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Sample records for interferon beta-1a avonex

  1. Neutralizing antibodies in multiple sclerosis patients on weekly intramuscular Avonex and biosimilar interferon beta-1a (CinnoVex): comparing results of measurements in two different laboratories.

    PubMed

    Shahkarami, Mohammad Amir; Vaziri, Behrouz; Salami, Shiva; Harandi, Ali Amini; Oger, Joel

    2013-02-28

    The appearance of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) has significant clinical and regulatory consequences for interferons in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). In a double blind, randomized clinical trial, 84 patients with relapsing remitting MS were enrolled in a 24month study period. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups receiving 30mcg weekly intramuscular injections of either Avonex® (Biogen Idec, USA; 42 patients) or CinnoVex® (CinnaGen Co, Iran; 42 patients). NAb titer was drawn for all patients every 6months and assayed using cytopathic effect assay (CPE) method in Tehran, Iran. To validate the measure done in the Iranian lab, 45 sera with adequate volume and proper storing condition were selected and sent to be rechecked using luciferase reporter gene assay (LA) method for verification in 2 phases in Vancouver, Canada. The cut-off point of 20 TRU was considered for positivity. The two labs found the same three samples to be positive (2 samples from patients received Avonex and 1 received CinnoVex) and 42 to be negative. They had the following values using the Kawade formula as recommended by international standards; 2238, 89 and 302 (TRu/ml) using CPE assay versus 2464, 290 and 169 (TRu/ml) using LA method. As similar results were obtained from CinnoVex or Avonex in our study, we suggest that both medications will have a similar immunogenetic profile. PMID:23220098

  2. A randomized, blinded, parallel-group, pilot trial of mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept) compared with interferon beta-1a (Avonex) in patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Frohman, Elliot M.; Cutter, Gary; Remington, Gina; Gao, Hongjiang; Rossman, Howard; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Durfee, Jacqueline E.; Conger, Amy; Carl, Ellen; Treadaway, Katherine; Lindzen, Eric; Salter, Amber; Frohman, Teresa C.; Shah, Anjali; Bates, Angela; Cox, Jennifer L.; Dwyer, Michael G.; Stüve, Olaf; Greenberg, Benjamin M.; Racke, Michael K.; Zivadinov, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background: Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF, CellCept®) has been utilized as an antirejection agent in transplant recipients and in patients with myriad autoimmune disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective: To investigate radiographic and clinical safety involving monotherapy use of daily oral MMF (1 g b.i.d.) versus weekly intramuscular interferon beta 1a (Avonex® at 30 mcg) in relapsing–remitting MS (RRMS). Methods: We organized a randomized, serial, 6-monthly, MRI-blinded, parallel-group multicenter pilot study to determine the safety of MMF versus interferon beta monotherapy in 35 untreated patients with RRMS, all of whom exhibited evidence of gadolinium (Gd) enhancement on a screening MRI of the brain. The primary outcome was the reduction in the cumulative mean number of combined active lesions (CAL), new Gd-enhancing lesions, and new T2 lesions on MRI analyses. Results: Both interferon beta and MMF appeared safe and well tolerated in the majority of patients. There was no difference between MMF therapy and the standard regimen of interferon beta therapy on the primary safety MRI endpoints of the study. However, the MMF group showed a trend toward a lower accumulation of combined active lesions, CAL, Gd and T2 lesions when compared with interferon beta treated patients. Conclusions: The results from this pilot study suggest that the application of MMF monotherapy in MS deserves further exploration. PMID:21180633

  3. Interferon Beta-1a Intramuscular Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which the nerves do not ... known how interferon beta-1a works to treat MS. ... doctor.Interferon beta-1a controls the symptoms of MS but does not cure it. Continue to use ...

  4. Interferon Beta-1a Intramuscular Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... interferon beta-1a intramuscular at around the same time of day on your injection days. Follow the ...

  5. Effect of statins on clinical and molecular responses to intramuscular interferon beta-1a

    PubMed Central

    Rudick, R A.; Pace, A; Rani, M R.S.; Hyde, R; Panzara, M; Appachi, S; Shrock, J; Maurer, S L.; Calabresi, P A.; Confavreux, C; Galetta, S L.; Lublin, F D.; Radue, E -W.; Ransohoff, R M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Findings from a small clinical study suggested that statins may counteract the therapeutic effects of interferon beta (IFNβ) in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods: We conducted a post hoc analysis of data from the Safety and Efficacy of Natalizumab in Combination With IFNβ-1a in Patients With Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (SENTINEL) study to determine the effects of statins on efficacy of IFNβ. SENTINEL was a prospective trial of patients with RRMS treated with natalizumab (Tysabri®, Biogen Idec, Inc., Cambridge, MA) plus IM IFNβ-1a (Avonex®, Biogen Idec, Inc.) 30 μg compared with placebo plus IM IFNβ-1a 30 μg. Clinical and MRI outcomes in patients treated with IM IFNβ-1a only (no-statins group, n = 542) were compared with those of patients taking IM IFNβ-1a and statins at doses used to treat hyperlipidemia (statins group, n = 40). Results: No significant differences were observed between treatment groups in adjusted annualized relapse rate (p = 0.937), disability progression (p = 0.438), number of gadolinium-enhancing lesions (p = 0.604), or number of new or enlarging T2-hyperintense lesions (p = 0.802) at 2 years. More patients in the statins group reported fatigue, extremity pain, muscle aches, and increases in hepatic transaminases compared with patients in the no-statins group. Statin treatment had no ex vivo or in vitro effect on induction of IFN-stimulated genes. Conclusions: Statin therapy does not appear to affect clinical effects of IM interferon beta-1a in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis or the primary molecular response to interferon beta treatment. GLOSSARY ANCOVA = analysis of covariance; CI = confidence interval; EDSS = Expanded Disability Status Scale; GAPDH = glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase; Gd+ = gadolinium-enhancing; IFNβ = interferon beta; ISG = IFN-stimulated gene; RRMS = relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis; SENTINEL = Safety and Efficacy of

  6. [Interferon beta 1-a in multiple sclerosis: 1-year experience in 62 patients].

    PubMed

    Tilbery, C P; Felipe, E; Moreira, M A; Mendes, M F; França, A S

    2000-06-01

    We report the results of a trial of interferon beta 1-a in 62 ambulatory patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Entry criteria included EDSS of 0 to 5.5 and at least two exacerbations in the previous 2 years. The patients received 3 million international units by subcutaneous injections three times a week. The end points were differences in exacerbation rate and treatment effect on disease progression. The annual exacerbation rate for patients that did not take the interferon beta 1-a was 1.32 and for the patients under medication 0.63. The EDSS score in patients that did not take the mediaction was 4.7 and 2.0 for the patients with interferon beta 1-a. Interferon beta 1-a was well tolerated and 85% of patients completed 1 year treatment. PMID:10920406

  7. Unusual Side Effects of Interferon Beta-1a in Patient with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Maryam; Pour Manshadi, Seyed Mohammad Yousof Mostafavi; Naderi, Nafiseh; Dehghan, Abolfazl; Azizi, Sanaz

    2012-01-01

    This is a descriptive case report of a 30-year-old man with massive epistaxis, echymosis on arms, abnormal CBC and increased plasma urea and creatinine level (i.e. above normal range). Probably, these are as side effects of interferon beta-1a injection. This is the first report according to our literature search (Pub Med, Google scholar, ISI web of knowledge, ProQuest, MD consult, Science Direct, and SCOPUS) about interferon beta-1a related abnormal kidney function tests hereafter. Abnormal kidney function tests (i.e. increased plasma urea and creatinie level) is not a known as side effect of interferon beta-1a. This case indicates, likely potential for development of these side effects with this medication. PMID:23922529

  8. Natalizumab plus interferon beta-1a reduces lesion formation in relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Stuart, William H; Calabresi, Peter A; Confavreux, Christian; Galetta, Steven L; Rudick, Richard A; Lublin, Fred D; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Wynn, Daniel R; Fisher, Elizabeth; Papadopoulou, Athina; Lynn, Frances; Panzara, Michael A; Sandrock, Alfred W

    2010-05-15

    The SENTINEL study showed that the addition of natalizumab improved outcomes for patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) who had experienced disease activity while receiving interferon beta-1a (IFNbeta-1a) alone. Previously unreported secondary and tertiary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures are presented here. Patients received natalizumab 300 mg (n=589) or placebo (n=582) intravenously every 4 weeks plus IFNbeta-1a 30 microg intramuscularly once weekly. Annual MRI scans allowed comparison of a range of MRI end points versus baseline. Over 2 years, 67% of patients receiving natalizumab plus IFNbeta-1a remained free of new or enlarging T2-lesions compared with 30% of patients receiving IFNbeta-1a alone. The mean change from baseline in T2 lesion volume over 2 years decreased in patients receiving natalizumab plus IFNbeta-1a and increased in those receiving IFNbeta-1a alone (-277.5mm(3) versus 525.6mm(3); p<0.001). Compared with IFNbeta-1a alone, add-on natalizumab therapy resulted in a smaller increase in mean T1-hypointense lesion volume after 2 years (1821.3mm(3) versus 2210.5mm(3); p<0.001), a smaller mean number of new T1-hypointense lesions over 2 years (2.3 versus 4.1; p<0.001), and a slower rate of brain atrophy during the second year of therapy (-0.31% versus -0.40%; p=0.020). Natalizumab add-on therapy reduced gadolinium-enhancing, T1-hypointense, and T2 MRI lesion activity and slowed brain atrophy progression in patients with relapsing MS who experienced disease activity despite treatment with IFNbeta-1a alone. PMID:20236661

  9. Effects of Systemic and Local Interferon Beta-1a on Epidural Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Işık, Semra; Doğan, Şeref; Özgün, Gonca; Ocakoğlu, Gökhan; Uğraş, Nesrin

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Level 1 randomized controlled study. Purpose To investigate the effects of systemic and local interferon-beta-1a (IFN-β-1a) on prevention of epidural fibrosis using histopathological parameters. Overview of Literature Epidural fibrosis involves fibroblastic invasion of nerve roots into the epidural space. Formation of dense fibrous tissue causes lumbar and radicular pain. Many surgical techniques and several materials have been proposed in the literature, but no study has assessed the effect of IFN-β-1a on prevention of epidural fibrosis. Methods Forty-eight adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups of eight: sham group, control group, systemic 44 μg IFN-β-1a group and 22 μg IFN-β-1a group (after laminectomy and discectomy, 0.28 mL and 0.14 mL IFN-β-1a applied subcutaneously three times for a week, respectively), local 44 μg IFN-β-1a group (laminectomy and discectomy, followed by 0.28 mL IFN-β-1a on the surgical area), and local 22 μg IFN-β-1a group (laminectomy and discectomy, followed by 0.14 mL IFN-β-1a on the surgical area). All rats were sacrificed after 4 weeks and groups were evaluated histopathologically. Results Compared with sham and control groups, significantly less epidural fibrosis, dural adhesion, and fibroblast cell density were observed in the local and systemic 44 μg IFN-β-1a groups. No other differences were evident between the local and systemic groups. Conclusions IFN-β-1a is effective in preventing epidural fibrosis with systemic and local application. PMID:27340517

  10. Interferon beta-1a treatment in HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Viana, Graça Maria de Castro; Silva, Marcos Antonio Custódio Neto da; Souza, Victor Lima; Lopes, Natália Barbosa da Silva; Silva, Diego Luz Felipe da; Nascimento, Maria do Desterro Soares Brandão

    2014-01-01

    Here a young patient (< 21 years of age) with a history of infective dermatitis is described. The patient was diagnosed with myelopathy associated with HTLV-1/tropical spastic paraparesis and treated with interferon beta-1a. The disease was clinically established as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), and laboratory tests confirmed the presence of antibodies to HTLV-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Mumps, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, schistosomiasis, herpes virus 1 and 2, rubella, measles, varicella-zoster toxoplasmosis, hepatitis, HIV, and syphilis were excluded by serology. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder and presented with nocturia, urinary urgency, paresthesia of the lower left limb, a marked reduction of muscle strength in the lower limbs, and a slight reduction in upper limb strength. During the fourth week of treatment with interferon beta-1a, urinary urgency and paresthesia disappeared and clinical motor skills improved. PMID:25229227

  11. INTERFERON BETA-1A TREATMENT IN HTLV-1-ASSOCIATED MYELOPATHY/TROPICAL SPASTIC PARAPARESIS: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Graça Maria de Castro; da Silva, Marcos Antonio Custódio Neto; Souza, Victor Lima; Lopes, Natália Barbosa da Silva; da Silva, Diego Luz Felipe; Nascimento, Maria do Desterro Soares Brandão

    2014-01-01

    Here a young patient (< 21 years of age) with a history of infective dermatitis is described. The patient was diagnosed with myelopathy associated with HTLV-1/tropical spastic paraparesis and treated with interferon beta-1a. The disease was clinically established as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), and laboratory tests confirmed the presence of antibodies to HTLV-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Mumps, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, schistosomiasis, herpes virus 1 and 2, rubella, measles, varicella-zoster toxoplasmosis, hepatitis, HIV, and syphilis were excluded by serology. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder and presented with nocturia, urinary urgency, paresthesia of the lower left limb, a marked reduction of muscle strength in the lower limbs, and a slight reduction in upper limb strength. During the fourth week of treatment with interferon beta-1a, urinary urgency and paresthesia disappeared and clinical motor skills improved. PMID:25229227

  12. Early treatment with high-dose interferon beta-1a reverses cognitive and cortical plasticity deficits in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Francesco; Kusayanagi, Hajime; Buttari, Fabio; Centini, Barbara; Monteleone, Fabrizia; Nicoletti, Carolina Gabri; Bernardi, Giorgio; Di Cantogno, Elisabetta Verdun; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Centonze, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Summary Acute inflammation is associated with cognitive deficits and alterations of cortical plasticity in multiple sclerosis (MS). We tested whether early treatment with high-dose interferon (IFN) beta-1a, known to reduce inflammatory activity, improves cortical function and cognitive deficits in MS. Eighty treatment-naïve relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) patients received IFN beta-1a (44 mcg) subcutaneously three times per week. Cognitive performance and cortical plasticity were measured through the paced auditory serial addition test (PASAT) and intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) before and up to two years after IFN beta-1a initiation. Before treatment, patients with gadolinium-enhancing lesions (Gd+) on MRI performed worse on the PASAT, and showed lower iTBS-induced plasticity, compared with Gd− patients. Six months after treatment initiation both PASAT and iTBS-induced plasticity improved in Gd+ and remained stable in Gd− patients. These results suggest that cognitive and synaptic plasticity deficits may be rescued during high-dose IFN beta-1a treatment in newly-diagnosed RRMS patients with Gd+ lesions. PMID:23402677

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of peginterferon beta-1a compared with interferon beta-1a and glatiramer acetate in the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Luis; Guo, Shien; Kinter, Elizabeth; Fay, Monica

    2016-07-01

    Objective Peginterferon beta-1a 125 mcg, administered subcutaneously (SC) every 2 weeks, a new disease-modifying therapy (DMT) for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2014. This study assesses the cost-effectiveness of peginterferon beta-1a vs interferon beta-1a (44 mcg SC 3 times per week) and glatiramer acetate (20 mg SC once-daily) in the treatment of RRMS from the perspective of a US payer over 10 years. Methods A Markov cohort economic model was developed for this analysis. The model predicts disability progression, occurrence of relapses and other adverse events and translates them into quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and costs. Natural history data were obtained from the placebo arm of the ADVANCE trial of peginterferon beta-1a, the London Ontario (Canada) database and a large population-based MS survey. Comparative efficacy of each DMT vs placebo was obtained from a network meta-analysis. Costs (in 2014 US dollars) were sourced from public databases and literature. Clinical and economic outcomes were discounted at 3% per year. Results Over 10 years, peginterferon beta-1a was dominant (i.e., more effective and less costly), with cost-savings of $22,070 and additional 0.06 QALYs when compared with interferon beta-1a 44 mcg and with cost-savings of $19,163 and 0.07 QALYs gained when compared with glatiramer acetate 20 mg. Results were most sensitive to variations in the treatment effect of each DMT, treatment acquisition costs of each DMT and the time horizon. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses indicated that peginterferon beta-1a remains dominant in >90% of 5,000 replications compared with either DMTs. Conclusion This analysis suggests that long-term treatment with peginterferon beta-1a improves clinical outcomes at reduced costs compared with interferon beta-1a 44 mcg and glatiramer acetate 20 mg and should be a valuable addition to managed care formularies for treating

  14. Results of sustained long-term use of interferon beta-1a in a community-based cohort of patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cohan, Stanley; Chen, Chiayi; Baraban, Elizabeth; Stuchiner, Tamela; Grote, Lois; Rodriguez, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated long-term efficacy of interferon beta-1a in large community-based cohorts. Objective Evaluate time to relapse, relapse rate, and disability progression in patients treated with intramuscular interferon beta-1a. Methods A retrospective review of medical records from 2000–2010 was performed. Adult patients with relapsing-remitting MS or clinically isolated syndrome treated with interferon beta-1a were included. Primary outcomes were time to relapse, annualized relapse rate, and changes in Expanded Disability Status Scale score. Other outcomes included factors associated with time to first relapse, risk of having a relapse while receiving interferon beta-1a, and discontinuation of therapy. Results In total, 364 of 696 patients screened were enrolled, with a mean age of 51 ± 12.1 years, disease duration of 9.39 ± 7.02 years, and duration of therapy of 4.03 ± 2.56 years. Mean time to first on-therapy relapse was 5.58 ± 0.26 years, annualized relapse rate was 0.30 ± 0.55 years, and mean increase in sustained Expanded Disability Status Scale score was 0.018. Relapse risk was associated with higher baseline Expanded Disability Status Scale score, age at disease onset, and number of relapses in the 12 months prior to therapy initiation. Conclusions This study demonstrates favorable clinical outcomes observed in a large community-based cohort, and serves to emphasize the continued therapeutic importance of interferon beta-1a, despite the development of newer agents with greater convenience of use, but also more potential risk of serious morbidity.

  15. Development of rheumatoid arthritis during treatment of multiple sclerosis with interferon beta 1-a. Coincidence of two conditions or a complication of treatment: A case report.

    PubMed

    Hojjati, Seyed Mohammad Masood; Heidari, Behzad; Babaei, Mansour

    2016-09-01

    Coexistence of multiple sclerosis (MS) with other autoimmune diseases has been attributed to common background genetic or environmental factors. This study presents development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during treatment of MS. The MS was confirmed by the Mc Donald criteria and the diagnosis of RA was confirmed by the ACR/EULAR criteria. A 35 years old women with 9 years of MS who was receiving interferon beta 1-a (INF) for 7 years and who did not respond to conventional therapy of RA over 8 months developed clinical manifestations of RA. But a rapid response was observed after discontinuation of INF. These findings suggest a possible contribution of INF in the development of RA. PMID:27489727

  16. Effect of dose and frequency of interferon beta-1a administration on clinical and magnetic resonance imaging parameters in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cocco, Eleonora; Marchi, Piernicola; Floris, Gianluca; Mascia, Maria Giuseppina; Deriu, Marcello; Sirca, Antonella; Mamusa, Elena; Lai, Marina; Mura, Marco; Mallarini, Giorgio; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna

    2006-01-01

    There is still debate over the optimal dosage, frequency and route of administration of interferon (IFN) beta in multiple sclerosis (MS). A prospective, non-randomized, comparative study was performed to evaluate differences in magnetic resonance imaging and clinical outcomes of two IFN beta-1a preparations (30mcg intramuscular [im] once-weekly [qw], AVO; and 22 mcg subcutaneous [sc] three-times-weekly [tiw]; R22). Relapsing-remitting MS patients on one of the two IFN preparations (AVO, n=47; R22, n=48) were assessed at baseline and after 6 months of further treatment. There were no significant differences between the two groups at baseline. Both groups showed significantly reduced relapse rates (F=19.5; p<0.001) from baseline (0.6) to 6-month assessment (0.2; p<0.001). Univariate analysis showed a significant difference in favour of R22 on T2 lesion volume (F=14.4; p<0.001) and T1 black hole lesion load (F=8.5; p=0.004), the latter showing a significant increase in the AVO group (p<0.001). The incidence of patients with new T1 black holes was also higher for AVO than R22 (23.5% vs 8.3%; p=0.025). These results from patients receiving AVO or R22 in normal clinical practice are in line with randomized clinical studies that show the benefits of high-dose, high-frequency administration of IFN beta-1a in MS therapy. PMID:17049133

  17. Interferon Beta-1a Subcutaneous Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... used syringes or automatic injection devices in a puncture resistant container that is out of the reach ... doctor or pharmacist about how to discard the puncture-resistant container.Always look at the medication in ...

  18. Interferon Beta-1a Subcutaneous Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... under the skin). It is usually injected three times a week. You should inject this medication on ...

  19. Peginterferon Beta-1a Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... peginterferon beta-1a injection at around the same time of day each time you inject it. Follow ...

  20. Effect of Treatment with Interferon Beta-1a on Changes in Voxel-Wise Magnetization Transfer Ratio in Normal Appearing Brain Tissue and Lesions of Patients with Relapsing–Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: A 24-Week, Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Zivadinov, Robert; Dwyer, Michael G.; Markovic-Plese, Silva; Kennedy, Cheryl; Bergsland, Niels; Ramasamy, Deepa P.; Durfee, Jacqueline; Hojnacki, David; Hayward, Brooke; Dangond, Fernando; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2014-01-01

    Background This pilot study investigated changes in remyelinating and demyelinating activity in normal appearing brain tissue (NABT) and lesions, by using voxel-wise magnetization transfer ratio (VW-MTR), in patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) receiving interferon beta-1a 44 mcg subcutaneously (IFN β-1a SC) three times weekly versus healthy controls (HCs) (NCT01085318). Methods Increasing (suggestive of remyelination) and decreasing (suggestive of demyelination) VW-MTR changes in NABT and in T2, T1 and gadolinium (Gd)-enhancing lesion volume were measured over 24 weeks in 23 patients treated with IFN β-1a SC and in 15 HCs (where applicable). VW-MTR changes were tested using the Wilcoxon signed–rank or Wilcoxon rank–sum test. Results A trend for greater volume of NABT with increasing VW-MTR at 24 weeks was observed for patients versus HCs (median [range] 1206 [0–15278]; 342 [0–951] mm3; p = 0.061). NABT volume with increasing VW-MTR at 12 weeks was significantly greater in patients than in HCs (852 [6–11577]; 360 [0–1755] mm3; p = 0.028). Similar findings were detected for lesion volumes. Two patients with notably high numbers of Gd-enhancing lesions at baseline had a markedly greater volume of tissue with increasing VW-MTR compared with other patients. Volume of NABT tissue with decreasing VW-MTR was significantly greater in patients versus HCs at 24 weeks (942 [0–6141]; 297 [0–852] mm3; p<0.001). Conclusions The significant change in NABT volume with increasing VW-MTR at 12 weeks suggests that active remyelination in patients with RRMS may occur during treatment with IFN β-1a SC. Findings from two patients with the highest number of Gd-enhancing lesions at baseline suggest that extensive remyelination in NABT may occur in patients with high disease activity. Tissue volume with decreasing VW-MTR was greater in patients than in HCs, despite treatment, validating the sensitivity of this technique for detecting MS

  1. Interferon-beta in pediatric multiple sclerosis patients: safety in short-term prescription.

    PubMed

    Basiri, Keivan; Etemadifar, Masood; Derakhshan, Fatemeh; Ashtari, Fereshteh; Shaygannejad, Vahid; Fatehi, Zahra; Maghzi, Amir Hadi; Fatehi, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    None of the approved immunomodulatory drugs in adults Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients have been officially approved for the pediatric patients and are currently used off-label in this population. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness and tolerability of intramuscular interferon beta1-a (Avonex(®)) and subcutaneously injected interferon beta1-b (Betaferon(®)) in children with definite relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). Thirteen patients aged younger than 16, who were recently diagnosed with definite RRMS according to the McDonald's criteria, were enrolled in this study. Six patients were treated with Avonex(®) 30 μg, intramuscularly every week, and seven patients were treated with Betaferon(®) 250 μg, subcutaneously every other day. All patients were treated with adult doses; initially interferon-beta was prescribed with half dose, and it was increased to full adult dose steadily. Eleven girls and two boys, mean (SD) age of 14.7 (1.9) years, were studied. Following nine months of using interferon-beta, nine patients (69.2%) had no relapses and the remaining four, experienced only one relapse. The mean EDSS score was decreased significantly after the study period. The present study provides reasonable data for the use of interferon-beta in Pediatric MS due to lack of short-term complications and safety. Studies with larger sample size and longer follow up duration are required to shed light on the long term impact of the interferon-beta therapy in children. PMID:22359077

  2. Cost Effectiveness Analysis of Avonex and CinnoVex in Relapsing Remitting MS

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Behzad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Jafari, Mehdi; Najafi, Smaeil; Kiadaliri, Aliasghar Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Multiple sclerosis is a chronic and degenerative neurological disease characterized by loss of myelin sheath of some neurons in brain and spinal cord. It is associated with high economic burden due to premature deaths and high occurrence of disabilities. The aim of the current study was to determine cost effectiveness of two major products of interferon 1a in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Method and Materials: Altogether, 140 patients who have consumed Avonex and CinnoVex in Relapsing Remitting MS for at least two years were randomly selected (70 patients in each group). Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was assessed using the adopted MSQoL-54 instrument. Costs were measured and valued from Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MOHME) perspective. Two-way sensitivity analysis was used to check robustness of the results. Results: Patients in CinnoVex group reported significantly higher scores in both physical (69.5 vs. 50.9, P<0.001) and mental (63.3 vs. 56.6, P=0.03) aspects of HRQoL than Avonex group. On the other hand, annual cost of CinnoVex and Avonex were 2410 US$ and 4515US$ per patient, respectively (P<0.001). Conclusions: The results showed that CinnoVex was dominant option over the study period. It is suggested that results of the current study should be considered in allocating resources to MS treatments in Iran. Of course, our findings should be interpreted with caution duo to short term horizon and lack of HRQoL scores at baseline (before the intervention). PMID:25716386

  3. EVASEP: A Noninterventional Study Describing the Perception of Neurologists, Patients, and Caregivers on Caregivers' Role in the Support of Patients Suffering from Multiple Sclerosis Treated with Subcutaneous Interferon Beta 1a

    PubMed Central

    Donzé, Cécile; Lenne, Bruno; Jean Deleglise, Anne-Sophie; Bellili, Yasmine; Hautecoeur, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background. The perception of the role of caregivers for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) is important but poorly studied, particularly in patients with low levels of disability. Objectives. To describe the perceptions of the role of caregivers from the perspective of the caregiver, the patient, and neurologists. Methods. This observational study was conducted in France on patients with relapsing remitting MS treated with subcutaneous (SC) interferon-β-1a (IFN-β-1a) for more than 24 months. Results. Caregiver, patients, and neurologists all considered providing moral support and fighting against the disease as the most important role of the care provider. Moral support was considered significantly more important by caregivers than the patients and neurologists (p = 0.002) and caregivers considered their role in helping patients to fight disease more important than did the neurologists (p = 0.006). Knowledge of disease and available treatments were less important among support providers than patients (p = 0.007 and p = 0.001). Conclusion. There are many unmet needs in the perception of the role of caregivers for people with MS which need to be addressed to deliver the most effective care package for patients and to support the needs of the support provider. PMID:27563466

  4. Time of interferon-beta 1a injection and duration of treatment affect clinical side effects and acute changes of plasma hormone and cytokine levels in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Kümpfel, T; Schwan, M; Pollmächer, Th; Yassouridis, A; Uhr, M; Trenkwalder, C; Weber, F

    2007-11-01

    During initiation of interferon-beta (IFN-beta) therapy, many multiple sclerosis (MS) patients experience systemic side effects which may depend on the time point of IFN-beta injection. We investigated the time course of plasma hormone-, cytokine- and cytokine-receptor concentrations after the first injection of IFN-beta either at 8.00 a.m. (group A) or at 6.00 p.m. (group B) and quantified clinical side effects within the first 9 h in 16 medication free patients with relapsing-remitting MS. This investigation was repeated after 6-month IFN-beta therapy. Plasma ACTH and cortisol concentrations followed their physiological rhythms, with lower levels in the evening compared to the morning, but raised earlier and stronger in group B after IFN-beta administration. IFN-beta injection in the evening led to a prompter increase of plasma IL-6 concentrations and temperature during the first hours and correlated to more intense clinical side effects compared to group A. Plasma IL-10 concentrations increased more in group A compared to group B, but sTNF-RI and sTNF-RII concentrations raised 7 h after IFN-beta injection only in group B. Acute effects on plasma hormone and cytokine concentrations adapted after 6-month IFN-beta treatment, while diurnal variations were still present. Baseline sTNF-RII concentrations were elevated after 6-month IFN-beta therapy only in group A. Our results show that time point of IFN-beta injection has differential effects on acute changes of plasma hormone and cytokine concentrations and is related to systemic side effects. This may have implications on the tolerability and effectiveness of IFN-beta therapy. PMID:17967841

  5. Less Frequent and Less Severe Flu-Like Syndrome in Interferon Beta-1a Treated Multiple Sclerosis Patients with at Least One Allele Bearing the G>C Polymorphism at Position -174 of the IL-6 Promoter Gene

    PubMed Central

    Bertoli, Diego; Serana, Federico; Sottini, Alessandra; Cordioli, Cinzia; Maimone, Davide; Amato, Maria Pia; Centonze, Diego; Florio, Ciro; Puma, Elisa; Capra, Ruggero; Imberti, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common adverse event of interferon beta (IFNβ) therapy for multiple sclerosis is flu-like syndrome (FLS), which has been reportedly related to increased levels of cytokines such as interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Average cytokine levels can be affected by single nucleotide polymorphism in the gene promoter regions. To investigate whether IL-6 -174 G>C and TNF-α -376 G>A polymorphisms could be correlated to the incidence of FLS, and whether an anti-inflammatory/antipyretic therapy may influence FLS development, a prospective observational study was performed in 190 treatment naïve, multiple sclerosis patients who started IM IFNβ-1a 30mcg once weekly. The identification of IL-6 -174 G>C and TNF-α -376 G>A polymorphisms was achieved by performing an amplification-refractory mutation system. Serum IL-6 levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in blood samples taken before therapy and then after the first and last IFNβ-1a injection of the follow-up. FLS-related symptoms were recorded by patients once per week during the first 12 weeks of therapy into a self-reported diary. We found that patients carrying at least one copy of the C allele at position -174 in the promoter of IL-6 gene produced lower levels of IL-6 and were less prone to develop FLS, which was also less severe. On the contrary, the polymorphism of TNF-α had no effect on FLS. Patients taking the first dose of anti-inflammatory/antipyretic therapy in the peri-injection period (within 1 hour) experienced a reduced FLS severity. In conclusion, the study of IL-6 -174 G>C polymorphism would allow the identification of patients lacking the C nucleotide on both alleles who are at risk of a more severe FLS, and may be addressed to a timely and stronger anti-inflammatory/antipyretic therapy for a more effective FLS prevention. PMID:26285213

  6. IFN beta 1a as Glucocorticoids-Sparing Therapy in a Patient with CLIPPERS

    PubMed Central

    Rico, María; Villafani, Javier; Tuñón, Alberto; Mateos, Valentín; Oliva-Nacarino, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 31 Final Diagnosis: CLIPPERS Symptoms: Ataxia • diplopia Medication: IFNbeta 1a Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) is a recently described inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, distinguished by brainstem- and spinal cord-centered lesions with a characteristic contrast enhancement on MRI, a lymphocytic perivascular infiltrate on pathological exam, and a dramatic response to and dependence on steroids therapy. Since its initial description in 2010, different glucocorticoid-sparing agents, mostly immunosuppressant drugs, have been used to minimize the dosage, but these therapies also carry the risk of important secondary effects. We present the first reported case of CLIPPERS treated with interferon beta 1a as add-on therapy. Case Report: A previously healthy 31-year-old man presented with gait ataxia and dysarthria. MRI showed pons-centered hyperintense patchy lesions on T2-weighted images. Additional tests ruled out other possible diagnoses and symptoms reversed with intravenous methylprednisolone. Over the years the patient presented with several episodes of deterioration each year, which were partly reversed with glucocorticoid therapy, but leaving him with growing sequelae. Four years after the initial event, treatment with interferon-beta-1a was initiated, achieving reduced frequency of the relapses to 1 every 4 years, which were no longer associated to increasing disability. This allowed reducing glucocorticoids to 30 mg of Deflazacort every other day. Conclusions: Interferon beta-1a could be an alternative to corticosteroid-combined therapy in CLIPPERS and its more benign profile of secondary effects compared to immunosuppressants could make it an attractive choice. PMID:26813773

  7. Incidence, characterization, and clinical impact analysis of peginterferon beta1a immunogenicity in patients with multiple sclerosis in the ADVANCE trial

    PubMed Central

    White, Joleen T.; Newsome, Scott D.; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Bermel, Robert A.; Cui, Yue; Seddighzadeh, Ali; Hung, Serena; Crossman, Mary; Subramanyam, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Background: Efficacy of interferon beta in multiple sclerosis (MS) can be dampened in patients who develop neutralizing antidrug antibodies (NAbs). Peginterferon beta1a is an interferon conjugated with a polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety. Pegylation increases a drug’s half life and exposure, and may also reduce immunogenicity. Objective: The objective of this study was to characterize the incidence and impact of immunogenicity to peginterferon beta1a over 2 years in patients with MS. Methods: Patients with relapsing–remitting MS (N = 1512) were randomized to subcutaneous peginterferon beta1a 125 μg every 2 or 4 weeks, or placebo, for 1 year; patients in the placebo group were rerandomized to active treatment in year 2. The incidence and titers of binding antibodies (BAbs) and NAbs to interferon and antibodies to PEG (anti-PEG) were assessed in analytically validated assays. The clinical impact of immunogenicity on relapse and magnetic resonance imaging endpoints was evaluated. Results: Over 2 years, 6%, less than 1%, and 7% of patients developed anti-interferon BAbs, NAbs, and anti-PEG antibodies, respectively. There was no discernible clinically meaningful effect of antibody status on the pharmacodynamic, efficacy, or safety parameters evaluated, although these analyses were limited by the low incidence of treatment-emergent antibodies. Conclusion: The treatment effect of peginterferon beta1a in patients with relapsing–remitting MS is not expected to be attenuated by immunogenicity. PMID:27366230

