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Sample records for intergranular cracking mechanism

  1. Selective Internal Oxidation as a Mechanism for Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking of Ni-Cr-Fe Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capell, Brent M.; Was, Gary S.

    2007-06-01

    The mechanism of selective internal oxidation (SIO) for intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of nickel-base alloys has been investigated through a series of experiments using high-purity alloys and a steam environment to control the formation of NiO on the surface. Five alloys (Ni-9Fe, Ni-5Cr, Ni-5Cr-9Fe, Ni-16Cr-9Fe, and Ni-30Cr-9Fe) were used to investigate oxidation and intergranular cracking behavior for hydrogen-to-water vapor partial pressure ratios (PPRs) between 0.001 and 0.9. The Ni-9Fe, Ni-5Cr, and Ni-5Cr-9Fe alloys formed a uniform Ni(OH)2 film at PPRs less than 0.09, and the higher chromium alloys formed chromium-rich oxide films over the entire PPR range studied. Corrosion coupon results show that grain boundary oxides extended for significant depths (>150 nm) below the sample surface for all but the highest Cr containing alloy. Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) test results showed that intergranular cracking varied with PPR and cracking was more pronounced at a PPR value where nonprotective Ni(OH)2 was able to form and a link between the nonprotective Ni(OH)2 film and the formation of grain boundary oxides is suggested. The observation of grain boundary oxides in stressed and unstressed samples as well as the influence of alloy content on IG cracking and oxidation support SIO as a mechanism for IGSCC.

  2. UNDERSTANDING THE MECHANISMS CONTROLLING ENVIRONMENTALLY-ASSISTED INTERGRANULAR CRACKING OF NICKEL-BASE ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Was

    2004-02-13

    Creep and IG cracking of nickel-base alloys depend principally on two factors--the deformation behavior and the effect of the environment. We have shown that both contribute to the observed degradation in primary water. The understanding of cracking does not lie wholly within the environmental effects arena, nor can it be explained only by intrinsic mechanical behavior. Rather, both processes contribute to the observed behavior in primary water. In this project, we had three objectives: (1) to verify that grain boundaries control deformation in Ni-16Cr-9Fe at 360 C, (2) to identify the environmental effect on IGSCC, and (3) to combine CSLBs and GBCs to maximize IGSCC resistance in Ni-Cr-Fe in 360 C primary water. Experiments performed in hydrogen gas at 360 C confirm an increase in the primary creep rate in Ni-16Cr-9Fe at 360 C due to hydrogen. The creep strain transients caused by hydrogen are proposed to be due to the collapse of dislocation pile-ups, as confirmed by observations in HVEM. The observations only partially support the hydrogen-enhanced plasticity model, but also suggest a potential role of vacancies in the accelerate creep behavior in primary water. In high temperature oxidation experiments designed to examine the potential for selective internal oxidation in the IGSCC process, cracking is greatest in the more oxidizing environments compared to the low oxygen potential environments where nickel metal is stable. In Ni-Cr-Fe alloys, chromium oxides form preferentially along the grain boundaries, even at low oxygen potential, supporting a potential role in grain boundary embrittlement due to preferential oxidation. Experiments designed to determine the role of grain boundary deformation on intergranular cracking have established, for the first time, a cause-and-effect relationship between grain boundary deformation and IGSCC. That is, grain boundary deformation in Ni-16Cr-9Fe in 360 C primary water leads to IGSCC of the deformed boundaries. As well

  3. Proceedings: 1987 EPRI Workshop on Mechanisms of Primary Water Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    1988-09-01

    Representatives from utilities, vendors, universities, government agencies, and EPRI reviewed recent research on stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubing in primary water. Participants agreed that, although the mechanism involved in cracking is uncertain, identifying the rate-limiting step is more important than understanding the complete mechanism.

  4. Intergranular Strain Evolution near Fatigue Crack Tips in Polycrystalline Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Lili; Gao, Yanfei; Lee, Sooyeol; Barabash, Rozaliya; Lee, Jinhaeng; Liaw, Peter K

    2011-01-01

    The deformation field near a steady fatigue crack includes a plastic zone in front of the crack tip and a plastic wake behind it, and the magnitude, distribution, and history of the residual strain along the crack path depend on the stress multiaxiality, material properties, and history of stress intensity factor and crack growth rate. An in situ, full-field, non-destructive measurement of lattice strain (which relies on the intergranular interactions of the inhomogeneous deformation fields in neighboring grains) by neutron diffraction techniques has been performed for the fatigue test of a Ni-based superalloy compact tension specimen. These microscopic grain level measurements provided unprecedented information on the fatigue growth mechanisms. A two-scale model is developed to predict the lattice strain evolution near fatigue crack tips in polycrystalline materials. An irreversible, hysteretic cohesive interface model is adopted to simulate a steady fatigue crack, which allows us to generate the stress/strain distribution and history near the fatigue crack tip. The continuum deformation history is used as inputs for the micromechanical analysis of lattice strain evolution using the slip-based crystal plasticity model, thus making a mechanistic connection between macro- and micro-strains. Predictions from perfect grain-boundary simulations exhibit the same lattice strain distributions as in neutron diffraction measurements, except for discrepancies near the crack tip within about one-tenth of the plastic zone size. By considering the intergranular damage, which leads to vanishing intergranular strains as damage proceeds, we find a significantly improved agreement between predicted and measured lattice strains inside the fatigue process zone. Consequently, the intergranular damage near fatigue crack tip is concluded to be responsible for fatigue crack growth.

  5. Quasi-static intergranular cracking in a Cu-Sn alloy: An analog of stress relief cracking of steels

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, E.V.; Menyhard, M.; Bika, D.; Rothman, B.; McMahon, C.J. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Intergranular cracking in a laboratory-made Cu-8wt%Sn alloy at 265 to 300{degree}C in vacuum was studied in order to explore the hypothesis that this could serve as an analog to the brittle mode of stress-relief cracking in steels and to test the mechanism proposed earlier to explain that phenomenon. This mechanism involves the stress-induced intergranular penetration along grain boundaries of a surface-adsorbed embrittling element. Sulfur is the active element in this regard in steels, and tin was envisioned as playing the same role in Cu-Sn alloys. Auger spectroscopy was used to confirm earlier reports of the surface activity of tin and to determine the segregation kinetics in the present polycrystals; no other elements were found to segregate to surfaces to any significant degree in the present alloy. Crack growth measurements showed that intergranular cracking occurs in an intermittent manner at an average rate on the order of 0.1 {mu}m/sec over a range of crack length. Crack initiation was found to be remarkably sensitive to the stress intensity, implying the existence of a threshold. The fracture appearance in the regions of slow crack growth was similar to that observed in steels undergoing stress-relief cracking at 500--600{degree}C. It was concluded that the quasi-static intergranular cracking in the steels and in the Cu-Sn alloy represent two aspects of the same generic phenomenon and that the proposed mechanism of stress-induced intergranular impurity penetration is valid. It is believed that liquid-and solid-metal embrittlement are closely related to the type of intergranular cracking described here.

  6. Quasi-static intergranular cracking in a Cu-Sn alloy: An analog of stress relief cracking of steels

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, E.V.; Menyhard, M.; Bika, D.; Rothman, B.; McMahon, C.J. Jr.

    1991-12-31

    Intergranular cracking in a laboratory-made Cu-8wt%Sn alloy at 265 to 300{degree}C in vacuum was studied in order to explore the hypothesis that this could serve as an analog to the brittle mode of stress-relief cracking in steels and to test the mechanism proposed earlier to explain that phenomenon. This mechanism involves the stress-induced intergranular penetration along grain boundaries of a surface-adsorbed embrittling element. Sulfur is the active element in this regard in steels, and tin was envisioned as playing the same role in Cu-Sn alloys. Auger spectroscopy was used to confirm earlier reports of the surface activity of tin and to determine the segregation kinetics in the present polycrystals; no other elements were found to segregate to surfaces to any significant degree in the present alloy. Crack growth measurements showed that intergranular cracking occurs in an intermittent manner at an average rate on the order of 0.1 {mu}m/sec over a range of crack length. Crack initiation was found to be remarkably sensitive to the stress intensity, implying the existence of a threshold. The fracture appearance in the regions of slow crack growth was similar to that observed in steels undergoing stress-relief cracking at 500--600{degree}C. It was concluded that the quasi-static intergranular cracking in the steels and in the Cu-Sn alloy represent two aspects of the same generic phenomenon and that the proposed mechanism of stress-induced intergranular impurity penetration is valid. It is believed that liquid-and solid-metal embrittlement are closely related to the type of intergranular cracking described here.

  7. Further Study of near Solidus Intergranular Cracking in Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    A series of tests, performed to determine the strain necessary to initiate intergranular cracking in Inconel 718 as a function of temperature, contained enough scatter near the melting temperature that questions remained as to the best curve of curves to fit to the data. Fracture surface analysis showed that the scatter was due to incipient melting in the grain boundary region. The melting contributed to low fracture strain but had only a small on the incipient cracking strain. Gleeble tests, which could be interrupted by water quenching, were used to study the incipient intergranular melting of Inconel 718. This modified weld simulation test provided a sufficiently rapid quench to preserve the intergranular microstructure created during incipient melting. This structure was studied both microscopically and with energy dispensive X-ray analysis. The implications of incipient melting and low-strain incipient cracking on the development of microfissuring envelopes are discussed.

  8. A probabilistic model of intergranular stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier, R.J.; Jones, W.B. ); Scully, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a model which utilizes a probabilistic failure criterion to describe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). A two-dimensional array of elements representing a section of a pipe wall is analyzed, with each element in the array representing a segment of grain boundary. The failure criterion is applied repetitively to each element of the array that is exposed to the interior of the pipe (i.e. the corrosive fluid) until that element dissolves, thereby exposing the next element. A number of environmental, mechanical, and materials factors have been incorporated into the model, including: (1) the macroscopic applied stress profile, (2) the stress history, (3) the extent and grain-to- grain distribution of carbide sensitization levels, which can be applied to a subset of elements comprising a grain boundary, and (4) a data set containing IGSCC crack growth rates as function of applied stress intensity and sensitization level averaged over a large population of grains. The latter information was obtained from the literature for AISI 304 stainless steel under light water nuclear reactor primary coolant environmental conditions. The resulting crack growth simulations are presented and discussed. 14 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking and selective internal oxidation of nickel-chromium-iron alloys in hydrogenated steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capell, Brent M.

    2005-07-01

    Selective internal oxidation (SIO) is a mechanism of grain boundary embrittlement through the formation of intergranular oxides of Cr2O3. SIO is proposed as a mechanism to explain intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Ni-base alloys in pressurized water reactor environments. The purpose of this work is to investigate SIO through a series of experiments using controlled-purity alloys in a controlled, low-pressure steam environment in which the oxygen potential is varied. Five alloys; Ni-9Fe, Ni-5Cr, LCr (Ni-5Cr-9Fe), CD85 (Ni-16Cr-9Fe) and HCr (Ni-30Cr-9Fe), were used in corrosion coupon exposure tests and constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests at 550°C and 400°C in an environment consisting of a controlled mixture of hydrogen, water vapor and argon. The hydrogen-to-water vapor partial pressure ratio (PPR) was varied between 0.001 and 0.9 to control the oxygen partial pressure. The Ni-9Fe, Ni-5Cr and LCr alloys formed a uniform Ni(OH)2 film at PPR values less than 0.09 while CD85 and HCr formed Cr2O 3 oxide films over the entire PPR range. Corrosion coupon results also show the formation of highly localized oxide particles at grain boundaries. Focused ion beam analysis revealed that intergranular oxides were observed at significant depths (>150 nm) down grain boundaries and the oxide morphology depended on the alloy composition and PPR value. Diffusion of oxygen along the grain boundary accounted for the growth of intergranular oxides. CERT test results showed that intergranular cracking was caused by creep-induced microvoid coalescence only at 550°C and did not depend on PPR. At 400°C, the cracking behavior depended on the PPR and resulted in a mixture of creep-induced microvoid coalescence and brittle intergranular failure. The cracked boundary fraction was higher at a PPR value where a Ni(OH)2 surface film formed. Alloy composition influenced cracking and the cracked boundary fraction decreased as the alloy chromium content increased. The

  10. Ultrasonic inspection reliability for intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, P G; Taylor, T T; Spanner, J C; Doctor, S R; Deffenbaugh, J D

    1990-07-01

    A pipe inspection round robin entitled Mini-Round Robin'' was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory from May 1985 through October 1985. The research was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research under a program entitled Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors.'' The Mini-Round Robin (MRR) measured the intergranular stress corrosion (GSC) crack detection and sizing capabilities of inservice inspection (ISI) inspectors that had passed the requirements of IEB 83-02 and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) sizing training course. The MRR data base was compared with an earlier Pipe Inspection Round Robin (PIRR) that had measured the performance of inservice inspection prior to 1982. Comparison of the MRR and PIRR data bases indicates no significant change in the inspection capability for detecting IGSCC. Also, when comparing detection of long and short cracks, no difference in detection capability was measured. An improvement in the ability to differentiate between shallow and deeper IGSCC was found when the MRR sizing capability was compared with an earlier sizing round robin conducted by the EPRI. In addition to the pipe inspection round robin, a human factors study was conducted in conjunction with the Mini-Round Robin. The most important result of the human factors study is that the Relative Operating Characteristics (ROC) curves provide a better methodology for describing inspector performance than only probability of detection (POD) or single-point crack/no crack data. 6 refs., 55 figs., 18 tabs.

  11. STUDY OF GRAIN BOUNDARY CHARACTER ALONG INTERGRANULAR STRESS CORROSION CRACK PATHS IN AUSTENITIC ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Guertsman, Valery Y.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2001-05-25

    Samples of austenitic stainless alloys were examined by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Misorientations were measured by electron backscattered diffraction. Grain boundary distributions were analyzed with special emphasis on the grain boundary character along intergranular stress-corrosion cracks and at crack arrest points. It was established that only coherent twin S3 boundaries could be considered as "special" ones with regard to crack resistance. However, it is possible that twin interactions with random grain boundaries may inhibit crack propagation. The results suggest that other factors besides geometrical ones play an important role in the intergranular stress-corrosion cracking of commercial alloys.

  12. Creep and intergranular cracking behavior of nickel-chromium-iron-carbon alloys in 360 C water

    SciTech Connect

    Angeliu, T.M.; Paraventi, D.J.; Was, G.S.

    1995-11-01

    Mechanical testing of controlled-purity Ni-x% Cr-9% Fe-y% C alloys at 360 C revealed an environmental enhancement in intergranular (IG) cracking and time-dependent deformation in high-purity (HP) and primary water (PW) over that exhibited in argon. Dimples on the IG facets indicated a creep void nucleation and growth failure mode. IG cracking was located primarily in the interior of the specimen and was not necessarily linked to the environment. Controlled-potential constant extension rate tensile (CERT) experiments showed increases in IG cracking as the applied potential decreased, suggesting that hydrogen was detrimental to the mechanical properties. It was proposed that the environment, through the presence of hydrogen, enhanced IG cracking by enhancing the matrix dislocation mobility. This conclusion was based on observations that dislocation creep controlled IG cracking of controlled-purity Ni-x% Cr-9% Fe-y% C in argon at 360 C. Grain-boundary cavitation (GBC) and sliding (GBS) results showed environmental enhancement of the creep rate primarily resulted from an increase in matrix plastic deformation. However, controlled-potential constant load tensile (CLT) experiments did not indicate a change in the creep rate as the applied potential decreased. While this result did not support hydrogen-assisted creep, the material already may have been saturated with hydrogen at these applied potentials, and thus, no effect was realized. Chromium and carbon decreased IG cracking in HP and PW by increasing the creep resistance. The surface film did not play a significant role in the creep or IG cracking behavior under the conditions investigated.

  13. Study on grain boundary character and strain distribution of intergranular cracking in the CGHAZ of T23 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Y.J.; Lu, H. Yu, C.; Xu, J.J.

    2013-10-15

    Intergranular reheat cracking in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone of T23 steel was produced by strain to fracture tests on a Gleeble 3500 thermal–mechanical simulator. Then the grain boundary character, as well as the strain distribution after reheat crack propagation, was studied by electron backscatter diffraction technique. The results showed that incoherent Σ3 boundaries were seldom found on the prior austenite grain boundaries. Therefore, only the type of random high-angle boundaries played a crucial role in the intergranular cracking. Microstructurally cavities and small cracks were preferentially initiated from high-angle grain boundaries. Low-angle grain boundaries and high-angle ones with misorientation angles less than 15° were more resistant to the cracking. More importantly, the fraction of high-angle grain boundaries increased with the plastic strain induced by both temperature gradient and stress in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone, which contributed to the crack initiation and propagation. Furthermore, the strain distributions in the vicinity of cavities and cracks revealed the accommodation processes of plastic deformation during stress relaxation. It also reflected the strength differences between grain interior and grain boundary at different heat-treated temperatures, which had a large influence on the cracking mechanism. - Highlights: • The coincidence site lattice boundaries play little role in the reheat cracking. • Cavity and crack occur at high-angle grain boundaries rather than low-angle ones. • The strain leads low-angle grain boundaries to transform to high-angle ones. • Strain distribution differs for cavity and crack zones at different temperatures.

  14. The effect of residuals on the presence of intergranular surface cracks on continuously cast billets

    SciTech Connect

    Wijngaarden, M.J.U.T. van; Visagie, G.P.

    1996-12-31

    During 1991, Iscor Vereeniging experienced a dramatic increase in the rejection rate of specialty steel bars rolled from continuously cast billets due to the presence of seams on the bars. The seams originated from tearing of the billets during the first 2 passes in the roughing mill during hot rolling. The defective billets were found to contain fine intergranular cracks on the surface. Such cracks have been described in the literature and have been attributed to the presence of high levels of residuals resulting in the well-known phenomenon of surface hot shortness which results from the enrichment of residuals at the grain boundaries after preferential oxidation of iron during scaling of the steel. The present investigation revealed that the effect of residuals on intergranular surface cracking is a complex interaction between steel composition and casting conditions such as casting speed, intensity of secondary cooling, section size, and mold type. This paper quantifies the effect of residuals on the intergranular surface cracking of continuously cast billets and quantitatively relates the incidence of these cracks to parameters which can be controlled during steelmaking and continuous casting.

  15. An Electrochemical Framework to Explain Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking in an Al-5.4%Cu-0.5%Mg-0.5%Ag Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, D. A.; Connolly, B. J.; Scully, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    A modified version of the Cu-depletion electrochemical framework was used to explain the metallurgical factor creating intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility in an aged Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy, C416. This framework was also used to explain the increased resistance to intergranular stress corrosion cracking in the overaged temper. Susceptibility in the under aged and T8 condition is consistent with the grain boundary Cu-depletion mechanism. Improvements in resistance of the T8+ thermal exposure of 5000 h at 225 F (T8+) compared to the T8 condition can be explained by depletion of Cu from solid solution.

  16. The role of Hydrogen and Creep in Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 in PWR Primary Water Environments ? a Review

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Hua, F H

    2004-07-12

    Intergranular attack (IGA) and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Alloy 600 in PWR steam generator environment has been extensively studied for over 30 years without rendering a clear understanding of the essential mechanisms. The lack of understanding of the IGSCC mechanism is due to a complex interaction of numerous variables such as microstructure, thermomechanical processing, strain rate, water chemistry and electrochemical potential. Hydrogen plays an important role in all these variables. The complexity, however, significantly hinders a clearer and more fundamental understanding of the mechanism of hydrogen in enhancing intergranular cracking via whatever mechanism. In this work, an attempt is made to review the role of hydrogen based on the current understanding of grain boundary structure and chemistry and intergranular fracture of nickel alloys, effect of hydrogen on electrochemical behavior of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 (e.g. the passive film stability, polarization behavior and open-circuit potential) and effect of hydrogen on PWSCC behavior of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690. Mechanistic studies on the PWSCC are briefly reviewed. It is concluded that further studies on the role of hydrogen on intergranular cracking in both inert and primary side environments are needed. These studies should focus on the correlation of the results obtained at different laboratories by different methods on materials with different metallurgical and chemical parameters.

  17. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of neutron-irradiated, thermally sensitized type 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Onchi, T.; Hide, K.; Mayuzumi, M.; Hoshiya, T.

    2000-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SS) have been used as core component materials for light water reactors. As reactors age, however, the material tends to suffer from degradation primarily resulting from irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) as well as intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Neutron-irradiated, thermally sensitized Type 304 (UNS S30400) stainless steels (SS) were examined by slow strain rate (SSR) stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests in 290 C water of 0.2 ppm dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) and by SSR tensile tests in 290 C inert gas environment. Neutron fluences ranged from 4 x 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2} to 3 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (energy [E] > 1 MeV). percent intergranular (%IG) cracking, which has been used as an intergranular (IG) cracking susceptibility indicator in the SSR SCC tests, changes anomalously with neutron fluence in spite of the strain-to-failure rate decreasing with an increase of neutron fluence. Apparently, %IG is a misleading indicator for the irradiated, thermally sensitized Type 304 SS and for the irradiated, nonsensitized SS when IG cracking susceptibility is compared at different neutron fluences, test temperatures, DO, and strain rates. These test parameters may affect deformation and fracture behaviors of the irradiated SS during the SSR SCC tests, resulting in changing %IG, which is given by the ratio of the total IG cracking area to the entire fracture surface area. It is suggested that strain-to-IG crack initiation for the irradiated, thermally sensitized SS and for the irradiated, nonsensitized SS is the alternative indicator in the SSR SCC tests. An engineering expedient to determine the IG crack initiation strain is given by a deviating point on superposed stress-strain curves in inert gas and in oxygenated water. The strain-to-IG crack initiation becomes smaller with an increase of neutron fluence and DO. The SSR tensile tests in inert gas are needed to obtain strain-to-IG crack initiation in

  18. Investigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in the fuel pool at Three Mile Island Unit 1

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    An intergranular stress corrosion cracking failure of 304 stainless steel pipe in 2000 ppM B as H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ + H/sub 2/O at 100/sup 0/C has been investigated. Constant extension rate testing has produced an intergranular type failure in material in air. Chemical analysis was performed on both the base metal and weld material, in addition to fractography, EPR testing and optical microscopy in discerning the mode of failure. Various effects of Cl/sup -/, O/sub 2/, and MnS are discussed. The results have indicated that the cause of failure was the severe sensitization coupled with probable contamination by S and possibly by Cl ions.

  19. Intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high-temperature caustic solutions containing contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, R.; Roberge, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1985-06-01

    Concentrated caustic is a primary cause of stress corrosion cracking and intergranular attack of Alloy 600 tubing in PWRs. However, temperature, electrochemical potential, stress, and metallurgical state all play a role. This study provides the quantitative evidence needed to develop models of crack growth and to devise effective countermeasures.

  20. High-Resolution Characterization of Intergranular Attack and Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 600 in High-Temperature Primary Water

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Larry E.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2000-06-01

    Intergranular (IG) attack regions and stress-corrosion cracks in alloy 600 U-bend samples tested in 330C, pressurized-water-reactor water have been characterized by analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM). Observations of cross-sectional samples revealed short oxidized zones preceding crack tips and narrow (10-nm wide), deeply penetrated, oxidized zones along grain boundaries exposed along open cracks. High-resolution TEM imaging and fine-probe analysis were used to determine the local chemistries and structures in these corrosion-affected zones. Matrix areas surrounding the crack tips appeared highly strained, whereas the IG penetrations generally did not. The predominant oxide structure found along crack walls and just ahead of crack tips was NiO with metal-atom ratios similar to the alloy. The attacked grain boundaries off open cracks contained similar fine-grained NiO-structure oxide together with local areas of Cr-rich oxide and Ni-rich metal. In contrast, Cr-rich oxide identified as Cr2O3 predominated at the leading edges of the IG attack. Stereoscopic imaging of these tip structures revealed nm-scale porosity and tunnels within the oxide and pores along the grain-boundary plane ahead of the oxide. The general interpretation of these results is that IG attack and cracking follows local dissolution or oxidation and the formation of pores at grain boundaries. This degradation occurs at the nanometer scale and therefore requires high-resolution ATEM methods to reveal detailed characteristics. Experimental support for several possible IG degradation mechanisms is considered.

  1. 1987 EPRI Workshop on Secondary-Side Intergranular Corrosion Mechanisms: Proceedings, Volumes 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    1988-09-01

    Participants at a 1987 steam generator corrosion workshop in Alexandria, Virginia, presented 33 papers discussing questions of environment-induced intergranular attack (IGA) and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Data collected from operating plants and research laboratories demonstrate that IGA/IGSCC occurs in caustic, neutral, and acidic environments.

  2. Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Superalloys to Resist Environment-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720, ATI 718Plus alloy, Haynes 282, and Inconel 740. Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  3. Stress corrosion cracking and intergranular corrosion of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuya, K.; Shima, S.; Kayano, H.; Narui, M.

    1992-09-01

    The effects of irradiation on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and intergranular corrosion (IGC) susceptibility were investigated in solution-treated Fe19Cr9NiMn alloys and JPCA irradiated to 5.3×1024 n/m2 (E > 1 MeV) at 573 K. In Fe19Cr9NiMn alloys, the irradiation enhanced IGC i n boiling HNO3 + Cr6+ solution when the alloys contained phosphorus and silicon and induced SCC in all the alloys with strain rate tensile tests in 571 K water containing 32 ppm oxygen. With increasing phosphorus and silicon contents. IGC was promoted but IGSCC was suppressed after irradiation. The results indicated that these elements are not the main contributors to irradiation-assisted SCC, although they affect SCC behavior. The Japanese Prime Candidate Alloy (JPCA) had better SCC resistance than Fe19Cr9NiMn alloys under the present irradiation condition.

  4. Creep and intergranular cracking of Ni-Cr-Fe-C in 360[degree]C argon

    SciTech Connect

    Angeliu, T.M. ); Was, G.S. )

    1994-06-01

    The influence of carbon and chromium on the creep and intergranular (IG) cracking behavior of controlled-purity Ni-xCr-9Fe-yC alloys in 360 C argon was investigated using constant extension rate tension (CERT) and constant load tension (CLT) testing. The CERT test results at 360 C show that the degree of IG cracking increases with decreasing bulk chromium or carbon content. The CLT test results at 360 C and 430 C reveal that, as the amounts of chromium and carbon in solution decrease, the steady-state creep rate increases. The occurrence of severe IG cracking correlates with a high steady-state creep rate, suggesting that creep plays a role in the IG cracking behavior in argon at 360 C. The failure mode of IG cracking and the deformation mode of creep are coupled through the formation of grain boundary voids that interlink to form grain boundary cavities, resulting in eventual failure by IG cavitation and ductile overload of the remaining ligaments. Grain boundary sliding may be enhancing grain boundary cavitation by redistributing the stress from inclined to more perpendicular boundaries and concentrating stress at discontinuities for the boundaries oriented 45 deg with respect to the tensile axis. Additions of carbon or chromium, which reduce the creep rate over all stress levels, also reduce the amount of IG fracture in CERT experiments. A damage accumulation model was formulated and applied to CERT tests to determine whether creep damage during a CERT test controls failure. Results show that, while creep plays a significant role in CERT experiments, failure is likely controlled by ductile overload caused by reduction in area resulting from grain boundary void formation and interlinkage.

  5. Proceedings: 1984 Workshop on Secondary-Side Stress Corrosion Cracking and Intergranular Corrosion of PWR Steam Generator Tubing

    SciTech Connect

    1986-03-01

    During 1984, research investigating intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in PWR steam generators provided data to formulate a corrosion-product transport theory. In addition, the research showed that changing the pH of liquids in generator crevices will retard and sometimes arrest the corrosion process.

  6. Proceedings: 1983 Workshop on Secondary-Side Stress Corrosion Cracking and Intergranular Corrosion of PWR Steam Generator Tubing

    SciTech Connect

    1986-03-01

    Participants in this international workshop discussed research investigating mechanisms and propagation rates of intergranular corrosion in PWR steam generators. Laboratory test results, which have been consistent with power plant experience, permitted preliminary definition of corrosion rates in alloy 600 tubing.

  7. Localized deformation as a key precursor to initiation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels employed in nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsen, Wade; Diego, Gonzalo; Devrient, Bastian

    2010-11-01

    Cold-work has been associated with the occurrence of intergranular cracking of stainless steels employed in light water reactors. This study examined the deformation behavior of AISI 304, AISI 347 and a higher stacking fault energy model alloy subjected to bulk cold-work and (for 347) surface deformation. Deformation microstructures of the materials were examined and correlated with their particular mechanical response under different conditions of temperature, strain rate and degree of prior cold-work. Select slow-strain rate tensile tests in autoclaves enabled the role of local strain heterogeneity in crack initiation in pressurized water reactor environments to be considered. The high stacking fault energy material exhibited uniform strain hardening, even at sub-zero temperatures, while the commercial stainless steels showed significant heterogeneity in their strain response. Surface treatments introduced local cold-work, which had a clear effect on the surface roughness and hardness, and on near-surface residual stress profiles. Autoclave tests led to transgranular surface cracking for a circumferentially ground surface, and intergranular crack initiation for a polished surface.

  8. Intergranular Cracking Susceptibility of 2.25Cr Heat-Resistant Steels Depending on Alloying Elements and Impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyun Je; Heo, Nam Hoe; Kim, Sung-Joon

    2016-05-01

    The intergranular cracking susceptibility of 2.25Cr heat-resistant steels increases with increasing bulk phosphorus content. This is due to the increase in phosphorus segregation concentration of prior austenite grain boundaries (PAGBs) and the prior austenite grain boundary/carbide interfaces (GCIs) with increasing bulk phosphorus content. Moreover, the susceptibility is higher in tungsten-added steels than the molybdenum-added steel. This is attributed to the higher driving force for carbide formation of tungsten which causes more active carbide formation in the tungsten-added steel, the consequent absence of the repulsive segregation between carbon and phosphorus, and the final higher phosphorus segregation concentration at the PAGBs and the GCIs. Additionally, the absence of sulfur segregation at the PAGBs and the GCIs of the molybdenum-added steel, which arises from the repulsive segregation between carbon and sulfur, acts as an additional factor which lowers the intergranular cracking susceptibility.

  9. Simulating Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking in AZ31 Using Three-Dimensional Cohesive Elements for Grain Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Chen, Z. H.; Dong, C. F.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a grain boundary model with three-dimensional (3D) cohesive elements for analyzing the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) on the crystal level in polycrystalline materials is presented. The objectives are to characterize the grain boundary microstructure and the fracture mechanism of IGSCC in AZ31 Mg alloy. In order to investigate the development of the microcrack and its effects on macrocrack evolution, a novel model of IGSCC propagation has been developed, in which the 3D Voronoi tessellations geometry is employed to model polycrystalline grain structures. And the 3D cohesive elements with zero constitutive thickness are directly inserted on the faces of two adjacent grains. The effect of the embrittlement due to the presence of hydrogen has also been included in the cohesive model. To validate the model, an IGSCC process of AZ31 Mg alloy in NaCl solution has been simulated, with the influence of hydrogen concentration being taken into account. It is found that damage develops at the triple lines between the grains and the combinations of grains can lead to high stresses at the grains boundary, especially those that are normal to the direction of the applied strain. In this paper, the effects of damage due to hydrogen and the grain sizes in microstructure are considered. The simulation results have a good consistency with the experimental phenomenon.

  10. Intergranular tellurium cracking of nickel-based alloys in molten Li, Be, Th, U/F salt mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatiev, Victor; Surenkov, Alexander; Gnidoy, Ivan; Kulakov, Alexander; Uglov, Vadim; Vasiliev, Alexander; Presniakov, Mikhail

    2013-09-01

    , and intergranular corrosion does not take place. In the fuel salt with [U(IV)]/[U(III)] = 4-20 the potentials of uranium alloy formation with the main components of the tested alloys are not reached, that's why alloys and intermetallic compounds are not formed on the surface of the investigated chromium-nickel alloys. Under such conditions any intergranular tellurium corrosion of the selected alloys does not occur. In the fuel salt with [U(IV)/]/[U(III)] = 100 the potentials of uranium alloy formation with the main components of the tested alloys are not also reached. Under such redox conditions any traces intergranular tellurium IGC on the HN80MTY and H80M-VI alloys specimens are not found. Certain signs of incipient IGC in the form of tellurium presence on the grain boundaries in the HN80MTB and EM-721 alloys surface layer and formation of not too deep cracks on HN80MTB alloy surface were revealed at [U(IV)/]/[U(III)] = 100. With this uranium ratio in the presence of corrosion products on the surface of all of the alloys films, containing tellurium, metals of the construction alloys and carbon, are formed. In the melt with [U(IV)]/[U(III)] = 500 in all of the alloys tested the tellurium IGC took place. The HN80MTY alloy shows the maximum resistance to tellurium IGC. The intensity of tellurium IGC of the alloy (the K parameter) is by 3-5 times lower as compared to other alloys. The EM-721 alloy has the minimal resistance to tellurium IGC (K = 9200 pc m/cm, the depth of cracks is up to 434 μm). The studies have shown, that the intensity of the nickel alloys IGC is controlled by the [U(IV)]/[U(III)] ratio, and its dependence on this parameter is of threshold character. Providing the uranium ratio value's monitoring and regulation, it is possible to control the tellurium corrosion and in such a way to eliminate IGC completely or to minimize its value. The alloys strength characteristics and their structure were changed insignificantly after testing within the [U

  11. OBSERVATIONS AND IMPLICATIONS OF INTERGRANULAR STRESS CORROSION CRACK GROWTH OF ALLOY 152 WELD METALS IN SIMULATED PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2013-08-15

    Significant intergranular (IG) crack growth during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests has been documented during tests in simulated PWR primary water on two alloy 152 specimens cut from a weldment produced by ANL. The cracking morphology was observed to change from transgranular (TG) to mixed mode (up to ~60% IG) during gentle cycling and cycle + hold loading conditions. Measured crack growth rates under these conditions often suggested a moderate degree of environmental enhancement consistent with faster growth on grain boundaries. However, overall SCC propagation rates at constant stress intensity (K) or constant load were very low in all cases. Initial SCC rates up to 6x10-9 mm/s were occasionally measured, but constant K/load growth rates dropped below ~1x10-9 mm/s with time even when significant IG engagement existed. Direct comparisons were made among loading conditions, measured crack growth response and cracking morphology during each test to assess IGSCC susceptibility of the alloy 152 specimens. These results were analyzed with respect to our previous SCC crack growth rate measurements on alloy 152/52 welds.

  12. Inhibition effect of the borate ion on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of sensitized type 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.; Shibata, T.; Haruna, T.

    1998-06-01

    The intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) behavior of sensitized type 304 stainless steel (SS) in dilute sodium borate solutions at 95 C was examined by slow strain rate testing using a dynamic observation system. The borate ion (B{sub 4}O{sub 7}{sup 2{minus}}) suppressed IGSCC susceptibility of sensitized type 304 SS by delaying the crack initiation time and reducing the crack initiation frequency. The inhibition effect of the borate ion on crack initiation may have resulted from its buffer effect on local acidification at crack nuclei and its inhibitive nature in reacting with metal ions to form a protective film. However, B{sub 4}O{sub 7}{sup 2{minus}} concentration provided no remarkable inhibition effect on crack velocity (CV), which depended mainly upon solution conductivity, within the scattered values. Hydroxyl ions also suppressed initiation of IGSCC, but not as effectively as B{sub 4}O{sub 7}{sup 2{minus}}. The crack initiation time obeyed the exponential probability distribution, and the CV obeyed the Weibull probability distribution.

  13. AN ULTRASONIC PHASED ARRAY EVALUATION OF INTERGRANULAR STRESS CORROSION CRACK (IGSCC) DETECTION IN AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL PIPING WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.

    2010-07-22

    Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for the inspection of light water reactor (LWR) components and challenging material/component configurations. This study assessed the effectiveness of far-side inspections on wrought stainless steel piping with austenitic welds, as found in thin-walled, boiling water reactor (BWR) component configurations, for the detection and characterization of intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC).

  14. Origins of Negative Strain Rate Dependence of Stress Corrosion Cracking Initiation in Alloy 690, and Intergranular Crack Formation in Thermally Treated Alloy 690

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-07-01

    We show that enhanced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) initiation in cold-rolled Alloy 690 with decreasing strain rate is related to the rate of short-range ordering (SRO) but not to the time-dependent corrosion process. Evidence for SRO is provided by aging tests on cold-rolled Alloy 690 at 623 K and 693 K (350 °C and 420 °C), respectively, which demonstrate its enhanced lattice contraction and hardness increase with aging temperature and time, respectively. Secondary intergranular cracks formed only in thermally treated and cold-rolled Alloy 690 during SCC tests, which are not SCC cracks, are caused by its lattice contraction by SRO before SCC tests but not by the orientation effect.

  15. Origins of Negative Strain Rate Dependence of Stress Corrosion Cracking Initiation in Alloy 690, and Intergranular Crack Formation in Thermally Treated Alloy 690

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-09-01

    We show that enhanced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) initiation in cold-rolled Alloy 690 with decreasing strain rate is related to the rate of short-range ordering (SRO) but not to the time-dependent corrosion process. Evidence for SRO is provided by aging tests on cold-rolled Alloy 690 at 623 K and 693 K (350 °C and 420 °C), respectively, which demonstrate its enhanced lattice contraction and hardness increase with aging temperature and time, respectively. Secondary intergranular cracks formed only in thermally treated and cold-rolled Alloy 690 during SCC tests, which are not SCC cracks, are caused by its lattice contraction by SRO before SCC tests but not by the orientation effect.

  16. Inhibitory effect of boric acid on intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, H.; Hirano, H.; Koike, M.; Suda, M.

    1995-09-01

    The inhibitory effect of boric acid on the Intergranular Attack and Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGA/SCC) propagation behavior of steam generator (SG) tubing was studied under accelerated test conditions. Based on the analysis results of stress intensity factors at IGA/SCC crack tips, the notched C-ring tests were carried out to evaluate the effect of stress intensity and boric acid on the IGA/SCC crack propagation. The A.C. impedance measurement and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) were also conducted to clarify the inhibitory effect of boric acid. Notched C-ring test results indicated that IGA/SCC crack velocity of alloy 600 increased gradually with increasing stress intensity factor in the range 4 to about 26 MPa{center_dot}m{sup 1/2}, which might be loaded on the IGA/SCC crack tips of actual SG tubes under PWR secondary conditions. Adding boric acid slightly retarded the crack velocity in both all volatile treatment (AVT) water and caustic solutions. IGA/SCC crack velocities were lower in nearly neutral solutions than in alkali or acidic solutions. Furthermore, A.C. impedance studies showed that the polarization resistances of oxide films formed in boric acid solutions were higher than those of films formed in acidic and alkali solutions. AES analysis revealed that boron content in the oxide films formed in acidic solution containing boric acid was lowest. Good agreement was obtained between the IGA/SCC inhibitory effect of boric acid and the formation of the stable oxide films containing boron.

  17. Use of Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Several Superalloys to Resist Environmentally-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720(TradeMark) ATI 718Plus(Registered TradeMark) alloy, Haynes 282(Trademark), and Inconel 740(TradeMark) Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  18. On the mechanism of intergranular embrittlement by phosphorus in transformer steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R. G.; White, C. L.; Wert, J. J.; Easton, D. S.

    1981-07-01

    Transformer steel (Fe-6 at. pct Si) was doped with varying amounts of phosphorus and given an embrittling step-cool heat treatment. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to determine that large increases in intergranular phosphorus concentration occurred in approximate proportion to the bulk phosphorus level through an equilibrium segregation mechanism. Bicrystals of this material were fractured at 300, 77 and 4.2 K. Grain boundary fracture energy, γgb was determined as a function of intergranular phosphorus concentration at 4.2 K. An analysis of γgband fracture mode, as a function of temperature, was used to evaluate the relative merits of intergranular fracture models based on reduced interatomic separation energy (Gibbs-Griffith model) and reduced interatomic cohesive strength (Seah model). It was found that the reduced interatomic separation energy model best fits the experimental findings.

  19. EPRI Nondestructive Evaluation Center: Assessment of the intergranular stress corrosion cracking training and qualification program: Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    Formal training programs for ultrasonic inspection of boiling water reactor (BWR) piping for intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) have been provided by the EPRI NDE Center since 1983. Separate courses are available for detection and sizing of IGSCC in unrepaired piping. A third course addresses inspection for IGSCC in piping which has been repaired by the weld overlay method. It is the policy of EPRI and EPRI NDE Center management to review these programs periodically, using both expertise internal to the NDE Center staff and from outside sources. This report provides the results of a review of the NDE Center IGSCC ultrasonic inspection training by a group of individuals who have no permanent relationshiip with the NDE Center, but who possess recognized expertise in the subject area.

  20. Microstructural characterization on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in PWR primary water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yun Soo; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik

    2013-09-01

    Stress corrosion cracks in Alloy 600 compact tension specimens tested at 325 °C in a simulated primary water environment of a pressurized water reactor were analyzed using microscopic equipment. Oxygen diffused into the grain boundaries just ahead of the crack tips from the external primary water. As a result of oxygen penetration, Cr oxides were precipitated on the crack tips and the attacked grain boundaries. The oxide layer in the crack interior was revealed to consist of double (inner and outer) layers. Cr oxides were found in the inner layer, with NiO and (Ni,Cr) spinels in the outer layer. Cr depletion (or Ni enrichment) zones were created in the attacked grain boundary, the crack tip, and the interface between the crack and matrix, which means that the formation of Cr oxides was due to the Cr diffusion from the surrounding matrix. The oxygen penetration and resultant metallurgical changes around the crack tip are believed to be significant factors affecting the PWSCC initiation and growth behaviors of Alloy 600. For interpretation of color in Fig. 4, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.

  1. Statistical crack mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Dienes, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    An alternative to the use of plasticity theory to characterize the inelastic behavior of solids is to represent the flaws by statistical methods. We have taken such an approach to study fragmentation because it offers a number of advantages. Foremost among these is that, by considering the effects of flaws, it becomes possible to address the underlying physics directly. For example, we have been able to explain why rocks exhibit large strain-rate effects (a consequence of the finite growth rate of cracks), why a spherical explosive imbedded in oil shale produces a cavity with a nearly square section (opening of bedding cracks) and why propellants may detonate following low-speed impact (a consequence of frictional hot spots).

  2. Using transmission Kikuchi diffraction to study intergranular stress corrosion cracking in type 316 stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Meisnar, Martina; Vilalta-Clemente, Arantxa; Gholinia, Ali; Moody, Michael; Wilkinson, Angus J; Huin, Nicolas; Lozano-Perez, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    Transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD), also known as transmission-electron backscatter diffraction (t-EBSD) is a novel method for orientation mapping of electron transparent transmission electron microscopy specimen in the scanning electron microscope and has been utilized for stress corrosion cracking characterization of type 316 stainless steels. The main advantage of TKD is a significantly higher spatial resolution compared to the conventional EBSD due to the smaller interaction volume of the incident beam with the specimen. Two 316 stainless steel specimen, tested for stress corrosion cracking in hydrogenated and oxygenated pressurized water reactor chemistry, were characterized via TKD. The results include inverse pole figure (IPFZ) maps, image quality maps and misorientation maps, all acquired in very short time (<60 min) and with remarkable spatial resolution (up to 5 nm step size possible). They have been used in order to determine the location of the open crack with respect to the grain boundary, deformation bands, twinning and slip. Furthermore, TKD has been used to measure the grain boundary misorientation and establish a gauge for quantifying plastic deformation at the crack tip and other regions in the surrounding matrix. Both grain boundary migration and slip transfer have been detected as well. PMID:25974882

  3. The roles of carbon and grain boundary carbides on the intergranular corrosion cracking behavior of Ni-16Cr-9Fe-xC alloys at 360 degrees C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Jason Lyle

    The roles of carbon and grain boundary carbides on the creep and cracking behaviors of controlled purity Ni-16Cr-9Fe-xC alloys at 360sp°C were both isolated and determined in order to better understand the effect of carbon distribution on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) behavior. Constant load tensile (CLT) tests were conducted in 360sp°C argon and primary water in order to determine relative creep susceptibilities, while constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests were performed in 360sp°C argon and primary water environments to study relative cracking propensities. Solid solution carbon increases the creep resistance of Ni-16Cr-9Fe-xC alloys at 360sp°C by delaying the recovery process of climb in the grain boundary. Grain boundary recovery rates were estimated by performing in situ TEM grain boundary dislocation spreading experiments to determine grain boundary diffusivities. The addition of 65 wppm carbon in solution serves to lower the grain boundary diffusivity and grain boundary recovery rate by over 4 orders of magnitude. As a result of lowering the grain boundary diffusivity, solid solution carbon suppresses both grain boundary sliding and cavitation. Grain boundary carbides decrease the creep resistance of Ni-16Cr-9Fe-xC alloys at 360sp°C compared to a microstucture containing all carbon in solution, but increase IGSCC resistance in primary water environments containing 0, 1, and 18 bar hydrogen overpressures. The magnitude of the beneficial effect of the grain boundary carbides is strongly dependent upon hydrogen overpressure. The superior IGSCC resistance of a microstrucutre containing grain boundary carbides can be attributed to its highest overall resistance to both creep and environmentally induced cracking. The detrimental effect of hydrogen on the IGSCC resistance shows consistencies with both the film rupture/slip dissolution and hydrogen embrittlement cracking mechanisms. It is proposed that carbon distribution influences the

  4. Mechanics of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr. (Editor); Elber, Wolf (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Papers are presented on plasticity induced crack closure, crack closure in fatigue crack growth, the dependence of crack closure on fatigue loading variables, and a procedure for standardizing crack closure levels. Also considered are a statistical approach to crack closure determination, the crack closure behavior of surface cracks under pure bending, closure measurements on short fatigue cracks, and crack closure under plane strain conditions. Other topics include fatigue crack closure behavior at high stress ratios, the use of acoustic waves for the characterization of closed fatigue cracks, and the influence of fatigue crack wake length and state of stress on crack closure.

  5. The creep and intergranular cracking behavior of Ni-Cr-Fe-C alloys in 360{degree}C water

    SciTech Connect

    Angeliu, T.M.; Paraventi, D.J.; Was, G.S.

    1995-09-01

    Mechanical testing of controlled-purity Ni-xCr-9Fe-yC alloys at 360 C revealed an environmental enhancement in IG cracking and time-dependent deformation in high purity and primary water over that exhibited in argon. Dimples on the IG facets indicate a creep void nucleation and growth failure mode. IG cracking was primarily located at the interior of the specimen and not necessarily linked to direct contact with the environment. Controlled potential CERT experiments showed increases in IG cracking as the applied potential decreased, suggesting that hydrogen is detrimental to the mechanical properties. It is proposed that the environment, through the presence of hydrogen, enhances IG cracking by enhancing the matrix dislocation mobility. This is based on observations that dislocation-controlled creep controls the IG cracking of controlled-purity Ni-xCr-9Fe-yC in argon at 360 C and grain boundary cavitation and sliding results that show the environmental enhancement of the creep rate is primarily due to an increase in matrix plastic deformation. However, controlled potential CLT experiments did not exhibit a change in the creep rate as the applied potential decreased. While this does not clearly support hydrogen assisted creep, the material may already be saturated with hydrogen at these applied potentials and thus no effect was realized. Chromium and carbon decrease the IG cracking in high purity and primary water by increasing the creep resistance. The surface film does not play a significant role in the creep or IG cracking behavior under the conditions investigated.

  6. Assessment of susceptibility of Type 304 stainless steel to intergranular stress corrosion cracking in simulated Savannah River Reactor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ondrejcin, R.S.; Caskey, C.R. Jr.

    1989-12-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Type 304 stainless steel rate tests (CERT) of specimens machined was evaluated by constant extension from Savannah River Plant (SRP) decontaminated process water piping. Results from 12 preliminary CERT tests verified that IGSCC occurred over a wide range of simulated SRP envirorments. 73 specimens were tested in two statistical experimental designs of the central composite class. In one design, testing was done in environments containing hydrogen peroxide; in the other design, hydrogen peroxide was omitted but oxygen was added to the environment. Prediction equations relating IGSCC to temperature and environmental variables were formulated. Temperature was the most important independent variable. IGSCC was severe at 100 to 120C and a threshold temperature between 40C and 55C was identified below which IGSCC did not occur. In environments containing hydrogen peroxide, as in SRP operation, a reduction in chloride concentration from 30 to 2 ppB also significantly reduced IGSCC. Reduction in sulfate concentration from 50 to 7 ppB was effective in reducing IGSCC provided the chloride concentration was 30 ppB or less and temperature was 95C or higher. Presence of hydrogen peroxide in the environment increased IGSCC except when chloride concentration was 11 ppB or less. Actual concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, oxygen and carbon dioxide did not affect IGSCC. Large positive ECP values (+450 to +750 mV Standard Hydrogen Electrode (SHE)) in simulated SRP environments containing hydrogen peroxide and were good agreement with ECP measurements made in SRP reactors, indicating that the simulated environments are representative of SRP reactor environments. Overall CERT results suggest that the most effective method to reduce IGSCC is to reduce chloride and sulfate concentrations.

  7. Effect of boron on intergranular hot cracking in Ni-Cr-Fe superalloys containing niobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    Solidification mechanisms had a dominant influence on microfissuring behavior of the test group. Carbon modified the Laves formation significantly and showed that one approach to alloy design would be balancing carbide formers against Laves formers. Boron's strong effect on microfissuring can be traced to its potency as a Laves former. Boron's segregation to grain boundaries plays at best a secondary role in microfissuring.

  8. Coercivity mechanism of α-Fe/Nd2Fe14B nanocomposite magnets with an intergranular amorphous phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongmei; Li, Wei; Li, Hailing; Zhang, Xiangyi

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the coercivity mechanism of nanocomposite magnets is essential for developing high-performance permanent magnets. In this study, the mechanism of coercivity enhancement in α-Fe/Nd2Fe14B nanocomposites with an intergranular amorphous phase has been studied. The homogeneity and strength of domain-wall pinning in the magnets are enhanced by the existence of an intergranular amorphous phase. The suitable exchange constant and thickness of the amorphous interface are favourable for simultaneously obtaining high coercivity and strong exchange coupling between hard and soft grains. The present work provides a way to achieve high coercivity in nanocomposite magnets by the modification of the interfacial structure.

  9. Fracture mechanics parameters for small fatigue cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a review of some common small-crack test specimens, the underlying causes of the small-crack effect, and the fracture-mechanics parameters that have been used to correlate or predict their growth behavior. This review concentrates on continuum mechanics concepts and on the nonlinear behavior of small cracks. The paper reviews some stress-intensity factor solutions for small-crack test specimens and develops some simple elastic-plastic J integral and cyclic J integral expressions that include the influence of crack-closure. These parameters were applied to small-crack growth data on two aluminum alloys, and a fatigue life prediction methodology is demonstrated. For these materials, the crack-closure transient from the plastic wake was found to be the major factor in causing the small-crack effect.

  10. An investigation on quench cracking behavior of superalloy Udimet 720LI using a fracture mechanics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, J.; Keefer, V.L.; Chang, K.M.; Furrer, D.

    2000-04-01

    Quench cracking can be a serious problem in the heat treatment of high strength superalloys. A new fracture mechanics approach, quench cracking toughness (K{sub Q}), was introduced to evaluate the on-cooling quench cracking resistance of superalloy Udimet 720LI. A fully automatic computer controlled data acquisition and processing system was set up to track the on-cooling quenching process and to simulate the quench cracking. The influences of grain size, cooling rate, solution temperature, and alloy processing routes on quench cracking resistance were investigated. Research results indicate that quench cracking revealed a typical brittle and intergranular failure at high temperatures, which causes a lower quench cracking toughness in comparison to fracture toughness at room temperature. Fine grain structures show the higher quench cracking resistance and lower failure temperatures than intermediate grain structures at the same cooling rates. Moreover, higher cooling rate results in lower cracking toughness under the same grain size structures. In comparison of processing routes, powder metallurgy (PM) alloys show higher cracking resistance than cast and wrought (CW) alloys for fine grain structures at the same cooling rates. However, for immediate grain structure, there is no obvious difference of K{sub Q} between the two processing route in this study.

  11. The role of grain boundary chemistry and structure in the environmentally-assisted intergranular cracking of nickel-base alloys. Progress report, [December 1, 1990--November 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Was, G.S.

    1993-11-01

    Progress focused on (1) determination of the role of C and Cr on deformation and IG cracking behavior of Ni-(5--30)Cr-9Fe, (2) determination of the effect of grain boundary misorientation on IG cracking behavior, (3) construction of an electron backscattering pattern (EBSP) imaging system, (4) determination of effect of the environment on creep and cracking, and (5) characterization of the surface film. Results showed that both C and Cr are potent solid solution strengtheners which can reduce the steady state creep rate at 360{degree}C by several orders of magnitude. Intergranular cracking of 100 {mu}m grain samples of high purity Ni-16Cr-9Fe at 360{degree}C occurs by formation of grain boundary voids and interlinkage, driven by dislocation creep in the matrix. Creep experiments in primary water at 360{degree}C and an applied cathodic potential show that the creep rate is increased by an order of magnitude over that in Ar and the percent IG fracture increases as well. Oxide film composition and thickness is a sensitive function of the C content, increasing in thickness and Ni(OH){sub 2} content with increase in C or decrease in Cr to 5 wt%. Thermomechanical treatments along with electron channeling pattern (ECP) analysis wee used to create and index, samples with enhanced fractions of coincident site lattice boundaries (CSLBs). Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) experiments on samples with a high percentage of CSLBs showed IG cracking compared with general high angle boundaries. However, these experiments were conducted on grain sizes of 300 {mu}m, while commercial material is an order of magnitude smaller. An electron backscattering pattern imaging system has been constructed for an environmental scanning electron microscope which can image grains below {mu}m. The system has been successfully benchmarked against results from ECP analysis.

  12. MECHANICS OF CRACK BRIDGING UNDER DYNAMIC LOADS

    SciTech Connect

    N. SRIDHAR; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    A bridging law for fiber reinforced composites under dynamic crack propagation conditions has been derived. Inertial effects in the mechanism of fiber pullout during dynamic propagation of a bridged crack are critically examined for the first time. By reposing simple shear lag models of pullout as problems of dynamic wave propagation, the effect of the frictional coupling between the fibers and the matrix is accounted for in a fairly straightforward way. The solutions yield the time-dependent relationship between the crack opening displacement and the bridging traction. Engineering criteria and the role of material and geometrical parameters for significant inertial effects are identified.

  13. Burrowing mechanics: burrow extension by crack propagation.

    PubMed

    Dorgan, Kelly M; Jumars, Peter A; Johnson, Bruce; Boudreau, B P; Landis, Eric

    2005-02-01

    Until now, the analysis of burrowing mechanics has neglected the mechanical properties of impeding, muddy, cohesive sediments, which behave like elastic solids. Here we show that burrowers can progress through such sediments by using a mechanically efficient, previously unsuspected mechanism--crack propagation--in which an alternating 'anchor' system of burrowing serves as a wedge to extend the crack-shaped burrow. The force required to propagate cracks through sediment in this way is relatively small: we find that the force exerted by the annelid worm Nereis virens in making and moving into such a burrow amounts to less than one-tenth of the force it needs to use against rigid aquarium walls. PMID:15690029

  14. Subcritical crack growth and mechanical weathering: a new consideration of how moisture influences rock erosion rates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppes, Martha-Cary; Keanini, Russell; Hancock, Gregory S.

    2016-04-01

    The contributions of moisture to the mechanical aspects of rock weathering and regolith production are poorly quantified. In particular, geomorphologists have largely overlooked the role of subcritical crack growth processes in physical weathering and the fact that moisture strongly influences the rates of those processes. This influence is irrespective of the function that moisture plays in stress loading mechanisms like freezing or hydration. Here we present a simple numerical model that explores the efficacy of subcritical crack growth in granite rock subaerially exposed under a range of moisture conditions. Because most weathering-related stress loading for rocks found at, or near, Earth's surface (hereafter surface rocks) is cyclic, we modeled crack growth using a novel combination of Paris' Law and Charles' Law. This combination allowed us to apply existing empirically-derived data for the stress corrosion index of Charles' Law to fatigue cracking. For stress, we focused on the relatively straightforward case of intergranular stresses that arise during solar-induced thermal cycling by conductive heat transfer, making the assumption that such stresses represent a universal minimum weathering stress experienced by all surface rocks. Because all other tensile weathering-related stresses would be additive in the context of crack growth, however, our model can be adapted to include other stress loading mechanisms. We validated our calculations using recently published thermal-stress-induced cracking rates. Our results demonstrate that 1) weathering-induced stresses as modeled herein, and as published by others, are sufficient to propagate fractures subcritically over long timescales with or without the presence of water 2) fracture propagation rates increase exponentially with respect to moisture, specifically relative humidity 3) fracture propagation rates driven by thermal cycling are strongly dependent on the magnitude of diurnal temperature ranges and the

  15. Analysis of internal crack healing mechanism under rolling deformation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haitao; Ai, Zhengrong; Yu, Hailiang; Wu, Hongyan; Liu, Xianghua

    2014-01-01

    A new experimental method, called the 'hole filling method', is proposed to simulate the healing of internal cracks in rolled workpieces. Based on the experimental results, the evolution in the microstructure, in terms of diffusion, nucleation and recrystallisation were used to analyze the crack healing mechanism. We also validated the phenomenon of segmented healing. Internal crack healing involves plastic deformation, heat transfer and an increase in the free energy introduced by the cracks. It is proposed that internal cracks heal better under high plastic deformation followed by slow cooling after rolling. Crack healing is controlled by diffusion of atoms from the matrix to the crack surface, and also by the nucleation and growth of ferrite grain on the crack surface. The diffusion mechanism is used to explain the source of material needed for crack healing. The recrystallisation mechanism is used to explain grain nucleation and growth, accompanied by atomic migration to the crack surface. PMID:25003518

  16. Analysis of Internal Crack Healing Mechanism under Rolling Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Haitao; Ai, Zhengrong; Yu, Hailiang; Wu, Hongyan; Liu, Xianghua

    2014-01-01

    A new experimental method, called the ‘hole filling method’, is proposed to simulate the healing of internal cracks in rolled workpieces. Based on the experimental results, the evolution in the microstructure, in terms of diffusion, nucleation and recrystallisation were used to analyze the crack healing mechanism. We also validated the phenomenon of segmented healing. Internal crack healing involves plastic deformation, heat transfer and an increase in the free energy introduced by the cracks. It is proposed that internal cracks heal better under high plastic deformation followed by slow cooling after rolling. Crack healing is controlled by diffusion of atoms from the matrix to the crack surface, and also by the nucleation and growth of ferrite grain on the crack surface. The diffusion mechanism is used to explain the source of material needed for crack healing. The recrystallisation mechanism is used to explain grain nucleation and growth, accompanied by atomic migration to the crack surface. PMID:25003518

  17. Theoretical studies on the mechanical behavior of granular materials under very low intergranular stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Kenneth W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The salient aspects of the theoretical modeling of a conventional triaxial test (CTC) of a cohesionless granular medium with stress and strain rate loading are described. Included are a controllable gravitational body force and provision for low confining pressure and/or very low intergranular stress. The modeling includes rational, analytic, and numerical phases, all in various stages of development. The numerical evolutions of theoretical models will be used in final design stages and in the analysis of the experimental data. In this the experimental design stage, it is of special interest to include in the candidate considerations every anomaly found in preliminary terrestrial experimentation. Most of the anomalies will be eliminated by design or enhanced for measurement as the project progresses. The main aspect of design being not the physical apparatus but the type and trajectories of loading elected. The major considerations that have been treated are: appearance and growth of local surface aberrations, stress-power coefficients, strain types, optical strain, radial bead migration, and measures of rotation for the proper stress flux.

  18. A Collector Plate Mechanism-Based Classical Intergranular Precipitation Model for Al Alloys Sensitized at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Gaosong; Derrick, Alexander T.; Zhu, Yakun; Free, Michael L.

    2015-11-01

    The sensitization behavior of Al 5xxx alloys is mainly caused by the formation of Mg-rich precipitates at grain boundaries. In this study, a classical nucleation-growth-coarsening theory for the description of intergranular precipitation is formulated, which adopts a collector plate mechanism, an equivalent average Mg concentration at the grain boundary, and new coarsening mechanisms. Three coarsening mechanisms, the modified Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner, the Kirchner mechanism, and a combination of these two mechanisms, are compared. Modeling results reveal that the Kirchner mechanism will breakdown when continuity ( √ {Nπ R2 } ) is close to 1. According to the new model, the coarsening still accounts for a small fraction (only 10 pct) in the final growth rate after aging at 343 K (70 °C) for 40 months, which is confirmed by the precipitate size distribution data. Thickness and continuity results predicted by the new model agree well with the experimental results obtained from scanning transmission electron microscopy images of Al 5083 H131 alloys aged at 343 K (70 °C) for different times. In addition, the new model is also applied to a high-temperature [453 K (180 °C)] situation, where coarsening of precipitates is observed.

  19. Modeling the Interactions Between Multiple Crack Closure Mechanisms at Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    A fatigue crack closure model is developed that includes interactions between the three closure mechanisms most likely to occur at threshold; plasticity, roughness, and oxide. This model, herein referred to as the CROP model (for Closure, Roughness, Oxide, and Plasticity), also includes the effects of out-of plane cracking and multi-axial loading. These features make the CROP closure model uniquely suited for, but not limited to, threshold applications. Rough cracks are idealized here as two-dimensional sawtooths, whose geometry induces mixed-mode crack- tip stresses. Continuum mechanics and crack-tip dislocation concepts are combined to relate crack face displacements to crack-tip loads. Geometric criteria are used to determine closure loads from crack-face displacements. Finite element results, used to verify model predictions, provide critical information about the locations where crack closure occurs.

  20. Mechanics of the crack path formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Asher A.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed analysis of experimentally obtained curvilinear crack path trajectories formed in a heterogeneous stress field is presented. Experimental crack path trajectories were used as data for the numerical simulations, recreating the actual stress field governing the development of the crack path. Thus, the current theories of crack curving and kinking could be examined by comparing them with the actual stress field parameters as they develop along the experimentally observed crack path. The experimental curvilinear crack path trajectories were formed in the tensile specimens with a hole positioned in the vicinity of a potential crack path. The numerical simulation, based on the solution of equivalent boundary value problems with the possible perturbations of the crack path, is presented.

  1. Mechanics of the crack path formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Asher A.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed analysis of experimentally obtained curvilinear crack path trajectories formed in a heterogeneous stress field is presented. Experimental crack path trajectories were used as data for numerical simulations, recreating the actual stress field governing the development of the crack path. Thus, the current theories of crack curving and kinking could be examined by comparing them with the actual stress field parameters as they develop along the experimentally observed crack path. The experimental curvilinear crack path trajectories were formed in the tensile specimens with a hole positioned in the vicinity of a potential crack path. The numerical simulation, based on the solution of equivalent boundary value problems with the possible perturbations of the crack path, is presented here.

