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Sample records for interferon beta-1a avonex

  1. Neutralizing antibodies in multiple sclerosis patients on weekly intramuscular Avonex and biosimilar interferon beta-1a (CinnoVex): comparing results of measurements in two different laboratories.

    PubMed

    Shahkarami, Mohammad Amir; Vaziri, Behrouz; Salami, Shiva; Harandi, Ali Amini; Oger, Joel

    2013-02-28

    The appearance of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) has significant clinical and regulatory consequences for interferons in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). In a double blind, randomized clinical trial, 84 patients with relapsing remitting MS were enrolled in a 24month study period. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups receiving 30mcg weekly intramuscular injections of either Avonex® (Biogen Idec, USA; 42 patients) or CinnoVex® (CinnaGen Co, Iran; 42 patients). NAb titer was drawn for all patients every 6months and assayed using cytopathic effect assay (CPE) method in Tehran, Iran. To validate the measure done in the Iranian lab, 45 sera with adequate volume and proper storing condition were selected and sent to be rechecked using luciferase reporter gene assay (LA) method for verification in 2 phases in Vancouver, Canada. The cut-off point of 20 TRU was considered for positivity. The two labs found the same three samples to be positive (2 samples from patients received Avonex and 1 received CinnoVex) and 42 to be negative. They had the following values using the Kawade formula as recommended by international standards; 2238, 89 and 302 (TRu/ml) using CPE assay versus 2464, 290 and 169 (TRu/ml) using LA method. As similar results were obtained from CinnoVex or Avonex in our study, we suggest that both medications will have a similar immunogenetic profile. PMID:23220098

  2. A randomized, blinded, parallel-group, pilot trial of mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept) compared with interferon beta-1a (Avonex) in patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Frohman, Elliot M.; Cutter, Gary; Remington, Gina; Gao, Hongjiang; Rossman, Howard; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Durfee, Jacqueline E.; Conger, Amy; Carl, Ellen; Treadaway, Katherine; Lindzen, Eric; Salter, Amber; Frohman, Teresa C.; Shah, Anjali; Bates, Angela; Cox, Jennifer L.; Dwyer, Michael G.; Stüve, Olaf; Greenberg, Benjamin M.; Racke, Michael K.; Zivadinov, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background: Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF, CellCept®) has been utilized as an antirejection agent in transplant recipients and in patients with myriad autoimmune disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective: To investigate radiographic and clinical safety involving monotherapy use of daily oral MMF (1 g b.i.d.) versus weekly intramuscular interferon beta 1a (Avonex® at 30 mcg) in relapsing–remitting MS (RRMS). Methods: We organized a randomized, serial, 6-monthly, MRI-blinded, parallel-group multicenter pilot study to determine the safety of MMF versus interferon beta monotherapy in 35 untreated patients with RRMS, all of whom exhibited evidence of gadolinium (Gd) enhancement on a screening MRI of the brain. The primary outcome was the reduction in the cumulative mean number of combined active lesions (CAL), new Gd-enhancing lesions, and new T2 lesions on MRI analyses. Results: Both interferon beta and MMF appeared safe and well tolerated in the majority of patients. There was no difference between MMF therapy and the standard regimen of interferon beta therapy on the primary safety MRI endpoints of the study. However, the MMF group showed a trend toward a lower accumulation of combined active lesions, CAL, Gd and T2 lesions when compared with interferon beta treated patients. Conclusions: The results from this pilot study suggest that the application of MMF monotherapy in MS deserves further exploration. PMID:21180633

  3. Interferon Beta-1a Intramuscular Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which the nerves do not ... known how interferon beta-1a works to treat MS. ... doctor.Interferon beta-1a controls the symptoms of MS but does not cure it. Continue to use ...

  4. Interferon Beta-1a Intramuscular Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... interferon beta-1a intramuscular at around the same time of day on your injection days. Follow the ...

  5. Effect of statins on clinical and molecular responses to intramuscular interferon beta-1a

    PubMed Central

    Rudick, R A.; Pace, A; Rani, M R.S.; Hyde, R; Panzara, M; Appachi, S; Shrock, J; Maurer, S L.; Calabresi, P A.; Confavreux, C; Galetta, S L.; Lublin, F D.; Radue, E -W.; Ransohoff, R M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Findings from a small clinical study suggested that statins may counteract the therapeutic effects of interferon beta (IFNβ) in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods: We conducted a post hoc analysis of data from the Safety and Efficacy of Natalizumab in Combination With IFNβ-1a in Patients With Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (SENTINEL) study to determine the effects of statins on efficacy of IFNβ. SENTINEL was a prospective trial of patients with RRMS treated with natalizumab (Tysabri®, Biogen Idec, Inc., Cambridge, MA) plus IM IFNβ-1a (Avonex®, Biogen Idec, Inc.) 30 μg compared with placebo plus IM IFNβ-1a 30 μg. Clinical and MRI outcomes in patients treated with IM IFNβ-1a only (no-statins group, n = 542) were compared with those of patients taking IM IFNβ-1a and statins at doses used to treat hyperlipidemia (statins group, n = 40). Results: No significant differences were observed between treatment groups in adjusted annualized relapse rate (p = 0.937), disability progression (p = 0.438), number of gadolinium-enhancing lesions (p = 0.604), or number of new or enlarging T2-hyperintense lesions (p = 0.802) at 2 years. More patients in the statins group reported fatigue, extremity pain, muscle aches, and increases in hepatic transaminases compared with patients in the no-statins group. Statin treatment had no ex vivo or in vitro effect on induction of IFN-stimulated genes. Conclusions: Statin therapy does not appear to affect clinical effects of IM interferon beta-1a in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis or the primary molecular response to interferon beta treatment. GLOSSARY ANCOVA = analysis of covariance; CI = confidence interval; EDSS = Expanded Disability Status Scale; GAPDH = glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase; Gd+ = gadolinium-enhancing; IFNβ = interferon beta; ISG = IFN-stimulated gene; RRMS = relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis; SENTINEL = Safety and Efficacy of

  6. [Interferon beta 1-a in multiple sclerosis: 1-year experience in 62 patients].

    PubMed

    Tilbery, C P; Felipe, E; Moreira, M A; Mendes, M F; França, A S

    2000-06-01

    We report the results of a trial of interferon beta 1-a in 62 ambulatory patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Entry criteria included EDSS of 0 to 5.5 and at least two exacerbations in the previous 2 years. The patients received 3 million international units by subcutaneous injections three times a week. The end points were differences in exacerbation rate and treatment effect on disease progression. The annual exacerbation rate for patients that did not take the interferon beta 1-a was 1.32 and for the patients under medication 0.63. The EDSS score in patients that did not take the mediaction was 4.7 and 2.0 for the patients with interferon beta 1-a. Interferon beta 1-a was well tolerated and 85% of patients completed 1 year treatment. PMID:10920406

  7. Unusual Side Effects of Interferon Beta-1a in Patient with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Maryam; Pour Manshadi, Seyed Mohammad Yousof Mostafavi; Naderi, Nafiseh; Dehghan, Abolfazl; Azizi, Sanaz

    2012-01-01

    This is a descriptive case report of a 30-year-old man with massive epistaxis, echymosis on arms, abnormal CBC and increased plasma urea and creatinine level (i.e. above normal range). Probably, these are as side effects of interferon beta-1a injection. This is the first report according to our literature search (Pub Med, Google scholar, ISI web of knowledge, ProQuest, MD consult, Science Direct, and SCOPUS) about interferon beta-1a related abnormal kidney function tests hereafter. Abnormal kidney function tests (i.e. increased plasma urea and creatinie level) is not a known as side effect of interferon beta-1a. This case indicates, likely potential for development of these side effects with this medication. PMID:23922529

  8. Natalizumab plus interferon beta-1a reduces lesion formation in relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Stuart, William H; Calabresi, Peter A; Confavreux, Christian; Galetta, Steven L; Rudick, Richard A; Lublin, Fred D; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Wynn, Daniel R; Fisher, Elizabeth; Papadopoulou, Athina; Lynn, Frances; Panzara, Michael A; Sandrock, Alfred W

    2010-05-15

    The SENTINEL study showed that the addition of natalizumab improved outcomes for patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) who had experienced disease activity while receiving interferon beta-1a (IFNbeta-1a) alone. Previously unreported secondary and tertiary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures are presented here. Patients received natalizumab 300 mg (n=589) or placebo (n=582) intravenously every 4 weeks plus IFNbeta-1a 30 microg intramuscularly once weekly. Annual MRI scans allowed comparison of a range of MRI end points versus baseline. Over 2 years, 67% of patients receiving natalizumab plus IFNbeta-1a remained free of new or enlarging T2-lesions compared with 30% of patients receiving IFNbeta-1a alone. The mean change from baseline in T2 lesion volume over 2 years decreased in patients receiving natalizumab plus IFNbeta-1a and increased in those receiving IFNbeta-1a alone (-277.5mm(3) versus 525.6mm(3); p<0.001). Compared with IFNbeta-1a alone, add-on natalizumab therapy resulted in a smaller increase in mean T1-hypointense lesion volume after 2 years (1821.3mm(3) versus 2210.5mm(3); p<0.001), a smaller mean number of new T1-hypointense lesions over 2 years (2.3 versus 4.1; p<0.001), and a slower rate of brain atrophy during the second year of therapy (-0.31% versus -0.40%; p=0.020). Natalizumab add-on therapy reduced gadolinium-enhancing, T1-hypointense, and T2 MRI lesion activity and slowed brain atrophy progression in patients with relapsing MS who experienced disease activity despite treatment with IFNbeta-1a alone. PMID:20236661

  9. Effects of Systemic and Local Interferon Beta-1a on Epidural Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Işık, Semra; Doğan, Şeref; Özgün, Gonca; Ocakoğlu, Gökhan; Uğraş, Nesrin

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Level 1 randomized controlled study. Purpose To investigate the effects of systemic and local interferon-beta-1a (IFN-β-1a) on prevention of epidural fibrosis using histopathological parameters. Overview of Literature Epidural fibrosis involves fibroblastic invasion of nerve roots into the epidural space. Formation of dense fibrous tissue causes lumbar and radicular pain. Many surgical techniques and several materials have been proposed in the literature, but no study has assessed the effect of IFN-β-1a on prevention of epidural fibrosis. Methods Forty-eight adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups of eight: sham group, control group, systemic 44 μg IFN-β-1a group and 22 μg IFN-β-1a group (after laminectomy and discectomy, 0.28 mL and 0.14 mL IFN-β-1a applied subcutaneously three times for a week, respectively), local 44 μg IFN-β-1a group (laminectomy and discectomy, followed by 0.28 mL IFN-β-1a on the surgical area), and local 22 μg IFN-β-1a group (laminectomy and discectomy, followed by 0.14 mL IFN-β-1a on the surgical area). All rats were sacrificed after 4 weeks and groups were evaluated histopathologically. Results Compared with sham and control groups, significantly less epidural fibrosis, dural adhesion, and fibroblast cell density were observed in the local and systemic 44 μg IFN-β-1a groups. No other differences were evident between the local and systemic groups. Conclusions IFN-β-1a is effective in preventing epidural fibrosis with systemic and local application. PMID:27340517

  10. INTERFERON BETA-1A TREATMENT IN HTLV-1-ASSOCIATED MYELOPATHY/TROPICAL SPASTIC PARAPARESIS: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Graça Maria de Castro; da Silva, Marcos Antonio Custódio Neto; Souza, Victor Lima; Lopes, Natália Barbosa da Silva; da Silva, Diego Luz Felipe; Nascimento, Maria do Desterro Soares Brandão

    2014-01-01

    Here a young patient (< 21 years of age) with a history of infective dermatitis is described. The patient was diagnosed with myelopathy associated with HTLV-1/tropical spastic paraparesis and treated with interferon beta-1a. The disease was clinically established as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), and laboratory tests confirmed the presence of antibodies to HTLV-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Mumps, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, schistosomiasis, herpes virus 1 and 2, rubella, measles, varicella-zoster toxoplasmosis, hepatitis, HIV, and syphilis were excluded by serology. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder and presented with nocturia, urinary urgency, paresthesia of the lower left limb, a marked reduction of muscle strength in the lower limbs, and a slight reduction in upper limb strength. During the fourth week of treatment with interferon beta-1a, urinary urgency and paresthesia disappeared and clinical motor skills improved. PMID:25229227

  11. Interferon beta-1a treatment in HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Viana, Graça Maria de Castro; Silva, Marcos Antonio Custódio Neto da; Souza, Victor Lima; Lopes, Natália Barbosa da Silva; Silva, Diego Luz Felipe da; Nascimento, Maria do Desterro Soares Brandão

    2014-01-01

    Here a young patient (< 21 years of age) with a history of infective dermatitis is described. The patient was diagnosed with myelopathy associated with HTLV-1/tropical spastic paraparesis and treated with interferon beta-1a. The disease was clinically established as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), and laboratory tests confirmed the presence of antibodies to HTLV-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Mumps, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, schistosomiasis, herpes virus 1 and 2, rubella, measles, varicella-zoster toxoplasmosis, hepatitis, HIV, and syphilis were excluded by serology. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder and presented with nocturia, urinary urgency, paresthesia of the lower left limb, a marked reduction of muscle strength in the lower limbs, and a slight reduction in upper limb strength. During the fourth week of treatment with interferon beta-1a, urinary urgency and paresthesia disappeared and clinical motor skills improved. PMID:25229227

  12. Early treatment with high-dose interferon beta-1a reverses cognitive and cortical plasticity deficits in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Francesco; Kusayanagi, Hajime; Buttari, Fabio; Centini, Barbara; Monteleone, Fabrizia; Nicoletti, Carolina Gabri; Bernardi, Giorgio; Di Cantogno, Elisabetta Verdun; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Centonze, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Summary Acute inflammation is associated with cognitive deficits and alterations of cortical plasticity in multiple sclerosis (MS). We tested whether early treatment with high-dose interferon (IFN) beta-1a, known to reduce inflammatory activity, improves cortical function and cognitive deficits in MS. Eighty treatment-naïve relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) patients received IFN beta-1a (44 mcg) subcutaneously three times per week. Cognitive performance and cortical plasticity were measured through the paced auditory serial addition test (PASAT) and intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) before and up to two years after IFN beta-1a initiation. Before treatment, patients with gadolinium-enhancing lesions (Gd+) on MRI performed worse on the PASAT, and showed lower iTBS-induced plasticity, compared with Gd− patients. Six months after treatment initiation both PASAT and iTBS-induced plasticity improved in Gd+ and remained stable in Gd− patients. These results suggest that cognitive and synaptic plasticity deficits may be rescued during high-dose IFN beta-1a treatment in newly-diagnosed RRMS patients with Gd+ lesions. PMID:23402677

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of peginterferon beta-1a compared with interferon beta-1a and glatiramer acetate in the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Luis; Guo, Shien; Kinter, Elizabeth; Fay, Monica

    2016-07-01

    Objective Peginterferon beta-1a 125 mcg, administered subcutaneously (SC) every 2 weeks, a new disease-modifying therapy (DMT) for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2014. This study assesses the cost-effectiveness of peginterferon beta-1a vs interferon beta-1a (44 mcg SC 3 times per week) and glatiramer acetate (20 mg SC once-daily) in the treatment of RRMS from the perspective of a US payer over 10 years. Methods A Markov cohort economic model was developed for this analysis. The model predicts disability progression, occurrence of relapses and other adverse events and translates them into quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and costs. Natural history data were obtained from the placebo arm of the ADVANCE trial of peginterferon beta-1a, the London Ontario (Canada) database and a large population-based MS survey. Comparative efficacy of each DMT vs placebo was obtained from a network meta-analysis. Costs (in 2014 US dollars) were sourced from public databases and literature. Clinical and economic outcomes were discounted at 3% per year. Results Over 10 years, peginterferon beta-1a was dominant (i.e., more effective and less costly), with cost-savings of $22,070 and additional 0.06 QALYs when compared with interferon beta-1a 44 mcg and with cost-savings of $19,163 and 0.07 QALYs gained when compared with glatiramer acetate 20 mg. Results were most sensitive to variations in the treatment effect of each DMT, treatment acquisition costs of each DMT and the time horizon. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses indicated that peginterferon beta-1a remains dominant in >90% of 5,000 replications compared with either DMTs. Conclusion This analysis suggests that long-term treatment with peginterferon beta-1a improves clinical outcomes at reduced costs compared with interferon beta-1a 44 mcg and glatiramer acetate 20 mg and should be a valuable addition to managed care formularies for treating

  14. Results of sustained long-term use of interferon beta-1a in a community-based cohort of patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cohan, Stanley; Chen, Chiayi; Baraban, Elizabeth; Stuchiner, Tamela; Grote, Lois; Rodriguez, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated long-term efficacy of interferon beta-1a in large community-based cohorts. Objective Evaluate time to relapse, relapse rate, and disability progression in patients treated with intramuscular interferon beta-1a. Methods A retrospective review of medical records from 2000–2010 was performed. Adult patients with relapsing-remitting MS or clinically isolated syndrome treated with interferon beta-1a were included. Primary outcomes were time to relapse, annualized relapse rate, and changes in Expanded Disability Status Scale score. Other outcomes included factors associated with time to first relapse, risk of having a relapse while receiving interferon beta-1a, and discontinuation of therapy. Results In total, 364 of 696 patients screened were enrolled, with a mean age of 51 ± 12.1 years, disease duration of 9.39 ± 7.02 years, and duration of therapy of 4.03 ± 2.56 years. Mean time to first on-therapy relapse was 5.58 ± 0.26 years, annualized relapse rate was 0.30 ± 0.55 years, and mean increase in sustained Expanded Disability Status Scale score was 0.018. Relapse risk was associated with higher baseline Expanded Disability Status Scale score, age at disease onset, and number of relapses in the 12 months prior to therapy initiation. Conclusions This study demonstrates favorable clinical outcomes observed in a large community-based cohort, and serves to emphasize the continued therapeutic importance of interferon beta-1a, despite the development of newer agents with greater convenience of use, but also more potential risk of serious morbidity.

  15. Development of rheumatoid arthritis during treatment of multiple sclerosis with interferon beta 1-a. Coincidence of two conditions or a complication of treatment: A case report.

    PubMed

    Hojjati, Seyed Mohammad Masood; Heidari, Behzad; Babaei, Mansour

    2016-09-01

    Coexistence of multiple sclerosis (MS) with other autoimmune diseases has been attributed to common background genetic or environmental factors. This study presents development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during treatment of MS. The MS was confirmed by the Mc Donald criteria and the diagnosis of RA was confirmed by the ACR/EULAR criteria. A 35 years old women with 9 years of MS who was receiving interferon beta 1-a (INF) for 7 years and who did not respond to conventional therapy of RA over 8 months developed clinical manifestations of RA. But a rapid response was observed after discontinuation of INF. These findings suggest a possible contribution of INF in the development of RA. PMID:27489727

  16. Effect of dose and frequency of interferon beta-1a administration on clinical and magnetic resonance imaging parameters in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cocco, Eleonora; Marchi, Piernicola; Floris, Gianluca; Mascia, Maria Giuseppina; Deriu, Marcello; Sirca, Antonella; Mamusa, Elena; Lai, Marina; Mura, Marco; Mallarini, Giorgio; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna

    2006-01-01

    There is still debate over the optimal dosage, frequency and route of administration of interferon (IFN) beta in multiple sclerosis (MS). A prospective, non-randomized, comparative study was performed to evaluate differences in magnetic resonance imaging and clinical outcomes of two IFN beta-1a preparations (30mcg intramuscular [im] once-weekly [qw], AVO; and 22 mcg subcutaneous [sc] three-times-weekly [tiw]; R22). Relapsing-remitting MS patients on one of the two IFN preparations (AVO, n=47; R22, n=48) were assessed at baseline and after 6 months of further treatment. There were no significant differences between the two groups at baseline. Both groups showed significantly reduced relapse rates (F=19.5; p<0.001) from baseline (0.6) to 6-month assessment (0.2; p<0.001). Univariate analysis showed a significant difference in favour of R22 on T2 lesion volume (F=14.4; p<0.001) and T1 black hole lesion load (F=8.5; p=0.004), the latter showing a significant increase in the AVO group (p<0.001). The incidence of patients with new T1 black holes was also higher for AVO than R22 (23.5% vs 8.3%; p=0.025). These results from patients receiving AVO or R22 in normal clinical practice are in line with randomized clinical studies that show the benefits of high-dose, high-frequency administration of IFN beta-1a in MS therapy. PMID:17049133

  17. Interferon Beta-1a Subcutaneous Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... under the skin). It is usually injected three times a week. You should inject this medication on ...

  18. Interferon Beta-1a Subcutaneous Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... used syringes or automatic injection devices in a puncture resistant container that is out of the reach ... doctor or pharmacist about how to discard the puncture-resistant container.Always look at the medication in ...

  19. Peginterferon Beta-1a Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... peginterferon beta-1a injection at around the same time of day each time you inject it. Follow ...

  20. Effect of Treatment with Interferon Beta-1a on Changes in Voxel-Wise Magnetization Transfer Ratio in Normal Appearing Brain Tissue and Lesions of Patients with Relapsing–Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: A 24-Week, Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Zivadinov, Robert; Dwyer, Michael G.; Markovic-Plese, Silva; Kennedy, Cheryl; Bergsland, Niels; Ramasamy, Deepa P.; Durfee, Jacqueline; Hojnacki, David; Hayward, Brooke; Dangond, Fernando; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2014-01-01

    Background This pilot study investigated changes in remyelinating and demyelinating activity in normal appearing brain tissue (NABT) and lesions, by using voxel-wise magnetization transfer ratio (VW-MTR), in patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) receiving interferon beta-1a 44 mcg subcutaneously (IFN β-1a SC) three times weekly versus healthy controls (HCs) (NCT01085318). Methods Increasing (suggestive of remyelination) and decreasing (suggestive of demyelination) VW-MTR changes in NABT and in T2, T1 and gadolinium (Gd)-enhancing lesion volume were measured over 24 weeks in 23 patients treated with IFN β-1a SC and in 15 HCs (where applicable). VW-MTR changes were tested using the Wilcoxon signed–rank or Wilcoxon rank–sum test. Results A trend for greater volume of NABT with increasing VW-MTR at 24 weeks was observed for patients versus HCs (median [range] 1206 [0–15278]; 342 [0–951] mm3; p = 0.061). NABT volume with increasing VW-MTR at 12 weeks was significantly greater in patients than in HCs (852 [6–11577]; 360 [0–1755] mm3; p = 0.028). Similar findings were detected for lesion volumes. Two patients with notably high numbers of Gd-enhancing lesions at baseline had a markedly greater volume of tissue with increasing VW-MTR compared with other patients. Volume of NABT tissue with decreasing VW-MTR was significantly greater in patients versus HCs at 24 weeks (942 [0–6141]; 297 [0–852] mm3; p<0.001). Conclusions The significant change in NABT volume with increasing VW-MTR at 12 weeks suggests that active remyelination in patients with RRMS may occur during treatment with IFN β-1a SC. Findings from two patients with the highest number of Gd-enhancing lesions at baseline suggest that extensive remyelination in NABT may occur in patients with high disease activity. Tissue volume with decreasing VW-MTR was greater in patients than in HCs, despite treatment, validating the sensitivity of this technique for detecting MS

  1. Interferon-beta in pediatric multiple sclerosis patients: safety in short-term prescription.

    PubMed

    Basiri, Keivan; Etemadifar, Masood; Derakhshan, Fatemeh; Ashtari, Fereshteh; Shaygannejad, Vahid; Fatehi, Zahra; Maghzi, Amir Hadi; Fatehi, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    None of the approved immunomodulatory drugs in adults Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients have been officially approved for the pediatric patients and are currently used off-label in this population. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness and tolerability of intramuscular interferon beta1-a (Avonex(®)) and subcutaneously injected interferon beta1-b (Betaferon(®)) in children with definite relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). Thirteen patients aged younger than 16, who were recently diagnosed with definite RRMS according to the McDonald's criteria, were enrolled in this study. Six patients were treated with Avonex(®) 30 μg, intramuscularly every week, and seven patients were treated with Betaferon(®) 250 μg, subcutaneously every other day. All patients were treated with adult doses; initially interferon-beta was prescribed with half dose, and it was increased to full adult dose steadily. Eleven girls and two boys, mean (SD) age of 14.7 (1.9) years, were studied. Following nine months of using interferon-beta, nine patients (69.2%) had no relapses and the remaining four, experienced only one relapse. The mean EDSS score was decreased significantly after the study period. The present study provides reasonable data for the use of interferon-beta in Pediatric MS due to lack of short-term complications and safety. Studies with larger sample size and longer follow up duration are required to shed light on the long term impact of the interferon-beta therapy in children. PMID:22359077

  2. Cost Effectiveness Analysis of Avonex and CinnoVex in Relapsing Remitting MS

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Behzad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Jafari, Mehdi; Najafi, Smaeil; Kiadaliri, Aliasghar Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Multiple sclerosis is a chronic and degenerative neurological disease characterized by loss of myelin sheath of some neurons in brain and spinal cord. It is associated with high economic burden due to premature deaths and high occurrence of disabilities. The aim of the current study was to determine cost effectiveness of two major products of interferon 1a in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Method and Materials: Altogether, 140 patients who have consumed Avonex and CinnoVex in Relapsing Remitting MS for at least two years were randomly selected (70 patients in each group). Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was assessed using the adopted MSQoL-54 instrument. Costs were measured and valued from Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MOHME) perspective. Two-way sensitivity analysis was used to check robustness of the results. Results: Patients in CinnoVex group reported significantly higher scores in both physical (69.5 vs. 50.9, P<0.001) and mental (63.3 vs. 56.6, P=0.03) aspects of HRQoL than Avonex group. On the other hand, annual cost of CinnoVex and Avonex were 2410 US$ and 4515US$ per patient, respectively (P<0.001). Conclusions: The results showed that CinnoVex was dominant option over the study period. It is suggested that results of the current study should be considered in allocating resources to MS treatments in Iran. Of course, our findings should be interpreted with caution duo to short term horizon and lack of HRQoL scores at baseline (before the intervention). PMID:25716386

  3. EVASEP: A Noninterventional Study Describing the Perception of Neurologists, Patients, and Caregivers on Caregivers' Role in the Support of Patients Suffering from Multiple Sclerosis Treated with Subcutaneous Interferon Beta 1a

    PubMed Central

    Donzé, Cécile; Lenne, Bruno; Jean Deleglise, Anne-Sophie; Bellili, Yasmine; Hautecoeur, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background. The perception of the role of caregivers for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) is important but poorly studied, particularly in patients with low levels of disability. Objectives. To describe the perceptions of the role of caregivers from the perspective of the caregiver, the patient, and neurologists. Methods. This observational study was conducted in France on patients with relapsing remitting MS treated with subcutaneous (SC) interferon-β-1a (IFN-β-1a) for more than 24 months. Results. Caregiver, patients, and neurologists all considered providing moral support and fighting against the disease as the most important role of the care provider. Moral support was considered significantly more important by caregivers than the patients and neurologists (p = 0.002) and caregivers considered their role in helping patients to fight disease more important than did the neurologists (p = 0.006). Knowledge of disease and available treatments were less important among support providers than patients (p = 0.007 and p = 0.001). Conclusion. There are many unmet needs in the perception of the role of caregivers for people with MS which need to be addressed to deliver the most effective care package for patients and to support the needs of the support provider. PMID:27563466

  4. Time of interferon-beta 1a injection and duration of treatment affect clinical side effects and acute changes of plasma hormone and cytokine levels in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Kümpfel, T; Schwan, M; Pollmächer, Th; Yassouridis, A; Uhr, M; Trenkwalder, C; Weber, F

    2007-11-01

    During initiation of interferon-beta (IFN-beta) therapy, many multiple sclerosis (MS) patients experience systemic side effects which may depend on the time point of IFN-beta injection. We investigated the time course of plasma hormone-, cytokine- and cytokine-receptor concentrations after the first injection of IFN-beta either at 8.00 a.m. (group A) or at 6.00 p.m. (group B) and quantified clinical side effects within the first 9 h in 16 medication free patients with relapsing-remitting MS. This investigation was repeated after 6-month IFN-beta therapy. Plasma ACTH and cortisol concentrations followed their physiological rhythms, with lower levels in the evening compared to the morning, but raised earlier and stronger in group B after IFN-beta administration. IFN-beta injection in the evening led to a prompter increase of plasma IL-6 concentrations and temperature during the first hours and correlated to more intense clinical side effects compared to group A. Plasma IL-10 concentrations increased more in group A compared to group B, but sTNF-RI and sTNF-RII concentrations raised 7 h after IFN-beta injection only in group B. Acute effects on plasma hormone and cytokine concentrations adapted after 6-month IFN-beta treatment, while diurnal variations were still present. Baseline sTNF-RII concentrations were elevated after 6-month IFN-beta therapy only in group A. Our results show that time point of IFN-beta injection has differential effects on acute changes of plasma hormone and cytokine concentrations and is related to systemic side effects. This may have implications on the tolerability and effectiveness of IFN-beta therapy. PMID:17967841

  5. Less Frequent and Less Severe Flu-Like Syndrome in Interferon Beta-1a Treated Multiple Sclerosis Patients with at Least One Allele Bearing the G>C Polymorphism at Position -174 of the IL-6 Promoter Gene

    PubMed Central

    Bertoli, Diego; Serana, Federico; Sottini, Alessandra; Cordioli, Cinzia; Maimone, Davide; Amato, Maria Pia; Centonze, Diego; Florio, Ciro; Puma, Elisa; Capra, Ruggero; Imberti, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common adverse event of interferon beta (IFNβ) therapy for multiple sclerosis is flu-like syndrome (FLS), which has been reportedly related to increased levels of cytokines such as interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Average cytokine levels can be affected by single nucleotide polymorphism in the gene promoter regions. To investigate whether IL-6 -174 G>C and TNF-α -376 G>A polymorphisms could be correlated to the incidence of FLS, and whether an anti-inflammatory/antipyretic therapy may influence FLS development, a prospective observational study was performed in 190 treatment naïve, multiple sclerosis patients who started IM IFNβ-1a 30mcg once weekly. The identification of IL-6 -174 G>C and TNF-α -376 G>A polymorphisms was achieved by performing an amplification-refractory mutation system. Serum IL-6 levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in blood samples taken before therapy and then after the first and last IFNβ-1a injection of the follow-up. FLS-related symptoms were recorded by patients once per week during the first 12 weeks of therapy into a self-reported diary. We found that patients carrying at least one copy of the C allele at position -174 in the promoter of IL-6 gene produced lower levels of IL-6 and were less prone to develop FLS, which was also less severe. On the contrary, the polymorphism of TNF-α had no effect on FLS. Patients taking the first dose of anti-inflammatory/antipyretic therapy in the peri-injection period (within 1 hour) experienced a reduced FLS severity. In conclusion, the study of IL-6 -174 G>C polymorphism would allow the identification of patients lacking the C nucleotide on both alleles who are at risk of a more severe FLS, and may be addressed to a timely and stronger anti-inflammatory/antipyretic therapy for a more effective FLS prevention. PMID:26285213

  6. IFN beta 1a as Glucocorticoids-Sparing Therapy in a Patient with CLIPPERS

    PubMed Central

    Rico, María; Villafani, Javier; Tuñón, Alberto; Mateos, Valentín; Oliva-Nacarino, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 31 Final Diagnosis: CLIPPERS Symptoms: Ataxia • diplopia Medication: IFNbeta 1a Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) is a recently described inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, distinguished by brainstem- and spinal cord-centered lesions with a characteristic contrast enhancement on MRI, a lymphocytic perivascular infiltrate on pathological exam, and a dramatic response to and dependence on steroids therapy. Since its initial description in 2010, different glucocorticoid-sparing agents, mostly immunosuppressant drugs, have been used to minimize the dosage, but these therapies also carry the risk of important secondary effects. We present the first reported case of CLIPPERS treated with interferon beta 1a as add-on therapy. Case Report: A previously healthy 31-year-old man presented with gait ataxia and dysarthria. MRI showed pons-centered hyperintense patchy lesions on T2-weighted images. Additional tests ruled out other possible diagnoses and symptoms reversed with intravenous methylprednisolone. Over the years the patient presented with several episodes of deterioration each year, which were partly reversed with glucocorticoid therapy, but leaving him with growing sequelae. Four years after the initial event, treatment with interferon-beta-1a was initiated, achieving reduced frequency of the relapses to 1 every 4 years, which were no longer associated to increasing disability. This allowed reducing glucocorticoids to 30 mg of Deflazacort every other day. Conclusions: Interferon beta-1a could be an alternative to corticosteroid-combined therapy in CLIPPERS and its more benign profile of secondary effects compared to immunosuppressants could make it an attractive choice. PMID:26813773

  7. Incidence, characterization, and clinical impact analysis of peginterferon beta1a immunogenicity in patients with multiple sclerosis in the ADVANCE trial

    PubMed Central

    White, Joleen T.; Newsome, Scott D.; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Bermel, Robert A.; Cui, Yue; Seddighzadeh, Ali; Hung, Serena; Crossman, Mary; Subramanyam, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Background: Efficacy of interferon beta in multiple sclerosis (MS) can be dampened in patients who develop neutralizing antidrug antibodies (NAbs). Peginterferon beta1a is an interferon conjugated with a polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety. Pegylation increases a drug’s half life and exposure, and may also reduce immunogenicity. Objective: The objective of this study was to characterize the incidence and impact of immunogenicity to peginterferon beta1a over 2 years in patients with MS. Methods: Patients with relapsing–remitting MS (N = 1512) were randomized to subcutaneous peginterferon beta1a 125 μg every 2 or 4 weeks, or placebo, for 1 year; patients in the placebo group were rerandomized to active treatment in year 2. The incidence and titers of binding antibodies (BAbs) and NAbs to interferon and antibodies to PEG (anti-PEG) were assessed in analytically validated assays. The clinical impact of immunogenicity on relapse and magnetic resonance imaging endpoints was evaluated. Results: Over 2 years, 6%, less than 1%, and 7% of patients developed anti-interferon BAbs, NAbs, and anti-PEG antibodies, respectively. There was no discernible clinically meaningful effect of antibody status on the pharmacodynamic, efficacy, or safety parameters evaluated, although these analyses were limited by the low incidence of treatment-emergent antibodies. Conclusion: The treatment effect of peginterferon beta1a in patients with relapsing–remitting MS is not expected to be attenuated by immunogenicity. PMID:27366230

  8. Quality of life in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients receiving CinnoVex compared with Avonex

    PubMed Central

    Hatam, Nahid; Bastani, Peivand; Shahtaheri, Rahil Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There is an increasing recognition among clinicians and researchers that the impact of chronic illnesses and their treatments must be assessed in terms of their quality of life (QoL) in addition to more traditional measures of clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to compare the QoL in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) using Avonex or CinnoVex. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study on one hundred patients with RRMS, fifty and fifty patients were being treated with Avonex (Biogen Idec, USA) and CinnoVex (CinnaGen, Iran), respectively. We used a disease-specific questionnaire for MS (Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 [MSQoL-54]). Both groups were tested for significant differences regarding sociodemographic. A multiple linear regression model was constructed to find factors that affected the different aspect of QoL of the whole sample of patients. Findings: MS groups did not differ in physical and mental health composite scores as well as relative scales. The results of regression models for each subscale showed that age, marriage, and Expanded Disability Status Scale were associated with several subscales of the MSQoL-54 (P < 0.05). Conclusion: In this study, it was seen that there are no significant differences between QoL of Avonex and CinnoVex, but a limitation in our study the results may be different in other countries and even various areas in Iran. PMID:27512709

  9. Peginterferon beta-1a in multiple sclerosis: 2-year results from ADVANCE

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Douglas L; Balcer, Laura J; Boyko, Alexey A; Pelletier, Jean; Liu, Shifang; Zhu, Ying; Seddighzadeh, Ali; Hung, Serena; Deykin, Aaron; Sheikh, Sarah I; Calabresi, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of subcutaneous peginterferon beta-1a over 2 years in patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis in the ADVANCE study. Methods: Patients were randomized to placebo or 125 µg peginterferon beta-1a every 2 or 4 weeks. For Year 2 (Y2), patients originally randomized to placebo were re-randomized to peginterferon beta-1a every 2 weeks or every 4 weeks. Patients randomized to peginterferon beta-1a in Year 1 (Y1) remained on the same dosing regimen in Y2. Results: Compared with Y1, annualized relapse rate (ARR) was further reduced in Y2 with every 2 week dosing (Y1: 0.230 [95% CI 0.183–0.291], Y2: 0.178 [0.136–0.233]) and maintained with every 4 week dosing (Y1: 0.286 [0.231–0.355], Y2: 0.291 [0.231–0.368]). Patients starting peginterferon beta-1a from Y1 displayed improved efficacy versus patients initially assigned placebo, with reductions in ARR (every 2 weeks: 37%, p<0.0001; every 4 weeks: 17%, p=0.0906), risk of relapse (every 2 weeks: 39%, p<0.0001; every 4 weeks: 19%, p=0.0465), 12-week disability progression (every 2 weeks: 33%, p=0.0257; every 4 weeks: 25%, p=0.0960), and 24-week disability progression (every 2 weeks: 41%, p=0.0137; every 4 weeks: 9%, p=0.6243). Over 2 years, greater reductions were observed with every 2 week versus every 4 week dosing for all endpoints and peginterferon beta-1a was well tolerated. Conclusions: Peginterferon beta-1a efficacy is maintained beyond 1 year, with greater effects observed with every 2 week versus every 4 week dosing, and a similar safety profile to Y1. Clinicaltrials.gov Registration Number: NCT00906399. PMID:25432952

  10. Management Strategies for Flu-Like Symptoms and Injection-Site Reactions Associated with Peginterferon Beta-1a

    PubMed Central

    Centonze, Diego; Newsome, Scott D.; Huang, DeRen; Robertson, Christopher; You, Xiaojun; Sabatella, Guido; Evilevitch, Vladimir; Leahy, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Flu-like symptoms (FLSs) and injection-site reactions (ISRs) have been reported with interferon beta treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS). We sought to obtain consensus on the characteristics/management of FLSs/ISRs in patients with relapsing-remitting MS based on experiences from the randomized, placebo-controlled ADVANCE study of peginterferon beta-1a. Methods: ADVANCE investigators with a predefined number of enrolled patients were eligible to participate in a consensus-generating exercise using a modified Delphi method. An independent steering committee oversaw the development of two sequential Delphi questionnaires. An average rating (AR) of 2.7 or more was defined as consensus a priori. Results: Thirty and 29 investigators (ie, responders) completed questionnaires 1 and 2, respectively, representing 374 patients from ADVANCE. Responders reported that the incidence/duration of FLSs/ISRs in their typical patient generally declined after 3 months of treatment. Responders reached consensus that FLSs typically last up to 24 hours (AR = 3.17) and have mild/moderate effects on activities of daily living (AR = 3.34). Patients should initiate acetaminophen/nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment on a scheduled basis (AR = 3.31) and change the timing of injection (AR = 3.28) to manage FLSs. Injection-site rotation/cooling and drug administration at room temperature (all AR ≥ 3.10) were recommended for managing ISRs. Patient education on FLSs/ISRs was advocated before treatment initiation. Conclusions: Delphi responders agreed on the management strategies for FLSs/ISRs and agreed that patient education is critical to set treatment expectations and promote adherence. PMID:27551246

  11. Immunogenicity of Recombinant Human Interferon Beta-1b in Immune-Tolerant Transgenic Mice Corresponds with the Biophysical Characteristics of Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Abdolvahab, Mohadeseh Haji; Fazeli, Ahmad; Halim, Andhyk; Sediq, Ahmad S; Fazeli, Mohammad Reza; Schellekens, Huub

    2016-04-01

    Determining to what extent biophysical characteristics of aggregates affect immunogenicity of therapeutic interferon beta-1b. Three recombinant human interferon beta-1b (rhIFNβ-1b) samples with different levels of aggregates generated by copper oxidation, thermal stress, or left untreated, as well as Avonex(®) drug substance and Betaferon(®) drug product, were injected intraperitoneally in nontransgenic and interferon beta transgenic FVB/N mice 5 times per week for 3 weeks. Antibodies against interferon beta were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. UV and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, size exclusion chromatography, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), fluid imaging microscopy, and resonant mass measurement, as well as sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting, were used to characterize and quantitate aggregates in the 3 rhIFNβ preparations, to correlate biophysical characteristics with immunogenicity. In immune-tolerant interferon beta transgenic FVB/N mice, Betaferon drug product showed the highest immunogenicity, while Avonex drug substance showed the lowest level of immunogenicity. Of the 3 forms of rhIFNβ-1b, copper-oxidized rhIFNβ-1b showed lower immunogenicity than thermally stressed rhIFNβ-1b, despite containing larger aggregates. Both copper-oxidized rhIFNβ-1b and thermally stressed rhIFNβ-1b exhibited changes in protein structure as shown using fluorescence spectroscopy and RP-HPLC. Nontransgenic, nonimmune-tolerant FVB/N mice generated high antibody titers against all interferon beta samples tested. The level of immunogenicity and the breaking of tolerance in FVB/N transgenic mice are not only related to the level of aggregation but also depend on the size and structure of the aggregates. PMID:26835734

  12. [Use of interferon-β in the treatment of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Ochi, Hirofumi

    2014-11-01

    Interferon-β (IFNβ) products are widely used as first-line treatment for multiple sclerosis and have well-established benefit-risk profiles over the short- and long-term. Commercially available agents in Japan include subcutaneous IFNβ-1β (Betaferon) and intramuscular IFNβ-1a(Avonex). Although these IFNβ products differ in dosage, frequency of administration and rout of delivery, both reduce relapse rate by about 30% and new lesion activity by about 65%. In addition, IFNβ products were shown to reduce the disability progression. However, clinical studies have also demonstrated that a subset of patients respond poorly to IFNβ treatment. Thus, it is an important strategy to identify the patients who have suboptimal treatment responses early, before disability ensures, as measured by combination of clinical data and MRI measures of disease activity. PMID:25518385

  13. Transient laminin beta 1a Induction Defines the Wound Epidermis during Zebrafish Fin Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen-Hui; Merriman, Alexander F.; Savage, Jeremiah; Willer, Jason; Wahlig, Taylor; Katsanis, Nicholas; Yin, Viravuth P.; Poss, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    The first critical stage in salamander or teleost appendage regeneration is creation of a specialized epidermis that instructs growth from underlying stump tissue. Here, we performed a forward genetic screen for mutations that impair this process in amputated zebrafish fins. Positional cloning and complementation assays identified a temperature-sensitive allele of the ECM component laminin beta 1a (lamb1a) that blocks fin regeneration. lamb1a, but not its paralog lamb1b, is sharply induced in a subset of epithelial cells after fin amputation, where it is required to establish and maintain a polarized basal epithelial cell layer. These events facilitate expression of the morphogenetic factors shha and lef1, basolateral positioning of phosphorylated Igf1r, patterning of new osteoblasts, and regeneration of bone. By contrast, lamb1a function is dispensable for juvenile body growth, homeostatic adult tissue maintenance, repair of split fins, or renewal of genetically ablated osteoblasts. fgf20a mutations or transgenic Fgf receptor inhibition disrupt lamb1a expression, linking a central growth factor to epithelial maturation during regeneration. Our findings reveal transient induction of lamb1a in epithelial cells as a key, growth factor-guided step in formation of a signaling-competent regeneration epidermis. PMID:26305099

  14. Transient laminin beta 1a Induction Defines the Wound Epidermis during Zebrafish Fin Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Hui; Merriman, Alexander F; Savage, Jeremiah; Willer, Jason; Wahlig, Taylor; Katsanis, Nicholas; Yin, Viravuth P; Poss, Kenneth D

    2015-08-01

    The first critical stage in salamander or teleost appendage regeneration is creation of a specialized epidermis that instructs growth from underlying stump tissue. Here, we performed a forward genetic screen for mutations that impair this process in amputated zebrafish fins. Positional cloning and complementation assays identified a temperature-sensitive allele of the ECM component laminin beta 1a (lamb1a) that blocks fin regeneration. lamb1a, but not its paralog lamb1b, is sharply induced in a subset of epithelial cells after fin amputation, where it is required to establish and maintain a polarized basal epithelial cell layer. These events facilitate expression of the morphogenetic factors shha and lef1, basolateral positioning of phosphorylated Igf1r, patterning of new osteoblasts, and regeneration of bone. By contrast, lamb1a function is dispensable for juvenile body growth, homeostatic adult tissue maintenance, repair of split fins, or renewal of genetically ablated osteoblasts. fgf20a mutations or transgenic Fgf receptor inhibition disrupt lamb1a expression, linking a central growth factor to epithelial maturation during regeneration. Our findings reveal transient induction of lamb1a in epithelial cells as a key, growth factor-guided step in formation of a signaling-competent regeneration epidermis. PMID:26305099

  15. Interferons and autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Olivier

    2009-10-01

    Interferons are ubiquitous cytokines produced by all mononuclear cell types in response to infection by a DNA or RNA virus. There are three major classes of interferons: type I or nonimmune interferons consist chiefly of interferons alpha produced by leukocytes and of interferon beta produced by fibroblasts, although there are several other less important variants; type II or immune interferon is interferon gamma, which is mainly produced by NK cells and T cells; and type III consists of the lambda interferons. Each type is characterized by a specific receptor and signal transduction pathway. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on the cell membrane and endosomes recognize viruses and other microorganisms. Binding of DNA or RNA to endosomal TLRs generates a signal whose transduction pathways lead to molecules capable of binding to genes for various interferons, interleukin-1, and TNFalpha. Interferons can stimulate or inhibit up to 300 different genes encoding proteins involved in antiviral defense mechanisms, inflammation, adaptive immunity, angiogenesis, and other processes. The properties of interferons are used to treat a number of viral infections (e.g., hepatitis B and hepatitis C), inflammatory diseases (interferon beta for multiple sclerosis and interferon gamma for systemic sclerosis), and malignancies. Overactivation of the interferon pathways has been demonstrated in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The result is a characteristic pattern of mRNA expression known as the interferon signature. Interferon overactivation is related to inadequate clearance of apoptotic particles with accumulation of apoptosis products (DNA-CpG motifs and U-RNA). Similar abnormalities have been found in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome, systemic sclerosis, and polymyositis, as well as in some cases of rheumatoid arthritis. Immunomodulation strategies designed to decrease interferon overactivity are being evaluated in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID

  16. Interferon Alfacon-1 Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Interferon alfacon-1 is no longer available in the United States. If you are currently taking this medication, you should call ... another treatment.Your doctor has ordered interferon alfacon-1 to help treat your hepatitis C infection. The ...

  17. Interferon: A Changing Picture

    PubMed Central

    Larke, R. P. Bryce

    1966-01-01

    Concepts regarding the nature and function of interferon have undergone considerable modification since its initial description in 1957. A low-molecular-weight protein, interferon has been produced by a variety of host cells following exposure not only to most viruses but also to bacterial cells and endotoxins, rickettsiae, nucleotides and a polyanionic polysaccharide (Statolon). Interferon production and activity require de novo synthesis of cellular RNA and protein, although interferon induced in vivo by endotoxins appears to involve release from a preformed state. The pathogenesis of primary viral infections may be determined largely by non-immune defence mechanisms. Interferon, detectable in the host's serum and associated with leukocytes during the course of viral illness, may make an important contribution to recovery. Low toxicity, weak antigenicity and wide range of antiviral activity make interferon an attractive therapeutic possibility. Stimulation of inherent interferon-producing mechanisms by administration of relatively innocuous agents may prove beneficial in humans. PMID:5322363

  18. Atorvastatin combined to interferon to verify the efficacy (ACTIVE) in relapsing-remitting active multiple sclerosis patients: a longitudinal controlled trial of combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Lanzillo, Roberta; Orefice, Giuseppe; Quarantelli, Mario; Rinaldi, Carlo; Prinster, Anna; Ventrella, Gianluca; Spitaleri, Daniele; Lus, Giacomo; Vacca, Giovanni; Carotenuto, Barbara; Salvatore, Elena; Brunetti, Arturo; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Brescia Morra, Vincenzo

    2010-04-01

    A large body of evidence suggests that, besides their cholesterol-lowering effect, statins exert anti-inflammatory action. Consequently, statins may have therapeutic potential in immune-mediated disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Our objectives were to determine safety, tolerability and efficacy of low-dose atorvastatin plus high-dose interferon beta-1a in multiple sclerosis patients responding poorly to interferon beta-1a alone. Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients, aged 18-50 years, with contrast-enhanced lesions or relapses while on therapy with interferon beta-1a 44 microg (three times weekly) for 12 months, were randomized to combination therapy (interferon + atorvastatin 20 mg per day; group A) or interferon alone (group B) for 24 months. Patients underwent blood analysis and clinical assessment with the Expanded Disability Status Scale every 3 months, and brain gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at screening, and 12 and 24 months thereafter. Primary outcome measure was contrast-enhanced lesion number. Secondary outcome measures were number of relapses, EDSS variation and safety laboratory data. Forty-five patients were randomized to group A (n = 21) or B (n = 24). At 24 months, group A had significantly fewer contrast-enhanced lesions versus baseline (p = 0.007) and significantly fewer relapses versus the two pre-randomization years (p < 0.001). At survival analysis, the risk for a 1-point EDSS increase was slightly higher in group B than in group A (p = 0.053). Low-dose atorvastatin may be beneficial, as add-on therapy, in poor responders to high-dose interferon beta-1a alone. PMID:20150398

  19. Rabies vaccines and interferon

    PubMed Central

    Turner, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Samples of Fermi, Semple, modified Semple, Duck embryo and tissue culture rabies vaccine were inoculated by different routes and in different doses into rabbits, mice and hamsters. The vaccines induced neither detectable interferon nor immediate protection against lethal challenge with CVS rabies virus. Under similar conditions, high but transient levels of interferon were induced in control animals of the same species with the polynucleotide complex Poly I.C. Hamsters but not mice were protected by Poly I.C.-induced interferon. No autointerference by vaccine with challenge virus was established. Vaccine-induced protection in mice was directly related to immune response. PMID:4506993

  20. Cytokine changes during interferon-beta therapy in multiple sclerosis: correlations with interferon dose and MRI response.

    PubMed

    Graber, Jerome J; Ford, David; Zhan, Min; Francis, Gordon; Panitch, Hillel; Dhib-Jalbut, Suhayl

    2007-04-01

    We investigated serum (IL-10 and IL-12p70) and cellular cytokine levels (IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IFN-gamma) in stimulated PBMC over 24 weeks in 15 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) patients randomized to receive once-weekly (qw) IFN-beta-1a 30 microg intramuscularly (IM) (n=8) or three-times-weekly (tiw) IFN-beta-1a 44 microg subcutaneously (SC) (n=7). Overall, IFN-beta treatment increased cellular IL-10 (p<0.01) levels and the ratios of cellular IL-10/IL-12p40 (p<0.01) and IL-10/IL-12p70 (p<0.02) while cellular IFN-gamma levels were reduced (p<0.01). Serum IL-10 levels were decreased in non-responders to therapy based on MRI-defined criteria (p<0.01) but did not change in responders over the course of treatment. In addition, non-responders demonstrated a decrease in serum IL-10/IL-12p70 ratio (p=0.031) and a decrease in cellular IL-12p70 (p<0.02). A decrease in cellular IFN-gamma was observed in responders (p=0.013). This is the first study that compares cytokine changes between the two IFN-beta regimes and demonstrates that serum IL-10 levels decrease in those patients who continue to have active MRI lesions while on interferon-beta therapy. PMID:17328965

  1. Interferon Gamma-1b Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Interferon gamma-1b injection is used to reduce the frequency and severity of serious infections in people ... with severe, malignant osteopetrosis (an inherited bone disease). Interferon gamma-1b is in a class of medications ...

  2. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses of annualized relapse rate over 2 years in the ADVANCE trial of peginterferon beta-1a in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Scott D; Kieseier, Bernd C; Arnold, Douglas L; Shang, Shulian; Liu, Shifang; Hung, Serena; Sabatella, Guido

    2016-09-01

    ADVANCE was a 2-year, double-blind, placebo-controlled, Phase 3 study in 1512 patients aged 18-65 years with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, which demonstrated that peginterferon beta-1a 125 mcg administered subcutaneously every 2 or 4 weeks led to significant reductions in annualized relapse rate (ARR) compared with placebo. This analysis examined ARR over 2 years in ADVANCE across subgroups. Patients were treated with peginterferon beta-1a every 2 weeks or every 4 weeks, or placebo during Year 1. Thereafter, patients on placebo were re-randomized to peginterferon beta-1a every 2 weeks or every 4 weeks (delayed treatment). Subgroup analyses were conducted by demographics and baseline disease characteristics. The following results compared ARR in these subgroups for patients in continuous 2-week treatment versus continuous 4-week treatment. ARR was similar in most demographic and baseline disease characteristic subgroups evaluated within the peginterferon beta-1a every-2-week arm or every-4-week arm over 2 years. Although for both doses some differences in the point estimates for ARR were noted among the subgroups, considerable overlap in the confidence intervals suggested that the efficacy of peginterferon beta-1a is similar in all patients irrespective of gender, age, body weight, geographical region, and disease activity at initiation of treatment. Within each peginterferon beta-1a dosing group, ARR was generally similar across most subgroups. PMID:27314959

  3. Contradictory results in interferon research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Several reports on immunologically related interferon research, both in the areas of basic science and clinical research, are briefly reviewed, and it is noted that in many cases the results obtained are contradictory. It is argued, however, that the contradictory results are not surprising since interferon is a biological response modifier and has been known to produce opposite results even when the same interferon prepartion is used. It is emphasized that dosage, timing, route, and other experimental conditions are essential factors in planning immunological studies with interferon. Careful planning of future experiments with interferon should be required to prevent the possible generation of effects that are opposite to those expected.

  4. [Immunomodulating properties of interferon inducers].

    PubMed

    Ershov, F I; Tazulakhova, E B

    1989-04-01

    Data on the immunomodulating activity of interferon inductors are presented. It was revealed that the inductors increased the animal vaccinal response. Schemes for combined use of the interferon inductors and immunomodulators were developed. The immunomodulators were shown to increase the host interferon response evident from synergistic increasing of the interferon titers or prolongation of interferon circulation in blood of the animals. The efficiency of the schemes for combined use of the interferon inductors and immunomodulators was obvious from stimulation of the antibody production. As a result the time of the antibody circulation in blood increased. The effect of the combined use of the immunomodulators and interferon inductors was studied. The combined use of the preparations significantly increased the average life-span of the animals and the rate of their survival. PMID:2546512

  5. Interferons and Interferon Regulatory Factors in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Claser, Carla; Tan, Kevin Shyong Wei; Rénia, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most serious infectious diseases in humans and responsible for approximately 500 million clinical cases and 500 thousand deaths annually. Acquired adaptive immune responses control parasite replication and infection-induced pathologies. Most infections are clinically silent which reflects on the ability of adaptive immune mechanisms to prevent the disease. However, a minority of these can become severe and life-threatening, manifesting a range of overlapping syndromes of complex origins which could be induced by uncontrolled immune responses. Major players of the innate and adaptive responses are interferons. Here, we review their roles and the signaling pathways involved in their production and protection against infection and induced immunopathologies. PMID:25157202

  6. Unique side effects of interferon.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Hina; Qadeer, Rashid; Kashif, Syed Mohammad; Rehan, Muhammad; Afsar, Salahuddin

    2015-08-01

    Interferon-alpha, a potent mediator of host immune response, has immunomodulatory properties in addition to its antiviral effects. A wide spectrum of autoimmune diseases can occur in patients treated with interferon-alpha for chronic hepatitis B and D, of which clinical systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) accounts for less than 1% and hypothyroidism for 2-4 %. We report herein a case of a 16-year-old male who developed antinuclear antibody (ANA)-negative SLE and hypothyroidism after treatment with interferon-alpha for chronic hepatitis. High index of suspicion is therefore necessary in all patients treated with interferon for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26228341

  7. High Resolution CZE-MS Quantitative Characterization of Intact Biopharmaceutical Proteins: Proteoforms of Interferon-β1.

    PubMed

    Bush, David R; Zang, Li; Belov, Arseniy M; Ivanov, Alexander R; Karger, Barry L

    2016-01-19

    New and improved methods are required for the enhanced characterization of complex biopharmaceuticals, especially those with charge and glycan heterogeneity. High resolution separation and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of intact proteoforms can contribute significantly to the characterization of such proteins, many of which are glycoproteins. Here, we report on capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) coupled via a commercial CESI sheathless interface to an Orbitrap ELITE MS for the intact analysis of recombinant human interferon-β1 (Avonex, rhIFN-β1), a biopharmaceutical with complex glycosylation at a single N-linked site. Using a cross-linked polyethylenimine coating, column efficiencies between 350,000 and 450,000 plates were produced, allowing separation based on charge and subtle hydrodynamic volume differences. A total of 138 proteoforms were found, and 55 were quantitated. Charge species due to deamidation and sialylation were separated by CZE. Given the high column efficiency, isobaric positional isomers of a single sialic acid on biantennary glycan antennae were resolved. Further, triantennary isomers (antenna on α(1-3) or α(1-6) arms) were separated and confirmed by exoglycosidase digestion. Proteoforms of the N-terminal cleavage of methionine were detected by precursor molecular weight and top-down ETD and HCD analysis of the reduced protein. Quantitative analysis suggested potential correlations between the methionine loss with the relative amount of the deamidation, as well as the level of deamidation with glycan structure. We demonstrate that high resolution CZE separation of intact glycoprotein species coupled to MS has significant potential for the in-depth characterization and quantitative analysis of biopharmaceutical proteoforms. PMID:26641950

  8. Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 and TLR9 agonists enhance interferon (IFN) beta-1a's immunoregulatory effects on B cells in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS).

    PubMed

    Tao, Yazhong; Zhang, Xin; Markovic-Plese, Silva

    2016-09-15

    We report that B cells from patients with RRMS have decreased endogenous IFN-β secretion and deficient IFN receptor (IFNAR)1/2 and TLR7 gene expression in comparison to healthy controls (HCs), which may contribute to disregulation of cytokine secretion by B cells. We propose that TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation with loxorubin (LOX) and CpG, in combination with exogenous IFN-β may effectively reconstitute endogenous IFN-β production deficit and induce the secretion of immunoregulatory cytokines by B cells. Both LOX/IFN-β and CpG/IFN-β in-vitro treatments of B cells from RRMS patients induced higher endogenous IFN-β gene expression in comparison to the exogenous IFN-β alone. CpG/IFN-β combination induced higher secretion of IL-10, TGF-β, and IL-27 in comparison to stimulation with IFN-β. Our study provides a basis for future clinical studies employing IFN-β and TLR7/9 agonists, which may enhance the resolution of the inflammatory response in RRMS. PMID:27609294

  9. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of recombinant human interferon-beta in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Salmon, P; Le Cotonnec, J Y; Galazka, A; Abdul-Ahad, A; Darragh, A

    1996-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of recombinant human interferon-beta (rHuIFN-beta 1a) were assessed following administration to 12 healthy male volunteers. Each subject received, in a double-blind, balanced, random-order, crossover sequence, single doses of 6 MIU of rHuIFN-beta 1a (Rebif) i.v., i.m., and s.c. or matching placebo on four occasions separated by washout periods of 1 week. Blood samples were collected at preset times for the measurement of serum IFN-beta levels and of intracellular 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase levels. Blood pressure, sitting heart rate, respiratory rate, oral body temperature, and tolerance were monitored regularly. All administrations of rHuIFN-beta 1a were well tolerated, although about half of the subjects had a flu-like syndrome, as expected. After i.v. bolus injection, the pharmacokinetics of rHuIFN-beta 1a were well described by a classic two-compartment model. Mean total clearance of rHuIFN-beta 1a was about 100 L.h-1. The distribution half-life was 5 min, and the terminal half-life was approximately 5 h. After i.m. or s.c. injection, serum IFN-beta profiles were rather flat, and about one sixth of the administered dose was available systemically. Extent and duration of clinical and biologic effects were independent of the route of administration and of the IFN-beta serum levels. Biologic pharmacodynamic effects persisted even when IFN-beta serum levels had returned to baseline and were still significantly elevated 3 days after a single dose. Because of the independence of the extent and duration of clinical and biologic pharmacodynamic effects from the route of administration and from the IFN-beta serum levels, the s.c route of administration is preferred in indications in which primarily an immunomodulatory action is sought. Predominantly antiviral and antiproliferative activity is enhanced by the i.v. route to provide adequate drug levels at the site of pathology, although its application is limited on practical

  10. Interferon Gamma in Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Kima, Peter E.; Soong, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a complex disease that is caused by parasites of the Leishmania genus. Leishmania are further classified into several complexes, each of which can engage in distinct interactions with mammalian hosts resulting in differing disease presentations. It is therefore not unexpected that host immune responses to Leishmania are variable. The induction of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and response to it in these infections has received considerable attention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of some of the host responses during Leishmania infections that are regulated by IFN-γ. In addition, studies that explore the nature of parasite-derived molecular mediators that might affect the host response to IFN-γ are also discussed. PMID:23801993

  11. Interferon Beta-1b Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... interferon beta-1b injection at around the same time of day each time you inject it. Follow ...

  12. Long-Term Adherence to IFN Beta-1a Treatment when Using RebiSmart® Device in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, O.; Arroyo, R.; Martínez-Yélamos, S.; Marco, M.; Merino, J. A. García; Muñoz, D.; Merino, E.; Roque, A.

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of disease-modifying drugs in the treatment of multiple sclerosis is associated with adherence. RebiSmart® electronic device provides useful information about adherence to the treatment with subcutaneous (sc) interferon (IFN) β-1a (Rebif®). The aim of the study was to determine long-term adherence to this treatment in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). This retrospective multicentre observational study analysed 258 patients with RRMS who were receiving sc IFN β-1a (Rebif®) treatment by using RebiSmart® until replacement (36 months maximum lifetime) or treatment discontinuation. Adherence was calculated with data (injection dosage, time, and date) automatically recorded by RebiSmart®. Patients in the study had a mean age of 41 years with a female proportion of 68%. Mean EDSS score at start of treatment was 1.8 (95% CI, 1.6–1.9). Overall adherence was 92.6% (95% CI, 90.6–94.5%). A total of 30.2% of patients achieved an adherence rate of 100%, 80.6% at least 90%, and only 13.2% of patients showed a suboptimal adherence (<80%). A total of 59.9% of subjects were relapse-free after treatment initiation. Among 106 subjects (41.1%) who experienced, on average, 1.4 relapses, the majority were mild (40.6%) or moderate (47.2%). Having experienced relapses from the beginning of the treatment was the only variable significantly related to achieving an adherence of at least 80% (OR = 3.06, 1.28–7.31). Results of this study indicate that sc IFN β-1a administration facilitated by RebiSmart® could lead to high rates of adherence to a prescribed dose regimen over 36 months. PMID:27526201

  13. Long-Term Adherence to IFN Beta-1a Treatment when Using RebiSmart® Device in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fernández, O; Arroyo, R; Martínez-Yélamos, S; Marco, M; Merino, J A García; Muñoz, D; Merino, E; Roque, A

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of disease-modifying drugs in the treatment of multiple sclerosis is associated with adherence. RebiSmart® electronic device provides useful information about adherence to the treatment with subcutaneous (sc) interferon (IFN) β-1a (Rebif®). The aim of the study was to determine long-term adherence to this treatment in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). This retrospective multicentre observational study analysed 258 patients with RRMS who were receiving sc IFN β-1a (Rebif®) treatment by using RebiSmart® until replacement (36 months maximum lifetime) or treatment discontinuation. Adherence was calculated with data (injection dosage, time, and date) automatically recorded by RebiSmart®. Patients in the study had a mean age of 41 years with a female proportion of 68%. Mean EDSS score at start of treatment was 1.8 (95% CI, 1.6-1.9). Overall adherence was 92.6% (95% CI, 90.6-94.5%). A total of 30.2% of patients achieved an adherence rate of 100%, 80.6% at least 90%, and only 13.2% of patients showed a suboptimal adherence (<80%). A total of 59.9% of subjects were relapse-free after treatment initiation. Among 106 subjects (41.1%) who experienced, on average, 1.4 relapses, the majority were mild (40.6%) or moderate (47.2%). Having experienced relapses from the beginning of the treatment was the only variable significantly related to achieving an adherence of at least 80% (OR = 3.06, 1.28-7.31). Results of this study indicate that sc IFN β-1a administration facilitated by RebiSmart® could lead to high rates of adherence to a prescribed dose regimen over 36 months. PMID:27526201

  14. Antibacterial activity of recombinant murine beta interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Fujiki, T; Tanaka, A

    1988-01-01

    Recombinant murine beta interferon was protective and therapeutic for mice against Listeria monocytogenes infection in vivo. The recombinant murine beta interferon caused enhanced H2O2 release by macrophages in vivo, but not in vitro. PMID:3343048

  15. A comprehensive cost-effectiveness analysis of treatments for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Newton, Ashley N; Stica, Christina M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the cost-effectiveness of four disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) used to treat multiple sclerosis (MS): glatiramer acetate (GA; Copaxone), interferon beta-1a (IFNβ-1a) intramuscular (IM) injection (Avonex), IFNβ-1a subcutaneous (SC) injection (Rebif), and interferon beta-1b (IFNβ-1b) SC injection (Betaseron). Cost-effectiveness analyses are useful in countering the financial uncertainties and treatment efficacy concerns faced by people with MS. We conducted simulation analyses of the principal findings of a 2009 study by Goldberg et al. (Goldberg LD, Edwards NC, Fincher C, et al: Comparing the cost-effectiveness of disease-modifying drugs for the first-line treatment of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. J Manag Care Pharm. 2009;15:543-555) to frame the researchers' findings from the perspectives of cost-conscious and cost-neutral MS patients. We found that for the cost-conscious consumer, the ranking of most (1) to least (4) preferred DMDs was 1) IFNβ -1a IM (Avonex), 2) GA (Copaxone), 3) IFNβ-1a SC (Rebif), and 4) IFNβ-1b SC (Beta-seron). For the cost-neutral consumer who places priority on effectiveness over costs, the ranking was 1) IFNβ-1a SC (Rebif), 2) IFNβ-1b SC (Betaseron), 3) GA (Copaxone), and 4) IFNβ-1a IM (Avonex). Future studies could examine cost-effectiveness over extended periods of time (eg, 15-20 years) and more closely examine the cost-effectiveness of natalizumab (Tysabri) relative to the four primary DMDs. PMID:24453716

  16. Ticks Take Cues from Mammalian Interferon.

    PubMed

    de Silva, Aravinda M

    2016-07-13

    Interferons are considered a first line of immune defense restricted to vertebrates. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Smith et al. (2016) demonstrate that mammalian interferon γ activates an antimicrobial response within ticks feeding on blood. The study suggests that arthropods have a parallel interferon-like defense system. PMID:27414493

  17. Effects of interferon on antibody formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of the effects of interferon on primary and secondary antibody responses and of the relationship of interferon to other cytokines, or cell products, are presented. Dosage- and timing-dependent immunoenhancing and immunosuppressive activities of interferon are documented for mouse spleen cell cultures and for mice infected with murine hepatitis virus (MHV-3). A possibility that altered interferon production might lead to immunopathological disorders, such as lupus erythematosus, AIDS, arthritis, etc., is discussed. Latest technological developments are presented that indicate that interferon does apparently play a major role in the regulation of antibody responses.

  18. No Love Lost Between Viruses and Interferons.

    PubMed

    Fensterl, Volker; Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Sen, Ganes C

    2015-11-01

    The interferon system protects mammals against virus infections. There are several types of interferons, which are characterized by their ability to inhibit virus replication and resultant pathogenesis by triggering both innate and cell-mediated immune responses. Virus infection is sensed by a variety of cellular pattern-recognition receptors and triggers the synthesis of interferons, which are secreted by the infected cells. In uninfected cells, cell surface receptors recognize the secreted interferons and activate intracellular signaling pathways that induce the expression of interferon-stimulated genes; the proteins encoded by these genes inhibit different stages of virus replication. To avoid extinction, almost all viruses have evolved mechanisms to defend themselves against the interferon system. Consequently, a dynamic equilibrium of survival is established between the virus and its host, an equilibrium that can be shifted to the host's favor by the use of exogenous interferon as a therapeutic antiviral agent. PMID:26958928

  19. Results of space experiment program "interferon"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tálas, Margarita; Bátkai, László; Stöger, Ivana; Nagy, Károly; Hiros, László; Konstantinova, Irina; Rykova, Marina; Mozgovaya, Irina; Guseva, Olga; Kozharinov, Valerii

    The results of the biological space experiment "Interferon" performed by two international cosmonaut teams (26 May 1980, and 16 May 1981) aboard space laboratory Solyut-6 are reported: (1) Human lymphocytes separated from blood of healthy donors and placed into "Interferon I" equipment could be kept for 7 days in suspension culture under spaceflight conditons. Interferon production could be induced in human lymphocytes by preparations of different origin: virus, synthetic polyribonucleotides, bacterial protein and plant pigment. An increased lymphocyte interferon production in space laboratory compared to ground control was observed. (2) Human interferon preparations and interferon inducers placed in space laboratory at room temperature for 7 days maintained their biological activity. (3) A decrease of induced interferon production and natural killer activity of lymphocytes isolated from peripheral blood of cosmonauts was observed on the 1st day on Earth after 7-days spaceflight.

  20. Animal Models of Interferon Signature Positive Lupus.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Haoyang; Szeto, Christopher; Han, Shuhong; Yang, Lijun; Reeves, Westley H

    2015-01-01

    Human lupus is strongly associated with a gene expression signature characterized by over-expression of Type I interferon-regulated genes. A strong interferon signature generally is not seen in the standard mouse models of lupus, despite considerable evidence for the involvement of toll-like receptor-driven interferon production. In contrast, pristane-induced lupus exhibits a prominent TLR7-dependent interferon signature. Importantly, genetic disorders with dysregulated interferon production in both human beings and mice cause severe autoinflammatory diseases but not the typical manifestations of lupus, suggesting that interferon over-production is insufficient to cause systemic lupus erythematosus itself. Single-gene models in mice suggest that lupus-like disease may result from abnormalities in B-cell activation and the clearance of dead cells. Pristane may mimic human systemic lupus erythematosus by causing synergistic abnormalities in interferon production along with defective clearance of apoptotic cells and over-active B-cell signaling. PMID:26097482

  1. Animal Models of Interferon Signature Positive Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Haoyang; Szeto, Christopher; Han, Shuhong; Yang, Lijun; Reeves, Westley H.

    2015-01-01

    Human lupus is strongly associated with a gene expression signature characterized by over-expression of Type I interferon-regulated genes. A strong interferon signature generally is not seen in the standard mouse models of lupus, despite considerable evidence for the involvement of toll-like receptor-driven interferon production. In contrast, pristane-induced lupus exhibits a prominent TLR7-dependent interferon signature. Importantly, genetic disorders with dysregulated interferon production in both human beings and mice cause severe autoinflammatory diseases but not the typical manifestations of lupus, suggesting that interferon over-production is insufficient to cause systemic lupus erythematosus itself. Single-gene models in mice suggest that lupus-like disease may result from abnormalities in B-cell activation and the clearance of dead cells. Pristane may mimic human systemic lupus erythematosus by causing synergistic abnormalities in interferon production along with defective clearance of apoptotic cells and over-active B-cell signaling. PMID:26097482

  2. Randomized Study Combining Interferon & Glatiramer Acetate in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lublin, Fred D.; Cofield, Stacey S.; Cutter, Gary R.; Conwit, Robin; Narayana, Ponnada A.; Nelson, Flavia; Salter, Amber R.; Gustafson, Tarah; Wolinsky, Jerry S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective A double-blind, randomized, controlled study to determine if combined use of interferon beta-1a (IFN) 30ug IM weekly and glatiramer acetate (GA) 20mg daily is more efficacious than either agent alone in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods 1008 participants were randomized and followed until the last participant enrolled completed 3 yrs. The primary endpoint was reduction in annualized relapse rate utilizing a strict definition of relapse. Secondary outcomes included time to confirmed disability, Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC) score and MRI metrics. Results Combination IFN + GA was not superior to the better of the single agents (GA) in risk of relapse. Both the combination therapy and GA were significantly better than IFN in reducing the risk of relapse. The Combination was not better than either agent alone in lessening confirmed EDSS progression or change in MSFC over 36 months. The combination was superior to either agent alone in reducing new lesion activity and accumulation of total lesion volumes. In a post hoc analysis, combination therapy resulted in a higher proportion of participants attaining disease activity free status (DAFS) compared to either single arm; driven by the MRI results. Interpretation Combining the two most commonly prescribed therapies for MS did not produce a significant clinical benefit over three years. An effect was seen on some MRI metrics. In a test of comparative efficacy, GA was superior to IFN in reducing the risk of exacerbation. The extension phase for CombiRx will address if the observed differences in MRI and DAFS findings predict later clinical differences. PMID:23424159

  3. Human Papillomaviruses and the Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Beglin, Melanie; Melar-New, Marta

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are small DNA viruses that target stratified keratinocytes for infection. A subset of HPV types infect epithelia in the genital tract and are the causative agents of cervical as well as other anogenital cancers. Interferon treatment of existing genital HPV lesions has had mixed results. While HPV proteins down-regulate the expression of interferon-inducible genes, interferon treatment ultimately induces their high-level transcription after a delay. Cells containing complete HPV genomes that are able to undergo productive replication upon differentiation are sensitive to interferon-induced growth arrest, while cells from high-grade cancers that only express E6 and E7 are resistant. Recent studies indicate this sensitivity is dependent upon the binding of the interferon-inducible factor, p56, to the E1 replication protein. The response to interferon by HPV proteins is complex and results from the action of multiple viral proteins. PMID:19715460

  4. Silicate minerals and the interferon system

    SciTech Connect

    Hahon, N.; Booth, J.A.

