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Sample records for intermedia fusobacterium nucleatum

  1. Determination of antibacterial activity of green coffee bean extract on periodontogenic bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bharath, Nagaraj; Sowmya, Nagur Karibasappa; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of pure green coffee bean extract on periodonto pathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Materials and Methods: Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were used to assess the antibacterial effect of pure green coffee bean extract against periodonto pathogenic bacteria by micro dilution method and culture method, respectively. Results: MIC values of Pg, Pi and Aa were 0.2 μg/ml whereas Fn showed sensitive at concentration of 3.125 μg/ml. MBC values mirrors the values same as that of MIC. Conclusion: Antimicrobial activity of pure green coffee bean extract against Pg, Pi, Fn and Aa suggests that it could be recommended as an adjunct to mechanical therapy in the management of periodontal disease. PMID:26097349

  2. Fusobacterium nucleatum: a commensal-turned pathogen.

    PubMed

    Han, Yiping W

    2015-02-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is an anaerobic oral commensal and a periodontal pathogen associated with a wide spectrum of human diseases. This article reviews its implication in adverse pregnancy outcomes (chorioamnionitis, preterm birth, stillbirth, neonatal sepsis, preeclampsia), GI disorders (colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, appendicitis), cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, respiratory tract infections, Lemierre's syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. The virulence mechanisms involved in the diseases are discussed, with emphasis on its colonization, systemic dissemination, and induction of host inflammatory and tumorigenic responses. The FadA adhesin/invasin conserved in F. nucleatum is a key virulence factor and a potential diagnostic marker for F. nucleatum-associated diseases. PMID:25576662

  3. Fusobacterium nucleatum: a commensal-turned pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yiping W.

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is an anaerobic oral commensal and a periodontal pathogen associated with a wide spectrum of human diseases. This article reviews its implication in adverse pregnancy outcomes (chorioamnionitis, preterm birth, stillbirth, neonatal sepsis, preeclampsia), GI disorders (colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, appendicitis), cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, respiratory tract infections, Lemierre’s syndrom and Alzheimer’s disease. The virulence mechanisms involved in the diseases are discussed, with a particular emphasis on its colonization, systemic dissemination, and induction of host inflammatory and tumorigenic responses. The FadA adhesin/invasin conserved in F. nucleatum is a key virulence factor and a potential diagnostic marker for F. nucleatum-associated diseases. PMID:25576662

  4. Endothelial Cell Response to Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Reila Tainá; Nguyen, Daniel; Stephens, Danielle; Pamuk, Ferda; Fernandes, Daniel; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Kantarci, Alpdogan

    2016-07-01

    Vascular response is an essential aspect of an effective immune response to periodontal disease pathogens, as new blood vessel formation contributes to wound healing and inflammation. Gaining a greater understanding of the factors that affect vascular response may then contribute to future breakthroughs in dental medicine. In this study, we have characterized the endothelial cell response to the common bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum, an important bridging species that facilitates the activity of late colonizers of the dental biofilm. Endothelial cells were infected with Fusobacterium nucleatum (strain 25586) for periods of 4, 12, 24, or 48 h. Cell proliferation and tube formation were analyzed, and expression of adhesion molecules (CD31 and CD34) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors 1 and 2 was measured by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Data indicate that F. nucleatum impaired endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation. The findings suggest that the modified endothelial cell response acts as a mechanism promoting the pathogenic progression of periodontal diseases and may potentially suggest the involvement of periodontopathogens in systemic diseases associated with periodontal inflammation. PMID:27185790

  5. Fusobacterium nucleatum and T-cells in Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mima, Kosuke; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Nishihara, Reiko; Qian, Zhi Rong; Yamauchi, Mai; Inamura, Kentaro; Kim, Sun A; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Nowak, Jonathan A.; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Kostic, Alecsandar D.; Giannakis, Marios; Watanabe, Hideo; Bullman, Susan; Milner, Danny A.; Harris, Curtis C.; Giovannucci, Edward; Garraway, Levi A.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Dranoff, Glenn; Chan, Andrew T.; Garrett, Wendy S.; Huttenhower, Curtis; Fuchs, Charles S.; Ogino, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Importance Evidence indicates a complex link between gut microbiome, immunity, and intestinal tumorigenesis. To target the microbiota and immunity for colorectal cancer prevention and therapy, a better understanding of the relationship between microorganisms and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment is needed. Experimental evidence suggests that Fusobacterium nucleatum may promote colonic neoplasia development by down-regulating antitumor T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity. Objective To test the hypothesis that higher amount of Fusobacterium nucleatum in colorectal carcinoma tissue is associated with lower density of T-cells in tumor tissue. Design A cross-sectional analysis was conducted on colorectal carcinoma cases in two U.S. nationwide prospective cohort studies. The amount of Fusobacterium nucleatum in colorectal carcinoma tissue was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay; we equally dichotomized positive cases (high versus low). Multivariable ordinal logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess associations of the amount of Fusobacterium nucleatum with densities (quartiles) of T-cells in tumor tissue, controlling for clinical and tumor molecular features, including microsatellite instability, CpG island methylator phenotype, LINE-1 methylation, and KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutation status. We adjusted two-sided α level to 0.013 for multiple hypothesis testing. Setting The Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Participants 598 colon and rectal carcinoma cases. Main outcomes and measures Densities of CD3+, CD8+, CD45RO (PTPRC)+, and FOXP3+ T-cells in tumor tissue, determined by tissue microarray immunohistochemistry and computer-assisted image analysis. Results Fusobacterium nucleatum was detected in colorectal carcinoma tissue in 76 (13%) of 598 cases. Compared with Fusobacterium nucleatum-negative cases, Fusobacterium nucleatum-high cases were inversely associated with the density of CD3+ T

  6. Fusobacterium nucleatum, inflammation, and immunity: the fire within human gut.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Arif; Miskeen, Abid Yousuf; Hazari, Younis Mohammad; Asrafuzzaman, Syed; Fazili, Khalid Majid

    2016-03-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is an identified proinflammatory autochthonous bacterium implicated in human colorectal cancer. It is also abundantly found in patients suffering from chronic gut inflammation (inflammatory bowel disease), consequently contributing to the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Majority of the studies have reported that colorectal tumors/colorectal adenocarcinomas are highly enriched with F. nucleatum compared to noninvolved adjacent colonic tissue. During the course of multistep development of colorectal cancer, tumors have evolved many mechanisms to resist the antitumor immune response. One of such favorite ploy is providing access to pathogenic bacteria, especially F. nucleatum in the colorectal tumor microenvironment, wherein both (colorectal tumors and F. nucleatum) exert profound effect on each other, consequently attracting tumor-permissive myeloid-derived suppressor cells, suppressing cytotoxic CD8+ T cells and inhibiting NK cell-mediated cancer cell killing. In this review, we have primarily focused on how this bug modulates the immune response, consequently rendering the antitumor immune cells inactive. PMID:26718210

  7. Efficient Gene Transfer and Targeted Mutagenesis in Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    Haake, Susan Kinder; Yoder, Sean; Gerardo, Sharon Hunt

    2006-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a Gram-negative anaerobe important in dental biofilm ecology and infectious diseases with significant societal impact. The lack of efficient genetic systems has hampered molecular analyses in this microorganism. We previously reported construction of a shuttle plasmid, pHS17, using the native fusobacterial plasmid pFN1 and an erythromycin resistance cassette. However, the host range of pHS17 was restricted to F. nucleatum, ATCC 10953 and the transformation efficiency was limited. This study was undertaken to improve genetic systems for molecular analysis in F. nucleatum. We identified a second F. nucleatum strain, ATCC 23726, which is transformed with improved efficiency compared to ATCC 10953. Two novel second generation pFN1-based shuttle plasmids, pHS23 and pHS30, were developed and enable transformation of ATCC 23726 at 6.2 x 104 and 1.5 x 106 transformants/microgram of plasmid DNA, respectively. The transformation efficiency of pHS30, which harbors a catP gene conferring resistance to chloramphenicol, was more than 1,000-fold greater than that of pHS17. The improved transformation efficiency facilitated disruption of the chromosomal rnr gene using a suicide plasmid pHS19, the first demonstration of targeted mutagenesis in F. nucleatum. These results provide significant advances in the development of systems for molecular analysis in F. nucleatum. PMID:16115683

  8. Cellular Components Mediating Coadherence of Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Wu, T; Cen, L; Kaplan, C; Zhou, X; Lux, R; Shi, W; He, X

    2015-10-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen found as part of the normal oral flora. It can be coisolated with Fusobacterium nucleatum, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, from oral disease sites, such as those involved in refractory periodontitis and pulp necrosis. The physical coadherence between these 2 clinically important microbes has been well documented and suggested to play a role in facilitating their oral colonization and colocalization and contributing to polymicrobial pathogenesis. Previous studies indicated that the physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum was mediated by the carbohydrate components on the surface of C. albicans and the protein components on the Fusobaterium cell surface. However, the identities of the components involved still remain elusive. This study was aimed at identifying the genetic determinants involved in coaggregation between the 2 species. By screening a C. albicans SN152 mutant library and a panel of F. nucleatum 23726 outer membrane protein mutants, we identified FLO9, which encodes a putative adhesin-like cell wall mannoprotein of C. albicans and radD, an arginine-inhibitable adhesin-encoding gene in F. nucleatum that is involved in interspecies coadherence. Consistent with these findings, we demonstrated that the strong coaggregation between wild-type F. nucleatum 23726 and C. albicans SN152 in an in vitro assay could be greatly inhibited by arginine and mannose. Our study also suggested a complex multifaceted mechanism underlying physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum and for the first time revealed the identity of major genetic components involved in mediating the coaggregation. These observations provide useful knowledge for developing new targeted treatments for disrupting interactions between these 2 clinically relevant pathogens. PMID:26152186

  9. Taxonomy, biology, and periodontal aspects of Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed Central

    Bolstad, A I; Jensen, H B; Bakken, V

    1996-01-01

    The pathogenic potential of Fusobacterium nucleatum and its significance in the development of periodontal diseases, as well as in infections in other organs, have gained new interest for several reasons. First, this bacterium has the potential to be pathogenic because of its number and frequency in periodontal lesions, its production of tissue irritants, its synergism with other bacteria in mixed infections, and its ability to form aggregates with other suspected pathogens in periodontal disease and thus act as a bridge between early and late colonizers on the tooth surface. Second, of the microbial species that are statistically associated with periodontal disease, F. nucleatum is the most common in clinical infections of other body sites. Third, during the past few years, new techniques have made it possible to obtain more information about F. nucleatum on the genetic level, thereby also gaining better knowledge of the structure and functions of the outer membrane proteins (OMPs). OMPs are of great interest with respect to coaggregation, cell nutrition, and antibiotic susceptibility. This review covers what is known to date about F. nucleatum in general, such as taxonomy and biology, with special emphasis on its pathogenic potential. Its possible relationship to other periodontal bacteria in the development of periodontal diseases and the possible roles played by OMPs are considered. PMID:8665477

  10. Anti-biofilm Activities from Resveratrol against Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhiyan; Huang, Zhengwei; Zhou, Wei; Tang, Zisheng; Ma, Rui; Liang, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a Gram-negative, anaerobic bacterium that plays an important role in dental plaque biofilm formation. In this study, we evaluate the effect of resveratrol, a phytoalexin compound, on F. nucleatum biofilm formation. The effects of different concentrations of resveratrol on biofilms formed on 96-well microtiter plates at different time points were determined by the MTT assay. The structures and thicknesses of the biofilm were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and gene expression was investigated by real-time PCR. The results showed that resveratrol at sub-MIC levels can significantly decrease biofilm formation, whereas it does not affect the bacterial growth rate. It was observed by CLSM images that the biofilm was visually decreased with increasing concentrations of resveratrol. Gene expression was down regulated in the biofilm in the presence of resveratrol. Our results revealed that resveratrol can effectively inhibit biofilm formation. PMID:27458454

  11. Oxidative stress response in the opportunistic oral pathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Steeves, Craig H; Potrykus, Joanna; Barnett, David A; Bearne, Stephen L

    2011-05-01

    The anaerobic, Gram-negative bacillus Fusobacterium nucleatum plays a vital role in oral biofilm formation and the development of periodontal disease. The organism plays a central bridging role between early and late colonizers within dental plaque and plays a protective role against reactive oxygen species. Using a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry approach, we have annotated 78 proteins within the proteome of F. nucleatum subsp. nucleatum and identified those proteins whose apparent intracellular concentrations change in response to either O(2)- or H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress. Three major protein systems were altered in response to oxidative stress: (i) proteins of the alkyl hydroperoxide reductase/thioredoxin reductase system were increased in intracellular concentration; (ii) glycolytic enzymes were modified by oxidation (i.e. D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and fructose 6-phosphate aldolase) or increased in intracellular concentration, with an accompanying decrease in ATP production; and (iii) the intracellular concentrations of molecular chaperone proteins and related proteins (i.e. ClpB, DnaK, HtpG, and HrcA) were increased. PMID:21563313

  12. Native Plasmids of Fusobacterium nucleatum: Characterization and Use in Development of Genetic Systems†

    PubMed Central

    Haake, Susan Kinder; Yoder, Sean C.; Attarian, Gwynne; Podkaminer, Kara

    2000-01-01

    Three native plasmids of Fusobacterium nucleatum were characterized, including DNA sequence analysis of one plasmid, pFN1. A shuttle plasmid, pHS17, capable of transforming Escherichia coli and F. nucleatum ATCC 10953 was constructed with pFN1. pHS17 was stably maintained in the F. nucleatum transformants, and differences in the transformation efficiencies suggested the presence of a restriction-modification system in F. nucleatum. PMID:10648549

  13. Interactions between Periodontal Bacteria and Human Oral Epithelial Cells: Fusobacterium nucleatum Adheres to and Invades Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yiping W.; Shi, Wenyuan; Huang, George T.-J.; Kinder Haake, Susan; Park, No-Hee; Kuramitsu, Howard; Genco, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Bacteria are causative agents of periodontal diseases. Interactions between oral bacteria and gingival epithelial cells are essential aspects of periodontal infections. Using an in vitro tissue culture model, a selected group of gram-negative anaerobic bacteria frequently associated with periodontal diseases, including Bacteroides forsythus, Campylobacter curvus, Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia, were examined for their ability to adhere to and invade primary cultures of human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC). The effects of these bacteria on the production of interleukin-8 (IL-8), a proinflammatory chemokine, were also measured. These studies provided an initial demonstration that F. nucleatum adhered to and invaded HGEC and that this was accompanied by high levels of IL-8 secretion from the epithelial cells. The attachment and invasion characteristics of F. nucleatum were also tested using KB cells, an oral epithelial cell line. The invasion was verified by transmission electron microscopy and with metabolic inhibitors. Invasion appeared to occur via a “zipping” mechanism and required the involvement of actins, microtubules, signal transduction, protein synthesis, and energy metabolism of the epithelial cell, as well as protein synthesis by F. nucleatum. A spontaneous mutant, lam, of F. nucleatum, isolated as defective in autoagglutination, was unable to attach to or invade HGEC or KB cells, further indicating the requirement of bacterial components in these processes. Sugar inhibition assays indicated that lectin-like interactions were involved in the attachment of F. nucleatum to KB cells. Investigation of these new virulence phenotypes should improve our understanding of the role of F. nucleatum in periodontal infections. PMID:10816455

  14. Fusobacterium nucleatum Osteomyelitis in 3 Previously Healthy Children: A Case Series and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Seth W; Boyce, Thomas G; Larson, A Noelle; Patel, Robin; Jackson, Mary Anne

    2015-12-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a rare cause of monomicrobial osteomyelitis in children. We describe the cases of 3 children with F. nucleatum osteomyelitis of the distal femoral epiphysis with concurrent septic arthritis and review 6 other cases reported in the literature. Our report emphasizes the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for anaerobic osteomyelitis, given its atypical presentation and the unique growth requirements of anaerobic bacteria. PMID:26407282

  15. Frequency, microbial interactions, and antimicrobial susceptibility of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Fusobacterium necrophorum isolated from primary endodontic infections.

    PubMed

    Jacinto, Rogério C; Montagner, Francisco; Signoretti, Fernanda G C; Almeida, Geovania C; Gomes, Brenda P F A

    2008-12-01

    This study assessed the prevalence and microbial interactions of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Fusobacterium necrophorum in primary endodontic infections from a Brazilian population and their antimicrobial susceptibility to some antibiotics by the E-test. One hundred ten samples from infected teeth with periapical pathologies were analyzed by culture methods. Five hundred eighty individual strains were isolated; 81.4% were strict anaerobes. F. nucleatum was found in 38 root canals and was associated with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella spp., and Eubacterium spp. F. necrophorum was found in 20 root canals and was associated with Peptostreptococcus prevotii. The simultaneous presence of F. nucleatum and F. necrophorum was not related to endodontic symptoms (p > 0.05). They were 100% susceptible to amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, and cephaclor. Fusobacterium spp. is frequently isolated from primary-infected root canals of teeth with periapical pathologies. Amoxicillin is a useful antibiotic against F. nucleatum and F. necrophorum in endodontic infections and has been prescribed as the first choice in Brazil. PMID:19026872

  16. Berberine may rescue Fusobacterium nucleatum-induced colorectal tumorigenesis by modulating the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui-Jun; Sun, Tian-Tian; Chen, Hui-Min; Chen, Hao-Yan; An, Hui-Fang; Weng, Yu-Rong; Yu, Jun; Li, Min; Qin, Wen-Xin; Ma, Xiong; Shen, Nan; Hong, Jie; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence links colorectal cancer (CRC) with the intestinal microbiota. However, the disturbance of intestinal microbiota and the role of Fusobacterium nucleatum during the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence have not yet been evaluated. Methods 454 FLX pyrosequencing was used to evaluate the disturbance of intestinal microbiota during the adenoma-carcinoma sequence pathway of CRC. Intestinal microbiota and mucosa tumor-immune cytokines were detected in mice after introducing 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), F. nucleatum or Berberine (BBR), using pyrosequencing and Bio-Plex Pro™ cytokine assays, respectively. Protein expressions were detected by western blotting. Results The levels of opportunistic pathogens, such as Fusobacterium, Streptococcus and Enterococcus spp. gradually increased during the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence in human fecal and mucosal samples. F. nucleatum treatment significantly altered lumen microbial structures, with increased Tenericutes and Verrucomicrobia (opportunistic pathogens) (P < 0.05 = in wild-type C57BL/6 and mice with DMH treatment). BBR intervention reversed the F. nucleatum-mediated increase in opportunistic pathogens, and the secretion of IL-21/22/31, CD40L and the expression of p-STAT3, p-STAT5 and p-ERK1/2 in mice, compared with mice fed with F. nucleatum alone. Conclusions F. nucleatum colonization in the intestine may prompt colorectal tumorigenesis. BBR could rescue F. nucleatum-induced colorectal tumorigenesis by modulating the tumor microenvironment and blocking the activation of tumorigenesis-related pathways. PMID:26397137

  17. Association of Fusobacterium nucleatum infection with colorectal cancer in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Yuan; Ge, Quan-Xing; Cao, Jie; Zhou, Yong-Jian; Du, Yan-Lei; Shen, Bo; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne; Nie, Yu-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) abundance in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues and its association with CRC invasiveness in Chinese patients. METHODS: The resected cancer and adjacent normal tissues (10 cm beyond cancer margins) from 101 consecutive patients with CRC were collected. Fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR) was applied to detect F. nucleatum in CRC and normal tissues. The difference of F. nucleatum abundance between cancer and normal tissues and the relationship of F. nucleatum abundance with clinical variables were evaluated. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis was performed on 22 CRC tissues with the highest F. nucleatum abundance by FQ-PCR testing to confirm FQ-PCR results. RESULTS: The median abundance of F. nucleatum in CRC tissues [0.242 (0.178-0.276)] was significantly higher than that in normal controls [0.050 (0.023-0.067)] (P < 0.001). F. nucleatum was over-represented in 88/101 (87.1%) CRC samples. The abundance of F. nucleatum determined by 2-ΔCT was significantly greater in tumor samples [0.242 (0.178, 0.276)] than in normal controls [0.050 (0.023, 0.067)] (P < 0.001). The frequency of patients with lymph node metastases was higher in the over-abundance group [52/88 (59.1%)] than in the under-abundance group [0/13 (0%)] (P < 0.005). No significant association of F. nucleatum with other clinico-pathological variables was observed (P > 0.05). FISH analysis also found more F. nucleatum in CRC than in normal tissues (median number 6, 25th 3, 75th 10 vs 2, 25th 1, 75th 5) (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: F. nucleatum was enriched in CRC tissues and associated with CRC development and metastasis. PMID:27004000

  18. Coinfection of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Actinomyces israelii in Mastoiditis Diagnosed by Next-Generation DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hoogestraat, Daniel R.; Abbott, April N.; SenGupta, Dhruba J.; Cummings, Lisa A.; Butler-Wu, Susan M.; Stephens, Karen; Cookson, Brad T.; Hoffman, Noah G.

    2014-01-01

    Some bacterial infections involve potentially complex mixtures of species that can now be distinguished using next-generation DNA sequencing. We present a case of mastoiditis where Gram stain, culture, and molecular diagnosis were nondiagnostic or discrepant. Next-generation sequencing implicated coinfection of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Actinomyces israelii, resolving these diagnostic discrepancies. PMID:24574281

  19. Macrolides Inhibit Fusobacterium nucleatum-Induced MUC5AC Production in Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Harada, Yosuke; Yamada, Koichi; Migiyama, Yohei; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is one of the most common anaerobic bacteria in periodontitis and is responsible for several extraoral infections, including respiratory tract diseases. In this study, we examined whether F. nucleatum induces mucin secretion in airway epithelial cells. We also examined the effects of macrolides on F. nucleatum-induced mucus production compared with the effects of other antibiotics that exert anti-anaerobic activities. The production of MUC5AC, the major core protein of mucin secreted from the airway surface epithelium, in bronchial epithelial cells after stimulation with culture supernatants (Sup) of F. nucleatum was analyzed by performing enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and quantitative RT-PCR. The cell-signaling pathway of F. nucleatum Sup stimulation was also analyzed by Western blotting. For inhibition studies, cells were treated with azithromycin, clarithromycin, clindamycin (CLDM), and metronidazole (MTZ). The F. nucleatum Sup induced NCI-H292 cells to express MUC5AC at both the protein level and the mRNA level in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. Macrolides inhibited F. nucleatum Sup-induced MUC5AC production, while CLDM and MTZ were less effective. F. nucleatum Sup induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and this induction was suppressed by macrolides. F. nucleatum Sup-induced MUC5AC production was blocked by the ERK pathway inhibitor U0126. F. nucleatum is likely to contribute to excessive mucin production, which suggests that periodontitis may correlate with the pathogenesis of chronic respiratory tract infection. Macrolides seem to reduce this mucin production and might represent an additional means of therapeutic intervention for F. nucleatum respiratory tract infections other than CLDM and MTZ. PMID:23380724

  20. Localization of the Fusobacterium nucleatum T18 adhesin activity mediating coaggregation with Porphyromonas gingivalis T22.

    PubMed Central

    Kinder, S A; Holt, S C

    1993-01-01

    Adherence of pathogenic bacteria is often an essential first step in the infectious process. The ability of bacteria to adhere to one another, or to coaggregate, may be an important factor in their ability to colonize and function as pathogens in the periodontal pocket. Previously, a strong and specific coaggregation was demonstrated between two putative periodontal pathogens, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The interaction appeared to be mediated by a protein adhesin on the F. nucleatum cells and a carbohydrate receptor on the P. gingivalis cells. In this investigation, we have localized the adhesin activity of F. nucleatum T18 to the outer membrane on the basis of the ability of F. nucleatum T18 vesicles to coaggregate with whole cells of P. gingivalis T22 and the ability of the outer membrane fraction of F. nucleatum T18 to inhibit coaggregation between whole cells of F. nucleatum T18 and P. gingivalis T22. Proteolytic pretreatment of the F. nucleatum T18 outer membrane fraction resulted in a loss of coaggregation inhibition, confirming the proteinaceous nature of the adhesin. The F. nucleatum T18 outer membrane fraction was found to be enriched for several proteins, including a 42-kDa major outer membrane protein which appeared to be exposed on the bacterial cell surface. Fab fragments prepared from antiserum raised to the 42-kDa outer membrane protein were found to partially but specifically block coaggregation. These data support the conclusion that the 42-kDa major outer membrane protein of F. nucleatum T18 plays a role in mediating coaggregation with P. gingivalis T22. Images PMID:8380804

  1. Morphological and physiological changes induced by contact-dependent interaction between Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    Bor, Batbileg; Cen, Lujia; Agnello, Melissa; Shi, Wenyuan; He, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum are well-studied oral commensal microbes with pathogenic potential that are involved in various oral polymicrobial infectious diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 coaggregates with C. albicans SN152, a process mainly mediated by fusobacterial membrane protein RadD and Candida cell wall protein Flo9. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential biological impact of this inter-kingdom interaction. We found that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 inhibits growth and hyphal morphogenesis of C. albicans SN152 in a contact-dependent manner. Further analysis revealed that the inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis is mediated via RadD and Flo9 protein pair. Using a murine macrophage cell line, we showed that the F. nucleatum-induced inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis promotes C. albicans survival and negatively impacts the macrophage-killing capability of C. albicans. Furthermore, the yeast form of C. albicans repressed F. nucleatum-induced MCP-1 and TNFα production in macrophages. Our study suggests that the interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum leads to a mutual attenuation of virulence, which may function to promote a long-term commensal lifestyle within the oral cavity. This finding has significant implications for our understanding of inter-kingdom interaction and may impact clinical treatment strategies. PMID:27295972

  2. Morphological and physiological changes induced by contact-dependent interaction between Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Bor, Batbileg; Cen, Lujia; Agnello, Melissa; Shi, Wenyuan; He, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum are well-studied oral commensal microbes with pathogenic potential that are involved in various oral polymicrobial infectious diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 coaggregates with C. albicans SN152, a process mainly mediated by fusobacterial membrane protein RadD and Candida cell wall protein Flo9. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential biological impact of this inter-kingdom interaction. We found that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 inhibits growth and hyphal morphogenesis of C. albicans SN152 in a contact-dependent manner. Further analysis revealed that the inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis is mediated via RadD and Flo9 protein pair. Using a murine macrophage cell line, we showed that the F. nucleatum-induced inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis promotes C. albicans survival and negatively impacts the macrophage-killing capability of C. albicans. Furthermore, the yeast form of C. albicans repressed F. nucleatum-induced MCP-1 and TNFα production in macrophages. Our study suggests that the interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum leads to a mutual attenuation of virulence, which may function to promote a long-term commensal lifestyle within the oral cavity. This finding has significant implications for our understanding of inter-kingdom interaction and may impact clinical treatment strategies. PMID:27295972

  3. Fusobacterium nucleatum adhesin FadA binds vascular-endothelial cadherin and alters endothelial integrity

    PubMed Central

    Fardini, Yann; Wang, Xiaowei; Témoin, Stéphanie; Nithianantham, Stanley; Lee, David; Shoham, Menachem; Han, Yiping W.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Fusobacterium nucleatum is a gram-negative oral anaerobe, capable of systemic dissemination causing infections and abscesses, often in mixed-species, at different body sites. We have shown previously that F. nucleatum adheres to and invades host epithelial and endothelial cells via a novel FadA adhesin. In this study, vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, a member of the cadherin family and a cell-cell junction molecule, was identified as the endothelial receptor for FadA, required for F. nucleatum binding to the cells. FadA co-localized with VE-cadherin on endothelial cells, causing relocation of VE-cadherin away from the cell-cell junctions. As a result, the endothelial permeability was increased, allowing the bacteria to cross the endothelium through loosened junctions. This crossing mechanism may explain why the organism is able to disseminate systemically to colonize in different body sites and even overcome the placental and blood-brain barriers. Co-incubation of F. nucleatum and E. coli enhanced penetration of the endothelial cells by the latter in the transwell assays, suggesting F. nucleatum may serve as an “enabler” for other microorganisms to spread systemically. This may explain why F. nucleatum is often found in mixed infections. This study reveals a possible novel dissemination mechanism utilized by pathogens. PMID:22040113

  4. Case series of patients with Fusobacterium nucleatum bacteremia with emphasis on the presence of cancer.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Erlangga; Wybo, Ingrid; Piérard, Denis

    2016-06-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is anaerobic oral microbiota that might be associated with cancer. We reported 22 consecutive cases of patients (mean age of 63.8 years (range 34-89), 59.1% male) with F. nucleatum bacteremia that were admitted to a university hospital over a 10-year period. In 17 (77.2%) of these patients, F. nucleatum was the sole possible pathogen. Seven of the 22 patients (31.8%) had active cancer: esophagus carcinoma (n = 3), hematologic malignancies (n = 1), gastrointestinal stromal tumor (n = 1), melanoma (n = 1), and breast cancer (n = 1). In six out of seven patients (85.7%), the F. nucleatum was found within six months of the diagnosis of cancer. Four of seven (57.1%), patients with cancer were on chemotherapy. Three of 22 patients (13.4%) died within 1 month of F. nucleatum bacteremia due to cancer. In conclusion, F. nucleatum bacteremia occurs rarely and when it is found, it is often in patients with cancer, especially those with a recent diagnosis. PMID:26853831

  5. Mycoplasma pneumoniae preceding Lemierre's syndrome due to Fusobacterium nucleatum complicated by acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infectious mononucleosis in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Klein, Natalie C; Petelin, Andrew; Cunha, Burke A

    2013-01-01

    We report an unusual case of Lemierre's syndrome due to a rare species of Fusobacterium, that is, Fusobacterium nucleatum preceded by Mycoplasma pneumoniae pharyngitis and followed later by Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis. PMID:22464641

  6. Association of Fusobacterium nucleatum with immunity and molecular alterations in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nosho, Katsuhiko; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Adachi, Yasushi; Ito, Miki; Mitsuhashi, Kei; Kurihara, Hiroyoshi; Kanno, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Itaru; Ishigami, Keisuke; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Maruyama, Reo; Imai, Kohzoh; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The human intestinal microbiome plays a major role in human health and diseases, including colorectal cancer. Colorectal carcinogenesis represents a heterogeneous process with a differing set of somatic molecular alterations, influenced by diet, environmental and microbial exposures, and host immunity. Fusobacterium species are part of the human oral and intestinal microbiota. Metagenomic analyses have shown an enrichment of Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) in colorectal carcinoma tissue. Using 511 colorectal carcinomas from Japanese patients, we assessed the presence of F. nucleatum. Our results showed that the frequency of F. nucleatum positivity in the Japanese colorectal cancer was 8.6% (44/511), which was lower than that in United States cohort studies (13%). Similar to the United States studies, F. nucleatum positivity in Japanese colorectal cancers was significantly associated with microsatellite instability (MSI)-high status. Regarding the immune response in colorectal cancer, high levels of infiltrating T-cell subsets (i.e., CD3+, CD8+, CD45RO+, and FOXP3+ cells) have been associated with better patient prognosis. There is also evidence to indicate that molecular features of colorectal cancer, especially MSI, influence T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity. Concerning the association between the gut microbiome and immunity, F. nucleatum has been shown to expand myeloid-derived immune cells, which inhibit T-cell proliferation and induce T-cell apoptosis in colorectal cancer. This finding indicates that F. nucleatum possesses immunosuppressive activities by inhibiting human T-cell responses. Certain microRNAs are induced during the macrophage inflammatory response and have the ability to regulate host-cell responses to pathogens. MicroRNA-21 increases the levels of IL-10 and prostaglandin E2, which suppress antitumor T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity through the inhibition of the antigen-presenting capacities of dendritic cells and T-cell proliferation in

  7. Proteomics of Fusobacterium nucleatum within a model developing oral microbial community

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Erik L; Wang, Tiansong; Beck, David A C; Dickinson, Brittany C; Wright, Christopher J; J Lamont, Richard; Hackett, Murray

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a common oral organism that can provide adhesive and metabolic support to developing periodontal bacterial communities. It is within the context of these communities that disease occurs. We have previously reported whole cell proteomics analyses of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus gordonii in early-stage communities with each other and with F. nucleatum, modeled using 18 h pellets. Here, we report the adaptation of F. nucleatum to the same experimental conditions as measured by differential protein expression. About 1210 F. nucleatum proteins were detected in single species F. nucleatum control samples, 1192 in communities with P. gingivalis, 1224 with S. gordonii, and 1135 with all three species. Quantitative comparisons among the proteomes revealed important changes in all mixed samples with distinct responses to P. gingivalis or S. gordonii alone and in combination. The results were inspected manually and an ontology analysis conducted using DAVID (Database for annotation, visualization, and integrated discovery). Extensive changes were detected in energy metabolism. All multispecies comparisons showed reductions in amino acid fermentation and a shift toward butanoate as a metabolic byproduct, although the two organism model community with S. gordonii showed increases in alanine, threonine, methionine, and cysteine pathways, and in the three species samples there were increases in lysine and methionine. The communities with P. gingivalis or all three organisms showed reduced glycolysis proteins, but F. nucleatum paired with S. gordonii displayed increased glycolysis/gluconeogenesis proteins. The S. gordonii containing two organism model also showed increases in the ethanolamine pathway while the three species sample showed decreases relative to the F. nucleatum single organism control. All of the nascent model communities displayed reduced translation, lipopolysaccharide, and cell wall biosynthesis, DNA replication and DNA

  8. Fusobacterium Nucleatum: Atypical Organism of Pyogenic Liver Abscess Might be Related to Sigmoid Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Wijarnpreecha, Karn; Yuklyaeva, Nataliya; Sornprom, Suthanya; Hyman, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Context: Pyogenic liver abscesses (PLAs) are the most common form of liver abscesses in the United States. Most cases are caused by enteric bacteria and anaerobes. We report a case of PLA caused by a rare pathogen, Fusobacterium nucleatum, from an unusual primary site of infection. Case Report: A 60-year-old male presented with subacute fever. Initial work-up revealed leukocytosis and elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Dental examination and Panorex x-ray were normal. Imaging of the liver with abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a 5.5 cm abscess in the right lobe of the liver. Culture of the aspirate grew Fusobacterium nucleatum. He improved with abscess drainage and antibiotic therapy with moxifloxacin and metronidazole. Colonoscopy performed a few weeks later, demonstrated sigmoid ulceration most likely from the previous diverticulitis. Conclusion: PLAs can be a complication of sigmoid diverticulitis and as a result of occult dental disease as well. The clinical presentation of Fusobacterium infection is diverse and can be fatal if diagnosis is delayed. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment are the keys to preventing serious complications. PMID:27213146

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray data of the FadA adhesin from Fusobacterium nucleatum

    SciTech Connect

    Nithianantham, Stanley; Xu, Minghua; Wu, Nan; Han, Yiping W.; Shoham, Menachem

    2006-12-01

    The FadA adhesin from F. nucleatum, which is involved in bacterial attachment and invasion of human oral epithelial cells, has been crystallized in space group P6{sub 1} or P6{sub 5}, and X-ray data have been collected to 1.9 Å resolution. Fusobacterium nucleatum is a Gram-negative anaerobe prevalent in the oral cavity that is associated with periodontal disease, preterm birth and infections in other parts of the human body. The bacteria attach to and invade epithelial and endothelial cells in the gum tissue and elsewhere via a 13.7 kDa adhesin protein FadA (Fusobacterium adhesin A). FadA exists in two forms: the intact form (pre-FadA), consisting of 129 amino acids, and the mature form (mFadA), which lacks an 18-residue signal sequence. Both forms have been expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. mFadA has been crystallized. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1} or P6{sub 5}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 59.3, c = 125.7 Å and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals exhibit an unusually high solvent content of 74%. Synchrotron X-ray data have been collected to 1.9 Å. The crystals are suitable for X-ray structure determination. The crystal structure of FadA may provide a basis for the development of therapeutic agents to combat periodontal disease and other infections associated with F. nucleatum.

  10. Withaferin A inhibits inflammatory responses induced by Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Noh, Eui-Jeong; Kang, Ming-Jung; Jeong, Yu-Jin; Lee, Jun-Young; Park, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Hye-Jin; Oh, Sang-Muk; Lee, Kyung-Bok; Kim, Dong-Jae; Shin, Ji-Ae; Cho, Sung-Dae; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2016-07-01

    Periodontitis is a progressive chronic inflammatory disease and a major cause of tooth loss in humans. As a withanolides, withaferin A (WA) is known to exhibit strong anti‑inflammatory activity. The present study examined whether WA inhibited inflammatory responses in macrophages in response to two representative periodontal pathogens, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Murine bone marrow‑derived macrophages (BMDMs) were used in this study and cytokine production in culture supernatants was measured by enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assays. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the activation of nuclear factor‑κB and mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), toll‑like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4. The production of nitric oxide (NO) was determined by the Griess reaction. WA treatment was shown to decrease interleukin (IL)‑6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α production in BMDMs in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans in a dose‑dependent manner. The phosphorylation of IκB‑α and MAPKs (p38, extracellular signal‑regulated kinases and c‑Jun N‑terminal kinases) induced by F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans was also inhibited by WA. F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans induced iNOS expression and NO production in BMDMs, which was inhibited by WA in a dose‑dependent manner. WA also reduced endogenous and induced expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in these cells. These results suggest that WA may be a potential therapeutic agent or preventive additive for periodontitis control. PMID:27220676

  11. High occurrence of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Clostridium difficile in the intestinal microbiota of colorectal carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Fukugaiti, Márcia H.; Ignacio, Aline; Fernandes, Miriam R.; Ribeiro, Ulysses; Nakano, Viviane; Avila-Campos, Mario J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal carcinoma is considered the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Several microorganisms have been associated with carcinogenesis, including Enterococcus spp., Helicobacter pylori, enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis, pathogenic E. coli strains and oral Fusobacterium. Here we qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated the presence of oral and intestinal microorganisms in the fecal microbiota of colorectal cancer patients and healthy controls. Seventeen patients (between 49 and 70 years-old) visiting the Cancer Institute of the Sao Paulo State were selected, 7 of whom were diagnosed with colorectal carcinoma. Bacterial detection was performed by qRT-PCR. Although all of the tested bacteria were detected in the majority of the fecal samples, quantitative differences between the Cancer Group and healthy controls were detected only for F. nucleatum and C. difficile. The three tested oral microorganisms were frequently observed, suggesting a need for furthers studies into a potential role for these bacteria during colorectal carcinoma pathogenesis. Despite the small number of patients included in this study, we were able to detect significantly more F. nucleatum and C. difficile in the Cancer Group patients compared to healthy controls, suggesting a possible role of these bacteria in colon carcinogenesis. This finding should be considered when screening for colorectal cancer. PMID:26691472

  12. Genome Sequence and Analysis of the Oral Bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum Strain ATCC 25586

    PubMed Central

    Kapatral, Vinayak; Anderson, Iain; Ivanova, Natalia; Reznik, Gary; Los, Tamara; Lykidis, Athanasios; Bhattacharyya, Anamitra; Bartman, Allen; Gardner, Warren; Grechkin, Galina; Zhu, Lihua; Vasieva, Olga; Chu, Lien; Kogan, Yakov; Chaga, Oleg; Goltsman, Eugene; Bernal, Axel; Larsen, Niels; D'Souza, Mark; Walunas, Theresa; Pusch, Gordon; Haselkorn, Robert; Fonstein, Michael; Kyrpides, Nikos; Overbeek, Ross

    2002-01-01

    We present a complete DNA sequence and metabolic analysis of the dominant oral bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum. Although not considered a major dental pathogen on its own, this anaerobe facilitates the aggregation and establishment of several other species including the dental pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Bacteroides forsythus. The F. nucleatum strain ATCC 25586 genome was assembled from shotgun sequences and analyzed using the ERGO bioinformatics suite (http://www.integratedgenomics.com). The genome contains 2.17 Mb encoding 2,067 open reading frames, organized on a single circular chromosome with 27% GC content. Despite its taxonomic position among the gram-negative bacteria, several features of its core metabolism are similar to that of gram-positive Clostridium spp., Enterococcus spp., and Lactococcus spp. The genome analysis has revealed several key aspects of the pathways of organic acid, amino acid, carbohydrate, and lipid metabolism. Nine very-high-molecular-weight outer membrane proteins are predicted from the sequence, none of which has been reported in the literature. More than 137 transporters for the uptake of a variety of substrates such as peptides, sugars, metal ions, and cofactors have been identified. Biosynthetic pathways exist for only three amino acids: glutamate, aspartate, and asparagine. The remaining amino acids are imported as such or as di- or oligopeptides that are subsequently degraded in the cytoplasm. A principal source of energy appears to be the fermentation of glutamate to butyrate. Additionally, desulfuration of cysteine and methionine yields ammonia, H2S, methyl mercaptan, and butyrate, which are capable of arresting fibroblast growth, thus preventing wound healing and aiding penetration of the gingival epithelium. The metabolic capabilities of F. nucleatum revealed by its genome are therefore consistent with its specialized niche in the mouth. PMID:11889109

  13. Genome sequence and analysis of the oral bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum strain ATCC 25586.

    PubMed

    Kapatral, Vinayak; Anderson, Iain; Ivanova, Natalia; Reznik, Gary; Los, Tamara; Lykidis, Athanasios; Bhattacharyya, Anamitra; Bartman, Allen; Gardner, Warren; Grechkin, Galina; Zhu, Lihua; Vasieva, Olga; Chu, Lien; Kogan, Yakov; Chaga, Oleg; Goltsman, Eugene; Bernal, Axel; Larsen, Niels; D'Souza, Mark; Walunas, Theresa; Pusch, Gordon; Haselkorn, Robert; Fonstein, Michael; Kyrpides, Nikos; Overbeek, Ross

    2002-04-01

    We present a complete DNA sequence and metabolic analysis of the dominant oral bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum. Although not considered a major dental pathogen on its own, this anaerobe facilitates the aggregation and establishment of several other species including the dental pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Bacteroides forsythus. The F. nucleatum strain ATCC 25586 genome was assembled from shotgun sequences and analyzed using the ERGO bioinformatics suite (http://www.integratedgenomics.com). The genome contains 2.17 Mb encoding 2,067 open reading frames, organized on a single circular chromosome with 27% GC content. Despite its taxonomic position among the gram-negative bacteria, several features of its core metabolism are similar to that of gram-positive Clostridium spp., Enterococcus spp., and Lactococcus spp. The genome analysis has revealed several key aspects of the pathways of organic acid, amino acid, carbohydrate, and lipid metabolism. Nine very-high-molecular-weight outer membrane proteins are predicted from the sequence, none of which has been reported in the literature. More than 137 transporters for the uptake of a variety of substrates such as peptides, sugars, metal ions, and cofactors have been identified. Biosynthetic pathways exist for only three amino acids: glutamate, aspartate, and asparagine. The remaining amino acids are imported as such or as di- or oligopeptides that are subsequently degraded in the cytoplasm. A principal source of energy appears to be the fermentation of glutamate to butyrate. Additionally, desulfuration of cysteine and methionine yields ammonia, H(2)S, methyl mercaptan, and butyrate, which are capable of arresting fibroblast growth, thus preventing wound healing and aiding penetration of the gingival epithelium. The metabolic capabilities of F. nucleatum revealed by its genome are therefore consistent with its specialized niche in the mouth. PMID:11889109

  14. Rapid detection of nusG and fadA in Fusobacterium nucleatum by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Huang, Simo; Yang, Zhan; Zou, Dayang; Dong, Derong; Liu, Anheng; Liu, Wei; Huang, Liuyu

    2016-08-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is associated with various human diseases such as periodontal disease and colorectal cancer (CRC); thus, F. nucleatum detection might serve as a novel diagnostic tool. Here, we describe the development of a sensitive and rapid molecular method for detecting two F. nucleatum genes: the highly conserved nusG and fadA, which encode a critical host colonization factor. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) primer sets for the rapid detection of nusG and fadA were designed and optimized. The nusG primers yielded consistent negative results for 20 non-F. nucleatum bacterial strains, confirming the high specificity of the primers. LAMP reaction primer sensitivity was determined, and its detection rate in comparison to conventional PCR was assessed using 57 clinical stool samples. The LAMP detection limit for nusG and fadA was 22.5 and 0.225 pg µl-1, respectively, indicating that the sensitivity of this method was 10-fold higher than that of conventional PCR. These results suggest that the LAMP technique is able to effectively identify F. nucleatum via nusG as well as detect its virulence factor. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to report the application of LAMP for the detection of nusG and fadA in F. nucleatum. The LAMP method constitutes a sensitive and specific visual assay for the rapid detection of the pathogen F. nucleatum. PMID:27339262

  15. Binding of the Fap2 protein of Fusobacterium nucleatum to human inhibitory receptor TIGIT protects tumors from immune cell attack.