  2. Propagation of stress corrosion cracks in alpha-brasses

    SciTech Connect

    Beggs, Dennis Vinton

    1981-01-01

    Transgranular and intergranular stress corrosion cracks were investigated in alpha-brasses in a tarnishing ammoniacal solution. Surface observation indicated that the transgranular cracks propagated discontinuously by the sudden appearance of a fine crack extending several microns ahead of the previous crack tip, often associated with the detection of a discrete acoustic emission (AE). By periodically increasing the deflection, crack front markings were produced on the resulting fracture surfaces, showing that the discontinuous propagation of the crack trace was representative of the subsurface cracking. The intergranular crack trace appeared to propagate continuously at a relatively blunt crack tip and was not associated with discrete AE. Under load pulsing tests with a time between pulses, ..delta..t greater than or equal to 3 s, the transgranular fracture surfaces always exhibited crack front markings which corresponded with the applied pulses. The spacing between crack front markings, ..delta..x, decreased linearly with ..delta..t. With ..delta..t less than or equal to 1.5 s, the crack front markings were in a one-to-one correspondence with applied pulses only at relatively long crack lengths. In this case, ..delta..x = ..delta..x* which approached a limiting value of 1 ..mu..m. No crack front markings were observed on intergranular fracture surfaces produced during these tests. It is concluded that transgranular cracking occurs by discontinuous mechanical fracture of an embrittled region around the crack tip, while intergranular cracking results from a different mechanism with cracking occurring via the film-rupture mechanism.

  3. Mechanism of hydrogen generation in the stress corrosion crack

    SciTech Connect

    Li, R.; Ferreira, M.G.S.

    1995-10-01

    Based on the mass transport in the stress corrosion crack, a mathematical expression of potential distribution along the stress corrosion crack is deduced. From this mathematical expression and the E-pH diagram for H{sub 2}O, a new mechanism for hydrogen generation in the stress corrosion crack i.e. H{sup +} partial potential drop mechanism, is proposed. Following this mechanism, the relationship between hydrogen generation and affecting factors, such as current density of anodic dissolution inside the crack, pH value, partial resistivity of H{sup +} ion, dimension of the crack and potential of the metal, is discussed. The mechanism is verified by experimental measurement results of the H{sup +} partial potential drop with microelectrodes placed in an artificial crack on AISI 410 stainless steel in 3%NaCl solution.

  4. Fracture mechanics parameters for cracks on a slightly undulating interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lin; Qu, Jianmin

    1993-11-01

    Typical bimaterial interfaces are nonplanar due to surface facets or roughness. Crack-tip stress fields of an interface crack must be influenced by nonplanarity of the interface. Consequently, interface toughness is affected. The crack-tip fields of a finite crack on an elastic/rigid interface with periodic undulation are studied. Particular emphasis is given to the fracture mechanics parameters, such as the stress intensity factors, crack-tip energy release rate, and crack-tip mode mixity. When the amplitude of interface undulation is very small relative to the crack length (which is the case for rough interfaces), asymptotic analysis is used to convert the nonplanarity effects into distributed dislocations located on the planar interface. Then, the resulting stress fields near the crack tip are obtained by using the Fourier integral transform method. It is found that the stress fields at the crack tip are strongly influenced by nonplanarity of the interface. Generally speaking, nonplanarity of the interface tends to shield the crack tip by reducing the crack-tip stress concentration.

  5. Velocity-Dependent Fatigue Crack Paths in Nanograined Pt Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meirom, R. A.; Clark, T.; Polcawich, R.; Pulskamp, J.; Dubey, M.; Muhlstein, C. L.

    2008-08-01

    Studies of crack growth in nanograined films assert that mechanical damage accumulates at grain boundaries irrespective of the crack velocity and loading conditions. This work shows that crack advance in nanograined Pt films involves a dislocation-slip mechanism that is a function of the crack growth rate and mode of loading. Crack paths in Pt were initially intergranular, but transitioned to a transgranular mode that persisted until catastrophic failure. This research demonstrates that crack growth mechanisms modeled for nanograined Ni cannot be generalized to other pure, metallic systems.

  6. Anomalous mechanical behavior and crack growth of oxide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, Jared Hilliard

    This thesis is concerned with analytically describing anomalous mechanical behaviors of glass. A new slow crack growth model is presented that considers a semi-elliptical crack in a cylindrical glass rod subjected to 4-point bending that is both loaded statically and under a time-dependent load. This model is used to explain a suppression of the loading-rate dependency of ion-exchanged strengthened glass. The stress relaxation behavior of an ion-exchanged strengthened glass is then analyzed in view of a newly observed water-assisted surface stress relaxation mechanism. By making refinements to a time-dependent Maxwell material model for stress buildup and relaxation, the anomalous subsurface compressive stress peak in ion-exchanged strengthened glass is explained. The notion of water-assisted stress relaxation is extended to the crack tip, where high tensile stresses exist. A toughening effect has historically been observed for cracks aged at subcritical stress intensity factors, where crack tip stress relaxation is hypothesized. A simple fracture mechanics model is developed that estimates a shielding stress intensity factor that is then superimposed with the far-field stress intensity factor. The model is used to estimate anomalous "restart" times for aged cracks. The same model predicts a non-linear crack growth rate for cracks loaded near the static fatigue limit. Double cantilever beam slow crack growth experiments were performed and new slow crack growth data for soda-lime silicate glass was collected. Interpretation of this new experimental slow crack growth data suggests that the origin of the static fatigue limit in glass is due to water-assisted stress relaxation. This thesis combines a number of studies that offer a new unified understanding of historical anomalous mechanical behaviors of glass. These anomalies are interpreted as simply the consequence of slow crack growth and water-assisted surface stress relaxation.

  7. Experimental Verification of a Cracked Fuel Mechanical Model

    SciTech Connect

    Williford, R. E.

    1982-12-01

    This report describes the results of a series of laboratory experiments conducted to independently verify a model that describes the nonlinear mechanical behavior of cracked fuel in pelletized UO{sub 2}/Zircaloy nuclear fuel rods under normal operating conditions. After a brief description of the analytical model, each experiment is discussed in detail. Experiments were conducted to verify the general behavior and numerical values for the three primary independent modelling parameters (effective crack roughness, effective gap roughness, and total crack length), and to verify the model predictions that the effective Young's moduli for cracked fuel systems were substantially less than those for solid UO{sub 2} pellets. In general, the model parameters and predictions were confirmed, and new insight was gained concerning the complexities of cracked fuel mechanics.

  8. Relating Ab Initio Mechanical Behavior of Intergranular Glassy Films in Γ-Si3N4 to Continuum Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, L.; Chen, J.; Ching, W.; Misra, A.

    2006-05-01

    Nanometer thin intergranular glassy films (IGFs) form in polycrystalline ceramics during sintering at high temperatures. The structure and properties of these IGFs are significantly changed by doping with rare earth elements. We have performed highly accurate large-scale ab initio calculations of the mechanical properties of both undoped and Yittria doped (Y-IGF) model by theoretical uniaxial tensile experiments. Uniaxial strain was applied by incrementally stretching the super cell in one direction, while the other two dimensions were kept constant. At each strain, all atoms in the model were fully relaxed using Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package VASP. The relaxed model at a given strain serves as the starting position for the next increment of strain. This process is carried on until the total energy (TE) and stress data show that the "sample" is fully fractured. Interesting differences are seen between the stress-strain response of undoped and Y-doped models. For the undoped model, the stress-strain behavior indicates that the initial atomic structure of the IGF is such that there is negligible coupling between the x- and the y-z directions. However, once the behavior becomes non- linear the lateral stresses increase, indicating that the atomic structure evolves with loading [1]. To relate the ab initio calculations to the continuum scales we analyze the atomic-scale deformation field under this uniaxial loading [1]. The applied strain in the x-direction is mostly accommodated by the IGF part of the model and the crystalline part experiences almost negligible strain. As the overall strain on the sample is incrementally increased, the local strain field evolves such that locations proximal to the softer spots attract higher strains. As the load progresses, the strain concentration spots coalesce and eventually form persistent strain localization zone across the IGF. The deformation pattern obtained through ab initio calculations indicates that it is possible to

  9. Intergranular failures of Alloy 600 in high temperature caustic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, R.; Roberge, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the results of our investigation of two commonly observed modes of failure of Alloy 600 in high temperature caustic environment namely, intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and intergranular attack (IGA). Specimens are studied as C-rings under constant deflection, wires with and without any externally applied load, and as straining electrodes. The potential dependence of average crack propagation rate is established in a single test by using several C-rings held at different potentials, by using a modification of the static potential gradient method of Seys and Van Haute. SCC appears to be governed by a film rupture mechanism and its propagation rate is significantly influenced by the electrochemical potential and associated surface film formation. The maximum crack propagation rate for C-rings and constant load specimens is very similar but much smaller than that calculated for a straining electrode at the same potential. IGA occurs over a wide range of potential - starting from a few tens of millivolts cathodic to the corrosion potential up to the lower end of anodic potentials normally required for SCC. IGA seems to be rather independent of stress and is generally more pronounced in the crevice area under the nuts used in C-rings. Examination of several creviced coupons shows that outside the crevice, enrichment of iron and chromium occurs on the surface as the potential is raised anodically, whereas the Ni:Fe and Ni:Cr ratios remain relatively independent of potential within the crevice.

  10. Fatigue crack nucleation in metallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Peralta, P.; Laird, C.; Ramamurty, U.; Suresh, S.; Campbell, G.H.; King, W.E.; Mitchell, T.E.

    1999-04-01

    The process of fatigue crack nucleation in metallic materials is reviewed placing emphasis in results derived for pure FCC metals with wavy slip behavior. The relationship between Persistent Slip Bands (PSB`s) and crack initiation will be examined for both single crystals and polycrystals, including the conditions for inter- and transgranular crack nucleation and their connection to type of loading, crystallography and slip geometry. The latter has been found to be an important parameter in the nucleation of intergranular cracks in polycrystals subjected to high strain fatigue, whereby primary slip bands with long slip lengths impinging on a grain boundary produce intergranular crack nucleation under the right conditions. Recent results related to intergranular crack nucleation in copper bicrystals and crack nucleation in Cu/Sapphire interfaces indicate that this mechanism controls crack nucleation in those simpler systems as well. Furthermore, it is found that under multiple slip conditions the crack nucleation location is controlled by the presence of local single slip conditions and long slip lengths for a particular Burgers vector that does not have to be in the primary slip system.

  11. Thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth in Inconel X-750

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchand, N.; Pelloux, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth (TMFCG) was studied in a gamma-gamma' nickel base superalloy Inconel X-750 under controlled load amplitude in the temperature range from 300 to 650 C. In-phase (T sub max at sigma sub max), out-of-phase (T sub min at sigma sub max), and isothermal tests at 650 C were performed on single-edge notch bars under fully reversed cyclic conditions. A dc electrical potential method was used to measure crack length. The electrical potential response obtained for each cycle of a given wave form and R value yields information on crack closure and crack extension per cycle. The macroscopic crack growth rates are reported as a function of delta k and the relative magnitude of the TMFCG are discussed in the light of the potential drop information and of the fractographic observations.

  12. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking: A rationalization of apparent differences among stress corrosion cracking tendencies for sensitized regions in the process water piping and in the tanks of SRS reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Louthan, M.R.

    1990-09-28

    The frequency of stress corrosion cracking in the near weld regions of the SRS reactor tank walls is apparently lower than the cracking frequency near the pipe-to-pipe welds in the primary cooling water system. The difference in cracking tendency can be attributed to differences in the welding processes, fabrication schedules, near weld residual stresses, exposure conditions and other system variables. This memorandum discusses the technical issues that may account the differences in cracking tendencies based on a review of the fabrication and operating histories of the reactor systems and the accepted understanding of factors that control stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels.

  13. Fracture Mechanics Analyses for Interface Crack Problems - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Shivakumar, Kunigal; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in fracture mechanics analyses of the interfacial crack problem are reviewed. The intent of the review is to renew the awareness of the oscillatory singularity at the crack tip of a bimaterial interface and the problems that occur when calculating mode mixity using numerical methods such as the finite element method in conjunction with the virtual crack closure technique. Established approaches to overcome the nonconvergence issue of the individual mode strain energy release rates are reviewed. In the recent literature many attempts to overcome the nonconvergence issue have been developed. Among the many approaches found only a few methods hold the promise of providing practical solutions. These are the resin interlayer method, the method that chooses the crack tip element size greater than the oscillation zone, the crack tip element method that is based on plate theory and the crack surface displacement extrapolation method. Each of the methods is validated on a very limited set of simple interface crack problems. However, their utility for a wide range of interfacial crack problems is yet to be established.

  14. Mechanisms of time-dependent crack growth at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Stock, S.R.

    1990-04-15

    Objective of this 3-y study was to conduct creep and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments and to characterize the crack tip damage mechanisms in a model material (Cu-1wt%Sb), which is known to cavitate at grain boundaries under creep deformation. Results were: In presence of large scale cavitation damage and crack branching, time rate of creep crack growth da/dt does not correlate with C[sub t] or C[sup *]. When cavitation damage is constrained, da/dt is characterized by C[sub t]. Area fraction of grain boundary cavitated is the single damage parameter for the extent of cavitation damage ahead of crack tips. C[sub t] is used for the creep-fatigue crack growth behavior. In materials prone to rapid cavity nucleation, creep cracks grow faster initially and then reach a steady state whose growth rate is determined by C[sub t]. Percent creep life exhausted correlates with average cavity diameter and fraction of grain boundary area occupied by cavities. Synchrotron x-ray tomographic microscopy was used to image individual cavities in Cu-1wt% Sb. A methodology was developed for predicting the remaining life of elevated temperature power plant components; (C[sub t])[sub avg] was used to correlate creep-fatigue crack growth in Cr-Mo and Cr-Mo-V steel and weldments.

  15. Influence of stress intensity and loading mode on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in primary waters of pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R.B.; Szklarska-Smialowska, Z. . Fontana Corrosion Center)

    1994-05-01

    The steam generator in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) of a nuclear power plant consists mainly of a shell made of carbon (C) steel and tubes made of alloy 600 (UNS N06600). However, alloy 600 suffers environmentally induced cracking with exposure to high-temperature primary water. The susceptibility of alloy 600 to integranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) was investigated as a function of the level of applied stresses and mode of loading. Constant load tests were conducted with specimens prepared from thin wall tubes, and constant deformation tests were conducted using specimens prepared from plates. With tubes exposed to primary water at 330 C, the crack propagation rate (CPR) was found to increase from 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]11] m/s at a stress intensity (K[sub i]) of 10 MPa[radical]m to 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]9] at K[sub i] = 60 MPa[radical]m. CPR obtained using compact specimens prepared from plates were 1 order of magnitude lower than values measured in tubes at the same temperature and in the same solution at each stress intensity. The corollary was that values of crack propagation and threshold stress intensities obtained using compact specimens could not be extrapolated to the behavior of thin wall tubes.

  16. A Re-examination of the Portevin-Le Chatelier Effect in Alloy 718 in Connection with Oxidation-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Bertrand; Viguier, Bernard; Andrieu, Eric; Cloue, Jean Marc

    2014-11-01

    In Alloy 718, a sharp transition exists in the fracture path changing from an intergranular brittle mode to a transgranular ductile mode which is associated with a transition of flow behavior from smooth in the dynamic strain aging regime to a serrated one in the Portevin-Le Chatelier (PLC) regime. In order to better understand both deformation and rupture behavior, PLC phenomenon in a precipitation-hardened nickel-base superalloy was carefully investigated in a wide range of temperatures [573 K to 973 K (300 °C to 700 °C)] and strain rates (10-5 to 3.2 × 10-2 s-1). Distinction was made between two PLC domains characterized by different evolutions of the critical strain to the onset of the first serration namely normal and inverse behavior. The apparent activation energies associated with both domains were determined using different methods. Results showed that normal and inverse behavior domains are related to dynamic interaction of dislocations with, respectively, interstitial and substitutional solutes atoms. This analysis confirms that normal PLC regime may be associated to the diffusion of carbon atoms, whereas the substitutional species involves in the inverse regime is discussed with an emphasis on the role of Nb and Mo.

  17. Microstructural mechanisms of cyclic deformation, fatigue crack initiation and early crack growth.

    PubMed

    Mughrabi, Haël

    2015-03-28

    In this survey, the origin of fatigue crack initiation and damage evolution in different metallic materials is discussed with emphasis on the responsible microstructural mechanisms. After a historical introduction, the stages of cyclic deformation which precede the onset of fatigue damage are reviewed. Different types of cyclic slip irreversibilities in the bulk that eventually lead to the initiation of fatigue cracks are discussed. Examples of trans- and intercrystalline fatigue damage evolution in the low cycle, high cycle and ultrahigh cycle fatigue regimes in mono- and polycrystalline face-centred cubic and body-centred cubic metals and alloys and in different engineering materials are presented, and some microstructural models of fatigue crack initiation and early crack growth are discussed. The basic difficulties in defining the transition from the initiation to the growth of fatigue cracks are emphasized. In ultrahigh cycle fatigue at very low loading amplitudes, the initiation of fatigue cracks generally occupies a major fraction of fatigue life and is hence life controlling. PMID:25713457

  18. Molecular-dynamics Simulation-based Cohesive Zone Representation of Intergranular Fracture Processes in Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakov, Vesselin I.; Saether, Erik; Phillips, Dawn R.; Glaessgen, Edward H.

    2006-01-01

    A traction-displacement relationship that may be embedded into a cohesive zone model for microscale problems of intergranular fracture is extracted from atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations. A molecular-dynamics model for crack propagation under steady-state conditions is developed to analyze intergranular fracture along a flat 99 [1 1 0] symmetric tilt grain boundary in aluminum. Under hydrostatic tensile load, the simulation reveals asymmetric crack propagation in the two opposite directions along the grain boundary. In one direction, the crack propagates in a brittle manner by cleavage with very little or no dislocation emission, and in the other direction, the propagation is ductile through the mechanism of deformation twinning. This behavior is consistent with the Rice criterion for cleavage vs. dislocation blunting transition at the crack tip. The preference for twinning to dislocation slip is in agreement with the predictions of the Tadmor and Hai criterion. A comparison with finite element calculations shows that while the stress field around the brittle crack tip follows the expected elastic solution for the given boundary conditions of the model, the stress field around the twinning crack tip has a strong plastic contribution. Through the definition of a Cohesive-Zone-Volume-Element an atomistic analog to a continuum cohesive zone model element - the results from the molecular-dynamics simulation are recast to obtain an average continuum traction-displacement relationship to represent cohesive zone interaction along a characteristic length of the grain boundary interface for the cases of ductile and brittle decohesion. Keywords: Crack-tip plasticity; Cohesive zone model; Grain boundary decohesion; Intergranular fracture; Molecular-dynamics simulation

  19. Crack Turning Mechanics of Composite Wing Skin Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, F. G.; Reeder, James R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The safety of future composite wing skin integral stiffener panels requires a full understanding of failure mechanisms of these damage tolerance critical structures under both in-plane and bending loads. Of primary interest is to derive mathematical models using fracture mechanics in anisotropic cracked plate structures, to assess the crack turning mechanisms, and thereby to enhance the residual strength in the integral stiffener composite structures. The use of fracture mechanics to assess the failure behavior in a cracked structure requires the identification of critical fracture parameters which govern the severity of stress and deformation field ahead of the flaw, and which can be evaluated using information obtained from the flaw tip. In the three-year grant, the crack-tip fields under plane deformation, crack-tip fields for anisotropic plates and anisotropic shells have been obtained. In addition, methods for determining the stress intensity factors, energy release rate, and the T-stresses have been proposed and verified. The research accomplishments can be summarized as follows: (1) Under plane deformation in anisotropic solids, the asymptotic crack-tip fields have been obtained using Stroh formalism; (2) The T-stress and the coefficient of the second term for sigma(sub y), g(sub 32), have been obtained using path-independent integral, the J-integral and Betti's reciprocal theorem together with auxiliary fields; (3) With experimental data performed by NASA, analyses indicated that the mode-I critical stress intensity factor K(sub Q) provides a satisfactory characterization of fracture initiation for a given laminate thickness, provided the failure is fiber-dominated and crack extends in a self-similar manner; (4) The high constraint specimens, especially for CT specimens, due to large T-stress and large magnitude of negative g(sub 32) term may be expected to inhibit the crack extension in the same plane and promote crack turning; (5) Crack turning out of

  20. Research on mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking in Zircaloy

    SciTech Connect

    Knorr, D.B.; Pelloux, R.M.

    1981-06-01

    The results of internal gas pressurization tests, primarily at 320/sup 0/C, on cladding tubes from two suppliers, Supplier A and Supplier B, are presented. The two lots show a substantial difference in iodine SCC susceptibility so a test matrix is used to resolve the relative contributions of surface condition, residual stress, and texture. Additional tests with constant deflection split-ring specimens and with unstressed cladding segments are used to understand crack initiation and the early crack growth stages of SCC. The difference in SCC susceptibility is due to crystallographic texture. Other variables such as surface finish, stress relief temperature, and residual stress have little or no effect. Mechanical properties, crack initiation, and crack propagation all depend on texture. Both initiation and propagation features are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A mechanism for crack initiation consistent with most observations in this study and with the work of other investigators is proposed. At 320/sup 0/C, lifetime is crack initiation limited while several tests at 390/sup 0/C indicate that lifetime is less initiation limited at higher temperature. 31 figures, 9 tables.

  1. Part 2. Metallurgical factors governing the H-assisted intergranular cracking of peak-aged Ti-3Al-8V-6Cr-4Mo-4Zr (Beta-C)

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudett, M.A.; Scully, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    A previous study (Part 1) showed that the solution-treated and aged (STA) (i.e., peak-aged) condition of Beta-C Ti, ({sigma}{sub 0.2 pct y} = 865 MPa), as measured by reductions in the fracture initiation stress with predissolved H content and the introduction of an intergranular (IG) fracture mode. It was also shown that yield-strength elevation and the subsequent enhancement in the local hydrostatic stresses within the notch root are not the controlling factors in the H-assisted IG fracture initiation of the STA condition. Previous work (Part 1) implicates a microstructural feature or condition associated with the 500 C aging treating. In this study, it is shown that localized internal hydride precipitation at the grain boundaries or alpha beta interfaces was not detected by a variety of experimental methods over the range of internal H contents for which IG fracture initiation was observed. It was also shown that grain-boundary alpha colonies or films are not responsible for the IG fracture initiation in the STA condition. A measured increase in hydrogen embrittlement (HG) susceptibility as a function of aging time at 500 C is consistent with the segregation or depletion of a critical species at the grain boundary. However, grain-boundary segregation/depletion could not be detected with Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) of specimens fracturing in a vacuum. Compression tests used to characterize and compare the alloys' slip behavior showed that plastic deformation is concentrated at or near the grain boundaries in the STA condition. Therefore, a possible intergranular fracture initiation mechanism that includes the effects of hydrogen and localized deformation is discussed.

  2. The role of intergranular chromium carbides on intergranular oxidation of nickel based alloys in pressurized water reactors primary water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaslain, F. O. M.; Le, H. T.; Duhamel, C.; Guerre, C.; Laghoutaris, P.

    2016-02-01

    Alloy 600 is used in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) but is susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). Intergranular chromium carbides have been found beneficial to reduce PWSCC. Focussed ion beam coupled with scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) 3D tomography has been used to reconstruct the morphology of grain boundary oxide penetrations and their interaction with intergranular Cr carbides in Alloy 600 subjected to a PWR environment. In presence of intergranular Cr carbides, the intergranular oxide penetrations are less deep but larger than without carbide. However, the intergranular oxide volumes normalized by the grain boundary length for both samples are similar, which suggest that intergranular oxidation growth rate is not affected by carbides. Analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows that the intergranular oxide consists mainly in a spinel-type oxide containing nickel and chromium, except in the vicinity of Cr carbides where Cr2O3 was evidenced. The formation of chromium oxide may explain the lower intergranular oxide depth observed in grain boundaries containing Cr carbides.

  3. Mechanics and mechanisms of cyclic fatigue-crack propagation in transformation-toughened zirconia ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.J. Sydney Univ., NSW . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Dauskardt, R.H.; Ritchie, R.O. ); Mai, Y.W. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-05-01

    Damage and cyclic fatigue failure under alternating loading in transformation-toughened zirconia ceramics is reviewed and compared to corresponding behavior under quasi-static loading (static fatigue). Current understanding of the role of transformation toughening in influencing cyclic fatigue-crack propagation behavior is examined based on studies which altered the extent of the tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation in MG-PSZ through subeutectoid aging. These studies suggest that near-tip computations of the crack-driving force (in terms of the local stress intensity) can be used to predict crack-growth behavior under constant amplitude and variable-amplitude (spectrum) loading, using spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy to measure the extent of the transformation zones. In addition, results are reviewed which rationalize distinctions between the crack-growth behavior of preexisting, long'' (> 2 mm), through-thickness cracks and naturally-occurring, small'' (1 to 100 [mu]m), surface cracks in terms of variations in crack-tip shielding with crack size. In the present study, the effect of grain size variations on crack-growth behavior under both monotonic (R-curve) and cyclic fatigue loading are examined. Such observations are used to speculate on the mechanisms associated with cyclic crack advance, involving such processes as alternating shear via transformation-band formation, cyclic modification of the degree of transformation toughening, and uncracked-ligament (or grain) bridging.

  4. Mechanics and mechanisms of cyclic fatigue-crack propagation in transformation-toughened zirconia ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.J. |; Dauskardt, R.H.; Ritchie, R.O.; Mai, Y.W.

    1992-05-01

    Damage and cyclic fatigue failure under alternating loading in transformation-toughened zirconia ceramics is reviewed and compared to corresponding behavior under quasi-static loading (static fatigue). Current understanding of the role of transformation toughening in influencing cyclic fatigue-crack propagation behavior is examined based on studies which altered the extent of the tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation in MG-PSZ through subeutectoid aging. These studies suggest that near-tip computations of the crack-driving force (in terms of the local stress intensity) can be used to predict crack-growth behavior under constant amplitude and variable-amplitude (spectrum) loading, using spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy to measure the extent of the transformation zones. In addition, results are reviewed which rationalize distinctions between the crack-growth behavior of preexisting, ``long`` (> 2 mm), through-thickness cracks and naturally-occurring, ``small`` (1 to 100 {mu}m), surface cracks in terms of variations in crack-tip shielding with crack size. In the present study, the effect of grain size variations on crack-growth behavior under both monotonic (R-curve) and cyclic fatigue loading are examined. Such observations are used to speculate on the mechanisms associated with cyclic crack advance, involving such processes as alternating shear via transformation-band formation, cyclic modification of the degree of transformation toughening, and uncracked-ligament (or grain) bridging.

  5. Intergranular failures of alloy 600 in high temperature caustic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.; Roberge, R.

    1985-03-01

    This paper describes the results of an investigation of two commonly observed modes of failure of Alloy 600 in high temperature caustic environment, namely, intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and intergranular attack (IGA). Specimens are studied as C-rings under constant deflection, wires with and without any externally applied load, and as straining electrodes. The potential dependence of average crack propagation rate is established in a single test in which several C-rings are held at different potentials by using a modification of the static potential gradient method of Seys and Van Haute. SCC appears to be governed by a film rupture mechanism, and its propagation rate is significantly influenced by the electrochemical potential and associated surface film formation. The maximum crack propagation rate for C-rings and constant load specimens is very similar but much smaller than that calculated for a straining electrode at the same potential. IGA occurs over a wide range of potential, starting from a few multiples of ten millivolts cathodic to the corrosion potential up to the lower end of anodic potentials normally required for SCC. IGA seems to be rather independent of stress and is generally more pronounced in the crevice area under the nuts used in C-rings. Examination of several creviced coupons shows that outside the crevice, enrichment of iron and chromium occurs on the surface as the potential is raised anodically, whereas the Ni:Fe and Ni:Cr ratios remain relatively independent of potential within the crevice. It is believed that a better knowledge of the crevice chemistry and its mass transport characteristics will provide a clue to the origin and extent of IGA.

  6. A nonlinear fracture mechanics approach to the growth of small cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical model of crack closure is used to study the crack growth and closure behavior of small cracks in plates and at notches. The calculated crack opening stresses for small and large cracks, together with elastic and elastic plastic fracture mechanics analyses, are used to correlate crack growth rate data. At equivalent elastic stress intensity factor levels, calculations predict that small cracks in plates and at notches should grow faster than large cracks because the applied stress needed to open a small crack is less than that needed to open a large crack. These predictions agree with observed trends in test data. The calculations from the model also imply that many of the stress intensity factor thresholds that are developed in tests with large cracks and with load reduction schemes do not apply to the growth of small cracks. The current calculations are based upon continuum mechanics principles and, thus, some crack size and grain structure exist where the underlying fracture mechanics assumptions become invalid because of material inhomogeneity (grains, inclusions, etc.). Admittedly, much more effort is needed to develop the mechanics of a noncontinuum. Nevertheless, these results indicate the importance of crack closure in predicting the growth of small cracks from large crack data.

  7. Low-pH SCC: Mechanical effects on crack propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Hagerdorn, E.L.

    1996-09-06

    A better definition of the role of mechanical factors on low-pH stress corrosion crack propagation is needed to aid in the prediction of crack growth rates on operating pipelines and to develop strategies to mitigate this form of cracking. The overall objective of the project was to determine the roles and synergistic effects of pressure, pressure fluctuations, and hydrotesting on low-pH stress corrosion crack growth. All testing was performed in a low-pH electrolyte (NS4 solution) under cyclic load conditions on pre-cracked specimens of one X-65 line pipe steel. The cyclic load conditions in the testing were related to field conditions using the J-integral parameter. This project consisted of the following three tasks, Task 1 - Development of Test Protocol, Task 2 - Mechanical Effects, and Task 3 - Effects of Hydrotesting. The purposes of Task 1 were to prepare the test specimens and experimental apparatus and to establish a standard test protocol for conducting the cyclic load tests and analyzing the test data. The specimen preparation procedures and environmental conditions were similar to those used in a previous project for TransCanada PipeLines (TCPL). The most significant difference between the tests performed in this project and the previous research was in the mode of loading. The previous work was performed under constant extension rate loading while this project was performed under cyclic load conditions. It is difficult to relate test conditions under constant extension rate loading with field conditions. However, the cyclic load conditions in the laboratory test can be directly related to field test conditions using the J-integral parameter. Modifications also were necessary in the data analysis procedure to account for the change in loading mode.

  8. Multiple-shock initiation via statistical crack mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Dienes, J.K.; Kershner, J.D.

    1998-12-31

    Statistical Crack Mechanics (SCRAM) is a theoretical approach to the behavior of brittle materials that accounts for the behavior of an ensemble of microcracks, including their opening, shear, growth, and coalescence. Mechanical parameters are based on measured strain-softening behavior. In applications to explosive and propellant sensitivity it is assumed that closed cracks act as hot spots, and that the heating due to interfacial friction initiates reactions which are modeled as one-dimensional heat flow with an Arrhenius source term, and computed in a subscale grid. Post-ignition behavior of hot spots is treated with the burn model of Ward, Son and Brewster. Numerical calculations using SCRAM-HYDROX are compared with the multiple-shock experiments of Mulford et al. in which the particle velocity in PBX 9501 is measured with embedded wires, and reactions are initiated and quenched.

  9. Characterization of Cracking and Crack Growth Properties of the C5A Aircraft Tie-Box Forging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Smith, Stephen W.; Newman, John A.; Willard, Scott A.

    2003-01-01

    Detailed destructive examinations were conducted to characterize the integrity and material properties of two aluminum alloy (7075-T6) horizontal stabilizer tie box forgings removed.from US. Air Force C5A and C5B transport aircraft. The C5B tie box forging was,found to contain no evidence of cracking. Thirteen cracks were found in the CSA,forging. All but one of the cracks observed in the C5A component were located along the top cap region (one crack was located in the bottom cap region). The cracks in the C5A component initiated at fastener holes and propagated along a highly tunneled intergranular crack path. The tunneled crack growth configuration is a likelv result of surface compressive stress produced during peening of the .forging suijace. The tie box forging ,fatigue crack growth, fracture and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) properties were characterized. Reported herein are the results of laboratory air ,fatigue crack growth tests and 95% relative humidity SCC tests conducted using specimens machined from the C5A ,forging. SCC test results revealed that the C5A ,forging material was susceptible to intergranular environmental assisted cracking: the C5A forging material exhibited a SCC crack-tip stress-intensity factor threshold of less than 6 MPadn. Fracture toughness tests revealed that the C5A forging material exhibited a fracture toughness that was 25% less than the C5B forging. The C5A forging exhibited rapid laboratory air fatigue crack growth rates having a threshold crack-tip stress-intensity factor range of less than 0.8 MPa sup m. Detailed fractographic examinations revealed that the ,fatigue crack intergranular growth crack path was similar to the cracking observed in the C5A tie box forging. Because both fatigue crack propagation and SCC exhibit similar intergranular crack path behavior, the damage mechanism resulting in multi-site cracking of tie box forgings cannot be determined unless local cyclic stresses can be quantified.

  10. High-resolution comparison of primary- and secondary-side intergranular degradation in alloy 600 steam generator tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Guertsman, Valery Y.; Thomas, Larry E.

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Intergranular (IG) attack and stress-corrosion cracks in alloy 600 tubing removed from the PWR steam generator #1 at Ringhals 2 have been characterized by analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM). Comparisons are made between environmentally induced cracks initiated on the primary-water ID surface versus those initiated on the secondary-water OD surface. General SCC crack morphologies were quite similar with branched IG cracking extending to approximately 50% through wall. Corrosion products in the open cracks were quite different with hydrated nickel phosphate seen filling the secondary-side crack, while the crack wall oxide in the primary-side crack was a Cr and Fe-rich spinel. Both samples revealed narrow (~10-nm wide), deeply penetrated, oxidized zones along most grain boundaries that intersect the open cracks. The local structures and chemistries in these corrosion-affected zones were examined by high-resolution TEM imaging, electron diffraction and fine-probe compositional analysis. These porous IG penetrations were nearly identical in appearance for both the primary- and secondary-side examples and contained Cr-rich oxides (Cr2O3 on the primary side and spinel plus Cr2O3 on the secondary side). Similarities between corrosion-induced structures for primary- and secondary-side cracking may indicate that the same degradation mechanism is operating in both cases. However, controlled experiments are needed where specific mechanisms can be properly distinguished.

  11. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics methodology for surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Hugo A.; Lambert, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    The Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics Methodology has evolved significantly in the last several years. Nevertheless, some of these concepts need to be extended further before the whole methodology can be safely applied to structural parts. Specifically, there is a need to include the effect of constraint in the characterization of material resistance to crack growth and also to extend these methods to the case of 3D defects. As a consequence, this project was started as a 36 month research program with the general objective of developing an elastic plastic fracture mechanics methodology to assess the structural reliability of pressure vessels and other parts of interest to NASA which may contain flaws. The project is divided into three tasks that deal with (1) constraint and thickness effects, (2) three-dimensional cracks, and (3) the Leak-Before-Burst (LBB) criterion. This report period (March 1994 to August 1994) is a continuation of attempts to characterize three dimensional aspects of fracture present in 'two dimensional' or planar configuration specimens (Chapter Two), especially, the determination of, and use of, crack face separation data. Also, included, are a variety of fracture resistance testing results (J(m)R-curve format) and a discussion regarding two materials of NASA interest (6061-T651 Aluminum alloy and 1N718-STA1 nickel-base super alloy) involving a bases for like constraint in terms of ligament dimensions, and their comparison to the resulting J(m)R-curves (Chapter Two).

  12. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics methodology for surface cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Hugo A.; Lambert, D. M.

    1994-08-01

    The Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics Methodology has evolved significantly in the last several years. Nevertheless, some of these concepts need to be extended further before the whole methodology can be safely applied to structural parts. Specifically, there is a need to include the effect of constraint in the characterization of material resistance to crack growth and also to extend these methods to the case of 3D defects. As a consequence, this project was started as a 36 month research program with the general objective of developing an elastic plastic fracture mechanics methodology to assess the structural reliability of pressure vessels and other parts of interest to NASA which may contain flaws. The project is divided into three tasks that deal with (1) constraint and thickness effects, (2) three-dimensional cracks, and (3) the Leak-Before-Burst (LBB) criterion. This report period (March 1994 to August 1994) is a continuation of attempts to characterize three dimensional aspects of fracture present in 'two dimensional' or planar configuration specimens (Chapter Two), especially, the determination of, and use of, crack face separation data. Also, included, are a variety of fracture resistance testing results (J(m)R-curve format) and a discussion regarding two materials of NASA interest (6061-T651 Aluminum alloy and 1N718-STA1 nickel-base super alloy) involving a bases for like constraint in terms of ligament dimensions, and their comparison to the resulting J(m)R-curves (Chapter Two).

  13. Crack

    MedlinePlus

    ... sound the drug makes as it heats up. Short-Term Effects Crack is a stimulant that is absorbed through ... quickly, after about 5 or 10 minutes. Other short-term effects include: higher heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure , ...

  14. Insights into Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms from High-Resolution Measurements of Crack-Tip Structures and Compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Thomas, Larry E.

    2010-04-05

    The fundamental basis for mechanistic understanding and modeling of SCC remains in question for many systems. Specific mechanisms controlling SCC can vary with changes in alloy characteristics, applied/residual stress or environmental conditions. The local crack electrochemistry, crack-tip mechanics and material metallurgy are the main factors controlling crack growth. These localized properties are difficult or impossible to measure in active cracks. Nevertheless, it is essential to quantitatively interrogate these crack-tip conditions if mechanistic understanding is to be obtained. A major recent advance has been the ability to investigate SCC cracks and crack tips using high-resolution ATEM techniques. ATEM enables the characterization of SCC cracks including trapped tip solution chemistries, corrosion product/film compositions and structures, and elemental composition gradients and defect microstructures along the crack walls and at the crack tip. A wide variety of methods for imaging and analyses at resolutions down to the atomic level can be used to examine the crack and corrosion film characteristics. Surface films and reaction layers have been examined by cross-sectional TEM techniques, but little work had been conducted on environmentally induced internal cracks until that of Lewis and co-workers [1-3] and the current authors [4-17]. This capability combined with modern ATEM techniques has enabled exciting new insights into corrosion processes occurring at buried interfaces and is being used to identify mechanisms controlling IGSCC in boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) components. The objective of this paper is to summarize certain results focused on IGSCC of Fe- base and Ni-base stainless alloys in high-temperature water environments. Representative crack-tip examples will be shown to illustrate specific aspects that are characteristic of SCC in the material/environment combinations. Differences and similarities in crack

  15. Behavior of cracked cylinders under combined thermal and mechanical loading

    SciTech Connect

    Ignaccolo, S.

    1996-12-01

    Nuclear pressure vessels and pipings can be submitted in their life to severe mechanical and thermal loadings. Engineering methods easy to apply, but sufficiently accurate, are needed to assess the flaws. In the field of non-linear fracture mechanics a lot of work has been achieved for structures submitted to mechanical loadings. But for thermal loadings, and particularly for thermal gradients, only few contributions are available. The authors propose, here, to present the main results of a complete set of finite element computations, conducted in France by CEA, EDF and FRAMATOME, on cracked cylinders submitted to combined mechanical and thermal loads. The interaction between these two types of loads is analyzed in the cases of austenitic and ferritic structures. Moreover, these results are compared to the predictions obtained by simplified engineering methods (R6 procedure, J{sub SA16}, and J{sub EDF} approaches). Their domain of validity is also discussed.

  16. Modeling Selective Intergranular Oxidation of Binary Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Li, Dongsheng; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-01-07

    Intergranular attack of alloys under hydrothermal conditions is a complex problem that depends on metal and oxygen transport kinetics via solid-state and channel-like pathways to an advancing oxidation front. Experiments reveal very different rates of intergranular attack and minor element depletion distances ahead of the oxidation front for nickel-based binary alloys depending on the minor element. For example, a significant Cr depletion up to 9 µm ahead of grain boundary crack tips were documented for Ni-5Cr binary alloy, in contrast to relatively moderate Al depletion for Ni-5Al (~100s of nm). We present a mathematical kinetics model that adapts Wagner’s model for thick film growth to intergranular attack of binary alloys. The transport coefficients of elements O, Ni, Cr, and Al in bulk alloys and along grain boundaries were estimated from the literature. For planar surface oxidation, a critical concentration of the minor element can be determined from the model where the oxide of minor element becomes dominant over the major element. This generic model for simple grain boundary oxidation can predict oxidation penetration velocities and minor element depletion distances ahead of the advancing front that are comparable to experimental data. The significant distance of depletion of Cr in Ni-5Cr in contrast to the localized Al depletion in Ni-5Al can be explained by the model due to the combination of the relatively faster diffusion of Cr along the grain boundary and slower diffusion in bulk grains, relative to Al.

  17. Circumferential cracking in steam generator tubes repaired by mechanical sleeving

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbe, J.; Pierson, E.; Laire, C.; Nedden, L. zur; Somville, P.; Royen, P. Van

    1995-12-31

    After one service cycle, leaks were detected in Doel 4 steam generator (SG) tubes repaired by mechanical sleeving (hydraulically + roll expanded). Two tubes were pulled and examined, one of them showing a big leak and the second being, pulled randomly. They both revealed through wall circumferential primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) at the upper hydraulic transition so that it was concluded that the problem was generic. A thorough assessment of the root causes of failure was undertaken, including stress and strain direct measurement by X-ray diffraction and photoelasticity, local stresses and temperature evaluation by calculation and stress corrosion cracking tests. Stress corrosion tests were carried out in 10 % NAOH environment, on mock-ups manufactured from reserve tubing of the plant simulating not only the upper joint but also the complete assembly (two joints). An estimate of the expected life was performed by comparison with reference mock-ups representative of the roll transitions (including the kiss roll). The findings are that the hydraulic expansion may generate high residual stresses, in spite of the very low residual deformations. Concerning, the temperature however, there are some indications that it could be substantially lower at the level of the cracking than at the tube to tubesheet roll transitions, which makes the quantified evaluation somewhat inaccurate. It is concluded that repair by mechanical sleeving is influenced by many parameters, including details of the installation procedure. Lifetime may be very limited when applied to PWSCC sensitive tubes and must be evaluated by appropriate testing. In particular, corrosion mock-ups should represent the entire sleeve, with both joints.

  18. Characterization of Cracking Mechanisms of Carbon Anodes Used in Aluminum Industry by Optical Microscopy and Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrani, Salah; Kocaefe, Duygu; Kocaefe, Yasar; Bhattacharyay, Dipankar; Bouazara, Mohamed; Morais, Brigitte

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the different mechanisms of crack formation in dense anodes used in the aluminum industry. The first approach used is based on the qualitative characterization of the surface cracks and the depth of these cracks. The second approach, which constitutes a quantitative characterization, is carried out by determining the distribution of the crack width along its length as well as the percentage of the surface containing cracks. A qualitative analysis of crack formation was also carried out using 3D tomography. It was observed that mixing and forming conditions have a significant effect on crack formation in green anodes. The devolatilization of pitch during baking causes the formation and propagation of cracks in baked anodes in which large particles control the direction of crack propagation.

  19. The effect of material heterogeneity and random loading on the mechanics of fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivatsan, T. S.; Sambandham, M.; Bharucha-Reid, A. T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews experimental work on the influence of variable amplitude or random loads on the mechanics and micromechanisms of fatigue crack growth. Implications are discussed in terms of the crack driving force, local plasticity, crack closure, crack blunting, and microstructure. Due to heterogeneity in the material's microstructure, the crack growth rate varies with crack tip position. Using the weakest link theory, an expression for crack growth rate is obtained as the expectation of a random variable. This expression is used to predict the crack growth rates for aluminum alloys, a titanium alloy, and a nickel steel in the mid-range region. It is observed, using the present theory, that the crack growth rate obeys the power law for small stress intensity factor range, and that the power is a function of a material constant.

  20. Fracture mechanics by three-dimensional crack-tip synchrotron X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Withers, P J

    2015-03-01

    To better understand the relationship between the nucleation and growth of defects and the local stresses and phase changes that cause them, we need both imaging and stress mapping. Here, we explore how this can be achieved by bringing together synchrotron X-ray diffraction and tomographic imaging. Conventionally, these are undertaken on separate synchrotron beamlines; however, instruments capable of both imaging and diffraction are beginning to emerge, such as ID15 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and JEEP at the Diamond Light Source. This review explores the concept of three-dimensional crack-tip X-ray microscopy, bringing them together to probe the crack-tip behaviour under realistic environmental and loading conditions and to extract quantitative fracture mechanics information about the local crack-tip environment. X-ray diffraction provides information about the crack-tip stress field, phase transformations, plastic zone and crack-face tractions and forces. Time-lapse CT, besides providing information about the three-dimensional nature of the crack and its local growth rate, can also provide information as to the activation of extrinsic toughening mechanisms such as crack deflection, crack-tip zone shielding, crack bridging and crack closure. It is shown how crack-tip microscopy allows a quantitative measure of the crack-tip driving force via the stress intensity factor or the crack-tip opening displacement. Finally, further opportunities for synchrotron X-ray microscopy are explored. PMID:25624521

  1. Fracture mechanics by three-dimensional crack-tip synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Withers, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the relationship between the nucleation and growth of defects and the local stresses and phase changes that cause them, we need both imaging and stress mapping. Here, we explore how this can be achieved by bringing together synchrotron X-ray diffraction and tomographic imaging. Conventionally, these are undertaken on separate synchrotron beamlines; however, instruments capable of both imaging and diffraction are beginning to emerge, such as ID15 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and JEEP at the Diamond Light Source. This review explores the concept of three-dimensional crack-tip X-ray microscopy, bringing them together to probe the crack-tip behaviour under realistic environmental and loading conditions and to extract quantitative fracture mechanics information about the local crack-tip environment. X-ray diffraction provides information about the crack-tip stress field, phase transformations, plastic zone and crack-face tractions and forces. Time-lapse CT, besides providing information about the three-dimensional nature of the crack and its local growth rate, can also provide information as to the activation of extrinsic toughening mechanisms such as crack deflection, crack-tip zone shielding, crack bridging and crack closure. It is shown how crack-tip microscopy allows a quantitative measure of the crack-tip driving force via the stress intensity factor or the crack-tip opening displacement. Finally, further opportunities for synchrotron X-ray microscopy are explored. PMID:25624521

  2. Kinetics and mechanisms of creep crack growth in a creep-resisting steel

    SciTech Connect

    Vainshtok, V.A.; Baumshtein, M.V.; Makovetskaya, I.A.; Man'ko, V.D.

    1986-02-01

    This paper discusses the nature of kinetic diagrams of growth of fatigue cracks in the temperature range typical of operation of important components of power equipment and examines the proportion of the incubation period of crack growth in the total life. The relationship of the kinetic diagrams of crack growth with the fracture mechanisms are examined and the effect of running life on creep crack propagation is reviewed.

  3. NASGRO(registered trademark): Fracture Mechanics and Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce; Shivakumar, V.; Mettu, Sambi; Beek, Joachim; Williams, Leonard; Yeh, Feng; McClung, Craig; Cardinal, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes NASGRO, which is a fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analysis software package that is used to reduce risk of fracture in Space Shuttles. The contents include: 1) Consequences of Fracture; 2) NASA Fracture Control Requirements; 3) NASGRO Reduces Risk; 4) NASGRO Use Inside NASA; 5) NASGRO Components: Crack Growth Module; 6) NASGRO Components:Material Property Module; 7) Typical NASGRO analysis: Crack growth or component life calculation; and 8) NASGRO Sample Application: Orbiter feedline flowliner crack analysis.

  4. Fracture processes and mechanisms of crack growth resistance in human enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, Devendra; Park, Saejin; Quinn, George D.; Arola, Dwayne

    2010-07-01

    Human enamel has a complex micro-structure that varies with distance from the tooth’s outer surface. But contributions from the microstructure to the fracture toughness and the mechanisms of crack growth resistance have not been explored in detail. In this investigation the apparent fracture toughness of human enamel and the mechanisms of crack growth resistance were evaluated using the indentation fracture approach and an incremental crack growth technique. Indentation cracks were introduced on polished surfaces of enamel at selected distances from the occlusal surface. In addition, an incremental crack growth approach using compact tension specimens was used to quantify the crack growth resistance as a Junction of distance from the occlusal surface. There were significant differences in the apparent toughness estimated using the two approaches, which was attributed to the active crack length and corresponding scale of the toughening mechanisms.

  5. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics methodology for surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Hugo A.; Boatwright, D. W.; Curtin, W. J.; Lambert, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    The Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics (EPFM) Methodology has evolved significantly in the last several years. Nevertheless, some of these concepts need to be extended further before the whole methodology can be safely applied to structural parts. Specifically, there is a need to include the effect of constraint in the characterization of material resistance to crack growth and also to extend these methods to the case of 3D defects. As a consequence, this project was started as a 36 month research program with the general objective of developing an EPFM methodology to assess the structural reliability of pressure vessels and other parts of interest to NASA containing defects. This report covers a computer modelling algorithm used to simulate the growth of a semi-elliptical surface crack; the presentation of a finite element investigation that compared the theoretical (HRR) stress field to that produced by elastic and elastic-plastic models; and experimental efforts to characterize three dimensional aspects of fracture present in 'two dimensional', or planar configuration specimens.

  6. Monitoring of solidification crack propagation mechanism in pulsed laser welding of 6082 aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Witzendorff, P.; Kaierle, S.; Suttmann, O.; Overmeyer, L.

    2016-03-01

    Pulsed laser sources with pulse durations in the millisecond regime can be used for spot welding and seam welding of aluminum. Seam welds are generally produced with several overlapping spot welds. Hot cracking has its origin in the solidification process of individual spot welds which determines the cracking morphology along the seam welding. This study used a monitoring unit to capture the crack geometry within individual spot welds during seam welding to investigate the conditions for initiation, propagation and healing (re-melting) of solidification cracking within overlapping pulsed laser welds. The results suggest that small crack radii and high crack angles with respect to welding direction are favorable conditions for crack healing which leads to crack-free seam welds. Optimized pulse shapes were used to produce butt welds of 0.5 mm thick 6082 aluminum alloys. Tensile tests were performed to investigate the mechanical strength in the as-welded condition.

  7. Multiscale Modeling of Intergranular Fracture in Aluminum: Constitutive Relation For Interface Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakov, V.; Saether, E.; Glaessgen, E. H.

    2008-01-01

    Intergranular fracture is a dominant mode of failure in ultrafine grained materials. In the present study, the atomistic mechanisms of grain-boundary debonding during intergranular fracture in aluminum are modeled using a coupled molecular dynamics finite element simulation. Using a statistical mechanics approach, a cohesive-zone law in the form of a traction-displacement constitutive relationship, characterizing the load transfer across the plane of a growing edge crack, is extracted from atomistic simulations and then recast in a form suitable for inclusion within a continuum finite element model. The cohesive-zone law derived by the presented technique is free of finite size effects and is statistically representative for describing the interfacial debonding of a grain boundary (GB) interface examined at atomic length scales. By incorporating the cohesive-zone law in cohesive-zone finite elements, the debonding of a GB interface can be simulated in a coupled continuum-atomistic model, in which a crack starts in the continuum environment, smoothly penetrates the continuum-atomistic interface, and continues its propagation in the atomistic environment. This study is a step towards relating atomistically derived decohesion laws to macroscopic predictions of fracture and constructing multiscale models for nanocrystalline and ultrafine grained materials.

  8. Dynamic fracture mechanics analysis for an edge delamination crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Doyle, James F.

    1994-01-01

    A global/local analysis is applied to the problem of a panel with an edge delamination crack subject to an impulse loading to ascertain the dynamic J integral. The approach uses the spectral element method to obtain the global dynamic response and local resultants to obtain the J integral. The variation of J integral along the crack front is shown. The crack behavior is mixed mode (Mode 2 and Mode 3), but is dominated by the Mode 2 behavior.

  9. Dislocation mechanism based model for stage II fatigue crack propagation rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumdar, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    Repeated plastic deformation, which of course depends on dislocation mechanism, at or near the crack tip leads to the fatigue crack propagation. By involving the theory of thermally activated flow and the cumulative plastic strain criterion, an effort is made here to model the stage II fatigue crack propagation rate in terms of the dislocation mechanism. The model, therefore, provides capability to ascertain: (1) the dislocation mechanism (and hence the near crack tip microstructures) assisting the crack growth, (2) the relative resistance of dislocation mechanisms to the crack growth, and (3) the fracture surface characteristics and its interpretation in terms of the dislocation mechanism. The local microstructure predicted for the room temperature crack growth in copper by this model is in good agreement with the experimental results taken from the literature. With regard to the relative stability of such dislocation mechanisms as the cross-slip and the dislocation intersection, the model suggests an enhancement of crack growth rate with an ease of cross-slip which in general promotes dislocation cell formation and is common in material which has high stacking fault energy (produces wavy slips). Cross-slip apparently enhances crack growth rate by promoting slip irreversibility and fracture surface brittleness to a greater degree.

  10. Updated Fatigue-Crack-Growth And Fracture-Mechanics Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Shivakumar, Venkataraman; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    NASA/FLAGRO 2.0 developed as analytical aid in predicting growth and stability of preexisting flaws and cracks in structural components of aerospace systems. Used for fracture-control analysis of space hardware. Organized into three modules to maximize efficiency in operation. Useful in: (1) crack-instability/crack-growth analysis, (2) processing raw crack-growth data from laboratory tests, and (3) boundary-element analysis to determine stresses and stress-intensity factors. Written in FORTRAN 77 and ANSI C.

  11. Accommodating and cracking mechanisms in low-cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineau, A.

    1978-01-01

    The three main stages of fatigue life (accommodation, crack initiation and crack growth) are briefly reviewed. The cyclic behavior of annealed or predeformed face-centered cubic metals is described. Moreover, two types of alloys (Al-4-Cu and WASPALOY) are examined regarding the influence of the interactions between the precipitates and the dislocations on the cyclic behavior. Data on the percent of life to crack initiation (for a microcrack smaller than about 100 microns) are also given. Finally, experimental and theoretical results on crack growth rates in lowcycle fatigue are described.

  12. Intergranular stress distributions in polycrystalline aggregates of irradiated stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hure, J.; El Shawish, S.; Cizelj, L.; Tanguy, B.

    2016-08-01

    In order to predict InterGranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) of post-irradiated austenitic stainless steel in Light Water Reactor (LWR) environment, reliable predictions of intergranular stresses are required. Finite elements simulations have been performed on realistic polycrystalline aggregate with recently proposed physically-based crystal plasticity constitutive equations validated for neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steel. Intergranular normal stress probability density functions are found with respect to plastic strain and irradiation level, for uniaxial loading conditions. In addition, plastic slip activity jumps at grain boundaries are also presented. Intergranular normal stress distributions describe, from a statistical point of view, the potential increase of intergranular stress with respect to the macroscopic stress due to grain-grain interactions. The distributions are shown to be well described by a master curve once rescaled by the macroscopic stress, in the range of irradiation level and strain considered in this study. The upper tail of this master curve is shown to be insensitive to free surface effect, which is relevant for IGSCC predictions, and also relatively insensitive to small perturbations in crystallographic texture, but sensitive to grain shapes.

  13. Modeling selective intergranular oxidation of binary alloys.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhijie; Li, Dongsheng; Schreiber, Daniel K; Rosso, Kevin M; Bruemmer, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    Intergranular attack of alloys under hydrothermal conditions is a complex problem that depends on metal and oxygen transport kinetics via solid-state and channel-like pathways to an advancing oxidation front. Experiments reveal very different rates of intergranular attack and minor element depletion distances ahead of the oxidation front for nickel-based binary alloys depending on the minor element. For example, a significant Cr depletion up to 9 μm ahead of grain boundary crack tips was documented for Ni-5Cr binary alloy, in contrast to relatively moderate Al depletion for Ni-5Al (∼100 s of nm). We present a mathematical kinetics model that adapts Wagner's model for thick film growth to intergranular attack of binary alloys. The transport coefficients of elements O, Ni, Cr, and Al in bulk alloys and along grain boundaries were estimated from the literature. For planar surface oxidation, a critical concentration of the minor element can be determined from the model where the oxide of minor element becomes dominant over the major element. This generic model for simple grain boundary oxidation can predict oxidation penetration velocities and minor element depletion distances ahead of the advancing front that are comparable to experimental data. The significant distance of depletion of Cr in Ni-5Cr in contrast to the localized Al depletion in Ni-5Al can be explained by the model due to the combination of the relatively faster diffusion of Cr along the grain boundary and slower diffusion in bulk grains, relative to Al. PMID:25573575

  14. THERMAL-MECHANICAL RESPONSE OF CRACKED SATIN WEAVE CFRP COMPOSITES AT CRYOGENIC TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, S.; Shindo, Y.; Narita, F.; Takeda, T.

    2008-03-03

    This paper examines the thermal-mechanical response of satin weave carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates with internal and/or edge cracks subjected to uniaxial tension load at cryogenic temperatures. Cracks are considered to occur in the transverse fiber bundles and extend through the entire thickness of the fiber bundles. Two-dimentional generalized plane strain finite element models are developed to study the effects of residual thermal stresses and cracks on the mechanical behavior of CFRP woven laminates. A detailed examination of the Young's modulus and stress distributions near the crack tip is carried out which provides insight into material behavior at cryogenic temperatures.

  15. Thermal-Mechanical Response of Cracked Satin Weave CFRP Composites at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Shindo, Y.; Narita, F.; Takeda, T.

    2008-03-01

    This paper examines the thermal-mechanical response of satin weave carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates with internal and/or edge cracks subjected to uniaxial tension load at cryogenic temperatures. Cracks are considered to occur in the transverse fiber bundles and extend through the entire thickness of the fiber bundles. Two-dimentional generalized plane strain finite element models are developed to study the effects of residual thermal stresses and cracks on the mechanical behavior of CFRP woven laminates. A detailed examination of the Young's modulus and stress distributions near the crack tip is carried out which provides insight into material behavior at cryogenic temperatures.

  16. Oxygen Embrittlement and Time-Dependent Grain-Boundary Cracking of ALLVAC 718PLUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, R. W.

    2008-11-01

    This study focuses on the time-dependent intergranular cracking of a newly developed Ni-base superalloy ALLVAC 718PLUS. Grain-boundary (GB) cracking is due to the penetration of oxygen down grain boundaries and subsequent oxidation of GB particles, i.e., carbides and possibly delta phase present at the grain boundaries. The GB oxidation and subsequent brittle intergranular failure of this material is highly dependent upon moisture level in the testing atmosphere. With increasing moisture level in the test atmosphere, it is demonstrated that hydrogen may become dominant over oxygen as the embrittling species. The degree of susceptibility to time-dependent intergranular cracking is also highly dependent upon microstructure. The behavior exhibited by ALLVAC 718PLUS is common to a wide range of Ni- base superalloys when tested in air or other aggressive environments. A six-step model for the grain-boundary cracking mechanism is presented. The model is presented for hydrogen in high-moisture environments but is equally applicable to oxygen at lower-moisture levels, as well. Structures which provide increased resistance to time-dependent intergranular cracking are also discussed.

  17. Electrochemical aspects of stress-corrosion cracking in. cap alpha. -brass

    SciTech Connect

    Burstein, G T; Newman, R C

    1981-01-01

    This paper considers a number of aspects of the stress-corrosion cracking of brass from the point of view of the localized electrochemical processes occurring at the tip of a propagating crack. The principal system examined is the intergranular SCC of 70-30 brass in near-neutral ammoniacal solutions, for which a detailed mechanism is developed. In addition, the effects of nitrite ions in promoting SCC of both brass and copper are considered.

  18. Computational modeling of the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendales, E. D.; Orjuela, F. A.; Chamarraví, O.

    2016-02-01

    In this article theoretical models and some existing data sets were examined in order to model the two main causes (hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion-cracking under stress) of the called environmentally assisted cracking phenomenon (EAC). Additionally, a computer simulation of flat metal plate subject to mechanical stress and cracking due both to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion was developed. The computational simulation was oriented to evaluate the effect on the stress-strain behavior, elongation percent and the crack growth rate of AISI SAE 1040 steel due to three corrosive enviroments (H2 @ 0.06MPa; HCl, pH=1.0; HCl, pH=2.5). From the computer simulation we conclude that cracking due to internal corrosion of the material near to the crack tip limits affects more the residual strength of the flat plate than hydrogen embrittlement and generates a failure condition almost imminent of the mechanical structural element.

  19. Augmented finite-element method for arbitrary cracking and crack interaction in solids under thermo-mechanical loadings.

    PubMed

    Jung, J; Do, B C; Yang, Q D

    2016-07-13

    In this paper, a thermal-mechanical augmented finite-element method (TM-AFEM) has been proposed, implemented and validated for steady-state and transient, coupled thermal-mechanical analyses of complex materials with explicit consideration of arbitrary evolving cracks. The method permits the derivation of explicit, fully condensed thermal-mechanical equilibrium equations which are of mathematical exactness in the piece-wise linear sense. The method has been implemented with a 4-node quadrilateral two-dimensional (2D) element and a 4-node tetrahedron three-dimensional (3D) element. It has been demonstrated, through several numerical examples that the new TM-AFEM can provide significantly improved numerical accuracy and efficiency when dealing with crack propagation problems in 2D and 3D solids under coupled thermal-mechanical loading conditions. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242303

  20. Fracture mechanics analyses of partial crack closure in shell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun

    2007-12-01

    This thesis presents the theoretical and finite element analyses of crack-face closure behavior in shells and its effect on the stress intensity factor under a bending load condition. Various shell geometries, such as spherical shell, cylindrical shell containing an axial crack, cylindrical shell containing a circumferential crack and shell with double curvatures, are all studied. In addition, the influence of material orthotropy on the crack closure effect in shells is also considered. The theoretical formulation is developed based on the shallow shell theory of Delale and Erdogan, incorporating the effect of crack-face closure at the compressive edges. The line-contact assumption, simulating the crack-face closure at the compressive edges, is employed so that the contact force at the closure edges is introduced, which can be translated to the mid-plane of the shell, accompanied by an additional distributed bending moment. The unknown contact force is computed by solving a mixed-boundary value problem iteratively, that is, along the crack length, either the normal displacement of the crack face at the compressive edges is equal to zero or the contact pressure is equal to zero. It is found that due to the curvature effects crack closure may not always occur on the entire length of the crack, depending on the direction of the bending load and the geometry of the shell. The crack-face closure influences significantly the magnitude of the stress intensity factors; it increases the membrane component but decreases the bending component. The maximum stress intensity factor is reduced by the crack-face closure. The significant influence of geometry and material orthotropy on rack closure behavior in shells is also predicted based on the analytical solutions. Three-dimensional FEA is performed to validate the theoretical solutions. It demonstrates that the crack face closure occurs actually over an area, not on a line, but the theoretical solutions of the stress intensity

  1. Mechanisms and Models for Crack Detection with Induction Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrana, J.; Goldammer, M.; Baumann, J.; Rothenfusser, M.; Arnold, W.

    2008-02-01

    Induction thermography is a non-contacting, non-destructive evaluation method with a wide range of applications. A deeper understanding of the detectability of cracks requires fundamental knowledge about the induced current density distribution in the component under test. A calculation of the current distribution provides information how much current is flowing at which location of the component, how a crack disturbs the current density, how much heat is produced at which location of the component, and how the heat diffuses to the surface. The heating process depends on the type of crack. On the one hand there are cracks which can be detected mainly by direct observation of the heating process due to an increased current density, and on the other hand there are cracks which can be detected mainly because of a modification of the heat diffusion. This paper presents an analytical model for the calculation of the current distribution, including the back-flow current along with finite-element calculations. Furthermore, two new crack models are presented for a better description of real cracks.

  2. The study on ``load relief`` mechanism of multiple cracks in thick-wall cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.H.; Huang, Z.Z.; Tan, Y.; Chen, L.Y.; Pan, B.Z.

