Science.gov

Sample records for interferometric images application

  1. Terahertz interferometric imaging of RDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinyukov, Alexander M.; Barat, Robert B.; Gary, Dale E.; Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni; Zorych, Ivan; Zimdars, David; Federici, John F.

    2007-04-01

    Experimental results of homodyne terahertz interferometric 2-D imaging of RDX are presented. Continuous waves at 0.25-0.6 THz are used to obtain images of a C-4 sample at several THz frequencies. The performance of an N element detector array is imitated by only one detector placed at N positions. The distance between the C-4 sample and the detector array is ~30 cm. By taking interferometric images at several THz frequencies RDX can be recognized by the spectral peak at 0.82 THz. Simulations of interferometric images of two point sources of spherical waves are presented. The terahertz interferometric imaging method can be used in defense and security applications to detect concealed weapons, explosives as well as chemical and biological agents.

  2. 180-GHz Interferometric Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Lim, Boon H.; O'Dwyer, Ian J.; Soria, Mary M.; Owen, Heather R.; Gaier, Todd C.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn, H.; Tanner, Alan B.; Ruf, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A 180-GHz interferometric imager uses compact receiver modules, combined high- and low-gain antennas, and ASIC (application specific integrated circuit) correlator technology, enabling continuous, all-weather observations of water vapor with 25-km resolution and 0.3-K noise in 15 minutes of observation for numerical weather forecasting and tropical storm prediction. The GeoSTAR-II prototype instrument is broken down into four major subsystems: the compact, low-noise receivers; sub-array modules; IF signal distribution; and the digitizer/correlator. Instead of the single row of antennas adopted in GeoSTAR, this version has four rows of antennas on a coarser grid. This dramatically improves the sensitivity in the desired field of view. The GeoSTAR-II instrument is a 48-element, synthetic, thinned aperture radiometer operating at 165-183 GHz. The instrument has compact receivers integrated into tiles of 16 elements in a 4x4 arrangement. These tiles become the building block of larger arrays. The tiles contain signal distribution for bias controls, IF signal, and local oscillator signals. The IF signals are digitized and correlated using an ASIC correlator to minimize power consumption. Previous synthetic aperture imagers have used comparatively large multichip modules, whereas this approach uses chip-scale modules mounted on circuit boards, which are in turn mounted on the distribution manifolds. This minimizes the number of connectors and reduces system mass. The use of ASIC technology in the digitizers and correlators leads to a power reduction close to an order of magnitude.

  3. Imaging interferometric microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Christian J; Kuznetsova, Yuliya; Brueck, S R J

    2003-08-15

    We introduce and demonstrate a new microscopy concept: imaging interferometric microscopy (IIM), which is related to holography, synthetic-aperture imaging, and off-axis-dark-field illumination techniques. IIM is a wavelength-division multiplex approach to image formation that combines multiple images covering different spatial-frequency regions to form a composite image with a resolution much greater than that permitted by the same optical system using conventional techniques. This new type of microscopy involves both off-axis coherent illumination and reinjection of appropriate zero-order reference beams. Images demonstrate high resolution, comparable with that of a high-numerical-aperture (NA) objective, while they retain the long working distance, the large depth of field, and the large field of view of a low-NA objective. A Fourier-optics model of IIM is in good agreement with the experiment. PMID:12943079

  4. Terahertz interferometric imaging of a concealed object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinyukov, Alexander M.; Bandyopadhyay, Aparajita; Sengupta, Amartya; Barat, Robert B.; Gary, Dale E.; Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni; Zimdars, David; Federici, John F.

    2006-10-01

    Experimental results of two-dimensional homodyne terahertz interferometric imaging are presented. The performance of an N element detector array is imitated by only one detector placed at N positions. Continuous waves at 0.25-0.3 THz are used to detect concealed objects: a metal object and an RDX sample. The terahertz interferometric imaging method can be used in defense and security applications to detect concealed weapons, explosives as well as chemical and biological agents.

  5. Terahertz interferometric and synthetic aperture imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinyukov, Alexander M.; Bandyopadhyay, Aparajita; Sengupta, Amartya; Barat, Robert B.; Gary, Dale E.; Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni; Zimdars, David; Federici, John F.

    2006-05-01

    Experimental results of homodyne terahertz interferometric 1-D and 2-D imaging are presented. Continuous waves at 0.25-0.3 THz are used to detect a metal object behind a barrier. The performance of an N element detector array is imitated by only one detector placed at N positions. The reconstructed images are in a good agreement with theoretical predictions. The terahertz interferometric imaging method can be used in defense and security applications to detect concealed weapons, explosives as well as chemical and biological agents.

  6. Imaging through scattering media by interferometric techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, A. M.; Aleksoff, C. C.; Chang, B. J.

    1981-07-01

    It is shown that while holographic techniques are effective in seeing through such scattering media as fog, their usefulness in field applications is limited by the requirement of a separate reference beam. An alternative interferometric technique that uses a grating interferometric imaging system is presented, whose main advantage is a relatively high tolerance to normal vibration and air disturbances. It is proposed that the system incorporate a recording device that combines an image converter-intensifier with a real time light modulator. In addition to permitting real time operation, such a device would also increase system sensitivity and permit the use of IR illumination.

  7. Multiple Beam Correlation Using Single-Mode Fiber Optics with Application to Interferometric Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaklan, Stuart Bruce

    A study of the application of single-mode fiber optics to the multiple-beam interferometric recombination problem is presented. In the laboratory, the fibers have been used in wide bandwidth, two-arm, Mach-Zehnder test interferometers as well as a 5-telescope imaging interferometer connected to an all-fiber beam combiner. Based upon these experiments and some theoretical studies it is shown that fiber optics and fiber optic components such as directional couplers provide an excellent alternative to conventional optics such as mirrors, beamsplitters, and relay lenses. The equations describing the measurement of the complex degree of coherence in an interferometer with a single-mode fiber in each arm are derived. The equations reveal an important feature of the fibers: they filter phase fluctuations due to aberrations and turbulence at the input and convert them to intensity fluctuations at the output. This leads to a simplification of the calibration of measured visibilities. The coupling efficiency of light which has passed through a turbulent atmosphere is also studied as a function of fiber parameters and turbulence conditions for both image motion stabilized and non-stabilized cases. For the former case, coupling efficiency remains greater than 50% as long as telescope diameter is no larger than the turbulence coherence length. Beam combination architectures using arrays of directional couplers are fully discussed. Arrays accommodating up to 20 input beams are presented. The arrays require only N detector pixels for N input beams. A scheme of temporal multiplexing of the phase of each beam is used to identify individual fringe pairs. One possible scheme allows wide bandwidths even for large numbers of beams. A 5-telescope interferometer has been constructed and connected to an all-fiber beam combiner. Two extended objects were observed and reconstructed using standard radio astronomy VLBI software. The interferometer and beam combiner had good thermal and

  8. Registration of interferometric SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Qian; Vesecky, John F.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1992-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) is a new way of performing topography mapping. Among the factors critical to mapping accuracy is the registration of the complex SAR images from repeated orbits. A new algorithm for registering interferometric SAR images is presented. A new figure of merit, the average fluctuation function of the phase difference image, is proposed to evaluate the fringe pattern quality. The process of adjusting the registration parameters according to the fringe pattern quality is optimized through a downhill simplex minimization algorithm. The results of applying the proposed algorithm to register two pairs of Seasat SAR images with a short baseline (75 m) and a long baseline (500 m) are shown. It is found that the average fluctuation function is a very stable measure of fringe pattern quality allowing very accurate registration.

  9. Cascaded interferometric imaging spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Swinyard, Bruce; Ferlet, Marc

    2007-09-01

    We present what we believe to be a novel method for order sorting a Fabry-Perot interferometer using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) in tandem. We demonstrate how the order sorting is achieved using a model instrument response as an example of an instrument working in the 5-25 microm band, although the method is generally applicable at all wavelengths. We show that an instrument of this type can be realized with a large bandwidth, a large field of view, and good transmission efficiency. These attributes make this instrument concept a useful technique in applications where true imaging spectroscopy is required, such as mapping large astronomical sources. We compare the performance of the new instrument to grating and standard FTS instruments in circumstances where the measurement is background and detector noise limited. We use a figure of merit based on the field of view and speed of detection and find that the new system has a speed advantage over a FTS with the same field of view in all circumstances. The instrument will be faster than a grating instrument with the same spectral resolution once the field of view is >13 times larger under high background conditions and >50 times larger with detector performances that match the photon noise from Zodiacal light. PMID:17805378

  10. Improved design of a passive millimeter-wave synthetic aperture interferometric imager for indoor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xianxun; Liu, Kai; Hu, Anyong; Miao, Jungang

    2015-10-01

    A passive millimeter-wave imager prototype based on synthetic aperture interferometric radiometer (SAIR) technique is developing at Beihang University. It is designed for concealed contraband detection on human body in indoor environment at video imaging rate. The radiometric sensitivity requirements have been discussed in details, and the performance requirements of the digital processing subsystem have been analytically determined. A novel distributed digital correlator array architecture is proposed by using FPGA array, which results in reduction of hardware complexity and cost of the digital processing subsystem. In the proposed architecture, multistage pipeline technique is introduced for the reuse of logical resource that in turn results in decrease of transmission rate requirements for each FPGA, so that the feasibility of the digital processing subsystem can be greatly enhanced.

  11. Analysis of an interferometric Stokes imaging polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Sukumar

    Estimation of Stokes vector components from an interferometric fringe encoded image is a novel way of measuring the State Of Polarization (SOP) distribution across a scene. Imaging polarimeters employing interferometric techniques encode SOP in- formation across a scene in a single image in the form of intensity fringes. The lack of moving parts and use of a single image eliminates the problems of conventional polarimetry - vibration, spurious signal generation due to artifacts, beam wander, and need for registration routines. However, interferometric polarimeters are limited by narrow bandpass and short exposure time operations which decrease the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) defined as the ratio of the mean photon count to the standard deviation in the detected image. A simulation environment for designing an Interferometric Stokes Imaging polarimeter (ISIP) and a detector with noise effects is created and presented. Users of this environment are capable of imaging an object with defined SOP through an ISIP onto a detector producing a digitized image output. The simulation also includes bandpass imaging capabilities, control of detector noise, and object brightness levels. The Stokes images are estimated from a fringe encoded image of a scene by means of a reconstructor algorithm. A spatial domain methodology involving the idea of a unit cell and slide approach is applied to the reconstructor model developed using Mueller calculus. The validation of this methodology and effectiveness compared to a discrete approach is demonstrated with suitable examples. The pixel size required to sample the fringes and minimum unit cell size required for reconstruction are investigated using condition numbers. The importance of the PSF of fore-optics (telescope) used in imaging the object is investigated and analyzed using a point source imaging example and a Nyquist criteria is presented. Reconstruction of fringe modulated images in the presence of noise involves choosing an

  12. Radio and optical interferometric imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwell, Tim J.

    1992-01-01

    Since diffraction-limited imaging with a single aperture yields angular resolution approx. lambda/D, the attainment of high angular resolution with single apertures requires the construction of correspondingly large monolithic apertures, the whole surface of which must be figured to much less than a wavelength. At the longer wavelengths, it is impossible to build a sufficiently large single aperture: for example, at lambda 21 cm, arcsec resolution requires an aperture of diameter approx. 50 km. At the shorter wavelengths, the atmosphere imposes a natural limit in resolution of about one arcsec. However, another route is possible; that is, using synthetic apertures to image the sky. Synthetic apertures are now in use in many fields, e.g., radio interferometry, radar imaging, and magnetic-resonance imaging. Radio-interferometric techniques developed in radio astronomy over the past 40 years are now being applied to optical and IR astronomical imaging by a number of groups. Furthermore, the problem of figuring synthetic apertures is considerably simpler, and can be implemented in a computer: new 'self-calibration' techniques allow imaging even in the presence of phase errors due to the atmosphere.

  13. Transient volcano deformation sources imaged with interferometric synthetic aperture radar: Application to Seguam Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterlark, Timothy; Lu, Zhong

    2004-01-01

    Thirty interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images, spanning various intervals during 1992–2000, document coeruptive and posteruptive deformation of the 1992–1993 eruption on Seguam Island, Alaska. A procedure that combines standard damped least squares inverse methods and collective surfaces, identifies three dominant amorphous clusters of deformation point sources. Predictions generated from these three point source clusters account for both the spatial and temporal complexity of the deformation patterns of the InSAR data. Regularized time series of source strength attribute a distinctive transient behavior to each of the three source clusters. A model that combines magma influx, thermoelastic relaxation, poroelastic effects, and petrologic data accounts for the transient, interrelated behavior of the source clusters and the observed deformation. Basaltic magma pulses, which flow into a storage chamber residing in the lower crust, drive this deformational system. A portion of a magma pulse is injected into the upper crust and remains in storage during both coeruption and posteruption intervals. This injected magma degasses and the volatile products accumulate in a shallow poroelastic storage chamber. During the eruption, another portion of the magma pulse is transported directly to the surface via a conduit roughly centered beneath Pyre Peak on the west side of the island. A small amount of this magma remains in storage during the eruption, and posteruption thermoelastic contraction ensues. This model, made possible by the excellent spatial and temporal coverage of the InSAR data, reveals a relatively simple system of interrelated predictable processes driven by magma dynamics.

  14. Weighting interferometric data for direct imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Frédéric

    2013-08-01

    The new generation interferometric arrays such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) are composed of a large number of telescopes and their configurations are optimized for Fourier plane (a.k.a. uv-plane) coverage. As a consequence, solving for the missing information in the uv-plane is becoming less critical and the imaging algorithms can be revisited. The situation is getting similar to that encountered with single filled aperture telescopes and it is becoming possible to make images in a direct way. In this article a new weighting method is introduced to obtain "pseudo-clean" images without using prior information to solve for the Fourier transform of the source. This method is similar but not equivalent to the successive application of robust weighting and tapering at different scales. The idea is to weight the data to compensate for the imperfect distribution of natural weights in the uv-plane. The price to pay for this direct imaging technique is that the final point spread function (PSF or beam) may not follow a simple analytical shape such as a Gaussian (but this is also the case in optical astronomy) and some sensitivity is lost (but this is the case with any imaging algorithm in interferometry). Two parameters are introduced to control the trade-off between imaging quality and sensitivity, namely a threshold parameter and a coupling parameter. This method is applied to simulated ALMA observations with 16, 32 and 50 antennas. As expected this method is found to be more efficient with more antennas and for more compact configurations because the uv-plane coverage is more complete. With 50 antennas in compact configuration it is possible to reduce the amplitude of the inner sidelobes (outer sidelobes) by a factor >6 (>2) compared to natural weighting for ~10 % loss in sensitivity, leading to sidelobes lower than 1.6 % of the main lobe peak value. With 16 antennas only, the method can still be used to reduce the inner sidelobes of a

  15. Near-field Interferometric Imaging of Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M.; Wu, T.; Akiyama, Y.; Kawasaki, Z.; Ushio, T.

    2015-12-01

    In the past, lightning interferometric mapping systems assumed that a source is very far from the measurement location. The assumption greatly simplifies the mathematics needed to locate the source, but the resulting source positions are limited to two spatial dimensions (azimuth and elevation). For short baseline systems, this assumption is very good because the source is almost always much farther away than the diameter of the array, making three-dimensional location all but impossible. By removing the far-field assumption, if the array is large enough it is possible to locate the source in three spatial dimensions using purely interferometric techniques. The purely interferometric method is quite different from the more typical time-of-arrival method. Instead of measuring arrival times or time differences of the radiation arriving at each station, a volume is imaged over a some integration period and then searched for a source. It is not necessary to know that a source exists in the integration period for the interferometric imaging technique to produce a well defined solution. Interferometric imaging can locate sources buried in noise, can locate both continuous and impulsive emission, and is capable of locating multiple simultaneously radiating sources. If the waveforms are corrected for propagation delay to the search volume, the integration period can be made arbitrarily small (limited only by the frequencies being observed), allowing the progression of lightning to be examined in detail. Near-field interferometry works equally well on a wide range of different signal types, from the LF to VHF bands in radio, or even on acoustic emissions from lightning. Near-field imaging can be used to correct the angular locations of short baseline systems when a source is very close to the array, or to produce full three-dimensional maps of lightning with long baseline arrays. Presented here are preliminary results of applying near-field interferometric imaging to the

  16. The 2012 interferometric imaging beauty contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Fabien; Cotton, William D.; Lawson, Peter R.; Ridgway, Steve T.; Aarnio, Alicia; Monnier, John D.; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Schertl, Dieter; Weigelt, Gerd; Thiébaut, Eric; Soulez, Férréol; Mary, David; Millour, Florentin; Vannier, Martin; Young, John; Elias, Nicholas M.; Schmitt, Henrique R.; Rengaswamy, Sridharan

    2012-07-01

    We present the results of the fifth Interferometric Imaging Beauty Contest. The contest consists in blind imaging of test data sets derived from model sources and distributed in the OIFITS format. Two scenarios of imaging with CHARA/MIRC-6T were offered for reconstruction: imaging a T Tauri disc and imaging a spotted red supergiant. There were eight different teams competing this time: Monnier with the software package MACIM; Hofmann, Schertl and Weigelt with IRS; Thiebaut and Soulez with MiRA ; Young with BSMEM; Mary and Vannier with MIROIRS; Millour and Vannier with independent BSMEM and MiRA entries; Rengaswamy with an original method; and Elias with the radio-astronomy package CASA. The contest model images, the data delivered to the contestants and the rules are described as well as the results of the image reconstruction obtained by each method. These results are discussed as well as the strengths and limitations of each algorithm.

  17. The 2014 interferometric imaging beauty contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, John D.; Berger, Jean-Philippe; Le Bouquin, Jean-Baptiste; Tuthill, Peter G.; Wittkowski, Markus; Grellmann, Rebekka; Müller, André; Renganswany, Sridhar; Hummel, Christian; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Schertl, Dieter; Weigelt, Gerd; Young, John; Buscher, David; Sanchez-Bermudez, Joel; Alberdi, Antxon; Schoedel, Rainer; Köhler, Rainer; Soulez, Ferréol; Thiébaut, Éric; Kluska, Jacques; Malbet, Fabien; Duvert, Gilles; Kraus, Stefan; Kloppenborg, Brian K.; Baron, Fabien; de Wit, Willem-Jan; Rivinius, Thomas; Merand, Antoine

    2014-07-01

    Here we present the results of the 6th biennial optical interferometry imaging beauty contest. Taking advantage of a unique opportunity, the red supergiant VY CMa and the Mira variable R Car were observed in the astronomical H-band with three 4-telescope configurations of the VLTI-AT array using the PIONIER instrument. The community was invited to participate in the subsequent image reconstruction and interpretation phases of the project. Ten groups submitted entries to the beauty contest, and we found reasonable consistency between images obtained from independent workers using quite different algorithms. We also found that significant differences existed between the submitted images, much greater than in past beauty contests that were all based on simulated data. A novel crowd-sourcing" method allowed consensus median images to be constructed, filtering likely artifacts and retaining real features." We definitively detect strong spots on the surfaces of both stars as well as distinct circumstellar shells of emission (likely water/CO) around R Car. In a close contest, Joel Sanchez (IAA-CSIC/Spain) was named the winner of the 2014 interferometric imaging beauty contest. This process has shown that new comers" can use publicly-available imaging software to interpret VLTI/PIONIER imaging data, as long as sufficient observations are taken to have complete uv coverage { a luxury that is often missing. We urge proposers to request adequate observing nights to collect sufficient data for imaging and for time allocation committees to recognise the importance of uv coverage for reliable interpretation of interferometric data. We believe that the result of the proposed broad international project will contribute to inspiring trust in the image reconstruction processes in optical interferometry.

  18. The 2010 interferometric imaging beauty contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malbet, Fabien; Cotton, William; Duvert, Gilles; Lawson, Peter; Chiavassa, Andrea; Young, John; Baron, Fabien; Buscher, David; Rengaswamy, Sridharan; Kloppenborg, Brian; Vannier, Martin; Mugnier, Laurent

    2010-07-01

    We present the results of the fourth Optical/IR Interferometry Imaging Beauty Contest. The contest consists of blind imaging of test data sets derived from model sources and distributed in the OI-FITS format. The test data consists of spectral data sets on an object "observed" in the infrared with spectral resolution. There were 4 different algorithms competing this time: BSMEM the Bispectrum Maximum Entropy Method by Young, Baron & Buscher; RPR the Recursive Phase Reconstruction by Rengaswamy; SQUEEZE a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm by Baron, Monnier & Kloppenborg; and, WISARD theWeak-phase Interferometric Sample Alternating Reconstruction Device by Vannier & Mugnier. The contest model image, the data delivered to the contestants and the rules are described as well as the results of the image reconstruction obtained by each method. These results are discussed as well as the strengths and limitations of each algorithm.

  19. Reliability analysis in aperture synthesis interferometric radiometers: Application to L band Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vall-Llossera, M.; Duffo, N.; Camps, A.; Corbella, I.; Torres, F.; Bará, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) instrument will be the first radiometer using aperture synthesis techniques for Earth observation. It will be boarded in the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Earth Explorer Opportunity Mission of the European Space Agency and launched in 2005. The configuration under study in the MIRAS Demonstrator Pilot Project is a Y-shaped array with 27 dual-polarization L band antennas in each arm, spaced 0.89 wavelengths. In addition to these 81 antennas there are 3 additional ones between the arms for phase restoration and redundancy purposes and an extra one at the center of the Y array that is connected to a noise injection radiometer. The digitized in-phase and quadrature outputs of each receiver are multiplexed in groups of four and optically transmitted to the hub where the complex cross correlations are computed. In this configuration there are 85 antennas-receiving channels and 21 multiplexers. The objectives of this paper are twofold: (1) the study of the performance degradation of Y-shaped aperture synthesis interferometric radiometers in case of single or multiple subsystem failures and (2) a reliability analysis at subsystem level.

  20. Fresnel Interferometric Imager: ground-based prototype.

    PubMed

    Serre, Denis; Deba, Paul; Koechlin, Laurent

    2009-05-20

    The Fresnel Interferometric Imager is a space-based astronomical telescope project yielding milli-arcsecond angular resolution and high contrast images with loose manufacturing constraints. This optical concept involves diffractive focusing and formation flying: a first "primary optics" space module holds a large binary Fresnel array, and a second "focal module" holds optical elements and focal instruments that allow for chromatic dispersion correction. We have designed a reduced-size Fresnel Interferometric Imager prototype and made optical tests in our laboratory in order to validate the concept for future space missions. The primary module of this prototype consists of a square, 8 cm side, 23 m focal length Fresnel array. The focal module is composed of a diaphragmed small telescope used as "field lens," a small cophased diverging Fresnel zone lens that cancels the dispersion, and a detector. An additional module collimates the artificial targets of various shapes, sizes, and dynamic ranges to be imaged. We describe the experimental setup, different designs of the primary Fresnel array, and the cophased Fresnel zone lens that achieves rigorous chromatic correction. We give quantitative measurements of the diffraction limited performances and dynamic range on double sources. The tests have been performed in the visible domain, lambda = 400-700 nm. In addition, we present computer simulations of the prototype optics based on Fresnel propagation that corroborate the optical tests. This numerical tool has been used to simulate the large aperture Fresnel arrays that could be sent to space with diameters of 3 to 30 m, foreseen to operate from Lyman alpha (121 nm) to mid IR (25 microm). PMID:19458729

  1. Nonlinear Interferometric Vibrational Imaging (NIVI) with Novel Optical Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boppart, Stephen A.; King, Matthew D.; Liu, Yuan; Tu, Haohua; Gruebele, Martin

    Optical imaging is essential in medicine and in fundamental studies of biological systems. Although many existing imaging modalities can supply valuable information, not all are capable of label-free imaging with high-contrast and molecular specificity. The application of molecular or nanoparticle contrast agents may adversely influence the biological system under investigation. These substances also present ongoing concerns over toxicity or particle clearance, which must be properly addressed before their approval for in vivo human imaging. Hence there is an increasing appreciation for label-free imaging techniques. It is of primary importance to develop imaging techniques that can indiscriminately identify and quantify biochemical compositions to high degrees of sensitivity and specificity through only the intrinsic optical response of endogenous molecular species. The development and use of nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging, which is based on the interferometric detection of optical signals from coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), along with novel optical sources, offers the potential for label-free molecular imaging.

  2. Wideband Interferometric Sensing and Imaging Polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdi, James Salvatore; Kessler, Otto; Boerner, Wolfgang-Martin

    1996-01-01

    Wideband Interferometric Sensing and Imaging Polarimetry (WISIP) has become an important, indispensible tool in wide area military surveillance and global environmental monitoring of the terrestrial and planetary covers. It enables dynamic, real time optimal feature extraction of significant characteristics of desirable targets and/or target sections with simultaneous suppression of undesirable background clutter and propagation path speckle at hitherto unknown clarity and never before achieved quality. WISIP may be adopted to the detection, recognition, and identification (DRI) of any stationary, moving or vibrating targets or distributed scatterer segments versus arbitrary stationary, dynamical changing and/or moving geo-physical/ecological environments, provided the instantaneous 2x2 phasor and 4x4 power density matrices for forward propagation/backward scattering, respectively, can be measured with sufficient accuracy. For example, the DRI of stealthy, dynamically moving inhomogeneous volumetric scatter environments such as precipitation scatter, the ocean/sea/lake surface boundary layers, the littoral coastal surf zones, pack ice and snow or vegetative canopies, dry sands and soils, etc. can now be successfully realized. A comprehensive overview is presented on how these modern high resolution/precision, complete polarimetric co-registered signature sensing and imaging techniques, complemented by full integration of novel navigational electronic tools, such as DGPS, will advance electromagnetic vector wave sensing and imaging towards the limits of physical realization. Various examples utilizing the most recent image data take sets of airborne, space shuttle, and satellite imaging systems demonstrate the utility of WISIP.

  3. Using APES for interferometric SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Palsetia, Marzban

    1996-06-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive FIR filtering approach, which is referred to as the APES (amplitude and phase estimation of a sinusoid) algorithm, for interferometric SAR imaging. We apply the APES algorithm on the data obtained from two vertically displaced apertures of a SAR system to obtain the complex amplitude and the phase difference estimates, which are proportional to the radar cross section and the height of the scatterer, respectively, at the frequencies of interest. We also demonstrate how the APES algorithm can be applied to data matrices with large dimensions without incurring high computational overheads. We compare the APES algorithm with other FIR filtering approaches including the Capon and FFT methods. We show via both numerical and experimental examples that the adaptive FIR filtering approaches such as Capon and APES can yield more accurate spectral estimates with much lower sidelobes and narrower spectral peaks than the FFT method. We show that although the APES algorithm yields somewhat wider spectral peaks than the Capon method, the former gives more accurate overall spectral estimates and SAR images than the latter and the FFT method.

  4. Interferometric SAR imaging by transmitting stepped frequency chaotic noise signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunhua; Gu, Xiang; Zhai, Wenshuai; Dong, Xiao; Shi, Xiaojin; Kang, Xueyan

    2015-10-01

    Noise radar has been applied in many fields since it was proposed more than 50 years ago. However, it has not been applied to interferometric SAR imaging yet as far as we know. This paper introduces our recent work on interferometric noise radar. An interferometric SAR system was developed which can transmit both chirp signal and chaotic noise signal (CNS) at multiple carrier frequencies. An airborne experiment with this system by transmitting both signals was carried out, and the data were processed to show the capability of interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The results shows that although the interferometric phase quality of CNS is degraded due to the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is lower compared with that of chirp signal, we still can get satisfied DEM after multi-looking processing. Another work of this paper is to apply compressed sensing (CS) theory to the interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The CS theory states that if a signal is sparse, then it can be accurately reconstructed with much less sampled data than that regularly required according to Nyquist Sampling Theory. To form a structured random matrix, if the transmitted signal is of fixed waveform, then random subsampling is needed. However, if the transmitted signal is of random waveform, then only uniform subsampling is needed. This is another advantage of noise signal. Both the interferometric phase images and the DEMs by regular method and by CS method are processed with results compared. It is shown that the degradation of interferometric phases due to subsampling is larger than that of amplitude image.

  5. New Theoretical Frameworks for Interferometric Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, F.; Monnier, J.; Young, J.; Buscher, D.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of new instruments (MIRC-6T at CHARA, PIONEER at VLTI, and VISION at NPOI) as well as the construction of MROI, the focus in optical and infrared interferometry has shifted toward imaging. However, examining the current “model-independent” image reconstruction packages proves they are often inadequate to reconstruct even simple objects. We present here two possible paths that are being explored to improve the quality of image reconstruction. The first is the Compressed Sensing framework, which prescribes the use of spatial bases in which the object is sparse. The second is the Bayesian evidence framework, which allows to discrimination between physical models in imaging. We illustrate the application of both frameworks with reconstruction of a simulated spotted star.

  6. Code-modulated interferometric imaging system using phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Vikas; Greene, Kevin; Floyd, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging provides compelling capabilities for security screening, navigation, and bio- medical applications. Traditional scanned or focal-plane mm-wave imagers are bulky and costly. In contrast, phased-array hardware developed for mass-market wireless communications and automotive radar promise to be extremely low cost. In this work, we present techniques which can allow low-cost phased-array receivers to be reconfigured or re-purposed as interferometric imagers, removing the need for custom hardware and thereby reducing cost. Since traditional phased arrays power combine incoming signals prior to digitization, orthogonal code-modulation is applied to each incoming signal using phase shifters within each front-end and two-bit codes. These code-modulated signals can then be combined and processed coherently through a shared hardware path. Once digitized, visibility functions can be recovered through squaring and code-demultiplexing operations. Pro- vided that codes are selected such that the product of two orthogonal codes is a third unique and orthogonal code, it is possible to demultiplex complex visibility functions directly. As such, the proposed system modulates incoming signals but demodulates desired correlations. In this work, we present the operation of the system, a validation of its operation using behavioral models of a traditional phased array, and a benchmarking of the code-modulated interferometer against traditional interferometer and focal-plane arrays.

  7. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy: tissue structure inferred by computed imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Daniel L.; Ralston, Tyler S.; Davis, Brynmor J.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2008-02-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM)1 is an optical microscopy computed-imaging technique for measuring the optical properties of three-dimensional structures and biological tissues. In this work, the principle of ISAM is reviewed, and its application to imaging tissue properties in various scanning geometries and instrument configurations is explored. The practicality of ISAM is demonstrated by imaging a rat heart and muscle using a real-time implementation of ISAM in conjunction with a clinical cart Optical Coherence Tomography instrument.

  8. Radar Interferometric Imaging of Near-Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, J. L.; Nolan, M. C.

    1999-09-01

    High resolution imagery and a three-dimensional characterization of Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) can be obtained with ground-based radars. The Arecibo and Goldstone radar systems yield data at spatial resolutions comparable to the highest resolution spacecraft images of asteroids obtained to date. The use of radar interferometry techniques can further improve imaging and shape reconstruction algorithms [1],[2] and may allow direct measurements of the topography of NEAs. A two-element radar interferometer of appropriate baseline provides an observable, the interferometric phase, which can be used to extract three-dimensional information about the target [3], hence giving additional control in shape modeling procedures. The measurement of interferometric phase also opens the possibility of mapping the topography of an asteroid, in a manner similar to that applied recently to the Moon [4]. Simulations show that this is feasible when potential ambiguities in range-Doppler imaging are avoided, for instance when elongated objects are in a favorable orientation. Radar interferometric imaging of 6489 Golevka was attempted during its June 1999 close approach to Earth [5]. The Arecibo 305 m telescope was used to transmit, and the DSN 70 m antenna in Madrid formed the second element of the interferometer. The Arecibo-Madrid baseline defined an ideal fringe pattern for interferometric mapping, but technical difficulties prevented imaging of the Madrid data. Radar interferometry concepts and simulation results will be presented, as well as any new data acquired before the meeting. [1] R. S. Hudson and S. J. Ostro (1994). Science, 263, 940. [2] R. S. Hudson and S. J. Ostro (1995). Science, 270, 84. [3] I. I. Shapiro et al. (1972). Science, 178, 939. [4] J. L. Margot et al. (1999). Science, 284, 1658. [5] J. L. Margot and M. C. Nolan (1999). ACM Meeting, July 26-30, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.

  9. Geodetic radio interferometric surveying - Applications and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, W. E.; Robertson, D. S.; Mackay, J. R.

    1985-05-01

    A National Geodetic Survey (NGS) review of candidate technologies in 1977 came to the conclusion that very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) using the MARK III system was suited for developing a modern polar motion and UT1 monitoring service. Project POLARIS (Polar-Motion Analysis by Radio Interferometric Surveying) was implemented jointly by the NGS, NASA, and the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO). Three permanent geodetic VLBI observatories were developed in the U.S., while West Germany constructed a dedicated geodetic VLBI observatory in Wettzell, Bavaria. Agencies in the two countries jointly initiated project IRIS (International Radio Interferometric Surveying) in 1982 with the objective to exploit the improved capabilities of the combined POLARIS/Wettzell network. Attention is given to aspects of VLBI, polar motion and UT1 time series, baseline length measurements, source coordinates, nutation, frequency standard evaluation, and relativistic deflection.

  10. Interferometric Imaging Diagnostics of X Hya's Circumstellar Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubois, X.; Wittkowski, M.; Perrin, G.; Kervella, P.; Ridgway, S. T.; Thiébaut, E.

    2015-08-01

    Optical interferometry is a powerful tool to investigate the close environment of AGB stars. With a spatial resolution of a few milli-arcseconds, it is even possible to image directly the surface of angularly large objects. This is of special interest for Mira stars and red supergiants for which the dust-wind is initiated from or very close to the photosphere by an interplay between pulsation and convection. Based on two-epoch interferometric observations of the Mira star X Hya, we show how the variation of the angular size with wavelength challenges pulsation models and how reconstructed images can reveal the evolution of the object shape and its asymmetric structures.

  11. Localized Surface Deformation Monitoring Applications using Ground Based Interferometric Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legarsky, J. J.; Gomez, F. G.; Rosenblad, B.; Loehr, E.; Gurnani, G.; Fallert, Z.; Gilliam, J.

    2014-12-01

    Ground based interferometric radar (GBIR) measurements of localized surface deformation may be sought-after in various geosciences applications. The University of Missouri (MU) GBIR system is highly portable; moreover, it can be removed and re-positioned at the same point with geodetic-grade precision for long-term and repeat surveys. Initial quick-look imagery at C-band and Ku-band may be viewed in near real-time at the study site. Polarimetric calibration, radiometric calibration, and time-series analysis may further enhance the imagery. The MU GBIR has demonstrated millimeter and better sensitivity to localized surface deformation. Using real-aperture imaging and precision rotation, the MU GBIR acquires data by deploying three antennas that may be mounted parallel to one another on a 1-meter high tower. During typical operation, images are acquired by azimuthally rotating the GBIR antennas about its vertical axis. During deployment, the fast imaging capabilities allow a data collect scan in about 20 seconds for a 180 degree field of view. During the 2013 and 2014 field seasons using the MU GBIR, several locations were studied. The study sites include a rockfall experiment in Colorado, several dams in Kansas and Missouri, and a rock glacier in southern Colorado. Study results and additional progress will be presented. These projects are sponsored by grants from the University of Missouri Research Board and the National Science Foundation.

  12. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy: Computed Imaging for Scanned Coherent Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brynmor J; Marks, Daniel L; Ralston, Tyler S; Carney, P Scott; Boppart, Stephen A

    2008-06-01

    Three-dimensional image formation in microscopy is greatly enhanced by the use of computed imaging techniques. In particular, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM) allows the removal of out-of-focus blur in broadband, coherent microscopy. Earlier methods, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), utilize interferometric ranging, but do not apply computed imaging methods and therefore must scan the focal depth to acquire extended volumetric images. ISAM removes the need to scan the focus by allowing volumetric image reconstruction from data collected at a single focal depth. ISAM signal processing techniques are similar to the Fourier migration methods of seismology and the Fourier reconstruction methods of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). In this article ISAM is described and the close ties between ISAM and SAR are explored. ISAM and a simple strip-map SAR system are placed in a common mathematical framework and compared to OCT and radar respectively. This article is intended to serve as a review of ISAM, and will be especially useful to readers with a background in SAR. PMID:20948975

  13. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy: Computed Imaging for Scanned Coherent Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brynmor. J.; Marks, Daniel. L.; Ralston, Tyler. S.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen. A.

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional image formation in microscopy is greatly enhanced by the use of computed imaging techniques. In particular, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM) allows the removal of out-of-focus blur in broadband, coherent microscopy. Earlier methods, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), utilize interferometric ranging, but do not apply computed imaging methods and therefore must scan the focal depth to acquire extended volumetric images. ISAM removes the need to scan the focus by allowing volumetric image reconstruction from data collected at a single focal depth. ISAM signal processing techniques are similar to the Fourier migration methods of seismology and the Fourier reconstruction methods of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). In this article ISAM is described and the close ties between ISAM and SAR are explored. ISAM and a simple strip-map SAR system are placed in a common mathematical framework and compared to OCT and radar respectively. This article is intended to serve as a review of ISAM, and will be especially useful to readers with a background in SAR. PMID:20948975

  14. Two microstrip arrays for interferometric SAR applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.

    1993-01-01

    Two types of C-band aircraft interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) are being developed at JPL to measure the ocean wave characteristics. Each type requires two identical antennas with each having a long rectangular aperture to radiate fan-shaped beam(s). One type of these radars requires each of its antennas to radiate a broadside beam that will measure the target's cross-track velocity. The other type, having each of its antennas to radiate two off-broadside pointed beams, will allow the measurement of both the cross-track and the along-track velocities of the target. Because flush mounting of the antenna on the aircraft fuselage is desirable, microstrip patch array is selected for these interferometric SAR antennas. To meet the radar system requirement, each array needs a total of 76 microstrip patches which are arranged in a 38 x 2 rectangular aperture with a physical size of 1.6m x 16.5cm. To minimize the insertion loss and physical real estate of this relatively long array, a combined series/parallel feed technique is used. Techniques to suppress cross-pol radiation and to effectively utilize the RF power are also implemented. Cross-pol level of lower than -30 dB from the co-pol peak and low insertion loss of 0.36 dB have been achieved for both types of arrays. For the type of radar that requires two off-braodside pointed beams, a simple phasing technique is used to achieve this dual-beam capability with adequate antenna gain (20 dBi) and sidelobe level (-14 dB). Both radar arrays have been flight tested on aircraft with excellent antenna performance demonstrated.

  15. Measuring droplet size distributions from overlapping interferometric particle images.

    PubMed

    Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Dam, Nico; van der Voort, Dennis; Bertens, Guus; van de Water, Willem

    2015-02-01

    Interferometric particle imaging provides a simple way to measure the probability density function (PDF) of droplet sizes from out-focus images. The optical setup is straightforward, but the interpretation of the data is a problem when particle images overlap. We propose a new way to analyze the images. The emphasis is not on a precise identification of droplets, but on obtaining a good estimate of the PDF of droplet sizes in the case of overlapping particle images. The algorithm is tested using synthetic and experimental data. We next use these methods to measure the PDF of droplet sizes produced by spinning disk aerosol generators. The mean primary droplet diameter agrees with predictions from the literature, but we find a broad distribution of satellite droplet sizes. PMID:25725854

  16. Interferometric system for precision imaging of vibrating structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Tang, Tony (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An optical profiler is modified in a way which allows it to image a MEMS device at various points during the movement of the MEMS device. The light source is synchronized with a desired movement of the MEMS device. The light source produces pulse at each synchronization period. During each pulse, an interferometric measurement is carried out. So long as the pulse is short enough such that the device does not move significantly, a detection of the position of the device can be accurately obtained.

  17. Automated computational aberration correction method for broadband interferometric imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Pande, Paritosh; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; South, Fredrick A; Boppart, Stephen A

    2016-07-15

    Numerical correction of optical aberrations provides an inexpensive and simpler alternative to the traditionally used hardware-based adaptive optics techniques. In this Letter, we present an automated computational aberration correction method for broadband interferometric imaging techniques. In the proposed method, the process of aberration correction is modeled as a filtering operation on the aberrant image using a phase filter in the Fourier domain. The phase filter is expressed as a linear combination of Zernike polynomials with unknown coefficients, which are estimated through an iterative optimization scheme based on maximizing an image sharpness metric. The method is validated on both simulated data and experimental data obtained from a tissue phantom, an ex vivo tissue sample, and an in vivo photoreceptor layer of the human retina. PMID:27420526

  18. Interferometric and nonlinear-optical spectral-imaging techniques for outer space and live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Kazuyoshi

    2015-12-01

    Multidimensional signals such as the spectral images allow us to have deeper insights into the natures of objects. In this paper the spectral imaging techniques that are based on optical interferometry and nonlinear optics are presented. The interferometric imaging technique is based on the unified theory of Van Cittert-Zernike and Wiener-Khintchine theorems and allows us to retrieve a spectral image of an object in the far zone from the 3D spatial coherence function. The retrieval principle is explained using a very simple object. The promising applications to space interferometers for astronomy that are currently in progress will also be briefly touched on. An interesting extension of interferometric spectral imaging is a 3D and spectral imaging technique that records 4D information of objects where the 3D and spectral information is retrieved from the cross-spectral density function of optical field. The 3D imaging is realized via the numerical inverse propagation of the cross-spectral density. A few techniques suggested recently are introduced. The nonlinear optical technique that utilizes stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) for spectral imaging of biomedical targets is presented lastly. The strong signals of SRS permit us to get vibrational information of molecules in the live cell or tissue in real time. The vibrational information of unstained or unlabeled molecules is crucial especially for medical applications. The 3D information due to the optical nonlinearity is also the attractive feature of SRS spectral microscopy.

  19. Biomolecular detection employing the Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS).

    PubMed

    Lopez, Carlos A; Daaboul, George G; Ahn, Sunmin; Reddington, Alexander P; Monroe, Margo R; Zhang, Xirui; Irani, Rostem J; Yu, Chunxiao; Genco, Caroline A; Cretich, Marina; Chiari, Marcella; Goldberg, Bennett B; Connor, John H; Ünlü, M Selim

    2011-01-01

    The sensitive measurement of biomolecular interactions has use in many fields and industries such as basic biology and microbiology, environmental/agricultural/biodefense monitoring, nanobiotechnology, and more. For diagnostic applications, monitoring (detecting) the presence, absence, or abnormal expression of targeted proteomic or genomic biomarkers found in patient samples can be used to determine treatment approaches or therapy efficacy. In the research arena, information on molecular affinities and specificities are useful for fully characterizing the systems under investigation. Many of the current systems employed to determine molecular concentrations or affinities rely on the use of labels. Examples of these systems include immunoassays such as the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques, gel electrophoresis assays, and mass spectrometry (MS). Generally, these labels are fluorescent, radiological, or colorimetric in nature and are directly or indirectly attached to the molecular target of interest. Though the use of labels is widely accepted and has some benefits, there are drawbacks which are stimulating the development of new label-free methods for measuring these interactions. These drawbacks include practical facets such as increased assay cost, reagent lifespan and usability, storage and safety concerns, wasted time and effort in labelling, and variability among the different reagents due to the labelling processes or labels themselves. On a scientific research basis, the use of these labels can also introduce difficulties such as concerns with effects on protein functionality/structure due to the presence of the attached labels and the inability to directly measure the interactions in real time. Presented here is the use of a new label-free optical biosensor that is amenable to microarray studies, termed the Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS), for detecting proteins, DNA, antigenic material

  20. GRAVITY: Microarcsecond Astrometry and Deep Interferometric Imaging with the VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhauer, F.; Perrin, G.; Brandner, W.; Straubmeier, C.; Böhm, A.; Baumeister, H.; Cassaing, F.; Clénet, Y.; Dodds-Eden, K.; Eckart, A.; Gendron, E.; Genzel, R.; Gillessen, S.; Gräter, A.; Gueriau, C.; Hamaus, N.; Haubois, X.; Haug, M.; Henning, T.; Hippler, S.; Hofmann, R.; Hormuth, F.; Houairi, K.; Kellner, S.; Kervella, P.; Klein, R.; Kolmeder, J.; Laun, W.; Léna, P.; Lenzen, R.; Marteaud, M.; Naranjo, V.; Neumann, U.; Paumard, T.; Rabien, S.; Ramos, J. R.; Reess, J. M.; Rohloff, R.-R.; Rouan, D.; Rousset, G.; Ruyet, B.; Sevin, A.; Thiel, M.; Ziegleder, J.; Ziegler, D.

    We present the AO assisted, near-infrared VLTI instrument GRAVITY for precision narrow-angle astrometry and interferometric phase referenced imaging of faint objects. With its two fibers per telescope beam, its internal wavefront sensors and fringe tracker, and a novel metrology concept, GRAVITY will not only push the sensitivity far beyond what is offered today, but will also advance the astrometric accuracy for UTs to 10 μas. GRAVITY is designed to work with four telescopes, thus providing phase referenced imaging and astrometry for 6 baselines simultaneously. Its unique capabilities and sensitivity will open a new window for the observation of a wide range of objects, and—amongst others—will allow the study of motions within a few times the event horizon size of the Galactic Center black hole.

  1. Investigation of Radar Interferometric Techniques with Application to the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surucu, Fahri

    In this thesis various radar interferometric techniques for studying the atmosphere are investigated. The Radar interferometric imaging (RII) technique is a powerful remote sensing technique for the visualization and investigation of the cross-field dynamics of ionospheric plasma irregularity processes. The inherent Doppler sorting capability of the technique helps in resolving between closely spaced irregularity patches with distinct line-of-sight motions. An example of this is demonstrated with the spread-F data collected at Jicamarca Radio Observatory, located near Lima, Peru. The zonal and vertical components of the drift velocity of distinct irregularity patches within the radar field of view are estimated using a combination of Doppler and image evolution information RII technique provides with temporal and spatial resolutions of a few seconds and kilometers, respectively. Other interferometric radar data collected at Jicamarca are studied to model the spectral and cross-spectral signatures of lower mesospheric returns. The aspect sensitivity of radar echoes and the horizontal, vertical, and random components of atmospheric fluid velocity are estimated using the spectral model developed and the poststatistics steering (PSS) technique. Simple interferometric methods are suggested to cope with the extreme conditions which can introduce systematic errors in wind and turbulence studies. Next, the viability of wind velocity estimation with the PSS technique is demonstrated by using the multiple -receiver MF radar data acquired near Islote, Puerto Rico. The PSS wind estimates compare favorably with spaced antenna (true) and interferometric wind estimates. However, spaced antenna (SA), imaging Doppler interferometry (IDI), and Doppler beam swinging (DBS) horizontal wind velocity estimators share common biases proportional to horizontal gradients in the vertical wind component w. In addition, SA wind estimators suffer some contamination coming from horizontal

  2. Low-cost interferometric TDM technology for dynamic sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Jeff; Cekorich, Allen

    2004-12-01

    A low-cost design approach for Time Division Multiplexed (TDM) fiber-optic interferometric interrogation of multi-channel sensor arrays is presented. This paper describes the evolutionary design process of the subject design. First, the requisite elements of interferometric interrogation are defined for a single channel sensor. The concept is then extended to multi-channel sensor interrogation implementing a TDM multiplex scheme where "traditional" design elements are utilized. The cost of the traditional TDM interrogator is investigated and concluded to be too high for entry into many markets. A new design approach is presented which significantly reduces the cost for TDM interrogation. This new approach, in accordance with the cost objectives, shows promise to bring this technology to within the threshold of commercial acceptance for a wide range of distributed fiber sensing applications.

  3. Interferometric out-of-focus imaging of ice particles with overlapping images.

    PubMed

    Brunel, M; Lemaitre, P; Porcheron, E; Coëtmellec, S; Gréhan, G; Jacquot-Kielar, J

    2016-06-20

    It is shown that the size and relative positions of two irregular rough particles can be analyzed using interferometric out-of-focus imaging despite the overlapping of their out-of-focus images. Simulations are confirmed by experiments done with ice particles generated in a freezing column. PMID:27409116

  4. Polarization interferometric nulling coronagraph for high-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Naoshi; Yokochi, Kaito; Nishikawa, Jun; Tamura, Motohide; Kurokawa, Takashi; Takeda, Mitsuo; Baba, Naoshi

    2010-06-01

    We propose a novel, high-contrast imager called a polarization interferometric nulling coronagraph (PINC) for direct detection of extrasolar planets. The PINC uses achromatic half-wave plates (HWPs) installed in a fully symmetric beam combiner based on polarizing beam splitters. Jones calculus suggests that a stellar halo suppression level of 10(-10) can be achieved at 5 lambda/D for a broad wavelength range from 1.6 to 2.2 microm by using Fresnel-rhomb HWPs made of BK7. Laboratory experiments on the PINC used two laser light sources (wavelengths of lambda=532 and 671 nm), and we obtained a halo suppression level of approximately 10(-6) at 5 lambda/D for both wavelengths. PMID:20517351

  5. Hierarchical model-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Huang, Haifeng; Dong, Zhen; Wu, Manqing

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar technology, classical image registration methods are incompetent for high-efficiency and high-accuracy masses of real data processing. Based on this fact, we propose a new method. This method consists of two steps: coarse registration that is realized by cross-correlation algorithm and fine registration that is realized by hierarchical model-based algorithm. Hierarchical model-based algorithm is a high-efficiency optimization algorithm. The key features of this algorithm are a global model that constrains the overall structure of the motion estimated, a local model that is used in the estimation process, and a coarse-to-fine refinement strategy. Experimental results from different kinds of simulated and real data have confirmed that the proposed method is very fast and has high accuracy. Comparing with a conventional cross-correlation method, the proposed method provides markedly improved performance.

  6. MODELING VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRIC IMAGES WITH THE CROSS-ENTROPY GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    Caproni, A.; Toffoli, R. T.; Monteiro, H.; Abraham, Z.; Teixeira, D. M.

    2011-07-20

    We present a new technique for obtaining model fittings to very long baseline interferometric images of astrophysical jets. The method minimizes a performance function proportional to the sum of the squared difference between the model and observed images. The model image is constructed by summing N{sub s} elliptical Gaussian sources characterized by six parameters: two-dimensional peak position, peak intensity, eccentricity, amplitude, and orientation angle of the major axis. We present results for the fitting of two main benchmark jets: the first constructed from three individual Gaussian sources, the second formed by five Gaussian sources. Both jets were analyzed by our cross-entropy technique in finite and infinite signal-to-noise regimes, the background noise chosen to mimic that found in interferometric radio maps. Those images were constructed to simulate most of the conditions encountered in interferometric images of active galactic nuclei. We show that the cross-entropy technique is capable of recovering the parameters of the sources with a similar accuracy to that obtained from the very traditional Astronomical Image Processing System Package task IMFIT when the image is relatively simple (e.g., few components). For more complex interferometric maps, our method displays superior performance in recovering the parameters of the jet components. Our methodology is also able to show quantitatively the number of individual components present in an image. An additional application of the cross-entropy technique to a real image of a BL Lac object is shown and discussed. Our results indicate that our cross-entropy model-fitting technique must be used in situations involving the analysis of complex emission regions having more than three sources, even though it is substantially slower than current model-fitting tasks (at least 10,000 times slower for a single processor, depending on the number of sources to be optimized). As in the case of any model fitting

  7. Fiber optic interferometric sensors for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses two fiber optic sensor development programs in the Photonics Laboratory, NASA Ames Research Center, one in progress and the other being initiated. The ongoing program involves development of advanced acoustic sensors for wind tunnel applications. The new undertaking involves development of a novel sensor technique for studies of aerodynamic transition from laminar to turbulent flow.

  8. Sparse representations and convex optimization as tools for LOFAR radio interferometric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, J. N.; Garsden, H.; Starck, J. L.; Corbel, S.; Woiselle, A.; Tasse, C.; McKean, J. P.; Bobin, J.

    2015-08-01

    Compressed sensing theory is slowly making its way to solve more and more astronomical inverse problems. We address here the application of sparse representations, convex optimization and proximal theory to radio interferometric imaging. First, we expose the theory behind interferometric imaging, sparse representations and convex optimization, and second, we illustrate their application with numerical tests with SASIR, an implementation of the FISTA, a Forward-Backward splitting algorithm hosted in a LOFAR imager. Various tests have been conducted in Garsden et al., 2015. The main results are: i) an improved angular resolution (super resolution of a factor ≈ 2) with point sources as compared to CLEAN on the same data, ii) correct photometry measurements on a field of point sources at high dynamic range and iii) the imaging of extended sources with improved fidelity. SASIR provides better reconstructions (five time less residuals) of the extended emission as compared to CLEAN. With the advent of large radiotelescopes, there is scope for improving classical imaging methods with convex optimization methods combined with sparse representations.

  9. Applications of interferometrically derived terrain slopes: Normalization of SAR backscatter and the interferometric correlation coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Charles L.; Wegmueller, Urs; Small, David L.; Rosen, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    Terrain slopes, which can be measured with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) interferometry either from a height map or from the interferometric phase gradient, were used to calculate the local incidence angle and the correct pixel area. Both are required for correct thematic interpretation of SAR data. The interferometric correlation depends on the pixel area projected on a plane perpendicular to the look vector and requires correction for slope effects. Methods for normalization of the backscatter and interferometric correlation for ERS-1 SAR are presented.

  10. Size determination of mixed liquid and frozen water droplets using interferometric out-of-focus imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquot Kielar, Justin; Wu, Yingchun; Coëtmellec, Sébastien; Lebrun, Denis; Gréhan, Gérard; Brunel, Marc

    2016-07-01

    We record simultaneously interferometric out-of-focus images and digital in-line holograms of liquid and frozen water droplets. We show that the analysis of speckle-like out-of-focus images allows a quantitative estimation of the size of the particles which is corroborated by numerical reconstruction of holograms recorded simultaneously. Interferometric out-of-focus imaging could be extended to the characterization of ice in clouds in the atmosphere.

  11. Application of Interferometric Radars to Planetary Geologic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Rosen, P.; Freeman, A.

    2005-01-01

    Radar interferometry is rapidly becoming one of the major applications of radar systems in Earth orbit. So far the 2000 flight of the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) is the only dedicated U.S. radar to be flown for the collection of interferometric data, but enough has been learned from this mission and from the use of foreign partner radars (ERS-1/2, Radarsat, ENIVISAT and JERS-1) for the potential planetary applications of this technique to be identified. A recent workshop was organized by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), and was held at Oxnard, CA, from October 20th - 22nd, 2004. At this meeting, the major interest was in terrestrial radar systems, but approx. 20 or the approx. 250 attendees also discussed potential applications of interferometric radar for the terrestrial planets. The primary foci were for the detection of planetary water, the search for active tectonism and volcanism and the improved topographic mapping. This abstract provides a summary of these planetary discussions at the Oxnard meeting.

  12. Non-interferometric quantitative phase imaging of yeast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poola, Praveen K.; Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; John, Renu

    2015-12-01

    Real-time imaging of live cells is quite difficult without the addition of external contrast agents. Various methods for quantitative phase imaging of living cells have been proposed like digital holographic microscopy and diffraction phase microscopy. In this paper, we report theoretical and experimental results of quantitative phase imaging of live yeast cells with nanometric precision using transport of intensity equations (TIE). We demonstrate nanometric depth sensitivity in imaging live yeast cells using this technique. This technique being noninterferometric, does not need any coherent light sources and images can be captured through a regular bright-field microscope. This real-time imaging technique would deliver the depth or 3-D volume information of cells and is highly promising in real-time digital pathology applications, screening of pathogens and staging of diseases like malaria as it does not need any preprocessing of samples.

  13. The origin, history and future of fiber-optic interferometric acoustic sensors for US Navy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, James H.; Bucaro, Joseph A.; Kirkendall, Clay K.; Dandridge, Anthony

    2011-05-01

    Fiber-optic interferometric acoustic sensors were first proposed for US Navy applications 36 years ago. This paper will review the origin, development and deployment of these sensors. Future applications will also be discussed.

  14. Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS)—A Platform Technology for Multiplexed Diagnostics and Digital Detection

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Oguzhan; Lortlar Ünlü, Nese; Yalçın Özkumur, Ayça; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, the growing need in disease diagnostics has stimulated rapid development of new technologies with unprecedented capabilities. Recent emerging infectious diseases and epidemics have revealed the shortcomings of existing diagnostics tools, and the necessity for further improvements. Optical biosensors can lay the foundations for future generation diagnostics by providing means to detect biomarkers in a highly sensitive, specific, quantitative and multiplexed fashion. Here, we review an optical sensing technology, Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS), and the relevant features of this multifunctional platform for quantitative, label-free and dynamic detection. We discuss two distinct modalities for IRIS: (i) low-magnification (ensemble biomolecular mass measurements) and (ii) high-magnification (digital detection of individual nanoparticles) along with their applications, including label-free detection of multiplexed protein chips, measurement of single nucleotide polymorphism, quantification of transcription factor DNA binding, and high sensitivity digital sensing and characterization of nanoparticles and viruses. PMID:26205273

  15. Using dynamic interferometric synthetic aperature radar (InSAR) to image fast-moving surface waves

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Paul

    2005-06-28

    A new differential technique and system for imaging dynamic (fast moving) surface waves using Dynamic Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is introduced. This differential technique and system can sample the fast-moving surface displacement waves from a plurality of moving platform positions in either a repeat-pass single-antenna or a single-pass mode having a single-antenna dual-phase receiver or having dual physically separate antennas, and reconstruct a plurality of phase differentials from a plurality of platform positions to produce a series of desired interferometric images of the fast moving waves.