    PubMed

    Gur, Chamutal; Ibrahim, Yara; Isaacson, Batya; Yamin, Rachel; Abed, Jawad; Gamliel, Moriya; Enk, Jonatan; Bar-On, Yotam; Stanietsky-Kaynan, Noah; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Shussman, Noam; Almogy, Gideon; Cuapio, Angelica; Hofer, Erhard; Mevorach, Dror; Tabib, Adi; Ortenberg, Rona; Markel, Gal; Miklić, Karmela; Jonjic, Stipan; Brennan, Caitlin A; Garrett, Wendy S; Bachrach, Gilad; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2015-02-17

    Bacteria, such as Fusobacterium nucleatum, are present in the tumor microenvironment. However, the immunological consequences of intra-tumoral bacteria remain unclear. Here, we have shown that natural killer (NK) cell killing of various tumors is inhibited in the presence of various F. nucleatum strains. Our data support that this F. nucleatum-mediated inhibition is mediated by human, but not by mouse TIGIT, an inhibitory receptor present on all human NK cells and on various T cells. Using a library of F. nucleatum mutants, we found that the Fap2 protein of F. nucleatum directly interacted with TIGIT, leading to the inhibition of NK cell cytotoxicity. We have further demonstrated that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes expressed TIGIT and that T cell activities were also inhibited by F. nucleatum via Fap2. Our results identify a bacterium-dependent, tumor-immune evasion mechanism in which tumors exploit the Fap2 protein of F. nucleatum to inhibit immune cell activity via TIGIT. PMID:25680274

  16. Influence of antimicrobial subinhibitory concentrations on hemolytic activity and bacteriocin-like substances in oral Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, A C; Gaetti-Jardim, E; Cai, S; Avila-Campos, M J

    2000-04-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is considered for its role in colonization of initial and late microorganisms in dental plaque and for its coaggregation with other bacterial species. It is known that action of different antimicrobial substances may interfere with either virulence factors or with host-bacteria interaction. The goal of this study was to examine the influence of subinhibitory concentrations of chlorhexidine, triclosan, penicillin G and metronidazole on hemolytic activity and bacteriocin-like substance production of oral F. nucleatum. A high resistance to penicillin G was observed and 63% of the isolates were beta-lactamase positive. All the tested isolates were susceptible to metronidazole. F. nucleatum isolates grown with or without antimicrobials were alpha-hemolytics. Bacteriocin-like substance production was increased in isolates grown with penicillin G. Impaired production of hemolytic or antagonic substances can suggest a role in the regulation of oral microbiota. PMID:10872683

  17. Regulation of fructose metabolism and polymer synthesis by Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953.

    PubMed Central

    Robrish, S A; Thompson, J

    1990-01-01

    Energy for the anaerobic growth of Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953 can be derived from the fermentation of sugar (fructose) or amino acid (glutamate). During growth on fructose, the cells formed large intracellular granules which after extraction yielded glucose by either acid or enzymatic hydrolysis. The endogenous polymer was subsequently metabolized, and after overnight incubation of the cells in buffer, the glucan granules were no longer detectable by electron microscopy. Anaerobically, washed cells grown previously on fructose fermented this sugar to a mixture of lactic, acetic, and butyric acids, and little intracellular glucan was formed. Aerobically, the cells slowly metabolized fructose to acetate. Provision of glutamic acid as an additional energy (ATP) source elicited rapid synthesis of polymer by glycolyzing cells. Intracellular granules were not present in glutamate-grown cells, and under anaerobic conditions, the resting cells failed to metabolize [14C] fructose. However, the addition of glutamic acid to the suspension resulted in the rapid accumulation of sugar by the cells. Approximately 15% of the 14C-labeled material was extractable with boiling water, and by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, this phosphorylated derivative was identified as [14C]fructose-1-phosphate. The nonextractable material represented [14C]glucan polymer. Fructose-1-phosphate kinase activity in fructose-grown cells was fivefold greater than that in glutamate-grown cells. We suggest that the activity of fructose-1-phosphate kinase and the availability of ATP regulate the flow of fructose into either the glycolytic or polymer-synthesizing pathway in F. nucleatum. Images PMID:2211506

  18. Identification of a Fusobacterium nucleatum PK1594 galactose-binding adhesin which mediates coaggregation with periopathogenic bacteria and hemagglutination.

    PubMed Central

    Shaniztki, B; Hurwitz, D; Smorodinsky, N; Ganeshkumar, N; Weiss, E I

    1997-01-01

    Attachment of Fusobacterium nucleatum to various oral surfaces is mediated by several adhesins anchored on its outer surface. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were prepared and used to identify the putative galactose-binding adhesin of F. nucleatum PK1594. Four unique MAbs, 8G7, 26B9, 28G11, and 29D4, were isolated on the basis of their ability to inhibit coaggregation of F. nucleatum PK1594 with Porphyromonas gingivalis PK1924. All four MAbs were also capable of inhibiting galactose-inhibitable interactions of F. nucleatum PK1594 with other oral gram-negative bacteria and with erythrocytes. Preincubation of F. nucleatum PK1594 with MAb 26B9 or its Fab fragments at concentrations lower than 1 microg/ml resulted in complete inhibition of coaggregation with P. gingivalis PK1924 or hemagglutination. F. nucleatum PK1594 surface components prepared by mild sonication or by extracting whole cells with detergents were subjected to Western blot analysis. None of the MAbs were able to recognize any polypeptide in these experiments. Therefore, detergent extracts of F. nucleatum PK1594 surface components were subjected to three experimental procedures: (i) separation by ion-exchange chromatography and testing of fractions for reaction with MAb 26B9 in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), (ii) lactose-Sepharose affinity chromatography and testing of the lactose eluate in ELISA with MAb 26B9, and (iii) immunoseparation with either MAb 26B9 or 8G7. Collectively, the results suggest that the putative adhesin is a 30-kDa outer membrane polypeptide which mediates the coaggregation with P. gingivalis PK1924 as well as other galactose-sensitive interactions of F. nucleatum PK1594. PMID:9393820

  19. NOX1/2 activation in human gingival fibroblasts by Fusobacterium nucleatum facilitates attachment of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sun Hee; Song, Ji-Eun; Kim, Suhee; Cho, Sung-Hyun; Lim, Yun Kyong; Kook, Joong-Ki; Kook, Min-Suk; Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal diseases are infectious polymicrobial inflammatory diseases that lead to destruction of the periodontal ligament, gingiva, and alveolar bone. Sequential colonization of a broad range of bacteria, including Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis, is an important phenomenon in this disease model. F. nucleatum is a facultative anaerobic species thought to be a key mediator of dental plaque maturation due to its extensive coaggregation with other oral bacteria, while P. gingivalis is an obligate anaerobic species that induces gingival inflammation by secreting various virulence factors. The formation of a bacterial complex by these two species is central to the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced during bacterial infections and are involved in intracellular signaling. However, the impact of oral bacteria-induced ROS on the ecology of F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis has yet to be clarified. In the present study, we investigated ROS production induced in primary human oral cells by F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis and its effect on the formation of their bacterial complexes and further host cell apoptosis. We found that in primary human gingival fibroblasts (GFs), two NADPH oxidase isoforms, NOX1 and NOX2, were activated in response to F. nucleatum infection but not P. gingivalis infection. Accordingly, increased NADPH oxidase activity and production of superoxide anion were observed in GFs after F. nucleatum infection, but not after P. gingivalis infection. Interestingly, in NOX1, NOX2, or NOX1/NOX2 knockdown cells, the number of P. gingivalis decreased when the cells were coinfected with F. nucleatum. A similar pattern of host cell apoptosis was observed. This implies that F. nucleatum contributes to attachment of P. gingivalis by triggering activation of NADPH oxidase in host cells, which may provide an environment more favorable to strict anaerobic bacteria and have a subsequent effect on apoptosis of

  20. Immunobiological activities of a porin fraction isolated from Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953.

    PubMed Central

    Takada, H; Ogawa, T; Yoshimura, F; Otsuka, K; Kokeguchi, S; Kato, K; Umemoto, T; Kotani, S

    1988-01-01

    From Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953 cell envelope fraction whose inner membranes had been removed by treatment with sodium N-lauroyl sarcosinate, an outer membrane protein (37,000 Mr in a native state) was prepared by extraction with lithium dodecyl sulfate. The protein thus obtained showed distinct porin activity, namely, the ability to form hydrophilic diffusion pores by incorporation into the artificial liposome membrane. The porin fraction exhibited strong immunobiological activities in the in vitro assays: B-cell mitogenicity and polyclonal B-cell activation on murine splenocytes, stimulatory effects on guinea pig peritoneal macrophages, and enhancement of the migration of human blood monocytes. The porin fraction also exhibited immunoadjuvant activity to increase the antibody production against sheep erythrocytes in the spleen of mice that were immunized by sheep erythrocytes with porin. Although chemical analyses revealed that the test porin fraction contained a considerable amount of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (around 12% of the fraction), the studies with LPS-nonresponding C3H/HeJ mice and on the inhibitory effects of polymyxin B strongly suggest that most of the above bioactivities are due to porin protein itself, not to coexistent LPS in the porin fraction. Images PMID:2831155

  1. Antiaggregation potential of berry fractions against pairs of Streptococcus mutans with Fusobacterium nucleatum or Actinomyces naeslundii.

    PubMed

    Riihinen, Kaisu; Ryynänen, Anu; Toivanen, Marko; Könönen, Eija; Törrönen, Riitta; Tikkanen-Kaukanen, Carina

    2011-01-01

    Coaggregation is an interspecies adhesion process, which is essential to the development of dental plaque. This is an in vitro study of the composition of the soluble solids in the berry juice molecular size fractions (<10 kDa, FI; 10-100 kDa, FII; >100 kDa, FIII) derived from apple, bilberry, blackcurrant, cloudberry, crowberry and lingonberry and their ability to inhibit and reverse coaggregation of the pairs of common species in dental plaque: Streptococcus mutans with Fusobacterium nucleatum or Actinomyces naeslundii. Inhibitory and reversal activity was found in the molecular size fractions FII and FIII of bilberry, blackcurrant, crowberry and lingonberry. The active fractions contained higher amounts of polyphenols (5-12% of soluble solids) than those without activity (<2% of soluble solids). Proanthocyanidins dominated in the active lingonberry juice fractions FII and FIII and also small amounts of anthocyanins were detected. Anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins and flavonol glycosides were prevalent in FII and FIII fractions of bilberry, blackcurrant and crowberry juices. Comparable amounts of sugars and titratable acids were present in the latter three berry juice fractions of different size. The results indicate that the high molecular size fractions of lingonberry, bilberry, blackcurrant and crowberry juices have antiaggregation potential on common oral bacteria, the potential being associated with their polyphenolic content. PMID:20623601

  2. Characterization of extracellular polymeric matrix, and treatment of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms with DNase I and proteinase K

    PubMed Central

    Ali Mohammed, Marwan Mansoor; Nerland, Audun H.; Al-Haroni, Mohammed; Bakken, Vidar

    2013-01-01

    Background Biofilms are organized communities of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix (EPM), often with great phylogenetic variety. Bacteria in the subgingival biofilm are key factors that cause periodontal diseases; among these are the Gram-negative bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The objectives of this study were to characterize the major components of the EPM and to test the effect of deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) and proteinase K. Methods F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis bacterial cells were grown in dynamic and static biofilm models. The effects of DNase I and proteinase K enzymes on the major components of the EPM were tested during biofilm formation and on mature biofilm. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used in observing biofilm structure. Results Proteins and carbohydrates were the major components of the biofilm matrix, and extracellular DNA (eDNA) was also present. DNase I and proteinase K enzymes had little effect on biofilms in the conditions used. In the flow cell, F. nucleatum was able to grow in partially oxygenated conditions while P. gingivalis failed to form biofilm alone in similar conditions. F. nucleatum supported the growth of P. gingivalis when they were grown together as dual species biofilm. Conclusion DNase I and proteinase K had little effect on the biofilm matrix in the conditions used. F. nucleatum formed biofilm easily and supported the growth of P. gingivalis, which preferred anaerobic conditions. PMID:23372876

  3. Antibody and T Cell Responses to Fusobacterium nucleatum and Treponema denticola in Health and Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jieun; Kho, Sang-A; Choi, Yun S.; Kim, Yong C.; Rhyu, In-Chul; Choi, Youngnim

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of the T cell response to the members of oral flora are poorly understood. We characterized the antibody and T cell responses to FadA and Td92, adhesins from Fusobacterium nucleatum, an oral commensal, and Treponema denticola, a periodontal pathogen, respectively. Peripheral blood and saliva were obtained from healthy individuals and patients with untreated chronic periodontitis (CP, n = 11 paris) and after successful treatment of the disease (n = 9). The levels of antigen-specific antibody were measured by ELISA. In plasma, IgG1 was the most abundant isotype of Ab for both Ags, followed by IgA and then IgG4. The levels of FadA-specific salivary IgA (sIgA) were higher than Td92-specific sIgA and the FadA-specific IgA levels observed in plasma. However, the periodontal health status of the individuals did not affect the levels of FadA- or Td92-specific antibody. Even healthy individuals contained FadA- and Td92-specific CD4+ T cells, as determined by the detection of intracytoplasmic CD154 after short-term in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with the antigens. Patients with CP tended to possess increased numbers of FadA- and Td92-specific CD4+ T cells but reduced numbers of Td92-specific Foxp3+CD4+ Tregs than the healthy subjects. Both FadA and Td92 induced the production of IFNγ and IL-10 but inhibited the secretion of IL-4 by PBMCs. In conclusion, F. nucleatum induced Th3 (sIgA)- and Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1)-dominant immune responses, whereas T. denticola induced a Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1)-dominant response. This IFNγ-dominant cytokine response was impaired in CP patients, and the Td92-induced IFNγ levels were negatively associated with periodontal destruction in patients. These findings may provide new insights into the homeostatic interaction between the immune system and oral bacteria and the pathogenesis of periodontitis. PMID:23335969

  4. Fusobacterium nucleatum Alters Atherosclerosis Risk Factors and Enhances Inflammatory Markers with an Atheroprotective Immune Response in ApoEnull Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes. F.; Chen, Hao; Zheng, Donghang; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Gangula, Pandu R.; Lucas, Alexandra R.; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2015-01-01

    The American Heart Association supports an association between periodontal disease (PD) and atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD) but does not as of yet support a causal relationship. Recently, we have shown that major periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola are causally associated with acceleration of aortic atherosclerosis in ApoEnull hyperlipidemic mice. The aim of this study was to determine if oral infection with another significant periodontal pathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum can accelerate aortic inflammation and atherosclerosis in the aortic artery of ApoEnull mice. ApoEnull mice (n = 23) were orally infected with F. nucleatum ATCC 49256 and euthanized at 12 and 24 weeks. Periodontal disease assessments including F. nucleatum oral colonization, gingival inflammation, immune response, intrabony defects, and alveolar bone resorption were evaluated. Systemic organs were evaluated for infection, aortic sections were examined for atherosclerosis, and inflammatory markers were measured. Chronic oral infection established F. nucleatum colonization in the oral cavity, induced significant humoral IgG (P=0.0001) and IgM (P=0.001) antibody response (12 and 24 weeks), and resulted in significant (P=0.0001) alveolar bone resorption and intrabony defects. F. nucleatum genomic DNA was detected in systemic organs (heart, aorta, liver, kidney, lung) indicating bacteremia. Aortic atherosclerotic plaque area was measured and showed a local inflammatory infiltrate revealed the presence of F4/80+ macrophages and CD3+ T cells. Vascular inflammation was detected by enhanced systemic cytokines (CD30L, IL-4, IL-12), oxidized LDL and serum amyloid A, as well as altered serum lipid profile (cholesterol, triglycerides, chylomicrons, VLDL, LDL, HDL), in infected mice and altered aortic gene expression in infected mice. Despite evidence for systemic infection in several organs and modulation of known atherosclerosis risk factors, aortic atherosclerotic

  5. Fap2 of Fusobacterium nucleatum Is a Galactose-Inhibitable Adhesin Involved in Coaggregation, Cell Adhesion, and Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Coppenhagen-Glazer, S.; Sol, A.; Abed, J.; Naor, R.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a common oral anaerobe involved in periodontitis that is known to translocate and cause intrauterine infections. In the oral environment, F. nucleatum adheres to a large diversity of species, facilitating their colonization and creating biological bridges that stabilize the multispecies dental biofilm. Many of these interactions (called coadherences or coaggregations) are galactose sensitive. Galactose-sensitive interactions are also involved in the binding of F. nucleatum to host cells. Hemagglutination of some F. nucleatum strains is also galactose sensitive, suggesting that a single galactose-sensitive adhesin might mediate the interaction of fusobacteria with many partners and targets. In order to identify the fusobacterial galactose-sensitive adhesin, a system for transposon mutagenesis in fusobacteria was created. The mutant library was screened for hemagglutination deficiency, and three clones were isolated. All three clones were found to harbor the transposon in the gene coding for the Fap2 outer membrane autotransporter. The three fap2 mutants failed to show galactose-inhibitable coaggregation with Porphyromonas gingivalis and were defective in cell binding. A fap2 mutant also showed a 2-log reduction in murine placental colonization compared to that of the wild type. Our results suggest that Fap2 is a galactose-sensitive hemagglutinin and adhesin that is likely to play a role in the virulence of fusobacteria. PMID:25561710

  6. Fap2 Mediates Fusobacterium nucleatum Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Enrichment by Binding to Tumor-Expressed Gal-GalNAc.

    PubMed

    Abed, Jawad; Emgård, Johanna E M; Zamir, Gideon; Faroja, Mouhammad; Almogy, Gideon; Grenov, Amalie; Sol, Asaf; Naor, Ronit; Pikarsky, Eli; Atlan, Karine A; Mellul, Anna; Chaushu, Stella; Manson, Abigail L; Earl, Ashlee M; Ou, Nora; Brennan, Caitlin A; Garrett, Wendy S; Bachrach, Gilad

    2016-08-10

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is associated with colorectal cancer and promotes colonic tumor formation in preclinical models. However, fusobacteria are core members of the human oral microbiome and less prevalent in the healthy gut, raising questions about how fusobacteria localize to CRC. We identify a host polysaccharide and fusobacterial lectin that explicates fusobacteria abundance in CRC. Gal-GalNAc, which is overexpressed in CRC, is recognized by fusobacterial Fap2, which functions as a Gal-GalNAc lectin. F. nucleatum binding to clinical adenocarcinomas correlates with Gal-GalNAc expression and is reduced upon O-glycanase treatment. Clinical fusobacteria strains naturally lacking Fap2 or inactivated Fap2 mutants show reduced binding to Gal-GalNAc-expressing CRC cells and established CRCs in mice. Additionally, intravenously injected F. nucleatum localizes to mouse tumor tissues in a Fap2-dependent manner, suggesting that fusobacteria use a hematogenous route to reach colon adenocarcinomas. Thus, targeting F. nucleatum Fap2 or host epithelial Gal-GalNAc may reduce fusobacteria potentiation of CRC. PMID:27512904

  7. Detection of fusobacterium nucleatum and fadA adhesin gene in patients with orthodontic gingivitis and non-orthodontic periodontal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jianning; Guo, Yang; Zhang, Yujie; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is one of the most abundant gram-negative bacilli colonizing the subgingival plaque and closely associated with periodontal disease. However it is unclear whether F. nucleatum is involved in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. A novel adhesin, FadA, which is unique to oral Fusobacteria, is required for F. nucleatum binding and invasion to epithelial cells and thus may play an important role in colonization of Fusobacterium in the host. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of F. nucleatum and its virulence factor FadA adhesion gene (fadA) in 169 subgingival biofilm samples from 55 cases of gingivitis patients with orthodontic appliances, 49 cases of gingivitis patients without orthodontic treatment, 35 cases of periodontitis patients and 30 cases of periodontally healthy people via PCR. The correlations between the F. nucleatum/fadA and gingivitis index(GI)was also analyzed. The detection rate of F. nucleatum/fadA in periodontitis group and non-orthodontic gingivitis group was higher than the other two groups (p<0.01) while it was higher in orthodontic gingivitis group than in health people (p<0.05). An obviously positive correlation was observed between the prevalence of F. nucleatum/fadA and GI. F. nucleatum carrying fadA may be more closely related to the development of gingivitis and periodontal disease compared with orthodontic gingivitis. PMID:24416378

  8. Antibacterial and antigelatinolytic effects of Satureja hortensis L. essential oil on epithelial cells exposed to Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Keskin, Mutlu; Könönen, Eija; Uitto, Veli-Jukka; Söderling, Eva; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca; Gürsoy, Ulvi K

    2015-04-01

    The present report examined the effects of essential oils (EOs) from Satureja hortensis L. and Salvia fruticosa M. on the viability and outer membrane permeability of the periodontopathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum, a key bacteria in oral biofilms, as well as the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9) activities in epithelial cells exposed to such bacteria. Membrane permeability was tested by measuring the N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine uptake and bacterial viability by using the commercially available Live/Dead BacLight kit. In addition, gelatin zymography was performed to analyze the inhibition of F. nucleatum-induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in HaCaT cells. We showed that 5, 10, and 25 μL/mL of Sat. hortensis L. EO decreased the ratio of live/dead bacteria and increased the outer membrane permeability in a range of time from 0 to 5 min. Treatments with 10 and 25 μL/mL of Sal. fruticosa M. also increased the membrane permeability and 5, 10, and 25 μL/mL of both EOs inhibited MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in keratinocytes induced after exposure of 24 h to F. nucleatum. We conclude that antibacterial and antigelatinolytic activities of Sat. hortensis L. EO have potential for the treatment of periodontal inflammation. PMID:24404975

  9. Fusobacterium nucleatum infection of gingival epithelial cells leads to NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent secretion of IL-1β and the danger signals ASC and HMGB1.

    PubMed

    Bui, Fiona Q; Johnson, Larry; Roberts, JoAnn; Hung, Shu-Chen; Lee, Jungnam; Atanasova, Kalina Rosenova; Huang, Pei-Rong; Yilmaz, Özlem; Ojcius, David M

    2016-07-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is an invasive anaerobic bacterium that is associated with periodontal disease. Previous studies have focused on virulence factors produced by F. nucleatum, but early recognition of the pathogen by the immune system remains poorly understood. Although an inflammasome in gingival epithelial cells (GECs) can be stimulated by danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) (also known as danger signals) such as ATP, inflammasome activation by this periodontal pathogen has yet to be described in these cells. This study therefore examines the effects of F. nucleatum infection on pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and inflammasome activation in GECs. Our results indicate that infection induces translocation of NF-κB into the nucleus, resulting in cytokine gene expression. In addition, infection activates the NLRP3 inflammasome, which in turn activates caspase-1 and stimulates secretion of mature IL-1β. Unlike other pathogens studied until now, F. nucleatum activates the inflammasome in GECs in the absence of exogenous DAMPs such as ATP. Finally, infection promotes release of other DAMPs that mediate inflammation, such as high-mobility group box 1 protein and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein, with a similar time-course as caspase-1 activation. Thus, F. nucleatum expresses the pathogen-associated molecular patterns necessary to activate NF-κB and also provides an endogenous DAMP to stimulate the inflammasome and further amplify inflammation through secretion of secondary DAMPs. PMID:26687842

  10. Synergic phototoxic effect of visible light or Gallium-Arsenide laser in the presence of different photo-sensitizers on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Habibollah; Mousavi, Seyed Amir; Forouzanfar, Ali; Zakeri, Mahdi; Shafaee, Hooman; Shahnaseri, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Background: According to the development of resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria following treatment with antimicrobial chemotherapeutic agents, alternative approaches such as lethal photosensitization are being used. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of visible light and laser beam radiation in conjugation with three different photosensitizers on the survival of two main periodontopathogenic bacteria including Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum in different exposure periods. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro prospective study, strains of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. were exposed to visible light at wavelengths of 440 nm and diode laser light, Gallium-Arsenide, at wavelength of 830 nm in the presence of a photosensitizer (erythrosine, curcuma, or hydrogen peroxide). They were exposed 1-5 min to each light. Each experiment was repeated 3 times for each strain of bacteria. Data were analyzed by two-ways ANOVA and least significant difference post-hoc tests. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. After 4 days the colonies were counted. Results: Viability of P. gingivalis was reduced 10% and 20% subsequent to exposure to visible light and diode laser, respectively. The values were 65% and 75% for F. nucleatum in a period of 5-min, respectively. Exposure to visible light or laser beam in conjugation with the photosensitizers suspension caused significant reduction in the number of P. gingivalis in duration of 5-min, suggesting a synergic phototoxic effect. However, the survival rate of F. nucleatum following the exposure to laser with hydrogen peroxide, erythrosine and rhizome of Curcuma longa (curcumin) after 5-min was 10%, 20% and 90% respectively. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, the synergic phototoxic effect of visible light in combination with each of the photosensitizers on P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. However, the synergic phototoxic effect of laser exposure and hydrogen peroxide and curcumin as

  11. Fusobacterium nucleatum Alters Atherosclerosis Risk Factors and Enhances Inflammatory Markers with an Atheroprotective Immune Response in ApoE(null) Mice.

    PubMed

    Velsko, Irina M; Chukkapalli, Sasanka S; Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes F; Chen, Hao; Zheng, Donghang; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Gangula, Pandu R; Lucas, Alexandra R; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2015-01-01

    The American Heart Association supports an association between periodontal disease (PD) and atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD) but does not as of yet support a causal relationship. Recently, we have shown that major periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola are causally associated with acceleration of aortic atherosclerosis in ApoEnull hyperlipidemic mice. The aim of this study was to determine if oral infection with another significant periodontal pathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum can accelerate aortic inflammation and atherosclerosis in the aortic artery of ApoEnull mice. ApoEnull mice (n = 23) were orally infected with F. nucleatum ATCC 49256 and euthanized at 12 and 24 weeks. Periodontal disease assessments including F. nucleatum oral colonization, gingival inflammation, immune response, intrabony defects, and alveolar bone resorption were evaluated. Systemic organs were evaluated for infection, aortic sections were examined for atherosclerosis, and inflammatory markers were measured. Chronic oral infection established F. nucleatum colonization in the oral cavity, induced significant humoral IgG (P=0.0001) and IgM (P=0.001) antibody response (12 and 24 weeks), and resulted in significant (P=0.0001) alveolar bone resorption and intrabony defects. F. nucleatum genomic DNA was detected in systemic organs (heart, aorta, liver, kidney, lung) indicating bacteremia. Aortic atherosclerotic plaque area was measured and showed a local inflammatory infiltrate revealed the presence of F4/80+ macrophages and CD3+ T cells. Vascular inflammation was detected by enhanced systemic cytokines (CD30L, IL-4, IL-12), oxidized LDL and serum amyloid A, as well as altered serum lipid profile (cholesterol, triglycerides, chylomicrons, VLDL, LDL, HDL), in infected mice and altered aortic gene expression in infected mice. Despite evidence for systemic infection in several organs and modulation of known atherosclerosis risk factors, aortic atherosclerotic

  12. Invasive Fusobacterium nucleatum may play a role in the carcinogenesis of proximal colon cancer through the serrated neoplasia pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiahui; Chen, Yongyu; Fu, Xiangsheng; Zhou, Xian; Peng, Yan; Shi, Lei; Chen, Ting; Wu, Yaxin

    2016-09-15

    The prevalence of invasive Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) within the serrated neoplasia pathway of the proximal colon has seldom been investigated. We examined the invasive Fn and bacterial biofilms in 35 proximal hyperplastic polyps (HPs), 33 sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs), 48 proximal colorectal cancers (CRCs) and 10 matched metastatic lymph nodes using 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Samples of normal mucosa, traditional adenomas (TAs), distal HPs, distal CRCs and matched lymph nodes with or without metastases were used as controls. The prevalence of invasive Fn within proximal HPs (65.7%) and SSAs (78.8%) were significantly higher than that of proximal TAs (28.9%) and distal TAs (24.4%; p < 0.05). Invasive Fn was detected in markedly more proximal CRCs (89.6%) than in distal CRCs (42.2%; p < 0.05). Moreover, invasive Fn was detected in a significantly higher proportion of matched metastatic lymph nodes (100%) than that within nonmetastatic lymph nodes (40.0%; p < 0.001). Bacterial biofilms were found on 52.1% of proximal CRCs, 55.6% of distal CRCs and 48.5% of SSAs. Biofilms were positive for Fn in 47.9% of proximal CRCs, 48.9% of distal CRCs and 27.3% of SSAs. However, the presence of Fn in biofilms was not related to invasive Fn within colorectal tissues (p = 0.415). Invasive Fn may play a role in the carcinogenesis of proximal colon developing via the serrated neoplasia pathway, but might have a less important role in the TA-carcinoma sequence. Bacterial biofilms may not contribute to the invasion of Fn into tumor tissues. PMID:27130618

  13. Wild Blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.) Polyphenols Target Fusobacterium nucleatum and the Host Inflammatory Response: Potential Innovative Molecules for Treating Periodontal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ben Lagha, Amel; Dudonné, Stéphanie; Desjardins, Yves; Grenier, Daniel

    2015-08-12

    Blueberries contain significant amounts of flavonoids to which a number of beneficial health effects in humans have been associated. The present study investigated the effect of a polyphenol-rich lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.) extract on the two main etiologic components of periodontitis, a multifactorial disorder affecting the supporting structures of the teeth. Phenolic acids, flavonoids (flavonols, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols), and procyanidins made up 16.6, 12.9, and 2.7% of the blueberry extract, respectively. The blueberry extract showed antibacterial activity (MIC = 1 mg/mL) against the periodontopathogenic bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum. This property may result from the ability of blueberry polyphenols to chelate iron. Moreover, the blueberry extract at 62.5 μg/mL inhibited F. nucleatum biofilm formation by 87.5 ± 2.3%. Subsequently, the ability of the blueberry extract to inhibit the NF-κB signaling pathway in U937-3xκB cells was investigated. The blueberry extract dose-dependently inhibited the activation of NF-κB induced by F. nucleatum. In addition, a pretreatment of macrophages with the blueberry extract (62.5 μg/mL) inhibited the secretion of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 by 87.3 ± 1.3, 80.7 ± 5.6, and 28.2 ± 9.3%, respectively, following a stimulation with F. nucleatum. Similarly, the secretion of MMP-8 and MMP-9 was also dose-dependently inhibited. This dual antibacterial and anti-inflammatory action of lowbush blueberry polyphenols suggests that they may be promising candidates for novel therapeutic agents. PMID:26207764

  14. Abnormal Pregnancy Outcomes in Mice Using an Induced Periodontitis Model and the Haematogenous Migration of Fusobacterium nucleatum Sub-Species to the Murine Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Claire T.; Fitzsimmons, Tracy R.; Marchant, Ceilidh; Bartold, P. Mark; Zilm, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate if there is subspecies specific migration to the placenta by Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) and to determine whether experimentally induced periodontitis results in adverse pregnancy outcomes (APO) in mice. Methods Periodontitis was induced in pregnant mice using an inoculum of Fn and Porphyromonas gingivalis. In parallel, four sub-species of Fn were individually injected into the circulatory system. At day 18 of gestation, the placenta, liver, spleen and blood were harvested and litter size, number of viable fetuses and resorptions, maternal, fetal and placenta weights were recorded. For the direct inoculation group, some mice were allowed to deliver for assessment of length of gestation, litter size, maternal, placental and pup weight. The presence of Fn was assessed by PCR and inflammatory mediators were measured by ELISA or multiplex analysis. Results Mice with alveolar bone loss, a marker of periodontitis, demonstrated significantly higher fetal weights (p = 0.015) and fetal/placental weight ratios (p = 0.030). PCR analysis of maternal organs did not identify Fn in any extracted tissues. In mice that received direct injection of Fn subspecies, varying degrees of APO were observed including preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, and fetal loss. Haematogenous spread of only Fn subsp. nucleatum to the placenta was confirmed. Litter size was significantly smaller (p = 0.023) and the number of resorptions was higher in inoculated versus control groups. Mice injected with subsp. nucleatum had significantly increased circulating CRP levels (p = 0.020) compared to controls while the mice with induced periodontitis had increased levels of IL-6 (p = 0.047) and IL-8 (p = 0.105). Conclusions Periodontitis in mice elevated fetal weight and the fetal weight/placental weight ratio. This study found that subsp. nucleatum migrated haematogenously to the placenta, leading to APO in mice. The study supports the potential role of Fn in the

  15. Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953 requires Actinomyces naeslundii ATCC 43146 for growth on saliva in a three-species community that includes Streptococcus oralis 34.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Saravanan; Chalmers, Natalia I; Du-Thumm, Laurence; Kolenbrander, Paul E

    2009-05-01

    Formation of dental plaque is a developmental process involving initial and late colonizing species that form polymicrobial communities. Fusobacteria are the most numerous gram-negative bacteria in dental plaque, but they become prevalent after the initial commensal colonizers, such as streptococci and actinomyces, have established communities. The unusual ability of these bacteria to coaggregate with commensals, as well as pathogenic late colonizers, has been proposed to facilitate colonization by the latter organisms. We investigated the integration of Fusobacterium nucleatum into multispecies communities by employing two in vitro models with saliva as the sole nutritional source. In flow cell biofilms, numbers of cells were quantified using fluorescently conjugated antibodies against each species, and static biofilms were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (q-PCR) using species-specific primers. Unable to grow as single-species biofilms, F. nucleatum grew in two-species biofilms with Actinomyces naeslundii but not with Streptococcus oralis. However, enhanced growth of fusobacteria was observed in three-species biofilms, indicating that there was multispecies cooperation. Importantly, these community dynamics yielded an 18-fold increase in the F. nucleatum biomass between 4 h and 18 h in the flow cell inoculated with three species. q-PCR analysis of static biofilms revealed that maximum growth of the three species occurred at 24 h to 36 h. Lower numbers of cells were observed at 48 h, suggesting that saliva could not support higher cell densities as the sole nutrient. Integration of F. nucleatum into multispecies commensal communities was evident from the interdigitation of fusobacteria in coaggregates with A. naeslundii and S. oralis and from the improved growth of fusobacteria, which was dependent on the presence of A. naeslundii. PMID:19286780

  16. Lethal effect of blue light-activated hydrogen peroxide, curcumin and erythrosine as potential oral photosensitizers on the viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    Habiboallh, Ghanbari; Mahbobeh, Naderi Nasab; Mina, Zareian Jahromi; Majid, Zakeri; Nooshin, Arjmand

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been introduced as a new modality in oral bacterial decontamination. Current research aims to evaluate the effect of photodynamic killing of visible blue light in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, curcumin and erythrosine as potential oral photosensitizers on Porphyromonas gingivalis associated with periodontal bone loss and Fusobacterium nucleatum associated with soft tissue inflammation. Materials and methods: Standard suspension of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum were exposed to Light Emitting Diode (LED) (440–480 nm) in combination with erythrosine (22 µm), curcumin (60 µM) and hydrogen peroxide (0.3 mM) for 5 min. Bacterial samples from each treatment groups (radiation-only group, photosensitizer-only group and blue light-activated photosensitizer group) were subcultured onto the surface of agar plates. Survival of these bacteria was determined by counting the number of colony forming units (CFU) after incubation. Results: Results for antibacterial assays on P. gingivalis confirmed that curcumin, Hydrogen peroxide and erythrosine alone exerted a moderate bactericidal effect which enhanced noticeably in conjugation with visible light. The survival rate of P. gingivalis reached zero present when the suspension exposed to blue light-activated curcumin and hydrogen peroxide for 2 min. Besides, curcumin exerted a remarkable antibacterial activity against F. nucleatum in comparison with erythrosine and hydrogen peroxide (P=0.00). Furthermore, the bactericidal effect of visible light alone on P. gingivalis as black-pigmented bacteria was significant. Conclusion: Our result suggested that visible blue light in the presence of erythrosine, curcumin and hydrogen peroxide would be consider as a potential approach of PDT to kill the main gramnegative periodontal pathogens. From a clinical standpoint, this regimen could be established as an additional minimally invasive antibacterial treatment of plaque induced

  17. Effect of estradiol on planktonic growth, coaggregation, and biofilm formation of the Prevotella intermedia group bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fteita, Dareen; Könönen, Eija; Söderling, Eva; Gürsoy, Ulvi Kahraman

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in the quantity and quality of biofilms at gingival margin are considered to play a role in the initiation and development of pregnancy-related gingivitis. Prevotella intermedia sensu lato is able to consume estradiol, the major sex hormone secreted during pregnancy, in the absence of vitamin K. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of estradiol on the planktonic growth, coaggregation, polysaccharide production, and biofilm formation of the P. intermedia group bacteria, namely P. intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, and Prevotella pallens. In all experiments, the type strain (ATCC) and a clinical strain (AHN) of P. intermedia, P. nigrescens, and P. pallens were incubated with the concentrations of 0, 30, 90, and 120 nmol/L of estradiol. Planktonic growth was assessed by means of the colony forming unit method, while coaggregation and biofilm formation were assessed by spectrophotometric methods. In the determination of protein and polysaccharide levels, the Bradford and phenol-sulfuric acid methods were used, respectively. P. pallens AHN 9283 and P. nigrescens ATCC 33563 increased their numbers at planktonic stage with increasing estradiol concentrations. In 48-h biofilm tests, elevated protein levels were found for both strains of P. intermedia, and the strains P. nigrescens ATCC 33563 and P. pallens AHN 9283 in the presence of estradiol. The P. intermedia strains also increased the levels of polysaccharide formation in the biofilm. Coaggregation of the P. intermedia group organisms with Fusobacterium nucleatum was enhanced only in P. intermedia AHN 8290. In conclusion, our in vitro experiments indicate that estradiol regulates planktonic growth, coaggregation, polysaccharide production, and biofilm formation characteristics of P. intermedia, P. nigrescens, and P. pallens differently. These results may, at least partly, explain the differences seen in their contribution to the pathogenesis of pregnancy-related gingivitis. PMID

  18. Incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of Fusobacterium species bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fusobacterium species (spp.) bacteremia is uncommon and has been associated with a variety of clinical presentations. We conducted a retrospective, population based study to determine the relative proportion of species in this genus causing bacteremia and the risk factors for infection and adverse clinical outcomes. Methods All cases of Fusobacterium spp. bacteremia detected at a regional microbiology laboratory serving outpatient and acute care for a population of approximately 1.3 million people over 11 years were identified from a computerized database. Clinical data on these cases was extracted from an administrative database and analyzed to determine underlying risk factors for and outcomes of infection. Results There were 72 incident cases of Fusobacterium spp. bacteremia over the study period (0.55 cases/100,000 population per annum). F. nucleatum was the most frequent species (61%), followed by F. necrophorum (25%). F. necrophorum bacteremia occurred in a younger population without underlying comorbidities and was not associated with mortality. F. nucleatum bacteremia was found in an older population and was associated with underlying malignancy or receiving dialysis. Death occurred in approximately 10% of F. nucleatum cases but causality was not established in this study. Conclusions Fusobacterium spp. bacteremia in our community is uncommon and occurs in approximately 5.5 cases per million population per annum. F. necrophorum occurred in an otherwise young healthy population and was not associated with any mortality. F. nucleatum was found primarily in older patients with chronic medical conditions and was associated with a mortality of approximately 10%. Bacteremias from other Fusobacterium spp. were rare. PMID:23734900

  19. Fusobacterium hwasookii sp. nov., Isolated from a Human Periodontitis Lesion.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eugene; Park, Soon-Nang; Lim, Yun Kyong; Shin, Yeseul; Paek, Jayoung; Hwang, Cheol Ho; Chang, Young-Hyo; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we classified the five strains (ChDC F128(T), ChDC F145, ChDC F174, ChDC F206, and ChDC F300) as a novel species of genus Fusobacterium by DNA-DNA hybridization and multi-locus phylogenetic analysis (MLPA), based on a single sequence (24,715 bp) of 22 concatenated housekeeping genes, with morphological and chemotaxonomic characteristics. DNA-DNA hybridization data showed that the values of genomic relatedness between ChDC F128(T) and each of the other novel strains were ranged from 79.0 to 82.6 %, while those of genomic relatedness between ChDC F128(T) and type strain of each of subspecies of F. nucleatum or Fusobacterium periodonticum were ranged from 40.9 to 54.4 %. MLPA revealed that the 5 strains were clustered as one group and clearly discriminated with F. nucleatum and F. periodonticum with 100 % bootstrap value. The DNA G+C content of the five novel strains were ranged from 26.9 to 27.0 mol%. The cellular fatty acid analysis of clinical isolates and type strains revealed C14:0, C16:0, and cis-9 C16:1 as the major fatty acids. The cell wall peptidoglycan of the 5 strains was comprised of meso-lanthionine. These results show that the 5 strains are novel species and belong to the genus Fusobacterium. Strain ChDC F128(T) (=KCOM 1249(T) = KCTC 5108(T) = JCM 30218(T)) is suggested to be the type strain of a novel species of genus Fusobacterium, for which the name Fusobacterium hwasookii sp. nov. is proposed. PMID:25257648

  20. A case of liver abscess with systemic infection caused by Fusobacterium.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Naoki; Okai, Ken; Takahashi, Atsushi; Abe, Kazumichi; Kanno, Yukiko; Hayashi, Manabu; Imaizumi, Hiromichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2016-05-01

    A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of an abnormal shadow on chest X-ray. Blood testing showed elevated levels of C-reactive protein and white blood cells. Computed tomography revealed multilocular masses of the right hepatic lobe, reticulonodular shadowing on both lungs, left kidney masses, and aortic arch aneurysm. Fusobacterium nucleatum was isolated from the hepatic abscess after percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Because of severe dental caries, he was diagnosed with liver abscess caused by dental infection with F. nucleatum. Administration of cefmetazole and meropenem was not effective; however, he showed remarkable improvement after treatment with metronidazole and continuous drainage. PMID:27151479

  1. 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequences in Bacteroides and Fusobacterium: evolutionary relationships within these genera and among eubacteria in general

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van den Eynde, H.; De Baere, R.; Shah, H. N.; Gharbia, S. E.; Fox, G. E.; Michalik, J.; Van de Peer, Y.; De Wachter, R.