    1995-11-01

    In this paper, the stress field on a given cross section in a thick-wall cylinder with single or multiple cracks is analyzed by means of 3-D photoelastic. Based on the study of the effect of crack on stress field, the concept of ``Additional Bending Moment`` is presented and the expression for non-dimensional ABM, M, is derived. The ``load relief`` mechanism of multiple cracks in a thick-wall cylinder is studied.

  3. Controlling stress corrosion cracking in mechanism components of ground support equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majid, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    The selection of materials for mechanism components used in ground support equipment so that failures resulting from stress corrosion cracking will be prevented is described. A general criteria to be used in designing for resistance to stress corrosion cracking is also provided. Stress corrosion can be defined as combined action of sustained tensile stress and corrosion to cause premature failure of materials. Various aluminum, steels, nickel, titanium and copper alloys, and tempers and corrosive environment are evaluated for stress corrosion cracking.

  4. Mechanisms of coke formation and fouling in thermal cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, R.K.; Rangwala, H.A.; Hsi, C.

    1995-12-31

    When heavy oil is cracked to produce distillate, coking of the reacting liquid is, in general, preceded by formation of a new, highly viscous liquid phase, rich in coke precursors. Results from pilot-scale experiments using feedstocks from Gudao (China) reported here show that inert-gas stripping of light distillates from the reacting liquid strongly inhibits coking and possibly the partition of precursors into the new phase. Heavy oil, rich in asphaltene, is often reported to have a high coking propensity. This paper provides experimental evidence to show that the asphaltene concentration is not the most critical factor in the coking propensity of heavy oil. Autoclave tests show that the liquid product could contain more than 40% of asphaltene, and yield only 60% of the coke produced by similar tests in which the liquid product contains less than 20% asphaltene. The solubility of asphaltene in the reaction liquid is the most crucial factor affecting coke yield. It controls the coking mechanisms and the fouling tendency of the resulting coke.

  5. Three-dimensional EBSD characterization of thermo-mechanical fatigue crack morphology in compacted graphite iron

    SciTech Connect

    Pirgazi, Hadi; Ghodrat, Sepideh; Kestens, Leo A.I.

    2014-04-01

    In cylinder heads made of compacted graphitic iron (CGI), heating and cooling cycles can lead to localized cracking due to thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF). To meticulously characterize the complex crack path morphology of CGI under TMF condition, in relation to microstructural features and to find out how and by which mechanisms the cracks predominantly develop, three-dimensional electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) was employed. Based on the precise quantitative microstructural analysis, it is found that graphite particles not only play a crucial role in the crack initiation, but also are of primary significance for crack propagation, i.e. crack growth is enhanced by the presence of graphite particles. Furthermore, the density of graphite particles on the fracture plane is more than double as high as in any other arbitrary plane of the structure. The obtained results did not indicate a particular crystallographic preference of fracture plane, i.e. the crystal plane parallel to the fracture plane was nearly of random orientation. - Highlights: • Crystallographic features of a thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) crack were studied. • Wide-field 3D EBSD is used to characterize the TMF crack morphology. • Data processing was applied on a large length scale of the order of millimeters. • Graphite density in the fracture plane is much higher than any other random plane. • It is revealed that crack growth is enhanced by the presence of graphite particles.

  6. Crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics by the scratch test.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhongjun; Liu, Congcong; Wang, Haorong; Yang, Xue; Fang, Fengzhou; Tang, Junjie

    2016-12-01

    To eliminate the negative effects of surface flaws and subsurface damage of glass-ceramics on clinical effectiveness, crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics were studied by single and double scratch experiments conducted using an ultra-precision machine. A self-manufactured pyramid shaped single-grit tool with a small tip radius was used as the scratch tool. The surface and subsurface crack propagations and interactions, surface morphology and material removal mechanism were investigated. The experimental results showed that the propagation of lateral cracks to the surface and the interaction between the lateral cracks and radial cracks are the two main types of material peeling, and the increase of the scratch depth increases the propagation angle of the radial cracks and the interaction between the cracks. In the case of a double scratch, the propagation of lateral cracks and radial cracks between paired scratches results in material peeling. The interaction between adjacent scratches depends on the scratch depth and separation distance. There is a critical separation distance where the normalized material removal volume reaches its peak. These findings can help reduce surface flaws and subsurface damage induced by the grinding process and improve the clinical effectiveness of glass-ceramics used as biological substitute and repair materials. PMID:27479896

  7. An extension of fracture mechanics/technology to larger and smaller cracks/defects.

    PubMed

    Abé, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Fracture mechanics/technology is a key science and technology for the design and integrity assessment of the engineering structures. However, the conventional fracture mechanics has mostly targeted a limited size of cracks/defects, say of from several hundred microns to several tens of centimeters. The author and his group has tried to extend that limited size and establish a new version of fracture technology for very large cracks used in geothermal energy extraction and for very small cracks/defects or damage often appearing in the combination of mechanical and electronic components of engineering structures. Those new versions are reviewed in this paper. PMID:19907123

  8. An extension of fracture mechanics/technology to larger and smaller cracks/defects

    PubMed Central

    Abé, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Fracture mechanics/technology is a key science and technology for the design and integrity assessment of the engineering structures. However, the conventional fracture mechanics has mostly targeted a limited size of cracks/defects, say of from several hundred microns to several tens of centimeters. The author and his group has tried to extend that limited size and establish a new version of fracture technology for very large cracks used in geothermal energy extraction and for very small cracks/defects or damage often appearing in the combination of mechanical and electronic components of engineering structures. Those new versions are reviewed in this paper. PMID:19907123

  9. Advanced TEM characterization of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sennour, M.; Laghoutaris, P.; Guerre, C.; Molins, R.

    2009-09-01

    Advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques were carried out in order to investigate stress corrosion cracking in Alloy 600 U-bend samples exposed in simulated PWR primary water at 330 °C. Using high-resolution imaging and fine-probe chemical analysis methods, ultrafine size oxides present inside cracks and intergranular attacks were nanoscale characterized. Results revealed predominance of Cr 2O 3 oxide and Ni-rich metal zones at the majority of encountered crack tip areas and at leading edge of intergranular attacks. However, NiO-structure oxide was predominant far from crack tip zones and within cracks propagating along twin boundaries and inside grains. These observations permit to suggest a mechanism for intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in PWR primary water. Indeed, the results suggest that stress corrosion cracking is depending on chromium oxide growth in the grain boundary. Oxide growth seems to be dependent on oxygen diffusion in porous oxide and chromium diffusion in strained alloy and in grain boundary beyond crack tip. Strain could promote transport kinetic and oxide formation by increasing defaults rate like dislocations.

  10. Microstructural indicators of transition mechanisms in time-dependent fatigue crack growth in nickel base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeter, Ann E.

    Gas turbine engines are an important part of power generation in modern society, especially in the field of aerospace. Aerospace engines are design to last approximately 30 years and the engine components must be designed to survive for the life of the engine or to be replaced at regular intervals to ensure consumer safety. Fatigue crack growth analysis is a vital component of design for an aerospace component. Crack growth modeling and design methods date back to an origin around 1950 with a high rate of accuracy. The new generation of aerospace engines is designed to be efficient as possible and require higher operating temperatures than ever seen before in previous generations. These higher temperatures place more stringent requirements on the material crack growth performance under creep and time dependent conditions. Typically the types of components which are subject to these requirements are rotating disk components which are made from advanced materials such as nickel base superalloys. Traditionally crack growth models have looked at high temperature crack growth purely as a function of temperature and assumed that all crack growth was either controlled by a cycle dependent or time dependent mechanism. This new analysis is trying to evaluate the transition between cycle-dependent and time-dependent mechanism and the microstructural markers that characterize this transitional behavior. The physical indications include both the fracture surface morphology as well as the shape of the crack front. The research will evaluate whether crack tunneling occurs and whether it consistently predicts a transition from cycle-dependent crack growth to time-dependent crack growth. The study is part of a larger research program trying to include the effects of geometry, mission profile and environmental effects, in addition to temperature effects, as a part of the overall crack growth system. The outcome will provide evidence for various transition types and correlate those

  11. Extrinsic factors in the mechanics of bridged cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.N. )

    1991-01-01

    Calculations for single-edge notch specimens under uniform remote tension are used to demonstrate the profound influence of the extrinsic factors of specimen shape and load distribution on the propagation of bridged cracks when the bridging zone length is comparable to any of the dimensions of the crack or the specimen. The influence of the extrinsic factors is so strong that there is a grave risk of seriously nonconservative predictions of strength and reliability if standard engineering methods are used for materials exhibiting such bridged cracks. However, this difficulty can be resolved by regarding the relationship between the bridging tractions p and the crack opening displacement u as a fundamental material property. Extensive calculations are summarized for one class of relations p(u) that rise to a peak corresponding to ligament failure and then fall gradually to zero at large u. Resistance curves of great variety are displayed. The central role of the bridging length scale, the initial crack extension over which the bridging zone matures, is demonstrated. The roles of various features of p(u) in determining the transition from noncatastrophic (or ductile) failure to catastrophic (or brittle) failure are examined.

  12. Indirect measurement of the viscosity of the intergranular glass phase in yttria-sintered silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, Mark B.; Drummond, Charles H., III

    1991-01-01

    Dense, sintered Si3N4 possesses a residual intergranular glass phase which softens at high temperatures, resulting in degradation of the ceramic's mechanical properties at high temperatures. An important parameter in the determination of the high temperature mechanical properties of sintered Si3N4 is the temperature-viscosity relationship of the intergranular glass. A method for indirectly measuring the intergranular glass viscosity at a given temperature using physical modelling of a two phase glass crystal microstructure and beam bending viscometry measurements of Si3N4 is described. Intergranular glass viscosities obtained by this method are presented for a yttria sintered Si3N4.

  13. Energy absorption mechanisms during crack propagation in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, D. P.; Adams, D. F.

    1979-01-01

    The stress distributions around individual fibers in a unidirectional boron/aluminum composite material subjected to axial and transverse loadings are being studied utilizing a generalized plane strain finite element analysis. This micromechanics analysis was modified to permit the analysis of longitudinal sections, and also to incorporate crack initiation and propagation. The analysis fully models the elastoplastic response of the aluminum matrix, as well as temperature dependent material properties and thermal stress effects. The micromechanics analysis modifications are described, and numerical results are given for both longitudinal and transverse models loaded into the inelastic range, to first failure. Included are initially cracked fiber models.

  14. Mechanical shielding reduces weld surface cracking in 6061 T6 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. E.

    1968-01-01

    Mechanical shield of high melting point material protects 6061-T6 aluminum welded with high frequency ac tungsten arc equipment. It is held in place around the weld bead area and eliminates heat check cracks.

  15. Environment enhanced fatigue crack propagation in metals: Inputs to fracture mechanics life prediction models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gangloff, R.P.; Kim, S.

    1993-09-01

    This report is a critical review of both environment-enhanced fatigue crack propagation data and the predictive capabilities of crack growth rate models. This information provides the necessary foundation for incorporating environmental effects in NASA FLAGRO and will better enable predictions of aerospace component fatigue lives. The review presents extensive literature data on stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue.' The linear elastic fracture mechanics approach, based on stress intensity range (Delta(K)) similitude with microscopic crack propagation threshold and growth rates, provides a basis for these data. Results are presented showing enhanced growth rates for gases (viz., H2 and H2O) and electrolytes (e.g. NaCl and H2O) in aerospace alloys including: C-Mn and heat treated alloy steels, aluminum alloys, nickel-based superalloys, and titanium alloys. Environment causes purely time-dependent accelerated fatigue crack growth above the monotonic load cracking threshold (KIEAC) and promotes cycle-time dependent cracking below (KIEAC). These phenomenon are discussed in terms of hydrogen embrittlement, dissolution, and film rupture crack tip damage mechanisms.

  16. Environment enhanced fatigue crack propagation in metals: Inputs to fracture mechanics life prediction models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Kim, Sang-Shik

    1993-01-01

    This report is a critical review of both environment-enhanced fatigue crack propagation data and the predictive capabilities of crack growth rate models. This information provides the necessary foundation for incorporating environmental effects in NASA FLAGRO and will better enable predictions of aerospace component fatigue lives. The review presents extensive literature data on 'stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue.' The linear elastic fracture mechanics approach, based on stress intensity range (Delta(K)) similitude with microscopic crack propagation threshold and growth rates, provides a basis for these data. Results are presented showing enhanced growth rates for gases (viz., H2 and H2O) and electrolytes (e.g. NaCl and H2O) in aerospace alloys including: C-Mn and heat treated alloy steels, aluminum alloys, nickel-based superalloys, and titanium alloys. Environment causes purely time-dependent accelerated fatigue crack growth above the monotonic load cracking threshold (KIEAC) and promotes cycle-time dependent cracking below (KIEAC). These phenomenon are discussed in terms of hydrogen embrittlement, dissolution, and film rupture crack tip damage mechanisms.

  17. Inner crack reconstruction and mechanical analysis for rock-specimen-based phase measuring profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yiping; He, Yuhang

    2009-12-01

    A higher precise inner crack three-dimenssional(3D) reconstructed method of rock specimens is presented. Two inner shapes of the crack are measured with Phase Measuring Profilometry (PMP), and their edges are drawn out by height information instead of the traditional method based on gray information. Subsequently contour matching and height matching are carried out with algorithms due to maximum correlativity. The inner width and volume of the crack are educed according to the fissure of a rock specimen's outer surface, and the 3D profile of the crack is reconstructed with a high repetitive precision superior to 20μm. The proposed method is effective for evaluating the crack's width of rock specimens in the exploitation of petroleum and natural gas with a mechanical analysis method. The experiment shows its feasibility and practicability.

  18. Inner crack reconstruction and mechanical analysis for rock-specimen-based phase measuring profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yiping; He, Yuhang

    2010-03-01

    A higher precise inner crack three-dimenssional(3D) reconstructed method of rock specimens is presented. Two inner shapes of the crack are measured with Phase Measuring Profilometry (PMP), and their edges are drawn out by height information instead of the traditional method based on gray information. Subsequently contour matching and height matching are carried out with algorithms due to maximum correlativity. The inner width and volume of the crack are educed according to the fissure of a rock specimen's outer surface, and the 3D profile of the crack is reconstructed with a high repetitive precision superior to 20μm. The proposed method is effective for evaluating the crack's width of rock specimens in the exploitation of petroleum and natural gas with a mechanical analysis method. The experiment shows its feasibility and practicability.

  19. Fracture mechanics of matrix cracking and delamination in glass/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caslini, M.; Zanotti, C.; Obrien, T. K.

    1986-01-01

    This study focused on characterizing matrix cracking and delamination behavior in multidirectional laminates. Static tension and tension-tension fatigue tests were conducted on two different layups. Damage onset, accumulation, and residual properties were measured. Matrix cracking was shown to have a considerable influence on residual stiffness of glass epoxy laminates, and could be predicted reasonably well for cracks in 90 deg piles using a simple shear lag analysis. A fracture mechanics analysis for the strain energy release rate associated with 90 deg ply-matrix crack formation was developed and was shown to correlate the onset of 90 deg ply cracks in different laminates. The linear degradation of laminate modulus with delamination area, previously observed for graphite epoxy laminates, was predicted for glass epoxy laminates using a simple rule of mixtures analysis. The strain energy release rate associated with edge delamination formation under static and cyclic loading was difficult to analyze because of the presence of several contemporary damage phenomena.

  20. Fatigue crack propagation rate model based on a dislocation mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumdar, P. K.; Jeelani, S.

    1986-01-01

    It has been noted that the crack propagation exponent p for most metals usually varies between values of 2 and 4, and that the motion of dislocations plays an important part in determining the exponent p. Attention is presently given to the significance of the exponent p in terms of the motion of dislocations, in view of the theory of thermally activated plastic flow and the cumulative plastic strain concept for a failure criterion.

  1. Crack Turning and Arrest Mechanisms for Integral Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Richard; Ingraffea, Anthony

    1999-01-01

    In the course of several years of research efforts to predict crack turning and flapping in aircraft fuselage structures and other problems related to crack turning, the 2nd order maximum tangential stress theory has been identified as the theory most capable of predicting the observed test results. This theory requires knowledge of a material specific characteristic length, and also a computation of the stress intensity factors and the T-stress, or second order term in the asymptotic stress field in the vicinity of the crack tip. A characteristic length, r(sub c), is proposed for ductile materials pertaining to the onset of plastic instability, as opposed to the void spacing theories espoused by previous investigators. For the plane stress case, an approximate estimate of r(sub c), is obtained from the asymptotic field for strain hardening materials given by Hutchinson, Rice and Rosengren (HRR). A previous study using of high order finite element methods to calculate T-stresses by contour integrals resulted in extremely high accuracy values obtained for selected test specimen geometries, and a theoretical error estimation parameter was defined. In the present study, it is shown that a large portion of the error in finite element computations of both K and T are systematic, and can be corrected after the initial solution if the finite element implementation utilizes a similar crack tip discretization scheme for all problems. This scheme is applied for two-dimensional problems to a both a p-version finite element code, showing that sufficiently accurate values of both K(sub I) and T can be obtained with fairly low order elements if correction is used. T-stress correction coefficients are also developed for the singular crack tip rosette utilized in the adaptive mesh finite element code FRANC2D, and shown to reduce the error in the computed T-stress significantly. Stress intensity factor correction was not attempted for FRANC2D because it employs a highly accurate

  2. Mechanical Property and Intergranular Corrosion Sensitivity of Zn-Free and Zn-Microalloyed Al-2.7Cu-1.7Li-0.3Mg Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-feng; Xu, Long; Cai, Chao; Chen, Yong-lai; Zhang, Xu-hu; Zheng, Zi-qiao

    2014-11-01

    The influence of 0.72 pct Zn addition on the tensile properties of Al-2.7Cu-1.7Li-0.3Mg alloys was investigated. Their intergranular corrosion (IGC) dependence on aging [T6 type at 423 K (150 °C) and 448 K (175 °C) and T8 type at 423 K (150 °C)] time was studied. An IGC diagram associated with aging process was established. The addition of 0.72 pct Zn enhanced the strength of the Al-Li alloy with T6 type aging at 448 K (175 °C). With aging process, the corrosion mode of the T6-aged Al-Li alloys was changed in the following order: pitting and local IGC (initial aging stage), general IGC (underaging stage), local IGC (near peak-aging stage), and pitting (overaging stage) again. The IGC depth was increased first and then decreased with aging time extension. The corrosion potential change of grains and the microstructure variation were used to explain the IGC sensitivity of the Al-Li alloy with different tempers. Meanwhile, 0.72 pct Zn addition decreased the IGC sensitivity of the Al-Li alloy, especially the T6-aged Al-Li alloy.

  3. Mechanical Property and Intergranular Corrosion Sensitivity of Zn-Free and Zn-Microalloyed Al-2.7Cu-1.7Li-0.3Mg Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-feng; Xu, Long; Cai, Chao; Chen, Yong-lai; Zhang, Xu-hu; Zheng, Zi-qiao

    2014-09-01

    The influence of 0.72 pct Zn addition on the tensile properties of Al-2.7Cu-1.7Li-0.3Mg alloys was investigated. Their intergranular corrosion (IGC) dependence on aging [T6 type at 423 K (150 °C) and 448 K (175 °C) and T8 type at 423 K (150 °C)] time was studied. An IGC diagram associated with aging process was established. The addition of 0.72 pct Zn enhanced the strength of the Al-Li alloy with T6 type aging at 448 K (175 °C). With aging process, the corrosion mode of the T6-aged Al-Li alloys was changed in the following order: pitting and local IGC (initial aging stage), general IGC (underaging stage), local IGC (near peak-aging stage), and pitting (overaging stage) again. The IGC depth was increased first and then decreased with aging time extension. The corrosion potential change of grains and the microstructure variation were used to explain the IGC sensitivity of the Al-Li alloy with different tempers. Meanwhile, 0.72 pct Zn addition decreased the IGC sensitivity of the Al-Li alloy, especially the T6-aged Al-Li alloy.

  4. Analytical and Experimental Study of Near-Threshold Interactions Between Crack Closure Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    The results of an analytical closure model that considers contributions and interactions between plasticity-, roughness-, and oxide-induced crack closure mechanisms are presented and compared with experimental data. The analytical model is shown to provide a good description of the combined influences of crack roughness, oxide debris, and plasticity in the near-threshold regime. Furthermore, analytical results indicate that closure mechanisms interact in a non-linear manner such that the total amount of closure is not the sum of closure contributions for each mechanism.

  5. Crack healing in cross-ply composites observed by dynamic mechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Christian; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2015-03-01

    Cross-ply composites with healable polymer matrices are characterized using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The [90,0]s samples are prepared by embedding layers of unidirectional glass or carbon fibers in 2MEP4FS, a polymer with thermally reversible covalent cross-links, which has been shown to be capable of healing internal cracks and fully recovering fracture toughness when the crack surfaces are kept in contact. After fabrication, cracks in the composites' transverse plies are observed due to residual thermal stresses introduced during processing. Single cantilever bending DMA measurements show the samples exhibit periods of increasing storage moduli with increasing temperature. These results are accurately modeled as a one-dimensional composite, which captures the underlying physics of the phenomenon. The effect of cracks on the stiffness is accounted for by a shear-lag model. The predicted crack density of the glass fiber composite is shown to fall within a range observed from microscopy images. Crack healing occurs as a function of temperature, with chemistry and mechanics-based rationales given for the onset and conclusion of healing. The model captures the essential physics of the phenomenon and yields results in accord with experimental observations.

  6. Measurement and Modeling of Hydrogen Environment-Assisted Cracking in a Ni-Cu-Al-Ti Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, James T.; Harris, Zachary D.; Dolph, Justin D.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    2016-03-01

    This research improves H decohesion mechanism-based modeling of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in a Ni-Cu superalloy, Monel K-500. New cracking data plus improved model parameters lead to accurate predictions of the cathodic potential dependencies of K TH and H diffusion-limited d a/d t II for Monel K-500 under slow-rising K in 0.6 M NaCl solution. Experiments and modeling demonstrate that IGSCC is eliminated for applied potentials more positive than a critical level between -900 and -840 mVSCE, but slow-subcritical cracking persists by a microvoid-based mechanism.

  7. Fracture mechanics applied to nonisothermal fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.; Meyers, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    Twelve nonisothermal fatigue crack growth tests were performed on Hastelloy-X tubular specimens in which strain and temperature varied simultaneously. Conditions were selected to include nominally elastic and nominally plastic conditions and temperatures up to 982 C. A number of parameters, including the stress intensity factor, strain intensity factor, and J-integral, were examined for their ability to correlate the data. There was no decisive difference between the success of the three parameters. Each parameter correlated data from different strain ranges to within no worse than a factor of 2.1 on da/dn. The effect of strain temperature cycle shape was investigated and found to be moderate, while a strain hold of 1 min had very little effect. An attempt was made to predict nonisothermal test results from isothermal data. These predictions were better than those made by using peak test temperature isothermal data but still not within scatter.

  8. Proceedings: 1985 EPRI Workshop on Remedial Actions for Secondary-Side Intergranular Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    1986-12-01

    During 1984 and 1985, several EPRI projects provided data showing that remedial actions can retard or stop intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in PWR steam generators. These remedies change either crevice-fluid pH, crevice-fluid concentration, or oxide-film composition on structural alloys.

  9. A critical evaluation of the stress-corrosion cracking mechanism in high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong-Min; Pyun, Su-Il; Chun, Young-Gab

    1991-10-01

    Attempts have been made to elucidate the mechanism of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in high-strength Al-Zn-Mg and Al-Li-Zr alloys exposed to aqueous environments by considering the temperature dependence of SCC susceptibility based upon the anodic dissolution and hydrogen embrittlement models. A quantitative correlation which involves the change of threshold stress intensity, K ISCC, with temperature on the basis of anodic dissolution has been developed with the aid of linear elastic fracture mechanics. From the derived correlation, it is concluded that the threshold stress intensity decreases as the test temperature increases. This suggestion is inconsistent with that predicted on the basis of hydrogen embrittlement. It is experimentally observed from the Al-Zn-Mg and Al-Li-Zr alloys that the threshold stress intensity, K,ISCC, decreases and the crack propagation rate, da/dt, over the stress intensity increases with increasing test temperature. From considering the change in SCC susceptibility with temperature, it is suggested that a gradual transition in the mechanism for the stress-corrosion crack propagation occurs from anodic dissolution in stage I, where the crack propagation rate increases sharply with stress intensity, to hydrogen embrittlement in stage II, where the crack propagation rate is independent of stress intensity.

  10. Simulation of crack propagation in fiber-reinforced concrete by fracture mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jun; Li, Victor C

    2004-02-01

    Mode I crack propagation in fiber-reinforced concrete (FRC) is simulated by a fracture mechanics approach. A superposition method is applied to calculate the crack tip stress intensity factor. The model relies on the fracture toughness of hardened cement paste (K{sub IC}) and the crack bridging law, so-called stress-crack width ({sigma}-{delta}) relationship of the material, as the fundamental material parameters for model input. As two examples, experimental data from steel FRC beams under three-point bending load are analyzed with the present fracture mechanics model. A good agreement has been found between model predictions and experimental results in terms of flexural stress-crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) diagrams. These analyses and comparisons confirm that the structural performance of concrete and FRC elements, such as beams in bending, can be predicted by the simple fracture mechanics model as long as the related material properties, K{sub IC} and ({sigma}-{delta}) relationship, are known.

  11. Development of Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics Analysis Code for Pipes with Stress Corrosion Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Hideo; Arakawa, Manabu; Yamashita, Norimichi; Yoshimura, Shinobu

    Risk-Informed integrity management methodologies have been developed for Japanese nuclear power plants. One of the issues of concern is the reliability assessment of piping with flaws due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Therefore, the probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis code has been developed, which can perform the reliability assessment for austenitic stainless steel piping with flaws due to SCC. This paper describes technical basis of this code. This method is based on Monte-Carlo technique considering many sample cases in a piping section, where the initiation and growth of cracks are calculated and piping failures, including leaks and rapture, are evaluated. A notable feature is that multiple cracks can be treated, consequently, assessment of coalescence of cracks and intricate break evaluation of piping section have been included. Moreover, the in-service inspection (ISI) and integrity evaluation by Fitness-for-Service (FFS) code are integrated into the analysis, and the contribution to failure probability decrease can be assessed. Key parameters are determined on a probability basis with the designated probability type throughout the procedure. Size, location and time of crack initiation, coefficients of crack growth due to SCC and factors for piping failure are included in those parameters. With this method the reliability level of the piping through the operation periods can be estimated and the contribution of various parameters including ISI can be quantitatively evaluated.

  12. Tests and analyses for fully plastic fracture mechanics of plane strain mode I crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, F.A.; Parks, D.M.; Kim, Y.J.

    1995-12-31

    Under monotonic loading, structures should ideally be ductile enough to provide continued resistance during crack growth. For fully plastic crack growth in low strength alloys, existing asymptotic solutions for elastic-plastic growing cracks are not applicable because they reach the fracture strain only in regions small compared to the inhomogeneities of the actual fracture process. For the limiting case of non-hardening fully-plastic plane strain crack growth, in a number of geometries and loadings the near-tip fields are characterized in terms of three parameters: an effective angle 2{theta}{sub s} between a pair of slip planes, and the normal stress {sigma}{sub s} and the increment of displacement {delta}u{sub s} across the planes. This three-parameter characterization is in contrast to the one- or two-parameter (K or J and T or Q) characterization in linear or non-linear elastic fracture mechanics. These {theta}{sub s}, {sigma}{sub s}, and {delta}u{sub s} parameters are found form the far-field geometries and loadings through slip line fields or least upper bound analyses based on circular arcs. The resulting crack growth, in terms of the crack tip opening angle (CTOA), is a function of {theta}{sub s}, {sigma}{sub s}, and the material. The geometry of the crack growing between two moving slip planes emanating from its tip reduces this function to the critical fracture shear strain left behind the slip planes, {gamma}f, as a function of {sigma}{sub s}. {gamma}f({sigma}{sub s}) is found theoretically from a hole initiation and growth model. It is also found from preliminary fully plastic crack growth experiments on unequally grooved specimens with fixed-grip extension or 4-point bending of a 1018 CF steel.

  13. Fractal and probability analysis of creep crack growth behavior in 2.25Cr-1.6W steel incorporating residual stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mengjia; Xu, Jijin; Lu, Hao; Chen, Jieshi; Chen, Junmei; Wei, Xiao

    2015-12-01

    In order to clarify creep crack growth behavior in 2.25Cr-1.6W steel incorporating residual stresses, creep crack tests were carried out on the tension creep specimens, in which the residual stresses were generated by local remelting and cooling. Residual stresses in the specimens were measured using Synchrotron X-ray diffraction techniques. The fracture surface of the creep specimen was analyzed using statistical methods and fractal analysis. The relation between fractal dimension of the fracture surface and fracture mode of the creep specimen was discussed. Due to different fracture mechanisms, the probability density functions of the height coordinates vary with the intergranular crack percentage. Good fitting was found between Gaussian distribution and the probability function of height coordinates of the high percentage intergranular crack surface.

  14. Impact of hydraulic suction history on crack growth mechanics in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Hallett, P. D.

    2008-05-01

    The mechanics of crack formation and the influence of soil stress history were described using the crack tip opening angle (CTOA) measured with fractography. Two soils were studied: a model soil consisting of 40% Ca-bentonite and 60% fine silica sand and a remolded paddy soil with similar clay content and mineralogy. Fracture testing used deep-notch bend specimens formed by molding soils at the liquid limit into rectangular bars, equilibrating to soil water suction ranging from 5 kPa to 50 kPa (with some 50 kPa specimens wetted to 5 kPa), and inserting a crack 0.4× specimen thickness. Bend tests at a constant displacement rate of 1 mm min-1 provided data on applied force and load point displacement. The growth and geometry of the cracks were quantified from a series of images to determine the CTOA. Modulus of rupture, evaluated from the peak force, increased as water suction increased. However, rewetting did not alter the peak stress from the 50 kPa value, indicating that shrinkage-induced consolidation was more important than the soil water suction at the onset of testing. CTOA measured during stable crack growth decreased with drying. CTOA decreased even further when specimens equilibrated initially to 50 kPa were rewetted to 5 kPa. These results suggested that CTOA was primarily governed by the stiffness, although rewetting probably altered the capillary stresses in advance of the crack tip. Our future work will combine CTOA with a model that couples hydrological and mechanical processes to take into account the dependency of CTOA on the soil water regime so that crack propagation in soil can be predicted.

  15. Fracture mechanics and surface chemistry studies of fatigue crack growth in an aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, R. P.; Pao, P. S.; Hart, R. G.; Weir, T. W.; Simmons, G. W.

    1980-12-01

    Fracture mechanics and surface chemistry studies were carried out to develop further understanding of the influence of water vapor on fatigue crack growth in aluminum alloys. The room temperature fatigue crack growth response was determined for 2219-T851 aluminum alloy exposed to water vapor at pressures from 1 to 30 Pa over a range of stress intensity factors ( K). Data were also obtained in vacuum (at < 0.50 μPa), and dehumidified argon. The test results showed that, at a frequency of 5 Hz, the rate of crack growth is essentially unaffected by water vapor until a threshold pressure is reached. Above this threshold, the rates increased, reaching a maximum within one order of magnitude increase in vapor pressure. This maximum crack growth rate is equal to that obtained in air (40 to 60 pct relative humidity), distilled water and 3.5 pct NaCl solution on the same material. Parallel studies of the reactions of water vapor with fresh alloy surfaces (produced either by in situ impact fracture or by ion etching) were made by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The extent of surface reaction was monitored by changes in the oxygen AES and XPS signals. Correlation between the fatigue crack growth response and the surface reaction kinetics has been made, and is consistent with a transport-limited model for crack growth. The results also suggest that enhancement of fatigue crack growth by water vapor in the aluminum alloys occurs through a “hydrogen embrittle ment” mechanism.

  16. Ultrasensitive mechanical crack-based sensor inspired by the spider sensory system.

    PubMed

    Kang, Daeshik; Pikhitsa, Peter V; Choi, Yong Whan; Lee, Chanseok; Shin, Sung Soo; Piao, Linfeng; Park, Byeonghak; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Kim, Tae-il; Choi, Mansoo

    2014-12-11

    Recently developed flexible mechanosensors based on inorganic silicon, organic semiconductors, carbon nanotubes, graphene platelets, pressure-sensitive rubber and self-powered devices are highly sensitive and can be applied to human skin. However, the development of a multifunctional sensor satisfying the requirements of ultrahigh mechanosensitivity, flexibility and durability remains a challenge. In nature, spiders sense extremely small variations in mechanical stress using crack-shaped slit organs near their leg joints. Here we demonstrate that sensors based on nanoscale crack junctions and inspired by the geometry of a spider's slit organ can attain ultrahigh sensitivity and serve multiple purposes. The sensors are sensitive to strain (with a gauge factor of over 2,000 in the 0-2 per cent strain range) and vibration (with the ability to detect amplitudes of approximately 10 nanometres). The device is reversible, reproducible, durable and mechanically flexible, and can thus be easily mounted on human skin as an electronic multipixel array. The ultrahigh mechanosensitivity is attributed to the disconnection-reconnection process undergone by the zip-like nanoscale crack junctions under strain or vibration. The proposed theoretical model is consistent with experimental data that we report here. We also demonstrate that sensors based on nanoscale crack junctions are applicable to highly selective speech pattern recognition and the detection of physiological signals. The nanoscale crack junction-based sensory system could be useful in diverse applications requiring ultrahigh displacement sensitivity. PMID:25503234

  17. Ultrasensitive mechanical crack-based sensor inspired by the spider sensory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Daeshik; Pikhitsa, Peter V.; Choi, Yong Whan; Lee, Chanseok; Shin, Sung Soo; Piao, Linfeng; Park, Byeonghak; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Kim, Tae-Il; Choi, Mansoo

    2014-12-01

    Recently developed flexible mechanosensors based on inorganic silicon, organic semiconductors, carbon nanotubes, graphene platelets, pressure-sensitive rubber and self-powered devices are highly sensitive and can be applied to human skin. However, the development of a multifunctional sensor satisfying the requirements of ultrahigh mechanosensitivity, flexibility and durability remains a challenge. In nature, spiders sense extremely small variations in mechanical stress using crack-shaped slit organs near their leg joints. Here we demonstrate that sensors based on nanoscale crack junctions and inspired by the geometry of a spider's slit organ can attain ultrahigh sensitivity and serve multiple purposes. The sensors are sensitive to strain (with a gauge factor of over 2,000 in the 0-2 per cent strain range) and vibration (with the ability to detect amplitudes of approximately 10 nanometres). The device is reversible, reproducible, durable and mechanically flexible, and can thus be easily mounted on human skin as an electronic multipixel array. The ultrahigh mechanosensitivity is attributed to the disconnection-reconnection process undergone by the zip-like nanoscale crack junctions under strain or vibration. The proposed theoretical model is consistent with experimental data that we report here. We also demonstrate that sensors based on nanoscale crack junctions are applicable to highly selective speech pattern recognition and the detection of physiological signals. The nanoscale crack junction-based sensory system could be useful in diverse applications requiring ultrahigh displacement sensitivity.

  18. A New Approximate Fracture Mechanics Analysis Methodology for Composites with a Crack or Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, H. C.; Arocho, A.

    1990-01-01

    A new approximate theory which links the inherent flaw concept with the theory of crack tip stress singularities at a bi-material interface was developed. Three assumptions were made: (1) the existence of inherent flaw (i.e., damage zone) at the tip of the crack, (2) a fracture of the filamentary composites initiates at a crack lying in the matrix material at the interface of the matrix/filament, and (3) the laminate fails whenever the principal load-carrying laminae fails. This third assumption implies that for a laminate consisting of 0 degree plies, cracks into matrix perpendicular to the 0 degree filaments are the triggering mechanism for the final failure. Based on this theory, a parameter bar K sub Q which is similar to the stress intensity factor for isotropic materials but with a different dimension was defined. Utilizing existing test data, it was found that bar K sub Q can be treated as a material constant. Based on this finding a fracture mechanics analysis methodology was developed. The analytical results are correlated well with test results. This new approximate theory can apply to both brittle and metal matrix composite laminates with crack or hole.

  19. Stress-relief cracking of a new ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawrocki, Jesse Gerald

    The mechanism of stress-relief cracking in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) of low-alloy ferritic steels was studied through a tempering study, stress-relaxation testing, and detailed microstructural characterization. A new ferritic alloy steel, HCM2S, was used as the model system. Common 2.25Cr-1 Mo steel, which is susceptible to stress-relief cracking, was used for comparison to HCM2S. The CGHAZ was simulated using Gleeble techniques. A dense distribution of small tungsten-rich carbides within the prior austenite grains induced secondary hardening in the CGHAZ of HCM2S. The CGHAZ of 2.25Cr-1 Mo steel exhibited secondary hardening due to the intragranular precipitation of many Fe-rich M3C carbides. The hardness of HCM2S was more stable at longer times and high temperatures than 2.25Cr-1 Mo steel due to the intragranular precipitation of small W and V-rich carbides. The CGHAZs of HCM2S and 2.25Cr-1 Mo steel were susceptible to stress-relief cracking between 575 and 725°C. HCM2S exhibited C-curve behavior with respect to the time to failure as a function of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) temperature. No segregation of tramp elements to prior austenite grain boundaries was detected in HCM2S. Both intergranular and intragranular carbide precipitation controlled the stress-relief cracking behavior. The amount of intergranular failure increased with test temperature due to the increasing amounts of Fe-rich M3C carbides at the prior austenite grain boundaries. These carbides acted as cavity nucleation sites. The cavities coalesced to form microcracks along prior austenite grain boundaries. Eventually, the remaining uncracked areas could not support the load and failed by ductile rupture. The balance of intergranular and intragranular carbide precipitation resulted in the C-curve behavior. The nose of the C-curve occurred at 675°C. The intragranular regions were strong because of a dense distribution of W/Fe-rich carbides, but the prior austenite grain

  20. Sulfide stress cracking characteristics of high strength steels from the viewpoint of fracture mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Asahi, H.; Ueno, M.

    1994-12-31

    Sulfide stress cracking (SSC) evaluation of high strength OCTG (oil country tubular goods) from the view point of environmental factors has been studied to some extent, but little research has been conducted from the view point of fracture mechanics. In the present study, SSC resistance was evaluated using threshold stress and K{sub 1ssc}. The same ranking of SSC resistance is obtained from both methods. However, SSC resistant steels show higher K{sub 1ssc} than conventional steels even if their respective threshold stresses are the same. For steel products bearing cracks and dents, SSC evaluation using both the threshold stress and the K{sub 1ssc} is suggested.

  1. A fracture mechanics approach for estimating fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels in LWR coolant environments

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H. B.; Chopra, O. K.

    2000-04-10

    A fracture mechanics approach for elastic-plastic materials has been used to evaluate the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels. The fatigue life of such steel, defined as the number of cycles required to form an engineering-size crack, i.e., 3-mm deep, is considered to be composed of the growth of (a) microstructurally small cracks and (b) mechanically small cracks. The growth of the latter was characterized in terms of {Delta}J and crack growth rate (da/dN) data in air and LWR environments; in water, the growth rates from long crack tests had to be decreased to match the rates from fatigue S-N data. The growth of microstructurally small cracks was expressed by a modified Hobson relationship in air and by a slip dissolution/oxidation model in water. The crack length for transition from a microstructurally small crack to a mechanically small crack was based on studies on small crack growth. The estimated fatigue S-N curves show good agreement with the experimental data for these steels in air and water environments. At low strain amplitudes, the predicted lives in water can be significantly lower than the experimental values.

  2. NASCRAC - A computer code for fracture mechanics analysis of crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, D. O.; Eason, E. D.; Thomas, J. M.; Bianca, C. J.; Salter, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    NASCRAC - a computer code for fracture mechanics analysis of crack growth - is described in this paper. The need for such a code is increasing as requirements grow for high reliability and low weight in aerospace components. The code is comprehensive and versatile, as well as user friendly. The major purpose of the code is calculation of fatigue, corrosion fatigue, or stress corrosion crack growth, and a variety of crack growth relations can be selected by the user. Additionally, crack retardation models are included. A very wide variety of stress intensity factor solutions are contained in the code, and extensive use is made of influence functions. This allows complex stress gradients in three-dimensional crack problems to be treated easily and economically. In cases where previous stress intensity factor solutions are not adequate, new influence functions can be calculated by the code. Additional features include incorporation of J-integral solutions from the literature and a capability for estimating elastic-plastic stress redistribution from the results of a corresponding elastic analysis. An example problem is presented which shows typical outputs from the code.

  3. Formation Mechanisms of Cracks Formed During Hot Rolling of Free-Machining Steel Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongjin; Kim, Hyunmin; Shin, Sang Yong; Rhee, Kiho; Ahn, Sang Bog; Lee, Duk Lak; Kim, Nack J.; Lee, Sunghak

    2012-03-01

    In this study, cracks formed in the edge side of Bi-S-based free-machining steel billets during hot rolling were analyzed in detail, and their formation mechanisms were clarified in relation with microstructure. Particular emphasis was placed on roles of bands of pearlites or C- and Mn-rich regions and complex iron oxides present in the edge side. Pearlite bands in the cracked region were considerably bent to the surface, while those in the noncracked region were parallel to the surface. This was because the alignment direction of pearlite bands was irregularly deviated up to 45 deg from the normal direction parallel to the surface, while the billet was rolled and rotated at 90 deg in the same direction between rolling passes. On the edge side, where pearlite bands were bent, iron oxides intruded deeply into the interior along pearlite bands, which worked as stress concentration sites during hot rolling and, consequently, main causes of the crack initiation in the rolled billet. On the surface of the wire rod rolled from the cracked billet, a few scabs were found when some protrusions were folded during hot rolling. In order to prevent the cracking in billets and scab formation in wire rods, (1) the increase of rolling passes and the decrease of reduction ratio for homogeneous rolling of billets and (2) the reduction in sulfur content for minimizing the formation and intrusion of complex iron oxides were suggested.

  4. Subcritical crack-growth behavior of borosilicate glass under cyclic loads: Evidence of a mechanical fatigue effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, S.J.; Dauskardt, R.H.; Bennison, S.J.

    1997-03-01

    Amorphous glasses are generally considered immune to mechanical fatigue effects associated with cyclic loading. In this study surprising new evidence is presented for a mechanical fatigue effect in borosilicate glass, in both moist air and dry nitrogen environments. The fatigue effect occurs at near threshold subcritical crack-growth rates (da/dt < 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} m/s) as the crack extension per cycle approaches the dimensions of the borosilicate glass network. While subcritical crack growth under cyclic loads at higher load levels is entirely consistent with environmentally assisted crack growth, lower growth rates actually exceed those measured under monotonic loads. This suggests a mechanical fatigue effect which accelerates subcritical crack-growth rates. Likely mechanisms for the mechanical fatigue effect are presented.

  5. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of materials from commercial BWRs: Role of grain-boundary microchemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Ruther, W.E.; Sanecki, J.E.; Hins, A.G.; Kassner, T.F.

    1993-12-01

    Constant-extension-rate tensile tests and grain-boundary analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy which were conducted on high- and commercial-purity (HP and CP) Type 304 stainless steel (SS) specimens from irradiated boiling-water reactor (BWR) components to determine susceptibility to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) and to identify the mechanisms of intergranular failure. The susceptibility of HP neutron absorber tubes to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) was higher than that of CP absorber tubes or CP control blade sheath. Contrary to previous beliefs, susceptibility to intergranular fracture could not be correlated with radiation-induced segregation of impurities such as Si, P, C, N, or S, but a correlation was obtained with grain-boundary Cr concentration, indicating a role for Cr depletion that promotes IASCC. Detailed analysis of grain-boundary chemistry was conducted on neutron absorber tubes that were fabricated from two similar heats of HP Type 304 SS of virtually identical bulk chemical composition but exhibiting a significant difference in susceptibility to IGSCC for similar fluence. Grain-boundary concentrations of Cr, Ni, Si, P, S, and C in the crack-resistant and susceptible HP heats were virtually identical. However, grain boundaries of the cracking-resistant material contained less N and more B and Li (transmutation product from B) than those of the crack-susceptible material, indicating beneficial effects of low N and high B contents.

  6. Adhesion mechanisms of bituminous crack sealant to aggregate and laboratory test development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajialiakbari Fini, Elham

    Crack sealing is a common pavement maintenance treatment because it extends pavement service life. However, crack sealant often fails prematurely due to a loss of adhesion. Since current test methods are mostly empirical and only provide a qualitative measure of bond strength, they cannot predict sealant adhesive failure accurately. Hence, there is an urgent need for test methods based on bituminous sealant rheology that can better predict sealant field performance. This study introduces three laboratory tests aimed to assess the bond property of hot-poured crack sealant to pavement crack walls. The three tests are designed to serve the respective needs of producers, engineers, and researchers. The first test implements the principle of surface energy to measure the thermodynamic work of adhesion, which is the energy spent in separating the two materials at the interface. The work of adhesion is reported as a measure of material compatibility at an interface. The second test is a direct adhesion test, a mechanical test which is designed to closely resemble both the installation process and the crack expansion due to thermal loading. This test uses the Direct Tension Test (DTT) device. The principle of the test is to apply a tensile force to detach the sealant from its aggregate counterpart. The maximum load, Pmax, and the energy to separation, E, are calculated and reported to indicate interface bonding. The third test implements the principles of fracture mechanics in a pressurized circular blister test. The apparatus is specifically designed to conduct the test for bituminous crack sealant, asphalt binder, or other bitumen-based materials. In this test, a fluid is injected at a constant rate at the interface between the substrate (aggregate or a standard material) and the adhesive (crack sealant) to create a blister. The fluid pressure and blister height are measured as functions of time; the data is used to calculate Interfacial Fracture Energy (IFE), which is a

  7. Carbonate-type cracking in an FCC Wet gas compressor station

    SciTech Connect

    Mirabel, E. ); Bhattacharjee, S. , P.O. Box 3843, Curacao ); Pazos, N. )

    1991-07-01

    The petroleum refinery industry is becoming increasingly aware of hydrogen-related damage that can be induced by wet hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and amine on equipment and piping fabricated from carbon and low-alloy steel. This paper reports that cracking of second-stage knock-out drum of a fluid catalytic cracking wet gas compressor station has been studied. Carbonate-type cracking mechanism in carbon steel has been identified as responsible for the intergranular and branched cracks that produced the leakage of the vessel. The gas containing CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, ammonia, and cyanides, plus water and sludge trapped in the gas inlet support, assisted by stress concentration due to welding configuration, have been identified as responsible for such a type of cracking.

  8. Is Frost Cracking By Segregation Ice Growth One of the Mechanisms That Erode Bedrock River Margins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alden, L. L.; Sklar, L. S.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers cut vertically and laterally into bedrock. However, control on the width of bedrock rivers is an unsolved problem. In alpine settings, frost cracking is one of the mechanisms that break down bedrock. Segregation ice drives growth of ice lenses within rock masses. When the temperature of the rock is within the "frost cracking window" of -3 to -8 °C, ice lenses can attract liquid water. Expanding ice lenses can exert sufficient pressure to fracture the rock. We hypothesize that alpine rivers may promote segregation ice growth at the river margin by supplying water, but also may inhibit frost cracking by supplying heat. We find support for this hypothesis in data collected along the Tuolumne and Mokelumne rivers in the Sierra Nevada, California. A 1D heat flow model predicts that frost cracking should occur above 2325 masl in this area. To test for a river effect, we measured fracture density along the Tuolumne River at ~2600 masl, finding that density at the river margin is significantly greater than on adjacent hillslopes in the Cathedral Peak granodiorite. We then deployed data loggers on the Mokelumne River (at 2486 masl) over the winter of 2013/2014 to record water, surface and subsurface rock temperatures at varying depths and distances from the river. Temperatures within the frost cracking window were only recorded at a distance of ~5 m from the river, suggesting an insulating effect from the river and snow cover. Rock temperatures 1 m deep equilibrated at ~ 2 °C, significantly colder than predicted by the 1D model. Ongoing work includes terrestrial LIDAR scans to detect erosion of the river bank at the Mokelumne site, and development of a 2D heat flow model to predict subsurface rock temperatures for varying surface boundary conditions and channel morphology. We expect that further analysis will reveal systematic relationships between the surface boundary conditions and rock temperature at depth, enabling predictive modeling of frost cracking

  9. Applicability of the fracture toughness master curve to irradiated highly embrittled steel and intergranular fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; Sokolov, Mikhail A; McCabe, Donald E

    2008-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has evaluated a submerged-arc (SA) weld irradiated to a high level of embrittlement and a temper embrittled base metal that exhibits significant intergranular fracture (IGF) relative to representation by the Master Curve. The temper embrittled steel revealed that the intergranular mechanism significantly extended the transition temperature range up to 150 C above To. For the irradiated highly embrittled SA weld study, a total of 21 1T compact specimens were tested at five different temperatures and showed the Master Curve to be nonconservative relative to the results, although that observation is uncertain due to evidence of intergranular fracture.

  10. Characterization of exposure dependent fatigue crack growth kinetics and damage mechanisms for aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Yunjo

    The effect of environmental exposure [given by the ratio of water vapor pressure to the loading frequency (PH2O/f)] on fatigue crack growth rates (FCGR) and damage mechanisms has been investigated for Al-Cu-Li/Mg alloys tested at constant stress intensity range (DeltaK = KMAX - KMIN). Different exposure dependences of the FCGR are explained by H-embrittlement and 3 rate-limiting processes that are similar for each alloy and aging condition. It is shown that the dislocation slip character (heterogeneous planar vs. wavy) controls FCGR at low to moderate exposures, rather than alloy composition and strengthening precipitate reactivity. However, the benefit of planar slip is significantly reduced at higher exposures. An SEM-based electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD)/stereology method was used to successfully quantify changes in fatigue fracture surface crystallography as a function of exposure for a peak aged Al-Cu-Li alloy and an under-aged Al-Cu-Mg alloy. Near-{111} slip band cracking (SBC) observed under high vacuum conditions is gradually replaced by near-{001}/{011} and high index, {hkl}, cracking planes as PH2O/f is increased. The complete absence of near-{111} SBC at higher exposures suggests H enhanced decohesion rather than slip based damage process enhanced by H. This conclusion was substantiated by direct TEM observation. Focused Ion Beam (FIB) milling was used to produce thin foils for TEM, which successfully revealed the underlying dislocation structure at the crack surface and within surrounding materials in under-aged Al-Cu-Mg tested at exposure conditions of ˜10 -8 and 50 Pa·sec. Both conditions exhibit a similar layer of dislocation cells just below the fracture surface which abruptly changes to localized slip bands away from the fracture surface, confirming the presence of a strain gradient at the crack tip. However, the thickness of the substructure layer and slip band width observed at ˜10-8 Pa·sec was larger than those observed at 50 Pa

  11. Fan-head shear rupture mechanism as a source of off-fault tensile cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    This presentation discusses the role of a recently identified fan-head shear rupture mechanism [1] in the creation of off-fault tensile cracks observed in earthquake laboratory experiments conducted on brittle photoelastic specimens [2,3]. According to the fan-mechanism the shear rupture propagation is associated with consecutive creation of small slabs in the fracture tip which, due to rotation caused by shear displacement of the fracture interfaces, form a fan-structure representing the fracture head. The fan-head combines such unique features as: extremely low shear resistance (below the frictional strength) and self-sustaining tensile stress intensification along one side of the interface. The variation of tensile stress within the fan-head zone is like this: it increases with distance from the fracture tip up to a maximum value and then decreases. For the initial formation of the fan-head high local stresses corresponding to the fracture strength should be applied in a small area, however after completions of the fan-head it can propagate dynamically through the material at low shear stresses (even below the frictional strength). The fan-mechanism allows explaining all unique features associated with the off-fault cracking process observed in photoelastic experiments [2,3]. In these experiments spontaneous shear ruptures were nucleated in a bonded, precut, inclined and pre-stressed interface by producing a local pressure pulse in a small area. Isochromatic fringe patterns around a shear rupture propagating along bonded interface indicate the following features of the off-fault tensile crack development: tensile cracks nucleate and grow periodically along one side of the interface at a roughly constant angle (about 80 degrees) relative to the shear rupture interface; the tensile crack nucleation takes place some distance behind the rupture tip; with distance from the point of nucleation tensile cracks grow up to a certain length within the rupture head zone

  12. Crack Growth Mechanisms under Anti-Plane Shear in Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, Allison Lynne

    The research conducted for this dissertation focuses on determining the mechanisms associated with crack growth in polymer matrix composite laminates subjected to anti-plane shear (mode III) loading. For mode III split-beam test methods were proposed, and initial evaluations were conducted. A single test method was selected for further evaluation. Using this test method, it was determined that the apparent mode III delamination toughness, GIIIc , depended on geometry, which indicated a true material property was not being measured. Transverse sectioning and optical microscopy revealed an array of transverse matrix cracks, or echelon cracks, oriented at approximately 45° and intersecting the plane of the delamination. Subsequent investigations found the echelon array formed prior to the onset of planar delamination advance and that growth of the planar delamination is always coupled to echelon array formation in these specimens. The evolution of the fracture surfaces formed by the echelon array and planar delamination were studied, and it was found that the development was similar to crack growth in homogenous materials subjected to mode III or mixed mode I-III loading, although the composite laminate architecture constrained the fracture surface development differently than homogenous materials. It was also found that, for split-beam specimens such as those used herein, applying an anti-plane shear load results in twisting of the specimen's uncracked region which gives rise to a mixed-mode I-III load condition. This twisting has been related to the apparent mode III toughness as well as the orientation of the transverse matrix cracks. A finite element model was then developed to study the mechanisms of initial echelon array formation. From this, it is shown that an echelon array will develop, but will become self-limiting prior to the onset of planar delamination growth.

  13. Investigation of Hot Cracking Behavior in Transverse Mechanically Arc Oscillated Autogenous AA2014 T6 TIG Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biradar, N. S.; Raman, R.

    2012-09-01

    Hot cracking studies on autogenous AA2014 T6 TIG welds were carried out. Significant cracking was observed during linear and circular welding test (CWT) on 4-mm-thick plates. Weld metal grain structure and amount of liquid distribution during the terminal stages of solidification were the key cause for hot cracking in aluminum welds. Square-wave AC TIG welding with transverse mechanical arc oscillation (TMAO) was employed to study the cracking behavior during linear and CWT. TMAO welds with amplitude = 0.9 mm and frequency = 0.5 Hz showed significant reduction in cracking tendency. The increase in cracking resistance in the arc-oscillated weld was attributed to grain refinement and improved weld bead morphology, which improved the weld metal ductility and uniformity, respectively, of residual tensile stresses that developed during welding. The obtained results were comparable to those of reported favorable results of electromagnetic arc oscillation.

  14. Grain-by-grain study of the mechanisms of crack propagation during iodine stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, R.E.; Dorado, A.O.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the tests conducted to determine the conditions leading to cracking of a specified grain of metal, during the iodine stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of zirconium alloys, focusing on the crystallographic orientation of crack paths, the critical stress conditions, and the significance of the fractographic features encountered. In order to perform crystalline orientation of fracture surfaces, a specially heat-treated Zircaloy-4 having very large grains, grown up to the wall thickness, was used. Careful orientation work has proved that intracrystalline pseudo-cleavage occurs only along basal planes. the effects of anisotropy, plasticity, triaxiality, and residual stresses originated in thermal contraction have to be considered to account for the influence of the stress state. A grain-by-grain calculation led to the conclusion that transgranular cracking always takes place on those bearing the maximum resolved tensile stress perpendicular to basal planes. Propagation along twin boundaries has been identified among the different fracture modes encountered.

  15. Computer modeling of the mechanical behavior of composites -- Interfacial cracks in fiber-reinforced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schmauder, S.; Haake, S. |; Mueller, W.H. |

    1996-06-15

    Computer modeling of materials and especially modeling the mechanical behavior of composites became increasingly popular in the past few years. Among them are examples of micromechanical modeling of real structures as well as idealized model structures of linear elastic and elasto-plastic material response. In this paper, Erdogan`s Integral Equation Method (IEM) is chosen as an example for a powerful method providing principle insight into elastic fracture mechanical situations. IEM or, alternatively, complex function techniques sometimes even allow for deriving analytical solutions such as in the case of a circumferential crack along a fiber/matrix interface. The analytical formulae of this interface crack will be analyzed numerically and typical results will be presented graphically.

  16. Representing Matrix Cracks Through Decomposition of the Deformation Gradient Tensor in Continuum Damage Mechanics Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A method is presented to represent the large-deformation kinematics of intraply matrix cracks and delaminations in continuum damage mechanics (CDM) constitutive material models. The method involves the additive decomposition of the deformation gradient tensor into 'crack' and 'bulk material' components. The response of the intact bulk material is represented by a reduced deformation gradient tensor, and the opening of an embedded cohesive interface is represented by a normalized cohesive displacement-jump vector. The rotation of the embedded interface is tracked as the material deforms and as the crack opens. The distribution of the total local deformation between the bulk material and the cohesive interface components is determined by minimizing the difference between the cohesive stress and the bulk material stress projected onto the cohesive interface. The improvements to the accuracy of CDM models that incorporate the presented method over existing approaches are demonstrated for a single element subjected to simple shear deformation and for a finite element model of a unidirectional open-hole tension specimen. The material model is implemented as a VUMAT user subroutine for the Abaqus/Explicit finite element software. The presented deformation gradient decomposition method reduces the artificial load transfer across matrix cracks subjected to large shearing deformations, and avoids the spurious secondary failure modes that often occur in analyses based on conventional progressive damage models.

  17. Effect of Microstructure on Low Temperature Cracking Behavior of EN82H Welds

    SciTech Connect

    W. J. Mills; C. M. Brown; M. G. Burke

    2001-04-30

    As-fabricated EN82H welds are susceptible to low temperature embrittlements in 54 degree C hydrogenated water. Values of J[sub]IC in water are typically 90% to 98% lower than those in air due to a fracture mechanism transition from microvoid coalescence to hydrogen-included intergranular fracture. Environmental J[sub]IC testing demonstrated that a high temperature (1093 degree C) anneal and furnace-cool alleviates the material's susceptibility to hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking. To identify metallurgical and compositional features that are responsible for the material's environment-sensitive behavior, detailed characterization of the microstructure and grain boundary chemistry for the as-fabricated and as-annealed materials was performed. Results from light optical microscopy, analytical electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, Auger electron spectroscopy and mechanical property characterization are used to provide insight into the observed low temperature embrittlement phenomenon. The key microstructural feature responsible for low temperature cracking in as-fabricated welds appears to be fine niobium and titanium-rich carbonitrides that cover most grain boundaries. These precipitates are effective hydrogen traps that promote hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking. Dissolution the fine carbonitrides during the 1093 degree C anneal reduces grain boundary trapping sites, which accounts for the improved fracture resistance displayed by the annealed weld. The role of strength level in promoting low temperature embrittlement is evaluated by cold-rolling the annealed weld to increase its yield strength from 280 to 640 MPa. The annealed and cold-rolled weld exhibits high toughness in 54 degree C water and shows no evidence of hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking, thereby demonstrating that strength is not a primary cause of low temperature embrittlement.

  18. Mechanics and crack formation in the extracellular matrix with articular cartilage as a model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, Sarah; Silverberg, Jesse; Bonassar, Lawrence; Cohen, Itai; Das, Moumita

    We investigate the mechanical structure-function relations in the extracellular matrix (ECM) with focus on crack formation and failure. As a model system, our study focuses on the ECM in articular cartilage (AC), the tissue that covers the ends of bones, and distributes load in joints including in the knees, shoulders, and hips. The strength, toughness, and crack resistance of native articular cartilage is unparalleled in materials made by humankind. This mechanical response is mainly due to its ECM. The ECM in AC has two major mechanobiological components: a network of the biopolymer collagen and a flexible aggrecan gel. We model this system as a biopolymer network embedded in a swelling gel, and investigate the conditions for the formation and propagation of cracks using a combination of rigidity percolation theory and energy minimization approaches. Our results may provide useful insights into the design principles of the ECM as well as of biomimetic hydrogels that are mechanically robust and can, at the same time, easily adapt to cues in their surroundings. This work was partially supported by a Cottrell College Science Award.

  19. A Fracture-Mechanical Model of Crack Growth and Interaction: Application to Pre-eruptive Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, C.; Sammonds, P.; Kilburn, C.

    2007-12-01

    A greater understanding of the physical processes occurring within a volcano is a key aspect in the success of eruption forecasting. By considering the role of fracture growth, interaction and coalescence in the formation of dykes and conduits as well as the source mechanism for observed seismicity we can create a more general, more applicable model for precursory seismicity. The frequency of volcano-tectonic earthquakes, created by fracturing of volcanic rock, often shows a short-term increase prior to eruption. Using fracture mechanics, the model presented here aims to determine the conditions necessary for the acceleration in fracture events which produces the observed pre-eruptive seismicity. By focusing on the cause of seismic events rather than simply the acceleration patterns observed, the model also highlights the distinction between an accelerating seismic sequence ending with an eruption and a short-term increase which returns to background levels with no activity occurring, an event also observed in the field and an important capability if false alarms are to be avoided. This 1-D model explores the effects of a surrounding stress field and the distribution of multi-scale cracks on the interaction and coalescence of these cracks to form an open pathway for magma ascent. Similarly to seismic observations in the field, and acoustic emissions data from the laboratory, exponential and hyperbolic accelerations in fracturing events are recorded. Crack distribution and inter-crack distance appears to be a significant controlling factor on the evolution of the fracture network, dominating over the effects of a remote stress field. The generality of the model and its basis on fundamental fracture mechanics results makes it applicable to studies of fracture networks in numerous situations. For example looking at the differences between high temperature fracture processes and purely brittle failure the model can be similarly applied to fracture dynamics in the

  20. The mechanics of moisture-expansion cracking in fired-clay ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Andrea; Hall, Christopher

    2013-03-01

    Samian ware (or terra sigillata) is a type of fired-clay ceramic produced at a number of sites in France in the period 50 BC to 200 AD and widely traded in Western Europe. It has a characteristic high-gloss surface, formed by application of a non-calcareous clay slip to the green body before firing. New SEM observations show that the slip layer is frequently crazed, although the cracks are not usually visible to the unaided eye. We discuss the mechanics of the crazing, and show that the cracking is driven by rehydroxylation (RHX) moisture expansion. Observations and analysis aid in understanding the RHX dating of archaeological pottery by showing that craze networks permit efficient transport of moisture through the slip layer.

  1. Time-dependent crack growth behavior of alloy 617 and alloy 230 at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Shawoon Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Two Ni-base solid-solution-strengthened superalloys: INCONEL 617 and HAYNES 230 were studied to check sustained loading crack growth (SLCG) behavior at elevated temperatures appropriate for Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) applictaions with constant stress intensity factor (Kmax= 27.75 MPa✓m) in air. The results indicate a time-dependent rate controlling process which can be characterized by a linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) parameter -- stress intensity factor (K). At elevated temperatures, the crack growth mechanism was best described using a damage zone concept. Based on results and study, SAGBOE (stress accelerated grain boundary oxidation embrittlement) is considered the primary reason for time-dependent SLCG. A thermodynamic equation was considered to correlate all the SLCG results to determine the thermal activation energy in the process. A phenomenological model based on a time-dependent factor was developed considering the previous researcher's time-dependent fatigue crack propagation (FCP) results and current SLCG results to relate cycle-dependent and time-dependent FCP for both alloys. Further study includes hold time (3+300s) fatigue testing and no hold (1s) fatigue testing with various load ratios (R) at 700°C with a Kmax of 27.75 MPa✓m. Study results suggest an interesting point: crack growth behavior is significantly affected with the change in R value in cycle-dependent process whereas in time-dependent process, change in R does not have any significant effect. Fractography study showed intergranular cracking mode for all time-dependent processes and transgranular cracking mode for cycle-dependent processes. In Alloy 230, SEM images display intergranular cracking with carbide particles, dense oxides and dimple mixed secondary cracks for time-dependent 3+300s FCP and SLCG test. In all cases, Alloy 230 shows better crack growth resistance compared to Alloy 617.