  16. A Comparative Study on Water Vapor Extracted from Interferometric SAR Images and Synchronized Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shilai

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) is a newly developed satellite observation technology which is applied in studies of hydrosphere, atmosphere, topography and earth surface changes caused by natural or anthropogenic activities. The technology is capable of retrieving accurate geophysical parameters with multiple air-/satellite-based SAR images through establishing interferometric geometry where the phase measurements precisely reflect the geometry between spaceborne platforms and earth surface and highly sensitive to its variation. Due to these unique advantages, interferometric technology has been widely applied in surveying the ground topography and detecting tiny dynamic changes of ground surface in the last two decades. However, the applicability of such technology is severely affected by differential atmospheric delay induced by inhomogeneity of air refractivity. Previous studies show that the water vapour with strong variation in both spatial and temporal domain dominates the atmospheric artifacts in interferometric phase measurements. It is the problem that we were trying to solve. In this research, we aim at determining and compensating atmospheric signal in SAR interferograms. Compared with previous works, this work studies the problem in a new perspective that the information of water vapor was extracted from Atmospheric Phase Screen (APS) obtained by Permanent Scatterer SAR Interferometry (PSInSAR), and was comparatively studied with synchronized water vapor data, including GPS observations, MERIS images and MM5 simulated products. The main contributive work in this research includes following aspects: Firstly, a water vapor component model was proposed for comparison between SAR and non-SAR water vapors. Besides the typical mixing turbulent and stratification terms, the spatial liner trend and ground feature related stationary term has been accounted for in mixed water vapor. Based on this model, a logical strategy of differentiation

  17. Rapid interferometric imaging of printed drug laden multilayer structures.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Niklas; Kassamakov, Ivan; Ehlers, Henrik; Genina, Natalja; Ylitalo, Tuomo; Haeggstrom, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The developments in printing technologies allow fabrication of micron-size nano-layered delivery systems to personal specifications. In this study we fabricated layered polymer structures for drug-delivery into a microfluidic channel and aimed to interferometrically assure their topography and adherence to each other. We present a scanning white light interferometer (SWLI) method for quantitative assurance of the topography of the embedded structure. We determined rapidly in non-destructive manner the thickness and roughness of the structures and whether the printed layers containing polymers or/and active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) adhere to each other. This is crucial in order to have predetermined drug release profiles. We also demonstrate non-invasive measurement of a polymer structure in a microfluidic channel. It shown that traceable interferometric 3D microscopy is a viable technique for detailed structural quality assurance of layered drug-delivery systems. The approach can have impact and find use in a much broader setting within and outside life sciences. PMID:24503863

  18. Rapid interferometric imaging of printed drug laden multilayer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandler, Niklas; Kassamakov, Ivan; Ehlers, Henrik; Genina, Natalja; Ylitalo, Tuomo; Haeggstrom, Edward

    2014-02-01

    The developments in printing technologies allow fabrication of micron-size nano-layered delivery systems to personal specifications. In this study we fabricated layered polymer structures for drug-delivery into a microfluidic channel and aimed to interferometrically assure their topography and adherence to each other. We present a scanning white light interferometer (SWLI) method for quantitative assurance of the topography of the embedded structure. We determined rapidly in non-destructive manner the thickness and roughness of the structures and whether the printed layers containing polymers or/and active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) adhere to each other. This is crucial in order to have predetermined drug release profiles. We also demonstrate non-invasive measurement of a polymer structure in a microfluidic channel. It shown that traceable interferometric 3D microscopy is a viable technique for detailed structural quality assurance of layered drug-delivery systems. The approach can have impact and find use in a much broader setting within and outside life sciences.

  19. Rapid interferometric imaging of printed drug laden multilayer structures

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Niklas; Kassamakov, Ivan; Ehlers, Henrik; Genina, Natalja; Ylitalo, Tuomo; Haeggstrom, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The developments in printing technologies allow fabrication of micron-size nano-layered delivery systems to personal specifications. In this study we fabricated layered polymer structures for drug-delivery into a microfluidic channel and aimed to interferometrically assure their topography and adherence to each other. We present a scanning white light interferometer (SWLI) method for quantitative assurance of the topography of the embedded structure. We determined rapidly in non-destructive manner the thickness and roughness of the structures and whether the printed layers containing polymers or/and active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) adhere to each other. This is crucial in order to have predetermined drug release profiles. We also demonstrate non-invasive measurement of a polymer structure in a microfluidic channel. It shown that traceable interferometric 3D microscopy is a viable technique for detailed structural quality assurance of layered drug-delivery systems. The approach can have impact and find use in a much broader setting within and outside life sciences. PMID:24503863

  20. A quantitative, non-interferometric X-ray phase contrast imaging technique

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Peter R.T.; Rigon, Luigi; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Lopez, Frances C.M.; Dreossi, Diego; Speller, Robert D.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We present a quantitative, non-interferometric, X-ray differential phase contrast imaging technique based on the edge illumination principle. We derive a novel phase retrieval algorithm which requires only two images to be acquired and verify the technique experimentally using synchrotron radiation. The technique is useful for planar imaging but is expected to be important for quantitative phase tomography also. The properties and limitations of the technique are studied in detail. PMID:23388958

  1. Interferometric and optical tests of water window imaging x ray microscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1993-01-01

    Interferometric tests of Schwarzchild X-ray Microscope are performed to evaluate the optical properties and alignment of the components. Photographic measurements of the spatial resolution, focal properties, and vignetting characteristics of the prototype Water Window Imaging X-ray Microscope are made and analyzed.

  2. The LINC-NIRVANA Fizeau interferometric imager: final lab integration, first light experiments and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, T. M.; Ragazzoni, R.; Eckart, A.; Weigelt, G.

    2014-07-01

    LINC-NIRVANA (LN) is an innovative Fizeau interferometric imager for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). LN uses Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) for high-sky-coverage single-eye imagery and interferometric beam combination. The last two years have seen both successes and challenges. On the one hand, final integration is proceeding well in the lab. We also achieved First Light at the LBT with the Pathfinder experiment. On the other hand, funding constraints have forced a significant re-planning of the overall instrument implementation. These laboratory, observatory, and financial "events" provide lessons for builders of complex interferometric instruments on large telescopes. This paper presents our progress and plans for bringing the instrument online at the telescope.

  3. Fiber-optic interferometric acoustic sensors for wind tunnel applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    Progress in developing fiber-optic interferometric sensors for aeroacoustic measurements in wind tunnels, performed under the NASA program, is reported. Preliminary results show that the fiber-optic interferometer sensor array is a powerful instrument for solving complex acoustic measurement problems in wind tunnels, which cannot be resolved with the conventional transducer technique.

  4. Simultaneous interferometric in-focus and out-of-focus imaging of ice crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kielar, Justin Jacquot; Lemaitre, Pascal; Gobin, Carole; Yingchun, Wu; Porcheron, Emmanuel; Coetmellec, Sébastien; Grehan, Gérard; Brunel, Marc

    2016-08-01

    Using a freezing column, dendrite-like ice crystals are generated and characterized simultaneously using in-focus imaging and interferometric out-of-focus imaging. This simultaneous analysis allows a validation of size measurements made from the analysis of the 2D-autocorrelation of speckle-like interferometric out-of-focus patterns of ice crystals. Measurements of the same particles by in-focus and out-of-focus techniques are in good agreement for 75% of the particles tested. Simulations of out-of-focus patterns are in very good agreement with experimental images. The analysis of the 2D-Fourier transform of the speckle-like patterns confirms that it is possible to evaluate the 2D-autocorrelation of the global shape of the particle (i.e. its 2D-projection on the plane of the CCD sensor).

  5. Interferometric Redatuming and Imaging of Low Frequency Earthquakes for Fine-Scale Subduction Zone Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowack, R. L.; Bostock, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the application of interferometric redatuming of seismic waveforms from low frequency earthquakes (LFE's) for fine-scale subduction zone structure. In this approach, seismic waveform data from two LFE sources recorded by an array at the Earth's surface are interferometrically redatumed to replace one of the sources at depth in the Earth by a virtual receiver. With many LFE sources along the top of a subducting plate, virtual source-receiver gathers can be constructed along the top of the plate boundary. Similar, but more involved approaches can also be applied to Wadati-Benioff seismic events which possess a wider depth distribution within the subducting plate. The construction of virtual shot-receiver profiles in the sub-surface has the advantage of effectively removing the distortion effects of the shallow structure above the plate and so affords the potential of providing more detailed images of the subduction zone structure itself. Here we perform initial numerical experiments for LFE sources and stations along a linear profile similar to that found in northern Cascadia. We first redatum synthetic P waveforms of LFE sources for a layered subduction zone structure including a dipping low velocity zone (LVZ) layer. The synthetic waveforms recorded at the surface array from a number of LFE sources are then redatumed to obtain a series of virtual common-source gathers along the top of the plate boundary, which can then be used for fine-scale imaging and velocity analysis of the plate itself. A second series of numerical experiments are performed using P waveforms of surface data from LFE sources to obtain virtual zero-offset profiles redatumed to the top of the plate structure. In these experiments a laterally varying lower boundary of the LVZ structure is imaged by the virtual zero-offset profiles at depth. In order to apply the redatuming approach to three-component seismic data recorded by LFE sources, an elastic formulation is required, however

  6. 3D spatial resolution and spectral resolution of interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Obara, Masaki; Yoshimori, Kyu

    2016-04-01

    Recently developed interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry (J. Opt. Soc. Am A18, 765 [2001]1084-7529JOAOD610.1364/JOSAA.18.000765) enables obtainment of the spectral information and 3D spatial information for incoherently illuminated or self-luminous object simultaneously. Using this method, we can obtain multispectral components of complex holograms, which correspond directly to the phase distribution of the wavefronts propagated from the polychromatic object. This paper focuses on the analysis of spectral resolution and 3D spatial resolution in interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry. Our analysis is based on a novel analytical impulse response function defined over four-dimensional space. We found that the experimental results agree well with the theoretical prediction. This work also suggests a new criterion and estimate method regarding 3D spatial resolution of digital holography. PMID:27139648

  7. Partially coherent analysis of imaging and interferometric phased arrays: noise, correlations, and fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Withington, Stafford; Saklatvala, George; Hobson, Michael P

    2006-06-01

    Phased arrays are of considerable importance for far-infrared, submillimeter-wave, and microwave astronomy; they are also being developed for areas as diverse as optical switching, radar, and radio communications. We present a discretized, modal theory of imaging and interferometric phased arrays. It is shown that the average powers, field correlations, power fluctuations, and correlations between power fluctuations at the output ports of an imaging, or interferometric, phased array can be determined for a source in any state of spatial coherence and polarization, once the synthesized beam patterns are known. It is not necessary to know anything about the internal construction of the beam-forming networks; indeed, the beam patterns can be taken from experimental data. The synthesized beams can be nonorthogonal and even linearly dependent. Our theory leads to many conceptual insights and opens the way to a range of new design and simulation techniques. PMID:16715152

  8. Interferometric grating method and its application in Fe-base shape memory alloy structure design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, J. W.; Wang, S. B.; Mao, C.; Li, H. Q.

    1998-06-01

    This paper presents an interferometric grating method used in measuring strain fields (ɛ z, ɛ θ, ɛ zθ) on a curved surface. This method can be used to determine the small and large strains with high sensitivity and has been applied successfully in Fe-base shape memory alloy (FSMA) structure design. In this study, five diffracted beam from the specimen surface produce the interferometric gratings through an optical system. Using image processing technique (fast Fourier transform with special interpolation and phase shifting technique), we have obtained the strain fields of outer surface of FSMA joint and contact pressure distribution on its inside surface which has mechanical deformation and transformation.

  9. Optoacoustic imaging using interferometric measurement of surface displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Carp, Stefan A.; Guerra, Arnold III; Duque, Samuel Q. Jr.; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2004-12-06

    We describe an optoacoustic imaging technique based on time-resolved measurements of laser-induced thermoelastic expansion. Tomographic images of tissue phantoms are formed using such measurements made at several locations following irradiation with a Q-switched Nd:YAG ({lambda}=1064 nm) laser pulse. Our system is based on a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer that measures surface displacement with a temporal resolution of 4 ns and a displacement sensitivity of 0.3 nm. Images formed from data sets acquired from several highly scattering tissue phantoms provide better than 200 {mu}m resolution and show great promise for high-resolution noninvasive imaging of heterogeneous tissues at depths approaching 1 cm.

  10. High-accuracy particle sizing by interferometric particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qieni, Lü; Wenhua, Jin; Tong, Lü; Xiang, Wang; Yimo, Zhang

    2014-02-01

    A method of high-accuracy estimation of fringes number/fringes frequency of interferogram based on erosion match and the Fourier transform technique is proposed. The edge images of the interference pattern of particles and the particle mask image are detected respectively by erosion operating firstly and then subtracted with the respective original image, and the center coordinate of particles can be extracted through the 2D correlation operation for the two edge images obtained. The interference pattern of each particle can then be achieved using the center coordinate, the shape and size of the particle image. The number of fringes/fringe spacing of the interferogram of the particle is extracted by Fourier transform and the modified Rife algorithm, and sub-pixel accuracy of the extracted frequency is acquired. Its performance is demonstrated by numerical simulation and experimental measurement. The measurement uncertainty is ±0.91 μm and the relative error 1.13% for the standard particle of diameter 45 μm. The research results show that the algorithm presented boasts high accuracy for particle sizing as well as location measurement.

  11. Imaging capabilities of weak-phase interferometric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannes, Andre

    1998-07-01

    The first imaging devices of optical interferometry are likely to be of weak phase, typically: a set of three- element arrays, coherent and stable, independently observing the same object. The study of their imaging capabilities essentially addresses the self-calibration problem and its stability. Like in VLBI, the principle of our self- calibration methods consists in preforming a series of alternate phase calibration operations and Fourier synthesis processes. Algebraic graph theory and algebraic number theory prove to be the key topics involved in the phase calibration operation. The latter can often be written in closed form. As expected, the relative expressions explicitly refer to a set of independent closure phases. To illustrate this essential point, we consider the special case of three-element arrays. The corresponding phase calibration formula, which is then particularly simple, provides all the elements for coping with the possible global instabilities. The Fourier synthesis process, which is also involved in the self-calibration cycles, is performed via WIPE, a methodology recently introduced in radio imaging and optical interferometry. The robustness of the image reconstruction process can then be well controlled.

  12. Fault detection and feature analysis in interferometric fringe patterns by the application of wavelet filters in convolution processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Sven; Wernicke, Guenther K.; Osten, Wolfgang; Kayser, Daniel; Demoli, Nazif; Gruber, Hartmut

    2001-01-01

    The detection and classification of faults is a major task for optical nondestructive testing in industrial quality control. Interferometric fringes, obtained by real-time optical measurement methods, contain a large amount of image data with information about possible defect features. This mass of data must be reduced for further evaluation. One possible way is the filtering of these images by applying the adaptive wavelet transform, which has been proved to be a capable tool in the detection of structures with definite spatial resolution. In this paper we show the extraction and classification of disturbances in interferometric fringe patterns, the application of several wavelet functions with different parameters for the detection of faults, and the combination of wavelet filters for fault classification. Examples of fringe patterns of known and varying vault parameters are processed showing the trend of the extracted features in order to draw conclusions concerning the relation between the feature, the filter parameter, and the fault attributes. Real-time processing was achieved by importing video sequences in a hybrid optoelectronic system with digital image processing and an optical correlation module. The optical correlator system is based on liquid- crystal spatial light modulators, which are addressed with image and filter data. Results of digital simulation and optical realization are compared.

  13. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar detection and estimation based 3D image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Christian D.; Moses, Randolph L.

    2006-05-01

    This paper explores three-dimensional (3D) interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) image reconstruction when multiple scattering centers and noise are present in a radar resolution cell. We introduce an IFSAR scattering model that accounts for both multiple scattering centers and noise. The problem of 3D image reconstruction is then posed as a multiple hypothesis detection and estimation problem; resolution cells containing a single scattering center are detected and the 3D location of these cells' pixels are estimated; all other pixels are rejected from the image. Detection and estimation statistics are derived using the multiple scattering center IFSAR model. A 3D image reconstruction algorithm using these statistics is then presented, and its performance is evaluated for a 3D reconstruction of a backhoe from noisy IFSAR data.

  14. In vivo optical interferometric imaging of human skin utilizing monochromatic light source.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Kentaro; Minemura, Hiroyuki; Anzai, Yumiko; Tomita, Daisuke; Shimanaka, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Tomokazu; Iida, Hiroki; Matsuura, Naoya; Katagiri, Chika; Yamashita, Toyonobu; Hara, Yusuke; Watanabe, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    We have demonstrated tomographic imaging of in vivo human skin with an optical interferometric imaging technique using a monochromatic light source. The axial resolution of this method is determined by the center wavelength and the NA of the objective and is irrelevant to the bandwidth of the light source in contrast to optical coherence tomography. Our imaging system is constructed with low-priced and small-sized compact disk optical pickup components, a laser diode, a high NA objective, and a voice coil actuator. In spite of its low cost and small size, our imaging system can visualize the structure of human skin as clearly as a commercial reflectance confocal microscope. PMID:27409189

  15. Direct and interferometric imaging approaches for detecting earth-like extrasolar planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, D. J.; Van Zyl, J.; Jones, D. L.; Tubbs, E.; Wright, V.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses functional requirements of space-based observational systems with sufficient sensitivity, resolution, and dynamic range to image earth-like extrasolar planets within a search radius of 10 parsecs from the sun. Both direct and interferometric systems operating at visible and infrared wavelengths are evaluated, and the methods used to establish the system tolerances are presented. Due to the more favorable star/planet contrast ratio in the infrared, optical tolerance requirements are less stringent than in the visible. However, reduction of thermal radiation from the telescope requires cooling of the primary optics. Other tradeoffs between various approaches are enumerated.

  16. Interferometric backward third harmonic generation microscopy for axial imaging with accuracy beyond the diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Sandkuijl, Daaf; Kontenis, Lukas; Coelho, Nuno M; McCulloch, Christopher; Barzda, Virginijus

    2014-01-01

    A new nonlinear microscopy technique based on interference of backward-reflected third harmonic generation (I-THG) from multiple interfaces is presented. The technique is used to measure height variations or changes of a layer thickness with an accuracy of up to 5 nm. Height variations of a patterned glass surface and thickness variations of fibroblasts are visualized with the interferometric epi-THG microscope with an accuracy at least two orders of magnitude better than diffraction limit. The microscopy technique can be broadly applied for measuring distance variations between membranes or multilayer structures inside biological tissue and for surface height variation imaging. PMID:24710103

  17. Line-imaging ORVIS measurements of interferometric windows under quasi-isentropic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Tommy; Hickman, Randy J.; Payne, Sheri L.; Trott, Wayne M.

    2009-06-01

    A line-imaging optically recording velocity interferometer system (ORVIS) has been implemented on the Veloce pulsed power generator to enable measurement of spatially resolved velocity histories of materials under dynamic compression. Interferometric windows are regularly used to maintain the high-pressure state of shock and ramp (quasi-isentropic) loaded materials. Although imaging through a shock or rapid ramp (<= 10 ns) loaded transparent window material has been reasonably successful, for slower ramp loading (˜ 440 ns) experiments, the elastic-plastic yielding of the window has an adverse effect on return light to the line-imaging ORVIS. The results of quasi-isentropic loading experiments with various interferometric windows such as LiF, NaCl, SiO2, PMMA, and sapphire are presented. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Improving image quality in intensity-interferometric spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Tomohiro

    2016-07-01

    Intensity-interferometric spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (I-SD-OCT), devised recently as a classical analog of quantum OCT, enables axially scanless cross-sectional imaging with an immunity to group-velocity dispersion and a factor-of-\\sqrt{2} resolution improvement. However, unwanted artifacts inevitably emerge in the resultant image. In this paper, it is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that such artifacts can be reduced without any difficulty by means of either a mechanical displacement of the detector for capturing spectral intensity patterns or a numerical displacement of the spectral intensity patterns stored in a computer. Furthermore, it is proved that the I-SD-OCT signal can be extracted from the conventional SD-OCT setup under a certain condition. These two features serve to improve the image quality in I-SD-OCT.

  19. Interferometric X-Ray Imaging of Breast Cancer Specimens at 51 keV X-Ray Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Wu, Jin; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Yoneyama, Akio; Lwin, Thet Thet; Aiyoshi, Yuji; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Ueno, Ei

    2004-08-01

    The feasibility of the interferometric X-ray imaging technique is examined for revealing the features of breast cancer specimens. The interferometric X-ray imaging system consisted of an asymmetrically cut silicon crystal, a monolithic X-ray interferometer, a phase-shifter, an object cell, and an X-ray CCD camera. Ten 10-mm-thick formalin-fixed breast cancer specimens were imaged at 51 keV, and these images were compared with absorption-contrast X-ray images obtained at 18 keV monochromatic synchrotron X-ray. The interferometric X-ray images clearly depicted the essential features of the breast cancer such as microcalcification down to a size of 0.036 mm, spiculation, and detailed inner soft tissue structures closely matched with histopathological morphology, while the absorption-contrast X-ray images obtained using nearly the same X-ray dose only resolved microcalcification down to a size of 0.108 mm and spiculation. The interferometric X-ray imaging technique can be considered to be an innovative technique for the early and accurate diagnosis of breast cancer using an extremely low X-ray dose.

  20. Multimodal interferometric microscopy for label-free 3D imaging of live cells in flow (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaked, Natan Tzvi

    2016-03-01

    I present multimodal wide-field interferometric microscopy platform for label-free 3-D imaging of live cells during fast flow. Using holographic optical tweezers, multiple cells can be optically trapped and rapidity rotated on all axes, while acquired using an external off-axis wide-field interferometric module developed in our lab. The interferometric projections are rapidly processed into the 3-D refractive-index profile of the cells using a tomographic phase microscopy algorithms that take into consideration optical diffraction effects. The algorithms for the 3-D refractive-index reconstruction, and for calculating various morphological parameters that should serve for online sorting of cells, are efficiently implemented in a nearly real-time manner. The potential of this new high-throughput imaging technique is for label-free image analysis and sorting of cells during flow, to substitute current cell sorting devices, which are based on external labeling that eventually damages the cell sample.

  1. Application of holographic interferometric studies of underwater shock-wave focusing to medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Nagoya, H.; Obara, Tetsuro; Kuwahara, M.

    1993-01-01

    Holographic interferometric flow visualization was successfully applied to underwater shock wave focusing and its application to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Real time diffuse holograms revealed the shock wave focusing process in an ellipsoidal reflector made from PMMA and double exposure holographic interferometry also clarified quantitatively the shock focusing process. Disintegration of urinary tract stones and gallbladder stones was observed by high speed photogrammetry. Tissue damage associated with the ESWL treatment is discussed in some detail.

  2. Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) earth physics. [application to radio astronomy and interferometric earth surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of the Michelson/Pease stellar interferometer are discussed. An analog of the interferometer using radio waves is described. The use of a conventional hard-wired interferometer with very long base line interferometry (VLBI) is analyzed. Mathematical models are developed to analyze the VLBI techniques. A summary of VLBI geodetic experiments is tabulated. The concept and application of the astronomical radio interferometric earth surveys (ARIES) are reported. A schematic diagram of ARIES implementation is provided.

  3. Computed optical interferometric tomography for high-speed volumetric cellular imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Shemonski, Nathan D; Adie, Steven G; Ahmad, Adeel; Bower, Andrew J; Carney, P Scott; Boppart, Stephen A

    2014-09-01

    Three-dimensional high-resolution imaging methods are important for cellular-level research. Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a low-coherence-based interferometry technology for cellular imaging with both high axial and lateral resolution. Using a high-numerical-aperture objective, OCM normally has a shallow depth of field and requires scanning the focus through the entire region of interest to perform volumetric imaging. With a higher-numerical-aperture objective, the image quality of OCM is affected by and more sensitive to aberrations. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) and computational adaptive optics (CAO) are computed imaging techniques that overcome the depth-of-field limitation and the effect of optical aberrations in optical coherence tomography (OCT), respectively. In this work we combine OCM with ISAM and CAO to achieve high-speed volumetric cellular imaging. Experimental imaging results of ex vivo human breast tissue, ex vivo mouse brain tissue, in vitro fibroblast cells in 3D scaffolds, and in vivo human skin demonstrate the significant potential of this technique for high-speed volumetric cellular imaging. PMID:25401012

  4. Computed optical interferometric tomography for high-speed volumetric cellular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Shemonski, Nathan D.; Adie, Steven G.; Ahmad, Adeel; Bower, Andrew J.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional high-resolution imaging methods are important for cellular-level research. Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a low-coherence-based interferometry technology for cellular imaging with both high axial and lateral resolution. Using a high-numerical-aperture objective, OCM normally has a shallow depth of field and requires scanning the focus through the entire region of interest to perform volumetric imaging. With a higher-numerical-aperture objective, the image quality of OCM is affected by and more sensitive to aberrations. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) and computational adaptive optics (CAO) are computed imaging techniques that overcome the depth-of-field limitation and the effect of optical aberrations in optical coherence tomography (OCT), respectively. In this work we combine OCM with ISAM and CAO to achieve high-speed volumetric cellular imaging. Experimental imaging results of ex vivo human breast tissue, ex vivo mouse brain tissue, in vitro fibroblast cells in 3D scaffolds, and in vivo human skin demonstrate the significant potential of this technique for high-speed volumetric cellular imaging. PMID:25401012

  5. Nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging for fast label-free visualization of molecular domains in skin.

    PubMed

    Benalcazar, Wladimir A; Boppart, Stephen A

    2011-07-01

    The most prevalent molecular constituents of skin are spatially mapped by the use of nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging, a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS)-based technique. Raman-like profiles over the range from 2,800 to 3,000 cm(-1) are acquired by means of completely suppressing the non-resonant background, allowing the generation of images based on the molecule-specific spectral profiles over the probed region with high spatial resolution. A simple algorithm that maps spectral content to color allows the visualization of histology in a manner analogous to that obtained with more conventional staining procedures (e.g., hematoxylin-eosin), but faster and with the benefit of having access to localized spectra, which could further enhance the potential for diagnosis of diseases, especially during the early stages of development. PMID:21465094

  6. Interferometric scattering microscopy and its combination with single-molecule fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Ortega Arroyo, Jaime; Cole, Daniel; Kukura, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    Interferometric scattering microscopy (iSCAT) is a light scattering-based imaging modality that offers a unique combination of imaging speed and precision for tracking nanoscopic labels and enables label-free optical sensing down to the single-molecule level. In contrast to fluorescence, iSCAT does not suffer from limitations associated with dye photochemistry and photophysics, or the requirement for fluorescent labeling. Here we present a protocol for constructing an iSCAT microscope from commercially available optical components and demonstrate its compatibility with simultaneously operating single-molecule, objective-type, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Given an intermediate level of experience with optics and microscopy, for instance graduate-level familiarity with laser beam steering and optical components, this protocol can be completed in a time frame of 2 weeks. PMID:26938114

  7. THE AzTEC/SMA INTERFEROMETRIC IMAGING SURVEY OF SUBMILLIMETER-SELECTED HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, Joshua D.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Huang Jiasheng; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Gurwell, Mark A.; Petitpas, Glen R.; Wilner, David J.; Yun, Min S.; Wilson, Grant W.; Scott, Kimberly S.; Austermann, Jason; Perera, Thushara; Peck, Alison B.; Hughes, David H.; Aretxaga, Itziar; Kim, Sungeun; Lowenthal, James D.

    2009-10-10

    We present results from a continuing interferometric survey of high-redshift submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) with the Submillimeter Array, including high-resolution (beam size approx2 arcsec) imaging of eight additional AzTEC 1.1 mm selected sources in the COSMOS field, for which we obtain six reliable (peak signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) >5 or peak S/N >4 with multiwavelength counterparts within the beam) and two moderate significance (peak S/N >4) detections. When combined with previous detections, this yields an unbiased sample of millimeter-selected SMGs with complete interferometric follow up. With this sample in hand, we (1) empirically confirm the radio-submillimeter association, (2) examine the submillimeter morphology-including the nature of SMGs with multiple radio counterparts and constraints on the physical scale of the far infrared-of the sample, and (3) find additional evidence for a population of extremely luminous, radio-dim SMGs that peaks at higher redshift than previous, radio-selected samples. In particular, the presence of such a population of high-redshift sources has important consequences for models of galaxy formation-which struggle to account for such objects even under liberal assumptions-and dust production models given the limited time since the big bang.

  8. The imaging method and sampling scheme of rotation scanning interferometric radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Ji; Sun, Weiying

    2008-11-01

    Rotation scanning interferometric radiometer is a kind of new proposed time shared imaging concept for purpose of further decreasing the hardware complexity and increasing the spatial resolution. The main problem need to be solved is the image reconstruction from the rotation sampling visibilities. In this study we develop a Pseudo-Polar FFT algorithm that suitable for dealing with the polar sampling grid data of rotation scanning system. It takes pseudo polar grid as the conversion destination instead of traditional Cartesian rectangular grid before the Fourier inversion. The involved effective 1D interpolations and 1D-FFT routines in this imaging algorithm guaranteed a high accuracy and computational efficiency. Moreover we analyzed the associated rotation sampling scheme such as the antenna array arrangement and rotation sampling interval which have great effects on the reconstruction results. Numerical simulations are present for validating the superiority of this new imaging algorithm. Simulation results also indicated that the non-redundant plane antenna array with good linearity is the prefer array arrangement for rotation scanning system.

  9. Discretized aperture mapping with a micro-lenses array for interferometric direct imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, Fabien; Antichi, Jacopo; Mawet, Dimitri; Jolissaint, Laurent; Carbillet, Marcel; Milli, Julien; Girard, Julien; Rabou, Patrick; Giro, Enrico; Mourard, Denis

    2014-08-01

    Discretized Aperture Mapping (DAM) appears as an original filtering technique easy to play with existing adaptive optics (AO) systems. In its essential DAM operates as an optical passive filter removing part of the phase residuals in the wavefront without introducing any difficult-to-align component in the Fourier conjugate of the entrance pupil plane. DAM reveals as a new interferometric technique combined with spatial filtering allowing direct imaging over a narrow field of view (FOV). In fact, the entrance pupil of a single telescope is divided into many sub-pupils so that the residual phase in each sub-pupil is filtered up to the DAM cut-off frequency. DAM enables to smooth the small scale wavefront defects which correspond to high spatial frequencies in the pupil plane and to low angular frequencies in the image plane. Close to the AO Nyquist frequency, such pupil plane spatial frequencies are not well measured by the wavefront sensor (WFS) due to aliasing. Once bigger than the AO Nyquist frequency, they are no more measured by the WFS due to the fitting limit responsible for the narrow AO FOV. The corresponding image plane angular frequencies are not transmitted by DAM and are useless to image small FOVs, as stated by interferometry. That is why AO and DAM are complementary assuming that the DAM cut-off frequency is equal to the AO Nyquist frequency. Here we describe the imaging capabilities when DAM is placed downstream an AO system, over a convenient pupil which precedes the scientific detector. We show firstly that the imaging properties are preserved on a narrow FOV allowing direct imaging throughout interferometry. Then we show how the residual pupil plane spatial frequencies bigger than the AO Nyquist one are filtered out, as well as the residual halo in the image is dimmed.

  10. Quasi real-time analysis of mixed-phase clouds using interferometric out-of-focus imaging: development of an algorithm to assess liquid and ice water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, P.; Brunel, M.; Rondeau, A.; Porcheron, E.; Gréhan, G.

    2015-12-01

    According to changes in aircraft certifications rules, instrumentation has to be developed to alert the flight crews of potential icing conditions. The technique developed needs to measure in real time the amount of ice and liquid water encountered by the plane. Interferometric imaging offers an interesting solution: It is currently used to measure the size of regular droplets, and it can further measure the size of irregular particles from the analysis of their speckle-like out-of-focus images. However, conventional image processing needs to be speeded up to be compatible with the real-time detection of icing conditions. This article presents the development of an optimised algorithm to accelerate image processing. The algorithm proposed is based on the detection of each interferogram with the use of the gradient pair vector method. This method is shown to be 13 times faster than the conventional Hough transform. The algorithm is validated on synthetic images of mixed phase clouds, and finally tested and validated in laboratory conditions. This algorithm should have important applications in the size measurement of droplets and ice particles for aircraft safety, cloud microphysics investigation, and more generally in the real-time analysis of triphasic flows using interferometric particle imaging.

  11. Discret aperture mapping with a micro-lenses array for interferometric direct imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, Fabien; Antichi, Jacopo; Rabou, Patrick; Giro, Enrico; Mawet, Dimitri; Milli, Julien; Girard, Julien; Carbillet, Marcel; Mourard, Denis

    2013-12-01

    A challenging study for high resolution and high-contrast imaging is the detection and the characterization of planets in the habitable zone. The problem of detection in imaging is due to both the contrast ratio and the tiny separation between the hosting star and the exoplanet. Certainly, many techniques in high-contrast imaging will have to be optimized simultaneously to enhance the detection treshold and to probe the candidates for life. In this context, the objective is to demonstrate the technical faisability and to get scientific returns with a new concept called Discret Aperture Mapping or DAM (Patru et al. 2011). DAM is a new interferometric technique allowing high contrast imaging over a narrow field of view imaged by the present class of mono-pupil telescopes equipped with adaptive optics (AO). DAM consists in mapping the telescope pupil to provide a correct sampling of the spatial frequency content of the telescope. DAM can be realized by an afocal double lenslet array array (BIGRE-DAM, Antichi et al. 2011), or by a single-mode fiber combiner (Fibered-DAM, Patru et al. 2008). The spatial filtering used in interferometry allows to subdivide the entrance pupil of a large telescope into many coherent sub-pupils, so that the intra-sub-pupil residual phase is averaged out. On the other side, frequencies higher than the deformable mirror sampling one are not corected by AO impling aliasing effect and a strong impact of Fresnel propagation on the compensated wavefront up to the final focus (Antichi et al. 2010). DAM is then a high frequency optical filter able to remove part of the AO residuals and to remove most of the halo in the image. It may improve the contrast limit to explore the inner region of new stellar systems (disk, exoplanet). We show here first simulation results on the DAM concept.

  12. Plastic mine detecting radar system using complex-valued self-organizing map that deals with multiple-frequency interferometric images.

    PubMed

    Hara, Takahiro; Hirose, Akira

    2004-01-01

    Ground penetrating radars (GPR's) have been often applied to underground object imaging. However, conventional radar systems do not work sufficiently to detect anti-personnel plastic landmines. We propose a novel radar imaging system, which processes adaptively interferometric front-end data obtained at multiple-frequency points. The system deals with interferometric images using complex-valued self-organizing map (C-SOM). We demonstrate a successful visualization of a plastic mine buried near the ground surface. PMID:15555861

  13. COLDER AND HOTTER: INTERFEROMETRIC IMAGING OF {beta} CASSIOPEIAE AND {alpha} LEONIS

    SciTech Connect

    Che, X.; Monnier, J. D.; Zhao, M.; Merand, A.; Ten Brummelaar, T.; McAlister, H.; Turner, N.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Ridgway, S. T.

    2011-05-10

    Near-infrared interferometers have recently imaged a number of rapidly rotating A-type stars, finding levels of gravity darkening inconsistent with theoretical expectations. Here, we present new imaging of both a cooler star {beta} Cas (F2IV) and a hotter one {alpha} Leo (B7V) using the CHARA array and the MIRC instrument at the H band. Adopting a solid-body rotation model with a simple gravity darkening prescription, we modeled the stellar geometric properties and surface temperature distributions, confirming that both stars are rapidly rotating and show gravity darkening anomalies. We estimate the masses and ages of these rapid rotators on L-R{sub pol} and H-R diagrams constructed for non-rotating stars by tracking their non-rotating equivalents. The unexpected fast rotation of the evolved sub-giant {beta} Cas offers a unique test of the stellar core-envelope coupling, revealing quite efficient coupling over the past {approx}0.5 Gyr. Lastly, we summarize all our interferometric determinations of the gravity darkening coefficient for rapid rotators, finding that none match the expectations from the widely used von Zeipel gravity darkening laws. Since the conditions of the von Zeipel law are known to be violated for rapidly rotating stars, we recommend using the empirically derived {beta} = 0.19 for such stars with radiation-dominated envelopes. Furthermore, we note that no paradigm exists for self-consistently modeling heavily gravity-darkened stars that show hot radiative poles with cool convective equators.

  14. Advanced Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Imaging Radar (InSAR) for Dune Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havivi, Shiran; Amir, Doron; Schvartzman, Ilan; August, Yitzhak; Mamman, Shimrit; Rotman, Stanely R.; Blumberg, Dan G.

    2016-04-01

    Aeolian morphologies are formed in the presence of sufficient wind energy and available lose particles. These processes occur naturally or are further enhanced or reduced by human intervention. The dimensions of change are dependent primarily on the wind energy and surface properties. Since the 1970s, remote sensing imagery, both optical and radar, have been used for documentation and interpretation of the geomorphologic changes of sand dunes. Remote sensing studies of aeolian morphologies is mostly useful to document major changes, yet, subtle changes, occurring in a period of days or months in scales of centimeters, are very difficult to detect in imagery. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is an imaging technique for measuring Earth's surface topography and deformation. InSAR images are produced by measuring the radar phase difference between two separated antennas that view the same surface area. Classical InSAR is based on high coherence between two or more images. The output (interferogram) can show subtle changes with an accuracy of several millimeters to centimeters. Very little work has been done on measuring or identifying the changes in dunes using InSAR methods. The reason is that dunes tend to be less coherent than firm, stable, surfaces. This work aims to demonstrate how interferometric decorrelation can be used for identifying dune instability. We hypothesize and demonstrate that the loss of radar coherence over time on dunes can be used as an indication of the dune's instability. When SAR images are acquired at sufficiently close intervals one can measure the time it takes to lose coherence and associate this time with geomorphic stability. To achieve our goals, the coherence change detection method was used, in order to identify dune stability or instability and the dune activity level. The Nitzanim-Ashdod coastal dunes along the Mediterranean, 40 km south of Tel-Aviv, Israel, were chosen as a case study. The dunes in this area are of

  15. The Age of the Directly Imaged Planet Host Star κ Andromedae Determined from Interferometric Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jeremy; White, R. J.; Quinn, S.; Ireland, M.; Boyajian, T.; Schaefer, G.; Baines, E. K.

    2016-05-01

    κ Andromedae, an early-type star that hosts a directly imaged low-mass companion, is expected to be oblate due to its rapid rotational velocity (v sin i = ˜162 km s‑1). We observed the star with the CHARA Array’s optical beam combiner, PAVO, measuring its size at multiple orientations and determining its oblateness. The interferometric measurements, combined with photometry and this v sin i value are used to constrain an oblate star model that yields the fundamental properties of the star and finds a rotation speed that is ˜85% of the critical rate and a low inclination of ˜30°. Three modeled properties (the average radius, bolometric luminosity, and equatorial velocity) are compared to MESA evolution models to determine an age and mass for the star. In doing so, we determine an age for the system of {47}-40+27 Myr. Based on this age and previous measurements of the companion’s temperature, the BHAC15 evolution models imply a mass for the companion of {22}-9+8 M J.

  16. The Age of the Directly Imaged Planet Host Star κ Andromedae Determined from Interferometric Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jeremy; White, R. J.; Quinn, S.; Ireland, M.; Boyajian, T.; Schaefer, G.; Baines, E. K.

    2016-05-01

    κ Andromedae, an early-type star that hosts a directly imaged low-mass companion, is expected to be oblate due to its rapid rotational velocity (v sin i = ∼162 km s‑1). We observed the star with the CHARA Array’s optical beam combiner, PAVO, measuring its size at multiple orientations and determining its oblateness. The interferometric measurements, combined with photometry and this v sin i value are used to constrain an oblate star model that yields the fundamental properties of the star and finds a rotation speed that is ∼85% of the critical rate and a low inclination of ∼30°. Three modeled properties (the average radius, bolometric luminosity, and equatorial velocity) are compared to MESA evolution models to determine an age and mass for the star. In doing so, we determine an age for the system of {47}-40+27 Myr. Based on this age and previous measurements of the companion’s temperature, the BHAC15 evolution models imply a mass for the companion of {22}-9+8 M J.

  17. An Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor for Point of Care Viral Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Reddington, Alexander P.; Trueb, Jacob T.; Freedman, David S.; Tuysuzoglu, Ahmet; Daaboul, George G.; Lopez, Carlos A.; Karl, W. Clem; Connor, John H.; Fawcett, Helen; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2014-01-01

    The use of in vitro diagnostic devices is transitioning from the laboratory to the primary care setting to address early disease detection needs. Time critical viral diagnoses are often made without support due to the experimental time required in today’s standard tests. Available rapid point of care (POC) viral tests are less reliable, requiring a follow-on confirmatory test before conclusions can be drawn. The development of a reliable POC viral test for the primary care setting would decrease the time for diagnosis leading to a lower chance of transmission and improve recovery. The single particle interferometric reflectance imaging sensor (SP-IRIS) has been shown to be a sensitive and specific-detection platform in serum and whole blood. This paper presents a step towards a POC viral assay through a SP-IRIS prototype with automated data acquisition and analysis and a simple, easy-to-use software interface. Decreasing operation complexity highlights the potential of SP-IRIS as a sensitive and specific POC diagnostic tool. With the integration of a microfluidic cartridge, this automated instrument will allow an untrained user to run a sample-to-answer viral assay in the POC setting. PMID:24271115

  18. Diffractive optical variable image devices generated by maskless interferometric lithography for optical security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Alexandre; Rebordão, José M.

    2011-05-01

    In optical security (protection against forgery and counterfeit of products and documents) the problem is not exact reproduction but the production of something sufficiently similar to the original. Currently, Diffractive Optically Variable Image Devices (DOVID), that create dynamic chromatic effects which may be easily recognized but are difficult to reproduce, are often used to protect important products and documents. Well known examples of DOVID for security are 3D or 2D/3D holograms in identity documents and credit cards. Others are composed of shapes with different types of microstructures yielding by diffraction to chromatic dynamic effects. A maskless interferometric lithography technique to generate DOVIDs for optical security is presented and compared to traditional techniques. The approach can be considered as a self-masking focused holography on planes tilted with respect to the reference optical axes of the system, and is based on the Scheimpflug and Hinge rules. No physical masks are needed to ensure optimum exposure of the photosensitive film. The system built to demonstrate the technique relies on the digital mirrors device MOEMS technology from Texas Instruments' Digital Light Processing. The technique is linear on the number of specified colors and does not depend either on the area of the device or the number of pixels, factors that drive the complexity of dot-matrix based systems. The results confirmed the technique innovation and capabilities in the creation of diffractive optical elements for security against counterfeiting and forgery.

  19. Sapce based low frequency interferometric radioastronomy: the path towards the imaging of the inner heliosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Zarka, P. M.; Girard, J. N.; Klein Wolt, M.; Boonstra, A. J.; Baan, W.; Briand, C.; Maksimovic, M.; Segret, B.

    2014-12-01

    Low frequency radioastronomy observatories for the heliosphere have been using similar instrumentation for decades. The Cassini, STEREO, and the future Solar Orbiter mission are embarking goniopolarmetric radio receiver connected to 3 electric wire antennas. Such instrument provides the spectral matrix (or part of it) from which the wave parameters can be derived. They require a point source assumption (plane wave) to derive the direction of arrival of the wave, the polarization and the flux density. In case of a spatially extended source (disk shaped, with a given radial profile), the source centroid direction and the apparent source size can also be derived. This type of instrumentation cannot provide much more parameters, as there is a maximum of to 9 independent measurements for each time-frequency step (i.e. an instantaneous set of measurements). Radio maps can be produced a posteriori combining consecutive data at the cost of averaging out small scale temporal variations. Furthermore, these inversion do not allow solving for several sources, or for complex source geometry. We present a concept of radioastronomy instrumentation using a swarm of small satellites (possibly cubesats) with sensitive radio receivers measuring the wave front and phase of the radio waves on each spacecraft. This instrument will also provide 3-dimensional interferometric measurement from which real imaging capabilities will arise, as it is now occurring on ground at frequencies above 15 MHz, with the LOFAR interferometer in Europe, or the LWA in teh USA. The proposed concept will be very complementary to these instruments, as they will be orepating from a few kHz to a few 10 Mhz from space, and thus not affected by the ionospheric cutoff at 10 MHz. Such resolved imaging capabilities of the inner heliosphere would be a real step forward to better understand the radio emissions mechanisms and the energetic at the orgin of the radio sources, as well as the propagation processes. We will

  20. Interferometric properties of standing spin waves and the application to a phase comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ya, X.; Chen, H.; Oyabu, S.; Peng, B.; Otsuki, H.; Tanaka, T.; Matsuyama, K.

    2015-05-01

    We numerically studied the material and structural parameter dependence of interferometric properties of the standing spin wave resonance (SSWR) by micromagnetic simulations and demonstrate the feasibility of practical application to an integrated phase comparator. The micromagnetic configuration of the synthesized SSWR emitted from the two microwave currents flowing through the parallel strip lines depends on the phase difference Δϕ between them. Resultantly, the Δϕ is converted to the related output voltage with an overlaid phase detector, inductively coupled to the magnetic strip. Among the investigated various material systems, low damping (α ˜ 0.001) metallic ferromagnets are found to exhibit superior device performance due to the reduced viscous dissipation.

  1. Interferometric properties of standing spin waves and the application to a phase comparator

    SciTech Connect

    Ya, X.; Chen, H.; Oyabu, S.; Peng, B.; Otsuki, H.; Tanaka, T. Matsuyama, K.

    2015-05-07

    We numerically studied the material and structural parameter dependence of interferometric properties of the standing spin wave resonance (SSWR) by micromagnetic simulations and demonstrate the feasibility of practical application to an integrated phase comparator. The micromagnetic configuration of the synthesized SSWR emitted from the two microwave currents flowing through the parallel strip lines depends on the phase difference Δϕ between them. Resultantly, the Δϕ is converted to the related output voltage with an overlaid phase detector, inductively coupled to the magnetic strip. Among the investigated various material systems, low damping (α ∼ 0.001) metallic ferromagnets are found to exhibit superior device performance due to the reduced viscous dissipation.

  2. Interferometric inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging for space targets based on wideband direct sampling using two antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Biao; Liu, Yang; Xu, Shiyou; Chen, Zengping

    2014-01-01

    Interferometric inverse synthetic aperture radar (InISAR) imaging provides complementary information to monostatic inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging. This paper proposes a new InISAR imaging system for space targets based on wideband direct sampling using two antennas. The system is easy to realize in engineering since the motion trajectory of space targets can be known in advance, which is simpler than that of three receivers. In the preprocessing step, high speed movement compensation is carried out by designing an adaptive matched filter containing speed that is obtained from the narrow band information. Then, the coherent processing and keystone transform for ISAR imaging are adopted to reserve the phase history of each antenna. Through appropriate collocation of the system, image registration and phase unwrapping can be avoided. Considering the situation not to be satisfied, the influence of baseline variance is analyzed and compensation method is adopted. The corresponding size can be achieved by interferometric processing of the two complex ISAR images. Experimental results prove the validity of the analysis and the three-dimensional imaging algorithm.

  3. Applicability of interferometric SAR technology to ground movement and pipeline monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grivas, Dimitri A.; Bhagvati, Chakravarthy; Schultz, B. C.; Trigg, Alan; Rizkalla, Moness

    1998-03-01

    This paper summarizes the findings of a cooperative effort between NOVA Gas Transmission Ltd. (NGTL), the Italian Natural Gas Transmission Company (SNAM), and Arista International, Inc., to determine whether current remote sensing technologies can be utilized to monitor small-scale ground movements over vast geographical areas. This topic is of interest due to the potential for small ground movements to cause strain accumulation in buried pipeline facilities. Ground movements are difficult to monitor continuously, but their cumulative effect over time can have a significant impact on the safety of buried pipelines. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR or SARI) is identified as the most promising technique of those considered. InSAR analysis involves combining multiple images from consecutive passes of a radar imaging platform. The resulting composite image can detect changes as small as 2.5 to 5.0 centimeters (based on current analysis methods and radar satellite data of 5 centimeter wavelength). Research currently in progress shows potential for measuring ground movements as small as a few millimeters. Data needed for InSAR analysis is currently commercially available from four satellites, and additional satellites are planned for launch in the near future. A major conclusion of the present study is that InSAR technology is potentially useful for pipeline integrity monitoring. A pilot project is planned to test operational issues.

  4. Use of ERS SAR interferometric coherence and PRI images to evaluate crop height and soil moisture and to identify crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeremans, Benoit; Dautrebande, Sylvia

    1998-12-01

    The aim of the present project was to identify the capabilities of multitemporal ERS SAR interferometric coherence and PRI images to evaluate soil moisture, to estimate crop height and to identify crops for four crop types (winter wheat, potato, sugar beet and maize) and for different pilot fields. The coherence images acquired during the winter and spring seasons can be used to identify bare or nearly bare fields with a threshold value, and then PRI images were used to quantify soil moisture value for each bare field. The coherence images acquired during the growing season were used to evaluate crop height for each studied crop type. Moreover, the coherence image provided some additional information to PRI images for the crop type identification. This study was carried out in the framework of the PRODEX program financed by the Belgian Federal Office for Scientific, Technical and Cultural affairs (OSTC) and the European Space Agency (ESA).

  5. A single-sided homogeneous Green's function representation for holographic imaging, inverse scattering, time-reversal acoustics and interferometric Green's function retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wapenaar, Kees; Thorbecke, Jan; van der Neut, Joost

    2016-04-01

    Green's theorem plays a fundamental role in a diverse range of wavefield imaging applications, such as holographic imaging, inverse scattering, time-reversal acoustics and interferometric Green's function retrieval. In many of those applications, the homogeneous Green's function (i.e. the Green's function of the wave equation without a singularity on the right-hand side) is represented by a closed boundary integral. In practical applications, sources and/or receivers are usually present only on an open surface, which implies that a significant part of the closed boundary integral is by necessity ignored. Here we derive a homogeneous Green's function representation for the common situation that sources and/or receivers are present on an open surface only. We modify the integrand in such a way that it vanishes on the part of the boundary where no sources and receivers are present. As a consequence, the remaining integral along the open surface is an accurate single-sided representation of the homogeneous Green's function. This single-sided representation accounts for all orders of multiple scattering. The new representation significantly improves the aforementioned wavefield imaging applications, particularly in situations where the first-order scattering approximation breaks down.

  6. An interferometric radar for displacement measurement and its application in civil engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, D.; Nagayama, T.; Sun, Z.; Fujino, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Recent progress in radar techniques and systems has led to the development of a microwave interferometer, potentially suitable for non-contact displacement monitoring of civil engineering structures. This paper describes a new interferometric radar system, named IBIS-S, which is possible to measure the static or dynamic displacement at multiple points of structures simultaneously with high accuracy. In this paper, the technical characteristics and specification of the radar system is described. Subsequently, the actual displacement sensitivity of the equipment is illustrated using the laboratory tests with random motion upon a shake table. Finally the applications of the radar system to the measurement on a cable-stayed bridge and a prestressed concrete bridge are presented and discussed. Results show that the new system is an accurate and effective method to measure displacements of multiple targets of structures. It should be noted that the current system can only measure the vibration of the target position along the sensor's line of sight. Hence, proper caution should be taken when designing the sensor posture and prior knowledge of the direction of motion is necessary.

  7. Monolithic silicon interferometric optoelectronic devices for label-free multi-analyte biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiakos, K.; Makarona, E.; Raptis, I.; Salapatas, A.; Psarouli, A.; Kakabakos, S.; Petrou, P.; Hoekman, M.; Stoffer, R.; Tukkiniemi, K.; Jobst, G.

    2013-02-01

    Miniaturized bioanalytical devices find wide applications ranging from blood tests to environmental monitoring. Such devices in the form of hand held personal laboratories can transform point-of-care monitoring provided miniaturization, multianalyte detection and sensitivity issues are successfully resolved. Optical detection in biosensors is superior in many respects to other types of sensing based on alternative signal transduction techniques, especially when both sensitivity and label free detection is sought. The main drawback of optical biosensing transducers relates to the unresolved manufacturability issues encountered when attempting monolithic integration of the light source. If the mature silicon processing technology could be used to monolithically integrate optical components, including light emitting devices, into complete photonic sensors, then the lab on a chip concept would materialize into a robust and affordable way. Here, we describe and demonstrate a bioanalytical device consisting of a monolithic silicon optocoupler properly engineered as a planar interferometric microchip. The optical microchip monolithically integrates silicon light emitting diodes and detectors optically coupled through silicon nitride waveguides designed to form Mach-Zehnder interferometers. Label free detection of proteins is demonstrated down to pM sensitivities.

  8. Ps-LAMBDA: Ambiguity success rate evaluation software for interferometric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhagen, Sandra; Li, Bofeng; Teunissen, Peter J. G.

    2013-04-01

    Integer ambiguity resolution is the process of estimating the unknown ambiguities of carrier-phase observables as integers. It applies to a wide range of interferometric applications of which Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) precise positioning is a prominent example. GNSS precise positioning can be accomplished anytime and anywhere on Earth, provided that the integer ambiguities of the very precise carrier-phase observables are successfully resolved. As wrongly resolved ambiguities may result in unacceptably large position errors, it is crucial that one is able to evaluate the probability of correct integer ambiguity estimation. This ambiguity success rate depends on the underlying mathematical model as well as on the integer estimation method used. In this contribution, we present the Matlab toolbox Ps-LAMBDA for the evaluation of the ambiguity success rates. It allows users to evaluate all available success rate bounds and approximations for different integer estimators. An assessment of the sharpness of the bounds and approximations is given as well. Furthermore, it is shown how the toolbox can be used to assess the integer ambiguity resolution performance for design and research purposes, so as to study for instance the impact of using different GNSS systems and/or different measurement scenarios.

  9. Tunable coherent radiation at soft X-ray wavelengths: Generation and interferometric applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rosfjord, Kristine Marie

    2004-07-01

    The availability of high power, spectrally and spatially coherent soft x-rays (SXR) would facilitate a wide variety of experiments as this energy region covers the primary resonances of many magnetic and biological materials. Specifically, there are the carbon and oxygen K-edges that are critical for biological imaging in the water window and the L-edges of iron, nickel, and cobalt for which imaging and scattering studies can be performed. A new coherent soft X-ray branchline at the Advanced Light Source has begun operation (beamline 12.0.2). Using the third harmonic from an 8 cm period undulator, this branch delivers coherent soft x-rays with photon energies ranging from 200eV to 1keV. This branchline is composed of two sub-branches one at 14X demagnification and the other 8X demagnification. The former is optimized for use at 500eV and the latter at 800eV. Here the expected power from the third harmonic of this undulator and the beamline design and characterization is presented. The characterization includes measurements on available photon flux as well as a series of double pinhole experiments to determine the coherence factor with respect to transverse distance. The first high quality Airy patterns at SXR wavelengths are created with this new beamline. The operation of this new beamline allows for interferometry to be performed in the SXR region. Here an interferometric experiment designed to directly determine the index of refraction of a material under test is performed. Measurements are first made in the EUV region using an established beamline (beamline12.0.1) to measure silicon, ruthenium and tantalum silicon nitride. This work is then extended to the SXR region using beamline 12.0.2 to test chromium and vanadium.

  10. Development of a folded compact range and its application in performing coherent change detection and interferometric ISAR measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, K.W.; Zittel, D.H.; Littlejohn, J.H.

    1996-09-01

    A folded compact range configuration has been developed at the Sandia National Laboratories` compact range antenna and radar cross section measurement facility as a means of performing indoor, environmentally controlled far-field simulations of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements of distributed target samples (i.e. gravel, sand, etc.). In particular, the folded compact range configuration has been used to perform both highly sensitive coherent change detection (CCD) measurements and interferometric inverse synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) measurements, which, in addition to the two-dimensional spatial resolution afforded by typical interferometric SAR (ISAR) processing, provides resolution of the relative height of targets with accuracies on the order of a wavelength. This paper describes the development of the folded compact range, as well as the coherent change detection and interferometric measurements that have been made with the system. The measurement have been very successful, and have demonstrated not only the viability of the folded compact range concept in simulating SAR CCD and IFSAR measurements, but also its usefulness as a tool in the research and development of SAR CCD and IFSAR image generation and measurement methodologies.

  11. Interferometric side-scan sonar signal denoised by wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sintes, Christophe R.; Legris, Michel; Solaiman, Basel

    2003-04-01

    This paper concerns the possibilities that side scan sonar have to determine the bathymetry. New side scan sonars, which are able to image the sea bottom with a high definition, estimate the relief with the same definition as conventional sonar images, using an interferometric multisensors system. Drawbacks concern the accuracy and errors of the numerical altitude model. Interferometric methods use a phase difference to determine a time delay between two sensors. The phase difference belongs to a finite interval (-π, +π), but the time delay between two sensors does not belong to a finite interval: the phase is 2π biased. The used sonar is designend for the use of the vernier technique, which allows to remove this bias. The difficulty comes from interferometric noise, which generates errors on the 2π bias estimation derived from the verier. The traditional way to reduce noise impact on the interferometric signal, is to average data. This method does not preserve the resolution of the bathymetric estimation. This paper presents an attempt to improve the accuracy and resolution of the interferometric signal through a wavelets based method of image despecklization. Traditionally, despecklization is processed on the logarithm of absolute value of the signal. But for this application, the proposed interferometric despecklizaiotn is achieved directly on the interferometric signal by integrating information, guided by the despeckled image. Finally, this multiscale analysis corresponds to an auto adaptive average filtering. A variant of this method is introduced and based on this assumption. This method used the identify function to reconstruct the signal. On the presented results, phase despecklization improves considerably the quality of the interferometric signal in terms of to noise ratio, without an important degradation of resolution.

  12. High-resolution interferometric radar images of equatorial spread F scattering structures using Capon's method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zewdie, G. K.; Rodrigues, F. S.; Paula, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    Coherent backscatter radar imaging techniques use measurements made by multiple antenna baselines (visibility estimates) to infer the spatial distribution of the scatterers (brightness function) responsible for the observed echoes. It has been proposed that the Capon method for spectral estimation can be used for high-resolution estimation of the brightness distribution. We investigate the application of the Capon method to measurements made by a small (7-baseline) 30 MHz ionospheric coherent backscatter radar interferometer in Sao Luis, Brazil. The longest baseline of the interferometer is only 15 times the wavelength of radar signal (10 m), and the ionospheric radar soundings have been made using only 4-8 kW transmitters. Nevertheless, we have been able to obtain high-resolution (kilometric scales in the zonal direction) images of scattering structures during equatorial spread F (ESF) events over a wide field of view (+/- 10 degrees off zenith). We will present numerical simulations demonstrating the performance of the technique for the Sao Luis radar setup as well as results of the Capon technique applied to actual measurements. We will discuss the behavior of the ESF scattering structures as seen in the Capon images. The high-resolution images can assist our interpretation of plasma instabilities in the equatorial ionosphere and serve to test our ability to model the behavior of ionospheric irregularities during space weather events such as those associated with ESF.