    1989-01-01

    The 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequences were determined for Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides capillosus, Bacteroides veroralis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Anaerorhabdus furcosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Fusobacterium mortiferum, and Fusobacterium varium. A dendrogram constructed by a clustering algorithm from these sequences, which were aligned with all other hitherto known eubacterial 5S rRNA sequences, showed differences as well as similarities with respect to results derived from 16S rRNA analyses. In the 5S rRNA dendrogram, Bacteroides clustered together with Cytophaga and Fusobacterium, as in 16S rRNA analyses. Intraphylum relationships deduced from 5S rRNAs suggested that Bacteroides is specifically related to Cytophaga rather than to Fusobacterium, as was suggested by 16S rRNA analyses. Previous taxonomic considerations concerning the genus Bacteroides, based on biochemical and physiological data, were confirmed by the 5S rRNA sequence analysis.

  2. Fusobacterium Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Buelow, Ben D.; Lambert, Joelle M.; Gill, Ryan M.

    2013-01-01

    Fusobacterium is well characterized as an oropharyngeal pathogen that may induce a septic thrombophlebitis by direct extension of abscess into an adjacent neck vessel (Lemierre's syndrome); its potential for visceral abscess formation, however, remains under-recognized. A 65-year-old man with a recent history of multiple rim-enhancing liver lesions presented to the emergency room with fever and abdominal pain. Based on interval increase in the size of the lesions, abscess was suspected. A liver biopsy was performed, and although no organism could be identified on routine microscopy, Warthin-Starry stain revealed Gram-negative bacilli consistent with an anaerobic Fusobacterium species as the underlying etiology of liver abscess formation. Subsequent anaerobic culture results confirmed the diagnosis. This case highlights the importance of consideration for Fusobacterium infection in the setting of liver abscess if anaerobic organisms have not yet been excluded on initial culture evaluation. PMID:24348321

  3. Fusobacterium liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Buelow, Ben D; Lambert, Joelle M; Gill, Ryan M

    2013-01-01

    Fusobacterium is well characterized as an oropharyngeal pathogen that may induce a septic thrombophlebitis by direct extension of abscess into an adjacent neck vessel (Lemierre's syndrome); its potential for visceral abscess formation, however, remains under-recognized. A 65-year-old man with a recent history of multiple rim-enhancing liver lesions presented to the emergency room with fever and abdominal pain. Based on interval increase in the size of the lesions, abscess was suspected. A liver biopsy was performed, and although no organism could be identified on routine microscopy, Warthin-Starry stain revealed Gram-negative bacilli consistent with an anaerobic Fusobacterium species as the underlying etiology of liver abscess formation. Subsequent anaerobic culture results confirmed the diagnosis. This case highlights the importance of consideration for Fusobacterium infection in the setting of liver abscess if anaerobic organisms have not yet been excluded on initial culture evaluation. PMID:24348321

  4. Scaling and root planning, and locally delivered minocycline reduces the load of Prevotella intermedia in an interdependent pattern, correlating with symptomatic improvements of chronic periodontitis: a short-term randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shuli; Wang, Ying; Sun, Wei; Chen, Hui; Wu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the respective or combinatory efficacy of locally delivered 2% minocycline (MO), and scaling and root planning (SRP) by assessing both clinical parameters and the loads of four main periodontal pathogens in treating chronic periodontitis (CP). Methods Seventy adults with CP were randomly assigned to the three treatment groups: 1) SRP alone; 2) MO alone; and 3) combinatory use of SRP and MO (SRP + MO). Before and 7 days after the treatments, we evaluated both clinical parameters (pocket depth [PD] and sulcus bleeding index [SBI]) and the gene load of four main periodontal pathogens (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans [Aa], Fusobacterium nucleatum [Fn], Porphyromonas gingivalis [Pg], and Prevotella intermedia [Pi]). Results The bacterial prevalence per patient was: Aa, 31.25%; Fn, 100%; Pg, 95.31%; and Pi, 98.44%. Seven days after treatment, the three treatments significantly reduced both PD and SBI, but not detection frequencies of the four pathogens. For PD, the reduction efficacy of SRP + MO was significantly higher than that of either MO or SRP. Only Pg responded significantly to SRP. Pg and Fn were significantly reduced in the presence of MO. Only SRP + MO showed a significant reduction effect on the gene load of Pi. The reduction of PD significantly correlated with the gene load of Pi (r=0.26; P=0.042) but not of the other bacteria. Conclusion SRP and MO reduced the load of Pi in an interdependent pattern, which correlated with symptomatic improvements of CP. PMID:26676022

  5. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Fusobacterium in a 21-year-old immunocompetent male

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zohair; Bansal, Saurabh K; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-01-01

    A 21-year-old male with no significant past medical history, presented with right upper quadrant (RUQ) abdominal pain along with fevers and chills. Lab work revealed leukocytosis, anemia, and slightly elevated alkaline phosphatase. Viral serology for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus were negative and he was immunocompetent. Computed tomography imaging revealed hepatic abscesses, the largest measuring 9.5 cm. Empiric antibiotics were started and percutaneous drains were placed in the abscesses. Anaerobic cultures from the abscesses grew Fusobacterium nucleatum. This is a gram negative anaerobic bacteria; a normal flora of the oral cavity. Fusobacterium is most commonly seen in Lemiere’s disease, which is translocation of oral bacteria to the internal jugular vein causing a thrombophlebitis and subsequent spread of abscesses. Our patient did not have Lemiere’s, and is the first case described of fusobacterium pyogenic liver abscess in a young immunocompetent male with good oral hygiene. This case was complicated by sepsis, empyema, and subsequent abscesses located outside the liver. These abscesses’ have the propensity to flare abruptly and can be fatal. This case not only illustrates fusobacterium as a rare entity for pyogenic liver abscess, but also the need for urgent diagnosis and treatment. It is incumbent on physicians to diagnose and drain any suspicious hepatic lesions. While uncommon, such infections may develop without any overt source and can progress rapidly. Prompt drainage with antibiotic therapy remains the cornerstone of therapy. PMID:25834342

  6. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Fusobacterium in a 21-year-old immunocompetent male.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zohair; Bansal, Saurabh K; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-03-28

    A 21-year-old male with no significant past medical history, presented with right upper quadrant (RUQ) abdominal pain along with fevers and chills. Lab work revealed leukocytosis, anemia, and slightly elevated alkaline phosphatase. Viral serology for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus were negative and he was immunocompetent. Computed tomography imaging revealed hepatic abscesses, the largest measuring 9.5 cm. Empiric antibiotics were started and percutaneous drains were placed in the abscesses. Anaerobic cultures from the abscesses grew Fusobacterium nucleatum. This is a gram negative anaerobic bacteria; a normal flora of the oral cavity. Fusobacterium is most commonly seen in Lemiere's disease, which is translocation of oral bacteria to the internal jugular vein causing a thrombophlebitis and subsequent spread of abscesses. Our patient did not have Lemiere's, and is the first case described of fusobacterium pyogenic liver abscess in a young immunocompetent male with good oral hygiene. This case was complicated by sepsis, empyema, and subsequent abscesses located outside the liver. These abscesses' have the propensity to flare abruptly and can be fatal. This case not only illustrates fusobacterium as a rare entity for pyogenic liver abscess, but also the need for urgent diagnosis and treatment. It is incumbent on physicians to diagnose and drain any suspicious hepatic lesions. While uncommon, such infections may develop without any overt source and can progress rapidly. Prompt drainage with antibiotic therapy remains the cornerstone of therapy. PMID:25834342

  7. Isolation of a Novel Bacteriophage Specific for the Periodontal Pathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum▿

    PubMed Central

    Machuca, Pamela; Daille, Leslie; Vinés, Enrique; Berrocal, Liliana; Bittner, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a periodontal pathogen that has been directly associated with the development and progression of periodontal disease, a widespread pathology that affects the support tissues of the tooth. We isolated a new bacteriophage (FnpΦ02) that specifically infects this bacterium. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the virion is composed of an icosahedral head and a segmented tail. The size of the phage genome was estimated to be approximately 59 kbp of double-stranded DNA. The morphological features and the genetic characteristics suggest that FnpΦ02 is part of the Siphoviridae family. Using one-step growth and adsorption experiments, the latent period, burst size, and adsorption rate were estimated to be 15 h, 100 infectious units per cell, and 7.5 × 10−10 ml min−1, respectively. A small fragment of phage DNA was cloned and sequenced, showing 93% nucleotide identity with the phage PA6 of Propionibacterium acnes and amino acid identity with fragments of two proteins (Gp3 and Gp4) of this phage. To our knowledge, FnpΦ02 is the first phage described to infect Fusobacterium nucleatum and provides the base for future exploration of phages in the control of periodontal disease. PMID:20851973

  8. Uterine Necrosis Associated with Fusobacterium necrophorum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Widelock, T.; Elkattah, R.; Gibbs, S.; Mashak, Z.; Mohling, S.; DePasquale, S.

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is infrequently implicated as a pathogenic organism. When pathogenic, the typical clinical presentation is that of pharyngitis, cervical adenopathy, and unilateral thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein. Infections caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum within the fields of obstetrics and gynecology have been infrequently reported. We describe a 19-year-old woman who underwent a cesarean delivery complicated by sepsis and purulent uterine necrosis secondary to Fusobacterium necrophorum infection. PMID:26000185

  9. The double massa intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Baydin, Serhat; Gungor, Abuzer; Baran, Oguz; Tanriover, Necmettin; Rhoton, Albert L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: To describe the rare finding of a double massa intermedia (MI). Typically, the MI (interthalamic adhesion) is a single bridge of gray matter connecting the medial surfaces of the thalami. Methods: Twelve formalin- and alcohol-fixed human third ventricles were examined from superior to inferior by fiber dissection technique under ×6 to ×40 magnifications and with the endoscope. Results: In all hemispheres, the anterior and posterior commissure were defined. The MI, which bridges the medial surfaces of the thalami, was defined in all hemispheres. In one hemisphere, there was a second bridge between the thalami, located posteroinferior to the common MI. Endoscopic view confirmed that there was a second MI in this specimen. The MI usually traverses the third ventricle posterior to the foramen of Monro and connects the paired thalami. The MI is an important landmark during endoscopic and microscopic surgeries of the third ventricle. Although a double MI is very rare, surgeons should be aware of the possibility in their surgical planning. Conclusion: The surgeon should be aware of the possibility of a double MI to avoid confusion during third ventricle surgery. PMID:27127695

  10. Human infections with Fusobacterium necrophorum.

    PubMed

    Brazier, Jon S

    2006-08-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacillus that can be a primary pathogen causing either localised abscesses and throat infections or systemic life-threatening disease. Systemic infections due to F. necrophorum are referred to as either Lemierre's disease/syndrome, post-anginal sepsis or necrobacillosis, but in the context of this mini-review, all are included under the umbrella term of 'invasive F. necrophorum disease' (IFND). Although IFND has been well documented for over a century, it is quite a rare condition and modern-day clinicians of various medical disciplines are frequently unaware of this organism and the severity of symptoms that it can cause. IFND classically occurs in previously healthy young people although the factors that trigger the invasive process are not fully understood. There are countless descriptive case histories and small series of cases of IFND disease in the literature and although commonly referred to as a 'forgotten' disease, in truth, it is probably best described as a repeatedly 'discovered' disease, as it may not always be included in medical curricula, and neither is it mentioned in some major medical textbooks. There is some evidence that IFND may be on the increase, particularly in the UK. The potential reasons for this are considered in this review along with an historical overview, and updates on disease incidence, patient demography, pathogenesis and laboratory diagnosis. PMID:16962962

  11. [Fusobacterium necrophorum septicemia in an infant].

    PubMed

    François, P; Plasse, M; Frappat, P; Guthmann, J P; Dubourgel, S; Pincemaille, O; Beaudoing, A

    1989-10-01

    In a 9 month-old infant admitted to hospital for a fever with chilles, anaerobic blood cultures isolated Fusobacterium necrophorum. On the 5th day of intravenous treatment with amoxicillin and metronidazole clinical signs of mastoiditis, the likely source of the sepsis, became apparent. Septicemias with Fusobacterium necrophorum are usually observed in teenagers and young adults during an acute bout of tonsilitis. This type of infection is exceptional in infants and requires a careful search for a primary focus in facial cavities and in the base of the skull. PMID:2604512

  12. Fusobacterium and Enterobacteriaceae: Important players for CRC?

    PubMed Central

    Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Jobin, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays an essential role in regulating intestinal homeostasis through its capacity to modulate various biological activities ranging from barrier, immunity and metabolic function. Not surprisingly, microbial dysbiosis is associated with numerous intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and colorectal cancer (CRC). In this piece, we will review recent evidence that gut microbial dysbiosis can influence intestinal disease, including colitis and CRC. We will discuss the biological events implicated in the development of microbial dysbiosis and the emergence of CRC-associated microorganisms, focusing on E.coli and F. nucleatum. Finally, the mechanisms by which E.coli and F. nucleatum exert potentially carcinogenic effects on the host will be reviewed. PMID:24972311

  13. Fusobacterium necrophorum presenting as isolated lung nodules

    PubMed Central

    Sonti, Rajiv; Fleury, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum causes Lemierre's syndrome - a dramatic and distinct condition beginning with pharyngitis before proceeding to internal jugular vein septic thrombophlebitis and respiratory tract infection in otherwise healthy individuals. It is rare, but by far the most common pathway to parenchymal lung disease with this organism. Here we describe we a 34 year old healthy lady who was nontoxic without any antecedent illness who presented with lung nodules due to fusobacterium necrophorum as the sole manifestation of disease. Leading diagnostic consideration prior to culture data was pulmonary vasculitis. Identifying her disease process was a somewhat chance occurrence, and it began to resolve prior to antibiotic therapy. Though it would be difficult to recommend keen awareness of this organism given its rarity, it is important to consider that its scope may be broader than traditionally considered. PMID:26236610

  14. Fusobacterium necrophorum presenting as isolated lung nodules.

    PubMed

    Sonti, Rajiv; Fleury, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum causes Lemierre's syndrome - a dramatic and distinct condition beginning with pharyngitis before proceeding to internal jugular vein septic thrombophlebitis and respiratory tract infection in otherwise healthy individuals. It is rare, but by far the most common pathway to parenchymal lung disease with this organism. Here we describe we a 34 year old healthy lady who was nontoxic without any antecedent illness who presented with lung nodules due to fusobacterium necrophorum as the sole manifestation of disease. Leading diagnostic consideration prior to culture data was pulmonary vasculitis. Identifying her disease process was a somewhat chance occurrence, and it began to resolve prior to antibiotic therapy. Though it would be difficult to recommend keen awareness of this organism given its rarity, it is important to consider that its scope may be broader than traditionally considered. PMID:26236610

  15. Lemierre's syndrome due to Fusobacterium necrophorum.

    PubMed

    Kuppalli, Krutika; Livorsi, Daniel; Talati, Naasha J; Osborn, Melissa

    2012-10-01

    We present a case of a patient with Lemierre's syndrome caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum who developed a right frontal lobe brain abscess. We summarise the epidemiology, microbiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, complications, therapy, and outcomes of Lemierre's syndrome. F necrophorum is most commonly associated with Lemierre's syndrome: a septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein. Patients usually present with an exudative tonsillitis, sore throat, dysphagia, and unilateral neck pain. Diagnosis of septic thrombophlebitis is best confirmed by obtaining a CT scan of the neck with contrast. Complications of the disease include bacteraemia with septic abscesses to the lungs, joints, liver, peritoneum, kidneys, and brain. Treatment should include a prolonged course of intravenous beta-lactam antibiotic plus metronidazole. PMID:22633566

  16. Unusual neurological presentation of Fusobacterium necrophorum disease.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Nasrean; Morris, Trefor; Dhillon, Rishi; Gibbon, Frances

    2016-01-01

    A 2-year-old girl presented to hospital, with reduced consciousness and fever. She had a 4-week history of fever treated with two courses of amoxicillin for tonsillitis diagnosed in primary care. Neuroimaging revealed multiple cerebral abscesses and subdural empyema. Pus aspirated from the intracranial collections grew Fusobacterium necrophorum and meropenem was started. Following neurosurgery, the patient continued to be agitated with fluctuating fever. She underwent close monitoring with regular neuroimaging. To control the progression of intracranial infection, she underwent three separate neurosurgical procedures following which she made a good recovery. This case demonstrates how an organism rarely associated with childhood illnesses presented atypically and progressed into a complex potentially fatal intracranial infection requiring a high degree of neurosurgical intervention. Awareness of this organism is important. The combination of source control together with appropriate antibiotic use was crucial in controlling the infection. PMID:26759436

  17. FusoBase: an online Fusobacterium comparative genomic analysis platform

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Mia Yang; Heydari, Hamed; Jakubovics, Nick S.; Mahmud, Mahafizul Imran; Dutta, Avirup; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Guat Jah; Mutha, Naresh V.R.; Tan, Shi Yang; Choo, Siew Woh

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium are anaerobic gram-negative bacteria that have been associated with a wide spectrum of human infections and diseases. As the biology of Fusobacterium is still not well understood, comparative genomic analysis on members of this species will provide further insights on their taxonomy, phylogeny, pathogenicity and other information that may contribute to better management of infections and diseases. To facilitate the ongoing genomic research on Fusobacterium, a specialized database with easy-to-use analysis tools is necessary. Here we present FusoBase, an online database providing access to genome-wide annotated sequences of Fusobacterium strains as well as bioinformatics tools, to support the expanding scientific community. Using our custom-developed Pairwise Genome Comparison tool, we demonstrate how differences between two user-defined genomes and how insertion of putative prophages can be identified. In addition, Pathogenomics Profiling Tool is capable of clustering predicted genes across Fusobacterium strains and visualizing the results in the form of a heat map with dendrogram. Database URL: http://fusobacterium.um.edu.my. PMID:25149689

  18. β-Thalassemia Intermedia: A Clinical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Musallam, Khaled M.; Taher, Ali T.; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer A.

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the molecular and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the disease process in patients with β-thalassemia intermedia has substantially increased over the past decade. Earlier studies observed that patients with β-thalassemia intermedia experience a clinical-complications profile that is different from that in patients with β-thalassemia major. In this article, a variety of clinical morbidities are explored, and their associations with the underlying disease pathophysiology and risk factors are examined. These involve several organs and organ systems including the vasculature, heart, liver, endocrine glands, bone, and the extramedullary hematopoietic system. The effects of some therapeutic interventions on the development of clinical complications are also discussed. PMID:22762026

  19. Evolution of Invasion in a Diverse Set of Fusobacterium Species

    PubMed Central

    Manson McGuire, Abigail; Cochrane, Kyla; Griggs, Allison D.; Haas, Brian J.; Abeel, Thomas; Zeng, Qiandong; Nice, Justin B.; MacDonald, Hanlon; Birren, Bruce W.; Berger, Bryan W.; Allen-Vercoe, Emma

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The diverse Fusobacterium genus contains species implicated in multiple clinical pathologies, including periodontal disease, preterm birth, and colorectal cancer. The lack of genetic tools for manipulating these organisms leaves us with little understanding of the genes responsible for adherence to and invasion of host cells. Actively invading Fusobacterium species can enter host cells independently, whereas passively invading species need additional factors, such as compromise of mucosal integrity or coinfection with other microbes. We applied whole-genome sequencing and comparative analysis to study the evolution of active and passive invasion strategies and to infer factors associated with active forms of host cell invasion. The evolution of active invasion appears to have followed an adaptive radiation in which two of the three fusobacterial lineages acquired new genes and underwent expansions of ancestral genes that enable active forms of host cell invasion. Compared to passive invaders, active invaders have much larger genomes, encode FadA-related adhesins, and possess twice as many genes encoding membrane-related proteins, including a large expansion of surface-associated proteins containing the MORN2 domain of unknown function. We predict a role for proteins containing MORN2 domains in adhesion and active invasion. In the largest and most comprehensive comparison of sequenced Fusobacterium species to date, we have generated a testable model for the molecular pathogenesis of Fusobacterium infection and illuminate new therapeutic or diagnostic strategies. PMID:25370491

  20. Association of Fusobacterium species in pancreatic cancer tissues with molecular features and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhashi, Kei; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Matsunaga, Yasutaka; Ito, Miki; Kurihara, Hiroyoshi; Kanno, Shinichi; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Naito, Takafumi; Adachi, Yasushi; Tachibana, Mami; Tanuma, Tokuma; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Shinohara, Toshiya; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Imamura, Masafumi; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Hirata, Koichi; Maruyama, Reo; Suzuki, Hiromu; Imai, Kohzoh

    2015-01-01

    Recently, bacterial infection causing periodontal disease has attracted considerable attention as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Fusobacterium species is an oral bacterial group of the human microbiome. Some evidence suggests that Fusobacterium species promote colorectal cancer development; however, no previous studies have reported the association between Fusobacterium species and pancreatic cancer. Therefore, we examined whether Fusobacterium species exist in pancreatic cancer tissue. Using a database of 283 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), we tested cancer tissue specimens for Fusobacterium species. We also tested the specimens for KRAS, NRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations and measured microRNA-21 and microRNA-31. In addition, we assessed epigenetic alterations, including CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). Our data showed an 8.8% detection rate of Fusobacterium species in pancreatic cancers; however, tumor Fusobacterium status was not associated with any clinical and molecular features. In contrast, in multivariate Cox regression analysis, compared with the Fusobacterium species-negative group, we observed significantly higher cancer-specific mortality rates in the positive group (p = 0.023). In conclusion, Fusobacterium species were detected in pancreatic cancer tissue. Tumor Fusobacterium species status is independently associated with a worse prognosis of pancreatic cancer, suggesting that Fusobacterium species may be a prognostic biomarker of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25797243

  1. Recurrent Fusobacterium pyogenic myositis of the rotator cuff A case report of recurrent Fusobacterium pyogenic myositis of the rotator cuff

    PubMed Central

    McElnay, Philip J.; McCann, Philip A.; Williams, Martin O.; Wakeley, Charles J.; Amirfeyz, Rouin

    2014-01-01

    Pyogenic myositis is uncommon. It normally affects the large muscle groups in the lower limb or trunk and the most common causative organism is Staphylococcus aureus. We present a case of an immunocompetent man who, unusually, had a recurring form of the disease in subscapularis and teres minor. The causative organism was also highly unusual (Fusobacterium). PMID:24926162

  2. Legal and institutional aspects of regulating intermedia pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Entman, R.M.

    1980-05-01

    Intermedia pollution is defined here as the creation of new environmental impacts by controlling existing ones. DOE asked four questions: (1) do the major environmental laws address intermedia pollution; (2) does the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have rules, regulations, and procedures through which it considers intermedia questions; (3) do the legislative histories of the laws indicate whether Congress intended for the EPA to consider intermedia issues; and (4) in what ways do the existing laws and regulatory procedures exacerbate intermedia pollution. The answer to the first three questions is yes; much of this report is devoted to amplifying and qualifying that response, the rest to answering the fourth question. The report frames these issues by asking how we can control the adverse environmental i.e., intermedia, impacts of EPA itself. A case study of the intermedia implications of recently issued air-pollution standards for coal-fired power plants illustrates the themes concretely. An analysis of policy alternatives for improving intermedia pollution control concludes the study. The major problems impending good intermedia policy decisions are: conflicts among and failures fully to implement environmental laws; political pressures; tendencies of EPA to minimize the adverse environmental consequences of its own actions; uncertainties caused by the rudimentary scientific understanding of intermedia pollution; and limitations on EPA's organizational ability to handle whatever complex intermedia information it does obtain. The final chapter assesses three policy responses to these problems: do nothing new; issue an incremental prod; and a new law and EPA suffice. Evaluation of these alternatives depends on how deficient current practices are thought to be.

  3. Fusobacterium necrophorum in North American Bighorn Sheep ( Ovis canadensis ) Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Narayanan, Sanjeevkumar; Batra, Sai Arun; Jegarubee, Bavananthasivam; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-07-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum has been detected in pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis ) lungs, in addition to the aerobic respiratory pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica , Bibersteinia trehalosi , Pasteurella multocida , and Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae . Similar to M. haemolytica , F. necrophorum produces a leukotoxin. Leukotoxin-induced lysis and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and macrophages are responsible for acute inflammation and lung tissue damage characteristic of M. haemolytica -caused pneumonia. As one approach in elucidating the role of F. necrophorum in BHS pneumonia, we determined the frequency of the presence of F. necrophorum in archived pneumonic BHS lung tissues, and susceptibility of BHS leukocytes to F. necrophorum leukotoxin. A species-specific PCR assay detected F. necrophorum in 37% of pneumonic BHS lung tissues (total tested n=70). Sequences of PCR amplicons were similar to the less virulent F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme. Fusobacterium necrophorum leukotoxin exhibited cytotoxicity to BHS PMNs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As with the M. haemolytica leukotoxin, F. necrophorum leukotoxin was more toxic to BHS PMNs than domestic sheep PMNs. It is likely that F. necrophorum enters the lungs after M. haemolytica and other aerobic respiratory pathogens enter the lungs and initiate tissue damage, thereby creating a microenvironment that is conducive for anaerobic bacterial growth. In summary, Fusobacterium leukotoxin is highly toxic for BHS leukocytes; however, based on the PCR findings, it is unlikely to play a direct role in the development of BHS pneumonia. PMID:27224212

  4. Anaerobic Spondylodiscitis due to Fusobacterium Species: A Case Report Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Latta, Tiffany N.; Mandapat, Aimee L.; Myers, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Spondylodiscitis caused by Fusobacterium species is rare. Most cases of spontaneous spondylodiscitis are caused by Staphylococcus aureus and most postoperative cases are caused by Staphylococcus aureus or coagulase-negative staphylococci. Escherichia coli is the most common Gram-negative organism causing spondylodiscitis. Fusobacterium species are unusual causes for anaerobic spondylodiscitis. We report the case of a patient with spontaneous L2-L3 spondylodiscitis, vertebral osteomyelitis, and epidural abscess caused by Fusobacterium species and review the literature for patients with Fusobacterium spondylodiscitis. PMID:26000181

  5. Fusobacterium necrophorum, an emerging pathogen of otogenic and paranasal infections?

    PubMed Central

    Creemers-Schild, D; Gronthoud, F; Spanjaard, L; Visser, L G; Brouwer, C N M; Kuijper, E J

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a rare causative agent of otitis and sinusitis. Most commonly known is the classic Lemièrre's syndrome of postanginal sepsis with suppurative thrombophlebitis of the jugular vein. We report five patients diagnosed recently with a complicated infection with F. necrophorum originating from otitis or sinusitis. Two patients recovered completely, one patient died due to complications of the infection, one patient retained a slight hemiparesis and one patient had permanent hearing loss. Diagnosis and management are discussed. A possible factor in the emergence of F. necrophorum is proposed. PMID:25356344

  6. Fusobacterium necrophorum, an emerging pathogen of otogenic and paranasal infections?

    PubMed

    Creemers-Schild, D; Gronthoud, F; Spanjaard, L; Visser, L G; Brouwer, C N M; Kuijper, E J

    2014-05-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a rare causative agent of otitis and sinusitis. Most commonly known is the classic Lemièrre's syndrome of postanginal sepsis with suppurative thrombophlebitis of the jugular vein. We report five patients diagnosed recently with a complicated infection with F. necrophorum originating from otitis or sinusitis. Two patients recovered completely, one patient died due to complications of the infection, one patient retained a slight hemiparesis and one patient had permanent hearing loss. Diagnosis and management are discussed. A possible factor in the emergence of F. necrophorum is proposed. PMID:25356344

  7. Evaluation of holy basil mouthwash as an adjunctive plaque control agent in a four day plaque regrowth model

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Anirudh B.; Vij, Chhavi; Trivedi, Dhiraj; Setty, Swati B.; Thakur, Srinath L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Various antibacterial and antiplaque agents are used in chemical plaque control but none are without their shortcomings. Chlorhexidine considered a gold standard, also has an array of side effects. To overcome these, numerous herbal extracts have been tried and tested and one among them is holy basil. The present study evaluated the antibacterial efficacy of holy basil in vitro against some periodontopathogens and its antiplaque effect in vivo. Study Design: Thirty periodontally healthy volunteers were randomly divided into three groups and refrained from all mechanical oral hygiene measures for 4 days and used one of the randomly assigned mouthwash (1- chlorhexidine; 2- holy basil; and 3- sterile water [placebo]) twice daily. The Plaque Index (PI) was assessed at days 0 and 5. Aqueous extract of holy basil was tested against Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (F.nucleatum). Results: Holy basil extract showed inhibition of both the tested periodontopathogens (P.intermedia and F.nucleatum) at various concentrations. In all groups, the PI increased from baseline to day 5. There was a statistically significant difference (p < .05) between the chlorhexidine and placebo rinse and the holy basil and placebo rinse, but no statistically significant difference was found between the chlorhexidine and holy basil rinse with respect to PI. Conclusions: These results indicate that the holy basil mouthwash has an antiplaque effect and is efficacious against P. intermedia and F. nucleatum strains in vitro. Hence holy basil mouthwash may have potential as an antiplaque mouthwash with prophylactic benefits. Key words:Antibacterial agent, basil, Fusobacterium nucleatum, mouthwashes, Prevotella intermedia. PMID:25674314

  8. β-Thalassemia Intermedia: A Bird’s-Eye View

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Anthony; Tyan, Paul; Radwan, Amr; Mallat, Naji; Taher, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Beta-thalassemia is due to a defect in the synthesis of the beta-globin chains, leading to alpha/beta imbalance, ineffective erythropoiesis, and chronic anemia. The spectrum of thalassemias is wide, with one end comprising thalassemia minor, which consists of a mild hypochromic microcytic anemia with no obvious clinical manifestations, while on the other end is thalassemia major, characterized by patients who present in their first years of life with profound anemia and regular transfusion requirements for survival. Along the spectrum lies thalassemia intermedia, a term developed to describe patients with manifestations that are neither mild enough nor severe enough to be classified in the spectrum’s extremes. Over the past decade, our understanding of β-thalassemia intermedia has increased tremendously with regards to molecular information as well as pathophysiology. It is now clear that β-thalassemia intermedia has a clinical presentation as well as complications associated with the disease that are different from those of β-thalassemia major. This review is designed to tackle issues related to β-thalassemia intermedia from the basic definition of the disease to paramedical issues, namely the quality of life in these patients. Genetics and pathophysiology are revisited, as well as the complications specific to this disease. These complications include effects on several organ systems, including the cardiovascular, hepatic, endocrine, renal, brain, and skeletal systems. Extramedullary hematopoiesis is also discussed in this article. Risk factors are highlighted and cutoffs are identified to minimize morbidities in β-thalassemia intermedia. Several treatment modalities are considered by shining a light on the pros and cons of each modality, as well as the role of special pharmacological agents in the progress of the disease and its morbidities. Finally, health-related quality of life is discussed in these patients with a direct comparison to the more severe

  9. Fusobacterium necrophorum otitis and mastoiditis in infants and young toddlers.

    PubMed

    Stergiopoulou, T; Walsh, T J

    2016-05-01

    There is an increased recovery of Fusobacterium necrophorum from cases of otitis media and mastoiditis in the pediatric population. These infections may be highly severe, causing local osteomyelitis, bacteremia, and Lemierre's syndrome. The severity and difficulties in providing optimal treatment for these infections may be especially difficult in this age group due to immunological immaturity and delayed presentation. In this review of literature, we present and analyze the clinical presentation, management, and outcome of otic infections caused by F. necrophorum in infants and young toddlers less than 2 years old. Search in Pubmed was conducted for reported cases in the English literature for the time period of the last 50 years. Twelve well-described cases were retrieved with F. necrophorum otitis and mastoiditis and complications reported in all cases. Treatment included both intravenously with antimicrobial agents (beta lactams plus metronidazole) and mastoidectomy. Lemierre's syndrome and Lemierre's syndrome variants developed in 60 % of the patients. Dissemination of the infection as distal osteomyelitis and septic shock were also reported. The outcome was favorable in all the cases. Otitis and mastoiditis infections in children less then 2 years old are invasive infections, and severe complications can occur. PMID:26951264

  10. CLINICAL APPLICATION OF RECOMBINANT ERYTHROPOIETIN IN BETA-THALASSAEMIA INTERMEDIA.

    PubMed

    Asadov, Ch; Alimirzoyeva, Z; Hasanova, M; Mammadova, T; Shirinova, A

    2016-06-01

    Research objective is to study the efficacy of recombinant erythropoietin (epoetin alfa) as alternative method of treatment beta-thalassemia intermedia. Study involved 58 patients with beta-thalassemia intermedia (23 women and 35 men). In all observed patients was defined levels of hemoglobin (Hb), red blood cells (RBC), erythrocyte indexes (MCV, MCH, MCHC), hemoglobin fractions (HbA, HbA2, HbF), serum ferritin, serum erythropoietin before and after administrated rEPO. All patients received rEPO during 6 month at the dose - 10000 IU subcutaneously. The majority of patients - 39 (67%) had a good response to rEPO (increase in hemoglobin level more than 20 g/l); 16 patients (28%) had a mean response (increase in Hb 10 - 20 g/l); in 3 (5%) patients occurred poor response to rEPO therapy (increase in Hb <10 g/l). After rEPO treatment of beta-thalassemia intermedia patients there was a statistically significant change in the number of RBC, levels of HbF and sEPO. The evaluation of interdependence between the indices of the baseline sEPO and increased Hb values in patients after rEPO treatment revealed the presence of the reverse direct relationship (r=-0.67). Based on the results, it can be concluded that the use of rEPO in complex therapy of beta-thalassemia intermedia leads to increased levels of Hb and consequently reducing the need for blood transfusions, and accordingly expected to prevent severe complications of blood transfusion (alloimmunization, hypersplenism, iron overload, contamination transmissible infections) facilitating normal growth and development, and a better quality of life. PMID:27441542

  11. Development and evaluation of new primers for PCR-based identification of Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanbin; Liu, Dali; Wang, Yiwei; Zhu, Cailian; Liang, Jingping; Shu, Rong

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the 16S rRNA. The new primer set, Pi-192 and Pi-468, increased the accuracy of PCR-based P. intermedia identification and could be useful in the detection of P. intermedia as well as epidemiological studies on periodontal disease. PMID:24875331

  12. Thalamic Massa Intermedia Duplication in a Dysmorphic 14 month-old Toddler

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Matthew T

    2015-01-01

    The massa intermedia is an inconstant parenchymal band connecting the medial thalami. It may be thickened in various disease processes such as Chiari II malformation or absent in other disease states. However, the massa intermedia may also be absent in up to 30% of normal human brains. To the best of my knowledge, detailed imaging findings of massa intermedia duplication have only been described in a single case report. An additional case of thalamic massa intermedia duplication discovered on a routine brain MR performed for dysmorphic facial features is reported herein. PMID:26622932

  13. Fusobacterium invasive infections in children: a retrospective study in two French tertiary care centres.

    PubMed

    Bailhache, M; Mariani-Kurkdjian, P; Lehours, P; Sarlangue, J; Pillet, P; Bingen, E; Faye, A

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to describe the clinical and biological characteristics and evolution of invasive Fusobacterium infections in children admitted to two French paediatric tertiary care centres. Children who were admitted from 1998 to 2009 to two tertiary care centres for invasive Fusobacterium infection were included in a retrospective study. Thirty-one children with a median age of 5.7 years (interquartile range, IQR [2.3; 9.3]) were included. Nine children had an underlying condition, most commonly sickle cell disease (n = 3) or immunodeficiency (n = 3). Two children had skin effraction prior to the infection. The major sites of infection were the head and neck (n = 14) and abdomen (n = 10). Three children suffered from atypical Lemierre's syndrome. More than half of the children had a bacterial co-infection (58 %). Six children were hospitalised in an intensive care unit, and 67 % of them had a chronic underlying disease. None of the children died. Six children with negative cultures had Fusobacterium identified through 16S RNA-PCR. Fusobacterium is responsible for severe infection in children. Microbiological diagnosis might be improved by the wider use of molecular detection. PMID:23471481

  14. Fusobacterium necrophorum in an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm, Treated by Once Daily Ertapenem

    PubMed Central

    Wotherspoon, D.; Street, J. A.; Hedderwick, S.; Baker, R.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory aneurysms may make up a small percentage of the total number of abdominal aortic aneurysms, but they present their own unique challenges. We present a case of a 65-year-old man whose aneurysm was found to be colonized by Fusobacterium necrophorum. PMID:23997565

  15. Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in β-thalassaemia intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin Hoi; Li, Allen; Lui, Tun Hing; Sit, Yan Kit

    2014-01-01

    A 22-year-old man known to have β-thalassaemia intermedia since childhood presented with bilateral lower limb weakness after spinal anaesthesia for an elective minor operation of his left leg. MRI and CT scans were performed to rule out acute epidural haematoma; coincidental imaging features of marrow hyperplasia and spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis were found. This article will present and discuss the imaging features, differential diagnosis, management and literature review of the rare occurrence of extramedullary haematopoiesis in the spinal epidural space. PMID:24390965

  16. SYNCHROTRON X-RAY ABSORPTION-EDGE COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY IMAGING OF THALLIUM COMPARTMENTALIZATION IN IBERIS INTERMEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thallium (TI) is an extremely toxic metal which, due to its similarities to K, is readily taken up by plants. Thallium is efficiently hyperaccumulated in Iberis intermedia as TI(I). Distribution and compartmentalization of TI in I. intermedia is highes...

  17. Anti-inflammatory, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Effects of Artemisinin Extracts from Artemisia annua L.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wan-Su; Choi, Woo Jin; Lee, Sunwoo; Kim, Woo Joong; Lee, Dong Chae; Sohn, Uy Dong; Shin, Hyoung-Shik

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial properties of artemisinin derived from water, methanol, ethanol, or acetone extracts of Artemisia annua L. were evaluated. All 4 artemisinin-containing extracts had anti-inflammatory effects. Of these, the acetone extract had the greatest inhibitory effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1β , IL-6, and IL-10) production. Antioxidant activity evaluations revealed that the ethanol extract had the highest free radical scavenging activity, (91.0±3.2%), similar to α-tocopherol (99.9%). The extracts had antimicrobial activity against the periodontopathic microorganisms Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. animalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, and Prevotella intermedia. This study shows that Artemisia annua L. extracts contain anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial substances and should be considered for use in pharmaceutical products for the treatment of dental diseases. PMID:25605993

  18. Mycelial pellet formation by edible ascomycete filamentous fungi, Neurospora intermedia.

    PubMed

    Nair, Ramkumar B; Lennartsson, Patrik R; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2016-12-01

    Pellet formation of filamentous fungi in submerged culture is an imperative topic of fermentation research. In this study, we report for the first time the growth of filamentous ascomycete fungus, Neurospora intermedia in its mycelial pellet form. In submerged culture, the growth morphology of the fungus was successfully manipulated into growing as pellets by modifying various cultivation conditions. Factors such as pH (2.0-10.0), agitation rate (100-150 rpm), carbon source (glucose, arabinose, sucrose, and galactose), the presence of additive agents (glycerol and calcium chloride) and trace metals were investigated for their effect on the pellet formation. Of the various factors screened, uniform pellets were formed only at pH range 3.0-4.0, signifying it as the most influential factor for N. intermedia pellet formation. The average pellet size ranged from 2.38 ± 0.12 to 2.86 ± 0.38 mm. The pellet formation remained unaffected by the inoculum type used and its size showed an inverse correlation with the agitation rate of the culture. Efficient glucose utilization was observed with fungal pellets, as opposed to the freely suspended mycelium, proving its viability for fast-fermentation processes. Scale up of the pelletization process was also carried out in bench-scale airlift and bubble column reactors (4.5 L). PMID:27103628

  19. Gravi-photomorphogenesis of the moss Pottia intermedia protonemata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkiv, O. T.; Kyjak, N. Y.; Khorkavtsiv, Y. D.; Kit, N. A.