  2. A study of creep crack growth in 2219-T851

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensussan, Philippe L.; Jablonski, David A.; Pelloux, Regis M.

    1984-01-01

    Creep crack growth rates were measured in high strength 2219-T851 aluminum alloy with a computerized fully automated test procedure. Crack growth tests were performed on CT specimens with side grooves. The experimental set-up is described. During a test, the specimen is cyclically loaded on a servohydraulic testing machine under computer control, maintained at maximum load for a given hold time at each cycle, unloaded, and then reloaded. Crack lengths are obtained from compliance measurements recorded during each unloading. It is shown that the measured crack growth rates per cycle do represent creep crack growth rates per unit time for hold times longer than 10 seconds. The validity of LEFM concepts for side-grooved specimens is reviewed, and compliance and stress intensity factor calibrations for such specimens are reported. For the range of testing conditions of this study, 2219-T851 is shown to be creep brittle in terms of concepts of fracture mechanics of creeping solids. It is found that, under these testing conditions, a correlation exists between the creep crack growth rates under plane strain conditions and the stress intensity factor ( da/dt = A K 3.8 at 175 °C) for simple K histories in a regime of steady or quasi-steady state crack growth. The micromechanisms of fracture are determined to be of complex nature. The fracture mode is observed to be mixed inter- and transgranular, the relative amount of intergranular fracture decreasing as K and da/dt increase.

  3. Boric acid application guidelines for intergranular corrosion inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Piskor, S.R. . Nuclear Services Div.)

    1990-12-01

    A significant fraction of the operating Pressurized Water Reactor steam generators have used or are using boric acid as an inhibitor to control stress corrosion cracking, intergranular attack, or denting. Boric acid is applied on line, or by means of crevice flushing, low power soaks, or a combination of these methods. When boric acid is used, it is important to have knowledge about its chemical and physical properties, its effect on corrosion, and its correct application. The data on these subjects may be found in a diversity of sources, which are often not readily available or convenient to use. In addition, new information has recently become available. This report has been prepared and revised to be comprehensive treatise on boric acid relevant to its application in nuclear steam generators. Relevant boric acid information from 1987--89 has been added to provide the latest available data from laboratory testing and power plant application. 5 figs.

  4. Application of the damage mechanics to the description of multiple cracks development in shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekov, Oleg

    2014-05-01

    Oil and gas shales are one of the most perspective sources of hydrocarbons. Damage processes are in the focus of any technology of oil shales development because of their extremely low permeability. As a rule the aim of stimulation treatments is to make a system of multiple cracks. Real rock masses are almost heterogeneous. Strength of layered rocks like shales has anisotropic properties. Damage mechanics gives one of the natural ways of description of multiple cracks development. The phenomenological model of multiple cracks evolution in porous media based on general principles of thermodynamics [Kondaurov V.I., Izvekov O.Y., 2009] was generalized to the case of layered rocks. This model takes into account elastic domain existence, dependency of elastic domain on orientation of axis of anisotropy, reduction of elasticity modulus in active process, permeability and porosity change. The model involves latent energy of damage and elastic energy release due to damage evolution. In the report some coupled problems of damage and filtration are discussed. This work was supported by Russian President Grant for Young Scientists MK-7249.2013.5. Kondaurov V.I., Izvekov O.Y. A Model of Saturated Porous Media with an Elastic Brittle Skeleton // Proc. of the 4-th Biot Conference on Poromechanics, POROMECHANICS IV. - EStech Publications, Inc., PA,USA, 2009.

  5. Eddy current modeling by finite element method for evaluation of mechanical properties of the structure cracked in absolute probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzallah, Salaheddine; Chabaat, Mohamed; Belgacem, Fethi Bin Muhammad

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a nondestructive evaluation by sensor Eddy current is used as a tool to control cracks and micro-cracks in materials. A simulation by a numerical approach based on the finite element method is employed to detect cracks in materials and eventually to study their propagation using a crucial parameter such as a Stress Intensity Factor (SIF). This method has emerged as one of the most efficient techniques for prospecting cracks in materials, evaluating SIFs and analyzing crack's growth in the context of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). This technique uses extrapolation of displacements from results compared with those obtained by the integral interaction. On the other hand, crack's growth is analyzed as a model by combining the maximum circumferential stress criteria with the critical plane for predicting the direction of crack growth. Moreover, a constant crack growth increment is determined using the modified Paris's model. Furthermore, stress intensity factors needed for these models are calculated using the domain form of the J-integral interactions.

  6. Evaluation of Generation Mechanism of Vertical Cracks in Top Coat of TBCs During APS Deposition by Laser AE Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, K.; Kuriki, H.; Araki, H.; Kuroda, S.; Enoki, M.

    2015-06-01

    Vertical cracks can be generated in the top coat of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). Since they are known to improve the durability of TBCs such as in the case of dense vertically cracked TBC, clarification of the mechanism and the criteria of cracking are very important. In this study, generation of such vertical cracks was monitored during APS process by laser acoustic emission (AE) method, which is an in situ, non-contact, and non-destructive technique. Temperature was also monitored inside and on the surface of a specimen during APS process for estimation of the temperature field in the top coat. Results of the AE and temperature monitoring were combined to evaluate the relationship between cracking and thermal stress in the top coat. Most of the AE events due to the generation of vertical cracks were detected during rapid heating of the surface of the top coat by the heat flux from the torch. It showed that the vertical cracks were induced due to the tensile stress caused by the temperature difference in the top coat from the rapid heating. Furthermore, the estimated critical thermal stress for vertical cracking from the monitoring results was consistent with a previously reported strength of YSZ coating deposited by thermal spray.

  7. Mechanisms of time-dependent crack growth at elevated temperature. Final project report, July 1, 1986--August 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Stock, S.R.

    1990-04-15

    Objective of this 3-y study was to conduct creep and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments and to characterize the crack tip damage mechanisms in a model material (Cu-1wt%Sb), which is known to cavitate at grain boundaries under creep deformation. Results were: In presence of large scale cavitation damage and crack branching, time rate of creep crack growth da/dt does not correlate with C{sub t} or C{sup *}. When cavitation damage is constrained, da/dt is characterized by C{sub t}. Area fraction of grain boundary cavitated is the single damage parameter for the extent of cavitation damage ahead of crack tips. C{sub t} is used for the creep-fatigue crack growth behavior. In materials prone to rapid cavity nucleation, creep cracks grow faster initially and then reach a steady state whose growth rate is determined by C{sub t}. Percent creep life exhausted correlates with average cavity diameter and fraction of grain boundary area occupied by cavities. Synchrotron x-ray tomographic microscopy was used to image individual cavities in Cu-1wt% Sb. A methodology was developed for predicting the remaining life of elevated temperature power plant components; (C{sub t}){sub avg} was used to correlate creep-fatigue crack growth in Cr-Mo and Cr-Mo-V steel and weldments.

  8. Three-dimensional morphology of pores and cracks in intact and mechanically deformed sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menendez, B.; David, C.; Wong, T.-F.; Martinez-Nistal, A.

    2003-04-01

    We have studied four different sandstones under confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In order to discriminate the void space from the grains, the samples were impregnated with a fluorescent dyed (Rhodamine B) resin and thin-sections with a thickness larger than usual were prepared and studied with CSLM. Two different kinds of samples have been studied: mechanically deformed samples of Darley Dale and Berea sandstones and intact samples of Rothbach and Bentheim sandstones. On each sample several three dimensional blocks have been investigated with size 228 by 152 microns and depths ranging from 35 to 100 microns. From each block a series of tens of parallel "virtual sections" has been recorded, separated by 1 or 2 microns in depth. First we show some examples on Darley Dale and Berea sandstone samples deformed in triaxial experiments. Rotating animations are built from series of 3D views of reconstructed crack networks taken step by step for different block orientations. When put together these 3D views nicely simulate a rotation of the 3D block. To create and run the animations we used the Confocal Assistant free software on a PC. Spectacular 3D animations representing crack networks in mechanically deformed samples are obtained this way in a very short time: some examples will be shown on the screen. Secondly we show on a poster some static 3D reconstructions of the pore and/or crack networks obtained using the Slicer Dicer software. For the intact samples we observe that pore (or grain) walls are smoother in Bentheim sandstone whereas in Rothbach sandstone the presence of a significant amount of coating clay minerals results in a visible surface roughness. Some differences in pore size and pore shape were also observed, with a more homogeneous distribution in Bentheim sandstone than in Rothbach sandstone. In both sandstones we observe the classical pore-to-throats junctions. Complex contact geometry between adjacent grains are sometimes observed. In the

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of intergranular fracture in UO2 with nine empirical interatomic potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Yongfeng Zhang; Paul C Millett; Michael R Tonks; Xian-Ming Bai; S Bulent Biner

    2014-09-01

    The intergranular fracture behavior of UO2 was studied using molecular dynamics simulations with a bicrystal model. The anisotropic fracture behavior due to the different grain boundary characters was investigated with the View the MathML source symmetrical tilt S5 and the View the MathML source symmetrical tilt S3 ({1 1 1} twin) grain boundaries. Nine interatomic potentials, seven rigid-ion plus two core–shell ones, were utilized to elucidate possible potential dependence. Initiating from a notch, crack propagation along grain boundaries was observed for most potentials. The S3 boundary was found to be more prone to fracture than the S5 one, indicated by a lower energy release rate associated with the former. However, some potential dependence was identified on the existence of transient plastic deformation at crack tips, and the results were discussed regarding the relevant material properties including the excess energies of metastable phases and the critical energy release rate for intergranular fracture. In general, local plasticity at crack tips was observed in fracture simulations with potentials that predict low excess energies for metastable phases and high critical energy release rates for intergranular fracture.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of intergranular fracture in UO2 with nine empirical interatomic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Millett, Paul C.; Tonks, Michael R.; Bai, Xian-Ming; Biner, S. Bulent

    2014-09-01

    The intergranular fracture behavior of UO2 was studied using molecular dynamics simulations with a bicrystal model. The anisotropic fracture behavior due to the different grain boundary characters was investigated with the <1 0 0> symmetrical tilt Σ5 and the <1 1 0> symmetrical tilt Σ3 ({1 1 1} twin) grain boundaries. Nine interatomic potentials, seven rigid-ion plus two core-shell ones, were utilized to elucidate possible potential dependence. Initiating from a notch, crack propagation along grain boundaries was observed for most potentials. The Σ3 boundary was found to be more prone to fracture than the Σ5 one, indicated by a lower energy release rate associated with the former. However, some potential dependence was identified on the existence of transient plastic deformation at crack tips, and the results were discussed regarding the relevant material properties including the excess energies of metastable phases and the critical energy release rate for intergranular fracture. In general, local plasticity at crack tips was observed in fracture simulations with potentials that predict low excess energies for metastable phases and high critical energy release rates for intergranular fracture.

  11. Code System for Fracture Mechanics Analysis of Circumferential Surface Cracks in Pipes.

    SciTech Connect

    BRUST, F.

    1999-07-28

    Version 00 The NRCPIPES software is designed to perform elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis for a circumferential surface cracked pipe, i.e., to establish the fracture-failure condition in terms of sustainable load (or stress) or displacement. The NRCPIPES software also includes several evaluation procedures and acceptance criteria for circumferential surface flaws based on the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI criteria, the British R6 Revision 3 Option 1 criteria, and the original Net-Section-Collapse (limit-load) analysis.

  12. Fatigue Crack Growth Mechanisms in High-Pressure Die-Cast Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kadiri, Haitham; Horstemeyer, M. F.; Jordon, J. B.; Xue, Yibin

    2008-01-01

    Microstructure-affected micromechanisms of fatigue crack growth operating near the limit plasticity regime were experimentally identified for the four main commercial high-pressure die-cast (HPDC) magnesium alloys: AM50, AM60, AZ91, and AE44. These fatigue micromechanisms manifested by the concomitant effects of casting pores, interdendritic Al-rich solid solution layer, β-phase particles, Mn-rich inclusions, rare earth-rich intermetallics, dendrite cell size, and surface segregation phenomena. These concomitant mechanisms clearly delineated the fatigue durability observed for the AM50, AM60, AZ91, and AE44 Mg alloys in both the low- and high-cycle fatigue regimes.

  13. Mechanical properties and examination of cracking in TMI-2 pressure vessel lower head material

    SciTech Connect

    Diercks, D.R.; Neimark, L.A.

    1993-09-01

    Mechanical tests have been conducted on material from 15 samples removed from the lower head of the Three Mile Island unit 2 nuclear reactor pressure vessel. Measured properties include tensile properties and hardness profiles at room temperature, tensile and creep properties at temperatures of 600 to 1200{degrees}C, and Charpy V-notch impact properties at {minus}20 to +300{degrees}C. These data, which were used in the subsequent analyses of the margin-to-failure of the lower head during the accident, are presented here. In addition, the results of metallographic and scanning electron microscope examinations of cladding cracking in three of the lower head samples are discussed.

  14. Code System for Fracture Mechanics Analysis of Circumferential Surface Cracks in Pipes.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-07-28

    Version 00 The NRCPIPES software is designed to perform elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis for a circumferential surface cracked pipe, i.e., to establish the fracture-failure condition in terms of sustainable load (or stress) or displacement. The NRCPIPES software also includes several evaluation procedures and acceptance criteria for circumferential surface flaws based on the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI criteria, the British R6 Revision 3 Option 1 criteria, and the original Net-Section-Collapsemore » (limit-load) analysis.« less

  15. The simulation and experimental analysis of the MFL for cracks inspection in pipelines under mechanics-magnetic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaochun; Xue, Li; Xu, Zhengwang

    2011-12-01

    Since the magnetic flux leakage (MFL) for cracks inspection in pipelines can be influenced by stress concentration, it is very difficult to characterize and size the crack or crack-like defects. Thus, the theory model of magnetization and permeability under mechanics-magnetic coupling was derived by thermodynamic equation firstly, and the effects of the applied stress on magnetization and permeability were analyzed theoretically. The finite element method (FEM) under mechanics-magnetic coupling was studied, and the relationship of the crack"s MFL and loaded stresses were simulated and studied using the 3D FEM. And the simulation results were verified by experiments with the help of material testing system (MTS). The simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the experimental results are basically consistent with simulation results, and the MFL density caused by cracks decreases with the applied stress increasing gradually. Therefore, the higher sensitivity sensors should be employed in the MFL measurement for pipeline cracks and the testing data should be compensated while quantitative interpretation.

  16. Aqueous environmental crack propagation in high-strength beta titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.M.; Young, G.A. Jr.; Scully, J.R.; Gangloff, R.P.

    1995-05-01

    The aqueous environment-assisted cracking (EAC) behavior of two peak-aged beta-titanium was characterized with a fracture mechanics method. Beta-21S is susceptible to EAC under rising load in neutral 3.5 pct NaCi at 25 C and {minus}600 mV{sub SCE}, as indicated by a reduced threshold for subcritical crack growth (K{sub TH}), an average crack growth rate of up to 10 {mu}m s, and intergranular fracture compared to microvoid rupture in air. In contrast, the initiation fracture toughness (K{sub ICi}) of Ti-15-3 in moist air is lower than that of Beta-21S at similar high {sigma}{sub YS} (1,300 MPa) but is not degraded by chloride, and cracking is by transgranular microvoid formation. The intergranular EAC susceptibility of Beta-21S correlates with both {alpha}-colonies precipitated at {beta} grain boundaries and intense slip localization; however, the causal factor is not defined. Data suggest that both features, and EAC, are promoted by prolonged solution treatment at high temperature. In a hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) scenario, crack-tip H could be transported by planar slip bands to strongly binding trap sites and stress/strain concentrations at {alpha} colony or {beta} grain boundaries. The EAC in Beta-21S is eliminated by cathodic polarization (to {minus}1,000 mV{sub SCE}), as well as by static loading for times that otherwise produce rising-load EAC.

  17. Creep-Environment Interactions in Dwell-Fatigue Crack Growth of Nickel Based Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Kimberly; Dahal, Jinesh; Sun, Yaofeng; Ghonem, Hamouda

    2014-05-01

    A multi-scale, mechanistic model is developed to describe and predict the dwell-fatigue crack growth rate in the P/M disk superalloy, ME3, as a function of creep-environment interactions. In this model, the time-dependent cracking mechanisms involve grain boundary sliding and dynamic embrittlement, which are identified by the grain boundary activation energy, as well as, the slip/grain boundary interactions in both air and vacuum. Modeling of the damage events is achieved by adapting a cohesive zone (CZ) approach which considers the deformation behavior of the grain boundary element at the crack tip. The deformation response of this element is controlled by the surrounding continuum in both far field (internal state variable model) and near field (crystal plasticity model) regions and the intrinsic grain boundary viscosity which defines the mobility of the element by scaling up the motion of dislocations into a mesoscopic scale. This intergranular cracking process is characterized by the rate at which the grain boundary sliding reaches a critical displacement. A damage criterion is introduced by considering the grain boundary mobility limit in the tangential direction leading to strain incompatibility and failure. Results of simulated intergranular crack growth rate using the CZ model are generated for temperatures ranging from 923 K to 1073 K (650 °C to 800 °C), in both air and vacuum. These results are compared with those experimentally obtained and analysis of the model sensitivity to loading conditions, particularly temperature and oxygen partial pressure, are presented.

  18. The Thermo-Mechanical Problem of Internal and Edge Cracks in Multi-Layered Woven GFRP Laminates at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, T.; Shindo, Y.; Narita, F.

    2004-06-01

    This paper presents the thermo-mechanical response of multi-layered G-11 woven glass/epoxy laminates with internal and/or edge cracks under tensile loading at cryogenic temperatures obtained from a two-dimensional finite element analysis. A condition of generalized plane strain is assumed to exist in the composite. Cracks are considered to occur in the transverse fiber bundles and extend through the entire thickness of the fiber bundles. The finite element model accounts for the temperature-dependent constituent properties. A detailed examination of the Young's modulus and stress distributions near the crack tip is carried out which provides insight into material behavior at cryogenic temperatures.

  19. ON THE ORIGIN OF INTERGRANULAR JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Yurchyshyn, V. B.; Goode, P. R.; Abramenko, V. I.; Steiner, O.

    2011-08-01

    We observe that intergranular jets, originating in the intergranular space surrounding individual granules, tend to be associated with granular fragmentation, in particular, with the formation and evolution of a bright granular lane (BGL) within individual granules. The BGLs have recently been identified as vortex tubes by Steiner et al. We further discover the development of a well-defined bright grain located between the BGL and the dark intergranular lane to which it is connected. Signatures of a BGL may reach the lower chromosphere and can be detected in off-band H{alpha} images. Simulations also indicate that vortex tubes are frequently associated with small-scale magnetic fields. We speculate that the intergranular jets detected in the New Solar Telescope (NST) data may result from the interaction between the turbulent small-scale fields associated with the vortex tube and the larger-scale fields existing in the intergranular lanes. The intergranular jets are much smaller and weaker than all previously known jet-like events. At the same time, they appear much more numerous than the larger events, leading us to the speculation that the total energy release and mass transport by these tiny events may not be negligible in the energy and mass-flux balance near the temperature minimum atop the photosphere. The study is based on the photospheric TiO broadband (1.0 nm) filter data acquired with the 1.6 m NST operating at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. The data set also includes NST off-band H{alpha} images collected through a Zeiss Lyot filter with a passband of 0.025 nm.

  20. The effect of hot isostatic pressing on crack initiation, fatigue, and mechanical properties of two cast aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, T.P.; Orbison, J.G.; Duncan, R.S.; Olivero, P.G.; Peterec, R.H.

    1999-06-01

    This article presents the results of an experimental materials testing program on the effect of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) on the crack initiation, fatigue, and mechanical properties of two cast aluminum alloys: AMS 4220 and 4225. These alloys are often used in castings for high temperature applications. Standard tensile and instrumented Charpy impact tests were performed at room and elevated temperatures. The resulting data quantify improvements in ultimate tensile strength, ductility, and Charpy impact toughness from the HIP process while indicating little change in yield strength for both alloys. In addition standard fracture mechanics fatigue tests along with a set of unique fatigue crack initiation tests were performed on the alloys. Hot isostatic pressing was shown to produce a significant increase in cycles to crack initiation for AMS 4225, while no change was evident in traditional da/dN fatigue crack growth. The data permits comparisons of the two alloys both with and without the HIP process.

  1. Damage Mechanisms and Controlled Crack Propagation in a Hot Pressed Silicon Nitride Ceramic. Ph.D. Thesis - Northwestern Univ., 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony Martin

    1994-01-01

    The subcritical growth of cracks from pre-existing flaws in ceramics can severely affect the structural reliability of a material. The ability to directly observe subcritical crack growth and rigorously analyze its influence on fracture behavior is important for an accurate assessment of material performance. A Mode I fracture specimen and loading method has been developed which permits the observation of stable, subcritical crack extension in monolithic and toughened ceramics. The test specimen and procedure has demonstrated its ability to generate and stably propagate sharp, through-thickness cracks in brittle high modulus materials. Crack growth for an aluminum oxide ceramic was observed to be continuously stable throughout testing. Conversely, the fracture behavior of a silicon nitride ceramic exhibited crack growth as a series of subcritical extensions which are interrupted by dynamic propagation. Dynamic initiation and arrest fracture resistance measurements for the silicon nitride averaged 67 and 48 J/sq m, respectively. The dynamic initiation event was observed to be sudden and explosive. Increments of subcritical crack growth contributed to a 40 percent increase in fracture resistance before dynamic initiation. Subcritical crack growth visibly marked the fracture surface with an increase in surface roughness. Increments of subcritical crack growth loosen ceramic material near the fracture surface and the fracture debris is easily removed by a replication technique. Fracture debris is viewed as evidence that both crack bridging and subsurface microcracking may be some of the mechanisms contributing to the increase in fracture resistance. A Statistical Fracture Mechanics model specifically developed to address subcritical crack growth and fracture reliability is used together with a damaged zone of material at the crack tip to model experimental results. A Monte Carlo simulation of the actual experiments was used to establish a set of modeling input

  2. Creep crack growth behavior of aluminum alloy 2519. Part 1: Experimental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, B.C.; Saxena, A.; McDowell, D.L.; Hall, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    The discipline of time-dependent fracture mechanics has traditionally focused on the creep crack growth behavior of high-temperature materials that display creep-ductile behavior, such as stainless steels and chromium-molybdenum steels. Elevated temperature aluminum alloys, however, have been developed that exhibit creep-brittle behavior; in this case, the creep crack growth rate correlates with the stress intensity factor, K. The fracture characteristics of aluminum alloy 2519-T87 were studied at 135 C, and the creep and creep crack growth behavior were characterized utilizing experimental and numerical methods. The strain to failure for creep deformation specimens was limited to only 1.2 to 2.0%. Creep crack growth tests revealed a unique correlation between the creep crack growth rate and K, a result consistent with creep-brittle behavior. No experimental correlation was found between the creep crack growth rate and the C{sub t} parameter. Microscopy of fracture surfaces revealed distinct regions of intergranular and transgranular fracture, and the transition between the fracture regions was found to occur at a critical K-level. Experimental results also appeared to show that initiation of crack growth (incubation) is controlled by the accumulation of a critical amount of damage ahead of the crack tip and that a correlation exists between the incubation time and K. Total time to failure is viewed as a summation of the incubation period and the crack growth period, and the design importance of incubation time is discussed.

  3. Analysis of cracked core spray injection line piping from the Quad Cities Units 1 and 2 boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Diercks, D.R.

    1983-12-01

    Elbow assemblies and adjacent piping from the loops A and B core spray injection lines of Quad Cities Units 1 and 2 Boiling Water Reactors have been examined in order to determine the nature and causes of coolant leakages and flaw indications detected during hydrostatic tests and subsequent ultrasonic inspections. The elbow assemblies were found to contain multiple intergranular cracks in the weld heat-affected zones. The cracking was predominantly axial in orientation in the forged elbow and wedge components, whereas mixed axial and circumferential cracking was seen in the wrought piping pieces. In at least two instances, axial cracks completely penetrated the circumferential weld joining adjacent components. Based upon the observations made in the present study, the failures were attributed to intergranular stress corrosion cracking caused by the weld-induced sensitized microstructure and residual stresses present; dissolved oxygen in the reactor coolant apparently served as the corrosive species. The predominantly axial orientation of the cracks present in the forged components is believed to be related to the banded microstructure present in these components. The metallographic studies reported are supplemented by x-radiography, chemical analysis and mechanical test results, determinations of the degree of sensitization present, and measurements of weld metal delta ferrite content.

  4. A review of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, P.

    1994-08-01

    The aim of this review is to assess from the available data whether irradiation in PWR primary water can adversely affect the properties of stainless steels due to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). The following aspects are examined: (i) Irradiation damage of the material, (ii) The influence of water radiolysis. Since the irradiation damage processes are similar for both PWR and BWR systems, differences observed in the intergranular cracking properties of core components of both systems must be attributable to differences in the synergistic interactions with the coolant chemistry. These aspects are analysed in detail to determine to what extent BWR experience can be used to predict IASCC in PWR core components. Several related potential failure mechanisms are also reviewed such as radiation hardening, radiation creep and helium or hydrogen embrittlement. The probable role of some or all of these failure mechanisms in core component failures observed to date, and in experiments ostensibly designed to observe IASCC, is critically examined.

  5. Fracture mechanics and surface chemistry investigations of environment-assisted crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.; Chou, Y. T.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that environment-assisted subcritical crack growth in high-strength steels and other high-strength alloys (particularly in hydrogen and in hydrogenous environments) is an important technological problem of long standing. This problem is directly related to issues of structural integrity, durability, and reliability. The terms 'hydrogen embrittlement' and 'stress corrosion cracking' have been employed to describe the considered phenomenon. This paper provides a summary of contributions made during the past ten years toward the understanding of environmentally assisted crack growth. The processes involved in crack growth are examined, and details regarding crack growth and chemical reactions are discussed, taking into account crack growth in steels exposed to water/water vapor, the effect of hydrogen, reactions involving hydrogen sulfide, and aspects of fracture surface morphology and composition. Attention is also given to the modeling of crack growth response, crack growth in gas mixtures, and the interaction of solute atoms with the crack-tip stress field.

  6. In situ electro-mechanical experiments and mechanics modeling of tensile cracking in indium tin oxide thin films on polyimide substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Cheng; Jia, Zheng; Bianculli, Dan; Li, Teng; Lou, Jun

    2011-05-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films supported by polymer substrates have been widely used as transparent electrodes/interconnects in flexible electronics. Understanding the electro-mechanical behaviors of such material system is crucial for reliable operation of flexible devices under large deformation. In this paper, we performed in situ mechanical and electrical tests of ITO thin films with two different thicknesses (200 and 80 nm) deposited on polyimide substrates inside a scanning electron microscope. The crack initiation and propagation, crack density evolution and the corresponding electrical resistance variation were systematically investigated. It was found that cracks initiated at a higher tensile strain level and saturated with a higher density in thinner ITO films. Integrated with a coherently formulated mechanics model, the cohesive toughness and fracture strength of ITO thin films and the ITO/polyimide interfacial toughness were quantitatively determined. The experimentally observed thickness dependence of the saturated crack density in ITO thin films was also quantitatively verified by the model.

  7. Bacterial division. Mechanical crack propagation drives millisecond daughter cell separation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoxue; Halladin, David K; Rojas, Enrique R; Koslover, Elena F; Lee, Timothy K; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Theriot, Julie A

    2015-05-01

    When Staphylococcus aureus undergoes cytokinesis, it builds a septum, generating two hemispherical daughters whose cell walls are only connected via a narrow peripheral ring. We found that resolution of this ring occurred within milliseconds ("popping"), without detectable changes in cell volume. The likelihood of popping depended on cell-wall stress, and the separating cells split open asymmetrically, leaving the daughters connected by a hinge. An elastostatic model of the wall indicated high circumferential stress in the peripheral ring before popping. Last, we observed small perforations in the peripheral ring that are likely initial points of mechanical failure. Thus, the ultrafast daughter cell separation in S. aureus appears to be driven by accumulation of stress in the peripheral ring and exhibits hallmarks of mechanical crack propagation. PMID:25931560

  8. Mechanical crack propagation drives millisecond daughter cell separation in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoxue; Halladin, David K.; Rojas, Enrique R.; Koslover, Elena F.; Lee, Timothy K.; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Theriot, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    When Staphylococcus aureus undergoes cytokinesis, it builds a septum generating two hemispherical daughters whose cell walls are only connected via a narrow peripheral ring. We found that resolution of this ring occurred within milliseconds (“popping”), without detectable changes in cell volume. The likelihood of popping depended on cell wall stress, and the separating cells split open asymmetrically leaving the daughters connected by a hinge. An elastostatic model of the wall indicated high circumferential stress in the peripheral ring before popping. Finally, we observed small perforations in the peripheral ring that are likely initial points of mechanical failure. Thus, the ultrafast daughter cell separation in S. aureus appears to be driven by accumulation of stress in the peripheral ring, and exhibits hallmarks of mechanical crack propagation. PMID:25931560

  9. Environment-assisted cracking of iron aluminide in 3.5% NaCl solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, H.; Qiao, L.; Mao, X.

    1996-03-15

    In 3.5% NaCl solution, the environment-assisted cracking behavior of an iron aluminide alloy was studied. Slow strain rate tests were done at different electrochemical potentials. A 55% loss in ductility was found when tested at anodic potentials, which suggests a material degradation by the aqueous environment. Results of the experiments that were carried out using pre-immersed specimens and notched tensile specimens confirmed this material degradation to be stress corrosion cracking (SCC). To identify the mechanism, an electrochemical permeation technique was employed. By measuring the diffusible hydrogen concentration, sensitivity to hydrogen embrittlement has been assessed at different potentials. Fracture surfaces were examined under the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Fracture mode was found to be mainly transgranular quasi-cleavage, except the ones tested at anodic potentials (that are 0 mV and {minus}100 mV vs SCE) on which intergranular SCC was found near the edge. It is believed that these cracks were initiated from the pits. These results indicate that the environment-assisted cracking is an intergranular SCC, controlled by anodic dissolution mechanism.

  10. Effect of electrode potential on stress corrosion cracking and crack chemistry of a nickel-base superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, J.A.; Kelly, R.G.; Gangloff, R.P.

    1997-12-01

    The aqueous environment assisted cracking (EAC) resistance of a superalloy, Alloy 718 (Ni-19Fe-18Cr-5Nb-1Ti-0.6Al), was characterized by a rising displacement fracture mechanics methods. This precipitation-strengthened alloy was susceptible to room-temperature EAC in acidified sodium chloride at cathodic and anodic potentials. The threshold for stable crack growth in chloride (K{sub TH}) was as low as 47 MPa{radical}m, reduced from the laboratory air crack initiation toughness (K{sub ICi}) of 81--85 MPa{radical}m. The fracture morphology changed from ductile microvoids in air to a mixture of voids, transgranular facets, and intergranular facets in acidic chloride. Subcritical crack growth rates were on the order of 5 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s for rising displacement at a stress intensity of 70 MPa{radical}m and were an order of magnitude slower for constant displacement conditions. The degree of reduction in K{sub TH} from K{sub ICi}, the amount and type of fracture surface features, and the crack growth rate depended on the applied electrode potential. Microstructure produced by sub- or super-{delta} solvus heat treatment affected these dependencies. Ion analysis indicated that alloy dissolution occurred at the crack tip even at cathodic polarizations.

  11. Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, Jeremy T; Gussev, Maxim N

    2011-04-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today s nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. . Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of IASCC are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure to irradiation, stress, and corrosive environment for all core internal components. The objective of this effort within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program is to evaluate the response and mechanisms of IASCC in austenitic stainless steels with single variable experiments. A series of high-value irradiated specimens has been acquired from the past international research programs, providing a valuable opportunity to examine the mechanisms of IASCC. This batch of irradiated specimens has been received and inventoried. In addition, visual examination and sample cleaning has been completed. Microhardness testing has been performed on these specimens. All samples show evidence of hardening, as expected, although the degree of hardening has saturated and no trend with dose is observed. Further, the change in hardening can be converted to changes in mechanical properties. The calculated yield stress is consistent with previous data from light water reactor conditions. In addition, some evidence of changes in deformation mode was identified via examination of the microhardness indents. This analysis may provide further insights into the deformation mode under larger scale tests. Finally, swelling analysis was performed using immersion density methods. Most alloys showed some evidence of swelling, consistent with the expected trends for this class of alloy. The Hf-doped alloy showed densification rather than swelling. This observation may be

  12. Stress-intensity factors of r-cracks in fiber-reinforced composites under thermal and mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, W. H.; Schmauder, S.

    1993-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of the calculation of stress-intensity factors at the tips of radial matrix cracks (r-cracks) in fiber-reinforced composites under thermal and/or transverse uniaxial or biaxial mechanical loading. The crack is either located in the immediate vicinity of a single fiber or it terminates at the interface between the fiber and the matrix. The problem is stated and solved numerically within the framework of linear elasticity using Erdogan's integral equation technique. It is shown that the solutions for purely thermal and purely mechanical loading can simply be superimposed in order to obtain the results of the combined loading case. Stress-intensity factors (SIFs) are calculated for various lengths and distances of the crack from the interface for each of these loading conditions. The behavior of the SIFs for cracks growing towards or away from the interface is examined. The role of the elastic mismatch between the fibers and the matrix is emphasized and studied extensively using the so-called Dundurs' parameters. It is shown that an r-crack, which is remotely located from the fiber, can either be stabilized or destabilized depending on both the elastic as well as the thermal mismatch of the fibrous composite. Furthermore, Dundurs' parameters are used to predict the exponent of the singularity of the crack tip elastic field and the behavior of the corresponding SIFs for cracks which terminate at the interface. An analytical solution for the SIFs is derived for all three loading conditions under the assumption that the elastic constants of the matrix and the fiber are equal. It is shown that the analytical solution is in good agreement with the corresponding numerical results. Moreover, another analytical solution from the literature, which is based upon Paris' equation for the calculation of stress-intensity factors, is compared with the numerical results and it is shown to be valid only for extremely short r-cracks touching the

  13. Reaction Control System Thruster Cracking Consultation: NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Materials Super Problem Resolution Team (SPRT) Findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Shah, Sandeep R.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    The shuttle orbiter s reaction control system (RCS) primary thruster serial number 120 was found to contain cracks in the counter bores and relief radius after a chamber repair and rejuvenation was performed in April 2004. Relief radius cracking had been observed in the 1970s and 1980s in seven thrusters prior to flight; however, counter bore cracking had never been seen previously in RCS thrusters. Members of the Materials Super Problem Resolution Team (SPRT) of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) conducted a detailed review of the relevant literature and of the documentation from the previous RCS thruster failure analyses. It was concluded that the previous failure analyses lacked sufficient documentation to support the conclusions that stress corrosion cracking or hot-salt cracking was the root cause of the thruster cracking and lacked reliable inspection controls to prevent cracked thrusters from entering the fleet. The NESC team identified and performed new materials characterization and mechanical tests. It was determined that the thruster intergranular cracking was due to hydrogen embrittlement and that the cracking was produced during manufacturing as a result of processing the thrusters with fluoride-containing acids. Testing and characterization demonstrated that appreciable environmental crack propagation does not occur after manufacturing.

  14. Flight monitor for jet engine disk cracks and the use of critical length criterion of fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barranger, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    A disk crack detector is discussed which is intended to operate under flight conditions. It monitors the disk rim for surface cracks emanating from the blade root interface. An eddy current type sensor, with a remotely located capacitance/conductance bridge and signal analyzer, can reliably detect a simulated crack 3 mm long. The sensor was tested on a spinning turbine disk at 540 C. Tests indicate that the system is useful at disk rim velocities to 460 m/sec. By using fracture mechanics, it is shown for Inconel 718 th at a crack operating under a rim stress of 34 x ten to the 7th power N/sqm has a critical length of 18 mm.

  15. Near-tip dual-length scale mechanics of mode-I cracking in laminate brittle matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, R.; Islam, S.; Charalambides, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of an on-going study of the near-tip mechanics of mode-I cracking in brittle matrix composite laminates. A finite element model is developed within the context of two competing characteristic lengths present in the composite: the microstructural length (the thickness of the layers) and a macro-length (crack-length, uncracked ligament size, etc.). For various values of the parameters which describe the ratio of these lengths and the constituent properties, the stresses ahead of a crack perpendicular to the laminates are compared with those predicted by assuming the composite is homogeneous orthotropic. The results can be used to determine the conditions for which homogenization can provide a sufficiently accurate description of the stresses in the vicinity of the crack-tip.

  16. Crustal Rock Fracture Mechanics for Design and Control of Artificial Subsurface Cracks in Geothermal Energy Extraction Engineering ({Gamma}-Project)

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Hideaki

    1983-12-15

    Recently a significant role of artificial and/or natural cracks in the geothermal reservoir has been demonstrated in the literatures (Abe, H., et al., 1983, Nielson, D.L. and Hullen, J.B., 1983), where the cracks behave as fluid paths and/or heat exchanging surfaces. Until now, however, there are several problems such as a design procedure of hydraulic fracturing, and a quantitative estimate of fluid and heat transfer for reservoir design. In order to develop a design methodology of geothermal reservoir cracks, a special distinguished research project, named as ''{Lambda}-Project'', started at Tohoku University (5 years project, 1983-1988). In this project a basic fracture mechanics model of geothermal reservoir cracks is being demonstrated and its validation is being discussed both theoretically and experimentally. This paper descibes an outline of ''{Lambda}-Project''.

  17. Analysis of crack propagation as an energy absorption mechanism in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, D. F.; Murphy, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    The crack initiation and crack propagation capability was extended to the previously developed generalized plane strain, finite element micromechanics analysis. Also, an axisymmetric analysis was developed, which contains all of the general features of the plane analysis, including elastoplastic material behavior, temperature-dependent material properties, and crack propagation. These analyses were used to generate various example problems demonstrating the inelastic response of, and crack initiation and propagation in, a boron/aluminum composite.

  18. Mechanisms of decrease in fatigue crack propagation resistance in irradiated and melted UHMWPE#

    PubMed Central

    Oral, Ebru; Malhi, Arnaz S.; Muratoglu, Orhun K.

    2005-01-01

    Adhesive/abrasive wear in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been minimized by radiation cross-linking. Irradiation is typically followed by melting to eliminate residual free radicals that cause oxidative embrittlement. Irradiation and subsequent melting reduce the strength and fatigue resistance of the polymer. We determined the radiation dose dependence and decoupled the effects of post-irradiation melting on the crystallinity, mechanical properties and fatigue crack propagation resistance of room temperature irradiated UHMWPE from those of irradiation alone. Stiffness and yield strength, were largely not affected by increasing radiation dose but were affected by changes in crystallinity, whereas plastic properties, ultimate tensile strength and elongation at break, were dominated at different radiation dose ranges by changes in radiation dose or crystallinity. Fatigue crack propagation resistance was shown to decrease with increase in radiation dose and with decrease in crystalline content. Morphology of fracture surfaces revealed loss of ductility with increase in radiation dose and more detrimental effects on ductility at lower radiation doses after post-irradiation melting. PMID:16105682

  19. Mechanism and estimation of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

    2002-08-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the Code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. This report provides an overview of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR coolant environments. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters (such as steel type, strain range, strain rate, temperature, dissolved-oxygen level in water, and flow rate) on the fatigue lives of these steels. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves for austenitic stainless steels as a function of the material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating environmental effects into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented. The influence of reactor environments on the mechanism of fatigue crack initiation in these steels is also discussed.

  20. Stress corrosion cracking on irradiated 316 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furutani, Gen; Nakajima, Nobuo; Konishi, Takao; Kodama, Mitsuhiro

    2001-02-01

    Tests on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) were carried out by using cold-worked (CW) 316 stainless steel (SS) in-core flux thimble tubes which were irradiated up to 5×10 26 n/m 2 ( E>0.1 MeV) at 310°C in a Japanese PWR. Unirradiated thimble tube was also tested for comparison with irradiated tubes. Mechanical tests such as the tensile, hardness tests and metallographic observations were performed. The susceptibility to SCC was examined by the slow strain rate test (SSRT) under PWR primary water chemistry condition and compositional analysis on the grain boundary segregation was made. Significant changes in the mechanical properties due to irradiation such as a remarkable increase of strength and hardness, and a considerable reduction of elongation were seen. SSRT results revealed that the intergranular fracture ratio (%IGSCC) increased as dissolved hydrogen (DH) increased. In addition, SSRT results in argon gas atmosphere showed a small amount of intergranular cracking. The depletion of Fe, Cr, Mo and the enrichment of Ni and Si were observed in microchemical analyses on the grain boundary.

  1. Role of Localized Deformation in Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Elaine A.; McMurtrey, Michael D.; Jiao, Zhijie; Was, Gary S.

    2012-01-01

    Intergranular cracking of irradiated austenitic alloys depended on localized grain boundary stress and deformation in both high-temperature aqueous and argon environments. Tensile specimens were irradiated with protons to doses of 1 to 7 dpa and then strained in high-temperature argon, simulated boiling water reactor normal water chemistry, and supercritical water environments. Quantitative measurements confirmed that the initiation of intergranular cracks was promoted by (1) the formation of coarse dislocation channels, (2) discontinuous slip across grain boundaries, (3) a high inclination of the grain boundary to the tensile axis, and (4) low-deformation propensity of grains as characterized by their Schmid and Taylor factors. The first two correlations, as well as the formation of intergranular cracks at the precise locations of dislocation channel-grain boundary intersections are evidence that localized deformation drives crack initiation. The latter two correlations are evidence that intergranular cracking is promoted at grain boundaries experiencing elevated levels of normal stress.

  2. Intergranular corrosion of Type 409 stainless steel used in automotive exhaust applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brossia, C.S.; Martin, K.L.

    1998-12-31

    Automotive exhaust systems must meet increasingly stringent lifetime requirements, and thus the incorporation of stainless steels (primarily ferritic) has increased. One of the failure mechanisms that is rarely encountered, but does occur, is intergranular corrosion. Intergranular corrosion of ferritic stainless steels is believed to occur via a similar mechanism as is observed in austenitic stainless, namely precipitation of chromium-carbon nitride (Cr-C/N) particles at the grain boundaries leading to Cr-depleted regions. In the present study, the effect of thermal history (including heat treatment, welding and post-weld heat treatment) and alloy chemistry on the level of sensitization of Type 409SS were examined.

  3. Mechanism of Irradiation Assisted Cracking of Core Components in Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Was, Gary S; Atzmon, Michael; Wang, Lumin

    2003-04-28

    The overall goal of the project is to determine the mechanism of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). IASCC has been linked to hardening, microstructural and microchemical changes during irradiation. Unfortunately, all of these changes occur simultaneously and at similar rates during irradiation, making attribution of IASCC to any one of these features nearly impossible to determine. The strategy set forth in this project is to develop means to separate microstructural from microchemical changes to evaluate each separately for their effect on IASCC. In the first part, post irradiation annealing (PIA) treatments are used to anneal the irradiated microstructure, leaving only radiation induced segregation (RIS) for evaluation for its contribution to IASCC. The second part of the strategy is to use low temperature irradiation to produce a radiation damage dislocation loop microstructure without radiation induced segregation in order to evaluate the effect of the dislocation microstructure alone.

  4. Fatigue Crack Growth Mechanisms for Nickel-based Superalloy Haynes 282 at 550-750 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozman, Kyle A.; Kruzic, Jamie J.; Sears, John S.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2015-10-01

    The fatigue crack growth rates for nickel-based superalloy Haynes 282 were measured at 550, 650, and 750 °C using compact tension specimens with a load ratio of 0.1 and cyclic loading frequencies of 25 and 0.25 Hz. The crack path was observed to be primarily transgranular for all temperatures, and the observed effect of increasing temperature was to increase the fatigue crack growth rates. The activation energy associated with the increasing crack growth rates over these three temperatures was calculated less than 60 kJ/mol, which is significantly lower than typical creep or oxidation mechanisms; therefore, creep and oxidation cannot explain the increase in fatigue crack growth rates. Transmission electron microscopy was done on selected samples removed from the cyclic plastic zone, and a trend of decreasing dislocation density was observed with increasing temperature. Accordingly, the trend of increasing crack growth rates with increasing temperature was attributed to softening associated with thermally assisted cross slip and dislocation annihilation.

  5. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Clark, R. W.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain, R. V.

    2007-11-06

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from January to December 2002. Topics that have been investigated include: (a) environmental effects on fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs in BWRs, (c) evaluation of causes and mechanisms of irradiation-assisted cracking of austenitic SS in PWRs, and (d) cracking in Ni-alloys and welds. A critical review of the ASME Code fatigue design margins and an assessment of the conservation in the current choice of design margins are presented. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to define the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic SSs. Experimental data are presented on the effects of surface roughness on fatigue crack initiation in these materials in air and LWR environments. Crack growth tests were performed in BWR environments on SSs irradiated to 0.9 and 2.0 x 10{sup 21} n x cm{sup -2}. The crack growth rates (CGRs) of the irradiated steels are a factor of {approx}5 higher than the disposition curve proposed in NUREG-0313 for thermally sensitized materials. The CGRs decreased by an order of magnitude in low-dissolved oxygen (DO) environments. Slow-strain-rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in high-purity 289 C water on steels irradiated to {approx}3 dpa. The bulk S content correlated well with the susceptibility to intergranular SCC in 289 C water. The IASCC susceptibility of SSs that contain >0.003 wt. % S increased drastically. bend tests in inert environments at 23 C were conducted on broken pieces of SSRT specimens and on unirradiated specimens of the same materials after hydrogen charging. The results of the tests and a review of other data in the literature

  6. Shrinkage Cracking: A mechanism for self-sustaining carbon mineralization reactions in olivine rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Fusseis, F.; Lisabeth, H. P.; Xing, T.; Xiao, X.; De Andrade, V. J. D.; Karato, S. I.

    2015-12-01

    The hydration and carbonation of olivine results in an up to ~44% increase in solid molar volume, which may choke off of fluid supply and passivate reactive surfaces, thus preventing further carbonation reactions. The carbonation of olivine has ben studied extensively in the laboratory. To date, observations from these experimental studies indicate that carbonation reaction rates generally decrease with time and the extent of carbonation is limited in olivine rocks. Field studies, however, show that 100% hydration and carbonation occur naturally in ultramafic rocks. The disagreement between the laboratory results under controlled conditions and the field observations underlines the lack of understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the self-sustaining carbonation interaction in nature. We developed a state-of-the-art pressurized hydrothermal cell that is transparent to X-rays to characterize the real-time evolution of pore geometry during fluid-rock interaction using in-situ synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography. Through a time series of high-resolution 3-dimensional images, we document the microstructural evolution of a porous olivine aggregate reacting with a sodium bicarbonate solution at elevated pressure and temperature conditions. We observed porosity increases, near constant rate of crystal growth, and pervasive reaction-induced fractures. Based on the nanometer scale tomography data, we propose that shrinkage cracking is the mechanism responsible for producing new reactive surface and keep the carbonation reaction self-sustaining in our experiment. Shrinkage cracks are commonly observed in drying mud ponds, cooling lava flows and ice wedge fields. Stretching of a contracting surface bonded to a substrate of nearly constant dimensions leads to a stress buildup in the surface layer. When the stress exceeds the tensile strength, polygonal cracks develop in the surface layer. In our experiments, the stretching mismatch between the surface and interior of

  7. Toughened epoxy polymers: Fatigue crack propagation mechanisms. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Azimi, H.R.

    1994-01-01

    This study examines several mechanisms by which the fatigue crack propagation (FCP) resistance of shear-yielding thermoset polymers can be improved. Specifically, this research has four objectives as follows: first, to develop a mechanistic understanding of the FCP behavior of rubber-modified thermoset polymers; second, to understand the effect of strength and shape of the inorganic fillers on the FCP resistance and micromechanisms in filled epoxy polymers; third, to elucidate the nature of the interactions among the crack-tip shielding mechanisms in thermoset polymers subjected to cyclic loading and synergistically toughened with both rubber and inorganic particles (i.e., hybrid composites); fourth, to study the role of interfaces on the synergistic interactions in FCP behavior of hybrid composites. The model - matrix material consists of a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) based type epoxy cured with piperidine. Parallel to the first objective, the epoxy matrix was modified with rubber while changing volume fraction, type, and size of the rubber particles. To accomplish the second goal, the epoxy polymers were modified by a total 10 volume percent of either one of the following three types of inorganic modifiers: hollow glass spheres (HGS); solid glass spheres (SGS); and short glass fibers (SGF). The third goal was met by processing three different systems of hybrid epoxy composites modified by (1) CTBN rubber and HGS, (2) CTBN rubber and SGS, and (3) CTBN rubber and SGF. The total volume fraction of the two modifiers in each hybrid system was kept constant at 10 percent while systematically changing their ratio. To meet the fourth objective, the surface properties of the SGS particles in the hybrid system were altered using adhesion promoter. A mechanistic understanding of the FCP behavior of rubber-modified epoxies was achieved by relating fractographs to observed FCP behavior.

  8. Hydrogen-induced crack nucleation in tensile testing of EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malitckii, Evgenii; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Hänninen, Hannu

    2015-11-01

    The effect of continuous hydrogen charging on tensile properties of EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels was studied at room and elevated temperatures of 100 °C and 300 °C. The hydrogen effect decreases with increase of the temperature for ODS-EUROFER steel, while susceptibility to hydrogen of EUROFER 97 steel remains approximately the same at all testing temperatures. Continuous hydrogen charging results in a reduction of the grain boundary cohesion of the EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels tested at RT. With increase of the testing temperature up to 300 °C EUROFER 97 steel exhibits relatively high amount of micro-cracks which agglomerate in sub-micrometer size cracks, while the hydrogen-induced intergranular crack nucleation in ODS-EUROFER steel is effectively suppressed. Possible mechanism of the hydrogen-induced crack nucleation and propagation under applied external stress is discussed.

  9. Evaluation and Repair of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking in Alloy 600/182 Control Rod Drive Mechanism Nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, Charles R.; Arey, Melvin L. Jr.; Robinson, Michael R.; Whitaker, David E.

    2002-07-01

    In February 2001, a routine visual inspection of the reactor vessel head of Oconee Nuclear Station Unit 3 identified boric acid crystals at nine of sixty-nine locations where control rod drive mechanism housings (CRDM nozzles) penetrate the head. The boric acid deposits resulted from primary coolant leaking from cracks in the nozzle attachment weld and from through-thickness cracks in the nozzle wall. A general overview of the inspection and repair process is presented and results of the metallurgical analysis are discussed in more detail. The analysis confirmed that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) is the mechanism of failure of both the Alloy 182 weld filler material and the alloy 600 wrought base material. (authors)

  10. Fracture mechanics of propagating 3-D fatigue cracks with parametric dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akiyuki; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2013-07-01

    Propagation of 3-D fatigue cracks is analyzed using a discrete dislocation representation of the crack opening displacement. Three dimensional cracks are represented with Volterra dislocation loops in equilibrium with the applied external load. The stress intensity factor (SIF) is calculated using the Peach-Koehler (PK) force acting on the crack tip dislocation loop. Loading mode decomposition of the SIF is achieved by selection of Burgers vector components to correspond to each fracture mode in the PK force calculations. The interaction between 3-D cracks and free surfaces is taken into account through application of the superposition principle. A boundary integral solution of an elasticity problem in a finite domain is superposed onto the elastic field solution of the discrete dislocation method in an infinite medium. The numerical accuracy of the SIF is ascertained by comparison with known analytical solution of a 3-D crack problem in pure mode I, and for mixed-mode loading. Finally, fatigue crack growth simulations are performed with the Paris law, showing that 3-D cracks do not propagate in a self-similar shape, but they re-configure as a result of their interaction with external boundaries. A specific numerical example of fatigue crack growth is presented to demonstrate the utility of the developed method for studies of 3-D crack growth during fatigue.

  11. Role of Grain Boundaries and Microstructure on the Environment Assisted Cracking of Pipeline Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafin, Muhammad

    2011-12-01

    In this research, two common types of environment assisted cracking (EAC) of pipeline steels, namely the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC), have been studied, and computer models have been developed to simulate the intergranular stress corrosion crack propagation behaviour in pipeline steel as well as to predict the intergranular fracture susceptibility, due to mechanical loading in non-corrosive environment, of polycrystalline materials. First, a new understanding of the IGSCC resistance of pipeline steel has been obtained by studying the grain boundary character and crystallographic orientation in both cracked and non-cracked pipeline steel samples using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray texture measurements. It has been found that the low-angle and certain types of special boundaries, known as the coincident site lattice (CSL) boundaries (S5, S11, and S13b types), are crack-resistant while the random high angle boundaries are prone to cracking. However, it has been also observed that the grain boundaries associated with {110} and {111} neighbour grain orientations having <110> and <111> rotation axis, respectively, are crack-resistant, while the cracked boundaries are mainly linked to the {100} orientation with <100> rotation axis. Subsequently, a novel integrated modeling approach, combining Voronoi Algorithm, Markov Chain theory, and Monte Carlo simulations, has been developed in order to predict the IGSCC behaviour of pipeline steels. The model takes both the physical microstructural features, such as the grain shape and grain size distribution, as well as the grain boundary characters and their orientations with respect to the external stress axis into account. The predicted crack propagation behaviour has been found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental crack-propagation and arrest data in API X65 pipeline steel. In addition, a texture based grain boundary character

  12. Aqueous sodium chloride induced intergranular corrosion of Al-Li-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Daeschner, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    Two methods have been explored to assess the susceptibility of Al-Li-Cu alloys to intergranular corrosion in aqueous sodium chloride solution. They are: (1) constant extension rate testing with and without alternate-immersion preexposure and (2) metallographic examination after exposure to a NaCl-H2O2 corrosive solution per Mil-H-6088F. Intergranular corrosion was found to occur in both powder and ingot metallurgy alloys of similar composition, using both methods. Underaging rendered the alloys most susceptible. The results correlate to stress-corrosion data generated in conventional time-to-failure and crack growth-rate tests. Alternate-immersion preexposure may be a reliable means to assess stress corrosion susceptibility of Al-Li-Cu alloys.

  13. Hydrogen role in stress corrosion cracking process of iron aluminide Fe{sub 3}Al in NaCl solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, H.; Qiao, L.; Mao, X.

    1995-09-01

    The stress corrosion cracking behavior of Fe3AI based intermetallic alloy in 3.5% NaCl solution was studied. The role of hydrogen in the cracking process was also defined. The susceptibility of the alloy to hydrogen embrittlement was first investigated by performing tensile tests in air environment and mineral oil. It was found that ductility increased with increasing strain rate when tested in air, but stayed at a high value when tested in mineral oil. This behavior indicates that the alloy is sensitive to hydrogen embrittlement in air. In 3.5% NaCl solution, the environmental effect was studied by slow strain rate tests that were done at electrochemical potentials ranging from {minus}1,000 mV to 0 mV vs SCE. When tested at anodic potentials, from {minus}500 mV to 0 mV vs SCE, ductility reduced from 8.7% to 3.9%. When tested in cathodic region, from {minus}500 mV to {minus}1,000 mV, the ductility was between 7.3% to 9.1%. Results of tests done on pre-immersed specimens and notched tensile specimens confirmed this material degradation to be caused by stress corrosion cracking (SCC). To identify the mechanism, an electrochemical permeation technique was employed. By measuring the diffusible hydrogen concentration, sensitivity to hydrogen embrittlement has been assessed at different potentials. Anodic dissolution is believed to be the controlling mechanism of the SCC as the alloy is less sensitive to hydrogen embrittlement at anodic potentials. Fracture surfaces were examined under the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Fracture mode was found to be mainly transgranular quasi-cleavage, except the ones tested at anodic potentials on which intergranular fracture area was found near the edge. This intergranular fracture, which increases with increasing anodic potential, is believed to be the stress corrosion cracking area. Pits which corroded intergranularly are the crack initiation sites.

  14. NDI method to locate intergranular corrosion around fastener holes in aluminum wing skins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, Paul S.

    1998-03-01

    Contact between galvanically dissimilar metals, such as cadmium plated steel fasteners and aluminum wing skins are known to be a source of corrosion. There is a design requirement to fill the void between the contacting surfaces of steel fasteners with a wet sealant. However, if the contacting surface is damaged or a void exists between the fastener head and the aluminum skin, moisture can collect and intergranular corrosion may occur along aluminum grain boundaries, which run parallel to the surface of the wing skin. If intergranular corrosion is allowed to propagate, delamination of the thin layers of aluminum, known as exfoliation corrosion will occur. When this intergranular corrosion reaches an exfoliated state, extensive rework is involved in removing the corrosion. This paper discusses the results of a USAF E-3A Engineering Service Task 89-E3B3-16 to develop a nondestructive inspection procedure to detect intergranular corrosion in an incipient state before it reaches exfoliation. Eddy current and ultrasonic inspection techniques were evaluated. A novel ultrasonic pulse echo technique was developed which utilizes a focus transducer with a hand held fixture. Inspections were performed on test parts which were removed from the upper wing skin of a retired 707 which had varying degrees of intergranular and exfoliation corrosion. Inspection results are compared to the results from the mechanical rework of the wing skin and dissection of a wing skin fastener hole.

  15. Stochastic mechanical degradation of multi-cracked fiber bundles with elastic and viscous interactions.

    PubMed

    Manca, Fabio; Giordano, Stefano; Palla, Pier Luca; Cleri, Fabrizio

    2015-05-01

    The mechanics of fiber bundles has been largely investigated in order to understand their complex failure modes. Under a mechanical load, the fibers fail progressively while the load is redistributed among the unbroken fibers. The classical fiber bundle model captures the most important features of this rupture process. On the other hand, the homogenization techniques are able to evaluate the stiffness degradation of bulk solids with a given population of cracks. However, these approaches are inadequate to determine the effective response of a degraded bundle where breaks are induced by non-mechanical actions. Here, we propose a method to analyze the behavior of a fiber bundle, undergoing a random distribution of breaks, by considering the intrinsic response of the fibers and the visco-elastic interactions among them. We obtain analytical solutions for simple configurations, while the most general cases are studied by Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the degradation of the effective bundle stiffness can be described by two scaling regimes: a first exponential regime for a low density of breaks, followed by a power-law regime at increasingly higher break density. For both regimes, we find analytical effective expressions described by specific scaling exponents. PMID:25998172

  16. Fracture mechanics; Proceedings of the 22nd National Symposium, Atlanta, GA, June 26-28, 1990. Vols. 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Hugo A. (Editor); Saxena, Ashok (Editor); Mcdowell, David L. (Editor); Atluri, Satya N. (Editor); Newman, James C., Jr. (Editor); Raju, Ivatury S. (Editor); Epstein, Jonathan S. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Current research on fracture mechanics is reviewed, focusing on ductile fracture; high-temperature and time-dependent fracture; 3D problems; interface fracture; microstructural aspects of fatigue and fracture; and fracture predictions and applications. Particular attention is given to the determination and comparison of crack resistance curves from wide plates and fracture mechanics specimens; a relationship between R-curves in contained and uncontained yield; the creep crack growth behavior of titanium alloy Ti-6242; a crack growth response in three heat resistant materials at elevated temperature; a crack-surface-contact model for determining effective-stress-intensity factors; interfacial dislocations in anisotropic bimaterials; an effect of intergranular crack branching on fracture toughness evaluation; the fracture toughness behavior of exservice chromium-molybdenum steels; the application of fracture mechanics to assess the significance of proof loading; and a load ratio method for estimating crack extension.

  17. Characterization of microstructure, local deformation and microchemistry in Alloy 690 heat-affected zone and stress corrosion cracking in high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhanpeng; Chen, Junjie; Shoji, Tetsuo; Takeda, Yoichi; Yamazaki, Seiya

    2015-10-01

    With increasing the distance from the weld fusion line in an Alloy 690 heat-affected zone, micro-hardness decreases, kernel average misorientation decreases and the fraction of Σ3 boundaries increases. Chromium depletion at grain boundaries in the Alloy 690 heat-affected zone is less significant than that in an Alloy 600 heat-affected zone. Alloy 690 heat-affected zone exhibits much higher IGSCC resistance than Alloy 600 heat-affected zone in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water. Heavily cold worked Alloy 690 exhibits localized intergranular stress corrosion cracking. The effects of metallurgical and mechanical properties on stress corrosion cracking in Alloy 690 are discussed.

  18. The effect of alloy composition on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys in aqueous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, J. D.; Williams, D. N.; Wood, R. A.; Jaffee, R. I.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of alloy composition on the aqueous stress corrosion of titanium alloys were studied with emphasis on determining the interrelations among composition, phase structure, and deformation and fracture properties of the alpha phase in alpha-beta alloys. Accomplishments summarized include the effects of alloy composition on susceptibility, and metallurgical mechanisms of stress-corrosion cracking.

  19. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds with artificially produced stress corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, Sandra; Wagner, Sabine

    2014-02-18

    Austenitic stainless steel welds and nickel alloy welds, which are widely used in nuclear power plants, present major challenges for ultrasonic inspection due to the grain structure in the weld. Large grains in combination with the elastic anisotropy of the material lead to increased scattering and affect sound wave propagation in the weld. This results in a reduced signal-to-noise ratio, and complicates the interpretation of signals and the localization of defects. Mechanized ultrasonic inspection was applied to study austenitic stainless steel test blocks with different types of flaws, including inter-granular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC). The results show that cracks located in the heat affected zone of the weld are easily detected when inspection from both sides of the weld is possible. In cases of limited accessibility, when ultrasonic inspection can be carried out only from one side of a weld, it may be difficult to distinguish between signals from scattering in the weld and signals from cracks.

  20. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds with artificially produced stress corrosion cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, Sandra; Wagner, Sabine

    2014-02-01

    Austenitic stainless steel welds and nickel alloy welds, which are widely used in nuclear power plants, present major challenges for ultrasonic inspection due to the grain structure in the weld. Large grains in combination with the elastic anisotropy of the material lead to increased scattering and affect sound wave propagation in the weld. This results in a reduced signal-to-noise ratio, and complicates the interpretation of signals and the localization of defects. Mechanized ultrasonic inspection was applied to study austenitic stainless steel test blocks with different types of flaws, including inter-granular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC). The results show that cracks located in the heat affected zone of the weld are easily detected when inspection from both sides of the weld is possible. In cases of limited accessibility, when ultrasonic inspection can be carried out only from one side of a weld, it may be difficult to distinguish between signals from scattering in the weld and signals from cracks.

  1. Stress-intensity factors of r-cracks in fiber-reinforced composites under thermal and mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, W. H.; Schmauder, S.

    1993-02-01

    The plane stress/plane strain problem of radial matrix cracking in fiber-reinforced composites, due to thermal mismatch and externally applied stress is solved numerically in the framework of linear elasticity, using Erdogan's integral equation technique. It is shown that, in order to obtain the results of the combined loading case, the solutions of purely thermal and purely mechanical loading can simply be superimposed. Stress-intensity factors are calculated for various lengths and distances of the crack from the interface for each of these loading conditions.