    1987-08-01

    Natural-occurring minerals representative of six silicate classes were examined for their influence on interferon induction by influenza virus in Rhesus monkey kidney (LLC-MK/sub 2/) cell monolayers. Minerals within the classes nesosilicate, sorosilicate, cyclosilicate, and inosilicate exhibited either little or marked (50% or greater) inhibition of interferon induction. Within the inosilicate class, however, minerals of the pyroxenoid group (wollastonite, pectolite, and rhodonite) all significantly showed a two- to threefold increase in interferon production. Silicate materials in the phyllosilicate and tectosilicate classes all showed inhibitory activity for the induction process. When silicate minerals were coated with the polymer poly(4-vinylpyridine-N-oxide), the inhibitory activity of silicates on viral interferon induction was counteracted. Of nine randomly selected silicate minerals, which inhibited viral interferon induction, none adversely affected the ability of exogenous interferon to confer antiviral cellular resistance. Increased levels of influenza virus multiplication concomitant with decreased levels of interferon occurred in cell monolayers pretreated with silicates. The findings of this study demonstrate the diverse effects of minerals representative of different silicate classes on the interferon system and indicate that certain silicates in comprising the viral interferon induction process may increase susceptibility to viral infection.

  5. Inactivation of human interferon by body fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cesario, T. C.; Mandell, A.; Tilles, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the effects of human feces, bile, saliva, serum, and cerebrospinal fluid on interferon activity. It is shown that crude interferon is inactivated by at least 50% more than with the control medium used, when incubated for 4 hr in vitro in the presence of serum, saliva, or cerebrospinal liquid, and by close to 100% when incubated with stool extract or bile.

  6. MS Disease-Modifying Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contents Injectable treatments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Oral treatments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Intravenous infusion treatments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Managing side effects of disease- modifying ... or subcutaneous), oral and intravenous (into the vein) infusion. INJECTABLE TREATMENTS Treatment (chemical name) Manufacturer Avonex ® (interferon ...

  7. Interferon-γ Inhibits Ebola Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rhein, Bethany A.; Powers, Linda S.; Rogers, Kai; Anantpadma, Manu; Singh, Brajesh K.; Sakurai, Yasuteru; Bair, Thomas; Miller-Hunt, Catherine; Sinn, Patrick; Davey, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus outbreaks, such as the 2014 Makona epidemic in West Africa, are episodic and deadly. Filovirus antivirals are currently not clinically available. Our findings suggest interferon gamma, an FDA-approved drug, may serve as a novel and effective prophylactic or treatment option. Using mouse-adapted Ebola virus, we found that murine interferon gamma administered 24 hours before or after infection robustly protects lethally-challenged mice and reduces morbidity and serum viral titers. Furthermore, we demonstrated that interferon gamma profoundly inhibits Ebola virus infection of macrophages, an early cellular target of infection. As early as six hours following in vitro infection, Ebola virus RNA levels in interferon gamma-treated macrophages were lower than in infected, untreated cells. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, to interferon gamma-treated macrophages did not further reduce viral RNA levels, suggesting that interferon gamma blocks life cycle events that require protein synthesis such as virus replication. Microarray studies with interferon gamma-treated human macrophages identified more than 160 interferon-stimulated genes. Ectopic expression of a select group of these genes inhibited Ebola virus infection. These studies provide new potential avenues for antiviral targeting as these genes that have not previously appreciated to inhibit negative strand RNA viruses and specifically Ebola virus infection. As treatment of interferon gamma robustly protects mice from lethal Ebola virus infection, we propose that interferon gamma should be further evaluated for its efficacy as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic strategy against filoviruses. Use of this FDA-approved drug could rapidly be deployed during future outbreaks. PMID:26562011

  8. Interferon-γ Inhibits Ebola Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Rhein, Bethany A; Powers, Linda S; Rogers, Kai; Anantpadma, Manu; Singh, Brajesh K; Sakurai, Yasuteru; Bair, Thomas; Miller-Hunt, Catherine; Sinn, Patrick; Davey, Robert A; Monick, Martha M; Maury, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus outbreaks, such as the 2014 Makona epidemic in West Africa, are episodic and deadly. Filovirus antivirals are currently not clinically available. Our findings suggest interferon gamma, an FDA-approved drug, may serve as a novel and effective prophylactic or treatment option. Using mouse-adapted Ebola virus, we found that murine interferon gamma administered 24 hours before or after infection robustly protects lethally-challenged mice and reduces morbidity and serum viral titers. Furthermore, we demonstrated that interferon gamma profoundly inhibits Ebola virus infection of macrophages, an early cellular target of infection. As early as six hours following in vitro infection, Ebola virus RNA levels in interferon gamma-treated macrophages were lower than in infected, untreated cells. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, to interferon gamma-treated macrophages did not further reduce viral RNA levels, suggesting that interferon gamma blocks life cycle events that require protein synthesis such as virus replication. Microarray studies with interferon gamma-treated human macrophages identified more than 160 interferon-stimulated genes. Ectopic expression of a select group of these genes inhibited Ebola virus infection. These studies provide new potential avenues for antiviral targeting as these genes that have not previously appreciated to inhibit negative strand RNA viruses and specifically Ebola virus infection. As treatment of interferon gamma robustly protects mice from lethal Ebola virus infection, we propose that interferon gamma should be further evaluated for its efficacy as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic strategy against filoviruses. Use of this FDA-approved drug could rapidly be deployed during future outbreaks. PMID:26562011

  9. Trisomy 21 consistently activates the interferon response

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelly D; Lewis, Hannah C; Hill, Amanda A; Pandey, Ahwan; Jackson, Leisa P; Cabral, Joseph M; Smith, Keith P; Liggett, L Alexander; Gomez, Eliana B; Galbraith, Matthew D; DeGregori, James; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2016-01-01

    Although it is clear that trisomy 21 causes Down syndrome, the molecular events acting downstream of the trisomy remain ill defined. Using complementary genomics analyses, we identified the interferon pathway as the major signaling cascade consistently activated by trisomy 21 in human cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that trisomy 21 activates the interferon transcriptional response in fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as circulating monocytes and T cells. Trisomy 21 cells show increased induction of interferon-stimulated genes and decreased expression of ribosomal proteins and translation factors. An shRNA screen determined that the interferon-activated kinases JAK1 and TYK2 suppress proliferation of trisomy 21 fibroblasts, and this defect is rescued by pharmacological JAK inhibition. Therefore, we propose that interferon activation, likely via increased gene dosage of the four interferon receptors encoded on chromosome 21, contributes to many of the clinical impacts of trisomy 21, and that interferon antagonists could have therapeutic benefits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16220.001 PMID:27472900

  10. Interferon effects on protozoan infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Wirth, J.; Kierszenbaum, F.; Degee, A. L. W.; Mansfield, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of interferon (IFN) on mice infected with two different parasitic protozoans, Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, are investigated experimentally. The preparation of the cell cultures, IFN and assays, antibody, and the experimental procedures are described. It is observed that in cells treated with IFN-gamma there is an increased association of T. cruzi with murine macrophages and an increase in the killing of T. cruzi by IFN-gamma-treated murine macrophages. For spleen cells infected with T.b. rhodesiense in vitro, it is detected that live trypanosomes cannot induce IFN in cells from normal mice, but can in cells from immunized mice; and that trypanosome-lysates induce IFN in vitro in cells from normal mice. The data suggest that there is a two-step mechanism for mice against T. cruzi and T.b. rhodesiense.

  11. Rat interferons. VI. Heterologous interferon in the treatment of viral infections.

    PubMed

    Lobodzińska, M; Albin, M

    1979-01-01

    In previous studies in vitro we demonstrated the protection of mouse cells against viral infections by rat interferon. In continuation, the present paper reports results of a study designed to confirm this heterospecific activity of rat interferon in vivo. Experiments were carried out with mice of the inbred 129/AoBoy strain, inoculated intranasally or intraperitoneally with EMC-strain Col MM, VSV and influenza A 055/74 viruses, and treated with mouse or rat interferon administered by the same routes as infection. Both interferons exhibited protective action. The therapeutic effect of the mouse and rat interferons was dependent on the infecting dose of the viruses. Rat interferon proved more effective in the treatment of mice infected intraperitoneally than mice infected intranasally. PMID:220932

  12. An Albumin-Free Formulation for Escherichia coli-Derived Interferon Beta-1b with Decreased Immunogenicity in Immune Tolerant Mice.

    PubMed

    Abdolvahab, Mohadeseh Haji; Fazeli, Ahmad; Radmalekshahi, Mazda; Nejadnik, M Reza; Fazeli, Mohammad Reza; Schellekens, Huub

    2016-03-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA)-free formulation of Escherichia coli-derived human interferon beta (IFNβ-1b) with a high percentage of monomeric protein and low immunogenicity is developed and characterized in the current study. UV spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blotting, Micro-Flow Imaging, resonant mass measurement, size exclusion, and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographies were applied to assess the effect of excipients on the stability of IFNβ-1b to establish a HSA-free formulation. The antiviral activity of IFNβ-1b was evaluated using human lung carcinoma cell line. Immune tolerant mice to hIFNβ were used to assess the immunogenicity of the HSA-free formulated IFNβ-1b in comparison to Betaferon(®) drug product and Avonex(®) drug substance as standards through IgG titering of plasma. HSA-free formulated IFNβ-1b, including 200 mM L-arginine, 200 mM trehalose, and 0.1% n-dodecyl β-D-maltoside in 10 mM sodium acetate buffer, pH 7.4, showed the highest biological activity. The stability of IFNβ-1b in the HSA-free formulation was monitored for 3 weeks at 4°C and 37°C with relative humidity of 10% and 75%, respectively. Protein aggregation and immunogenicity in transgenic mice were decreased in the HSA-free formulated IFNβ-1b compared to Betaferon. The stability, biological activity, and immunogenicity of the HSA-free formulation and Betaferon were evaluated. Incubation of formulations at 4°C and 37°C for 3 weeks showed that the HSA-free formulated IFNβ-1b was more stable and less immunogenic in transgenic FVB/N mice. Low immunogenicity and the absence of HSA, which reduces the potential risk of viral infection (eg, HIV and HCV), are promising for clinical studies. PMID:26824268

  13. Treatment of trypanosome-infected mice with exogenous interferon, interferon inducers, or antibody to interferon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degee, Antonie L. W.; Mansfield, John M.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1986-01-01

    Earlier studies have demonstrated that mice resistant to Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (the B10.BR/SgSnJ strain) produces, upon infection by this parasite, two peaks of serum interferon (IFN), while the susceptible mice (C3HeB/FeJ) produces no IFN. In the present study, survival times were compared for B10.BR/SgSnJ, C3HeB/FeJ, and CBA/J (an intermediately resistant strain) mice that were injected, prior to infection with the parasite, with either of the following three preparations (1) IFN-gamma, (2) an antibody to IFN-gamma and (3) polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (to induce IFN-alpha/beta). No effect on the survival times of mice by any of these preparations could be demonstrated, contrary to some previous reports.

  14. Immunomodulatory activity of interferon-beta

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Lloyd H; Reder, Anthony T

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disorder of the central nervous system that appears to be driven by a shift in immune functioning toward excess inflammation that results in demyelination and axonal loss. Beta interferons were the first class of disease-modifying therapies to be approved for patients with MS after treatment with this type I interferon improved the course of MS on both clinical and radiological measures in clinical trials. The mechanism of action of interferon-beta appears to be driven by influencing the immune system at many levels, including antigen-presenting cells, T cells, and B cells. One effect of these interactions is to shift cytokine networks in favor of an anti-inflammatory effect. The pleiotropic mechanism of action may be a critical factor in determining the efficacy of interferon-beta in MS. This review will focus on select immunological mechanisms that are influenced by this type I cytokine. PMID:25356432

  15. Type I interferon dysregulation and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    McGlasson, Sarah; Jury, Alexa; Jackson, Andrew; Hunt, David

    2015-09-01

    Type I interferon is an essential component of the brain's innate immune defence, conferring protection against viral infection. Recently, dysregulation of the type I interferon pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a spectrum of neuroinfectious and neuroinflammatory disorders. Underactivity of the type I interferon response is associated with a predisposition to herpes simplex encephalitis. Conversely, a group of 'interferonopathic' disorders, characterized by severe neuroinflammation and overactivity of type I interferon, has been described. Elucidation of the genetic basis of these Mendelian neuroinflammatory diseases has uncovered important links between nucleic acid sensors, innate immune activation and neuroinflammatory disease. These mechanisms have an important role in the pathogenesis of more common polygenic diseases that can affect the brain, such as lupus and cerebral small vessel disease. In this article, we review the spectrum of neurological disease associated with type I interferon dysregulation, as well as advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of these conditions. We highlight the potential utility of type I interferon as both a biomarker and a therapeutic target in neuroinflammatory disease. PMID:26303851

  16. Inhibited interferon production after space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Gould, C. L.; Williams, J.; Mandel, A. D.

    1988-01-01

    Several studies have been performed in our laboratories indicating that interferon production may be impaired in rodents after space flight. Using an antiorthostatic suspension model that simulates some of the effects of microgravity seen during space flight, we have shown that interferon-alpha/beta production was inhibited. The inhibition was not due solely to the stress of suspension. The inhibited interferon production was transient, as suspended animals returned to normal caging recovered the ability to produce interferon. Antiorthostatic suspension of mice also resulted in a loss of resistance to infection with the diabetogenic strain of encephalomyocarditis virus, which correlated with the drop in interferon production. In rats flown in US Space Shuttle mission SL-3, interferon-gamma production was inhibited severely when spleen cells were challenged with concanavalin-A upon return to earth. In contrast, interleukin-3 production by these cells was normal. These results suggest that immune responses may be altered after antiorthostatic modeling or space flight, and the resistance to viral infections may be especially affected.

  17. Binding of human interferon alpha to cells of different sensitivities: studies with internally radiolabeled interferon retaining full biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Yonehara, S; Yonehara-Takahashi, M; Ishii, A

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics of interferon binding to various cells with different interferon sensitivity were studied by using [3H]leucine-labeled, pure human interferon alpha from Namalwa cells. Scatchard analysis of the binding data on cells sensitive to interferon alpha (human FL and fibroblasts and bovine MDBK) indicated the presence of two kinds of binding sites with high and low affinities. The binding constants of the high-affinity sites in these cells were similar (4 X 10(10) to 11 X 10(10) M-1). Cells insensitive to human interferon alpha (human HEC-1 and mouse L cells) were shown to have only low-affinity sites, suggesting that high-affinity binding sites are indispensable for interferon sensitivity and represent interferon receptors. However, the number of sites in three human diploid fibroblast strains and one strain trisomic for chromosome 21 were not proportionally correlated to the interferon sensitivity of the cells. The high-affinity binding to human cells was completely inhibited by both nonradioactive human interferons alpha and beta in a similar manner, but binding to bovine MDBK cells, on which human interferon beta is practically inactive, was inhibited effectively only by interferon alpha and not by beta. These results suggest that the receptor for human interferon alpha is common to human interferon beta in human cells, whereas the receptor on bovine cells binds only human interferon alpha. PMID:6300453

  18. Pegylated Interferon Alpha–Associated Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Kathleen T.; Nelson, Bruce; Harrison, Andrew R.; McLoon, Linda K.; Lee, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    A 52-year-old man with chronic hepatitis C presented with painless, bilateral, simultaneous non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and peripheral neuropathy. Symptoms began 19 weeks after starting peginterferon alpha-2a. The peripheral neuropathy and vision of the right eye improved, but the vision of the left eye worsened after stopping interferon. We identified 23 additional cases of NAION during interferon alpha therapy. At least 12 of these patients suffered bilateral NAION. Patients lost vision 1–40 weeks after initiating therapy. Of 21 eyes that had documented initial and follow-up acuities, 8 improved, 1 worsened, and the rest remained stable. One patient had a painful peripheral neuropathy. Treatment with interferon alpha may result in NAION. Discontinuation of therapy deserves consideration after weighing individual risks and benefits. PMID:20351572

  19. Influenza virus activation of the interferon system

    PubMed Central

    Killip, Marian J.; Fodor, Ervin; Randall, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    The host interferon (IFN) response represents one of the first barriers that influenza viruses must surmount in order to establish an infection. Many advances have been made in recent years in understanding the interactions between influenza viruses and the interferon system. In this review, we summarise recent work regarding activation of the type I IFN response by influenza viruses, including attempts to identify the viral RNA responsible for IFN induction, the stage of the virus life cycle at which it is generated and the role of defective viruses in this process. PMID:25678267

  20. [Interferon inducing activity of rabies cell culture vaccine in humans].

    PubMed

    Atanasiu, P; Yokota, Y; Gamet, A

    1979-01-01

    Rabies cell culture vaccines are able to induce circulating interferon in human sera. In 8/15 cases a low peak of interferon appears in the serum about 8 h after the vaccination. The inhibition has been considered as due to interferon because of the resistance to pH 2 and lack of activity on other animal species. PMID:39484

  1. Regulating the diverse outcomes of interferon's interference.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Heather D; Kaech, Susan M

    2014-08-01

    Regulatory T cells are crucial for preventing autoimmunity, but how their function is restrained to allow optimal effector T cells responses in appropriate contexts is unclear. In a recent paper in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, Campbell and colleagues demonstrate that virus-induced type I interferon acts directly on Treg cells to allow for functional antiviral T cell responses. PMID:25052591

  2. Relative sensitivities of viruses to different species of interferon.

    PubMed

    Stewart, W E; Scott, W D; Sulkin, S E

    1969-08-01

    Some viruses were found to be more sensitive than others to the action of interferons from certain species of animals but less sensitive to interferons from other species. Vaccinia virus was the most sensitive to mouse and hamster interferons of five viruses tested, but the least sensitive of these five viruses to human, rabbit, and bat interferons. The relative sensitivities of the viruses to interferons were found to be characteristic for each of the species tested, with those closely related phylogenetically exhibiting similar patterns of relative interferon-induced virus resistance. The amount of synthetic double-stranded polynucleotide polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid required to induce resistance to each of the viruses in each of the cell species correlated with the interferon sensitivities of the viruses. PMID:4308914

  3. Mechanisms underlying the inhibition of interferon signaling by viruses

    PubMed Central

    Devasthanam, Anand S

    2014-01-01

    A hallmark of the antiviral response is the induction of interferons. First discovered in 1957 by Issac and Lindeman, interferons are noted for their ability to interfere with viral replication. Interferons act via autocrine and paracrine pathways to induce an antiviral state in infected cells and in neighboring cells containing interferon receptors. Interferons are the frontline defenders against viral infection and their primary function is to locally restrict viral propagation. Viruses have evolved mechanisms to escape the host interferon response, thus gaining a replicative advantage in host cells. This review will discuss recent findings on the mechanisms viruses use to evade the host interferon response. This knowledge is important because the treatment of viral infections is a challenge of global proportions and a better understanding of the mechanisms viruses use to persist in the host may uncover valuable insights applicable to the discovery of novel drug targets. PMID:24504013

  4. Characteristics of hepatitis C treatment with pegylated interferons and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Méndez, Ricardo; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    The effect of interferon alfa against hepatitis C virus has been well documented. However, clinical efficacy is low due to the short interferon residence in the body. To prolong half-life, interferon molecules have been bound to the biologically inert polymer, polyethyleneglycol. Pegylated interferons exhibit a longer residence time with an improved clinical efficacy, although the rate of therapeutic failure is still important. Addition of ribavirin to interferon, either pegylated or not, significantly increases efficacy. Therefore, the combination of a pegylated interferon with ribavirin has become the standard treatment of chronic hepatitis C. As the efficacy and safety of such combinations are not yet optimal, different drugs, including other types of long-acting interferons and ribavirin analogs, are presently been investigated. PMID:20713998

  5. Regulation of interferon-gamma gene expression.

    PubMed

    Young, H A

    1996-08-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), also known as type II interferon, is an important immunoregulatory gene that has multiple effects on the development, maturation, and function of the immune system. IFN-gamma mRNA and protein are expressed predominantly by T cells and large granular lymphocytes. The IFN-gamma mRNA is induced/inhibited in these cell types by a wide variety of extracellular signals, thus implicating a number of diverse, yet convergent signal transduction pathways in its transcriptional control. In this review, I describe how DNA methylation and specific DNA binding proteins may regulate transcription of the IFN-gamma gene in response to extracellular signals. PMID:8877725

  6. Oromucosal Administration of Interferon to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Beilharz, Manfred W.; Cummins, Martin J.; Bennett, Alayne L.; Cummins, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    The prevailing dogma is that, to be systemically effective, interferon-alpha (IFNα) must be administered in sufficiently high doses to yield functional blood concentrations. Such an approach to IFNα therapy has proven effective in some instances, but high-dose parenteral IFNα therapy has the disadvantage of causing significant adverse events. Mounting evidence suggests that IFNα delivered into the oral cavity in low doses interacts with the oral mucosa in a unique manner to induce systemic host defense mechanisms without IFNα actually entering the circulation, thus reducing the potential for toxic side effects. A better understanding of the applications and potential benefits of this treatment modality are under active investigation. This paper provides a review of the relevant literature on the clinical use of the oromucosal route of administration of interferon, with an emphasis on the treatment of influenza.

  7. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Gamma-Interferon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Gamma-Interferon. Stimulates the body's immune system and is used clinically in the treatment of cancer. Potential as an anti-tumor agent against solid tumors as well as leukemia's and lymphomas. It has additional utility as an anti-ineffective agent, including antiviral, anti-bacterial, and anti-parasitic activities. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Charles Bugg.

  8. Recent advances in the anti-HCV mechanisms of interferon.

    PubMed

    Huang, Menghao; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Peng, Zonggen

    2014-08-01

    Interferon (IFN) in combination with ribavirin has been the standard of care (SOC) for chronic hepatitis C for the past few decades. Although the current SOC lacks the desired efficacy, and 4 new direct-acting antiviral agents have been recently approved, interferons are still likely to remain the cornerstone of therapy for some time. Moreover, as an important cytokine system of innate immunity, host interferon signaling provides a powerful antiviral response. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which HCV infection controls interferon production, and how interferons, in turn, trigger anti-HCV activities as well as control the outcome of HCV infection remain to be clarified. In this report, we review current progress in understanding the mechanisms of IFN against HCV, and also summarize the knowledge of induction of interferon signaling by HCV infection. PMID:26579391

  9. [Effects of neuropeptides on interferon production in vitro].

    PubMed

    Kul'chikov, A E; Makarenko, A N

    2008-01-01

    The study of an interferon-inducing action of neuropeptides (a cerebrolysin model) on production of interferons by human blood leukocytes has shown that neuropeptides induce gamma-interferon production in the titer 267 IU/ml that determines one of the mechanisms of a neuroimmunocorrecting effect of cerebrolysin (Ebewe, Austria) in many neurological diseases (acute stroke, brain traumas and different neuroinfectious diseases). PMID:18720720

  10. Racial differences in responses to therapy with interferon in chronic hepatitis C. Consensus Interferon Study Group.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K R; Hoofnagle, J H; Tong, M J; Lee, W M; Pockros, P; Heathcote, E J; Albert, D; Joh, T

    1999-09-01

    The likelihood of a sustained response to a course of interferon in patients with chronic hepatitis C correlates with several clinical and viral factors, including age, viral genotype and initial levels of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in serum. The role of race and ethnicity has not been assessed. We evaluated the association of race with response to interferon in a large randomized, controlled trial using either consensus interferon (9 microg) or interferon alfa-2b (3 million units) given three times weekly for 24 weeks. African-American patients participating in the study were similar to white patients in mean age (43 vs. 42 years) and baseline levels of HCV RNA (3.6 vs. 3.0 million copies/mL) but had lower rates of cirrhosis (5% vs. 12%) and more frequently had viral genotype 1 (88% vs. 66%: P =.004). Most strikingly, the rates of end-of-treatment and sustained virological responses were lower among the 40 African-American patients (5% and 2%) than among the 380 white patients (33% and 12%) (P =.04 and.07). Rates of response among Hispanic and Asian-American patients were not statistically different than non-Hispanic white patients. Median viral levels decreased by week 24 of therapy by 2.5 logs in white patients (from 3.0 to 0.012 million copies/mL) but by only 0.5 logs among African- American patients (from 3.6 to 1.8 million copies/mL). Thus, there are marked racial differences in virological responses to interferon in hepatitis C that must be considered in assessing trials of interferon therapy and in counseling patients regarding treatment. The differences in response rates are as yet unexplained. PMID:10462387

  11. Alpha-interferon in the treatment of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Fayad, M N; Yamout, B I; Mroueh, S

    1997-11-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is an inexorably progressive disease with no effective therapy. Recent trials of intrathecal and intraventricular alpha-interferon yielded controversial results. We tried intrathecal or intraventricular alpha-interferon in four patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. None of them had evidence of improvement. We reviewed the previously published studies on the use of alpha-interferon in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Further international collaborative studies are needed to determine the role of alpha-interferon in the treatment of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. PMID:9430312

  12. Interferon activity of mitogen-induced chicken splenic lymphocytes which do not express interferon mRNA.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, S K; Cloud, S S; Burnside, J

    1996-10-01

    Interferon activity was measured in media from virally infected chicken embryo fibroblasts and Concanavalin A-stimulated splenic lymphocytes using a viral inhibition assay. Both cell types produce interferon activity. A cDNA probe corresponding to a chicken interferon mRNA was used to probe Northern blots of RNA prepared from both cells. A single hybridizing species of 900 bases was detected in virally infected fibroblast RNA, but no hybridizing species was detected in the splenic lymphocytes. These results suggest that the interferon activity produced by lymphocytes is of different molecular origin than the corresponding activity produced by virally infected fibroblasts. PMID:8969047

  13. Expansion of amphibian intronless interferons revises the paradigm for interferon evolution and functional diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interferons (IFNs) are key cytokines identified in vertebrates, and evolutionary dominance of intronless IFN genes in amniotes is a signature event in IFN evolution. For the first time, we show that the emergence and expansion of intronless IFN genes is evident in amphibians, shown by 24-37 intronle...

  14. Physiological Proteins in Therapeutics: A Current Review on Interferons.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debosree; Ghosh, Debjani; Parida, Pratap

    2016-01-01

    Interferons are produced in vivo and are one of the prime components of natural defense system of animals. They are released by the viral infected cells and provide protection to the neighboring cells against viral infection. The cyto-protective property of the proteins ignited the thought of their pharmaceutical adaptation for therapeutic use against viral diseases in individuals in whom the interferons released naturally are not sufficient to combat the situation. Interferon supplements have been found to complement various antiviral drugs. Considering the efficacy of interferons in regulating angiogenesis and immunomodulation, they can be adapted for therapy of the killer diseases like cancer and AIDS. We have come ahead more than twenty five years after the approval of clinical use of interferon as drugs and are today really in a position to promise a disease free life to our present and next generation. Interferon therapy will be contributing a big share to the upcoming remedies for the new diseases and we are thus armed to fight back the deadly viral threats. Interferons have been modified [pegylated etc.] and have already been adapted to some extent in certain diseases and are in regular use in some. Thus interferons if modified as per need and used in combination with either antiviral drugs, antibiotics, antioxidants may strengthen our defense system effectively to bring about a strong protection against wide range of diseases. PMID:27499189

  15. Specificity, cross-talk and adaptation in Interferon signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilman, Anton

    Innate immune system is the first line of defense of higher organisms against pathogens. It coordinates the behavior of millions of cells of multiple types, achieved through numerous signaling molecules. This talk focuses on the signaling specificity of a major class of signaling molecules - Type I Interferons - which are also used therapeutically in the treatment of a number of diseases, such as Hepatitis C, multiple sclerosis and some cancers. Puzzlingly, different Interferons act through the same cell surface receptor but have different effects on the target cells. They also exhibit a strange pattern of temporal cross-talk resulting in a serious clinical problem - loss of response to Interferon therapy. We combined mathematical modeling with quantitative experiments to develop a quantitative model of specificity and adaptation in the Interferon signaling pathway. The model resolves several outstanding experimental puzzles and directly affects the clinical use of Type I Interferons in treatment of viral hepatitis and other diseases.

  16. Results of space experiment program "Interferon". I. Production of interferon in vitro by human lymphocytes aboard space laboratory Solyut-6 ("Interferon I") and influence of space flight on lymphocyte functions of cosmonauts ("Interferon III").

    PubMed

    Tálas, M; Bátkai, L; Stöger, I; Nagy, L; Hiros, L; Konstantinova, I; Rykova, M; Mozgovaya, I; Guseva, O; Kozharinov, V

    1983-01-01

    The results of the biological space experiment "Interferon" performed by two international cosmonaut crews aboard the space laboratory Solyut-6 are reported. Human lymphocytes separated from the blood of healthy donors and placed into "Interferon I" equipment could be kept for 7 days in suspension culture under spaceflight conditions. Interferon production could be induced in human lymphocytes by preparations of different origin, such as virus, synthetic polyribonucleotides, bacterial protein and plant pigment. An increased lymphocyte interferon production was observed in the space laboratory as compared to the ground control. A decrease of induced interferon production and natural killer cell activity was observed in the cosmonauts' lymphocytes on the 1st day on Earth after 7 days spaceflight. PMID:6659855

  17. Induction of Type I Interferons by Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Kathryn M.; McWhirter, Sarah M.; Vance, Russell E.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Type I interferons (IFNs) are secreted cytokines that orchestrate diverse immune responses to infection. Although typically considered to be most important in the response to viruses, type I IFNs are also induced by most, if not all, bacterial pathogens. Although diverse mechanisms have been described, bacterial induction of type I IFNs occurs upon stimulation of two main pathways: (1) Toll-like receptor (TLR) recognition of bacterial molecules such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS); (2) TLR-independent recognition of molecules delivered to the host cell cytosol. Cytosolic responses can be activated by two general mechanisms. First, viable bacteria can secrete stimulatory ligands into the cytosol via specialized bacterial secretion systems. Second, ligands can be released from bacteria that lyse or are degraded. The bacterial ligands that induce the cytosolic pathways remains uncertain in many cases, but appear to include various nucleic acids. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how bacteria induce type I interferons and the roles type I IFNs play in host immunity. PMID:20482555

  18. Interferon Gamma in Successful Pregnancies1

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Shawn P.; Tayade, Chandrakant; Ashkar, Ali A.; Hatta, Kota; Zhang, Jianhong; Croy, B. Anne

    2009-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFNG) is a proinflammatory cytokine secreted in the uterus during early pregnancy. It is abundantly produced by uterine natural killer cells in maternal endometrium but also by trophoblasts in some species. In normal pregnancies of mice, IFNG plays critical roles that include initiation of endometrial vasculature remodeling, angiogenesis at implantation sites, and maintenance of the decidual (maternal) component of the placenta. In livestock and in humans, deviations in these processes are thought to contribute to serious gestational complications, such as fetal loss or preeclampsia. Interferon gamma has broader roles in activation of innate and adaptive immune responses to viruses and tumors, in part through upregulating transcription of genes involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and antigen processing/presentation. Despite this, rodent and human trophoblast cells show dampened responses to IFNG that reflect the resistance of these cells to IFNG-mediated activation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transplantation antigen expression. Lack of MHC class II antigens on trophoblasts is thought to facilitate survival of the semiallogeneic conceptus in the presence of maternal lymphocytes. This review describes the dynamic roles of IFNG in successful pregnancy and briefly summarizes data on IFNG in gestational pathologies. PMID:19164174

  19. The many faces of interferon tau.

    PubMed

    Bazer, Fuller W; Ying, Wei; Wang, Xiaoqiu; Dunlap, Kathrin A; Zhou, Beiyan; Johnson, Greg A; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-03-01

    Interferon tau (IFNT) was discovered as the pregnancy recognition signal in ruminants, but is now known to have a plethora of physiological functions in the mammalian uterus. The mammalian uterus includes, from the outer surface to the lumen, the serosa, myometrium and endometrium. The endometrium consists of the luminal, superficial glandular, and glandular epithelia, each with a unique phenotype, stromal cells, vascular elements, nerves and immune cells. The uterine epithelia secrete or selectively transport molecules into the uterine lumen that are collectively known as histotroph. Histotroph is required for growth and development of the conceptus (embryo and its associated extra-embryonic membranes) and includes nutrients such as amino acids and glucose, enzymes, growth factors, cytokines, lymphokines, transport proteins for vitamins and minerals and extracellular matrix molecules. Interferon tau and progesterone stimulate transport of amino acids in histotroph, particularly arginine. Arginine stimulates the mechanistic target of rapamycin pathway to induce proliferation, migration and protein synthesis by cells of the conceptus, and arginine is the substrate for synthesis of nitric oxide and polyamines required for growth and development of the conceptus. In ruminants, IFNT also acts in concert with progesterone from the corpus luteum to increase expression of genes for transport of nutrients into the uterine lumen, as well as proteases, protease inhibitors, growth factors for hematopoiesis and angiogenesis and other molecules critical for implantation and placentation. Collectively, the pleiotropic effects of IFNT contribute to survival, growth and development of the ruminant conceptus. PMID:25557050

  20. Blockade of interferon Beta, but not interferon alpha, signaling controls persistent viral infection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Cherie T; Sullivan, Brian M; Teijaro, John R; Lee, Andrew M; Welch, Megan; Rice, Stephanie; Sheehan, Kathleen C F; Schreiber, Robert D; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2015-05-13

    Although type I interferon (IFN-I) is thought to be beneficial against microbial infections, persistent viral infections are characterized by high interferon signatures suggesting that IFN-I signaling may promote disease pathogenesis. During persistent lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, IFNα and IFNβ are highly induced early after infection, and blocking IFN-I receptor (IFNAR) signaling promotes virus clearance. We assessed the specific roles of IFNβ versus IFNα in controlling LCMV infection. While blockade of IFNβ alone does not alter early viral dissemination, it is important in determining lymphoid structure, lymphocyte migration, and anti-viral T cell responses that lead to accelerated virus clearance, approximating what occurs during attenuation of IFNAR signaling. Comparatively, blockade of IFNα was not associated with improved viral control, but with early dissemination of virus. Thus, despite their use of the same receptor, IFNβ and IFNα have unique and distinguishable biologic functions, with IFNβ being mainly responsible for promoting viral persistence. PMID:25974304

  1. Positive feedback regulation of type I interferon by the interferon-stimulated gene STING

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Feng; Li, Bing; Yu, Yongxin; Iyer, Shankar S; Sun, Mingyu; Cheng, Genhong

    2015-01-01

    Stimulator of interferon genes (STING) is an important regulator of the innate immune response to cytoplasmic DNA. However, regulation of STING itself is largely unknown. Here, we show that STING transcription is induced by innate immune activators, such as cyclic dinucleotides (CDNs), through an IFNAR1- and STAT1-dependent pathway. We also identify a STAT1 binding site in the STING promoter that contributes to the activation of STING transcription. Furthermore, we show that induction of STING mediates the positive feedback regulation of CDN-triggered IFN-I. Thus, our study demonstrates that STING is an interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) and its induction is crucial for the IFN-I positive feedback loop. PMID:25572843

  2. Regulation of type I interferon responses

    PubMed Central

    Ivashkiv, Lionel B.; Donlin, Laura T.

    2014-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) activate intracellular antimicrobial programmes and influence the development of innate and adaptive immune responses. Canonical type I IFN signalling activates the Janus kinase (JAK)–signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway, leading to transcription of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). Host, pathogen and environmental factors regulate the responses of cells to this signalling pathway and thus calibrate host defences while limiting tissue damage and preventing autoimmunity. Here, we summarize the signalling and epigenetic mechanisms that regulate type I IFN-induced STAT activation and ISG transcription and translation. These regulatory mechanisms determine the biological outcomes of type I IFN responses and whether pathogens are cleared effectively or chronic infection or autoimmune disease ensues. PMID:24362405

  3. Phleboviruses and the Type I Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Wuerth, Jennifer Deborah; Weber, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    The genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae contains a number of emerging virus species which pose a threat to both human and animal health. Most prominent members include Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), sandfly fever Naples virus (SFNV), sandfly fever Sicilian virus (SFSV), Toscana virus (TOSV), Punta Toro virus (PTV), and the two new members severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) and Heartland virus (HRTV). The nonstructural protein NSs is well established as the main phleboviral virulence factor in the mammalian host. NSs acts as antagonist of the antiviral type I interferon (IFN) system. Recent progress in the elucidation of the molecular functions of a growing list of NSs proteins highlights the astonishing variety of strategies employed by phleboviruses to evade the IFN system. PMID:27338447

  4. Recombinant DNA products: Insulin, interferon and growth hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Bollon, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    This book provides the discussion of products of biotechnology of recombinant DNA. The contents include: Recombinant DNA techniques; isolation, cloning, and expression of genes; from somatostatin to human insulin; yeast; an alternative organism for foreign protein production; background in human interferon; preclinical assessment of biological properties of recombinant DNA derived human interferons; human clinical trials of bacteria-derived human ..cap alpha.. interferon.f large scale production of human alpha interferon from bacteria; direct expression of human growth hormone in escherichia coli with the lipoprotein promoter; biological actions in humans of recombinant DNA synthesized human growth hormone; NIH guidelines for research involving recombinant DNA molecules; appendix; viral vectors and the NHY guidelines; FDA's role in approval and regulation of recombinant DNA drugs; and index.

  5. Beta-interferon inhibits cell infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Beta interferon has been shown to inhibit the capacity of bloodstream forms of the flagellate Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, to associate with and infect mouse peritoneal macrophages and rat heart myoblasts. The inhibitory effect was abrogated in the presence of specific antibodies to the interferon. Pretreatment of the parasites with interferon reduced their infectivity for untreated host cells, whereas pretreament of either type of host cell did not affect the interaction. The effect of interferon on the trypanosomes was reversible; the extent of the inhibitory effect was significantly reduced afer 20 min, and was undetectable after 60 min when macrophages were used as host cells. For the myoblasts, 60 min elapsed before the inhibitory effect began to subside and 120 min elapsed before it became insignificant or undetectable.

  6. Human Cytokinome Analysis for Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Al-Yahya, Suhad; Mahmoud, Linah; Al-Zoghaibi, Fahad; Al-Tuhami, Abdullah; Amer, Haithem; Almajhdi, Fahad N.; Polyak, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cytokines are a group of small secreted proteins that mediate a diverse range of immune and nonimmune responses to inflammatory and microbial stimuli. Only a few of these cytokines mount an antiviral response, including type I, II, and III interferons (IFNs). During viral infections and under inflammatory conditions, a number of cytokines and chemokines are coproduced with IFN; however, no systematic study exists on the interactions of the cytokine repertoire with the IFN response. Here, we performed the largest cytokine and chemokine screen (the human cytokinome, with >240 members) to investigate their modulation of type I and type II IFN responses in a cell line model. We evaluated the cytokine activities in both IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) and IFN-γ activation sequence (GAS) reporter systems. Several cytokine clusters that augment either or both ISRE- and GAS-mediated responses to IFNs were derived from the screen. We identified novel modulators of IFN response—betacellulin (BTC), interleukin 11 (IL-11), and IL-17F—that caused time-dependent induction of the IFN response. The ability to induce endogenous IFN-β and IFN-stimulated genes varies among these cytokines and was largely dependent on Stat1, as assessed by Stat1 mutant fibroblasts. Certain cytokines appear to augment the IFN-β response through the NF-κB pathway. The novel IFN-like cytokines augmented the antiviral activity of IFN-α against several RNA viruses, including encephalomyocarditis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and influenza virus, in susceptible cell lines. Overall, the study represents a large-scale analysis of cytokines for enhancing the IFN response and identified cytokines capable of enhancing Stat1, IFN-induced gene expression, and antiviral activities. IMPORTANCE Innate immunity to viruses is an early defense system to ward off viruses. One mediator is interferon (IFN), which activates a cascade of biochemical events that aim to control the virus life

  7. Axonal interferon responses and alphaherpesvirus neuroinvasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ren

    Infection by alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV), typically begins at a peripheral epithelial surface and continues into the peripheral nervous system (PNS) that innervates this tissue. Inflammatory responses are induced at the infected peripheral site prior to viral invasion of the PNS. PNS neurons are highly polarized cells with long axonal processes that connect to distant targets. When the peripheral tissue is first infected, only the innervating axons are exposed to this inflammatory milieu, which include type I interferon (e.g. IFNbeta) and type II interferon (i.e. IFNgamma). IFNbeta can be produced by all types of cells, while IFNgamma is secreted by some specific types of immune cells. And both types of IFN induce antiviral responses in surrounding cells that express the IFN receptors. The fundamental question is how do PNS neurons respond to the inflammatory milieu experienced only by their axons. Axons must act as potential front-line barriers to prevent PNS infection and damage. Using compartmented cultures that physically separate neuron axons from cell bodies, I found that pretreating isolated axons with IFNbeta or IFNgamma significantly diminished the number of HSV-1 and PRV particles moving from axons to the cell bodies in an IFN receptor-dependent manner. Furthermore, I found the responses in axons are activated differentially by the two types of IFNs. The response to IFNbeta is a rapid, axon-only response, while the response to IFNgamma involves long distance signaling to the PNS cell body. For example, exposing axons to IFNbeta induced STAT1 phosphorylation (p-STAT1) only in axons, while exposure of axons to IFNgamma induced p-STAT1 accumulation in distant cell body nuclei. Blocking transcription in cell bodies eliminated IFNgamma-, but not IFNbeta-mediated antiviral effects. Proteomic analysis of IFNbeta- or IFNgamma-treated axons identified several differentially regulated proteins. Therefore

  8. Virus Multiplicity of Infection Affects Type I Interferon Subtype Induction Profiles and Interferon-Stimulated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Zaritsky, Luna A.; Bedsaul, Jacquelyn R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type I interferons (IFNs) are induced upon viral infection and important mediators of innate immunity. While there is 1 beta interferon (IFN-β) protein, there are 12 different IFN-α subtypes. It has been reported extensively that different viruses induce distinct patterns of IFN subtypes, but it has not been previously shown how the viral multiplicity of infection (MOI) can affect IFN induction. In this study, we discovered the novel finding that human U937 cells infected with 2 different concentrations of Sendai virus (SeV) induce 2 distinct type I IFN subtype profiles. Cells infected at the lower MOI induced more subtypes than cells infected at the higher MOI. We found that this was due to the extent of signaling through the IFN receptor (IFNAR). The cells infected at the lower viral MOI induced the IFNAR2-dependent IFN-α subtypes 4, 6, 7, 10, and 17, which were not induced in cells infected at higher virus concentrations. IFN-β and IFN-α1, -2, and -8 were induced in an IFNAR-independent manner in cells infected at both virus concentrations. IFN-α5, -14, -16, and -21 were induced in an IFNAR-dependent manner in cells infected at lower virus concentrations and in an IFNAR-independent manner in cells infected at higher virus concentrations. These differences in IFN subtype profiles in the 2 virus concentrations also resulted in distinct interferon-stimulated gene induction. These results present the novel finding that different viral MOIs differentially activate JAK/STAT signaling through the IFNAR, which greatly affects the profile of IFN subtypes that are induced. IMPORTANCE Type I IFNs are pleiotropic cytokines that are instrumental in combating viral diseases. Understanding how the individual subtypes are induced is important in developing strategies to block viral replication. Many studies have reported that different viruses induce distinct type I IFN subtype profiles due to differences in the way viruses are sensed in different cell types

  9. Cytokine therapeutics: lessons from interferon alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Gutterman, J U

    1994-01-01

    Cytokines are soluble proteins that allow for communication between cells and the external environment. Interferon (IFN) alpha, the first cytokine to be produced by recombinant DNA technology, has emerged as an important regulator of growth and differentiation, affecting cellular communication and signal transduction pathways as well as immunological control. This review focuses on the biological and clinical activities of the cytokine. Originally discovered as an antiviral substance, the efficacy of IFN-alpha in malignant, viral, immunological, angiogenic, inflammatory, and fibrotic diseases suggests a spectrum of interrelated pathophysiologies. The principles learned from in vivo studies will be discussed, particularly hairy cell leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, certain angiogenic diseases, and hepatitis. After the surprising discovery of activity in a rare B-cell neoplasm, IFN-alpha emerged as a prototypic tumor suppressor protein that represses the clinical tumorigenic phenotype in some malignancies capable of differentiation. Regulatory agencies throughout the world have approved IFN-alpha for treatment of 13 malignant and viral disorders. The principles established with this cytokine serve as a paradigm for future development of natural proteins for human disease. PMID:8108387

  10. Potentiation of radiation injury by interferon

    SciTech Connect

    Dritschilo, A.; Mossman, K.; Gray, M.; Sreevalsan, T.

    1982-02-01

    Interferon (IFN) is being tested clinically in the treatment of a wide range of human malignancies. Patients undergoing cancer treatment may require radiotherapy in conjunction with IFN administration. This study examined the effect of purified preparations of IFN on the radiation response of mouse Swiss 3T3 cells in culture. Cells were exposed to 10 U/ml of mouse IFN or human IFN 2 hours prior to radiation. The IFN was left in the medium for the duration of the experiment. Marked enhancement of radiation response was observed in the presence of mouse IFN as compared to human IFN or no IFN treatment. The difference in radiation response was due to a reduction in the shoulder portion of the survival curve with no change in the slope of the exponential portion. Since human IFN was inactive in these experiments, the data suggest that the potentiation of radiation damage is specific for mouse IFN. The reduction in the shoulder in the presence of mouse IFN suggests the inhibition of the ability of cells to accumulate sublethal radiation injury. Split-dose experiments to test for sublethal radiation injury repair capacity failed to demonstrate an IFN effect. We conclude from these studies that IFN potentiates radiation injury. In clinical situations in which IFN is used, careful monitoring of dosage and timing of irradiation may be required to avoid excessive tissue damage. Moreover, treatment strategies may be directed to time radiation and IFN to obtain an improved therapeutic ratio.

  11. Interferon Alpha Association with Neuromyelitis Optica

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Nasrin; Voss, Anne; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Thue Lillevang, Soeren

    2013-01-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) has immunoregulatory functions in autoimmune inflammatory diseases. The goal of this study was to determine occurrence and clinical consequences of IFN-α in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) patients. Thirty-six NMO and 41 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients from a population-based retrospective case series were included. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score and MRI findings determined disease activity. Linear regression was used to assess the effects of the level of IFN-α on disability (EDSS). IFN-α was determined by sensitive ELISA assays. IFN-α was detectable in sera from 9/36 NMO patients, significantly more often than in the MS group (2/41) (P = 0.0197). A higher frequency of IFN-α was observed in NMO patients with acute relapse compared to NMO patients in remission (P < 0.001) and compared to the MS patients with relapse (P = 0.010). In NMO patients, the levels of IFN-α were significantly associated with EDSS (P = 0.0062). It may be concluded that IFN-α was detectable in a subgroup of NMO patients. Association of IFN-α levels with clinical disease activity and severity suggests a role for IFN-α in disease perpetuation and may provide a plausible explanation for a negative effect of IFN-1 treatment in NMO patients. PMID:24348680

  12. STAT-Phosphorylation–Independent Induction of Interferon Regulatory Factor-9 by Interferon

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN)-dependent STAT1 and STAT2 activation requires specific tyrosine residues (337Y and 512Y) located in the cytoplasmic domain of IFNAR-2c, the β-subunit of the human type I IFN receptor. To identify STAT activation-independent induction of ISGs, we used a mutant cell line in which both 337Y and 512Y were substituted with phenylalanine (337F512F or FF mutant). In these cells, type I IFN failed to activate STAT1, STAT2, and STAT3 did not induce well-characterized ISGs and did not exert antiviral or antiproliferative effects. Using Oligonucleotide array (Affymetrix™) analysis, we showed that interferon regulatory factor-9 (IRF-9) was the only gene induced by IFN-β in FF cells. Transient transfection analysis using an IRF-9 promoter–reporter luciferase construct in FF cells confirmed induction of the IRF-9 transcription unit by IFN-β. EMSA analysis using an IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-like sequence on the IRF-9 promoter detected 2 novel DNA-binding complexes induced in nuclear extracts of IFN-β-treated FF cells. Supershift experiments identified the proteins IRF-1 and C/EBP-β in the complex. These studies provide the first evidence that signaling pathways leading to gene transcription are activated by IFN-β independent of STAT phosphorylation. PMID:20038197

  13. T-cell homeostasis in chronic HCV-infected patients treated with interferon and ribavirin or an interferon-free regimen.

    PubMed

    Hartling, Hans Jakob; Birch, Carsten; Gaardbo, Julie C; Hove, Malene; Trøseid, Marius; Clausen, Mette Rye; Gerstoft, Jan; Ullum, Henrik; Nielsen, Susanne Dam

    2015-10-01

    Direct-acting antiviral has replaced pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin-based treatment in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. While interferon-α is immune modulating and causes lymphopenia, interferon-free regimens seem to be well-tolerated. This study aimed to compare T-cell homeostasis before, during, and after HCV treatment with or without interferon-α in patients with chronic HCV infection. A total of 20 patients with chronic HCV infection were treated with pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin, and six patients were treated with an interferon-free regimen. All patients were treated for a minimum of 12 weeks. Interferon-α treatment caused an increase in the density of the receptor for IL-7 (IL-7Rα) during treatment, while interferon-free regimens caused a decrease in IL-7Rα density. After a sustained viral response, proportions of IL-7Rα+ T cells and IL-7Rα density decreased compared to prior treatment values. Finally, a proportion of CD8+ effector memory was lower while proportion of apoptotic T cells was higher after sustained virologic response compared to prior treatment. Despite lymphopenia during interferon, alterations in T-cell homeostasis during treatment were relatively similar in patients receiving interferon-based treatment and in patients receiving interferon-free treatment, and alterations during and after treatment seem to illustrate a reduced need for high levels of T cells aimed at controlling infection. PMID:26279289

  14. Interferon therapy of chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Brunetto, Maurizia Rossana; Bonino, Ferruccio

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) results from the inability of the host's immune system to control viral replication. Interferon-α (IFN-α) therapy can convert CHB into inactive hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in 20-30% of the treated patients. In spite of the low response rate, IFN-α therapy has the advantage of having a limited duration and being effective even after therapy, as demonstrated by a much higher incidence of HBsAg clearance in responders to IFN-α than in naturally occurring inactive HBsAg carriers. IFN-α has multiple antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory activities and targets: cellular genes (IFN-stimulated genes) activating different pathways of antiviral defense in infected and noninfected cells, HBV replication blocking the RNA-containing core particle formation and accelerating their decay, degrading pregenomic RNA, and modulating the nuclear viral minichromosome (covalently closed circular DNA) activity by targeting its epigenetic regulation and both innate and adaptive immune response. The interference of viral heterogeneity and genetic polymorphisms of the host on IFN-α susceptibility is under investigation. Only a better understanding of the complex interplay between the different activities of IFN-α would warrant the amelioration of current therapeutic strategies and the design of new therapeutic approaches. The study of on-treatment dynamics of HBV infection by means of combined quantitative monitoring of serum HBV DNA and HBsAg warrant tailoring treatment at the single-patient level and can help to make treatment more cost-effective by using the different combinations of currently available antivirals, including IFN, more appropriately. Integrated molecular and clinical knowledge in a systems medicine fashion is mandatory to further improve antiviral therapy in CHB. PMID:25034484

  15. Neutralizing Antibodies Against Interferon-Beta

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The development of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is a major problem in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with interferon-beta (IFN-ß). Whereas binding antibodies (BAbs) can be demonstrated in the vast majority of patients, only a smaller proportion of patients develop NAbs. The principle in NAb in vitro assays is the utilization of cultured cell lines that are responsive to IFN-ß. The cytopathic effect (CPE) assay measures the capacity of NAbs to neutralize IFN- ß's protective effect on cells challenged with virus and the MxA induction assay measures the ability of NAbs to reduce the IFN-ß-induced expression of MxA, either at the mRNA or the protein level. A titer of >20 neutralizing units/ml traditionally defines NAb posi-tivity. NAbs in high titers completely abrogate the in vivo response to IFN-ß, whereas the effect of low and intermediate titers is unpredictable. As clinically important NAbs appear only after 9-18 months IFN- ß0 therapy, short-term studies of two years or less are unsuitable for evaluation of clinical NAb effects. All long-term trials of three years or more concordantly show evidence of a detrimental effect of NAbs on relapses, disease activity on MRI, or on disease progression. Persistent high titers of NAbs indicate an abrogation of the biological response and, hence, absence of therapeutic efficacy, and this observation should lead to a change of therapy. As low and medium titers are ambiguous treatment decisions in patients with low NAb titres should be guided by determination of in vivo mRNA MxA induction and clinical disease activity. PMID:21180570

  16. Type I Interferons Direct Gammaherpesvirus Host Colonization.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cindy S E; Lawler, Clara; May, Janet S; Belz, Gabrielle T; Stevenson, Philip G

    2016-05-01

    Gamma-herpesviruses colonise lymphocytes. Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) infects B cells via epithelial to myeloid to lymphoid transfer. This indirect route entails exposure to host defences, and type I interferons (IFN-I) limit infection while viral evasion promotes it. To understand how IFN-I and its evasion both control infection outcomes, we used Mx1-cre mice to tag floxed viral genomes in IFN-I responding cells. Epithelial-derived MuHV-4 showed low IFN-I exposure, and neither disrupting viral evasion nor blocking IFN-I signalling markedly affected acute viral replication in the lungs. Maximising IFN-I induction with poly(I:C) increased virus tagging in lung macrophages, but the tagged virus spread poorly. Lymphoid-derived MuHV-4 showed contrastingly high IFN-I exposure. This occurred mainly in B cells. IFN-I induction increased tagging without reducing viral loads; disrupting viral evasion caused marked attenuation; and blocking IFN-I signalling opened up new lytic spread between macrophages. Thus, the impact of IFN-I on viral replication was strongly cell type-dependent: epithelial infection induced little response; IFN-I largely suppressed macrophage infection; and viral evasion allowed passage through B cells despite IFN-I responses. As a result, IFN-I and its evasion promoted a switch in infection from acutely lytic in myeloid cells to chronically latent in B cells. Murine cytomegalovirus also showed a capacity to pass through IFN-I-responding cells, arguing that this is a core feature of herpesvirus host colonization. PMID:27223694

  17. Type I Interferons Direct Gammaherpesvirus Host Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cindy S. E.; Lawler, Clara; May, Janet S.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-herpesviruses colonise lymphocytes. Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) infects B cells via epithelial to myeloid to lymphoid transfer. This indirect route entails exposure to host defences, and type I interferons (IFN-I) limit infection while viral evasion promotes it. To understand how IFN-I and its evasion both control infection outcomes, we used Mx1-cre mice to tag floxed viral genomes in IFN-I responding cells. Epithelial-derived MuHV-4 showed low IFN-I exposure, and neither disrupting viral evasion nor blocking IFN-I signalling markedly affected acute viral replication in the lungs. Maximising IFN-I induction with poly(I:C) increased virus tagging in lung macrophages, but the tagged virus spread poorly. Lymphoid-derived MuHV-4 showed contrastingly high IFN-I exposure. This occurred mainly in B cells. IFN-I induction increased tagging without reducing viral loads; disrupting viral evasion caused marked attenuation; and blocking IFN-I signalling opened up new lytic spread between macrophages. Thus, the impact of IFN-I on viral replication was strongly cell type-dependent: epithelial infection induced little response; IFN-I largely suppressed macrophage infection; and viral evasion allowed passage through B cells despite IFN-I responses. As a result, IFN-I and its evasion promoted a switch in infection from acutely lytic in myeloid cells to chronically latent in B cells. Murine cytomegalovirus also showed a capacity to pass through IFN-I-responding cells, arguing that this is a core feature of herpesvirus host colonization. PMID:27223694

  18. The type I interferons: Basic concepts and clinical relevance in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    López de Padilla, Consuelo M; Niewold, Timothy B

    2016-01-15

    There is increasing scientific and clinical interest in elucidating the biology of type I Interferons, which began approximately 60 years ago with the concept of "viral interference", a property that reduces the ability of a virus to infect cells. Although our understanding of the multiple cellular and molecular functions of interferons has advanced significantly, much remains to be learned and type I Interferons remain an active and fascinating area of inquiry. In this review, we cover some general aspects of type I interferon genes, with emphasis on interferon-alpha, and various aspects of molecular mechanisms triggered by type I interferons and toll-like receptor signaling by the Janus activated kinase/signal transducer activation of transcription (JAK-STAT) pathway and interferon regulatory factor pathway. We will also describe the role of type I interferons in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, and its potential use as therapeutic agent. PMID:26410416

  19. Adherence to treatment of chronic hepatitis C: from interferon containing regimens to interferon and ribavirin free regimens

    PubMed Central

    Younossi, Zobair M.; Stepanova, Maria; Henry, Linda; Nader, Fatema; Younossi, Youssef; Hunt, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients’ experience during treatment may affect treatment adherence. Our aim was to assess the impact of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) on adherence to different anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) regimens. Clinical, demographic, and PRO data (short form-36 [SF-36], chronic liver disease questionnaire-hepatitis C version [CLDQ-HCV], functional assessment of chronic illness therapy-fatigue [FACIT-F], work productivity and activity impairment: specific health problem [WPAI:SHP]) from 13 multinational clinical trials of anti-HCV treatment were available. Treatment adherence was defined as >80% of prescribed doses taken. Included were 4825 HCV patients. Regimens were grouped into: interferon- and ribavirin (RBV)-containing (±sofosbuvir [SOF]), interferon-free RBV-containing (RBV + SOF ± ledipasvir [LDV]), and interferon-free RBV-free (LDV/SOF). The adherence to these regimens were 77.6%, 84.3%, and 96.2%, respectively (P < 0.0001). Nonadherent patients were more likely to be unemployed and to have a greater PRO impairment at baseline (up to −5.3% lower PRO scores, P < 0.0001). During treatment with interferon- or RBV-based regimens, nonadherent patients experienced lower PROs and had larger decrements from their baseline PRO scores. In contrast, there were no significant declines in PRO scores (all P > 0.05) for the small number of patients who were nonadherent to LDV/SOF. In multivariate analysis, being treatment-naive, longer treatment duration, and receiving an interferon- or RBV-containing regimen were associated with a lower likelihood of adherence (all P < 0.003). Better baseline and on-treatment PRO scores were associated with a higher likelihood of adherence to interferon and RBV. The use of interferon and/or RBV, longer duration of treatment, and lower baseline and on-treatment PRO scores were linked to a decreased likelihood of being adherent to interferon + RBV-containing or interferon-free RBV-containing antiviral

  20. Adherence to treatment of chronic hepatitis C: from interferon containing regimens to interferon and ribavirin free regimens.

    PubMed

    Younossi, Zobair M; Stepanova, Maria; Henry, Linda; Nader, Fatema; Younossi, Youssef; Hunt, Sharon

    2016-07-01

    Patients' experience during treatment may affect treatment adherence. Our aim was to assess the impact of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) on adherence to different anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) regimens.Clinical, demographic, and PRO data (short form-36 [SF-36], chronic liver disease questionnaire-hepatitis C version [CLDQ-HCV], functional assessment of chronic illness therapy-fatigue [FACIT-F], work productivity and activity impairment: specific health problem [WPAI:SHP]) from 13 multinational clinical trials of anti-HCV treatment were available. Treatment adherence was defined as >80% of prescribed doses taken.Included were 4825 HCV patients. Regimens were grouped into: interferon- and ribavirin (RBV)-containing (±sofosbuvir [SOF]), interferon-free RBV-containing (RBV + SOF ± ledipasvir [LDV]), and interferon-free RBV-free (LDV/SOF). The adherence to these regimens were 77.6%, 84.3%, and 96.2%, respectively (P < 0.0001). Nonadherent patients were more likely to be unemployed and to have a greater PRO impairment at baseline (up to -5.3% lower PRO scores, P < 0.0001). During treatment with interferon- or RBV-based regimens, nonadherent patients experienced lower PROs and had larger decrements from their baseline PRO scores. In contrast, there were no significant declines in PRO scores (all P > 0.05) for the small number of patients who were nonadherent to LDV/SOF. In multivariate analysis, being treatment-naive, longer treatment duration, and receiving an interferon- or RBV-containing regimen were associated with a lower likelihood of adherence (all P < 0.003). Better baseline and on-treatment PRO scores were associated with a higher likelihood of adherence to interferon and RBV.The use of interferon and/or RBV, longer duration of treatment, and lower baseline and on-treatment PRO scores were linked to a decreased likelihood of being adherent to interferon + RBV-containing or interferon-free RBV-containing antiviral regimens

  1. Interferons and inflammasomes: Cooperation and counterregulation in disease.

    PubMed

    Labzin, Larisa I; Lauterbach, Mario A R; Latz, Eicke

    2016-07-01

    Interferons and the IL-1 family of cytokines have important roles in host defense against invading viruses and bacteria. Inflammasomes, multimeric cytosolic sensors of infection, are required for IL-1β and IL-18 processing and release. Interferons, IL-1β, and IL-18 are also implicated in autoimmune disease and chronic inflammation. Although independent but complementary pathways induce these cytokine subsets during infection, in some circumstances the cross-talk between these key inflammatory mediators is a particular requirement for effective host defense. In this review we will summarize recent discoveries concerning the potentiation of inflammasome responses by type I interferons, particularly in patients with gram-negative bacterial infections, and reflect on the molecular mechanisms of IFN-β's immunosuppressive effects through modulation of inflammasome and IL-1β signaling in patients with tuberculosis and multiple sclerosis. PMID:27373324

  2. [Autoimmunization induced by interferon alpha therapy in chronic hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Rocca, Pierre; Codes, Liana; Chevallier, Michèle; Trépo, Christian; Zoulim, Fabien

    2004-11-01

    We report the case of a 56 year-old woman with post-transfusion chronic hepatitis C who presented with a severe ALT flare up associated with a rapid progression of liver fibrosis during interferon alpha 2b therapy. Several hypotheses were considered to explain the etiology of this ALT flare: there was no viral super infection by other hepatotropic viruses, no toxic hepatitis, no metabolic disease, and no other specific liver diseases could be identified. HLA typing showed a specific profile A1 B8 DR3 (risk factor of auto-immunization during interferon alpha therapy) with antinuclear antibodies and anti smooth muscle antibodies. This case suggests that auto-immunization induced by interferon alpha should be investigated in case of ALT flare that is not followed by an HCV breakthrough. PMID:15657545

  3. Role of interferon in resistance and immunity to protozoa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Degee, A. L. W.; Mansfield, J. M.; Newsome, A. L.; Arnold, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Production of interferon (I) in response to protozoan infection, and the interferon-mediated inhibition of parasite replication were studied in order to determine if these effects may be related to immunologic-mediated resistance of the hosts. Two extracellular parasites-Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Naegleria fowlei were used. Upon infection with the trypanosome, only resistant strains of mice produced I. An early peak of alpha/beta I is followed by appearance of gamma I, which coincided with antibody production and a drop in parasitemia. In case of the amoeba, pretreatment of its suspension with alpha/beta I inhibits its replication in vitro, and appears to protect mice from the infection and the disease. It is proposed that production of interferon, with its regulatory effect on the immune responses, may play a major role in regulating the processes of protozoan-caused diseases.

  4. Gamma interferon receptor defect presenting as recurrent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Balasubramanian; Amperayani, Sumanth; Dhanalakshmi, K; Padmanaban, Swathi

    2014-07-01

    Failure of response to therapy in childhood tuberculosis may be due to resistance, paradoxical response or immunodeficiency. Interferon-γ (IFNγ) plays a major role during host defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). An 8-y-old boy presented with fever, hepatosplenomegaly and parotid abscess. He had been earlier treated for BCG adenitis in infancy and at 5 y for TB osteomyelitis of iliac bone and recovered. Investigations confirmed disseminated Mycobacterium Avium Intracellulare infection. He was investigated for immunodeficiency because of recurrent mycobacterial disease and a partial defect of γ-interferon receptor was identified. He required a 2 y course of therapy with a 7 drug regimen and recovered. The authors report this case because of its rarity and to highlight the need to consider γ-interferon receptor defect in the presence of recurrent tuberculosis (TB) and also review the options for therapy. PMID:23681833

  5. Recurrent Pericarditis, an Unexpected Effect of Adjuvant Interferon Chemotherapy for Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Marmoush, Fady; Shafi, Muhammad Ismail; Shah, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced pericarditis is a well-described cardiac pathology that can result from a variety of medications; however, interferon-mediated pericarditis is extremely rare. We present a case of a young female with recurrent pericarditis due to interferon therapy. The role of interferon in adjuvant chemotherapy is well known and yields good effect, but this case highlights the very uncommon phenomena of interferon induced pericarditis and the significant distress it can cause. PMID:27418981

  6. The Use of Interferons in the Treatment of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Spaccarelli, Natalie; Rook, Alain H

    2015-10-01

    Interferons are polypeptides that naturally occur in the human body as a part of the innate immune response. By harnessing these immunomodulatory functions, synthetic interferons have shown efficacy in combating various diseases including cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. This article closely examines the qualities of interferon alfa and interferon gamma and the evidence behind their use in the 2 most common types of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, namely, mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome. PMID:26433845

  7. Expansion of amphibian intronless interferons revises the paradigm for interferon evolution and functional diversity

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Yongming; Liu, Qinfang; Lee, Jinhwa; Ma, Wenjun; Blecha, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are key cytokines identified in vertebrates and evolutionary dominance of intronless IFN genes in amniotes is a signature event in IFN evolution. For the first time, we show that the emergence and expansion of intronless IFN genes is evident in amphibians, shown by 24–37 intronless IFN genes in each frog species. Amphibian IFNs represent a molecular complex more complicated than those in other vertebrate species, which revises the established model of IFN evolution to facilitate re-inspection of IFN molecular and functional diversity. We identified these intronless amphibian IFNs and their intron-containing progenitors, and functionally characterized constitutive and inductive expression and antimicrobial roles in infections caused by zoonotic pathogens, such as influenza viruses and Listeria monocytogenes. Amphibians, therefore, may serve as overlooked vectors/hosts for zoonotic pathogens, and the amphibian IFN system provides a model to study IFN evolution in molecular and functional diversity in coping with dramatic environmental changes during terrestrial adaption. PMID:27356970

  8. Expansion of amphibian intronless interferons revises the paradigm for interferon evolution and functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yongming; Liu, Qinfang; Lee, Jinhwa; Ma, Wenjun; McVey, D Scott; Blecha, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are key cytokines identified in vertebrates and evolutionary dominance of intronless IFN genes in amniotes is a signature event in IFN evolution. For the first time, we show that the emergence and expansion of intronless IFN genes is evident in amphibians, shown by 24-37 intronless IFN genes in each frog species. Amphibian IFNs represent a molecular complex more complicated than those in other vertebrate species, which revises the established model of IFN evolution to facilitate re-inspection of IFN molecular and functional diversity. We identified these intronless amphibian IFNs and their intron-containing progenitors, and functionally characterized constitutive and inductive expression and antimicrobial roles in infections caused by zoonotic pathogens, such as influenza viruses and Listeria monocytogenes. Amphibians, therefore, may serve as overlooked vectors/hosts for zoonotic pathogens, and the amphibian IFN system provides a model to study IFN evolution in molecular and functional diversity in coping with dramatic environmental changes during terrestrial adaption. PMID:27356970

  9. Treatment of Hepatitis C Infections with Interferon: A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Robert M.; Contente, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Interferons were first described in 1957, but it was not until 34 years after their discovery that sufficient quantities of it were available for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, Clinicians now have an excellent understanding of the basis for the effectiveness of interferon alpha (IFN-α) in the therapy of this disease. Treatment with IFN-α is more efficient when it complemented by the antiviral ribavirin and the IFN-α is conjugated with polyethylene glycol to form peginterferon. In the near future treatment of HCV with IFN-α may involve new anti-HCV agents that are currently under development. PMID:21152181

  10. The Rotavirus Interferon Antagonist NSP1: Many Targets, Many Questions.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Michelle M

    2016-06-01

    Rotavirus is a leading cause of death due to diarrhea among young children across the globe. Despite the limited coding capacity that is characteristic of RNA viruses, rotavirus dedicates substantial resources to avoiding the host innate immune response. Among these strategies is use of the interferon antagonist protein NSP1, which targets cellular proteins required for interferon production to be degraded by the proteasome. Although numerous cellular targets have been described, there remain many questions about the mechanism of NSP1 activity and its role in promoting replication in specific host species. PMID:27009959

  11. Human interferon and its inducers: clinical program overview at Roswell Park Memorial Institute.

    PubMed

    Carter, W A; Horoszewicz, J S

    1978-11-01

    An overview of the clinical interferon program at Roswell Park Memorial Institute is presented. Purified fibroblast interferon and a novel inducer of human interferon [rIn-r(C12,U)n] are being evaluated for possible antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory activities in patients with cancer. PMID:728908

  12. Functional characterization of canine interferon-lambda.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenhui; Xu, Lei; Ren, Liqian; Qu, Hongren; Li, Jing; Liang, Jingjing; Liu, Wenjun; Yang, Limin; Luo, Tingrong

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we provide the first comprehensive annotation of canine interferon-λ (CaIFN-λ, type III IFN). Phylogenetic analysis based on genomic sequences indicated that CaIFN-λ is located in the same branch with Swine IFN-λ1 (SwIFN-λ), Bat IFN-λ1 (BaIFN-λ), and human IFN-λ1 (HuIFN-λ1). CaIFN-λ was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified to further investigate the biological activity in vitro. The recombinant CaIFN-λ (rCaIFN-λ) displayed potent antiviral activity on both homologous and heterologous animal cells in terms of inhibiting the replication of the New Jersey serotype of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), canine parvovirus, and influenza virus A/WSN/33 (H1N1), respectively. In addition, we also found that rCaIFN-λ exhibits a significant antiproliferative response against A72 canine tumor cells and MDCK cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, CaIFN-λ activated the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. To evaluate the expression of CaIFN-λ induced by virus and the expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) induced by rCaIFN-λ in the MDCK cells, we measured the relative mRNA level of CaIFN-λ and ISGs (ISG15, Mx1, and 2'5'-OAS) by quantitative real-time PCR and found that the mRNA level of CaIFN-λ and the ISGs significantly increased after treating the MDCK cells with viruses and rCaIFN-λ protein, respectively. Finally, to evaluate the binding activity of rCaIFN-λ to its receptor, we expressed the extracellular domain of the canine IFN-λ receptor 1 (CaIFN-λR1-EC) and determined the binding activity via ELISA. Our results demonstrated that rCaIFN-λ bound tightly to recombinant CaIFN-λR1-EC (rCaIFN-λR1-EC). PMID:24950142

  13. Neuropsychiatric Adverse Effects of Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Raison, Charles L.; Demetrashvili, Marina; Capuron, Lucile; Miller, Andrew H.

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant preparations of the cytokine interferon (IFN)-α are increasingly used to treat a number of medical conditions, including chronic viral hepatitis and several malignancies. Although frequently effective, IFNα induces a variety of neuropsychiatric adverse effects, including an acute confusional state that develops rapidly after initiation of high-dose IFNα, a depressive syndrome that develops more slowly over weeks to months of treatment, and manic conditions most often characterised by extreme irritability and agitation, but also occasionally by euphoria. Acute IFNα-induced confusional states are typically characterised by disorientation, lethargy, somnolence, psychomotor retardation, difficulties with speaking and writing, parkinsonism and psychotic symptoms. Strategies for managing delirium should be employed, including treatment of contributing medical conditions, use of either typical or atypical antipsychotic agents and avoidance of medications likely to worsen mental status. Significant depressive symptoms occur in 21–58% of patients receiving IFNα, with symptoms typically manifesting over the first several months of treatment. The most replicated risk factor for developing depression is the presence of mood and anxiety symptoms prior to treatment. Other potential, but less frequently replicated, risk factors include a past history of major depression, being female and increasing IFNα dosage and treatment duration. The available data support two approaches to the pharmacological management of IFNα-induced depression: antidepressant pretreatment or symptomatic treatment once IFNα has been initiated. Pretreatment might be best reserved for patients already receiving antidepressants or for patients who endorse depression or anxiety symptoms of mild or greater severity prior to therapy. Several recent studies demonstrate that antidepressants effectively treat IFNα-induced depression once it has developed, allowing the vast majority of

  14. Effect of flight in mission SL-3 on interferon-gamma production by rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, C. L.; Williams, J. A.; Mandel, A. D.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1985-01-01

    Rats flown in Space Shuttle mission SL-3 were sacrificed after flight and spleens were removed. Cultures of spleen cells were challenged with the mitogen concanavalin-A to attempt to induce interferon-gamma. Most control, ground-based rats had spleen cells that produced moderate titers of interferon-gamma. Spleen cells from flown rats did not produce interferon-gamma in most cases, and one flown rat produced minimally detectable amounts of interferon. These data suggest that interferon-gamma production was inhibited in rats flown in mission SL-3 immediately upon return to earth.

  15. Interferon Production and Protein Synthesis in Chick Cells

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Robert M.

    1966-01-01

    Friedman, Robert M. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Md.). Interferon production and protein synthesis in chick cells. J. Bacteriol. 91:1224–1229. 1966.—Overnight incubation of chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF) at 4 C before infection with live Semliki Forest virus (SFV) increased virus yields but decreased interferon production. The same findings were noted when CEF were incubated for 4 hr with p-fluorophenylalanine (FPA) before infection with live SFV or inactivated Chikungunya virus. In both systems incorporation of C14-leucine into protein appeared to be increased after pretreatment at 4 C or with FPA. Protein synthesis could be raised in CEF incubated in 0.5% serum after trypsinization by increasing the concentration of serum. CEF in 10% serum had higher rates of C14-leucine incorporation than did cells in 1.5% serum, but again the cells with the apparently high rate of incorporation produced less interferon. These findings may be related to the mechanism of cellular control over interferon production. PMID:5929753

  16. Interferon Gamma as a Biomarker of Exposure to Enteric Viruses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) was selected as a biomarker for viral exposure. Twelve-week-old BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with Coxsackievirus B3 or B4 diluted in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Control mice were injected with PBS only. Four months after viral infectio...