  13. Interferometric Dynamic Measurement: Techniques Based on High-Speed Imaging or a Single Photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yu; Pedrini, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, optical interferometry-based techniques have been widely used to perform noncontact measurement of dynamic deformation in different industrial areas. In these applications, various physical quantities need to be measured in any instant and the Nyquist sampling theorem has to be satisfied along the time axis on each measurement point. Two types of techniques were developed for such measurements: one is based on high-speed cameras and the other uses a single photodetector. The limitation of the measurement range along the time axis in camera-based technology is mainly due to the low capturing rate, while the photodetector-based technology can only do the measurement on a single point. In this paper, several aspects of these two technologies are discussed. For the camera-based interferometry, the discussion includes the introduction of the carrier, the processing of the recorded images, the phase extraction algorithms in various domains, and how to increase the temporal measurement range by using multiwavelength techniques. For the detector-based interferometry, the discussion mainly focuses on the single-point and multipoint laser Doppler vibrometers and their applications for measurement under extreme conditions. The results show the effort done by researchers for the improvement of the measurement capabilities using interferometry-based techniques to cover the requirements needed for the industrial applications. PMID:24963503

  14. Interferometric dynamic measurement: techniques based on high-speed imaging or a single photodetector.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Li, Xide

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, optical interferometry-based techniques have been widely used to perform noncontact measurement of dynamic deformation in different industrial areas. In these applications, various physical quantities need to be measured in any instant and the Nyquist sampling theorem has to be satisfied along the time axis on each measurement point. Two types of techniques were developed for such measurements: one is based on high-speed cameras and the other uses a single photodetector. The limitation of the measurement range along the time axis in camera-based technology is mainly due to the low capturing rate, while the photodetector-based technology can only do the measurement on a single point. In this paper, several aspects of these two technologies are discussed. For the camera-based interferometry, the discussion includes the introduction of the carrier, the processing of the recorded images, the phase extraction algorithms in various domains, and how to increase the temporal measurement range by using multiwavelength techniques. For the detector-based interferometry, the discussion mainly focuses on the single-point and multipoint laser Doppler vibrometers and their applications for measurement under extreme conditions. The results show the effort done by researchers for the improvement of the measurement capabilities using interferometry-based techniques to cover the requirements needed for the industrial applications. PMID:24963503

  15. Imaging systems and applications.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Gisele; Catrysse, Peter B; Farrell, Joyce E; Fowler, Boyd; Mait, Joseph N

    2012-02-01

    Imaging systems are used in consumer, medical, and military applications. Designing, developing, and building imaging systems requires a multidisciplinary approach. This issue features current research in imaging systems that ranges from fundamental theories to novel applications. Although the papers collected are diverse, their unique compilation provides a systems perspective to imaging. PMID:22307134

  16. Stellar Rotation and Proto-Planetary Disks: What Interferometric Imaging and High Cadence Photometry Can Tell Us

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, James; White, R. J.; Plavchan, P.; Monnier, J. D.; Baron, F.; Henry, G. W.; Kloppenborg, B. K.; Che, X.; Schaefer, G.; Zhao, M.; Jones, J.; Pedretti, E.; Thureau, N.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Farrington, C. D.; McAlister, H. A.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N. H.; Ridgway, S. T.

    2013-01-01

    Presented are the results of a dissertation project. We present the first interferometric images of cool starspots on the magnetically active giant lambda Andromeda (Lam And). The 12 images span various rotational phases in 2010 and 2011, which allow us to directly characterize the starspot's temperature, location and size. Stellar rotation can be identified in the 6 images from 2011 that comprise ~40% of one rotation of Lam And. In a complementary starspot study, we highlight results of a 3 year near-IR photometric monitoring of young stars in the rho Ophiuchus star-forming region based on 2MASS calibration field observations. Of 101 variable stars identified, 32 exhibit periodic variability. For 6 variable stars, two different physical mechanisms are believed to be operating concurrently. The variability of 3 of these stars is believed to be caused by periodic occulations of spotted star, potentially sustained or driven by a proto-planet or a warped disk, at or near the co-rotation radius.

  17. Neutron Imaging and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Ian S; McGreevy, Robert L; Bilheux, Hassina Z

    2009-04-01

    Neutron Imaging and Applications offers an introduction to the basics of neutron beam production and instrumentation in addition to the wide scope of techniques that provide unique imaging capabilities over a broad and diverse range of applications. An instructional overview of neutron sources, optics and detectors, allows readers to delve more deeply into the discussions of radiography, tomography, phase contrast imaging and prospective applications using advanced neutron holography techniques and polarized beams. A section devoted to overviews in a growing range of applications describes imaging of fuel cells and hydrogen storage devices for a robust hydrogen economy; new directions in material science and engineering; the investigation of precious artifacts of cultural heritage importance; determination of plant physiology and growth processes; imaging of biological tissues and macromolecules, and the practical elements of neutron imaging for homeland security and contraband detection. Written by key experts in the field, researchers and engineers involved with imaging technologies will find Neutron Imaging and Applications a valuable reference.

  18. Interferometric hard x-ray phase contrast imaging at 204 nm grating period

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Han; Gomella, Andrew A.; Miao, Houxun; Lynch, Susanna K.; Wolfe, Douglas E.; Xiao Xianghui; Liu Chian; Morgan, Nicole

    2013-01-15

    We report on hard x-ray phase contrast imaging experiments using a grating interferometer of approximately 1/10th the grating period achieved in previous studies. We designed the gratings as a staircase array of multilayer stacks which are fabricated in a single thin film deposition process. We performed the experiments at 19 keV x-ray energy and 0.8 {mu}m pixel resolution. The small grating period resulted in clear separation of different diffraction orders and multiple images on the detector. A slitted beam was used to remove overlap of the images from the different diffraction orders. The phase contrast images showed detailed features as small as 10 {mu}m, and demonstrated the feasibility of high resolution x-ray phase contrast imaging with nanometer scale gratings.

  19. Active control of a balanced two-stage pendulum vibration isolation system and its application to laser interferometric gravity wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Veitch, P.J.; Robertson, N.A.; Cantley, C.A.; Hough, J. )

    1993-05-01

    The investigation of the servo control of the position of the bottom mass in a balanced two-stage pendulum vibration isolation system is reported. Experimental results for a simple prototype system and predictions based on a model presented in this paper are in good agreement. The application of such a system to a high-sensitivity laser interferometric gravity wave detector is discussed.

  20. Interferometric Imaging with the 32 Element Murchison Wide-Field Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ord, S. M.; Mitchell, D. A.; Wayth, R. B.; Greenhill, L. J.; Bernardi, G.; Gleadow, S.; Edgar, R. G.; Clark, M. A.; Allen, G.; Arcus, W.; Benkevitch, L.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F. H.; Bunton, J. D.; Burns, S.; Cappallo, R. J.; Coles, W. A.; Corey, B. E.; deSouza, L.; Doeleman, S. S.; Derome, M.; Deshpande, A.; Emrich, D.; Goeke, R.; Gopalakrishna, M. R.; Herne, D.; Hewitt, J. N.; Kamini, P. A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kincaid, B. B.; Kocz, J.; Kowald, E.; Kratzenberg, E.; Kumar, D.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Madhavi, S.; Matejek, M.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Pathikulangara, J.; Prabu, T.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Salah, J. E.; Schinkel, A.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Stevens, J.; Tingay, S. J.; Vaccarella, A.; Waterson, M.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C.

    2010-11-01

    The Murchison Wide-Field Array (MWA) is a low-frequency radio telescope, currently under construction, intended to search for the spectral signature of the epoch of reionization (EOR) and to probe the structure of the solar corona. Sited in western Australia, the full MWA will comprise 8192 dipoles grouped into 512 tiles and will be capable of imaging the sky south of 40° declination, from 80 MHz to 300 MHz with an instantaneous field of view that is tens of degrees wide and a resolution of a few arcminutes. A 32 station prototype of the MWA has been recently commissioned and a set of observations has been taken that exercise the whole acquisition and processing pipeline. We present Stokes I, Q, and U images from two ~4 hr integrations of a field 20° wide centered on Pictoris A. These images demonstrate the capacity and stability of a real-time calibration and imaging technique employing the weighted addition of warped snapshots to counter extreme wide-field imaging distortions.

  1. Instrumental Direction-dependent Effects in Wide-field Wide-band Interferometric Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Sanjay; Rau, U.; Golap, K.

    2014-04-01

    Many next generation radio telescopes, some now in operation, offer significant improvement in the sensitivity and angular resolution compared to the telescopes operated in the past decades. This improvement in sensitivity is achieved with the use of wide-band receivers and larger collecting area. The effects of wide instantaneous fractional bandwidths that classical calibration and imaging algorithms ignore, lead to errors higher than the sensitivity that these new telescopes offer. Examples, relevant for some of the telescopes already in operation include the effects of time and frequency variant primary beams, frequency dependence of the emission from the sky and antenna pointing errors. The effects of wide fractional bandwidth and ionospheric phase screen limit the imaging performance below ~1 GHz. Additionally, significant variations in the shape of the wide-band primary beams (PB) for aperture array telescopes leads to errors of similar magnitude. Corrections for these effects increases the required computing power by many orders of magnitude. Furthermore, both wide fractional bandwidths and larger collecting area lead to many orders of magnitude increase in the data volume also, putting severe constraints on the run-time performance of the algorithms for calibration and imaging. In this talk, I will review the state-of-the-art algorithms for wide-field wide-band imaging and the run-time costs of the different approaches for correction of various direction-dependent effects and discuss the computational challenges in thermal noise-limited wide-field imaging with current and future radio telescopes.

  2. Imaging the bipolarity of myosin filaments with Interferometric Second Harmonic Generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Maxime; Couture, Charles-André; Miri, Amir K.; Laliberté, Mathieu; Bertrand-Grenier, Antony; Mongeau, Luc; Légaré, François

    2013-01-01

    We report that combining interferometry with Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy provides valuable information about the relative orientation of noncentrosymmetric structures composing tissues. This is confirmed through the imaging of rat medial gastrocnemius muscle. The inteferometric Second Harmonic Generation (ISHG) images reveal that each side of the myosin filaments composing the A band of the sarcomere generates π phase shifted SHG signal which implies that the myosin proteins at each end of the filaments are oriented in opposite directions. This highlights the bipolar structural organization of the myosin filaments and shows that muscles can be considered as a periodically poled biological structure. PMID:24156065

  3. WIDE-FIELD WIDE-BAND INTERFEROMETRIC IMAGING: THE WB A-PROJECTION AND HYBRID ALGORITHMS

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, S.; Rau, U.; Golap, K. E-mail: rurvashi@nrao.edu

    2013-06-20

    Variations of the antenna primary beam (PB) pattern as a function of time, frequency, and polarization form one of the dominant direction-dependent effects at most radio frequency bands. These gains may also vary from antenna to antenna. The A-Projection algorithm, published earlier, accounts for the effects of the narrow-band antenna PB in full polarization. In this paper, we present the wide-band A-Projection algorithm (WB A-Projection) to include the effects of wide bandwidth in the A-term itself and show that the resulting algorithm simultaneously corrects for the time, frequency, and polarization dependence of the PB. We discuss the combination of the WB A-Projection and the multi-term multi-frequency synthesis (MT-MFS) algorithm for simultaneous mapping of the sky brightness distribution and the spectral index distribution across a wide field of view. We also discuss the use of the narrow-band A-Projection algorithm in hybrid imaging schemes that account for the frequency dependence of the PB in the image domain.

  4. Wide-field wide-band Interferometric Imaging: The WB A-Projection and Hybrid Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, S.; Rau, U.; Golap, K.

    2013-06-01

    Variations of the antenna primary beam (PB) pattern as a function of time, frequency, and polarization form one of the dominant direction-dependent effects at most radio frequency bands. These gains may also vary from antenna to antenna. The A-Projection algorithm, published earlier, accounts for the effects of the narrow-band antenna PB in full polarization. In this paper, we present the wide-band A-Projection algorithm (WB A-Projection) to include the effects of wide bandwidth in the A-term itself and show that the resulting algorithm simultaneously corrects for the time, frequency, and polarization dependence of the PB. We discuss the combination of the WB A-Projection and the multi-term multi-frequency synthesis (MT-MFS) algorithm for simultaneous mapping of the sky brightness distribution and the spectral index distribution across a wide field of view. We also discuss the use of the narrow-band A-Projection algorithm in hybrid imaging schemes that account for the frequency dependence of the PB in the image domain.

  5. Diameter measurement of single-mode fiber by using interferometric and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Joenathan, C; Bunch, R M

    1993-10-20

    Two methods to measure the cladding diameter of single-mode fibers are presented. The first method is based on an interference fringe measurement technique. Interference fringe spacing at two different planes is measured to determine the cladding diameter of the fiber. The theory of the fringe formation in the interferometeric arrangement using single-mode fibers is discussed. It is theoretically shown that the far-field overlapping Gaussian field distribution from the fibers shifts the position of the fringe maxima and minima. As a special case of unit fringe visibility the minima positions do not shift, whereasthe maxima positions are shifted. In the case of a Lloyd mirror arrangement it is shown that fringes can be obtained from a rough surface as well. A lens is used in the second method to image the two identical point sources that cause the interference. Through the use of the magnification and spacing of the images, the cladding diameter is estimated. It is shown that the accuracy of the fiber cladding-diameter measurement can be enhanced by generating multiple point sources. Consistent results of the fiber cladding diameter have been obtained with the proposed methods. Fiber cladding-diameter measurements with a standard error of less than 0.15 µm can be achieved. PMID:20856425

  6. FAST TRACK PAPER: Evaluation of elastodynamic interferometric redatuming: a synthetic study on salt dome flank imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Rongrong; Willis, Mark E.; Campman, Xander H.; Toksöz, M. Nafi

    2009-03-01

    The recent introduction of novel redatuming techniques, based on the principles of time-reversed acoustics and source-receiver reciprocity, has allowed seismic measurements collected on one datum to be extrapolated to another datum. Under favourable conditions, this process can approximately remove the complicated overburden structures without any velocity information. We introduce an elastic redatuming scheme for walkaway vertical seismic profiles (WVSPs) based on these principles, using P- and S-wave potentials, which are derived from the spatial derivatives of the measured wavefields. Additional field acquisition is utilized to directly measure these derivatives. We test our elastic redatuming scheme on data simulated with an elastic finite difference algorithm. The elastodynamic Green's functions between multicomponent receivers in a borehole are then extracted from data recorded using multicomponent (P- and S-wave) sources at the surface. The wavefields are redatumed as four parts: two related to the P-wave potential, and another two related to the S-wave potential. These parts are migrated separately and form four independent images of the salt dome flank, providing a more complete elastic description of the subsurface.

  7. Interferometric rotation sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, T. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An interferometric rotation sensor and control system is provided which includes a compound prism interferometer and an associated direction control system. Light entering the interferometer is split into two paths with the light in the respective paths being reflected an unequal number of times, and then being recombined at an exit aperture in phase differing relationships. Incoming light is deviated from the optical axis of the device by an angle, alpha. The angle causes a similar displacement of the two component images at the exit aperture which results in a fringe pattern. Fringe numbers are directly related to angle alpha. Various control systems of the interferometer are given.

  8. Linear interferometric image processing for analysis of a particle in a volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Qieni; Wang, Xiang; Lü, Tong; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Yimo

    2014-04-01

    A method of extracting the number of fringes/fringe spacing of compression interferogram based on a wavelet-matched filter and Fourier transform technique is proposed, and sub-pixel accuracy of the extracted frequency is achieved by the modified Rife algorithm. Both numerical simulation and experimental measurement are carried out to verify the performance of the method. The measurement uncertainty is ± 1.118 μm and the absolute error is 1.873 μm for standard particles of diameter 45 μm. The research results show that the algorithm presented in this paper is feasible, and is promising for application to a high-density spray field.

  9. Applications of Radar Interferometric Techniques to Assess Natural Hazards and their Controlling Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, M.; Becker, R.; Gebremichael, E.; Othman, A.; Emil, M.; Ahmed, M.; Elkadiri, R.; Pankratz, H. G.; Chouinard, K.

    2015-12-01

    Radar interferometric techniques including Persistent Scatterer (PS), Small BAseline Subset (SBAS), and two and three pass (differential interferometry) methods were applied to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) datasets. These include the European Space Agency (ESA) ERS-1, ERS-2, Environmental satellite (Envisat), and Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) to conduct the following: (1) map the spatial distribution of land deformation associated with a wide range of geologic settings, (2) quantify the rates of the observed land deformation, and (3) identify the factors controlling the observed deformation. The research topics/areas include: (1) subsidence associated with sediment compaction in a Delta setting (Nile Delta, Egypt), (2) deformation in a rifting setting (Red Sea rifting along the Red Sea coastal zone and proximal basement outcrops in Egypt and Saudi Arabia), (3) deformation associated with salt dome intrusion and the dissolution of sabkha deposits (Jazan area in Saudi Arabia), (4) mass transport associated with debris flows (Jazan area in Saudi Arabia), and (5) deformation preceding, contemporaneous with, or following large earthquakes (in Nepal; magnitude: 7.8; date: April, 25, 2015) and medium earthquakes (in Harrat Lunayyir volcanic field, central Saudi Arabia; magnitude: 5.7; date: May 19, 2009). The identification of the factor(s) controlling the observed deformation was attained through spatial correlation of extracted radar velocities with relevant temporal and static ground based and remotely sensed geological and cultural data sets (e.g., lithology, structure, precipitation, land use, and earthquake location, magnitude, and focal mechanism) in a Geographical Information System (GIS) environment.

  10. Nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boppart, Stephen A. (Inventor); Marks, Daniel L. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method of examining a sample, which includes: exposing a reference to a first set of electromagnetic radiation, to form a second set of electromagnetic radiation scattered from the reference; exposing a sample to a third set of electromagnetic radiation to form a fourth set of electromagnetic radiation scattered from the sample; and interfering the second set of electromagnetic radiation and the fourth set of electromagnetic radiation. The first set and the third set of electromagnetic radiation are generated from a source; at least a portion of the second set of electromagnetic radiation is of a frequency different from that of the first set of electromagnetic radiation; and at least a portion of the fourth set of electromagnetic radiation is of a frequency different from that of the third set of electromagnetic radiation.

  11. Meteorological image processing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bracken, P. A.; Dalton, J. T.; Hasler, A. F.; Adler, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Meteorologists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center are conducting an extensive program of research in weather and climate related phenomena. This paper focuses on meteorological image processing applications directed toward gaining a detailed understanding of severe weather phenomena. In addition, the paper discusses the ground data handling and image processing systems used at the Goddard Space Flight Center to support severe weather research activities and describes three specific meteorological studies which utilized these facilities.

  12. KaRIn on SWOT: modeling and simulation of near-nadir Ka-band interferometric SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjørtoft, Roger; Koudogbo, Fifamè; Duro, Javier; Ruiz, Christian; Gaudin, Jean-Marc; Mallet, Alain; Pourthie, Nadine; Lion, Christine; Ordoqui, Patrick; Arnaud, Alain

    2010-10-01

    The principal instrument of the wide-swath altimetry mission SWOT is KaRIn, a Ka-band interferometric SAR system operating on near-nadir swaths on both sides of the satellite track. Due to the short wavelength and particular observation geometry, there are very limited reports on the backscattering from natural surfaces. Simulators that cover both radiometric and geometric aspects are therefore developed in the framework of the CNES phase 0 and A studies of SWOT. This article presents the modeling and simulation approaches that have been adopted, and shows some preliminary simulation results.

  13. Combined optical micromanipulation and interferometric topography (COMMIT)

    PubMed Central

    Sarshar, Mohammad; Lu, Thompson; Anvari, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    Optical tweezers have emerged as a prominent light-based tool for pico-Newton (pN) force microscopy in mechanobiological studies. However, the efficacy of optical tweezers are limited in applications where concurrent metrology of the nano-sized structures under interrogation is essential to the quantitative analysis of its mechanical properties and various mechanotransduction events. We have developed an all-optical platform delivering pN force resolution in parallel with nano-scale structural imaging of the biological sample by combining optical tweezers with interferometric quantitative phase microscopy. These capabilities allow real-time micromanipulation and label-free measurement of sample’s nanostructures and nanomechanical responses, opening avenues to a wide range of new research possibilities and applications in biology. PMID:27446661

  14. High Temperature Millimeter Wave Radiometric and Interferometric Measurements of Slag-Refractory Interaction for Application to Coal Gasifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCloy, John S.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Slaugh, Ryan; Woskov, Paul P.

    2011-11-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) radiometry can be used for simultaneous measurement of emissivity and temperature of materials under extreme environments such as in slagging coal gasifiers, where sensors have been identified as a key enabling technology need for process optimization. We present a dual-channel MMW heterodyne radiometer with active interferometric capability that allows simultaneous measurements of sample temperature, emissivity, and flow dynamics. Interferometric capability at 137 GHz is supplied via a probe signal originating from a local oscillator allowing monitoring of sample dynamics such as volume expansion and thickness change. This capability has been used to monitor characteristic behavior between refractories and slag such as slag infiltration, slag melting, viscous flow, foaming, and crucible corrosion by the molten slag. These results show the promise of the MMW system for extracting process parameters from operating slagging coal gasifiers, providing valuable information for process efficiency, control, and increased productivity.

  15. High temperature millimeter wave radiometric and interferometric measurements of slag-refractory interaction for application to coal gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2011-09-17

    Millimeter wave (MMW) radiometry can be used for simultaneous measurement of emissivity and temperature of materials under extreme environments (high temperature, pressure, and corrosive environments) such as in slagging coal gasifiers, where sensors have been identified as a key enabling technology need for process optimization. We present a state-of-the-art dual-channel MMW heterodyne radiometer with active interferometric capability that allows simultaneous radiometric measurements of sample temperature, emissivity, and flow dynamics to over 1873 K. Interferometric capability is supplied via a probe signal originating from the 137 GHz radiometer local oscillator (LO). The interferometric 'video' channels allow measurement of additional parameters simultaneously, such as volume expansion, thickness change, and slag viscosity along with temperature or emissivity. This capability has been used to demonstrate measurement of temperature and simulated coal slag infiltration into a chromia refractory brick sample as well as slag flow down a vertically placed refractory brick. Observed phenomena include slag melting and slumping, slag reboil and foam with oxygen evolution, and eventual failure of the alumina crucible through corrosion by the molten slag. These results show the promise of the MMW system for extracting quantitative and qualitative process parameters from operating slagging coal gasifiers, providing valuable information for process efficiency, control, and increased productivity.

  16. Interferometric phase-contrast X-ray CT imaging of VX2 rabbit cancer at 35keV X-ray energy

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Tohoru; Wu Jin; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Lwin, Thet-Thet; Itai, Yuji; Yoneyama, Akio; Hyodo, Kazuyuki

    2004-05-12

    Imaging of large objects at 17.7-keV low x-ray energy causes huge x-ray exposure to the objects even using interferometric phase-contrast x-ray CT (PCCT). Thus, we tried to obtain PCCT images at high x-ray energy of 35keV and examined the image quality using a formalin-fixed VX2 rabbit cancer specimen with 15-mm in diameter. The PCCT system consisted of an asymmetrically cut silicon (220) crystal, a monolithic x-ray interferometer, a phase-shifter, an object cell and an x-ray CCD camera. The PCCT at 35 keV clearly visualized various inner structures of VX2 rabbit cancer such as necrosis, cancer, the surrounding tumor vessels, and normal liver tissue. Besides, image-contrast was not degraded significantly. These results suggest that the PCCT at 35 KeV is sufficient to clearly depict the histopathological morphology of VX2 rabbit cancer specimen.

  17. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, Tyler S.; Marks, Daniel L.; Scott Carney, P.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2007-02-01

    State-of-the-art methods in high-resolution three-dimensional optical microscopy require that the focus be scanned through the entire region of interest. However, an analysis of the physics of the light-sample interaction reveals that the Fourier-space coverage is independent of depth. Here we show that, by solving the inverse scattering problem for interference microscopy, computed reconstruction yields volumes with a resolution in all planes that is equivalent to the resolution achieved only at the focal plane for conventional high-resolution microscopy. In short, the entire illuminated volume has spatially invariant resolution, thus eliminating the compromise between resolution and depth of field. We describe and demonstrate a novel computational image-formation technique called interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM). ISAM has the potential to broadly impact real-time three-dimensional microscopy and analysis in the fields of cell and tumour biology, as well as in clinical diagnosis where in vivo imaging is preferable to biopsy.

  18. Application and Evaluation of ALOS PALSAR Data for Monitoring of Mining Induced Surface Deformations Using Interferometric Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Diana; Wegmuller, Urs; Spreckels, Volker; Busch, Wolfgang

    2008-11-01

    The main objective of the projects "Determination of ground motions in mining areas by interferometric analyses of ALOS data" (ALOS ADEN 3576, ESA) and "Monitoring of mining induced surface deformation" (ALOS-RA-094, JAXA) is to evaluate PALSAR data for surface deformation monitoring, using interferometric techniques. We present monitoring results of surface movements for an active hard coal colliery of the German hard coal mining company RAG Deutsche Steinkohle (RAG). Underground mining activities lead to ground movements at the surface with maximum subsidence rates of about 10cm per month for the test site. In these projects the L-band sensor clearly demonstrates the good potential for deformation monitoring in active mining areas, especially in rural areas. In comparison to C-band sensors we clearly observe advantages in resolving the high deformation gradients that are present in this area and we achieve a more complete spatial coverage than with C-band. Extensive validation data based on levelling data and GPS measurements are available within RAǴs GIS based database "GeoMon" and thus enable an adequate analysis of the quality of the interferometric results. Previous analyses confirm the good accuracy of PALSAR data for deformation monitoring in mining areas. Furthermore, we present results of special investigations like precision geocoding of PALSAR data and corner reflector analysis. At present only DInSAR results are obtained due to the currently available number of PALSAR scenes. For the future we plan to also apply Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) using longer series of PALSAR data.

  19. Interferometric Plasmonic Lensing with Nanohole Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-12-18

    Nonlinear photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) of nanohole arrays in gold films maps propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) launched from lithographically patterned structures. Strong near field photoemission patterns are observed in the PEEM images, recorded following low angle of incidence irradiation of nanohole arrays with sub-15 fs laser pulses centered at 780 nm. The recorded photoemission patterns are attributed to constructive and destructive interferences between PSPs launched from the individual nanoholes which comprise the array. By exploiting the wave nature of PSPs, we demonstrate how varying the array geometry (hole diameter, pitch, and number of rows/columns) ultimately yields intense localized photoemission. Through a combination of PEEM and finite-difference time-domain simulations, we identify the optimal array geometry for efficient light coupling and interferometric plasmonic lensing. We show a preliminary application of inteferometric plasmonic lensing by enhancing the photoemission from the vertex of a gold triangle using nanohole array.

  20. An Automated Mapping Processor using C-Band Interferometric SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Michel, T. R.; Martin, J. M.; Houshmand, B.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a processor which has been implemented to generate map products starting from C-band interferometric data. The first stage of the processor consists of the conventional interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing producing a digital elevation model (DEM) and a SAR brightness image in sensor coordinates. In the second stage of processing, a land use classification map is obtained by using the DEM, brightness, and interferometric correlation layers. Auxiliary layers which include a drainage layer, a height gradient layer, a height error layer, an estimated penetration layer, and a shaded relief layer are also computed. In the final step, all UTM collocated layers are combined in a geographical information system (GIS) which allows for both hard copy map products and digital applications.

  1. An Automated Mapping Processor Using C-Band Interferometric SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Michel, T. R.; Martin, J. M.; Houshmand, B.

    1996-01-01

    We present the description of a processor which has been implemented to generate map products starting from C-band interferometric data. The first stage of the processor consists of the conventional interferometric SAR processing producing a Digital Elevation Model (DEMs) and a SAR brightness image in sensor coordinates. In the second stage of processing, a land use classification map is obtained by using the DEM, brightness, and interferometric correlation layers. Auxiliary layers which include a drainage layer, a height gradient layer, a height error layer, an estimated penetration layer, and a shaded relief layer are also computed. In the final step, all UTM collocated layers are combined in a GIS system which allows for both hard copy map products and for digital applications.

  2. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, Tyler S.

    State-of-the-art interferometric microscopies have problems representing objects that lie outside of the focus because the defocus and diffraction effects are not accounted for in the processing. These problems occur because of the lack of comprehensive models to include the scattering effects in the processing. In this dissertation, a new modality in three-dimensional (3D) optical microscopy, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM), is introduced to account for the scattering effects. Comprehensive models for interferometric microscopy, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) are developed, for which forward, adjoint, normal, and inverse operators are formulated. Using an accurate model for the probe beam, the resulting algorithms demonstrate accurate linear estimation of the susceptibility of an object from the interferometric data. Using the regularized least squares solution, an ISAM reconstruction of underlying object structure having spatially invariant resolution is obtained from simulated and experimental interferometric data, even in regions outside of the focal plane of the lens. Two-dimensional (2D) and 3D interferometric data is used to resolve objects outside of the confocal region with minimal loss of resolution, unlike in OCT. Therefore, high-resolution details are recovered from outside of the confocal region. Models and solutions are presented for the planar-scanned, the rotationally scanned, and the full-field illuminated geometry. The models and algorithms presented account for the effects of a finite beam width, the source spectrum, the illumination and collection fields, as well as defocus, diffraction and dispersion effects.

  3. Applications of Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Galbán, Craig; Galbán, Stefanie; Van Dort, Marcian; Luker, Gary D.; Bhojani, Mahaveer S.; Rehemtualla, Alnawaz; Ross, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Today molecular imaging technologies play a central role in clinical oncology. The use of imaging techniques in early cancer detection, treatment response and new therapy development is steadily growing and has already significantly impacted clinical management of cancer. In this chapter we will overview three different molecular imaging technologies used for the understanding of disease biomarkers, drug development, or monitoring therapeutic outcome. They are (1) optical imaging (bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging) (2) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and (3) nuclear imaging (e.g, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET)). We will review the use of molecular reporters of biological processes (e.g. apoptosis and protein kinase activity) for high throughput drug screening and new cancer therapies, diffusion MRI as a biomarker for early treatment response and PET and SPECT radioligands in oncology. PMID:21075334

  4. A methodology for outperforming filtering results in the interferometric process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saqellari-Likoka, A.; Karathanassi, V.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a method for reducing the filtering effects on the interferometric phase signal is proposed. Theoretical analysis showed that while noise reduction is maximized after filtering, the loose of interferometric phase signal is also maximized. This state has been also verified by observations on SAR interferometric data where pixels with high coherence value, which are assumed to contain a lot of information, presented lower coherence values after SAR image filtering. The proposed method performs interferometric phase modeling. The method recovers the signal after the interferometric filtering for the pixels that loss of information is observed. The selection of these pixels is based on the decrease of their coherence value after the filtering. Signal recovery is associated to the preservation of the initial values for these pixels. Consequently, the method prevents the decrease of the coherence values for these pixels. Performance of the method depends on the performance of the used filter; however, it always improves the interferometric results. Since the phase signal is the basis for the DEM production, its preservation improves all the steps of the interferometric procedure, especially the phase unwapping. Effects of the method on the final interferometric product, the DEM, are also evident. The proposed method was evaluated using real interferometric data. Experiments showed that the applied filters within this study, did not always improve the accuracy of the produced DEM. Sub-images for which filtering does not improve their mean coherence value have been selected and the proposed method has been applied. For these sub-images, coherence values and RMS errors of the produced DEMs showed that the method improves the results of the interferometric procedure. It compensates the negative effects of the filtering for these sub-images and leads to the improvement of the DEM accuracy in the majority of the cases.

  5. Identifying and discriminating phase transitions along decaying shocks with line imaging Doppler interferometric velocimetry and streaked optical pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millot, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast line-imaging velocity interferometer system for any reflector and streaked optical pyrometry are now commonly used to obtain high precision equation of state and electronic transport data under dynamic compression at major high energy density science facilities. We describe a simple way to improve distinguishing phase transformation signatures from other signals when monitoring decaying shock waves. The line-imaging capability of these optical diagnostics offers additional supporting evidence to the assignment of particular anomalies—such as plateaus or reversals—to the occurrence of a phase transition along the Hugoniot. We illustrate the discussion with two example datasets collected during laser driven shock compression of quartz and stishovite.

  6. Robust high-contrast companion detection from interferometric observations. The CANDID algorithm and an application to six binary Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallenne, A.; Mérand, A.; Kervella, P.; Monnier, J. D.; Schaefer, G. H.; Baron, F.; Breitfelder, J.; Le Bouquin, J. B.; Roettenbacher, R. M.; Gieren, W.; Pietrzyński, G.; McAlister, H.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.; Ridgway, S.; Kraus, S.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Long-baseline interferometry is an important technique to spatially resolve binary or multiple systems in close orbits. By combining several telescopes together and spectrally dispersing the light, it is possible to detect faint components around bright stars in a few hours of observations. Aims: We provide a rigorous and detailed method to search for high-contrast companions around stars, determine the detection level, and estimate the dynamic range from interferometric observations. Methods: We developed the code CANDID (Companion Analysis and Non-Detection in Interferometric Data), a set of Python tools that allows us to search systematically for point-source, high-contrast companions and estimate the detection limit using all interferometric observables, i.e., the squared visibilities, closure phases and bispectrum amplitudes. The search procedure is made on a N × N grid of fit, whose minimum needed resolution is estimated a posteriori. It includes a tool to estimate the detection level of the companion in the number of sigmas. The code CANDID also incorporates a robust method to set a 3σ detection limit on the flux ratio, which is based on an analytical injection of a fake companion at each point in the grid. Our injection method also allows us to analytically remove a detected component to 1) search for a second companion; and 2) set an unbiased detection limit. Results: We used CANDID to search for the companions around the binary Cepheids V1334 Cyg, AX Cir, RT Aur, AW Per, SU Cas, and T Vul. First, we showed that our previous discoveries of the components orbiting V1334 Cyg and AX Cir were detected at >25σ and >13σ, respectively. The astrometric positions and flux ratios provided by CANDID for these two stars are in good agreement with our previously published values. The companion around AW Per is detected at more than 15σ with a flux ratio of f = 1.22 ± 0.30%, and it is located at ρ = 32.16 ± 0.29 mas and PA = 67.1 ± 0.3°. We made a

  7. Robust snapshot interferometric spectropolarimetry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daesuk; Seo, Yoonho; Yoon, Yonghee; Dembele, Vamara; Yoon, Jae Woong; Lee, Kyu Jin; Magnusson, Robert

    2016-05-15

    This Letter describes a Stokes vector measurement method based on a snapshot interferometric common-path spectropolarimeter. The proposed scheme, which employs an interferometric polarization-modulation module, can extract the spectral polarimetric parameters Ψ(k) and Δ(k) of a transmissive anisotropic object by which an accurate Stokes vector can be calculated in the spectral domain. It is inherently strongly robust to the object 3D pose variation, since it is designed distinctly so that the measured object can be placed outside of the interferometric module. Experiments are conducted to verify the feasibility of the proposed system. The proposed snapshot scheme enables us to extract the spectral Stokes vector of a transmissive anisotropic object within tens of msec with high accuracy. PMID:27176992

  8. Polarization-sensitive interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    South, Fredrick A.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Xu, Yang; Shemonski, Nathan D.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional optical microscopy suffers from the well-known compromise between transverse resolution and depth-of-field. This is true for both structural imaging methods and their functional extensions. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) is a solution to the 3D coherent microscopy inverse problem that provides depth-independent transverse resolution. We demonstrate the extension of ISAM to polarization sensitive imaging, termed polarization-sensitive interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (PS-ISAM). This technique is the first functionalization of the ISAM method and provides improved depth-of-field for polarization-sensitive imaging. The basic assumptions of polarization-sensitive imaging are explored, and refocusing of birefringent structures is experimentally demonstrated. PS-ISAM enables high-resolution volumetric imaging of birefringent materials and tissue.

  9. Real applications of quantum imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genovese, Marco

    2016-07-01

    In previous years the possibility of creating and manipulating quantum states of light has paved the way for the development of new technologies exploiting peculiar properties of quantum states, such as quantum information, quantum metrology and sensing, quantum imaging, etc. In particular quantum imaging addresses the possibility of overcoming limits of classical optics by using quantum resources such as entanglement or sub-Poissonian statistics. Albeit, quantum imaging is a more recent field than other quantum technologies, e.g. quantum information, it is now mature enough for application. Several different protocols have been proposed, some of them only theoretically, others with an experimental implementation and a few of them pointing to a clear application. Here we present a few of the most mature protocols ranging from ghost imaging to sub shot noise imaging and sub-Rayleigh imaging.

  10. Imaging spectrometry for ecological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, Paul J.

    Imaging spectrometry from aircraft or satellite borne sensors has many potential ecological applications. This paper reviews its use for the remote sensing of foliar biochemical concentration, as this is an ecological application of remote sensing that is unique to imaging spectrometry. Attention is focussed on the development of methodologies, drawing where relevant on theory and techniques from both outside and inside remote sensing. Examples from the fields of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and geological remote sensing, along with an extensive reference list, provide an introduction to some of the ecological opportunities offered by imaging spectrometry.

  11. The Fringe-Imaging Skin Friction Technique PC Application User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Gregory G.

    1999-01-01

    A personal computer application (CXWIN4G) has been written which greatly simplifies the task of extracting skin friction measurements from interferograms of oil flows on the surface of wind tunnel models. Images are first calibrated, using a novel approach to one-camera photogrammetry, to obtain accurate spatial information on surfaces with curvature. As part of the image calibration process, an auxiliary file containing the wind tunnel model geometry is used in conjunction with a two-dimensional direct linear transformation to relate the image plane to the physical (model) coordinates. The application then applies a nonlinear regression model to accurately determine the fringe spacing from interferometric intensity records as required by the Fringe Imaging Skin Friction (FISF) technique. The skin friction is found through application of a simple expression that makes use of lubrication theory to relate fringe spacing to skin friction.

  12. BIOLUMINESCENCE IMAGING: PROGRESS AND APPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Christian E.; Tannous, Bakhos A.

    2015-01-01

    Application of bioluminescence imaging has grown tremendously in the past decade and has significantly contributed to the core conceptual advances in biomedical research. This technology provides valuable means for monitoring of different biological processes for immunology, oncology, virology and neuroscience. In this review, we will discuss current trends in bioluminescence and its application in different fields with emphasis on cancer research. PMID:21788092

  13. Real-time interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ralston, Tyler S; Marks, Daniel L; Carney, P Scott; Boppart, Stephen A

    2008-02-18

    An interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) system design with real-time 2D cross-sectional processing is described in detail. The system can acquire, process, and display the ISAM reconstructed images at frame rates of 2.25 frames per second for 512 X 1024 pixel images. This system provides quantitatively meaningful structural information from previously indistinguishable scattering intensities and provides proof of feasibility for future real-time ISAM systems. PMID:18542337

  14. Interferometric SAR coherence classification utility assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, D.A.

    1998-03-01

    The classification utility of a dual-antenna interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) is explored by comparison of maximum likelihood classification results for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) intensity images and IPSAR intensity and coherence images. The addition of IFSAR coherence improves the overall classification accuracy for classes of trees, water, and fields. A threshold intensity-coherence classifier is also compared to the intensity-only classification results.

  15. Determination of forced convection parameters by interferometric imaging of the concentration field during growth of KDP crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sunil; Muralidhar, K.

    2011-07-01

    Growth of a potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal from its aqueous solution has been considered under forced convection conditions. The KDP crystal is grown in a conventional top hanging geometry. Forced convection conditions are created by rotating the crystal about a vertical axis. The rotational RPM is varied in a cycle, creating an accelerated rotation (AR) paradigm. The effect of varying the rotational RPM on the concentration field around the crystal was investigated. Mach-Zehnder interferometry was adopted as an optical technique to image the evolving concentration fields. Six different experiments were performed to obtain the specific set of time periods and rotation rates of the acceleration cycle that result in a uniform concentration field around the growing crystal. The Reynolds number, an index of the strength of forced convection, was optimized through the experiments. The optimized parameters of the accelerated rotation cycle were found to be as follows: maximum rotation rate of 32 RPM, spin up period=40 s, spin down period=40 s, steady period=40 s, and stationary period=40 s. The parametric study further revealed that concentration was highly sensitive to the maximum rotation rate adopted during the AR cycle. It did not depend crucially on the time periods that could be varied by as much as ±25% around the respective average values. Finally, a KDP crystal was grown using the optimized forced convection parameters and the crystal quality was found to be good.

  16. Multi-colour microscopic interferometry for optical metrology and imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Pramanik, Manojit; Nandigana, Krishna Mohan; Kothiyal, Mahendra Prasad

    2016-09-01

    Interferometry has been widely used for optical metrology and imaging applications because of their precision, reliability, and versatility. Although single-wavelength interferometery can provide high sensitivity and resolution, it has several drawbacks, namely, it fails to quantify large-discontinuities, large-deformations, and shape of unpolished surfaces. Multiple-wavelength techniques have been successfully used to overcome the drawbacks associated with single wavelength analysis. The use of colour CCD camera allows simultaneous acquisition of multiple interferograms. The advances in colour CCD cameras and image processing techniques have made the multi-colour interferometry a faster, simpler, and cost-effective tool for industrial applications. This article reviews the recent advances in multi-colour interferometric techniques and their demanding applications for characterization of micro-systems, non-destructive testing, and bio-imaging applications.

  17. High-accuracy simultaneous measurement of particle size and location using interferometric out-of-focus imaging.

    PubMed

    Qieni, Lu; Kan, Han; Baozhen, Ge; Xiang, Wang

    2016-07-25

    A method based on unidirectional gradient-matched algorithm and Fourier transform technique is proposed to simultaneously extract the location and the number of fringes/fringe spacing of a particle interferogram. The position coordinate (x,y) of a particle can be determined with high accuracy because of the elimination of the fringe within the particle fringe pattern. Furthermore, the method can be employed to achieve sub-pixel frequency extraction when combined with an improved Rife algorithm. The performance of the method has been verified by numerical simulations and experimental measurements. The results suggest that the method presented here is highly beneficial to applications such as spray, in accurately measuring both the particle size and its location. PMID:27464108

  18. Industrial Applications of Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciora, Radu Adrian; Simion, Carmen Mihaela

    2014-11-01

    The recent advances in sensors quality and processing power provide us with excellent tools for designing more complex image processing and pattern recognition tasks. In this paper we review the existing applications of image processing and pattern recognition in industrial engineering. First we define the role of vision in an industrial. Then a dissemination of some image processing techniques, feature extraction, object recognition and industrial robotic guidance is presented. Moreover, examples of implementations of such techniques in industry are presented. Such implementations include automated visual inspection, process control, part identification, robots control. Finally, we present some conclusions regarding the investigated topics and directions for future investigation

  19. Industrial Applications of Terahertz Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitler, J. Axel; Shen, Yao-Chun

    This chapter gives a concise overview of potential industrial applications for terahertz imaging that have been reported over the past decade with a discussion of the major advantages and limitations of each approach. In the second half of the chapter we discuss in more detail how terahertz imaging can be used to investigate the microstructure of pharmaceutical dosage forms. A particular focus in this context is the nondestructive measurement of the coating thickness of polymer coated tablets, both by means of high resolution offline imaging in research and development as well as for in-line quality control during production.

  20. Source Detection with Interferometric Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trott, Cathryn M.; Wayth, Randall B.; Macquart, Jean-Pierre R.; Tingay, Steven J.

    2012-04-01

    The detection of sources in interferometric radio data typically relies on extracting information from images, formed by Fourier transform of the underlying visibility dataset, and CLEANed of contaminating sidelobes through iterative deconvolution. Variable and transient radio sources span a large range of variability timescales, and their study has the potential to enhance our knowledge of the dynamic universe. Their detection and classification involve large data rates and non-stationary PSFs, commensal observing programs and ambitious science goals, and will demand a paradigm shift in the deployment of next-generation instruments. Optimal source detection and classification in real time requires efficient and automated algorithms. On short time-scales variability can be probed with an optimal matched filter detector applied directly to the visibility dataset. This paper shows the design of such a detector, and some preliminary detection performance results.

  1. Detection of Fast Transients with Radio Interferometric Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Chengalur, J. N.; Cox, P. J.; Gupta, Y.; Prasad, J.; Roy, J.; Bailes, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Kudale, S. S.; van Straten, W.

    2013-05-01

    Next-generation radio arrays, including the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its pathfinders, will open up new avenues for exciting transient science at radio wavelengths. Their innovative designs, comprising a large number of small elements, pose several challenges in digital processing and optimal observing strategies. The Giant Metre-wave Radio Telescope (GMRT) presents an excellent test-bed for developing and validating suitable observing modes and strategies for transient experiments with future arrays. Here we describe the first phase of the ongoing development of a transient detection system for GMRT that is planned to eventually function in a commensal mode with other observing programs. It capitalizes on the GMRT's interferometric and sub-array capabilities, and the versatility of a new software backend. We outline considerations in the plan and design of transient exploration programs with interferometric arrays, and describe a pilot survey that was undertaken to aid in the development of algorithms and associated analysis software. This survey was conducted at 325 and 610 MHz, and covered 360 deg2 of the sky with short dwell times. It provides large volumes of real data that can be used to test the efficacies of various algorithms and observing strategies applicable for transient detection. We present examples that illustrate the methodologies of detecting short-duration transients, including the use of sub-arrays for higher resilience to spurious events of terrestrial origin, localization of candidate events via imaging, and the use of a phased array for improved signal detection and confirmation. In addition to demonstrating applications of interferometric arrays for fast transient exploration, our efforts mark important steps in the roadmap toward SKA-era science.

  2. DETECTION OF FAST TRANSIENTS WITH RADIO INTERFEROMETRIC ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Chengalur, J. N.; Gupta, Y.; Prasad, J.; Roy, J.; Kudale, S. S.; Cox, P. J.; Bailes, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Van Straten, W.

    2013-05-01

    Next-generation radio arrays, including the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its pathfinders, will open up new avenues for exciting transient science at radio wavelengths. Their innovative designs, comprising a large number of small elements, pose several challenges in digital processing and optimal observing strategies. The Giant Metre-wave Radio Telescope (GMRT) presents an excellent test-bed for developing and validating suitable observing modes and strategies for transient experiments with future arrays. Here we describe the first phase of the ongoing development of a transient detection system for GMRT that is planned to eventually function in a commensal mode with other observing programs. It capitalizes on the GMRT's interferometric and sub-array capabilities, and the versatility of a new software backend. We outline considerations in the plan and design of transient exploration programs with interferometric arrays, and describe a pilot survey that was undertaken to aid in the development of algorithms and associated analysis software. This survey was conducted at 325 and 610 MHz, and covered 360 deg{sup 2} of the sky with short dwell times. It provides large volumes of real data that can be used to test the efficacies of various algorithms and observing strategies applicable for transient detection. We present examples that illustrate the methodologies of detecting short-duration transients, including the use of sub-arrays for higher resilience to spurious events of terrestrial origin, localization of candidate events via imaging, and the use of a phased array for improved signal detection and confirmation. In addition to demonstrating applications of interferometric arrays for fast transient exploration, our efforts mark important steps in the roadmap toward SKA-era science.

  3. Fast interferometric second harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Couture, Charles-André; Légaré, Katherine; Pinsard, Maxime; Rivard, Maxime; Brown, Cameron; Légaré, François

    2016-01-01

    We report the implementation of fast Interferometric Second Harmonic Generation (I-SHG) microscopy to study the polarity of non-centrosymmetric structures in biological tissues. Using a sample quartz plate, we calibrate the spatially varying phase shift introduced by the laser scanning system. Compensating this phase shift allows us to retrieve the correct phase distribution in periodically poled lithium niobate, used as a model sample. Finally, we used fast interferometric second harmonic generation microscopy to acquire phase images in tendon. Our results show that the method exposed here, using a laser scanning system, allows to recover the polarity of collagen fibrils, similarly to standard I-SHG (using a sample scanning system), but with an imaging time about 40 times shorter. PMID:26977349

  4. Multifocal interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Chng, Xiong Kai Benjamin; Adie, Steven G.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Scott Carney, P.

    2014-01-01

    There is an inherent trade-off between transverse resolution and depth of field (DOF) in optical coherence tomography (OCT) which becomes a limiting factor for certain applications. Multifocal OCT and interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) each provide a distinct solution to the trade-off through modification to the experiment or via post-processing, respectively. In this paper, we have solved the inverse problem of multifocal OCT and present a general algorithm for combining multiple ISAM datasets. Multifocal ISAM (MISAM) uses a regularized combination of the resampled datasets to bring advantages of both multifocal OCT and ISAM to achieve optimal transverse resolution, extended effective DOF and improved signal-to-noise ratio. We present theory, simulation and experimental results. PMID:24977909

  5. Multifocal interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Chng, Xiong Kai Benjamin; Adie, Steven G; Boppart, Stephen A; Carney, P Scott

    2014-06-30

    There is an inherent trade-off between transverse resolution and depth of field (DOF) in optical coherence tomography (OCT) which becomes a limiting factor for certain applications. Multifocal OCT and interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) each provide a distinct solution to the trade-off through modification to the experiment or via post-processing, respectively. In this paper, we have solved the inverse problem of multifocal OCT and present a general algorithm for combining multiple ISAM datasets. Multifocal ISAM (MISAM) uses a regularized combination of the resampled datasets to bring advantages of both multifocal OCT and ISAM to achieve optimal transverse resolution, extended effective DOF and improved signal-to-noise ratio. We present theory, simulation and experimental results. PMID:24977909

  6. Radio-interferometric tracking using fault-tolerant phase unwrapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachár, Gergely; Simon, Gyula

    2016-04-01

    A novel radio-interferometric measurement method for tracking applications is proposed. Fixed radio transceiver nodes are used to generate interferometric signals, allowing the tracking of a moving object equipped with a radio receiver. Low-frequency phase measurements of the interferometric signals are processed by the proposed simultaneous phase unwrapping algorithm, and then the real-time position estimates are calculated. The performance of the tracking system is analyzed by simulations and real measurements, indicating that the proposed method tolerates well substantial measurement phase noise and even sporadic large measurement errors.

  7. Derivation of terrain slope from SAR interferometric phase gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegmueller, Urs; Werner, Charles L.; Rosen, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between the gradient of the interferometric phase and the terrain slope, which, it is thought, would allow a derivation of the terrain slopes without phase unwrapping, is presented. A linear relationship between the interferometric phase gradient and the terrain slopes was found. A quantitative error analysis showed that only very small errors are introduced by these approximations for orbital Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) geometries. An example of a slope map for repeat pass interferometry from ERS-1 SAR data is given. A number of direct and indirect applications of the terrain slope are indicated: erosion and avalanche hazard studies, radiometric calibration of SAR data, and normalization of the interferometric correlation coefficient.

  8. Full-field interferometric confocal microscopy using a VCSEL array

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Brandon; Bromberg, Yaron; Choma, Michael A.; Cao, Hui

    2014-01-01

    We present an interferometric confocal microscope using an array of 1200 VCSELs coupled to a multimode fiber. Spatial coherence gating provides ~18,000 continuous virtual pinholes allowing an entire en face plane to be imaged in a snapshot. This approach maintains the same optical sectioning as a scanning confocal microscope without moving parts, while the high power of the VCSEL array (~5 mW per laser) enables high-speed image acquisition with integration times as short as 100 µs. Interferometric detection also recovers the phase of the image, enabling quantitative phase measurements and improving the contrast when imaging phase objects. PMID:25078199

  9. Image wavelet decomposition and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treil, N.; Mallat, S.; Bajcsy, R.

    1989-01-01

    The general problem of computer vision has been investigated for more that 20 years and is still one of the most challenging fields in artificial intelligence. Indeed, taking a look at the human visual system can give us an idea of the complexity of any solution to the problem of visual recognition. This general task can be decomposed into a whole hierarchy of problems ranging from pixel processing to high level segmentation and complex objects recognition. Contrasting an image at different representations provides useful information such as edges. An example of low level signal and image processing using the theory of wavelets is introduced which provides the basis for multiresolution representation. Like the human brain, we use a multiorientation process which detects features independently in different orientation sectors. So, images of the same orientation but of different resolutions are contrasted to gather information about an image. An interesting image representation using energy zero crossings is developed. This representation is shown to be experimentally complete and leads to some higher level applications such as edge and corner finding, which in turn provides two basic steps to image segmentation. The possibilities of feedback between different levels of processing are also discussed.

  10. Computational adaptive optics for broadband optical interferometric tomography of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boppart, Stephen A.

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution real-time tomography of biological tissues is important for many areas of biological investigations and medical applications. Cellular level optical tomography, however, has been challenging because of the compromise between transverse imaging resolution and depth-of-field, the system and sample aberrations that may be present, and the low imaging sensitivity deep in scattering tissues. The use of computed optical imaging techniques has the potential to address several of these long-standing limitations and challenges. Two related techniques are interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) and computational adaptive optics (CAO). Through three-dimensional Fourierdomain resampling, in combination with high-speed OCT, ISAM can be used to achieve high-resolution in vivo tomography with enhanced depth sensitivity over a depth-of-field extended by more than an order-of-magnitude, in realtime. Subsequently, aberration correction with CAO can be performed in a tomogram, rather than to the optical beam of a broadband optical interferometry system. Based on principles of Fourier optics, aberration correction with CAO is performed on a virtual pupil using Zernike polynomials, offering the potential to augment or even replace the more complicated and expensive adaptive optics hardware with algorithms implemented on a standard desktop computer. Interferometric tomographic reconstructions are characterized with tissue phantoms containing sub-resolution scattering particles, and in both ex vivo and in vivo biological tissue. This review will collectively establish the foundation for high-speed volumetric cellular-level optical interferometric tomography in living tissues.

  11. Multipulse interferometric frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C.W.; Siders, J.L.W.; Omenetto, F.G.; Taylor, A.J.

    1999-04-01

    The authors review multipulse interferometric frequency-resolved optical gating (MI-FROG) as a technique, uniquely suited for pump-probe coherent spectroscopy using amplified visible and near-infrared short-pulse systems and/or emissive targets, for time-resolving ultrafast phase shifts and intensity changes. Application of polarization-gate MI-FROG to the study of ultrafast ionization in gases is presented.

  12. TE/TM Simulations of Interferometric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houshmand, Bijan

    2000-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) measurements at X-, C-, L-, and P-band are used to derive ground topography at meter level resolution. Interpretation of the derived topography requires attention due to the complex interaction of the radar signal with ground cover. The presence of penetrable surfaces such as vegetation, and tree canopies poses a challenge since the depth of penetration depends on a number of parameters such as the operating radar frequency, polarization, incident angle, as well as terrain structure. The dependence of the reconstructed topography on polarization may lead to the characterization of the ground cover. Simulation of interferometric measurements is useful for interpretation of the derived topography (B. Houshmand, Proceedings of URSI, 314, 1997). In this talk , time domain simulations for interferometric measurement for TE- and TM- polarization are presented. Time domain simulation includes the effects of the surface material property as well geometry comparable the radar signal wavelength (B. Houshmand, Proceedings of the URSI, 25, 1998). The IFSAR simulation is carried out in two steps. First, the forward scattering data is generated based on full wave analysis. Next, the electromagnetic information is inverted to generate surface topography. This inversion is based on the well known IFSAR processing technique which is composed of signal compression, and formation of an interferogram. The full wave forward scattering data is generated by the scattered-field formulation of the FDTD algorithm. The simulation is carried out by exciting the computational domain by a radar signal. The scattered field is then computed and translated to the receiving interferometric antennas using the time-domain Huygen's principle. The inversion process starts by compressing the time-domain data. The range compressed data from both receivers are then coregistered to form an interferogram. The resulting interferogram is then related to the

  13. Planning applications in image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boddy, Mark; White, Jim; Goldman, Robert; Short, Nick, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    We describe two interim results from an ongoing effort to automate the acquisition, analysis, archiving, and distribution of satellite earth science data. Both results are applications of Artificial Intelligence planning research to the automatic generation of processing steps for image analysis tasks. First, we have constructed a linear conditional planner (CPed), used to generate conditional processing plans. Second, we have extended an existing hierarchical planning system to make use of durations, resources, and deadlines, thus supporting the automatic generation of processing steps in time and resource-constrained environments.

  14. Bayes classification of interferometric TOPSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, T. R.; Rodriguez, E.; Houshmand, B.; Carande, R.

    1995-01-01

    We report the Bayes classification of terrain types at different sites using airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) data. A Gaussian maximum likelihood classifier was applied on multidimensional observations derived from the SAR intensity, the terrain elevation model, and the magnitude of the interferometric correlation. Training sets for forested, urban, agricultural, or bare areas were obtained either by selecting samples with known ground truth, or by k-means clustering of random sets of samples uniformly distributed across all sites, and subsequent assignments of these clusters using ground truth. The accuracy of the classifier was used to optimize the discriminating efficiency of the set of features that was chosen. The most important features include the SAR intensity, a canopy penetration depth model, and the terrain slope. We demonstrate the classifier's performance across sites using a unique set of training classes for the four main terrain categories. The scenes examined include San Francisco (CA) (predominantly urban and water), Mount Adams (WA) (forested with clear cuts), Pasadena (CA) (urban with mountains), and Antioch Hills (CA) (water, swamps, fields). Issues related to the effects of image calibration and the robustness of the classification to calibration errors are explored. The relative performance of single polarization Interferometric data classification is contrasted against classification schemes based on polarimetric SAR data.

  15. Crustal-scale interferometric imaging in the Malargüe region, Argentina, with P-wave coda and multidimensional deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishitsuji, Yohei; Minato, Shohei; Hartstra, Iris; Boullenger, Boris; Wapenaar, Kees; Gomez, Martín; Draganov, Deyan

    2016-04-01

    Several seismic investigations - using receiver-function methods as well as tomographic approaches - have been carried out in the Malargüe region (Argentina) for various purposes over a few decades. We use a body-wave seismic interferometry (SI) approach to retrieve reflections later used for the consecutive imaging of the subsurface. We investigate the applicability of the body-wave SI using P-wave coda from local earthquakes with the aim to retrieve reflection responses from a part of the Andean crust below the seismic array we use. We called our technique local-earthquake P-wave coda (LEPC) SI. In this presentation, we show three different LEPC SI results based on three different SI theories: crosscorrelation, crosscoherence, and multidimensional deconvolution. We find that, from a structural-interpretation point of view, multidimensional deconvolution based on the truncated singular-value decomposition scheme provides us with a better structural imaging than the other SI approaches. We interpret deep thrust faults in the imaging results from LEPC SI, whose presence in this region has previously been indicated from interpretation of active seismic-survey data and exploration-well data. We also interpret dimmed-amplitude parts in the reflection image as possible melting zones that have been previously indicated by magnetotelluric methods. The LEPC SI method we propose could be used as a low-cost alternative to active-source seismic surveys for imaging and monitoring purposes of deeper geothermal reservoirs, e.g. in enhanced geothermal systems where the target structures are down to 10 km depth.

  16. Nonclassical light in interferometric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, N. A.; Difiore, L.; Romano, R.; Solimeno, S.; Zaccaria, F.; Manko, Margarita A.; Manko, Vladimir I.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the even and odd coherent light and other nonclassical states of light like superposition of coherent states with different phases may replace the squeezed light in an interferometric gravitational wave detector to increase its sensitivity.

  17. Application of iterative blind deconvolution to the reconstruction of LBT LINC-NIRVANA images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desiderá, G.; Anconelli, B.; Bertero, M.; Boccacci, P.; Carbillet, M.