    The protonemata development proceeds in the process of gradual differentiation of growing apical cells and intercalar cells the shortened lateral branches of the latters being transformed into three-dimensional gametophore buds (Demkiv et al., 1991). Normal course of plant development needs favourable external conditions. Sometimes, however, external environment agents can accelerate the development of organism. So, apical protonema cells of darkgrown gravitropic P. intermedia differentiate gametophore-buds in light of low intensity (Ripetskyj, 1999). We investigate the influence of gravistimulation on bud formation in haploid and diploid P. intermedia protonema. Diploid protonema was found to react on light weaker than haploid one. Under the influence of light the darkgrown apical cells and lateral branches of haploid protonema were directly transformed into buds, while in diploid protonema at first the formation of bundles of rhizoid type filaments takes place on the tips of caulonema and buds appeared in center of such bundles. The participation of gravity in gametophore bud formation was assessed by clinorotating protonema in darkness. Being illuminated such protonema also developed buds quickly the latters being formed along all stolon. It can be suggested that at 1g the growth zone of apical cells actively attract inductors of bud formation. During clinorotation the inductors probably are transferred much more slower than under stationary state and that is why the buds arised not only at the tips of stolons but along all their length. It is known that gametophore bud formation can be stimulated by exogenous phytohormones. As M. Bopp (1980) has shown, that kinetin selectively promotes bud formation on moss protonema. Our observations have shown 0,5 -- 50 μ M of kinetin stimulate the bud formation on diploid aposporic protonema much more effectively that on haploid one. It can be concluded that the amount of endogenous cytokinins in haploid protonemal cells is

  20. Secondary haemochromatosis in a patient with thalassemia intermedia.

    PubMed

    Rotaru, Ionela; Gaman, Amelia; Gaman, G

    2014-01-01

    Haemochromatosis is due to excessive accumulation of iron in tissues and organs impairing their function. The most common haematologic disorders that are subject to an intensive transfusion regimen bringing excess iron in the body are: thalassemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. The value of serum ferritin in these patients (indicator of iron stores condition) reaches high values. Red cell substitution bringing additional iron intake must be accompanied by administration of chelation therapy in order to prevent haemochromatosis and related complications. We present the case of a patient with thalassemia intermedia, integumentary secondary haemochromatosis, cirrhosis with haemochromatosis, and secondary diabetes, who died at the age of 33 years because of upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to the rupture of oesophageal varices. PMID:24791210

  1. A thalassaemia intermedia case with concomitant left atrial thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Cem; Basaran, Ozcan; Topal, Yasar; Akin, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    Although marked improvements have been observed in the life expectancy of patients with thalassaemia by regular blood transfusion and strict iron chelation therapies in recent years, these patients still have to deal with several complications, mainly cardiovascular. One of the life-threatening complications is the chronic hypercoagulable state and thromboembolic events which develop due to haemostatic alterations in patients with thalassaemia, although they are more frequently seen in those with thalassaemia intermedia. Many thromboembolic complications, mainly deep venous thrombosis and cerebral thrombosis, have been reported in thalassaemia. However, intracardiac thrombosis is rarely seen. In this manuscript, we presented a case that underwent splenectomy 6 years ago but not regularly attended the control visits and presented to our clinic with gradually increasing exercise dyspnoea for 2 months. PMID:24951612

  2. Nuevos sistemas de frecuencia intermedia para el IAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olalde, J. C.; Perilli, D.; Larrarte, J. J.

    Se presenta el diagrama en bloques de los nuevos sistemas de Frecuencia Intermedia para los dos radiómetros instalados en el IAR. Entre las características más importantes del sistema podemos mencionar la posibilidad de conectar cualquiera de las dos antenas a los ``backend" disponibles: analizador espectral de alta resolución (META II) de 0,05 Hz, autocorrelador de 1008 canales y contínuo. Se incorporan al sistema nuevos sintetizadores de frecuencia implementados con PLL y la moderna técnica de síntesis digital directa. Por último, el conjunto del sistema es susceptible de ser configurado por las computadoras de adquisición de datos, supervisadas por otra, que entrega el estado de funcionamiento actual y evita la selección de configuraciones incorrectas por parte del usuario.

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Brachyspira intermedia isolates from European layers.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, Marc; Boyen, Filip; Pasmans, Frank; Garmyn, An; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Martel, An

    2011-09-01

    A broth microdilution method was used to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of 20 Brachyspira intermedia isolates obtained from different layer flocks in Belgium and The Netherlands between 2008 and 2010. The antimicrobial agents used were tylosin, tilmicosin, tiamulin, valnemulin, doxycycline, and lincomycin. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) distribution patterns of tylosin, tilmicosin, lincomycin, and doxycycline were bimodal, demonstrating acquired resistance against doxycycline in three strains, against the macrolides in two strains, and against lincomycin in one strain. The MICs of tiamulin and valnemulin showed a monomodal distribution, but with tailing toward the higher MIC values, possibly suggesting low-level acquired resistance in six isolates. Sequencing revealed a G1058C mutation in the 16S rRNA gene in all doxycycline-resistant strains. The strain resistant to tylosin, tilmicosin, and lincomycin had an A2058T mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. PMID:21663534

  4. Paraspinal extramedullary hematopoiesis in patients with thalassemia intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Mhaidli, Hani; Taher, Ali T.

    2010-01-01

    Ineffective erythropoiesis in patients with thalassemia intermedia drives extramedullary hematopoietic tumor formation in several parts of the body. Paraspinal involvement has received increasing attention due to the associated morbidity secondary to spinal cord compression. Although the history and physical examination may help narrow the differential diagnosis, radiographic imaging remains essential to confirm the existence of hematopoietic tissue. Characteristic appearance has been observed mainly on magnetic resonance imaging. Several treatment options have been described, including transfusion therapy, laminectomy, radiotherapy, and the use of fetal hemoglobin inducing agents that decrease the hematopoietic drive. However, the ideal management scheme remains controversial. Until large prospective trials evaluate the efficacy and safety of the available treatment options, both in single and in combination therapy, an individualized approach should be entertained. PMID:20204423

  5. Septic Thrombophlebitis Caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum in an Intravenous Drug User.

    PubMed

    Dimitropoulou, D; Lagadinou, M; Papayiannis, T; Siabi, V; Gogos, C A; Marangos, M

    2013-01-01

    Septic thrombophlebitis is characterized by venous thrombosis, inflammation and bacteremia, that can lead to fatal complications such as sepsis, septic emboli and even death. Though most commonly caused by indwelling catheters, it is also related to intravenous drug users (IVDU) especially those who attempt to inject drugs into more proximal and central veins. Lemierre's syndrome, also referred to as post-anginal sepsis or necrobacillosis, is a suppurative thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein. Primary infection is associated with oropharyngeal and dental infections and the most common causative organism is Fusobacterium necrophorum. We report a case of Lemierre's syndrome in an IVDU, caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, which was inoculated at the site of injection, without a history of sore throat or pharyngitis. PMID:23691378

  6. Septic Thrombophlebitis Caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum in an Intravenous Drug User

    PubMed Central

    Dimitropoulou, D.; Lagadinou, M.; Papayiannis, T.; Siabi, V.; Gogos, C. A.; Marangos, M.

    2013-01-01

    Septic thrombophlebitis is characterized by venous thrombosis, inflammation and bacteremia, that can lead to fatal complications such as sepsis, septic emboli and even death. Though most commonly caused by indwelling catheters, it is also related to intravenous drug users (IVDU) especially those who attempt to inject drugs into more proximal and central veins. Lemierre's syndrome, also referred to as post-anginal sepsis or necrobacillosis, is a suppurative thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein. Primary infection is associated with oropharyngeal and dental infections and the most common causative organism is Fusobacterium necrophorum. We report a case of Lemierre's syndrome in an IVDU, caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, which was inoculated at the site of injection, without a history of sore throat or pharyngitis. PMID:23691378

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp. funduliforme Bovine Liver Abscess Isolate B35

    PubMed Central

    Calcutt, Michael J.; Foecking, Mark F.; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G.

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that causes foot rot and liver abscesses in cattle. F. necrophorum subsp. necrophorum and the less virulent organism F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme are recognized. We present here a draft genome sequence of the bovine liver abscess isolate F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme strain B35, which affords a genomic perspective of virulence and bovine adaptation. PMID:24786958

  8. Effect of disturbance of the gastrointestinal microflora on the faecal excretion of Fusobacterium necrophorum biovar A.

    PubMed

    Smith, G R; Thornton, E A

    1993-04-01

    Oral pretreatment of mice with either a mixture of kanamycin and erythromycin or metronidazole to modify the gut microflora greatly enhanced the faecal excretion of Fusobacterium necrophorum biovar A given by mouth. This lends support to the suggestion that disturbance of the gastrointestinal microflora in animals such as cattle, which often carry the organism in the rumen, may lead to intestinal multiplication and faecal excretion, thereby providing a source of infection that may lead to necrobacillosis of the body surface. PMID:8472777

  9. Carotid artery stenoses and thrombosis secondary to cavernous sinus thromboses in Fusobacterium necrophorum meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, T. H.; Bergvall, V.; Bradshaw, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    We report the case of a young man with Fusobacterium necrophorum meningitis who developed bilateral carotid artery stenosis associated with thrombosis of the cavernous sinuses. Intraluminal clot was present in the region of the stenoses for which he was anticoagulated. The clinical presentation, problems with diagnosis, the use of anticoagulation and the need for prolonged treatment with metronidazole are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2235810

  10. Pathogenicity of Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens isolates in a wound chamber model in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hafström, C; Dahlén, G

    1997-06-01

    The pathogenicity of 14 isolates identified as Prevotella intermedia or Prevotella nigrescens by serogrouping using monoclonal antibodies was compared in a tissue cage model in rabbits. Seven strains from periodontal abscesses, 5 strains from deep periodontal pockets and 2 strains from gingivitis were tested in the animal model comprising 6 Teflon tissue cages implanted on the back each of 34 rabbits. A total of 10(5)-10(8) cells of P. intermedia or P. nigrescens strains were inoculated alone or together with either Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans or Streptococcus mitis. Five strains of Porphyromonas gingivalis were used as a reference. The infectivity was recorded as pus formation and log viable count in aspirated material for 3, 7 and 14 days. None of the Prevotella strains inoculated in monoculture survived more than 3 days, and they had no capacity to produce abscess. P. intermedia or P. nigrescens strains in combination with A. actinomycetemcomitans produced abscesses in 33-100% and with S. mitis in 42-100%. No difference in abscess formation or log viable count in samples after 14 days was recorded between serogroup I (P. intermedia) and serogroup II and III (P. nigrescens). The infectivity of P. intermedia or P. nigresceas strains did not differ whether they were isolated from periodontal abscess, periodontal pocket or gingivitis. P. intermedia and P. nigrescens strains produced abscesses in combination with a facultative anaerobic strain and appears to have a similar pathogenicity in the wound chamber model in rabbits. PMID:9467400

  11. Gravitropism in caulonemata of the moss Pottia intermedia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, C. I.; Kern, V. D.; Ripetskyj, R. T.; Demkiv, O. T.; Sack, F. D.

    1998-01-01

    The gravitropism of caulonemata of Pottia intermedia is described and compared with that of other mosses. Spore germination produces primary protonemata including caulonemata which give rise to buds that form the leafy moss plant, the gametophore. Primary caulonemata are negatively gravitropic but their growth and the number of filaments are limited in the dark. Axenic culture of gametophores results in the production of secondary caulonemata that usually arise near the leaf base. Secondary protonemata that form in the light are agravitropic. Secondary caulonemata that form when gametophores are placed in the dark for several days show strong negative gravitropism and grow well in the dark. When upright caulonemata are reorientated to the horizontal or are inverted, upward bending can be detected after 1 h and caulonemata reach the vertical within 1-2 d. Clear amyloplast sedimentation occurs 10-15 minutes after horizontal placement and before the start of upward curvature. This sedimentation takes place in a sub-apical zone. Amyloplast sedimentation also takes place along the length of upright and inverted Pottia protonemata. These results support the hypothesis that amyloplast sedimentation functions in gravitropic sensing since sedimentation occurs before gravitropism in Pottia and since the location and presence of a unique sedimentation zone is conserved in all four mosses known to gravitropic protonomata.

  12. Genetic determinants of β-thalassemia intermedia in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Jabbar; Ahmad, Nafees; Siraj, Sami; Hoti, Naseruddin

    2015-01-01

    This study covers the molecular characterization of clinically diagnosed β-thalassemia intermedia (β-TI) patients in Pakistan. Blood samples of β-TI patients were collected from all four provinces of Pakistan throughout the period of 2011-2013. The study was carried out using allele-specific primers through polymerase chain reaction or sequencing to determine both α- and β-thalassemia (α- and β-thal) mutations, and restriction enzymes for the characterization of β-globin gene arrangements. In a total of 63 patients, the IVS-I-5 (G > C) was the most frequent mutation (33.88%). The codon 30 (G > A) and IVS-II-1 (T > C) mutations were found only in the Punjabi ethnic group, while the codon 30 (G > C) and Hb S (HBB: c.20A > T) mutations were found only in the Pashtoon and Sindhi ethnic groups, respectively. In case of α-globin genotypes, 44 patients were normal (αα/αα), six patients carried the αα/-α(3.7) genotype, 12 patients carried the -α(3.7)/-α(3.7) genotype, while one patient had the αα/ααα(anti 3.7) genotype. We found that haplotype I was the most frequent, mostly associated with the codons 8/9 (+G) mutation, while the Saudi haplotype was found only with Hb S. PMID:25707679

  13. Characterization of Atypical Isolates of Yersinia intermedia and Definition of Two New Biotypes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Liliane; Leclercq, Alexandre; Savin, Cyril; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    The species Yersinia intermedia is a member of the genus Yersinia which belongs to the Enterobacteriaceae family. This species is divided into eight biotypes, according to Brenner's biotyping scheme. This scheme relies on five tests (utilization of Simmons citrate and acid production from d-melibiose, d-raffinose, α-methyl-d-glucoside [αMG], and l-rhamnose). The collection of the French Yersinia Reference Laboratory (Institut Pasteur, Paris, France) contained 44 strains that were originally identified as Y. intermedia but whose characteristics did not fit into the biotyping scheme. These 44 strains were separated into two biochemical groups: variant 1 (positive for acid production from l-rhamnose and αMG and positive for Simmons citrate utlization) and variant 2 (positive for acid production from l-rhamnose and αMG). These atypical strains could correspond to new biotypes of Y. intermedia, to Y. frederiksenii strains having the atypical property of fermenting αMG, or to new Yersinia species. These strains did not exhibit growth or phenotypic properties different from those of Y. intermedia and Y. frederiksenii and did not harbor any of the virulence traits usually found in pathogenic species. DNA-DNA hybridizations performed between one strain each of variants 1 and 2 and the Y. intermedia and Y. frederiksenii type strains demonstrated that these variants do belong to the Y. intermedia species. We thus propose that Brenner's biotyping scheme be updated by adding two new biotypes: 9 (for variant 1) and 10 (for variant 2) to the species Y. intermedia. PMID:19494062

  14. In Vitro Effects of Polyphosphate against Prevotella intermedia in Planktonic Phase and Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eun-Young; Kim, Minjung; Noh, Mi Hee; Moon, Ji-Hoi; Lee, Jin-Yong

    2016-02-01

    Polyphosphate (polyP) has gained a wide interest in the food industry due to its potential as a decontaminating agent. In this study, we examined the effect of sodium tripolyphosphate (polyP3; Na5P3O10) against planktonic and biofilm cells of Prevotella intermedia, a major oral pathogen. The MIC of polyP3 against P. intermedia ATCC 49046 determined by agar dilution method was 0.075%, while 0.05% polyP3 was bactericidal against P. intermedia in time-kill analysis performed using liquid medium. A crystal violet binding assay for the assessment of biofilm formation by P. intermedia showed that sub-MICs of polyP3 significantly decreased biofilm formation. Under the scanning electron microscope, decreased numbers of P. intermedia cells forming the biofilms were observed when the bacterial cells were incubated with 0.025% or higher concentrations of polyP3. Assessment of biofilm viability with LIVE/DEAD staining and viable cell count methods showed that 0.05% or higher concentrations of polyP3 significantly decreased the viability of the preformed biofilms in a concentration-dependent manner. The zone sizes of alpha-hemolysis formed on horse blood agar produced by P. intermedia were decreased in the presence of polyP3. The expression of the genes encoding hemolysins and the genes of the hemin uptake (hmu) locus was downregulated by polyP3. Collectively, our results show that polyP is an effective antimicrobial agent against P. intermedia in biofilms as well as planktonic phase, interfering with the process of hemin acquisition by the bacterium. PMID:26596937

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Brachyspira intermedia and Brachyspira pilosicoli isolates from Australian chickens.

    PubMed

    Hampson, D J; Stephens, C P; Oxberry, S L

    2006-02-01

    Susceptibilities of predominantly Australian isolates of the pathogenic intestinal spirochaetes Brachyspira intermedia (n = 25) and Brachyspira pilosicoli (n = 17) from chickens were tested in agar dilution against four concentrations each of the antimicrobials tiamulin, lincomycin, tylosin, metronidazole, tetracycline and ampicillin. Based on available minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoint values for Brachyspira hyodysenteriae or other Gram-negative enteric veterinary pathogens, isolates of both species generally were susceptible to tiamulin, lincomycin, metronidazole and tetracycline. Although not classed as resistant, four isolates of B. intermedia had an elevated MIC range for tiamulin (1 to 4 mg/l), 11 isolates of B. intermedia and five of B. pilosicoli had an elevated MIC range for lincomycin (10 to 50 mg/l), one isolate of B. pilosicoli had an elevated MIC range for tetracycline (10 to 20 mg/l), and one isolate of B. intermedia and five of B. pilosicoli had an elevated MIC range for ampicillin (10 to 50 mg/l). A clear lack of susceptibility to tylosin (MIC > 4 mg/l) was seen in 11 isolates each of B. intermedia and B. pilosicoli, and to ampicillin (MIC > 32 mg/l) in two isolates of B. pilosicoli. These data suggest that some resistance to common antimicrobials exists among intestinal spirochetes obtained from laying hens and supports the need of MIC data for clinical isolates before any treatment is considered. PMID:16448937

  16. Endocrine and Bone Complications in β-Thalassemia Intermedia: Current Understanding and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Noureldine, MohammadHassan A.; Abbas, Hussein A.

    2015-01-01

    Thalassemia intermedia (TI), also known as nontransfusion dependent thalassemia (NTDT), is a type of thalassemia where affected patients do not require lifelong regular transfusions for survival but may require occasional or even frequent transfusions in certain clinical settings and for defined periods of time. NTDT encompasses three distinct clinical forms: β-thalassemia intermedia (β-TI), Hb E/β-thalassemia, and α-thalassemia intermedia (Hb H disease). Over the past decade, our understanding of the molecular features, pathophysiology, and complications of NTDT particularly β-TI has increased tremendously but data on optimal treatment of disease and its various complications are still lacking. In this paper, we shall review a group of commonly encountered complications in β-TI, mainly endocrine and bone complications. PMID:25834825

  17. Digital Distribution of Advertising for Publications (DDAP): a graphic arts prototype of electronic intermedia publishing (EIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Patrice M.

    1998-01-01

    The Digital Distribution of Advertising for Publications (DDAP) is a graphic arts industry prototype of Electronic Intermedia Publishing (EIP). EIP is a strategic, multi- industrial concept that seeks to enable the capture and input of volumes of data (i.e., both raster and object oriented data -- as well as the latter's antecedent which is vector data -- color data and black-and-white data) from a multiplicity of devices; then flowing, controlling, manipulating, modifying, storing, retrieving, transmitting, and shipping, that data through an industrial process for output to a multiplicity of output devices (e.g., ink on paper, toner on paper, bits and bytes on CD ROM, Internet, Multimedia, HDTV, etc.). As the technical requirements of the print medium are among the most rigorous in the Intermedia milieu the DDAP prototype addresses some of the most challenging issues faced in Electronic Intermedia Publishing (EIP).

  18. Molecular Characterization of β-Thalassemia Intermedia in Southeast Iran.

    PubMed

    Miri-Moghaddam, Ebrahim; Bahrami, Sara; Naderi, Majid; Bazi, Ali; Karimipoor, Morteza

    2016-06-01

    Inheritance of mild mutations within the β-globin gene and coinheritance of α-thalassemia (α-thal) are known as two important genetic modifiers in β-thalassemia (β-thal) intermedia (β-TI). We aimed to evaluate the spectrum of β- and α-thal mutations in β-TI patients in Southeast Iran. Common β- and α-globin gene mutations were detected by amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) and multiplex gap-PCR, respectively. There were 26 male (57.8%) and 19 female (42.2%) patients. HBB: c.92 + 5T > C [IVS-I-5 (G > C)] and HBB: c.-138C + 1G > A [IVS-II-I (G > A)] represented the prevalent alleles with respective frequencies of 60.0 and 10.0%. Other β-globin mutations included HBB: c.-138C > T [-88 (C > T)], HBB: c.27_28insG [frameshift codons (FSC) 8/9 (+G)], HBB: c.46delT [codon 15 (-T)], HBB: c.93-22_95del (IVS-I, 25 del), and the 619 bp deletion (NG_000007.3: g.71609_72227del619). The predominant genotypic combinations were β(0)/β(0) (68.9%), β(0)/β(+ )(8.9%) and β(+)/β(+ )(2.2%). Coinheritance of α-thal was observed in 33.0% of the patients, with the -α(3.7) (rightward) (NG_000006.1: g.34164_37967del3804) as the most common deletion (86.0%). One patient was diagnosed with the -α(4.2) (leftward) (AF221717) and one with the - -(MED) (g.24664_41064del16401) deletions, while no patients carried the -(α)(20.5) (g.15164_37864del22701), α(-5 nt) (HBA2: c.95 + 2_95_6delTGAGG) or codon 19 (-G) (HBA2: c.56delG) mutations. The alleviating molecular mechanism was not explainable by β(+ )or concurrent α-thal in more than half of our β-TI patients. This encourages conducting more studies to identify other contributing factors, especially Hb F-inducing genetic modifiers. PMID:27117567

  19. Binding and activation of plasminogen at the surface of Fusobacterium necrophorum.

    PubMed

    Holm, Karin; Rasmussen, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a gram-negative, anaerobic bacterium, which has been suggested to be a normal inhabitant of the oral flora. In rare cases, it can invade the tonsils and deeper tissues, causing the serious condition Lemièrre's syndrome. Recruitment of host plasminogen is a well-known bacterial virulence mechanism, and plasmin activity at the bacterial surface is thought to be important for bacterial invasion. Herein we show that plasminogen can be recruited to the surface of F. necrophorum, that surface-bound plasminogen is more easily converted to active plasmin than plasminogen in buffer, and that bound plasminogen is protected against inactivation by α2-antiplasmin. These findings add to the understanding of the pathogenesis of Lemièrre's syndrome. PMID:23583624

  20. Hepatic abscess caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum after a trip to the dentist.

    PubMed

    Bytyci, Faton; Khromenko, Elena

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old man with no significant medical history was admitted to the hospital, with high-grade fever and right upper quadrant pain. He was found, on abdominal ultrasound, to have a right lobe hepatic cystic lesion. MRI of the abdomen confirmed a hepatic abscess. Cultures obtained under CT guidance showed the abscess to be caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum. This is a rare bacterium that can cause potentially fatal liver abscesses. Following drainage and intravenous antibiotic treatment, the patient improved and was discharged on a 4-week antibiotic course. An abdominal CT, performed 6 weeks after discharge, showed total resolution of the abscess. The patient had, 2 weeks prior to the development of the liver abscess, undergone routine dental cleaning. Neither upper respiratory symptoms nor sore throat had been identified prior to the presentation. PMID:26933183

  1. Issues in Designing a Hypermedia Document System: The Intermedia Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yankelovich, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Intermedia, a hypermedia system developed at Brown University's Institute for Research (Rhode Island) in Information and Scholarship, is first described, and then used as a case study to explore a number of key issues that software designers must consider in the development of hypermedia document systems. A hypermedia document system is defined as…

  2. Identification of a lycopsamine-N-oxide chemotype of Amsinckia intermedia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In February 2012, an apparent poisoning outbreak in cattle occurred on rangeland infested with Amsinckia intermedia near Kingman, Arizona. Plant samples were collected from the location every month from the time of the poisoning outbreak through to when the plant seeded and senesced in May 2012. A...

  3. Composition, Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Activities of Satureja intermedia C.A.Mey Essential Oil.

    PubMed

    Sharifi-Rad, Javad; Sharifi-Rad, Mehdi; Hoseini-Alfatemi, Seyedeh Mahsan; Iriti, Marcello; Sharifi-Rad, Majid; Sharifi-Rad, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the essential oil (EO) constituents from the aerial parts of Satureja intermedia C.A.Mey were detected by GC and GC/MS. The antimicrobial activity of EO on oral pathogens and its cytotoxicity to human cancer cells were determined by the microbroth dilution method and the crystal violet staining method, respectively. Thirty-nine compounds were identified and the main EO constituents were γ-terpinene (37.1%), thymol (30.2%), p-cymene (16.2%), limonene (3.9%), α-terpinene (3.3%), myrcene (2.5%), germacrene B (1.4%), elemicine (1.1%) and carvacrol (0.5%). The S. intermedia EO showed a concentration-dependent decrease in viability of Hep-G2 (hepatocellular carcinoma) and MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma) human cancer cell lines (p < 0.05). Antimicrobial screening of S. intermedia EO demonstrated slight antibacterial and antifungal activities against Streptococcus mutants, S. salivarius, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and C. glabrata. Further preclinical studies are needed to assess the efficacy and safety of S. intermedia EO as a new promising anticancer agent. PMID:26247936

  4. Development and evaluation of the neutralizing capacity of horse antivenom against the Brazilian spider Loxosceles intermedia.

    PubMed

    Braz, A; Minozzo, J; Abreu, J C; Gubert, I C; Chávez-Olórtegui, C

    1999-09-01

    Spider bites due to Loxosceles intermedia are currently a major public health problem in South Brazil. About 3000 cases are reported annually. Specific treatment for spider bites is provided by the polyvalent anti-arachnidic antiserum produced by Butantan Institute, São Paulo, Brazil by immunizing horses with mixtures of venoms from Tityus serrulatus and T. bahiensis scorpions, as well as Phoneutria nigriventer and L. gaucho spiders. Due to the large amounts of the anti-arachnidic antivenom required and since L. intermedia venom has some biochemical and pharmacological variations, we have produced a specific anti-L. intermedia antivenom. This study shows that horses immunized with crude L. intermedia venom produced IgG antibodies that neutralized the dermonecrotic and lethal activities of the venom. The neutralizing potency of the anti-loxoscelic antivenom was compared with that of the anti-arachnidic antivenom. Our results indicate that both antivenoms were effective in terms of neutralization. However, the anti-loxoscelic antivenom was more efficient than the anti-arachnidic. PMID:10400292

  5. Formation of Lignans(-)-Secoisolariciresinol and (-)-Matairesinol with Forsythia intermedia Cell-Free Extracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umezawa, Toshiaki; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    1991-01-01

    In vivo labeling experiments of Forsythia intermedia plant tissue with [8-(C-14)]- and [9,9-(2)H2,OC(2)H3]coniferyl alcohols revealed that the lignans, (-)-secoisolariciresinol and (-)-matairesinol, were derived from two coniferyl alcohol molecules; no evidence for the formation of the corresponding (+)-enantiomers was found. Administration of (+/-)-[Ar-(H-3)] secoisolariciresinols to excised shoots of F.intermedia resulted in a significant conversion into (-)-matairesinol; again, the (+)-antipode was not detected. Experiments using cell-free extracts of F.intermedia confirmed and extended these findings. In the presence of NAD(P)H and H2O2, the cell-free extracts catalyzed the formation of (-)- secoisolariciresinol, with either [8-(C-14)]- or [9,9-(2)H2,OC(2)H3]coniferyl alcohols as substrates. The (+)- enantiomer was not formed. Finally, when either (-)-[Ar-(H-3)] or (+/-)-[Ar-(H-2)]secoisolariciresinols were used as substrates, in the presence of NAD(P), only (-)- and not (+)-matairesinol formation occurred. The other antipode, (+)-secoisolariciresinol, did not serve as a substrate for the formation of either (+)- or (-)-matairesinol. Thus, in F.intermedia, the formation of the lignan, (-)-secoisolariciresinol, occurs under strict stereochemical control, in a reaction or reactions requiring NAD(P)H and H2O2 as cofactors. This stereoselectivity is retained in the subsequent conversion into (-)-matairesinol, since (+)-secoisolariciresinol is not a substrate. These are the first two enzymes to be discovered in lignan formation.

  6. Ectoparasites of the critically endangered insular cavy, Cavia intermedia (Rodentia: Caviidae), southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Regolin, André Luis; Furnari, Nina; de Castro Jacinavicius, Fernando; Linardi, Pedro Marcos; de Carvalho-Pinto, Carlos José

    2015-04-01

    Cavia intermedia is a rodent species critically endangered and is found only on a 10 hectare island off the southern Brazilian coast. To identify the ectoparasites of C. intermedia, 27 specimens (14 males and 13 females), representing approximately 65% of the estimated total population, were captured and examined. A total of 1336 chewing lice of two species were collected: Gliricola lindolphoi (Amblycera: Gyropidae) and Trimenopon hispidum (Amblycera: Trimenoponidae). In addition, chiggers Arisocerus hertigi (Acari: Trombiculidae) and Eutrombicula sp. (Acari: Trombiculidae) were collected from the ears of all captured animals. This low species richness compared to those for other Cavia species is expected for island mammals. Although the results presented here are not conclusive about the relationship between C. intermedia and ectoparasites, this low species richness found might be reflected in a low level of investment by the hosts in the basal immune defense, since investments in white blood cell production by mammals are influenced by the diversity of parasites in the environment. Additionally, considering that it might result in host vulnerability to other parasites that might be introduced through exotic or migratory host species, the monitoring of C. intermedia, including parasitological and immunological assessments, is recommended as a key component of conservation efforts. PMID:25830106

  7. Composition, Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Activities of Satureja intermedia C.A.Mey Essential Oil

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi-Rad, Javad; Sharifi-Rad, Mehdi; Hoseini-Alfatemi, Seyedeh Mahsan; Iriti, Marcello; Sharifi-Rad, Majid; Sharifi-Rad, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the essential oil (EO) constituents from the aerial parts of Satureja intermedia C.A.Mey were detected by GC and GC/MS. The antimicrobial activity of EO on oral pathogens and its cytotoxicity to human cancer cells were determined by the microbroth dilution method and the crystal violet staining method, respectively. Thirty-nine compounds were identified and the main EO constituents were γ-terpinene (37.1%), thymol (30.2%), p-cymene (16.2%), limonene (3.9%), α-terpinene (3.3%), myrcene (2.5%), germacrene B (1.4%), elemicine (1.1%) and carvacrol (0.5%). The S. intermedia EO showed a concentration-dependent decrease in viability of Hep-G2 (hepatocellular carcinoma) and MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma) human cancer cell lines (p < 0.05). Antimicrobial screening of S. intermedia EO demonstrated slight antibacterial and antifungal activities against Streptococcus mutants, S. salivarius, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and C. glabrata. Further preclinical studies are needed to assess the efficacy and safety of S. intermedia EO as a new promising anticancer agent. PMID:26247936

  8. A Rare Cause of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: Fusobacterium Infection—A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Male, Heather J.

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare syndrome characterized by excessive activation of the immune system. Bacterial infections are very rare precipitants of this disease. A 19-year-old gentleman presented with headache, fatigue, and malaise. He was found to be hypotensive, tachycardic, and febrile. Broad spectrum antibiotics were initiated, and a lumbar puncture ruled out meningitis. Patient progressively developed shock that required use of vasopressors, as well as renal and respiratory failure. Blood cultures grew Fusobacterium necrophorum. Given continued fevers despite appropriate antimicrobials, a bone marrow biopsy was performed revealing increased histiocytes with hemophagocytosis. Dexamethasone was added with dramatic clinical improvement. Our case highlights Fusobacterium as a rare precipitant of HLH and proves that a high index of clinical suspicion is crucial for early diagnosis of HLH, allowing for prompt initiation of HLH-specific immunosuppressive therapy that can be life-saving. PMID:27563473

  9. A Rare Cause of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: Fusobacterium Infection-A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Mohyuddin, Ghulam Rehman; Male, Heather J

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare syndrome characterized by excessive activation of the immune system. Bacterial infections are very rare precipitants of this disease. A 19-year-old gentleman presented with headache, fatigue, and malaise. He was found to be hypotensive, tachycardic, and febrile. Broad spectrum antibiotics were initiated, and a lumbar puncture ruled out meningitis. Patient progressively developed shock that required use of vasopressors, as well as renal and respiratory failure. Blood cultures grew Fusobacterium necrophorum. Given continued fevers despite appropriate antimicrobials, a bone marrow biopsy was performed revealing increased histiocytes with hemophagocytosis. Dexamethasone was added with dramatic clinical improvement. Our case highlights Fusobacterium as a rare precipitant of HLH and proves that a high index of clinical suspicion is crucial for early diagnosis of HLH, allowing for prompt initiation of HLH-specific immunosuppressive therapy that can be life-saving. PMID:27563473

  10. Perianesthetic development of diaphragmatic hernia in a horse with equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID)

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Molly K.; Lee, Wesley L.; Eggleston, Randy B.

    2015-01-01

    A 21-year-old Thoroughbred gelding with a history of equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) presented with priapism of 2 days’ duration. The horse received a caudal morphine epidural and then underwent corpus cavernosum lavage and phallectomy under general anesthesia. The patient’s recovery featured multiple unsuccessful attempts to stand and his respiratory distress persisted for several hours until he acutely developed severe colic and was euthanized. Necropsy findings revealed a pituitary adenoma of the pars intermedia, bilateral adrenal cortical hyperplasia, and diaphragmatic herniation. This report suggests that horses with PPID may present a greater risk for diaphragmatic hernia under general anesthesia or during procedures placing stress on the diaphragm, including anesthetic recovery. PMID:25565714

  11. Chemical control of Loxosceles intermedia (Araneae: Sicariidae) with pyrethroids: field and laboratory evaluation.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Silva, M A; Duque, J E L; Ramires, E N; Andrade, C F S; Marques-da-Silva, E; Marques, F A; Delay, C E; Fontana, J D; Silva, A C S; Fraguas, G M

    2010-02-01

    Bites from the recluse or brown spiders (genus Loxosceles) can cause necrotic lesions and systemic effects in humans throughout the world. In the state of Paraná, Brazil, loxoscelism is considered a serious public health problem, and Loxosceles intermedia Mello-Leitão (Araneae: Sicariidae) is associated with the majority of reported accidents. In the present research we evaluated the susceptibility of L. intermedia to pyrethroid insecticides currently used for the control of spiders in both field and laboratory conditions. In laboratory tests, the most active pesticides in descending order were microencapsulated lambda-cyhalothrin (LC50 = 0.023 mg/kg), nonmicroencapsulated lambda-cyhalothrin (LC50 = 0.047 mg/kg), deltamethrin (LC50 = 0.26 mg/kg), and cypermethrin (LC50 = 1.38 mg/kg). Cockroaches, Phoetalia circumvagans (Burmeister) (n = 30), killed with microencapsulated lambdacyalothrin, were offered to the spiders. L. intermedia fed on 63.3% of the dead cockroaches during the first 6 h of experiment; none of the spiders died during the subsequent 15 d. Microencapsulated lambdacyalothrin was chosen for application in two contiguous houses. The mean volume applied was 22.8 mg (AI)/m2. Dead spiders were found during all the inspections up to 60 d after the initial application. In total, 297 dead spiders were collected; 65.7% in the attic shared by the two homes, 10.8% inside the house that had most cracks and crevices sealed and 23.6% in the control house. The use of lambda-cyhalothrin-based products for L. intermedia control is discussed. PMID:20214382

  12. Cleavage of CD14 and LBP by a protease from Prevotella intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Deschner, James; Singhal, Anuradha; Long, Ping; Liu, Chau-Ching; Piesco, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease caused by subgingival microorganisms and their components, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Responses of the host to LPS are mediated by CD14 and LPS-binding protein (LBP). In this study, it was determined that proteases from a periodontal pathogen, Prevotella intermedia, cleave CD14 and LBP, and thereby modulate the virulence of LPS. Culture supernatants from two strains of P. intermedia (ATCC 25611 and 25261) cleaved CD14 and LBP in a concentration-dependent manner. Zymographic and molecular mass analysis revealed the presence of a membrane-associated, 170-kDa, monomeric protease. Class-specific inhibitors and stimulators demonstrated that this enzyme is a metal-requiring, thiol-activated, cysteine protease. The protease was stable over a wide range of temperatures (4–56 °C) and pH values (4.5–8.5). This enzyme also decreased the expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-specific mRNA in the LPS-activated macrophage-like cell lines U937 and THP-1 in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that it also cleaves membrane-associated CD14. Furthermore, addition of soluble CD14 abrogated protease-mediated inhibition of IL-1 mRNA expression induced by LPS. The observations suggest that proteolysis of CD14 and LBP by P. intermedia protease might modulate the virulence of LPS at sites of periodontal infections. PMID:12728301

  13. A novel expression profile of the Loxosceles intermedia spider venomous gland revealed by transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Gremski, Luiza Helena; da Silveira, Rafael Bertoni; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Probst, Christian Macagnan; Ferrer, Valéria Pereira; Nowatzki, Jenifer; Weinschutz, Hellen Chris; Madeira, Humberto Maciel; Gremski, Waldemiro; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Veiga, Silvio Sanches

    2010-12-01

    Spiders of the Loxosceles genus are cosmopolitan, and their venom components possess remarkable biological properties associated with their ability to act upon different molecules and receptors. Accidents with Loxosceles intermedia specimens are recognized as a public health problem in the south of Brazil. To describe the transcriptional profile of the L. intermedia venom gland, we generated a wide cDNA library, and its transcripts were functionally and structurally analyzed. After initial analyses, 1843 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) produced readable sequences that were grouped into 538 clusters, 281 of which were singletons. 985 reads (53% of total ESTs) matched to known proteins. Similarity searches showed that toxin-encoding transcripts account for 43% of the total library and comprise a great number of ESTs. The most frequent toxins were from the LiTx family, which are known for their insecticidal activity. Both phospholipase D and astacin-like metalloproteases toxins account for approximately 9% of total transcripts. Toxins components such as serine proteases, hyaluronidases and venom allergens were also found but with minor representation. Almost 10% of the ESTs encode for proteins involved in cellular processes. These data provide an important overview of the L. intermedia venom gland expression scenario and revealed significant differences from profiles of other spiders from the Loxosceles genus. Furthermore, our results also confirm that this venom constitutes an amazing source of novel compounds with potential agrochemical, industrial and pharmacological applications. PMID:20644878

  14. Protoplast formation and regeneration of dehydrodivanillin-degrading strains of Fusobacterium varium and Enterococcus faecium.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W; Ohmiya, K; Shimizu, S

    1986-01-01

    Two strains of rumen anaerobes isolated from dehydrodivanillin-degrading cultures were identified as Fusobacterium varium and Enterococcus faecium. These organisms degraded dehydrodivanillin synergistically to 5-carboxymethylvanillin and vanillic acid. Specific conditions for protoplast formation and cell wall regeneration for both bacteria were determined, under strictly anaerobic conditions, to be as follows. The cell wall of each bacterium in yeast extract medium was loosened by adding penicillin G during early log-phase growth. The cell wall of F. varium was lysed by lysozyme (1 mg/ml) in glycerol (0.2 M)-phosphate buffer (0.05 M; pH 7.0). The addition of NaCl (0.08 M) with lysozyme was necessary for lysis of E. faecium in this solution. Almost all cells were converted to protoplasts after 2 h of incubation at 37 degrees C. Regeneration of both protoplasts was 20 to 30% on an agar-containing yeast extract medium. Images PMID:3777921

  15. Human Infection with Fusobacterium necrophorum (Necrobacillosis), with a Focus on Lemierre's Syndrome†

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Terry

    2007-01-01

    Summary: Human infection with Fusobacterium necrophorum usually involves F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme rather than F. necrophorum subsp. necrophorum, which is a common pathogen in animals. Lemierre's syndrome, or postanginal sepsis, is the most common life-threatening manifestation. Tonsillitis is followed by septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and then a septicemia with septic emboli in lungs and other sites. Recent evidence suggests that F. necrophorum can be limited to the throat and cause persistent or recurrent tonsillitis. F. necrophorum is unique among non-spore-forming anaerobes, first for its virulence and association with Lemierre's syndrome as a monomicrobial infection and second because it seems probable that it is an exogenously acquired infection. The source of infection is unclear; suggestions include acquisition from animals or human-to-human transmission. Approximately 10% of published cases are associated with infectious mononucleosis, which may facilitate invasion. Recent work suggests that underlying thrombophilia may predispose to internal jugular vein thrombophlebitis. Lemierre's syndrome was relatively common in the preantibiotic era but seemed to virtually disappear with widespread use of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infection. In the last 15 years there has been a rise in incidence, possibly related to restriction in antibiotic use for sore throat. PMID:17934077

  16. Sucrose fermentation by Fusobacterium mortiferum ATCC 25557: transport, catabolism, and products.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J; Nguyen, N Y; Robrish, S A

    1992-01-01

    Studies of sucrose utilization by Fusobacterium mortiferum ATCC 25557 have provided the first definitive evidence for phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar:phosphotransferase activity in the family Bacteroidaceae. The phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sucrose:phosphotransferase system and the two enzymes required for the dissimilation of sucrose 6-phosphate are induced specifically by growth of F. mortiferum on the disaccharide. Monomeric sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase (M(r), 52,000) and a dimeric ATP-dependent fructokinase (subunit M(r), 32,000) have been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity. The physicochemical and catalytic properties of these enzymes have been examined, and the N-terminal amino acid sequences for both proteins are reported. The characteristics of sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase and fructokinase from F. mortiferum are compared with the same enzymes from both gram-positive and gram-negative species. Butyric, acetic, and D-lactic acids are the end products of sucrose fermentation by F. mortiferum. A pathway is proposed for the translocation, phosphorylation, and metabolism of sucrose by this anaerobic pathogen. Images PMID:1533618

  17. In vitro degradation of lysine by ruminal fluid-based fermentations and by Fusobacterium necrophorum.

    PubMed

    Elwakeel, E A; Amachawadi, R G; Nour, A M; Nasser, M E A; Nagaraja, T G; Titgemeyer, E C

