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) with increased silencing activities and nuclease resistance properties. Therefore, we designed and synthesized five types of siRNA containing acetal-type nucleoside analogs at their 3'-dangling ends. We found that the siRNA containing 1-O-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-β-D-ribofuranose at the 3'-dangling end was the most potent among the synthesized siRNAs and showed more resistance to nucleolytic degradation by a 3' exonuclease than a natural RNA did. Thus, modification of siRNAs by addition of 1-O-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-β-D-ribofuranose may hold promise as a means of improving the silencing activity and nuclease resistance of siRNAs. PMID:26397394

  8. A single Argonaute gene is required for induction of RNA silencing antiviral defense and promotes viral RNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qihong; Choi, Gil H; Nuss, Donald L

    2009-10-20

    Dicer gene dcl2, required for the RNA silencing antiviral defense response in the chestnut blight fungus Cryphonectria parasitica, is inducible upon mycovirus infection and promotes viral RNA recombination. We now report that the antiviral defense response requires only one of the four C. parasitica Argonaute-like protein genes, agl2. The agl2 gene is required for the virus-induced increase in dcl2 transcript accumulation. Agl2 and dcl2 transcripts accumulated to much higher levels in response to hairpin RNA production or infection by a mutant CHV1-EP713 hypovirus lacking the suppressor of RNA silencing p29 than to wild-type CHV1-EP713. Similar results were obtained for an agl2-promoter/EGFP-reporter construct, indicating that p29-mediated repression of agl2 transcript accumulation is promoter-dependent. Significantly, the agl2 deletion mutant exhibited stable maintenance of non-viral sequences in recombinant hypovirus RNA virus vectors and the absence of hypovirus-defective interfering (DI) RNA production. These results establish a key role for an Argonaute gene in the induction of an RNA silencing antiviral defense response and the promotion of viral RNA recombination. They also provide evidence for a mechanism by which a virus-encoded RNA silencing suppressor represses the transcriptional induction of an RNA silencing component. PMID:19822766

  9. Human amniotic epithelial cell feeder layers maintain human iPS cell pluripotency via inhibited endogenous microRNA-145 and increased Sox2 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Te; Cheng, Weiwei; Huang, Yongyi; Huang, Qin; Jiang, Lizhen; Guo, Lihe

    2012-02-15

    Currently, human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells were generated from patient or disease-specific sources and share the same key properties as embryonic stem cells. This makes them attractive for personalized medicine, drug screens or cellular therapy. Long-term cultivation and maintenance of normal iPS cells in an undifferentiated self-renewing state are a major challenge. Our previous studies have shown that human amniotic epithelial cells (HuAECs) could provide a good source of feeder cells for mouse and human embryonic stem cells, or spermatogonial stem cells, but the mechanism for this is unknown. Here, we examined the effect of endogenous microRNA-145 regulation on Sox2 expression in human iPS cells by HuAECs feeder cells regulation, and in turn on human iPS cells pluripotency. We found that human IPS cells transfected with a microRNA-145 mutant expressed Sox2 at high levels, allowing iPS to maintain a high level of AP activity in long-term culture and form teratomas in SCID mice. Expression of stem cell markers was increased in iPS transfected with the microRNA-145 mutant, compared with iPS was transfected with microRNA-145. Besides, the expression of Drosha proteins of the microRNA-processor complex, required for the generation of precursor pre-miRNA, was significantly increased in human iPS cells cultured on MEF but not on HuAECs. Taken together, these results suggest that endogenous Sox2 expression may be regulated by microRNA-145 in human iPS cells with HuAECs feeder cells, and Sox2 is a crucial component required for maintenance of them in an undifferentiated, proliferative state capable of self-renewal. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer microRNA-145 inhibits Sox2 expression in human iPS cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer microRNA-145 suppresses the self-renewal and pluripotency of human iPS cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HuAECs regulate expression of microRNA-145 and Sox2 in human iPS cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HuAECs feeder

  10. Type I interferon signaling genes in recurrent major depression: increased expression detected by whole-blood RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, S; Battle, A; Zhu, X; Potash, J B; Weissman, M M; Shi, J; Beckman, K; Haudenschild, C; McCormick, C; Mei, R; Gameroff, M J; Gindes, H; Adams, P; Goes, F S; Mondimore, F M; MacKinnon, D F; Notes, L; Schweizer, B; Furman, D; Montgomery, S B; Urban, A E; Koller, D; Levinson, D F

    2014-12-01

    A study of genome-wide gene expression in major depressive disorder (MDD) was undertaken in a large population-based sample to determine whether altered expression levels of genes and pathways could provide insights into biological mechanisms that are relevant to this disorder. Gene expression studies have the potential to detect changes that may be because of differences in common or rare genomic sequence variation, environmental factors or their interaction. We recruited a European ancestry sample of 463 individuals with recurrent MDD and 459 controls, obtained self-report and semi-structured interview data about psychiatric and medical history and other environmental variables, sequenced RNA from whole blood and genotyped a genome-wide panel of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms. We used analytical methods to identify MDD-related genes and pathways using all of these sources of information. In analyses of association between MDD and expression levels of 13 857 single autosomal genes, accounting for multiple technical, physiological and environmental covariates, a significant excess of low P-values was observed, but there was no significant single-gene association after genome-wide correction. Pathway-based analyses of expression data detected significant association of MDD with increased expression of genes in the interferon α/β signaling pathway. This finding could not be explained by potentially confounding diseases and medications (including antidepressants) or by computationally estimated proportions of white blood cell types. Although cause-effect relationships cannot be determined from these data, the results support the hypothesis that altered immune signaling has a role in the pathogenesis, manifestation, and/or the persistence and progression of MDD. PMID:24296977

  11. Colorimetric In Situ Hybridization Identifies MYC Gene Signal Clusters Correlating With Increased Copy Number, mRNA, and Protein in Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Carlo; Kendrick, Samantha; Johnson, Nathalie; Gascoyne, Randy; Chan, Wing C.; Weisenburger, Dennis; Braziel, Rita; Cook, James R.; Tubbs, Raymond; Campo, Elias; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Delabie, Jan; Jaffe, Elaine; Zhang, Wenjun; Brunhoeber, Patrick; Nitta, Hiro; Grogan, Tom; Rimsza, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities of the MYC oncogene on chromosome 8 are characteristic of Burkitt lymphoma and other aggressive B-cell lymphomas, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We recently described a colorimetric in situ hybridization (CISH) method for detecting extra copies of the MYC gene in DLBCL and the frequent occurrence of excess copies of discrete MYC signals in the context of diploidy or polyploidy of chromosome 8, which correlated with increased mRNA signals. We further observed enlarged MYC signals, which were counted as a single gene copy but, by their dimension and unusual shape, likely consisted of “clusters” of MYC genes. In this study, we sought to further characterize these clusters of MYC signals by determining whether the presence of these correlated with other genetic features, mRNA levels, protein, and overall survival. We found that MYC clusters correlated with an abnormal MYC locus and with increased mRNA. MYC mRNA correlated with protein levels, and both increased mRNA and protein correlated with poorer overall survival. MYC clusters were seen in both the germinal center and activated B-cell subtypes of DLBCL. Clusters of MYC signals may be an underappreciated, but clinically important, feature of aggressive B-cell lymphomas with potential prognostic and therapeutic relevance. PMID:23355209

  12. Plasma components affect accuracy of circulating cancer-related microRNA quantitation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Ja; Linnstaedt, Sarah; Palma, Jaime; Park, Joon Cheol; Ntrivalas, Evangelos; Kwak-Kim, Joanne Y H; Gilman-Sachs, Alice; Beaman, Kenneth; Hastings, Michelle L; Martin, Jeffrey N; Duelli, Dominik M

    2012-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as candidate biomarkers of various diseases and conditions including malignancy and pregnancy. This approach requires sensitive and accurate quantitation of miRNA concentrations in body fluids. Herein we report that enzyme-based miRNA quantitation, which is currently the mainstream approach for identifying differences in miRNA abundance among samples, is skewed by endogenous serum factors that co-purify with miRNAs and anticoagulant agents used during collection. Of importance, different miRNAs were affected to varying extent among patient samples. By developing measures to overcome these interfering activities, we increased the accuracy, and improved the sensitivity of miRNA detection up to 30-fold. Overall, the present study outlines key factors that prevent accurate miRNA quantitation in body fluids and provides approaches that enable faithful quantitation of miRNA abundance in body fluids. PMID:22154918

  13. MicroRNA-223 and microRNA-92a in stool and plasma samples act as complementary biomarkers to increase colorectal cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pi-Yueh; Chen, Chia-Chun; Chang, Yu-Sun; Tsai, Wen-Sy; You, Jeng-Fu; Lin, Geng-Ping; Chen, Ting-Wen; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Chan, Err-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant levels of circulating miRNAs are potential biomarkers for the early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, no previous systematic study has examined miRNAs in various specimen types from the same patient to evaluate their clinical utility. In this study, we compiled information from ∼450 articles published before 2012, and selected the 46 most frequently reported CRC-related miRNAs as candidates. We then established a 46-miRNA multiplex RT-qPCR method, and efficiently examined two clinically accessible samples: stool from fecal occult blood test and EDTA plasma. A total of 62 tissue, 447 stool, and 398 plasma samples were collected from CRC patients and healthy controls. Good correlations of detectable miRNAs were noticed in paired tumor tissues, stool, and plasma samples of 62 CRC patients. Using these 62 CRC patients and 62 matched healthy controls as the training set, 5 and 11 differentially expressed miRNAs achieved the area under the ROC curve (AUC) greater than 0.7 in stool and plasma samples, respectively. The selected miRNAs was subsequently validated using the remaining enrolled samples as the test cohort; 4 miRNAs in stool and 6 miRNAs in plasma were maintained discriminating powers for CRC patients. After examining the complementary effect, combined analysis of miR-223 and miR-92a, which were commonly present in stool and plasma samples, yielded the highest sensitivity of 96.8% and the specificity of 75% for CRC (AUC = 0.907). These results allowed us to establish a two-miRNA biosignature in two types of CRC clinical specimens with a high sensitivity for CRC detection. PMID:26848774

  14. Ventilation-induced increases in EGFR ligand mRNA are not altered by intra-amniotic LPS or ureaplasma in preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Noah H; Gisslen, Tate; Polglase, Graeme R; Kallapur, Suhas G; Jobe, Alan H

    2014-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis and mechanical ventilation are associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in preterm infants. Mechanical ventilation at birth activates both inflammatory and acute phase responses. These responses can be partially modulated by previous exposure to intra-amniotic (IA) LPS or Ureaplasma parvum (UP). Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands participate in lung development, and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) 1 and ACE2 contribute to lung inflammation. We asked whether brief mechanical ventilation at birth altered EGFR and ACE pathways and if antenatal exposure to IA LPS or UP could modulate these effects. Ewes were exposed to IA injections of UP, LPS or saline multiple days prior to preterm delivery at 85% gestation. Lambs were either immediately euthanized or mechanically ventilated for 2 to 3 hr. IA UP and LPS cause modest changes in the EGFR ligands amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), heparin binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF), and betacellulin (BTC) mRNA expression. Mechanical ventilation greatly increased mRNA expression of AREG, EREG, and HB-EGF, with no additional increases resulting from IA LPS or UP. With ventilation AREG and EREG mRNA localized to cells in terminal airspace. EGFR mRNA also increased with mechanical ventilation. IA UP and LPS decreased ACE1 mRNA and increased ACE2 mRNA, resulting in a 4 fold change in the ACE1/ACE2 ratio. Mechanical ventilation with large tidal volumes increased both ACE1 and ACE2 expression. The alterations seen in ACE with IA exposures and EGFR pathways with mechanical ventilation may contribute to the development of BPD in preterm infants. PMID:24788984

  15. Structural and genetic requirements for the biogenesis of tobacco rattle virus-derived small interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Donaire, Livia; Barajas, Daniel; Martínez-García, Belén; Martínez-Priego, Llucia; Pagán, Israel; Llave, César

    2008-06-01

    In plants, small RNA-guided processes referred to as RNA silencing control gene expression and serve as an efficient antiviral mechanism. Plant viruses are inducers and targets of RNA silencing as infection involves the production of functional virus-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Here we investigate the structural and genetic components influencing the formation of Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-derived siRNAs. TRV siRNAs are mostly 21 nucleotides in length and derive from positive and negative viral RNA strands, although TRV siRNAs of positive polarity are significantly more abundant. This asymmetry appears not to correlate with the presence of highly structured regions of single-stranded viral RNA. The Dicer-like enzyme DCL4, DCL3, or DCL2 targets, alone or in combination, viral templates to promote synthesis of siRNAs of both polarities from all regions of the viral genome. The heterogeneous distribution profile of TRV siRNAs reveals differential contributions throughout the TRV genome to siRNA formation. Indirect evidence suggests that DCL2 is responsible for production of a subset of siRNAs derived from the 3' end region of TRV. TRV siRNA biogenesis and antiviral silencing are strongly dependent on the combined activity of the host-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerases RDR1, RDR2, and RDR6, thus providing evidence that perfectly complementary double-stranded RNA serves as a substrate for siRNA production. We conclude that the overall composition of viral siRNAs in TRV-infected plants reflects the combined action of several interconnected pathways involving different DCL and RDR activities. PMID:18353962

  16. MicroRNA-1 downregulation increases connexin 43 displacement and induces ventricular tachyarrhythmias in rodent hypertrophic hearts.

    PubMed

    Curcio, Antonio; Torella, Daniele; Iaconetti, Claudio; Pasceri, Eugenia; Sabatino, Jolanda; Sorrentino, Sabato; Giampà, Salvatore; Micieli, Mariella; Polimeni, Alberto; Henning, Beverley J; Leone, Angelo; Catalucci, Daniele; Ellison, Georgina M; Condorelli, Gianluigi; Indolfi, Ciro

    2013-01-01

    Downregulation of the muscle-specific microRNA-1 (miR-1) mediates the induction of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy. Dysfunction of the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43), an established miR-1 target, during cardiac hypertrophy leads to ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT). However, it is still unknown whether miR-1 and Cx43 are interconnected in the pro-arrhythmic context of hypertrophy. Thus, in this study we investigated whether a reduction in the extent of cardiac hypertrophy could limit the pathological electrical remodeling of Cx43 and the onset of VT by modulating miR-1 levels. Wistar male rats underwent mechanical constriction of the ascending aorta to induce pathologic left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and afterwards were randomly assigned to receive 10mg/kg valsartan, VAL (LVH+VAL) delivered in the drinking water or placebo (LVH) for 12 weeks. Sham surgery was performed for control groups. Programmed ventricular stimulation reproducibly induced VT in LVH compared to LVH+VAL group. When compared to sham controls, rats from LVH group showed a significant decrease of miR-1 and an increase of Cx43 expression and its ERK1/2-dependent phosphorylation, which displaces Cx43 from the gap junction. Interestingly, VAL administration to rats with aortic banding significantly reduced cardiac hypertrophy and prevented miR-1 down-regulation and Cx43 up-regulation and phosphorylation. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments in neonatal cardiomyocytes (NCMs) in vitro confirmed that Cx43 is a direct target of miR-1. Accordingly, in vitro angiotensin II stimulation reduced miR-1 levels and increased Cx43 expression and phosphorylation compared to un-stimulated NCMs. Finally, in vivo miR-1 cardiac overexpression by an adenoviral vector intra-myocardial injection reduced Cx43 expression and phosphorylation in mice with isoproterenol-induced LVH. In conclusion, miR-1 regulates Cx43 expression and activity in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of

  17. Isolation of vesicular stomatitis virus defective interfering genomes with different amounts of 5'-terminal complementarity.

    PubMed Central

    Kolakofsky, D

    1982-01-01

    I isolated at least 30 different vesicular stomatitis virus defective interfering (DI) genomes, distinguished by chain length, by five independent undiluted passages of a repeatedly cloned virus plaque. Labeling of the 3' hydroxyl ends of these DI genomes and RNase digestion studies demonstrated that the ends of these DI genomes were terminally complementary to different extents (approximately 46 to 200 nucleotides). Mapping studies showed that the complementary ends of all of the DI genomes were derived from the 5' ends of the nondefective minus-strand genome. Regardless of the extent of terminal complementarity, all of the DI genomes synthesized the same 46-nucleotide minus-strand leader RNA. Images PMID:6281468

  18. Long non-coding antisense RNA KRT7-AS is activated in gastric cancers and supports cancer cell progression by increasing KRT7 expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Binbin; Song, Jee Hoon; Cheng, Yulan; Abraham, John M.; Ibrahim, Sariat; Sun, Zhenguo; Ke, Xiquan

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are associated with human carcinogenesis. One group of lncRNAs, which are antisense in orientation to coding mRNAs (ASs), have been recently described in cancers but are poorly understood. We sought to identify ASs involved in human gastric cancer (GC) and to elucidate their mechanisms of action in carcinogenesis. We performed massively parallel RNA sequencing in GCs and matched normal tissues, as well as in GC-derived and normal gastric epithelial cell lines. One AS, designated KRT7-AS, was selected due to its marked upregulation and concordant expression with its cognate sense counterpart, KRT7, in GC tissues and cell lines. KRT7-AS formed an RNA-RNA hybrid with KRT7 and controlled KRT7 expression at both the mRNA and the post-transcriptional levels. Moreover, forced overexpression of the KRT7-overlapping region (OL) of KRT7-AS (but not its non-KRT7-overlapping portions) increased keratin 7 protein levels in cells. Finally, forced overexpression of full-length (FL) KRT7-AS or OL KRT7-AS (but not its non-KRT7-overlapping regions) promoted GC cell proliferation and migration. We conclude that lncRNA KRT7-AS promotes GC, at least in part, by increasing KRT7 expression. PMID:26876208

  19. Modified gold nanoparticles for intracellular delivery of anti-liver cancer siRNA.

    PubMed

    Shaat, Hanan; Mostafa, Amany; Moustafa, Moustafa; Gamal-Eldeen, Amira; Emam, Ahmed; El-Hussieny, Enas; Elhefnawi, Mahmoud

    2016-05-17

    To overcome the rapid enzymatic degradation and low transfection efficiency of siRNA, the delivery carriers for siRNA is a therapeutic demand to increase its stability. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified by branched polyethyleneimine (bPEI) were developed as an efficient and safe intracellular delivery carriers for siRNA. The current study implied that siRNA designed against an oncogene c-Myc could be delivered by a modified AuNPs complex without significant cytotoxicity. The comparative semi-quantitative and quantitative real time PCR were used to measure the c-Myc gene expression after transfection with naked siRNA and siRNA/bPEI/AuNPs, but AuNPs interfered with PCR. However, the c-Myc protein translation was successfully detected in the transfected HuH7 cells with naked siRNA and siRNA/bPEI/AuNPs and it was found to be inhibited by siRNA/bPEI/AuNPs more than naked siRNA. The results validate the successful silencing of c-Myc gene. Accordingly, it may confirm the promising and effective delivery of siRNA by bPEI/AuNPs. The complex enhances the cellular uptake of siRNA without significant cytotoxicity and confirms that bPEI modified AuNPs could be used as a good candidate for safe cellular delivery of siRNA. PMID:27036397

  20. Green tea increases the antiinflammatory tristetraprolin and decreases the proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor mRNA levels in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) family proteins have antiinflammatory activity by binding to and destabilizing proinflammatory mRNAs such as TNF mRNA, and represent a potential therapeutic target for inflammation-related diseases. Tea has antiinflammatory properties but the molecular mechanism has not been e...

  1. 47 CFR 73.185 - Computation of interfering signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... interfering station to be considered as pertinent to transmission by one reflection. To provide for variation... angle than the pertinent angle for one reflection, the method of calculating interference will not...

  2. 47 CFR 73.185 - Computation of interfering signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... interfering station to be considered as pertinent to transmission by one reflection. To provide for variation... angle than the pertinent angle for one reflection, the method of calculating interference will not...

  3. 47 CFR 73.185 - Computation of interfering signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... interfering station to be considered as pertinent to transmission by one reflection. To provide for variation... angle than the pertinent angle for one reflection, the method of calculating interference will not...

  4. 47 CFR 73.185 - Computation of interfering signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... interfering station to be considered as pertinent to transmission by one reflection. To provide for variation... angle than the pertinent angle for one reflection, the method of calculating interference will not...

  5. 47 CFR 73.185 - Computation of interfering signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... interfering station to be considered as pertinent to transmission by one reflection. To provide for variation... angle than the pertinent angle for one reflection, the method of calculating interference will not...