  2. Rate-dependent mode I interlaminar crack growth mechanisms in graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, J. W., Jr.; Carlsson, L. A.; Smiley, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the mode I fracture behavior of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK composites is examined over four decades of crosshead rates (0.25-250 mm/min). Straight-sided double-cantilever-beam specimens consisting of unidirectional laminates were tested at room temperature. For graphite/epoxy the load-deflection response was linear to fracture, and stable slow crack growth initiating at the highest load level was observed for all rates tested. In contrast, mode I crack growth in the graphite/PEEK material was often unstable and showed stick-slip behavior. Subcritical crack growth occurring prior to the onset of fracture was observed at intermediate displacement rates. A mechanism for the fracture behavior of the graphite/PEEK material (based on viscoelastic, plastic, and microcrack coalescence in the process zone) is proposed and related to the observed rate-dependent phenomena.

  3. Crossing grain boundaries in metals by slip bands, cleavage and fatigue cracks.

    PubMed

    Pineau, André

    2015-03-28

    The size and the character (low and large angle, special boundaries, tilt and twist boundaries, twins) of the grain boundaries (GBs) in polycrystalline materials influence their strength and their fracture toughness. Recent studies devoted to nanocrystalline (NC) materials have shown a deviation from the Hall-Petch law. Special GBs formed by Σ3 twins in face-centred cubic metals are also known to have a strong effect on the mechanical behaviour of these metals, in particular their work-hardening rate. Grain orientation influences also crack path, the fracture toughness of body-centred cubic (BCC) metals and the fatigue crack growth rate of microstructurally short cracks. This paper deals both with slip transfer at GBs and with the interactions between propagating cracks with GBs. In the analysis of slip transfer, the emphasis is placed on twin boundaries (TBs) for which the dislocation reactions during slip transfer are analysed theoretically, experimentally and using the results of atomic molecular simulations published in the literature. It is shown that in a number of situations this transfer leads to a normal motion of the TB owing to the displacement of partial dislocations along the TB. This motion can generate a de-twinning effect observed in particular in NC metals. Crack propagation across GBs is also considered. It is shown that cleavage crack path behaviour in BCC metals is largely dependent on the twist component of the GBs. A mechanism for the propagation of these twisted cracks involving a segmentation of the crack front and the existence of intergranular parts is discussed and verified for a pressure vessel steel. A similar segmentation seems to occur for short fatigue cracks although, quite surprisingly, this crossing mechanism for fatigue cracks does not seem to have been examined in very much detail in the literature. Metallurgical methods used to improve the strength of the materials, via grain boundaries, are briefly discussed. PMID:25713451

  4. Influence of extrinsic crack deflection and delamination mechanisms on the cryogenic toughness of aluminum-lithium alloy 2090: Behavior in plate (T81) vs sheet (T83) material

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1989-02-01

    Cryogenic strength-toughness relationships are examined in 1.6-mm- thick sheet of commercial 2090-T8 aluminum-lithium alloy, and results compared with behavior in 12.7-mm-thick rolled plate. Unlike the significant increase in L-T fracture toughness exhibited by thick place sections at cryogenic temperatures, the thin sheet (of normally similar composition and microstructure) shows a marked decrease in toughness between 298 and 77 K. Such contrasting observations are attributed primarily to the low short-transverse toughness of the 2090-plate material, which results in enhanced through-thickness intergranular splitting during low-temperature fracture and hence to a prominent role of crack-divider delamination toughening. 23 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Mechanical and metallurgical effects on low-pH stress corrosion cracking of natural gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Harle, B.A.; Beavers, J.A.; Jaske, C.E.

    1995-12-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of natural gas pipelines in low-pH environments is a serious problem for the gas transmission industry. This paper describes results of an ongoing research program investigating crack growth of API X-65 and X-52 line pipe steels in a low-pH cracking environment using a J-integral technique. The overall objective of the work is to estimate crack growth rates on operating pipelines. In previous work, it was demonstrated that the technique could be utilized to reproduce the cracking observed in the field and that the J integral is a good parameter for characterizing crack growth behavior. Recent work has focused on the evaluation of the influence of loading parameters, such as displacement rate, and metallurgy, on crack growth. Testing has also been performed in which loading sequences involved: (a) a constant displacement rate, until cracking was detected, followed by maintaining a constant displacement; and, (b) slowly loading a specimen to fifty percent of its tensile strength in an inert, non-aqueous environment followed by loading in the low-pH environment.

  6. The analysis of fatigue crack growth mechanism and oxidation and fatigue life at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1988-01-01

    Two quantitative models based on experimentally observed fatigue damage processes have been made: (1) a model of low cycle fatigue life based on fatigue crack growth under general-yielding cyclic loading; and (2) a model of accelerated fatigue crack growth at elevated temperatures based on grain boundary oxidation. These two quantitative models agree very well with the experimental observations.

  7. Intergranular fracture in UO{sub 2}: derivation of traction-separation law from atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Millett, P.C.; Tonks, M.R.; Bai, Xian-Ming; Biner, S.B.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, the intergranular fracture behavior of UO{sub 2} was studied by molecular dynamics simulations using the Basak potential. In addition, the constitutive traction-separation law was derived from atomistic data using the cohesive-zone model. In the simulations a bicrystal model with the (100) symmetric tilt Σ5 grain boundaries was utilized. Uniaxial tension along the grain boundary normal was applied to simulate Mode-I fracture. The fracture was observed to propagate along the grain boundary by micro-pore nucleation and coalescence, giving an overall intergranular fracture behavior. Phase transformations from the Fluorite to the Rutile and Scrutinyite phases were identified at the propagating crack tips. These new phases are metastable and they transformed back to the Fluorite phase at the wake of crack tips as the local stress concentration was relieved by complete cracking. Such transient behavior observed at atomistic scale was found to substantially increase the energy release rate for fracture. Insertion of Xe gas into the initial notch showed minor effect on the overall fracture behavior. (authors)

  8. Intergranular fracture in UO2: derivation of traction-separation law from atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yongfeng Zhang; Paul C Millett; Michael R Tonks; Xian-Ming Bai; S Bulent Biner

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the intergranular fracture behavior of UO2 was studied by molecular dynamics simulations using the Basak potential. In addition, the constitutive traction-separation law was derived from atomistic data using the cohesive-zone model. In the simulations a bicrystal model with the (100) symmetric tilt E5 grain boundaries was utilized. Uniaxial tension along the grain boundary normal was applied to simulate Mode-I fracture. The fracture was observed to propagate along the grain boundary by micro-pore nucleation and coalescence, giving an overall intergranular fracture behavior. Phase transformations from the Fluorite to the Rutile and Scrutinyite phases were identified at the propagating crack tips. These new phases are metastable and they transformed back to the Fluorite phase at the wake of crack tips as the local stress concentration was relieved by complete cracking. Such transient behavior observed at atomistic scale was found to substantially increase the energy release rate for fracture. Insertion of Xe gas into the initial notch showed minor effect on the overall fracture behavior.

  9. Lead induced stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 690 in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, K.K.; Lim, J.K.; Moriya, Shinichi; Watanabe, Yutaka; Shoji, Tetsuo

    1995-12-31

    Recent investigations of cracked steam generator tubes at nuclear power plants concluded that lead significantly contributed to cracking the Alloy 600 materials. In order to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of Alloy 690, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) and anodic polarization measurements were performed. The SSRTs were conducted in a lead-chloride solution (PbCl{sub 2}) and in a chloride but lead free solution (NaCl) at pH of 3 and 4.5 at 288 C. The anodic polarization measurements were carried out at 30 C using the same solutions as in SSRT. The SSRT results showed that Alloy 690 was susceptible to SCC in both solutions. In the lead chloride solution, cracking had slight dependence on lead concentration and pH. Cracking tend to increase with a higher lead concentration and a lower pH and was mainly intergranular and was to be a few tens to hundreds micrometers in length. In the chloride only solution, cracking was similar to the lead induced SCC. The results of anodic polarization measurement and electron probe micro analysis (EPMA) helped to understand lead induced SCC. Lead was a stronger active corrosive element but had a minor affect on cracking susceptibility of the alloy. While, chloride was quite different from lead effect to SCC. A possible mechanism of lead induced SCC of Alloy 690 was also discussed based on the test results.

  10. Fracture Mechanics of Thin, Cracked Plates Under Tension, Bending and Out-of-Plane Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehnder, Alan T.; Hui, C. Y.; Potdar, Yogesh; Zucchini, Alberto

    1999-01-01

    Cracks in the skin of aircraft fuselages or other shell structures can be subjected to very complex stress states, resulting in mixed-mode fracture conditions. For example, a crack running along a stringer in a pressurized fuselage will be subject to the usual in-plane tension stresses (Mode-I) along with out-of-plane tearing stresses (Mode-III like). Crack growth and initiation in this case is correlated not only with the tensile or Mode-I stress intensity factor, K(sub I), but depends on a combination of parameters and on the history of crack growth. The stresses at the tip of a crack in a plate or shell are typically described in terms of either the small deflection Kirchhoff plate theory. However, real applications involve large deflections. We show, using the von-Karman theory, that the crack tip stress field derived on the basis of the small deflection theory is still valid for large deflections. We then give examples demonstrating the exact calculation of energy release rates and stress intensity factors for cracked plates loaded to large deflections. The crack tip fields calculated using the plate theories are an approximation to the actual three dimensional fields. Using three dimensional finite element analyses we have explored the relationship between the three dimensional elasticity theory and two dimensional plate theory results. The results show that for out-of-plane shear loading the three dimensional and Kirchhoff theory results coincide at distance greater than h/2 from the crack tip, where h/2 is the plate thickness. Inside this region, the distribution of stresses through the thickness can be very different from the plate theory predictions. We have also explored how the energy release rate varies as a function of crack length to plate thickness using the different theories. This is important in the implementation of fracture prediction methods using finite element analysis. Our experiments show that under certain conditions, during fatigue crack

  11. An insight into the breathing mechanism of a crack in a rotating shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgantzinos, S. K.; Anifantis, N. K.

    2008-11-01

    The time history of local flexibilities associated with a breathing crack in a rotating shaft is the concern of this paper. Considering quasi-static approximation, the deflections of a circular cross-section beam presenting a crack of different depths, due to bending or torsion loads are analyzed with the aid of a refined nonlinear contact-finite element procedure in order to predict accurately the time-variant flexibility of the fractured shaft. This method predicts the partial contact of crack surfaces, and it is appropriate to evaluate the instantaneous crack flexibilities. The bending load is applied in several aperture angles, in order to simulate a rotating load on a fixed beam. Results obtained for the rotating beam can then be used for the analysis of cracked, horizontal axis rotors. The effect of friction is also considered in the cracked area. Portions of crack surfaces in contact are predicted, the direct and the cross-coupled flexibility coefficients are calculated by applying energy principles. The numerical results compared with relevant previously published results, show high consistency.

  12. A new failure mechanism in thin film by collaborative fracture and delamination: Interacting duos of cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marthelot, Joël; Bico, José; Melo, Francisco; Roman, Benoît

    2015-11-01

    When a thin film moderately adherent to a substrate is subjected to residual stress, the cooperation between fracture and delamination leads to unusual fracture patterns, such as spirals, alleys of crescents and various types of strips, all characterized by a robust characteristic length scale. We focus on the propagation of a duo of cracks: two fractures in the film connected by a delamination front and progressively detaching a strip. We show experimentally that the system selects an equilibrium width on the order of 25 times the thickness of the coating and independent of both fracture and adhesion energies. We investigate numerically the selection of the width and the condition for propagation by considering Griffith's criterion and the principle of local symmetry. In addition, we propose a simplified model based on the criterion of maximum of energy release rate, which provides insights of the physical mechanisms leading to these regular patterns, and predicts the effect of material properties on the selected width of the detaching strip.

  13. Mechanics of the injected pulsejet into gelatin gel and evaluation of the effect by puncture and crack generation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, T.; Arafune, T.; Washio, T.; Nakagawa, A.; Ogawa, Y.; Tominaga, T.; Sakuma, I.; Kobayashi, E.

    2014-08-01

    Recently, fluid jets have become widely used in medical devices and have been created and evaluated in clinical environments. Such devices are classified into two broad groups; those adopting continuous jets and those adopting discrete (or pulsed) jets. We developed a discrete jet device for brain cancer treatment, called a laser-induced liquid jet (LILJ) system. Although several studies have evaluated the availability and described the treatment mechanisms of fluid jet devices, the mechanisms of the fluid and injected material remain under-investigated. In this paper, we report the mechanism of frequent pulsejet injections into a viscoelastic biological material; namely, simulated gelatin brain tissue. The mechanism is evaluated by the injection depth, an easily measured parameter. To explain the injection mechanism, we propose that the pulsejet is pressured by forces introduced by resistance on the side surface of the hole and the reaction force proportionate to the injection depth. The pulsejet generated and propagated cracks in the gelatin, and the resistance eventually fractured the side surface of the hole. We evaluated the proposed model by measuring the behavior of pulsejets injected into gelatin by the LILJ. From the results, the following conclusions were obtained. First, the proposed model accurately describes the behavior of the injected pulsejet. Second, whether the hole or crack growth largely increases the final injection depth can be evaluated from differences in the decay constant. Finally, crack growth increases the final injection depth when the number of the injected pulsejets is greater than the inverse of the decay constant.

  14. Elevated temperature crack growth in aluminum alloys: Tensile deformation of 2618 and FVS0812 aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leng, Yang; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    Understanding the damage tolerance of aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures is essential for safe applications of advanced materials. The objective of this project is to investigate the time dependent subcritical cracking behavior of powder metallurgy FVS0812 and ingot metallurgy 2618 aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures. The fracture mechanics approach was applied. Sidegrooved compact tension specimens were tested at 175, 250, and 316 C under constant load. Subcritical crack growth occurred in each alloy at applied stress intensity levels (K) of between about 14 and 25 MPa/m, well below K (sub IC). Measured load, crack opening displacement and displacement rate, and crack length and growth rate (da/dt) were analyzed with several continuum fracture parameters including, the C-integral, C (sub t), and K. Elevated temperature growth rate data suggest that K is a controlling parameter during time dependent cracking. For FVS0812, da/dt is highest at 175 C when rates are expressed as a function of K. While crack growth rate is not controlled by C (sub t) at 175 C, da/dt appears to better correlate with C (sub t) at higher temperatures. Creep brittle cracking at intermediate temperatures, and perhaps related to strain aging, is augmented by time dependent transient creep plasticity at higher temperatures. The C (sub t) analysis is, however, complicated by the necessity to measure small differences in the elastic crack growth and creep contributions to the crack opening displacement rate. A microstructural study indicates that 2618 and FVS0812 are likely to be creep brittle materials, consistent with the results obtained from the fracture mechanics study. Time dependent crack growth of 2618 at 175 C is characterized by mixed transgranular and intergranular fracture. Delamination along the ribbon powder particle boundaries occurs in FVS0812 at all temperatures. The fracture mode of FVS0812 changes with temperature. At 175 C, it is characterized as dimpled rupture

  15. Crack growth phenomena in micro-machined single crystal silicon and design implications for micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Alissa Mirella

    The creation of micron-sized mechanisms using semiconductor processing technology is known collectively as MEMS, or Micro Electro Mechanical Systems. Many MEMS devices, such as accelerometers and switches, have mechanical structures fabricated from single crystal silicon, a brittle material. The reliability and longevity of these devices depends on minimizing the probability of fracture, and therefore requires a thorough understanding of crack growth phenomena in silicon. In this study, a special micro-machined fracture specimen, the compression-loaded double cantilever beam, was developed to study fracture phenomena in single crystal silicon on a size scale relevant to MEMS. The decreasing stress intensity geometry of this sample provided stable, controllable crack propagation in test sections as thin as 100 mum. Several common MEMS fabrication methods (plasma and chemical etch) were used to achieve a range of surface finishes. A 650 A thick titanium crack gage was used to directly measure crack extension as a function of time using the potential drop technique. High speed (100 MHz) data acquisition techniques were employed to capture fracture events on the sub-microsecond time scale. The stability of the sample design and the micron-scale resolution of the crack gage facilitated investigation into the existence of a stress corrosion effect in silicon. No evidence of sub-critical crack growth due to exposure to humid air was found in carefully controlled tests lasting up to 24 hours. Rapid crack propagation velocities (>1 km/s) during quasi-static loading were recorded using high speed data acquisition techniques. Unique evidence was found of reflected stress waves causing multiple, momentary arrests during rapid fracture events. These measurements, along with atomic force microscope scans of the fracture surfaces, offer new insight into the kinetics of the fracture process in silicon. Over 100 micro-machined samples were fractured in this research. Weibull

  16. Intergranular diffusion and embrittlement of a Ni-16Mo-7Cr alloy in Te vapor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hongwei; Li, Zhijun; Leng, Bin; Zhang, Wenzhu; Han, Fenfen; Jia, Yanyan; Zhou, Xingtai

    2015-12-01

    Nickel and some nickel-base alloys are extremely sensitive to intergranular embrittlement and tellurium (Te) enhanced cracking, which should be concerned during their serving in molten salt reactors. Here, a systematic study about the effects of its temperature on the reaction products at its surface, the intergranular diffusion of Te in its body and its embrittlement for a Ni-16Mo-7Cr alloy contacting Te is reported. For exposed to Te vapor at high temperature (823-1073 K), the reaction products formed on the surface of the alloy were Ni3Te2, CrTe, and MoTe2, and the most serious embrittlement was observed at 1073 K. The kinetic measurement in terms of Te penetration depth in the alloy samples gives an activation energy of 204 kJ/mol. Electron probe microanalysis confirmed the local enrichment of Te at grain boundaries. And clearly, the embrittlement was results from the intergranular diffusion and segregation of element Te.

  17. The mechanism of stress-corrosion cracking in 7075 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Various aspects of stress-corrosion cracking in 7075 aluminum alloy are discussed. A model is proposed in which the continuous anodic path along which the metal is preferentially attacked consists of two phases which alternate as anodes.

  18. Real-time Observations of Rock Cracking and Weather Provide Insights into Thermal Stress-Related Processes of Mechanical Weathering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppes, M. C.; Magi, B. I.; Keanini, R.

    2015-12-01

    The environmental conditions (weather and/or climate) that limit or drive mechanical weathering via thermal stress are poorly understood. Here we examine acoustic emission (AE) records of rock cracking in boulders sitting on the ground in humid-temperate (~1 year of data) and semi-arid (~3 years) locations. We compare on-site average ambient daily temperature for days in which cracking occurs to the average temperatures for those dates derived from local climate records. The temperatures characterizing days on which cracking occurs is similar for both stations (range = -10 C to +30 C); where 21% and 73% of cracking occurs on hot days (> 20C) in the humid and semi-arid climates respectively while 17% and 0.1% occurs on very cold days (-8C to -3C). When days during which cracking occurs are compared to climate averages, 81% (NC) and 51% (NM) of all cracking occurs on days with absolute temperature anomalies >1, regardless of the temperature. The proportion of cracking that occurs on anomalously hot or cold days rises to 92% and 77% when the data is normalized to account for uneven sampling of the days with extreme temperatures. In order to determine to what extent this trend holds true in a more complex setting, we examined an existing 100+ year record of rock falls from Yosemite Valley. Preliminary results, although more equivocal, are consistent with the boulder cracking AE data. We examine the AE datasets in the context of our previous numerical modeling of insolation-driven thermal stress in rock and hypothesize that there is an increased potential for fracture on days with extreme temperatures because 1) thermal-stress is dependent on temperature variance from far-field and/or average rock temperatures and 2) that days with climatologically extreme air temperatures result in maximums in such variance. An implication of our results is that environments with extreme weather variability may have higher thermal breakdown rates, including certain locations today and

  19. An anodic dissolution-based mechanism for the rapid cracking, ``pre-exposure`` phenomenon demonstrated by Al-Li-Cu alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.; Wall, F.D.; Stoner, G.E.; Moran, J.P.

    1993-12-31

    Al-Li-Cu alloys have been observed to fail in less than 24 hours after removal from a one week immersion in aerated 3.5 w/o NaCl solution. Anodic dissolution-based mechanisms proposed previously for this phenomenon have been amended based on further experiment and characterization of the rapid cracking process. Amendments are based on studies of the relative electrochemical behavior of the microstructural elements in the subgrain boundary region, time to failure SCC testing in a simulated crack solution, evolution of crack potential and pH with time, fractographic examination of failed samples, and X-ray diffraction of films passivating crack walls. Results suggest that an active path exists along subgrain boundaries that is comprised of the highly reactive T{sub 1} (Al{sub 2}CuLi) precipitate phase and a solute depleted zone that does not readily passivate when exposed to the crack environment. The matrix phase does appear to passivate in the crack environment thereby confining the crack to the subgrain boundary region. This active path is enabled when cracks are isolated from a bulk environment, but is disabled otherwise. Potential and pH conditions required for cracking are discussed as is the formation of a hydrotalcite Li{sub 2}[Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 6}]{sub 2}{center_dot}CO{sub 3}{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O film that appears to be responsible for passivating crack walls.

  20. Small-crack test methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, James M.; Allison, John E.

    This book contains chapters on fracture mechanics parameters for small fatigue cracks, monitoring small-crack growth by the replication method, measurement of small cracks by photomicroscopy (experiments and analysis), and experimental mechanics of microcracks. Other topics discussed are the real-time measurement of small-crack-opening behavior using an interferometric strain/displacement gage; direct current electrical potential measurement of the growth of small cracks; an ultrasonic method for the measurement of the size and opening behavior of small fatigue cracks; and the simulation of short crack and other low closure loading conditions, utilizing constant K(max) Delta-K-decreasing fatigue crack growth procedures.

  1. Rotating plasma jets in the photospheric intergranular lanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmerer, Birgit; Hanslmeier, Arnold; Muthsam, Herbert; Piantschitsch, Isabell; Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz

    2016-07-01

    High resolution simulations and observations of the solar photosphere reveal the population of small granular cells with diameters less than 600 km. However, the underlying mechanisms of their generation are still unclear. Simulations show that the majority of small granules may not result from fragmentation of larger granular cells but instead evolve and dissolve in the intergranular lanes. We study the dynamics of these granular cells in high resolution simulations. We found that the small granules show a jet-like behavior with strong horizontal and vertical vortex motions. A newly developed algorithm that tracks the evolution of the 3D plasma cells in the convection zone and lower photosphere shows strong vertical vorticity within the small granular cells. The rotating plasma jets, which are visible as small granules, may generate magnetized vortex flows and torsional Alfvén waves observed at upper layers and hence can play a distinct role in the energy supply to the chromosphere and corona.

  2. The effect of alloy composition on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys in aqueous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. N.

    1971-01-01

    Emphasis has been placed on determining the interrelations among the composition, phase structure, deformation, and fracture properties of the alpha phase in susceptible alpha-beta alloys. The program is divided into two parts: (1) evaluation of the aqueous stress corrosion susceptibility of a series of alloys that contain various alpha-soluble elements; and (2) investigations of the metallurgical aspects of the mechanism of aqueous stress corrosion cracking.

  3. The effect of pre-stress cycles on fatigue crack growth - An analysis of crack growth mechanism. [in Al alloy plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, T. S.; Liu, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    Cyclic prestress increases subsequent fatigue crack growth rate in 2024-T351 aluminum alloy. This increase in growth rate, caused by the prestress, and the increased rate, caused by temper embrittlement as observed by Ritchie and Knott (1973), cannot be explained by the crack tip blunting model alone. Each fatigue crack increment consists of two components, a brittle and a ductile component. They are controlled by the ductility of the material and its cyclic yield strength, respectively.

  4. Development of a novel technique to assess the vulnerability of micro-mechanical system components to environmentally assisted cracking.

    SciTech Connect

    Enos, David George; Goods, Steven Howard

    2006-11-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) will play an important functional role in future DOE weapon and Homeland Security applications. If these emerging technologies are to be applied successfully, it is imperative that the long-term degradation of the materials of construction be understood. Unlike electrical devices, MEMS devices have a mechanical aspect to their function. Some components (e.g., springs) will be subjected to stresses beyond whatever residual stresses exist from fabrication. These stresses, combined with possible abnormal exposure environments (e.g., humidity, contamination), introduce a vulnerability to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). EAC is manifested as the nucleation and propagation of a stable crack at mechanical loads/stresses far below what would be expected based solely upon the materials mechanical properties. If not addressed, EAC can lead to sudden, catastrophic failure. Considering the materials of construction and the very small feature size, EAC represents a high-risk environmentally induced degradation mode for MEMS devices. Currently, the lack of applicable characterization techniques is preventing the needed vulnerability assessment. The objective of this work is to address this deficiency by developing techniques to detect and quantify EAC in MEMS materials and structures. Such techniques will allow real-time detection of crack initiation and propagation. The information gained will establish the appropriate combinations of environment (defining packaging requirements), local stress levels, and metallurgical factors (composition, grain size and orientation) that must be achieved to prevent EAC.

  5. The growth of small corrosion fatigue cracks in alloy 2024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1993-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 2024 is established. The damaging effect of salt water on the early stages of small crack growth is characterized by crack initiation at constituent particle pits, intergranular microcracking for a less than 100 micrometers, and transgranular small crack growth for a micrometer. In aqueous 1 percent NaCl and at a constant anodic potential of -700 mV(sub SCE), small cracks exhibit a factor of three increase in fatigue crack growth rates compared to laboratory air. Small cracks exhibit accelerated corrosion fatigue crack growth rates at low levels of delta-K (less than 1 MPa square root of m) below long crack delta-K (sub th). When exposed to Paris regime levels of crack tip stress intensity, small corrosion fatigue cracks exhibit growth rates similar to that observed for long cracks. Results suggest that crack closure effects influence the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates of small cracks (a less than or equal to 100 micrometers). This is evidenced by similar small and long crack growth behavior at various levels of R. Contrary to the corrosion fatigue characteristics of small cracks in high strength steels, no pronounced chemical crack length effect is observed for Al by 2024 exposed to salt water.

  6. Investigation of Fatigue Crack Propagation in Spot-Welded Joints Based on Fracture Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanifard, S.; Bonab, M. A. Mohtadi; Jabbari, Gh.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, fatigue crack propagation life of resistance spot welds in tensile-shear specimens is investigated based on the calculation of stress intensity factors and J-integral using three-dimensional finite element method. For comparison, experimental works on 5083-O aluminum alloy spot-welded joints have been carried out to verify the numerical predictions of fatigue crack propagation of welded joints. A lot of analyses have been performed to obtain stress intensity factors and J-integral in tensile-shear specimens of spot-welded joints by using commercial software ANSYS. These gathered data have been formulated by using statistical software SPSS. The results of fatigue propagation life and predicted fatigue crack path revealed very good agreement with the experimental fatigue test data and photograph of cross-section of the fatigued spot-weld specimens.

  7. The influence of low-strain thermo-mechanical processing on grain boundary network characteristics in type 304 austenitic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Engelberg, D L; Humphreys, F J; Marrow, T J

    2008-06-01

    Grain boundary engineering of austenitic stainless steel, through the introduction of plastic strain and thermal annealing, can be used to develop microstructures with improved resistance to inter-granular degradation. The influence of low-strain thermo-mechanical processing on grain boundary network development, with systematic variations of annealing treatments, has been investigated. Three stages of the microstructure development during grain boundary engineering in low-strain processing conditions are identified, and correlated with changes in grain boundary character and deviation distributions. Low-energy connected length segments at triple junctions, which have been proposed to be responsible for crack bridging during inter-granular stress corrosion cracking, can be influenced by the choice of the annealing treatment parameters. The development of individual grain boundary length segments of different character showed consistent trends with increasing grain size. Crack length predictions are consistent with the beneficial effect of designing microstructures with high fractions of twin grain boundaries and smaller grain size. PMID:18503670

  8. Grain boundary segregation and intergranular failure

    SciTech Connect

    White, C.L.

    1980-01-01

    Trace elements and impurities often segregate strongly to grain boundaries in metals and alloys. Concentrations of these elements at grain boundaries are often 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 5/ times as great as their overall concentration in the alloy. Because of such segregation, certain trace elements can exert a disproportionate influence on material properties. One frequently observed consequence of trace element segregation to grain boundaries is the occurrence of grain boundary failure and low ductility. Less well known are incidences of improved ductility and inhibition of grain boundary fracture resulting from trace element segregation to grain boundaries in certain systems. An overview of trace element segregation and intergranular failure in a variety of alloy systems as well as preliminary results from studies on Al 3% Li will be presented.

  9. Complex nonlinear deformation of nanometer intergranular glassy films in beta-Si3N4.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Ouyang, Lizhi; Rulis, Paul; Misra, Anil; Ching, W Y

    2005-12-16

    The mechanical properties of a model of Y-doped intergranular glassy film in silicon nitride ceramics are studied by large-scale ab initio modeling. By linking directly to its electronic structure, it is shown that this microstructure has a complex nonlinear deformation under stress and Y doping significantly enhances the mechanical properties. The calculation of the electrostatic potential across the film supports the space charge model in ceramic microstructures. PMID:16384476

  10. Gear Crack Propagation Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Reduced weight is a major design goal in aircraft power transmissions. Some gear designs incorporate thin rims to help meet this goal. Thin rims, however, may lead to bending fatigue cracks. These cracks may propagate through a gear tooth or into the gear rim. A crack that propagates through a tooth would probably not be catastrophic, and ample warning of a failure could be possible. On the other hand, a crack that propagates through the rim would be catastrophic. Such cracks could lead to disengagement of a rotor or propeller from an engine, loss of an aircraft, and fatalities. To help create and validate tools for the gear designer, the NASA Lewis Research Center performed in-house analytical and experimental studies to investigate the effect of rim thickness on gear-tooth crack propagation. Our goal was to determine whether cracks grew through gear teeth (benign failure mode) or through gear rims (catastrophic failure mode) for various rim thicknesses. In addition, we investigated the effect of rim thickness on crack propagation life. A finite-element-based computer program simulated gear-tooth crack propagation. The analysis used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, and quarter-point, triangular elements were used at the crack tip to represent the stress singularity. The program had an automated crack propagation option in which cracks were grown numerically via an automated remeshing scheme. Crack-tip stress-intensity factors were estimated to determine crack-propagation direction. Also, various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack-propagation life. Experiments were performed in Lewis' Spur Gear Fatigue Rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Gears with various backup ratios were tested to validate crack-path predictions. Also, test gears were installed with special crack-propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending-fatigue crack growth. From both predictions and tests, gears with backup ratios

  11. Cyclic fatigue and fracture in pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite mechanical heart-valve prostheses: role of small cracks in life prediction.

    PubMed

    Dauskardt, R H; Ritchie, R O; Takemoto, J K; Brendzel, A M

    1994-07-01

    A fracture-mechanics based study has performed to characterize the fracture toughness and rates of cyclic fatigue-crack growth of incipient flaws in prosthetic heart-valve components made of pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite. Such data are required to predict the safe structural lifetime of mechanical heart-valve prostheses using damage-tolerant analysis. Unlike previous studies where fatigue-crack propagation data were obtained using through-thickness, long cracks (approximately 2-20 mm long), growing in conventional (e.g., compact-tension) samples, experiments were performed on physically small cracks (approximately 100-600 microns long), initiated on the surface of the pyrolytic-carbon coating to simulate reality. Small-crack toughness results were found to agree closely with those measured conventionally with long cracks. However, similar to well-known observations in metal fatigue, it was found that based on the usual computations of the applied (far-field) driving force in terms of the maximum stress intensity, Kmax, small fatigue cracks grew at rates that exceeded those of long cracks at the same applied stress intensity, and displayed a negative dependency on Kmax; moreover, they grew at applied stress intensities less than the fatigue threshold value, below which long cracks are presumed dormant. To resolve this apparent discrepancy, it is shown that long and small crack results can be normalized, provided growth rates are characterized in terms of the total (near-tip) stress intensity (incorporating, for example, the effect of residual stress); with this achieved, in principle, either form of data can be used for life prediction of implant devices. Inspection of the long and small crack results reveals extensive scatter inherent in both forms of growth-rate data for the pyrolytic-carbon material. PMID:8083247

  12. Numerical, micro-mechanical prediction of crack growth resistance in a fibre-reinforced/brittle matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Michael G.; Ghosh, Asish; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1990-01-01

    Micromechanics fracture models are incorporated into three distinct fracture process zones which contribute to the crack growth resistance of fibrous composites. The frontal process zone includes microcracking, fiber debonding, and some fiber failure. The elastic process zone is related only to the linear elastic creation of new matrix and fiber fracture surfaces. The wake process zone includes fiber bridging, fiber pullout, and fiber breakage. The R-curve predictions of the model compare well with empirical results for a unidirectional, continuous fiber C/C composite. Separating the contributions of each process zone reveals the wake region to contain the dominant crack growth resistance mechanisms. Fractography showed the effects of the micromechanisms on the macroscopic fracture behavior.

  13. Crack barriers improve the mechanical and thermal properties of non-metallic sinter materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruenthaler, K. H.; Heinrich, W.; Janes, S.; Nixdorf, J.

    1979-01-01

    Means of improving the tensile strength of ceramic composites by introducing ductile intermediate layers capable of absorbing the elastic energy at the rupture front are studied. Tests with an Al203 laminate with niobium inclusions showed that crack propagation could be successfully precluded by dissipation of the energy by deformation and/or delamination at the inclusion/matrix interface.

  14. Environmental enhancement of creep crack growth in Inconel 718 by oxygen and water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Valerio, P.; Gao, M.; Wei, R.P. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics)

    1994-05-15

    Inconel 718 alloy is widely used in high temperature applications. Because of its sensitivity to environmentally enhanced crack growth at high temperatures, its use has been limited to modest temperatures (i.e., below 973 K). To improve its performance and to better predict its service life, it is important to develop a better understanding of the processes of crack growth at high temperatures in this alloy. It has been shown that the creep crack growth rates (CCGR) in air are at least two orders of magnitude faster than those in vacuum or inert environments. CCGR were also found to depend strongly on temperature. Fractographic studies showed that crack growth was intergranular in air and in vacuum with brittle appearing grain boundary separation in air and extensive cavity formation in vacuum. The increased CCGR in air has been attributed to the enhancement by oxygen; principally through enhanced cavity nucleation and growth by high-pressure carbon monoxide/dioxide formed by the reactions of oxygen that diffused into the material with the grain boundary carbides. The appropriateness of this mechanism, however, may be questioned by the absence of cavitation on the crack surfaces produced in air. As such the mechanism for crack growth needs to be re-examined. Because of the presence of moisture in air, the possible influence of hydrogen needs to be considered as well. In this study, preliminary experiments were conducted to examine the process of environmentally enhanced creep crack growth in Inconel 718 alloy in terms of possible mechanisms and rate controlling processes. Creep crack growth experiments were carried out in air, oxygen (from 2.67 to 100 kPa), moist argon (water vapor) and pure argon at temperatures from 873 to 973 K.

  15. Creep in Thermally Cracked Granite: Physical, Mechanical and Damage Properties Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Schubnel, A. J.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.; Ge, H.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the effects of pervasive crack damage on the rupture processes of a fine-grained granite, under triaxial stress, in wet (H20) and dry (argon gas) saturated conditions, at room temperature. Eight samples of La Peyratte granite (a granodiorite with an average grain size of 200 microns) were cored with an initial porosity of <1%. Damage was introduced by heating four samples up to 700°C. These were then compared to the intact granite specimens. 4 samples were deformed at a constant strain rate of 2x10-6/s until brittle failure occurred. 4 other samples were deformed in creep conditions. During these 8 experiments, at each step, we recorded strains, elastic wave velocities and Acoustic Emissions (AE). Our main results are: 1. The brittle strength of the sample remained unchanged (approx. 500MPa deviatoric stress at 30MPa effective pressure), whether the sample was heat-treated or not. We did not observe any significant water weakening as well. However, the onset of dilatancy was observed at lower deviatoric stress in the heat-treated specimen than for the intact ones. 2. Acoustic emissions revealed useful in order to image the rupture processes. Indeed, AE locations and Focal mechanism were in good agreement with the post mortem analysis of sample. In intact specimen, failure occurred after a larger premonitory AE activity, while heat-treated specimen had a longer aftershocks activity. In creep conditions, we show that extreme damage localization is already initiated during the primary and secondary creep phases. 3. However, in all our experiments, we observed the development of an elastic fabric well before the onset of rupture. To be more precise, measuring the P wave velocities along two different horizontal travel paths - one perpendicular and one parallel to the eventual rupture plane, away from the nucleation zone - we showed that that both started to diverge as early as at 70% of the final rupture strength. This shows that quite early on during

  16. Physical and Mechanical Properties of a Thermally Cracked Fine-Grained Granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Schubnel, A.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.; Ge, H.

    2013-12-01

    Effects of thermal-crack damage on the rupture processes of a fine-grained granite were investigated under triaxial stress, under water (wet) and argon gas (dry) saturated conditions, and room temperature. Thermal cracking was introduced by slowly heating and cooling two samples of La Peyratte granite up to 700oC, which were compared to two intact specimens. For each rock sample, a hydrostatic test was first carried up to 90 MPa effective pressure (5 MPa constant pore pressure). The samples were then deformed to failure at a constant strain rate of 2.10-6 s-1, at 30 MPa effective pressure. Our results show that: (1) permeability of heat-treated specimens was 4-5 orders of magnitude larger than that of intact specimens at low effective mean pressure; (2) nevertheless, at our experimental conditions (2.10-6s-1), thermal cracking had no significant influence on the brittle strength: (3) similarly, no obvious water weakening effect was observed; (4) however, with increasing stress, elastic anisotropy appeared at lower differential stress in heat-treated specimens than in intact ones, but close to failure, the magnitude of P wave anisotropy was approximately the same for both types of specimens; (5) acoustic emission hypocenter locations and P wave velocity anisotropy in the basal plane demonstrate that strain localization started right at the onset of dilatancy for heat-treated specimens, later in the intact specimens; (6) inverting wave velocities for crack density, we show that failure was reached for vertical crack densities of 0.35 for dry specimens, and possibly 0.5 for water-saturated specimens.

  17. Crack propagation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budarapu, P. R.; Javvaji, B.; Sutrakar, V. K.; Roy Mahapatra, D.; Zi, G.; Rabczuk, T.

    2015-08-01

    The crack initiation and growth mechanisms in an 2D graphene lattice structure are studied based on molecular dynamics simulations. Crack growth in an initial edge crack model in the arm-chair and the zig-zag lattice configurations of graphene are considered. Influence of the time steps on the post yielding behaviour of graphene is studied. Based on the results, a time step of 0.1 fs is recommended for consistent and accurate simulation of crack propagation. Effect of temperature on the crack propagation in graphene is also studied, considering adiabatic and isothermal conditions. Total energy and stress fields are analyzed. A systematic study of the bond stretching and bond reorientation phenomena is performed, which shows that the crack propagates after significant bond elongation and rotation in graphene. Variation of the crack speed with the change in crack length is estimated.

  18. Gear crack propagation investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Ballarini, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the effect of gear rim thickness on crack propagation life. The FRANC (FRacture ANalysis Code) computer program was used to simulate crack propagation. The FRANC program used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, finite element modeling, and a unique re-meshing scheme to determine crack tip stress distributions, estimate stress intensity factors, and model crack propagation. Various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack propagation life based on the calculated stress intensity factors. Experimental tests were performed in a gear fatigue rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Test gears were installed with special crack propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending fatigue crack growth. Good correlation between predicted and measured crack growth was achieved when the fatigue crack closure concept was introduced into the analysis. As the gear rim thickness decreased, the compressive cyclic stress in the gear tooth fillet region increased. This retarded crack growth and increased the number of crack propagation cycles to failure.

  19. Fracture Profile and Crack Propagation of Ultra-High Strength Hot-Stamped Boron Steel During Mechanical Trimming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xianhong; Yang, Kun; Chen, Sisi; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical trimming process for ultra-high strength boron steel after hot stamping was carried out in this study. Shear and tensile tests were designed to analyze the influences of stress state on the fracture mode; trimmed fracture surface and profile were observed and compared to other commonly used steels such as DP980 and Q235 etc.; the crack propagation during trimming process was studied through step-by-step tests. The observation and analysis reveal that the fracture mode of hot-stamped boron steel is highly related to the stress state, it belongs to cleavage fracture on low stress triaxiality but dimple fracture on high stress triaxiality. Such phenomenon is reflected in the trimming process, during which the stress state changes from shear-dominated state to tensile-dominated state. In addition, the burnish zone of trimmed boron steel is much smaller than other high strength steels, and the profile of cutting surface shows an `S'-like shape which is destructive to the trimming tool. Moreover, during the trimming process, most martensite laths near the cutting edge are stretched and rotated markedly to the direction of the shear band, and the main crack expands along those grain boundaries, which may penetrate through a few martensite laths and form small crack branches.

  20. Thermal-mechanical properties of cracked UO/sub 2/ pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Williford, R.E.; Mohr, C.L.; Lanning, D.D.

    1980-11-01

    A series of experiments (IFA-431, 432, 513, and 527) sponsored by the Fuel Behavior Research Branch of the USNRC are being irradiated in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor to better define LWR fuel behavior over the normal operating range of power reactor fuel rods. One fuel behavior variable of interest is the thermally induced cracking of UO/sub 2/ fuel pellets. The effects of pellet cracking on the effective thermal conductivity and elastic moduli for the fragmented fuel were found to be primarily dependent on the free area in the r, theta plane of the fuel rod. The free area is defined as the area within the cladding inner surface that is not occupied by the fuel fragments themselves.

  1. Fracture Mechanics Analysis of an Annular Crack in a Three-concentric-cylinder Composite Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuguoglu, Latife H.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2004-01-01

    A boundary-value problem governing a three-phase concentric-cylinder model was analytically modeled to analyze annular interfacial crack problems with Love s strain functions in order to find the stress intensity factors (SIFs) and strain energy release rates (SERRs) at the tips of an interface crack in a nonhomogeneous medium. The complex form of a singular integral equation (SIE) of the second kind was formulated using Bessel s functions in the Fourier domain, and the SIF and total SERR were calculated using Jacoby polynomials. For the validity of the SIF equations to be established, the SIE of the three-concentric-cylinder model was reduced to the SIE for a two-concentric-cylinder model, and the results were compared with the previous results of Erdogan. A preliminary set of parametric studies was carried out to show the effect of interphase properties on the SERR. The method presented here provides insight about the effect of interphase properties on the crack driving force.

  2. Short crack growth behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Sadananda, K.; Vasudevan, A.K.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have re-evaluated short crack growth behavior using concepts developed recently, and they show that these concepts provide a unified framework that can explain both short and long crack growth behavior without resorting to the crack closure effect. They consider that the behavior of long cracks, including the effects of load ratio, R, is fundamental. they had shown previously that, since fatigue is at least a two-parameter problem in that at least two load parameters are required for an unambiguous description, there are two critical driving forces required simultaneously for fatigue cracks to grow. In extending this analysis to the growth of short cracks, they reject the current notion of the lack of similitude for short cracks and express the similitude as a fundamental postulate that, for a given crack growth mechanism, equal crack tip driving forces result in equal crack growth rates. Short crack growth behavior confirms the concept that two parameters are required to define fatigue; consequently, for fatigue cracks to grow, two thresholds need to be satisfied simultaneously. The authors present examples from the literature to illustrate the concepts discussed.

  3. On the toughening of brittle materials by grain bridging:promoting intergranular fracture through grain angle, strength, andtoughness

    SciTech Connect

    Foulk III, J.W.; Johnson, G.C.; Klein, P.A.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2007-11-15

    The structural reliability of many brittle materials such asstructural ceramics relies on the occurrence of intergranular, as opposedto transgranular, fracture in order to induce toughening by grainbridging. For a constant grain boundary strength and grain boundarytoughness, the current work examines the role of grain strength, graintoughness, and grain angle in promoting intergranular fracture in orderto maintain such toughening. Previous studies have illustrated that anintergranular path and the consequent grain bridging process can bepartitioned into five distinct regimes, namely: propagate, kink, arrest,stall and bridge. To determine the validity of the assumed intergranularpath, the classical penentration/deflection problem of a crack impingingon an interface is reexamined within a cohesive zone framework forintergranular and transgranular fracture. Results considering both modesof propagation, i.e., a transgranular and intergranular path, reveal thatcrack-tip shielding is a natural outcome of the cohesive zone approach tofracture. Cohesive zone growth in one mode shields the opposing mode fromthe stresses required for cohesive zone initiation. Although stablepropagation occurs when the required driving force is equivalent to thetoughness for either transgranular or intergranular fracture, the mode ofpropagation depends on the normalized grain strength, normalized graintoughness, and grain angle. For each grain angle, the intersection ofsingle path and multiple path solutions demarcates "strong" grains thatincrease the macroscopic toughness and "weak" grains that decrease it.The unstable transition to intergranular fracture reveals that anincreasinggrain toughness requires a growing region of the transgranularcohesive zone be at and near the peak cohesive strength. The inability ofthe body to provide the requisite stress field yields an overdriven andunstable configuration. The current results provide restrictions for theachievement of substantial toughening

  4. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Ni-Fe-Cr Alloys Relevant to Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, Suraj

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Ni-Fe-Cr alloys and weld metals was investigated in simulated environments representative of high temperature water used in the primary and secondary circuits of nuclear power plants. The mechanism of primary water SCC (PWSCC) was studied in Alloys 600, 690, 800 and Alloy 82 dissimilar metal welds using the internal oxidation model as a guide. Initial experiments were carried out in a 480°C hydrogenated steam environment considered to simulate high temperature reducing primary water. Ni alloys underwent classical internal oxidation intragranularly resulting in the expulsion of the solvent metal, Ni, to the surface. Selective intergranular oxidation of Cr in Alloy 600 resulted in embrittlement, while other alloys were resistant owing to their increased Cr contents. Atom probe tomography was used to determine the short-circuit diffusion path used for Ni expulsion at a sub-nanometer scale, which was concluded to be oxide-metal interfaces. Further exposures of Alloys 600 and 800 were done in 315°C simulated primary water and intergranular oxidation tendency was comparable to 480°C hydrogenated steam. Secondary side work involved SCC experiments and electrochemical measurements, which were done at 315°C in acid sulfate solutions. Alloy 800 C-rings were found to undergo acid sulfate SCC (AcSCC) to a depth of up to 300 microm in 0.55 M sulfate solution at pH 4.3. A focused-ion beam was used to extract a crack tip from a C-ring and high resolution analytical electron microscopy revealed a duplex oxide structure and the presence of sulfur. Electrochemical measurements were taken on Ni alloys to complement crack tip analysis; sulfate was concluded to be the aggressive anion in mixed sulfate and chloride systems. Results from electrochemical measurements and crack tip analysis suggested a slip dissolution-type mechanism to explain AcSCC in Ni alloys.

  5. Microchemistry of corroded intergranular surfaces. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, D.L.; Varsanik, R.G.

    1985-02-01

    Sections of Alloy 600 boiler tubes which had undergone multi-year exposure to typical conditions in a Babcock-and-Wilcox model boiler were received for examination of grain surfaces which had undergone intergranular attack during service. The primary problem was to prepare samples of the desired surface in a way that would not degrade it. This was accomplished by pneumatically inflating the tube sections until they burst; the ductile layer of Alloy 600 expanded plastically, while the exterior IGA layer did not. Subsequent twisting of the metal section caused the outer surface to drop off, exposing the IGA surfaces. Examination of these fresh surfaces was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), wavelength-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (WDX), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and selected area diffraction (SAD). There appears to be a distinct film of material between the IGA grains on the order of 150 to 200A thick. This film has not been fully characterized, but has been found to be sodium and/or sulfur-rich. Electron diffraction suggests that this layer may consist of a mixed sodium/transition-metal oxide and a nickel sulfide. Confirmation of this hypothesis could best be accomplished by examination of ion-thinned sections of this material in an analytical electron microscope.

  6. Environmentally assisted cracking of LWR materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    Research on environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of light water reactor materials has focused on (a) fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, (b) crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs, and (d) EAC in high- nickel alloys. The effect of strain rate during different portions of the loading cycle on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels in 289{degree}C water was determined. Crack growth studies on wrought and cast SSs have been completed. The effect of dissolved-oxygen concentration in high-purity water on IASCC of irradiated Type 304 SS was investigated and trace elements in the steel that increase susceptibility to intergranular cracking were identified. Preliminary results were obtained on crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320{degree}C. The program on Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Light Water Reactor Materials is currently focused on four tasks: fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, fatigue and environmentally assisted crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic SS, irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic SSs, and environmentally assisted crack growth in high-nickel alloys. Measurements of corrosion-fatigue crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast stainless steels has been essentially completed. Recent progress in these areas is outlined in the following sections.

  7. Effect of crack surface geometry on fatigue crack closure

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, W.J.; Gokhale, A.M.; Antolovich, S.D.

    1995-10-01

    The geometry of crack faces often plays a critical role in reducing crack extension forces when crack closure occurs during fatigue crack growth. Most previous studies of fatigue crack closure are concerned with mechanical measure of closure as related to the crack growth rate; very little attention has been given to the geometry of the crack surfaces. The objective is to identify those aspects of crack surface geometry that are important in the closure process, to develop quantitative fractographic techniques to estimate such attributes in a statistically significant and robust manner, and to correlate them to the physical process of crack closure. For this purpose, fatigue crack propagation experiments were performed on a Ni-base superalloy and crack growth rates and crack closure loads were measured. Digital image profilometry and software-based analysis techniques were used for statistically reliable and detailed quantitative characterization of fatigue crack profiles. It is shown that the dimensionless, scale-independent attributes, such a height-to-width ratio of asperities, fractal dimensions, dimensionless roughness parameters, etc., do not represent the aspects of crack geometry that are of primary importance in the crack closure phenomena. Furthermore, it is shown that the scale-dependent characteristics, such as average asperity height, do represent the aspects of crack geometry that play an interactive role in the closure process. These observations have implications concerning the validity of geometry-dependent, closure-based models for fatigue crack growth.

  8. Effect of crack surface geometry on fatigue crack closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, W. J.; Gokhale, Arun M.; Antolovich, S. D.

    1995-10-01

    The geometry of crack faces often plays a critical role in reducing crack extension forces when crack closure occurs during fatigue crack growth. Most previous studies of fatigue crack closure are concerned with mechanical measures of closure as related to the crack growth rate; very little attention has been given to the geometry of the crack surfaces. Our objective is to identify those aspects of crack surface geometry that are important in the closure process, to develop quantitative fractographic techniques to estimate such attributes in a statistically significant and robust manner, and to correlate them to the physical process of crack closure. For this purpose, fatigue crack propagation experiments were performed on a Ni-base superalloy and crack growth rates and crack closure loads were measured. Digital image profilometry and software-based analysis techniques were used for statistically reliable and detailed quantitative characterization of fatigue crack profiles. It is shown that the dimensionless, scale-independent attributes, such as height-to-width ratio of asperities, fractal dimensions, dimensionless roughness parameters, etc., do not represent the aspects of crack geometry that are of primary importance in the crack closure phenomena. Furthermore, it is shown that the scaledependent characteristics, such as average asperity height, do represent the aspects of crack geometry that play an interactive role in the closure process. These observations have implications concerning the validity of geometry-dependent, closure-based models for fatigue crack growth.

  9. Quantity Effect of Radial Cracks on the Cracking Propagation Behavior and the Crack Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingjing; Xu, Jun; Liu, Bohan; Yao, Xuefeng; Li, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    In this letter, the quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior as well as the circular crack generation on the impacted glass plate within the sandwiched glass sheets are experimentally investigated via high-speed photography system. Results show that the radial crack velocity on the backing glass layer decreases with the crack number under the same impact conditions during large quantities of repeated experiments. Thus, the “energy conversion factor” is suggested to elucidate the physical relation between the cracking number and the crack propagation speed. Besides, the number of radial crack also takes the determinative effect in the crack morphology of the impacted glass plate. This study may shed lights on understanding the cracking and propagation mechanism in laminated glass structures and provide useful tool to explore the impact information on the cracking debris. PMID:25048684

  10. Study of intergranular embrittlement in Fe-12Mn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.J.

    1982-06-01

    A high resolution scanning Auger microscopic study has been performed on the intergranular fracture surfaces of Fe-12Mn steels in the as-austenitized condition. Fracture mode below the ductile-brittle transition temperature was intergranular whenever the alloy was quenched from the austenite field. The intergranular fracture surface failed to reveal any consistent segregation of P, S, As, O, or N. The occasional appearance of S or O on the fracture surface was found to be due to a low density precipitation of MnS and MnO/sub 2/ along the prior austenite boundaries. An AES study with Ar/sup +/ ion-sputtering showed no evidence of manganese enrichment along the prior austenite boundaries, but a slight segregation of carbon which does not appear to be implicated in the tendency toward intergranular fracture. Addition of 0.002% B with a 1000/sup 0/C/1h/WQ treatment yielded a high Charpy impact energy at liquid nitrogen temperature, preventing the intergranular fracture. High resolution AES studies showed that 3 at. % B on the prior austenite grain boundaries is most effective in increasing the grain boundary cohesive strength in an Fe-12Mn alloy. Trace additions of Mg, Zr, or V had negligible effects on the intergranular embrittlement. A 450/sup 0/C temper of the boron-modified alloys was found to cause tempered martensite embrittlement, leading to intergranular fracture. The embrittling treatment of the Fe-12Mn alloys with and without boron additions raised the ductile-brittle transition by 150/sup 0/C. This tempered martensite embrittlement was found to be due to the Mn enrichment of the fracture surface to 32 at. % Mn in the boron-modified alloy and 38 at. % Mn in the unmodified alloy. The Mn-enriched region along the prior austenite grain boundaries upon further tempering is believed to cause nucleation of austenite and to change the chemistry of the intergranular fracture surfaces. 61 figures.

  11. BWR pipe crack and weld clad overlay studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.; Maiya, P.S.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.; Rybicki, E.F.

    1985-10-01

    This paper presents results on (a) the influence of simulated BWR environments and temperature on the intergranular-stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility of sensitized stainless steels (SS), (b) the stress-corrosion susceptibility of alternative piping materials, (c) analysis of field components to assess the effectiveness of in-service inspection techniques and the in-reactor performance of weld overlay repairs, and (d) finite-element analyses and experimental measurement of residual stresses in weldments with weld overlays. Fracture-mechanics crack-growth data are presented to confirm correlations between the critical corrosion potentials required to inhibit IGSCC and the level of impurities in the environment. Slow-strain-rate tests show that very low levels of impurities (25 ppb of sulfate) can produce suseptibility to transgranular-stress-corrosion cracking (TGSCC) in Type 316NG SS and that nitrogen levels is SS above 0.1 wt. % appear to increase susceptibility to TGSCC. Preliminary results on a German Type 347NG SS suggest that it is at least as resistant to TGSCC in impurity environments as Type 316NG SS. Measurements on overlay weldments removed from the Hatch-2 reactor confirm that compressive residual stresses are produced on the inner surface of the weldments by the overlay.

  12. Strain oxidation cracking of austenitic stainless steels at 610 C

    SciTech Connect

    Calvar, M. Le; Scott, P.M.; Magnin, T.; Rieux, P.

    1998-02-01

    Strain oxidation cracking of both forged and welded austenitic stainless steels (SS) was studied. Creep and slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were performed in vacuum, air, and a gas furnace environment (air + carbon dioxide [CO{sub 2}] + water [H{sub 2}O]). Results showed cracking was environmentally dependent. Almost no cracking was observed in vacuum, whereas intergranular cracking was observed with increasing severity in passing from an air to a gas furnace environment. The most severe cracking was associated with formation of a less protective film formed in the gas furnace environment (air: haematite-like M{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide; gas furnace environment: spinel M{sub 3}O{sub 4} oxide). Cracking depended strongly on the carbon content and the sensitization susceptibility of the material: the higher the carbon content, the more susceptible the alloy. This cracking was believed to be similar to other oxidation-induced cracking phenomena.

  13. A fractographic study of iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in irradiated Zircaloy-2 cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Sachio; Nagai, Masayuki

    1983-02-01

    A fractographic interpretation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Zircaloy-2 was made through detailed scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of cladding tubes irradiated and subjected to internal pressurization SCC tests in an iodine environment. The SEM examination of the fracture surface revealed that both intergranular and transgranular fracture appeared in the regions of crack initiation. The W-type voids were observed in the intergranular fracture. As the crack proceeded, transgranular fracture, or cleavage facet, became predominant. Cleavage facets were separated by tearing ridges as well as by fluting marks. The appearance of tearing ridges is consistent with the increase of slip systems in α-zirconium with increasing temperature.

  14. High-Temperature Mechanical Behavior and Fracture Analysis of a Low-Carbon Steel Related to Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillana, Begoña; Boom, Rob; Eskin, Dmitry; Mizukami, Hideo; Hanao, Masahito; Kawamoto, Masayuki

    2012-12-01

    Cracking in continuously cast steel slabs has been one of the main problems in casting for decades. In recent years, the use of computational models has led to a significant improvement in caster performance and product quality. However, these models require accurate thermomechanical properties as input data, which are either unreliable or nonexistent for many alloys of commercial interest. A major reason for this lack of reliable data is that high-temperature mechanical properties are difficult to measure. Several methods have been developed to assess the material strength during solidification, especially for light alloys. The tensile strength during solidification of a low carbon aluminum-killed (LCAK; obtained from Tata Steel Mainland Europe cast at the DSP plant in IJmuiden, the Netherlands) has been studied by a technique for high-temperature tensile testing, which was developed at Sumitomo Metal Industries in Japan. The experimental technique enables a sample to melt and solidify without a crucible, making possible the accurate measurement of load over a small solidification temperature range. In the current study, the tensile test results are analyzed and the characteristic zero-ductility and zero-strength temperatures are determined for this particular LCAK steel grade. The fracture surfaces are investigated following tensile testing, which provides an invaluable insight into the fracture mechanism and a better understanding with respect to the behavior of the steel during solidification. The role of minor alloying elements, like sulfur, in hot cracking susceptibility is also discussed.

  15. Mechanism of hot-rolling crack formation in lean duplex stainless steel 2101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhi-hui; Li, Jing-yuan; Wang, Yi-de

    2016-04-01

    The thermoplasticity of duplex stainless steel 2205 (DSS2205) is better than that of lean duplex steel 2101 (LDX2101), which undergoes severe cracking during hot rolling. The microstructure, microhardness, phase ratio, and recrystallization dependence of the deformation compatibility of LDX2101 and DSS2205 were investigated using optical microscopy (OM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), Thermo-Calc software, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that the phase-ratio transformations of LDX2101 and DSS2205 were almost equal under the condition of increasing solution temperature. Thus, the phase transformation was not the main cause for the hot plasticity difference of these two steels. The grain size of LDX2101 was substantially greater than that of DSS2205, and the microhardness difference of LDX2101 was larger than that of DSS2205. This difference hinders the transfer of strain from ferrite to austenite. In the rolling process, the ferrite grains of LDX2101 underwent continuous softening and were substantially refined. However, although little recrystallization occurred at the boundaries of austenite, serious deformation accumulated in the interior of austenite, leading to a substantial increase in hardness. The main cause of crack formation is the microhardness difference between ferrite and austenite.

  16. Assessment of surface relief and short cracks under cyclic creep in a type 316LN austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Aritra; Nagesha, A.; Parameswaran, P.; Sandhya, R.; Laha, K.

    2015-12-01

    Formation of surface relief and short cracks under cyclic creep (stress-controlled fatigue) in type 316LN stainless steel was studied at temperatures ranging from ambient to 923 K using scanning electron microscopy technique. The surface topography and crack distribution behaviour under cyclic creep were found to be strong functions of testing temperature due to the difference in strain accumulation. At 823 K, surface relief mainly consisted of fine slip markings due to negligible accumulation of strain as a consequence of dynamic strain ageing (DSA) which led to an increase in the cyclic life. Persistent slip markings (PSM) with distinct extrusions containing minute cracks were seen to prevail in the temperature range 873-923 K, indicating a higher slip activity causing higher strain accumulation in the absence of DSA. Besides, a large number of secondary cracks (both transgranular and intergranular) which were partially accentuated by severe oxidation, were observed. Extensive cavitation-induced grain boundary cracking took place at 923 K, which coalesced with PSM-induced transgranular cracks resulting in failure dominated by creep that in turn led to a drastic reduction in cyclic life. Investigations on the influence of stress rate were also carried out which underlined the presence of DSA at 823 K. At 923 K, lowering the stress rate caused further strengthening of the contribution from creep damage marked by a shift in the damage mechanism from cyclic slip to diffusion.

  17. Grain boundary oxidation and fatigue crack growth at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.; Oshida, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth rate at elevated temperatures can be accelerated by grain boundary oxidation. Grain boundary oxidation kinetics and the statistical distribution of grain boundary oxide penetration depth were studied. At a constant delta K-level and at a constant test temperature, fatigue crack growth rate, da/dN, is a function of cyclic frequency, nu. A fatigue crack growth model of intermittent micro-ruptures of grain boundary oxide is constructed. The model is consistent with the experimental observations that, in the low frequency region, da/dN is inversely proportional to nu, and fatigue crack growth is intergranular.

  18. The investigation of crack mechanism for Tyranno-SA SiC/SiC composites with ESI method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J. Y.; Chen, C. W.; Fang, P. C.; Yin, K. M.; Chen, F. R.; Katoh, Y.; Kohyama, A.; Kai, J. J.

    2004-08-01

    In order to clarify the fracture mechanism of frictional stress and bonding strength in SiC/SiC composites, the mechanical test and HRTEM equipped with electron energy loss spectrometer were used. Due to the high sensitivity of carbon k-edge in the EELS spectrum, EELS is more convenient than other analytical tools. The advanced electronic spectroscopic image (ESI) technique is applied to observe the wide area around the interface of SiC fiber/pyrolytic carbon/SiC matrix. The sp 2 fraction mapping reveals the non-uniform and high sp 2 concentration existence at the interface of fiber/pyrolytic carbon. This result proves the cracking start at this region and extends to whole specimen.

  19. A study on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in hot alkaline-sulfide solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasse, Kevin Robert

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) generally have superior strength and corrosion resistance as compared to most standard austenitic and ferritic stainless grades owing to a balanced microstructure of austenite and ferrite. As a result of having favorable properties, DSS have been selected for the construction of equipment in pulp and paper, chemical processing, nuclear, oil and gas as well as other industries. The use of DSS has been restricted in some cases because of stress corrosion cracking (SCC), which can initiate and grow in either the ferrite or austenite phase depending on the environment. Thorough understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in chloride- and hydrogen sulfide-containing solutions has been useful for material selection in many environments. However, understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in sulfide-containing caustic solutions is limited, which has restricted the capacity to optimize process and equipment design in pulp and paper environments. Process environments may contain different concentrations of hydroxide, sulfide, and chloride, altering corrosion and SCC susceptibility of each phase. Crack initiation and growth behavior will also change depending on the relative phase distribution and properties of austenite and ferrite. The role of microstructure and environment on the SCC of standard grade UNS S32205 and lean grade UNS S32101 in hot alkaline-sulfide solution were evaluated in this work using electrochemical, film characterization, mechanical testing, X-ray diffraction, and microscopy techniques. Microstructural aspects, which included residual stress state, phase distribution, phase ratio, and microhardness, were related to the propensity for SCC crack initiation in different simulated alkaline pulping liquors at 170 °C. Other grades of DSS and reference austenitic and superferritic grades of stainless steel were studied using exposure coupons for comparison to understand compositional effects and individual phase susceptibility

  20. Corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    Various papers on corrosion cracking are presented. The topics addressed include: unique case studies on hydrogen embrittlement failures in components used in aeronautical industry; analysis of subcritical cracking in a Ti-5Al-2.5Sn liquid hydrogen control valve; corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking of 7475-T7351 aluminum alloy; effects of salt water environment and loading frequency on crack initiation in 7075-T7651 aluminum alloy and Ti-6Al-4V; stress corrosion cracking of 4340 steel in aircraft ignition starter residues. Also discussed are: stress corrosion cracking of a titanium alloy in a hydrogen-free environment; automation in corrosion fatigue crack growth rate measurements; the breaking load method, a new approach for assessing resistance to growth of early stage stress corrosion cracks; stress corrosion cracking properties of 2090 Al-Li alloy; repair welding of cracked free machining Invar 36; radial bore cracks in rotating disks.