    2013-01-01

    The objective of these studies was to characterize some factors affecting lysine degradation by mixed ruminal bacteria and by ruminal Fusobacterium necrophorum. Mixed ruminal bacteria degraded lysine, and addition of pure cultures of F. necrophorum did not increase lysine degradation. Addition of acetic or propionic acid strikingly reduced NH(3) production from lysine by mixed ruminal bacteria at pH 6, but not at pH 7. Although typical ruminal environments with acidic pH and normal concentrations of volatile fatty acids might inhibit lysine degradation by F. necrophorum, ruminal fluid contained enough bacteria with a lysine-degrading capacity to ferment 50 mM lysine in vitro. Of 7 strains of ruminal F. necrophorum tested, all grew on both lactate and lysine as the primary energy source. Both subspecies of ruminal F. necrophorum (necrophorum and funduliforme) used lysine as a primary C and energy source. Lysine and glutamic acid were effectively fermented by F. necrophorum, but alanine and tryptophan were not, and histidine and methionine were fermented only to a minor extent. The end products of lactate fermentation by F. necrophorum were propionate and acetate, and those of lysine degradation were butyrate and acetate. Fermentation of glutamic acid by F. necrophorum yielded acetate and butyrate in a ratio near to 2:1. The minimum inhibitory concentration of tylosin for F. necrophorum was not dependent on whether bacteria were grown with lactate or lysine, but F. necrophorum was more susceptible to monensin when grown on lysine than on lactate. Although F. necrophorum is generally resistant to monensin, the ionophore may reduce lysine degradation by F. necrophorum in the rumen. The essential oil components limonene, at 20 or 100 μg/mL, and thymol, at 100 μg/mL, inhibited F. necrophorum growth, whereas eugenol, guaiacol, and vanillin had no effect. Our findings may lead to ways to minimize ruminal lysine degradation and thus increase its availability to the animal

  18. Factor H binding as a complement evasion mechanism for an anaerobic pathogen, Fusobacterium necrophorum.

    PubMed

    Friberg, Nathalie; Carlson, Petteri; Kentala, Erna; Mattila, Petri S; Kuusela, Pentti; Meri, Seppo; Jarva, Hanna

    2008-12-15

    Fusobacterium necrophorum subspecies funduliforme is an obligate anaerobic Gram-negative rod causing invasive infections such as the life-threatening Lemierre's syndrome (sore throat, septicemia, jugular vein thrombosis, and disseminated infection). The aim of our study was to understand if and how F. necrophorum avoids C activation. We studied 12 F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme strains isolated from patients with sepsis. All strains were resistant to serum killing after a 1-h incubation in 20% serum. The bacteria bound, at different levels, the C inhibitor factor H (fH). Binding was ionic and specific in nature and occurred via sites on both the N terminus and the C terminus of fH. Bound fH remained functionally active as a cofactor for factor I in the cleavage of C3b. Interestingly, patients with the most severe symptoms carried strains with the strongest ability to bind fH. An increased C3b deposition and membrane attack complex formation on the surface of a weakly fH-binding strain was observed and its survival in serum at 3.5 h was impaired. This strain had not caused a typical Lemierre's syndrome. These data, and the fact that fH-binding correlated with the severity of disease, suggest that the binding of fH contributes to virulence and survival of F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme in the human host. Our data show, for the first time, that an anaerobic bacterium is able to bind the C inhibitor fH to evade C attack. PMID:19050282

  19. Invasive Fusobacterium necrophorum infections and Lemièrre's syndrome: the role of thrombophilia and EBV.

    PubMed

    Holm, K; Svensson, P J; Rasmussen, M

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to describe the clinical spectrum of invasive Fusobacterium necrophorum infections and Lemièrre's syndrome, to examine the role of underlying thrombophilia and concomitant mononucleosis in Lemièrre's syndrome, and to describe thromboembolic complications. Patients with invasive F. necrophorum infections were identified either prospectively or retrospectively through the regional database of clinical microbiology from 2000 to 2015. Patient records were reviewed and blood samples from patients with Lemièrre's syndrome were collected for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serology and screening for thrombophilia. Of the 65 patients included, 33 had Lemièrre's syndrome. Of the remaining 32 patients, other infections of the respiratory tract and abdominal or urogenital infections were most common. Patients with Lemièrre's syndrome or other tonsillar infections were younger than patients from the other groups. For Lemièrre's syndrome, the 26 patients with severe sepsis on admittance had longer duration of symptoms. Three of five patients who developed distant manifestations had more than 14 days of symptoms. Jugular vein thrombosis was verified in 14 patients, two of whom developed serious complications. Three of 26 patients tested had factor V Leiden mutation, corresponding to the background prevalence. One of 22 patients tested had a concomitant EBV infection. This study confirms earlier studies of the clinical spectrum caused by F. necrophorum. For Lemièrre's syndrome, the study adds to the knowledge on thromboembolic outcome, demonstrating that jugular vein thrombosis may cause severe complications. The time to treatment seems to be important for the risk of severe disease. In this study, concomitant EBV infection or underlying thrombophilia was uncommon. PMID:26272176

  20. Bad news itself or just the messenger? The high mortality of Fusobacterium spp. infections is related to disseminated malignancy and other comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Johannesen, Katrine; Dessau, Ram; Heltberg, Ole; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    Background Fusobacterium species are pleomorphic, obligate anaerobic gram-negative bacilli. They are difficult to culture and grow slowly. If antibiotic treatment is initiated prior to blood cultures, the bacteria might evade detection. This is a comprehensive report on mortality in non-bacteraemia fusobacterial infection. Methods Data were collected retrospectively in adults having a positive culture with Fusobacterium spp. admitted during 2000–2012 at the medical department. Data on culture specimens, number of cultures, admission and culture dates, patient age, gender, clinical disease, Charlson's index of co-morbidity, CRP level and survival were obtained. For comparison, we traced 60 consecutive, similarly obtained cultures from 2009 to 2010 containing Staphylococcus aureus. Results Within a 12-year period, we identified 28 patients with a positive culture of Fusobacterium spp. in a medical ward serving a population of 220,000. Only a minority (39%) had a positive blood culture, and 54% had focus in respiratory tract or pleura. Overall 6-month mortality was 32%, and unrelated to subspecies, treatment or anatomic location but significantly related to age >60 years, admission for severe, acute illness, and comorbidity, especially metastatic malignancy. Comparison between infection with Fusobacterium spp. and S. aureus showed that Fusobacterium spp. infections were predominantly community acquired, while S. aureus were both community and hospital acquired. Overall mortality for both bacterial infections increased significantly with age and current malignant disease. S. aureus–infected patients carried a significantly higher mortality. Conclusion Our data support that Fusobacterium spp. infection is a marker for significant, chronic disease rather than carrying a poor prognosis per se. PMID:27171316

  1. Quantitative profiling of colorectal cancer-associated bacteria reveals associations between fusobacterium spp., enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) and clinicopathological features of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, Katie S; Dakshinamurthy, Amirtha; Goldberg, Paul; Blackburn, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have presented clinical or in vitro evidence linking bacteria to colorectal cancer, but these bacteria have not previously been concurrently quantified by qPCR in a single cohort. We quantify these bacteria (Fusobacterium spp., Streptococcus gallolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF), Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), and afaC- or pks-positive E. coli) in paired tumour and normal tissue samples from 55 colorectal cancer patients. We further investigate the relationship between a) the presence and b) the level of colonisation of each bacterial species with site and stage of disease, age, gender, ethnicity and MSI-status. With the exception of S. gallolyticus, we detected all bacteria profiled here in both tumour and normal samples at varying frequencies. ETBF (FDR = 0.001 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples) and afaC-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.03, normal samples) were significantly enriched in the colon compared to the rectum. ETBF (FDR = 0.04 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples, respectively) and Fusobacterium spp. (FDR = 0.03 tumour samples) levels were significantly higher in late stage (III/IV) colorectal cancers. Fusobacterium was by far the most common bacteria detected, occurring in 82% and 81% of paired tumour and normal samples. Fusobacterium was also the only bacterium that was significantly higher in tumour compared to normal samples (p = 6e-5). We also identified significant associations between high-level colonisation by Fusobacterium and MSI-H (FDR = 0.05), age (FDR = 0.03) or pks-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.01). Furthermore, we exclusively identified atypical EPEC in our cohort, which has not been previously reported in association with colorectal cancer. By quantifying colorectal cancer-associated bacteria across a single cohort, we uncovered inter- and intra-individual patterns of colonization not previously recognized, as well as important associations with clinicopathological

  2. Intermedia transfer factors for fifteen toxic pollutants released to air basins in California

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.; Daniels, J.I.; Chiao, F.F.; Hsieh, D.P.H.

    1993-10-01

    This report provides a summary definition of the intermedia-transfer factors (ITFs). Methods are discussed for estimating these parameters in the absence of measured values, and the estimation errors inherent in these estimation methods are considered. A detailed summary is provided of measured and estimated ITF values for fifteen air contaminants. They include: 1,3 butadiene; cadmium; cellosolve; cellosolve acetate; chloroform; di-2-ethylhexylphthalate; 1,4-dioxame; hexachlorobenzene; inorganic arsenic; inorganic lead; nickel; tetrachloroethylene; toluene; toluene-2,4-diisocyanate; and 1,3-xylene. Recommendations are made regarding the expected value and variance in these values for use in exposure models.

  3. Early changes in the ultrastructure of the pars intermedia of the pituitary of Xenopus laevis after change of background color.

    PubMed

    Volcanes, B D; Weatherhead, B

    1976-01-01

    Stereological analysis of the secretory cells of the pars intermedia of Xenopus laevis over a period of 3 days following the transfer of animals from a white to a black background has revealed that significant alterations in the ultrastructural appearance of these cells can be detected 8 h after the transfer. In particular, changes in the secretory granules and the rough endoplasmic reticulum were found to correlate well with previous reports concerning the melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) content and the capacity for protein synthesis of the pars intermedia. PMID:1028946

  4. Prevalence of Pulmonary Hypertension in Patients with Thalassemia Intermedia in 2009: a single center’s experience

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Hassan Mottaghi; Badiei, Zahra; Eftekhari, Kambiz; Shakeri, Reza; Farhangi, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are various clinical symptoms of thalassemia intermedia, and they lie roughly between those of major and minor forms of the disease. Patients with thalassemia intermedia occasionally require blood transfusions. This renders them susceptible to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) syndrome, which is one of the most significant complications in patients with thalassemia intermedia. PAH is more common in in thalassemia intermedia than in thalassemia major, and it may cause cardiac complications in patients who are older than 30. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of PAH in thalassemia intermedia patients so that they can be referred expeditiously for treatment, thereby preventing the complications that occur later. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted under the supervision of hematology department of Mashhad Medical University. Forty-one patients with thalassemia intermedia were examined at the Sarvar Thalassemia and Hemophilia Clinic of Mashhad. Electrocardiography, chest radiography, and echocardiography tests were performed for all of the patients by the same pediatric cardiologist. The data were processed by SPSS software, version 11.5, and the results were analyzed using chi-squared, Student’s t, and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: The mean age of the patients was 21.93±8.34. They had been under pediatric heart specialists’ constant examination and treatment since their childhood when they were diagnosed with TI, and continue to receive regular follow-up care. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension was 24% in our study population. In patients with thalassemia intermedia, the left ventricular (LV) mass indices were about 3–5 times higher than would be expected in a normal population. Patients with higher LV mass indices have a greater risk of developing pulmonary hypertension, and those with serum ferritin levels below 1000 ng/ml are less susceptible to diastolic dysfunction. Conclusion: Pulmonary

  5. Evaluation of the antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of in vitro cultured Drosera intermedia extracts.

    PubMed

    Grevenstuk, Tomás; Gonçalves, Sandra; Almeida, Sara; Coelho, Natacha; Quintas, Célia; Gaspar, Maria Nelma; Romano, Anabela

    2009-08-01

    Evaluation of the antioxidant activity of the methanol, water and n-hexane extracts of Drosera intermedia, determined by the Folin-Ciocalteau (F-C), trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and oxygen radical antioxidant capacity (ORAC) assays showed that the methanol extract had the highest antioxidant activity (F-C: 378.6 +/- 31.5 micromol(GAE)/mg(extract); TEAC: 332.2 +/- 29.1 micromol(TE)/mg(extract); ORAC: 64.7 +/- 7.8 micromol(TE)/mg(extract). Antimicrobial activity was tested against seven bacterial and eight yeast strains using the agar diffusion assay, followed by the determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC). All tested D. intermedia extracts demonstrated strong antimicrobial properties with a broad spectrum of activity. However, the n-hexane extract exhibited much greater activity than water and methanol extracts. The most susceptible microorganisms to the n-hexane extract were Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228 and Candida albicans YP0175, for which a MIC value of 13.0 microg/mL was scored. PMID:19768984

  6. Role of cin-miR2118 in drought stress responses in Caragana intermedia and Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bi-Fei; Li, Wan-Feng; Xu, Hai-Yan; Qi, Li-Wang; Han, Su-Ying

    2015-12-10

    The miR2118 is highly conserved in leguminous plants. Its function is to regulate the expression of genes encoding the TIR-NBS-LRR resistance protein. In this study, cin-miR2118 from Caragana intermedia was functionally characterized, especially with regard to its role in drought stress resistance. Two target genes of cin-miR2118 were predicted and cloned, the occurrence of miR2118 target sequence in both genes indicated that they might be targets of cin-miR2118. We investigated the expression patterns of cin-miR2118 and its target genes in C. intermedia stems and found diverse changes in expression in response to drought stress. CiDR1 was negatively correlated with corresponding miR2118 expression while CiDR2 was positively correlated with cin-miR2118. For further study, induced tolerance was observed in the transgenic Tobacco with overexpression cin-miR2118 upon 140-min water deficiency. And the expression level of cin-miR2118 was dramatically increased under drought stress. These results reveal that cin-miR2118 exert positive effects on drought stress tolerance. In addition, our study unexpectedly found that overexpression of cin-miR2118 in Tobacco can cause phenotype changes, which suggested that cin-miR2118 may have a novel function as a growth regulator in Tobacco. PMID:26216304

  7. Cumberlandian Mollusk Conservation Program. Activity 8: analysis of macrofauna factors. [Conradilla caelata; quadrula intermedia

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, W.C.; Ahlstedt, S.A.; Hickman, G.D.; Hill, D.M.

    1986-02-01

    This study provides information that may be critical to the continued survival of the mussels Conradilla caelata and Qadrula intermedia in several rivers throughout the region. The biotic components of several river reaches that have populations of these endangered species were examined to determine what biotic attributes were different from those study reaches that did not have these mussels. In all cases the quantity and quality of the benthos would be considered adequate to sustain those consumers, in this case fish, that are necessary to assure continuation of the mussel community. If fish other than Etheostoma zonale (banded darter) are determined to be acceptable hosts for either Conradilla caelata or Qadrula intermedia then there will probably be adequate numbers at each potential transplant site to accomplish reproduction. During this study we have determined that the benthic macrofauna at all sites is adequate, and supports a fish assemblage of considerable diversity and abundance, hence it is probable that adequate fish hosts are available to accommodate a complex mussel fauna.

  8. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of borneol dehydrogenase from the glandular trichomes of Lavandula x intermedia.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Lukman S; Galata, Mariana; Demissie, Zerihun A; Mahmoud, Soheil S

    2012-12-15

    Several varieties of Lavandula x intermedia (lavandins) are cultivated for their essential oils (EOs) for use in cosmetic, hygiene and personal care products. These EOs are mainly constituted of monoterpenes including camphor, which contributes an off odor reducing the olfactory appeal of the oil. We have recently constructed a cDNA library from the glandular trichomes (the sites of EO synthesis) of L. x intermedia plants. Here, we describe the cloning of a borneol dehydrogenase cDNA (LiBDH) from this library. The 780 bp open reading frame of the cDNA encoded a 259 amino acid short chain alcohol dehydrogenase with a predicted molecular mass of ca. 27.5 kDa. The recombinant LiBDH was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified by Ni-NTA agarose affinity chromatography, and functionally characterized in vitro. The bacterially produced enzyme specifically converted borneol to camphor as the only product with K(m) and k(cat) values of 53 μM and 4.0 × 10(-4) s(-1), respectively. The LiBDH transcripts were specifically expressed in glandular trichomes of mature flowers indicating that like other Lavandula monoterpene synthases the expression of this gene is regulated in a tissue-specific manner. The cloning of LiBDH has far reaching implications in improving the quality of Lavandula EOs through metabolic engineering. PMID:23058847

  9. Cloning of a sesquiterpene synthase from Lavandula x intermedia glandular trichomes.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Lukman S; Demissie, Zerihun A; Mahmoud, Soheil S

    2013-11-01

    The essential oil (EO) of Lavandula is dominated by monoterpenes, but can also contain small amounts of sesquiterpenes, depending on species and environmental conditions. For example, the sesquiterpene 9-epi-caryophyllene can make up to 8 % of the EO in a few species, including those commercially propagated for EO production. Here, we report the cloning and functional characterization of 9-epi-caryophyllene synthase (LiCPS) from the glandular trichomes of Lavandula x intermedia, cv. Grosso. The 1,617 bp open reading frame of LiCPS, which did not encode a transit peptide, was expressed in Escherichia coli and the recombinant protein purified by Ni-NTA agarose affinity chromatography. The ca. 60 kDa recombinant protein specifically converted farnesyl diphosphate to 9-epi-caryophyllene. LiCPS also produced a few monoterpenes when assayed with the monoterpene precursor geranyl diphosphate (GPP), but--unlike most monoterpene synthases--was not able to derive detectable amounts of any products from the cis isomer of GPP, neryl diphosphate. The LiCPS transcripts accumulated in developing L. x intermedia flowers and were highly enriched in glandular trichomes, but were not detected in leaves suggesting that the transcriptional expression of this gene is spatially and developmentally regulated. PMID:23918183

  10. Noninvasive analysis of skin iron and zinc levels in beta-thalassemia major and intermedia

    SciTech Connect

    Gorodetsky, R.; Goldfarb, A.; Dagan, I.; Rachmilewitz, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    Diagnostic x-ray spectrometry, a method based on x-ray fluorescence analysis, was used for noninvasive determination of iron and zinc in two distinct skin areas, representing predominantly dermal and epidermal tissues, in 56 patients with beta-thalassemia major and intermedia. The mean iron levels in the skin of patients with beta-thalassemia major and intermedia were elevated by greater than 200% and greater than 50%, respectively, compared with control values. The zinc levels of both skin areas examined were within the normal range. The data indicate that the rate and number of blood transfusions, which correlated well with serum ferritin levels (r . 0.8), are not the only factors that determine the amount of iron deposition in the skin (r less than 0.6). Other sources of iron intake contribute to the total iron load in the tissues, particularly in patients who are not given multiple transfusions. The noninvasive quantitation of skin levels may reflect the extent of iron deposition in major parenchymal organs. Repeated DXS examinations of the skin could monitor the clearance of iron from the tissues of patients with iron overload in the course of therapy with chelating agents.

  11. In vitro sensitivity of poultry Brachyspira intermedia isolates to essential oil components and in vivo reduction of Brachyspira intermedia in rearing pullets with cinnamaldehyde feed supplementation.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, M; Pasmans, F; Mahu, M; Vande Maele, L; De Pauw, N; Yang, Z; Haesebrouck, F; Martel, A

    2013-05-01

    Cecal enteritis due to Brachyspira infections tends to be chronic in laying hens. Limited availability of antimicrobial drugs for use in laying hens emphasizes the need for alternative control measures. A broth microdilution method was used to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of 20 Brachyspira intermedia field isolates from laying hen flocks to components of essential oils (EO). Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions, obtained for 8 EO components, were all monomodal. Cinnamaldehyde had the lowest MIC values (40 to 80 mg/L), followed by nerolidol, capsaicin, carvacrol, and thymol (80 to 320 mg/L), eugenol (160 to 640 mg/L), and linalool (320 to 1,280 mg/L). The MIC ranges of piperine were mostly above the test range of 1,280 mg/L. In an in vivo experiment, coated trans-cinnamaldehyde was supplemented to the feed of rearing pullets. A completely randomized experimental design with 4 treatments and 3 replicates each (replicate = group of seven 1-d-old laying hen chickens) was applied. The negative and positive controls received a conventional feed during the whole trial. The positive controls were orally inoculated on 3 consecutive days (d 22, 23, and 24) with 1 mL of 1.0 × 10(8) cfu/mL of a B. intermedia field isolate. Two treatment groups (preventive and curative), identically inoculated, received the coated trans-cinnamaldehyde-supplemented feed (500 mg/kg of trans-cinnamaldehyde), the preventive group from d 1, the curative from d 25. On d 32, ceca were collected for bacteriologic Brachyspira enumeration. The mean enumeration of Brachyspira cells was decreased (P < 0.05) in the curative treated group versus the positive control group. The in vitro results of the present study demonstrate the potential of EO components as antimicrobials against poultry Brachyspira isolates, including isolates with acquired resistance for classic antimicrobial drugs. Reduction of Brachyspira colonization in young pullets was obtained, in a curative way, in

  12. Does estradiol have an impact on the dipeptidyl peptidase IV enzyme activity of the Prevotella intermedia group bacteria?

    PubMed

    Fteita, Dareen; Könönen, Eija; Gürsoy, Mervi; Söderling, Eva; Gürsoy, Ulvi Kahraman

    2015-12-01

    Initiation and development of pregnancy-associated gingivitis is seemingly related to the microbial shift towards specific gram-negative anaerobes in subgingival biofilms. It is known that Prevotella intermedia sensu lato is able to use estradiol as an alternative source of growth instead of vitamin K. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of estradiol on the bacterial dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) enzyme activity in vitro as a virulent factor of the Prevotella intermedia group bacteria, namely P. intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, Prevotella pallens, and Prevotella aurantiaca. In all experiments, 2 strains of each Prevotella species were used. Bacteria were incubated with the concentrations of 0, 30, 90, and 120 nmol/L of estradiol and were allowed to build biofilms at an air-solid interface. DPPIV activities of biofilms were measured kinetically during 20 min using a fluorometric assay. The enzyme activity was later related to the amount of protein produced by the same biofilm, reflecting the biofilm mass. Estradiol significantly increased DPPIV activities of the 8 Prevotella strains in a strain- and dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our in vitro experiments indicate that estradiol regulates the DPPIV enzyme activity of P. intermedia, P. nigrescens, P. pallens, and P. aurantiaca strains differently. Our results may, at least partly, explain the role of estradiol to elicit a virulent state which contributes to the pathogenesis of pregnancy-related gingivitis. PMID:26386229

  13. Complete genome sequence of Brachyspira intermedia reveals unique genomic features in Brachyspira species and phage-mediated horizontal gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Brachyspira spp. colonize the intestines of some mammalian and avian species and show different degrees of enteropathogenicity. Brachyspira intermedia can cause production losses in chickens and strain PWS/AT now becomes the fourth genome to be completed in the genus Brachyspira. Results 15 classes of unique and shared genes were analyzed in B. intermedia, B. murdochii, B. hyodysenteriae and B. pilosicoli. The largest number of unique genes was found in B. intermedia and B. murdochii. This indicates the presence of larger pan-genomes. In general, hypothetical protein annotations are overrepresented among the unique genes. A 3.2 kb plasmid was found in B. intermedia strain PWS/AT. The plasmid was also present in the B. murdochii strain but not in nine other Brachyspira isolates. Within the Brachyspira genomes, genes had been translocated and also frequently switched between leading and lagging strands, a process that can be followed by different AT-skews in the third positions of synonymous codons. We also found evidence that bacteriophages were being remodeled and genes incorporated into them. Conclusions The accessory gene pool shapes species-specific traits. It is also influenced by reductive genome evolution and horizontal gene transfer. Gene-transfer events can cross both species and genus boundaries and bacteriophages appear to play an important role in this process. A mechanism for horizontal gene transfer appears to be gene translocations leading to remodeling of bacteriophages in combination with broad tropism. PMID:21816042

  14. Thiazolidinedione (pioglitazone) blocks P. gingivalis- and F. nucleatum, but not E. coli, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) production in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M; Nishimura, F; Naruishi, H; Soga, Y; Kokeguchi, S; Takashiba, S

    2005-03-01

    An elevated level of C-reactive protein (CRP) predicts the future development of coronary heart disease. Periodontitis appears to up-regulate CRP. CRP is produced by hepatocytes in response to interleukin-6 (IL-6). A major source of IL-6 in obese subjects is adipocytes. We hypothesized that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from periodontal pathogens stimulated adipocytes to produce IL-6, and that the production was suppressed by the drugs targeted against insulin resistance, thiazolidinedione (pioglitazone), since this agent potentially showed an anti-inflammatory effect. Mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes were stimulated with E. coli, P. gingivalis, and F. nucleatum LPS. The IL-6 concentration in culture supernatants was measured. All LPS stimulated adipocytes to produce IL-6. Although pioglitazone changed adipocyte appearance from large to small, and completely suppressed P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum LPS-induced IL-6 production, E. coli LPS-induced IL-6 production was not efficiently blocked. Thus, pioglitazone completely blocked periodontal-bacteria-derived LPS-induced IL-6 production in adipocytes, a major inducer of CRP. PMID:15723863

  15. Desarrollo curricular, conciencia ambiental y tecnologia para estudiantes de intermedia: Una investigacion en accion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Ramos, Teresita

    Se llevó a cabo una investigación en acción con los propósitos de 1) documentar las relaciones de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación en las clases de ciencias de escuela intermedia como elemento de apoyo cuando se aborda el tema ambiental y sus conceptos pertinentes, a partir de las observaciones de la investigadora, así como las entrevistas y diarios reflexivos de los estudiantes de una escuela intermedia en la zona metropolitana, y luego 2) diseñar una unidad instruccional sobre el tema ambiental que integre actividades tecnologías para el curso de ciencias de la escuela intermedia según el modelo PROCIC y las observaciones que hayan iniciado los estudiantes participantes. Finalmente, se plantearon las implicaciones educativas para el currículo del Programa de Ciencias al instrumentar este modelo de unidad mediante PROCIC, e integrado la tecnología y el tema ambiental. Los hallazgos se analizaron y se categorizaron de acuerdo con las preguntas de investigación. El hallazgo principal de la investigación aborda las cuatro relaciones centrales en las que se articula la utilización de las tecnologías y sus aplicaciones en la clase de ciencias. Estas cuatro relaciones que recogen la posición de los estudiantes son: 1) Perspectiva de los estudiantes hacia la tecnología. 2) Participación de los estudiantes en los aspectos docentes. 3) Aprendizaje estudiantil sobre el ambiente, y 4) Conciencia ambiental en relación con la vida diaria. Estas relaciones ponen de manifiesto,cómo se plantea en las implicaciones, la necesidad de más investigación en acción en la sala de clases, la importancia—como tema transversal—de la conciencia ambiental mediante la tecnología al construir conocimientos significativos dentro y fuera de la escuela, asó como, valorar la investigación y la dialogicidad en la sala de clases como actividades que obligan al reexamen de la práctica didáctica en su formas curriculares de objetivos, recursos

  16. Different Water Use Strategies of Juvenile and Adult Caragana intermedia Plantations in the Gonghe Basin, Tibet Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhiqing; Zhu, Yajuan; Liu, Liying

    2012-01-01

    Background In a semi-arid ecosystem, water is one of the most important factors that affect vegetation dynamics, such as shrub plantation. A water use strategy, including the main water source that a plant species utilizes and water use efficiency (WUE), plays an important role in plant survival and growth. The water use strategy of a shrub is one of the key factors in the evaluation of stability and sustainability of a plantation. Methodology/Principal Findings Caragana intermedia is a dominant shrub of sand-binding plantations on sand dunes in the Gonghe Basin in northeastern Tibet Plateau. Understanding the water use strategy of a shrub plantation can be used to evaluate its sustainability and long-term stability. We hypothesized that C. intermedia uses mainly deep soil water and its WUE increases with plantation age. Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen were used to determine the main water source and leaf carbon isotope discrimination was used to estimate long-term WUE. The root system was investigated to determine the depth of the main distribution. The results showed that a 5-year-old C. intermedia plantation used soil water mainly at a depth of 0–30 cm, which was coincident with the distribution of its fine roots. However, 9- or 25-year-old C. intermedia plantations used mainly 0–50 cm soil depth water and the fine root system was distributed primarily at soil depths of 0–50 cm and 0–60 cm, respectively. These sources of soil water are recharged directly by rainfall. Moreover, the long-term WUE of adult plantations was greater than that of juvenile plantations. Conclusions The C. intermedia plantation can change its water use strategy over time as an adaptation to a semi-arid environment, including increasing the depth of soil water used for root growth, and increasing long-term WUE. PMID:23029303

  17. Intraspecies Variability Affects Heterotypic Biofilms of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia: Evidences of Strain-Dependence Biofilm Modulation by Physical Contact and by Released Soluble Factors

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Graziela Murta; Colombo, Andrea Vieira; Rodrigues, Paulo Henrique; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzetti

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that strain and virulence diversity exist within the population structure of Porphyromonas gingivalis. In the present study we investigate intra- and inter-species variability in biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis and partners Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens. All strains tested showed similar hydrophobicity, except for P. gingivalis W83 which has roughly half of the hydrophobicity of P. gingivalis ATCC33277. An intraspecies variability in coaggregation of P. gingivalis with P. intermedia was also found. The association P. gingivalis W83/P. intermedia 17 produced the thickest biofilm and strain 17 was prevalent. In a two-compartment system P. gingivalis W83 stimulates an increase in biomass of strain 17 and the latter did not stimulate the growth of P. gingivalis W83. In addition, P. gingivalis W83 also stimulates the growth of P. intermedia ATCC25611 although strain W83 was prevalent in the association with P. intermedia ATCC25611. P. gingivalis ATCC33277 was prevalent in both associations with P. intermedia and both strains of P. intermedia stimulate the growth of P. gingivalis ATCC33277. FISH images also showed variability in biofilm structure. Thus, the outcome of the association P. gingivalis/P. intermedia seems to be strain-dependent, and both soluble factors and physical contact are relevant. The association P. gingivalis-P. nigrescens ATCC33563 produced larger biomass than each monotypic biofilm, and P. gingivalis was favored in consortia, while no differences were found in the two-compartment system. Therefore, in consortia P. gingivalis-P. nigrescens physical contact seems to favor P. gingivalis growth. The intraspecies variability found in our study suggests strain-dependence in ability of microorganisms to recognize molecules in other bacteria which may further elucidate the dysbiosis event during periodontitis development giving additional explanation for periodontal bacteria, such as P. gingivalis and P

  18. Pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (equine Cushing’s disease) in a Thoroughbred stallion: a single report

    PubMed Central

    HATAZOE, Takashi; KAWAGUCHI, Hiroaki; HOBO, Seiji; MISUMI, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) generally occurs in older horses showing hirsutism, delayed molting, weight loss, polydipsia, polyuria, laminitis, and reproductive disorders (in broodmares), but there have been no reports on stallions. This report presents a case of a 21-year-old Thoroughbred stallion that developed hirsutism and experienced delayed molting. There were no abnormal findings for semen quality or the stallion’s sexual desire. The horse was diagnosed with PPID based on dexamethasone suppression test and plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone. It was then medicated with pergolide mesylate. Since the horse died due to humerus fracture, an autopsy was conducted, and pituitary adenoma was confirmed. No pathological findings were defined in the testicles; therefore, reproductive activity might not have been impaired. PMID:26858577

  19. Ivy sign in mildly symptomatic β-thalassemia intermedia, with development of moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    El Beltagi, Ahmed H; El-Sheikh, Ahmed; El-Saif, Reem; Norbash, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Cerebrovascular occlusive disease with secondary proliferative angiogenesis can be idiopathic as a standalone disease state, known as moyamoya disease, or it may develop secondary to different disease entities, such as chronic hemoglobinopathies, in which case it is known as moyamoya syndrome. Although moyamoya syndrome has been well described with sickle cell anemia, its association with other hemoglobinopathies is rarely reported. We describe a 16-year-old girl with β-thalassemia intermedia who presented with recurrent headaches and focal seizures non-responsive to medical treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse intrasulcal bright signal intensity on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and leptomeningeal enhancement previously termed the "ivy sign", and her magnetic resonance angiography was consistent with bilateral moyamoya disease. The literature describing and explaining the pathogenesis of the "ivy sign" and its relationship to moyamoya disease was reviewed. PMID:24571831

  20. Purification and partial characterization of an elastolytic serine protease of Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Y; Fujimura, S; Nakamura, T

    1993-01-01

    Elastolytic strains of Prevotella intermedia were isolated from pus samples of adult periodontal lesions. Elastase was found to associate with envelope, and it could be solubilized with guanidine-HCl. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity by sequential procedures including ion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. This elastase was a serine protease, and its mass was 31 kDa. It hydrolyzed elastin powder, but collagen and azodye-conjugated proteins were not degraded by this enzyme. Both synthetic substrates for human pancreatic (glutaryl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-prolyl-L-leucine p-nitroanilide) and leukocyte elastase (methoxy succinyl-L-alanyl-alanyl-L-prolyl-L-valine p-nitroanilide) were hydrolyzed. Images PMID:8357246

  1. Complications of β-thalassemia intermedia in Iran during 1996-2010 (single-center study).

    PubMed

    Rafsanjani, Khadijeh Arjmandi; Mafi, Negar; Tafreshi, R Isa

    2011-09-01

    Patients with thalassemia intermedia (TI) experience many complications, of which the incidence varies greatly among cases. Considering the high prevalence of thalassemia in Iran, the study was carried out to determine the frequency of TI complications in Iranian patients and to find possible risk factors for each of them. Using the sampling method of "census," the authors included 153 patients who were seen in their tertiary hematology clinic with the diagnosis of TI during 1996-2010; an analytical cross-sectional study was performed and the data was analyzed by SPSS software using univariate and regression analyses. Mean age of the patients at the time of the study was 17.4 years and 36.5% were receiving transfusions (regularly or occasionally). Mean hemoglobin was 9.2 g/dL and mean serum ferritin was 858 ng/mL. Splenectomy was performed in 46.9% and it was correlated with age and the age at diagnosis in regression analysis. Cholelithiasis was found in 25.5% and was correlated with age and history of splenectomy. Pulmonary hypertension, detected in 23.5%, was correlated with thrombocytosis and mitral valve regurgitation in univariate analysis. Endocrine disease (hypogonadism, hypothyroidism, and adrenal insufficiency) was detected in 8% of the patients. In univariate analysis, endocrine disease was correlated with age of the patients. Regarding bone density of the spine, 53% of cases had osteoporosis. Thrombocytosis was present in 42% of patients and was correlated with their age. Since the severity of thalassemia intermedia vary greatly among patients, a careful evaluation of clinical, laboratory, and genetic aspects is necessary to differentiate TI in a patient at presentation. Moreover, TI patients should be carefully followed up for early detection and management of newly developed complications. The authors also suggest confirmatory controlled studies with larger sample sizes to assist in developing guidelines for surveillance and treatment of TI. PMID

  2. Humoral immune responses to periodontal pathogens in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Shet, Uttom; Oh, Hee-Kyun; Chung, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Young-Joon; Kim, Ok-Su; Lim, Hoi-Jeong; Shin, Min-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Elderly people are thought to be more susceptible to periodontal disease due to reduced immune function associated with aging. However, little information is available on the nature of immune responses against putative periodontal pathogens in geriatric patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the serum IgG antibody responses to six periodontal pathogens in geriatric subjects. Methods The study population consisted of 85 geriatric patients and was divided into three groups: 29 mild (MCP), 27 moderate (MoCP) and 29 severe (SCP) chronic periodontitis patients. Serum levels of IgG antibody to Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compared among the groups. Results All three groups showed levels of serum IgG in response to P. gingivalis, A. actinomycetemcomitans, and P. intermedia that were three to four times higher than levels of IgG to T. forsythia, T. denticola, and F. nucleatum. There were no significant differences among all three groups in IgG response to P. gingivalis (P=0.065), T. forsythia (P=0.057), T. denticola (P=0.1), and P. intermedia (P=0.167), although the IgG levels tended to be higher in patients with SCP than in those with MCP or MoCP (with the exception of those for P. intermedia). In contrast, there were significant differences among the groups in IgG levels in response to F. nucleatum (P=0.001) and A. actinomycetemcomitans (P=0.003). IgG levels to A. actinomycetemcomitans were higher in patients with MCP than in those with MoCP or SCP. Conclusions When IgG levels were compared among three periodontal disease groups, only IgG levels to F. nucleatum significantly increased with the severity of disease. On the contrary, IgG levels to A. actinomycetemcomitans decreased significantly in patients with SCP compared to those with MCP. There were no

  3. Method to quantify live and dead cells in multi-species oral biofilm by real-time PCR with propidium monoazide

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Real-time PCR (qPCR) is a widely used technique in analysing environmental and clinical microbiological samples. However, its main limitation was its inability to discriminate between live and dead cells. Recently, propidium monoazide (PMA) together with qPCR has been used to overcome this problem, with good results for different bacterial species in different types of samples. Our objective was to implement this technique for analysing mortality in multi-species oral biofilms formed in vitro with five oral bacteria: Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii, Veillonella parvula, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia. We also tested its effectiveness on biofilms treated with an antiseptic solution containing 0.07% w/w cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). Standardisation of the qPCR-PMA method was performed on pure, heat-killed planktonic cultures of each species, detecting mortality higher than 4 log in S. oralis, S. gordonii and F. nucleatum and higher than 2 for V. parvula and P. intermedia. We obtained similar results for all species when using CPC. When we analysed biofilms with qPCR-PMA, we found that the mortality in the non-CPC treated multi-species biofilms was lower than 1 log for all species. After treatment with CPC, the viability reduction was higher than 4 log in S. oralis and S. gordonii, higher than 3 log in F. nucleatum and P. intermedia and approximately 2 in V. parvula. In short, we standardised the conditions for using qPCR-PMA in 5 oral bacterial species and proved its usefulness for quantification of live and dead cells in multi-species oral biofilms formed in vitro, after use of an antiseptic. PMID:23289803

  4. Fastidious anaerobe agar compared with Wilkins-Chalgren agar, brain heart infusion agar, and brucella agar for susceptibility testing of Fusobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Brazier, J S; Goldstein, E J; Citron, D M; Ostovari, M I

    1990-11-01

    Fastidious anaerobe agar supported the growth of 82 strains of fusobacteria better than brain heart infusion agar, brucella agar, and Wilkins-Chalgren agar. Fastidious anaerobe agar showed less hazing and fewer tailing endpoints with beta-lactam antibiotics. Whole-blood supplementation improved the performance of all media. Wilkins-Chalgren agar without blood failed to support the growth of 17% of the strains. All Fusobacterium ulcerans strains were resistant to clindamycin. PMID:2073122

  5. Characterization of Brown spider (Loxosceles intermedia) hemolymph: cellular and biochemical analyses.

    PubMed

    Bednaski, A V; Trevisan-Silva, D; Matsubara, F H; Boia-Ferreira, M; Olivério, M M; Gremski, L H; Cavalheiro, R P; De Paula, D M B; Paredes-Gamero, E J; Takahashi, H K; Toledo, M S; Nader, H B; Veiga, S S; Chaim, O M; Senff-Ribeiro, A

    2015-05-01

    This is the first study on the hemolymph from a spider of the Loxosceles genus. These animals are responsible for a great number of envenomation cases worldwide. Several studies on Loxosceles venoms have been published, and the knowledge about the venom and its toxins is considerable, not only regarding the biological and biochemical characterization, but also regarding structural, genetic and phylogenetic approaches. However, the literature on Loxosceles hemolymph is nonexistent. The main goal of the present study was to characterize biochemically the hemolymph content, and especially, to identify its different hemocytes. Moreover, many papers have already shown molecules whose source is the hemolymph and their very interesting activities and biomedical applications, for example, antifungal and antibacterial activities. A 2D-SDS-PAGE of brown spider hemolymph showed approximately 111 spots for pH 3-10 and 150 spots for pH 4-7. A lectin-blotting assay showed that hemolymph carbohydrate residues were similar to those found in venom. Several types of TAG and DAG phospholipids were found in the hemolymph and characterized by HPTLC and mass spectrometry. Four different hemocytes were characterized in Loxosceles intermedia hemolymph: prohemocyte, plasmatocyte, granulocyte and adipohemocyte. This paper opens new possibilities on toxinology, studying an unknown biological material, and it characterizes a source of molecules with putative biotechnological applications. PMID:25720299

  6. Old fronds serve as a vernal carbon source in the wintergreen fern Dryopteris intermedia (Aspleniaceae).

    PubMed

    Tessier, Jack T; Bornn, Matthew P

    2007-01-01

    Maintaining green leaves beyond the growing season has been hypothesized to benefit plants by supplying either a nutrient or a carbon source. Understanding such ecophysiological aspects of plants will help us to appreciate how a species functions in its environment and predict how it might be affected by future changes in that environment. The wintergreen fern species Dryopteris intermedia does not retranslocate nitrogen and phosphorus from old fronds in spring, but photosynthesis does take place in the old fronds during this season. To determine if carbon fixed in the old fronds is translocated to other parts of the plant, we labeled old fronds with (13)C via photosynthetic uptake and examined old fronds, new fronds, fine roots, and rhizomes for (13)C content 1 day and 1 month after labeling the old fronds. Vernally fixed carbon was translocated to the new fronds but not significantly to the below ground tissues. Old fronds in this species, therefore, serve as a carbon source for vernal growth of new fronds. This is the first study in which a fern was labeled with (13)C to track vernally fixed carbon from old fronds to the rest of the plant in a wintergreen species. Future research should examine the precise timing of this carbon movement and examine other species for a similar or contrasting strategy. PMID:21642204

  7. A new autocatalytic activation mechanism for cysteine proteases revealed by Prevotella intermedia interpain A

    PubMed Central

    Mallorquí-Fernández, Noemí; Manandhar, Surya P.; Mallorquí-Fernández, Goretti; Usón, Isabel; Wawrzonek, Katarzyna; Kantyka, Tomasz; Solà, Maria; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Enghild, Jan J.; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F.Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Prevotella intermedia is a major periodontopathogen contributing to human gingivitis and periodontitis. Such pathogens release proteases as virulence factors that cause deterrence of host defences and tissue destruction. A new cysteine protease from the cysteine-histidine-dyad class, interpain A, was studied in its zymogenic and its self-processed mature form. The latter consists of a bivalved moiety made up by two subdomains. In the structure of a catalytic cysteine-to-alanine zymogen variant, the right subdomain interacts with an unusual prodomain, thus contributing to latency. Unlike the catalytic cysteine residue, already in its competent conformation in the zymogen, the catalytic histidine is swung out from its active conformation and trapped in a cage shaped by a backing helix, a zymogenic hairpin and a latency flap in the zymogen. Dramatic rearrangement of up to 20Å of these elements triggered by a tryptophan switch occurs during activation and accounts for a new activation mechanism for proteolytic enzymes. These findings can be extrapolated to related potentially pathogenic cysteine proteases such as Streprococcus pyogenes SpeB and Porphyromonas gingivalis periodontain. PMID:17993455

  8. Rapid detection of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia and Porphyromona gingivalis by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    García, L; Tercero, J C; Legido, B; Ramos, J A; Alemany, J; Sanz, M