  6. Persistent CSF but not plasma HIV RNA is associated with increased risk of new-onset moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms; a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Edward R; Crum, Rosa M; Treisman, Glenn J; Mehta, Shruti H; Clifford, David B; Ellis, Ronald J; Gelman, Benjamin B; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L; Marra, Christina M; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David M; Mcarthur, Justin C

    2016-08-01

    Major depressive disorder is the most common neuropsychiatric complication in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections and is associated with worse clinical outcomes. We determined if detectable cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) HIV ribonucleic acid (RNA) at threshold ≥50 copies/ml is associated with increased risk of depression. The CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) cohort is a six-center US-based prospective cohort with bi-annual follow-up of 674 participants. We fit linear mixed models (N = 233) and discrete-time survival models (N = 154; 832 observations) to evaluate trajectories of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) II scores and the incidence of new-onset moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms (BDI ≥ 17) among participants on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), who were free of depression at study entry and received a minimum of three CSF examinations over 2496 person-months follow-up. Detectable CSF HIV RNA (threshold ≥50 copies/ml) at any visit was associated with a 4.7-fold increase in new-onset depression at subsequent visits adjusted for plasma HIV RNA and treatment adherence; hazard ratio (HR) = 4.76, (95 % CI 1.58-14.3); P = 0.006. Depression (BDI) scores were 2.53 points higher (95 % CI 0.47-4.60; P = 0.02) over 6 months if CSF HIV RNA was detectable at a prior study visit in fully adjusted models including age, sex, race, education, plasma HIV RNA, duration and adherence of CART, and lifetime depression diagnosis by Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM-IV) criteria. Persistent CSF but not plasma HIV RNA is associated with an increased risk for new-onset depression. Further research evaluating the role of immune activation and inflammatory markers may improve our understanding of this association. PMID:26727907

  7. Skeletal muscle myostatin mRNA expression is fiber-type specific and increases during hindlimb unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, C. J.; Booth, F. W.; Gordon, S. E.

    1999-01-01

    Transgenic mice lacking a functional myostatin (MSTN) gene demonstrate greater skeletal muscle mass resulting from muscle fiber hypertrophy and hyperplasia (McPherron, A. C., A. M. Lawler, and S. -J. Lee. Nature 387: 83-90, 1997). Therefore, we hypothesized that, in normal mice, MSTN may act as a negative regulator of muscle mass. Specifically, we hypothesized that the predominately slow (type I) soleus muscle, which demonstrates greater atrophy than the fast (type II) gastrocnemius-plantaris complex (Gast/PLT), would show more elevation in MSTN mRNA abundance during hindlimb unloading (HU). Surprisingly, MSTN mRNA was not detectable in weight-bearing or HU soleus muscle, which atrophied 42% by the 7th day of HU in female ICR mice. In contrast, MSTN mRNA was present in weight-bearing Gast/PLT muscle and was significantly elevated (67%) at 1 day but not at 3 or 7 days of HU. However, the Gast/PLT muscle had only atrophied 17% by the 7th day of HU. Because the soleus is composed only of type I and IIa fibers, whereas the Gast/PLT expresses type IId/x and IIb in addition to type I and IIa, it was necessary to perform a more careful analysis of the relationship between MSTN mRNA levels and myosin heavy-chain (MHC) isoform expression (as a marker of fiber type). A significant correlation (r = 0.725, P < 0. 0005) was noted between the percentage of MHC isoform IIb expression and MSTN mRNA abundance in several muscles of the mouse hindlimb. These results indicate that MSTN expression is not strongly associated with muscle atrophy induced by HU; however, it is strongly associated with MHC isoform IIb expression in normal muscle.

  8. Downregulation of lncRNA CASC2 by microRNA-21 increases the proliferation and migration of renal cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yunjie; Xu, Renfang; Xu, Xianlin; Zhou, Yaojun; Cui, Li; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-07-01

    Several long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified that may have a crucial role in tumor progression and metastasis. The lncRNA cancer susceptibility candidate 2 (CASC2) has previously been reported to act as a tumor suppressor gene in glioma and colorectal cancer. However, the expression and function of CASC2 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains to be elucidated. The present study confirmed that CASC2 was downregulated in human RCC tissues and human RCC cell lines (786‑O and A498). Restoration of CASC2 expression via transfection with a pcDNA3.1(+)‑CASC2 vector was able to inhibit cell proliferation and migration in 786‑O and A498 cells, as compared with in the cells transfected with a pcDNA3.1(+) empty vector. MicroRNA‑21 (miR‑21) has been reported to be upregulated in human RCC tissues and cell lines, and is associated with the malignant progression of RCC. In the present study, bioinformatics analysis and dual‑luciferase reporter assays confirmed that CASC2 was a direct target gene of miR‑21. miR‑21 was able to decrease the expression of CASC2 in 786‑O and A498 cells. Furthermore, overexpression of miR‑21 partly abrogated CASC2‑mediated inhibition of 786‑O and A498 cell proliferation and migration. The present study provides evidence indicating that CASC2 targeted by miR‑21 acts as a tumor suppressor in RCC. Therefore, CASC2 may be considered a novel target for the diagnosis and treatment of RCC. PMID:27222255

  9. Host Factors Modulating RSV Infection: Use of Small Interfering RNAs to Probe Functional Importance.

    PubMed

    Caly, Leon; Li, Hong-Mei; Jans, David

    2016-01-01

    Although respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and the elderly worldwide [1], the protein-protein interactions between the host cell and virus remain poorly understood. We have used a focused small interfering RNA (siRNA) approach to knock-down and examine the role(s) of various host cell proteins. Here, we describe approaches for casein kinase 2α (CK2α) as a key example. We show how to study the effect of host gene (CK2α) knockdown using siRNA on cell-associated and released virus titers, using both quantitative RT-PCR, which measures the level of viral RNA, and plaque assay, which measures infectious virus directly. Both assays identified reduced viral titers with CK2α gene knock-down, indicating that it is likely required for efficient viral assembly and/or release. Effects were confirmed in RSV infected cells using the specific CK2α inhibitor 4,5,6,7-tetrabromobenzotriazole, revealing a similar reduction in viral titers as CK2α specific siRNA. This demonstrates that siRNA can be used to characterize critical host cell-RSV protein-protein interactions, and establishes CK2α as a future druggable target. PMID:27464690

  10. A Multi-RNAi Microsponge Platform for Simultaneous Controlled Delivery of Multiple Small Interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Roh, Young Hoon; Deng, Jason Z; Dreaden, Erik C; Park, Jae Hyon; Yun, Dong Soo; Shopsowitz, Kevin E; Hammond, Paula T

    2016-03-01

    Packaging multiple small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules into nanostructures at precisely defined ratios is a powerful delivery strategy for effective RNA interference (RNAi) therapy. We present a novel RNA nanotechnology based approach to produce multiple components of polymerized siRNA molecules that are simultaneously self-assembled and densely packaged into composite sponge-like porous microstructures (Multi-RNAi-MSs) by rolling circle transcription. The Multi-RNAi-MSs were designed to contain a combination of multiple polymeric siRNA molecules with precisely controlled stoichiometry within a singular microstructure by manipulating the types and ratios of the circular DNA templates. The Multi-RNAi-MSs were converted into nanosized complexes by polyelectrolyte condensation to manipulate their physicochemical properties (size, shape, and surface charge) for favorable delivery, while maintaining the multifunctional properties of the siRNAs for combined therapeutic effects. These Multi-RNAi-MS systems have great potential in RNAi-mediated biomedical applications, for example, for the treatment of cancer, genetic disorders, and viral infections. PMID:26695874

  11. Prepubertal increases in gonadotropin-releasing hormone mRNA, gonadotropin-releasing hormone precursor, and subsequent maturation of precursor processing in male rats.

    PubMed Central

    Dutlow, C M; Rachman, J; Jacobs, T W; Millar, R P

    1992-01-01

    Changes in gonadotropins and gonadal steroids during sexual maturation in rats and humans are well documented but little is known about hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) gene expression in relation to these events. This study measured hypothalamic proGnRH mRNA, GnRH precursor, and fully processed GnRH from postnatal day 8 until day 62 in male rats. GnRH precursor increased on day 22, reached a peak on day 24, declined on day 25 and returned to infantile levels by day 28. A secondary rise in precursor occurred at about day 40 when testosterone levels increased. GnRH mRNA increased on day 22 and remained elevated over the study period to day 26. GnRH increased on day 24 and remained at this level until a secondary rise occurred coincident with the testosterone rise at about day 40. The ratio of GnRH precursor to GnRH was high until day 24 and was low from day 26 onwards, reflecting a maturation of the processing enzyme system between these 2 d. Thus, an abrupt increase in GnRH gene transcription (mRNA) occurs early in juvenile male rats (day 22), well before the onset of puberty. An increase in GnRH precursor accompanies these early changes and this is followed by the maturation of processing as evidenced by the rapid decline of precursor and increase in GnRH from day 24 onward. Images PMID:1469100

  12. shRNA-mediated silencing of sorcin increases drug chemosensitivity in myeloma KM3/DDP and U266/ADM cell lines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ping; Jiang, Yong-Fang; Wang, Jing-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Sorcin is a penta-EF hand calcium binding protein, which is involved in the resistance to chemotherapeutics in cancer cells, and is overexpressed in various cancer cells. However, tumor relapse combined with the development of drug resistance remains a significant problem. Here, we demonstrated that silencing of Sorcin in chemotherapy resistance myeloma U266/ADM and KM3/DDP cell lines resulted in reduced cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis. Sorcin siRNA successfully silenced Sorcin mRNA and protein expression. Silencing of Sorcin also significantly reduced the mRNA and protein expression levels of MDR1, MRP1, GST-π, Survinvin, Livin, Bcl-2, Cyclin-D1, phospho-Src, C-myc, p21, NF-κB and phospho-AKT, while p53 expression and caspase-3 and caspase-8 activity significantly increased when compared with control group. Silencing of Sorcin significantly increased the sensitivity of KM3/DDP cells to cisplatin and the sensitivity of U266/ADM to adriamycin, compared to cells untransfected and transfected with negative control shRNA. In addition, intracellular accumulation of Rhodamine 123 significantly increased in KM3/DDP and U266/ADM cells. In summary, our studies indicate that drug resistance can be effectively reversed in cisplatin-resistance and adriamycin-resistant myeloma cells through delivery of siRNAs targeting Sorcin. Assessment of potential as a target for human myeloma treatment is clearly warranted. PMID:26045737

  13. Acute "binge" cocaine increases mu-opioid receptor mRNA levels in areas of the rat mesolimbic mesocortical dopamine system.

    PubMed

    Yuferov, V; Zhou, Y; Spangler, R; Maggos, C E; Ho, A; Kreek, M J

    1999-01-01

    Autoradiography studies demonstrated that chronic "binge" cocaine administration increased mu-opioid receptor density in dopaminergically innervated rat brain regions, including the cingulate cortex, the nucleus accumbens, and the basolateral amygdala. The present study investigated the effects of a single day of binge-pattern cocaine administration (3 x 15 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.] at hourly intervals) on mu-opioid receptor mRNA levels in selected brain regions. Rats were sacrificed 30 min after the third injection and mRNA levels were measured by a quantitative solution hybridization RNase protection assay. Acute binge cocaine administration significantly increased mu-opioid receptor mRNA levels in the frontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala, but not in the caudate-putamen, thalamus, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. As has been suggested for other G-protein coupled receptors, the rapid increase of MOR mRNA reported in this study might represent an adaptive response to compensate for a decrease in number of receptors following cocaine-induced opioid peptide release. PMID:10210176

  14. Inhibition of osteolysis and increase of bone formation after local administration of siRNA-targeting RANK in a polyethylene particle-induced osteolysis model.

    PubMed

    Córdova, L A; Trichet, V; Escriou, V; Rosset, P; Amiaud, J; Battaglia, S; Charrier, C; Berreur, M; Brion, R; Gouin, F; Layrolle, P; Passuti, N; Heymann, D

    2015-02-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK) and RANK-ligand are relevant targets for the treatment of polyethylene particle-induced osteolysis. This study assessed the local administration of siRNA, targeting both human RANK and mouse Rank transcripts in a mouse model. Four groups of mice were implanted with polyethylene (PE) particles in the calvaria and treated locally with 2.5, 5 and 10 μg of RANK siRNA or a control siRNA delivered by the cationic liposome DMAPAP/DOPE. The tissues were harvested at day 9 after surgery and evaluated by micro-computed tomography, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) immunohistochemistry for macrophages and osteoblasts, and gene relative expression of inflammatory and osteolytic markers. 10 μg of RANK siRNA exerted a protective effect against PE particle-induced osteolysis, decreasing the bone loss and the osteoclastogenesis, demonstrated by the significant increase in the bone volume (P<0.001) and by the reduction in both the number of TRAP(+) cells and osteoclast activity (P<0.01). A bone anabolic effect demonstrated by the formation of new trabecular bone was confirmed by the increased immunopositive staining for osteoblast-specific proteins. In addition, 5 and 10 μg of RANK siRNA downregulated the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (P<0.01) without depletion of macrophages. Our findings show that RANK siRNA delivered locally by a synthetic vector may be an effective approach for reducing osteolysis and may even stimulate bone formation in aseptic loosening of prosthetic implants. PMID:25462844

  15. HIV Tat protein affects circadian rhythmicity by interfering with the circadian system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, T; Jiang, Z; Hou, W; Li, Z; Cheng, S; Green, LA; Wang, Y; Wen, X; Cai, L; Clauss, M; Wang, Z

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Sleep disorders are common in patients with HIV/AIDS, and can lead to poor quality of life. Although many studies have investigated the aetiology of these disorders, it is still unclear whether impaired sleep quality is associated with HIV itself, social problems, or side effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Moreover, despite its known neurological associations, little is known about the role of the trans-activator of transcription (Tat) protein in sleep disorders in patients with HIV/AIDS. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the sleep quality of patients with HIV/AIDS affected by an altered circadian rhythm correlates with cerebrospinal HIV Tat protein concentration. Methods Ninety-six patients with HIV/AIDS between 20 and 69 years old completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Their circadian rhythm parameters of blood pressure, Tat concentration in cerebrospinal fluid, melatonin concentration, CD4 cell count and HIV RNA viral load in serum were measured. Results The circadian amplitude of systolic blood pressure and the score for sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) were negatively correlated with HIV Tat protein concentration, while the melatonin value was positively correlated with Tat protein concentration. Conclusions The HIV Tat protein affects circadian rhythmicity by interfering with the circadian system in patients with HIV/AIDS and further increases the melatonin excretion value. A Tat protein-related high melatonin value may counteract HIV-related poor sleep quality during the progression of HIV infection. This study provides the first clinical evidence offering an explanation for why sleep quality did not show an association with progression of HIV infection in previous studies. PMID:24750691

  16. Activation of p38 signaling increases utrophin A expression in skeletal muscle via the RNA-binding protein KSRP and inhibition of AU-rich element-mediated mRNA decay: implications for novel DMD therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Amirouche, Adel; Tadesse, Helina; Lunde, John A; Bélanger, Guy; Côté, Jocelyn; Jasmin, Bernard J

    2013-08-01

    Several therapeutic approaches are currently being developed for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) including upregulating the levels of endogenous utrophin A in dystrophic fibers. Here, we examined the role of post-transcriptional mechanisms in controlling utrophin A expression in skeletal muscle. We show that activation of p38 leads to an increase in utrophin A independently of a transcriptional induction. Rather, p38 controls the levels of utrophin A mRNA by extending the half-life of transcripts via AU-rich elements (AREs). This mechanism critically depends on a decrease in the functional availability of KSRP, an RNA-binding protein known to promote decay of ARE-containing transcripts. In vitro and in vivo binding studies revealed that KSRP interacts with specific AREs located within the utrophin A 3' UTR. Electroporation experiments to knockdown KSRP led to an increase in utrophin A in wild-type and mdx mouse muscles. In pre-clinical studies, treatment of mdx mice with heparin, an activator of p38, causes a pronounced increase in utrophin A in diaphragm muscle fibers. Together, these studies identify a pathway that culminates in the post-transcriptional regulation of utrophin A through increases in mRNA stability. Furthermore, our results constitute proof-of-principle showing that pharmacological activation of p38 may prove beneficial as a novel therapeutic approach for DMD. PMID:23575223

  17. Sphingosine kinase-1, S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 and S1P2 mRNA expressions are increased in liver with advanced fibrosis in human

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Masaya; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Kurano, Makoto; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Maki, Harufumi; Kudo, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in liver fibrosis or inflammation was not fully examined in human. Controversy exists which S1P receptors, S1P1 and S1P3 vs S1P2, would be importantly involved in its mechanism. To clarify these matters, 80 patients who received liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 patients for metastatic liver tumor were enrolled. S1P metabolism was analyzed in background, non-tumorous liver tissue. mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) but not SK2 were increased in livers with fibrosis stages 3–4 compared to those with 0–2 and to normal liver. However, S1P was not increased in advanced fibrotic liver, where mRNA levels of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2) but not S1P-degrading enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, mRNA levels of S1P2 but not S1P1 or S1P3 were increased in advanced fibrotic liver. These increased mRNA levels of SK1, SPNS2 and S1P2 in fibrotic liver were correlated with α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels in liver, and with serum ALT levels. In conclusion, S1P may be actively generated, transported to outside the cells, and bind to its specific receptor in human liver to play a role in fibrosis or inflammation. Altered S1P metabolism in fibrotic liver may be their therapeutic target. PMID:27562371

  18. Sphingosine kinase-1, S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 and S1P2 mRNA expressions are increased in liver with advanced fibrosis in human.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masaya; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Kurano, Makoto; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Maki, Harufumi; Kudo, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in liver fibrosis or inflammation was not fully examined in human. Controversy exists which S1P receptors, S1P1 and S1P3 vs S1P2, would be importantly involved in its mechanism. To clarify these matters, 80 patients who received liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 patients for metastatic liver tumor were enrolled. S1P metabolism was analyzed in background, non-tumorous liver tissue. mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) but not SK2 were increased in livers with fibrosis stages 3-4 compared to those with 0-2 and to normal liver. However, S1P was not increased in advanced fibrotic liver, where mRNA levels of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2) but not S1P-degrading enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, mRNA levels of S1P2 but not S1P1 or S1P3 were increased in advanced fibrotic liver. These increased mRNA levels of SK1, SPNS2 and S1P2 in fibrotic liver were correlated with α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels in liver, and with serum ALT levels. In conclusion, S1P may be actively generated, transported to outside the cells, and bind to its specific receptor in human liver to play a role in fibrosis or inflammation. Altered S1P metabolism in fibrotic liver may be their therapeutic target. PMID:27562371

  19. In vitro transcription of defective interfering particles of influenza virus produces polyadenylic acid-containing complementary RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Chanda, P K; Chambers, T M; Nayak, D P

    1983-01-01

    Influenza virus defective interfering (DI) RNAs, which originate from polymerase genes by simple internal deletion, can be transcribed in vitro. These DI RNA transcripts contain covalently linked polyadenylic acid, and their synthesis is dependent on ApG or capped RNAs as primers. Furthermore, like the standard viral RNA transcripts, they are complementary in nature and are slightly smaller in size compared with the corresponding DI RNAs. Hybridization of the specific DI RNA transcripts with the corresponding DI RNA segments and analysis of the duplex RNA by gel electrophoresis indicate that they are not incomplete polymerase gene transcripts, but rather the transcripts of the DI RNAs. Since influenza virus DI RNAs contain both the 5' and the 3' termini and transcribe polyadenylic acid-containing complementary RNAs in vitro the mechanism of interference may differ from that of the 5' DI RNAs of Sendai and vesicular stomatitis viruses. Images PMID:6185696

  20. Increased interleukin-1beta mRNA expression in skin biopsies of horses with Culicoides hypersensitivity following challenge with Culicoides nubeculosus extract.