  17. Interferon induced IFIT family genes in host antiviral defense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Secretion of interferons (IFNs) from virus-infected cells is a hallmark of host antiviral immunity and in fact, IFNs exert their antiviral activities through the induction of antiviral proteins. The IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) family is among hundreds of IF stimulated ...

  18. Alpha-interferon in the treatment of nodular lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Urba, W J; Longo, D L

    1986-12-01

    Patients with nodular lymphoma initially respond to a number of therapies but relapse is common and inexorable with time, and despite further therapy, most patients will ultimately die of their lymphoma. The recent demonstration of their sensitivity to alpha-interferon is promising. The importance of this human antitumor effect is that it is presumably based on mechanisms different from conventional agents. Phase I trials of various doses and schedules of recombinant alpha-interferon have shown that effective serum levels can be obtained by intramuscular (IM), intravenous (IV), or subcutaneous (SC) routes. Virtually all patients experienced some degree of acute toxicity manifested by fever, chills, myalgia, and headache. Tolerance usually developed to acute adverse effects within the first few weeks of therapy, regardless of dose or schedule. Fatigue and anorexia were the most important adverse reactions, occurring during the first two weeks of treatment and generally persisting for the duration of therapy. Occasional adverse effects relating to the central nervous and cardiovascular systems have been reported. Primary laboratory abnormalities observed during treatment include decreases in hematologic parameters and elevations of liver function tests. The clinical efficacy of alpha-interferon, both natural and recombinant, has been demonstrated in both untreated and heavily pretreated patients with nodular lymphoma. The response rate has approached 50% in recent studies; however, less than half were complete responders. Future directions include combination of interferon with cytotoxic agents or other biological response modifiers and use as adjuvant therapy. PMID:3541218

  19. Who benefits most from adjuvant interferon treatment for melanoma?

    PubMed

    Gogas, Helen; Abali, Huseyin; Ascierto, Paolo A; Demidov, Lev; Pehamberger, Hubert; Robert, Caroline; Schachter, Jacob; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Hauschild, Axel; Espinosa, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma has a poor prognosis; the median survival for patients with stage IV melanoma ranges from 8 to 18 months after diagnosis. Interferon-α provides significant improvement in disease-free survival at the cost of poor tolerability. Identifying patients who benefit the most may improve the cost:benefit ratio. In addition, no data exist for the role of adjuvant therapy in noncutaneous melanoma. Molecular profiles may help to identify patients who benefit the most from adjuvant interferon therapy. In this review, the American Joint Commission on Cancer 2009 staging criteria and emerging biomarker data to guide adjuvant treatment decisions will be discussed. Several criteria to guide selection of patients are discussed in detail. These include Breslow thickness, number of positive lymph nodes, whether or not the primary lesion has ulcerated, immunologic markers, and cytokine profiles. Substantial progress has been made in deciding which patients benefit from interferon-α adjuvant therapy. Interferon-α is the only agent currently approved for the adjuvant treatment of this deadly disease, despite its side effect profile. More effective drugs with better tolerability are needed. PMID:24176884

  20. Interferons and Their Receptors in Birds: A Comparison of Gene Structure, Phylogenetic Analysis, and Cross Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Wang, Mingshu; Cheng, Anchun

    2014-01-01

    Interferon may be thought of as a key, with the interferon receptor as the signal lock: Crosstalk between them maintains their balance during viral infection. In this review, the protein structure of avian interferon and the interferon receptor are discussed, indicating remarkable similarity between different species. However, the structures of the interferon receptors are more sophisticated than those of the interferons, suggesting that the interferon receptor is a more complicated signal lock system and has considerable diversity in subtypes or structures. Preliminary evolutionary analysis showed that the subunits of the interferon receptor formed a distinct clade, and the orthologs may be derived from the same ancestor. Furthermore, the development of interferons and interferon receptors in birds may be related to an animal’s age and the maintenance of a balanced state. In addition, the equilibrium between interferon and its receptor during pathological and physiological states revealed that the virus and the host influence this equilibrium. Birds could represent an important model for studies on interferon’s antiviral activities and may provide the basis for new antiviral strategies. PMID:25405736

  1. ELF4 is critical for induction of type I interferon and the host antiviral response

    PubMed Central

    You, Fuping; Wang, Penghua; Yang, Long; Yang, Guang; Zhao, Yang O; Qian, Feng; Walker, Wendy; Sutton, Richard; Montgomery, Ruth; Lin, Rongtuan; Iwasaki, Akiko; Fikrig, Erol

    2014-01-01

    Induction of type I interferon is a central event of innate immunity, essential for host defense. Here we report that the transcription factor ELF4 is induced by type I interferon and upregulates interferon expression in a feed-forward loop. ELF4 deficiency leads to reduced interferon production, resulting in enhanced susceptibility to West Nile virus encephalitis in mice. After viral infection, ELF4 is recruited by STING, interacts with and is activated by the MAVS-TBK1 complex, and translocates into the nucleus to bind interferon promoters. Cooperative binding with ELF4 increases the binding affinity of interferon regulatory factors IRF3 and IRF7, which is mediated by EICE elements. Thus, in addition to identifying a regulator of innate immune signaling, we uncovered a role for EICE elements in interferon transactivation. PMID:24185615

  2. Type III interferon (IFN-lambda) antagonizes the antiviral activity of interferon-alpha in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bordi, L; Lalle, E; Lapa, D; Caglioti, C; Quartu, S; Capobianchi, M R; Castilletti, C

    2013-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFN-lambda) are the most recently discovered members of IFN family. Synergism between different IFN types is well established, but for type I and type III IFNs no conclusive evidence has been reported so far. Possible synergism/antagonism between IFN-alpha and IFN-lambda in the inhibition of virus replication (EMCV, WNV lineage 1 and 2, CHIKV and HSV-1), and in the activation of intracellular pathways of IFN response (MxA and 2'-5' OAS) was evaluated in different cell lines (Vero E6, A549 and Wish cells). The antiviral potency of IFN-lambda1 and -l2 was lower than that of IFN-alpha. When IFN-alpha and -lambda were used together, the Combination Index (CI) for virus inhibition was greater than 1 virtually for all virus/host cell systems, indicating antagonistic effect. Antagonism between IFN-alpha and -l was also observed for the induction of mRNA for both MxA and 2'-5'OAS. Elucidating the interplay between IFN-alpha and -lambda may help to better understand innate defence mechanisms against viral infections, including the molecular mechanisms underlying the influence of IL-28B polymorphisms in the response to HCV and other viral infections. PMID:24382181

  3. Negative regulation of the interferon response by an interferon-induced long non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Kambara, Hiroto; Niazi, Farshad; Kostadinova, Lenche; Moonka, Dilip K; Siegel, Christopher T; Post, Anthony B; Carnero, Elena; Barriocanal, Marina; Fortes, Puri; Anthony, Donald D; Valadkhan, Saba

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play critical roles in diverse cellular processes; however, their involvement in many critical aspects of the immune response including the interferon (IFN) response remains poorly understood. To address this gap, we compared the global gene expression pattern of primary human hepatocytes before and at three time points after treatment with IFN-α. Among ∼ 200 IFN-induced lncRNAs, one transcript showed ∼ 100-fold induction. This RNA, which we named lncRNA-CMPK2, was a spliced, polyadenylated nuclear transcript that was induced by IFN in diverse cell types from human and mouse. Similar to protein-coding IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), its induction was dependent on JAK-STAT signaling. Intriguingly, knockdown of lncRNA-CMPK2 resulted in a marked reduction in HCV replication in IFN-stimulated hepatocytes, suggesting that it could affect the antiviral role of IFN. We could show that lncRNA-CMPK2 knockdown resulted in upregulation of several protein-coding antiviral ISGs. The observed upregulation was caused by an increase in both basal and IFN-stimulated transcription, consistent with loss of transcriptional inhibition in knockdown cells. These results indicate that the IFN response involves a lncRNA-mediated negative regulatory mechanism. lncRNA-CMPK2 was strongly upregulated in a subset of HCV-infected human livers, suggesting a role in modulation of the IFN response in vivo. PMID:25122750

  4. Negative regulation of the interferon response by an interferon-induced long non-coding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Kambara, Hiroto; Niazi, Farshad; Kostadinova, Lenche; Moonka, Dilip K.; Siegel, Christopher T.; Post, Anthony B.; Carnero, Elena; Barriocanal, Marina; Fortes, Puri; Anthony, Donald D.; Valadkhan, Saba

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play critical roles in diverse cellular processes; however, their involvement in many critical aspects of the immune response including the interferon (IFN) response remains poorly understood. To address this gap, we compared the global gene expression pattern of primary human hepatocytes before and at three time points after treatment with IFN-α. Among ∼200 IFN-induced lncRNAs, one transcript showed ∼100-fold induction. This RNA, which we named lncRNA-CMPK2, was a spliced, polyadenylated nuclear transcript that was induced by IFN in diverse cell types from human and mouse. Similar to protein-coding IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), its induction was dependent on JAK-STAT signaling. Intriguingly, knockdown of lncRNA-CMPK2 resulted in a marked reduction in HCV replication in IFN-stimulated hepatocytes, suggesting that it could affect the antiviral role of IFN. We could show that lncRNA-CMPK2 knockdown resulted in upregulation of several protein-coding antiviral ISGs. The observed upregulation was caused by an increase in both basal and IFN-stimulated transcription, consistent with loss of transcriptional inhibition in knockdown cells. These results indicate that the IFN response involves a lncRNA-mediated negative regulatory mechanism. lncRNA-CMPK2 was strongly upregulated in a subset of HCV-infected human livers, suggesting a role in modulation of the IFN response in vivo. PMID:25122750

  5. Differential Transcriptional Responses to Interferon-α and Interferon-γ in Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Santosh; Ji, Xuhuai; Calderon-Rodriguez, Gloria M.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Liang, T. Jake

    2010-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) plays a central role in the innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses. While IFN-α is currently approved for treating chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C, in limited studies, IFN-γ has not been shown to be effective for chronic hepatitis B or C. To identify the potential mechanism underlying the differential antiviral effects of IFN-α and IFN-γ, we used cDNA microarray to profile the global transcriptional response to IFN-α and IFN-γ in primary human hepatocytes, the target cell population of hepatitis viruses. Our results reveal distinct patterns of gene expression induced by these 2 cytokines. Overall, IFN-α induces more genes than IFN-γ at the transcriptional level. Distinct sets of genes were induced by IFN-α and IFN-γ with limited overlaps. IFN-α induces gene transcription at an early time point (6 h) but not at a later time point (18 h), while the effects of IFN-γ are more prominent at 18 h than at 6 h, suggesting a delayed transcriptional response to IFN-γ in the hepatocytes. These findings indicate differential actions of IFN-α and IFN-γ in the context of therapeutic intervention for chronic viral infections in the liver. PMID:20038212

  6. Borna disease virus nucleoprotein inhibits type I interferon induction through the interferon regulatory factor 7 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Wuqi; Kao, Wenping; Zhai, Aixia; Qian, Jun; Li, Yujun; Zhang, Qingmeng; Zhao, Hong; Hu, Yunlong; Li, Hui; Zhang, Fengmin

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •IRF7 nuclear localisation was inhibited by BDV persistently infected. •BDV N protein resistant to IFN induction both in BDV infected OL cell and N protein plasmid transfected OL cell. •BDV N protein is related to the inhibition of IRF7 nuclear localisation. -- Abstract: The expression of type I interferon (IFN) is one of the most potent innate defences against viral infection in higher vertebrates. Borna disease virus (BDV) establishes persistent, noncytolytic infections in animals and in cultured cells. Early studies have shown that the BDV phosphoprotein can inhibit the activation of type I IFN through the TBK1–IRF3 pathway. The function of the BDV nucleoprotein in the inhibition of IFN activity is not yet clear. In this study, we demonstrated IRF7 activation and increased IFN-α/β expression in a BDV-persistently infected human oligodendroglia cell line following RNA interference-mediated BDV nucleoprotein silencing. Furthermore, we showed that BDV nucleoprotein prevented the nuclear localisation of IRF7 and inhibited endogenous IFN induction by poly(I:C), coxsackie virus B3 and IFN-β. Our findings provide evidence for a previously undescribed mechanism by which the BDV nucleoprotein inhibits type I IFN expression by interfering with the IRF7 pathway.

  7. Type 1 Interferons Inhibit Myotube Formation Independently of Upregulation of Interferon-Stimulated Gene 15

    PubMed Central

    Franzi, Sara; Salajegheh, Mohammad; Nazareno, Remedios; Greenberg, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Type 1 interferon (IFN)-inducible genes and their inducible products are upregulated in dermatomyositis muscle. Of these, IFN-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) is one of the most upregulated, suggesting its possible involvement in the pathogenesis of this disease. To test this postulate, we developed a model of type 1 IFN mediated myotube toxicity and assessed whether or not downregulation of ISG15 expression prevents this toxicity. Methods Mouse myoblasts (C2C12 cell line) were cultured in the presence of type 1 or type 2 IFNs and ISG15 expression assessed by microarray analysis. The morphology of newly formed myotubes was assessed by measuring their length, diameter, and area on micrographs using imaging software. ISG15 expression was silenced through transfection with small interference RNA. Results Type 1 IFNs, especially IFN-beta, increased ISG15 expression in C2C12 cells and impaired myotube formation. Silencing of ISG15 resulted in knockdown of ISG15 protein, but without phenotypic rescue of myotube formation. Discussion IFN-beta affects myoblast differentiation ability and myotube morphology in vitro.These studies provide evidence that ISG15, which is highly upregulated in dermatomyositis muscle, does not appear to play a key role in IFN-beta-mediated C2C12 myoblast cell fusion. PMID:23750257

  8. Phase II Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial of conventional radiation therapy followed by treatment with recombinant interferon-{beta} for supratentorial glioblastoma: Results of RTOG 9710

    SciTech Connect

    Colman, Howard . E-mail: hcolman@mdanderson.org; Berkey, Brian A.; Maor, Moshe H.; Groves, Morris D.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Vermeulen, Sandra; Mehta, Minesh P.; Yung, W.K. Alfred

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether recombinant human interferon {beta}-1a (rhIFN-{beta}), when given after radiation therapy, improves survival in glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: After surgery, 109 patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial glioblastoma were enrolled and treated with radiation therapy (60 Gy). A total of 55 patients remained stable after radiation and were treated with rhIFN-{beta} (6 MU/day i.m., 3 times/week). Outcomes were compared with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group glioma historical database. Results: RhIFN-{beta} was well tolerated, with 1 Grade 4 toxicity and 8 other patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity. Median survival time (MST) of the 55 rhIFN-{beta}-treated patients was 13.4 months. MST for the 34 rhIFN-{beta}-treated in RPA Classes III and IV was 16.9 vs. 12.4 months for historical controls (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.89-1.81). There was also a trend toward improved survival across all RPA Classes comparing the 55 rhIFN-{beta} treated patients and 1,658 historical controls (HR = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.94-1.63). The high rate of early failures (54/109) after radiation and before initiation of rhIFN-{beta} was likely caused by stricter interpretation of early radiographic changes in the current study. Matched-pair and intent-to-treat analyses performed to try to address this bias showed no difference in survival between study patients and controls. Conclusion: RhIFN-{beta} given after conventional radiation therapy was well tolerated, with a trend toward survival benefit in patients who remained stable after radiation therapy. These data suggest that rhIFN-{beta} warrants further evaluation in additional studies, possibly in combination with current temozolomide-based regimens.

  9. Weapons of STAT destruction. Interferon evasion by paramyxovirus V protein.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Curt M

    2004-12-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family of proteins function to activate gene transcription downstream of myriad cytokine and growth factor signals. The prototype STAT proteins, STAT1 and STAT2, are required for innate and adaptive antimicrobial immune responses that result from interferon signal transduction. While many viruses have evolved the ability to avoid these antiviral cytokines, the Paramyxoviruses are distinct in their abilities to interfere directly with STAT proteins. Individual paramyxovirus species differ greatly in their precise mechanism of STAT signaling evasion, but a virus-encoded protein called V plays a central role in this process. The theme of V-dependent interferon evasion and its variations provide significant insights into virus-host interactions and viral immune evasion that can help define targets for antiviral drug design. Exposure of the viral weapons of STAT destruction may also be instructive for application to STAT-directed therapeutics for diseases characterized by STAT hyperactivity. PMID:15606749

  10. The interferon response to intracellular DNA: why so many receptors?

    PubMed

    Unterholzner, Leonie

    2013-11-01

    The detection of intracellular DNA has emerged to be a key event in the innate immune response to viruses and intracellular bacteria, and during conditions of sterile inflammation and autoimmunity. One of the consequences of the detection of DNA as a 'stranger' and a 'danger' signal is the production of type I interferons and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Much work has been dedicated to the elucidation of the signalling cascades that activate this DNA-induced gene expression programme. However, while many proteins have been proposed to act as sensors for intracellular DNA in recent years, none has been met with universal acceptance, and a theory linking all the recent observations is, as yet, lacking. This review presents the evidence for the various interferon-inducing DNA receptors proposed to date, and examines the hypotheses that might explain why so many different receptors appear to be involved in the innate immune recognition of intracellular DNA. PMID:23962476

  11. Systems biology unravels interferon responses to respiratory virus infections

    PubMed Central

    Kroeker, Andrea L; Coombs, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    Interferon production is an important defence against viral replication and its activation is an attractive therapeutic target. However, it has long been known that viruses perpetually evolve a multitude of strategies to evade these host immune responses. In recent years there has been an explosion of information on virus-induced alterations of the host immune response that have resulted from data-rich omics technologies. Unravelling how these systems interact and determining the overall outcome of the host response to viral infection will play an important role in future treatment and vaccine development. In this review we focus primarily on the interferon pathway and its regulation as well as mechanisms by which respiratory RNA viruses interfere with its signalling capacity. PMID:24600511

  12. Successful Treatment of Provisional Cutaneous Mastocytosis with Interferon Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Andrea; Bhat, Ramesh M

    2016-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a disorder characterized by the clonal proliferation of mast cells and their accumulation in skin, bone marrow, liver, and spleen. Cutaneous mastocytosis presents in children in over 90% of the cases and any cutaneous manifestation in an adult is the earliest sign of the systemic disease. A 45-year-old patient presented with itchy dark lesions over the body since childhood and Darier's sign was positive. Skin biopsy showed features of mastocytosis and immunohistochemistry was positive for CD34. Since the patient was refractory to treatment with antihistamines and psoralen-ultraviolet A therapy, injections of interferon alpha were given – 3 million IU twice weekly subcutaneously as they have been proven to improve constitutional symptoms. Very few reports of successful treatment of cutaneous mastocytosis using interferon alpha have been published. PMID:27293273

  13. Interferon-free strategies without a nucleoside/nucleotide analogue.

    PubMed

    Welzel, Tania Mara; Zeuzem, Stefan

    2014-02-01

    The identification of viral and host factors involved in hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication was a key prerequisite for the discovery and further exploration of antiviral drug targets. As of today, numerous direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs), as well as host-targeting agents (HTAs), have been developed and entered clinical testing. The goal to omit pegylated interferon due to its unfavorable side-effect profile from novel HCV therapeutic approaches led to an expedited design and competitive conduct of DAA combination trials striving for easily applicable, all-oral HCV treatments. Approval of several interferon-free regimens is awaited in the near future (2014/2015). Results of different DAA combination trials (without nucleos(t)ide polymerase inhibitors) and trials involving HTAs are reviewed herein. PMID:24782258

  14. Successful Treatment of Provisional Cutaneous Mastocytosis with Interferon Alpha.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Andrea; Bhat, Ramesh M

    2016-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a disorder characterized by the clonal proliferation of mast cells and their accumulation in skin, bone marrow, liver, and spleen. Cutaneous mastocytosis presents in children in over 90% of the cases and any cutaneous manifestation in an adult is the earliest sign of the systemic disease. A 45-year-old patient presented with itchy dark lesions over the body since childhood and Darier's sign was positive. Skin biopsy showed features of mastocytosis and immunohistochemistry was positive for CD34. Since the patient was refractory to treatment with antihistamines and psoralen-ultraviolet A therapy, injections of interferon alpha were given - 3 million IU twice weekly subcutaneously as they have been proven to improve constitutional symptoms. Very few reports of successful treatment of cutaneous mastocytosis using interferon alpha have been published. PMID:27293273

  15. Interferon-induced 2'-5' adenylate synthetase in vivo and interferon production in vitro by lymphocytes from systemic lupus erythematosus patients with and without circulating interferon

    SciTech Connect

    Preble, O.T.; Rothko, K.; Klippel, J.H.; Friedman, R.M.; Johnston, M.I.

    1983-06-01

    The interferon (IFN)-induced enzyme 2-5A synthetase was elevated in mononuclear cells from both serum IFN-positive and -negative systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. This suggests that a much higher percentage of patients than previously thought produce endogenous IFN. These results may partly explain findings that mononuclear cells from SLE patients are deficient in IFN production in vitro in response to certain IFN inducers. Although normal lymphocytes can produce an acid-labile alpha IFN after stimulation with C. parvum in vitro, the reason for endogenous production of this unusual alpha IFN by SLE patients remains unknown.

  16. Interleukin-4 enhances interferon-gamma synthesis but inhibits development of interferon-gamma-producing cells.

    PubMed Central

    Noble, A; Kemeny, D M

    1995-01-01

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is antagonistic for many of the activities of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and, as well as suppressing the development of T-helper type-1 (Th1) cells, has been reported to block directly the synthesis of IFN-gamma in human lymphocytes. However, IL-4 transgenic mice produce increased amounts of IFN-gamma as well as IL-4. We have compared the ability of rat IL-4 to regulate IFN-gamma secretion in short-term cultures of spleen cells with its effect on the differentiation of T lymphocytes into IFN-gamma-producing, or Th1-type, cells. Normal rat spleen cells were stimulated using a variety of mitogens and ovalbumin antigen, with or without IL-4, for 12-24 hr and the levels of IFN-gamma in the supernatants measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results show that when normal rat splenocytes were stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) or concavalin A (Con A), IL-4 enhanced secretion of IFN-gamma after 12-24 hr. This enhancement was also apparent when splenocytes from animals immunized 10 days previously with alum-precipitated ovalbumin were stimulated with ovalbumin in vitro, and appeared to be mediated primarily via CD+ T cells. In contrast, when spleen cells were maximally stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and ionomycin, addition of IL-4 had no effect on the amount of IFN-gamma secreted. When splenocytes were stimulated with Con A for 4 days in the presence of IL-4, and restimulated with PMA and ionomycin, IFN-gamma secretion was greatly suppressed. Our results indicate that IL-4 exerts differential effects on IFN-gamma secretion and on the development of IFN-gamma-producing lymphocytes. PMID:7558122

  17. Interferon γ-inducible Protein (IFI) 16 Transcriptionally Regulates Type I Interferons and Other Interferon-stimulated Genes and Controls the Interferon Response to both DNA and RNA Viruses*

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Mikayla R.; Sharma, Shruti; Atianand, Maninjay; Jensen, Søren B.; Carpenter, Susan; Knipe, David M.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A.

    2014-01-01

    The interferon γ-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) has recently been linked to the detection of nuclear and cytosolic DNA during infection with herpes simplex virus-1 and HIV. IFI16 binds dsDNA via HIN200 domains and activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING), leading to TANK (TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator)-binding kinase-1 (TBK1)-dependent phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and transcription of type I interferons (IFNs) and related genes. To better understand the role of IFI16 in coordinating type I IFN gene regulation, we generated cell lines with stable knockdown of IFI16 and examined responses to DNA and RNA viruses as well as cyclic dinucleotides. As expected, stable knockdown of IFI16 led to a severely attenuated type I IFN response to DNA ligands and viruses. In contrast, expression of the NF-κB-regulated cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β was unaffected in IFI16 knockdown cells, suggesting that the role of IFI16 in sensing these triggers was unique to the type I IFN pathway. Surprisingly, we also found that knockdown of IFI16 led to a severe attenuation of IFN-α and the IFN-stimulated gene retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) in response to cyclic GMP-AMP, a second messenger produced by cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) as well as RNA ligands and viruses. Analysis of IFI16 knockdown cells revealed compromised occupancy of RNA polymerase II on the IFN-α promoter in these cells, suggesting that transcription of IFN-stimulated genes is dependent on IFI16. These results indicate a broader role for IFI16 in the regulation of the type I IFN response to RNA and DNA viruses in antiviral immunity. PMID:25002588

  18. Interferon-stimulated genes: roles in viral pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schoggins, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) are critical for controlling virus infections. As new antiviral ISGs continue to be identified and characterized, their roles in viral pathogenesis are also being explored in more detail. Our current understanding of how ISGs impact viral pathogenesis comes largely from studies in knockout mice, with isolated examples from human clinical data. This review outlines recent developments on the contributions of various ISGs to viral disease outcomes in vivo. PMID:24713352

  19. Interferon induces natural killer cell blastogenesis in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biron, C. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Welsh, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Interferon (IFN), types beta and gamma, and IFN inducers polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, all stimulated the generation of blast-natural killer (NK) cells in mouse spleens, Blast-NK cells were characterized on the basis of size, 3H-thymidine uptake, and NK cell markers These data indicate that in addition to augmenting NK cell-mediated lysis, IFN may regulate NK cell proliferation in vivo.

  20. Remission of liver fibrosis by interferon-alpha 2b.

    PubMed

    Moreno, M G; Muriel, P

    1995-08-01

    Fibrosis is a dynamic process associated with the continuous deposition and resorption of connective tissue, mainly collagen. Therapeutic strategies are emerging by which this dynamic process can be modulated. Since interferons are known to inhibit collagen production, the aim of this study was to investigate if the administration of interferon-alpha 2b (IFN-alpha) can restore the normal hepatic content of collagen in rats with established fibrosis. Fibrosis was induced by prolonged bile duct ligation. IFN-alpha (100,000 IU/rat/day; s.c.) was administered to fibrotic rats for 15 days. Bile duct ligation increased liver collagen content 6-fold. In addition, serum and liver markers of hepatic injury increased significantly; liver histology showed an increase in collagen deposition, and the normal architecture was lost, with large zones of necrosis being observed frequently. IFN-alpha administration reversed to normal the values of all the biochemical markers measured and restored the normal architecture of the liver. Our results demonstrated that IFN-alpha is useful in reversing fibrosis and liver damage induced by biliary obstruction in the rat. However, further investigations are required to evaluate the therapeutic relevance of interferons on non-viral fibrosis and cholestasis. PMID:7646558

  1. Two Modes of the Axonal Interferon Response Limit Alphaherpesvirus Neuroinvasion

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ren; Koyuncu, Orkide O.; Greco, Todd M.; Diner, Benjamin A.; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection by alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV), typically begins at epithelial surfaces and continues into the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Inflammatory responses are induced at the infected peripheral site prior to invasion of the PNS. When the peripheral tissue is first infected, only the innervating axons are exposed to this inflammatory milieu, which includes the interferons (IFNs). The fundamental question is how do PNS cell bodies respond to these distant, potentially damaging events experienced by axons. Using compartmented cultures that physically separate neuron axons from cell bodies, we found that pretreating isolated axons with beta interferon (IFN-β) or gamma interferon (IFN-γ) significantly diminished the number of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and PRV particles moving in axons toward the cell bodies in a receptor-dependent manner. Exposing axons to IFN-β induced STAT1 phosphorylation (p-STAT1) only in axons, while exposure of axons to IFN-γ induced p-STAT1 accumulation in distant cell body nuclei. Blocking transcription in cell bodies eliminated antiviral effects induced by IFN-γ, but not those induced by IFN-β. Proteomic analysis of IFN-β- or IFN-γ-treated axons identified several differentially regulated proteins. Therefore, unlike treatment with IFN-γ, IFN-β induces a noncanonical, local antiviral response in axons. The activation of a local IFN response in axons represents a new paradigm for cytokine control of neuroinvasion. PMID:26838720

  2. Treatment of carcinoid syndrome with recombinant interferon alpha-2a.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolomeo, M; Bajetta, E; Zilembo, N; de Braud, F; Di Leo, A; Verusio, C; D'Aprile, M; Scanni, A; Barduagni, M; Barduagni A [corrected to Barduagni, M

    1993-01-01

    The prognosis and the quality of life of patients with carcinoid tumors is related either to symptoms from the substances secreted or to progressive tumor growth. Medical treatment with cytotoxic agents is of marginal value for increasing life expectancy and reducing clinical symptoms. Recent studies with interferon have shown interesting results. In the present investigation, 22 patients with carcinoid tumors and syndrome were treated with recombinant interferon alpha-2a (r-IFN alpha-2a) at the dose of 6 x 10(6) IU intramuscularly daily for 8 weeks and three times weekly thereafter. The primary tumor was localized in the foregut (n = 11), midgut (n = 7), hindgut (n = 1), and unknown site (n = 3). Most cases had liver metastasis. Seventeen patients had elevated 5-hydroxyindoloacetic acid (5-HIAA) excretion and 5 had flushing and/or diarrhea as the only clinical manifestation. Six cases presented a complete syndrome (flushing, diarrhea and 5-HIAA excretion). Control of symptoms was obtained in 80% and a 5-HIAA level reduction in 58% of the patients. The interferon treatment was more effective for control of the carcinoid syndrome than for control of tumor growth. The treatment was well tolerated and fever, myalgia, anorexia and fatigue were the most frequent side-effects. PMID:7686766

  3. Enhanced antitumor reactivity of tumor-sensitized T cells by interferon alfa

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Woude, D.L.; Wagner, P.D.; Shu, S.; Chang, A.E. )

    1991-03-01

    Tumor-draining lymph node cells from mice bearing the methylcholanthrene-induced MCA 106 tumors can be sensitized in vitro to acquire antitumor reactivity. We examined the effect of interferon alfa on the function of cells that underwent in vitro sensitization in adoptive immunotherapy. Interferon alfa increased the antitumor reactivity of in vitro sensitized cells in the treatment of MCA 106 pulmonary metastases. This effect was evident in irradiated mice, indicating that a host response to the interferon alfa was not required. Interferon alfa treatment increased class I major histocompatibility complex antigen expression on tumor cells and increased their susceptibility to lysis by in vitro sensitized cells. These results suggest that interferon alfa enhancement of adoptive immunotherapy was mediated by its effect on tumor cells. Interferon alfa may be a useful adjunct to the adoptive immunotherapy of human cancer.

  4. Production of human beta interferon in insect cells infected with a Baculovirus expression vector

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.E.; Summers, M.D.; Fraser, M.J.

    1983-12-01

    Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) was used as an expression vector for human beta interferon. By using specially constructed plasmids, the protein-coding sequences for interferon were linked to the AcNPV promoter for the gene encoding for polyhedrin, the major occlusion protein. The interferon gene was inserted at various locations relative to the AcNPV polyhedrin transcriptional and translational signals, and the interferon-polyhedrin hybrid genes were transferred to infectious AcNPV expression vectors. Biologically active interferon was produced, and greater than 95% was secreted from infected insect cells. A maximum of ca. 5 x 10/sup 6/ U of interferon activity was produced by 10/sup 6/ infected cells. These results demonstrate that AcNPV should be suitable for use as a eucaryotic expression vector for the production of products from cloned genes.

  5. Delayed Liver Function Impairment Secondary to Interferon β-1a Use in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ming-Feng; Yen, Su-Chen; Chun-Yen, Lin; Rong-Kuo, Lyu

    2013-01-01

    Interferon β-1a is a widely used immunomodulation treatment for multiple sclerosis. Liver function impairment is a common side effect and usually develops in the first 6 months after interferon use. Here, we describe 2 multiple sclerosis patients who developed delayed liver function impairment 5 years after receiving interferon β-1a treatment. Their liver function recovered after discontinuing interferon use, and further detailed hepatological evaluations excluded other etiologies of liver function impairment. Our case reports illustrate that liver function impairment induced by interferon β-1a can be delayed for 5 years after starting treatment and, probably, this is an idiosyncratic reaction. Regular liver function monitoring in multiple sclerosis patients who receive interferon β is necessary even after the first 6 months of treatment, especially in those patients with concomitant use of other liver-toxic medications. PMID:23904853

  6. Mice devoid of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) show normal expression of type I interferon genes.

    PubMed Central

    Reis, L F; Ruffner, H; Stark, G; Aguet, M; Weissmann, C

    1994-01-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) binds tightly to the interferon (IFN)-beta promoter and has been implicated in the induction of type I IFNs. We generated mice devoid of functional IRF-1 by targeted gene disruption. As reported by others, IRF-1-deficient mice showed a discrete phenotype: the CD4/CD8 ratio was increased and IFN-gamma-induced levels of macrophage iNO synthase mRNA were strongly diminished. However, type I IFN induction in vivo by virus or double-stranded RNA was unimpaired, as evidenced by serum IFN titers and IFN mRNA levels in spleen, liver and lung. There was also no impairment in the response of type I IFN-inducible genes. Therefore, IRF-1 is not essential for these processes in vivo. Images PMID:7957048

  7. Interferon-λ and interleukin-22 cooperate for the induction of interferon-stimulated genes and control of rotavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ines; Schwierzeck, Vera; Nguyen, Nam; Guendel, Fabian; Gronke, Konrad; Ryffel, Bernhard; Hoelscher, Christoph; Dumoutier, Laure; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Staeheli, Peter; Diefenbach, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The epithelium is the major entry point for many viruses but the processes protecting barrier surfaces against viral infections are incompletely understood. We identify interleukin (IL)-22 produced by group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) as an amplifier of interferon (IFN)-λ signaling, a synergism required to curtail replication of rotavirus, the leading cause of childhood gastroenteritis. Cooperation between IL-22 and IFN-λ receptors, both of which are preferentially expressed by intestinal epithelial cells, was required for optimal STAT1 transcription factor activation and expression of interferon-stimulated genes. This data suggests that epithelial cells are protected against virus replication by co-opting two evolutionarily related cytokine networks. These data may inform the design of novel immunotherapies of virus infections that are sensitive to IFNs. PMID:26006013

  8. Enhancement of antiviral protection against encephalomyocarditis virus by a combination of isoprinosine and interferon.

    PubMed

    Chany, C; Cerutti, I

    1977-01-01

    The antiviral effect of interferon against encephalomyocarditis (EMC) virus infection in mice was enhanced by isoprinosine. However, the enhancement was only obtained when both interferon and the virus were inoculated into the peritoneum; the inoculation route of isoprinosone did not modify significantly the final results. In addition, the time sequence of injections was of great importance; generally the injection of isoprinosine had to precede that of interferon by a few hours. PMID:74245

  9. The effects of interferon-alpha/beta in a model of rat heart transplantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, A. D.; Klein, J. B.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Ogden, L. L. 2nd; Gray, L. A. Jr

    1992-01-01

    Interferons have multiple immunologic effects. One such effect is the activation of expression of cell surface antigens. Interferon alpha/beta enhance expression of class I but not class II histocompatibility antigens. Contradictory information has been published regarding the effect of interferon-alpha/beta administration in patients with kidney transplantation. In a model of rat heart transplantation we demonstrated that administration of interferon-alpha/beta accelerated rejection in a dose-dependent fashion in the absence of maintenance cyclosporine. Animals treated with maintenance cyclosporine had evidence of increased rejection at 20 days that was resolved completely at 45 days with cyclosporine alone.

  10. Erythema Annulare Centrifugum-Like Eruption Associated with Pegylated Interferon Treatment for Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Yoong, Deborah; Solomon, Robert; Ostrowski, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Current standard of treatment for chronic hepatitis C virus infection requires the use of pegylated interferon plus ribavirin. Treatment with these two agents has been associated with numerous side effects, which frequently include dermatologic eruptions. We report a cutaneous eruption associated with interferon having clinical presentation of erythema annulare centrifugum. The eruption occurred within days of the first interferon injection and repeatedly flared following subsequent injections. Our patient was able to continue therapy without interruption, while managing the reaction with topical corticosteroid and oral antihistamine. We conclude that this is a benign cutaneous eruption associated with interferon which can be managed without discontinuing treatment for hepatitis C. PMID:25386320

  11. [Interferon status in the treatment of neuroleptic-resistant patients with paranoid schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Maruta, N A; Rachkauskas, G S; Frolov, V M; Vysochin, E V

    2012-01-01

    We studied 73 patients with paranoid schizophrenia with resistance to neuroleptics. All patients were divided into two groups - basic (37 patients) and comparison (36 patients). Both groups received traditional treatment. Patients of the basic group were treated with the combination of reamberin and cycloferon. Before treatment, significant alterations in the interferon status (IFS), which were characterized by the decrease of serum interferon (SIFN) activity and blood α- and γ-interferons (IFN) levels, were identified in both group. The positive effect of the drug combination on clinical symptoms and interferon status (the normalization of SIFN activity, increase in blood α- and γ-IFN levels) was found. PMID:22677752

  12. Effect of Interferon and Interferon Inducers on Infections with a Nonviral Intracellular Microorganism, Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Kazar, J; Gillmore, J D; Gordon, F B

    1971-06-01

    The effect of mouse interferon (IF) on the multiplication of Chlamydia trachomatis (strain MRC-1/G) in homologous (L-929) cell cultures and the effect of the IF inducers Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and polyriboinosinic acid-polyribocytidylic acid complex (poly I:C) on the experimental infection of mice with aerosolized C. trachomatis (strain MoPn) were investigated. Treatment of infected cell cultures with IF reduced the number of cells containing chlamydial inclusions and depressed the yield of chlamydiae as determined by titrations for infectivity. Growth of chlamydiae was reduced when cultures were exposed to IF 6 or 18 hr before infection, and slight reduction of the yield was also detectable in cell cultures treated with IF at early intervals (0 or 4 hr) after chlamydial infection. No effect of IF on penetration of chlamydiae into mouse cells was observed, whether phagocytic cells from peritoneal washings or L-929 cells were used, indicating that the inhibitory effect of IF occurs after chlamydiae enter the host cell. Additional evidence was obtained that a significant effect of IF occurs at an early stage in maturation of the intracellular chlamydiae. In mice exposed repeatedly to NDV aerosols and challenged with aerosolized MoPn 8 hr after the first exposure to NDV, mortality was delayed by 2 to 3 days and lung consolidation was slightly reduced at 3 days after infection. Yields of chlamydiae from lung pools of NDV-treated mice, taken at 3, 6, and 9 days after challenge, were not significantly different from those of controls. Similar results were obtained when mice were challenged with MoPn 8 hr after intranasal injection with 100 mug of poly I:C or 24 hr after intravenous injection with 200 mug of poly I:C. In contrast, administration of 0.2 ml of NDV (10(8.3) plaque-forming units) intravenously 10 hr before or 24 hr after challenge with MoPn accelerated mortality of mice by 2 to 3 days. In all experiments, detectable levels of IF in sera or 20% lung

  13. Ribavirin improves early responses to peginterferon through enhanced interferon signaling

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Jordan J.; Lutchman, Glen A.; Heller, Theo; Hara, Koji; Pfeiffer, Julie K.; Leff, Richard D; Meek, Claudia; Rivera, Maria; Ko, Myung; Koh, Christopher; Rotman, Yaron; Ghany, Marc G.; Haynes-Williams, Vanessa; Neumann, Avidan U.; Liang, T. Jake; Hoofnagle, Jay H.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims: The therapeutic mechanisms of ribavirin for hepatitis C are unclear. Microarray analyses have shown that ribavirin increases induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). We evaluated viral kinetics, serum cytokine expression, and viral mutagenesis during early stages of peginterferon therapy with and without ribavirin. Methods: Fifty patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection genotype 1 were randomly assigned to groups that were given peginterferon alfa-2a, with or without ribavirin, for 4 weeks; all patients then received an additional 44 weeks of combination therapy. First- and second-phase viral kinetics were evaluated. Serum levels of IP10, MIG, and MCP1 were quantified as measures of the ISG response. NS5A and NS5B were partially sequenced and mutation rates were calculated. Results: The first-phase decrease in HCV RNA was similar between groups. Patients that received ribavirin had a more rapid second-phase decrease, compared with patients that did not receive ribavirin—particularly those with an adequate first-phase decrease (0.61 vs. 0.35 log10 IU/mL/week, p=0.018). At 12 hrs, fold induction of serum IP10 was higher in patients given the combination therapy than those given only peginterferon (7.6- vs. 3.8-fold, p=0.01); however, the difference was greatest in patients with an adequate first-phase decrease in HCV RNA. IP10-induction correlated with first- and second-phase kinetics and with ribavirin serum concentrations on day 3. HCV mutation rates were similar between groups. Conclusion: Ribavirin improves the kinetics of the early response to therapy in patients with an adequate initial response to peginterferon. Induction of interferon-stimulated cytokines correlates with viral kinetics following ribavirin therapy, suggesting that ribavirin promotes interferon signaling. PMID:20303352

  14. Spreading Depression Transiently Disrupts Myelin via Interferon-gamma Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pusic, Aya D.; Mitchell, Heidi M.; Kunkler, Phillip E.; Klauer, Neal; Kraig, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis and migraine with aura are clinically correlated and both show imaging changes suggestive of myelin disruption. Furthermore, cortical myelin loss in the cuprizone animal model of multiple sclerosis enhances susceptibility to spreading depression, the likely underlying cause of migraine with aura. Since multiple sclerosis pathology involves inflammatory T cell lymphocyte production of interferon-gamma and a resulting increase in oxidative stress, we tested the hypothesis that spreading depression disrupts myelin through similar signaling pathways. Rat hippocampal slice cultures were initially used to explore myelin loss in spreading depression, since they contain T cells, and allow for controlled tissue microenvironment. These experiments were then translated to the in vivo condition in neocortex. Spreading depression in slice cultures induced significant loss of myelin integrity and myelin basic protein one day later, with gradual recovery by seven days. Myelin basic protein loss was abrogated by T cell depletion, neutralization of interferon-gamma, and pharmacological inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase-2. Conversely, one day after exposure to interferon-gamma, significant reductions in spreading depression threshold, increases in oxidative stress, and reduced levels of glutathione, an endogenous neutral sphingomyelinase-2 inhibitor, emerged. Similarly, spreading depression triggered significant T cell accumulation, sphingomyelinase activation, increased oxidative stress, and reduction of grey and white matter myelin in vivo. Myelin disruption is involved in spreading depression, thereby providing pathophysiological links between multiple sclerosis and migraine with aura. Myelin disruption may promote spreading depression by enhancing aberrant excitability. Thus, preservation of myelin integrity may provide novel therapeutic targets for migraine with aura. PMID:25500111

  15. Acetaminophen Modulates the Transcriptional Response to Recombinant Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Aaron; Flaman, Anathea S.; Prasad, Shiv S.; Gravel, Caroline; Williams, Andrew; Yauk, Carole L.; Li, Xuguang

    2010-01-01

    Background Recombinant interferon treatment can result in several common side effects including fever and injection-site pain. Patients are often advised to use acetaminophen or other over-the-counter pain medications as needed. Little is known regarding the transcriptional changes induced by such co-administration. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested whether the administration of acetaminophen causes a change in the response normally induced by interferon-β treatment. CD-1 mice were administered acetaminophen (APAP), interferon-β (IFN-β) or a combination of IFN-β+APAP and liver and serum samples were collected for analysis. Differential gene expression was determined using an Agilent 22 k whole mouse genome microarray. Data were analyzed by several methods including Gene Ontology term clustering and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. We observed a significant change in the transcription profile of hepatic cells when APAP was co-administered with IFN-β. These transcriptional changes included a marked up-regulation of genes involved in signal transduction and cell differentiation and down-regulation of genes involved in cellular metabolism, trafficking and the IκBK/NF-κB cascade. Additionally, we observed a large decrease in the expression of several IFN-induced genes including Ifit-3, Isg-15, Oasl1, Zbp1 and predicted gene EG634650 at both early and late time points. Conclusions/Significance A significant change in the transcriptional response was observed following co-administration of IFN-β+APAP relative to IFN-β treatment alone. These results suggest that administration of acetaminophen has the potential to modify the efficacy of IFN-β treatment. PMID:20544007

  16. Polymorphism in the interferon-alpha gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Golovleva, I.; Kandefer-Szerszen, M.; Beckman, L.; Lundgren, E.

    1996-01-01

    A pronounced genetic polymorphism of the interferon type I gene family has been assumed on the basis of RFLP analysis of the genomic region as well as the large number of sequences published compared to the number of loci. However, IFNA2 is the only locus that has been carefully analyzed concerning gene frequency, and only naturally occurring rare alleles have been found. We have extended the studies on a variation of expressed sequences by studying the IFNA1, IFNA2, IFNA10, IFNA13, IFNA14, and IFNA17 genes. Genomic white-blood-cell DNA from a population sample of blood donors and from a family material were screened by single-nucleotide primer extension (allele-specific primer extension) of PCR fragments. Because of sequence similarities, in some cases "nested" PCR was used, and, when applicable, restriction analysis or control sequencing was performed. All individuals carried the interferon-alpha 1 and interferon-alpha 13 variants but not the LeIF D variant. At the IFNA2 and IFNA14 loci only one sequence variant was found, while in the IFNA10 and IFNA17 groups two alleles were detected in each group. The IFNA10 and IFNA17 alleles segregated in families and showed a close fit to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. There was a significant linkage disequilibrium between IFNA10 and IFNA17 alleles. The fact that the extent of genetic polymorphism was lower than expected suggests that a majority of the previously described gene sequences represent nonpolymorphic rare mutants that may have arisen in tumor cell lines. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8751858

  17. Effect of space flight on interferon production - mechanistic studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1991-01-01

    Ground-based models were studied for the effects of space flight on immune responses. Most time was spent on the model for the antiorthostatic, hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension model for rats. Results indicate that suspension is useful for modeling the effects of spaceflight on functional immune responses, such as interferon and interleukin production. It does not appear to be useful for modeling shifts in leukocyte sub-populations. Calcium and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D sub 3 appear to play a pivitol role in regulating shifts in immune responses due to suspension. The macrophage appears to be an important target cell for the effects of suspension on immune responses.

  18. Regulation of Hepatocyte Fate by Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Horras, Christopher J.; Lamb, Cheri L.; Mitchell, Kristen A.

    2011-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-γ is a cytokine known for its immunomodulatory and anti-proliferative action. In the liver, IFN-γ can induce hepatocyte apoptosis or inhibit hepatocyte cell cycle progression. This article reviews recent mechanistic reports that describe how IFN-γ may direct the fate of hepatocytes either towards apoptosis or a cell cycle arrest. This review also describes a probable role for IFN-γ in modulating hepatocyte fate during liver regeneration, transplantation, hepatitis, fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and highlights promising areas of research that may lead to the development of IFN-γ as a therapy to enhance recovery from liver disease. PMID:21334249

  19. Links between innate and adaptive immunity via type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Le Bon, Agnes; Tough, David F

    2002-08-01

    Type I interferon (IFN-alpha/beta) is expressed rapidly following exposure to a wide variety of infectious agents and plays a key role in innate control of virus replication. Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cells both produce IFN-alpha/beta and undergo maturation in response to IFN-alpha/beta. Moreover, IFN-alpha/beta has been shown to potently enhance immune responses in vivo through the stimulation of dendritic cells. These findings indicate that IFN-alpha/beta serves as a signal linking innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:12088676

  20. Computer simulations of human interferon gamma mutated forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilkova, E.; Litov, L.; Petkov, P.; Petkov, P.; Markov, S.; Ilieva, N.

    2010-01-01

    In the general framework of the computer-aided drug design, the method of molecular-dynamics simulations is applied for investigation of the human interferon-gamma (hIFN-γ) binding to its two known ligands (its extracellular receptor and the heparin-derived oligosaccharides). A study of 100 mutated hIFN-γ forms is presented, the mutations encompassing residues 86-88. The structural changes are investigated by comparing the lengths of the α-helices, in which these residues are included, in the native hIFN-γ molecule and in the mutated forms. The most intriguing cases are examined in detail.

  1. Duration of effect of interferon aerosol prophylaxis of vesicular stomatitis virus infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wyde, P R; Sun, C S; Wilson, S Z; Knight, V

    1985-01-01

    Mice were exposed for 8 h to continuous small-particle aerosols containing natural mouse alpha interferon (estimated dosage 100 U per mouse) or one of two concentrations of hybrid recombinant alpha interferon A/D bgl (estimated dosages of 100 and 10,000 U per mouse, respectively). On days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 after exposure to these interferons, three mice from each group were inoculated intranasally with 100 PFU of vesicular stomatitis virus. Control mice were exposed to aerosols of saline or inoculated intraperitoneally with either natural mouse alpha interferon (350 U) or one of two doses of hybrid recombinant alpha interferon A/D bgl (350 or 35,000 U) and challenged similarly. Of mice injected intraperitoneally, only those given 35,000 U of hybrid recombinant alpha interferon A/D bgl 24 h before virus challenge were protected from pulmonary infection, compared with the saline-treated control mice. Of mice given 100 U of either interferon by small-particle aerosol, only those exposed 24 h before inoculation of vesicular stomatitis virus had reduced pulmonary titers of the virus. However, of mice given ca. 10,000 U of hybrid recombinant alpha interferon A/D bgl by small-particle aerosol, all groups except those exposed 9 days before virus inoculation had significantly reduced lung virus titers. PMID:2984982

  2. Interferon Administered in the Cerebrospinal Space and Its Effect on Rabies in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Monto; Nash, Carolyn; Morgan, Charles W.; Armstrong, John A.; Carroll, Robert G.; Postic, Bosko

    1974-01-01

    Because combined administration of intramuscular and intravenous interferon has been partially successful in the incubationary treatment of rabies, the effect of direct interferon administration into the cerebrospinal fluid space was tested. After injecting 1,800 U of interferon into the cisterna magna or the lateral ventricle, periodic samples, obtained by cisternal taps, showed that 1 to 5% remained after 24 h, as opposed to the known clearance of interferon from the bloodstream to this level within minutes. The distributions of interferon and 131I-labeled albumin were similar as demonstrated by kinetics of clearance monitored over 24 h. Beginning with and after experimental infection of rabbits, daily intraventricular injections of one million units of interferon were given for as long as 3 weeks. Interferon was prepared from cell culture fluids after pressure dialysis and chromatography on Sephadex G-100. This intensive treatment did not prevent encephalitis, but prolonged the length of the incubation period by one- to two-thirds. The outcome after intraventricular administration was not as favorable as when one million units equally divided between intramuscular and intravenous injections were given at the time of challenge. Interferon administered in the subarachnoid space in this fashion is apparently inadequate to protect the rabbit against rabies. Its role as an adjunct measure, or other methods of administration in the nervous system, remains to be examined. Images PMID:4816460

  3. Intranasal application of alpha interferon reduces morbidity associated with low pathogenic avian influenza infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type I interferons, including interferon alpha (IFN-alpha), are expressed rapidly after viral infection, and represent a first line of defense initiated by the innate immune response. Following infection of chickens with avian influenza virus (AIV), transcription of IFN-alpha is quickly up regulate...

  4. Ribavirin Potentiates Interferon Action by Augmenting Interferon-Stimulated Gene Induction in Hepatitis C Virus Cell Culture Models

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Emmanuel; Feld, Jordan J.; Li, Qisheng; Hu, Zongyi; Fried, Michael W.; Liang, T. Jake

    2012-01-01

    The combination of pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin is the standard treatment for chronic hepatitis C. Our recent clinical study suggests that ribavirin augments the induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) in patients treated for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In order to further characterize the mechanisms of action of ribavirin, we examined the effect of ribavirin treatment on ISG induction in cell culture. In addition, the effect of ribavirin on infectious HCV cell culture systems was studied. Similar to interferon (IFN)-α, ribavirin potently inhibits JFH-1 infection of Huh7.5.1 cells in a dose-dependent manner, which spans the physiological concentration of ribavirin in vivo. Microarray analysis and subsequent quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays demonstrated that ribavirin treatment resulted in the induction of a distinct set of ISGs. These ISGs, including IFN regulatory factors 7 and 9, are known to play an important role in anti-HCV responses. When ribavirin is used in conjunction with IFN-α, induction of specific ISGs is synergistic when compared with either drug applied separately. Direct up-regulation of these antiviral genes by ribavirin is mediated by a novel mechanism different from those associated with IFN signaling and intracellular double-stranded RNA sensing pathways such as RIG-I and MDA5. RNA interference studies excluded the activation of the Toll-like receptor and nuclear factor κB pathways in the action of ribavirin. Conclusion Our study suggests that ribavirin, acting by way of a novel innate mechanism, potentiates the anti-HCV effect of IFN. Understanding the mechanism of action of ribavirin would be valuable in identifying novel antivirals PMID:21254160

  5. Interferon regulatory factors and TFIIB cooperatively regulate interferon-responsive promoter activity in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, I M; Blanco, J C; Tsai, S Y; Tsai, M J; Ozato, K

    1996-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) bind to the interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) and regulate interferon- and virus-mediated gene expression. IRF-1 acts as a transcriptional activator, while IRF-2 acts as a repressor. Here we show that IRF-1 and IRF-2 bind to both cellular TFIIB, a component of the basal transcription machinery, and recombinant TFIIB (rTFIIB) and that this protein-protein interaction facilitates binding of IRFs to the ISRE. A functional interaction between TFIIB and IRF was assessed by a newly established in vitro transcription assay in which recombinant IRF-1 (rIRF-1) stimulated transcription specifically from an ISRE-containing template. With this assay we show that rIRF-1 and rTFIIB cooperatively enhance the ISRE promoter in vitro. We found that the activity of an ISRE-containing promoter was cooperatively enhanced upon cotransfection of TFIIB and IRF-1 cDNAs into P19 embryonal carcinoma cells, further demonstrating functional interactions in vivo. The cooperative enhancement by TFIIB and IRF-1 was independent of the TATA sequence in the ISRE promoter but dependent on the initiator sequence (Inr) and was abolished when P19 cells were induced to differentiate by retinoic acid treatment. In contrast, cotransfection of TFIIB and IRF-1 into NIH 3T3 cells resulted in a dose-dependent repression of promoter activation which occurred in a TATA-dependent manner. Our results indicate the presence of a cell type-specific factor that mediates the functional interaction between IRFs and TFIIB and that acts in conjunction with the requirement of TATA and Inr for promoter activation. PMID:8887661

  6. Role for herpes simplex virus 1 ICP27 in the inhibition of type I interferon signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Karen E.; Song, Byeongwoon; Knipe, David M.

    2008-05-10

    Host cells respond to viral infection by many mechanisms, including the production of type I interferons which act in a paracrine and autocrine manner to induce the expression of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Viruses have evolved means to inhibit interferon signaling to avoid induction of the innate immune response. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) has several mechanisms to inhibit type I interferon production, the activities of ISGs, and the interferon signaling pathway itself. We report that the inhibition of the Jak/STAT pathway by HSV-1 requires viral gene expression and that viral immediate-early protein ICP27 plays a role in downregulating STAT-1 phosphorylation and in preventing the accumulation of STAT-1 in the nucleus. We also show that expression of ICP27 by transfection causes an inhibition of IFN-induced STAT-1 nuclear accumulation. Therefore, ICP27 is necessary and sufficient for at least some of the effects of HSV infection on STAT-1.

  7. Reduction in intensity of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in mice by aerosol administration of gamma interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, J M; Liggitt, H D; Brunette, E N; Fuchs, H J; Shellito, J E; Debs, R J

    1991-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in patients with AIDS may result from impaired local release of gamma interferon from lung lymphocytes and subsequent failure of macrophage activation. We tested this hypothesis with mice rendered immunodeficient by selective depletion of CD4+ lymphocytes and inoculated intratracheally with P. carinii. After aerosol administration of recombinant murine gamma interferon, the intensity of P. carinii infection in these mice was reduced in comparison with that in mice not treated with gamma interferon. Histologic scoring of lung tissue did not reveal additional pulmonary inflammation attributable to gamma interferon. Aerosol administration of gamma interferon may reduce the intensity of P. carinii infection by augmentation of host defense, despite persistent CD4+ lymphocyte depletion. Images PMID:1682252

  8. Effect of antiorthostatic suspension on interferon-alpha/beta production by the mouse (41939)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Andrea; Steffen, Joseph M.; Musacchia, X. J.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Mandel, Adrian D.

    1984-01-01

    Mice were suspended in a model that simulates the weightlessness that occurs during prolonged space flight. After one and two weeks of suspension in an antiorthostatic (head-down tilt) position, the mice were challenged with polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid to induce interferon-alpha/beta. Interferon production was severely reduced in mice that had been suspended. When mice were allowed to recover in cages for a week following removal from suspension, they recovered their full interferon-production capacity. Mice suspended in an orthostatic (horizontal) position did not have their interferon production capabilities affected, which indicates that stress per se was not a major component in the effects of antiorthostatic suspension on interferon induction.

  9. 78 FR 46593 - Prospective Grant of Start-up Exclusive License: Kits for the Detection of Human Interferon-Alpha...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... the Detection of Human Interferon-Alpha Subtypes and Allotypes AGENCY: National Institutes of Health...-2008/0), titled ``Compositions for Detecting Human Interferon- Alpha Subtypes and Methods of Use'', to.... This technology relates to use of kits for the detection of human interferon-alpha subtypes...

  10. Murine interferon system regulation: isolation and characterization of a mutant 3T6 cell engaged in the semiconstitutive synthesis of interferon.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, A P; Colby, C

    1978-06-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of a virus-resistant mutant of murine 3T6 cells. The mutant, designated 3T6-VrB2, displays a high degree of resistance to infection by members of the toga-, rhabdo- and picornavirus classes. The level of this resistance to infection is similar to the parent 3T6 pretreated with approximately 100 lU/ml of interferon. Upon co-cultivation of 3T6-VrB2 cells with interferon-sensitive mouse cells, an antiviral state is induced in the latter cells as measured by a reduction of virus yield following infection. The nature of the induction is defined by a series of experiments using anti-mouse interferon antiserum. In the presence of this antiserum, the ability of the mutant to induce an antiviral state in interferon-sensitive mouse cells upon co-cultivation is eliminated. Additionally, growth of the mutant cells in the presence of this antiserum causes a reversal of the virus-resistant phenotype. Our results indicate that 3T6-VrB2 contains a mutation affecting the regulation of the murine interferon system such that the cell is engaged in the semiconstitutive synthesis of interferon. PMID:208779

  11. Interferon-λ restricts West Nile virus neuroinvasion by tightening the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Lazear, Helen M.; Daniels, Brian P.; Pinto, Amelia K.; Huang, Albert C.; Vick, Sarah C.; Doyle, Sean E.; Gale, Michael; Klein, Robyn S.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Although interferon-λ [also known as type III interferon or interleukin-28 (IL-28)/IL-29] restricts infection by several viruses, its inhibitory mechanism has remained uncertain. We used recombinant interferon-λ and mice lacking the interferon-λ receptor (IFNLR1) to evaluate the effect of interferon-λ on infection with West Nile virus, an encephalitic flavivirus. Cell culture studies in mouse keratinocytes and dendritic cells showed no direct antiviral effect of exogenous interferon-λ, even though expression of interferon-stimulated genes was induced. We observed no differences in West Nile virus burden between wild-type and Ifnlr1−/− mice in the draining lymph nodes, spleen, or blood. We detected increased West Nile virus infection in the brain and spinal cord of Ifnlr1−/− mice, yet this was not associated with a direct antiviral effect in mouse neurons. Instead, we observed an increase in blood-brain barrier permeability in Ifnlr1−/− mice. Treatment of mice with pegylated interferon-λ2 resulted in decreased blood-brain barrier permeability, reduced West Nile virus infection in the brain without affecting viremia, and improved survival against lethal virus challenge. An in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier showed that interferon-λ signaling in mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells increased transendothelial electrical resistance, decreased virus movement across the barrier, and modulated tight junction protein localization in a protein synthesis– and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)–independent manner. Our data establish an indirect antiviral function of interferon-λ in which noncanonical signaling through IFNLR1 tightens the blood-brain barrier and restricts viral neuroinvasion and pathogenesis. PMID:25904743

  12. Interferon-λ restricts West Nile virus neuroinvasion by tightening the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Lazear, Helen M; Daniels, Brian P; Pinto, Amelia K; Huang, Albert C; Vick, Sarah C; Doyle, Sean E; Gale, Michael; Klein, Robyn S; Diamond, Michael S

    2015-04-22

    Although interferon-λ [also known as type III interferon or interleukin-28 (IL-28)/IL-29] restricts infection by several viruses, its inhibitory mechanism has remained uncertain. We used recombinant interferon-λ and mice lacking the interferon-λ receptor (IFNLR1) to evaluate the effect of interferon-λ on infection with West Nile virus, an encephalitic flavivirus. Cell culture studies in mouse keratinocytes and dendritic cells showed no direct antiviral effect of exogenous interferon-λ, even though expression of interferon-stimulated genes was induced. We observed no differences in West Nile virus burden between wild-type and Ifnlr1(-/-) mice in the draining lymph nodes, spleen, or blood. We detected increased West Nile virus infection in the brain and spinal cord of Ifnlr1(-/-) mice, yet this was not associated with a direct antiviral effect in mouse neurons. Instead, we observed an increase in blood-brain barrier permeability in Ifnlr1(-/-) mice. Treatment of mice with pegylated interferon-λ2 resulted in decreased blood-brain barrier permeability, reduced West Nile virus infection in the brain without affecting viremia, and improved survival against lethal virus challenge. An in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier showed that interferon-λ signaling in mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells increased transendothelial electrical resistance, decreased virus movement across the barrier, and modulated tight junction protein localization in a protein synthesis- and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)-independent manner. Our data establish an indirect antiviral function of interferon-λ in which noncanonical signaling through IFNLR1 tightens the blood-brain barrier and restricts viral neuroinvasion and pathogenesis. PMID:25904743

  13. Interferon-Stimulated Gene 15 and the Protein ISGylation System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongxian

    2011-01-01

    Interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) is one of the most upregulated genes upon Type I interferon treatment or pathogen infection. Its 17 kDa protein product, ISG15, was the first ubiquitin-like modifier identified, and is similar to a ubiquitin linear dimer. As ISG15 modifies proteins in a similar manner to ubiquitylation, protein conjugation by ISG15 is termed ISGylation. Some of the primary enzymes that promote ISGylation are also involved in ubiquitin conjugation. The process to remove ISG15 from its conjugated proteins, termed de-ISGylation, is performed by a cellular ISG15-specific protease, ubiquitin-specific proteases with molecular mass 43 kDa (UBP43)/ubiquitin-specific proteases 18. Relative to ubiquitin, the biological function of ISG15 is still poorly understood, but ISG15 appears to play important roles in various biological and cellular functions. Therefore, there is growing interest in ISG15, as the study of free ISG15 and functional consequences of ISGylation/de-ISGylation may identify useful therapeutic targets. This review highlights recent discoveries and remaining questions important to understanding the biological functions of ISG15. PMID:21190487

  14. Exogenous interferon prolongs survival of rabies infected mice.

    PubMed

    Mehta, S; Roy, S; Mukherjee, S; Yadav, N; Patel, N; Chowdhary, A

    2015-09-01

    Rabies is an acute viral infection that causes encephalomyelitis in almost all warm blooded animals and is invariably fatal once the clinical signs appear. The present study was carried out to assess the effect of recombinant human interferon alpha (rhIFN α-2A) treatment on the survival of rabies infected mice and its correlation with cytokines expression. The gene expression of TNF-α and IL-6 was measured by SYBR Green Real Time PCR for two groups-"Pre-exposure" (mice were inoculated with rhIFN α-2A prior to rabies infection) and "Post-exposure" (mice were inoculated with rhIFN α-2A post rabies virus infection). Delayed mortality was observed in interferon treated infected groups. In addition, statistically significant decrease (P < 0.0001) in the expression of TNF-α and IL-6 was observed, both in the pre-exposure and post-exposure groups. These findings indicate that modulation of cytokine secretion using exogenous biologicals such as rhIFN may offer novel therapeutic approaches to treat diseases such as rabies. PMID:26396983

  15. Interferon but not MxB inhibits foamy retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Bähr, Ariane; Singer, Anna; Hain, Anika; Vasudevan, Ananda Ayyappan Jaguva; Schilling, Mirjam; Reh, Juliane; Riess, Maximilian; Panitz, Sylvia; Serrano, Vanessa; Schweizer, Matthias; König, Renate; Chanda, Sumit; Häussinger, Dieter; Kochs, Georg; Lindemann, Dirk; Münk, Carsten

    2016-01-15

    Foamy viruses (FV) are retroviruses that are widely distributed in primate and non-primate animal species. We tested here FV with capsids of simian and non-simian origin for sensitivity to interferon-β (IFN-β). Our data show significant inhibition of FV by IFN-β early in infection of human HOS and THP-1 but not of HEK293T cells. The post-entry restriction of FV was not mediated by the interferon-induced MxB protein that was recently identified as a capsid-interacting restriction factor targeting Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) before integration. Neither the ectopic expression of MxA or MxB in HEK293T cells nor the lack of MxB expression in CRISPR/CAS MxB THP-1 knockout cells impacted the infection of the tested FV. IFN-β treated THP-1 and THP-1 KO MxB cells showed the same extend of restriction to FV. Together, the data demonstrate that IFN-β inhibits FV early in infection and that MxB is not a restriction factor of FV. PMID:26609934

  16. Interferon Gamma Receptor: The Beginning of the Journey

    PubMed Central

    Blouin, Cédric M.; Lamaze, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Our view of endocytosis and membrane trafficking of transmembrane receptors has dramatically changed over the last 20 years. Several new endocytic routes have been discovered and mechanistically characterized in mammalian cells. Long considered as a passive means to terminate signaling through down-regulation of the number of activated receptors at the plasma membrane, it is now established that receptor endocytosis and endosomal sorting can be directly linked to the regulation of intracellular signaling pathways. The functional links between membrane trafficking of interferon receptors and JAK/STAT signaling have recently begun to be unraveled. These studies raise the exciting possibility that a certain level of signal specificity can be achieved through endocytosis and selective localization of the activated complexes within cellular membranes. The ongoing development of high-resolution cell imaging techniques with better spatial and temporal resolution gives new means of deciphering the inherent complexity of membrane trafficking and signaling. This should help to better comprehend the molecular mechanisms by which endocytosis and endosomal sorting of interferon receptors can orchestrate signaling selectivity within the JAK/STAT pathway that can be activated by as many as 60 different cytokines, growth factors, and hormones. PMID:24027571

  17. Interferons Mediate Terminal Differentiation of Human Cortical Thymic Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Laine, David; Zaffran, Yona; Azocar, Olga; Servet-Delprat, Christine; Wild, T. Fabian; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Valentin, Hélène

    2002-01-01

    In the thymus, epithelial cells comprise a heterogeneous population required for the generation of functional T lymphocytes, suggesting that thymic epithelium disruption by viruses may compromise T-cell lymphopoiesis in this organ. In a previous report, we demonstrated that in vitro, measles virus induced differentiation of cortical thymic epithelial cells as characterized by (i) cell growth arrest, (ii) morphological and phenotypic changes, and (iii) apoptotis as a final step of this process. In the present report, we have analyzed the mechanisms involved. First, measles virus-induced differentiation of thymic epithelial cells is shown to be strictly dependent on beta interferon (IFN-β) secretion. In addition, transfection with double-stranded RNA, a common intermediate of replication for a broad spectrum of viruses, is reported to similarly mediate thymic epithelial cell differentiation through IFN-β induction. Finally, we demonstrated that recombinant IFN-α, IFN-β, or IFN-γ was sufficient to induce differentiation and apoptosis of uninfected thymic epithelial cells. These observations suggested that interferon secretion by either infected cells or activated leukocytes, such as plasmacytoid dendritic cells or lymphocytes, may induce thymic epithelium disruption in a pathological context. Thus, we have identified a new mechanism that may contribute to thymic atrophy and altered T-cell lymphopoiesis associated with many infections. PMID:12050353

  18. Response of differentiated but not anaplastic teratoma to interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Rustin, G. J.; Kaye, S. B.; Williams, C. J.; Newlands, E. S.; Bagshawe, K. D.; Toy, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    A Phase 2 trial was conducted using intramuscular lymphoblastoid interferon (IFN, Wellcome Research Laboratories), 4 MU per day, in 10 patients with chemotherapy-resistant teratomas. There was stabilisation of disease in 2 patients both of whom were in retrospect considered to have had differentiated teratoma at the time of IFN administration. There was progression of presumed active anaplastic germ cell tumour in 8 patients. One of these patients, a 15-year-old boy with biopsy proven differentiated teratoma has received 2 courses of lymphoblastoid IFN and 1 course of recombinant leukocyte A IFN (Roche Products Ltd.) lasting 5 1/2, 8 and 8+ months respectively. He has had a mixed response in his differentiated tumour which on each occasion has been maintained for the duration that he received IFN. Rising HCG levels during his second course of interferon required additional cytotoxic chemotherapy. Lymphoblastoid IFN does not appear to be active against anaplastic germ cell tumours but both lymphoblastoid and recombinant leukocyte A IFN may be useful in the treatment of unresectable differentiated teratoma. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:6498061

  19. The HIN-200 family: More than interferon-inducible genes?

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlow, Louise E.A.; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Clarke, Christopher J.P. . E-mail: chris.clarke@petermac.org

    2005-08-01

    The HIN-200 family was initially grouped together based on their hemopoietic expression, interferon-inducibility, nuclear localization, and characteristic 200 amino-acid domains. In this review, we performed a comprehensive search of genome databases and determined the location of previously characterized and predicted genes within the human, mouse, and rat HIN-200 loci. Several novel proteins were predicted in the mouse and rat. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of this family of proteins and highlight the most important findings. In addition to a role in interferon biology, there is now good evidence supporting a role for these proteins as regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation. The activity of HIN-200 proteins is not restricted to the hemopoietic system as they are expressed and can function in a variety of other cells and tissues. The importance of HIN-200 proteins in disease now is beginning to be understood as they appear to be involved in autoimmunity and may act as tumor suppressor proteins.