  8. Quality of life in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients receiving CinnoVex compared with Avonex

    PubMed Central

    Hatam, Nahid; Bastani, Peivand; Shahtaheri, Rahil Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There is an increasing recognition among clinicians and researchers that the impact of chronic illnesses and their treatments must be assessed in terms of their quality of life (QoL) in addition to more traditional measures of clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to compare the QoL in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) using Avonex or CinnoVex. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study on one hundred patients with RRMS, fifty and fifty patients were being treated with Avonex (Biogen Idec, USA) and CinnoVex (CinnaGen, Iran), respectively. We used a disease-specific questionnaire for MS (Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 [MSQoL-54]). Both groups were tested for significant differences regarding sociodemographic. A multiple linear regression model was constructed to find factors that affected the different aspect of QoL of the whole sample of patients. Findings: MS groups did not differ in physical and mental health composite scores as well as relative scales. The results of regression models for each subscale showed that age, marriage, and Expanded Disability Status Scale were associated with several subscales of the MSQoL-54 (P < 0.05). Conclusion: In this study, it was seen that there are no significant differences between QoL of Avonex and CinnoVex, but a limitation in our study the results may be different in other countries and even various areas in Iran. PMID:27512709

  9. Peginterferon beta-1a in multiple sclerosis: 2-year results from ADVANCE

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Douglas L; Balcer, Laura J; Boyko, Alexey A; Pelletier, Jean; Liu, Shifang; Zhu, Ying; Seddighzadeh, Ali; Hung, Serena; Deykin, Aaron; Sheikh, Sarah I; Calabresi, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of subcutaneous peginterferon beta-1a over 2 years in patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis in the ADVANCE study. Methods: Patients were randomized to placebo or 125 µg peginterferon beta-1a every 2 or 4 weeks. For Year 2 (Y2), patients originally randomized to placebo were re-randomized to peginterferon beta-1a every 2 weeks or every 4 weeks. Patients randomized to peginterferon beta-1a in Year 1 (Y1) remained on the same dosing regimen in Y2. Results: Compared with Y1, annualized relapse rate (ARR) was further reduced in Y2 with every 2 week dosing (Y1: 0.230 [95% CI 0.183–0.291], Y2: 0.178 [0.136–0.233]) and maintained with every 4 week dosing (Y1: 0.286 [0.231–0.355], Y2: 0.291 [0.231–0.368]). Patients starting peginterferon beta-1a from Y1 displayed improved efficacy versus patients initially assigned placebo, with reductions in ARR (every 2 weeks: 37%, p<0.0001; every 4 weeks: 17%, p=0.0906), risk of relapse (every 2 weeks: 39%, p<0.0001; every 4 weeks: 19%, p=0.0465), 12-week disability progression (every 2 weeks: 33%, p=0.0257; every 4 weeks: 25%, p=0.0960), and 24-week disability progression (every 2 weeks: 41%, p=0.0137; every 4 weeks: 9%, p=0.6243). Over 2 years, greater reductions were observed with every 2 week versus every 4 week dosing for all endpoints and peginterferon beta-1a was well tolerated. Conclusions: Peginterferon beta-1a efficacy is maintained beyond 1 year, with greater effects observed with every 2 week versus every 4 week dosing, and a similar safety profile to Y1. Clinicaltrials.gov Registration Number: NCT00906399. PMID:25432952

  10. Management Strategies for Flu-Like Symptoms and Injection-Site Reactions Associated with Peginterferon Beta-1a

    PubMed Central

    Centonze, Diego; Newsome, Scott D.; Huang, DeRen; Robertson, Christopher; You, Xiaojun; Sabatella, Guido; Evilevitch, Vladimir; Leahy, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Flu-like symptoms (FLSs) and injection-site reactions (ISRs) have been reported with interferon beta treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS). We sought to obtain consensus on the characteristics/management of FLSs/ISRs in patients with relapsing-remitting MS based on experiences from the randomized, placebo-controlled ADVANCE study of peginterferon beta-1a. Methods: ADVANCE investigators with a predefined number of enrolled patients were eligible to participate in a consensus-generating exercise using a modified Delphi method. An independent steering committee oversaw the development of two sequential Delphi questionnaires. An average rating (AR) of 2.7 or more was defined as consensus a priori. Results: Thirty and 29 investigators (ie, responders) completed questionnaires 1 and 2, respectively, representing 374 patients from ADVANCE. Responders reported that the incidence/duration of FLSs/ISRs in their typical patient generally declined after 3 months of treatment. Responders reached consensus that FLSs typically last up to 24 hours (AR = 3.17) and have mild/moderate effects on activities of daily living (AR = 3.34). Patients should initiate acetaminophen/nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment on a scheduled basis (AR = 3.31) and change the timing of injection (AR = 3.28) to manage FLSs. Injection-site rotation/cooling and drug administration at room temperature (all AR ≥ 3.10) were recommended for managing ISRs. Patient education on FLSs/ISRs was advocated before treatment initiation. Conclusions: Delphi responders agreed on the management strategies for FLSs/ISRs and agreed that patient education is critical to set treatment expectations and promote adherence. PMID:27551246

  11. Immunogenicity of Recombinant Human Interferon Beta-1b in Immune-Tolerant Transgenic Mice Corresponds with the Biophysical Characteristics of Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Abdolvahab, Mohadeseh Haji; Fazeli, Ahmad; Halim, Andhyk; Sediq, Ahmad S; Fazeli, Mohammad Reza; Schellekens, Huub

    2016-04-01

    Determining to what extent biophysical characteristics of aggregates affect immunogenicity of therapeutic interferon beta-1b. Three recombinant human interferon beta-1b (rhIFNβ-1b) samples with different levels of aggregates generated by copper oxidation, thermal stress, or left untreated, as well as Avonex(®) drug substance and Betaferon(®) drug product, were injected intraperitoneally in nontransgenic and interferon beta transgenic FVB/N mice 5 times per week for 3 weeks. Antibodies against interferon beta were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. UV and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, size exclusion chromatography, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), fluid imaging microscopy, and resonant mass measurement, as well as sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting, were used to characterize and quantitate aggregates in the 3 rhIFNβ preparations, to correlate biophysical characteristics with immunogenicity. In immune-tolerant interferon beta transgenic FVB/N mice, Betaferon drug product showed the highest immunogenicity, while Avonex drug substance showed the lowest level of immunogenicity. Of the 3 forms of rhIFNβ-1b, copper-oxidized rhIFNβ-1b showed lower immunogenicity than thermally stressed rhIFNβ-1b, despite containing larger aggregates. Both copper-oxidized rhIFNβ-1b and thermally stressed rhIFNβ-1b exhibited changes in protein structure as shown using fluorescence spectroscopy and RP-HPLC. Nontransgenic, nonimmune-tolerant FVB/N mice generated high antibody titers against all interferon beta samples tested. The level of immunogenicity and the breaking of tolerance in FVB/N transgenic mice are not only related to the level of aggregation but also depend on the size and structure of the aggregates. PMID:26835734

  12. [Use of interferon-β in the treatment of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Ochi, Hirofumi

    2014-11-01

    Interferon-β (IFNβ) products are widely used as first-line treatment for multiple sclerosis and have well-established benefit-risk profiles over the short- and long-term. Commercially available agents in Japan include subcutaneous IFNβ-1β (Betaferon) and intramuscular IFNβ-1a(Avonex). Although these IFNβ products differ in dosage, frequency of administration and rout of delivery, both reduce relapse rate by about 30% and new lesion activity by about 65%. In addition, IFNβ products were shown to reduce the disability progression. However, clinical studies have also demonstrated that a subset of patients respond poorly to IFNβ treatment. Thus, it is an important strategy to identify the patients who have suboptimal treatment responses early, before disability ensures, as measured by combination of clinical data and MRI measures of disease activity. PMID:25518385

  13. Transient laminin beta 1a Induction Defines the Wound Epidermis during Zebrafish Fin Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen-Hui; Merriman, Alexander F.; Savage, Jeremiah; Willer, Jason; Wahlig, Taylor; Katsanis, Nicholas; Yin, Viravuth P.; Poss, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    The first critical stage in salamander or teleost appendage regeneration is creation of a specialized epidermis that instructs growth from underlying stump tissue. Here, we performed a forward genetic screen for mutations that impair this process in amputated zebrafish fins. Positional cloning and complementation assays identified a temperature-sensitive allele of the ECM component laminin beta 1a (lamb1a) that blocks fin regeneration. lamb1a, but not its paralog lamb1b, is sharply induced in a subset of epithelial cells after fin amputation, where it is required to establish and maintain a polarized basal epithelial cell layer. These events facilitate expression of the morphogenetic factors shha and lef1, basolateral positioning of phosphorylated Igf1r, patterning of new osteoblasts, and regeneration of bone. By contrast, lamb1a function is dispensable for juvenile body growth, homeostatic adult tissue maintenance, repair of split fins, or renewal of genetically ablated osteoblasts. fgf20a mutations or transgenic Fgf receptor inhibition disrupt lamb1a expression, linking a central growth factor to epithelial maturation during regeneration. Our findings reveal transient induction of lamb1a in epithelial cells as a key, growth factor-guided step in formation of a signaling-competent regeneration epidermis. PMID:26305099

  14. Transient laminin beta 1a Induction Defines the Wound Epidermis during Zebrafish Fin Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Hui; Merriman, Alexander F; Savage, Jeremiah; Willer, Jason; Wahlig, Taylor; Katsanis, Nicholas; Yin, Viravuth P; Poss, Kenneth D

    2015-08-01

    The first critical stage in salamander or teleost appendage regeneration is creation of a specialized epidermis that instructs growth from underlying stump tissue. Here, we performed a forward genetic screen for mutations that impair this process in amputated zebrafish fins. Positional cloning and complementation assays identified a temperature-sensitive allele of the ECM component laminin beta 1a (lamb1a) that blocks fin regeneration. lamb1a, but not its paralog lamb1b, is sharply induced in a subset of epithelial cells after fin amputation, where it is required to establish and maintain a polarized basal epithelial cell layer. These events facilitate expression of the morphogenetic factors shha and lef1, basolateral positioning of phosphorylated Igf1r, patterning of new osteoblasts, and regeneration of bone. By contrast, lamb1a function is dispensable for juvenile body growth, homeostatic adult tissue maintenance, repair of split fins, or renewal of genetically ablated osteoblasts. fgf20a mutations or transgenic Fgf receptor inhibition disrupt lamb1a expression, linking a central growth factor to epithelial maturation during regeneration. Our findings reveal transient induction of lamb1a in epithelial cells as a key, growth factor-guided step in formation of a signaling-competent regeneration epidermis. PMID:26305099

  15. Interferons and autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Olivier

    2009-10-01

    Interferons are ubiquitous cytokines produced by all mononuclear cell types in response to infection by a DNA or RNA virus. There are three major classes of interferons: type I or nonimmune interferons consist chiefly of interferons alpha produced by leukocytes and of interferon beta produced by fibroblasts, although there are several other less important variants; type II or immune interferon is interferon gamma, which is mainly produced by NK cells and T cells; and type III consists of the lambda interferons. Each type is characterized by a specific receptor and signal transduction pathway. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on the cell membrane and endosomes recognize viruses and other microorganisms. Binding of DNA or RNA to endosomal TLRs generates a signal whose transduction pathways lead to molecules capable of binding to genes for various interferons, interleukin-1, and TNFalpha. Interferons can stimulate or inhibit up to 300 different genes encoding proteins involved in antiviral defense mechanisms, inflammation, adaptive immunity, angiogenesis, and other processes. The properties of interferons are used to treat a number of viral infections (e.g., hepatitis B and hepatitis C), inflammatory diseases (interferon beta for multiple sclerosis and interferon gamma for systemic sclerosis), and malignancies. Overactivation of the interferon pathways has been demonstrated in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The result is a characteristic pattern of mRNA expression known as the interferon signature. Interferon overactivation is related to inadequate clearance of apoptotic particles with accumulation of apoptosis products (DNA-CpG motifs and U-RNA). Similar abnormalities have been found in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome, systemic sclerosis, and polymyositis, as well as in some cases of rheumatoid arthritis. Immunomodulation strategies designed to decrease interferon overactivity are being evaluated in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID

  16. Interferon Alfacon-1 Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Interferon alfacon-1 is no longer available in the United States. If you are currently taking this medication, you should call ... another treatment.Your doctor has ordered interferon alfacon-1 to help treat your hepatitis C infection. The ...

  17. Interferon: A Changing Picture

    PubMed Central

    Larke, R. P. Bryce

    1966-01-01

    Concepts regarding the nature and function of interferon have undergone considerable modification since its initial description in 1957. A low-molecular-weight protein, interferon has been produced by a variety of host cells following exposure not only to most viruses but also to bacterial cells and endotoxins, rickettsiae, nucleotides and a polyanionic polysaccharide (Statolon). Interferon production and activity require de novo synthesis of cellular RNA and protein, although interferon induced in vivo by endotoxins appears to involve release from a preformed state. The pathogenesis of primary viral infections may be determined largely by non-immune defence mechanisms. Interferon, detectable in the host's serum and associated with leukocytes during the course of viral illness, may make an important contribution to recovery. Low toxicity, weak antigenicity and wide range of antiviral activity make interferon an attractive therapeutic possibility. Stimulation of inherent interferon-producing mechanisms by administration of relatively innocuous agents may prove beneficial in humans. PMID:5322363

  18. Atorvastatin combined to interferon to verify the efficacy (ACTIVE) in relapsing-remitting active multiple sclerosis patients: a longitudinal controlled trial of combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Lanzillo, Roberta; Orefice, Giuseppe; Quarantelli, Mario; Rinaldi, Carlo; Prinster, Anna; Ventrella, Gianluca; Spitaleri, Daniele; Lus, Giacomo; Vacca, Giovanni; Carotenuto, Barbara; Salvatore, Elena; Brunetti, Arturo; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Brescia Morra, Vincenzo

    2010-04-01

    A large body of evidence suggests that, besides their cholesterol-lowering effect, statins exert anti-inflammatory action. Consequently, statins may have therapeutic potential in immune-mediated disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Our objectives were to determine safety, tolerability and efficacy of low-dose atorvastatin plus high-dose interferon beta-1a in multiple sclerosis patients responding poorly to interferon beta-1a alone. Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients, aged 18-50 years, with contrast-enhanced lesions or relapses while on therapy with interferon beta-1a 44 microg (three times weekly) for 12 months, were randomized to combination therapy (interferon + atorvastatin 20 mg per day; group A) or interferon alone (group B) for 24 months. Patients underwent blood analysis and clinical assessment with the Expanded Disability Status Scale every 3 months, and brain gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at screening, and 12 and 24 months thereafter. Primary outcome measure was contrast-enhanced lesion number. Secondary outcome measures were number of relapses, EDSS variation and safety laboratory data. Forty-five patients were randomized to group A (n = 21) or B (n = 24). At 24 months, group A had significantly fewer contrast-enhanced lesions versus baseline (p = 0.007) and significantly fewer relapses versus the two pre-randomization years (p < 0.001). At survival analysis, the risk for a 1-point EDSS increase was slightly higher in group B than in group A (p = 0.053). Low-dose atorvastatin may be beneficial, as add-on therapy, in poor responders to high-dose interferon beta-1a alone. PMID:20150398

  19. Rabies vaccines and interferon

    PubMed Central

    Turner, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Samples of Fermi, Semple, modified Semple, Duck embryo and tissue culture rabies vaccine were inoculated by different routes and in different doses into rabbits, mice and hamsters. The vaccines induced neither detectable interferon nor immediate protection against lethal challenge with CVS rabies virus. Under similar conditions, high but transient levels of interferon were induced in control animals of the same species with the polynucleotide complex Poly I.C. Hamsters but not mice were protected by Poly I.C.-induced interferon. No autointerference by vaccine with challenge virus was established. Vaccine-induced protection in mice was directly related to immune response. PMID:4506993

  20. Cytokine changes during interferon-beta therapy in multiple sclerosis: correlations with interferon dose and MRI response.

    PubMed

    Graber, Jerome J; Ford, David; Zhan, Min; Francis, Gordon; Panitch, Hillel; Dhib-Jalbut, Suhayl

    2007-04-01

    We investigated serum (IL-10 and IL-12p70) and cellular cytokine levels (IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IFN-gamma) in stimulated PBMC over 24 weeks in 15 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) patients randomized to receive once-weekly (qw) IFN-beta-1a 30 microg intramuscularly (IM) (n=8) or three-times-weekly (tiw) IFN-beta-1a 44 microg subcutaneously (SC) (n=7). Overall, IFN-beta treatment increased cellular IL-10 (p<0.01) levels and the ratios of cellular IL-10/IL-12p40 (p<0.01) and IL-10/IL-12p70 (p<0.02) while cellular IFN-gamma levels were reduced (p<0.01). Serum IL-10 levels were decreased in non-responders to therapy based on MRI-defined criteria (p<0.01) but did not change in responders over the course of treatment. In addition, non-responders demonstrated a decrease in serum IL-10/IL-12p70 ratio (p=0.031) and a decrease in cellular IL-12p70 (p<0.02). A decrease in cellular IFN-gamma was observed in responders (p=0.013). This is the first study that compares cytokine changes between the two IFN-beta regimes and demonstrates that serum IL-10 levels decrease in those patients who continue to have active MRI lesions while on interferon-beta therapy. PMID:17328965

  1. Interferon Gamma-1b Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Interferon gamma-1b injection is used to reduce the frequency and severity of serious infections in people ... with severe, malignant osteopetrosis (an inherited bone disease). Interferon gamma-1b is in a class of medications ...

  2. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses of annualized relapse rate over 2 years in the ADVANCE trial of peginterferon beta-1a in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Scott D; Kieseier, Bernd C; Arnold, Douglas L; Shang, Shulian; Liu, Shifang; Hung, Serena; Sabatella, Guido

    2016-09-01

    ADVANCE was a 2-year, double-blind, placebo-controlled, Phase 3 study in 1512 patients aged 18-65 years with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, which demonstrated that peginterferon beta-1a 125 mcg administered subcutaneously every 2 or 4 weeks led to significant reductions in annualized relapse rate (ARR) compared with placebo. This analysis examined ARR over 2 years in ADVANCE across subgroups. Patients were treated with peginterferon beta-1a every 2 weeks or every 4 weeks, or placebo during Year 1. Thereafter, patients on placebo were re-randomized to peginterferon beta-1a every 2 weeks or every 4 weeks (delayed treatment). Subgroup analyses were conducted by demographics and baseline disease characteristics. The following results compared ARR in these subgroups for patients in continuous 2-week treatment versus continuous 4-week treatment. ARR was similar in most demographic and baseline disease characteristic subgroups evaluated within the peginterferon beta-1a every-2-week arm or every-4-week arm over 2 years. Although for both doses some differences in the point estimates for ARR were noted among the subgroups, considerable overlap in the confidence intervals suggested that the efficacy of peginterferon beta-1a is similar in all patients irrespective of gender, age, body weight, geographical region, and disease activity at initiation of treatment. Within each peginterferon beta-1a dosing group, ARR was generally similar across most subgroups. PMID:27314959

  3. Contradictory results in interferon research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Several reports on immunologically related interferon research, both in the areas of basic science and clinical research, are briefly reviewed, and it is noted that in many cases the results obtained are contradictory. It is argued, however, that the contradictory results are not surprising since interferon is a biological response modifier and has been known to produce opposite results even when the same interferon prepartion is used. It is emphasized that dosage, timing, route, and other experimental conditions are essential factors in planning immunological studies with interferon. Careful planning of future experiments with interferon should be required to prevent the possible generation of effects that are opposite to those expected.

  4. [Immunomodulating properties of interferon inducers].

    PubMed

    Ershov, F I; Tazulakhova, E B

    1989-04-01

    Data on the immunomodulating activity of interferon inductors are presented. It was revealed that the inductors increased the animal vaccinal response. Schemes for combined use of the interferon inductors and immunomodulators were developed. The immunomodulators were shown to increase the host interferon response evident from synergistic increasing of the interferon titers or prolongation of interferon circulation in blood of the animals. The efficiency of the schemes for combined use of the interferon inductors and immunomodulators was obvious from stimulation of the antibody production. As a result the time of the antibody circulation in blood increased. The effect of the combined use of the immunomodulators and interferon inductors was studied. The combined use of the preparations significantly increased the average life-span of the animals and the rate of their survival. PMID:2546512

  5. Interferons and Interferon Regulatory Factors in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Claser, Carla; Tan, Kevin Shyong Wei; Rénia, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most serious infectious diseases in humans and responsible for approximately 500 million clinical cases and 500 thousand deaths annually. Acquired adaptive immune responses control parasite replication and infection-induced pathologies. Most infections are clinically silent which reflects on the ability of adaptive immune mechanisms to prevent the disease. However, a minority of these can become severe and life-threatening, manifesting a range of overlapping syndromes of complex origins which could be induced by uncontrolled immune responses. Major players of the innate and adaptive responses are interferons. Here, we review their roles and the signaling pathways involved in their production and protection against infection and induced immunopathologies. PMID:25157202

  6. Unique side effects of interferon.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Hina; Qadeer, Rashid; Kashif, Syed Mohammad; Rehan, Muhammad; Afsar, Salahuddin

    2015-08-01

    Interferon-alpha, a potent mediator of host immune response, has immunomodulatory properties in addition to its antiviral effects. A wide spectrum of autoimmune diseases can occur in patients treated with interferon-alpha for chronic hepatitis B and D, of which clinical systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) accounts for less than 1% and hypothyroidism for 2-4 %. We report herein a case of a 16-year-old male who developed antinuclear antibody (ANA)-negative SLE and hypothyroidism after treatment with interferon-alpha for chronic hepatitis. High index of suspicion is therefore necessary in all patients treated with interferon for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26228341

  7. High Resolution CZE-MS Quantitative Characterization of Intact Biopharmaceutical Proteins: Proteoforms of Interferon-β1.

    PubMed

    Bush, David R; Zang, Li; Belov, Arseniy M; Ivanov, Alexander R; Karger, Barry L

    2016-01-19

    New and improved methods are required for the enhanced characterization of complex biopharmaceuticals, especially those with charge and glycan heterogeneity. High resolution separation and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of intact proteoforms can contribute significantly to the characterization of such proteins, many of which are glycoproteins. Here, we report on capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) coupled via a commercial CESI sheathless interface to an Orbitrap ELITE MS for the intact analysis of recombinant human interferon-β1 (Avonex, rhIFN-β1), a biopharmaceutical with complex glycosylation at a single N-linked site. Using a cross-linked polyethylenimine coating, column efficiencies between 350,000 and 450,000 plates were produced, allowing separation based on charge and subtle hydrodynamic volume differences. A total of 138 proteoforms were found, and 55 were quantitated. Charge species due to deamidation and sialylation were separated by CZE. Given the high column efficiency, isobaric positional isomers of a single sialic acid on biantennary glycan antennae were resolved. Further, triantennary isomers (antenna on α(1-3) or α(1-6) arms) were separated and confirmed by exoglycosidase digestion. Proteoforms of the N-terminal cleavage of methionine were detected by precursor molecular weight and top-down ETD and HCD analysis of the reduced protein. Quantitative analysis suggested potential correlations between the methionine loss with the relative amount of the deamidation, as well as the level of deamidation with glycan structure. We demonstrate that high resolution CZE separation of intact glycoprotein species coupled to MS has significant potential for the in-depth characterization and quantitative analysis of biopharmaceutical proteoforms. PMID:26641950

  8. Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 and TLR9 agonists enhance interferon (IFN) beta-1a's immunoregulatory effects on B cells in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS).

    PubMed

    Tao, Yazhong; Zhang, Xin; Markovic-Plese, Silva

    2016-09-15

    We report that B cells from patients with RRMS have decreased endogenous IFN-β secretion and deficient IFN receptor (IFNAR)1/2 and TLR7 gene expression in comparison to healthy controls (HCs), which may contribute to disregulation of cytokine secretion by B cells. We propose that TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation with loxorubin (LOX) and CpG, in combination with exogenous IFN-β may effectively reconstitute endogenous IFN-β production deficit and induce the secretion of immunoregulatory cytokines by B cells. Both LOX/IFN-β and CpG/IFN-β in-vitro treatments of B cells from RRMS patients induced higher endogenous IFN-β gene expression in comparison to the exogenous IFN-β alone. CpG/IFN-β combination induced higher secretion of IL-10, TGF-β, and IL-27 in comparison to stimulation with IFN-β. Our study provides a basis for future clinical studies employing IFN-β and TLR7/9 agonists, which may enhance the resolution of the inflammatory response in RRMS. PMID:27609294

  9. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of recombinant human interferon-beta in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Salmon, P; Le Cotonnec, J Y; Galazka, A; Abdul-Ahad, A; Darragh, A

    1996-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of recombinant human interferon-beta (rHuIFN-beta 1a) were assessed following administration to 12 healthy male volunteers. Each subject received, in a double-blind, balanced, random-order, crossover sequence, single doses of 6 MIU of rHuIFN-beta 1a (Rebif) i.v., i.m., and s.c. or matching placebo on four occasions separated by washout periods of 1 week. Blood samples were collected at preset times for the measurement of serum IFN-beta levels and of intracellular 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase levels. Blood pressure, sitting heart rate, respiratory rate, oral body temperature, and tolerance were monitored regularly. All administrations of rHuIFN-beta 1a were well tolerated, although about half of the subjects had a flu-like syndrome, as expected. After i.v. bolus injection, the pharmacokinetics of rHuIFN-beta 1a were well described by a classic two-compartment model. Mean total clearance of rHuIFN-beta 1a was about 100 L.h-1. The distribution half-life was 5 min, and the terminal half-life was approximately 5 h. After i.m. or s.c. injection, serum IFN-beta profiles were rather flat, and about one sixth of the administered dose was available systemically. Extent and duration of clinical and biologic effects were independent of the route of administration and of the IFN-beta serum levels. Biologic pharmacodynamic effects persisted even when IFN-beta serum levels had returned to baseline and were still significantly elevated 3 days after a single dose. Because of the independence of the extent and duration of clinical and biologic pharmacodynamic effects from the route of administration and from the IFN-beta serum levels, the s.c route of administration is preferred in indications in which primarily an immunomodulatory action is sought. Predominantly antiviral and antiproliferative activity is enhanced by the i.v. route to provide adequate drug levels at the site of pathology, although its application is limited on practical

  10. Interferon Gamma in Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Kima, Peter E.; Soong, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a complex disease that is caused by parasites of the Leishmania genus. Leishmania are further classified into several complexes, each of which can engage in distinct interactions with mammalian hosts resulting in differing disease presentations. It is therefore not unexpected that host immune responses to Leishmania are variable. The induction of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and response to it in these infections has received considerable attention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of some of the host responses during Leishmania infections that are regulated by IFN-γ. In addition, studies that explore the nature of parasite-derived molecular mediators that might affect the host response to IFN-γ are also discussed. PMID:23801993

  11. Interferon Beta-1b Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... interferon beta-1b injection at around the same time of day each time you inject it. Follow ...

  12. Antibacterial activity of recombinant murine beta interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Fujiki, T; Tanaka, A

    1988-01-01

    Recombinant murine beta interferon was protective and therapeutic for mice against Listeria monocytogenes infection in vivo. The recombinant murine beta interferon caused enhanced H2O2 release by macrophages in vivo, but not in vitro. PMID:3343048

  13. Long-Term Adherence to IFN Beta-1a Treatment when Using RebiSmart® Device in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, O.; Arroyo, R.; Martínez-Yélamos, S.; Marco, M.; Merino, J. A. García; Muñoz, D.; Merino, E.; Roque, A.

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of disease-modifying drugs in the treatment of multiple sclerosis is associated with adherence. RebiSmart® electronic device provides useful information about adherence to the treatment with subcutaneous (sc) interferon (IFN) β-1a (Rebif®). The aim of the study was to determine long-term adherence to this treatment in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). This retrospective multicentre observational study analysed 258 patients with RRMS who were receiving sc IFN β-1a (Rebif®) treatment by using RebiSmart® until replacement (36 months maximum lifetime) or treatment discontinuation. Adherence was calculated with data (injection dosage, time, and date) automatically recorded by RebiSmart®. Patients in the study had a mean age of 41 years with a female proportion of 68%. Mean EDSS score at start of treatment was 1.8 (95% CI, 1.6–1.9). Overall adherence was 92.6% (95% CI, 90.6–94.5%). A total of 30.2% of patients achieved an adherence rate of 100%, 80.6% at least 90%, and only 13.2% of patients showed a suboptimal adherence (<80%). A total of 59.9% of subjects were relapse-free after treatment initiation. Among 106 subjects (41.1%) who experienced, on average, 1.4 relapses, the majority were mild (40.6%) or moderate (47.2%). Having experienced relapses from the beginning of the treatment was the only variable significantly related to achieving an adherence of at least 80% (OR = 3.06, 1.28–7.31). Results of this study indicate that sc IFN β-1a administration facilitated by RebiSmart® could lead to high rates of adherence to a prescribed dose regimen over 36 months. PMID:27526201

  14. Long-Term Adherence to IFN Beta-1a Treatment when Using RebiSmart® Device in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fernández, O; Arroyo, R; Martínez-Yélamos, S; Marco, M; Merino, J A García; Muñoz, D; Merino, E; Roque, A

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of disease-modifying drugs in the treatment of multiple sclerosis is associated with adherence. RebiSmart® electronic device provides useful information about adherence to the treatment with subcutaneous (sc) interferon (IFN) β-1a (Rebif®). The aim of the study was to determine long-term adherence to this treatment in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). This retrospective multicentre observational study analysed 258 patients with RRMS who were receiving sc IFN β-1a (Rebif®) treatment by using RebiSmart® until replacement (36 months maximum lifetime) or treatment discontinuation. Adherence was calculated with data (injection dosage, time, and date) automatically recorded by RebiSmart®. Patients in the study had a mean age of 41 years with a female proportion of 68%. Mean EDSS score at start of treatment was 1.8 (95% CI, 1.6-1.9). Overall adherence was 92.6% (95% CI, 90.6-94.5%). A total of 30.2% of patients achieved an adherence rate of 100%, 80.6% at least 90%, and only 13.2% of patients showed a suboptimal adherence (<80%). A total of 59.9% of subjects were relapse-free after treatment initiation. Among 106 subjects (41.1%) who experienced, on average, 1.4 relapses, the majority were mild (40.6%) or moderate (47.2%). Having experienced relapses from the beginning of the treatment was the only variable significantly related to achieving an adherence of at least 80% (OR = 3.06, 1.28-7.31). Results of this study indicate that sc IFN β-1a administration facilitated by RebiSmart® could lead to high rates of adherence to a prescribed dose regimen over 36 months. PMID:27526201

  15. A comprehensive cost-effectiveness analysis of treatments for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Newton, Ashley N; Stica, Christina M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the cost-effectiveness of four disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) used to treat multiple sclerosis (MS): glatiramer acetate (GA; Copaxone), interferon beta-1a (IFNβ-1a) intramuscular (IM) injection (Avonex), IFNβ-1a subcutaneous (SC) injection (Rebif), and interferon beta-1b (IFNβ-1b) SC injection (Betaseron). Cost-effectiveness analyses are useful in countering the financial uncertainties and treatment efficacy concerns faced by people with MS. We conducted simulation analyses of the principal findings of a 2009 study by Goldberg et al. (Goldberg LD, Edwards NC, Fincher C, et al: Comparing the cost-effectiveness of disease-modifying drugs for the first-line treatment of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. J Manag Care Pharm. 2009;15:543-555) to frame the researchers' findings from the perspectives of cost-conscious and cost-neutral MS patients. We found that for the cost-conscious consumer, the ranking of most (1) to least (4) preferred DMDs was 1) IFNβ -1a IM (Avonex), 2) GA (Copaxone), 3) IFNβ-1a SC (Rebif), and 4) IFNβ-1b SC (Beta-seron). For the cost-neutral consumer who places priority on effectiveness over costs, the ranking was 1) IFNβ-1a SC (Rebif), 2) IFNβ-1b SC (Betaseron), 3) GA (Copaxone), and 4) IFNβ-1a IM (Avonex). Future studies could examine cost-effectiveness over extended periods of time (eg, 15-20 years) and more closely examine the cost-effectiveness of natalizumab (Tysabri) relative to the four primary DMDs. PMID:24453716

  16. Ticks Take Cues from Mammalian Interferon.

    PubMed

    de Silva, Aravinda M

    2016-07-13

    Interferons are considered a first line of immune defense restricted to vertebrates. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Smith et al. (2016) demonstrate that mammalian interferon γ activates an antimicrobial response within ticks feeding on blood. The study suggests that arthropods have a parallel interferon-like defense system. PMID:27414493

  17. Effects of interferon on antibody formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of the effects of interferon on primary and secondary antibody responses and of the relationship of interferon to other cytokines, or cell products, are presented. Dosage- and timing-dependent immunoenhancing and immunosuppressive activities of interferon are documented for mouse spleen cell cultures and for mice infected with murine hepatitis virus (MHV-3). A possibility that altered interferon production might lead to immunopathological disorders, such as lupus erythematosus, AIDS, arthritis, etc., is discussed. Latest technological developments are presented that indicate that interferon does apparently play a major role in the regulation of antibody responses.

  18. No Love Lost Between Viruses and Interferons.

    PubMed

    Fensterl, Volker; Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Sen, Ganes C

    2015-11-01

    The interferon system protects mammals against virus infections. There are several types of interferons, which are characterized by their ability to inhibit virus replication and resultant pathogenesis by triggering both innate and cell-mediated immune responses. Virus infection is sensed by a variety of cellular pattern-recognition receptors and triggers the synthesis of interferons, which are secreted by the infected cells. In uninfected cells, cell surface receptors recognize the secreted interferons and activate intracellular signaling pathways that induce the expression of interferon-stimulated genes; the proteins encoded by these genes inhibit different stages of virus replication. To avoid extinction, almost all viruses have evolved mechanisms to defend themselves against the interferon system. Consequently, a dynamic equilibrium of survival is established between the virus and its host, an equilibrium that can be shifted to the host's favor by the use of exogenous interferon as a therapeutic antiviral agent. PMID:26958928

  19. Results of space experiment program "interferon"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tálas, Margarita; Bátkai, László; Stöger, Ivana; Nagy, Károly; Hiros, László; Konstantinova, Irina; Rykova, Marina; Mozgovaya, Irina; Guseva, Olga; Kozharinov, Valerii

    The results of the biological space experiment "Interferon" performed by two international cosmonaut teams (26 May 1980, and 16 May 1981) aboard space laboratory Solyut-6 are reported: (1) Human lymphocytes separated from blood of healthy donors and placed into "Interferon I" equipment could be kept for 7 days in suspension culture under spaceflight conditons. Interferon production could be induced in human lymphocytes by preparations of different origin: virus, synthetic polyribonucleotides, bacterial protein and plant pigment. An increased lymphocyte interferon production in space laboratory compared to ground control was observed. (2) Human interferon preparations and interferon inducers placed in space laboratory at room temperature for 7 days maintained their biological activity. (3) A decrease of induced interferon production and natural killer activity of lymphocytes isolated from peripheral blood of cosmonauts was observed on the 1st day on Earth after 7-days spaceflight.