    PubMed

    Kolm, Gabriela; Knapp, Elzbieta; Wagner, Regina; Klein, Dieter

    2006-09-15

    Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) is a primary cytokine of the skin that has a pivotal role in keratinocyte differentiation, epidermal wound healing and host defense. Pathological increase of cutaneous IL-1beta is associated with edema formation, epidermal hyperproliferation and atopic dermatitis in humans. However, in horses the role of cutaneous IL-1beta in edema formation and allergic skin disease has not been characterised so far. Particularly in Culicoides hypersensitivity (CHS), intradermal injection of Culicoides extract may be associated with enhanced transcription of local IL-1beta. To examine the mRNA expression of IL-1beta and its receptor antagonist IL-1RA in the skin of horses, biopsy specimens of horses affected and non-affected by CHS prior and following intradermal challenge with a commercial C. nubeculosus extract were examined. Our hypothesis was that cutaneous IL-1beta mRNA was significantly upregulated in horses with CHS in response to Culicoides allergen. Biopsies were taken from sites prior to and 4 h following intradermal challenge with C. nubeculosus extract. In order to obtain reliable data, real time PCR was performed and genes of interest were normalized using three different housekeeping genes, beta-actin, GAPDH, beta-2-microglobulin. No significant difference was detected in non-challenged cutaneous IL-1beta mRNA and IL-1RA mRNA levels between CHS affected and non-affected horses. Intradermal injection of C. nubeculosus extract resulted in local upregulation of IL-1beta mRNA both in horses with typical history, characteristic clinical signs for CHS and a positive intradermal skin test (IDT), and non-affected horses with a negative IDT. However, the difference in prior and post challenged site IL-1beta mRNA levels only reached statistical significance in the affected horses (p=0.01 versus 0.7). In contrast, IL-1RA mRNA levels did not demonstrate any modification following intradermal injection with C. nubeculosus in either group. In contrast

  1. Reflex splanchnic nerve stimulation increases levels of proenkephalin A mRNA and proenkephalin A-related peptides in the rat adrenal medulla.

    PubMed Central

    Kanamatsu, T; Unsworth, C D; Diliberto, E J; Viveros, O H; Hong, J S

    1986-01-01

    The effect of reflex splanchnic nerve stimulation on proenkephalin A biosynthesis was investigated in the rat adrenal medulla. Tissue levels of native [Met5]enkephalin-like immunoreactivity (IR) (measured by direct RIA of tissue extracts), cryptic [Met5]enkephalin-like IR (calculated as the increase in [Met5]enkephalin-like IR detected in tissue extracts after sequential digestion with trypsin and carboxypeptidase B), and proenkephalin A mRNA were determined in adrenal medulla from rats sacrificed at various times after a period of insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Two hours of insulin hypoglycemia, which produced intense reflex stimulation of the splanchnic nerves as evidenced by a 55% decrease in the adrenal medulla catecholamine levels, resulted in a 3-fold increase in proenkephalin A mRNA levels in this tissue. The proenkephalin A mRNA levels reached a maximum 15-fold increase over control values 24 hr after this period of hypoglycemic stress and then gradually declined with an approximate half-life of 4 days. Native and cryptic [Met5]enkephalin-like IR had increased 9-fold and 12-fold, respectively, 24 hr after this period of hypoglycemia, and both demonstrated maximum increases of 130-fold and 50-fold, respectively, after 96 hr. Combined pretreatment (i.p. administration) with the ganglionic and muscarinic blocking agents chlorisondamine (5 mg/kg of body weight) and atropine (1 mg/kg) blocked the increase in levels of proenkephalin A mRNA seen in the rat adrenal medulla following insulin hypoglycemia. These data indicate that reflex splanchnic nerve discharge stimulates proenkephalin biosynthesis, probably at the level of gene expression. Images PMID:3538020

  2. Modeling the intracellular replication of influenza A virus in the presence of defective interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Laske, Tanja; Heldt, Frank Stefan; Hoffmann, Helene; Frensing, Timo; Reichl, Udo

    2016-02-01

    Like many other viral pathogens, influenza A viruses can form defective interfering particles (DIPs). These particles carry a large internal deletion in at least one of their genome segments. Thus, their replication depends on the co-infection of cells by standard viruses (STVs), which supply the viral protein(s) encoded by the defective segment. However, DIPs also interfere with STV replication at the molecular level and, despite considerable research efforts, the mechanism of this interference remains largely elusive. Here, we present a mechanistic mathematical model for the intracellular replication of DIPs. In this model, we account for the common hypothesis that defective interfering RNAs (DI RNAs) possess a replication advantage over full-length (FL) RNAs due to their reduced length. By this means, the model captures experimental data from yield reduction assays and from studies testing different co-infection timings. In addition, our model predicts that one important aspect of interference is the competition for viral proteins, namely the heterotrimeric viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and the viral nucleoprotein (NP), which are needed for encapsidation of naked viral RNA. Moreover, we find that there may be an optimum for both the DI RNA synthesis rate and the time point of successive co-infection of a cell by DIPs and STVs. Comparing simulations for the growth of DIPs with a deletion in different genome segments suggests that DI RNAs derived from segments which encode for the polymerase subunits are more competitive than others. Overall, our model, thus, helps to elucidate the interference mechanism of DI RNAs and provides a novel hypothesis why DI RNAs derived from the polymerase-encoding segments are more abundant in DIP preparations. PMID:26592173

  3. Efficient inhibition of the formation of joint adhesions by ERK2 small interfering RNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fengfeng; Ruan, Hongjiang; Fan, Cunyi; Zeng, Bingfang; Wang, Chunyang; Wang, Xiang

    2010-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-{beta}1 and fibroblast growth factor-2 play very important roles in fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression. These processes lead to the formation of joint adhesions through the SMAD and MAPK pathways, in which extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)2 is considered to be crucial. Based on these theories, we examined the effects of a lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting ERK2 on the suppression of joint adhesion formation in vivo. The effects were assessed in vivo from different aspects including the adhesion score, histology and joint contracture angle. We found that the adhesions in the ERK2 siRNA group became soft and weak, and were easily stretched. Accordingly, the flexion contracture angles in the ERK2 siRNA group were also reduced (P < 0.05 compared with the control group). The animals appeared healthy, with no signs of impaired wound healing. In conclusion, local delivery of a lentivirus-mediated siRNA targeting ERK2 can ameliorate joint adhesion formation effectively and safely.

  4. Production of functional small interfering RNAs by an amino-terminal deletion mutant of human Dicer

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Edward M.; Whisnant, Adam W.; Kornepati, Anand V. R.; Marshall, Joy B.; Bogerd, Hal P.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2015-01-01

    Although RNA interference (RNAi) functions as a potent antiviral innate-immune response in plants and invertebrates, mammalian somatic cells appear incapable of mounting an RNAi response and few, if any, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can be detected. To examine why siRNA production is inefficient, we have generated double-knockout human cells lacking both Dicer and protein kinase RNA-activated. Using these cells, which tolerate double-stranded RNA expression, we show that a mutant form of human Dicer lacking the amino-terminal helicase domain can process double-stranded RNAs to produce high levels of siRNAs that are readily detectable by Northern blot, are loaded into RNA-induced silencing complexes, and can effectively and specifically inhibit the expression of cognate mRNAs. Remarkably, overexpression of this mutant Dicer, but not wild-type Dicer, also resulted in a partial inhibition of Influenza A virus—but not poliovirus—replication in human cells. PMID:26621737

  5. Increased mRNA expression of peripheral glial cell markers in bipolar disorder: The effect of long-term lithium treatment.

    PubMed

    Ferensztajn-Rochowiak, Ewa; Tarnowski, Maciej; Samochowiec, Jerzy; Michalak, Michal; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2016-09-01

    Neuroinflammation, with microglial activation as an important element, plays a role in the pathogenesis of bipolar disorder (BD). Also, in mood disorders, pathological changes have been demonstrated in macroglial cells, such as astrocyctes and oligodendrocytes. Postmortem brain studies of BD patients to assess glial cells, such as astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and their markers such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), Olig1 and Olig2, produced controversial results. On the other hand, investigation of these markers in the peripheral blood of such patients has not been performed so far. In this study, we examined the mRNA levels of GFAP, Olig1 and Olig2, in the peripheral blood of three groups: 15 BD subjects with a duration of illness at least 10 years (mean 20±9 years) but never treated with lithium, 15 subjects with BD treated continuously with lithium for 8-40 years (mean 16±8 years), and 15 control subjects. The groups were age-and sex-matched. Expression of mRNA markers was measured by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RQ-PCR). We observed increased mRNA levels of the Olig1 and Olig 2 glial markers studied in the BD patients not taking lithium, compared with the control subjects and increased mRNA level of GFAP, compared with lithium-treated patients. In the lithium-treated BD patients GFAP and Olig1 expression was at similar levels to that in the control group. However, Olig 2 expression was even higher than in the BD patients not taking lithium. The possible mechanisms concerning the higher expression of peripheral mRNA markers in BD patients may involve ongoing inflammatory process, compensatory mechanisms and regenerative responses. The beneficial effect of lithium may be related to its anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:27474686

  6. Chloroplast-targeted ERD1 protein declines but its mRNA increases during senescence in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, L.M.; Amasino, R.M. . Dept. of Biochemistry); Froehlich, J.E. . DOE Plant Research Lab.)

    1999-04-01

    Arabidopsis ERD1 is a ClpC-like protein that sequence analysis suggests may interact with the chloroplast-localized ClpP protease to facilitate proteolysis. The mRNA encoded by the ERD1 gene has previously been shown to accumulate in response to senescence and to a variety of stresses and hormones. Here the authors show that the ERD1 protein, in contrast to the ERD1 mRNA, strongly declines in abundance with age, becoming undetectable in fully expanded leaves. Sequence analysis also suggests that ERD1 is chloroplast targeted, and they show in an in vitro system that the native protein is properly imported, processed, and present within the soluble fraction of the chloroplast, presumably the stroma. They show that ClpP protein, which is also present in the stroma, declines with age in parallel with ERD1. These results are consistent with the interaction of ERD1 and ClpP, but they suggest that it is unlikely that either plays a major role during senescence. Certain other chloroplast proteins decline with age coordinately with ERD1 and ClpP, suggesting that these declines are markers of an early age-mediated change that occurs within the chloroplast.

  7. Effect of combination therapy of siRNA targeting growth hormone receptor and 5-fluorouracil in hepatic metastasis of colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, DONG; ZHANG, YI; LIANG, DAOMING; YUAN, YONG; ZENG, DEMIAO; CHEN, JIAYONG; YANG, JIE

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting human growth hormone receptor (hGHR) combined with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on the hepatic metastasis of colon cancer. The animal model of liver metastases using human SW480 colon cancer cells was established on BALB/c mice and the siRNA interfering plasmid targeting hGHR gene was constructed. The tumor-bearing mice were randomly divided into the saline control, plasmid, growth hormone (GH), 5-FU, 5-FU+plasmid and 5-FU+plasmid+GH groups. The liver metastasis in each group was observed. All the animals showed liver metastases and using siRNA-interfering plasmid treatment the incidence of liver metastases was significantly reduced in the tumor groups compared to the saline or GH group. The combined treatment of interfering plasmid and 5-FU slightly decreased the incidence of liver metastases in the tumor groups compared to the plasmid alone or 5-FU alone treatment, although the findings were not statistically significant. On the basis of the combination of interfering plasmid and 5-FU, the additional GH did not increase the incidence of liver metastases (P>0.05), but improved the weight loss of the mice (P<0.05) induced by the inhibition of GHR and toxicity of 5-FU. The present results showed that siRNA targeting hGHR is able to reduce the incidence of liver metastases of human SW480 colon cancer cells in mice. Thus, GHR may be important in tumor metastasis. PMID:26788158

  8. Nanocarrier mediated Delivery of siRNA/miRNA in Combination with Chemotherapeutic Agents for Cancer Therapy: Current Progress and Advances

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Nishant S.; Tekade, Rakesh K.; Chougule, Mahavir B.

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents have certain limitations when it comes to treating cancer, the most important being severe side effects along with multidrug resistance developed against them. Tumor cells exhibits drug resistance due to activation of various cellular level processes viz. activation of drug efflux pumps, anti-apoptotic defense mechanisms etc. Currently, RNA interference (RNAi) based therapeutic approaches are under vibrant scrutinization to seek cancer cure. Especially small interfering RNA (siRNA) and micro RNA (miRNA), are able to knock down the carcinogenic genes by targeting the mRNA expression, which underlies the uniqueness of this therapeutic approach. Recent research focus in the regime of cancer therapy involves the engagement of targeted delivery of siRNA/miRNA in combinations with other therapeutic agents (such as gene, DNA or chemotherapeutic drug) for targeting permeability glycoprotein (P-gp), Multidrug resistant protein 1(MRP-1), B-cell lymphoma (BCL-2) and other targets that are mainly responsible for resistance in cancer therapy. RNAi-chemotherapeutic drug combinations have also been found to be effective against different molecular targets as well and can increase the sensitization of cancer cells to therapy several folds. However, due to stability issues associated with siRNA/miRNA suitable protective carrier is needed and nanotechnology based approaches have been widely explored to overcome these drawbacks. Furthermore, it has been univocally advocated that the co-delivery of siRNA/miRNA with other chemodrugs significantly enhances their capability to overcome cancer resistance compared to naked counterparts. The objective of this article is to review recent nanocarrier based approaches adopted for the delivery of siRNA/miRNA combinations with other anticancer agents (siRNA/miRNA/pDNA/chemodrugs) to treat cancer. PMID:25204288

  9. MicroRNA-146a constrains multiple parameters of intestinal immunity and increases susceptibility to DSS colitis

    PubMed Central

    Runtsch, Marah C.; Hu, Ruozhen; Alexander, Margaret; Wallace, Jared; Kagele, Dominique; Petersen, Charisse; Valentine, John F.; Welker, Noah C.; Bronner, Mary P.; Chen, Xinjian; Smith, Daniel P.; Ajami, Nadim J.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Round, June L.; O'Connell, Ryan M.

    2015-01-01

    Host-microbial interactions within the mammalian intestines must be properly regulated in order to promote host health and limit disease. Because the microbiota provide constant immunological signals to intestinal tissues, a variety of regulatory mechanisms have evolved to ensure proper immune responses to maintain homeostasis. However, many of the genes that comprise these regulatory pathways, including immune-modulating microRNAs (miRNAs), have not yet been identified or studied in the context of intestinal homeostasis. Here, we investigated the role of microRNA-146a (miR-146a) in regulating intestinal immunity and barrier function and found that this miRNA is expressed in a variety of gut tissues in adult mice. By comparing intestinal gene expression in WT and miR-146a−/− mice, we demonstrate that miR-146a represses a subset of gut barrier and inflammatory genes all within a network of immune-related signaling pathways. We also found that miR-146a restricts the expansion of intestinal T cell populations, including Th17, Tregs, and Tfh cells. GC B cells, Tfh ICOS expression, and the production of luminal IgA were also reduced by miR-146a in the gut. Consistent with an enhanced intestinal barrier, we found that miR-146a−/− mice are resistant to DSS-induced colitis, a model of Ulcerative Colitis (UC), and this correlated with elevated colonic miR-146a expression in human UC patients. Taken together, our data describe a role for miR-146a in constraining intestinal barrier function, a process that alters gut homeostasis and enhances at least some forms of intestinal disease in mice. PMID:26456940

  10. Antibody targeting facilitates effective intratumoral siRNA nanoparticle delivery to HER2-overexpressing cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Palanca-Wessels, Maria C.; Booth, Garrett C.; Convertine, Anthony J.; Lundy, Brittany B.; Berguig, Geoffrey Y.; Press, Michael F.; Stayton, Patrick S.; Press, Oliver W.

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of RNA interference (RNAi) has been limited by inefficient delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA). Tumor-specific recognition can be effectively achieved by antibodies directed against highly expressed cancer cell surface receptors. We investigated the utility of linking an internalizing streptavidin-conjugated HER2 antibody to an endosome-disruptive biotinylated polymeric nanocarrier to improve the functional cytoplasmic delivery of siRNA in breast and ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in an intraperitoneal ovarian cancer xenograft model in vivo, yielding an 80% reduction of target mRNA and protein levels with sustained repression for at least 96 hours. RNAi-mediated site specific cleavage of target mRNA was demonstrated using the 5′ RLM-RACE (RNA ligase mediated-rapid amplification of cDNA ends) assay. Mice bearing intraperitoneal human ovarian tumor xenografts demonstrated increased tumor accumulation of Cy5.5 fluorescently labeled siRNA and 70% target gene suppression after treatment with HER2 antibody-directed siRNA nanocarriers. Detection of the expected mRNA cleavage product by 5′ RLM-RACE assay confirmed that suppression occurs via the expected RNAi pathway. Delivery of siRNA via antibody-directed endosomolytic nanoparticles may be a promising strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:26840082

  11. Synthesis of ¹⁸O-labeled RNA for application to kinetic studies and imaging.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Tomohiro; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Naoya; Shimahara, Akiko; Kato, Shiori; Yoshitake, Ayumi; Utsunomiya, Ayumi; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Gabazza, Esteban C; Ohgi, Tadaaki

    2013-07-01

    Radioisotopes and fluorescent compounds are frequently used for RNA labeling but are unsuitable for clinical studies of RNA drugs because of the risk from radiation exposure or the nonequivalence arising from covalently attached fluorophores. Here, we report a practical phosphoramidite solid-phase synthesis of (18)O-labeled RNA that avoids these disadvantages, and we demonstrate its application to quantification and imaging. The synthesis involves the introduction of a nonbridging (18)O atom into the phosphate group during the oxidation step of the synthetic cycle by using (18)O water as the oxygen donor. The (18)O label in the RNA was stable at pH 3-8.5, while the physicochemical and biological properties of labeled and unlabeled short interfering RNA were indistinguishable by circular dichroism, melting temperature and RNA-interference activity. The (18)O/(16)O ratio as measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry increased linearly with the concentration of (18)O-labeled RNA, and this technique was used to determine the blood concentration of (18)O-labeled RNA after administration to mice. (18)O-labeled RNA transfected into human A549 cells was visualized by isotope microscopy. The RNA was observed in foci in the cytoplasm around the nucleus, presumably corresponding to endosomes. These methodologies may be useful for kinetic and cellular-localization studies of RNA in basic and pharmaceutical studies. PMID:23632164

  12. Structure-Guided Control of siRNA Off-Target Effects.

    PubMed

    Suter, Scott R; Sheu-Gruttadauria, Jessica; Schirle, Nicole T; Valenzuela, Rachel; Ball-Jones, Alexi A; Onizuka, Kazumitsu; MacRae, Ian J; Beal, Peter A

    2016-07-20

    Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are promising therapeutics that make use of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway, but liabilities arising from the native RNA structure necessitate chemical modification for drug development. Advances in the structural characterization of components of the human RNAi pathway have enabled structure-guided optimization of siRNA properties. Here we report the 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of human Argonaute 2 (hAgo2), a key nuclease in the RNAi pathway, bound to an siRNA guide strand bearing an unnatural triazolyl nucleotide at position 1 (g1). Unlike natural nucleotides, this analogue inserts deeply into hAgo2's central RNA binding cleft and thus is able to modulate pairing between guide and target RNAs. The affinity of the hAgo2-siRNA complex for a seed-only matched target was significantly reduced by the triazolyl modification, while the affinity for a fully matched target was unchanged. In addition, siRNA potency for off-target repression was reduced (4-fold increase in IC50) by the modification, while on-target knockdown was improved (2-fold reduction in IC50). Controlling siRNA on-target versus microRNA (miRNA)-like off-target potency by projection of substituent groups into the hAgo2 central cleft from g1 is a new approach to enhance siRNA selectivity with a strong structural rationale. PMID:27387838

  13. Increased mRNA expression of manganese superoxide dismutase in psoriasis skin lesions and in cultured human keratinocytes exposed to IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Löntz, W; Sirsjö, A; Liu, W; Lindberg, M; Rollman, O; Törmä, H

    1995-02-01

    Because reactive oxygen species have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various hyperproliferative and inflammatory diseases, the mRNA expression of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase was studied in psoriatic skin tissue. By using reverse transcription-PCR we found similar expression of copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) in the involved vs. uninvolved psoriatic skin. In contrast, the level of the manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) mRNA message was consistently higher in lesional psoriatic skin as compared to adjacent uninvolved skin and healthy control skin. Parallel investigation of those cytokines that are thought to be direct or indirect inducers of the MnSOD activity revealed an increased mRNA expression of IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and GM-CSF in lesional psoriatic skin. To study if these cytokines exert a direct effect on dismutase expression in epidermal cells, human keratinocytes in culture were challenged with IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and GM-CSF. It was found that IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha, but not GM-CSF, induced the mRNA expression of MnSOD, and an additive effect was demonstrated for the two former cytokines. Further, the expression of both CuZnSOD and MnSOD transcripts was similar in cultured keratinocytes maintained at low differentiation (low Ca2+ medium) and cells forced to terminal differentiation (by high Ca2+ medium). Our results indicate that the abnormal expression of MnSOD mRNA in lesional psoriatic skin is not directly linked to the pathologic state of keratinocyte differentiation in the skin. It seems more likely that the cutaneous overexpression of MnSOD in psoriatic epidermis represents a protective cellular response evoked by cytokines released from inflammatory cells invading the diseased skin. PMID:7744320

