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Sample records for intermediate phosphorylation reactions

  1. Intermediate Reactions of Oxidative Phosphorylation in Mitochondria From Cabbage 12

    PubMed Central

    Lotlikar, Prabhakar D.; Remmert, Lemar F.

    1968-01-01

    Respiratory control ratios between 2.0 and 9.0 were obtained by comparison of the respiratory rates of cabbage mitochondria in the presence and in the absence of individual components of the system used to provide ADP and by comparing the rates before and after exhaustion of added ADP. These results indicate that respiration in cabbage mitochondria is controlled by the availability of ADP, which serves as the phosphate acceptor. Pentachlorophenol (PCP), 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), gramicidin and oleic acid inhibited phosphorylation to a greater extent than respiration in the cabbage mitochondria, but these reagents did not stimulate respiration in the absence of a phosphate acceptor. Respiration was stimulated by DNP only in the presence of added ATP. 2,4-Dinitrophenol, pentachlorophenol, dicumarol and gramicidin did not stimulate ATPase activity either in the presence or absence of added Mg2+. Oleic acid stimulated ATPase activity in the presence of added Mg2+, but did not stimulate respiration even in the presence of added ATP. The ATP-32Pi exchange rate was increased many fold in the presence of added Mg2+. Oleic acid and 2,4-dinitrophenol inhibited the exchange almost completely. PMID:5641190

  2. Nuclear reactions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyam, Radhey

    2016-05-01

    In the domain of Nuclear reactions at intermediate energies, the QCD coupling constant αs is large enough (~ 0.3 - 0.5) to render the perturbative calculational techniques inapplicable. In this regime the quarks are confined into colorless hadrons and it is expected that effective field theories of hadron interactions via exchange of hadrons, provide useful tools to describe such reactions. In this contribution we discuss the application of one such theory, the effective Lagrangian model, in describing the hadronic reactions at intermediate energies whose measurements are the focus of a vast international experimental program.

  3. Studying Reaction Intermediates Formed at Graphenic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Depanjan; Sen Gupta, Soujit; Narayanan, Rahul; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2014-03-01

    We report in-situ production and detection of intermediates at graphenic surfaces, especially during alcohol oxidation. Alcohol oxidation to acid occurs on graphene oxide-coated paper surface, driven by an electrical potential, in a paper spray mass spectrometry experiment. As paper spray ionization is a fast process and the time scale matches with the reaction time scale, we were able to detect the intermediate, acetal. This is the first observation of acetal formed in surface oxidation. The process is not limited to alcohols and the reaction has been extended to aldehydes, amines, phosphenes, sugars, etc., where reaction products were detected instantaneously. By combining surface reactions with ambient ionization and mass spectrometry, we show that new insights into chemical reactions become feasible. We suggest that several other chemical transformations may be studied this way. This work opens up a new pathway for different industrially and energetically important reactions using different metal catalysts and modified substrate.

  4. Biological phosphoryl-transfer reactions: understanding mechanism and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Jonathan K; Zalatan, Jesse G; Herschlag, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Phosphoryl-transfer reactions are central to biology. These reactions also have some of the slowest nonenzymatic rates and thus require enormous rate accelerations from biological catalysts. Despite the central importance of phosphoryl transfer and the fascinating catalytic challenges it presents, substantial confusion persists about the properties of these reactions. This confusion exists despite decades of research on the chemical mechanisms underlying these reactions. Here we review phosphoryl-transfer reactions with the goal of providing the reader with the conceptual and experimental background to understand this body of work, to evaluate new results and proposals, and to apply this understanding to enzymes. We describe likely resolutions to some controversies, while emphasizing the limits of our current approaches and understanding. We apply this understanding to enzyme-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer and provide illustrative examples of how this mechanistic background can guide and deepen our understanding of enzymes and their mechanisms of action. Finally, we present important future challenges for this field. PMID:21513457

  5. Phosphorylated aminosugars: Synthesis, properties, and reactivity in enzymatic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sem, D.S.; Cleland, W.W. )

    1991-05-21

    A number of phosphorylated aminosugars have been prepared and tested as substrates for metabolic reactions. 6-Aminoglucose is a slow substrate for yeast hexokinase with a V{sub max} that is only 0.012% that of glucose. While V{sub max} is pH independent, V/K decreases below the pK of 9.0 of the amino group. 6-Aminoglucose is a competitive inhibitor vs glucose with a K{sub i} value increasing below the pK of 9 but leveling off at 33 mM below pH 7.16. Thus, protonation decreases binding affinity by 2.4 kcal/mol and only the neutral amine is catalytically competent. 6-Aminoglucose-6-P was synthesized enzymatically with hexokinase. Its pK's determined by {sup 31}P NMR were 2.46 and 8.02 ({alpha} anomer) and 2.34 and 7.85 ({beta} anomer), with a {beta}:{alpha} ratio of 3.0. It is most stable at pH 12, while as a monoanion its half-life is 3 h. The {sup 31}P NMR chemical shifts of the analogues are 8-8.5 ppm at pH 9.5. Their relative stability is 6-aminogluconate-6-P > 3-aminoglyceraldehyde-3-P > 6-aminoglucose-6-P > 6-aminofructose-1,6-bis-P{approx equal}6-aminofructose-6-P > 5-aminoribulose-5-P. These analogues were tested as substrates for their respective enzymes. Phosphorylated aminosugars are thus excellent isosteric analogues of normal metabolic intermediates, except for reactions catalyzed by kinases.

  6. A new intermediate in the Prins reaction

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Takeshi; Yamazaki, Shoko

    2013-01-01

    Summary Two Prins reactions were investigated by the use of DFT calculations. A model composed of R–CH=CH2 + H3O+(H2O)13 + (H2C=O)2, R = Me and Ph, was adopted to trace reaction paths. For both alkenes, the concerted path forming 1,3-diols was obtained as the rate determining step (TS1). TS stands for a transition state. From the 1,3-diol, a bimolecular elimination (TS2) leads to the allylic alcohol as the first channel. In the second channel, the 1,3-diol was converted via TS3 into an unprecedented hemiacetal intermediate, HO–CH2–O–CH(R)–CH2–CH2–OH. This intermediate undergoes ring closure (TS4), affording the 1,3-dioxane product. The intermediate is of almost the same stability as the product, and two species were suggested to be in a state of equilibrium. While the geometry of TS1 appears to be forwarded to that of a carbocation intermediate, the cation disappeared through the enlargement of the water cluster. Dynamical calculations of a classical trajectory using the atom-centered density matrix propagation molecular dynamics model on the four TSs were carried out, and results of IRC calculations were confirmed by them. PMID:23532354

  7. A new intermediate in the Prins reaction.

    PubMed

    Yamabe, Shinichi; Fukuda, Takeshi; Yamazaki, Shoko

    2013-01-01

    Two Prins reactions were investigated by the use of DFT calculations. A model composed of R-CH=CH2 + H3O(+)(H2O)13 + (H2C=O)2, R = Me and Ph, was adopted to trace reaction paths. For both alkenes, the concerted path forming 1,3-diols was obtained as the rate determining step (TS1). TS stands for a transition state. From the 1,3-diol, a bimolecular elimination (TS2) leads to the allylic alcohol as the first channel. In the second channel, the 1,3-diol was converted via TS3 into an unprecedented hemiacetal intermediate, HO-CH2-O-CH(R)-CH2-CH2-OH. This intermediate undergoes ring closure (TS4), affording the 1,3-dioxane product. The intermediate is of almost the same stability as the product, and two species were suggested to be in a state of equilibrium. While the geometry of TS1 appears to be forwarded to that of a carbocation intermediate, the cation disappeared through the enlargement of the water cluster. Dynamical calculations of a classical trajectory using the atom-centered density matrix propagation molecular dynamics model on the four TSs were carried out, and results of IRC calculations were confirmed by them. PMID:23532354

  8. Solvent effects on ozonolysis reaction intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Rio, Emma; Aplincourt, Philippe; Ruiz-López, Manuel F.

    1997-12-01

    Solvent effects on relative stability, electronic and molecular structure of ozonolysis reaction intermediates are analyzed with the help of ab initio MP2/6-31+G ** calculations. A continuum model is employed to account for solute-solvent electrostatic interactions. The results show that there are large effects on the structure and relative stability of carbonyl oxide by substantially favoring its zwitterionic character. A complex formed by carbonyl oxide and formaldehyde is shown to be stable in the gas phase and in solution. This complex can be involved in solvent cage reactions leading to secondary ozonides. Thermodynamically, primary ozonide decomposition is favored by the solvent.

  9. Fission in intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Blaich, T.; Boissevain, J.; Fowler, M.M.; Gavron, A.; Jacak, B.V.; Lysaght, P.S.; Britt, H.C.; Fields, D.J.

    1989-04-01

    A systematic study of reaction mechanisms at intermediate energies (50--100 MeV/A) has been performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's BeValac using medium weight projectiles on medium and heavy element targets. A gas and plastic phoswich detector system was employed which gave large geometric coverage and a wide dynamic response. The particles identified with the gas detectors could be characterized into three components--intermediate mass fragments (IMF), fission fragments (FF) and heavy residues (HR). Major observed features are: the reaction yields are similar in the 50 to 100 MeV/A range, central collisions have high multiplicity of IMF's with broad angular correlations consistent with a large participant region, effects of final state Coulomb interactions are observed and give information on the size and temporal behavior of the source, true fission yields are dependent on target fissility and correlated with relatively peripheral collisions. Analysis of fission and evaporation yields implies limiting conditions for which fission decay remains a viable deexcitation channel. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Screening for protein phosphorylation using nanoscale reactions on microdroplet arrays.

    PubMed

    Küster, Simon K; Pabst, Martin; Zenobi, Renato; Dittrich, Petra S

    2015-01-26

    We present a novel and straightforward screening method to detect protein phosphorylations in complex protein mixtures. A proteolytic digest is separated by a conventional nanoscale liquid chromatography (nano-LC) separation and the eluate is immediately compartmentalized into microdroplets, which are spotted on a microarray MALDI plate. Subsequently, the enzyme alkaline phosphatase is applied to every second microarray spot to remove the phosphate groups from phosphorylated peptides, which results in a mass shift of n×-80 Da. The MALDI-MS scan of the microarray is then evaluated by a software algorithm to automatically identify the phosphorylated peptides by exploiting the characteristic chromatographic peak profile induced by the phosphatase treatment. This screening method does not require extensive MS/MS experiments or peak list evaluation and can be easily extended to other enzymatic or chemical reactions. PMID:25504774

  11. Cyclic AMP-modulated phosphorylation of intermediate filament proteins in cultured avian myogenic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gard, D L; Lazarides, E

    1982-01-01

    The intermediate filament proteins desmin and vimentin and the muscle tropomyosins were the major protein phosphate acceptors in 8-day-old myotubes incubated for 4 h in medium containing radiolabeled phosphate. The addition of isoproterenol or 8-bromo-cyclic AMP (BrcAMP) resulted in a two- to threefold increase in incorporation of 32PO4 into both desmin and vimentin, whereas no changes in the incorporation of 32PO4 into tropomyosin or other cellular proteins were observed. The BrcAMP- or hormonally induced increase in 32PO4 incorporation into desmin and vimentin was independent of protein synthesis and was not caused by stimulation of protein phosphate turnover. In addition, BrcAMP did not induce significant changes in the specific activity of the cellular ATP pool. These data suggest that the observed increase in 32PO4 incorporation represented an actual increase in phosphorylation of the intermediate filament proteins desmin and vimentin. Two-dimensional tryptic analysis of desmin from 8-day-old myotubes revealed five phosphopeptides of which two showed a 7- to 10-fold increase in 32PO4 incorporation in BrcAMP-treated myotubes. Four of the phosphopeptides identified in desmin labeled in vivo were also observed in desmin phosphorylated in vitro by bovine heart cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Although phosphorylation of desmin and vimentin was apparent in myogenic cells at all stages of differentiation, BrcAMP- and isoproterenol-induced increases in phosphorylation of these proteins were restricted to mature myotubes. These data strongly suggest that in vivo phosphorylation of the intermediate filament proteins desmin and vimentin is catalyzed by the cAMP-dependent protein kinases and that such phosphorylation may be regulated during muscle differentiation. Images PMID:6294504

  12. Reactions and reaction intermediates on iron surfaces. III. Reactions of aldehydes and ketones on Fe(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Benziger, J.B.; Madix, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The reactions of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acetone on Fe(100) were studied by temperature-programmed reaction spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were observed to react with adsorbed hydrogen to form adsorbed alkoxy intermediates. These reactions occurred at low temperature (ca. 200 K). In the absence of adsorbed hydrogen, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde decomposed to adsorbed CO and hydrogen. This reaction was also observed at low temperatures. On an initially clean surface the aldehydes first decomposed, forming adsorbed hydrogen which subsequently reacted with adsorbed aldehyde to form an alkoxy intermediate. The alkoxy intermediates reacted to form CO and H/sub 2/ primarily, with lesser amounts of alcohol, aldehyde, and hydrocarbon products. Acetone reacted differently from the aldehydes and did not appear to form an alkoxy intermediate. XPS results suggested that acetone and acetaldehyde did not adsorb in their keto form on the surface and it is suggested that they adsorbed as enol intermediates. The distinct reaction behavior of acetone may be due to these enol intermediates.

  13. A computational study of the phosphoryl transfer reaction between ATP and Dha in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Bordes, I; Ruiz-Pernía, J J; Castillo, R; Moliner, V

    2015-10-28

    Phosphoryl transfer reactions are ubiquitous in biology, being involved in processes ranging from energy and signal transduction to the replication genetic material. Dihydroxyacetone phosphate (Dha-P), an intermediate of the synthesis of pyruvate and a very important building block in nature, can be generated by converting free dihydroxyacetone (Dha) through the action of the dihydroxyacetone kinase enzyme. In this paper the reference uncatalyzed reaction in solution has been studied in order to define the foundations of the chemical reaction and to determine the most adequate computational method to describe this electronically complex reaction. In particular, the phosphorylation reaction mechanism between adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and Dha in aqueous solution has been studied by means of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations with the QM subset of atoms described with semi-empirical and DFT methods. The results appear to be strongly dependent on the level of calculation, which will have to be taken into account for future studies of the reaction catalyzed by enzymes. In particular, PM3/MM renders lower free energy barriers and a less endergonic process than AM1d/MM and PM6/MM methods. Nevertheless, the concerted pathway was not located with the former combination of potentials. PMID:26303076

  14. Kinetics, mechanisms and products of reactions of Criegee intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr-Ewing, Andrew

    The atmospheric ozonolysis of alkenes such as isoprene produces Criegee intermediates which are increasingly recognized as important contributors to oxidation chemistry in the Earth's troposphere. Stabilized Criegee intermediates are conveniently produced in the laboratory by ultraviolet photolysis of diiodoalkanes in the presence of O2, and can be detected by absorption spectroscopy using their strong electronic bands in the near ultraviolet region. We have used these techniques to study a wide range of reactions of Criegee intermediates, including their self-reactions, and reactions with carboxylic acids and various other trace atmospheric constituents. In collaboration with the Sandia National Laboratory group led by Drs C.A. Taatjes and D.L. Osborn, we have used photoionization and mass spectrometry methods, combined with electronic structure calculations, to characterize the products of several of these reactions. Our laboratory studies determine rate coefficients for the Criegee intermediate reactions, many of which prove to be fast. In the case of reactions with carboxylic acids, a correlation between the dipole moments of the reactants and the reaction rate coefficients suggests a dipole-capture controlled reaction and allows us to propose a structure-activity relationship to predict the rates of related processes. The contributions of these various Criegee intermediate reactions to the chemistry of the troposphere have been assessed using the STOCHEM-CRI global atmospheric chemistry model. This work was supported by NERC grant NE/K004905/1.

  15. (Ligand intermediates in metal-catalyzed reactions)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report consists of sections on sigma bond complexes of alkenes, a new carbon-hydrogen bond activation reaction of alkene complexes, carbon-hydrogen bond migrations in alkylidene complexes, carbon- hydrogen bond migrations in alkyne complexes, synthesis, structure and reactivity of C{sub x} complexes, synthesis and reactivity of alcohol and ether complexes, new catalysts for the epimerization of secondary alcohols; carbon-hydrogen bond activation in alkoxide complexes, pi/sigma equilibria in metal/O=CXX' complexes, and other hydrocarbon ligands; miscellaneous.(WET)

  16. Electronic energy levels of intermediates in the nickel carbonylation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, I. A.; Pratt, G. W.; Johnson, K. H.; Dresselhaus, G.

    1981-03-01

    Using the multiple scattering Xa method, electronic energy levels have been found self-consistently for the intermediates Ni(CO)n, n = 1,2,3 in the formation of nickel tetracarbonyl via the Ni-CO surface reaction. Linear geometries have been assumed for NiCO and Ni(CO)2, and a trigonal planar conformation for Ni(CO)3, in accordance with previously published IR spectra. The intermediates were assumed to be in the gas phase, free of surface interaction. From the energy level structure found, all three of the intermediates were determined to be diamagnetic, as Ni(CO)4 is known to be.

  17. Two alternate kinetic routes for the decomposition of the phosphorylated intermediate of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Y

    1984-07-10

    The decomposition of the phosphorylated intermediate (EP) of sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase, purified by the method of deoxycholic acid extraction, was studied by first phosphorylating with [gamma-32P]ATP, then diluting the reaction mixture with 20 volumes of medium containing nonradioactive ATP, and finally quenching serial samples with acid for determination of residual [32P]EP. The time course of [32P]EP decomposition consists of an initial fast phase followed by a slow phase. The two components of EP, EPfast (1.1 nmol/mg) and EPslow (2.8 nmol/mg), decomposed with the rate constants of 6 and 0.8 min-1, respectively, in the presence of 0.5 mM CaCl2, 5mM MgCl2, and 90 mM KCl at pH 7.0 and O degrees C. The sum of the hydrolytic activities corresponding to the two components accounts for the steady state velocity of the Pi production under the same conditions, indicating that the two components represent simultaneous pathways, rather than sequential steps of EP decomposition. As the time of phosphorylation with [gamma-32P]ATP is increased from 2 to 15 s, the fraction of EPfast decreases in favor of EPslow. This conversion decreases the rate of total Pi production by the enzyme following an initial Pi burst. Conversion of EPfast to EPslow is favored by millimolar concentrations of Ca2+. On the other hand, conversion of EPslow to EPfast is obtained by reducing Ca2+ or raising Mg2+ concentration, but is prevented by removal of ADP. The EPslow fraction decreases in favor of EPfast as the temperature is increased from 0 to 22 degrees C. PMID:6234309

  18. Cryospectrokinetic characterization of intermediates in biochemical reactions: carboxypeptidase A.

    PubMed Central

    Auld, D S; Galdes, A; Geoghegan, K F; Holmquist, B; Martinelli, R A; Vallee, B L

    1984-01-01

    Cryospectrokinetic studies provide concurrent structural, kinetic, and chemical data on short-lived intermediates in the course of the interactions of enzymes with their substrates and of other, similar pairs of biomolecules. Subzero temperatures extend the lifetimes of these intermediates and, combined with rapid-mixing and rapid-scanning instrumentation, allow simultaneous measurement of both their physical-chemical and kinetic characteristics. For carboxypeptidase A, the spectra of a chromophoric, enzymatically functional cobalt atom at the active site signal the structure of the coordination complex during catalysis, while radiationless energy transfer between enzyme tryptophans and the fluorescent dansyl blocking group of rapidly hydrolyzed peptide and ester substrates provides the basis for measurement of the rates of formation and breakdown of intermediates. Subzero radiationless energy transfer kinetic studies of the zinc and cobalt enzymes disclose two intermediates in the hydrolysis of both peptides and esters and furnish all the rate and equilibrium constants for the reaction scheme E + S in equilibrium ES1 in equilibrium ES2----E + P. The chemical and kinetic data indicate that neither of these is an acylenzyme intermediate. Both absorption and EPR spectra of the ES2 reaction intermediates consistently demonstrate the formation of transient metal complexes, differences between the effects induced by peptides and esters, and strong similarities between those induced by all peptides on the one hand and all esters on the other. The marked alterations of the cobalt spectra likely reflect the coordination of a substrate carboxyl and/or carbonyl group to the metal at a critical step in the course of catalysis. The cryospectrokinetic approach developed here in the mechanistic study of this metalloenzyme is applicable to the examination of transients of biochemical reactions in general. It will allow molecular characterization of previously elusive

  19. The Role of Phosphate in a Multistep Enzymatic Reaction: Reactions of the Substrate and Intermediate in Pieces

    PubMed Central

    Kholodar, Svetlana A.; Allen, C. Leigh; Gulick, Andrew M.; Murkin, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Several mechanistically unrelated enzymes utilize the binding energy of their substrate’s nonreacting phosphoryl group to accelerate catalysis. Evidence for the involvement of the phosphodianion in transition state formation has come from reactions of the substrate in pieces, in which reaction of a truncated substrate lacking its phosphorylmethyl group is activated by inorganic phosphite. What has remained unknown until now is how the phosphodianion group influences the reaction energetics at different points along the reaction coordinate. 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) reductoisomerase (DXR), which catalyzes the isomerization of DXP to 2-C-methyl-D-erythrose 4-phosphate (MEsP) and subsequent NADPH-dependent reduction, presents a unique opportunity to address this concern. Previously, we have reported the effect of covalently linked phosphate on the energetics of DXP turnover. Through the use of chemically synthesized MEsP and its phosphate-truncated analogue, 2-C-methyl-D-glyceraldehyde, the current study revealed a loss of 6.1 kcal/mol of kinetic barrier stabilization upon truncation, of which 4.4 kcal/mol was regained in the presence of phosphite dianion. The activating effect of phosphite was accompanied by apparent tightening of its interactions within the active site at the intermediate stage of the reaction, suggesting a role of the phosphodianion in disfavoring intermediate release and in modulation of the on-enzyme isomerization equilibrium. The results of kinetic isotope effect and structural studies indicate rate limitation by physical steps when the covalent linkage is severed. These striking differences in the energetics of the natural reaction and the reactions in pieces provide a deeper insight into the contribution of enzyme–phosphodianion interactions to the reaction coordinate. PMID:25642788

  20. Dehydropericyclic Reactions: Symmetry-Controlled Routes to Strained Reactive Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Skraba-Joiner, Sarah L; Johnson, Richard P; Agarwal, Jay

    2015-12-01

    The conceptual dehydrogenation of pericyclic reactions yields dehydropericyclic processes, which usually lead to strained or reactive intermediates. This is a simple scheme for inventing new chemical reactions. Computational results on two novel dehydropericyclic reactions are presented here. Conjugated enynes undergo a singlet-state photoisomerization that transposes the methylene carbon. We previously suggested excited-state closure to 1,2-cyclobutadiene followed by thermal ring opening. CCSD(T)//DFT computations show two minima of similar energy corresponding to 1,2-cyclobutadiene, one chiral and closed shell and the second a planar diradical. The chiral structure has a low barrier to ring opening and may best explain results on enyne photoisomerization. The first examples of 1,3-diyne + yne cycloadditions to give o-benzynes were reported in 1997. Computations on intramolecular versions of this tridehydro (-3H2) Diels-Alder reaction support a concerted mechanism for the parent triyne (1,3,8-nonatriyne); however, a slight electronic advantage in the concerted path may be outweighed by the difference in entropy of activation for sequential vs simultaneous formation of two new ring bonds. PMID:26418846

  1. Effective reaction rates in diffusion-limited phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the kinetics of the ubiquitous phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle on biological membranes by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the triangular lattice. We establish the dependence of effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients as well as the steady-state phosphorylated substrate fraction on the diffusion coefficient and concentrations of opposing enzymes: kinases and phosphatases. In the limits of zero and infinite diffusion, the numerical results agree with analytical predictions; these two limits give the lower and the upper bound for the macroscopic rate coefficients, respectively. In the zero-diffusion limit, which is important in the analysis of dense systems, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions can convert only these substrates which remain in contact with opposing enzymes. In the most studied regime of nonzero but small diffusion, a contribution linearly proportional to the diffusion coefficient appears in the reaction rate. In this regime, the presence of opposing enzymes creates inhomogeneities in the (de)phosphorylated substrate distributions: The spatial correlation function shows that enzymes are surrounded by clouds of converted substrates. This effect becomes important at low enzyme concentrations, substantially lowering effective reaction rates. Effective reaction rates decrease with decreasing diffusion and this dependence is more pronounced for the less-abundant enzyme. Consequently, the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrates can increase or decrease with diffusion, depending on relative concentrations of both enzymes. Additionally, steady states are controlled by molecular crowders which, mostly by lowering the effective diffusion of reactants, favor the more abundant enzyme.

  2. A Theoretical Study of Phosphoryl Transfers of Tyrosyl-DNA Phosphodiesterase I (Tdp1) and the Possibility of a "Dead-End" Phosphohistidine Intermediate.

    PubMed

    DeYonker, Nathan J; Webster, Charles Edwin

    2015-07-14

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase I (Tdp1) is a DNA repair enzyme conserved across eukaryotes that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond between the tyrosine residue of topoisomerase I and the 3'-phosphate of DNA. Atomic level details of the mechanism of Tdp1 are proposed and analyzed using a fully quantum mechanical, geometrically constrained model. The structural basis for the computational model is the vanadate-inhibited crystal structure of human Tdp1 (hTdp1, Protein Data Bank entry 1RFF ). Density functional theory computations are used to acquire thermodynamic and kinetic data along the catalytic pathway, including the phosphoryl transfer and subsequent hydrolysis. Located transition states and intermediates along the reaction coordinate suggest an associative phosphoryl transfer mechanism with five-coordinate phosphorane intermediates. Similar to both theoretical and experimental results for phospholipase D, the proposed mechanism for hTdp1 also includes the thermodynamically favorable possibility of a four-coordinate phosphohistidine "dead-end" product. PMID:26121557

  3. Phosphorylation Reaction in cAPK Protein Kinase - Free Energy Quantum Mechanic/Molecular Mechanics Simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, Marat; Yang, Jie; Adams, Joseph; Taylor, Susan S.; Weare, John H.

    2007-11-29

    Protein kinases catalyze the transfer of the γ-phosphoryl group from ATP, a key regulatory process governing signalling pathways in eukaryotic cells. The structure of the active site in these enzymes is highly conserved implying common catalytic mechanism. In this work we investigate the reaction process in cAPK protein kinase (PKA) using a combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics approach. The novel computational features of our work include reaction pathway determination with nudged elastic band methodology and calculation of free energy profiles of the reaction process taking into account finite temperature fluctuations of the protein environment. We find that the transfer of the γ-phosphoryl group in the protein environment is an exothermic reaction with the reaction barrier of 15 kcal/mol.

  4. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.C.

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  5. Crystal structures of intermediates in the nitroalkane oxidase reaction.

    PubMed

    Héroux, Annie; Bozinovski, Dragana M; Valley, Michael P; Fitzpatrick, Paul F; Orville, Allen M

    2009-04-21

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to nitrite and the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. Crystal structures to 2.2 A resolution or better of enzyme complexes with bound substrates and of a trapped substrate-flavin adduct are described. The D402N enzyme has no detectable activity with neutral nitroalkanes [Valley, M. P., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2003) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125, 8738-8739]. The structure of the D402N enzyme crystallized in the presence of 1-nitrohexane or 1-nitrooctane shows the presence of the substrate in the binding site. The aliphatic chain of the substrate extends into a tunnel leading to the enzyme surface. The oxygens of the substrate nitro group interact both with amino acid residues and with the 2'-hydroxyl of the FAD. When nitroalkane oxidase oxidizes nitroalkanes in the presence of cyanide, an electrophilic flavin imine intermediate can be trapped [Valley, M. P., Tichy, S. E., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2005) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 2062-2066]. The structure of the enzyme trapped with cyanide during oxidation of 1-nitrohexane shows the presence of the modified flavin. A continuous hydrogen bond network connects the nitrogen of the CN-hexyl-FAD through the FAD 2'-hydroxyl to a chain of water molecules extending to the protein surface. Together, our complementary approaches provide strong evidence that the flavin cofactor is in the appropriate oxidation state and correlates well with the putative intermediate state observed within each of the crystal structures. Consequently, these results provide important structural descriptions of several steps along the nitroalkane oxidase reaction cycle. PMID:19265437

  6. Crystal Structures of Intermediates in the Nitroalkane Oxidase Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, A.; Bozinovski, D; Valley, M; Fitzpatrick, P; Orville, A

    2009-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to nitrite and the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. Crystal structures to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution or better of enzyme complexes with bound substrates and of a trapped substrate-flavin adduct are described. The D402N enzyme has no detectable activity with neutral nitroalkanes. The structure of the D402N enzyme crystallized in the presence of 1-nitrohexane or 1-nitrooctane shows the presence of the substrate in the binding site. The aliphatic chain of the substrate extends into a tunnel leading to the enzyme surface. The oxygens of the substrate nitro group interact both with amino acid residues and with the 2'-hydroxyl of the FAD. When nitroalkane oxidase oxidizes nitroalkanes in the presence of cyanide, an electrophilic flavin imine intermediate can be trapped (Valley, M. P., Tichy, S. E., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2005) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 2062-2066). The structure of the enzyme trapped with cyanide during oxidation of 1-nitrohexane shows the presence of the modified flavin. A continuous hydrogen bond network connects the nitrogen of the CN-hexyl-FAD through the FAD 2'-hydroxyl to a chain of water molecules extending to the protein surface. Together, our complementary approaches provide strong evidence that the flavin cofactor is in the appropriate oxidation state and correlates well with the putative intermediate state observed within each of the crystal structures. Consequently, these results provide important structural descriptions of several steps along the nitroalkane oxidase reaction cycle.

  7. Interaction of Ca2+ and protein phosphorylation in the rabbit platelet release reaction.

    PubMed

    Lyons, R M; Shaw, J O

    1980-02-01

    Ca2+ flux and protein phosphorylation have been implicated as playing an important role in the induction of the platelet release reaction. However, the interactions between Ca2+, protein phosphorylation, and the release reaction have been difficult to study because secretion in human platelets is independent of extracellular Ca2+. Thus, we studied rabbit platelets, which, unlike human platelets, require extracellular Ca2+ for serotonin release to occur. Thrombin, basophil platelet-activating factor (PAF), or ionophore A23187 treatment of intact 32PO43--loaded rabbit platelets resulted in a 200-400% increase in phosphorylation of P7P and P9P, respectively. These peptides were similar in all respects to the peptides phosphorylated in thrombin-treated human platelets. When Ca2+ was replaced in the medium by EGTA, (a) thrombin- and PAF-induced rabbit platelet [3H]serotonin release was inhibited by 60-75%, whereas ionophore-induced release was blocked completely; (b) thrombin-, PAF-, or ionophore-induced P9P phosphorylation was inhibited by 60%; and (c) ionophore-induced P7P phosphorylation was decreased by 60%, whereas that caused by thrombin or PAF was decreased by only 20%. At 0.25-0.5 U/ml of thrombin, phosphorylation preceded [3H]serotonin release with the time for half-maximal release being 26.0 +/- 1.3 s SE (n = 3) and the time for half-maximal phosphorylation being 12.3 +/- 1.3 s SE (n = 3) for P7P and 3.7 +/- 0.17 s SE (n = 3) for P9P. P9P phosphorylation was significantly inhibited (P less than 0.015) by removal by Ca2+ from the medium at a time point before any thrombin- or ionophore-induced serotonin release was detectable. Thus, our data suggest that Ca2+ flux precedes the onset of serotonin secretion and that the rabbit platelet is an appropriate model in which to study the effects of Ca2+ on protein phosphorylation during the platelet release reaction. PMID:6985917

  8. The effect of Mg/2+/ and Ca/2+/ on urea-catalyzed phosphorylation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuk, G. J.; Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) on phosphorylation reactions catalyzed by urea is investigated, showing that Mg(2+) improves markedly the yield of products containing pyrophosphate bonds. Yields of up to 25% of uridine diphosphate can be obtained with struvite at temperatures as low as 65 C.

  9. Characterizing Active Site Conformational Heterogeneity along the Trajectory of an Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeymer, Cathleen; Werbeck, Nicolas D; Zimmermann, Sabine; Reinstein, Jochen; Hansen, D Flemming

    2016-09-12

    States along the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by the nucleoside monophosphate kinase UmpK were captured and changes in the conformational heterogeneity of conserved active site arginine side-chains were quantified by NMR spin-relaxation methods. In addition to apo and ligand-bound UmpK, a transition state analog (TSA) complex was utilized to evaluate the extent to which active site conformational entropy contributes to the transition state free energy. The catalytically essential arginine side-chain guanidino groups were found to be remarkably rigid in the TSA complex, indicating that the enzyme has evolved to restrict the conformational freedom along its reaction path over the energy landscape, which in turn allows the phosphoryl transfer to occur selectively by avoiding side reactions. PMID:27534930

  10. A method for the determination of the cellular phosphorylation potential and glycolytic intermediates in yeast.

    PubMed

    Wallace, P G; Pedler, S M; Wallace, J C; Berry, M N

    1994-11-01

    A method is described for rapidly quenching metabolism in yeast and extracting metabolites for analysis. The saponin digitonin is used to permeabilize the yeast cell membrane, in conjunction with perchloric acid (PCA) to quench metabolism and extract metabolites. Using this digitonin-PCA quench and extraction procedure, we have determined ATP concentrations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the range 2.89-3.39 mM, [ATP]/[ADP] ratios of 4.5-6.6, and phosphorylation potentials of 48.7-49.9 kJ.mol-1. A direct comparison with the currently accepted freeze/grind PCA/thaw procedure for extraction of yeast cell metabolites shows that essentially the same values are obtained by both techniques. The digitonin-PCA quench extraction method, used in conjunction with automated enzymatic analyses of metabolites, allows rapid extraction and analysis of large numbers of samples and metabolites and hence permits detailed investigations of intermediary metabolism in yeast. PMID:7864365

  11. Thermal decomposition of specifically phosphorylated D-glucoses and their role in the control of the Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Yaylayan, Varoujan A; Machiels, David; Istasse, Louis

    2003-05-21

    One of the main shortcomings of the information available on the Maillard reaction is the lack of knowledge to control the different pathways, especially when it is desired to direct the reaction away from the formation of carcinogenic and other toxic substances to more aroma and color generation. The use of specifically phosphorylated sugars may impart some elements of control over the aroma profile generated by the Maillard reaction. Thermal decomposition of 1- and 6-phosphorylated glucoses was studied in the presence and absence of ammonia and selected amino acids through pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using nonpolar PLOT and medium polar DB-1 columns. The analysis of the data has indicated that glucose-1-phosphate relative to glucose undergoes more extensive phosphate-catalyzed ring opening followed by formation of sugar-derived reactive intermediates as was indicated by a 9-fold increase in the amount of trimethylpyrazine and a 5-fold increase in the amount of 2,3-dimethylpyrazine, when pyrolyzed in the presence of glycine. In addition, glucose-1-phosphate alone generated a 6-fold excess of acetol as compared to glucose. On the other hand, glucose-6-phosphate enhanced retro-aldol reactions initiated from a C-6 hydroxyl group and increased the subsequent formation of furfural and 4-cyclopentene-1,3-dione. Furthermore, it also stabilized 1- and 3-deoxyglucosone intermediates and enhanced the formation of six carbon atom-containing Maillard products derived directly from them through elimination reactions such as 1,6-dimethyl-2,4-dihydroxy-3-(2H)-furanone (acetylformoin), 2-acetylpyrrole, 5-methylfurfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, and 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3-(2H)-furanone (Furaneol), due to the enhanced leaving group ability of the phosphate moiety at the C-6 carbon. However, Maillard products generated through the nucleophilic action of the C-6 hydroxyl group such as 2-acetylfuran and 2,3-dihydro-3,5-dihydroxy-4H-pyran-4-one were retarded, due

  12. Regulation of protein phosphorylation of the intermediate-sized filament vimentin in the ciliary epithelium of the mammalian eye

    SciTech Connect

    Coca-Prados, M.

    1985-08-25

    The intermediate-sized filaments of vimentin-type (Mr = 57,000) have been identified biochemically and immunochemically as a major cytoskeleton component in the ciliary epithelium of the mammalian eye. When human or rabbit ciliary processes, or cultured ciliary epithelial-derived cells were incubated in serum-free medium containing (TSP)orthophosphate and any of the following agents: 1) beta-adrenergic agonists (isoproterenol or epinephrine), 2) direct activators of adenylate cyclase (cholera toxin or forskolin), 3) analogs of cyclic AMP (8-Br-cAMP), or 4) prostaglandin E1, the phosphorylation of vimentin was significantly enhanced. The maximal enhancement ranged, in vivo and in vitro, from about 3-fold in human to 5-fold in rabbit, with either 1 mM 8-Br-cAMP or 0.1 microM forskolin. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy using a monoclonal antibody, anti-vimentin, allowed the localization of vimentin filaments in cultured ciliary epithelial cells. Treatment of these cells in culture with the catecholamine hormone, isoproterenol (1 microM), resulted in a profound reorganization of vimentin filaments. This may be correlated with the enhanced levels of phosphorylated vimentin observed upon increasing cellular cyclic AMP.

  13. Shear stress induced reorganization of the keratin intermediate filament network requires phosphorylation by protein kinase C zeta.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Schneider, Jaime L; Sitikov, Albert; Goldman, Robert D; Ridge, Karen M

    2009-06-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) form a fibrous polymer network that helps epithelial cells withstand external mechanical forces. Recently, we established a correlation between the structure of the KIF network and its local mechanical properties in alveolar epithelial cells. Shear stress applied across the cell surface resulted in the structural remodeling of KIF and a substantial increase in the elastic modulus of the network. This study examines the mechanosignaling that regulates the structural remodeling of the KIF network. We report that the shear stress-mediated remodeling of the KIF network is facilitated by a twofold increase in the dynamic exchange rate of KIF subunits, which is regulated in a PKC zeta and 14-3-3-dependent manner. PKC zeta phosphorylates K18pSer33, and this is required for the structural reorganization because the KIF network in A549 cells transfected with a dominant negative PKC zeta, or expressing the K18Ser33Ala mutation, is unchanged. Blocking the shear stress-mediated reorganization results in reduced cellular viability and increased apoptotic levels. These data suggest that shear stress mediates the phosphorylation of K18pSer33, which is required for the reorganization of the KIF network, resulting in changes in mechanical properties of the cell that help maintain the integrity of alveolar epithelial cells. PMID:19357195

  14. Structural Insights into Intermediate Steps in the Sir2 Deacetylation Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hawse, William F.; Hoff, Kevin G.; Fatkins, David G.; Daines, Alison; Zubkova, Olga V.; Schramm, Vern L.; Zheng, Weiping; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2010-07-22

    Sirtuin enzymes comprise a unique class of NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylases. Although structures of many sirtuin complexes have been determined, structural resolution of intermediate chemical steps are needed to understand the deacetylation mechanism. We report crystal structures of the bacterial sirtuin, Sir2Tm, in complex with an S-alkylamidate intermediate, analogous to the naturally occurring O-alkylamidate intermediate, and a Sir2Tm ternary complex containing a dissociated NAD{sup +} analog and acetylated peptide. The structures and biochemical studies reveal critical roles for the invariant active site histidine in positioning the reaction intermediate, and for a conserved phenylalanine residue in shielding reaction intermediates from base exchange with nicotinamide. The new structural and biochemical studies provide key mechanistic insight into intermediate steps of the Sir2 deacetylation reaction.

  15. Fluxes of carbon, phosphorylation, and redox intermediates during growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on different carbon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cortassa, S.; Aon, J.C.; Aon, M.A.

    1995-07-20

    In the present work the authors developed a method for estimating anabolic fluxes when yeast are growing on various carbon substrates (glucose, glycerol, lactate, pyruvate, acetate, or ethanol) in minimal medium. Fluxes through the central amphibolic pathways were calculated from the product of the total required amount of a specified carbon intermediate times the growth rate. The required amount of each carbon intermediate was estimated from the experimentally determined macromolecular composition of cells grown in each carbon source and the monomer composition of macromolecules. Substrates sharing most metabolic pathways such as ethanol and acetate, despite changes in the macromolecular composition, namely carbohydrate content, did not show large variations in the overall fluxes through the main amphibolic pathways. For instance, in order to supply anabolic precursors to sustain growth rates in the range of 0.16/h to 0.205/h, similar large fluxes through Acetyl CoA synthase were required by acetate or ethanol. The V{sub max} activities of key enzymes of the main amphibolic pathways measured in permeabilized yeast cells allowed to confirm, qualitatively, the operation of those pathways for all substrates and were consistent on most substrates with the estimate fluxes required to sustain growth.

  16. 18F-Labelled Intermediates for Radiosynthesis by Modular Build-Up Reactions: Newer Developments

    PubMed Central

    Ermert, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    This brief review gives an overview of newer developments in 18F-chemistry with the focus on small 18F-labelled molecules as intermediates for modular build-up syntheses. The short half-life (<2 h) of the radionuclide requires efficient syntheses of these intermediates considering that multistep syntheses are often time consuming and characterized by a loss of yield in each reaction step. Recent examples of improved synthesis of 18F-labelled intermediates show new possibilities for no-carrier-added ring-fluorinated arenes, novel intermediates for tri[18F]fluoromethylation reactions, and 18F-fluorovinylation methods. PMID:25343144

  17. Radiotracer Evidence Implicating Phosphoryl and Phosphatidyl Bases as Intermediates in Betaine Synthesis by Water-Stressed Barley Leaves 12

    PubMed Central

    Hitz, William D.; Rhodes, David; Hanson, Andrew D.

    1981-01-01

    In barley, glycine betaine is a metabolic end product accumulated by wilted leaves; betaine accumulation involves acceleration of de novo synthesis from serine, via ethanolamine, N-methylethanolamines, choline, and betaine aldehyde (Hanson, Scott 1980 Plant Physiol 66: 342-348). Because in animals and microorganisms the N-methylation of ethanolamine involves phosphatide intermediates, and because in barley, wilting markedly increases the rate of methylation of ethanolamine to choline, the labeling of phosphatides was followed after supplying [14C]ethanolamine to attached leaf blades of turgid and wilted barley plants. The kinetics of labeling of phosphatidylcholine and betaine showed that phosphatidylcholine became labeled 2.5-fold faster in wilted than in turgid leaves, and that after short incubations, phosphatidylcholine was always more heavily labeled than betaine. In pulse-chase experiments with wilted leaves, label from [14C]ethanolamine continued to accumulate in betaine as it was being lost from phosphatidylcholine. When [14C]monomethylethanolamine was supplied to wilted leaves, phosphatidylcholine was initially more heavily labeled than betaine. These results are qualitatively consistent with a precursor-to-product relationship between phosphatidylcholine and betaine. The following experiments, in which tracer amounts of [14C]ethanolamine or [14C]formate were supplied to wilted barley leaves, implicated phosphoryl and phosphatidyl bases as intermediates in the methylation steps between ethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. Label from both [14C]ethanolamine and [14C]formate entered phosphorylmonomethylethanolamine and phosphorylcholine very rapidly; these phosphoryl bases were the most heavily labeled products at 15 to 30 minutes after label addition and lost label rapidly as the fed 14C-labeled precursor was depleted. Phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine were also significantly labeled from [14C]ethanolamine and [14C]formate at early

  18. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, themore » thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.« less

  19. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, the thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.

  20. ADP- and K+-sensitive phosphorylated intermediate of Na,K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Yoda, S; Yoda, A

    1986-01-25

    In the phosphoenzyme (EP) of the electric eel Na,K-ATPase, the sum of the ADP-sensitive EP and the K+-sensitive EP exceeds 150% of EP in the presence of 100 mM Na+. This unusual phenomenon can be explained by the formation of three phosphoenzymes: ADP-sensitive K+-insensitive (E1P), K+-sensitive ADP-insensitive (E2P), and ADP- and K+-sensitive (E*P) phosphoenzymes, as proposed by Nørby et al. (Nørby, J. G., Klodos, I., and Christiansen, N. O. (1983) J. Gen. Physiol. 82, 725-757). By applying a simple approximation method for the assay of E1P, E*P, and E2P, it was found that the phosphorylation of the enzyme was much faster than the conversion among each EP and the phosphoenzyme changed as E1NaATP----E1P----E*P----E2P. In the fragmental eel enzyme, the step of E*P to E2P was much slower than the step of E1P to E*P. In the steady state, the E1P was predominant above 400 mM Na+, whereas E*P and E2P were predominant between 60 and 300 mM Na+ and below 60 mM Na+, respectively. The characteristic difference of the eel enzyme from the beef brain enzyme and probably from the kidney enzyme seems to be that the dissociation constant of Na+ on the E1P-E*P equilibrium is higher than that on the E*P-E2P. The E*P and E1P both interacted with ADP to form ATP without formation of inorganic phosphate in the absence of free Mg2+. In the Na,K-ATPase proteoliposomes, the vesicle membrane interfered with the conversion of E1P to E2P, especially the change of E1P to E*P, and furthermore, the E1P content increased. This barrier effect was partially counteracted by monensin or carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Oligomycin reacted with E1P and probably with E*P, therefore inhibiting their conversion to E2P and interaction with K+. PMID:3003056

  1. Investigation of Unexpected Reaction Intermediates in the Alkaline Hydrolysis of Methyl 3,5-Dinitrobenzoate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Clesia C.; Silva, Ricardo O.; Navarro, Daniela M. A. F.; Navarro, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    An experimental project aimed at identifying stable reaction intermediates is described. Initially, the studied reaction appears to involve the simple hydrolysis, by aqueous sodium hydroxide, of methyl 3,5-dinitrobenzoate dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide. On mixing the substrates, however, the reaction mixture unexpectedly turns an intense red in…

  2. Synthesis and reactivity of intermediates formed in the T4 RNA ligase reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, P U; McLaughlin, L W

    1987-01-01

    The intermediate adenylated donor derivatives A(5')pp(5')dTp and A(5')pp(5')GpGpGp have been prepared from suitable phosphorylating reagents activated by 1-hydroxybenzotriazole. Phosphodiester bond formation between donor and acceptor oligonucleotides as catalyzed by T4 RNA ligase is shown to be more efficient when the adenylated form of the donor molecule is used. PMID:3299268

  3. Role of compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-05-01

    Hot compound nuclei are frequently produced in intermediate-energy reactions through a variety of processes. Their decay is shown to be an important and at times dominant source of complex fragments, high energy-gamma rays, and even pions.

  4. CONSIDERATION OF REACTION INTERMEDIATES IN STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS: A KEY TO UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Consideration of Reaction Intermediates in Structure- Activity Relationships: A Key to Understanding and Prediction

    A structure-activity relationship (SAR) represents an empirical means for generalizing chemical information relative to biological activity, and is frequent...

  5. Non-enzymatic synthesis of the coenzymes, uridine diphosphate glucose and cytidine diphosphate choline, and other phosphorylated metabolic intermediates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, A.; Dworkin, J.; Oro, J.

    1987-01-01

    Using urea and cyanamide, the two condensing agents considered to have been present on the primitive earth, uridine diphosphate glucose (UDPG), cytidine diphosphate choline (CDP-choline), glucose-1-phosphate (G1P), and glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) were synthesized under simulated prebiotic conditions. The reaction products were separated and identified using paper chromatography, thin layer chromatography, enzymatic analyses, and ion-pair reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The possibility of nonenzymatic synthesis of metabolic intermediates on the primitive earth from simple precursors was thus demonstrated.

  6. Two-neutron interferometry in low- and intermediate-energy heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliente, G.; Colonna, N.; Ghetti, R.; De Filippo, E.

    1999-11-16

    Two-nucleon interferometry can be used in low- and intermediate-energy heavy ion reactions to probe the space-time evolution of hot and possibly compressed nuclear systems. At low energy, angle-gated correlation functions have allowed to succesfully extract the lifetime of moderately excited compound nuclei. At intermediate energy, two-neutron interferometry has been used to obtain information on the contribution of different mechanisms to the reaction dynamics.

  7. Elusive Reaction Intermediates in Solution Explored by ESI-MS: Reverse Periscope for Mechanistic Investigations.

    PubMed

    Iacobucci, Claudio; Reale, Samantha; De Angelis, Francesco

    2016-02-24

    Just as periscopes allow a submarine to visually search for objects above the surface of the sea, in a reversed periscope fashion electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) can analyze the compounds at the gas phase/liquid phase interface for chemical entities which may exist in solution. The challenge is the identification and structural characterization of key elusive reaction intermediates in chemical transformations, intermediates which are able to explain how chemical processes occur. This Minireview summarizes recent selected publications on the use of ESI-MS techniques for studying solution intermediates of homogeneous chemical reactions. PMID:26799781

  8. Incomplete Combustion of Hydrogen: Trapping a Reaction Intermediate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Bruce; Hoette, Trisha

    2007-01-01

    The combustion of hydrogen in air is quite complex with at least 28 mechanistic steps and twelve reaction species. Most of the species involved are radicals (having unpaired electrons) in nature. Among the various species generated, a few are stable, including hydrogen peroxide. In a normal hydrogen flame, the hydrogen peroxide goes on to further…

  9. Investigation of the intermediate-energy deuteron breakup reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Divadeenam, M.; Ward, T.E.; Mustafa, M.G.; Udagawa, T.; Tamura, T.

    1989-01-01

    The Udagawa-Tamura formalism is employed to calculate the proton singles both in the bound and unbound regions. Both the Elastic-Breakup (EB) and the Breakup-Fusion (BF) processes are considered to calculate the doubly-differential cross section for light and intermediate mass nuclei. The calculated spectra for 25 and 56 MeV deuterons reproduce the experimental spectra very well except for the spectra at large angle and at low energies, of the outgoing particle. Contributions due to precompound and evaporation processes are estimated to supplement the spectral results based on the Elastic-Breakup and Breakup-Fusion mechanisms. An extension of the model calculations to higher deuteron energies is being made to test the (EB + BF) model limitations. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Temperature-scan cryocrystallography reveals reaction intermediates in bacteriophytochrome

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaojing; Ren, Zhong; Kuk, Jane; Moffat, Keith

    2012-03-27

    Light is a fundamental signal that regulates important physiological processes such as development and circadian rhythm in living organisms. Phytochromes form a major family of photoreceptors responsible for red light perception in plants, fungi and bacteria. They undergo reversible photoconversion between red-absorbing (Pr) and far-red-absorbing (Pfr) states, thereby ultimately converting a light signal into a distinct biological signal that mediates subsequent cellular responses. Several structures of microbial phytochromes have been determined in their dark-adapted Pr or Pfr states. However, the structural nature of initial photochemical events has not been characterized by crystallography. Here we report the crystal structures of three intermediates in the photoreaction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophytochrome (PaBphP). We used cryotrapping crystallography to capture intermediates, and followed structural changes by scanning the temperature at which the photoreaction proceeded. Light-induced conformational changes in PaBphP originate in ring D of the biliverdin (BV) chromophore, and E-to-Z isomerization about the C{sub 15} = C{sub 16} double bond between rings C and D is the initial photochemical event. As the chromophore relaxes, the twist of the C{sub 15} methine bridge about its two dihedral angles is reversed. Structural changes extend further to rings B and A, and to the surrounding protein regions. These data indicate that absorption of a photon by the Pfr state of PaBphP converts a light signal into a structural signal via twisting and untwisting of the methine bridges in the linear tetrapyrrole within the confined protein cavity.

  11. Atmospheric chemistry. Direct kinetic measurement of the reaction of the simplest Criegee intermediate with water vapor.

    PubMed

    Chao, Wen; Hsieh, Jun-Ting; Chang, Chun-Hung; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2015-02-13

    Carbonyl oxides, or Criegee intermediates, are important transient species formed in the reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbons with ozone. Although direct detection of Criegee intermediates has recently been realized, the main atmospheric sink of Criegee intermediates remains unclear. We report ultraviolet absorption spectroscopic measurements of the lifetime of the simplest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, at various relative humidity levels up to 85% at 298 kelvin. An extremely fast decay rate of CH2OO was observed at high humidity. The observed quadratic dependence of the decay rate on water concentration implied a predominant reaction with water dimer. On the basis of the water dimer equilibrium constant, the effective rate coefficient of the CH2OO + (H2O)2 reaction was determined to be 6.5 (±0.8) × 10(-12) cubic centimeters per second. This work would help modelers to better constrain the atmospheric concentrations of CH2OO. PMID:25569112

  12. DFT research on the dehydroxylation reaction of pyrophyllite 2. Characterization of reactants, intermediates, and transition states along the reaction path.

    PubMed

    Molina-Montes, Esther; Donadio, Davide; Hernández-Laguna, Alfonso; Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio

    2008-07-17

    We delineate the dehydroxylation reaction of pyrophyllite in detail by localizing the complete reaction path on the free energy surface obtained previously by Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics and the implemented metadynamics algorithm ( Molina-Montes et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2008, 112, 7051 ). All intermediates were identified, and a transition state search was also undertaken with the PRFO algorithm. The characterization of this reaction and the atomic rearrangement in the intermediates and products at quantum mechanical level were performed for the two reaction paths found previously: (i) direct dehydroxylation through the octahedral hole (cross mechanism) or between contiguous hydroxyl groups (on-site mechanism) and (ii) two-step dehydroxylation assisted by apical oxygens for each of the two steps. New intermediates were found and determined structurally. The structural variations found for all intermediates and transition states are in agreement with experimental results. The formation of these structures indicates that the dehydroxylation process is much more complex than a first-order reaction and can explain the wide range of temperatures for completing the reaction, and these results can be extrapolated to the dehydroxylation of other dioctahedral 2:1 phyllosilicates. PMID:18563890

  13. Spectroscopic features of cytochrome P450 reaction intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Abhinav; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2010-01-01

    Preface Cytochromes P450 constitute a broad class of heme monooxygenase enzymes with more than 11,500 isozymes which have been identified in organisms from all biological kingdoms [1]. These enzymes are responsible for catalyzing dozens chemical oxidative transformations such as hydroxylation, epoxidation, N-demethylation, etc., with very broad range of substrates [2-3]. Historically these enzymes received their name from ‘pigment 450’ due to the unusual position of the Soret band in UV-Vis absorption spectra of the reduced CO-saturated state [4-5]. Despite detailed biochemical characterization of many isozymes, as well as later discoveries of other ‘P450-like heme enzymes’ such as nitric oxide synthase and chloroperoxidase, the phenomenological term ‘cytochrome P450’ is still commonly used as indicating an essential spectroscopic feature of the functionally active protein which is now known to be due to the presence of a thiolate ligand to the heme iron [6]. Heme proteins with an imidazole ligand such as myoglobin and hemoglobin as well as an inactive form of P450 are characterized by Soret maxima at 420 nm [7]. This historical perspective highlights the importance of spectroscopic methods for biochemical studies in general, and especially for heme enzymes, where the presence of the heme iron and porphyrin macrocycle provides rich variety of specific spectroscopic markers available for monitoring chemical transformations and transitions between active intermediates of catalytic cycle. PMID:21167809

  14. Ketene as a Reaction Intermediate in the Carbonylation of Dimethyl Ether to Methyl Acetate over Mordenite.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Dominik B; Christensen, Jakob M; Temel, Burcin; Studt, Felix; Moses, Poul Georg; Rossmeisl, Jan; Riisager, Anders; Jensen, Anker D

    2015-06-15

    Unprecedented insight into the carbonylation of dimethyl ether over Mordenite is provided through the identification of ketene (CH2CO) as a reaction intermediate. The formation of ketene is predicted by detailed DFT calculations and verified experimentally by the observation of doubly deuterated acetic acid (CH2DCOOD), when D2O is introduced in the feed during the carbonylation reaction. PMID:25967363

  15. Computational analysis of the mechanism of chemical reactions in terms of reaction phases: hidden intermediates and hidden transition States.

    PubMed

    Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2010-05-18

    (A(n,s) < 0) the curving of the path, and thus the structural changes of the reaction complex. URVA can show the mechanism of a reaction expressed in terms of reaction phases, revealing the sequence of chemical processes in the reaction complex and making it possible to determine those electronic factors that control the mechanism and energetics of the reaction. The magnitude of adiabatic curvature coupling coefficients is related to strength and polarizability of the bonds being broken. Transient points along the reaction path are associated with hidden intermediates and hidden transition states, which can be converted into real intermediates and transition states when the reaction conditions or the substitution pattern of the reaction complex are appropriately changed. Accordingly, URVA represents a theoretical tool with tremendous experimental potential, offering the chemist the ability to assert greater control over reactions. PMID:20232791

  16. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1992-07-31

    Conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used to study the intermediates involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. These intermediates were excited state of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and species formed in reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern was the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes. (DLC)

  17. Reaction of phosphorylated and O-glycosylated peptides by chemically targeted identification at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Rusnak, Felicia; Zhou, Jie; Hathaway, Gary M

    2004-12-01

    Conditions for carrying out chemically targeted identification of peptides containing phosphorylated or glycosylated serine residues have been investigated. Ba(OH)2 was used at ambient temperature to catalyze the beta-elimination reaction at 25 degrees C. Nucleophilic addition of 2-aminoethanethiol was performed in both parallel and tandem experiments. The method was demonstrated by the reaction of beta-casein tryptic digest phosphopeptides and an O-glycosylated peptide. Contrary to an earlier report by others, the glycopeptide was found to react with essentially the same kinetics as phosphopeptides. Conversion of four phosphoserines in residues 15, 17, 18, and 19 from bovine beta-casein N-terminal tryptic phosphopeptides were followed by monitoring the time course of the addition reaction. The chemistry proceeded rapidly at room temperature with a half-reaction time of 15 min. No side-reaction products were observed; however, care was taken to minimize all counter ions that either precipitate barium or neutralize the base. Digestion of the converted peptides with lysine endopeptidase identified all five phosphoserines in the beta-casein tryptic digest. Alternatively, preincubation with base followed by nucleophilic addition of the thiol was found to work satisfactorily. The use of the water-soluble hydrochloride of 2-aminoethanethiol allowed beta-elimination, nucleophilic addition, and desalting to be carried out on a micro C18 reverse phase pipette tip. PMID:15585826

  18. Quantum mechanical investigations on the role of neutral and negatively charged enamine intermediates in organocatalyzed reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubin, Pierre O.; Jacquemin, Denis; Leherte, Laurence; Vercauteren, Daniel P.

    2014-04-01

    The proline-catalyzed aldol reaction is the seminal example of asymmetric organocatalysis. Previous theoretical and experimental studies aimed at identifying its mechanism in order to rationalize the outcome of this reaction. Here, we focus on key steps with modern first principle methods, i.e. the M06-2X hybrid exchange-correlation functional combined to the solvation density model to account for environmental effects. In particular, different pathways leading to the formation of neutral and negatively charged enamine intermediates are investigated, and their reactivity towards two electrophiles, i.e. an aldehyde and a benzhydrylium cation, are compared. Regarding the self-aldol reaction, our calculations confirm that the neutral enamine intermediate is more reactive than the negatively charged one. For the reaction with benzhydrylium cations however, the negatively charged enamine intermediate is more reactive.

  19. Clustering recognition model for intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Solis, E.J.; Mignerey, A.C.

    1996-07-01

    A clustering model which allows the recognition of mass fragments from dynamical simulations has been developed. Studying the evolution of a microscopic computation based on the nuclear Boltzman equation, a suitable time is chosen to define bound clusters. At this stopping time the cluster cores for each member of the distribution are defined as a function of the overall density. Then an iterative routine is applied to estimate the coalescence of the surrounding nucleons. Once the fragment formation has been established, a statistical decay code is used to generate the final fragment distributions. Applications are shown to the reactions {sup 129}Xe + {sup nat}Cu at 50 MeV/nucleon and {sup 139}La on {sup 27}Al and {sup nat}Cu at 45 MeV/nucleon. A general improvement in cluster identification is found over approaches where a standard cluster separation algorithm has been used. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Multidimensional least-squares resolution of Raman spectra from intermediates in sensitized photochemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fister, J.C. III; Harris, J.M.

    1995-12-01

    Transient resonance Raman spectroscopy is used to elicit reaction kinetics and intermediate spectra from sensitized photochemical reactions. Nonlinear least-squares analysis of Raman spectra of a triplet-state photosensitizer (benzophenone), acquired as a function of laser intensity and/or quencher concentration allow the Raman spectra of the sensitizer excited state and intermediate photoproducts to be resolved from the spectra of the ground state and solvent. In cases where physical models describing the system kinetics cannot be found, factor analysis techniques are used to obtain the intermediate spectra. Raman spectra of triplet state benzophenone and acetophenone, obtained as a function of laser excitation kinetics, and the Raman spectra of intermediates formed by energy transfer (triplet-state biacetyl) and hydrogen abstraction (benzhydrol radical) are discussed.

  1. Identification of fleeting electrochemical reaction intermediates using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brown, Timothy A; Chen, Hao; Zare, Richard N

    2015-06-17

    We report a new method for the mass spectrometric detection of fleeting reaction intermediates in electrochemical reactions utilizing a "waterwheel" working electrode setup. This setup takes inspiration from desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry, where the sampling time is on the order of milliseconds, to sample directly from the surface of a working electrode for mass spectrometric analysis. We present data that show the formation of a diimine intermediate of the electrochemical oxidation of uric acid that has a lifetime in solution of 23 ms as well as data that provide evidence for the formation of a similar diimine species from the electrooxidation of xanthine, which has not been previously observed. PMID:26030136

  2. Intermediates Formed in the Reactions of Organocuprates with α,β-Unsaturated Nitriles.

    PubMed

    Putau, Aliaksei; Brand, Harald; Koszinowski, Konrad

    2016-08-26

    Conjugate additions of organocuprates are of outstanding importance for organic synthesis. To improve our mechanistic understanding of these reactions, we have used electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the identification of the ionic intermediates formed upon the treatment of LiCuR2 ⋅LiCN (R=Me, Bu, Ph) with a series of α,β-unsaturated nitriles. Acrylonitrile, the weakest Michael acceptor included, did not afford any detectable intermediates. Fumaronitrile (FN) yielded adducts of the type Lin-1 Cun R2n (FN)n (-) , n=1-3. When subjected to fragmentation in the gas phase, these adducts were not converted into the conjugate addition products, but re-dissociated into the reactants. In contrast, the reaction with 1,1-dicyanoethylene furnished the products of the conjugate addition without any observable intermediates. Tri- and tetracyanoethylene proved to be quite reactive as well. The presence of several cyano groups in these substrates opened up reaction pathways different from simple conjugate additions, however, and led to dimerization and substitution reactions. Moreover, the gas-phase fragmentation behavior of the species formed from these substrates indicated the occurrence of single-electron transfer processes. Additional quantum-chemical calculations provided insight into the structures and stabilities of the observed intermediates and their consecutive reactions. PMID:27461093

  3. Acetic anhydride: an intermediate analogue in the acyl-exchange reaction of citramalate lyase.

    PubMed

    Buckel, W

    1976-04-15

    1. Reactivation of deacetyl citramalate lyase by acetic anhydride proceeds through an enzyme-anhydride complex prior to actual acetylation. The reaction is inhibited by citramalate which is competitive with acetic anhydride. 2. A corresponding complex is an intermediate in the carboxymethylation of deacetyl enzyme by iodoacetate. However, the inhibition of this reaction by S-citramalate appears to be non-competitive with iodoacetate. 3. The results lead to the conclusion that acetic anhydride can be regarded as a structural analogue of citramalic acetic anhydride, the proposed intermediate in the acyl exchange reaction on citramalate lyase. 4. The formation of 6-citryl thiolester from the 1-thiolester via the cyclic citric anhydride provides a chemicla model for enzymic acyl exchange. 5. The data suggest that anhydrides are of general importance in acyl exchange reactions of thiolesters. PMID:1278157

  4. On the nature of the reaction intermediate in the HIV-1 protease: a quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, V.; Raugei, S.; Piana, S.; Carloni, P.