  20. Animal Models of Interferon Signature Positive Lupus.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Haoyang; Szeto, Christopher; Han, Shuhong; Yang, Lijun; Reeves, Westley H

    2015-01-01

    Human lupus is strongly associated with a gene expression signature characterized by over-expression of Type I interferon-regulated genes. A strong interferon signature generally is not seen in the standard mouse models of lupus, despite considerable evidence for the involvement of toll-like receptor-driven interferon production. In contrast, pristane-induced lupus exhibits a prominent TLR7-dependent interferon signature. Importantly, genetic disorders with dysregulated interferon production in both human beings and mice cause severe autoinflammatory diseases but not the typical manifestations of lupus, suggesting that interferon over-production is insufficient to cause systemic lupus erythematosus itself. Single-gene models in mice suggest that lupus-like disease may result from abnormalities in B-cell activation and the clearance of dead cells. Pristane may mimic human systemic lupus erythematosus by causing synergistic abnormalities in interferon production along with defective clearance of apoptotic cells and over-active B-cell signaling. PMID:26097482

  1. Animal Models of Interferon Signature Positive Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Haoyang; Szeto, Christopher; Han, Shuhong; Yang, Lijun; Reeves, Westley H.

    2015-01-01

    Human lupus is strongly associated with a gene expression signature characterized by over-expression of Type I interferon-regulated genes. A strong interferon signature generally is not seen in the standard mouse models of lupus, despite considerable evidence for the involvement of toll-like receptor-driven interferon production. In contrast, pristane-induced lupus exhibits a prominent TLR7-dependent interferon signature. Importantly, genetic disorders with dysregulated interferon production in both human beings and mice cause severe autoinflammatory diseases but not the typical manifestations of lupus, suggesting that interferon over-production is insufficient to cause systemic lupus erythematosus itself. Single-gene models in mice suggest that lupus-like disease may result from abnormalities in B-cell activation and the clearance of dead cells. Pristane may mimic human systemic lupus erythematosus by causing synergistic abnormalities in interferon production along with defective clearance of apoptotic cells and over-active B-cell signaling. PMID:26097482

  2. Randomized Study Combining Interferon & Glatiramer Acetate in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lublin, Fred D.; Cofield, Stacey S.; Cutter, Gary R.; Conwit, Robin; Narayana, Ponnada A.; Nelson, Flavia; Salter, Amber R.; Gustafson, Tarah; Wolinsky, Jerry S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective A double-blind, randomized, controlled study to determine if combined use of interferon beta-1a (IFN) 30ug IM weekly and glatiramer acetate (GA) 20mg daily is more efficacious than either agent alone in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods 1008 participants were randomized and followed until the last participant enrolled completed 3 yrs. The primary endpoint was reduction in annualized relapse rate utilizing a strict definition of relapse. Secondary outcomes included time to confirmed disability, Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC) score and MRI metrics. Results Combination IFN + GA was not superior to the better of the single agents (GA) in risk of relapse. Both the combination therapy and GA were significantly better than IFN in reducing the risk of relapse. The Combination was not better than either agent alone in lessening confirmed EDSS progression or change in MSFC over 36 months. The combination was superior to either agent alone in reducing new lesion activity and accumulation of total lesion volumes. In a post hoc analysis, combination therapy resulted in a higher proportion of participants attaining disease activity free status (DAFS) compared to either single arm; driven by the MRI results. Interpretation Combining the two most commonly prescribed therapies for MS did not produce a significant clinical benefit over three years. An effect was seen on some MRI metrics. In a test of comparative efficacy, GA was superior to IFN in reducing the risk of exacerbation. The extension phase for CombiRx will address if the observed differences in MRI and DAFS findings predict later clinical differences. PMID:23424159

  3. Human Papillomaviruses and the Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Beglin, Melanie; Melar-New, Marta

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are small DNA viruses that target stratified keratinocytes for infection. A subset of HPV types infect epithelia in the genital tract and are the causative agents of cervical as well as other anogenital cancers. Interferon treatment of existing genital HPV lesions has had mixed results. While HPV proteins down-regulate the expression of interferon-inducible genes, interferon treatment ultimately induces their high-level transcription after a delay. Cells containing complete HPV genomes that are able to undergo productive replication upon differentiation are sensitive to interferon-induced growth arrest, while cells from high-grade cancers that only express E6 and E7 are resistant. Recent studies indicate this sensitivity is dependent upon the binding of the interferon-inducible factor, p56, to the E1 replication protein. The response to interferon by HPV proteins is complex and results from the action of multiple viral proteins. PMID:19715460

  4. Silicate minerals and the interferon system

    SciTech Connect

    Hahon, N.; Booth, J.A.

    1987-08-01

    Natural-occurring minerals representative of six silicate classes were examined for their influence on interferon induction by influenza virus in Rhesus monkey kidney (LLC-MK/sub 2/) cell monolayers. Minerals within the classes nesosilicate, sorosilicate, cyclosilicate, and inosilicate exhibited either little or marked (50% or greater) inhibition of interferon induction. Within the inosilicate class, however, minerals of the pyroxenoid group (wollastonite, pectolite, and rhodonite) all significantly showed a two- to threefold increase in interferon production. Silicate materials in the phyllosilicate and tectosilicate classes all showed inhibitory activity for the induction process. When silicate minerals were coated with the polymer poly(4-vinylpyridine-N-oxide), the inhibitory activity of silicates on viral interferon induction was counteracted. Of nine randomly selected silicate minerals, which inhibited viral interferon induction, none adversely affected the ability of exogenous interferon to confer antiviral cellular resistance. Increased levels of influenza virus multiplication concomitant with decreased levels of interferon occurred in cell monolayers pretreated with silicates. The findings of this study demonstrate the diverse effects of minerals representative of different silicate classes on the interferon system and indicate that certain silicates in comprising the viral interferon induction process may increase susceptibility to viral infection.

  5. Inactivation of human interferon by body fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cesario, T. C.; Mandell, A.; Tilles, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the effects of human feces, bile, saliva, serum, and cerebrospinal fluid on interferon activity. It is shown that crude interferon is inactivated by at least 50% more than with the control medium used, when incubated for 4 hr in vitro in the presence of serum, saliva, or cerebrospinal liquid, and by close to 100% when incubated with stool extract or bile.

  6. MS Disease-Modifying Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contents Injectable treatments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral treatments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Intravenous infusion treatments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Managing side effects of disease- modifying ... or subcutaneous), oral and intravenous (into the vein) infusion. INJECTABLE TREATMENTS Treatment (chemical name) Manufacturer Avonex ® (interferon ...

  7. Interferon-γ Inhibits Ebola Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rhein, Bethany A.; Powers, Linda S.; Rogers, Kai; Anantpadma, Manu; Singh, Brajesh K.; Sakurai, Yasuteru; Bair, Thomas; Miller-Hunt, Catherine; Sinn, Patrick; Davey, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus outbreaks, such as the 2014 Makona epidemic in West Africa, are episodic and deadly. Filovirus antivirals are currently not clinically available. Our findings suggest interferon gamma, an FDA-approved drug, may serve as a novel and effective prophylactic or treatment option. Using mouse-adapted Ebola virus, we found that murine interferon gamma administered 24 hours before or after infection robustly protects lethally-challenged mice and reduces morbidity and serum viral titers. Furthermore, we demonstrated that interferon gamma profoundly inhibits Ebola virus infection of macrophages, an early cellular target of infection. As early as six hours following in vitro infection, Ebola virus RNA levels in interferon gamma-treated macrophages were lower than in infected, untreated cells. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, to interferon gamma-treated macrophages did not further reduce viral RNA levels, suggesting that interferon gamma blocks life cycle events that require protein synthesis such as virus replication. Microarray studies with interferon gamma-treated human macrophages identified more than 160 interferon-stimulated genes. Ectopic expression of a select group of these genes inhibited Ebola virus infection. These studies provide new potential avenues for antiviral targeting as these genes that have not previously appreciated to inhibit negative strand RNA viruses and specifically Ebola virus infection. As treatment of interferon gamma robustly protects mice from lethal Ebola virus infection, we propose that interferon gamma should be further evaluated for its efficacy as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic strategy against filoviruses. Use of this FDA-approved drug could rapidly be deployed during future outbreaks. PMID:26562011

  8. Interferon-γ Inhibits Ebola Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Rhein, Bethany A; Powers, Linda S; Rogers, Kai; Anantpadma, Manu; Singh, Brajesh K; Sakurai, Yasuteru; Bair, Thomas; Miller-Hunt, Catherine; Sinn, Patrick; Davey, Robert A; Monick, Martha M; Maury, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus outbreaks, such as the 2014 Makona epidemic in West Africa, are episodic and deadly. Filovirus antivirals are currently not clinically available. Our findings suggest interferon gamma, an FDA-approved drug, may serve as a novel and effective prophylactic or treatment option. Using mouse-adapted Ebola virus, we found that murine interferon gamma administered 24 hours before or after infection robustly protects lethally-challenged mice and reduces morbidity and serum viral titers. Furthermore, we demonstrated that interferon gamma profoundly inhibits Ebola virus infection of macrophages, an early cellular target of infection. As early as six hours following in vitro infection, Ebola virus RNA levels in interferon gamma-treated macrophages were lower than in infected, untreated cells. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, to interferon gamma-treated macrophages did not further reduce viral RNA levels, suggesting that interferon gamma blocks life cycle events that require protein synthesis such as virus replication. Microarray studies with interferon gamma-treated human macrophages identified more than 160 interferon-stimulated genes. Ectopic expression of a select group of these genes inhibited Ebola virus infection. These studies provide new potential avenues for antiviral targeting as these genes that have not previously appreciated to inhibit negative strand RNA viruses and specifically Ebola virus infection. As treatment of interferon gamma robustly protects mice from lethal Ebola virus infection, we propose that interferon gamma should be further evaluated for its efficacy as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic strategy against filoviruses. Use of this FDA-approved drug could rapidly be deployed during future outbreaks. PMID:26562011

  9. Trisomy 21 consistently activates the interferon response

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelly D; Lewis, Hannah C; Hill, Amanda A; Pandey, Ahwan; Jackson, Leisa P; Cabral, Joseph M; Smith, Keith P; Liggett, L Alexander; Gomez, Eliana B; Galbraith, Matthew D; DeGregori, James; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2016-01-01

    Although it is clear that trisomy 21 causes Down syndrome, the molecular events acting downstream of the trisomy remain ill defined. Using complementary genomics analyses, we identified the interferon pathway as the major signaling cascade consistently activated by trisomy 21 in human cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that trisomy 21 activates the interferon transcriptional response in fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as circulating monocytes and T cells. Trisomy 21 cells show increased induction of interferon-stimulated genes and decreased expression of ribosomal proteins and translation factors. An shRNA screen determined that the interferon-activated kinases JAK1 and TYK2 suppress proliferation of trisomy 21 fibroblasts, and this defect is rescued by pharmacological JAK inhibition. Therefore, we propose that interferon activation, likely via increased gene dosage of the four interferon receptors encoded on chromosome 21, contributes to many of the clinical impacts of trisomy 21, and that interferon antagonists could have therapeutic benefits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16220.001 PMID:27472900

  10. Interferon effects on protozoan infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Wirth, J.; Kierszenbaum, F.; Degee, A. L. W.; Mansfield, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of interferon (IFN) on mice infected with two different parasitic protozoans, Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, are investigated experimentally. The preparation of the cell cultures, IFN and assays, antibody, and the experimental procedures are described. It is observed that in cells treated with IFN-gamma there is an increased association of T. cruzi with murine macrophages and an increase in the killing of T. cruzi by IFN-gamma-treated murine macrophages. For spleen cells infected with T.b. rhodesiense in vitro, it is detected that live trypanosomes cannot induce IFN in cells from normal mice, but can in cells from immunized mice; and that trypanosome-lysates induce IFN in vitro in cells from normal mice. The data suggest that there is a two-step mechanism for mice against T. cruzi and T.b. rhodesiense.

  11. Rat interferons. VI. Heterologous interferon in the treatment of viral infections.

    PubMed

    Lobodzińska, M; Albin, M

    1979-01-01

    In previous studies in vitro we demonstrated the protection of mouse cells against viral infections by rat interferon. In continuation, the present paper reports results of a study designed to confirm this heterospecific activity of rat interferon in vivo. Experiments were carried out with mice of the inbred 129/AoBoy strain, inoculated intranasally or intraperitoneally with EMC-strain Col MM, VSV and influenza A 055/74 viruses, and treated with mouse or rat interferon administered by the same routes as infection. Both interferons exhibited protective action. The therapeutic effect of the mouse and rat interferons was dependent on the infecting dose of the viruses. Rat interferon proved more effective in the treatment of mice infected intraperitoneally than mice infected intranasally. PMID:220932

  12. Treatment of trypanosome-infected mice with exogenous interferon, interferon inducers, or antibody to interferon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degee, Antonie L. W.; Mansfield, John M.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1986-01-01

    Earlier studies have demonstrated that mice resistant to Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (the B10.BR/SgSnJ strain) produces, upon infection by this parasite, two peaks of serum interferon (IFN), while the susceptible mice (C3HeB/FeJ) produces no IFN. In the present study, survival times were compared for B10.BR/SgSnJ, C3HeB/FeJ, and CBA/J (an intermediately resistant strain) mice that were injected, prior to infection with the parasite, with either of the following three preparations (1) IFN-gamma, (2) an antibody to IFN-gamma and (3) polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (to induce IFN-alpha/beta). No effect on the survival times of mice by any of these preparations could be demonstrated, contrary to some previous reports.

  13. An Albumin-Free Formulation for Escherichia coli-Derived Interferon Beta-1b with Decreased Immunogenicity in Immune Tolerant Mice.

    PubMed

    Abdolvahab, Mohadeseh Haji; Fazeli, Ahmad; Radmalekshahi, Mazda; Nejadnik, M Reza; Fazeli, Mohammad Reza; Schellekens, Huub

    2016-03-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA)-free formulation of Escherichia coli-derived human interferon beta (IFNβ-1b) with a high percentage of monomeric protein and low immunogenicity is developed and characterized in the current study. UV spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blotting, Micro-Flow Imaging, resonant mass measurement, size exclusion, and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographies were applied to assess the effect of excipients on the stability of IFNβ-1b to establish a HSA-free formulation. The antiviral activity of IFNβ-1b was evaluated using human lung carcinoma cell line. Immune tolerant mice to hIFNβ were used to assess the immunogenicity of the HSA-free formulated IFNβ-1b in comparison to Betaferon(®) drug product and Avonex(®) drug substance as standards through IgG titering of plasma. HSA-free formulated IFNβ-1b, including 200 mM L-arginine, 200 mM trehalose, and 0.1% n-dodecyl β-D-maltoside in 10 mM sodium acetate buffer, pH 7.4, showed the highest biological activity. The stability of IFNβ-1b in the HSA-free formulation was monitored for 3 weeks at 4°C and 37°C with relative humidity of 10% and 75%, respectively. Protein aggregation and immunogenicity in transgenic mice were decreased in the HSA-free formulated IFNβ-1b compared to Betaferon. The stability, biological activity, and immunogenicity of the HSA-free formulation and Betaferon were evaluated. Incubation of formulations at 4°C and 37°C for 3 weeks showed that the HSA-free formulated IFNβ-1b was more stable and less immunogenic in transgenic FVB/N mice. Low immunogenicity and the absence of HSA, which reduces the potential risk of viral infection (eg, HIV and HCV), are promising for clinical studies. PMID:26824268

  14. Immunomodulatory activity of interferon-beta

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Lloyd H; Reder, Anthony T

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disorder of the central nervous system that appears to be driven by a shift in immune functioning toward excess inflammation that results in demyelination and axonal loss. Beta interferons were the first class of disease-modifying therapies to be approved for patients with MS after treatment with this type I interferon improved the course of MS on both clinical and radiological measures in clinical trials. The mechanism of action of interferon-beta appears to be driven by influencing the immune system at many levels, including antigen-presenting cells, T cells, and B cells. One effect of these interactions is to shift cytokine networks in favor of an anti-inflammatory effect. The pleiotropic mechanism of action may be a critical factor in determining the efficacy of interferon-beta in MS. This review will focus on select immunological mechanisms that are influenced by this type I cytokine. PMID:25356432

  15. Type I interferon dysregulation and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    McGlasson, Sarah; Jury, Alexa; Jackson, Andrew; Hunt, David

    2015-09-01

    Type I interferon is an essential component of the brain's innate immune defence, conferring protection against viral infection. Recently, dysregulation of the type I interferon pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a spectrum of neuroinfectious and neuroinflammatory disorders. Underactivity of the type I interferon response is associated with a predisposition to herpes simplex encephalitis. Conversely, a group of 'interferonopathic' disorders, characterized by severe neuroinflammation and overactivity of type I interferon, has been described. Elucidation of the genetic basis of these Mendelian neuroinflammatory diseases has uncovered important links between nucleic acid sensors, innate immune activation and neuroinflammatory disease. These mechanisms have an important role in the pathogenesis of more common polygenic diseases that can affect the brain, such as lupus and cerebral small vessel disease. In this article, we review the spectrum of neurological disease associated with type I interferon dysregulation, as well as advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of these conditions. We highlight the potential utility of type I interferon as both a biomarker and a therapeutic target in neuroinflammatory disease. PMID:26303851

  16. Inhibited interferon production after space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Gould, C. L.; Williams, J.; Mandel, A. D.

    1988-01-01

    Several studies have been performed in our laboratories indicating that interferon production may be impaired in rodents after space flight. Using an antiorthostatic suspension model that simulates some of the effects of microgravity seen during space flight, we have shown that interferon-alpha/beta production was inhibited. The inhibition was not due solely to the stress of suspension. The inhibited interferon production was transient, as suspended animals returned to normal caging recovered the ability to produce interferon. Antiorthostatic suspension of mice also resulted in a loss of resistance to infection with the diabetogenic strain of encephalomyocarditis virus, which correlated with the drop in interferon production. In rats flown in US Space Shuttle mission SL-3, interferon-gamma production was inhibited severely when spleen cells were challenged with concanavalin-A upon return to earth. In contrast, interleukin-3 production by these cells was normal. These results suggest that immune responses may be altered after antiorthostatic modeling or space flight, and the resistance to viral infections may be especially affected.

  17. Binding of human interferon alpha to cells of different sensitivities: studies with internally radiolabeled interferon retaining full biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Yonehara, S; Yonehara-Takahashi, M; Ishii, A

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics of interferon binding to various cells with different interferon sensitivity were studied by using [3H]leucine-labeled, pure human interferon alpha from Namalwa cells. Scatchard analysis of the binding data on cells sensitive to interferon alpha (human FL and fibroblasts and bovine MDBK) indicated the presence of two kinds of binding sites with high and low affinities. The binding constants of the high-affinity sites in these cells were similar (4 X 10(10) to 11 X 10(10) M-1). Cells insensitive to human interferon alpha (human HEC-1 and mouse L cells) were shown to have only low-affinity sites, suggesting that high-affinity binding sites are indispensable for interferon sensitivity and represent interferon receptors. However, the number of sites in three human diploid fibroblast strains and one strain trisomic for chromosome 21 were not proportionally correlated to the interferon sensitivity of the cells. The high-affinity binding to human cells was completely inhibited by both nonradioactive human interferons alpha and beta in a similar manner, but binding to bovine MDBK cells, on which human interferon beta is practically inactive, was inhibited effectively only by interferon alpha and not by beta. These results suggest that the receptor for human interferon alpha is common to human interferon beta in human cells, whereas the receptor on bovine cells binds only human interferon alpha. PMID:6300453

  18. Pegylated Interferon Alpha–Associated Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Kathleen T.; Nelson, Bruce; Harrison, Andrew R.; McLoon, Linda K.; Lee, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    A 52-year-old man with chronic hepatitis C presented with painless, bilateral, simultaneous non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and peripheral neuropathy. Symptoms began 19 weeks after starting peginterferon alpha-2a. The peripheral neuropathy and vision of the right eye improved, but the vision of the left eye worsened after stopping interferon. We identified 23 additional cases of NAION during interferon alpha therapy. At least 12 of these patients suffered bilateral NAION. Patients lost vision 1–40 weeks after initiating therapy. Of 21 eyes that had documented initial and follow-up acuities, 8 improved, 1 worsened, and the rest remained stable. One patient had a painful peripheral neuropathy. Treatment with interferon alpha may result in NAION. Discontinuation of therapy deserves consideration after weighing individual risks and benefits. PMID:20351572

  19. Influenza virus activation of the interferon system

    PubMed Central

    Killip, Marian J.; Fodor, Ervin; Randall, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    The host interferon (IFN) response represents one of the first barriers that influenza viruses must surmount in order to establish an infection. Many advances have been made in recent years in understanding the interactions between influenza viruses and the interferon system. In this review, we summarise recent work regarding activation of the type I IFN response by influenza viruses, including attempts to identify the viral RNA responsible for IFN induction, the stage of the virus life cycle at which it is generated and the role of defective viruses in this process. PMID:25678267

  20. [Interferon inducing activity of rabies cell culture vaccine in humans].

    PubMed

    Atanasiu, P; Yokota, Y; Gamet, A

    1979-01-01

    Rabies cell culture vaccines are able to induce circulating interferon in human sera. In 8/15 cases a low peak of interferon appears in the serum about 8 h after the vaccination. The inhibition has been considered as due to interferon because of the resistance to pH 2 and lack of activity on other animal species. PMID:39484

  1. Regulating the diverse outcomes of interferon's interference.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Heather D; Kaech, Susan M

    2014-08-01

    Regulatory T cells are crucial for preventing autoimmunity, but how their function is restrained to allow optimal effector T cells responses in appropriate contexts is unclear. In a recent paper in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, Campbell and colleagues demonstrate that virus-induced type I interferon acts directly on Treg cells to allow for functional antiviral T cell responses. PMID:25052591

  2. Mechanisms underlying the inhibition of interferon signaling by viruses

    PubMed Central

    Devasthanam, Anand S

    2014-01-01

    A hallmark of the antiviral response is the induction of interferons. First discovered in 1957 by Issac and Lindeman, interferons are noted for their ability to interfere with viral replication. Interferons act via autocrine and paracrine pathways to induce an antiviral state in infected cells and in neighboring cells containing interferon receptors. Interferons are the frontline defenders against viral infection and their primary function is to locally restrict viral propagation. Viruses have evolved mechanisms to escape the host interferon response, thus gaining a replicative advantage in host cells. This review will discuss recent findings on the mechanisms viruses use to evade the host interferon response. This knowledge is important because the treatment of viral infections is a challenge of global proportions and a better understanding of the mechanisms viruses use to persist in the host may uncover valuable insights applicable to the discovery of novel drug targets. PMID:24504013

  3. Relative sensitivities of viruses to different species of interferon.

    PubMed

    Stewart, W E; Scott, W D; Sulkin, S E

    1969-08-01

    Some viruses were found to be more sensitive than others to the action of interferons from certain species of animals but less sensitive to interferons from other species. Vaccinia virus was the most sensitive to mouse and hamster interferons of five viruses tested, but the least sensitive of these five viruses to human, rabbit, and bat interferons. The relative sensitivities of the viruses to interferons were found to be characteristic for each of the species tested, with those closely related phylogenetically exhibiting similar patterns of relative interferon-induced virus resistance. The amount of synthetic double-stranded polynucleotide polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid required to induce resistance to each of the viruses in each of the cell species correlated with the interferon sensitivities of the viruses. PMID:4308914

  4. Characteristics of hepatitis C treatment with pegylated interferons and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Méndez, Ricardo; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    The effect of interferon alfa against hepatitis C virus has been well documented. However, clinical efficacy is low due to the short interferon residence in the body. To prolong half-life, interferon molecules have been bound to the biologically inert polymer, polyethyleneglycol. Pegylated interferons exhibit a longer residence time with an improved clinical efficacy, although the rate of therapeutic failure is still important. Addition of ribavirin to interferon, either pegylated or not, significantly increases efficacy. Therefore, the combination of a pegylated interferon with ribavirin has become the standard treatment of chronic hepatitis C. As the efficacy and safety of such combinations are not yet optimal, different drugs, including other types of long-acting interferons and ribavirin analogs, are presently been investigated. PMID:20713998

  5. Regulation of interferon-gamma gene expression.

    PubMed

    Young, H A

    1996-08-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), also known as type II interferon, is an important immunoregulatory gene that has multiple effects on the development, maturation, and function of the immune system. IFN-gamma mRNA and protein are expressed predominantly by T cells and large granular lymphocytes. The IFN-gamma mRNA is induced/inhibited in these cell types by a wide variety of extracellular signals, thus implicating a number of diverse, yet convergent signal transduction pathways in its transcriptional control. In this review, I describe how DNA methylation and specific DNA binding proteins may regulate transcription of the IFN-gamma gene in response to extracellular signals. PMID:8877725

  6. Oromucosal Administration of Interferon to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Beilharz, Manfred W.; Cummins, Martin J.; Bennett, Alayne L.; Cummins, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    The prevailing dogma is that, to be systemically effective, interferon-alpha (IFNα) must be administered in sufficiently high doses to yield functional blood concentrations. Such an approach to IFNα therapy has proven effective in some instances, but high-dose parenteral IFNα therapy has the disadvantage of causing significant adverse events. Mounting evidence suggests that IFNα delivered into the oral cavity in low doses interacts with the oral mucosa in a unique manner to induce systemic host defense mechanisms without IFNα actually entering the circulation, thus reducing the potential for toxic side effects. A better understanding of the applications and potential benefits of this treatment modality are under active investigation. This paper provides a review of the relevant literature on the clinical use of the oromucosal route of administration of interferon, with an emphasis on the treatment of influenza.

  7. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Gamma-Interferon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Gamma-Interferon. Stimulates the body's immune system and is used clinically in the treatment of cancer. Potential as an anti-tumor agent against solid tumors as well as leukemia's and lymphomas. It has additional utility as an anti-ineffective agent, including antiviral, anti-bacterial, and anti-parasitic activities. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Charles Bugg.

  8. Recent advances in the anti-HCV mechanisms of interferon.

    PubMed

    Huang, Menghao; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Peng, Zonggen

    2014-08-01

    Interferon (IFN) in combination with ribavirin has been the standard of care (SOC) for chronic hepatitis C for the past few decades. Although the current SOC lacks the desired efficacy, and 4 new direct-acting antiviral agents have been recently approved, interferons are still likely to remain the cornerstone of therapy for some time. Moreover, as an important cytokine system of innate immunity, host interferon signaling provides a powerful antiviral response. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which HCV infection controls interferon production, and how interferons, in turn, trigger anti-HCV activities as well as control the outcome of HCV infection remain to be clarified. In this report, we review current progress in understanding the mechanisms of IFN against HCV, and also summarize the knowledge of induction of interferon signaling by HCV infection. PMID:26579391

  9. [Effects of neuropeptides on interferon production in vitro].

    PubMed

    Kul'chikov, A E; Makarenko, A N

    2008-01-01

    The study of an interferon-inducing action of neuropeptides (a cerebrolysin model) on production of interferons by human blood leukocytes has shown that neuropeptides induce gamma-interferon production in the titer 267 IU/ml that determines one of the mechanisms of a neuroimmunocorrecting effect of cerebrolysin (Ebewe, Austria) in many neurological diseases (acute stroke, brain traumas and different neuroinfectious diseases). PMID:18720720

  10. Racial differences in responses to therapy with interferon in chronic hepatitis C. Consensus Interferon Study Group.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K R; Hoofnagle, J H; Tong, M J; Lee, W M; Pockros, P; Heathcote, E J; Albert, D; Joh, T

    1999-09-01

    The likelihood of a sustained response to a course of interferon in patients with chronic hepatitis C correlates with several clinical and viral factors, including age, viral genotype and initial levels of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in serum. The role of race and ethnicity has not been assessed. We evaluated the association of race with response to interferon in a large randomized, controlled trial using either consensus interferon (9 microg) or interferon alfa-2b (3 million units) given three times weekly for 24 weeks. African-American patients participating in the study were similar to white patients in mean age (43 vs. 42 years) and baseline levels of HCV RNA (3.6 vs. 3.0 million copies/mL) but had lower rates of cirrhosis (5% vs. 12%) and more frequently had viral genotype 1 (88% vs. 66%: P =.004). Most strikingly, the rates of end-of-treatment and sustained virological responses were lower among the 40 African-American patients (5% and 2%) than among the 380 white patients (33% and 12%) (P =.04 and.07). Rates of response among Hispanic and Asian-American patients were not statistically different than non-Hispanic white patients. Median viral levels decreased by week 24 of therapy by 2.5 logs in white patients (from 3.0 to 0.012 million copies/mL) but by only 0.5 logs among African- American patients (from 3.6 to 1.8 million copies/mL). Thus, there are marked racial differences in virological responses to interferon in hepatitis C that must be considered in assessing trials of interferon therapy and in counseling patients regarding treatment. The differences in response rates are as yet unexplained. PMID:10462387

  11. Alpha-interferon in the treatment of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Fayad, M N; Yamout, B I; Mroueh, S

    1997-11-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is an inexorably progressive disease with no effective therapy. Recent trials of intrathecal and intraventricular alpha-interferon yielded controversial results. We tried intrathecal or intraventricular alpha-interferon in four patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. None of them had evidence of improvement. We reviewed the previously published studies on the use of alpha-interferon in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Further international collaborative studies are needed to determine the role of alpha-interferon in the treatment of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. PMID:9430312

  12. Interferon activity of mitogen-induced chicken splenic lymphocytes which do not express interferon mRNA.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, S K; Cloud, S S; Burnside, J

    1996-10-01

    Interferon activity was measured in media from virally infected chicken embryo fibroblasts and Concanavalin A-stimulated splenic lymphocytes using a viral inhibition assay. Both cell types produce interferon activity. A cDNA probe corresponding to a chicken interferon mRNA was used to probe Northern blots of RNA prepared from both cells. A single hybridizing species of 900 bases was detected in virally infected fibroblast RNA, but no hybridizing species was detected in the splenic lymphocytes. These results suggest that the interferon activity produced by lymphocytes is of different molecular origin than the corresponding activity produced by virally infected fibroblasts. PMID:8969047

  13. Expansion of amphibian intronless interferons revises the paradigm for interferon evolution and functional diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interferons (IFNs) are key cytokines identified in vertebrates, and evolutionary dominance of intronless IFN genes in amniotes is a signature event in IFN evolution. For the first time, we show that the emergence and expansion of intronless IFN genes is evident in amphibians, shown by 24-37 intronle...

  14. Physiological Proteins in Therapeutics: A Current Review on Interferons.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debosree; Ghosh, Debjani; Parida, Pratap

    2016-01-01

    Interferons are produced in vivo and are one of the prime components of natural defense system of animals. They are released by the viral infected cells and provide protection to the neighboring cells against viral infection. The cyto-protective property of the proteins ignited the thought of their pharmaceutical adaptation for therapeutic use against viral diseases in individuals in whom the interferons released naturally are not sufficient to combat the situation. Interferon supplements have been found to complement various antiviral drugs. Considering the efficacy of interferons in regulating angiogenesis and immunomodulation, they can be adapted for therapy of the killer diseases like cancer and AIDS. We have come ahead more than twenty five years after the approval of clinical use of interferon as drugs and are today really in a position to promise a disease free life to our present and next generation. Interferon therapy will be contributing a big share to the upcoming remedies for the new diseases and we are thus armed to fight back the deadly viral threats. Interferons have been modified [pegylated etc.] and have already been adapted to some extent in certain diseases and are in regular use in some. Thus interferons if modified as per need and used in combination with either antiviral drugs, antibiotics, antioxidants may strengthen our defense system effectively to bring about a strong protection against wide range of diseases. PMID:27499189

  15. Specificity, cross-talk and adaptation in Interferon signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilman, Anton

    Innate immune system is the first line of defense of higher organisms against pathogens. It coordinates the behavior of millions of cells of multiple types, achieved through numerous signaling molecules. This talk focuses on the signaling specificity of a major class of signaling molecules - Type I Interferons - which are also used therapeutically in the treatment of a number of diseases, such as Hepatitis C, multiple sclerosis and some cancers. Puzzlingly, different Interferons act through the same cell surface receptor but have different effects on the target cells. They also exhibit a strange pattern of temporal cross-talk resulting in a serious clinical problem - loss of response to Interferon therapy. We combined mathematical modeling with quantitative experiments to develop a quantitative model of specificity and adaptation in the Interferon signaling pathway. The model resolves several outstanding experimental puzzles and directly affects the clinical use of Type I Interferons in treatment of viral hepatitis and other diseases.

  16. Results of space experiment program "Interferon". I. Production of interferon in vitro by human lymphocytes aboard space laboratory Solyut-6 ("Interferon I") and influence of space flight on lymphocyte functions of cosmonauts ("Interferon III").