  14. Increased IL18 mRNA levels in peripheral artery disease and its association with triglyceride and LDL cholesterol levels: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Deser, Serkan Burc; Bayoglu, Burcu; Besirli, Kazım; Cengiz, Mujgan; Arapi, Berk; Junusbekov, Yerik; Dirican, Ahmet; Arslan, Caner

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) typically refers to lower limb vessel ischemia caused by atherosclerotic stenosis of lower extremity arteries. IL18 is a pleiotropic pro-inflammatory cytokine reported to function as an inflammatory biomarker in cardiovascular diseases. IL18 activity is balanced by high-affinity naturally occurring IL18-binding protein (IL18BP). This study aimed to determine whether IL18, IL18 BP mRNA levels and -137 G/C (rs187238) polymorphism, which was previously associated with IL18 gene transcriptional activity, were associated with PAD etiology. IL18, IL18BP mRNA levels from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and -137 G/C (rs187238) polymorphism were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and RT-PCR, respectively, in 55 PAD patients (26 aorta-iliac, 29 femoro-popliteal) and 61 disease-free controls. IL18 mRNA levels were increased in PAD patients compared with healthy controls (p = 0.09); however, did not reach a statistical significant level, also did not significantly differ between aorta-iliac and femoro-popliteal occlusive PAD subgroups (p = 0.285). However, IL18BP mRNA levels were significantly lower in PAD group compared with controls (p < 0.001). Genotype frequencies of rs187238 polymorphism did not significantly differ between PAD patients and controls (p = 0.385). IL18 mRNA levels were significantly correlated with triglycerides and LDL cholesterol levels in PAD patients (p = 0.003, p = 0.014, respectively). HDL cholesterol levels were negatively correlated with IL18 mRNA levels in controls (p = 0.05). This report is a preliminary study to show an association between IL18, IL18BP mRNA levels and PAD and suggests that the IL18 gene may have a significant relationship with triglyceride and LDL cholesterol levels in PAD patients. PMID:26438531

  15. Luteinizing Hormone Receptor mRNA Down-Regulation Is Mediated through ERK-Dependent Induction of RNA Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Bindu; Franzo-Romain, Megan; Damanpour, Shadi

    2011-01-01

    The ligand-induced down-regulation of LH receptor (LHR) expression in the ovaries, at least in part, is regulated by a posttranscriptional process mediated by a specific LH receptor mRNA binding protein (LRBP). The LH-mediated signaling pathways involved in this process were examined in primary cultures of human granulosa cells. Treatment with 10 IU human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) for 12 h resulted in the down-regulation of LHR mRNA expression while producing an increase in LHR mRNA binding to LRBP as well as a 2-fold increase in LRBP levels. The activation of ERK½ pathway in LH-mediated LHR mRNA down-regulation was also established by demonstrating the translocation of ERK½ from the cytosol to the nucleus using confocal microcopy. Inhibition of protein kinase A using H-89 or ERK½ by U0126 abolished the LH-induced LHR mRNA down-regulation. These treatments also abrogated both the increases in LRBP levels as well as the LHR mRNA binding activity. The abolishment of the hCG-induced increase in LRBP levels and LHR mRNA binding activity was further confirmed by transfecting granulosa cells with ERK½ specific small interfering RNA. This treatment also reversed the hCG-induced down-regulation of LHR mRNA. These data show that LH-regulated ERK½ signaling is required for the LRBP-mediated down-regulation of LHR mRNA. PMID:21147848

  16. Short Hairpin RNA (shRNA): Design, Delivery, and Assessment of Gene Knockdown

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Chris B.; Guthrie, Elizabeth H.; Huang, Max Tze-Han; Taxman, Debra J.

    2013-01-01

    Shortly after the cellular mechanism of RNA interference (RNAi) was first described, scientists began using this powerful technique to study gene function. This included designing better methods for the successful delivery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) into mammalian cells. While the simplest method for RNAi is the cytosolic delivery of siRNA oligonucleotides, this technique is limited to cells capable of transfection and is primarily utilized during transient in vitro studies. The introduction of shRNA into mammalian cells through infection with viral vectors allows for stable integration of shRNA and long-term knockdown of the targeted gene; however, several challenges exist with the implementation of this technology. Here we describe some well-tested protocols which should increase the chances of successful design, delivery, and assessment of gene knockdown by shRNA. We provide suggestions for designing shRNA targets and controls, a protocol for sequencing through the secondary structure of the shRNA hairpin structure, and protocols for packaging and delivery of shRNA lentiviral particles. Using real-time PCR and functional assays we demonstrate the successful knockdown of ASC, an inflammatory adaptor molecule. These studies demonstrate the practicality of including two shRNAs with different efficacies of knockdown to provide an additional level of control and to verify dose dependency of functional effects. Along with the methods described here, as new techniques and algorithms are designed in the future, shRNA is likely to include further promising application and continue to be a critical component of gene discovery. PMID:20387148

  17. Prenatal ethanol increases ethanol intake throughout adolescence, alters ethanol-mediated aversive learning, and affects μ but not δ or κ opioid receptor mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Fabio, María Carolina; Macchione, Ana Fabiola; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2015-06-01

    Animal models of prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) have indicated a facilitatory effect of PEE on adolescent ethanol intake, but few studies have assessed the effects of moderate PEE throughout adolescence. The mechanisms underlying this facilitatory effect remain largely unknown. In the present study, we analysed ethanol intake in male and female Wistar rats with or without PEE (2.0 g/kg, gestational days 17-20) from postnatal days 37 to 62. The results revealed greater ethanol consumption in PEE rats than in controls, which persisted throughout adolescence. By the end of testing, ethanol ingestion in PEE rats was nearly 6.0 g/kg. PEE was associated with insensitivity to ethanol-induced aversion. PEE and control rats were further analysed for levels of μ, δ and κ opioid receptor mRNA in the infralimbic cortex, nucleus accumbens shell, and ventral tegmental area. Similar levels of mRNA were observed across most areas and opioid receptors, but μ receptor mRNA in the ventral tegmental area was significantly increased by PEE. Unlike previous studies that assessed the effects of PEE on ethanol intake close to birth, or in only a few sessions during adolescence, the present study observed a facilitatory effect of PEE that lasted throughout adolescence. PEE was associated with insensitivity to the aversive effect of ethanol, and increased levels of μ opioid receptor transcripts. PEE is a prominent vulnerability factor that probably favors the engagement of adolescents in risky trajectories of ethanol use. PMID:25865037

  18. Marked Increase in Nitric Oxide Synthase mRNA in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglia after Peripheral Axotomy: In situ Hybridization and Functional Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verge, Valerie M. K.; Xu, Zhang; Xu, Xiao-Jun; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Hokfelt, Tomas

    1992-12-01

    Using in situ hybridization, we studied nitric oxide (NO) synthase (EC 1.14.23.-) mRNA in lumbar dorsal root ganglia after peripheral transection of the sciatic nerve in rats. The effect of the NO synthase inhibitor N^ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester on the nociceptive flexor reflex was also studied in axotomized rats. Nerve section induced a dramatic increase in number of NO synthase mRNA-positive cells in the ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia. In some of these cells the peptides galanin and/or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and/or neuropeptide Y were also strongly up-regulated. Intravenous administration of nitro-L-arginine methyl ester blocked spinal hyperexcitability at much lower dosages in axotomized than in normal animals. The results suggest involvement of NO in the function of lumbar sensory neurons, especially after axotomy, perhaps preferentially at peripheral sites.

  19. Disruption of microRNA-21 by TALEN leads to diminished cell transformation and increased expression of cell-environment interaction genes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiwei; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Yingjia; Lin, Ting-Yu; Kurata, Jessica; Wu, Jun; Vonderfecht, Steven; Sun, Guihua; Huang, He; Yee, Jiing-Kuan; Hu, Jianda; Lin, Ren-Jang

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-21 is dysregulated in many cancers and fibrotic diseases. Since miR-21 suppresses several tumor suppressor and anti-apoptotic genes, it is considered a cancer therapeutic target. Antisense oligonucleotides are commonly used to inhibit a miRNA; however, blocking miRNA function via an antagomir is temporary, often only achieves a partial knock-down, and may be complicated by off-target effects. Here, we used transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to disrupt miR-21 in cancerous cells. Individual deletion clones were screened and isolated without drug selection. Sequencing and quantitative RT-PCR identified clones with no miR-21 expression. The loss of miR-21 led to subtle but global increases of mRNAs containing miR-21 target sequences. Cells without miR-21 became more sensitive to cisplatin and less transformed in culture and in mouse xenografts. In addition to the increase of PDCD4 and PTEN protein, mRNAs for COL4A1, JAG1, SERPINB5/Maspin, SMAD7, and TGFBI – all are miR-21 targets and involved in TGFβ and fibrosis regulation – were significantly upregulated in miR-21 knockout cells. Gene ontology and pathway analysis suggested that cell-environment interactions involving extracellular matrix can be an important miR-21 pathogenic mechanism. The study also demonstrates the value of using TALEN-mediated microRNA gene disruption in human pathobiological studies. PMID:25304376

  20. Overexpression of the maize Corngrass1 microRNA prevents flowering, improves digestibility, and increases starch content of switchgrass

    PubMed Central

    Chuck, George S.; Tobias, Christian; Sun, Lan; Kraemer, Florian; Li, Chenlin; Dibble, Dean; Arora, Rohit; Bragg, Jennifer N.; Vogel, John P.; Singh, Seema; Simmons, Blake A.; Pauly, Markus; Hake, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Biofuels developed from biomass crops have the potential to supply a significant portion of our transportation fuel needs. To achieve this potential, however, it will be necessary to develop improved plant germplasm specifically tailored to serve as energy crops. Liquid transportation fuel can be created from the sugars locked inside plant cell walls. Unfortunately, these sugars are inherently resistant to hydrolytic release because they are contained in polysaccharides embedded in lignin. Overcoming this obstacle is a major objective toward developing sustainable bioenergy crop plants. The maize Corngrass1 (Cg1) gene encodes a microRNA that promotes juvenile cell wall identities and morphology. To test the hypothesis that juvenile biomass has superior qualities as a potential biofuel feedstock, the Cg1 gene was transferred into several other plants, including the bioenergy crop Panicum virgatum (switchgrass). Such plants were found to have up to 250% more starch, resulting in higher glucose release from saccharification assays with or without biomass pretreatment. In addition, a complete inhibition of flowering was observed in both greenhouse and field grown plants. These results point to the potential utility of this approach, both for the domestication of new biofuel crops, and for the limitation of transgene flow into native plant species. PMID:21987797

  1. RNA Sequence Analysis of Human Huntington Disease Brain Reveals an Extensive Increase in Inflammatory and Developmental Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Labadorf, Adam; Hoss, Andrew G.; Lagomarsino, Valentina; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Hadzi, Tiffany C.; Bregu, Joli; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Gusella, James F.; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Akbarian, Schahram; Weng, Zhiping; Myers, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s Disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. Transcriptional dysregulation in the human HD brain has been documented but is incompletely understood. Here we present a genome-wide analysis of mRNA expression in human prefrontal cortex from 20 HD and 49 neuropathologically normal controls using next generation high-throughput sequencing. Surprisingly, 19% (5,480) of the 28,087 confidently detected genes are differentially expressed (FDR<0.05) and are predominantly up-regulated. A novel hypothesis-free geneset enrichment method that dissects large gene lists into functionally and transcriptionally related groups discovers that the differentially expressed genes are enriched for immune response, neuroinflammation, and developmental genes. Markers for all major brain cell types are observed, suggesting that HD invokes a systemic response in the brain area studied. Unexpectedly, the most strongly differentially expressed genes are a homeotic gene set (represented by Hox and other homeobox genes), that are almost exclusively expressed in HD, a profile not widely implicated in HD pathogenesis. The significance of transcriptional changes of developmental processes in the HD brain is poorly understood and warrants further investigation. The role of inflammation and the significance of non-neuronal involvement in HD pathogenesis suggest anti-inflammatory therapeutics may offer important opportunities in treating HD. PMID:26636579

  2. Nerve Growth Factor Increases mRNA Levels for the Prion Protein and the β -amyloid Protein Precursor in Developing Hamster Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, William C.; Neve, Rachael L.; Prusiner, Stanley B.; McKinley, Michael P.

    1988-12-01

    Deposition of amyloid filaments serves as a pathologic hallmark for some neurodegenerative disorders. The prion protein (PrP) is found in amyloid of animals with scrapie and humans with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease; the β protein is present in amyloid deposits in Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome patients. These two proteins are derived from precursors that in the brain are expressed primarily in neurons and are membrane bound. We found that gene expression for PrP and the β -protein precursor (β -PP) is regulated in developing hamster brain. Specific brain regions showed distinct patterns of ontogenesis for PrP and β -PP mRNAs. The increases in PrP and β -PP mRNAs in developing basal forebrain coincided with an increase in choline acetyltransferase activity, raising the possibility that these markers might be coordinately controlled in cholinergic neurons and regulated by nerve growth factor (NGF). Injections of NGF into the brains of neonatal hamsters increased both PrP and β -PP mRNA levels. Increased PrP and β -PP mRNA levels induced by NGF were confined to regions that contain NGF-responsive cholinergic neurons and were accompanied by elevations in choline acetyltransferase. It remains to be established whether or not exogenous NGF acts to increase PrP and β -PP gene expression selectively in forebrain cholinergic neurons in the developing hamster and endogenous NGF regulates expression of these genes.

  3. 36 CFR 2.32 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... authorized to maintain order and control public access and movement during fire fighting operations, search... resources, or other activities where the control of public movement and activities is necessary to maintain... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interfering with...

  4. 36 CFR 2.32 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... authorized to maintain order and control public access and movement during fire fighting operations, search... resources, or other activities where the control of public movement and activities is necessary to maintain... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interfering with...

  5. Increased serum levels of circulating exosomal microRNA-373 in receptor-negative breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Eichelser, Corinna; Stückrath, Isabel; Müller, Volkmar; Milde-Langosch, Karin; Wikman, Harriet; Pantel, Klaus; Schwarzenbach, Heidi

    2014-10-30

    In this study, we compared the blood serum levels of circulating cell-free and exosomal microRNAs, and their involvement in the molecular subtypes of breast cancer patients. Our analyses on cell-free miR-101, miR-372 and miR-373 were performed in preoperative blood serum of 168 patients with invasive breast cancer, 19 patients with benign breast diseases and 28 healthy women. MicroRNAs were additionally quantified in exosomes of 50 cancer patients and 12 healthy women from the same cohort. Relative concentrations were measured by quantitative TaqMan MicroRNA assays and correlated to clinicopathological risk factors. The concentrations of cell-free miR-101 (p=0.013) and miR-373 (p=0.024) were significantly different between patients with breast cancer and benign tumors. A prevalence of miR-101, miR-372 and miR-373 were found in exosomes. The levels of circulating exosomal (but not cell-free) miR-373 were higher in triple negative than luminal carcinomas (p=0.027). Also, estrogen-negative (p=0.021) and progesterone-negative (p=0.01) tumors displayed higher concentrations of exosomal miR-373 than patients with hormone-receptor positive tumors. Overexpression of miR-373 by transfection of MCF-7 cells showed downregulated protein expression of the estrogen receptor, and inhibition of apoptosis induced by camptothecin. Our data indicate that serum levels of exosomal miR-373 are linked to triple negative and more aggressive breast carcinomas. PMID:25333260

  6. Prolonged food deprivation increases mRNA expression of deiodinase 1 and 2, and thyroid hormone receptor β-1 in a fasting-adapted mammal.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A; MacKenzie, Duncan S; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2013-12-15

    Food deprivation in mammals is typically associated with reduced thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations and deiodinase content and activity to suppress metabolism. However, in prolonged-fasted, metabolically active elephant seal pups, TH levels are maintained, if not elevated. The functional relevance of this apparent paradox is unknown and demonstrates variability in the regulation of TH levels, metabolism and function in food-deprived mammals. To address our hypothesis that cellular TH-mediated activity is upregulated with fasting duration, we quantified the mRNA expression and protein content of adipose and muscle deiodinase type I (DI1) and type II (DI2), and TH receptor beta-1 (THrβ-1) after 1, 3 and 7 weeks of fasting in northern elephant seal pups (N=5-7 per week). Fasting did not decrease the concentrations of plasma thyroid stimulating hormone, total triiodothyronine (tT3), free T3, total thyroxine (tT4) or free T4, suggesting that the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis is not suppressed, but rather maintained during fasting. Mean mRNA expression of adipose DI1 and DI2 increased threefold and fourfold, respectively, and 20- and 30-fold, respectively, in muscle. With the exception of adipose DI1, protein expression of adipose DI2 and muscle DI1 and DI2 increased twofold to fourfold. Fasting also increased adipose (fivefold) and muscle (fourfold) THrβ-1 mRNA expression, suggesting that the mechanisms mediating cellular TH activity are upregulated with prolonged fasting. The data demonstrate a unique, atypical mechanism of TH activity and regulation in mammals adapted to prolonged food deprivation in which the potential responsiveness of peripheral tissues and cellular TH activity are increased, which may contribute to their lipid-based metabolism. PMID:24307712

  7. Prolonged food deprivation increases mRNA expression of deiodinase 1 and 2, and thyroid hormone receptor β-1 in a fasting-adapted mammal

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G.; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A.; MacKenzie, Duncan S.; Crocker, Daniel E.; Ortiz, Rudy M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Food deprivation in mammals is typically associated with reduced thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations and deiodinase content and activity to suppress metabolism. However, in prolonged-fasted, metabolically active elephant seal pups, TH levels are maintained, if not elevated. The functional relevance of this apparent paradox is unknown and demonstrates variability in the regulation of TH levels, metabolism and function in food-deprived mammals. To address our hypothesis that cellular TH-mediated activity is upregulated with fasting duration, we quantified the mRNA expression and protein content of adipose and muscle deiodinase type I (DI1) and type II (DI2), and TH receptor beta-1 (THrβ-1) after 1, 3 and 7 weeks of fasting in northern elephant seal pups (N=5–7 per week). Fasting did not decrease the concentrations of plasma thyroid stimulating hormone, total triiodothyronine (tT3), free T3, total thyroxine (tT4) or free T4, suggesting that the hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid axis is not suppressed, but rather maintained during fasting. Mean mRNA expression of adipose DI1 and DI2 increased threefold and fourfold, respectively, and 20- and 30-fold, respectively, in muscle. With the exception of adipose DI1, protein expression of adipose DI2 and muscle DI1 and DI2 increased twofold to fourfold. Fasting also increased adipose (fivefold) and muscle (fourfold) THrβ-1 mRNA expression, suggesting that the mechanisms mediating cellular TH activity are upregulated with prolonged fasting. The data demonstrate a unique, atypical mechanism of TH activity and regulation in mammals adapted to prolonged food deprivation in which the potential responsiveness of peripheral tissues and cellular TH activity are increased, which may contribute to their lipid-based metabolism. PMID:24307712

  8. Robust Protection against Highly Virulent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Swine by Combination Treatment with Recombinant Adenoviruses Expressing Porcine Alpha and Gamma Interferons and Multiple Small Interfering RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Hyeon; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Kim, Se-Kyung; You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Taeseong; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Seo, Min-Goo; Kim, Byounghan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because the currently available vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) provide no protection until 4 to 7 days postvaccination, the only alternative method to halt the spread of the FMD virus (FMDV) during outbreaks is the application of antiviral agents. Combination treatment strategies have been used to enhance the efficacy of antiviral agents, and such strategies may be advantageous in overcoming viral mechanisms of resistance to antiviral treatments. We have developed recombinant adenoviruses (Ads) for the simultaneous expression of porcine alpha and gamma interferons (Ad-porcine IFN-αγ) as well as 3 small interfering RNAs (Ad-3siRNA) targeting FMDV mRNAs encoding nonstructural proteins. The antiviral effects of Ad-porcine IFN-αγ and Ad-3siRNA expression were tested in combination in porcine cells, suckling mice, and swine. We observed enhanced antiviral effects in porcine cells and mice as well as robust protection against the highly pathogenic strain O/Andong/SKR/2010 and increased expression of cytokines in swine following combination treatment. In addition, we showed that combination treatment was effective against all serotypes of FMDV. Therefore, we suggest that the combined treatment with Ad-porcine IFN-αγ and Ad-3siRNA may offer fast-acting antiviral protection and be used with a vaccine during the period that the vaccine does not provide protection against FMD. IMPORTANCE The use of current foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines to induce rapid protection provides limited effectiveness because the protection does not become effective until a minimum of 4 days after vaccination. Therefore, during outbreaks antiviral agents remain the only available treatment to confer rapid protection and reduce the spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in livestock until vaccine-induced protective immunity can become effective. Interferons (IFNs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been reported to be effective antiviral agents against

  9. Low temperature inhibits RNA silencing-mediated defence by the control of siRNA generation

    PubMed Central

    Szittya, György; Silhavy, Dániel; Molnár, Attila; Havelda, Zoltán; Lovas, Ágnes; Lakatos, Lóránt; Bánfalvi, Zsófia; Burgyán, József

    2003-01-01

    Temperature dramatically affects plant–virus interactions. Outbreaks of virus diseases are frequently associated with low temperature, while at high temperature viral symptoms are often attenuated (heat masking) and plants rapidly recover from virus diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms of these well-known observations are not yet understood. RNA silencing is a conserved defence system of eukaryotic cells, which operates against molecular parasites including viruses and transgenes. Here we show that at low temperature both virus and transgene triggered RNA silencing are inhibited. Therefore, in cold, plants become more susceptible to viruses, and RNA silencing-based phenotypes of transgenic plants are lost. Consistently, the levels of virus- and transgene-derived small (21–26 nucleotide) interfering (si) RNAs—the central molecules of RNA silencing-mediated defence pathways—are dramatically reduced at low temperature. In contrast, RNA silencing was activated and the amount of siRNAs gradually increased with rising temperature. However, temperature does not influence the accumulation of micro (mi) RNAs, which play a role in developmental regulation, suggesting that the two classes of small (si and mi) RNAs are generated by different nuclease complexes. PMID:12554663

  10. Increased mRNA levels for components of the lysosomal, Ca2+-activated, and ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathways in skeletal muscle from head trauma patients.