  20. Interleukins, interferons, and establishment of pregnancy in pigs.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Daniel J; Lucy, Matthew C; D Geisert, Rodney

    2016-06-01

    Early pregnancy in mammals requires complex and highly orchestrated cellular and molecular interactions between specialized cells within the endometrium and the conceptus. Proinflammatory cytokines are small signaling proteins released by leukocytes that augment innate and adaptive immune responses. They are also released by the mammalian trophectoderm as the conceptus apposes the uterine surface for implantation. On approximately day 12 of development in pigs, the conceptus undergoes a rapid morphological transformation referred to as elongation while simultaneously releasing estrogens and a novel conceptus form of interleukin-1 beta (IL1β). Following elongation, pig conceptuses express interferon gamma (IFNγ) and, in lesser amounts, interferon delta (IFNδ). Significant IFN signaling takes place within the endometrium between day 14 and 18 of pregnancy as the conceptus intimately associates with the uterine epithelium. Based on studies carried out in pigs and other mammals, the combined spacio-temporal activities of conceptus estrogens, IL1β, and IFN set in motion a series of coordinated events that promote establishment of pregnancy. This is achieved through enhancement of conceptus development, uterine receptivity, maternal-fetal hemotropic exchange, and endometrial leukocyte function. These events require activation of specific signaling pathways within the uterine luminal epithelium, glandular epithelium, and stroma. Here, we review proinflammatory cytokine expression by pig conceptuses and the hypothesized actions of these molecules during establishment of pregnancy. PMID:27001998

  1. Hepatitis B, interferon, and acne fulminans in a young girl

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sandeep; Malik, Ajay; Kumar, Dharmendra; Sodhi, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Acne fulminans (AF) is a very rare severe form of acne seen in young males, characterized by a sudden and explosive onset of hemorrhagic pustules and ulceration on the trunk, systemic features in the form of fever, polyarthropathy, malaise, erythema nodosum and painful osteolytic bone involvement with leukocytosis, and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Conventional treatment of AF includes corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agents for the initial phase followed by isotretinoin. Active hepatitis B infection with a high viral load precludes the administration of any immunosuppressive drugs. We present the case of an 18-year-old girl with a history of occasional acne who presented with AF of sudden onset following administration of interferon-alpha-2a for her recently detected hepatitis B infection. Management of hepatitis B was withheld in view of her general condition. The patient was managed with low dose isotretinoin with subsidence of lesions. AF in a young female precipitated by interferon and its management with isotretinoin in the presence of active hepatitis B infection make the case unique. PMID:27057488

  2. Interferon Lambda: A New Sword in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lasfar, Ahmed; Abushahba, Walid; Balan, Murugabaskar; Cohen-Solal, Karine A.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of the interferon-lambda (IFN-λ) family has considerably contributed to our understanding of the role of interferon not only in viral infections but also in cancer. IFN-λ proteins belong to the new type III IFN group. Type III IFN is structurally similar to type II IFN (IFN-γ) but functionally identical to type I IFN (IFN-α/β). However, in contrast to type I or type II IFNs, the response to type III IFN is highly cell-type specific. Only epithelial-like cells and to a lesser extent some immune cells respond to IFN-λ. This particular pattern of response is controlled by the differential expression of the IFN-λ receptor, which, in contrast to IFN-α, should result in limited side effects in patients. Recently, we and other groups have shown in several animal models a potent antitumor role of IFN-λ that will open a new challenging era for the current IFN therapy. PMID:22190970

  3. Ophthalmological side effects of interferon therapy of chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Medhat, Eman; Esmat, Gamal; Hamza, Eman; Abdel Aziz, Amr; Fouad Fathalah, Waleed; Zakaria, Zeinab; Mostafa, Sameh

    2016-01-01

    Background Egypt has one of the highest prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) worldwide. Ophthalmological side effects are recognized complications of interferon (IFN) therapy. This study aimed to evaluate IFN-induced ophthalmological manifestations in patients receiving PEGylated interferon (PEG IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) and to assess the effect of IFN duration, response and systemic risk factors on the severity. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 100 patients with chronic HCV who were candidates for PEG-IFN and RBV therapy. All patients were subjected to clinical and ophthalmological examination, laboratory investigations, abdominal ultrasound, colored fundus photography and fundus fluorescein angiography, follow up was made at weeks 12, 24, and 48 of treatment. Results IFN-induced retinopathy had been found in (9/100; 9%), 5 (5/9; 55.5%) of them had bilateral lesions, (3/9; 33.3%) were treatment responders and (6/9; 66.6%) non responders. The time of retinopathy appearance was mainly at W12. Retinopathy was asymptomatic in most of the affected patients (7/9; 77.77%) and reversible, cotton wool spots was the major associated sign. Patients with older age, DM and or HTN, and non-responders to antiviral therapy were associated with more severe retinopathy. Conclusions Retinopathy is not a rare complication of IFN therapy for chronic HCV infection, but fortunately it’s asymptomatic and reversible. Ophthalmological assessment at base-line and at follow up during IFN treatment is very important. PMID:27275462

  4. Type I interferon signaling protects mice from lethal henipavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Dhondt, Kévin P; Mathieu, Cyrille; Chalons, Marie; Reynaud, Joséphine M; Vallve, Audrey; Raoul, Hervé; Horvat, Branka

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are closely related, recently emerged paramyxoviruses that form Henipavirus genus and are capable of causing considerable morbidity and mortality in a number of mammalian species, including humans. However, in contrast to many other species and despite expression of functional virus entry receptors, mice are resistant to henipavirus infection. We report here the susceptibility of mice deleted for the type I interferon receptor (IFNAR-KO) to both HeV and NiV. Intraperitoneally infected mice developed fatal encephalitis, with pathology and immunohistochemical features similar to what was found in humans. Viral RNA was found in the majority of analyzed organs, and sublethally infected animals developed virus-specific neutralizing antibodies. Altogether, these results reveal IFNAR-KO mice as a new small animal model to study HeV and NiV pathogenesis, prophylaxis, and treatment and suggest the critical role of type I interferon signaling in the control of henipavirus infection. PMID:23089589

  5. Interferon action on parental Semliki forest virus ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Friedman, R M; Fantes, K H; Levy, H B; Carter, W B

    1967-12-01

    Actinomycin D-treated chick fibroblasts were infected with purified (32)P-labeled Semliki forest virus, and ribonucleic acid (RNA) was extracted after 1 or 2 hr. Within 1 hr, viral RNA forms sedimenting in sucrose gradients at 42S, 30S, and 16S were present. The 42S form corresponded to the RNA of the virion. The 16S form appeared to be a double-stranded template for the formation of new viral RNA, since nascent RNA was associated with it and the molecule could be heat-denatured and subsequently reannealed by slow cooling. Interferon treatment before infection, or puromycin (50 mug/ml) or cycloheximide (200 mug/ml) added at the time of virus infection, had no effect on the formation of the 30S RNA but inhibited the production of the 16S form. Several findings made it unlikely that these results were due to breakdown of parental RNA and reincorporation of (32)P into progeny structures. The results suggested that the mechanism of interferon action involves inhibition of protein synthesis by parental viral RNA, since a specific viral RNA polymerase had previously been demonstrated to be necessary for production of 16S RNA. No protein synthesis appears necessary for formation of 30S RNA from parental virus RNA. PMID:5621488

  6. Hepatitis B, interferon, and acne fulminans in a young girl.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sandeep; Malik, Ajay; Kumar, Dharmendra; Sodhi, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Acne fulminans (AF) is a very rare severe form of acne seen in young males, characterized by a sudden and explosive onset of hemorrhagic pustules and ulceration on the trunk, systemic features in the form of fever, polyarthropathy, malaise, erythema nodosum and painful osteolytic bone involvement with leukocytosis, and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Conventional treatment of AF includes corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agents for the initial phase followed by isotretinoin. Active hepatitis B infection with a high viral load precludes the administration of any immunosuppressive drugs. We present the case of an 18-year-old girl with a history of occasional acne who presented with AF of sudden onset following administration of interferon-alpha-2a for her recently detected hepatitis B infection. Management of hepatitis B was withheld in view of her general condition. The patient was managed with low dose isotretinoin with subsidence of lesions. AF in a young female precipitated by interferon and its management with isotretinoin in the presence of active hepatitis B infection make the case unique. PMID:27057488

  7. Natural interferon-beta treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Reina; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Haga, Yuki; Nakamura, Masato; Yasui, Shin; Jiang, Xia; Wu, Shuang; Arai, Makoto; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-05-18

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can cause liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Several studies have demonstrated that the eradication of HCV reduces the occurrence of HCC. In Japan, as many people live to an advanced age, HCV-infected patients are also getting older, and the age at HCC diagnosis has also increased. Although older HCV-infected patients have a risk of developing HCC, the treatment response to peginterferon-alpha plus ribavirin therapy is relatively poor in these patients because of drop-out or discontinuation of this treatment due to adverse events. It is established that the mechanism of action between interferon-alpha and interferon-beta is slightly different. Short-term natural interferon-beta monotherapy is effective for patients with acute hepatitis C and patients infected with HCV genotype 2 and low viral loads. Natural interferon-beta plus ribavirin for 48 wk or for 24 wk are also effective for some patients with HCV genotype 1 or HCV genotype 2. Natural interferon-beta plus ribavirin has been used for certain "difficult-to-treat" HCV-infected patients. In the era of direct-acting anti-virals, natural interferon-beta plus ribavirin may be one of the therapeutic options for special groups of HCV-infected patients. In the near future, signal transduction pathways of interferon-beta will inform further directions. PMID:26052401

  8. Influence of Interferon-Alpha Combined with Chemo (Radio) Therapy on Immunological Parameters in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Karakhanova, Svetlana; Mosl, Beate; Harig, Sabine; von Ahn, Katharina; Fritz, Jasmin; Schmidt, Jan; Jäger, Dirk; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V.

    2014-01-01

    Prognosis of patients with carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas is particularly poor. A combination of chemotherapy with immunotherapy could be an option for treatment of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to perform an immunomonitoring of 17 patients with pancreatic cancer from the CapRI-2 study, and tumor-bearing mice treated with combination of chemo (radio) therapies with interferon-2α. Low doses of interferon-2α led to a decrease in total leukocyte and an increase in monocyte counts. Furthermore, we observed a positive effect of interferon-2α therapy on the dendritic cells and NK (natural killer) cell activation immediately after the first injection. In addition, we recorded an increased amount of interferon-γ and IL-10 in the serum following the interferon-2α therapy. These data clearly demonstrate that pancreatic carcinoma patients also show an immunomodulatory response to interferon-2α therapy. Analysis of immunosuppressive cells in the Panc02 orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer revealed an accumulation of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells in spleens and tumors of the mice treated with interferon-2α and 5-fluorouracil. The direct effect of the drugs on myeloid-derived suppressor cells was also registered in vitro. These data expose the importance of immunosuppressive mechanisms induced by combined chemo-immunotherapy. PMID:24608924

  9. Influence of interferon-alpha combined with chemo (radio) therapy on immunological parameters in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Karakhanova, Svetlana; Mosl, Beate; Harig, Sabine; von Ahn, Katharina; Fritz, Jasmin; Schmidt, Jan; Jäger, Dirk; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2014-01-01

    Prognosis of patients with carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas is particularly poor. A combination of chemotherapy with immunotherapy could be an option for treatment of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to perform an immunomonitoring of 17 patients with pancreatic cancer from the CapRI-2 study, and tumor-bearing mice treated with combination of chemo (radio) therapies with interferon-2α. Low doses of interferon-2α led to a decrease in total leukocyte and an increase in monocyte counts. Furthermore, we observed a positive effect of interferon-2α therapy on the dendritic cells and NK (natural killer) cell activation immediately after the first injection. In addition, we recorded an increased amount of interferon-γ and IL-10 in the serum following the interferon-2α therapy. These data clearly demonstrate that pancreatic carcinoma patients also show an immunomodulatory response to interferon-2α therapy. Analysis of immunosuppressive cells in the Panc02 orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer revealed an accumulation of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells in spleens and tumors of the mice treated with interferon-2α and 5-fluorouracil. The direct effect of the drugs on myeloid-derived suppressor cells was also registered in vitro. These data expose the importance of immunosuppressive mechanisms induced by combined chemo-immunotherapy. PMID:24608924

  10. Interferon alpha 2b as maintenance therapy improves outcome in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, Agustin; Neri, Natividad; Huerta-Guzmán, Judith; Pérez, Felipe; Sotelo, León

    2004-11-01

    The role of interferon alpha as maintenance therapy in follicular lymphoma (FL) remains unsolved. We started a controlled clinical trial to assess if interferon alpha 2b could improve outcome, measured with event free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with FL in complete remission after chemotherapy based anthracyclines and adjuvant radiotherapy to sites of initial bulky disease. Three hundred and eighty four patients in complete response after 6 cycles of CEOP-Bleo (cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, vincristine, prednisone and bleomycin, at standard doses), and adjuvant radiotherapy when necessary, were randomized to received Interferon alpha 2b, three times a week for 1 year or no treatment (control group). Median follow up was 9.8 years (range 7.0-15 years); actuarial curves showed that EFS was 64% (95% confidence interval (CI) 56-71%) in patients treated with interferon that was statistically significant to patients in the control group: 35% (95% CI: 28-43%) (p<.01). OS was also statistically significant: 81% in patients treated with interferon (95% CI: 74-93%) and 57% (95% CI: 50-63%) in the control group (p<.001). Toxicity was mild, all patients received the planned dose of interferon on time. The use of aggressive chemotherapy and maintenance therapy with interferon alpha 2b in follicular lymphoma improved outcome; more than 60% of patients remain alive free of disease at longer follow-up. PMID:15512813

  11. Coinhibition of viral interferon induction by Benzo(. alpha. )pyrene in association with occupation-related particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hahon, N. West Virginia Univ., Morgantown ); Booth, J.A. ); Flowers, L. )

    1990-06-01

    Benzo({alpha})pyrene (B(a)P) in combination with coal, asbestos, silicate, or metal particles was studied for its inhibitory effects on interferon-{alpha}/{beta} induction by influenza virus in rhesus monkey kidney (LLC-MK{sub 2}) cell monolayers. B(a)P per se had no adverse effect on the induction process. However, when cell cultures were pretreated with B(a)P that was bioactivated by rat liver S9 homogenate, from 52 to 65% inhibition of interferon induction occurred. Significantly greater depression (coinhibition) of viral interferon induction (>83%) resulted when bioactivated B(a)P was incorporated with coal particles representative of coal rank (anthracite, bituminous, lignite, peat). Coinhibition affected by bioactivated B(a)P was coal rank-independent but any interferon inhibitory activity affected by coal particles per se was coal rank-independent. When metals (aluminum, aluminum oxide, ferric oxide, nickel, or chromium) or asbestos fibers were individually mixed with bioactivated B(a)P, coinhibition of cellular interferon synthesis also resulted which was significantly greater than that manifested by bioactivated B(a)P or particles per se. Coinhibition of interferon induction by silicates and the bioactivated hydrocarbon was not in evidence although some silicates alone partially inhibited the induction process. Viral interferon induction was inhibited in a dose-response manner by B(a)P ({+-}S9) in combination with selected particles.

  12. Cross-Species Antiviral Activity of Goose Interferons against Duck Plague Virus Is Related to Its Positive Self-Feedback Regulation and Subsequent Interferon Stimulated Genes Induction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Zhou, Qin; Wei, Yunan; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Sun, Kunfeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-01-01

    Interferons are a group of antiviral cytokines acting as the first line of defense in the antiviral immunity. Here, we describe the antiviral activity of goose type I interferon (IFNα) and type II interferon (IFNγ) against duck plague virus (DPV). Recombinant goose IFNα and IFNγ proteins of approximately 20 kDa and 18 kDa, respectively, were expressed. Following DPV-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) infection of duck embryo fibroblast cells (DEFs) with IFNα and IFNγ pre-treatment, the number of viral gene copies decreased more than 100-fold, with viral titers dropping approximately 100-fold. Compared to the control, DPV-EGFP cell positivity was decreased by goose IFNα and IFNγ at 36 hpi (3.89%; 0.79%) and 48 hpi (17.05%; 5.58%). In accordance with interferon-stimulated genes being the “workhorse” of IFN activity, the expression of duck myxovirus resistance (Mx) and oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) was significantly upregulated (p < 0.001) by IFN treatment for 24 h. Interestingly, duck cells and goose cells showed a similar trend of increased ISG expression after goose IFNα and IFNγ pretreatment. Another interesting observation is that the positive feedback regulation of type I IFN and type II IFN by goose IFNα and IFNγ was confirmed in waterfowl for the first time. These results suggest that the antiviral activities of goose IFNα and IFNγ can likely be attributed to the potency with which downstream genes are induced by interferon. These findings will contribute to our understanding of the functional significance of the interferon antiviral system in aquatic birds and to the development of interferon-based prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against viral disease. PMID:27438848

  13. Cross-Species Antiviral Activity of Goose Interferons against Duck Plague Virus Is Related to Its Positive Self-Feedback Regulation and Subsequent Interferon Stimulated Genes Induction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Zhou, Qin; Wei, Yunan; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Sun, Kunfeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-01-01

    Interferons are a group of antiviral cytokines acting as the first line of defense in the antiviral immunity. Here, we describe the antiviral activity of goose type I interferon (IFNα) and type II interferon (IFNγ) against duck plague virus (DPV). Recombinant goose IFNα and IFNγ proteins of approximately 20 kDa and 18 kDa, respectively, were expressed. Following DPV-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) infection of duck embryo fibroblast cells (DEFs) with IFNα and IFNγ pre-treatment, the number of viral gene copies decreased more than 100-fold, with viral titers dropping approximately 100-fold. Compared to the control, DPV-EGFP cell positivity was decreased by goose IFNα and IFNγ at 36 hpi (3.89%; 0.79%) and 48 hpi (17.05%; 5.58%). In accordance with interferon-stimulated genes being the "workhorse" of IFN activity, the expression of duck myxovirus resistance (Mx) and oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) was significantly upregulated (p < 0.001) by IFN treatment for 24 h. Interestingly, duck cells and goose cells showed a similar trend of increased ISG expression after goose IFNα and IFNγ pretreatment. Another interesting observation is that the positive feedback regulation of type I IFN and type II IFN by goose IFNα and IFNγ was confirmed in waterfowl for the first time. These results suggest that the antiviral activities of goose IFNα and IFNγ can likely be attributed to the potency with which downstream genes are induced by interferon. These findings will contribute to our understanding of the functional significance of the interferon antiviral system in aquatic birds and to the development of interferon-based prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against viral disease. PMID:27438848

  14. Direct costs of interferon-based and interferon-free direct-acting antiviral regimens for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Gray, E; O'Leary, A; Kieran, J A; Fogarty, E; Dowling, T; Norris, S

    2016-09-01

    Given the increasing budget impact of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment, robust real-world cost data are essential for healthcare decision-makers to evaluate and understand the costs and benefits of these treatments. To determine the direct cost of treating HCV infection in a hospital-based ambulatory care setting in Ireland based on available data from the Irish national hepatitis C treatment registry. A microcosting study of the direct costs of patients with hepatitis C treated with interferon-based and interferon-free direct-acting antiviral regimens was conducted. Attendance at the outpatient clinic for clinical assessment, the quantity of resources used per patient, the medication prescribed and the identification and timing of staff involvement was measured and combined to establish a mean cost of treatment per patient and a cost per sustained virological response (SVR). One hundred and sixty-eight patients were included in the analysis; 119 treated with interferon-based direct-acting antiviral regimens and 47 treated with interferon-free regimens. The mean costs of treatment with the interferon-based regimens per patient were €38 286 (95% CI €35 305-€41 061). The cost per SVR was €62 457. The mean cost of treatment with interferon-free regimens per patient was €55 734 (95% CI €50 906-€60 880). The cost per SVR was €81 873. Real-world cost data provide valuable information to enhance reimbursement decisions. While the direct costs associated with hepatitis C treatment in Ireland are substantial, it is reasonable to expect that the mean cost of treatment and the cost per SVR will reduce as patients with less advanced disease are treated with interferon-free therapies. PMID:26996144

  15. Bortezomib sensitizes human glioblastoma cells to induction of apoptosis by type I interferons through NOXA expression and Mcl-1 cleavage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruishan; Davidoff, Andrew M; Pfeffer, Lawrence M

    2016-09-01

    Glioblastomas are highly invasive and aggressive primary brain tumors. Type I interferons have significant, pleiotropic anticancer activity. However, through various pathways many cancers become interferon-resistant, limiting interferon's clinical utility. In this study, we demonstrated that the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib sensitized human glioblastoma cells to the antiproliferative action of interferons, which involved the induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis but not necroptosis. We found that death ligands such as TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) were not involved in interferon/bortezomib-induced apoptosis, although interferon induced TRAIL expression. However, apoptosis was induced through an intrinsic pathway involving increased NOXA expression and Mcl-1 cleavage. Our findings may provide an important rationale for combining type I interferons with bortezomib for glioblastoma therapy. PMID:27450810

  16. n-Dodecyl-β-D-maltoside inhibits aggregation of human interferon-β-1b and reduces its immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Rifkin, Robert A; Maggio, Edward T; Dike, Sonny; Kerr, Douglas A; Levy, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The development of neutralizing antibodies to the protein drug interferon-β is a significant impediment to its use in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Neutralizing antibodies to interferon-β arise from aggregation of the peptide during manufacturing and storage. We tested the ability of dodecylmaltoside, a nontoxic alkylsaccharide surfactant, to reduce aggregation of interferon-β in vitro and to reduce its immunogenicity in vivo. Interferon-β, in solution with and without dodecylmaltoside, was periodically evaluated for aggregation by light scatter for 1 month. Interferon-β, with and without dodecylmaltoside, was given 3 days/week for 1 month to mice; the sera of these mice were analyzed for anti-interferon-β antibodies by ELISA. Dodecylmaltoside reduces the aggregation of interferon-β in vitro and its immunogenicity in vivo. Our positive findings warrant additional tests of dodecylmaltoside as a therapeutic adjuvant in rodent models of multiple sclerosis. PMID:20532646

  17. Regulation of antiviral T cell responses by type I interferons.

    PubMed

    Crouse, Josh; Kalinke, Ulrich; Oxenius, Annette

    2015-04-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are pro-inflammatory cytokines that are rapidly induced in different cell types during viral infections. The consequences of type I IFN signalling include direct antiviral activity, innate immune cell activation and regulation of adaptive immune responses. In this Review, we discuss recent conceptual advances in our understanding of indirect and direct regulation of T cell immunity by type I IFNs, which can either promote or inhibit T cell activation, proliferation, differentiation and survival. This regulation depends, to a large extent, on the timing of type I IFN exposure relative to T cell receptor signalling. Type I IFNs also provide activated T cells with resistance to natural killer cell-mediated elimination. PMID:25790790

  18. Molecular basis of interferon resistance in hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Perales, Celia; Beach, Nathan M; Sheldon, Julie; Domingo, Esteban

    2014-10-01

    Resistance to interferon (IFN) in hepatitis C virus (HCV) differs from resistance to standard, directly-acting antiviral (DAA) agents in that the virus confronts a multicomponent antiviral state evoked by IFN. This renders unlikely the repeated selection of the same specific mutations that confer an IFN-resistance phenotype. Comparison of amino acid sequences of viral proteins in HCV that replicates in the presence of IFN in vivo or in cell culture (with entire virus or subgenomic replicons) reveals very few common candidate IFN resistance substitutions. Multiple host and viral factors contribute to divergent responses to IFN. The environmental heterogeneity in which exogenous IFN is expected to exert its selective effect may increase as a result of incorporation of new DAAs in therapy. PMID:24968186

  19. Interferon in resistance to bacterial and protozoan infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Gould, Cheryl L.; Kierszenbaum, Felipe; Degee, Antonie L. W.; Mansfield, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of genetic differences in mouse strains on the modulation of protozoan infections by interferon (IFN) were investigated. In one set of experiments, three different strains of mice were injected with T. cruzi, and their sera were assayed at five time intervals for IFN titer. A greater quantity of IFN was produced by mouse strains that were susceptible to T. cruzi infection than by the more resistant strain. In another set of experiments, spleen cell cultures from inbred strains of mice were challenged with an antigen made from T.b. rhodesiense. The cells from mice resistant to infection, produced greater amounts of IFN-gamma than did cells from the susceptible mice. In a third set of experiments, it was found that mice injected with T.b. rhodesiense before being infected with a diabetogenic virus (EMC-D) were resistant to the effects of the virus and did not produce virus-specific antibody.

  20. Interferons and viruses: an evolutionary arms race of molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Hans-Heinrich; Schneider, William M.; Rice, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Over half a century has passed since interferons (IFNs) were discovered and shown to inhibit virus infection in cultured cells. Since then, researchers have steadily brought to light the molecular details of IFN signaling, catalogued their pleiotropic effects on cells, and harnessed their therapeutic potential for a variety of maladies. While advances have been plentiful, several fundamental questions have yet to be answered and much complexity remains to be unraveled. We explore the current knowledge surrounding four main questions: are type I IFN subtypes differentially produced in response to distinct pathogens? How are IFN subtypes distinguished by cells? What are the mechanisms and consequences of viral antagonism? Lastly, how can the IFN response be harnessed to improve vaccine efficacy? PMID:25704559

  1. Immune Alterations in Patients with Anti-Interferon-γ Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Chruewkamlow, Nuttapol; Mahasongkram, Kodchakorn; Pata, Supansa; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Salee, Parichart; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Kasinrerk, Watchara

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies against interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) can cause immunodeficiency and are associated with various opportunistic infections. In the present study, we investigated other cellular immune parameters for a better understanding of the immunodeficiency condition in the patients. The numbers of WBC, monocytes and NK cells were increased in patients with anti-IFN-γ autoantibodies (AAbs). Upon TCR activation, T cell proliferation and IL-2 receptor of the patients remained intact. Nonetheless, the Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ and TNF-α) production was up-regulated. The production of Th2 (IL-4) and Th17 (IL-17) cytokines was unchanged. We suggest that, in addition to the presence of anti-IFN-γ autoantibodies, alterations in the cellular immune functions may also contribute to this immunodeficiency. PMID:26727515

  2. An innate antiviral pathway acting before interferons at epithelial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Marie B; Reinert, Line S; Thomsen, Martin K; Bagdonaite, Ieva; Nandakumar, Ramya; Cheshenko, Natalia; Prabakaran, Thaneas; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Krzyzowska, Malgosha; Kratholm, Sine K; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Petersen, Steen V; Goriely, Stanislas; Bibby, Bo Martin; Eriksson, Kristina; Ruland, Jürgen; Thomsen, Allan R; Herold, Betsy C; Wandall, Hans H; Frische, Sebastian; Holm, Christian K; Paludan, Søren R

    2016-02-01

    Mucosal surfaces are exposed to environmental substances and represent a major portal of entry for microorganisms. The innate immune system is responsible for early defense against infections and it is believed that the interferons (IFNs) constitute the first line of defense against viruses. Here we identify an innate antiviral pathway that works at epithelial surfaces before the IFNs. The pathway is activated independently of known innate sensors of viral infections through a mechanism dependent on viral O-linked glycans, which induce CXCR3 chemokines and stimulate antiviral activity in a manner dependent on neutrophils. This study therefore identifies a previously unknown layer of antiviral defense that exerts its action on epithelial surfaces before the classical IFN response is operative. PMID:26595890

  3. The Two Faces of Interferon-γ in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, M. Raza; Merlino, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is a cytokine whose biological activity is conventionally associated with cytostatic/cytotoxic and antitumor mechanisms during cell-mediated adaptive immune response. It has been used clinically to treat a variety of malignancies, albeit with mixed results and side effects that can be severe. Despite ample evidence implicating a role for IFN-γ in tumor immune surveillance, there has been a steady flow of reports suggesting that it may also have pro-tumorigenic effects under certain circumstances. We propose that in fact IFN-γ treatment is a double-edged sword whose anti- and pro-tumorigenic activities are dependent on the cellular, microenvironmental, and/or molecular context. As such, inhibition of the IFN-γ/IFNγR pathway may prove to be a viable new therapeutic target for a subset of malignancies. PMID:21705455

  4. Interferons, Signal Transduction Pathways, and the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Nallar, Shreeram C.

    2014-01-01

    The interferon (IFN) family of cytokines participates in the development of innate and acquired immune defenses against various pathogens and pathogenic stimuli. Discovered originally as a proteinaceous substance secreted from virus-infected cells that afforded immunity to neighboring cells from virus infection, these cytokines are now implicated in various human pathologies, including control of tumor development, cell differentiation, and autoimmunity. It is now believed that the IFN system (IFN genes and the genes induced by them, and the factors that regulate these processes) is a generalized alarm of cellular stress, including DNA damage. IFNs exert both beneficial and deleterious effects on the central nervous system (CNS). Our knowledge of the IFN-regulated processes in the CNS is far from being clear. In this article, we reviewed the current understanding of IFN signal transduction pathways and gene products that might have potential relevance to diseases of the CNS. PMID:25084173

  5. Type I Interferons in Newborns-Neurotoxicity versus Antiviral Defense.

    PubMed

    Bogunovic, Dusan

    2016-01-01

    In most children and adults, primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is asymptomatic. However, very rarely (incidence of 1 in 1,000,000), it can cause herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). HSE also occurs in infants but with a much starker incidence of one in three. This age difference in susceptibility to HSV-1-caused HSE is not well understood. In a recent article in mBio, authors have identified the choroid plexus as the anatomical site of robust HSV-1 replication in the brain. They point to low levels of type I interferon (IFN) receptor as causal of the lack of HSV-1 replication control in neonates, in contrast to adults. Here, I discuss these findings in the context of human genetic evidence. I point to the balancing act of type I IFN acting as a neurotoxin and an antiviral agent, an evolutionary choice of a lesser evil. PMID:27190218

  6. INTERFERON REGULATORY FACTOR 4 AND 8 IN B CELL DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Runqing

    2010-01-01

    IRF4 and 8 are members of the interferon regulatory factor family of transcription factors and have been shown to be essential for the development and function of T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. A series of recent studies have further demonstrated critical functions for IRF4 and 8 at several stages of B cell development including pre-B cell development, receptor editing, germinal center reaction and plasma cell generation. Collectively, these new studies provide molecular insights into the function of IRF4 and 8 and underscore a requirement for IRF4 and 8 throughout B cell development. This review focuses on the recent advances on roles of IRF4 and 8 in B cell development. PMID:18775669

  7. Type I Interferons in Newborns—Neurotoxicity versus Antiviral Defense

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In most children and adults, primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is asymptomatic. However, very rarely (incidence of 1 in 1,000,000), it can cause herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). HSE also occurs in infants but with a much starker incidence of one in three. This age difference in susceptibility to HSV-1-caused HSE is not well understood. In a recent article in mBio, authors have identified the choroid plexus as the anatomical site of robust HSV-1 replication in the brain. They point to low levels of type I interferon (IFN) receptor as causal of the lack of HSV-1 replication control in neonates, in contrast to adults. Here, I discuss these findings in the context of human genetic evidence. I point to the balancing act of type I IFN acting as a neurotoxin and an antiviral agent, an evolutionary choice of a lesser evil. PMID:27190218

  8. Interfering with interferon receptor sorting and trafficking: impact on signaling.

    PubMed

    Claudinon, Julie; Monier, Marie-Noëlle; Lamaze, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) and their receptors (IFN-Rs) play fundamental roles in a multitude of biological functions. Many articles and reviews emphasize that the JAK/STAT machinery is obligatory for relay of the information transmitted by IFNs after binding to their cognate receptors at the plasma membrane. In contrast, very few studies have addressed the endocytosis and the intracellular trafficking of IFN-Rs, the immediate step following IFN binding. However, recent findings have shed light on the importance of IFN-R sorting and trafficking in the control of IFN signaling. Thus, IFN-Rs can be included in the growing family of signaling receptors for which regulation of biological activity critically involves endocytosis and trafficking. PMID:17493737

  9. Neopterin and interferon gamma serum levels in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Khoss, A E; Balzar, E; Steger, H; Howanietz, H; Wladika, W; Hamilton, G; Woloszczuk, W

    In the follow-up of children receiving renal allografts the early differential diagnosis of infections and rejection episodes is the main problem. Serum levels of neopterin (N), a pteridine released from stimulated macrophages, was determined by radioimmunoassay. Also interferon-gamma (IF) serum levels, a marker of T lymphocyte activity, were determined with an immunoradiometric assay in 19 kidney-transplanted children. Both, infections and rejection episodes, are accompanied by distinct increases in N. The IF are elevated 1-3 days earlier than N, the median values during infections being significantly (p less than or equal to 0.001) higher than those during rejection crises. The routine measurement of N and IF allow the simple, quick and reliable monitoring of the immune status, which seems to be of a high relevance for the daily monitoring of transplant recipients. PMID:3150820

  10. Modulation of epidermal growth factor receptors by human alpha interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Zoon, K C; Karasaki, Y; zur Nedden, D L; Hu, R Q; Arnheiter, H

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with human interferon (IFN)-alpha 2 at 37 degrees C results in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and a reduction of the subsequent binding of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) at 4 degrees C. Human IFN-beta and -gamma, which exhibit little antiviral and antiproliferative activities on MDBK cells, have little effect on cell growth or the binding of 125I-labeled EGF to these cells. The binding of EGF is decreased after exposure to IFN-alpha for greater than 8 hr. Scatchard analyses of the EGF binding data indicate that a 20-hr exposure period results in a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface EGF receptors and a reduction in the affinity of EGF for its receptor. The rate of internalization of EGF by MDBK cells does not appear to be affected by IFN treatment. PMID:3095830

  11. Modulation of epidermal growth factor receptors by human alpha interferon.

    PubMed

    Zoon, K C; Karasaki, Y; zur Nedden, D L; Hu, R Q; Arnheiter, H

    1986-11-01

    Treatment of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with human interferon (IFN)-alpha 2 at 37 degrees C results in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and a reduction of the subsequent binding of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) at 4 degrees C. Human IFN-beta and -gamma, which exhibit little antiviral and antiproliferative activities on MDBK cells, have little effect on cell growth or the binding of 125I-labeled EGF to these cells. The binding of EGF is decreased after exposure to IFN-alpha for greater than 8 hr. Scatchard analyses of the EGF binding data indicate that a 20-hr exposure period results in a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface EGF receptors and a reduction in the affinity of EGF for its receptor. The rate of internalization of EGF by MDBK cells does not appear to be affected by IFN treatment. PMID:3095830

  12. Interferon-α and pericardial injury: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Fayaz A; Singh, Sujata; Pandit, Anil; Alegria, Jorge R; Camoriano, John; Stanton, Melissa L; Mookadam, Farouk

    2014-01-01

    Interferon- α (IFN-α) alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents has been used in the management of many malignant and non-malignant conditions. Pericarditis with or without pericardial effusion has been reported with IFN-α therapy, and available literature is limited to case reports. Pericardial constriction after interferon use has not been described in the published literature to date. We performed a systematic review of literature to address the demographic features, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and outcome of interferon-related pericardial injury.

  13. Interferon-γ release assay for tuberculosis screening of healthcare workers at a Korean tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Yun; Jeon, Kyeongman; Suh, Gee Young; Kwon, O Jung; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Yoonchang, Sung Won; Kang, Eun-Suk; Koh, Won-Jung

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the annual incidence of tuberculosis infection among newly employed doctors and nurses in Korea. The annual incidence of tuberculosis infection ranged from 3.3% to 5.7%, based on the definition of conversion of an interferon-γ release assay, which suggests that stricter preventive strategies against nosocomial TB infection should be employed. Follow-up interferon-γ levels measured after 3 months of isoniazid and rifampicin treatment showed considerable variation. Therefore, serial testing with interferon-γ release assays after treatment of latent TB infection may be insufficient for evaluating the effects of treatment due to the variable responses. PMID:20936910

  14. RelA-Induced Interferon Response Negatively Regulates Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kochupurakkal, Bose S; Wang, Zhigang C; Hua, Tony; Culhane, Aedin C; Rodig, Scott J; Rajkovic-Molek, Koraljka; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Richardson, Andrea L; Biswas, Debajit K; Iglehart, J Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Both oncogenic and tumor-suppressor activities are attributed to the Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-kB) pathway. Moreover, NF-kB may positively or negatively regulate proliferation. The molecular determinants of these opposing roles of NF-kB are unclear. Using primary human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) as a model, we show that increased RelA levels and consequent increase in basal transcriptional activity of RelA induces IRF1, a target gene. Induced IRF1 upregulates STAT1 and IRF7, and in consort, these factors induce the expression of interferon response genes. Activation of the interferon pathway down-regulates CDK4 and up-regulates p27 resulting in Rb hypo-phosphorylation and cell cycle arrest. Stimulation of HMEC with IFN-γ elicits similar phenotypic and molecular changes suggesting that basal activity of RelA and IFN-γ converge on IRF1 to regulate proliferation. The anti-proliferative RelA-IRF1-CDK4 signaling axis is retained in ER+/HER2- breast tumors analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Using immuno-histochemical analysis of breast tumors, we confirm the negative correlation between RelA levels and proliferation rate in ER+/HER2- breast tumors. These findings attribute an anti-proliferative tumor-suppressor role to basal RelA activity. Inactivation of Rb, down-regulation of RelA or IRF1, or upregulation of CDK4 or IRF2 rescues the RelA-IRF1-CDK4 induced proliferation arrest in HMEC and are points of disruption in aggressive tumors. Activity of the RelA-IRF1-CDK4 axis may explain favorable response to CDK4/6 inhibition observed in patients with ER+ Rb competent tumors. PMID:26460486

  15. RelA-Induced Interferon Response Negatively Regulates Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kochupurakkal, Bose S.; Wang, Zhigang C.; Hua, Tony; Culhane, Aedin C.; Rodig, Scott J.; Rajkovic-Molek, Koraljka; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Richardson, Andrea L.; Biswas, Debajit K.; Iglehart, J. Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Both oncogenic and tumor-suppressor activities are attributed to the Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-kB) pathway. Moreover, NF-kB may positively or negatively regulate proliferation. The molecular determinants of these opposing roles of NF-kB are unclear. Using primary human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) as a model, we show that increased RelA levels and consequent increase in basal transcriptional activity of RelA induces IRF1, a target gene. Induced IRF1 upregulates STAT1 and IRF7, and in consort, these factors induce the expression of interferon response genes. Activation of the interferon pathway down-regulates CDK4 and up-regulates p27 resulting in Rb hypo-phosphorylation and cell cycle arrest. Stimulation of HMEC with IFN-γ elicits similar phenotypic and molecular changes suggesting that basal activity of RelA and IFN-γ converge on IRF1 to regulate proliferation. The anti-proliferative RelA-IRF1-CDK4 signaling axis is retained in ER+/HER2- breast tumors analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Using immuno-histochemical analysis of breast tumors, we confirm the negative correlation between RelA levels and proliferation rate in ER+/HER2- breast tumors. These findings attribute an anti-proliferative tumor-suppressor role to basal RelA activity. Inactivation of Rb, down-regulation of RelA or IRF1, or upregulation of CDK4 or IRF2 rescues the RelA-IRF1-CDK4 induced proliferation arrest in HMEC and are points of disruption in aggressive tumors. Activity of the RelA-IRF1-CDK4 axis may explain favorable response to CDK4/6 inhibition observed in patients with ER+ Rb competent tumors. PMID:26460486

  16. The importance of the type I interferon system in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Rönnblom, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The type I interferon (IFN) system is our main defense against viral infections and consists of a large number of sensors of nucleic acid that can trigger the production of more than 15 different proteins with antiviral and immunostimulatory capacity. There are several observations suggesting an important role for this system in the etiopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune diseases. Among these are the development of autoimmune diseases during IFN-α treatment, a prominent increase in the expression of type I IFN regulated genes (an IFN signature) in a number of rheumatic diseases, the existence of endogenous IFN inducers in SLE patients and a genetic association between autoimmune diseases and gene variants within the type I IFN signalling pathway. Collectively, these observations suggests that inhibition of the type I IFN system could be beneficial in SLE and possible also other autoimmune diseases. Many different therapeutic targets exist and several studies are in progress aiming to block or down-regulate the activated type I IFN system. A number of studies with monoclonal anti-IFN-α antibodies in SLE patients have been reported, and a small study investigating vaccination with an interferon-α-kinoid against IFN-α has been published. Trials targeting the type I IFN receptor are under way, and other possibilities include elimination of the endogenous IFN inducers and inhibition of key molecules in the type I IFN signalling pathway. Results so far show that it is possible to partially suppress the IFN signature, improve several biomarkers and ameliorate clinical manifestations by some of these new treatment strategies. PMID:27586799

  17. Interferon Consensus Sequence Binding Protein Confers Resistance against Yersinia enterocolitica

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Joachim; Kempf, Volkhard A. J.; Diebold, Joachim; Bücheler, Nicole; Preger, Sonja; Horak, Ivan; Sing, Andreas; Kramer, Uwe; Autenrieth, Ingo B.

    2000-01-01

    Interferon consensus sequence binding protein (ICSBP)-deficient mice display enhanced susceptibility to intracellular pathogens. At least two distinct immunoregulatory defects are responsible for this phenotype. First, diminished production of reactive oxygen intermediates in macrophages results in impaired intracellular killing of microorganisms. Second, defective early interleukin-12 (IL-12) production upon microbial challenge leads to a failure in gamma interferon (IFN-γ) induction and subsequently in T helper 1 immune responses. Here, we investigated the role of ICSBP in resistance against the extracellular bacterium Yersinia enterocolitica. ICSBP−/− mice failed to produce IL-12 and IFN-γ, but also IL-4, after Yersinia challenge. In addition, granuloma formation was highly disturbed in infected ICSBP−/− mice, leading to multiple necrotic abscesses in affected organs. Consequently, ICSBP−/− mice rapidly succumbed to acute Yersinia infection. In vitro treatment of spleen cells from ICSBP−/− mice with recombinant IL-12 (rIL-12) or rIL-18 in combination with a second stimulus resulted in IFN-γ induction. In experimental therapy of infected ICSBP−/− mice, we observed that administration of rIL-12 induced IFN-γ production which was associated with improved resistance to Yersinia. In contrast, treatment with rIL-18 failed to enhance endogenous IFN-γ production but nevertheless reduced bacterial burden in ICSBP−/− mice. Although cytokine therapy with rIL-12 or rIL-18 ameliorated the course of Yersinia infection in ICSBP−/− mice, both cytokines failed to completely restore impaired immunity. Taken together, the results indicate that the transcription factor ICSBP is essential for efficient host immune defense against Yersinia. These results are important for understanding the complex host immune responses in bacterial infections. PMID:10678954

  18. Reovirus μ2 Protein Inhibits Interferon Signaling through a Novel Mechanism Involving Nuclear Accumulation of Interferon Regulatory Factor 9▿

    PubMed Central

    Zurney, Jennifer; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Holm, Geoffrey H.; Dermody, Terence S.; Sherry, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The secreted cytokine alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) binds its receptor to activate the Jak-STAT signal transduction pathway, leading to formation of the heterotrimeric IFN-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3) transcription complex for induction of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) and establishment of an antiviral state. Many viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit the IFN pathway, thereby subverting the innate antiviral response. Here, we demonstrate that the mildly myocarditic reovirus type 1 Lang (T1L), but not the nonmyocarditic reovirus type 3 Dearing, represses IFN induction of a subset of ISGs and that this repressor function segregates with the T1L M1 gene. Concordantly, the T1L M1 gene product, μ2, dramatically inhibits IFN-β-induced reporter gene expression. Surprisingly, T1L infection does not degrade components of the ISGF3 complex or interfere with STAT1 or STAT2 nuclear translocation as has been observed for other viruses. Instead, infection with T1L or reassortant or recombinant viruses containing the T1L M1 gene results in accumulation of interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) in the nucleus. This effect has not been previously described for any virus and suggests that μ2 modulates IRF9 interactions with STATs for both ISGF3 function and nuclear export. The M1 gene is a determinant of virus strain-specific differences in the IFN response, which are linked to virus strain-specific differences in induction of murine myocarditis. We find that virus-induced myocarditis is associated with repression of IFN function, providing new insights into the pathophysiology of this disease. Together, these data provide the first report of an increase in IRF9 nuclear accumulation associated with viral subversion of the IFN response and couple virus strain-specific differences in IFN antagonism to the pathogenesis of viral myocarditis. PMID:19109390

  19. Creation of transgenic Brassica napus L. plants expressing human alpha 2b interferon gene.

    PubMed

    Sakhno, L O; Kvasko, O Y; Olevinska, Z M; Spivak, M Y; Kuchuk, M V

    2012-01-01

    Spring rapeseed transgenic lines expressing human interferon alpha 2b were created by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of aseptic plant leaf explants. The maximum antiviral activity of the leaf extracts reached 4500 IU/g fresh weight. It was determined that the antioxidant activity and the activity of an enzyme of plant antioxidant system--superoxide dismutase (SOD)--in the leaf tissues of transgenic plants increased compared to controls. There were no correlations between the interferon and antioxidant activities, as well as between SOD and interferon activities. Using the obtained transgenic rapeseed plants with high interferon and antioxidant activities as a feed additive for animals might have preventive effect on their body, increasing resistance to infections of various origins. PMID:23285745

  20. Cholinoceptor Activation Subserving the Effects of Interferon Gamma on the Contractility of Rat Ileum

    PubMed Central

    Sterin-Borda, Leonor; Rodriguez, Martin; de Bracco, Maria M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant rat interferon γ stimulated the contractility of isolated rat ileum at doses of 4–12 units/ml. Muscarinic cholinoceptors were involved, as treatment of the tissue with atropine prevented the contractile response of the ileum. Furthermore, interferon γ increased the affinity of carbachol for the cholinoceptors and did not change its maximum effect. Neurogenic pathways were also involved since pretreatment of ileum with hexamethonium, hemicholinium or tetrodotoxin impaired the contractile effect of interferon γ. In contrast to the action of exogenous carbachol, the effects of interferon γ are indirect. They appear to involve a G protein regulating phosphoinositide turnover and cytoskeletal structures since they could not be induced in ileum strips that were pretreated with pertussis toxin, phospholipase C inhibitors (2-nitro-carboxyphenyl, NN-diphenyl carbamate and neomycin), cytochalasine B or colchicine. PMID:18475595

  1. [Busulfan versus busulfan-interferon as maintenance therapy in chronic myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    López Hernández, M A; Flores-Chapa, J D; Trueba Christy, E; Borbolla Escoboza, J R; Carrillo Rosales, T

    1996-01-01

    We studied 30 patients in order to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of alfa interferon associated with busulfan as maintenance treatment in de novo chronic granulocytic leukemia. Patients received 0.2 mg/kg of busulfan and reached complete hematological remission (CHR). Patients were then randomized in two groups: one to receive busulfan to be administered when the leukocyte count was above 15 x 10(9)/L, and another to receive subcutaneously 5 million IU of alpha-interferon three times per week (plus busulfan if the leukocyte count went above 15 x 10(9)/L). The duration of CHR was longer in the alfa-interferon group: 31 vs 16 months (p = 0.03) but no cytogenetic remissions were observed. Alfa interferon was well tolerated: no patient was excluded from the study due to toxicity. PMID:8966391

  2. Retinopathy in chronic hepatitis C patients during interferon treatment with ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Jain, K; Lam, W; Waheeb, S; Thai, Q; Heathcote, J

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To assess the ocular effect of interferon alfa 2b prescribed with ribavirin in patients undergoing therapy for chronic hepatitis C.
METHODS—19 patients with chronic hepatitis C who satisfied the follow up criteria were assessed for ocular complications using slit lamp biomicroscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy before, during, and after the treatment at regular intervals.
RESULTS—8/19 patients, while on treatment, developed an asymptomatic retinopathy. Among these 3/8 were relapsers and 5/9 were non-responders to interferon monotherapy. All retinal changes faded, often while the patients continued the therapy. There was no significant association in occurrence of retinopathy with haematological and/or biochemical changes.
CONCLUSION—Retinopathy was more common in interferon monotherapy non-responders than relapsers when treated with interferon alfa 2b with the addition of ribavirin. The changes were transient, disappearing while the patients were still being treated.

 PMID:11567959

  3. Results of interferon-based treatments in Alaska Native and American Indian population with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Stephen E.; Townshend-Bulson, Lisa J.; Bruden, Dana J. T.; Homan, Chriss E.; Gove, James E.; Plotnik, Julia N.; Simons, Brenna C.; Spradling, Philip R.; McMahon, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been few reports of hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment results with interferon-based regimens in indigenous populations. Objective To determine interferon-based treatment outcome among Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI) population. Design In an outcomes study of 1,379 AN/AI persons with chronic HCV infection from 1995 through 2013, we examined treatment results of 189 persons treated with standard interferon, interferon plus ribavirin, pegylated interferon plus ribavirin and triple therapy with a protease inhibitor. For individuals treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, the effect of patient characteristics on response was also examined. Results Sustained virologic response (SVR) with standard interferon was 16.7% (3/18) and with standard interferon and ribavirin was 29.7% (11/37). Of 119 persons treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, 61 achieved SVR (51.3%), including 10 of 46 with genotype 1 (21.7%), 38 of 51 with genotype 2 (74.5%) and 13 of 22 with genotype 3 (59.1%). By multivariate analysis, SVR in the pegylated interferon group was associated with female sex (p=0.002), estimated duration of infection (p=0.034) and HCV genotype (p<0.0001). There was a high discontinuation rate due to side effects in those treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin for genotype 1 (52.2%). Seven of 15 genotype 1 patients treated with pegylated interferon, ribavirin and telaprevir or boceprevir achieved SVR (46.7%). Conclusions We had success with pegylated interferon-based treatment of AN/AI people with genotypes 2 and 3. However, there were low SVR and high discontinuation rates for those with genotype 1. PMID:27029671

  4. Rapid Sensitive Assay for Interferons Based on the Inhibition of MM Virus Nucleic Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Patton T.; Giron, David J.

    1970-01-01

    A method for assaying mouse interferon based on the inhibition of viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis was devised. The amount of MM virus and RNA synthesized in interferon-treated L-cell cultures was determined by measuring the amount of 3H-uridine converted into a trichloroacetic acid-insoluble form after treatment of the infected cultures with 2.5 μg of actinomycin D per ml. The amount of RNA synthesized was inversely related to the concentration of interferon used for treatment. A linear dose-response regression curve was obtained by plotting the log of the amount of RNA made, expressed as a percentage of the control, versus the log of the reciprocal of the interferon dilution. A unit of interferon was defined as that concentration which inhibited nucleic acid synthesis by 50% (INAS50). The concentration of mouse interferon could be determined within 24 hr. This assay method, on the average, was approximately half as sensitive as the method which measured the 50% reduction of MM virus plaque number (PDD50-MM method), but was, on the average, almost 1.7 times as sensitive as the PDD50-VSV method. It averaged approximately 20 times the sensitivity of the methods which used as end points the 70% reduction in yield of MM virus or the complete inhibition of cytopathic effect by MM virus. The reproducibility of the INAS50 technique was tested in two ways. (i) Four independent assays of an interferon specimen were performed with replicate cultures. The standard deviation was 11.2% of the mean titer. (ii) On different dates, one interferon specimen was assayed seven times and another was assayed four times. The standard deviations were 21.5 and 26.6% of the respective mean titers. PMID:4320919

  5. A case of arthropathy and hypothyroidism during recombinant alpha-interferon therapy.

    PubMed

    Maccari, S; Bassi, C; Giovannini, A G; Plancher, A C

    1991-12-01

    Late side effects of alpha-interferon therapy include some autoimmune diseases, such as thyroiditis. We present the case of a patient with severe chronic active hepatitis and hepatitis-C-virus positivity, who during alpha-interferon therapy developed an autoimmune thyroiditis and at the same time arthropathy with some characteristics of rheumatoid arthritis (several articular stations simultaneously affected, involvement of the hand joints and morning stiffness). PMID:1666349

  6. Inhibited interferon-gamma but normal interleukin-3 production from rats flown on the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Cheryl L.; Lyte, Mark; Williams, Joann; Mandel, Adrian D.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    Rats were flown on Space Shuttle SL-3 for one week. When spleen cells were removed from these rats and challenged with concanavalin-A, interferon-gamma production was severely inhibited, while interleukin-3 production was unaffected compared to ground-based control rats. These data indicate that there is a defect in interferon-gamma production in rats that have been exposed to spaceflight. This defect could contribute to, and be one reason for, immunosuppression observed after spaceflight.

  7. Gamma-interferon alters globin gene expression in neonatal and adult erythroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.A.; Perrine, S.P.; Antognetti, G.; Perlmutter, D.H.; Emerson, S.G.; Sieff, C.; Faller, D.V.

    1987-06-01

    The effect of gamma-interferon on fetal hemoglobin synthesis by purified cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors was studied with a radioligand assay to measure hemoglobin production by BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Coculture with recombinant gamma-interferon resulted in a significant and dose-dependent decrease in fetal hemoglobin production by neonatal and adult, but not fetal, BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Accumulation of fetal hemoglobin by cord blood BFU-E-derived erythroblasts decreased up to 38.1% of control cultures (erythropoietin only). Synthesis of both G gamma/A gamma globin was decreased, since the G gamma/A gamma ratio was unchanged. Picograms fetal hemoglobin per cell was decreased by gamma-interferon addition, but picograms total hemoglobin was unchanged, demonstrating that a reciprocal increase in beta-globin production occurred in cultures treated with gamma-interferon. No toxic effect of gamma-interferon on colony growth was noted. The addition of gamma-interferon to cultures resulted in a decrease in the percentage of HbF produced by adult BFU-E-derived cells to 45.6% of control. Fetal hemoglobin production by cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors, was not significantly affected by the addition of recombinant GM-CSF, recombinant interleukin 1 (IL-1), recombinant IL-2, or recombinant alpha-interferon. Although fetal progenitor cells appear unable to alter their fetal hemoglobin program in response to any of the growth factors added here, the interaction of neonatal and adult erythroid progenitors with gamma-interferon results in an altered expression of globin genes.

  8. Antipyrine clearance and response to interferon treatment in patients with chronic active hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Coverdale, S; Byth, K; Field, J; Liddle, C; Lin, R; Farrell, G C

    1995-10-01

    To determine whether hepatic metabolic function affects the response to interferon treatment, we measured antipyrine clearance (APC) in 85 patients with chronic active hepatitis C and compared the results with treatment outcome. Among 55 patients who responded to interferon by normalization of alanine transaminase (ALT), median APC before treatment was 0.47 (range, 0.12 to 0.98; normal range, 0.34 to 1.02 mL/min/kg body wt), a value that was significantly greater than in 30 nonresponders (0.23; 0.08 to 0.67 mL/min/kg body wt, P < .001). APC was closely associated with response to interferon. The response rate among cases with values > 0.25 mL/min/kg body weight was 79%, the same as in cases without cirrhosis. Cases without cirrhosis and with APC of > 0.25 mL/min/kg body weight had an 85% chance of responding to interferon; this was unlikely a simple reflection of histological activity, because the correlation with Scheuer score was poor in this subgroup (r = -.31, P < .05). A second, independent group of 43 patients was used to test the predictive value of APC (using 0.25 mL/min/kg body wt as a cut-off) for response to interferon treatment. In this group, APC correctly predicted positive response to interferon in 75% of cases. APC was also used to measure the effects of treatment on hepatic metabolic function. Regardless of outcome, there was no change in APC at the end of a 6-month course of interferon treatment. Six months later, however, improvement in APC (14%; P < .05) was evident among responders but not in those who had failed to respond to interferon.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7557852

  9. Interferon-γ Suppresses Intestinal Epithelial Aquaporin-1 Expression via Janus Kinase and STAT3 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Dicay, Michael S.; Hirota, Christina L.; Ronaghan, Natalie J.; Peplowski, Michael A.; Zaheer, Raza S.; Carati, Colin A.; MacNaughton, Wallace K.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are associated with dysregulated electrolyte and water transport and resultant diarrhea. Aquaporins are transmembrane proteins that function as water channels in intestinal epithelial cells. We investigated the effect of the inflammatory cytokine, interferon-γ, which is a major player in inflammatory bowel diseases, on aquaporin-1 expression in a mouse colonic epithelial cell line, CMT93. CMT93 monolayers were exposed to 10 ng/mL interferon-γ and aquaporin-1 mRNA and protein expressions were measured by real-time PCR and western blot, respectively. In other experiments, CMT93 cells were pretreated with inhibitors or were transfected with siRNA to block the effects of Janus kinases, STATs 1 and 3, or interferon regulatory factor 2, prior to treatment with interferon-γ. Interferon-γ decreased aquaporin-1 expression in mouse intestinal epithelial cells in a manner that did not depend on the classical STAT1/JAK2/IRF-1 pathway, but rather, on an alternate Janus kinase (likely JAK1) as well as on STAT3. The pro-inflammatory cytokine, interferon-γ may contribute to diarrhea associated with intestinal inflammation in part through regulation of the epithelial aquaporin-1 water channel via a non-classical JAK/STAT receptor signalling pathway. PMID:25793528

  10. Enhanced resistance to acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi in mice treated with an interferon inducer.

    PubMed Central

    James, S L; Kipnis, T L; Sher, A; Hoff, R

    1982-01-01

    For an exploration of the effects of interferon-inducible resistance mechanisms in acute American trypanosomiasis, the synthetic interferon inducer tilerone hydrochloride was administered to mice of the C57BL/6J strain, which is highly resistant to Trypanosoma cruzi, 18 to 24 h before infection with a potentially lethal dose of bloodstream trypomastigotes. Although all of the control mice died within 30 days of the acute infection, approximately 50% of the tilerone-treated animals were able to survive indefinitely (P less than 0.05). The tilerone-treated mice demonstrated significant levels of serum interferon and splenic natural killer cells at the time of infection. Macrophages isolated from the peritoneal cavities of tilerone-treated C57BL/6J mice appeared to kill significant numbers of trypanosomes during 2 to 3 days of in vitro culture, indicating that activated macrophages may contribute to the enhanced resistance to T. cruzi infection in these mice. Beige mice treated with tilerone did not survive T. cruzi infection as well as tilerone-treated heterozygotes did, suggesting a role for natural killer cells in interferon-induced resistance. These results suggest that interferon or effector mechanisms enhanced by interferon induction can play a significant role in influencing resistance to T. cruzi infection. PMID:6173326

  11. Transcriptome analysis reveals a classical interferon signature induced by IFNλ4 in human primary cells.

    PubMed

    Lauber, C; Vieyres, G; Terczyńska-Dyla, E; Anggakusuma; Dijkman, R; Gad, H H; Akhtar, H; Geffers, R; Vondran, F W R; Thiel, V; Kaderali, L; Pietschmann, T; Hartmann, R

    2015-09-01

    The IFNL4 gene is negatively associated with spontaneous and treatment-induced clearance of hepatitis C virus infection. The activity of IFNλ4 has an important causal role in the pathogenesis, but the molecular details are not fully understood. One possible reason for the detrimental effect of IFNλ4 could be a tissue-specific regulation of an unknown subset of genes. To address both tissue and subtype specificity in the interferon response, we treated primary human hepatocytes and airway epithelial cells with IFNα, IFNλ3 or IFNλ4 and assessed interferon mediated gene regulation using transcriptome sequencing. Our data show a surprisingly similar response to all three subtypes of interferon. We also addressed the tissue specificity of the response, and identified a subset of tissue-specific genes. However, the interferon response is robust in both tissues with the majority of the identified genes being regulated in hepatocytes as well as airway epithelial cells. Thus we provide an in-depth analysis of the liver interferon response seen over an array of interferon subtypes and compare it to the response in the lung epithelium. PMID:26066369

  12. [The treatment of renal cell carcinoma with recombinant human leukocyte interferon].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, J; Yamauchi, T; Hashimura, T; Yoshida, O; Kohnami, T; Tomoyoshi, T; Ogura, K; Fukuyama, T; Nakagawa, K

    1985-03-01

    Recombinant human leukocyte (alpha) interferon was administered i.m. at the initial dose of 3 X 10(6) U/day to 27 patients with measurable metastatic renal cell carcinoma during the past 2 years. The results of 22 of these patients were evaluable. Three patients (13.6%) showed partial response; 3 patients (13.6%), minor response; 7 patients (31.8%), no change; and 9 patients (40.9%), progressive disease. Major toxicity consisted of fever (55.5%), anorexia (44.4%), malaise (22.2%), elevation of GOT/GPT (48.1%), leukopenia (44.4%) and thrombocytopenia (29.6%). When the 3 patients who showed stabilization (S) and the 2 patients who showed mixed effects (ME) among the 7 patients who showed no change are classified into the responded group, half the patients had some response to interferon. Characteristics of these responders (PR + MR + ME + S) were good performance status, relatively longer disease-free interval, metastases limited to the lungs or metastasis to lungs and one other organ excluding the liver, and frequency of interferon-induced thrombocytopenia. Interferon administration is still being continued to 4 patients on an outpatient basis, 5 patients are hospitalized and 13 patients have died. In conclusion, patients with pulmonary metastases seem to be the best responding group for interferon treatment in renal cell carcinoma and further trials, especially combined regimens with chemotherapy and/or other kinds of interferon should be tested. PMID:4025077

  13. Retinopathy during interferon-β treatment for multiple sclerosis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gaetani, Lorenzo; Menduno, Paola S; Cometa, Francesco; Di Gregorio, Maria; Sarchielli, Paola; Cagini, Carlo; Calabresi, Paolo; Di Filippo, Massimiliano

    2016-03-01

    The onset of new visual symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis is often associated with a neuro-ophthalmologic manifestation of the disease. However, other possible differential diagnoses need to be ruled out, including drug-induced retinal side effects. Although uncommon, retinal side effects of interferon-beta formulations may occur, and need to be promptly recognized and treated by neurologists. In this manuscript, we report the case of a 37-year-old woman affected by multiple sclerosis diagnosed with interferon beta-associated retinopathy and we review the literature with regard to the epidemiology, clinical presentation, management and follow-up of interferon beta-associated retinopathy. Interferon-beta induced retinopathy seems to be an uncommon and a dose-related side effect in multiple sclerosis patients. Retinopathy tends to completely resolve after treatment discontinuation. Neurologists must be aware that immune-modulatory drugs, in particular interferon beta, have been reported to cause retinal side effects. In multiple sclerosis patients complaining of new visual symptoms during interferon-beta treatment, it is thus advisable to perform an ophthalmological assessment to rule out and properly manage retinopathy. PMID:26292794

  14. Dual Modulation of Type I Interferon Response by Bluetongue Virus

    PubMed Central

    Doceul, Virginie; Chauveau, Emilie; Lara, Estelle; Bréard, Emmanuel; Sailleau, Corinne; Zientara, Stéphan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus that causes an economically important disease in ruminants. BTV infection is a strong inducer of type I interferon (IFN-I) in multiple cell types. It has been shown recently that BTV and, more specifically, the nonstructural protein NS3 of BTV are able to modulate the IFN-I synthesis pathway. However, nothing is known about the ability of BTV to counteract IFN-I signaling. Here, we investigated the effect of BTV on the IFN-I response pathway and, more particularly, the Janus tyrosine kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription protein (STAT) signaling pathway. We found that BTV infection triggered the expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) in A549 cells. However, when BTV-infected cells were stimulated with external IFN-I, we showed that activation of the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) promoter and expression of ISGs were inhibited. We found that this inhibition involved two different mechanisms that were dependent on the time of infection. After overnight infection, BTV blocked specifically the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT1. This inhibition correlated with the redistribution of STAT1 in regions adjacent to the nucleus. At a later time point of infection, BTV was found to interfere with the activation of other key components of the JAK/STAT pathway and to induce the downregulation of JAK1 and TYK2 protein expression. Overall, our study indicates for the first time that BTV is able to interfere with the JAK/STAT pathway to modulate the IFN-I response. IMPORTANCE Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes a severe disease in ruminants and has an important impact on the livestock economy in areas of endemicity such as Africa. The emergence of strains, such as serotype 8 in Europe in 2006, can lead to important economic losses due to commercial restrictions and prophylactic measures. It has been known for many years that BTV is a strong inducer of type I

  15. HIV Downregulates Interferon-Stimulated Genes in Primary Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wie, Seong-Heon; Du, Pinyi; Luong, Tiffany Q.; Rought, Steffney E.; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Lozach, Jean; Corbeil, Jacques; Kornbluth, Richard S.; Richman, Douglas D.

    2013-01-01

    HIV is able to outpace the innate immune response, including that mediated by interferon (IFN), to establish a productive infection. Primary macrophages, however, may be protected from HIV infection by treatment with type I IFN before virus exposure. The ability of HIV to modulate the type I IFN-mediated innate immune response when it encounters a cell that has already been exposed to IFN remains poorly defined. The optimal pretreatment time (12 h) and the most potent HIV-inhibitors (e.g., IFN-α2 and -ω) were identified to investigate the ability of HIV to modulate an established type I IFN response. Gene expression at the level of the entire transcriptome was then compared between primary macrophages treated with type I IFNs, as opposed to treated with IFNs and then infected with HIV. Although HIV was not able to establish a robust infection, the virus was able to downregulate a number of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) with a fold change greater than 1.5 (i.e., AXL, IFI27, IFI44, IFI44L, ISG15, OAS1, OAS3, and XAF1). The downregulation of OAS1 by the presence of HIV was confirmed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In conclusion, even though HIV replication is significantly inhibited by IFN pretreatment, the virus is able to downregulate the transcription of known antiviral ISGs (e.g., IFI44, ISG15, and OAS1). PMID:23276142

  16. Variable Resistance of RMS to Interferon γ Signaling.

    PubMed

    Simon-Keller, Katja; Mößinger, Katharina; Bohlender, Anna-Lena; Ströbel, Philipp; Marx, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Aims. Chimeric T cells directed to the γ-subunit of the fetal acetylcholine receptor (fAChR) produce large amounts of interferon-γ (IFNγ) on coculture with fAChR-expressing rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cells prior to RMS cell death. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether IFNγ blocks proliferation and survival of RMS cells and modulates expression of genes with relevance for cytotoxicity of chimeric T cells. Methods. Expression levels of IFNγ receptor (IFNGR), AChR, MHCI, MHCII, and CIITA (class II transactivator) by RMS were checked by flow cytometry, qRT-PCR, and western blot. Proliferation and cell survival were investigated by annexin V and propidium iodide staining and MTT (thiazolyl-blue-tetrazolium-bromide) assay. Key phosphorylation and binding sites of IFNGRs were checked by DNA sequencing. Results. IFNγ treatment blocked proliferation in 3 of 6 RMS cell lines, but reduced survival in only one. IFNGR was expressed at levels comparable to controls and binding sites for JAK and STAT1 were intact. Induction of several target genes (e.g., AChR, MHCI, and MHCII) by IFNγ was detected on the RNA level but not protein level. Conclusions. IFNγ does not significantly contribute to the killing of RMS cells by fAChR directed chimeric T cells. Signalling downstream of the IFNR receptor, including the posttranscriptional level, is impaired in most RMS cell lines. PMID:22919516

  17. Variable Resistance of RMS to Interferon γ Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Simon-Keller, Katja; Mößinger, Katharina; Bohlender, Anna-Lena; Ströbel, Philipp; Marx, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Aims. Chimeric T cells directed to the γ-subunit of the fetal acetylcholine receptor (fAChR) produce large amounts of interferon-γ (IFNγ) on coculture with fAChR-expressing rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cells prior to RMS cell death. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether IFNγ blocks proliferation and survival of RMS cells and modulates expression of genes with relevance for cytotoxicity of chimeric T cells. Methods. Expression levels of IFNγ receptor (IFNGR), AChR, MHCI, MHCII, and CIITA (class II transactivator) by RMS were checked by flow cytometry, qRT-PCR, and western blot. Proliferation and cell survival were investigated by annexin V and propidium iodide staining and MTT (thiazolyl-blue-tetrazolium-bromide) assay. Key phosphorylation and binding sites of IFNGRs were checked by DNA sequencing. Results. IFNγ treatment blocked proliferation in 3 of 6 RMS cell lines, but reduced survival in only one. IFNGR was expressed at levels comparable to controls and binding sites for JAK and STAT1 were intact. Induction of several target genes (e.g., AChR, MHCI, and MHCII) by IFNγ was detected on the RNA level but not protein level. Conclusions. IFNγ does not significantly contribute to the killing of RMS cells by fAChR directed chimeric T cells. Signalling downstream of the IFNR receptor, including the posttranscriptional level, is impaired in most RMS cell lines. PMID:22919516

  18. Inborn errors of anti-viral interferon immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Sancho-Shimizu, Vanessa; de Diego, Rebeca Perez; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The three types of interferon (IFNs) are essential for immunity against at least some viruses in the mouse model of experimental infections, type I IFNs displaying the broadest and strongest anti-viral activity. Consistently, human genetic studies have shown that type II IFN is largely redundant for immunity against viruses in the course of natural infections. The precise contributions of human type I and III IFNs remain undefined. However, various inborn errors of anti-viral IFN immunity have been described, which can result in either broad or narrow immunological and viral phenotypes. The broad disorders impair the response to (STAT1, TYK2) or the production of at least type I and type III IFNs following multiple stimuli (NEMO), resulting in multiple viral infections at various sites, including herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). The narrow disorders impair exclusively (TLR3) or mostly (UNC-93B, TRIF, TRAF3) the TLR3-dependent induction of type I and III IFNs, leading to HSE in apparently otherwise healthy individuals. These recent discoveries highlight the importance of human type I and III IFNs in protective immunity against viruses, including the TLR3-IFN pathway in protection against HSE. PMID:22347990

  19. Constrained evolvability of interferon suppression in an RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Garijo, Raquel; Cuevas, José M; Briz, Álvaro; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Innate immunity responses controlled by interferon (IFN) are believed to constitute a major selective pressure shaping viral evolution. Viruses encode a variety of IFN suppressors, but these are often multifunctional proteins that also play essential roles in other steps of the viral infection cycle, possibly limiting their evolvability. Here, we experimentally evolved a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) mutant carrying a defect in the matrix protein (M∆51) that abolishes IFN suppression and that has been previously used in the context of oncolytic virotherapy. Serial transfers of this virus in normal, IFN-secreting cells led to a modest recovery of IFN blocking capacity and to weak increases in viral fitness. Full-genome ultra-deep sequencing and phenotypic analysis of population variants revealed that the anti-IFN function of the matrix protein was not restored, and that the Mdelta51 defect was instead compensated by changes in the viral phosphoprotein. We also show that adaptation to IFN-secreting cells can be driven by the selection of fast-growing viruses with no IFN suppression capacity, and that these population variants can be trans-complemented by other, IFN-suppressing variants. Our results thus suggest that virus-virus interactions and alternative strategies of innate immunity evasion can determine the evolution of IFN suppression in a virus. PMID:27098004

  20. Interferon-α signaling promotes embryonic HSC maturation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Peter Geon; Canver, Matthew C; Rhee, Catherine; Ross, Samantha J; Harriss, June V; Tu, Ho-Chou; Orkin, Stuart H; Tucker, Haley O; Daley, George Q

    2016-07-14

    In the developing mouse embryo, the first hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) arise in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) and mature as they transit through the fetal liver (FL). Compared with FL and adult HSCs, AGM HSCs have reduced repopulation potential in irradiated adult transplant recipients but mechanisms underlying this deficiency in AGM HSCs are poorly understood. By co-expression gene network analysis, we deduced that AGM HSCs show lower levels of interferon-α (IFN-α)/Jak-Stat1-associated gene expression than FL HSCs. Treatment of AGM HSCs with IFN-α enhanced long-term hematopoietic engraftment and donor chimerism. Conversely, IFN-α receptor-deficient AGMs (Ifnαr1(-/-)), had significantly reduced donor chimerism. We identify adenine-thymine-rich interactive domain-3a (Arid3a), a factor essential for FL and B lymphopoiesis, as a key transcriptional co-regulator of IFN-α/Stat1 signaling. Arid3a occupies the genomic loci of Stat1 as well as several IFN-α effector genes, acting to regulate their expression. Accordingly, Arid3a(-/-) AGM HSCs had significantly reduced transplant potential, which was rescued by IFN-α treatment. Our results implicate the inflammatory IFN-α/Jak-Stat pathway in the developmental maturation of embryonic HSCs, whose manipulation may lead to increased potency of reprogrammed HSCs for transplantation. PMID:27095787

  1. Renal deposition of alpha interferon in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Panem, S; Ordóñez, N; Vilcek, J

    1983-01-01

    Earlier studies from several laboratories showed that interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) is present in the sera of a large percentage of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We now report the detection of IFN-alpha by indirect immunofluorescence in renal sections of three patients with SLE but not in six control kidneys. The immunofluorescence reaction was mediated by three hyperimmune antisera to IFN-alpha raised in three different species, but not by any preimmune serum. The reaction was specifically blocked by absorption of the anti-IFN-alpha sera with purified IFN-alpha made by recombinant DNA techniques or with IFN-alpha isolated from the serum of an SLE patient, but not by bovine serum albumin or human immunoglobulin G. In contrast, antisera to IFN-beta or IFN-gamma did not mediate immunofluorescence. The pattern of IFN-alpha deposition resembled that seen with anti-human immunoglobulin G, suggesting association with immune complexes. Immune complexes were then preparatively eluted from the homogenate of an SLE kidney by treatment with buffer at pH 2.8. Biologically active IFN was found in this eluate and was demonstrated to be IFN-alpha by specific neutralization with IFN antisera. These results extend the specific association of IFN-alpha with SLE. Images PMID:6413415

  2. Interferon-gamma Genetic Polymorphism and Expression in Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Hsien; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Lu, Hsing-Fang; Wong, Henry Sung-Ching; Yu, Hong-Ren; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Huang, Fu-Chen; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Kuo, Ho-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology. IFNG gene encoding interferon (IFN)-γ, produced by natural killer cells and T cells, has been suggested to play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of Kawasaki disease. The aim of this study was to examin the correlation of gene polymorphisms of the IFNG gene and plasma levels of IFN-γ in KD patients and their outcomes. A total of 950 subjects (381 KD and 569 controls) were recruited. Three tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (rs2069718, rs1861493, rs2069705) were selected for TaqMan allelic discrimination assay. Clinical phenotypes, coronary artery lesions (CAL), coronary artery aneurysms (CAA) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment outcomes were collected for analysis. Plasma IFN-γ levels were also measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Polymorphisms of the IFNG gene were significantly different between the normal controls and KD patients. The G allele of rs1861493 conferred a better response to IVIG treatment in KD patients. AA allele frequencies of rs1861493 were also associated with a significantly higher risk of CAA in KD patients. Furthermore, the plasma IFN-γ level was lower in the AA allele than in the GG allele of rs1861493 both before and after IVIG treatment in KD patients. This study provides the first evidence supporting an association between IFNG gene polymorphisms, susceptibility of KD, IVIG responsiveness, and plasma IFN-γ levels in KD patients. PMID:27124053

  3. Type I interferons mediate pancreatic toxicities of PERK inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiujing; Zhao, Bin; Gui, Jun; Katlinski, Kanstantsin V; Brice, Angela; Gao, Yan; Li, ChangHong; Kushner, Jake A; Koumenis, Constantinos; Diehl, J Alan; Fuchs, Serge Y

    2015-12-15

    The great preclinical promise of the pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) inhibitors in neurodegenerative disorders and cancers is marred by pancreatic injury and diabetic syndrome observed in PERK knockout mice and humans lacking PERK function and suffering from Wolcott-Rallison syndrome. PERK mediates many of the unfolded protein response (UPR)-induced events, including degradation of the type 1 interferon (IFN) receptor IFNAR1 in vitro. Here we report that whole-body or pancreas-specific Perk ablation in mice leads to an increase in IFNAR1 protein levels and signaling in pancreatic tissues. Concurrent IFNAR1 deletion attenuated the loss of PERK-deficient exocrine and endocrine pancreatic tissues and prevented the development of diabetes. Experiments using pancreas-specific Perk knockouts, bone marrow transplantation, and cultured pancreatic islets demonstrated that stabilization of IFNAR1 and the ensuing increased IFN signaling in pancreatic tissues represents a major driver of injury triggered by Perk loss. Neutralization of IFNAR1 prevented pancreatic toxicity of PERK inhibitor, indicating that blocking the IFN pathway can mitigate human genetic disorders associated with PERK deficiency and help the clinical use of PERK inhibitors. PMID:26627716

  4. The MTT assay underestimates the growth inhibitory effects of interferons.

    PubMed Central

    Jabbar, S. A.; Twentyman, P. R.; Watson, J. V.