  1. Effect of heat treatment and heat-to-heat variations in the fatigue-crack growth response of Alloy 718. Part 2. Microscopic observation

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.; James, L.A.

    1980-04-01

    The microstructural aspects that influenced the room temperature and elevated temperature fatigue-crack propagation response of annealed, conventional, and modified heat-treated Alloy 718 were studied. Electron fractographic examination of Alloy 718 fatigue fracture surfaces revealed that operative crack growth mechanisms were dependent on heat treatment, heat-to-heat variations, temperature, and prevailing crack tip stress intensity level. In the low temperature regime (below 538{sup 0}C), all fracture surfaces exhibited a faceted appearance at low {Delta} levels, which is indicative of crystallographic fracture along intense inhomogeneous slip bands. The facets in the modified Alloy 718, however, were found to be rather poorly defined since the modified heat treatment tends to promote more homogeneous slip processes. Under progressively higher stress intensity levels, the room temperature and elevated temperature fatigue fracture surfaces exhibited striations, followed by a combination of striations and dimple rupture at the highest {Delta} values. Striation spacing measurements in all three heat-treated conditions were generally found to be in agreement with macroscopic growth rates at 24 and 538{sup 0}C. Under high temperature conditions (above 538{sup 0}C), evidence of intergranular fracture was also detected on the fatigue fracture surfaces, particularly at low stress intensity levels. This intergranular failure mechanism was found to be more extensive in the modified heat-treated Alloy 718. 17 figures.

  2. Intergranular stresses in Zircaloy-2 with rod texture

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, J.W.L.; Mason, T.E.; Holden, T.M.; Turner, P.A.

    1999-01-15

    The intergranular strains in thermally and mechanically anisotropic Zircaloy-2 with rod texture have been measured in situ under uniaxial tension along the rod axis by neutron diffraction. An in-plane biaxial stress state was developed in the grains as deformation proceeded. The tensors describing the stress state of the grains throughout the deformation process have been determined experimentally in the natural crystallographic axes system. After 5% deformation, the stress tensor components of the grains, {sigma}{sub 11} and {sigma}{sub 33}--stresses acting along the {l_angle}a{r_angle}-axes and {l_angle}c{r_angle}-axes lying in the transverse plane--are 230 {+-} 20 MPa and {minus}241 {+-} 21 MPa, respectively. The angular dependence of the initial thermal residual stress state and the final deformed state have also been obtained. The elasto-plastic self-confident model has been used to simulate the experiments and exhibits agreement with experiment. It appears that the introduction of basal slip {l_brace}0001{r_brace}{l_angle}1{bar 2}10{r_angle} considerably improves the agreement with experiment.

  3. Detection of Intergranular Corrosion in Cold Plate Face Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Smith, Stephen W.; Piascik, Robert S.; Howell, Patricia A.

    2002-01-01

    Cold plates are critical for cooling electronic systems in the shuttle. As a result of the environmental conditions in which they operate, water can condense between them and a support shelf. In some cases, this water results in intergranular corrosion in the face sheet. If the intergranular corrosion sufficiently penetrates the face sheet, a coolant leak could occur and jeopardize cold plate operation. This paper examines techniques for detecting and characterizing the intergranular corrosion, to enable recertification of cold plates that have been in operation for 15 plus years. Intergranular corrosion was artificially induced in the face sheets of a series of cold plate specimens using an electrochemical process. Some of the cold plate specimens were separated for destructive characterization of the extent of corrosion produced by the electrochemical process and to insure the induced corrosion was intergranular. The rest of the specimens were characterized nondestructively using several techniques. X-ray tomography and ultrasonic techniques provided the best indication of corrosion in these specimens and will be the focus of this paper. An x-ray tomography technique was shown to be the most effective technique for characterizing depth of the intergranular corrosion. From these measurements, corrosion profile maps were developed that were consistent with subsequent destructive evaluations of the specimens. This enabled the assessment of NDE (ondestructive evaluation) standards to evaluate the viability of other NDE techniques. Due to system constraints, a different technique must be used to inspect an entire cold plate. An ultrasonic technique was shown to be very reliable for detection of corrosion in the unbacked regions of the face sheet. The ultrasonic technique was performed in an alcohol bath to avoid additional corrosion during the NDE evaluation. A pulse echo technique that focuses on the RMS value of the signal is shown to be very sensitive to the

  4. Effect of dissolved oxygen content on stress corrosion cracking of a cold worked 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Litao; Wang, Jianqiu

    2014-03-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth tests of a cold worked nuclear grade 316L stainless steel were conducted in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environment containing various dissolved oxygen (DO) contents but no dissolved hydrogen. The crack growth rate (CGR) increased with increasing DO content in the simulated PWR primary water. The fracture surface exhibited typical intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics.

  5. Small Crack Growth and Fatigue Life Predictions for High-Strength Aluminium Alloys. Part 1; Experimental and Fracture Mechanics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, X. R.; Newman, J. C.; Zhao, W.; Swain, M. H.; Ding, C. F.; Phillips, E. P.

    1998-01-01

    The small crack effect was investigated in two high-strength aluminium alloys: 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad alloy. Both experimental and analytical investigations were conducted to study crack initiation and growth of small cracks. In the experimental program, fatigue tests, small crack and large crack tests A,ere conducted under constant amplitude and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading conditions. A pronounced small crack effect was observed in both materials, especially for the negative stress ratios. For all loading conditions, most of the fatigue life of the SENT specimens was shown to be crack propagation from initial material defects or from the cladding layer. In the analysis program, three-dimensional finite element and A weight function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors and to develop SIF equations for surface and corner cracks at the notch in the SENT specimens. A plastisity-induced crack-closure model was used to correlate small and large crack data, and to make fatigue life predictions, Predicted crack-growth rates and fatigue lives agreed well with experiments. A total fatigue life prediction method for the aluminum alloys was developed and demonstrated using the crack-closure model.

  6. Influence of circumferential notch and fatigue crack on the mechanical integrity of biodegradable magnesium-based alloy in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Bobby Kannan, M; Singh Raman, R K; Witte, F; Blawert, C; Dietzel, W

    2011-02-01

    Applications of magnesium alloys as biodegradable orthopaedic implants are critically dependent on the mechanical integrity of the implant during service. In this study, the mechanical integrity of an AZ91 magnesium alloy was studied using a constant extension rate tensile (CERT) method. The samples in two different geometries that is, circumferentially notched (CN), and circumferentially notched and fatigue cracked (CNFC), were tested in air and in simulated body fluid (SBF). The test results show that the mechanical integrity of the AZ91 magnesium alloy decreased substantially (∼50%) in both the CN and CNFC samples exposed to SBF. Fracture surface analysis revealed secondary cracks suggesting stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the alloy in SBF. PMID:21210510

  7. Multi-scale modeling of microstructure dependent intergranular brittle fracture using a quantitative phase-field based method

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Zhang, Yongfeng; Tonks, Michael R.

    2015-12-07

    In this study, the fracture behavior of brittle materials is strongly influenced by their underlying microstructure that needs explicit consideration for accurate prediction of fracture properties and the associated scatter. In this work, a hierarchical multi-scale approach is pursued to model microstructure sensitive brittle fracture. A quantitative phase-field based fracture model is utilized to capture the complex crack growth behavior in the microstructure and the related parameters are calibrated from lower length scale atomistic simulations instead of engineering scale experimental data. The workability of this approach is demonstrated by performing porosity dependent intergranular fracture simulations in UO2 and comparing the predictions with experiments.

  8. On the Effect of Local Grain-Boundary Chemistry on the Macroscopic Mechanical Properties of a High Purity Y2O3-Al2O3-Containing Silicon Nitride Ceramic: Role of Oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, A; McNaney, J M; Hoffman, M J; Ritchie, R O

    2004-11-23

    The effects of grain-boundary chemistry on the mechanical properties were investigated on high-purity silicon nitride ceramics, specifically involving the role of oxygen. Varying the grain-boundary oxygen content, by control of oxidizing heat treatments and sintering additives, was found to result in a transition in fracture mechanism from transgranular to intergranular fracture, with an associated increase in fracture toughness. This phenomenon is correlated to an oxygen-induced change in grain-boundary chemistry that appears to affect fracture by ''weakening'' the interface, facilitating debonding and crack advance along the boundaries, and consequently toughening by grain bridging. It is concluded that if the oxygen content in the thin grain-boundary films exceeds a lower limit, which is {approx}0.87 equiv% oxygen content, then the interfacial structure and bonding characteristics favor intergranular debonding during crack propagation; otherwise, transgranular fracture ensues.

  9. A comparison of the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of commercially pure titanium grade 4 in Ringer's solution and in distilled water: a fracture mechanics approach.

    PubMed

    Roach, Michael D; Williamson, R Scott; Thomas, Joseph A; Griggs, Jason A; Zardiackas, Lyle D

    2014-01-01

    From the results of laboratory investigations reported in the literature, it has been suggested that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanisms may contribute to early failures in titanium alloys that have elevated oxygen concentrations. However, the susceptibility of titanium alloys to SCC in physiological environments remains unclear. In this study, a fracture mechanics approach was used to examine the SCC susceptibility of CP titanium grade 4 in Ringer's solution and distilled de-ionized (DI) water, at 37°C. The study duration was 26 weeks, simulating the non-union declaration of a plated fracture. Four wedge loads were used corresponding to 86-95% of the alloy's ligament yield load. The longest cracks were measured to be 0.18 mm and 0.10 mm in Ringer's solution and DI water, respectively. SEM analysis revealed no evidence of extensive fluting and quasi-cleavage fracture features which, in literature reports, were attributed to SCC. We thus postulate that the Ringer's solution accelerated the wedge-loaded crack growth without producing the critical stresses needed to change the fracture mechanism. Regression analysis of the crack length results led to a significant best-fit relationship between crack growth velocity (independent variable) and test electrolyte, initial wedge load, and time of immersion of specimen in electrolyte (dependent variables). PMID:23852924

  10. Automatic crack propagation tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, M. S.; Weidner, T. J.; Yehia, N. A. B.; Burd, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element based approach to fully automatic crack propagation tracking is presented. The procedure presented combines fully automatic mesh generation with linear fracture mechanics techniques in a geometrically based finite element code capable of automatically tracking cracks in two-dimensional domains. The automatic mesh generator employs the modified-quadtree technique. Crack propagation increment and direction are predicted using a modified maximum dilatational strain energy density criterion employing the numerical results obtained by meshes of quadratic displacement and singular crack tip finite elements. Example problems are included to demonstrate the procedure.

  11. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to extend the work performed in the base program (CR 182247) into the regime of time-dependent crack growth under isothermal and thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) loading, where creep deformation also influences the crack growth behavior. The investigation was performed in a two-year, six-task, combined experimental and analytical program. The path-independent integrals for application to time-dependent crack growth were critically reviewed. The crack growth was simulated using a finite element method. The path-independent integrals were computed from the results of finite-element analyses. The ability of these integrals to correlate experimental crack growth data were evaluated under various loading and temperature conditions. The results indicate that some of these integrals are viable parameters for crack growth prediction at elevated temperatures.

  12. A microscopic study of crack initiation mechanisms in 7075 aluminum alloy sheets.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. L.; Liebowitz, H.

    1973-01-01

    A study of the opening mode of crack initiation in 7075-T6 aluminum alloy sheets has been conducted with the aid of a scanning electron microscope. Observations were made from several orientations, including the top view of the specimen which showed the notch profile and the edge view of the specimen which showed the entire notch front along the specimen thickness. It was found that the edge view exhibited the first signs of permanent deformation at about 55% of the breaking strength. These changes took the form of deformation bands which were aligned in the direction of the tensile axis and apparently defined limiting regions of homogeneous slip. It is felt that the appearance of microcracks at loads approaching the breaking strength was of fundamental importance in the formation of the final fracture surface. Many of these microcraks were initiated at intermetallic particles and other metallurgically weak regions on the notch surface. It was also possible to correlate the strain in the notch with the stress intensity factor for the various loads. Very large plastic strains were observed on the notch tip as compared to published values of elongation at fracture for unnotched specimens.

  13. The mechanics and physics of fracturing: application to thermal aspects of crack propagation and to fracking.

    PubMed

    Cherepanov, Genady P

    2015-03-28

    By way of introduction, the general invariant integral (GI) based on the energy conservation law is presented, with mention of cosmic, gravitational, mass, elastic, thermal and electromagnetic energy of matter application to demonstrate the approach, including Coulomb's Law generalized for moving electric charges, Newton's Law generalized for coupled gravitational/cosmic field, the new Archimedes' Law accounting for gravitational and surface energy, and others. Then using this approach the temperature track behind a moving crack is found, and the coupling of elastic and thermal energies is set up in fracturing. For porous materials saturated with a fluid or gas, the notion of binary continuum is used to introduce the corresponding GIs. As applied to the horizontal drilling and fracturing of boreholes, the field of pressure and flow rate as well as the fluid output from both a horizontal borehole and a fracture are derived in the fluid extraction regime. The theory of fracking in shale gas reservoirs is suggested for three basic regimes of the drill mud permeation, with calculating the shape and volume of the local region of the multiply fractured rock in terms of the pressures of rock, drill mud and shale gas. PMID:25713454

  14. Mechanisms of fatigue crack retardation following single tensile overloads in powder metallurgy aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, G. H.; Reynolds, A. P.; Starke, E. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    In ingot metallurgy (IM) alloys, the number of delay cycles following a single tensile overload typically increases from a minimum at an intermediate baseline stress intensity range, Delta-K(B), with decreasing Delta-K(B) approaching threshold and increasing Delta-K(B) approaching unstable fracture to produce a characteristic 'U' shaped curve. Two models have been proposed to explain this behavior. One model is based on the interaction between roughness and plasticity-induced closure, while the other model only utilizes plasticity-induced closure. This article examines these models, using experimental results from constant amplitude and single overload fatigue tests performed on two powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys, AL-905XL and AA 8009. The results indicate that the 'U'-shaped curve is primarily due to plasticity-induced closure, and that the plasticity-induced retardation effect is through-thickness in nature, occurring in both the surface and interior regions. However, the retardation effect is greater at the surface, because the increase in plastic strain at the crack tip and overload plastic zone size are larger in the plane-stress surface regions than in the plane-strain interior regions. These results are not entirely consistent with either of the proposed models.

  15. Prediction of fatigue crack-growth patterns and lives in three-dimensional cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Raju, I. S.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth patterns and lives for surface cracks, surface cracks at holes, and corner cracks at holes in three dimensional bodies were predicted using linear-elastic fracture mechanics concepts that were modified to account for crack-closure behavior. The predictions were made by using stress intensity factor equations for these crack configurations and the fatigue crack-growth (delta K against rate) relationship for the material of interest. The crack configurations were subjected to constant-amplitude fatigue loading under either remote tension or bending loads. The predicted crack growth patterns and crack growth lives for aluminum alloys agreed well with test data from the literature.

  16. Tensile stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel irradiated to very high dose

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Strain, R. V.; Shack, W. J.

    2001-09-01

    Certain safety-related core internal structural components of light water reactors, usually fabricated from Type 304 or 316 austenitic stainless steels (SSs), accumulate very high levels of irradiation damage (20--100 displacement per atom or dpa) by the end of life. The data bases and mechanistic understanding of, the degradation of such highly irradiated components, however, are not well established. A key question is the nature of irradiation-assisted intergranular cracking at very high dose, i.e., is it purely mechanical failure or is it stress-commotion cracking? In this work, hot-cell tests and microstructural characterization were performed on Type 304 SS from the hexagonal fuel can of the decommissioned EBR-11 reactor after irradiation to {approximately}50 dpa at {approximately}370 C. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted at 289 C in air and in water at several levels of electrochemical potential (ECP), and microstructural characteristics were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microcopies. The material deformed significantly by twinning and exhibited surprisingly high ductility in air, but was susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at high ECP. Low levels of dissolved O and ECP were effective in suppressing the susceptibility of the heavily irradiated material to IGSCC, indicating that the stress corrosion process associated with irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion, rather than purely mechanical separation of grain boundaries, plays the dominant role. However, although IGSCC was suppressed, the material was susceptible to dislocation channeling at low ECP, and this susceptibility led to poor work-hardening capability and low ductility.

  17. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Gruber, Eugene E.; Shack, William J.

    2010-06-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (≤3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC

  18. Three-Dimensional Gear Crack Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Sane, Ashok D.; Drago, Raymond J.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional crack growth simulation was performed on a split-tooth gear design using boundary element modeling and linear elastic fracture mechanics. Initial cracks in the fillet of the teeth produced stress intensity factors of greater magnitude (and thus, greater crack growth rates) than those in the root or groove areas of the teeth. Crack growth simulation was performed on a case study to evaluate crack propagation paths. Tooth fracture was predicted from the crack growth simulation for an initial crack in the tooth fillet region. Tooth loads on the uncracked mesh of the split-tooth design were up to five times greater than those on the cracked mesh if equal deflections of the cracked and uncracked teeth were considered. Predicted crack shapes as well as crack propagation life are presented based on calculated stress intensity factors, mixed-mode crack propagation trajectory theories, and fatigue crack growth theories.

  19. Cold-Cracking Assessment in AA7050 Billets during Direct-Chill Casting by Thermomechanical Simulation of Residual Thermal Stresses and Application of Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalpoor, M.; Eskin, D. G.; Katgerman, L.

    2009-12-01

    Thermally induced strains and stresses developed during direct-chill (DC) semicontinuous casting of high strength aluminum alloys can result in formation of micro-cracks in different locations of the billet. Rapid propagation of such micro-cracks in tensile thermal stress fields can lead to catastrophic failure of ingots in the solid state called cold cracking. Numerical models can simulate the thermomechanical behavior of an ingot during casting and after solidification and reveal the critical cooling conditions that result in catastrophic failure, provided that the constitutive parameters of the material represent genuine as-cast properties. Application of fracture mechanics, on the other hand, can help to derive the critical crack length leading to failure. In the present research work, the state of residual thermal stresses was determined in an AA7050 billet during DC casting by means of ALSIM5. Simulation results showed that in the steady-state conditions, large compressive stresses form near the surface of the billet in the circumferential direction, whereas in the center, the stresses are tensile in all directions. Magnitudes of von Mises effective stresses, the largest component of principal stresses and the fracture mechanics concepts, were then applied to investigate the crack susceptibility of the billet.

  20. Crack layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1987-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  1. Crack layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1984-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  2. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Nickel-base Superalloy Haynes 282 at 550-750 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozman, K. A.; Kruzic, J. J.; Hawk, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    The fatigue crack growth rates for nickel-based superalloy Haynes 282 were measured at temperatures of 550, 650, and 750 °C using compact tension specimens with a load ratio of 0.1 and cyclic loading frequencies of 25 Hz and 0.25 Hz. Increasing the temperature from 550 to 750 °C caused the fatigue crack growth rates to increase from ~20 to 60% depending upon the applied stress intensity level. The effect of reducing the applied loading frequency increased the fatigue crack growth rates from ~20 to 70%, also depending upon the applied stress intensity range. The crack path was observed to be transgranular for the temperatures and frequencies used during fatigue crack growth rate testing. At 750 °C, there were some indications of limited intergranular cracking excursions at both loading frequencies; however, the extent of intergranular crack growth was limited and the cause is not understood at this time.

  3. A comprehensive evaluation of the mechanism of skin tumorigenesis by straight-run and cracked petroleum middle distillates.

    PubMed

    Nessel, C S; Priston, R A; McKee, R H; Cruzan, G; Riley, A J; Hagemann, R; Plutnick, R T; Simpson, B J

    1998-07-01

    The role of skin irritation and other factors on the tumorigenic activity of petroleum middle distillates (PMDs) in mice was examined in a comprehensive research program. The program culminated in a 2-year dermal carcinogenicity study which compared the effects of equal weekly doses of irritating and nonirritating PMDs. Modified Ames mutagenicity studies and three- to seven-ring polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) analyses indicated that the mutagenic activity of PMDs was correlated to PAC content. In subchronic and subacute studies, PMDs produced marked skin irritation which was ameliorated if the test samples were diluted in mineral oil. The reduction in irritation level was not a result of reduced dermal absorption. Straight-run kerosine (SRK), straight-run gas oil (SRGO), and catalytically cracked light cycle oil (LCO) were evaluated in the dermal carcinogenicity study. Test materials were applied either undiluted (2x/week) or as 28.5% (7x/week) or 50% (4x/week) concentrations in mineral oil for a total weekly dose of 100 microliters PMD per animal. All three materials produced moderate to marked skin irritation and increased tumor frequency when applied undiluted. When diluted, the irritant effects of SRK and SRGO, which contain low levels of PACs, were ameliorated, and there were no significant increases in tumors relative to controls. LCO, containing 8.7% three- to seven-ring PACs, increased tumor frequency when diluted, even when skin irritation was limited. These data indicate that the tumorigenic activity of straight-run MDs is likely a consequence of a nongenotoxic process, associated with frequent cell damage and repair. PMDs which contain low levels of three- to seven-ring PACs are unlikely to cause tumors in the absence of prolonged skin irritation. In addition, genotoxic mechanisms may also contribute to tumor formation for other PMDs containing higher levels of PACs, e.g., products blended with cracked stocks. PMID:9720137

  4. The Stress Corrosion Crack Growth Rate of Alloy 600 Heat Affected Zones Exposed to High Purity Water

    SciTech Connect

    George A. Young; Nathan Lewis

    2003-04-05

    Grain boundary chromium carbides improve the resistance of nickel based alloys to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). However, in weld heat affected zones (HAZ's), thermal cycles from fusion welding can solutionize beneficial grain boundary carbides, produce locally high residual stresses and strains, and promote PWSCC. The present research investigates the crack growth rate of an A600 HAZ as a function of test temperature. The A600 HAZ was fabricated by building up a gas-tungsten-arc-weld deposit of EN82H filler metal onto a mill-annealed A600 plate. Fracture mechanics based, stress corrosion crack growth rate testing was performed in high purity water between 600 F and 680 F at an initial stress intensity factor of 40 ksi {radical}in and at a constant electrochemical potential. The HAZ samples exhibited significant SCC, entirely within the HAZ at all temperatures tested. While the HAZ samples showed the same temperature dependence for SCC as the base material (HAZ: 29.8 {+-} 11.2{sub 95%} kcal/mol vs A600 Base: 35.3 {+-} 2.58{sub 95%} kcal/mol), the crack growth rates were {approx} 30X faster than the A600 base material tested at the same conditions. The increased crack growth rates of the HAZ is attributed to fewer intergranular chromium rich carbides and to increased plastic strain in the HAZ as compared to the unaffected base material.

  5. Self-sintering-assisted high intergranular connectivity in ball-milled ex situ MgB2 bulks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Akiyasu; Shimoyama, Jun-ichi; Ogino, Hiraku; Kishio, Kohji

    2014-11-01

    To understand the mechanisms leading to higher intergranular connectivity in polycrystalline ex situ MgB2 prepared using a pressure-less self-sintering technique, the influence of the initial particle size of the MgB2 powder was investigated. MgB2 bulks sintered at 900 °C for 24 h using ball-milled powders exhibited a network structure with both qualitatively and quantitatively improved intergranular couplings. The connectivity calculated using normal-state transport measurements reached a high value of ˜40%, which is comparable to that of MgB2 bulks fabricated via Mg diffusion or high-pressure-assisted processes. Moreover, the sintering time required to achieve a reasonably high connectivity of 25-30% was less than 1 h. Notably, microstructural analyses confirmed the formation of intergranular necks and grain boundaries during the early stage of sintering. These results suggested self-sintering of the ball-milled MgB2 bulks proceeded much more rapidly than those sintered using an MgB2 powder without ball-milling. Increased intergranular contact points and decreased gap length between grains in green compact are assumed to be the origins for the stimulated self-sintering and corresponding increase in the electrical connectivity.

  6. Analysis of Subcritical Crack Growth in Dental Ceramics Using Fracture Mechanics and Fractography

    PubMed Central

    Taskonak, Burak; Griggs, Jason A.; Mecholsky, John J.; Yan, Jia-Hau

    2008-01-01

    .05) but did not have significantly different fracture toughness (P>0.05). Regarding critical flaw size, stressing rate had a significant effect for In-Ceram® Zirconia specimens (P≤0.05) but not for Vitadur Alpha specimens (P>0.05). Fatigue parameters, n and ln B, were 38.4 and −12.7 for Vitadur Alpha and were 13.1 and 10.4 for In-Ceram® Zirconia. Significance Moisture assisted subcritical crack growth had a more deleterious effect on In-Ceram® Zirconia core ceramic than on Vitadur Alpha porcelain. Fracture surface analysis identified fracture surface features that can potentially mislead investigators into misidentifying the critical flaw. PMID:17845817

  7. Effect of boric acid on intergranular corrosion and on hideout return efficiency of sodium in the tube support plate crevices

    SciTech Connect

    Paine, J.P.N.; Shoemaker, C.E.; Campan, J.L.; Brunet, J.P.; Schindler, P.; Stutzmann, A.

    1995-12-31

    Sodium hydroxide is one of the main causes of intergranular attack/stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC) of alloy 600 steam generator (S.G.) tubes. Boric acid appears to be one of the possible remedies for intergranular corrosion process inhibition. In order to obtain data on boric acid injection efficiency, an experimental program was performed on previously corroded tubes. To prevent premature tube wall cracking, samples were sleeved on alloy 690 tubes. The objective of the tests was to evaluate, on a statistically valid number of samples, the effectiveness of boric acid and tube sleeving as possible remedies for IGA/SCC extension. Another independent experimental program was initiated to determine the hideout return efficiency in the tube support plate (TSP) and tubesheet (TS) crevices after a significant duration ({<=} 180 hours) of sodium hideout. The main objective of the first tests being a statistical evaluation of the efficiency of boric acid treatment, was not achieved. The tests did demonstrate that sleeving effectively reduces IGA/SCC growth. In an additional program, cracks were obtained on highly susceptible tubes when specimens were not sleeved. The companion tests performed in the same conditions but with an addition of boric acid did not show any IGA or cracks. These results seem to demonstrate the possible effect of boric acid in preventing the corrosion process. Results of the second tests did not demonstrate any difference in the amount of sodium piled up in the crevices before and after boric acid injection. They however showed an increase of the hideout return efficiency at the tube support plate level from 78 % without boric acid to 95 % when boric acid is present in the feed water.

  8. Structural Reliability of Ceramics at High Temperature: Mechanisms of Fracture and Fatigue Crack Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold H. Dauskardt

    2005-08-01

    Final report of our DOE funded research program. Aim of the research program was to provide a fundamental basis from which the mechanical reliability of layered structures may be understood, and to provide guidelines for the development of technologically relevant layered material structures with optimum resistance to fracture and subcritical debonding. Progress in the program to achieve these goals is described.

  9. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Dislocation formation and twinning from the crack tip in Ni3Al: molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hong-Xian; Wang, Chong-Yu; Yu, Tao; Du, Jun-Ping

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of low-temperature deformation in a fracture process of L12 Ni3Al is studied by molecular dynamic simulations. Owing to the unstable stacking energy, the [0bar 11] superdislocation is dissociated into partial dislocations separated by a stacking fault. The simulation results show that when the crack speed is larger than a critical speed, the Shockley partial dislocations will break forth from both the crack tip and the vicinity of the crack tip; subsequently the super intrinsic stacking faults are formed in adjacent {111} planes, meanwhile the super extrinsic stacking faults and twinning also occur. Our simulation results suggest that at low temperatures the ductile fracture in L12 Ni3Al is accompanied by twinning, which is produced by super-intrinsic stacking faults formed in adjacent {111} planes.

  10. Investigating the mechanism of transgranular stress corrosion cracking in near-neutral pH environments on buried fuel transmission pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, Stefanie Lynn

    This research investigates the mechanism of transgranular stress corrosion cracking on fuel transmission pipelines. This research proposes that in near-neutral pH environments, hydrogen can be generated by the dissociation of carbonic acid and the reaction of metal ions with bicarbonate solutions, significantly increasing the available hydrogen for diffusion into the pipeline steel. This research has shown that TGSCC of pipeline steels is possible in simple groundwater solutions containing bicarbonate ions and carbon dioxide. Microstructural characterization coupled with hydrogen permeation indicates that the level of strain in the microstructure has the most influence on hydrogen diffusivity. Hydrogen accumulation occurs preferentially in at high energy discontinuous interfaces such as inclusion interfaces. It was determined that a stress concentration is required to facilitate sufficient hydrogen accumulation in the pipeline steel in order to initiate TGSCC. It was discovered that these stress concentrations develop from inclusions falling out of the pipeline surface. Slow strain rate tests found that TGSCC occurred in a wide range of compositions and temperatures as long as near-neutral conditions were maintained. Microcracks ahead of the crack tip provide evidence of hydrogen in these cracking processes. Morphology of these microcracks indicates that cracks propagate by the coalescence of microcracks with the main crack tip. Further research findings, scientific impact, and potential future work are also discussed.

  11. J-integral elastic plastic fracture mechanics evaluation of the stability of cracks in nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M. P.; McMeeking, R. M.; Parks, D. M.

    1980-06-01

    Contributions were made toward developing a new methodology to assess the stability of cracks in pressure vessels made from materials that exhibit a significant increase in toughness during the early increments of crack growth. It has a wide range of validity from linear elastic to fully plastic behavior.

  12. Intergranular fracture in an Al-Li-Cu-Mg-Zr alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, J.A.; Lumsden, J.B.

    1985-02-01

    The intergranular fracture characteristics of the Al-Li-Cu-Mg-Zr alloy is studied for underaged (170 C/4 hr) and overaged (230 C/4 hr) conditions. In addition, extensive intergranular fracture parallel to the tensile axis (delamination) in longitudinal tensile specimens is found together with equal concentration of K on all intergranular fracture surfaces independent of aging treatment. K is believed to promote intergranular fracture in Al-Li alloys similarly to a Na presence. 7 references.

  13. Understanding the Origins of Intergranular Corrosion in Copper-Containing Al-Mg-Si Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairy, Shravan K.; Alam, Talukder; Rometsch, Paul A.; Davies, Chris H. J.; Banerjee, Raj; Birbilis, Nick

    2016-03-01

    A definitive understanding of the mechanism of intergranular corrosion (IGC) in under-aged (UA) Cu-containing Al-Mg-Si alloys has not been clear to date. The grain boundary microstructure and chemistry in an UA Cu-containing Al-Mg-Si alloy were characterized by coupling atom probe tomography and scanning transmission electron microscopy. The rapid formation of an ultra-thin wetting Cu layer and discrete Q-phase (Al4Cu2Mg8Si7) precipitates along the grain boundaries, and a precipitate-free zone adjacent to the grain boundaries in the UA condition contribute to IGC.

  14. Intergranular Jc determination in toroidal high temperature superconductors using a soft-core closed magnetic circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Lessure, H.S.; Simizu, S.; Kung, P.J.; Baumert, B.A.; Snakar, S.G.; McHenry, M.E. )

    1991-03-01

    An examination of weak link coupling between grains has been made using a noncontact magnetic technique. This paper reports intergranular Jc(T) measurements for unaligned and grain aligned sintered YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} (YBC) toroids. Supercurrent is deduced from measurement of the net current encircling the core and Jc is found from supercurrent saturation in contrast to onset pickup voltage criteria. Agreement with recently reported direct transport measurements on the aligned sample suggests that the conduction mechanism is the same as for direct transport.

  15. Effect of intergranular surface attack on the fatigue and corrosion properties of AM-355 CRT material

    SciTech Connect

    Bhansali, K.J.; Liu, G.; Grendahl, S.M.; Champagne, V.K.; Pepi, M.S.

    1998-12-31

    A dynamic part, consisting of a stack of laminates, failed in the field after an unexpectedly short life. Failure analysis showed that a multitude of fatigue cracks originated from a combination of corrosion and fretting. Recent changes in the production process of the laminates resulted in the presence of an intergranular (IG) morphology on the surface. Due to the criticality of this part`s application, a better understanding of the influence of varying degrees of IG attack on fatigue properties was pursued. Coupon specimens were machined from actual components with different surface IG conditions and were subjected to fatigue testing. Results showed a direct relationship between the number of cycles to failure and the severity of surface IG attack. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements indicated that a sample with IG attack had a lower breakdown potential and an unstable passivation behavior as compared to that without an IG attack. The detrimental effects of surface IG attack on the crack initiation process, endurance limit and corrosion resistance is discussed in terms of the stress concentration and breakdown of the passivation layer.

  16. Intergranular fracture in irradiated Inconel X-750 containing very high concentrations of helium and hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Judge, Colin D.; Gauquelin, Nicolas; Walters, Lori; Wright, Mike; Cole, James I.; Madden, James; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Griffiths, Malcolm

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, it has been determined that Inconel X-750 CANDU spacers have lost strength and material ductility following irradiation in reactor. The irradiated fracture behaviour of ex-service material was also found to be entirely intergranular. The heavily thermalized flux spectrum in a CANDU reactor results in transmutation of 58Ni to 59Ni. The 59Ni itself has unusually high thermal neutron reaction cross-sections of the type: (n, γ), (n, p), and (n,α). The latter two reactions, in particular, contribute to a significant enhancement of the atomic displacements in addition to creating high concentrations of hydrogen and helium within the material. Metallographic examinations by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have confirmed the presence of helium bubbles in the matrix and aligned along grain boundaries and matrix-precipitate interfaces. He bubble size and density are found to be highly dependent on the irradiation temperature and material microstructure; the bubbles are larger within grain boundary precipitates. TEM specimens extracted from fracture surfaces and crack tips give direct evidence linking crack propagation with grain boundary He bubbles.

  17. Intergranular fracture in irradiated Inconel X-750 containing very high concentrations of helium and hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Colin D.; Gauquelin, Nicolas; Walters, Lori; Wright, Mike; Cole, James I.; Madden, James; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Griffiths, Malcolm

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, it has been observed that Inconel X-750 spacers in CANDU reactors exhibits lower ductility with reduced load carrying capacity following irradiation in a reactor environment. The fracture behaviour of ex-service material was also found to be entirely intergranular at high doses. The thermalized flux spectrum in a CANDU reactor leads to transmutation of 58Ni to 59Ni. The 59Ni itself has unusually high thermal neutron reaction cross-sections of the type: (n, γ), (n, p), and (n, α). The latter two reactions, in particular, contribute to a significant enhancement of the atomic displacements in addition to creating high concentrations of hydrogen and helium within the material. Microstructural examinations by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have confirmed the presence of helium bubbles in the matrix and aligned along grain boundaries and matrix-precipitate interfaces. Helium bubble size and density are found to be highly dependent on the irradiation temperature and material microstructure; the bubbles are larger within grain boundary precipitates. TEM specimens extracted from fracture surfaces and crack tips provide information that is consistent with crack propagation along grain boundaries due to the presence of He bubbles.

  18. Fracture mechanics. [review of fatigue crack propagation and technology of constructing safe structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardrath, H. F.

    1974-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a rapidly emerging discipline for assessing the residual strength of structures containing flaws due to fatigue, corrosion or accidental damage and for anticipating the rate of which such flaws will propagate if not repaired. The discipline is also applicable in the design of structures with improved resistance to such flaws. The present state of the design art is reviewed using this technology to choose materials, to configure safe and efficient structures, to specify inspection procedures, to predict lives of flawed structures and to develop reliability of current and future airframes.

  19. The Chlamydial Type III Secretion Mechanism: Revealing Cracks in a Tough Nut

    PubMed Central

    Betts-Hampikian, Helen Jennifer; Fields, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    Present-day members of the Chlamydiaceae contain parasitic bacteria that have been co-evolving with their eukaryotic hosts over hundreds of millions of years. Likewise, a type III secretion system encoded within all genomes has been refined to complement the unique obligate intracellular niche colonized so successfully by Chlamydia spp. All this adaptation has occurred in the apparent absence of the horizontal gene transfer responsible for creating the wide range of diversity in other Gram-negative, type III-expressing bacteria. The result is a system that is, in many ways, uniquely chlamydial. A critical mass of information has been amassed that sheds significant light on how the chlamydial secretion system functions and contributes to an obligate intracellular lifestyle. Although the overall mechanism is certainly similar to homologous systems, an image has emerged where the chlamydial secretion system is essential for both survival and virulence. Numerous apparent differences, some subtle and some profound, differentiate chlamydial type III secretion from others. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of the current state of knowledge regarding the Chlamydia type III secretion mechanism. We focus on the aspects that are distinctly chlamydial and comment on how this important system influences chlamydial pathogenesis. Gaining a grasp on this fascinating system has been challenging in the absence of a tractable genetic system. However, the surface of this tough nut has been scored and the future promises to be fruitful and revealing. PMID:21738522

  20. Environment-assisted cracking of a nickel-based superalloy in hydrogen-producing solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillard, Jennifer Anne

    The environment assisted cracking (EAC) of nickel-based superalloy 718 was characterized in acidic chloride solutions under hydrogen-producing conditions using a rising-load fracture mechanics method. The stress intensity at the onset of crack growth (KTH) was used to measure EAC susceptibility as a function of applied electrode potential and solution chemistry. For all test conditions KTH was reduced from the air fracture initiation toughness (KICi). EAC susceptibility depended on both the electrode potential and solution pH. When the electrode potential was constant, susceptibility increased as the solution pH decreased. When the solution pH was constant, there was a minimum in KTH at intermediate electrode potentials. The appearance of the fracture surface gradually changed from voids and transgranular facets to voids with transgranular and intergranular facets as KTH decreased. The amount of plasticity associated with the voids and transgranular facets decreased as KTH decreased. Transgranular cracking dominated the onset of crack growth and occurred primarily by slip band fracture. A ductile fracture model, based on a critical fracture strain as measured by void growth, accurately predicted KTH and microstructure effects, suggesting that absorbed hydrogen lowered KTH from K ICi by promoting secondary microvoid nucleation which lead to intravoid strain localization and transgranular cracking. An empirical model of hydrogen production and absorption, based on a local crack chemistry that was less acidic than the bulk, was developed and used to predict the pH dependence of KTH at -1.0 VSCE . Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement data from the literature, hydrogen charging results, potentiostatic and potentiodynamic polarization data, and data from a buffered solution were combined to predict KTH of Alloy 718 as a function of solution pH at -1.0 VSCE in acidic chloride environments. The model accurately predicted KTH over the pH range studied.

  1. Al-Li alloy AA2198's very high cycle fatigue crack initiation mechanism and its fatigue thermal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Luopeng; Cao, Xiaojian; Chen, Yu; Wang, Qingyuan

    2015-10-01

    AA2198 alloy is one of the third generation Al-Li alloys which have low density, high elastic modulus, high specific strength and specific stiffness. Compared With the previous two generation Al-Li alloys, the third generation alloys have much improved in alloys strength, corrosion resistance and weldable characteristic. For these advantages, the third generation Al-Li alloys are used as aircraft structures, such as C919 aviation airplane manufactured by China and Russia next generation aviation airplane--MS-21. As we know, the aircraft structures are usually subjected to more than 108 cycles fatigue life during 20-30 years of service, however, there is few reported paper about the third generation Al-Li alloys' very high cycle fatigue(VHCF) which is more than 108 cycles fatigue. The VHCF experiment of AA2198 have been carried out. The two different initiation mechanisms of fatigue fracture have been found in VHCF. The cracks can initiate from the interior of the testing material with lower stress amplitude and more than 108 cycles fatigue life, or from the surface or subsurface of material which is the dominant reason of fatigue failures. During the experiment, the infrared technology is used to monitor the VHCF thermal effect. With the increase of the stress, the temperature of sample is also rising up, increasing about 15 °C for every 10Mpa. The theoretical thermal analysis is also carried out.

  2. 3D Progressive Damage Modeling for Laminated Composite Based on Crack Band Theory and Continuum Damage Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Pineda, Evan J.; Ranatunga, Vipul; Smeltzer, Stanley S.

    2015-01-01

    A simple continuum damage mechanics (CDM) based 3D progressive damage analysis (PDA) tool for laminated composites was developed and implemented as a user defined material subroutine to link with a commercially available explicit finite element code. This PDA tool uses linear lamina properties from standard tests, predicts damage initiation with an easy-to-implement Hashin-Rotem failure criteria, and in the damage evolution phase, evaluates the degradation of material properties based on the crack band theory and traction-separation cohesive laws. It follows Matzenmiller et al.'s formulation to incorporate the degrading material properties into the damaged stiffness matrix. Since nonlinear shear and matrix stress-strain relations are not implemented, correction factors are used for slowing the reduction of the damaged shear stiffness terms to reflect the effect of these nonlinearities on the laminate strength predictions. This CDM based PDA tool is implemented as a user defined material (VUMAT) to link with the Abaqus/Explicit code. Strength predictions obtained, using this VUMAT, are correlated with test data for a set of notched specimens under tension and compression loads.

  3. Random loading fatigue crack growth: Crack closure considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Keith

    1987-01-01

    The prediction of fatigue crack growth is an important element of effective fracture control for metallic structures and mechanical components, especially in the aerospace industry. The prediction techniques available and applied today are mostly based on fatigue crack growth measurements determined in constant amplitude testing. However, while many service loadings are constant amplitude, many more loadings are random amplitude. An investigation to determine which statistics of random loadings are relevant to fatigue crack closure was conducted. The fundamentals of random processes and crack closure are briefly reviewed, then the relevance of certain random process parameters to the crack closure calculation are discussed qualitatively. A course for further research is outlined.

  4. Biomolecule-assisted synthesis of single-crystalline selenium nanowires and nanoribbons via a novel flake-cracking mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Ye, Xingchen; Dai, Wei; Hou, Weiyi; Zuo, Fan; Xie, Yi

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the biomolecule-assisted synthesis method has been a new and promising focus in the preparation of various nanomaterials. But current works mainly focus on the synthesis of metal nanoparticles and nanowires using macro-biomolecules (e.g. virus, protein and DNA) as templates in the presence of a reducing agent. Beta-carotene, one of the most common bio-antioxidants, can be oxidized to form species with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic ends, which can provide an in situ soft template for the synthesis of nanomaterials. Herein, a simple beta-carotene-assisted method was developed for the first time to synthesize t-Se nanowires and nanoribbons with high crystallinity. We demonstrate that beta-carotene serves as not only the reducing agent, but also an in situ template in the preparation of Se one-dimensional nanostructures. It is found that the growth mechanism of Se nanomaterials is different from the familiar sphere-wire process. A novel flake-cracking mechanism is proposed. By this biomolecule-assisted route, Te one-dimensional nanostructures and Pd nanowires were also fabricated. The assisted-biomolecule in our method may be spread to carotenoids and other antioxidants, and thus broaden the application fields of biomolecules. Our preliminary investigations have shown that the facile, solution-phase biomolecule-assisted method can be potentially extended to the preparation of other low-dimensional nanostructures. The synthesized t-Se nanowires and nanoribbons may serve as templates to generate other tubular functional nanomaterials and find applications in the studies of structure-property relationships as well as in the fabrication of nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  5. Microstructural dependence of aqueous-environment-assisted crack growth and hydrogen uptake in AA 7050

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Lisa Marie

    This goal of this research was to explain the effects of heat treatment, Cu content, and electrode potential (EApp) on short-transverse aqueous environment assisted cracking (EAC) in a precipitation hardened Al-Zn-Mg-(Cu) alloy. Substantial intergranular EAC susceptibility was observed in several underaged (UA) and peak aged (PA) tempers of AA 7050, where increasing E App produced a slow crack growth rate (da/dt) incubation and transition to fast da/dt. Above the transition potential, da/dt was dramatically increased by further increases in EApp. In contrast the overaged (OA) condition was highly EAC resistant, exhibiting transgranular da/dt ≤2 x 10-8 mm/sec or ≈ 10,000 times slower than PA. Crack growth rates in the low Cu alloy were several orders of magnitude higher than those exhibited by the high Cu material at similar EApp and were only slightly reduced on overaging. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) results showed enhanced hydrogen uptake in fast-cracking EAC regions compared to as-received hydrogen concentrations. Hydrogen analyses were complicated by the dependence of H-production and uptake on wake exposure time and a pH gradient in the occluded crack environment. Trends between applied anodic potential, crack wake H concentration (normalized by the wake exposure time), and aqueous da/dt were observed. Nuclear reaction analysis revealed unexpectedly high near-surface H concentrations ( ≈ 2000 wppm). The H-concentration profiles indicate that the observed da/dt can be rate-limited by bulk H-diffusion into the crack tip process zone, where EAC is promoted by a hydrogen embrittlement mechanism. The transition potential to fast da/dt increased in the anodic direction with increased isothermal aging time. Additionally, the presence of large Cu-containing second phase particles (S-phase) on high angle grain boundaries partially negated the beneficial effect of overaging on EAC in the Cu-containing alloy, an effect not observed in humid air cracking

  6. Localized Deformation as a Primary Cause of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Was

    2009-03-31

    The objective of this project is to determine whether deformation mode is a primary factor in the mechanism of irradiation assisted intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys in light watert reactor core components. Deformation mode will be controlled by both the stacking fault energy of the alloy and the degree of irradiation. In order to establish that localized deformation is a major factor in IASCC, the stacking fault energies of the alloys selected for study must be measured. Second, it is completely unknown how dose and SFE trade-off in terms of promoting localized deformation. Finally, it must be established that it is the localized deformation, and not some other factor that drives IASCC.

  7. The effect of residual stress on the fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Si-Mg cast alloys—Mechanisms and corrective mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lados, Diana A.; Apelian, Diran

    2006-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of various types of alloys is significantly affected by the presence of residual stress induced by manufacturing and post-manufacturing processes. There is a qualitative understanding of the effects of residual stress on fatigue behavior, but the effects are not comprehensively quantified or accounted for. The difficulty in quantifying these effects is largely due to the complexity of residual-stress measurements (especially considering that parts produced in similar conditions can have different residual-stress levels) and the lack of mathematical models able to convert experimental data with residual stress into residual-stress-free data. This article provides experimental, testing, and mathematical techniques to account for residual-stress effects on crack growth rate data, together with two methods for eliminating residual stresses in crack growth test specimens. Fracture-mechanics concepts are used to calculate, in simple and convenient ways, stress-intensity factors caused by residual stresses. The method is advantageous, considering that stress-intensity factors are determined before the actual test is conducted. Further on, residual-stress-intensity factors are used to predict the residual-stress distribution in compact tension (CT) specimens prior to testing. Five cast Al-Si-Mg alloys with three Si levels (in unmodified (UM) as well as Sr-modified (M) conditions) were analyzed both with and without residual stress. Fatigue cracks are grown under both constant stress ratio, R=0.1, and constant maximum stress-intensity factor, K max = const., conditions. The mechanisms involved in crack growth through residual-stress fields are presented.

  8. Measurement of intergranular attack in stainless steel using ultrasonic energy

    DOEpatents

    Mott, Gerry; Attaar, Mustan; Rishel, Rick D.

    1989-08-08

    Ultrasonic test methods are used to measure the depth of intergranular attack (IGA) in a stainless steel specimen. The ultrasonic test methods include a pitch-catch surface wave technique and a through-wall pulse-echo technique. When used in combination, these techniques can establish the extent of IGA on both the front and back surfaces of a stainless steel specimen from measurements made on only one surface.

  9. Intergranular degradation assessment via random grain boundary network analysis

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Mukul; Schwartz, Adam J.; King, Wayne E.

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for determining the resistance of polycrystalline materials to intergranular degradation or failure (IGDF), by analyzing the random grain boundary network connectivity (RGBNC) microstructure. Analysis of the disruption of the RGBNC microstructure may be assess the effectiveness of materials processing in increasing IGDF resistance. Comparison of the RGBNC microstructures of materials exposed to extreme operating conditions to unexposed materials may be used to diagnose and predict possible onset of material failure due to

  10. Evolution of Crack-Tip Transformation Zones in Superelastic Nitinol Subjected to in Situ Fatigue. a Fracture Mechanics And Synchrotron X-Ray Microdiffraction Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, S.W.; Mehta, A.; Pelton, A.R.; Ritchie, R.O.; /UC, Berkeley /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-29

    The ultrahigh spatial resolution ({approx}1 {micro}m{sup 2}) of synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction is combined with fracture mechanics techniques to directly measure in situ three-dimensional strains, phases and crystallographic alignment ahead of a growing fatigue crack (100 cycles in situ) in superelastic Nitinol. The results provide some surprising insights into the growth of cracks in phase-transforming material at the microscale. Specifically, despite a macroscopic superelastic strain recovery of 6-8% associated with the phase transformation, individual austenite grains experience local strains of less than 1.5%. This observation indicates that it is the localized process of the accommodation of the transformation and subsequent loading of the martensite that provide the main source of the large recoverable strains. Furthermore, the plastic region ahead of the crack is composed of deformed martensite. This micromechanical transformation process is dependent upon the material texture, and directly influences the transformation zone size/shape as well as the crack path.

  11. Effect of solution treatment on stress corrosion cracking behavior of an as-forged Mg-Zn-Y-Zr alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, S D; Xu, D K; Wang, B J; Sheng, L Y; Han, E H; Dong, C

    2016-01-01

    Effect of solid solution treatment (T4) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of an as-forged Mg-6.7%Zn-1.3%Y-0.6%Zr (in wt.%) alloy has been investigated using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) testing in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results demonstrated that the SCC susceptibility index (ISCC) of as-forged samples was 0.95 and its elongation-to-failure (εf) was only 1.1%. After T4 treatment, the SCC resistance was remarkably improved. The ISCC and εf values of T4 samples were 0.86 and 3.4%, respectively. Fractography and surface observation indicated that the stress corrosion cracking mode for as-forged samples was dominated by transgranular and partially intergranular morphology, whereas the cracking mode for T4 samples was transgranular. In both cases, the main cracking mechanism was associated with hydrogen embrittlement (HE). Through alleviating the corrosion attack of Mg matrix, the influence of HE on the SCC resistance of T4 samples can be greatly suppressed. PMID:27387817

  12. Effect of solution treatment on stress corrosion cracking behavior of an as-forged Mg-Zn-Y-Zr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. D.; Xu, D. K.; Wang, B. J.; Sheng, L. Y.; Han, E. H.; Dong, C.

    2016-07-01

    Effect of solid solution treatment (T4) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of an as-forged Mg-6.7%Zn-1.3%Y-0.6%Zr (in wt.%) alloy has been investigated using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) testing in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results demonstrated that the SCC susceptibility index (ISCC) of as-forged samples was 0.95 and its elongation-to-failure (εf) was only 1.1%. After T4 treatment, the SCC resistance was remarkably improved. The ISCC and εf values of T4 samples were 0.86 and 3.4%, respectively. Fractography and surface observation indicated that the stress corrosion cracking mode for as-forged samples was dominated by transgranular and partially intergranular morphology, whereas the cracking mode for T4 samples was transgranular. In both cases, the main cracking mechanism was associated with hydrogen embrittlement (HE). Through alleviating the corrosion attack of Mg matrix, the influence of HE on the SCC resistance of T4 samples can be greatly suppressed.

  13. Effect of solution treatment on stress corrosion cracking behavior of an as-forged Mg-Zn-Y-Zr alloy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S. D.; Xu, D. K.; Wang, B. J.; Sheng, L. Y.; Han, E. H.; Dong, C.

    2016-01-01

    Effect of solid solution treatment (T4) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of an as-forged Mg-6.7%Zn-1.3%Y-0.6%Zr (in wt.%) alloy has been investigated using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) testing in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results demonstrated that the SCC susceptibility index (ISCC) of as-forged samples was 0.95 and its elongation-to-failure (εf) was only 1.1%. After T4 treatment, the SCC resistance was remarkably improved. The ISCC and εf values of T4 samples were 0.86 and 3.4%, respectively. Fractography and surface observation indicated that the stress corrosion cracking mode for as-forged samples was dominated by transgranular and partially intergranular morphology, whereas the cracking mode for T4 samples was transgranular. In both cases, the main cracking mechanism was associated with hydrogen embrittlement (HE). Through alleviating the corrosion attack of Mg matrix, the influence of HE on the SCC resistance of T4 samples can be greatly suppressed. PMID:27387817

  14. Fatigue Crack Initiation In WASPALOY at 20 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, D. L.; Tryon, R. G.; Oja, M.; Matthews, R.; Ravi Chandran, K. S.

    2007-09-01

    In two WASPALOY specimens, the orientations of grains that initiated fatigue cracks and adjacent ograins were measured using electron backscattered diffraction patterns (EBSP). Crystallographic relationships were found for crack initiating regions that resulted in slip transmission across areas larger than the initiating grain, and the initiating grain was usually larger than average. A similar evaluation of control areas on each specimen found that there was much less likelihood of slip transmission across grain boundaries. Schmid factors (SFs) were also evaluated. It is concluded that the reason that fatigue cracks formed at these locations was due to the lower stress required for slip initiation in these clusters of grains oriented for slip transmission across grain boundaries. Many of the cracks initiated within grain boundaries. A detailed crystallographic analysis of the adjacent grains suggests criteria for intergranular (IG) crack initiation.

  15. Analysis of cracked core spray piping from the Quad Cities Unit 2 boiling water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Diercks, D.R.; Gaitonde, S.M.

    1982-09-01

    The results of a metallurgical analysis of leaking cracks detected in the core spray injection piping of Commonwealth Edison Company's Quad Cities Unit 2 Boiling Water Reactor are described. The cracks were present in a welded 105/sup 0/ elbow assembly in the line, and were found to be caused by intergranular stress corrosion cracking associated with the probable presence of dissolved oxygen in the reactor cooling water and the presence of grain boundary sensitization and local residual stresses induced by welding. The failure is unusual in several respects, including the very large number of cracks (approximately 40) present in the failed component, the axial orientation of the cracks, and the fact that at least one crack completely penetrated a circumferential weld. Virtually all of the cracking occurred in forged material, and the microstructural evidence presented suggests that the orientation of the cracks was influenced by the presence of axially banded delta ferrite in the microstructure of the forged components.

  16. Finite element analysis of type IV cracking in 2.25Cr-1Mo steel weldment based on micro-mechanistic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Sunil; Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Mathew, M. D.

    2011-08-01

    Creep studies were carried out on 2.25Cr-1Mo steel base metal and its fusion-welded weldments at 823 K over the stress range 100-240 MPa. The weldment possessed lower creep rupture strength than the base metal due to type IV failure at the outer edge of the heat-affected zone (HAZ). Premature failure of the weldment was associated with pronounced creep cavitation accompanied with localized creep deformation in the soft intercritical region of the HAZ that was sandwiched between relatively higher creep deformation-resistant microstructural regions. The cavitation was associated with coarse intergranular precipitates in the intercritical region of the HAZ. The type IV cracking in the intercritical region of the HAZ was found to initiate deep inside the weldment and propagate towards the specimen surface. Finite element analysis of stress and strain distributions across the weldment was carried out considering the micro-mechanical strength inhomogeneity across it to explain the observed features of type IV cracking. The estimated higher von-Mises and principal stresses deep inside the intercritical region of the HAZ of the weldment led to the localized creep deformation and preferential cavity nucleation and growth, resulting in type IV failure of the weldment. The role of intergranular precipitate particles in the intercritical region of the HAZ in facilitating creep cavity nucleation by the exhaustion of creep ductility of the material close to the precipitate was corroborated from finite element analysis of stress and strain distribution around the precipitates.

  17. The study of crack resistance of TiAlN coatings under mechanical loading and thermal cycle testing

    SciTech Connect

    Akulinkin, Alexandr Shugurov, Artur Sergeev, Viktor; Panin, Alexey; Cheng, C.-H.

    2015-10-27

    The effect of preliminary ion bombardment of 321 stainless steel substrate on crack resistance of TiAlN coatings at uniaxial tension and thermal cycling is studied. The ion-beam treatment of the substrate is shown to substantially improve the adhesion strength of the coatings that prevents their delamination and spalling under uniaxial tension. The resistance to crack propagation and spalling by the thermal shock is higher in the TiAlN coating deposited onto the substrate subjected to Ti ion bombardment as compared to that in the TiAlN coating deposited onto the initial substrate.

  18. The study of crack resistance of TiAlN coatings under mechanical loading and thermal cycle testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akulinkin, Alexandr; Shugurov, Artur; Panin, Alexey; Sergeev, Viktor; Cheng, C.-H.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of preliminary ion bombardment of 321 stainless steel substrate on crack resistance of TiAlN coatings at uniaxial tension and thermal cycling is studied. The ion-beam treatment of the substrate is shown to substantially improve the adhesion strength of the coatings that prevents their delamination and spalling under uniaxial tension. The resistance to crack propagation and spalling by the thermal shock is higher in the TiAlN coating deposited onto the substrate subjected to Ti ion bombardment as compared to that in the TiAlN coating deposited onto the initial substrate.

  19. SCCIG: a phenomenological model for iodine stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy. Volume 1. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.K.; Challenger, K.D.; Tasooji, A.; Ranjan, G.V.; Brooks, G.N.; Eisenberger, M.; Thomas, J.M.

    1981-04-01

    This report presents a new model for iodine stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Zircaloy, developed as an ingredient of EPRI's SPEAR light-water reactor fuel performance code. The model is based on experimental data generated under related EPRI programs and elsewhere, as well as certain theoretical considerations. It is a unified treatment of SCC crack initiation, crack propagation, and non-SCC fracture, treating such sub-process as intergranular failure, transgranular (cleavage plus fluting) failure, ductile rupture, changes in the local stress and strain distribution due to crack formation and growth, iodine penetration along the SCC crack, and the mutual couplings among these processes.

  20. Role of oxygen diffusion at Ni/Cr2O3 interface in intergranular oxidation of Ni-Cr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medasani, Bharat; Sushko, Maria; Schreiber, Daniel; Rosso, Kevin; Bruemmer, Stephen

    Certain Ni-Cr alloys used in nuclear systems experience intergranular oxidation and stress corrosion cracking when exposed to high-temperature water leading to their degradation and unexpected failure. To develop a mechanistic understanding of grain boundary oxidation processes, we proposed a mesoscale metal alloy oxidation model that combines quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) with mesoscopic Poisson-Nernst-Planck/classical DFT. This framework encompasses the chemical specificity of elementary diffusion processes and mesoscale reactive dynamics, and allows modeling oxidation processes on experimentally relevant length scales from first principles. As a proof of concept, a preliminary model was previously employed that limited oxygen diffusion pathways to those through the oxide phase and did not allow oxygen diffusion in the alloy or across oxide/alloy interfaces. In this work, we expand the model to include oxygen diffusion pathways along Ni/Cr2O3 interfaces and demonstrate the increasing importance of such pathways for intergranular oxidation of Ni-Cr alloys with high Cr content. This work is supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division. Simulations are performed using PNNL Institutional Computing facility.

  1. Elimination of intergranular corrosion susceptibility of cold-worked and sensitized AlSl 316 SS by laser surface melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvathavarthini, N.; Subbarao, R. V.; Dayal, R. K.; Khatak, H. S.; Kumar, Sanjay

    2001-02-01

    Susceptibility to intergranular corrosion (IGC) and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) due to sensitization is one of the major problems associated with austenitic stainless steels. Thermal exposures encountered during fabrication (welding, hot working, etc.) and elevated temperature service may lead to sensitization of components of austenitic stainless steels. Laser surface melting (LSM) is an in-situ method to increase the life of a sensitized component by modifying the surface microstructure without affecting the bulk properties. In this paper, the results obtained in the attempt to improve IGC resistance of coldworked and sensitized 316 SS by LSM are presented. Type 316 SS specimens cold worked to various degrees ranging from 5 to 25% reduction in thickness and sensitized to different degrees by exposing at 898 K for different durations were laser surface melted using continuous wave (cw) CO2 laser. ASTM standard A262 practice A, optical metallography, and ASTM standard G108 were used to characterize the specimens before and after LSM. Influence of prior deformation on the desensitization behavior was evaluated for the laser melting conditions adopted during the investigation. Complete dissolution of M23C6 due to laser melting and suppression of re-precipitation due to rapid quenching result in a desensitized homogenous microstructure, which is immune to IGC. Under identical laser melting conditions, the extent of desensitization decreases with an increase in the degree of cold work, and hence, higher power levels and an extended interaction time must be adopted to homogenize the sensitized microstructure with prior cold work.

  2. Susceptibility of carbon steel to stress corrosion cracking in sodium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Flis, J.

    2005-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of carbon steel and decarburized steel was studied in 8.5 M sodium hydroxide at 100 ?C. Potentiodynamic experiments were performed to determine the potential values to be applied in slow strain rate(ssr) experiments. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate the surfaces of corroded samples. Severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking was observed on the carbon steel samples in comparison to the decarburized steel samples.

  3. Mitigation of Crack Damage in Metallic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, Patrick E.; Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Leser, William P.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Wallace, Terryl A.; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    A system designed to mitigate or heal crack damage in metallic materials has been developed where the protected material or component is coated with a low-melting temperature film. After a crack is formed, the material is heated, melting the film which then infiltrates the crack opening through capillary action. Upon solidification, the healing material inhibits further crack damage in two ways. While the crack healing material is intact, it acts like an adhesive that bonds or bridges the crack faces together. After fatigue loading damages, the healing material in the crack mouth inhibits further crack growth by creating artificially-high crack closure levels. Mechanical test data show that this method sucessfully arrests or retards crack growth in laboratory specimens.

  4. Shuttle Fuel Feedliner Cracking Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tomas E.; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of material covered during 'Space Shuttle Fuel Feedliner Cracking Investigation MSFC Fluids Workshop' held November 19-21, 2002. Topics covered include: cracks on fuel feed lines of Orbiter space shuttles, fluid driven cracking analysis, liner structural modes, structural motion in a fluid, fluid borne drivers, three dimensional computational fluid dynamics models, fluid borne drivers from pumps, amplification mechanisms, flow parameter mapping, and flight engine flow map.

  5. In vivo oxide-induced stress corrosion cracking of Ti-6Al-4V in a neck-stem modular taper: Emergent behavior in a new mechanism of in vivo corrosion.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jeremy L; Mali, Sachin; Urban, Robert M; Silverton, Craig D; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2012-02-01

    In vivo modular taper corrosion in orthopedic total joint replacements has been documented to occur for head-neck tapers, modular-body tapers, and neck-stem tapers. While the fretting corrosion mechanism by which this corrosion occurs has been described in the literature, this report shows new and as yet unreported mechanisms at play. A retrieved Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-6Al-4V neck-stem taper interface, implanted for 6 years is subjected to failure analysis to document taper corrosion processes that lead to oxide driven crack formation on the medial side of the taper. Metallurgical sectioning techniques and scanning electron microscopy analysis are used to document the taper corrosion processes. The results show large penetrating pitting attack of both sides of the taper interface where corrosion selectively attacks the beta phase of the microstructure and eventually consumes the alpha phase. The pitting attack evolves into plunging pits that ultimately develop into cracks where the crack propagation process is one of corrosion resulting in oxide formation and subsequent reorganization. This process drives open the crack and advances the front by a combination of oxide-driven crack opening stresses and corrosion attack at the tip. The oxide that forms has a complex evolving structure including a network of transport channels that provide access of fluid to the crack tip. This emergent behavior does not appear to require continued fretting corrosion to propagate the pitting and cracking. This new mechanism is similar to stress corrosion cracking where the crack tip stresses arise from the oxide formation in the crack and not externally applied tensile stresses. PMID:22113876

  6. Replica-based Crack Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Piascik, R. S.; Willard, Scott A.; Dawicke, David S.