    1998-01-01

    The identification of specific periodontal pathogens by conventional methods, mainly anaerobic cultivation, is difficult, time consuming and even sometimes unreliable. Therefore, a multiplex PCR method for simultaneous detection of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A.a.), Porphyromona gingivalis (P.g.) and Prevotella intermedia (P.i.) was developed for rapid and easy identification of these specific bacterial pathogens in subgingival plaque samples. In this paper, there is a detailed description of the oligonucleotide primer selection, DNA extraction and PCR conditions and the sequencing of the amplified products. The locus chosen to be amplified is a highly variable region in the 16S ribosomal DNA. For the development of this technique ATCC cultures and pure cultures from subgingival plaque samples taken from periodontitis patients were used. As an internal positive control a recombinant plasmid was developed. This simple DNA extraction procedure and the DNA amplification and visualization of the amplified product permits the detection of the bacteria in a working day. Thus, this multiplex PCR method is a rapid and effective detection method for specific periodontal pathogens. PMID:9524322

  9. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Euglena gracilis, Euglena intermedia and their extract.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Tang, Xiaoling; Song, Wenshuang; Zhu, Lina; Liu, Xingang; Yan, Xiaomin; Jin, Chengzhi; Ren, Qingguang

    2015-02-01

    Extracellular and intracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by Euglena gracilis (EG) strain and Euglena intermedia (EI) strain are reported in this study. The obtained nanoparticles showed an absorption peak approximates 420 nm in the UV-visible spectrum, corresponding to the plasmon resonance of AgNPs. According to the result of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer, the intakes of silver ions by EI and EG are roughly equal. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis of the successful in vivo and in vitro synthesised AgNPs indicated the sizes, ranging from 6 to 24 nm and 15 to 60 nm in diameter, respectively, and a spherical-shaped polydispersal of the particles. The successful formation of AgNPs has been confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis connected to the TEM. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements reveal the presence of bioactive functional groups such as amines are found to be the capping and stabilising agents of nanoparticles. To our knowledge, this is the first report where two kinds of Euglena microalga were used as the potential source for in vivo and in vitro biosynthesis of AgNPs. PMID:25650322

  10. [Septic shock Fusobacterium necrophorum from origin gynecological at complicated an acute respiratory distress syndrome: a variant of Lemierre's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Huynh-Moynot, Sophie; Commandeur, Diane; Danguy des Déserts, Marc; Drouillard, Isabelle; Leguen, Patrick; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a female patient of 47 years old who presents in a state of septic shock with acute insufficient respiratory complicated with syndrome of acute respiratory distress, together with a list of abdominal pain and polyarthralgia too. In her case of medical history, it is retained that she has had a intra-uterine device since 6 years without medical follow up. The initial thoraco-abdomino-pelvic scan shows a left ovarian vein thrombosis, as well as the opaqueness alveolus diffused interstitiel bilaterally and an aspect of ileitis. The IUD is taken off because of sudden occuring of purulent leucorrhoea. This results in a clinical and paraclinical improvement, whereas aminopenicillin was administered to the patient since 1 week. The microbiological blood test allows to put in evidence Fusobacterium necrophorum found in a blood culture and is sensitive to the amoxicilline-acide clavulanique and metronidazole. Isolation of this bacteria, classically found in Lemierre's syndrome, allowed to explain the multilfocalization of the symtoms and the list of pain. The whole concerns about a variant of Lemierre's syndrom: a state of septic shock secondary then caused by the anaerobic Gram negative bacilli, which is a commensal bacteria of the female genital tractus, complicated of septic emboli typical. PMID:21464014

  11. Antimicrobial activity of diterpenes from Viguiera arenaria against endodontic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Tatiane C; Simão, Marília R; Ambrósio, Sérgio R; Furtado, Niege A J C; Veneziani, Rodrigo C S; Heleno, Vladimir C G; Da Costa, Fernando B; Gomes, Brenda P F A; Souza, Maria Gorete M; Borges dos Reis, Erika; Martins, Carlos H G

    2011-01-01

    Six pimarane-type diterpenes isolated from Viguiera arenaria Baker and two semi-synthetic derivatives were evaluated in vitro against a panel of representative microorganisms responsible for dental root canal infections. The microdilution method was used for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) against Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella nigrescens, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella buccae, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Bacteroides fragilis, Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinomyces viscosus, Peptostreptococcus micros, Enterococcus faecalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The compounds ent-pimara-8(14),15-dien-19-oic acid, its sodium salt and ent-8(14),15-pimaradien-3β-ol were the most active, displaying MIC values ranging from 1 to 10 μg mL-1. The results also allow us to conclude that minor structural differences among these diterpenes significantly influence their antimicrobial activity, bringing new perspectives to the discovery of new chemicals for use as a complement to instrumental endodontic procedures. PMID:21233793

  12. Antimicrobial activities against periodontopathic bacteria of Pittosporum tobira and its active compound.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jung-Hyun; Jeong, Yong Joon; Koo, Hyun Jung; Park, Dae Won; Kang, Se Chan; Khoa, Hoang Viet Bach; Le, Le Ba; Cho, Joon Hyeong; Lee, Jin-Yong

    2014-01-01

    The study of medicinal plants for treatment of periodontitis is of great value to establish their efficacy as sources of new antimicrobial drugs. Five hundred and fifty eight Korean local plant extracts were screened for antibacterial activity against representative periodontopathic bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Among the various medicinal plants, the alcohol extract of Pittosporum tobira, which significantly exhibited antibacterial effect for all tested strains, showed the highest activity in the antimicrobial assays. NMR analyses revealed that R1-barrigenol, a triterpene sapogenin, was the most effective compound in P. tobira. These results demonstrated that P. tobira possesses antimicrobial properties and would be beneficial for the prevention and treatment of periodontitis. PMID:24662076

  13. A Novel Hyaluronidase from Brown Spider (Loxosceles intermedia) Venom (Dietrich's Hyaluronidase): From Cloning to Functional Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Valéria Pereira; de Mari, Thiago Lopes; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Trevisan Silva, Dilza; da Silveira, Rafael Bertoni; Gremski, Waldemiro; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Veiga, Silvio Sanches

    2013-01-01

    Loxoscelism is the designation given to clinical symptoms evoked by Loxosceles spider's bites. Clinical manifestations include skin necrosis with gravitational spreading and systemic disturbs. The venom contains several enzymatic toxins. Herein, we describe the cloning, expression, refolding and biological evaluation of a novel brown spider protein characterized as a hyaluronidase. Employing a venom gland cDNA library, we cloned a hyaluronidase (1200 bp cDNA) that encodes for a signal peptide and a mature protein. Amino acid alignment revealed a structural relationship with members of hyaluronidase family, such as scorpion and snake species. Recombinant hyaluronidase was expressed as N-terminal His-tag fusion protein (∼45 kDa) in inclusion bodies and activity was achieved using refolding. Immunoblot analysis showed that antibodies that recognize the recombinant protein cross-reacted with hyaluronidase from whole venom as well as an anti-venom serum reacted with recombinant protein. Recombinant hyaluronidase was able to degrade purified hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS), while dermatan sulfate (DS) and heparan sulfate (HS) were not affected. Zymograph experiments resulted in ∼45 kDa lytic zones in hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) substrates. Through in vivo experiments of dermonecrosis using rabbit skin, the recombinant hyaluronidase was shown to increase the dermonecrotic effect produced by recombinant dermonecrotic toxin from L. intermedia venom (LiRecDT1). These data support the hypothesis that hyaluronidase is a “spreading factor”. Recombinant hyaluronidase provides a useful tool for biotechnological ends. We propose the name Dietrich's Hyaluronidase for this enzyme, in honor of Professor Carl Peter von Dietrich, who dedicated his life to studying proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans. PMID:23658852

  14. Ruegeria intermedia sp. nov., a moderately thermophilic bacterium isolated from a coastal hot spring.

    PubMed

    Kämpfer, P; Arun, A B; Rekha, P D; Busse, H-J; Young, C-C; Glaeser, S P

    2013-07-01

    A cream-coloured, Gram-negative, aerobic, non-motile moderately thermophilic, rod-to-irregular-shaped bacterium, CC-GIMAT-2(T), was isolated from a coastal hot spring of Green Island (Lutao), located off Taituang, Taiwan, on marine agar 2216. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and subsequent comparisons showed that it was placed into the genus Ruegeria with 97.4 % similarity to Ruegeria lacuscaerulensis ITI-1157(T), and a lower sequence similarity to all other species of the genus Ruegeria. Reconstruction of phylogenetic trees indicated that strain CC-GIMAT-2(T) clustered within the genus Ruegeria. Robust tree topology for the genus Ruegeria including the new strain was only obtained by including all Rhodobacteraceae type strains but not if the analysis was limited to few selected taxa. The quinone system contained exclusively ubiquinone Q-10 and the fatty acid profile consisted mainly of C18 : 1ω7c, 11-methyl C18 : 1ω7c and C12 : 0 3-OH. The predominant polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and an unidentified aminolipid. Other lipids were detected in moderate to minor amounts. The characteristic feature of the polyamine pattern was the predominant triamine spermidine. On the basis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and of the chemotaxonomic and physiological data, strain CC-GIMAT-2(T) represents a novel species of the genus Ruegeria, for which the name Ruegeria intermedia sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC-GIMAT-2(T) ( = CCUG 59209(T) = LMG 25539(T) = CCM 7758(T)). PMID:23243093

  15. Co-Localized or Randomly Distributed? Pair Cross Correlation of In Vivo Grown Subgingival Biofilm Bacteria Quantified by Digital Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lux, Renate; Riep, Birgit; Kikhney, Judith; Friedmann, Anton; Wolinsky, Lawrence E.; Göbel, Ulf B.; Daims, Holger; Moter, Annette

    2012-01-01

    The polymicrobial nature of periodontal diseases is reflected by the diversity of phylotypes detected in subgingival plaque and the finding that consortia of suspected pathogens rather than single species are associated with disease development. A number of these microorganisms have been demonstrated in vitro to interact and enhance biofilm integration, survival or even pathogenic features. To examine the in vivo relevance of these proposed interactions, we extended the spatial arrangement analysis tool of the software daime (digital image analysis in microbial ecology). This modification enabled the quantitative analysis of microbial co-localization in images of subgingival biofilm species, where the biomass was confined to fractions of the whole-image area, a situation common for medical samples. Selected representatives of the disease-associated red and orange complexes that were previously suggested to interact with each other in vitro (Tannerella forsythia with Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis with Prevotella intermedia) were chosen for analysis and labeled with specific fluorescent probes via fluorescence in situ hybridization. Pair cross-correlation analysis of in vivo grown biofilms revealed tight clustering of F. nucleatum/periodonticum and T. forsythia at short distances (up to 6 µm) with a pronounced peak at 1.5 µm. While these results confirmed previous in vitro observations for F. nucleatum and T. forsythia, random spatial distribution was detected between P. gingivalis and P. intermedia in the in vivo samples. In conclusion, we successfully employed spatial arrangement analysis on the single cell level in clinically relevant medical samples and demonstrated the utility of this approach for the in vivo validation of in vitro observations by analyzing statistically relevant numbers of different patients. More importantly, the culture-independent nature of this approach enables similar quantitative analyses for

  16. Evolución de estrellas enanas blancas de Helio de masa baja e intermedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althaus, L. G.; Benvenuto, O. G.

    Numerosas observaciones realizadas particularmente en los últimos dos años parecen confirmar que las enanas blancas (EB) de helio de masa baja e intermedia son el resultado de la evolución de sistemas binarios cercanos. Con el objeto de realizar una adecuada interpretación de estos objetos son necesarios modelos de EBs de helio lo más detallado posibles. En este estudio presentamos cálculos detallados de la evolución de EBs de helio con masas entre M=0.1Msolar y M=0.5Msolar a intervalos de 0.05Msolar . Para ello, hemos tenido en cuenta los efectos de temperatura finita mediante un código de evolución estelar lo más actualizado posible. En particular, el transporte de energía es descripto en el marco del nuevo modelo para la convección turbulenta desarrollado por Canuto - Mazzitelli. Además hemos considerado la nueva ecuación de estado para plasmas de helio de Saumon et al. y nuevas opacidades radiativas OPAL. Las pérdidas por neutrinos fueron asimismo tenidas en cuenta. Excepto para las EBs más masivas, nuestros modelos iniciales están ubicados en las cercanías de la correspondiente línea de Hayashi para configuraciones de helio. Nuestros resultados muestran que existe una región prohibida en el diagrama observacional HR donde ninguna EB de helio puede encontrarse. Dicha región es para log{(L/Lsolar )}>= -0.25 and log{Teff} >= 4.45. Hemos encontrado también que los tracks evolutivos en el diagrama HR en el dominio de alta luminosidad (pre - EB) son fuertemente afectados por la eficiencia convectiva y que las pérdidas por neutrinos son importantes en los modelos más masivos. Finalmente hemos analizado la estructura de la zona convectiva externa encontrando que la teoría de Canuto - Mazzitelli conduce a un perfil convectivo muy diferente del dado por cualquier versión de la popular teoría de la mixing length. Si bién este comportamiento es decisivo en el contexto de las inestabilides pulsacionales, los radios y gravedades superficiales de

  17. A Preliminary Study of the Effects of pH upon Fluorescence in Suspensions of Prevotella intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Christopher K.; Billingsley, Karen; de Josselin de Jong, Elbert; Higham, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    The quantification of fluorescence in dental plaque is currently being developed as a diagnostic tool to help inform and improve oral health. The oral anaerobe Prevotella intermedia exhibits red fluorescence due to the accumulation of porphyrins. pH affects the fluorescence of abiotic preparations of porphyrins caused by changes in speciation between monomers, higher aggregates and dimers, but this phenomenon has not been demonstrated in bacteria. Fluorescence spectra were obtained from suspensions of P. intermedia that were adjusted to pHs commensurate with the range found within dental plaque. Two fluorescent motifs were identified; 410 nm excitation / 634 nm emission (peak A) and 398 nm excitation / 622 nm emission (peak B). A transition in the fluorescence spectra was observed from peak A to peak B with increasing pH which was also evident as culture age increased from 24 hours to 96 hours. In addition to these ‘blue-shifts’, the intensity of peak A increased with pH whilst decreasing with culture age from 24 to 96 hours. A bacterium’s relationship with the local physiochemical environment at the time of image capture may therefore affect the quantification of dental plaque fluorescence. PMID:27441707

  18. α:Non-α and Gγ:Aγ globin chain ratios in thalassemia intermedia patients treated with hydroxyurea

    PubMed Central

    Najjari, Abbas; Asouri, Mohsen; Gouhari, Ladan Hosseini; Niaki, Haleh Akhavan; Nejad, Amir Sasan Mozaffari; Eslami, Seyyedeh Masoumeh; Abolghasemi, Hassan; Ataee, Ramin; Ebrahimi, Abdol Ali; Moshaei, Masoumeh Rezaei; Ahmadi, Ali Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To elucidate the possible ways by which hydroxyurea molecules affect globin chain (α or β-like) synthesis. Methods A total of 23 thalassemia intermedia patients (13 male and 10 female) aged between 5 and 26 years were treated for five months with 15 mg/(kg·day) of hydroxyurea. Hemoglobins electrophoresis and globin chain electrophoresis was performed on each sample at different time points before and during the treatment. Results Fetal hemoglobin increased significantly in most patients and average episodes of transfusion decreased. Both Gγ and Aγ-globin chains increased significantly and α-globin:Nonα-globin chain as well as Gγ-globin:Aγ globin chains ratios decreased. Conclusions Improvement in α:non-α ratio and consequent decrease of free α-globin chain might be the cause of beneficial effects of hydroxyurea therapy. Two patients who felt better didn't show significant increase in their fetal hemoglobin level, and this is in contradiction with the hypothesis claiming that the HbF level increase is the cause of such therapeutic effect. In spite of the unclear mechanism of action of this drug, hydroxyurea therapy had noticeable impacts on thalassemia intermedia and also sickle cell disease and even patients suffering from thalassemia major. PMID:25183077

  19. Simultaneous quantitative analysis of nine triterpenoid saponins for the quality control of Stauntonia obovatifoliola Hayata subsp. intermedia stems.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuran; Qiu, Feng; Pan, Xueqiang; Li, Jing; Wang, Manyuan; Gong, Muxin

    2014-12-01

    Stauntonia obovatifoliola Hayata subsp. intermedia is used in China to treat rheumatic arthralgia, hernia pain, and traumatic pain. An accurate and reliable method based on high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection has been developed and validated for the quantitative determination of nine triterpenoid saponins in this herb. By using a Kromasil 100-5 C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm), nine analytes were separated by gradient elution over a running time of 45.0 min. All standard calibration curves demonstrated satisfactory linearity (R(2) ≥ 0.9995) within a relatively wide range. The precision was evaluated by intra- and interday tests, which revealed relative standard deviation values within the ranges of 0.20-2.83 and 0.51-2.79%, respectively. The recoveries for the nine target compounds were between 84.6 and 103% with relative standard deviation values less than 2.67%. The samples were also analyzed on a linear trap quadrupole Orbitrap Velos Pro mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization source in negative mode to confirm the quantification results. In conclusion, the present high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection method could serve as an accurate and reliable method for the quality evaluation of Stauntonia obovatifoliola Hayata subsp. intermedia stems. PMID:25315436

  20. 6-phospho-alpha-D-glucosidase from Fusobacterium mortiferum: cloning, expression, and assignment to family 4 of the glycosylhydrolases.

    PubMed Central

    Bouma, C L; Reizer, J; Reizer, A; Robrish, S A; Thompson, J

    1997-01-01

    The Fusobacterium mortiferum malH gene, encoding 6-phospho-alpha-glucosidase (maltose 6-phosphate hydrolase; EC 3.2.1.122), has been isolated, characterized, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The relative molecular weight of the polypeptide encoded by malH (441 residues; Mr of 49,718) was in agreement with the estimated value (approximately 49,000) obtained by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for the enzyme purified from F. mortiferum. The N-terminal sequence of the MalH protein obtained by Edman degradation corresponded to the first 32 amino acids deduced from the malH sequence. The enzyme produced by the strain carrying the cloned malH gene cleaved [U-14C]maltose 6-phosphate to glucose 6-phosphate (Glc6P) and glucose. The substrate analogs p-nitrophenyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside 6-phosphate (pNP alphaGlc6P) and 4-methylumbelliferyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside 6-phosphate (4MU alphaGlc6P) were hydrolyzed to yield Glc6P and the yellow p-nitrophenolate and fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferyl aglycons, respectively. The 6-phospho-alpha-glucosidase expressed in E. coli (like the enzyme purified from F. mortiferum) required Fe2+, Mn2+, Co2+, or Ni2+ for activity and was inhibited in air. Synthesis of maltose 6-phosphate hydrolase from the cloned malH gene in E. coli was modulated by addition of various sugars to the growth medium. Computer-based analyses of MalH and its homologs revealed that the phospho-alpha-glucosidase from F. mortiferum belongs to the seven-member family 4 of the glycosylhydrolase superfamily. The cloned 2.2-kb Sau3AI DNA fragment from F. mortiferum contained a second partial open reading frame of 83 residues (designated malB) that was located immediately upstream of malH. The high degree of sequence identity of MalB with IIB(Glc)-like proteins of the phosphoenol pyruvate dependent:sugar phosphotransferase system suggests participation of MalB in translocation of maltose and related alpha-glucosides in F. mortiferum. PMID:9209025

  1. REHABILITATION AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER EXTENSIVE SURGICAL DEBRIDEMENT OF A KNEE INFECTED BY FUSOBACTERIUM NECROPHORUM: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Matthew S.; Kegelmeyer, Deborah K.; Kloos, Anne D.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Joint infection is a rare but serious complication after knee injury that should be part of a physical therapist's differential diagnosis. This case report presents the care of a 17 year‐old female athlete with septic arthritis from a Fusobacterium infection after sustaining a right lateral meniscus tear. Joint pathology combined with the aggressive infectious agent led to arthrofibrosis of her knee joint and resultant activity limitations and participation restrictions. The purpose of this case report is to highlight a rare and unique pathology, the serious effects that a joint infection can have on musculoskeletal function, and the challenges encountered during the rehabilitation process. Case Description: The subject was a 17 year‐old volleyball player who injured her right knee while playing volleyball. Within 7 days, the subject developed a severe joint infection that spread into surrounding gluteal, quadriceps, and gastrocnemius musculature. The infection was surgically debrided eight times during a 10‐week inpatient hospital stay. A manipulation under anesthesia was performed to restore range of motion in her knee joint. Outpatient physical therapy was initiated 4 days later in order to restore musculoskeletal function. Outcome: Over eight months of physical therapy services were utilized to address the impairments and activity limitations caused by her joint dysfunction. She met her physical therapy goals and made significant improvements on the Knee Outcome Survey and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale. Success in physical therapy and completion of additional strength training exercise allowed this subject to return to competitive softball at the club level during her freshman year of college. Discussion: Though rare after musculoskeletal injury, joint infection can lead to soft tissue damage, partial or complete degradation of articular cartilage, and arthrofibrosis causing significant disability. Physical therapists must

  2. Subgingival bacteria in Ghanaian adolescents with or without progression of attachment loss

    PubMed Central

    Dahlén, Gunnar; Claesson, Rolf; Åberg, Carola Höglund; Haubek, Dorte; Johansson, Anders; Kwamin, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study describes subgingival bacterial profiles associated with clinical periodontal status in Ghanaian adolescents with or without progression of attachment loss. Materials and methods Among 500 adolescents included in a cohort study, 397 returned 2 years later for a periodontal re-examination, including full-mouth CAL measurements. At follow-up, a subgroup of 98 adolescents was also subjected to bacterial sampling with paper points at four periodontal sites (mesial aspect of 11, 26, 31, and 46) and analyzed with the checkerboard DNA–DNA hybridization technique against DNA-probes from nine periodontitis-associated bacterial species. Results The 98 Ghanaian adolescents examined in the present study were similar to the entire group examined at the 2-year follow-up with respect to age, gender, and CAL ≥3 mm. A high detection frequency of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia (>99%) using checkerboard analysis was found, while for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans the detection frequency was <50%. A strong correlation was found at the individual level between the presence of P. intermedia and the total CAL change, and P. intermedia and Porphyromonas gingivalis were strongly correlated with a change in CAL and probing pocket depth (PPD) at the sampled sites. In a linear regression model, a significant discriminating factor for the total CAL change in the dentition during the 2-year follow-up period was obtained for P. intermedia and public school. Conclusion This study indicates that subgingival bacterial species other than A. actinomycetemcomitans, for example, P. intermedia, have a significant association with periodontal breakdown (change in CAL) in Ghanaian adolescents with progression of periodontal attachment loss. PMID:24834145

  3. Protective antibodies against a sphingomyelinase D from Loxosceles intermedia spider venom elicited in mice with different genetic background.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Camila Franco Batista; Vilela, Andrea; Coura, Luis Augusto M; Rodrigues, Fernandes Tenório Gomes; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto; Chávez-Olortegui, Carlos; Maioli, Tatiani U; Felicori, Liza F

    2016-07-19

    In the present investigation we used a recombinant LiD1 toxin, named rLiD1his, from Loxosceles intermedia brown spider to elicit specific antibodies in mice carrying different Human Leukocyte Antigens class II (HLAII) {DRB1.0401 (DR4), DQB1.0601 (DQ6) and DQB1.0302 (DQ8)} as well as in BALB/C and C57BL/6 control mice. All mice strains produced high antibody titers against rLiD1his but DR4 mice antibodies (the lower responder mice) were not able to recognize L. intermedia crude venom. The anti-rLiD1his sera, except from DR4 mice, were able to neutralize dermonecrotic, hemorrhagic and edematogenic effects of rLiD1his in naïve rabbits. Overlapping peptides from the amino acid sequence of LiD1 toxin were prepared by SPOT method and differences in LiD1 epitope recognition were observed using different mice anti-rLiD1his sera. The region (160)DKVGHDFSGNDDISDVGK(177) was recognized by transgenic DQ8 and DQ6 mice sera. Other epitopes were recognized by at least two different animals' sera including (10)MGHMVNAIGQIDEFVNLG(27), (37)FDDNANPEYTYHGIP(51), (70)GLRSATTPGNSKYQEKLV(87) and (259)AAYKKKFRVATYDDN(273). Among these epitopes, the epitopes 37-51 and 160-177 have already been shown in previously studies as good candidates to be used alone or combined with other peptides to induce protective immune response against Loxosceles venoms. The results presented here highlight the importance of HLAII in antibody response and recognition of specific B-cell epitopes of rLiD1his spider toxin according to HLAII type and impact in the epitopic vaccine development against this spider. PMID:27265457

  4. Ethanol and Protein from Ethanol Plant By-Products Using Edible Fungi Neurospora intermedia and Aspergillus oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Bátori, Veronika; Ferreira, Jorge A.; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.; Lennartsson, Patrik R.

    2015-01-01

    Feasible biorefineries for production of second-generation ethanol are difficult to establish due to the process complexity. An alternative is to partially include the process in the first-generation plants. Whole stillage, a by-product from dry-mill ethanol processes from grains, is mostly composed of undegraded bran and lignocelluloses can be used as a potential substrate for production of ethanol and feed proteins. Ethanol production and the proteins from the stillage were investigated using the edible fungi Neurospora intermedia and Aspergillus oryzae, respectively. N. intermedia produced 4.7 g/L ethanol from the stillage and increased to 8.7 g/L by adding 1 FPU of cellulase/g suspended solids. Saccharomyces cerevisiae produced 0.4 and 5.1 g/L ethanol, respectively. Under a two-stage cultivation with both fungi, up to 7.6 g/L of ethanol and 5.8 g/L of biomass containing 42% (w/w) crude protein were obtained. Both fungi degraded complex substrates including arabinan, glucan, mannan, and xylan where reductions of 91, 73, 38, and 89% (w/v) were achieved, respectively. The inclusion of the current process can lead to the production of 44,000 m3 of ethanol (22% improvement), around 12,000 tons of protein-rich biomass for animal feed, and energy savings considering a typical facility producing 200,000 m3 ethanol/year. PMID:26682213

  5. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Adhesin Unique to Oral Fusobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yiping W.; Ikegami, Akihiko; Rajanna, Chythanya; Kawsar, Hameem I.; Zhou, Yun; Li, Mei; Sojar, Hakimuddin T.; Genco, Robert J.; Kuramitsu, Howard K.; Deng, Cheri X.

    2005-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a gram-negative anaerobe that is prevalent in periodontal disease and infections of different parts of the body. The organism has remarkable adherence properties, binding to partners ranging from eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells to extracellular macromolecules. Understanding its adherence is important for understanding the pathogenesis of F. nucleatum. In this study, a novel adhesin, FadA (Fusobacterium adhesin A), was demonstrated to bind to the surface proteins of the oral mucosal KB cells. FadA is composed of 129 amino acid (aa) residues, including an 18-aa signal peptide, with calculated molecular masses of 13.6 kDa for the intact form and 12.6 kDa for the secreted form. It is highly conserved among F. nucleatum, Fusobacterium periodonticum, and Fusobacterium simiae, the three most closely related oral species, but is absent in the nonoral species, including Fusobacterium gonidiaformans, Fusobacterium mortiferum, Fusobacterium naviforme, Fusobacterium russii, and Fusobacterium ulcerans. In addition to FadA, F. nucleatum ATCC 25586 and ATCC 49256 also encode two paralogues, FN1529 and FNV2159, each sharing 31% identity with FadA. A double-crossover fadA deletion mutant, F. nucleatum 12230-US1, was constructed by utilizing a novel sonoporation procedure. The mutant had a slightly slower growth rate, yet its binding to KB and Chinese hamster ovarian cells was reduced by 70 to 80% compared to that of the wild type, indicating that FadA plays an important role in fusobacterial colonization in the host. Furthermore, due to its uniqueness to oral Fusobacterium species, fadA may be used as a marker to detect orally related fusobacteria. F. nucleatum isolated from other parts of the body may originate from the oral cavity. PMID:16030227

  6. Immunoglobulin G and A Antibody Responses to Bacteroides forsythus and Prevotella intermedia in Sera and Synovial Fluids of Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Ketil; Brun, Johan G.; Madland, Tor Magne; Tynning, Turid; Jonsson, Roland

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibody immune responses to Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Bacteroides forsythus, and Candida albicans in the sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the synovial fluid (SF) of patients with RA (RA-SF samples), and the SF of patients without RA (non-RA-SF samples). An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine IgG and IgA antibody levels in 116 serum samples from patients with RA, 52 RA-SF samples, and 43 non-RA-SF samples; and these were compared with those in SF samples from 9 patients with osteoarthritis (OA-SF samples) and the blood from 100 donors (the control [CTR] group). Higher levels of IgG antibodies against B. forsythus (P < 0.0001) and P. intermedia (P < 0.0001) were found in non-RA-SF samples than in OA-SF samples, and higher levels of IgG antibodies against B. forsythus (P = 0.003) and P. intermedia (P = 0.024) were found in RA-SF samples than in OA-SF samples. Significantly higher levels of IgA antibodies against B. forsythus were demonstrated in both RA-SF and non-RA-SF samples than in OA-SF samples. When corrected for total Ig levels, levels of IgG antibody against B. forsythus were elevated in RA-SF and non-RA-SF samples compared to those in OA-SF samples. Lower levels of Ig antibodies against B. forsythus were found in the sera of patients with RA than in the plasma of the CTR group for both IgG (P = 0.003) and IgA (P < 0.0001). When corrected for total Ig levels, the levels of IgG and IgA antibodies against B. forsythus were still found to be lower in the sera from patients with RA than in the plasma of the CTR group (P < 0.0001). The levels of antibodies against P. gingivalis and C. albicans in the sera and SF of RA and non-RA patients were comparable to those found in the respective controls. The levels of IgG and IgA antibodies against B. forsythus were elevated in SF from patients with RA and non-RA-SF samples

  7. Spatial Heterogeneity of Soil Nutrients after the Establishment of Caragana intermedia Plantation on Sand Dunes in Alpine Sandy Land of the Tibet Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingxue; Jia, Zhiqing; Zhu, Yajuan; Wang, Yongsheng; Li, Hong; Yang, Defu; Zhao, Xuebin

    2015-01-01

    The Gonghe Basin region of the Tibet Plateau is severely affected by desertification. Compared with other desertified land, the main features of this region is windy, cold and short growing season, resulting in relatively difficult for vegetation restoration. In this harsh environment, identification the spatial distribution of soil nutrients and analysis its impact factors after vegetation establishment will be helpful for understanding the ecological relationship between soil and environment. Therefore, in this study, the 12-year-old C. intermedia plantation on sand dunes was selected as the experimental site. Soil samples were collected under and between shrubs on the windward slopes, dune tops and leeward slopes with different soil depth. Then analyzed soil organic matter (SOM), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), total potassium (TK), available nitrogen (AN), available phosphorus (AP) and available potassium (AK). The results showed that the spatial heterogeneity of soil nutrients was existed in C. intermedia plantation on sand dunes. (1) Depth was the most important impact factor, soil nutrients were decreased with greater soil depth. One of the possible reasons is that windblown fine materials and litters were accumulated on surface soil, when they were decomposed, more nutrients were aggregated on surface soil. (2) Topography also affected the distribution of soil nutrients, more soil nutrients distributed on windward slopes. The herbaceous coverage were higher and C. intermedia ground diameter were larger on windward slopes, both of them probably related to the high soil nutrients level for windward slopes. (3) Soil “fertile islands” were formed, and the “fertile islands” were more marked on lower soil nutrients level topography positions, while it decreased towards higher soil nutrients level topography positions. The enrichment ratio (E) for TN and AN were higher than other nutrients, most likely because C. intermedia is a leguminous

  8. Spatial Heterogeneity of Soil Nutrients after the Establishment of Caragana intermedia Plantation on Sand Dunes in Alpine Sandy Land of the Tibet Plateau.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingxue; Jia, Zhiqing; Zhu, Yajuan; Wang, Yongsheng; Li, Hong; Yang, Defu; Zhao, Xuebin

    2015-01-01

    The Gonghe Basin region of the Tibet Plateau is severely affected by desertification. Compared with other desertified land, the main features of this region is windy, cold and short growing season, resulting in relatively difficult for vegetation restoration. In this harsh environment, identification the spatial distribution of soil nutrients and analysis its impact factors after vegetation establishment will be helpful for understanding the ecological relationship between soil and environment. Therefore, in this study, the 12-year-old C. intermedia plantation on sand dunes was selected as the experimental site. Soil samples were collected under and between shrubs on the windward slopes, dune tops and leeward slopes with different soil depth. Then analyzed soil organic matter (SOM), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), total potassium (TK), available nitrogen (AN), available phosphorus (AP) and available potassium (AK). The results showed that the spatial heterogeneity of soil nutrients was existed in C. intermedia plantation on sand dunes. (1) Depth was the most important impact factor, soil nutrients were decreased with greater soil depth. One of the possible reasons is that windblown fine materials and litters were accumulated on surface soil, when they were decomposed, more nutrients were aggregated on surface soil. (2) Topography also affected the distribution of soil nutrients, more soil nutrients distributed on windward slopes. The herbaceous coverage were higher and C. intermedia ground diameter were larger on windward slopes, both of them probably related to the high soil nutrients level for windward slopes. (3) Soil "fertile islands" were formed, and the "fertile islands" were more marked on lower soil nutrients level topography positions, while it decreased towards higher soil nutrients level topography positions. The enrichment ratio (E) for TN and AN were higher than other nutrients, most likely because C. intermedia is a leguminous shrub. PMID

  9. Interaction of Prevotella intermedia Strain 17 Leucine-Rich Repeat Domain Protein AdpF with Eukaryotic Cells Promotes Bacterial Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Dipanwita; Kang, Dae-Joong; Anaya-Bergman, Cecilia; Wyant, Tiana; Ghosh, Arnab K.; Miyazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Prevotella intermedia is an oral bacterium implicated in a variety of oral diseases. Although internalization of this bacterium by nonphagocytic host cells is well established, the molecular players mediating the process are not well known. Here, the properties of a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain protein, designated AdpF, are described. This protein contains a leucine-rich region composed of 663 amino acid residues, and molecular modeling shows that it folds into a classical curved solenoid structure. The cell surface localization of recombinant AdpF (rAdpF) was confirmed by electron and confocal microscopy analyses. The recombinant form of this protein bound fibronectin in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the protein was internalized by host cells, with the majority of the process accomplished within 30 min. The internalization of rAdpF was inhibited by nystatin, cytochalasin, latrunculin, nocodazole, and wortmannin, indicating that microtubules, microfilaments, and signal transduction are required for the invasion. It is noteworthy that preincubation of eukaryotic cells with AdpF increased P. intermedia 17 internalization by 5- and 10-fold for HeLa and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell lines, respectively. The addition of the rAdpF protein was also very effective in inducing bacterial internalization into the oral epithelial cell line HN4, as well as into primary cells, including human oral keratinocytes (HOKs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Finally, cells exposed to P. intermedia 17 internalized the bacteria more readily upon reinfection. Taken together, our data demonstrate that rAdpF plays a role in the internalization of P. intermedia 17 by a variety of host cells. PMID:24711565

  10. [Noma/Cancrum oris: a neglected disease].

    PubMed

    García-Moro, Maria; García-Merino, Enrique; Martín-Del-Rey, Angel; García-Sánchez, Enrique; García-Sánchez, José Elías

    2015-10-01

    Noma is an aggressive orofacial gangrenous pathology that damages hard and soft tissues of the mouth and the face. Throughout the centuries it has been present around the globe, but nowadays it has practically disappeared from developed countries and mainly affects children from the most disadvantaged places, especially in Africa. Noma disease is a multifactorial process; malnutrition, debilitating diseases (bacterial or viral systemic diseases, HIV-associated immunosuppression, etc.) and intraoral infections are some of the factors implied. The characteristic tissue necrosis is produced by a polymicrobial infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella melaninogenica, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Bacteroides fragilis, Bacillus cereus, Trueperella pyogenes, spyrochetes, etc, are some of the species that have been isolated from the affected areas. Without treatment, noma is lethal in a short period of time, and the patients that survive show severe sequelae that hinder their life and interpersonal relationships. The aim of this paper is to unify the existing information and to promote wider knowledge and awareness among the population. PMID:26437752

  11. Desensitization to hydroxycarbamide following long-term treatment of thalassaemia intermedia as observed in vivo and in primary erythroid cultures from treated patients.

    PubMed

    Rigano, Paolo; Pecoraro, Alice; Calzolari, Roberta; Troia, Antonio; Acuto, Santina; Renda, Disma; Pantalone, Gaetano Restivo; Maggio, Aurelio; Di Marzo, Rosalba

    2010-12-01

    Hydroxycarbamide (HC) is a pharmacological agent capable of stimulating fetal haemoglobin (HbF) production during adult life. High levels of HbF may ameliorate the clinical course of β-thalassaemia and sickle cell disease. The efficacy of HC for the treatment of thalassaemia major and thalassaemia intermedia is variable. Although an increase of HbF has been observed in most patients, only some patients experience significant improvement in total haemoglobin levels. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness and safety of short- (1 year) and long-term (mean follow-up 68 months) HC treatment in 24 thalassaemia intermedia patients. Additionally, we evaluated if primary erythroid progenitor cells cultured from treated patients responded to HC treatment in a manner similar to that observed in vivo. Our results confirm a good response to HC after a short-term follow-up in 70% of thalassaemia intermedia patients and a reduction of clinical response in patients with a long follow-up. Erythroid cultures obtained from patients during treatment reproduced the observed in vivo response. Interestingly, haematopoietic stem cells from long-term treated patients showed reduced ability to develop into primary erythroid cultures some months before the reduction of the 'in vivo' response. The mechanism of this loss of response to HC remains to be determined. PMID:20955403

  12. Pathogenic Bacterial Species Associated with Endodontic Infection Evade Innate Immune Control by Disabling Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Aritsune; Jin, Jun-O; Johnston, Christopher D.; Yamazaki, Hajime; Houri-Haddad, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic infections, in which oral bacteria access the tooth pulp chamber, are common and do not resolve once established. To investigate the effects of these infections on the innate immune response, we established a mouse subcutaneous chamber model, where a mixture of four oral pathogens commonly associated with these infections (endodontic pathogens [EP]), i.e., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus intermedius, Parvimonas micra, and Prevotella intermedia, was inoculated into subcutaneously implanted titanium chambers. Cells that infiltrated the chamber after these infections were primarily neutrophils; however, these neutrophils were unable to control the infection. Infection with a nonpathogenic oral bacterial species, Streptococcus mitis, resulted in well-controlled infection, with bacterial numbers reduced by 4 to 5 log units after 7 days. Propidium iodide (PI) staining of the chamber neutrophils identified three distinct populations: neutrophils from EP-infected chambers were intermediate in PI staining, while cells in chambers from mice infected with S. mitis were PI positive (apoptotic) or negative (live). Strikingly, neutrophils from EP-infected chambers were severely impaired in their ability to phagocytose and to generate reactive oxygen species in vitro after removal from the chamber compared to cells from S. mitis-infected chambers. The mechanism of neutrophil impairment was necrotic cell death as determined by morphological analyses. P. intermedia alone could induce a similar neutrophil phenotype. We conclude that the endodontic pathogens, particularly P. intermedia, can efficiently disable and kill infiltrating neutrophils, allowing these infections to become established. These results can help explain the persistence of endodontic infections and demonstrate a new virulence mechanism associated with P. intermedia. PMID:25024367

  13. The effect of blue light on periodontal biofilm growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carla R; Song, Xiaoqing; Polymeri, Angeliki; Goodson, J Max; Wang, Xiaoshan; Soukos, Nikolaos S

    2015-11-01

    We have previously shown that blue light eliminates the black-pigmented oral bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, and Prevotella melaninogenica. In the present study, the in vitro photosensitivity of the above black-pigmented microorganisms and four Fusobacteria species (Fusobacterium nucleatum ss. nucleatum, F. nucleatum ss. vincentii, F. nucleatum ss. polymorphum, Fusobacterium periodonticum) was investigated in pure cultures and human dental plaque suspensions. We also tested the hypothesis that phototargeting the above eight key periodontopathogens in plaque-derived biofilms in vitro would control growth within the dental biofilm environment. Cultures of the eight bacteria were exposed to blue light at 455 nm with power density of 80 mW/cm2 and energy fluence of 4.8 J/cm2. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of bacteria was performed to demonstrate the presence and amounts of porphyrin molecules within microorganisms. Suspensions of human dental plaque bacteria were also exposed once to blue light at 455 nm with power density of 50 mW/cm2 and energy fluence of 12 J/cm2. Microbial biofilms developed from the same plaque were exposed to 455 nm blue light at 50 mW/cm2 once daily for 4 min (12 J/cm2) over a period of 3 days (4 exposures) in order to investigate the cumulative action of phototherapy on the eight photosensitive pathogens as well as on biofilm growth. Bacterial growth was evaluated using the colony-forming unit (CFU) assay. The selective phototargeting of pathogens was studied using whole genomic probes in the checkerboard DNA-DNA format. In cultures, all eight species showed significant growth reduction (p < 0.05). HPLC demonstrated various porphyrin patterns and amounts of porphyrins in bacteria. Following phototherapy, the mean survival fractions were reduced by 28.5 and 48.2% in plaque suspensions and biofilms, respectively, (p < 0.05). DNA probe analysis showed significant

  14. An Extraordinary Accumulation of (-)-Pinoresinol in Cell-Free Extracts of Forsythia intermedia: Evidence for Enantiospecific Reduction of (+)-Pinoresinol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katayama, Takeshi; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    1992-01-01

    Stereoselective and enantiospecific transformation mechanisms in lignan biogenesis are only now yielding to scientific inquiry: it has been shown that soluble cell-free preparations from Forsythia intermedia catalysis the formation of the enantiomerically pure lignan, (-)-secoisolariciresinol, when incubated with coniferyl alcohol in the presence of NAD(P)H and H2O2. Surprisingly, (-)-pinoresinol also accumulates in this soluble cell-free assay mixture in greater than 96% enantiomeric excess, even though it is not the naturally occurring antipode present in Forsythia sp. But these soluble cell-free preparations do not engender stereoselective coupling; instead, racemic pinoresinols are first formed, catalysed by an H2O2-dependent peroxidase reaction. An enantiospecific NAD(P)H reductase then converts (+)- pinoresinol, and not the (-)-antipode, into (-)-secoisolariciresinol. Stereoselective syntheis of(+)-pinoresinol from E-coniferyl alcohol is, however, catalysed by an insoluble enzyme preparation in F. suspensa, obtained following removal of readily soluble and ionically bound enzymes; no exogenously supplied cofactors were required other than oxygen, although the reaction was stimulated by NAD-malate addition. Thus, the overall biochemical pathway to enantiomerically pure (-)-secoisolariciresinol has been delineated.