    2008-07-01

    Several mechanistic aspects of Aspartic Proteases' enzymatic reaction are currently highly controversial. There is general consensus that the first step of the reaction involves a nucleophilic attack of a water molecule to the substrate carbonyl carbon with subsequent formation of a metastable intermediate (INT). However, the exact nature of this intermediate is subject of debate. While ab initio and QM/MM calculations predict that INT is a neutral gem-diol specie, empirical valence bond calculations suggest that the protein frame can stabilize a charged oxyanion intermediate. Here the relative stability of the gem diol and oxyanion intermediate is calculated by performing density functional and post-Hartree-Fock calculations. The robustness of the results is assessed by increasing the size of the system and of the basis set and by performing QM/MM calculations that explicitly include protein/solvent electrostatic effects. Our results suggest that the neutral gem-diol intermediate is 20-30 kcal/mol more stable than the charged oxyanion. It is therefore concluded that only the neutral specie is populated during the enzymatic reaction.

  5. Direct measurement of Criegee intermediate (CH2OO) reactions with acetone, acetaldehyde, and hexafluoroacetone.

    PubMed

    Taatjes, Craig A; Welz, Oliver; Eskola, Arkke J; Savee, John D; Osborn, David L; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M; Mok, Daniel W K; Shallcross, Dudley E; Percival, Carl J

    2012-08-14

    Criegee biradicals, i.e., carbonyl oxides, are critical intermediates in ozonolysis and have been implicated in autoignition chemistry and other hydrocarbon oxidation systems, but until recently the direct measurement of their gas-phase kinetics has not been feasible. Indirect determinations of Criegee intermediate kinetics often rely on the introduction of a scavenger molecule into an ozonolysis system and analysis of the effects of the scavenger on yields of products associated with Criegee intermediate reactions. Carbonyl species, in particular hexafluoroacetone (CF(3)COCF(3)), have often been used as scavengers. In this work, the reactions of the simplest Criegee intermediate, CH(2)OO (formaldehyde oxide), with three carbonyl species have been measured by laser photolysis/tunable synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry. Diiodomethane photolysis produces CH(2)I radicals, which react with O(2) to yield CH(2)OO + I. The formaldehyde oxide is reacted with a large excess of a carbonyl reactant and both the disappearance of CH(2)OO and the formation of reaction products are monitored. The rate coefficient for CH(2)OO + hexafluoroacetone is k(1) = (3.0 ± 0.3) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), supporting the use of hexafluoroacetone as a Criegee-intermediate scavenger. The reactions with acetaldehyde, k(2) = (9.5 ± 0.7) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and with acetone, k(3) = (2.3 ± 0.3) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), are substantially slower. Secondary ozonides and products of ozonide isomerization are observed from the reactions of CH(2)OO with acetone and hexafluoroacetone. Their photoionization spectra are interpreted with the aid of quantum-chemical and Franck-Condon-factor calculations. No secondary ozonide was observable in the reaction of CH(2)OO with acetaldehyde, but acetic acid was identified as a product under the conditions used (4 Torr and 293 K). PMID:22481381

  6. Reaction of arynes with vinylogous amides: nucleophilic addition to the ortho-quinodimethide intermediate.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Wang, Xuemei; Wei, Zhibin; Wu, Chunrui; Shi, Feng

    2013-09-01

    The reaction of arynes with vinylogous amides containing no free N-H bonds proceeds in a [2 + 2] cycloaddition fashion at ambient temperature. The electronic properties of the vinylogous amides allow for the cycloadducts undergoing a facile ring-opening process, leading to electronically biased ortho-quinodimethide intermediates. Subsequent nucleophilic addition with alcohols affords 2-substituted benzaldehydes or ketones. PMID:23957502

  7. Cross-hetero-dehydrogenative coupling reaction of phosphites: a catalytic metal-free phosphorylation of amines and alcohols.

    PubMed

    Dhineshkumar, Jayaraman; Prabhu, Kandikere Ramaiah

    2013-12-01

    Phosphorylation of amines, alcohols, and sulfoximines are accomplished using molecular iodine as a catalyst and H2O2 as the sole oxidant under mild reaction conditions. This method provides an easy route for synthesizing a variety of phosphoramidates, phosphorus triesters and sulfoximine-derived phosphoramidates which are of biological importance. PMID:24219013

  8. Arylpalladium Phosphonate Complexes as Reactive Intermediates in Phosphorus-Carbon Bond Forming Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, Mark C.; Grimes, Thomas V.; Wang, Xiaoping; Cundari, Thomas R.; Stockland, Robert A. Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorus-carbon bond formation from discrete transition metal complexes have been investigated through a combination of synthetic, spectroscopic, crystallographic, and computational methods. Reactive intermediates of the type (diphosphine)Pd(aryl)(P(O)(OEt)(2)) have been prepared, characterized, and studied as possible intermediates in metal-mediated coupling reactions. Several of the reactive intermediates were characterized crystallographicaliy, and a discussion of the solid state structures is presented. In contrast to other carbon-heteroelement bond forming reactions, palladium complexes containing electron-donating substituents on the aromatic fragment exhibited faster rates of reductive elimination. Large bite angle diphosphine ligands induced rapid rates of elimination, while bipyridine and small bite angle diphosphine ligands resulted in much slower rates of elimination. An investigation of the effect of typical impurities on the elimination reaction was carried out. While excess diphosphine, pyridine, and acetonitrile had little effect on the observed rate, the addition of water slowed the phosphorus-carbon bond forming reaction. Coordination of water to the complex was observed spectroscopically and crystallographically. Computational studies were utilized to probe the reaction pathways for P-C bond formation via Pd catalysis.

  9. Insights into the serine protease mechanism from atomic resolution structures of trypsin reaction intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Radisky, Evette S.; Lee, Justin M.; Lu, Chia-Jung Karen; Koshland, Daniel E.

    2006-01-01

    Atomic resolution structures of trypsin acyl-enzymes and a tetrahedral intermediate analog, along with previously solved structures representing the Michaelis complex, are used to reconstruct events in the catalytic cycle of this classic serine protease. Structural comparisons provide insight into active site adjustments involved in catalysis. Subtle motions of the catalytic serine and histidine residues coordinated with translation of the substrate reaction center are seen to favor the forward progress of the acylation reaction. The structures also clarify the attack trajectory of the hydrolytic water in the deacylation reaction. PMID:16636277

  10. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1991-12-31

    During this period, conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used for the characterization of the intermediates that are involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. The intermediates of interest were the excited states of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and the species formed in the reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern has been the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes.

  11. Electron nuclear double resonance determined structures of enzyme reaction intermediates: structural evidence for substrate destabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makinen, Marvin W.

    1998-12-01

    Angle selective ENDOR of nitroxyl spin-labels is briefly reviewed to illustrate the methodology of structure analysis developed in our laboratory for characterizing catalytically competent intermediates of enzyme catalyzed reactions. ENDOR structure determination of a reaction intermediate of α-chymotrypsin formed with a kinetically specific spin-labeled substrate and of an enzyme-inhibitor complex formed with a spin-labeled transition-state inhibitor analog is briefly described. Both spin-labeled molecules bound in the active site of the enzyme are found in torsionally distorted conformations. It is suggested that this torsionally distorted state in which the bound ligand is of higher potential energy than in the ground state conformation reflects substrate destabilization in the course of the enzyme catalyzed reaction.

  12. Benchmarking of activation reaction distribution in an intermediate energy neutron field.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Morev, Mikhail N; Hirota, Masahiro; Abe, Takuya; Koike, Yuya; Iwai, Satoshi; Iimoto, Takeshi; Kosako, Toshiso

    2011-07-01

    Neutron-induced reaction rate depth profiles inside concrete shield irradiated by intermediate energy neutron were calculated using a Monte-Carlo code and compared with an experiment. An irradiation field of intermediate neutron produced in the forward direction from a thick (stopping length) target bombarded by 400 MeV nucleon(-1) carbon ions was arranged at the heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba. Ordinary concrete shield of 90 cm thickness was installed 50 cm downstream the iron target. Activation detectors of aluminum, gold and gold covered with cadmium were inserted at various depths. Irradiated samples were extracted after exposure and gamma-ray spectrometry was performed for each sample. Comparison of experimental and calculated shows good agreement for both low- and high-energy neutron-induced reaction except for (27)Al(n,X)(24)Na reaction at the surface. PMID:21515619

  13. Mechanistic insight into the hydrazine decomposition on Rh(111): effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhigang; Lu, Xiaoqing; Wen, Zengqiang; Wei, Shuxian; Liu, Yunjie; Fu, Dianling; Zhao, Lianming; Guo, Wenyue

    2013-10-14

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to systematically investigate the effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity for hydrazine (N2H4) decomposition on Rh(111). Reaction mechanisms via intramolecular and NH2-assisted N2H4 decompositions are comparatively analyzed, including adsorption configuration, reaction energy and barrier of elementary step, and reaction network. Our results show that the most favorable N2H4 decomposition pathway starts with the initial N-N bond scission to the NH2 intermediate, followed by stepwise H stripping from adsorbed N2Hx (x = 1-4) species, and finally forms the N2 and NH3 products. Comparatively, the stepwise intramolecular dehydrogenation via N2H4→ N2H3→ N2H2→ N2H → N2, and N2H4→ NH2→ NH → N with or without NH2 promotion effect, are unfavorable due to higher energy barriers encountered. Energy barrier analysis, reaction rate constants, and electronic structures are used to identify the crucial competitive route. The promotion effect of the NH2 intermediate is structurally reflected in the weakening of the N-H bond and strengthening of the N-N bond in N2Hx in the coadsorption system; it results intrinsically from the less structural deformation of the adsorbate, and weakening of the interaction between dehydrogenated fragment and departing H in transition state. Our results highlight the crucial effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity and provide a theoretical approach to analyze the effect. PMID:23990024

  14. Insights into the Mechanism of Type I Dehydroquinate Dehydratases from Structures of Reaction Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Caffrey, Michael; Anderson, Wayne F.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-02-27

    The biosynthetic shikimate pathway consists of seven enzymes that catalyze sequential reactions to generate chorismate, a critical branch point in the synthesis of the aromatic amino acids. The third enzyme in the pathway, dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD), catalyzes the dehydration of 3-dehydroquinate to 3-dehydroshikimate. We present three crystal structures of the type I DHQD from the intestinal pathogens Clostridium difficile and Salmonella enterica. Structures of the enzyme with substrate and covalent pre- and post-dehydration reaction intermediates provide snapshots of successive steps along the type I DHQD-catalyzed reaction coordinate. These structures reveal that the position of the substrate within the active site does not appreciably change upon Schiff base formation. The intermediate state structures reveal a reaction state-dependent behavior of His-143 in which the residue adopts a conformation proximal to the site of catalytic dehydration only when the leaving group is present. We speculate that His-143 is likely to assume differing catalytic roles in each of its observed conformations. One conformation of His-143 positions the residue for the formation/hydrolysis of the covalent Schiff base intermediates, whereas the other conformation positions the residue for a role in the catalytic dehydration event. The fact that the shikimate pathway is absent from humans makes the enzymes of the pathway potential targets for the development of non-toxic antimicrobials. The structures and mechanistic insight presented here may inform the design of type I DHQD enzyme inhibitors.

  15. A kinetic study of the CH2OO Criegee intermediate self-reaction, reaction with SO2 and unimolecular reaction using cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chhantyal-Pun, Rabi; Davey, Anthony; Shallcross, Dudley E; Percival, Carl J; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2015-02-01

    Criegee intermediates are important species formed during the ozonolysis of alkenes. Reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates with various species like SO2 and NO2 may contribute significantly to tropospheric chemistry. In the laboratory, self-reaction can be an important loss pathway for Criegee intermediates and thus needs to be characterized to obtain accurate bimolecular reaction rate coefficients. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy was used to perform kinetic measurements for various reactions of CH2OO at 293 K and under low pressure (7 to 30 Torr) conditions. For the reaction CH2OO + CH2OO (8), a rate coefficient k8 = (7.35 ± 0.63) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was derived from the measured CH2OO decay rates, using an absorption cross section value reported previously. A rate coefficient of k4 = (3.80 ± 0.04) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was obtained for the CH2OO + SO2 (4) reaction. An upper limit for the unimolecular CH2OO loss rate coefficient of 11.6 ± 8.0 s(-1) was deduced from studies of reaction (4). SO2 catalysed CH2OO isomerization or intersystem crossing is proposed to occur with a rate coefficient of (3.53 ± 0.32) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). PMID:25553776

  16. Holliday intermediates and reaction by-products in FLP protein-promoted site-specific recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Leon, L; Huang, L C; Umlauf, S W; Cox, M M; Inman, R B

    1988-01-01

    Holliday structures are formed and resolved by FLP protein during site-specific recombination. These structures have been isolated and are visualized in both native and partially denatured states by electron microscopy. No single-strand breaks are found within the junction, indicating that the structure results from a reciprocal exchange of strands. These structures have properties consistent with being reaction intermediates. Double-strand cleavage products and "Y structures" are also detected and appear to be by-products of the reaction. The Y structures are three-armed branched molecules with a covalently closed junction located at the FLP recombination target site. Models are discussed, suggesting that both of these novel structures are made by aberrant cleavages during formation and resolution of the Holliday intermediate. Images PMID:3065624

  17. Possibility of production of neutron-rich isotopes in transfer-type reactions at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Lukyanov, S. M.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2008-08-15

    The production cross sections of neutron-rich isotopes of Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, Ar, K, Ca, Sc, and Ti in the multinucleon transfer reactions {sup 48}Ca(64 MeV/nucleon, 140 MeV/nucleon) + {sup 181}Ta and {sup 48}Ca(142 MeV/nucleon) + {sup nat}W are estimated. A good agreement of the calculated results with the available experimental data confirms the mechanism of multinucleon transfer at almost peripheral collisions at intermediate energies. The global trend of production cross section with the charge (mass) number of target in reactions with {sup 48}Ca beam is discussed for the future experiments.

  18. Random sampling of the Green’s Functions for reversible reactions with an intermediate state

    SciTech Connect

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2013-06-01

    Exact random variate generators were developed to sample Green’s functions used in Brownian Dynamics (BD) algorithms for the simulations of chemical systems. These algorithms, which use less than a kilobyte of memory, provide a useful alternative to the table look-up method that has been used in similar work. The cases that are studied with this approach are (1) diffusion-influenced reactions; (2) reversible diffusion-influenced reactions and (3) reactions with an intermediate state such as enzymatic catalysis. The results are validated by comparison with those obtained by the Independent Reaction Times (IRT) method. This work is part of our effort in developing models to understand the role of radiation chemistry in the radiation effects on human body and may eventually be included in event-based models of space radiation risk.

  19. Folylpolyglutamate synthetase: direct evidence for an acyl phosphate intermediate in the enzyme-catalyzed reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, R.; McGuire, J.J.; Shane, B.; Coward, J.K.

    1986-05-01

    The nature of the intermediate in the reaction catalyzed by folylpoly-..gamma..-glutamate synthetase (FPGS) has been investigated. Incubation of ..cap alpha..,..gamma..-(/sup 18/O)methotrexate with ATP, glutamate, and FPGS resulted in the formation of (/sup 18/O)phosphate, thus providing strong evidence for the formation of a ..gamma..-glutamyl phosphate during catalysis. The inorganic phosphate formed in the enzyme-catalyzed reaction was separated from other products and substrates by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, then converted to the trimethyl ester, and analyzed by mass spectroscopy. Stoichiometric formation of (/sup 18/O)phosphate was observed in the case of the E. coli enzyme, isolated from a transformant containing the cloned FPGS-dihydrofolate synthetase (folC) gene. In addition, /sup 31/P-NMR analysis of the phosphate isolated from the reaction using E. coli FPGS showed the expected /sup 18/O-isotopic perturbations due to both singly bonded and doubly bonded P-/sup 18/O species. Similar experiments were carried out with FPGS isolated from hog liver. In this case, the small amounts of pure enzyme available precluded use of the NMR technique. However, mass spectral analysis of the derivatized phosphate product revealed the presence of (/sup 18/O)-trimethyl phosphate, thus indicating that the reaction catalyzed by the mammalian enzyme also proceeds via an acyl phosphate intermediate.

  20. Structural characterization of the reaction pathway in phosphoserine phosphatase: Crystallographic 'snapshots' of intermediate states.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weiru; Cho, Ho S.; Kim, Rosalind; Jancarik, Jaru; Yokota, Hisao; Nguyen, Henry H.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Wemmer, David E.; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2004-04-12

    Phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP) is a member of a large class of enzymes that catalyze phosphoester hydrolysis using a phosphoaspartate enzyme intermediate. PSP is a likely regulator of the steady-state-serine level in the brain, which is a critical co-agonist of the N-methyl--aspartate type of glutamate receptors. Here, we present high-resolution (1.5 1.9 Angstrom) structures of PSP from Methanococcus jannaschii, which define the open state prior to substrate binding, the complex with phosphoserine substrate bound (with a D to N mutation in the active site), and the complex with AlF3, a transition-state analog for the phospho-transfer steps in the reaction. These structures, together with those described for the BeF3- complex (mimicking the phospho-enzyme) and the enzyme with phosphate product in the active site, provide a detailed structural picture of the full reaction cycle. The structure of the apostate indicates partial unfolding of the enzyme to allow substrate binding, with refolding in the presence of substrate to provide specificity. Interdomain and active-site conformational changes are identified. The structure with the transition state analog bound indicates a ''tight'' intermediate. A striking structure homology, with significant sequence conservation, among PSP, P-type ATPases and response regulators suggests that the knowledge of the PSP reaction mechanism from the structures determined will provide insights into the reaction mechanisms of the other enzymes in this family.

  1. Reaction intermediates in the catalytic Gif-type oxidation from nuclear inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopalan, S.; Asthalter, T.; Rabe, V.; Laschat, S.

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) of synchrotron radiation, also known as nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS), has been shown to provide valuable insights into metal-centered vibrations at Mössbauer-active nuclei. We present a study of the iron-centered vibrational density of states (VDOS) during the first step of the Gif-type oxidation of cyclohexene with a novel trinuclear Fe3(μ 3-O) complex as catalyst precursor. The experiments were carried out on shock-frozen solutions for different combinations of reactants: Fe3(μ 3-O) in pyridine solution, Fe3(μ 3-O) plus Zn/acetic acid in pyridine without and with addition of either oxygen or cyclohexene, and Fe3(μ 3-O)/Zn/acetic acid/pyridine/cyclohexene (reaction mixture) for reaction times of 1 min, 5 min, and 30 min. The projected VDOS of the Fe atoms was calculated on the basis of pseudopotential density functional calculations. Two possible reaction intermediates were identified as [Fe(III)(C5H5N)2(O2CCH3)2]+ and Fe(II)(C5H5N)4(O2CCH3)2, yielding evidence that NIS (NRVS) allows to identify the presence of iron-centered intermediates also in complex reaction mixtures.

  2. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Tyler C.; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B.; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO2 from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin. PMID:26020841

  3. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L

    2015-06-23

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO₂ from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin. PMID:26020841

  4. Reactions between Criegee Intermediates and the Inorganic Acids HCl and HNO3 : Kinetics and Atmospheric Implications.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Elizabeth S; Kapnas, Kara M; Murray, Craig

    2016-08-22

    Criegee intermediates (CIs) are a class of reactive radicals that are thought to play a key role in atmospheric chemistry through reactions with trace species that can lead to aerosol particle formation. Recent work has suggested that water vapor is likely to be the dominant sink for some CIs, although reactions with trace species that are sufficiently rapid can be locally competitive. Herein, we use broadband transient absorption spectroscopy to measure rate constants for the reactions of the simplest CI, CH2 OO, with two inorganic acids, HCl and HNO3 , both of which are present in polluted urban atmospheres. Both reactions are fast; at 295 K, the reactions of CH2 OO with HCl and HNO3 have rate constants of 4.6×10(-11)  cm(3)  s(-1) and 5.4×10(-10)  cm(3)  s(-1) , respectively. Complementary quantum-chemical calculations show that these reactions form substituted hydroperoxides with no energy barrier. The results suggest that reactions of CIs with HNO3 in particular are likely to be competitive with those with water vapor in polluted urban areas under conditions of modest relative humidity. PMID:27440012

  5. Progress in applyiong the FKK multistep reaction theory to intermediate-energy data evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B.; Young, P.G.

    1994-07-01

    Recent developments to the physics modeling in the FKK-GNASH code system are reviewed. We describe modifications to include a linking of multistep direct and multistep compound processes, which are important when the incident energy is less than about 30 MeV. A model for multiple preequilibrium emission is given, and compared with experimental measurements of proton reactions on {sup 90}Zr at 160 MeV. We also give some preliminary observations concerning FKK calculations which use both normal and non-normal DWBA matrix elements. We describe the application of the FKK-GNASH code to a range of nuclear data applications, including intermediate energy reactions of importance in the accelerator transmutation of waste, and fast neutron and proton cancer radiation treatment. We outline areas where further work is needed for the accurate modeling of nuclear reactions using the FKK theory.

  6. Atomistic Description of Reaction Intermediates for Supported Metathesis Catalysts Enabled by DNP SENS.

    PubMed

    Ong, Ta-Chung; Liao, Wei-Chih; Mougel, Victor; Gajan, David; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Obtaining detailed structural information of reaction intermediates remains a key challenge in heterogeneous catalysis because of the amorphous nature of the support and/or the support interface that prohibits the use of diffraction-based techniques. Combining isotopic labeling and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of surface enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy (SENS) towards surface species in heterogeneous alkene metathesis catalysts; this in turn allows direct determination of the bond connectivity and measurement of the carbon-carbon bond distance in metallacycles, which are the cycloaddition intermediates in the alkene metathesis catalytic cycle. Furthermore, this approach makes possible the understanding of the slow initiation and deactivation steps in these heterogeneous metathesis catalysts. PMID:26953812

  7. Identification of a potential general acid/base in the reversible phosphoryl transfer reactions catalyzed by tyrosine recombinases: Flp H305

    PubMed Central

    Whiteson, Katrine L.; Chen, Yu; Chopra, Neeraj; Raymond, Amy C.; Rice, Phoebe A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Flp provides a unique opportunity to apply the tools of chemical biology to phosphoryl transfer reactions. Flp and other tyrosine recombinases catalyze site-specific DNA rearrangements via a phosphotyrosine intermediate, similar to the mechanism of type Ib topoisomerases [1]. Unlike most related enzymes, Flp’s nucleophilic tyrosine derives from a different protomer than the remainder of its active site [2, 3]. Because the tyrosine can be supplied exogenously, non-natural synthetic analogs can be used. Here we examine the catalytic role of Flp’s conserved H305. DNA cleavage was studied using a peptide containing either tyrosine (pKa≅10), or 3-fluoro-tyrosine (pKa≅8.4). Religation was studied using DNA substrates with 3’-phospho-cresol (pKa≅10) or 3’-para-nitro-phenol (pKa≅7.1) mimicking the covalent protein-DNA intermediate. In both cases, the tyrosine analog with the lower pKa specifically restored the activity of an H305 mutant. These results provide the first experimental evidence that this conserved histidine functions as a general acid/base catalyst in tyrosine recombinases. PMID:17317566

  8. The Nature of the Reaction Intermediates in the FAD-Dependent Epoxidation Mechanism of Styrene Monooxygenase*

    PubMed Central

    Kantz, Auric; Gassner, George T.

    2010-01-01

    Styrene monooxygenase (SMO) is a two-component flavoenzyme composed of an NADH-specific flavin reductase (SMOB) and FAD-specific styrene epoxidase (NSMOA). NSMOA binds tightly to reduced FAD and catalyzes the stereospecific addition of one atom of molecular oxygen to the vinyl side chain of styrene in the enantioselective synthesis of S-styrene oxide. In this mechanism, molecular oxygen first reacts with NSMOA(FADred) to yield an FAD C(4a)- peroxide intermediate. This species is non-fluorescent and has an absorbance maximum of 382 nm. Styrene then reacts with the peroxide intermediate with a second order rate constant of 2.6 × 106 ± 0.1 × 106 M−1 s−1 to yield a fluorescent intermediate with an absorbance maximum of 368 nm. We compute an activation free energy of 8.7 kcal.mol∙−1 for the oxygenation step in good agreement with that expected for a peroxide-catalyzed epoxidation, and acid-quenched samples recovered at defined time points in the single-turnover reaction indicate that styrene oxide synthesis is coincident with the formation phase of the fluorescent intermediate. These findings support FAD C(4a)-peroxide as the oxygen atom donor and identity of the fluorescent intermediate as an FAD C(4a)-hydroxide product of the styrene epoxidation. Overall, four pH-dependent rate constants corresponding to peroxyflavin formation (pKa = 7.2), styrene epoxidation (pKa = 7.7), styrene oxide dissociation (pKa = 8.3), and hydroxyflavin dehydration (pKa 7.6) are needed to fit the single-turnover kinetics. PMID:21166448

  9. Inhibition of monoterpene cyclases by sulfonium analogs of presumptive carbocationic intermediates of the cyclization reaction.

    PubMed

    Croteau, R; Wheeler, C J; Aksela, R; Oehlschlager, A C

    1986-06-01

    The enzymatic cyclization of geranyl pyrophosphate to monoterpenes is thought to proceed through a series of carbocation-pyrophosphate anion paired intermediates. Sulfonium analogs of two putative carbocationic intermediates of the cyclization sequence were shown to be inhibitors of the conversion of the acyclic precursor to the bicyclic monoterpenes (+)-alpha-pinene and (+)-bornyl pyrophosphate by partially purified cyclase preparations from sage (Salvia officinalis). The sulfonium analog of the tertiary allylic, linalyl, intermediate (i.e. methyl-(4-methylpent-3-en-1-yl)vinyl-sulfonium perchlorate) provided respective Ki values of 2.5 microM and 3.0 microM against the cyclization to alpha-pinene and bornyl pyrophosphate at a substrate concentration of 5 microM, whereas the sulfonium analog of the monocyclic, alpha-terpinyl, intermediate (i.e. dimethyl-(4-methylcyclohex-3-en-1-yl) sulfonium iodide) exhibited respective Ki values of 3.4 microM and 3.9 microM against the same two cyclizations. The potency of inhibition in all cases increased with increasing substrate concentration, indicating that the affinity of the enzymes for the sulfonium analogs was increased by the presence of the pyrophosphate ester. Inorganic pyrophosphate at a concentration of 50 microM, which alone had little influence on the cyclizations, increased the effectiveness of inhibition of the sulfonium analogs severalfold, and the apparent Ki for inorganic pyrophosphate was reduced manyfold by the presence of either analog at 5 microM. That the combination of sulfonium analog and pyrophosphate provided synergistic inhibition of the electrophilic cyclizations indicated that the cyclases bind the paired species more tightly than either partner alone. Specificity studies suggested that inhibition by the above sulfonium ion:pyrophosphate pairs was due to both electronic and structural resemblance to intermediates of the reaction. PMID:3011779

  10. Characterization of a diiron(III) peroxo intermediate in the reaction cycle of methane monooxygenase hydroxylase from Methylococcus cupsulatus (Bath)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.E.; Valentine, A.M.; Lippard, S.J.; Qiu, D.; Spiro, T.G.; Edmondson, D.E.; Appelman, E.H.

    1995-05-03

    We present new optical and resonance Raman spectroscopic data that characterize the first intermediate as a diiron(III) peroxo species. The time-resolved optical and freeze-quench resonance Raman spectroscopic experiments strongly support assignment of the first intermediate, variously designated P or L, in the MMO hydroxylase reaction cycle as a symmetrical diiron(III) peroxo species. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used in the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.

  12. Gold-Catalyzed Reactions via Cyclopropyl Gold Carbene-like Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cycloisomerizations of 1,n-enynes catalyzed by gold(I) proceed via electrophilic species with a highly distorted cyclopropyl gold(I) carbene-like structure, which can react with different nucleophiles to form a wide variety of products by attack at the cyclopropane or the carbene carbons. Particularly important are reactions in which the gold(I) carbene reacts with alkenes to form cyclopropanes either intra- or intermolecularly. In the absence of nucleophiles, 1,n-enynes lead to a variety of cycloisomerized products including those resulting from skeletal rearrangements. Reactions proceeding through cyclopropyl gold(I) carbene-like intermediates are ideally suited for the bioinspired synthesis of terpenoid natural products by the selective activation of the alkyne in highly functionalized enynes or polyenynes. PMID:26061916

  13. Photonuclear reactions of actinide and pre-actinide nuclei at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Tapan; Basu, D. N.

    2007-12-15

    Photonuclear reaction is described with an approach based on the quasideuteron nuclear photoabsorption model followed by the process of competition between light particle evaporation and fission for the excited nucleus. Thus fission process is considered as a decay mode. The evaporation-fission process of the compound nucleus is simulated in a Monte Carlo framework. Photofission reaction cross sections are analysed in a systematic manner in the energy range {approx}50-70 MeV for the actinides {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 237}Np and the pre-actinide nuclei {sup 208}Pb and {sup 209}Bi. The study reproduces satisfactorily well the available experimental data of photofission cross sections at energies {approx}50-70 MeV and the increasing trend of nuclear fissility with the fissility parameter Z{sup 2}/A for the actinides and pre-actinides at intermediate energies ({approx}20-140 MeV)

  14. Direct Observation of Intermediates Involved in the Interruption of the Bischler-Napieralski Reaction.

    PubMed

    White, Kolby L; Mewald, Marius; Movassaghi, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    The first mechanistic investigation of electrophilic amide activation of α,α-disubstituted tertiary lactams and the direct observation of key intermediates by in situ FTIR, (1)H, (13)C, and (19)F NMR in our interrupted Bischler-Napieralski-based synthetic strategy to the aspidosperma alkaloids, including a complex tetracyclic diiminium ion, is discussed. The reactivity of a wide range of pyridines with trifluoromethanesulfonic anhydride was systematically examined, and characteristic IR absorption bands for the corresponding N-trifluoromethanesulfonylated pyridinium trifluoromethanesulfonates were assigned. The reversible formation of diiminium ether intermediates was studied, providing insight into divergent mechanistic pathways as a function of the steric environment of the amide substrate and stoichiometry of reagents. Importantly, when considering base additives during electrophilic amide activation, more hindered α-quaternary tertiary lactams require the use of non-nucleophilic pyridine additives in order to avoid deactivation via a competing desulfonylation reaction. The isolation and full characterization of a tetracyclic iminium trifluoromethanesulfonate provided additional correlation between in situ characterization of sensitive intermediates and isolable compounds involved in this synthetic transformation. PMID:26166404

  15. Direct Observation of Intermediates Involved in the Interruption of the Bischler–Napieralski Reaction

    PubMed Central

    White, Kolby L.; Mewald, Marius; Movassaghi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The first mechanistic investigation of electrophilic amide activation of α,α-disubstituted tertiary lactams and the direct observation of key intermediates by in situ FTIR, 1H, 13C, and 19F NMR in our interrupted Bischler–Napieralski based synthetic strategy to the aspidosperma alkaloids, including a complex tetracyclic diiminium ion, is discussed. The reactivity of a wide range of pyridines with trifluoromethanesulfonic anhydride was systematically examined, and characteristic IR absorption bands for the corresponding N-trifluoromethanesulfonylated pyridinium trifluoromethanesulfonates were assigned. The reversible formation of diiminium ether intermediates was studied, providing insight into divergent mechanistic pathways as a function of the steric environment of the amide substrate and stoichiometry of reagents. Importantly, when considering base additives during electrophilic amide activation, more hindered α-quaternary tertiary lactams require the use of non-nucleophilic pyridine additives in order to avoid deactivation via a competing desulfonylation reaction. The isolation and full characterization of a tetracyclic iminium trifluoromethanesulfonate provided additional correlation between in situ characterization of sensitive intermediates and isolable compounds involved in this synthetic transformation. PMID:26166404

  16. Reaction intermediates in the catalytic mechanism of Escherichia coli MutY DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Raymond C; Hitomi, Kenichi; Arvai, Andrew S; House, Paul G; Kurtz, Andrew J; Dodson, M L; McCullough, Amanda K; Tainer, John A; Lloyd, R Stephen

    2004-11-01

    The Escherichia coli adenine DNA glycosylase, MutY, plays an important role in the maintenance of genomic stability by catalyzing the removal of adenine opposite 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine or guanine in duplex DNA. Although the x-ray crystal structure of the catalytic domain of MutY revealed a mechanism for catalysis of the glycosyl bond, it appeared that several opportunistically positioned lysine side chains could participate in a secondary beta-elimination reaction. In this investigation, it is established via site-directed mutagenesis and the determination of a 1.35-A structure of MutY in complex with adenine that the abasic site (apurinic/apyrimidinic) lyase activity is alternatively regulated by two lysines, Lys142 and Lys20. Analyses of the crystallographic structure also suggest a role for Glu161 in the apurinic/apyrimidinic lyase chemistry. The beta-elimination reaction is structurally and chemically uncoupled from the initial glycosyl bond scission, indicating that this reaction occurs as a consequence of active site plasticity and slow dissociation of the product complex. MutY with either the K142A or K20A mutation still catalyzes beta and beta-delta elimination reactions, and both mutants can be trapped as covalent enzyme-DNA intermediates by chemical reduction. The trapping was observed to occur both pre- and post-phosphodiester bond scission, establishing that both of these intermediates have significant half-lives. Thus, the final spectrum of DNA products generated reflects the outcome of a delicate balance of closely related equilibrium constants. PMID:15326180

  17. Kinetics and intermediates of the reaction of fully reduced Escherichia coli bo₃ ubiquinol oxidase with O₂.

    PubMed

    Szundi, Istvan; Kittredge, Clive; Choi, Sylvia K; McDonald, William; Ray, Jayashree; Gennis, Robert B; Einarsdóttir, Ólöf

    2014-08-26

    Cytochrome bo₃ ubiquinol oxidase from Escherichia coli catalyzes the reduction of O₂ to water by ubiquinol. The reaction mechanism and the role of ubiquinol continue to be a subject of discussion. In this study, we report a detailed kinetic scheme of the reaction of cytochrome bo₃ with O₂ with steps specific to ubiquinol. The reaction was investigated using the CO flow-flash method, and time-resolved optical absorption difference spectra were collected from 1 μs to 20 ms after photolysis. Singular value decomposition-based global exponential fitting resolved five apparent lifetimes, 22 μs, 30 μs, 42 μs, 470 μs, and 2.0 ms. The reaction mechanism was derived by an algebraic kinetic analysis method using frequency-shifted spectra of known bovine states to identify the bo3 intermediates. It shows 42 μs O₂ binding (3.8 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)), producing compound A, followed by faster (22 μs) heme b oxidation, yielding a mixture of PR and F, and rapid heme b rereduction by ubiquinol (30 μs), producing the F intermediate and semiquinone. In the 470 μs step, the o₃ F state is converted into the o₃(3+) oxidized state, presumably by semiquinone/ubiquinol, without the concomitant oxidation of heme b. The final 2 ms step shows heme b reoxidation and the partial rereduction of the binuclear center and, following O₂ binding, the formation of a mixture of P and F during a second turnover cycle. The results show that ubiquinol/semiquinone plays a complex role in the mechanism of O₂ reduction by bo₃, displaying kinetic steps that have no analogy in the CuA-containing heme-copper oxidases. PMID:25076393

  18. Imaging single-molecule reaction intermediates stabilized by surface dissipation and entropy.

    PubMed

    Riss, Alexander; Paz, Alejandro Pérez; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; De Oteyza, Dimas G; Bradley, Aaron J; Ugeda, Miguel M; Gorman, Patrick; Jung, Han Sae; Crommie, Michael F; Rubio, Angel; Fischer, Felix R

    2016-07-01

    Chemical transformations at the interface between solid/liquid or solid/gaseous phases of matter lie at the heart of key industrial-scale manufacturing processes. A comprehensive study of the molecular energetics and conformational dynamics that underlie these transformations is often limited to ensemble-averaging analytical techniques. Here we report the detailed investigation of a surface-catalysed cross-coupling and sequential cyclization cascade of 1,2-bis(2-ethynyl phenyl)ethyne on Ag(100). Using non-contact atomic force microscopy, we imaged the single-bond-resolved chemical structure of transient metastable intermediates. Theoretical simulations indicate that the kinetic stabilization of experimentally observable intermediates is determined not only by the potential-energy landscape, but also by selective energy dissipation to the substrate and entropic changes associated with key transformations along the reaction pathway. The microscopic insights gained here pave the way for the rational design and control of complex organic reactions at the surface of heterogeneous catalysts. PMID:27325094

  19. Inhibition of biotin carboxylase by a reaction intermediate analog: implications for the kinetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C Z; Amspacher, D; Strongin, R; Waldrop, G L

    1999-12-20

    The first committed step in long-chain fatty acid synthesis is catalyzed by the multienzyme complex acetyl CoA carboxylase. One component of the acetyl CoA carboxylase complex is biotin carboxylase which catalyzes the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin. The Escherichia coli form of biotin carboxylase can be isolated from the other components of the acetyl CoA carboxylase complex such that enzymatic activity is retained. The synthesis of a reaction intermediate analog inhibitor of biotin carboxylase has been described recently (Organic Lett. 1, 99-102, 1999). The inhibitor is formed by coupling phosphonoacetic acid to the 1'-N of biotin. In this paper the characterization of the inhibition of biotin carboxylase by this reaction-intermediate analog is described. The analog showed competitive inhibition versus ATP with a slope inhibition constant of 8 mM. Noncompetitive inhibition was found for the analog versus biotin. Phosphonoacetate exhibited competitive inhibition with respect to ATP and noncompetitive inhibition versus bicarbonate. Biotin was found to be a noncompetitive substrate inhibitor of biotin carboxylase. These data suggested that biotin carboxylase had an ordered addition of substrates with ATP binding first followed by bicarbonate and then biotin. PMID:10600526

  20. Multifragmentation in intermediate energy {sup 129}Xe-induced heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tso, Kin

    1996-05-01

    The {sup 129}Xe-induced reactions on {sup nat}Cu, {sup 89}Y, {sup 165}Ho, and {sup 197}Au at bombarding energies of E/A = 40 & 60 MeV have been studied theoretically and experimentally in order to establish the underlying mechanism of multifragmentation at intermediate energy heavy-Ion collisions. Nuclear disks formed in central heavy-ion collisions, as simulated by means of Boltzmann-like kinetic equations, break up into several fragments due to a new kind of Rayleigh-like surface instability. A sheet of liquid, stable in the limit of non-interacting surfaces, is shown to become unstable due to surface-surface interactions. The onset of this instability is determined analytically. A thin bubble behaves like a sheet and is susceptible to the surface instability through the crispation mode. The Coulomb effects associated with the depletion of charges in the central cavity of nuclear bubbles are investigated. The onset of Coulomb instability is demonstrated for perturbations of the radial mode. Experimental intermediate-mass-fragment multiplicity distributions for the {sup 129}Xe-induced reactions are shown to be binomial at each transverse energy. From these distributions, independent of the specific target, an elementary binary decay probability p can be extracted that has a thermal dependence. Thus it is inferred that multifragmentation is reducible to a combination of nearly independent emission processes. If sequential decay is assumed, the increase of p with transverse energy implies a contraction of the emission time scale. The sensitivity of p to the lower Z threshold in the definition of intermediate-mass-fragments points to a physical Poisson simulations of the particle multiplicities show that the weak auto-correlation between the fragment multiplicity and the transverse energy does not distort a Poisson distribution into a binomial distribution. The effect of device efficiency on the experimental results has also been studied.

  1. Ozonation of benzotriazole and methylindole: Kinetic modeling, identification of intermediates and reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Benitez, F Javier; Acero, Juan L; Real, Francisco J; Roldán, Gloria; Rodríguez, Elena

    2015-01-23

    The ozonation of 1H-benzotriazole (BZ) and 3-methylindole (ML), two emerging contaminants that are frequently present in aquatic environments, was investigated. The experiments were performed with the contaminants (1μM) dissolved in ultrapure water. The kinetic study led to the determination of the apparent rate constants for the ozonation reactions. In the case of 1H-benzotriazole, these rate constants varied from 20.1 ± 0.4M(-1)s(-1) at pH=3 to 2143 ± 23 M(-1)s(-1) at pH=10. Due to its acidic nature (pKa=8.2), the degree of dissociation of this pollutant was determined at every pH of work, and the specific rate constants of the un-dissociated and dissociated species were evaluated, being the values of these rate constants 20.1 ± 2.0 and 2.0 ± 0.3 × 10(3)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. On the contrary, 3-methylindole does not present acidic nature, and therefore, it can be proposed an average value for its rate constant of 4.90 ± 0.7 × 10(5)M(-1)s(-1) in the whole pH range 3-10. Further experiments were performed to identify the main degradation byproducts (10 mg L(-1) of contaminants, 0.023 gh(-1) of ozone). Up to 8 intermediates formed in the ozonation of 3-methylindole were identified by LC-TOFMS, while 6 intermediates were identified in the ozonation of 1H-benzotriazole. By considering these intermediate compounds, the reaction mechanisms were proposed and discussed. Finally, evaluated rate constants allowed to predict and modeling the oxidation of these micropollutants in general aquatic systems. PMID:24953706

  2. The Pressure Dependency of Stabilized Criegee Intermediate Yields of Selected Ozone-Alkene Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakala, J. P.; Donahue, N. M.

    2014-12-01

    Stabilized Criegee Intermediates (SCI) play an important role as an oxidizing species in atmospheric reactions. The ozonolysis of alkenes in the atmosphere, i.e. the mechanism by which the SCIs are produced, is a major pathway to the formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere. Just how much SCIs contribute to the SOA formation is not well known and fundamental research in the kinetics of SCI formation need to be performed to shed light on this mystery. The alkene ozonolysis is highly exothermic reaction, so a third body is needed for stabilizing the SCI, thus making the SCI yield pressure dependent. We studied the production of SCIs at different pressures by studying their ability to oxidize sulfur dioxide in a pressure controlled flow reactor. We used a mixture of ultra-high purity nitrogen, oxygen, and a selective scavenger for hydroxyl radical (OH) as a carrier gas, and injected a mixture of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide and selected alkene to the center of the flow for ozonolysis to take place. With the OH radical scavenged, the SCI yield of the reaction was measured by measuring the amount of sulfuric acid formed in the reaction between SCI and sulfur dioxide with a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). This work was supported by NASA/ROSES grant NNX12AE54G to CMU and Academy of Finland Center of Excellence project 1118615.

  3. Reaction of Stabilized Criegee Intermediates from Ozonolysis of Limonene with Water: Ab Initio and DFT Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lei; Lan, Ru; Xu, Yi-Sheng; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Yang, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of the chemical reaction of H2O with three stabilized Criegee intermediates (stabCI-OO, stabCI-CH3-OO and stabCIx-OO) produced via the limonene ozonolysis reaction has been investigated using ab initio and DFT (Density Functional Theory) methods. It has been shown that the formation of the hydrogen-bonded complexes is followed by two different reaction pathways, leading to the formation of either OH radicals via water-catalyzed H migration or of α-hydroxy hydroperoxide. Both pathways were found to be essential sources of atmospheric OH radical and H2O2 making a significant contribution to the formation of secondary aerosols in the Earth’s atmosphere. The activation energies at the CCSD(T)/6-31G(d) + CF level of theory were found to be in the range of 14.70–21.98 kcal mol−1. The formation of α-hydroxy hydroperoxide for the reaction of stabCIx-OO and H2O with the activation energy of 14.70 kcal mol−1 is identified as the most favorable pathway. PMID:23481640

  4. Photochemical studies of reactive intermediates involved in gas phase ion-neutral reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Osterheld, T.H.

    1992-01-01

    Infrared multiple photon dissociation was used to study unimolecular reactions of gas phase ions in a Fourier transform mass spectrometer. Specifically, the influence of intermediates on reactivity and dynamics was investigated. Dissociation of nitrobenzene cation displays a variety of surprising and apparently non-statistical behavior. The authors demonstrated that some of its reactions involve an isomerization to phenyl nitrite cation by a dissociation/reassociation mechanism in an ion-neutral complex. This allowed the behavior to be explained by normal statistical reactions. Previous work in other laboratories suggested that methane loss from acetone cation occurs by tunneling of a hydrogen atom. Part of the evidence came from the observation of very large isotope effects. The authors demonstrated that methane loss could not occur by tunneling. They further showed that the isotope effects result from normal zero point vibrational energy differences in an ion-neutral complex mechanism. Two simple dissociations of butanone cation do not compete as expected. They also found that the rates for the low energy reactions are much slower than statistical calculations. They explained these results by a prior isomerization to an ion-neutral complex. They calculated that the ion-neutral complex has a higher density of states than butanone cation even at energies well below a reaction threshold. McLafferty and co-workers demonstrated that acetone enol cation isomerizes to a symmetric acetone cation structure which then loses methyl groups at unequal rates. The authors have confirmed this behavior and demonstrated that the non-statistical dissociation depends on the internal energy. They proposed that an excited vibrational mode of the transition state for isomerization couples more strongly with the reaction coordinate, thus yielding more non-statistical dissociation.

  5. Chemically Activated Formation of Organic Acids in Reactions of the Criegee Intermediate with Aldehydes and Ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.

    2013-08-08

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, .CH2OO.) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between .CH2OO. and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48–51 kcal mol-1 lower in energy, formed via 1,3- cycloaddition of .CH2OO. across the CQO bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O–O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO o CH3CHO o CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10-4 times lower than the initial .CH2OO. concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  6. Mass Spectrometric-Based Selected Reaction Monitoring of Protein Phosphorylation during Symbiotic Signaling in the Model Legume, Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Junko; Barrett-Wilt, Gregory A.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the major cereal crops corn, rice, and wheat, leguminous plants such as soybean and alfalfa can meet their nitrogen requirement via endosymbiotic associations with soil bacteria. The establishment of this symbiosis is a complex process playing out over several weeks and is facilitated by the exchange of chemical signals between these partners from different kingdoms. Several plant components that are involved in this signaling pathway have been identified, but there is still a great deal of uncertainty regarding the early events in symbiotic signaling, i.e., within the first minutes and hours after the rhizobial signals (Nod factors) are perceived at the plant plasma membrane. The presence of several protein kinases in this pathway suggests a mechanism of signal transduction via posttranslational modification of proteins in which phosphate is added to the hydroxyl groups of serine, threonine and tyrosine amino acid side chains. To monitor the phosphorylation dynamics and complement our previous untargeted 'discovery' approach, we report here the results of experiments using a targeted mass spectrometric technique, Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) that enables the quantification of phosphorylation targets with great sensitivity and precision. Using this approach, we confirm a rapid change in the level of phosphorylation in 4 phosphosites of at least 4 plant phosphoproteins that have not been previously characterized. This detailed analysis reveals aspects of the symbiotic signaling mechanism in legumes that, in the long term, will inform efforts to engineer this nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in important non-legume crops such as rice, wheat and corn. PMID:27203723

  7. Mass Spectrometric-Based Selected Reaction Monitoring of Protein Phosphorylation during Symbiotic Signaling in the Model Legume, Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Van Ness, Lori K; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Maeda, Junko; Barrett-Wilt, Gregory A; Sussman, Michael R; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the major cereal crops corn, rice, and wheat, leguminous plants such as soybean and alfalfa can meet their nitrogen requirement via endosymbiotic associations with soil bacteria. The establishment of this symbiosis is a complex process playing out over several weeks and is facilitated by the exchange of chemical signals between these partners from different kingdoms. Several plant components that are involved in this signaling pathway have been identified, but there is still a great deal of uncertainty regarding the early events in symbiotic signaling, i.e., within the first minutes and hours after the rhizobial signals (Nod factors) are perceived at the plant plasma membrane. The presence of several protein kinases in this pathway suggests a mechanism of signal transduction via posttranslational modification of proteins in which phosphate is added to the hydroxyl groups of serine, threonine and tyrosine amino acid side chains. To monitor the phosphorylation dynamics and complement our previous untargeted 'discovery' approach, we report here the results of experiments using a targeted mass spectrometric technique, Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) that enables the quantification of phosphorylation targets with great sensitivity and precision. Using this approach, we confirm a rapid change in the level of phosphorylation in 4 phosphosites of at least 4 plant phosphoproteins that have not been previously characterized. This detailed analysis reveals aspects of the symbiotic signaling mechanism in legumes that, in the long term, will inform efforts to engineer this nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in important non-legume crops such as rice, wheat and corn. PMID:27203723

  8. Snapshot of a Reaction Intermediate: Analysis of Benzoylformate Decarboxylase in Complex with a Benzoylphosphonate Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Gabriel S.; Kneen, Malea M.; Chakraborty, Sumit; Baykal, Ahmet T.; Nemeria, Natalia; Yep, Alejandra; Ruby, David I.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Kenyon, George L.; McLeish, Michael J.; Jordan, Frank; Ringe, Dagmar

    2009-04-22

    Benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC) is a thiamin diphosphate- (ThDP-) dependent enzyme acting on aromatic substrates. In addition to its metabolic role in the mandelate pathway, BFDC shows broad substrate specificity coupled with tight stereo control in the carbon-carbon bond-forming reverse reaction, making it a useful biocatalyst for the production of chiral-hydroxy ketones. The reaction of methyl benzoylphosphonate (MBP), an analogue of the natural substrate benzoylformate, with BFDC results in the formation of a stable analogue (C2{alpha}-phosphonomandelyl-ThDP) of the covalent ThDP-substrate adduct C2{alpha}-mandelyl-ThDP. Formation of the stable adduct is confirmed both by formation of a circular dichroism band characteristic of the 1',4'-iminopyrimidine tautomeric form of ThDP (commonly observed when ThDP forms tetrahedral complexes with its substrates) and by high-resolution mass spectrometry of the reaction mixture. In addition, the structure of BFDC with the MBP inhibitor was solved by X-ray crystallography to a spatial resolution of 1.37 {angstrom} (PDB ID 3FSJ). The electron density clearly shows formation of a tetrahedral adduct between the C2 atom of ThDP and the carbonyl carbon atom of the MBP. This adduct resembles the intermediate from the penultimate step of the carboligation reaction between benzaldehyde and acetaldehyde. The combination of real-time kinetic information via stopped-flow circular dichroism with steady-state data from equilibrium circular dichroism measurements and X-ray crystallography reveals details of the first step of the reaction catalyzed by BFDC. The MBP-ThDP adduct on BFDC is compared to the recently solved structure of the same adduct on benzaldehyde lyase, another ThDP-dependent enzyme capable of catalyzing aldehyde condensation with high stereospecificity.

  9. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of lithium sulfur battery reaction intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wujcik, Kevin; Pascal, Tod; Prendergast, David; Balsara, Nitash

    2015-03-01

    Lithium sulfur batteries have a theoretical energy density nearly five times greater than current lithium ion battery standards, but questions still remain regarding the reaction pathways through which soluble lithium polysulfide (Li2Sx, ``x'' ranging from 2 to 8) reaction intermediates are formed. Complicating spectroelectrochemical approaches to elucidate redox pathways is the challenge of obtaining spectral standards for individual Li2Sx species. Lithium polysulfides cannot be isolated as individual component and exist only in solution as a distribution of different Li2Sx molecules formed via disproportionation reactions (e.g. 2Li2S4 goes to Li2S3 + Li2S5). X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the sulfur K-edge has recently been employed as a technique to study Li-S chemistry. We have recently obtained XAS standards for individual Li2Sx species via first principles DFT simulations and the excited electron and core hole approach. Here, experimental sulfur K-edge XAS of Li2Sx species dissolved in poly(ethylene oxide) are compared to spectra obtained from analogous theoretical calculations. The impact that polysulfide solution concentration and the presence of other lithium salts (e.g. LiNO3) have on X-ray spectra of Li2Sx species is explored via experiment and theory.

  10. Mössbauer and EPR Study of Reaction Intermediates of Cytochrome P450

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schünemann, V.; Trautwein, A. X.; Jung, C.; Terner, J.

    2002-06-01

    We present a complementary Mössbauer and EPR study on reaction intermediates of substrate-free and substrate-bound cytochrome P450cam from Pseudomonas putida prepared by the freeze-quench method from 57Fe-labeled P450cam using peroxy acetic acid as oxidizing agent. When reacting the substrate-free P450cam for 8 ms reaction time the reaction mixture consists of ˜85% of ferric low-spin iron (Fe(III)) with g-factors and hyperfine parameters of the starting material; the remaining ˜15% are identified as ferryl iron (Fe(IV); S Fe=1) by its Mössbauer signature. Parallel to the ferryl iron a tyrosine radical ( S rad=1/2) is formed. The two paramagnetic species are not exchange-coupled; however, they are close enough to significantly influence the (EPR) relaxation behavior of the radical spin. In the case of substrate-bound P450cam only trace amounts of the tyrosine radical are formed within 8 ms (<3%); within the accuracy of Mössbauer spectroscopy (5%) iron(IV) can not be detected. The results point to Tyr-96, which is hydrogen-bonded to the substrate camphor, as the candidate for the observed tyrosine radical.

  11. Workshop on hadron structure from photo-reactions at intermediate energies: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan, A.M.; Sandorfi, A.M.

    1992-10-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: The proton compton effect: Recent measurements of the electric and magnetic polorizabilities of the proton; experiments on the electric polarizability of the neutron; chiral symmetry and nucleon polarizabilities; chiral model predictions for electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon, a consumer report; the polarizabilities of bound nucleons; nucleon polarizability in free space and in nuclear matter; mechanisms of photon scattering on nucleons at intermediate energies; pion polarizabilities in chiral perturbation theory; pion polarizabilities and the shielding of {sigma}(700)-meson exchange in {gamma}{gamma}{yields}{pi}{pi} processes; pion and kaon polarizabilities in the quark confinement model; radiative pion photoproduction and pion polarizabilities; pion and sigma polarizabilities and radiative transitions; the quadrupole amplitude in the {gamma}{Nu}-{Delta} transition; pion photoproduction and the {gamma}{Nu}-{Delta} amplitudes; effective- lagrangians, Watson`s theorem, and the E2/M1 mixing ratio in the excitation of the delta resonance; new measurements of the p({rvec {gamma}}, {pi}{sup o}) reaction; multipole analyses and photo-decay couplings at intermediate energies; compton scattering off the proton; connections between compton scattering and pion photoproduction in the delta region; single-pion electroproduction and the transverse one-half and scalar helicity transition form factors; relativistic effects, QCD mixing angles, and {Nu} {yields} {Nu}{gamma} and {Delta} {yields} {gamma}{Nu} transition form factors; electroproduction studies of the {Nu} {yields} {Delta} transition at bates and CEBAF.

  12. Glutathione peroxidase's reaction intermediate selenenic acid is stabilized by the protein microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Liu, Jun; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2014-11-01

    Selenenic acids are highly reactive intermediates of selenoproteins' enzymatic reactions. Knowledge of how the protein environment protects and stabilizes them is fundamental not only to descriptions of selenoproteins' reactivity but also potentially for proteomics and therapeutics. However, selenenic acids are considered particularly short-lived and are not yet identified in wild-type selenoproteins. Here, we report trapping the selenenic acid in glutathione peroxidase, an antioxidant enzyme that efficiently eliminates hydroperoxides. It has long been thought that selenium-containing glutathione peroxidases form a selenenic acid intermediate. However, this putative species has eluded detection. Here, we report its identification. The selenenic acid in bovine glutathione peroxidase 1 was chemically trapped using dimedone, an alkylating agent specific to sulfenic and selenenic acids. The alkylation of the catalytic selenocysteine was verified by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. In the presence of glutathione, the selenocysteine was not alkylated because the selenenic acid condenses faster with glutathione than the alkylation reaction. In the absence of thiols, the selenenic acid was surprisingly long-lived with 95% of the protein still able to react with dimedone 10 min after hydrogen peroxide was removed, indicating that the protein environment stabilizes the selenenic acid by shielding it from reactive groups in the protein. After 30 min, the selenocysteine was no longer modified but became accessible once the protein was exposed to reducing agents. This suggests that the selenenic acid reacted with a protein's amide or amine to form a selenylamide bond. Such a modification may play a role in protecting glutathione peroxidase׳' reactivity. PMID:25124921

  13. Glutathione Peroxidase’s Reaction Intermediate Selenenic Acid is Stabilized by the Protein Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei; Liu, Jun; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Selenenic acids are highly reactive intermediates of selenoproteins’ enzymatic reactions. Knowledge of how the protein environment protects and stabilizes them is fundamental not only to descriptions of selenoproteins’ reactivity but also potentially for proteomics and therapeutics. However, selenenic acids are considered particularly short-lived and were not yet identified in wild-type selenoproteins. Here, we report trapping the selenenic acid in glutathione peroxidase, an anti-oxidant enzyme that efficiently eliminates hydroperoxides. It has long been thought that selenium-containing glutathione peroxidases form a selenenic acid intermediate. However, this putative species has eluded detection. Here, we report its identification. The selenenic acid in bovine glutathione peroxidase 1 was chemically trapped using dimedone, an alkylating agent specific to sulfenic and selenenic acids. The alkylation of the catalytic selenocysteine was verified by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. In the presence of glutathione, the selenocysteine was not alkylated because the selenenic acid condenses faster with glutathione than the alkylation reaction. In the absence of thiols, the selenenic acid was surprisingly long-lived with 95% of the protein still able to react with dimedone 10 min after hydrogen peroxide was removed, indicating that the protein environment stabilizes the selenenic acid by shielding it from reactive groups in the protein. After 30 min, the selenocysteine was no longer modified but became accessible once the protein was exposed to reducing agents. This suggests that the selenenic acid reacted with a protein’s amide or amine to form a selenylamide bond. Such a modification may play a role in protecting glutathione peroxidase’s reactivity. PMID:25124921

  14. Reaction of ferric cytochrome P450cam with peracids: kinetic characterization of intermediates on the reaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Spolitak, Tatyana; Dawson, John H; Ballou, David P

    2005-05-27

    Reactions of substrate-free ferric cytochrome P450cam with peracids to generate Fe=O intermediates have previously been investigated with contradictory results. Using stopped-flow spectrophotometry, the reaction with m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid demonstrated an Fe(IV)=O + porphyrin pi-cation radical (Cpd I) (Egawa, T., Shimada, H., and Ishimura, Y. (1994) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 201, 1464-1469). By contrast, with peracetic acid, Fe(IV)=O plus a tyrosyl radical were observed by freeze-quench Mossbauer and EPR spectroscopy (Schunemann, V., Jung, C., Trautwein, A. X., Mandon, D., and Weiss, R. (2000) FEBS Lett. 479, 149-154). Our detailed kinetic studies have resolved these contradictory results. At pH >7, a significant fraction of Cpd I is formed transiently, whereas at low pH only a species with a Soret band at 406 nm, presumably Fe(IV)=O + tyrosyl radical, is observed. Evidence for formation of an acylperoxo complex en route to Cpd I was obtained. Because of rapid heme destruction, steps subsequent to formation of the highly oxidized forms could not be fully characterized. Heme destruction was avoided by including peroxidase substrates (e.g. guaiacol), which were oxidized to characteristic peroxidase products as the Fe(III)-P450 was regenerated. Addition of ascorbate to either of the high valent species also reforms the Fe(III) state with only a small loss of heme absorbance. These results indicate that typical peroxidase chemistry occurs with P450cam and offer an explanation for the contrasting results reported earlier. The delineation of improved conditions (pH, temperature, choice of peracid) for generating highly oxidized species with P450cam should be valuable for their further characterization. PMID:15781454

  15. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of reactive intermediates in photochemical and transition metal-assisted oxidation, decarboxylation and alkyl transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Carraher, Jack McCaslin

    2014-01-01

    Reactive species like high-valent metal-oxo complexes and carbon and oxygen centered radicals are important intermediates in enzymatic systems, atmospheric chemistry, and industrial processes. Understanding the pathways by which these intermediates form, their relative reactivity, and their fate after reactions is of the utmost importance. Herein are described the mechanistic detail for the generation of several reactive intermediates, synthesis of precursors, characterization of precursors, and methods to direct the chemistry to more desirable outcomes yielding ‘greener’ sources of commodity chemicals and fuels.

  16. Fission Fragment Charge and Mass Distributions from Intermediate-Energy Reactions of 238-U Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souliotis, G. A.; Loveland, W.; Zyromski, K. E.; Wozniak, G. J.; Morrissey, D. J.; Aleklett, Kjell

    1999-10-01

    The charge, mass and velocity distributions of fission fragments from the interaction of 20 MeV/nucleon 238-U projectiles with 27-Al and 208-Pb have been measured using the MSU A1200 fragment separator. The observed distributions from the U+Al reaction are consistent with fission following fusion-like events giving rise to products that are very n-deficient relative to the line of beta-stability. However, the distributions from the U+Pb reaction are consistent with fission following quasielastic or deep-inelastic collisions, resulting in fragments that are neutron rich. Substantial yields of very n-rich nuclei are observed. Estimates of rates of important n-rich nuclides from a typical second generation projectile-fragmentation (PF) facility are given. Finally, the importance of the present cross section data for the planning of next generation intermediate-energy PF facilities able to produce short-lived neutron-rich radioactive beams by fission of heavy projectiles is discussed.