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, O; Beaufrere, B; Boirie, Y; Ralliere, C; Taillandier, D; Aurousseau, E; Schoeffler, P; Arnal, M; Attaix, D

    1996-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for enhanced muscle protein breakdown in hospitalized patients, which frequently results in lean body wasting, are unknown. To determine whether the lysosomal, Ca2+-activated, and ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathways are activated, we measured mRNA levels for components of these processes in muscle biopsies from severe head trauma patients. These patients exhibited negative nitrogen balance and increased rates of whole-body protein breakdown (assessed by [13C]leucine infusion) and of myofibrillar protein breakdown (assessed by 3-methylhistidine urinary excretion). Increased muscle mRNA levels for cathepsin D, m-calpain, and critical components of the ubiquitin proteolytic pathway (i.e., ubiquitin, the 14-kDa ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2, and proteasome subunits) paralleled these metabolic adaptations. The data clearly support a role for multiple proteolytic processes in increased muscle proteolysis. The ubiquitin proteolytic pathway could be activated by altered glucocorticoid production and/or increased circulating levels of interleukin 1beta and interleukin 6 observed in head trauma patients and account for the breakdown of myofibrillar proteins, as was recently reported in animal studies. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8610106

  11. Spin O decay angular distribution for interfering mesons in electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.; Gilfoyle, G.

    1994-04-01

    Self analyzing meson electroproduction experiments are currently being planned for the CEBAF CLAS detector. These experiments deduce the spin polarization of outgoing unstable spin s (?)0 mesons from their decay angular distribution, W({theta},{psi}). The large angular acceptance of the CLAS detector permits kinematic tracking of a sufficient number of these events to accurately determine electroproduction amplitudes from the deduced polarization. Maximum polarization information is obtained from W({theta},{psi}) for decay into spin 0 daughters. The helicity of the decaying meson is transferred to the daughter`s relative orbital angular momentum m-projection; none is {open_quotes}absorbed{close_quotes} into daughter helicities. The decaying meson`s helicity maximally appears in W({theta},{psi}). W({theta},{psi}) for spin 0 daughters has been derived for (1) vector meson electroproduction and (2) general interfering mesons produced by incident pions. This paper derives W({theta},{psi}) for electroproduction of two interfering mesons that decay into spin 0 daughters. An application is made to the case of interfering scalar and vector mesons. The derivation is an extension of work by Schil using the general decay formalism of Martin. The expressions can be easily extended to the case of N interfering mesons since interference occurs pairwise in the observable W ({theta},{psi}), a quadratic function of the meson amplitudes. The derivation uses the virtual photon density matrix of Schil which is transformed by a meson electroproduction transition operator, T. The resulting density matrix for the interfering mesons is then converted into a corresponding statistical tensor and contracted into the efficiency tensor for spin 0 daughters.

  12. Antidepressant dose of taurine increases mRNA expression of GABAA receptor α2 subunit and BDNF in the hippocampus of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Caletti, Greice; Almeida, Felipe Borges; Agnes, Grasiela; Nin, Maurício Schüler; Barros, Helena Maria Tannhauser; Gomez, Rosane

    2015-04-15

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder associated with higher risk for depression. Diabetic rats present depressive-like behaviors and taurine, one of the most abundant free amino acids in the brain, reverses this depressive behaviors. Because taurine is a GABAA agonist modulator, we hypothesize that its antidepressant effect results from the interaction on this system by changing α2 GABAA receptor subunit expression, beside changes on BDNF mRNA, and memory in diabetic rats. Streptozotocin-diabetic and non-diabetic Wistar rats were daily injected with 100mg/kg of taurine or saline, intraperitoneally, for 30 days. At the end of the experiment, rats were exposed to the novel object recognition memory. Later they were euthanized, the brains were weighed, and the hippocampus was dissected for α2 GABAA subunit and BDNF mRNA expression. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that diabetic rats presented lower α2 GABAA subunit and BDNF mRNA expression than non-diabetic rats and taurine increased both parameters in these sick rats. Taurine also reversed the lower brain weight and improved the short-term memory in diabetic rats. Thus, the taurine antidepressant effect may be explained by interference with the GABA system, in line to its neuroprotective effect showed here by preventing brain weight loss and improving memory in diabetic rats. PMID:25612506

  13. Lysophosphatidic acid can support the formation of membranous structures and an increase in MBP mRNA levels in differentiating oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nogaroli, Luciana; Yuelling, Larra M.; Dennis, Jameel; Gorse, Karen; Payne, Shawn G.; Fuss, Babette

    2009-01-01

    During development, differentiating oligodendrocytes progress in distinct maturation steps from premyelinating to myelinating cells. Such maturing oligodendrocytes express both receptors mediating signaling via extracellular lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and the major enzyme generating extracellular LPA, namely phosphodiesterase-Iα/autotaxin (PD-Iα/ATX). However, the biological role of extracellular LPA during the maturation of differentiating oligodendrocytes is currently unclear. Here, we demonstrate that application of exogenous LPA induced an increase in the area occupied by the oligodendrocytes’ process network, but only when PD-Iα/ATX expression was down-regulated. This increase in network area was caused primarily by the formation of membranous structures. In addition, LPA increased the number of cells positive for myelin basic protein (MBP). This effect was associated by an increase in the mRNA levels coding for MBP but not myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Taken together, these data suggest that LPA may play a crucial role in regulating the later stages of oligodendrocyte maturation. PMID:18594965

  14. PepFect6 Mediated SiRNA Delivery into Organotypic Cultures.

    PubMed

    Dash-Wagh, Suvarna; Langel, Ülo; Ulfendahl, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Gene silencing by small interfering RNA (SiRNA) is an attractive therapeutic approach for pathological disorders that targets a specific gene. However, its applications are limited, as naked RNA is rapidly degraded by RNases and is inadequately internalized by the target cells in the body. Several viral and nonviral vectors have been described to improve the delivery of SiRNAs both in cultured cells as well as in vivo. Increasing evidence suggests that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are an efficient, non-cytotoxic tool for intracellular delivery of SiRNA. Recently, a new peptide, PepFect6 (PF6), based system has been described for efficient SiRNA delivery in various cell types. PF6 is an amphipathic stearyl-TP10 peptide carrying a pH titratable trifluoromethylquinoline moiety that facilitate endosomal release. PF6 forms stable non-covalent complexes with SiRNA. Upon internalization, the complexes rapidly escape the endosomal compartment, resulting in robust RNA interference (RNAi) responses. This chapter describes a protocol to use the PF6-nanoparticle technology for SiRNA delivery into organotypic cultures of the inner ear i.e., cochlea. We also highlight different critical points in the peptide/SiRNA complex preparation, transfection and in analyzing the efficacy of PF6-SiRNA associated RNAi response. PMID:26472439

  15. Increased expression of Hsp70 and Hsp90 mRNA as biomarkers of thermal stress in loggerhead turtle embryos (Caretta Caretta).

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, J N; Kennington, W J; Berry, O; Whiting, S; Meekan, M; Mitchell, N J

    2015-01-01

    The survival and viability of sea turtle embryos is dependent upon favourable nest temperatures throughout the incubation period. Consequently, future generations of sea turtles may be at risk from increasing nest temperatures due to climate change, but little is known about how embryos respond to heat stress. Heat shock genes are likely to be important in this process because they code for proteins that prevent cellular damage in response to environmental stressors. This study provides the first evidence of an expression response in the heat shock genes of embryos of loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) exposed to realistic and near-lethal temperatures (34°C and 36°C) for 1 or 3 hours. We investigated changes in Heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60), Hsp70, and Hsp90 mRNA in heart (n=24) and brain tissue (n=29) in response to heat stress. Under the most extreme treatment (36°C, 3h), Hsp70 increased mRNA expression by a factor of 38.8 in heart tissue and 15.7 in brain tissue, while Hsp90 mRNA expression increased by a factor of 98.3 in heart tissue and 14.7 in brain tissue. Hence, both Hsp70 and Hsp90 are useful biomarkers for assessing heat stress in the late-stage embryos of sea turtles. The method we developed can be used as a platform for future studies on variation in the thermotolerance response from the clutch to population scale, and can help us anticipate the resilience of reptile embryos to extreme heating events. PMID:25526653

  16. RNA-induced silencing attenuates G protein-mediated calcium signals.

    PubMed

    Philip, Finly; Sahu, Shriya; Golebiewska, Urszula; Scarlata, Suzanne

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipase Cβ (PLCβ) is activated by G protein subunits in response to environmental stimuli to increase intracellular calcium. In cells, a significant portion of PLCβ is cytosolic, where it binds a protein complex required for efficient RNA-induced silencing called C3PO (component 3 promoter of RISC). Binding between C3PO and PLCβ raises the possibility that RNA silencing activity can affect the ability of PLCβ to mediate calcium signals. By use of human and rat neuronal cell lines (SK-N-SH and PC12), we show that overexpression of one of the main components of C3PO diminishes Ca(2+) release in response to Gαq/PLCβ stimulation by 30 to 40%. In untransfected SK-N-SH or PC12 cells, the introduction of siRNA(GAPDH) [small interfering RNA(glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase)] reduces PLCβ-mediated calcium signals by ∼30%, but addition of siRNA(Hsp90) (heat shock protein 90) had little effect. Fluorescence imaging studies suggest an increase in PLCβ-C3PO association in cells treated with siRNA(GAPDH) but not siRNA(Hsp90). Taken together, our studies raise the possibility that Ca(2+) responses to extracellular stimuli can be modulated by components of the RNA silencing machinery.-Philip, F., Sahu, S., Golebiewska, U., Scarlata, S. RNA-induced silencing attenuates G protein-mediated calcium signals. PMID:26862135

  17. Ribozymes targeted to stearoyl-ACP delta9 desaturase mRNA produce heritable increases of stearic acid in transgenic maize leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Merlo, A O; Cowen, N; Delate, T; Edington, B; Folkerts, O; Hopkins, N; Lemeiux, C; Skokut, T; Smith, K; Woosley, A; Yang, Y; Young, S; Zwick, M

    1998-01-01

    Ribozymes are RNAs that can be designed to catalyze the specific cleavage or ligation of target RNAs. We have explored the possibility of using ribozymes in maize to downregulate the expression of the stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (Delta9) desaturase gene. Based on site accessibility and catalytic activity, several ribozyme constructs were designed and transformed into regenerable maize lines. One of these constructs, a multimer hammerhead ribozyme linked to a selectable marker gene, was shown to increase leaf stearate in two of 13 maize lines. There were concomitant decreases in Delta9 desaturase mRNA and protein. The plants with the altered stearate phenotype were shown to express ribozyme RNA. The ribozyme-mediated trait was heritable, as evidenced by stearate increases in the leaves of the R1 plants derived from a high-stearate line. The increase in stearate correlated with the presence of the ribozyme gene. A catalytically inactive version of this ribozyme did not produce any significant effect in transgenic maize. This is evidence that ribozymes can be used to modulate the expression of endogenous genes in maize. PMID:9761789

  18. Para amino benzoic acid-derived self-assembled biocompatible nanoparticles for efficient delivery of siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Teegala Lakshminarayan; Krishnarao, P Sivarama; Rao, Garikapati Koteswara; Bhimireddy, Eswar; Venkateswarlu, P; Mohapatra, Debendra K; Yadav, JS; Bhadra, Utpal; Pal Bhadra, Manika

    2015-01-01

    A number of diseases can result from abnormal gene expression. One of the approaches for treating such diseases is gene therapy to inhibit expression of a particular gene in a specific cell population by RNA interference. Use of efficient delivery vehicles increases the safety and success of gene therapy. Here we report the development of functionalized biocompatible fluorescent nanoparticles from para amino benzoic acid nanoparticles for efficient delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA). These nanoparticles were non-toxic and did not interfere with progression of the cell cycle. The intrinsic fluorescent nature of these nanoparticles allows easy tracking and an opportunity for diagnostic applications. Human Bcl-2 siRNA was complexed with these nanoparticles to inhibit expression in cells at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Our findings indicated high gene transfection efficiency. These biocompatible nanoparticles allow targeted delivery of siRNA, providing an efficient vehicle for gene delivery. PMID:26491299

  19. Global effects of the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway on the transcriptional landscape.

    PubMed

    Cecere, Germano; Hoersch, Sebastian; O'Keeffe, Sean; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Grishok, Alla

    2014-04-01

    Argonaute proteins and their small RNA cofactors short interfering RNAs are known to inhibit gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Argonaute CSR-1 binds thousands of endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) that are antisense to germline transcripts. However, its role in gene expression regulation remains controversial. Here we used genome-wide profiling of nascent RNA transcripts and found that the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway promoted sense-oriented RNA polymerase II transcription. Moreover, a loss of CSR-1 function resulted in global increase in antisense transcription and ectopic transcription of silent chromatin domains, which led to reduced chromatin incorporation of centromere-specific histone H3. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the CSR-1 pathway helps maintain the directionality of active transcription, thereby propagating the distinction between transcriptionally active and silent genomic regions. PMID:24681887

  20. Aminoglycosides: Molecular Insights on the Recognition of RNA and Aminoglycoside Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Chittapragada, Maruthi; Roberts, Sarah; Ham, Young Wan

    2009-01-01

    RNA is increasingly recognized for its significant functions in biological systems and has recently become an important molecular target for therapeutics development. Aminoglycosides, a large class of clinically significant antibiotics, exert their biological functions by binding to prokaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and interfering with protein translation, resulting in bacterial cell death. They are also known to bind to viral mRNAs such as HIV-1 RRE and TAR. Consequently, aminoglycosides are accepted as the single most important model in understanding the principles that govern small molecule-RNA recognition, which is essential for the development of novel antibacterial, antiviral or even anti-oncogenic agents. This review outlines the chemical structures and mechanisms of molecular recognition and antibacterial activity of aminoglycosides and various aminoglycoside mimics that have recently been devised to improve biological efficacy, binding affinity and selectivity, or to circumvent bacterial resistance. PMID:19812740

  1. Mifepristone increases mRNA translation rate, triggers the unfolded protein response, increases autophagic flux, and kills ovarian cancer cells in combination with proteasome or lysosome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Hapon, Maria B; Goyeneche, Alicia A; Srinivasan, Rekha; Gamarra-Luques, Carlos D; Callegari, Eduardo A; Drappeau, Donis D; Terpstra, Erin J; Pan, Bo; Knapp, Jennifer R; Chien, Jeremy; Wang, Xuejun; Eyster, Kathleen M; Telleria, Carlos M

    2016-08-01

    The synthetic steroid mifepristone blocks the growth of ovarian cancer cells, yet the mechanism driving such effect is not entirely understood. Unbiased genomic and proteomic screenings using ovarian cancer cell lines of different genetic backgrounds and sensitivities to platinum led to the identification of two key genes upregulated by mifepristone and involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR): the master chaperone of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), glucose regulated protein (GRP) of 78 kDa, and the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous transcription factor (CHOP). GRP78 and CHOP were upregulated by mifepristone in ovarian cancer cells regardless of p53 status and platinum sensitivity. Further studies revealed that the three UPR-associated pathways, PERK, IRE1α, and ATF6, were activated by mifepristone. Also, the synthetic steroid acutely increased mRNA translation rate, which, if prevented, abrogated the splicing of XBP1 mRNA, a non-translatable readout of IRE1α activation. Moreover, mifepristone increased LC3-II levels due to increased autophagic flux. When the autophagic-lysosomal pathway was inhibited with chloroquine, mifepristone was lethal to the cells. Lastly, doses of proteasome inhibitors that are inadequate to block the activity of the proteasomes, caused cell death when combined with mifepristone; this phenotype was accompanied by accumulation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins denoting proteasome inhibition. The stimulation by mifepristone of ER stress and autophagic flux offers a therapeutic opportunity for utilizing this compound to sensitize ovarian cancer cells to proteasome or lysosome inhibitors. PMID:27233943

  2. Rapid increase in enzyme and peptide mRNA in sympathetic ganglia after electrical stimulation in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Schalling, M; Stieg, P E; Lindquist, C; Goldstein, M; Hökfelt, T

    1989-01-01

    Thoracic ganglia in humans were studied after electrical, preganglionic stimulation using in situ hybridization with synthetic oligonucleotide probes against the catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (EC 1.14.16.2) and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (EC 1.14.17.1) and neuropeptide tyrosine. Immunohistochemical analysis was also performed. Following short peroperative stimulation a severalfold increase in all three mRNAs was found in principal ganglion cells, whereas no definite changes could be detected in enzyme or peptide levels with immunohistochemistry. The results suggest a very rapid and sensitive regulation of genes involved in signal transmission in the sympathetic nervous system of humans. Moreover, they indicate that electrical stimulation of neurons and/or pathways combined with in situ hybridization may be used as a method to define neuronal projections by visualizing increases in mRNAs for transmitter enzymes and/or peptide in target cells. Images PMID:2567003

  3. Antagomirs targeting microRNA-134 increase hippocampal pyramidal neuron spine volume in vivo and protect against pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M; Engel, Tobias; Merino-Serrais, Paula; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; Rodriguez-Alvarez, Natalia; Reynolds, James; Reschke, Cristina R; Conroy, Ronan M; McKiernan, Ross C; deFelipe, Javier; Henshall, David C

    2015-07-01

    Emerging data support roles for microRNA (miRNA) in the pathogenesis of various neurologic disorders including epilepsy. MicroRNA-134 (miR-134) is enriched in dendrites of hippocampal neurons, where it negatively regulates spine volume. Recent work identified upregulation of miR-134 in experimental and human epilepsy. Targeting miR-134 in vivo using antagomirs had potent anticonvulsant effects against kainic acid-induced seizures and was associated with a reduction in dendritic spine number. In the present study, we measured dendritic spine volume in mice injected with miR-134-targeting antagomirs and tested effects of the antagomirs on status epilepticus triggered by the cholinergic agonist pilocarpine. Morphometric analysis of over 6,400 dendritic spines in Lucifer yellow-injected CA3 pyramidal neurons revealed increased spine volume in mice given antagomirs compared to controls that received a scrambled sequence. Treatment of mice with miR-134 antagomirs did not alter performance in a behavioral test (novel object location). Status epilepticus induced by pilocarpine was associated with upregulation of miR-134 within the hippocampus of mice. Pretreatment of mice with miR-134 antagomirs reduced the proportion of animals that developed status epilepticus following pilocarpine and increased animal survival. In antagomir-treated mice that did develop status epilepticus, seizure onset was delayed and total seizure power was reduced. These studies provide in vivo evidence that miR-134 regulates spine volume in the hippocampus and validation of the seizure-suppressive effects of miR-134 antagomirs in a model with a different triggering mechanism, indicating broad conservation of anticonvulsant effects. PMID:24874920

  4. Chronic stress enhanced fear memories are associated with increased amygdala zif268 mRNA expression and are resistant to reconsolidation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Ann N.; Parga, Alejandro; Paode, Pooja; Watterson, Lucas R.; Nikulina, Ella M.; Hammer, Ronald P.; Conrad, Cheryl D.