    2007-01-01

    A surface replica-based crack inspection method has recently been developed for use in Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) hydrogen feedline flowliners. These flowliners exist to ensure favorable flow of liquid hydrogen over gimble joint bellows, and consist of two rings each containing 38 elongated slots. In the summer of 2002, multiple cracks ranging from 0.1 inches to 0.6 inches long were discovered; each orbiter contained at least one cracked flowliner. These long cracks were repaired and eddy current inspections ensured that no cracks longer than 0.075 inches were present. However, subsequent fracture-mechanics review of flight rationale required detection of smaller cracks, and was the driving force for development of higher-resolution inspection method. Acetate tape surface replicas have been used for decades to detect and monitor small cracks. However, acetate tape replicas have primarily been limited to laboratory specimens because complexities involved in making these replicas - requiring acetate tape to be dissolved with acetone - are not well suited for a crack inspection tool. More recently developed silicon-based replicas are better suited for use as a crack detection tool. A commercially available silicon-based replica product has been determined to be acceptable for use in SSME hydrogen feedlines. A method has been developed using this product and a scanning electron microscope for analysis, which can find cracks as small as 0.005 inches and other features (e.g., pits, scratches, tool marks, etc.) as small as 0.001 inches. The resolution of this method has been validated with dozens of cracks generated in a laboratory setting and this method has been used to locate 55 cracks (ranging in size from 0.040 inches to 0.004 inches) on space flight hardware. These cracks were removed by polishing away the cracked material and a second round of replicas confirmed the repair.

  7. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gangloff, R.P.

    1990-06-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  8. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  9. Multi-scale modeling of microstructure dependent intergranular brittle fracture using a quantitative phase-field based method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Zhang, Yongfeng; Tonks, Michael R.

    2015-12-07

    In this study, the fracture behavior of brittle materials is strongly influenced by their underlying microstructure that needs explicit consideration for accurate prediction of fracture properties and the associated scatter. In this work, a hierarchical multi-scale approach is pursued to model microstructure sensitive brittle fracture. A quantitative phase-field based fracture model is utilized to capture the complex crack growth behavior in the microstructure and the related parameters are calibrated from lower length scale atomistic simulations instead of engineering scale experimental data. The workability of this approach is demonstrated by performing porosity dependent intergranular fracture simulations in UO2 and comparing themore » predictions with experiments.« less

  10. Effects of Intergranular Gas Bubbles on Thermal Conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    K. Chockalingam; Paul C. Millett; M. R. Tonks

    2012-11-01

    Model microstructures obtained from phase-field simulations are used to study the effective heat transfer across bicrys- tals with stationary grain boundary bubble populations. We find that the grain boundary coverage, irrespective of the intergranular bubble radii, is the most relevant parameter to the thermal resistance, which we use to derive effec- tive Kapitza resistances that are dependent on the grain boundary coverage and Kaptiza resistance of the intact grain boundary. We propose a model to predict thermal conductivity as a function of porosity, grain-size, Kaptiza resistance of the intact grain boundary, and grain boundary bubble coverage.

  11. High-temperature low-cycle-fatigue and crack-growth behaviors of three superalloys: HASTELLOY X, HAYNES 230, and HAYNES 188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yulin

    Low cycle fatigue (LCF) and fatigue crack growth (FCG) experiments on three superalloys HASTELLOY X, HAYNES 230, and HAYNES 188 have been conducted at temperatures from 649 to 982°C. Hold times were imposed at the maximum strain or load to investigate the hold-time effect. In general, the fatigue life decreased as the temperature or hold time increased. However, for the HAYNES 230 alloy at total strain ranges higher than 1.0% and without a hold time, the LCF life was longer at 927°C than at 816°C. This "abnormal" behavior was found to result from the smaller plastic strain amplitude at half-life at 927°C than that at 816°C. An increase in the temperature and/or the introduction of a hold time decreased the hardening rate and increased the softening rate for all the three alloys. The introduction of a hold time and/or the increase of the test temperature progressively changed the fracture mode from the transgranular to mixed trans/inter-granular, then to intergranular feature. Within the two phases of the fatigue process, crack initiation was more severely influenced by the change of the hold time and/or temperature. The FCG data of HASTELLOY X and HAYNES 230 alloys were analyzed with an emphasis on hold-time and temperature effects. The crack grew faster at a higher temperature and a longer hold time. Fracture-mechanics parameters, C*, Ct, and (Ct)avg, were applied to correlate the crack-growth rates. The fatigue-cracking path was mainly transgranular at 816 and 927°C. The cracking path became dominantly intergranular if the hold time increased to 2 min, indicating that the time-dependent damage mechanisms were in control. The Ct and (Ct)avg parameters were capable of consolidating time dependent crack growth rate from different temperatures and alloys. The tests were conducted in air. Therefore, the fracture surfaces were frequently covered with a dark layer of oxides, making fracture feature difficult to identify under scanning-electron-microscopy. To

  12. Knuckle Cracking

    MedlinePlus

    ... older obese people. Question: Can cracking knuckles / joints lead to arthritis? Answer: There is no evidence of ... or damaged joints due to arthritis could potentially lead more easily to ligament injury or acute trauma ...

  13. The relationship between observed stress corrosion cracking fracture morphology and microstructure in Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect

    Symons, D.M.; Burke, M.G.; Foster, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    Microstructure is known to influence the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of Alloy 600 in both hydrogenated water and steam environments. This study evaluated the relative SCC response of a single heat of Alloy 600 as a function of microstructure in a hydrogenated doped-steam environment. The 400 C doped-steam environment was selected for the SCC tests to accelerate cracking. The material was evaluated in three conditions: (1) as-received (2) as-annealed, and (3) as-annealed + 26% deformation. Microstructural characterization was performed using analytical electron microscopy (AEM) techniques for the evaluation of carbide type and morphology, and general structure. Constant displacement (bolt-loaded) compact tension specimens were used to induce SCC. The as-annealed and as-annealed plus cold worked samples had two fracture morphologies: a rough intergranular SCC fracture morphology and a smooth intergranular fracture morphology. The SCC fracture in the as-received specimens was characterized by a classic intergranular morphology at low magnification, consistent with the microstructural evaluation of cross-sectional metallographic samples. More detailed examination revealed a pseudo-intergranular fracture morphology. This pseudo-intergranular morphology appears to be comprised of very fine cleavage-like microfacets. These observations may assist in understanding the difference in SCC fracture morphologies as reported in the open literature.

  14. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel core internal welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Park, J.-H.; Ruther, W. E.; Sanecki, J. E.; Strain, R. V.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1999-04-14

    Microstructural analyses by several advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on austenitic stainless steel mockup and core shroud welds that had cracked in boiling water reactors. Contrary to previous beliefs, heat-affected zones of the cracked Type 304L, as well as 304 SS core shroud welds and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds, were free of grain-boundary carbides, which shows that core shroud failure cannot be explained by classical intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Neither martensite nor delta-ferrite films were present on the grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to welding fumes, the heat-affected zones of the core shroud welds were significantly contaminated by oxygen and fluorine, which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination seems to promote fluorine contamination and suppress thermal sensitization. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests also indicate that fluorine exacerbates the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of core shroud welds.

  15. A metallurgical evaluation of stress corrosion cracking in large diameter stainless steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, D.A.; Rawl, D.E. Jr.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing (UT) of the stainless steel piping in the primary coolant water system of SRS reactors indicates the presence of short, partly-through-wall stress corrosion cracks in the heat-affected zone of approximately 7% of the circumferential pipe welds. These cracks are thought to develop by intergranular nucleation and mixed mode propagation. Metallographic evaluations have confirmed the UT indications of crack size and provided evidence that crack growth involved the accumulation of chloride inside the growing crack. It is postulated that the development of an oxygen depletion cell inside the crack results in the migration of chloride ions to the crack tip to balance the accumulation of positively charged metallic ions. The results of this metallurgicial evaluation, combined with structural assessments of system integrity, support the existence of leak-before-break conditions in the SRS reactor piping system. 13 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels in light water reactor environments : mechanism and prediction.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    1998-01-27

    Section 111 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. The effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Recent test data illustrate potentially significant effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of carbon and low-alloy steels. Under certain loading and environmental conditions, fatigue lives of test specimens may be shorter than those in air by a factor of {approx}70. The crack initiation and crack growth characteristics of carbon and low-alloy steels in LWR environments are presented. Decreases in fatigue life of these steels in high-dissolved-oxygen water are caused primarily by the effect of environment on growth of short cracks < 100 {micro}m in depth. The material and loading parameters that influence fatigue life in LWR environments are defined. Fatigue life is decreased significantly when five conditions are satisfied simultaneously, viz., applied strain range, service temperature, dissolved oxygen in water, and S content in steel are above a threshold level, and loading strain rate is below a threshold value. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the fatigue life of these steels in LWR environments. The significance of the effect of environment on the current Code design curve is evaluated.

  17. Modeling Crack Propagation in Polycrystalline Microstructure Using Variational Multiscale Method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, S.; Sundararaghavan, V.

    2016-01-01

    Crack propagation in a polycrystalline microstructure is analyzed using a novel multiscale model. The model includes an explicit microstructural representation at critical regions (stress concentrators such as notches and cracks) and a reduced order model that statistically captures the microstructure at regions far away from stress concentrations. Crack propagation is modeled in these critical regions using the variational multiscale method. In this approach, a discontinuous displacement field is added to elements that exceed the critical values of normal or tangential tractions during loading. Compared to traditional cohesive zone modeling approaches, the method does not require the use of any specialmore » interface elements in the microstructure and thus can model arbitrary crack paths. The capability of the method in predicting both intergranular and transgranular failure modes in an elastoplastic polycrystal is demonstrated under tensile and three-point bending loads.« less

  18. Crack-path effect on material toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Asher A.

    1990-01-01

    The main features of a toughening mechanism associated with a curvilinear crack path are examined using a model consisting of a macrocrack in a brittle solid with a curvilinear segment at the crack tip. A numerical procedure for finite and semiinfinite cracks is formulated and evaluated using an example which has an exact solution (a finite crack in the form of a circular arc in a uniform stress field). It is shown that, for a relatively small amplitude of crack path oscillations, the toughening ratio can be taken equal to the ratio of the corresponding crack path lengths.

  19. Thermal-Fatigue Crack-Growth Characteristics and Mechanical Strain Cycling Behavior of A-286 Discaloy, and 16-25-6 Austenitic Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert W.; Smith, Gordon T.

    1960-01-01

    Thermal-fatigue crack-growth characteristics of notched- and unnotched-disk specimens of A-286, Discaloy, hot-cold worked 16-25-6, and overaged 16-25-6 were experimentally studied. Separately controlled variables were total strain range (0.0043 to 0.0079 in./in.), maximum cycle temperature (1300 and 1100 F), and hold time at maximum temperature (O and 5 min). A limited number of mechanical, push-pull, constant-strain cycle tests at room temperature were made using notched and un-notched bars of the same materials. In these tests the number of cycles to failure as well as the variation of load change with accumulated cycles was measured, and the effects of mean stress were observed. Constant-strain-range mechanical-fatigue tests at room temperature revealed notched-bar fatigue life to be strongly influenced by mean stress. For a specific strain range, the longest fatigue life was always found to be associated with the least-tensile (or most compressive) mean stress. By defining thermal-fatigue life as the number of cycles required to produce a crack area of 6000 square mils, the relative thermal-fatigue resistances of the test materials were established. Notched-disk specimens of A-286 and Discaloy steels exhibited longer fatigue lives than either hot-cold worked or overaged 16-25-6. On the other hand, unnotched-disk specimens of Discaloy and hot-cold worked 16-25-6 had longer lives than A-286 and overaged 16-25-6. Separation of the crack-growth data into microstage and macrostage periods revealed that the macrostage period accounted for the greatest part of the difference among materials when tested in the notched configuration, while the microstage was largely responsible for the differences encountered in unnotched disks.

  20. Probability of failure in BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) reactor coolant piping: Volume 2, Pipe failure induced by crack growth and failure of intermediate supports

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, T.; Bumpus, S.E.; Chinn, D.J.; Mensing, R.W.; Holman, G.S.

    1989-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) contracted with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to conduct a study to determine if the probability of occurrence of a double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) in the major coolant piping systems of nuclear power plants is large enough to warrant the current stringent design requirements of designing against the postulated effects of a DEGB. The study includes both the PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) and the BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) plants in the United States. Following the study of PWR plants, a study of BWR reactor coolant piping was performed. The Brunswick Steam Electric Plant at Southport, North Carolina was selected as the pilot plant for the BWR evaluation. The probability of pipe failure in three major coolant pipings was assessed: the recirculation loops, the primary steam lines, and the main feedwater lines. In the case of recirculation loops, both the existing and a proposed replacement system were studied. A probabilistic fracture mechanics approach was used in this study to estimate the crack growth and to assess the crack stability in the piping systems throughout the lifetime of the plant. The effects of the failure of intermediate pipe supports were also examined. The results of the assessment indicated that the probability of occurrence of DEGB due to crack growth and instability is small if the problem of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) is resolved by the use of the replacement system. 33 refs., 41 figs., 32 tabs.

  1. The effect of microstructure on 650 C fatigue crack growth in P/M Astroloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Miner, R. V.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of microstructure on fatigue crack propagation at 650 C has been studied in a P/M nickel-base superalloy, Astroloy. Crack propagation data were obtained in air and vacuum at 20 cpm with a modified compact tension specimen. The rate of crack growth, da/dn, was correlated with the stress intensity range. Key microstructural variables examined were grain size and the distribution and size of the strengthening gamma prime phase. A fine grain size less than 20 microns always promoted rapid, intergranular failure, while a large grain size promoted slower, transgranular failure which decreased as the size and volume fraction of aging gamma prime was manipulated so as to increase alloy strength. The rapid, intergranular mode of failure of the fine grain microstructures was suppressed in vacuum.

  2. Amorphous intergranular phases control the properties of rodent tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Lyle M.; Cohen, Michael J.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Pasteris, Jill D.; Seda, Takele; Joester, Derk

    2015-02-01

    Dental enamel, a hierarchical material composed primarily of hydroxylapatite nanowires, is susceptible to degradation by plaque biofilm-derived acids. The solubility of enamel strongly depends on the presence of Mg2+, F-, and CO32-. However, determining the distribution of these minor ions is challenging. We show—using atom probe tomography, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlative techniques—that in unpigmented rodent enamel, Mg2+ is predominantly present at grain boundaries as an intergranular phase of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP). In the pigmented enamel, a mixture of ferrihydrite and amorphous iron-calcium phosphate replaces the more soluble Mg-ACP, rendering it both harder and more resistant to acid attack. These results demonstrate the presence of enduring amorphous phases with a dramatic influence on the physical and chemical properties of the mature mineralized tissue.

  3. Stress corrosion crack tip microstructure in nickel-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Shei, S.A.; Yang, W.J.

    1994-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking behavior of several nickel-base alloys in high temperature caustic environments has been evaluated. The crack tip and fracture surfaces were examined using Auger/ESCA and Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) to determine the near crack tip microstructure and microchemistry. Results showed formation of chromium-rich oxides at or near the crack tip and nickel-rich de-alloying layers away from the crack tip. The stress corrosion resistance of different nickel-base alloys in caustic may be explained by the preferential oxidation and dissolution of different alloying elements at the crack tip. Alloy 600 (UNS N06600) shows good general corrosion and intergranular attack resistance in caustic because of its high nickel content. Thermally treated Alloy 690 (UNS N06690) and Alloy 600 provide good stress corrosion cracking resistance because of high chromium contents along grain boundaries. Alloy 625 (UNS N06625) does not show as good stress corrosion cracking resistance as Alloy 690 or Alloy 600 because of its high molybdenum content.

  4. Cracking behavior of cored structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wahid, A.; Olson, D.L.; Matlock, D.K. . Center for Welding and Joining Research); Kelly, T.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a composition gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Data on stress corrosion cracking and fatigue crack growth in selected FCC alloys are used to illustrate the significance of microsegregation on mechanical properties.

  5. Cracking behavior of cored structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wahid, A.; Olson, D.L.; Matlock, D.K.; Kelly, T.J.

    1991-12-31

    The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a composition gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Data on stress corrosion cracking and fatigue crack growth in selected FCC alloys are used to illustrate the significance of microsegregation on mechanical properties.

  6. Modeling crack growth processes in fusion reactor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Russell H.; Wolfer, Wilhelm G.

    1984-05-01

    Models for the effect of the chemical environment on crack growth processes in austenitic and ferritic stainless were evaluated. The effect of impurity segregation, yield strength, and hydrogen on crack growth of HT-9 and radiation induced phosphorus segregation on the intergranular stress corrosion of 316SS have been evaluated. Moderate increases in impurity segregation and/or yield strength caused significant decreases in the K IC and K TH of HT-9, while less than a 10 fold increase in the intergranular stress corrosion crack growth rate of 316SS was predicted for a fluence of 100 dpa using the radiation induced phosphorus segregation data of Brimhall et al. and the stress corrosion model of Parkins. Therefore, while radiation induced impurity segregation is greater in 316SS than HT-9, the effect of impurity segregation may be more pronounced in HT-9. The effect of hydrogen on fatigue crack thresholds was evaluated using a model by Tien which describes the threshold as a function of surface energy. A reduction in the surface energy by hydrogen adsorption was found to cause a decrease in the fatigue threshold a small but comparable amount to that observed for 2-1/4Cr-lMo steel.

  7. Issues of intergranular embrittlement of VVER-type nuclear reactors pressure vessel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabusov, O.

    2016-04-01

    In light of worldwide tendency to extension of service life of operating nuclear power plants - VVER-type in the first place - recently a special attention is concentrated on phenomena taking place in reactor pressure vessel materials that are able to lead to increased level of mechanical characteristics degradation (resistibility to brittle fracture) during long term of operation. Formerly the hardening mechanism of degradation (increase in the yield strength under influence of irradiation) mainly had been taken into consideration to assess pressure vessel service life limitations, but when extending the service life up to 60 years and more the non-hardening mechanism (intergranular embrittlement of the steels) must be taken into account as well. In this connection NRC “Kurchatov Institute” has initiated a number of works on investigations of this mechanism contribution to the total embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels. The main results of these investigations are described in this article. Results of grain boundary phosphorus concentration measurements in specimens made of first generation of VVER-type pressure vessels materials as well as VVER-1000 surveillance specimens are presented. An assessment of non-hardening mechanism contribution to the total ductile-to- brittle transition temperature shift is given.

  8. Monitoring of stress corrosion cracking in stainless steel weldments by acoustic and electrochemical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezu, Akio; Cho, Hideo; Takemoto, Mikio

    2006-09-01

    A new hybrid monitoring technique for chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is proposed. It uses both the acoustic emission (AE) and corrosion potential fluctuation (CPF) techniques. This paper discusses the results of SCC tests on butt-welded Type 304 stainless steel pipes. The weld pipe suffered transgranular (TG)-SCC in a concentrated magnesium chloride solution (40 mass%), but suffered intergranular (IG) attack and falling-off of grains in a heat-affected zone (HAZ) in a dilute chloride solution (35 mass%). SCC initiations in both concentrated and dilute corrodants were successfully monitored using a CPF technique. However, the CPF technique could not monitor the propagation of the SCC. This propagation could be detected using an AE technique. Secondary AE was produced by hydrogen gas evolution and by the cracking of corrosion products, and the primary AE was produced by the falling-off of grains due to the mutual actions of anodic dissolution and the mechanical fracture along a chromium-depleted zone in the grain boundary. The volume of metal loss by the dissolution was predicted from the local anodic current due to the fluctuation of the corrosion potential, and was found to correspond to the volume of the grain boundary attack. The fact that the primary AE was detected just after rapid drop (RD)-type CPF suggested that the grain boundary corrosion caused the falling-off of the grain that produced the primary AE.

  9. On post-weld heat treatment cracking in tig welded superalloy ATI 718Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asala, G.; Ojo, O. A.

    The susceptibility of heat affected zone (HAZ) to cracking in Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welded Allvac 718Plus superalloy during post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) was studied. Contrary to the previously reported case of low heat input electron beam welded Allvac 718Plus, where HAZ cracking occurred during PWHT, the TIG welded alloy is crack-free after PWHT, notwithstanding the presence of similar micro-constituents that caused cracking in the low input weld. Accordingly, the formation of brittle HAZ intergranular micro-constituents may not be a sufficient factor to determine cracking propensity, the extent of heat input during welding may be another major factor that influences HAZ cracking during PWHT of the aerospace superalloy Allvac 718Plus.

  10. Technical Letter Report - Analysis of Ultrasonic Data on Piping Cracks at Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant Before and After Applying a Mechanical Stress Improvement Process, JCN-N6319, Task 2

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Crawford, Susan L.

    2008-02-26

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assisting the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in developing a position on the management of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in piping systems previously analyzed for leak-before-break (LBB). Part of this work involves determining whether inspections alone are sufficient or if inspections plus mitigation techniques are needed. The work described in this report addresses the reliability of ultrasonic phased-array (PA) examinations for inspection of cracks that have been subjected to the mitigation method of mechanical stress improvement process (MSIP). It is believed that stresses imparted during MSIP may make ultrasonic crack responses in piping welds more difficult to detect and accurately characterize. To explore this issue, data were acquired, both before and after applying MSIP, and analyzed from cracked areas in piping at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) in Lithuania. This work was performed under NRC Project JCN-N6319, PWSCC in Leak-Before-Break Systems.

  11. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E.

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from April 1995 to December 1995. Topics that have been investigated include fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, EAC of Alloy 600 and 690, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic steels in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in simulated LWR environments. Effects of fluoride-ion contamination on susceptibility to intergranular cracking of high- and commercial- purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-tensile tests at 288 degrees Centigrade. Microchemical changes in the specimens were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials.

  12. Crack Formation in Cement-Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprince, A.; Pakrastinsh, L.; Vatin, N.

    2016-04-01

    The cracking properties in cement-based composites widely influences mechanical behavior of construction structures. The challenge of present investigation is to evaluate the crack propagation near the crack tip. During experiments the tension strength and crack mouth opening displacement of several types of concrete compositions was determined. For each composition the Compact Tension (CT) specimens were prepared with dimensions 150×150×12 mm. Specimens were subjected to a tensile load. Deformations and crack mouth opening displacement were measured with extensometers. Cracks initiation and propagation were analyzed using a digital image analysis technique. The formation and propagation of the tensile cracks was traced on the surface of the specimens using a high resolution digital camera with 60 mm focal length. Images were captured during testing with a time interval of one second. The obtained experimental curve shows the stages of crack development.

  13. Observations of crack propagation along a Zr-doped alumina grain boundary.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, A; Kondo, S; Tochigi, E; Shibata, N; Ikuhara, Y

    2014-11-01

    Structural ceramics are typically used in polycrystalline form. It is well known that polycrystalline ceramics often show the intergranular fracture. To improve their mechanical properties, transition metals can be used as dopants into a bulk material, which tend to segregate into the grain boundaries[1]. However, the effect of dopant segregation on grain boundary fracture is still uncertain. In order to investigate the fracture behavior of a dopant-segregated grain boundary, we observed the crack propagation of a Zr-doped alumina grain boundary by in situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), and characterized the fracture surface by scanning TEM (STEM).An alumina bicrystal with a Zr-doped Σ13 grain boundary was fabricated by diffusion bonding at 1500(o)C for 10 hours in air, where a face of one crystal was coated by Zr metal in advance to the bonding (Fig. 1a). A TEM sample was prepared from the bicrystal by mechanical grinding and Ar ion milling. For in situ indentation, the sample had a free edge perpendicular to the grain boundary (Fig. 1b). The indentation experiment was performed by using a double-tilt indentation holder (Nanofactory) and JEM-2010 (200kV, JEOL). The fracture surface was further observed by high angle annular dark field (HAADF) STEM (ARM-200F, 200kV, JEOL).jmicro;63/suppl_1/i20-a/DFU064F1F1DFU064F1Fig. 1.(a) Schematic illustrations of bicrystal fabrication by diffusion bonding and (b) Bright field TEM image showing the geometric arrangement of the in situ nanoindentation experiment In the in situ TEM nanoindentation experiment, at first a crack was introduced in bulk close to the grain boundary and propagated with the amount of indentation. After the crack reached the grain boundary, it preferentially propagated along the grain boundary. To identify the crack pass at the atomic level, the STEM analysis was performed. We found that three-atomic-layer Zr was formed in the unbroken region of the grain boundary, whereas

  14. Interface cracks in piezoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govorukha, V.; Kamlah, M.; Loboda, V.; Lapusta, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Due to their intrinsic electromechanical coupling behavior, piezoelectric materials are widely used in sensors, actuators and other modern technologies. It is well known that piezoelectric ceramics are very brittle and susceptible to fracture. In many cases, fracture occurs at interfaces as debonding and cracks. This leads to an undesired degradation of electrical and mechanical performance. Because of the practical and fundamental importance of the problem, interface cracks in piezoelectric materials have been actively studied in the last few decades. This review provides a comprehensive survey of recent works on cracks situated at the interface of two materials, at least one of which has piezoelectric or piezoelectromagnetic properties. Different electric boundary conditions along the crack faces are discussed. The oscillating and contact zone models for in-plane straight interface cracks between two dissimilar piezoelectric materials or between piezoelectric and non-piezoelectric ones are reviewed. Different peculiarities related to the investigation of interface cracks in piezoelectric materials for the anti-plane case, for functionally graded and thermopiezoelectric materials are presented. Papers related to magnetoelectroelastic bimaterials, to steady state motion of interface cracks in piezoelectric bimaterials and to circular arc-cracks at the interface of piezoelectric materials are reviewed, and various methods used to address these problems are discussed. The review concludes with an outlook on future research directions.

  15. Shapes Formed By Interacting Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, K.

    2014-12-01

    Brittle failure through multiple cracks occurs in a wide variety of contexts, from microscopic failures in rocks to geological faults and planetary ice crusts. In each of these situations, with complicated stress geometries and different microscopic mechanisms, pairwise interactions between approaching cracks nonetheless produce characteristically curved fracture paths. We investigate the origins of this widely observed "en passant" crack pattern by fracturing a rectangular slab which is notched on two sides and then subjected to quasistatic uniaxial, biaxial, or shear strain. The two cracks propagate along approximately straight paths until they pass each other, after which they curve and release a lens-shaped fragment. Under uniaxial strain, we find that each crack path has a universal shape and aspect ratio which is independent of the material. By changing the geometry of the applied strain, we are able to achieve different aspect ratios for the crack paths. With birefringent materials, it is possible to interpret these patterns in light of the stress geometry, and we are able to explain the origins of these universal shapes with a simple geometrical model. Since a variety of aspect ratios have similarly been observed in geological contexts, this raises the possibility of using observed crack shapes as a diagnostic for the stress conditions under which cracks were formed in nature. In particular, the shape may serve as a means to infer the boundary loading in situations where history and dynamics are inaccessible.

  16. Modelling and measurement of crack closure and crack growth following overloads and underloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, R. J.; Hudak, S. J.; Davidson, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    Ignoring crack growth retardation following overloads can result in overly conservative life predictions in structures subjected to variable amplitude fatigue loading. Crack closure is believed to contribute to the crack growth retardation, although the specific closure mechanism is dabatable. The delay period and corresponding crack growth rate transients following overload and overload/underload cycles were systematically measured as a function of load ratio and overload magnitude. These responses are correlated in terms of the local 'driving force' for crack growth, i.e. the effective stress intensity factor range. Experimental results are compared with the predictions of a Dugdale-type (1960) crack closure model, and improvements in the model are suggested.

  17. A comparison of stress in cracked fibrous tissue specimens with varied crack location, loading, and orientation using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Peloquin, John M; Elliott, Dawn M

    2016-04-01

    Cracks in fibrous soft tissue, such as intervertebral disc annulus fibrosus and knee meniscus, cause pain and compromise joint mechanics. A crack concentrates stress at its tip, making further failure and crack extension (fracture) more likely. Ex vivo mechanical testing is an important tool for studying the loading conditions required for crack extension, but prior work has shown that it is difficult to reproduce crack extension. Most prior work used edge crack specimens in uniaxial tension, with the crack 90° to the edge of the specimen. This configuration does not necessarily represent the loading conditions that cause in vivo crack extension. To find a potentially better choice for experiments aiming to reproduce crack extension, we used finite element analysis to compare, in factorial combination, (1) center crack vs. edge crack location, (2) biaxial vs. uniaxial loading, and (3) crack-fiber angles ranging from 0° to 90°. The simulated material was annulus fibrosus fibrocartilage with a single fiber family. We hypothesized that one of the simulated test cases would produce a stronger stress concentration than the commonly used uniaxially loaded 90° crack-fiber angle edge crack case. Stress concentrations were compared between cases in terms of fiber-parallel stress (representing risk of fiber rupture), fiber-perpendicular stress (representing risk of matrix rupture), and fiber shear stress (representing risk of fiber sliding). Fiber-perpendicular stress and fiber shear stress concentrations were greatest in edge crack specimens (of any crack-fiber angle) and center crack specimens with a 90° crack-fiber angle. However, unless the crack is parallel to the fiber direction, these stress components alone are insufficient to cause crack opening and extension. Fiber-parallel stress concentrations were greatest in center crack specimens with a 45° crack-fiber angle, either biaxially or uniaxially loaded. We therefore recommend that the 45° center crack case be

  18. Measurement and Modeling of Hydrogen Environment-Assisted Cracking in Monel K-500

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Ha, Hung M.; Burns, James T.; Scully, John R.

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen environment-assisted cracking (HEAC) of Monel K-500 is quantified using slow-rising stress intensity loading with electrical potential monitoring of small crack propagation and elastoplastic J-integral analysis. For this loading, with concurrent crack tip plastic strain and H accumulation, aged Monel K-500 is susceptible to intergranular HEAC in NaCl solution when cathodically polarized at -800 mVSCE ( E A, vs saturated calomel) and lower. Intergranular cracking is eliminated by reduced cathodic polarization more positive than -750 mVSCE. Crack tip diffusible H concentration rises, from near 0 wppm at E A of -765 mVSCE, with increasing cathodic polarization. This behavior is quantified by thermal desorption spectroscopy and barnacle cell measurements of hydrogen solubility vs overpotential for planar electrodes, plus measured-local crevice potential, and pH scaled to the crack tip. Using crack tip H concentration, excellent agreement is demonstrated between measurements and decohesion-based model predictions of the E A dependencies of threshold stress intensity and Stage II growth rate. A critical level of cathodic polarization must be exceeded for HEAC to occur in aged Monel K-500. The damaging-cathodic potential regime likely shifts more negative for quasi-static loading or increasing metallurgical resistance to HEAC.

  19. Crack tip deformation and fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.-W.

    1981-01-01

    Recent research on fatigue crack growth is summarized. Topics discussed include the use of the differential stress intensity factor to characterize crack tip deformation, the use of the unzipping model to study the growth of microcracks and the fatigue crack growth in a ferritic-martensitic steel, and the development of a model of fatige crack growth threshold. It is shown that in the case of small yielding, the differential stress intensity factor provides an adequate description of cyclic plastic deformation at the crack tip and correlates well with the crack growth rate. The unzipping model based on crack tip shear decohesion process is found to be in good agreement with the measured crack growth and striation spacing measurements. The proposed model of crack growth threshold gives correct predictions of the crack growth behavior in the near-threshold region.

  20. Application of damage mechanism-specific NDE methods in support of risk-informed inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, S.M.; Ammirato, F.V.

    1996-12-01

    Risk-informed inservice inspection (RISI) programs effectively concentrate limited and costly examination resources on systems and locations most relevant to plant safety. The thought process used in the selection of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods and procedures in a RISI program is expected to change toward integrating NDE into integrity management, with a concentration on understanding failure mechanisms. Identifying which damage mechanisms may be operative in specific locations and applying appropriate NDE methods to detect the presence of these damage mechanisms is fundamental to effective RISI application. Considerable information is already available on inspection for damage mechanisms such as intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), thermal fatigue, and erosion-corrosion. Similar procedures are under development for other damage mechanisms that may occur individually or in combination with other mechanisms. Guidance is provided on application of NDE procedures in an RISI framework to facilitate implementation by utility staff (Gosselin, 1996).

  1. Observations on hydrogen induced delayed plasticity and cracking in 4340 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, J.A.

    1983-02-01

    The crack growth rates measured by potential drop provided strong evidence that crack advance occurs continuously during hydrogen assisted cracking. If crack growth occurred by the stepwise HIDP-C mechanism, variations in growth rate would be expected to appear in the potential drop results. For example, during the period of plastic zone extension, a low crack growth rate would be expected, followed by a period of higher crack growth rate during actual extension of the crack. The results obtained in this investigation do not eliminate the possibility that stepwise crack growth occurred at different points along the crack front at different times, appearing as continuous average crack advance. Furthermore, these results do not provide evidence for the mechanism of crack extension. The results do show that the average crack front advance is continuous during hydrogen assisted cracking, not stepwise, as would be expected for the HIDP-C mechanism of crack growth. 13 references.

  2. The effect of alloy composition on the mechanism of stress-corrosion cracking of titanium alloys in aqueous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, R. A.; Boyd, J. D.; Williams, D. N.; Jaffee, R. I.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed study was made of the relation between the size distribution of Ti3Al particles in a Ti-8Al alloy and the tensile properties measured in air and in saltwater. The size distribution of Ti3Al was varied by isothermal aging for various times at temperatures in the range 770 to 970 K (930 to 1290 F). The aging kinetics were found to be relatively slow. Quantitative measurements of the particle coarsening rate at 920 K (1200 F) showed good agreement with the predicted behavior for coarsening controlled by matrix diffusion, and suggested that the specific free energy of the Ti3Al alpha interface in negligible small. In all cases, the Ti3Al particles were sheared by the glide dislocations. It was concluded that there is a definite correlation between the presence of deformable Ti3Al particles and an alloy's susceptibility to aqueous stress corrosion cracking. Furthermore, the appearance of the surface slip lines and the dislocation substructure in deformed specimens suggest that the specific effect of the Ti3Al particles is to cause a nonhomogeneous planar slip character and an enhanced chemical potential of the slip bands.

  3. Stress-corrosion cracking in BWR and PWR piping

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, R.W.

    1983-07-01

    Intergranular stress-corrosion cracking of weld-sensitized wrought stainless steel piping has been an increasingly ubiquitous and expensive problem in boiling-water reactors over the last decade. In recent months, numerous cracks have been found, even in large-diameter lines. A number of potential remedies have been developed. These are directed at providing more resistant materials, reducing weld-induced stresses, or improving the water chemistry. The potential remedies are discussed, along with the capabilities of ultrasonic testing to find and size the cracks and related safety issues. The problem has been much less severe to date in pressurized-water reactors, reflecting the use of different materials and much lower coolant oxygen levels.

  4. Atomistic Structure, Strength, and Kinetic Properties of Intergranular Films in Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Garofalini, Stephen H

    2015-01-08

    Intergranular films (IGFs) present in polycrystalline oxide and nitride ceramics provide an excellent example of nanoconfined glasses that occupy only a small volume percentage of the bulk ceramic, but can significantly influence various mechanical, thermal, chemical, and optical properties. By employing molecular dynamics computer simulations, we have been able to predict structures and the locations of atoms at the crystal/IGF interface that were subsequently verified with the newest electron microscopies. Modification of the chemistry of the crystal surface in the simulations provided the necessary mechanism for adsorption of specific rare earth ions from the IGF in the liquid state to the crystal surface. Such results had eluded other computational approaches such as ab-initio calculations because of the need to include not only the modified chemistry of the crystal surfaces but also an accurate description of the adjoining glassy IGF. This segregation of certain ions from the IGF to the crystal caused changes in the local chemistry of the IGF that affected fracture behavior in the simulations. Additional work with the rare earth ions La and Lu in the silicon oxynitride IGFs showed the mechanisms for their different affects on crystal growth, even though both types of ions are seen adhering to a bounding crystal surface that would normally imply equivalent affects on grain growth.

  5. The three thresholds for fatigue crack propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.J.

    1997-12-01

    The three governing threshold conditions in metal fatigue are considered, one relating to crack growth in single crystals, one concerned with crack growth in polycrystalline materials, and one based on linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). All three conditions are examined in relation to the two physical processes of cracking, i.e., Stage I (shear) and Stage II (tensile) crack growth. The LEFM threshold is seen as a lower bound condition for fatigue crack growth rate, and the single crystal threshold is viewed in relation to the fundamental threshold pertaining to the fatigue resistance of polycrystalline metals.

  6. Cracks in Flow Liners and Their Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Raju, I. S.

    2005-01-01

    Cracks were detected in flow liners at the gimbal joints in the LH2 feedlines of the space shuttle's main engines. The cracks initiated at defects in the drainage slots of the flow liners and grew due to high cycle fatigue. Fracture mechanics analyses were conducted to evaluate the life of the liners. These analyses yielded extremely short lives in the presence of small surface or corner cracks. A high fidelity detection method, edge replication, was used to detect the very small cracks. The detected cracks were removed by polishing and the surface quality of the slots was reestablished to improve life of the liners.

  7. Fatigue-Crack-Growth Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Elastic and plastic deformations calculated under variety of loading conditions. Prediction of fatigue-crack-growth lives made with FatigueCrack-Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to initial crack configuration, FASTRAN predicts crack length and other parameters until complete break occurs. Loads are tensile or compressive and of variable or constant amplitude. FASTRAN incorporates linear-elastic fracture mechanics with modifications of load-interaction effects caused by crack closure. FASTRAN considered research tool, because of lengthy calculation times. FASTRAN written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution.

  8. A 3D coupled hydro-mechanical granular model for the prediction of hot tearing formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sistaninia, M.; Phillion, A. B.; Drezet, J.-M.; Rappaz, M.

    2012-07-01

    A new 3D coupled hydro-mechanical granular model that simulates hot tearing formation in metallic alloys is presented. The hydro-mechanical model consists of four separate 3D modules. (I) The Solidification Module (SM) is used for generating the initial solid-liquid geometry. Based on a Voronoi tessellation of randomly distributed nucleation centers, this module computes solidification within each polyhedron using a finite element based solute diffusion calculation for each element within the tessellation. (II) The Fluid Flow Module (FFM) calculates the solidification shrinkage and deformation-induced pressure drop within the intergranular liquid. (III) The Semi-solid Deformation Module (SDM) is used to simulate deformation of the granular structure via a combined finite element / discrete element method. In this module, deformation of the solid grains is modeled using an elasto-viscoplastic constitutive law. (IV) The Failure Module (FM) is used to simulate crack initiation and propagation with the fracture criterion estimated from the overpressure required to overcome the capillary forces at the liquid-gas interface. The FFM, SDM, and FM are coupled processes since solid deformation, intergranular flow, and crack initiation are deeply linked together. The granular model predictions have been validated against bulk data measured experimentally and calculated with averaging techniques.

  9. The influence of microstructure on the mechanical behavior of silicon nitride ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, P.F.; Lin, H.T.; Hwang, S.L.; Hoffmann, M.J.; Chen, I-Wei

    1992-12-31

    Elongated Si nitride grains produced during densification in a liquid phase can increase the fracture toughness, but this depends on the activation of intergranular rather than transgranular fracture. Bridging in the crack wake by elongated grains and pullout of some of these grains suggest that the crack wake mechanisms that contribute to toughening of whisker-reinforced ceramics can also operate in Si nitrides containing elongated grains. With diameters of the larger elongated grains approaching 9 {mu}m, strengths > 800 MPa have been achieved along with Weibull moduli, but clustering of these larger elongated grains must be avoided. Fatigue of these toughened Si nitrides is influenced by silicate grain boundary phases. Design of toughened Si nitrides must consider effects of silicate phase composition and content on fatigue and creep. 8 figs, 18 refs.

  10. Intergranular fracture in some precipitation-hardened aluminum alloys at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kuramoto, S.; Itoh, G.; Kanno, M.

    1996-10-01

    Intergranular fracture at low temperatures from room temperature down to 4.2 K has been studied in some precipitation-hardened aluminum alloys. Microscopic appearance of intergranular facets is revealed to be greatly affected by the microstructure adjacent to the grain boundaries (GBs). When large precipitates on GBs and wide precipitation-free zones (PFZs) are present, coalescence of microvoids initiated at the GB precipitates causes the intergranular fracture with dimples. This fracture process is found to be unaffected by deformation temperature. On the other hand, in the presence of fine precipitates on GBs and narrow PFZs, matrix slip localization exerts significant influence on the fracture behavior. At low temperatures, large stress concentration at GBs leads to intergranular fracture, forming sharp ledges on the fracture surfaces, while at room temperature, the dynamic recovery process is thought to relax such stress concentration, resulting in a transgranular ductile rupture.

  11. Study on Laser-Assisted Rejuvenation of Inter-Granular Corrosion Damaged Type 304 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Bhardwaj, V. K.; Agrawal, D. K.; Kumar, Manoj; Upadhyay, B. N.; Sankar, P. Ram; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, R.; Oak, S. M.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2015-09-01

    The paper evaluates laser surface melting treatment for rejuvenation of inter-granular corrosion damaged type 304 stainless steel. Surface melting of inter-granular corrosion damaged specimens with CW CO2 and pulsed Nd:YAG lasers was quite effective in sealing surface damage. However, inter-granular corrosion susceptibility of laser-rejuvenated surface was strongly influenced by associated thermal exposure. With respect to CW CO2 laser, pulsed Nd:YAG laser-rejuvenated surface demonstrated significantly suppressed micro-structural damage and IGC-susceptibility. Compact pulsed Nd:YAG laser, with flexible beam transportation, presents an effective tool for in-situ rejuvenation of inter-granular corrosion damaged in-service stainless steel components operating in susceptible environments.

  12. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties evaluation for the LBB concept in VVERs

    SciTech Connect

    Ruscak, M.; Chvatal, P.; Karnik, D.

    1997-04-01

    One of the conditions required for Leak Before Break application is the verification that the influence of corrosion environment on the material of the component can be neglected. Both the general corrosion and/or the initiation and, growth of corrosion-mechanical cracks must not cause the degradation. The primary piping in the VVER nuclear power plant is made from austenitic steels (VVER 440) and low alloy steels protected with the austenitic cladding (VVER 1000). Inspection of the base metal and heterogeneous weldments from the VVER 440 showed that the crack growth rates are below 10 m/s if a low oxygen level is kept in the primary environment. No intergranular cracking was observed in low and high oxygen water after any type of testing, with constant or periodic loading. In the framework of the LBB assessment of the VVER 1000, the corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties were also evaluated. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical testing was oriented predominantly to three types of tests: stress corrosion cracking tests corrosion fatigue tests evaluation of the resistance against corrosion damage. In this paper, the methods used for these tests are described and the materials are compared from the point of view of response on static and periodic mechanical stress on the low alloyed steel 10GN2WA and weld metal exposed in the primary circuit environment. The slow strain rate tests and static loading of both C-rings and CT specimens were performed in order to assess the stress corrosion cracking characteristics. Cyclic loading of CT specimens was done to evaluate the kinetics of the crack growth under periodical loading. Results are shown to illustrate the approaches used. The data obtained were evaluated also from the point of view of comparison of the influence of different structure on the stress corrosion cracking appearance. The results obtained for the base metal and weld metal of the piping are presented here.

  13. MESO-SCALE MODELING OF THE INFLUENCE OF INTERGRANULAR GAS BUBBLES ON EFFECTIVE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Paul C. Millett; Michael Tonks

    2011-06-01

    Using a mesoscale modeling approach, we have investigated how intergranular fission gas bubbles, as observed in high-burnup nuclear fuel, modify the effective thermal conductivity in a polycrystalline material. The calculations reveal that intergranular porosity has a significantly higher resistance to heat transfer compared to randomly-distributed porosity. A model is developed to describe this conductivity reduction that considers an effective grain boundary Kapitza resistance as a function of the fractional coverage of grain boundaries by bubbles.

  14. Hierarchical Formation of Intrasplat Cracks in Thermal Spray Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2016-06-01

    Intrasplat cracks, an essential feature of thermally sprayed ceramic coatings, play important roles in determining coating properties. However, final intrasplat crack patterns are always considered to be disordered and irregular, resulting from random cracking during splat cooling, since the detailed formation process of intrasplat cracks has scarcely been considered. In the present study, the primary formation mechanism for intrasplat cracking was explored based on both experimental observations and mechanical analysis. The results show that the intrasplat crack pattern in thermally sprayed ceramic splats presents a hierarchical structure with four sides and six neighbors, indicating that intrasplat crack patterns arise from successive domain divisions due to sequential cracking during splat cooling. The driving forces for intrasplat cracking are discussed, and the experimental data quantitatively agree well with theoretical results. This will provide insight for further coating structure designs and tailoring by tuning of intrasplat cracks.

  15. Characteristics of lead induced stress corrosion cracking of alloy 690 in high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, K.K.; Lim, J.K.; Watanabe, Yutaka; Shoji, Tetsuo

    1996-10-01

    Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were conducted on alloy 690 in various lead chloride solutions and metal lead added to 100 ppm chloride solution at 288 C. The corrosion potential (rest potential) for the alloy was measured with SSRT tests. The cracking was observed by metallographic examination and electron probe micro analyzer. Also, the corrosion behavior of the alloy was evaluated by anodic polarized measurement at 30 C. Resulting from the tests, cracking was characterized by cracking behavior, crack length and crack growth rate, and lead effects on cracking. The cracking was mainly intergranular in mode, approximately from 60 um to 450 um in crack length, and approximately 10{sup {minus}6} to 10{sup {minus}7} mmS-1 in crack velocity. The cracking was evaluated through the variation the corrosion potential in potential-time and lead behavior during SSRTs. The lead effect in corrosion was evaluated through active to passive transition behavior in anodic polarized curves. The corrosion reactions in the cracking region were confirmed by electron probe microanalysis. Alloy 690 is used for steam generation tubes in pressurized water reactors.

  16. Current research on fatigue cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Jono, M.; Komai, K.

    1987-01-01

    This first volume of CJMR (Current Japanese Materials Research), contains thirteen chapters concerning the above three themes of fatigue cracks. Each chapter is not a single paper as appearing in many academic journals and transactions, but a systematic review of the current achievement by each author with the emphasis on important points. The common feature is that the elaborated experimental techniques and theoretical approaches, some of which are quite unique, are introduced by respective authors to make clear the difficulty arising in the observation of small cracks and analysis of data. Theoretical models are proposed from the viewpoint of fracture mechanics to link the two thresholds of fatigue limit and crack growth, and intensive discussions are made for further development of the theory. Threshold stress intensity factors and the growth rate of medium and long sized cracks are also discussed, together with their opening behavior. The influencing factors are plastic zone size, the stress ratio and residual stress distribution occurring in welded joints. Mode II crack growth is of great significance since the initial fatigue cracks propagate mainly in shear mode. The problems of fatigue crack growth in corrosive environment is highly important since its retardation and enhancement take place in structural steels affected by the variety of factors. Life prediction in such environments poses another important problem. These are systematically discussed in this book.

  17. Detection and characterization of stainless steel SCC by the analysis of crack related acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Kovač, Jaka; Legat, Andraž; Zajec, Bojan; Kosec, Tadeja; Govekar, Edvard

    2015-09-01

    In the paper the results of the acoustic emission (AE) based detection and characterization of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in stainless steel are presented. As supportive methods for AE interpretation, electrochemical noise, specimen elongation measurements, and digital imaging of the specimen surface were used. Based on the defined qualitative and quantitative time and power spectra characteristics of the AE bursts, a manual and an automatic procedure for the detection of crack related AE bursts were introduced. The results of the analysis of the crack related AE bursts indicate that the AE method is capable of detecting large scale cracks, where, apart from intergranular crack propagation, also some small ductile fractures occur. The sizes of the corresponding ductile fracture areas can be estimated based on a relative comparison of the energies of the detected AE bursts. It has also been shown that AE burst time and power spectra features can be successfully used for the automatic detection of SCC. PMID:26112425

  18. Visual simulation of fatigue crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Margolin, H.; Lin, F.B.

    1998-07-01

    An attempt has been made to visually simulate fatigue crack propagation from a precrack. An integrated program was developed for this purpose. The crack-tip shape was determined at four load positions in the first load cycle. The final shape was a blunt front with an ear profile at the precrack tip. A more general model, schematically illustrating the mechanism of fatigue crack growth and striation formation in a ductile material, was proposed based on this simulation. According to the present model, fatigue crack growth is an intermittent process; cyclic plastic shear strain is the driving force applied to both state 1 and 2 crack growth. No fracture mode transition occurs between the two stages in the present study. The crack growth direction alternates, moving up and down successively, producing fatigue striations. A brief examination has been made of the crack growth path in a ductile two-phase material.

  19. Effect of impurity content on creep crack growth resistance in 1Cr1Mo0.25V ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattorini, F.; Franzoni, U.; Sturlese, S.

    1990-07-01

    The effect of impurity content on creep crack growth (CCG) rate and, more generally, on hot ductility of a typical lCrlMo0.25V ferritic steel was evaluated. Four heats intentionally doped with various amounts of impurities were characterized after heat treatments simulating the industrial thermal cycle taking place in a 1000-mm-diameter high-pressure rotor at two positions: near the outside surface and at the center in the cases of air cooling and oil quenching, respectively. Results indicate that the highest crack growth rates occur in the grade with a low P content (40 ppm) and Sn and Sb values (100 to 200 ppm) comparable with those characteristic of commercial steels. A marked reduction in brittleness is achieved only through a substantial reduction in the amount of Sn and Sb, even when medium-to-high P levels (100 ppm) are present. Creep resistance in terms of both time to rupture and minimum growth rate is not influenced by the impurity content, at least within the range of stresses investigated. Auger analyses on crept specimens demonstrate the presence of a selective segregation of impurity elements similar to that found in other ferritic steels: P is the only segregating element at non-cavitated grain boundaries, while cavitated areas contain Sn, Sb, and Cu in addition to P. The embrittlement at high Sn and Sb levels depends on two factors: at low P levels, cracks rapidly propagate under surface diffusivity control; at high P levels, excess P segregates at the grain boundaries, and crack propagation proceeds by an intergranular decohesion mechanism.

  20. Early stages in the development of stress corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Simonen, E.P.

    1993-12-01

    Processes in growth of short cracks and stage I of long stress corrosion cracks were identified and evaluated. There is evidence that electrochemical effects can cause short stress corrosion cracks to grow at rates faster or slower than long cracks. Short cracks can grow at faster rates than long cracks for a salt film dissolution growth mechanism or from reduced oxygen inhibition of hydrolytic acidification. An increasing crack growth rate with increasing crack length could result from a process of increasing crack tip concentration of a critical anion, such as Cl{sup {minus}}, with increasing crack length in a system where the crack velocity is dependent on the Cl{sup {minus}} or some other anion concentration. An increasing potential drop between crack tip and mouth would result in an increased anion concentration at the crack tip and hence an increasing crack velocity. Stage I behavior of long cracks is another early development stage in the life of a stress corrosion crack which is poorly understood. This stage can be described by da/dt = AK{sup m} where da/dt is crack velocity, A is a constant, K is stress intensity and m ranges from 2 to 24 for a variety of materials and environments. Only the salt film dissolution model was found to quantitatively describe this stage; however, the model was only tested on one material and its general applicability is unknown.

  1. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yau, J. F.; Malik, S. N.; Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Laflen, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Elevated Temperature Crack Growth Project is to evaluate proposed nonlinear fracture mechanics methods for application to combustor liners of aircraft gas turbine engines. During the first year of this program, proposed path-independent (P-I) integrals were reviewed for such applications. Several P-I integrals were implemented into a finite-element postprocessor which was developed and verified as part of the work. Alloy 718 was selected as the analog material for use in the forthcoming experimental work. A buttonhead, single-edge notch specimen was designed and verified for use in elevated-temperature strain control testing with significant inelastic strains. A crack mouth opening displacement measurement device was developed for further use.

  2. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  3. Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility Using Fracture Mechanics Techniques, Part 1. [environmental tests of aluminum alloys, stainless steels, and titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprowls, D. O.; Shumaker, M. B.; Walsh, J. D.; Coursen, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SSC) tests were performed on 13 aluminum alloys, 13 precipitation hardening stainless steels, and two titanium 6Al-4V alloy forgings to compare fracture mechanics techniques with the conventional smooth specimen procedures. Commercially fabricated plate and rolled or forged bars 2 to 2.5-in. thick were tested. Exposures were conducted outdoors in a seacoast atmosphere and in an inland industrial atmosphere to relate the accelerated tests with service type environments. With the fracture mechanics technique tests were made chiefly on bolt loaded fatigue precracked compact tension specimens of the type used for plane-strain fracture toughness tests. Additional tests of the aluminum alloy were performed on ring loaded compact tension specimens and on bolt loaded double cantilever beams. For the smooth specimen procedure 0.125-in. dia. tensile specimens were loaded axially in constant deformation type frames. For both aluminum and steel alloys comparative SCC growth rates obtained from tests of precracked specimens provide an additional useful characterization of the SCC behavior of an alloy.

  4. Peridynamic model for fatigue cracking.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Abe Askari

    2014-10-01

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics in which the field equations can be applied on discontinuities, such as growing cracks. This paper proposes a bond damage model within peridynamics to treat the nucleation and growth of cracks due to cyclic loading. Bond damage occurs according to the evolution of a variable called the "remaining life" of each bond that changes over time according to the cyclic strain in the bond. It is shown that the model reproduces the main features of S-N data for typical materials and also reproduces the Paris law for fatigue crack growth. Extensions of the model account for the effects of loading spectrum, fatigue limit, and variable load ratio. A three-dimensional example illustrates the nucleation and growth of a helical fatigue crack in the torsion of an aluminum alloy rod.

  5. The effects of cold rolling orientation and water chemistry on stress corrosion cracking behavior of 316L stainless steel in simulated PWR water environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junjie; Lu, Zhanpeng; Xiao, Qian; Ru, Xiangkun; Han, Guangdong; Chen, Zhen; Zhou, Bangxin; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2016-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking behaviors of one-directionally cold rolled 316L stainless steel specimens in T-L and L-T orientations were investigated in hydrogenated and deaerated PWR primary water environments at 310 °C. Transgranular cracking was observed during the in situ pre-cracking procedure and the crack growth rate was almost not affected by the specimen orientation. Locally intergranular stress corrosion cracks were found on the fracture surfaces of specimens in the hydrogenated PWR water. Extensive intergranular stress corrosion cracks were found on the fracture surfaces of specimens in deaerated PWR water. More extensive cracks were found in specimen T-L orientation with a higher crack growth rate than that in the specimen L-T orientation with a lower crack growth rate. Crack branching phenomenon found in specimen L-T orientation in deaerated PWR water was synergistically affected by the applied stress direction as well as the preferential oxidation path along the elongated grain boundaries, and the latter was dominant.

  6. Crack Propagation in Bamboo's Hierarchical Cellular Structure

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Meisam K.; Lu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Bamboo, as a natural hierarchical cellular material, exhibits remarkable mechanical properties including excellent flexibility and fracture toughness. As far as bamboo as a functionally graded bio-composite is concerned, the interactions of different constituents (bamboo fibers; parenchyma cells; and vessels.) alongside their corresponding interfacial areas with a developed crack should be of high significance. Here, by using multi-scale mechanical characterizations coupled with advanced environmental electron microscopy (ESEM), we unambiguously show that fibers' interfacial areas along with parenchyma cells' boundaries were preferred routes for crack growth in both radial and longitudinal directions. Irrespective of the honeycomb structure of fibers along with cellular configuration of parenchyma ground, the hollow vessels within bamboo culm affected the crack propagation too, by crack deflection or crack-tip energy dissipation. It is expected that the tortuous crack propagation mode exhibited in the present study could be applicable to other cellular natural materials as well. PMID:24998298

  7. Toward Improving the Type IV Cracking Resistance in Cr-Mo Steel Weld Through Thermo-Mechanical Processing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shassere, Benjamin A.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-02-23

    Detailed microstructure characterization of Grade 91 (Modified 9Cr-1Mo, ASTM A387) steel subjected to a thermo-mechanical treatment (TMT) process was performed to rationalize the cross-weld creep properties. A series of thermo-mechanical processing in the austenite phase region, followed by isothermal aging at temperatures at 973 to 1173 K (700 to 900ºC) was applied to the Grade 91 steel to promote precipitation kinetics of MX (M: Nb and V, X: C and N) in the austenite matrix. Detailed characterization of the base metals after standard tempering confirmed the presence of fine MX dispersion within the tempered martensitic microstructure in steels processed at/andmore » above 1073 K (800 ºC). Relatively low volume fraction of M23C6 precipitates was observed after processing at 1073 K (800 ºC). The cross-weld creep strength after processing was increased with respect to the increase of MX dispersion, indicating that these MX precipitates maintained during weld thermal cycles in the fine grained heat affected zone (FGHAZ) region and thereby contribute to improved creep resistant of welds in comparison to the welds made with the standard “normalization and tempering” processes. Lastly, the steels processed in this specific processing condition showed improved cross-weld creep resistance and sufficient room-temperature toughness. The above data is also analysed based on existing theories of creep deformation based on dislocation climb mechanism.« less

  8. Toward Improving the Type IV Cracking Resistance in Cr-Mo Steel Weld Through Thermo-Mechanical Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shassere, Benjamin A.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Detailed microstructure characterization of Grade 91 (Modified 9Cr-1Mo, ASTM A387) steel subjected to a thermo-mechanical treatment process was performed to rationalize the cross-weld creep properties. A series of thermo-mechanical processing in the austenite phase region, followed by isothermal aging at temperatures at 973 K to 1173 K (700 °C to 900 °C), was applied to the Grade 91 steel to promote precipitation kinetics of MX (M: Nb and V, X: C and N) in the austenite matrix. Detailed characterization of the base metals after standard tempering confirmed the presence of fine MX dispersion within the tempered martensitic microstructure in steels processed at/and above 1073 K (800 °C). Relatively low volume fraction of M23C6 precipitates was observed after processing at 1073 K (800 °C). The cross-weld creep strength after processing was increased with respect to the increase of MX dispersion, indicating that these MX precipitates maintained during weld thermal cycles in the fine-grained heat-affected zone region and thereby contribute to improved creep resistant of welds in comparison to the welds made with the standard "normalization and tempering" processes. The steels processed in this specific processing condition showed improved cross-weld creep resistance and sufficient room temperature toughness. The above data are also analyzed based on existing theories of creep deformation based on dislocation climb mechanism.

  9. Intergranular Corrosion Behavior of 304LN Stainless Steel Heat Treated at 623 K (350 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raghuvir; Kumar, Mukesh; Ghosh, Mainak; Das, Gautam; Singh, P. K.; Chattoraj, I.

    2013-01-01

    Low temperature sensitization of 304LN stainless steel from the two pipes, differing slightly in chemical composition, has been investigated; specimens were aged at 623 K (350 °C) for 20,000 hours and evaluated for intergranular corrosion and degree of sensitization. The base and heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the 304LN-1 appear resistant to sensitization, while 304LN-2 revealed a "dual" type microstructure at the transverse section and HAZ. The microstructure at 5.0-mm distance from the fusion line indicates qualitatively less sensitization as compared to that at 2.0 mm. The 304LN-2 base alloy shows overall lower degree of sensitization values as compared to the 304LN-1. A similar trend of degree of sensitization was observed in the HAZ where it was higher in the 304LN-1 as compared to the 304LN-2. The weld zone of both the stainless steels suffered from cracking during ASTM A262 practice E, while the parent metals and HAZs did not show such fissures. A mottled image within the ferrite lamella showed spinodal decomposition. The practice E test and transmission electron microscopy results indicate that the interdendritic regions may suffer from failure due to carbide precipitation and due to the evolution of brittle phase from spinodal decomposition.

  10. BWR pipe crack remedies evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.; Maiya, P.S.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.

    1986-10-01

    This paper presents results on: (a) the influence of simulated BWR environments on the stress-corrosion-craking (SCC) susceptibility of Types 304, 316NG, and 347 stainless (SS); (b) fracture-mechanics crack-growth-rate measurements on these materials and weld overlay specimens in different environments; and (c) residual stress measurements and metallographic evaluations of conventional pipe weldments treated by a mechanical-stress-improvement process (MSIP) as well as those produced by a narrow-gap welding procedure. Crack initiation studies on Types 304 and 316NG SS under crevice and non-crevice conditions in 289/sup 0/C water containing 0.25 ppM dissolved oxygen with low sulfate concentrations indicate that SCC initiates at very low strains (<3%) in the nuclear grade material. Crack growth measurements on fracture-mechanics-type specimens, under low-frequency cyclic loading, show that the Type 316NG steel cracks at a somewhat lower rate (approx.40%) than sensitized Type 304 SS in an impurity environment with 0.25 ppM dissolved-oxygen; however, the latter material stops cracking when sulfate is removed from the water. Crack growth in both materials ceases under simulated hydrogen-water chemistry conditions (<5 ppB oxygen) even with 100 ppB sulfate present in the water. An unexpected result was obtained in the test on a weld overlay specimen in the impurity environment, viz., the crack grew to the overlay interface at a nominal rate, branched at 90/sup 0/ in both directions, and then grew at high rate (parallel to the nominal applied load). Residual stress measurements on MSIP-treated weldments and those produced by a narrow-gap welding procedure indicate that these techniques produce compressive stresses over most of the inner surface near the weld and heat-affected zones.

  11. Crack, crack house sex, and HIV risk.

    PubMed

    Inciardi, J A

    1995-06-01

    Limited attention has been focused on HIV risk behaviors of crack smokers and their sex partners, yet there is evidence that the crack house and the crack-using life-style may be playing significant roles in the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. The purposes of this research were to study the attributes and patterns of "sex for crack" exchanges, particularly those that occurred in crack houses, and to assess their potential impact on the spread of HIV. Structured interviews were conducted with 17 men and 35 women in Miami, Florida, who were regular users of crack and who had exchanged sex for crack (or for money to buy crack) during the past 30 days. In addition, participant observation was conducted in 8 Miami crack houses. Interview and observational data suggest that individuals who exchange sex for crack do so with considerable frequency, and through a variety of sexual activities. Systematic data indicated that almost a third of the men and 89% of the women had had 100 or more sex partners during the 30-day period prior to study recruitment. Not only were sexual activities anonymous, extremely frequent, varied, uninhibited (often undertaken in public areas of crack houses), and with multiple partners but, in addition, condoms were not used during the majority of contacts. Of the 37 subjects who were tested for HIV and received their test results 31% of the men and 21% of the women were HIV seropositive. PMID:7611845

  12. Aluminum-containing intergranular phases in hot-pressed silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao Feng; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2003-01-12

    Aluminum-containing intergranular phases, forming intergranular films and secondary phase particles at triple-junctions in SiC hot-pressed with aluminum, boron, and carbon additions, were studied by transmission electron microscopy. Statistical high-resolution electron microscopy study of intergranular films indicated that a large fraction of the vitreous intergranular films in the s-hot-pressed SiC crystallized during postannealing in argon above 1000 C. However, brief heating to 1900 C indeed re-melted 25 percent of the crystallized intergranular films. The structural transitions were reflected in the statistical width distributions of the amorphous grain boundary layers. At triple-junctions, Al2O3, Al2OC-SiC solid solution, and mullite phases were newly identified. These phases,together with others reported before are represented in a quaternary phase diagram for 1900 C. It is proposed that a SiC-Al2OC liquid domain is to be included in this phase diagram.