    2006-06-01

    Context: .The paper is about methods for multiple image deconvolution and their application to the reconstruction of the images acquired by the Fizeau interferometer, denoted LINC-NIRVANA, under development for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The multiple images of the same target are obtained with different orientations of the baseline. Aims: .To propose and develop a blind method for dealing with cases where no knowledge or very poor knowledge of the point spread functions (PSF) is available. Methods: .The approach is an iterative one where object and PSFs are alternately updated using deconvolution methods related to the standard Richardson-Lucy method. It is basically an extension, to the multiple image case, of iterative blind deconvolution methods proposed in the case of a single image. Results: .The method is applied to simulated LBT LINC-NIRVANA images and its limitations are investigated. The algorithm has been implemented in the module BLI of the software package AIRY (Astronomical Image Reconstruction in interferometrY), available under request. The preliminary results we have obtained are promising but an extensive simulation program is still necessary for a full understanding of the applicability of the method in the practice of the reconstruction of LINC-NIRVANA images.

  18. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar terrain elevation mapping from multiple observations

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiglia, D.C.; Wahl, D.E.

    1994-07-01

    All prior interferometric SAR imaging experiments to date dealt with pairwise processing. Simultaneous image collections from two antenna systems or two-pass single antenna collections are processed as interferometric pairs to extract corresponding pixel by pixel phase differences which encode terrain elevation height. The phase differences are wrapped values which must be unwrapped and scaled to yield terrain height. We propose two major classes of techniques that hold promise for robust multibaseline (multiple pair) interferometric SAR terrain elevation mapping. The first builds on the capability of a recently published method for robust weighted and unweighted least-squares phase unwrapping, while the second attacks the problem directly in a maximum likelihood (ML) formulation. We will provide several examples (actual and simulated SAR imagery) that illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  19. Electromagnetic Imaging Methods for Nondestructive Evaluation Applications

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yiming; Liu, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic nondestructive tests are important and widely used within the field of nondestructive evaluation (NDE). The recent advances in sensing technology, hardware and software development dedicated to imaging and image processing, and material sciences have greatly expanded the application fields, sophisticated the systems design and made the potential of electromagnetic NDE imaging seemingly unlimited. This review provides a comprehensive summary of research works on electromagnetic imaging methods for NDE applications, followed by the summary and discussions on future directions. PMID:22247693

  20. New approaches in interferometric SAR data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Qian; Vesecky, John F.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1992-01-01

    It is well established that interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images can be inverted to perform surface elevation mapping. Among the factors critical to the mapping accuracy are registration of the interfering SAR images and phase unwrapping. A novel registration algorithm is presented that determines the registration parameters through optimization. A new figure of merit is proposed that evaluates the registration result during the optimization. The phase unwrapping problem is approached through a new method involving fringe line detection. The algorithms are tested with two SEASAT SAR images of terrain near Yellowstone National Park. These images were collected on Seasat orbits 1334 and 1420, which were very close together in space, i.e., less than 100 m. The resultant elevation map is compared with the USGS digital terrain elevation model.

  1. uvmcmcfit: Parametric models to interferometric data fitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussmann, Shane; Leung, Tsz Kuk (Daisy); Conley, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Uvmcmcfit fits parametric models to interferometric data. It is ideally suited to extract the maximum amount of information from marginally resolved observations with interferometers like the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), Submillimeter Array (SMA), and Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI). uvmcmcfit uses emcee (ascl:1303.002) to do Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and can measure the goodness of fit from visibilities rather than deconvolved images, an advantage when there is strong gravitational lensing and in other situations. uvmcmcfit includes a pure-Python adaptation of Miriad’s (ascl:1106.007) uvmodel task to generate simulated visibilities given observed visibilities and a model image and a simple ray-tracing routine that allows it to account for both strongly lensed systems (where multiple images of the lensed galaxy are detected) and weakly lensed systems (where only a single image of the lensed galaxy is detected).

  2. Application of graphically oriented programming to imaging of structure deterioration of historic glass by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylwestrzak, Marcin; Kwiatkowska, Ewa A.; Karaszkiewicz, Pawel; Iwanicka, Magdalena; Targowski, Piotr

    2009-07-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an interferometric method utilising light of low temporal coherence for noninvasive structural imaging of objects weakly absorbing and scattering light. In this contribution, using various examples of images of objects made of glass affected by the atmospheric corrosion and/or by crizzling, we demonstrate a software developed in our laboratory specifically for 3D OCT imaging of samples with a fine structure. For this task we employed the OpenGL platform (Open Graphics Library), an Application Programming Interface (API) for writing applications dedicated to interactive 3D computer graphics. In our application we have utilized texture rendering with a modulation of transparency and a colour as a function of elevation.

  3. Interferometric radar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ronald A.; Shipman, Mark; Holder, E. J.; Williams, James K.

    2002-08-01

    The United States Army Space and Missile Defense Command (USASMDC) has interest in a technology demonstration that capitalizes on investment in fire control and smart interceptor technologies that have matured beyond basic research. The concept SWORD (Short range missile defense With Optimized Radar Distribution) consists of a novel approach utilizing a missile interceptor and interferometric fire control radar. A hit-to-kill, closed-loop, command guidance scheme is planned that takes advantage of extremely accurate target and interceptor state vectors derived via the fire control radar. The fire control system has the capability to detect, track, and classify multiple threats in a tactical regime as well as simultaneously provide command guidance updates to multiple missile interceptors. The missile interceptor offers a cost reduction potential as well as an enhancement to the kinematics range and lethality over existing SHORAD systems. Additionally, the Radio Frequency (RF) guidance scheme offers increased battlefield weather performance. The Air Defense (AD) community, responding to current threat capabilities and trends, has identified an urgent need to have a capability to counter proliferated, low cost threats with a low cost-per-kill weapon system. The SWORD system will offer a solution that meets this need. The SWORD critical technologies will be identified including a detailed description of each. Validated test results and basic principles of operation will be presented to prove the merit of past investments. The Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology (DAS(R&T) has a three- year Science and Technology Program to evaluate the errors and proposed mitigation techniques associated with target spectral dispersion and range gate straddle. Preliminary bench-top experiment results will be presented in this paper.

  4. Optical spatial heterodyne interferometric Fourier transform technique (OSHIFT) and a resulting interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georges, James A., III

    2007-09-01

    This article reports on the novel patent pending Optical Spatial Heterodyne Interferometric Fourier Transform Technique (the OSHIFT technique), the resulting interferometer also referred to as OSHIFT, and its preliminary results. OSHIFT was borne out of the following requirements: wavefront sensitivity on the order of 1/100 waves, high-frequency wavefront spatial sampling, snapshot 100Hz operation, and the ability to deal with discontinuous wavefronts. The first two capabilities lend themselves to the use of traditional interferometric techniques; however, the last two prove difficult for standard techniques, e.g., phase shifting interferometry tends to take a time sequence of images and most interferometers require estimation of a center fringe across wavefront discontinuities. OSHIFT overcomes these challenges by employing a spatial heterodyning concept in the Fourier (image) plane of the optic-under-test. This concept, the mathematical theory, an autocorrelation view of operation, and the design with results of OSHIFT will be discussed. Also discussed will be future concepts such as a sensor that could interrogate an entire imaging system as well as a methodology to create innovative imaging systems that encode wavefront information onto the image. Certain techniques and systems described in this paper are the subject of a patent application currently pending in the United States Patent Office.

  5. An extensible imaging platform for optical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, Gianluca; Azar, Fred S.

    2009-02-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has recently developed an extensible imaging platform (XIP), a new open-source software development platform. XIP can be used to rapidly develop imaging applications designed to meet the needs of the optical imaging community. XIP is a state-of-the-art set of visual 'drag and drop' programming tools and associated libraries for rapid prototyping and application development. The tools include modules tailored for medical imaging, many of which are GPU hardware accelerated. They also provide a friendlier environment for utilizing popular toolkits such as ITK and VTK, and enable the visualization and processing of optical imaging data and standard DICOM data. XIP has built-in functionality for multidimensional data visualization and processing, and enables the development of independently optimized and re-usable software modules, which can be seamlessly added and interconnected to build advanced applications. XIP applications can run "stand alone", including in client/server mode for remote access. XIP also supports the DICOM WG23 "Application Hosting" standard, which will enable plug-in XIP applications to run on any DICOM host workstation. Such interoperability will enable the optical imaging community to develop and deploy modular applications across all academic/clinical/industry partners with WG23 compliant imaging workstations.

  6. A geometry-based image search engine for advanced RADARSAT-1/2 GIS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotamraju, Vinay; Rabus, Bernhard; Busler, Jennifer

    2012-06-01

    Space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors, such as RADARSAT-1 and -2, enable a multitude of defense and security applications owing to their unique capabilities of cloud penetration, day/night imaging and multi-polarization imaging. As a result, advanced SAR image time series exploitation techniques such as Interferometric SAR (InSAR) and Radargrammetry are now routinely used in applications such as underground tunnel monitoring, infrastructure monitoring and DEM generation. Imaging geometry, as determined by the satellite orbit and imaged terrain, plays a critical role in the success of such techniques. This paper describes the architecture and the current status of development of a geometry-based search engine that allows the search and visualization of archived and future RADARSAT-1 and -2 images appropriate for a variety of advanced SAR techniques and applications. Key features of the search engine's scalable architecture include (a) Interactive GIS-based visualization of the search results; (b) A client-server architecture for online access that produces up-to-date searches of the archive images and that can, in future, be extended to acquisition planning; (c) A techniquespecific search mode, wherein an expert user explicitly sets search parameters to find appropriate images for advanced SAR techniques such as InSAR and Radargrammetry; (d) A future application-specific search mode, wherein all search parameters implicitly default to preset values according to the application of choice such as tunnel monitoring, DEM generation and deformation mapping; (f) Accurate baseline calculations for InSAR searches, and, optimum beam configuration for Radargrammetric searches; (g) Simulated quick look images and technique-specific sensitivity maps in the future.

  7. Imaging Strategies for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seung Yun; Ricles, Laura M.; Suggs, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering has evolved with multifaceted research being conducted using advanced technologies, and it is progressing toward clinical applications. As tissue engineering technology significantly advances, it proceeds toward increasing sophistication, including nanoscale strategies for material construction and synergetic methods for combining with cells, growth factors, or other macromolecules. Therefore, to assess advanced tissue-engineered constructs, tissue engineers need versatile imaging methods capable of monitoring not only morphological but also functional and molecular information. However, there is no single imaging modality that is suitable for all tissue-engineered constructs. Each imaging method has its own range of applications and provides information based on the specific properties of the imaging technique. Therefore, according to the requirements of the tissue engineering studies, the most appropriate tool should be selected among a variety of imaging modalities. The goal of this review article is to describe available biomedical imaging methods to assess tissue engineering applications and to provide tissue engineers with criteria and insights for determining the best imaging strategies. Commonly used biomedical imaging modalities, including X-ray and computed tomography, positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, optical imaging, and emerging techniques and multimodal imaging, will be discussed, focusing on the latest trends of their applications in recent tissue engineering studies. PMID:25012069

  8. Applications Of Image Processing In Criminalistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krile, Thomas F.; Walkup, John F.; Barsallo, Adonis; Olimb, Hal; Tarng, Jaw-Horng

    1987-01-01

    A review of some basic image processing techniques for enhancement and restoration of images is given. Both digital and optical approaches are discussed. Fingerprint images are used as examples to illustrate the various processing techniques and their potential applications in criminalistics.

  9. Brain Imaging: Applications in Psychiatry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreasen, Nancy C.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses various brain imaging techniques, including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, measurement of regional cerebral blood flow, single photo emission tomography, and position emission tomography. Describes the uses of these techniques in helping to understand brain functioning. (TW)

  10. Optical design of interferometric telescopes with wide fields of view.

    PubMed

    Sabatke, Erin E; Burge, James H; Hinz, Philip

    2006-11-01

    The performance of wide-field multiple-aperture imaging systems is dominated by easily understood, low-order errors. Each aperture produces an individual image, each pair of apertures produces a set of fringes under a diffraction envelope, and the system bandwidth produces a coherence envelope. For wide-field imaging, each of these elements must be coincident in the image plane as the field angle changes. We explore the causes of image degradation, derive first-order rules for preserving image quality across field, and give an example design that enforces some of the rules to achieve a relatively wide-field interferometric imaging telescope. PMID:17068543

  11. Interferometric SAR phase difference calibration: Methods and results

    SciTech Connect

    Bickel, D.L.; Hensley, W.H.

    1993-12-31

    This paper addresses the steps necessary to determine and maintain the phase calibration of a two-channel interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR). The method, setup, and accuracy of four different calibration techniques are compared. The most novel technique involves pointing the interferometric baseline at nadir and imaging a lake surface. The other techniques include measuring various flat surfaces in traditional side-looking IFSAR maps, in-flight closed-loop calibration path measurements, and static laboratory measurements. Initial results indicate that, using combinations of these measurements, it is possible to maintain the interferometric phase calibration of Sandia National Laboratories` K{sub U} Band IFSAR to better than 3 degrees. The time variability of various parts of the calibration and requirements for recalibration are also discussed.

  12. Mass spectrometry imaging for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangjiang; Ouyang, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The development of mass spectrometry imaging technologies is of significant current research interest. Mass spectrometry potentially is capable of providing highly specific information about the distribution of chemical compounds on tissues at highly sensitive levels. The required in-situ analysis for the tissue imaging forced MS analysis being performed off the traditional conditions optimized in pharmaceutical applications with intense sample preparation. This critical review seeks to present an overview of the current status of the MS imaging with different sampling ionization methods and to discuss the 3D imaging and quantitative imaging capabilities needed to be further developed, the importance of the multi-modal imaging, and a balance between the pursuit of the high imaging resolution and the practical application of MS imaging in biomedicine. PMID:23539099

  13. Mobile radio interferometric geodetic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.; Niell, A. E.; Ong, K. M.; Resch, G. M.; Morabito, D. D.; Claflin, E. S.; Lockhart, T. G.

    1978-01-01

    Operation of the Astronomical Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying (ARIES) in a proof of concept mode is discussed. Accuracy demonstrations over a short baseline, a 180 km baseline, and a 380 km baseline are documented. Use of ARIES in the Sea Slope Experiment of the National Geodetic Survey to study the apparent differences between oceanographic and geodetic leveling determinations of the sea surface along the Pacific Coast is described. Intergration of the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System and a concept called SERIES (Satellite Emission Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying) is briefly reviewed.

  14. Application of image fusion techniques in DSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Feng; Wu, Jian; Cui, Zhiming; Xu, Jing

    2007-12-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is an important technology in both medical diagnoses and interposal therapy, which can eliminate the interferential background and give prominence to blood vessels by computer processing. After contrast material is injected into an artery or vein, a physician produces fluoroscopic images. Using these digitized images, a computer subtracts the image made with contrast material from a series of post injection images made without background information. By analyzing the characteristics of DSA medical images, this paper provides a solution of image fusion which is in allusion to the application of DSA subtraction. We fuse the images of angiogram and subtraction, in order to obtain the new image which has more data information. The image that fused by wavelet transform can display the blood vessels and background information clearly, and medical experts gave high score on the effect of it.

  15. New formulation for interferometric synthetic aperture radar for terrain mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Jakowatz, C.V. Jr.; Wahl, D.E.; Eichel, P.H.; Thompson, P.A.

    1994-04-01

    The subject of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) for high-accuracy terrain elevation mapping continues to gain importance in the arena of radar signal processing. Applications to problems in precision terrain-aided guidance and automatic target recognition, as well as a variety of civil applications, are being studied by a number of researchers. Not unlike many other areas of SAR processing, the subject of IFSAR can at first glance appear to be somewhat mysterious. In this paper we show how the mathematics of IFSAR for terrain elevation mapping using a pair of spotlight mode SAR collections can be derived in a very straightforward manner. Here, we employ an approach that relies entirely on three-dimensional Fourier transforms, and utilizes no reference to range equations or Doppler concepts. The result is a simplified explanation of the fundamentals of interferometry, including an easily-seen link between image domain phase difference and terrain elevation height. The derivation builds upon previous work by the authors in which a framework for spotlight mode SAR image formation based on an analogy to three-dimensional computerized axial tomography (CAT) was developed. After outlining the major steps in the mathematics, we show how a computer simulator which utilizes three-dimensional Fourier transforms can be constructed that demonstrates all of the major aspects of IFSAR from spotlight mode collections.

  16. Petrophysical applications of NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, W.P.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1985-12-01

    A system for obtaining high-resolution NMR images of oil field cores is described. Separate proton density and T/sub 2/ relaxation images are obtained to distinguish spatial variations of fluid-filled porosity and the physical nature of the pores. Results are presented for typical sandstones.

  17. Lens-Free Imaging for Biological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Bok; Bae, Hojae; Koo, Kyo-in; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Ozcan, Aydogan; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Lens-free (or lensless) imaging is emerging as a cost-effective, compact, and lightweight detection method that can serve numerous biological applications. Lens-free imaging can generate high-resolution images within a field-portable platform, which is ideal for affordable point-of-care devices aiming at resource-limited settings. In this mini-review, we first describe different modes of operation for lens-free imaging and then highlight several recent biological applications of this emerging platform technology. PMID:22357607

  18. Medical imaging applications of amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Mireshghi, A.; Drewery, J.S.; Hong, W.S.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Lee, H.K.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1994-07-01

    Two dimensional hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) pixel arrays are good candidates as flat-panel imagers for applications in medical imaging. Various performance characteristics of these imagers are reviewed and compared with currently used equipments. An important component in the a-Si:H imager is the scintillator screen. A new approach for fabrication of high resolution CsI(Tl) scintillator layers, appropriate for coupling to a-Si:H arrays, are presented. For nuclear medicine applications, a new a-Si:H based gamma camera is introduced and Monte Carlo simulation is used to evaluate its performance.

  19. Laser imaging for clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Houten, John P.; Cheong, Wai-Fung; Kermit, Eben L.; King, Richard A.; Spilman, Stanley D.; Benaron, David A.

    1995-03-01

    Medical optical imaging (MOI) uses light emitted into opaque tissues in order to determine the interior structure and chemical content. These optical techniques have been developed in an attempt to prospectively identify impending brain injuries before they become irreversible, thus allowing injury to be avoided or minimized. Optical imaging and spectroscopy center around the simple idea that light passes through the body in small amounts, and emerges bearing clues about tissues through which it passed. Images can be reconstructed from such data, and this is the basis of optical tomography. Over the past few years, techniques have been developed to allow construction of images from such optical data at the bedside. We have used a time-of-flight system reported earlier to monitor oxygenation and image hemorrhage in neonatal brain. This article summarizes the problems that we believe can be addressed by such techniques, and reports on some of our early results.

  20. Passive terahertz imaging for security application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lan-tao; Deng, Chao; Zhao, Yuan-meng; Zhang, Cun-lin

    2013-08-01

    The passive detection is safe for passengers and operators as no radiation. Therefore, passive terahertz (THz) imaging can be applied to human body security check. Imaging in the THz band offers the unique property of being able to identify object through a range of materials. Therefore passive THz imaging is meaningful for security applications. This attribute has always been of interest to both the civil and military marks with applications. We took advantage of a single THz detector and a trihedral scanning mirror to propose another passive THz beam scanning imaging method. This method overcame the deficiencies of the serious decline in image quality due to the movement of the focused mirror. We exploited a THz scanning mirror with a trihedral scanning mirror and an ellipsoidal mirror to streamline the structure of the system and increase the scanning speed. Then the passive THz beam scanning imaging system was developed based on this method. The parameters were set as follows: the best imaging distance was 1.7m, the image height was 2m, the image width was 1m, the minimum imaging time of per frame was 8s, and the minimum resolution was 4cm. We imaged humans with different objects hidden under their clothes, such as fruit knife, belt buckle, mobile phone, screwdriver, bus cards, keys and other items. All the tested stuffs could be detected and recognized from the image.

  1. Graph theory for analyzing pair-wise data: application to geophysical model parameters estimated from interferometric synthetic aperture radar data at Okmok volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, Elena C.; Cardiff, Michael; Feigl, Kurt L.

    2016-07-01

    Graph theory is useful for analyzing time-dependent model parameters estimated from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data in the temporal domain. Plotting acquisition dates (epochs) as vertices and pair-wise interferometric combinations as edges defines an incidence graph. The edge-vertex incidence matrix and the normalized edge Laplacian matrix are factors in the covariance matrix for the pair-wise data. Using empirical measures of residual scatter in the pair-wise observations, we estimate the relative variance at each epoch by inverting the covariance of the pair-wise data. We evaluate the rank deficiency of the corresponding least-squares problem via the edge-vertex incidence matrix. We implement our method in a MATLAB software package called GraphTreeTA available on GitHub (https://github.com/feigl/gipht). We apply temporal adjustment to the data set described in Lu et al. (Geophys Res Solid Earth 110, 2005) at Okmok volcano, Alaska, which erupted most recently in 1997 and 2008. The data set contains 44 differential volumetric changes and uncertainties estimated from interferograms between 1997 and 2004. Estimates show that approximately half of the magma volume lost during the 1997 eruption was recovered by the summer of 2003. Between June 2002 and September 2003, the estimated rate of volumetric increase is (6.2 ± 0.6) × 10^6~m^3/year . Our preferred model provides a reasonable fit that is compatible with viscoelastic relaxation in the five years following the 1997 eruption. Although we demonstrate the approach using volumetric rates of change, our formulation in terms of incidence graphs applies to any quantity derived from pair-wise differences, such as range change, range gradient, or atmospheric delay.

  2. Photoacoustic lifetime imaging and its biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qi

    Even though oxygen plays a crucial role in body function and cancer biology, methods of measuring oxygen level in tissue are all limited. The current gold standard relies on an invasive electrode for only single-point reading at a time. The photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI) approach overcomes these major limitations by applying photoacoustic probing to oxygen-sensitive optical transient absorption. The capability of assessing oxygen distribution is demonstrated by imaging tumor hypoxia in a small animal model, and monitoring changes of tissue oxygen induced by external modulations. Proposed applications of this imaging technique includes imaging-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT) and activatable probes for molecular imaging.

  3. Image registration for luminescent paint applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James H.; Mclachlan, Blair G.

    1993-01-01

    The use of pressure sensitive luminescent paints is a viable technique for the measurement of surface pressure on wind tunnel models. This technique requires data reduction of images obtained under known as well as test conditions and spatial transformation of the images. A general transform which registers images to subpixel accuracy is presented and the general characteristics of transforms for image registration and their derivation are discussed. Image resection and its applications are described. The mapping of pressure data to the three dimensional model surface for small wind tunnel models to a spatial accuracy of 0.5 percent of the model length is demonstrated.

  4. Interferometric tomography of continuous fields with incomplete projections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, Soyoung S.; Sun, Hogwei

    1988-01-01

    Interferometric tomography in the presence of an opaque object is investigated. The developed iterative algorithm does not need to augment the missing information. It is based on the successive reconstruction of the difference field, the difference between the object field to be reconstructed and its estimate, only in the difined region. The application of the algorithm results in stable convergence.

  5. Interferometric tomography of continuous fields with incomplete projections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, Soyoung S.; Sun, Hongwei

    1989-01-01

    Interferometric tomography in the presence of an opaque object has been investigated. In principle the developed iterative algorithm does not need to augment the missing information. It is based on the successive reconstruction of the difference field, the difference between the object field to be reconstructed and its estimate, in the defined region only. The application of the algorithm results in stable convergence.

  6. CMOS imager for pointing and tracking applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Sun, Chao (Inventor); Yang, Guang (Inventor); Heynssens, Julie B. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Systems and techniques to realize pointing and tracking applications with CMOS imaging devices. In general, in one implementation, the technique includes: sampling multiple rows and multiple columns of an active pixel sensor array into a memory array (e.g., an on-chip memory array), and reading out the multiple rows and multiple columns sampled in the memory array to provide image data with reduced motion artifact. Various operation modes may be provided, including TDS, CDS, CQS, a tracking mode to read out multiple windows, and/or a mode employing a sample-first-read-later readout scheme. The tracking mode can take advantage of a diagonal switch array. The diagonal switch array, the active pixel sensor array and the memory array can be integrated onto a single imager chip with a controller. This imager device can be part of a larger imaging system for both space-based applications and terrestrial applications.

  7. Small pixel uncooled imaging FPAs and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Richard; Franks, Glen; Lacroix, Daniel; Hyland, Sandra; Murphy, Robert

    2010-04-01

    BAE Systems continues to make dramatic progress in uncooled microbolometer sensors and applications. This paper will review the latest advancements in microbolometer technology at BAE Systems, including the development status of 17 micrometer pixel pitch detectors and imaging modules which are entering production and will be finding their way into BAE Systems products and applications. Benefits include increased die per wafer and potential benefits to SWAP for many applications. Applications include thermal weapons sights, thermal imaging modules for remote weapon stations, vehicle situational awareness sensors and mast/pole mounted sensors.

  8. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar imagery of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainsworth, T. L.; Cannella, M. E.; Jansen, R. W.; Chubb, S. R.; Carande, R. E.; Foley, E. W.; Goldstein, R. M.; Valenzuela, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    The advent of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) imagery brought to the ocean remote sensing field techniques used in radio astronomy. Whilst details of the interferometry differ between the two fields, the basic idea is the same: Use the phase information arising from positional differences of the radar receivers and/or transmitters to probe remote structures. The interferometric image is formed from two complex synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. These two images are of the same area but separated in time. Typically the time between these images is very short -- approximately 50 msec for the L-band AIRSAR (Airborne SAR). During this short period the radar scatterers on the ocean surface do not have time to significantly decorrelate. Hence the two SAR images will have the same amplitude, since both obtain the radar backscatter from essentially the same object. Although the ocean surface structure does not significantly decorrelate in 50 msec, surface features do have time to move. It is precisely the translation of scattering features across the ocean surface which gives rise to phase differences between the two SAR images. This phase difference is directly proportional to the range velocity of surface scatterers. The constant of proportionality is dependent upon the interferometric mode of operation.

  9. Prior image constrained image reconstruction in emerging computed tomography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Stephen T.

    Advances have been made in computed tomography (CT), especially in the past five years, by incorporating prior images into the image reconstruction process. In this dissertation, we investigate prior image constrained image reconstruction in three emerging CT applications: dual-energy CT, multi-energy photon-counting CT, and cone-beam CT in image-guided radiation therapy. First, we investigate the application of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) in dual-energy CT, which has been called "one of the hottest research areas in CT." Phantom and animal studies are conducted using a state-of-the-art 64-slice GE Discovery 750 HD CT scanner to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose reduction in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging. Second, we extend the application of PICCS from dual-energy CT to multi-energy photon-counting CT, which has been called "one of the 12 topics in CT to be critical in the next decade." Numerical simulations are conducted to generate multiple energy bin images for a photon-counting CT acquisition and to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose efficiency improvement. Third, we investigate the performance of a newly proposed prior image constrained scatter correction technique to correct scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT, which, when used in image-guided radiation therapy procedures, can assist in patient localization, and potentially, dose verification and adaptive radiation therapy. Phantom studies are conducted using a Varian 2100 EX system with an on-board imager to investigate the extent to which the prior image constrained scatter correction technique can mitigate scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT. Results show that these prior image constrained image reconstruction techniques can reduce radiation dose in dual-energy CT by 50% in phantom and animal studies in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging, can lead to radiation

  10. Medical Applications of Microwave Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao; Lim, Eng Gee; Tang, Yujun

    2014-01-01

    Ultrawide band (UWB) microwave imaging is a promising method for the detection of early stage breast cancer, based on the large contrast in electrical parameters between malignant tumour tissue and the surrounding normal breast-tissue. In this paper, the detection and imaging of a malignant tumour are performed through a tomographic based microwave system and signal processing. Simulations of the proposed system are performed and postimage processing is presented. Signal processing involves the extraction of tumour information from background information and then image reconstruction through the confocal method delay-and-sum algorithms. Ultimately, the revision of time-delay and the superposition of more tumour signals are applied to improve accuracy. PMID:25379515

  11. Computer image processing: Geologic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Computer image processing of digital data was performed to support several geological studies. The specific goals were to: (1) relate the mineral content to the spectral reflectance of certain geologic materials, (2) determine the influence of environmental factors, such as atmosphere and vegetation, and (3) improve image processing techniques. For detection of spectral differences related to mineralogy, the technique of band ratioing was found to be the most useful. The influence of atmospheric scattering and methods to correct for the scattering were also studied. Two techniques were used to correct for atmospheric effects: (1) dark object subtraction, (2) normalization of use of ground spectral measurements. Of the two, the first technique proved to be the most successful for removing the effects of atmospheric scattering. A digital mosaic was produced from two side-lapping LANDSAT frames. The advantages were that the same enhancement algorithm can be applied to both frames, and there is no seam where the two images are joined.

  12. (Sub)millimetre interferometric imaging of a sample of COSMOS/AzTEC submillimetre galaxies. I. Multiwavelength identifications and redshift distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miettinen, O.; Smolčić, V.; Novak, M.; Aravena, M.; Karim, A.; Masters, D.; Riechers, D. A.; Bussmann, R. S.; McCracken, H. J.; Ilbert, O.; Bertoldi, F.; Capak, P.; Feruglio, C.; Halliday, C.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Navarrete, F.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D.; Schinnerer, E.; Sheth, K.

    2015-05-01

    We used the Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) to map a sample of 15 submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) in the COSMOS field at the wavelength of 1.3 mm. The target SMGs were originally discovered in the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT)/AzTEC 1.1 mm continuum survey at S/N1.1 mm = 4-4.5. This paper presents, for the first time, interferometric millimetre-wavelength observations of these sources. The angular resolution of our observations, 1''&dotbelow;8, allowed us to accurately determine the positions of the target SMGs. Using a detection threshold of S/N1.3 mm> 4.5 regardless of multiwavelength counterpart association, and 4

  13. Analysis of material properties for MEMS using interferometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahony, Conor; Hill, Martin; Mathewson, Alan

    2003-03-01

    As the scope and depth of research into microelectromechanical systems increases, the issue of mechanical characterisation has emerged as a major consideration in device design. It is now common to include a set of test structures on a MEMS wafer for extraction of thin film material properties (in particular, residual stress and Young's modulus). These structures usually consist of micromachined beams and strain gauges, and measurement techniques include tensile testing, electromechanical characterisation, SEM imaging, and Raman spectroscopy. However, some of these tests are destructive and difficult to carry out at wafer scale. This work uses electrostatic actuation to pull fixed-fixed beams towards the substrate, and a white-light interferometer to record the beam deflection profile. Finite-element simulation software is employed to model this deflection, and to estimate the material properties which minimise the difference between the measured and simulated profiles. The test is non-destructive, suitable for wafer-level characterisation, and the structures involved require less die space than other methods. We have developed a 1.5mm surface micromachining process for the fabrication of composite and monolayer structures with applications in relay switching, optical imaging and radio-frequency components. This work presents results obtained using interferometric analysis for both monolayer (titanium) and composite (SiOx - metal) thin films fabricated with this process.

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS OF SPECTRAL IMAGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The utility of remote sensing using spectral imaging is just being realized through the investigation to a wide variety of environmental issues. Improved spectral and spatial resolution is very important to the detection of effects once regarded as unobservable. A current researc...

  15. Real-time spinning-disk interferometric immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Manoj M.; Inerowicz, Halina D.; Regnier, Fred E.; Nolte, David D.

    2004-06-01

    We describe real-time detection of antigen/antibody binding using a high-speed label-free interferometric detection technique. The sensor, called the BioCD, consists of microfabricated gold interferometric structures on 2" dielectric laser mirror substrates that spin at rates up to 6000 rpm. The interferometric microdiffraction elements operate in the linear sensitivity regime of the interferometer. Antibodies or proteins are immobilized on the gold interferometric structures through an intermediate thiol layer. The molecules are immobilized by application of reagents or samples to the disk while it is spinning. The centrifugal force distributes the sample over the sensor surface, causing a change in the optical phase of the interferometric element, which is detected in real-time using lock-in detection with small detection bandwidth. The thiolated BioCD is spun at 1500 rpm and anti-mouse IgG, rabbit IgG and mouse IgG are delivered in succession to the sensor surface with potash buffered saline (PBS) wash cycles interspersed between each exposure to remove excess unbound proteins. The layer of anti-mouse IgG binds to the thiolated gold sensor elements which later bind specific mouse IgG. We have observed a 10% change in the interferometric signal when mouse IgG binds to an immobilized layer of anti-mouse IgG. No significant non-specific binding of rabbit IgG was detected. The sensitivity and throughput of this sensor will be discussed. An advantage of this new approach, relative to previous work in which the disk was incubated with antigen off-line, is the real-time detection of antigen binding, which could be valuable for simultaneous high-speed screening of a large number of protein interactions.

  16. Holographic interferometric tomography for reconstructing flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, Soyoung S.

    1994-01-01

    Holographic interferometric tomography is a technique for instantaneously capturing and quantitatively reconstructing three-dimensional flow fields. It has a very useful application potential for high-speed aerodynamics. However, three major challenging tasks need to be accomplished before its practical applications. First, fluid flows are mostly unsteady or at least non repeatable. Consequently, a means for Instantaneously recording three-dimensional flow fields, that is, a simple holographic technique for simultaneously recording multi-directional projections, needs to be developed. Second, while holographic interferometry provides enormous data storage capabilities, expeditious data extraction from complicated interferograms is very important for timely near real-time applications. Third, unlike medical applications, flow tomography does not provide complete data sets but instead involves ill-posed reconstruction problems of incomplete projection and limited angular scanning. During this summer research period, new experimental techniques and corresponding hardware were developed and tested to address the above mentioned tasks. The first task was achieved by diffuser illumination. This concept allows instantaneous capture of many projections with a conventional setup for single-projection recording. For the second task, a phase-shifting technique was incorporated. This technique allows one to acquire multiple phase-stepped interferograms for a single projection and thus to extract phase information from intensity data almost at real-time. For the third task, the research that has been extensively conducted previously was utilized. In this research period, a complete experimental setup that provides the above three major capabilities was designed, built, and tested by integrating all the techniques. A simple laboratory experiment for simulating wind-tunnel testing was then conducted. A test flow was produced by employing a relatively simple device that generated

  17. A simple image display application for windows.

    PubMed

    Conrad, G R

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a simple application for displaying low-to-moderate resolution digital images under the Windows operating environment. The display of scintigraphic images was of special interest, and for this reason the program was designed to show sequences of images and to account for broad ranges of pixel values. In order to function under a variety of Windows versions, the program was developed using the 16-bit Microsoft C +2 compiler and targeted for Windows 3.1 enhanced. It was tested with Trionix images for nuclear medicine and Siemens for computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR). The resulting application, called SID, successfully read Magnetom, Somatom, Trionix, and Interfile images of dimension 512 or less on Intel-based Windows PCs with 256 color SVGA-compatible (Super Video Graphics Adapters) video hardware. Early applications of the program included remote monitoring of image studies, resident review of teaching cases, review of research images, and preparation of educational materials. This article describes the features, operation, and potential applications of SID. PMID:9268906

  18. Clinical applications of choroidal imaging technologies.

    PubMed

    Chhablani, Jay; Barteselli, Giulio

    2015-05-01

    Choroid supplies the major blood supply to the eye, especially the outer retinal structures. Its understanding has significantly improved with the advent of advanced imaging modalities such as enhanced depth imaging technique and the newer swept source optical coherence tomography. Recent literature reports the findings of choroidal changes, quantitative as well as qualitative, in various chorioretinal disorders. This review article describes applications of choroidal imaging in the management of common diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, high myopia, central serous chorioretinopathy, chorioretinal inflammatory diseases, and tumors. This article briefly discusses future directions in choroidal imaging including angiography. PMID:26139797

  19. Interferometric seismoelectric Green's function representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ridder, Sjoerd A. L.; Slob, Evert; Wapenaar, Kees

    2009-09-01

    Interferometric Green's function representations can be used to retrieve a Green's function between two receiver stations, effectively turning one receiver into a source. Through reciprocity theorems of the convolution and correlation types, we derive interferometric Green's function representations for coupled electromagnetic and seismic wave propagation in 1-D. These representations express a symmetrized Green's function in terms of correlations of sources distributed throughout the domain of reciprocity and on its boundary. The main challenge for practical implementation is the necessity of sources throughout a domain. Numerical examples show how this constraint can be relaxed for different configurations. In a configuration of two layers bounded by a vacuum, seismic noise sources behind the interface can be used to recover seismoelectric reflection responses that suffer from small amplitude losses, but are not corrupted by spurious events.

  20. Lunar Interferometric Radio Array: LIRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, J.; Pixton, S.; Roberts, C.; Reyhanoglu, M.

    2000-01-01

    The Lunar Interferometric Radio Array (LIRA) is a performance driven design, with emphasis on utilizing the unique attributes of the far-side of the moon as a platform for radio astronomy. LIRA consists of three independent Lunar Telescope Units (LTUs), autonomously landed on the moon, and a communications relay satellite orbiting at libration point two (L2). Each LTU deploys a large inflatable spheroid, whose underside has been impregnated with a reflective coating. The spheroid is then gradually hardened into a shell by the suns ultraviolet radiation. LIRA achieves broadband capabilities by operating each LTU independently (tuned to offset frequencies), or provides high resolution observations as a three-element interferometer. The interferometer is functional with as few as two elements, yet will achieve greater resolution with additional elements. Thus, LIRA delivers both redundancy and the possibility for future expansion. Data processing, including interferometric synthesis, occurs at an earth-based ground station, eliminating the need for complex onboard data manipulation.

  1. Microfiber interferometric acoustic transducers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuxin; Jin, Long; Li, Jie; Ran, Yang; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2014-04-01

    Acoustic and ultrasonic transducers are key components in biomedical information technology, which has been applied in medical diagnosis, photoacoustic endoscopy and photoacoustic imaging. In this paper, an acoustic transducer based on Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) fabricated in a microscaled optical fiber is demonstrated. The transducer is fabricated by forming two wavelength-matched Bragg gratings into the microfiber by means of side illumination with a 193nm excimer laser. When placing the transducer in water, the applied acoustic signal periodically changes the refractive index (RI) of the surrounding liquid and modulates the transmission of the FPI based on the evanescent-field interaction between the liquid and the transmitting light. As a result, the acoustic signal can be constructed with a tunable laser whose output wavelength is located at the slope of the inteferometric fringes. The transducer presents a sensitivity of 10 times higher than the counterparts fabricated in conventional singlemode fibers and has great potential to achieve higher resolution for photoacoustic imaging due to its reduced diameter. PMID:24718189

  2. Pediatric Electrocardiographic Imaging (ECGI) Applications

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jennifer N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) has been used in pediatric and congenital heart patients to better understand their electrophysiologic substrates. In this article we focus on the 4 subjects related to pediatric ECGI: 1) ECGI in patients with congenital heart disease and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, 2) ECGI in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and pre-excitation, 3) ECGI in pediatric patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, and 4) ECGI for pediatric cardiac resynchronization therapy. PMID:25722754

  3. Interferometric observation of microlensing events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassan, Arnaud; Ranc, Clément

    2016-05-01

    Interferometric observations of microlensing events have the potential to provide unique constraints on the physical properties of the lensing systems. In this work, we first present a formalism that closely combines interferometric and microlensing observable quantities, which lead us to define an original microlensing (u, v) plane. We run simulations of long-baseline interferometric observations and photometric light curves to decide which observational strategy is required to obtain a precise measurement on vector Einstein radius. We finally perform a detailed analysis of the expected number of targets in the light of new microlensing surveys (2011+) which currently deliver 2000 alerts per year. We find that a few events are already at reach of long-baseline interferometers (CHARA, VLTI), and a rate of about six events per year is expected with a limiting magnitude of K ≃ 10. This number would increase by an order of magnitude by raising it to K ≃ 11. We thus expect that a new route for characterizing microlensing events will be opened by the upcoming generations of interferometers.

  4. Polarimetric Ground Based Interferometric Radar for Surface Deformation Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legarsky, J. J.; Gomez, F. G.; Rosenblad, B.; Loehr, E.; Deng, H.; Held, B.; Jenkins, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ground based interferometric radar (GBIR) measurements of surface deformation at sub-millimeter sensitivity may be desirable for a number of earth science applications including terrain mapping and monitoring of landslide movements. Through University of Missouri (MU) led efforts, a portable polarimetric GBIR has been developed for surface deformation mapping. Fully polarimetric capabilities allow the application of polarimetric interferometry, scatterer decomposition, and other advanced polarimetric methods. Using open literature techniques, polarimetric calibration and absolute radiometric calibration using known targets may be performed. The MU GBIR radiates electromagnetic waves at a number of free space wavelengths including C-band approximately 5.7 cm and Ku-band about 1.8 cm. The initial mechanical deployment setup time is typically about 10 minutes. For image formation, the MU GBIR employs azimuth scanning, which may collect data for a single pass interferogram in 20 seconds for a 180 degree azimuth sweep. Initial inteferograms may be formed at the deployment site in near real time. Moreover, the MU GBIR can be removed and re-positioned at the same point with relatively high (geodetic-grade) precision. A number of field experiments have been performed at various sites using the system. Demonstration of millimeter and better sensitivity to deformation over the course of a day of data collects has been performed at a test site using the MU GBIR. Study results and further development progress will be presented. This project is sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation.

  5. Simultaneous CARS and Interferometric Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivolaru, Daniel; Danehy, Paul M.; Grinstead, Keith D., Jr.; Tedder, Sarah; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports for the first time the combination of a dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering system with an interferometric Rayleigh scattering system (CARS - IRS) to provide time-resolved simultaneous measurement of multiple properties in combustion flows. The system uses spectrally narrow green (seeded Nd:YAG at 532 nm) and yellow (552.9 nm) pump beams and a spectrally-broad red (607 nm) beam as the Stokes beam. A spectrometer and a planar Fabry-Perot interferometer used in the imaging mode are used to record the spectrally broad CARS spectra and the spontaneous Rayleigh scattering spectra, respectively. Time-resolved simultaneous measurement of temperature, absolute mole fractions of N2, O2, and H2, and two components of velocity in a Hencken burner flame were performed to demonstrate the technique.

  6. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leisawitz, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The far-infrared astrophysics community is eager to follow up Spitzer and Herschel observations with sensitive, high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy, for such measurements are needed to understand merger-driven star formation and chemical enrichment in galaxies, star and planetary system formation, and the development and prevalence of water-bearing planets. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) is a wide field-of-view space-based spatio-spectral interferometer designed to operate in the 25 to 400 micron wavelength range. This talk will summarize the SPIRIT mission concept, with a focus on the science that motivates it and the technology that enables it. Without mentioning SPIRIT by name, the astrophysics community through the NASA Astrophysics Roadmap Committee recently recommended this mission as the first in a series of space-based interferometers. Data from a laboratory testbed interferometer will be used to illustrate how the spatio-spectral interferometry technique works.

  7. Distortion compensation in interferometric testing of mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Brian M.; Reardon, Patrick J

    2009-01-20

    We present a method to compensate for the imaging distortion encountered in interferometric testing of mirrors, which is introduced by interferometer optics as well as from geometric projection errors. Our method involves placing a mask, imprinted with a regular square grid, over the mirror and finding a transformation that relates the grid coordinates to coordinates in the base plane of the parent surface. This method can be used on finished mirrors since no fiducials have to be applied to the surfaces. A critical step in the process requires that the grid coordinates be projected onto the mirror base plane before the regression is performed. We apply the method successfully during a center-of-curvature null test of an F/2 off-axis paraboloid.

  8. Raman chemical imaging: Development and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeberle, Michael D.

    Recent advances in electronically tunable filters, such as acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTF) and liquid crystal tunable filters (LCTF), combined with multispectral image processing strategies make Raman chemical imaging a powerful technique for the routine analysis of material chemical architecture. Raman chemical imaging combines Raman spectroscopy and digital imaging technology to assess material molecular composition and structure. Raman spectroscopy probes molecular composition and structure without being destructive to the sample. The spectrum for an analyte within even a complex host matrix is harnessed to generate unique contrast intrinsic to the analyte species without the use of stains, dyes, or contrast agents. This thesis provides a brief introduction to the field of Raman chemical imaging by describing the major methods employed. The research presented here focuses on wide field Raman imaging in conjunction with electronically tunable filters, and therefore a general methodology for performing Raman chemical imaging analysis of unknown samples is described. The AOTF and LCTF Raman chemical imaging microscopes developed during this research are also presented. The general operating principles of the AOTF and the LCTF are briefly discussed along with their specific implementation within the microscope based imaging systems. Raman chemical imaging represents an efficient, widely applicable approach for understanding the relationship between material molecular architecture and material function, which is central to the engineering of advanced materials. AOTF Raman chemical imaging has been employed in the visualization of the architecture of polypropylene and polyurethane blended polymers. High fidelity Raman images were and domains in the 3-5 mum ranges were differentiated. The AOTF Raman chemical imaging microscope has also been applied to the histopathological characterization of human breast tissue. A foreign polymer inclusion in the tissue was

  9. Spaceborne radar applications in geology. An introduction to imaging radar and application examples of ERS SAR in geology and geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Karen

    2005-12-01

    This document is intended for geologists who are interested in broadening their knowledge of interpretation of imaging radar data, but also addresses the general public for reference and information. It introduces imaging radar as it may be used by technicians and image interpreters, stressing the use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for Earth observation in general and for geology in particular. Interferometric SAR is briefly treated, with some basic and practical hints. An illustrated application study on land subsidence is included. SAR/optical data fusion is explained, with examples of the different methods suggested. The main part of the document, part II, consists of 14 case studies that demonstrate the potential of SAR imagery for geology. These studies cover themes such as the detection and mapping of neotectonic activity, tectonic mapping, and recognition of karst structures, as well as analysis of active lahars and other volcanic events. They look into drainage systems in desert areas, consider lithofacies changes and morphostructure texture analysis, and they demonstrate the geological mapping of active tectonic compression. Finally, the document mentions the key points of the ESA SAR missions. Contacts for further information are also provided.

  10. Applications of nuclear medicine in genitourinary imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blaufox, M.D.; Kalika, V.; Scharf, S.; Milstein, D.

    1982-01-01

    Major advances in nuclear medicine instrumentation and radiopharmaceuticals for renal studies have occurred during the last decade. Current nuclear medicine methodology can be applied for accurate evaluation of renal function and for renal imaging in a wide variety of clinical situations. Total renal function can be estimated from the plasma clearance of agents excreted by glomerular filtration or tubular secretion, and individual function can be estimated by imaging combined with renography. A major area of radionuclide application is in the evaluation of obstructive uropathy. The introduction of diuretic renography and the use of computer-generated regions of interest offer the clinician added useful data which may aid in diagnosis and management. Imaging is of proven value also in trauma, renovascular hypertension, and acute and chronic renal failure. Methods for the evaluation of residual urine, vesicoureteral reflux, and testicular torsion have achieved increasing clinical use. These many procedures assure a meaningful and useful role for the application of nuclear medicine in genitourinary imaging.

  11. ICG fluorescence imaging and its medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Mitsuharu; Shikayama, Takahiro

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a novel optical angiography system, and introduces its medical applications. We developed the optical enhanced imaging system which can observe the blood and lymphatic vessels as the Indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence image. The imaging system consists of 760nm light emitted diode (LED) as excite light, CCD camera as a detector, a high-pass optical filter in front of the CCD and video processing system. The advantage of ICG fluorescence method is safe (radiation free), high sensitive, real time monitoring of blood and/or lymphatic flow, small size, easy to operate and cost effective compared to conventional X-ray angiography or scintigraphy. We have applied this method to several clinical applications such as breast cancer sentinel lymph node (SLN) navigation, lymph edema diagnostic and identification of liver segmentation. In each application, ICG fluorescence method shows useful result. It's indicated that this method is promising technique as optical angiography.

  12. Real-time computed optical interferometric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemonski, Nathan D.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Ahmad, Adeel; Adie, Steven G.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-03-01

    High-resolution tomography is of great importance to many areas of biomedical imaging, but with it comes several apparent tradeoffs such as a narrowing depth-of-field and increasing optical aberrations. Overcoming these challenges has attracted many hardware and computational solutions. Hardware solutions, though, can become bulky or expensive and computational approaches can require high computing power or large processing times. This study demonstrates memory efficient implementations of interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) and computational adaptive optics (CAO) - two computational approaches for overcoming the depthof- field limitation and the effect of optical aberrations in optical coherence tomography (OCT). Traditionally requiring lengthy post processing, here we report implementations of ISAM and CAO on a single GPU for real-time in vivo imaging. Real-time, camera-limited ISAM processing enabled reliable acquisition of stable data for in vivo imaging, and CAO processing on the same GPU is shown to quickly correct static aberrations. These algorithmic advances hold the promise for high-resolution volumetric imaging in time-sensitive situations as well as enabling aberrationfree cellular-level volumetric tomography.

  13. Spectral modulation interferometry for quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ruibo; Chen, Shichao; Li, Chengshuai; Zhu, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    We propose a spectral-domain interferometric technique, termed spectral modulation interferometry (SMI), and present its application to high-sensitivity, high-speed, and speckle-free quantitative phase imaging. In SMI, one-dimensional complex field of an object is interferometrically modulated onto a broadband spectrum. Full-field phase and intensity images are obtained by scanning along the orthogonal direction. SMI integrates the high sensitivity of spectral-domain interferometry with the high speed of spectral modulation to quantify fast phase dynamics, and its dispersive and confocal nature eliminates laser speckles. The principle and implementation of SMI are discussed. Its performance is evaluated using static and dynamic objects. PMID:25780737

  14. Application of numerical methods to elasticity imaging.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, Benjamin; Ormachea, Juvenal; Rodríguez, Paul; Parker, Kevin J

    2013-03-01

    Elasticity imaging can be understood as the intersection of the study of biomechanical properties, imaging sciences, and physics. It was mainly motivated by the fact that pathological tissue presents an increased stiffness when compared to surrounding normal tissue. In the last two decades, research on elasticity imaging has been an international and interdisciplinary pursuit aiming to map the viscoelastic properties of tissue in order to provide clinically useful information. As a result, several modalities of elasticity imaging, mostly based on ultrasound but also on magnetic resonance imaging and optical coherence tomography, have been proposed and applied to a number of clinical applications: cancer diagnosis (prostate, breast, liver), hepatic cirrhosis, renal disease, thyroiditis, arterial plaque evaluation, wall stiffness in arteries, evaluation of thrombosis in veins, and many others. In this context, numerical methods are applied to solve forward and inverse problems implicit in the algorithms in order to estimate viscoelastic linear and nonlinear parameters, especially for quantitative elasticity imaging modalities. In this work, an introduction to elasticity imaging modalities is presented. The working principle of qualitative modalities (sonoelasticity, strain elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse) and quantitative modalities (Crawling Waves Sonoelastography, Spatially Modulated Ultrasound Radiation Force (SMURF), Supersonic Imaging) will be explained. Subsequently, the areas in which numerical methods can be applied to elasticity imaging are highlighted and discussed. Finally, we present a detailed example of applying total variation and AM-FM techniques to the estimation of elasticity. PMID:24010245

  15. Quality measures in applications of image restoration.

    PubMed

    Kriete, A; Naim, M; Schafer, L

    2001-01-01

    We describe a new method for the estimation of image quality in image restoration applications. We demonstrate this technique on a simulated data set of fluorescent beads, in comparison with restoration by three different deconvolution methods. Both the number of iterations and a regularisation factor are varied to enforce changes in the resulting image quality. First, the data sets are directly compared by an accuracy measure. These values serve to validate the image quality descriptor, which is developed on the basis of optical information theory. This most general measure takes into account the spectral energies and the noise, weighted in a logarithmic fashion. It is demonstrated that this method is particularly helpful as a user-oriented method to control the output of iterative image restorations and to eliminate the guesswork in choosing a suitable number of iterations. PMID:11587324

  16. Spaceborne imaging radar - Geologic and oceanographic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.

    1980-01-01

    Synoptic, large-area radar images of the earth's land and ocean surface, obtained from the Seasat orbiting spacecraft, show the potential for geologic mapping and for monitoring of ocean surface patterns. Structural and topographic features such as lineaments, anticlines, folds and domes, drainage patterns, stratification, and roughness units can be mapped. Ocean surface waves, internal waves, current boundaries, and large-scale eddies have been observed in numerous images taken by the Seasat imaging radar. This article gives an illustrated overview of these applications.

  17. UVMULTIFIT: A versatile tool for fitting astronomical radio interferometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí-Vidal, I.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Muller, S.; Casey, S.

    2014-03-01

    Context. The analysis of astronomical interferometric data is often performed on the images obtained after deconvolving the interferometer's point spread function. This strategy can be understood (especially for cases of sparse arrays) as fitting models to models, since the deconvolved images are already non-unique model representations of the actual data (i.e., the visibilities). Indeed, the interferometric images may be affected by visibility gridding, weighting schemes (e.g., natural vs. uniform), and the particulars of the (non-linear) deconvolution algorithms. Fitting models to the direct interferometric observables (i.e., the visibilities) is preferable in the cases of simple (analytical) sky intensity distributions. Aims: We present UVMULTIFIT, a versatile library for fitting visibility data, implemented in a Python-based framework. Our software is currently based on the CASA package, but can be easily adapted to other analysis packages, provided they have a Python API. Methods: The user can simultaneously fit an indefinite number of source components to the data, each of which depend on any algebraic combination of fitting parameters. Fits to individual spectral-line channels or simultaneous fits to all frequency channels are allowed. Results: We have tested the software with synthetic data and with real observations. In some cases (e.g., sources with sizes smaller than the diffraction limit of the interferometer), the results from the fit to the visibilities (e.g., spectra of close by sources) are far superior to the output obtained from the mere analysis of the deconvolved images. Conclusions: UVMULTIFIT is a powerful improvement of existing tasks to extract the maximum amount of information from visibility data, especially in cases close to the sensitivity/resolution limits of interferometric observations.

  18. Reflectometric measurement of plasma imaging and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mase, A.; Ito, N.; Oda, M.; Komada, Y.; Nagae, D.; Zhang, D.; Kogi, Y.; Tobimatsu, S.; Maruyama, T.; Shimazu, H.; Sakata, E.; Sakai, F.; Kuwahara, D.; Yoshinaga, T.; Tokuzawa, T.; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Yamaguchi, S.; Tsuji-Iio, S.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G.; Lee, W.; Padhi, S.; Kim, K. W.

    2012-01-01

    Progress in microwave and millimeter-wave technologies has made possible advanced diagnostics for application to various fields, such as, plasma diagnostics, radio astronomy, alien substance detection, airborne and spaceborne imaging radars called as synthetic aperture radars, living body measurements. Transmission, reflection, scattering, and radiation processes of electromagnetic waves are utilized as diagnostic tools. In this report we focus on the reflectometric measurements and applications to biological signals (vital signal detection and breast cancer detection) as well as plasma diagnostics, specifically by use of imaging technique and ultra-wideband radar technique.

  19. Single-exposure super-resolved interferometric microscopy by RGB multiplexing in lensless configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granero, Luis; Ferreira, Carlos; Zalevsky, Zeev; García, Javier; Micó, Vicente

    2016-07-01

    Single-Exposure Super-Resolved Interferometric Microscopy (SESRIM) reports on a way to achieve one-dimensional (1-D) superresolved imaging in digital holographic microscopy (DHM) by a single illumination shot and digital recording. SESRIM provides color-coded angular multiplexing of the accessible sample's range of spatial frequencies and it allows their recording in a single CCD (color or monochrome) snapshot by adding 3 RGB coherent reference beams at the output plane. In this manuscript, we extend the applicability of SESRIM to the field of digital in-line holographic microscopy (DIHM), that is, working without lenses. As consequence of the in-line configuration, an additional restriction concerning the object field of view (FOV) must be imposed to the technique. Experimental results are reported for both a synthetic object (USAF resolution test target) and a biological sample (swine sperm sample) validating this new kind of superresolution imaging method named as lensless SESRIM (L-SESRIM).

  20. Microstructured optical fiber interferometric breathing sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favero, Fernando C.; Villatoro, Joel; Pruneri, Valerio

    2012-03-01

    In this paper a simple photonic crystal fiber (PCF) interferometric breathing sensor is introduced. The interferometer consists of a section of PCF fusion spliced at the distal end of a standard telecommunications optical fiber. Two collapsed regions in the PCF caused by the splicing process allow the excitation and recombination of a core and a cladding PCF mode. As a result, the reflection spectrum of the device exhibits a sinusoidal interference pattern that instantly shifts when water molecules, present in exhaled air, are adsorbed on or desorbed from the PCF surface. The device can be used to monitor a person's breathing whatever the respiration rate. The device here proposed could be particularly important in applications where electronic sensors fail or are not recommended. It may also be useful in the evaluation of a person's health and even in the diagnosis and study of the progression of serious illnesses such as sleep apnea syndrome.

  1. Characterizing Levees using Polarimetric and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabbiru, L.; Aanstoos, J. V.; Mahrooghy, M.; Gokaraju, B.; Nobrega, R. A.; Younan, N. H.

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring the physical condition of levees is vital in order to protect them from flooding. The dynamics of subsurface water events can cause damage on levee structures which could lead to slough slides, sand boils or through seepage. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology, due to its high spatial resolution and soil penetration capability, is a good choice to identify such problem areas so that they can be treated to avoid possible catastrophic failure. The radar polarimetric and interferometric data is capable of identifying variations in soil properties of the areas which might cause levee failure. The study area encompasses portion of levees of the lower Mississippi river in the United States. The methodology of this research is mainly categorized into two streams: 1) polarimetric data analysis and classification, and 2) interferometric analysis. Two sources of SAR imagery are used: a) quad-polarized, L-band data from Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) for polarimetric classification, and b) high resolution dual-polarized Terrasar-X data for interferometric analysis. NASA's UAVSAR imagery acquired between 2009 and 2011 are used for the analysis. The polarimetric classification is performed based on the decomposition parameters: entropy (H), anisotropy (A) and alpha (α) and the results detected slough slides on the levees and potential future slides. In the interferometric approach, the Terrasar-X SAR images acquired at different times in the year 2011 are combined into pairs to exploit the phase difference of the signals. The interferometric information is used to find evidence of potential small-scale deformations which could be pre-cursors to levee failure.