  17. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (∼ 50 MeV to ∼ 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used in the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are available now. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results. Our current results indicate this is, in fact, the case.

  18. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used inmore » the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.« less

  19. Developing mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes relevant to reactive intermediates of biological oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Shinobu

    2015-07-21

    Active-oxygen species generated on a copper complex play vital roles in several biological and chemical oxidation reactions. Recent attention has been focused on the reactive intermediates generated at the mononuclear copper active sites of copper monooxygenases such as dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM), tyramine β-monooxygenase (TβM), peptidylglycine-α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), and polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMO). In a simple model system, reaction of O2 and a reduced copper(I) complex affords a mononuclear copper(II)-superoxide complex or a copper(III)-peroxide complex, and subsequent H(•) or e(-)/H(+) transfer, which gives a copper(II)-hydroperoxide complex. A more reactive species such as a copper(II)-oxyl radical type species could be generated via O-O bond cleavage of the peroxide complex. However, little had been explored about the chemical properties and reactivity of the mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes due to the lack of appropriate model compounds. Thus, a great deal of effort has recently been made to develop efficient ligands that can stabilize such reactive active-oxygen complexes in synthetic modeling studies. In this Account, I describe our recent achievements of the development of a mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex using a simple tridentate ligand consisting of an eight-membered cyclic diamine with a pyridylethyl donor group. The superoxide complex exhibits a similar structure (four-coordinate tetrahedral geometry) and reactivity (aliphatic hydroxylation) to those of a proposed reactive intermediate of copper monooxygenases. Systematic studies based on the crystal structures of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes of the related tridentate supporting ligands have indicated that the rigid eight-membered cyclic diamine framework is crucial for controlling the geometry and the redox potential, which are prerequisites for the generation of such a unique mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex

  20. Chronic restraint stress induces sperm acrosome reaction and changes in testicular tyrosine phosphorylated proteins in rats

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Supatcharee; Burawat, Jaturon; Sukhorum, Wannisa; Sampannang, Apichakan; Maneenin, Chanwit; Iamsaard, Sitthichai

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stress is a cause of male infertility. Although sex hormones and sperm quality have been shown to be low in stress, sperm physiology and testicular functional proteins, such as phosphotyrosine proteins, have not been documented. Objective: To investigate the acrosome status and alterations of testicular proteins involved in spermatogenesis and testosterone synthesis in chronic stress in rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, male rats were divided into 2 groups (control and chronic stress (CS), n=7). CS rats were immobilized (4 hr/day) for 42 consecutive days. The blood glucose level (BGL), corticosterone, testosterone, acrosome status, and histopathology were examined. The expressions of testicular steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR), cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage (CYP11A1), and phosphorylated proteins were analyzed. Results: Results showed that BGL (71.25±2.22 vs. 95.60±3.36 mg/dl), corticosterone level (24.33±4.23 vs. 36.9±2.01 ng/ml), acrosome reacted sperm (3.25±1.55 vs. 17.71±5.03%), and sperm head abnormality (3.29±0.71 vs. 6.21±1.18%) were significantly higher in CS group in comparison with control. In contrast, seminal vesicle (0.41±0.05 vs. 0.24±0.07 g/100g), testosterone level (3.37±0.79 vs. 0.61±0.29 ng/ml), and sperm concentration (115.33±7.70 vs. 79.13±3.65×106 cells/ml) of CS were significantly lower (p<0.05) than controls. Some atrophic seminiferous tubules and low sperm mass were apparent in CS rats. The expression of CYP11A1 except StAR protein was markedly decreased in CS rats. In contrast, a 55 kDa phosphorylated protein was higher in CS testes. Conclusion: CS decreased the expression of CYP11A, resulting in decreased testosterone, and increased acrosome-reacted sperm, assumed to be the result of an increase of 55 kDa phosphorylated protein. PMID:27525328

  1. The thermodynamic properties of 2-aminobiphenyl (an intermediate in the carbazole/hydrogen reaction network)

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, W.V.; Chirico, R.D.; Knipmeyer, S.E.; Nguyen, A.

    1990-12-01

    Catalytic hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) is a key step in upgrading processes for conversion of heavy petroleum, shale oil, tar sands, and the products of the liquefaction of coal to economically viable products. This research program provides accurate experimental thermochemical and thermophysical properties for key organic nitrogen-containing compounds present in the range of alternative feedstocks, and applies the experimental information to thermodynamic analyses of key HDN reaction networks. This report is the first in a series that will lead to an analysis of a three-ring HDN system; the carbazole/hydrogen reaction network. 2-Aminobiphenyl is the initial intermediate in the HDN pathway for carbazole, which consumes the least hydrogen possible. Measurements leading to the calculation of the ideal-gas thermodynamic properties for 2-aminobiphenyl are reported. Experimental methods included combustion calorimetry, adiabatic heat-capacity calorimetry, comparative ebulliometry, inclined-piston gauge manometry, and differential-scanning calorimetry (d.s.c). Entropies, enthalpies, and Gibbs energies of formation were derived for the ideal gas for selected temperatures between 298.15 K and 820 K. The critical temperature and critical density were determined for 2-aminobiphenyl with the d.s.c., and the critical pressure was derived. The Gibbs energies of formation are used in thermodynamic calculations to compare the feasibility of the initial hydrogenolysis step in the carbazole/H{sub 2} network with that of its hydrocarbon and oxygen-containing analogous; i.e., fluorene/H{sub 2} and dibenzofuran/H{sub 2}. Results of the thermodynamic calculations are compared with those of batch-reaction studies reported in the literature. 57 refs., 8 figs., 18 tabs.

  2. Weak interaction processes in supernovae: New probes using charge exchange reaction at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frekers, Dieter

    2005-04-01

    Spin-isospin-flip excitations in nuclei at vanishing momentum transfer are generally referred to as Gamov-Teller (GT) transitions. They are being studied because the simplicity of the excitation makes them an ideal probe for testing nuclear structure models. In astrophysics, GT transitions provide an important input for model calculations and element formation during the explosive phase of a massive star at the end of its life-time. GT transitions in the β- direction (also referred to as isospin lowering T< transitions) have extensively been studied through (p,n) and (3He,t) charge-exchange reactions [B.D. Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. C 36 (1987) 2195, B.D. Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. C 43 (1991) 50, J. Rapaport et al., Phys. Rev. C 24 (1981) 335, H. Akimune et al., Nucl. Phys. A 569 (1994) 245c, Y. Fujita et al., Phys. Lett. B 365 (1996) 29]. The generally good resolution allows easy extraction of the GT distribution and the total B(GT-) strength in the final nucleus. On the other hand, determination of B(GT+) strength through a charge-exchange reaction in the T> direction were mostly done with secondary neutron beams, and as such, they come with significant experimental difficulties. TRIUMF has pioneered this field in the late 80's and early 90's with a rich and highly successful (n,p) program using a several hundred MeV neutron beam from a 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction [R. Helmer, Can. J. Phys. 65 (1987) 588]. In this paper we present the (d,2He) reaction at intermediate energies as another and potentially even more powerful tool for charge-exchange reactions in the T>, resp. β+ direction. The key issue here will be the high resolution of order 100 keV, which provides new and sometimes unexpected insight into nuclear structure phenomena. This program has been launched at the AGOR Superconducting Cyclotron Facility at the KVI Groningen. By now, it covers a wide field of physics questions ranging from few-body physics, the structure of halo-nuclei, to questions pertaining

  3. Oligomer Formation Reactions of Criegee Intermediates in the Ozonolysis of Small Unsaturated Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Y.; Inomata, S.; Hirokawa, J.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) constitutes a substantial fraction of atmospheric fine particulate matters and has an effect on visibility, climate and human health. One of the major oxidizing processes leading to SOA formation is an ozonolysis of unsaturated hydrocarbons (UHCs).[1] Despite of its importance, the contribution of the ozonolysis of UHCs to the SOA formation in the troposphere is not sufficiently understood due to a lack of information on reaction pathways to produce low volatile compounds. While many studies have previously been focused on SOA formation from the ozonolysis of large UHCs, SOA formation from the ozonolysis of UHCs with less than six carbon atoms have been rarely investigated because their products are expected to be too volatile to contribute to the SOA formation. Very recently, a few studies have reported the SOA formation from the ozonolysis of such small UHCs but chemical mechanisms are still unclear. [2-4] In order to understand SOA formation from the ozonolysis of the small UHCs, this study investigated gas- and particle-phase products in laboratory experiments with a Teflon bag using a negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-CIMS) with chloride ion transfer for chemical ionization. This technique is suitable for analysis of compounds such as carboxylic acids and hydroperoxides expected to be produced in the ozonolysis of UHCs with less fragmentation, high selectivity, and high sensitivity. In the particle-phase analysis, SOAs collected on a PTFE filter were heated, and thermally desorbed compounds were analyzed. In the gas-phase analysis, series of peaks with an interval of a mass-to-charge ratio equal to the molecular weight of a Criegee intermediate formed in their ozonolysis were observed. These peaks were attributed to oligomeric hydroperoxides composed of Criegee intermediates as a chain unit. These oligomeric hydroperoxides were also observed in the particle-phase analysis, indicating that the oligomeric

  4. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Electron-Nuclear Double Resonance Studies of the Reactions of Cryogenerated Hydroperoxoferric–Hemoprotein Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The fleeting ferric peroxo and hydroperoxo intermediates of dioxygen activation by hemoproteins can be readily trapped and characterized during cryoradiolytic reduction of ferrous hemoprotein–O2 complexes at 77 K. Previous cryoannealing studies suggested that the relaxation of cryogenerated hydroperoxoferric intermediates of myoglobin (Mb), hemoglobin, and horseradish peroxidase (HRP), either trapped directly at 77 K or generated by cryoannealing of a trapped peroxo-ferric state, proceeds through dissociation of bound H2O2 and formation of the ferric heme without formation of the ferryl porphyrin π-cation radical intermediate, compound I (Cpd I). Herein we have reinvestigated the mechanism of decays of the cryogenerated hydroperoxyferric intermediates of α- and β-chains of human hemoglobin, HRP, and chloroperoxidase (CPO). The latter two proteins are well-known to form spectroscopically detectable quasistable Cpds I. Peroxoferric intermediates are trapped during 77 K cryoreduction of oxy Mb, α-chains, and β-chains of human hemoglobin and CPO. They convert into hydroperoxoferric intermediates during annealing at temperatures above 160 K. The hydroperoxoferric intermediate of HRP is trapped directly at 77 K. All studied hydroperoxoferric intermediates decay with measurable rates at temperatures above 170 K with appreciable solvent kinetic isotope effects. The hydroperoxoferric intermediate of β-chains converts to the S = 3/2 Cpd I, which in turn decays to an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-silent product at temperature above 220 K. For all the other hemoproteins studied, cryoannealing of the hydroperoxo intermediate directly yields an EPR-silent majority product. In each case, a second follow-up 77 K γ-irradiation of the annealed samples yields low-spin EPR signals characteristic of cryoreduced ferrylheme (compound II, Cpd II). This indicates that in general the hydroperoxoferric intermediates relax to Cpd I during cryoanealing at low temperatures, but

  5. The Identification of Stable Reaction Intermediates on Aluminum Oxide Surfaces with Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, Michael Karpovich

    The stable surface intermediates that were formed in several heterogeneous reactions on aluminum oxide films were identified with inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy. The alumina films were synthesized by the plasma oxidation of aluminum metal films. The temperature and exposure dependent interaction of cyclopropane carboxylic acid with alumina films was studied. Cyclopropane carboxylate and n-butane carboxylate were the only adsorbed species formed. The n-butane carboxylate results from hydrogenolysis of the cyclopropyl ring of the adsorbed cyclopropane carboxylate with hydrogen supplied by surface hydroxyl groups. The relative populations of the two surface species are strongly dependent upon coverage and temperature. The adsorption of gaseous dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP) on alumina films was investigated. Surface temperatures ranged between 200 K and 673 K, and exposures ranged between 3 x 10('-4) and 10 Torr-s. Tunneling spectra of deuterium labeled DMMP, perdeutero methyl alcohol, methyl methyl phosphonic acid, methyl phosphonic acid and trimethyl phosphine oxide, all adsorbed on aluminum oxide surfaces, were used to clarify the structures of the species resulting from the adsorption and decomposition of DMMP. At 200 K, DMMP is adsorbed molecularly with high surface coverages. At surface temperatures above 295 K, DMMP is adsorbed dissociatively in low coverages. Surface temperatures above 473 K lead to the dealkylation of the dissociatively adsorbed adspecies, which results in the formation of adsorbed methyl phosphonate. The adsorption and reaction of three phosphonate esters on alumina films was comparatively examined. The phosphonate esters were diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP), dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP) and diphenyl methyl phosphonate (DPMP). The adsorption temperatures ranged from 200 to 673 K. At 373 K, DIMP was found to adsorb dissociatively in low coverages as isopropyl methyl phosphonate. Above 373 K the isopropyl methyl

  6. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.C.

    1994-04-01

    Phenyl (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}), phenoxy (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O) and benzyne (C{sub 6}H{sub 4}) are fundamentally important prototype molecules. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are also very important reactive intermediates in hydrocarbon combustion systems, particularly with regard to soot formation chemistry, as well as to the combustion chemistry of aromatic additives in gasoline. The authors proposed to study the kinetics and mechanisms of these three benchmark reactive intermediates using two complementary laser diagnostic techniques -- laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the first year of this contractual work, they have employed a new type of LRA, i.e. the intra-cavity resonance absorption technique, to measure the rate constants for C{sub 6}H{sub 5} reactions, extending the limit of rate constant measurement down to 10{sup {minus}18} cm{sup 3}/s. They have tested this method for the following reactions: C{sub 6}H{sub 5} + HBr, CH{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} at 297 K and obtained their rate constants to be 3.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}11}, 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}14}, 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}16}, 7.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}18} and 6.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}18} cm{sup 3}/s, respectively. In the second study, the REMPI spectroscopy of C{sub 6}H{sub 5} is being investigated with the two laser pump-probe surface photolysis method. The desorbed C{sub 6}H{sub 5} photofragment is ionized by (1+1) MPI in the spectral range 200--260 nm. Similarly, the NO photofragment is also detected by (1+1) MPI in the same spectral region. The detailed photofragmentation of the absorbed C{sub 6}H{sub 5}NO at 193 and 248 nm is being analyzed presently and a new experiment with acetophenone on a quartz surface is under way.

  7. Infrared matrix isolation and theoretical study of the initial intermediates in the reaction of ozone with cycloheptene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinelo, Laura; Ault, Bruce S.

    2012-10-01

    Matrix isolation combined with infrared spectroscopy resulted in the observation of early intermediates in the reaction of two conformers of cycloheptene and ozone, marking the first observation of these intermediates for a cyclic alkene with conformational isomerism. Spectral evidence supports the presence of the primary ozonide of the chair and boat conformers of cis-cycloheptene, which represents the first time two primary ozonide isomers have been observed for any alkene. In addition, at least one conformer of the Criegee intermediate formed through ring-opening of the cyclic primary ozonide, as well as stable end products. Both the Criegee intermediate and primary ozonide were observed in the spectra of the initial deposition in twin jet experiments. After the matrix was annealed to 36 K, peaks of the primary ozonide increased by ˜250% while the peak of the Criegee intermediate increased by ˜150%. Supporting data was obtained from 18O-labeled ozone experiments. In addition to experimental evidence, further justification was provided by theoretical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,2p) level. The photochemical reactions of the trapped species were also studied. After irradiation of the secondary ozonide and stable products of the ozonolysis reaction, 1-hexanal and carbon dioxide were observed. Late, stable oxidation products of cycloheptene were observed in merged jet experiments.

  8. Intermediates in the cation reactions in solution probed by an in situ surface enhanced Raman scattering method

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chih-Shan; Chen, Hung-Ying; Chen, Hsueh-Szu; Gwo, Shangjr; Chen, Lih-Juann

    2015-01-01

    For chemical reactions in liquid state, such as catalysis, understanding of dynamical changes is conducive to practical applications. Solvation of copper salts in aqueous solution has implications for life, the environment, and industry. In an ongoing research, the question arises that why the color of aqueous CuCl2 solution changes with solution concentration? In this work, we have developed a convenient and efficient in situ surface enhanced Raman scattering technique to probe the presence of many intermediates, some of them are responsible for color change, in crystallization of aqueous copper chloride solution. The versatility of the novel technique was confirmed in the identification of five intermediates states in the transition from CdS to MoS2 nanowires in solution. The facile in situ method is expected to be widely applicable in probing intermediate states in a variety of chemical reactions in solution. PMID:26333518

  9. Intermediates in the cation reactions in solution probed by an in situ surface enhanced Raman scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chih-Shan; Chen, Hung-Ying; Chen, Hsueh-Szu; Gwo, Shangjr; Chen, Lih-Juann

    2015-09-01

    For chemical reactions in liquid state, such as catalysis, understanding of dynamical changes is conducive to practical applications. Solvation of copper salts in aqueous solution has implications for life, the environment, and industry. In an ongoing research, the question arises that why the color of aqueous CuCl2 solution changes with solution concentration? In this work, we have developed a convenient and efficient in situ surface enhanced Raman scattering technique to probe the presence of many intermediates, some of them are responsible for color change, in crystallization of aqueous copper chloride solution. The versatility of the novel technique was confirmed in the identification of five intermediates states in the transition from CdS to MoS2 nanowires in solution. The facile in situ method is expected to be widely applicable in probing intermediate states in a variety of chemical reactions in solution.

  10. An ab initio investigation of possible intermediates in the reaction of the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackels, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemical techniques are used to investigate covalently-bonded and hydrogen-bonded species that may be important intermediates in the reaction of hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals. Stable structures of both types are identified. Basis sets of polarized double zeta quality and large scale configuration interaction wave functions are utilized. Based on electronic energies, the covalently bonded HOOOH species is 26.4 kcal/mol more stable than the OH and HO2 radicals. Similarly, the hydrogen bonded HO---HO2 species has an electronic energy 4.7 kcal/mol below that of the component radicals, after correction is made for the basis set superposition error. The hydrogen bonded form is planar, possesses one relatively normal hydrogen bond, and has the lowest energy 3A' and 1A' states that are essentially degenerate. The 1A" and 3A" excited states produced by rotation of the unpaired OH electron into the molecular plane are very slightly bound.

  11. ENDOR studies of the intermediate electron acceptor radical anion I-. in Photosystem II reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, W; Isaacson, R A; Okamura, M Y; Abresch, E C; Plato, M; Feher, G

    1989-11-23

    The EPR and ENDOR characteristics of the intermediate electron acceptor radical anion I-. in Photosystem II (PS II) are shown to be identical in membrane particles and in the D1D2 cytochrome b-559 complex (Nanba, O. and Satoh, K. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84, 109-112). These findings provide further evidence that the D1D2 complex is the reaction center of PS II and show that the pheophytin binding site is intact. A hydrogen bond between I-. and the protein (GLU D1-130) is postulated on the basis of D2O exchange experiments. The ENDOR data of I-. and of the pheophytin a radical anion in different organic solvents are compared and the observed differences are related to structural changes of the molecule on the basis of molecular orbital calculations (RHF-INDO/SP). The importance of the orientation of the vinyl group (attached to ring I) on electron transfer is discussed. PMID:2553112

  12. Modulation of the kinetics and the steady-state level of intermediates of mitochondrial coupled reactions by inhibitors and uncouplers.

    PubMed

    Yagi, T; Matsuno-Yagi, A; Vik, S B; Hatefi, Y

    1984-02-28

    In oxidative phosphorylation and ATP-driven uphill electron transfer from succinate to NAD, double-reciprocal plots of rates vs. substrate concentrations of the energy-driven reactions are a family of parallel lines at several fixed subsaturating concentrations of the substrates or at several moderate concentrations of the inhibitors of the energy-yielding reactions. Thus, as shown elsewhere [Hatefi, Y., Yagi, T., Phelps, D. C., Wong, S.-Y., Vik, S. B., & Galante, Y. M. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79, 1756-1760], partial uncoupling decreases the Vappmax and increases the Kappm of the substrates of the energy-driven reactions, resulting in a decrease of Vmax/Km as a function of increased uncoupling. However, partial limitation of the flow rates of the energy-yielding reactions decreases both the Vappmax and the Kappm of the substrates of the energy-driven reactions, resulting in no change in Vmax/Km. This is true as long as the rate limitation is moderate (e.g., less than 60%), under which conditions the steady-state membrane potential (delta psi) remains essentially unchanged. At high inhibition of the energy-yielding reactions, or at moderate inhibition in the presence of low levels of an uncoupler to cause partial uncoupling, then the family of double-reciprocal plots is no longer parallel and tends to converge toward the left. Under these conditions, steady-state delta psi and Vmax/Km also decrease as inhibition is increased. The relationship between the magnitude of steady-state delta psi and the rate of the energy-driven reaction was studied in oxidative phosphorylation, ATP-driven electron transfer from succinate to NAD, and respiration-driven uniport calcium transport by intact mitochondria.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6712922

  13. Reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates from ozonolysis of limonene with sulfur dioxide: ab initio and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Xu, Yi-sheng; Ding, Ai-zhong

    2010-12-01

    The mechanism of the reaction of the sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) with four stabilized Criegee intermediates (stabCI-CH(3)-OO, stabCI-OO, stabCIx-OO, and stabCH(2)OO) produced via the ozonolysis of limonene have been investigated using ab initio and DFT (density functional theory) methods. It has been shown that the intermediate adduct formed by the initiation of these reactions may be followed by two different reaction pathways such as H migration reaction to form carboxylic acids and rearrangement of oxygen to produce the sulfur trioxide (SO(3)) from the terminal oxygen of the COO group and SO(2). We found that the reaction of stabCI-OO and stabCH(2)OO with SO(2) can occur via both the aforementioned scenarios, whereas that of stabCI-CH(3)-OO and stabCIx-OO with SO(2) is limited to the second pathway only due to the absence of migrating H atoms. It has been shown that at the CCSD(T)/6-31G(d) + CF level of theory the activation energies of six reaction pathways are in the range of 14.18-22.59 kcal mol(-1), with the reaction between stabCIx-OO and SO(2) as the most favorable pathway of 14.18 kcal mol(-1) activation energy and that the reaction of stabCI-OO and stabCH(2)OO with SO(2) occurs mainly via the second reaction path. The thermochemical analysis of the reaction between SO(2) and stabilized Criegee intermediates indicates that the reaction of SO(2) and stabilized Criegee intermediates formed from the exocyclic primary ozonide decomposition is the main pathway of the SO(3) formation. This is likely to explain the large (~100%) difference in the production rate in the favor of the exocyclic compounds observed in recent experiments on the formation of H(2)SO(4) from exocyclic and endocyclic compounds. PMID:21053959

  14. The GC-MS Observation of Intermediates in a Stepwise Grignard Addition Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latimer, Devin

    2007-01-01

    Preparation of phenylmagnesium bromide described by Eckert, addition of three equivalents of Grignard reagent to diethyl carbonate to form triphenylmethanol and a series of GC-MS procedures that form intermediates. The analysis is consistent with a gas chromatogram and mass spectrum for each of the expected intermediates and final product of the…

  15. Forming a Two-Ring Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon without a Benzene Intermediate: the Reaction of Propargyl with Acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, David; Savee, John; Selby, Talitha; Welz, Oliver; Taatjes, Craig

    The reaction of acetylene (HCCH) with a resonance-stabilized free radical is a commonly invoked mechanism for the generation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), which are likely precursors of soot particles in combustion. In this work, we examine the sequential addition of acetylene to the propargyl radical (H2CCCH) at temperatures of 800 and 1000 K. Using time-resolved multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry with tunable ionizing radiation, we identified the isomeric forms of the C5H5 and C7H7 intermediates in this reaction sequence, and confirmed that the final C9H8 product is the two-ring aromatic compound indene. We identified two different resonance-stabilized C5H5 intermediates, with different temperature dependencies. Furthermore, the C7H7 intermediate is the tropyl radical (c-C7H7) , not the benzyl radical (C6H5CH2) , as is usually assumed in combustion environments. These experimental results are in general agreement with the latest electronic structure / master equation results of da Silva et al. This work shows a pathway for PAH formation that bypasses benzene / benzyl intermediates.

  16. Insights into the carboxyltransferase reaction of pyruvate carboxylase from the structures of bound product and intermediate analogs.

    PubMed

    Lietzan, Adam D; St Maurice, Martin

    2013-11-15

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) is a biotin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the MgATP- and bicarbonate-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in central metabolism. The carboxyltransferase (CT) domain of PC catalyzes the transfer of a carboxyl group from carboxybiotin to the accepting substrate, pyruvate. It has been hypothesized that the reactive enolpyruvate intermediate is stabilized through a bidentate interaction with the metal ion in the CT domain active site. Whereas bidentate ligands are commonly observed in enzymes catalyzing reactions proceeding through an enolpyruvate intermediate, no bidentate interaction has yet been observed in the CT domain of PC. Here, we report three X-ray crystal structures of the Rhizobium etli PC CT domain with the bound inhibitors oxalate, 3-hydroxypyruvate, and 3-bromopyruvate. Oxalate, a stereoelectronic mimic of the enolpyruvate intermediate, does not interact directly with the metal ion. Instead, oxalate is buried in a pocket formed by several positively charged amino acid residues and the metal ion. Furthermore, both 3-hydroxypyruvate and 3-bromopyruvate, analogs of the reaction product oxaloacetate, bind in an identical manner to oxalate suggesting that the substrate maintains its orientation in the active site throughout catalysis. Together, these structures indicate that the substrates, products and intermediates in the PC-catalyzed reaction are not oriented in the active site as previously assumed. The absence of a bidentate interaction with the active site metal appears to be a unique mechanistic feature among the small group of biotin-dependent enzymes that act on α-keto acid substrates. PMID:24157795

  17. Characterization of manganese(V)-oxo polyoxometalate intermediates and their properties in oxygen-transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Khenkin, Alex M; Kumar, Devesh; Shaik, Sason; Neumann, Ronny

    2006-12-01

    A manganese(III)-substituted polyoxometalate, [alpha2-P2MnIII(L)W17O61]7- (P2W17MnIII), was studied as an oxidation catalyst using iodopentafluorobenzene bis(tifluoroacetate) (F5PhI(TFAc)2) as a monooxygen donor. Pink P2W17MnIII turns green upon addition of F5PhI(TFAc)2. The 19F NMR spectrum of F5PhI(TFAc)2 with excess P2W17MnIII at -50 degrees C showed the formation of an intermediate attributed to P2W17MnIII-F5PhI(TFAc)2 that disappeared upon warming. The 31P NMR spectra of P2W17MnIII with excess F5PhI(TFAc)2 at -50 and -20 degrees C showed a pair of narrow peaks attributed to a diamagnetic, singlet manganese(V)-oxo species, P2W17MnV=O. An additional broad peak at -10.6 ppm was attributed to both the P2W17MnIII-F5PhI(TFAc)2 complex and a paramagnetic, triplet manganese(V)-oxo species. The electronic structure and reactivity of P2W17MnV=O were modeled by DFT calculations using the analogous Keggin compound, [PMnV=OW11O39]4-. Calculations with a pure functional, UBLYP, showed singlet and triplet ground states of similar energy. Further calculations using both the UBLYP and UB3LYP functionals for epoxidation and hydroxylation of propene showed lowest lying triplet transition states for both transformations, while singlet and quintet transition states were of higher energy. The calculations especially after corrections for the solvent effect indicate that [PMnV=OW11O39]4- should be highly reactive, even more reactive than analogous MnV=O porphyrin species. Kinetic measurements of the reaction of P2W17MnV=O with 1-octene indicated, however, that P2W17MnV=O was less reactive than a MnV=O porphyrin. The experimental enthalpy of activation confirmed that the energy barrier for epoxidation is low, but the highly negative entropy of activation leads to a high free energy of activation. This result originates in our view from the strong solvation of the highly charged polyoxometalate by the polar solvent used and adventitious water. The higher negative charge of the

  18. Imaging Consecutive Steps of O2 Reaction with Hydroxylated TiO₂(110): Identification of HO₂ and Terminal OH Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Deskins, N. Aaron; Zhang, Zhenrong; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Dupuis, Michel; Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2009-01-15

    We report results of the combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the molecular oxygen reaction with a partially hydroxylated TiO₂(110) surface. The consecutive steps of both primary and secondary site-specific reactions have been tracked with high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). For the first time, we have directly imaged stable, adsorbed hydroperoxyl (HO₂) species, which is believed to be a key intermediate in many heterogeneous photochemical processes but generally metastable and “elusive” until now. We also found terminal hydroxyl groups, another critical but never directly observed intermediates. A conclusive evidence that O₂ reacts spontaneously with a single bridging OH group as an initial reaction step is provided. The experimental results are supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations that have determined species energies and configurations. Reported observations provide a basis for a consistent description of the elementary reaction steps and offer molecular-level insight into the underlying reaction mechanisms. In a broader perspective, the results are expected to have far reaching implications for various catalytic systems involving the interconversion of O₂ and H₂O.

  19. Reactions of acetone oxide stabilized Criegee intermediate with SO2, NO2, H2O and O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukui, Alexandre; Chen, Hui; Xiao, Shan; Mellouki, Wahid; Daële, Veronique

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles represent a critical component of the atmosphere, impacting global climate, regional air pollution, and human health. The formation of new atmospheric particles and their subsequent growth to larger sizes are the key processes for understanding of the aerosol effects. Sulphuric acid, H2SO4, has been identified to play the major role in formation of new atmospheric particles and in subsequent particle growth. Until recently the reaction of OH with SO2 has been considered as the only important source of H2SO4 in the atmosphere. However, recently it has been suggested that the oxidation of SO2 by Criegee biradicals can be a significant additional atmospheric source of H2SO4 comparable with the reaction of SO2 with OH. Here we present some results about the reactions of the acetone oxide stabilized Criegee intermediate, (CH3)2=OO, produced in the reaction of 2,3-dimethyl-butene (TME) with O3. The formation of the H2SO4 in the reaction of acetone oxide with SO2 was investigated in the specially constructed atmospheric pressure laminar flow reactor. The Criegee intermediate was generated by ozonolysis of TME. The H2SO4, generated by addition of SO2, was directly monitored with Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (SAMU, LPC2E). Relative rates of reactions of acetone oxide with SO2, NO2, H2O and ozone were determined from the dependencies of the H2SO4 yield at different concentrations of the reactants. Atmospheric applications of the obtained results are discussed in relation to the importance of this additional H2SO4 formation pathway compared to the reaction of OH with SO2.

  20. Dynamical effects of spin-dependent interactions in low- and intermediate-energy heavy-ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Li, Bao-An; Shen, Wen-Qing; Xia, Yin

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that noncentral nuclear forces, such as the spin-orbital coupling and the tensor force, play important roles in understanding many interesting features of nuclear structures. However, their dynamical effects in nuclear reactions are poorly known because only the spin-averaged observables are normally studied both experimentally and theoretically. Realizing that spin-sensitive observables in nuclear reactions may convey useful information about the in-medium properties of noncentral nuclear interactions, besides earlier studies using the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach to understand the effects of spin-orbital coupling on the threshold energy and spin polarization in fusion reactions, some efforts have been made recently to explore the dynamical effects of noncentral nuclear forces in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions using transport models. The focus of these studies has been on investigating signatures of the density and isospin dependence of the form factor in the spin-dependent single-nucleon potential. Interestingly, some useful probes were identified in the model studies but so far there are still no data to compare with. In this brief review, we summarize the main physics motivations as well as the recent progress in understanding the spin dynamics and identifying spin-sensitive observables in heavy-ion reactions at intermediate energies. We hope the interesting, important, and new physics potentials identified in the spin dynamics of heavy-ion collisions will stimulate more experimental work in this direction.

  1. Detailed mechanism of the CH2I + O2 reaction: Yield and self-reaction of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Wei-Lun; Chang, Chun-Hung; Lee, Yu-Fang; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Lin, Jim-Min, Jr.

    2014-09-01

    The application of a new reaction scheme using CH2I + O2 to generate the simplest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, has stimulated lively research; the Criegee intermediates are extremely important in atmospheric chemistry. The detailed mechanism of CH2I + O2 is hence important in understanding kinetics involving CH2OO. We employed ultraviolet absorption to probe simultaneously CH2I2, CH2OO, CH2I, and IO in the reaction system of CH2I + O2 upon photolysis at 248 nm of a flowing mixture of CH2I2, O2, and N2 (or SF6) in the pressure range 7.6-779 Torr to investigate the reaction kinetics. With a detailed mechanism to model the observed temporal profiles of CH2I, CH2OO, and IO, we found that various channels of the reaction CH2I + O2 and CH2OO + I play important roles; an additional decomposition channel of CH2I + O2 to form products other than CH2OO or ICH2OO becomes important at pressure less than 60 Torr. The pressure dependence of the derived rate coefficients of various channels of reactions of CH2I + O2 and CH2OO + I has been determined. We derived a rate coefficient also for the self-reaction of CH2OO as k = (8 ± 4) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 at 295 K. The yield of CH2OO from CH2I + O2 was found to have a pressure dependence on N2 and O2 smaller than in previous reports; for air under 1 atm, the yield of ˜30% is about twice of previous estimates.

  2. Paramagnetic intermediates in reactions of the components of catalytic systems of the Ziegler type. Reactions of azo and azomethine complexes of Ni(II) with diethylaluminum chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasov, Ya.A.; Ismailov, E.G.; Medzhidov, A.A.

    1988-04-01

    The intermediate paramagnetic particles, i.e., radical particles, complexes of Ni(I), and Ni/sub n/(O) aggregates, formed as a result of the reaction of azo and azomethine complexes of Ni(II) with Et/sub 2/AlCl in solvent media (toluene, THF, heptane) have been identified with the aid of ESR. The possibility of the stabilization of reactive intermediate complexes of Ni(I) by organophosphorus ligands (DPPE and TPP) has been demonstrated, and the magnetic-resonance parameters of their adducts have been determined. It has been postulated that the formation of radical particles occurs as a result of the coordination of the nitrogen atoms of the azo or azomethine ligands by the organoaluminum compound followed by splitting of the -N=N or -CH=N bonds.

  3. Active intermediates of polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase from Aeromonas caviae in polymerization reaction.

    PubMed

    Numata, Keiji; Motoda, Yoko; Watanabe, Satoru; Tochio, Naoya; Kigawa, Takanori; Doi, Yoshiharu

    2012-11-12

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase from Aeromonas caviae FA440 (PhaC(Ac), BAA21815) is one of the most valuable PHA synthase, because of its function to synthesize a practical bioplastic, poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-(R)-3-hydroxyhexanoate] [P(3HB-co-3HHx)]. However, biochemical activity and active intermediates of PhaC(Ac) have not been clarified until now. In the present study, a gene of PhaC(Ac) was cloned and overexpressed by a cell-free protein expression system. Both the polymerization activity and oligomerization behavior of the purified PhaC(Ac) were characterized in order to clarify the active intermediates of PhaC(Ac) based on the hydrodynamic diameters and specific activities of PhaC(Ac). The influences of a substrate, (R)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA (3HB-CoA), on the oligomerization of PhaC(Ac) (7.5 μM) were also investigated, and then the Hill coefficient (n = 2.6 ± 0.4) and the microscopic dissociation constant (K(m) = 77 ± 5 μM) were determined. Based on the results, the active intermediate of PhaC(Ac) was concluded to be the dimeric PhaC(Ac) containing 3HB-CoA as an activator for its dimerization. This information is critical for revealing the relationships between its dimerization and function in PHA synthesis. PMID:23043466

  4. Processes forming Gas, Tar, and Coke in Cellulose Gasification from Gas-Phase Reactions of Levoglucosan as Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Fukutome, Asuka; Kawamoto, Haruo; Saka, Shiro

    2015-07-01

    The gas-phase pyrolysis of levoglucosan (LG), the major intermediate species during cellulose gasification, was studied experimentally over the temperature range of 400-900 °C. Gaseous LG did not produce any dehydration products, which include coke, furans, and aromatic substances, although these are characteristic products of the pyrolysis of molten LG. Alternatively, at >500 °C, gaseous LG produced only fragmentation products, such as noncondensable gases and condensable C1 -C3 fragments, as intermediates during noncondensable gas formation. Therefore, it was determined that secondary reactions of gaseous LG can result in the clean (tar- and coke-free) gasification of cellulose. Cooling of the remaining LG in the gas phase caused coke formation by the transition of the LG to the molten state. The molecular mechanisms that govern the gas- and molten-phase reactions of LG are discussed in terms of the acid catalyst effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding to promote the molten-phase dehydration reactions. PMID:26099988

  5. Liquid-phase hydrogenation of citral over Pt/SiO{sub 2} catalysts. 2. Hydrogenation of reaction intermediate compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, U.K.; Sysak, M.N.; Vannice, M.A.

    2000-04-01

    Liquid-phase hydrogenation of the four principal reaction intermediates formed during citral hydrogenation, i.e., nerol, geraniol, citronellal, and citronellol, was studied at 298 and 373 K under 20 atm H{sub 2} at concentrations of 0.5 to 1.0 M in hexane. A decrease in the initial reaction rate as temperature increased from 298 to 373 K was exhibited during the hydrogenation of all four compounds, just as reported earlier for citral; however, the decrease in rate at 373 K was only one-half for citronellal whereas it was orders of magnitude greater for nerol and geraniol. Furthermore, simultaneous hydrogenation of citronellal and geraniol at 298 K resulted in a continuous decrease in the rate of citronellal disappearance in contrast to the nearly constant rate of disappearance observed during hydrogenation of citronellal alone. Competitive hydrogenation of citral with either geraniol or citronellal showed that geraniol hydrogenation to citronellol is kinetically insignificant during citral hydrogenation at 373 K. The initial activity for hydrogenation of the intermediates at 298 K follows the following trend: geraniol > nerol < citronellol < E-citral, citronellal > Z-citral. Based on the relative hydrogenation rates of the intermediate alone versus its hydrogenation in the presence of other reactants, the relative size of the adsorption equilibrium constants for the various organic compounds appears to be as follows: citral > citronellal > geraniol, nerol > citronellol > 3,7-dimethyloctanol. This study indicates that activation of the C{double_bond}O bond should be performed at higher reaction temperatures to maximize selectivity to the unsaturated alcohols.

  6. Localisation of the sites of action of cadmium on oxidative phosphorylation in potato tuber mitochondria using top-down elasticity analysis.

    PubMed

    Kesseler, A; Brand, M D

    1994-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the significant sites of action of cadmium on oxidative phosphorylation in potato tuber mitocondria. We simplified the system to three convenient subsystems linked via the production or consumption of a common intermediate, namely protonmotive force. The three subsystems were substrate oxidation, which produces protonmotive force, and the proton leak reactions and the phosphorylation reactions, which consume protonmotive force. By measuring the effect of cadmium on the kinetic response of each subsystem to protonmotive force (top-down elasticity analysis), we found that cadmium stimulated proton leak reactions and strongly inhibited substrate oxidation, but had no measurable effect on the phosphorylation reactions. Cadmium therefore decreases the amount of ATP produced/oxygen consumed (the effective P/O ratio) not by inhibiting the phosphorylation reactions directly, but by inhibiting the production of protonmotive force and by diverting proton flux from phosphorylation reactions to the proton leak reactions. PMID:7957227

  7. Probing elastic and inelastic breakup contributions to intermediate-energy two-proton removal reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, K.; Bazin, D.; Gade, A.; Tostevin, J. A.; Baugher, T.; Chajecki, Z.; Coupland, D.; Famiano, M. A.; Ghosh, T. K.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hodges, R.; Howard, M. E.; Kilburn, M.; Lynch, W. G.; Manning, B.; Meierbachtol, K.; Quarterman, P.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Sanetullaev, A.; Stroberg, S. R.; Tsang, M. B.; Weisshaar, D.; Winkelbauer, J.; Winkler, R.; Youngs, M.

    2012-05-01

    The two-proton removal reaction from 28Mg projectiles has been studied at 93 MeV/u. First coincidence measurements of the heavy 26Ne projectile residues, the removed protons, and other light charged particles enabled the relative cross sections from each of the three possible elastic and inelastic proton removal mechanisms to be determined. These more final-state-exclusive measurements are key for further interrogation of these reaction mechanisms and use of the reaction channel for quantitative spectroscopy of very neutron-rich nuclei. The relative and absolute yields of the three contributing mechanisms are compared to reaction model expectations based on the use of eikonal dynamics and sd-shell-model structure amplitudes.

  8. Precursors in the preparation of transition metal nitrides and transition metal carbonitrides and their reaction intermediates

    DOEpatents

    Maya, Leon

    1991-01-01

    A process for making ammonolytic precursors to nitride and carbonitride ceramics. Extreme reaction conditions are not required and the precursor is a powder-like substance that produces ceramics of improved purity and morphology upon pyrolysis.

  9. Process for preparing transition metal nitrides and transition metal carbonitrides and their reaction intermediates

    DOEpatents

    Maya, Leon

    1988-05-24

    A process for making ammonolytic precursors to nitride and carbonitride ceramics. Extreme reaction conditions are not required and the precursor is a powder-like substance that produces ceramics of improved purity and morphology upon pyrolysis.

  10. Energy-loss cross sections for inclusive charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Dubey, Rajendra R.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-exchange reactions for scattering to the continuum are considered in a high-energy multiple scattering model. Calculations for (p,n) and (He-3,H-3) reactions are made and compared with experimental results for C-12, O-16, and Al-27 targets. Coherent effects are shown to lead to an important role for inelastic multiple scattering terms when light projectiles are considered.

  11. Direct evidence for an acyl phosphate intermediate in the folylpoly-. gamma. -glutamate synthetase and dihydrofolate synthetase-catalyzed reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, R.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of the reactions catalyzed by two enzymes, namely dihydrofolate synthetase (DHFS) and folylpoly-..gamma..-glutamate synthetase (FPGS), has been investigated. The nature of the intermediate in each of the two reactions was monitored simultaneously in the multifunctional enzyme, FPGS/DHFS from E. coli. The latter was isolated from a transformant containing the cloned FPGS/DHFS gene. Incubation of (/sup 18/O)-H/sub 2/Pte and (/sup 17/O)-glutamate with ATP and the enzyme, resulted in the formation of (/sup 18/O)- and (/sup 17/O)-P/sub i/, thus providing strong evidence for the formation of an acyl phosphate species during catalysis of each reaction. The inorganic phosphate formed in the enzyme-catalyzed reaction was purified by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, then converted to the trimethyl ester and analyzed by mass spectroscopy /sup 17/O NMR and /sup 31/P NMR. Stoichiometric formation of (/sup 17/O)- and (/sup 18/O)-Pi was observed. /sup 31/P NMR analysis showed the expected /sup 18/O-induced isotopic perturbations. The presence of (/sup 17/O)-trimethyl phosphate was revealed by /sup 17/O NMR. The mechanism of the FPGS-catalyzed reaction was also investigated with the antifolate (/sup 18/O)-methotrexate.

  12. On the chemistry of ethanol on basic oxides: revising mechanisms and intermediates in the Lebedev and Guerbet reactions.

    PubMed

    Chieregato, Alessandro; Velasquez Ochoa, Juliana; Bandinelli, Claudia; Fornasari, Giuseppe; Cavani, Fabrizio; Mella, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    A common way to convert ethanol into chemicals is by upgrading it over oxide catalysts with basic features; this method makes it possible to obtain important chemicals such as 1-butanol (Guerbet reaction) and 1,3-butadiene (Lebedev reaction). Despite their long history in chemistry, the details of the close inter-relationship of these reactions have yet to be discussed properly. Our present study focuses on reactivity tests, in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, MS analysis, and theoretical modeling. We used MgO as a reference catalyst with pure basic features to explore ethanol conversion from its very early stages. Based on the obtained results, we formulate a new mechanistic theory able to explain not only our results but also most of the scientific literature on Lebedev and Guerbet chemistry. This provides a rational description of the intermediates shared by the two reaction pathways as well as an innovative perspective on the catalyst requirements to direct the reaction pathway toward 1-butanol or butadiene. PMID:25504787

  13. Inverse Kinematics Studies of Intermediate-Energy Reactions Relevant for SEE and Medical Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Aichelin, J.; Bargholtz, Ch.; Geren, L.; Tegner, P.-E.; Zartova, I.; Blomgren, J.; Olsson, N.; Budzanowski, A.; Czech, B.; Skwirczynska, I.; Chubarov, M.; Lozhkin, O.; Murin, Yu.; Pljuschev, V.; Zubkov, M.; Ekstroem, C.; Kolozhvari, A.; Persson, H.; Westerberg, L.; Jakobsson, B.

    2005-05-24

    The lack of systematic experimental checks on the intermediate-energy nuclear model simulations of heavily ionizing recoils from nucleon-nucleus collisions -- critical inputs for the Single Event Effect analysis of microelectronics and dosimetry calculations including high-LET components in the cancer tumor radiation therapy -- has been a primary motivation for a new experiment planned at the CELSIUS nuclear storage ring of The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden. Details of the experiment and the first results from a feasibility study are presented here.

  14. Studies of the primary oxygen intermediate in the reaction of fully reduced cytochrome oxidase.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, R S; Greenwood, C; Gibson, Q H

    1991-10-15

    The formation and disappearance of a photosensitive species during the reaction of reduced cytochrome c oxidase (putatively a3II.O2), EC 1.9.3.1, has been followed by (a) mixing a3II.CO with O2 in a stopped flow apparatus; (b) initiating the oxygen-oxidase reaction by removing CO with a laser flash; (c) probing the reaction mixture for photosensitivity with a second laser flash. Photosensitivity appears in the reaction mixture after the first laser flash, reaches a maximum after 50-60 microseconds ([O2] greater than 100 microM), and disappears in a further 50-100 microseconds. The kinetics can be represented by the scheme [formula: see text]. In species B, O2 is associated with the protein, possibly CuB, but not with the heme. Species C is the photosensitive a3II.O2 complex, and in D, a3 iron has been oxidized. The formation of species C is responsible for the rapid phase of absorbance change in the oxidase-oxygen reaction. The rate of reaction with oxygen approaches the limit of 35,000 s-1 at high oxygen. Nitric oxide, however, reacts with FeII oxidase with a rate of 1 x 10(8) M-1 s-1, which is accurately maintained up to an observed rate of 10(5) s-1. In flash photolysis experiments, approximately half of the photodissociated nitric oxidase recombines in a biphasic geminate reaction with rates of 1 x 10(8) s-1 and 1 x 10(7) s-1. PMID:1655779

  15. Synthesis of Y1BaCu3O(x) superconducting powders by intermediate phase reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moure, C.; Fernandez, J. F.; Tartaj, J.; Recio, P.; Duran, P.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for synthesizing Y1Ba2Cu3O(x) by solid state reactions was developed. The method is based on the use of barium compounds, previously synthesized, as intermediate phases for the process. The reaction kinetics of this procedure were established between 860 C and 920 C. The crystal structure and the presence of second phases were studied by means of XRD. The sintering behavior and ceramic parameters were also determined. The orthorhombic type-I structure was obtained on the synthesized bodies after a cooling cycle in an air atmosphere. Superconducting transition took place at 91 K. Sintering densities higher than 95 percent D sub th were attained at temperatures below 940 C.

  16. Fear load: The psychophysiological over-expression of fear as an intermediate phenotype associated with trauma reactions.

    PubMed

    Norrholm, Seth Davin; Glover, Ebony M; Stevens, Jennifer S; Fani, Negar; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J; Jovanovic, Tanja

    2015-11-01

    Psychophysiological measures of fear expression provide observable intermediate phenotypes of fear-related symptoms. Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) advocate using neurobiological intermediate phenotypes that provide dimensional correlates of psychopathology. Negative Valence Systems in the RDoC matrix include the construct of acute threat, which can be measured on a physiological level using potentiation of the acoustic startle reflex assessed via electromyography recordings of the orbicularis oculi muscle. Impairments in extinction of fear-potentiated startle due to high levels of fear (termed fear load) during the early phases of extinction have been observed in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The goals of the current work were to examine dimensional associations between fear-related symptoms of PTSD and fear load variables to test their validity as an intermediate phenotype. We examined extinction of fear-potentiated startle in a cohort (n=269) of individuals with a broad range of civilian trauma exposure (range 0-13 traumatic events per person, mean=3.5). Based on previously reported findings, we hypothesized that fear load would be significantly associated with intrusion and fear memories of an index traumatic event. The results indicated that early extinction was correlated with intrusive thoughts (p=0.0007) and intense physiological reactions to trauma reminders (p=0.036). Degree of adult or childhood trauma exposure, and depression severity were not associated with fear load. After controlling for age, sex, race, income, level of prior trauma, and level of fear conditioning, fear load during extinction was still significantly predictive of intrusive thoughts (p=0.004). The significance of these findings is that they support dimensional associations with symptom severity rather than diagnostic category and, as such, fear load may emerge as a transdiagnostic intermediate phenotype expressed across fear-related disorders (e.g., specific phobia, social

  17. High Resolution Reaction Intermediates of rabbit Muscle Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate Aldolase: Substrate Cleavage and Induced Fit

    SciTech Connect

    St-Jean,M.; Lafrance-Vanasse, J.; Liotard, B.; Sygusch, J.

    2005-01-01

    Crystal structures were determined to 1.8-Angstrom resolution of the glycolytic enzyme fructose-1, 6-bis(phosphate) aldolase trapped in complex with its substrate and a competitive inhibitor, mannitol-1, 6-bis(phosphate). The enzyme substrate complex corresponded to the postulated Schiff base intermediate and has reaction geometry consistent with incipient C3-C4 bond cleavage catalyzed by Glu-187, which is adjacent to the Schiff base forming Lys-229. Atom arrangement about the cleaved bond in the reaction intermediate mimics a pericyclic transition state occurring in non-enzymatic aldol condensations. Lys-146 hydrogen bonds the substrate C4 hydroxyl and assists substrate cleavage by stabilizing the developing negative charge on the C4 hydroxyl during proton abstraction. Mannitol-1, 6-bis(phosphate) forms a non-covalent complex in the active site whose binding geometry mimics the covalent carbinolamine precursor. Glu-187 hydrogen bonds the C2 hydroxyl of the inhibitor in the enzyme complex substantiating a proton transfer role by Glu-187 in catalyzing the conversion of the carbinolamine intermediate to Schiff base. Modeling of the acyclic substrate configuration into the active site shows Glu-187, in acid form, hydrogen bonding both substrate C2 carbonyl and C4 hydroxyl, thereby aligning the substrate ketose for nucleophilic attack by Lys-229. The multi-functional role by Glu-187 epitomizes a canonical mechanistic feature conserved in Schiff base forming aldolases catalyzing carbohydrate metabolism. Trapping of tagatose-1, 6-bis(phosphate), a diastereoisomer of fructose-1, 6-bis(phosphate), displayed stereospecific discrimination and reduced ketohexose binding specificity. Each ligand induces homologous conformational changes in two adjacent a-helical regions that promote phosphate binding in the active site.

  18. Hydrogen bonding to the cysteine ligand of superoxide reductase: acid-base control of the reaction intermediates.

    PubMed

    Tremey, Emilie; Bonnot, Florence; Moreau, Yohann; Berthomieu, Catherine; Desbois, Alain; Favaudon, Vincent; Blondin, Geneviève; Houée-Levin, Chantal; Nivière, Vincent

    2013-10-01

    Superoxide reductase (SOR) is a non-heme iron metalloenzyme that detoxifies superoxide radical in microorganisms. Its active site consists of an unusual non-heme Fe(2+) center in a [His4Cys1] square pyramidal pentacoordination, with the axial cysteine ligand proposed to be an essential feature in catalysis. Two NH peptide groups from isoleucine 118 and histidine 119 establish hydrogen bonds involving the sulfur ligand (Desulfoarculus baarsii SOR numbering). To investigate the catalytic role of these hydrogen bonds, the isoleucine 118 residue of the SOR from Desulfoarculus baarsii was mutated into alanine, aspartate, or serine residues. Resonance Raman spectroscopy showed that the mutations specifically induced an increase of the strength of the Fe(3+)-S(Cys) and S-Cβ(Cys) bonds as well as a change in conformation of the cysteinyl side chain, which was associated with the alteration of the NH hydrogen bonding involving the sulfur ligand. The effects of the isoleucine mutations on the reactivity of SOR with O2 (•-) were investigated by pulse radiolysis. These studies showed that the mutations induced a specific increase of the pK a of the first reaction intermediate, recently proposed to be an Fe(2+)-O2 (•-) species. These data were supported by density functional theory calculations conducted on three models of the Fe(2+)-O2 (•-) intermediate, with one, two, or no hydrogen bonds involving the sulfur ligand. Our results demonstrated that the hydrogen bonds between the NH (peptide) and the cysteine ligand tightly control the rate of protonation of the Fe(2+)-O2 (•-) reaction intermediate to form an Fe(3+)-OOH species. PMID:23917995

  19. Vibrational spectrum of the lumi intermediate in the room temperature rhodopsin photo-reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Ujj, L; Jäger, F; Atkinson, G H

    1998-01-01

    The vibrational spectrum (650-1750 cm(-1)) of the lumi-rhodopsin (lumi) intermediate formed in the microsecond time regime of the room-temperature rhodopsin (RhRT) photoreaction is measured for the first time using picosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (PTR/CARS). The vibrational spectrum of lumi is recorded 2.5 micros after the 3-ps, 500-nm excitation of RhRT. Complementary to Fourier transform infrared spectra recorded at Rh sample temperatures low enough to freeze lumi, these PTR/CARS results provide the first detailed view of the vibrational degrees of freedom of room-temperature lumi (lumiRT) through the identification of 21 bands. The exceptionally low intensity (compared to those observed in bathoRT) of the hydrogen out-of-plane (HOOP) bands, the moderate intensity and absolute positions of C-C stretching bands, and the presence of high-intensity C==C stretching bands suggest that lumiRT contains an almost planar (nontwisting), all-trans retinal geometry. Independently, the 944-cm(-1) position of the most intense HOOP band implies that a resonance coupling exists between the out-of-plane retinal vibrations and at least one group among the amino acids comprising the retinal binding pocket. The formation of lumiRT, monitored via PTR/CARS spectra recorded on the nanosecond time scale, can be associated with the decay of the blue-shifted intermediate (BSI(RT)) formed in equilibrium with the bathoRT intermediate. PTR/CARS spectra measured at a 210-ns delay contain distinct vibrational features attributable to BSI(RT), which suggest that the all-trans retinal in both BSI(RT) and lumiRT is strongly coupled to part of the retinal binding pocket. With regard to the energy storage/transduction mechanism in RhRT, these results support the hypothesis that during the formation of lumiRT, the majority of the photon energy absorbed by RhRT transfers to the apoprotein opsin. PMID:9512045

  20. Momentum distributions in stripping reactions of radioactive projectiles at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertulani, C. A.; Hansen, P. G.

    2004-09-01

    The theory of one-nucleon removal in the stripping reaction (inelastic breakup) on a light target is extended to cover two-dimensional momentum distributions of the reaction residues with the use of realistic profile functions for the core-target and nucleon-target interactions. Examples of the calculated projected parallel- and transverse momentum distributions are given. The transverse momentum distributions, projections on a Cartesian axis perpendicular to the beam direction, show an interesting intermingling of the stripping reaction with elastic scattering of the reaction residue on the target. We also obtain doubly differential distributions of the cross section on the parallel- and transverse-momentum variables. The distributions depend strongly on the value of the magnetic quantum number m . They will be of importance for evaluating acceptance corrections in experiments, and they lead to alignment with the possibility of anisotropic emission of subsequent gamma rays, an interesting spectroscopic tool. Experimental data for proton stripping of 8B agree with our calculations.

  1. A Pivotal Heme-transfer Reaction Intermediate in Cytochrome c Biogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Mavridou, Despoina A. I.; Stevens, Julie M.; Mönkemeyer, Leonie; Daltrop, Oliver; di Gleria, Katalin; Kessler, Benedikt M.; Ferguson, Stuart J.; Allen, James W. A.

    2012-01-01

    c-Type cytochromes are widespread proteins, fundamental for respiration or photosynthesis in most cells. They contain heme covalently bound to protein in a highly conserved, highly stereospecific post-translational modification. In many bacteria, mitochondria, and archaea this heme attachment is catalyzed by the cytochrome c maturation (Ccm) proteins. Here we identify and characterize a covalent, ternary complex between the heme chaperone CcmE, heme, and cytochrome c. Formation of the complex from holo-CcmE occurs in vivo and in vitro and involves the specific heme-binding residues of both CcmE and apocytochrome c. The enhancement and attenuation of the amounts of this complex correlates completely with known consequences of mutations in genes for other Ccm proteins. We propose the complex is a trapped catalytic intermediate in the cytochrome c biogenesis process, at the point of heme transfer from CcmE to the cytochrome, the key step in the maturation pathway. PMID:22121193

  2. Nuclear spin polarization following intermediate-energy heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Groh, D. E.; Pinter, J. S.; Mantica, P. F.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Khoa, D. T.

    2007-11-15

    Intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions can produce a spin polarization of the projectile-like species. Spin polarization has been observed for both nucleon removal and nucleon pickup processes. Qualitative agreement with measured spin polarization as a function of the momentum of the projectile-like fragment is found in a kinematic model that considers conservation of linear and angular momentum and assumes peripheral interactions between the fast projectile and target. Better quantitative agreement was reached by including more realistic angular distributions and deorientation caused by {gamma}-ray emission and by correcting for the out-of-plane acceptance. The newly introduced corrections were found to apply to both nucleon removal and nucleon pickup processes.

  3. Workshop on hadron structure from photo-reactions at intermediate energies: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan, A.M.; Sandorfi, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: The proton compton effect: Recent measurements of the electric and magnetic polorizabilities of the proton; experiments on the electric polarizability of the neutron; chiral symmetry and nucleon polarizabilities; chiral model predictions for electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon, a consumer report; the polarizabilities of bound nucleons; nucleon polarizability in free space and in nuclear matter; mechanisms of photon scattering on nucleons at intermediate energies; pion polarizabilities in chiral perturbation theory; pion polarizabilities and the shielding of [sigma](700)-meson exchange in [gamma][gamma][yields][pi][pi] processes; pion and kaon polarizabilities in the quark confinement model; radiative pion photoproduction and pion polarizabilities; pion and sigma polarizabilities and radiative transitions; the quadrupole amplitude in the [gamma][Nu]-[Delta] transition; pion photoproduction and the [gamma][Nu]-[Delta] amplitudes; effective- lagrangians, Watson's theorem, and the E2/M1 mixing ratio in the excitation of the delta resonance; new measurements of the p([rvec [gamma

  4. Neutral Current Neutrino-{sup 116}Cd Reaction Cross Sections at Low and Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Balasi, K. G.; Kosmas, T. S.; Divari, P. C.; Chasioti, V. C.

    2008-01-24

    Differential and integrated cross sections for inelastic scattering of electron neutrinos from a {sup 116}Cd target at low and intermediate neutrino energies ({epsilon}{sub i}{<=}100 MeV) are presented. The nuclear wave functions for the initial and final nuclear states are constructed in the context of quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). By exploiting the results of these cross sections, we study the response of {sup 116}Cd to supernova neutrino spectra by utilizing the folding procedure and employing a two-parameter Fermi-Dirac distribution for the supernova neutrino spectra. Our results show that, this isotope may play a significant role in supernova neutrino detection, in addition to its use in double-beta-decay experiments (COBRA, etc)

  5. Intermediate-scale sodium-concrete reaction tests with basalt and limestone concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Hassberger, J.A.; Muhlestein, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    Ten tests were performed to investigate the chemical reactions and rate and extent of attack between sodium and basalt and limestone concretes. Test temperatures ranged from 510 to 870/sup 0/C (950 to 1600/sup 0/F) and test times from 2 to 24 hours. Sodium hydroxide was added to some of the tests to assess the impact of a sodium hydroxide-aided reaction on the overall penetration characteristics. Data suggest that the sodium penetration of concrete surfaces is limited. Penetration of basalt concrete in the presence of sodium hydroxide is shown to be less severe than attack by the metallic sodium alone. Presence of sodium hydroxide changes the characteristics of sodium penetration of limestone concrete, but no major differences in bulk penetration were observed as compared to penetration by metallic sodium.

  6. Sensitivity of the blue loops of intermediate-mass stars to nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Halabi, Ghina M.; El Eid, Mounib

    2012-11-20

    We investigate the effects of a modification of the {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}){sup 15}O reaction rate, as suggested by recent evaluations, on the formation and extension of the blue loops encountered during the evolution of the stars in the mass range 5M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator} to 12M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }. We show that the blue loops of stars in the mass range 5M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator} to 8M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }, that is the range of super ABG stars, are severely affected by a modification of the important {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}){sup 15}O reaction rate. We also show that the blue loops can be restored if envelope overshooting is included, which is necessary to explain the observations of the Cepheid stars.