    1989-01-01

    The growth inhibitory effects of interferons, IFN-alpha and IFN-gamma on human lung cancer cell lines were studied using both a tetrazolium (MTT) colorimetric assay and direct cell counting. Significant discrepancies between the two assays were observed, the MTT assay consistently underestimating the growth inhibitory effects of the IFNs. There was no direct chemical effect of the IFNs on the tetrazolium reduction process. IFN treated cells showed increased cell size compared with control cells, although there was little or no change in cell cycle distribution. Mitochondrial activity was 30-50% greater in IFN-gamma treated cells (COR-L23) than the controls. Reduced formazan production per cell was observed in medium which had supported cell growth for several days. Differential 'medium conditioning' led to a difference in formazan production per cell between IFN and control cells and this was the major basis of the observed discrepancy. This discrepancy was not due to the differences in the glucose concentrations between these media. However, differences in pH between the media proved to be the major contributory factor of the discrepancy. PMID:2529890

  5. Interferon-Gamma Promotes Infection of Astrocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rafael Rodrigues; Mariante, Rafael M.; Silva, Andrea Alice; dos Santos, Ana Luiza Barbosa; Roffê, Ester; Santiago, Helton; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNγ) is crucial for immunity against intracellular pathogens such as the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD). IFNγ is a pleiotropic cytokine which regulates activation of immune and non-immune cells; however, the effect of IFNγ in the central nervous system (CNS) and astrocytes during CD is unknown. Here we show that parasite persists in the CNS of C3H/He mice chronically infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain despite the increased expression of IFNγ mRNA. Furthermore, most of the T. cruzi-bearing cells were astrocytes located near IFNγ+ cells. Surprisingly, in vitro experiments revealed that pretreatment with IFNγ promoted the infection of astrocytes by T. cruzi increasing uptake and proliferation of intracellular forms, despite inducing increased production of nitric oxide (NO). Importantly, the effect of IFNγ on T. cruzi uptake and growth is completely blocked by the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibody Infliximab and partially blocked by the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis L-NAME. These data support that IFNγ fuels astrocyte infection by T. cruzi and critically implicate IFNγ-stimulated T. cruzi-infected astrocytes as sources of TNF and NO, which may contribute to parasite persistence and CNS pathology in CD. PMID:25695249

  6. Nasal absorption of interferon: Enhancement by surfactant agents

    SciTech Connect

    Baglioni, C.; Phipps, R.J. )

    1990-10-01

    The effect of spraying the nasal mucosa with an aerosol of recombinant human interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha 2a) was studied in an animal model, the sheep, because cultures of sheep cells were found to be responsive to the antiviral activity of this IFN. Binding assays with {sup 125}I-labeled IFN-alpha 2a detected very few receptors in sheep nasal mucosa, but a membrane fraction prepared from this mucosa had abundant high-affinity receptors. Nasal mucosa homogenates were prepared from the turbinates of sheep that had been sprayed with IFN-alpha 2a aerosols, and the 2',5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A) activity induced in response was measured. To try to enhance the permeability of the mucosa, surfactant agents were added to the IFN and aerosols generated. There were measurable levels of 2-5A synthetase after aerosols with added sodium deoxycholate or, better, polyoxyethylene 9-lauryl ether. This latter surfactant was well tolerated in previous studies with intranasally administered insulin. The level of 2-5A synthetase induced was related to the dose of IFN, and the increased activity persisted up to 72 h after an IFN aerosol. These studies suggest that surfactant agents may make IFN aerosols much more effective for the prophylaxis of respiratory virus infections.

  7. Interferon Beta: From Molecular Level to Therapeutic Effects.

    PubMed

    Haji Abdolvahab, M; Mofrad, M R K; Schellekens, H

    2016-01-01

    Interferon beta (IFNβ) is a cytokine that is naturally produced by the immune system in response to biological and chemical stimuli. It signals by binding to the heterodimeric type I IFN receptor composed of the IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 chains, and regulates the expression of a plethora of genes by means of the classical JAK/STAT and other pathways. IFNβ is pleiotropic in that it elicits antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory activities on numerous cell types. The biological activities underpin the mechanisms by which the protein is used to treat various diseases such as hepatitis C infection and multiple sclerosis. Despite the success of IFNβ therapy, the drug may evoke the production of antidrug antibodies that may reduce treatment efficiency. Immunogenicity is related to many factors: among them, structural properties, particularly aggregation, and T-cell and B-cell epitopes in the structure of IFNβ, appear to be important. Knowledge of the structural properties of IFNβ and its relation to immunogenicity may help scientists to develop safer and more effective forms. Several methods have been used to predict and reduce the immunogenicity of certain IFNβ drug products. In this chapter, we review the current knowledge on IFNβ from its structure, dynamic conformation, signaling pathway, and mechanism of action to its therapeutic effects. Immunogenicity and its relation to structural properties of IFNβ are also discussed. PMID:27572132

  8. Mood and cognitive side effects of interferon-alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Valentine, A D; Meyers, C A; Kling, M A; Richelson, E; Hauser, P

    1998-02-01

    The central nervous system side effects associated with interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) therapy, including depression and cognitive changes, can compromise otherwise effective immunotherapy. The term "depression" has multiple meanings ranging from a feeling of sadness to a neuropsychiatric disorder with defined diagnostic criteria. A syndrome of mood disturbance with memory impairment, cognitive slowing, and impaired executive function is common with IFN-alpha therapy and is consistent with mild subcortical dementia. Cognitive deficits and mood disorder may occur independently, and in some cases depression is a reactive phenomenon. Risk factors for development of IFN-alpha neurotoxicity include duration of treatment, high-dose therapy, and prior cranial irradiation or neurologic illness. Past or current psychiatric illness also may put the patient at risk. Subtypes of major depression are associated with neuroendocrine and neurochemical alterations that are consistent with the observed activities of IFN-alpha. This may provide insight into the etiology of IFN-alpha neurotoxicity, as well as possible interventions. Assessment of the neuropsychiatric status of patients treated with IFN-alpha should be a standard of care. Possible pharmacologic interventions to decrease the neurotoxicity associated with IFN-alpha therapy include antidepressants, psychostimulants, and opioid antagonists. Preliminary clinical and research experience suggests that it is possible to effectively palliate IFN-alpha toxicity. PMID:9482539

  9. Characterisation of gamma-interferon responsive promoters in fish.

    PubMed

    Castro, Rosario; Martin, Samuel A M; Bird, Steve; Lamas, Jesús; Secombes, Christopher J

    2008-07-01

    Reporter constructs of three interferon (IFN)-gamma-induced rainbow trout genes were generated to examine specificity to type I or type II IFN. Constructs included gammaIP-10, LMP2 and TAP2 and were used to transfect trout fibroblast cells (RTG-2) which were then exposed to rainbow trout rIFNs. The gammaIP-10 construct showed high reporter activity even in the absence of rIFNs. The LMP2 promoter contained one GAS element and two double ISRE elements, of four constructs made, only those with ISRE elements showed significant reporter activity following rIFN-gamma stimulation. The TAP2 regulatory region contained two GAS, two ISRE and one C/EBP element from which four constructs were made. Reporter expression for the construct containing all five elements showed an 11- and 2-fold increase in response to rIFN-gamma and type I rIFN, respectively. Constructs containing only the GAS elements did not respond to rIFNs. The TAP2 construct with two ISRE and the C/EBP gave the greatest dose-dependent reporter response to rIFN-gamma, with no significant response to type I rIFN. These data suggest that the ISRE elements, or elements nearby, are essential for the induction of type II IFN responsive genes in trout. The TAP2 construct is a candidate to develop a IFN-gamma reporter stable cell line. PMID:18457879

  10. Interferon-γ: Promising therapeutic target in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Joe WE; Ramji, Dipak P

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the vasculature and is the primary cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD). CVD is currently the world’s leading cause of death and the numbers are predicted to rise further because of a global increase in risk factors such as diabetes and obesity. Current therapies such as statins have had a major impact in reducing mortality from CVD. However, there is a marked residual CVD risk in patients on statin therapy. It is therefore important to understand the molecular basis of this disease in detail and to develop alternative novel therapeutics. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that is often regarded as a master regulator of atherosclerosis development. IFN-γ is able to influence several key steps during atherosclerosis development, including pro-inflammatory gene expression, the recruitment of monocytes from the blood to the activated arterial endothelium and plaque stability. This central role of IFN-γ makes it a promising therapeutic target. The purpose of this editorial is to describe the key role IFN-γ plays during atherosclerosis development, as well as discuss potential strategies to target it therapeutically. PMID:26309816

  11. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy based-on interferon-gamma detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guan-Wei; Kuo, Yi-Ching; Tsai, Pei-I.; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an ancient disease constituted a long-term menace to public health. According to World Health Organization (WHO), mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infected nearly a third of people of the world. There is about one new TB occurrence every second. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is associated with susceptibility to TB, and interferongamma release assays (IGRA) is considered to be the best alternative of tuberculin skin test (TST) for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Although significant progress has been made with regard to the design of enzyme immunoassays for IFN-γ, adopting this assay is still labor-intensive and time-consuming. To alleviate these drawbacks, we used IFN-γ antibody to facilitate the detection of IFN-γ. An experimental verification on the performance of IGRA was done in this research. We developed two biosensor configurations, both of which possess high sensitivity, specificity, and rapid IFN-γ diagnoses. The first is the electrochemical method. The second is a circular polarization interferometry configuration, which incorporates two light beams with p-polarization and s-polarization states individually along a common path, a four photo-detector quadrature configuration to arrive at a phase modulated ellipsometer. With these two methods, interaction between IFN-γ antibody and IFN-γ were explored and presented in detail.

  12. Interferon-λ: immune functions at barrier surfaces and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Lazear, Helen M.; Nice, Timothy J.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY When type III interferon (IFN-λ; also known as interleukin-28 (IL-28) and IL-29) was discovered in 2003, its antiviral function was expected to be analogous to the type I IFNs (IFN-α and IFN-β), via the induction of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). While IFN-λ stimulates expression of antiviral ISGs preferentially in cells of epithelial origin, recent studies have defined additional antiviral mechanisms in other cell types and tissues. Models of viral infection using mice lacking IFN-λ signaling and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations with human disease have expanded our understanding of the contribution of IFN-λ to the antiviral response at anatomic barriers and the immune response beyond these barriers. In this review, we highlight recent insights into the functions of IFN-λ, including its ability to restrict virus spread into the brain and to clear chronic viral infections in the gastrointestinal tract. We also discuss how IFN-λ modulates innate and adaptive immunity, autoimmunity, and tumor progression and its possible therapeutic applications in human disease. PMID:26200010

  13. Interferon-Gamma Directly Mediates Developmental Biliary Defects

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Shuang; EauClaire, Steven F.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Biliary atresia (BA) is the most common identifiable hepatobiliary disease affecting infants, in which there are defects in intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts and progressive fibrosis. Activation of interferon-gamma (IFNγ) appears to be critical in both patients with BA and in rodent models of BA. We have recently reported a zebrafish model of biliary disease that shares features with BA, in which inhibition of DNA methylation leads to intrahepatic biliary defects and activation of IFNγ target genes. Here we report that ifng genes are hypomethylated and upregulated in zebrafish larvae treated with azacytidine (azaC), an inhibitor of DNA methylation. Injection of IFNγ protein into developing zebrafish larvae leads to biliary defects, suggesting that activation of the IFNγ pathway is sufficient to cause developmental biliary defects. These defects are associated with decreased cholangiocyte proliferation and with a decrease in the expression of vhnf1 (hnf1b, tcf2), which encodes a homeodomain protein with previously reported roles in biliary development in multiple models. These results support an importance of IFNγ in mediating biliary defects, and also demonstrate the feasibility of direct injection of intact protein into developing zebrafish larvae. PMID:23448251

  14. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Interferons and Their Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are low molecular weight cell-derived proteins that include the type I, II, and III IFN families. IFNs are critical for an optimal immune response during microbial infections while dysregulated expression can lead to autoimmune diseases. Given its role in disease, it is important to understand cellular mechanisms of IFN regulation. 3′ untranslated regions (3′ UTRs) have emerged as potent regulators of mRNA and protein dosage and are controlled through multiple regulatory elements including adenylate uridylate (AU)-rich elements (AREs) and microRNA (miRNA) recognition elements. These AREs are targeted by RNA-binding proteins (ARE-BPs) for degradation and/or stabilization through an ARE-mediated decay process. miRNA are endogenous, single-stranded RNA molecules ∼22 nucleotides in length that regulate mRNA translation through the miRNA-induced silencing complex. IFN transcripts, like other labile mRNAs, harbor AREs in their 3′ UTRs that dictate the turnover of mRNA. This review is a survey of the literature related to IFN regulation by miRNA, ARE-BPs, and how these complexes interact dynamically on the 3′ UTR. Additionally, downstream effects of these post-transcriptional regulators on the immune response will be discussed. Review topics include past studies, current understanding, and future challenges in the study of post-transcriptional regulation affecting IFN responses. PMID:24702117

  15. Interferon-Inducible GTPases in Host Resistance, Inflammation and Disease.

    PubMed

    Pilla-Moffett, Danielle; Barber, Matthew F; Taylor, Gregory A; Coers, Jörn

    2016-08-28

    Cell-autonomous immunity is essential for host organisms to defend themselves against invasive microbes. In vertebrates, both the adaptive and the innate branches of the immune system operate cell-autonomous defenses as key effector mechanisms that are induced by pro-inflammatory interferons (IFNs). IFNs can activate cell-intrinsic host defenses in virtually any cell type ranging from professional phagocytes to mucosal epithelial cells. Much of this IFN-induced host resistance program is dependent on four families of IFN-inducible GTPases: the myxovirus resistance proteins, the immunity-related GTPases, the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), and the very large IFN-inducible GTPases. These GTPase families provide host resistance to a variety of viral, bacterial, and protozoan pathogens through the sequestration of microbial proteins, manipulation of vesicle trafficking, regulation of antimicrobial autophagy (xenophagy), execution of intracellular membranolytic pathways, and the activation of inflammasomes. This review discusses our current knowledge of the molecular function of IFN-inducible GTPases in providing host resistance, as well as their role in the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory Crohn's disease. While substantial advances were made in the recent past, few of the known functions of IFN-inducible GTPases have been explored in any depth, and new functions await discovery. This review will therefore highlight key areas of future exploration that promise to advance our understanding of the role of IFN-inducible GTPases in human diseases. PMID:27181197

  16. The nucleocapsid protein of measles virus blocks host interferon response

    SciTech Connect

    Takayama, Ikuyo; Sato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Akira; Omi-Furutani, Mio; Sugai, Akihiro; Kanki, Keita; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2012-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. A number of paramyxoviruses inhibit host interferon (IFN) signaling pathways in host immune systems by various mechanisms. Inhibition mechanisms have been described for many paramyxoviruses. Although there are inconsistencies among previous reports concerning MV, it appears that P/V/C proteins interfere with the pathways. In this study, we confirmed the effects of MV P gene products of a wild MV strain on IFN pathways and examined that of other viral proteins on it. Interestingly, we found that N protein acts as an IFN-{alpha}/{beta} and {gamma}-antagonist as strong as P gene products. We further investigated the mechanisms of MV-N inhibition, and revealed that MV-N blocks the nuclear import of activated STAT without preventing STAT and Jak activation or STAT degradation, and that the nuclear translocation of MV-N is important for the inhibition. The inhibitory effect of the N protein was observed as a common feature of other morbilliviruses. The results presented in this report suggest that N protein of MV as well as P/V/C proteins is involved in the inhibition of host IFN signaling pathways.

  17. Interferon-gamma promotes infection of astrocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rafael Rodrigues; Mariante, Rafael M; Silva, Andrea Alice; dos Santos, Ana Luiza Barbosa; Roffê, Ester; Santiago, Helton; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNγ) is crucial for immunity against intracellular pathogens such as the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD). IFNγ is a pleiotropic cytokine which regulates activation of immune and non-immune cells; however, the effect of IFNγ in the central nervous system (CNS) and astrocytes during CD is unknown. Here we show that parasite persists in the CNS of C3H/He mice chronically infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain despite the increased expression of IFNγ mRNA. Furthermore, most of the T. cruzi-bearing cells were astrocytes located near IFNγ+ cells. Surprisingly, in vitro experiments revealed that pretreatment with IFNγ promoted the infection of astrocytes by T. cruzi increasing uptake and proliferation of intracellular forms, despite inducing increased production of nitric oxide (NO). Importantly, the effect of IFNγ on T. cruzi uptake and growth is completely blocked by the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibody Infliximab and partially blocked by the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis L-NAME. These data support that IFNγ fuels astrocyte infection by T. cruzi and critically implicate IFNγ-stimulated T. cruzi-infected astrocytes as sources of TNF and NO, which may contribute to parasite persistence and CNS pathology in CD. PMID:25695249

  18. Role of Interferon-λ in Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Koch, Sonja; Finotto, Susetta

    2015-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFNs), or IFN-λ, are known to have potent antiviral and antiproliferative activities. It inhibits viral replication and upregulates cytotoxic responses to virally infected cells. Besides these characteristics, IFN-λ also has additional activities in the immune system. In fact, it induces the proliferation of Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells mediated in part by dendritic cells and inhibit the production of IL-5 and IL-13 in vitro. Regulatory T cells and the Th2 cytokines like IL-5 and IL-13 play important roles in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. In humans, there seems to be an inverse link between IFN-λ and the severity of allergic asthma and allergic asthma exacerbations. Asthmatic patients, without a detectable viral infection show an inverse correlation between IL-28 and IL-29 mRNA levels and severity of allergic responses in the airways. These additional features of IFN-λ that affect the adaptive immune system make it a potential immunotherapeutic agent for the treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:25592858

  19. The evolving role of interferons in viral eradication strategies.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are a family of pleiotropic cytokines that are released when viral infection is sensed by pattern recognition receptors. They induce an antiviral state in target cells through influencing the expression of hundreds of genes termed IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), which interfere with the replication of viruses in wide-ranging ways, and they have stimulatory effects on antiviral cell-mediated immunity. Although the role of therapeutic IFNs in the management of infectious diseases has predominantly been restricted to the treatment of chronic hepatotropic viruses, IFNs have effects on the replication of diverse families of viruses in cell culture models, and the potential to harness our endogenous defence system through therapeutic modulation of IFN pathways remains a tantalising prospect for both the broad-spectrum and tailored treatment of viral infections. Additionally, the study of the IFN system has become crucial to our understanding of host/pathogen molecular interactions, which provides plentiful targets for small molecule inhibitors of infection. Although the emergence of directly acting antivirals (DAAs) has resulted in the displacement of pegylated IFNα (pegIFNα) for the treatment of HCV, recent findings have suggested potential roles for IFNs and IFN-related therapies in HIV and HBV eradication strategies, opening up a new avenue of research for this important family of cytokines. PMID:27482449

  20. Recombinant interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma) in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Mahrle, G; Schulze, H J

    1990-12-01

    This paper gives a short review on the function, pharmacokinetics, and therapeutic application of recombinant interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma) in dermatology. Simultaneously, our own experiences are presented for 57 patients (phase II study) suffering from genital warts (21 patients), psoriatic arthritis (10 patients), psoriasis vulgaris (three patients), malignant melanoma (six patients), bowenoid papulosis (four patients), Behcet's disease (four patients), basal cell carcinoma (six patients), as well as herpes simplex recidivans, epidermodysplasia verruciformis, and mycosis fungoides (one patient each). We conclude that there might be an indication for treatment with rIFN-gamma in genital warts, bowenoid papulosis, Behcet's disease, and microbial infections, such as leprosy and cutaneous leishmaniasis. Even though there are reports of a limited beneficial effect of rIFN-gamma on arthritis and skin lesions in psoriasis, we failed to observe any in 10 patients. The main side effects in our low-dose study (50-100 micrograms/d) were mild fever (78%), fatigue (78%), and myalgia (65%). Laboratory tests revealed an increase in the serum triglyceride level, in particular, in psoriatic patients. PMID:2124242

  1. Ectopic expression of interferon regulatory factor-1 potentiates granulocytic differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Coccia, E M; Stellacci, E; Valtieri, M; Masella, B; Feccia, T; Marziali, G; Hiscott, J; Testa, U; Peschle, C; Battistini, A

    2001-01-01

    Numerous transcription factors allow haematopoietic cells to respond to lineage- and stage-specific cytokines and to act as their effectors. It is increasingly evident that the interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) transcription factor can selectively regulate different sets of genes depending on the cell type and/or the nature of cellular stimuli, evoking distinct responses in each. In the present study, we investigated mechanisms underlying the differentiation-inducing properties of granulocytic colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and whether IRF transcription factors are functionally relevant in myeloid differentiation. Both normal human progenitors and murine 32Dcl3 myeloblasts induced to differentiate along the granulocytic pathway showed an up-regulation of IRF-1 expression. Ectopic expression of IRF-1 did not abrogate the growth factor requirement of 32Dcl3 cells, although a small percentage of cells that survived cytokine deprivation differentiated fully to neutrophils. Moreover, in the presence of G-CSF, granulocytic differentiation of IRF-1-expressing cells was accelerated, as assessed by morphology and expression of specific differentiation markers. Down-modulation of c-Myb protein and direct stimulation of lysozyme promoter activity by IRF-1 were also observed. Conversely, constitutive expression of IRF-2, a repressor of IRF-1 transcriptional activity, completely abrogated the G-CSF-induced neutrophilic maturation. We conclude that IRF-1 exerts a pivotal role in granulocytic differentiation and that its induction by G-CSF represents a limiting step in the early events of differentiation. PMID:11716756

  2. Palmitoyl derivatives of interferon alpha: potential for cutaneous delivery.

    PubMed

    Foldvari, M; Attah-Poku, S; Hu, J; Li, Q; Hughes, H; Babiuk, L A; Kruger, S

    1998-10-01

    Palmitoyl derivatives of interferon alpha2b (p-IFNalpha) were prepared by covalent attachment of the fatty acid to lysine residues in the protein through a reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide palmitate ester. The p-IFNalpha was characterized by capillary electrophoresis (CE), mass spectrometry (MS), SDS-PAGE, and antiviral assay. Flow-through diffusion cells and human breast skins were used to measure cutaneous and percutaneous absorption. Formation of p-IFNalpha derivatives was demonstrated by CE to be dependent on reaction time and reagent: protein ratio. Electrospray MS of the crude p-IFNalpha mixture indicated three populations of IFNalpha derivatives with 10, 11, and 12 palmitoyl substitutions. The addition of palmitoyl residues to IFNalpha under the conditions described reduced the antiviral specific activity by 50%. However, the cutaneous absorption of p-IFNalpha was about 5-6 times greater than the parent protein. The amount of p-IFNalpha and IFN alpha in whole skin after 24 h of treatment was 2.106 +/- 1.216 microg/cm2 and 0.407 +/- 0.108 microg/cm2, respectively. Approximately two times higher flux was detected for p-IFNalpha compared to the nonfatty acylated IFNalpha. The total amount of drug diffused in 24 h was also approximately two times higher for the p-IFNalpha. The results indicate a potential for using fatty acylated derivatives of IFN alpha for dermal and transdermal delivery. PMID:9758677

  3. Clinical and Immunologic Basis of Interferon Therapy in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Tarhini, Ahmad A.; Kirkwood, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Interferon α2b (IFN-α2b) at high dosage is critical to the reversal of signaling defects in T cells of melanoma patients, and to the durable effector (α DC1) polarization of dendritic cells. These immunoregulatory effects appear to be uniquely achieved with levels of IFN-α only attainable in vivo using the high-dose regimen of IFN-α2b (HDI). Three US cooperative group studies have evaluated the benefit of HDI as an adjuvant therapy for high-risk melanoma. All have demonstrated significant and durable reduction in the frequency of relapse, while the first and third trials have demonstrated significant improvements in the fractions of patients surviving compared with observation (E1684) or with a ganglioside vaccine (GMK, E1694). A meta-analysis of 13 randomized trials evaluating adjuvant IFN therapy has now also demonstrated significant benefits for IFN in terms of RFS and OS. Research of IFN-α in melanoma is now focused on identifying prognostic markers of outcome and predictors of therapeutic response. PMID:20074274

  4. Interactions of the interferon system with cellular metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1986-01-01

    The results of studies concerning the interaction of the interferon (Inf) system with the activities of carcinogens, tumor promoters, and cytochrome P-450 are presented. The results show that the addition of a tumor promoter (TPA or 4-O-methyl-TPA) to a tissue culture enhances virus-induced Inf-gamma production, suggesting a potential value of tumor promoters in the biosynthesis of commercial Inf. On the other hand, the carcinogens were reported to inhibit the induction of Inf-alpha/beta in cultured cells and in intact animals (with no effect on the administered or preformed Inf). The demonstration of a correlation between the carcinogenic potential of a compound and its inhibitive effect on Inf production suggests a possible use of the Inf production assay in the evaluation of the carcinogenicity of chemicals. In addition, it was shown that the induction of Inf-alpha/beta as well as the administration of this Inf depresses the levels of rat liver cytochrome P-450 which is responsible for binding lipophilic drugs, steroids, and carcinogens, thus increasing the toxicity of the respective chemical.

  5. Gamma Interferon Release Assays for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Denkinger, Claudia M.; Kik, Sandra V.; Rangaka, Molebogeng X.; Zwerling, Alice; Oxlade, Olivia; Metcalfe, John Z.; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Dowdy, David W.; Dheda, Keertan; Banaei, Niaz

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Identification and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) can substantially reduce the risk of developing active disease. However, there is no diagnostic gold standard for LTBI. Two tests are available for identification of LTBI: the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release assay (IGRA). Evidence suggests that both TST and IGRA are acceptable but imperfect tests. They represent indirect markers of Mycobacterium tuberculosis exposure and indicate a cellular immune response to M. tuberculosis. Neither test can accurately differentiate between LTBI and active TB, distinguish reactivation from reinfection, or resolve the various stages within the spectrum of M. tuberculosis infection. Both TST and IGRA have reduced sensitivity in immunocompromised patients and have low predictive value for progression to active TB. To maximize the positive predictive value of existing tests, LTBI screening should be reserved for those who are at sufficiently high risk of progressing to disease. Such high-risk individuals may be identifiable by using multivariable risk prediction models that incorporate test results with risk factors and using serial testing to resolve underlying phenotypes. In the longer term, basic research is necessary to identify highly predictive biomarkers. PMID:24396134

  6. Intraperitoneal administration of interferon beta in ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rambaldi, A; Introna, M; Colotta, F; Landolfo, S; Colombo, N; Mangioni, C; Mantovani, A

    1985-07-15

    Eight patients with advanced ovarian carcinomas resistant to conventional chemotherapy were injected with interferon (IFN) beta (3 X 10(6) U) intraperitoneally twice a week. Seven subjects had ascites. Side effects included abdominal pain, fever, and constipation, but no hematologic toxicity was observed. Growth of solid tumor lesions was unaffected by IFN beta, with the possible exception of one patient who had stable disease. IFN beta intraperitoneally inhibited completely the formation of ascites in four of seven patients with effusions. Natural killer (NK) cell activity was measured in peripheral blood and tumor-associated lymphocytes (PBL and TAL). Using stringent criteria that included repeated assessment of baseline activity, a clear cut increase in NK cytotoxicity of TAL was detected in two of six subjects from whom TAL could be purified. Augmentation of NK activity was restricted to the peritoneal compartment with no effect on PBL. Studies on biologic response modifiers encompassing an analysis of events taking place at sites directly involved by neoplasia may provide an opportunity for generating information on the in situ regulation of tumor-associated host defense mechanisms in humans. PMID:2408731

  7. Development of myasthenia gravis after interferon alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Gurtubay, I G; Morales, G; Aréchaga, O; Gállego, J

    1999-03-01

    Interferon (IFN) alpha is now used in the treatment of some malignant diseases and chronic viral hepatitis. There have been several reports of development of autoantibodies and autoimmune diseases or the deterioration of preexisting disorders in patients under treatment. We enclose a case of myasthenia gravis (MG) which developed after six weeks of treatment as fluctuating bilateral ptosis, intermittent diplopia, and mild weakness of limb and neck muscles. A test dose of edrophonium chloride was administered, resulting in improved muscle strength. Elevated anti acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody titer was found. Single fiber electromyography showed an increased jitter from extensor digitorum communis, frequently accompanied by transmission blocking. Repetitive electric 3 Hz stimulation of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, revealed an abnormal decrement of 28% in compound motor action potential. Myasthenia gravis was diagnosed and the patient was given pyridostigmine, immunoglobulines and prednisone with benefit. Six months latter he developed an acute myasthenic crisis with severe respiratory failure and high anti AChR antibody titer. IFN-alpha can induce MG or simply manifests a preexisting subclinical disease, but otherwise its therapeutic efficacy in MG has been shown in experimental and clinical studies. Autoimmune mechanisms, as the release of different cytokines as IFN, by immunocompetent cells, may be involved in the pathogenesis of both MG and chronic active hepatitis. Autoantibody production against postsynaptic membrane structures by IFN-alpha could be the underlying pathophysiology. PMID:10207675

  8. [Phase I study of a recombinant gamma interferon (S-6810)].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, M; Takaku, F; Maekawa, T; Ota, K; Ichimaru, M; Izuo, M; Takakura, K; Ikeda, S; Koiso, K; Machida, T

    1987-02-01

    A phase I study of a recombinant gamma interferon (S-6810) was conducted in a cooperative study involving 11 institutions. S-6810 was administered at doses of 2, 4, 8, 12, 32 and 64 X 10(6) U/m2 by one-hour infusion for 5 consecutive days. A total of 40 courses were administered to 31 patients. High fever exceeding 38 degrees C with chills occurred in about 80% of patients. The incidences of other toxicities were fatigue in 50%, gastrointestinal toxicities in 30-40%, and changes in hepatic enzymes and hematologic toxicities in 20-30%. Dose-limiting factors were judged to be hypotension, leukopenia and central nervous toxicity. Maximum tolerated dose was 64 X 10(6) U/m2 and an optimal dose for phase II study was considered to be 6 X 10(6) U/m2 by daily chronic schedule. Blood concentration was highest at the end of infusion, and then decreased rapidly with a biphasic curve. The peak concentrations were elevated by escalation of doses. A partial response was observed in a patient with mycosis fungoides. PMID:3101608

  9. Inhibition of Type III Interferon Activity by Orthopoxvirus Immunomodulatory Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The type III interferon (IFN) family elicits an antiviral response that is nearly identical to that evoked by IFN-α/β. However, these cytokines (known as IFN-λ1, 2, and 3) signal through a distinct receptor, and thus may be resistant to the evasion strategies used by some viruses to avoid the IFN-α/β response. Orthopoxviruses are highly resistant to IFN-α/β because they encode well-characterized immunomodulatory proteins that inhibit IFN activity. These include a secreted receptor (B18R) that neutralizes IFN-α/β, and a cytoplasmic protein (E3L) that blocks IFN-α/β effector functions in infected cells. We therefore determined the ability of these immunomodulators to abrogate the IFN-λ–induced antiviral response. We found that (i) vaccinia virus (VACV) replication is resistant to IFN-λ antiviral activity; (ii) neither VACV B18R nor the variola virus homolog B20R neutralizes IFN-λ; (iii) VACV E3L inhibits the IFN-λ–mediated antiviral response through a PKR-dependent pathway; (iv) VACV infection inhibits IFN-λR–mediated signal transduction and gene expression. These results demonstrate differential sensitivity of IFN-λ to multiple distinct evasion mechanisms employed by a single virus. PMID:20038204

  10. Role of interferon in lymphocyte recruitment into the skin

    SciTech Connect

    Issekutz, T.B.; Stoltz, J.M.; Webster, D.M.

    1986-05-01

    Large numbers of lymphocytes are recruited from the blood into sites of cutaneous DTH reactions. Our goal was to investigate the factors controlling this recruitment. /sup 111/In-labeled peritoneal exudate lymphocytes were injected iv and the accumulation of these cells in skin sites injected with a variety of stimuli, was used to measure lymphocyte recruitment in rats. Large numbers of lymphocytes migrated into vaccinia- and KLH-injected sites in sensitized animals, but only into the viral and not the KLH lesions in non-immune animals. Lymphocytes also migrated efficiently into sites injected with the alpha-interferon (IFN) inducers, uv-inactivated vaccinia virus and poly I:C, as well as into sites injected with IFN. In each case there was a dose-response relationship. Analysis of the kinetics of lymphocyte recruitment demonstrated that the peak rate of migration occurred most rapidly after the injection of IFN, later after poly I:C, and was slowest to be reached after vaccinia virus. Rabbit anti-IFN blocked the recruitment of lymphocytes by uv-inactivated vaccinia and by IFN. Histologically, all of these sites demonstrated a dense mononuclear cell infiltrate in the dermis. It is suggested that IFN may be an important mediator in the recruitment of lymphocytes into inflammatory reactions.

  11. Constrained evolvability of interferon suppression in an RNA virus

    PubMed Central

    Garijo, Raquel; Cuevas, José M.; Briz, Álvaro; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Innate immunity responses controlled by interferon (IFN) are believed to constitute a major selective pressure shaping viral evolution. Viruses encode a variety of IFN suppressors, but these are often multifunctional proteins that also play essential roles in other steps of the viral infection cycle, possibly limiting their evolvability. Here, we experimentally evolved a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) mutant carrying a defect in the matrix protein (M∆51) that abolishes IFN suppression and that has been previously used in the context of oncolytic virotherapy. Serial transfers of this virus in normal, IFN-secreting cells led to a modest recovery of IFN blocking capacity and to weak increases in viral fitness. Full-genome ultra-deep sequencing and phenotypic analysis of population variants revealed that the anti-IFN function of the matrix protein was not restored, and that the Mdelta51 defect was instead compensated by changes in the viral phosphoprotein. We also show that adaptation to IFN-secreting cells can be driven by the selection of fast-growing viruses with no IFN suppression capacity, and that these population variants can be trans-complemented by other, IFN-suppressing variants. Our results thus suggest that virus-virus interactions and alternative strategies of innate immunity evasion can determine the evolution of IFN suppression in a virus. PMID:27098004

  12. [Antibacterial effects of gamma-interferon in experimental Klebsiella infection].

    PubMed

    Fil'chakov, I V; Avdeeva, L V; Fil'chakov, F V; Spivak, N Ia; Protsap, E I; Ivanenko, V K

    1992-07-01

    The results of the experimental study on the effect of the natural and recombinant gamma-interferons (gamma-IFs) of mice on the process of the infection caused by Klebsiella sp. are presented. The infection was reproduced by intraperitoneal contamination of mice with a virulent culture of Klebsiella pneumoniae 5055, line SHK. The gamma-IFs were administered to the animals in a dose of 250 units per mouse on days 1 and 3 after the contamination. Survival of the animals, clearance of the pathogen from the blood and liver and functional activity of the phagocytes in the contaminated mice were investigated. It was shown that both the natural and recombinant gamma-IF stimulated the phagocytic activity and oxidative metabolism of the phagocytes in the contaminated mice. Activation of these functions after the use of the natural gamma-IF correlated with its marked protective effect and accelerated elimination of the pathogen from the host which was not observed after the use of the recombinant gamma-IF. PMID:1456806

  13. Dissection of the interferon gamma-MHC class II signal transduction pathway reveals that type I and type II interferon systems share common signalling component(s).

    PubMed Central

    Loh, J E; Chang, C H; Fodor, W L; Flavell, R A

    1992-01-01

    We have used a herpes virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) based metabolic selection system to isolate mutants defective in the interferon gamma mediated induction of the MHC class II promoter. All the mutations act in trans and result in no detectable induction of MHC and invariant chain (Ii) gene expression. Scatchard analysis indicates that the mutants have a normal number of surface IFN gamma receptors with the same affinity constant. The mutants fall into two broad categories. One class of mutants is still able to induce MHC class I, IRF-1, 9-27, 1-8 and GBP genes by IFN gamma. A second class of mutants is defective for the IFN gamma induction of all the genes tested; surprisingly, the IFN alpha/beta induction of MHC class I, 9-27, ISG54 and ISG15 genes is also defective in these mutants, although different members of this class can be discriminated by the response of the GBP and IRF-1 genes to type I interferons. These data demonstrate that the signalling pathways of both type I and type II interferon systems share common signal transduction component(s). These mutants will be useful for the study of IFN gamma regulation of class II genes and Ii chain, and to elucidate molecular components of type I and type II interferon signal transduction. Images PMID:1314162

  14. [Phase II study of recombinant human interferon gamma (S-6810) in renal cell carcinoma. Urological Cooperative Study Group of Recombinant Human Interferon Gamma (S-6810)].

    PubMed

    Machida, T; Koiso, K; Takaku, F; Ogawa, M

    1987-02-01

    A phase II study of recombinant human interferon gamma (rHuIFN-gamma) administered intravenously and intramuscularly was carried out in 84 patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma with the cooperation of 18 institutions throughout Japan. The eligibility of the patients and evaluation of the responses were undertaken according to the general criteria proposed by Drs. Koyama and Saito. Out of 84 cases entered in this phase II study, 62 patients were evaluable for antitumor effects. In the case of continuous administration of 8-12 X 10(6) U/m2/day interferon for 4 weeks, 32 patients were evaluable. The response rate was 6.3%. In the case of intermittent therapy of 40 X 10(6) U/m2/day interferon for 8 weeks, six out of 30 patients (20%) were evaluable as responders. Among them, one patient showed a complete response, all patients tolerated this type of interferon well. Major adverse effects were fever (86.8%), anorexia (67.1%), fatigue (53.9%) and leukopenia (42.1%). No life-threatening toxicities were found. The results of this study showed that rHuIFN-gamma had antitumor activity against renal cell carcinoma. PMID:3101607

  15. Interferon induced protection against foot-and-mouth disease virus correlates with enhanced tissue specific innate immune cell infiltration and interferon stimulated gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In previous studies we have demonstrated that type I interferon (IFN-alpha/beta) or a combination of IFN-alpha/beta and type II IFNs (IFN-gamma) delivered by replication-defective human adenovirus (Ad5) vectors can protect swine when challenged 1 day later with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). P...

  16. Type I and Type II Interferons Inhibit the Translation of Murine Norovirus Proteins▿

    PubMed Central

    Changotra, Harish; Jia, Yali; Moore, Tara N.; Liu, Guangliang; Kahan, Shannon M.; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Karst, Stephanie M.

    2009-01-01

    Human noroviruses are responsible for more than 95% of nonbacterial epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide. Both onset and resolution of disease symptoms are rapid, suggesting that components of the innate immune response are critical in norovirus control. While the study of the human noroviruses has been hampered by the lack of small animal and tissue culture systems, our recent discovery of a murine norovirus (MNV) and its in vitro propagation have allowed us to begin addressing norovirus replication strategies and immune responses to norovirus infection. We have previously demonstrated that interferon responses are critical to control MNV-1 infection in vivo and to directly inhibit viral replication in vitro. We now extend these studies to define the molecular basis for interferon-mediated inhibition. Viral replication intermediates were not detected in permissive cells pretreated with type I interferon after either infection or transfection of virion-associated RNA, demonstrating a very early block to virion production that is after virus entry and uncoating. A similar absence of viral replication intermediates was observed in infected primary macrophages and dendritic cells pretreated with type I IFN. This was not due to degradation of incoming genomes in interferon-pretreated cells since similar levels of genomes were present in untreated and pretreated cells through 6 h of infection, and these genomes retained their integrity. Surprisingly, this block to the translation of viral proteins was not dependent on the well-characterized interferon-induced antiviral molecule PKR. Similar results were observed in cells pretreated with type II interferon, except that the inhibition of viral translation was dependent on PKR. Thus, both type I and type II interferon signaling inhibit norovirus translation in permissive myeloid cells, but they display distinct dependence on PKR for this inhibition. PMID:19297466

  17. Antifibrotic mechanism of deferoxamine in concanavalin A induced-liver fibrosis: Impact on interferon therapy.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Samar F; El-Bakly, Wesam M; El-Naga, Reem N; Awad, Azza S; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal

    2015-11-01

    Iron-overload is a well-known factor of hepatotoxicity and liver fibrosis, which found to be a common finding among hepatitis C virus patients and related to interferon resistance. We aimed to elucidate the potential antifibrotic effect of deferoxamine; the main iron chelator, and its additional usefulness to interferon-based therapy in concanavalin A-induced immunological model of liver fibrosis. Rats were treated with deferoxamine and/or pegylated interferon-α for 6 weeks. Hepatotoxicity indices, oxidative stress, inflammatory and liver fibrosis markers were assessed. Concanavalin A induced a significant increase in hepatotoxicity indices and lipid peroxidation accompanied with a significant depletion of total antioxidant capacity, glutathione level and superoxide dismutase activity. Besides, it increased CD4(+) T-cells content and the downstream inflammatory cascades, including NF-κB, TNF-α, iNOS, COX-2, IL-6 and IFN-γ. Furthermore, α-SMA, TGF-β1 and hydroxyproline were increased markedly, which confirmed by histopathology. Treatment with either deferoxamine or pegylated interferon-α alone reduced liver fibrosis markers significantly and improved liver histology. However, some of the hepatotoxicity indices and oxidative stress markers did not improve upon pegylated interferon-α treatment alone, besides the remarkable increase in IL-6. Combination therapy of deferoxamine with pegylated interferon-α further improved all previous markers, ameliorated IL-6 elevation, as well as increased hepcidin expression. In conclusion, our study provides evidences for the potent antifibrotic effects of deferoxamine and the underlying mechanisms that involved attenuating oxidative stress and subsequent inflammatory cascade, as well as the production of profibrogenic factors. Addition of deferoxamine to interferon regimen for HCV patients may offer a promising adjuvant modality to enhance therapeutic response. PMID:26358138

  18. The effects of 5-fluorouracil and interferon-alpha on early healing of experimental intestinal anastomoses.

    PubMed Central

    de Waard, J. W.; Wobbes, T.; de Man, B. M.; van der Linden, C. J.; Hendriks, T.

    1996-01-01

    The continuing search for effective adjuvant therapy after resection of intestinal malignancies has prompted a growing interest in both immediate post-operative regional chemotherapy and the combination of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and interferon-alpha as drugs of choice. We have compared the effects of both compounds, alone and together, on early healing of intestinal anastomoses. Four groups (n = 26 each) of rats underwent resection and anastomosis of both ileum and colon: a control group and three groups receiving intraperitoneal 5-FU, interferon-alpha or both on the day of surgery and the next 2 days. Animals were killed 3 or 7 days (n = 10 each) after operation in order to measure anastomotic strength and hydroxyproline content. The remaining six animals in each group were used to study anastomotic collagen synthetic capacity at day 3. Three days after operation, ileal anastomotic bursting pressure was lowered by 37% in the 5-FU/interferon-alpha group (P = 0.0104). At day 7, anastomotic breaking strength was reduced significantly in ileum (P = 0.0221) and colon (P = 0.0054) of the 5-FU/interferon-alpha group and in colon of the interferon-alpha group (P = 0.0221). Collagen synthetic capacity was strongly suppressed by 5-FU but not by interferon-alpha. However, no differences in anastomotic hydroxyproline content were observed between groups at both days 3 and 7. Thus, post-operative use of interferon-alpha, in particular in combination with 5-FU, may be detrimental to anastomotic repair in the intestine. PMID:8795572

  19. Randomized clinical trial comparing systemic interferon with diathermocoagulation in primary multiple and widespread anogenital condyloma.

    PubMed

    Benedetti Panici, P; Scambia, G; Baiocchi, G; Perrone, L; Pintus, C; Mancuso, S

    1989-09-01

    Two hundred three patients (median age 26 years; range 18-45) with untreated multiple and widespread anogenital condyloma were randomly assigned to one of four study arms in order to compare the efficacy, toxicity, and tolerability of recombinant interferon alpha-2b with those of diathermocoagulation. Of 200 evaluable patients, 51 were treated intramuscularly (IM) with 3 x 10(6) U (3 MU)/m2 daily for 3 weeks (total dose 63 MU/m2), 50 received subcutaneous thrice-weekly injections of 3 MU/m2 for 4 weeks (total dose 36 MU/m2), 51 underwent diathermocoagulation, and 48 were not treated and were used as a control group. Six months after the end of treatment, the overall response rate (complete and partial responses) was 70%: 57 and 82% for patients receiving interferon alpha-2b (IM and subcutaneously) and diathermocoagulation, respectively, and 8% for the control group. After 6 months from therapy, no significant differences in complete response were found among the different types of treatment: 20, 20, and 35% for the two interferon groups and the diathermocoagulation group, respectively. Fifteen and two complete responders in the cauterization and interferon groups, respectively, experienced disease recurrence (P less than .01). All patients given interferon therapy complained of flu-like symptoms, which declined progressively after the first week of treatment. Fatigue, lasting as long as patients received interferon, was the most prevalent chronic side effect. We conclude that systemic recombinant interferon alpha-2b is active in treating patients with primary condyloma lesions and does so as well as cauterization.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2761917

  20. Enhancement of human gamma-interferon production in recombinant E. coli using batch cultivation.

    PubMed

    Babaeipour, Valiollah; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Khalilzadeh, Rasoul; Maghsoudi, Nader; Farnoud, Amir Mohammad

    2010-04-01

    Development of inexpensive and simple culture media and appropriate induction conditions are always favorable for industry. In this research, chemical composition and stoichiometric data for gamma-interferon production and recombinant Escherichia coli growth were used in order to achieve a simple medium and favorable induction conditions. To achieve this goal, the effects of medium composition and induction conditions on the production of gamma-interferon were investigated in batch culture of E. coli BL21 (DE3) [pET3a-ifngamma]. These conditions were considered as suitable conditions for the production of gamma-interferon: 2.5x M9 medium, supplemented with a mixture of amino acids (milligram per liter), including glutamic acid 215, aspartic acid 250, lysine 160, and phenylalanine 90, and induction at late-log phase (OD(600) = 4.5). Under these conditions, dry cell weight of 6 +/- 0.2 g/l and gamma-interferon concentration of 2.15 +/- 0.1 g/l were obtained. Later, without changing the concentration ratio of amino acids and glucose, the effect of increase in the primary glucose concentration on productivity of gamma-interferon was investigated. It was found that 25 g/l glucose will result in maximum attainable biomass and recombinant human gamma-interferon. At improved conditions, a dry cell weight of 14 +/- 0.2 g/l, concentration and overall productivity of gamma-interferon 4.2 +/- 0.1 g/l and 420 +/- 10 mg/l h, respectively, were obtained. PMID:19655276

  1. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Inhibits Gamma Interferon and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression▿†

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Katharina; Wies, Effi; Neipel, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) carries four genes with homology to human interferon regulatory factors (IRFs). One of these IRFs, the viral interferon regulatory factor 3 (vIRF-3), is expressed in latently infected primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells and required for their continuous proliferation. Moreover, vIRF-3 is known to be involved in modulation of the type I interferon (IFN) response. We now show that vIRF-3 also interferes with the type II interferon system and antigen presentation to the adaptive immune system. Starting with an analysis of the transcriptome, we show that vIRF-3 inhibits expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules: small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of vIRF-3 in KSHV-infected PEL cell lines resulted in increased MHC II levels; overexpression of vIRF-3 in KSHV-negative B cells leads to downmodulation of MHC II. This regulation could be traced back to inhibition of class II transactivator (CIITA) transcription by vIRF-3. Reporter assays revealed that the gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-sensitive CIITA promoters PIV and PIII were inhibited by vIRF-3. Consistently, IFN-γ levels increased upon vIRF-3 knockdown in PEL cells. IFN-γ regulation by vIRF-3 was confirmed in reporter assays as well as by upregulation of typical IFN-γ target genes upon knockdown of vIRF-3 in PEL cells. In summary, we conclude that vIRF-3 contributes to the viral immunoevasion by downregulation of IFN-γ and CIITA and thus MHC II expression. PMID:21345951

  2. Epitope Mapping of Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies to Human Interferon-γ Using Human-Bovine Interferon-γ Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Bartek; Rudström, Karin; Ehrnfelt, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to identify conformational epitopes, recognized by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) made against human (h) interferon (IFN)-γ. Based on the mAbs' (n = 12) ability to simultaneously bind hIFN-γ in ELISA, 2 epitope clusters with 5 mAbs in each were defined; 2 mAbs recognized unique epitopes. Utilizing the mAbs' lack of reactivity with bovine (b) IFN-γ, epitopes were identified using 7 h/bIFN-γ chimeras where the helical regions (A-F) or the C terminus were substituted with bIFN-γ residues. Chimeras had a N-terminal peptide tag enabling the analysis of mAb recognition of chimeras in ELISA. The 2 mAb clusters mapped to region A and E, respectively; the epitopes of several mAbs also involved additional regions. MAbs in cluster A neutralized, to various degrees, IFN-γ-mediated activation of human cells, in line with the involvement of region A in the IFN-γ receptor interaction. MAbs mapping to region E displayed a stronger neutralizing capacity although this region has not been directly implicated in the receptor interaction. The results corroborate earlier studies and provide a detailed picture of the link between the epitope specificity and neutralizing capacity of mAbs. They further demonstrate the general use of peptide-tagged chimeric proteins as a powerful and straightforward method for efficient mapping of conformational epitopes. PMID:27336613

  3. The interferon signaling antagonist function of yellow fever virus NS5 protein is activated by Type I interferon

    PubMed Central

    Rajsbaum, Ricardo; Macleod, Jesica M. Levingston; Pisanelli, Giuseppe; Pham, Alissa; Ayllon, Juan; Miorin, Lisa; Martinez, Carles; tenOever, Benjamin R; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    Summary To successfully establish infection Flaviviruses have to overcome the antiviral state induced by type I interferon (IFN-I). The nonstructural NS5 proteins of several flaviviruses antagonize IFN-I signaling. Here we show that yellow fever virus (YFV) inhibits IFN-I signaling through a unique mechanism that involves binding of YFV NS5 to the IFN-activated transcription factor STAT2 only in cells that have been stimulated with IFN-I. This NS5-STAT2 interaction requires IFN-I-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1 and the K63-linked polyubiquitination at a lysine in the N-terminal region of YFV NS5. We identified TRIM23 as the E3 ligase that interacts with and polyubiquitinates YFV NS5 to promote its binding to STAT2 and trigger IFN-I signaling inhibition. Our results demonstrate the importance of YFV NS5 in overcoming the antiviral action of IFN-I and offer a unique example of a viral protein that is activated by the same host pathway that it inhibits. PMID:25211074

  4. Activation of Vago by interferon regulatory factor (IRF) suggests an interferon system-like antiviral mechanism in shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaozheng; Li, Haoyang; Chen, Yixiao; Chen, Yonggui; Wang, Sheng; Weng, Shao-Ping; Xu, Xiaopeng; He, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    There is a debate on whether invertebrates possess an antiviral immunity similar to the interferon (IFN) system of vertebrates. The Vago gene from arthropods encodes a viral-activated secreted peptide that restricts virus infection through activating the JAK-STAT pathway and is considered to be a cytokine functionally similar to IFN. In this study, the first crustacean IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-like gene was identified in Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. The L. vannamei IRF showed similar protein nature to mammalian IRFs and could be activated during virus infection. As a transcriptional regulatory factor, L. vannamei IRF could activate the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-containing promoter to regulate the expression of mammalian type I IFNs and initiate an antiviral state in mammalian cells. More importantly, IRF could bind the 5′-untranslated region of L. vannamei Vago4 gene and activate its transcription, suggesting that shrimp Vago may be induced in a similar manner to that of IFNs and supporting the opinion that Vago might function as an IFN-like molecule in invertebrates. These suggested that shrimp might possess an IRF-Vago-JAK/STAT regulatory axis, which is similar to the IRF-IFN-JAK/STAT axis of vertebrates, indicating that invertebrates might possess an IFN system-like antiviral mechanism. PMID:26459861

  5. Epitope Mapping of Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies to Human Interferon-γ Using Human-Bovine Interferon-γ Chimeras.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Bartek; Rudström, Karin; Ehrnfelt, Cecilia; Ahlborg, Niklas

    2016-09-01

    Our aim was to identify conformational epitopes, recognized by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) made against human (h) interferon (IFN)-γ. Based on the mAbs' (n = 12) ability to simultaneously bind hIFN-γ in ELISA, 2 epitope clusters with 5 mAbs in each were defined; 2 mAbs recognized unique epitopes. Utilizing the mAbs' lack of reactivity with bovine (b) IFN-γ, epitopes were identified using 7 h/bIFN-γ chimeras where the helical regions (A-F) or the C terminus were substituted with bIFN-γ residues. Chimeras had a N-terminal peptide tag enabling the analysis of mAb recognition of chimeras in ELISA. The 2 mAb clusters mapped to region A and E, respectively; the epitopes of several mAbs also involved additional regions. MAbs in cluster A neutralized, to various degrees, IFN-γ-mediated activation of human cells, in line with the involvement of region A in the IFN-γ receptor interaction. MAbs mapping to region E displayed a stronger neutralizing capacity although this region has not been directly implicated in the receptor interaction. The results corroborate earlier studies and provide a detailed picture of the link between the epitope specificity and neutralizing capacity of mAbs. They further demonstrate the general use of peptide-tagged chimeric proteins as a powerful and straightforward method for efficient mapping of conformational epitopes. PMID:27336613

  6. Recessive genetic deregulation abrogates c-myc suppression by interferon and is implicated in oncogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kimchi, A.; Resnitzky, D.; Ber, R.; Gat, G.

    1988-07-01

    Previously the authors demonstrated that many hematopoietic tumor cells are resistant to the inhibitory effects that interferon exerts on c-myc mRNA expression without losing other receptor-mediated intracellular responses. They report here that this partial resistance was overridden in two independent stable somatic cell hybrids prepared by fusion between sensitive and resistant cells. The c-myc mRNA transcribed from the active allele of the resistant parent cell was reduced by interferon within the context of the cell hybrid. It was therefore concluded that changes in the cis-acting sequences of c-myc were not involved in this type of relaxed regulation and that resistance resulted rather from inactivation or loss of postreceptor elements which operate in trans. The growth-stimulating effect that this genetic deregulation might have on cells was tested in experimental systems of cell differentiation in which an autocrine interferon is produced. For that purpose the authors isolated variant clones of M1 myeloid cells which were partially resistant to alpha and beta interferons and tested their growth behaviour during in vitro-induced differentiation. The resistant clones displayed higher proliferative activity on days 2 and 3 of differentiation than did the sensitive clones, which stopped proliferating. The loss of c-myc responses to the self-produced interferon disrupted the normal cessation of growth during differentiation and therefore might lead cells along the pathway of neoplasia.

  7. A comparative study of variants of pegylated interferon alpha in treatment of chronic HCV patients.

    PubMed

    El Sabaawy, Dalia; El-Haggar, Sahar; El-Bahrawy, Hoda; Waked, Imam; El-Said, Hala

    2015-06-01

    HCV infection presents a vast burden in the regions of high prevalence such as Egypt, where most HCV isolates are genotype 4b. Combined treatment of three variants of pegylated interferon and ribavirin is still the standard of care in Egypt. However, no conclusive data confirming their efficacy are available. Here, 60 chronic HCV patients were randomized for ribavirin plus Peg Intron (PEG-IFNα-2b), Pegasys (PEG-IFNα-2a) or Reiveron Retard (PEG-IFNα-2a). Serum interferon and antibody (Ab) levels were measured, and responses and costs were compared. Serum interferon levels were higher in Pegasys group (1625.1 ng/mL) followed by Reiveron Retard (1076.5 ng/mL), and Peg Intron group (857.72 ng/mL). Moreover, Ab levels were the lowest in Reiveron Retard group (318.4 ng/mL), followed by Peg Intron (439.93 ng/mL), and Pegasys cases (610.83 ng/mL). The best 24-week response rates were detected in the Pegasys group (73.3%), followed by Peg Intron (66.67%), and Reiveron Retard (40%). Treatment with both Pegasys and Peg Intron were most cost-effective. Furthermore, Pegasys was superior in both 6-month response and serum interferon, despite having higher Ab levels (more antigenicity). Our data have notable clinical implications and suggest that Pegasys may be a superior choice of interferon therapy for chronic HCV under low socioeconomic conditions. PMID:25904442

  8. Cutaneous Sarcoidosis: An Uncommon Side Effect of Pegylated Interferon and Ribavirin Use for Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Elson Vidal; Gaburri, Ana Karla; Gaburri, Debora; Sementilli, Angelo

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) has evolved in the past 15 years and combination of pegylated interferon plus ribavirin is its current standard therapy. However, several side effects are commonly observed and frequently lead to transient or definitive interruption of treatment. Although sarcoidosis in its systemic or cutaneous form is a very rare side effect in such circumstances, some cases have been reported even with conventional interferon. This brief review of the literature and description of a case of sarcoidosis occurring in a tattoo and a scar patient's face, during treatment with pegylated interferon alpha-2b plus ribavirin, is an educative report directed in special to dermatologists. The lesion improved after drug interruption and recurred after retreatment with pegylated interferon alpha-2a. We conclude that this side effect must call the attention of doctors to seek for the diagnosis and therapy as soon as possible in such circumstances. No differences were noticed neither with alpha-2a nor alpha-2b pegylated interferon employment. PMID:21103255

  9. [Apt guidelines for applying immunomodulation with interferons in the multiple sclerosis at children].

    PubMed

    Steczkowska, Małgorzata; Skowronek-Bała, Barbara; Bawół, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The disease usually affects young people, although it may also occur in early childhood. As well as the availability of diagnostic methods rises also the possibility of disease-modifying treatment increases. With constant development of diagnostic methods also the possibility of disease-modifying treatment (DMT) increases. Since 2012 in Poland a therapeutic program of the National Health Fund gives the possibility of using first-line therapy treatment in children/adolescents with multiple sclerosis (over 12 years of age), and since June 2015 using the interferon beta in children of 7 years old and body mass below 30 kg has been approved. Interferon beta is the first choice treatment. When selecting interferon type the child's age, lifestyle and the possibility of cooperation must be taken into account. The comprehensive care to a child with MS is based on cooperation of pediatric neurologist, rehabilitation physician, physiotherapist, psychologist and nurse. Training for self-administered interferon injection takes place in the hospital department and under the direct supervision of an experienced nurse. All these elements are taking place in our Clinic. The recent studies from the literature clearly have proven the efficacy and safety of interferon beta treatment in children. Yet agains/still it is a huge challenge to search for an effective and safe drug/ medication but with much more convenient form of administration. PMID:27349050

  10. Modelling and analysis of dynamics of viral infection of cells and of interferon resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getto, Ph.; Kimmel, M.; Marciniak-Czochra, A.

    2008-08-01

    Interferons are active biomolecules, which help fight viral infections by spreading from infected to uninfected cells and activate effector molecules, which confer resistance from the virus on cells. We propose a new model of dynamics of viral infection, including endocytosis, cell death, production of interferon and development of resistance. The novel element is a specific biologically justified mechanism of interferon action, which results in dynamics different from other infection models. The model reflects conditions prevailing in liquid cultures (ideal mixing), and the absence of cells or virus influx from outside. The basic model is a nonlinear system of five ordinary differential equations. For this variant, it is possible to characterise global behaviour, using a conservation law. Analytic results are supplemented by computational studies. The second variant of the model includes age-of-infection structure of infected cells, which is described by a transport-type partial differential equation for infected cells. The conclusions are: (i) If virus mortality is included, the virus becomes eventually extinct and subpopulations of uninfected and resistant cells are established. (ii) If virus mortality is not included, the dynamics may lead to extinction of uninfected cells. (iii) Switching off the interferon defense results in a decrease of the sum total of uninfected and resistant cells. (iv) Infection-age structure of infected cells may result in stabilisation or destabilisation of the system, depending on detailed assumptions. Our work seems to constitute the first comprehensive mathematical analysis of the cell-virus-interferon system based on biologically plausible hypotheses.

  11. [Alpha interferon induced hyperthyroidism: a case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Maiga, I; Valdes-Socin, H; Thiry, A; Delwaide, J; Sidibe, A T; Beckers, A

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with alpha interferon in hepatitis C triggers a thyroid autoimmunity in a variable percentage of cases (2-8%). This complication raises some questions about its screening, the possibility to continue anti-viral therapy and thyroid treatment. Alpha interferon has an immunomodulatory effect on the thyroid, but also an inhibitory effect on thyroid hormone synthesis. This explains the occurrence of cases of thyroid dysfunction, which often remain undetected because of their latency. Factors predicting thyroid dysfunction with interferon use are: female sex, history of thyroid disease and previous autoimmunity. Several clinical aspects are encountered including hypothyroidism (the most frequent depending on the series) and hyperthyroidism related to Graves' disease. For their detection, a cooperation between general practionners, gastroenterologists and endocrinologists is mandatory thyroid function tests are requested before, during and after treatment,with alpha interferon. Therapeutic aspects of thyroid disorders range from simple monitoring to symptomatic treatment, such as thyroxine prescription in the presence of hypothyroidism. Antithyroid drugs radioactive iodine or thyroid surgery are used in cases of severe or persistent Graves' disease induced by alpha interferon. PMID:26376567

  12. Enhancement of basophil chemotaxis in vitro by virus-induced interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Lett-Brown, M A; Aelvoet, M; Hooks, J J; Georgiades, J A; Thueson, D O; Grant, J A

    1981-01-01

    It is well established that viral infections may precipitate or worsen attacks of bronchial asthma. Furthermore, in symptomatic atopic subjects, the local accumulation of basophils and the production of a basophil chemotactic factor have been reported. We have investigated the effect of cell-free supernates from viral stimulated cultures of human mononuclear cells on the in vitro migration of human basophils. Our results show the presence of a factor in these culture supernates that enhances the migration of basophils toward two separate chemoattractants, a peptide from C5 and a lymphokine. The enhancing activity, while affecting basophil migration, did not change the response of monocytes. The enhancing activity resembled viral-induced interferon when (a) pH 2 stability, (b) heat resistance, (c) trypsin sensitivity, and (d) species-specificity were compared. Finally, the enhancing activity for basophil chemotaxis and the interferon titer were highly correlated in preparations with a 10(4)-fold difference in interferon specific activity. Our studies show that viral-induced interferon can augment the in vitro chemotactic response of basophils. Because mediators present in basophils may be involved in the pathogenesis of immediate hypersensitivity, the modulation of basophil movement by interferon suggests a possible mechanism for the association between viral infections and atopic disorders. PMID:6161946

  13. Interferon-free therapies for chronic hepatitis C: toward a hepatitis C virus-free world?

    PubMed

    Gentile, Ivan; Buonomo, Antonio Riccardo; Zappulo, Emanuela; Borgia, Guglielmo

    2014-07-01

    About 2% of the world's population is estimated to be chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). These chronic carriers are at risk of developing liver cirrhosis and its complications. Successful treatment of HCV infection is associated with improved quality of life and increased survival. Antiviral approaches were formerly based on interferon and therefore all patients with a contraindication to interferon were excluded from treatment (e.g., patients with decompensated disease, severe impairment of other organs). Very recently, interferon-free combinations have become available for genotypes 2 and 3. This review focuses on the most recently reported data on the various interferon-free combinations used (namely, sofosbuvir-based combinations, the ABT-450/ombitasvir/dasabuvir/ribavirin combination, the daclatasvir/asunaprevir combination, and the MK-5172/MK-8742 combination). All these combinations yielded amazing results in terms of efficacy (90-100%), tolerability and safety. If the problem of the high cost is overcome, interferon-free therapies will lead to what has long been a chimera, namely, an HCV-free world. PMID:24918116

  14. Isolation of human beta-interferon receptor by wheat germ lectin affinity and immunosorbent column chromatographies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.Q.; Fournier, A.; Tan, Y.H.

    1986-06-15

    Radioiodinated human beta-interferon-Ser 17 (Betaseron) was reversibly cross-linked to Daudi cells by dithiobis(succinimidylpropionate). The radioactive ligand was cross-linked to three macromolecules forming labeled complexes of apparent Mr values of 130,000, 220,000, and 320,000. Betaseron, human alpha-interferon, human interleukin 2 but not recombinant human gamma-interferon competed with the labeled ligand for binding to these putative receptor(s). Human leukocyte-produced gamma-interferon competed weakly with /sup 125/I-Betaseron for binding to Daudi cells. The Betaseron-receptor complex(es) was purified by passage through a wheat germ lectin column followed by chromatography on an anti-interferon immunosorbent column and semipreparative gel electrophoresis. The cross-linked ligand-receptor complex was shown to be highly purified by sodium dodecyl sulfate and acetic acid:urea:Triton X-100 polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It can be dissociated into the labeled Betaseron (Mr = 17,000) ligand and a receptor moiety which has an apparent molecular weight of 110,000. The chromatographic behavior of the ligand-receptor complex on wheat germ lectin column suggests that the receptor is a glycoprotein. The described procedure yielded about 1 microgram of Betaseron receptor from 10(10) Daudi cells, estimated to contain a maximum of about 15 micrograms of the receptor.

  15. Interferon-inducible GTPase: a novel viral response protein involved in rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Wang, Hualei; Jin, Hongli; Cao, Zengguo; Feng, Na; Zhao, Yongkun; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Qian; Zhao, Guoxing; Yan, Feihu; Wang, Lina; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Tu, Changchun; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-05-01

    Rabies virus infection is a major public health concern because of its wide host-interference spectrum and nearly 100 % lethality. However, the interactions between host and virus remain unclear. To decipher the authentic response in the central nervous system after rabies virus infection, a dynamic analysis of brain proteome alteration was performed. In this study, 104 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified, and intermediate filament, interferon-inducible GTPases, and leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 16C were the three outstanding groups among these proteins. Interferon-inducible GTPases were prominent because of their strong upregulation. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR showed distinct upregulation of interferon-inducible GTPases at the level of transcription. Several studies have shown that interferon-inducible GTPases are involved in many biological processes, such as viral infection, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and autophagy. These findings indicate that interferon-inducible GTPases are likely to be a potential target involved in rabies pathogenesis or the antiviral process. PMID:26906695

  16. [Interferon-alpha and liver fibrosis in patients with chronic damage due to hepatitis C virus].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Huezo, María Sarai; Gallegos-Orozco, Juan Fernando

    2003-01-01

    The present review focuses on the published information published regarding the effects of interferon alpha therapy on liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver damage secondary to hepatitis C infection. Data reviewed included results of the in vitro effects of interferon on hepatic cell line cultures with regards to indirect markers of fibrosis, activation of hepatic stellate cells and oxidative stress response. In the clinical arena, there is current clear evidence of a favorable histological outcome in patients with sustained viral response to interferon therapy. For this reason, the current review focuses more on the histological outcomes regarding liver fibrosis in patients who have not attained viral response to therapy (non-responders) or who already have biopsy defined cirrhosis. Data in these patients were analyzed according to the results of objective testing of fibrosis through the assessment of liver biopsy and its change during time, specially because the morbidity and mortality of this disease is directly related to the complications of liver cirrhosis and not necessarily to the persistence of the hepatitis C virus. Lastly, it is concluded that the process of liver fibrosis/cirrhosis is a dynamic one and that there is some evidence to support the usefulness of interferon alpha therapy as a means to halt or retard the progression of hepatic fibrosis. The result of current clinical trials in which interferon therapy is being used to modify the progression of fibrosis in non-responders or cirrhotic patients is eagerly awaited. PMID:14702938

  17. Pre-treatment waking cortisol response and vulnerability to interferon α induced depression.

    PubMed

    Eccles, Jessica; Lallemant, Camille; Mushtaq, Farrah; Greenwood, Matthew; Keller, Majella; Golding, Bruno; Tibble, Jeremy; Haq, Inam; Whale, Richard

    2012-12-01

    Depressive disorder is a common consequence of interferon α treatment. An understanding of the aetiological processes involved is evolving. HPA axis abnormalities are clearly described in community depressive disorder and represent vulnerability to depression development. We explored whether pre-treatment HPA axis abnormalities influence depression emergence during interferon α treatment. We examined waking HPA axis response via salivary cortisol sampling in 44 non-depressed, chronic hepatitis C infected patients due to commence standard interferon α treatment. Hamilton depression scales and the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV major depressive disorder status were administered monthly during treatment. Major depressive disorder developed in 26 of 44 subjects during interferon-α treatment. The pre-treatment waking cortisol response over 1h was significantly greater in the subsequent switch to depression group (F=4.23, p=0.046). The waking cortisol response pre-treatment with interferon α appears greater in those subsequently switching to depressive disorder during treatment. This waking response may join other vulnerability factors for depression emergence in this group. This model could prove a valuable tool in understanding non-iatrogenic depressive disorder in the general population and notably the role of cytokines. PMID:22571879

  18. Efficacy of PEGylated Interferon in Treatment-Experienced Chinese Patients With HBeAg Positive Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yue-Li; Li, Hu; Liu, Fen; Zhang, Dazhi; Ren, Hong; Hu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background After treatment cessation, a high prevalence of relapse was reported in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients in China, especially in nucleot(s)ide analogues (NUCs)-experienced patients. Re-treatment for these patients remains unsolved. Objectives This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of PEGylated interferon in HBeAg positive patients with exposure to antiviral therapy. Patients and Methods A total of 55 treatment-experienced, HBeAg positive Chinese patients were enrolled in this study. Of these patients, 33 were NUCs-experienced and 22 were interferon-experienced. PEGylated interferon was administered to 34 patients; and 21 patients were retreated with conventional interferon. Results Of the 34 treatment-experienced patients who received PEGylated interferon, 52.9% achieved virologic response, and 41.2% achieved HBeAg loss and seroconversion. Patients who were treated with PEGylated interferon for 48 weeks achieved higher virologic response (80%); HBeAg loss (60%); HBeAg seroconversion (60%); and HBsAg loss (5%) than patients treated for 24 weeks with PEGylated interferon. Their responses were also higher than those who were treated with conventional interferon. HBeAg seroconversion in treatment-experienced patients was independently associated with 48-week PEGylated interferon therapy duration. Conclusions PEGylated interferon was effective in treatment-experienced patients with HBeAg positive CHB, and showed higher rates of virological response, HBeAg loss, and seroconversion. The results provide important information regarding the role of re-treatment with PEGylated interferon in treatment-experienced HBeAg positive patients. PMID:27257427

  19. Interferon-independent and -induced regulation of Epstein-Barr virus EBNA-1 gene transcription in Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Nonkwelo, C; Ruf, I K; Sample, J

    1997-01-01

    Replication of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome within latently infected cells is dependent on the EBV EBNA-1 protein. The objective of this study was to identify transcriptional regulatory proteins that mediate EBNA-1 expression via the viral promoter Qp, which is active in EBV-associated tumors such as Burkitt lymphoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Results of a yeast one-hybrid screen suggested that a subset of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family may regulate EBNA-1 transcription by targeting an essential cis-regulatory element of Qp, QRE-2. Further investigation indicated that the transcriptional activator IRF-1 and the closely related IRF-2, a repressor of interferon-induced gene expression, are both capable of activating Qp. However, the major QRE-2-specific binding activity detected within extracts of Burkitt lymphoma cells was attributed to IRF-2, suggesting that interferon-independent activation of Qp is largely mediated by IRF-2 in these cells. We observed no effect of gamma interferon on Qp activity in transfection assays, whereas we observed a moderate but significant repression of Qp activity in response to alpha interferon, possibly mediated by either the interferon consensus sequence binding protein or IRF-7, a novel alpha interferon-inducible factor identified in this study. Since expression of IRF-1 and IRF-2 is increased in response to interferons, the Qp activity observed in the presence of interferon likely represented an equilibrium between IRF factors that activate and those that repress gene expression in response to interferon. Thus, by usurping both IRF-1 and its transcriptional antagonist IRF-2 to activate Qp, EBV has evolved not only a mechanism to constitutively express EBNA-1 but also one which may sustain EBNA-1 expression in the face of the antiviral effects of interferon. PMID:9261415

  20. Antagonism of type I interferon responses by new world hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Levine, Jessica R; Prescott, Joseph; Brown, Kyle S; Best, Sonja M; Ebihara, Hideki; Feldmann, Heinz

    2010-11-01

    Evasion of interferon (IFN)-mediated antiviral signaling is a common defense strategy for pathogenic RNA viruses. To date, research on IFN antagonism by hantaviruses is limited and has focused on only a subset of the numerous recognized hantavirus species. The host IFN response has two phases, an initiation phase, resulting in the induction of alpha/beta IFN (IFN-α/β), and an amplification phase, whereby IFN-α/β signals through the Jak/STAT pathway, resulting in the establishment of the cellular antiviral state. We examined interactions between these critical host responses and the New World hantaviruses. We observed delayed cellular responses in both Andes virus (ANDV)- and Sin Nombre virus (SNV)-infected A549 and Huh7-TLR3 cells. We found that IFN-β induction is inhibited by coexpression of ANDV nucleocapsid protein (NP) and glycoprotein precursor (GPC) and is robustly inhibited by SNV GPC alone. Downstream amplification by Jak/STAT signaling is also inhibited by SNV GPC and by either NP or GPC of ANDV. Therefore, ANDV- and SNV-encoded proteins have the potential for inhibiting both IFN-β induction and signaling, with SNV exhibiting the more potent antagonism ability. Herein we identify ANDV NP, a previously unrecognized inhibitor of Jak/STAT signaling, and show that IFN antagonism by ANDV relies on expression of both the glycoproteins and NP, whereas the glycoproteins appear to be sufficient for antagonism by SNV. These data suggest that IFN antagonism strategies by hantaviruses are quite variable, even between species with similar disease phenotypes, and may help to better elucidate species-specific pathogenesis. PMID:20844031

  1. Enhanced expression of codon optimized interferon gamma in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Bevan Kai-Sheng; Yusufi, Faraaz N K; Mariati; Yang, Yuansheng; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2013-09-10

    The human interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is a potential drug candidate for treating various diseases due to its immunomodulatory properties. The efficient production of this protein can be achieved through a popular industrial host, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. However, recombinant expression of foreign proteins is typically suboptimal possibly due to the usage of non-native codon patterns within the coding sequence. Therefore, we demonstrated the application of a recently developed codon optimization approach to design synthetic IFN-γ coding sequences for enhanced heterologous expression in CHO cells. For codon optimization, earlier studies suggested to establish the target usage distribution pattern in terms of selected design parameters such as individual codon usage (ICU) and codon context (CC), mainly based on the host's highly expressed genes. However, our RNA-Seq based transcriptome profiling indicated that the ICU and CC distribution patterns of different gene expression classes in CHO cell are relatively similar, unlike other microbial expression hosts, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This finding was further corroborated through the in vivo expression of various ICU and CC optimized IFN-γ in CHO cells. Interestingly, the CC-optimized genes exhibited at least 13-fold increase in expression level compared to the wild-type IFN-γ while a maximum of 10-fold increase was observed for the ICU-optimized genes. Although design criteria based on individual codons, such as ICU, have been widely used for gene optimization, our experimental results suggested that codon context is relatively more effective parameter for improving recombinant IFN-γ expression in CHO cells. PMID:23876479

  2. Glatiramer acetate treatment negatively regulates type I interferon signaling

    PubMed Central

    Molnarfi, Nicolas; Prod'homme, Thomas; Schulze-Topphoff, Ulf; Spencer, Collin M.; Weber, Martin S.; Patarroyo, Juan C.; Lalive, Patrice H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Glatiramer acetate (GA; Copaxone), a disease-modifying therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS), promotes development of anti-inflammatory (M2, type II) monocytes that can direct differentiation of regulatory T cells. We investigated the innate immune signaling pathways that participate in GA-mediated M2 monocyte polarization. Methods: Monocytes were isolated from myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)–deficient, Toll-IL-1 receptor domain–containing adaptor inducing interferon (IFN)–β (TRIF)–deficient, IFN-α/β receptor subunit 1 (IFNAR1)–deficient, and wild-type (WT) mice and human peripheral blood. GA-treated monocytes were stimulated with Toll-like receptor ligands, then evaluated for activation of kinases and transcription factors involved in innate immunity, and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. GA-treated mice were evaluated for cytokine secretion and susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Results: GA-mediated inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine production by monocytes occurred independently of MyD88 and nuclear factor–κB, but was blocked by TRIF deficiency. Furthermore, GA did not provide clinical benefit in TRIF-deficient mice. GA inhibited activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, an upstream regulator of activating transcription factor (ATF)–2, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1, which regulates IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). Consequently, nuclear translocation of ATF-2 and IRF3, components of the IFN-β enhanceosome, was impaired. Consistent with these observations, GA inhibited production of IFN-β in vivo in WT mice, but did not modulate proinflammatory cytokine production by monocytes from IFNAR1-deficient mice. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that GA inhibits the type I IFN pathway in M2 polarization of monocytes independently of MyD88, providing an important mechanism connecting innate and adaptive immune modulation in GA therapy and valuable insight regarding its

  3. Type I interferons increase host susceptibility to Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Chessler, Anne-Danielle C; Caradonna, Kacey L; Da'dara, Akram; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2011-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes human Chagas' disease, induces a type I interferon (IFN) (IFN-α/β) response during acute experimental infection in mice and in isolated primary cell types. To examine the potential impact of the type I IFN response in shaping outcomes in experimental T. cruzi infection, groups of wild-type (WT) and type I IFN receptor-deficient (IFNAR(-/-)) 129sv/ev mice were infected with two different T. cruzi strains under lethal and sublethal conditions and several parameters were measured during the acute stage of infection. The results demonstrate that type I IFNs are not required for early host protection against T. cruzi. In contrast, under conditions of lethal T. cruzi challenge, WT mice succumbed to infection whereas IFNAR(-/-) mice were ultimately able to control parasite growth and survive. T. cruzi clearance in and survival of IFNAR(-/-) mice were accompanied by higher levels of IFN-γ production by isolated splenocytes in response to parasite antigen. The suppression of IFN-γ in splenocytes from WT mice was independent of IL-10 levels. While the impact of type I IFNs on the production of IFN-γ and other cytokines/chemokines remains to be fully determined in the context of T. cruzi infection, our data suggest that, under conditions of high parasite burden, type I IFNs negatively impact IFN-γ production, initiating a detrimental cycle that contributes to the ultimate failure to control infection. These findings are consistent with a growing theme in the microbial pathogenesis field in which type I IFNs can be detrimental to the host in a variety of nonviral pathogen infection models. PMID:21402764

  4. Maintenance therapy with interferon alfa 2b in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Díaz-Maqueo, J C; Talavera, A; Nambo, M J; García, E L

    1998-08-01

    We performed a randomized clinical trial to assess the efficacy and toxicity of interferon alfa 2b (IFN) as maintenance therapy in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease in complete remission (CR) after conventional chemotherapy. One hundred and thirty-five patients (stage IIIB-IV B) were initially treated with EBVD (epirubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine). IF CR was achieved they were randomly assigned to receive either maintenance therapy with IFN 5.0 MU three times a week for one year or no further treatment (control group). Clinical and laboratory characteristics at diagnosis were quite similar in both groups. After a median follow-up of 74.3 months (range 49 to 108), 61 out of 68 patients (91%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 76% to 97%) remain in first complete remission in the IFN-treated group compared to 38 out of 67 (58%; 95% CI: 49% to 71%) in the control group (p<.01). Overall survival was also better in the IFN treated group: 62 patients (92%; 95% CI: 82% to 97%) are alive free of disease at 7-years compared to 40 patients (67%, 95%: 55% to 76%) in the control group (p<.01). Toxicity secondary to IFN administration was mild and no dose modification was necessary during treatment. All patients received the planned dose of IFN. This was not an intent-to treat analysis. IFN administration as maintenance therapy was appears to be the only cause of improvement in outcome in these patients. We feel that IFN should be considered as maintenance therapy in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease because this treatment improves the final outcome without the excessive toxicities of more aggressive therapeutic approaches such as bone marrow transplantation during first CR. We hope that IFN will be considered in future randomized clinical trials in order to define it's role in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease. PMID:9711927

  5. Probable involvement of p11 with interferon alpha induced depression

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiqiang; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Lili; Ding, Huaxia; Zhang, Jingjing; Song, Chen; Zhang, Yanfei; Xia, Namei; Li, Mingfang; Liang, Yinming; Hu, Xianzhang; Luan, Haojiang; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Depression is one of the major side effects of interferon alpha (IFN-α) treatment, but the molecular mechanism underlying IFN-α-induced depression remains unclear. Several studies have shown that the serotonin receptors 5-HTR1b and 5-HTR4 play key roles in the anti-depression effects associated with p11 (S100A10). We investigated the effects of IFN-α on the regulation of p11, 5-HTR1b and 5-HTR4 in mice and human neuroblastoma cells (SH-sy5y). We found that intraperitoneal injection with IFN-α in Balb/c mice resulted in an increased immobility in FST and TST, and potently lowered the protein levels of p11, 5-HTR1b and 5-HTR4 in the hippocampus or cingulate gyrus. IFN-α significantly down-regulated the protein levels of p11, 5-HTR1b and 5-HTR4 in SH-sy5y cells, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Our study revealed that over-expression of p11 could prevent the IFN-α-induced down-regulation of 5-HTR1b and 5-HTR4. The results indicated that IFN-α treatment resulted in p11 down-regulation, which subsequently decreased 5-HTR1b and 5-HTR4 in vitro or in vivo. Our findings suggested that p11 might be a potential regulator on 5-HTR1b and 5-HTR4 as well as a predictor of or a therapeutic target for IFN-α-induced depression. PMID:26821757

  6. Behavioral effects of infection with interferon-gamma adenovector.

    PubMed

    Kwant, Amanda; Sakic, Boris

    2004-05-01

    Anxiety and depression of unknown etiology are frequent complications of the systemic autoimmune disease lupus erythematosus (SLE). To elucidate key pathogenic factors we study the "autoimmunity-associated behavioral syndrome" (AABS) in lupus-prone MRL-lpr mice. Based on the evidence that serum levels of the neuroactive cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) are increased both in human and murine forms of SLE, the present study examines whether sustained IFN-gamma production in non-autoimmune mice induces deficits comparable to AABS, particularly in tasks reflective of emotional reactivity and motivated behavior. For this purpose, wild-type and IFN-gamma knockout C57BL/6J mice were infected with adenovirus carrying the cDNA for murine IFN-gamma (i.p. 2 x 10(8) pfu of virus per mouse) and shortly thereafter tested in the behavioral battery used in the detection of AABS. Serum levels of IFN-gamma were found to peak 24 h after the infection, normalized within 5 days. Although all infected animals showed reduced food/water intake and body weight, the recovery rate was slower in groups injected with IFN-gamma virus. No deficits were observed in the models of anxiety, but blunted responsiveness in the sucrose preference test (a putative model of anhedonia) lasted well beyond the IFN-gamma clearance period. These results suggest that a relatively brief elevation in systemic IFN-gamma levels impairs ingestive behavior and leads to prolonged changes in motivated behavior. As such, they are consistent with the hypothesis that upregulation in synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines contributes to induction of AABS and more specifically, to limbic system dysfunction during lupus-like disease. PMID:15084423

  7. [Phase I-II study of recombinant interferon gamma].