  2. The application of interferometry to optical astronomical imaging.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, John E; Haniff, Christopher A

    2002-05-15

    In the first part of this review we survey the role optical/infrared interferometry now plays in ground-based astronomy. We discuss in turn the origins of astronomical interferometry, the motivation for its development, the techniques of its implementation, examples of its astronomical significance, and the limitations of the current generation of interferometric arrays. The second part focuses on the prospects for ground-based astronomical imaging interferometry over the near to mid-term (i.e. 10 years) at optical and near-infrared wavelengths. An assessment is made of the astronomical and technical factors which determine the optimal designs for imaging arrays. An analysis based on scientific capability, technical feasibility and cost argues for an array of large numbers of moderate-sized (2 m class) telescopes rather than one comprising a small number of much larger collectors. PMID:12804289

  3. Digital imaging applications in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Leong, F Joel W-M; Leong, Anthony S-Y

    2003-03-01

    Digital imaging has progressed at a rapid rate and is likely to eventually replace chemical photography in most areas of professional and amateur digital image acquisition. In pathology, digital microscopy has implications beyond that of taking a photograph. The arguments for adopting this new medium are compelling, and given similar developments in other areas of pathology and radiologic imaging, acceptance of the digital medium should be viewed as a component of the technological evolution of the laboratory. A digital image may be stored, replicated, catalogued, employed for educational purposes, transmitted for further interpretation (telepathology), analyzed for salient features (medical vision/image analysis), or form part of a wider digital healthcare strategy. Despite advances in digital camera technology, good image acquisition still requires good microscope optics and the correct calibration of all system components, something which many neglect. The future of digital imaging in pathology is very promising and new applications in the fields of automated quantification and interpretation are likely to have profound long-term influence on the practice of anatomic pathology. This paper discusses the state of the art of digital imaging in anatomic pathology. PMID:12605090

  4. Interferometric optical vortex array generator.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, P

    2007-05-20

    Two new interferometric configurations for optical vortex array generation are presented. These interferometers are different from the conventional interferometers in that they are capable of producing a large number of isolated zeros of intensity, and all of them contain optical vortices. Simulation and theory for optical vortex array generation using three-plane-wave interference is presented. The vortex dipole array produced this way is noninteracting, as there are no attraction or repulsion forces between them, leading to annihilation or creation of vortex pairs. PMID:17514234

  5. Interferometric optical vortex array generator

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, P

    2007-05-20

    Two new interferometric configurations for optical vortex array generation are presented.These interferometers are different from the conventional interferometers in that they are capable of producing a large number of isolated zeros of intensity, and all of them contain optical vortices. Simulation and theory for optical vortex array generation using three-plane-wave interference is presented. The vortex dipole array produced this way is noninteracting, as there are no attraction or repulsion forces between them, leading to annihilation or creation of vortex pairs.

  6. Interferometric monitoring of dip coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Alexandre F.; Menegotto, Thiago; Horowitz, Flavio

    2004-02-01

    Dip-coated films, which are widely used in the coating industry, are usually measured by capacitive methods with micrometric precision. For the first time to our knowledge, we have applied an interferometric determination of the evolution of thickness in real time to nonvolatile Newtonian mineral oils with several viscosities and distinct dip withdrawing speeds. The evolution of film thickness during the process depends on time as t-1/2, in accordance with a simple model. Comparison with measured results with an uncertainty of +/-0.007 μm) showed good agreement after the initial steps of the process had been completed.

  7. Decorrelation in interferometric radar echoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Villasensor, John

    1992-01-01

    A radar interferometric technique for topographic mapping of surfaces promises a high resolution, globally consistent approach to generation of digital elevation models. One implementation approach, that of utilizing a single SAR system in a nearly repeating orbit, is attractive not only for cost and complexity reasons but also in that it permits inference of changes in the surface over the orbit repeat cycle from the correlation properties of the radar echoes. The various sources contributing to the echo correlation statistics are characterized, and the term which most closely describes surficial change is isolated. There is decorrelation increasing with time, but digital terrain model generation remains feasible.

  8. An imaging toolbox for smart phone applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchul, Alexandr; Bhupathiraju, Deepthi; Agaian, Sos; Akopian, David

    2006-05-01

    The paper presents a Digital Image Processing toolbox for cellular phones. It is intended for users dealing with imaging algorithms and allows the processing of real images taken by the camera phones. For example, users are able to analyze the images and selected regions of interest using different transforms including Discrete Fourier, Hartley, and Cosine Transforms. One can apply different filters such as median and moving average. Simple image enhancement techniques are also included in the toolbox. A handy user interface allows a suitable browsing through the images and operators. The toolbox is designed to be expandable and more operations will be included in the future targeting military and security applications. The toolbox is implemented using Series 60 Platform SDK for Symbian tm OS, for C++. It allows developers to quickly and efficiently run and test applications for devices that are compatible with the Series 60 Platform. The algorithms are first implemented on Series 60 Platform device emulator on the PC and then installed on the cell phone.

  9. Interferometric phase reconstruction using simplified coherence network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kui; Song, Ruiqing; Wang, Hui; Wu, Di; Wang, Hua

    2016-09-01

    Interferometric time-series analysis techniques, which extend the traditional differential radar interferometry, have demonstrated a strong capability for monitoring ground surface displacement. Such techniques are able to obtain the temporal evolution of ground deformation within millimeter accuracy by using a stack of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. In order to minimize decorrelation between stacked SAR images, the phase reconstruction technique has been developed recently. The main idea of this technique is to reform phase observations along a SAR stack by taking advantage of a maximum likelihood estimator which is defined on the coherence matrix estimated from each target. However, the phase value of a coherence matrix element might be considerably biased when its corresponding coherence is low. In this case, it will turn to an outlying sample affecting the corresponding phase reconstruction process. In order to avoid this problem, a new approach is developed in this paper. This approach considers a coherence matrix element to be an arc in a network. A so-called simplified coherence network (SCN) is constructed to decrease the negative impact of outlying samples. Moreover, a pointed iterative strategy is designed to resolve the transformed phase reconstruction problem defined on a SCN. For validation purposes, the proposed method is applied to 29 real SAR images. The results demonstrate that the proposed method has an excellent computational efficiency and could obtain more reliable phase reconstruction solutions compared to the traditional method using phase triangulation algorithm.

  10. Fundus autofluorescence applications in retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Gabai, Andrea; Veritti, Daniele; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) is a relatively new imaging technique that can be used to study retinal diseases. It provides information on retinal metabolism and health. Several different pathologies can be detected. Peculiar AF alterations can help the clinician to monitor disease progression and to better understand its pathogenesis. In the present article, we review FAF principles and clinical applications. PMID:26139802

  11. Fundus autofluorescence applications in retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gabai, Andrea; Veritti, Daniele; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) is a relatively new imaging technique that can be used to study retinal diseases. It provides information on retinal metabolism and health. Several different pathologies can be detected. Peculiar AF alterations can help the clinician to monitor disease progression and to better understand its pathogenesis. In the present article, we review FAF principles and clinical applications. PMID:26139802

  12. Frequency modulated lasers for interferometric optical gyroscopes.

    PubMed

    Komljenovic, Tin; Tran, Minh A; Belt, Michael; Gundavarapu, Sarat; Blumenthal, Daniel J; Bowers, John E

    2016-04-15

    We study the use of frequency modulated lasers in interferometric optical gyroscopes and show that by exploiting various frequency modulation signals, the laser coherence can be controlled. We show that both angle random walk and bias stability of an interferometric optical gyroscope based on laser sources can be improved with this technique. PMID:27082342

  13. Applications of Imaging Flow Cytometry for Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Mark; Davis, Aubrey; Abbriano, Raffaela; Pugsley, Haley R; Traller, Jesse C; Smith, Sarah R; Shrestha, Roshan P; Cook, Orna; Sánchez-Alvarez, Eva L; Manandhar-Shrestha, Kalpana; Alderete, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The ability to image large numbers of cells at high resolution enhances flow cytometric analysis of cells and cell populations. In particular, the ability to image intracellular features adds a unique aspect to analyses, and can enable correlation between molecular phenomena resulting in alterations in cellular phenotype. Unicellular microalgae are amenable to high-throughput analysis to capture the diversity of cell types in natural samples, or diverse cellular responses in clonal populations, especially using imaging cytometry. Using examples from our laboratory, we review applications of imaging cytometry, specifically using an Amnis(®) ImageStream(®)X instrument, to characterize photosynthetic microalgae. Some of these examples highlight advantages of imaging flow cytometry for certain research objectives, but we also include examples that would not necessarily require imaging and could be performed on a conventional cytometer to demonstrate other concepts in cytometric evaluation of microalgae. We demonstrate the value of these approaches for (1) analysis of populations, (2) documentation of cellular features, and (3) analysis of gene expression. PMID:27460237

  14. Imaging spectrometer for process industry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrala, Esko; Okkonen, Jukka T.; Hyvarinen, Timo S.; Aikio, Mauri; Lammasniemi, Jorma

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents an imaging spectrometer principle based on a novel prism-grating-prism (PGP) element as the dispersive component and advanced camera solutions for on-line applications. The PGP element uses a volume type holographic plane transmission grating made of dichromated gelatin (DCG). Currently, spectrographs have been realized for the 400 - 1050 nm region but the applicable spectral region of the PGP is 380 - 1800 nm. Spectral resolution is typically between 1.5 and 5 nm. The on-axis optical configuration and simple rugged tubular optomechanical construction of the spectrograph provide a good image quality and resistance to harsh environmental conditions. Spectrograph optics are designed to be interfaced to any standard CCD camera. Special camera structures and operating modes can be used for applications requiring on-line data interpretation and process control.

  15. Usability Practice in Medical Imaging Application Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chufeng; Abdelnour-Nocera, Jose; Wells, Stephen; Pan, Nora

    Historically, development of medical imaging applications has focused on solving technical issues for small numbers of expert users. However, their use is now more mainstream and users are no longer willing to tolerate poor performance and usability. In this study we illustrate the application of user centred design methods in a medical imaging applications development company by using a usability comparative study of different regions of interest (ROI) tools. A use case analysis was used to judge usability efficiency and effectiveness of different ROI tools; and a user observation was also carried out which measured the accuracy achieved by these tools. We have found that useful results can be obtained by using these methods. We also generated some concrete suggestions that could be incorporated into future product development.

  16. Acoustic Location of Lightning Using Interferometric Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erives, H.; Arechiga, R. O.; Stock, M.; Lapierre, J. L.; Edens, H. E.; Stringer, A.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Acoustic arrays have been used to accurately locate thunder sources in lightning flashes. The acoustic arrays located around the Magdalena mountains of central New Mexico produce locations which compare quite well with source locations provided by the New Mexico Tech Lightning Mapping Array. These arrays utilize 3 outer microphones surrounding a 4th microphone located at the center, The location is computed by band-passing the signal to remove noise, and then computing the cross correlating the outer 3 microphones with respect the center reference microphone. While this method works very well, it works best on signals with high signal to noise ratios; weaker signals are not as well located. Therefore, methods are being explored to improve the location accuracy and detection efficiency of the acoustic location systems. The signal received by acoustic arrays is strikingly similar to th signal received by radio frequency interferometers. Both acoustic location systems and radio frequency interferometers make coherent measurements of a signal arriving at a number of closely spaced antennas. And both acoustic and interferometric systems then correlate these signals between pairs of receivers to determine the direction to the source of the received signal. The primary difference between the two systems is the velocity of propagation of the emission, which is much slower for sound. Therefore, the same frequency based techniques that have been used quite successfully with radio interferometers should be applicable to acoustic based measurements as well. The results presented here are comparisons between the location results obtained with current cross correlation method and techniques developed for radio frequency interferometers applied to acoustic signals. The data were obtained during the summer 2013 storm season using multiple arrays sensitive to both infrasonic frequency and audio frequency acoustic emissions from lightning. Preliminary results show that

  17. Determining the operating characteristics of an ultraviolet interferometric spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L.

    1983-01-01

    A prototype interferometric spectrometer system is being built by NASA to explore the potential of the technique for applications involving the visible and near ultraviolet portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The system is limited only by the frequency bandpass of the optical components used in the system, the quality of the optical components, and ultimately by the memory capacity of the computer; tradeoffs between the wavenumber resolution of the produced spectrum, the bandpass limits of the optics, and the number of samples obtained from the interferogram must be delineated explicitly. The prototype Ultraviolet Interferometric Spectrometer (UVIS) instrument is expected to be configured several different ways to ascertain its suitability for various applications. To exploit its inherent flexibility, this reference document describes these parameter tradeoffs.

  18. Topographic slope from the SAR interferometric phase gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Charles L.; Rosen, Paul A.

    1993-01-01

    A new algorithm for the direct calculation of topographic slope maps from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferograms is presented. The algorithm derives slope maps without first requiring the creation of a digital elevational model (DEM) from the interferogram, thus obviating the need for high SNR in the interferogram and altitude calibration points for the scene. SAR data useful for interferometry has been collected by the Active Microwave Imager on board the ERS-1 satellite, when it was in a short period repeat orbit. Two passes of the radar sensor form a cross-track interferometric baseline. For a point target at some position (x,y,h), the interferometric phase difference phi is proportional to the difference in path lengths for the two sensor positions to the scatterer. Given the phase difference as measured in the complex interferogram and an accurate baseline geometry, the position of the scatterer, most significantly the height h, can be determined through triangulation. The interferometric phase measurement however is known only modulo 2-pi, and hence it is necessary to determine the correct multiple of 2-pi to add to the phase at each point to obtain an estimate of the actual phase with respect to an absolute datum. This phase unwrapping process is required for creating DEM's, and is difficult or impossible for regions of low SNR or SAR image layover. The new algorithm described here derives slope maps without requiring phase unwrapping.

  19. Lensless single-exposure super-resolved interferometric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granero, Luis; Ferreira, Carlos; García, Javier; Micó, Vicente

    2013-04-01

    Single Exposure Super Resolved Interferometric Microscopy (SESRIM) has been recently proposed as a way to achieve one dimensional super resolved imaging in digital holographic microscopy. SESRIM uses Red-Green-Blue (RGB) multiplexing for illuminating the sample having different propagation angles for each one of the three illumination wavelengths and it has been experimentally validated considering color (A. Calabuig, V. Mico, J. Garcia, Z. Zalevsky, and C. Ferreira, "Single-exposure super-resolved interferometric microscopy by red-green-blue multiplexing," Opt. Lett. 36, 885-887, 2011) and monochrome (A. Calabuig, J. Garcia, C. Ferreira, Z. Zalevsky, and V. Mico, "Resolution improvement by single-exposure superresolved interferometric microscopy with a monochrome sensor," J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 28, 2346-2358, 2011) digital sensors for holographic recording. In this contribution, we will first review some of the characteristics of the previously reported SESRIM approaches and second, we will present preliminary results for the extension of SESRIM to the field of lensless holographic microscopy. Experimental results are reported validating this new kind of superresolution imaging method named as lensless SESRIM (L-SESRIM).

  20. Uncooled LWIR imaging: applications and market analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takasawa, Satomi

    2015-05-01

    The evolution of infrared (IR) imaging sensor technology for defense market has played an important role in developing commercial market, as dual use of the technology has expanded. In particular, technologies of both reduction in pixel pitch and vacuum package have drastically evolved in the area of uncooled Long-Wave IR (LWIR; 8-14 μm wavelength region) imaging sensor, increasing opportunity to create new applications. From the macroscopic point of view, the uncooled LWIR imaging market is divided into two areas. One is a high-end market where uncooled LWIR imaging sensor with sensitivity as close to that of cooled one as possible is required, while the other is a low-end market which is promoted by miniaturization and reduction in price. Especially, in the latter case, approaches towards consumer market have recently appeared, such as applications of uncooled LWIR imaging sensors to night visions for automobiles and smart phones. The appearance of such a kind of commodity surely changes existing business models. Further technological innovation is necessary for creating consumer market, and there will be a room for other companies treating components and materials such as lens materials and getter materials and so on to enter into the consumer market.

  1. Quantitative interferometric microscopy cytometer based on regularized optical flow algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Vargas, Javier; Wang, Shouyu; Li, Zhenhua; Liu, Fei

    2015-09-01

    Cell detections and analysis are important in various fields, such as medical observations and disease diagnoses. In order to analyze the cell parameters as well as observe the samples directly, in this paper, we present an improved quantitative interferometric microscopy cytometer, which can monitor the quantitative phase distributions of bio-samples and realize cellular parameter statistics. The proposed system is able to recover the phase imaging of biological samples in the expanded field of view via a regularized optical flow demodulation algorithm. This algorithm reconstructs the phase distribution with high accuracy with only two interferograms acquired at different time points simplifying the scanning system. Additionally, the method is totally automatic, and therefore it is convenient for establishing a quantitative phase cytometer. Moreover, the phase retrieval approach is robust against noise and background. Excitingly, red blood cells are readily investigated with the quantitative interferometric microscopy cytometer system.

  2. System Engineering the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, Tristram T.; Leisawitz, David T.; Rinehart, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) was designed to accomplish three scientific objectives: (1) learn how planetary systems form from protostellar disks and how they acquire their inhomogeneous chemical composition; (2) characterize the family of extrasolar planetary systems by imaging the structure in debris disks to understand how and where planets of different types form; and (3) learn how high-redshift galaxies formed and merged to form the present-day population of galaxies. SPIRIT will accomplish these objectives through infrared observations with a two aperture interferometric instrument. This paper gives an overview of SPIRIT design and operation, and how the three design cycle concept study was completed. The error budget for several key performance values allocates tolerances to all contributing factors, and a performance model of the spacecraft plus instrument system demonstrates meeting those allocations with margin.

  3. Demonstration of interferometric atom-pattern engineering via Rabi oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Jun; Jiang, Yan; Lu, Guo-Peng; Zhu, Min-Jie; Zhao, Bo; Bao, Xiao-Hui; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-03-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of atom-pattern engineering via Rabi oscillations. We make use of interferometric Raman beams to drive a microwave transition for laser-cooled atoms confined within an optical dipole trap. Up to nine fringes are patterned within a half wavelength of the Raman standing wave. We also demonstrate spatial atom localization by using two Raman pulses together with optical depletion. Our work may be useful in atom-pattern engineering for quantum information and simulation applications.

  4. Acquisition and applications of 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterian, Paul; Mocanu, Elena

    2007-08-01

    The moiré fringes method and their analysis up to medical and entertainment applications are discussed in this paper. We describe the procedure of capturing 3D images with an Inspeck Camera that is a real-time 3D shape acquisition system based on structured light techniques. The method is a high-resolution one. After processing the images, using computer, we can use the data for creating laser fashionable objects by engraving them with a Q-switched Nd:YAG. In medical field we mention the plastic surgery and the replacement of X-Ray especially in pediatric use.

  5. Extended SWIR imaging sensors for hyperspectral imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, A.; Benecke, M.; Wendler, J.; Sieck, A.; Hübner, D.; Figgemeier, H.; Breiter, R.

    2016-05-01

    AIM has developed SWIR modules including FPAs based on liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) grown MCT usable in a wide range of hyperspectral imaging applications. Silicon read-out integrated circuits (ROIC) provide various integration and readout modes including specific functions for spectral imaging applications. An important advantage of MCT based detectors is the tunable band gap. The spectral sensitivity of MCT detectors can be engineered to cover the extended SWIR spectral region up to 2.5μm without compromising in performance. AIM developed the technology to extend the spectral sensitivity of its SWIR modules also into the VIS. This has been successfully demonstrated for 384x288 and 1024x256 FPAs with 24μm pitch. Results are presented in this paper. The FPAs are integrated into compact dewar cooler configurations using different types of coolers, like rotary coolers, AIM's long life split linear cooler MCC030 or extreme long life SF100 Pulse Tube cooler. The SWIR modules include command and control electronics (CCE) which allow easy interfacing using a digital standard interface. The development status and performance results of AIM's latest MCT SWIR modules suitable for hyperspectral systems and applications will be presented.

  6. Active gated imaging for automotive safety applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauer, Yoav; Sonn, Ezri

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents the Active Gated Imaging System (AGIS), in relation to the automotive field. AGIS is based on a fast gated-camera equipped with a unique Gated-CMOS sensor, and a pulsed Illuminator, synchronized in the time domain to record images of a certain range of interest which are then processed by computer vision real-time algorithms. In recent years we have learned the system parameters which are most beneficial to night-time driving in terms of; field of view, illumination profile, resolution and processing power. AGIS provides also day-time imaging with additional capabilities, which enhances computer vision safety applications. AGIS provides an excellent candidate for camera-based Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) and the path for autonomous driving, in the future, based on its outstanding low/high light-level, harsh weather conditions capabilities and 3D potential growth capabilities.

  7. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar studies of Alaska volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Wicks, C., Jr.; Power, J.; Dzurisin, D.; Thatcher, W.; Masterlark, Timothy

    2002-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imaging is a recently developed geodetic technique capable of measuring ground-surface deformation with centimeter to subcentimeter vertical precision and spatial resolution of tens-of-meter over a relatively large region (???104 km2). The spatial distribution of surface deformation data, derived from InSAR images, enables the construction of detailed mechanical models to enhance the study of magmatic and tectonic processes associated with volcanoes. This paper summarizes our recent InSAR studies of several Alaska volcanoes, which include Okmok, Akutan, Kiska, Augustine, Westdahl, and Peulik volcanoes.

  8. Process for combining multiple passes of interferometric SAR data

    DOEpatents

    Bickel, Douglas L.; Yocky, David A.; Hensley, Jr., William H.

    2000-11-21

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) is a promising technology for a wide variety of military and civilian elevation modeling requirements. IFSAR extends traditional two dimensional SAR processing to three dimensions by utilizing the phase difference between two SAR images taken from different elevation positions to determine an angle of arrival for each pixel in the scene. This angle, together with the two-dimensional location information in the traditional SAR image, can be transformed into geographic coordinates if the position and motion parameters of the antennas are known accurately.

  9. Rapid Development of Interferometric Software Using MIRIAD and Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Peter K. G.; Law, Casey J.; Bower, Geoffrey C.

    2012-06-01

    State-of-the-art radio interferometers are complex systems that unleash torrents of data. If current and planned instruments are to routinely meet their performance goals, standard analysis techniques must be significantly improved, becoming simultaneously more sophisticated, more automatic, and more scalable. While there is no shortage of ideas for next-generation algorithms, there is a shortage of development resources, so it is vital that programming environments for interferometric software allow for rapid, flexible development. We present an open-source software package, miriad-python, that provides access to the MIRIAD interferometric reduction system in the Python programming language. The modular design of MIRIAD and the high productivity and accessibility of Python provide an excellent foundation for rapid development of interferometric software. Several other projects with similar goals exist, and we describe them and compare miriad-python with them in detail. Along with an overview of the package design, we present sample code and applications, including the detection of millisecond astrophysical transients, determination and application of nonstandard calibration parameters, interactive data visualization, and a reduction pipeline using a directed acyclic graph dependency model analogous to that of the traditional UNIX tool make. The key aspects of the miriad-python software project are documented. We find that miriad-python provides an extremely effective environment for prototyping new interferometric software, though certain existing packages provide far more infrastructure for some applications. While equivalent software written in compiled languages can be much faster than Python, there are many situations in which execution time is profitably exchanged for speed of development, code readability, accessibility to nonexpert programmers, quick interlinking with foreign software packages, and other virtues of the Python language.

  10. Science with GRAVITY, the NIR Interferometric Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paumard, T.; Gillessen, S.; Brander, W.; Eckart, A.; Berger, J.; Garcia, P.; Amorim, A.; Anton, S.; Bartko, H.; Baumeister, H.; Carvas, P.; Cassaing, F.; Choquet, E.; Clénet, Y.; Collin, C.; Dodds-Eden, K.; Eisenhauer, F.; Fédou, P.; Gendron, É.; Genzel, R.; Gräter, A.; Guériau, C.; Haubois, X.; Haug, M.; Hippler, S.; Hofmann, R.; Hormuth, F.; Houairi, K.; Ihle, S.; Jocou, L.; Kellner, S.; Kervella, P.; Klein, R.; Kolmeder, J.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Lacour, S.; Lapeyrene, V.; Laun, W.; Lenzen, R.; Le Ruyet, B.; Lima, J. M. A.; Marteaud, M.; Moulin, T.; Naranjo, V.; Neumann, U.; Patru, F.; Perraut, K.; Perrin, G.; Pfuhl, O.; Réess, J.; Rabien, S.; Ramos, J. R.; Rohloff, R.; Rousset, G.; Sevin, A.; Thiel, M.; Vincent, F.; Ziegleder, J.; Ziegler, D.

    2011-05-01

    10-m class telescopes have brought a wealth of breakthroughs in Galactic Center science. They have allowed tantalizing results such as the measurement of orbits of stars coming close to relativistic velocities and energetic outbursts in the emission from Sgr A*. To get more details in the flaring activity of Sgr A* and trace truly relativistic orbits, a spatial resolution of a few milliarcseconds only is required. For this purpose, we are currently designing GRAVITY, a second generation instrument for the VLT Interferometer.

  11. Interferometric spectro-imager system (ISIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermande, Paul; Buil, Christian; Delbru, Francis

    1987-01-01

    This paper concerns an original design for a spectroimager, in which spectral analysis is performed by interferometry, with the necessary path difference being obtained as a direct result of the apparent displacement of the source as seen from the satellite while orbiting. Descriptions are given of the breadboard model used to determine the feasibility of the project, and of the transportable spectroimager (SIT) currently being produced at Aerospatiale Cannes (France).

  12. Second development of scientific experimental satellite image and its application

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xianfang; Liu Dechang; Huang Shutao

    1996-07-01

    In order to enlarge application range of scientific experimental satellite image, second development research has been done. The paper recommends how to transform from scientific experimental satellite image format into digital data format; how to process the transformed data, enhance and extract image information. Finally, the application of the processed image to in-situ leaching sandstone uranium deposit is described. Good results have been achieved, indicating the second development and application of the scientific experimental satellite image have great potentialities and prospects.

  13. Applications of superconducting bolometers in security imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luukanen, A.; Leivo, M. M.; Rautiainen, A.; Grönholm, M.; Toivanen, H.; Grönberg, L.; Helistö, P.; Mäyrä, A.; Aikio, M.; Grossman, E. N.

    2012-12-01

    Millimeter-wave (MMW) imaging systems are currently undergoing deployment World-wide for airport security screening applications. Security screening through MMW imaging is facilitated by the relatively good transmission of these wavelengths through common clothing materials. Given the long wavelength of operation (frequencies between 20 GHz to ~ 100 GHz, corresponding to wavelengths between 1.5 cm and 3 mm), existing systems are suited for close-range imaging only due to substantial diffraction effects associated with practical aperture diameters. The present and arising security challenges call for systems that are capable of imaging concealed threat items at stand-off ranges beyond 5 meters at near video frame rates, requiring substantial increase in operating frequency in order to achieve useful spatial resolution. The construction of such imaging systems operating at several hundred GHz has been hindered by the lack of submm-wave low-noise amplifiers. In this paper we summarize our efforts in developing a submm-wave video camera which utilizes cryogenic antenna-coupled microbolometers as detectors. Whilst superconducting detectors impose the use of a cryogenic system, we argue that the resulting back-end complexity increase is a favorable trade-off compared to complex and expensive room temperature submm-wave LNAs both in performance and system cost.

  14. Adaptive Optics Retinal Imaging: Emerging Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Godara, Pooja; Dubis, Adam M.; Roorda, Austin; Duncan, Jacque L.; Carroll, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    The human retina is a uniquely accessible tissue. Tools like scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) provide clinicians with remarkably clear pictures of the living retina. While the anterior optics of the eye permit such non-invasive visualization of the retina and associated pathology, these same optics induce significant aberrations that in most cases obviate cellular-resolution imaging. Adaptive optics (AO) imaging systems use active optical elements to compensate for aberrations in the optical path between the object and the camera. Applied to the human eye, AO allows direct visualization of individual rod and cone photoreceptor cells, RPE cells, and white blood cells. AO imaging has changed the way vision scientists and ophthalmologists see the retina, helping to clarify our understanding of retinal structure, function, and the etiology of various retinal pathologies. Here we review some of the advances made possible with AO imaging of the human retina, and discuss applications and future prospects for clinical imaging. PMID:21057346

  15. Applications review for a Space Program Imaging Radar (SPIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonett, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    The needs, applications, user support, research, and theoretical studies of imaging radar are reviewed. The applications of radar in water resources, minerals and petroleum exploration, vegetation resources, ocean radar imaging, and cartography are discussed. The advantages of space imaging radar are presented, and it is recommended that imaging radar be placed on the space shuttle.

  16. Medical applications of digital image morphing.

    PubMed

    Penska, Keith; Folio, Les; Bunger, Rolf

    2007-09-01

    The authors present a unique medical technical application for illustrating the success and/or failure of the physiological healing process as a dynamically morphed video. Two examples used in this report include the healing of a severely fractured humerus from an explosion in Iraq and the other of dramatic tissue destruction from a poisonous spider bite. For the humerus, several sequential x-rays obtained throughout orthopedic surgical procedures and the healing process were morphed together representing a time-lapsed video of the healing process. The end result is a video that demonstrates the healing process in an animation that radiologists envision and report to other clinicians. For the brown recluse spider bite, a seemingly benign skin lesion transforms into a wide gaping necrotic wound with dramatic appearance within days. This novel technique is not presented for readily apparent clinical advantage, rather, it may have more immediate application in providing treatment options to referring providers and/or patients, as well as educational value of healing or disease progression over time. Image morphing is one of those innovations that is just starting to come into its own. Morphing is an image processing technology that transforms one image into another by generating a series of intermediate synthetic images. It is the same process that Hollywood uses to turn people into animals in movies, for example. The ability to perform morphing, once restricted to high-end graphics workstations, is now widely available for desktop computers. The authors describe how a series of radiographic images were morphed into a short movie clip using readily available software and an average laptop. The resultant video showed the healing process of an open comminuted humerus fracture that helped demonstrate how amazingly the human body heals in a case presentation in a time-lapse fashion. PMID:17273920

  17. Iterated unscented Kalman filter for phase unwrapping of interferometric fringes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xianming

    2016-08-22

    A fresh phase unwrapping algorithm based on iterated unscented Kalman filter is proposed to estimate unambiguous unwrapped phase of interferometric fringes. This method is the result of combining an iterated unscented Kalman filter with a robust phase gradient estimator based on amended matrix pencil model, and an efficient quality-guided strategy based on heap sort. The iterated unscented Kalman filter that is one of the most robust methods under the Bayesian theorem frame in non-linear signal processing so far, is applied to perform simultaneously noise suppression and phase unwrapping of interferometric fringes for the first time, which can simplify the complexity and the difficulty of pre-filtering procedure followed by phase unwrapping procedure, and even can remove the pre-filtering procedure. The robust phase gradient estimator is used to efficiently and accurately obtain phase gradient information from interferometric fringes, which is needed for the iterated unscented Kalman filtering phase unwrapping model. The efficient quality-guided strategy is able to ensure that the proposed method fast unwraps wrapped pixels along the path from the high-quality area to the low-quality area of wrapped phase images, which can greatly improve the efficiency of phase unwrapping. Results obtained from synthetic data and real data show that the proposed method can obtain better solutions with an acceptable time consumption, with respect to some of the most used algorithms. PMID:27557170

  18. Image Understanding Applications of Lattice Autoassociative Memories.

    PubMed

    Grana, Manuel; Chyzhyk, Darya

    2016-09-01

    Multivariate mathematical morphology (MMM) aims to extend the mathematical morphology from gray scale images to images whose pixels are high-dimensional vectors, such as remote sensing hyperspectral images and functional magnetic resonance images (fMRIs). Defining an ordering over the multidimensional image data space is a fundamental issue MMM, to ensure that ensuing morphological operators and filters are mathematically consistent. Recent approaches use the outputs of two-class classifiers to build such reduced orderings. This paper presents the applications of MMM built on reduced supervised orderings based on lattice autoassociative memories (LAAMs) recall error measured by the Chebyshev distance. Foreground supervised orderings use one set of training data from a foreground class, whereas background/foreground supervised orderings use two training data sets, one for each relevant class. The first case study refers to the realization of the thematic segmentation of the hyperspectral images using spatial-spectral information. Spectral classification is enhanced by a spatial processing consisting in the spatial correction guided by a watershed segmentation computed by the LAAM-based morphological operators. The approach improves the state-of-the-art hyperspectral spatial-spectral thematic map building approaches. The second case study is the analysis of resting state fMRI data, working on a data set of healthy controls, schizophrenia patients with and without auditory hallucinations. We perform two experiments: 1) the localization of differences in brain functional networks on population-dependent templates and 2) the classification of subjects into each possible pair of cases. In this data set, we find that the LAAM-based morphological features improve over the conventional correlation-based graph measure features often employed in fMRI data classification. PMID:26292345

  19. Applications of scientific imaging in environmental toxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Demerdash, Aref M.

    The national goals of clean air, clean water, and healthy ecosystems are a few of the primary forces that drive the need for better environmental monitoring. As we approach the end of the 1990s, the environmental questions at regional to global scales are being redefined and refined in the light of developments in environmental understanding and technological capability. Research in the use of scientific imaging data for the study of the environment is urgently needed in order to explore the possibilities of utilizing emerging new technologies. The objective of this research proposal is to demonstrate the usability of a wealth of new technology made available in the last decade to providing a better understanding of environmental problems. Research is focused in two imaging techniques macro and micro imaging. Several examples of applications of scientific imaging in research in the field of environmental toxicology were presented. This was achieved on two scales, micro and macro imaging. On the micro level four specific examples were covered. First, the effect of utilizing scanning electron microscopy as an imaging tool in enhancing taxa identification when studying diatoms was presented. Second, scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive x-ray analyzer were demonstrated as a valuable and effective tool for identifying and analyzing household dust samples. Third, electronic autoradiography combined with FT-IR microscopy were used to study the distribution pattern of [14C]-Malathion in rats as a result of dermal exposure. The results of the autoradiography made on skin sections of the application site revealed the presence of [ 14C]-activity in the first region of the skin. These results were evidenced by FT-IR microscopy. The obtained results suggest that the penetration of Malathion into the skin and other tissues is vehicle and dose dependent. The results also suggest the use of FT-IR microscopy imaging for monitoring the disposition of

  20. Airborne Radar Interferometric Repeat-Pass Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Michel, Thierry R.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chapman, Bruce D.; Fore, Alexander; Simard, Marc; Zebker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Earth science research often requires crustal deformation measurements at a variety of time scales, from seconds to decades. Although satellites have been used for repeat-track interferometric (RTI) synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) mapping for close to 20 years, RTI is much more difficult to implement from an airborne platform owing to the irregular trajectory of the aircraft compared with microwave imaging radar wavelengths. Two basic requirements for robust airborne repeat-pass radar interferometry include the ability to fly the platform to a desired trajectory within a narrow tube and the ability to have the radar beam pointed in a desired direction to a fraction of a beam width. Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is equipped with a precision auto pilot developed by NASA Dryden that allows the platform, a Gulfstream III, to nominally fly within a 5 m diameter tube and with an electronically scanned antenna to position the radar beam to a fraction of a beam width based on INU (inertial navigation unit) attitude angle measurements.

  1. Application of GFP imaging in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-04-01

    Multicolored proteins have allowed the color-coding of cancer cells growing in vivo and enabled the distinction of host from tumor with single-cell resolution. Non-invasive imaging with fluorescent proteins enabled the dynamics of metastatic cancer to be followed in real time in individual animals. Non-invasive imaging of cancer cells expressing fluorescent proteins has allowed the real-time determination of efficacy of candidate antitumor and antimetastatic agents in mouse models. The use of fluorescent proteins to differentially label cancer cells in the nucleus and cytoplasm can visualize the nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics of cancer cells in vivo including: mitosis, apoptosis, cell-cycle position, and differential behavior of nucleus and cytoplasm that occurs during cancer-cell deformation and extravasation. Recent applications of the technology described here include linking fluorescent proteins with cell-cycle-specific proteins such that the cells change color from red to green as they transit from G1 to S phases. With the macro- and micro-imaging technologies described here, essentially any in vivo process can be imaged, giving rise to the new field of in vivo cell biology using fluorescent proteins. PMID:25686095

  2. Application of GFP imaging in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Multicolored proteins have allowed the color coding of cancer cells growing in vivo and enabled the distinction of host from tumor with single-cell resolution. Non-invasive imaging with fluorescent proteins enabled follow the dynamics of metastatic cancer to be followed in real time in individual animals. Non-invasive imaging of cancer cells expressing fluorescent proteins has enabled the real-time determination of efficacy of candidate antitumor and antimetastatic agents in mouse models. The use of fluorescent proteins to differentially label cancer cells in the nucleus and cytoplasm allow visualization of the nuclear–cytoplasmic dynamics of cancer cells in vivo, mitosis, apoptosis, cell-cycle position and differential behavior of nucleus and cytoplasm such as occurs during cancer-cell deformation and extravasation. Recent applications of the technology described here include linking fluorescent proteins with cell-cycle-specific proteins (FUCCI) such that the cells change color from red to green as they transit from G1 to S phases. With the macro and micro imaging technologies described here, essentially any in vivo process can be imaged, enabling the new field of in vivo cell biology using fluorescent proteins. PMID:25686095

  3. Target identification and navigation performance modeling of a passive millimeter wave imager.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Eddie L; Furxhi, Orges

    2010-07-01

    Human task performance using a passive interferometric millimeter wave imaging sensor is modeled using a task performance modeling approach developed by the U.S. Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate. The techniques used are illustrated for an imaging system composed of an interferometric antenna array, optical upconversion, and image formation using a shortwave infrared focal plane array. Two tasks, target identification and pilotage, are modeled. The effects of sparse antenna arrays on task performance are considered. Applications of this model include system trade studies for concealed weapon identification, navigation in fog, and brownout conditions. PMID:20648126

  4. Overview and Applications of UAVSAR's Multi-Squint Polarimetric Imaging Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott Hensley; Chen, Curtis; Michel, Thierry; Jones, Cathleen; Chapman, Bruce; Muellerschoen, Ron

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed a reconfigurable polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR), specifically designed to acquire airborne repeat track interferometric (RTI) SAR data for application to monitoring surface deformation and vegetation structure measurements. The system employs a precision autopilot developed by NASA Dryden that allows the plane to fly precise trajectories usually within a 5 m tube. Also required for robust repeat pass applications is the ability to point the antenna in the same direction on repeat passes to a fraction of an azimuth beamwidth (8? for UAVSAR). This precise pointing is achieved using an electronically scanned antenna whose pointing is based on inertial navigation unit (INU) attitude angle data. The radar design is fully polarimetric with an 80 MHz bandwidth (2 m range resolution) and has a greater than 20 km range swath when flying at its nominal altitude of 12500 m. The ability to electronically steer the beam on a pulse-to-pulse basis has allowed a new mode of SAR data acquisition whereby the radar beam is steered to different squint angles on successive pulses thereby simultaneously generating images at multiple squint angles. This mode offers the possibility of generating vector deformation measurements with a single pair of repeat passes and to obtain greater kz diversity for vegetation studies with a reduced number of passes. This paper will present an overview of the mode, discuss its potential for deformation and vegetation, and show some examples using UAVSAR data.

  5. The application of ghost imaging in infrared imaging detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hongtao; Yang, Zhaohua; Li, Dapeng; Wu, Ling-an

    2015-11-01

    Traditional imaging are mostly based on the principle of lens imaging which is simple but the imaging result is heavily dependent on the quality of detector. It is usual to increase the detector array density or reduce the size of pixels to improve the imaging resolution, especially for infrared imaging. It will decrease the light flux causing the noise enhance relatively and add the cost on the contrary. Besides, there is a novel imaging technology called ghost imaging. We present a new infrared imaging method named computational ghost imaging only using a bucket detector without spatial resolution, which avoiding the allocation of flux on the pixel dimension as well as reducing the cost.

  6. Terahertz electronics for sensing and imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Short channel field effect transistors can detect terahertz radiation. Such detection is enabled by the excitation of the plasma waves rectified due to the device nonlinearities. The resulting response has nanometer scale spatial resolution and can be modulated in the sub THz range. This technology could enable a variety of sensing, imaging, and wireless communication applications, including detection of biological and chemical hazardous agents, cancer detection, shortrange covert communications (in THz and sub-THz windows), and applications in radio astronomy. Field effect transistors implemented using III-V, III-N, Si, SiGe, and graphene have been used to detect THz radiation. Using silicon transistors in plasmonic regimes is especially appealing because of compatibility with standard readout silicon VLSI components.

  7. Research on a novel MOEMS interferometric gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huilan; Feng, Lishuang; Lin, Heng; Zhang, Chunxi

    2006-11-01

    MOEMS (Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical System) gyroscope is one of the research hotspot of international inertial domain. It combines advantages of optical detect principle of optical gyroscopes and MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) fabrication technique. It is solid-state. It has little volume, light weight, good stability, and large dynamic scale. And it can be batch fabricated. These make it has large applications in inertial technology domain. A MOEMS interferometric gyroscope which uses spatial optical paths to sensitive Sagnac effect is presented. A spatial helical optical structure composed of micromirrors was designed. Light traveled in free space, which could reduce wastage. The gyroscope has no coupling problem, no back scatter, and no movable parts. The structure of the gyroscope has advantages in microminiaturization. It could be manufactured using MEMS technics. Theoretical analyses were made to parameters of the spatial optical path from the viewpoint of improving the fundamental detection limit. Theorem proving experiment was researched. Based on experiment design, output signals of the gyroscope on rotate platform were measured using Lock-in amplifier and other instruments. Theorem proving of the Sagnac effect is realized, and the bias stability of the gyroscope system is about 8 °/h.

  8. Interferometric array layout design by tomographic projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Villiers, M.

    2007-07-01

    Context: This study pertains to the optimization of the layout of a single configuration interferometric array to achieve a desired natural tapering for the density distribution of its UV plane coverage. Existing techniques that seek this goal determine a two dimensional density gradient that acts on the UV samples and in turn on the antenna positions. This gradient is commonly computed by gridding the UV plane, and is sometimes averaged over a number of different scales due to the sparseness of the UV samples. Aims: The goal of this study is to demonstrate a new method that can move antenna positions to achieve an ideal density distribution for the UV samples without the need for gridding. Methods: An approach is described where the UV samples are projected into a one dimensional vector. If an equivalent projection is done for an ideal model distribution, the difference between these vectors yields correction terms which can be mapped to new antenna positions. Such modifications are made in all directions until a close match is achieved to the desired UV plane coverage and equivalently, by the Fourier transform, the ideal point spread function. Results: Results are provided that relate achievable resolution (for Gaussian UV coverage) to the number of antennas available to the algorithm, for a few different observation modes. Preliminary layouts are shown for the Square Kilometer Array pathfinder project, the Karoo Array Telescope. Conclusions: The proposed method is applicable to very few as well as a large number of antennas. Multiple objective optimization is not considered.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging: Principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kean, D.; Smith, M.

    1986-01-01

    This text covers the physics underlying magnetic resonance (MR) imaging; pulse sequences; image production; equipment; aspects of clinical imaging; and the imaging of the head and neck, thorax, abdomen and pelvis, and musculoskeletal system; and MR imaging. The book provides about 150 examples of MR images that give an overview of the pathologic conditions imaged. There is a discussion of the physics of MR imaging and also on the spin echo.

  10. Ultrawideband radar imaging system for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jafari, H.M.; Liu, W.; Hranilovic, S.; Deen, M.J.

    2006-05-15

    Ultrawideband (UWB) (3-10 GHz) radar imaging systems offer much promise for biomedical applications such as cancer detection because of their good penetration and resolution characteristics. The underlying principle of UWB cancer detection is a significant contrast in dielectric properties, which is estimated to be greater than 2:1 between normal and cancerous tissue, compared to a few-percent contrast in radiographic density exploited by x rays. This article presents a feasibility study of the UWB imaging of liver cancer tumors, based on the frequency-dependent finite difference time domain method. The reflection, radiation, and scattering properties of UWB pulses as they propagate through the human body are studied. The reflected and back-scattered electromagnetic energies from cancer tumors inside the liver are also investigated. An optimized, ultrawideband antenna was designed for near field operation, allowing for the reduction of the air-skin interface. It will be placed on the fat-liver tissue phantom with a malignant tumor stimulant. By performing an incremental scan over the phantom and removing early time artifacts, including reflection from the antenna ends, images based on the back-scattered signal from the tumor can be constructed. This research is part of our effort to develop a UWB cancer detection system with good detection and localization properties.

  11. Approximate wavenumber domain algorithm for interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Qiao; Lei, Yong; Wang, Yi; Yu, Daoyin

    2010-05-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM), which can increase transverse resolution with fixed depth of field in the spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) is analyzed. Due to the high computational complexity needed for ISAM, the approximate wavenumber domain algorithm or ωKA is applied, which can save much rebuilding time without the Stolt interpolation. The multiple scatterers simulation and improved two-dimensional (2D) imaging of fresh pig liver based on the proposed ωKA approach are demonstrated. The current simulation and experimental results prove the effectiveness of the approximate ωKA.

  12. Interferometric, astrometric, and photometric studies of Epsilon Aurigae: Seeing the disk around a distant star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloppenborg, Brian

    2012-05-01

    Epsilon (epsilon) Aurigae is a binary star system that has baffled astronomers for 170 years. In 1821 it was first noticed that the star system had dimmed by nearly 50%. After many decades of photometric monitoring, the 27.1 year period was finally established in 1903. A few years later, in 1912, Henry Norris Russell published the first analytic methods for binary star analysis. Later application of these formulae came to an interesting conclusion; the system was composed of two stars: the visible F-type supergiant, and an equally massive, but yet photometrically and spectroscopically invisible, companion. Several theories were advanced to explain this low-light to high-mass conundrum, eventually settling on the notion that the companion object is obscured from view by a disk of opaque material. With this topic solved, the debate shifted the evolutionary state of the system. Two scenarios became dominant: the system is either relativity young, and composed of a massive, 15 Mo (solar mass), F-type supergiant and a nearly equally massive main sequence companion inside of the disk; or a much older and significantly less massive, 4 Mo, F-type post-asymptotic giant branch object with a more massive, 6 Mo, companion surrounded by a debris disk. In this dissertation I disentangle the two evolutionary states by comparing the photometric behavior of the F-type star to known supergiant and post-asymptotic giant branch objects; and deriving a dynamical mass for the two components using astrometric, radial velocity, and interferometric data. Along with this, I provide the first interferometric images during the eclipse which prove the 50% dimming is indeed caused by an opaque disk. The first chapter presents the reader with the status quo of epsilon Aurigae research and the topics I wish to address in this dissertation. Chapter two presents an analysis of nearly 30 years of photometry on the system, concluding the star periodically exhibits stable pulsation on 1/3 orbital

  13. SOURCE DETECTION IN INTERFEROMETRIC VISIBILITY DATA. I. FUNDAMENTAL ESTIMATION LIMITS

    SciTech Connect

    Trott, Cathryn M.; Wayth, Randall B.; Macquart, Jean-Pierre R.; Tingay, Steven J.

    2011-04-20

    Transient radio signals of astrophysical origin present an avenue for studying the dynamic universe. With the next generation of radio interferometers being planned and built, there is great potential for detecting and studying large samples of radio transients. Currently used image-based techniques for detecting radio sources have not been demonstrated to be optimal, and there is a need for development of more sophisticated algorithms and methodology for comparing different detection techniques. A visibility-space detector benefits from our good understanding of visibility-space noise properties and does not suffer from the image artifacts and need for deconvolution in image-space detectors. In this paper, we propose a method for designing optimal source detectors using visibility data, building on statistical decision theory. The approach is substantially different to conventional radio astronomy source detection. Optimal detection requires an accurate model for the data, and we present a realistic model for the likelihood function of radio interferometric data, including the effects of calibration, signal confusion, and atmospheric phase fluctuations. As part of this process, we derive fundamental limits on the calibration of an interferometric array, including the case where many relatively weak 'in-beam' calibrators are used. These limits are then applied, along with a model for atmospheric phase fluctuations, to determine the limits on measuring source position, flux density, and spectral index, in the general case. We then present an optimal visibility-space detector using realistic models for an interferometer.

  14. Robust image modeling techniques with an image restoration application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, Rangasami L.; Eom, Kie-Bum

    1988-08-01

    A robust parameter-estimation algorithm for a nonsymmetric half-plane (NSHP) autoregressive model, where the driving noise is a mixture of a Gaussian and an outlier process, is presented. The convergence of the estimation algorithm is proved. An algorithm to estimate parameters and original image intensity simultaneously from the impulse-noise-corrupted image, where the model governing the image is not available, is also presented. The robustness of the parameter estimates is demonstrated by simulation. Finally, an algorithm to restore realistic images is presented. The entire image generally does not obey a simple image model, but a small portion (e.g., 8 x 8) of the image is assumed to obey an NSHP model. The original image is divided into windows and the robust estimation algorithm is applied for each window. The restoration algorithm is tested by comparing it to traditional methods on several different images.

  15. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    DOEpatents

    Demos, Stavros; Staggs, Michael C.

    2006-12-12

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  16. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    DOEpatents

    Demos; Stavros , Staggs; Michael C.

    2006-03-21

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  17. Interferometric Rayleigh Scattering Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivolaru, Daniel (Inventor); Danehy, Paul M. (Inventor); Lee, Joseph W. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method and apparatus for performing simultaneous multi-point measurements of multiple velocity components in a gas flow is described. Pulses of laser light are directed to a measurement region of unseeded gas to produce Rayleigh or Mie scattered light in a plurality of directions. The Rayleigh or Mie scattered light is collected from multiple directions and combined in a single collimated light beam. The Rayleigh or Mie scattered light is then mixed together with a reference laser light before it is passed through a single planar Fabry-Perot interferometer for spectral analysis. At the output of the interferometer, a high-sensitivity CCD camera images the interference fringe pattern. This pattern contains the spectral and spatial information from both the Rayleigh scattered light and the reference laser light. Interferogram processing software extracts and analyzes spectral profiles to determine the velocity components of the gas flow at multiple points in the measurement region. The Rayleigh light rejected by the interferometer is recirculated to increase the accuracy and the applicability of the method for measurements at high temperatures without requiring an increase in the laser energy.

  18. Two satellite image sets for the training and validation of image processing systems for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Michael R.; Aldridge, Shawn; Herzog, Britny; Moore, Frank

    2010-04-01

    Many image processing algorithms utilize the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) to provide efficient compression and near-perfect reconstruction of image data. Defense applications often require the transmission of data at high levels of compression over noisy channels. In recent years, evolutionary algorithms (EAs) have been utilized to optimize image transform filters that outperform standard wavelets for bandwidth-constrained compression of satellite images. The optimization of these filters requires the use of training images appropriately chosen for the image processing system's intended applications. This paper presents two robust sets of fifty images each intended for the training and validation of satellite and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) reconnaissance image processing algorithms. Each set consists of a diverse range of subjects consisting of cities, airports, military bases, and landmarks representative of the types of images that may be captured during reconnaissance missions. Optimized algorithms may be "overtrained" for a specific problem instance and thus exhibit poor performance over a general set of data. To reduce the risk of overtraining an image filter, we evaluate the suitability of each image as a training image. After evolving filters using each image, we assess the average compression performance of each filter across the entire set of images. We thus identify a small subset of images from each set that provide strong performance as training images for the image transform optimization problem. These images will also provide a suitable platform for the development of other algorithms for defense applications. The images are available upon request from the contact author.

  19. Image and video fingerprinting: forensic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Frédéric; Chupeau, Bertrand; Massoudi, Ayoub; Diehl, Eric

    2009-02-01

    Fighting movie piracy often requires automatic content identification. The most common technique to achieve this uses watermarking, but not all copyrighted content is watermarked. Video fingerprinting is an efficient alternative solution to identify content, to manage multimedia files in UGC sites or P2P networks and to register pirated copies with master content. When registering by matching copy fingerprints with master ones, a model of distortion can be estimated. In case of in-theater piracy, the model of geometric distortion allows the estimation of the capture location. A step even further is to determine, from passive image analysis only, whether different pirated versions were captured with the same camcorder. In this paper we present three such fingerprinting-based forensic applications: UGC filtering, estimation of capture location and source identification.

  20. Applications of high-resolution remote sensing image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strome, W. M.; Leckie, D.; Miller, J.; Buxton, R.

    1990-01-01

    There are many situations in which the image resolution of satellite data is insufficient to provide the detail required for resource management and environmental monitoring. This paper will focus on applications of high-resolution (0.4 to 10 m) airborne multispectral and imaging spectrometer data acquired in Canada using the MEIS II multispectral line imager and the PMI imaging spectrometer. Applications discussed will include forestry, mapping, and geobotany.

  1. Development of image mappers for hyperspectral biomedical imaging applications

    PubMed Central

    Kester, Robert T.; Gao, Liang; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2010-01-01

    A new design and fabrication method is presented for creating large-format (>100 mirror facets) image mappers for a snapshot hyperspectral biomedical imaging system called an image mapping spectrometer (IMS). To verify this approach a 250 facet image mapper with 25 multiple-tilt angles is designed for a compact IMS that groups the 25 subpupils in a 5 × 5 matrix residing within a single collecting objective's pupil. The image mapper is fabricated by precision diamond raster fly cutting using surface-shaped tools. The individual mirror facets have minimal edge eating, tilt errors of <1 mrad, and an average roughness of 5.4 nm. PMID:20357875

  2. Modifications of intensity-interferometric spectral-domain optical coherence tomography with dispersion cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Tomohiro

    2015-04-01

    Intensity-interferometric spectral-domain (SD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) developed recently enables axial-scan-free cross-sectional imaging with group-velocity dispersion cancellation and a factor-of-\\sqrt{2} resolution improvement. This paper is concerned with a simple and practical method of realizing OCT of this kind. Specifically, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that intensity-interferometric SD-OCT can be realized in a simple way by means of a slightly modified conventional SD-OCT setup.

  3. Viewpoints on Medical Image Processing: From Science to Application

    PubMed Central

    Deserno (né Lehmann), Thomas M.; Handels, Heinz; Maier-Hein (né Fritzsche), Klaus H.; Mersmann, Sven; Palm, Christoph; Tolxdorff, Thomas; Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Medical image processing provides core innovation for medical imaging. This paper is focused on recent developments from science to applications analyzing the past fifteen years of history of the proceedings of the German annual meeting on medical image processing (BVM). Furthermore, some members of the program committee present their personal points of views: (i) multi-modality for imaging and diagnosis, (ii) analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging, (iii) model-based image analysis, (iv) registration of section images, (v) from images to information in digital endoscopy, and (vi) virtual reality and robotics. Medical imaging and medical image computing is seen as field of rapid development with clear trends to integrated applications in diagnostics, treatment planning and treatment. PMID:24078804

  4. Observing the Sun with micro-interferometric devices: a didactic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defrère, D.; Absil, O.; Hanot, C.; Riaud, P.; Magette, A.; Marion, L.; Wertz, O.; Finet, F.; Steenackers, M.; Habraken, S.; Surdej, A.; Surdej, J.

    2014-04-01

    Measuring the angular diameter of celestial bodies has long been the main purpose of stellar interferometry and was its historical motivation. Nowadays, stellar interferometry is widely used for various other scientific purposes that require very high angular resolution measurements. In terms of angular spatial scales probed, observing distant stars located 10 to 100~pc away with a large hectometric interferometer is equivalent to observing our Sun with a micrometric baseline. Based on this idea, we have manufactured a set of micro-interferometric devices and tested them on the sky. The micro-interferometers consist of a chrome layer deposited on a glass plate that has been drilled by laser lithography to produce micron-sized holes with configurations corresponding to proposed interferometer projects such as CARLINA, ELSA, KEOPS, and OVLA. In this paper, we describe these interferometric devices and present interferometric observations of the Sun made in the framework of Astrophysics lectures being taught at the Liège University. By means of a simple photographic camera placed behind a micro-interferometric device, we observed the Sun and derived its angular size. This experiment provides a very didactic way to easily obtain fringe patterns similar to those that will be obtained with future large imaging arrays. A program written in C also allows to reproduce the various point spread functions and fringe patterns observed with the micro-interferometric devices for different types of sources, including the Sun.

  5. Achieving stabilization in interferometric logic operations.

    PubMed

    Zavalin, Andrey I; Shamir, Joseph; Vikram, Chandra S; Caulfield, H John

    2006-01-10

    Interferometric systems with amplitude beam splitters can implement reversible operations that, on detection, become Boolean operators. Being passive, they consume no energy, do not limit the operating bandwidth, and have negligible latency. Unfortunately, conventional interferometric systems are notoriously sensitive to uncontrolled disturbances. Here the use of polarization in a common-path interferometric logic gate with and without polarization beam splitters is explored as an attractive alternative to overcome those difficulties. Two of three device configurations considered offer significant stability and lower drive modulator voltage as advantages over the previous systems. The first experimental tests of such a system are reported. Common-path interferometry lends itself to even more stability and robustness by compatibility with no-air-gap, solid optics. PMID:16422166

  6. Achieving stabilization in interferometric logic operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavalin, Andrey I.; Shamir, Joseph; Vikram, Chandra S.; Caulfield, H. John

    2006-01-01

    Interferometric systems with amplitude beam splitters can implement reversible operations that, on detection, become Boolean operators. Being passive, they consume no energy, do not limit the operating bandwidth, and have negligible latency. Unfortunately, conventional interferometric systems are notoriously sensitive to uncontrolled disturbances. Here the use of polarization in a common-path interferometric logic gate with and without polarization beam splitters is explored as an attractive alternative to overcome those difficulties. Two of three device configurations considered offer significant stability and lower drive modulator voltage as advantages over the previous systems. The first experimental tests of such a system are reported. Common-path interferometry lends itself to even more stability and robustness by compatibility with no-air-gap, solid optics.

  7. Satellite emission radio interferometric earth surveying series - GPS geodetic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.

    1979-01-01

    A concept called SERIES (satellite emissions radio interferometric earth surveying) which makes use of GPS (global positioning system) radio transmissions without any satellite modifications, is described. Through the use of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and its calibration methods, 0.5 to 3 cm three dimensional baseline accuracy can be achieved over distances of 2 to 200 km respectively, with only 2 hours of on-site data acquisition. Attention is given to such areas as: the radio flux equivalent of GPS transmissions, synthesized delay precision, transmission and frequency subsystem requirements, tropospheric and ionospheric errors. Applications covered include geodesy and seismic tectonics.

  8. Broadband infrared beam splitter for spaceborne interferometric infrared sounder.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tianyan; Liu, Dingquan; Qin, Yang

    2014-10-01

    A broadband infrared beam splitter (BS) on ZnSe substrate used for the spaceborne interferometric infrared sounder (SIIRS) is studied in the spectral range of 4.44-15 μm. Both broadband antireflection coating and broadband beam-splitter coating in this BS are designed and tested. To optimize the optical properties and the stability of the BS, suitable infrared materials were selected, and improved deposition techniques were applied. The designed structures matched experimental data well, and the properties of the BS met the application specification of SIIRS. PMID:25322240

  9. Time frequency requirements for radio interferometric earth physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.; Fliegel, H. F.

    1973-01-01

    Two systems of VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) are now applicable to earth physics: an intercontinental baseline system using antennas of the NASA Deep Space Network, now observing at one-month intervals to determine UTI for spacecraft navigation; and a shorter baseline system called ARIES (Astronomical Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying), to be used to measure crustal movement in California for earthquake hazards estimation. On the basis of experience with the existing DSN system, a careful study has been made to estimate the time and frequency requirements of both the improved intercontinental system and of ARIES. Requirements for the two systems are compared and contrasted.