  15. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of dihydroflavonol 4-reductase gene in flower organs of Forsythia x intermedia.

    PubMed

    Rosati, C; Cadic, A; Duron, M; Renou, J P; Simoneau, P

    1997-10-01

    The expression, during flower development, of the gene encoding the anthocyanin pathway key enzyme dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) was investigated in floral organs of Forsythia x intermedia cv. 'Spring Glory'. Full-length DFR and partial chalcone synthase (CHS) cDNAs, the gene of interest and a flavonoid pathway control gene respectively, were obtained from petal RNA by reverse transcription PCR. Whereas for CHS northern blot analysis enabled the study of its expression pattern, competitive PCR assays were necessary to quantify DFR mRNA levels in wild-type plants and in petals of 2 transgenic clones containing a CaMV 35S promoter-driven DFR gene of Antirrhinum majus. Results indicated a peak of CHS and DFR transcript levels in petals at the very early stages of anthesis, and different expression patterns in anthers and sepals. In comparison to wild-type plants, transformants showed a more intense anthocyanin pigmentation of some vegetative organs, and a dramatic increase in DFR transcript concentration and enzymatic activity in petals. However, petals of transformed plants did not accumulate any anthocyanins. These results indicate that other genes and/or regulatory factors should be considered responsible for the lack of anthocyanin production in Forsythia petals. PMID:9349254

  16. Bacteria prevalence in a large Italian population sample: a clinical and microbiological study.

    PubMed

    Checchi, L; Gatto, M R; Checchi, V; Carinci, F

    2016-01-01

    The present study detects those bacterial species which are more strongly related to bleeding on probing, suppuration and smoking in periodontal-affected patients. Nine hundred and fifty-one patients with periodontal diseases were admitted to the Department of Periodontology and Implantology, Dental School of Bologna University where they underwent microbiological tests for six periodontal pathogens (Actinomyces actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Tannerella forsythia). Cluster analysis explored the variables that mostly influence both the presence and absolute\\relative bacterial load. Logistic regression and multivariate linear regression quantifies these relations. The probability of recovering bacteria belonging to the Red Complex is greater by 25-48% in presence of bleeding on probing. When probing depth is less than 3 mm the probability of presence of each bacterial species is inferior in comparison with depth >6 mm both for Red Complex (of 20-37%), the Orange complex (of 41-61%) and Actinomyces actinomycetemcomitans (46%). Total bacterial cell count increases with pocket depth above all for the Red Complex. As Treponema Denticola and Tannerella Forsytia presence is associated with bleeding on probing and Prevotella intermedia presence with suppuration and smoking. The examination of these three as indicators of periodontitis evolution is suggested. PMID:27469569

  17. [Clinical and microbiological study of adult periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Nogueira Moreira, A; Fernández Canigia, L; Furman, C; Chiappe, V; Marcantoni, M; Bianchini, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a microbiological evaluation of sites with and without clinical evidence of moderate and severe periodontitis and their correlation with clinical parameters. A total of 52 disease sites and 10 healthy sites were selected according to clinical criteria. The following clinical indexes were measured for all the sites: plaque index, gingival index, blood on probing, depth on probing and insertion level. Samples of subgingival plaque were collected for culture and for differential counts of microbial morphotypes. In disease sites the most frequently isolated were: Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens (65%), Porphyromonas gingivalis (23%), Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (23%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (10%) and Peptostreptococcus sp. (31%). The aerobic gram-positive microflora was predominant in healthy sites. Significant differences were observed in microbial morphotypes between healthy and disease sites: cocci 18.71% and 78.90%, motile rods 46.12% and 16.70%, total spirochetes 26.48% and 2.80%, respectively. The presence of motile rods, spirochetes and P. intermedia/nigrescens were the parameters with most sensitivity to suspect periodontal disease. There were significant differences in the subgingival microflora between healthy and disease sites in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis. PMID:11594003

  18. Serum antibodies to periodontal pathogens are a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Pamela Sparks; Steffen, Michelle J.; Smith, Charles; Jicha, Gregory; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Abner, Erin; Dawson, Dolph

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation in periodontal disease has been suggested as a potential risk factor in Alzheimer’s disease. The purpose of this study was to examine serum antibody levels to bacteria of periodontal disease in participants who eventually converted to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) compared to the antibody levels in control subjects. Methods Serum from 158 participants in the BRAINS (Biologically Resilient Adults in Neurological Studies) research program at the University of Kentucky were analyzed for IgG antibody levels to 7 oral bacteria associated with periodontitis including: Aggregati-bacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Campylobacter rectus, Tre-ponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia. All 158 participants were cognitively intact at baseline venous blood draw. Eighty one of the participants developed either mild-cognitive impairment (MCI) or Alz-heimer’s disease (AD) or both, and 77 controls remained cognitively intact in the years of follow up. Antibody levels were compared between controls and AD subjects at baseline draw and after conversion and controls and MCI subjects at baseline draw and after conversion using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. AD and MCI participants were not directly compared. Linear regression models were used to adjust for potential confounding. Results Antibody levels to F. nucleatum and P. intermedia, were significantly increased (α = 0.05) at baseline serum draw in the AD patients compared to controls. These results remained significant when controlling for baseline age, Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) score and apolipoprotein epsilon 4 (APOE ε4) status. Conclusions This study provides initial data that demonstrate elevated antibodies to periodontal disease bacteria in subjects years prior cognitive impairment and suggests that periodontal disease could potentially contribute to the risk of AD onset/progression. Additional cohort studies profiling oral

  19. A protein-repellent and antibacterial nanocomposite for Class-V restorations to inhibit periodontitis-related pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Xie, Xianju; Imazato, Satoshi; Weir, Michael D; Reynolds, Mark A; Xu, Hockin H K

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a bioactive dental composite and investigate the effects of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM) in Class V composite on mechanical properties, water sorption, protein adsorption, and inhibition of four species of periodontitis-related biofilms for the first time. The resin consisted of ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA) and pyromellitic glycerol dimethacrylate (PMGDM). DMAHDM, MPC and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) were incorporated into the resin. Four species (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Fusobacterium nucleatum) were tested for biofilm colony-forming units (CFU), live/dead, metabolic activity, and polysaccharide production. The results showed that adding DMAHDM and MPC to the composite did not compromise the mechanical properties (p>0.1), with acceptable water sorption values. Composite with 3% MPC reduced protein adsorption to 1/9 that of a commercial composite (p<0.05). For all four species, the composite with 3% DMAHDM+3% MPC had much greater reduction in biofilms than using DMAHDM or MPC alone (p<0.05). Biofilm CFU was reduced by about 4 orders of magnitude via 3% DMAHDM+3% MPC, compared to control. The inhibition efficacy for the four species was: P. gingivalis>P intermedia=A. actinomycetemcomitans>F. nucleatum. In conclusion, a novel bioactive composite with 3% DMAHDM and 3% MPC achieved the greatest reduction in biofilm growth, metabolic activity and polysaccharide of four periodontal pathogens. The new composite is promising for Class V restorations especially with subgingival margins to inhibit periodontal pathogens, combat periodontitis and protect the periodontium. PMID:27287170

  20. A cost-effectiveness analysis of identifying Fusobacterium necrophorum in throat swabs followed by antibiotic treatment to reduce the incidence of Lemierre's syndrome and peritonsillar abscesses.

    PubMed

    Bank, S; Christensen, K; Kristensen, L H; Prag, J

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper was to estimate the cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) saved by identifying Fusobacterium necrophorum in throat swabs followed by proper antibiotic treatment, to reduce the incidence of Lemierre's syndrome and peritonsillar abscesses (PTA) originating from a pharyngitis. The second purpose was to estimate the population size required to indicate that antibiotic treatment has an effect. Data from publications and our laboratory were collected. Monte Carlo simulation and one-way sensitivity analysis were used to analyse cost-effectiveness. The cost-effectiveness analysis shows that examining throat swabs from 15- to 24-year-olds for F. necrophorum followed by antibiotic treatment will probably be less costly than most other life-saving medical interventions, with a median cost of US$8,795 per QALY saved. To indicate a reduced incidence of Lemierre's syndrome and PTA in Denmark, the intervention probably has to be followed for up to 5 years. Identifying F. necrophorum in throat swabs from 15- to 24-year-olds followed by proper antibiotic treatment only requires a reduction of 20-25 % in the incidence of Lemierre's syndrome and PTA to be cost-effective. This study warrants further examination of the effect of antibiotic treatment on the outcome of F. necrophorum acute and recurrent pharyngitis, as well as the effect on Lemierre's syndrome and PTA. PMID:22886057

  1. Preliminary Extraction and Identification of the 44.5 kDa Outer Membrane Proteins Isolated from Bovine Fusobacterium necrophorum (AB).

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Chen, Li-Zhi; Liu, Xiao-Ying; Feng, Er-Kai; Wang, Sun-Jie; Cao, Yue

    2013-12-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum (AB) in the pharynx, respiratory tract, female reproductive tract or urinary system is the causative agent of footrot and hepatic abscesses in animals and acute Lemierre's syndrome in humans. Current methods do not effectively protect animals and humans against F. necrophorum (AB). The outer membrane proteins (OMP) of F. necrophorum (AB) can be used as new material to protect against the diseases induced by F. necrophorum (AB). The aim of this study was to extract OMP and examine the immunogenic response of OMP. The preliminary extraction of OMP of F. necrophorum (AB) was identified by SDS-PAGE and stained by Coomassie Brilliant Blue R-250 (CB B R-250) and silver staining methods. The results showed that only a major band of 44.5 kDa was observed when staining the gel using CB B R-250. This band represented the target protein. In contrast, many small bands were observed by the silver staining method. The OMP also exhibited immune biological activities according to western blot analysis. The brightest band among the multi-banding observed was the OMP. Thus, the OMP was obtained and had immunogenic activity. The results provide a new direction to protect animals and humans against F. necrophorum (AB) in the clinical setting. PMID:24426142

  2. Are Putative Periodontal Pathogens Reliable Diagnostic Markers?▿

    PubMed Central

    Riep, Birgit; Edesi-Neuß, Lilian; Claessen, Friderike; Skarabis, Horst; Ehmke, Benjamin; Flemmig, Thomas F.; Bernimoulin, Jean-Pierre; Göbel, Ulf B.; Moter, Annette

    2009-01-01

    Periodontitis is one of the most common chronic inflammatory diseases. A number of putative bacterial pathogens have been associated with the disease and are used as diagnostic markers. In the present study, we compared the prevalence of oral bacterial species in the subgingival biofilm of generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP) (n = 44) and chronic periodontitis (CP) (n = 46) patients with that of a periodontitis-resistant control group (PR) (n = 21). The control group consisted of subjects at least 65 years of age with only minimal or no periodontitis and no history of periodontal treatment. A total of 555 samples from 111 subjects were included in this study. The samples were analyzed by PCR of 16S rRNA gene fragments and subsequent dot blot hybridization using oligonucleotide probes specific for Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, a Treponema denticola-like phylogroup (Treponema phylogroup II), Treponema lecithinolyticum, Campylobacter rectus, Fusobacterium spp., and Fusobacterium nucleatum, as well as Capnocytophaga ochracea. Our data confirm a high prevalence of the putative periodontal pathogens P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, and T. forsythia in the periodontitis groups. However, these species were also frequently detected in the PR group. For most of the species tested, the prevalence was more associated with increased probing depth than with the subject group. T. lecithinolyticum was the only periodontopathogenic species showing significant differences both between GAP and CP patients and between GAP patients and PR subjects. C. ochracea was associated with the PR subjects, regardless of the probing depth. These results indicate that T. lecithinolyticum may be a diagnostic marker for GAP and C. ochracea for periodontal health. They also suggest that current presumptions of the association of specific bacteria with periodontal health and disease require further

  3. Relationship Between Serum Hepcidin and Ferritin Levels in Patients With Thalassemia Major and Intermedia in Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Esmaeilzadeh, Masoomeh; Honar, Naser; Hassani, Fatemeh; Dehbozorgian, Javad; Rezaei, Narges; Abdollahi, Maryam; Bardestani, Marzieh; Safaei, Sanaz; Karimi, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepcidin is a key regulator of iron absorption in humans. It is mainly affected by hypoxia and iron stores. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the correlation between serum hepcidin and ferritin levels in patients with Thalassemia Major (TM) and Thalassemia Intermedia (TI). Patients and Methods: The current cross-sectional study investigated 88 randomly selected patients with Thalassemia, 48 TM and 40 TI, registered at the Thalassemia Clinic of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, a referral center for Thalassemia in Southern Iran in 2013. All patients with TI were receiving Hydroxyurea (HU) 10 - 15 mg/kg/day for at least 10 years. The serum hepcidin, ferritin levels, hemoglobin (Hb) and nucleated Red Blood Cell (RBC) of the two groups were measured. Results: No statistically significant correlation was observed between serum hepcidin and ferritin levels in any of the two groups of patients with TM (rs = 0.02, P = 0.892) or TI (rs = 0.055, P = 0.734). The median Interquartile Range (IQR) for serum hepcidin and ferritin levels were significantly higher in TM compared to TI group, (hepcidin: 87.6 (43.9) vs. 51.8 (23.4), P < 0.001; ferritin: 2208 (3761) vs. 465 (632), P < 0.001). Conclusions: There was insignificant correlation between serum hepcidin and ferritin levels in the two groups of patients with TM and TI. It seems that regulation of hepcidin in patients with Thalassemia is more affected by erythropoeitic activity than iron stores. Also, hepcidin levels were significantly higher in patients with TM than TI, possibly due to higher erythropoeitic activity in TI. In TI, it seems that low dose HU increases Hb levels and leads to transfusion-independence, but it is not high enough to suppress bone marrow activity and ineffective erythropoiesis. Consequently, serum hepcidin level decreases. PMID:26421179

  4. Circumpolar diversity and geographic differentiation of mtDNA in the critically endangered Antarctic blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia).

    PubMed

    Sremba, Angela L; Hancock-Hanser, Brittany; Branch, Trevor A; LeDuc, Rick L; Baker, C Scott

    2012-01-01

    The Antarctic blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia) was hunted to near extinction between 1904 and 1972, declining from an estimated initial abundance of more than 250,000 to fewer than 400. Here, we describe mtDNA control region diversity and geographic differentiation in the surviving population of the Antarctic blue whale, using 218 biopsy samples collected under the auspices of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) during research cruises from 1990-2009. Microsatellite genotypes and mtDNA sequences identified 166 individuals among the 218 samples and documented movement of a small number of individuals, including a female that traveled at least 6,650 km or 131° longitude over four years. mtDNA sequences from the 166 individuals were aligned with published sequences from 17 additional individuals, resolving 52 unique haplotypes from a consensus length of 410 bp. From this minimum census, a rarefaction analysis predicted that only 72 haplotypes (95% CL, 64, 86) have survived in the contemporary population of Antarctic blue whales. However, haplotype diversity was relatively high (0.968±0.004), perhaps as a result of the longevity of blue whales and the relatively recent timing of the bottleneck. Despite the potential for circumpolar dispersal, we found significant differentiation in mtDNA diversity (F(ST) = 0.032, p<0.005) and microsatellite alleles (F(ST) = 0.005, p<0.05) among the six Antarctic Areas historically used by the IWC for management of blue whales. PMID:22412889

  5. Role of the cysteine protease interpain A of Prevotella intermedia in breakdown and release of haem from haemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Dominic P; Wawrzonek, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Anna; Birss, Andrew J; Potempa, Jan; Smalley, John W

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The Gram-negative oral anaerobe Prevotella intermedia forms an iron(III) protoporphyrin IX pigment from haemoglobin. The microorganism expresses a 90 kDa cysteine protease, Interpain A (InpA), a homologue of Streptococcus pyogenes streptopain (SpeB). The role of InpA in haemoglobin breakdown and haem release was investigated. At pH 7.5, InpA mediated oxidation of oxyhaemoglobin to hydroxymethaemoglobin (in which the haem iron is oxidised to the Fe(III) state and which carries OH− as the sixth co-ordinate ligand) by limited proteolysis of globin chains as indicated by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF analysis. Prolonged incubation at pH 7.5, did not result in further haemoglobin protein breakdown, but in the formation of a haemoglobin haemichrome (where the haem Fe atom is co-ordinated by another amino acid ligand in addition to the proximal histidine) stable to degradation by InpA. InpA-mediated haem release from hydroxymethaemoglobin-agarose was minimal compared with trypsin at pH 7.5. At pH 6.0, InpA increased oxidation at a rate greater than auto-oxidation, producing aquomethaemoglobin (with H2O as sixth co-ordinate ligand), and resulted in its complete breakdown and haem loss. Aquo-methaemoglobin proteolysis and haem release was prevented by blocking haem dissociation by ligation with azide, whilst InpA proteolysis of haem-free globin was rapid even at pH 7.5. Both oxidation of oxyhaemoglobin and breakdown of methaemoglobin by InpA were inhibited by the cysteine-protease inhibitor E64. In summary we conclude that InpA may play a central role in haem acquisition by mediating oxyhaemoglobin oxidation, and by degrading aquomethaemoglobin in which haem-globin affinity is weakened under acidic conditions. PMID:19814715

  6. High-level association of bovine digital dermatitis Treponema spp. with contagious ovine digital dermatitis lesions and presence of Fusobacterium necrophorum and Dichelobacter nodosus.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, L E; Clegg, S R; Angell, J W; Newbrook, K; Blowey, R W; Carter, S D; Bell, J; Duncan, J S; Grove-White, D H; Murray, R D; Evans, N J

    2015-05-01

    Contagious ovine digital dermatitis (CODD) is an important foot disease in sheep, with significant animal welfare and economic implications. It is thought that CODD emerged from bovine digital dermatitis (BDD) via treponemal bacteria. With wildlife species such as elk now suffering a CODD-like disease, it is imperative to clarify these disease etiologies. A large investigation into treponemal association with CODD is warranted. CODD lesions (n = 58) and healthy sheep foot tissues (n = 56) were analyzed by PCR for the three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups and two other lameness-associated bacteria, Dichelobacter nodosus and Fusobacterium necrophorum. Spirochete culture was also attempted on CODD lesions. "Treponema medium/Treponema vincentii-like," "Treponema phagedenis-like," and Treponema pedis spirochetes were identified in 39/58 (67%), 49/58 (85%), and 41/58 (71%) of CODD lesions, respectively. One or more BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups were detected in 100% of CODD lesions. Healthy foot tissues did not amplify BDD-associated Treponema phylogroup DNA. D. nodosus and F. necrophorum were present in 34/58 (59%) and 41/58 (71%) of CODD lesions and 22/56 (39%) and 5/56 (9%) of healthy foot tissues, respectively. Thirty-two spirochetes were isolated from CODD lesions, with representatives clustering with, and indistinguishable from, each of the three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups based on 16S rRNA gene comparisons. This study for the first time demonstrates a high-level association for BDD treponeme phylogroups in CODD and their absence from healthy tissues, supporting the hypothesis that BDD treponemes play a primary causative role in CODD and confirming that the specific PCR assays are an effective differential diagnostic tool for CODD. PMID:25740778

  7. Subcutaneous immunization with inactivated bacterial components and purified protein of Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum and Trueperella pyogenes prevents puerperal metritis in Holstein dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Machado, Vinícius Silva; Bicalho, Marcela Luccas de Souza; Meira Junior, Enoch Brandão de Souza; Rossi, Rodolfo; Ribeiro, Bruno Leonardo; Lima, Svetlana; Santos, Thiago; Kussler, Arieli; Foditsch, Carla; Ganda, Erika Korzune; Oikonomou, Georgios; Cheong, Soon Hon; Gilbert, Robert Owen; Bicalho, Rodrigo Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the efficacy of five vaccine formulations containing different combinations of proteins (FimH; leukotoxin, LKT; and pyolysin, PLO) and/or inactivated whole cells (Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum, and Trueperella pyogenes) in preventing postpartum uterine diseases. Inactivated whole cells were produced using two genetically distinct strains of each bacterial species (E. coli, F. necrophorum, and T. pyogenes). FimH and PLO subunits were produced using recombinant protein expression, and LKT was recovered from culturing a wild F. necrophorum strain. Three subcutaneous vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 1 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; Vaccine 2 was composed of proteins only; and Vaccine 3 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells only. Two intravaginal vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 4 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; and Vaccine 5 was composed of PLO and LKT. To evaluate vaccine efficacy, a randomized clinical trial was conducted at a commercial dairy farm; 371 spring heifers were allocated randomly into one of six different treatments groups: control, Vaccine 1, Vaccine 2, Vaccine 3, Vaccine 4 and Vaccine 5. Late pregnant heifers assigned to one of the vaccine groups were each vaccinated twice: at 230 and 260 days of pregnancy. When vaccines were evaluated grouped as subcutaneous and intravaginal, the subcutaneous ones were found to significantly reduce the incidence of puerperal metritis. Additionally, subcutaneous vaccination significantly reduced rectal temperature at 6±1 days in milk. Reproduction was improved for cows that received subcutaneous vaccines. In general, vaccination induced a significant increase in serum IgG titers against all antigens, with subcutaneous vaccination again being more effective. In conclusion, subcutaneous vaccination with inactivated bacterial components and/or protein subunits of E. coli, F. necrophorum and T. pyogenes

  8. High-Level Association of Bovine Digital Dermatitis Treponema spp. with Contagious Ovine Digital Dermatitis Lesions and Presence of Fusobacterium necrophorum and Dichelobacter nodosus

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, S. R.; Angell, J. W.; Newbrook, K.; Blowey, R. W.; Carter, S. D.; Bell, J.; Duncan, J. S.; Grove-White, D. H.; Murray, R. D.; Evans, N. J.

    2015-01-01

    Contagious ovine digital dermatitis (CODD) is an important foot disease in sheep, with significant animal welfare and economic implications. It is thought that CODD emerged from bovine digital dermatitis (BDD) via treponemal bacteria. With wildlife species such as elk now suffering a CODD-like disease, it is imperative to clarify these disease etiologies. A large investigation into treponemal association with CODD is warranted. CODD lesions (n = 58) and healthy sheep foot tissues (n = 56) were analyzed by PCR for the three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups and two other lameness-associated bacteria, Dichelobacter nodosus and Fusobacterium necrophorum. Spirochete culture was also attempted on CODD lesions. “Treponema medium/Treponema vincentii-like,” “Treponema phagedenis-like,” and Treponema pedis spirochetes were identified in 39/58 (67%), 49/58 (85%), and 41/58 (71%) of CODD lesions, respectively. One or more BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups were detected in 100% of CODD lesions. Healthy foot tissues did not amplify BDD-associated Treponema phylogroup DNA. D. nodosus and F. necrophorum were present in 34/58 (59%) and 41/58 (71%) of CODD lesions and 22/56 (39%) and 5/56 (9%) of healthy foot tissues, respectively. Thirty-two spirochetes were isolated from CODD lesions, with representatives clustering with, and indistinguishable from, each of the three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups based on 16S rRNA gene comparisons. This study for the first time demonstrates a high-level association for BDD treponeme phylogroups in CODD and their absence from healthy tissues, supporting the hypothesis that BDD treponemes play a primary causative role in CODD and confirming that the specific PCR assays are an effective differential diagnostic tool for CODD. PMID:25740778

  9. Subcutaneous Immunization with Inactivated Bacterial Components and Purified Protein of Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum and Trueperella pyogenes Prevents Puerperal Metritis in Holstein Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Vinícius Silva; Bicalho, Marcela Luccas de Souza; Meira Junior, Enoch Brandão de Souza; Rossi, Rodolfo; Ribeiro, Bruno Leonardo; Lima, Svetlana; Santos, Thiago; Kussler, Arieli; Foditsch, Carla; Ganda, Erika Korzune; Oikonomou, Georgios; Cheong, Soon Hon; Gilbert, Robert Owen; Bicalho, Rodrigo Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the efficacy of five vaccine formulations containing different combinations of proteins (FimH; leukotoxin, LKT; and pyolysin, PLO) and/or inactivated whole cells (Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum, and Trueperella pyogenes) in preventing postpartum uterine diseases. Inactivated whole cells were produced using two genetically distinct strains of each bacterial species (E. coli, F. necrophorum, and T. pyogenes). FimH and PLO subunits were produced using recombinant protein expression, and LKT was recovered from culturing a wild F. necrophorum strain. Three subcutaneous vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 1 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; Vaccine 2 was composed of proteins only; and Vaccine 3 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells only. Two intravaginal vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 4 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; and Vaccine 5 was composed of PLO and LKT. To evaluate vaccine efficacy, a randomized clinical trial was conducted at a commercial dairy farm; 371 spring heifers were allocated randomly into one of six different treatments groups: control, Vaccine 1, Vaccine 2, Vaccine 3, Vaccine 4 and Vaccine 5. Late pregnant heifers assigned to one of the vaccine groups were each vaccinated twice: at 230 and 260 days of pregnancy. When vaccines were evaluated grouped as subcutaneous and intravaginal, the subcutaneous ones were found to significantly reduce the incidence of puerperal metritis. Additionally, subcutaneous vaccination significantly reduced rectal temperature at 6±1 days in milk. Reproduction was improved for cows that received subcutaneous vaccines. In general, vaccination induced a significant increase in serum IgG titers against all antigens, with subcutaneous vaccination again being more effective. In conclusion, subcutaneous vaccination with inactivated bacterial components and/or protein subunits of E. coli, F. necrophorum and T. pyogenes

  10. Activation of the Contact System at the Surface of Fusobacterium necrophorum Represents a Possible Virulence Mechanism in Lemièrre's Syndrome ▿

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Karin; Frick, Inga-Maria; Björck, Lars; Rasmussen, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum causes Lemièrre's syndrome, a serious disease with septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein, pulmonary involvement, and systemic inflammation. The contact system is a link between inflammation and coagulation, and contact activation by the bacteria could therefore contribute to the abnormal coagulation and inflammation seen in patients with Lemièrre's syndrome. In this study, F. necrophorum was found to bind radiolabeled high-molecular-weight kininogen (HK), a central component of the contact system. Binding was inhibited by the addition of unlabeled HK and domain D5 of HK but not other components of the contact system, indicating a specific interaction mediated through the D5 region. Binding of HK was significantly reduced after pretreatment of the bacteria with trypsin, suggesting that surface proteins are involved in HK binding. Incubation of the bacteria with human plasma resulted in an HK breakdown pattern suggestive of bradykinin release, and bradykinin was also detected in the supernatant. In addition, we show that factor XI (FXI), another component of the contact system, binds to F. necrophorum and that the bound FXI reconstitutes the activated partial thromboplastin time of FXI-deficient plasma. Thrombin activity was detected at the surface of the bacteria following incubation with plasma, indicating that the intrinsic pathway of coagulation is activated at the surface. This activity was completely blocked by inhibitors of the contact system. The combined results show that the contact system is activated at the surface of F. necrophorum, suggesting a pathogenic role for this system in Lemièrre's syndrome. PMID:21646449

  11. Role of the cysteine protease interpain A of Prevotella intermedia in breakdown and release of haem from haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Dominic P; Wawrzonek, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Anna; Birss, Andrew J; Potempa, Jan; Smalley, John W

    2010-01-01

    The gram-negative oral anaerobe Prevotella intermedia forms an iron(III) protoporphyrin IX pigment from haemoglobin. The bacterium expresses a 90 kDa cysteine protease, InpA (interpain A), a homologue of Streptococcus pyogenes streptopain (SpeB). The role of InpA in haemoglobin breakdown and haem release was investigated. At pH 7.5, InpA mediated oxidation of oxyhaemoglobin to hydroxymethaemoglobin [in which the haem iron is oxidized to the Fe(III) state and which carries OH- as the sixth co-ordinate ligand] by limited proteolysis of globin chains as indicated by SDS/PAGE and MALDI (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization)-TOF (time-of-flight) analysis. Prolonged incubation at pH 7.5 did not result in further haemoglobin protein breakdown, but in the formation of a haemoglobin haemichrome (where the haem Fe atom is co-ordinated by another amino acid ligand in addition to the proximal histidine residue) resistant to degradation by InpA. InpA-mediated haem release from hydroxymethaemoglobin-agarose was minimal compared with trypsin at pH 7.5. At pH 6.0, InpA increased oxidation at a rate greater than auto-oxidation, producing aquomethaemoglobin (with water as sixth co-ordinate ligand), and resulted in its complete breakdown and haem loss. Aquomethaemoglobin proteolysis and haem release was prevented by blocking haem dissociation by ligation with azide, whereas InpA proteolysis of haem-free globin was rapid, even at pH 7.5. Both oxidation of oxyhaemoglobin and breakdown of methaemoglobin by InpA were inhibited by the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64 [trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-(4-guanidino)butane]. In summary, we conclude that InpA may play a central role in haem acquisition by mediating oxyhaemoglobin oxidation, and by degrading aquomethaemoglobin in which haem-globin affinity is weakened under acidic conditions. PMID:19814715

  12. Description of Trischistoma abharensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Trischistomatidae) and first record of Tripylella intermedia (Bütschli, 1873) Brzeski & Winiszewska-Ślipinska, 1993 (Nematoda: Tripylidae) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Asghari, Ramezan; Eskandari, Ali; Maafi, Zahra Tanha; Zhao, Zeng Qi; Álvarez-Ortega, Sergio; Nadirkhanloo, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Two populations of the genera Trischistoma and Tripylella were recovered from the rhizosphere of grapevines and mosses growing on alder trees in Zanjan and Guilan provinces, respectively, Iran. The nematodes were identified as Trischistoma abharensis n. sp. and Tripylella intermedia, respectively. Trischistoma abharensis n. sp. is characterized by having females with body length 1069-1322 μm, presence of sparse somatic setae on the sublateral body, absence of ventromedian cervical setae, a distinct dorsal tooth directed anteriorly, absence of post-vulval uterine sac, and tail with one pair of subdorsal caudal setae. Males were not found. Tripylella intermedia is characterised by having females with body length 905-990 μm, annulated cuticle, stoma with two chambers: with dorsal tooth lying in posterior buccal chamber, and one large subventral and one small subventral tooth, respectively lying in posterior and anterior buccal chambers, cardiac glands large, composed of six fused cells, and tail 121-155 μm long, ventrally bent, anterior half broad, then suddenly narrowing, with posterior half tapered narrowly and cylindrically. The phylogenetic relationships of both species were analysed using sequences of the partial small subunit (SSU) and D2/D3 expansion segments of large subunit (partial LSU) of ribosomal RNA genes and are discussed. PMID:26250191

  13. Closure of chronic non healing ankle ulcer with low level laser therapy in a patient presenting with thalassemia intermedia: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Snehil; Agrawal, Parul Raj; Sharma, Dinesh Kumari; Singh, Ravindra Pratap

    2014-01-01

    In this single case study, the possible effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) was explored in the form of light emitting diodes on a chronic non-healing wound of 6 months duration in an 18-year-old male patient suffering from thalassemia intermedia. After irradiation, with LLLT dosage of 17.3 J/cm2 for 8 min for 2 weeks duration followed by proliferative dosage of 8.65-4.33 J/cm2 for 4 min from 3rd week to 6th week for 2 min along with antibiotics vancomycin (15 mg/kg) and a combination of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid (1 g). Proliferation of healthy granulation tissue was observed with decrease in score of pressure ulcer scale with complete re-epithelialization eventually LLLT irradiation could be a novel method of treatment for chronic non-healing wound in a thalassemia intermedia patient and an useful adjunct to standard care of treatment of pressure ulcers. It is postulated that LED irradiation augments wound healing with an early closure and no recurrence at the irradiated site even after follow up of 6 months. PMID:25593435

  14. Closure of chronic non healing ankle ulcer with low level laser therapy in a patient presenting with thalassemia intermedia: Case report.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Snehil; Agrawal, Parul Raj; Sharma, Dinesh Kumari; Singh, Ravindra Pratap

    2014-01-01

    In this single case study, the possible effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) was explored in the form of light emitting diodes on a chronic non-healing wound of 6 months duration in an 18-year-old male patient suffering from thalassemia intermedia. After irradiation, with LLLT dosage of 17.3 J/cm(2) for 8 min for 2 weeks duration followed by proliferative dosage of 8.65-4.33 J/cm(2) for 4 min from 3(rd) week to 6(th) week for 2 min along with antibiotics vancomycin (15 mg/kg) and a combination of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid (1 g). Proliferation of healthy granulation tissue was observed with decrease in score of pressure ulcer scale with complete re-epithelialization eventually LLLT irradiation could be a novel method of treatment for chronic non-healing wound in a thalassemia intermedia patient and an useful adjunct to standard care of treatment of pressure ulcers. It is postulated that LED irradiation augments wound healing with an early closure and no recurrence at the irradiated site even after follow up of 6 months. PMID:25593435

  15. Evaluation of anti-microbial activity of spore powder of Ganoderma lucidum on clinical isolates of Prevotella intermedia: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Ranganath N.; Dixitraj, P. T.; Nayak, Aarati; Bhat, Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed at evaluating the anti-microbial activity of spore powder of Ganoderma lucidum on Prevotella intermedia isolated from subgingival plaque from chronic periodontitis patients. Settings and Design: Written informed consent was obtained from each subject enrolled in the study. The Institutional Ethics Committee granted the ethical clearance for the study. Materials and Methods: This study included 20 patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis. Pooled subgingival plaque samples were collected using sterile curettes from the deepest sites of periodontal pockets. The collected samples were then transported in 1 mL of reduced transport fluid. The organisms were cultured and confirmed. These organisms were then used for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) procedure. Statistical Analysis: Mean of the MIC value obtained was calculated. Results: Thirteen out of the 20 clinical samples were tested that showed sensitivity at various concentrations. Five samples showed sensitivity at all concentrations. Twelve samples showed sensitivity at 8 mcg/ml. Eleven samples showed sensitivity at 4 mcg/ml, 8 samples showed sensitivity at 2 mcg/ml, and 5 samples showed sensitivity even at 1 mcg/ml. Mean MIC value of G. lucidum spore powder for P. intermedia obtained was 3.62 mcg/ml. Conclusion: G. lucidum with its multipotential bioactivity could be used as an anti-microbial, in conjunction with conventional therapy in periodontal disease. PMID:26604581

  16. Cardiac Function and Iron Chelation in Thalassemia Major and Intermedia: a Review of the Underlying Pathophysiology and Approach to Chelation Management

    PubMed Central

    Aessopos, Athanasios; Berdoukas, Vasilios

    2009-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of mortality and one of the main causes of morbidity in beta-thalassemia. Patients with homozygous thalassemia may have either a severe phenotype which is usually transfusion dependent or a milder form that is thalassemia intermedia. The two main factors that determine cardiac disease in homozygous β thalassemia are the high output state that results from chronic tissue hypoxia, hypoxia-induced compensatory reactions and iron overload. The high output state playing a major role in thalassaemia intermedia and the iron load being more significant in the major form. Arrhythmias, vascular involvement that leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance and an increased systemic vascular stiffness and valvular abnormalities also contribute to the cardiac dysfunction in varying degrees according to the severity of the phenotype. Endocrine abnormalities, infections, renal function and medications can also play a role in the overall cardiac function. For thalassaemia major, regular and adequate blood transfusions and iron chelation therapy are the mainstays of management. The approach to thalassaemia intermedia, today, is aimed at monitoring for complications and initiating, timely, regular transfusions and/or iron chelation therapy. Once the patients are on transfusions, then they should be managed in the same way as the thalassaemia major patients. If cardiac manifestations of dysfunction are present in either form of thalassaemia, high pre transfusion Hb levels need to be maintained in order to reduce cardiac output and appropriate intensive chelation therapy needs to be instituted. In general recommendations on chelation, today, are usually made according to the Cardiac Magnetic Resonance findings, if available. With the advances in the latter technology and the ability to tailor chelation therapy according to the MRI findings as well as the availability of three iron chelators, together with increasing the transfusions as need

  17. Speciation history and widespread introgression in the European short-call tree frogs (Hyla arborea sensu lato, H. intermedia and H. sarda).

    PubMed

    Gvoždík, Václav; Canestrelli, Daniele; García-París, Mario; Moravec, Jiří; Nascetti, Giuseppe; Recuero, Ernesto; Teixeira, José; Kotlík, Petr

    2015-02-01

    European tree frogs (Hyla) characterized by short temporal parameters of the advertisement call form six genetically differentiated but morphologically cryptic taxa, H. arborea sensu stricto, H. orientalis and H. molleri from across Europe to western Asia (together referred to as H. arborea sensu lato), two putative taxa within H. intermedia (Northern and Southern) from the Italian Peninsula and Sicily, and H. sarda from Sardinia and Corsica. Here, we assess species limits and phylogenetic relationships within these 'short-call tree frogs' based on mitochondrial DNA and nuclear protein-coding markers. The mitochondrial and nuclear genes show partly incongruent phylogeographic patterns, which point to a complex history of gene flow across taxa, particularly in the Balkans. To test the species limits in the short-call tree frogs and to infer the species tree, we used coalescent-based approaches. The monophyly of H. arborea sensu lato is supported by the mtDNA as well as by the all-gene species tree. The Northern and Southern lineages of H. intermedia have been connected by nuclear gene flow (despite their deep mtDNA divergence) and should be treated as conspecific. On the contrary, the parapatric taxa within H. arborea sensu lato should be considered distinct species (H. arborea, H. orientalis, H. molleri) based on the coalescent analysis, although signs of hybridization were detected between them (H. arborea×H. orientalis; H. arborea×H. molleri). A mitochondrial capture upon secondary contact appears to explain the close mtDNA relationship between the geographically remote Iberian H. molleri and H. orientalis from around the Black Sea. Introgressive hybridization occurred also between the Balkan H. arborea and northern Italian H. intermedia, and between the Minor Asiatic H. orientalis and Arabian H. felix arabica (the latter belonging to a different acoustic group/clade). Our results shed light on the species limits in the European short-call tree frogs and show

  18. Molecular cloning and in silico characterization of knottin peptide, U2-SCRTX-Lit2, from brown spider (Loxosceles intermedia) venom glands.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Gabriel Otto; de Resende Lara, Pedro Túlio; Scott, Luis Paulo Barbour; Braz, Antônio Sérgio Kimus; Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Matsubara, Fernando Hitomi; Soares, Eduardo Mendonça; Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Veiga, Silvio Sanches; Chaim, Olga Meiri

    2016-09-01

    Inhibitor cystine knots (ICKs) are a family of structural peptides with a large number of cysteine residues that form intramolecular disulfide bonds, resulting in a knot. These peptides are involved in a variety of biological functions including predation and defense, and are found in various species, such as spiders, scorpions, sea anemones, and plants. The Loxosceles intermedia venom gland transcriptome identified five groups of ICK peptides that represent more than 50 % of toxin-coding transcripts. Here, we describe the molecular cloning of U2-Sicaritoxin-Lit2 (U2-SCRTX-Lit2), bioinformatic characterization, structure prediction, and molecular dynamic analysis. The sequence of U2-SCRTX-Lit2 obtained from the transcriptome is similar to that of μ-Hexatoxin-Mg2, a peptide that inhibits the insect Nav channel. Bioinformatic analysis of sequences classified as ICK family members also showed a conservation of cysteine residues among ICKs from different spiders, with the three dimensional molecular model of U2-SCRTX-Lit2 similar in structure to the hexatoxin from μ-hexatoxin-Mg2a. Molecular docking experiments showed the interaction of U2-SCRTX-Lit2 to its predictable target-the Spodoptera litura voltage-gated sodium channel (SlNaVSC). After 200 ns of molecular dynamic simulation, the final structure of the complex showed stability in agreement with the experimental data. The above analysis corroborates the existence of a peptide toxin with insecticidal activity from a novel ICK family in L. intermedia venom and demonstrates that this peptide targets Nav channels. PMID:27488102

  19. Association between Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, Oral Microbiota and Systemic Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Akcalı, Aliye; Bostanci, Nagihan; Özçaka, Özgün; Öztürk-Ceyhan, Banu; Gümüş, Pınar; Buduneli, Nurcan; Belibasakis, Georgios N.

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder of women that not only is the leading cause of infertility but also shows a reciprocal link with oral health. This study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that the levels of putative periodontal pathogens in saliva and their antibody response in serum are elevated in PCOS, compared to systemic health. A total of 125 women were included in four groups; 45 women with PCOS and healthy periodontium, 35 women with PCOS and gingivitis, 25 systemically and periodontally healthy women, 20 systemically healthy women with gingivitis. Salivary levels of seven putative periodontal pathogens were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and serum antibody levels were analyzed by ELISA. In women with PCOS, salivary Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus oralis and Tannerella forsythia levels were higher than matched systemically healthy women, particularly in the case of gingivitis. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Treponema denticola levels were similar among study groups. The presence of PCOS also enhanced P. gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and S. oralis serum antibody levels, when gingivitis was also present. Gingival inflammation correlated positively with levels of the studied taxa in saliva, particularly in PCOS. The presence of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum in saliva also exhibited a strong positive correlation with the corresponding serum antibody levels. In conclusion, as an underlying systemic endocrine condition, PCOS may quantitatively affect the composition of oral microbiota and the raised systemic response to selective members of this microbial community, exerting a confounding role in resultant gingival inflammation and periodontal health. The most consistent effect appeared to be exerted on P. gingivalis. PMID:25232962

  20. Association between polycystic ovary syndrome, oral microbiota and systemic antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Akcalı, Aliye; Bostanci, Nagihan; Özçaka, Özgün; Öztürk-Ceyhan, Banu; Gümüş, Pınar; Buduneli, Nurcan; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder of women that not only is the leading cause of infertility but also shows a reciprocal link with oral health. This study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that the levels of putative periodontal pathogens in saliva and their antibody response in serum are elevated in PCOS, compared to systemic health. A total of 125 women were included in four groups; 45 women with PCOS and healthy periodontium, 35 women with PCOS and gingivitis, 25 systemically and periodontally healthy women, 20 systemically healthy women with gingivitis. Salivary levels of seven putative periodontal pathogens were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and serum antibody levels were analyzed by ELISA. In women with PCOS, salivary Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus oralis and Tannerella forsythia levels were higher than matched systemically healthy women, particularly in the case of gingivitis. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Treponema denticola levels were similar among study groups. The presence of PCOS also enhanced P. gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and S. oralis serum antibody levels, when gingivitis was also present. Gingival inflammation correlated positively with levels of the studied taxa in saliva, particularly in PCOS. The presence of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum in saliva also exhibited a strong positive correlation with the corresponding serum antibody levels. In conclusion, as an underlying systemic endocrine condition, PCOS may quantitatively affect the composition of oral microbiota and the raised systemic response to selective members of this microbial community, exerting a confounding role in resultant gingival inflammation and periodontal health. The most consistent effect appeared to be exerted on P. gingivalis. PMID:25232962

  1. Effects of long-term exposure to two fungicides, pyrimethanil and tebuconazole, on survival and life history traits of Italian tree frog (Hyla intermedia).