  13. Control of cryogenic intergranular fracture in high-manganese austenitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Strum, M.J.

    1986-12-01

    The sources of cryogenic intergranular embrittlement in high-Mn austenitic steels and the conditions necessary for its control are examined. It is shown that the high-Mn alloys are inherently susceptible to intergranular embrittlement due to both their low grain boundary cohesion and heterogeneous deformation characteristics. Extrinsic sources of embrittlement which could account for the transition behavior are not observed. An Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) study shows no indication of impurity-segregation-induced embrittlement. No grain boundary precipitation is observed, and austenite stabilization does not ensure ductile fracture. The influence of chemistry modifications on the ductile-to-brittle transition behavior were also examined through additions of N, Cr, and C to binary Fe-31 Mn. Nitrogen additions increase the 77K yield strength at a rate of 2200 MPa per weight percent N, and increase the austenite stability, but also increase the susceptibility of ternary alloys to intergranular fracture. Quaternary Cr additions are effective in increasing the N solubility, and lower the transition temperature. Carbon additions result in complete suppression of intergranular fracture at 77K. Qualitatively significant changes in the deformation heterogeneity with chemistry modifications are not observed. The temper-toughening of Fe-Mn-Cr-N alloys is associated with the grain boundary segregation of boron and the redistribution of N. Both boron and carbon are expected to inhibit intergranular fracture through increases in grain boundary cohesion.

  14. Failure mechanism for flexible dye-sensitized solar cells under repeated outward bending: Cracking and spalling off of nano-porous titanium dioxide film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xue-Long; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Chang-Jiu; Liu, Mei; Fan, Sheng-Qiang

    2015-04-01

    Flexibility, as well as efficiency, of flexible dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) is of significant importance to their applications. In this study, quantitative bending test, carried out with a lab-developed solar cell bending tester, is used to simulate the flexible service condition. The photovoltaic performance, morphology of the photoanode and electrochemical property evolution during bending service are examined to aim at understanding the bending failure mechanism for the flexible DSCs under repeated outward bending (the TiO2 film in the photoanode is in tension). Results show that when the bending radius is 12 mm, the efficiency of the plastic DSCs keeps unchanged with increasing the bending cycle. When the bending radius is smaller than 12 mm, the efficiency of the flexible DSCs decreases with increasing the bending cycle. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results show that the increase of the electron transport resistance (Rt) in TiO2 network is responsible for the degradation of efficiency. Furthermore, the photoanodes after repeated bending is cracking and spalling off from the ITO surface. Finally, a failure model for the flexible DSCs under repeated outward bending is proposed.

  15. CRACK GROWTH RESPONSE OF ALLOY 152 AND 52 WELD METALS IN SIMULATED PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2009-12-01

    The crack growth response of alloy 152 and 52 weld metals has been measured in simulated PWR primary water at both high (325-350 C) and low (50 C) temperatures. Tests were performed on samples machined from alloy 152 or 52 mockup welds. Propagation rates under cycle + hold and constant K conditions at high temperatures show stable, but extremely low SCC growth rates. The most significant intergranular cracking occurred during cycling at 50 C, particularly for the alloy 152 weld metal at high stress intensity.

  16. Analysis of small crack behavior for airframe applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclung, R. C.; Chan, K. S.; Hudak, S. J., Jr.; Davidson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The small fatigue crack problem is critically reviewed from the perspective of airframe applications. Different types of small cracks-microstructural, mechanical, and chemical-are carefully defined and relevant mechanisms identified. Appropriate analysis techniques, including both rigorous scientific and practical engineering treatments, are briefly described. Important materials data issues are addressed, including increased scatter in small crack data and recommended small crack test methods. Key problems requiring further study are highlighted.

  17. Fatigue-crack-propagation thresholds in a nickel-base superalloy at high frequencies and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyam, A.; Milligan, W. W.; Padula, S. A.; Marras, S. I.

    2002-07-01

    Fatigue-crack-propagation (FCP) tests were conducted on the powder metallurgy nickel-base superalloy KM4 at temperatures of 20 °C, 550 °C, and 650 °C. Two different heat treatments were investigated, one yielding a relatively coarse grain size of 55 µm and another yielding a fine grain size of 6 µm. Tests were conducted at 100 Hz and 1000 Hz and at load ratios between 0.3 and 0.7. In the Paris regime, trends observed at high frequencies for KM4 were identical to those observed by earlier investigators at lower frequencies: coarse grains, low load ratios, low temperatures, and higher frequencies generally resulted in lower crack-propagation rates. However, in contrast to the Paris-regime behavior, thresholds were a complicated function of microstructure, load ratio, temperature, and frequency, and the only variable that resulted in a consistent trend in threshold was the load ratio. For example, thresholds increased from 100 to 1000 Hz for the fine-grained material at 550 °C, but decreased with the same frequency variation at 650 °C. One reason for this complexity was a change to intergranular fracture in the fine-grained microstructure at 650 °C, which was beneficial for high-frequency thresholds. Higher load ratios and lower frequencies promoted intergranular fracture. However, not all of the complexity could be explained by changing fracture mechanisms. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) stereofractography was utilized to determine quantitative measures of fracture-surface roughness. The most useful quantitative measure was found to be the standard deviation of the fracture-surface height, which is a physically meaningful length parameter and which corresponded to about half the grain size during room-temperature fatigue at near-threshold Δ K levels. The roughness of the fracture surface was found to increase as the load ratio was increased for both microstructures. For the coarse-grained microstructure, there was a direct correlation between fracture

  18. On the development of a new pre-weld thermal treatment procedure for preventing heat-affected zone (HAZ) liquation cracking in nickel-base IN 738 superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ola, O. T.; Ojo, O. A.; Chaturvedi, M. C.

    2014-10-01

    Hot cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of precipitation strengthened nickel-base superalloys, such as IN 738, during fusion welding remains a major factor limiting reparability of nickel-base gas turbine components. The problem of HAZ intergranular cracking can be addressed by modifying the microstructure of the pre-weld material through thermal treatment, which requires significant understanding of the critical factors controlling cracking behaviour. The decomposition of Mo-Cr-W-and Cr-rich borides in the alloy, among other factors, has been observed to contribute significantly to non-equilibrium intergranular liquation and, hence, intergranular liquation cracking during welding. Gleeble physical simulation of HAZ microstructure has also shown that non-equilibrium liquation is more severe in the vicinity of decomposed borides in the alloy and can occur at temperatures as low as 1,150 °C. Although currently existing pre-weld heat treatments for IN 738 superalloy minimize the contributions of dissolution of second phases, including borides, to HAZ intergranular liquation, these heat treatments are not industrially feasible due to process-related difficulties. Therefore, a new industrially feasible and effective pre-weld thermal treatment process, designated as FUMT, was developed during the present research by controlling both the formation of borides and the segregation of boron at the grain boundaries in the pre-weld heat-treated material. This thermal treatment was observed to very significantly reduce intergranular HAZ cracking in welded IN 738 superalloy. The details of the development process and developed procedure are presented in this paper.

  19. Combustion in cracks of PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect

    Berghout, H. L.; Son, S. F.; Bolme, C. A.; Hill, L. G.; Asay, B. W.; Dickson, P. M.; Henson, B. F.; Smilowitz, L. B.

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments involving the combustion of PBX 9501 explosive under confined conditions reveal the importance of crack and flaws in reaction violence. Experiments on room temperature confined disks of pristine and thermally damaged PBX 9501 reveal that crack ignition depends on hot gases entering existing or pressure induced cracks rather than on energy release at the crack tip. PBX 9501 slot combustion experiments show that the reaction propagation rate in the slot does not depend on the external pressure. We have observed 1500 d s in long slots of highly-confined PBX 9501. We present experiments that examine the combustion of mechanically and thermally damaged samples of PBX 9501.

  20. Semi-empirical crack tip analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Ben Ouezdon, M.

    1988-01-01

    Experimentally observed crack opening displacements are employed as the solution of the multiple crack interaction problem. Then the near and far fields are reconstructed analytically by means of the double layer potential technqiue. Evaluation of the effective stress intensity factor resulting from the interaction of the main crack and its surrounding crazes in addition to the remotely applied load is presented as an illustrative example. It is shown that crazing (as well as microcracking) may constitute an alternative mechanism to Dugdale-Berenblatt models responsible for the cancellation of the singularity at the crack tip.

  1. Cracks in Sheets Draped on Curved Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Noah P.; Koning, Vinzenz; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Irvine, William T. M.

    Conforming materials to surfaces with Gaussian curvature has proven a versatile tool to guide the behavior of mechanical defects such as folds, blisters, scars, and pleats. In this talk, we show how curvature can likewise be used to control material failure. In our experiments, thin elastic sheets are confined on curved geometries that stimulate or suppress the growth of cracks, and steer or arrest their propagation. By redistributing stresses in a sheet, curvature provides a geometric tool for protecting certain regions and guiding crack patterns. A simple model captures crack behavior at the onset of propagation, while a 2D phase-field model successfully captures the crack's full phenomenology.

  2. Transient thermoelastic fracture of interface cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Kokini, K.; Reynolds, R.R. )

    1992-09-01

    The transient behavior of an interface crack at the center and edge of two finite dissimilar materials free to bend and subjected to a transient thermal load was studied. It was first assumed that the crack was insulated. The effect of allowing heat to conduct through the crack upon closing was also investigated. The effects of the mechanical and thermal material property ratios as well as the thickness ratio on the crack deformations and the transient strain energy release rate were calculated. 13 refs.

  3. Effect of heat treatment on caustic stress corrosion cracking behavior of alloy 600

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, J.K.

    1999-12-01

    Constant elongation rate tests (CERT) were conducted to evaluate the effect of heat treatment on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility of alloy 600 (UNS NO6600) in 140 C and 50% caustic solution at {minus}900 mV vs saturated calomel electrode (SCE). Results showed: (1) Heat treatment at low temperature for a long time (600 C for 260 h) led to a material that was not susceptible to caustic intergranular (IG) cracking. Increase in heat treatment temperature enhanced IG cracking susceptibility. Caustic IGSCC susceptibility was at maximum near the carbon solubility limit. However, when the heat treatment temperature was higher than the carbon solubility limit, a significant decrease in crack growth rate was observed. (2) Grain boundaries acted as a preferential crack path when grain boundary carbon segregation was likely. Thermodynamic considerations suggested that severe caustic IGSCC susceptibility near the carbon solubility limit could be explained in terms of carbon segregation at the grain boundaries. (3) IGSCC in caustic solution did not seem to be caused by chromium depletion. (4) Although formation of semi-continuous IG carbides and IGSCC resistance seemed to exhibit a similar chronological response with heat treatment, it was unlikely that grain boundary IG carbides played a role in caustic IGSCC susceptibility.

  4. On the crack growth resistance and strength of the B2 iron aluminides Fe-40Al, Fe-45Al, and Fe-10Ni-40Al (at. %)

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1994-09-01

    The crack growth resistance and yield strength of the B2 iron aluminides Fe-40Al, Fe-45Al, are Fe-10Ni-40Al (at. %) have been investigated at room temperature laboratory air. After fast cooling from 1273 K, Fe-45Al and Fe-10Ni-40Al are much stronger than Fe-40Al, and exhibit considerably lower crack growth resistance. The crack growth resistance decreases with decreasing crack propagation velocity. Low crack propagation velocities favor intergranular fracture, whereas high velocities can lead to significant contributions from transgranular fracture. Boron additions to Fe-40Al and Fe-10Ni-40Al improve the crack growth resistance, reduce its dependence on the crack propagation velocity, and cause the path to be predominantly transgranular. In a plot of fracture toughness versus yield strength, the properties of the iron aluminides are similar to those of typical aluminum alloys.

  5. Fatigue and Creep Crack Propagation behaviour of Alloy 617 in the Annealed and Aged Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Julian K. Benz; Richard N. Wright

    2013-10-01

    The crack propagation behaviour of Alloy 617 was studied under various conditions. Elevated temperature fatigue and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments were conducted at 650 and 800 degrees C under constant stress intensity (triangle K) conditions and triangular or trapezoidal waveforms at various frequencies on as-received, aged, and carburized material. Environmental conditions included both laboratory air and characteristic VHTR impure helium. As-received Alloy 617 displayed an increase in the crack growth rate (da/dN) as the frequency was decreased in air which indicated a time-dependent contribution component in fatigue crack propagation. Material aged at 650°C did not display any influence on the fatigue crack growth rates nor the increasing trend of crack growth rate with decreasing frequency even though significant microstructural evolution, including y’ (Ni3Al) after short times, occurred during aging. In contrast, carburized Alloy 617 showed an increase in crack growth rates at all frequencies tested compared to the material in the standard annealed condition. Crack growth studies under quasi-constant K (i.e. creep) conditions were also completed at 650 degrees C and a stress intensity of K = 40 MPa9 (square root)m. The results indicate that crack growth is primarily intergranular and increased creep crack growth rates exist in the impure helium environment when compared to the results in laboratory air. Furthermore, the propagation rates (da/dt) continually increased for the duration of the creep crack growth either due to material aging or evolution of a crack tip creep zone. Finally, fatigue crack propagation tests at 800 degrees C on annealed Alloy 617 indicated that crack propagation rates were higher in air than impure helium at the largest frequencies and lowest stress intensities. The rates in helium, however, eventually surpass the rates in air as the frequency is reduced and the stress intensity is decreased which was not observed at 650

  6. Magnetic patterning: local manipulation of the intergranular exchange coupling via grain boundary engineering

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuo-Feng; Liao, Jung-Wei; Hsieh, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Liang-Wei; Huang, Yen-Chun; Wen, Wei-Chih; Chang, Mu-Tung; Lo, Shen-Chuan; Yuan, Jun; Lin, Hsiu-Hau; Lai, Chih-Huang

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic patterning, with designed spatial profile of the desired magnetic properties, has been a rising challenge for developing magnetic devices at nanoscale. Most existing methods rely on locally modifying magnetic anisotropy energy or saturation magnetization, and thus post stringent constraints on the adaptability in diverse applications. We propose an alternative route for magnetic patterning: by manipulating the local intergranular exchange coupling to tune lateral magnetic properties. As demonstration, the grain boundary structure of Co/Pt multilayers is engineered by thermal treatment, where the stress state of the multilayers and thus the intergranular exchange coupling can be modified. With Ag passivation layers on top of the Co/Pt multilayers, we can hinder the stress relaxation and grain boundary modification. Combining the pre-patterned Ag passivation layer with thermal treatment, we can design spatial variations of the magnetic properties by tuning the intergranular exchange coupling, which diversifies the magnetic patterning process and extends its feasibility for varieties of new devices. PMID:26156786

  7. Grain-boundary engineering markedly reduces susceptibility to intergranular hydrogen embrittlement in metallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtle, Sabine; Kumar, Mukul; Somerday, Brian P.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2009-05-10

    The feasibility of using 'grain-boundary engineering' techniques to reduce the susceptibility of a metallic material to intergranular embrittlement in the presence of hydrogen is examined. Using thermomechanical processing, the fraction of 'special' grain boundaries was increased from 46% to 75% (by length) in commercially pure nickel samples. In the presence of hydrogen concentrations between 1200 and 3400 appm, the high special fraction microstructure showed almost double the tensile ductility; also, the proportion of intergranular fracture was significantly lower and the J{sub c} fracture toughness values were some 20-30% higher in comparison with the low special fraction microstructure. We attribute the reduction in the severity of hydrogen-induced intergranular embrittlement to the higher fraction of special grain boundaries, where the degree of hydrogen segregation at these boundaries is reduced.

  8. Online Bridge Crack Monitoring with Smart Film

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuliang; Li, Xingxing; Zhou, Zhixiang; Zhang, Xu; Yang, Guang; Qiu, Minfeng

    2013-01-01

    Smart film crack monitoring method, which can be used for detecting initiation, length, width, shape, location, and propagation of cracks on real bridges, is proposed. Firstly, the fabrication of the smart film is developed. Then the feasibility of the method is analyzed and verified by the mechanical sensing character of the smart film under the two conditions of normal strain and crack initiation. Meanwhile, the coupling interference between parallel enameled wires of the smart film is discussed, and then low-frequency detecting signal and the custom communication protocol are used to decrease interference. On this basis, crack monitoring system with smart film is designed, where the collected crack data is sent to the remote monitoring center and the cracks are simulated and recurred. Finally, the monitoring system is applied to six bridges, and the effects are discussed. PMID:24489496

  9. Online bridge crack monitoring with smart film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Benniu; Wang, Shuliang; Li, Xingxing; Zhou, Zhixiang; Zhang, Xu; Yang, Guang; Qiu, Minfeng

    2013-01-01

    Smart film crack monitoring method, which can be used for detecting initiation, length, width, shape, location, and propagation of cracks on real bridges, is proposed. Firstly, the fabrication of the smart film is developed. Then the feasibility of the method is analyzed and verified by the mechanical sensing character of the smart film under the two conditions of normal strain and crack initiation. Meanwhile, the coupling interference between parallel enameled wires of the smart film is discussed, and then low-frequency detecting signal and the custom communication protocol are used to decrease interference. On this basis, crack monitoring system with smart film is designed, where the collected crack data is sent to the remote monitoring center and the cracks are simulated and recurred. Finally, the monitoring system is applied to six bridges, and the effects are discussed. PMID:24489496

  10. Measurement and analysis of critical crack tip processes during fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, D. L.; Hudak, S. J.; Dexter, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanics of fatigue crack growth under constant-amplitudes and variable-amplitude loading were examined. Critical loading histories involving relatively simple overload and overload/underload cycles were studied to provide a basic understanding of the underlying physical processes controlling crack growth. The material used for this study was 7091-T7E69, a powder metallurgy aluminum alloy. Local crack-tip parameters were measured at various times before, during, and after the overloads, these include crack-tip opening loads and displacements, and crack-tip strain fields. The latter were useed, in combination with the materials cyclic and monotonic stress-strain properties, to compute crack-tip residual stresses. The experimental results are also compared with analytical predictions obtained using the FAST-2 computer code. The sensitivity of the analytical model to constant-amplitude fatigue crack growth rate properties and to through-thickness constrain are studied.

  11. Crack shape developments and leak rates for circumferential complex-cracked pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Brickstad, B.; Bergman, M.

    1997-04-01

    A computerized procedure has been developed that predicts the growth of an initial circumferential surface crack through a pipe and further on to failure. The crack growth mechanism can either be fatigue or stress corrosion. Consideration is taken to complex crack shapes and for the through-wall cracks, crack opening areas and leak rates are also calculated. The procedure is based on a large number of three-dimensional finite element calculations of cracked pipes. The results from these calculations are stored in a database from which the PC-program, denoted LBBPIPE, reads all necessary information. In this paper, a sensitivity analysis is presented for cracked pipes subjected to both stress corrosion and vibration fatigue.

  12. Mechanisms of the micro-crack generation in an ultra-thin AlN/GaN superlattice structure grown on Si(110) substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X. Q. Takahashi, T.; Ide, T.; Shimizu, M.

    2015-09-28

    We investigate the generation mechanisms of micro-cracks (MCs) in an ultra-thin AlN/GaN superlattice (SL) structure grown on Si(110) substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The SL is intended to be used as an interlayer (IL) for relaxing tensile stress and obtaining high-quality crack-free GaN grown on Si substrates. It is found that the MCs can be generated by two different mechanisms, where large mismatches of the lattice constant (LC) and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) play key roles in the issue. Different MC configurations (low-density and high-density MCs) are observed, which are considered to be formed during the different growth stages (SL growth and cooling down processes) due to the LC and the CTE effects. In-situ and ex-situ experimental results support the mechanism interpretations of the MCs generation. The mechanism understanding makes it possible to optimize the SL IL structure for growing high-quality crack-free GaN films on Si substrates for optical and electronic device applications.

  13. Mechanisms of the micro-crack generation in an ultra-thin AlN/GaN superlattice structure grown on Si(110) substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X. Q.; Takahashi, T.; Ide, T.; Shimizu, M.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the generation mechanisms of micro-cracks (MCs) in an ultra-thin AlN/GaN superlattice (SL) structure grown on Si(110) substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The SL is intended to be used as an interlayer (IL) for relaxing tensile stress and obtaining high-quality crack-free GaN grown on Si substrates. It is found that the MCs can be generated by two different mechanisms, where large mismatches of the lattice constant (LC) and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) play key roles in the issue. Different MC configurations (low-density and high-density MCs) are observed, which are considered to be formed during the different growth stages (SL growth and cooling down processes) due to the LC and the CTE effects. In-situ and ex-situ experimental results support the mechanism interpretations of the MCs generation. The mechanism understanding makes it possible to optimize the SL IL structure for growing high-quality crack-free GaN films on Si substrates for optical and electronic device applications.

  14. CRACK GROWTH RESPONSE OF ALLOY 690 IN SIMULATED PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2009-12-01

    The stress corrosion crack growth response of three extruded alloy 690 CRDM tube heats was investigated in several thermomechanical conditions. Extremely low propagation rates (< 1 x 10{sup -9} mm/s) were observed under constant stress intensity factor (K) loading at 325-350 C in the as-received, thermally treated (TT) materials despite using a variety of transitioning techniques. Post-test observation of the crack-growth surfaces revealed only isolated intergranular (IG) cracking. One-dimensional cold rolling to 17% reduction and testing in the S-L orientation did not promote enhanced stress corrosion rates. However, somewhat higher propagation rates were observed in a 30% cold-rolled alloy 690TT specimen tested in the T-L orientation. Cracking of the cold-rolled material was promoted on grain boundaries oriented parallel to the rolling plane with the % IG increasing with the amount of cold rolling.

  15. Grain boundary oxidation and oxidation accelerated fatigue crack nucleation and propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.; Oshida, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue life at elevated temperatures is often shortened by oxidation. Grain boundary oxidation penetrates deeper than the surface oxidation. Therefore, grain boundary oxide penetration could be the primary cause of accelerated fatigue crack nucleation and propagation, and the shortened fatigue life at elevated temperatures. Grain boundary oxidation kinetics was studied and its statistical scatter was analyzed by the Weibull's distribution function. The effects of grain boundary oxidation on shortened fatigue life was analyzed and discussed. A model of intermittent microruptures of the grain boundary oxide was proposed for the fatigue crack growth in the low frequency region. The proposed model is consistent with the observations that fatigue crack growth rate in the low frequency region with hold time at K sub max is inversely proportional to cyclic frequency and that crack growth is intergranular.

  16. Influence of environment on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of 12% Cr steel.

    PubMed

    Schönbauer, Bernd M; Stanzl-Tschegg, Stefanie E

    2013-12-01

    In the present work, the influence of different environments on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of 12% Cr steam turbine blade steel is investigated. Fatigue crack growth rates (FCGRs) in the near threshold regime are measured with ultrasonic fatigue testing technique. Fatigue tests are performed in vacuum, air and different aqueous environments with defined chloride and oxygen content. Furthermore, the influence of different stress ratios is investigated. It is found that crack propagation is not necessarily enhanced with increasing corrosiveness. In the aqueous environments, the FCGRs below 10⁻⁸ m/cycle are lower than in air. The threshold stress intensity factor ranges are higher or equal. Observation of the fracture surfaces shows oxide formation and partly intergranular fracture for specimens tested in aqueous environments. Crack closure effects seem to be responsible for this unexpected behaviour. PMID:23490013

  17. Review of environmental effects on fatigue crack growth of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.

    1994-05-01

    Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking of piping, pressure vessel cladding, and core components in light water reactors are potential concerns to the nuclear industry and regulatory agencies. The degradation processes include intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel (SS) piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and propagation of fatigue or stress corrosion cracks (which initiate in sensitized SS cladding) into low-alloy ferritic steels in BWR pressure vessels. Crack growth data for wrought and cast austenitic SSs in simulated BWR water, developed at Argonne National Laboratory under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsorship over the past 10 years, have been compiled into a data base along with similar data obtained from the open literature. The data were analyzed to develop corrosion-fatigue curves for austenitic SSs in aqueous environments corresponding to normal BWR water chemistries, for BWRs that add hydrogen to the feedwater, and for pressurized water reactor primary-system-coolant chemistry.

  18. Alternating method applied to edge and surface crack problems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartranft, R. J.; Sih, G. C.

    1973-01-01

    The alternating method, which intimately combines analytical results with numerical calculations, as applied to edge crack problems in two dimensions and surface crack problems in three dimensions, is treated. The case of a crack perpendicular to the edge of a semiinfinite material is considered. One of the crack geometries that has received continual interest in fracture mechanics is that of a semielliptical crack whose major axis lies on a stress free surface. In order to demonstrate the sensitivity of the solution to the influence of the free surface the semicircular crack problem is again treated by the alternating method.

  19. Crack problems involving nonhomogeneous interfacial regions in bonded materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to two classes of fracture-related solid mechanics problems in which the model leads to some physically anomalous results. The first is the interface crack problem associated with the debonding process in which the corresponding elasticity solution predicts severe oscillations of stresses and the crack surface displacements vary near the crack tip. The second deals with crack intersecting the interface. The nature of the solutions around the crack tips arising from these problems is reviewed. The rationale for introducing a new interfacial zone model is discussed, its analytical consequences within the context of the two crack-problem classes are described, and some examples are presented.

  20. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics Evaluation of Selected Passive Components – Technical Letter Report

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, Fredric A.; Doctor, Steven R.; Gosselin, Stephen R.; Rudland, David L.; Xu, H.; Wilkowski, Gery M.; Lydell, Bengt O.

    2007-05-31

    This report addresses the potential application of probabilistic fracture mechanics computer codes to support the Proactive Materials Degradation Assessment (PMDA) program as a method to predict component failure probabilities. The present report describes probabilistic fracture mechanics calculations that were performed for selected components using the PRO-LOCA and PRAISE computer codes. The calculations address the failure mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking, intergranular stress corrosion cracking, and fatigue for components and operating conditions that are known to make particular components susceptible to cracking. It was demonstrated that the two codes can predict essentially the same failure probabilities if both codes start with the same fracture mechanics model and the same inputs to the model. Comparisons with field experience showed that both codes predict relatively high failure probabilities for components under operating conditions that have resulted in field failures. It was found that modeling assumptions and inputs tended to give higher calculated failure probabilities than those derived from data on field failures. Sensitivity calculations were performed to show that uncertainties in the probabilistic calculations were sufficiently large to explain the differences between predicted failure probabilities and field experience.

  1. Observation of Intralaminar Cracking in the Edge Crack Torsion Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Davidson, Barry D.

    2013-01-01

    The edge crack torsion (ECT) test is evaluated to determine its suitability for measuring fracture toughness associated with mode III delamination growth onset. A series of ECT specimens with preimplanted inserts with different lengths is tested and examined using nondestructive and destructive techniques. Ultrasonic inspection of all tested specimens reveals that delamination growth occurs at one interface ply beneath the intended midplane interface. Sectioning and optical microscopy suggest that the observed delamination growth results from coalescence of angled intralaminar matrix cracks that form and extend across the midplane plies. The relative orientation of these cracks is approximately 45 deg with respect to the midplane, suggesting their formation is caused by resolved principal tensile stresses arising due to the global mode-III shear loading. Examination of ECT specimens tested to loads below the level corresponding to delamination growth onset reveals that initiation of intralaminar cracking approximately coincides with the onset of nonlinearity in the specimen's force-displacement response. The existence of intralaminar cracking prior to delamination growth onset and the resulting delamination extension at an unintended interface render the ECT test, in its current form, unsuitable for characterization of mode III delamination growth onset. The broader implications of the mechanisms observed in this study are also discussed with respect to the current understanding of shear-driven delamination in tape-laminate composites.

  2. The effect of local texture on crack propagation in Fe-Al ordered alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Fionova, L.; Juarez-Islas, J.A.; Perez, R.; Albarran, J.L.; Flores, O.; Martinez, L. . Lab. de Cuernavaca); Titovets, Yu. . Dept. of Metal Physics)

    1994-12-15

    The ordered Fe-Al alloys have received considerable attention during the last few years, due to their possible high temperature structural use. B2 iron aluminide is attractive also from a density consideration and might be a promising matrix material for fiber reinforce composite systems. However, poor ductility prevents potential applications of this material. Iron aluminides exhibit preferentially intergranular fracture at room temperature which indicates the importance of grain boundary (GB) properties for mechanical behavior of these polycrystals. It is well known that the type of GB strongly affects its cohesion energy, which leads to preferential crack propagation along high energy GBs, whereas, the low energy GBs are resistant to the fracture. The effect of GB parameters on fracture behavior was an impetus for the study of GB characteristics in the ordered alloys. In these works, an enhanced plasticity is associated with the higher portion of small angle and low-[Sigma] GBs in polycrystal. Obviously, these data evidence the possibility of GB design, which can be used in addition to the alloying to improve the plasticity of these materials. This paper aims to study the GB characteristics (misorientation parameters and spatial distribution of different type GBs) in Fe-Al alloy to elucidate the microstructural aspects of fracture behavior of B2 FeAl.

  3. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  4. Why do drying films crack?

    PubMed

    Lee, Wai Peng; Routh, Alexander F

    2004-11-01

    Understanding the mechanism by which films fail during drying is the first step in controlling this natural process. Previous studies have examined the spacing between cracks with predictions made by assuming a balance between elastic energy released with a surface energy consumed. We introduce a new scaling for the spacing between cracks in drying dispersions. The scaling relates to the distance that solvent can flow, to relieve capillary stresses, as a film fails. The scaling collapses data for a range of evaporation rates, film thicknesses, particle sizes, and materials. This work identifies capillary pressures, induced by packed particle fronts travelling horizontally across films, as responsible for the failure in dried films. PMID:15518466

  5. Optical methods of stress analysis applied to cracked components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    After briefly describing the principles of frozen stress photoelastic and moire interferometric analyses, and the corresponding algorithms for converting optical data from each method into stress intensity factors (SIF), the methods are applied to the determination of crack shapes, SIF determination, crack closure displacement fields, and pre-crack damage mechanisms in typical aircraft component configurations.

  6. In-vitro characterization of stress corrosion cracking of aluminium-free magnesium alloys for temporary bio-implant applications.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Lokesh; Singh Raman, R K; Hofstetter, Joelle; Uggowitzer, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    The complex interaction between physiological stresses and corrosive human body fluid may cause premature failure of metallic biomaterials due to the phenomenon of stress corrosion cracking. In this study, the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of biodegradable and aluminium-free magnesium alloys ZX50, WZ21 and WE43 was investigated by slow strain rate tensile testing in a simulated human body fluid. Slow strain rate tensile testing results indicated that each alloy was susceptible to stress corrosion cracking, and this was confirmed by fractographic features of transgranular and/or intergranular cracking. However, the variation in alloy susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking is explained on the basis of their electrochemical and microstructural characteristics. PMID:25063163

  7. Dynamics of cracking in drying colloidal sheets.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Rajarshi; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S

    2016-04-01

    Colloidal dispersions are known to display a fascinating network of cracks on drying. We probe the fracture mechanics of free-standing films of aqueous polymer-particle dispersions. Thin films of the dispersion are cast between a pair of plain steel wires and allowed to dry under ambient conditions. The strain induced on the particle network during drying is relieved by cracking. The stress which causes the films to crack has been calculated by measuring the deflection of the wires. The critical cracking stress varied inversely to the two-thirds' power of the film thickness. We also measure the velocity of the tip of a moving crack. The motion of a crack has been modeled as a competition between the release of the elastic energy stored in the particle network, the increase in surface energy as a result of the growth of a crack, the rate of viscous dissipation of the interstitial fluid and the kinetic energy associated with a moving crack. There is fair agreement between the measured crack velocities and predictions. PMID:26924546

  8. Atomistically derived cohesive zone model of intergranular fracture in polycrystalline graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guin, Laurent; Raphanel, Jean L.; Kysar, Jeffrey W.

    2016-06-01

    Pristine single crystal graphene is the strongest known two-dimensional material, and its nonlinear anisotropic mechanical properties are well understood from the atomic length scale up to a continuum description. However, experiments indicate that grain boundaries in the polycrystalline form reduce the mechanical behavior of polycrystalline graphene. Herein, we perform atomistic-scale molecular dynamics simulations of the deformation and fracture of graphene grain boundaries and express the results as continuum cohesive zone models (CZMs) that embed notions of the grain boundary ultimate strength and fracture toughness. To facilitate energy balance, we employ a new methodology that simulates a quasi-static controlled crack propagation which renders the kinetic energy contribution to the total energy negligible. We verify good agreement between Griffith's critical energy release rate and the work of separation of the CZM, and we note that the energy of crack edges and fracture toughness differs by about 35%, which is attributed to the phenomenon of bond trapping. This justifies the implementation of the CZM within the context of the finite element method (FEM). To enhance computational efficiency in the FEM implementation, we discuss the use of scaled traction-separation laws (TSLs) for larger element sizes. As a final result, we have established that the failure characteristics of pristine graphene and high tilt angle bicrystals differ by less than 10%. This result suggests that one could use a unique or a few typical TSLs as a good approximation for the CZMs associated with the mechanical simulations of the polycrystalline graphene.

  9. Dislocation shielding of a cohesive crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandakkar, Tanmay K.; Chng, Audrey C.; Curtin, W. A.; Gao, Huajian

    2010-04-01

    Dislocation interaction with a cohesive crack is of increasing importance to computational modelling of crack nucleation/growth and related toughening mechanisms in confined structures and under cyclic fatigue conditions. Here, dislocation shielding of a Dugdale cohesive crack described by a rectangular traction-separation law is studied. The shielding is completely characterized by three non-dimensional parameters representing the effective fracture toughness, the cohesive strength, and the distance between the dislocations and the crack tip. A closed form analytical solution shows that, while the classical singular crack model predicts that a dislocation can shield or anti-shield a crack depending on the sign of its Burgers vector, at low cohesive strengths a dislocation always shields the cohesive crack irrespective of the Burgers vector. A numerical study shows the transition in shielding from the classical solution of Lin and Thomson (1986) in the high strength limit to the solution in the low strength limit. An asymptotic analysis yields an approximate analytical model for the shielding over the full range of cohesive strengths. A discrete dislocation (DD) simulation of a large (>10 3) number of edge dislocations interacting with a cohesive crack described by a trapezoidal traction-separation law confirms the transition in shielding, showing that the cohesive crack does behave like a singular crack at very high cohesive strengths (˜7 GPa), but that significant deviations in shielding between singular and cohesive crack predictions arise at cohesive strengths around 1GPa, consistent with the analytic models. Both analytical and numerical studies indicate that an appropriate crack tip model is essential for accurately quantifying dislocation shielding for cohesive strengths in the GPa range.

  10. Matrix cracking in ceramic-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Danchaivijit, S.; Shetty, D.K. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    Matrix cracking in ceramic-matrix composites with unbonded frictional interface has been studied using fracture mechanics theory. The critical stress for extension of a fiber-bridged crack has been analyzed using the stress-intensity approach. The analysis uses a new shear-lag formulation of the crack-closure traction applied by the bridging fibers based on the assumption of a constant sliding friction stress over the sliding length of the fiber-matrix interface. The new formulation satisfies two required limiting conditions: (a) when the stress in the bridging fiber approaches the far-field applied stress, the crack-opening displacement approaches a steady-state upper limit that is in agreement with the previous formulations; and (b) in the limit of zero crack opening, the stress in the bridging fiber approaches the far-field fiber stress. This lower limit of the bridging stress is distinctly different from the previous formulations. For all other conditions, the closure traction is a function of the far-field applied stress in addition to the local crack-opening displacement, the interfacial sliding friction stress, and the material properties. Numerical calculations using the stress-intensity approach indicate that the critical stress for crack extension decreases with increasing crack length and approaches a constant steady-state value for large cracks. The steady-state matrix-cracking stress agrees with a steady-state energy balance analysis applied to the continuum model, but it is slightly less than the matrix-cracking stress predicted by such theories of steady-state cracking as that of Aveston, Cooper, and Kelly. The origin of this difference and a method for reconciliation of the two theoretical approaches are discussed.

  11. Low-energy EDX--a novel approach to study stress corrosion cracking in SUS304 stainless steel via scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Meisnar, Martina; Lozano-Perez, Sergio; Moody, Michael; Holland, James

    2014-11-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in type SUS304 stainless steels, tested under pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water conditions, has been characterized with unprecedented spatial resolution using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and novel low-energy (∼3 kV) energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). An advancement of the large area silicon drift detector (SDD) has enhanced its sensitivity for X-rays in the low-energy part of the atomic spectrum. Therefore, it was possible to operate the SEM at lower accelerating voltages in order to reduce the interaction volume of the beam with the material and achieve higher spatial resolution and better signal-to-noise ratio. In addition to studying the oxide chemistry at the surface of intergranular stress corrosion cracks, the technique has proven capable of resolving Ni enrichment ahead of some crack tips. Active cracks could be distinguished from inactive ones due to the presence of oxides in the open crack and Ni-rich regions ahead of the crack tip. Furthermore, it has been established that SCC features can be better resolved with low-energy (3 kV) than high-energy (12 kV) EDX. The low effort in sample preparation, execution and data analysis makes SEM the ideal tool for initial characterization and selection of the most important SCC features such as dominant cracks and interesting crack tips, later to be studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). PMID:25080272

  12. How fatigue cracks grow, interact with microstructure, and lose similitude

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, D.L.

    1997-12-01

    This paper reviews the processes by which fatigue cracks grow and interact with applied load and microstructure. Fatigue crack growth processes are remarkably similar irrespective of microstructure, crack size, or nature of the loading. Large strains at fatigue crack tips applied over repeated cycles severely alter, or homogenize, microstructures, followed by crack advance. Microstructure affects fatigue crack growth kinetics more than growth processes. But, under marginal conditions, fatigue crack growth rates are also affected by microstructural features. Examples are small cracks growing under low stresses or large cracks growing near threshold. The prediction of safe lifetimes for machine parts, such as gas turbine components, requires that laboratory-generated fatigue crack growth rate data be transferred to field-operating conditions. This transfer depends on the maintenance of similitude: microstructurely, mechanically, and environmentally. However, for many industrially important conditions, similitude with large fatigue crack growth is lost, partially because of changes in fatigue crack closure. The effect of closure on similitude is discussed. New data are presented to illustrate the loss of similitude between applied loading and crack tip strain response. The resulting strain rates of material within the process zone are unexpected. Environmentally influenced fatigue crack growth rates are likely to be influenced by these strain rates.

  13. Double coating protection of Nd-Fe-B magnets: Intergranular phosphating treatment and copper plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jingwu; Chen, Haibo; Qiao, Liang; Lin, Min; Jiang, Liqiang; Che, Shenglei; Hu, Yangwu

    2014-12-01

    In this work, a double coating protection technique of phosphating treatment and copper plating was made to improve the corrosion resistance of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets. In other words, the intergranular region of sintered Nd-Fe-B is allowed to generate passive phosphate conversion coating through phosphating treatment, followed by the copper coating on the surface of sintered Nd-Fe-B. The morphology and corrosion resistance of the phosphated sintered Nd-Fe-B were observed using SEM and electrochemical method respectively. The phosphate conversion coating was formed more preferably on the intergranular region of sintered Nd-Fe-B than on the main crystal region; just after a short time of phosphating treatment, the intergranular region of sintered Nd-Fe-B has been covered by the phosphate conversion coating and the corrosion resistance is significantly improved. With the synergistic protection of the intergranular phosphorization and the followed copper electrodeposition, the corrosion resistance of the sintered Nd-Fe-B is significantly better than that with a single phosphate film or single plating protection.

  14. Effect of Se partial pressure on intergranular embrittlement of a Pt-Rh-W alloy

    SciTech Connect

    White, C.L.; Keiser, J.R.; Heatherly, L.; Newsome, J.F.

    1981-07-01

    This note presents additional experimental results concerning the effect of P/sub Se/ on the degree of intergranular embrittlement and the extent of Se contamination at Pt +30 wt % Rh +8 wt % W Alloy (Pt-3008) grain boundaries. 8 refs.

  15. Ultrasonic Flaw Detection of Cracks and Machined Flaws as Observed Through Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Diaz, Aaron A.

    2009-07-01

    Piping welds in the pressure boundary of light water reactors (LWRs) are subject to a volumetric examination based on Section XI of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Due to access limitations and high background radiation levels, the technique used is primarily ultrasonic rather than radiographic. Many of the austenitic welds in safety-related piping systems provide limited access to both sides of the weld, so a far-side examination is necessary. Historically, far-side inspections have performed poorly because of the coarse and elongated grains that make up the microstructures of austenitic weldments. The large grains cause the ultrasound to be scattered, attenuated, and redirected. Additionally, grain boundaries or weld geometry may reflect coherent ultrasonic echoes, making flaw detection and discrimination a more challenging endeavor. Previous studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on ultrasonic far-side examinations in austenitic piping welds involved the application of conventional transducers, use of low-frequency Synthetic Aperture Focusing Techniques (SAFT), and ultrasonic phased-array (PA) methods on specimens containing implanted thermal fatigue cracks and machined reflectors [1-2]. From these studies, PA inspection provided the best results, detecting nearly all of the flaws from the far side. These results were presented at the Fifth International Conference on NDE in Relation to Structural Integrity for Nuclear and Pressurised Components in 2006. This led to an invitation to examine field-removed specimens containing service-induced intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC) at the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI) Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Center, in Charlotte, North Carolina. Results from this activity are presented.

  16. Star-Shaped Crystallographic Cracking of Localized Nanoporous Defects.

    PubMed

    Renner, Frank Uwe; Ankah, Genesis Ngwa; Bashir, Asif; Ma, Duancheng; Biedermann, P Ulrich; Shrestha, Buddha Ratna; Nellessen, Monika; Khorashadizadeh, Anahita; Losada-Pérez, Patricia; Duarte, Maria Jazmin; Raabe, Dierk; Valtiner, Markus

    2015-09-01

    On self-assembled monolayer-covered Cu-Au substrates, localized volume shrinkage at initial dealloying sites leads to cracks within the attacked regions. It is started from well-controlled surface structures to gain fundamental insights in the driving mechanisms of localized corrosion and crack formation. Both the crack density and the crack morphology are critically dependent on surface orientation, crystallography, and inhibitor molecule species. PMID:26192203

  17. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." Stacey is recovering from her ...

  18. Detection of Cracking Levels in Brittle Rocks by Parametric Analysis of the Acoustic Emission Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradian, Zabihallah; Einstein, Herbert H.; Ballivy, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    Determination of the cracking levels during the crack propagation is one of the key challenges in the field of fracture mechanics of rocks. Acoustic emission (AE) is a technique that has been used to detect cracks as they occur across the specimen. Parametric analysis of AE signals and correlating these parameters (e.g., hits and energy) to stress-strain plots of rocks let us detect cracking levels properly. The number of AE hits is related to the number of cracks, and the AE energy is related to magnitude of the cracking event. For a full understanding of the fracture process in brittle rocks, prismatic specimens of granite containing pre-existing flaws have been tested in uniaxial compression tests, and their cracking process was monitored with both AE and high-speed video imaging. In this paper, the characteristics of the AE parameters and the evolution of cracking sequences are analyzed for every cracking level. Based on micro- and macro-crack damage, a classification of cracking levels is introduced. This classification contains eight stages (1) crack closure, (2) linear elastic deformation, (3) micro-crack initiation (white patch initiation), (4) micro-crack growth (stable crack growth), (5) micro-crack coalescence (macro-crack initiation), (6) macro-crack growth (unstable crack growth), (7) macro-crack coalescence and (8) failure.

  19. The interaction between inclusions and cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1973-01-01

    Some current fracture theories are reviewed and a group of mechanics problems of practical interest relating to the elastic interaction between cracks and inclusions are identified and results summarized.

  20. Effect of Annealing Treatment on Mechanical Properties of Nanocrystalline α-iron: an Atomistic Study

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xuhang; Zhang, Hao; Li, D. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Claims are often found in the literature that metallic materials can be nanocrystallized by severe plastic deformation (SPD). However, SPD does not generate a well-defined nanocrystalline (NC) material, which can be achieved by subsequent annealing/recovery treatment. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is employed to study the effect of annealing on structure and mechanical properties of cyclic deformed NC α-iron, which simulates SPD-processed α-iron. It is demonstrated that grain boundaries in the deformed NC α-iron evolve to a more equilibrium state during annealing, eliminating or minimizing the residual stress. The annealing treatment increases the system's strength by reducing dislocation emission sources, and improves material ductility through strengthening grain boundaries' resistance to intergranular cracks. The results indicate that the annealing treatment is an essential process for obtaining a well-defined NC structure with superior mechanical properties. PMID:25675978

  1. On fatigue crack growth under random loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W. Q.; Lin, Y. K.; Lei, Y.

    1992-09-01

    A probabilistic analysis of the fatigue crack growth, fatigue life and reliability of a structural or mechanical component is presented on the basis of fracture mechanics and theory of random processes. The material resistance to fatigue crack growth and the time-history of the stress are assumed to be random. Analytical expressions are obtained for the special case in which the random stress is a stationary narrow-band Gaussian random process, and a randomized Paris-Erdogan law is applicable. As an example, the analytical method is applied to a plate with a central crack, and the results are compared with those obtained from digital Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. Fatigue-Crack-Growth Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Shivakumar, V.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Fatigue Crack Growth (NASA/FLAGRO) computer program developed as aid in predicting growth of preexisting flaws and cracks in structural components of space systems. Is enhanced version of FLAGRO4 and incorporates state-of-the-art improvements in both fracture mechanics and computer technology. Provides fracture-mechanics analyst with computerized method of evaluating "safe-crack-growth-life" capabilities of structural components. Also used to evaluate tolerance to damage of structure of given design. Designed modular to facilitate revisions and operation on minicomputers. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  3. A thermomechanical cohesive zone model for bridged delamination cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattiangadi, Ashwin; Siegmund, Thomas

    2004-03-01

    The coupled thermomechanical numerical analysis of composite laminates with bridged delamination cracks loaded by a temperature gradient is described. The numerical approach presented is based on the framework of a cohesive zone model. A traction-separation law is presented which accounts for breakdown of the micromechanisms responsible for load transfer across bridged delamination cracks. The load transfer behavior is coupled to heat conduction across the bridged delamination crack. The coupled crack-bridging model is implemented into a finite element framework as a thermomechanical cohesive zone model (CZM). The fundamental response of the thermomechanical CZM is described. Subsequently, bridged delamination cracks of fixed lengths are studied. Values of the crack tip energy release rate and of the crack heat flux are computed to characterize the loading of the structure. Specimen geometries are considered that lead to crack opening through bending deformation and buckling delamination. The influence of critical mechanical and thermal parameters of the bridging zone on the thermomechanical delamination behavior is discussed. Bridging fibers not only contribute to crack conductance, but by keeping the crack opening small they allow heat flux across the delamination crack to be sustained longer, and thereby contribute to reduced levels of thermal stresses. The micro-mechanism based cohesive zone model allows the assessment of the effectiveness of the individual mechanisms contributing to the thermomechanical crack bridging embedded into the structural analysis.

  4. Effects of crack geometry and material behavior on scattering by cracks for QNDE applications

    SciTech Connect

    Achenbach, J.D.

    1989-09-15

    In work carried out on this project, the usual mathematical modeling of ultrasonic wave scattering by flaws is being extended to account for several typical characteristics of fatigue and stress-corrosion cracks, and the environment of such cracks. Work has been completed on scattering by macrocrack-microcrack configurations. We have also investigated reflection and transmission by a flaw plane consisting of an infinite array of randomly oriented cracks. In another investigation the propagation of mechanical disturbances in solids with periodically distributed cracks has been studied.

  5. Fatigue crack growth automated testing method

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, P.W.; VanDenAvyle, J.A.; Laing, J.

    1989-06-01

    A computer controlled servo-hydraulic mechanical test system has been configured to conduct automated fatigue crack growth testing. This provides two major benefits: it allows continuous cycling of specimens without operator attention over evenings and weekends; and complex load histories, including random loading and spectrum loading, can be applied to the specimens to simulate cyclic loading of engineering structures. The software is written in MTS Multi-User Basic to control test machine output and acquire data at predetermined intervals. Compact tension specimens are cycled according to ASTM specification E647-86. Fatigue crack growth is measured via specimen compliance during the test using a compliance/crack length calibration determined earlier by visual crack length measurements. This setup was used to measure crack growth rates in 6063 aluminum alloy for a variety of cyclic loadings, including spectrum loads. Data collected compared well with tests run manually. 13 figs.

  6. Laboratory Study of Crack Development and Crack Interaction in Concrete Blocks due to Swelling of Cracking Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frühwirt, Thomas; Plößer, Arne; Konietzky, Heinz

    2015-04-01

    The main focus of this work was to investigate temporary and spatial features of crack development in concrete blocks due to the action of a swelling agent. A commercial available cement-based mortar which shows heavily swelling behaviour when hydrating is used to provide inside pressure in boreholes in conrete blocks and hence serves as cracking agent. As no data for the swelling behaviour of the cracking agent were available the maximum axial swelling stress and axial free swelling strain were determined experimentally. In a first series of tests on concrete blocks the influence of an external mechanical, unidirectional stress on the development-time and orientation of cracks has been investigated for a range of loading levels. The stress state in the blocks prepared with a single borehole was determined by a superposition of internal stresses caused by swelling pressure and external mechanical loading. For a second series of tests prismatic blocks with two boreholes where prepared. This test setup allowed to realize different orientation of boreholes with respect to the uniaxial loading direction. Complementary tests were done using the cracking agent in both, only one or none of the boreholes. Different modes of crack interaction and influence of filled or unfilled boreholes have been observed. Features of crack development showed significant sensitivity to external loading. Starting even at very low load levels crack orientation was primarely determined by the direction of the external load. Temporal change in crack development due to the different load levels was insignificant and no consistent conclusion could be drawn. Crack interaction phenomena only were observed with two boreholes orientated primarely in direction of the external loading. Even in these cases crack orientation was mainly determined by the external stress field and only locally influenced by other cracks or the unfilled borehole. The work provides us with an extensive catalogue of

  7. Modelling microstructurally sensitive fatigue short crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Los Rios, E. R.; Xin, X. J.; Navarro, A.

    1994-10-01

    Microstructurally sensitive fatigue short crack growth can occur in many engineering components devoid of large defects. Continuum mechanics principles, including linear elastic fracture mechanics, used in damage tolerance design and life prediction methods are not applicable in these situations and therefore new concepts need to be developed to characterize this type of growth. A microstructurally sensitive model of fatigue crack growth is presented in which the effect of microstructure is dominant in the early stage of growth but plays a negligible role after the crack has gone through the transition from structure-sensitive to structure-insensitive growth. The effect of both microstructure and structure sensitive variables on the transition from short cracks to continuum mechanics and the conditions for crack instability leading to final failure are examined. The microstructural variables incorporated in the equations that describe the model are those controlling the extent and intensity of crack tip plasticity such as grain size, precipitation and dispersion hardening, strain hardening and mis-orientation between grains. It is expected that the concepts developed within the model will form the basis for the design of new crack-resistant materials.

  8. Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Chung, H.M.; Hicks, P.D.; Hins, A.G.; Park, J.Y.; Shack, W.J.

    1991-12-01

    Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in light water reactors (LWRs) are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. The degradation processes include intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of austenitic stainless steel (SS) piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and propagation of fatigue or SCC cracks (which initiate in sensitized SS cladding) into low-alloy ferritic steels in BWR pressure vessels. Similar cracking has also occurred in upper shell-to-transition cone girth welds in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator vessels. Another concern is failure of reactor-core internal components after accumulation of relatively high fluence, which has occurred in both BWRs and PWRs. Research during the past year focused on (1) fatigue and SCC of ferritic steels used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels, (2) role of chromate and sulfate in simulated BWR water in SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS, and (3) irradiation-assisted SCC in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs. Failure after accumulation of relatively high fluence has been attributed to radiation-induced segregation (RIS) of elements such as Si, P, Ni, and Cr. This document provides a summary of research progress in these areas.

  9. Measurement and analysis of critical crack tip processes associated with variable amplitude fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudak, S. J., Jr.; Davidson, D. L.; Chan, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    Crack growth retardation following overloads can result in overly conservative life predictions in structures subjected to variable amplitude fatigue loading when linear damage accumulation procedures are employed. Crack closure is believed to control the crack growth retardation, although the specific closure mechanism is debatable. Information on the relative contributions to crack closure from: (1) plasticity left in the wake of the advancing crack and (2) crack tip residual stresses is provided. The delay period and corresponding crack growth rate transients following overloads are systematically measured as a function of load ratio (R) and overload magnitude. These responses are correlated in terms of the local 'driving force' for crack growth as measured by crack tip opening loads and delta K sub eff. The latter measurements are obtained using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a cyclic loading stage; measurements are quantified using a relatively new stereoimaging technique. Combining experimental results with analytical predictions suggests that both plastic wake and residual stress mechanism are operative, the latter becoming predominate as R increases.

  10. Elapsed time for crack formation during drying.

    PubMed

    Giorgiutti-Dauphiné, F; Pauchard, L

    2014-05-01

    The drying of colloidal films usually leads to mechanical instabilities that affect the uniformity of the final deposit. The resulting patterns are the signature of the mechanical stress, and reveal the way the system consolidates. We report experimental results on the crack patterns induced by the drying of sessile drops of concentrated dispersions. Crack patterns exhibit a well-defined spatial order, and a regular temporal periodicity. In addition, the onset of cracking occurs after a well-defined elapsed time that depends on the mechanical properties of the gel, and on the drying kinetics. The estimation of the time elapsed before cracks form is related to the elastic properties of the material. This is supported by quantitative measurements using indentation testing and by a simple scaling law derived from poro-elastic theory. PMID:24853634

  11. Stability analysis of bridged cracks in brittle matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, Roberto; Muju, Sandeep

    1991-01-01

    The bridging of matrix cracks by fibers is an important toughening mechanism in fiber reinforced brittle matrix composites. This paper presents the results of a nonlinear finite element analysis of the Mode-I propagation of a bridged matrix crack in a finite size specimen. The composite is modeled as an orthotropic continuum and the bridging due to the fibers is modeled as a distribution of tractions which resist crack opening. A critical stress intensity factor criterion is employed for matrix crack propagation while a critical crack opening condition is used for fiber failure. The structural response of the specimen (load-deflection curves) as well as the stress intensity factor of the propagating crack are calculated for various constituent properties and specimen configurations for both tensile and bending loading. By controlling the length of the bridged crack results are obtained which highlight the transition from stable to unstable behavior of the propagating crack.

  12. Control and Manipulation of Nano Cracks Mimicking Optical Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Young D.; Yeo, Junyeob; Lee, Habeom; Hong, Sukjoon; Kwon, Jinhyeong; Kim, Kyunkyu; Ko, Seung Hwan

    2015-11-01

    Generally, a fracture is considered as an uncontrollable thus useless phenomenon due to its highly random nature. The aim of this study is to investigate highly ordered cracks such as oscillatory cracks and to manipulate via elaborate control of mechanical properties of the cracking medium including thickness, geometry, and elastic mismatch. Specific thin film with micro-sized notches was fabricated on a silicon based substrate in order to controllably generate self-propagating cracks in large area. Interestingly, various nano-cracks behaved similar to optical wave including refraction, total internal reflection and evanescent wave. This novel phenomena of controlled cracking was used to fabricate sophisticated nano/micro patterns in large area which cannot be obtained even with conventional nanofabrication methods. We also have showed that the cracks are directly implementable into a nano/micro-channel application since the cracks naturally have a form of channel-like shape.

  13. The noncontinuum crack tip deformation behavior of surface microcracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, W. L.

    1980-07-01

    The crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) of small surface fatigue cracks (lengths of the grain size) in Al 2219-T851 depends upon the location of a crack relative to the grain boundaries. Both CTOD and crack tip closure stress are greatest when the crack tip is a large distance from the next grain boundary in the direction of crack propagation. Contrary to behavioral trends predicted by continuum fracture mechanics, crack length has no detectable effect on the contribution of plastic deformation to CTOD. It is apparent from these observations that the region of significant plastic deformation is confined by the grain boundaries, resulting in a plastic zone size that is insensitive to crack length and to external load.

  14. Effective crack lengths by compliance measurement for ARALL-2 laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Christopher D.; Wilson, Dale A.

    1991-01-01

    As a means of determining a stress intensity factor solution, the compliance properties of an ARALL-2 laminated-sheet composite were investigated. Fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) tests were conducted on middle crack tension (MT) specimens fabricated from a layup consisting of three sheets of 2024-T3 aluminum bonded together with unidirectional aramid fibers embedded in epoxy. Excellent fatigue crack growth properties are obtained by the presence of unbroken aramid fibers in the wake of the crack tip. These unbroken fibers act as a bridging mechanism to inhibit further crack growth. To quantify the effect of maximum fatigue load on compliance, a series of FCGR tests were performed. Effective crack lengths were determined to be at least 10 mm shorter than surface measured crack lengths for a 76-mm-wide specimen. The bridging zone was estimated to be at least 5 mm. Compliance and stress intensity factor as functions of effective crack length were determined.

  15. Control and Manipulation of Nano Cracks Mimicking Optical Wave

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Young D.; Yeo, Junyeob; Lee, Habeom; Hong, Sukjoon; Kwon, Jinhyeong; Kim, Kyunkyu; Ko, Seung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Generally, a fracture is considered as an uncontrollable thus useless phenomenon due to its highly random nature. The aim of this study is to investigate highly ordered cracks such as oscillatory cracks and to manipulate via elaborate control of mechanical properties of the cracking medium including thickness, geometry, and elastic mismatch. Specific thin film with micro-sized notches was fabricated on a silicon based substrate in order to controllably generate self-propagating cracks in large area. Interestingly, various nano-cracks behaved similar to optical wave including refraction, total internal reflection and evanescent wave. This novel phenomena of controlled cracking was used to fabricate sophisticated nano/micro patterns in large area which cannot be obtained even with conventional nanofabrication methods. We also have showed that the cracks are directly implementable into a nano/micro-channel application since the cracks naturally have a form of channel-like shape. PMID:26612107

  16. Comparison of fatigue crack propagation in Modes I and III

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, R.O.

    1985-06-01

    The propagation behavior of fatigue cracks in Mode III (anti-plane shear), measured under cyclic torsion, is described and compared with more commonly encountered behavior under Mode I (tensile opening) loads. It is shown that a unique, global characterization of Mode III growth rates, akin to the Paris ''law'' in Mode I, is only possible if characterizating parameters appropriate to large-scale yielding are employed and allowance is made for crack tip shielding from sliding crack surface interference (i.e., friction and abrasion) between mating fracture surfaces. Based on the crack tip stress and deformation fields for Mode III stationary cracks, the cyclic crack tip displacement, (..delta..CTD/sub III/, and plastic strain intensity range ..delta..GAMMA/sub III/, have been proposed and are found to provide an adequate description of behavior in a range of steels, provided crack surface interference is minimized. The magnitude of this interference, which is somewhat analogous to crack closure in Mode I, is further examined in the light of the complex fractography of torsional fatigue failures and the question of a ''fatigue threshold'' for Mode III crack growth. Finally, micro-mechanical models for cyclic crack extension in anti-plane shear are briefly described, and the contrasting behavior between Mode III and Mode I cracks subjected to simple variable amplitude spectra is examined in terms of the differing role of crack tip blunting and closure in influencing shear, as opposed to tensile opening, modes of crack growth.

  17. Thermoelastic analysis of matrix crack growth in particulate composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sridhar, N.; Rickman, J.M.; Srolovitz, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    The authors examine the conditions under which differences in thermal expansion between a particle and the matrix lead to crack growth within the matrix. Using linear elasticity fracture mechanics, they obtain closed-form, analytical results for the case of a penny shaped crack present in the matrix interacting with a spherical inclusion which is misfitting with respect to the matrix. A simple and direct relationship is established between the strain energy release rate, the crack size, the crack orientation with respect to the inclusion, the crack/inclusion separation, the degree of thermal expansion mismatch and the elastic properties of the medium. The authors also analyze the size to which these cracks can grow and find that for a given misfit strain and material properties, crack growth is inhibited beyond a certain critical crack size. They find that beyond this critical size, the elastic strain energy released upon crack growth is no longer sufficient to compensate for the energy expended in extending the crack, since the crack is growing into the rapidly decreasing stress field. The modification of the above conditions for crack growth due to the superposition of an external stress field has also been analyzed. The preferred orientation of these cracks as a function of misfit strain is predicted. The implication of these results for thermal cycling are analyzed.

  18. Molecular dynamic simulations of the intergranular films between alumina and silicon nitride crystal grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shenghong

    The intergranular films (IGFs) between the ceramics grains have very important effects on the structure and mechanical properties on the whole ceramics and have been studied for many decades. In the thesis, molecular dynamic (MD) computer simulations were applied to study the IGFs between the alumina and silicon nitride ceramic grains. Preferential adsorption of specific ions from the IGFs to the contacting surfaces of the alumina crystals was observed in the study of calcium-alumino-silicate glassy (CAS) IGFs formed between the combined basal and prism orientations of alpha-Al2O3 crystals. This segregation of specific ions to the interface enables formation of localized, ordered structures between the IGF and the crystals. However, the segregation behavior of the ions is anisotropic, depending on the orientation of the alpha-Al2O 3 crystals. Self-diffusion of calcium ions between these CAS IGFs was also carried out by MD simulations. The results show that the diffusion coefficients adjacent to the interfaces are smaller and the activation energies are much higher than those in the interior of the IGF and in bulk glasses. It was also suggested that Ca transport is mainly though the interior of the IGF and implies that diffusion would be significantly inhibited by sufficiently thin IGFs. The growth of the alumina ceramic grains was simulated in the contacting with IGFs containing high concentrations of aluminum ions. Five different compositions in the IGFs were studied. Results show preferential growth along the [1120] of the (1120) surface in comparison to growth along the [0001] direction on the (0001) surface for compositions near a Ca/Al ratio of 0.5. The simulations also show the mechanism by which Ca ions in the IGF inhibit growth on the basal surface. The simulations provide an atomistic view of attachment onto crystal surfaces, affecting grain growth in alumina. The dissolution of the alumina crystal grains in the silicate melts is another important issue in

  19. Effect of carbon on stress corrosion cracking and anodic oxidation of iron in NaOH solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Flis, J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret

    2008-06-01

    Anodic behaviour of decarburised iron and of quenched Fe–C materials with up to 0.875 wt% C was examined in 8.5 M NaOH at 100 °C to explain the role of carbon in caustic stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of plain steels. Removal of carbon from Armco iron strongly reduced its intergranular SCC. Slip steps on grains did not initiate cracks. It has been shown that carbon at low contents deteriorates the passivation of iron, whereas at high contents it promotes the formation of magnetite. High resistance to SCC of high carbon steels can be explained by an intense formation of magnetite on these steels.

  20. Investigation of Helicopter Longeron Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurgical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.