  10. Investigation of laser holographic interferometric techniques for structure inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, W. P.

    1973-01-01

    The application of laser holographic interferometric techniques for nondestructive inspection of material structures commonly used in aerospace works is investigated. Two types of structures, composite plate and solid fuel rocket engine motor casing, were examined. In conducting the experiments, both CW HeNe gas lasers and Q-switched ruby lasers were used as light sources for holographic recording setups. Different stressing schemes were investigated as to their effectiveness in generating maximum deformation at regions of structural weakness such as flaws and disbonds. Experimental results on stressing schemes such as thermal stressing, pressurized stressing, transducer excitation, and mechanical impact are presented and evaluated.

  11. Three-dimensional motion correction using speckle and phase for in vivo computed optical interferometric tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shemonski, Nathan D.; Ahn, Shawn S.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; South, Fredrick A.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the years, many computed optical interferometric techniques have been developed to perform high-resolution volumetric tomography. By utilizing the phase and amplitude information provided with interferometric detection, post-acquisition corrections for defocus and optical aberrations can be performed. The introduction of the phase, though, can dramatically increase the sensitivity to motion (most prominently along the optical axis). In this paper, we present two algorithms which, together, can correct for motion in all three dimensions with enough accuracy for defocus and aberration correction in computed optical interferometric tomography. The first algorithm utilizes phase differences within the acquired data to correct for motion along the optical axis. The second algorithm utilizes the addition of a speckle tracking system using temporally- and spatially-coherent illumination to measure motion orthogonal to the optical axis. The use of coherent illumination allows for high-contrast speckle patterns even when imaging apparently uniform samples or when highly aberrated beams cannot be avoided. PMID:25574426

  12. Differential Interferometric Applications in Alpine Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, T.; Wegmueller, U.; Wiesmann, A.; Kääb, A.; Frauenfelder, R.; Werner, C.; Graf, K.; Rätzo, H.; Lateltin, O.

    2004-06-01

    The high-mountain mass-transport systems are the results of steady mass shifts and catastrophic mass-movement events. The equilibrium of these systems is markedly influenced by ice occurrence, which makes high mountains especially sensitive to climate impacts [1]. The creeping and thawing of frozen debris, often found as permafrost, is a significant factor for the disposition of periglacial debris flows and related slope instabilities [2]. Not only instabilities of debris slopes but also instabilities of rock slopes can be connected to glacial and permafrost processes [3]. Glacier retreats, for instance, affect the stability of valley flanks, or varying ice content affects the rock hydrology. Such system interactions clearly show the urgent need of integral hazard assessments accounting for a variety of relevant processes in high mountains, also considering that a variety of natural hazards in high mountain regions are affecting human activities. Taking into account the wide-area coverage, remote-sensing techniques represent suitable tools for an integral hazard mapping and monitoring in high mountains, regions that are typically difficult to assess [4]. The focus of this contribution is on the potential and limitations of differential SAR interferometry [5,6] for the detection and monitoring of unstable high-mountain slopes [7-11]. SAR data of the ERS and JERS satellites for the Swiss Alps have been analyzed with short baseline interferometry and point target interferometry [12.13]. Significant results for permafrost creeping are presented. The work presented here is part of the ongoing SLAM (Services for Landslide Monitoring) project supported by the European Space Agency [14].

  13. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adie, Steven G.; Shemonski, Nathan D.; Ralston, Tyler S.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    The trade-off between transverse resolution and depth-of-field, and the mitigation of optical aberrations, are long-standing problems in optical imaging. The deleterious impact of these problems on three-dimensional tomography increases with numerical aperture (NA), and so they represent a significant impediment for real-time cellular resolution tomography over the typical imaging depths achieved with OCT. With optical coherence microscopy (OCM), which utilizes higher-NA optics than OCT, the depth-of-field is severely reduced, and it has been postulated that aberrations play a major role in reducing the useful imaging depth in OCM. Even at lower transverse resolution, both these phenomena produce artifacts that degrade the imaging of fine tissue structures. Early approaches to the limited depth-of-field problem in time-domain OCT utilized dynamic focusing. In spectral-domain OCT, this focus-shifting approach to data acquisition leads to long acquisition times and large datasets. Adaptive optics (AO) has been utilized to correct optical aberrations, in particular for retinal OCT, but in addition to requiring elaborate and expensive setups, the real-time optimization requirements at the time of imaging, and the correction of spatially varying effects of aberrations throughout an imaged volume, remain as significant challenges. This chapter presents computed imaging solutions for the reconstruction of sample structure when imaging with ideal and aberrated Gaussian beams.

  14. Advances in Clinical and Biomedical Applications of Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jimmy L.; Wang, Bo; Wilson, Katheryne E.; Bayer, Carolyn L.; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Kim, Seungsoo; Homan, Kimberly A.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Photoacoustic imaging is an imaging modality that derives image contrast from the optical absorption coefficient of the tissue being imaged. The imaging technique is able to differentiate between healthy and diseased tissue with either deeper penetration or higher resolution than other functional imaging modalities currently available. From a clinical standpoint, photoacoustic imaging has demonstrated safety and effectiveness in diagnosing diseased tissue regions using either endogenous tissue contrast or exogenous contrast agents. Furthermore, the potential of photoacoustic imaging has been demonstrated in various therapeutic interventions ranging from drug delivery and release to image-guided therapy and monitoring. Areas covered in this review This article reviews the current state of photoacoustic imaging in biomedicine from a technological perspective, highlights various biomedical and clinical applications of photoacoustic imaging, and gives insights on future directions. What the reader will gain Readers will learn about the various applications of photoacoustic imaging, as well as the various contrast agents that can be used to assist photoacoustic imaging. This review will highlight both pre-clinical and clinical uses for photoacoustic imaging, as well as discuss some of the challenges that must be addressed to move photoacoustic imaging into the clinical realm. Take home message Photoacoustic imaging offers unique advantages over existing imaging modalities. The imaging field is broad with many exciting applications for detecting and diagnosing diseased tissue or processes. Photoacoustics is also used in therapeutic applications to identify and characterize the pathology and then to monitor the treatment. Although the technology is still in its infancy, much work has been done in the pre-clinical arena, and photoacoustic imaging is fast approaching the clinical setting. PMID:21344060

  15. A backscattered x-ray imager for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Eric Jude L.; Dibianca, Frank A.; Shukla, Hemant; Gulabani, Daya

    2005-04-01

    Conventional X-ray radiographic systems rely on transmitted photons for the production of images. Backscatter imaging makes use of the more abundant scattered photons for image formation. Specifically, incoherently (Compton) scattered X-ray photons are detected and used for image formation in this modality of medical imaging. However, additional information is obtained when the transmitted X-ray photons are also detected and used. Transmission radiography produces a two-dimensional image of a three dimensional system, therefore image information from a shallower object is often contaminated by image information from underlying objects. Backscattered x-ray imaging largely overcomes this deficiency by imaging depth selectively, which reduces corruption of shallow imaging information by information from deeper objects lying under it. Backscattered x-ray imaging may be particularly useful for examining anatomical structures at shallow depths beneath the skin. Some typical applications for such imaging might be breast imaging, middle ear imaging, imaging of skin melanomas, etc. Previous investigations, by way of theoretical calculations and computational simulations into the feasibility of this kind of imaging have uncovered high-contrast and SNR parameters. Simulations indicate that this method can be used for imaging relatively high-density objects at depths of up to approximately five centimeters below the surface. This paper presents both theoretical and experimental SNR results on this new medical imaging modality.

  16. New impedance and electrochemical image techniques for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, N. J.

    2010-03-01

    A method to image local surface impedance and electrochemical current optically is developed for biological applications. The principle of the impedance imaging is based on sensitive dependence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on local surface charge density. The technique can image local surface impedance and charge while providing simultaneously a conventional surface plasmon resonance (SPR) image. By applying a potential modulation to a sensor surface, it is possible to obtain an image of the DC component, and the amplitude and phase images of the AC component. The DC image provides local molecular binding, as found in the conventional SPR imaging technique. The AC images are directly related to the local impedance of the surface. This imaging capability may be used as a new detection platform for DNA and protein microarrays, a new method for analyzing local molecular binding and interfacial processes and a new tool for imaging cells and tissues.

  17. Stable image acquisition for mobile image processing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Kai-Fabian; Fritze, Alexander; Gillich, Eugen; Mönks, Uwe; Lohweg, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Today, mobile devices (smartphones, tablets, etc.) are widespread and of high importance for their users. Their performance as well as versatility increases over time. This leads to the opportunity to use such devices for more specific tasks like image processing in an industrial context. For the analysis of images requirements like image quality (blur, illumination, etc.) as well as a defined relative position of the object to be inspected are crucial. Since mobile devices are handheld and used in constantly changing environments the challenge is to fulfill these requirements. We present an approach to overcome the obstacles and stabilize the image capturing process such that image analysis becomes significantly improved on mobile devices. Therefore, image processing methods are combined with sensor fusion concepts. The approach consists of three main parts. First, pose estimation methods are used to guide a user moving the device to a defined position. Second, the sensors data and the pose information are combined for relative motion estimation. Finally, the image capturing process is automated. It is triggered depending on the alignment of the device and the object as well as the image quality that can be achieved under consideration of motion and environmental effects.

  18. Applications of Digital Image Processing 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. -C.

    1988-01-01

    A new technique, digital image velocimetry, is proposed for the measurement of instantaneous velocity fields of time dependent flows. A time sequence of single-exposure images of seed particles are captured with a high-speed camera, and a finite number of the single-exposure images are sampled within a prescribed period in time. The sampled images are then digitized on an image processor, enhanced, and superimposed to construct an image which is equivalent to a multiple exposure image used in both laser speckle velocimetry and particle image velocimetry. The superimposed image and a single-exposure Image are digitally Fourier transformed for extraction of information on the velocity field. A great enhancement of the dynamic range of the velocity measurement is accomplished through the new technique by manipulating the Fourier transform of both the single-exposure image and the superimposed image. Also the direction of the velocity vector is unequivocally determined. With the use of a high-speed video camera, the whole process from image acquisition to velocity determination can be carried out electronically; thus this technique can be developed into a real-time capability.

  19. Application of Uncooled Monolithic Thermoelectric Linear Arrays to Imaging Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Paul W.

    Introduction Identification of Incipient Failure of Railcar Wheels Technical Description of the Model IR 1000 Imaging Radiometer Performance of the Model IR 1000 Imaging Radiometer Initial Application Summary Imaging Radiometer for Predictive and Preventive Maintenance Description Operation Specifications Summary References INDEX CONTENTS OF VOLUMES IN THIS SERIES

  20. Application of homomorphism to secure image sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Naveed; Puech, William; Hayat, Khizar; Brouzet, Robert

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we present a new approach for sharing images between l players by exploiting the additive and multiplicative homomorphic properties of two well-known public key cryptosystems, i.e. RSA and Paillier. Contrary to the traditional schemes, the proposed approach employs secret sharing in a way that limits the influence of the dealer over the protocol and allows each player to participate with the help of his key-image. With the proposed approach, during the encryption step, each player encrypts his own key-image using the dealer's public key. The dealer encrypts the secret-to-be-shared image with the same public key and then, the l encrypted key-images plus the encrypted to-be shared image are multiplied homomorphically to get another encrypted image. After this step, the dealer can safely get a scrambled image which corresponds to the addition or multiplication of the l + 1 original images ( l key-images plus the secret image) because of the additive homomorphic property of the Paillier algorithm or multiplicative homomorphic property of the RSA algorithm. When the l players want to extract the secret image, they do not need to use keys and the dealer has no role. Indeed, with our approach, to extract the secret image, the l players need only to subtract their own key-image with no specific order from the scrambled image. Thus, the proposed approach provides an opportunity to use operators like multiplication on encrypted images for the development of a secure privacy preserving protocol in the image domain. We show that it is still possible to extract a visible version of the secret image with only l-1 key-images (when one key-image is missing) or when the l key-images used for the extraction are different from the l original key-images due to a lossy compression for example. Experimental results and security analysis verify and prove that the proposed approach is secure from cryptographic viewpoint.

  1. Note: Near infrared interferometric silicon wafer metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. S.; Park, H. M.; Joo, K. N.

    2016-04-01

    In this investigation, two near infrared (NIR) interferometric techniques for silicon wafer metrology are described and verified with experimental results. Based on the transparent characteristic of NIR light to a silicon wafer, the fiber based spectrally resolved interferometry can measure the optical thickness of the wafer and stitching low coherence scanning interferometry can reconstruct entire surfaces of the wafer.

  2. Quantum Limits in Interferometric GW Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romano, R.; Barone, F.; Maddalena, P.; Solimeno, S.; Zaccaria, F.; Manko, M. A.; Manko, V. I.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss a model for interferometric GW antennas illuminated by a laser beam and a vacuum squeezed field. The sensitivity of the antenna will depend on the properties of the radiation entering the two ports and on the optical characteristics of the interferometer components, e.g. mirrors, beam-splitter, lenses.

  3. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microwave Radiometers : an Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colliander, Andreas; McKague, Darren

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes 1) the progress of the work of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS) Instrumentation and Future Technologies Technical Committee (IFT-TC) Microwave Radiometer Working Group and 2) an overview of the development of interferometric synthetic aperture microwave radiometers as an introduction to a dedicated session.

  4. Phase-stepping interferometric system for capturing instantaneous flow field under harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, Alpheus W.; Yu, Enxi; Cha, Soyoung S.

    2003-04-01

    Interferometric reconstruction of a flow field usually consists of three steps. The first is to record interferograms, the second is to extract phase information from interferograms and the final is for numerical inversion of the phase data. In interferometric flow recording, test section enclosures and opaque models are frequently present, blocking a portion of the probing rays or restricting the view angle of the field to produce a partial data set especially for interferometric tomography. It also involves very harsh environments with external vibrations and disturbances of the ambient air. The ill-posed problem is susceptible to experimental noise and can produce serious distortions in reconstruction. Interferometric reconstruction of flow fields thus needs accurate phase information extraction. The major problem encountered in interferometry is that it is extremely sensitive to external disturbances including the vibration of the optical setup. This is true especially for aerodynamic wind tunnel testing. For successful application of interferometry to experimental fluid mechancis and heat/mass transfer, efficient mechanisms for accurate flow-field recording and information extraction are thus very necessary. In interferometric recording, use of the phase stepping techniques is desirable whenever possible, since they provide the most accuracy. However, they are not applicable under disturbing conditions; that is, under harsh environments. In an effort to provide accurate interferometric data, we device interferogram recording and reduction techniques. They are based on a phase-stepping method: however, applicable to harsh environments including wind tunnel testing. Here we present the governing concepts, investigation results, and application demonstration of our approaches for practical flow measurements. The developed approaches are tested through phoase extraction and 3D reconstruction of an experimental flow field, which is designed for future wind tunnel

  5. Autoradiographic image intensification - Applications in medical radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askins, B. S.

    1978-01-01

    The image of an 80 to 90 percent underexposed medical radiograph can be increased to readable density and contrast by autoradiographic image intensification. The technique consists of combining the image silver of the radiograph with a radioactive compound, thiourea labeled with sulfur-35, and then making an autoradiograph from the activated negative.

  6. Stability in computed optical interferometric tomography (Part I): Stability requirements

    PubMed Central

    Shemonski, Nathan D.; Adie, Steven G.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; South, Fredrick A.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    As imaging systems become more advanced and acquire data at faster rates, increasingly dynamic samples can be imaged without concern of motion artifacts. For optical interferometric techniques such as optical coherence tomography, it often follows that initially, only amplitude-based data are utilized due to unstable or unreliable phase measurements. As systems progress, stable phase maps can also be acquired, enabling more advanced, phase-dependent post-processing techniques. Here we report an investigation of the stability requirements for a class of phase-dependent post-processing techniques – numerical defocus and aberration correction with further extensions to techniques such as Doppler, phase-variance, and optical coherence elastography. Mathematical analyses and numerical simulations over a variety of instabilities are supported by experimental investigations. PMID:25321004

  7. Pelvic applications of diffusion magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Antonio C; Krishnaraj, Arun; Pires, Cintia E; Bittencourt, Leonardo K; Guimarães, Alexander R

    2011-02-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a powerful imaging technique in neuroimaging; its value in abdominal and pelvic imaging has only recently been appreciated as a result of improvements in magnetic resonance imaging technology. There is growing interest in the use of DWI for evaluating pathology in the pelvis. Its ability to noninvasively characterize tissues and to depict changes at a cellular level allows DWI to be an effective complement to conventional sequences of pelvic imaging, especially in oncologic patients. The addition of DWI may obviate contrast material in those with renal insufficiency or contrast material allergy. PMID:21129639

  8. Robust image modeling technique with a bioluminescence image segmentation application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jianghong; Wang, Ruiping; Tian, Jie

    2009-02-01

    A robust pattern classifier algorithm for the variable symmetric plane model, where the driving noise is a mixture of a Gaussian and an outlier process, is developed. The veracity and high-speed performance of the pattern recognition algorithm is proved. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has recently gained wide acceptance in the field of in vivo small animal molecular imaging. So that it is very important for BLT to how to acquire the highprecision region of interest in a bioluminescence image (BLI) in order to decrease loss of the customers because of inaccuracy in quantitative analysis. An algorithm in the mode is developed to improve operation speed, which estimates parameters and original image intensity simultaneously from the noise corrupted image derived from the BLT optical hardware system. The focus pixel value is obtained from the symmetric plane according to a more realistic assumption for the noise sequence in the restored image. The size of neighborhood is adaptive and small. What's more, the classifier function is base on the statistic features. If the qualifications for the classifier are satisfied, the focus pixel intensity is setup as the largest value in the neighborhood.Otherwise, it will be zeros.Finally,pseudo-color is added up to the result of the bioluminescence segmented image. The whole process has been implemented in our 2D BLT optical system platform and the model is proved.

  9. Damage Assessment Map from Interferometric Coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, S.; Fielding, E. J.; Simons, M.; Rosen, P. A.; Owen, S. E.; Webb, F.

    2010-12-01

    Large earthquakes cause buildings to collapse, which often claims the lives of many. For example, 2010 Haiti earthquake killed about 230,000 people, with about 280,000 buildings collapsed or severely damaged. When a major earthquake hits an urban area, one of the most critical information for rescue operations is rapid and accurate assessment of building-collapse areas. From a study on 2003 Bam earthquake in Iran, interferometric coherence was proved useful for earthquake damage assessment (Fielding et al., 2005) when similar perpendicular baselines can be found for pre- and coseismic interferometric pairs and when there is little temporal and volume decorrelation. In this study we develop a new algorithm to create a more robust and accurate damage assessment map using interferometric coherence despite different interferometric baselines and with other decorrelation sources. We test the algorithm on a building block that recently underwent demolition, which is a proxy for building collapse due to earthquakes, for new construction in the City of Pasadena, California. The size of the building block is about 150 m E-W and 300 m N-S, and the demolition project started on April 23, 2007 and continued until January 22, 2008. After we process Japanese L-band ALOS PALSAR data with ROI_PAC, an interferometric coherence map that spans the demolition period is registered to a coherence map before the demolition, and the relative bias of the coherence values are removed, then a causality constraint is applied to enhance the change due to demolition. The results show clear change in coherence at the demolition site. We improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the coherence change at the demolition site from 17.3 (for simple difference) to 44.6 (with the new algorithm). The damage assessment map algorithm will become more useful with the emergence of InSAR missions with more frequent data acquisition, such as Sentinel-1 and DESDynI.

  10. An Innovative Transponder-Based Interferometric Radar for Vibration Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, F.; Cerutti, A.; Farina, P.; De Pasquale, G.; Novembrini, G.

    2010-05-28

    Ground-based radar interferometry has recently emerged as an innovative technology of remote sensing, able to accurately measure the static or dynamic displacement of several points of a structure. This technique in the last couple of years has been applied to different types of structures, such as bridges, towers and chimneys. This paper presents a prototype system developed by IDS, originally aimed at measuring the structural vibrations of helicopter rotor blades, based on an interferometric technique and constituted by combination of a radar sensor and a series of transponders installed on the target structure. The main advantages of this solution with respect to conventional interferometric radars, are related to the increased spatial resolution of the system, provided by the possibility to discriminate different transponders installed within the same resolution cell of the radar sensor, and to the reduction of the ambient noise (e.g. multi-path) on the radar measurement. The first feature allows the use of the microwave technology even on target areas with limited dimensions, such as industrial facilities, while the second aspect may extend the use of radar interferometric systems to complex scenarios, where multi-reflections are expected due to the presence of natural targets with high reflectivity to the radar signal. In the paper, the system and its major characteristics are first described; subsequently, application to the measurement of ambient vibration response of a lab set-up is summarized. Then the data acquired on a rotating mock-up are reported and analyzed to identify natural frequencies and mode shapes of the investigated structure.

  11. An Innovative Transponder-Based Interferometric Radar for Vibration Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, F.; Cerutti, A.; Farina, P.; De Pasquale, G.; Novembrini, G.

    2010-05-01

    Ground-based radar interferometry has recently emerged as an innovative technology of remote sensing, able to accurately measure the static or dynamic displacement of several points of a structure. This technique in the last couple of years has been applied to different types of structures, such as bridges, towers and chimneys. This paper presents a prototype system developed by IDS, originally aimed at measuring the structural vibrations of helicopter rotor blades, based on an interferometric technique and constituted by combination of a radar sensor and a series of transponders installed on the target structure. The main advantages of this solution with respect to conventional interferometric radars, are related to the increased spatial resolution of the system, provided by the possibility to discriminate different transponders installed within the same resolution cell of the radar sensor, and to the reduction of the ambient noise (e.g. multi-path) on the radar measurement. The first feature allows the use of the microwave technology even on target areas with limited dimensions, such as industrial facilities, while the second aspect may extend the use of radar interferometric systems to complex scenarios, where multi-reflections are expected due to the presence of natural targets with high reflectivity to the radar signal. In the paper, the system and its major characteristics are first described; subsequently, application to the measurement of ambient vibration response of a lab set-up is summarized. Then the data acquired on a rotating mock-up are reported and analyzed to identify natural frequencies and mode shapes of the investigated structure.

  12. An image denoising application using shearlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevindir, Hulya Kodal; Yazici, Cuneyt

    2013-10-01

    Medical imaging is a multidisciplinary field related to computer science, electrical/electronic engineering, physics, mathematics and medicine. There has been dramatic increase in variety, availability and resolution of medical imaging devices for the last half century. For proper medical imaging highly trained technicians and clinicians are needed to pull out clinically pertinent information from medical data correctly. Artificial systems must be designed to analyze medical data sets either in a partially or even a fully automatic manner to fulfil the need. For this purpose there has been numerous ongoing research for finding optimal representations in image processing and computer vision [1, 18]. Medical images almost always contain artefacts and it is crucial to remove these artefacts to obtain healthy results. Out of many methods for denoising images, in this paper, two denoising methods, wavelets and shearlets, have been applied to mammography images. Comparing these two methods, shearlets give better results for denoising such data.

  13. Reconfigurable machine for applications in image and video compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartenstein, Reiner W.; Becker, Juergen; Kress, Rainier; Reinig, Helmut; Schmidt, Karin

    1995-02-01

    This paper presents a reconfigurable machine for applications in image or video compression. The machine can be used stand alone or as a universal accelerator co-processor for desktop computers for image processing. It is well suited for image compression algorithms such as JPEG for still pictures or for encoding MPEG movies. It provides a much cheaper and more flexible hardware platform than special image compression ASICs and it can substantially accelerate desktop computing.

  14. Deformable mirror interferometric analysis for the direct imagery of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazoyer, Johan; Galicher, Raphaël.; Baudoz, Pierre; Lanzoni, Patrick; Zamkotsian, Frédéric; Rousset, Gérard

    2014-07-01

    Direct imaging of exoplanet systems requires the use of coronagraphs to reach high contrast levels (10-8 to 10-11) at small angular separations (0.100). However, the performance of these devices is drastically limited by aberrations (in phase or in amplitude, introduced either by atmosphere or by the optics). Coronagraphs must therefore be combined with extreme adaptive optic systems, composed of a focal plane wavefront sensor and of a high order deformable mirror. These adaptive optic systems must reach a residual error in the corrected wavefront of less than 0.1 nm (RMS) with a rate of 1 kHz. In addition, the surface defects of the deformable mirror, inherent from the fabrication process, must be limited in order to avoid the introduction of amplitude aberrations. An experimental high contrast bench has been developed at the Paris Observatory (LESIA). This bench includes a Boston Micromachine deformable mirror composed of 1024 actuators. For a precise analysis of its surface and performance, we characterized this mirror on the interferometric bench developed since 2004 at the Marseille Observatory (LAM). In this paper, we present this interferometric bench as well as the results of the analysis. This will include a precise surface characterization and a description of the behavior of the actuators, on a 10 by 10 actuator range (behavior of a single actuator, study of the cross-talk between neighbor actuators, influence of a stuck actuator) and on full mirror scale (general surface shape).

  15. Perceived Image Quality Improvements from the Application of Image Deconvolution to Retinal Images from an Adaptive Optics Fundus Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliz, P.; Nemeth, S. C.; Erry, G. R. G.; Otten, L. J.; Yang, S. Y.

    Aim: The objective of this project was to apply an image restoration methodology based on wavefront measurements obtained with a Shack-Hartmann sensor and evaluating the restored image quality based on medical criteria.Methods: Implementing an adaptive optics (AO) technique, a fundus imager was used to achieve low-order correction to images of the retina. The high-order correction was provided by deconvolution. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor measures aberrations. The wavefront measurement is the basis for activating a deformable mirror. Image restoration to remove remaining aberrations is achieved by direct deconvolution using the point spread function (PSF) or a blind deconvolution. The PSF is estimated using measured wavefront aberrations. Direct application of classical deconvolution methods such as inverse filtering, Wiener filtering or iterative blind deconvolution (IBD) to the AO retinal images obtained from the adaptive optical imaging system is not satisfactory because of the very large image size, dificulty in modeling the system noise, and inaccuracy in PSF estimation. Our approach combines direct and blind deconvolution to exploit available system information, avoid non-convergence, and time-consuming iterative processes. Results: The deconvolution was applied to human subject data and resulting restored images compared by a trained ophthalmic researcher. Qualitative analysis showed significant improvements. Neovascularization can be visualized with the adaptive optics device that cannot be resolved with the standard fundus camera. The individual nerve fiber bundles are easily resolved as are melanin structures in the choroid. Conclusion: This project demonstrated that computer-enhanced, adaptive optic images have greater detail of anatomical and pathological structures.

  16. System for interferometric distortion measurements that define an optical path

    DOEpatents

    Bokor, Jeffrey; Naulleau, Patrick

    2003-05-06

    An improved phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer can measure both distortion and wavefront aberration. In the preferred embodiment, the interferometer employs an object-plane pinhole array comprising a plurality of object pinholes located between the test optic and the source of electromagnetic radiation and an image-plane mask array that is positioned in the image plane of the test optic. The image-plane mask array comprises a plurality of test windows and corresponding reference pinholes, wherein the positions of the plurality of pinholes in the object-plane pinhole array register with those of the plurality of test windows in image-plane mask array. Electromagnetic radiation that is directed into a first pinhole of object-plane pinhole array thereby creating a first corresponding test beam image on the image-plane mask array. Where distortion is relatively small, it can be directly measured interferometrically by measuring the separation distance between and the orientation of the test beam and reference-beam pinhole and repeating this process for at least one other pinhole of the plurality of pinholes of the object-plane pinhole array. Where the distortion is relative large, it can be measured by using interferometry to direct the stage motion, of a stage supporting the image-plane mask array, and then use the final stage motion as a measure of the distortion.

  17. Applications of energy filtered imaging in biology.

    PubMed

    Shuman, H; Somlyo, A V; Safer, D; Frey, T; Somlyo, A P

    1983-01-01

    We describe the use of a magnetic sector spectrometer positioned below the projection chamber of an electron microscope for energy filtered transmission imaging. The spectrometer used has circular pole face edges and is corrected for second order aberrations. A round EM lens is placed after the sector to form a real image of the virtual achromatic image produced by the spectrometer. A slit placed in the dispersion plane allows the passage of electrons in a selected energy range. The filtered image is projected onto a transmission phosphor and acquired with a silicon intensified TV camera and stored in digital form on computer disk. Filtered images are taken at two energies, one immediately preceding (pre-edge) and one on the characteristic energy loss (edge). To obtain images showing the distribution of elements, background subtraction is performed by either subtraction or division of edge and pre-edge images. The optical properties of the imaging system are described and the results are illustrated by energy filtered images of single ferritin molecules (Fe M2,3 and C k), the phosphorus distribution in ribosomes (PL2,3) and the localization of calcium in muscle (Ca L2, 3). The major advantage of the system, compared to other energy filtered imaging methods, is that it can be readily adapted to existing high vacuum microscopes without the necessity of modifying the column to insert a spectrometer. PMID:6635570

  18. The flight test of Pi-SAR(L) for the repeat-pass interferometric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nohmi, Hitoshi; Shimada, Masanobu; Miyawaki, Masanori

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes the experiment of the repeat pass interferometric SAR using Pi-SAR(L). The air-borne repeat-pass interferometric SAR is expected as an effective method to detect landslide or predict a volcano eruption. To obtain a high-quality interferometric image, it is necessary to make two flights on the same flight pass. In addition, since the antenna of the Pi-SAR(L) is secured to the aircraft, it is necessary to fly at the same drift angle to keep the observation direction same. We built a flight control system using an auto pilot which has been installed in the airplane. This navigation system measures position and altitude precisely with using a differential GPS, and the PC Navigator outputs a difference from the desired course to the auto pilot. Since the air density is thinner and the speed is higher than the landing situation, the gain of the control system is required to be adjusted during the repeat pass flight. The observation direction could be controlled to some extent by adjusting a drift angle with using a flight speed control. The repeat-pass flight was conducted in Japan for three days in late November. The flight was stable and the deviation was within a few meters for both horizontal and vertical direction even in the gusty condition. The SAR data were processed in time domain based on range Doppler algorism to make the complete motion compensation. Thus, the interferometric image processed after precise phase compensation is shown.

  19. Image analysis applications for grain science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayas, Inna Y.; Steele, James L.

    1991-02-01

    Morphometrical features of single grain kernels or particles were used to discriminate two visibly similar wheat varieties foreign material in wheat hardsoft and spring-winter wheat classes and whole from broken corn kernels. Milled fractions of hard and soft wheat were evaluated using textural image analysis. Color image analysis of sound and mold damaged corn kernels yielded high recognition rates. The studies collectively demonstrate the potential for automated classification and assessment of grain quality using image analysis.

  20. Clinical applications of functional MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Belyaev, Artem S; Peck, Kyung K; Brennan, Nicole M Petrovich; Holodny, Andrei I

    2013-05-01

    Functional magnetic resonance (fMR) imaging for neurosurgical planning has become the standard of care in centers where it is available. Although paradigms to measure eloquent cortices are not yet standardized, simple tasks elicit reliable maps for planning neurosurgical procedures. A patient-specific paradigm design will refine the usability of fMR imaging for prognostication and recovery of function. Certain pathologic conditions and technical issues limit the interpretation of fMR imaging maps in clinical use and should be considered carefully. However, fMR imaging for neurosurgical planning continues to provide insights into how the brain works and how it responds to pathologic insults. PMID:23642553

  1. Image segmentation by iterative parallel region growing with application to data compression and image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.

    1988-01-01

    Image segmentation can be a key step in data compression and image analysis. However, the segmentation results produced by most previous approaches to region growing are suspect because they depend on the order in which portions of the image are processed. An iterative parallel segmentation algorithm avoids this problem by performing globally best merges first. Such a segmentation approach, and two implementations of the approach on NASA's Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) are described. Application of the segmentation approach to data compression and image analysis is then described, and results of such application are given for a LANDSAT Thematic Mapper image.

  2. Novel biomedical applications of Cerenkov radiation and radioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Antonello E; Boschi, Federico

    2015-03-01

    The main goals of this review is to provide an up-to-date account of the different uses of Cerenkov radiation (CR) and radioluminescence imaging for pre-clinical small animal imaging. We will focus on new emerging applications such as the use of Cerenkov imaging for monitoring radionuclide and external radiotherapy in humans. Another novel application that will be described is the monitoring of radiochemical synthesis using microfluidic chips. Several pre-clinical aspects of CR will be discussed such as the development of 3D reconstruction methods for Cerenkov images and the use of CR as excitation source for nanoparticles or for endoscopic imaging. We will also include a discussion on radioluminescence imaging that is a more general method than Cerenkov imaging for the detection using optical methods of alpha and gamma emitters. PMID:25555905

  3. BOOK REVIEW: Infrared Thermal Imaging: Fundamentals, Research and Applications Infrared Thermal Imaging: Fundamentals, Research and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planinsic, Gorazd

    2011-09-01

    Ten years ago, a book with a title like this would be interesting only to a narrow circle of specialists. Thanks to rapid advances in technology, the price of thermal imaging devices has dropped sharply, so they have, almost overnight, become accessible to a wide range of users. As the authors point out in the preface, the growth of this area has led to a paradoxical situation: now there are probably more infrared (IR) cameras sold worldwide than there are people who understand the basic physics behind them and know how to correctly interpret the colourful images that are obtained with these devices. My experience confirms this. When I started using the IR camera during lectures on the didactics of physics, I soon realized that I needed more knowledge, which I later found in this book. A wide range of potential readers and topical areas provides a good motive for writing a book such as this one, but it also represents a major challenge for authors, as compromises in the style of writing and choice of topics are required. The authors of this book have successfully achieved this, and indeed done an excellent job. This book addresses a wide range of readers, from engineers, technicians, and physics and science teachers in schools and universities, to researchers and specialists who are professionally active in the field. As technology in this area has made great progress in recent times, this book is also a valuable guide for those who opt to purchase an infrared camera. Chapters in this book could be divided into three areas: the fundamentals of IR thermal imaging and related physics (two chapters); IR imaging systems and methods (two chapters) and applications, including six chapters on pedagogical applications; IR imaging of buildings and infrastructure, industrial applications, microsystems, selected topics in research and industry, and selected applications from other fields. All chapters contain numerous colour pictures and diagrams, and a rich list of relevant

  4. Interferometric Views of Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plambeck, R. L.; Wright, M. C. H.

    1999-10-01

    Many studies of molecular clouds require quantitative comparisons of images at widely different wavelengths. For example, one may map dust spectral index variations to search for evidence of grain growth in protostellar cores, or use 3-2/2-1/1-0 C18O line ratios to derive gas kinetic temperatures, or search for chemical abundance anomalies caused by shocks or MHD waves. ALMA will dramatically improve the accuracy of these measurements because it will provide almost complete sampling of visibilities across the u,v plane, allowing one to synthesize mathematically perfect, matched beams at different wavelengths. The reliability of such comparisons will be limited by the difficulty in measuring the flux from extended structures. For a homogeneous array such as ALMA, visibilities on spacings smaller than the antenna diameter are recovered by mosaicing. Pointing and surface errors lead to errors in these data, limiting the image fidelity (Cornwell, Holdaway, & Uson 1993), particularly at submillimeter wavelengths. One could improve the image fidelity by measuring the short spacing visibilities directly with an auxiliary array of smaller antennas.

  5. Application of coherent 10 micron imaging lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M.L.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Bennett, C.A.

    1997-04-01

    With the continuing progress in mid-IR array detector technology and high bandwidth fan-outs, i.f. electronics, high speed digitizers, and processing capability, true coherent imaging lidar is becoming a reality. In this paper experimental results are described using a 10 micron coherent imaging lidar.

  6. Photoacoustic tomography: applications for atherosclerosis imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangha, Gurneet S.; Goergen, Craig J.

    2016-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is a debilitating condition that increases a patient’s risk for intermittent claudication, limb amputation, myocardial infarction, and stroke, thereby causing approximately 50% of deaths in the western world. Current diagnostic imaging techniques, such as ultrasound, digital subtraction angiography, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and optical imaging remain suboptimal for detecting development of early stage plaques. This is largely due to the lack of compositional information, penetration depth, and/or clinical efficiency of these traditional imaging techniques. Photoacoustic imaging has emerged as a promising modality that could address some of these limitations to improve the diagnosis and characterization of atherosclerosis-related diseases. Photoacoustic imaging uses near-infrared light to induce acoustic waves, which can be used to recreate compositional images of tissue. Recent developments in photoacoustic techniques show its potential in noninvasively characterizing atherosclerotic plaques deeper than traditional optical imaging approaches. In this review, we discuss the significance and development of atherosclerosis, current and novel clinical diagnostic methods, and recent works that highlight the potential of photoacoustic imaging for both experimental and clinical studies of atherosclerosis.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging: present and future applications

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Donald L.; Liu, Peter; Wismer, Gary L.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Stark, David D.; New, Paul F.J.; Okada, Robert D.; Brady, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has created considerable excitement in the medical community, largely because of its great potential to diagnose and characterize many different disease processes. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that, because MR imaging is similar to computed tomography (CT) scanning in identifying structural disorders and because it is more costly and difficult to use, this highly useful technique must be judged against CT before it can become an accepted investigative tool. At present MR imaging has demonstrated diagnostic superiority over CT in a limited number of important, mostly neurologic, disorders and is complementary to CT in the diagnosis of certain other disorders. For most of the remaining organ systems its usefulness is not clear, but the lack of ionizing radiation and MR's ability to produce images in any tomographic plane may eventually prove to be advantageous. The potential of MR imaging to display in-vivo spectra, multinuclear images and blood-flow data makes it an exciting investigative technique. At present, however, MR imaging units should be installed only in medical centres equipped with the clinical and basic research facilities that are essential to evaluate the ultimate role of this technique in the care of patients. ImagesFig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14 PMID:3884120

  8. Nuclear cardiac imaging: Principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an analysis of the pathophysiologic concepts and effectiveness of the commonly available cardiac imaging modalities: thallium-201 scintigraphy, myocardial infarct avid-imaging, and radionuclide ventriculography. Emphasis is on the implications of these diagnostic procedures. Organizing an efficient laboratory, instrumentation, radiopharmaceuticals, and exercise testing are discussed.

  9. Imaging-Genetics Applications in Child Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To place imaging-genetics research in the context of child psychiatry. Method: A conceptual overview is provided, followed by discussion of specific research examples. Results: Imaging-genetics research is described linking brain function to two specific genes, for the serotonin-reuptake-transporter protein and a monoamine oxidase…

  10. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar: building tomorrow's tools today

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong

    2006-01-01

    A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system transmits electromagnetic (EM) waves at a wavelength that can range from a few millimeters to tens of centimeters. The radar wave propagates through the atmosphere and interacts with the Earth’s surface. Part of the energy is reflected back to the SAR system and recorded. Using a sophisticated image processing technique, called SAR processing (Curlander and McDonough, 1991), both the intensity and phase of the reflected (or backscattered) signal of each ground resolution element (a few meters to tens of meters) can be calculated in the form of a complex-valued SAR image representing the reflectivity of the ground surface. The amplitude or intensity of the SAR image is determined primarily by terrain slope, surface roughness, and dielectric constants, whereas the phase of the SAR image is determined primarily by the distance between the satellite antenna and the ground targets, slowing of the signal by the atmosphere, and the interaction of EM waves with ground surface. Interferometric SAR (InSAR) imaging, a recently developed remote sensing technique, utilizes the interaction of EM waves, referred to as interference, to measure precise distances. Very simply, InSAR involves the use of two or more SAR images of the same area to extract landscape topography and its deformation patterns.

  11. Emerging Applications of Conjugated Polymers in Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junwei; Liu, Jie; Wei, Chen-Wei; Liu, Bin; O’Donnell, Matthew; Gao, Xiaohu

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, conjugated polymers have attracted considerable attention from the imaging community as a new class of contrast agent due to their intriguing structural, chemical, and optical properties. Their size and emission wavelength tunability, brightness, photostability, and low toxicity have been demonstrated in a wide range of in vitro sensing and cellular imaging applications, and have just begun to show impact in in vivo settings. In this Perspective, we summarize recent advances in engineering conjugated polymers as imaging contrast agents, their emerging applications in molecular imaging (referred to as in vivo uses in this paper), as well as our perspectives on future research. PMID:23860904

  12. Merging of range images for inspection or safety applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mure-Dubois, James; Hügli, Heinz

    2008-08-01

    Range imagers provide useful information for part inspection, robot control, or human safety applications in industrial environments. However, some applications may require more information than range data from a single viewpoint. Therefore, multiple range images must be combined to create a three-dimensional representation of the scene. Although simple in its principle, this operation is not straightforward to implement in industrial systems, since each range image is affected by noise. In this paper, we present two specific applications where merging of range images must be performed. We use the same processing pipeline for both applications : conversion from range image to point clouds, elimination of degrees of freedom between different clouds, validation of the merged results. Nevertheless, each step in this pipeline requires dedicated algorithms for our example applications. The first application is high resolution inspection of large parts, where many range images are acquired sequentially and merged in a post-processing step, allowing to create a virtual model of the part observed, typically larger than the instrument's field of view. The key requirement in this application is high accuracy for the merging of multiple point clouds. The second application discussed is human safety in a human/robot environment: range images are used to ensure that no human is present in the robot’s zone of operation, and can trigger the robot's emergency shutdown when needed. In this case, range image merging is required to avoid uncertainties due to occlusions. The key requirement here is real-time operation, namely the merging operation should not introduce a significant latency in the data processing pipeline. For both application cases, the improvements brought by merging multiple range images are clearly illustrated.

  13. Double Lloyd's mirror: versatile instrument for XUV surface interferometry and interferometric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlova, M.; Rus, B.; Mocek, T.; Polan, J.; Stupka, M.; Prag, A.; Homer, P.; Hudecek, M.; Jamelot, G.; Lagron, J. C.; Cassou, K.; Ros, D.; Kazamias, S.; Klisnick, A.; Park, J.-J.; Nam, C.-H.

    2005-09-01

    We have developed a double Lloyd's mirror wavefront-splitting interferometer, constituting a compact device for surface probing in the XUV and soft X-ray spectral domain. The device consists of two independently adjustable superpolished flat surfaces, operated under grazing incidence angle to reflect a diverging or parallel beam. When the mirrors are appropriately inclined to each other, the structure produces interference fringes at the required distance and with tuneable fringe period. The double Lloyd's mirror may be used alone for surface topography with nanometric altitude resolution, or in conjunction with an imaging element for interferometric XUV surface microscopy. In the latter case, resolution in the plane of the probed surface is about micron, which is given by the quality of the imaging element and/or by the detector pixel size. Here, we present results obtained using the double Lloyd's mirror in two separate X-ray laser and high harmonics generation (HHG) application projects. The first experiment was aimed at understanding microscopic nature of the effects involved in laserinduced optical damage of thin pellicles, exposed to sub-ns laser pulses (438 nm) producing fluence of up to 10 Jcm-2. The probing source in this case was a QSS neon-like zinc soft X-ray laser, proving a few mJ at 21.2 nm in ~100-ps pulses. The second experiment was carried out using a narrowly collimated HHG beam near 30 nm, employed to topographically probe the surface of a semiconductor chip.

  14. Measuring the Direction and Angular Velocity of a Black Hole Accretion Disk via Lagged Interferometric Covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael D.; Loeb, Abraham; Shiokawa, Hotaka; Chael, Andrew A.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.

    2015-11-01

    We show that interferometry can be applied to study irregular, rapidly rotating structures, as are expected in the turbulent accretion flow near a black hole. Specifically, we analyze the lagged covariance between interferometric baselines of similar lengths but slightly different orientations. For a flow viewed close to face-on, we demonstrate that the peak in the lagged covariance indicates the direction and angular velocity of the emission pattern from the flow. Even for moderately inclined flows, the covariance robustly estimates the flow direction, although the estimated angular velocity can be significantly biased. Importantly, measuring the direction of the flow as clockwise or counterclockwise on the sky breaks a degeneracy in accretion disk inclinations when analyzing time-averaged images alone. We explore the potential efficacy of our technique using three-dimensional, general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and we highlight several baseline pairs for the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) that are well-suited to this application. These results indicate that the EHT may be capable of estimating the direction and angular velocity of the emitting material near Sgr A*, and they suggest that a rotating flow may even be utilized to improve imaging capabilities.

  15. Using SVD for improved interferometric Green's function retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, Gabriela; Malcolm, Alison; Mikesell, Dylan; van Wijk, Kasper

    2013-09-01

    Seismic interferometry (SI) is a technique used to estimate the Green's function (GF) between two receiver locations, as if there were a source at one of the receiver locations. However, in many applications, the requirements to recover the exact GF are not satisfied and SI yields a poor estimate of the GF. For these non-ideal cases, we improve the interferometric GFs, by applying singular value decomposition (SVD) to the cross-correlations before stacking. The SVD approach preserves energy that is stationary in the cross-correlations, which is the energy that contributes most to the GF recovery, and attenuates non-stationary energy, which leads to artefacts in the interferometric GF. We apply this method to construct virtual shot gathers (for both synthetic and field data) and demonstrate how using SVD enhances physical arrivals in these gathers. We also find that SVD is robust with respect to weakly correlated random noise, allowing a better recovery of events from noisy data, in some cases recovering energy that would otherwise be completely lost in the noise and that the standard SI technique fails to recover.

  16. Interferometric estimation of ice sheet motion and topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joughlin, Ian; Kwok, Ron; Fahnestock, Mark; Winebrenner, Dale; Tulaczyk, Slawek; Gogenini, Prasad

    1997-01-01

    With ERS-1/2 satellite radar interferometry, it is possible to make measurements of glacier motion with high accuracy and fine spatial resolution. Interferometric techniques were applied to map velocity and topography for several outlet glaciers in Greenland. For the Humboldt and Petermann glaciers, data from several adjacent tracks were combined to make a wide-area map that includes the enhanced flow regions of both glaciers. The discharge flux of the Petermann glacier upstream of the grounding line was estimated, thereby establishing the potential use of ERS-1/2 interferometric data for monitoring ice-sheet discharge. Interferograms collected along a single track are sensitive to only one component of motion. By utilizing data from ascending and descending passes and by making a surface-parallel flow assumption, it is possible to measure the full three-dimensional vector flow field. The application of this technique for an area on the Ryder glacier is demonstrated. Finally, ERS-1/2 interferograms were used to observe a mini-surge on the Ryder glacier that occurred in autumn of 1995.

  17. Expert system for noise-ridden interferometric data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Wonjong; Cha, Soyoung S.

    1993-12-01

    Automation of interferogram analysis is very important for successful application of all interferometric measurement techniques. In high-speed aerodynamics or experimental mechanics, complex noise-ridden fringe patterns frequently arise due to prevailing adverse environments. In conventional practice, only local information has been heavily utilized to reduce background noise or to correct phase information. Under these circumstances, the currently available techniques, that is, fringe tracking, phase-shifting, Fourier transform, and regression methods, confront difficulties in phase unwrapping and thus need substantial interactive manual operations. The developed rule-based expert system utilizes both global/regional and local information, and makes use of expert knowledge. It can thus provide a potential for more comprehensive automation in noise reduction and phase unwrapping. The developed expert system adopts a hybrid mechanism in a single package, that is, the low-level and high-level processings to produce an optimal solution in fringe analysis. The system can be coupled with any current interferometric reduction techniques, being based on the analysis of isophase contour lines.

  18. [Susceptibility weighted imaging. Theory and applications].

    PubMed

    Haddar, D; Haacke, Em; Sehgal, V; Delproposto, Z; Salamon, G; Seror, O; Sellier, N

    2004-11-01

    Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI) is a new MR imaging technique using the BOLD effect (Blood Oxygen Level Dependent) and the differences of susceptibility between tissues. It is a 3D gradient echo, fully velocity compensated sequence. The echo time is chosen to maximize the signal cancellation in veins and a specific post-processing is applied using the phase images as a complementary source of contrast. It is very useful for the visualization of veins either normal or abnormal. It shows hemorrhage, even of small quantity, better than conventional gradient echo sequences. Its use is still limited by a long acquisition time and some remaining artifacts. PMID:15602412

  19. Uncooled thermal imaging sensor and application advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Peter W.; Cox, Stephen; Murphy, Bob; Grealish, Kevin; Joswick, Mike; Denley, Brian; Feda, Frank; Elmali, Loriann; Kohin, Margaret

    2006-05-01

    BAE Systems continues to advance the technology and performance of microbolometer-based thermal imaging modules and systems. 640x480 digital uncooled infrared focal plane arrays are in full production, illustrated by recent production line test data for two thousand focal plane arrays. This paper presents a snapshot of microbolometer technology at BAE Systems and an overview of two of the most important thermal imaging sensor programs currently in production: a family of thermal weapons sights for the United States Army and a thermal imager for the remote weapons station on the Stryker vehicle.

  20. In vivo Coherent Raman Imaging for Neuroscience Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Daniel

    2010-08-01

    The use of coherent Raman imaging is described for applications in neuroscience. Myelin imaging of the spinal cord can be performed with Raman imaging through the use of the vibration in carbon-hydrogen bonds, dominant in lipids. First, we demonstrate in vivo histomorphometry in live animal for characterization of myelin-related nervous system pathologies. This is used to characterize spinal cord health during multiple sclerosis. Second, Raman spectroscopy of tissue is discussed. We discuss the challenges that live animal imaging brings, together with important aspects of coherent Raman imaging in tissue.

  1. Application of optical coherence tomography based microangiography for cerebral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Utku; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    Requirements of in vivo rodent brain imaging are hard to satisfy using traditional technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging and two-photon microscopy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging tool that can easily reach at high speeds and provide high resolution volumetric images with a relatively large field of view for rodent brain imaging. Here, we provide the overview of recent developments of functional OCT based imaging techniques for neuroscience applications on rodents. Moreover, a summary of OCT-based microangiography (OMAG) studies for stroke and traumatic brain injury cases on rodents are provided.

  2. Multimodality Image Fusion-Guided Procedures: Technique, Accuracy, and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Kruecker, Jochen; Kadoury, Samuel; Kobeiter, Hicham; Venkatesan, Aradhana M. Levy, Elliot Wood, Bradford J.

    2012-10-15

    Personalized therapies play an increasingly critical role in cancer care: Image guidance with multimodality image fusion facilitates the targeting of specific tissue for tissue characterization and plays a role in drug discovery and optimization of tailored therapies. Positron-emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) may offer additional information not otherwise available to the operator during minimally invasive image-guided procedures, such as biopsy and ablation. With use of multimodality image fusion for image-guided interventions, navigation with advanced modalities does not require the physical presence of the PET, MRI, or CT imaging system. Several commercially available methods of image-fusion and device navigation are reviewed along with an explanation of common tracking hardware and software. An overview of current clinical applications for multimodality navigation is provided.

  3. Focused-laser interferometric position sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Stephen J.; Barwick, Brett; Batelaan, Herman

    2005-12-15

    We describe a simple method to measure the position shifts of an object with a range of tens of micrometers using a focused-laser (FL) interferometric position sensor. In this article we examine the effects of mechanical vibration on FL and Michelson interferometers. We tested both interferometers using vibration amplitudes ranging from 0 to 20 {mu}m. Our FL interferometer has a resolution much better than the diffraction grating periodicities of 10 and 14 {mu}m used in our experiments. A FL interferometer provides improved mechanical stability at the expense of spatial resolution. Our experimental results show that Michelson interferometers cannot be used when the vibration amplitude is more than an optical wavelength. The main purpose of this article is to demonstrate that a focused-laser interferometric position sensor can be used to measure the position shifts of an object on a less sensitive, micrometer scale when the vibration amplitude is too large to use a Michelson interferometer.

  4. Imaging radar techniques for remote sensing applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelenka, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    The basic concepts of fine-resolution, imaging radar systems are reviewed. Both side-looking and hologram (downward-looking) radars are described and compared. Several examples of microwave imagery obtained with these two types of systems are shown.

  5. Mineral mapping and applications of imaging spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; Boardman, J.; Mustard, J.; Kruse, F.; Ong, C.; Pieters, C.; Swayze, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    Spectroscopy is a tool that has been used for decades to identify, understand, and quantify solid, liquid, or gaseous materials, especially in the laboratory. In disciplines ranging from astronomy to chemistry, spectroscopic measurements are used to detect absorption and emission features due to specific chemical bonds, and detailed analyses are used to determine the abundance and physical state of the detected absorbing/emitting species. Spectroscopic measurements have a long history in the study of the Earth and planets. Up to the 1990s remote spectroscopic measurements of Earth and planets were dominated by multispectral imaging experiments that collect high-quality images in a few, usually broad, spectral bands or with point spectrometers that obtained good spectral resolution but at only a few spatial positions. However, a new generation of sensors is now available that combines imaging with spectroscopy to create the new discipline of imaging spectroscopy. Imaging spectrometers acquire data with enough spectral range, resolution, and sampling at every pixel in a raster image so that individual absorption features can be identified and spatially mapped (Goetz et al., 1985).

  6. Application of infrared imaging in ferrocyanide tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, K.L.; Mailhot, R.B. Jr.; McLaren, J.M.; Morris, K.L.

    1994-09-28

    This report analyzes the feasibility of using infrared imaging techniques and scanning equipment to detect potential hot spots within ferrocyanide waste tanks at the Hanford Site. A hot spot is defined as a volumetric region within a waste tank with an excessively warm temperature that is generated by radioactive isotopes. The thermal image of a hot spot was modeled by computer. this model determined the image an IR system must detect. Laboratory and field tests of the imaging system are described, and conclusions based on laboratory and field data are presented. The report shows that infrared imaging is capable of detecting hot spots in ferrocyanide waste tanks with depths of up to 3.94 m (155 in.). The infrared imaging system is a useful technology for initial evaluation and assessment of hot spots in the majority of ferrocyanide waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The system will not allow an exact hot spot and temperature determination, but it will provide the necessary information to determine the worst-case hot spot detected in temperature patterns. Ferrocyanide tanks are one type of storage tank on the Watch List. These tanks are identified as priority 1 Hanford Site Tank farm Safety Issues.

  7. Using stereoscopic imaging for visualization applications

    SciTech Connect

    Adelson, S.J.

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of scientific visualization is to simplify the analysis of numerical data by rendering the information as an image. Even when the image is familiar, as in the case of terrain data, preconceptions about what the image should look like and deceptive image artifacts can create misconceptions about what information is actually contained in the scene. One way of aiding the development of unambiguous visualizations is to add stereoscopic depth to the image. Despite the recent proliferation of affordable stereoscopic viewing equipment, few researchers are at this time taking advantage of stereo in their visualizations. It is generally perceived that the rendering time will have to be doubled in order to generate the pair, and so stereoscopic viewing is sacrificed in the name of expedient rendering. We show that this perception is often invalid. The second half of a stereoscopic image can be generated from the first half for a fraction of the computational cost of complete rendering, usually no more than 50% of the cost and in many cases as little as 5%. Using the techniques presented here, the benefits of stereoscopy can be added to existing visualization systems for only a small cost over current single-frame rendering methods.

  8. High-energy proton imaging for biomedical applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Prall, Matthias; Durante, Marco; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, B.; Graeff, C.; Lang, Phillipp M.; LaTessa, Ciara; Shestov, Less; Simoniello, P.; Danly, Christopher R.; et al

    2016-06-10

    The charged particle community is looking for techniques exploiting proton interactions instead of X-ray absorption for creating images of human tissue. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering inside the measured object it has shown to be highly non-trivial to achieve sufficient spatial resolution. We present imaging of biological tissue with a proton microscope. This device relies on magnetic optics, distinguishing it from most published proton imaging methods. For these methods reducing the data acquisition time to a clinically acceptable level has turned out to be challenging. In a proton microscope, data acquisition and processing are much simpler. This device even allowsmore » imaging in real time. The primary medical application will be image guidance in proton radiosurgery. Proton images demonstrating the potential for this application are presented. As a result, tomographic reconstructions are included to raise awareness of the possibility of high-resolution proton tomography using magneto-optics.« less

  9. High-energy proton imaging for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prall, M.; Durante, M.; Berger, T.; Przybyla, B.; Graeff, C.; Lang, P. M.; Latessa, C.; Shestov, L.; Simoniello, P.; Danly, C.; Mariam, F.; Merrill, F.; Nedrow, P.; Wilde, C.; Varentsov, D.

    2016-06-01

    The charged particle community is looking for techniques exploiting proton interactions instead of X-ray absorption for creating images of human tissue. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering inside the measured object it has shown to be highly non-trivial to achieve sufficient spatial resolution. We present imaging of biological tissue with a proton microscope. This device relies on magnetic optics, distinguishing it from most published proton imaging methods. For these methods reducing the data acquisition time to a clinically acceptable level has turned out to be challenging. In a proton microscope, data acquisition and processing are much simpler. This device even allows imaging in real time. The primary medical application will be image guidance in proton radiosurgery. Proton images demonstrating the potential for this application are presented. Tomographic reconstructions are included to raise awareness of the possibility of high-resolution proton tomography using magneto-optics.

  10. High-energy proton imaging for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Prall, M.; Durante, M.; Berger, T.; Przybyla, B.; Graeff, C.; Lang, P. M.; LaTessa, C.; Shestov, L.; Simoniello, P.; Danly, C.; Mariam, F.; Merrill, F.; Nedrow, P.; Wilde, C.; Varentsov, D.

    2016-01-01

    The charged particle community is looking for techniques exploiting proton interactions instead of X-ray absorption for creating images of human tissue. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering inside the measured object it has shown to be highly non-trivial to achieve sufficient spatial resolution. We present imaging of biological tissue with a proton microscope. This device relies on magnetic optics, distinguishing it from most published proton imaging methods. For these methods reducing the data acquisition time to a clinically acceptable level has turned out to be challenging. In a proton microscope, data acquisition and processing are much simpler. This device even allows imaging in real time. The primary medical application will be image guidance in proton radiosurgery. Proton images demonstrating the potential for this application are presented. Tomographic reconstructions are included to raise awareness of the possibility of high-resolution proton tomography using magneto-optics. PMID:27282667

  11. Radionuclide Imaging Applications in Cardiomyopathies and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Harinstein, Matthew E; Soman, Prem

    2016-03-01

    Multiple epidemiological factors including population aging and improved survival after acute coronary syndromes have contributed to a heart failure (HF) prevalence in the USA in epidemic proportions. In the absence of transplantation, HF remains a progressive disease with poor prognosis. The structural and functional abnormalities of the myocardium in HF can be assessed by various radionuclide imaging techniques. Radionuclide imaging may be uniquely suited to address several important clinical questions in HF such as identifying etiology and guiding the selection of patients for coronary revascularization. Newer approaches such as autonomic innervation imaging, phase analysis for synchrony assessment, and other molecular imaging techniques continue to expand the applications of radionuclide imaging in HF. In this manuscript, we review established and evolving applications of radionuclide imaging for the diagnosis, risk stratification, and management of HF. PMID:26841785

  12. High-energy proton imaging for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Prall, M; Durante, M; Berger, T; Przybyla, B; Graeff, C; Lang, P M; LaTessa, C; Shestov, L; Simoniello, P; Danly, C; Mariam, F; Merrill, F; Nedrow, P; Wilde, C; Varentsov, D

    2016-01-01

    The charged particle community is looking for techniques exploiting proton interactions instead of X-ray absorption for creating images of human tissue. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering inside the measured object it has shown to be highly non-trivial to achieve sufficient spatial resolution. We present imaging of biological tissue with a proton microscope. This device relies on magnetic optics, distinguishing it from most published proton imaging methods. For these methods reducing the data acquisition time to a clinically acceptable level has turned out to be challenging. In a proton microscope, data acquisition and processing are much simpler. This device even allows imaging in real time. The primary medical application will be image guidance in proton radiosurgery. Proton images demonstrating the potential for this application are presented. Tomographic reconstructions are included to raise awareness of the possibility of high-resolution proton tomography using magneto-optics. PMID:27282667

  13. A null-steering viewpoint of interferometric SAR

    SciTech Connect

    BICKEL,DOUGLAS L.