    PubMed

    Tálas, M; Bátkai, L; Stöger, I; Nagy, L; Hiros, L; Konstantinova, I; Rykova, M; Mozgovaya, I; Guseva, O; Kozharinov, V

    1983-01-01

    The results of the biological space experiment "Interferon" performed by two international cosmonaut crews aboard the space laboratory Solyut-6 are reported. Human lymphocytes separated from the blood of healthy donors and placed into "Interferon I" equipment could be kept for 7 days in suspension culture under spaceflight conditions. Interferon production could be induced in human lymphocytes by preparations of different origin, such as virus, synthetic polyribonucleotides, bacterial protein and plant pigment. An increased lymphocyte interferon production was observed in the space laboratory as compared to the ground control. A decrease of induced interferon production and natural killer cell activity was observed in the cosmonauts' lymphocytes on the 1st day on Earth after 7 days spaceflight. PMID:6659855

  17. Interferon Gamma in Successful Pregnancies1

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Shawn P.; Tayade, Chandrakant; Ashkar, Ali A.; Hatta, Kota; Zhang, Jianhong; Croy, B. Anne

    2009-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFNG) is a proinflammatory cytokine secreted in the uterus during early pregnancy. It is abundantly produced by uterine natural killer cells in maternal endometrium but also by trophoblasts in some species. In normal pregnancies of mice, IFNG plays critical roles that include initiation of endometrial vasculature remodeling, angiogenesis at implantation sites, and maintenance of the decidual (maternal) component of the placenta. In livestock and in humans, deviations in these processes are thought to contribute to serious gestational complications, such as fetal loss or preeclampsia. Interferon gamma has broader roles in activation of innate and adaptive immune responses to viruses and tumors, in part through upregulating transcription of genes involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and antigen processing/presentation. Despite this, rodent and human trophoblast cells show dampened responses to IFNG that reflect the resistance of these cells to IFNG-mediated activation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transplantation antigen expression. Lack of MHC class II antigens on trophoblasts is thought to facilitate survival of the semiallogeneic conceptus in the presence of maternal lymphocytes. This review describes the dynamic roles of IFNG in successful pregnancy and briefly summarizes data on IFNG in gestational pathologies. PMID:19164174

  18. The many faces of interferon tau.

    PubMed

    Bazer, Fuller W; Ying, Wei; Wang, Xiaoqiu; Dunlap, Kathrin A; Zhou, Beiyan; Johnson, Greg A; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-03-01

    Interferon tau (IFNT) was discovered as the pregnancy recognition signal in ruminants, but is now known to have a plethora of physiological functions in the mammalian uterus. The mammalian uterus includes, from the outer surface to the lumen, the serosa, myometrium and endometrium. The endometrium consists of the luminal, superficial glandular, and glandular epithelia, each with a unique phenotype, stromal cells, vascular elements, nerves and immune cells. The uterine epithelia secrete or selectively transport molecules into the uterine lumen that are collectively known as histotroph. Histotroph is required for growth and development of the conceptus (embryo and its associated extra-embryonic membranes) and includes nutrients such as amino acids and glucose, enzymes, growth factors, cytokines, lymphokines, transport proteins for vitamins and minerals and extracellular matrix molecules. Interferon tau and progesterone stimulate transport of amino acids in histotroph, particularly arginine. Arginine stimulates the mechanistic target of rapamycin pathway to induce proliferation, migration and protein synthesis by cells of the conceptus, and arginine is the substrate for synthesis of nitric oxide and polyamines required for growth and development of the conceptus. In ruminants, IFNT also acts in concert with progesterone from the corpus luteum to increase expression of genes for transport of nutrients into the uterine lumen, as well as proteases, protease inhibitors, growth factors for hematopoiesis and angiogenesis and other molecules critical for implantation and placentation. Collectively, the pleiotropic effects of IFNT contribute to survival, growth and development of the ruminant conceptus. PMID:25557050

  19. Induction of Type I Interferons by Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Kathryn M.; McWhirter, Sarah M.; Vance, Russell E.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Type I interferons (IFNs) are secreted cytokines that orchestrate diverse immune responses to infection. Although typically considered to be most important in the response to viruses, type I IFNs are also induced by most, if not all, bacterial pathogens. Although diverse mechanisms have been described, bacterial induction of type I IFNs occurs upon stimulation of two main pathways: (1) Toll-like receptor (TLR) recognition of bacterial molecules such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS); (2) TLR-independent recognition of molecules delivered to the host cell cytosol. Cytosolic responses can be activated by two general mechanisms. First, viable bacteria can secrete stimulatory ligands into the cytosol via specialized bacterial secretion systems. Second, ligands can be released from bacteria that lyse or are degraded. The bacterial ligands that induce the cytosolic pathways remains uncertain in many cases, but appear to include various nucleic acids. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how bacteria induce type I interferons and the roles type I IFNs play in host immunity. PMID:20482555

  20. Positive feedback regulation of type I interferon by the interferon-stimulated gene STING

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Feng; Li, Bing; Yu, Yongxin; Iyer, Shankar S; Sun, Mingyu; Cheng, Genhong

    2015-01-01

    Stimulator of interferon genes (STING) is an important regulator of the innate immune response to cytoplasmic DNA. However, regulation of STING itself is largely unknown. Here, we show that STING transcription is induced by innate immune activators, such as cyclic dinucleotides (CDNs), through an IFNAR1- and STAT1-dependent pathway. We also identify a STAT1 binding site in the STING promoter that contributes to the activation of STING transcription. Furthermore, we show that induction of STING mediates the positive feedback regulation of CDN-triggered IFN-I. Thus, our study demonstrates that STING is an interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) and its induction is crucial for the IFN-I positive feedback loop. PMID:25572843

  1. Blockade of interferon Beta, but not interferon alpha, signaling controls persistent viral infection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Cherie T; Sullivan, Brian M; Teijaro, John R; Lee, Andrew M; Welch, Megan; Rice, Stephanie; Sheehan, Kathleen C F; Schreiber, Robert D; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2015-05-13

    Although type I interferon (IFN-I) is thought to be beneficial against microbial infections, persistent viral infections are characterized by high interferon signatures suggesting that IFN-I signaling may promote disease pathogenesis. During persistent lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, IFNα and IFNβ are highly induced early after infection, and blocking IFN-I receptor (IFNAR) signaling promotes virus clearance. We assessed the specific roles of IFNβ versus IFNα in controlling LCMV infection. While blockade of IFNβ alone does not alter early viral dissemination, it is important in determining lymphoid structure, lymphocyte migration, and anti-viral T cell responses that lead to accelerated virus clearance, approximating what occurs during attenuation of IFNAR signaling. Comparatively, blockade of IFNα was not associated with improved viral control, but with early dissemination of virus. Thus, despite their use of the same receptor, IFNβ and IFNα have unique and distinguishable biologic functions, with IFNβ being mainly responsible for promoting viral persistence. PMID:25974304

  2. Regulation of type I interferon responses

    PubMed Central

    Ivashkiv, Lionel B.; Donlin, Laura T.

    2014-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) activate intracellular antimicrobial programmes and influence the development of innate and adaptive immune responses. Canonical type I IFN signalling activates the Janus kinase (JAK)–signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway, leading to transcription of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). Host, pathogen and environmental factors regulate the responses of cells to this signalling pathway and thus calibrate host defences while limiting tissue damage and preventing autoimmunity. Here, we summarize the signalling and epigenetic mechanisms that regulate type I IFN-induced STAT activation and ISG transcription and translation. These regulatory mechanisms determine the biological outcomes of type I IFN responses and whether pathogens are cleared effectively or chronic infection or autoimmune disease ensues. PMID:24362405

  3. Phleboviruses and the Type I Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Wuerth, Jennifer Deborah; Weber, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    The genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae contains a number of emerging virus species which pose a threat to both human and animal health. Most prominent members include Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), sandfly fever Naples virus (SFNV), sandfly fever Sicilian virus (SFSV), Toscana virus (TOSV), Punta Toro virus (PTV), and the two new members severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) and Heartland virus (HRTV). The nonstructural protein NSs is well established as the main phleboviral virulence factor in the mammalian host. NSs acts as antagonist of the antiviral type I interferon (IFN) system. Recent progress in the elucidation of the molecular functions of a growing list of NSs proteins highlights the astonishing variety of strategies employed by phleboviruses to evade the IFN system. PMID:27338447

  4. Recombinant DNA products: Insulin, interferon and growth hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Bollon, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    This book provides the discussion of products of biotechnology of recombinant DNA. The contents include: Recombinant DNA techniques; isolation, cloning, and expression of genes; from somatostatin to human insulin; yeast; an alternative organism for foreign protein production; background in human interferon; preclinical assessment of biological properties of recombinant DNA derived human interferons; human clinical trials of bacteria-derived human ..cap alpha.. interferon.f large scale production of human alpha interferon from bacteria; direct expression of human growth hormone in escherichia coli with the lipoprotein promoter; biological actions in humans of recombinant DNA synthesized human growth hormone; NIH guidelines for research involving recombinant DNA molecules; appendix; viral vectors and the NHY guidelines; FDA's role in approval and regulation of recombinant DNA drugs; and index.

  5. Beta-interferon inhibits cell infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Beta interferon has been shown to inhibit the capacity of bloodstream forms of the flagellate Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, to associate with and infect mouse peritoneal macrophages and rat heart myoblasts. The inhibitory effect was abrogated in the presence of specific antibodies to the interferon. Pretreatment of the parasites with interferon reduced their infectivity for untreated host cells, whereas pretreament of either type of host cell did not affect the interaction. The effect of interferon on the trypanosomes was reversible; the extent of the inhibitory effect was significantly reduced afer 20 min, and was undetectable after 60 min when macrophages were used as host cells. For the myoblasts, 60 min elapsed before the inhibitory effect began to subside and 120 min elapsed before it became insignificant or undetectable.

  6. Human Cytokinome Analysis for Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Al-Yahya, Suhad; Mahmoud, Linah; Al-Zoghaibi, Fahad; Al-Tuhami, Abdullah; Amer, Haithem; Almajhdi, Fahad N.; Polyak, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cytokines are a group of small secreted proteins that mediate a diverse range of immune and nonimmune responses to inflammatory and microbial stimuli. Only a few of these cytokines mount an antiviral response, including type I, II, and III interferons (IFNs). During viral infections and under inflammatory conditions, a number of cytokines and chemokines are coproduced with IFN; however, no systematic study exists on the interactions of the cytokine repertoire with the IFN response. Here, we performed the largest cytokine and chemokine screen (the human cytokinome, with >240 members) to investigate their modulation of type I and type II IFN responses in a cell line model. We evaluated the cytokine activities in both IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) and IFN-γ activation sequence (GAS) reporter systems. Several cytokine clusters that augment either or both ISRE- and GAS-mediated responses to IFNs were derived from the screen. We identified novel modulators of IFN response—betacellulin (BTC), interleukin 11 (IL-11), and IL-17F—that caused time-dependent induction of the IFN response. The ability to induce endogenous IFN-β and IFN-stimulated genes varies among these cytokines and was largely dependent on Stat1, as assessed by Stat1 mutant fibroblasts. Certain cytokines appear to augment the IFN-β response through the NF-κB pathway. The novel IFN-like cytokines augmented the antiviral activity of IFN-α against several RNA viruses, including encephalomyocarditis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and influenza virus, in susceptible cell lines. Overall, the study represents a large-scale analysis of cytokines for enhancing the IFN response and identified cytokines capable of enhancing Stat1, IFN-induced gene expression, and antiviral activities. IMPORTANCE Innate immunity to viruses is an early defense system to ward off viruses. One mediator is interferon (IFN), which activates a cascade of biochemical events that aim to control the virus life

  7. Axonal interferon responses and alphaherpesvirus neuroinvasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ren

    Infection by alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV), typically begins at a peripheral epithelial surface and continues into the peripheral nervous system (PNS) that innervates this tissue. Inflammatory responses are induced at the infected peripheral site prior to viral invasion of the PNS. PNS neurons are highly polarized cells with long axonal processes that connect to distant targets. When the peripheral tissue is first infected, only the innervating axons are exposed to this inflammatory milieu, which include type I interferon (e.g. IFNbeta) and type II interferon (i.e. IFNgamma). IFNbeta can be produced by all types of cells, while IFNgamma is secreted by some specific types of immune cells. And both types of IFN induce antiviral responses in surrounding cells that express the IFN receptors. The fundamental question is how do PNS neurons respond to the inflammatory milieu experienced only by their axons. Axons must act as potential front-line barriers to prevent PNS infection and damage. Using compartmented cultures that physically separate neuron axons from cell bodies, I found that pretreating isolated axons with IFNbeta or IFNgamma significantly diminished the number of HSV-1 and PRV particles moving from axons to the cell bodies in an IFN receptor-dependent manner. Furthermore, I found the responses in axons are activated differentially by the two types of IFNs. The response to IFNbeta is a rapid, axon-only response, while the response to IFNgamma involves long distance signaling to the PNS cell body. For example, exposing axons to IFNbeta induced STAT1 phosphorylation (p-STAT1) only in axons, while exposure of axons to IFNgamma induced p-STAT1 accumulation in distant cell body nuclei. Blocking transcription in cell bodies eliminated IFNgamma-, but not IFNbeta-mediated antiviral effects. Proteomic analysis of IFNbeta- or IFNgamma-treated axons identified several differentially regulated proteins. Therefore

  8. Virus Multiplicity of Infection Affects Type I Interferon Subtype Induction Profiles and Interferon-Stimulated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Zaritsky, Luna A.; Bedsaul, Jacquelyn R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type I interferons (IFNs) are induced upon viral infection and important mediators of innate immunity. While there is 1 beta interferon (IFN-β) protein, there are 12 different IFN-α subtypes. It has been reported extensively that different viruses induce distinct patterns of IFN subtypes, but it has not been previously shown how the viral multiplicity of infection (MOI) can affect IFN induction. In this study, we discovered the novel finding that human U937 cells infected with 2 different concentrations of Sendai virus (SeV) induce 2 distinct type I IFN subtype profiles. Cells infected at the lower MOI induced more subtypes than cells infected at the higher MOI. We found that this was due to the extent of signaling through the IFN receptor (IFNAR). The cells infected at the lower viral MOI induced the IFNAR2-dependent IFN-α subtypes 4, 6, 7, 10, and 17, which were not induced in cells infected at higher virus concentrations. IFN-β and IFN-α1, -2, and -8 were induced in an IFNAR-independent manner in cells infected at both virus concentrations. IFN-α5, -14, -16, and -21 were induced in an IFNAR-dependent manner in cells infected at lower virus concentrations and in an IFNAR-independent manner in cells infected at higher virus concentrations. These differences in IFN subtype profiles in the 2 virus concentrations also resulted in distinct interferon-stimulated gene induction. These results present the novel finding that different viral MOIs differentially activate JAK/STAT signaling through the IFNAR, which greatly affects the profile of IFN subtypes that are induced. IMPORTANCE Type I IFNs are pleiotropic cytokines that are instrumental in combating viral diseases. Understanding how the individual subtypes are induced is important in developing strategies to block viral replication. Many studies have reported that different viruses induce distinct type I IFN subtype profiles due to differences in the way viruses are sensed in different cell types

  9. Cytokine therapeutics: lessons from interferon alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Gutterman, J U

    1994-01-01

    Cytokines are soluble proteins that allow for communication between cells and the external environment. Interferon (IFN) alpha, the first cytokine to be produced by recombinant DNA technology, has emerged as an important regulator of growth and differentiation, affecting cellular communication and signal transduction pathways as well as immunological control. This review focuses on the biological and clinical activities of the cytokine. Originally discovered as an antiviral substance, the efficacy of IFN-alpha in malignant, viral, immunological, angiogenic, inflammatory, and fibrotic diseases suggests a spectrum of interrelated pathophysiologies. The principles learned from in vivo studies will be discussed, particularly hairy cell leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, certain angiogenic diseases, and hepatitis. After the surprising discovery of activity in a rare B-cell neoplasm, IFN-alpha emerged as a prototypic tumor suppressor protein that represses the clinical tumorigenic phenotype in some malignancies capable of differentiation. Regulatory agencies throughout the world have approved IFN-alpha for treatment of 13 malignant and viral disorders. The principles established with this cytokine serve as a paradigm for future development of natural proteins for human disease. PMID:8108387

  10. Interferon Alpha Association with Neuromyelitis Optica

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Nasrin; Voss, Anne; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Thue Lillevang, Soeren

    2013-01-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) has immunoregulatory functions in autoimmune inflammatory diseases. The goal of this study was to determine occurrence and clinical consequences of IFN-α in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) patients. Thirty-six NMO and 41 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients from a population-based retrospective case series were included. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score and MRI findings determined disease activity. Linear regression was used to assess the effects of the level of IFN-α on disability (EDSS). IFN-α was determined by sensitive ELISA assays. IFN-α was detectable in sera from 9/36 NMO patients, significantly more often than in the MS group (2/41) (P = 0.0197). A higher frequency of IFN-α was observed in NMO patients with acute relapse compared to NMO patients in remission (P < 0.001) and compared to the MS patients with relapse (P = 0.010). In NMO patients, the levels of IFN-α were significantly associated with EDSS (P = 0.0062). It may be concluded that IFN-α was detectable in a subgroup of NMO patients. Association of IFN-α levels with clinical disease activity and severity suggests a role for IFN-α in disease perpetuation and may provide a plausible explanation for a negative effect of IFN-1 treatment in NMO patients. PMID:24348680

  11. Potentiation of radiation injury by interferon

    SciTech Connect

    Dritschilo, A.; Mossman, K.; Gray, M.; Sreevalsan, T.

    1982-02-01

    Interferon (IFN) is being tested clinically in the treatment of a wide range of human malignancies. Patients undergoing cancer treatment may require radiotherapy in conjunction with IFN administration. This study examined the effect of purified preparations of IFN on the radiation response of mouse Swiss 3T3 cells in culture. Cells were exposed to 10 U/ml of mouse IFN or human IFN 2 hours prior to radiation. The IFN was left in the medium for the duration of the experiment. Marked enhancement of radiation response was observed in the presence of mouse IFN as compared to human IFN or no IFN treatment. The difference in radiation response was due to a reduction in the shoulder portion of the survival curve with no change in the slope of the exponential portion. Since human IFN was inactive in these experiments, the data suggest that the potentiation of radiation damage is specific for mouse IFN. The reduction in the shoulder in the presence of mouse IFN suggests the inhibition of the ability of cells to accumulate sublethal radiation injury. Split-dose experiments to test for sublethal radiation injury repair capacity failed to demonstrate an IFN effect. We conclude from these studies that IFN potentiates radiation injury. In clinical situations in which IFN is used, careful monitoring of dosage and timing of irradiation may be required to avoid excessive tissue damage. Moreover, treatment strategies may be directed to time radiation and IFN to obtain an improved therapeutic ratio.

  12. STAT-Phosphorylation–Independent Induction of Interferon Regulatory Factor-9 by Interferon

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN)-dependent STAT1 and STAT2 activation requires specific tyrosine residues (337Y and 512Y) located in the cytoplasmic domain of IFNAR-2c, the β-subunit of the human type I IFN receptor. To identify STAT activation-independent induction of ISGs, we used a mutant cell line in which both 337Y and 512Y were substituted with phenylalanine (337F512F or FF mutant). In these cells, type I IFN failed to activate STAT1, STAT2, and STAT3 did not induce well-characterized ISGs and did not exert antiviral or antiproliferative effects. Using Oligonucleotide array (Affymetrix™) analysis, we showed that interferon regulatory factor-9 (IRF-9) was the only gene induced by IFN-β in FF cells. Transient transfection analysis using an IRF-9 promoter–reporter luciferase construct in FF cells confirmed induction of the IRF-9 transcription unit by IFN-β. EMSA analysis using an IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-like sequence on the IRF-9 promoter detected 2 novel DNA-binding complexes induced in nuclear extracts of IFN-β-treated FF cells. Supershift experiments identified the proteins IRF-1 and C/EBP-β in the complex. These studies provide the first evidence that signaling pathways leading to gene transcription are activated by IFN-β independent of STAT phosphorylation. PMID:20038197

  13. T-cell homeostasis in chronic HCV-infected patients treated with interferon and ribavirin or an interferon-free regimen.

    PubMed

    Hartling, Hans Jakob; Birch, Carsten; Gaardbo, Julie C; Hove, Malene; Trøseid, Marius; Clausen, Mette Rye; Gerstoft, Jan; Ullum, Henrik; Nielsen, Susanne Dam

    2015-10-01

    Direct-acting antiviral has replaced pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin-based treatment in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. While interferon-α is immune modulating and causes lymphopenia, interferon-free regimens seem to be well-tolerated. This study aimed to compare T-cell homeostasis before, during, and after HCV treatment with or without interferon-α in patients with chronic HCV infection. A total of 20 patients with chronic HCV infection were treated with pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin, and six patients were treated with an interferon-free regimen. All patients were treated for a minimum of 12 weeks. Interferon-α treatment caused an increase in the density of the receptor for IL-7 (IL-7Rα) during treatment, while interferon-free regimens caused a decrease in IL-7Rα density. After a sustained viral response, proportions of IL-7Rα+ T cells and IL-7Rα density decreased compared to prior treatment values. Finally, a proportion of CD8+ effector memory was lower while proportion of apoptotic T cells was higher after sustained virologic response compared to prior treatment. Despite lymphopenia during interferon, alterations in T-cell homeostasis during treatment were relatively similar in patients receiving interferon-based treatment and in patients receiving interferon-free treatment, and alterations during and after treatment seem to illustrate a reduced need for high levels of T cells aimed at controlling infection. PMID:26279289

  14. Interferon therapy of chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Brunetto, Maurizia Rossana; Bonino, Ferruccio

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) results from the inability of the host's immune system to control viral replication. Interferon-α (IFN-α) therapy can convert CHB into inactive hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in 20-30% of the treated patients. In spite of the low response rate, IFN-α therapy has the advantage of having a limited duration and being effective even after therapy, as demonstrated by a much higher incidence of HBsAg clearance in responders to IFN-α than in naturally occurring inactive HBsAg carriers. IFN-α has multiple antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory activities and targets: cellular genes (IFN-stimulated genes) activating different pathways of antiviral defense in infected and noninfected cells, HBV replication blocking the RNA-containing core particle formation and accelerating their decay, degrading pregenomic RNA, and modulating the nuclear viral minichromosome (covalently closed circular DNA) activity by targeting its epigenetic regulation and both innate and adaptive immune response. The interference of viral heterogeneity and genetic polymorphisms of the host on IFN-α susceptibility is under investigation. Only a better understanding of the complex interplay between the different activities of IFN-α would warrant the amelioration of current therapeutic strategies and the design of new therapeutic approaches. The study of on-treatment dynamics of HBV infection by means of combined quantitative monitoring of serum HBV DNA and HBsAg warrant tailoring treatment at the single-patient level and can help to make treatment more cost-effective by using the different combinations of currently available antivirals, including IFN, more appropriately. Integrated molecular and clinical knowledge in a systems medicine fashion is mandatory to further improve antiviral therapy in CHB. PMID:25034484

  15. Type I Interferons Direct Gammaherpesvirus Host Colonization.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cindy S E; Lawler, Clara; May, Janet S; Belz, Gabrielle T; Stevenson, Philip G

    2016-05-01

    Gamma-herpesviruses colonise lymphocytes. Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) infects B cells via epithelial to myeloid to lymphoid transfer. This indirect route entails exposure to host defences, and type I interferons (IFN-I) limit infection while viral evasion promotes it. To understand how IFN-I and its evasion both control infection outcomes, we used Mx1-cre mice to tag floxed viral genomes in IFN-I responding cells. Epithelial-derived MuHV-4 showed low IFN-I exposure, and neither disrupting viral evasion nor blocking IFN-I signalling markedly affected acute viral replication in the lungs. Maximising IFN-I induction with poly(I:C) increased virus tagging in lung macrophages, but the tagged virus spread poorly. Lymphoid-derived MuHV-4 showed contrastingly high IFN-I exposure. This occurred mainly in B cells. IFN-I induction increased tagging without reducing viral loads; disrupting viral evasion caused marked attenuation; and blocking IFN-I signalling opened up new lytic spread between macrophages. Thus, the impact of IFN-I on viral replication was strongly cell type-dependent: epithelial infection induced little response; IFN-I largely suppressed macrophage infection; and viral evasion allowed passage through B cells despite IFN-I responses. As a result, IFN-I and its evasion promoted a switch in infection from acutely lytic in myeloid cells to chronically latent in B cells. Murine cytomegalovirus also showed a capacity to pass through IFN-I-responding cells, arguing that this is a core feature of herpesvirus host colonization. PMID:27223694

  16. Type I Interferons Direct Gammaherpesvirus Host Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cindy S. E.; Lawler, Clara; May, Janet S.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-herpesviruses colonise lymphocytes. Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) infects B cells via epithelial to myeloid to lymphoid transfer. This indirect route entails exposure to host defences, and type I interferons (IFN-I) limit infection while viral evasion promotes it. To understand how IFN-I and its evasion both control infection outcomes, we used Mx1-cre mice to tag floxed viral genomes in IFN-I responding cells. Epithelial-derived MuHV-4 showed low IFN-I exposure, and neither disrupting viral evasion nor blocking IFN-I signalling markedly affected acute viral replication in the lungs. Maximising IFN-I induction with poly(I:C) increased virus tagging in lung macrophages, but the tagged virus spread poorly. Lymphoid-derived MuHV-4 showed contrastingly high IFN-I exposure. This occurred mainly in B cells. IFN-I induction increased tagging without reducing viral loads; disrupting viral evasion caused marked attenuation; and blocking IFN-I signalling opened up new lytic spread between macrophages. Thus, the impact of IFN-I on viral replication was strongly cell type-dependent: epithelial infection induced little response; IFN-I largely suppressed macrophage infection; and viral evasion allowed passage through B cells despite IFN-I responses. As a result, IFN-I and its evasion promoted a switch in infection from acutely lytic in myeloid cells to chronically latent in B cells. Murine cytomegalovirus also showed a capacity to pass through IFN-I-responding cells, arguing that this is a core feature of herpesvirus host colonization. PMID:27223694

  17. Neutralizing Antibodies Against Interferon-Beta

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The development of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is a major problem in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with interferon-beta (IFN-ß). Whereas binding antibodies (BAbs) can be demonstrated in the vast majority of patients, only a smaller proportion of patients develop NAbs. The principle in NAb in vitro assays is the utilization of cultured cell lines that are responsive to IFN-ß. The cytopathic effect (CPE) assay measures the capacity of NAbs to neutralize IFN- ß's protective effect on cells challenged with virus and the MxA induction assay measures the ability of NAbs to reduce the IFN-ß-induced expression of MxA, either at the mRNA or the protein level. A titer of >20 neutralizing units/ml traditionally defines NAb posi-tivity. NAbs in high titers completely abrogate the in vivo response to IFN-ß, whereas the effect of low and intermediate titers is unpredictable. As clinically important NAbs appear only after 9-18 months IFN- ß0 therapy, short-term studies of two years or less are unsuitable for evaluation of clinical NAb effects. All long-term trials of three years or more concordantly show evidence of a detrimental effect of NAbs on relapses, disease activity on MRI, or on disease progression. Persistent high titers of NAbs indicate an abrogation of the biological response and, hence, absence of therapeutic efficacy, and this observation should lead to a change of therapy. As low and medium titers are ambiguous treatment decisions in patients with low NAb titres should be guided by determination of in vivo mRNA MxA induction and clinical disease activity. PMID:21180570

  18. The type I interferons: Basic concepts and clinical relevance in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    López de Padilla, Consuelo M; Niewold, Timothy B

    2016-01-15

    There is increasing scientific and clinical interest in elucidating the biology of type I Interferons, which began approximately 60 years ago with the concept of "viral interference", a property that reduces the ability of a virus to infect cells. Although our understanding of the multiple cellular and molecular functions of interferons has advanced significantly, much remains to be learned and type I Interferons remain an active and fascinating area of inquiry. In this review, we cover some general aspects of type I interferon genes, with emphasis on interferon-alpha, and various aspects of molecular mechanisms triggered by type I interferons and toll-like receptor signaling by the Janus activated kinase/signal transducer activation of transcription (JAK-STAT) pathway and interferon regulatory factor pathway. We will also describe the role of type I interferons in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, and its potential use as therapeutic agent. PMID:26410416

  19. Adherence to treatment of chronic hepatitis C: from interferon containing regimens to interferon and ribavirin free regimens

    PubMed Central

    Younossi, Zobair M.; Stepanova, Maria; Henry, Linda; Nader, Fatema; Younossi, Youssef; Hunt, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients’ experience during treatment may affect treatment adherence. Our aim was to assess the impact of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) on adherence to different anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) regimens. Clinical, demographic, and PRO data (short form-36 [SF-36], chronic liver disease questionnaire-hepatitis C version [CLDQ-HCV], functional assessment of chronic illness therapy-fatigue [FACIT-F], work productivity and activity impairment: specific health problem [WPAI:SHP]) from 13 multinational clinical trials of anti-HCV treatment were available. Treatment adherence was defined as >80% of prescribed doses taken. Included were 4825 HCV patients. Regimens were grouped into: interferon- and ribavirin (RBV)-containing (±sofosbuvir [SOF]), interferon-free RBV-containing (RBV + SOF ± ledipasvir [LDV]), and interferon-free RBV-free (LDV/SOF). The adherence to these regimens were 77.6%, 84.3%, and 96.2%, respectively (P < 0.0001). Nonadherent patients were more likely to be unemployed and to have a greater PRO impairment at baseline (up to −5.3% lower PRO scores, P < 0.0001). During treatment with interferon- or RBV-based regimens, nonadherent patients experienced lower PROs and had larger decrements from their baseline PRO scores. In contrast, there were no significant declines in PRO scores (all P > 0.05) for the small number of patients who were nonadherent to LDV/SOF. In multivariate analysis, being treatment-naive, longer treatment duration, and receiving an interferon- or RBV-containing regimen were associated with a lower likelihood of adherence (all P < 0.003). Better baseline and on-treatment PRO scores were associated with a higher likelihood of adherence to interferon and RBV. The use of interferon and/or RBV, longer duration of treatment, and lower baseline and on-treatment PRO scores were linked to a decreased likelihood of being adherent to interferon + RBV-containing or interferon-free RBV-containing antiviral

  20. Adherence to treatment of chronic hepatitis C: from interferon containing regimens to interferon and ribavirin free regimens.

    PubMed

    Younossi, Zobair M; Stepanova, Maria; Henry, Linda; Nader, Fatema; Younossi, Youssef; Hunt, Sharon

    2016-07-01

    Patients' experience during treatment may affect treatment adherence. Our aim was to assess the impact of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) on adherence to different anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) regimens.Clinical, demographic, and PRO data (short form-36 [SF-36], chronic liver disease questionnaire-hepatitis C version [CLDQ-HCV], functional assessment of chronic illness therapy-fatigue [FACIT-F], work productivity and activity impairment: specific health problem [WPAI:SHP]) from 13 multinational clinical trials of anti-HCV treatment were available. Treatment adherence was defined as >80% of prescribed doses taken.Included were 4825 HCV patients. Regimens were grouped into: interferon- and ribavirin (RBV)-containing (±sofosbuvir [SOF]), interferon-free RBV-containing (RBV + SOF ± ledipasvir [LDV]), and interferon-free RBV-free (LDV/SOF). The adherence to these regimens were 77.6%, 84.3%, and 96.2%, respectively (P < 0.0001). Nonadherent patients were more likely to be unemployed and to have a greater PRO impairment at baseline (up to -5.3% lower PRO scores, P < 0.0001). During treatment with interferon- or RBV-based regimens, nonadherent patients experienced lower PROs and had larger decrements from their baseline PRO scores. In contrast, there were no significant declines in PRO scores (all P > 0.05) for the small number of patients who were nonadherent to LDV/SOF. In multivariate analysis, being treatment-naive, longer treatment duration, and receiving an interferon- or RBV-containing regimen were associated with a lower likelihood of adherence (all P < 0.003). Better baseline and on-treatment PRO scores were associated with a higher likelihood of adherence to interferon and RBV.The use of interferon and/or RBV, longer duration of treatment, and lower baseline and on-treatment PRO scores were linked to a decreased likelihood of being adherent to interferon + RBV-containing or interferon-free RBV-containing antiviral regimens

  1. [Autoimmunization induced by interferon alpha therapy in chronic hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Rocca, Pierre; Codes, Liana; Chevallier, Michèle; Trépo, Christian; Zoulim, Fabien

    2004-11-01

    We report the case of a 56 year-old woman with post-transfusion chronic hepatitis C who presented with a severe ALT flare up associated with a rapid progression of liver fibrosis during interferon alpha 2b therapy. Several hypotheses were considered to explain the etiology of this ALT flare: there was no viral super infection by other hepatotropic viruses, no toxic hepatitis, no metabolic disease, and no other specific liver diseases could be identified. HLA typing showed a specific profile A1 B8 DR3 (risk factor of auto-immunization during interferon alpha therapy) with antinuclear antibodies and anti smooth muscle antibodies. This case suggests that auto-immunization induced by interferon alpha should be investigated in case of ALT flare that is not followed by an HCV breakthrough. PMID:15657545

  2. Role of interferon in resistance and immunity to protozoa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Degee, A. L. W.; Mansfield, J. M.; Newsome, A. L.; Arnold, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Production of interferon (I) in response to protozoan infection, and the interferon-mediated inhibition of parasite replication were studied in order to determine if these effects may be related to immunologic-mediated resistance of the hosts. Two extracellular parasites-Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Naegleria fowlei were used. Upon infection with the trypanosome, only resistant strains of mice produced I. An early peak of alpha/beta I is followed by appearance of gamma I, which coincided with antibody production and a drop in parasitemia. In case of the amoeba, pretreatment of its suspension with alpha/beta I inhibits its replication in vitro, and appears to protect mice from the infection and the disease. It is proposed that production of interferon, with its regulatory effect on the immune responses, may play a major role in regulating the processes of protozoan-caused diseases.