    2015-01-01

    The chronically stressed brain may present a vulnerability to develop maladaptive fear-related behaviors in response to a traumatic event. In rodents, chronic stress leads to amygdala hyperresponsivity and dendritic hypertrophy and produces a post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-like phenotype that includes exaggerated fear learning following Pavlovian fear conditioning and resistance to extinction. It is unknown whether chronic stress-induced enhanced fear memories are vulnerable to disruption via reconsolidation blockade, as a novel therapeutic approach for attenuating exaggerated fear memories. We used a chronic stress procedure in a rat model (wire mesh restraint for 6h/d/21d) to create a vulnerable brain that leads to a PTSD-like phenotype. We then examined freezing behavior during acquisition, reactivation and after post-reactivation rapamycin administration (i.p., 40 mg/kg) in a Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm to determine its effects on reconsolidation as well as the subsequent functional activation of limbic structures using zif268 mRNA. Chronic stress increased amygdala zif268 mRNA during fear memory retrieval at reactivation. Moreover, these enhanced fear memories were unaffected by post reactivation rapamycin to disrupt long-term fear memory. Also, post-reactivation long term memory processing was also associated with increased amygdala (LA and BA), and decreased hippocampal CA1 zif268 mRNA expression. These results suggest potential challenges for reconsolidation blockade as an effective approach in treating exaggerated fear memories, as in PTSD. Our findings also support chronic stress manipulations combined with fear conditioning as a useful preclinical approach to study a PTSD-like phenotype. PMID:25732249

  5. Detecting and Eliminating Interfering Organic Compounds in Waters Analyzed for Isotopic Composition by Crds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, B. A.; Hsiao, G. S.; Rella, C.

    2010-12-01

    Optical spectroscopy based CRDS technology for isotopic analysis of δD and δ18O directly from liquid water has greatly increased the number and type of liquid samples analyzed. This increase has also revealed a previously unrecognized sample contamination problem. Recently West[1] and Brand[2] identified samples containing ethanol, methanol, plant extracts and other organic compounds analyzed by CRDS and other spectroscopy based techniques as yielding erroneous results for δD and δ18O (especially δD) due to spectroscopic interference. Not all organic compounds generate interference. Thus, identifying which samples are contaminated by which organic compounds is of key importance for data credibility and correction. To address this problem a new approach in the form of a software suite, ChemCorrect™, has been developed. A chemometrics component uses a spectral library of water isotopologues and interfering organic compounds to best fit the measured spectra. The best fit values provide a quantitative assay of the actual concentrations of the various species and are then evaluated to generate a visual flag indicating samples affected by organic contamination. Laboratory testing of samples spiked with known quantities of interfering organic compounds such as methanol, ethanol, and terpenes was performed. The software correctly flagged and identified type of contamination for all the spiked samples without any false positives. Furthermore the reported values were a linear function of actual concentration with an R^2>0.99 even for samples which contained multiple organic compounds. Further testing was carried out against a range of industrial chemical compounds which can contaminate ground water as well as a variety of plant derived waters and juices which were also analyzed by IRMS. The excellent results obtained give good insight into which organic compounds cause interference and which classes of plants are likely to contain interfering compounds. Finally

  6. Delivery of small interfering RNAs in human cervical cancer cells by polyethylenimine-functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuan-Pin; Lin, I.-Jou; Chen, Chih-Chen; Hsu, Yi-Chiang; Chang, Chi-Chang; Lee, Mon-Juan

    2013-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes are capable of penetrating the cell membrane and are widely considered as potential carriers for gene or drug delivery. Because the C-C and C=C bonds in carbon nanotubes are nonpolar, functionalization is required for carbon nanotubes to interact with genes or drugs as well as to improve their biocompatibility. In this study, polyethylenimine (PEI)-functionalized single-wall (PEI-NH-SWNTs) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (PEI-NH-MWNTs) were produced by direct amination method. PEI functionalization increased the positive charge on the surface of SWNTs and MWNTs, allowing carbon nanotubes to interact electrostatically with the negatively charged small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and to serve as nonviral gene delivery reagents. PEI-NH-MWNTs and PEI-NH-SWNTs had a better solubility in water than pristine carbon nanotubes, and further removal of large aggregates by centrifugation produced a stable suspension of reduced particle size and improved homogeneity and dispersity. The amount of grafted PEI estimated by thermogravimetric analysis was 5.08% ( w/ w) and 5.28% ( w/ w) for PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs, respectively. For the assessment of cytotoxicity, various concentrations of PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs were incubated with human cervical cancer cells, HeLa-S3, for 48 h. PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs induced cell deaths in a dose-dependent manner but were less cytotoxic compared to pure PEI. As determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, siRNAs directed against glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (siGAPDH) were completely associated with PEI-NH-SWNTs or PEI-NH-MWNTs at a PEI-NH-SWNT/siGAPDH or PEI-NH-MWNT/siGAPDH mass ratio of 80:1 or 160:1, respectively. Furthermore, PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs successfully delivered siGAPDH into HeLa-S3 cells at PEI-NH-SWNT/siGAPDH and PEI-NH-MWNT/siGAPDH mass ratios of 1:1 to 20:1, resulting in suppression of the mRNA level of GAPDH to an extent similar to that of DharmaFECT, a common transfection

  7. Ribosomal P3 protein AtP3B of Arabidopsis acts as both protein and RNA chaperone to increase tolerance of heat and cold stresses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang Ho; Lee, Young Mee; Park, Joung Hun; Nawkar, Ganesh M; Oh, Hun Taek; Kim, Min Gab; Lee, Soo In; Kim, Woe Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2016-07-01

    The P3 proteins are plant-specific ribosomal P-proteins; however, their molecular functions have not been characterized. In a screen for components of heat-stable high-molecular weight (HMW) complexes, we isolated the P3 protein AtP3B from heat-treated Arabidopsis suspension cultures. By size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), SDS-PAGE and native PAGE followed by immunoblotting with anti-AtP3B antibody, we showed that AtP3B was stably retained in HMW complexes following heat shock. The level of AtP3B mRNA increased in response to both high- and low-temperature stresses. Bacterially expressed recombinant AtP3B protein exhibited both protein and RNA chaperone activities. Knockdown of AtP3B by RNAi made plants sensitive to both high- and low-temperature stresses, whereas overexpression of AtP3B increased tolerance of both conditions. Together, our results suggest that AtP3B protects cells against both high- and low-temperature stresses. These findings provide novel insight into the molecular functions and in vivo roles of acidic ribosomal P-proteins, thereby expanding our knowledge of the protein production machinery. PMID:27004478

  8. Sonic hedgehog increases the skin wound-healing ability of mouse embryonic stem cells through the microRNA 200 family

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Han Na; Han, Ho Jae

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose To use stem cell therapy effectively, it is important to enhance the therapeutic potential of stem cells with soluble factors. Although sonic hedgehog (shh) is important in maintaining the stem cell, the recovery effect of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) with shh has not yet been elucidated. The present study investigated the effect of mESCs with shh in skin recovery in vivo as well as the related intracellular signal pathways in vitro. Experimental Approach The healing effect of mESCs with shh on skin wounds was examined in vivo in ICR mice. The involvement of Smads, the microRNA (miR)-200 family, zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox (ZEBs) and E-cadherin on shh-induced mESC migration and self-renewal was determined in vitro. Key Results The mESCs with shh increased re-epithelialization and VEGF expression in skin wounds. Shh-treated mESCs increased both secreted and intracellular levels of VEGF. Shh induced dephosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β through the Smoothened receptor and increased the phosphorylation of Smad1 and Smad2/3 in mESCs. Shh-induced decrease of the mmu-miR-141, -200c, -200a, -200b and -429 expression levels was significantly reversed by Smad4 siRNA. Shh increased nuclear expression of ZEB1/ZEB2 and decreased E-cadherin expression while increasing cell migration and skin wound healing. Both these effects were reversed by mmu-miR-141 and -200b mimics. Conclusions and Implications Mouse ESCs accelerated skin wound healing by shh through down-regulating E-cadherin, an effect dependent on mmu-miR-141 and -200b. Our data provides evidence for the effectiveness of shh in stem cell-based therapy in vivo. PMID:25257936

  9. Defective interfering RNAs of Japanese encephalitis virus found in mosquito cells and correlation with persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kuen-Nan; Tsang, Shih-Fang; Huang, Chung-Hao; Chang, Ruey-Yi

    2007-03-01

    Defective interfering (DI) RNAs are deletion mutants of viral genomes that are known in many cases to contribute to persistent infection and modification of viral pathogenesis. Cell type also plays a critical role in the establishment of viral persistence. In this study we have identified for the first time the generation of DI RNAs of Japanese encephalitis virus in C6/36 mosquito cells. A persistent infection was established by replacing growth medium on surviving cells and continued cell passaging. Persistent infection was demonstrated by a continual release of infectious virus, fluorescent antibody staining, and Northern analysis. A population of DI RNAs of approximately 8.2-9.7 kb, not detectable in acutely infected cells, became apparent in the persistently infected cells by 25 days postinfection. Sequence analyses revealed a population of DI RNAs that contained in-frame deletions of 1.3-2.8 kb covering the region of the E gene and some flanking C or prM and NS1 gene sequences. Transcripts from one cDNA clone of a DI RNA replicated in uninfected mosquito cells as demonstrated by RT-PCR. DI RNA-containing virions in supernatant fluids from persistently infected mosquito cells could be used to establish persistent infection in BHK-21 cells. The correlation of DI RNA presence with cell survival suggests that DI RNAs are contributing mechanistically to the establishment of persistent infection in both the mosquito and mammalian cells. PMID:17134784

  10. Cell type-specific delivery of short interfering RNAs by dye-functionalised theranostic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Press, Adrian T.; Traeger, Anja; Pietsch, Christian; Mosig, Alexander; Wagner, Michael; Clemens, Mark G.; Jbeily, Nayla; Koch, Nicole; Gottschaldt, Michael; Bézière, Nicolas; Ermolayev, Volodymyr; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Popp, Jürgen; Kessels, Michael M.; Qualmann, Britta; Schubert, Ulrich S.; Bauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Efficient delivery of short interfering RNAs reflects a prerequisite for the development of RNA interference therapeutics. Here, we describe highly specific nanoparticles, based on near infrared fluorescent polymethine dye-derived targeting moieties coupled to biodegradable polymers. The fluorescent dye, even when coupled to a nanoparticle, mimics a ligand for hepatic parenchymal uptake transporters resulting in hepatobiliary clearance of approximately 95% of the dye within 45 min. Body distribution, hepatocyte uptake and excretion into bile of the dye itself, or dye-coupled nanoparticles can be tracked by intravital microscopy or even non-invasively by multispectral optoacoustic tomography. Efficacy of delivery is demonstrated in vivo using 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase siRNA as an active payload resulting in a reduction of plasma cholesterol levels if siRNA was formulated into dye-functionalised nanoparticles. This suggests that organ-selective uptake of a near infrared dye can be efficiently transferred to theranostic nanoparticles allowing novel possibilities for personalised silencing of disease-associated genes. PMID:25470305

  11. Genome-Wide Discovery and Analysis of Phased Small Interfering RNAs in Chinese Sacred Lotus

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yun; Wang, Shengpeng; Sunkar, Ramanjulu

    2014-01-01

    Phased small interfering RNA (phasiRNA) generating loci (briefly as PHAS) in plants are a novel class of genes that are normally regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs). Similar to miRNAs, phasiRNAs encoded by PHAS play important regulatory roles by targeting protein coding transcripts in plant species. We performed a genome-wide discovery of PHAS loci in Chinese sacred lotus and identified a total of 106 PHAS loci. Of these, 47 loci generate 21 nucleotide (nt) phasiRNAs and 59 loci generate 24 nt phasiRNAs, respectively. We have also identified a new putative TAS3 and a putative TAS4 loci in the lotus genome. Our results show that some of the nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) disease resistance proteins and MYB transcription factors potentially generate phasiRNAs. Furthermore, our results suggest that some large subunit (LSU) rRNAs can derive putative phasiRNAs, which is potentially resulted from crosstalk between small RNA biogenesis pathways that are employed to process rRNAs and PHAS loci, respectively. Some of the identified phasiRNAs have putative trans-targets with less than 4 mismatches, suggesting that the identified PHAS are involved in many different pathways. Finally, the discovery of 24 nt PHAS in lotus suggests that there are 24 nt PHAS in dicots. PMID:25469507

  12. The Application of Clinical Lithotripter Shock Waves to RNA Nucleotide Delivery to Cells.

    PubMed

    Nwokeoha, Sandra; Carlisle, Robert; Cleveland, Robin O

    2016-10-01

    The delivery of genes into cells through the transfer of ribonucleic acids (RNAs) has been found to cause a change in the level of target protein expression. RNA-based transfection is conceptually more efficient than commonly delivered plasmid DNA because it does not require division or damage of the nuclear envelope, thereby increasing the chances of the cell remaining viable. Shock waves (SWs) have been found to induce cellular uptake by transiently altering the permeability of the plasma membrane, thereby overcoming a critical step in gene therapy. However, accompanying SW bio-effects include dose-dependent irreversible cell injury and cytotoxicity. Here, the effect of SWs generated by a clinical lithotripter on the viability and permeabilisation of three different cell lines in vitro was investigated. Comparison of RNA stability before and after SW exposure revealed no statistically significant difference. Optimal SW exposure parameters were identified to minimise cell death and maximise permeabilisation, and applied to enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) messenger RNA (mRNA) or anti-eGFP small interfering RNA delivery. As a result, eGFP mRNA expression levels increased up to 52-fold in CT26 cells, whereas a 2-fold decrease in GFP expression was achieved after anti-eGFP small interfering RNA delivery to MCF-7/GFP cells. These results indicate that SW parameters can be employed to achieve effective nucleotide delivery, laying the foundation for non-invasive and high-tolerability RNA-based gene therapy. PMID:27444864

  13. Differential regulation of host mRNA translation during obligate pathogen-plant interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus infection reprograms the plant messenger RNA (mRNA) transcriptome by activating or interfering with a variety of signaling pathways, but the effects on host mRNA translation have not been explored on a genome-wide scale. To address this issue, Arabidopsis thaliana mRNA transcripts were quantif...

  14. Unsteady transonic flow calculations for interfering lifting surface configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    Unsteady transonic flow calculations are presented for aerodynamically interfering lifting surface configurations. Calculations are performed by extending the XTRAN3S (Version 1.5) unsteady transonic small-disturbance code to allow the treatment of an additional lifting surface. The research was conducted as a first-step toward developing the capability to treat a complete flight vehicle. Grid generation procedures for swept tapered interfering lifting surface applications of XTRAN3S are described. Transonic calculations are presented for wing-tail and canard-wing configurations for several values of mean angle of attack. The effects of aerodynamic interference on transonic steady pressure distributions and steady and oscillatory spanwise lift distributions are demonstrated. Results due to wing, tail, or canard pitching motions are presented and discussed in detail.

  15. Increased bioplastic production with an RNA polymerase sigma factor SigE during nitrogen starvation in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Osanai, Takashi; Numata, Keiji; Oikawa, Akira; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Iijima, Hiroko; Doi, Yoshiharu; Tanaka, Kan; Saito, Kazuki; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2013-12-01

    Because cyanobacteria directly harvest CO2 and light energy, their carbon metabolism is important for both basic and applied sciences. Here, we show that overexpression of the sigma factor sigE in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 widely changes sugar catabolism and increases production of the biodegradable polyester polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) during nitrogen starvation. sigE overexpression elevates the levels of proteins implicated in glycogen catabolism, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis. PHB accumulation is enhanced by sigE overexpression under nitrogen-limited conditions, yet the molecular weights of PHBs synthesized by the parental glucose-tolerant and sigE overexpression strain are similar. Although gene expression induced by nitrogen starvation is changed and other metabolites (such as GDP-mannose and citrate) accumulate under sigE overexpression, genetic engineering of this sigma factor altered the metabolic pathway from glycogen to PHB during nitrogen starvation. PMID:23861321

  16. Incremental learning methods with retrieving of interfered patterns.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, K; Yamaguchi, N; Ishii, N

    1999-01-01

    There are many cases that a neural-network-based system must memorize some new patterns incrementally. However, if the network learns the new patterns only by referring to them, it probably forgets old memorized patterns, since parameters in the network usually correlate not only to the old memories but also to the new patterns. A certain way to avoid the loss of memories is to learn the new patterns with all memorized patterns. It needs, however, a large computational power. To solve this problem, we propose incremental learning methods with retrieving interfered patterns (ILRI). In these methods, the system employs a modified version of a resource allocating network (RAN) which is one variation of a generalized radial basis function (GRBF). In ILRI, the RAN learns new patterns with a relearning of a few number of retrieved past patterns that are interfered with the incremental learning. In this paper, we construct ILRI in two steps. In the first step, we construct a system which searches the interfered patterns from past input patterns stored in a database. In the second step, we improve the first system in such a way that the system does not need the database. In this case, the system regenerates the input patterns approximately in a random manner. The simulation results show that these two systems have almost the same ability, and the generalization ability is higher than other similar systems using neural networks and k-nearest neighbors. PMID:18252636

  17. Oral treatment with zinc sulfate increases the expression of Th1 cytokines mRNA in BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Afshari, Mahsa; Riazi-Rad, Farhad; Khaze, Vahid; Bahrami, Fariborz; Ajdary, Soheila; Alimohammadian, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-05-01

    Leishmaniases consist of a group of diseases caused by protozoan parasites of Leishmania genus. The outcome of the disease depends on the immune responses of the host as well as the pathogenicity of the strain of the parasite. In murine models, the inoculation of Leishmania major into resistant mice results in Th1 responses and recovery from the infection. However in the susceptible mice, the same inoculation leads to a profile of Th2 responses. Zinc (Zn) is an essential trace element which is required for the growth and development of the immune responses. In this study, the influence of Zn sulfate on mRNA expression of main cytokines of the immune response was studied in susceptible BALB/c mice infected with L. major. The inoculated mice were divided into 3 groups, namely the untreated (control), the zinc sulfate treated (weeks 2, 4 and 8), and the Glucantime-treated (weeks 4 and 8) mice. During different time points post-infection, the lesion sizes and the parasite burden were measured in all the groups. Moreover, the expression of Ifng, Il4, Il10 and Il12 mRNA levels in the draining lymph nodes of the treated mice were compared to the control mice using real-time PCR. Our data demonstrated significant decreases in lesion sizes and parasite loads in Zn sulfate treated group compared to the untreated group. Moreover, significant fold increases in expression of Ifng transcript were observed in mice treated with Zn sulfate compared to the control. The ratio of Ifng/Il4 mRNA was also higher in Zn sulfate-treated mice compared to Glucantime-treated animals. These results indicate that Zn Sulfate has the ability to induce strong Th1 responses in susceptible BALB/c mice inoculated with L. major. PMID:26896749

  18. The Exosome and Trans-Acting Small Interfering RNAs Regulate Cuticular Wax Biosynthesis during Arabidopsis Inflorescence Stem Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Patricia; Zhao, Lifang; Eveleigh, Nathan; Yu, Yu; Chen, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    The primary aerial surfaces of land plants are covered with a cuticle, a protective layer composed of the cutin polyester matrix and cuticular waxes. Previously, we discovered a unique mechanism of regulating cuticular wax biosynthesis during Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stem elongation that involves ECERIFERUM7 (CER7), a core subunit of the exosome. Because loss-of-function mutations in CER7 result in reduced expression of the wax biosynthetic gene CER3, we proposed that CER7 is involved in degrading a messenger RNA encoding a CER3 repressor. To identify this putative repressor, we performed a cer7 suppressor screen that resulted in the isolation of the posttranscriptional gene-silencing components RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE1 and SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING3, indicating that small RNAs regulate CER3 expression. To establish the identity of the effector RNA species and determine whether these RNAs control CER3 transcript levels directly, we cloned additional genes identified in our suppressor screen and performed next-generation sequencing of small RNA populations that differentially accumulate in the cer7 mutant in comparison with the wild type. Our results demonstrate that the trans-acting small interfering RNA class of small RNAs are the effector molecules involved in direct silencing of CER3 and that the expression of five additional genes (EARLY RESPONSE TO DEHYDRATION14, AUXIN RESISTANT1, a translation initiation factor SUI1 family protein, and two genes of unknown function) is controlled by both CER7 and trans-acting small interfering RNAs. PMID:25502190

  19. The use of small interfering RNAs to inhibit adipocyte differentiation in human preadipocytes and fetal-femur-derived mesenchymal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Mirmalek-Sani, S.-H.; Yang, X.; Zhang, J.; Oreffo, R.O.C. . E-mail: roco@soton.ac.uk

    2006-06-10

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been used in functional genomics and offers innovative approaches in the development of novel therapeutics. Human mesenchymal stem cells offer a unique cell source for tissue engineering/regeneration strategies. The current study examined the potential of small interfering RNAs (siRNA) against human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) to suppress adipocyte differentiation (adipogenesis) in human preadipocytes and fetal-femur-derived mesenchymal cells. Adipogenesis was investigated using cellular and biochemical analysis. Transient transfection with PPAR{gamma}-siRNA using a liposomal-based strategy resulted in a significant inhibition of adipogenesis in human preadipocytes and fetal-femur-derived mesenchymal cells, compared to controls (cell, liposomal and negative siRNA). The inhibitory effect of PPAR{gamma}-siRNA was supported by testing human PPAR{gamma} mRNA and adipogenic associated genes using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to adiponectin receptor 1 and 2 as well as examination of fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP{sub 3}) expression, an adipocyte-specific marker. The current studies indicate that PPAR{gamma}-siRNA is a useful tool to study adipogenesis in human cells, with potential applications both therapeutic and in the elucidation of mesenchymal cell differentiation in the modulation of cell differentiation in human mesenchymal cells.