    2000-05-02

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) extends the two-dimensional imaging capability of traditional synthetic aperture radar to three-dimensions by using an aperture in the elevation plane to estimate the 3-D structure of the target. The operation of this additional aperture can be viewed from a null-steering point of view, rather than the traditional phase determination point of view. Knowing that IFSAR can be viewed from the null-steering perspective allows one to take advantage of the mathematical foundation developed for null-steering arrays. In addition, in some problems of interest in IFSAR the null-steering perspective provides better intuition and suggests alternative solutions. One example is the problem of estimating building height where layover is present.

  14. Interferometric Radio Transient Reconstruction in Compressed Sensing Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, M.; Girard, J. N.; Starck, J.-L.; Corbel, S.; Tasse, C.

    2015-12-01

    Imaging by aperture synthesis from interferometric data is a well-known, but strong ill-posed inverse problem. Strong and faint radio sources can be imaged unambiguously using time and frequency integration to gather more Fourier samples of the sky. , However, these imagers assumes a steady sky and the complexity of the problem increases when transients radio sources are also present in the data. Hopefully, in the context of transient imaging, the spatial and temporal information are separable which enable extension of an imager fit for a steady sky. We introduce independent spatial and temporal wavelet dictionaries to sparsely represent the transient in both spatial domain and temporal domain. These dictionaries intervenes in a new reconstruction method developed in the Compressed Sensing (CS) framework and using a primal-dual splitting algorithm. According to the preliminary tests in different noise regimes, this new ``Time-agile'' (or 2D-1D) method seems to be efficient in detecting and reconstructing the transients temporal dependence.

  15. Fluorescence and Cerenkov luminescence imaging. Applications in small animal research.

    PubMed

    Schwenck, J; Fuchs, K; Eilenberger, S H L; Rolle, A-M; Castaneda Vega, S; Thaiss, W M; Maier, F C

    2016-04-12

    This review addresses small animal optical imaging (OI) applications in diverse fields of basic research. In the past, OI has proven to be cost- and time-effective, allows real-time imaging as well as high-throughput analysis and does not imply the usage of ionizing radiation (with the exception of Cerenkov imaging applications). Therefore, this technique is widely spread - not only geographically, but also among very different fields of basic research - and is represented by a large body of publications. Originally used in oncology research, OI is nowadays emerging in further areas like inflammation and infectious disease as well as neurology. Besides fluorescent probe-based contrast, the feasibility of Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) has been recently shown in small animals and thus represents a new route for future applications. Thus, this review will focus on examples for OI applications in inflammation, infectious disease, cell tracking as well as neurology, and provides an overview over CLI. PMID:27067794

  16. On digital image processing technology and application in geometric measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiugen; Xing, Ruonan; Liao, Na

    2014-04-01

    Digital image processing technique is an emerging science that emerging with the development of semiconductor integrated circuit technology and computer science technology since the 1960s.The article introduces the digital image processing technique and principle during measuring compared with the traditional optical measurement method. It takes geometric measure as an example and introduced the development tendency of digital image processing technology from the perspective of technology application.

  17. Optimizing signal and image processing applications using Intel libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landré, Jérôme; Truchetet, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents optimized signal and image processing libraries from Intel Corporation. Intel Performance Primitives (IPP) is a low-level signal and image processing library developed by Intel Corporation to optimize code on Intel processors. Open Computer Vision library (OpenCV) is a high-level library dedicated to computer vision tasks. This article describes the use of both libraries to build flexible and efficient signal and image processing applications.

  18. Image Processing Application for Cognition (IPAC) - Traditional and Emerging Topics in Image Processing in Astronomy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesenson, M.; Roby, W.; Helou, G.; McCollum, B.; Ly, L.; Wu, X.; Laine, S.; Hartley, B.

    2008-08-01

    A new application framework for advanced image processing for astronomy is presented. It implements standard two-dimensional operators, and recent developments in the field of non-astronomical image processing (IP), as well as original algorithms based on nonlinear partial differential equations (PDE). These algorithms are especially well suited for multi-scale astronomical images since they increase signal to noise ratio without smearing localized and diffuse objects. The visualization component is based on the extensive tools that we developed for Spitzer Space Telescope's observation planning tool Spot and archive retrieval tool Leopard. It contains many common features, combines images in new and unique ways and interfaces with many astronomy data archives. Both interactive and batch mode processing are incorporated. In the interactive mode, the user can set up simple processing pipelines, and monitor and visualize the resulting images from each step of the processing stream. The system is platform-independent and has an open architecture that allows extensibility by addition of plug-ins. This presentation addresses astronomical applications of traditional topics of IP (image enhancement, image segmentation) as well as emerging new topics like automated image quality assessment (QA) and feature extraction, which have potential for shaping future developments in the field. Our application framework embodies a novel synergistic approach based on integration of image processing, image visualization and image QA (iQA).

  19. Real-time hyperspectral imaging for food safety applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multispectral imaging systems with selected bands can commonly be used for real-time applications of food processing. Recent research has demonstrated several image processing methods including binning, noise removal filter, and appropriate morphological analysis in real-time mode can remove most fa...

  20. An airborne four-camera imaging system for agricultural applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes the design and testing of an airborne multispectral digital imaging system for remote sensing applications. The system consists of four high resolution charge coupled device (CCD) digital cameras and a ruggedized PC equipped with a frame grabber and image acquisition software. T...

  1. TOPICAL REVIEW: Shearography technology and applications: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, D.; Tatam, R. P.; Groves, R. M.

    2010-10-01

    Shearography is a full-field speckle interferometric technique used to determine surface displacement derivatives. For an interferometric technique, shearography is particularly resilient to environmental disturbances and has hence become an invaluable measurement tool outside of the optics laboratory. Furthermore, the inclusion of additional measurement channels has turned shearography from a qualitative inspection tool into a system suitable for quantitative surface strain measurement. In this review article we present a comprehensive overview of the technique, describing the principle of operation, optical configurations, image processing algorithms and applications, with a focus on more recent technological advances.

  2. Processing Infrared Images For Fire Management Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, John R.; Pratt, William K.

    1981-12-01

    The USDA Forest Service has used airborne infrared systems for forest fire detection and mapping for many years. The transfer of the images from plane to ground and the transposition of fire spots and perimeters to maps has been performed manually. A new system has been developed which uses digital image processing, transmission, and storage. Interactive graphics, high resolution color display, calculations, and computer model compatibility are featured in the system. Images are acquired by an IR line scanner and converted to 1024 x 1024 x 8 bit frames for transmission to the ground at a 1.544 M bit rate over a 14.7 GHZ carrier. Individual frames are received and stored, then transferred to a solid state memory to refresh the display at a conventional 30 frames per second rate. Line length and area calculations, false color assignment, X-Y scaling, and image enhancement are available. Fire spread can be calculated for display and fire perimeters plotted on maps. The performance requirements, basic system, and image processing will be described.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging. Application to family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, R. H.; Somers, S.; Jurriaans, E.; Yu, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review indications, contraindications, and risks of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to help primary care physicians refer patients appropriately for MRI, screen for contraindications to using MRI, and educate patients about MRI. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Recommendations are based on classic textbooks, the policies of our MRI group, and a literature search using MEDLINE with the MeSH headings magnetic resonance imaging, brain, musculoskeletal, and spine. The search was limited to human, English-language, and review articles. Evidence in favour of using MRI for imaging the head, spine, and joints is well established. For cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic conditions, MRI has been shown useful for certain indications, usually to complement other modalities. MAIN MESSAGE: For demonstrating soft tissue conditions, MRI is better than computed tomography (CT), but CT shows bone and acute bleeding better. Therefore, patients with trauma or suspected intracranial bleeding should have CT. Tumours, congenital abnormalities, vascular structures, and the cervical or thoracic spine show better on MRI. Either modality can be used for lower back pain. Cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic abnormalities should be imaged with ultrasound or CT before MRI. Contraindications for MRI are mainly metallic implants or shrapnel, severe claustrophobia, or obesity. CONCLUSIONS: With the increasing availability of MRI scanners in Canada, better understanding of the indications, contraindications, and risks will be helpful for family physicians and their patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:10509224

  4. Electromagnetic inverse applications for functional brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, C.C.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project addresses an important mathematical and computational problem in functional brain imaging, namely the electromagnetic {open_quotes}inverse problem.{close_quotes} Electromagnetic brain imaging techniques, magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG), are based on measurements of electrical potentials and magnetic fields at hundreds of locations outside the human head. The inverse problem is the estimation of the locations, magnitudes, and time-sources of electrical currents in the brain from surface measurements. This project extends recent progress on the inverse problem by combining the use of anatomical constraints derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with Bayesian and other novel algorithmic approaches. The results suggest that we can achieve significant improvements in the accuracy and robustness of inverse solutions by these two approaches.

  5. Neural networks: Application to medical imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Laurence P.

    1994-01-01

    The research mission is the development of computer assisted diagnostic (CAD) methods for improved diagnosis of medical images including digital x-ray sensors and tomographic imaging modalities. The CAD algorithms include advanced methods for adaptive nonlinear filters for image noise suppression, hybrid wavelet methods for feature segmentation and enhancement, and high convergence neural networks for feature detection and VLSI implementation of neural networks for real time analysis. Other missions include (1) implementation of CAD methods on hospital based picture archiving computer systems (PACS) and information networks for central and remote diagnosis and (2) collaboration with defense and medical industry, NASA, and federal laboratories in the area of dual use technology conversion from defense or aerospace to medicine.

  6. Stereo imaging velocimetry for microgravity applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Brian B.; Meyer, Maryjo B.; Bethea, Mark D.

    1994-01-01

    Stereo imaging velocimetry is the quantitative measurement of three-dimensional flow fields using two sensors recording data from different vantage points. The system described in this paper, under development at NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, uses two CCD cameras placed perpendicular to one another, laser disk recorders, an image processing substation, and a 586-based computer to record data at standard NTSC video rates (30 Hertz) and reduce it offline. The flow itself is marked with seed particles, hence the fluid must be transparent. The velocimeter tracks the motion of the particles, and from these we deduce a multipoint (500 or more), quantitative map of the flow. Conceptually, the software portion of the velocimeter can be divided into distinct modules. These modules are: camera calibration, particle finding (image segmentation) and centroid location, particle overlap decomposition, particle tracking, and stereo matching. We discuss our approach to each module, and give our currently achieved speed and accuracy for each where available.

  7. MEM application to IRAS CPC images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, A. P.

    1994-01-01

    A method for applying the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to Chopped Photometric Channel (CPC) IRAS additional observations is illustrated. The original CPC data suffered from problems with repeatability which MEM is able to cope with by use of a noise image, produced from the results of separate data scans of objects. The process produces images of small areas of sky with circular Gaussian beams of approximately 30 in. full width half maximum resolution at 50 and 100 microns. Comparison is made to previous reconstructions made in the far-infrared as well as morphologies of objects at other wavelengths. Some projects with this dataset are discussed.

  8. Multimodality Image Fusion Guided Procedures: Technique, Accuracy, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Kruecker, Jochen; Kadoury, Samuel; Kobeiter, Hicham; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Levy, Elliot; Wood, Bradford J.

    2012-01-01

    Personalized therapies play an increasingly critical role in cancer care; Image guidance with multimodality image fusion facilitates the targeting of specific tissue for tissue characterization, and plays a role in drug discovery and optimization of tailored therapies. PET, MRI and contrast enhanced CT may offer additional information not otherwise available to the operator during minimally invasive image guided procedures such as biopsy and ablation. With use of multimodality image fusion for image-guided interventions, navigation with advanced modalities does not require the physical presence of the PET, MRI, or CT imaging system. Several commercially available methods of image fusion and device navigation are reviewed along with an explanation of common tracking hardware and software. An overview of current clinical applications for multimodality navigation is provided. PMID:22851166

  9. Clinical applications of high-resolution ocular magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanitame, Keizo; Sone, Takashi; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki; Awai, Kazuo

    2012-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using fast sequences with subjects staring at a target can provide motion-free ocular images, and small receiver surface coils make it possible to produce ocular images with high spatial resolution. MRI using half-Fourier single-shot rapid acquisition with a relaxation enhancement sequence as a fast T2-weighted imaging yields useful images for the morphologic diagnosis of ocular diseases, and MRI using a fast spoiled gradient-recalled-echo sequence as a T1-weighted imaging yields additional information by the administration of gadolinium-based contrast material for assessing the vascularity of intraocular tumors. These ocular imaging techniques are useful for the evaluation of patients with angle closure glaucoma, congenital abnormality of ocular globes, intraocular tumors and several types of detachments, as well as patients after ocular surgery. In this pictorial essay, we demonstrate the clinical applications of fast high-resolution ocular MRI with fixation of the subjects' visual foci. PMID:22923185

  10. Cylindrical millimeter-wave imaging technique and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2006-05-01

    The wideband microwave or millimeter-wave cylindrical imaging technique has been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for several applications including concealed weapon detection and automated body measurement for apparel fitting. This technique forms a fully-focused, diffraction-limited, three-dimensional image of the person or imaging target by scanning an inward-directed vertical array around the person or imaging target. The array is switched electronically to sequence across the array at high-speed, so that a full 360 degree mechanical scan over the cylindrical aperture can occur in 2-10 seconds. Wideband, coherent reflection data from each antenna position are recorded in a computer and subsequently reconstructed using an FFT-based image reconstruction algorithm developed at PNNL. The cylindrical scanning configuration is designed to optimize the illumination of the target and minimize non-returns due to specular reflection of the illumination away from the array. In this paper, simulated modeling data are used to explore imaging issues that affect the cylindrical imaging technique. Physical optics scattering simulations are used to model realistic returns from curved surfaces to determine the extent to which specular reflection affects the signal return and subsequent image reconstruction from these surfaces. This is a particularly important issue for the body measurement application. Also, an artifact in the imaging technique, referred to as "circular convolution aliasing" is discussed including methods to reduce or eliminate it. Numerous simulated and laboratory measured imaging results are presented.

  11. Improving terrain height estimates from RADARSAT interferometric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, P.A.; Eichel, P.H.; Calloway, T.M.

    1998-03-01

    The authors describe two methods of combining two-pass RADAR-SAT interferometric phase maps with existing DTED (digital terrain elevation data) to produce improved terrain height estimates. The first is a least-squares estimation procedure that fits the unwrapped phase data to a phase map computed from the DTED. The second is a filtering technique that combines the interferometric height map with the DTED map based on spatial frequency content. Both methods preserve the high fidelity of the interferometric data.

  12. Quad Tree Structures for Image Compression Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markas, Tassos; Reif, John

    1992-01-01

    Presents a class of distortion controlled vector quantizers that are capable of compressing images so they comply with certain distortion requirements. Highlights include tree-structured vector quantizers; multiresolution vector quantization; error coding vector quantizer; error coding multiresolution algorithm; and Huffman coding of the quad-tree…

  13. Infrared scanning images: An archeological application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaber, G.G.; Gumerman, G.J.

    1969-01-01

    Aerial infrared scanner images of an area near the Little Colorado River in north-central Arizona disclosed the existence of scattered clusters of parallel linear features in the ashfall area of Sunset Crater. The features are not obvious in conventional aerial photographs, and only one cluster could be recognized on the ground. Soil and pollen analyses reveal that they are prehistoric agricultural plots.

  14. Stability in computed optical interferometric tomography (Part II): in vivo stability assessment

    PubMed Central

    Shemonski, Nathan D.; Ahmad, Adeel; Adie, Steven G.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; South, Fredrick A.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Stability is of utmost importance to a wide range of phase-sensitive processing techniques. In Doppler optical coherence tomography and optical coherence elastography, in addition to defocus and aberration correction techniques such as interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy and computational/digital adaptive optics, a precise understanding of the system and sample stability helps to guide the system design and choice of imaging parameters. This article focuses on methods to accurately and quantitatively measure the stability of an imaging configuration in vivo. These methods are capable of partially decoupling axial from transverse motion and are compared against the stability requirements for computed optical interferometric tomography laid out in the first part of this article. PMID:25321016

  15. Deconvolution of interferometric data using interior point iterative algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theys, C.; Lantéri, H.; Aime, C.

    2016-09-01

    We address the problem of deconvolution of astronomical images that could be obtained with future large interferometers in space. The presentation is made in two complementary parts. The first part gives an introduction to the image deconvolution with linear and nonlinear algorithms. The emphasis is made on nonlinear iterative algorithms that verify the constraints of non-negativity and constant flux. The Richardson-Lucy algorithm appears there as a special case for photon counting conditions. More generally, the algorithm published recently by Lanteri et al. (2015) is based on scale invariant divergences without assumption on the statistic model of the data. The two proposed algorithms are interior-point algorithms, the latter being more efficient in terms of speed of calculation. These algorithms are applied to the deconvolution of simulated images corresponding to an interferometric system of 16 diluted telescopes in space. Two non-redundant configurations, one disposed around a circle and the other on an hexagonal lattice, are compared for their effectiveness on a simple astronomical object. The comparison is made in the direct and Fourier spaces. Raw "dirty" images have many artifacts due to replicas of the original object. Linear methods cannot remove these replicas while iterative methods clearly show their efficacy in these examples.

  16. Application of Laser Imaging for Bio/geophysical Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummel, J. R.; Goltz, S. M.; Depiero, N. L.; Degloria, D. P.; Pagliughi, F. M.

    1992-01-01

    SPARTA, Inc. has developed a low-cost, portable laser imager that, among other applications, can be used in bio/geophysical applications. In the application to be discussed here, the system was utilized as an imaging system for background features in a forested locale. The SPARTA mini-ladar system was used at the International Paper Northern Experimental Forest near Howland, Maine to assist in a project designed to study the thermal and radiometric phenomenology at forest edges. The imager was used to obtain data from three complex sites, a 'seed' orchard, a forest edge, and a building. The goal of the study was to demonstrate the usefulness of the laser imager as a tool to obtain geometric and internal structure data about complex 3-D objects in a natural background. The data from these images have been analyzed to obtain information about the distributions of the objects in a scene. A range detection algorithm has been used to identify individual objects in a laser image and an edge detection algorithm then applied to highlight the outlines of discrete objects. An example of an image processed in such a manner is shown. Described here are the results from the study. In addition, results are presented outlining how the laser imaging system could be used to obtain other important information about bio/geophysical systems, such as the distribution of woody material in forests.

  17. NMR imaging of components and materials for DOE application

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, B.R.

    1993-12-01

    The suitability for using NMR imaging to characterize liquid, polymeric, and solid materials was reviewed. The most attractive applications for NMR imaging appear to be liquid-filled porous samples, partially cured polymers, adhesives, and potting compounds, and composite polymers/high explosives containing components with widely varying thermal properties. Solid-state NMR line-narrowing and signal-enhancing markedly improve the imaging possibilities of true solid and materials. These techniques provide unique elemental and chemical shift information for highly complex materials and complement images with similar spatial resolution, such as X-ray computed tomography (CT).

  18. Applications of magnetic resonance image segmentation in neurology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Tomi; Lahtinen, Antti J.; Dastidar, Prasun; Ryymin, Pertti; Laarne, Paeivi; Malmivuo, Jaakko; Laasonen, Erkki; Frey, Harry; Eskola, Hannu

    1999-05-01

    After the introduction of digital imagin devices in medicine computerized tissue recognition and classification have become important in research and clinical applications. Segmented data can be applied among numerous research fields including volumetric analysis of particular tissues and structures, construction of anatomical modes, 3D visualization, and multimodal visualization, hence making segmentation essential in modern image analysis. In this research project several PC based software were developed in order to segment medical images, to visualize raw and segmented images in 3D, and to produce EEG brain maps in which MR images and EEG signals were integrated. The software package was tested and validated in numerous clinical research projects in hospital environment.

  19. Biomedical applications of a new portable Raman imaging probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hidetoshi; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Ikeda, Teruki; Wada, Satoshi; Tashiro, Hideo; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2001-10-01

    This article reports the outline of a new portable Raman imaging probe and its applications. This probe may be the smallest and lightest Raman imaging probe in the world. It is equipped with an interchangeable long-working distance microscope objective lens. The irradiation area is about 45 and 90 μm and the spatial resolution is 1 μm. In the present study, the Raman imaging probe was used to obtain a Raman image of diamond particles and a Raman mapping of carotenoid in Euglena.

  20. Recent applications of thermal imagers for security assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Bisbee, T.L.

    1997-06-01

    This paper discusses recent applications by Sandia National Laboratories of cooled and uncooled thermal infrared imagers to wide-area security assessment systems. Thermal imagers can solve many security assessment problems associated with the protection of high-value assets at military bases, secure installations, and commercial facilities. Thermal imagers can provide surveillance video from security areas or perimeters both day and night without expensive security lighting. Until fairly recently, thermal imagers required open-loop cryogenic cooling to operate. The high cost of these systems and associated maintenance requirements restricted their widespread use. However, recent developments in reliable, closed-loop, linear drive cryogenic coolers and uncooled infrared imagers have dramatically reduced maintenance requirements, extended MTBF, and are leading to reduced system cost. These technology developments are resulting in greater availability and practicality for military as well as civilian security applications.

  1. Infrared Imaging Tools for Diagnostic Applications in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Gurjarpadhye, Abhijit Achyut; Parekh, Mansi Bharat; Dubnika, Arita; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Inayathullah, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Infrared (IR) imaging is a collection of non-invasive imaging techniques that utilize the IR domain of the electromagnetic spectrum for tissue assessment. A subset of these techniques construct images using back-reflected light, while other techniques rely on detection of IR radiation emitted by the tissue as a result of its temperature. Modern IR detectors sense thermal emissions and produce a heat map of surface temperature distribution in tissues. Thus, the IR spectrum offers a variety of imaging applications particularly useful in clinical diagnostic area, ranging from high-resolution, depth-resolved visualization of tissue to temperature variation assessment. These techniques have been helpful in the diagnosis of many medical conditions including skin/breast cancer, arthritis, allergy, burns, and others. In this review, we discuss current roles of IR-imaging techniques for diagnostic applications in dermatology with an emphasis on skin cancer, allergies, blisters, burns and wounds. PMID:26691203

  2. Continuous-terahertz-wave molecular imaging system for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Liangliang; Wu, Tong; Wang, Ruixue; Zuo, Shasha; Wu, Dong; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Molecular imaging techniques are becoming increasingly important in biomedical research and potentially in clinical practice. We present a continuous-terahertz (THz)-wave molecular imaging system for biomedical applications, in which an infrared (IR) laser is integrated into a 0.2-THz reflection-mode continuous-THz-wave imaging system to induce surface plasmon polaritons on the nanoparticles and further improve the intensity of the reflected signal from the water around the nanoparticles. A strong and rapid increment of the reflected THz signal in the nanoparticle solution upon the IR laser irradiation is demonstrated, using either gold or silver nanoparticles. This low-cost, simple, and stable continuous-THz-wave molecular imaging system is suitable for miniaturization and practical imaging applications; in particular, it shows great promise for cancer diagnosis and nanoparticle drug-delivery monitoring.

  3. Fast sensors for time-of-flight imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Vallance, Claire; Brouard, Mark; Lauer, Alexandra; Slater, Craig S; Halford, Edward; Winter, Benjamin; King, Simon J; Lee, Jason W L; Pooley, Daniel E; Sedgwick, Iain; Turchetta, Renato; Nomerotski, Andrei; John, Jaya John; Hill, Laura

    2014-01-14

    The development of sensors capable of detecting particles and radiation with both high time and high positional resolution is key to improving our understanding in many areas of science. Example applications of such sensors range from fundamental scattering studies of chemical reaction mechanisms through to imaging mass spectrometry of surfaces, neutron scattering studies aimed at probing the structure of materials, and time-resolved fluorescence measurements to elucidate the structure and function of biomolecules. In addition to improved throughput resulting from parallelisation of data collection - imaging of multiple different fragments in velocity-map imaging studies, for example - fast image sensors also offer a number of fundamentally new capabilities in areas such as coincidence detection. In this Perspective, we review recent developments in fast image sensor technology, provide examples of their implementation in a range of different experimental contexts, and discuss potential future developments and applications. PMID:24002354

  4. A High Performance Image Data Compression Technique for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Pen-Shu; Venbrux, Jack

    2003-01-01

    A highly performing image data compression technique is currently being developed for space science applications under the requirement of high-speed and pushbroom scanning. The technique is also applicable to frame based imaging data. The algorithm combines a two-dimensional transform with a bitplane encoding; this results in an embedded bit string with exact desirable compression rate specified by the user. The compression scheme performs well on a suite of test images acquired from spacecraft instruments. It can also be applied to three-dimensional data cube resulting from hyper-spectral imaging instrument. Flight qualifiable hardware implementations are in development. The implementation is being designed to compress data in excess of 20 Msampledsec and support quantization from 2 to 16 bits. This paper presents the algorithm, its applications and status of development.

  5. Comparison of mouse mammary gland imaging techniques and applications: Reflectance confocal microscopy, GFP Imaging, and ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Tilli, Maddalena T; Parrish, Angela R; Cotarla, Ion; Jones, Laundette P; Johnson, Michael D; Furth, Priscilla A

    2008-01-01

    Background Genetically engineered mouse models of mammary gland cancer enable the in vivo study of molecular mechanisms and signaling during development and cancer pathophysiology. However, traditional whole mount and histological imaging modalities are only applicable to non-viable tissue. Methods We evaluated three techniques that can be quickly applied to living tissue for imaging normal and cancerous mammary gland: reflectance confocal microscopy, green fluorescent protein imaging, and ultrasound imaging. Results In the current study, reflectance confocal imaging offered the highest resolution and was used to optically section mammary ductal structures in the whole mammary gland. Glands remained viable in mammary gland whole organ culture when 1% acetic acid was used as a contrast agent. Our application of using green fluorescent protein expressing transgenic mice in our study allowed for whole mammary gland ductal structures imaging and enabled straightforward serial imaging of mammary gland ducts in whole organ culture to visualize the growth and differentiation process. Ultrasound imaging showed the lowest resolution. However, ultrasound was able to detect mammary preneoplastic lesions 0.2 mm in size and was used to follow cancer growth with serial imaging in living mice. Conclusion In conclusion, each technique enabled serial imaging of living mammary tissue and visualization of growth and development, quickly and with minimal tissue preparation. The use of the higher resolution reflectance confocal and green fluorescent protein imaging techniques and lower resolution ultrasound were complementary. PMID:18215290

  6. Diffusion-weighted imaging in pediatric body MR imaging: principles, technique, and emerging applications.

    PubMed

    Chavhan, Govind B; Alsabban, Zehour; Babyn, Paul S

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging is an emerging technique in body imaging that provides indirect information about the microenvironment of tissues and lesions and helps detect, characterize, and follow up abnormalities. Two main challenges in the application of DW imaging to body imaging are the decreased signal-to-noise ratio of body tissues compared with neuronal tissues due to their shorter T2 relaxation time, and image degradation related to physiologic motion (eg, respiratory motion). Use of smaller b values and newer motion compensation techniques allow the evaluation of anatomic structures with DW imaging. DW imaging can be performed as a breath-hold sequence or a free-breathing sequence with or without respiratory triggering. Depending on the mobility of water molecules in their microenvironment, different normal tissues have different signals at DW imaging. Some normal tissues (eg, lymph nodes, spleen, ovarian and testicular parenchyma) are diffusion restricted, whereas others (eg, gallbladder, corpora cavernosa, endometrium, cartilage) show T2 shine-through. Epiphyses that contain fatty marrow and bone cortex appear dark on both DW images and apparent diffusion coefficient maps. Current and emerging applications of DW imaging in pediatric body imaging include tumor detection and characterization, assessment of therapy response and monitoring of tumors, noninvasive detection and grading of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, detection of abscesses, and evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24819803

  7. Cross-validation of interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy and optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Ralston, Tyler S; Adie, Steven G; Marks, Daniel L; Boppart, Stephen A; Carney, P Scott

    2010-05-15

    Computationally reconstructed interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy is coregistered with optical coherence tomography (OCT) focal plane data to provide quantitative cross validation with OCT. This is accomplished through a qualitative comparison of images and a quantitative analysis of the width of the point-spread function in simulation and experiment. The width of the ISAM point-spread function is seen to be independent of depth, in contrast to OCT. PMID:20479849

  8. Applications of pulse radiolysis to imaging sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Meisel, D.

    1996-05-01

    Pulse radiolysis has been used over the last 3 decades to study a variety of physical and chemical systems, including those relevant to imaging processes. This review outlines the similarities between photolysis and radiolysis and highlight the differences. It focuses on time-resolved variants of the two disciplines, flash photolysis vs pulse radiolysis. The strength (and weakness) of the radiolytic techniques is their nonspecificity; the energy is always absorbed by the solvent and not the solute. Radiation chemistry principles that were developed for one discipline are easily transportable to another. The pulse radiolysis technique with a wide arsenal of detection techniques is currently used to identify short-lived intermediates and to determine their kinetic and thermodynamic properties. Together, these studies provide mechanistic insight into the behavior of physical systems. We demonstrate the utility of the approach in several areas of interest to imaging sciences: clustering of silver atoms, growth of silver halides, and medium effects on these systems.

  9. Bayesian image reconstruction: Application to emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, J.; Llacer, J.

    1989-02-01

    In this paper we propose a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) method of image reconstruction in the Bayesian framework for the Poisson noise case. We use entropy to define the prior probability and likelihood to define the conditional probability. The method uses sharpness parameters which can be theoretically computed or adjusted, allowing us to obtain MAP reconstructions without the problem of the grey'' reconstructions associated with the pre Bayesian reconstructions. We have developed several ways to solve the reconstruction problem and propose a new iterative algorithm which is stable, maintains positivity and converges to feasible images faster than the Maximum Likelihood Estimate method. We have successfully applied the new method to the case of Emission Tomography, both with simulated and real data. 41 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Development and Evaluation of Science and Technology Education Program Using Interferometric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Y.; Ikemitsu, H.; Nango, K.

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a science and technology education program to teach junior high school students to measure terrain changes by using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR). The objectives of the proposed program are to evaluate and use information technology by performing SAR data processing in order to measure ground deformation, and to incorporate an understanding of Earth sciences by analyzing interferometric SAR processing results. To draft the teaching guidance plan for the developed education program, this study considers both science and technology education. The education program was used in a Japanese junior high school. An educational SAR processor developed by the authors and the customized Delft object-oriented radar interferometric software package were employed. Earthquakes as diastrophism events were chosen as practical teaching materials. The selected events indicate clear ground deformation in differential interferograms with high coherence levels. The learners were able to investigate the ground deformations and disasters caused by the events. They interactively used computers and became skilled at recognizing the knowledge and techniques of information technology, and then they evaluated the technology. Based on the results of pre- and post-questionnaire surveys and self-evaluation by the learners, it was clarified that the proposed program was applicable for junior high school education, and the learners recognized the usefulness of Earth observation technology by using interferometric SAR. The usefulness of the teaching materials in the learning activities was also shown through the practical teaching experience.

  11. Image 100 procedures manual development: Applications system library definition and Image 100 software definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guseman, L. F., Jr.; Decell, H. P., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An outline for an Image 100 procedures manual for Earth Resources Program image analysis was developed which sets forth guidelines that provide a basis for the preparation and updating of an Image 100 Procedures Manual. The scope of the outline was limited to definition of general features of a procedures manual together with special features of an interactive system. Computer programs were identified which should be implemented as part of an applications oriented library for the system.

  12. Uncooled thermal imaging sensor for UAV applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, Derick M.; Manning, Paul A.; Wyllie, Tim A.

    2001-10-01

    Research by DERA aimed at unmanned air vehicle (UAV) size reduction and control automation has led to a unique solution for a short range reconnaissance UAV system. Known as OBSERVER, the UAV conventionally carries a lightweight visible band sensor payload producing imagery with a large 40°x90° field of regard (FOR) to maximize spatial awareness and target detection ranges. Images taken from three CCD camera units set at elevations from plan view and up to the near horizon and are 'stitched' together to produce the large contiguous sensor footprint. This paper describes the design of a thermal imaging (TI) sensor which has been developed to be compatible with the OBSERVER UAV system. The sensor is based on UK uncooled thermal imaging technology research and offers a compact and lightweight solution operating in the 8-12 μm waveband without the need for cryogenic cooling. Infra-red radiation is gathered using two lead scandium tantalate (PST) hybrid thermal detectors each with a 384 X 288 pixel resolution, known as the Very Large Array (VLA). The TI system is designed to maintain the imaging format with that of the visible band sensor. In order to practically achieve this with adequate resolution performance, a dual field of view (FOV) optical system is used within a pitchable gimbal. This combines the advantages of a wide angle 40°x30° FOV for target detection and a narrow angle 13°x10° FOV 'foveal patch' to improve target recognition ranges. The gimbal system can be steered in elevation to give the full 90° coverage as with the visible band sensor footprint. The concept of operation is that targets can be detected over the large FOV and then the air vehicle is maneuvered so as to bring the target into the foveal patch view for recognition at an acceptable stand-off range.

  13. [The application of X-ray imaging in forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Kučerová, Stěpánka; Safr, Miroslav; Ublová, Michaela; Urbanová, Petra; Hejna, Petr

    2014-07-01

    X-ray is the most common, basic and essential imaging method used in forensic medicine. It serves to display and localize the foreign objects in the body and helps to detect various traumatic and pathological changes. X-ray imaging is valuable in anthropological assessment of an individual. X-ray allows non-invasive evaluation of important findings before the autopsy and thus selection of the optimal strategy for dissection. Basic indications for postmortem X-ray imaging in forensic medicine include gunshot and explosive fatalities (identification and localization of projectiles or other components of ammunition, visualization of secondary missiles), sharp force injuries (air embolism, identification of the weapon) and motor vehicle related deaths. The method is also helpful for complex injury evaluation in abused victims or in persons where abuse is suspected. Finally, X-ray imaging still remains the gold standard method for identification of unknown deceased. With time modern imaging methods, especially computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, are more and more applied in forensic medicine. Their application extends possibilities of the visualization the bony structures toward a more detailed imaging of soft tissues and internal organs. The application of modern imaging methods in postmortem body investigation is known as digital or virtual autopsy. At present digital postmortem imaging is considered as a bloodless alternative to the conventional autopsy. PMID:25186776

  14. Silica microwire-based interferometric electric field sensor.

    PubMed

    Han, Chunyang; Lv, Fangxing; Sun, Chen; Ding, Hui

    2015-08-15

    Silica microwire, as an optical waveguide whose diameter is close to or smaller than the wavelength of the guided light, is of great interest because it exhibits a number of excellent properties such as tight confinement, large evanescent fields, and great configurability. Here, we report a silica microwire-based compact photonic sensor for real-time detection of high electric field. This device contains an interferometer with propylene carbonate cladding. Based on the Kerr electro-optic effect of propylene carbonate, the applied intensive transient electric field can change the refractive index of propylene carbonate, which shifts the interferometric fringe. Therefore, the electric field could be demodulated by monitoring the fringe shift. The sensor was successfully used to detect alternating electric field with frequency of 50 Hz and impulse electric field with duration time of 200 μs. This work lays a foundation for future applications in electric field sensing. PMID:26274634

  15. X-ray imaging for security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. Paul

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray screening of luggage by aviation security personnel may be badly hindered by the lack of visual cues to depth in an image that has been produced by transmitted radiation. Two-dimensional "shadowgraphs" with "organic" and "metallic" objects encoded using two different colors (usually orange and blue) are still in common use. In the context of luggage screening there are no reliable cues to depth present in individual shadowgraph X-ray images. Therefore, the screener is required to convert the 'zero depth resolution' shadowgraph into a three-dimensional mental picture to be able to interpret the relative spatial relationship of the objects under inspection. Consequently, additional cognitive processing is required e.g. integration, inference and memory. However, these processes can lead to serious misinterpretations of the actual physical structure being examined. This paper describes the development of a stereoscopic imaging technique enabling the screener to utilise binocular stereopsis and kinetic depth to enhance their interpretation of the actual nature of the objects under examination. Further work has led to the development of a technique to combine parallax data (to calculate the thickness of a target material) with the results of a basis material subtraction technique to approximate the target's effective atomic number and density. This has been achieved in preliminary experiments with a novel spatially interleaved dual-energy sensor which reduces the number of scintillation elements required by 50% in comparison to conventional sensor configurations.

  16. Terahertz parametric sources and imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, M.; Ogawa, Y.; Otani, C.; Kawase, K.

    2005-12-01

    We have studied the generation of terahertz (THz) waves by optical parametric processes based on laser light scattering from the polariton mode of nonlinear crystals. Using parametric oscillation of LiNbO 3 or MgO-doped LiNbO 3 crystal pumped by a nano-second Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, we have realized a widely tunable coherent THz-wave sources with a simple configuration. We report the detailed characteristics of the oscillation and the radiation including tunability, spatial and temporal coherency, uni directivity, and efficiency. A Fourier transform limited THz-wave spectrum narrowing was achieved by introducing the injection seeding method. Further, we have developed a spectroscopic THz imaging system using a TPO, which allows detection and identification of drugs concealed in envelopes, by introducing the component spatial pattern analysis. Several images of the envelope are recorded at different THz frequencies and then processed. The final result is an image that reveals what substances are present in the envelope, in what quantity, and how they are distributed across the envelope area. The example presented here shows the identification of three drugs, two of which illegal, while one is an over-the-counter drug.

  17. Global shutter imagers for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynants, G.

    2014-05-01

    Global shutter image sensors offer significant advantages over rolling shutter imagers but their implementation needs careful consideration. Each pixel needs a storage element on which the signal is stored after the exposure period. To cope with low read noise requirements, it is essential that the pixel can still perform correlated double sampling or CDS. This requires a second memory element in the pixel, so that the reset reference level of the sense amplifier can be read before the charge is dumped onto the sense node. An important specification is the parasitic light sensitivity or shutter efficiency of the pixel. This is a measure how insensitive the memory cell in the pixel is to light. Depending on the pixel architecture, this may be especially difficult in combination with backside illumination. Other important pixel performance parameters related to pixel architecture are read noise and dark current. In this paper we will review global shutter pixel architectures, compare their performances and discuss future developments. We discuss the issues related to global shutter pixels for high dynamic range and backside illumination, and how the most advanced CMOS image sensor process technologies can offer new approaches.

  18. RNA imaging in living cells – methods and applications

    PubMed Central

    Urbanek, Martyna O; Galka-Marciniak, Paulina; Olejniczak, Marta; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2014-01-01

    Numerous types of transcripts perform multiple functions in cells, and these functions are mainly facilitated by the interactions of the RNA with various proteins and other RNAs. Insight into the dynamics of RNA biosynthesis, processing and cellular activities is highly desirable because this knowledge will deepen our understanding of cell physiology and help explain the mechanisms of RNA-mediated pathologies. In this review, we discuss the live RNA imaging systems that have been developed to date. We highlight information on the design of these systems, briefly discuss their advantages and limitations and provide examples of their numerous applications in various organisms and cell types. We present a detailed examination of one application of RNA imaging systems: this application aims to explain the role of mutant transcripts in human disease pathogenesis caused by triplet repeat expansions. Thus, this review introduces live RNA imaging systems and provides a glimpse into their various applications. PMID:25483044

  19. Applications of dual energy computed tomography in abdominal imaging.

    PubMed

    Lestra, T; Mulé, S; Millet, I; Carsin-Vu, A; Taourel, P; Hoeffel, C

    2016-06-01

    Dual energy computed tomography (CT) is an imaging technique based on data acquisition at two different energy settings. Recent advances in CT have allowed data acquisition and almost simultaneously analysis of two spectra of X-rays at different energy levels resulting in novel developments in the field of abdominal imaging. This technique is widely used in cardiovascular imaging, especially for pulmonary embolism work-up but is now also increasingly developed in the field of abdominal imaging. With dual-energy CT it is possible to obtain virtual unenhanced images from monochromatic reconstructions as well as attenuation maps of different elements, thereby improving detection and characterization of a variety of renal, adrenal, hepatic and pancreatic abnormalities. Also, dual-energy CT can provide information regarding urinary calculi composition. This article reviews and illustrates the different applications of dual-energy CT in routine abdominal imaging. PMID:26993967

  20. A probabilistic approach for color correction in image mosaicking applications.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Miguel; Sappa, Angel Domingo; Santos, Vitor

    2015-02-01

    Image mosaicking applications require both geometrical and photometrical registrations between the images that compose the mosaic. This paper proposes a probabilistic color correction algorithm for correcting the photometrical disparities. First, the image to be color corrected is segmented into several regions using mean shift. Then, connected regions are extracted using a region fusion algorithm. Local joint image histograms of each region are modeled as collections of truncated Gaussians using a maximum likelihood estimation procedure. Then, local color palette mapping functions are computed using these sets of Gaussians. The color correction is performed by applying those functions to all the regions of the image. An extensive comparison with ten other state of the art color correction algorithms is presented, using two different image pair data sets. Results show that the proposed approach obtains the best average scores in both data sets and evaluation metrics and is also the most robust to failures. PMID:25438315

  1. Molecular Imaging with MRI: Potential Application in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Wu, Chang Qiang; Chen, Tian Wu; Tang, Meng Yue; Zhang, Xiao Ming

    2015-01-01

    Despite the variety of approaches that have been improved to achieve a good understanding of pancreatic cancer (PC), the prognosis of PC remains poor, and the survival rates are dismal. The lack of early detection and effective interventions is the main reason. Therefore, considerable ongoing efforts aimed at identifying early PC are currently being pursued using a variety of methods. In recent years, the development of molecular imaging has made the specific targeting of PC in the early stage possible. Molecular imaging seeks to directly visualize, characterize, and measure biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels. Among different imaging technologies, the magnetic resonance (MR) molecular imaging has potential in this regard because it facilitates noninvasive, target-specific imaging of PC. This topic is reviewed in terms of the contrast agents for MR molecular imaging, the biomarkers related to PC, targeted molecular probes for MRI, and the application of MRI in the diagnosis of PC. PMID:26579537

  2. Interferometric Radar Observations of Glaciar San Rafael, Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric; Forster, Richard; Isacks, Bryan

    1996-01-01

    Interferometric radar observations of Glaciar San Rafael, Chile, were collected in October 1994 by NASA's Spaceborne Imaging Radar C (SIR-C) at both L- (24cm) and C-band frequency (5.6cm), with vertical transmit and receive polarization. The C-band data did not yield good geophysical products, because the temporal coherence of the signal was significantly reduced after 24h. The L-band data were, however, successfully employed to map the surface topography of the icefield with a 10m uncertainty in height, and measure ice velocity with a precision of 4 mm/d or 1.4 m/a. The corresponding error in strain rates is 0.05/a at a 30 m horizontal spacing. The one-dimensional interferometric velocities were subsequently converted to horizontal displacements by assuming a flow direction and complemented by feature-tracking results near the calving front. The results provide a comprehensive view of the ice-flow dynamics of Glaciar San Rafael. The glacier has a core of rapid flow, 4.5 km in width and 3.5 degrees in average slope,surrounded by slower moving ice, not by rock. Ice velocity is 2.6 m/d or 0.95 km/a near the equilibrium line altitude (1200m), increasing rapidly before the glacier enters the narrower terminal valley, to reach 17.5 m/d or 6.4 km/a at the calving front. Strain rates are dominated by lateral shearing at the glacier margins (0.4-0.7/a), except for the terminal-valley section, where longitudinal strain rates average close to 1/a. This spectacular longitudinal increase in ice velocity in the last few kilometers may be a fundamental feature of tidewater glaciers.

  3. Error analysis and data reduction for interferometric surface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping

    High-precision optical systems are generally tested using interferometry, since it often is the only way to achieve the desired measurement precision and accuracy. Interferometers can generally measure a surface to an accuracy of one hundredth of a wave. In order to achieve an accuracy to the next order of magnitude, one thousandth of a wave, each error source in the measurement must be characterized and calibrated. Errors in interferometric measurements are classified into random errors and systematic errors. An approach to estimate random errors in the measurement is provided, based on the variation in the data. Systematic errors, such as retrace error, imaging distortion, and error due to diffraction effects, are also studied in this dissertation. Methods to estimate the first order geometric error and errors due to diffraction effects are presented. Interferometer phase modulation transfer function (MTF) is another intrinsic error. The phase MTF of an infrared interferometer is measured with a phase Siemens star, and a Wiener filter is designed to recover the middle spatial frequency information. Map registration is required when there are two maps tested in different systems and one of these two maps needs to be subtracted from the other. Incorrect mapping causes wavefront errors. A smoothing filter method is presented which can reduce the sensitivity to registration error and improve the overall measurement accuracy. Interferometric optical testing with computer-generated holograms (CGH) is widely used for measuring aspheric surfaces. The accuracy of the drawn pattern on a hologram decides the accuracy of the measurement. Uncertainties in the CGH manufacturing process introduce errors in holograms and then the generated wavefront. An optimal design of the CGH is provided which can reduce the sensitivity to fabrication errors and give good diffraction efficiency for both chrome-on-glass and phase etched CGHs.

  4. Spatial-scanning hyperspectral imaging probe for bio-imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hoong-Ta; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-03-01

    The three common methods to perform hyperspectral imaging are the spatial-scanning, spectral-scanning, and snapshot methods. However, only the spectral-scanning and snapshot methods have been configured to a hyperspectral imaging probe as of today. This paper presents a spatial-scanning (pushbroom) hyperspectral imaging probe, which is realized by integrating a pushbroom hyperspectral imager with an imaging probe. The proposed hyperspectral imaging probe can also function as an endoscopic probe by integrating a custom fabricated image fiber bundle unit. The imaging probe is configured by incorporating a gradient-index lens at the end face of an image fiber bundle that consists of about 50 000 individual fiberlets. The necessary simulations, methodology, and detailed instrumentation aspects that are carried out are explained followed by assessing the developed probe's performance. Resolution test targets such as United States Air Force chart as well as bio-samples such as chicken breast tissue with blood clot are used as test samples for resolution analysis and for performance validation. This system is built on a pushbroom hyperspectral imaging system with a video camera and has the advantage of acquiring information from a large number of spectral bands with selectable region of interest. The advantages of this spatial-scanning hyperspectral imaging probe can be extended to test samples or tissues residing in regions that are difficult to access with potential diagnostic bio-imaging applications.

  5. High speed global shutter image sensors for professional applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xu; Meynants, Guy

    2015-04-01

    Global shutter imagers expand the use to miscellaneous applications, such as machine vision, 3D imaging, medical imaging, space etc. to eliminate motion artifacts in rolling shutter imagers. A low noise global shutter pixel requires more than one non-light sensitive memory to reduce the read noise. But larger memory area reduces the fill-factor of the pixels. Modern micro-lenses technology can compensate this fill-factor loss. Backside illumination (BSI) is another popular technique to improve the pixel fill-factor. But some pixel architecture may not reach sufficient shutter efficiency with backside illumination. Non-light sensitive memory elements make the fabrication with BSI possible. Machine vision like fast inspection system, medical imaging like 3D medical or scientific applications always ask for high frame rate global shutter image sensors. Thanks to the CMOS technology, fast Analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) can be integrated on chip. Dual correlated double sampling (CDS) on chip ADC with high interface digital data rate reduces the read noise and makes more on-chip operation control. As a result, a global shutter imager with digital interface is a very popular solution for applications with high performance and high frame rate requirements. In this paper we will review the global shutter architectures developed in CMOSIS, discuss their optimization process and compare their performances after fabrication.

  6. Light-pulse atom interferometric device

    DOEpatents

    Biedermann, Grant; McGuinness, Hayden James Evans; Rakholia, Akash; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Schwindt, Peter; Wheeler, David R.

    2016-03-22

    An atomic interferometric device useful, e.g., for measuring acceleration or rotation is provided. The device comprises at least one vapor cell containing a Raman-active chemical species, an optical system, and at least one detector. The optical system is conformed to implement a Raman pulse interferometer in which Raman transitions are stimulated in a warm vapor of the Raman-active chemical species. The detector is conformed to detect changes in the populations of different internal states of atoms that have been irradiated by the optical system.

  7. Interferometric tomography metrology of conformal optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutin, Mikhail; Gutin, Olga; Wang, Xu-Ming; Ehlinger, Dennis

    2013-06-01

    Conformal windows and domes improve aerodynamic quality of missiles and aircraft but introduce significant optical aberrations. These aberrations can be compensated, provided both window and corrective optics are fabricated to high tolerances. Highly accurate measurement of conformal optics is required for success of the fabrication process. This paper describes the development of the Interferometric Tomography - a new tool for metrology of conformal aspheric optics, including optics with very high aberrations. The metrology system is designed to measure wavefront aberrations as well as the optical figure of both surfaces.

  8. Applications Of Digital Image Acquisition In Anthropometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolford, Barbara; Lewis, James L.

    1981-10-01

    Anthropometric data on reach and mobility have traditionally been collected by time consuming and relatively inaccurate manual methods. Three dimensional digital image acquisition promises to radically increase the speed and ease of data collection and analysis. A three-camera video anthropometric system for collecting position, velocity, and force data in real time is under development for the Anthropometric Measurement Laboratory at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The use of a prototype of this system for collecting data on reach capabilities and on lateral stability is described. Two extensions of this system are planned.

  9. Translational Applications of Molecular Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Michael J.; Eckelman, William C.; Vera, David

    2005-06-17

    Molecular imaging is becoming a larger part of imaging research and practice. The Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the Department of Energy funds a significant number of researchers in this area. The proposal is to partially fund a workshop to inform scientists working in nuclear medicine and nuclear medicine practitioners of the recent advances of molecular imaging in nuclear medicine as well as other imaging modalities. A limited number of topics related to radionuclide therapy will also be discussed. The proposal is to request partial funds for the workshop entitled “Translational Applications of Molecular Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy” to be held prior to the Society of Nuclear Medicine Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada in June 2005. The meeting will be held on June 17-18. This will allow scientists interested in all aspects of nuclear medicine imaging to attend. The chair of the organizing group is Dr. Michael J. Welch. The organizing committee consists of Dr. Welch, Dr. William C. Eckelman and Dr. David Vera. The goal is to invite speakers to discuss the most recent advances of modern molecular imaging and therapy. Speakers will present advances made in in vivo tagging imaging assays, technical aspects of small animal imaging, in vivo imaging and bench to bedside translational study – the role of a diagnostic scan on therapy selection. This latter topic will include discussions on α therapy and new approaches to dosimetry. Several of these topics are those funded by the Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  10. Technique of diffusion weighted imaging and its application in stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enzhong; Tian, Jie; Han, Ying; Wang, Huifang; Li, Wu; He, Huiguang

    2003-05-01

    To study the application of diffusion weighted imaging and image post processing in the diagnosis of stroke, especially in acute stroke, 205 patients were examined by 1.5 T or 1.0 T MRI scanner and the images such as T1, T2 and diffusion weighted images were obtained. Image post processing was done with "3D Med System" developed by our lab to analyze data and acquire the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map. In acute and subacute stage of stroke, the signal in cerebral infarction areas changed to hyperintensity in T2- and diffusion-weighted images, normal or hypointensity in T1-weighted images. In hyperacute stage, however, the signal was hyperintense just in the diffusion weighted imaes; others were normal. In the chronic stage, the signal in T1- and diffusion-weighted imaging showed hypointensity and hyperintensity in T2 weighted imaging. Because ADC declined obviously in acute and subacute stage of stroke, the lesion area was hypointensity in ADC map. With the development of the disease, ADC gradually recovered and then changed to hyperintensity in ADC map in chronic stage. Using diffusion weighted imaging and ADC mapping can make a diagnosis of stroke, especially in the hyperacute stage of stroke, and can differentiate acute and chronic stroke.

  11. A scanned beam THz imaging system for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Zachary D.; Li, Wenzao; Suen, Jon; Tewari, Priyamvada; Bennett, David; Bajwa, Neha; Brown, Elliott; Culjat, Martin; Grundfest, Warren; Singh, Rahul

    2011-10-01

    THz medical imaging has been a topic of increased interest recently due largely to improvements in source and detector technology and the identification of suitable applications. One aspect of THz medical imaging research not often adequately addressed is pixel acquisition rate and phenomenology. The majority of active THz imaging systems use translation stages to raster scan a sample beneath a fixed THz beam. While these techniques have produced high resolution images of characterization targets and animal models they do not scale well to human imaging where clinicians are unwilling to place patients on large translation stages. This paper presents a scanned beam THz imaging system that can acquire a 1 cm2 area with 1 mm2 pixels and a per-pixel SNR of 40 dB in less than 5 seconds. The system translates a focused THz beam across a stationary target using a spinning polygonal mirror and HDPE objective lens. The illumination is centered at 525 GHz with ~ 125 GHz of response normalized bandwidth and the component layout is designed to optically co-locate the stationary source and detector ensuring normal incidence across a 50 mm × 50 mm field of view at standoff of 190 mm. Component characterization and images of a test target are presented. These results are some of the first ever reported for a short standoff, high resolution, scanned beam THz imaging system and represent an important step forward for practical integration of THz medical imaging where fast image acquisition times and stationary targets (patients) are requisite.

  12. Infrared photothermal imaging for standoff detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendziora, C. A.; Jones, Robert M.; Furstenberg, Robert; Papantonakis, Michael; Nguyen, Viet; McGill, R. Andrew

    2012-06-01

    We are developing a technique for the stand-off detection of trace analytes and residues (explosives, hazardous chemicals, drugs, etc.) using photo-thermal infrared imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS). Herein, we refer to this technique as "RED" for "Remote Explosives Detection" or "Resonance Enhanced Detection". This approach leverages recent developments in critical enabling micro and nano-technology components. The first component, a compact IR quantum cascade laser (QCL), is tuned to fundamental absorption bands in the analytes and directed to illuminate a surface of interest. The second component, an IR focal plane array (FPA), is used to image the surface and detect any small increase in the thermal emission upon laser illumination. We have demonstrated the technique at up to 30 meters of stand-off distance indoors and in field tests, while operating the lasers below the eye-safe intensity limit (100 mW/cm2). In this manuscript we detail several recent improvements to the method and system, as well as some recent results for explosives on complex substrates such as car panels and fabrics. We also introduce a computational framework for modeling and simulating the optical and thermal phenomena associated with the photothermal process.

  13. Smart imaging using laser targeting: a multiple barcodes application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, M. Junaid; Riza, Nabeel A.

    2014-05-01

    To the best of our knowledge, proposed is a novel variable depth of field smart imager design using intelligent laser targeting for high productivity multiple barcodes reading applications. System smartness comes via the use of an Electronically Controlled Variable Focal-Length Lens (ECVFL) to provide an agile pixel (and/or pixel set) within the laser transmitter and optical imaging receiver. The ECVFL in the receiver gives a flexible depth of field that allows clear image capture over a range of barcode locations. Imaging of a 660 nm wavelength laser line illuminated 95-bit one dimensional barcode is experimentally demonstrated via the smart imager for barcode target distances ranging from 10 cm to 54 cm. The smart system captured barcode images are evaluated using a proposed barcode reading algorithm. Experimental results after computer-based post-processing show a nine-fold increase in barcode target distance variation range (i.e., range variation increased from 2.5 cm to 24.5 cm) when compared to a conventional fixed lens imager. Applications for the smart imager include industrial multiple product tracking, marking, and inspection systems.

  14. Mining remote-image repositories with application to Mars Rover stereoscopic image datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Andrew; Shadid, Waseem; Eppes, Martha C.

    2009-02-01

    As of December 2008, the two Mars rover spacecraft Spirit and Opportunity have collected more than 4 years worth of data from nine imaging instruments producing greater than 200k images which includes both raw image data from spacecraft instruments and images generated by post-processing algorithms developed by NASA's Multimission Image Processing Laboratory (MIPL). This paper describes a prototype software system that allows scientists to browse and data-mine the images produced from NASA's Mars Exploratory Rover (MER) missions with emphasis on the automatic detection of images containing rocks that are of interest for geological research. We highlight two aspects of our prototype system: (1) software design for mining remote data repositories, (2) a computationally efficient image search engine for detecting MER images that containing rocks. Datatype abstractions made at the software design level allow users to access and visualize the source data through a single simple-to-use interface when the underlying data may originate from a local or remote image repository. Data mining queries into the MER image data are specified over chronological intervals denoted (sols) as each interval is a solar day. As in other mining applications, an automatic detection and classification algorithm is used to compute a relevance score that represents how relevant a given recorded image is to the user-specified query. Query results are presented as list of records, sorted by their relevance score, which the user may then visualize and investigate to extract information of interest. Several standard image analysis tools are provided for investigation of 2D images (e.g., histogram equalization, edge detection, etc.) and, when available, stereoscopic data is integrated with the image data using multiple windows which show both the 2D image and 3D surface geometry. The combination of data mining and a high-quality visualization interface provides MER researchers unprecedented access

  15. Fizeau interferometric cophasing of segmented mirrors: experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Cheetham, Anthony; Cvetojevic, Nick; Norris, Barnaby; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Tuthill, Peter

    2014-06-01

    We present an optical testbed demonstration of the Fizeau Interferometric Cophasing of Segmented Mirrors (FICSM) algorithm. FICSM allows a segmented mirror to be phased with a science imaging detector and three filters (selected among the normal science complement). It requires no specialised, dedicated wavefront sensing hardware. Applying random piston and tip/tilt aberrations of more than 5 wavelengths to a small segmented mirror array produced an initial unphased point spread function with an estimated Strehl ratio of 9% that served as the starting point for our phasing algorithm. After using the FICSM algorithm to cophase the pupil, we estimated a Strehl ratio of 94% based on a comparison between our data and simulated encircled energy metrics. Our final image quality is limited by the accuracy of our segment actuation, which yields a root mean square (RMS) wavefront error of 25 nm. This is the first hardware demonstration of coarse and fine phasing an 18-segment pupil with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) geometry using a single algorithm. FICSM can be implemented on JWST using any of its scientic imaging cameras making it useful as a fall-back in the event that accepted phasing strategies encounter problems. We present an operational sequence that would co-phase such an 18-segment primary in 3 sequential iterations of the FICSM algorithm. Similar sequences can be readily devised for any segmented mirror. PMID:24921490

  16. Performance assessment of 3D surface imaging technique for medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tuotuo; Geng, Jason; Li, Shidong

    2013-03-01

    Recent development in optical 3D surface imaging technologies provide better ways to digitalize the 3D surface and its motion in real-time. The non-invasive 3D surface imaging approach has great potential for many medical imaging applications, such as motion monitoring of radiotherapy, pre/post evaluation of plastic surgery and dermatology, to name a few. Various commercial 3D surface imaging systems have appeared on the market with different dimension, speed and accuracy. For clinical applications, the accuracy, reproducibility and robustness across the widely heterogeneous skin color, tone, texture, shape properties, and ambient lighting is very crucial. Till now, a systematic approach for evaluating the performance of different 3D surface imaging systems still yet exist. In this paper, we present a systematic performance assessment approach to 3D surface imaging system assessment for medical applications. We use this assessment approach to exam a new real-time surface imaging system we developed, dubbed "Neo3D Camera", for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The assessments include accuracy, field of view, coverage, repeatability, speed and sensitivity to environment, texture and color.