  3. Interferons and inflammasomes: Cooperation and counterregulation in disease.

    PubMed

    Labzin, Larisa I; Lauterbach, Mario A R; Latz, Eicke

    2016-07-01

    Interferons and the IL-1 family of cytokines have important roles in host defense against invading viruses and bacteria. Inflammasomes, multimeric cytosolic sensors of infection, are required for IL-1β and IL-18 processing and release. Interferons, IL-1β, and IL-18 are also implicated in autoimmune disease and chronic inflammation. Although independent but complementary pathways induce these cytokine subsets during infection, in some circumstances the cross-talk between these key inflammatory mediators is a particular requirement for effective host defense. In this review we will summarize recent discoveries concerning the potentiation of inflammasome responses by type I interferons, particularly in patients with gram-negative bacterial infections, and reflect on the molecular mechanisms of IFN-β's immunosuppressive effects through modulation of inflammasome and IL-1β signaling in patients with tuberculosis and multiple sclerosis. PMID:27373324

  4. Gamma interferon receptor defect presenting as recurrent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Balasubramanian; Amperayani, Sumanth; Dhanalakshmi, K; Padmanaban, Swathi

    2014-07-01

    Failure of response to therapy in childhood tuberculosis may be due to resistance, paradoxical response or immunodeficiency. Interferon-γ (IFNγ) plays a major role during host defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). An 8-y-old boy presented with fever, hepatosplenomegaly and parotid abscess. He had been earlier treated for BCG adenitis in infancy and at 5 y for TB osteomyelitis of iliac bone and recovered. Investigations confirmed disseminated Mycobacterium Avium Intracellulare infection. He was investigated for immunodeficiency because of recurrent mycobacterial disease and a partial defect of γ-interferon receptor was identified. He required a 2 y course of therapy with a 7 drug regimen and recovered. The authors report this case because of its rarity and to highlight the need to consider γ-interferon receptor defect in the presence of recurrent tuberculosis (TB) and also review the options for therapy. PMID:23681833

  5. The Use of Interferons in the Treatment of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Spaccarelli, Natalie; Rook, Alain H

    2015-10-01

    Interferons are polypeptides that naturally occur in the human body as a part of the innate immune response. By harnessing these immunomodulatory functions, synthetic interferons have shown efficacy in combating various diseases including cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. This article closely examines the qualities of interferon alfa and interferon gamma and the evidence behind their use in the 2 most common types of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, namely, mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome. PMID:26433845

  6. Recurrent Pericarditis, an Unexpected Effect of Adjuvant Interferon Chemotherapy for Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Marmoush, Fady; Shafi, Muhammad Ismail; Shah, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced pericarditis is a well-described cardiac pathology that can result from a variety of medications; however, interferon-mediated pericarditis is extremely rare. We present a case of a young female with recurrent pericarditis due to interferon therapy. The role of interferon in adjuvant chemotherapy is well known and yields good effect, but this case highlights the very uncommon phenomena of interferon induced pericarditis and the significant distress it can cause. PMID:27418981

  7. Expansion of amphibian intronless interferons revises the paradigm for interferon evolution and functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yongming; Liu, Qinfang; Lee, Jinhwa; Ma, Wenjun; McVey, D Scott; Blecha, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are key cytokines identified in vertebrates and evolutionary dominance of intronless IFN genes in amniotes is a signature event in IFN evolution. For the first time, we show that the emergence and expansion of intronless IFN genes is evident in amphibians, shown by 24-37 intronless IFN genes in each frog species. Amphibian IFNs represent a molecular complex more complicated than those in other vertebrate species, which revises the established model of IFN evolution to facilitate re-inspection of IFN molecular and functional diversity. We identified these intronless amphibian IFNs and their intron-containing progenitors, and functionally characterized constitutive and inductive expression and antimicrobial roles in infections caused by zoonotic pathogens, such as influenza viruses and Listeria monocytogenes. Amphibians, therefore, may serve as overlooked vectors/hosts for zoonotic pathogens, and the amphibian IFN system provides a model to study IFN evolution in molecular and functional diversity in coping with dramatic environmental changes during terrestrial adaption. PMID:27356970

  8. Expansion of amphibian intronless interferons revises the paradigm for interferon evolution and functional diversity

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Yongming; Liu, Qinfang; Lee, Jinhwa; Ma, Wenjun; Blecha, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are key cytokines identified in vertebrates and evolutionary dominance of intronless IFN genes in amniotes is a signature event in IFN evolution. For the first time, we show that the emergence and expansion of intronless IFN genes is evident in amphibians, shown by 24–37 intronless IFN genes in each frog species. Amphibian IFNs represent a molecular complex more complicated than those in other vertebrate species, which revises the established model of IFN evolution to facilitate re-inspection of IFN molecular and functional diversity. We identified these intronless amphibian IFNs and their intron-containing progenitors, and functionally characterized constitutive and inductive expression and antimicrobial roles in infections caused by zoonotic pathogens, such as influenza viruses and Listeria monocytogenes. Amphibians, therefore, may serve as overlooked vectors/hosts for zoonotic pathogens, and the amphibian IFN system provides a model to study IFN evolution in molecular and functional diversity in coping with dramatic environmental changes during terrestrial adaption. PMID:27356970

  9. The Rotavirus Interferon Antagonist NSP1: Many Targets, Many Questions.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Michelle M

    2016-06-01

    Rotavirus is a leading cause of death due to diarrhea among young children across the globe. Despite the limited coding capacity that is characteristic of RNA viruses, rotavirus dedicates substantial resources to avoiding the host innate immune response. Among these strategies is use of the interferon antagonist protein NSP1, which targets cellular proteins required for interferon production to be degraded by the proteasome. Although numerous cellular targets have been described, there remain many questions about the mechanism of NSP1 activity and its role in promoting replication in specific host species. PMID:27009959

  10. Treatment of Hepatitis C Infections with Interferon: A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Robert M.; Contente, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Interferons were first described in 1957, but it was not until 34 years after their discovery that sufficient quantities of it were available for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, Clinicians now have an excellent understanding of the basis for the effectiveness of interferon alpha (IFN-α) in the therapy of this disease. Treatment with IFN-α is more efficient when it complemented by the antiviral ribavirin and the IFN-α is conjugated with polyethylene glycol to form peginterferon. In the near future treatment of HCV with IFN-α may involve new anti-HCV agents that are currently under development. PMID:21152181

  11. Human interferon and its inducers: clinical program overview at Roswell Park Memorial Institute.

    PubMed

    Carter, W A; Horoszewicz, J S

    1978-11-01

    An overview of the clinical interferon program at Roswell Park Memorial Institute is presented. Purified fibroblast interferon and a novel inducer of human interferon [rIn-r(C12,U)n] are being evaluated for possible antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory activities in patients with cancer. PMID:728908

  12. Functional characterization of canine interferon-lambda.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenhui; Xu, Lei; Ren, Liqian; Qu, Hongren; Li, Jing; Liang, Jingjing; Liu, Wenjun; Yang, Limin; Luo, Tingrong

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we provide the first comprehensive annotation of canine interferon-λ (CaIFN-λ, type III IFN). Phylogenetic analysis based on genomic sequences indicated that CaIFN-λ is located in the same branch with Swine IFN-λ1 (SwIFN-λ), Bat IFN-λ1 (BaIFN-λ), and human IFN-λ1 (HuIFN-λ1). CaIFN-λ was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified to further investigate the biological activity in vitro. The recombinant CaIFN-λ (rCaIFN-λ) displayed potent antiviral activity on both homologous and heterologous animal cells in terms of inhibiting the replication of the New Jersey serotype of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), canine parvovirus, and influenza virus A/WSN/33 (H1N1), respectively. In addition, we also found that rCaIFN-λ exhibits a significant antiproliferative response against A72 canine tumor cells and MDCK cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, CaIFN-λ activated the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. To evaluate the expression of CaIFN-λ induced by virus and the expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) induced by rCaIFN-λ in the MDCK cells, we measured the relative mRNA level of CaIFN-λ and ISGs (ISG15, Mx1, and 2'5'-OAS) by quantitative real-time PCR and found that the mRNA level of CaIFN-λ and the ISGs significantly increased after treating the MDCK cells with viruses and rCaIFN-λ protein, respectively. Finally, to evaluate the binding activity of rCaIFN-λ to its receptor, we expressed the extracellular domain of the canine IFN-λ receptor 1 (CaIFN-λR1-EC) and determined the binding activity via ELISA. Our results demonstrated that rCaIFN-λ bound tightly to recombinant CaIFN-λR1-EC (rCaIFN-λR1-EC). PMID:24950142

  13. Neuropsychiatric Adverse Effects of Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Raison, Charles L.; Demetrashvili, Marina; Capuron, Lucile; Miller, Andrew H.

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant preparations of the cytokine interferon (IFN)-α are increasingly used to treat a number of medical conditions, including chronic viral hepatitis and several malignancies. Although frequently effective, IFNα induces a variety of neuropsychiatric adverse effects, including an acute confusional state that develops rapidly after initiation of high-dose IFNα, a depressive syndrome that develops more slowly over weeks to months of treatment, and manic conditions most often characterised by extreme irritability and agitation, but also occasionally by euphoria. Acute IFNα-induced confusional states are typically characterised by disorientation, lethargy, somnolence, psychomotor retardation, difficulties with speaking and writing, parkinsonism and psychotic symptoms. Strategies for managing delirium should be employed, including treatment of contributing medical conditions, use of either typical or atypical antipsychotic agents and avoidance of medications likely to worsen mental status. Significant depressive symptoms occur in 21–58% of patients receiving IFNα, with symptoms typically manifesting over the first several months of treatment. The most replicated risk factor for developing depression is the presence of mood and anxiety symptoms prior to treatment. Other potential, but less frequently replicated, risk factors include a past history of major depression, being female and increasing IFNα dosage and treatment duration. The available data support two approaches to the pharmacological management of IFNα-induced depression: antidepressant pretreatment or symptomatic treatment once IFNα has been initiated. Pretreatment might be best reserved for patients already receiving antidepressants or for patients who endorse depression or anxiety symptoms of mild or greater severity prior to therapy. Several recent studies demonstrate that antidepressants effectively treat IFNα-induced depression once it has developed, allowing the vast majority of

  14. Effect of flight in mission SL-3 on interferon-gamma production by rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, C. L.; Williams, J. A.; Mandel, A. D.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1985-01-01

    Rats flown in Space Shuttle mission SL-3 were sacrificed after flight and spleens were removed. Cultures of spleen cells were challenged with the mitogen concanavalin-A to attempt to induce interferon-gamma. Most control, ground-based rats had spleen cells that produced moderate titers of interferon-gamma. Spleen cells from flown rats did not produce interferon-gamma in most cases, and one flown rat produced minimally detectable amounts of interferon. These data suggest that interferon-gamma production was inhibited in rats flown in mission SL-3 immediately upon return to earth.

  15. Interferon Gamma as a Biomarker of Exposure to Enteric Viruses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) was selected as a biomarker for viral exposure. Twelve-week-old BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with Coxsackievirus B3 or B4 diluted in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Control mice were injected with PBS only. Four months after viral infectio...

  16. Interferon Production and Protein Synthesis in Chick Cells

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Robert M.

    1966-01-01

    Friedman, Robert M. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Md.). Interferon production and protein synthesis in chick cells. J. Bacteriol. 91:1224–1229. 1966.—Overnight incubation of chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF) at 4 C before infection with live Semliki Forest virus (SFV) increased virus yields but decreased interferon production. The same findings were noted when CEF were incubated for 4 hr with p-fluorophenylalanine (FPA) before infection with live SFV or inactivated Chikungunya virus. In both systems incorporation of C14-leucine into protein appeared to be increased after pretreatment at 4 C or with FPA. Protein synthesis could be raised in CEF incubated in 0.5% serum after trypsinization by increasing the concentration of serum. CEF in 10% serum had higher rates of C14-leucine incorporation than did cells in 1.5% serum, but again the cells with the apparently high rate of incorporation produced less interferon. These findings may be related to the mechanism of cellular control over interferon production. PMID:5929753

  17. Alpha-interferon in the treatment of nodular lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Urba, W J; Longo, D L

    1986-12-01

    Patients with nodular lymphoma initially respond to a number of therapies but relapse is common and inexorable with time, and despite further therapy, most patients will ultimately die of their lymphoma. The recent demonstration of their sensitivity to alpha-interferon is promising. The importance of this human antitumor effect is that it is presumably based on mechanisms different from conventional agents. Phase I trials of various doses and schedules of recombinant alpha-interferon have shown that effective serum levels can be obtained by intramuscular (IM), intravenous (IV), or subcutaneous (SC) routes. Virtually all patients experienced some degree of acute toxicity manifested by fever, chills, myalgia, and headache. Tolerance usually developed to acute adverse effects within the first few weeks of therapy, regardless of dose or schedule. Fatigue and anorexia were the most important adverse reactions, occurring during the first two weeks of treatment and generally persisting for the duration of therapy. Occasional adverse effects relating to the central nervous and cardiovascular systems have been reported. Primary laboratory abnormalities observed during treatment include decreases in hematologic parameters and elevations of liver function tests. The clinical efficacy of alpha-interferon, both natural and recombinant, has been demonstrated in both untreated and heavily pretreated patients with nodular lymphoma. The response rate has approached 50% in recent studies; however, less than half were complete responders. Future directions include combination of interferon with cytotoxic agents or other biological response modifiers and use as adjuvant therapy. PMID:3541218

  18. Who benefits most from adjuvant interferon treatment for melanoma?

    PubMed

    Gogas, Helen; Abali, Huseyin; Ascierto, Paolo A; Demidov, Lev; Pehamberger, Hubert; Robert, Caroline; Schachter, Jacob; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Hauschild, Axel; Espinosa, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma has a poor prognosis; the median survival for patients with stage IV melanoma ranges from 8 to 18 months after diagnosis. Interferon-α provides significant improvement in disease-free survival at the cost of poor tolerability. Identifying patients who benefit the most may improve the cost:benefit ratio. In addition, no data exist for the role of adjuvant therapy in noncutaneous melanoma. Molecular profiles may help to identify patients who benefit the most from adjuvant interferon therapy. In this review, the American Joint Commission on Cancer 2009 staging criteria and emerging biomarker data to guide adjuvant treatment decisions will be discussed. Several criteria to guide selection of patients are discussed in detail. These include Breslow thickness, number of positive lymph nodes, whether or not the primary lesion has ulcerated, immunologic markers, and cytokine profiles. Substantial progress has been made in deciding which patients benefit from interferon-α adjuvant therapy. Interferon-α is the only agent currently approved for the adjuvant treatment of this deadly disease, despite its side effect profile. More effective drugs with better tolerability are needed. PMID:24176884

  19. Interferon induced IFIT family genes in host antiviral defense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Secretion of interferons (IFNs) from virus-infected cells is a hallmark of host antiviral immunity and in fact, IFNs exert their antiviral activities through the induction of antiviral proteins. The IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) family is among hundreds of IF stimulated ...

  20. Interferons and Their Receptors in Birds: A Comparison of Gene Structure, Phylogenetic Analysis, and Cross Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Wang, Mingshu; Cheng, Anchun

    2014-01-01

    Interferon may be thought of as a key, with the interferon receptor as the signal lock: Crosstalk between them maintains their balance during viral infection. In this review, the protein structure of avian interferon and the interferon receptor are discussed, indicating remarkable similarity between different species. However, the structures of the interferon receptors are more sophisticated than those of the interferons, suggesting that the interferon receptor is a more complicated signal lock system and has considerable diversity in subtypes or structures. Preliminary evolutionary analysis showed that the subunits of the interferon receptor formed a distinct clade, and the orthologs may be derived from the same ancestor. Furthermore, the development of interferons and interferon receptors in birds may be related to an animal’s age and the maintenance of a balanced state. In addition, the equilibrium between interferon and its receptor during pathological and physiological states revealed that the virus and the host influence this equilibrium. Birds could represent an important model for studies on interferon’s antiviral activities and may provide the basis for new antiviral strategies. PMID:25405736

  1. ELF4 is critical for induction of type I interferon and the host antiviral response

    PubMed Central

    You, Fuping; Wang, Penghua; Yang, Long; Yang, Guang; Zhao, Yang O; Qian, Feng; Walker, Wendy; Sutton, Richard; Montgomery, Ruth; Lin, Rongtuan; Iwasaki, Akiko; Fikrig, Erol

    2014-01-01

    Induction of type I interferon is a central event of innate immunity, essential for host defense. Here we report that the transcription factor ELF4 is induced by type I interferon and upregulates interferon expression in a feed-forward loop. ELF4 deficiency leads to reduced interferon production, resulting in enhanced susceptibility to West Nile virus encephalitis in mice. After viral infection, ELF4 is recruited by STING, interacts with and is activated by the MAVS-TBK1 complex, and translocates into the nucleus to bind interferon promoters. Cooperative binding with ELF4 increases the binding affinity of interferon regulatory factors IRF3 and IRF7, which is mediated by EICE elements. Thus, in addition to identifying a regulator of innate immune signaling, we uncovered a role for EICE elements in interferon transactivation. PMID:24185615

  2. Type 1 Interferons Inhibit Myotube Formation Independently of Upregulation of Interferon-Stimulated Gene 15

    PubMed Central

    Franzi, Sara; Salajegheh, Mohammad; Nazareno, Remedios; Greenberg, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Type 1 interferon (IFN)-inducible genes and their inducible products are upregulated in dermatomyositis muscle. Of these, IFN-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) is one of the most upregulated, suggesting its possible involvement in the pathogenesis of this disease. To test this postulate, we developed a model of type 1 IFN mediated myotube toxicity and assessed whether or not downregulation of ISG15 expression prevents this toxicity. Methods Mouse myoblasts (C2C12 cell line) were cultured in the presence of type 1 or type 2 IFNs and ISG15 expression assessed by microarray analysis. The morphology of newly formed myotubes was assessed by measuring their length, diameter, and area on micrographs using imaging software. ISG15 expression was silenced through transfection with small interference RNA. Results Type 1 IFNs, especially IFN-beta, increased ISG15 expression in C2C12 cells and impaired myotube formation. Silencing of ISG15 resulted in knockdown of ISG15 protein, but without phenotypic rescue of myotube formation. Discussion IFN-beta affects myoblast differentiation ability and myotube morphology in vitro.These studies provide evidence that ISG15, which is highly upregulated in dermatomyositis muscle, does not appear to play a key role in IFN-beta-mediated C2C12 myoblast cell fusion. PMID:23750257

  3. Borna disease virus nucleoprotein inhibits type I interferon induction through the interferon regulatory factor 7 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Wuqi; Kao, Wenping; Zhai, Aixia; Qian, Jun; Li, Yujun; Zhang, Qingmeng; Zhao, Hong; Hu, Yunlong; Li, Hui; Zhang, Fengmin

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •IRF7 nuclear localisation was inhibited by BDV persistently infected. •BDV N protein resistant to IFN induction both in BDV infected OL cell and N protein plasmid transfected OL cell. •BDV N protein is related to the inhibition of IRF7 nuclear localisation. -- Abstract: The expression of type I interferon (IFN) is one of the most potent innate defences against viral infection in higher vertebrates. Borna disease virus (BDV) establishes persistent, noncytolytic infections in animals and in cultured cells. Early studies have shown that the BDV phosphoprotein can inhibit the activation of type I IFN through the TBK1–IRF3 pathway. The function of the BDV nucleoprotein in the inhibition of IFN activity is not yet clear. In this study, we demonstrated IRF7 activation and increased IFN-α/β expression in a BDV-persistently infected human oligodendroglia cell line following RNA interference-mediated BDV nucleoprotein silencing. Furthermore, we showed that BDV nucleoprotein prevented the nuclear localisation of IRF7 and inhibited endogenous IFN induction by poly(I:C), coxsackie virus B3 and IFN-β. Our findings provide evidence for a previously undescribed mechanism by which the BDV nucleoprotein inhibits type I IFN expression by interfering with the IRF7 pathway.

  4. Type III interferon (IFN-lambda) antagonizes the antiviral activity of interferon-alpha in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bordi, L; Lalle, E; Lapa, D; Caglioti, C; Quartu, S; Capobianchi, M R; Castilletti, C

    2013-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFN-lambda) are the most recently discovered members of IFN family. Synergism between different IFN types is well established, but for type I and type III IFNs no conclusive evidence has been reported so far. Possible synergism/antagonism between IFN-alpha and IFN-lambda in the inhibition of virus replication (EMCV, WNV lineage 1 and 2, CHIKV and HSV-1), and in the activation of intracellular pathways of IFN response (MxA and 2'-5' OAS) was evaluated in different cell lines (Vero E6, A549 and Wish cells). The antiviral potency of IFN-lambda1 and -l2 was lower than that of IFN-alpha. When IFN-alpha and -lambda were used together, the Combination Index (CI) for virus inhibition was greater than 1 virtually for all virus/host cell systems, indicating antagonistic effect. Antagonism between IFN-alpha and -l was also observed for the induction of mRNA for both MxA and 2'-5'OAS. Elucidating the interplay between IFN-alpha and -lambda may help to better understand innate defence mechanisms against viral infections, including the molecular mechanisms underlying the influence of IL-28B polymorphisms in the response to HCV and other viral infections. PMID:24382181

  5. Negative regulation of the interferon response by an interferon-induced long non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Kambara, Hiroto; Niazi, Farshad; Kostadinova, Lenche; Moonka, Dilip K; Siegel, Christopher T; Post, Anthony B; Carnero, Elena; Barriocanal, Marina; Fortes, Puri; Anthony, Donald D; Valadkhan, Saba

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play critical roles in diverse cellular processes; however, their involvement in many critical aspects of the immune response including the interferon (IFN) response remains poorly understood. To address this gap, we compared the global gene expression pattern of primary human hepatocytes before and at three time points after treatment with IFN-α. Among ∼ 200 IFN-induced lncRNAs, one transcript showed ∼ 100-fold induction. This RNA, which we named lncRNA-CMPK2, was a spliced, polyadenylated nuclear transcript that was induced by IFN in diverse cell types from human and mouse. Similar to protein-coding IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), its induction was dependent on JAK-STAT signaling. Intriguingly, knockdown of lncRNA-CMPK2 resulted in a marked reduction in HCV replication in IFN-stimulated hepatocytes, suggesting that it could affect the antiviral role of IFN. We could show that lncRNA-CMPK2 knockdown resulted in upregulation of several protein-coding antiviral ISGs. The observed upregulation was caused by an increase in both basal and IFN-stimulated transcription, consistent with loss of transcriptional inhibition in knockdown cells. These results indicate that the IFN response involves a lncRNA-mediated negative regulatory mechanism. lncRNA-CMPK2 was strongly upregulated in a subset of HCV-infected human livers, suggesting a role in modulation of the IFN response in vivo. PMID:25122750

  6. Negative regulation of the interferon response by an interferon-induced long non-coding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Kambara, Hiroto; Niazi, Farshad; Kostadinova, Lenche; Moonka, Dilip K.; Siegel, Christopher T.; Post, Anthony B.; Carnero, Elena; Barriocanal, Marina; Fortes, Puri; Anthony, Donald D.; Valadkhan, Saba

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play critical roles in diverse cellular processes; however, their involvement in many critical aspects of the immune response including the interferon (IFN) response remains poorly understood. To address this gap, we compared the global gene expression pattern of primary human hepatocytes before and at three time points after treatment with IFN-α. Among ∼200 IFN-induced lncRNAs, one transcript showed ∼100-fold induction. This RNA, which we named lncRNA-CMPK2, was a spliced, polyadenylated nuclear transcript that was induced by IFN in diverse cell types from human and mouse. Similar to protein-coding IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), its induction was dependent on JAK-STAT signaling. Intriguingly, knockdown of lncRNA-CMPK2 resulted in a marked reduction in HCV replication in IFN-stimulated hepatocytes, suggesting that it could affect the antiviral role of IFN. We could show that lncRNA-CMPK2 knockdown resulted in upregulation of several protein-coding antiviral ISGs. The observed upregulation was caused by an increase in both basal and IFN-stimulated transcription, consistent with loss of transcriptional inhibition in knockdown cells. These results indicate that the IFN response involves a lncRNA-mediated negative regulatory mechanism. lncRNA-CMPK2 was strongly upregulated in a subset of HCV-infected human livers, suggesting a role in modulation of the IFN response in vivo. PMID:25122750

  7. Differential Transcriptional Responses to Interferon-α and Interferon-γ in Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Santosh; Ji, Xuhuai; Calderon-Rodriguez, Gloria M.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Liang, T. Jake

    2010-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) plays a central role in the innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses. While IFN-α is currently approved for treating chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C, in limited studies, IFN-γ has not been shown to be effective for chronic hepatitis B or C. To identify the potential mechanism underlying the differential antiviral effects of IFN-α and IFN-γ, we used cDNA microarray to profile the global transcriptional response to IFN-α and IFN-γ in primary human hepatocytes, the target cell population of hepatitis viruses. Our results reveal distinct patterns of gene expression induced by these 2 cytokines. Overall, IFN-α induces more genes than IFN-γ at the transcriptional level. Distinct sets of genes were induced by IFN-α and IFN-γ with limited overlaps. IFN-α induces gene transcription at an early time point (6 h) but not at a later time point (18 h), while the effects of IFN-γ are more prominent at 18 h than at 6 h, suggesting a delayed transcriptional response to IFN-γ in the hepatocytes. These findings indicate differential actions of IFN-α and IFN-γ in the context of therapeutic intervention for chronic viral infections in the liver. PMID:20038212

  8. Phase II Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial of conventional radiation therapy followed by treatment with recombinant interferon-{beta} for supratentorial glioblastoma: Results of RTOG 9710

    SciTech Connect

    Colman, Howard . E-mail: hcolman@mdanderson.org; Berkey, Brian A.; Maor, Moshe H.; Groves, Morris D.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Vermeulen, Sandra; Mehta, Minesh P.; Yung, W.K. Alfred

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether recombinant human interferon {beta}-1a (rhIFN-{beta}), when given after radiation therapy, improves survival in glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: After surgery, 109 patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial glioblastoma were enrolled and treated with radiation therapy (60 Gy). A total of 55 patients remained stable after radiation and were treated with rhIFN-{beta} (6 MU/day i.m., 3 times/week). Outcomes were compared with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group glioma historical database. Results: RhIFN-{beta} was well tolerated, with 1 Grade 4 toxicity and 8 other patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity. Median survival time (MST) of the 55 rhIFN-{beta}-treated patients was 13.4 months. MST for the 34 rhIFN-{beta}-treated in RPA Classes III and IV was 16.9 vs. 12.4 months for historical controls (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.89-1.81). There was also a trend toward improved survival across all RPA Classes comparing the 55 rhIFN-{beta} treated patients and 1,658 historical controls (HR = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.94-1.63). The high rate of early failures (54/109) after radiation and before initiation of rhIFN-{beta} was likely caused by stricter interpretation of early radiographic changes in the current study. Matched-pair and intent-to-treat analyses performed to try to address this bias showed no difference in survival between study patients and controls. Conclusion: RhIFN-{beta} given after conventional radiation therapy was well tolerated, with a trend toward survival benefit in patients who remained stable after radiation therapy. These data suggest that rhIFN-{beta} warrants further evaluation in additional studies, possibly in combination with current temozolomide-based regimens.

  9. Successful Treatment of Provisional Cutaneous Mastocytosis with Interferon Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Andrea; Bhat, Ramesh M

    2016-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a disorder characterized by the clonal proliferation of mast cells and their accumulation in skin, bone marrow, liver, and spleen. Cutaneous mastocytosis presents in children in over 90% of the cases and any cutaneous manifestation in an adult is the earliest sign of the systemic disease. A 45-year-old patient presented with itchy dark lesions over the body since childhood and Darier's sign was positive. Skin biopsy showed features of mastocytosis and immunohistochemistry was positive for CD34. Since the patient was refractory to treatment with antihistamines and psoralen-ultraviolet A therapy, injections of interferon alpha were given – 3 million IU twice weekly subcutaneously as they have been proven to improve constitutional symptoms. Very few reports of successful treatment of cutaneous mastocytosis using interferon alpha have been published. PMID:27293273

  10. Weapons of STAT destruction. Interferon evasion by paramyxovirus V protein.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Curt M

    2004-12-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family of proteins function to activate gene transcription downstream of myriad cytokine and growth factor signals. The prototype STAT proteins, STAT1 and STAT2, are required for innate and adaptive antimicrobial immune responses that result from interferon signal transduction. While many viruses have evolved the ability to avoid these antiviral cytokines, the Paramyxoviruses are distinct in their abilities to interfere directly with STAT proteins. Individual paramyxovirus species differ greatly in their precise mechanism of STAT signaling evasion, but a virus-encoded protein called V plays a central role in this process. The theme of V-dependent interferon evasion and its variations provide significant insights into virus-host interactions and viral immune evasion that can help define targets for antiviral drug design. Exposure of the viral weapons of STAT destruction may also be instructive for application to STAT-directed therapeutics for diseases characterized by STAT hyperactivity. PMID:15606749

  11. The interferon response to intracellular DNA: why so many receptors?

    PubMed

    Unterholzner, Leonie

    2013-11-01

    The detection of intracellular DNA has emerged to be a key event in the innate immune response to viruses and intracellular bacteria, and during conditions of sterile inflammation and autoimmunity. One of the consequences of the detection of DNA as a 'stranger' and a 'danger' signal is the production of type I interferons and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Much work has been dedicated to the elucidation of the signalling cascades that activate this DNA-induced gene expression programme. However, while many proteins have been proposed to act as sensors for intracellular DNA in recent years, none has been met with universal acceptance, and a theory linking all the recent observations is, as yet, lacking. This review presents the evidence for the various interferon-inducing DNA receptors proposed to date, and examines the hypotheses that might explain why so many different receptors appear to be involved in the innate immune recognition of intracellular DNA. PMID:23962476

  12. Systems biology unravels interferon responses to respiratory virus infections

    PubMed Central

    Kroeker, Andrea L; Coombs, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    Interferon production is an important defence against viral replication and its activation is an attractive therapeutic target. However, it has long been known that viruses perpetually evolve a multitude of strategies to evade these host immune responses. In recent years there has been an explosion of information on virus-induced alterations of the host immune response that have resulted from data-rich omics technologies. Unravelling how these systems interact and determining the overall outcome of the host response to viral infection will play an important role in future treatment and vaccine development. In this review we focus primarily on the interferon pathway and its regulation as well as mechanisms by which respiratory RNA viruses interfere with its signalling capacity. PMID:24600511

  13. Interferon-free strategies without a nucleoside/nucleotide analogue.

    PubMed

    Welzel, Tania Mara; Zeuzem, Stefan

    2014-02-01

    The identification of viral and host factors involved in hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication was a key prerequisite for the discovery and further exploration of antiviral drug targets. As of today, numerous direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs), as well as host-targeting agents (HTAs), have been developed and entered clinical testing. The goal to omit pegylated interferon due to its unfavorable side-effect profile from novel HCV therapeutic approaches led to an expedited design and competitive conduct of DAA combination trials striving for easily applicable, all-oral HCV treatments. Approval of several interferon-free regimens is awaited in the near future (2014/2015). Results of different DAA combination trials (without nucleos(t)ide polymerase inhibitors) and trials involving HTAs are reviewed herein. PMID:24782258

  14. Successful Treatment of Provisional Cutaneous Mastocytosis with Interferon Alpha.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Andrea; Bhat, Ramesh M

    2016-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a disorder characterized by the clonal proliferation of mast cells and their accumulation in skin, bone marrow, liver, and spleen. Cutaneous mastocytosis presents in children in over 90% of the cases and any cutaneous manifestation in an adult is the earliest sign of the systemic disease. A 45-year-old patient presented with itchy dark lesions over the body since childhood and Darier's sign was positive. Skin biopsy showed features of mastocytosis and immunohistochemistry was positive for CD34. Since the patient was refractory to treatment with antihistamines and psoralen-ultraviolet A therapy, injections of interferon alpha were given - 3 million IU twice weekly subcutaneously as they have been proven to improve constitutional symptoms. Very few reports of successful treatment of cutaneous mastocytosis using interferon alpha have been published. PMID:27293273

  15. Interferon-induced 2'-5' adenylate synthetase in vivo and interferon production in vitro by lymphocytes from systemic lupus erythematosus patients with and without circulating interferon

    SciTech Connect

    Preble, O.T.; Rothko, K.; Klippel, J.H.; Friedman, R.M.; Johnston, M.I.

    1983-06-01

    The interferon (IFN)-induced enzyme 2-5A synthetase was elevated in mononuclear cells from both serum IFN-positive and -negative systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. This suggests that a much higher percentage of patients than previously thought produce endogenous IFN. These results may partly explain findings that mononuclear cells from SLE patients are deficient in IFN production in vitro in response to certain IFN inducers. Although normal lymphocytes can produce an acid-labile alpha IFN after stimulation with C. parvum in vitro, the reason for endogenous production of this unusual alpha IFN by SLE patients remains unknown.

  16. Interleukin-4 enhances interferon-gamma synthesis but inhibits development of interferon-gamma-producing cells.

    PubMed Central

    Noble, A; Kemeny, D M

    1995-01-01

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is antagonistic for many of the activities of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and, as well as suppressing the development of T-helper type-1 (Th1) cells, has been reported to block directly the synthesis of IFN-gamma in human lymphocytes. However, IL-4 transgenic mice produce increased amounts of IFN-gamma as well as IL-4. We have compared the ability of rat IL-4 to regulate IFN-gamma secretion in short-term cultures of spleen cells with its effect on the differentiation of T lymphocytes into IFN-gamma-producing, or Th1-type, cells. Normal rat spleen cells were stimulated using a variety of mitogens and ovalbumin antigen, with or without IL-4, for 12-24 hr and the levels of IFN-gamma in the supernatants measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results show that when normal rat splenocytes were stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) or concavalin A (Con A), IL-4 enhanced secretion of IFN-gamma after 12-24 hr. This enhancement was also apparent when splenocytes from animals immunized 10 days previously with alum-precipitated ovalbumin were stimulated with ovalbumin in vitro, and appeared to be mediated primarily via CD+ T cells. In contrast, when spleen cells were maximally stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and ionomycin, addition of IL-4 had no effect on the amount of IFN-gamma secreted. When splenocytes were stimulated with Con A for 4 days in the presence of IL-4, and restimulated with PMA and ionomycin, IFN-gamma secretion was greatly suppressed. Our results indicate that IL-4 exerts differential effects on IFN-gamma secretion and on the development of IFN-gamma-producing lymphocytes. PMID:7558122

  17. Interferon-stimulated genes: roles in viral pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schoggins, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) are critical for controlling virus infections. As new antiviral ISGs continue to be identified and characterized, their roles in viral pathogenesis are also being explored in more detail. Our current understanding of how ISGs impact viral pathogenesis comes largely from studies in knockout mice, with isolated examples from human clinical data. This review outlines recent developments on the contributions of various ISGs to viral disease outcomes in vivo. PMID:24713352

  18. Interferon γ-inducible Protein (IFI) 16 Transcriptionally Regulates Type I Interferons and Other Interferon-stimulated Genes and Controls the Interferon Response to both DNA and RNA Viruses*

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Mikayla R.; Sharma, Shruti; Atianand, Maninjay; Jensen, Søren B.; Carpenter, Susan; Knipe, David M.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A.

    2014-01-01

    The interferon γ-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) has recently been linked to the detection of nuclear and cytosolic DNA during infection with herpes simplex virus-1 and HIV. IFI16 binds dsDNA via HIN200 domains and activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING), leading to TANK (TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator)-binding kinase-1 (TBK1)-dependent phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and transcription of type I interferons (IFNs) and related genes. To better understand the role of IFI16 in coordinating type I IFN gene regulation, we generated cell lines with stable knockdown of IFI16 and examined responses to DNA and RNA viruses as well as cyclic dinucleotides. As expected, stable knockdown of IFI16 led to a severely attenuated type I IFN response to DNA ligands and viruses. In contrast, expression of the NF-κB-regulated cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β was unaffected in IFI16 knockdown cells, suggesting that the role of IFI16 in sensing these triggers was unique to the type I IFN pathway. Surprisingly, we also found that knockdown of IFI16 led to a severe attenuation of IFN-α and the IFN-stimulated gene retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) in response to cyclic GMP-AMP, a second messenger produced by cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) as well as RNA ligands and viruses. Analysis of IFI16 knockdown cells revealed compromised occupancy of RNA polymerase II on the IFN-α promoter in these cells, suggesting that transcription of IFN-stimulated genes is dependent on IFI16. These results indicate a broader role for IFI16 in the regulation of the type I IFN response to RNA and DNA viruses in antiviral immunity. PMID:25002588

  19. Interferon induces natural killer cell blastogenesis in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biron, C. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Welsh, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Interferon (IFN), types beta and gamma, and IFN inducers polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, all stimulated the generation of blast-natural killer (NK) cells in mouse spleens, Blast-NK cells were characterized on the basis of size, 3H-thymidine uptake, and NK cell markers These data indicate that in addition to augmenting NK cell-mediated lysis, IFN may regulate NK cell proliferation in vivo.