  20. Nucleolin stabilizes Bcl-X L messenger RNA in response to UVA irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jack; Tsaprailis, George; Bowden, G Tim

    2008-02-15

    Our laboratory has previously reported that UVA irradiation can increase the expression of Bcl-X(L), an antiapoptotic molecule, by stabilizing its mRNA in cultured immortalized human keratinocytes. To understand the mechanism by which the Bcl-X(L) message is stabilized, we used a synthetic Bcl-X(L) 3'-untranslated region (UTR) to capture RNA-binding proteins. Nucleolin was identified as one of the binding proteins as determined by tandem mass spectrometry coupled to liquid chromatography analysis. Further study showed that nucleolin specifically recognized the AU-rich elements (AUUUA) in the 3'-UTR of the Bcl-X(L) mRNA and could stabilize the mRNA in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of nucleolin stabilizes the Bcl-X(L) mRNA in HeLa cells, whereas reducing nucleolin by small interfering RNA shortens the Bcl-X(L) mRNA half-life. Interestingly, nucleolin physically interacted with polyadenylate [poly(A)]-binding protein through it RGG motifs. Its stabilizing effect on the Bcl-X(L) mRNA was dependent upon the presence of poly(A) tail. Based on these data, we propose a model in which nucleolin protects the Bcl-X(L) mRNA from nuclease degradation by enhancing the stability of the ribonucleoprotein loop structure. PMID:18281479

  1. Inhibition of RNA interference and modulation of transposable element expression by cell death in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weiwu; Liang, Chengzhi; Birchler, James A

    2011-08-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) regulates gene expression by sequence-specific destruction of RNA. It acts as a defense mechanism against viruses and represses the expression of transposable elements (TEs) and some endogenous genes. We report that mutations and transgene constructs that condition cell death suppress RNA interference in adjacent cells in Drosophila melanogaster. The reversal of RNAi is effective for both the white (w) eye color gene and green fluorescent protein (GFP), indicating the generality of the inhibition. Antiapoptotic transgenes that reverse cell death will also reverse the inhibition of RNAi. Using GFP and a low level of cell death produced by a heat shock-head involution defective (hs-hid) transgene, the inhibition appears to occur by blocking the conversion of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to short interfering RNA (siRNA). We also demonstrate that the mus308 gene and endogenous transposable elements, which are both regularly silenced by RNAi, are increased in expression and accompanied by a reduced level of siRNA, when cell death occurs. The finding that chronic ectopic cell death affects RNAi is critical for an understanding of the application of the technique in basic and applied studies. These results also suggest that developmental perturbations, disease states, or environmental insults that cause ectopic cell death would alter transposon and gene expression patterns in the organism by the inhibition of small RNA silencing processes. PMID:21596898

  2. Construction of p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors and its effects on alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis induced by hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chan; Dong, Wen-Bin; Zhao, Shuai; Li, Qing-Ping; Kang, Lan; Lei, Xiao-Ping; Guo, Lin; Zhai, Xue-Song

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to observe the inhibitive effects of p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors on the expression of p66Shc, and to explore its effects on alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis induced by hyperoxia. Methods The gene sequences were cloned into the pLenR-GPH-shRNA lentiviral vector, which was selected by Genebank searches. The pLenR-GPH-shRNA and lentiviral vector packaging plasmid mix were cotransfected into 293T cells to package lentiviral particles. Culture virus supernatant was harvested, and then the virus titer was determined by serial dilution assay. A549 cells were transduced with the constructed lentiviral vectors, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to evaluate p66Shc expression. This study is divided into a control group, a hyperoxia group, an A549-p66ShcshRNA hyperoxia group, and a negative lentivirus group. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry after 24 hours; the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and caspase-9 were detected by immunohistochemistry assay. The production of reactive oxygen species and cellular mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm) were determined by fluorescence microscopy. Results We successfully established the p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors, A549-p66ShcshRNA. The A549-p66ShcshRNA was transfected into alveolar epithelial cells, and the inhibitive effects on the expression of p66Shc were observed. Both RT-PCR and Western blot demonstrated downregulation of p66Shc expression in A549 cells. In the A549-p66ShcshRNA hyperoxia group, we found dampened oxidative stress. A549-p66ShcshRNA can cause p66Shc gene silencing, reduce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation, reduce membrane potential decrease, reduce the apoptosis of A549 cells, and reduce alveolar epithelial cell injury, while the lentiviral empty vector group had no such changes. Conclusion p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vector can affect the

  3. Chronic dietary exposure to chlorpyrifos causes behavioral impairments, low activity of brain membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase, and increased brain acetylcholinesterase-R mRNA.

    PubMed

    López-Granero, Caridad; Cardona, Diana; Giménez, Estela; Lozano, Rafael; Barril, José; Sánchez-Santed, Fernando; Cañadas, Fernando

    2013-06-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is an organophosphate (OP) insecticide that is metabolically activated to the highly toxic chlorpyrifos oxon. Dietary exposure is the main route of intoxication for non-occupational exposures. However, only limited behavioral effects of chronic dietary exposure have been investigated. Therefore, male Wistar rats were fed a dose of 5mg/kg/day of CPF for thirty-one weeks. Animals were evaluated in spatial learning and impulsivity tasks after 21 weeks of CPF dietary exposure and one week after exposure ended, respectively. In addition, the degree of inhibition of brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was evaluated for both the soluble and particulate forms of the enzyme, as well as AChE gene expression. Also, brain acylpeptide hydrolase (APH) was investigated as an alternative target for OP-mediated effects. All variables were evaluated at various time points in response to CPF diet and after exposure ended. Results from behavioral procedures suggest cognitive and emotional disorders. Moreover, low levels of activity representing membrane-bound oligomeric forms (tetramers) were also observed. In addition, increased brain AChE-R mRNA levels were detected after four weeks of CPF dietary exposure. However, no changes in levels of brain APH were observed among groups. In conclusion, our data point to a relationship between cognitive impairments and changes in AChE forms, specifically to a high inhibition of the particulate form and a modification of alternative splicing of mRNA during CPF dietary exposure. PMID:23545134

  4. Altered microRNA expression after infection with human cytomegalovirus leads to TIMP3 downregulation and increased shedding of metalloprotease substrates, including MICA.

    PubMed

    Esteso, Gloria; Luzón, Elisa; Sarmiento, Elisabeth; Gómez-Caro, Ruth; Steinle, Alexander; Murphy, Gillian; Carbone, Javier; Valés-Gómez, Mar; Reyburn, Hugh T

    2014-08-01

    Proteolytic shedding of ligands for the NK group 2D (NKG2D) receptor is a strategy used by tumors to modulate immune recognition by NK cells and cytotoxic T cells. A number of metalloproteases, especially those of the A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) family, can mediate NKG2D ligand cleavage and this process can be modulated by expression of the thiol isomerase ERp5. In this article, we describe that an increased shedding of the NKG2D ligand MICA is observed postinfection with several strains of human CMV due to an enhanced activity of ADAM17 (TNF-α converting enzyme) and matrix metalloprotease 14 caused by a reduction in the expression of the endogenous inhibitor of metalloproteases tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3). This decrease in TIMP3 expression correlates with increased expression of a cellular miRNA known to target TIMP3, and we also identify a human CMV-encoded microRNA able to modulate TIMP3 expression. These observations characterize a novel viral strategy to influence the shedding of cell-surface molecules involved in immune response modulation. They also provide an explanation for previous reports of increased levels of various ADAM17 substrates in the serum from patients with CMV disease. Consistent with this hypothesis, we detected soluble MICA in serum of transplant recipients with CMV disease. Finally, these data suggest that it might be worthwhile to prospectively study ADAM17 activity in a larger group of patients to assay whether this might be a useful biomarker to identify patients at risk for development of CMV disease. PMID:24973455

  5. Increased expression of osteonectin/SPARC mRNA and protein in age-related human cataracts and spatial expression in the normal human lens

    PubMed Central

    Kantorow, Marc; Huang, Quingling; Yang, Xian-jie; Sage, E. Helene; Magabo, Kristine S.; Miller, Kevin M.; Horwitz, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We have previously reported increased levels of Osteonectin/SPARC transcript in age-related cataractous compared to normal human lenses. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the corresponding levels of osteonectin/SPARC protein in age-related cataractous relative to normal lenses and to evaluate the levels of osteonectin/SPARC transcript in specific types of age-related human cataracts. The spatial expression of osteonectin/SPARC was also evaluated in normal human lenses. Methods Specific types of age-related cataracts were collected and graded. Normal human lenses were microdissected into epithelia and fibers. Osteonectin/SPARC protein levels were monitored by Western immunoblotting, and transcript levels were evaluated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Osteonectin/SPARC expression patterns were examined by RT-PCR and by immunostaining. Results Higher levels of osteonectin/SPARC protein were detected in age-related cataractous relative to normal human lenses. Increased levels of osteonectin/SPARC transcript were also detected in posterior-subcapsular and nuclear cataractous lenses relative to normal lenses. Osteonectin/SPARC transcripts were detected in the lens epithelium but not fibers. Osteonectin/SPARC protein levels were highest in the peripheral lens epithelium. Conclusions Consistent with our previous studies on osteonectin/SPARC mRNA levels, osteonectin/SPARC protein levels were also elevated in cataractous compared to normal human lenses. Increased levels of osteonectin/SPARC mRNA were also found in nuclear and posterior-subcapsular cataracts relative to normal lenses. Osteonectin/SPARC expression is confined to the lens epithelium, and osteonectin/SPARC levels are highest in the peripheral lens epithelium. PMID:10756178

  6. Increased MET Gene Copy Number but Not mRNA Level Predicts Postoperative Recurrence in Patients with Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczuk, Oksana; Kozlowski, Miroslaw; Niklinska, Wiesława; Kisluk, Joanna; Niklinska, Barbara Joanna; Niklinski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship of MET copy number (CN) and MET mRNA expression to other molecular alterations, clinicopathologic characteristics, and survival of patients with resected non–small cell lung cancer. One hundred fifty-one paired surgical samples of tumor and tumor-distant normal lung tissues were analyzed by comparative quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods with commercially available assays and the CopyCaller software v. 1.0 for post-PCR data processing (downloadable from www.appliedbiosystems.com). MET copy gain (set as more than 3.0 copies per cell) was found in 18.5% of the samples and occurred more frequently in the adenocarcinomas (ADCs) with an increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) CN (P = .001 and .030 for EGFR and HER2, respectively) and in the ADCs with EGFR activating mutations (P = .051) but did not correlate with KRAS dosage or mutational status. MET mRNA level was 1.76-fold higher [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.29-2.40] in the tumor compared to unaffected lung tissue and associated significantly with MET CN (beta coefficient, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.22-1.87; P < .001). In the multivariable analysis, patients diagnosed with ADC with increased MET CN had a significantly higher risk of disease recurrence (hazard ratio, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.20-2.57; P = .004). An increased MET CN in combination with histologic type appears to be a prognostic factor in patients with ADC after a curative surgery. PMID:25389455

  7. PEGylated cyclodextrins as novel siRNA nanosystems: correlations between polyethylene glycol length and nanoparticle stability.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Bruno M D C; Ogier, Julien R; Quinlan, Aoife; Darcy, Raphael; Griffin, Brendan T; Cryan, John F; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2014-10-01

    Silencing disease-related genes in the central nervous system (CNS) using short interfering RNA (siRNA) holds great promise for treating neurological disorders. Yet, delivery of RNAi therapeutics to the brain poses major challenges to non-viral systems, especially when considering systemic administration. Cationic nanoparticles have been widely investigated for siRNA delivery, but the tendency of these to aggregate in physiological environments limits their intravenous application. Thus, strategies to increase the stability of nanoparticles have been developed. Here, we investigated the ability of modified cationic amphiphilic or PEGylated amphiphilic cyclodextrins (CD) to formulate stable CD.siRNA nanoparticles. To this end, we describe a simple method for post-modification of pre-formed cationic CD.siRNA nanoparticles at their surface using PEGylated CDs of different PEG lengths. PEGylated CD.siRNA nanoparticles presented reduced surface charges and increased stability in physiological salt conditions. Stability of PEGylated CD.siRNA nanoparticles in vitro increased with both PEG length and PEG density at the surface. Furthermore, in a comparative pharmacokinetic study, increased systemic exposure and reduced clearance were achieved with CD-formulations when compared to naked siRNAs. However, no significant differences were observed among non-PEGylated and PEGylated CD.siRNAs suggesting that longer PEG lengths might be required for improving stability in vivo. PMID:24992319

  8. Evaluation of Exogenous siRNA Addition as a Metabolic Engineering Tool for Modifying Biopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Tummala, Seshu; Titus, Michael; Wilson, Lee; Wang, Chunhua; Ciatto, Carlo; Foster, Donald; Szabo, Zoltan; Guttman, Andras; Li, Chen; Bettencourt, Brian; Jayaraman, Muthuswamy; Deroot, Jack; Thill, Greg; Kocisko, David; Pollard, Stuart; Charisse, Klaus; Kuchimanchi, Satya; Hinkle, Greg; Milstein, Stuart; Myers, Rachel; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Karger, Barry; Rossomando, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Traditional metabolic engineering approaches, including homologous recombination, zinc finger nucleases, and short hairpin RNA (shRNA), have previously been employed to generate biologics with specific characteristics that improve efficacy, potency, and safety. An alternative approach is to exogenously add soluble small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes, formulated with a cationic lipid, directly to cells grown in shake flasks or bioreactors, This approach has the following potential advantages : no cell line development required, ability to tailor mRNA silencing by adjusting siRNA concentration, simultaneous silencing of multiple target genes, and potential temporal control of down regulation of target gene expression. In this study, we demonstrate proof of concept of the siRNA feeding approach as a metabolic engineering tool in the context of increasing monoclonal antibody afucosylation. First, potent siRNA duplexes targeting fut8 and gmds were dosed into shake flasks with cells that express an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody. Dose response studies demonstrated the ability to titrate the silencing effect. Furthermore, siRNA addition resulted in no deleterious effects on cell growth, final protein titer, or specific productivity. In bioreactors, antibodies produced by cells following siRNA treatment exhibited improved functional characteristics compared to antibodies from untreated cells, including increased levels of afucosylation (63%), a 17-fold improvement in FCgRIIIa binding, and an increase in specific cell lysis by up to 30%, as determined in an ADCC assay. In addition, standard purification procedures effectively cleared the exogenously added siRNA and transfection agent. Moreover, no differences were observed when other key product quality structural attributes were compared to untreated controls. These results establish that exogenous addition of siRNA represents a potentially novel metabolic engineering tool to improve biopharmaceutical function and

  9. Elucidation of the physicochemical properties and potency of siRNA-loaded small-sized lipid nanoparticles for siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yusuke; Note, Yusuke; Maeki, Masatoshi; Kaji, Noritada; Baba, Yoshinobu; Tokeshi, Manabu; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2016-05-10

    Because nanoparticles with diameters less than 50nm penetrate stromal-rich tumor tissues more efficiently, the synthesis of small-sized nanoparticles encapsulating short interfering RNA (siRNA) is important in terms of realizing novel siRNA medicine for the treatment of various cancers. Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) are the leading systems for the delivery of siRNA in vivo. Limit size LNPs were successfully synthesized using a microfluidic mixing technique. However, the physicochemical properties and potential for in vivo siRNA delivery of the limit-size LNPs have not been examined in detail. In the present study, we prepared LNPs with different diameters from 32 to 67nm using a microfluidic mixing devise and examined the physicochemical properties of the particles and the potential for their use in delivering siRNA in vitro and in vivo to liver. Reducing the size of the LNPs causes poor-packing and an increased surface area, which result in their instability in serum. Moreover, it was revealed that the ability of endosomal escape (cytosolic siRNA release) of the smaller LNPs is subject to inhibition by serum compared to that of larger counterparts. Taken together, an increase in packing and avoiding the adsorption of serum components are key strategies for the development of next-generation highly potent and small-sized LNPs. PMID:26995758

  10. A Mutation in the 5′ Untranslated Region Increases Stability of norA mRNA, Encoding a Multidrug Resistance Transporter of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Bénédicte; Truong-Bolduc, Que Chi; Zhang, Xiamei; Hooper, David C.

    2001-01-01

    NorA, a multidrug efflux pump in Staphylococcus aureus, protects the cell from multiple drugs, including quinolones. The flqB mutation (T→G) in the 5′ untranslated region upstream of norA causes norA overexpression of 4.9-fold in cis, as measured in norA::blaZ fusions. The transcriptional initiation site of norA was unchanged in mutant and wild-type strains, but the half-life of norA mRNA was increased 4.8-fold in the flqB mutant compared to the wild-type strain. Computer-generated folding of the first 68 nucleotides of the norA transcript predicts an additional stem-loop and changes in a putative RNase III cleavage site in the flqB mutant. PMID:11244079

  11. AB171. RNA alternative splicing modulator can effectively increase lymphoblast enzyme activity in patients with cardiac fabry disease caused by IVS4+919G >A mutation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yung-Hsiu; Li, Cheng-Fang; Huang, Chun-Kai; Lin, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Ting-Rong; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2015-01-01

    splicing and to increase the amount of normal α-Gal A protein. And amiloride HCl increased the splicing ratio (2.5 fold) and enzyme activity (2.2 fold) of α-Gal A in the lymphoblasts with IVS4+919G >A mutation. Conclusions Our results provide proof-of-concept that aberrant RNA splicing caused by the cardiac variant fabry mutation, IVS4+919G >A, can be rescued by HDIs. The use of HDIs may become a viable therapeutic strategy for patients with this highly prevalent mutation in the Han population.