  17. Infrared active polarimetric imaging system controlled by image segmentation algorithms: application to decamouflage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannier, Nicolas; Goudail, François; Plassart, Corentin; Boffety, Matthieu; Feneyrou, Patrick; Leviandier, Luc; Galland, Frédéric; Bertaux, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    We describe an active polarimetric imager with laser illumination at 1.5 µm that can generate any illumination and analysis polarization state on the Poincar sphere. Thanks to its full polarization agility and to image analysis of the scene with an ultrafast active-contour based segmentation algorithm, it can perform adaptive polarimetric contrast optimization. We demonstrate the capacity of this imager to detect manufactured objects in different types of environments for such applications as decamouflage and hazardous object detection. We compare two imaging modes having different number of polarimetric degrees of freedom and underline the characteristics that a polarimetric imager aimed at this type of applications should possess.

  18. The application of similar image retrieval in electronic commerce.

    PubMed

    Hu, YuPing; Yin, Hua; Han, Dezhi; Yu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Traditional online shopping platform (OSP), which searches product information by keywords, faces three problems: indirect search mode, large search space, and inaccuracy in search results. For solving these problems, we discuss and research the application of similar image retrieval in electronic commerce. Aiming at improving the network customers' experience and providing merchants with the accuracy of advertising, we design a reasonable and extensive electronic commerce application system, which includes three subsystems: image search display subsystem, image search subsystem, and product information collecting subsystem. This system can provide seamless connection between information platform and OSP, on which consumers can automatically and directly search similar images according to the pictures from information platform. At the same time, it can be used to provide accuracy of internet marketing for enterprises. The experiment shows the efficiency of constructing the system. PMID:24883411

  19. Strain Imaging: From Physiology to Practical Applications in Daily Practice.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Nishtha; Ananthasubramaniam, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Non-Doppler, 2-dimensional strain imaging is a new echocardiographic technique for obtaining strain and strain rate measurements, which serves as a major advancement in understanding myocardial deformation. It analyzes motion in ultrasound imaging by tracking speckles in 2 dimensions. There are a lot of data emerging with multiple applications of strain imaging in the clinical practice of echocardiography. As incorporation of strain imaging in daily practice has been challenging, we intend to systematically highlight the top 10 applications of speckle-tracking echocardiography, which every cardiologist should be aware of: chemotherapy cardiotoxicity, left ventricular assessment, cardiac amyloidosis, hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, right ventricular dysfunction, valvular heart diseases (aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation), cardiac sarcoidosis, athlete heart, left atrial assessment, and cardiac dyssynchrony. PMID:25839992

  20. The Application of Similar Image Retrieval in Electronic Commerce

    PubMed Central

    Hu, YuPing; Yin, Hua; Han, Dezhi; Yu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Traditional online shopping platform (OSP), which searches product information by keywords, faces three problems: indirect search mode, large search space, and inaccuracy in search results. For solving these problems, we discuss and research the application of similar image retrieval in electronic commerce. Aiming at improving the network customers' experience and providing merchants with the accuracy of advertising, we design a reasonable and extensive electronic commerce application system, which includes three subsystems: image search display subsystem, image search subsystem, and product information collecting subsystem. This system can provide seamless connection between information platform and OSP, on which consumers can automatically and directly search similar images according to the pictures from information platform. At the same time, it can be used to provide accuracy of internet marketing for enterprises. The experiment shows the efficiency of constructing the system. PMID:24883411

  1. A hyperspectral image analysis workbench for environmental science applications

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, J.H.; Zawada, D.G.; Simunich, K.L.; Slater, J.C.

    1992-10-01

    A significant challenge to the information sciences is to provide more powerful and accessible means to exploit the enormous wealth of data available from high-resolution imaging spectrometry, or ``hyperspectral`` imagery, for analysis, for mapping purposes, and for input to environmental modeling applications. As an initial response to this challenge, Argonne`s Advanced Computer Applications Center has developed a workstation-based prototype software workbench which employs Al techniques and other advanced approaches to deduce surface characteristics and extract features from the hyperspectral images. Among its current capabilities, the prototype system can classify pixels by abstract surface type. The classification process employs neural network analysis of inputs which include pixel spectra and a variety of processed image metrics, including image ``texture spectra`` derived from fractal signatures computed for subimage tiles at each wavelength.

  2. A hyperspectral image analysis workbench for environmental science applications

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, J.H.; Zawada, D.G.; Simunich, K.L.; Slater, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    A significant challenge to the information sciences is to provide more powerful and accessible means to exploit the enormous wealth of data available from high-resolution imaging spectrometry, or hyperspectral'' imagery, for analysis, for mapping purposes, and for input to environmental modeling applications. As an initial response to this challenge, Argonne's Advanced Computer Applications Center has developed a workstation-based prototype software workbench which employs Al techniques and other advanced approaches to deduce surface characteristics and extract features from the hyperspectral images. Among its current capabilities, the prototype system can classify pixels by abstract surface type. The classification process employs neural network analysis of inputs which include pixel spectra and a variety of processed image metrics, including image texture spectra'' derived from fractal signatures computed for subimage tiles at each wavelength.

  3. Advanced technologies for remote sensing imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, L.L.

    1993-06-07

    Generating and returning imagery from great distances has been generally associated with national security activities, with emphasis on reliability of system operation. (While the introduction of such capabilities was usually characterized by high levels of innovation, the evolution of such systems has followed the classical track of proliferation of ``standardized items`` expressing ever more incremental technological advances.) Recent focusing of interest on the use of remote imaging systems for commercial and scientific purposes can be expected to induce comparatively rapid advances along the axes of efficiency and technological sophistication, respectively. This paper reviews the most basic reasons for expecting the next decade of advances to dwarf the impressive accomplishments of the past ten years. The impact of these advances clearly will be felt in all major areas of large-scale human endeavor, commercial, military and scientific.

  4. An imaging spectrometer for microgravity application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wallace K.

    1995-01-01

    Flame structure is the result of complex interaction of mechanisms operating in both unwanted fires and controlled combustion systems. The scientific study of gas-jet diffusion flames in reduced-gravity environment is of interest because the effects of buoyancy on flow entrainment and acceleration are lessened. Measurements of flames have been restricted to cinematography, thermocouples, and radiometers. SSG, Inc. is developing an MWIR imaging spectrometer (MIS) for microgravity flame measurements. The device will be delivered to NASA Lewis at the end of this project to demonstrate flame measurements in the laboratory. With proper modifications, the MIS can be used to monitor a gas-jet flame under microgravity on a NASA Learjet or DC-9.

  5. X-ray characterization of CMOS imaging detector with high resolution for fluoroscopic imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Bo Kyung; Kim, Cho Rong; Jeon, Seongchae; Kim, Ryun Kyung; Seo, Chang-Woo; Yang, Keedong; Heo, Duchang; Lee, Tae-Bum; Shin, Min-Seok; Kim, Jong-Boo; Kwon, Oh-Kyung

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS)-based X-ray imaging detectors with high spatial resolution for medical imaging application. In this study, our proposed X-ray CMOS imaging sensor has been fabricated by using a 0.35 μm 1 Poly 4 Metal CMOS process. The pixel size is 100 μm×100 μm and the pixel array format is 24×96 pixels, which provide a field-of-view (FOV) of 9.6 mm×2.4 mm. The 14.3-bit extend counting analog-to digital converter (ADC) with built-in binning mode was used to reduce the area and simultaneously improve the image resolution. Both thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) and Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator screens were used as converters for incident X-rays to visible light photons. The optical property and X-ray imaging characterization such as X-ray to light response as a function of incident X-ray exposure dose, spatial resolution and X-ray images of objects were measured under different X-ray energy conditions. The measured results suggest that our developed CMOS-based X-ray imaging detector has the potential for fluoroscopic imaging and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging applications.

  6. Application of rough set for medical images data mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuyan; Wang, Chunmei; Chen, Yan

    2010-08-01

    To study the application of Rough set algorithm for diagnosis breast cancer, attribute reduction strategies of rough set are applied to the data mining of the mammography classification, proposes a medical images classifier based on association rules. Attribute reduction strategies of rough set for medical image data mining are realized. The experiment results are given. The experimental results show that the system performs well in accuracy, verified the great potential of rough set in assistant medical treatment.

  7. Practical applications of 3D sonography in gynecologic imaging.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Rochelle F; Fleischer, Arthur C

    2014-11-01

    Volume imaging in the pelvis has been well demonstrated to be an extremely useful technique, largely based on its ability to reconstruct the coronal plane of the uterus that usually cannot be visualized using traditional 2-dimensional (2D) imaging. As a result, this technique is now a part of the standard pelvic ultrasound protocol in many institutions. A variety of valuable applications of 3D sonography in the pelvis are discussed in this article. PMID:25444101

  8. 3D Winding Number: Theory and Application to Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Becciu, Alessandro; Fuster, Andrea; Pottek, Mark; van den Heuvel, Bart; ter Haar Romeny, Bart; van Assen, Hans

    2011-01-01

    We develop a new formulation, mathematically elegant, to detect critical points of 3D scalar images. It is based on a topological number, which is the generalization to three dimensions of the 2D winding number. We illustrate our method by considering three different biomedical applications, namely, detection and counting of ovarian follicles and neuronal cells and estimation of cardiac motion from tagged MR images. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation emphasizes the reliability of the results. PMID:21317978

  9. Laundering and Deinking Applications of 1H NMR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutunjian, P. N.; Borchardt, J. K.; Prieto, N. E.; Raney, K. H.; Ferris, J. A.

    One-dimensional 1H NMR imaging techniques are used to visualize oil removal from fabrics and paper fibers immersed in aqueous solutions of nonionic detergents. The method provides a unique approach to the study of oil-removal kinetics in nonionic detergent systems where traditional optical techniques fail due to solution turbidity. The only requirement of the NMR experiment is the use of deuterated water in order to selectively image the hydrocarbon phase. Preliminary applications to laundering and paper deinking are discussed.

  10. Application of imaging radar technology to uranium exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wu; Jie-lin, Zhang; Yanju, Huang; Chuan, Zhang; Donghui, Zhang

    2014-03-01

    The history of imaging radar technology development, technical advantages, current technology research status of lithologic identification with remote sensing have been comprehensively evaluated on this thesis. Radar technology applied in structure recognition, rock identification, and uranium exploration research are discussed in this paper. Examples of microwave-optical fusion technology have been given in part 3, and the results demonstrate that imaging radar technology, as one of the most frontier observation techniques, has extensive application prospect in uranium exploration.

  11. Design and Applications of Bispecific Heterodimers: Molecular Imaging and beyond

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ligand-based molecular imaging probes have been designed with high affinity and specificity for monitoring biological process and responses. Single-target recognition by traditional probes can limit their applicability for disease detection and therapy because synergistic action between disease mediators and different receptors is often involved in disease progression. Consequently, probes that can recognize multiple targets should demonstrate higher targeting efficacy and specificity than their monospecific peers. This concept has been validated by multiple bispecific heterodimer-based imaging probes that have demonstrated promising results in several animal models. This review summarizes the design strategies for bispecific peptide- and antibody-based heterodimers and their applications in molecular targeting and imaging. The design and application of bispecific heterodimer-conjugated nanomaterials are also discussed. PMID:24738564

  12. Surface imaging microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogala, Eric W.; Bankman, Isaac N.

    2008-04-01

    The three-dimensional shapes of microscopic objects are becoming increasingly important for battlespace CBRNE sensing. Potential applications of microscopic 3D shape observations include characterization of biological weapon particles and manufacturing of micromechanical components. Aerosol signatures of stand-off lidar systems, using elastic backscatter or polarization, are dictated by the aerosol particle shapes and sizes that must be well characterized in the lab. A low-cost, fast instrument for 3D surface shape microscopy will be a valuable point sensor for biological particle sensing applications. Both the cost and imaging durations of traditional techniques such as confocal microscopes, atomic force microscopes, and electron scanning microscopes are too high. We investigated the feasibility of a low-cost, fast interferometric technique for imaging the 3D surface shape of microscopic objects at frame rates limited only by the camera in the system. The system operates at two laser wavelengths producing two fringe images collected simultaneously by a digital camera, and a specialized algorithm we developed reconstructs the surface map of the microscopic object. The current implementation assembled to test the concept and develop the new 3D reconstruction algorithm has 0.25 micron resolution in the x and y directions, and about 0.1 micron accuracy in the z direction, as tested on a microscopic glass test object manufactured with etching techniques. We describe the interferometric instrument, present the reconstruction algorithm, and discuss further development.

  13. Focal-Plane Imaging of Crossed Beams in Nonlinear Optics Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivolaru, Daniel; Herring, G. C.

    2007-01-01

    An application of focal-plane imaging that can be used as a real time diagnostic of beam crossing in various optical techniques is reported. We discuss two specific versions and demonstrate the capability of maximizing system performance with an example in a combined dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering interferometric Rayleigh scattering experiment (CARS-IRS). We find that this imaging diagnostic significantly reduces beam alignment time and loss of CARS-IRS signals due to inadvertent misalignments.

  14. Invited review article: Interferometric gravity wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Cella, G; Giazotto, A

    2011-10-01

    A direct detection of gravitational waves is still lacking today. A network of several earthbound interferometric detectors is currently operating with a continuously improving sensitivity. The window of interest for observation has a lower cut off in the frequency domain below some tens of hertz, determined by the effect of seismic motion. For larger frequencies, the sensitivity is limited by thermal effects below few hundreds of hertz and by the quantum nature of light above that value. Each of these sources of noise pose a big technological challenge to experimentalists, and there are big expectations for the next generation of detectors. A reduction of thermal effects by at least one order of magnitude will be obtained with new and carefully designed materials. At that point the quantum nature of light will become an issue, and the use of quantum non-demolition techniques will become mandatory. In this review, we discuss interferometric detection of gravitational waves from an instrumental point of view. We try to address conceptually important issues with an audience of non-experts in mind. A particular emphasis is given to the description of the current limitations and to the perspectives of beating them. PMID:22047273

  15. Biological applications of fluorescence lifetime imaging beyond microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, Walter J.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; Lee, Hyeran; Guo, Kevin; Almutairi, Adah; Fréchet, Jean M. J.; Fischer, Georg M.; Daltrozzo, Ewald; Achilefu, Samuel

    2010-02-01

    Fluorescence lifetime is a relatively new contrast mechanism for optical imaging in living subjects that relies on intrinsic properties of fluorophores rather than concentration dependent intensity. Drawing upon the success of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) for investigation of protein-protein interactions and intracellular physiology, in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLI) promises to dramatically increase the utility of fluorescencebased imaging in preclinical and clinical applications. Intrinsic fluorescence lifetime measurements in living tissues can distinguish pathologies such as cancer from healthy tissue. Unfortunately, intrinsic FLT contrast is limited to superficial measurements. Conventional intensity-based agents have been reported for measuring these phenomena in vitro, but translation into living animals is difficult due to optical properties of tissues. For this reason, contrast agents that can be detected in the near infrared (NIR) wavelengths are being developed by our lab and others to enhance the capabilities of this modality. FLT is less affected by concentration and thus is better for detecting small changes in physiology, as long as sufficient fluorescence signal can be measured. FLT can also improve localization of signals for improved deep tissue imaging. Examples of the utility of exogenous contrast agents will be discussed, including applications in monitoring physiologic functions, controlled drug release and cancer biology. Instrumentation for FLI will also be discussed, including planar and diffuse optical imaging in time and frequency domains. Future applications will also be discussed that are being developed in this exciting field that complement other optical modalities.

  16. Phase Sensitive X-Ray Imaging: Towards its Interdisciplinary Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kottler, C.; Revol, V.; Kaufmann, R.; Urban, C.; Knop, K.; Sennhauser, U.; Jerjen, I.; Lüthi, T.; Cardot, F.; Niedermann, P.; Morel, J.-P.; Maake, C.; Walt, H.; Knop, E.; Blanc, N.

    2010-04-01

    X-ray phase imaging including phase tomography has been attracting increasing attention during the past few decades. The advantage of X-ray phase imaging is that an extremely high sensitivity is achieved for weakly absorbing materials, such as biological soft tissues, which generate a poor contrast by conventional schemes. Especially for such living samples, where the reduction of the applied dose is of paramount interest, phase sensitive measurements schemes have an inherent potential for a significant dose reduction combined with an image quality enhancement. Several methods have been invented for x-ray phase contrast imaging that either use an approach based on interferometry, diffraction or wave-field propagation. Some of these techniques have a potential for commercial applications, such as in medicine, non-destructive testing, security and inspection. The scope of this manuscript thus deals with one particular such technique that measures the diffraction caused by the specimen by means of a grating interferometer. Examples of measurements are shown that depict the potential of phase contrast imaging for future commercial applications, such as in medical imaging, non-destructive testing and inspection for quality control. The current state of the technology is briefly reviewed as well as its shortcomings to be overcome with regard to the applications.

  17. Monitoring image quality for security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larabi, Mohamed-Chaker; Nicholson, Didier

    2011-01-01

    This work is focusing on the definition of a procedure for the qualification of coding schemes for video surveillance applications. It consists in developing and benchmarking tools that learn from the expertise of police and security department. This expertise is intended to be modeled thanks to a campaign of subjective measurement allowing to analyze the way they are using in performing the security tasks like face or license plate recognition, event detection and so on. The results of the previous test are used will be used to tune and to construct a hybrid metric based on basic artifacts detection due to compression and transmission.

  18. Optical and digital microscopic imaging techniques and applications in pathology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The conventional optical microscope has been the primary tool in assisting pathological examinations. The modern digital pathology combines the power of microscopy, electronic detection, and computerized analysis. It enables cellular-, molecular-, and genetic-imaging at high efficiency and accuracy to facilitate clinical screening and diagnosis. This paper first reviews the fundamental concepts of microscopic imaging and introduces the technical features and associated clinical applications of optical microscopes, electron microscopes, scanning tunnel microscopes, and fluorescence microscopes. The interface of microscopy with digital image acquisition methods is discussed. The recent developments and future perspectives of contemporary microscopic imaging techniques such as three-dimensional and in vivo imaging are analyzed for their clinical potentials. PMID:21483100

  19. Geological applications using an electrical micro imaging tool

    SciTech Connect

    Eubanks, D.; Seiler, D.; Russell, B.

    1995-11-20

    The resistivity micro imaging tool introduced by Halliburton produces electrical images that are being used in a variety of geological applications. The tool is a microresistivity-type imaging device with six independent articulating arms extending from the main body.Each arm is mounted with a pad containing a 25-electrode scanning array. The EMI tool and all other micro imaging devices measure changes in resistivity along the borehole wall that correspond to subtle changes in rock composition, grain texture, and fluid properties. High-end graphics software processes the data to produce highly visual 2D and 3D images of the borehole. The paper describes the use of this tool in fault analysis, fracture analysis, rock texture, strata dip analysis, and thin-bed analysis.

  20. DIANE stationary neutron radiography system image quality and industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cluzeau, S.; Huet, J.; Le Tourneur, P.

    1994-05-01

    The SODERN neutron radiography laboratory has operated since February 1993 using a sealed tube generator (GENIE 46). An experimental programme of characterization (dosimetry, spectroscopy) has confirmed the expected performances concerning: neutron flux intensity, neutron energy range, residual gamma flux. Results are given in a specific report [2]. This paper is devoted to the image performance reporting. ASTM and specific indicators have been used to test the image quality with various converters and films. The corresponding modulation transfer functions are to be determined from image processing. Some industrial applications have demonstrated the capabilities of the system: corrosion detection in aircraft parts, ammunitions filling testing, detection of polymer lacks in sandwich steel sheets, detection of moisture in a probe for geophysics, residual ceramic cores imaging in turbine blades. Various computerized electronic imaging systems will be tested to improve the industrial capabilities.

  1. Interferometric Quantum-Nondemolition Single-Photon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kok, Peter; Lee, Hwang; Dowling, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Two interferometric quantum-nondemolition (QND) devices have been proposed: (1) a polarization-independent device and (2) a polarization-preserving device. The prolarization-independent device works on an input state of up to two photons, whereas the polarization-preserving device works on a superposition of vacuum and single- photon states. The overall function of the device would be to probabilistically generate a unique detector output only when its input electromagnetic mode was populated by a single photon, in which case its output mode would also be populated by a single photon. Like other QND devices, the proposed devices are potentially useful for a variety of applications, including such areas of NASA interest as quantum computing, quantum communication, detection of gravity waves, as well as pedagogical demonstrations of the quantum nature of light. Many protocols in quantum computation and quantum communication require the possibility of detecting a photon without destroying it. The only prior single- photon-detecting QND device is based on quantum electrodynamics in a resonant cavity and, as such, it depends on the photon frequency. Moreover, the prior device can distinguish only between one photon and no photon. The proposed interferometric QND devices would not depend on frequency and could distinguish between (a) one photon and (b) zero or two photons. The first proposed device is depicted schematically in Figure 1. The input electromagnetic mode would be a superposition of a zero-, a one-, and a two-photon quantum state. The overall function of the device would be to probabilistically generate a unique detector output only when its input electromagnetic mode was populated by a single photon, in which case its output mode also would be populated by a single photon.

  2. Advanced interferometric profile measurements through refractive media

    SciTech Connect

    Koev, Stephan T.; Ghodssi, Reza

    2008-09-15

    Optical profilers are valuable tools for the characterization of microelectromechanical systems (MEMSs). They use phase sifting interferometry (PSI) or vertical scanning interferometry to measure the topography of microscale structures with nanometer resolution. However, for many emerging MEMS applications, the sample needs to be imaged while placed in a liquid or in a package with a glass window. The increased refractive index of the transparent medium degrades the interference image contrast and prevents any measurement of the sample. We report on the modification of a Veeco NT1100 optical profiler to enable PSI measurements through refractive media. This approach can be applied to any other optical profiler with PSI capability. The modification consists in replacing the original illumination source with a custom-built narrow linewidth source, which increases the coherence length of the light and the contrast of the interference image. We present measurements taken with the modified configuration on samples covered with 3 mm water or 500 {mu}m glass, and we compare them to measurements of uncovered samples. We show that the measurement precision is only slightly reduced by the water and glass, and that it is still sufficiently high for typical MEMS applications. The described method can be readily used for measuring through other types and thicknesses of refractive materials.

  3. X-ray backscatter imaging for aerospace applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shedlock, Daniel; Edwards, Talion; Toh, Chin

    2011-06-23

    Scatter x-ray imaging (SXI) is a real time, digital, x-ray backscatter imaging technique that allows radiographs to be taken from one side of an object. This x-ray backscatter imaging technique offers many advantages over conventional transmission radiography that include single-sided access and extremely low radiation fields compared to conventional open source industrial radiography. Examples of some applications include the detection of corrosion, foreign object debris, water intrusion, cracking, impact damage and leak detection in a variety of material such as aluminum, composites, honeycomb structures, and titanium.

  4. X-Ray Backscatter Imaging for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shedlock, Daniel; Edwards, Talion; Toh, Chin

    2011-06-01

    Scatter x-ray imaging (SXI) is a real time, digital, x-ray backscatter imaging technique that allows radiographs to be taken from one side of an object. This x-ray backscatter imaging technique offers many advantages over conventional transmission radiography that include single-sided access and extremely low radiation fields compared to conventional open source industrial radiography. Examples of some applications include the detection of corrosion, foreign object debris, water intrusion, cracking, impact damage and leak detection in a variety of material such as aluminum, composites, honeycomb structures, and titanium.

  5. [Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging and its Application in Ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Lindner, T; Langner, S; Paul, K; Pohlmann, A; Hadlich, S; Niendorf, T; Jünemann, A; Guthoff, R F; Stachs, O

    2015-12-01

    The value of diffusion-weighted magnet resonance imaging (DWI-MRI) has been demonstrated for an ever growing range of clinical indications. DWI is sensitive to the diffusion of water molecules and probes their random displacement within tissue. DWI provides both qualitative and quantitative information on tissue characteristics, e.g. tissue cellularity. This review provides an overview of diffusion-weighted imaging and its emerging applications in ophthalmology. The basic physics and technical foundations of DWI are introduced. The emerging applications of DWI are surveyed, particularly in diseases of the eye, orbit and optical nerve. PMID:26678901

  6. The future of imaging spectroscopy - Prospective technologies and applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaepman, M.E.; Green, R.O.; Ungar, S.G.; Curtiss, B.; Boardman, J.; Plaza, A.J.; Gao, B.-C.; Ustin, S.; Kokaly, R.; Miller, J.R.; Jacquemoud, S.; Ben-Dor, E.; Clark, R.; Davis, C.; Dozier, J.; Goodenough, D.G.; Roberts, D.; Swayze, G.; Milton, E.J.; Goetz, A.F.H.

    2006-01-01

    Spectroscopy has existed for more than three centuries now. Nonetheless, significant scientific advances have been achieved. We discuss the history of spectroscopy in relation to emerging technologies and applications. Advanced focal plane arrays, optical design, and intelligent on-board logic are prime prospective technologies. Scalable approaches in pre-processing of imaging spectrometer data will receive additional focus. Finally, we focus on new applications monitoring transitional ecological zones, where human impact and disturbance have highest impact as well as in monitoring changes in our natural resources and environment We conclude that imaging spectroscopy enables mapping of biophysical and biochemical variables of the Earth's surface and atmospheric composition with unprecedented accuracy.

  7. Motion tracking in infrared imaging for quantitative medical diagnostic applications

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tze-Yuan; Herman, Cila

    2014-01-01

    In medical applications, infrared (IR) thermography is used to detect and examine the thermal signature of skin abnormalities by quantitatively analyzing skin temperature in steady state conditions or its evolution over time, captured in an image sequence. However, during the image acquisition period, the involuntary movements of the patient are unavoidable, and such movements will undermine the accuracy of temperature measurement for any particular location on the skin. In this study, a tracking approach using a template-based algorithm is proposed, to follow the involuntary motion of the subject in the IR image sequence. The motion tacking will allow to associate a temperature evolution to each spatial location on the body while the body moves relative to the image frame. The affine transformation model is adopted to estimate the motion parameters of the template image. The Lucas–Kanade algorithm is applied to search for the optimized parameters of the affine transformation. A weighting mask is incorporated into the algorithm to ensure its tracking robustness. To evaluate the feasibility of the tracking approach, two sets of IR image sequences with random in-plane motion were tested in our experiments. A steady-state (no heating or cooling) IR image sequence in which the skin temperature is in equilibrium with the environment was considered first. The thermal recovery IR image sequence, acquired when the skin is recovering from 60-s cooling, was the second case analyzed. By proper selection of the template image along with template update, satisfactory tracking results were obtained for both IR image sequences. The achieved tracking accuracies are promising in terms of satisfying the demands imposed by clinical applications of IR thermography. PMID:24587692

  8. Motion tracking in infrared imaging for quantitative medical diagnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tze-Yuan; Herman, Cila

    2014-01-01

    In medical applications, infrared (IR) thermography is used to detect and examine the thermal signature of skin abnormalities by quantitatively analyzing skin temperature in steady state conditions or its evolution over time, captured in an image sequence. However, during the image acquisition period, the involuntary movements of the patient are unavoidable, and such movements will undermine the accuracy of temperature measurement for any particular location on the skin. In this study, a tracking approach using a template-based algorithm is proposed, to follow the involuntary motion of the subject in the IR image sequence. The motion tacking will allow to associate a temperature evolution to each spatial location on the body while the body moves relative to the image frame. The affine transformation model is adopted to estimate the motion parameters of the template image. The Lucas-Kanade algorithm is applied to search for the optimized parameters of the affine transformation. A weighting mask is incorporated into the algorithm to ensure its tracking robustness. To evaluate the feasibility of the tracking approach, two sets of IR image sequences with random in-plane motion were tested in our experiments. A steady-state (no heating or cooling) IR image sequence in which the skin temperature is in equilibrium with the environment was considered first. The thermal recovery IR image sequence, acquired when the skin is recovering from 60-s cooling, was the second case analyzed. By proper selection of the template image along with template update, satisfactory tracking results were obtained for both IR image sequences. The achieved tracking accuracies are promising in terms of satisfying the demands imposed by clinical applications of IR thermography.

  9. Applications of digital image acquisition in anthropometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolford, B.; Lewis, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of a video kinesimeter, a device for the automatic real-time collection of kinematic and dynamic data. Based on the detection of a single bright spot by three TV cameras, the system provides automatic real-time recording of three-dimensional position and force data. It comprises three cameras, two incandescent lights, a voltage comparator circuit, a central control unit, and a mass storage device. The control unit determines the signal threshold for each camera before testing, sequences the lights, synchronizes and analyzes the scan voltages from the three cameras, digitizes force from a dynamometer, and codes the data for transmission to a floppy disk for recording. Two of the three cameras face each other along the 'X' axis; the third camera, which faces the center of the line between the first two, defines the 'Y' axis. An image from the 'Y' camera and either 'X' camera is necessary for determining the three-dimensional coordinates of the point.

  10. Landsat image registration for agricultural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, R. H., Jr.; Juday, R. D.; Wacker, A. G.; Kaneko, T.

    1982-01-01

    An image registration system has been developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to spatially align multi-temporal Landsat acquisitions for use in agriculture and forestry research. Working in conjunction with the Master Data Processor (MDP) at the Goddard Space Flight Center, it functionally replaces the long-standing LACIE Registration Processor as JSC's data supplier. The system represents an expansion of the techniques developed for the MDP and LACIE Registration Processor, and it utilizes the experience gained in an IBM/JSC effort evaluating the performance of the latter. These techniques are discussed in detail. Several tests were developed to evaluate the registration performance of the system. The results indicate that 1/15-pixel accuracy (about 4m for Landsat MSS) is achievable in ideal circumstances, sub-pixel accuracy (often to 0.2 pixel or better) was attained on a representative set of U.S. acquisitions, and a success rate commensurate with the LACIE Registration Processor was realized. The system has been employed in a production mode on U.S. and foreign data, and a performance similar to the earlier tests has been noted.

  11. Interferometric three-dimensional single molecule localization microscopy using a single high-numerical-aperture objective.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Goodwin, P M; Werner, J H

    2014-11-01

    Interferometric detection of the fluorescence emission from a single molecule [interferometric photoactivated localization microscopy (iPALM)] enables a localization accuracy of nanometers in axial localization for 3D superresolution imaging. However, iPALM uses two high-numerical-aperture (NA) objectives in juxtaposition for fluorescence collection (a 4Pi microscope geometry), increasing expense and limiting samples that can be studied. Here, we propose an interferometric single molecule localization microscopy method using a single high-NA objective. The axial position of single molecules can be unambiguously determined from the phase-shifted interference signals with nanometer precision and over a range of 2λ. The use of only one objective simplifies the system configuration and sample mounting. In addition, due to the use of wavefront-splitting interference in our approach, the two parts of the wavefront that eventually merge and interfere with each other travel along nearly equivalent optical paths, which should minimize the effect of drift for long-term 3D superresolution imaging. PMID:25402907

  12. Speckle interferometric techniques applied to the observation of the solar photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aime, C.; Ricort, G.

    1980-01-01

    Speckle interferometric techniques are used to study the solar granulation. Calibration of the effects of atmospheric turbulence is performed by using either the difference in behavior between redundant and non redundant apertures in presence of atmospheric turbulence, or by analysing moon-limb blurring during a solar eclipse, or by using the changes in seeing conditions during speckle-interferometric measurements. These techniques require a theoretical knowledge of the effects of atmospheric turbulence on the modulation transfer function (M.T.F.) of the image as it is impractical to use an unresolved star near the sun as a reference source during day time observations. The agreement between the experimental M.T.F. obtained with an unresolved star and the theoretical form deduced from Korff's log-normal assumptions is extended to day time conditions.

  13. Dual-Frequency Interferometric SAR Observations of a Tropical Rain-Forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigot, E.

    1996-01-01

    Repeat-pass, interferometric, radar observations of tropical rain-forest collected by the Shuttle Imaging Radar C (SIR-C) in the state of Rondonia, Brazil, reveal signal coherence is destroyed at C-band (5.6-cm) in the forest, whereas L-band (24-cm) radar signals remain strongly coherent over the entire landscape. At L-band, the rms difference in inferred topographic height between the forest and adjacent clearings is 5 m, equivalent to the height noise. Atmospheric delays are large, however, forming kilometer-sized anomalies with a 1.2-cm rms one way. Radar interferometric studies of the humid tropics must therefore be conducted at long radar wavelengths, with kilometric base-lines or with two antennas operating simultaneously.

  14. Dual-Frequency Interferometric SAR Observations of a Tropical Rain-Forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, E.

    1996-01-01

    Repeat-pass, interferometric, radar observations of tropical rain-forest collected by the Shuttle Imaging Radar C (SIR-C) in the state of Rondonia, Brazil, reveal signal coherence is destroyed at C-band (5.6-cm) in the forest, whereas L-band (24-cm) radar signals remain strongly coherent over the entire landscape. At L-band, the rms difference in inferred topographic height between the forest and adjacent clearings is 5 m, equivalent to the height noise. Atmospheric delays are large, however, forming kilometer-sized anomalies with a 1.2-cm rms one way. Radar interferometric studies of the humid tropics must therefore be conducted at long radar wavelengths, with kilometric baselines or with two antennas operating simultaneously.

  15. HD139614: the Interferometric Case for a Group-Ib Pre-Transitional Young Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labadie, Lucas; Matter, Alexis; Kreplin, Alexander; Lopez, Bruno; Wolf, Sebastian; Weigelt, Gerd; Ertel, Steve; Berger, Jean-Philippe; Pott, Jorg-Uwe; Danchi, William C.

    2014-01-01

    The Herbig Ae star HD139614 is a group-Ib object, which featureless SED indicates disk flaring and a possible pre-transitional evolutionary stage. We present mid- and near-IR interferometric results collected with MIDI, AMBER and PIONIER with the aim of constraining the spatial structure of the 0.1-10 AU disk region and assess its possible multi-component structure. A two-component disk model composed of an optically thin 2-AU wide inner disk and an outer temperature-gradient disk starting at 5.6 AU reproduces well the observations. This is an additional argument to the idea that group-I HAeBe inner disks could be already in the disk-clearing transient stage. HD139614 will become a prime target for mid-IR interferometric imaging with the second-generation instrument MATISSE of the VLTI.

  16. Interferometric coupling of the Keck telescopes with single-mode fibers.

    PubMed

    Perrin, G; Woillez, J; Lai, O; Guérin, J; Kotani, T; Wizinowich, P L; Le Mignant, D; Hrynevych, M; Gathright, J; Léna, P; Chaffee, F; Vergnole, S; Delage, L; Reynaud, F; Adamson, A J; Berthod, C; Brient, B; Collin, C; Crétenet, J; Dauny, F; Deléglise, C; Fédou, P; Goeltzenlichter, T; Guyon, O; Hulin, R; Marlot, C; Marteaud, M; Melse, B-T; Nishikawa, J; Reess, J-M; Ridgway, S T; Rigaut, F; Roth, K; Tokunaga, A T; Ziegler, D

    2006-01-13

    Here we report successful interferometric coupling of two large telescopes with single-mode fibers. Interference fringes were obtained in the 2- to 2.3-micrometer wavelength range on the star 107 Herculis by using the two Keck 10-meter telescopes, each feeding their common interferometric focus with 300 meters of single-mode fibers. This experiment demonstrates the potential of fibers for future kilometric arrays of telescopes and is the first step toward the 'OHANA (Optical Hawaiian Array for Nanoradian Astronomy) interferometer at the Mauna Kea observatory in Hawaii. It opens the way to sensitive optical imagers with resolutions below 1 milli-arc second. Our experimental setup can be directly extended to large telescopes separated by many hundreds of meters. PMID:16410516

  17. BAYESIAN INFERENCE OF POLARIZED COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POWER SPECTRA FROM INTERFEROMETRIC DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Karakci, Ata; Korotkov, Andrei; Tucker, Gregory S.; Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Zhang, Le; Timbie, Peter; Bunn, Emory F.

    2013-01-15

    Detection of B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation is one of the frontiers of observational cosmology. Because they are an order of magnitude fainter than E-modes, it is quite a challenge to detect B-modes. Having more manageable systematics, interferometers prove to have a substantial advantage over imagers in detecting such faint signals. Here, we present a method for Bayesian inference of power spectra and signal reconstruction from interferometric data of the CMB polarization signal by using the technique of Gibbs sampling. We demonstrate the validity of the method in the flat-sky approximation for a simulation of an interferometric observation on a finite patch with incomplete uv-plane coverage, a finite beam size, and a realistic noise model. With a computational complexity of O(n {sup 3/2}), n being the data size, Gibbs sampling provides an efficient method for analyzing upcoming cosmology observations.

  18. Application of multifocusing method for subsurface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landa, Evgeny; Gurevich, Boris; Keydar, Shemer; Trachtman, Pinchas

    1999-12-01

    The multifocusing method consists of stacking seismic data with arbitrary source-receiver distribution according to a new paraxial moveout correction. This multifocusing moveout correction is based on a local spherical approximation of the reflection wave fronts in the vicinity of an observation surface. The multifocusing method does not require any knowledge of the subsurface model and can produce an accurate zero offset section, even in cases of a complex geological structure and/or low signal-to-noise ratio. The moveout correction parameters are the emergence angle and the wavefront curvatures for the normal wave and normal-incidence-point wave. The estimated sets of these parameters can be looked upon as new wavefield attributes containing important information regarding the subsurface model. Application of the multifocusing algorithm to synthetic and real data examples demonstrates its advantages in comparison with conventional CMP processing.

  19. On combining image-based and ontological semantic dissimilarities for medical image retrieval applications

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Camille; Depeursinge, Adrien; Napel, Sandy; Beaulieu, Christopher F.; Rubin, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted image retrieval applications can assist radiologists by identifying similar images in archives as a means to providing decision support. In the classical case, images are described using low-level features extracted from their contents, and an appropriate distance is used to find the best matches in the feature space. However, using low-level image features to fully capture the visual appearance of diseases is challenging and the semantic gap between these features and the high-level visual concepts in radiology may impair the system performance. To deal with this issue, the use of semantic terms to provide high-level descriptions of radiological image contents has recently been advocated. Nevertheless, most of the existing semantic image retrieval strategies are limited by two factors: they require manual annotation of the images using semantic terms and they ignore the intrinsic visual and semantic relationships between these annotations during the comparison of the images. Based on these considerations, we propose an image retrieval framework based on semantic features that relies on two main strategies: (1) automatic “soft” prediction of ontological terms that describe the image contents from multi-scale Riesz wavelets and (2) retrieval of similar images by evaluating the similarity between their annotations using a new term dissimilarity measure, which takes into account both image-based and ontological term relations. The combination of these strategies provides a means of accurately retrieving similar images in databases based on image annotations and can be considered as a potential solution to the semantic gap problem. We validated this approach in the context of the retrieval of liver lesions from computed tomographic (CT) images and annotated with semantic terms of the RadLex ontology. The relevance of the retrieval results was assessed using two protocols: evaluation relative to a dissimilarity reference standard defined for pairs

  20. Image database generation using image metric constraints: an application within the CALADIOM project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landeau, Stéphane; Dagobert, Tristan

    2006-05-01

    Performance assessment and optimization of ATR systems poses the problem of developing image databases for learning and testing purposes. An automatic IR image database generation technique is presented in this paper. The principle consists in superimposing segmented background, target and mask (bushes for example) from real images, under the constraint of predefined image characterization metrics. Each image is automatically computed according to a specification which defines the metrics levels to reach, such as the local contrast ΔT RSS (NVESD metric), the Signal to Clutter Ratio, or the masking ratio target/mask. An integrated calibrated sensor model simulates the sensor degradations by using the pre and post-filter MTF, and the 3D noise parameters of the camera. The image generation comes with the construction of a ground truth file which indicates all the parameter values defining the image scenario. A large quantity of images can be generated accordingly, leading to a meaningful statistical evaluation. A key feature is that this technique allows to build learning and testing databases with comparable difficulty, in the sense of the chosen image metrics. The theoretical interest of this technique is presented in the paper, compared to the classical ones which use real or simulated data. An application is also presented, within the CALADIOM project (terrestrial target detection with programmable artificial IR retina combined with IR ATR system). Over 38,000 images were processed by this ATR for training and testing, involving seven armored vehicles as targets.

  1. Computational adaptive optics for broadband interferometric tomography of tissues and cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adie, Steven G.; Mulligan, Jeffrey A.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) can shape aberrated optical wavefronts to physically restore the constructive interference needed for high-resolution imaging. With access to the complex optical field, however, many functions of optical hardware can be achieved computationally, including focusing and the compensation of optical aberrations to restore the constructive interference required for diffraction-limited imaging performance. Holography, which employs interferometric detection of the complex optical field, was developed based on this connection between hardware and computational image formation, although this link has only recently been exploited for 3D tomographic imaging in scattering biological tissues. This talk will present the underlying imaging science behind computational image formation with optical coherence tomography (OCT) -- a beam-scanned version of broadband digital holography. Analogous to hardware AO (HAO), we demonstrate computational adaptive optics (CAO) and optimization of the computed pupil correction in 'sensorless mode' (Zernike polynomial corrections with feedback from image metrics) or with the use of 'guide-stars' in the sample. We discuss the concept of an 'isotomic volume' as the volumetric extension of the 'isoplanatic patch' introduced in astronomical AO. Recent CAO results and ongoing work is highlighted to point to the potential biomedical impact of computed broadband interferometric tomography. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of HAO vs. CAO for the effective shaping of optical wavefronts, and highlight opportunities for hybrid approaches that synergistically combine the unique advantages of hardware and computational methods for rapid volumetric tomography with cellular resolution.

  2. Time-division multiplexing of polarization-insensitive fiber-optic Michelson interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S. C.; Lin, W. W.; Chen, M. H.

    1995-06-01

    A system of time-division multiplexing of polarization-insensitive fiber-optic Michelson interferometric sensors that uses Faraday rotator mirror elements is demonstrated. This system is constructed with conventional low-birefringence single-mode fiber and is able to solve the polarization-fading problem by a combination of Faraday rotator mirrors with unbalanced Michelson interferometers. The system is lead-fiber insensitive and has potentials for practical field applications.

  3. Driving micro-optical imaging systems towards miniature camera applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückner, Andreas; Duparré, Jacques; Dannberg, Peter; Leitel, Robert; Bräuer, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Up to now, multi channel imaging systems have been increasingly studied and approached from various directions in the academic domain due to their promising large field of view at small system thickness. However, specific drawbacks of each of the solutions prevented the diffusion into corresponding markets so far. Most severe problems are a low image resolution and a low sensitivity compared to a conventional single aperture lens besides the lack of a cost-efficient method of fabrication and assembly. We propose a microoptical approach to ultra-compact optics for real-time vision systems that are inspired by the compound eyes of insects. The demonstrated modules achieve a VGA resolution with 700x550 pixels within an optical package of 6.8mm x 5.2mm and a total track length of 1.4mm. The partial images that are separately recorded within different optical channels are stitched together to form a final image of the whole field of view by means of image processing. These software tools allow to correct the distortion of the individual partial images so that the final image is also free of distortion. The so-called electronic cluster eyes are realized by state-of-the-art microoptical fabrication techniques and offer a resolution and sensitivity potential that makes them suitable for consumer, machine vision and medical imaging applications.

  4. Imaging systems for biomedical applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Radparvar, M.

    1995-06-06

    Many of the activities of the human body manifest themselves by the presence of a very weak magnetic field outside the body, a field that is so weak that an ultra-sensitive magnetic sensor is needed for specific biomagnetic measurements. Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) are extremely sensitive detectors of magnetic flux and have been used extensively to detect the human magnetocardiogram, and magnetoencephalogram. and other biomagnetic signals. In order to utilize a SQUID as a magnetometer, its transfer characteristics should be linearized. This linearization requires extensive peripheral electronics, thus limiting the number of SQUID magnetometer channels in a practical system. The proposed digital SQUID integrates the processing circuitry on the same cryogenic chip as the SQUID magnetometer and eliminates the sophisticated peripheral electronics. Such a system is compact and cost effective, and requires minimal support electronics. Under a DOE-sponsored SBIR program, we designed, simulated, laid out, fabricated, evaluated, and demonstrated a digital SQUID magnetometer. This report summarizes the accomplishments under this program and clearly demonstrates that all of the tasks proposed in the phase II application were successfully completed with confirmed experimental results.

  5. Real-time in vivo computed optical interferometric tomography.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Adeel; Shemonski, Nathan D; Adie, Steven G; Kim, Hee-Seok; Hwu, Wen-Mei W; Carney, P Scott; Boppart, Stephen A

    2013-06-01

    High-resolution real-time tomography of scattering tissues is important for many areas of medicine and biology(1-6). However, the compromise between transverse resolution and depth-of-field in addition to low sensitivity deep in tissue continue to impede progress towards cellular-level volumetric tomography. Computed imaging has the potential to solve these long-standing limitations. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM)(7-9) is a computed imaging technique enabling high-resolution volumetric tomography with spatially invariant resolution. However, its potential for clinical diagnostics remains largely untapped since full volume reconstructions required lengthy postprocessing, and the phase-stability requirements have been difficult to satisfy in vivo. Here we demonstrate how 3-D Fourier-domain resampling, in combination with high-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT), can achieve high-resolution in vivo tomography. Enhanced depth sensitivity was achieved over a depth-of-field extended in real time by more than an order of magnitude. This work lays the foundation for high-speed volumetric cellular-level tomography. PMID:23956790

  6. Addressing the challenges of thermal imaging for firefighting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrzewa, Joseph; Meyer, William H.; Poe, George; Terre, William A.; Salapow, Thomas M.; Raimondi, John

    2003-09-01

    By providing visibility through smoke and absolute darkness, thermal imaging has the potential to radically improve the effectiveness and safety of the modern firefighter. Some of the roles of thermal imaging are assisting in detection of victims; navigating through dark, smoke-filled structures; detecting indications of imminent flash-over/roll-over; identifying and attacking the seat and extension of a fire; and surveying for lingering hot spots after a fire is nearly extinguished. In many respects, thermal imaging is ideally suited for these functions. However, firefighting applications present the infrared community some unique and challenging design constraints, not the least of which is an operating environment that is in some ways more harsh than most aerospace applications. While many previous papers have described the benefits of thermal imaging for firefighters, this paper describes several specific engineering challenges of this application. These include large ambient temperature range, rapidly changing scene dynamics, extreme demands on AGC, and large dynamic range requirements. This paper describes these and other challenges in detail and explains how they were addressed and overcome in the design of Evolution 5000, a state-of-the-art thermal imager designed and manufactured by Mine Safety Appliances (MSA) using Indigo System"s Omega miniature uncooled camera core.

  7. Research-grade CMOS image sensors for remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Pe, Olivier; Tulet, Michel; Davancens, Robert; Larnaudie, Franck; Magnan, Pierre; Martin-Gonthier, Philippe; Corbiere, Franck; Belliot, Pierre; Estribeau, Magali

    2004-11-01

    Imaging detectors are key elements for optical instruments and sensors on board space missions dedicated to Earth observation (high resolution imaging, atmosphere spectroscopy...), Solar System exploration (micro cameras, guidance for autonomous vehicle...) and Universe observation (space telescope focal planes, guiding sensors...). This market has been dominated by CCD technology for long. Since the mid-90s, CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) have been competing with CCDs for consumer domains (webcams, cell phones, digital cameras...). Featuring significant advantages over CCD sensors for space applications (lower power consumption, smaller system size, better radiations behaviour...), CMOS technology is also expanding in this field, justifying specific R&D and development programs funded by national and European space agencies (mainly CNES, DGA and ESA). All along the 90s and thanks to their increasingly improving performances, CIS have started to be successfully used for more and more demanding space applications, from vision and control functions requiring low-level performances to guidance applications requiring medium-level performances. Recent technology improvements have made possible the manufacturing of research-grade CIS that are able to compete with CCDs in the high-performances arena. After an introduction outlining the growing interest of optical instruments designers for CMOS image sensors, this paper will present the existing and foreseen ways to reach high-level electro-optics performances for CIS. The developments and performances of CIS prototypes built using an imaging CMOS process will be presented in the corresponding section.

  8. Research-grade CMOS image sensors for demanding space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Pé, Olivier; Tulet, Michel; Davancens, Robert; Larnaudie, Franck; Magnan, Pierre; Corbière, Franck; Martin-Gonthier, Philippe; Belliot, Pierre

    2004-06-01

    Imaging detectors are key elements for optical instruments and sensors on board space missions dedicated to Earth observation (high resolution imaging, atmosphere spectroscopy...), Solar System exploration (micro cameras, guidance for autonomous vehicle...) and Universe observation (space telescope focal planes, guiding sensors...). This market has been dominated by CCD technology for long. Since the mid-90s, CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) have been competing with CCDs for more and more consumer domains (webcams, cell phones, digital cameras...). Featuring significant advantages over CCD sensors for space applications (lower power consumption, smaller system size, better radiations behaviour...), CMOS technology is also expanding in this field, justifying specific R&D and development programs funded by national and European space agencies (mainly CNES, DGA, and ESA). All along the 90s and thanks to their increasingly improving performances, CIS have started to be successfully used for more and more demanding applications, from vision and control functions requiring low-level performances to guidance applications requiring medium-level performances. Recent technology improvements have made possible the manufacturing of research-grade CIS that are able to compete with CCDs in the high-performances arena. After an introduction outlining the growing interest of optical instruments designers for CMOS image sensors, this talk will present the existing and foreseen ways to reach high-level electro-optics performances for CIS. The developments of CIS prototypes built using an imaging CMOS process and of devices based on improved designs will be presented.

  9. Dual plasmonic gold nanoparticles for multispectral photoacoustic imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Vijay; Subhash, Hrebesh; Breathnach, Aedán.; Leahy, Martin; Dockery, Peter; Olivo, Malini

    2014-03-01

    Nanoparticle contrast agents for molecular targeted imaging have widespread interest in diagnostic applications with cellular resolution, specificity and selectivity for visualization and assessment of various disease processes. Of particular interest is gold nanoparticle owing to its tunability of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and its relative inertness. Here we present the synthesis of anisotropic multi-branched star shaped gold nanoparticles exhibiting dual-band plasmon absorption peaks and its application as a contrast agent for multispectral photoacoustic imaging. The transverse plasmon absorption peak of the synthesised dual plasmonic gold nanostar (DPGNS) was around 700 nm and that of longitudinal plasmon absorption in the longer wavelength region around 1050-1150 nm. Unlike most reported PA contrast agent with surface plasmon absorption in the range of 700 to 800 nm showing moderate tissue penetration, 1050-1200 nm range lies in the farther region of the optical window of biological tissue where scattering and the intrinsic optical extinction of endogenous chromophores is at its minimum. We also present a proof of principle demonstration of DPGNS as contrast agent for multispectral photoacoustic animal imaging. Our results show that DPGNS are promising for PA imaging with extended-depth imaging applications.

  10. IRMA--content-based image retrieval in medical applications.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Thomas M; Güld, Mark O; Thies, Christian; Plodowski, Bartosz; Keysers, Daniel; Ott, Bastian; Schubert, Henning

    2004-01-01

    The impact of content-based access to medical images is frequently reported but existing systems are designed for only a particular modality or context of diagnosis. Contrarily, our concept of image retrieval in medical applications (IRMA) aims at a general structure for semantic content analysis that is suitable for numerous applications in case-based reasoning or evidence-based medicine. Within IRMA, stepwise processing results in six layers of information modeling (raw data layer, registered data layer, feature layer, scheme layer, object layer, knowledge layer) incorporating medical expert knowledge. At the scheme layer, medical images are represented by a hierarchical structure of ellipses (blobs) describing image regions. Hence, image retrieval transforms to graph matching. The multilayer processing is implemented using a distributed system designed with only three core elements. The central database holds program sources, process-ing schemes, images, features, and blob trees; the scheduler balances distributed computing by addressing daemons running on all connected workstations; and the web server provides graphical user interfaces for data entry and retrieval.. PMID:15360931

  11. Adaptive coded aperture imaging: progress and potential future applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottesman, Stephen R.; Isser, Abraham; Gigioli, George W., Jr.

    2011-09-01

    Interest in Adaptive Coded Aperture Imaging (ACAI) continues to grow as the optical and systems engineering community becomes increasingly aware of ACAI's potential benefits in the design and performance of both imaging and non-imaging systems , such as good angular resolution (IFOV), wide distortion-free field of view (FOV), excellent image quality, and light weight construct. In this presentation we first review the accomplishments made over the past five years, then expand on previously published work to show how replacement of conventional imaging optics with coded apertures can lead to a reduction in system size and weight. We also present a trade space analysis of key design parameters of coded apertures and review potential applications as replacement for traditional imaging optics. Results will be presented, based on last year's work of our investigation into the trade space of IFOV, resolution, effective focal length, and wavelength of incident radiation for coded aperture architectures. Finally we discuss the potential application of coded apertures for replacing objective lenses of night vision goggles (NVGs).

  12. a Review of Hyperspectral Imaging in Close Range Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, T. H.; Buckley, S. J.

    2016-06-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is an established method for material mapping, which has been conventionally applied from airborne and spaceborne platforms for a range of applications, including mineral and vegetation mapping, change detection and environmental studies. The main advantage of lightweight hyperspectral imagers lies in the flexibility to deploy them from various platforms (terrestrial imaging and from unmanned aerial vehicles; UAVs), as well as the high spectral resolution to cover an expanding wavelength range. In addition, spatial resolution allows object sampling distances from micrometres to tens of centimetres - complementary to conventional nadir-looking systems. When this new type of imaging device was initially released, few instruments were available and the applicability and potential of the method was restricted. Today, a wider range of instruments, with a range of specifications, is available, with significant improvements over the first generation of technology. In this contribution, the state-of-the-art of hyperspectral imaging will be reviewed from a close range measurement perspective, highlighting how the method supplements geometric modelling techniques. An overview of the processing workflow, adjusted to the more complex close range imaging scenario will be given. This includes the integration with 3D laser scanning and photogrammetric models to provide a geometric framework and real world coordinate system for the hyperspectral imagery.

  13. Interferometric processing of C-band SAR data for the improvement of stand age estimation in rubber plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trisasongko, Bambang H.; Paull, David J.; Panuju, Dyah R.

    2015-01-01

    Rubber ranks the second largest plantation in Indonesia after oil palm. While oil palm plantations have been exploited mainly by large companies, many rubber plantations are still managed by peasant farmers who maintain its biodiversity. Due to its broad and scattered location, monitoring tropical rubber plantation is a crucial application of active remote sensing. In this paper, the backscatter coefficient of Envisat Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) is compared to interferometric coherence to study the relationship between stand age and SAR parameters. It is shown that VV polarized C-band SAR achieves its saturation level in plantations aged about 5-10 years. Extension of saturation level can be achieved by processing an interferometric pair of ASAR data, which results in interferometric coherence. In this paper, coherence can take up to 20 years stand age to achieve prior to saturation. Since stand age is highly related to biomass, this finding argues that the biomass can be best estimated using coherence.

  14. Reliability design of CMOS image sensor for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ning; Chen, Shijun; Chen, Yongping

    2013-08-01

    In space applications, sensors work in very harsh space environment. Thus the reliability design must be carefully considered. This paper addresses the techniques which effectively increase the reliability of CMOS image sensors. A radiation tolerant pixel design which is implemented in a sun tracker sensor is presented. Measurement results of total dose radiation, SEL, SEU, etc prove the radiation immunity of the sensor.

  15. Application of Imaging Technology to Chicken Carcasses and Hatching Eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Machine vision technology has been utilized by many sectors of the food and agriculture industry to facilitate sorting, inspection, and field mapping. A specific application, hyperspectral imaging, has been adapted to detect the fertility/early development of hatching eggs and fecal material on chi...

  16. Techniques for Field Application of Lingual Ultrasound Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gick, Bryan; Bird, Sonya; Wilson, Ian

    2005-01-01

    Techniques are discussed for using ultrasound for lingual imaging in field-related applications. The greatest challenges we have faced distinguishing the field setting from the laboratory setting are the lack of controlled head/transducer movement, and the related issue of tissue compression. Two experiments are reported. First, a pilot study…

  17. Clinical applications of imaging biomarkers. Part 1. The neuroradiologist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Smith, E T S

    2011-01-01

    This article is concerned with the application and usage in clinical practice of techniques of detection and measurement of imaging biomarkers. Some commentaries in the article derive from a literature search and include summaries of recently published material compiled and linked to each other by extensive use of the text contained in the material examined.

  18. Perspectives on Imaging: Advanced Applications. Introduction and Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Clifford A.; Lunin, Lois F.

    1991-01-01

    Provides an overview of six articles that address relationships between electronic imaging technology and information science. Articles discuss the areas of technology; applications in the fields of visual arts, medicine, and textile history; conceptual foundations; and future visions, including work in virtual reality and cyberspace. (LRW)

  19. Application of tomographic particle image velocimetry to complex (dusty) plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jeremiah

    2011-11-29

    Over the past decade, particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques have been used to obtain detailed measurements of the thermal and transport properties of weakly-coupled dusty plasmas. This paper reports on the application of an extension of these techniques, tomographic PIV (tom-PIV), which provides an instantaneous volumetric measurement of the particle transport.

  20. A Low-Cost Imaging System for Aerial Applicators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural aircraft provide a readily available and versatile platform for airborne remote sensing. Although various airborne imaging systems are being used for research and commercial applications, most of these systems are either too expensive or too complex to be of practical use for aerial app...