  20. Two Modes of the Axonal Interferon Response Limit Alphaherpesvirus Neuroinvasion

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ren; Koyuncu, Orkide O.; Greco, Todd M.; Diner, Benjamin A.; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection by alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV), typically begins at epithelial surfaces and continues into the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Inflammatory responses are induced at the infected peripheral site prior to invasion of the PNS. When the peripheral tissue is first infected, only the innervating axons are exposed to this inflammatory milieu, which includes the interferons (IFNs). The fundamental question is how do PNS cell bodies respond to these distant, potentially damaging events experienced by axons. Using compartmented cultures that physically separate neuron axons from cell bodies, we found that pretreating isolated axons with beta interferon (IFN-β) or gamma interferon (IFN-γ) significantly diminished the number of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and PRV particles moving in axons toward the cell bodies in a receptor-dependent manner. Exposing axons to IFN-β induced STAT1 phosphorylation (p-STAT1) only in axons, while exposure of axons to IFN-γ induced p-STAT1 accumulation in distant cell body nuclei. Blocking transcription in cell bodies eliminated antiviral effects induced by IFN-γ, but not those induced by IFN-β. Proteomic analysis of IFN-β- or IFN-γ-treated axons identified several differentially regulated proteins. Therefore, unlike treatment with IFN-γ, IFN-β induces a noncanonical, local antiviral response in axons. The activation of a local IFN response in axons represents a new paradigm for cytokine control of neuroinvasion. PMID:26838720

  1. Treatment of carcinoid syndrome with recombinant interferon alpha-2a.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolomeo, M; Bajetta, E; Zilembo, N; de Braud, F; Di Leo, A; Verusio, C; D'Aprile, M; Scanni, A; Barduagni, M; Barduagni A [corrected to Barduagni, M

    1993-01-01

    The prognosis and the quality of life of patients with carcinoid tumors is related either to symptoms from the substances secreted or to progressive tumor growth. Medical treatment with cytotoxic agents is of marginal value for increasing life expectancy and reducing clinical symptoms. Recent studies with interferon have shown interesting results. In the present investigation, 22 patients with carcinoid tumors and syndrome were treated with recombinant interferon alpha-2a (r-IFN alpha-2a) at the dose of 6 x 10(6) IU intramuscularly daily for 8 weeks and three times weekly thereafter. The primary tumor was localized in the foregut (n = 11), midgut (n = 7), hindgut (n = 1), and unknown site (n = 3). Most cases had liver metastasis. Seventeen patients had elevated 5-hydroxyindoloacetic acid (5-HIAA) excretion and 5 had flushing and/or diarrhea as the only clinical manifestation. Six cases presented a complete syndrome (flushing, diarrhea and 5-HIAA excretion). Control of symptoms was obtained in 80% and a 5-HIAA level reduction in 58% of the patients. The interferon treatment was more effective for control of the carcinoid syndrome than for control of tumor growth. The treatment was well tolerated and fever, myalgia, anorexia and fatigue were the most frequent side-effects. PMID:7686766

  2. Remission of liver fibrosis by interferon-alpha 2b.

    PubMed

    Moreno, M G; Muriel, P

    1995-08-01

    Fibrosis is a dynamic process associated with the continuous deposition and resorption of connective tissue, mainly collagen. Therapeutic strategies are emerging by which this dynamic process can be modulated. Since interferons are known to inhibit collagen production, the aim of this study was to investigate if the administration of interferon-alpha 2b (IFN-alpha) can restore the normal hepatic content of collagen in rats with established fibrosis. Fibrosis was induced by prolonged bile duct ligation. IFN-alpha (100,000 IU/rat/day; s.c.) was administered to fibrotic rats for 15 days. Bile duct ligation increased liver collagen content 6-fold. In addition, serum and liver markers of hepatic injury increased significantly; liver histology showed an increase in collagen deposition, and the normal architecture was lost, with large zones of necrosis being observed frequently. IFN-alpha administration reversed to normal the values of all the biochemical markers measured and restored the normal architecture of the liver. Our results demonstrated that IFN-alpha is useful in reversing fibrosis and liver damage induced by biliary obstruction in the rat. However, further investigations are required to evaluate the therapeutic relevance of interferons on non-viral fibrosis and cholestasis. PMID:7646558

  3. Production of human beta interferon in insect cells infected with a Baculovirus expression vector

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.E.; Summers, M.D.; Fraser, M.J.

    1983-12-01

    Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) was used as an expression vector for human beta interferon. By using specially constructed plasmids, the protein-coding sequences for interferon were linked to the AcNPV promoter for the gene encoding for polyhedrin, the major occlusion protein. The interferon gene was inserted at various locations relative to the AcNPV polyhedrin transcriptional and translational signals, and the interferon-polyhedrin hybrid genes were transferred to infectious AcNPV expression vectors. Biologically active interferon was produced, and greater than 95% was secreted from infected insect cells. A maximum of ca. 5 x 10/sup 6/ U of interferon activity was produced by 10/sup 6/ infected cells. These results demonstrate that AcNPV should be suitable for use as a eucaryotic expression vector for the production of products from cloned genes.

  4. Enhanced antitumor reactivity of tumor-sensitized T cells by interferon alfa

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Woude, D.L.; Wagner, P.D.; Shu, S.; Chang, A.E. )

    1991-03-01

    Tumor-draining lymph node cells from mice bearing the methylcholanthrene-induced MCA 106 tumors can be sensitized in vitro to acquire antitumor reactivity. We examined the effect of interferon alfa on the function of cells that underwent in vitro sensitization in adoptive immunotherapy. Interferon alfa increased the antitumor reactivity of in vitro sensitized cells in the treatment of MCA 106 pulmonary metastases. This effect was evident in irradiated mice, indicating that a host response to the interferon alfa was not required. Interferon alfa treatment increased class I major histocompatibility complex antigen expression on tumor cells and increased their susceptibility to lysis by in vitro sensitized cells. These results suggest that interferon alfa enhancement of adoptive immunotherapy was mediated by its effect on tumor cells. Interferon alfa may be a useful adjunct to the adoptive immunotherapy of human cancer.

  5. Delayed Liver Function Impairment Secondary to Interferon β-1a Use in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ming-Feng; Yen, Su-Chen; Chun-Yen, Lin; Rong-Kuo, Lyu

    2013-01-01

    Interferon β-1a is a widely used immunomodulation treatment for multiple sclerosis. Liver function impairment is a common side effect and usually develops in the first 6 months after interferon use. Here, we describe 2 multiple sclerosis patients who developed delayed liver function impairment 5 years after receiving interferon β-1a treatment. Their liver function recovered after discontinuing interferon use, and further detailed hepatological evaluations excluded other etiologies of liver function impairment. Our case reports illustrate that liver function impairment induced by interferon β-1a can be delayed for 5 years after starting treatment and, probably, this is an idiosyncratic reaction. Regular liver function monitoring in multiple sclerosis patients who receive interferon β is necessary even after the first 6 months of treatment, especially in those patients with concomitant use of other liver-toxic medications. PMID:23904853

  6. Interferon-λ and interleukin-22 cooperate for the induction of interferon-stimulated genes and control of rotavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ines; Schwierzeck, Vera; Nguyen, Nam; Guendel, Fabian; Gronke, Konrad; Ryffel, Bernhard; Hoelscher, Christoph; Dumoutier, Laure; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Staeheli, Peter; Diefenbach, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The epithelium is the major entry point for many viruses but the processes protecting barrier surfaces against viral infections are incompletely understood. We identify interleukin (IL)-22 produced by group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) as an amplifier of interferon (IFN)-λ signaling, a synergism required to curtail replication of rotavirus, the leading cause of childhood gastroenteritis. Cooperation between IL-22 and IFN-λ receptors, both of which are preferentially expressed by intestinal epithelial cells, was required for optimal STAT1 transcription factor activation and expression of interferon-stimulated genes. This data suggests that epithelial cells are protected against virus replication by co-opting two evolutionarily related cytokine networks. These data may inform the design of novel immunotherapies of virus infections that are sensitive to IFNs. PMID:26006013

  7. Mice devoid of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) show normal expression of type I interferon genes.

    PubMed Central

    Reis, L F; Ruffner, H; Stark, G; Aguet, M; Weissmann, C

    1994-01-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) binds tightly to the interferon (IFN)-beta promoter and has been implicated in the induction of type I IFNs. We generated mice devoid of functional IRF-1 by targeted gene disruption. As reported by others, IRF-1-deficient mice showed a discrete phenotype: the CD4/CD8 ratio was increased and IFN-gamma-induced levels of macrophage iNO synthase mRNA were strongly diminished. However, type I IFN induction in vivo by virus or double-stranded RNA was unimpaired, as evidenced by serum IFN titers and IFN mRNA levels in spleen, liver and lung. There was also no impairment in the response of type I IFN-inducible genes. Therefore, IRF-1 is not essential for these processes in vivo. Images PMID:7957048

  8. Enhancement of antiviral protection against encephalomyocarditis virus by a combination of isoprinosine and interferon.

    PubMed

    Chany, C; Cerutti, I

    1977-01-01

    The antiviral effect of interferon against encephalomyocarditis (EMC) virus infection in mice was enhanced by isoprinosine. However, the enhancement was only obtained when both interferon and the virus were inoculated into the peritoneum; the inoculation route of isoprinosone did not modify significantly the final results. In addition, the time sequence of injections was of great importance; generally the injection of isoprinosine had to precede that of interferon by a few hours. PMID:74245

  9. The effects of interferon-alpha/beta in a model of rat heart transplantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, A. D.; Klein, J. B.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Ogden, L. L. 2nd; Gray, L. A. Jr

    1992-01-01

    Interferons have multiple immunologic effects. One such effect is the activation of expression of cell surface antigens. Interferon alpha/beta enhance expression of class I but not class II histocompatibility antigens. Contradictory information has been published regarding the effect of interferon-alpha/beta administration in patients with kidney transplantation. In a model of rat heart transplantation we demonstrated that administration of interferon-alpha/beta accelerated rejection in a dose-dependent fashion in the absence of maintenance cyclosporine. Animals treated with maintenance cyclosporine had evidence of increased rejection at 20 days that was resolved completely at 45 days with cyclosporine alone.

  10. Erythema Annulare Centrifugum-Like Eruption Associated with Pegylated Interferon Treatment for Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Yoong, Deborah; Solomon, Robert; Ostrowski, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Current standard of treatment for chronic hepatitis C virus infection requires the use of pegylated interferon plus ribavirin. Treatment with these two agents has been associated with numerous side effects, which frequently include dermatologic eruptions. We report a cutaneous eruption associated with interferon having clinical presentation of erythema annulare centrifugum. The eruption occurred within days of the first interferon injection and repeatedly flared following subsequent injections. Our patient was able to continue therapy without interruption, while managing the reaction with topical corticosteroid and oral antihistamine. We conclude that this is a benign cutaneous eruption associated with interferon which can be managed without discontinuing treatment for hepatitis C. PMID:25386320

  11. [Interferon status in the treatment of neuroleptic-resistant patients with paranoid schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Maruta, N A; Rachkauskas, G S; Frolov, V M; Vysochin, E V

    2012-01-01

    We studied 73 patients with paranoid schizophrenia with resistance to neuroleptics. All patients were divided into two groups - basic (37 patients) and comparison (36 patients). Both groups received traditional treatment. Patients of the basic group were treated with the combination of reamberin and cycloferon. Before treatment, significant alterations in the interferon status (IFS), which were characterized by the decrease of serum interferon (SIFN) activity and blood α- and γ-interferons (IFN) levels, were identified in both group. The positive effect of the drug combination on clinical symptoms and interferon status (the normalization of SIFN activity, increase in blood α- and γ-IFN levels) was found. PMID:22677752

  12. Effect of Interferon and Interferon Inducers on Infections with a Nonviral Intracellular Microorganism, Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Kazar, J; Gillmore, J D; Gordon, F B

    1971-06-01

    The effect of mouse interferon (IF) on the multiplication of Chlamydia trachomatis (strain MRC-1/G) in homologous (L-929) cell cultures and the effect of the IF inducers Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and polyriboinosinic acid-polyribocytidylic acid complex (poly I:C) on the experimental infection of mice with aerosolized C. trachomatis (strain MoPn) were investigated. Treatment of infected cell cultures with IF reduced the number of cells containing chlamydial inclusions and depressed the yield of chlamydiae as determined by titrations for infectivity. Growth of chlamydiae was reduced when cultures were exposed to IF 6 or 18 hr before infection, and slight reduction of the yield was also detectable in cell cultures treated with IF at early intervals (0 or 4 hr) after chlamydial infection. No effect of IF on penetration of chlamydiae into mouse cells was observed, whether phagocytic cells from peritoneal washings or L-929 cells were used, indicating that the inhibitory effect of IF occurs after chlamydiae enter the host cell. Additional evidence was obtained that a significant effect of IF occurs at an early stage in maturation of the intracellular chlamydiae. In mice exposed repeatedly to NDV aerosols and challenged with aerosolized MoPn 8 hr after the first exposure to NDV, mortality was delayed by 2 to 3 days and lung consolidation was slightly reduced at 3 days after infection. Yields of chlamydiae from lung pools of NDV-treated mice, taken at 3, 6, and 9 days after challenge, were not significantly different from those of controls. Similar results were obtained when mice were challenged with MoPn 8 hr after intranasal injection with 100 mug of poly I:C or 24 hr after intravenous injection with 200 mug of poly I:C. In contrast, administration of 0.2 ml of NDV (10(8.3) plaque-forming units) intravenously 10 hr before or 24 hr after challenge with MoPn accelerated mortality of mice by 2 to 3 days. In all experiments, detectable levels of IF in sera or 20% lung

  13. Ribavirin improves early responses to peginterferon through enhanced interferon signaling

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Jordan J.; Lutchman, Glen A.; Heller, Theo; Hara, Koji; Pfeiffer, Julie K.; Leff, Richard D; Meek, Claudia; Rivera, Maria; Ko, Myung; Koh, Christopher; Rotman, Yaron; Ghany, Marc G.; Haynes-Williams, Vanessa; Neumann, Avidan U.; Liang, T. Jake; Hoofnagle, Jay H.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims: The therapeutic mechanisms of ribavirin for hepatitis C are unclear. Microarray analyses have shown that ribavirin increases induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). We evaluated viral kinetics, serum cytokine expression, and viral mutagenesis during early stages of peginterferon therapy with and without ribavirin. Methods: Fifty patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection genotype 1 were randomly assigned to groups that were given peginterferon alfa-2a, with or without ribavirin, for 4 weeks; all patients then received an additional 44 weeks of combination therapy. First- and second-phase viral kinetics were evaluated. Serum levels of IP10, MIG, and MCP1 were quantified as measures of the ISG response. NS5A and NS5B were partially sequenced and mutation rates were calculated. Results: The first-phase decrease in HCV RNA was similar between groups. Patients that received ribavirin had a more rapid second-phase decrease, compared with patients that did not receive ribavirin—particularly those with an adequate first-phase decrease (0.61 vs. 0.35 log10 IU/mL/week, p=0.018). At 12 hrs, fold induction of serum IP10 was higher in patients given the combination therapy than those given only peginterferon (7.6- vs. 3.8-fold, p=0.01); however, the difference was greatest in patients with an adequate first-phase decrease in HCV RNA. IP10-induction correlated with first- and second-phase kinetics and with ribavirin serum concentrations on day 3. HCV mutation rates were similar between groups. Conclusion: Ribavirin improves the kinetics of the early response to therapy in patients with an adequate initial response to peginterferon. Induction of interferon-stimulated cytokines correlates with viral kinetics following ribavirin therapy, suggesting that ribavirin promotes interferon signaling. PMID:20303352

  14. Spreading Depression Transiently Disrupts Myelin via Interferon-gamma Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pusic, Aya D.; Mitchell, Heidi M.; Kunkler, Phillip E.; Klauer, Neal; Kraig, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis and migraine with aura are clinically correlated and both show imaging changes suggestive of myelin disruption. Furthermore, cortical myelin loss in the cuprizone animal model of multiple sclerosis enhances susceptibility to spreading depression, the likely underlying cause of migraine with aura. Since multiple sclerosis pathology involves inflammatory T cell lymphocyte production of interferon-gamma and a resulting increase in oxidative stress, we tested the hypothesis that spreading depression disrupts myelin through similar signaling pathways. Rat hippocampal slice cultures were initially used to explore myelin loss in spreading depression, since they contain T cells, and allow for controlled tissue microenvironment. These experiments were then translated to the in vivo condition in neocortex. Spreading depression in slice cultures induced significant loss of myelin integrity and myelin basic protein one day later, with gradual recovery by seven days. Myelin basic protein loss was abrogated by T cell depletion, neutralization of interferon-gamma, and pharmacological inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase-2. Conversely, one day after exposure to interferon-gamma, significant reductions in spreading depression threshold, increases in oxidative stress, and reduced levels of glutathione, an endogenous neutral sphingomyelinase-2 inhibitor, emerged. Similarly, spreading depression triggered significant T cell accumulation, sphingomyelinase activation, increased oxidative stress, and reduction of grey and white matter myelin in vivo. Myelin disruption is involved in spreading depression, thereby providing pathophysiological links between multiple sclerosis and migraine with aura. Myelin disruption may promote spreading depression by enhancing aberrant excitability. Thus, preservation of myelin integrity may provide novel therapeutic targets for migraine with aura. PMID:25500111

  15. Acetaminophen Modulates the Transcriptional Response to Recombinant Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Aaron; Flaman, Anathea S.; Prasad, Shiv S.; Gravel, Caroline; Williams, Andrew; Yauk, Carole L.; Li, Xuguang

    2010-01-01

    Background Recombinant interferon treatment can result in several common side effects including fever and injection-site pain. Patients are often advised to use acetaminophen or other over-the-counter pain medications as needed. Little is known regarding the transcriptional changes induced by such co-administration. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested whether the administration of acetaminophen causes a change in the response normally induced by interferon-β treatment. CD-1 mice were administered acetaminophen (APAP), interferon-β (IFN-β) or a combination of IFN-β+APAP and liver and serum samples were collected for analysis. Differential gene expression was determined using an Agilent 22 k whole mouse genome microarray. Data were analyzed by several methods including Gene Ontology term clustering and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. We observed a significant change in the transcription profile of hepatic cells when APAP was co-administered with IFN-β. These transcriptional changes included a marked up-regulation of genes involved in signal transduction and cell differentiation and down-regulation of genes involved in cellular metabolism, trafficking and the IκBK/NF-κB cascade. Additionally, we observed a large decrease in the expression of several IFN-induced genes including Ifit-3, Isg-15, Oasl1, Zbp1 and predicted gene EG634650 at both early and late time points. Conclusions/Significance A significant change in the transcriptional response was observed following co-administration of IFN-β+APAP relative to IFN-β treatment alone. These results suggest that administration of acetaminophen has the potential to modify the efficacy of IFN-β treatment. PMID:20544007

  16. Polymorphism in the interferon-alpha gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Golovleva, I.; Kandefer-Szerszen, M.; Beckman, L.; Lundgren, E.

    1996-01-01

    A pronounced genetic polymorphism of the interferon type I gene family has been assumed on the basis of RFLP analysis of the genomic region as well as the large number of sequences published compared to the number of loci. However, IFNA2 is the only locus that has been carefully analyzed concerning gene frequency, and only naturally occurring rare alleles have been found. We have extended the studies on a variation of expressed sequences by studying the IFNA1, IFNA2, IFNA10, IFNA13, IFNA14, and IFNA17 genes. Genomic white-blood-cell DNA from a population sample of blood donors and from a family material were screened by single-nucleotide primer extension (allele-specific primer extension) of PCR fragments. Because of sequence similarities, in some cases "nested" PCR was used, and, when applicable, restriction analysis or control sequencing was performed. All individuals carried the interferon-alpha 1 and interferon-alpha 13 variants but not the LeIF D variant. At the IFNA2 and IFNA14 loci only one sequence variant was found, while in the IFNA10 and IFNA17 groups two alleles were detected in each group. The IFNA10 and IFNA17 alleles segregated in families and showed a close fit to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. There was a significant linkage disequilibrium between IFNA10 and IFNA17 alleles. The fact that the extent of genetic polymorphism was lower than expected suggests that a majority of the previously described gene sequences represent nonpolymorphic rare mutants that may have arisen in tumor cell lines. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8751858

  17. Links between innate and adaptive immunity via type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Le Bon, Agnes; Tough, David F

    2002-08-01

    Type I interferon (IFN-alpha/beta) is expressed rapidly following exposure to a wide variety of infectious agents and plays a key role in innate control of virus replication. Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cells both produce IFN-alpha/beta and undergo maturation in response to IFN-alpha/beta. Moreover, IFN-alpha/beta has been shown to potently enhance immune responses in vivo through the stimulation of dendritic cells. These findings indicate that IFN-alpha/beta serves as a signal linking innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:12088676

  18. Effect of space flight on interferon production - mechanistic studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1991-01-01

    Ground-based models were studied for the effects of space flight on immune responses. Most time was spent on the model for the antiorthostatic, hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension model for rats. Results indicate that suspension is useful for modeling the effects of spaceflight on functional immune responses, such as interferon and interleukin production. It does not appear to be useful for modeling shifts in leukocyte sub-populations. Calcium and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D sub 3 appear to play a pivitol role in regulating shifts in immune responses due to suspension. The macrophage appears to be an important target cell for the effects of suspension on immune responses.

  19. Regulation of Hepatocyte Fate by Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Horras, Christopher J.; Lamb, Cheri L.; Mitchell, Kristen A.

    2011-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-γ is a cytokine known for its immunomodulatory and anti-proliferative action. In the liver, IFN-γ can induce hepatocyte apoptosis or inhibit hepatocyte cell cycle progression. This article reviews recent mechanistic reports that describe how IFN-γ may direct the fate of hepatocytes either towards apoptosis or a cell cycle arrest. This review also describes a probable role for IFN-γ in modulating hepatocyte fate during liver regeneration, transplantation, hepatitis, fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and highlights promising areas of research that may lead to the development of IFN-γ as a therapy to enhance recovery from liver disease. PMID:21334249

  20. Computer simulations of human interferon gamma mutated forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilkova, E.; Litov, L.; Petkov, P.; Petkov, P.; Markov, S.; Ilieva, N.

    2010-01-01

    In the general framework of the computer-aided drug design, the method of molecular-dynamics simulations is applied for investigation of the human interferon-gamma (hIFN-γ) binding to its two known ligands (its extracellular receptor and the heparin-derived oligosaccharides). A study of 100 mutated hIFN-γ forms is presented, the mutations encompassing residues 86-88. The structural changes are investigated by comparing the lengths of the α-helices, in which these residues are included, in the native hIFN-γ molecule and in the mutated forms. The most intriguing cases are examined in detail.

  1. Duration of effect of interferon aerosol prophylaxis of vesicular stomatitis virus infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wyde, P R; Sun, C S; Wilson, S Z; Knight, V

    1985-01-01

    Mice were exposed for 8 h to continuous small-particle aerosols containing natural mouse alpha interferon (estimated dosage 100 U per mouse) or one of two concentrations of hybrid recombinant alpha interferon A/D bgl (estimated dosages of 100 and 10,000 U per mouse, respectively). On days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 after exposure to these interferons, three mice from each group were inoculated intranasally with 100 PFU of vesicular stomatitis virus. Control mice were exposed to aerosols of saline or inoculated intraperitoneally with either natural mouse alpha interferon (350 U) or one of two doses of hybrid recombinant alpha interferon A/D bgl (350 or 35,000 U) and challenged similarly. Of mice injected intraperitoneally, only those given 35,000 U of hybrid recombinant alpha interferon A/D bgl 24 h before virus challenge were protected from pulmonary infection, compared with the saline-treated control mice. Of mice given 100 U of either interferon by small-particle aerosol, only those exposed 24 h before inoculation of vesicular stomatitis virus had reduced pulmonary titers of the virus. However, of mice given ca. 10,000 U of hybrid recombinant alpha interferon A/D bgl by small-particle aerosol, all groups except those exposed 9 days before virus inoculation had significantly reduced lung virus titers. PMID:2984982

  2. Interferon Administered in the Cerebrospinal Space and Its Effect on Rabies in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Monto; Nash, Carolyn; Morgan, Charles W.; Armstrong, John A.; Carroll, Robert G.; Postic, Bosko

    1974-01-01

    Because combined administration of intramuscular and intravenous interferon has been partially successful in the incubationary treatment of rabies, the effect of direct interferon administration into the cerebrospinal fluid space was tested. After injecting 1,800 U of interferon into the cisterna magna or the lateral ventricle, periodic samples, obtained by cisternal taps, showed that 1 to 5% remained after 24 h, as opposed to the known clearance of interferon from the bloodstream to this level within minutes. The distributions of interferon and 131I-labeled albumin were similar as demonstrated by kinetics of clearance monitored over 24 h. Beginning with and after experimental infection of rabbits, daily intraventricular injections of one million units of interferon were given for as long as 3 weeks. Interferon was prepared from cell culture fluids after pressure dialysis and chromatography on Sephadex G-100. This intensive treatment did not prevent encephalitis, but prolonged the length of the incubation period by one- to two-thirds. The outcome after intraventricular administration was not as favorable as when one million units equally divided between intramuscular and intravenous injections were given at the time of challenge. Interferon administered in the subarachnoid space in this fashion is apparently inadequate to protect the rabbit against rabies. Its role as an adjunct measure, or other methods of administration in the nervous system, remains to be examined. Images PMID:4816460

  3. Intranasal application of alpha interferon reduces morbidity associated with low pathogenic avian influenza infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type I interferons, including interferon alpha (IFN-alpha), are expressed rapidly after viral infection, and represent a first line of defense initiated by the innate immune response. Following infection of chickens with avian influenza virus (AIV), transcription of IFN-alpha is quickly up regulate...

  4. Ribavirin Potentiates Interferon Action by Augmenting Interferon-Stimulated Gene Induction in Hepatitis C Virus Cell Culture Models

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Emmanuel; Feld, Jordan J.; Li, Qisheng; Hu, Zongyi; Fried, Michael W.; Liang, T. Jake

    2012-01-01

    The combination of pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin is the standard treatment for chronic hepatitis C. Our recent clinical study suggests that ribavirin augments the induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) in patients treated for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In order to further characterize the mechanisms of action of ribavirin, we examined the effect of ribavirin treatment on ISG induction in cell culture. In addition, the effect of ribavirin on infectious HCV cell culture systems was studied. Similar to interferon (IFN)-α, ribavirin potently inhibits JFH-1 infection of Huh7.5.1 cells in a dose-dependent manner, which spans the physiological concentration of ribavirin in vivo. Microarray analysis and subsequent quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays demonstrated that ribavirin treatment resulted in the induction of a distinct set of ISGs. These ISGs, including IFN regulatory factors 7 and 9, are known to play an important role in anti-HCV responses. When ribavirin is used in conjunction with IFN-α, induction of specific ISGs is synergistic when compared with either drug applied separately. Direct up-regulation of these antiviral genes by ribavirin is mediated by a novel mechanism different from those associated with IFN signaling and intracellular double-stranded RNA sensing pathways such as RIG-I and MDA5. RNA interference studies excluded the activation of the Toll-like receptor and nuclear factor κB pathways in the action of ribavirin. Conclusion Our study suggests that ribavirin, acting by way of a novel innate mechanism, potentiates the anti-HCV effect of IFN. Understanding the mechanism of action of ribavirin would be valuable in identifying novel antivirals PMID:21254160

  5. Interferon regulatory factors and TFIIB cooperatively regulate interferon-responsive promoter activity in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, I M; Blanco, J C; Tsai, S Y; Tsai, M J; Ozato, K

    1996-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) bind to the interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) and regulate interferon- and virus-mediated gene expression. IRF-1 acts as a transcriptional activator, while IRF-2 acts as a repressor. Here we show that IRF-1 and IRF-2 bind to both cellular TFIIB, a component of the basal transcription machinery, and recombinant TFIIB (rTFIIB) and that this protein-protein interaction facilitates binding of IRFs to the ISRE. A functional interaction between TFIIB and IRF was assessed by a newly established in vitro transcription assay in which recombinant IRF-1 (rIRF-1) stimulated transcription specifically from an ISRE-containing template. With this assay we show that rIRF-1 and rTFIIB cooperatively enhance the ISRE promoter in vitro. We found that the activity of an ISRE-containing promoter was cooperatively enhanced upon cotransfection of TFIIB and IRF-1 cDNAs into P19 embryonal carcinoma cells, further demonstrating functional interactions in vivo. The cooperative enhancement by TFIIB and IRF-1 was independent of the TATA sequence in the ISRE promoter but dependent on the initiator sequence (Inr) and was abolished when P19 cells were induced to differentiate by retinoic acid treatment. In contrast, cotransfection of TFIIB and IRF-1 into NIH 3T3 cells resulted in a dose-dependent repression of promoter activation which occurred in a TATA-dependent manner. Our results indicate the presence of a cell type-specific factor that mediates the functional interaction between IRFs and TFIIB and that acts in conjunction with the requirement of TATA and Inr for promoter activation. PMID:8887661

  6. Effect of antiorthostatic suspension on interferon-alpha/beta production by the mouse (41939)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Andrea; Steffen, Joseph M.; Musacchia, X. J.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Mandel, Adrian D.

    1984-01-01

    Mice were suspended in a model that simulates the weightlessness that occurs during prolonged space flight. After one and two weeks of suspension in an antiorthostatic (head-down tilt) position, the mice were challenged with polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid to induce interferon-alpha/beta. Interferon production was severely reduced in mice that had been suspended. When mice were allowed to recover in cages for a week following removal from suspension, they recovered their full interferon-production capacity. Mice suspended in an orthostatic (horizontal) position did not have their interferon production capabilities affected, which indicates that stress per se was not a major component in the effects of antiorthostatic suspension on interferon induction.

  7. Role for herpes simplex virus 1 ICP27 in the inhibition of type I interferon signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Karen E.; Song, Byeongwoon; Knipe, David M.

    2008-05-10

    Host cells respond to viral infection by many mechanisms, including the production of type I interferons which act in a paracrine and autocrine manner to induce the expression of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Viruses have evolved means to inhibit interferon signaling to avoid induction of the innate immune response. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) has several mechanisms to inhibit type I interferon production, the activities of ISGs, and the interferon signaling pathway itself. We report that the inhibition of the Jak/STAT pathway by HSV-1 requires viral gene expression and that viral immediate-early protein ICP27 plays a role in downregulating STAT-1 phosphorylation and in preventing the accumulation of STAT-1 in the nucleus. We also show that expression of ICP27 by transfection causes an inhibition of IFN-induced STAT-1 nuclear accumulation. Therefore, ICP27 is necessary and sufficient for at least some of the effects of HSV infection on STAT-1.

  8. Reduction in intensity of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in mice by aerosol administration of gamma interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, J M; Liggitt, H D; Brunette, E N; Fuchs, H J; Shellito, J E; Debs, R J

    1991-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in patients with AIDS may result from impaired local release of gamma interferon from lung lymphocytes and subsequent failure of macrophage activation. We tested this hypothesis with mice rendered immunodeficient by selective depletion of CD4+ lymphocytes and inoculated intratracheally with P. carinii. After aerosol administration of recombinant murine gamma interferon, the intensity of P. carinii infection in these mice was reduced in comparison with that in mice not treated with gamma interferon. Histologic scoring of lung tissue did not reveal additional pulmonary inflammation attributable to gamma interferon. Aerosol administration of gamma interferon may reduce the intensity of P. carinii infection by augmentation of host defense, despite persistent CD4+ lymphocyte depletion. Images PMID:1682252

  9. 78 FR 46593 - Prospective Grant of Start-up Exclusive License: Kits for the Detection of Human Interferon-Alpha...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... the Detection of Human Interferon-Alpha Subtypes and Allotypes AGENCY: National Institutes of Health...-2008/0), titled ``Compositions for Detecting Human Interferon- Alpha Subtypes and Methods of Use'', to.... This technology relates to use of kits for the detection of human interferon-alpha subtypes...