    PubMed

    Adachi, K; Ogawa, M; Usui, N; Inagaki, J; Horikoshi, N; Inoue, K; Nakada, H; Tada, A; Yamazaki, H; Mukaiyama, T

    1985-06-01

    A phase I-II study of human recombinant interferon gamma (rIFN-gamma) was conducted in patients with various advanced cancer refractory to standard chemotherapies. In the phase I study, seven patients received 14 courses of escalating doses ranging from 2 X 10(6)U/m2 to 64 X 10(6)U/m2 by 1-hour intravenous infusion for 5 consecutive days. The toxicities were high fever with chills, anorexia, occasional nausea and vomiting, elevation of serum GOT, and dose-related leukopenia and neurotoxic symptoms such as heavy fatigue with somnolence or lethargy, both of which were reversible. The pharmacokinetics showed that the peak levels of serum rIFN-gamma activity were dose-related but decreased rapidly to below measurable levels within 6 hours after infusion in patients receiving less than 12 X 10(6)U/m2. Considering these data, the dosage of rIFN-gamma 6 X 10(6) U/m2 by daily intramuscular injection for more than 4 weeks was selected for the early phase II study. There was no partial response out of 11 evaluable patients but a stable condition was observed in 2 cases of renal cell carcinoma and one case each of breast cancer and ovarian cancer. All toxicities seen were similar to those observed in the phase I study, but no tachyphylaxis developed with continued dosage. The antitumor effect of rIFN-gamma remains to be evaluated in a further study employing higher doses. PMID:2988459

  8. Evaluation of gamma interferon and antibody tuberculosis tests in alpacas.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Shelley; Holder, Tom; Clifford, Derek; Dexter, Ian; Brewer, Jacky; Smith, Noel; Waring, Laura; Crawshaw, Tim; Gillgan, Steve; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Lawrence, John; Clarke, John; de la Rua-Domenech, Ricardo; Vordermeier, Martin

    2012-10-01

    We describe the performance of cell-based and antibody blood tests for the antemortem diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in South American camelids (SAC). The sensitivity and specificity of the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release assay, two lateral flow rapid antibody tests (Stat-Pak and Dual Path Platform [DPP]), and two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based antibody tests (Idexx and Enferplex) were determined using diseased alpacas from Mycobacterium bovis culture-confirmed breakdown herds and TB-free alpacas from geographical areas with no history of bovine TB, respectively. Our results show that while the sensitivities of the IFN-γ and antibody tests were similar (range of 57.7% to 66.7%), the specificity of the IFN-γ test (89.1%) was lower than those of any of the antibody tests (range of 96.4% to 97.4%). This lower specificity of the IFN-γ test was at least in part due to undisclosed Mycobacterium microti infection in the TB-free cohort, which stimulates a positive purified protein derivative (PPD) response. The sensitivity of infection detection could be increased by combining two antibody tests, but even the use of all four antibody tests failed to detect all diseased alpacas. These antibody-negative alpacas were IFN-γ positive. We found that the maximum sensitivity could be achieved only by the combination of the IFN-γ test with two antibody tests in a "test package," although this resulted in decreased specificity. The data from this evaluation of tests with defined sensitivity and specificity provide potential options for antemortem screening of SAC for TB in herd breakdown situations and could also find application in movement testing and tracing investigations. PMID:22914362

  9. Evaluation of Gamma Interferon and Antibody Tuberculosis Tests in Alpacas

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Tom; Clifford, Derek; Dexter, Ian; Brewer, Jacky; Smith, Noel; Waring, Laura; Crawshaw, Tim; Gillgan, Steve; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Lawrence, John; Clarke, John; de la Rua-Domenech, Ricardo; Vordermeier, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We describe the performance of cell-based and antibody blood tests for the antemortem diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in South American camelids (SAC). The sensitivity and specificity of the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release assay, two lateral flow rapid antibody tests (Stat-Pak and Dual Path Platform [DPP]), and two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based antibody tests (Idexx and Enferplex) were determined using diseased alpacas from Mycobacterium bovis culture-confirmed breakdown herds and TB-free alpacas from geographical areas with no history of bovine TB, respectively. Our results show that while the sensitivities of the IFN-γ and antibody tests were similar (range of 57.7% to 66.7%), the specificity of the IFN-γ test (89.1%) was lower than those of any of the antibody tests (range of 96.4% to 97.4%). This lower specificity of the IFN-γ test was at least in part due to undisclosed Mycobacterium microti infection in the TB-free cohort, which stimulates a positive purified protein derivative (PPD) response. The sensitivity of infection detection could be increased by combining two antibody tests, but even the use of all four antibody tests failed to detect all diseased alpacas. These antibody-negative alpacas were IFN-γ positive. We found that the maximum sensitivity could be achieved only by the combination of the IFN-γ test with two antibody tests in a “test package,” although this resulted in decreased specificity. The data from this evaluation of tests with defined sensitivity and specificity provide potential options for antemortem screening of SAC for TB in herd breakdown situations and could also find application in movement testing and tracing investigations. PMID:22914362

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Ebola VP35 interferon inhibitory domain mutant proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Daisy W.; Borek, Dominika; Farahbakhsh, Mina; Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Nix, Jay C.; Wang, Tianjiao; Prins, Kathleen C.; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Honzatko, Richard B.; Helgeson, Luke A.; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.

    2010-06-21

    VP35 is one of seven structural proteins encoded by the Ebola viral genome and mediates viral replication, nucleocapsid formation and host immune suppression. The C-terminal interferon inhibitory domain (IID) of VP35 is critical for dsRNA binding and interferon inhibition. The wild-type VP35 IID structure revealed several conserved residues that are important for dsRNA binding and interferon antagonism. Here, the expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant Zaire Ebola VP35 IID mutants R312A, K319A/R322A and K339A in space groups P6{sub 1}22, P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and P2{sub 1}, respectively, are described. Diffraction data were collected using synchrotron sources at the Advanced Light Source and the Advanced Photon Source.

  11. Celiac disease manifested during the treatment of chronic hepatitis C by pegylated alpha interferon and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Gombosova, L; Jarcuska, P; Benova, B; Benicky, M; Lazurova, I

    2011-01-01

    Authors report a case of patient suffering from haemophilia A and hepatitis C virus infection acquired probably after blood transfusions and substitution factors application. He was treated with pegylated interferon alpha and ribavirin, with the development of malabsorption symptoms during the therapy. Celiac disease was established by histological, histochemical and serological examinations. oth, interferon alpha and ribavirin treatment as well as virus of hepatitis C may trigger coeliac disease in genetically predisposed individuals. The immunological mechanism of celiac disease include balance disruption between Th1 and Th2 immunological response with Th1 predominance. Only few similar cases have been published in the professional literature to date. Development of celiac disease during interferon alpha therapy with haemophilia A was not published until now (Fig. 3, Ref. 13). PMID:21692415

  12. Development and evaluation of an interferon-γ release assay in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    Paudel, Sarad; Villanueva, Marvin A; Mikota, Susan K; Nakajima, Chie; Gairhe, Kamal P; Subedi, Suraj; Rayamajhi, Nabin; Sashika, Mariko; Shimozuru, Michito; Matsuba, Takashi; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Tsubota, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    We developed an interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) specific for Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Whole blood collected from forty captive Asian elephants was stimulated with three different mitogens i.e., phytohemagglutinin (PHA), pokweed mitogen (PWM) and phorbol myristate aceteate/ionomycin (PMA/I). A sandwich ELISA that was able to recognize the recombinant elephant interferon-γ (rEIFN-γ) as well as native interferon-γ from the Asian elephants was performed using anti-elephant IFN-γ rabbit polyclonal antibodies as capture antibodies and biotinylated anti-elephant IFN-γ rabbit polyclonal antibodies as detection antibodies. PMA/I was the best mitogen to use as a positive control for an Asian elephant IGRA. The development of an Asian elephant-specific IGRA that detects native IFN-γ in elephant whole blood provides promising results for its application as a potential diagnostic tool for diseases, such as tuberculosis (TB) in Asian elephants. PMID:26983683

  13. Failure of interferon to inhibit plutonium-induced osteosarcomas in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.N.; Kern, E.R.; Braaten, B.; Glasgow, L.A.; Wrenn, M.E.; Atherton, D.A.; Mays, C.W.; Charrier, K.; Ayoroa, G.

    1984-05-01

    The injection of murine interferon three times weekly in dose levels of 1,250, 5,000, or 20,000 U produced no significant antitumor effect against primary /sup 239/Pu-induced osteosarcomas in C57BL/6J mice. The interferon treatment was begun 94 days after the plutonium injection, which is well before the radiographic or microscopic appearance of neoplasia, and was continued until the moribund state or death. The average radiation dose accumulated by the skeleton at the time of first treatment was approximately 300 rad. The largest dose of interferon studied, 20,000 U/injection, was approximately 3 X 10(6) U/m2 of body surface, or 10(6) U/kg body weight.

  14. Effects of prednisone, aspirin, and acetaminophen on an in vivo biologic response to interferon in humans.

    PubMed

    Witter, F R; Woods, A S; Griffin, M D; Smith, C R; Nadler, P; Lietman, P S

    1988-08-01

    In healthy volunteers receiving a single intramuscular dose of 18 X 10(6) U interferon alone or after 24 hours of an 8-day course of prednisone (40 mg/day), aspirin (650 mg every 4 hours), or acetaminophen (650 mg every 4 hours), the magnitude of the biologic response to interferon was quantified by measuring the time course of the induction of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase and resistance to vesicular stomatitis virus infection in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Prednisone decreased the AUC of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity (p less than 0.05), whereas administration of aspirin or acetaminophen did not affect this biologic response. No measurable effect was seen during administration of prednisone, aspirin, or acetaminophen on the duration or intensity of vesicular stomatitis virus yield reduction. The side effects seen with interferon administration at the dose tested were not altered in a clinically meaningful manner by prednisone, aspirin, or acetaminophen. PMID:2456175

  15. [Antiviral activity of interferon and its inducers in human lymphoblastoid and somatic cells].

    PubMed

    Novokhatskiĭ, A S; Labzo, S S; Tsareva, A A

    1979-04-01

    The antiviral effect of interferon inductors, such as poly-I--poly-C, phage f2 RNA replicative form and low molecular inductor GSN and their influence on cellular DNA synthesis were studied in the cultures of lymphoblastoid (inplanting lines Raji Namalva) and somatic human cells. The Semliki forest virus used as the test organism multiplicated well in cells Raji accumulating up to 9 lg BOU/ml. The two-strand RNA was less active in the lymphoid cells than in the somatic ones. GSN was 10 times more active and less toxic in cells Raji as compared to the fibroblasts. The lymphoblastoid interferon had higher antiviral activity as compared to the fibroblast interferon in the system of Raji--Semliki forest virus than in the system of the human embryon fibroblast--Venezuela Horse Encephalytic Virus. Romantadin actively inhibited (100 times) production of the alfavirus in both the somatic and lymphoblastoid cells. PMID:220908

  16. Antiviral Activity and Induction of Interferon-Like Substance by Quinacrine and Acranil

    PubMed Central

    Gláz, E. T.; Szolgay, Erika; Stöger, Ivana; Tálas, Margarita

    1973-01-01

    Several drugs with certain structural similarities (tricyclic ring system with dialkylaminoalkyl side chains) to tilorone, a potent interferon inducer, were screened for antiviral activity in vivo. Two acridine drugs, Acranil and quinacrine, were found to be effective, the former being almost as protective as tilorone and the latter less so. Both agents induced an interferon-like substance which could be detected in the serum of treated mice. The concentration of the inhibitory factor in the serum was highest after exposure to tilorone, followed in turn by Acranil and quinacrine, based on the administration of equal weights of drugs. Both tilorone and Acranil induced lower levels of circulating interferon-like substance in Balb/c mice than in other strains of mice. The serum factor induced by Acranil was shown to be stable at pH 2. PMID:4790609

  17. Effects of ozone and photochemical oxidants on interferon production by rabbit alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Shingu, H.; Sugiyama, M.; Watanabe, M.; Nakajima, T.

    1980-03-01

    The results obtained in this study demonstrated that the capacity of interferon production by alveolar macrophage was depressed immediately after exposure to O/sub 3/ greater than 1 ppM or Ox exceeding average of 0.3 ppM (max. 0.7 ppM) for 3 hours. In these experiments, it was shown that depression in interferon production corresponded in degree to elevation of gas concentration. This finding suggested that alveolar macrophages, existing in a state of single cell in the lung, were probably exposed directly to the inhaled gas in this experimental system. The results that depression of interferon production in Dutch rabbit under the same O/sub 3/ concentration was greater in degree than that in rabbit suggest that sensitivity of alveolar macrophage to O/sub 3/ or presumably to other irritating gases is different among species.

  18. Severe osteoporosis due to systemic mast cell disease: successful treatment with interferon alpha-2B.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, T; Beyeler, C; Lämmle, B; Hunziker, T; Vock, P; Olah, A J; Dahinden, C; Gerber, N J

    1996-09-01

    We describe a 33-year old man suffering from severe vertebral osteoporosis and urticaria pigmentosa due to systemic mast cell disease (SMCD). Because i.v. clodronate therapy could not prevent further vertebral fractures, an additional treatment with interferon alpha-2b was initiated. During 24 months of treatment, our patient had no further pain episodes, no new vertebral fractures were discovered, trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) increased significantly and urticarial symptoms improved. Nevertheless, the extent of skin lesions remained unchanged. On histological examination, a remarkable decrease of mast cells was observed in the bone marrow, but not in the skin. Five months after discontinuation of interferon alpha-2b, trabecular BMD decreased and urticarial symptoms deteriorated. These findings illustrate a beneficial effect of interferon alpha-2b on SMCD-induced osteoporosis as well as urticarial symptoms, and raise the question whether this treatment may have a diverse impact on mast cell population in different tissues. PMID:8810675

  19. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 Interacts with a Member of the Interferon-Stimulated Gene 15 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Sarah R.; Stopford, Charles M.; West, John A.; Bennett, Christopher L.; Giffin, Louise

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a gammaherpesvirus known to establish lifelong latency in the human host. We and others have previously shown that three KSHV homologs of cellular interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), known as viral IRFs (vIRFs), participate in evasion of the host interferon (IFN) response. We report that vIRF1 interacts with the cellular interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) E3 ligase, HERC5, in the context of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) activation and IFN induction. The ISG15 protein is covalently conjugated to target proteins upon activation of the interferon response. Interaction between vIRF1 and HERC5 was confirmed by immunoprecipitation, and the region between amino acids 224 and 349 of vIRF1 was required for interaction with HERC5. We further report that expression of vIRF1 in the context of TLR3 activation results in decreased ISG15 conjugation of proteins. Specifically, TLR3-induced ISG15 conjugation and protein levels of cellular IRF3, a known ISG15 target, were decreased in the presence of vIRF1 compared to the control. vIRF1 itself was also identified as a target of ISG15 conjugation. KSHV-infected cells exhibited increased ISG15 conjugation upon reactivation from latency in coordination with increased IFN. Furthermore, knockdown of ISG15 in latently infected cells resulted in a higher level of KSHV reactivation and an increase in infectious virus. These data suggest that the KSHV vIRF1 protein affects ISG15 conjugation and interferon responses and may contribute to effective KSHV replication. IMPORTANCE The KSHV vIRF1 protein can inhibit interferon activation in response to viral infection. We identified a cellular protein named HERC5, which is the major ligase for ISG15, as a vIRF1 binding partner. vIRF1 association with HERC5 altered ISG15 modification of cellular proteins, and knockdown of ISG15 augmented reactivation of KSHV from latency. PMID:26355087

  20. Quantification of different human alpha interferon subtypes and pegylated interferon activities by measuring MxA promoter activation.

    PubMed

    François, Catherine; Bernard, Isabelle; Castelain, Sandrine; Charleston, Bryan; Fray, Martin D; Capiod, Jean-Claude; Duverlie, Gilles

    2005-09-01

    Alpha interferons (alpha-IFNs) are potent biologically active proteins synthesized and secreted by somatic cells during viral infection. Quantification of alpha-IFN concentrations in biological samples is used for diagnosis. More recently, recombinant IFNs have been used as antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory therapeutic agents, and particularly for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. For this purpose, IFN has recently been coupled to polyethylene glycol (PEG) to improve the pharmacokinetic properties. The measure of alpha-IFN in biological samples from treated patients could be useful to ensure compliance to therapy and the true IFN activity in relation to viral decay during follow-up. In particular, it could be used to monitor the PEG-IFN concentration in patients treated for hepatitis C virus infection. The most frequently used test is a bioassay based on the antiviral property of the IFN, but the assay is not highly reproducible. Here, we present a reporter test based on MxA promoter activation of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression (Mx-CAT). MxA is an antiviral protein induced and tightly regulated by alpha-IFN. The Mx-CAT assay showed good reproducibility of 15% and was suitable to quantify PEG-IFN and numerous other alpha-IFN subtypes as well, despite a differential MxA promoter activation in relation with the subtype. A good correlation was obtained with the reporter assay and a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on samples from treated patients. This test could be useful for monitoring IFN therapy of chronically infected hepatitis C virus-infected patients treated with the standard IFN, PEG-IFN, and probably forthcoming recombinant IFNs. PMID:16127052

  1. Early Changes in Interferon Signaling Define Natural Killer Cell Response and Refractoriness To Interferon-based Therapy of Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Edlich, Birgit; Ahlenstiel, Golo; Azpiroz, Aintzane Zabaleta; Stoltzfus, Jonathan; Noureddin, Mazen; Serti, Elisavet; Feld, Jordan J.; Liang, T. Jake; Rotman, Yaron; Rehermann, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells exhibit a polarized phenotype with increased cytotoxicity and decreased IFN- γ production in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Here we asked whether this is due to type I interferon (IFN)-induced expression and phosphorylation levels of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) molecules in NK cells and whether it affects the response and refractoriness of NK cells to IFN-α-based therapy of hepatitis C. STAT1 levels in NK cells were significantly higher in patients with chronic HCV infection than in uninfected controls. STAT1 levels and induction of phosphorylated STAT1 (pSTAT1) increased further during IFN-α-based therapy with preferential STAT1 over STAT4 phosphorylation. Induction of pSTAT1 correlated with increased NK cytotoxicity (TRAIL expression and degranulation) and decreased IFN-γ production. NK cells from patients with a greater than 2 log10 first phase HCV RNA decline to IFN-α-based therapy (>99% IFN effectiveness) displayed strong pSTAT1 induction in vivo and were refractory to further stimulation in vitro. In contrast, NK cells from patients with a less than 2 log10 first phase HCV RNA decline exhibited lower pSTAT1 induction in vivo (p=0.024) but retained greater IFN-α responsiveness in vitro (p=0.024). NK cells of all patients became refractory to in vivo and in vitro stimulation by IFN-α during the second phase virological response. Conclusion These data show that IFN-α-induced modulation of STAT1/4 phosphorylation underlies the polarization of NK cells towards increased cytotoxicity and decreased IFN-γ production in HCV infection, and that NK cell responsiveness and refractoriness correlate to the antiviral effectiveness of IFN-α-based therapy. PMID:21898483

  2. Mice Deficient in Interferon-Gamma or Interferon-Gamma Receptor 1 Have Distinct Inflammatory Responses to Acute Viral Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Young; Schultz, Kimberly L. W.; Griffin, Diane E.

    2013-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-gamma is an important component of the immune response to viral infections that can have a role both in controlling virus replication and inducing inflammatory damage. To determine the role of IFN-gamma in fatal alphavirus encephalitis, we have compared the responses of wild type C57BL/6 (WTB6) mice with mice deficient in either IFN-gamma (GKO) or the alpha-chain of the IFN-gamma receptor (GRKO) after intranasal infection with a neuroadapted strain of sindbis virus. Mortalities of GKO and GRKO mice were similar to WTB6 mice. Both GKO and GRKO mice had delayed virus clearance from the brain and spinal cord, more infiltrating perforin+ cells and lower levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 mRNAs than WTB6 mice. However, inflammation was more intense in GRKO mice than WTB6 or GKO mice with more infiltrating CD3+ T cells, greater expression of major histocompatibility complex-II and higher levels of interleukin-17A mRNA. Fibroblasts from GRKO embryos did not develop an antiviral response after treatment with IFN-gamma, but showed increases in TNF-alpha, IL-6, CXCL9 and CXCL10 mRNAs although these increases developed more slowly and were less intense than those of WTB6 fibroblasts. These data indicate that both GKO and GRKO mice fail to develop an IFN-gamma-mediated antiviral response, but differ in regulation of the inflammatory response to infection. Therefore, GKO and GRKO cannot be considered equivalent when assessing the role of IFN-gamma in CNS viral infections. PMID:24204622

  3. Rapid response to 2'-deoxycoformycin in advanced hairy cell leukemia after failure of interferons alpha and gamma.

    PubMed

    Lembersky, B C; Ratain, M J; Westbrook, C; Golomb, H M

    1988-01-01

    A patient with advanced hairy cell leukemia initially had a short-lived minor response to interferon alpha therapy and failed to respond to interferon gamma. Subsequent treatment with 2'-deoxycoformycin (dCF) administered biweekly for 12 wk resulted in a complete hematological remission which has continued for 16 months without additional therapy. PMID:3128105

  4. Monitoring interferon β treatment response with magnetic resonance spectroscopy in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yetkin, Mehmet Fatih; Mirza, Meral; Dönmez, Halil

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the white matter of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with healthy controls and to monitor the response to the treatment with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS).Fifteen healthy controls and 36 recently diagnosed MS patients never treated with interferon β were included in this study. In the patient group, MRS was performed before treatment, at 6th and 12th month after the initiation of treatment and once in control group. Patient group was divided into 3 interferon groups randomly. Physical examination findings were recorded as Expanded Disability Status Scale scores before treatment, at 6th and 12th month of interferon treatment.At the end of 1 year follow up, 26 of 36 patients completed the study. In patients' white matter lesions, N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratios were lower than control group's white matters. NAA/Cr ratios were higher in control group's white matter than patient's normal appearing white matter but this difference was not statistically significant. There was no difference in choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) ratios between 2 groups. In follow-up period, NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr ratios obtained from patients' white matter lesions and normal appearing white matter did not change statistically.This study showed that in MS patients' white matters, especially in white matter lesions, neuron viability is reduced compared with healthy controls' normal white matter; and in the patients treated with interferon β NAA/Cr ratios remained stable. These stable levels of metabolite ratios in the patients who received interferon β therapy can be explained with either the shortness of the follow-up period post-treatment or may reflect a positive effect of the beta interferon therapy on the progress of MS. PMID:27603381

  5. SWiss Atorvastatin and Interferon Beta-1b Trial In Multiple Sclerosis (SWABIMS) - rationale, design and methodology

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Statins have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties in addition to their lipid-lowering effects. Currently, the effects of statins on multiple sclerosis are still controversial. Therefore, randomized clinical trials are needed to provide better evidence on the therapeutic potential of statins in multiple sclerosis. The SWiss Atorvastatin and Interferon Beta-1b trial in Multiple Sclerosis (SWABIMS) evaluates the efficacy, safety and tolerability of atorvastatin 40 mg per os daily and subcutaneous interferon beta-1b every other day compared to monotherapy with subcutaneous interferon beta-1b every other day in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Methods/Design SWABIMS is a multi-centre, randomized, parallel-group, rater-blinded, Phase IIb-study conducted in eight hospitals in Switzerland. 80 treatment naïve patients with relapsing-remitting forms of multiple sclerosis will receive subcutaneous interferon beta-1b for three months. Afterwards, they are randomized into two equal-sized parallel arms, receiving atorvastatin 40 mg/d or not in addition to interferon beta-1b for another 12 months. Disease activity measured by the proportion of patients with new T2 lesions is the primary endpoint. Discussion SWABIMS is designed to give further information about the therapeutic effect of atorvastatin 40 mg per os daily as add-on therapy to interferon beta-1b in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Furthermore important safety and tolerability data will be generated. Trial Registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier: NCT00942591; Swissmedic reference number: 2005DR2119 PMID:20003436

  6. Macroscale production and analysis of crystalline interferon alpha-2B in microgravity on STS-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Paul; Nagabhushan, Tattanahalli L.; Long, Marianna M.; Bugg, Charles E.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.

    1996-03-01

    The development and production of a zinc-interferon alpha-2b crystalline suspension on STS-52 has accelerated our ability to prepare novel high quality pharmaceutical preparations. Crystalline suspensions of protein therapeutics have applications in drug delivery, formulation, and manufacturing. These applications require crystalline suspensions of relatively small particles (<100 microns) of uniform size and shape. Previously, a crystalline form of interferon alpha-2b was identified from microscale crystallization methods with utility in pharmaceutical applications from microscale crystallization methods. Conditions for macroscale crystallization were established by adapting a microscale vapor diffusion method to a macroscale temperature induction method. A series of earth based pilot experiments established conditions to reproducibly crystallize zinc interferon alpha-2b in high yield and under ``cleanroom'' conditions. These conditions were maintained in microgravity. Greater than 95% of the available protein crystallized in both the ground and flight experiments. The samples were analyzed using a battery of physical, biochemical, and biological characterization methods. The results demonstrated that sample processing, polysulfone bottle confinement, and the conditions used for crystallization did not have a negative effect on protein integrity. Redissolved crystals from the flight and ground experiments showed full biological activity in a cytopathic effect inhibition assay as compared to an interferon control standard. Morphometric analysis comparing the overall length and width of the derived crystals showed a 2.4 fold increase in the length and width of the space grown crystals as compared to earth grown crystals. Subcutaneous injections of space grown crystalline preparation was compared to a non-crystalline interferon preparation in a primate pharmacokinetic study. The crystalline interferon preparation had a measured serum half-life of 12 hours as compared

  7. Protease inhibitors partially overcome the interferon nonresponse phenotype in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Rojo, A; Fischer, S E; Adeyi, O; Zita, D; Deneke, M G; Selzner, N; Chen, L; Malespin, M; Cotler, S J; McGilvray, I D; Feld, J J

    2016-05-01

    The outcome of triple therapy with protease inhibitors (PI) depends on the intrinsic response to interferon. Interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression differs by cell type in the liver and is a strong predictor of interferon responsiveness. Patients who respond well to interferon have low/absent ISG expression in hepatocytes but significant ISG expression in macrophages. Nonresponders (NRs) show the opposite pattern. We aimed to determine the association between cell-type-specific ISG staining and treatment outcome with PI-based triple therapy. Liver biopsy tissue from consecutive patients treated with boceprevir or telaprevir with peginterferon and ribavirin was stained for myxovirus A (MxA). Staining was scored 0-3 in macrophages (M-MxA) and hepatocytes (H-MxA), and IL28B genotyping was performed. Of 56 patients included 41 achieved SVR (73%) (sustained virological response), 2 (4%) relapsed, 10 (18%) were NRs, and 3 (5%) were lost to follow-up. Median M-MxA staining was stronger and H-MxA staining was weaker in patients who achieved SVR. MxA staining correlated with IL28B genotype and with the HCV RNA decline during lead-in phase. However, unlike with dual therapy, the negative predictive value (NPV) of absent or weak M-MxA staining was poor (42%), while the positive predictive value improved (93%). Although by multivariable logistic regression M-MxA staining was significantly associated with SVR (OR 4.35, 1.32-14.28, P = 0.012), the predictive ability was inadequate to withhold therapy. The interaction between macrophages and hepatocytes plays a critical role in interferon responsiveness; however, the addition of a PI at least partially overcomes the interferon nonresponse phenotype making the predictive ability of ISG staining less clinically useful. PMID:26710754

  8. The role of consensus interferon in the current treatment of chronic hepatitis C viral infection.

    PubMed

    Fish, Eleanor N; Harrison, Stephen A; Hassanein, Tarek

    2008-09-01

    The current standard-of-care for chronic hepatitis C viral infection is treatment with pegylated interferon (PegIFN) plus ribavirin for 24 to 48 weeks. Approximately 50% of HCV-infected patients achieve a sustained viral response (SVR) to this treatment. However, the remaining patients either respond during treatment but relapse upon treatment cessation, respond minimally, or do not respond at all. Much research effort has been expended in attempting to predict those patients who will achieve viral eradication with PegIFN/ribavirin treatment, and it is now clear that those who have either a rapid virologic response (RVR) by week 4 of treatment or a complete early virologic response (cEVR, HCV RNA qualitative negative) by week 12 will go on to achieve SVR at very high rates (70%-90%). Several trials have been completed in patients that fail to achieve RVR or cEVR. These trials include strategies of extending duration of therapy, induction regimens, or retreatment with similar and dissimilar alfa interferons. A recent study of 696 genotype 1 patients treated with both PegIFN and weight-based ribavirin revealed that only 1.6% (4/246) of patients without RVR or cEVR achieved SVR. Consensus interferon, a wholly synthetic interferonalfa, is one of the agents that has been utilized in patients that fail treatment with PegIFN/ribavirin. This molecule has been demonstrated to have a very high affinity for the interferon-alfa receptor, and laboratory studies have demonstrated that it has high levels of antiviral activity. In order to optimally utilize consensus interferon, it is important to understand its unique mechanism of action. In addition, the latest research showing the importance of achieving RVR or cEVR should be reviewed, along with strategies for utilizing consensus interferon in re-treatment, or more specifically upon identification of on-treatment failure in historically difficult-to-treat patients. PMID:23329909

  9. Swine Interferon-Inducible Transmembrane Proteins Potently Inhibit Influenza A Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lanz, Caroline; Yángüez, Emilio; Andenmatten, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Human interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) were identified as restriction factors of influenza A virus (IAV). Given the important role of pigs in the zoonotic cycle of IAV, we cloned swine IFITMs (swIFITMs) and found two IFITM1-like proteins, one homologue of IFITM2, and a homologue of IFITM3. We show that swIFITM2 and swIFITM3 localize to endosomes and display potent antiviral activities. Knockdown of swIFITMs strongly reduced virus inhibition by interferon, establishing the swIFITMs as potent restriction factors in porcine cells. PMID:25320322

  10. [Comparative analysis of the action of an interferon inducer in in vitro and in vivo systems].

    PubMed

    Ershov, F I; Novokhatskiĭ, A S; Tazulakhova, E B

    1978-06-01

    Investigation of interferon inductor (poly IC) in vitro (chick embryon fibroblasts) and in vivo (mice) showed that the main parameters of the preparation effect, i. e. induction of interferon and development of resistance to viruses are as a whole quite comparable. The phenomenon of hyporeactivity in the both systems was reproduced on repeated use of the inductor. At the same time significant differences in the stimulating effect of DEAE-dextran were registered. The merits and demerits of the in vitro system for using in studies on antiviral drugs of the above type are discussed. PMID:209734

  11. Follow-up of patients with mycosis fungoides after interferon α2b treatment failure

    PubMed Central

    Studziński, Maciej; Giebel, Sebastian; Krause, Anna; Olejniczak, Monika; Grzanka, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of T cell cutaneous lymphoma( CTCL) is a controversial subject and the effectiveness of treatment is still low. Aim Report of single center experience of management CTCL after progression after first line treatment. Material and methods We present 41 patients with CTCL, 29 received interferon α2b in first line, and 12 of them received second line therapy. Results Overall response rate for second line therapy was 60%. Conclusions Results of the follow-up of patients with mycosis fungoides after interferon α2b treatment failure with the literature review and discussion. PMID:26015774

  12. Depression and suicide ideation in chronic hepatitis C patients untreated and treated with interferon: prevalence, prevention, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lucaciu, Laura A.; Dumitrascu, Dan L.

    2015-01-01

    Interferon-based therapies were until recently the standard of care in chronic hepatitis C (CHC), despite their side effects. We aimed to review the available data on the depression and suicide in CHC patients receiving or not antiviral therapy based on interferon treatment. A PubMed search was performed, identifying relevant papers published between 1991 and January 2015 concerning major depressive disorders and suicidal risk in patients under interferon. A total of 21 relevant papers were retrieved. Prospective studies reported depression as the most common side effect of interferon, with an incidence peak between weeks 8 and 12 of therapy. Suicide risk was analyzed in 7 of the reviewed articles, and case reports of attempted suicide were discussed. Moreover, studies have shown that pretreatment with serotonin reuptake inhibitors is a good strategy for the prevention of interferon-induced depression. PMID:26424594

  13. Interferon-dependent induction of mRNA for the major histocompatibility antigens in human fibroblasts and lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fellous, M; Nir, U; Wallach, D; Merlin, G; Rubinstein, M; Revel, M

    1982-01-01

    In human cells treated with interferons, there is an increase in the amount of HLA-A,B,C and beta 2-microglobulin exposed on the cell surface. We have used a cloned HLA-A,B,C cDNA probe to demonstrate by molecular hybridization that this effect of interferon is preceded by a large increase in the amount of HLA mRNA in the cell. This effect was found in five different human cell lines, with purified leukocyte and fibroblast interferons. The increase in HLA mRNA is comparable in its kinetics and dose-response to the induction of (2'-5') oligo(A) synthetase mRNA by interferons. Therefore, interferons seem to activate at least two cellular genes which have different biochemical functions. Images PMID:6179076

  14. Experience with pegylated interferon α-2a in advanced myeloproliferative neoplasms in an international cohort of 118 patients.

    PubMed

    Gowin, Krisstina; Thapaliya, Prakash; Samuelson, Jan; Harrison, Claire; Radia, Deepti; Andreasson, Bjorn; Mascarenhas, John; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Barbui, Tiziano; Rea, Catherine J; Camoriano, John; Gentry, Amy; Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques; O'Connell, Casey; Mesa, Ruben

    2012-10-01

    The Philadelphia negative myeloproliferative neoplasms, including polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, are associated with substantial vascular and transformative complications. Standard therapy for high-risk disease, particularly in patients that have failed initial therapy, remains controversial. Non-pegylated interferon has previously been shown to be effective in controlling erythrocytosis, thrombocytosis and thrombotic complications, but was found to have poor tolerability and excessive adverse effects. Recently, pegylated interferon alpha-2a was introduced and found to be better tolerated and less toxic than standard interferon. In addition, in recent phase II trials, pegylated interferon alpha-2a therapy was found to induce both hematologic and molecular remissions. We retrospectively analyzed 118 myeloproliferative patients who underwent pegylated interferon alpha-2a treatment. Responses were evaluated by ELN, IWG-MET and EUMNET standardized criteria sets and adverse effects were analyzed. PMID:22419578

  15. Experience with pegylated interferon α-2a in advanced myeloproliferative neoplasms in an international cohort of 118 patients

    PubMed Central

    Gowin, Krisstina; Thapaliya, Prakash; Samuelson, Jan; Harrison, Claire; Radia, Deepti; Andreasson, Bjorn; Mascarenhas, John; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Barbui, Tiziano; Rea, Catherine J.; Camoriano, John; Gentry, Amy; Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques; O'Connell, Casey; Mesa, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    The Philadelphia negative myeloproliferative neoplasms, including polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, are associated with substantial vascular and transformative complications. Standard therapy for high-risk disease, particularly in patients that have failed initial therapy, remains controversial. Non-pegylated interferon has previously been shown to be effective in controlling erythrocytosis, thrombocytosis and thrombotic complications, but was found to have poor tolerability and excessive adverse effects. Recently, pegylated interferon alpha-2a was introduced and found to be better tolerated and less toxic than standard interferon. In addition, in recent phase II trials, pegylated interferon alpha-2a therapy was found to induce both hematologic and molecular remissions. We retrospectively analyzed 118 myeloproliferative patients who underwent pegylated interferon alpha-2a treatment. Responses were evaluated by ELN, IWG-MET and EUMNET standardized criteria sets and adverse effects were analyzed. PMID:22419578

  16. Short-term and long-term safety and tolerability of interferon β-1b in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Reder, Anthony T; Oger, Joel F; Kappos, Ludwig; O'Connor, Paul; Rametta, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Clinical trials have generated a wealth of data on the safety profile of interferon β-1b for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). In general, interferon β-1b has not been associated with serious or life-threatening side effects during long-term treatment. Flu-like symptoms, injection site reactions, depression, and elevated liver transaminases were the most common adverse events in clinical trials. This review will discuss the rates of these and other common adverse events observed in 3 clinical trials of interferon β-1b: BENEFIT, BEYOND, and the 16-year Long-Term Follow-up (LTF) of the pivotal interferon β-1b trial in MS, as well as how these adverse events may influence patient and physician decision making when selecting a disease-modifying therapy. In addition, we will discuss the effects of interferon β-1b on mortality in the 16-year and 21-year LTF studies. PMID:25876467

  17. Natural human interferon-alpha 2 is O-glycosylated.

    PubMed Central

    Adolf, G R; Kalsner, I; Ahorn, H; Maurer-Fogy, I; Cantell, K

    1991-01-01

    Natural human interferon alpha 2 (IFN-alpha 2) was isolated from a preparation of partially purified human leucocyte IFN by monoclonal-antibody immunoaffinity chromatography. The purified protein had a specific activity of 1.5 x 10(8) i.u./mg; it was estimated to constitute 10-20% of the total antiviral activity of leucocyte IFN. N-Terminal amino-acid-sequence analysis identified the subspecies IFN-alpha 2b and/or IFN-alpha 2c, whereas IFN-alpha 2a was not detectable. The structure of natural IFN-alpha 2 was found to differ from that of its recombinant (Escherichia coli-derived) equivalent. First, reverse-phase h.p.l.c. showed that natural IFN-alpha 2 was significantly more hydrophilic then expected. Secondly, the apparent molecular mass of the natural protein determined by SDS/PAGE was higher than that of recombinant IFN-alpha 2; incubation under mild alkaline conditions known to eliminate O-linked carbohydrates resulted in a reduction of the apparent molecular mass to that of the recombinant protein. On sequence analysis of proteolytic peptides, Thr-106 was found to be modified. These results suggested that Thr-106 of natural IFN-alpha 2 carries O-linked carbohydrates. Reverse-phase h.p.l.c. as well as SDS/PAGE of natural IFN-alpha 2 showed that glycosylation is heterogeneous. For characterization of the carbohydrate moieties, the protein was treated with neuraminidase and/or O-glycanase and analysed by gel electrophoresis; in addition, glycopeptides obtained by proteinase digestion and separated by h.p.l.c. were characterized by sequence analysis and m.s. Further information on the composition of the glycans was obtained by monosaccharide analysis. The results indicate that natural IFN-alpha 2 contains the disaccharide galactosyl-N-acetylgalactosamine (Gal-GalNAc) linked to Thr-106. In part of the molecules, this core carbohydrate carries (alpha-)N-acetylneuraminic acid, whereas a disaccharide, probably N-acetyl-lactosamine, is bound to Gal-GalNAc in another

  18. Differential Biological Activities of Swine Interferon-α Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, Cinzia; Razzuoli, Elisabetta; Crooke, Helen; Soule, Olubukola; Pezzoni, Giulia; Ferraris, Monica; Ferrari, Angelo; Amadori, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    Interferons (IFNs) play a crucial role in the host's immune response and other homeostatic control actions. Three IFN types and several IFN families within the types allow for a plethora of regulatory actions. The number of distinct IFN molecules is highest among type I IFNs and, in particular, within the IFN-α family. In pigs, there are 17 IFN-α subtypes with different antiviral activities and different expression profiles; however, no data are available about biological properties other than the antiviral effector activities. Therefore, 16 porcine IFN-α genes were cloned, expressed in mammalian Chinese hamster ovary cells, and characterized for antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and MHC-modulating activities at a pre-established level of 10 IU/mL. Antiviral activity: IFN-α2, -α5, -α9, and -α10 showed the highest level of activity in a pseudorabies virus yield reduction assay. On the contrary, little, if any, activity was shown by IFN-α3, -α7, -α13, -α4, and -α15. Anti-inflammatory activity: With the exception of IFNs-α2, -α7, -α9, and -α11, all IFN-α subtypes had significant anti-inflammatory control activity in an interleukin-8 (IL-8) yield reduction assay. Gene expression analyses showed that some IFN-α subtypes can significantly downregulate the expression of IL-8, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), IL-6, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), βD1, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-kB) genes, while maintaining or upregulating the expression of βD4. Immunomodulation: A significant upregulation of class I and/or class II MHC was induced by all the IFNs under study, with the exception of IFNs-α11, -α15, and -α16, which instead significantly downregulated class I MHC. Our results indicate that gene duplications in the porcine IFN-α family underlie diverse effector and regulatory activities, being therefore instrumental in host survival and environmental adaptation. This role of IFN-α could be founded on fine-tuning and regulation of pro- and anti

  19. Posttranscriptional inhibition of interferon-gamma production by lead.

    PubMed

    Heo, Yong; Mondal, Tapan K; Gao, Donghong; Kasten-Jolly, Jane; Kishikawa, Hiroko; Lawrence, David A

    2007-03-01

    Lead (Pb) is known to preferentially suppress the activation and development of type-1 CD4+ helper T cell (Th1) responses, whereas it enhances the development of type-2 CD4+ helper T cell (Th2) responses. The inhibition of interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) production has been demonstrated in vitro with a Th1 clone and DO11.10 ovalbumin-transgenic (OVA-tg) CD4+ T cells, and in vivo with wild-type and OVA-tg BALB/c mice; however, the mechanisms responsible for the Pb-induced downregulation of IFNgamma have not been reported. Here, we assessed the modulation of IFNgamma production at the mRNA and protein levels. Pb did not significantly affect IFNgamma mRNA expression by a Th1 clone or activated splenocytes, as measured by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), ribonuclease protection, and real-time RT-PCR. However, Pb did significantly lower the amount of IFNgamma protein in supernatants and cell lysates of antigen-activated T cells in comparison to stimulated controls, suggesting that the lower amounts of IFNgamma released into culture supernatants were not due to a blockage of secretion that gave rise to a cytoplasmic accumulation of IFNgamma. Pb inhibition also was not prevented by addition of zinc or iron. Pb did not enhance protein degradation of IFNgamma, in that lactacystin, an effective blocker of proteosomal proteolysis, did not prevent loss of IFNgamma; additionally, Pb did not accelerate loss of IFNgamma after cycloheximide treatment. Pb did, however, significantly suppress IFNgamma biosynthesis, as investigated using 35S-incorporation in pulse/chase experiments, although it did not suppress total protein synthesis, indicating that Pb selectively inhibits IFNgamma biosynthesis. Thus, Pb appears to selectively interfere with the translation of certain proteins, such as IFNgamma. IL-12 blocked Pb's preferential promotion of Th2 cells, but absence of STAT6 did not prevent the Pb skewing. Thus, Pb may modulate unique regulatory pathways. PMID

  20. Inhibitors of the Interferon Response Enhance Virus Replication In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Claire E.; Randall, Richard E.; Adamson, Catherine S.

    2014-01-01

    Virus replication efficiency is influenced by two conflicting factors, kinetics of the cellular interferon (IFN) response and induction of an antiviral state versus speed of virus replication and virus-induced inhibition of the IFN response. Disablement of a virus's capacity to circumvent the IFN response enables both basic research and various practical applications. However, such IFN-sensitive viruses can be difficult to grow to high-titer in cells that produce and respond to IFN. The current default option for growing IFN-sensitive viruses is restricted to a limited selection of cell-lines (e.g. Vero cells) that have lost their ability to produce IFN. This study demonstrates that supplementing tissue-culture medium with an IFN inhibitor provides a simple, effective and flexible approach to increase the growth of IFN-sensitive viruses in a cell-line of choice. We report that IFN inhibitors targeting components of the IFN response (TBK1, IKK2, JAK1) significantly increased virus replication. More specifically, the JAK1/2 inhibitor Ruxolitinib enhances the growth of viruses that are sensitive to IFN due to (i) loss of function of the viral IFN antagonist (due to mutation or species-specific constraints) or (ii) mutations/host cell constraints that slow virus spread such that it can be controlled by the IFN response. This was demonstrated for a variety of viruses, including, viruses with disabled IFN antagonists that represent live-attenuated vaccine candidates (Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), Influenza Virus), traditionally attenuated vaccine strains (Measles, Mumps) and a slow-growing wild-type virus (RSV). In conclusion, supplementing tissue culture-medium with an IFN inhibitor to increase the growth of IFN-sensitive viruses in a cell-line of choice represents an approach, which is broadly applicable to research investigating the importance of the IFN response in controlling virus infections and has utility in a number of practical applications including

  1. Adaptation of Enterovirus 71 to Adult Interferon Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Caine, Elizabeth A.; Partidos, Charalambos D.; Santangelo, Joseph D.; Osorio, Jorge E.

    2013-01-01

    Non-polio enteroviruses, including enterovirus 71 (EV71), have caused severe and fatal cases of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in the Asia-Pacific region. The development of a vaccine or antiviral against these pathogens has been hampered by the lack of a reliable small animal model. In this study, a mouse adapted EV71 strain was produced by conducting serial passages through A129 (α/β interferon (IFN) receptor deficient) and AG129 (α/β, γ IFN receptor deficient) mice. A B2 sub genotype of EV71 was inoculated intraperitoneally (i.p.) into neonatal AG129 mice and brain-harvested virus was subsequently passaged through 12 and 15 day-old A129 mice. When tested in 10 week-old AG129 mice, this adapted strain produced 100% lethality with clinical signs including limb paralysis, eye irritation, loss of balance, and death. This virus caused only 17% mortality in same age A129 mice, confirming that in the absence of a functional IFN response, adult AG129 mice are susceptible to infection by adapted EV71 isolates. Subsequent studies in adult AG129 and young A129 mice with the adapted EV71 virus examined the efficacy of an inactivated EV71 candidate vaccine and determined the role of humoral immunity in protection. Passive transfer of rabbit immune sera raised against the EV71 vaccine provided protection in a dose dependent manner in 15 day-old A129 mice. Intramuscular injections (i.m.) in five week-old AG129 mice with the alum adjuvanted vaccine also provided protection against the mouse adapted homologous strain. No clinical signs of disease or mortality were observed in vaccinated animals, which received a prime-and-boost, whereas 71% of control animals were euthanized after exhibiting systemic clinical signs (P<0.05). The development of this animal model will facilitate studies on EV71 pathogenesis, antiviral testing, the evaluation of immunogenicity and efficacy of vaccine candidates, and has the potential to establish correlates of protection studies. PMID

  2. Increased responsiveness of rat dorsal horn neurons in vivo following prolonged intrathecal exposure to interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Vikman, K S; Siddall, P J; Duggan, A W

    2005-01-01

    Prolonged increases in the level of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma occur in the CNS during some disease states associated with persistent pain. Administration of interferon-gamma to both humans and rodents has produced pain or pain-related behavior but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. The present study examined the effects of repeated intrathecal administration of interferon-gamma on dorsal horn neuronal responses under in vivo conditions. In addition, behavioral effects of interferon-gamma treatment were studied. Intrathecal cannulae were implanted into anesthetized rats. Animals then received either 1000 U of recombinant rat interferon-gamma in 10 microl buffer intrathecally, repeated four times over 8 days, or similarly administered buffer (controls). Interferon-gamma-treated animals showed a significant reduction in paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation of the hind paw. Electrophysiological experiments were performed under halothane anesthesia. Extracellular recordings of spontaneous and evoked responses were obtained from dorsal horn neurons (n=64) in the lumbar spinal cord. There was a significantly higher proportion of spontaneously active neurons in the interferon-gamma-treated animals (50%) when compared with controls (19%). A significantly increased proportion of neurons from interferon-gamma-treated animals displayed afterdischarges following both innocuous and noxious mechanical stimulation of the receptive field (brush: 21% in interferon-gamma-treated, 3% in controls; pinch: 97% in interferon-gamma-treated, 50% in controls). Neurons from interferon-gamma-treated animals also showed significantly increased wind-up of action potentials in response to repeated electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at C-fiber strength at both 0.5 and 1 Hz. Paired-pulse inhibition, evoked through electrical stimulation of the cutaneous receptive field, was significantly decreased in neurons from interferon-gamma-treated animals at 50

  3. Serum Interferon-Related MicroRNAs as Biomarkers to Predict the Response to Interferon Therapy in Chronic Hepatitis C Genotype 4

    PubMed Central

    Motawi, Tarek Kamal; Shaker, Olfat Gamil; El-Maraghy, Shohda Assem; Senousy, Mahmoud Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are messengers during interferon-virus interplay and are involved in antiviral immunity, however, little is known about interferon-related microRNAs regarding their detection in serum and their potential use as non-invasive diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in chronic hepatitis C (CHC). To elucidate some of the molecular aspects underlying failure of pegylated interferon-α/ribavirin therapy, we investigated pretreatment expression profiles of seven selected interferon-related microRNAs (miR-146a, miR-34a, miR-130a, miR-19a, miR-192, miR-195, and miR-296) by quantitative RT-PCR custom array technology in serum of Egyptian CHC genotype 4 patients and whether their pretreatment levels would predict patient response to the combination therapy. One hundred and six CHC patients and forty matched healthy controls were included. Patients were divided into sustained virological response (SVR) and non-responder (NR) groups. Serum miR-34a, miR-130a, miR-19a, miR-192, miR-195, and miR-296 were upregulated, whereas serum miR-146a was downregulated in CHC compared to controls. Significant correlations were found between expression levels of studied microRNAs and also with clinical data. Pretreatment levels of miR-34a, miR-130a, and miR-195 were significantly higher, whereas miR-192 and miR-296 levels were significantly lower in SVR than NR patients. miR-19a and miR-146a levels were not significantly different between the two groups. miR-34a was superior to differentiate CHC from controls, whereas miR-296 was superior to discriminate SVR from NR patients by receiver operating characteristic analysis. Multivariate logistic analysis revealed miR-34a and miR-195 as independent predictors for SVR and miR-192 as an independent variable for non-response. In conclusion, pretreatment expression profiles of five interferon-related microRNAs are associated with treatment outcome in CHC. Of these, miR-34a, miR-195, and miR-192 could predict treatment response. The profiling

  4. Serum interferon-related microRNAs as biomarkers to predict the response to interferon therapy in chronic hepatitis C genotype 4.

    PubMed

    Motawi, Tarek Kamal; Shaker, Olfat Gamil; El-Maraghy, Shohda Assem; Senousy, Mahmoud Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are messengers during interferon-virus interplay and are involved in antiviral immunity, however, little is known about interferon-related microRNAs regarding their detection in serum and their potential use as non-invasive diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in chronic hepatitis C (CHC). To elucidate some of the molecular aspects underlying failure of pegylated interferon-α/ribavirin therapy, we investigated pretreatment expression profiles of seven selected interferon-related microRNAs (miR-146a, miR-34a, miR-130a, miR-19a, miR-192, miR-195, and miR-296) by quantitative RT-PCR custom array technology in serum of Egyptian CHC genotype 4 patients and whether their pretreatment levels would predict patient response to the combination therapy. One hundred and six CHC patients and forty matched healthy controls were included. Patients were divided into sustained virological response (SVR) and non-responder (NR) groups. Serum miR-34a, miR-130a, miR-19a, miR-192, miR-195, and miR-296 were upregulated, whereas serum miR-146a was downregulated in CHC compared to controls. Significant correlations were found between expression levels of studied microRNAs and also with clinical data. Pretreatment levels of miR-34a, miR-130a, and miR-195 were significantly higher, whereas miR-192 and miR-296 levels were significantly lower in SVR than NR patients. miR-19a and miR-146a levels were not significantly different between the two groups. miR-34a was superior to differentiate CHC from controls, whereas miR-296 was superior to discriminate SVR from NR patients by receiver operating characteristic analysis. Multivariate logistic analysis revealed miR-34a and miR-195 as independent predictors for SVR and miR-192 as an independent variable for non-response. In conclusion, pretreatment expression profiles of five interferon-related microRNAs are associated with treatment outcome in CHC. Of these, miR-34a, miR-195, and miR-192 could predict treatment response. The profiling

  5. Interferons as Therapy for Viral and Neoplastic Diseases: From Panacea to Pariah to Paragon

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Robert M.; Contente, Sara

    2009-01-01

    For more than 20 years after the excitement engendered by their discovery in 1957 as antiviral agents, there were no significant clinical uses of interferons; however, following their cloning they have been employed as effective treatment for several viral, autoimmune, and neoplastic diseases.

  6. Expression of biologically active human interferon alpha 2 in aloe vera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have developed a system for transgenic expression of proteins in Aloe Vera. Using this approach we have generated plants expressing the human gene interferon alpha 2, IFNa2. IFNa2 is a small secreted cytokine that plays a vital role in regulating the body’s immune response to viral infections a...

  7. Increased binding of circulating systemic lupus erythematosus autoantibodies to recombinant interferon alpha 2b.

    PubMed

    Khan, Wahid Ali; Qureshi, Javed Anwer

    2015-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by various types of immunological abnormalities including circulating and tissue-fixed autoantibodies reactive with autoantigens. The mechanism that can explain the production of these antibodies is unclear. Here we address the binding specificity of SLE autoantibodies with recombinant alpha interferon 2b (hrIFN α-2b), commercially available interferon (IFN α-2b), and the gene (cIFN α-2b) encoding this interferon. hrIFN α-2b showed higher binding with naturally occurring SLE autoantibodies as compared to IFN α-2b (p < 0.05) or cIFN α-2b gene (p < 0.001) as assessed by direct binding, inhibition ELISA, and quantitative precipitin titration. The relative affinity of SLE autoantibodies for hrIFN α-2b, IFN α-2b, and cIFN α-2b gene was in the order of 1.13 × 10(-7) , 1.38 × 10(-6) , and 1.22 × 10(-6) , respectively. hrIFN α-2b is shown to have unique epitopes that would explain the possible antigenic role of hrIFN α-2b in the generation of SLE autoantibodies. Anti-hrIFN α-2b antibodies have been shown to represent an alternative immunological probe for the estimation of interferon alpha 2b in the serum of SLE patients. PMID:26547367

  8. Immunotherapy with imiquimod and interferon alfa for metastasized Merkel cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, R.U.; Braunschweig, T.; Ghassemi, A.; Rübben, A.

    2016-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (mcc) is a highly aggressive neuroendocrine tumour of the skin. Remission rates are high with chemotherapy in patients with metastasis, but without any improvement in overall survival. We present the case of a 90-year-old woman with facial mcc. After radiation and surgery, the mcc recurred with widespread cutaneous and regional lymph node metastases. The metastases were treated with weekly intralesional injections of 1–2×106 IU interferon alfa-2a, accompanied by topical imiquimod 5% cream 3 times weekly. After partial regression, subcutaneous pegylated interferon alfa-2b was added at a dose of 30 μg weekly, which was then increased to 50 μg weekly. At 4 months after the start of immunotherapy, all cutaneous metastases and the intralesionally treated lymph node metastases receded. Interruption or reduction of systemic interferon application resulted in locoregional relapses that were successfully treated with surgery or intralesional interferon injections. The patient remains alive 30 months after initiation of immunotherapy, suggesting that locally metastasized mcc might be able to be controlled with local and systemic immunotherapy. PMID:27122984

  9. [Interferon-alpha toxicity and reversible bilateral optical neuropathy: a timely withdrawal of the drug].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Carro, G; Fernández-Alonso, R; González-Diéguez, M L; Rodríguez-García, M; Junceda-Moreno, J

    2014-04-01

    Clinical case A patient with chronic, painless, bilateral loss of vision, after significant intake of interferon (IFNα) and ribavirina due to liver transplant. Ocular fundus is normal. A suspected retrobulbar optic neuropathy is confirmed by a prolongation of the latency of the patient's visual evoked potential. There being no prior record of risk factors and with the patient's systemic analysis giving normal results, the clinical improvement and the electro-physiological tests conducted after the drug was withdrawn point to interferon as negatively affecting the bilateral optic nerve. Discussion Interferon-α is used in the treatment of viral and neoplastic illnesses. Currently the drug is formulated as Interferon alfa pegilado (IFNα-p) in order to reduce toxicity and increase tolerance. The most common secondary effects are flu symptoms, asthenia and weigh loss. Affected ocular tissue is rare and optic neuropathy is also an infrequent complication: retinopathy at the beginning of treatment is, however, more frequent. The most widely accepted hypothesis as to the cause of toxicity is the presence of circulating immune complexes. It is, therefore, essential for ophthalmologists to be aware of the toxicity of this drug in order to be able to withdraw it in good time, thus preventing potentially irreversible sight loss. PMID:24269470

  10. Myasthenia Crisis Induced by Pegylated-Interferon in Patient With Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Baik, Su Jung; Kim, Tae Hun; Kim, Hye In; Rhie, Jeong Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis is occasionally associated with thymoma that needs surgical resection and may progress to severe respiratory failure. We experienced a rare case of myasthenia crisis during antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C, in whom mediastinal thymoma was discovered and successfully managed with surgical thymectomy and meticulous medical care. A 47-year-old-male patient complained of sudden diplopia 1 week after stopping 11-week administration of pegylated-interferon and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Ophthalmologic examinations revealed ptosis on the right eyelid and restricted right eye movement. Myasthenia gravis was confirmed by positive repetitive nerve stimulation test and positive serum antiacetylcholine receptor antibody test, and mediastinal thymoma was found on chest CT scan. The ocular myasthenia gravis progressed to respiratory failure even after discontinuing antiviral treatment but eventually recovered with thymectomy, anticholinesterase administration, steroid pulse therapy, and prolonged ventilator care. We describe the clinical features of this life-threatening complication of interferon treatment along with previous myasthenia crisis cases by interferon for chronic hepatitis C. In patients with chronic hepatitis C who is going to receive interferon-based antiviral treatment, physicians need to keep in mind the potential life-threatening manifestations of myasthenia gravis before and during antiviral treatment especially when patients complain of muscular weakness and easy fatigability. PMID:27227948

  11. Insights into the Interferon Regulatory Factor Activation from the Crystal Structure of Dimeric IRF5

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Lam, S; Srinath, H; Jiang, Z; Correia, J; Schiffer, C; Fitzgerald, K; Lin, K; Royer, Jr., W

    2008-01-01

    The interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) are involved in the innate immune response and are activated by phosphorylation. The structure of a pseudophosphorylated IRF5 activation domain now reveals structural changes in the activated form that would turn an autoinhibitory region into a dimerization interface. In vivo analysis supports the relevance of such a dimer to transcriptional activation.

  12. Myasthenia Crisis Induced by Pegylated-Interferon in Patient With Chronic Hepatitis C: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Baik, Su Jung; Kim, Tae Hun; Kim, Hye In; Rhie, Jeong Yeon

    2016-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis is occasionally associated with thymoma that needs surgical resection and may progress to severe respiratory failure. We experienced a rare case of myasthenia crisis during antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C, in whom mediastinal thymoma was discovered and successfully managed with surgical thymectomy and meticulous medical care.A 47-year-old-male patient complained of sudden diplopia 1 week after stopping 11-week administration of pegylated-interferon and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Ophthalmologic examinations revealed ptosis on the right eyelid and restricted right eye movement. Myasthenia gravis was confirmed by positive repetitive nerve stimulation test and positive serum antiacetylcholine receptor antibody test, and mediastinal thymoma was found on chest CT scan. The ocular myasthenia gravis progressed to respiratory failure even after discontinuing antiviral treatment but eventually recovered with thymectomy, anticholinesterase administration, steroid pulse therapy, and prolonged ventilator care. We describe the clinical features of this life-threatening complication of interferon treatment along with previous myasthenia crisis cases by interferon for chronic hepatitis C.In patients with chronic hepatitis C who is going to receive interferon-based antiviral treatment, physicians need to keep in mind the potential life-threatening manifestations of myasthenia gravis before and during antiviral treatment especially when patients complain of muscular weakness and easy fatigability. PMID:27227948

  13. ENHANCEMENT OF NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY AND INTERFERON PRODUCTION BY MANGANESE IN YOUNG MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect that MnCl2 has on murine splenic natural killer (NK) cell activity was investigated in infant (10 days old), pre-weanling (18 days old) and weanling (24 days old) C57BL/6J mice. Both MnCl2 and Poly I:C caused elevations in serum interferon levels. Time-course studies r...

  14. Mapping a Dynamic Innate Immunity Protein Interaction Network Regulating Type I Interferon Production

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shitao; Wang, Lingyan; Berman, Michael; Kong, Young-Yun; Dorf, Martin E.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY To systematically investigate innate immune signaling networks regulating production of type I interferon, we analyzed protein complexes formed after microbial recognition. Fifty-eight baits were associated with 260 interacting proteins forming a human innate immunity interactome for type I interferon (HI5) of 401 unique interactions; 21% of interactions were modulated by RNA, DNA, or LPS. Overexpression and depletion analyses identified 22 unique genes that regulated NF-κB and ISRE reporter activity, viral replication, or virus-induced interferon production. Detailed mechanistic analysis defined a role for mind bomb (MIB) E3 ligases in K63-linked ubiquitination of TBK1, a kinase that phosphorylates IRF transcription factors controlling interferon production. Mib genes selectively controlled responses to cytosolic RNA. MIB deficiency reduced antiviral activity, establishing the role of MIB proteins as positive regulators of antiviral responses. The HI5 provides a dynamic physical and regulatory network that serves as a resource for mechanistic analysis of innate immune signaling. PMID:21903422

  15. Identification, Characterization, and Developmental Expression Pattern of Type III Interferon Receptor Gene in the Chinese Goose

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qin; Chen, Shun; Qi, Yulin; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Chen, Xiaoyue; Zhou, Xue; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-01-01

    Interferons, as the first line of defense against the viral infection, play an important role in innate immune responses. Type III interferon (IFN-λ) was a newly identified member of IFN family, which plays IFN-like antiviral activity. Towards a better understanding of the type III interferon system in birds, type III interferon lambda receptor (IFNLR1) was first identified in the Chinese goose. In this paper, we had cloned 1952 bp for goose IFNLR1 (goIFNLR1), including an ORF of 1539 bp, encoding a 512-amino acid protein with a 20 aa predict signal peptide at its N terminal and a 23 aa transmembrane region. The predicted amino acid sequence of goIFNLR1 has 90%, 73%, and 34% identity with duck IFNLR1 (predicted sequence), chicken IFNLR1, and human IFNLR1, respectively. And the age-related tissue distribution of goIFNLR1 was identified by Real Time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), we found that the goIFNLR1 has a mainly expression in epithelium-rich tissues similar to other species', such as small intestinal, lung, liver, and stomach. Moreover, a relatively high expression of goIFNLR1 was also observed in the secondary immune tissues (harderian gland and cecal tonsil). The identification and tissue distribution of goIFNLR1 will facilitate further study of the role of IFN-λ in goose antiviral defense. PMID:26064884

  16. Subgenomic HCV RNA decline during interferon-a treatment is biphasic and dose dependent

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S; Dahari, Harel; Sainz, Bruno; Uprichard, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Although replicon systems have been extensively used to investigate interferon-{alpha} (IFN) treatment a detailed description of genotype -1 b-HCV -sub-genomic replicon (sg 1 b) kinetics in the presence of IFN is still missing. Here, we sought to analyze sg 1 b under various IFN concentrations and define its decay patterns.

  17. Crystal structure of human interferon-γ receptor 2 reveals the structural basis for receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Mikulecký, Pavel; Zahradník, Jirí; Kolenko, Petr; Černý, Jiří; Charnavets, Tatsiana; Kolářová, Lucie; Nečasová, Iva; Pham, Phuong Ngoc; Schneider, Bohdan

    2016-09-01

    Interferon-γ receptor 2 is a cell-surface receptor that is required for interferon-γ signalling and therefore plays a critical immunoregulatory role in innate and adaptive immunity against viral and also bacterial and protozoal infections. A crystal structure of the extracellular part of human interferon-γ receptor 2 (IFNγR2) was solved by molecular replacement at 1.8 Å resolution. Similar to other class 2 receptors, IFNγR2 has two fibronectin type III domains. The characteristic structural features of IFNγR2 are concentrated in its N-terminal domain: an extensive π-cation motif of stacked residues KWRWRH, a NAG-W-NAG sandwich (where NAG stands for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine) and finally a helix formed by residues 78-85, which is unique among class 2 receptors. Mass spectrometry and mutational analyses showed the importance of N-linked glycosylation to the stability of the protein and confirmed the presence of two disulfide bonds. Structure-based bioinformatic analysis revealed independent evolutionary behaviour of both receptor domains and, together with multiple sequence alignment, identified putative binding sites for interferon-γ and receptor 1, the ligands of IFNγR2. PMID:27599734

  18. Comparison of Tuberculin Activity in the Interferon-gamma Assay for the Diagnosis of Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle infected with bovine tuberculosis still represent a serious regulatory and health concern in a variety of countries. Early diagnosis using the in vitro interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) assay has been applied for more than a decade. Briefly, IFN-gamma responses in whole blood cultures stimulated w...

  19. Effects of chicken interferon Gamma on Newcastle disease virus vaccine immunogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More effective vaccines are needed to control avian diseases. The use of chicken interferon gamma (chIFN') during vaccination is a potentially important but controversial approach that may improve the immune response to antigens. In the present study, three different systems to co-deliver chIFN' wit...