    PubMed

    Bernabò, Ilaria; Guardia, Antonello; Macirella, Rachele; Sesti, Settimio; Crescente, Antonio; Brunelli, Elvira

    2016-03-01

    Over the last few years, the hazards associated with the extensive use of fungicides have become an issue of great concern but, at present, the effects of these substances on amphibians remain poorly understood. The goal of the present study was to assess the effects of two commonly used fungicides, tebuconazole and pyrimethanil, on Italian Tree Frog (Hyla intermedia), a species frequently found in agricultural areas. Tadpoles were exposed to fungicides from developmental Gosner stage 25 (GS 25) to completion of metamorphosis (GS 46) and the whole exposure period lasted 78 days. For both tested fungicides we used two concentrations (5 and 50μg/L) that are comparable to those detected in surface waters, near agricultural fields. A variety of sublethal effects-on growth, development, behavior, and physiology-may be used for evaluating alterations induced by pollutants in amphibians. We estimated whether pyrimethanil and tebuconazole exposure impacted on H. intermedia life history traits. For this purpose, survival, growth, development, initiation of metamorphosis, success and size at metamorphosis, time to metamorphosis, and frequency of morphological abnormalities were evaluated. We showed, for all considered endpoints, that the exposure to tebuconazole exerts more harmful effects on H. intermedia than does exposure to pyrimethanil. Before the onset of metamorphic climax we showed, for both fungicides, that the low concentrations (5μg/L) induced significantly greater effects than the higher ones (50μg/L) on survival and deformity incidence. During the metamorphic climax, a complete reversal of this nonlinear trend takes place, and the percentage of animals initiating metamorphosis was reduced in fungicide-exposed groups in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, a strong correlation emerged between fungicide exposure and the incidence of morphological abnormalities such as tail malformations, scoliosis, edema, mouth and limb deformities. Exposure to tested

  2. In Vitro Evaluation of Planktonic Growth on Experimental Cement-Retained Titanium Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Balci, Nur; Cakan, Umut; Aksu, Burak; Akgul, Oncu; Ulger, Nurver

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of selected cements, or their combination with titanium, on the growth of two periodontopathic bacteria: Prevotella intermedia (Pi) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). MATERIAL AND METHODS This study was comprised of several experimental groups: 1) Dental luting cements (glass ionomer cement, methacrylate-based resin cement, zinc-oxide eugenol cement, eugenol-free zinc oxide cement; 2) titanium discs; and 3) titanium combination cement discs. The disks were submerged in bacterial suspensions of either Fn or Pi. Planktonic bacterial growth within the test media was measured by determining the optical density of the cultures (OD600). Mean and standard deviations were calculated for planktonic growth from three separate experiments. RESULTS Intergroup comparison of all experimental groups revealed increased growth of Pi associated with cement-titanium specimens in comparison with cement specimens. Regarding the comparison of all groups for Fn, there was an increased amount of bacterial growth in cement-titanium specimens although the increase was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS The combination of cement with titanium may exacerbate the bacterial growth capacity of Pi and Fn in contrast to their sole effect. PMID:27058704

  3. Giant frontal mucocele complicated by subdural empyema: treatment of a rare association.

    PubMed

    Visocchi, Massimiliano; Esposito, Giuseppe; Della Pepa, Giuseppe Maria; Doglietto, Francesco; Nucci, Carlotta Ginevra; Fontanella, Marco Maria; Montano, Nicola

    2012-03-01

    Giant frontal mucocele (GFM) is an extremely rare cause of frontal lobe syndrome. Subdural empyema (SDE) is an uncommon complication of paranasal sinisutis, for which craniotomy and decompressive craniotomy are the most effective surgical procedures. A 54-year-old man was brought unconscious to the emergency room where recurrent generalized seizures occurred. Heroine abuse, HCV-related hepatitis, prolonged antibiotic therapy for treatment of purulent rhinorrhea, along with recent personality changes were reported. High white blood cell count, pansinusitis, GFM, SDE and cerebritis were documented. The patient underwent bifrontal craniotomy in emergency, extensive drilling of the inner aspect of the frontal bone, surgical toilet of the enlarged frontal sinus and its "cranialization". Prevotella intermedia and Fusobacterium nucleatum were isolated and antibiotic therapy was started intravenously and then continued orally for 3 months. 2 years later the patient has recovered, though minor signs of frontal lobe syndrome persist. To the authors knowledge, this is the first case of GFM with SDE reported in the literature. Although decompressive craniectomy is advocated in extreme conditions, as in this case, "internal decompressive craniectomy", obtained with craniotomy and cranialization of the frontal sinuses, is strongly advocated in cases of SDE associated with megasinuses. PMID:22427297

  4. In Vitro Evaluation of Planktonic Growth on Experimental Cement-Retained Titanium Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Nur; Cakan, Umut; Aksu, Burak; Akgul, Oncu; Ulger, Nurver

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of selected cements, or their combination with titanium, on the growth of two periodontopathic bacteria: Prevotella intermedia (Pi) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). Material/Methods This study was comprised of several experimental groups: 1) Dental luting cements (glass ionomer cement, methacrylate-based resin cement, zinc-oxide eugenol cement, eugenol-free zinc oxide cement; 2) titanium discs; and 3) titanium combination cement discs. The disks were submerged in bacterial suspensions of either Fn or Pi. Planktonic bacterial growth within the test media was measured by determining the optical density of the cultures (OD600). Mean and standard deviations were calculated for planktonic growth from three separate experiments. Results Intergroup comparison of all experimental groups revealed increased growth of Pi associated with cement-titanium specimens in comparison with cement specimens. Regarding the comparison of all groups for Fn, there was an increased amount of bacterial growth in cement-titanium specimens although the increase was not statistically significant. Conclusions The combination of cement with titanium may exacerbate the bacterial growth capacity of Pi and Fn in contrast to their sole effect. PMID:27058704

  5. Putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in pregnant women: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haixia; Zhu, Ce; Li, Fei; Xu, Wei; Tao, Danying; Feng, Xiping

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about herpesvirus and putative periodontopathic bacteria in maternal chronic periodontitis. The present case-control study aimed to explore the potential relationship between putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in maternal chronic periodontitis.Saliva samples were collected from 36 pregnant women with chronic periodontitis (cases) and 36 pregnant women with healthy periodontal status (controls). Six putative periodontopathic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis [Pg], Aggregatibacer actinomycetemcomitans [Aa], Fusobacterium nucleatum [Fn], Prevotella intermedia [Pi], Tannerella forsythia [Tf], and Treponema denticola [Td]) and three herpesviruses (Epstein-Barr virus [EBV], human cytomegalovirus [HCMV], and herpes simplex virus [HSV]) were detected. Socio-demographic data and oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels were also collected. The results showed no significant differences in socio-demographic background, oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels between the two groups (all P > 0.05). The detection rates of included periodontopathic microorganisms were not significantly different between the two groups (all P > 0.05), but the coinfection rate of EBV and Pg was significantly higher in the case group than in the control group (P = 0.028). EBV and Pg coinfection may promote the development of chronic periodontitis among pregnant women. PMID:27301874

  6. Faropenem, a new oral penem: antibacterial activity against selected anaerobic and fastidious periodontal isolates.

    PubMed

    Milazzo, I; Blandino, G; Caccamo, F; Musumeci, R; Nicoletti, G; Speciale, A

    2003-03-01

    The in vitro activity of faropenem, an oral penem, was compared with those of penicillin, co-amoxiclav, cefoxitin, clindamycin, erythromycin and metronidazole against 106 isolates of anaerobic pathogens involved in systemic infections. The organisms tested comprised Porphyromonas gingivalis (29), Prevotella spp. (eight), Prevotella melaninogenica (seven), Prevotella intermedia (five), Actinomyces spp. (25), Fusobacterium nucleatum (14), Peptostreptococcus spp. (11), Bacteroides ureolyticus (five) and Bacteroides forsythus (two). The antimicrobial properties of faropenem were investigated by studying MICs, MBCs, time-kill kinetics and post-antibiotic effect (PAE). Faropenem was highly active against all the anaerobes tested (MIC(90) < or = 0.5 mg/L) and was bactericidal against both beta-lactamase-positive and -negative anaerobes, with a maximum bactericidal effect at 10 x MIC at between 12 and 24 h. In addition, faropenem had an in vitro PAE on all the tested isolates and this was not influenced by beta-lactamase production. Faropenem may be useful for treating infections caused by periodontal bacteria or oral flora. PMID:12615878

  7. Identification of an antibacterial protein by functional screening of a human oral metagenomic library.

    PubMed

    Arivaradarajan, Preeti; Warburton, Philip J; Paramasamy, Gunasekaran; Nair, Sean P; Allan, Elaine; Mullany, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Screening of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library containing metagenomic DNA from human plaque and saliva allowed the isolation of four clones producing antimicrobial activity. Three of these were pigmented and encoded homologues of glutamyl-tRNA reductase (GluTR), an enzyme involved in the C5 pathway leading to tetrapyrole synthesis, and one clone had antibacterial activity with no pigmentation. The latter contained a BAC with an insert of 15.6 kb. Initial attempts to localize the gene(s) responsible for antimicrobial activity by subcloning into pUC-based vectors failed. A new plasmid for toxic gene expression (pTGEX) was designed enabling localization of the antibacterial activity to a 4.7-kb HindIII fragment. Transposon mutagenesis localized the gene to an open reading frame of 483 bp designated antibacterial protein1 (abp1). Abp1 was 94% identical to a hypothetical protein of Neisseria subflava (accession number WP_004519448.1). An Escherichia coli clone expressing Abp1 exhibited antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis BS78H, Staphylococcus epidermidis NCTC 11964 and B4268, and S. aureus NCTC 12493,ATCC 35696 and NCTC 11561. However, no antibacterial activity was observed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027, N. subflava ATCC A1078, E. coli K12 JM109 and BL21(DE3) Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586 and NCTC 11326, Prevotella intermedia ATCC 25611, Veillonella parvula ATCC 10790 or Lactobacillus casei NCTC 6375. PMID:26347298

  8. Effects of Hangeshashinto on Growth of Oral Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Fukamachi, Haruka; Matsumoto, Chinami; Omiya, Yuji; Arimoto, Takafumi; Morisaki, Hirobumi; Kataoka, Hideo; Kadena, Miki; Funatsu, Takahiro; Fukutake, Masato; Kase, Yoshio; Kuwata, Hirotaka

    2015-01-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) in cancer patients induced by chemotherapy or radiotherapy has a significant impact on quality of life, and causes considerable morbidity. Oral microorganisms are likely to intensify the inflammatory process and aggravate the formation of ulcers. Hangeshashinto (HST), a Japanese kampo medicine, has been reported to be effective when used as a gargle for the treatment of OM. To clarify the effects of HST on oral microorganisms, we assessed its antimicrobial activity against 27 microbial species, including 19 oral bacteria and one fungus. HST extract inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria, including Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella melaninogenica, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Porphyromonas asaccharolytica, though inhibitory effects were less pronounced for Gram-positive bacteria and the fungal strain. We then investigated the effects of antibacterial activities on 15 purified ingredients of HST and determined that baicalein, berberine, coptisine, [6]-shogaol, and homogentisic acid actively inhibited the growth of these bacteria. These findings showed that HST inhibits the growth of specific Gram-negative periodontopathogenic bacteria, which are significant pathogens in OM, without disturbing the normal oral flora. Our data suggest that HST may be a useful treatment for OM in patients undergoing anticancer treatment. PMID:26170876

  9. The influence of orthodontic fixed appliances on the oral microbiota: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Amanda Osório Ayres; Marquezan, Mariana; Nojima, Matilde da Cunha Gonçalves; Alviano, Daniela Sales; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether there is scientific evidence to support the hypothesis that the presence of orthodontic fixed appliances influences the oral microbiota. Methods The search for articles was conducted in PubMed; ISI Web of Knowledge and Ovid databases, including articles published in English until May 17th, 2012. They should report human observational studies presenting the following keywords: "fixed orthodontic appliance" AND "microbiological colonization"; OR "periodontal pathogens"; OR "Streptococcus"; OR "Lactobacillus"; OR "Candida"; OR "Tannerella forsythia"; OR "Treponema denticola"; OR "Fusobacterium nucleatum"; OR "Actimomyces actinomycetemcomitans"; OR "Prevotella intermedia", OR "Prevotella nigrescens"; OR "Porphyromonas gingivalis". Articles were previously selected by title and abstract. Articles that met the inclusion criteria were analyzed and classified as having low, moderate or high methodology quality. A new detailed checklist for quality assessment was developed based on the information required for applicable data extraction for reviews. The study design, sample, follow-up period, collection and microbial analysis methods, statistical treatment, results and discussion were assessed. Results The initial search retrieved 305 articles of which 33 articles were selected by title and abstract. After full-text reading, 8 articles met the inclusion criteria, out of which 4 articles were classified as having low and 4 as moderate methodological quality. The moderate methodological quality studies were included in the systematic review. Conclusions The literature revealed moderate evidence that the presence of fixed appliances influences the quantity and quality of oral microbiota. PMID:24945514

  10. Role of suspected periodontopathogens in microbiological monitoring of periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Dahlén, G

    1993-08-01

    Periodontal disease is the clinical result of a complex interaction between the host and plaque bacteria. Although a specificity to some degree is found for Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), it has been difficult to obtain evidence for a specific etiological role of the bacteria associated with periodontal disease in adults. What we see is the net result of host-parasite interactions which in an unpredictable moment accumulate and exceed the threshold of tissue integrity. This hypothesis is concomitant with the view of periodontal disease as a polymicrobial infection, predominantly anaerobic, which occurs commonly in the oral cavity or elsewhere in the body. Some micro-organisms (risk markers) occur more frequently than others and may significantly determine the outcome of this host-parasite interaction. Microbiological sampling and analysis seem to be of limited value in risk assessment; however, they can be used as tools in diagnosis in LJP patients and acute infections, and in treatment decision and therapy control in "refractory" patients. Suspected pathogens (risk markers) are Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and some species of spirochetes, while the roles of Prevotella intermedia, Bacteroidesforsythus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Campylobacter rectus, and Peptostreptococcus micros are more uncertain. The presence of periodontopathogens as well as enterics, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida especially, should be considered in patients with systemic individual disorders--e.g., diabetes mellitus, neutropenia, agranulocytosis, and AIDS--or with implants. PMID:8260004

  11. Periodontal bacteria in the genital tract: are they related to adverse pregnancy outcome?

    PubMed

    Cassini, M A; Pilloni, A; Condò, S G; Vitali, L A; Pasquantonio, G; Cerroni, L

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important factors implicated in preterm birth (PTB) is acute genitourinary tract infection. The bacteria causing chronic periodontal inflammation include Gram-negative rods and anaerobes similar to those found in women with bacterial vaginosis. The aim of this prospective study is to investigate the relationship between oral and vaginal microflora and preterm low birth weight. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to detect both the presence and level of six periodontitis-related species: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (Tf), Treponema denticola (Td), Fusobacterium nucleatum ssp(Fn), and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) for both oral samples of subgingival plaque and cervical samples, obtained from 80 patients, during gynaecological examinations. The more representative oral pathogen (less than 60 percent) species in oral samples of preterm and term group were Tf, Td, and Fn. 24.4 percent of pregnant women presented periodontal pathogens in vaginal swab; the most representative species with a percentage over 0.1 percent of total bacteria in genital tract of preterm group were Tf, Td, and Piwith a positive correlation (less than 0.5). The presence of the bacterium T. denticolain the vagina, regardless of the amount, adversely affects preterm delivery. PMID:24355228

  12. Putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in pregnant women: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haixia; Zhu, Ce; Li, Fei; Xu, Wei; Tao, Danying; Feng, Xiping

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about herpesvirus and putative periodontopathic bacteria in maternal chronic periodontitis. The present case-control study aimed to explore the potential relationship between putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in maternal chronic periodontitis.Saliva samples were collected from 36 pregnant women with chronic periodontitis (cases) and 36 pregnant women with healthy periodontal status (controls). Six putative periodontopathic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis [Pg], Aggregatibacer actinomycetemcomitans [Aa], Fusobacterium nucleatum [Fn], Prevotella intermedia [Pi], Tannerella forsythia [Tf], and Treponema denticola [Td]) and three herpesviruses (Epstein-Barr virus [EBV], human cytomegalovirus [HCMV], and herpes simplex virus [HSV]) were detected. Socio-demographic data and oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels were also collected. The results showed no significant differences in socio-demographic background, oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels between the two groups (all P > 0.05). The detection rates of included periodontopathic microorganisms were not significantly different between the two groups (all P > 0.05), but the coinfection rate of EBV and Pg was significantly higher in the case group than in the control group (P = 0.028). EBV and Pg coinfection may promote the development of chronic periodontitis among pregnant women. PMID:27301874

  13. Longitudinal study on clinical and microbial analysis of periodontal status in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Machado, Fernanda Campos; Cesar, Dionéia Evangelista; Apolônio, Ana Carolina Morais; Ribeiro, Luiz Claudio; Ribeiro, Rosangela Almeida

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to provide a longitudinal overview of the subgingival bacterial microbiome using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, in women in the second trimester of pregnancy (between 14 and 24 weeks), and 48 h and 8 weeks postpartum. Of 31 women evaluated during pregnancy, 24 returned for the 48-h and 18 for their 8-week exams postpartum. Probing depth (PD), bleeding on probing, clinical attachment level, and presence of calculus were recorded. Subgingival plaque samples were collected, and FISH was used to identify the numbers of eight periodontal pathogens. Friedman test was used to compare differences between follow-up examinations, followed by a multiple comparison test for a post hoc pairwise comparison. Clinically, a significantly greater number of teeth with PD = 4-5 mm were found during pregnancy than on postpartum examinations. Microbial analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in cell count over the study period for Prevotella nigrescens. P. intermedia, Campylobacter rectus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis also decrease, although not significantly, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans increased. No significant changes were found for Fusobacterium nucleatum, Treponema denticola, or Tannerella forsythia. Our data demonstrate a change in the subgingival microbiota during pregnancy, at least for P. nigrescens. PMID:27556678

  14. Development of a novel multi-triplex qPCR method for the assessment of bacterial community structure in oral populations.

    PubMed

    Ciric, Lena; Pratten, Jonathan; Wilson, Michael; Spratt, David

    2010-12-01

    Gingivitis and dental caries are two of the most predominant diseases in humans. Both conditions are easily treated with the removal of the plaque biofilm by brushing or the use of oral hygiene products. In both cases, pathogenic taxa found within the plaque biofilm are the causal agents of the disease. Actinomyces naeslundii, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotalla intermedia have all been implicated in the development of gingivitis, while Streptococcus mutans is the main organism associated with dental caries. Many studies have so far focused on the use of culture methods to detect and enumerate the pathogenic taxa within plaque samples. However, these methods are both labour intensive and biased towards culturable taxa. In the present study, a novel high-throughput multi-triplex quantitative PCR method was developed with the aim to investigate the community dynamics associated with oral communities. Three triplex assays were designed targeting taxa associated with gingivitis and dental caries as well as oral health. Saliva samples collected from healthy individuals were used in order to validate the newly developed method. PMID:23766283

  15. Treponema denticola chymotrypsin-like proteinase (CTLP) integrates spirochaetes within oral microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Cogoni, Valentina; Morgan-Smith, Alex; Fenno, J. Christopher; Dymock, David

    2012-01-01

    Treponema denticola is found ubiquitously in the human oral cavity and is mainly associated with bacterial communities implicated in the establishment and development of periodontal disease. The ability to become integrated within biofilm communities is crucial to the growth and survival of oral bacteria, and involves inter-bacterial coaggregation, metabolic cooperation, and synergy against host defences. In this article we show that the chymotrypsin-like proteinase (CTLP), found within a high-molecular-mass complex on the cell surface, mediates adherence of T. denticola to other potential periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella intermedia and Parvimonas micra. Proteolytic activity per se did not appear to be required for the interactions, and expression of the major outer-sheath protein (Msp) was not necessary, except for binding Parv. micra. Biofilms of densely packed cells and matrix, up to 40 µm in depth, were formed between T. denticola and P. gingivalis on salivary pellicle, with T. denticola cells enriched in the upper layers. Expression of CTLP, but not Msp, was critical for dual-species biofilm formation with P. gingivalis. T. denticola did not form dual-species biofilms with any of the other three periodontal bacterial species under various conditions. Synergy between T. denticola and P. gingivalis was also shown by increased inhibition of blood clotting, which was CTLP-dependent. The results demonstrate the critical role of CTLP in interactions of T. denticola with other oral micro-organisms, leading to synergy in microbial community development and host tissue pathogenesis. PMID:22313692

  16. Novel Therapeutic Approach for the Treatment of Periodontitis by Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Madhu; Pentyala, Kishore Babu; Urolagin, Sarvesh Basavaraj; K B, Menaka; Bhoi, Shreedevi

    2014-01-01

    Aims and objectives: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical and microbiological efficacy of locally delivered 1% curcumin gel as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 25 patients, belonging to both sex, aged between 21-45 years. All patients diagnosed as chronic periodontitis with periodontal pockets of depth >5mm bilaterally were randomly selected. A split mouth design was followed and the patients received a complete prophylaxis including scaling and root planing. Examination of plaque index, bleeding index, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level were measured for each patient. The test group received 1% curcumin gel along with scaling and root planing whereas the control group received scaling and root planing alone followed by microbiological samples taken at baseline, 1, 3 and 6 months interval. Results: The 1% curcumin gel appeared to provide significant improvements in clinical parameters. Microbiological counts of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and capnocytophaga showed significant reduction in periopathogens at the test sites after six months when compared with that of control sites. Conclusion: Locally delivered 1% curcumin gel was more effective in inhibiting the growth of oral bacteria when used as an adjunct to SRP in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. PMID:25654035

  17. Antimicrobial effect of adjunctive use of chlorhexidine mouthrinse in untreated gingivitis: a randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Becerik, Sema; Türkoğlu, Oya; Emingil, Gülnur; Vural, Caner; Ozdemir, Güven; Atilla, Gül

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of chlorhexidine mouthrinse (CHX) in addition to daily plaque control on subgingival microbiota in patients with untreated gingivitis. Fifty gingivitis patients were randomized to CHX or placebo groups. CHX group rinsed with 0.2% CHX, while placebo group rinsed with placebo mouthrinse for 4 weeks. Subgingival plaque samples were collected and plaque index (PI), papilla bleeding index (PBI), calculus index, and probing pocket depth (PPD) were recorded at baseline and at 4 weeks. The amounts of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and total bacteria were detected by quantitative real-time PCR method. In the CHX group the total bacteria count was significantly reduced in posterior teeth at 4 weeks (p < 0.05), while no significant decrease was observed in the placebo group (p > 0.05). CHX mouthrinse as an adjunct to daily plaque control could be useful in the management of plaque-associated gingivitis and in reducing the subgingival total bacteria count especially in posterior teeth. PMID:21569094

  18. Optimization of quantitative polymerase chain reactions for detection and quantification of eight periodontal bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to optimize quantitative (real-time) polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays for 8 major periodontal pathogens, i.e. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micros, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tanerella forsythia and Treponema denticola, and of the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. Results Eighteen different primer pairs were analyzed in silico regarding specificity (using BLAST analysis) and the presence of secondary structures at primer binding sites (using mFOLD). The most specific and efficiently binding primer pairs, according to these analyses, were selected for qPCR-analysis to determine amplification efficiency, limit of quantification and intra-run reproducibility. For the selected primer pairs, one for each species, the specificity was confirmed by assessing amplification of DNA extracts from isolates of closely related species. For these primer pairs, the intercycler portability was evaluated on 3 different thermal cyclers (the Applied Biosystems 7300, the Bio-Rad iQ5 and the Roche Light Cycler 480). For all assays on the different cyclers, a good correlation of the standard series was obtained (i.e. r2 ≥ 0.98), but quantification limits varied among cyclers. The overall best quantification limit was obtained by using a 2 μl sample in a final volume of 10 μl on the Light Cycler 480. Conclusions In conclusion, the proposed assays allow to quantify the bacterial loads of S. mutans, 6 periodontal pathogenic species and the genus Fusobacterium.This can be of use in assessing periodontal risk, determination of the optimal periodontal therapy and evaluation of this treatment. PMID:23199017

  19. Two glucose/xylose transporter genes from the yeast Candida intermedia: first molecular characterization of a yeast xylose–H+ symporter

    PubMed Central

    Leandro, Maria José; Gonçalves, Paula; Spencer-Martins, Isabel

    2006-01-01

    Candida intermedia PYCC 4715 was previously shown to grow well on xylose and to transport this sugar by two different transport systems: high-capacity and low-affinity facilitated diffusion and a high-affinity xylose–proton symporter, both of which accept glucose as a substrate. Here we report the isolation of genes encoding both transporters, designated GXF1 (glucose/xylose facilitator 1) and GXS1 (glucose/xylose symporter 1) respectively. Although GXF1 was isolated by functional complementation of an HXT-null (where Hxt refers to hexose transporters) Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, isolation of the GXS1 cDNA required partial purification and micro-sequencing of the transporter, identified by its relative abundance in cells grown on low xylose concentrations. Both genes were expressed in S. cerevisiae and the kinetic parameters of glucose and xylose transport were determined. Gxs1 is the first yeast xylose/glucose–H+ symporter to be characterized at the molecular level. Comparison of its amino acid sequence with available sequence data revealed the existence of a family of putative monosaccharide–H+ symporters encompassing proteins from several yeasts and filamentous fungi. PMID:16402921

  20. Fermentation and aerobic metabolism of cellodextrins by yeasts. [Candida wickerhamii; C. guiliermondii; C. molischiana; Debaryomyces polymorphus; Pichia guilliermondii; Clavispora lusitaniae; Kluyveromyces lactis; Brettanomyces claussenii; Rhodotorula minuta; Dekkera intermedia

    SciTech Connect

    Freer, S.N. )

    1991-03-01

    The fermentation and aerobic metabolism of cellodextrins by 14 yeast species or strains was monitored. When grown aerobically, Candida wickerhamii, C. guilliermondii, and C. molischiana metabolized cellodextrins of degree of polymerization 3 to 6. C. wicherhamii and C. molischiana also fermented these substrates, while C. guilliermondii fermented only cellodextrins of degree of polymerization {<=} 3. Debaryomyces polymorphus, Pichia guilliermondii, Clavispora lusitaniae, and one of two strains of Kluyveromyces lactis metabolized glucose, cellobiose, and cellotriose when grown aerobically. These yeasts also fermented these substrates, except for K. lactis, which fermented only glucose and cellobiose. The remaining species/strains tested, K. lactis, Brettanomyces claussenii, Brettanomyces anomalus, Kluyveromyces dobzhanskii, Rhodotorula minuta, and Dekkera intermedia, both fermented and aerobically metabolized glucose and cellobiose. Crude enzyme preparations from all 14 yeast species or strains were tested for ability to hydrolyze cellotriose and cellotretose. Most of the yeasts produced an enzyme(s) capable of hydrolyzing cellotriose. However, with two exceptions, R. minuta and P. guilliermondii, only the yeasts that metabolized cellodextrins of degree of polymerization >3 produced an enzyme(s) that hydrolyzed cellotretose.

  1. Metabolic indicators of oxidative stress correlate with haemichrome attachment to membrane, band 3 aggregation and erythrophagocytosis in beta-thalassaemia intermedia.

    PubMed

    Cappellini, M D; Tavazzi, D; Duca, L; Graziadei, G; Mannu, F; Turrini, F; Arese, P; Fiorelli, G

    1999-03-01

    Haematological data, genotype, transfusion requirements, metabolic indicators of oxidative stress (flux via hexose-monophosphate shunt (HMPS); steady state level of GSH and GSSG, NADPH and NADP; activity of anti-oxidant enzymes), parameters of membrane damage (aggregated band 3; membrane-bound haemichromes, autologous immunoglobulins (Igs) and C3 complement fragments) and erythrophagocytosis were measured in erythrocytes (RBC) of 15 beta-thalassaemia intermedia patients (nine splenectomized) with low, if any, transfusion requirements. Patients presented increased aggregated band 3, bound haemichromes, Igs and C3 complement fragments, and increased erythrophagocytosis. Bound haemichromes strongly correlated with aggregated band 3. Anti-band 3 Igs were predominantly associated with aggregated band 3. Erythrophagocytosis positively correlated with aggregated band 3, haemichromes and Igs, suggesting the involvement of haemichrome-induced band 3 aggregation in phagocytic removal of beta-thalassaemic RBC. Splenectomized patients showed higher degrees of membrane damage and phagocytosis, significantly higher numbers of circulating RBC precursors, and tendentially higher numbers of reticulocytes. Basal flux via HMPS was increased twofold, but HMPS stimulation by methylene blue was decreased, as was the glucose flux via HMPS. GSH was remarkably decreased, whereas NADPH was increased. Except for unchanged catalase and glutathione reductase, anti-oxidant enzymes had increased activity. Negative correlation between HMPS stimulation by methylene blue and bound haemichromes indicated that the ability to enhance HMPS may counteract haemichrome precipitation and limit consequent membrane damage leading to erythrophagocytosis. PMID:10086787

  2. Localization of amylin-like immunoreactivity in melanocyte-stimulating hormone-containing cells of the pars intermedia but not those of the pars distalis in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirohumi; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    Immunohistochemical techniques were employed to investigate the distribution of amylin-like immunoreactivity in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary. Amylin-immunoreactive cells were observed in the pars intermedia, and these cells were found to be immunoreactive for α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (αMSH) as well. In contrast, αMSH-immunoreactive cells in the pars distalis were immuno-negaitive for amylin. These light microscopic findings were confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. Amylin-immunoreactive signals were located on the haloes of presumable secretory granules in association with αMSH-immunoreactive signals in the amylin-positive cells. However, in the pars distalis, the αMSH-positive cells did not contain amylin-immunoreactive secretory granules. Western blot analysis of axolotl pituitary extracts revealed the labeling of a protein band at approximately 10.5-kDa by the anti-rat amylin serum, which was not labeled by the anti-αMSH antibody. These findings indicate that amylin secreted from MSH-producing cells in the pars intermedia may modulate MSH secretion in an autocrine fashion and may participate in MSH functions such as fatty homeostasis together with MSH. PMID:26797189

  3. A randomized Phase I/II Trial of HQK-1001, an oral fetal globin gene inducer, in β–thalassaemia intermedia and HbE/β–thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Fucharoen, Suthat; Inati, Adlette; Siritanaratku, Noppadol; Thein, Swee Lay; Wargin, William C.; Koussa, Suzanne; Taher, Ali; Chaneim, Nattawara; Boosalis, Michael; Berenson, Ronald; Perrine, Susan P.

    2014-01-01

    β–thalassemia intermedia syndromes (BTI) cause hemolytic anemia, ineffective erythropoiesis, and widespread complications. Higher fetal globin expression within genotypes reduces globin imbalance and ameliorates anemia. Sodium 2,2 dimethylbutyrate (HQK-1001), an orally bioavailable short-chain fatty acid derivative, induces γ-globin expression experimentally and is well-tolerated in normal subjects. Accordingly, a randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled, Phase I/II trial was performed in 21 adult BTI patients (14 with HbE/β0 thalassemia and 7 with β+/β0 thalassemia intermedia, to determine effective doses for fetal globin induction, safety, and tolerability. HQK-1001 or placebo were administered once daily for 8 weeks at four dose levels (10, 20, 30, or 40 mg/kg/day), and subjects were monitored for laboratory and clinical events. Pharmacokinetic profiles demonstrated a t1/2 of 10–12 hours. Adverse events with HQK-1001 treatment were not significantly different from placebo treatment. Median HbF increased with the 20 mg/kg treatment doses above baseline levels by 6.6% and 0.44 g/dL (p <0.01) in 8/9 subjects; total hemoglobin (Hgb) increased by a mean of 1.1 gm/dL in 4/9 subjects. These findings identify a safe oral therapeutic which induces fetal globin in BTI. Further investigation of HQK-1001 with longer dosing to definitively evaluate its hematologic potential appears warranted. PMID:23530969

  4. Lavandin (Lavandula × intermedia Emeric ex Loiseleur) essential oil from Spain: determination of aromatic profile by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, antioxidant and lipoxygenase inhibitory bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Alejandro; Martinez-Gutierrez, Ramiro; Tomas, Virginia; Tudela, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Lavandin (Lavandula × intermedia Emeric ex Loiseleur) essential oils (EOs), from Abrial, Super and Grosso cultivars, cultivated and extracted in the South East of Spain, were analysed by using GC/MS to determine their composition, in both relative (peak area) and absolute (using standard curves) concentrations. Linalool (34-47%), linalyl acetate (17-34%), camphor (4-9%) and eucalyptol (3-7%) were determined as the main molecules. This characterisation was completed with the enantioselective gas chromatography, where ( - )-linalool, (+)-camphor and ( - )-linalyl acetate were determined as the main components. Antioxidant activity was evaluated positively by several methods: activity against free radicals, chelating and reducing power, probably due to linalool and linalyl acetate. Mild inhibitory activity on lipoxygenase was observed supporting potential anti-inflammatory activity, mainly due to linalool and camphor. These properties support the potential use of L. × intermedia essential oils as natural cosmetic and natural pharmaceutical ingredient to fight several skin diseases. PMID:26106980

  5. Prelude to Oral Microbes and Chronic Diseases: Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Atanasova, Kalina R; Yilmaz, Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Associations between oral and systemic health are ancient. Oral opportunistic bacteria, particularly, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, have recently been deviated from their traditional roles and arguably ascended to central players based on their participations in complex co-dependent mechanisms of diverse systemic chronic diseases risk and pathogenesis, including cancers, rheumatoid-arthritis, and diabetes. PMID:25813714

  6. High-Level Antimicrobial Efficacy of Representative Mediterranean Natural Plant Extracts against Oral Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Cecere, Manuel; Skaltsounis, Alexios Leandros; Argyropoulou, Aikaterini; Hellwig, Elmar; Aligiannis, Nektarios

    2014-01-01

    Nature is an unexplored reservoir of novel phytopharmaceuticals. Since biofilm-related oral diseases often correlate with antibiotic resistance, plant-derived antimicrobial agents could enhance existing treatment options. Therefore, the rationale of the present report was to examine the antimicrobial impact of Mediterranean natural extracts on oral microorganisms. Five different extracts from Olea europaea, mastic gum, and Inula viscosa were tested against ten bacteria and one Candida albicans strain. The extraction protocols were conducted according to established experimental procedures. Two antimicrobial assays—the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) assay—were applied. The screened extracts were found to be active against each of the tested microorganisms. O. europaea presented MIC and MBC ranges of 0.07–10.00 mg mL−1 and 0.60–10.00 mg mL−1, respectively. The mean MBC values for mastic gum and I. viscosa were 0.07–10.00 mg mL−1 and 0.15–10.00 mg mL−1, respectively. Extracts were less effective against C. albicans and exerted bactericidal effects at a concentration range of 0.07–5.00 mg mL−1 on strict anaerobic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Parvimonas micra). Ethyl acetate I. viscosa extract and total mastic extract showed considerable antimicrobial activity against oral microorganisms and could therefore be considered as alternative natural anti-infectious agents. PMID:25054150

  7. Influence of topography and hydrophilicity on initial oral biofilm formation on microstructured titanium surfaces in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Almaguer-Flores, A.; Olivares-Navarrete, R.; Wieland, M.; Ximénez-Fyvie, L. A.; Schwartz, Z.; Boyan, B. D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of the microtopography and hydrophilicity of titanium (Ti) substrates on initial oral biofilm formation. Materials and methods Nine bacterial species belonging to the normal oral microbiota, including: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Actinomyces israelii, Campylobacter rectus, Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Streptococcus sanguinis were tested on Ti surfaces: pretreatment (PT [Ra<0.2 μm]), acid-etched (A [Ra<0.8 μm]), A modified to be hydrophilic (modA), sand-blasted/acid-etched (SLA [Ra = 4 μm]), and hydrophilic SLA (modSLA). Disks were incubated for 24 h in anaerobic conditions using a normal culture medium (CM) or human saliva (HS). The total counts of bacteria and the proportion of each bacterial species were analysed by checkerboard DNA–DNA hybridization. Results: Higher counts of bacteria were observed on all surfaces incubated with CM compared with the samples incubated with HS. PT, SLA, and modSLA exhibited higher numbers of attached bacteria in CM, whereas SLA and modSLA had a significant increase in bacterial adhesion in HS. The proportion of the species in the initial biofilms was also influenced by the surface properties and the media used: SLA and modSLA increased the proportion of species like A. actinomycetemcomitans and S. sanguinis in both media, while the adhesion of A. israelii and P. gingivalis on the same surfaces was affected in the presence of saliva. Conclusions The initial biofilm formation and composition were affected by the microtopography and hydrophilicity of the surface and by the media used. PMID:21492236

  8. Microbial diversity of the supra- and subgingival biofilm of healthy individuals after brushing with chlorhexidine- or silver-coated toothbrush bristles.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Cássio; Paulo, Diana Ferreira; Pita, Murillo Sucena; Pedrazzi, Vinícius; de Albuquerque Junior, Rubens Ferreira

    2015-02-01

    Nanoparticulate silver has recently been reported as an effective antimicrobial agent. The aim of this clinical study was to investigate the potential changes on the oral microbiota of healthy individuals after controlled brushing with chlorhexidine- or silver-coated toothbrush bristles. Twenty-four healthy participants were enrolled in this investigation and randomly submitted to 3 interventions. All the participants received, in a crossover format, the following toothbrushing interventions: (i) chlorhexidine-coated bristles, (ii) silver-coated bristles, and (iii) conventional toothbrush (Control). All the interventions had a duration of 30 days. The DNA checkerboard hybridization method was used to identify and quantify up to 43 microbial species colonizing the supra- and subgingival biofilm. The supragingival samples presented higher genome counts than the subgingival samples (p < 0.0001). The total genome counts from the Control group showed the highest values, followed by the silver and chlorhexidine groups (p < 0.0001). After 4 weeks of brushing, the silver-coated and chlorhexidine-coated bristles were capable of reducing or maintaining lower levels of the bacterial counts of the putative periodontal pathogens Tanerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Other major periodontal pathogens, such as Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella nigrescens, and Parvimonas micra, were also detected at lower levels. The toothbrush bristles impregnated with silver nanoparticles reduced the total and individual genome count in the supra- and subgingival biofilm after 4 weeks of brushing. Chlorhexidine was not effective in reducing the total genome counts in both supra- or subgingival biofilm after 4 weeks of brushing. Chlorhexidine reduced the individual genome counts in the supragingival biofilm for most of the target species, including putative periodontal pathogens. PMID:25581046

  9. Association of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and pathogenic oral bacteria in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Sahli, Michelle W; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Ram, Pavani K; LaMonte, Michael J.; Hovey, Kathleen M.; Genco, Robert J.; Andrews, Christopher A.; Millen, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous findings of an association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations and periodontal disease, may be partially explained by vitamin D’s antimicrobial properties. To our knowledge, no study has investigated the association between 25(OH)D and pathogenic oral bacteria, a putative cause of periodontal disease. Methods We examined the association between plasma 25(OH)D concentrations and pathogenic oral bacteria among postmenopausal women in the Buffalo Osteoporosis and Periodontal Disease Study (1997–2000), an ancillary study of the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study. Subgingival plaque samples were assessed using immunofluorescence for the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythensis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella intermedia and Campylobacter rectus. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for prevalent bacteria by quintile (Q) of 25(OH)D concentrations adjusting for age and body mass index. Results Of the 855 participants, 288 (34%) had deficient/inadequate (<50 nmol/L) 25(OH)D concentrations and 497 (58%) had at least one species of pathogenic bacteria. No significant association was found between 25(OH)D and presence of any of these bacteria (adjusted OR for high (Q5) compared to low (Q1) 25(OH)D=0.96; 95% CI: 0.61–1.50, p for trend=0.50). Inverse, although not statistically significant, associations were found between 25(OH)D and more than one species of pathogenic bacteria (adjusted OR for adequate compared to deficient/inadequate 25(OH)D=0.85; 95% CI: 0.60–1.19). Conclusions No association was observed between pathogenic oral bacteria and 25(OH)D concentrations in postmenopausal women. This may be due to the species of bacteria assessed, small effect size or a true absence of an association. PMID:24261910

  10. Real-time monitoring of the metabolic activity of periodontopathic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Kazuko; Washio, Jumpei; Sasaki, Keiichi; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial metabolic activity is associated with the onset and progression mechanisms of oral biofilm-mediated disease; however, at present no method to monitor bacterial metabolism exists, especially for periodontopathic bacteria. Therefore, we aimed to establish a novel method for monitoring the metabolic activity of periodontopathic bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia (Pi) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), as well as Streptococcus mutans (Sm) for comparison. The method is based on the dye resazurin, which is converted to the fluorescent molecule resorufin by reducing molecules derived from bacterial metabolism. Additionally, the effects of antimicrobial substances on bacterial metabolic activity were evaluated using this method. When bacterial suspensions were incubated with tryptone, glutamate, aspartate or glucose in the presence of resazurin, the fluorescence intensity increased over time by these bacterial metabolic reactions, indicating that this method can be used to monitor the metabolic activity of periodontopathic bacteria. Chlorhexidine showed the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 15-49 μg/ml for tryptone metabolism by Pg, Pi, and Fn, and 7.1-18 μg/ml for glucose metabolism by Pi and Sm. The IC50s for cetylpyridinium chloride and sodium dodecyl sulfate were 0.8-2.1 and 28-44 μg/ml, respectively for all bacteria examined. Fluoride had no effect except the IC50 of 640 μg/ml for Sm, while minocycline hydrochloride had no effect on any of the bacteria. The present study established the method for real-time monitoring of the metabolic activity of periodontopathic bacteria, and the method might be useful for evaluating the effects of antimicrobial substances on the bacterial metabolic activity. PMID:25986950