  7. Investigation of the O+allyl addition/elimination reaction pathways from the OCH(2)CHCH(2) radical intermediate.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Benjamin L; Lau, Kai-Chung; Butler, Laurie J; Lee, Shih-Huang; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2008-08-28

    These experiments study the preparation of and product channels resulting from OCH(2)CHCH(2), a key radical intermediate in the O+allyl bimolecular reaction. The data include velocity map imaging and molecular beam scattering results to probe the photolytic generation of the radical intermediate and the subsequent pathways by which the radicals access the energetically allowed product channels of the bimolecular reaction. The photodissociation of epichlorohydrin at 193.3 nm produces chlorine atoms and c-OCH(2)CHCH(2) radicals; these undergo a facile ring opening to the OCH(2)CHCH(2) radical intermediate. State-selective resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection resolves the velocity distributions of ground and spin-orbit excited state chlorine independently, allowing for a more accurate determination of the internal energy distribution of the nascent radicals. We obtain good agreement detecting the velocity distributions of the Cl atoms with REMPI, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization at 13.8 eV, and electron bombardment ionization; all show a bimodal distribution of recoil kinetic energies. The dominant high recoil kinetic energy feature peaks near 33 kcalmol. To elucidate the product channels resulting from the OCH(2)CHCH(2) radical intermediate, the crossed laser-molecular beam experiment uses VUV photoionization and detects the velocity distribution of the possible products. The data identify the three dominant product channels as C(3)H(4)O (acrolein)+H, C(2)H(4)+HCO (formyl radical), and H(2)CO (formaldehyde)+C(2)H(3). A small signal from C(2)H(2)O (ketene) product is also detected. The measured velocity distributions and relative signal intensities at me=27, 28, and 29 at two photoionization energies show that the most exothermic product channel, C(2)H(5)+CO, does not contribute significantly to the product branching. The higher internal energy onset of the acrolein+H product channel is consistent with the relative barriers en route to

  8. [Ligand intermediates in metal-catalyzed reactions]. Progress report, July 1, 1989--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This report consists of sections on sigma bond complexes of alkenes, a new carbon-hydrogen bond activation reaction of alkene complexes, carbon-hydrogen bond migrations in alkylidene complexes, carbon- hydrogen bond migrations in alkyne complexes, synthesis, structure and reactivity of C{sub x} complexes, synthesis and reactivity of alcohol and ether complexes, new catalysts for the epimerization of secondary alcohols; carbon-hydrogen bond activation in alkoxide complexes, pi/sigma equilibria in metal/O=CXX` complexes, and other hydrocarbon ligands; miscellaneous.(WET)

  9. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. [Annual] progress report, August 1, 1989--July 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1992-07-31

    Conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used to study the intermediates involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. These intermediates were excited state of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and species formed in reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern was the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes. (DLC)

  10. Structure of Naegleria Tet-like dioxygenase (NgTet1) in complexes with a reaction intermediate 5-hydroxymethylcytosine DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Pais, June E.; Dai, Nan; Corrêa, Ivan R.; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Yu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    The family of ten-eleven translocation (Tet) dioxygenases is widely distributed across the eukaryotic tree of life, from mammals to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi. Like mammalian Tet proteins, the Naegleria Tet-like protein, NgTet1, acts on 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and generates 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in three consecutive, Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxidation reactions. The two intermediates, 5hmC and 5fC, could be considered either as the reaction product of the previous enzymatic cycle or the substrate for the next cycle. Here we present a new crystal structure of NgTet1 in complex with DNA containing a 5hmC. Along with the previously solved NgTet1–5mC structure, the two complexes offer a detailed picture of the active site at individual stages of the reaction cycle. In the crystal, the hydroxymethyl (OH-CH2-) moiety of 5hmC points to the metal center, representing the reaction product of 5mC hydroxylation. The hydroxyl oxygen atom could be rotated away from the metal center, to a hydrophobic pocket formed by Ala212, Val293 and Phe295. Such rotation turns the hydroxyl oxygen atom away from the product conformation, and exposes the target CH2 towards the metal-ligand water molecule, where a dioxygen O2 molecule would occupy to initiate the next round of reaction by abstracting a hydrogen atom from the substrate. The Ala212-to-Val (A212V) mutant profoundly limits the product to 5hmC, probably because the reduced hydrophobic pocket size restricts the binding of 5hmC as a substrate. PMID:26323320

  11. Structure of Naegleria Tet-like dioxygenase (NgTet1) in complexes with a reaction intermediate 5-hydroxymethylcytosine DNA

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Pais, June E.; Dai, Nan; Corrêa, Jr., Ivan R.; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Yu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-08-31

    The family of ten-eleven translocation (Tet) dioxygenases is widely distributed across the eukaryotic tree of life, from mammals to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi. Like mammalian Tet proteins, the Naegleria Tet-like protein, NgTet1, acts on 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and generates 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in three consecutive, Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxidation reactions. The two intermediates, 5hmC and 5fC, could be considered either as the reaction product of the previous enzymatic cycle or the substrate for the next cycle. Here we present a new crystal structure of NgTet1 in complex with DNA containing a 5hmC. Along with the previously solvedmore » NgTet1–5mC structure, the two complexes offer a detailed picture of the active site at individual stages of the reaction cycle. In the crystal, the hydroxymethyl (OH-CH2-) moiety of 5hmC points to the metal center, representing the reaction product of 5mC hydroxylation. The hydroxyl oxygen atom could be rotated away from the metal center, to a hydrophobic pocket formed by Ala212, Val293 and Phe295. Such rotation turns the hydroxyl oxygen atom away from the product conformation, and exposes the target CH2 towards the metal-ligand water molecule, where a dioxygen O2 molecule would occupy to initiate the next round of reaction by abstracting a hydrogen atom from the substrate. The Ala212-to-Val (A212V) mutant profoundly limits the product to 5hmC, probably due to the reduced hydrophobic pocket size restricts the binding of 5hmC as a substrate.« less

  12. Structure of Naegleria Tet-like dioxygenase (NgTet1) in complexes with a reaction intermediate 5-hydroxymethylcytosine DNA.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Pais, June E; Dai, Nan; Corrêa, Ivan R; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Yu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-12-15

    The family of ten-eleven translocation (Tet) dioxygenases is widely distributed across the eukaryotic tree of life, from mammals to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi. Like mammalian Tet proteins, the Naegleria Tet-like protein, NgTet1, acts on 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and generates 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in three consecutive, Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxidation reactions. The two intermediates, 5hmC and 5fC, could be considered either as the reaction product of the previous enzymatic cycle or the substrate for the next cycle. Here we present a new crystal structure of NgTet1 in complex with DNA containing a 5hmC. Along with the previously solved NgTet1-5mC structure, the two complexes offer a detailed picture of the active site at individual stages of the reaction cycle. In the crystal, the hydroxymethyl (OH-CH2-) moiety of 5hmC points to the metal center, representing the reaction product of 5mC hydroxylation. The hydroxyl oxygen atom could be rotated away from the metal center, to a hydrophobic pocket formed by Ala212, Val293 and Phe295. Such rotation turns the hydroxyl oxygen atom away from the product conformation, and exposes the target CH2 towards the metal-ligand water molecule, where a dioxygen O2 molecule would occupy to initiate the next round of reaction by abstracting a hydrogen atom from the substrate. The Ala212-to-Val (A212V) mutant profoundly limits the product to 5hmC, probably because the reduced hydrophobic pocket size restricts the binding of 5hmC as a substrate. PMID:26323320

  13. Reactivity and reaction intermediates for acetic acid adsorbed on CeO2(111)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Calaza, Florencia C.; Chen, Tsung -Liang; Mullins, David R.; Xu, Ye; Steven H. Overbury

    2015-05-02

    Adsorption and reaction of acetic acid on a CeO2(1 1 1) surface was studied by a combination of ultra-highvacuum based methods including temperature desorption spectroscopy (TPD), soft X-ray photoelectronspectroscopy (sXPS), near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and reflection absorption IRspectroscopy (RAIRS), together with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. TPD shows that thedesorption products are strongly dependent upon the initial oxidation state of the CeO2 surface, includingselectivity between acetone and acetaldehyde products. The combination of sXPS and NEXAFS demon-strate that acetate forms upon adsorption at low temperature and is stable to above 500 K, above whichpoint ketene, acetone and acetic acidmore » desorb. Furthermore, DFT and RAIRS show that below 500 K, bridge bondedacetate coexists with a moiety formed by adsorption of an acetate at an oxygen vacancy, formed bywater desorption.« less

  14. Reactivity and reaction intermediates for acetic acid adsorbed on CeO2(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Calaza, Florencia C.; Chen, Tsung -Liang; Mullins, David R.; Xu, Ye; Steven H. Overbury

    2015-05-02

    Adsorption and reaction of acetic acid on a CeO2(1 1 1) surface was studied by a combination of ultra-highvacuum based methods including temperature desorption spectroscopy (TPD), soft X-ray photoelectronspectroscopy (sXPS), near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and reflection absorption IRspectroscopy (RAIRS), together with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. TPD shows that thedesorption products are strongly dependent upon the initial oxidation state of the CeO2 surface, includingselectivity between acetone and acetaldehyde products. The combination of sXPS and NEXAFS demon-strate that acetate forms upon adsorption at low temperature and is stable to above 500 K, above whichpoint ketene, acetone and acetic acid desorb. Furthermore, DFT and RAIRS show that below 500 K, bridge bondedacetate coexists with a moiety formed by adsorption of an acetate at an oxygen vacancy, formed bywater desorption.

  15. Mechanistic studies on a Cu-catalyzed aerobic oxidative coupling reaction with N-phenyl tetrahydroisoquinoline: structure of intermediates and the role of methanol as a solvent.

    PubMed

    Boess, Esther; Sureshkumar, Devarajulu; Sud, Abhishek; Wirtz, Cornelia; Farès, Christophe; Klussmann, Martin

    2011-06-01

    The mechanism of an aerobic copper-catalyzed oxidative coupling reaction with N-phenyl tetrahydroisoquinoline was investigated. The oxidized species formed from the reaction of the amine with the copper catalyst were analyzed by NMR-spectroscopy. An iminium dichlorocuprate was found to be the reactive intermediate and could be structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. The effect of methanol to effectively stabilize the iminium ion was investigated and shown to be beneficial in an oxidative allylation reaction. PMID:21561084

  16. Characterization of the peroxidase mechanism upon reaction of prostacyclin synthase with peracetic acid. Identification of a tyrosyl radical intermediate.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hui-Chun; Gerfen, Gary J; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Tsai, Ah-Lim; Wang, Lee-Ho

    2009-02-10

    Prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) is a membrane-bound class III cytochrome P450 that catalyzes an isomerization of prostaglandin H(2), an endoperoxide, to prostacyclin. We report here the characterization of the PGIS intermediates in reactions with other peroxides, peracetic acid (PA), and iodosylbenzene. Rapid-scan stopped-flow experiments revealed an intermediate with an absorption spectrum similar to that of compound ES (Cpd ES), which is an oxo-ferryl (Fe(IV)O) plus a protein-derived radical. Cpd ES, formed upon reaction with PA, has an X-band (9 GHz) EPR signal of g = 2.0047 and a half-saturation power, P(1/2), of 0.73 mW. High-field (130 GHz) EPR reveals the presence of two species of tyrosyl radicals in Cpd ES with their g-tensor components (g(x), g(y), g(z)) of 2.00970, 2.00433, 2.00211 and 2.00700, 2.00433, 2.00211 at a 1:2 ratio, indicating that one is involved in hydrogen bonding and the other is not. The line width of the g = 2 signal becomes narrower, while its P(1/2) value becomes smaller as the reaction proceeds, indicating migration of the unpaired electron to an alternative site. The rate of electron migration ( approximately 0.2 s(-1)) is similar to that of heme bleaching, suggesting the migration is associated with the enzymatic inactivation. Moreover, a g = 6 signal that is presumably a high-spin ferric species emerges after the appearance of the amino acid radical and subsequently decays at a rate comparable to that of enzymatic inactivation. This loss of the g = 6 species thus likely indicates another pathway leading to enzymatic inactivation. The inactivation, however, was prevented by the exogenous reductant guaiacol. The studies of PGIS with PA described herein provide a mechanistic model of a peroxidase reaction catalyzed by the class III cytochromes P450. PMID:19187034

  17. Reactions of Atmospheric Particulate Stabilized Criegee Intermediates Lead to High-Molecular-Weight Aerosol Components.

    PubMed

    Wang, MingYi; Yao, Lei; Zheng, Jun; Wang, XinKe; Chen, JianMin; Yang, Xin; Worsnop, Douglas R; Donahue, Neil M; Wang, Lin

    2016-06-01

    Aging of organic aerosol particles is one of the most poorly understood topics in atmospheric aerosol research. Here, we used an aerosol flow tube together with an iodide-adduct high-resolution time-of-flight chemical-ionization mass spectrometer equipped with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO-HRToF-CIMS) to investigate heterogeneous ozonolysis of oleic acid (OL), developing a comprehensive oxidation mechanism with observed products. In addition to the well-known first-generation C9 products including nonanal, nonanoic acid, azelaic acid, and 9-oxononanoic acid, the iodide-adduct chemical ionization permitted unambiguous determination of a large number of high-molecular-weight particulate products up to 670 Da with minimum amounts of fragmentation. These high-molecular-weight products are characterized by a fairly uniform carbon oxidation state but stepwise addition of a carbon backbone moiety, and hence continuous decrease in the volatility. Our results demonstrate that heterogeneous oxidation of organic aerosols has a significant effect on the physiochemical properties of organic aerosols and that reactions of particulate SCIs from ozonolysis of an unsaturated particulate species represent a previously underappreciated mechanism that lead to formation of high-molecular-weight particulate products that are stable under typical atmospheric conditions. PMID:27186797

  18. A novel and facile decay path of Criegee intermediates by intramolecular insertion reactions via roaming transition states.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trong-Nghia; Putikam, Raghunath; Lin, M C

    2015-03-28

    We have discovered a new and highly competitive product channel in the unimolecular decay process for small Criegee intermediates, CH2OO and anti/syn-CH3C(H)OO, occurring by intramolecular insertion reactions via a roaming-like transition state (TS) based on quantum-chemical calculations. Our results show that in the decomposition of CH2OO and anti-CH3C(H)OO, the predominant paths directly produce cis-HC(O)OH and syn-CH3C(O)OH acids with >110 kcal/mol exothermicities via loose roaming-like insertion TSs involving the terminal O atom and the neighboring C-H bonds. For syn-CH3C(H)OO, the major decomposition channel occurs by abstraction of a H atom from the CH3 group by the terminal O atom producing CH2C(H)O-OH. At 298 K, the intramolecular insertion process in CH2OO was found to be 600 times faster than the commonly assumed ring-closing reaction. PMID:25833584

  19. A novel and facile decay path of Criegee intermediates by intramolecular insertion reactions via roaming transition states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Trong-Nghia; Putikam, Raghunath; Lin, M. C.

    2015-03-01

    We have discovered a new and highly competitive product channel in the unimolecular decay process for small Criegee intermediates, CH2OO and anti/syn-CH3C(H)OO, occurring by intramolecular insertion reactions via a roaming-like transition state (TS) based on quantum-chemical calculations. Our results show that in the decomposition of CH2OO and anti-CH3C(H)OO, the predominant paths directly produce cis-HC(O)OH and syn-CH3C(O)OH acids with >110 kcal/mol exothermicities via loose roaming-like insertion TSs involving the terminal O atom and the neighboring C-H bonds. For syn-CH3C(H)OO, the major decomposition channel occurs by abstraction of a H atom from the CH3 group by the terminal O atom producing CH2C(H)O-OH. At 298 K, the intramolecular insertion process in CH2OO was found to be 600 times faster than the commonly assumed ring-closing reaction.

  20. A novel and facile decay path of Criegee intermediates by intramolecular insertion reactions via roaming transition states

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Trong-Nghia; Putikam, Raghunath; Lin, M. C.

    2015-03-28

    We have discovered a new and highly competitive product channel in the unimolecular decay process for small Criegee intermediates, CH{sub 2}OO and anti/syn-CH{sub 3}C(H)OO, occurring by intramolecular insertion reactions via a roaming-like transition state (TS) based on quantum-chemical calculations. Our results show that in the decomposition of CH{sub 2}OO and anti-CH{sub 3}C(H)OO, the predominant paths directly produce cis-HC(O)OH and syn-CH{sub 3}C(O)OH acids with >110 kcal/mol exothermicities via loose roaming-like insertion TSs involving the terminal O atom and the neighboring C–H bonds. For syn-CH{sub 3}C(H)OO, the major decomposition channel occurs by abstraction of a H atom from the CH{sub 3} group by the terminal O atom producing CH{sub 2}C(H)O–OH. At 298 K, the intramolecular insertion process in CH{sub 2}OO was found to be 600 times faster than the commonly assumed ring-closing reaction.

  1. Mechanistic origins of chemo- and regioselectivity of Ru(II)-catalyzed reactions involving ortho-alkenylarylacetylene, alkyne, and methanol: the crucial role of a chameleon-like intermediate.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yanfeng; Qu, Shuanglin; Tao, Yuan; Song, Chunyu; Wang, Zhi-Xiang

    2014-10-01

    M06-DFT computations have been applied to understand four catalytic systems which involved [Ru(Cp*)(MeCN)3]PF6 or [Ru(Tp)(PPh3)(MeCN)2]PF6 as mediator and ortho-alkenylarylacetylene, terminal alkyne, and methanol as reactants. Potentially, the products of these systems could be dihydrobiphenylenes, 1,3-dienyl ether, and naphthalene. Remarkably, each system afforded product selectively. Our computed mechanisms successfully account for the chemo- and regioselectivities of these systems. Furthermore, the study demonstrates that the chameleon-like mono(carbene) intermediates formed via the intermolecular alkyne-alkyne oxidative coupling play a crucial role to complete the reactions. According to their geometric and electronic structures, three resonance structures were introduced to characterize their reactivity properties, which address the features of the classical alkyne-alkyne oxidative coupling intermediates, mono(carbene) species, and electrophilicity of the intermediates, respectively. The reactivity properties lead to three channels isomerizing the intermediates to three isomers. Surprisingly, the bis(carbene) isomers, which are similar to the bis(carbene) intermediates generally considered to be crucial in the neutral RuCp*Cl-catalyzed systems, are accessible but not reactive enough to continue the subsequent reaction steps partially due to aromaticity. The other two isomers continue subsequent reaction steps. These findings may help not only to understand the four specific catalytic reactions but also to advance the [2 + 2 + 2] synthetic methodology. PMID:25222525

  2. Understanding the reaction mechanism and intermediate stabilization in mammalian serine racemase using multiscale quantum-classical simulations.

    PubMed

    Nitoker, Neta; Major, Dan Thomas

    2015-01-20

    Serine racemase (SerR) is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme catalyzing the racemization of l-Ser to d-Ser. In mammals, d-Ser is an endogenous coagonist required for the activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), thus making SerR a promising pharmaceutical target. However, mechanistic studies of SerR are scarce, and the details of the enzymatic racemization reaction are not fully understood. In the current study we elucidate the catalytic mechanism in SerR by employing combined multiscale classical/quantum simulations. The free energy profile of a model SerR racemization reaction is first calculated in the gas phase and in aqueous solution. To obtain the free energy profile for the enzymatic reaction, hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with umbrella sampling are performed. The results suggest that in SerR, similarly to the related enzyme alanine racemase, the unprotonated PLP-substrate intermediate is stabilized mostly due to solvation effects contributed by water molecules and active-site residues, as well as long-range electrostatic interactions with the enzyme environment. In addition to a deeper understanding of the racemization mechanism in SerR, based on our simulations we propose specific mutations, which might shift the SerR equilibrium in favor of either l-Ser or d-Ser. Finally, the current studies have produced catalytically competent forms of the rat and human enzymes, which may serve as targets for future docking studies and drug design. PMID:25493718

  3. Phosphorylation of the D1 Photosystem II Reaction Center Protein Is Controlled by an Endogenous Circadian Rhythm1

    PubMed Central

    Booij-James, Isabelle S.; Swegle, W. Mark; Edelman, Marvin; Mattoo, Autar K.

    2002-01-01

    The light dependence of D1 phosphorylation is unique to higher plants, being constitutive in cyanobacteria and algae. In a photoautotrophic higher plant, Spirodela oligorrhiza, grown in greenhouse conditions under natural diurnal cycles of solar irradiation, the ratio of phosphorylated versus total D1 protein (D1-P index: [D1-P]/[D1] + [D1-P]) of photosystem II is shown to undergo reproducible diurnal oscillation. These oscillations were clearly out of phase with the period of maximum in light intensity. The timing of the D1-P index maximum was not affected by changes in temperature, the amount of D1 kinase activity present in the thylakoid membranes, the rate of D1 protein synthesis, or photoinhibition. However, when the dark period in a normal diurnal cycle was cut short artificially by transferring plants to continuous light conditions, the D1-P index timing shifted and reached a maximum within 4 to 5 h of light illumination. The resultant diurnal oscillation persisted for at least two cycles in continuous light, suggesting that the rhythm is endogenous (circadian) and is entrained by an external signal. PMID:12481090

  4. Synthesis of Y1Ba2Cu3O(sub x) superconducting powders by intermediate phase reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, C.; Fernandez, J. F.; Recio, P.; Duran, P.

    1990-01-01

    One of the more striking problems for the synthesis of the Y1Ba2Cu3Ox compound is the high-temperature decomposition of the BaCO3. This compound is present as raw material or as an intermediate compound in chemical processes such as amorphous citrate, coprecipitation oxalate, sol-gel process, acetate pyrolisis, etc. This fact makes difficult the total formation reaction of the Y1Ba2Cu3Ox phase and leads to the presence of undesirable phases such as the BaCuO2 phase, the 'green phase', Y2BaCuO5 and others. Here, a new procedure to overcome this difficulty is studied. The barium cation is previously combined with yttrium and/or copper to form intermediate compounds which can react between them to give Y1Ba2Cu3Ox. BaY2O4 and BaCu2O3 react according to the equation BaY2O4+3BaCu2O3 yields 2Y1Ba2Cu3Ox. BaY2O4 is a stable compound of the Y2O3-BaO system; BaCu2O3 is an intimate mixture of BaCuO2 and uncombined CuO. The reaction kinetics of these phases have been established between 860 and 920 C. The phase evolution has been determined. The crystal structure of the Y1Ba2Cu3Ox obtained powder was studied. According to the results obtained from the kinetics study the Y1Ba2Cu3Ox the synthesis was performed at temperatures of 910 to 920 C for short treatment times (1 to 2 hours). Pure Y1Ba2Cu3Ox was prepared, which develops orthorombic type I structure despite of the cooling cycle. Superconducting transition took place at 91 K. The sintering behavior and the superconducting properties of sintered samples were studied. Density, microstructure and electrical conductivity were measured. Sintering densities higher than 95 percent D(sub th) were attained at temperatures below 940 C. Relatively fine grained microstructure was observed, and little or no-liquid phase was detected.

  5. Conversion of inactive (phosphorylated) pyruvate dehydrogenase complex into active complex by the phosphate reaction in heart mitochondria is inhibited by alloxan-diabetes or starvation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hutson, N J; Kerbey, A L; Randle, P J; Sugden, P H

    1978-08-01

    1. The conversion of inactive (phosphorylated) pyruvate dehydrogenase complex into active (dephosphorylated) complex by pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase is inhibited in heart mitochondria prepared from alloxan-diabetic or 48h-starved rats, in mitochondria prepared from acetate-perfused rat hearts and in mitochondria prepared from normal rat hearts incubated with respiratory substrates for 6 min (as compared with 1 min). 2. This conclusion is based on experiments with isolated intact mitochondria in which the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase reaction was inhibited by pyruvate or ATP depletion (by using oligomycin and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone), and in experiments in which the rate of conversion of inactive complex into active complex by the phosphatase was measured in extracts of mitochondria. The inhibition of the phosphatase reaction was seen with constant concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+ (activators of the phosphatase). The phosphatase reaction in these mitochondrial extracts was not inhibited when an excess of exogenous pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate was used as substrate. It is concluded that this inhibition is due to some factor(s) associated with the substrate (pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate complex) and not to inhibition of the phosphatase as such. 3. This conclusion was verified by isolating pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate complex, free of phosphatase, from hearts of control and diabetic rats an from heart mitochondria incubed for 1min (control) or 6min with respiratory substrates. The rates of re-activation of the inactive complexes were then measured with preparations of ox heart or rat heart phosphatase. The rates were lower (relative to controls) with inactive complex from hearts of diabetic rats or from heart mitochondria incubated for 6min with respiratory substrates. 4. The incorporation of 32Pi into inactive complex took 6min to complete in rat heart mitocondria. The extent of incorporation was consistent with

  6. Transition Metal Donor-Peptide-Acceptor Complexes: From Intramolecular Electron Transfer Reactions to the Study of Reactive Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Isied, Stephan S.

    2003-03-11

    The trans-polyproline (PII) oligomers (Figure 1) are unusually rigid peptide structures which have been extensively studied by our group for peptide mediated intramolecular electron transfer (ET) at long distances. We have previously studied ET across a series of metal ion donor (D) acceptor (A) oligoproline peptides with different distances, driving forces and reorganizational energies. The majority of these experiments involve generating the ET intermediate using pulse radiolysis methods, although more recently photochemical methods are also used. Results of these studies showed that ET across peptides can vary by more than twelve orders of magnitude. Using ruthenium bipyridine donors, ET reaction rate constants across several proline residues (n = 4 - 9) occurred in the millisecond (ms) to {micro}s timescale, thus limiting the proline peptide conformational motions to only minor changes (far smaller than the large changes that occur on the ms to sec timescale, such as trans to cis proline isomerization). The present report describes our large data base of experimental results for D-peptide-A complexes in terms of a model where the involvement of both superexchange and hopping (hole and electron) mechanisms account for the long range ET rate constants observed. Our data shows that the change from superexchange to hopping mechanisms occurs at different distances depending on the type of D and A and their interactions with the peptides. Our model is also consistent with generalized models for superexchange and hopping which have been put forward by a number of theoretical groups to account for long range ET phenomena.

  7. Methanol synthesis on ZnO({{000overline{1}}}). II. Structure, energetics, and vibrational signature of reaction intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Janos; Frenzel, Johannes; Meyer, Bernd; Marx, Dominik

    2013-07-01

    A rigorous characterization of a wealth of molecular species adsorbed at oxygen defects on ZnO(000overline{1}) is given. These defects represent the putative active sites in methanol synthesis from CO and H2. The oxidation state of the ZnO catalyst and thus the preferred charge state and the reactivity of the oxygen vacancies depend on the gas phase temperature and pressure conditions. Considering charge states of oxygen vacancies relevant at the reducing conditions of the industrial process, i.e., F++/H2, F0, F0/H2, and F-, as well as the F++ center which is abundant at UHV conditions and therefore important to allow for comparison with surface science experiments, we have investigated the structure, energetics, and vibrational frequencies of an exhaustive catalog of reaction intermediates using electronic structure calculations. After having identified the characteristic adsorption modes of CO, formate, formic acid, hydroxymethylene, formyl, formaldehyde, dioxomethylene, hydroxymethyl, hydroxymethoxide, methoxide, as well as methanol itself, the thermodynamic stability of all species with respect to the charge state of the oxygen vacancy and their electronic stabilization is discussed in detail and summarized in an energy level diagram.

  8. LC/MS/MS structure elucidation of reaction intermediates formed during the TiO2 photocatalysis of microcystin-LR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR), a cyanotoxin and emerging drinking water contaminant, was treated with TiO(2) photocatalysts immobilized on stainless steel plates as an alternative to nanoparticles in slurry. The reaction intermediates of MC-LR were identified with mass spectrometry (MS)...

  9. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of reactive intermediates in photochemical and transition metal-assisted oxidation, decarboxylation and alkyl transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraher, Jack McCaslin

    Reactive species like high-valent metal-oxo complexes and carbon and oxygen centered radicals are important intermediates in enzymatic systems, atmospheric chemistry, and industrial processes. Understanding the pathways by which these intermediates form, their relative reactivity, and their fate after reactions is of the utmost importance. Herein are described the mechanistic detail for the generation of several reactive intermediates, synthesis of precursors, characterization of precursors, and methods to direct the chemistry to more desirable outcomes yielding 'greener' sources of commodity chemicals and fuels. High-valent Chromium from Hydroperoxido-Chromium(III). The decomposition of pentaaquahydroperoxido chromium(III) ion (hereafter Cr aqOOH2+) in acidic aqueous solutions is kinetically complex and generates mixtures of products (Craq3+, HCrO 4-, H2O2, and O2). The yield of high-valent chromium products (known carcinogens) increased from a few percent at pH 1 to 70 % at pH 5.5 (near biological pH). Yields of H 2O2 increased with acid concentration. The reproducibility of the kinetic data was poor, but became simplified in the presence of H2O2 or 2,2‧-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) dianion (ABTS2-). Both are capable of scavenging strongly oxidizing intermediates). The observed rate constants (pH 1, [O2] ≤ 0.03 mM) in the presence of these scavengers are independent of [scavenger] and within the error are the same (k,ABTS2- = (4.9 +/- 0.2) x 10-4 s-1 and kH2O2 = (5.3 +/- 0.7) x 10-4 s-1); indicating involvement of the scavengers in post-rate determining steps. In the presence of either scavenger, decomposition of CrOOH2+ obeyed a two-term rate law, k obs / s-1 = (6.7 +/- 0.7) x 10-4 + (7.6 +/- 1.1) x 10-4 [H+]. Effect of [H+] on the kinetics and the product distribution, cleaner kinetics in the presence of scavengers, and independence of kobs on [scavenger] suggest a dual-pathway mechanism for the decay of Craq OOH2+. The H+-catalyzed path

  10. Role of the reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates with peroxy radicals in particle formation and growth in air.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Wingen, Lisa M; Perraud, Véronique; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2015-05-21

    Ozonolysis of alkenes is an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. However, the mechanisms by which stabilized Criegee intermediates (SCI) react to form and grow the particles, and in particular the contributions from oligomers, are not well understood. In this study, ozonolysis of trans-3-hexene (C6H12), as a proxy for small alkenes, was investigated with an emphasis on the mechanisms of particle formation and growth. Ozonolysis experiments were carried out both in static Teflon chambers (18-20 min reaction times) and in a glass flow reactor (24 s reaction time) in the absence and presence of OH or SCI scavengers, and under different relative humidity (RH) conditions. The chemical composition of polydisperse and size-selected SOA particles was probed using different mass spectrometric techniques and infrared spectroscopy. Oligomers having SCI as the chain unit are found to be the dominant components of such SOA particles. The formation mechanism for these oligomers suggested by our results follows the sequential addition of SCI to organic peroxy (RO2) radicals, in agreement with previous studies by Moortgat and coworkers. Smaller particles are shown to have a relatively greater contribution from longer oligomers. Higher O/C ratios are observed in smaller particles and are similar to those of oligomers resulting from RO2 + nSCI, supporting a significant role for longer oligomers in particle nucleation and early growth. Under atmospherically relevant RH of 30-80%, water vapor suppresses oligomer formation through scavenging SCI, but also enhances particle nucleation. Under humid conditions, or in the presence of formic or hydrochloric acid as SCI scavengers, peroxyhemiacetals are formed by the acid-catalyzed particle phase reaction between oligomers from RO2 + nSCI and a trans-3-hexene derived carbonyl product. In contrast to the ozonolysis of trans-3-hexene, oligomerization involving RO2 + nSCI does not appear to be prevalent in the

  11. Histone phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rossetto, Dorine; Avvakumov, Nikita; Côté, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications are key components of diverse processes that modulate chromatin structure. These marks function as signals during various chromatin-based events, and act as platforms for recruitment, assembly or retention of chromatin-associated factors. The best-known function of histone phosphorylation takes place during cellular response to DNA damage, when phosphorylated histone H2A(X) demarcates large chromatin domains around the site of DNA breakage. However, multiple studies have also shown that histone phosphorylation plays crucial roles in chromatin remodeling linked to other nuclear processes. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of histone phosphorylation and describe the many kinases and phosphatases that regulate it. We discuss the key roles played by this histone mark in DNA repair, transcription and chromatin compaction during cell division and apoptosis. Additionally, we describe the intricate crosstalk that occurs between phosphorylation and other histone modifications and allows for sophisticated control over the chromatin remodeling processes. PMID:22948226

  12. 4′-CyanoPLP presents better prospect for the experimental detection of elusive cyclic intermediate radical in the reaction of lysine 5,6-aminomutase

    SciTech Connect

    Maity, Amarendra Nath; Ke, Shyue-Chu

    2015-02-06

    Graphical abstract: The results of our calculations suggest that the reaction of 4′-cyanoPLP with lysine 5,6-aminomutase offers better prospect for the experimental detection of elusive cyclic azacyclopropylcarbinyl radical, which is proposed to be a key intermediate in the reaction of pyridoxal-5′-phosphate dependent radical aminomutases. - Highlights: • 4′-CyanoI{sup ·} is the lowest energy radical intermediate in the reaction of 5,6-LAM. • 4′-CyanoPLP offers good prospect for the experimental observation of elusive I{sup ·}. • The calculated HFCCs would help to characterize 4′-cyanoI{sup ·} by EPR. - Abstract: The results of our calculations suggest that the reaction of 4′-cyanoPLP with lysine 5,6-aminomutase offers better prospect for the experimental detection of elusive cyclic azacyclopropylcarbinyl radical (I{sup ·}), which is proposed to be a key intermediate in the reaction of pyridoxal-5′-phosphate dependent radical aminomutases. We have calculated the corresponding hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) for {sup 14}N and {sup 13}C of cyano group using several basis sets to help the characterization of 4′-cyanoI{sup ·}.

  13. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. Progress report, August 1, 1989--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1991-12-31

    During this period, conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used for the characterization of the intermediates that are involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. The intermediates of interest were the excited states of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and the species formed in the reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern has been the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes.

  14. Imaging Consecutive Steps of O2 Reaction with Hydroxylated TiO2(110): Identification of HO2 and Terminal OH Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Deskins, N. Aaron; Zhang, Zhenrong; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Dupuis, Michel; Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2009-01-15

    The hydroperoxyl (HO2) species is believed to be a key intermediate in many heterogeneous photochemical processes, but generally metastable and thus hard to prove. We report here that for the first time, we directly imaged stable, adsorbed HO2 species during O2 reaction with a partially hydroxylated TiO2(110). We also found terminal hydroxyl groups, another critical but never directly observed intermediates. By imaging species and tracking site-specific reactions with high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy, and determining the energies and configurations with density functional theory calculations, we provide molecular-level insight into the underlying reaction mechanisms. These results are expected to have far reaching implications for various catalytic systems involving the interconversion of O2 and H2O.

  15. Adsorption and oxidation of formaldehyde on a polycrystalline Pt film electrode: An in situ IR spectroscopy search for adsorbed reaction intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Behm, R Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Summary As part of a mechanistic study of the electrooxidation of C1 molecules we have systematically investigated the dissociative adsorption/oxidation of formaldehyde on a polycrystalline Pt film electrode under experimental conditions optimizing the chance for detecting weakly adsorbed reaction intermediates. Employing in situ IR spectroscopy in an attenuated total reflection configuration (ATR-FTIRS) with p-polarized IR radiation to further improve the signal-to-noise ratio, and using low reaction temperatures (3 °C) and deuterium substitution to slow down the reaction kinetics and to stabilize weakly adsorbed reaction intermediates, we could detect an IR absorption band at 1660 cm−1 characteristic for adsorbed formyl intermediates. This assignment is supported by an isotope shift in wave number. Effects of temperature, potential and deuterium substitution on the formation and disappearance of different adsorbed species (COad, adsorbed formate, adsorbed formyl), are monitored and quantified. Consequences on the mechanism for dissociative adsorption and oxidation of formaldehyde are discussed. PMID:24991512

  16. Fuel-Specific Influences on the Composition of Reaction Intermediates in Premixed Flames of Three C5H10O2 Ester Isomers

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B.; Cool, T. A.; Westbrook, Charles K.; Hansen, N.; Kohse-Hoinghaus, K.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of the composition of reaction intermediates in low-pressure premixed flat flames of three simple esters, the methyl butanoate (MB), methyl isobutanoate (MIB), and ethyl propanoate (EP) isomers of C{sub 5}H{sub 10}O{sub 2}, enable further refinement and validation of a detailed chemical reaction mechanism originally developed in modeling studies of similar flames of methyl formate, methyl acetate, ethyl formate, and ethyl acetate. Photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS), using monochromated synchrotron radiation, reveals significant differences in the compositions of key reaction intermediates between flames of the MB, MIB, and EP isomers studied under identical flame conditions. Detailed kinetic modeling describes how these differences are related to molecular structures of each of these isomers, leading to unique fuel destruction pathways. Despite the simple structures of these small esters, they contain structural functional groups expected to account for fuel-specific effects observed in the combustion of practical biodiesel fuels. The good agreement between experimental measurements and detailed reaction mechanisms applicable to these simple esters demonstrates that major features of each flame can be predicted with reasonable accuracy by building a hierarchical reaction mechanism based on three factors: (1) unimolecular decomposition of the fuel, especially by complex bond fission; (2) H-atom abstraction reactions followed by β-scission of the resulting radicals, leading to nearly all of the intermediate species observed in each flame; (3) the rates of H-atom abstraction reactions for each alkoxy or alkyl group (i.e., methoxy, ethoxy, methyl, ethyl, propyl) are effectively the same as in other ester fuels with the same structural groups.

  17. An Adenosine Triphosphate-Phosphate Exchange Catalyzed by a Soluble Enzyme Couple Inhibited by Uncouplers of Oxidative Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Allison, William S.; Benitez, Lita V.

    1972-01-01

    The sulfenic acid form of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.12), which is an acyl phosphatase, will catalyze an acetyl phosphate-Pi exchange reaction. This exchange reaction is reversibly inhibited by the uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation, 2,4-dinitrophenol, m-Cl carbonylcyanide-phenylhydrazone, pentachlorophenol, and 5-chloro-3-tert-butyl-2′-chloro-4′-nitrosalicylanalide, and is irreversibly inhibited by cyanide and dicumarol. An ATP-Pi exchange reaction similar to that catalyzed by mitochondria can be simulated by a system composed of oxidized glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.1.28), 3-phosphoglycerate, ATP, 32Pi, and appropriate cofactors. The ATP-Pi exchange is inhibited by uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. Higher concentrations of uncouplers will also inhibit the ATPase reaction catalyzed by the coupled enzyme system. The exchange reactions catalyzed by the sulfenic acid form of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate are consistent with a sulfenyl carboxylate intermediate. On the basis of these observations, a reaction scheme has been postulated for covalent coupling in oxidative phosphorylation that includes a sulfenyl carboxylate as a nonphosphorylated, high energy intermediate and an acyl phosphate as a phosphorylated, high energy intermediate. PMID:4507619

  18. Phosphorylation of adenosine in renal brush-border membrane vesicles by an exchange reaction catalysed by adenosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Sayós, J; Solsona, C; Mallol, J; Lluis, C; Franco, R

    1994-01-01

    Uptake of [3H]adenosine in brush-border membrane (BBM) vesicles from either rat or pig kidney leads to an accumulation of intravesicular [3H]AMP. The lack of significant levels of ATP and the presence of AMP in BBM indicated that a phosphotransfer between [3H]adenosine and AMP occurs. The phosphotransfer activity is inhibited by iodotubercidin, which suggests that it is performed by adenosine kinase acting in an ATP-independent manner. The existence of a similar phosphotransferase activity was demonstrated in membrane-free extracts from pig kidney. From the compounds tested it was shown that a variety of mononucleotides could act as phosphate donors. The results suggest that phosphotransfer reactions may be physiologically relevant in kidney. PMID:8110185

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of [RuIII(edta)(H2O)]- with HOBr to form an intermediate RuV=O complex in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Debabrata; Mitra, Anannya; van Eldik, Rudi

    2006-10-21

    The interaction of [Ru(III)(edta)(H(2)O)](-) (1) (edta = ethylenediaminetetraacetate) with the oxygen transfer agent HOBr, was studied kinetically as a function of [HOBr] and temperature (5-35 degrees C) at a fixed pH of 6.2. Spectroscopic evidence is reported for the formation of a high valent intermediate (edta)Ru(V)=O complex. Water soluble 2,2'-azobis(3-ethylbenzithiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) was employed as a trap for this intermediate in order to gain further mechanistic information. Reactions were carried out under pseudo-first conditions for [ABTS] > [HOBr] > [1], and were monitored as a function of time for the formation of the one-electron oxidation product ABTS(*+). The reported kinetic data are interpreted in terms of a suggested reaction mechanism and discussed in reference to data reported before. PMID:17028677

  20. Oxidative and Photosynthetic Phosphorylation Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jui H.

    1970-01-01

    Proposes a molecular mechanism for the coupling of phosphorylation to electron transport in both mitochondria and chloroplasts. Justifies the proposed reaction schemes in terms of thermodynamics and biochemical data. Suggests how areobic respiration could have evolved. (EB)

  1. Cryogenic Trapping and Isotope Editing Identify a Protonated Water Cluster as an Intermediate in the Photosynthetic Oxygen-Evolving Reaction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhanjun; Barry, Bridgette A

    2016-09-01

    Internal water is known to play a catalytic role in several enzymes. In photosystem II (PSII), water is the substrate. To oxidize water, the PSII Mn4CaO5 cluster or oxygen evolving center (OEC) cycles through five oxidation states, termed Sn states. As reaction products, molecular oxygen is released, and protons are transferred through a ∼25 Å hydrogen-bonded network from the OEC to the thylakoid lumen. Previously, it was reported that a broad infrared band at 2880 cm(-1) is produced during the S1-to-S2 transition and accompanies flash-induced, S state cycling at pH 7.5. Here, we report that when the S2 state is trapped by continuous illumination under cryogenic conditions (190 K), an analogous 2740/2900 cm(-1) band is observed. The frequency depended on the sodium chloride concentration. This band is unambiguously assigned to a normal mode of water by D2(16)O and H2(18)O solvent exchange. Its large, apparent H2(18)O isotope shift, ammonia sensitivity, frequency, and intensity support assignment to a stretching vibration of a hydronium cation, H3O(+), in a small, protonated internal water cluster, nH2O(H3O(+)). Water OH stretching bands, which may be derived from the hydration shell of the hydronium ion, are also identified. Using the 2740 cm(-1) infrared marker, the results of calcium depletion and strontium reconstitution on the protonated water cluster are found to be pH dependent. This change is attributed to protonation of an amino acid side chain and a possible change in nH2O(H3O)(+) localization in the hydrogen-bonding network. These results are consistent with an internal water cluster functioning as a proton acceptor and an intermediate during the S1-to-S2 transition. Our experiments demonstrate the utility of this infrared signal as a novel functional probe in PSII. PMID:27491625

  2. Spectroscopic and Kinetic Characterization of Peroxidase-Like π-Cation Radical Pinch-Porphyrin-Iron(III) Reaction Intermediate Models of Peroxidase Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hernández Anzaldo, Samuel; Arroyo Abad, Uriel; León García, Armando; Ramírez Rosales, Daniel; Zamorano Ulloa, Rafael; Reyes Ortega, Yasmi

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic and kinetic characterization of two intermediates from the H₂O₂ oxidation of three dimethyl ester [(proto), (meso), (deuteroporphyrinato) (picdien)]Fe(III) complexes ([FePPPic], [FeMPPic] and [FeDPPic], respectively) pinch-porphyrin peroxidase enzyme models, with s = 5/2 and 3/2 Fe(III) quantum mixed spin (qms) ground states is described herein. The kinetic study by UV/Vis at λmax = 465 nm showed two different types of kinetics during the oxidation process in the guaiacol test for peroxidases (1-3 + guaiacol + H₂O₂ → oxidation guaiacol products). The first intermediate was observed during the first 24 s of the reaction. When the reaction conditions were changed to higher concentration of pinch-porphyrins and hydrogen peroxide only one type of kinetics was observed. Next, the reaction was performed only between pinch-porphyrins-Fe(III) and H₂O₂, resulting in only two types of kinetics that were developed during the first 0-4 s. After this time a self-oxidation process was observed. Our hypotheses state that the formation of the π-cation radicals, reaction intermediates of the pinch-porphyrin-Fe(III) family with the ligand picdien [N,N'-bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-propane-1,3-diamine], occurred with unique kinetics that are different from the overall process and was involved in the oxidation pathway. UV-Vis, ¹H-NMR and ESR spectra confirmed the formation of such intermediates. The results in this paper highlight the link between different spectroscopic techniques that positively depict the kinetic traits of artificial compounds with enzyme-like activity. PMID:27355940

  3. Facile Detection of Acyl- and Peptidyl- intermediates on Thiotemplate Carrier Domains via Phosphopantetheinyl Elimination Reactions During Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Bumpus, Stefanie B.; Calderone, Christopher T.; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Aron, Zachary D.; Straight, Paul D.; Kolter, Roberto; Walsh, Christopher T.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2008-01-01

    With the emergence of drug resistance and the genomic revolution there has been a renewed interest in the genes that are responsible for the generation of bioactive natural products. Secondary metabolites of one major class are biosynthesized at one or more sites by ultra large enzymes that carry covalent intermediates on phosphopantetheine arms. Because such intermediates are difficult to characterize in vitro, we have developed a new approach for streamlined detection of substrates, intermediates and products attached to a phosphopantetheinyl arm of the carrier site. During vibrational activation of gas phase carrier domains, facile elimination occurs in benchtop and Fourier-Transform mass spectrometers alike. Phosphopantetheinyl ejections quickly reduce >100 kDa megaenzymes to <1000 Da ions for structural assignment of intermediates at <0.007 Da mass accuracy without proteolytic digestion. This “Top Down” approach quickly illuminated diverse acyl-intermediates on the carrier domains of the nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) or polyketide synthases (PKSs) found in the biosynthetic pathways of prodigiosin, pyoluteorin, mycosubtilin, nikkomycin, enterobactin, gramicidin and several proteins from the orphan pksX gene cluster from Bacillus subtilis. By focusing on just those regions undergoing covalent chemistry, the method delivered clean proof for the reversible dehydration of hydroxymethylglutaryl-S-PksL via incorporation of 2H or 18O from the buffer. The facile nature of this revised assay will allow diverse laboratories to spearhead their NRPS/PKS projects with benchtop mass spectrometers. PMID:17042494

  4. Clathrochelates meet phosphorus. New thio- and phosphorylation reactions of an iron(II) dichloroclathrochelate precursor and preparation of its first phosphorus(III)-containing macrobicyclic derivative.

    PubMed

    Artyushin, Oleg I; Matveeva, Ekaterina V; Vologzhanina, Anna V; Voloshin, Yan Z

    2016-03-28

    Phosphorylation reactions of an iron(II) dichloroclathrochelate FeBd2(Cl2Gm)(BF)2 (where Bd(2-) and Cl2Gm(2-) are α-benzildioxime and dichloroglyoxime dianions, respectively) with diphenylphosphine oxide and diethyl thiophosphite were performed under phase-transfer conditions. In the case of diethyl thiophosphite as a P-nucleophile, the best yields were obtained in the dichloromethane-50% NaOH aqueous solution-5 mol% triethylbenzylammonium chloride (TEBAC) system. The use of different molar ratios of a macrobicycle precursor and this thiophosphorylating agent allowed us to obtain both the mono- and the diphosphorylated cage complexes. Nucleophilic substitution with diphenylphosphine oxide was performed in the K2CO3-acetonitrile-5 mol% TEBAC system, giving only the corresponding monophosphorylated iron(II) complex in high yield even in the presence of an excess of this P-nucleophile. The phosphorus(v)-containing clathrochelate product was reduced with an excess of silicoform to give an iron(II) macrobicycle with an inherent diphenylphosphine group in an almost quantitative yield, which was then characterized by (31)P{(1)H} NMR and single-crystal X-ray diffraction; it easily undergoes re-oxidation to the initial clathrochelate. The synthesized phosphorus(v)-containing cage complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, MALDI-TOF mass, IR, UV-Vis, (1)H, (11)B, (13)C{(1)H}, (19)F{(1)H} and (31)P{(1)H} NMR spectra, and by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. PMID:26902835

  5. Two Reaction Mechanisms via Iminium Ion Intermediates: The Different Reactivities of Diphenylprolinol Silyl Ether and Trifluoromethyl-Substituted Diarylprolinol Silyl Ether.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Hiroaki; Uchimaru, Tadafumi; Hayashi, Yujiro

    2015-08-24

    The reactions of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes with cyclopentadiene in the presence of diarylprolinol silyl ethers as catalyst proceed via iminium cations as intermediates, and can be divided into two types; one involving a Michael-type reaction (type A) and one involving a cycloaddition (type B). Diphenylprolinol silyl ethers and trifluoromethyl-substituted diarylprolinol silyl ethers, which are widely used proline-type organocatalysts, have been investigated in this study. As the LUMO of the iminium ion derived from trifluoromethyl-substituted diarylprolinol silyl ether is lower in energy than that derived from diphenylprolinol silyl ether, as supported by ab initio calculations, the trifluoromethyl-substituted catalyst is more reactive in a type B reaction. The iminium ion from an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde is generated more quickly with diphenylprolinol silyl ether than with the trifluoromethyl-substituted diarylprolinol silyl ether. When the generation of the iminium ion is the rate-determining step, the diphenylprolinol silyl ether catalyst is the more reactive. Because acid accelerates the generation of iminium ions and reduces the generation of anionic nucleophiles in the Michael-type reaction (type A), it is necessary to select the appropriate acid for specific reactions. In general, diphenylprolinol silyl ether is a superior catalyst for type A reactions, whereas the trifluoromethyl-substituted diarylprolinol silyl ether catalyst is preferred for type B reactions. PMID:26096559

  6. Interaction of CO with OH on Au(111): HCOO, CO3, and HOCO as Key Intermediates in the Water-Gas Shift Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Senanayake, S.; Stacchiola, D; Liu, P; Mullins, C; Hrbek, J; Rodriguez, J

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the role of formate (HCOO), carbonate (CO{sub 3}), and carboxyl (HOCO) species as possible intermediates in the OH{sub ads} + CO{sub gas} {yields} CO{sub 2,gas} + 0.5H{sub 2,gas} reaction on Au(111) using synchrotron-based core level photoemission, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), and infrared absorption spectroscopy (IR). Adsorbed HCOO, CO{sub 3}, and OH species were prepared by adsorbing formic acid, carbon dioxide, and water on a Au(111) surface precovered with 0.2 ML of atomic oxygen, respectively. HCOOH interacts weakly with Au(111), but on O/Au(111) it dissociates its acidic H to yield adsorbed formate. The results of NEXAFS, IR, and density-functional calculations indicate that the formate adopts a bidentate configuration on Au(111). Since the HCOO groups are stable on Au(111) up to temperatures near 350 K, it is not likely that formate is a key intermediate for the OH{sub ads} + CO{sub gas} {yields} CO{sub 2,gas} + 0.5H{sub 2,gas} reaction at low temperatures. In fact, the formation of this species could lead eventually to surface poisoning. When compared to a formate species, a carbonate species formed by the reaction of CO{sub 2} with O/Au(111) has low stability, decomposing at temperatures between 100 and 125 K, and should not poison the gold surface. Neither HCOO nor CO{sub 3} was detected during the reaction of CO with OH on Au(111) at 90-120 K. The results of photoemission and IR spectroscopy point to HO {leftrightarrow} CO interactions, consistent with the formation of an unstable HOCO intermediate which has a very short lifetime on the gold surface. The possible mechanism for the low-temperature water-gas shift on gold catalysts is discussed in light of these results.

  7. Tracking reactive intermediates by FTIR monitoring of reactions in low-temperature sublimed solids: nitric oxide disproportionation mediated by ruthenium(II) carbonyl porphyrin Ru(TPP)(CO).

    PubMed

    Azizyan, Arsen S; Kurtikyan, Tigran S; Martirosyan, Garik G; Ford, Peter C

    2013-05-01

    Interaction of NO ((15)NO) with amorphous layers of Ru(II) carbonyl porphyrin (Ru(TPP)(CO), TPP(2-) = meso-tetraphenylporphyrinato dianion) was monitored by FTIR spectroscopy from 80 K to room temperature. An intermediate spectrally characterized at very low temperatures (110 K) with ν(CO) at 2001 cm(-1) and ν(NO) at 1810 cm(-1) (1777 cm(-1) for (15)NO isotopomer) was readily assigned to the mixed carbonyl-nitrosyl complex Ru(TPP)(CO)(NO), which is the logical precursor to CO labilization. Remarkably, Ru(TPP)-mediated disproportionation of NO is seen even at 110 K, an indication of how facile this reaction is. By varying the quantity of supplied NO, it was also demonstrated that the key intermediate responsible for NO disproportionation is the dinitrosyl complex Ru(TPP)(NO)2, supporting the conclusion previously made from solution experiments. PMID:23573997

  8. Structural and Kinetic Evidence That Catalytic Reaction of Human UDP-glucose 6-Dehydrogenase Involves Covalent Thiohemiacetal and Thioester Enzyme Intermediates*

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Sigrid; Chaikuad, Apirat; Klimacek, Mario; Kavanagh, Kathryn L.; Oppermann, Udo; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Biosynthesis of UDP-glucuronic acid by UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase (UGDH) occurs through the four-electron oxidation of the UDP-glucose C6 primary alcohol in two NAD+-dependent steps. The catalytic reaction of UGDH is thought to involve a Cys nucleophile that promotes formation of a thiohemiacetal enzyme intermediate in the course of the first oxidation step. The thiohemiacetal undergoes further oxidation into a thioester, and hydrolysis of the thioester completes the catalytic cycle. Herein we present crystallographic and kinetic evidence for the human form of UGDH that clarifies participation of covalent catalysis in the enzymatic mechanism. Substitution of the putative catalytic base for water attack on the thioester (Glu161) by an incompetent analog (Gln161) gave a UGDH variant (E161Q) in which the hydrolysis step had become completely rate-limiting so that a thioester enzyme intermediate accumulated at steady state. By crystallizing E161Q in the presence of 5 mm UDP-glucose and 2 mm NAD+, we succeeded in trapping a thiohemiacetal enzyme intermediate and determined its structure at 2.3 Å resolution. Cys276 was covalently modified in the structure, establishing its role as catalytic nucleophile of the reaction. The thiohemiacetal reactive C6 was in a position suitable to become further oxidized by hydride transfer to NAD+. The proposed catalytic mechanism of human UGDH involves Lys220 as general base for UDP-glucose alcohol oxidation and for oxyanion stabilization during formation and breakdown of the thiohemiacetal and thioester enzyme intermediates. Water coordinated to Asp280 deprotonates Cys276 to function as an aldehyde trap and also provides oxyanion stabilization. Glu161 is the Brønsted base catalytically promoting the thioester hydrolysis. PMID:22123821

  9. Exploiting Acid Phosphatases in the Synthesis of Phosphorylated Monoalcohols and Diols

    PubMed Central

    Tasnádi, Gábor; Lukesch, Michael; Zechner, Michaela; Jud, Wolfgang; Hall, Mélanie; Ditrich, Klaus; Baldenius, Kai; Hartog, Aloysius F.; Wever, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A set of phosphatases was evaluated for their potential to catalyze the regio‐ and stereoselective phosphorylation of alcohols using a high‐energy inorganic phosphate donor, such as di‐, tri‐ and polyphosphate. Parameters such as type and amount of phosphate donor and pH of the reaction were investigated in order to minimize the thermodynamically favored hydrolysis of the phosphate donor and the formed phosphate ester. Diols were monophosphorylated with high selectivities. This biocatalytic phosphorylation method provides selectively activated and/or protected synthetic intermediates for further chemical and/or enzymatic transformations and is applicable to a large scale (6.86 g) in a flow setup with immobilized phosphatase.

  10. From bis(silylene) and bis(germylene) pincer-type nickel(II) complexes to isolable intermediates of the nickel-catalyzed Sonogashira cross-coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Daniel; Brück, Andreas; Irran, Elisabeth; Meier, Florian; Kaupp, Martin; Driess, Matthias; Hartwig, John F

    2013-10-16

    The first [ECE]Ni(II) pincer complexes with E = Si(II) and E = Ge(II) metallylene donor arms were synthesized via C-X (X = H, Br) oxidative addition, starting from the corresponding [EC(X)E] ligands. These novel complexes were fully characterized (NMR, MS, and XRD) and used as catalyst for Ni-catalyzed Sonogashira reactions. These catalysts allowed detailed information on the elementary steps of this catalytic reaction (transmetalation → oxidative addition → reductive elimination), resulting in the isolation and characterization of an unexpected intermediate in the transmetalation step. This complex, {[ECE]Ni acetylide → CuBr} contains both nickel and copper, with the copper bound to the alkyne π-system. Consistent with these unusual structural features, DFT calculations of the {[ECE]Ni acetylide → CuBr} intermediates revealed an unusual E-Cu-Ni three-center-two-electron bonding scheme. The results reveal a general reaction mechanism for the Ni-based Sonogashira coupling and broaden the application of metallylenes as strong σ-donor ligands for catalytic transformations. PMID:24053603

  11. Characterisation of Criegee intermediates in the gas phase by stabilisation with a spin trap and analysis by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorio, Chiara; Tapparo, Andrea; Barbon, Antonio; Toffoletti, Antonio; Kalberer, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can react with o xidants present in the atmosphere to form less volatile compounds which could partition in the condensed phase and contribute to organic aerosol mass. One of the most important and efficient reaction for the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is the ozonolysis of alkenes. This process occurs with a generally accepted mechanism, proposed for the first time by Rudolf Criegee (Criegee, 1975). According to the Criegee mechanism, ozone coordinates to the double bond of alkenes forming a primary ozonide, which promptly decomposes to form biradical intermediates called Criegee intermediates (CIs). CIs further react quickly to form first generation oxidation products. The analysis of Criegee intermediates represent an analytical challenge due to their characteristic high reactivity and low concentrations. Their role in the formation of SOA remains highly uncertain because of uncertainty in the kinetic of their reaction with different atmospheric compounds. Up to date, only a few studies have been able to detect the CIs directly (Welz et al., 2012) or indirectly (Mauldin et al., 2012). The aim of this study is the development of a method for the on-line measurement of CIs by stabilization with a spin trap (5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline N-oxide, DMPO) and detection via proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The novel method is used to study the ozonolysis of α-pinene in a flow tube, one of the most important precursors in the formation of SOA, often used as a proxy in global aerosol models to study the effects of biogenic organic aerosols on climate change. Criegee R., 1975. Angewandte Chemie 14, 745-752. Welz O., et al., 2012. Science 335, 204 207. Mauldin R. L., et al., 2012. Nature 488, 193-196.

  12. Isolation, Characterization of an Intermediate in an Oxygen Atom-Transfer Reaction, and the Determination of the Bond Dissociation Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Nemykin, Victor N.; Laskin, Julia; Basu, Partha

    2004-07-19

    Redox reactions coupled with the formal loss or gain of an oxygen atom are ubiquitous in chemical processes. Such reactions proceed through the reduction of the donor center (XO) and the oxidation of the acceptor (Y) molecule. Among many examples of the metal centered oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactivity, those involving molybdenum complexes have been widely investigated due to their involvement in mononuclear molybdenum enzymes. The heat of reaction of the overall atom transfer process can be expressed as a difference between the bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of the oxygen-donor(X) and oxygen-acceptor(Y) bond, i.e., H=DX=o-DY=O.

  13. Model for particle production in nuclear reactions at intermediate energies: Application to C-C collisions at 95 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudouet, J.; Durand, D.

    2016-07-01

    A model describing nuclear collisions at intermediate energies is presented and the results are compared with recently measured double differential cross sections in C-C reactions at 95 MeV/nucleon. Results show the key role played by geometrical effects and the memory of the entrance channel, in particular the momentum distributions of the two incoming nuclei. Special attention is paid to the description of processes occurring at midrapidity. To this end, a random particle production mechanism by means of a coalescence process in velocity space is considered in the overlap region of the two interacting nuclei.