  20. Type III interferon protects swine against foot-and-mouth disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years we have developed novel strategies to control foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) including the use of biotherapeutics such as interferons (IFN) delivered by a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5). Swine can be sterilely protected after vaccination with an Ad5 that encodes po...

  1. Immunotherapy with imiquimod and interferon alfa for metastasized Merkel cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wahl, R U; Braunschweig, T; Ghassemi, A; Rübben, A

    2016-04-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (mcc) is a highly aggressive neuroendocrine tumour of the skin. Remission rates are high with chemotherapy in patients with metastasis, but without any improvement in overall survival. We present the case of a 90-year-old woman with facial mcc. After radiation and surgery, the mcc recurred with widespread cutaneous and regional lymph node metastases. The metastases were treated with weekly intralesional injections of 1-2×10(6) IU interferon alfa-2a, accompanied by topical imiquimod 5% cream 3 times weekly. After partial regression, subcutaneous pegylated interferon alfa-2b was added at a dose of 30 μg weekly, which was then increased to 50 μg weekly. At 4 months after the start of immunotherapy, all cutaneous metastases and the intralesionally treated lymph node metastases receded. Interruption or reduction of systemic interferon application resulted in locoregional relapses that were successfully treated with surgery or intralesional interferon injections. The patient remains alive 30 months after initiation of immunotherapy, suggesting that locally metastasized mcc might be able to be controlled with local and systemic immunotherapy. PMID:27122984

  2. [Disseminated BCG disease revealing a partial deficiency in receptor 1 interferon gamma].

    PubMed

    Antonietti, J; Retornaz, K; Bernasconi, A; Laporte, R-J; Minodier, P; Bustamante, J-C; Dubus, J-C

    2015-09-01

    We report on a case of disseminated BCGitis with an unusual presentation in a 4-month-old infant revealing a syndrome of Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacteria due to a partial dominant mutation of the interferon gamma receptor 1 gene. PMID:26251056

  3. A stay of execution: type I interferons pardon T cells from death by natural killers.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Shannon M; Zajac, Allan J

    2014-06-19

    In this issue of Immunity, Crouse et al., (2014) and Xu et al., (2014), show that by modulating the expression of natural killer (NK) cell receptor ligands, type I interferons protect responding T cells against culling by NK cells. PMID:24950208

  4. Bovine Tuberculosis: Analyzing the Parameters of the Interferon Gamma Assay and Improved Diagnosis with New Antigens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine tuberculosis (TB), a zoonotic disease with a major economic impact, continues to be a significant problem with a global perspective. The BOVIGAM® interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) assay constitutes a laboratory-based tuberculosis test and is widely used complementary to the tuberculin skin test....

  5. Antiviral activity of bovine type III interferon against foot-and-mouth disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interferons (IFN) are the first line of defense against viral infections. Recently a new family of IFNs, type III, has been identified in humans, mice, swine and chickens. Here we report the identification and characterization of a member of the bovine type III IFN family, boIFN-lambda3, also known...

  6. Type-1 interferon signaling mediates neuro-inflammatory events in models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Juliet M; Minter, Myles R; Newman, Andrew G; Zhang, Moses; Adlard, Paul A; Crack, Peter J

    2014-05-01

    A neuro-inflammatory response has been implicated in human patients and animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Type-1 interferons are pleiotropic cytokines involved in the initiation and regulation of the pro-inflammatory response; however, their role in AD is unknown. This study investigated the contribution of type-1 IFN signaling in the neuro-inflammatory response to amyloid-beta (Aβ) in vitro and in the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of AD. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay confirmed a 2-fold increase in IFNα in APP/PS1 brains compared with control brains. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction also identified increased IFNα and IFNβ expression in human pre-frontal cortex from AD patients. In vitro studies in primary neurons demonstrated Aβ-induced type-1 IFN expression preceded that of other classical pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL1-β, and IL-6. Significantly, ablation of type-1 interferon-α receptor 1 expression in BE(2)M17 neuroblastoma cells and primary neurons afforded protection against Aβ-induced toxicity. This study supports a role for type-1 interferons in the pro-inflammatory response and neuronal cell death in AD and suggests that blocking type-1 interferon-α receptor 1 maybe a therapeutic target to limit the disease progression. PMID:24262201

  7. Comparison of Tuberculin Activity in the Interferon-gamma Assay for the Diagnosis of Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle infected with bovine tuberculosis still represent a serious regulatory and health concern in a variety of countries. Early diagnosis using the in vitro interferon gamma (IFN-g) assay has been applied for more than a decade. Briefly, IFN-g responses in whole blood cultures stimulated with puri...

  8. Bovine Tuberculosis: Effect of the Tuberculin Skin Test on In vitro Interferon gamma Responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a disease of zoonotic and economic importance. In many countries, control is based on test and slaughter policies and/or abattoir surveillance. For testing, cell mediated immune- (CMI-) based assays (i.e., Tuberculin skin test (TST) supplemented by the interferon gamma (...

  9. Development of a Second Generation Bovigam Interferon Gamma (IFN-gamma) Assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In search for better tools to control bovine tuberculosis, the development of diagnostic tests with improved performance and enhanced ease-of-use has a high priority. BOVIGAM®, a rapid laboratory assay, measures gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) production in whole blood samples after induction of a ce...

  10. INTERFERON-GAMMA STIMULATING ACTIVITIES OF THE FRACTIONATED NEOSPORA CANINUM TACHYZOITE LYSATE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neospora caninum is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite, causing bovine abortion worldwide. Our recent research showed that N. caninum tachyzoite lysate elicits production of the T cell cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-g) by both bovine and murine T cells, which may be critical to host protec...

  11. Activation of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Is Inhibited by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Talon, Julie; Horvath, Curt M.; Polley, Rosalind; Basler, Christopher F.; Muster, Thomas; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2000-01-01

    We present a novel mechanism by which viruses may inhibit the alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) cascade. The double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding protein NS1 of influenza virus is shown to prevent the potent antiviral interferon response by inhibiting the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), a key regulator of IFN-α/β gene expression. IRF-3 activation and, as a consequence, IFN-β mRNA induction are inhibited in wild-type (PR8) influenza virus-infected cells but not in cells infected with an isogenic virus lacking the NS1 gene (delNS1 virus). Furthermore, NS1 is shown to be a general inhibitor of the interferon signaling pathway. Inhibition of IRF-3 activation can be achieved by the expression of wild-type NS1 in trans, not only in delNS1 virus-infected cells but also in cells infected with a heterologous RNA virus (Newcastle disease virus). We propose that inhibition of IRF-3 activation by a dsRNA binding protein significantly contributes to the virulence of influenza A viruses and possibly to that of other viruses. PMID:10933707

  12. [Treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma with interferon alpha and OK-432 (streptococcal preparation)].

    PubMed

    Shinoda, M; Naide, Y

    1992-11-01

    A total of 12 patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma received interferon alpha (3 million units intramuscularly 6 times weekly) and OK-432 (5 KE (Klinische Einheit) intramuscularly twice weekly). Metastatic lesions appeared before operation in six patients and after operation in six patients. Among them 5 patients had received interferon therapy and this combination therapy was started after the judgment of progressive disease for interferon therapy. Eleven pulmonary and 5 bone metastases were evaluable. The median duration of the combination therapy was 89.3 weeks. There were 4 partial responses and no complete responses among the 12 patients, giving a response rate of 33.3%. The median duration of response was 25 months, with a range of 6 to 54 months. Responses were seen predominantly in patients in whom metastases appeared after operation (3 of 4 responders). However, regarding the individual organs, two complete and 2 partial responses were observed among 11 pulmonary metastases and 2 partial responses among 5 bone metastases. The survival period after discovery of the metastasis was 10 to 67 months and the 5-year survival rate was 70.5%. Almost all patients had fever and induration at the injection site. Other side effects included leukopenia, anorexia, and depression. This combination therapy is thought to be effective against bone or other organs metastasis resistant to interferon alone. PMID:1485585

  13. Noncanonical Effects of IRF9 in Intestinal Inflammation: More than Type I and Type III Interferons

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, Isabella; Rosebrock, Felix; Hainzl, Eva; Heider, Susanne; Majoros, Andrea; Wienerroither, Sebastian; Strobl, Birgit; Stockinger, Silvia; Kenner, Lukas; Müller, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    The interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3) transcription factor with its Stat1, Stat2, and interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) subunits is employed for transcriptional responses downstream of receptors for type I interferons (IFN-I) that include IFN-α and IFN-β and type III interferons (IFN-III), also called IFN-λ. Here, we show in a murine model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis that IRF9 deficiency protects animals, whereas the combined loss of IFN-I and IFN-III receptors worsens their condition. We explain the different phenotypes by demonstrating a function of IRF9 in a noncanonical transcriptional complex with Stat1, apart from IFN-I and IFN-III signaling. Together, Stat1 and IRF9 produce a proinflammatory activity that overrides the benefits of the IFN-III response on intestinal epithelial cells. Our results further suggest that the CXCL10 chemokine gene is an important mediator of this proinflammatory activity. We thus establish IFN-λ as a potentially anticolitogenic cytokine and propose an important role for IRF9 as a component of noncanonical Stat complexes in the development of colitis. PMID:25918247

  14. INCREASED SUSCEPTIBILITY TO PENTOBARBITAL FOLLOWING MOUSE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION: ROLE OF VIRAL-INDUCED INTERFERON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative roles of viral induced interferon (IFN) and viral infection of the liver in mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV)-induced depression of cytochrome P-450 (cyt P-450) levels and enhancement of pentobarbital-induced sleeping time (PEN-S...

  15. Treatment of putative non-A, non-B, non-C hepatitis with alpha interferon: a preliminary trial.

    PubMed

    Van Thiel, D H; Gavaler, J S; Baddour, N; Friedlander, L; Wright, H I

    1994-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis due to putative non-A, non-B, non-C hepatitis occurring in an individual who is negative for HBV and HCV markers has been identifiable only recently. Little or nothing is known about its natural history or response to interferon therapy. In the present study, 13 subjects with chronic non-A, non-B, non-C hepatitis were treated with interferon for 6 months (5 million units, three times per week). Prior to and after 6 months of therapy and again 6 weeks after discontinuing interferon therapy, each subject underwent a liver biopsy. These tissues were used to define the histopathology, the character of the cellular infiltrate within the liver, and the changes in histopathology and inflammatory infiltrate achieved in response to interferon therapy and withdrawal. No differences for age, gender, initial AST, bilirubin, histopathology, or Knodell score were evident between responders (n = 7) and non-responders (n = 6). Only the number of NK cells was altered significantly as a result of IFN treatment and distinguished responders from non-responders. These data demonstrate that: (1) chronic non-A, non-B, non-hepatitis can be treated with interferon; (2) interferon activates NK cells and enhances hepatocyte expression of Class II MHC antigens; and (3) interferon also increases the number of CD3, CD4, and CD8 cells found within the liver but these changes do not distinguish between responders and non-responders. PMID:7931774

  16. Interferon treatment for chronic hepatitis C infection in hemophiliacs--influence of virus load, genotype, and liver pathology on response.

    PubMed

    Hanley, J P; Jarvis, L M; Andrew, J; Dennis, R; Hayes, P C; Piris, J; Lee, R; Simmonds, P; Ludlam, C A

    1996-03-01

    In this study, we assessed the effectiveness of interferon treatment in 31 hemophiliacs with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Interferon alfa-2a (3 MU three times weekly) was administered for 6 months. Response was assessed by both serial alanine transaminase (ALT) and HCV RNA levels measured by a sensitive semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. HCV genotype was determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), and evidence of changing genotypes during interferon therapy was sought. Severity of liver disease was assessed by both noninvasive and invasive methods, including laparoscopic liver inspection and biopsy. Sustained normalization of ALT levels occurred in eight patients (28%), and seven (24%) became nonviremic as assessed by PCR (<80 HCV/mL). Responders universally cleared HCV RNA within 2 months of starting interferon. Genotype 3a was associated with a favorable response to interferon. No evidence was found for a change in circulating genotype in patients who failed to respond to interferon or who relapsed. This study confirms that response rates to interferon are low in hemophiliacs as compared with other groups with chronic HCV infection. We have also demonstrated that virus load measurement over the first 8 to 12 weeks of treatment is an extremely useful method to identify responders at an early stage. PMID:8634415

  17. Counteraction of poly(4-vinylpyridine-n-oxide) on the depression of viral interferon induction by coal dust.

    PubMed Central

    Hahon, N

    1976-01-01

    The depressive activity of coal dust on interferon induction by influenza was markedly subverted when either coal dust or LLC-MK2 cell monolayers were pretreated with poly (4-vinylpyridine-N-oside). The polymer alone neither induced interferon synthesis, inhibited viral induction of interferon, influenced viral multiplication, nor affected cellular-induced resistance by interferon. Absorption of the polymer to coal dust not only occurred at a more rapid rate than to cell monolayers, but also less polymer was required to pretreat coal dust than cell monolayers to achieve comparable amelioration of interferon production. The polymer effectively negated the adverse activity of coal dust particles, irrespective of the latter's size (is less than 2.0 to 74.0 mum). Virus multiplication in the presence of coal dust=treated cell monolayers attained a level that was twofol higher than that noted with either polymer-pretreated coal dust or polymer-pretreated cell monolayers. Interferon production was almost completely inhibited in the presence of coal dust; pretreating coal dust or cells with the polymer abrogated this inhibitory activity of coal dust. It is tentatively suggested that coal dust particles per se directly interact with cell membranes to subvert interferon induction and that the formation of an absorbed polymerlayer on these complexes prevents their interaction. PMID:178603

  18. Modulation of alpha-interferon's antiviral and clinical effects by aspirin, acetaminophen, and prednisone in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, C W; Petty, B G; Woods, A; Kuwahara, S K; Witter, F R; Soo, W; Griffin, D E; Lietman, P S

    1995-10-01

    The magnitude and duration of the antiviral and clinical effect of alpha-interferon was measured in healthy volunteers. A single 3 million unit intramuscular dose of interferon was given either alone (controls) or after 72 h of concomitant medications. These medications included either aspirin (650 mg every 4 h), acetaminophen (650 mg every 4 h), or prednisone (40 mg per day). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were assayed for resistance to vesicular stomatitis virus infection and induction of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity as evidence of interferon's antiviral effect. Co-administration of acetaminophen increased both antiviral parameters by more than 70% (P < 0.05) and reduced symptoms after interferon dosing, compared to controls. Aspirin and prednisone did not demonstrate any significant differences from controls in antiviral effect. As a group, acetaminophen, aspirin, and prednisone reduced the clinical symptoms by 47% compared to controls (P = 0.03) after interferon dosing, although individual drug comparisons failed to reach statistical significance. Independent of treatment group, the changes in antiviral markers after interferon dosing correlated closely with each other (r = 0.72, P < 0.001), but neither correlated with symptoms or fever (r < 0.30, P > 0.05). Acetaminophen enhances the antiviral effects of a single intramuscular dose of alpha-interferon, considering the parameters measured in these healthy volunteers. PMID:8585766

  19. Rhinovirus Load Is High despite Preserved Interferon-β Response in Cystic Fibrosis Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cammisano, Maria; Chen, He; Singh, Sareen; Kooi, Cora; Leigh, Richard; Beaudoin, Trevor; Rousseau, Simon; Lands, Larry C.

    2015-01-01

    Lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) is often exacerbated following acute upper respiratory tract infections caused by the human rhinovirus (HRV). Pathophysiology of these exacerbations is presently unclear and may involve deficient innate antiviral or exaggerated inflammatory responses in CF airway epithelial cells. Furthermore, responses of CF cells to HRV may be adversely affected by pre-exposure to virulence factors of Pseudomonas (P.) aeruginosa, the microorganism that frequently colonizes CF airways. Here we examined production of antiviral cytokine interferon-β and inflammatory chemokine interleukin-8, expression of the interferon-responsive antiviral gene 2’-5’-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1), and intracellular virus RNA load in primary CF (delF508 CFTR) and healthy airway epithelial cells following inoculation with HRV16. Parallel cells were exposed to virulence factors of P. aeruginosa prior to and during HRV16 inoculation. CF cells exhibited production of interferon-β and interleukin-8, and expression of OAS1 at levels comparable to those in healthy cells, yet significantly higher HRV16 RNA load during early hours post-inoculation with HRV16. In line with this, HRV16 RNA load was higher in the CFBE41o- dF cell line overexpessing delF508 CFTR, compared with the isogenic control CFBE41o- WT (wild-type CFTR). Pre-exposure to virulence factors of P. aeruginosa did not affect OAS1 expression or HRV16 RNA load, but potentiated interleukin-8 production. In conclusion, CF cells demonstrate elevated HRV RNA load despite preserved interferon-β and OAS1 responses. High HRV load in CF airway epithelial cells appears to be due to deficiencies manifesting early during HRV infection, and may not be related to interferon-β. PMID:26599098

  20. In Vivo-Simulated Sonotransfection and the Effect of Gamma Interferon Gene on Neurofibroma Proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Kazuki; Feril, Loreto B.; Yoshida, Yuichi; Nakayama, Juichiro; Tachibana, Katsuro

    2007-05-01

    We have previously shown that ultrasound-mediated gene transfection (or sonotransfection) can be optimized on the basis of concepts drawn from previous in vitro experiments demonstrating ultrasound-induced apoptosis. At optimized conditions, we have shown using five cancer cell lines (HeLa, U937, Meth A, T24 and PC3) that sonotransfection is superior to other conventional non-viral methods such as electroporation and liposome-mediated transfection. In the present study, we further investigate the gene transfection of pEGFP-N1 into neurofibroma cell line isolated from human dermal neurofibroma, using an improved experimental set up that simulates in vivo conditions. The ultrasound device used was SonoPore KTAC-4000, which is capable of various settings. Using transducers of centre frequency 1.011 MHz, the optimal conditions include ISATA of 0.15, 0.44 and 0.64 W/cm2, burst frequency of 0.5 Hz, 25% duty factor, and 10-40 sec exposure duration. Cells were assayed at 24, 48 and 72 hr after the sonication. The transfection efficiency was found to be around 10%. Then we further investigated whether sonotransfection of gamma interferon on neurofibroma cell lines in vivo can suppress cell proliferation. Gamma interferon is well known as a pluripotential cytokine. It exerts an anti-tumor activity in some malignant diseases such as malignant lymphoma. Gamma interferon gene transfection by use of lipofectamin has been found to markedly inhibit the proliferation of neurofibroma cell lines in vitro. Our new experimental system was applied in evaluating the effect of sonotransfected gamma interferon gene on neurofibroma proliferation in vitro. It is suggested that ultrasound-mediated gamma interferon gene transfection could potentially become a non-surgical method in treating skin diseases, such as neurofibromas, particularly in patients with von Recklinghausen's disease.

  1. TLR3, TLR4 and TLRs7–9 Induced Interferons Are Not Impaired in Airway and Blood Cells in Well Controlled Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Annemarie; Edwards, Michael R.; Macintyre, Jonathan; del Rosario, Ajerico; Gielen, Vera; Haas, Jennifer; Kon, Onn Min; McHale, Mark; Johnston, Sebastian L.

    2013-01-01

    Defective Rhinovirus induced interferon-β and interferon-λ production has been reported in bronchial epithelial cells from asthmatics but the mechanisms of defective interferon induction in asthma are unknown. Virus infection can induce interferon through Toll like Receptors (TLR)3, TLR7 and TLR8. The role of these TLRs in interferon induction in asthma is unclear. This objective of this study was to measure the type I and III interferon response to TLR in bronchial epithelial cells and peripheral blood cells from atopic asthmatics and non-atopic non-asthmatics. Bronchial epithelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from atopic asthmatic and non-atopic non-asthmatic subjects were stimulated with agonists to TLR3, TLR4 & TLRs7–9 and type I and III interferon and pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin(IL)-6 and IL-8, responses assessed. mRNA expression was analysed by qPCR. Interferon proteins were analysed by ELISA. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were induced by each TLR ligand in both cell types. Ligands to TLR3 and TLR7/8, but not other TLRs, induced interferon-β and interferon-λ in bronchial epithelial cells. The ligand to TLR7/8, but not those to other TLRs, induced only type I interferons in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. No difference was observed in TLR induced interferon or pro-inflammatory cytokine production between asthmatic and non-asthmatic subjects from either cell type. TLR3 and TLR7/8,, stimulation induced interferon in bronchial epithelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Interferon induction to TLR agonists was not observed to be different in asthmatics and non-asthmatics. PMID:23824215

  2. Late onset autoimmune thrombocytopenia associated with pegylated interferon-alpha-2b plus ribavirin treatment for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Elefsiniotis, Ioannis S; Pantazis, Konstantinos D; Fotos, Nikolaos V; Moulakakis, Antonios; Mavrogiannis, Christos

    2006-03-01

    Interferon-induced, immune-mediated, thrombocytopenia is a rare event. In this report the case is described of development of severe, reversible, autoimmune thrombocytopenia in a patient with chronic hepatitis C virus infection, 6 months after the discontinuation of pegylated interferon-alpha-2b plus ribavirin treatment. Physicians must be aware that autoimmune thrombocytopenia can occur even after the end of treatment, as a late onset complication, especially when using the pegylated forms of interferons, which have longer half-lives and prolonged activity. PMID:16638114

  3. Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia Type 1: Report of One Patient and Analysis of Previously Reported Patients Treated with Interferon Alpha.

    PubMed

    Salihoglu, Ayse; Elverdi, Tugrul; Eskazan, Ahmet Emre; Eyice, Deniz; Bavunoglu, Isil; Ar, Muhlis Cem; Ongoren, Seniz; Guzel, Elif; Baslar, Zafer; Tunckale, Aydin; Tuzuner, Nukhet; Soysal, Teoman

    2016-06-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias are a rare group of inherited anemias characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and distinct morphological abnormalities in the erythroblasts. Interferon alpha has been shown to be effective in type 1 congenital dyserythropoietic anemia but the optimal duration of therapy is undefined. We present here a 32-years-old female patient diagnosed with type 1 congenital dyserythropoietic anemia precipitated by pregnancy and treated successfully with a short course of interferon alpha resulting in a durable response. A literature search including PubMed database on previously published articles regarding congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type 1 patients treated with interferon is conducted. PMID:27408411

  4. Fingolimod versus interferon beta/glatiramer acetate after natalizumab suspension in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Iaffaldano, Pietro; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Pozzilli, Carlo; Brescia Morra, Vincenzo; Ghezzi, Angelo; Millefiorini, Enrico; Patti, Francesco; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Zimatore, Giovanni Bosco; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Amato, Maria Pia; Bertolotto, Antonio; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Granella, Franco; Coniglio, Gabriella; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Sola, Patrizia; Lus, Giacomo; Ferrò, Maria Teresa; Iuliano, Gerardo; Corea, Francesco; Protti, Alessandra; Cavalla, Paola; Guareschi, Angelica; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Paolicelli, Damiano; Tortorella, Carla; Lepore, Vito; Prosperini, Luca; Saccà, Francesco; Baroncini, Damiano; Comi, Giancarlo; Trojano, Maria

    2015-11-01

    The comparative effectiveness of fingolimod versus interferon beta/glatiramer acetate was assessed in a multicentre, observational, prospectively acquired cohort study including 613 patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis discontinuing natalizumab in the Italian iMedWeb registry. First, after natalizumab suspension, the relapse risk during the untreated wash-out period and during the course of switch therapies was estimated through Poisson regression analyses in separated models. During the wash-out period an increased risk of relapses was found in patients with a higher number of relapses before natalizumab treatment (incidence rate ratio = 1.31, P = 0.0014) and in patients discontinuing natalizumab due to lack of efficacy (incidence rate ratio = 2.33, P = 0.0288), patient's choice (incidence rate ratio = 2.18, P = 0.0064) and adverse events (incidence rate ratio = 2.09, P = 0.0084). The strongest independent factors influencing the relapse risk after the start of switch therapies were a wash-out duration longer than 3 months (incidence rate ratio = 1.78, P < 0.0001), the number of relapses experienced during and before natalizumab treatment (incidence rate ratio = 1.61, P < 0.0001; incidence rate ratio = 1.13, P = 0.0118, respectively) and the presence of comorbidities (incidence rate ratio = 1.4, P = 0.0097). Switching to fingolimod was associated with a 64% reduction of the adjusted-risk for relapse in comparison with switching to interferon beta/glatiramer acetate (incidence rate ratio = 0.36, P < 0.0001). Secondly, patients who switched to fingolimod or to interferon beta/glatiramer acetate were propensity score-matched on a 1-to-1 basis at the switching date. In the propensity score-matched sample a Poisson model showed a significant lower incidence of relapses in patients treated with fingolimod in comparison with those treated with interferon beta/glatiramer acetate (incidence rate ratio = 0.52, P = 0.0003) during a 12-month follow-up. The cumulative

  5. Resident bone marrow macrophages produce type 1 interferons that can selectively inhibit interleukin-7-driven growth of B lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Lin, Q; Langston, H; Cooper, M D

    1995-10-01

    Type 1 interferons alpha and beta are found to be potent inhibitors of IL-7-induced growth of early B lineage cells, while having no effect on cell growth induced by IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, or autogenous factors. The combination of IL-7 and interferons alpha/beta induces bcl-2 down-regulation and cell death by apoptosis. These conclusions were derived initially from experiments employing exogenous cytokines, but functional type 1 interferons are also shown to be produced by resident bone marrow macrophages. As physiological modulators of IL-7-driven proliferation and cell survival, interferons alpha/beta may cooperate with other homeostatic factors to maintain the balanced production of normal B lineage cells. PMID:7584138

  6. Unmasking of myasthenia gravis during pegylated Alfa 2 a interferon and ribavirin therapy for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Ayesha

    2016-05-01

    Over last few decades, hepatitis C has emerged as a serious infection that has threatened the health and budgets of millions in the world. The objective of health professionals to treat it with recommended therapy of Alfa interferon and Ribavirin combination presents certain risks. One of the alarms is the ability of interferon to stimulate the production of autoantibodies in the body resulting in expression of autoimmune diseases in few who develop these antibodies. The case presented here is about unmasking of myasthenia gravis in a patient who received alfa interferon therapy for her chronic hepatitis C. Alfa interferon probably plays an important role in manifestation of the diseases in susceptible patients and all autoimmune diseases cannot be taken as mere side effects of the therapy. Clinicians need to be alert to pick up these diseases earlier so that the prompt management is possible. PMID:27183950

  7. Reversible bone marrow aplasia induced by pegylated interferon-α-2a therapy in a patient with primary myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mainali, Naba R; Bhatt, Vijaya R; Kedia, Shiksha; Krishnamurthy, Jairam; Wake, Laura M; Akhtari, Mojtaba

    2014-10-01

    Interferon has been widely used in the management of patients with hematological malignancies such as polycythemia vera, myelofibrosis, chronic myeloid leukemia and viral infections such as chronic hepatitis C. Hematological adverse effects such as cytopenias have been observed, particularly in patients who receive a combination of interferon-α-2a and ribavirin for hepatitis C. Mild myelosuppression can be seen with pegylated interferon; however, bone marrow aplasia in patients with myelofibrosis has not been reported. It is important to be aware of such a serious complication since persistent bone marrow aplasia can be fatal. We describe a case of pegylated interferon-induced reversible bone marrow aplasia in a patient with primary myelofibrosis. PMID:24067929

  8. Pharmacogenomics of interferon-β in multiple sclerosis: what has been accomplished and how can we ensure future progress?

    PubMed

    Carlson, Rebecca J; Doucette, J Ronald; Knox, Katherine; Nazarali, Adil J

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive disorder of the central nervous system, often resulting in significant disability in early adulthood. The field of pharmacogenomics holds promise in distinguishing responders from non-responders to drug treatment. Most studies on genetic polymorphisms in MS have addressed treatment with interferon-β, yet few findings have been replicated. This review outlines the barriers that currently hinder the validity, reproducibility, and inter-study comparison of pharmacogenomics research as it relates to the use of interferon-β. Notably, statistical power, varying definitions of responder status, varying assay and genotyping methodologies, and anti-interferon-β neutralizing antibodies significantly confound existing data. Future work should focus on addressing these factors in order to optimize interferon-β treatment outcomes in MS. PMID:25524087

  9. Interferon-targeted therapy in systemic lupus erythematosus: Is this an alternative to targeting B and T cells?

    PubMed

    Kalunian, K C

    2016-09-01

    Clinical trials of investigational agents in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have focused on targeting dysregulated B and T cells; however, recent translational research findings of the importance of the dysregulation of the innate immune system in SLE have led to clinical trials that target interferon. Three biologics that target type I interferons have been tested for their efficacy and safety in active SLE patients; these phase II trials have tested the hypothesis that down-regulation of interferon-regulated gene expression (the interferon signature) lessen the clinical burden of SLE. Rontalizumab, an anti-interferon-α monoclonal antibody, was studied in patients who had discontinued immunosuppressants. This study failed to show efficacy as assessed by both two outcome assessments; however, in low interferon signature patients, response was higher and corticosteroid usage was less in rontalizumab-treated patients. Sifalimumab, another anti-interferon-α monoclonal antibody, was studied in patients who remained on standard of care therapy. This study showed significantly better efficacy in patients treated with two sifalimumab dosages; significant differences were seen in the high interferon signature group. In a similar design and in a similar population as the sifalimumab study, anifrolumab, a monoclonal antibody that binds to a type I interferon receptor, was studied in patients who remained on standard of care therapy. In this study, one dosage group demonstrated efficacy and statistically significant effects were achieved in both tested dosage groups with secondary end points. Oral corticosteroid reduction to ≤7.5 mg daily was achieved in one of the tested dosage groups and organ-specific outcomes were significantly improved in that same group. For all studies, no significant differences in serious adverse effects were seen; although, herpes zoster infections were increased in sifalimumab- and anifrolumab-treated patients and influenza rates were

  10. Induction of human beta-interferon synthesis with poly(rI . rC) in mouse cells transfected with cloned cDNA plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Pitha, P M; Ciufo, D M; Kellum, M; Raj, N B; Reyes, G R; Hayward, G S

    1982-01-01

    Human genomic DNA and plasmids carrying portions of the cDNA gene for human beta-interferon have been introduced into mouse Ltk- cells by cotransfection with a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) gene. One plasmid contains 840 base pairs of human DNA complementary to pre-beta-interferon mRNA inserted into pBR322, whereas the other plasmids have hybrid genes containing only the 560-base pair coding region inserted under the transcriptional control of the TK promoter. Constitutive interferon production could not be detected in any of the mouse TK+ cell lines tested. Nevertheless, synthesis of interferon could be induced by poly(rI . rC) treatment in at least 16 of these cell lines, including clones transfected with genomic DNA, the beta-interferon cDNA, and the TK-beta-interferon cDNA hybrid gene. The interferon produced was specific for human cells and could be neutralized by antiserum against human beta-interferon. In contrast to human fibroblast cells, in which the synthesis of induced beta-interferon is transient, the poly(rI . rC)-induced TK+ lines continued to produce beta-interferon for prolonged periods of time and did not respond to superinduction conditions. Therefore, in transfected mouse cells, the coding DNA sequence from the human beta-interferon gene, without any of the adjacent 3' or 5' flanking human DNA sequences, was sufficient both to direct synthesis of biologically active product and to respond to the specific induction system that operates in human cells. However, the mechanism that switches off the synthesis of induced interferon in human cells appears not to operate in mouse cells transfected with beta-interferon cDNA. PMID:6956863

  11. The mode of action of interferons in viral infections and their possible role in the control of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Billiau, A

    1986-01-01

    Interferons can alter the course of virus infections by inhibiting virus replication at the intracellular level and by modifying the aspecific and specific immune response to viral antigens in body fluids and on cellular surfaces. Treatment of isolated cells with interferon renders them resistant to infections by viruses belonging to virtually any family. Knowledge of the mechanism of this effect is derived from studies employing both DNA (especially vaccinia virus and SV40) and RNA-viruses (especially picorna-, toga-, rhabdo-, reo- and retroviruses). Interferon induces multiple alterations in the level and state of intracellular regulatory molecules, leading to inhibition of virus replication at several possible steps. In the case of certain DNA viruses, transcription of viral DNA seems to be inhibited. In the case of RNA viruses the target for interferon action is mainly translation. The retroviridae constitute a special case and, in view of their analogy with the hepadnaviridae, are of particular relevance to the possible effects of interferon on the replication of HBV. Interferon inhibits one or more initial stages of primary infection of cells by transforming or nontransforming retroviruses, thereby preventing or delaying the synthesis and/or integration of viral DNA. In cells that already contain an integrated and fully expressed retrovirus genome, interferon treatment results in a reduced release of viral particles as well as a downward shift of the ratios between the numbers of infectious vs noninfectious particles. Immuno-modulatory properties of interferon which might alter the course of HBV-infection include: potentiation of cytotoxic activity of lymphocytes and macrophages; direct anti-inflammatory effects; enhancement or depression in antibody formation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2439572

  12. Recombinant interferon-α in myelofibrosis reduces bone marrow fibrosis, improves its morphology and is associated with clinical response.

    PubMed

    Pizzi, Marco; Silver, Richard T; Barel, Ariella; Orazi, Attilio

    2015-10-01

    Recombinant interferon-α represents a well-established therapeutic option for the treatment of polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia. Recent studies also suggest a role for recombinant interferon-α in the treatment of 'early stage' primary myelofibrosis, but few studies have reported the bone marrow changes after clinically successful interferon therapy. The aim of the present study is to detail the histological responses to recombinant interferon-α in primary myelofibrosis and post-polycythemia vera/post-essential thrombocythemia myelofibrosis and to correlate these with clinical findings. We retrospectively studied 12 patients with primary myelofibrosis or post-polycythemia vera/post-essential thrombocythemia myelofibrosis, who had been treated with recombinant interferon-α. Six patients had received other prior cytoreductive therapies. Bone marrow biopsy was assessed for the following histological parameters: (i) cellularity; (ii) myeloid-to-erythroid ratio; (iii) megakaryocyte tight clusters; (iv) megakaryocyte and naked nuclei density; (v) megakaryocytic atypia; (vi) fibrosis; and (vii) the percentage of blasts. Clinical and laboratory data were included: (i) constitutional symptoms; (ii) splenomegaly, if present; and (iii) complete cell blood count. The clinical response to therapy was evaluated using the International Working Group for Myelofibrosis Research and Treatment/European LeukemiaNet response criteria. The Dynamic International Prognostic Scoring System (DIPSS) score was calculated before and after recombinant interferon-α administration. Successful interferon therapy for myelofibrosis was associated with a significant reduction of marrow fibrosis, cellularity, megakaryocyte density and naked nuclei density. The presence of JAK2(V617F) mutation correlated with improved DIPSS score. JAK2(V617F)-negative cases showed worsening of such score or evolution to acute myeloid leukemia. Cytogenetic analysis documented a normal karyotype in all

  13. Gamma interferon release assay for monitoring of treatment response for active tuberculosis: an explosion in the spaghetti factory.

    PubMed

    Denkinger, Claudia M; Pai, Madhukar; Patel, Meena; Menzies, Dick

    2013-02-01

    Few studies have correlated the results of interferon (gamma interferon) release assays (IGRAs) with known markers of tuberculosis (TB) treatment response. We report the results of serial QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube assay (QFT) testing on 149 patients with active tuberculosis and correlate the results with smear and culture conversion. We show that QFT results do not offer much value for treatment monitoring of TB disease. PMID:23175268

  14. Sensitivity of African swine fever virus to type I interferon is linked to genes within multigene families 360 and 505.

    PubMed

    Golding, Josephine P; Goatley, Lynnette; Goodbourn, Steve; Dixon, Linda K; Taylor, Geraldine; Netherton, Christopher L

    2016-06-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes a lethal haemorrhagic disease of pigs. There are conflicting reports on the role of interferon in ASFV infection. We therefore analysed the interaction of ASFV with porcine interferon, in vivo and in vitro. Virulent ASFV induced biologically active IFN in the circulation of pigs from day 3-post infection, whereas low virulent OUR T88/3, which lacks genes from multigene family (MGF) 360 and MGF505, did not. Infection of porcine leucocytes enriched for dendritic cells, with ASFV, in vitro, induced high levels of interferon, suggesting a potential source of interferon in animals undergoing acute ASF. Replication of OUR T88/3, but not virulent viruses, was reduced in interferon pretreated macrophages and a recombinant virus lacking similar genes to those absent in OUR T88/3 was also inhibited. These findings suggest that as well as inhibiting the induction of interferon, MGF360 and MGF505 genes also enable ASFV to overcome the antiviral state. PMID:27043071

  15. [Expression of the human interferon alpha F gene in the obligate methylotroph Methylobacillus flagellatum KT and Pseudomonas putida].

    PubMed

    Chistoserdov, A Iu; Eremashvili, M R; Mashko, S V; Lapidus, A L; Skvortsova, M A

    1987-08-01

    The expression of human leucocyte interferon alpha F gene in plasmid pLM-IFN alpha F-273 is controlled by a hybrid tac (trp-lac) promoter. A structural gene for interferon alpha F is a component of the hybrid operon lacZ'-IFN alpha F-TcR, that contains an E. coli trp-operon intercystronic region. Plasmid pLM IFN alpha F-273--directed interferon synthesis allows to obtain about 10(7) IU/l. This plasmid was cloned in broad-host-range vector plasmid pAYC31. The hybrid bi-repliconed plasmid containing interferon gene as well as its single-repliconed deletion derivatives obtained by the in vivo recombination, were introduced into obligate methylotroph Methylobacillus flagellatum KT and Pseudomonas putida PpG6. Methylotrophic strain and Pseudomonas were able to transcribe the interferon gene from E. coli tac promoter, the yield of interferon being 2-4-fold higher as compared with the one in the initial host. PMID:3119998

  16. Treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma with a combination of human lymphoblastoid interferon-alpha and cimetidine.

    PubMed

    Kotake, T; Kinouchi, T; Saiki, S; Kuroda, M; Miki, T; Kiyohara, H; Usami, M

    1991-02-01

    Human lymphoblastoid interferon-alpha was administered intramuscularly at a dose of 5 x 10(6) units/day to 20 metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients. For potentiating the antitumor effect of interferon, cimetidine was also given to them orally at a dose of 800 mg/day. The combination therapy obtained a complete response in three patients (15%) and a partial response in three (15%). Nine patients (45%) had stable disease and five (25%), progressive disease. All six patients who responded to the combination therapy had been nephrectomized and had pulmonary metastases. Two of them also had metastases to other sites (mediastinal lymph nodes and bone). The pulmonary metastases were significantly more receptive to interferon therapy than those at the other sites. The average times before a response was obtained were 2.2 months for a minor response, 2.7 months for a partial response and 3.0 months for a complete response, and the average duration of response was 26 months. The six patients who responded survived for a significantly longer period than the 14 non-responding patients treated with interferon in combination with cimetidine. The major toxicities encountered were fever, fatigue and anorexia due to interferon, and the combination therapy was well tolerated except in three patients. The results suggest that interferon-alpha and cimetidine combination therapy may be of use in the management of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:2067120

  17. Sensitivity of African swine fever virus to type I interferon is linked to genes within multigene families 360 and 505

    PubMed Central

    Golding, Josephine P.; Goatley, Lynnette; Goodbourn, Steve; Dixon, Linda K.; Taylor, Geraldine; Netherton, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes a lethal haemorrhagic disease of pigs. There are conflicting reports on the role of interferon in ASFV infection. We therefore analysed the interaction of ASFV with porcine interferon, in vivo and in vitro. Virulent ASFV induced biologically active IFN in the circulation of pigs from day 3-post infection, whereas low virulent OUR T88/3, which lacks genes from multigene family (MGF) 360 and MGF505, did not. Infection of porcine leucocytes enriched for dendritic cells, with ASFV, in vitro, induced high levels of interferon, suggesting a potential source of interferon in animals undergoing acute ASF. Replication of OUR T88/3, but not virulent viruses, was reduced in interferon pretreated macrophages and a recombinant virus lacking similar genes to those absent in OUR T88/3 was also inhibited. These findings suggest that as well as inhibiting the induction of interferon, MGF360 and MGF505 genes also enable ASFV to overcome the antiviral state. PMID:27043071

  18. [Obtaining and characteristics of domestic preparation interferon alpha-2b with prolonged effect].

    PubMed

    Pokholenko, Ia A; Porubleva, L V; Dubeĭ, I Ia; Rebriev, A V; Sutugina, L P; Gromovoĭ, T Iu; Pokrovskiĭ, V A; Obolenskaia, M Iu; Chernykh, S I

    2008-01-01

    Pegylated interferon alpha-2b (PEG-IFN alpha-2b) is a domestic preparation of a modified recombinant interferon alpha-2b with prolonged effect. The preparation was obtained by N-terminal pegylation of IFN alpha-2b with polyethylene glycol (PEG). This paper presents the method of PEG-IFN alpha-2b synthesis and characteristics of the obtained product. PAAG electrophoresis, Western blot analysis and MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry confirm that the preparation is an N-terminal pegylated IFN alpha-2b that contains no more than 10% of dipegylated IFN alpha-2b. The comparison of PEG-IFN alpha-2b with its foreign analogue has revealed the similarity of their biological activity and pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:19351063

  19. Interferon-Induced Transmembrane Protein–Mediated Inhibition of Host Cell Entry of Ebolaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Wrensch, Florian; Karsten, Christina B.; Gnirß, Kerstin; Hoffmann, Markus; Lu, Kai; Takada, Ayato; Winkler, Michael; Simmons, Graham; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Ebolaviruses are highly pathogenic in humans and nonhuman primates and pose a severe threat to public health. The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) proteins can restrict entry of ebolaviruses, influenza A viruses, and other enveloped viruses. However, the breadth and mechanism of the antiviral activity of IFITM proteins are incompletely understood. Here, we employed ebolavirus glycoprotein–pseudotyped vectors and ebolavirus-like particles to address this question. We show that IFITM proteins inhibit the cellular entry of diverse ebolaviruses and demonstrate that type I interferon induces IFITM protein expression in macrophages, major viral targets. Moreover, we show that IFITM proteins block entry of influenza A viruses and ebolaviruses by different mechanisms and provide evidence that antibodies and IFITM proteins can synergistically inhibit cellular entry of ebolaviruses. These results provide insights into the role of IFITM proteins in infection by ebolaviruses and suggest a mechanism by which antibodies, though poorly neutralizing in vitro, might contribute to viral control in vivo. PMID:26034199

  20. Recurrent Classical Type of Kaposi's Sarcoma Treated by Interferon-alpha

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min Ju

    2008-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a lympho-angioproliferative disease, with four variants; one of which is classical KS (CKS). Classical KS is clinically characterized by single or multiple pea-sized bluish-red macules on the distal portions of the lower extremities. A 60-year-old man presented with an asymptomatic, solitary patch on the left sole. He had been successfully treated for the classical type of Kaposi sarcoma on the right sole with interferon-alpha 3 years before. The patient was treated with six million units of interferon-alpha three times per week for 6 months. The lesion showed complete resolution and there has been no report of recurrence for 1 year after treatment. PMID:27303184

  1. The role of type I interferons in intestinal infection, homeostasis, and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyeseon; Kelsall, Brian L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Type I interferons are a widely expressed family of effector cytokines that promote innate antiviral and antibacterial immunity. Paradoxically, they can also suppress immune responses by driving production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, and dysregulation of these cytokines can contribute to host-mediated immunopathology and disease progression. Recent studies describe their anti-inflammatory role in intestinal inflammation and the locus containing IFNAR, a heterodimeric receptor for the type I interferons has been identified as a susceptibility region for human inflammatory bowel disease in a genome-wide association study. This review focuses on the role of type I IFNs in the gut in health and disease and their emerging role as immune modulator. Clear understanding of type I IFN-mediated immune responses may provide revenue for fine-tuning existing IFN treatment for infection and intestinal inflammation. PMID:24942688

  2. Interferon-beta in multiple sclerosis. Can we control its costs?

    PubMed

    Tolley, K H; Whynes, D K

    1997-03-01

    The recent licensing of interferon-beta for use in patients with multiple sclerosis has caused concern, in view of the equivocal evidence of efficacy, pressure of public expectation towards its use and the high expected cost if widespread use were to be sanctioned. Whether such alarm is justified remains a moot point. Owing to the limited range of circumstances of proven efficacy and the lack of cost-effectiveness data, it remains unclear whether sanctioned usage will proliferate to the anticipated extent. Unit costs may well fall in the future owing to competition in the pharmaceutical market. Interferon-beta is simply one example of a growing trend in actively promoted high-cost preparations over which rationing decisions will have to be reached. PMID:10165310

  3. Infectious disease. Life-threatening influenza and impaired interferon amplification in human IRF7 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ciancanelli, Michael J; Huang, Sarah X L; Luthra, Priya; Garner, Hannah; Itan, Yuval; Volpi, Stefano; Lafaille, Fabien G; Trouillet, Céline; Schmolke, Mirco; Albrecht, Randy A; Israelsson, Elisabeth; Lim, Hye Kyung; Casadio, Melina; Hermesh, Tamar; Lorenzo, Lazaro; Leung, Lawrence W; Pedergnana, Vincent; Boisson, Bertrand; Okada, Satoshi; Picard, Capucine; Ringuier, Benedicte; Troussier, Françoise; Chaussabel, Damien; Abel, Laurent; Pellier, Isabelle; Notarangelo, Luigi D; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Basler, Christopher F; Geissmann, Frédéric; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Snoeck, Hans-Willem; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-04-24

    Severe influenza disease strikes otherwise healthy children and remains unexplained. We report compound heterozygous null mutations in IRF7, which encodes the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 7, in an otherwise healthy child who suffered life-threatening influenza during primary infection. In response to influenza virus, the patient's leukocytes and plasmacytoid dendritic cells produced very little type I and III interferons (IFNs). Moreover, the patient's dermal fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived pulmonary epithelial cells produced reduced amounts of type I IFN and displayed increased influenza virus replication. These findings suggest that IRF7-dependent amplification of type I and III IFNs is required for protection against primary infection by influenza virus in humans. They also show that severe influenza may result from single-gene inborn errors of immunity. PMID:25814066

  4. Life-threatening influenza and impaired interferon amplification in human IRF7 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ciancanelli, Michael J.; Huang, Sarah X. L.; Luthra, Priya; Garner, Hannah; Itan, Yuval; Volpi, Stefano; Lafaille, Fabien G.; Trouillet, Céline; Schmolke, Mirco; Albrecht, Randy A.; Israelsson, Elisabeth; Lim, Hye Kyung; Casadio, Melina; Hermesh, Tamar; Lorenzo, Lazaro; Leung, Lawrence W.; Pedergnana, Vincent; Boisson, Bertrand; Okada, Satoshi; Picard, Capucine; Ringuier, Benedicte; Troussier, Françoise; Chaussabel, Damien; Abel, Laurent; Pellier, Isabelle; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Basler, Christopher F.; Geissmann, Frédéric; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Snoeck, Hans-Willem; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Severe influenza disease strikes otherwise healthy children and remains unexplained. We report compound heterozygous null mutations in IRF7, which encodes the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 7, in an otherwise healthy child who suffered life-threatening influenza during primary infection. In response to influenza virus, the patient’s leukocytes and plasmacytoid dendritic cells produced very little type I and III interferons (IFNs). Moreover, the patient’s dermal fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)–derived pulmonary epithelial cells produced reduced amounts of type I IFN and displayed increased influenza virus replication. These findings suggest that IRF7-dependent amplification of type I and III IFNs is required for protection against primary infection by influenza virus in humans. They also show that severe influenza may result from single-gene inborn errors of immunity. PMID:25814066

  5. Interferon-Induced Transmembrane Protein-Mediated Inhibition of Host Cell Entry of Ebolaviruses.

    PubMed

    Wrensch, Florian; Karsten, Christina B; Gnirß, Kerstin; Hoffmann, Markus; Lu, Kai; Takada, Ayato; Winkler, Michael; Simmons, Graham; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Ebolaviruses are highly pathogenic in humans and nonhuman primates and pose a severe threat to public health. The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) proteins can restrict entry of ebolaviruses, influenza A viruses, and other enveloped viruses. However, the breadth and mechanism of the antiviral activity of IFITM proteins are incompletely understood. Here, we employed ebolavirus glycoprotein-pseudotyped vectors and ebolavirus-like particles to address this question. We show that IFITM proteins inhibit the cellular entry of diverse ebolaviruses and demonstrate that type I interferon induces IFITM protein expression in macrophages, major viral targets. Moreover, we show that IFITM proteins block entry of influenza A viruses and ebolaviruses by different mechanisms and provide evidence that antibodies and IFITM proteins can synergistically inhibit cellular entry of ebolaviruses. These results provide insights into the role of IFITM proteins in infection by ebolaviruses and suggest a mechanism by which antibodies, though poorly neutralizing in vitro, might contribute to viral control in vivo. PMID:26034199

  6. [Hyper-IgE syndrome treated with interferon alpha 2 beta. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Segura Mendez, N H; del Rivero Hernández, L; Mejía Ortega, J; Ubaldo Ortiz Vázquez, J; Varela Delgado, A L; Espínola Reyna, G; Rico, G

    2000-01-01

    The hyper IgE syndrome is characterized by recurrent abscess on the skin, and airways and itching dermatitis. The data acquired in the lab is hypergammaglobulinemy, eosinophil in blood, tissue, sputum, with fagocitos, and quimiotaxis defect. Since 1972 it has been reported 150 cases in the world without no geographic difference and 2:1 relation with the masculine gender. The therapeutic ways are even controversial. The therapy with interferon alpha 2 beta is the alternative treatment so diminish the dermis inflammation as the seric IgE reduction. This case shows a patient with the classic clinic data and seric IgE levels who didn't present response to the habitual therapy, because of this. He was the switch to the interferon alpha 2 beta. Later on the therapy it wasesented clinical changes over the symptomatology with reduction in the over seric IgE. PMID:11558395

  7. Interferon-γ : The Major Mediator of Resistance against Toxoplasma gondii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Orellana, Manuel A.; Schreiber, Robert D.; Remington, Jack S.

    1988-04-01

    Mice were injected with a monoclonal antibody to interferon-γ to examine the importance of endogenous production of this lymphokine in resistance against infection with the sporozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Mice with intraperitoneal infections of T. gondii that received no antibody survived and developed chronic T. gondii infection, whereas the infected mice that received the monoclonal antibody died of toxoplasmosis. The activation of macrophages, which kill T. gondii in vivo, was inhibited by administration of the monoclonal antibody, but the production of antibodies to T. gondii was not suppressed. The fact that an antibody to interferon-γ can eliminate resistance to acute Toxoplasma infection in mice suggests that this lymphokine is an important mediator of host resistance to this parasite.

  8. Interferon-Free Treatments for Chronic Hepatitis C Genotype 1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    FakhriRavari, Alireza; Malakouti, Mazyar; Brady, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects as many as 185 million people globally, many of whom are chronically infected and progress over time to cirrhosis, decompensated liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma, and eventually death without a liver transplant. In the United States, HCV genotype 1 constitutes about 75% of all infections. While interferon and ribavirin therapy was the cornerstone of treatment for many years, interferon-free treatments have become the standard of care with the emergence of new direct-acting agents, resulting in more effective treatment, shorter duration of therapy, better tolerability, lower pill burden, and ultimately better adherence. This review will summarize the evidence for the currently available combination therapies as well as emerging therapies in phase 3 trials for treatment of HCV genotype 1. PMID:27350940

  9. Monocyte and interferon based therapy for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Green, Daniel S; Nunes, Ana T; Annunziata, Christina M; Zoon, Kathryn C

    2016-06-01

    Cytokines and cells of the innate immune system have been shown to be critical regulators in the elimination, equilibrium and escape of malignant cells. Despite in vitro and in vivo evidence, components of the innate immune system have shown limited efficacy in the treatment of ovarian cancer. Intraperitoneal immunotherapies are a promising field that has not yet been fully explored in ovarian cancer. Cytokine immunotherapy using interferon alpha (IFN-α) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) has predominantly been used intraperitoneally in ovarian cancer, with promising results. Early studies also showed that autologous monocytes infused into the peritoneum have anti-tumor properties. Combination therapies have been shown to be more effective in treating cancer than mono-therapies. Based on these observations the combination of cell therapy with cytokine therapy may provide a unique strategy for the treatment of chemotherapy resistant solid cancers. PMID:27026228

  10. Type I Interferons: Key Players in Normal Skin and Select Cutaneous Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are a family of naturally existing glycoproteins known for their antiviral activity and their ability to influence the behavior of normal and transformed cell types. Type I Interferons include IFN-α and IFN-β. Currently, IFN-α has numerous approved antitumor applications, including malignant melanoma, in which IFN-α has been shown to increase relapse free survival. Moreover, IFN-α has been successfully used in the intralesional treatment of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In spite of these promising clinical results; however, there exists a paucity of knowledge on the precise anti-tumor action of IFN-α/β at the cellular and molecular levels in cutaneous malignancies such as SCC, BCC, and melanoma. This review summarizes current knowledge on the extent to which Type I IFN influences proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and immune function in normal skin, cutaneous SCC, BCC, and melanoma. PMID:24516470

  11. Inhibiting DNA methylation causes an interferon response in cancer via dsRNA including endogenous retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Chiappinelli, Katherine B.; Strissel, Pamela L.; Desrichard, Alexis; Li, Huili; Henke, Christine; Akman, Benjamin; Hein, Alexander; Rote, Neal S.; Cope, Leslie M.; Snyder, Alexandra; Makarov, Vladimir; Buhu, Sadna; Slamon, Dennis J.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Zahnow, Cynthia A.; Mergoub, Taha; Chan, Timothy A.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Strick, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Summary We show that DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTis) upregulate immune signaling in cancer through the viral defense pathway. In ovarian cancer (OC), DNMTis trigger cytosolic sensing of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) causing a Type I Interferon response and apoptosis. Knocking down dsRNA sensors TLR3 and MAVS reduces this response twofold, and blocking interferon beta or its receptor abrogates it. Upregulation of hypermethylated endogenous retrovirus (ERV) genes accompanies the response and ERV overexpression activates the response. Basal levels of ERV and viral defense gene expression significantly correlate in primary OC and the latter signature separates primary samples for multiple tumor types from The Cancer Genome Atlas into low versus high expression groups. In melanoma patients treated with an immune checkpoint therapy, high viral defense signature expression in tumors significantly associates with durable clinical response and DNMTi treatment sensitizes to anti-CTLA4 therapy in a pre-clinical melanoma model. PMID:26317466

  12. Phosphorylation of influenza A virus NS1 protein at threonine 49 suppresses its interferon antagonistic activity.

    PubMed

    Kathum, Omer Abid; Schräder, Tobias; Anhlan, Darisuren; Nordhoff, Carolin; Liedmann, Swantje; Pande, Amit; Mellmann, Alexander; Ehrhardt, Christina; Wixler, Viktor; Ludwig, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation acts as a fundamental molecular switch that alters protein function and thereby regulates many cellular processes. The non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A virus is an important factor regulating virulence by counteracting cellular immune responses against viral infection. NS1 was shown to be phosphorylated at several sites; however, so far, no function has been conclusively assigned to these post-translational events yet. Here, we show that the newly identified phospho-site threonine 49 of NS1 is differentially phosphorylated in the viral replication cycle. Phosphorylation impairs binding of NS1 to double-stranded RNA and TRIM25 as well as complex formation with RIG-I, thereby switching off its interferon antagonistic activity. Because phosphorylation was shown to occur at later stages of infection, we hypothesize that at this stage other functions of the multifunctional NS1 beyond its interferon-antagonistic activity are needed. PMID:26687707

  13. Self-reactive IgE exacerbates interferon responses associated with autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Henault, Jill; Riggs, Jeffrey M.; Karnell, Jodi L.; Liarski, Vladimir M.; Li, Jianqing; Shirinian, Lena; Xu, Linda; Casey, Kerry A.; Smith, Michael A.; Khatry, Deepak B.; Izhak, Liat; Clarke, Lorraine; Herbst, Ronald; Ettinger, Rachel; Petri, Michelle; Clark, Marcus R.; Mustelin, Tomas; Kolbeck, Roland; Sanjuan, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Canonically, IgE mediates allergic immune responses by triggering mast cells and basophils to release histamine and Type 2 helper cytokines. Here, we report that in human systemic lupus erythematosus, IgE antibodies specific for double-stranded DNA activate plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), an immune cell type linked to viral defense, leading to the secretion of substantial amounts of interferon-α. The concentrations of dsDNA-specific IgE found in patient serum correlated with disease severity and greatly potentiated pDC functions by triggering phagocytosis via FcεRI followed by Toll-like receptor 9-mediated DNA sensing in phagosomes. These findings expand the known pathogenic mechanisms of IgE-mediated inflammation beyond those found in allergy and demonstrate that IgE can trigger interferon responses capable of exacerbating self-destructive autoimmune responses. PMID:26692173

  14. Structural Insights into the Neutralization Properties of the Fully Human, Anti-interferon Monoclonal Antibody Sifalimumab.

    PubMed

    Oganesyan, Vaheh; Peng, Li; Woods, Robert M; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F

    2015-06-12

    We report the three-dimensional structure of human interferon α-2A (IFN-α2A) bound to the Fab fragment of a therapeutic monoclonal antibody (sifalimumab; IgG1/κ). The structure of the corresponding complex was solved at a resolution of 3.0 Å using molecular replacement and constitutes the first reported structure of a human type I IFN bound to a therapeutic antibody. This study revealed the major contribution made by the first complementarity-determining region in each of sifalimumab light and heavy chains. These data also provided the molecular basis for sifalimumab mechanism of action. We propose that its interferon-neutralizing properties are the result of direct competition for IFN-α2A binding to the IFN receptor subunit 1 (IFNAR1) and do not involve inhibiting IFN-α2A binding to the IFN receptor subunit 2 (IFNAR2). PMID:25925951

  15. Interferon regulatory factor 5 in human autoimmunity and murine models of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Eames, Hayley L; Corbin, Alastair L; Udalova, Irina A

    2016-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been demonstrated as a key transcription factor of the immune system, playing important roles in modulating inflammatory immune responses in numerous cell types including dendritic cells, macrophages, and B cells. As well as driving the expression of type I interferon in antiviral responses, IRF5 is also crucial for driving macrophages toward a proinflammatory phenotype by regulating cytokine and chemokine expression and modulating B-cell maturity and antibody production. This review highlights the functional importance of IRF5 in a disease setting, by discussing polymorphic mutations at the human Irf5 locus that lead to susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease. In concordance with this, we also discuss lessons in IRF5 functionality learned from murine in vivo models of autoimmune disease and inflammation and hypothesize that modulation of IRF5 activity and expression could provide potential therapeutic benefits in the clinic. PMID:26207886

  16. Pimecrolimus increases the expression of interferon-inducible genes that modulate human coronary artery cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hussner, Janine; Sünwoldt, Juliane; Seibert, Isabell; Gliesche, Daniel G; Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette E Meyer

    2016-08-01

    The pharmacodynamics of the loaded compounds defines clinical failure or success of a drug-eluting device. Various limus derivatives have entered clinics due to the observed positive outcome after stent implantation, which is explained by their antiproliferative activity resulting from inhibition of the cytosolic immunophilin FK506-binding protein 12. Although pimecrolimus also binds to this protein, pimecrolimus-eluting stents failed in clinics. However, despite its impact on T lymphocytes little is known about the pharmacodynamics of pimecrolimus in cultured human coronary artery cells. We were able to show that pimecrolimus exerts antiproliferative activity in human smooth muscle and endothelial cells. Furthermore in those cells pimecrolimus induced transcription of interferon-inducible genes which in part are known to modulate cell proliferation. Modulation of gene expression may be part of an interaction between calcineurin, the downstream target of the pimecrolimus/FK506-binding protein 12-complex, and the toll-like receptor 4. In accordance are our findings showing that silencing of toll-like receptor 4 by siRNA in A549 a lung carcinoma cell line reduced the activation of interferon-inducible genes upon pimecrolimus treatment in those cells. Based on our findings we hypothesize that calcineurin inhibition may induce the toll-like receptor 4 mediated activation of type I interferon signaling finally inducing the observed effect in endothelial and smooth muscle cells. The crosstalk of interferon and toll-like receptor signaling may be a molecular mechanism that contributed to the failure of pimecrolimus-eluting stents in humans. PMID:27212382

  17. Endogenous interferon production by endotoxin-responsive macrophages provides an autostimulatory differentiation signal.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, S N; Fertsch, D

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that peritoneal macrophages (resident or thioglycolate-induced) derived from mouse strains fully responsive to gram-negative endotoxins continue to differentiate in vitro, as evidenced by an increased capacity to phagocytose via the Fc receptor with time in culture. In contrast, macrophages derived from endotoxin-hyporesponsive mouse strains (e.g., C3H/HeJ or C57BL/10ScN) exhibit no such increase in phagocytic capacity, and, in fact, significantly lose the capacity to phagocytose particles opsonized with immunoglobulin G with time in culture. This defect was found to be fully correctable by the addition to the cultures of an exogenous source of alpha, beta, or gamma interferon. In this study, we compared C3H/HeN (endotoxin-responsive) and C3H/HeJ (endotoxin-responsive) and C3H/HeJ (endotoxin-hyporesponsive) macrophages in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism responsible for this difference in phagocytic (differentiative) potential. The following observations support the hypothesis that endotoxin-responsive macrophages, in contrast to endotoxin-hyporesponsive macrophages, produce significantly higher levels of an autostimulatory differentiation signal that appears to be macrophage-derived interferon. (i) Anti-alpha/beta-interferon antibody greatly reduces the ability of C3H/HeN macrophages to phagocytose opsonized erythrocytes: (ii) C3H/HeJ macrophages can be made more phagocytic by coculture with C3H/HeN macrophages or by treatment with supernatants derived from C3H/HeN macrophage cultures; and (iii) C3H/HeN macrophages spontaneously lose Mac-1 antigen with time in culture. C3H/HeJ macrophages must be interferon-treated to be equivalently down-regulated. PMID:6378797

  18. Rapid in vivo screening of experimental drugs for tuberculosis using gamma interferon gene-disrupted mice.

    PubMed

    Lenaerts, Anne J M; Gruppo, Veronica; Brooks, Jason V; Orme, Ian M

    2003-02-01

    We have developed a rapid new in vivo method for screening experimental drugs for their activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis by using the gamma interferon gene-disrupted (GKO) C57BL/6 mouse. Due to the rapid growth of the infection, statistical differences indicating positive efficacy of active compounds can be seen after only 8 days of treatment. To validate this model, several fluoroquinolones, including ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and gatifloxacin, were tested in parallel. PMID:12543692

  19. Antiviral Activities of Different Interferon Types and Subtypes against Hepatitis E Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Todt, Daniel; François, Catherine; Anggakusuma; Behrendt, Patrick; Engelmann, Michael; Knegendorf, Leonard; Vieyres, Gabrielle; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Hartmann, Rune; Pietschmann, Thomas; Duverlie, Gilles; Steinmann, Eike

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the causative agent of hepatitis E in humans and a member of the genusOrthohepevirusin the familyHepeviridae HEV infections are the common cause of acute hepatitis but can also take chronic courses. Ribavirin is the treatment of choice for most patients, and type I interferon (IFN) has been evaluated in a few infected transplant patientsin vivo In this study, the antiviral effects of different exogenously administered interferons were investigated by using state-of-the-art subgenomic replicon and full-length HEV genome cell culture models. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) subgenomic replicons based on the genotype 2a JFH1 isolate served as the reference. The experiments revealed that HEV RNA replication was inhibited by the application of all types of IFN, including IFN-α (type I), IFN-γ (type II), and IFN-λ3 (type III), but to a far lesser extent than HCV replication. Simultaneous determination of interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression levels for all IFN types demonstrated efficient downregulation by HEV. Furthermore, different IFN-α subtypes were also able to block viral replication in combination with ribavirin. The IFN-α subtypes 2a and 2b exerted the strongest antiviral activity against HEV. In conclusion, these data demonstrate for the first time moderate anti-HEV activities of types II and III IFNs and different IFN-α subtypes. As HEV employed a potent anti-interferon mechanism by restricting ISG expression, exogenous application of IFNs as immunotherapy should be carefully assessed. PMID:26787701

  20. Autoantibodies, complement and type I interferon as biomarkers for personalized medicine in SLE.

    PubMed

    Biesen, R; Rose, T; Hoyer, B F; Alexander, T; Hiepe, F

    2016-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can be a mysterious disease, presenting with extremely divergent clinical phenotypes. Already, biomarkers are very helpful tools for diagnosis, assessment and monitoring of disease activity, differential diagnosis of clinical manifestations, prediction of the disease course and stratified therapy, and they hold the key to personalized medicine in SLE. We summarize the clinical information that can only be supplied by autoantibodies, complement components and interferon biomarkers in this diverse disease. PMID:27252258

  1. Disseminated Talaromyces marneffei and Mycobacterium abscessus in a Patient With Anti-Interferon-γ Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Pruetpongpun, Nattapol; Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Damronglerd, Pansachee; Suthiwartnarueput, Worapop; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Rujanavej, Sasinuch; Suwantarat, Nuntra

    2016-04-01

    Anti-interferon (IFN)-γ autoantibodies are increasingly recognized as a cause of adult-onset immunodeficiency and increased risk for infections with intracellular pathogens. We report on disseminated Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei and Mycobacterium abscessus infection in a 72-year-old, human immunodeficiency virus noninfected, Thai man with anti-IFN-γ autoantibody. The patient was successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy and rituximab to control B cell-derived autoantibodies. PMID:27419165

  2. Disseminated Talaromyces marneffei and Mycobacterium abscessus in a Patient With Anti-Interferon-γ Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pruetpongpun, Nattapol; Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Damronglerd, Pansachee; Suthiwartnarueput, Worapop; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Rujanavej, Sasinuch; Suwantarat, Nuntra

    2016-01-01

    Anti-interferon (IFN)-γ autoantibodies are increasingly recognized as a cause of adult-onset immunodeficiency and increased risk for infections with intracellular pathogens. We report on disseminated Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei and Mycobacterium abscessus infection in a 72-year-old, human immunodeficiency virus noninfected, Thai man with anti-IFN-γ autoantibody. The patient was successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy and rituximab to control B cell-derived autoantibodies. PMID:27419165

  3. Success of measles virotherapy in ATL depends on type I interferon secretion and responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Parrula, Cecilia; Fernandez, Soledad A.; Landes, Kristina; Huey, Devra; Lairmore, Michael; Niewiesk, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is a highly aggressive CD4+/CD25+ T-cell malignancy caused by human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). Previous studies in the MET-1 cell /NOD/SCID mouse model of ATL demonstrated that MET-1 cells are very susceptible to measles virus (MV) oncolytic therapy. To further evaluate the potential of MV therapy in ATL, the susceptibility of several HTLV-1 transformed CD4+ T cell lines (MT-1, MT-2, MT-4 and C8166-45 ) as well as HTLV-1 negative CD4+ T cell lines (Jurkat and CCRF-CEM) to infection with MV was tested in vitro. All cell lines were permissive to MV infection and subsequent cell death, except MT-1 and CCRF-CEM cells which were susceptible and permissive to MV infection, but resistant to cell death. The resistance to MV-mediated cell death was associated with IFNβ produced by MT-1 and CCRF-CEM cells. Inhibition of IFNβ rendered MT-1 and CCRF-CEM cells susceptible to MV-mediated cell death. Cells susceptible to MV-induced cell death did not produce nor were they responsive to IFNβ. Upon infection with NDV, MT-1 and CCRF-CEM but not the susceptible cell lines up-regulated pSTAT-2. In vivo, treatment of tumors induced by MT-1 cell lines which produce IFNβ demonstrated only small increases in mean survival time, while only two treatments prolonged mean survival time in mice with MET-1 tumors deficient in type I interferon production. These results indicate that type I interferon production is closely linked with the inability of tumor cells to respond to type I interferon. Screening of tumor cells for type I interferon could be a useful strategy to select candidate patients for MV virotherapy. PMID:24911240

  4. Adjuvant High-Dose Interferon-α for Resected Melanoma in a Patient with HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Nakhle S.; George, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Adjuvant interferon (IFN)-α remains the standard adjuvant therapy for intermediate and high-risk melanoma after definitive surgical resection. Data addressing the role and safety of adjuvant immunotherapy in HIV-infected patients with melanoma are lacking. We report on an HIV+ patient who received IFN-α as adjuvant treatment for high-risk melanoma. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of such an approach. PMID:20555019

  5. Overexpression of Recombinant Human Beta Interferon (rhINF-β) in Periplasmic Space of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Morowvat, Mohammad Hossein; Babaeipour, Valiollah; Rajabi-Memari, Hamid; Vahidi, Hossein; Maghsoudi, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Human Interferon β (INF-β) is a member of cytokines family which different studies have shown its immunomodulatory and antiviral activities. In this study an expression vector was designed and constructed for expression of human INF-β-1b either in shake flasks or bench top bioreactor. The designed vector was constructed based upon pET-25b(+) with T7 promoter. Recombinant human beta interferon (rhINF-β) was codon optimized and overexpressed as a soluble, N-terminal pelB fusion protein and secreted into the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The sugar, Isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) was used as a chemical inducer for rhINF-β production in the shake flasks and bench top bioreactor. Timing of beta interferon expression was controlled by using the T7 promoter. The rhINF-β protein was extracted from periplasmic space by osmotic shock treatment and the expression of the beta interferon encoding gene in random selected transformants, was confirmed by western and dot blot methods. The maximum of product formation achieved at the OD600nm = 3.42 was found to be 35 % of the total protein content of the strain which translates to 0.32 g L-1. The constructed vector could efficiently overexpress the rhINF-β into the periplasmic space of E. coli. The obtained yield of the produced rhINF-β was more than previous reports. The system is easily adapted to include other vectors, tags or fusions and therefore has the potential to be broadly applicable to express other recombinant proteins. PMID:24711841

  6. Overexpression of Recombinant Human Beta Interferon (rhINF-β) in Periplasmic Space of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Morowvat, Mohammad Hossein; Babaeipour, Valiollah; Rajabi-Memari, Hamid; Vahidi, Hossein; Maghsoudi, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Human Interferon β (INF-β) is a member of cytokines family which different studies have shown its immunomodulatory and antiviral activities. In this study an expression vector was designed and constructed for expression of human INF-β-1b either in shake flasks or bench top bioreactor. The designed vector was constructed based upon pET-25b(+) with T7 promoter. Recombinant human beta interferon (rhINF-β) was codon optimized and overexpressed as a soluble, N-terminal pelB fusion protein and secreted into the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The sugar, Isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) was used as a chemical inducer for rhINF-β production in the shake flasks and bench top bioreactor. Timing of beta interferon expression was controlled by using the T7 promoter. The rhINF-β protein was extracted from periplasmic space by osmotic shock treatment and the expression of the beta interferon encoding gene in random selected transformants, was confirmed by western and dot blot methods. The maximum of product formation achieved at the OD600nm = 3.42 was found to be 35 % of the total protein content of the strain which translates to 0.32 g L-1. The constructed vector could efficiently overexpress the rhINF-β into the periplasmic space of E. coli. The obtained yield of the produced rhINF-β was more than previous reports. The system is easily adapted to include other vectors, tags or fusions and therefore has the potential to be broadly applicable to express other recombinant proteins. PMID:24711841

  7. Interferon-β therapy and risk of thrombocytopenia in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Koudriavtseva, Tatiana; Plantone, Domenico; Renna, Rosaria; Mandoj, Chiara; Giannarelli, Diana; Mainero, Caterina

    2015-12-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a well-described adverse event of several disease-modifying therapies (DMT) in multiple sclerosis (MS). On the other hand, an increased prevalence of MS has been reported in patients with immune thrombocytopenia. In this retrospective, cross-sectional, case-control study we evaluated in a heterogeneous MS cohort: (1) the prevalence of thrombocytopenia in comparison with sex- and age-matched controls; (2) the relationship between thrombocytopenia and patients' demographic, clinical characteristics; (3) the risk for thrombocytopenia in relation to DMT. 187 consecutive MS patients [51 males, mean age (±SD) 44.5 ± 10.7 years] and 200 controls (56 males, mean age 45.5 ± 12 years) were included. Thrombocytopenia was defined as platelet count lower than normal laboratory values (130-400 × 10(9)/L). The prevalence of thrombocytopenia was significantly higher in MS patients than in controls (7 vs. 2.5 %, p = 0.04). Thrombocytopenia was present only in relapsing-remitting MS cases, and significantly associated with lower EDSS (p = 0.002) and with a trend for shorter disease duration (p = 0.06). It was more frequent in patients on high-dose interferon-β therapy compared with those on low-dose interferon-β therapy, other therapies or untreated patients (p = 0.02). High-dose interferon-β therapy was associated with more than eightfold increase in the risk for thrombocytopenia (odds ratio 8.60, 95 % confidence interval: 1.01-74.48 adjusted for EDSS, disease duration and type of disease). The prevalence of thrombocytopenia was increased in MS patients treated with DMT. High-dose interferon-β therapy is the variable most strongly associated with thrombocytopenia. PMID:26209931

  8. Chicken interferon consensus sequence-binding protein (ICSBP) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 1 genes reveal evolutionary conservation in the IRF gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Jungwirth, C; Rebbert, M; Ozato, K; Degen, H J; Schultz, U; Dawid, I B