  10. Murine interferon system regulation: isolation and characterization of a mutant 3T6 cell engaged in the semiconstitutive synthesis of interferon.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, A P; Colby, C

    1978-06-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of a virus-resistant mutant of murine 3T6 cells. The mutant, designated 3T6-VrB2, displays a high degree of resistance to infection by members of the toga-, rhabdo- and picornavirus classes. The level of this resistance to infection is similar to the parent 3T6 pretreated with approximately 100 lU/ml of interferon. Upon co-cultivation of 3T6-VrB2 cells with interferon-sensitive mouse cells, an antiviral state is induced in the latter cells as measured by a reduction of virus yield following infection. The nature of the induction is defined by a series of experiments using anti-mouse interferon antiserum. In the presence of this antiserum, the ability of the mutant to induce an antiviral state in interferon-sensitive mouse cells upon co-cultivation is eliminated. Additionally, growth of the mutant cells in the presence of this antiserum causes a reversal of the virus-resistant phenotype. Our results indicate that 3T6-VrB2 contains a mutation affecting the regulation of the murine interferon system such that the cell is engaged in the semiconstitutive synthesis of interferon. PMID:208779

  11. Interferon-λ restricts West Nile virus neuroinvasion by tightening the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Lazear, Helen M; Daniels, Brian P; Pinto, Amelia K; Huang, Albert C; Vick, Sarah C; Doyle, Sean E; Gale, Michael; Klein, Robyn S; Diamond, Michael S

    2015-04-22

    Although interferon-λ [also known as type III interferon or interleukin-28 (IL-28)/IL-29] restricts infection by several viruses, its inhibitory mechanism has remained uncertain. We used recombinant interferon-λ and mice lacking the interferon-λ receptor (IFNLR1) to evaluate the effect of interferon-λ on infection with West Nile virus, an encephalitic flavivirus. Cell culture studies in mouse keratinocytes and dendritic cells showed no direct antiviral effect of exogenous interferon-λ, even though expression of interferon-stimulated genes was induced. We observed no differences in West Nile virus burden between wild-type and Ifnlr1(-/-) mice in the draining lymph nodes, spleen, or blood. We detected increased West Nile virus infection in the brain and spinal cord of Ifnlr1(-/-) mice, yet this was not associated with a direct antiviral effect in mouse neurons. Instead, we observed an increase in blood-brain barrier permeability in Ifnlr1(-/-) mice. Treatment of mice with pegylated interferon-λ2 resulted in decreased blood-brain barrier permeability, reduced West Nile virus infection in the brain without affecting viremia, and improved survival against lethal virus challenge. An in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier showed that interferon-λ signaling in mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells increased transendothelial electrical resistance, decreased virus movement across the barrier, and modulated tight junction protein localization in a protein synthesis- and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)-independent manner. Our data establish an indirect antiviral function of interferon-λ in which noncanonical signaling through IFNLR1 tightens the blood-brain barrier and restricts viral neuroinvasion and pathogenesis. PMID:25904743

  12. Interferon-λ restricts West Nile virus neuroinvasion by tightening the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Lazear, Helen M.; Daniels, Brian P.; Pinto, Amelia K.; Huang, Albert C.; Vick, Sarah C.; Doyle, Sean E.; Gale, Michael; Klein, Robyn S.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Although interferon-λ [also known as type III interferon or interleukin-28 (IL-28)/IL-29] restricts infection by several viruses, its inhibitory mechanism has remained uncertain. We used recombinant interferon-λ and mice lacking the interferon-λ receptor (IFNLR1) to evaluate the effect of interferon-λ on infection with West Nile virus, an encephalitic flavivirus. Cell culture studies in mouse keratinocytes and dendritic cells showed no direct antiviral effect of exogenous interferon-λ, even though expression of interferon-stimulated genes was induced. We observed no differences in West Nile virus burden between wild-type and Ifnlr1−/− mice in the draining lymph nodes, spleen, or blood. We detected increased West Nile virus infection in the brain and spinal cord of Ifnlr1−/− mice, yet this was not associated with a direct antiviral effect in mouse neurons. Instead, we observed an increase in blood-brain barrier permeability in Ifnlr1−/− mice. Treatment of mice with pegylated interferon-λ2 resulted in decreased blood-brain barrier permeability, reduced West Nile virus infection in the brain without affecting viremia, and improved survival against lethal virus challenge. An in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier showed that interferon-λ signaling in mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells increased transendothelial electrical resistance, decreased virus movement across the barrier, and modulated tight junction protein localization in a protein synthesis– and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)–independent manner. Our data establish an indirect antiviral function of interferon-λ in which noncanonical signaling through IFNLR1 tightens the blood-brain barrier and restricts viral neuroinvasion and pathogenesis. PMID:25904743

  13. Type I interferon signaling protects mice from lethal henipavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Dhondt, Kévin P; Mathieu, Cyrille; Chalons, Marie; Reynaud, Joséphine M; Vallve, Audrey; Raoul, Hervé; Horvat, Branka

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are closely related, recently emerged paramyxoviruses that form Henipavirus genus and are capable of causing considerable morbidity and mortality in a number of mammalian species, including humans. However, in contrast to many other species and despite expression of functional virus entry receptors, mice are resistant to henipavirus infection. We report here the susceptibility of mice deleted for the type I interferon receptor (IFNAR-KO) to both HeV and NiV. Intraperitoneally infected mice developed fatal encephalitis, with pathology and immunohistochemical features similar to what was found in humans. Viral RNA was found in the majority of analyzed organs, and sublethally infected animals developed virus-specific neutralizing antibodies. Altogether, these results reveal IFNAR-KO mice as a new small animal model to study HeV and NiV pathogenesis, prophylaxis, and treatment and suggest the critical role of type I interferon signaling in the control of henipavirus infection. PMID:23089589

  14. Interferon action on parental Semliki forest virus ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Friedman, R M; Fantes, K H; Levy, H B; Carter, W B

    1967-12-01

    Actinomycin D-treated chick fibroblasts were infected with purified (32)P-labeled Semliki forest virus, and ribonucleic acid (RNA) was extracted after 1 or 2 hr. Within 1 hr, viral RNA forms sedimenting in sucrose gradients at 42S, 30S, and 16S were present. The 42S form corresponded to the RNA of the virion. The 16S form appeared to be a double-stranded template for the formation of new viral RNA, since nascent RNA was associated with it and the molecule could be heat-denatured and subsequently reannealed by slow cooling. Interferon treatment before infection, or puromycin (50 mug/ml) or cycloheximide (200 mug/ml) added at the time of virus infection, had no effect on the formation of the 30S RNA but inhibited the production of the 16S form. Several findings made it unlikely that these results were due to breakdown of parental RNA and reincorporation of (32)P into progeny structures. The results suggested that the mechanism of interferon action involves inhibition of protein synthesis by parental viral RNA, since a specific viral RNA polymerase had previously been demonstrated to be necessary for production of 16S RNA. No protein synthesis appears necessary for formation of 30S RNA from parental virus RNA. PMID:5621488

  15. Hepatitis B, interferon, and acne fulminans in a young girl.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sandeep; Malik, Ajay; Kumar, Dharmendra; Sodhi, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Acne fulminans (AF) is a very rare severe form of acne seen in young males, characterized by a sudden and explosive onset of hemorrhagic pustules and ulceration on the trunk, systemic features in the form of fever, polyarthropathy, malaise, erythema nodosum and painful osteolytic bone involvement with leukocytosis, and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Conventional treatment of AF includes corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agents for the initial phase followed by isotretinoin. Active hepatitis B infection with a high viral load precludes the administration of any immunosuppressive drugs. We present the case of an 18-year-old girl with a history of occasional acne who presented with AF of sudden onset following administration of interferon-alpha-2a for her recently detected hepatitis B infection. Management of hepatitis B was withheld in view of her general condition. The patient was managed with low dose isotretinoin with subsidence of lesions. AF in a young female precipitated by interferon and its management with isotretinoin in the presence of active hepatitis B infection make the case unique. PMID:27057488

  16. Response of differentiated but not anaplastic teratoma to interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Rustin, G. J.; Kaye, S. B.; Williams, C. J.; Newlands, E. S.; Bagshawe, K. D.; Toy, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    A Phase 2 trial was conducted using intramuscular lymphoblastoid interferon (IFN, Wellcome Research Laboratories), 4 MU per day, in 10 patients with chemotherapy-resistant teratomas. There was stabilisation of disease in 2 patients both of whom were in retrospect considered to have had differentiated teratoma at the time of IFN administration. There was progression of presumed active anaplastic germ cell tumour in 8 patients. One of these patients, a 15-year-old boy with biopsy proven differentiated teratoma has received 2 courses of lymphoblastoid IFN and 1 course of recombinant leukocyte A IFN (Roche Products Ltd.) lasting 5 1/2, 8 and 8+ months respectively. He has had a mixed response in his differentiated tumour which on each occasion has been maintained for the duration that he received IFN. Rising HCG levels during his second course of interferon required additional cytotoxic chemotherapy. Lymphoblastoid IFN does not appear to be active against anaplastic germ cell tumours but both lymphoblastoid and recombinant leukocyte A IFN may be useful in the treatment of unresectable differentiated teratoma. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:6498061

  17. The HIN-200 family: More than interferon-inducible genes?

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlow, Louise E.A.; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Clarke, Christopher J.P. . E-mail: chris.clarke@petermac.org

    2005-08-01

    The HIN-200 family was initially grouped together based on their hemopoietic expression, interferon-inducibility, nuclear localization, and characteristic 200 amino-acid domains. In this review, we performed a comprehensive search of genome databases and determined the location of previously characterized and predicted genes within the human, mouse, and rat HIN-200 loci. Several novel proteins were predicted in the mouse and rat. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of this family of proteins and highlight the most important findings. In addition to a role in interferon biology, there is now good evidence supporting a role for these proteins as regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation. The activity of HIN-200 proteins is not restricted to the hemopoietic system as they are expressed and can function in a variety of other cells and tissues. The importance of HIN-200 proteins in disease now is beginning to be understood as they appear to be involved in autoimmunity and may act as tumor suppressor proteins.

  18. Interleukins, interferons, and establishment of pregnancy in pigs.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Daniel J; Lucy, Matthew C; D Geisert, Rodney

    2016-06-01

    Early pregnancy in mammals requires complex and highly orchestrated cellular and molecular interactions between specialized cells within the endometrium and the conceptus. Proinflammatory cytokines are small signaling proteins released by leukocytes that augment innate and adaptive immune responses. They are also released by the mammalian trophectoderm as the conceptus apposes the uterine surface for implantation. On approximately day 12 of development in pigs, the conceptus undergoes a rapid morphological transformation referred to as elongation while simultaneously releasing estrogens and a novel conceptus form of interleukin-1 beta (IL1β). Following elongation, pig conceptuses express interferon gamma (IFNγ) and, in lesser amounts, interferon delta (IFNδ). Significant IFN signaling takes place within the endometrium between day 14 and 18 of pregnancy as the conceptus intimately associates with the uterine epithelium. Based on studies carried out in pigs and other mammals, the combined spacio-temporal activities of conceptus estrogens, IL1β, and IFN set in motion a series of coordinated events that promote establishment of pregnancy. This is achieved through enhancement of conceptus development, uterine receptivity, maternal-fetal hemotropic exchange, and endometrial leukocyte function. These events require activation of specific signaling pathways within the uterine luminal epithelium, glandular epithelium, and stroma. Here, we review proinflammatory cytokine expression by pig conceptuses and the hypothesized actions of these molecules during establishment of pregnancy. PMID:27001998

  19. Hepatitis B, interferon, and acne fulminans in a young girl

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sandeep; Malik, Ajay; Kumar, Dharmendra; Sodhi, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Acne fulminans (AF) is a very rare severe form of acne seen in young males, characterized by a sudden and explosive onset of hemorrhagic pustules and ulceration on the trunk, systemic features in the form of fever, polyarthropathy, malaise, erythema nodosum and painful osteolytic bone involvement with leukocytosis, and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Conventional treatment of AF includes corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agents for the initial phase followed by isotretinoin. Active hepatitis B infection with a high viral load precludes the administration of any immunosuppressive drugs. We present the case of an 18-year-old girl with a history of occasional acne who presented with AF of sudden onset following administration of interferon-alpha-2a for her recently detected hepatitis B infection. Management of hepatitis B was withheld in view of her general condition. The patient was managed with low dose isotretinoin with subsidence of lesions. AF in a young female precipitated by interferon and its management with isotretinoin in the presence of active hepatitis B infection make the case unique. PMID:27057488

  20. Interferon Lambda: A New Sword in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lasfar, Ahmed; Abushahba, Walid; Balan, Murugabaskar; Cohen-Solal, Karine A.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of the interferon-lambda (IFN-λ) family has considerably contributed to our understanding of the role of interferon not only in viral infections but also in cancer. IFN-λ proteins belong to the new type III IFN group. Type III IFN is structurally similar to type II IFN (IFN-γ) but functionally identical to type I IFN (IFN-α/β). However, in contrast to type I or type II IFNs, the response to type III IFN is highly cell-type specific. Only epithelial-like cells and to a lesser extent some immune cells respond to IFN-λ. This particular pattern of response is controlled by the differential expression of the IFN-λ receptor, which, in contrast to IFN-α, should result in limited side effects in patients. Recently, we and other groups have shown in several animal models a potent antitumor role of IFN-λ that will open a new challenging era for the current IFN therapy. PMID:22190970

  1. Interferon-Stimulated Gene 15 and the Protein ISGylation System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongxian

    2011-01-01

    Interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) is one of the most upregulated genes upon Type I interferon treatment or pathogen infection. Its 17 kDa protein product, ISG15, was the first ubiquitin-like modifier identified, and is similar to a ubiquitin linear dimer. As ISG15 modifies proteins in a similar manner to ubiquitylation, protein conjugation by ISG15 is termed ISGylation. Some of the primary enzymes that promote ISGylation are also involved in ubiquitin conjugation. The process to remove ISG15 from its conjugated proteins, termed de-ISGylation, is performed by a cellular ISG15-specific protease, ubiquitin-specific proteases with molecular mass 43 kDa (UBP43)/ubiquitin-specific proteases 18. Relative to ubiquitin, the biological function of ISG15 is still poorly understood, but ISG15 appears to play important roles in various biological and cellular functions. Therefore, there is growing interest in ISG15, as the study of free ISG15 and functional consequences of ISGylation/de-ISGylation may identify useful therapeutic targets. This review highlights recent discoveries and remaining questions important to understanding the biological functions of ISG15. PMID:21190487

  2. Exogenous interferon prolongs survival of rabies infected mice.

    PubMed

    Mehta, S; Roy, S; Mukherjee, S; Yadav, N; Patel, N; Chowdhary, A

    2015-09-01

    Rabies is an acute viral infection that causes encephalomyelitis in almost all warm blooded animals and is invariably fatal once the clinical signs appear. The present study was carried out to assess the effect of recombinant human interferon alpha (rhIFN α-2A) treatment on the survival of rabies infected mice and its correlation with cytokines expression. The gene expression of TNF-α and IL-6 was measured by SYBR Green Real Time PCR for two groups-"Pre-exposure" (mice were inoculated with rhIFN α-2A prior to rabies infection) and "Post-exposure" (mice were inoculated with rhIFN α-2A post rabies virus infection). Delayed mortality was observed in interferon treated infected groups. In addition, statistically significant decrease (P < 0.0001) in the expression of TNF-α and IL-6 was observed, both in the pre-exposure and post-exposure groups. These findings indicate that modulation of cytokine secretion using exogenous biologicals such as rhIFN may offer novel therapeutic approaches to treat diseases such as rabies. PMID:26396983

  3. Interferon but not MxB inhibits foamy retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Bähr, Ariane; Singer, Anna; Hain, Anika; Vasudevan, Ananda Ayyappan Jaguva; Schilling, Mirjam; Reh, Juliane; Riess, Maximilian; Panitz, Sylvia; Serrano, Vanessa; Schweizer, Matthias; König, Renate; Chanda, Sumit; Häussinger, Dieter; Kochs, Georg; Lindemann, Dirk; Münk, Carsten

    2016-01-15

    Foamy viruses (FV) are retroviruses that are widely distributed in primate and non-primate animal species. We tested here FV with capsids of simian and non-simian origin for sensitivity to interferon-β (IFN-β). Our data show significant inhibition of FV by IFN-β early in infection of human HOS and THP-1 but not of HEK293T cells. The post-entry restriction of FV was not mediated by the interferon-induced MxB protein that was recently identified as a capsid-interacting restriction factor targeting Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) before integration. Neither the ectopic expression of MxA or MxB in HEK293T cells nor the lack of MxB expression in CRISPR/CAS MxB THP-1 knockout cells impacted the infection of the tested FV. IFN-β treated THP-1 and THP-1 KO MxB cells showed the same extend of restriction to FV. Together, the data demonstrate that IFN-β inhibits FV early in infection and that MxB is not a restriction factor of FV. PMID:26609934

  4. Interferon Gamma Receptor: The Beginning of the Journey

    PubMed Central

    Blouin, Cédric M.; Lamaze, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Our view of endocytosis and membrane trafficking of transmembrane receptors has dramatically changed over the last 20 years. Several new endocytic routes have been discovered and mechanistically characterized in mammalian cells. Long considered as a passive means to terminate signaling through down-regulation of the number of activated receptors at the plasma membrane, it is now established that receptor endocytosis and endosomal sorting can be directly linked to the regulation of intracellular signaling pathways. The functional links between membrane trafficking of interferon receptors and JAK/STAT signaling have recently begun to be unraveled. These studies raise the exciting possibility that a certain level of signal specificity can be achieved through endocytosis and selective localization of the activated complexes within cellular membranes. The ongoing development of high-resolution cell imaging techniques with better spatial and temporal resolution gives new means of deciphering the inherent complexity of membrane trafficking and signaling. This should help to better comprehend the molecular mechanisms by which endocytosis and endosomal sorting of interferon receptors can orchestrate signaling selectivity within the JAK/STAT pathway that can be activated by as many as 60 different cytokines, growth factors, and hormones. PMID:24027571

  5. Interferons Mediate Terminal Differentiation of Human Cortical Thymic Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Laine, David; Zaffran, Yona; Azocar, Olga; Servet-Delprat, Christine; Wild, T. Fabian; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Valentin, Hélène

    2002-01-01

    In the thymus, epithelial cells comprise a heterogeneous population required for the generation of functional T lymphocytes, suggesting that thymic epithelium disruption by viruses may compromise T-cell lymphopoiesis in this organ. In a previous report, we demonstrated that in vitro, measles virus induced differentiation of cortical thymic epithelial cells as characterized by (i) cell growth arrest, (ii) morphological and phenotypic changes, and (iii) apoptotis as a final step of this process. In the present report, we have analyzed the mechanisms involved. First, measles virus-induced differentiation of thymic epithelial cells is shown to be strictly dependent on beta interferon (IFN-β) secretion. In addition, transfection with double-stranded RNA, a common intermediate of replication for a broad spectrum of viruses, is reported to similarly mediate thymic epithelial cell differentiation through IFN-β induction. Finally, we demonstrated that recombinant IFN-α, IFN-β, or IFN-γ was sufficient to induce differentiation and apoptosis of uninfected thymic epithelial cells. These observations suggested that interferon secretion by either infected cells or activated leukocytes, such as plasmacytoid dendritic cells or lymphocytes, may induce thymic epithelium disruption in a pathological context. Thus, we have identified a new mechanism that may contribute to thymic atrophy and altered T-cell lymphopoiesis associated with many infections. PMID:12050353

  6. Ophthalmological side effects of interferon therapy of chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Medhat, Eman; Esmat, Gamal; Hamza, Eman; Abdel Aziz, Amr; Fouad Fathalah, Waleed; Zakaria, Zeinab; Mostafa, Sameh

    2016-01-01

    Background Egypt has one of the highest prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) worldwide. Ophthalmological side effects are recognized complications of interferon (IFN) therapy. This study aimed to evaluate IFN-induced ophthalmological manifestations in patients receiving PEGylated interferon (PEG IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) and to assess the effect of IFN duration, response and systemic risk factors on the severity. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 100 patients with chronic HCV who were candidates for PEG-IFN and RBV therapy. All patients were subjected to clinical and ophthalmological examination, laboratory investigations, abdominal ultrasound, colored fundus photography and fundus fluorescein angiography, follow up was made at weeks 12, 24, and 48 of treatment. Results IFN-induced retinopathy had been found in (9/100; 9%), 5 (5/9; 55.5%) of them had bilateral lesions, (3/9; 33.3%) were treatment responders and (6/9; 66.6%) non responders. The time of retinopathy appearance was mainly at W12. Retinopathy was asymptomatic in most of the affected patients (7/9; 77.77%) and reversible, cotton wool spots was the major associated sign. Patients with older age, DM and or HTN, and non-responders to antiviral therapy were associated with more severe retinopathy. Conclusions Retinopathy is not a rare complication of IFN therapy for chronic HCV infection, but fortunately it’s asymptomatic and reversible. Ophthalmological assessment at base-line and at follow up during IFN treatment is very important. PMID:27275462

  7. Influence of Interferon-Alpha Combined with Chemo (Radio) Therapy on Immunological Parameters in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Karakhanova, Svetlana; Mosl, Beate; Harig, Sabine; von Ahn, Katharina; Fritz, Jasmin; Schmidt, Jan; Jäger, Dirk; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V.

    2014-01-01

    Prognosis of patients with carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas is particularly poor. A combination of chemotherapy with immunotherapy could be an option for treatment of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to perform an immunomonitoring of 17 patients with pancreatic cancer from the CapRI-2 study, and tumor-bearing mice treated with combination of chemo (radio) therapies with interferon-2α. Low doses of interferon-2α led to a decrease in total leukocyte and an increase in monocyte counts. Furthermore, we observed a positive effect of interferon-2α therapy on the dendritic cells and NK (natural killer) cell activation immediately after the first injection. In addition, we recorded an increased amount of interferon-γ and IL-10 in the serum following the interferon-2α therapy. These data clearly demonstrate that pancreatic carcinoma patients also show an immunomodulatory response to interferon-2α therapy. Analysis of immunosuppressive cells in the Panc02 orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer revealed an accumulation of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells in spleens and tumors of the mice treated with interferon-2α and 5-fluorouracil. The direct effect of the drugs on myeloid-derived suppressor cells was also registered in vitro. These data expose the importance of immunosuppressive mechanisms induced by combined chemo-immunotherapy. PMID:24608924

  8. Influence of interferon-alpha combined with chemo (radio) therapy on immunological parameters in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Karakhanova, Svetlana; Mosl, Beate; Harig, Sabine; von Ahn, Katharina; Fritz, Jasmin; Schmidt, Jan; Jäger, Dirk; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2014-01-01

    Prognosis of patients with carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas is particularly poor. A combination of chemotherapy with immunotherapy could be an option for treatment of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to perform an immunomonitoring of 17 patients with pancreatic cancer from the CapRI-2 study, and tumor-bearing mice treated with combination of chemo (radio) therapies with interferon-2α. Low doses of interferon-2α led to a decrease in total leukocyte and an increase in monocyte counts. Furthermore, we observed a positive effect of interferon-2α therapy on the dendritic cells and NK (natural killer) cell activation immediately after the first injection. In addition, we recorded an increased amount of interferon-γ and IL-10 in the serum following the interferon-2α therapy. These data clearly demonstrate that pancreatic carcinoma patients also show an immunomodulatory response to interferon-2α therapy. Analysis of immunosuppressive cells in the Panc02 orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer revealed an accumulation of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells in spleens and tumors of the mice treated with interferon-2α and 5-fluorouracil. The direct effect of the drugs on myeloid-derived suppressor cells was also registered in vitro. These data expose the importance of immunosuppressive mechanisms induced by combined chemo-immunotherapy. PMID:24608924

  9. Natural interferon-beta treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Reina; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Haga, Yuki; Nakamura, Masato; Yasui, Shin; Jiang, Xia; Wu, Shuang; Arai, Makoto; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-05-18

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can cause liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Several studies have demonstrated that the eradication of HCV reduces the occurrence of HCC. In Japan, as many people live to an advanced age, HCV-infected patients are also getting older, and the age at HCC diagnosis has also increased. Although older HCV-infected patients have a risk of developing HCC, the treatment response to peginterferon-alpha plus ribavirin therapy is relatively poor in these patients because of drop-out or discontinuation of this treatment due to adverse events. It is established that the mechanism of action between interferon-alpha and interferon-beta is slightly different. Short-term natural interferon-beta monotherapy is effective for patients with acute hepatitis C and patients infected with HCV genotype 2 and low viral loads. Natural interferon-beta plus ribavirin for 48 wk or for 24 wk are also effective for some patients with HCV genotype 1 or HCV genotype 2. Natural interferon-beta plus ribavirin has been used for certain "difficult-to-treat" HCV-infected patients. In the era of direct-acting anti-virals, natural interferon-beta plus ribavirin may be one of the therapeutic options for special groups of HCV-infected patients. In the near future, signal transduction pathways of interferon-beta will inform further directions. PMID:26052401

  10. Coinhibition of viral interferon induction by Benzo(. alpha. )pyrene in association with occupation-related particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hahon, N. West Virginia Univ., Morgantown ); Booth, J.A. ); Flowers, L. )

    1990-06-01

    Benzo({alpha})pyrene (B(a)P) in combination with coal, asbestos, silicate, or metal particles was studied for its inhibitory effects on interferon-{alpha}/{beta} induction by influenza virus in rhesus monkey kidney (LLC-MK{sub 2}) cell monolayers. B(a)P per se had no adverse effect on the induction process. However, when cell cultures were pretreated with B(a)P that was bioactivated by rat liver S9 homogenate, from 52 to 65% inhibition of interferon induction occurred. Significantly greater depression (coinhibition) of viral interferon induction (>83%) resulted when bioactivated B(a)P was incorporated with coal particles representative of coal rank (anthracite, bituminous, lignite, peat). Coinhibition affected by bioactivated B(a)P was coal rank-independent but any interferon inhibitory activity affected by coal particles per se was coal rank-independent. When metals (aluminum, aluminum oxide, ferric oxide, nickel, or chromium) or asbestos fibers were individually mixed with bioactivated B(a)P, coinhibition of cellular interferon synthesis also resulted which was significantly greater than that manifested by bioactivated B(a)P or particles per se. Coinhibition of interferon induction by silicates and the bioactivated hydrocarbon was not in evidence although some silicates alone partially inhibited the induction process. Viral interferon induction was inhibited in a dose-response manner by B(a)P ({+-}S9) in combination with selected particles.

  11. Interferon alpha 2b as maintenance therapy improves outcome in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, Agustin; Neri, Natividad; Huerta-Guzmán, Judith; Pérez, Felipe; Sotelo, León

    2004-11-01

    The role of interferon alpha as maintenance therapy in follicular lymphoma (FL) remains unsolved. We started a controlled clinical trial to assess if interferon alpha 2b could improve outcome, measured with event free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with FL in complete remission after chemotherapy based anthracyclines and adjuvant radiotherapy to sites of initial bulky disease. Three hundred and eighty four patients in complete response after 6 cycles of CEOP-Bleo (cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, vincristine, prednisone and bleomycin, at standard doses), and adjuvant radiotherapy when necessary, were randomized to received Interferon alpha 2b, three times a week for 1 year or no treatment (control group). Median follow up was 9.8 years (range 7.0-15 years); actuarial curves showed that EFS was 64% (95% confidence interval (CI) 56-71%) in patients treated with interferon that was statistically significant to patients in the control group: 35% (95% CI: 28-43%) (p<.01). OS was also statistically significant: 81% in patients treated with interferon (95% CI: 74-93%) and 57% (95% CI: 50-63%) in the control group (p<.001). Toxicity was mild, all patients received the planned dose of interferon on time. The use of aggressive chemotherapy and maintenance therapy with interferon alpha 2b in follicular lymphoma improved outcome; more than 60% of patients remain alive free of disease at longer follow-up. PMID:15512813

  12. Cross-Species Antiviral Activity of Goose Interferons against Duck Plague Virus Is Related to Its Positive Self-Feedback Regulation and Subsequent Interferon Stimulated Genes Induction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Zhou, Qin; Wei, Yunan; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Sun, Kunfeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-01-01

    Interferons are a group of antiviral cytokines acting as the first line of defense in the antiviral immunity. Here, we describe the antiviral activity of goose type I interferon (IFNα) and type II interferon (IFNγ) against duck plague virus (DPV). Recombinant goose IFNα and IFNγ proteins of approximately 20 kDa and 18 kDa, respectively, were expressed. Following DPV-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) infection of duck embryo fibroblast cells (DEFs) with IFNα and IFNγ pre-treatment, the number of viral gene copies decreased more than 100-fold, with viral titers dropping approximately 100-fold. Compared to the control, DPV-EGFP cell positivity was decreased by goose IFNα and IFNγ at 36 hpi (3.89%; 0.79%) and 48 hpi (17.05%; 5.58%). In accordance with interferon-stimulated genes being the “workhorse” of IFN activity, the expression of duck myxovirus resistance (Mx) and oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) was significantly upregulated (p < 0.001) by IFN treatment for 24 h. Interestingly, duck cells and goose cells showed a similar trend of increased ISG expression after goose IFNα and IFNγ pretreatment. Another interesting observation is that the positive feedback regulation of type I IFN and type II IFN by goose IFNα and IFNγ was confirmed in waterfowl for the first time. These results suggest that the antiviral activities of goose IFNα and IFNγ can likely be attributed to the potency with which downstream genes are induced by interferon. These findings will contribute to our understanding of the functional significance of the interferon antiviral system in aquatic birds and to the development of interferon-based prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against viral disease. PMID:27438848

  13. Cross-Species Antiviral Activity of Goose Interferons against Duck Plague Virus Is Related to Its Positive Self-Feedback Regulation and Subsequent Interferon Stimulated Genes Induction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Zhou, Qin; Wei, Yunan; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Sun, Kunfeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-01-01

    Interferons are a group of antiviral cytokines acting as the first line of defense in the antiviral immunity. Here, we describe the antiviral activity of goose type I interferon (IFNα) and type II interferon (IFNγ) against duck plague virus (DPV). Recombinant goose IFNα and IFNγ proteins of approximately 20 kDa and 18 kDa, respectively, were expressed. Following DPV-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) infection of duck embryo fibroblast cells (DEFs) with IFNα and IFNγ pre-treatment, the number of viral gene copies decreased more than 100-fold, with viral titers dropping approximately 100-fold. Compared to the control, DPV-EGFP cell positivity was decreased by goose IFNα and IFNγ at 36 hpi (3.89%; 0.79%) and 48 hpi (17.05%; 5.58%). In accordance with interferon-stimulated genes being the "workhorse" of IFN activity, the expression of duck myxovirus resistance (Mx) and oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) was significantly upregulated (p < 0.001) by IFN treatment for 24 h. Interestingly, duck cells and goose cells showed a similar trend of increased ISG expression after goose IFNα and IFNγ pretreatment. Another interesting observation is that the positive feedback regulation of type I IFN and type II IFN by goose IFNα and IFNγ was confirmed in waterfowl for the first time. These results suggest that the antiviral activities of goose IFNα and IFNγ can likely be attributed to the potency with which downstream genes are induced by interferon. These findings will contribute to our understanding of the functional significance of the interferon antiviral system in aquatic birds and to the development of interferon-based prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against viral disease. PMID:27438848

  14. Direct costs of interferon-based and interferon-free direct-acting antiviral regimens for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Gray, E; O'Leary, A; Kieran, J A; Fogarty, E; Dowling, T; Norris, S

    2016-09-01

    Given the increasing budget impact of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment, robust real-world cost data are essential for healthcare decision-makers to evaluate and understand the costs and benefits of these treatments. To determine the direct cost of treating HCV infection in a hospital-based ambulatory care setting in Ireland based on available data from the Irish national hepatitis C treatment registry. A microcosting study of the direct costs of patients with hepatitis C treated with interferon-based and interferon-free direct-acting antiviral regimens was conducted. Attendance at the outpatient clinic for clinical assessment, the quantity of resources used per patient, the medication prescribed and the identification and timing of staff involvement was measured and combined to establish a mean cost of treatment per patient and a cost per sustained virological response (SVR). One hundred and sixty-eight patients were included in the analysis; 119 treated with interferon-based direct-acting antiviral regimens and 47 treated with interferon-free regimens. The mean costs of treatment with the interferon-based regimens per patient were €38 286 (95% CI €35 305-€41 061). The cost per SVR was €62 457. The mean cost of treatment with interferon-free regimens per patient was €55 734 (95% CI €50 906-€60 880). The cost per SVR was €81 873. Real-world cost data provide valuable information to enhance reimbursement decisions. While the direct costs associated with hepatitis C treatment in Ireland are substantial, it is reasonable to expect that the mean cost of treatment and the cost per SVR will reduce as patients with less advanced disease are treated with interferon-free therapies. PMID:26996144

  15. Bortezomib sensitizes human glioblastoma cells to induction of apoptosis by type I interferons through NOXA expression and Mcl-1 cleavage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruishan; Davidoff, Andrew M; Pfeffer, Lawrence M

    2016-09-01

    Glioblastomas are highly invasive and aggressive primary brain tumors. Type I interferons have significant, pleiotropic anticancer activity. However, through various pathways many cancers become interferon-resistant, limiting interferon's clinical utility. In this study, we demonstrated that the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib sensitized human glioblastoma cells to the antiproliferative action of interferons, which involved the induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis but not necroptosis. We found that death ligands such as TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) were not involved in interferon/bortezomib-induced apoptosis, although interferon induced TRAIL expression. However, apoptosis was induced through an intrinsic pathway involving increased NOXA expression and Mcl-1 cleavage. Our findings may provide an important rationale for combining type I interferons with bortezomib for glioblastoma therapy. PMID:27450810

  16. n-Dodecyl-β-D-maltoside inhibits aggregation of human interferon-β-1b and reduces its immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Rifkin, Robert A; Maggio, Edward T; Dike, Sonny; Kerr, Douglas A; Levy, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The development of neutralizing antibodies to the protein drug interferon-β is a significant impediment to its use in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Neutralizing antibodies to interferon-β arise from aggregation of the peptide during manufacturing and storage. We tested the ability of dodecylmaltoside, a nontoxic alkylsaccharide surfactant, to reduce aggregation of interferon-β in vitro and to reduce its immunogenicity in vivo. Interferon-β, in solution with and without dodecylmaltoside, was periodically evaluated for aggregation by light scatter for 1 month. Interferon-β, with and without dodecylmaltoside, was given 3 days/week for 1 month to mice; the sera of these mice were analyzed for anti-interferon-β antibodies by ELISA. Dodecylmaltoside reduces the aggregation of interferon-β in vitro and its immunogenicity in vivo. Our positive findings warrant additional tests of dodecylmaltoside as a therapeutic adjuvant in rodent models of multiple sclerosis. PMID:20532646

  17. Neopterin and interferon gamma serum levels in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Khoss, A E; Balzar, E; Steger, H; Howanietz, H; Wladika, W; Hamilton, G; Woloszczuk, W

    In the follow-up of children receiving renal allografts the early differential diagnosis of infections and rejection episodes is the main problem. Serum levels of neopterin (N), a pteridine released from stimulated macrophages, was determined by radioimmunoassay. Also interferon-gamma (IF) serum levels, a marker of T lymphocyte activity, were determined with an immunoradiometric assay in 19 kidney-transplanted children. Both, infections and rejection episodes, are accompanied by distinct increases in N. The IF are elevated 1-3 days earlier than N, the median values during infections being significantly (p less than or equal to 0.001) higher than those during rejection crises. The routine measurement of N and IF allow the simple, quick and reliable monitoring of the immune status, which seems to be of a high relevance for the daily monitoring of transplant recipients. PMID:3150820

  18. Immune Alterations in Patients with Anti-Interferon-γ Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Chruewkamlow, Nuttapol; Mahasongkram, Kodchakorn; Pata, Supansa; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Salee, Parichart; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Kasinrerk, Watchara

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies against interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) can cause immunodeficiency and are associated with various opportunistic infections. In the present study, we investigated other cellular immune parameters for a better understanding of the immunodeficiency condition in the patients. The numbers of WBC, monocytes and NK cells were increased in patients with anti-IFN-γ autoantibodies (AAbs). Upon TCR activation, T cell proliferation and IL-2 receptor of the patients remained intact. Nonetheless, the Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ and TNF-α) production was up-regulated. The production of Th2 (IL-4) and Th17 (IL-17) cytokines was unchanged. We suggest that, in addition to the presence of anti-IFN-γ autoantibodies, alterations in the cellular immune functions may also contribute to this immunodeficiency. PMID:26727515

  19. An innate antiviral pathway acting before interferons at epithelial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Marie B; Reinert, Line S; Thomsen, Martin K; Bagdonaite, Ieva; Nandakumar, Ramya; Cheshenko, Natalia; Prabakaran, Thaneas; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Krzyzowska, Malgosha; Kratholm, Sine K; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Petersen, Steen V; Goriely, Stanislas; Bibby, Bo Martin; Eriksson, Kristina; Ruland, Jürgen; Thomsen, Allan R; Herold, Betsy C; Wandall, Hans H; Frische, Sebastian; Holm, Christian K; Paludan, Søren R

    2016-02-01

    Mucosal surfaces are exposed to environmental substances and represent a major portal of entry for microorganisms. The innate immune system is responsible for early defense against infections and it is believed that the interferons (IFNs) constitute the first line of defense against viruses. Here we identify an innate antiviral pathway that works at epithelial surfaces before the IFNs. The pathway is activated independently of known innate sensors of viral infections through a mechanism dependent on viral O-linked glycans, which induce CXCR3 chemokines and stimulate antiviral activity in a manner dependent on neutrophils. This study therefore identifies a previously unknown layer of antiviral defense that exerts its action on epithelial surfaces before the classical IFN response is operative. PMID:26595890

  20. The Two Faces of Interferon-γ in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, M. Raza; Merlino, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is a cytokine whose biological activity is conventionally associated with cytostatic/cytotoxic and antitumor mechanisms during cell-mediated adaptive immune response. It has been used clinically to treat a variety of malignancies, albeit with mixed results and side effects that can be severe. Despite ample evidence implicating a role for IFN-γ in tumor immune surveillance, there has been a steady flow of reports suggesting that it may also have pro-tumorigenic effects under certain circumstances. We propose that in fact IFN-γ treatment is a double-edged sword whose anti- and pro-tumorigenic activities are dependent on the cellular, microenvironmental, and/or molecular context. As such, inhibition of the IFN-γ/IFNγR pathway may prove to be a viable new therapeutic target for a subset of malignancies. PMID:21705455

  1. Interferons, Signal Transduction Pathways, and the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Nallar, Shreeram C.