  14. Kinetic and product studies of Criegee intermediate reactions with halogenated and non-halogenated carboxylic acids and their implications in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhantyal-Pun, Rabi; Rotavera, Brandon; Eskola, Arkke; Taatjes, Craig; Percival, Carl; Shallcross, Dudley; Orr-Ewing, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Criegee intermediates are important species formed during the ozonolysis of alkenes. Direct measurement and modelling studies have shown that reactions of stabilized Criegee intermediates with species like SO2 and NO2 may have a significant effect in tropospheric chemistry.[1, 2] Reaction rates of Criegee intermediates with simple carboxylic acids like HCOOH and CH3COOH have been shown to be near the collision limit and may be a significant sink for these otherwise stable species in the atmosphere.[3, 4] Results obtained from our time-resolved Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) apparatus[5] for reactions of the Criegee intermediates, CH2OO and (CH3)2COO with various halogenated (CF3COOH, CF3CF2COOH, CClF2COOH and CHCl2COOH) and non-halogenated (HCOOH and CH3COOH) carboxylic acids will be presented, together with Structure Activity Relationship (SAR) based on these observations. Structure characterization of the products from these reactions using the Multiplexed PhotoIonization Mass Spectrometry (MPIMS) apparatus[1,3] as well as implications for Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) formation, assessed using the global atmospheric model STOCHEM, will also be discussed. Bibliography 1. O. Welz, J. D. Savee, D. L. Osborn, S. S. Vasu, C. J. Percival, D. E. Shallcross and C. A. Taatjes, Science, 2012, 335, 204-207. 2. C. J. Percival, O. Welz, A. J. Eskola, J. D. Savee, D. L. Osborn, D. O. Topping, D. Lowe, S. R. Utembe, A. Bacak, G. McFiggans, M. C. Cooke, P. Xiao, A. T. Archibald, M. E. Jenkin, R. G. Derwent, I. Riipinen, D. W. K. Mok, E. P. F. Lee, J. M. Dyke, C. A. Taatjes and D. E. Shallcross, Faraday Discuss., 2013, 165, 45-73. 3. O. Welz, A. J. Eskola, L. Sheps, B. Rotavera, J. D. Savee, A. M. Scheer, D. L. Osborn, D. Lowe, A. M. Booth, P. Xiao, M. A. H. Khan, C. J. Percival, D. E. Shallcross and C. A. Taatjes, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2014, 53, 4547-4550. 4. M. D. Hurley, M. P. S. Andersen, T. J. Wallington, D. A. Ellis, J. W. Martin and S. A. Mabury, J. Phys. Chem. A

  15. Time-Resolved Crystallography of the Reaction Intermediate of Nitrile Hydratase: Revealing a Role for the Cysteinesulfenic Acid Ligand as a Catalytic Nucleophile.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Yasuaki; Kato, Yuki; Hashimoto, Koichi; Iida, Keisuke; Nagasawa, Kazuo; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Dohmae, Naoshi; Noguchi, Keiichi; Noguchi, Takumi; Yohda, Masafumi; Odaka, Masafumi

    2015-09-01

    The reaction mechanism of nitrile hydratase (NHase) was investigated using time-resolved crystallography of the mutant NHase, in which βArg56, strictly conserved and hydrogen bonded to the two post-translationally oxidized cysteine ligands, was replaced by lysine, and pivalonitrile was the substrate. The crystal structures of the reaction intermediates were determined at high resolution (1.2-1.3 Å). In combination with FTIR analyses of NHase following hydration in H2 (18) O, we propose that the metal-coordinated substrate is nucleophilically attacked by the O(SO(-) ) atom of αCys114-SO(-) , followed by nucleophilic attack of the S(SO(-) ) atom by a βArg56-activated water molecule to release the product amide and regenerate αCys114-SO(-) . PMID:26333053

  16. Analysis of the reaction products from micro-vial pyrolysis of the mixture glucose/proline and of a tobacco leaf extract:Search for Amadori intermediates.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Kazuhisa; David, Frank; Tienpont, Bart; Sandra, Koen; Ochiai, Nobuo; Tamura, Hirotoshi; Sandra, Pat

    2015-11-27

    Micro-vial pyrolysis (PyroVial) was used to study the production of compounds important for the aroma of heat-treated natural products such as tobacco. Firstly, a mixture of glucose and proline was pyrolyzed as model, as this sugar and amino acid are also abundant in tobacco leaf (Nicotiana tobacum L.). The pyrolysate was analyzed using headspace-GC–MS, liquid injection GC–MS and LC–MS. Next, micro-vial pyrolysis in combination with LC–MS was applied to tobacco leaf extract. Using MS deconvolution, molecular feature extraction and differential analysis it was possible to identify Amadori intermediates of the Maillard reaction in the tobacco leaf extract. The intermediate disappeared as was the case for 1-deoxy-1-prolino-β-d-fructose or the concentration decreased in the pyrolysate compared to the original extract such as for the 1-deoxy-1-[2-(3-pyridyl)-1-pyrrolidinyl]-β-d-fructose isomers indicating that Amadori intermediates are important precursors for aroma compound formation. PMID:26602543

  17. Mononuclear Nonheme High-Spin (S=2) versus Intermediate-Spin (S=1) Iron(IV)-Oxo Complexes in Oxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Bae, Seong Hee; Seo, Mi Sook; Lee, Yong-Min; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Kim, Won-Suk; Nam, Wonwoo

    2016-07-01

    Mononuclear nonheme high-spin (S=2) iron(IV)-oxo species have been identified as the key intermediates responsible for the C-H bond activation of organic substrates in nonheme iron enzymatic reactions. Herein we report that the C-H bond activation of hydrocarbons by a synthetic mononuclear nonheme high-spin (S=2) iron(IV)-oxo complex occurs through an oxygen non-rebound mechanism, as previously demonstrated in the C-H bond activation by nonheme intermediate (S=1) iron(IV)-oxo complexes. We also report that C-H bond activation is preferred over C=C epoxidation in the oxidation of cyclohexene by the nonheme high-spin (HS) and intermediate-spin (IS) iron(IV)-oxo complexes, whereas the C=C double bond epoxidation becomes a preferred pathway in the oxidation of deuterated cyclohexene by the nonheme HS and IS iron(IV)-oxo complexes. In the epoxidation of styrene derivatives, the HS and IS iron(IV) oxo complexes are found to have similar electrophilic characters. PMID:27273456

  18. Superstructure in the Metastable Intermediate-Phase Li2/3 FePO4 Accelerating the Lithium Battery Cathode Reaction.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Shin-ichi; Natsui, Ryuichi; Yamada, Atsuo

    2015-07-27

    LiFePO4 is an important cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. Regardless of the biphasic reaction between the insulating end members, Lix FePO4 , x≈0 and x≈1, optimization of the nanostructured architecture has substantially improved the power density of positive LiFePO4 electrode. The charge transport that occurs in the interphase region across the biphasic boundary is the primary stage of solid-state electrochemical reactions in which the Li concentrations and the valence state of Fe deviate significantly from the equilibrium end members. Complex interactions among Li ions and charges at the Fe sites have made understanding stability and transport properties of the intermediate domains difficult. Long-range ordering at metastable intermediate eutectic composition of Li2/3 FePO4 has now been discovered and its superstructure determined, which reflected predominant polaron crystallization at the Fe sites followed by Li(+) redistribution to optimize the Li-Fe interactions. PMID:26074480

  19. Fenton-like oxidation of small aromatic acids from biomass burning in atmospheric water and in the absence of light: Identification of intermediates and reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Santos, Patrícia S M; Domingues, M Rosário M; Duarte, Armando C

    2016-07-01

    A previous work showed that the night period is important for the occurrence of Fenton-like oxidation of small aromatic acids from biomass burning in atmospheric waters, which originate new chromophoric compounds apparently more complex than the precursors, although the chemical transformations involved in the process are still unknown. In this work were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) the organic intermediate compounds formed during the Fenton-like oxidation of three aromatic acids from biomass burning (benzoic, 4-hydroxybenzoic and 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acids), the same compounds evaluated in the previous study, in water and in the absence of light, which in turns allows to disclose the chemical reaction pathways involved. The oxidation intermediate compounds found for benzoic acid were 2-hydroxybenzoic, 3-hydroxybenzoic, 4-hydroxybenzoic, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic, 2,6-dihydroxybenzoic and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acids. The oxidation intermediates for 4-hydroxybenzoic acid were 3,4-hydroxybenzoic acid and hydroquinone, while for 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid were 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzoic and 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acids, and tetrahydroxybenzene. The results suggested that the hydroxylation of the three small aromatic acids is the main step of Fenton-like oxidation in atmospheric waters during the night, and that the occurrence of decarboxylation is also an important step during the oxidation of the 4-dihydroxybenzoic and 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acids. In addition, it is important to highlight that the compounds produced are also small aromatic compounds with potential adverse effects on the environment, besides becoming available for further chemical reactions in atmospheric waters. PMID:27088537

  20. A closer look at the spectroscopic properties of possible reaction intermediates in wild-type and mutant (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiya; Lees, Nicholas S; Hall, Dominique; Welideniya, Dhanushi; Hoffman, Brian M; Duin, Evert C

    2012-06-19

    (E)-4-Hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase (IspH or LytB) catalyzes the terminal step of the MEP/DOXP pathway where it converts (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate (HMBPP) into the two products, isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. The reaction involves the reductive elimination of the C4 hydroxyl group, using a total of two electrons. Here we show that the active form of IspH contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster and not the [3Fe-4S] form. Our studies show that the cluster is the direct electron source for the reaction and that a reaction intermediate is bound directly to the cluster. This active form has been trapped in a state, dubbed FeS(A), that was detected by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy when one-electron-reduced IspH was incubated with HMBPP. In addition, three mutants of IspH have been prepared and studied, His42, His124, and Glu126 (Aquifex aeolicus numbering), with particular attention paid to the effects on the cluster properties and possible reaction intermediates. None of the mutants significantly affected the properties of the [4Fe-4S](+) cluster, but different effects were observed when one-electron-reduced forms were incubated with HMBPP. Replacing His42 led to an increased K(M) value and a much lower catalytic efficiency, confirming the role of this residue in substrate binding. Replacing the His124 also resulted in a lower catalytic efficiency. In this case, however, the enzyme showed the loss of the [4Fe-4S](+) EPR signal upon addition of HMBPP without the subsequent formation of the FeS(A) signal. Instead, a radical-type signal was observed in some of the samples, indicating that this residue plays a role in the correct positioning of the substrate. The incorrect orientation in the mutant leads to the formation of substrate-based radicals instead of the cluster-bound intermediate complex FeS(A). Replacing the Glu126 also resulted in a lower catalytic efficiency, with yet a third type of EPR

  1. Formation of 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone through methylglyoxal: a Maillard reaction intermediate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Ho, Chi-Tang

    2008-08-27

    The caramel-like aroma compound, 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone (DMHF) was quantified and verified by HPLC and GC-MS in the Maillard reaction based on methylglyoxal (MG). The reaction was performed in the 0.5 M phosphate buffer by heating MG with or without either glycine or cysteine at 120 degrees C for 1 h. MG alone or MG with cysteine could produce increased level of DMHF with pH increased, whereas MG with glycine had contrary trend. Experiments using a 1:1 mixture of [(13)C6]glucose and [(12)C6]glucose indicate that in the presence of glycine or cysteine, glucose skeleton kept intact during DMHF formation since a 1:1 mixture of [(13)C6]DMHF and [(12)C6]DMHF was formed. Acetylformoin was detected in the glucose with amino acid reaction system as a precursor of DMHF, while in the MG reaction systems, acetylformoin could not be identified. It is suggested different pathways of DMHF formation via MG and glucose. PMID:18593173

  2. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Chlorite-Periodate System: Formation of a Short-Lived Key Intermediate OClOIO3 and Its Subsequent Reactions.

    PubMed

    Baranyi, Nóra; Csekő, György; Valkai, László; Xu, Li; Horváth, Attila K

    2016-03-01

    The chlorite-periodate reaction has been studied spectrophotometrically in acidic medium at 25.0 ± 0.1 °C, monitoring the absorbance at 400 nm in acetate/acetic acid buffer at constant ionic strength (I = 0.5 M). We have shown that periodate was exclusively reduced to iodate, but chlorite ion was oxidized to chlorate and chlorine dioxide via branching pathways. The stoichiometry of the reaction can be described as a linear combination of two limiting stoichiometries under our experimental conditions. Detailed initial rate studies have clearly revealed that the formal kinetic orders of hydrogen ion, chlorite ion, and periodate ion are all strictly one, establishing an empirical rate law to be d[ClO2]/dt = kobs[ClO2(-)][IO4(-)][H(+)], where the apparent rate coefficient (kobs) was found to be 70 ± 13 M(-2) s(-1). On the basis of the experiments, a simple four-step kinetic model with three fitted kinetic parameters is proposed by nonlinear parameter estimation. The reaction was found to proceed via a parallel oxygen transfer reaction leading to the exclusive formation of chlorate and iodate as well as via the formation of a short-lived key intermediate OClOIO3 followed by its further transformations by a sequence of branching pathways. PMID:26849795

  3. Study of a reaction between 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone and N,N$prime;-diphenyl thiourea involving an EDA adduct as intermediate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Kakali; Mukherjee, Asok K.

    2004-06-01

    The reaction between 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone and N, N'-diphenyl thiourea in acetonitrile medium, which yields the product, 2,3-( N, N'-diphenylthioureylene)-naphtho-1,4-quinone has been found to take place in two ways—thermal and photochemical. The thermal (dark) reaction occurs through an electron donor-acceptor (EDA) adduct as intermediate with evolution of HCl and kinetic data fit into the scheme A+ B⇄ AB ( fast)→ product ( slow) Formation constant of the EDA adduct and the rate constant of the slow process have been determined at four different temperatures from which the enthalpy of formation of AB has been determined. The photochemical reaction has been studied with 360 nm ordinary light and also with 365 and 370 nm laser beams. Use of laser causes about 10 3-fold increase in the rate of the reaction but does not affect the quantum yield. The final product has been isolated and characterised by elemental analysis, 1H and 13C NMR, IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.

  4. Chiral propargylic cations as intermediates in SN1-type reactions: substitution pattern, nuclear magnetic resonance studies, and origin of the diastereoselectivity.

    PubMed

    Nitsch, Dominik; Huber, Stefan M; Pöthig, Alexander; Narayanan, Arjun; Olah, George A; Prakash, G K Surya; Bach, Thorsten

    2014-02-19

    Nine propargylic acetates, bearing a stereogenic center (-C*HXR(2)) adjacent to the electrophilic carbon atom, were prepared and subjected to SN1-type substitution reactions with various silyl nucleophiles employing bismuth trifluoromethanesulfonate [Bi(OTf)3] as the Lewis acid. The diastereoselectivity of the reactions was high when the alkyl group R(2) was tertiary (tert-butyl), irrespective of the substituent X. Products were formed consistently with a diastereomeric ratio larger than 95:5 in favor of the anti-diastereoisomer. If the alkyl substitutent R(2) was secondary, the diastereoselectivity decreased to 80:20. The reaction was shown to proceed stereoconvergently, and the relative product configuration was elucidated. The reaction outcome is explained by invoking a chiral propargylic cation as an intermediate, which is preferentially attacked by the nucleophile from one of its two diastereotopic faces. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest a preferred conformation in which the group R(2) is almost perpendicular to the plane defined by the three substituents at the cationic center, with the nucleophile approaching the electrophilic center opposite to R(2). Transition states calculated for the reaction of allyltrimethylsilane with two representative cations support this hypothesis. Tertiary propargylic cations with a stereogenic center (-C*HXR(2)) in the α position were generated by ionization of the respective alcohol precursors with FSO3H in SO2ClF at -80 °C. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were obtained for five cations, and the chemical shifts could be unambiguously assigned. The preferred conformation of the cations as extracted from nuclear Overhauser experiments is in line with the preferred conformation responsible for the reaction of the secondary propargylic cations. PMID:24494822

  5. Nucleon-induced reactions at intermediate energies: New data at 96 MeV and theoretical status

    SciTech Connect

    Blideanu, V.; Lecolley, F.R.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lefort, T.; Marie, N.; Ban, G.; Louvel, M.; Dangtip, S.; Tippawan, U.; Elmgren, K.; Eudes, Ph.; Guertin, A.

    2004-07-01

    Double-differential cross sections for light charged particle production (up to A=4) were measured in 96 MeV neutron-induced reactions, at the TSL Laboratory Cyclotron in Uppsala (Sweden). Measurements for three targets, Fe, Pb, and U, were performed using two independent devices, SCANDAL and MEDLEY. The data were recorded with low-energy thresholds and for a wide angular range (20 deg. -160 deg. ). The normalization procedure used to extract the cross sections is based on the np elastic scattering reaction that we measured and for which we present experimental results. A good control of the systematic uncertainties affecting the results is achieved. Calculations using the exciton model are reported. Two different theoretical approaches proposed to improve its predictive power regarding the complex particle emission are tested. The capabilities of each approach is illustrated by comparison with the 96 MeV data that we measured, and with other experimental results available in the literature.

  6. Reaction of alkynes and azides: not triazoles through copper-acetylides but oxazoles through copper-nitrene intermediates.

    PubMed

    Haldón, Estela; Besora, Maria; Cano, Israel; Cambeiro, Xacobe C; Pericàs, Miquel A; Maseras, Feliu; Nicasio, M Carmen; Pérez, Pedro J

    2014-03-17

    Well-defined copper(I) complexes of composition [Tpm*(,Br) Cu(NCMe)]BF4 (Tpm*(,Br) =tris(3,5-dimethyl-4-bromo-pyrazolyl)methane) or [Tpa(*) Cu]PF6 (Tpa(*) =tris(3,5-dimethyl-pyrazolylmethyl)amine) catalyze the formation of 2,5-disubstituted oxazoles from carbonyl azides and terminal alkynes in a direct manner. This process represents a novel procedure for the synthesis of this valuable heterocycle from readily available starting materials, leading exclusively to the 2,5-isomer, attesting to a completely regioselective transformation. Experimental evidence and computational studies have allowed the proposal of a reaction mechanism based on the initial formation of a copper-acyl nitrene species, in contrast to the well-known mechanism for the copper-catalyzed alkyne and azide cycloaddition reactions (CuAAC) that is triggered by the formation of a copper-acetylide complex. PMID:24616053

  7. Time-Resolved X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Data for the Study of Chemical Reaction Intermediate States

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz Moreno, Sofia; Bowron, Daniel T.; Evans, John

    2007-02-02

    Energy-dispersive X-ray absorption Spectroscopy is an increasingly powerful tool for the investigation of kinetic processes in chemical systems as an element-specific local structure and electronic-state probe. In this paper we present a study of the structural evolution of the inner-sphere electron transfer reaction between [IrCl6]2- and [Co(CN)5]3-. The experimental requirements necessary for the extraction of maximal structural and electronic information are discussed.

  8. Complete and Incomplete Fusion Competition in 11B-INDUCED Fission Reactions on 197Au at the Intermediate Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demekhina, N. A.; Karapetyan, G. S.; Balabekyan, A. R.

    2015-06-01

    Above Coulomb barrier cross sections of fission fragment production were measured in reactions of 11B with 197Au target. Induced-activity method was used for measurement the fission decay channel of the composite nuclei. Systematic of the fission fragment charge and mass distributions was used for fission cross section calculation. Fission fraction of the composite nuclei decay was compared with PACE-4 mode calculations. Estimated suppression for fission fraction followed the complete fusion have been obtained 35%.

  9. CO2 activation and carbonate intermediates: an operando AP-XPS study of CO2 electrolysis reactions on solid oxide electrochemical cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi; Mao, Baohua; Geller, Aaron; Chang, Rui; Gaskell, Karen; Liu, Zhi; Eichhorn, Bryan W

    2014-06-21

    Through the use of ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and specially designed ceria-based solid oxide electrochemical cells, carbon dioxide (CO2) electrolysis reactions (CO2 + 2e(-)→ CO + O(2-)) and carbon monoxide (CO) electro-oxidation reactions (CO + O(2-)→ CO2 + 2e(-)) over cerium oxide electrodes have been investigated in the presence of 0.5 Torr CO-CO2 gas mixtures at ∼600 °C. Carbonate species (CO3(2-)) are identified on the ceria surface as reaction intermediates. When CO2 electrolysis is promoted on ceria electrodes at +2.0 V applied bias, we observe a higher concentration of CO3(2-) over a 400 μm-wide active region on the ceria surface, accompanied by Ce(3+)/Ce(4+) redox changes. This increase in the CO3(2-) steady-state concentration suggests that the process of pre-coordination of CO2 to the ceria surface to form a CO3(2-) intermediate (CO2(g) + O(2-)(surface)→ CO3(2-)(surface)) precedes a rate-limiting electron transfer process involving CO3(2-) reduction to give CO and oxide ions (CO3(2-)(surface) + 2Ce(3+)→ CO(g) + 2O(2-)(surface) + 2Ce(4+)). When the applied bias is switched to -1.5 V to promote CO electro-oxidation on ceria, the surface CO3(2-) concentration slightly decreases from the equilibrium value, suggesting that the electron transfer process is also a rate-limiting process in the reverse direction. PMID:24806971

  10. Electro-Fenton degradation of the antibiotic sulfanilamide with Pt/carbon-felt and BDD/carbon-felt cells. Kinetics, reaction intermediates, and toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    El-Ghenymy, Abdellatif; Rodríguez, Rosa María; Brillas, Enric; Oturan, Nihal; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2014-01-01

    The degradation of 230 mL of a 0.6-mM sulfanilamide solution in 0.05 M Na₂SO₄ of pH 3.0 has been studied by electro-Fenton process. The electrolytic cell contained either a Pt or boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a carbon-felt cathode. Under these conditions, organics are oxidized by hydroxyl radicals formed at the anode surface from water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between initially added (and then electrochemically regenerated) Fe(2+) and cathodically generated H₂O₂. From the decay of sulfanilamide concentration determined by reversed-phase liquid chromatography, an optimum Fe(2+) concentration of 0.20 mM in both cells was found. The drug disappeared more rapidly using BDD than Pt, and, in both cases, it was more quickly removed with raising applied current. Almost total mineralization was achieved using the BDD/carbon-felt cell, whereas the alternative use of Pt anode led to a slightly lower mineralization degree. In both cells, the degradation rate was accelerated at higher current but with the concomitant fall of mineralization current efficiency due to the greater increase in rate of the parasitic reactions of hydroxyl radicals. Reversed-phase liquid chromatography allowed the identification of catechol, resorcinol, hydroquinone, p-benzoquinone, and 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene as aromatic intermediates, whereas ion exclusion chromatography revealed the formation of malic, maleic, fumaric, acetic, oxalic, formic, and oxamic acids. NH₄(+), NO₃(-), and SO₄(2-) ions were released during the electro-Fenton process. A plausible reaction sequence for sulfanilamide mineralization involving all detected intermediates has been proposed. The toxicity of the solution was assessed from the Vibrio fischeri bacteria luminescence inhibition. Although it acquired its maximum value at short electrolysis time, the solution was completely detoxified at the end of the electro-Fenton treatment, regardless of the anode used. PMID:24687785

  11. Investigation of the O+allyl addition/elimination reaction pathways from the OCH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2} radical intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    FitzPatrick, Benjamin L.; Lau, K.-C.; Butler, Laurie J.; Lee, S.-H.; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2008-08-28

    These experiments study the preparation of and product channels resulting from OCH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2}, a key radical intermediate in the O+allyl bimolecular reaction. The data include velocity map imaging and molecular beam scattering results to probe the photolytic generation of the radical intermediate and the subsequent pathways by which the radicals access the energetically allowed product channels of the bimolecular reaction. The photodissociation of epichlorohydrin at 193.3 nm produces chlorine atoms and c-OCH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2} radicals; these undergo a facile ring opening to the OCH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2} radical intermediate. State-selective resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection resolves the velocity distributions of ground and spin-orbit excited state chlorine independently, allowing for a more accurate determination of the internal energy distribution of the nascent radicals. We obtain good agreement detecting the velocity distributions of the Cl atoms with REMPI, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization at 13.8 eV, and electron bombardment ionization; all show a bimodal distribution of recoil kinetic energies. The dominant high recoil kinetic energy feature peaks near 33 kcal/mol. To elucidate the product channels resulting from the OCH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2} radical intermediate, the crossed laser-molecular beam experiment uses VUV photoionization and detects the velocity distribution of the possible products. The data identify the three dominant product channels as C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O (acrolein)+H, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}+HCO (formyl radical), and H{sub 2}CO (formaldehyde)+C{sub 2}H{sub 3}. A small signal from C{sub 2}H{sub 2}O (ketene) product is also detected. The measured velocity distributions and relative signal intensities at m/e=27, 28, and 29 at two photoionization energies show that the most exothermic product channel, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}+CO, does not contribute significantly to the product branching. The higher internal energy onset of the

  12. Parkin-catalyzed Ubiquitin-Ester Transfer Is Triggered by PINK1-dependent Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Iguchi, Masahiro; Kujuro, Yuki; Okatsu, Kei; Koyano, Fumika; Kosako, Hidetaka; Kimura, Mayumi; Suzuki, Norihiro; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Keiji; Matsuda, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    PINK1 and PARKIN are causal genes for autosomal recessive familial Parkinsonism. PINK1 is a mitochondrial Ser/Thr kinase, whereas Parkin functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Under steady-state conditions, Parkin localizes to the cytoplasm where its E3 activity is repressed. A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential triggers Parkin E3 activity and recruits it to depolarized mitochondria for ubiquitylation of mitochondrial substrates. The molecular basis for how the E3 activity of Parkin is re-established by mitochondrial damage has yet to be determined. Here we provide in vitro biochemical evidence for ubiquitin-thioester formation on Cys-431 of recombinant Parkin. We also report that Parkin forms a ubiquitin-ester following a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential in cells, and that this event is essential for substrate ubiquitylation. Importantly, the Parkin RING2 domain acts as a transthiolation or acyl-transferring domain rather than an E2-recruiting domain. Furthermore, formation of the ubiquitin-ester depends on PINK1 phosphorylation of Parkin Ser-65. A phosphorylation-deficient mutation completely inhibited formation of the Parkin ubiquitin-ester intermediate, whereas phosphorylation mimics, such as Ser to Glu substitution, enabled partial formation of the intermediate irrespective of Ser-65 phosphorylation. We propose that PINK1-dependent phosphorylation of Parkin leads to the ubiquitin-ester transfer reaction of the RING2 domain, and that this is an essential step in Parkin activation. PMID:23754282

  13. Photodegradation of imidacloprid insecticide by Ag-deposited titanate nanotubes: a study of intermediates and their reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Grover, Inderpreet Singh; Singh, Satnam; Pal, Bonamali

    2014-12-31

    The present work demonstrates the influence of Ag-loading (0.2-1.0 wt %) onto sodium titanate nanotubes (TNT) for complete photomineralization of the neurotoxic imidacloprid (IMI) insecticide under UV light illumination. It has been observed that degradation of IMI follows pseudo-first-order kinetics, where 0.5 wt % Ag-loaded TNT exhibited highest apparent rate constant (2.2 × 10(-2) min(-1)) and corresponding least half-life (t1/2) of 31 min for IMI relative to bare P25-TiO2 (3.4 × 10(-3) min(-1), t1/2 = 230 min). The mineralization of IMI intermediates to CO2 during its photooxidation has been described by time course GC-MS and GC analysis and has been correlated with the kinetic analysis. The investigation for the role and quantitative estimation of the fate of heteroatoms (N, O, and Cl) present in IMI revealed an increase in the amount of nitrate, nitrite, and chloride ions with time during its photooxidation. On the basis of these results a mechanistic pathway for photomineralization of IMI is proposed. PMID:25458204

  14. Apparent anti-Woodward-Hoffmann addition to a nickel bis(dithiolene) complex: the reaction mechanism involves reduced, dimetallic intermediates.

    PubMed

    Dang, Li; Shibl, Mohamed F; Yang, Xinzheng; Harrison, Daniel J; Alak, Aiman; Lough, Alan J; Fekl, Ulrich; Brothers, Edward N; Hall, Michael B

    2013-04-01

    Nickel dithiolene complexes have been proposed as electrocatalysts for alkene purification. Recent studies of the ligand-based reactions of Ni(tfd)2 (tfd = S2C2(CF3)2) and its anion [Ni(tfd)2](-) with alkenes (ethylene and 1-hexene) showed that in the absence of the anion, the reaction proceeds most rapidly to form the intraligand adduct, which decomposes by releasing a substituted dihydrodithiin. However, the presence of the anion increases the rate of formation of the stable cis-interligand adduct, and decreases the rate of dihydrodithiin formation and decomposition. In spite of both computational and experimental studies, the mechanism, especially the role of the anion, remained somewhat elusive. We are now providing a combined experimental and computational study that addresses the mechanism and explains the role of the anion. A kinetic study (global analysis) for the reaction of 1-hexene is reported, which supports the following mechanism: (1) reversible intraligand addition, (2) oxidation of the intraligand addition product prior to decomposition, and (3) interligand adduct formation catalyzed by Ni(tfd)2(-). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed on the Ni(tfd)2/Ni(tfd)2(-)/ethylene system to shed light on the selectivity of adduct formation in the absence of anion and on the mechanism in which Ni(tfd)2(-) shifts the reaction from intraligand addition to interligand addition. Computational results show that in the neutral system the free energy of activation for intraligand addition is lower than that for interligand addition, in agreement with the experimental results. The computations predict that the anion enhances the rate of the cis-interligand adduct formation by forming a dimetallic complex with the neutral complex. The [(Ni(tfd)2)2](-) dimetallic complex then coordinates ethylene and isomerizes to form a Ni,S-bound ethylene complex, which then rapidly isomerizes to the stable interligand adduct but not to the intraligand adduct

  15. Spectroscopic detection of intermediates in the reaction of dioxygen with the reduced methane monooxygenase hydroxylase from Methylococcus capsulatus (bath)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.E.; Salifoglou, A.; Lippard, S.J. ); Wang, D.; Huynh, B.H.; Edmondson, D.E. )

    1994-08-10

    Soluble methane monoxygenase (MMO), an enzyme system isolated from methanotrophic bacteria, which catalyzes the conversion of methane to methanol, has three components, a hydroxylase (H), a coupling protein (B), and a reductase (R). In this communication we present the results of stopped-flow and freeze-quench kinetic investigations of the reaction of dioxygen with the reduced hydroxylase, H[sub red], which elaborate upon and extend the findings of parallel work on MMOH from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. 34 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Structure of Naegleria Tet-like dioxygenase (NgTet1) in complexes with a reaction intermediate 5-hydroxymethylcytosine DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Pais, June E.; Dai, Nan; Corrêa, Jr., Ivan R.; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Yu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-08-31

    The family of ten-eleven translocation (Tet) dioxygenases is widely distributed across the eukaryotic tree of life, from mammals to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi. Like mammalian Tet proteins, the Naegleria Tet-like protein, NgTet1, acts on 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and generates 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in three consecutive, Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxidation reactions. The two intermediates, 5hmC and 5fC, could be considered either as the reaction product of the previous enzymatic cycle or the substrate for the next cycle. Here we present a new crystal structure of NgTet1 in complex with DNA containing a 5hmC. Along with the previously solved NgTet1–5mC structure, the two complexes offer a detailed picture of the active site at individual stages of the reaction cycle. In the crystal, the hydroxymethyl (OH-CH2-) moiety of 5hmC points to the metal center, representing the reaction product of 5mC hydroxylation. The hydroxyl oxygen atom could be rotated away from the metal center, to a hydrophobic pocket formed by Ala212, Val293 and Phe295. Such rotation turns the hydroxyl oxygen atom away from the product conformation, and exposes the target CH2 towards the metal-ligand water molecule, where a dioxygen O2 molecule would occupy to initiate the next round of reaction by abstracting a hydrogen atom from the substrate. The Ala212-to-Val (A212V) mutant profoundly limits the product to 5hmC, probably due to the reduced hydrophobic pocket size restricts the binding of 5hmC as a substrate.

  17. Syntheses of tricyanofluoroborates M[BF(CN)3] (M = Na, K): (CH3)3SiCl catalysis, countercation effect, and reaction intermediates.

    PubMed

    Sprenger, Jan A P; Landmann, Johannes; Drisch, Michael; Ignat'ev, Nikolai; Finze, Maik

    2015-04-01

    Potassium tricyanofluoroborate, K[BF(CN)3], which is the starting material for tricyanofluoroborate room-temperature ionic liquids [N. Ignat'ev et al. J. Fluorine Chem., submitted] was obtained on a molar scale (140 g) from Na[BF4] and (CH3)3SiCN with a purity of up to 99.9%. The initial product of the reaction that was catalyzed by (CH3)3SiCl was Na[BF(CN)3]·(CH3)3SiCN that was characterized by multinuclear NMR and vibrational spectroscopy, elemental analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Na[BF(CN)3]·(CH3)3SiCN was converted to K[BF(CN)3] via a simple extraction protocol. The catalytic effect of (CH3)3SiCl was evaluated and some intermediates of the reaction, including the isocyanoborate anion [BF(NC)(CN)2](-), were identified using multinuclear NMR and vibrational spectroscopy. K[BF2(CN)2] also reacted with (CH3)3SiCN in the presence of (CH3)3SiCl, to result in K[BF(CN)3]. The interpretation of the experimental observations was supported by data derived from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In addition, the influence of selected countercations of the tetrafluoroborate anion on the progress of the (CH3)3SiCl-catalyzed reaction was studied. The fastest reaction was observed for Na[BF4], while the conversion of [BF4](-) to [BF(CN)3](-) was slower with the countercation K(+). Li[BF4] and [Et4N][BF4] were converted under the reaction conditions applied to Li[BF2(CN)2] and [Et4N][BF2(CN)2] only. PMID:25785852

  18. A model for the compositions of non-stoichiometric intermediate phases formed by diffusion reactions, and its application to Nb3Sn superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, X.; Sumption, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we explore the compositions of non-stoichiometric intermediate phases formed by diffusion reactions: a mathematical framework is developed and tested against the specific case of Nb3Sn superconductors. In the first part, the governing equations for the bulk diffusion and inter-phase interface reactions during the growth of a compound are derived, numerical solutions to which give both the composition profile and growth rate of the compound layer. The analytic solutions are obtained with certain approximations made. In the second part, we explain an effect that the composition characteristics of compounds can be quite different depending on whether it is the bulk diffusion or grain boundary diffusion that dominates in the compounds, and that “frozen” bulk diffusion leads to unique composition characteristics that the bulk composition of a compound layer remains unchanged after its initial formation instead of varying with the diffusion reaction system; here the model is modified for the case of grain boundary diffusion. Finally, we apply this model to the Nb3Sn superconductors and propose approaches to control their compositions. PMID:26754774

  19. Protonation states of intermediates in the reaction mechanism of [NiFe] hydrogenase studied by computational methods.

    PubMed

    Dong, Geng; Ryde, Ulf

    2016-06-01

    The [NiFe] hydrogenases catalyse the reversible conversion of H2 to protons and electrons. The active site consists of a Fe ion with one carbon monoxide, two cyanide, and two cysteine (Cys) ligands. The latter two bridge to a Ni ion, which has two additional terminal Cys ligands. It has been suggested that one of the Cys residues is protonated during the reaction mechanism. We have used combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) geometry optimisations, large QM calculations with 817 atoms, and QM/MM free energy simulations, using the TPSS and B3LYP methods with basis sets extrapolated to the quadruple zeta level to determine which of the four Cys residues is more favourable to protonate for four putative states in the reaction mechanism, Ni-SIa, Ni-R, Ni-C, and Ni-L. The calculations show that for all states, the terminal Cys-546 residue is most easily protonated by 14-51 kJ/mol, owing to a more favourable hydrogen-bond pattern around this residue in the protein. PMID:26940957

  20. Construction of the Octose 8-Phosphate Intermediate in Lincomycin A Biosynthesis: Characterization of the Reactions Catalyzed by LmbR and LmbN

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Eita; Lin, Chia-I; Lin, Ke-Yi; Liu, Hung-wen

    2012-01-01

    Lincomycin A is a potent antimicrobial agent noted for its unusual C1 methylmercapto-substituted eight-carbon sugar. Despite its long clinical history for the treatment of Grampositive infections, the biosynthesis of the C8-sugar, methylthiolincosamide (MTL), is poorly understood. Here, we report our studies of the two initial enzymatic steps in the MTL biosynthetic pathway leading to the identification of D-erythro-D-gluco-octose 8-phosphate as a key intermediate. Our experiments demonstrate that this intermediate is formed via a transaldol reaction catalyzed by LmbR using D-fructose 6-phosphate or D-sedoheptulose 7-phosphate as the C3 donor and D-ribose 5-phosphate as the C5 acceptor. Subsequent 1,2-isomerization catalyzed by LmbN converts the resulting 2-keto C8-sugar (octulose 8-phosphate) to octose 8-phosphate. These results provide, for the first time, in vitro evidence revealing the biosynthetic origin of the C8 backbone of MTL. PMID:22989310

  1. Caught in the Act: The 1.5 Å Resolution Crystal Structures of the HIV-1 Protease and the I54V Mutant Reveal a Tetrahedral Reaction Intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Chumanevich, Alexander A.; Liu, Fengling; Louis, John M.; Weber, Irene T.

    2008-03-21

    HIV-1 protease (PR) is the target for several important antiviral drugs used in AIDS therapy. The drugs bind inside the active site cavity of PR where normally the viral polyprotein substrate is bound and hydrolyzed. We report two high-resolution crystal structures of wild-type PR (PR{sub WT}) and the multi-drug-resistant variant with the I54V mutation (PR{sub I54V}) in complex with a peptide at 1.46 and 1.50 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The peptide forms a gem-diol tetrahedral reaction intermediate (TI) in the crystal structures. Distinctive interactions are observed for the TI binding in the active site cavity of PR{sub WT} and PR{sub I54V}. The mutant PR{sub I54V}/TI complex has lost water-mediated hydrogen bond interactions with the amides of Ile50 and Ile50{prime} in the flap. Hence, the structures provide insight into the mechanism of drug resistance arising from this mutation. The structures also illustrate an intermediate state in the hydrolysis reaction. One of the gem-diol hydroxide groups in the PR{sub WT} complex forms a very short (2.3 {angstrom}) hydrogen bond with the outer carboxylate oxygen of Asp25. Quantum chemical calculations based on this TI structure are consistent with protonation of the inner carboxylate oxygen of Asp25{prime}, in contrast to several theoretical studies. These TI complexes and quantum calculations are discussed in relation to the chemical mechanism of the peptide bond hydrolysis catalyzed by PR.

  2. Intermediate products of sulfur disproportional reaction and their physical role in effusive to explosive submarine volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Takano, B.; Butterfield, D. A.; Resing, J.; Chadwick, W. W.; Embley, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    Recent direct observations of submarine volcanic activity in the Mariana Arc are giving us a chance to examine the role of volcanic gas in submarine volcanic conduits. Unlike subaerial volcanoes, where hydrogeologic conditions have different character from place to place, the overlying water mass above submarine volcanoes gives a uniform hydrographic setting. Currently, the places where we can directly observe submarine volcanic activity are located deeper than 400 m, which raises the boiling point of seawater to over 240 deg C. This situation allows us to examine the interaction of volcanic gases with ambient seawater at a shorter distance from the magma source than at subaerial volcanic settings. Arc volcano settings give us longer and more frequent opportunities to make observations and provide a more diverse range of submarine volcanism than ridge settings. Among the three major components of volcanic gases (i.e., H2O, CO2 and SO2), water follows a two phase boundary below the critical temperature after volatile components leave from the magmatic source. Milky sulfur sol bearing hydrothermal fluid is commonly observed throughout Mariana active sites. Most of the sulfur sol (colloidal elemental sulfur and polysulfides) might be formed by disproportional reaction of sulfur dioxide with seawater when water vapor shrinks to liquid water. The reaction creates not only sulfur sol but also various types of sulfite, which affects the pH of seawater. We detected short-lived sulfite species in the water column above several active Mariana volcanoes such as NW Rota-1, Daikoku and Nikko by on-board HPLC. Because most observations are made on the liquid phase side of H2O boundary, it is very hard to get data to investigate the physical and chemical sulfur sol forming process occurring on the vapor phase side or at the critical state (i.e., near the magma source process). Carbon dioxide behaves as a gas at a wide range of pressures and temperatures and carries heat and

  3. Detection of Intermediates in the Oxidative Half-Reaction of the FAD-Dependent Thymidylate Synthase from Thermotoga maritima: Carbon Transfer without Covalent Pyrimidine Activation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Thymidylate, a vital DNA precursor, is synthesized by thymidylate synthases (TSs). A second class of TSs, encoded by the thyX gene, is found in bacteria and a few other microbes and is especially widespread in anaerobes. TS encoded by thyX requires a flavin adenine dinucleotide prosthetic group for activity. In the oxidative half-reaction, the reduced flavin is oxidized by 2′-deoxyuridine 5′-monophosphate (dUMP) and (6R)-N5,N10-methylene-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate (CH2THF), synthesizing 2′-deoxythymidine 5′-monophosphate (dTMP). dTMP synthesis is a complex process, requiring the enzyme to promote carbon transfer, probably by increasing the nucleophilicity of dUMP and the electrophilicity of CH2THF, and reduction of the transferred carbon. The mechanism of the oxidative half-reaction was investigated by transient kinetics. Two intermediates were detected, the first by a change in the flavin absorbance spectrum in stopped-flow experiments and the second by the transient disappearance of deoxynucleotide in acid quenching experiments. The effects of substrate analogues and the behavior of mutated enzymes on these reactions lead to the conclusion that activation of dUMP does not occur through a Michael-like addition, the mechanism for the activation analogous with that of the flavin-independent TS. Rather, we propose that the nucleophilicity of dUMP is enhanced by electrostatic polarization upon binding to the active site. This conclusion rationalizes many of our observations, for instance, the markedly slower reactions when two arginine residues that hydrogen bond with the uracil moiety of dUMP were mutated to alanine. The activation of dUMP by polarization is consistent with the majority of the published data on ThyX and provides a testable mechanistic hypothesis. PMID:25068636

  4. Heterolytic cleavage of peroxide by a diferrous compound generates metal-based intermediates identical to those observed with reactions utilizing oxygen-atom-donor molecules.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Gerard T; Rybak-Akimova, Elena V; Caradonna, John P

    2008-01-01

    Under cryogenic stopped-flow conditions, addition of 2-methyl-1-phenylprop-2-yl hydroperoxide (MPPH) to the diiron(II) compound, [Fe(2)(H(2)Hbamb)(2)(NMeIm)(2)] (1; NMeIm=N-methylimidazole; H(4)HBamb: 2,3-bis(2-hydroxybenzamido)dimethylbutane) results in heterolytic peroxide O-O bond cleavage, forming a high-valent species, 2. The UV/Vis spectrum of 2 and its kinetic behavior suggest parallel reactivity to that seen in the reaction of 1 with oxygen-atom-donor (OAD) molecules, which has been reported previously. Like the interaction with OAD molecules, the reaction of 1 with MPPH proceeds through a three step process, assigned to oxygen-atom transfer to the iron center to form a high-valent intermediate (2), ligand rearrangement of the metal complex, and, finally, decay to a diferric mu-oxo compound. Careful examination of the order of the reaction with MPPH reveals saturation behavior. This, coupled with the anomalous non-Arrhenius behavior of the first step of the reaction, indicates that there is a preequilibrium peroxide binding step prior to O-O bond cleavage. At higher temperatures, the addition of the base, proton sponge, results in a marked decrease in the rate of O-O bond cleavage to form 2; this is assigned as a peroxide deprotonation effect, indicating that the presence of protons is an important factor in the heterolytic cleavage of peroxide. This phenomenon has been observed in other iron-containing enzymes, the catalytic cycles of which include peroxide O-O bond cleavage. PMID:18680115

  5. Detection of intermediates in the oxidative half-reaction of the FAD-dependent thymidylate synthase from Thermotoga maritima: carbon transfer without covalent pyrimidine activation.

    PubMed

    Conrad, John A; Ortiz-Maldonado, Mariliz; Hoppe, Samuel W; Palfey, Bruce A

    2014-08-19

    Thymidylate, a vital DNA precursor, is synthesized by thymidylate synthases (TSs). A second class of TSs, encoded by the thyX gene, is found in bacteria and a few other microbes and is especially widespread in anaerobes. TS encoded by thyX requires a flavin adenine dinucleotide prosthetic group for activity. In the oxidative half-reaction, the reduced flavin is oxidized by 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-monophosphate (dUMP) and (6R)-N5,N10-methylene-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate (CH2THF), synthesizing 2'-deoxythymidine 5'-monophosphate (dTMP). dTMP synthesis is a complex process, requiring the enzyme to promote carbon transfer, probably by increasing the nucleophilicity of dUMP and the electrophilicity of CH2THF, and reduction of the transferred carbon. The mechanism of the oxidative half-reaction was investigated by transient kinetics. Two intermediates were detected, the first by a change in the flavin absorbance spectrum in stopped-flow experiments and the second by the transient disappearance of deoxynucleotide in acid quenching experiments. The effects of substrate analogues and the behavior of mutated enzymes on these reactions lead to the conclusion that activation of dUMP does not occur through a Michael-like addition, the mechanism for the activation analogous with that of the flavin-independent TS. Rather, we propose that the nucleophilicity of dUMP is enhanced by electrostatic polarization upon binding to the active site. This conclusion rationalizes many of our observations, for instance, the markedly slower reactions when two arginine residues that hydrogen bond with the uracil moiety of dUMP were mutated to alanine. The activation of dUMP by polarization is consistent with the majority of the published data on ThyX and provides a testable mechanistic hypothesis. PMID:25068636

  6. Quasielastic charge-exchange reaction p/sup 3/ He. -->. n/sub F/ ppp at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Blinov, A.V.; Vanyushin, I.A.; Grechko, V.E.; Zombkovskii, S.M.; Kondratyuk, L.A.; Korolev, Y.V.; Selektor, Y.M.; Solov'ev, V.V.; Turov, V.F.; Chuvilo, I.V.; and others

    1988-04-01

    The principal characteristics of the quasielastic-charge-exchange reaction p/sup 3/He..-->..n/sub F/ppp are investigated by means of the liquid-hydrogen bubble chamber at our institute of diameter 80 cm, exposed in beams of /sup 3/He nuclei with momenta 2.5 and 5 GeV/c (the kinetic energy of the primary protons T/sub p/ in the rest system of the nucleus is respectively 0.318 and 0.978 GeV). The experimental data are compared with the predictions of the Glauber-Sitenko multiple-scattering theory and with the pole model taking into account the interaction of spectator nucleons in the final state. In the mass spectrum of the 3p system at 3.05 GeV a well expressed structure is observed which is not described in the framework of the pole model. A possible resonance occurrence of this structure is discussed.

  7. Kinetic and spectroscopic characterization of intermediates and component interactions in reactions of methane monooxygenase from methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.E.; Valentine, A.M.; Salifoglou, A.; Lippard, S.J.; Wang, D.; Huynh, B.H.; Edmondson, D.E.

    1995-10-18

    We describe mechanistic studies of the soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) enzyme system from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). Interactions among the three sMMO components, the hydroxylase (H), reductase (R), and protein B (B), were investigated by monitoring conversion of nitrobenzene to nitrophenol under both single turnover and catalytic conditions. During catalytic turnover, hydroxylation occurs to afford 3-nitrophenol (43%) and 4-nitrophenol (57%), whereas hydroxylation takes place exclusively (> 95%) to give 4-nitrophenol under single turnover conditions in the absence of reductase. Protein B exerts a strong influence on single turnover reactions of nitrobenzene, with optimal rate constants and yields obtained by using 1.5-2 equiv of protein R per equivalent of hydroxylase. The temperature dependence of these kinetic values was determined. Changes in dioxygen concentration and pH, as well as exchange of solvent accessible protons with D{sub 2}O, did not significantly affect the rate constants for either of these processes, the implications of which for the kinetic mechanism are discussed. From the present and related evidence, structures for H{sub peroxo} and Q are proposed. 54 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Characterization of Metastable Intermediates Formed in the Reaction Between a Mn(II) Complex and Dioxygen, Including a Crystallographic Structure of a Binuclear Mn(III)-Peroxo Species

    PubMed Central

    Coggins, Michael K.; Sun, Xianru; Kwak, Yeonju; Solomon, Edward I.; Rybak-Akimova, Elena; Kovacs, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Transition-metal peroxos have been implicated as key intermediates in a variety of critical biological processes involving O2. Due to their highly reactive nature, very few metal-peroxos have been characterized. The dioxygen chemistry of manganese remains largely unexplored despite the proposed involvement of a binuclear Mn-peroxo, either as a precursor to O2, or derived from O2, in both photosynthetic H2O oxidation and DNA biosynthesis, arguably two of the most fundamental processes of life. Neither of these biological intermediates has been observed. Herein we describe the dioxygen chemistry of coordinatively unsaturated [MnII(SMe2N4(6-MeDPEN))] +(1), and the characterization of intermediates formed en route to a binuclear mono-oxo bridged Mn(III) product {[MnIII(SMe2N4(6-MeDPEN)]2-(μ-O)}2+ (2), the oxo atom of which is derived from 18O2. At low-temperatures, a dioxygen intermediate, [Mn(SMe2N4(6-MeDPEN))(O2)]+ (4), is observed (by stopped-flow) to rapidly and irreversibly form in this reaction (k1(−10 °C)= 3780±180M−1s−1, ΔH1‡ = 26.4±1.7 kJ mol−1, ΔS1‡ = − 75.6±6.8 J mol−1K−1), and then convert more slowly (k2(−10 °C)= 417±3.2 M−1s−1, ΔH2‡ = 47.1±1.4 kJ mol−1, ΔS2‡ = − 15.0±5.7 J mol−1K−1) to a species 3 with isotopically sensitive stretches at νo-o (Δ18O) = 819(47) cm−1, kO–O= 3.02 mdyn/Å, and νMn-O(Δ18O) = 611(25) cm−1 consistent with a peroxo. Intermediate 3 releases approximately 0.5 equiv of H2O2 per Mn ion upon protonation, and the rate of conversion of 4 to 3 is dependent on [Mn(II)] concentration, consistent with the formation of a binuclear Mn-peroxo. This was verified by X-ray crystallography, where the peroxo of {[MnIII(SMe2N4(6-Me-DPEN)]2(trans–μ–1,2–O2)}2+ (3) is shown to be bridging between two Mn(III) ions in an end-on trans-μ-1,2-fashion. This represents the first characterized example of a binuclear Mn(III)-peroxo, and a rare case in which more than one intermediate is observed

  9. Physicochemical Changes and Glycation Reaction in Intermediate-Moisture Protein-Sugar Foods with and without Addition of Resveratrol during Storage.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Zhanwu; Gu, Mantun; Hao, Wangjun; Shen, Yixiao; Zhang, Weimin; Zheng, Lili; Ai, Binling; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Xu, Zhimin

    2016-06-22

    An intermediate-moisture food (IMF) model consisting of whey protein isolate and glucose and an IMF model fortified with resveratrol were used to study the effect of resveratrol on physicochemical changes and glycation of protein-sugar-rich foods during storage. The water activity (aw) of the storage was controlled at 0.75 or 0.56. The browning rate or hardness of fortified IMFs was significantly lower than that of IMFs after 45-day storage. The rate of Maillard reaction in the samples stored at aw 0.56 was higher than that of samples stored at aw 0.75. The fortified IMFs had lower levels of AGEs (advanced glycation end products), CML (N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)-l-lysine), and insoluble protein during storage. The inhibition capability of resveratrol against glycation was also confirmed by using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis to monitor glycated proteins and protein aggregation in the samples. The results of this study suggested that resveratrol could be used as an inhibitor to reduce the formation of undesirable AGEs and other Maillard reaction products in foods during storage. PMID:27218138

  10. Infrared spectroscopic observation of the stabilized intermediate complex FO{sub 3} formed by reaction of mobile fluorine atoms with ozone molecules trapped in an argon matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Misochko, E.Y.; Akimov, A.V.; Wight, C.A.

    1999-10-07

    Chemical reaction of F atoms with O{sub 3} molecules in a solid argon matrix was studied with FTIR spectroscopy. Fluorine atoms were generated by UV photolysis of F{sub 2} molecules in dilute solutions of F{sub 2} and O{sub 3} in solid argon. The FO-O{sub 2} complex is observed for the first time as an intermediate product by reaction of mobile F atoms with isolated ozone molecules. The observed complex is characterized by two intense absorption bands at 1522 and 968 cm{sup {minus}1}. Use of isotopic mixtures {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O provides strong evidence for assignment of these bands to the O-O stretch and F-O stretch fundamentals of the complex, which are red-shifted by 34 and 61 cm{sup {minus}1}, respectively, from the corresponding values for O{sub 2} and FO. Photolysis at 532 nm leads to decay of the FO-O{sub 2} complexes and to the appearance of isolated free FO radicals.

  11. Phosphorylated. beta. -dicarbonyl compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Liorber, B.G.; Tarzivolova, T.A.; Pavlov, V.A.; Zykova, T.V.; Kisilev, V.V.; Tumasheva, N.A.; Slizkii, A.Yu.; Shagvaleev, F.S.

    1987-08-20

    The reaction of trialkyl phosphites with alkyl malonyl chlorides leads to alkyl 3-dialkoxyphosphoryl-3-oxopropionates, which exist in the stable E-enol form. Depending on the basicities of the bases, the reactions of alkyl 3-dialkoxyphosphoryl-3-oxopropionates with nitrogen bases proceed with retention of the C-P bond and the formation of phosphorylated azomethine derivatives or with cleavage of the C-P bond and the liberation of nitrogen-containing derivatives of malonic acid. The /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, and /sup 13/P NMR spectra were recorded with a Bruker WP-80 NMR spectrometer. The chemical shifts of the protons and carbon atoms are presented relative to tetramethylsilane (TMS). The chemical shifts of the /sup 31/P nuclei were determined relative to H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/.

  12. A kinetic and theoretical study of the borate catalysed reactions of hydrogen peroxide: the role of dioxaborirane as the catalytic intermediate for a wide range of substrates.

    PubMed

    Deary, Michael E; Durrant, Marcus C; Davies, D Martin

    2013-01-14

    Our recent work has provided new insights into the equilibria and species that exist in aqueous solution at different pHs for the boric acid - hydrogen peroxide system, and the role of these species in oxidation reactions. Most recently, (M. C. Durrant, D. M. Davies and M. E. Deary, Org. Biomol. Chem., 2011, 9, 7249-7254), we have produced strong theoretical and experimental evidence for the existence of a previously unreported monocyclic three membered peroxide species, dioxaborirane, that is the likely catalytic species in borate mediated electrophilic reactions of hydrogen peroxide in alkaline solution. In the present paper, we extend our study of the borate-peroxide system to look at a wide range of substrates that include substituted dimethyl anilines, methyl-p-tolyl sulfoxide, halides, hydrogen sulfide anion, thiosulfate, thiocyanate, and hydrazine. The unusual selectivity-reactivity pattern of borate catalysed reactions compared with hydrogen peroxide and inorganic or organic peracids previously observed for the organic sulfides (D. M. Davies, M. E. Deary, K. Quill and R. A. Smith, Chem.-Eur. J., 2005, 11, 3552-3558) is also seen with substituted dimethyl aniline nucleophiles. This provides evidence that the pattern is not due to any latent electrophilic tendency of the organic sulfides and further supports dioxaborirane being the likely reactive intermediate, thus broadening the applicability of this catalytic system. Moreover, density functional theory calculations on our proposed mechanism involving dioxaborirane are consistent with the experimental results for these substrates. Results obtained at high concentrations of both borate and hydrogen peroxide require the inclusion the diperoxodiborate dianion in the kinetic analysis. A scheme detailing our current understanding of the borate-peroxide system is presented. PMID:23188177

  13. Properties of phosphorylated thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Frączyk, Tomasz; Ruman, Tomasz; Wilk, Piotr; Palmowski, Paweł; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Cieśla, Joanna; Zieliński, Zbigniew; Nizioł, Joanna; Jarmuła, Adam; Maj, Piotr; Gołos, Barbara; Wińska, Patrycja; Ostafil, Sylwia; Wałajtys-Rode, Elżbieta; Shugar, David; Rode, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) may undergo phosphorylation endogenously in mammalian cells, and as a recombinant protein expressed in bacterial cells, as indicated by the reaction of purified enzyme protein with Pro-Q® Diamond Phosphoprotein Gel Stain (PGS). With recombinant human, mouse, rat, Trichinella spiralis and Caenorhabditis elegans TSs, expressed in Escherichia coli, the phosphorylated, compared to non-phosphorylated recombinant enzyme forms, showed a decrease in Vmax(app), bound their cognate mRNA (only rat enzyme studied), and repressed translation of their own and several heterologous mRNAs (human, rat and mouse enzymes studied). However, attempts to determine the modification site(s), whether endogenously expressed in mammalian cells, or recombinant proteins, did not lead to unequivocal results. Comparative ESI-MS/analysis of IEF fractions of TS preparations from parental and FdUrd-resistant mouse leukemia L1210 cells, differing in sensitivity to inactivation by FdUMP, demonstrated phosphorylation of Ser(10) and Ser(16) in the resistant enzyme only, although PGS staining pointed to the modification of both L1210 TS proteins. The TS proteins phosphorylated in bacterial cells were shown by (31)P NMR to be modified only on histidine residues, like potassium phosphoramidate (KPA)-phosphorylated TS proteins. NanoLC-MS/MS, enabling the use of CID and ETD peptide fragmentation methods, identified several phosphohistidine residues, but certain phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues were also implicated. Molecular dynamics studies, based on the mouse TS crystal structure, allowed one to assess potential of several phosphorylated histidine residues to affect catalytic activity, the effect being phosphorylation site dependent. PMID:26315778

  14. Prebiotic phosphorylation of nucleosides in formamide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoffstall, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study intended to assess phosphorylation under neither aqueous nor dry thermal conditions. Instead, phosphorylations were attempted in possible nonaqueous prebiotic solvents. Formamide appeared to be the most obvious candidate for phosphorylation studies. Three main classes of phosphorylated products were formed in formamide solution: adenosine monophosphates, cyclic adenosine phosphate, and adenosine diphosphates. Experiments were designed to investigate the extent of phosphorylation of nucleosides in formamide, the relative amounts of nucleoside monophosphate, diphosphates and cyclic phosphate formed and the relative effectiveness of different sources of phosphate as phosphorylating agents in formamide. Reaction variables were temperature, nature of the phosphate or condensed phosphate, nucleoside, concentration of reactants and possible effects of additives. Product identification was based on qualitative and quantitative thin layer chromatography.

  15. Imino-Oxy Acetic Acid Dealkylation as Evidence for an Inner-Sphere Alcohol Intermediate in the Reaction Catalyzed by Peptidylglycine α-Hydroxylating Monooxygenase (PHM)

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Neil R.; Lowe, Edward W.; Merkler, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM, EC 1.14.17.3) catalyzes the stereospecific hydroxylation of a glycyl α-carbon in a reaction that requires O2 and ascorbate. Subsequent dealkylation of the α-hydroxyglycine by another enzyme, peptidylamidoglycolate lyase (PAL. EC 4.3.2.5), yields a bioactive amide and glyoxylate. PHM is a non-coupled, type II dicopper monooxygenase which activates O2 at only a single copper atom, CuM. In this study, the PHM mechanism was probed using a non-natural substrate, benzaldehyde imino-oxy acetic acid (BIAA). PHM catalyzes the O-oxidative dealkylation of BIAA to benzaldoxime and glyoxylate with no involvement of PAL. The minimal kinetic mechanism for BIAA was shown to be steady-state ordered using primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects. The D(V/K)APPARENT, BIAA decreased from 14.7 ± 1.0 as [O2] → 0 to 1.0 ± 0.2 as [O2] → ∞ suggesting the dissociation rate constant from the PHM·BIAA complex decreases as [O2] increases; thereby, reducing the steady-state concentration of [PHM]free. BIAA was further used to differentiate between potential oxidative Cu/O species using a QM/MM reaction coordinate simulation to determine which species could yield product O-dealkylation that matched our experimental data. The results of this study provided compelling evidence for the presence of a covalently linked CuII-alkoxide intermediate with a quartet spin state responsible BIAA oxidation. PMID:19569683

  16. Ab initio study of hypervalent sulfur hydrides as model intermediates in the interconversion reactions of compounds containing sulfur-sulfur bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Laitinen, R.S.; Pakkanen, T.A.; Steudel, R.

    1987-02-04

    Ab initio MO calculations involving the 4-31G* basis set have been used to predict the equilibrium geometries of the hypervalent sulfur hydrides H/sub 2/SS, (HS)/sub 2/SS, H/sub 2/S(SH)/sub 2/, H/sub 2/S(SSH)/sub 2/, and the cyclic H/sub 4/S/sub 4/. The energy changes in their formation from appropriate sulfanes H/sub 2/S/sub n/ (n = 1-4) have been studied with the 6-31G* basis set including the correction for the electron correlation by the second- and third-order Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory. The results are used to discuss the possible pathways in the interconversion reactions between various sulfur compounds containing cumulated SS bonds, for example, the formation of S/sub 7/ from S/sub 8/ for which hypervalent intermediates have been proposed recently. Comparison with experimental evidence is made whenever possible.

  17. Correction: Acid-catalyzed carboxylic acid esterification and ester hydrolysis mechanism: acylium ion as a sharing active intermediate via a spontaneous trimolecular reaction based on density functional theory calculation and supported by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hongchang; Wang, Yilei; Hua, Ruimao

    2015-12-28

    Correction for 'Acid-catalyzed carboxylic acid esterification and ester hydrolysis mechanism: acylium ion as a sharing active intermediate via a spontaneous trimolecular reaction based on density functional theory calculation and supported by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry' by Hongchang Shi et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/c5cp02914g. PMID:26583937

  18. Uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Terada, H

    1990-07-01

    Uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria inhibit the coupling between the electron transport and phosphorylation reactions and thus inhibit ATP synthesis without affecting the respiratory chain and ATP synthase (H(+)-ATPase). Miscellaneous compounds are known to be uncouplers, but weakly acidic uncouplers are representative because they show very potent activities. The most potent uncouplers discovered so far are the hindered phenol SF 6847, and hydrophobic salicylanilide S-13, which are active in vitro at concentrations in the 10 nM range. For induction of uncoupling, an acid dissociable group, bulky hydrophobic moiety and strong electron-withdrawing group are required. Weakly acidic uncouplers are considered to produce uncoupling by their protonophoric action in the H(+)-impermeable mitochondrial membrane. For exerting these effects, the stability of the respective uncoupler anions in the hydrophobic membrane is very important. High stability is achieved by delocalization of the polar ionic charge through uncoupler (chemical)-specific mechanisms. Such an action of weakly acidic uncouplers is characteristic of the highly efficient membrane targeting action of a nonsite-specific type of bioactive compound. PMID:2176586

  19. Uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Terada, H

    1990-01-01

    Uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria inhibit the coupling between the electron transport and phosphorylation reactions and thus inhibit ATP synthesis without affecting the respiratory chain and ATP synthase (H(+)-ATPase). Miscellaneous compounds are known to be uncouplers, but weakly acidic uncouplers are representative because they show very potent activities. The most potent uncouplers discovered so far are the hindered phenol SF 6847, and hydrophobic salicylanilide S-13, which are active in vitro at concentrations in the 10 nM range. For induction of uncoupling, an acid dissociable group, bulky hydrophobic moiety and strong electron-withdrawing group are required. Weakly acidic uncouplers are considered to produce uncoupling by their protonophoric action in the H(+)-impermeable mitochondrial membrane. For exerting these effects, the stability of the respective uncoupler anions in the hydrophobic membrane is very important. High stability is achieved by delocalization of the polar ionic charge through uncoupler (chemical)-specific mechanisms. Such an action of weakly acidic uncouplers is characteristic of the highly efficient membrane targeting action of a nonsite-specific type of bioactive compound. PMID:2176586

  20. Chromophoric spin-labeled beta-lactam antibiotics for ENDOR structural characterization of reaction intermediates of class A and class C beta-lactamases.

    PubMed

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Hofer, Jennifer E; Huang, Wanzhi; Palzkill, Timothy; Makinen, Marvin W

    2004-05-01

    The chromophoric spin-label substrate 6-N-[3-(2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxypyrrolin-3-yl)-propen-2-oyl]penicillanic acid (SLPPEN) was synthesized by acylation of 6-aminopenicillanic acid with the acid chloride of 3-(2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxypyrrolinyl)-2-propenoic acid and characterized by physical methods. By application of angle-selected electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR), we have determined the molecular structure of SLPPEN in solution. SLPPEN exhibited UV absorption properties that allowed accurate monitoring of the kinetics of its enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis. The maximum value of the (substrate-product) difference extinction coefficient was 2824 M(-1) cm(-1) at 275 nm compared to 670 M(-1) cm(-1) at 232 nm for SLPEN [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 117 (1995) 6739]. For SLPPEN, the steady-state kinetic parameters kcat and kcat/KM, determined under initial velocity conditions, were 637 +/- 36 s(-1) and 13.8 +/- 1.4 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, for hydrolysis catalyzed by TEM-1 beta-lactamase of E. coli, and 0.5 +/- 0.04 s(-1) and 3.9 +/- 0.4 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) for hydrolysis catalyzed by the beta-lactamase of Enterobacter cloacae P99. We have also observed "burst kinetics" for the hydrolysis of SLPPEN with P99 beta-lactamase, indicative of formation of an acylenzyme reaction intermediate. In DMSO:H2O (30:70, v:v) cryosolvent mixtures buffered to pH* 7.0, the half-life of the acylenzyme intermediate formed with the P99 enzyme at -5 degrees C was > or = 3 min, suitable for optical characterization. The observation of burst kinetics in the hydrolysis of SLPPEN catalyzed by P99 beta-lactamase suggests that this chromophoric spin-labeled substrate is differentially sensitive to active site interactions underlying the cephalosporinase and penicillinase reactivity of this class C enzyme. PMID:15134725

  1. Arginine Coordination in Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer: Evaluation of the Effect of Arg166 Mutations in Escherichia Coli Alkaline Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, P.J.; Lassila, J.K.; Fenn, T.D.; Zalatan, J.G.; Herschlag, D.