    1995-01-01

    Members of the IRF family mediate transcriptional responses to interferons (IFNs) and to virus infection. So far, proteins of this family have been studied only among mammalian species. Here we report the isolation of cDNA clones encoding two members of this family from chicken, interferon consensus sequence-binding protein (ICSBP) and IRF-1. The predicted chicken ICSBP and IRF-1 proteins show high levels of sequence similarity to their corresponding human and mouse counterparts. Sequence identities in the putative DNA-binding domains of chicken and human ICSBP and IRF-1 were 97% and 89%, respectively, whereas the C-terminal regions showed identities of 64% and 51%; sequence relationships with mouse ICSBP and IRF-1 are very similar. Chicken ICSBP was found to be expressed in several embryonic tissues, and both chicken IRF-1 and ICSBP were strongly induced in chicken fibroblasts by IFN treatment, supporting the involvement of these factors in IFN-regulated gene expression. The presence of proteins homologous to mammalian IRF family members, together with earlier observations on the occurrence of functionally homologous IFN-responsive elements in chicken and mammalian genes, highlights the conservation of transcriptional mechanisms in the IFN system, a finding that contrasts with the extensive sequence and functional divergence of the IFNs. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7536924

  9. Type I interferon induces necroptosis in macrophages during infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Nirmal; McComb, Scott; Mulligan, Rebecca; Dudani, Renu; Krishnan, Lakshmi; Sad, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a virulent pathogen that induces rapid host death. Here we observed that host survival after infection with S. Typhimurium was enhanced in the absence of type I interferon signaling, with improved survival of mice deficient in the receptor for type I interferons (Ifnar1−/− mice) that was attributed to macrophages. Although there was no impairment in cytokine expression or inflammasome activation in Ifnar1−/− macrophages, they were highly resistant to S. Typhimurium–induced cell death. Specific inhibition of the kinase RIP1or knockdown of the gene encoding the kinase RIP3 prevented the death of wild-type macrophages, which indicated that necroptosis was a mechanism of cell death. Finally, RIP3-deficient macrophages, which cannot undergo necroptosis, had similarly less death and enhanced control of S. Typhimurium in vivo. Thus, we propose that S. Typhimurium induces the production of type I interferon, which drives necroptosis of macrophages and allows them to evade the immune response. PMID:22922364

  10. The human P-glycoprotein transporter enhances the type I interferon response to Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    PubMed

    Sigal, Nadejda; Kaplan Zeevi, Millie; Weinstein, Shiri; Peer, Dan; Herskovits, Anat A

    2015-06-01

    Human multidrug efflux transporters are known for their ability to extrude antibiotics and toxic compounds out of cells, yet accumulating data indicate they have additional functions in diverse physiological processes not related to drug efflux. Here, we show that the human multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (also named MDR1 and ABCB1) is transcriptionally induced in the monocytic cell line THP-1 upon infection with the human intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Notably, we found that P-gp is important for full activation of the type I interferon response elicited against L. monocytogenes bacteria. Both inhibition of P-gp function by verapamil and inhibition of its transcription using mRNA silencing led to a reduction in the magnitude of the type I response in infected cells. This function of P-gp was specific to type I interferon cytokines elicited against cytosolic replicating bacteria and was not observed in response to cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP), a molecule that was shown to be secreted by L. monocytogenes during infection and to trigger type I interferons. Moreover, P-gp was not involved in activation of other proinflammatory cytokines, such as those triggered by vacuolar-restricted L. monocytogenes or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Taken together, these findings demonstrate a role for P-gp in proper development of an innate immune response against intracellular pathogens, highlighting the complexity in employing therapeutic strategies that involve inhibition of multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps. PMID:25824830

  11. The Human P-Glycoprotein Transporter Enhances the Type I Interferon Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, Nadejda; Kaplan Zeevi, Millie; Weinstein, Shiri; Peer, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Human multidrug efflux transporters are known for their ability to extrude antibiotics and toxic compounds out of cells, yet accumulating data indicate they have additional functions in diverse physiological processes not related to drug efflux. Here, we show that the human multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (also named MDR1 and ABCB1) is transcriptionally induced in the monocytic cell line THP-1 upon infection with the human intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Notably, we found that P-gp is important for full activation of the type I interferon response elicited against L. monocytogenes bacteria. Both inhibition of P-gp function by verapamil and inhibition of its transcription using mRNA silencing led to a reduction in the magnitude of the type I response in infected cells. This function of P-gp was specific to type I interferon cytokines elicited against cytosolic replicating bacteria and was not observed in response to cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP), a molecule that was shown to be secreted by L. monocytogenes during infection and to trigger type I interferons. Moreover, P-gp was not involved in activation of other proinflammatory cytokines, such as those triggered by vacuolar-restricted L. monocytogenes or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Taken together, these findings demonstrate a role for P-gp in proper development of an innate immune response against intracellular pathogens, highlighting the complexity in employing therapeutic strategies that involve inhibition of multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps. PMID:25824830

  12. Beyond interferon: rationale and prospects for newer treatment paradigms for chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Karoll J.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection results in a chronic carrier state in 80% of individuals infected with the virus and presently affects over 170 million people worldwide. Approximately 20% of those chronically infected will ultimately progress to develop cirrhosis and death due to end-stage liver disease or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Unlike many other chronic viral infections, effective treatments for HCV are available. Cure from the infection is known as a sustained virologic response (SVR). SVR is associated with reversal of the long-term outcomes of chronic liver disease, decrease in incidence of HCC, and decrease HCV attributable mortality. The current FDA approved therapies for hepatitis C virus genotype 1 (GT-1) include pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) in combination with a directly acting antiviral agent (DAA). New therapeutic advances are being made aiming to simplify management, improve the tolerability of treatment, and shorten the duration of therapy. Moreover, treatment regimens that will effectively eradicate hepatitis C without the use of interferon formulations (IFN) are being developed. In this review, we report the transition of HCV therapeutics from an interferon-α based combination therapy to an all-oral, directly acting antiviral therapy. PMID:25553238

  13. Modulation by gamma interferon of antiviral cell-mediated immune responses in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Utermöhlen, O; Dangel, A; Tárnok, A; Lehmann-Grube, F

    1996-01-01

    Mice were infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and injected once 24 h later with a monoclonal antibody directed against gamma interferon. In comparison with controls, the increase of numbers of CD8+ T cells and the generation of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in spleens and virus clearance from organs were diminished, as was the ability of spleen cells to transmit adoptive immunity to infected recipients. The same treatment slightly but consistently lessened rather than augmented the virus titers early in infection, which was also observed in thymusless nu/nu mice. Injection into infected mice of the lymphokine itself in quantities probably higher than are produced endogenously resulted in lower virus titers in spleens but higher titers in livers. The adoptive immunity in infected mice achieved by infusion of immune spleen cells was not altered by treating the recipients with gamma interferon monoclonal antibody. Such treatment did not measurably affect the production of antiviral serum antibodies. We conclude that in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-infected mice, gamma interferon is needed for the generation of antivirally active CD8+ T lymphocytes, and furthermore that in this experimental model, direct antiviral effects of the lymphokine elude detection. PMID:8627670

  14. Noncanonical Autophagy Is Required for Type I Interferon Secretion in Response to DNA-Immune Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Riggs, Jeffrey M.; Tian, Jane; Mehta, Payal; Clarke, Lorraine; Sasai, Miwa; Latz, Eicke; Brinkmann, Melanie M.; Iwasaki, Akiko; Coyle, Anthony J.; Kolbeck, Roland

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9) is largely responsible for discriminating self from pathogenic DNA. However, association of host DNA with autoantibodies activates TLR9, inducing the pathogenic secretion of type I interferons (IFNs) from plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Here, we found that in response to DNA-containing immune complexes (DNA-IC), but not to soluble ligands, IFN-α production depended upon the convergence of the phagocytic and autophagic pathways, a process called microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3)-associated phagocytosis (LAP). LAP was required for TLR9 trafficking into a specialized interferon signaling compartment by a mechanism that involved autophagy-related proteins, but not the conventional autophagic preinitiation complex, or adaptor protein-3 (AP-3). Our findings unveil a new role for nonconventional autophagy in inflammation and provide one mechanism by which anti-DNA autoantibodies, such as those found in several autoimmune disorders, bypass the controls that normally restrict the apportionment of pathogenic DNA and TLR9 to the interferon signaling compartment. PMID:23219390

  15. Optineurin Regulates the Interferon Response in a Cell Cycle-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Génin, Pierre; Cuvelier, Frédérique; Lambin, Sandrine; Côrte-Real Filipe, Josina; Autrusseau, Elodie; Laurent, Christine; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Weil, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Viral invasion into a host is initially recognized by the innate immune system, mainly through activation of the intracellular cytosolic signaling pathway and coordinated activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factors that promote type I interferon gene induction. The TANK-binding Kinase 1 (TBK1) phosphorylates and activates IRF3. Here, we show that Optineurin (Optn) dampens the antiviral innate immune response by targeting the deubiquitinating enzyme CYLD to TBK1 in order to inhibit its enzymatic activity. Importantly, we found that this regulatory mechanism is abolished at the G2/M phase as a consequence of the nuclear translocation of CYLD and Optn. As a result, we observed, at this cell division stage, an increased activity and phosphorylation of TBK1 that lead to its relocalization to mitochondria and to enhanced interferon production, suggesting that this process, which relies on Optn function, might be of major importance to mount a preventive antiviral response during mitosis. PMID:25923723

  16. Interferon alpha bioactivity critically depends on Scavenger receptor class B type I function.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Marcos; Fioravanti, Jessica; Aranda, Fernando; Paredes, Vladimir; Gomar, Celia; Ardaiz, Nuria; Fernandez-Ruiz, Veronica; Méndez, Miriam; Nistal-Villan, Estanislao; Larrea, Esther; Gao, Qinshan; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Prieto, Jesus; Berraondo, Pedro

    2016-08-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-B1) binds pathogen-associated molecular patterns participating in the regulation of the inflammatory reaction but there is no information regarding potential interactions between SR-B1 and the interferon system. Herein, we report that SR-B1 ligands strongly regulate the transcriptional response to interferon α (IFNα) and enhance its antiviral and antitumor activity. This effect was mediated by the activation of TLR2 and TLR4 as it was annulled by the addition of anti-TLR2 or anti-TLR4 blocking antibodies. In vivo, we maximized the antitumor activity of IFNα co-expressing in the liver a SR-B1 ligand and IFNα by adeno-associated viruses. This gene therapy strategy eradicated liver metastases from colon cancer with reduced toxicity. On the other hand, genetic and pharmacological inhibition of SR-B1 blocks the clathrin-dependent interferon receptor recycling pathway with a concomitant reduction in IFNα signaling and bioactivity. This effect can be applied to enhance cancer immunotherapy with oncolytic viruses. Indeed, SR-B1 antagonists facilitate replication of oncolytic viruses amplifying their tumoricidal potential. In conclusion, SR-B1 agonists behave as IFNα enhancers while SR-B1 inhibitors dampen IFNα activity. These results demonstrate that SR-B1 is a suitable pharmacology target to enhance cancer immunotherapy based on IFNα and oncolytic viruses. PMID:27622065

  17. Oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus expressing interferon-γ has enhanced therapeutic activity

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; Roy, Dominic Guy; Falls, Theresa; Twumasi-Boateng, Kwame; St-Germain, Lauren Elizabeth; Marguerie, Monique; Garcia, Vanessa; Selman, Mohammed; Jennings, Victoria Ann; Pettigrew, Jessica; Amos, Sally; Diallo, Jean-Simon; Nelson, Brad; Bell, John Cameron

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are known to stimulate the antitumor immune response by specifically replicating in tumor cells. This is believed to be an important aspect of the durable responses observed in some patients and the field is rapidly moving toward immunotherapy. As a further means to engage the immune system, we engineered a virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), to encode the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-γ. We used the 4T1 mammary adenocarcinoma as well as other murine tumor models to characterize immune responses in tumor-bearing animals generated by treatment with our viruses. The interferon-γ-encoding virus demonstrated greater activation of dendritic cells and drove a more profound secretion of proinflammatory cytokines compared to the parental virus. From a therapeutic point of view, the interferon-γ virus slowed tumor growth, minimized lung tumors, and prolonged survival in several murine tumor models. The improved efficacy was lost in immunocompromized animals; hence the mechanism appears to be T-cell-mediated. Taken together, these results demonstrate the ability of oncolytic viruses to act as immune stimulators to drive antitumor immunity as well as their potential for targeted gene therapy. PMID:27119116

  18. Novel interferon-{lambda}s induce antiproliferative effects in neuroendocrine tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zitzmann, Kathrin; Brand, Stephan; Baehs, Sebastian; Goeke, Burkhard; Meinecke, Jennifer; Spoettl, Gerald; Meyer, Heinrich; Auernhammer, Christoph J. . E-mail: Christoph.Auernhammer@med.uni-muenchen.de

    2006-06-16

    Interferon-{alpha} (IFN-{alpha}) is used for biotherapy of neuroendocrine carcinomas. The interferon-{lambda}s (IL-28A/B and IL-29) are a novel group of interferons. In this study, we investigated the effects of the IFN-{lambda}s IL-28A and IL-29 on human neuroendocrine BON1 tumor cells. Similar to IFN-{alpha}, incubation of BON1 cells with IL-28A (10 ng/ml) and IL-29 (10 ng/ml) induced phosphorylation of STAT1, STAT2, and STAT3, significantly decreased cell numbers in a proliferation assay, and induced apoptosis as demonstrated by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-cleavage, caspase-3-cleavage, and DNA-fragmentation. Stable overexpression of suppressor of cytokine signaling proteins (SOCS1 and SOCS3) completely abolished the aforementioned effects indicating that SOCS proteins act as negative regulators of IFN-{lambda} signaling in BON1 cells. In conclusion, the novel IFN-{lambda}s IL-28A and IL-29 potently induce STAT signaling and antiproliferative effects in neuroendocrine BON1 tumor cells. Thus, IFN-{lambda}s may hint a promising new approach in the antiproliferative therapy of neuroendocrine tumors.

  19. Attenuation of the type I interferon response in cells infected with human rhinovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Kotla, Swathi; Peng, Tao; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Gustin, Kurt E.

    2008-05-10

    The type I interferon (IFN) response requires the coordinated activation of the latent transcription factors NF-{kappa}B, IRF-3 and ATF-2 which in turn activate transcription from the IFN-{beta} promoter. Here we have examined the type I interferon response in rhinovirus type 14-infected A549 cells, with particular emphasis on the status of the transcription factor IRF-3. Our results indicate that although rhinovirus type 14 (RV14) infection induces the activation of NF-{kappa}B and ATF-2, only very low levels of IFN-{beta} mRNA are detected. Analysis of ISG54 mRNA levels revealed very little induction of this IRF-3 responsive transcript and suggested that IRF-3 activation might be impaired. Examination of IRF-3 in RV14-infected cells demonstrated only low levels of phosphorylation, a lack of homodimer formation and an absence of nuclear accumulation indicating that this transcription factor is not activated. Inhibition of viral protein synthesis following infection resulted in an increase in IFN-{beta} mRNA levels indicating that viral gene products prevent induction of this pathway. Collectively, these results indicate that RV14 infection inhibits the host type I interferon response by interfering with IRF-3 activation.

  20. Macroscale production of crystalline interferon alfa-2b in microgravity on STS-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagabhushan, Tattanahalli L.; Reichert, Paul; Long, Marianna M.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Bugg, Charles E.

    1995-01-01

    Macroscale crystallization of zinc interferon alfa-2b was achieved on STS-52 in October 1992 in the Protein Crystallization Facility. Conditions for crystallization were established by adapting a microscale vapor diffusion method to a macroscale temperature induction method. A series of earth based pilot experiments established conditions to reproducibly crystallize zinc interferon alfa-2b in high yield and under cleanroom conditions. As a control for the STS-52 mission, a ground experiment was run simultaneously and in the same configuration as the flight experiment. Greater than 95% of the available protein crystallized in both the ground and flight experiments. Using a battery of physical, biochemical and biological characterization assays, demonstrated that sample processing, polysulfone bottle confinement and the conditions used for crystallization did not have a negative effect on protein integrity. Redissolved crystals from the flight and ground experiments showed full biological activity in a cytopathic effect inhibition assay as compared to an interferon control standard. Morphometric analysis comparing the overall length and width of the derived crystals showed a 2.4 fold increase in the length and width of the space grown crystals as compared to earth grown crystals. Space grown crystals have remained a stable free flowing suspension for over 2 years. Based on these results, further experiments are envisioned to investigate macroscale crystallization of biologically active macromolecules in microgravity.

  1. Continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil with alpha 2b interferon for advanced colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, J. E.; Hulse, P.; Lorigan, P.; Jayson, G.; Scarffe, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    Thirty patients with symptomatic colorectal carcinoma were commenced on treatment with 5-fluorouracil (2.5 g week-1) administered by continuous intravenous infusion and alpha 2b interferon (3 x 10(6) U s.c. three times a week). Six out of 30 patients (20%) achieved a partial response. Three patients (10%) had stable disease and 21 patients (70%) progressed on treatment. Twenty patients (67%) completed ten or more weeks of treatment. In nine patients, treatment was withdrawn after 2-9 weeks because of disease progression or death. One patient's treatment was interrupted by emergency surgery. The median survival for all patients was 210 days (7 months). The principal side-effects were oral mucositis (12/30 patients), nausea (8/30 patients) and transient diarrhoea (4/30 patients), and initial constitutional symptoms due to alpha 2b interferon. The combination of low-dose continuous infusional 5-fluorouracil and low-dose alpha 2b interferon is well tolerated but has no obvious advantage over alternative infusional regimens using 5-fluorouracil as a single agent. PMID:7599051

  2. Current report on the interferon program at Roswell Park Memorial Institute.

    PubMed

    Murphy, G P

    1981-01-01

    An overview of the interferon program at Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI), is presented. This program encompasses three interrelated areas of research and new drug development: (a) basic research on purification and characterization of animal and human interferons (leukocyte, fibroblast, and immune); (b) large scale manufacture and preclinical testing of human fibroblast interferon (HFIF); and (c) clinical trials with HFIF to determine its safety of administration as well as antiviral, antitumor, and immunomodulatory activities in patients with neoplastic or viral disease. The antitumor effect of HFIF produced at RPMI as assessed by intralesional injection of various metastatic nodules resulted in an overall 71% local response. Phase I studies in 13 patients demonstrated that HFIF can be administered safely by the subcutaneous, intramuscular, and intravenous routes in doses up to 25 million units per day without any serious untoward effects. Intrathecal administration of HFIF into patients with CNS leukemia was also well tolerated. Pharmacokinetic studies indicated significant levels of HFIF in serum and cerebrospinal fluid after intravenous and intrathecal administration, respectively. Coincidental with the HFIF systemic administration during the Phase I trials, favorable responses in several laboratory, immune, and clinical parameters were observed. These results provide the rationale for conducting phase II and phase III clinical trials with HFIF produced at RPMI. PMID:6165867

  3. IPC: professional type 1 interferon-producing cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cell precursors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Jun

    2005-01-01

    Type 1 interferon-(alpha, beta, omega)-producing cells (IPCs), also known as plasmacytoid dendritic cell precursors (pDCs), represent 0.2%-0.8% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in both humans and mice. IPCs display plasma cell morphology, selectively express Toll-like receptor (TLR)-7 and TLR9, and are specialized in rapidly secreting massive amounts of type 1 interferon following viral stimulation. IPCs can promote the function of natural killer cells, B cells, T cells, and myeloid DCs through type 1 interferons during an antiviral immune response. At a later stage of viral infection, IPCs differentiate into a unique type of mature dendritic cell, which directly regulates the function of T cells and thus links innate and adaptive immune responses. After more than two decades of effort by researchers, IPCs finally claim their place in the hematopoietic chart as the most important cell type in antiviral innate immunity. Understanding IPC biology holds future promise for developing cures for infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:15771572

  4. Stress-induced alterations in interferon production and class II histocompatibility antigen expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Cunnick, J. E.; Armfield, A. V.; Wood, P. G.; Rabin, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    Mild electric foot-shock has been shown to be a stressor that can alter immune responses. Male Lewis rats were exposed to one session of 16 5.0-s 1.6-mA foot-shocks. Production of interferon-gamma by splenocytes in response to concanavalin-A was decreased in spleens from the shocked rats compared to control spleens. Spleen cells from rats treated with nadolol, a peripherally acting beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, and then shocked, showed dose-dependent attenuation of the suppression of interferon-gamma production. This suggests that catecholamines mediate shock-induced suppression of interferon-gamma production. The percentage of splenic mononuclear cells expressing class II histocompatibility (Ia) antigens on their surfaces from spleens of shocked rats was determined by flow cytometry. Significantly decreased class II positive mononuclear cells were present in the spleens of shocked rats in comparison to the spleens of control rats. This may reflect an alteration of cell trafficking or decreased production of class II antigens.

  5. DNA binding and transcription activation by chicken interferon regulatory factor-3 (chIRF-3)

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Caroline E.; May, Donna L.; Deeley, Roger G.

    2000-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) are a family of transcription factors involved in the cellular response to interferons and viral infection. Previously we isolated an IRF from a chicken embryonic liver cDNA library. Using a PCR-based binding site selection assay, we have characterised the binding specificity of chIRF-3. The optimal binding site (OBS) fits within the consensus interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) but the specificity of chIRF-3 binding allows less variation in nucleotides outside the core IRF-binding sequence. A comparison of IRF-1 and chIRF-3 binding to ISREs in electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that the binding specificity of chIRF-3 was clearly distinguishable from IRF-1. The selection assay also showed that chIRF-3 is capable of binding an inverted repeat of two half OBSs separated by 10–13 nt. ChIRF-3 appears to bind both the OBS and inverted repeat sites as a dimer with the protein–protein interaction requiring a domain between amino acids 117 and 311. In transfection experiments expression of chIRF-3 strongly activated a promoter containing the OBS. The activation domain was mapped to between amino acids 138 and 221 and a domain inhibitory to activation was also mapped to the C-terminal portion of chIRF-3. PMID:11095692

  6. Interferon alpha bioactivity critically depends on Scavenger receptor class B type I function

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Marcos; Fioravanti, Jessica; Aranda, Fernando; Paredes, Vladimir; Gomar, Celia; Ardaiz, Nuria; Fernandez-Ruiz, Veronica; Méndez, Miriam; Nistal-Villan, Estanislao; Larrea, Esther; Gao, Qinshan; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Prieto, Jesus; Berraondo, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-B1) binds pathogen-associated molecular patterns participating in the regulation of the inflammatory reaction but there is no information regarding potential interactions between SR-B1 and the interferon system. Herein, we report that SR-B1 ligands strongly regulate the transcriptional response to interferon α (IFNα) and enhance its antiviral and antitumor activity. This effect was mediated by the activation of TLR2 and TLR4 as it was annulled by the addition of anti-TLR2 or anti-TLR4 blocking antibodies. In vivo, we maximized the antitumor activity of IFNα co-expressing in the liver a SR-B1 ligand and IFNα by adeno-associated viruses. This gene therapy strategy eradicated liver metastases from colon cancer with reduced toxicity. On the other hand, genetic and pharmacological inhibition of SR-B1 blocks the clathrin-dependent interferon receptor recycling pathway with a concomitant reduction in IFNα signaling and bioactivity. This effect can be applied to enhance cancer immunotherapy with oncolytic viruses. Indeed, SR-B1 antagonists facilitate replication of oncolytic viruses amplifying their tumoricidal potential. In conclusion, SR-B1 agonists behave as IFNα enhancers while SR-B1 inhibitors dampen IFNα activity. These results demonstrate that SR-B1 is a suitable pharmacology target to enhance cancer immunotherapy based on IFNα and oncolytic viruses. PMID:27622065

  7. Recombinant leukocyte A interferon in advanced breast cancer. Results of a phase II efficacy trial.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, S A; Mayer, D; Ochs, J J; Abrams, P G; Knost, J A; Foon, K A; Fein, S; Oldham, R K

    1983-05-01

    Nineteen patients with advanced refractory metastatic breast cancer no longer responsive to chemotherapy were treated in the first phase II efficacy trial of recombinant leukocyte A interferon (IFL-rA), a highly purified single molecular species of alpha interferon prepared by recombinant DNA methods. Patients received a previously determined maximum tolerated dose for this agent (50 X 10(6) U/m2 body surface area) by intramuscular injection three times weekly for up to 3 months. The symptoms of toxicity observed in this trial resemble those previously reported for alpha interferons and include fever, chills, fatigue, anorexia, and leukopenia. All patients required dose reductions, most often for reasons of severe fatigue. Of the 17 patients evaluable for tumor response, one patient had stable disease and 16 had evidence of tumor progression. We conclude that IFL-rA is not an active agent in the treatment of advanced, refractory breast cancer when used at a maximum tolerated dose on this treatment schedule. PMID:6342490

  8. A multiple-dose phase I trial of recombinant leukocyte A interferon in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, S A; Knost, J A; Fein, S; Abrams, P G; Foon, K A; Ochs, J J; Schoenberger, C; Maluish, A E; Oldham, R K

    1982-11-19

    Eighty-one patients with a variety of refractory disseminated malignant neoplasms have been treated in the first multiple fixed-dose phase I trial of recombinant leukocyte A interferon (IFL-rA). Each patient received IFL-rA by intramuscular injection, three times weekly for 28 days. Dosages were escalated in different patients from 1 to 136 x 10(6) units per injection. The toxic reactions seen with IFL-rA resembled those of nonrecombinant leukocyte interferon and included fever, chills, fatigue, anorexia, myalgia, headache, occasional nausea and vomiting, and dose-dependent reversible leukopenia and hepatic transaminase elevations. The pharmacokinetics of IFL-rA were also comparable with nonrecombinant leukocyte interferon. Objective evidence of antitumor activity was seen in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, breast cancer, and melanoma, indicating that IFL-rA, the first genetically engineered biological response modifier available for testing in cancer patients, is biologically active in vivo. PMID:6752447

  9. The Role of Interferon in the Management of BCG Refractory Nonmuscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Andres F.; Theisen, Katherine; Ferroni, Matthew; Maranchie, Jodi K.; Hrebinko, Ronald; Davies, Benjamin J.; Gingrich, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Thirty to forty percent of patients with high grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) fail to respond to intravesical therapy with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). Interferon-α2B plus BCG has been shown to be effective in a subset of patients with NMIBC BCG refractory disease. Here we present a contemporary series on the effectiveness and safety of intravesical BCG plus interferon-α2B therapy in patients with BCG refractory NMIBC. Methods. From January of 2005 to April of 2014 we retrospectively found 44 patients who underwent induction with combination IFN/BCG for the management of BCG refractory NMIBC. A chart review was performed to assess initial pathological stage/grade, pathological stage/grade at the time of induction, time to IFN/BCG failure, pathological stage/grade at failure, postfailure therapy, and current disease state. Results. Of the 44 patients who met criteria for the analysis. High risk disease was found in 88.6% of patients at induction. The 12-month and 24-month recurrence-free survival were 38.6% and 18.2%, respectively. 25 (56.8%) ultimately had disease recurrence. Radical cystectomy was performed in 16 (36.4%) patients. Conclusion. Combination BCG plus interferon-α2B remains a reasonably safe alternative treatment for select patients with BCG refractory disease prior to proceeding to radical cystectomy. PMID:26550012

  10. Host Responses to Melioidosis and Tuberculosis Are Both Dominated by Interferon-Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Gavin C. K. W.; Schreiber, M. Fernanda; Bautista, Ruben; Maude, Rapeephan R.; Dunachie, Susanna; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Dougan, Gordon; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis (Burkholderia pseudomallei infection) is a common cause of community-acquired sepsis in Northeast Thailand and northern Australia. B. pseudomallei is a soil saprophyte endemic to Southeast Asia and northern Australia. The clinical presentation of melioidosis may mimic tuberculosis (both cause chronic suppurative lesions unresponsive to conventional antibiotics and both commonly affect the lungs). The two diseases have overlapping risk profiles (e.g., diabetes, corticosteroid use), and both B. pseudomallei and Mycobacterium tuberculosis are intracellular pathogens. There are however important differences: the majority of melioidosis cases are acute, not chronic, and present with severe sepsis and a mortality rate that approaches 50% despite appropriate antimicrobial therapy. By contrast, tuberculosis is characteristically a chronic illness with mortality <2% with appropriate antimicrobial chemotherapy. We examined the gene expression profiles of total peripheral leukocytes in two cohorts of patients, one with acute melioidosis (30 patients and 30 controls) and another with tuberculosis (20 patients and 24 controls). Interferon-mediated responses dominate the host response to both infections, and both type 1 and type 2 interferon responses are important. An 86-gene signature previously thought to be specific for tuberculosis is also found in melioidosis. We conclude that the host responses to melioidosis and to tuberculosis are similar: both are dominated by interferon-signalling pathways and this similarity means gene expression signatures from whole blood do not distinguish between these two diseases. PMID:23383015

  11. Raynaud's phenomenon and bilateral olecranon bursitis co-existing in a patient with chronic hepatitis B and D treated with pegylated interferon.

    PubMed

    Arain, Shafique Rehman; Umer, Tahira Perveen

    2016-06-01

    Pegylated interferon remains the first line treatment for patients with hepatitis D virus and more than one year therapy may be necessary. Interferon a has the most extensive clinical application and is used for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B and D virus as well as HCV infections. The attachment of polyethylene glycol to interferon increases its half-life. Treatment with peg interferon is associated with many troublesome and occasionally with serious or even life-threatening side effects. In this case report, we have described a patient with chronic hepatitis B and D, who developed Raynaud's phenomenon, ischaemic digital necrosis and bilateral olecranon bursitis during Pegylated interferon therapy. The patient underwent a very extensive workup in order to determine the underlying cause of his digital ischaemia and olecranon bursitis, which was finally determined to be secondary to the use of Pegylated interferon. PMID:27339587

  12. Interferon-induced Ifit2/ISG54 protects mice from lethal VSV neuropathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fensterl, Volker; Wetzel, Jaime L; Ramachandran, Srividya; Ogino, Tomoaki; Stohlman, Stephen A; Bergmann, Cornelia C; Diamond, Michael S; Virgin, Herbert W; Sen, Ganes C

    2012-01-01

    Interferon protects mice from vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection and pathogenesis; however, it is not known which of the numerous interferon-stimulated genes (ISG) mediate the antiviral effect. A prominent family of ISGs is the interferon-induced with tetratricopeptide repeats (Ifit) genes comprising three members in mice, Ifit1/ISG56, Ifit2/ISG54 and Ifit3/ISG49. Intranasal infection with a low dose of VSV is not lethal to wild-type mice and all three Ifit genes are induced in the central nervous system of the infected mice. We tested their potential contributions to the observed protection of wild-type mice from VSV pathogenesis, by taking advantage of the newly generated knockout mice lacking either Ifit2 or Ifit1. We observed that in Ifit2 knockout (Ifit2(-/-)) mice, intranasal VSV infection was uniformly lethal and death was preceded by neurological signs, such as ataxia and hind limb paralysis. In contrast, wild-type and Ifit1(-/-) mice were highly protected and survived without developing such disease. However, when VSV was injected intracranially, virus replication and survival were not significantly different between wild-type and Ifit2(-/-) mice. When administered intranasally, VSV entered the central nervous system through the olfactory bulbs, where it replicated equivalently in wild-type and Ifit2(-/-) mice and induced interferon-β. However, as the infection spread to other regions of the brain, VSV titers rose several hundred folds higher in Ifit2(-/-) mice as compared to wild-type mice. This was not caused by a broadened cell tropism in the brains of Ifit2(-/-) mice, where VSV still replicated selectively in neurons. Surprisingly, this advantage for VSV replication in the brains of Ifit2(-/-) mice was not observed in other organs, such as lung and liver. Pathogenesis by another neurotropic RNA virus, encephalomyocarditis virus, was not enhanced in the brains of Ifit2(-/-) mice. Our study provides a clear demonstration of tissue-, virus- and

  13. Whole Blood Interferon-Gamma Assay for Baseline Tuberculosis Screening among Japanese Healthcare Students

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, Katsuyuki; Ogura, Toshio; Nishii, Kenji; Kodani, Tsuyoshi; Onishi, Masaru; Shimizu, Yukito; Kanehiro, Arihiko; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Tobe, Kazuo

    2007-01-01

    Background The whole blood interferon-gamma assay (QuantiFERON-TB-2G; QFT) has not been fully evaluated as a baseline tuberculosis screening test in Japanese healthcare students commencing clinical contact. The aim of this study was to compare the results from the QFT with those from the tuberculin skin test (TST) in a population deemed to be at a low risk for infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Healthcare students recruited at Okayama University received both the TST and the QFT to assess the level of agreement between these two tests. The interleukin-10 levels before and after exposure to M tuberculosis-specific antigens (early-secreted antigenic target 6-kDa protein [ESAT-6] and culture filtrate protein 10 [CFP-10]) were also measured. Of the 536 healthcare students, most of whom had been vaccinated with bacillus-Calmette-Guérin (BCG), 207 (56%) were enrolled in this study. The agreement between the QFT and the TST results was poor, with positive result rates of 1.4% vs. 27.5%, respectively. A multivariate analysis also revealed that the induration diameter of the TST was not affected by the interferon-gamma concentration after exposure to either of the antigens but was influenced by the number of BCG needle scars (p = 0.046). The whole blood interleukin-10 assay revealed that after antigen exposure, the median increases in interleukin-10 concentration was higher in the subgroup with the small increase in interferon-gamma concentration than in the subgroup with the large increase in interferon-gamma concentration (0.3 vs. 0 pg/mL; p = 0.004). Conclusions/Significance As a baseline screening test for low-risk Japanese healthcare students at their course entry, QFT yielded quite discordant results, compared with the TST, probably because of the low specificity of the TST results in the BCG-vaccinated population. We also found, for the first time, that the change in the interleukin-10 level after exposure to specific

  14. Circulating Interferon-Gamma Levels Are Associated with Low Body Weight in Newly Diagnosed Kenyan Non-Substance Using Tuberculosis Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Shaviya, Nathan; Budambula, Valentine; Webale, Mark K.; Were, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Although interferon-gamma, interleukin-10, and adiponectin are key immunopathogenesis mediators of tuberculosis, their association with clinical manifestations of early stage disease is inconclusive. We determined interferon-gamma, interleukin-10, and adiponectin levels in clinically and phenotypically well-characterised non-substance using new pulmonary tuberculosis patients (n = 13) and controls (n = 14) from Kenya. Interferon-gamma levels (P < 0.0001) and interferon-gamma to interleukin-10 (P < 0.001) and interferon-gamma to adiponectin (P = 0.027) ratios were elevated in tuberculosis cases. Correlation analyses in tuberculosis cases showed associations of interferon-gamma levels with body weight (ρ = −0.849; P < 0.0001), body mass index (ρ = 0.664; P = 0.013), hip girth (ρ = −0.579; P = 0.038), and plateletcrit (ρ = 0.605; P = 0.028); interferon-gamma to interleukin-10 ratio with diastolic pressure (ρ = −0.729; P = 0.005); and interferon-gamma to adiponectin ratio with body weight (ρ = −0.560; P = 0.047), body mass index (ρ = −0.604; P = 0.029), and plateletcrit (ρ = 0.793; P = 0.001). Taken together, our results suggest mild-inflammation in early stage infection characterised by upregulation of circulating interferon-gamma production in newly infected TB patients. PMID:26880909

  15. Dietary apigenin potentiates the inhibitory effect of interferon-α on cancer cell viability through inhibition of 26S proteasome-mediated interferon receptor degradation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng; Yang, Li-juan; Wang, Ping; He, Yu-jiao; Huang, Jun-mei; Liu, Han-wei; Shen, Xiao-fei; Wang, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Background Type I interferons (IFN-α/β) have broad and potent immunoregulatory and antiproliferative activities. However, it is still known whether the dietary flavonoids exhibit their antiviral and anticancer properties by modulating the function of type I IFNs. Objective This study aimed at determining the role of apigenin, a dietary plant flavonoid abundant in common fruits and vegetables, on the type I IFN-mediated inhibition of cancer cell viability. Design Inhibitory effect of apigenin on human 26S proteasome, a known negative regulator of type I IFN signaling, was evaluated in vitro. Molecular docking was conducted to know the interaction between apigenin and subunits of 26S proteasome. Effects of apigenin on JAK/STAT pathway, 26S proteasome-mediated interferon receptor stability, and cancer cells viability were also investigated. Results Apigenin was identified to be a potent inhibitor of human 26S proteasome in a cell-based assay. Apigenin inhibited the chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like activities of the human 26S proteasome and increased the ubiquitination of endogenous proteins in cells. Results from computational modeling of the potential interactions of apigenin with the chymotrypsin site (β5 subunit), caspase site (β1 subunit), and trypsin site (β2 subunit) of the proteasome were consistent with the observed proteasome inhibitory activity. Apigenin enhanced the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins (STAT1 and STAT2) and promoted the endogenous IFN-α-regulated gene expression. Apigenin inhibited the IFN-α-stimulated ubiquitination and degradation of type I interferon receptor 1 (IFNAR1). Apigenin also sensitized the inhibitory effect of IFN-α on viability of cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. Conclusion These results suggest that apigenin potentiates the inhibitory effect of IFN-α on cancer cell viability by activating JAK/STAT signaling pathway through inhibition of 26S proteasome

  16. Antiviral activity and host gene induction by tamarin and marmoset interferon-α and interferon-γ in the GBV-B primary hepatocyte culture model

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Deborah; Guerra, Bernadette; Lanford, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    GBV-B induces hepatitis in tamarins and marmosets and is a surrogate model for HCV infections. Here, we cloned and characterized the antiviral activity of tamarin and marmoset interferon (IFN)α and IFNγ. Potent antiviral activity was observed for tamarin and marmoset IFNα in primary hepatocyte cultures infected with GBV-B. The antiviral activity was greater in cultures exposed to IFNα prior to GBV-B infection, suggesting that either GBV-B was capable of inhibition of the antiviral activity of exogenous IFNα or that the preexisting endogenous IFN response to the virus reduced efficacy to exogenous IFNα. IFNγ also exhibited antiviral activity in GBV-B infected hepatocytes. The transcriptional response to IFNα in marmoset hepatocytes was characterized using human genome microarrays. Since the GBV-B hepatocyte culture model possesses a functional innate immune response, it will provide opportunities to explore the nature of the antiviral response to a virus closely related to HCV. PMID:19501869

  17. Interferon γ (IFNγ) Signaling via Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 2 (mTORC2) and Regulatory Effects in the Generation of Type II Interferon Biological Responses.

    PubMed

    Kroczynska, Barbara; Rafidi, Robert L; Majchrzak-Kita, Beata; Kosciuczuk, Ewa M; Blyth, Gavin T; Jemielity, Jacek; Warminska, Zofia; Saleiro, Diana; Mehrotra, Swarna; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Fish, Eleanor N; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2016-01-29

    We provide evidence for a unique pathway engaged by the type II IFN receptor, involving mTORC2/AKT-mediated downstream regulation of mTORC1 and effectors. These events are required for formation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F complex (eIF4F) and initiation of mRNA translation of type II interferon-stimulated genes. Our studies establish that Rictor is essential for the generation of type II IFN-dependent antiviral and antiproliferative responses and that it controls the generation of type II IFN-suppressive effects on normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Together, our findings establish a central role for mTORC2 in IFNγ signaling and type II IFN responses. PMID:26645692

  18. The Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi Utilizes Multiple Ligands, Including RNA, for Interferon Regulatory Factor 3-Dependent Induction of Type I Interferon-Responsive Genes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jennifer C.; Maylor-Hagen, Heather; Ma, Ying; Weis, John H.; Weis, Janis J.

    2010-01-01

    We recently discovered a critical role for type I interferon (IFN) in the development of murine Lyme arthritis. Borrelia burgdorferi-mediated induction of IFN-responsive genes by bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) was dependent upon a functional type I IFN receptor but independent of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), TLR4, TLR9, and the adapter molecule MyD88. We now demonstrate that induction of the IFN transcriptional profile in B. burgdorferi-stimulated BMDMs occurs independently of the adapter TRIF and of the cytoplasmic sensor NOD2. In contrast, B. burgdorferi-induced transcription of these genes was dependent upon a rapid STAT1 feedback amplification pathway. IFN profile gene transcription was IRF3 dependent but did not utilize B. burgdorferi-derived DNA or DNase-sensitive ligands. Instead, IFN-responsive gene expression could be induced by B. burgdorferi-derived RNA. Interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3)-dependent IFN profile gene transcription was also induced by sonicated bacteria, by the lipoprotein OspA, and by factors released into the BSKII medium during culture of B. burgdorferi. The IFN-stimulatory activity of B. burgdorferi culture supernatants was not destroyed by nuclease treatment. Nuclease digestion also had no effect on IFN profile induction mediated by sonicated B. burgdorferi. Thus, B. burgdorferi-derived RNA, OspA, and non-nucleic acid ligands present in both sonicated bacteria and B. burgdorferi culture medium contribute to type I IFN-responsive gene induction. These findings suggest that B. burgdorferi invasion of joint tissue and the resultant type I IFN induction associated with Lyme arthritis development may involve multiple triggering ligands. PMID:20404081

  19. Two Interferons Alpha Influence Each Other During Their Interaction With the Extracellular Domain of Human Type I Interferon Receptor Subunit 2

    PubMed Central

    Schmeisser, Hana; Gorshkova, Inna; Brown, Patrick H.; Kontsek, Peter; Schuck, Peter; Zoon, Kathryn C.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between two human interferons alpha (IFN-αs) and the extracellular (EC) domain of human type I IFN receptor subunit 2 (IFNAR2) was analyzed. Previous experiments using Daudi cells showed that IFN-α21b and some IFN-α hybrids (made from IFN-α2c and 21b) competed poorly for the IFN-α2b binding site. This study examined the causes of the poor competition between these IFN-αs. IFN-α2c and the IFN hybrid CM3 {IFN-α21b(1-75)(81-95)/IFN-α2c(76-80)(96-166), Y86K} were selected for this study based on their cell binding and biological properties. Competitive binding ELISA, native electrophoresis followed by Western blot, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), surface plasmon resonance biosensor (SPR) analysis, as well as neutralization of antiproliferative activities on Daudi cells in the presence of soluble IFNAR2-EC show evidence that each of the described IFN-α subtypes affected the binding of the other IFN-α to IFNAR2-EC by affecting the stability of the complex, i.e. dissociation of the complex. Moreover, native electrophoresis with different IFNAR2-EC mutants showed that IFN-α2c and CM3 utilize different amino acids in the binding domain of IFNAR2-EC. In addition to that, analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) revealed differences in the oligomeric state of the two studied interferons. Our results demonstrated that two individual IFN-αs interact differentially with IFNAR2-EC and influence each other during this interaction. This study contributes to the understanding of the mutual interaction between multiple IFN-α subtypes during the competition for binding to the receptor. PMID:18027911

  20. A novel interferon regulatory factor family transcription factor, ICSAT/Pip/LSIRF, that negatively regulates the activity of interferon-regulated genes.

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, T; Nishida, J; Tanaka, S; Sakai, R; Mitani, K; Yoshida, M; Taniguchi, T; Yazaki, Y; Hirai, H

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated a novel cDNA clone encoding interferon (IFN) consensus sequence-binding protein in adult T-cell leukemia cell line or activated T cells (ICSAT); this protein is the human homolog of the recently cloned Pip/LSIRF. ICSAT is structurally most closely related to the previously cloned ICSBP, a member of the IFN regulatory factor (IRF) family of proteins that binds to interferon consensus sequences (ICSs) found in many promoters of the IFN-regulated genes. Among T-cell lines investigated, ICSAT was abundantly expressed in human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected T cells. When the HTLV-1 tax gene was expressed or phorbol myristake acetate-A23187 stimulation was used, ICSAT expression was induced in Jurkat cells which otherwise do not express ICSAT. When the binding of ICSAT to four different ICSs was tested, the relative differences in binding affinities for those ICSs were determined. To study the functional role of ICSAT, we performed cotransfection experiments with the human embryonal carcinoma cell line N-Tera2. ICSAT was demonstrated to possess repressive function over the gene activation induced by IFN stimulation or by IRF-1 cotransfection. Such repressive function is similar to that seen in IRF-2 or ICSBP. However, we have found that ICSAT has a different repressive effect from that of IRF-2 or ICSBP in some IFN-responsive reporter constructs. These results suggest that a novel mechanism of gene regulation by "differential repression" is used by multiple members of repressor proteins with different repressive effects on the IFN-responsive genes. PMID:8657101

  1. Foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase inhibits dsRNA-induced type I interferon transcription by decreasing interferon regulatory factor 3/7 in protein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Luo, Rui; Ye, Rui; Fang, Ying; Xie, Lilan; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} FMDV L{sup pro} inhibits poly(I:C)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} mRNA expression. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits MDA5-mediated activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter. {yields} L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter activation by decreasing IRF-3/7 in protein levels. {yields} The ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not necessary to inhibit IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} activation. -- Abstract: The leader proteinase (L{sup pro}) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been identified as an interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) antagonist that disrupts the integrity of transcription factor nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study, we showed that the reduction of double stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} expression caused by L{sup pro} was also associated with a decrease of interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF-3/7) in protein levels, two critical transcription factors for activation of IFN-{alpha}/{beta}. Furthermore, overexpression of L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes including 2',5'-OAS, ISG54, IP-10, and RANTES. Screening L{sup pro} mutants indicated that the ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not required for suppressing dsRNA-induced activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter and decreasing IRF-3/7 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in addition to disrupting NF-{kappa}B, L{sup pro} also decreases IRF-3/7 expression to suppress dsRNA-induced type I IFN production, suggesting multiple strategies used by FMDV to counteract the immune response to viral infection.

  2. Inhibition of Beta Interferon Induction by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Suggests a Two-Step Model for Activation of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Martin; Pichlmair, Andreas; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Cros, Jerome; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Haller, Otto; Weber, Friedemann

    2005-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is caused by a novel coronavirus termed SARS-CoV. We and others have previously shown that the replication of SARS-CoV can be suppressed by exogenously added interferon (IFN), a cytokine which is normally synthesized by cells as a reaction to virus infection. Here, we demonstrate that SARS-CoV escapes IFN-mediated growth inhibition by preventing the induction of IFN-β. In SARS-CoV-infected cells, no endogenous IFN-β transcripts and no IFN-β promoter activity were detected. Nevertheless, the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), which is essential for IFN-β promoter activity, was transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus early after infection with SARS-CoV. However, at a later time point in infection, IRF-3 was again localized in the cytoplasm. By contrast, IRF-3 remained in the nucleus of cells infected with the IFN-inducing control virus Bunyamwera delNSs. Other signs of IRF-3 activation such as hyperphosphorylation, homodimer formation, and recruitment of the coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP) were found late after infection with the control virus but not with SARS-CoV. Our data suggest that nuclear transport of IRF-3 is an immediate-early reaction to virus infection and may precede its hyperphosphorylation, homodimer formation, and binding to CBP. In order to escape activation of the IFN system, SARS-CoV appears to block a step after the early nuclear transport of IRF-3. PMID:15681410

  3. Direct, Interferon-Independent Activation of the CXCL10 Promoter by NF-κB and Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 during Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brownell, Jessica; Bruckner, Jacob; Wagoner, Jessica; Thomas, Emmanuel; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Gale, Michael; Liang, T. Jake

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection of hepatocytes leads to transcriptional induction of the chemokine CXCL10, which is considered an interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene. However, we have recently shown that IFNs are not required for CXCL10 induction in hepatocytes during acute HCV infection. Since the CXCL10 promoter contains binding sites for several proinflammatory transcription factors, we investigated the contribution of these factors to CXCL10 transcriptional induction during HCV infection in vitro. Wild-type and mutant CXCL10 promoter-luciferase reporter constructs were used to identify critical sites of transcriptional regulation. The proximal IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) and NF-κB binding sites positively regulated CXCL10 transcription during HCV infection as well as following exposure to poly(I·C) (a Toll-like receptor 3 [TLR3] stimulus) and 5′ poly(U) HCV RNA (a retinoic acid-inducible gene I [RIG-I] stimulus) from two viral genotypes. Conversely, binding sites for AP-1 and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBP-β) negatively regulated CXCL10 induction in response to TLR3 and RIG-I stimuli, while only C/EBP-β negatively regulated CXCL10 during HCV infection. We also demonstrated that interferon-regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) is transiently recruited to the proximal ISRE during HCV infection and localizes to the nucleus in HCV-infected primary human hepatocytes. Furthermore, IRF3 activated the CXCL10 promoter independently of type I or type III IFN signaling. The data indicate that sensing of HCV infection by RIG-I and TLR3 leads to direct recruitment of NF-κB and IRF3 to the CXCL10 promoter. Our study expands upon current knowledge regarding the mechanisms of CXCL10 induction in hepatocytes and lays the foundation for additional mechanistic studies that further elucidate the combinatorial and synergistic aspects of immune signaling pathways. PMID:24257594

  4. Stimulation of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression by Beta Interferon Increases Necrotic Death of Macrophages upon Listeria monocytogenes Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Zwaferink, Heather; Stockinger, Silvia; Reipert, Siegfried; Decker, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Murine macrophage death upon infection with Listeria monocytogenes was previously shown to be increased by beta interferon, produced by the infected cells. We saw that interferon-upregulated caspase activation or other interferon-inducible, death-associated proteins, including TRAIL, protein kinase R, and p53, were not necessary for cell death. Macrophage death was reduced when inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was inhibited during infection, and iNOS-deficient macrophages were less susceptible to death upon infection than wild-type cells. The production of nitric oxide correlated with increased death, while no role was seen for iNOS in control of Listeria numbers during infection of resting macrophages. This indicates that the induction of iNOS by beta interferon in cells infected with L. monocytogenes contributes to cell death. Based on morphology, the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential, and a lack of dependence on caspase 1, we characterize the type of cell death occurring and show that infected macrophages die by interferon-upregulated necrosis. PMID:18268032

  5. Lichen planus induced by pegylated interferon alfa-2a therapy in a patient monitored for delta hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Safak; Arslan, Eyup; Baysal, Birol; Baykara, Sule Nergiz; Uzun, Ozlem Ceren; Kaya, Sehmuz

    2015-01-01

    Interferons are used for treatment of chronic hepatitis B. They can induce or exacerbate some skin disorders, such as lichen planus. In this study, as we know, we presented the first case developing lichen planus while receiving interferon treatment due to delta hepatitis. A 31-year-old male patient presented to our outpatient clinic with HBsAg positivity. With his analyses, HBV DNA was negative, anti-delta total was positive, ALT was 72 U/L (upper limit 41 U/L), and platelet was 119 000/mm(3). He was therefore started on subcutaneous pegylated interferon alfa-2a therapy at 180 mcg/week for delta hepatitis. At month 4 of therapy, the patient developed diffuse eroded lace-like lesions in oral mucosa, white plaques on lips, and itchy papular lesions in the hands and feet. Lichen planus was considered by the dermatology clinic and topical treatment (mometasone furoate) was given. The lesions persisted at month 5 of therapy and biopsy samples were obtained from oral mucosal lesions and interferon dose was reduced to 135 mcg/week. Biopsy demonstrated nonkeratinized stratified squamous epithelium; epithelial acanthosis, spongiosis, and apoptotic bodies were observed in the epidermis and therefore lichen planus was considered. At month 6 of therapy, lesions did not improve and even progressed and interferon treatment was therefore discontinued. PMID:25821612

  6. Defining critical roles for NF-κB p65 and type I interferon in innate immunity to rhinovirus

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Nathan W; Slater, Louise; Glanville, Nicholas; Haas, Jennifer J; Caramori, Gaetano; Casolari, Paolo; Clarke, Deborah L; Message, Simon D; Aniscenko, Julia; Kebadze, Tatiana; Zhu, Jie; Mallia, Patrick; Mizgerd, Joseph P; Belvisi, Maria; Papi, Alberto; Kotenko, Sergei V; Johnston, Sebastian L; Edwards, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    The importance of NF-κB activation and deficient anti-viral interferon induction in the pathogenesis of rhinovirus-induced asthma exacerbations is poorly understood. We provide the first in vivo evidence in man and mouse that rhinovirus infection enhanced bronchial epithelial cell NF-κB p65 nuclear expression, NF-κB p65 DNA binding in lung tissue and NF-κB-regulated airway inflammation. In vitro inhibition of NF-κB reduced rhinovirus-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines but did not affect type I/III interferon induction. Rhinovirus-infected p65-deficient mice exhibited reduced neutrophilic inflammation, yet interferon induction, antiviral responses and virus loads were unaffected, indicating that NF-κB p65 is required for pro-inflammatory responses, but redundant in interferon induction by rhinoviruses in vivo. Conversely, IFNAR1−/− mice exhibited enhanced neutrophilic inflammation with impaired antiviral immunity and increased rhinovirus replication, demonstrating that interferon signalling was critical to antiviral immunity. We thus provide new mechanistic insights into rhinovirus infection and demonstrate the therapeutic potential of targeting NF-κB p65 (to suppress inflammation but preserve anti-viral immunity) and type I IFN signalling (to enhance deficient anti-viral immunity) to treat rhinovirus-induced exacerbations of airway diseases. PMID:23165884

  7. Rotavirus acceleration of type 1 diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice depends on type I interferon signalling.

    PubMed

    Pane, Jessica A; Fleming, Fiona E; Graham, Kate L; Thomas, Helen E; Kay, Thomas W H; Coulson, Barbara S

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus infection is associated with childhood progression to type 1 diabetes. Infection by monkey rotavirus RRV accelerates diabetes onset in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, which relates to regional lymph node infection and a T helper 1-specific immune response. When stimulated ex vivo with RRV, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) from naïve NOD mice secrete type I interferon, which induces the activation of bystander lymphocytes, including islet-autoreactive T cells. This is our proposed mechanism for diabetes acceleration by rotaviruses. Here we demonstrate bystander lymphocyte activation in RRV-infected NOD mice, which showed pDC activation and strong upregulation of interferon-dependent gene expression, particularly within lymph nodes. The requirement for type I interferon signalling was analysed using NOD mice lacking a functional type I interferon receptor (NOD.IFNAR1(-/-) mice). Compared with NOD mice, NOD.IFNAR1(-/-) mice showed 8-fold higher RRV titers in lymph nodes and 3-fold higher titers of total RRV antibody in serum. However, RRV-infected NOD.IFNAR1(-/-) mice exhibited delayed pDC and lymphocyte activation, no T helper 1 bias in RRV-specific antibodies and unaltered diabetes onset when compared with uninfected controls. Thus, the type I interferon signalling induced by RRV infection is required for bystander lymphocyte activation and accelerated type 1 diabetes onset in genetically susceptible mice. PMID:27405244

  8. Meta-Analysis of Combination Therapy of Chinese Herbs Plus Interferon and Ribavirin in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianjun; Xin, Shaojie; Jin, Xueyuan; Cheng, Yongqian; Yan, Tao; Qing, Song; Ding, Ning; Zhao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We aimed to evaluate the combination therapy of Chinese herbs plus interferon and ribavirin in treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). MATERIAL AND METHODS Related databases were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated biochemical response, virological response, histological response, and/or adverse reactions to combination therapy of interferon and ribavirin with and without Chinese herbs. The RR (relative risk) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated. Sensitivity analysis was conducted by omitting one study at a time. Publication bias among the eligible studies was evaluated by Egger's test. RESULTS A total of 17 RCTs matched the selection criteria. Overall, combination therapies of Chinese herbs plus interferon and ribavirin achieved significantly higher ALT (alanine transaminase) and ETVR (the end-of-treatment viral response), and significantly lower levels of HA (hyaluronic acid), LN (laminin), PC III (procollagen iii peptide), IV-C (type IV collagen), decreased LC (decreasing leukocyte count), ATF (abnormal thyroid function), psychosis, and anemia in CHC patients compared with those treated without Chinese herbs. Sensitivity analysis showed no changes and no potential publication bias was found. CONCLUSIONS The current evidence suggests that combination therapy of Chinese herb plus interferon and ribavirin yields better outcome and fewer adverse events in CHC patients than that of interferon plus ribavirin therapy. PMID:27237628

  9. Site-specific in situ growth of an interferon-polymer conjugate that outperforms PEGASYS in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jin; Wang, Guilin; Zhao, Wenguo; Liu, Xinyu; Zhang, Libin; Gao, Weiping

    2016-07-01

    Conjugating poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), PEGylation, to therapeutic proteins is widely used as a means to improve their pharmacokinetics and therapeutic potential. One prime example is PEGylated interferon-alpha (PEGASYS). However, PEGylation usually leads to a heterogeneous mixture of positional isomers with reduced bioactivity and low yield. Herein, we report site-specific in situ growth (SIG) of a PEG-like polymer, poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (POEGMA), from the C-terminus of interferon-alpha to form a site-specific (C-terminal) and stoichiometric (1:1) POEGMA conjugate of interferon-alpha in high yield. The POEGMA conjugate showed significantly improved pharmacokinetics, tumor accumulation and anticancer efficacy as compared to interferon-alpha. Notably, the POEGMA conjugate possessed a 7.2-fold higher in vitro antiproliferative bioactivity than PEGASYS. More importantly, in a murine cancer model, the POEGMA conjugate completely inhibited tumor growth and eradicated tumors of 75% mice without appreciable systemic toxicity, whereas at the same dose, no mice treated with PEGASYS survived for over 58 days. The outperformance of a site-specific POEGMA conjugate prepared by SIG over PEGASYS that is the current gold standard for interferon-alpha delivery suggests that SIG is of interest for the development of next-generation protein therapeutics. PMID:27152679

  10. Meta-Analysis of Combination Therapy of Chinese Herbs Plus Interferon and Ribavirin in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianjun; Xin, Shaojie; Jin, Xueyuan; Cheng, Yongqian; Yan, Tao; Qing, Song; Ding, Ning; Zhao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to evaluate the combination therapy of Chinese herbs plus interferon and ribavirin in treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Material/Methods Related databases were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated biochemical response, virological response, histological response, and/or adverse reactions to combination therapy of interferon and ribavirin with and without Chinese herbs. The RR (relative risk) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated. Sensitivity analysis was conducted by omitting one study at a time. Publication bias among the eligible studies was evaluated by Egger’s test. Results A total of 17 RCTs matched the selection criteria. Overall, combination therapies of Chinese herbs plus interferon and ribavirin achieved significantly higher ALT (alanine transaminase) and ETVR (the end-of-treatment viral response), and significantly lower levels of HA (hyaluronic acid), LN (laminin), PC III (procollagen iii peptide), IV-C (type IV collagen), decreased LC (decreasing leukocyte count), ATF (abnormal thyroid function), psychosis, and anemia in CHC patients compared with those treated without Chinese herbs. Sensitivity analysis showed no changes and no potential publication bias was found. Conclusions The current evidence suggests that combination therapy of Chinese herb plus interferon and ribavirin yields better outcome and fewer adverse events in CHC patients than that of interferon plus ribavirin therapy. PMID:27237628

  11. Interferon-γ Is a Crucial Activator of Early Host Immune Defense against Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bieri, Raphael; Bolz, Miriam; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Pluschke, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a chronic necrotizing human skin disease associated with the production of the cytotoxic macrolide exotoxin mycolactone. Despite extensive research, the type of immune responses elicited against this pathogen and the effector functions conferring protection against BU are not yet fully understood. While histopathological analyses of advanced BU lesions have demonstrated a mainly extracellular localization of the toxin producing acid fast bacilli, there is growing evidence for an early intra-macrophage growth phase of M. ulcerans. This has led us to investigate whether interferon-γ might play an important role in containing M. ulcerans infections. In an experimental Buruli ulcer mouse model we found that interferon-γ is indeed a critical regulator of early host immune defense against M. ulcerans infections. Interferon-γ knockout mice displayed a faster progression of the infection compared to wild-type mice. This accelerated progression was reflected in faster and more extensive tissue necrosis and oedema formation, as well as in a significantly higher bacterial burden after five weeks of infection, indicating that mice lacking interferon-γ have a reduced capacity to kill intracellular bacilli during the early intra-macrophage growth phase of M. ulcerans. This data demonstrates a prominent role of interferon-γ in early defense against M. ulcerans infection and supports the view that concepts for vaccine development against tuberculosis may also be valid for BU. PMID:26863011

  12. The human interferon-regulated ISG95 protein interacts with RNA polymerase II and shows methyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haline-Vaz, Thais; Lima Silva, Tereza Cristina; Zanchin, Nilson I.T.

    2008-08-08

    A major mechanism of cellular resistance to viral invasion involves genes from the interferon signaling pathway, called ISGs (interferon stimulated genes). Global transcriptional profiling studies have linked increased expression of ISG95 (KIAA0082) to response to interferon treatment and viral infection, suggesting that it may be part of the cellular defense against viral replication. In this work, we show that the ISG95 promoter can drive interferon-induced transcription of a reporter gene in Vero cells. Recombinant ISG95 shows RNA- and S-adenosyl-methionine binding and protein methyltransferase activity in vitro. ISG95 interacts with the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, which is consistent with its nuclear localization and with the predicted function of the WW domain found in the C-terminal region of ISG95. The results presented in this work indicate that ISG95 is part of the interferon response pathway and functions in the pre-mRNA processing events mediated by the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II.

  13. Rotavirus acceleration of type 1 diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice depends on type I interferon signalling

    PubMed Central

    Pane, Jessica A.; Fleming, Fiona E.; Graham, Kate L.; Thomas, Helen E.; Kay, Thomas W. H.; Coulson, Barbara S.

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus infection is associated with childhood progression to type 1 diabetes. Infection by monkey rotavirus RRV accelerates diabetes onset in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, which relates to regional lymph node infection and a T helper 1-specific immune response. When stimulated ex vivo with RRV, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) from naïve NOD mice secrete type I interferon, which induces the activation of bystander lymphocytes, including islet-autoreactive T cells. This is our proposed mechanism for diabetes acceleration by rotaviruses. Here we demonstrate bystander lymphocyte activation in RRV-infected NOD mice, which showed pDC activation and strong upregulation of interferon-dependent gene expression, particularly within lymph nodes. The requirement for type I interferon signalling was analysed using NOD mice lacking a functional type I interferon receptor (NOD.IFNAR1−/− mice). Compared with NOD mice, NOD.IFNAR1−/− mice showed 8-fold higher RRV titers in lymph nodes and 3-fold higher titers of total RRV antibody in serum. However, RRV-infected NOD.IFNAR1−/− mice exhibited delayed pDC and lymphocyte activation, no T helper 1 bias in RRV-specific antibodies and unaltered diabetes onset when compared with uninfected controls. Thus, the type I interferon signalling induced by RRV infection is required for bystander lymphocyte activation and accelerated type 1 diabetes onset in genetically susceptible mice. PMID:27405244

  14. Interferon therapy in hepatitis C leading to chronic type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zornitzki, Taiba; Malnick, Stephen; Lysyy, Lyudmila; Knobler, Hilla

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review the prevalence, clinical data and course of interferon- associated type 1 diabetes in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. METHODS: Search of all interferon (INF)-related type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) cases published in the English literature from 1992 to December 2013 according to the key words: chronic hepatitis C infection, diabetes mellitus type 1, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, and interferon treatment. We found 107 cases and analyzed their clinical and laboratory data and long-term follow-up. Due to the predominance of cases described in Japanese literature, we analyzed separately cases of Caucasian and Japanese origin. In addition we describe a representative case with HCV who developed INF-related T1DM. RESULTS: Our data show that INF treatment increases the risk of developing T1DM by 10-18 fold compared with the corresponding general population and the median age of onset was 43 years (range: 24-66 years) in Caucasians and 52 years (range: 45-63 years) in Japanese. Most patients developed T1DM during INF treatment, after a median time-period of 4.2 and 5.7 mo in Caucasian and Japanese groups, respectively. The clinical course was characterized by a fulminant course with abrupt severe hyperglycemia or ketoacidosis, a high titer of anti-islet autoantibodies and almost all patients (105/107) permanently required insulin therapy with a follow-up of up to 4 years. A substantial number of patients had evidence for other autoimmune disorders mainly thyroid diseases (25% and 31% in Caucasian and Japanese groups, respectively). CONCLUSION: INF-associated T1DM in HCV has a fulminant course, often associated with other autoimmune diseases, and results almost inevitably in permanent insulin therapy requirement. PMID:25574096

  15. Type I Interferon Protects against Pneumococcal Invasive Disease by Inhibiting Bacterial Transmigration across the Lung

    PubMed Central

    LeMessurier, Kim S.; Häcker, Hans; Chi, Liying; Tuomanen, Elaine; Redecke, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infection is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Type I interferon (IFN-I), whose contribution to antiviral and intracellular bacterial immunity is well established, is also elicited during pneumococcal infection, yet its functional significance is not well defined. Here, we show that IFN-I plays an important role in the host defense against pneumococci by counteracting the transmigration of bacteria from the lung to the blood. Mice that lack the type I interferon receptor (Ifnar1−/−) or mice that were treated with a neutralizing antibody against the type I interferon receptor, exhibited enhanced development of bacteremia following intranasal pneumococcal infection, while maintaining comparable bacterial numbers in the lung. In turn, treatment of mice with IFNβ or IFN-I-inducing synthetic double stranded RNA (poly(I:C)), dramatically reduced the development of bacteremia following intranasal infection with S. pneumoniae. IFNβ treatment led to upregulation of tight junction proteins and downregulation of the pneumococcal uptake receptor, platelet activating factor receptor (PAF receptor). In accordance with these findings, IFN-I reduced pneumococcal cell invasion and transmigration across epithelial and endothelial layers, and Ifnar1−/− mice showed overall enhanced lung permeability. As such, our data identify IFN-I as an important component of the host immune defense that regulates two possible mechanisms involved in pneumococcal invasion, i.e. PAF receptor-mediated transcytosis and tight junction-dependent pericellular migration, ultimately limiting progression from a site-restricted lung infection to invasive, lethal disease. PMID:24244159

  16. Kinetics of relapse after pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Brochot, Etienne; Riachi, Ghassan; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Guillemard, Catherine; Vabret, Astrid; Mathurin, Philippe; Nguyen-Khac, Eric; Duverlie, Gilles

    2013-07-01

    To optimize standard treatment of chronic hepatitis C in responder patients who have achieved undetectable viral load, a prospective study was conducted to determine the factors and kinetics of virologic relapse. Responder patients were monitored 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 24 weeks after the end of treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Forty-seven of the 154 patients (30.5%) relapsed. Relapse was significantly associated with absence of rapid virologic response (RVR), retreatment, higher baseline viral load, older age, and lower weight-based dose of pegylated interferon. Relapse was more frequent in patients failing to achieve a RVR after receiving pegylated interferon alpha 2a < 2.5 µg/week or alpha 2b < 1.5 µg/week (P = 0.002). Among patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 with non-CC IL-28B polymorphism (rs12979860), viral decay during treatment was lower in relapsers (P = 0.003 at week 4). Relapse was detected at weeks 2, 4, 8, and 12 after the end of treatment for 5, 8, 10, and 6 patients infected with HCV genotype 1, respectively. Positive predictive values for sustained virologic response were 70.9%, 80.2%, 91.9%, and 98.8% at weeks 2, 4, 8, and 12, respectively. Only one patient relapsed beyond 24 weeks. Closer follow-up and treatment adaptation in patients failing to achieve RVR may decrease the relapse rate in slower responders and heavier patients. Monitoring viral load as early as 1 month after the end of treatment could be useful to assess virologic response. PMID:23918537

  17. Aqueous Tear Deficiency Increases Conjunctival Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) Expression and Goblet Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; De Paiva, Cintia S.; Moore, Quianta L.; Volpe, Eugene A.; Li, De-Quan; Gumus, Koray; Zaheer, Mahira L.; Corrales, Rosa M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the hypothesis that increased interferon-γ (IFN-γ) expression is associated with conjunctival goblet cell loss in subjects with tear dysfunction. Methods Goblet cell density (GCD) was measured in impression cytology from the temporal bulbar conjunctiva, and gene expression was measured in cytology samples from the nasal bulbar conjunctiva obtained from 68 subjects, including normal control, meibomian gland disease (MGD), non-Sjögren syndrome (non-SSATD)-, and Sjögren syndrome (SSATD)-associated aqueous tear deficiency. Gene expression was evaluated by real-time PCR. Tear meniscus height (TMH) was measured by optical coherence tomography. Fluorescein and lissamine green dye staining evaluated corneal and conjunctival disease, respectively. Between-group mean differences and correlation coefficients were calculated. Results Compared to control, IFN-γ expression was significantly higher in both ATD groups, and its receptor was higher in SSATD. Expression of IL-13 and its receptor was similar in all groups. Goblet cell density was lower in the SSATD group; expression of MUC5AC mucin was lower and cornified envelope precursor small proline-rich region (SPRR)-2G higher in both ATD groups. Interferon-γ transcript number was inversely correlated with GCD (r = −0.37, P < 0.04) and TMH (r = −0.37, P = 0.02), and directly correlated with lissamine green staining (r = 0.51, P < 0.001) and SPRR-2G expression (r = 0.32, P < 0.05). Conclusions Interferon-γ expression in the conjunctiva was higher in aqueous deficiency and correlated with goblet cell loss and severity of conjunctival disease. These results support findings of animal and culture studies showing that IFN-γ reduces conjunctival goblet cell number and mucin production. PMID:26618646

  18. Global changes in STAT target selection and transcription regulation upon interferon treatments

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Stephen E.; Bertone, Paul; Nath, Anjali K.; Royce, Thomas E.; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Snyder, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) proteins play a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression, but their targets and the manner in which they select them remain largely unknown. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA microarray analysis (ChIP-chip), we have identified the regions of human chromosome 22 bound by STAT1 and STAT2 in interferon-treated cells. Analysis of the genomic loci proximal to these binding sites introduced new candidate STAT1 and STAT2 target genes, several of which are affiliated with proliferation and apoptosis. The genes on chromosome 22 that exhibited interferon-induced up- or down-regulated expression were determined and correlated with the STAT-binding site information, revealing the potential regulatory effects of STAT1 and STAT2 on their target genes. Importantly, the comparison of STAT1-binding sites upon interferon (IFN)-γ and IFN-α treatments revealed dramatic changes in binding locations between the two treatments. The IFN-α induction revealed nonconserved STAT1 occupancy at IFN-γ-induced sites, as well as novel sites of STAT1 binding not evident in IFN-γ-treated cells. Many of these correlated with binding by STAT2, but others were STAT2 independent, suggesting that multiple mechanisms direct STAT1 binding to its targets under different activation conditions. Overall, our results reveal a wealth of new information regarding IFN/STAT-binding targets and also fundamental insights into mechanisms of regulation of gene expression in different cell states. PMID:16319195

  19. High yield soluble bacterial expression and streamlined purification of recombinant human interferon α-2a.

    PubMed

    Bis, Regina L; Stauffer, Tara M; Singh, Surinder M; Lavoie, Thomas B; Mallela, Krishna M G

    2014-07-01

    Interferon α-2a (IFNA2) is a member of the Type I interferon cytokine family, known for its antiviral and anti-proliferative functions. The role of this family in the innate immune response makes it an attractive candidate for the treatment of many viral and chronic immune-compromised diseases. Recombinant IFNA2 is clinically used to modulate hairy cell leukemia as well as hepatitis c. Historically, IFNA2 has been purified from human leukocytes as well as bacterial expression systems. In most cases, bacterial expression of IFNA2 resulted in inclusion body formation, or required numerous purification steps that decreased the protein yield. Here, we describe an expression and purification scheme for IFNA2 using a pET-SUMO bacterial expression system and a single purification step. Using the SUMO protein as the fusion tag achieved high soluble protein expression. The SUMO tag was cleaved with the Ulp1 protease leaving no additional amino acids on the fusion terminus following cleavage. Mass spectrometry, circular dichroism, 2D heteronuclear NMR, and analytical ultracentrifugation confirmed the amino acid sequence identity, secondary and tertiary protein structures, and the solution behavior of the purified IFNA2. The purified protein also had antiviral and anti-proliferative activities comparable to the WHO International Standard, NIBSC 95/650, and the IFNA2 standard available from PBL Assay Science. Combining the expression and purification protocols developed here to produce IFNA2 on a laboratory scale with the commercial fermenter technology commonly used in pharmaceutical industry may further enhance IFNA2 yields, which will promote the development of interferon-based protein drugs to treat various disorders. PMID:24794500

  20. Influence of natural and recombinant interferons on development of antiviral condition and activity of natural killers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V.P.; Avdeev, G.I.; Vyadro, M.M.; Leikin, Yu.D.; Frolova, I.S.

    1986-03-01

    For the purpose of a preliminary estimate of the therapeutic potential of domestic recombinant alpha/sub 2/-component of human leukocytic interferon (rl) in vitro tests, the authors studied its ability to induce development of antiviral condition in diploid culture of human embryo fibroblasts and to activate the cytolytic effect of natural killers in relation to tumor cells, of the K-562 leukemia line and cells of lung adenocarcinoma. The authors used a medicinal form of rL which was derived by expression of a reconstructed gene in Escherichia coli cells. Part of the tests were conducted with an analogous preparation synthesized using another producer, Pseudomonas sp). The biological effect of both preparations was the same. For comparison, a natural preparation was used in all tests: human leukocytic interferon for injection, II(le). The authors studied activity of natural killers in a fraction of mononuclears isolated from blood of essentially healthy donors and from cancer patients. Cells were incubated for 2 h with various concentrations of interferons, then combined in a ratio of 25-50:1 with target cells labeled with /sup 51/Cr. Cytotoxic reaction was conducted for 4 (4-CTR) or 18 h (18-CTR) at 37/sup 0/C. Natural killers could thus be divided into two subpopulations: killer (4-CTR) and cytotoxic (18-CTR) cells. In preliminary tests, both preparations possessed the ability to active natural killers. The effective concentration for rL was within the limits of 1000-2000 IU/ml, and 50-200 Iu/ml for Le. The data on activation of natural killers in 16 oncological patients (primarily with lung cancer), the authors established that both rL and Le induced activation of natural killers in the overwhelming majority of cases in relation to K-562 target cells and adenocarcinomas of the lung.