  12. Sodium bicarbonate ingestion augments the increase in PGC-1α mRNA expression during recovery from intense interval exercise in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Percival, Michael E; Martin, Brian J; Gillen, Jenna B; Skelly, Lauren E; MacInnis, Martin J; Green, Alex E; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Gibala, Martin J

    2015-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that ingestion of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) prior to an acute session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) would augment signaling cascades and gene expression linked to mitochondrial biogenesis in human skeletal muscle. On two occasions separated by ∼1 wk, nine men (mean ± SD: age 22 ± 2 yr, weight 78 ± 13 kg, V̇O(2 peak) 48 ± 8 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) performed 10 × 60-s cycling efforts at an intensity eliciting ∼90% of maximal heart rate (263 ± 40 W), interspersed with 60 s of recovery. In a double-blind, crossover manner, subjects ingested a total of 0.4 g/kg body weight NaHCO3 before exercise (BICARB) or an equimolar amount of a placebo, sodium chloride (PLAC). Venous blood bicarbonate and pH were elevated at all time points after ingestion (P < 0.05) in BICARB vs. PLAC. During exercise, muscle glycogen utilization (126 ± 47 vs. 53 ± 38 mmol/kg dry weight, P < 0.05) and blood lactate accumulation (12.8 ± 2.6 vs. 10.5 ± 2.8 mmol/liter, P < 0.05) were greater in BICARB vs. PLAC. The acute exercise-induced increase in the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a downstream marker of AMP-activated protein kinase activity, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase were similar between treatments (P > 0.05). However, the increase in PGC-1α mRNA expression after 3 h of recovery was higher in BICARB vs. PLAC (approximately sevenfold vs. fivefold compared with rest, P < 0.05). We conclude that NaHCO3 before HIIT alters the mRNA expression of this key regulatory protein associated with mitochondrial biogenesis. The elevated PGC-1α mRNA response provides a putative mechanism to explain the enhanced mitochondrial adaptation observed after chronic HIIT supplemented with NaHCO3 in rats. PMID:26384407

  13. Target delivery of small interfering RNAs with vitamin E-coupled nanoparticles for treating hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Duan, Liang; Yan, Yan; Liu, Jingyi; Wang, Bo; Li, Pu; Hu, Qin; Chen, Weixian

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) represents a promising strategy for the treatment of HCV infection. However, the development of an effective system for in vivo delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to target organ remains a formidable challenge. Here, we develop a unique nanoparticle platform (VE-DC) composed of α-tocopherol (vitamin E) and cholesterol-based cationic liposomes (DOTAP-Chol) for systemic delivery of siRNAs to the liver. A HCV-replicable cell line, Huh7.5.1-HCV, and a transient HCV core expressing cell line, Huh7.5.1-Core, were constructed and used to assess the in vitro anti-HCV activity of VE-DC/siRNAs. A transient in vivo HCV model was also constructed by hydrodynamic injection of pCDNA3.1(+)-3FLAG-Core (pCore-3FLAG) plasmid expressing core protein or pGL3-5'UTR-luciferase (pGL3-5'UTR-luc) plasmid expressing luciferase driven by HCV 5'UTR. Nanoscale VE-DC/siRNA was intravenously injected to assess the liver-targeting property as well as antiviral activity. The nanoscale VE-DC effectively exerted an anti-HCV activity in the in vitro cell models. Post-administration of VE-DC/siRNAs also effectively delivered siRNAs to the liver, suppressing core protein production and firefly luciferase activity, without inducing an innate immunity response or off-target and toxicity effects. The VE-DC platform has high potential as a vehicle for delivery of siRNAs to the liver for gene therapy for targeting hepatitis C. PMID:27113197

  14. Target delivery of small interfering RNAs with vitamin E-coupled nanoparticles for treating hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Liang; Yan, Yan; Liu, Jingyi; Wang, Bo; Li, Pu; Hu, Qin; Chen, Weixian

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) represents a promising strategy for the treatment of HCV infection. However, the development of an effective system for in vivo delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to target organ remains a formidable challenge. Here, we develop a unique nanoparticle platform (VE-DC) composed of α-tocopherol (vitamin E) and cholesterol-based cationic liposomes (DOTAP-Chol) for systemic delivery of siRNAs to the liver. A HCV-replicable cell line, Huh7.5.1-HCV, and a transient HCV core expressing cell line, Huh7.5.1-Core, were constructed and used to assess the in vitro anti-HCV activity of VE-DC/siRNAs. A transient in vivo HCV model was also constructed by hydrodynamic injection of pCDNA3.1(+)-3FLAG-Core (pCore-3FLAG) plasmid expressing core protein or pGL3-5′UTR-luciferase (pGL3-5′UTR-luc) plasmid expressing luciferase driven by HCV 5′UTR. Nanoscale VE-DC/siRNA was intravenously injected to assess the liver-targeting property as well as antiviral activity. The nanoscale VE-DC effectively exerted an anti-HCV activity in the in vitro cell models. Post-administration of VE-DC/siRNAs also effectively delivered siRNAs to the liver, suppressing core protein production and firefly luciferase activity, without inducing an innate immunity response or off-target and toxicity effects. The VE-DC platform has high potential as a vehicle for delivery of siRNAs to the liver for gene therapy for targeting hepatitis C. PMID:27113197

  15. Brain α2-adrenoceptors in monoamine-depleted rats: increased receptor density, G coupling proteins, receptor turnover and receptor mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Catalina; Miralles, Antonio; Busquets, Xavier; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the molecular and cellular events involved in the up-regulation (and receptor supersensitivity) of brain α2-adrenoceptors as a result of chronic depletion of noradrenaline (and other monoamines) by reserpine. Chronic reserpine (0.25 mg kg−1 s.c., every 48 h for 6 – 14 days) increased significantly the density (Bmax values) of cortical α2-adrenoceptor agonist sites (34 – 48% for [3H]-UK14304, 22 – 32% for [3H]-clonidine) but not that of antagonist sites (11 – 18% for [3H]-RX821002). Competition of [3H]-RX821002 binding by (−)-adrenaline further indicated that chronic reserpine was associated with up-regulation of the high-affinity state of α2-adrenoceptors. In cortical membranes of reserpine-treated rats (0.25 mg kg−1 s.c., every 48 h for 20 days), the immunoreactivities of various G proteins (Gαi1/2, Gαi3, Gαo and Gαs) were increased (25 – 34%). Because the high-affinity conformation of the α2-adrenoceptor is most probably related to the complex with Gαi2 proteins, these results suggested an increase in signal transduction through α2-adrenoceptors (and other monoamine receptors) induced by chronic reserpine. After α2-adrenoceptor alkylation, the analysis of receptor recovery (Bmax for [3H]-UK14304) indicated that the increased density of cortical α2-adrenoceptors in reserpine-treated rats was probably due to a higher appearance rate constant of the receptor (Δr=57%) and not to a decreased disappearance rate constant (Δk=7%). Northern- and dot-blot analyses of RNA extracted from the cerebral cortex of saline- and reserpine-treated rats (0.25 mg kg−1, s.c., every 48 h for 20 days) revealed that reserpine markedly increased the expression of α2a-adrenoceptor mRNA in the brain (125%). This transcriptional activation of the receptor gene expression appears to be the cellular mechanism by which reserpine induces up-regulation in the density of brain α2-adrenoceptors

  16. Circular RNA Related to the Chondrocyte ECM Regulates MMP13 Expression by Functioning as a MiR-136 ‘Sponge’ in Human Cartilage Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Xin; Hu, Xiaoqing; Dai, Linghui; Fu, Xin; Zhang, Jiying; Ao, Yingfang

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are involved in the development of various diseases, but there is little knowledge of circRNAs in osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of study was to identify circRNA expression in articular cartilage and to explore the function of chondrocyte extracellular matrix (ECM)-related circRNAs (circRNA-CER) in cartilage. To identify circRNAs that are specifically expressed in cartilage, we compared the expression of circRNAs in OA cartilage with that in normal cartilage. Bioinformatics was employed to predict the interaction of circRNAs and mRNAs in cartilage. Loss-of-function and rescue experiments for circRNA-CER were performed in vitro. A total of 71 circRNAs were differentially expressed in OA and normal cartilage. CircRNA-CER expression increased with interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor levels in chondrocytes. Silencing of circRNA-CER using small interfering RNA suppressed MMP13 expression and increased ECM formation. CircRNA-CER could compete for miR-136 with MMP13. Our results demonstrated that circRNA-CER regulated MMP13 expression by functioning as a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) and participated in the process of chondrocyte ECM degradation. We propose that circRNA-CER could be used as a potential target in OA therapy. PMID:26931159

  17. PFOS Disturbs BDNF-ERK-CREB Signalling in Association with Increased MicroRNA-22 in SH-SY5Y Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wu; He, Qing-zhi; Wu, Cheng-qiu; Pan, Xiao-yuan; Wang, Jing; Tan, Yan; Shan, Xiao-yun; Zeng, Huai-cai

    2015-01-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, is neurotoxic to mammalian species. However, the underlying mechanism of its neurotoxicity was unclear. We hypothesized that PFOS suppresses BDNF expression to produce its neurotoxic effects by inhibiting the ERK-CREB pathway. SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells were exposed to various concentrations of PFOS to examine the role of the BDNF-ERK-CREB signalling pathway in PFOS-induced apoptosis and cytotoxicity. Furthermore, to ascertain the mechanism by which PFOS reduces BDNF signalling, we examined the expression levels of miR-16 and miR-22, which potentially regulate BDNF mRNA translation at the posttranscriptional level. Results indicated that PFOS significantly decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. In addition, BDNF and pERK protein levels decreased after PFOS treatment; however, pCREB protein levels were significantly elevated in PFOS treated groups. TrkB protein expression increased in the 10 μM and 50 μM PFOS groups and significantly decreased in the 100 μM PFOS group. Our results demonstrated that PFOS exposure decreased miR-16 expression and increased miR-22 expression, which may represent a possible mechanism by which PFOS decreases BDNF protein levels. PFOS may inhibit BDNF-ERK-CREB signalling by increasing miR-22 levels, which may, in part, explain the mechanism of PFOS neurotoxicity. PMID:26649298

  18. Long non-coding RNA MALAT1 increases AKAP-9 expression by promoting SRPK1-catalyzed SRSF1 phosphorylation in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lin-Ying; Huang, Yu-qi; Liu, Yan-Ping; Xiao, Li-Wei; Li, Sheng-Nan; Zhu, Hui-Fang; Li, Zu-Guo; Kan, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Our earlier findings indicate that the long non-coding RNA MALAT1 promotes colorectal cancer (CRC) cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis in vitro and in vivo by increasing expression of AKAP-9. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by which MALAT1 enhances AKAP9 expression in CRC SW480 cells. We found that MALAT1 interacts with both SRPK1 and SRSF1. MALAT1 increases AKAP-9 expression by promoting SRPK1-catalyzed SRSF1 phosphorylation. Following MALAT1 knockdown, overexpression of SRPK1 was sufficient to restore SRSF1 phosphorylation and AKAP-9 expression to a level that promoted cell proliferation, invasion and migration in vitro. Conversely, SRPK1 knockdown after overexpression of MALAT1 in SW480 cells diminished SRSF1 phosphorylation and AKAP-9 expression and suppressed cell proliferation, invasion and migration in vitro. These findings suggest MALAT1 increases AKAP-9 expression by promoting SRPK1-catalyzed SRSF1 phosphorylation in CRC cells. These results reveal a novel molecular mechanism by which MALAT1 regulates AKAP-9 expression in CRC cells. PMID:26887056

  19. Knockdown of long noncoding RNA H19 sensitizes human glioma cells to temozolomide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Pengfei; Wang, Ping; Sun, Xiaoling; Yuan, Zhongshun; Zhan, Rucai; Ma, Xiangyu; Li, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is commonly used in glioma chemotherapy. However, a great clinical challenge for TMZ is chemoresistance. H19 transcripts are recognized as long noncoding RNAs, which potentially interact with chromatin-modifying complexes to regulate gene expression via epigenetic changes. Our data based on glioma patients showed that the expression of H19 was significantly upregulated in TMZ-resistant tumors compared with the TMZ-sensitive tumors. To determine the function of H19 in glioma, cell lines U87 and U251 were exposed to TMZ to establish TMZ-resistant clones U87TMZ and U251TMZ. In U87TMZ and U251TMZ, the expression level of H19 transcripts was increased compared to wild-type or nonresistant clones, as determined by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Concomitant treatment with small interfering RNA specifically targeting H19 and TMZ in resistant glioma clones resulted in decreased IC50 values for TMZ, and increased apoptotic rates than control small interfering RNA-treated cells. This was also evident by the increased PARP cleavage in resistant cells exposed to TMZ + si-H19. Furthermore, the reduced expression of H19 altered major drug resistance genes, such as MDR, MRP, and ABCG2, both at the mRNA and protein levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that H19 plays an important role in the development of TMZ resistance, and may represent a novel therapeutic target for TMZ-resistant gliomas. PMID:27366087

  20. Sirolimus induces apoptosis and reverses multidrug resistance in human osteosarcoma cells in vitro via increasing microRNA-34b expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Zhao, Rui-hua; Tseng, Kuo-Fu; Li, Kun-peng; Lu, Zhi-gang; Liu, Yuan; Han, Kun; Gan, Zhi-hua; Lin, Shu-chen; Hu, Hai-yan; Min, Da-liu

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Multi-drug resistance poses a critical bottleneck in chemotherapy. Given the up-regulation of mTOR pathway in many chemoresistant cancers, we examined whether sirolimus (rapamycin), a first generation mTOR inhibitor, might induce human osteosarcoma (OS) cell apoptosis and increase the sensitivity of OS cells to anticancer drugs in vitro. Methods: Human OS cell line MG63/ADM was treated with sirolimus alone or in combination with doxorubicin (ADM), gemcitabine (GEM) or methotrexate (MTX). Cell proliferation and apoptosis were detected using CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. MiRNAs in the cells were analyzed with miRNA microarray. The targets of miR-34b were determined based on TargetScan analysis and luciferase reporter assays. The expression of relevant mRNA and proteins was measured using qRT-PCR and Western blotting. MiR-34, PAK1 and ABCB1 levels in 40 tissue samples of OS patients were analyzed using qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization assays. Results: Sirolimus (1–100 nmol/L) dose-dependently suppressed the cell proliferation (IC50=23.97 nmol/L) and induced apoptosis. Sirolimus (10 nmol/L) significantly sensitized the cells to anticancer drugs, leading to decreased IC50 values of ADM, GEM and MTX (from 25.48, 621.41 and 21.72 μmol/L to 4.93, 73.92 and 6.77 μmol/L, respectively). Treatment of with sirolimus increased miR-34b levels by a factor of 7.5 in the cells. Upregulation of miR-34b also induced apoptosis and increased the sensitivity of the cells to the anticancer drugs, whereas transfection with miR-34b-AMO, an inhibitor of miR-34b, reversed the anti-proliferation effect of sirolimus. Two key regulators of cell cycle, apoptosis and multiple drug resistance, PAK1 and ABCB1, were demonstrated to be the direct targets of miR-34b. In 40 tissue samples of OS patients, significantly higher miR-34 ISH score and lower PAK5 and ABCB1 scores were detected in the chemo-sensitive group. Conclusion: Sirolimus increases the sensitivity of human OS

  1. Liposome-based co-delivery of siRNA and docetaxel for the synergistic treatment of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Mei-Hua; Zeng, Rui-Fang; Fang, Shi; Dai, Qiang-Sheng; Li, He-Ping; Long, Jian-Ting

    2014-10-20

    Combination of more than one therapeutic strategy is the standard treatment in clinics. Co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drug and small interfering RNA (siRNA) within a nanoparticulate system will suppress the tumor growth. In the present study, docetaxel (DTX) and BCL-2 siRNA was incorporated in a PEGylated liposome to systemically deliver in a lung cancer model (A549). The resulting nanoparticle (lipo-DTX/siRNA) was stable and exhibited a sustained release profile. The co-delivery of therapeutic moieties inhibited the cell proliferation (A549 and H226) in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, the co-delivery system of DTX and siRNA exhibited a remarkable apoptosis of cancer cells with elevated levels of caspase 3/7 activity (apoptosis markers). Cell cycle analysis further showed remarkable increase in sub-G0/G1 phase, indicating increasing hypodiploids or apoptotic cells. Pharmacokinetic study showed a long circulating profile for DTX from lipo-DTX/siRNA system facilitating the passive tumor targeting. In vivo antitumor study on A549 cell bearing xenograft tumor model exhibited a remarkable tumor regression profile for lipo-DTX/siRNA with 100% survival rate. The favorable tumor inhibition response was attributed to the synergistic effect of DTX potency and MDR reversing ability of BCL-2 siRNA in the tumor mass. Overall, experimental results suggest that co-delivery of DTX and siRNA could be promising approach in the treatment of lung cancers. PMID:25138252

  2. A 22-nt artificial microRNA mediates widespread RNA silencing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Marcus; Eamens, Andrew L; Finnegan, E Jean; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    It is known that 22-nucleotide (nt) microRNAs (miRNAs) derived from asymmetric duplexes trigger phased small-interfering RNA (phasiRNA) production from complementary targets. Here we investigate the efficacy of 22-nt artificial miRNA (amiRNA)-mediated RNA silencing relative to conventional hairpin RNA (hpRNA) and 21-nt amiRNA-mediated RNA silencing. CHALCONE SYNTHASE (CHS) was selected as a target in Arabidopsis thaliana due to the obvious and non-lethal loss of anthocyanin accumulation upon widespread RNA silencing. Over-expression of CHS in the pap1-D background facilitated visual detection of both local and systemic RNA silencing. RNA silencing was initiated in leaf tissues from hpRNA and amiRNA plant expression vectors under the control of an Arabidopsis RuBisCo small subunit 1A promoter (SSU). In this system, hpRNA expression triggered CHS silencing in most leaf tissues but not in roots or seed coats. Similarly, 21-nt amiRNA expression from symmetric miRNA/miRNA* duplexes triggered CHS silencing in all leaf tissues but not in roots or seed coats. However, 22-nt amiRNA expression from an asymmetric duplex triggered CHS silencing in all tissues, including roots and seed coats, in the majority of plant lines. This widespread CHS silencing required RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE6-mediated accumulation of phasiRNAs from the endogenous CHS transcript. These results demonstrate the efficacy of asymmetric 22-nt amiRNA-directed RNA silencing and associated phasiRNA production and activity, in mediating widespread RNA silencing of an endogenous target gene. Asymmetric 22-nt amiRNA-directed RNA silencing requires little modification of existing amiRNA technology and is expected to be effective in suppressing other genes and/or members of gene families. PMID:23937661

  3. Second-phase hepatitis C virus RNA decline during telaprevir-based therapy increases with drug effectiveness: implications for treatment duration.

    PubMed

    Guedj, Jeremie; Perelson, Alan S

    2011-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA decay during antiviral therapy is characterized by a rapid first phase, followed by a slower second phase. The current understanding of viral kinetics attributes the magnitude of the first phase of decay to treatment effectiveness, whereas the second phase of decay is attributed to the progressive loss of infected cells. Here, we analyzed data from 44 patients treated with telaprevir, a potent HCV protease inhibitor. Using a viral kinetic model that accounts for the pharmacokinetics of telaprevir, we found the second-phase slope of viral decline to be strongly correlated with treatment effectiveness and to be roughly four-fold more rapid than has been reported with interferon-based therapies. Because telaprevir is not known to increase the death rate of infected cells, our results suggest that the second-phase slope of viral decline is driven not only by the death of infected cells, but may also involve other mechanisms, such as a treatment-effectiveness-dependent degradation of intracellular viral RNA. As a result of the enhanced viral decay caused by the high antiviral effectiveness of telaprevir, we predict that if drug resistance could be avoided by using an appropriate combination of antiviral agents, treatment duration needed to clear HCV might be dramatically shortened. Indeed, we predict that in 95% of fully compliant patients, the last virus particle should be eliminated by week 7 of therapy. If the remaining infected hepatocytes act as a potential reservoir for the renewal of infection, no more than 10 weeks of treatment should be sufficient to clear the infection in 95% of fully compliant patients. However, if patients miss doses, treatment duration would need to be extended. PMID:21384401

  4. Allergen-specific immune response suppresses interleukin 10 expression in B cells via increasing micro-RNA-17-92 cluster.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiao-Rui; Qiu, Shu-Qi; Yang, Li-Tao; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Gui; Liu, Jiang-Qi; Zeng, Lu; Li, Xiao-Xi; Mo, Li-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10-expressing B cells play a critical role in the immune homeostasis in the body; its regulation has not been fully understood. Micro-RNA (miR)-17-92 cluster has strong regulation in the immunity. This study tests a hypothesis that miR-17-92 cluster suppresses IL-10 expression in B cells. In this study, peripheral B cells were collected from patients with allergic rhinitis (AR). The B cells were treated with specific allergens, dust mite extracts, in the culture. The expressions of miR-17-92 cluster and IL-10 in the culture were assessed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that the levels of miR-19a, but not the rest of the 5 members (miR-17, miR-18a, miR-19b, miR-20a, and miR-92a), were significantly higher in peripheral B cells from AR patients as than in B cells from healthy participants. Exposure of B cells from AR patients to specific allergen, dust mite extracts, significantly increased the levels if miR-19a and suppressed the expression of IL-10 in B cells. The levels of histone deacetylase 11 and acetylated H3K9 were higher, and the RNA polymerase II and c-Maf (the IL-10 transcription factor) were lower, at the IL-10 promoter locus. In conclusion, miR-19a mediates the allergen-specific immune response-decreased IL-10 expression in B cells. PMID:27491928

  5. Mutations in TFIIIA that increase stability of the TFIIIA-5 S rRNA gene complex: unusual effects on the kinetics of complex assembly and dissociation.

    PubMed

    Brady, Kristina L; Ponnampalam, Stephen N; Bumbulis, Michael J; Setzer, David R

    2005-07-22

    We have identified four mutations in Xenopus TFIIIA that increase the stability of TFIIIA-5 S rRNA gene complexes. In each case, the mutation has a relatively modest effect on equilibrium binding affinity. In three cases, these equilibrium binding effects can be ascribed primarily to decreases in the rate constant for protein-DNA complex dissociation. In the fou