    2009-05-22

    Arginine residues are commonly found in the active sites of enzymes catalyzing phosphoryl transfer reactions. Numerous site-directed mutagenesis experiments establish the importance of these residues for efficient catalysis, but their role in catalysis is not clear. To examine the role of arginine residues in the phosphoryl transfer reaction, we have measured the consequences of mutations to arginine 166 in Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase on hydrolysis of ethyl phosphate, on individual reaction steps in the hydrolysis of the covalent enzyme-phosphoryl intermediate, and on thio substitution effects. The results show that the role of the arginine side chain extends beyond its positive charge, as the Arg166Lys mutant is as compromised in activity as Arg166Ser. Through measurement of individual reaction steps, we construct a free energy profile for the hydrolysis of the enzyme-phosphate intermediate. This analysis indicates that the arginine side chain strengthens binding by {approx}3 kcal/mol and provides an additional 1-2 kcal/mol stabilization of the chemical transition state. A 2.1 {angstrom} X-ray diffraction structure of Arg166Ser AP is presented, which shows little difference in enzyme structure compared to the wild-type enzyme but shows a significant reorientation of the bound phosphate. Altogether, these results support a model in which the arginine contributes to catalysis through binding interactions and through additional transition state stabilization that may arise from complementarity of the guanidinum group to the geometry of the trigonal bipyramidal transition state.

  2. Real-time Monitoring of Intermediates Reveals the Reaction Pathway in the Thiol-Disulfide Exchange between Disulfide Bond Formation Protein A (DsbA) and B (DsbB) on a Membrane-immobilized Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) System*

    PubMed Central

    Yazawa, Kenjiro; Furusawa, Hiroyuki; Okahata, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    Disulfide bond formation protein B (DsbBS-S,S-S) is an inner membrane protein in Escherichia coli that has two disulfide bonds (S-S, S-S) that play a role in oxidization of a pair of cysteine residues (SH, SH) in disulfide bond formation protein A (DsbASH,SH). The oxidized DsbAS-S, with one disulfide bond (S-S), can oxidize proteins with SH groups for maturation of a folding preprotein. Here, we have described the transient kinetics of the oxidation reaction between DsbASH,SH and DsbBS-S,S-S. We immobilized DsbBS-S,S-S embedded in lipid bilayers on the surface of a 27-MHz quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) device to detect both formation and degradation of the reaction intermediate (DsbA-DsbB), formed via intermolecular disulfide bonds, as a mass change in real time. The obtained kinetic parameters (intermediate formation, reverse, and oxidation rate constants (kf, kr, and kcat, respectively) indicated that the two pairs of cysteine residues in DsbBS-S,S-S were more important for the stability of the DsbA-DsbB intermediate than ubiquinone, an electron acceptor for DsbBS-S,S-S. Our data suggested that the reaction pathway of almost all DsbASH,SH oxidation processes would proceed through this stable intermediate, avoiding the requirement for ubiquinone. PMID:24145032

  3. Real-time monitoring of intermediates reveals the reaction pathway in the thiol-disulfide exchange between disulfide bond formation protein A (DsbA) and B (DsbB) on a membrane-immobilized quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) system.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Kenjiro; Furusawa, Hiroyuki; Okahata, Yoshio

    2013-12-13

    Disulfide bond formation protein B (DsbBS-S,S-S) is an inner membrane protein in Escherichia coli that has two disulfide bonds (S-S, S-S) that play a role in oxidization of a pair of cysteine residues (SH, SH) in disulfide bond formation protein A (DsbASH,SH). The oxidized DsbAS-S, with one disulfide bond (S-S), can oxidize proteins with SH groups for maturation of a folding preprotein. Here, we have described the transient kinetics of the oxidation reaction between DsbASH,SH and DsbBS-S,S-S. We immobilized DsbBS-S,S-S embedded in lipid bilayers on the surface of a 27-MHz quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) device to detect both formation and degradation of the reaction intermediate (DsbA-DsbB), formed via intermolecular disulfide bonds, as a mass change in real time. The obtained kinetic parameters (intermediate formation, reverse, and oxidation rate constants (kf, kr, and kcat, respectively) indicated that the two pairs of cysteine residues in DsbBS-S,S-S were more important for the stability of the DsbA-DsbB intermediate than ubiquinone, an electron acceptor for DsbBS-S,S-S. Our data suggested that the reaction pathway of almost all DsbASH,SH oxidation processes would proceed through this stable intermediate, avoiding the requirement for ubiquinone. PMID:24145032

  4. Kinetics of stabilised Criegee intermediates derived from alkene ozonolysis: reactions with SO2, H2O and decomposition under boundary layer conditions.

    PubMed

    Newland, Mike J; Rickard, Andrew R; Alam, Mohammed S; Vereecken, Luc; Muñoz, Amalia; Ródenas, Milagros; Bloss, William J

    2015-02-14

    The removal of SO2 in the presence of alkene-ozone systems has been studied for ethene, cis-but-2-ene, trans-but-2-ene and 2,3-dimethyl-but-2-ene, as a function of humidity, under atmospheric boundary layer conditions. The SO2 removal displays a clear dependence on relative humidity for all four alkene-ozone systems confirming a significant reaction for stabilised Criegee intermediates (SCI) with H2O. The observed SO2 removal kinetics are consistent with relative rate constants, k(SCI + H2O)/k(SCI + SO2), of 3.3 (±1.1) × 10(-5) for CH2OO, 26 (±10) × 10(-5) for CH3CHOO derived from cis-but-2-ene, 33 (±10) × 10(-5) for CH3CHOO derived from trans-but-2-ene, and 8.7 (±2.5) × 10(-5) for (CH3)2COO derived from 2,3-dimethyl-but-2-ene. The relative rate constants for k(SCI decomposition)/k(SCI + SO2) are -2.3 (±3.5) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH2OO, 13 (±43) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH3CHOO derived from cis-but-2-ene, -14 (±31) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH3CHOO derived from trans-but-2-ene and 63 (±14) × 10(11) cm(-3) for (CH3)2COO. Uncertainties are ±2σ and represent combined systematic and precision components. These values are derived following the approximation that a single SCI is present for each system; a more comprehensive interpretation, explicitly considering the differing reactivity for syn- and anti-SCI conformers, is also presented. This yields values of 3.5 (±3.1) × 10(-4) for k(SCI + H2O)/k(SCI + SO2) of anti-CH3CHOO and 1.2 (±1.1) × 10(13) for k(SCI decomposition)/k(SCI + SO2) of syn-CH3CHOO. The reaction of the water dimer with CH2OO is also considered, with a derived value for k(CH2OO + (H2O)2)/k(CH2OO + SO2) of 1.4 (±1.8) × 10(-2). The observed SO2 removal rate constants, which technically represent upper limits, are consistent with decomposition being a significant, structure dependent, sink in the atmosphere for syn-SCI. PMID:25562069

  5. The secondary coordination sphere controlled reactivity of a ferric-superoxo heme: unexpected conversion to a ferric hydroperoxo intermediate by reaction with a high-spin ferrous heme.

    PubMed

    Nagaraju, Perumandla; Ohta, Takehiro; Liu, Jin-Gang; Ogura, Takashi; Naruta, Yoshinori

    2016-06-01

    A bio-inspired heme complex involving both a proton donor and an axial imidazole ligand reduces the activation energy for the formation of a ferric hydroperoxo intermediate. A high-spin ferrous heme is shown to be capable of reducing its superoxy species to generate a ferric hydroperoxo intermediate for the first time. PMID:27105471

  6. Kinetic preference for the 3'-5'-linked dimer in the reaction of guanosine 5'-phosphorylmorpholinamide with deoxyguanosine 5'-phosphoryl-2-methylimidazolide as a function of poly(C) concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.

    1998-01-01

    The formation of the internucleotide bond in diguanylate synthesis was studied in aqueous solution at pH 8 and 0.2 M Mg2+ in the presence and absence of polycytidylate, poly(C). The investigation was simplified by using guanosine 5'-phosphorylmorpholinamide, mor-pG, which can act only as a nucleophile, and deoxyguanosine 5'-phosphoryl-2-methylimidazolide, 2-MeImpdG, which can act only as an electrophile. The time-dependent product distribution was monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In the absence of poly(C) the reaction between mor-pG and 2-MeImpdG yielded small amounts of the dimer mor-pGpdG with a regioselectivity of 2'-5':3'-5' = 3.5. In the presence of poly(C) dimer yields increased and a reversal in regioselectivity occurred; both effects were in proportion to the concentration of the polymer. The results can be quantitatively explained with the proposition that poly(C), acting as the template, catalyzes the reaction between template-bound monomers by about a factor of 4-5 over the reaction in solution and yields dimers with a regioselectivity of 2'-5':3'-5' approximately 0.33. These findings illustrate the intrinsic preference of guanosine monomers to correctly self-assemble on the appropriate template.

  7. Developmentally regulated interconversions between end product-inhibitable and noninhibitable forms of a first pathway-specific enzyme activity can be mimicked in vitro by protein dephosphorylation-phosphorylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Frisa, P S; Sonneborn, D R

    1982-10-01

    During the life cycle of Blastocladiella emersonii, dramatic shifts occur in the sensitivity of the first hexosamine biosynthetic pathway-specific enzyme [amidotransferase; 2-amino-2-deoxy-D-glucose-6-phosphate ketol-isomerase (amino-transferring), EC 5.3.1.19] to end product inhibition. These shifts are developmentally correlated with changes in the utilization of the end product (uridine-5'-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine) for chitin synthesis [Selitrennikoff, C. P., Dalley, N. E. & Sonneborn, D. R. (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 77, 5998-6002]. Alterations in amidotransferase sensitivity to end product inhibition can be mimicked by in vitro protein dephosphorylation-phosphorylation reactions, as follows: (i) Zoospore end product-inhibitable amidotransferase activity can be converted to a noninhibitable form by an endogenous (zoospore) protein phosphatase (phosphoprotein phosphohydrolase EC 3.1.3.16) reaction; this noninhibitable form can be converted back to an inhibitable form either by an endogenous cAMP-independent protein kinase (ATP:protein phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.37) reaction or with an added cAMP-dependent protein kinase. (ii) Noninhibitable amidotransferase activity from growing cells can also be converted to the inhibitable form with added protein kinase. PMID:6959119

  8. Long-term dynamics of multisite phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Boris Y; Mattingly, Henry H; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y

    2016-07-15

    Multisite phosphorylation cycles are ubiquitous in cell regulation systems and are studied at multiple levels of complexity, from molecules to organisms, with the ultimate goal of establishing predictive understanding of the effects of genetic and pharmacological perturbations of protein phosphorylation in vivo. Achieving this goal is essentially impossible without mathematical models, which provide a systematic framework for exploring dynamic interactions of multiple network components. Most of the models studied to date do not discriminate between the distinct partially phosphorylated forms and focus on two limiting reaction regimes, distributive and processive, which differ in the number of enzyme-substrate binding events needed for complete phosphorylation or dephosphorylation. Here we use a minimal model of extracellular signal-related kinase regulation to explore the dynamics of a reaction network that includes all essential phosphorylation forms and arbitrary levels of reaction processivity. In addition to bistability, which has been studied extensively in distributive mechanisms, this network can generate periodic oscillations. Both bistability and oscillations can be realized at high levels of reaction processivity. Our work provides a general framework for systematic analysis of dynamics in multisite phosphorylation systems. PMID:27226482

  9. Water oxidation: Intermediate identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Alexander J.

    2016-08-01

    The slow kinetics of light-driven water oxidation on haematite is an important factor limiting the material's efficiency. Now, an intermediate of the water-splitting reaction has been identified offering hope that the full mechanism will soon be resolved.

  10. Comment on "A novel and facile decay path of Criegee intermediates by intramolecular insertion reactions via roaming transition states" [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 124312 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Lawrence B.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    2015-10-01

    We discuss the recent report of a roaming type mechanism for the decomposition of the Criegee intermediate. We show that the predicted barrier height for this new pathway is too low by ˜30 kcal/mol owing to an inconsistent use of spin-restricted and spin-unrestricted calculations. As a result, this new pathway is not expected to compete significantly with the well-known dioxirane pathways for the decomposition of the Criegee intermediate.

  11. Comment on "A novel and facile decay path of Criegee intermediates by intramolecular insertion reactions via roaming transition states" [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 124312 (2015)].

    PubMed

    Harding, Lawrence B; Klippenstein, Stephen J

    2015-10-28

    We discuss the recent report of a roaming type mechanism for the decomposition of the Criegee intermediate. We show that the predicted barrier height for this new pathway is too low by ∼30 kcal/mol owing to an inconsistent use of spin-restricted and spin-unrestricted calculations. As a result, this new pathway is not expected to compete significantly with the well-known dioxirane pathways for the decomposition of the Criegee intermediate. PMID:26520558

  12. Comment on “A novel and facile decay path of Criegee intermediates by intramolecular insertion reactions via roaming transition states” [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 124312 (2015)

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, Lawrence B.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    2015-10-28

    We discuss the recent report of a roaming type mechanism for the decomposition of the Criegee intermediate. We show that the predicted barrier height for this new pathway is too low by ∼30 kcal/mol owing to an inconsistent use of spin-restricted and spin-unrestricted calculations. As a result, this new pathway is not expected to compete significantly with the well-known dioxirane pathways for the decomposition of the Criegee intermediate.

  13. Cellular regulation by protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Edmond H

    2013-01-11

    A historical account of the discovery of reversible protein phosphorylation is presented. This process was uncovered in the mid 1950s in a study undertaken with Edwin G. Krebs to elucidate the complex hormonal regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylase. Contrary to the known activation of this enzyme by AMP which serves as an allosteric effector, its hormonal regulation results from a phosphorylation of the protein by phosphorylase kinase following the activation of the latter by Ca(2+) and ATP. The study led to the establishment of the first hormonal cascade of successive enzymatic reactions, kinases acting on kinases, initiated by cAMP discovered by Earl Sutherland. It also showed how two different physiological processes, carbohydrate metabolism and muscle contraction, could be regulated in concert. PMID:23058924

  14. A thiamin-bound, pre-decarboxylation reaction intermediate analogue in the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 subunit induces large scale disorder-to-order transformations in the enzyme and reveals novel structural features in the covalently bound adduct.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, Palaniappa; Sax, Martin; Brunskill, Andrew; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Nemeria, Natalia; Zhang, Sheng; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2006-06-01

    The crystal structure of the E1 component from the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc) has been determined with phosphonolactylthiamin diphosphate (PLThDP) in its active site. PLThDP serves as a structural and electrostatic analogue of the natural intermediate alpha-lactylthiamin diphosphate (LThDP), in which the carboxylate from the natural substrate pyruvate is replaced by a phosphonate group. This represents the first example of an experimentally determined, three-dimensional structure of a thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme containing a covalently bound, pre-decarboxylation reaction intermediate analogue and should serve as a model for the corresponding intermediates in other ThDP-dependent decarboxylases. Regarding the PDHc-specific reaction, the presence of PLThDP induces large scale conformational changes in the enzyme. In conjunction with the E1-PLThDP and E1-ThDP structures, analysis of a H407A E1-PLThDP variant structure shows that an interaction between His-407 and PLThDP is essential for stabilization of two loop regions in the active site that are otherwise disordered in the absence of intermediate analogue. This ordering completes formation of the active site and creates a new ordered surface likely involved in interactions with the lipoyl domains of E2s within the PDHc complex. The tetrahedral intermediate analogue is tightly held in the active site through direct hydrogen bonds to residues His-407, Tyr-599, and His-640 and reveals a new, enzyme-induced, strain-related feature that appears to aid in the decarboxylation process. This feature is almost certainly present in all ThDP-dependent decarboxylases; thus its inclusion in our understanding of general thiamin catalysis is important. PMID:16531404

  15. Internal regulation of ATP turnover, glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ainscow, E K; Brand, M D

    1999-12-01

    Previously [Ainscow, E.K. & Brand, M.D. (1999) Eur. J. Biochem. 263, 671-685], top-down control analysis was used to describe the control pattern of energy metabolism in rat hepatocytes. The system was divided into nine reaction blocks (glycogen breakdown, glucose release, glycolysis, lactate production, NADH oxidation, pyruvate oxidation, mitochondrial proton leak, mitochondrial phosphorylation and ATP consumption) linked by five intermediates (intracellular glucose 6-phosphate, pyruvate and ATP levels, cytoplasmic NADH/NAD ratio and mitochondrial membrane potential). The kinetic responses (elasticities) of reaction blocks to intermediates were determined and used to calculate control coefficients. In the present paper, these elasticities and control coefficients are used to quantify the internal regulatory pathways within the cell. Flux control coefficients were partitioned to give partial flux control coefficients. These describe how strongly one block of reactions controls the flux through another via its effects on the concentration of a particular intermediate. Most flux control coefficients were the sum of positive and negative partial effects acting through different intermediates; these partial effects could be large compared to the final control strength. An important result was the breakdown of the way ATP consumption controlled respiration: changes in ATP level were more important than changes in mitochondrial membrane potential in stimulating oxygen consumption when ATP consumption increased. The partial internal response coefficients to changes in each intermediate were also calculated; they describe how steady state concentrations of intermediates are maintained. Increases in mitochondrial membrane potential were opposed mostly by decreased supply, whereas increases in glucose-6-phosphate, NADH/NAD and pyruvate were opposed mostly by increased consumption. Increases in ATP were opposed significantly by both decreased supply and increased consumption

  16. Phosphorylation and RLK signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant genomes encode hundreds of receptor-like kinases (RLKs) with an organization of functional domains similar to that of animal receptor kinases. Ligand-dependent phosphorylation has now been demonstrated for several plant RLKs and identification of specific phosphorylation sites followed by thei...

  17. A Simple Hydraulic Analog Model of Oxidative Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Willis, Wayne T; Jackman, Matthew R; Messer, Jeffrey I; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Glancy, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is the primary source of cellular energy transduction in mammals. This energy conversion involves dozens of enzymatic reactions, energetic intermediates, and the dynamic interactions among them. With the goal of providing greater insight into the complex thermodynamics and kinetics ("thermokinetics") of mitochondrial energy transduction, a simple hydraulic analog model of oxidative phosphorylation is presented. In the hydraulic model, water tanks represent the forward and back "pressures" exerted by thermodynamic driving forces: the matrix redox potential (ΔGredox), the electrochemical potential for protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane (ΔGH), and the free energy of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) (ΔGATP). Net water flow proceeds from tanks with higher water pressure to tanks with lower pressure through "enzyme pipes" whose diameters represent the conductances (effective activities) of the proteins that catalyze the energy transfer. These enzyme pipes include the reactions of dehydrogenase enzymes, the electron transport chain (ETC), and the combined action of ATP synthase plus the ATP-adenosine 5'-diphosphate exchanger that spans the inner membrane. In addition, reactive oxygen species production is included in the model as a leak that is driven out of the ETC pipe by high pressure (high ΔGredox) and a proton leak dependent on the ΔGH for both its driving force and the conductance of the leak pathway. Model water pressures and flows are shown to simulate thermodynamic forces and metabolic fluxes that have been experimentally observed in mammalian skeletal muscle in response to acute exercise, chronic endurance training, and reduced substrate availability, as well as account for the thermokinetic behavior of mitochondria from fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle and the metabolic capacitance of the creatine kinase reaction. PMID:26807634

  18. Sterol biosynthesis: strong inhibition of maize delta 5,7-sterol delta 7-reductase by novel 6-aza-B-homosteroids and other analogs of a presumptive carbocationic intermediate of the reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Rahier, A; Taton, M

    1996-06-01

    A series of mono- and diazasteroids have been synthesized as analogs of a predicted carbocationic intermediate of delta 5,7-sterol delta 7-reductase (delta 7-SR). 6-Aza-B-homo-5 alpha-cholest-7-en-3 beta-ol (4), a novel compound whose synthesis is described for the first time, and 6,7-diaza-5 alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3 beta-ol (6) were shown to be very powerful inhibitors of delta 7-SR in a preparation isolated from maize (Zea mays) (K(i),app = 50-70 nM, Ki,app/Km,app = 1.0 x 10(-4) to 1.3 x 10(-4). The data are consistent with a carbonium ion mechanism for the reduction; compounds 4 and 6 probably act as reaction intermediate analogs. Compound 4, in contrast to compound 6, displayed in the same microsomal preparation more than 50-fold selectivity for inhibition of the delta 7-SR versus delta 8-delta 7-sterol isomerase, cycloeucalenol isomerase, and delta 8,14-sterol delta 14-reductase, the mechanism of these four enzymes involving presumptive cationic intermediates centered respectively at C7, C8, C9, and C14. These observations highlight the paramount importance of the location of the positively charged nitrogen atom(s) in the B-ring structure for selectivity among these enzymes involving structurally close cationic reaction intermediates. Efficient in vivo inhibition of sterol biosynthesis in bramble cell suspension cultures by a low concentration of compound 4 was demonstrated and confirmed the in vitro properties of this derivative.) PMID:8679532

  19. An early intermediate in the folding reaction of the B1 domain of protein G contains a native-like core.

    PubMed

    Park, S H; O'Neil, K T; Roder, H

    1997-11-25

    The folding kinetics of a 57-residue IgG binding domain of streptococcal protein G has been studied under varying solvent conditions, using stopped-flow fluorescence methods. Although GB1 has been cited as an example of a protein that obeys a two-state folding mechanism, the following kinetic observations suggest the presence of an early folding intermediate. Under stabilizing conditions (low denaturant concentrations, especially in the presence of sodium sulfate), the kinetics of folding shows evidence of a major unresolved fluorescence change during the 1.5 ms dead time of the stopped-flow experiment (burst phase). Together with some curvature in the rate profile for the single observable folding phase, this provides clear evidence of the rapid formation of compact states with native-like fluorescence for the single tryptophan at position 43. In refolding experiments at increasing denaturant concentrations, the amplitude of the sub-millisecond phase decreases sharply and the corresponding slope (m value) is only about 30% lower than that of the equilibrium unfolding curve indicative of a pre-equilibrium transition involving cooperative unfolding of an ensemble of compact intermediates. The dependence on guanidine hydrochloride concentration of both rates and amplitudes (including the equilibrium transition) is described quantitatively by a sequential three-state mechanism, U [symbol: see text] I [symbol: see text] N, where an intermediate (I) in rapid equilibrium with the unfolded state (U) precedes the rate-limiting formation of the native state (N). A 66-residue fragment of GB1 with an N-terminal extension containing five apolar side chains exhibits three-state kinetic behavior virtually identical to that of the 57-residue fragment. This is consistent with the presence of a well-shielded native-like core excluding the N-terminal tail in the early folding intermediate and argues against a mechanism involving random hydrophobic collapse, which would predict a

  20. Linking Chemical Electron–Proton Transfer to Proton Pumping in Cytochrome c Oxidase: Broken-Symmetry DFT Exploration of Intermediates along the Catalytic Reaction Pathway of the Iron–Copper Dinuclear Complex

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    After a summary of the problem of coupling electron and proton transfer to proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase, we present the results of our earlier and recent density functional theory calculations for the dinuclear Fe-a3–CuB reaction center in this enzyme. A specific catalytic reaction wheel diagram is constructed from the calculations, based on the structures and relative energies of the intermediate states of the reaction cycle. A larger family of tautomers/protonation states is generated compared to our earlier work, and a new lowest-energy pathway is proposed. The entire reaction cycle is calculated for the new smaller model (about 185–190 atoms), and two selected arcs of the wheel are chosen for calculations using a larger model (about 205 atoms). We compare the structural and redox energetics and protonation calculations with available experimental data. The reaction cycle map that we have built is positioned for further improvement and testing against experiment. PMID:24960612

  1. Sequential Phosphorylation of Smoothened Transduces Graded Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ying; Ospina, Jason K.; Zhang, Junzheng; Michelson, Andrew P.; Schoen, Adam M.; Zhu, Alan Jian

    2012-01-01

    The correct interpretation of a gradient of the morphogen Hedgehog (Hh) during development requires phosphorylation of the Hh signaling activator Smoothened (Smo); however, the molecular mechanism by which Smo transduces graded Hh signaling is not well understood. We show that regulation of the phosphorylation status of Smo by distinct phosphatases at specific phosphorylated residues creates differential thresholds of Hh signaling. Phosphorylation of Smo was initiated by adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP)–dependent protein kinase (PKA) and further enhanced by casein kinase I (CKI). We found that protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) directly dephosphorylated PKA-phosphorylated Smo to reduce signaling mediated by intermediate concentrations of Hh, whereas PP2A specifically dephosphorylated PKA-primed, CKI-phosphorylated Smo to restrict signaling by high concentrations of Hh. We also established a functional link between sequentially phosphorylated Smo species and graded Hh activity. Thus, we propose a sequential phosphorylation model in which precise interpretation of morphogen concentration can be achieved upon versatile phosphatase-mediated regulation of the phosphorylation status of an essential activator in developmental signaling. PMID:21730325

  2. Analyzing the H19- and T65-epitopes in 38 kd phosphorylated protein of Marek's disease viruses and comparing chicken immunological reactions to viruses point-mutated in the epitopes.

    PubMed

    Zhizhong, Cui; Zhi, Zhang; Aijian, Qin; Lucy, Lee F

    2004-02-01

    DNA sequencing analysis in 38 kd phosphorylated protein (pp38) ORF of Marek's disease viruses (MDV) indicated that all tested 10 virulent strains with different pathotypes had 'A' at base #320 and glutamine at aa#107 while reacted with monoclonal antibody (Mab) H19 in indirect fluorescence antibody test (IFA). However, vaccine strain CVI988 had 'G' at base#320 and arginine at aa#107 instead, when it was negative in IFA with Mab H19. Some strains were also reactive with Mab T65 in IFA while there was 'G' at base #326 and glycine at aa#109, but the other strains, which had 'A' at base #326 and glutamic acid at aa#109, did not react with Mab T65. By comparison of CVI988 to its point mutants CVI/rpp38(AG) and CVI/rpp38(AA) with 1 or 2 base(s) changes at bases #320 and /or #326 of pp38 gene for their reactivity with Mab H19 and T65, it was confirmed that the glutamine at aa#107 and glycine at aa#109 were critical to epitopes H19 and T65 respectively. Immuno-reactions to MDV were compared in SPF chickens inoculated with cloned CVI988 and its mutant CVI/rpp38(AG). It was found that antibody responses to MDV in chickens inoculated with CVI/rpp38(AG) were delayed and significantly lower than that in chickens inoculated with the native CVI988. By differential comparison of antibody titers to different antigens, a third epitope specific to CVI988 and dependent on arginine at aa#107 was suggested to be responsible for the big difference in antibody responses induced by native CVI988 and its mutant. PMID:15382680

  3. Mining Conditional Phosphorylation Motifs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jun; Gong, Haipeng; Deng, Shengchun; He, Zengyou

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation motifs represent position-specific amino acid patterns around the phosphorylation sites in the set of phosphopeptides. Several algorithms have been proposed to uncover phosphorylation motifs, whereas the problem of efficiently discovering a set of significant motifs with sufficiently high coverage and non-redundancy still remains unsolved. Here we present a novel notion called conditional phosphorylation motifs. Through this new concept, the motifs whose over-expressiveness mainly benefits from its constituting parts can be filtered out effectively. To discover conditional phosphorylation motifs, we propose an algorithm called C-Motif for a non-redundant identification of significant phosphorylation motifs. C-Motif is implemented under the Apriori framework, and it tests the statistical significance together with the frequency of candidate motifs in a single stage. Experiments demonstrate that C-Motif outperforms some current algorithms such as MMFPh and Motif-All in terms of coverage and non-redundancy of the results and efficiency of the execution. The source code of C-Motif is available at: https://sourceforge. net/projects/cmotif/. PMID:26356863

  4. Study of the CH2I + O2 Reaction with a Step-Scan Fourier-Transform Infrared Absorption Spectrometer: Spectra of the Criegee Intermediate CH2OO and DIOXIRANE(?)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2014-06-01

    The Criegee intermediates are carbonyl oxides that play key roles in ozonolysis of unsaturated organic compounds. This mechanism was first proposed by Criegee in 1949, but the first direct observation of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO in the gaseous phase has been reported only recently using photoionization mass spectrometry. Our group has reported the low-resolution IR spectra of CH2OO, produced from the reaction of CH2I + O2, with a second-generation step-scan Fourier-transfom IR absorption spectrometer. The spectral assignments were based on comparison of observed vibrational wavenumbers and rotational contours with theoretical predictions. Here, we report the IR absorption spectra of CH2OO at a resolution of 0.32 wn, showing partially rotationally-resolved structures. The origins of the νb{3}, νb{4}, νb{6}, and νb{8} vibrational modes of CH2OO are determined to be 1434.1, 1285.7, 909.2, and 847.3 wn, respectively. With the analysis of the vibration-rotational spectra, we provide a definitive assignment of these bands to CH2OO. The observed vibrational wavenumbers indicate a zwitterionic contribution to this singlet biradical showing a strengthened C-O bond and a weakened O-O bond. This zwitterionic character results to an extremely rapid self reaction via a cyclic dimer to form 2H2CO + O2 (1Δg). Another group of weak transient IR bands centered at 1231.5, 1213.3, and 899.8 wn are also observed. These bands might be contributed from dioxirane, which was postulated to be another important intermediate that might be isomerized from the Criegee intermediate in the reaction of O3 with 1-alkenes. O. Welz, J. D. Savee, D. L. Osborn, S. S.Vasu, C. J. Percival, D. E. Shallcross, and C. A. Taatjes, Science 335, 204 (2012). Y.-T. Su, Y.-H. Huang, H. A.Witek, and Y.-P. Lee, Science 340, 174 (2013).

  5. Evolutionary constraints of phosphorylation in eukaryotes, prokaryotes, and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gnad, Florian; Forner, Francesca; Zielinska, Dorota F; Birney, Ewan; Gunawardena, Jeremy; Mann, Matthias

    2010-12-01

    High accuracy mass spectrometry has proven to be a powerful technology for the large scale identification of serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylation in the living cell. However, despite many described phosphoproteomes, there has been no comparative study of the extent of phosphorylation and its evolutionary conservation in all domains of life. Here we analyze the results of phosphoproteomics studies performed with the same technology in a diverse set of organisms. For the most ancient organisms, the prokaryotes, only a few hundred proteins have been found to be phosphorylated. Applying the same technology to eukaryotic species resulted in the detection of thousands of phosphorylation events. Evolutionary analysis shows that prokaryotic phosphoproteins are preferentially conserved in all living organisms, whereas-site specific phosphorylation is not. Eukaryotic phosphosites are generally more conserved than their non-phosphorylated counterparts (with similar structural constraints) throughout the eukaryotic domain. Yeast and Caenorhabditis elegans are two exceptions, indicating that the majority of phosphorylation events evolved after the divergence of higher eukaryotes from yeast and reflecting the unusually large number of nematode-specific kinases. Mitochondria present an interesting intermediate link between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic domains. Applying the same technology to this organelle yielded 174 phosphorylation sites mapped to 74 proteins. Thus, the mitochondrial phosphoproteome is similarly sparse as the prokaryotic phosphoproteomes. As expected from the endosymbiotic theory, phosphorylated as well as non-phosphorylated mitochondrial proteins are significantly conserved in prokaryotes. However, mitochondrial phosphorylation sites are not conserved throughout prokaryotes, consistent with the notion that serine/threonine phosphorylation in prokaryotes occurred relatively recently in evolution. Thus, the phosphoproteome reflects major events in the

  6. A Closer Look at the Spectroscopic Properties of Possible Reaction Intermediates in WT and Mutant (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl Diphosphate Reductase (IspH/LytB)†

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weiya; Lees, Nicholas S.; Hall, Dominique; Welideniya, Dhanushi; Hoffman, Brian M.; Duin, Evert C.

    2012-01-01

    (E)-4-Hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl diphosphate reductase (IspH or LytB) catalyzes the terminal step of the MEP/DOXP pathway where it converts (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl diphosphate (HMBPP) into the two products isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. The reaction involves the reductive elimination of the C4 hydroxyl group, using a total of two electrons. Here we show that the active form of IspH contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster and not the [3Fe-4S] form. Our studies show that the cluster is not only the direct electron source for the reaction but that a reaction intermediate is bound directly to the cluster. This active form, has been trapped in a state, dubbed FeSA, that was detected in EPR spectroscopy when one-electron-reduced IspH was incubated with HMBPP. In addition, three mutants of IspH protein have been prepared and studied, His42, His124 and Glu126 (Aquifex aeolicus numbering), with particular attention to the effects on the cluster properties and possible reaction intermediates. None of the mutants affected the properties of the [4Fe-4S]+ cluster significantly, but different effects were observed when one-electron-reduced forms were incubated with HMBPP. Replacing the His42 led to an increased Km value and much lower catalytic efficiency, confirming the role of this residue in substrate binding. Replacing the His124 also resulted in lower catalytic efficiency. In this case, however, enzyme showed the loss of the [4Fe-4S]+ EPR signal upon addition of HMBPP without the subsequent formation of the FeSA signal. Instead, a radical-type signal was observed in some of the samples indicating that this residue plays a role in the correct positioning of the substrate. The incorrect orientation in the mutant leads to the formation of substrate-based radicals instead of the cluster-bound-intermediate complex FeSA. Replacing the Glu126 also resulted in lower catalytic efficiency, with yet a third type of EPR signal being detected upon incubation with

  7. Ni/Fe-supported over hydrotalcites precursors as catalysts for clean and selective oxidation of Basic Yellow 11: reaction intermediates determination.

    PubMed

    Ovejero, G; Rodríguez, A; Vallet, A; García, J

    2013-01-01

    In this work, Basic Yellow 11 (BY 11) was employed as model compound to study catalytic wet air oxidation as a pre-treatment step to the conventional biological oxidation. Ni and Fe catalysts supported over hydrotalcite (HT) were prepared by incipient wetness and excess impregnation to obtain catalysts with different metal loadings (from 1 to 10 wt.%). HTs were synthesized by co-precipitation and characterized with XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), BET, thermogravimetric analysis and SEM. Results showed that dye conversion increased with Ni and Fe content up to 7 wt.% and that the most effective catalyst were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation. The influence of metal loading in the catalyst, and the preparation method as well as the reaction conditions was investigated. A mechanism and reaction pathways for BY 11 during catalytic liquid phase oxidation have also been proposed. PMID:22960061

  8. Diallyl Trisulfide Is a Fast H2S Donor, but Diallyl Disulfide Is a Slow One: The Reaction Pathways and Intermediates of Glutathione with Polysulfides.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dong; Wu, Haixia; Wong, Ming Wah; Huang, Dejian

    2015-09-01

    Diallyl trisulfide (DATS) reacts rapidly with glutathione (GSH) to release H2S through thiol-disulfide exchange followed by allyl perthiol reduction by GSH. Yet diallyl disulfide (DADS) only releases a minute amount of H2S via a sluggish reaction with GSH through an α-carbon nucleophilic substitution pathway. The results clarify the misunderstanding of DADS as a rapid H2S donor, which is attributed to its DATS impurity. PMID:26301500

  9. ATP-driven transhydrogenation and ionization of water in a reconstituted glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (phosphorylating and non-phosphorylating) model system.

    PubMed

    Serrano, A; Mateos, M I; Losada, M

    1993-12-30

    In an unbuffered medium, an intense acidification occurs during the oxidation of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P) to 3-phospho-D-glycerate (PGA) catalyzed by NADP(+)-specific non-phosphorylating G3P dehydrogenase, an enzyme that photosynthetic eukaryotic cells contain exclusively in their cytosol. The true enzymatic character of this proton release is the consequence of the following redox/acid-base reaction: G3P + NADP+ + H2O-->PGA + NADPH + 2H+. When the well-established ATP-dependent reduction of PGA to G3P, catalyzed by PGA kinase and NAD(+)-specific phosphorylating G3P dehydrogenase, was coupled through the intermediate G3P to the above reverse oxidation reaction, a transient alkalinization of the medium followed by its acidification accompanied transhydrogenation from NADH to NADP+. The significance of the observed endergonic transhydrogenation and ionization of water at the expense of the chemical energy of ATP in this reconstituted enzyme system as well as its relevance for the export of reducing power (H-) across the chloroplast membrane and the maintenance of the pH gradient that exists between the stroma and the cytosol are discussed. PMID:8280152

  10. The reaction of pristane (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane) with radiolytically generated reactive oxygen intermediates results in a stable genotoxic compound as assessed by the SOS chromotest.

    PubMed

    Janz, S; Brede, O; Müller, J

    1991-07-01

    The most widely studied model of plasmacytomagenesis is the induction of plasmacytomas in BALB/c mice by i.p. injections of the isoalkane pristane (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane). Employing a simple quantitative and well-established short-term bacterial genotoxicity assay, the SOS chromotest, as a model system, we have investigated whether pristane may potentially be involved in causing or modulating the genotoxic events thought to induce plasma cell tumorigenesis. We found that incorporation of pristane into the cell membranes enhance the SOS response in Escherichia coli PQ37 and PQ300 induced by gamma-radiation under hyperoxic conditions. Moreover, the oxidation of pristane by radiolytically generated reactive oxygen intermediates yielded a stable, genotoxic product active on E. coli PQ300, a SOS tester strain designed to detect oxidative genotoxins. We discuss these findings in relation to the tumor-promoting role of the chronic i.p. inflammation that accompanies plasmacytomagenesis and conclude that, under these specific conditions, pristane may possess a previously unrecognized genotoxic activity in its tumorigenic potential. PMID:2070489

  11. Magnetic field effects on electron transfer reactions involving sextet-spin ( S = 5/2) intermediates generated on photoexcitation of a Cr(III)-porphyrin complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yukie; Hoshino, Mikio; Hayashi, Hisaharu

    The excited trip-sextet ( 6 T 1 ) state of chloro-(3-methylimidazol)-( meso -tetraphenylporphyrinato) chromium(III) (Cr III P) is quenched by 1,1 '-dibenzyl-4,4 '-bipyridinium (BV 2+ ) in acetonitrile through electron transfer to give 5 (Cr III P .+ ) and 2 BV .+ . The intermediate is a geminate ion pair in the sextet (Sx) state 6 [ 5 (Cr III P .+ ) 2 BV .+ ], which decays through either the escape from a solvent cage to give the free ions or the spin conversion to the quartet (Qa) state followed by back electron transfer. The free ion yield ( ΦFI ) increased with increasing magnetic field from 0 to 4 T and then slightly decreased from 4 T to 10 T. These magnetic field effects are explained as follows. Under low fields where the Zeeman splitting of the spin sublevels is lower than or comparable with the electron spin dipole-dipole interaction within 5 (Cr III P .+ ), this interaction effectively induces the Sx ⇔Qa conversion of [ 5 (Cr III P .+ ) 2 BV + ] to result in low ΦFI values. Under high fields where the Zeeman splitting is larger than the dipole-dipole interaction, the Sx Qa conversion is decreased with increasing field to cause higher ΦFI values. The slight decrease in ΦFI above 4 T may be due to the Δg mechanism.

  12. Diminished CAGE Effect in {p}-H2: IR Identification of Intermediates in Addition Reactions of CL Atom with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yuan-Pern; Bahou, Mohammed; Golec, Barbara

    2011-06-01

    We report infrared absorption spectra of several free radicals produced upon reaction of Cl atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons isolated in solid {p}-H2. Cl atoms were produced by in situ photodissociation of Cl2 isolated in solid {p}-H2 at 365 nm. In experiments with the Cl2/C6H6/{p}-H2 matrices, intense absorption features at 617.0, 719.8, 956.0, and 1430.5 Cm-1 and weaker ones at 577.1, 833.6, 876.8, 833.6, 983.0, 993.5, 1008.0, 1026.4, 1112.5, 1118.5, 1179.0, 1406.5, 1509.4, 2967.2, 3054.3, 3063.4, 3070.9, and 3083.9 Cm-1 appeared upon irradiation of the matrix at 365 nm and increased in intensity upon subsequent annealing of the matrix at 4.8 K for a few minutes. By comparison of vibrational wavenumbers and deuterium isotopic shifts predicted with the B3PW91 and MPW1PW91/aug-cc-pVTZ methods, these features are readily assigned to the σ-complex of ClC6H6 (chlorocyclohexadienyl radical), rather than the previously proposed π-complex. In experiments with the Cl2/C2H2/{p}-H2 matrices, the 1-chloroethyl radicals (CHClCH3) and chloroethene (C2H3Cl) are identified as the main products of the Cl + C2H2 reaction in solid {p}-H2. The assignments of IR absorption lines at 738.2, 1027.6, 1283.4, 1377.1, 1426.6, 1442.6, and 2861.2 Cm-1 to 1-chloroethyl radicals are based on comparison of the observed vibrational wavenumbers and 13C- and D-isotopic shifts with those predicted with the B3LYP and MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ methods. These results indicate that the primary products of the addition reaction Cl + C2H2, the 2-chlorovinyl radicals, are unstable; they react readily with {p}-H2 to form CHClCH3 and C2H3Cl. If time permits, other examples such as Cl + 1, 3-butadien and H + C6H6 or C6H5Cl will be discussed. These results serve as excellent examples to demonstrate that the diminished cage effect of solid {p}-H2 makes production of free radicals via bimolecular reactions feasible.

  13. Thermally-generated reactive intermediates: Trapping of the parent ferrocene-based o-quinodimethane and reactions of diradicals generated by hydrogen-atom transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.M.

    1993-09-01

    Ferrocenocyclobutene is prepared by flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of the N-amino-2-phenylaziridine hydrazone of 2-methylferrocenealdehyde. In the second section of this dissertation, a series of hydrocarbon rearrangements were observed. FVP of o-allyltoluene at 0.1 Torr (700--900 C) gives 2-methylindan and indene, accompanied by o-propenyltoluene. FVP of 2-methyl-2`-vinylbiphenyl gives 9-methyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene, which fits the proposed mechanism. However, FVP of 2-(o-methylbenzyl)styrene gives mainly anthracene and 1-methylanthracene. This cyclization reaction was also successful with o-allylphenol and o-(2-methylallyl)phenol.

  14. Reactions of C{sub 2}H{sub 5} radicals with O, O{sub 3}, and NO{sub 3}: Decomposition pathways of the intermediate C{sub 2}H{sub 5}O radical

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyermann, K.; Seeba, J.; Olzmann, M.; Viskolcz

    1999-07-22

    Alkoxy radicals are important species in the atmospheric degradation of hydrocarbons as well as in combustion processes. Additionally, they play a crucial role in the pyrolysis of oxygen-containing hydrocarbons. The reactions of C{sub 2}H{sub 5} with O, O{sub 3}, and NO{sub 3} have been investigated in a discharge flow reactor at room temperature and pressures between 1 and 3 mbar. The reaction products were detected by mass spectrometry with electron-impact ionization. The product pattern observed is explained in terms of the decomposition of an intermediately formed, chemically activated ethoxy radical. It is shown that, with this assumption, the experimentally determined branching ratios of the different product channels can be reproduced nearly quantitatively by RRKM calculations based on ab initio results for the stationary points of the potential energy surface of C{sub 2}H{sub 5}O. For C{sub 2}H{sub 5} + O and C{sub 2}H{sub 5} + O{sub 3}, the existence of an additional, parallel channel leading to OH has to be assumed.. High-pressure Arrhenius parameters for the unimolecular reactions of the ethoxy radical are given and discussed.

  15. Extensional flow convecting a reactant undergoing a first order homogeneous reaction and diffusional mass transfer from a sphere at low to intermediate Peclet and Damkohler numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, N. Y.; Reed, X. B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Forced convective diffusion-reaction is considered for viscous axisymmetric extensional convecting velocity in the neighborhood of a sphere. For Peclet numbers in the range 0.1 less than or equal to Pe less than or equal to 500 and for Damkohler numbers increasing with increasing Pe but in the overall range 0.02 less than or equal to Da less than or equal to 10, average and local Sherwood numbers have been computed. By introducing the eigenfunction expansion c(r, Theta) = Sum of c(n)(r)P(n)(cos Theta) into the forced convective diffusion equation for the concentration of a chemical species undergoing a first order homogeneous reaction and by using properties of the Legendre functions Pn(cos Theta), the variable coefficient PDE can be reduced to a system of N + 1 second order ODEs for the radial functions c(sub n)(r), n = 0, 1, 2,..., N. The adaptive grid algorithm of Pereyra and Lentini can be used to solve the corresponding 2(N + 1) first order differential equations as a two-point boundary value problem on 1 less than or equal to r less than or equal to r(sub infinity). Convergence of the expansion for a specific value of N can thus be established and provides 'spectral' behavior as well as the full concentration field c(r, Theta).

  16. Theoretical vibrational spectroscopy of intermediates and the reaction mechanism of the guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis by the protein complex Ras-GAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrenova, Maria G.; Grigorenko, Bella L.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.

    2016-09-01

    The structures and vibrational spectra of the reacting species upon guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis to guanosine diphosphate and inorganic phosphate (Pi) trapped inside the protein complex Ras-GAP were analyzed following the results of QM/MM simulations. The frequencies of the phosphate vibrations referring to the reactants and to Pi were compared to those observed in the experimental FTIR studies. A good correlation between the theoretical and experimental vibrational data provides a strong support to the reaction mechanism of GTP hydrolysis by the Ras-GAP enzyme system revealed by the recent QM/MM modeling. Evolution of the vibrational bands associated with the inorganic phosphate Pi during the elementary stages of GTP hydrolysis is predicted.

  17. Theoretical vibrational spectroscopy of intermediates and the reaction mechanism of the guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis by the protein complex Ras-GAP.

    PubMed

    Khrenova, Maria G; Grigorenko, Bella L; Nemukhin, Alexander V

    2016-09-01

    The structures and vibrational spectra of the reacting species upon guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis to guanosine diphosphate and inorganic phosphate (Pi) trapped inside the protein complex Ras-GAP were analyzed following the results of QM/MM simulations. The frequencies of the phosphate vibrations referring to the reactants and to Pi were compared to those observed in the experimental FTIR studies. A good correlation between the theoretical and experimental vibrational data provides a strong support to the reaction mechanism of GTP hydrolysis by the Ras-GAP enzyme system revealed by the recent QM/MM modeling. Evolution of the vibrational bands associated with the inorganic phosphate Pi during the elementary stages of GTP hydrolysis is predicted. PMID:27214270

  18. Struvite and prebiotic phosphorylation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, G. J.; Orgel, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    Struvite rather than apatite or amorphous calcium phosphate is precipitated when phosphate is added to seawater containing more than 0.01M NH4+ ions. Struvite may have precipitated from evaporating seawater on the primitive earth, and may have been important for prebiotic phosphorylation.

  19. New mechanistic insight into the oxygen reduction reaction on Ruddlesden–Popper cathodes for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Wenyuan; Guan, Bo; Zhang, Xinxin; Yan, Jianhua; Zhou, Yue; Liu, Xingbo

    2016-01-01

    Ruddlesden–Popper (R–P) phase materials have been investigated widely as cathode candidates for IT-SOFCs. However, widespread application of R–P phase cathodes demands further improvement in electrode activity whose progress is hindered by the limited information in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The ORR mechanism for the R–P phase is therefore investigated in this paper using (LaSr)2NiO4d as an example. Accurate characterization of the surface oxygen exchange process is realized by developing thin and dense polycrystalline LSNO layers via a versatile spray-modified pressing method we invented before to avoid perceptible bulk diffusion contribution, surface enrichment and geometry complication. The governing factors ofmore » the ORR are identified as oxygen adsorption and incorporation based on the findings in reaction orders from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), stoichiometryrelated chemical capacitance and intrinsic anisotropic properties. The incorporation rate is proven to drastically depend on the amount of interstitial oxygen O00 i . Since the unfilled interstitial sites V i in the R–P phase serve to accommodate the adsorbed oxygen during incorporation, like vacancies in the perovskite structure V O , moreO00 i would seem to suppress the kinetics of this process. In regards to this, for the first time, a physical model is proposed to reconcile the discrepancy between the experimental results and intuitive reasoning. Based on supporting evidence, this model illustrates a possibility of how O00 i works to regulate the exchange rate, and how the contradiction between V O and O00 i is harmonized so that the latter in the R–P structure also positively promotes the incorporation rate in the ORR« less

  20. New mechanistic insight into the oxygen reduction reaction on Ruddlesden–Popper cathodes for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wenyuan; Guan, Bo; Zhang, Xinxin; Yan, Jianhua; Zhou, Yue; Liu, Xingbo

    2016-01-01

    Ruddlesden–Popper (R–P) phase materials have been investigated widely as cathode candidates for IT-SOFCs. However, widespread application of R–P phase cathodes demands further improvement in electrode activity whose progress is hindered by the limited information in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The ORR mechanism for the R–P phase is therefore investigated in this paper using (LaSr)2NiO4#2;d as an example. Accurate characterization of the surface oxygen exchange process is realized by developing thin and dense polycrystalline LSNO layers via a versatile spray-modified pressing method we invented before to avoid perceptible bulk diffusion contribution, surface enrichment and geometry complication. The governing factors of the ORR are identified as oxygen adsorption and incorporation based on the findings in reaction orders from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), stoichiometryrelated chemical capacitance and intrinsic anisotropic properties. The incorporation rate is proven to drastically depend on the amount of interstitial oxygen O00 i #2;#3;. Since the unfilled interstitial sites V#3; i #2;#3; in the R–P phase serve to accommodate the adsorbed oxygen during incorporation, like vacancies in the perovskite structure V#4;#4; O #2;#3;, moreO00 i would seem to suppress the kinetics of this process. In regards to this, for the first time, a physical model is proposed to reconcile the discrepancy between the experimental results and intuitive reasoning. Based on supporting evidence, this model illustrates a possibility of how O00 i works to regulate the exchange rate, and how the contradiction between V#4;#4; O and O00 i is harmonized so that the latter in the R–P structure also positively promotes the incorporation rate in the ORR

  1. THE EFFECT OF THE {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O REACTION ON THE BLUE LOOPS IN INTERMEDIATE-MASS STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Halabi, Ghina M.; El Eid, Mounib F.; Champagne, Arthur

    2012-12-10

    We present stellar evolutionary sequences of stars in the mass range 5-12 M{sub Sun }, having solar-like initial composition. The stellar models are obtained using updated input physics, including recent rates of thermonuclear reactions. We investigate the effects of a modification of the {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O reaction rate, as suggested by recent evaluations, on the formation and extension of the blue loops encountered during the evolution of the stars in the above mass range. We find that a reduced {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O rate, as described in the text, has a striking impact on the physical conditions of burning and mixing during shell hydrogen burning when the blue loops are formed. In particular, we find that the efficiency of shell hydrogen burning is crucial for the formation of an extended blue loop. We show that a significantly reduced {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O rate affects severely the extension of the blue loops and the time spent by the star in the blue part of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram in the mass range 5-7 M{sub Sun} if the treatment of convection is based on the Schwarzschild criterion only. In this case, envelope overshooting helps to restore well-extended blue loops as supported by the observations of the Cepheid stars. If core overshooting is included during the core hydrogen and core helium burning phases, the loop formation and its properties depend on how this overshooting is treated for a given stellar mass range, as well as on its efficiency.

  2. A Crystallographic Snapshot of Tyrosine Trans-phosphorylation in Action

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Xu, C; Ma, J; Eliseenkova, A; Li, W; Pollock, P; Pitteloud, N; Miller, W; Neubert, T; Mohammadi, M

    2008-01-01

    Tyrosine trans-phosphorylation is a key event in receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, yet, the structural basis for this process has eluded definition. Here, we present the crystal structure of the FGF receptor 2 kinases caught in the act of trans-phosphorylation of Y769, the major C-terminal phosphorylation site. The structure reveals that enzyme- and substrate-acting kinases engage each other through elaborate and specific interactions not only in the immediate vicinity of Y769 and the enzyme active site, but also in regions that are as much of 18 {angstrom} away from D626, the catalytic base in the enzyme active site. These interactions lead to an unprecedented level of specificity and precision during the trans-phosphorylation on Y769. Time-resolved mass spectrometry analysis supports the observed mechanism of trans-phosphorylation. Our data provide a molecular framework for understanding the mechanism of action of Kallmann syndrome mutations and the order of trans-phosphorylation reactions in FGFRs. We propose that the salient mechanistic features of Y769 trans-phosphorylation are applicable to trans-phosphorylation of the equivalent major phosphorylation sites in many other RTKs.

  3. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometric investigations of [alpha]-dicarbonyl compounds--Probing intermediates formed in the course of the nonenzymatic browning reaction of l-ascorbic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Anke; Trage, Claudia; Schwarz, Helmut; Kroh, Lothar W.

    2007-05-01

    A new method is presented which allows the simultaneous detection of various [alpha]-dicarbonyl compounds generated in the course of the nonenzymatic browning reaction initiated by thermal treatment of l-ascorbic acid, namely: glyoxal, methylglyoxal, diacetyl, 3-deoxy-l-pentosone, and l-threosoneE 3-Deoxy-l-threosone was successfully identified as a new C4-[alpha]-dicarbonyl structure for the first time in the degradation of Vitamin C by application of this non-chromatographic mass spectrometric approach. Moreover, a more detailed elucidation of the mechanistic scenario with respect to the oxidative and nonoxidative pathways is presented by using dehydro-l-ascorbic acid and 2,3-diketo-l-gulonic acid instead of l-ascorbic acid as a starting material. Furthermore, the postulated pathways are corroborated with the aid of 13C-isotopic labeling studies. The investigations were extended to baby food, and the successful detection of [alpha]-dicarbonyl compounds characteristic for Vitamin C degradation proved the matrix tolerance of the introduced method.

  4. LiCuS, an intermediate phase in the electrochemical conversion reaction of CuS with Li: A potential environment-friendly battery and solar cell material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beleanu, Andreea; Kiss, Janos; Baenitz, Michael; Majumder, Mayukh; Senyshyn, Anatoliy; Kreiner, Guido; Felser, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    The crystal structure of a ternary sulfide with the approximate composition LiCuS, which is a promising candidate for environment-friendly battery and solar cell materials is reported. The crystal structure was solved by a combination of neutron and X-ray powder diffraction data, and 7Li solid-state NMR analysis. A yellow powder, Li1.1Cu0.9S, was obtained by the reaction of CuS with a slight excess of Li metal. The compound crystallizes in the Na3AgO2 structure type in the space group Ibam. An idealized crystal structure of Li1.1Cu0.9S can be derived from the cubic Li2S structure by moving a part of the Li along the c axis so that these Li atoms become linearly coordinated by S. All the metal sites are occupied by randomly mixed Li and Cu atoms; however, there is a strong preference for linear coordination by Cu. The density functional theory calculations show that Li1.1Cu0.9S is a direct band-gap semiconductor with an energy gap of 1.95 eV in agreement with experimental data.

  5. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. Final report, August 4, 1986--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1997-12-31

    The techniques of continuous photolysis and pulsed laser flash photolysis, continuous and pulse radiolysis, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, and time-resolved fluorimetry have been used to examine intramolecular electron transfer within the solvent quenching cage, photodynamics of quenching of the excited states of transition-metal photosensitizers, the properties of excites states and one-electron reduced forms, ground- and excited-state interactions with solutes, and photoinduced oxidations of organic solutes in aqueous solution. The following specific areas were examined: (1) the parameters that govern the yields of redox products from excited-state electron-transfer quenching reactions; (2) the mediation of the properties of excited states and one-electron reduced forms by the ligands and the solution medium; (3) the effect of the interactions between the ground state of the complex and the solution components on the behavior of the excited state; (4) the yields of singlet oxygen from excited-state energy-transfer quenching by O{sub 2}; and (5) the oxidations of solutes by singlet oxygen, excited-state electron-transfer quenching, and free radicals. This report contains the abstracts of 50 publications describing the studies.

  6. Recoil studies of photonuclear reactions on natCu, natAg, natTa, and 197Au at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, I.; Haba, H.; Matsumura, H.; Sakamoto, K.; Miyamoto, Y.; Oura, Y.; Shibata, S.; Furukawa, M.

    1999-01-01

    The recoil properties of nuclides produced in the photonuclear reactions on natCu, natAg, natTa, and 197Au induced by bremsstrahlung of end-point energies (E o) of 250 to 1000 MeV have been investigated using the thick-target thick-catcher method. The obtained mean ranges of produced nuclides smoothly increase with an increase of the mass difference (ΔA) between products and target, and show E 0-independence at E 0≥600 MeV, reflecting the limiting behavior above (3, 3) resonance region. The mean kinetic energies, T, deduced from the mean ranges show the following two components; (1) (γ, xn) products by giant-resonance and/or quasi-deuteron resonance absorption, (2) (γ, xnyp) products by mainly (3, 3) resonance absorption. Slightly rapid increase of T was found around ΔA=15, 18, 24, and 25 for natCu, natAg, natTa and 197Au, respectively, reflecting a change in mechanism. Kinematic properties of the product nuclei were calculated by using the PICA (Photon-Induced Intranuclear Cascade Analysis) code. The T calculated by the PICA code at E 0=400 MeV well reproduced the experimental results of natCu, but the same calculation for natAg, natTa, and 197Au gave lower mean kinetic energies than the experimental results.

  7. Recoil studies of photonuclear reactions on natCu, natAg, natTa, and 197Au at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, I.; Haba, H.; Matsumura, H.; Sakamoto, K.; Miyamoto, Y.; Oura, Y.; Shibata, S.; Furukawa, M.

    1999-01-01

    The recoil properties of nuclides produced in the photonuclear reactions on natCu, natAg, natTa, and 197Au induced by bremsstrahlung of end-point energies ( E o) of 250 to 1000 MeV have been investigated using the thick-target thick-catcher method. The obtained mean ranges of produced nuclides smoothly increase with an increase of the mass difference (ΔA) between products and target, and show E 0-independence at E 0≥600 MeV, reflecting the limiting behavior above (3, 3) resonance region. The mean kinetic energies, T, deduced from the mean ranges show the following two components; (1) (γ, xn) products by giant-resonance and/or quasi-deuteron resonance absorption, (2) (γ, xnyp) products by mainly (3, 3) resonance absorption. Slightly rapid increase of T was found around ΔA=15, 18, 24, and 25 for natCu, natAg, natTa and 197Au, respectively, reflecting a change in mechanism. Kinematic properties of the product nuclei were calculated by using the PICA (Photon-Induced Intranuclear Cascade Analysis) code. The T calculated by the PICA code at E 0=400 MeV well reproduced the experimental results of natCu, but the same calculation for natAg, natTa, and 197Au gave lower mean kinetic energies than the experimental results.

  8. Radiolytic oxidation of 1,2,4-benzenetriol. An application of time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy to kinetic studies of reaction intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, L.; Tripathi, G.N.R.; Schuler, R.H.

    1987-03-26

    In acidic solution, 1,2,4-benzenetriol is rapidly oxidized by OH or N/sub 3/ to form a mixture of neutral 2,4- and 3,4-dihydroxyphenoxyl radicals. At higher pH these radicals deprotonate (pK/sub a/(1) = 4.75) to form the 2-hydroxy-p-benzosemiquinone radical anion which exhibits a prominent resonance Raman band at 1625 cm/sup -1/ attributable to the Wilson 8a ring stretching mode. In basic solutions this radical subsequently reacts with OH/sup -/ to form the radical dianion (pK/sub a/(2) = 8.85) in which the 8a band is shifted to an appreciably lower frequency (1587 cm/sup -1/). While the absorption spectra of these latter radicals are very similar and do not allow ready examination of their interconversion by absorption spectrophotometry, the difference between these 8a frequencies is sufficiently great that the Raman method can be used to examine the acid-base equilibrium between the two forms of the radical and to follow the deprotonation kinetics. It is shown that even at high pH the radical monoanion is initially formed on oxidation by N/sub 3/ and that deprotonation subsequently occurs by its reaction with base with a rate constant of (9.6 +/- 1.5) x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ d/sup -1/. These studies illustrate very well the application of time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy as a complement to kinetic spectrophotometry in sorting out the details of secondary processes in pulse radiolysis studies.

  9. Phosphoryl transfer from α-d-glucose 1-phosphate catalyzed by Escherichia coli sugar-phosphate phosphatases of two protein superfamily types.