    2014-01-01

    The interferon (IFN) family of cytokines participates in the development of innate and acquired immune defenses against various pathogens and pathogenic stimuli. Discovered originally as a proteinaceous substance secreted from virus-infected cells that afforded immunity to neighboring cells from virus infection, these cytokines are now implicated in various human pathologies, including control of tumor development, cell differentiation, and autoimmunity. It is now believed that the IFN system (IFN genes and the genes induced by them, and the factors that regulate these processes) is a generalized alarm of cellular stress, including DNA damage. IFNs exert both beneficial and deleterious effects on the central nervous system (CNS). Our knowledge of the IFN-regulated processes in the CNS is far from being clear. In this article, we reviewed the current understanding of IFN signal transduction pathways and gene products that might have potential relevance to diseases of the CNS. PMID:25084173

  2. Type I Interferons in Newborns-Neurotoxicity versus Antiviral Defense.

    PubMed

    Bogunovic, Dusan

    2016-01-01

    In most children and adults, primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is asymptomatic. However, very rarely (incidence of 1 in 1,000,000), it can cause herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). HSE also occurs in infants but with a much starker incidence of one in three. This age difference in susceptibility to HSV-1-caused HSE is not well understood. In a recent article in mBio, authors have identified the choroid plexus as the anatomical site of robust HSV-1 replication in the brain. They point to low levels of type I interferon (IFN) receptor as causal of the lack of HSV-1 replication control in neonates, in contrast to adults. Here, I discuss these findings in the context of human genetic evidence. I point to the balancing act of type I IFN acting as a neurotoxin and an antiviral agent, an evolutionary choice of a lesser evil. PMID:27190218

  3. Modulation of epidermal growth factor receptors by human alpha interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Zoon, K C; Karasaki, Y; zur Nedden, D L; Hu, R Q; Arnheiter, H

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with human interferon (IFN)-alpha 2 at 37 degrees C results in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and a reduction of the subsequent binding of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) at 4 degrees C. Human IFN-beta and -gamma, which exhibit little antiviral and antiproliferative activities on MDBK cells, have little effect on cell growth or the binding of 125I-labeled EGF to these cells. The binding of EGF is decreased after exposure to IFN-alpha for greater than 8 hr. Scatchard analyses of the EGF binding data indicate that a 20-hr exposure period results in a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface EGF receptors and a reduction in the affinity of EGF for its receptor. The rate of internalization of EGF by MDBK cells does not appear to be affected by IFN treatment. PMID:3095830

  4. Modulation of epidermal growth factor receptors by human alpha interferon.

    PubMed

    Zoon, K C; Karasaki, Y; zur Nedden, D L; Hu, R Q; Arnheiter, H

    1986-11-01

    Treatment of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with human interferon (IFN)-alpha 2 at 37 degrees C results in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and a reduction of the subsequent binding of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) at 4 degrees C. Human IFN-beta and -gamma, which exhibit little antiviral and antiproliferative activities on MDBK cells, have little effect on cell growth or the binding of 125I-labeled EGF to these cells. The binding of EGF is decreased after exposure to IFN-alpha for greater than 8 hr. Scatchard analyses of the EGF binding data indicate that a 20-hr exposure period results in a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface EGF receptors and a reduction in the affinity of EGF for its receptor. The rate of internalization of EGF by MDBK cells does not appear to be affected by IFN treatment. PMID:3095830

  5. Regulation of antiviral T cell responses by type I interferons.

    PubMed

    Crouse, Josh; Kalinke, Ulrich; Oxenius, Annette

    2015-04-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are pro-inflammatory cytokines that are rapidly induced in different cell types during viral infections. The consequences of type I IFN signalling include direct antiviral activity, innate immune cell activation and regulation of adaptive immune responses. In this Review, we discuss recent conceptual advances in our understanding of indirect and direct regulation of T cell immunity by type I IFNs, which can either promote or inhibit T cell activation, proliferation, differentiation and survival. This regulation depends, to a large extent, on the timing of type I IFN exposure relative to T cell receptor signalling. Type I IFNs also provide activated T cells with resistance to natural killer cell-mediated elimination. PMID:25790790

  6. Molecular basis of interferon resistance in hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Perales, Celia; Beach, Nathan M; Sheldon, Julie; Domingo, Esteban

    2014-10-01

    Resistance to interferon (IFN) in hepatitis C virus (HCV) differs from resistance to standard, directly-acting antiviral (DAA) agents in that the virus confronts a multicomponent antiviral state evoked by IFN. This renders unlikely the repeated selection of the same specific mutations that confer an IFN-resistance phenotype. Comparison of amino acid sequences of viral proteins in HCV that replicates in the presence of IFN in vivo or in cell culture (with entire virus or subgenomic replicons) reveals very few common candidate IFN resistance substitutions. Multiple host and viral factors contribute to divergent responses to IFN. The environmental heterogeneity in which exogenous IFN is expected to exert its selective effect may increase as a result of incorporation of new DAAs in therapy. PMID:24968186

  7. Interferon in resistance to bacterial and protozoan infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Gould, Cheryl L.; Kierszenbaum, Felipe; Degee, Antonie L. W.; Mansfield, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of genetic differences in mouse strains on the modulation of protozoan infections by interferon (IFN) were investigated. In one set of experiments, three different strains of mice were injected with T. cruzi, and their sera were assayed at five time intervals for IFN titer. A greater quantity of IFN was produced by mouse strains that were susceptible to T. cruzi infection than by the more resistant strain. In another set of experiments, spleen cell cultures from inbred strains of mice were challenged with an antigen made from T.b. rhodesiense. The cells from mice resistant to infection, produced greater amounts of IFN-gamma than did cells from the susceptible mice. In a third set of experiments, it was found that mice injected with T.b. rhodesiense before being infected with a diabetogenic virus (EMC-D) were resistant to the effects of the virus and did not produce virus-specific antibody.

  8. Interferons and viruses: an evolutionary arms race of molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Hans-Heinrich; Schneider, William M.; Rice, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Over half a century has passed since interferons (IFNs) were discovered and shown to inhibit virus infection in cultured cells. Since then, researchers have steadily brought to light the molecular details of IFN signaling, catalogued their pleiotropic effects on cells, and harnessed their therapeutic potential for a variety of maladies. While advances have been plentiful, several fundamental questions have yet to be answered and much complexity remains to be unraveled. We explore the current knowledge surrounding four main questions: are type I IFN subtypes differentially produced in response to distinct pathogens? How are IFN subtypes distinguished by cells? What are the mechanisms and consequences of viral antagonism? Lastly, how can the IFN response be harnessed to improve vaccine efficacy? PMID:25704559

  9. Interfering with interferon receptor sorting and trafficking: impact on signaling.

    PubMed

    Claudinon, Julie; Monier, Marie-Noëlle; Lamaze, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) and their receptors (IFN-Rs) play fundamental roles in a multitude of biological functions. Many articles and reviews emphasize that the JAK/STAT machinery is obligatory for relay of the information transmitted by IFNs after binding to their cognate receptors at the plasma membrane. In contrast, very few studies have addressed the endocytosis and the intracellular trafficking of IFN-Rs, the immediate step following IFN binding. However, recent findings have shed light on the importance of IFN-R sorting and trafficking in the control of IFN signaling. Thus, IFN-Rs can be included in the growing family of signaling receptors for which regulation of biological activity critically involves endocytosis and trafficking. PMID:17493737

  10. INTERFERON REGULATORY FACTOR 4 AND 8 IN B CELL DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Runqing

    2010-01-01

    IRF4 and 8 are members of the interferon regulatory factor family of transcription factors and have been shown to be essential for the development and function of T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. A series of recent studies have further demonstrated critical functions for IRF4 and 8 at several stages of B cell development including pre-B cell development, receptor editing, germinal center reaction and plasma cell generation. Collectively, these new studies provide molecular insights into the function of IRF4 and 8 and underscore a requirement for IRF4 and 8 throughout B cell development. This review focuses on the recent advances on roles of IRF4 and 8 in B cell development. PMID:18775669

  11. Type I Interferons in Newborns—Neurotoxicity versus Antiviral Defense

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In most children and adults, primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is asymptomatic. However, very rarely (incidence of 1 in 1,000,000), it can cause herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). HSE also occurs in infants but with a much starker incidence of one in three. This age difference in susceptibility to HSV-1-caused HSE is not well understood. In a recent article in mBio, authors have identified the choroid plexus as the anatomical site of robust HSV-1 replication in the brain. They point to low levels of type I interferon (IFN) receptor as causal of the lack of HSV-1 replication control in neonates, in contrast to adults. Here, I discuss these findings in the context of human genetic evidence. I point to the balancing act of type I IFN acting as a neurotoxin and an antiviral agent, an evolutionary choice of a lesser evil. PMID:27190218

  12. Interferon-α and pericardial injury: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Fayaz A; Singh, Sujata; Pandit, Anil; Alegria, Jorge R; Camoriano, John; Stanton, Melissa L; Mookadam, Farouk

    2014-01-01

    Interferon- α (IFN-α) alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents has been used in the management of many malignant and non-malignant conditions. Pericarditis with or without pericardial effusion has been reported with IFN-α therapy, and available literature is limited to case reports. Pericardial constriction after interferon use has not been described in the published literature to date. We performed a systematic review of literature to address the demographic features, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and outcome of interferon-related pericardial injury.

  13. Interferon-γ release assay for tuberculosis screening of healthcare workers at a Korean tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Yun; Jeon, Kyeongman; Suh, Gee Young; Kwon, O Jung; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Yoonchang, Sung Won; Kang, Eun-Suk; Koh, Won-Jung

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the annual incidence of tuberculosis infection among newly employed doctors and nurses in Korea. The annual incidence of tuberculosis infection ranged from 3.3% to 5.7%, based on the definition of conversion of an interferon-γ release assay, which suggests that stricter preventive strategies against nosocomial TB infection should be employed. Follow-up interferon-γ levels measured after 3 months of isoniazid and rifampicin treatment showed considerable variation. Therefore, serial testing with interferon-γ release assays after treatment of latent TB infection may be insufficient for evaluating the effects of treatment due to the variable responses. PMID:20936910

  14. RelA-Induced Interferon Response Negatively Regulates Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kochupurakkal, Bose S.; Wang, Zhigang C.; Hua, Tony; Culhane, Aedin C.; Rodig, Scott J.; Rajkovic-Molek, Koraljka; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Richardson, Andrea L.; Biswas, Debajit K.; Iglehart, J. Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Both oncogenic and tumor-suppressor activities are attributed to the Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-kB) pathway. Moreover, NF-kB may positively or negatively regulate proliferation. The molecular determinants of these opposing roles of NF-kB are unclear. Using primary human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) as a model, we show that increased RelA levels and consequent increase in basal transcriptional activity of RelA induces IRF1, a target gene. Induced IRF1 upregulates STAT1 and IRF7, and in consort, these factors induce the expression of interferon response genes. Activation of the interferon pathway down-regulates CDK4 and up-regulates p27 resulting in Rb hypo-phosphorylation and cell cycle arrest. Stimulation of HMEC with IFN-γ elicits similar phenotypic and molecular changes suggesting that basal activity of RelA and IFN-γ converge on IRF1 to regulate proliferation. The anti-proliferative RelA-IRF1-CDK4 signaling axis is retained in ER+/HER2- breast tumors analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Using immuno-histochemical analysis of breast tumors, we confirm the negative correlation between RelA levels and proliferation rate in ER+/HER2- breast tumors. These findings attribute an anti-proliferative tumor-suppressor role to basal RelA activity. Inactivation of Rb, down-regulation of RelA or IRF1, or upregulation of CDK4 or IRF2 rescues the RelA-IRF1-CDK4 induced proliferation arrest in HMEC and are points of disruption in aggressive tumors. Activity of the RelA-IRF1-CDK4 axis may explain favorable response to CDK4/6 inhibition observed in patients with ER+ Rb competent tumors. PMID:26460486

  15. The importance of the type I interferon system in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Rönnblom, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The type I interferon (IFN) system is our main defense against viral infections and consists of a large number of sensors of nucleic acid that can trigger the production of more than 15 different proteins with antiviral and immunostimulatory capacity. There are several observations suggesting an important role for this system in the etiopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune diseases. Among these are the development of autoimmune diseases during IFN-α treatment, a prominent increase in the expression of type I IFN regulated genes (an IFN signature) in a number of rheumatic diseases, the existence of endogenous IFN inducers in SLE patients and a genetic association between autoimmune diseases and gene variants within the type I IFN signalling pathway. Collectively, these observations suggests that inhibition of the type I IFN system could be beneficial in SLE and possible also other autoimmune diseases. Many different therapeutic targets exist and several studies are in progress aiming to block or down-regulate the activated type I IFN system. A number of studies with monoclonal anti-IFN-α antibodies in SLE patients have been reported, and a small study investigating vaccination with an interferon-α-kinoid against IFN-α has been published. Trials targeting the type I IFN receptor are under way, and other possibilities include elimination of the endogenous IFN inducers and inhibition of key molecules in the type I IFN signalling pathway. Results so far show that it is possible to partially suppress the IFN signature, improve several biomarkers and ameliorate clinical manifestations by some of these new treatment strategies. PMID:27586799

  16. RelA-Induced Interferon Response Negatively Regulates Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kochupurakkal, Bose S; Wang, Zhigang C; Hua, Tony; Culhane, Aedin C; Rodig, Scott J; Rajkovic-Molek, Koraljka; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Richardson, Andrea L; Biswas, Debajit K; Iglehart, J Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Both oncogenic and tumor-suppressor activities are attributed to the Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-kB) pathway. Moreover, NF-kB may positively or negatively regulate proliferation. The molecular determinants of these opposing roles of NF-kB are unclear. Using primary human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) as a model, we show that increased RelA levels and consequent increase in basal transcriptional activity of RelA induces IRF1, a target gene. Induced IRF1 upregulates STAT1 and IRF7, and in consort, these factors induce the expression of interferon response genes. Activation of the interferon pathway down-regulates CDK4 and up-regulates p27 resulting in Rb hypo-phosphorylation and cell cycle arrest. Stimulation of HMEC with IFN-γ elicits similar phenotypic and molecular changes suggesting that basal activity of RelA and IFN-γ converge on IRF1 to regulate proliferation. The anti-proliferative RelA-IRF1-CDK4 signaling axis is retained in ER+/HER2- breast tumors analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Using immuno-histochemical analysis of breast tumors, we confirm the negative correlation between RelA levels and proliferation rate in ER+/HER2- breast tumors. These findings attribute an anti-proliferative tumor-suppressor role to basal RelA activity. Inactivation of Rb, down-regulation of RelA or IRF1, or upregulation of CDK4 or IRF2 rescues the RelA-IRF1-CDK4 induced proliferation arrest in HMEC and are points of disruption in aggressive tumors. Activity of the RelA-IRF1-CDK4 axis may explain favorable response to CDK4/6 inhibition observed in patients with ER+ Rb competent tumors. PMID:26460486

  17. Interferon Consensus Sequence Binding Protein Confers Resistance against Yersinia enterocolitica

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Joachim; Kempf, Volkhard A. J.; Diebold, Joachim; Bücheler, Nicole; Preger, Sonja; Horak, Ivan; Sing, Andreas; Kramer, Uwe; Autenrieth, Ingo B.

    2000-01-01

    Interferon consensus sequence binding protein (ICSBP)-deficient mice display enhanced susceptibility to intracellular pathogens. At least two distinct immunoregulatory defects are responsible for this phenotype. First, diminished production of reactive oxygen intermediates in macrophages results in impaired intracellular killing of microorganisms. Second, defective early interleukin-12 (IL-12) production upon microbial challenge leads to a failure in gamma interferon (IFN-γ) induction and subsequently in T helper 1 immune responses. Here, we investigated the role of ICSBP in resistance against the extracellular bacterium Yersinia enterocolitica. ICSBP−/− mice failed to produce IL-12 and IFN-γ, but also IL-4, after Yersinia challenge. In addition, granuloma formation was highly disturbed in infected ICSBP−/− mice, leading to multiple necrotic abscesses in affected organs. Consequently, ICSBP−/− mice rapidly succumbed to acute Yersinia infection. In vitro treatment of spleen cells from ICSBP−/− mice with recombinant IL-12 (rIL-12) or rIL-18 in combination with a second stimulus resulted in IFN-γ induction. In experimental therapy of infected ICSBP−/− mice, we observed that administration of rIL-12 induced IFN-γ production which was associated with improved resistance to Yersinia. In contrast, treatment with rIL-18 failed to enhance endogenous IFN-γ production but nevertheless reduced bacterial burden in ICSBP−/− mice. Although cytokine therapy with rIL-12 or rIL-18 ameliorated the course of Yersinia infection in ICSBP−/− mice, both cytokines failed to completely restore impaired immunity. Taken together, the results indicate that the transcription factor ICSBP is essential for efficient host immune defense against Yersinia. These results are important for understanding the complex host immune responses in bacterial infections. PMID:10678954

  18. Reovirus μ2 Protein Inhibits Interferon Signaling through a Novel Mechanism Involving Nuclear Accumulation of Interferon Regulatory Factor 9▿

    PubMed Central

    Zurney, Jennifer; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Holm, Geoffrey H.; Dermody, Terence S.; Sherry, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The secreted cytokine alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) binds its receptor to activate the Jak-STAT signal transduction pathway, leading to formation of the heterotrimeric IFN-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3) transcription complex for induction of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) and establishment of an antiviral state. Many viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit the IFN pathway, thereby subverting the innate antiviral response. Here, we demonstrate that the mildly myocarditic reovirus type 1 Lang (T1L), but not the nonmyocarditic reovirus type 3 Dearing, represses IFN induction of a subset of ISGs and that this repressor function segregates with the T1L M1 gene. Concordantly, the T1L M1 gene product, μ2, dramatically inhibits IFN-β-induced reporter gene expression. Surprisingly, T1L infection does not degrade components of the ISGF3 complex or interfere with STAT1 or STAT2 nuclear translocation as has been observed for other viruses. Instead, infection with T1L or reassortant or recombinant viruses containing the T1L M1 gene results in accumulation of interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) in the nucleus. This effect has not been previously described for any virus and suggests that μ2 modulates IRF9 interactions with STATs for both ISGF3 function and nuclear export. The M1 gene is a determinant of virus strain-specific differences in the IFN response, which are linked to virus strain-specific differences in induction of murine myocarditis. We find that virus-induced myocarditis is associated with repression of IFN function, providing new insights into the pathophysiology of this disease. Together, these data provide the first report of an increase in IRF9 nuclear accumulation associated with viral subversion of the IFN response and couple virus strain-specific differences in IFN antagonism to the pathogenesis of viral myocarditis. PMID:19109390

  19. Cholinoceptor Activation Subserving the Effects of Interferon Gamma on the Contractility of Rat Ileum

    PubMed Central

    Sterin-Borda, Leonor; Rodriguez, Martin; de Bracco, Maria M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant rat interferon γ stimulated the contractility of isolated rat ileum at doses of 4–12 units/ml. Muscarinic cholinoceptors were involved, as treatment of the tissue with atropine prevented the contractile response of the ileum. Furthermore, interferon γ increased the affinity of carbachol for the cholinoceptors and did not change its maximum effect. Neurogenic pathways were also involved since pretreatment of ileum with hexamethonium, hemicholinium or tetrodotoxin impaired the contractile effect of interferon γ. In contrast to the action of exogenous carbachol, the effects of interferon γ are indirect. They appear to involve a G protein regulating phosphoinositide turnover and cytoskeletal structures since they could not be induced in ileum strips that were pretreated with pertussis toxin, phospholipase C inhibitors (2-nitro-carboxyphenyl, NN-diphenyl carbamate and neomycin), cytochalasine B or colchicine. PMID:18475595

  20. Creation of transgenic Brassica napus L. plants expressing human alpha 2b interferon gene.

    PubMed

    Sakhno, L O; Kvasko, O Y; Olevinska, Z M; Spivak, M Y; Kuchuk, M V

    2012-01-01

    Spring rapeseed transgenic lines expressing human interferon alpha 2b were created by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of aseptic plant leaf explants. The maximum antiviral activity of the leaf extracts reached 4500 IU/g fresh weight. It was determined that the antioxidant activity and the activity of an enzyme of plant antioxidant system--superoxide dismutase (SOD)--in the leaf tissues of transgenic plants increased compared to controls. There were no correlations between the interferon and antioxidant activities, as well as between SOD and interferon activities. Using the obtained transgenic rapeseed plants with high interferon and antioxidant activities as a feed additive for animals might have preventive effect on their body, increasing resistance to infections of various origins. PMID:23285745

  1. Retinopathy in chronic hepatitis C patients during interferon treatment with ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Jain, K; Lam, W; Waheeb, S; Thai, Q; Heathcote, J

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To assess the ocular effect of interferon alfa 2b prescribed with ribavirin in patients undergoing therapy for chronic hepatitis C.
METHODS—19 patients with chronic hepatitis C who satisfied the follow up criteria were assessed for ocular complications using slit lamp biomicroscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy before, during, and after the treatment at regular intervals.
RESULTS—8/19 patients, while on treatment, developed an asymptomatic retinopathy. Among these 3/8 were relapsers and 5/9 were non-responders to interferon monotherapy. All retinal changes faded, often while the patients continued the therapy. There was no significant association in occurrence of retinopathy with haematological and/or biochemical changes.
CONCLUSION—Retinopathy was more common in interferon monotherapy non-responders than relapsers when treated with interferon alfa 2b with the addition of ribavirin. The changes were transient, disappearing while the patients were still being treated.

 PMID:11567959

  2. [Busulfan versus busulfan-interferon as maintenance therapy in chronic myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    López Hernández, M A; Flores-Chapa, J D; Trueba Christy, E; Borbolla Escoboza, J R; Carrillo Rosales, T

    1996-01-01

    We studied 30 patients in order to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of alfa interferon associated with busulfan as maintenance treatment in de novo chronic granulocytic leukemia. Patients received 0.2 mg/kg of busulfan and reached complete hematological remission (CHR). Patients were then randomized in two groups: one to receive busulfan to be administered when the leukocyte count was above 15 x 10(9)/L, and another to receive subcutaneously 5 million IU of alpha-interferon three times per week (plus busulfan if the leukocyte count went above 15 x 10(9)/L). The duration of CHR was longer in the alfa-interferon group: 31 vs 16 months (p = 0.03) but no cytogenetic remissions were observed. Alfa interferon was well tolerated: no patient was excluded from the study due to toxicity. PMID:8966391

  3. Results of interferon-based treatments in Alaska Native and American Indian population with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Stephen E.; Townshend-Bulson, Lisa J.; Bruden, Dana J. T.; Homan, Chriss E.; Gove, James E.; Plotnik, Julia N.; Simons, Brenna C.; Spradling, Philip R.; McMahon, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been few reports of hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment results with interferon-based regimens in indigenous populations. Objective To determine interferon-based treatment outcome among Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI) population. Design In an outcomes study of 1,379 AN/AI persons with chronic HCV infection from 1995 through 2013, we examined treatment results of 189 persons treated with standard interferon, interferon plus ribavirin, pegylated interferon plus ribavirin and triple therapy with a protease inhibitor. For individuals treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, the effect of patient characteristics on response was also examined. Results Sustained virologic response (SVR) with standard interferon was 16.7% (3/18) and with standard interferon and ribavirin was 29.7% (11/37). Of 119 persons treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, 61 achieved SVR (51.3%), including 10 of 46 with genotype 1 (21.7%), 38 of 51 with genotype 2 (74.5%) and 13 of 22 with genotype 3 (59.1%). By multivariate analysis, SVR in the pegylated interferon group was associated with female sex (p=0.002), estimated duration of infection (p=0.034) and HCV genotype (p<0.0001). There was a high discontinuation rate due to side effects in those treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin for genotype 1 (52.2%). Seven of 15 genotype 1 patients treated with pegylated interferon, ribavirin and telaprevir or boceprevir achieved SVR (46.7%). Conclusions We had success with pegylated interferon-based treatment of AN/AI people with genotypes 2 and 3. However, there were low SVR and high discontinuation rates for those with genotype 1. PMID:27029671

  4. A case of arthropathy and hypothyroidism during recombinant alpha-interferon therapy.

    PubMed

    Maccari, S; Bassi, C; Giovannini, A G; Plancher, A C

    1991-12-01

    Late side effects of alpha-interferon therapy include some autoimmune diseases, such as thyroiditis. We present the case of a patient with severe chronic active hepatitis and hepatitis-C-virus positivity, who during alpha-interferon therapy developed an autoimmune thyroiditis and at the same time arthropathy with some characteristics of rheumatoid arthritis (several articular stations simultaneously affected, involvement of the hand joints and morning stiffness). PMID:1666349

  5. Rapid Sensitive Assay for Interferons Based on the Inhibition of MM Virus Nucleic Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Patton T.; Giron, David J.

    1970-01-01

    A method for assaying mouse interferon based on the inhibition of viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis was devised. The amount of MM virus and RNA synthesized in interferon-treated L-cell cultures was determined by measuring the amount of 3H-uridine converted into a trichloroacetic acid-insoluble form after treatment of the infected cultures with 2.5 μg of actinomycin D per ml. The amount of RNA synthesized was inversely related to the concentration of interferon used for treatment. A linear dose-response regression curve was obtained by plotting the log of the amount of RNA made, expressed as a percentage of the control, versus the log of the reciprocal of the interferon dilution. A unit of interferon was defined as that concentration which inhibited nucleic acid synthesis by 50% (INAS50). The concentration of mouse interferon could be determined within 24 hr. This assay method, on the average, was approximately half as sensitive as the method which measured the 50% reduction of MM virus plaque number (PDD50-MM method), but was, on the average, almost 1.7 times as sensitive as the PDD50-VSV method. It averaged approximately 20 times the sensitivity of the methods which used as end points the 70% reduction in yield of MM virus or the complete inhibition of cytopathic effect by MM virus. The reproducibility of the INAS50 technique was tested in two ways. (i) Four independent assays of an interferon specimen were performed with replicate cultures. The standard deviation was 11.2% of the mean titer. (ii) On different dates, one interferon specimen was assayed seven times and another was assayed four times. The standard deviations were 21.5 and 26.6% of the respective mean titers. PMID:4320919

  6. Antipyrine clearance and response to interferon treatment in patients with chronic active hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Coverdale, S; Byth, K; Field, J; Liddle, C; Lin, R; Farrell, G C

    1995-10-01

    To determine whether hepatic metabolic function affects the response to interferon treatment, we measured antipyrine clearance (APC) in 85 patients with chronic active hepatitis C and compared the results with treatment outcome. Among 55 patients who responded to interferon by normalization of alanine transaminase (ALT), median APC before treatment was 0.47 (range, 0.12 to 0.98; normal range, 0.34 to 1.02 mL/min/kg body wt), a value that was significantly greater than in 30 nonresponders (0.23; 0.08 to 0.67 mL/min/kg body wt, P < .001). APC was closely associated with response to interferon. The response rate among cases with values > 0.25 mL/min/kg body weight was 79%, the same as in cases without cirrhosis. Cases without cirrhosis and with APC of > 0.25 mL/min/kg body weight had an 85% chance of responding to interferon; this was unlikely a simple reflection of histological activity, because the correlation with Scheuer score was poor in this subgroup (r = -.31, P < .05). A second, independent group of 43 patients was used to test the predictive value of APC (using 0.25 mL/min/kg body wt as a cut-off) for response to interferon treatment. In this group, APC correctly predicted positive response to interferon in 75% of cases. APC was also used to measure the effects of treatment on hepatic metabolic function. Regardless of outcome, there was no change in APC at the end of a 6-month course of interferon treatment. Six months later, however, improvement in APC (14%; P < .05) was evident among responders but not in those who had failed to respond to interferon.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7557852

  7. Inhibited interferon-gamma but normal interleukin-3 production from rats flown on the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Cheryl L.; Lyte, Mark; Williams, Joann; Mandel, Adrian D.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    Rats were flown on Space Shuttle SL-3 for one week. When spleen cells were removed from these rats and challenged with concanavalin-A, interferon-gamma production was severely inhibited, while interleukin-3 production was unaffected compared to ground-based control rats. These data indicate that there is a defect in interferon-gamma production in rats that have been exposed to spaceflight. This defect could contribute to, and be one reason for, immunosuppression observed after spaceflight.

  8. Gamma-interferon alters globin gene expression in neonatal and adult erythroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.A.; Perrine, S.P.; Antognetti, G.; Perlmutter, D.H.; Emerson, S.G.; Sieff, C.; Faller, D.V.

    1987-06-01

    The effect of gamma-interferon on fetal hemoglobin synthesis by purified cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors was studied with a radioligand assay to measure hemoglobin production by BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Coculture with recombinant gamma-interferon resulted in a significant and dose-dependent decrease in fetal hemoglobin production by neonatal and adult, but not fetal, BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Accumulation of fetal hemoglobin by cord blood BFU-E-derived erythroblasts decreased up to 38.1% of control cultures (erythropoietin only). Synthesis of both G gamma/A gamma globin was decreased, since the G gamma/A gamma ratio was unchanged. Picograms fetal hemoglobin per cell was decreased by gamma-interferon addition, but picograms total hemoglobin was unchanged, demonstrating that a reciprocal increase in beta-globin production occurred in cultures treated with gamma-interferon. No toxic effect of gamma-interferon on colony growth was noted. The addition of gamma-interferon to cultures resulted in a decrease in the percentage of HbF produced by adult BFU-E-derived cells to 45.6% of control. Fetal hemoglobin production by cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors, was not significantly affected by the addition of recombinant GM-CSF, recombinant interleukin 1 (IL-1), recombinant IL-2, or recombinant alpha-interferon. Although fetal progenitor cells appear unable to alter their fetal hemoglobin program in response to any of the growth factors added here, the interaction of neonatal and adult erythroid progenitors with gamma-interferon results in an altered expression of globin genes.

  9. Retinopathy during interferon-β treatment for multiple sclerosis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gaetani, Lorenzo; Menduno, Paola S; Cometa, Francesco; Di Gregorio, Maria; Sarchielli, Paola; Cagini, Carlo; Calabresi, Paolo; Di Filippo, Massimiliano

    2016-03-01

    The onset of new visual symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis is often associated with a neuro-ophthalmologic manifestation of the disease. However, other possible differential diagnoses need to be ruled out, including drug-induced retinal side effects. Although uncommon, retinal side effects of interferon-beta formulations may occur, and need to be promptly recognized and treated by neurologists. In this manuscript, we report the case of a 37-year-old woman affected by multiple sclerosis diagnosed with interferon beta-associated retinopathy and we review the literature with regard to the epidemiology, clinical presentation, management and follow-up of interferon beta-associated retinopathy. Interferon-beta induced retinopathy seems to be an uncommon and a dose-related side effect in multiple sclerosis patients. Retinopathy tends to completely resolve after treatment discontinuation. Neurologists must be aware that immune-modulatory drugs, in particular interferon beta, have been reported to cause retinal side effects. In multiple sclerosis patients complaining of new visual symptoms during interferon-beta treatment, it is thus advisable to perform an ophthalmological assessment to rule out and properly manage retinopathy. PMID:26292794

  10. Enhanced resistance to acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi in mice treated with an interferon inducer.

    PubMed Central

    James, S L; Kipnis, T L; Sher, A; Hoff, R

    1982-01-01

    For an exploration of the effects of interferon-inducible resistance mechanisms in acute American trypanosomiasis, the synthetic interferon inducer tilerone hydrochloride was administered to mice of the C57BL/6J strain, which is highly resistant to Trypanosoma cruzi, 18 to 24 h before infection with a potentially lethal dose of bloodstream trypomastigotes. Although all of the control mice died within 30 days of the acute infection, approximately 50% of the tilerone-treated animals were able to survive indefinitely (P less than 0.05). The tilerone-treated mice demonstrated significant levels of serum interferon and splenic natural killer cells at the time of infection. Macrophages isolated from the peritoneal cavities of tilerone-treated C57BL/6J mice appeared to kill significant numbers of trypanosomes during 2 to 3 days of in vitro culture, indicating that activated macrophages may contribute to the enhanced resistance to T. cruzi infection in these mice. Beige mice treated with tilerone did not survive T. cruzi infection as well as tilerone-treated heterozygotes did, suggesting a role for natural killer cells in interferon-induced resistance. These results suggest that interferon or effector mechanisms enhanced by interferon induction can play a significant role in influencing resistance to T. cruzi infection. PMID:6173326