    PubMed

    Wildberger, Patricia; Pfeiffer, Martin; Brecker, Lothar; Rechberger, Gerald N; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2015-03-01

    The Cori ester α-d-glucose 1-phosphate (αGlc 1-P) is a high-energy intermediate of cellular carbohydrate metabolism. Its glycosidic phosphomonoester moiety primes αGlc 1-P for flexible exploitation in glucosyl and phosphoryl transfer reactions. Two structurally and mechanistically distinct sugar-phosphate phosphatases from Escherichia coli were characterized in this study for utilization of αGlc 1-P as a phosphoryl donor substrate. The agp gene encodes a periplasmic αGlc 1-P phosphatase (Agp) belonging to the histidine acid phosphatase family. Had13 is from the haloacid dehydrogenase-like phosphatase family. Cytoplasmic expression of Agp (in E. coli Origami B) gave a functional enzyme preparation (kcat for phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water, 40 s(-1)) that was shown by mass spectrometry to exhibit no free cysteines and the native intramolecular disulfide bond between Cys(189) and Cys(195). Enzymatic phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water in H2 (18)O solvent proceeded with complete (18)O label incorporation into the phosphate released, consistent with catalytic reaction through O-1-P, but not C-1-O, bond cleavage. Hydrolase activity of both enzymes was not restricted to a glycosidic phosphomonoester substrate, and d-glucose 6-phosphate was converted with a kcat similar to that of αGlc 1-P. By examining phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to an acceptor substrate other than water (d-fructose or d-glucose), we discovered that Agp exhibited pronounced synthetic activity, unlike Had13, which utilized αGlc 1-P mainly for phosphoryl transfer to water. By applying d-fructose in 10-fold molar excess over αGlc 1-P (20 mM), enzymatic conversion furnished d-fructose 1-phosphate as the main product in a 55% overall yield. Agp is a promising biocatalyst for use in transphosphorylation from αGlc 1-P. PMID:25527541

  10. The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system: regulation by protein phosphorylation and phosphorylation-dependent protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Deutscher, Josef; Aké, Francine Moussan Désirée; Derkaoui, Meriem; Zébré, Arthur Constant; Cao, Thanh Nguyen; Bouraoui, Houda; Kentache, Takfarinas; Mokhtari, Abdelhamid; Milohanic, Eliane; Joyet, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) carries out both catalytic and regulatory functions. It catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of a variety of sugars and sugar derivatives but also carries out numerous regulatory functions related to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate metabolism, to chemotaxis, to potassium transport, and to the virulence of certain pathogens. For these different regulatory processes, the signal is provided by the phosphorylation state of the PTS components, which varies according to the availability of PTS substrates and the metabolic state of the cell. PEP acts as phosphoryl donor for enzyme I (EI), which, together with HPr and one of several EIIA and EIIB pairs, forms a phosphorylation cascade which allows phosphorylation of the cognate carbohydrate bound to the membrane-spanning EIIC. HPr of firmicutes and numerous proteobacteria is also phosphorylated in an ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the bifunctional HPr kinase/phosphorylase. PTS-mediated regulatory mechanisms are based either on direct phosphorylation of the target protein or on phosphorylation-dependent interactions. For regulation by PTS-mediated phosphorylation, the target proteins either acquired a PTS domain by fusing it to their N or C termini or integrated a specific, conserved PTS regulation domain (PRD) or, alternatively, developed their own specific sites for PTS-mediated phosphorylation. Protein-protein interactions can occur with either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated PTS components and can either stimulate or inhibit the function of the target proteins. This large variety of signal transduction mechanisms allows the PTS to regulate numerous proteins and to form a vast regulatory network responding to the phosphorylation state of various PTS components. PMID:24847021

  11. The Bacterial Phosphoenolpyruvate:Carbohydrate Phosphotransferase System: Regulation by Protein Phosphorylation and Phosphorylation-Dependent Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aké, Francine Moussan Désirée; Derkaoui, Meriem; Zébré, Arthur Constant; Cao, Thanh Nguyen; Bouraoui, Houda; Kentache, Takfarinas; Mokhtari, Abdelhamid; Milohanic, Eliane; Joyet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) carries out both catalytic and regulatory functions. It catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of a variety of sugars and sugar derivatives but also carries out numerous regulatory functions related to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate metabolism, to chemotaxis, to potassium transport, and to the virulence of certain pathogens. For these different regulatory processes, the signal is provided by the phosphorylation state of the PTS components, which varies according to the availability of PTS substrates and the metabolic state of the cell. PEP acts as phosphoryl donor for enzyme I (EI), which, together with HPr and one of several EIIA and EIIB pairs, forms a phosphorylation cascade which allows phosphorylation of the cognate carbohydrate bound to the membrane-spanning EIIC. HPr of firmicutes and numerous proteobacteria is also phosphorylated in an ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the bifunctional HPr kinase/phosphorylase. PTS-mediated regulatory mechanisms are based either on direct phosphorylation of the target protein or on phosphorylation-dependent interactions. For regulation by PTS-mediated phosphorylation, the target proteins either acquired a PTS domain by fusing it to their N or C termini or integrated a specific, conserved PTS regulation domain (PRD) or, alternatively, developed their own specific sites for PTS-mediated phosphorylation. Protein-protein interactions can occur with either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated PTS components and can either stimulate or inhibit the function of the target proteins. This large variety of signal transduction mechanisms allows the PTS to regulate numerous proteins and to form a vast regulatory network responding to the phosphorylation state of various PTS components. PMID:24847021

  12. endo/exo stereoselectivity in Diels-Alder reactions of α,β-dialkylated conjugated enals to cyclic 1,3-dienes: intermediates in the synthesis of (-)-β-santalol and its analogs.

    PubMed

    Chapuis, Christian; Skuy, David; de Saint Laumer, Jean-Yves; Brauchli, Robert

    2014-10-01

    Highly exo-selective [4+2] cycloadditions of cyclopenta-1,3-diene 2a to α,β-dialkyl conjugated enals 5 are compared with the analogous endo-favored Diels-Alder reaction of cyclohexa-1,3-diene 7. The exo-stereoselectivity is lower in the homologous case of methylcyclopenta-1,3-diene 9. This diastereoselectivity is discussed either in terms of a retro-homo-Diels-Alder reaction, associated with thermodynamic control, or with respect to either a competing hetero-Diels-Alder/Claisen or Cope domino pathway, or retro-Claisen/retro-hetero-Diels-Alder of the endo-homo-cycloadducts. These hypothetical mechanisms have been examined by DFT calculations at the MPW1K(CH2 Cl2 )/6-31+G** level of theory for the AlCl3 -mediated cycloadditions of 5d to 2a and 7. Application of Corey's methodology to the γ-halogeno-α-methyl-substituted dienophiles 5a and 5b allowed an enantioselective preparation of known and useful intermediates for the synthesis of either the naturally occurring (-)-β-santalol or its potentially olfactive structural analogs. PMID:25329781

  13. Unimolecular dissociation of the propargyl radical intermediate of the CH+C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and C+C{sub 2}H{sub 3} reactions

    SciTech Connect

    McCunn, Laura R.; FitzPatrick, Benjamin L.; Krisch, Maria J.; Butler, Laurie J.; Liang, C.-W.; Lin, Jim J.

    2006-10-07

    This paper examines the unimolecular dissociation of propargyl (HCCCH{sub 2}) radicals over a range of internal energies to probe the CH+HCCH and C+C{sub 2}H{sub 3} bimolecular reactions from the radical intermediate to products. The propargyl radical was produced by 157 nm photolysis of propargyl chloride in crossed laser-molecular beam scattering experiments. The H-loss and H{sub 2} elimination channels of the nascent propargyl radicals were observed. Detection of stable propargyl radicals gave an experimental determination of 71.5 (+5/-10) kcal/mol as the lowest barrier to dissociation of the radical. This barrier is significantly lower than predictions for the lowest barrier to the radical's dissociation and also lower than calculated overall reaction enthalpies. Products from both H{sub 2}+HCCC and H+C{sub 3}H{sub 2} channels were detected at energies lower than what has been theoretically predicted. An HCl elimination channel and a minor C-H fission channel were also observed in the photolysis of propargyl chloride.

  14. Intramolecular charge transfer of 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile probed by time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption: No evidence for two ICT states and a {pi}{sigma}{sup *} reaction intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Zachariasse, Klaas A.; Druzhinin, Sergey I.; Senyushkina, Tamara; Kovalenko, Sergey A.

    2009-12-14

    For the double exponential fluorescence decays of the locally excited (LE) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) states of 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile (DMABN) in acetonitrile (MeCN) the same times {tau}{sub 1} and {tau}{sub 2} are observed. This means that the reversible LE<-->ICT reaction, starting from the initially excited LE state, can be adequately described by a two state mechanism. The most important factor responsible for the sometimes experimentally observed differences in the nanosecond decay time, with {tau}{sub 1}(LE)<{tau}{sub 1}(ICT), is photoproduct formation. By employing a global analysis of the LE and ICT fluorescence response functions with a time resolution of 0.5 ps/channel in 1200 channels reliable kinetic and thermodynamic data can be obtained. The arguments presented in the literature in favor of a {pi}{sigma}* state with a bent CN group as an intermediate in the ICT reaction of DMABN are discussed. From the appearance of an excited state absorption (ESA) band in the spectral region between 700 and 800 nm in MeCN for N,N-dimethylanilines with CN, Br, F, CF{sub 3}, and C(=O)OC{sub 2}H{sub 2} p-substituents, it is concluded that this ESA band cannot be attributed to a {pi}{sigma}{sup *} state, as only the C-C{identical_to}N group can undergo the required 120 deg. bending.

  15. Reaction of [TpRh(C2 H4 )2 ] with Dimethyl Acetylenedicarboxylate: Identification of Intermediates of the [2+2+2] Alkyne and Alkyne-Ethylene Cyclo(co)trimerizations.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Giovanni; Santos, Laura L; Posadas, Cristina M; Campos, Jesús; Mereiter, Kurt; Paneque, Margarita

    2016-09-12

    The reaction between the bis(ethylene) complex [TpRh(C2 H4 )2 ], 1, (Tp=hydrotris(pyrazolyl)borate), and dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate (DMAD) has been studied under different experimental conditions. A mixture of products was formed, in which TpRh(I) species were prevalent, whereas the presence of trapping agents, like water or acetonitrile, allowed for the stabilization and isolation of octahedral TpRh(III) compounds. An excess of DMAD gave rise to a small amount of the [2+2+2] cyclotrimerization product hexamethyl mellitate (6). Although no catalytic application of 1 was achieved, mechanistic insights shed light on the formation of stable rhodium species representing the resting state of the catalytic cycle of rhodium-mediated [2+2+2] cyclo(co)trimerization reactions. Metallacyclopentene intermediate species, generated from the activation of one alkyne and one ethylene molecule from 1, and metallacyclopentadiene species, formed by oxidative coupling of two alkynes to the rhodium centre, are crucial steps in the pathways leading to the final organometallic and organic products. PMID:27535720

  16. Acid-catalyzed carboxylic acid esterification and ester hydrolysis mechanism: acylium ion as a sharing active intermediate via a spontaneous trimolecular reaction based on density functional theory calculation and supported by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hongchang; Wang, Yilei; Hua, Ruimao

    2015-11-11

    By DFT calculation, we found that acid-catalyzed carboxylic acid esterification and ester hydrolysis are brief two-step reactions. First, the carboxylic acid hydroxyl-oxygen or ester alkyl-oxygen is protonated, which generates a highly active acylium ion. The protonation requires an activation energy (Ea) of 4-10 kcal mol(-1), and is the rate-controlling step of the esterification or hydrolysis. Sequentially, the acylium ion spontaneously reacts with two alcohol or two water molecules to form a neutral product molecule; this is a trimolecular reaction. The acylium ion is the highly active intermediate shared by esterification and hydrolysis. ESI-MS data for several typical carboxylic acids confirmed that their acylium ions are easily generated. For 2,4,6-trialkylbenzoic acid and its ester, the two unsubstituted carbons in the benzene ring are very easily protonated, and we have thus revealed the root of the success of Newman's method. Based on these results, the popular esterification and hydrolysis mechanism in organic chemistry textbooks is incorrect. PMID:26445892

  17. Stereochemical course of the reactions catalyzed by the bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate: Mannitol phosphotransferase system

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, E.G.; Knowles, J.R. ); Khandekar, S.S.; Jacobson, G.R. )

    1990-07-24

    The authors have determined the overall stereochemical course of the reactions leading to the phosphorylation of D-mannitol by mannitol-specific enzyme II (EII{sup Mtl}) of the Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate- (PEP) dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS). In the presence of enzyme I and HPr of the PTS, and of membranes containing EII{sup Mtl}, the phospho group from ((R)-{sup 16}O, {sup 17}O, {sup 18}O)PEP was transferred to D-mannitol to form mannitol 1-phosphate with overall inversion of the configuration at phosphorus with respect to that of PEP. Since in the course of these reactions enzyme I and HPr are each covalently phosphorylated at a single site and inversion of the chiral phospho group from PEP indicates an odd number of transfer steps overall, transfer from phospho-HPr to mannitol via EII{sup Mtl} must also occur in an odd number of steps. Taken together with the fact that catalytically important phospho-EII{sup Mtl} intermediates have been demonstrated biochemically, the results imply that EII{sup Mtl} is sequentially phosphorylated at two different sites during phospho transfer from phospho-HPr to mannitol. This conclusion is consistent with the available evidence on phospho-EII{sup Mtl} intermediates and in particular with the recent report that two different phospho peptides can be isolated from the fully phosphorylated protein.

  18. Reaction of the Co(II)-substrate radical pair catalytic intermediate in coenzyme B12-dependent ethanolamine ammonia-lyase in frozen aqueous solution from 190 to 217 K.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chen; Warncke, Kurt

    2008-12-15

    The decay kinetics of the aminoethanol-generated Co(II)-substrate radical pair catalytic intermediate in ethanolamine ammonia-lyase from Salmonella typhimurium have been measured on timescales of <10(5) s in frozen aqueous solution from 190 to 217 K. X-band continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of the disordered samples has been used to continuously monitor the full radical pair EPR spectrum during progress of the decay after temperature step reaction initiation. The decay to a diamagnetic state is complete and no paramagnetic intermediate states are detected. The decay exhibits three kinetic regimes in the measured temperature range, as follows. i), Low temperature range, 190 < or = T < or = 207 K: the decay is biexponential with constant fast (0.57 +/- 0.04) and slow (0.43 +/- 0.04) phase amplitudes. ii), Transition temperature range, 207 < T < 214 K: the amplitude of the slow phase decreases to zero with a compensatory rise in the fast phase amplitude, with increasing temperature. iii), High temperature range, T > or = 214 K: the decay is monoexponential. The observed first-order rate constants for the monoexponential (k(obs,m)) and the fast phase of the biexponential decay (k(obs,f)) adhere to the same linear relation on an lnk versus T(-1) (Arrhenius) plot. Thus, k(obs,m) and k(obs,f) correspond to the same apparent Arrhenius prefactor and activation energy (logA(app,f) (s(-1)) = 13.0, E(a,app,f) = 15.0 kcal/mol), and therefore, a common decay mechanism. We propose that k(obs,m) and k(obs,f) represent the native, forward reaction of the substrate through the radical rearrangement step. The slow phase rate constant (k(obs,s)) for 190 < or = T < or = 207 K obeys a different linear Arrhenius relation (logA(app,s) (s(-1)) = 13.9, E(a,app,s) = 16.6 kcal/mol). In the transition temperature range, k(obs,s) displays a super-Arrhenius increase with increasing temperature. The change in E(a,app,s) with temperature and the narrow range over

  19. Solution NMR of a 463-Residue Phosphohexomutase: Domain 4 Mobility, Substates, and Phosphoryl Transfer Defect

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, Akella V. S.; Anbanandam, Asokan; Kelm, Allek; Mehra-Chaudhary, Ritcha; Wei, Yirui; Qin, Peiwu; Lee, Yingying; Berjanskii, Mark V.; Mick, Jacob A.; Beamer, Lesa J.; Van Doren, Steven R.

    2012-01-05

    Phosphomannomutase/phosphoglucomutase contributes to the infectivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, retains and reorients its intermediate by 180°, and rotates domain 4 to close the deep catalytic cleft. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of the backbone of wild-type and S108C-inactivated enzymes were assigned to at least 90%. 13C secondary chemical shifts report excellent agreement of solution and crystallographic structure over the 14 α-helices, C-capping motifs, and 20 of the 22 β-strands. Major and minor NMR peaks implicate substates affecting 28% of assigned residues. These can be attributed to the phosphorylation state and possibly to conformational interconversions. The S108C substitution of the phosphoryl donor and acceptor slowed transformation of the glucose 1-phosphate substrate by impairing kcat. Addition of the glucose 1,6-bisphosphate intermediate accelerated this reaction by 2–3 orders of magnitude, somewhat bypassing the defect and apparently relieving substrate inhibition. The S108C mutation perturbs the NMR spectra and electron density map around the catalytic cleft while preserving the secondary structure in solution. Diminished peak heights and faster 15N relaxation suggest line broadening and millisecond fluctuations within four loops that can contact phosphosugars. 15N NMR relaxation and peak heights suggest that domain 4 reorients slightly faster in solution than domains 1–3, and with a different principal axis of diffusion. Finally, this adds to the crystallographic evidence of domain 4 rotations in the enzyme, which were previously suggested to couple to reorientation of the intermediate, substrate binding, and product release.

  20. Abiotic regioselective phosphorylation of adenosine with borate in formamide.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Hutter, Daniel; Benner, Steven A

    2015-04-01

    Nearly 40 years ago, Schoffstall and his coworkers used formamide as a solvent to permit the phosphorylation of nucleosides by inorganic phosphate to give nucleoside phosphates, which (due to their thermodynamic instability with respect to hydrolysis) cannot be easily created in water by an analogous phosphorylation (the "water problem" in prebiotic chemistry). More recently, we showed that borate could stabilize certain carbohydrates against degradation (the "asphalt problem"). Here, we combine the two concepts to show that borate can work in formamide to guide the reactivity of nucleosides under conditions where they are phosphorylated. Specifically, reaction of adenosine in formamide with inorganic phosphate and pyrophosphate in the presence of borate gives adenosine-5'-phosphate as the only detectable phosphorylated product, with formylation (as opposed to hydrolysis) being the competing reaction. PMID:25826074

  1. The deterioration of intermediate moisture foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labruza, T. P.

    1971-01-01

    Deteriorative reactions are low and food quality high if intermediate moisture content of a food is held at a water activity of 0.6 to 0.75. Information is of interest to food processing and packaging industry.

  2. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis XVI. Kinetic Relationships of the Intermediates in Steady State Photosynthesis

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Benson, A. A.; Kawaguchi, S.; Hayes, P.; Calvin, M.

    1952-06-05

    A kinetic study of the accumulation of C{sup 14} in the intermediates of steady state photosynthesis in C{sup 14}O{sub 2} provides information regarding the sequence of reactions involved. The work described applied the radio-chromatographic technique for analysis of the labeled early products. The simultaneous carboxylation reaction resulting in malic acid as well as phosphoglycerate is demonstrated in experiments at high light intensity. A comparison of radioactivities in a number of phosphorylated sugars as a function of time reveals concurrent synthesis of fructose and sedoheptulose phosphates followed by that of ribulose phosphates and later by that of glucose phosphates. The possibility that the cleavage of C{sub 4} compounds to C{sub 2} carbon dioxide acceptors may involve C{sub 7} and C{sub 5} sugars and evidence for this mechanism is presented.

  3. tRNAGlu Increases the Affinity of Glutamyl-tRNA Synthetase for Its Inhibitor Glutamyl-Sulfamoyl-Adenosine, an Analogue of the Aminoacylation Reaction Intermediate Glutamyl-AMP: Mechanistic and Evolutionary Implications

    PubMed Central

    Blais, Sébastien P.; Kornblatt, Jack A.; Barbeau, Xavier; Bonnaure, Guillaume; Lagüe, Patrick; Chênevert, Robert; Lapointe, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    For tRNA-dependent protein biosynthesis, amino acids are first activated by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) yielding the reaction intermediates aminoacyl-AMP (aa-AMP). Stable analogues of aa-AMP, such as aminoacyl-sulfamoyl-adenosines, inhibit their cognate aaRSs. Glutamyl-sulfamoyl-adenosine (Glu-AMS) is the best known inhibitor of Escherichia coli glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS). Thermodynamic parameters of the interactions between Glu-AMS and E. coli GluRS were measured in the presence and in the absence of tRNA by isothermal titration microcalorimetry. A significant entropic contribution for the interactions between Glu-AMS and GluRS in the absence of tRNA or in the presence of the cognate tRNAGlu or of the non-cognate tRNAPhe is indicated by the negative values of –TΔSb, and by the negative value of ΔCp. On the other hand, the large negative enthalpy is the dominant contribution to ΔGb in the absence of tRNA. The affinity of GluRS for Glu-AMS is not altered in the presence of the non-cognate tRNAPhe, but the dissociation constant Kd is decreased 50-fold in the presence of tRNAGlu; this result is consistent with molecular dynamics results indicating the presence of an H-bond between Glu-AMS and the 3’-OH oxygen of the 3’-terminal ribose of tRNAGlu in the Glu-AMS•GluRS•tRNAGlu complex. Glu-AMS being a very close structural analogue of Glu-AMP, its weak binding to free GluRS suggests that the unstable Glu-AMP reaction intermediate binds weakly to GluRS; these results could explain why all the known GluRSs evolved to activate glutamate only in the presence of tRNAGlu, the coupling of glutamate activation to its transfer to tRNA preventing unproductive cleavage of ATP. PMID:25860020

  4. Synaptic plasticity and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hey-Kyoung

    2009-01-01

    A number of neuronal functions, including synaptic plasticity, depend on proper regulation of synaptic proteins, many of which can be rapidly regulated by phosphorylation. Neuronal activity controls the function of these synaptic proteins by exquisitely regulating the balance of various protein kinase and protein phosphatase activity. Recent understanding of synaptic plasticity mechanisms underscores important roles that these synaptic phosphoproteins play in regulating both pre- and post-synaptic functions. This review will focus on key postsynaptic phosphoproteins that have been implicated to play a role in synaptic plasticity. PMID:16904750

  5. Structures of the Phosphorylated and VO3-bound 2H-Phosphatase Domain of Sts-2

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Jakoncic, J.; Parker, K.A.; Carpino, N; Nassar, N.

    2009-09-23

    The C-terminal domain of the suppressor of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling 1 and 2 (Sts-1 and -2) proteins has homology to the 2H-phosphatase family of enzymes. The phosphatase activity of the correspondent Sts-1 domain, Sts-1{sub PGM}, is key for its ability to negatively regulate the signaling of membrane-bound receptors including TCR and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). A nucleophilic histidine, which is transiently phosphorylated during the phosphatase reaction, is essential for the activity. Here, we present the crystal structure of Sts-2{sub PGM} in the phosphorylated active form and bound to VO{sub 3}, which represent structures of an intermediate and of a transition state analogue along the path of the dephosphorylation reaction. In the former structure, the proposed nucleophilic His366 is the only phoshorylated residue and is stabilized by several interactions with conserved basic residues within the active site. In the latter structure, the vanadium atom sits in the middle of a trigonal bipyramid formed by the three oxygen atoms of the VO{sub 3} molecule, atom NE2 of His366, and an apical water molecule Wa. The V-NE2 bond length (2.25 {angstrom}) suggests that VO{sub 3} is not covalently attached to His366 and that the reaction mechanism is partially associative. The two structures also suggest a role for Glu476 in activating a uniquely positioned water molecule. In both structures, the conformation of the active site is remarkably similar to the one seen in apo-Sts-2{sub PGM} suggesting that the spatial arrangement of the catalytic residues does not change during the dephosphorylation reaction.

  6. Arginine Coordination in Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer: Evaluation of the Effect of Arg166 Mutations in Escherichia coli Alkaline Phosphatase†,‡

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Patrick J.; Lassila, Jonathan Kyle; Fenn, Timothy D.; Zalatan, Jesse G.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Arginine residues are commonly found in the active sites of enzymes catalyzing phosphoryl transfer reactions. Numerous site-directed mutagenesis experiments establish the importance of these residues for efficient catalysis, but their role in catalysis is not clear. To examine the role of arginine residues in the phosphoryl transfer reaction, we have measured the consequences of mutations to arginine 166 in Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase on hydrolysis of ethyl phosphate, on individual reaction steps in the hydrolysis of the covalent enzyme-phosphoryl intermediate, and on thio-substitution effects. The results show that the role of the arginine side chain extends beyond its positive charge, as the Arg166Lys mutant is as compromised in activity as Arg166Ser. Through measurement of individual reaction steps, we construct a free-energy profile for the hydrolysis of the enzyme-phosphate intermediate. This analysis indicates that the arginine side chain strengthens binding by ∼3 kcal/mol and provides an additional 1-2 kcal/mol stabilization of the chemical transition state. A 2.1 Å x-ray diffraction structure of Arg166Ser AP is presented, which shows little difference in enzyme structure compared to the wild-type enzyme, but shows a significant reorientation of the bound phosphate. Altogether, these results support a model in which the arginine contributes to catalysis through binding interactions and through additional transition state stabilization that may arise from complementarity of the guanidinum group to the geometry of the trigonal bipyramidal transition state. PMID:18627128

  7. In vitro phosphorylation as tool for modification of silk and keratin fibrous materials.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Vadim; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-05-01

    An overview is given of the recent work on in vitro enzymatic phosphorylation of silk fibroin and human hair keratin. Opposing to many chemical "conventional" approaches, enzymatic phosphorylation is in fact a mild reaction and the treatment falls within "green chemistry" approach. Silk and keratin are not phosphorylated in vivo, but in vitro. This enzyme-driven modification is a major technological breakthrough. Harsh chemical chemicals are avoided, and mild conditions make enzymatic phosphorylation a real "green chemistry" approach. The current communication presents a novel approach stating that enzyme phosphorylation may be used as a tool to modify the surface charge of biocompatible materials such as keratin and silk. PMID:27075736

  8. Determination of GPCR Phosphorylation Status: Establishing a Phosphorylation Barcode.

    PubMed

    Prihandoko, Rudi; Bradley, Sophie J; Tobin, Andrew B; Butcher, Adrian J

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are rapidly phosphorylated following agonist occupation in a process that mediates receptor uncoupling from its cognate G protein, a process referred to as desensitization. In addition, this process provides a mechanism by which receptors can engage with arrestin adaptor molecules and couple to downstream signaling pathways. The importance of this regulatory process has been highlighted recently by the understanding that ligands can direct receptor signaling along one pathway in preference to another, the phenomenon of signaling bias that is partly mediated by the phosphorylation status or phosphorylation barcode of the receptor. Methods to determine the phosphorylation status of a GPCR in vitro and in vivo are necessary to understand not only the physiological mechanisms involved in GPCR signaling, but also to fully examine the signaling properties of GPCR ligands. This unit describes detailed methods for determining the overall phosphorylation pattern on a receptor (the phosphorylation barcode), as well as mass spectrometry approaches that can define the precise sites that become phosphorylated. These techniques, coupled with the generation and characterization of receptor phosphorylation-specific antibodies, provide a full palate of techniques necessary to determine the phosphorylation status of any given GPCR subtype. PMID:26344213

  9. An evolutionary view on thylakoid protein phosphorylation uncovers novel phosphorylation hotspots with potential functional implications.

    PubMed

    Grieco, Michele; Jain, Arpit; Ebersberger, Ingo; Teige, Markus

    2016-06-01

    The regulation of photosynthetic light reactions by reversible protein phosphorylation is well established today, but functional studies have so far mostly been restricted to processes affecting light-harvesting complex II and the core proteins of photosystem II. Virtually no functional data are available on regulatory effects at the other photosynthetic complexes despite the identification of multiple phosphorylation sites. Therefore we summarize the available data from 50 published phospho-proteomics studies covering the main complexes involved in photosynthetic light reactions in the 'green lineage' (i.e. green algae and land plants) as well as its cyanobacterial counterparts. In addition, we performed an extensive orthologue search for the major photosynthetic thylakoid proteins in 41 sequenced genomes and generated sequence alignments to survey the phylogenetic distribution of phosphorylation sites and their evolutionary conservation from green algae to higher plants. We observed a number of uncharacterized phosphorylation hotspots at photosystem I and the ATP synthase with potential functional relevance as well as an unexpected divergence of phosphosites. Although technical limitations might account for a number of those differences, we think that many of these phosphosites have important functions. This is particularly important for mono- and dicot plants, where these sites might be involved in regulatory processes such as stress acclimation. PMID:27117338

  10. Ligand intermediates in metal-catalyzed reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gladysz, J.A.

    1991-09-06

    This report consists of six sections, which cover pi/sigma equilibria in aldehyde and ketone complexes, abstraction of vinylic protons from alkene complexes, mechanism of rearrangement of alkylidene to alkene complexes, rearrangement of terminal acetylene to vinylidene complexes, synthesis and reactivity of lithiocarbide complexes, and new catalysts for the epimerization of secondary alcohols; carbon-hydrogen bond activation in alkoxide complexes. (WET)

  11. An Artificial Enzyme Made by Covalent Grafting of an Fe(II) Complex into β-Lactoglobulin: Molecular Chemistry, Oxidation Catalysis, and Reaction-Intermediate Monitoring in a Protein.

    PubMed

    Buron, Charlotte; Sénéchal-David, Katell; Ricoux, Rémy; Le Caër, Jean-Pierre; Guérineau, Vincent; Méjanelle, Philippe; Guillot, Régis; Herrero, Christian; Mahy, Jean-Pierre; Banse, Frédéric

    2015-08-17

    An artificial metalloenzyme based on the covalent grafting of a nonheme Fe(II) polyazadentate complex into bovine β-lactoglobulin has been prepared and characterized by using various spectroscopic techniques. Attachment of the Fe(II) catalyst to the protein scaffold is shown to occur specifically at Cys121. In addition, spectrophotometric titration with cyanide ions based on the spin-state conversion of the initial high spin (S=2) Fe(II) complex into a low spin (S=0) one allows qualitative and quantitative characterization of the metal center's first coordination sphere. This biohybrid catalyst activates hydrogen peroxide to oxidize thioanisole into phenylmethylsulfoxide as the sole product with an enantiomeric excess of up to 20 %. Investigation of the reaction between the biohybrid system and H2 O2 reveals the generation of a high spin (S=5/2) Fe(III) (η(2) -O2 ) intermediate, which is proposed to be responsible for the catalytic sulfoxidation of the substrate. PMID:26178593

  12. Surprisingly high activity for oxygen reduction reaction of selected oxides lacking long oxygen-ion diffusion paths at intermediate temperatures: a case study of cobalt-free BaFeO(3-δ).

    PubMed

    Dong, Feifei; Chen, Yubo; Chen, Dengjie; Shao, Zongping

    2014-07-23

    The widespread application of solid oxide fuel cell technology requires the development of innovative electrodes with high activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at intermediate temperatures. Here, we demonstrate that a cobalt-free parent oxide BaFeO(3-δ) (BF), which lacks long-range oxygen-ion diffusion paths, has surprisingly high electrocatalytic activity for ORR. Both in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction analysis on room-temperature powder and transmission electron microscopy on quenched powder are applied to investigate the crystal structure of BF. Despite the lack of long oxygen-ion diffusion paths, the easy redox of iron cations as demonstrated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and oxygen temperature-programmed desorption and the high oxygen vacancy concentration as supported by iodometric titration and TGA benefit the reduction of oxygen to oxygen ions. Moreover, the electrical conductivity relaxation technique in conjunction with a transient thermogravimetric study reveals very high surface exchange kinetics of BF oxide. At 700 °C, the area specific resistance of BF cathode, as expressed by a symmetrical cell configuration, is only ∼0.021 Ω cm(2), and the derived single fuel cell achieves high power output with a peak power density of 870 mW cm(-2). It suggests that an undoped BF parent oxide can be used as a high-efficiency catalyst for ORR. PMID:24978102

  13. Phosphorylation of Kraft fibers with phosphate esters.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ying; Belosinschi, Dan; Brouillette, François; Belfkira, Ahmed; Chabot, Bruno

    2014-06-15

    Phosphate esters, derived from two different long-chain aliphatic alcohols, were used as phosphorylating reagents for Kraft pulp fibers. High phosphorus contents and almost non-degraded fibers were obtained by following this pathway. The phosphorylation efficiency was influenced by the alkyl chain length of PEs since the phosphorus content in modified fibers was higher for the shorter chain reagent. Due to the heterogeneous reaction environment, the amount of grafted phosphorus was found to be almost three times higher at the surface than in the bulk of the fibers. Analyses also indicated that the phosphorus was bonded to fibers as a phosphate-like structure. Furthermore, the situation seemed to be different for the fiber surface where significant amounts of phosphorus were present in more complex structures like pyrophosphate or even oligo-phosphate. PMID:24721058

  14. Phosphorylation of vaccinia virus core proteins during transcription in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Moussatche, N; Keller, S J

    1991-01-01

    The phosphorylation of vaccinia virus core proteins has been studied in vitro during viral transcription. The incorporation of [gamma-32P]ATP into protein is linear for the first 2 min of the reaction, whereas incorporation of [3H]UTP into RNA lags for 1 to 2 min before linear synthesis. At least 12 different proteins are phosphorylated on autoradiograms of acrylamide gels, and the majority of label is associated with low-molecular-weight proteins. If the transcription reaction is reduced by dropping the pH to 7 from its optimal of 8.5, two proteins (70 and 80 kDa) are no longer phosphorylated. RNA isolated from the pH 7 transcription reaction hybridized primarily to the vaccinia virus HindIII DNA fragments D to F, whereas the transcripts synthesized at pH 8.5 hybridized to almost all of the HindIII-digested vaccinia virus DNA fragments. The differences between the pH 7.0 and 8.5 transcription reactions in phosphorylation and transcription could be eliminated by preincubating the viral cores with 2 mM ATP. In sum, the results suggest that the phosphorylation of the 70- and 80-kDa peptides may contribute to the regulation of early transcription. Images PMID:2016772

  15. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation. PMID:25482764

  16. Phosphorylation site prediction in plants.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiuming; Schulze, Waltraud X; Xu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation events on serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues are the most pervasive protein covalent bond modifications in plant signaling. Both low and high throughput studies reveal the importance of phosphorylation in plant molecular biology. Although becoming more and more common, the proteome-wide screening on phosphorylation by experiments remains time consuming and costly. Therefore, in silico prediction methods are proposed as a complementary analysis tool to enhance the phosphorylation site identification, develop biological hypothesis, or help experimental design. These methods build statistical models based on the experimental data, and they do not have some of the technical-specific bias, which may have advantage in proteome-wide analysis. More importantly computational methods are very fast and cheap to run, which makes large-scale phosphorylation identifications very practical for any types of biological study. Thus, the phosphorylation prediction tools become more and more popular. In this chapter, we will focus on plant specific phosphorylation site prediction tools, with essential illustration of technical details and application guidelines. We will use Musite, PhosPhAt and PlantPhos as the representative tools. We will present the results on the prediction of the Arabidopsis protein phosphorylation events to give users a general idea of the performance range of the three tools, together with their strengths and limitations. We believe these prediction tools will contribute more and more to the plant phosphorylation research community. PMID:25930706

  17. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation. PMID:25482764

  18. Deciphering the Interplay among Multisite Phosphorylation, Interaction Dynamics, and Conformational Transitions in a Tripartite Protein System

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Multisite phosphorylation is a common pathway to regulate protein function, activity, and interaction pattern in vivo, but routine biochemical analysis is often insufficient to identify the number and order of individual phosphorylation reactions and their mechanistic impact on the protein behavior. Here, we integrate complementary mass spectrometry (MS)-based approaches to characterize a multisite phosphorylation-regulated protein system comprising Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) and its coactivators Aurora kinase A (Aur-A) and Bora, the interplay of which is essential for mitotic entry after DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest. Native MS and cross-linking–MS revealed that Aur-A/Bora-mediated Plk1 activation is accompanied by the formation of Aur-A/Bora and Plk1/Bora heterodimers. We found that the Aur-A/Bora interaction is independent of the Bora phosphorylation state, whereas the Plk1/Bora interaction is dependent on extensive Bora multisite phosphorylation. Bottom-up and top-down proteomics analyses showed that Bora multisite phosphorylation proceeds via a well-ordered sequence of site-specific phosphorylation reactions, whereby we could reveal the involvement of up to 16 phosphorylated Bora residues. Ion mobility spectrometry–MS demonstrated that this multisite phosphorylation primes a substantial structural rearrangement of Bora, explaining the interdependence between extensive Bora multisite phosphorylation and Plk1/Bora complex formation. These results represent a first benchmark of our multipronged MS strategy, highlighting its potential to elucidate the mechanistic and structural implications of multisite protein phosphorylation. PMID:27504491

  19. DNA Oligonucleotide 3'-Phosphorylation by a DNA Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Camden, Alison J; Walsh, Shannon M; Suk, Sarah H; Silverman, Scott K

    2016-05-10

    T4 polynucleotide kinase is widely used for 5'-phosphorylation of DNA and RNA oligonucleotide termini, but no natural protein enzyme is capable of 3'-phosphorylation. Here, we report the in vitro selection of deoxyribozymes (DNA enzymes) capable of DNA oligonucleotide 3'-phosphorylation, using a 5'-triphosphorylated RNA transcript (pppRNA) as the phosphoryl donor. The basis of selection was the capture, during each selection round, of the 3'-phosphorylated DNA substrate terminus by 2-methylimidazole activation of the 3'-phosphate (forming 3'-MeImp) and subsequent splint ligation with a 5'-amino DNA oligonucleotide. Competing and precedented DNA-catalyzed reactions were DNA phosphodiester hydrolysis or deglycosylation, each also leading to a 3'-phosphate but at a different nucleotide position within the DNA substrate. One oligonucleotide 3'-kinase deoxyribozyme, obtained from an N40 random pool and named 3'Kin1, can 3'-phosphorylate nearly any DNA oligonucleotide substrate for which the 3'-terminus has the sequence motif 5'-NKR-3', where N denotes any oligonucleotide sequence, K = T or G, and R = A or G. These results establish the viabilty of in vitro selection for identifying DNA enzymes that 3'-phosphorylate DNA oligonucleotides. PMID:27063020

  20. A systems model of phosphorylation for inflammatory signaling events.

    PubMed

    Sadreev, Ildar I; Chen, Michael Z Q; Welsh, Gavin I; Umezawa, Yoshinori; Kotov, Nikolay V; Valeyev, Najl V

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation is a fundamental biochemical reaction that modulates protein activity in cells. While a single phosphorylation event is relatively easy to understand, multisite phosphorylation requires systems approaches for deeper elucidation of the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this paper we develop a mechanistic model for single- and multi-site phosphorylation. The proposed model is compared with previously reported studies. We compare the predictions of our model with experiments published in the literature in the context of inflammatory signaling events in order to provide a mechanistic description of the multisite phosphorylation-mediated regulation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) and Interferon Regulatory Factor 5 (IRF-5) proteins. The presented model makes crucial predictions for transcription factor phosphorylation events in the immune system. The model proposes potential mechanisms for T cell phenotype switching and production of cytokines. This study also provides a generic framework for the better understanding of a large number of multisite phosphorylation-regulated biochemical circuits. PMID:25333362

  1. Phosphorylation of lamins determine their structural properties and signaling functions

    PubMed Central

    Torvaldson, Elin; Kochin, Vitaly; Eriksson, John E

    2015-01-01

    Lamin A/C is part of the nuclear lamina, a meshwork of intermediate filaments underlying the inner nuclear membrane. The lamin network is anchoring a complex set of structural and linker proteins and is either directly or through partner proteins also associated or interacting with a number of signaling protein and transcription factors. During mitosis the nuclear lamina is dissociated by well established phosphorylation- dependent mechanisms. A-type lamins are, however, also phosphorylated during interphase. A recent study identified 20 interphase phosphorylation sites on lamin A/C and explored their functions related to lamin dynamics; movements, localization and solubility. Here we discuss these findings in the light of lamin functions in health and disease. PMID:25793944

  2. Evidence of histidine phosphorylation in isocitrate lyase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Roberston, E.F.; Hoyt, J.C.; Reeves, H.C.

    1987-05-01

    Escherichia coli isocitrate lyase can be phosphorylated in vitro in an ATP-dependent reaction. Partially purified extracts were incubated with ..gamma..-/sup 32/P-ATP and analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by a Western blot and autoradiography. Radioactivity was associated with the lyase only when blotting was performed under alkaline conditions. This suggests that phosphate groups are attached to the lyase via an acid-labile P-N bond rather than a more stable P-O bond. Treatment of the lyase with diethyl pyrocarbonate, a histidine modifying agent, blocks incorporation of /sup 32/P-phosphate. Treatment with phosphoramidate, a histidine phosphorylating agent, alters the isoelectric point of the lyase suggesting that the enzyme can be phosphorylated at histidine residues. Loss of catalytic activity after treatment with potato acid phosphatase indicates that isocitrate lyase activity may be modulated by phosphorylation.

  3. Effect of Bonding Temperature on Interfacial Reaction and Mechanical Properties of Diffusion-Bonded Joint Between Ti-6Al-4V and 304 Stainless Steel Using Nickel as an Intermediate Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirunavukarasu, Gopinath; Kundu, Sukumar; Mishra, Brajendra; Chatterjee, Subrata

    2014-04-01

    An investigation was carried out on the solid-state diffusion bonding between Ti-6Al-4V (TiA) and 304 stainless steel (SS) using pure nickel (Ni) of 200- μm thickness as an intermediate material prepared in vacuum in the temperature range from 973 K to 1073 K (700 °C to 800 °C) in steps of 298 K (25 °C) using uniaxial compressive pressure of 3 MPa and 60 minutes as bonding time. Scanning electron microscopy images, in backscattered electron mode, had revealed existence of layerwise Ti-Ni-based intermetallics such as either Ni3Ti or both Ni3Ti and NiTi at titanium alloy-nickel (TiA/Ni) interface, whereas nickel-stainless steel (Ni/SS) diffusion zone was free from intermetallic phases for all joints processed. Chemical composition of the reaction layers was determined in atomic percentage by energy dispersive spectroscopy and confirmed by X-ray diffraction study. Room-temperature properties of the bonded joints were characterized using microhardness evaluation and tensile testing. The maximum hardness value of ~800 HV was observed at TiA/Ni interface for the bond processed at 1073 K (800 °C). The hardness value at Ni/SS interface for all the bonds was found to be ~330 HV. Maximum tensile strength of ~206 MPa along with ~2.9 pct ductility was obtained for the joint processed at 1023 K (750 °C). It was observed from the activation study that the diffusion rate at TiA/Ni interface is lesser than that at the Ni/SS interface. From microhardness profile, fractured surfaces and fracture path, it was demonstrated that failure of the joints was initiated and propagated apparently at the TiA/Ni interface near Ni3Ti intermetallic phase.

  4. Chloroacetone photodissociation at 193 nm and the subsequent dynamics of the CH3C(O)CH2 radical--an intermediate formed in the OH + allene reaction en route to CH3 + ketene.

    PubMed

    Alligood, Bridget W; FitzPatrick, Benjamin L; Szpunar, David E; Butler, Laurie J

    2011-02-01

    We use a combination of crossed laser-molecular beam experiments and velocity map imaging experiments to investigate the primary photofission channels of chloroacetone at 193 nm; we also probe the dissociation dynamics of the nascent CH(3)C(O)CH(2) radicals formed from C-Cl bond fission. In addition to the C-Cl bond fission primary photodissociation channel, the data evidence another photodissociation channel of the precursor, C-C bond fission to produce CH(3)CO and CH(2)Cl. The CH(3)C(O)CH(2) radical formed from C-Cl bond fission is one of the intermediates in the OH + allene reaction en route to CH(3) + ketene. The 193 nm photodissociation laser allows us to produce these CH(3)C(O)CH(2) radicals with enough internal energy to span the dissociation barrier leading to the CH(3) + ketene asymptote. Therefore, some of the vibrationally excited CH(3)C(O)CH(2) radicals undergo subsequent dissociation to CH(3) + ketene products; we are able to measure the velocities of these products using both the imaging and scattering apparatuses. The results rule out the presence of a significant contribution from a C-C bond photofission channel that produces CH(3) and COCH(2)Cl fragments. The CH(3)C(O)CH(2) radicals are formed with a considerable amount of energy partitioned into rotation; we use an impulsive model to explicitly characterize the internal energy distribution. The data are better fit by using the C-Cl bond fission transition state on the S(1) surface of chloroacetone as the geometry at which the impulsive force acts, not the Franck-Condon geometry. Our data suggest that, even under atmospheric conditions, the reaction of OH with allene could produce a small branching to CH(3) + ketene products, rather than solely producing inelastically stabilized adducts. This additional channel offers a different pathway for the OH-initiated oxidation of such unsaturated volatile organic compounds, those containing a C=C=C moiety, than is currently included in atmospheric models

  5. Circadian autodephosphorylation of cyanobacterial clock protein KaiC occurs via formation of ATP as intermediate.

    PubMed

    Nishiwaki, Taeko; Kondo, Takao

    2012-05-25

    The cyanobacterial circadian oscillator can be reconstituted in vitro; mixing three clock proteins (KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC) with ATP results in an oscillation of KaiC phosphorylation with a periodicity of ~24 h. The hexameric ATPase KaiC hydrolyzes ATP bound at subunit interfaces. KaiC also exhibits autokinase and autophosphatase activities, the latter of which is particularly noteworthy because KaiC is phylogenetically distinct from typical protein phosphatases. To examine this activity, we performed autodephosphorylation assays using (32)P-labeled KaiC. The residual radioactive ATP bound to subunit interfaces was removed using a newly established method, which included the dissociation of KaiC hexamers into monomers and the reconstitution of KaiC hexamers with nonradioactive ATP. This approach ensured that only the signals derived from (32)P-labeled KaiC were examined. We detected the transient formation of [(32)P]ATP preceding the accumulation of (32)P(i). Together with kinetic analyses, our data demonstrate that KaiC undergoes dephosphorylation via a mechanism that differs from those of conventional protein phosphatases. A phosphate group at a phosphorylation site is first transferred to KaiC-bound ADP to form ATP as an intermediate, which can be regarded as a reversal of the autophosphorylation reaction. Subsequently, the ATP molecule is hydrolyzed to form P(i). We propose that the ATPase active site mediates not only ATP hydrolysis but also the bidirectional transfer of the phosphate between phosphorylation sites and the KaiC-bound nucleotide. On the basis of these findings, we can now dissect the dynamics of the KaiC phosphorylation cycle relative to ATPase activity. PMID:22493509

  6. Circadian Autodephosphorylation of Cyanobacterial Clock Protein KaiC Occurs via Formation of ATP as Intermediate*

    PubMed Central

    Nishiwaki, Taeko; Kondo, Takao

    2012-01-01

    The cyanobacterial circadian oscillator can be reconstituted in vitro; mixing three clock proteins (KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC) with ATP results in an oscillation of KaiC phosphorylation with a periodicity of ∼24 h. The hexameric ATPase KaiC hydrolyzes ATP bound at subunit interfaces. KaiC also exhibits autokinase and autophosphatase activities, the latter of which is particularly noteworthy because KaiC is phylogenetically distinct from typical protein phosphatases. To examine this activity, we performed autodephosphorylation assays using 32P-labeled KaiC. The residual radioactive ATP bound to subunit interfaces was removed using a newly established method, which included the dissociation of KaiC hexamers into monomers and the reconstitution of KaiC hexamers with nonradioactive ATP. This approach ensured that only the signals derived from 32P-labeled KaiC were examined. We detected the transient formation of [32P]ATP preceding the accumulation of 32Pi. Together with kinetic analyses, our data demonstrate that KaiC undergoes dephosphorylation via a mechanism that differs from those of conventional protein phosphatases. A phosphate group at a phosphorylation site is first transferred to KaiC-bound ADP to form ATP as an intermediate, which can be regarded as a reversal of the autophosphorylation reaction. Subsequently, the ATP molecule is hydrolyzed to form Pi. We propose that the ATPase active site mediates not only ATP hydrolysis but also the bidirectional transfer of the phosphate between phosphorylation sites and the KaiC-bound nucleotide. On the basis of these findings, we can now dissect the dynamics of the KaiC phosphorylation cycle relative to ATPase activity. PMID:22493509

  7. Data requirements for intermediate energy nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlstein, S.

    1990-01-01

    Several applications that include spallation neutron sources, space radiation effects, biomedical isotope production, accelerator shielding and radiation therapy make use of intermediate energy nuclear data extending to several GeV. The overlapping data needs of these applications are discussed in terms of what projectiles, targets and reactions are of interest. Included is a discussion of what is generally known about these data and what is needed to facilitate their use in intermediate energy applications. 40 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Chemoselective synthesis and analysis of naturally occurring phosphorylated cysteine peptides.

    PubMed

    Bertran-Vicente, Jordi; Penkert, Martin; Nieto-Garcia, Olaia; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Schmieder, Peter; Krause, Eberhard; Hackenberger, Christian P R

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to protein O-phosphorylation, studying the function of the less frequent N- and S-phosphorylation events have lagged behind because they have chemical features that prevent their manipulation through standard synthetic and analytical methods. Here we report on the development of a chemoselective synthetic method to phosphorylate Cys side-chains in unprotected peptides. This approach makes use of a reaction between nucleophilic phosphites and electrophilic disulfides accessible by standard methods. We achieve the stereochemically defined phosphorylation of a Cys residue and verify the modification using electron-transfer higher-energy dissociation (EThcD) mass spectrometry. To demonstrate the use of the approach in resolving biological questions, we identify an endogenous Cys phosphorylation site in IICB(Glc), which is known to be involved in the carbohydrate uptake from the bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS). This new chemical and analytical approach finally allows further investigating the functions and significance of Cys phosphorylation in a wide range of crucial cellular processes. PMID:27586301

  9. Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

    1981-05-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities.

  10. A comparative study of nitrite reduction by synthetic and biogenic Fe(II-III) hydroxysalts green rusts: Evidence for hydroxyl-nitrite green rust formation as an intermediate reaction product.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ona-Nguema, G.; Guerbois, D.; Morin, G.; Zhang, Y.; Noel, V.; Brest, J.

    2013-12-01

    -GR(Cl) led to the reduction of nitrite ions to ammonium, and that the production of ammonium depended on their Fe(II) content. XRD patterns indicated that both synthetic green rusts were fully oxidized into magnetite during the reaction with nitrite. For biogenic green rusts, the study revealed that both bio-GR(CO3)F and bio-GR(CO3)L were capable of reducing nitrite ions without ammonium production, suggesting the conversion of nitrite ions to nitrogen gas. Moreover, we provided evidence for the first time that the interactions of bio-GR(CO3)F with nitrite led to the formation of an hydroxy-nitrite green rust as a result of the incorporation of nitrite in the interlayer region of bio-GR(CO3)F; such an intercalation of nitrite ions was not observed in experiments with bio-GR(CO3)L. XRD analysis indicated that GR(NO2) was formed as an intermediate reaction product prior to the fully oxidation of GR to ferric oxyhydroxides. [1] Philips S., Laanbroek H. J. and Verstraete W. (2002). Rev. Environ. Sci. Biotechnol. 1, 115-141.

  11. Perspective: Spectroscopy and kinetics of small gaseous Criegee intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2015-07-01

    The Criegee intermediates, carbonyl oxides proposed by Criegee in 1949 as key intermediates in the ozonolysis of alkenes, play important roles in many aspects of atmospheric chemistry. Because direct detection of these gaseous intermediates was unavailable until recently, previous understanding of their reactions, derived from indirect experimental evidence, had great uncertainties. Recent laboratory detection of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO and some larger members, produced from ultraviolet irradiation of corresponding diiodoalkanes in O2, with various methods such as photoionization, ultraviolet absorption, infrared absorption, and microwave spectroscopy opens a new door to improved understanding of the roles of these Criegee intermediates. Their structures and spectral parameters have been characterized; their significant zwitterionic nature is hence confirmed. CH2OO, along with other products, has also been detected directly with microwave spectroscopy in gaseous ozonolysis reactions of ethene. The detailed kinetics of the source reaction, CH2I + O2, which is critical to laboratory studies of CH2OO, are now understood satisfactorily. The kinetic investigations using direct detection identified some important atmospheric reactions, including reactions with NO2, SO2, water dimer, carboxylic acids, and carbonyl compounds. Efforts toward the characterization of larger Criegee intermediates and the investigation of related reactions are in progress. Some reactions of CH3CHOO are found to depend on conformation. This perspective examines progress toward the direct spectral characterization of Criegee intermediates and investigations of the associated reaction kinetics, and indicates some unresolved problems and prospective challenges for this exciting field of research.

  12. Synthesis of Isomeric Phosphoubiquitin Chains Reveals that Phosphorylation Controls Deubiquitinase Activity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Huguenin-Dezot, Nicolas; De Cesare, Virginia; Peltier, Julien; Knebel, Axel; Kristaryianto, Yosua Adi; Rogerson, Daniel T; Kulathu, Yogesh; Trost, Matthias; Chin, Jason W

    2016-07-26

    Ubiquitin is post-translationally modified by phosphorylation at several sites, but the consequences of these modifications are largely unknown. Here, we synthesize multi-milligram quantities of ubiquitin phosphorylated at serine 20, serine 57, and serine 65 via genetic code expansion. We use these phosphoubiquitins for the enzymatic assembly of 20 isomeric phosphoubiquitin dimers, with different sites of isopeptide linkage and/or phosphorylation. We discover that phosphorylation of serine 20 on ubiquitin converts UBE3C from a dual-specificity E3 ligase into a ligase that primarily synthesizes K48 chains. We profile the activity of 31 deubiquitinases on the isomeric phosphoubiquitin dimers in 837 reactions, and we discover that phosphorylation at distinct sites in ubiquitin can activate or repress cleavage of a particular linkage by deubiquitinases and that phosphorylation at a single site in ubiquitin can control the specificity of deubiquitinases for distinct ubiquitin linkages. PMID:27425610

  13. Protein phosphorylation in chloroplasts - a survey of phosphorylation targets.

    PubMed

    Baginsky, Sacha

    2016-06-01

    The development of new software tools, improved mass spectrometry equipment, a suite of optimized scan types, and better-quality phosphopeptide affinity capture have paved the way for an explosion of mass spectrometry data on phosphopeptides. Because phosphoproteomics achieves good sensitivity, most studies use complete cell extracts for phosphopeptide enrichment and identification without prior enrichment of proteins or subcellular compartments. As a consequence, the phosphoproteome of cell organelles often comes as a by-product from large-scale studies and is commonly assembled from these in meta-analyses. This review aims at providing some guidance on the limitations of meta-analyses that combine data from analyses with different scopes, reports on the current status of knowledge on chloroplast phosphorylation targets, provides initial insights into phosphorylation site conservation in different plant species, and highlights emerging information on the integration of gene expression with metabolism and photosynthesis by means of protein phosphorylation. PMID:26969742

  14. Interphase phosphorylation of lamin A.

    PubMed

    Kochin, Vitaly; Shimi, Takeshi; Torvaldson, Elin; Adam, Stephen A; Goldman, Anne; Pack, Chan-Gi; Melo-Cardenas, Johanna; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Goldman, Robert D; Eriksson, John E

    2014-06-15

    Nuclear lamins form the major structural elements that comprise the nuclear lamina. Loss of nuclear structural integrity has been implicated as a key factor in the lamin A/C gene mutations that cause laminopathies, whereas the normal regulation of lamin A assembly and organization in interphase cells is still undefined. We assumed phosphorylation to be a major determinant, identifying 20 prime interphase phosphorylation sites, of which eight were high-turnover sites. We examined the roles of these latter sites by site-directed mutagenesis, followed by detailed microscopic analysis - including fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and nuclear extraction techniques. The results reveal three phosphorylation regions, each with dominant sites, together controlling lamin A structure and dynamics. Interestingly, two of these interphase sites are hyper-phosphorylated in mitotic cells and one of these sites is within the sequence that is missing in progerin of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. We present a model where different phosphorylation combinations yield markedly different effects on the assembly, subunit turnover and the mobility of lamin A between, and within, the lamina, the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm of interphase cells. PMID:24741066

  15. Respiration and Oxidative Phosphorylation in Treponema pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Lysko, Paul G.; Cox, C. D.

    1978-01-01

    Exogenous and endogenously generated reduced pyridine nucleotides caused marked stimulation of O2 uptake when added to treponemal cell-free extracts, which indicated that terminal electron transport was coupled to the consumption of O2. Oxidation of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) was shown to correlate stoichiometrically with O2 reduction, suggesting that NADH was being oxidized through a mainstream respiratory chain dehydrogenase. Oxygen evolution in treponemal extracts was observed after the completion of O2 uptake which was stimulated by exogenous NADH and endogenously generated reduced NAD phosphate. Oxygen evolution was inhibited by both cyanide and pyruvate, which was consistent with O2 release from H2O2 by catalase. The addition of exogenous H2O2 to treponemal extracts caused rapid O2 evolution characteristic of a catalase reaction. A spectrophotometric assay was used to measure ATP formation in T. pallidum cell-free extracts that were stimulated with NADH. P/O ratios from 0.5 to 1.1 were calculated from the amounts of ATP formed versus NADH oxidized. Phosphorylating activity was dependent on Pi concentration and was sensitive to cyanide, N, N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone. Adenine nucleotide pools of T. pallidum were measured by the firefly luciferin-luciferase assay. Shifts in adenine nucleotide levels upon the addition of NADH to cell-free extracts were impossible to evaluate due to the presence of NAD+ nucleosidase. However, when whole cells, previously incubated under an atmosphere of 95% N2-5% CO2, were sparged with air, ATP and ADP levels increased, while AMP levels decreased. The shift was attributed to both oxidative phosphorylation and to the presence of an adenylate kinase activity. T. pallidum was also found to possess an Mg2+ - and Ca2+ -stimulated ATPase activity which was sensitive to N, N′ -dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. These data indicated a capability for oxidative phosphorylation

  16. Ultrasensitive dual phosphorylation dephosphorylation cycle kinetics exhibits canonical competition behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qingdao; Qian, Hong

    2009-09-01

    We establish a mathematical model for a cellular biochemical signaling module in terms of a planar differential equation system. The signaling process is carried out by two phosphorylation-dephosphorylation reaction steps that share common kinase and phosphatase with saturated enzyme kinetics. The pair of equations is particularly simple in the present mathematical formulation, but they are singular. A complete mathematical analysis is developed based on an elementary perturbation theory. The dynamics exhibits the canonical competition behavior in addition to bistability. Although widely understood in ecological context, we are not aware of a full range of biochemical competition in a simple signaling network. The competition dynamics has broad implications to cellular processes such as cell differentiation and cancer immunoediting. The concepts of homogeneous and heterogeneous multisite phosphorylation are introduced and their corresponding dynamics are compared: there is no bistability in a heterogeneous dual phosphorylation system. A stochastic interpretation is also provided that further gives intuitive understanding of the bistable behavior inside the cells.

  17. Time Resolved Spectroscopic Studies Relevant to Reactive Intermediates in Homogeneous Catalysis. The Migratory Insertion Reaction, P. C. Ford, S. M. Massick Coord. Chem. Rev. 2002, 226, 39-49

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Peter C.; S.M. massick

    2002-12-31

    OAK-B135 Mechanisms of the homogeneous catalytic and photocatalytic activation of small molecules such as carbon monoxide, dihydrogen and various hydrocarbons. Time-resolved spectroscopic investigations of rhodium and iridium halo carbonyl complex intermediates proposed in methanol carbonylation catalysts.

  18. OGlcNAcylation and Phosphorylation Have Opposing Structural Effects in tau: Phosphothreonine Induces Particular Conformational Order

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation and OGlcNAcylation are dynamic intracellular protein post-translational modifications that frequently are alternatively observed on the same serine and threonine residues. Phosphorylation and OGlcNAcylation commonly occur in natively disordered regions of proteins, and often have opposing functional effects. In the microtubule-associated protein tau, hyperphosphorylation is associated with protein misfolding and aggregation as the neurofibrillary tangles of Alzheimer’s disease, whereas OGlcNAcylation stabilizes the soluble form of tau. A series of peptides derived from the proline-rich domain (residues 174–251) of tau was synthesized, with free Ser/Thr hydroxyls, phosphorylated Ser/Thr (pSer/pThr), OGlcNAcylated Ser/Thr, and diethylphosphorylated Ser/Thr. Phosphorylation and OGlcNAcylation were found by CD and NMR to have opposing structural effects on polyproline helix (PPII) formation, with phosphorylation favoring PPII, OGlcNAcylation opposing PPII, and the free hydroxyls intermediate in structure, and with phosphorylation structural effects greater than OGlcNAcylation. For tau196–209, phosphorylation and OGlcNAcylation had similar structural effects, opposing a nascent α-helix. Phosphomimic Glu exhibited PPII-favoring structural effects. Structural changes due to Thr phosphorylation were greater than those of Ser phosphorylation or Glu, with particular conformational restriction as the dianion, with mean 3JαN = 3.5 Hz (pThr) versus 5.4 Hz (pSer), compared to 7.2, 6.8, and 6.2 Hz for Thr, Ser, and Glu, respectively, values that correlate with the backbone torsion angle ϕ. Dianionic phosphothreonine induced strong phosphothreonine amide protection and downfield amide chemical shifts (δmean = 9.63 ppm), consistent with formation of a stable phosphate-amide hydrogen bond. These data suggest potentially greater structural importance of threonine phosphorylation than serine phosphorylation due to larger induced structural effects. PMID

  19. Phosphoryl Transfer from α-d-Glucose 1-Phosphate Catalyzed by Escherichia coli Sugar-Phosphate Phosphatases of Two Protein Superfamily Types

    PubMed Central

    Wildberger, Patricia; Pfeiffer, Martin; Brecker, Lothar; Rechberger, Gerald N.; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    The Cori ester α-d-glucose 1-phosphate (αGlc 1-P) is a high-energy intermediate of cellular carbohydrate metabolism. Its glycosidic phosphomonoester moiety primes αGlc 1-P for flexible exploitation in glucosyl and phosphoryl transfer reactions. Two structurally and mechanistically distinct sugar-phosphate phosphatases from Escherichia coli were characterized in this study for utilization of αGlc 1-P as a phosphoryl donor substrate. The agp gene encodes a periplasmic αGlc 1-P phosphatase (Agp) belonging to the histidine acid phosphatase family. Had13 is from the haloacid dehydrogenase-like phosphatase family. Cytoplasmic expression of Agp (in E. coli Origami B) gave a functional enzyme preparation (kcat for phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water, 40 s−1) that was shown by mass spectrometry to exhibit no free cysteines and the native intramolecular disulfide bond between Cys189 and Cys195. Enzymatic phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water in H218O solvent proceeded with complete 18O label incorporation into the phosphate released, consistent with catalytic reaction through O-1–P, but not C-1–O, bond cleavage. Hydrolase activity of both enzymes was not restricted to a glycosidic phosphomonoester substrate, and d-glucose 6-phosphate was converted with a kcat similar to that of αGlc 1-P. By examining phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to an acceptor substrate other than water (d-fructose or d-glucose), we discovered that Agp exhibited pronounced synthetic activity, unlike Had13, which utilized αGlc 1-P mainly for phosphoryl transfer to water. By applying d-fructose in 10-fold molar excess over αGlc 1-P (20 mM), enzymatic conversion furnished d-fructose 1-phosphate as the main product in a 55% overall yield. Agp is a promising biocatalyst for use in transphosphorylation from αGlc 1-P. PMID:25527541

  20. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    SciTech Connect

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  1. Autophagy proteins regulate ERK phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Athonvarangkul, Diana; Mishall, Priti; Sahu, Srabani; Singh, Rajat

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved pathway that maintains cellular quality control. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) controls various aspects of cell physiology including proliferation. Multiple signalling cascades, including ERK, have been shown to regulate autophagy, however whether autophagy proteins (ATG) regulate cell signalling is unknown. Here we show that growth factor exposure increases the interaction of ERK cascade components with ATG proteins in the cytosol and nucleus. ERK and its upstream kinase MEK localize to the extra-luminal face of autophagosomes. ERK2 interacts with ATG proteins via its substrate-binding domains. Deleting Atg7 or Atg5 or blocking LC3 lipidation or ATG5–ATG12 conjugation decreases ERK phosphorylation. Conversely, increasing LC3-II availability by silencing the cysteine protease ATG4B or acute trehalose exposure increases ERK phosphorylation. Decreased ERK phosphorylation in Atg5−/− cells does not occur from overactive phosphatases. Our findings thus reveal an unconventional function of ATG proteins as cellular scaffolds in the regulation of ERK phosphorylation. PMID:24240988

  2. Electron capture dissociation mass spectrometric analysis of lysine-phosphorylated peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kowalewska, Karolina; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Ruman, Tomasz; Frączyk, Tomasz; Rode, Wojciech; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins is an essential signalling mechanism in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Although N-phosphorylation of basic amino acid is known for its importance in biological systems, it is still poorly explored in terms of products and mechanisms. In the present study, two MS fragmentation methods, ECD (electron-capture dissociation) and CID (collision-induced dissociation), were tested as tools for analysis of N-phosphorylation of three model peptides, RKRSRAE, RKRARKE and PLSRTLSVAAKK. The peptides were phosphorylated by reaction with monopotassium phosphoramidate. The results were confirmed by 1H NMR and 31P NMR studies. The ECD method was found useful for the localization of phosphorylation sites in unstable lysine-phosphorylated peptides. Its main advantage is a significant reduction of the neutral losses related to the phosphoramidate moiety. Moreover, the results indicate that the ECD–MS may be useful for analysis of regioselectivity of the N-phosphorylation reaction. Stabilities of the obtained lysine-phosphorylated peptides under various conditions were also tested. PMID:20144148

  3. Phosphorylation in halobacterial signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, J; Tolliday, N; Schmitt, C; Schuster, S C; Oesterhelt, D

    1995-01-01

    Regulated phosphorylation of proteins has been shown to be a hallmark of signal transduction mechanisms in both Eubacteria and Eukarya. Here we demonstrate that phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are also the underlying mechanism of chemo- and phototactic signal transduction in Archaea, the third branch of the living world. Cloning and sequencing of the region upstream of the cheA gene, known to be required for chemo- and phototaxis in Halobacterium salinarium, has identified cheY and cheB analogs which appear to form part of an operon which also includes cheA and the following open reading frame of 585 nucleotides. The CheY and CheB proteins have 31.3 and 37.5% sequence identity compared with the known signal transduction proteins CheY and CheB from Escherichia coli, respectively. The biochemical activities of both CheA and CheY were investigated following their expression in E.coli, isolation and renaturation. Wild-type CheA could be phosphorylated in a time-dependent manner in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP and Mg2+, whereas the mutant CheA(H44Q) remained unlabeled. Phosphorylated CheA was dephosphorylated rapidly by the addition of wild-type CheY. The mutant CheY(D53A) had no effect on phosphorylated CheA. The mechanism of chemo- and phototactic signal transduction in the Archaeon H.salinarium, therefore, is similar to the two-component signaling system known from chemotaxis in the eubacterium E.coli. Images PMID:7556066

  4. Tumor-promoting phorbol ester stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation in U-937 monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Grunberger, G; Zick, Y; Taylor, S I; Gorden, P

    1984-01-01

    Solubilized lectin-purified extracts from human monocyte-like cells (U-937) and freshly isolated human mononuclear cells preincubated in the presence of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulated phosphorylation of synthetic tyrosine-containing polymers and of casein. Tyrosine phosphorylation was confirmed by phospho amino acid analysis. PMA stimulated phosphorylation of exogenous substrates in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. This phosphorylation reaction did not require addition of phospholipid, diolein, or calcium. Biologically inactive phorbol compounds did not stimulate phosphorylation in this system. In addition, PMA enhanced phosphorylation of a Mr approximately equal to 140,000 protein as well as several other endogenous proteins in the U-937 extracts. PMA treatment stimulated predominantly phosphorylation on tyrosine residues of the Mr 140,000 protein. Tyrosine phosphorylation, typical of growth-promoting peptides such as insulin or epidermal growth factor, is believed to play a role in regulating normal and disordered cellular growth and proliferation. The demonstration of PMA-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation might provide a clue to the mechanism of cellular differentiation and proliferation induced by the tumor promoter. Images PMID:6201862

  5. Structure and Mechanistic Implications of a Tryptophan Synthase Quinonoid Intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Barends,T.; Domratcheva, T.; Kulik, V.; Blumenstein, L.; Niks, D.; Dunn, M.; Schlichting, I.

    2008-01-01

    Quinonoid intermediates play a key role in the catalytic mechanism of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes. Whereas structures of other PLP-bound reaction intermediates have been determined, a high-quality structure of a quinonoid species has not been reported. We present the crystal structure of the indoline quinonoid intermediate of tryptophan synthase (see figure) and discuss its implications for the enzymatic mechanism and allosteric regulation.

  6. Spatial proximity statistics suggest a regulatory role of protein phosphorylation on compound binding.

    PubMed

    Korkuć, Paula; Walther, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification that regulates protein function by the attachment of negatively charged phosphate groups to phosphorylatable amino acid residues. As a mode of action, an influence of phosphorylation on the binding of compounds to proteins has been discussed and described for a number of proteins in the literature. However, a systematic statistical survey probing for enriched phosphorylation sites close to compound binding sites in support of this notion and with properly chosen random reference distributions has not been presented yet. Using high-resolution protein structures from the Protein Data Bank including their co-crystallized non-covalently bound compounds and experimentally determined phosphorylation sites, we analyzed the pairwise distance distributions of phosphorylation and compound binding sites on protein surfaces. We found that phosphorylation sites are indeed located at significantly closer distances to compounds than expected by chance holding true specifically also for the subset of compound binding sites serving as catalytic sites of metabolic reactions. This tendency was particularly evident when treating phosphorylation sites as collective sets supporting the relevance of phosphorylation hotspots. Interestingly, phosphorylation sites were found to be closer to negatively charged than to positively charged compounds suggesting a stronger modulation of the binding of negatively charged compounds in dependence on phosphorylation status than on positively charged compounds. The enrichment of phosphorylation sites near compound binding sites confirms a regulatory role of phosphorylation in compound binding and provides a solid statistical basis for the literature-reported selected events. Proteins 2016; 84:565-579. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26817627

  7. Protein Phosphorylation: A Major Switch Mechanism for Metabolic Regulation.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Sean J; James, David E; Mann, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    Metabolism research is undergoing a renaissance because many diseases are increasingly recognized as being characterized by perturbations in intracellular metabolic regulation. Metabolic changes can be conferred through changes to the expression of metabolic enzymes, the concentrations of substrates or products that govern reaction kinetics, or post-translational modification (PTM) of the proteins that facilitate these reactions. On the 60th anniversary since its discovery, reversible protein phosphorylation is widely appreciated as an essential PTM regulating metabolism. With the ability to quantitatively measure dynamic changes in protein phosphorylation on a global scale - hereafter referred to as phosphoproteomics - we are now entering a new era in metabolism research, with mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics at the helm. PMID:26498855

  8. Biocatalytic functionalization of hydroxyalkyl acrylates and phenoxyethanol via phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tasnádi, Gábor; Hall, Mélanie; Baldenius, Kai; Ditrich, Klaus; Faber, Kurt

    2016-09-10

    The enzymatic phosphorylation of phenoxyethanol, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate and 4-hydroxybutyl acrylate catalyzed by acid phosphatases PhoN-Sf and PiACP at the expense of inorganic di-, tri-, hexameta- or polyphosphate was applied to the preparative-scale synthesis of phosphorylated compounds. The reaction conditions were optimized with respect to enzyme immobilization, substrate concentration, pH and type of phosphate donor. The mild reaction conditions prevented undesired polymerization and hydrolysis of the acrylate ester moiety. Application of a continuous flow system allowed facile scale-up and mono-phosphates were obtained in up to 26% isolated yield with space-time yields of 0.89kgL(-1)h(-1). PMID:27422352

  9. Models of glycolysis: Glyceraldehyde as a source of energy and monomers for prebiotic condensation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    All organisms require energy in a chemical form for maintenance and growth. In contemporary life this chemical energy is obtained by the synthesis of the phosphoanhydride bonds of ATP. Among the biological processes that yield ATP, fermentation is generally considered primitive, because it operates under anaerobic conditions by substrate-level phosphorylation which does not require compartmentation by membranes. Fermentation by the glycolytic pathway, which is found in almost every living cell, is an especially attractive energy source for primitive life. Glycolysis not only produces useful chemical energy (ATP), but intermediates of this pathway are also involved in amino acid synthesis and photosynthetic carbon-fixation. It is believed that energy and substrates needed for the origin of life were provided by nonenzymatic chemical reactions that resemble the enzyme-mediated reactions of glycolysis. These nonenzymatic reactions would have provided a starting point for the evolutionary development of glycolysis.

  10. Phosphorylation of Glyceric Acid in Aqueous Solution Using Trimetaphosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Vera; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    The phosphorylation of glyceric acid is an interesting prebiotic reaction because it converts a simple, potentially prebiotic organic molecule into phosphate derivatives that are central to carbohydrate metabolism. We find that 0.05 M glyceric acid in the presence of 0.5 M trimetaphosphate in alkaline solution gives a mixture of 2- and 3-phosphoglyceric acids in combined yields of up to 40%.

  11. N-phosphorylated ketene S,N-acetals

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, V.A.; Dol'nikova, T.Yu.; Grapov, A.F.; Mel'nikov, N.N.

    1987-09-20

    The authors investigate the reactions of phosphorisocyanitidic and phosphorisocyanatidothioc esters with organic CH acids and determine that the products, depending on the substituent on the beta-carbon atom, are either ketene S,N-acetals or equilibrium mixtures of these and phosphorylated imino thioesters. IR spectra were determined in chloroform. H 1 and P 31 NMR spectra were determined in deuterated acetone. An analysis of the spectra, including the determination of spin-spin coupling constants, is conducted.

  12. Time-resolved heme protein intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Denis

    2005-03-01

    To determine the enzymatic mechanisms of heme proteins, it is necessary to identify the intermediates along the catalytic pathway and measure the times of their formation and decay. Resonance Raman scattering spectra are especially powerful for obtaining such information as the electronic structure of the heme group and the nature of the ligand coordinated to the heme iron atom may be monitored. The oxygen intermediates of two physiologically important enzymes will be presented. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) uses oxygen to convert arginine to NO and citrulline; and cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) reduces oxygen to water to support oxidative phosphorylation. The fate or the oxygen in each of these enzymes has been followed by resonance Raman scattering. In NOS the oxygen is slowly converted to an activated species that then reacts fast, whereas in CcO the oxygen is rapidly converted to a reactive species that subsequently reacts slowly. The properties of the intermediates and the origin of the differences between these enzymes will be discussed.

  13. Intermediate Strength Gravitational Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, John

    2005-03-17

    Weak lensing is found in the correlations of shear in {approx}10{sup 4} galaxy images, strong lensing is detected by the obvious distortion of a single galaxy image, whereas intermediate lensing requires detection of less obvious curvature in several neighboring galaxies. Small impact-parameter lensing causes a sextupole distortion whose orientation is correlated with the quadrupole distortion (shear). By looking within a field for the spatial correlation of this sextupole-quadrupole correlation, an intermediate lensing regime is observed. This technique requires correction for the sextupole as well as the quadrupole content of the PSF. We remove the HST PSF and uncover intermediate lensing in the Hubble deep fields. Correlations of the type expected are found.

  14. A trans acting ribozyme that phosphorylates exogenous RNA.

    PubMed

    Saran, Dayal; Nickens, David G; Burke, Donald H

    2005-11-15

    The structural complexity required for substrate recognition within an active site constrains the evolution of novel catalytic functions. To evaluate those constraints within populations of incipient ribozymes, we performed a selection for kinase ribozymes under conditions that allowed competition for phosphorylation at nine candidate sites. Two candidate sites are the hydroxyl groups on a "quasi-diffusible" chloramphenicol (Cam) moiety tethered to the evolving library through an inert, flexible linker. A subtractive step was included to allow only seven ribose 2' hydroxyls to compete with the two Cam hydroxyls for phosphorylation. After the library was incubated with gamma-thio-ATP (ATPgammaS), active species were recovered from a polyacrylamide gel containing [(N-acryloylamino)phenyl] mercury (APM) and amplified for further cycles of selection. Activity assays on selected isolates and truncated derivatives identified the essential secondary structure of the dominant RNA motif. Phosphorylation was independent of the Cam moiety, indicating ribose 2' phosphorylation. The dominant motif was separated into catalytic "ribozyme" and "substrate" strands. Partial alkaline digestion of the substrate strand before and after phosphorylation identified the precise modification site as the first purine (R) within the required sequence 5'-RAAAANCG-3'. The reaction shows approximately 10-fold preference for ATPgammaS over ATP and is independent of pH over a wide range (5.5-8.9), consistent with a dissociative reaction mechanism that is rate-limited by formation of a metaphosphate transition state. Divalent metal ions are required, with a slight preference of Mn(2+) > Mg(2+) > Ca(2+). Lack of reactivity in [Co(NH(3))(6)](3+) indicates a requirement for inner sphere contact with the metal ion, either for structural stabilization, catalysis, or both. PMID:16274247

  15. Effective reaction rates for diffusion-limited reaction cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nałecz-Jawecki, Paweł; Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    Biological signals in cells are transmitted with the use of reaction cycles, such as the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, in which substrate is modified by antagonistic enzymes. An appreciable share of such reactions takes place in crowded environments of two-dimensional structures, such as plasma membrane or intracellular membranes, and is expected to be diffusion-controlled. In this work, starting from the microscopic bimolecular reaction rate constants and using estimates of the mean first-passage time for an enzyme-substrate encounter, we derive diffusion-dependent effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients (EMRRC) for a generic reaction cycle. Each EMRRC was found to be half of the harmonic average of the microscopic rate constant (phosphorylation c or dephosphorylation d), and the effective (crowding-dependent) motility divided by a slowly decreasing logarithmic function of the sum of the enzyme concentrations. This implies that when c and d differ, the two EMRRCs scale differently with the motility, rendering the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules diffusion-dependent. Analytical predictions are verified using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the two-dimensional triangular lattice at the single-molecule resolution. It is demonstrated that the proposed formulas estimate the steady-state concentrations and effective reaction rates for different sets of microscopic reaction rates and concentrations of reactants, including a non-trivial example where with increasing diffusivity the fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules changes from 10% to 90%.

  16. Mammalian liver cytochrome c is tyrosine-48 phosphorylated in vivo, inhibiting mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong; Lee, Icksoo; Salomon, Arthur R.; Yu, Kebing; Hüttemann, Maik

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome c (Cyt c) is part of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), accepting electrons from bc1 complex and transferring them to cytochrome c oxidase (CcO). The ETC generates the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is used by ATP synthase to produce ATP. In addition, the release of Cyt c from the mitochondria often commits a cell to undergo apoptosis. Considering its central role in life (respiration) and death (apoptosis) decisions one would expect tight regulation of Cyt c function. Reversible phosphorylation is a main cellular regulatory mechanism, but the effect of cell signaling targeting the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system is not well understood, and only a small number of proteins that can be phosphorylated have been identified to date. We have recently shown that Cyt c isolated from cow heart tissue is phosphorylated on tyrosine 97 in vivo, which leads to inhibition of respiration in the reaction with CcO. In this study we isolated Cyt c from a different organ, cow liver, under conditions preserving the physiological phosphorylation state. Western analysis with a phospho-tyrosine specific antibody suggested that liver Cyt c is phosphorylated. Surprisingly, the phosphorylation site was unambiguously assigned to Tyr-48 by immobilized metal affinity chromatography/nano-liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (IMAC/nano-LC/ESI-MS), and not to the previously identified phospho-Tyr-97 in cow heart. As is true of Tyr-97, Tyr-48 is conserved in eukaryotes. As one possible consequence of Tyr-48 phosphorylation we analyzed the in vitro reaction kinetics with isolated cow liver CcO revealing striking differences. Maximal turnover of Tyr-48 phosphorylated Cyt c was 3.7 s−1 whereas dephosphorylation resulted in a 2.2 fold increase in activity to 8.2 s−1. Effects of Tyr-48 phosphorylation based on the Cyt c crystal structure are discussed. PMID:18471988

  17. Hispanic American Heritage, Intermediate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Mike

    This resource book features the cultural heritage of Hispanics living within the United States and includes ideas, materials, and activities to be used with students in the intermediate grades and middle school. This book explores the definition of the term "Hispanic Americans" and suggests a multilayered population with a variety of cultural…

  18. English 200: Intermediate Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Kelly

    2005-01-01

    "English 200: Intermediate Composition" is a program elective for English majors and a writing-intensive elective for nonmajors at Southern Connecticut State University (SCSU), a comprehensive institution of 11,000 undergraduate and graduate (master's level) students. English 200 is described in the departmental course catalog as a course "in…

  19. INTERMEDIATE READINGS IN TAGALOG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BOWEN, J. DONALD, ED.

    THE SECOND IN A SERIES OF TEXTS DESIGNED TO HELP THE STUDENT ACHIEVE AN UNDERSTANDING OF FILIPINO CULTURE AND ACQUIRE ENOUGH PROFICIENCY IN TAGALOG TO COMMUNICATE EASILY AND MEANINGFULLY, THESE INTERMEDIATE READINGS ARE COORDINATED WITH THE EDITOR'S "BEGINNING TAGALOG" (ED 014 696). INCLUDED IN PART I ARE READINGS WRITTEN ESPECIALLY FOR THIS TEXT…

  20. GLOSSARY TO INTERMEDIATE HINDI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Indian Language and Area Center.

    INCLUDED IN THIS GLOSSARY ARE THE VOCABULARY ITEMS FOR THE READINGS IN "INTERMEDIATE HINDI." THE ITEMS ARE ARRANGED BY SELECTION IN SERIAL ORDER. EACH ENTRY INCLUDES NAGARI (DEVANAGARI) SCRIPT SPELLING, A NOTATION OF THE FORM CLASS, AND A SHORT ENGLISH GLOSS. THESE TWO VOLUMES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE AS A SET FOR $7.00 FROM THE COLLEGE PRINTING…

  1. SPACE: Intermediate Level Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis. Center for School Improvement and Performance.

    These modules were developed to assist teachers at the intermediate level to move away from extensive skill practice and toward more meaningful interdisciplinary learning. This packet, to be used by teachers in the summer Extended Learning Program, provides detailed thematic lesson plans matched to the Indiana Curriculum Proficiency Guide. The…

  2. Intermediate Cambodian Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, Franklin E., Ed.; Proum, Im, Ed.

    This book is a sequel to the "Cambodian System of Writing and Beginning Reader." It is intended to serve as an intermediate reader to develop the student's ability to the point of reading Cambodian texts with the aid of a dictionary. Part One of the book consists of 37 readings, graded in length and difficulty, and selected to provide a wide range…

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis supports protein tyrosine phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kusebauch, Ulrike; Ortega, Corrie; Ollodart, Anja; Rogers, Richard S.; Sherman, David R.; Moritz, Robert L.; Grundner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation determines growth and adaptive decisions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). At least 11 two-component systems and 11 Ser/Thr protein kinases (STPKs) mediate phosphorylation on Asp, His, Ser, and Thr. In contrast, protein phosphorylation on Tyr has not been described previously in Mtb. Here, using a combination of phospho-enrichment and highly sensitive mass spectrometry, we show extensive protein Tyr phosphorylation of diverse Mtb proteins, including STPKs. Several STPKs function as dual-specificity kinases that phosphorylate Tyr in cis and in trans, suggesting that dual-specificity kinases have a major role in bacterial phospho-signaling. Mutation of a phosphotyrosine site of the essential STPK PknB reduces its activity in vitro and in live Mtb, indicating that Tyr phosphorylation has a functional role in bacterial growth. These data identify a previously unrecognized phosphorylation system in a human pathogen that claims ∼1.4 million lives every year. PMID:24927537

  4. Oxidative phosphorylation and energy buffering in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Nitschmann, W H; Peschek, G A

    1986-01-01

    The onset of respiration in the cyanobacteria Anacystis nidulans and Nostoc sp. strain Mac upon a shift from dark anaerobic to aerobic conditions was accompanied by rapid energization of the adenylate pool (owing to the combined action of ATP synthase and adenylate kinase) and also the guanylate, uridylate, and cytidylate pools (owing to nucleoside diphosphate and nucleoside monophosphate kinases). Rates of the various transphosphorylation reactions were comparable to the rate of oxidative phosphorylation, thus explaining, in part, low approximately P/O ratios which incorporate adenylates only. The increase of ATP, GTP, UTP, and CTP levels (nanomoles per minute per milligram [dry weight]) in oxygen-pulsed cells of A. nidulans and Nostoc species was calculated to be, on average, 2.3, 1.05, 0.8, and 0.57, respectively. Together with aerobic steady-state pool sizes of 1.35, 0.57, 0.5, and 0.4 nmol/mg (dry weight) for these nucleotides, a fairly uniform turnover of 1.3 to 1.5 min-1 was derived. All types of nucleotides, therefore, may be conceived of as being in equilibrium with each other, reflecting the energetic homeostasis or energy buffering of the (respiring) cyanobacterial cell. For the calculation of net efficiencies of oxidative phosphorylation in terms of approximately P/O ratios, this energy buffering was taken into account. Moreover, in A. nidulans an additional 30% of the energy initially conserved in ATP by oxidative phosphorylation was immediately used up by a plasma membrane-bound reversible H+-ATPase for H+ extrusion. Consequently, by allowing for energy buffering and ATPase-linked H+ extrusion, maximum P/O ratios of 2.6 to 3.3 were calculated. By contrast, in Nostoc sp. all the H+ extrusion, appeared to be linked to a plasma membrane-bound respiratory chain, thus bypassing any ATP formation and leading to P/O ratios of only 1.3 to 1.5 despite the correction for energy buffering. PMID:3023299

  5. Criegee intermediates in the indoor environment. New insights

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shallcross, D. E.; Taatjes, C. A.; Percival, C. J.

    2014-03-25

    Criegee intermediates are formed in the ozonolysis of alkenes and play an important role in indoor chemistry, notably as a source of OH radicals. Recent studies have shown that these Criegee intermediates react very quickly with NO2, SO2, and carbonyls, and in this study, steady-state calculations are used to inspect the potential impact of these data on indoor chemistry. It is shown that these reactions could accelerate NO3 formation and SO2 removal in the indoor environment significantly. In addition, reaction between Criegee intermediates and halogenated carbonyls could provide a significant loss process indoors, where currently one does not exist.

  6. Phosphorylation-independent stimulation of DNA topoisomerase II alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Kimura, K; Saijo, M; Tanaka, M; Enomoto, T

    1996-05-01

    It has been suggested that casein kinase II phosphorylates DNA topoisomerase II alpha (topo II alpha) in mouse FM3A cells, by comparison of phosphopeptide maps of topo II alpha labeled in intact cells and of topo II alpha phosphorylated by various kinases in vitro. The phosphorylation of purified topo II alpha by casein kinase II, which attached a maximum of two phosphate groups per topo II alpha molecule, had no effect on the activity of topo II alpha. Dephosphorylation of purified topo II alpha by potato acid phosphatase, which almost completely dephosphorylated the topo II alpha, did not reduce the activity of topo II alpha. The incubation itself, regardless of phosphorylation or dephosphorylation status, stimulated the enzyme activity in both reactions. Topo II alpha activity was stimulated by incubation in a medium containing low concentrations of glycerol but not in that containing high concentrations of glycerol, such as the 50% in which purified topo II alpha is stored. The stimulation of topo II alpha activity by incubation was dependent on the concentration of topo II alpha, requiring a relatively high concentration of topo II alpha. PMID:8631919

  7. Kinetics of oxidation of chlorobenzenes and phenyl-ureas by Fe(II)/H2O2 and Fe(III)/H2O2. Evidence of reduction and oxidation reactions of intermediates by Fe(II) or Fe(III).

    PubMed

    Gallard, H; De Laat, J

    2001-02-01

    The rates of degradation of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB), 2,5-dichloronitrobenzene (DCNB), diuron and isoproturon by Fe(II)/H2O2 and Fe(III)/H2O2 have been investigated in dilute aqueous solution ([Organic compound]0 approximately 1 microM, at 25.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C and pH < or = 3). Using the relative rate method with atrazine as the reference compound, and the Fe(II)/H2O2 (with an excess of Fe(II)) and Fe(III)/H2O2 systems as sources of OH radicals, the rate constants for the reaction of OH* with TCB and DCNB were determined as (6.0 +/- 0.3)10(9) and (1.1 +/- 0.2)10(9) M(-1) s(-1). Relative rates of degradation of diuron and isoproturon by Fe(II)/H2O2 were about two times smaller in the absence of dissolved oxygen than in the presence of oxygen. These data indicate that radical intermediates are reduced back to the parent compound by Fe(II) in the absence of oxygen. Oxidation experiments with Fe(III)/H2O2 showed that the rate of decomposition of atrazine markedly increased in the presence of TCB and this increase has been attributed to a regeneration of Fe(II) by oxidation reactions of intermediates (radical species and dihydroxybenzenes) by Fe(III). PMID:11100792

  8. Phosphorylation of drebrin by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 and its role in neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Kazuya; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Inaguma, Yutaka; Asada, Akiko; Kimura, Taeko; Takahashi, Junya; Taoka, Masato; Ohshima, Toshio; Furuichi, Teiichi; Isobe, Toshiaki; Nagata, Koh-ichi; Shirao, Tomoaki; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5)-p35 is a proline-directed Ser/Thr kinase which plays a key role in neuronal migration, neurite outgrowth, and spine formation during brain development. Dynamic remodeling of cytoskeletons is required for all of these processes. Cdk5-p35 phosphorylates many cytoskeletal proteins, but it is not fully understood how Cdk5-p35 regulates cytoskeletal reorganization associated with neuronal migration. Since actin filaments are critical for the neuronal movement and process formation, we aimed to find Cdk5 substrates among actin-binding proteins. In this study, we isolated actin gels from mouse brain extracts, which contain many actin-binding proteins, and phosphorylated them by Cdk5-p35 in vitro. Drebrin, a side binding protein of actin filaments and well known for spine formation, was identified as a phosphorylated protein. Drebrin has two isoforms, an embryonic form drebrin E and an adult type long isoform drebrin A. Ser142 was identified as a common phosphorylation site to drebrin E and A and Ser342 as a drebrin A-specific site. Phosphorylated drebrin is localized at the distal area of total drebrin in the growth cone of cultured primary neurons. By expressing nonphosphorylatable or phosphorylation mimicking mutants in developing neurons in utero, the reversible phosphorylation/dephosphorylation reaction of drebrin was shown to be involved in radial migration of cortical neurons. These results suggest that Cdk5-p35 regulates neuronal migration through phosphorylation of drebrin in growth cone processes. PMID:24637538

  9. Phosphorylation sites of the B2 chain of bovine alpha-crystallin

    SciTech Connect

    Chiesa, R.; Gawinowicz-Kolks, M.A.; Kleiman, N.J.; Spector, A.

    1987-05-14

    The B2 chain of bovine lens alpha-crystallin is phosphorylated in a cAMP-dependent reaction. By analysis of /sup 32/P-labelled chymotryptic peptides isolated from alpha-crystallin obtained from lenses labelled in organ culture, two phosphorylated B2 chain fragments were found. Sequence analysis of the fragments gave the following results: Arg-Ala-Pro-Ser-Trp-Ile-Asp-Thr-Gly-Leu and Ser-Leu-Ser-Pro-Phe corresponding to residues 56 to 65 and 43 to 47, respectively. It is established by this work that B1 is a phosphorylated post-translational product of B2. Both the A2 and B2 chains of alpha-crystallin are phosphorylated at a similar site with the sequence Arg-(X)-Pro-Ser. This is an unusual site for cAMP-phosphorylation since the phosphorylated serine is preceded by a proline residue. It may also be of significance that the other B2 chain phosphorylation site even more radically differs from previously reported cAMP-dependent phosphorylation sites.

  10. Identification of Ser-543 as the major regulatory phosphorylation site in spinach leaf nitrate reductase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, M.; Shiraishi, N.; Campbell, W. H.; Yoo, B. C.; Harmon, A. C.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Spinach leaf NADH:nitrate reductase (NR) responds to light/dark signals and photosynthetic activity in part as a result of rapid regulation by reversible protein phosphorylation. We have identified the major regulatory phosphorylation site as Ser-543, which is located in the hinge 1 region connecting the cytochrome b domain with the molybdenum-pterin cofactor binding domain of NR, using recombinant NR fragments containing or lacking the phosphorylation site sequence. Studies with NR partial reactions indicated that the block in electron flow caused by phosphorylation also could be localized to the hinge 1 region. A synthetic peptide (NR6) based on the phosphorylation site sequence was phosphorylated readily by NR kinase (NRk) in vitro. NR6 kinase activity tracked the ATP-dependent inactivation of NR during several chromatographic steps and completely inhibited inactivation/phosphorylation of native NR in vitro. Two forms of NRk were resolved by using anion exchange chromatography. Studies with synthetic peptide analogs indicated that both forms of NRk had similar specificity determinants, requiring a basic residue at P-3 (i.e., three amino acids N-terminal to the phosphorylated serine) and a hydrophobic residue at P-5. Both forms are strictly calcium dependent but belong to distinct families of protein kinases because they are distinct immunochemically.

  11. Catalytic mechanism of α-phosphate attack in dUTPase is revealed by X-ray crystallographic snapshots of distinct intermediates, 31P-NMR spectroscopy and reaction path modelling

    PubMed Central

    Barabás, Orsolya; Németh, Veronika; Bodor, Andrea; Perczel, András; Rosta, Edina; Kele, Zoltán; Zagyva, Imre; Szabadka, Zoltán; Grolmusz, Vince I.; Wilmanns, Matthias; Vértessy, Beáta G.

    2013-01-01

    Enzymatic synthesis and hydrolysis of nucleoside phosphate compounds play a key role in various biological pathways, like signal transduction, DNA synthesis and metabolism. Although these processes have been studied extensively, numerous key issues regarding the chemical pathway and atomic movements remain open for many enzymatic reactions. Here, using the Mason–Pfizer monkey retrovirus dUTPase, we study the dUTPase-catalyzed hydrolysis of dUTP, an incorrect DNA building block, to elaborate the mechanistic details at high resolution. Combining mass spectrometry analysis of the dUTPase-catalyzed reaction carried out in and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulation, we show that the nucleophilic attack occurs at the α-phosphate site. Phosphorus-31 NMR spectroscopy (31P-NMR) analysis confirms the site of attack and shows the capability of dUTPase to cleave the dUTP analogue α,β-imido-dUTP, containing the imido linkage usually regarded to be non-hydrolyzable. We present numerous X-ray crystal structures of distinct dUTPase and nucleoside phosphate complexes, which report on the progress of the chemical reaction along the reaction coordinate. The presently used combination of diverse structural methods reveals details of the nucleophilic attack and identifies a novel enzyme–product complex structure. PMID:23982515

  12. Catalytic mechanism of α-phosphate attack in dUTPase is revealed by X-ray crystallographic snapshots of distinct intermediates, 31P-NMR spectroscopy and reaction path modelling.

    PubMed

    Barabás, Orsolya; Németh, Veronika; Bodor, Andrea; Perczel, András; Rosta, Edina; Kele, Zoltán; Zagyva, Imre; Szabadka, Zoltán; Grolmusz, Vince I; Wilmanns, Matthias; Vértessy, Beáta G

    2013-12-01

    Enzymatic synthesis and hydrolysis of nucleoside phosphate compounds play a key role in various biological pathways, like signal transduction, DNA synthesis and metabolism. Although these processes have been studied extensively, numerous key issues regarding the chemical pathway and atomic movements remain open for many enzymatic reactions. Here, using the Mason-Pfizer monkey retrovirus dUTPase, we study the dUTPase-catalyzed hydrolysis of dUTP, an incorrect DNA building block, to elaborate the mechanistic details at high resolution. Combining mass spectrometry analysis of the dUTPase-catalyzed reaction carried out in and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulation, we show that the nucleophilic attack occurs at the α-phosphate site. Phosphorus-31 NMR spectroscopy ((31)P-NMR) analysis confirms the site of attack and shows the capability of dUTPase to cleave the dUTP analogue α,β-imido-dUTP, containing the imido linkage usually regarded to be non-hydrolyzable. We present numerous X-ray crystal structures of distinct dUTPase and nucleoside phosphate complexes, which report on the progress of the chemical reaction along the reaction coordinate. The presently used combination of diverse structural methods reveals details of the nucleophilic attack and identifies a novel enzyme-product complex structure. PMID:23982515

  13. Theoretical Investigation of the Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer of β-phosphoglucomutase: Revisiting Both Steps of the Catalytic Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Elsasser, Brigitta M.; Dohmeier-Fischer, Silvia; Fels, Gregor

    2012-07-12

    Enzyme catalyzed phosphate transfer is a part of almost all metabolic processes. Such reactions are of central importance for the energy balance in all organisms and play important roles in cellular control at all levels. Mutases transfer a phosphoryl group while nucleases cleave the phosphodiester linkages between two nucleotides. The subject of our present study is the Lactococcus lactis β-phosphoglucomutase (β-PGM), which effectively catalyzes the interconversion of β-D-glucose-1-phosphate (β-G1P) to β- D-glucose-6-phosphate (β-G6P) and vice versa via stabile intermediate β-D-glucose-1,6-(bis)phosphate (β-G1,6diP) in the presence of Mg2+. In this paper we revisited the reaction mechanism of the phosphoryl transfer starting from the bisphosphate β-G1,6diP in both directions (toward β-G1P and β-G6P) combining docking techniques and QM/MM theoretical method at the DFT/PBE0 level of theory. In addition we performed NEB (nudged elastic band) and free energy calculations to optimize the path and to identify the transition states and the energies involved in the catalytic cycle. Our calculations reveal that both steps proceed via dissociative pentacoordinated phosphorane, which is not a stabile intermediate but rather a transition state. In addition to the Mg2+ ion, Ser114 and Lys145 also play important roles in stabilizing the large negative charge on the phosphate through strong coordination with the phosphate oxygens and guiding the phosphate group throughout the catalytic process. The calculated energy barrier of the reaction for the β-G1P to β-G1,6diP step is only slightly higher than for the β-G1,6diP to β-G6P step (16.10 kcal mol-1 versus 15.10 kcal mol-1) and is in excellent agreement with experimental findings (14.65 kcal mol-1).

  14. Unveiling the crucial intermediates in androgen production.

    PubMed

    Mak, Piotr J; Gregory, Michael C; Denisov, Ilia G; Sligar, Stephen G; Kincaid, James R

    2015-12-29

    Ablation of androgen production through surgery is one strategy against prostate cancer, with the current focus placed on pharmaceutical intervention to restrict androgen synthesis selectively, an endeavor that could benefit from the enhanced understanding of enzymatic mechanisms that derives from characterization of key reaction intermediates. The multifunctional cytochrome P450 17A1 (CYP17A1) first catalyzes the typical hydroxylation of its primary substrate, pregnenolone (PREG) and then also orchestrates a remarkable C17-C20 bond cleavage (lyase) reaction, converting the 17-hydroxypregnenolone initial product to dehydroepiandrosterone, a process representing the first committed step in the biosynthesis of androgens. Now, we report the capture and structural characterization of intermediates produced during this lyase step: an initial peroxo-anion intermediate, poised for nucleophilic attack on the C20 position by a substrate-associated H-bond, and the crucial ferric peroxo-hemiacetal intermediate that precedes carbon-carbon (C-C) bond cleavage. These studies provide a rare glimpse at the actual structural determinants of a chemical transformation that carries profound physiological consequences. PMID:26668369

  15. Unveiling the crucial intermediates in androgen production

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Piotr J.; Gregory, Michael C.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.; Kincaid, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Ablation of androgen production through surgery is one strategy against prostate cancer, with the current focus placed on pharmaceutical intervention to restrict androgen synthesis selectively, an endeavor that could benefit from the enhanced understanding of enzymatic mechanisms that derives from characterization of key reaction intermediates. The multifunctional cytochrome P450 17A1 (CYP17A1) first catalyzes the typical hydroxylation of its primary substrate, pregnenolone (PREG) and then also orchestrates a remarkable C17–C20 bond cleavage (lyase) reaction, converting the 17-hydroxypregnenolone initial product to dehydroepiandrosterone, a process representing the first committed step in the biosynthesis of androgens. Now, we report the capture and structural characterization of intermediates produced during this lyase step: an initial peroxo-anion intermediate, poised for nucleophilic attack on the C20 position by a substrate-associated H-bond, and the crucial ferric peroxo-hemiacetal intermediate that precedes carbon–carbon (C-C) bond cleavage. These studies provide a rare glimpse at the actual structural determinants of a chemical transformation that carries profound physiological consequences. PMID:26668369

  16. Perspective: Spectroscopy and kinetics of small gaseous Criegee intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2015-07-14

    The Criegee intermediates, carbonyl oxides proposed by Criegee in 1949 as key intermediates in the ozonolysis of alkenes, play important roles in many aspects of atmospheric chemistry. Because direct detection of these gaseous intermediates was unavailable until recently, previous understanding of their reactions, derived from indirect experimental evidence, had great uncertainties. Recent laboratory detection of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH{sub 2}OO and some larger members, produced from ultraviolet irradiation of corresponding diiodoalkanes in O{sub 2}, with various methods such as photoionization, ultraviolet absorption, infrared absorption, and microwave spectroscopy opens a new door to improved understanding of the roles of these Criegee intermediates. Their structures and spectral parameters have been characterized; their significant zwitterionic nature is hence confirmed. CH{sub 2}OO, along with other products, has also been detected directly with microwave spectroscopy in gaseous ozonolysis reactions of ethene. The detailed kinetics of the source reaction, CH{sub 2}I + O{sub 2}, which is critical to laboratory studies of CH{sub 2}OO, are now understood satisfactorily. The kinetic investigations using direct detection identified some important atmospheric reactions, including reactions with NO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, water dimer, carboxylic acids, and carbonyl compounds. Efforts toward the characterization of larger Criegee intermediates and the investigation of related reactions are in progress. Some reactions of CH{sub 3}CHOO are found to depend on conformation. This perspective examines progress toward the direct spectral characterization of Criegee intermediates and investigations of the associated reaction kinetics, and indicates some unresolved problems and prospective challenges for this exciting field of research.

  17. Substrate Activation by Iron Superoxo Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Krebs, Carsten; Bollinger, J. Martin

    2010-01-01

    A growing number of non-heme-iron oxygenases and oxidases catalyze reactions for which the well-established mechanistic paradigm involving a single C-H-bond cleaving intermediate of the Fe(IV)-oxo (ferryl) type [1] is insufficient to explain the chemistry. It is becoming clear that, in several of these cases, Fe(III)-superoxide complexes formed by simple addition of O2 to the reduced [Fe(II)] cofactor initiate substrate oxidation by abstracting hydrogen [2]. This substrate-oxidizing entry route into high-valent-iron intermediates makes possible an array of complex and elegant oxidation reactions without consumption of valuable reducing equivalents. Examples of this novel mechanistic strategy are discussed with the goal of bringing forth unifying principles. PMID:20951572

  18. Highly enantioselective trapping of zwitterionic intermediates by imines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Huang; Li, Ming; Jiang, Li-Qin; Lv, Feng-Ping; Zan, Li; Zhai, Chang-Wei; Doyle, Michael P.; Hu, Wen-Hao

    2012-09-01

    Reactions with the unstable and highly reactive zwitterionic intermediates generated in processes catalysed by transition metals are providing new opportunities for molecular constructions. Insertion reactions involve the collapse of zwitterionic intermediates, but trapping them would allow structural elaborations that are not currently available. To synthesize complex molecules in this manner, reactive electrophiles can be used to trap the zwitterionic intermediates. Here, we describe the use of imines, activated by chiral organocatalysts, and a highly efficient integrated rhodium and chiral Brønsted acid co-catalysed process to trap zwitterionic intermediates that have been proposed previously to undergo a formal C-H insertion reaction, allowing us to obtain polyfunctionalized indole and oxindole derivatives in a single step with excellent diastereoselectivity and enantioselectivity.

  19. Phosphorylated nano-diamond/ Polyimide Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyler-Çiǧil, Asli; Çakmakçi, Emrah; Vezir Kahraman, Memet

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a novel route to synthesize polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nanodiamond films with improved thermal and mechanical properties was developed. Surface phosphorylation of nano-diamond was performed in dichloromethane. Phosphorylation dramatically enhanced the thermal stability of nano-diamond. Poly(amic acid) (PAA), which is the precursor of PI, was successfully synthesized with 3,3',4,4'-Benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) and 4,4'-oxydianiline (4,4'-ODA) in the solution of N,N- dimethylformamide (DMF). Pure BTDA-ODA polyimide films and phosphorylated nanodiamond containing BTDA-ODA PI films were prepared. The PAA displayed good compatibility with phosphorylated nano-diamond. The morphology of the polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical structure of polyimide and polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond was characterized by FTIR. SEM and FTIR results showed that the phosphorylated nano-diamond was successfully prepared. Thermal properties of the polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nanodiamond was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA results showed that the thermal stability of (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond film was increased.

  20. Intermediate water recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckman, G.; Anderson, A. R. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    A water recovery system for collecting, storing, and processing urine, wash water, and humidity condensates from a crew of three aboard a spacecraft is described. The results of a 30-day test performed on a breadboard system are presented. The intermediate water recovery system produced clear, sterile, water with a 96.4 percent recovery rate from the processed urine. Recommendations for improving the system are included.

  1. Effect of heat shock on S6 phosphorylation during the development of Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    da Silva, A M; Juliani, M H; Bonato, M C

    1987-11-01

    Changes in phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 during heat shock, induction of thermotolerance and recovery from heat shock at different stages of Blastocladiella emersonii development were investigated. Independently of the initial state of S6 phosphorylation (maximal or intermediate), a rapid and complete dephosphorylation of S6 is induced by heat shock and S6 remains unphosphorylated during the acquired thermotolerance. During recovery from heat shock rephosphorylation of S6 occurs always to the levels characteristic of that particular stage, coincidently with the turn off of heat shock protein synthesis. PMID:3454866

  2. Characterization of a Unique Pathway for 4-Cresol Catabolism Initiated by Phosphorylation in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Du, Lei; Ma, Li; Qi, Feifei; Zheng, Xianliang; Jiang, Chengying; Li, Ailei; Wan, Xiaobo; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Li, Shengying

    2016-03-18

    4-Cresol is not only a significant synthetic intermediate for production of many aromatic chemicals, but also a priority environmental pollutant because of its toxicity to higher organisms. In our previous studies, a gene cluster implicated to be involved in 4-cresol catabolism, creCDEFGHIR, was identified in Corynebacterium glutamicum and partially characterized in vivo. In this work, we report on the discovery of a novel 4-cresol biodegradation pathway that employs phosphorylated intermediates. This unique pathway initiates with the phosphorylation of the hydroxyl group of 4-cresol, which is catalyzed by a novel 4-methylbenzyl phosphate synthase, CreHI. Next, a unique class I P450 system, CreJEF, specifically recognizes phosphorylated intermediates and successively oxidizes the aromatic methyl group into carboxylic acid functionality via alcohol and aldehyde intermediates. Moreover, CreD (phosphohydrolase), CreC (alcohol dehydrogenase), and CreG (aldehyde dehydrogenase) were also found to be required for efficient oxidative transformations in this pathway. Steady-state kinetic parameters (Km and kcat) for each catabolic step were determined, and these results suggest that kinetic controls serve a key role in directing the metabolic flux to the most energy effective route. PMID:26817843

  3. Starch phosphorylation: insights and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mahlow, Sebastian; Orzechowski, Sławomir; Fettke, Joerg

    2016-07-01

    During starch metabolism, the phosphorylation of glucosyl residues of starch, to be more precise of amylopectin, is a repeatedly observed process. This phosphorylation is mediated by dikinases, the glucan, water dikinase (GWD) and the phosphoglucan, water dikinase (PWD). The starch-related dikinases utilize ATP as dual phosphate donor transferring the terminal γ-phosphate group to water and the β-phosphate group selectively to either C6 position or C3 position of a glucosyl residue within amylopectin. By the collaborative action of both enzymes, the initiation of a transition of α-glucans from highly ordered, water-insoluble state to a less order state is realized and thus the initial process of starch degradation. Consequently, mutants lacking either GWD or PWD reveal a starch excess phenotype as well as growth retardation. In this review, we focus on the increased knowledge collected over the last years related to enzymatic properties, the precise definition of the substrates, the physiological implications, and discuss ongoing questions. PMID:27147464

  4. Reactions of nitrogen oxides with heme models. Characterization of NO and NO2 dissociation from Fe(TPP)(NO2)(NO) by flash photolysis and rapid dilution techniques: Fe(TPP)(NO2) as an unstable intermediate.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mark D; Lorkovic, Ivan M; Wedeking, Katrin; Zanella, Andrew W; Works, Carmen F; Massick, Steve M; Ford, Peter C

    2002-08-21

    Described are studies directed toward elucidating the controversial chemistry relating to the solution phase reactions of nitric oxide with the iron(II) porphyrin complex Fe(TPP)(NO) (1, TPP = meso-tetraphenylporphinato2-). The only reaction observable with clean NO is the formation of the diamagnetic dinitrosyl species Fe(TPP)(NO)2 (2), and this is seen only at low temperatures (K(1) < 3 M(-1) at ambient temperature). However, 1 does readily react reversibly with N2O3 in the presence of excess NO to give the nitro nitrosyl complex Fe(TPP)(NO2)(NO) (3), suggesting that previous claims that 1 promotes NO disproportionation to give 3 may have been compromised by traces of air in the nitric oxide sources. It is also noted that 3 undergoes reversible loss of NO to give the elusive nitro species Fe(TPP)(NO2) (4), which has been implicated as a powerful oxygen atom transfer agent in reactions with various substrates. Furthermore, in the presence of excess NO2, the latter undergoes oxidation to the stable nitrato analogue Fe(TPP)(NO3) (5). Owing to such reactivity of Fe(TPP)(NO2), flash photolysis and stopped-flow kinetics rather than static techniques were necessary for the accurate measurement of dissociation equilibria characteristic of Fe(TPP)(NO2)(NO) in 298 K toluene solution. Flash photolysis of 3 resulted in competitive NO2 and NO dissociation to give Fe(TPP)(NO) and Fe(TPP)(NO2), respectively. The rate constant for the reaction of 1 with N2O3 to generate Fe(TPP)(NO2)(NO) was determined to be 1.8 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1), and that for the NO reaction with 4 was similarly determined to be 4.2 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). Stopped-flow rapid dilution techniques were used to determine the rate constant for NO dissociation from 3 as 2.6 s(-1). The rapid dilution experiments also demonstrated that Fe(TPP)(NO2) readily undergoes further oxidation to give Fe(TPP)(NO3). The mechanistic implications of these observations are discussed, and it is suggested that NO2 liberated

  5. Histone tyrosine phosphorylation comes of age

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rakesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Histones were discovered over a century ago and have since been found to be the most extensively post-translationally modified proteins, although tyrosine phosphorylation of histones had remained elusive until recently. The year 2009 proved to be a landmark year for histone tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation as five research groups independently discovered this modification. Three groups describe phosphorylation of Y142 in the variant histone H2A.X, where it may be involved in the cellular decision making process to either undergo DNA repair or apoptosis in response to DNA damage. Further, one group suggests that phosphorylation of histone H3 on Y99 is crucial for its regulated proteolysis in yeast, while another found that Y41 phosphorylation modulates chromatin architecture and oncogenesis in mammalian cells. These pioneering studies provide the initial conceptual framework for further analyses of the diverse roles of tyrosine phosphorylation on different histones, with far reaching implications for human health and disease. PMID:20935492

  6. Histidine phosphorylation relieves copper inhibition in the mammalian potassium channel KCa3.1.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shekhar; Panda, Saswati; Li, Zhai; Fuhs, Stephen R; Hunter, Tony; Thiele, Dennis J; Hubbard, Stevan R; Skolnik, Edward Y

    2016-01-01

    KCa2.1, KCa2.2, KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 constitute a family of mammalian small- to intermediate-conductance potassium channels that are activated by calcium-calmodulin. KCa3.1 is unique among these four channels in that activation requires, in addition to calcium, phosphorylation of a single histidine residue (His358) in the cytoplasmic region, by nucleoside diphosphate kinase-B (NDPK-B). The mechanism by which KCa3.1 is activated by histidine phosphorylation is unknown. Histidine phosphorylation is well characterized in prokaryotes but poorly understood in eukaryotes. Here, we demonstrate that phosphorylation of His358 activates KCa3.1 by antagonizing copper-mediated inhibition of the channel. Furthermore, we show that activated CD4(+) T cells deficient in intracellular copper exhibit increased KCa3.1 histidine phosphorylation and channel activity, leading to increased calcium flux and cytokine production. These findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for a mammalian potassium channel and for T-cell activation, and highlight a unique feature of histidine versus serine/threonine and tyrosine as a regulatory phosphorylation site. PMID:27542194

  7. Histidine phosphorylation relieves copper inhibition in the mammalian potassium channel KCa3.1

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shekhar; Panda, Saswati; Li, Zhai; Fuhs, Stephen R; Hunter, Tony; Thiele, Dennis J; Hubbard, Stevan R; Skolnik, Edward Y

    2016-01-01

    KCa2.1, KCa2.2, KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 constitute a family of mammalian small- to intermediate-conductance potassium channels that are activated by calcium-calmodulin. KCa3.1 is unique among these four channels in that activation requires, in addition to calcium, phosphorylation of a single histidine residue (His358) in the cytoplasmic region, by nucleoside diphosphate kinase-B (NDPK-B). The mechanism by which KCa3.1 is activated by histidine phosphorylation is unknown. Histidine phosphorylation is well characterized in prokaryotes but poorly understood in eukaryotes. Here, we demonstrate that phosphorylation of His358 activates KCa3.1 by antagonizing copper-mediated inhibition of the channel. Furthermore, we show that activated CD4+ T cells deficient in intracellular copper exhibit increased KCa3.1 histidine phosphorylation and channel activity, leading to increased calcium flux and cytokine production. These findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for a mammalian potassium channel and for T-cell activation, and highlight a unique feature of histidine versus serine/threonine and tyrosine as a regulatory phosphorylation site. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16093.001 PMID:27542194

  8. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate pool size: functional importance for oxidative metabolism in exercising human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Bowtell, Joanna L; Marwood, Simon; Bruce, Mark; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2007-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the major final common pathway for oxidation of carbohydrates, lipids and some amino acids, which produces reducing equivalents in the form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide that result in production of large amounts of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) via oxidative phosphorylation. Although regulated primarily by the products of ATP hydrolysis, in particular adenosine diphosphate, the rate of delivery of reducing equivalents to the electron transport chain is also a potential regulatory step of oxidative phosphorylation. The TCA cycle is responsible for the generation of approximately 67% of all reducing equivalents per molecule of glucose, hence factors that influence TCA cycle flux will be of critical importance for oxidative phosphorylation. TCA cycle flux is dependent upon the supply of acetyl units, activation of the three non-equilibrium reactions within the TCA cycle, and it has been suggested that an increase in the total concentration of the TCA cycle intermediates (TCAi) is also necessary to augment and maintain TCA cycle flux during exercise. This article reviews the evidence of the functional importance of the TCAi pool size for oxidative metabolism in exercising human skeletal muscle. In parallel with increased oxidative metabolism and TCA cycle flux during exercise, there is an exercise intensity-dependent 4- to 5-fold increase in the concentration of the TCAi. TCAi concentration reaches a peak after 10-15 minutes of exercise, and thereafter tends to decline. This seems to support the suggestion that the concentration of TCAi may be of functional importance for oxidative phosphorylation. However, researchers have been able to induce dissociations between TCAi pool size and oxidative energy provision using a variety of nutritional, pharmacological and exercise interventions. Brief periods of endurance training (5 days or 7 weeks) have been found to result in reduced TCAi pool

  9. [Sugar phosphorylation activities in acetogenic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Jiang, W; Patterson, J A

    1999-12-01

    Seven acetogenic bacteria (Acetitomaculum ruminis, Acetobacterium woodii, Eubacterium limosum as well as isolates A2, A4, A10 and H3HH) were tested for PEP- and ATP-dependent phosphorylation of glucose and 2-deoxyglucose. Although all organisms had detectable phosphorylation activity, substantial variation existed in the rates of both PEP- and ATP-dependent phosphorylation. Isolate Alo had the highest rate of PEP-dependent phosphorylation of 11.62 nmol.L-1.mg-1.min-1. Isolate A10, H3HH as well as E. limosum most likely have a glucose phosphotransferase system(PTS). In contrast, A ruminis, A. woodii and isolate A2, A4 had PEP-dependent glucose phosphorylation rates very similar to control rates, suggesting the lack of PTS activity. The rates of ATP-dependent glucose phosphorylation were higher than PEP-dependent phosphorylation in all organisms surveyed. However, substantial variation existed in the rates of ATP-dependent glucose phosphorylation. The glucose PTS of isolates A10 and H3HH were induced by the presence of extracellular glucose. Moreover, the specific activity of the glucose PTS of both isolates increased as cultures progressed from the early log to late log phase of growth. ATP- and PEP-dependent maltose and sucrose phosphorylation was detected in isolates A10 and H3HH. Although activity was detected in both isolates(A10 and H3HH), the rate of activity varied considerably, depending on the sugar and organism tested. PMID:12555560

  10. Impact of sulfur dioxide oxidation by Stabilized Criegee Intermediate on sulfate

    EPA Science Inventory

    We revise the Carbon Bond chemical mechanism to explicitly represent three Stabilized Criegee Intermediates (SCIs) and their subsequent reactions with sulfur dioxide, water monomer, and water dimer, and incorporate the reactions into the Community Multiscale Air Quality model. Th...

  11. Phosphorylation of human link proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Oester, D.A.; Caterson, B.; Schwartz, E.R.

    1986-06-13

    Three link proteins of 48, 44 and 40 kDa were purified from human articular cartilage and identified with monoclonal anti-link protein antibody 8-A-4. Two sets of lower molecular weight proteins of 30-31 kDa and 24-26 kDa also contained link protein epitopes recognized by the monoclonal antibody and were most likely degradative products of the intact link proteins. The link proteins of 48 and 40 kDa were identified as phosphoproteins while the 44 kDa link protein did not contain /sup 32/P. The phosphorylated 48 and 40 kDa link proteins contained approximately 2 moles PO/sub 4//mole link protein.

  12. Rapid changes in plasma membrane protein phosphorylation during initiation of cell wall digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Blowers, D.P.; Boss, W.F.; Trewavas, A.J. )

    1988-02-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles from wild carrot cells grown in suspension culture were isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning, and ATP-dependent phosphorylation was measured with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in the presence and absence of calcium. Treatment of the carrot cells with the cell wall digestion enzymes, driselase, in a sorbitol osmoticum for 1.5 min altered the protein phosphorylation pattern compared to that of cells treated with sorbitol alone. Driselase treatment resulted in decreased phosphorylation of a band of M{sub r} 80,000 which showed almost complete calcium dependence in the osmoticum treated cells; decreased phosphorylation of a band of M{sub r} 15,000 which showed little calcium activation, and appearance of a new band of calcium-dependent phosphorylation at M{sub r} 22,000. However, protein phosphorylation was decreased. Adding driselase to the in vitro reaction mixture caused a general decrease in the membrane protein phosphorylation either in the presence or absence of calcium which did not mimic the in vivo response. Cells labeled in vivo with inorganic {sup 32}P also showed a response to the Driselase treatment. An enzymically active driselas preparation was required for the observed responses.

  13. Bacterial single-stranded DNA-binding proteins are phosphorylated on tyrosine

    PubMed Central

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Petranovic, Dina; Macek, Boris; Cepo, Tina; Mann, Matthias; Davies, Julian; Jensen, Peter R.; Vujaklija, Dusica

    2006-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) are required for repair, recombination and replication in all organisms. Eukaryotic SSBs are regulated by phosphorylation on serine and threonine residues. To our knowledge, phosphorylation of SSBs in bacteria has not been reported. A systematic search for phosphotyrosine-containing proteins in Streptomyces griseus by immunoaffinity chromatography identified bacterial SSBs as a novel target of bacterial tyrosine kinases. Since genes encoding protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) have not been recognized in streptomycetes, and SSBs from Streptomyces coelicolor (ScSSB) and Bacillus subtilis (BsSSB) share 38.7% identity, we used a B.subtilis protein-tyrosine kinase YwqD to phosphorylate two cognate SSBs (BsSSB and YwpH) in vitro. We demonstrate that in vivo phosphorylation of B.subtilis SSB occurs on tyrosine residue 82, and this reaction is affected antagonistically by kinase YwqD and phosphatase YwqE. Phosphorylation of B.subtilis SSB increased binding almost 200-fold to single-stranded DNA in vitro. Tyrosine phosphorylation of B.subtilis, S.coelicolor and Escherichia coli SSBs occured while they were expressed in E.coli, indicating that tyrosine phosphorylation of SSBs is a conserved process of post-translational modification in taxonomically distant bacteria. PMID:16549871

  14. Prebiotic phosphorylation of thymidine at 65 C in simulated desert conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, M. J.; Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    The phosphorylation of thymidine is described for a variety of conditions at 65 C to demonstrate that the reaction could readily take place in deserts at the present time. This might be used as an indication that urea-phosphate mixtures could have been important as phosphorylating agents on the primitive earth. Reaction products were identified by comparing their chromatographic and electrophoretic mobilities with those of authentic materials and by enzymatic degradation. The results show that good yields of nucleotides are obtained when nucleosides are heated with urea-phospate mixtures at 65 C. Reactions proceed more rapidly at moderate humidities than in a stream of dry nitrogen. Occasional wetting results in even faster and more extensive reactions. There was no reaction for a mixture of urea and trimetaphosphate.

  15. Sulfonyl and phosphoryl azides: going further beyond the click realm of alkyl and aryl azides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok Hwan; Park, Sae Hume; Choi, Ji Ho; Chang, Sukbok

    2011-10-01

    Whereas alkyl and aryl azides readily react with terminal alkynes to afford 1,4-disubstituted-1,2,3-triazoles in excellent yields and selectivity in the presence of a copper catalyst, sulfonyl, phosphoryl, and certain acyl azides allow additional chemistry upon ring-opening of the corresponding copper-triazole intermediates. The amazingly versatile new chemistry stems from the high reactivity of a ring-opened ketenimine intermediate, with which a wide range of nucleophiles react to give multicomponent products. Among those nucleophiles, amines, alcohols, water, and heterocyclic compounds are especially capable of being involved in this new chemistry. PMID:21748856

  16. Phosphorylation of the multidrug resistance associated glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Mellado, W.; Horwitz, S.B.

    1987-11-03

    Drug-resistant cell lines derived from the mouse macrophage-like cell line J774.2 express the multidrug resistant phenotype which includes the overexpression of a membrane glycoprotein (130-140 kilodaltons). Phosphorylation of this resistant-specific glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) in intact cells and in cell-free membrane fractions has been studied. The phosphorylated glycoprotein can be immunoprecipitated by a rabbit polyclonal antibody specific for the glycoprotein. Phosphorylation studies done with partially purified membrane fractions derived from colchicine-resistant cells indicated that (a) phosphorylation of the glycoprotein in 1 mM MgCl/sub 2/ was enhanced a minimum of 2-fold by 10 ..mu..M cAMP and (b) the purified catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) phosphorylated partially purified glycoprotein that was not phosphorylated by (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP alone, suggesting that autophosphorylation was not involved. These results indicate that the glycoprotein is a phosphoprotein and that at least one of the kinases responsible for its phosphorylation is a membrane-associated protein kinase A. The state of phosphorylation of the glycoprotein, which is a major component of the multidrug resistance phenotype, may be related to the role of the glycoprotein in maintaining drug resistance.

  17. Phosphorylation of the multidrug resistance associated glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Mellado, W; Horwitz, S B

    1987-11-01

    Drug-resistant cell lines derived from the mouse macrophage-like cell line J774.2 express the multidrug resistance phenotype which includes the overexpression of a membrane glycoprotein (130-140 kilodaltons). Phosphorylation of this resistant-specific glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) in intact cells and in cell-free membrane fractions has been studied. The phosphorylated glycoprotein can be immunoprecipitated by a rabbit polyclonal antibody specific for the glycoprotein. Phosphorylation studies done with partially purified membrane fractions derived from colchicine-resistant cells indicated that (a) phosphorylation of the glycoprotein in 1 mM MgCl2 was enhanced a minimum of 2-fold by 10 microM cAMP and (b) the purified catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) phosphorylated partially purified glycoprotein that was not phosphorylated by [gamma-32P]ATP alone, suggesting that autophosphorylation was not involved. These results indicate that the glycoprotein is a phosphoprotein and that at least one of the kinases responsible for its phosphorylation is a membrane-associated protein kinase A. The state of phosphorylation of the glycoprotein, which is a major component of the multidrug resistance phenotype, may be related to the role of the glycoprotein in maintaining drug resistance. PMID:3427052

  18. Membrane Fission: Model for Intermediate Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kozlovsky, Yonathan; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    Membrane budding-fission is a fundamental process generating intracellular carriers of proteins. Earlier works were focused only on formation of coated buds connected to the initial membrane by narrow membrane necks. We present the theoretical analysis of the whole pathway of budding-fission, including the crucial stage where the membrane neck undergoes fission and the carrier separates from the donor membrane. We consider two successive intermediates of the reaction: 1), a constricted membrane neck coming out of aperture of the assembling protein coat, and 2), hemifission intermediate resulting from self-fusion of the inner monolayer of the neck, while its outer monolayer remains continuous. Transformation of the constricted neck into the hemifission intermediate is driven by the membrane stress produced in the neck by the protein coat. Although apparently similar to hemifusion, the fission is predicted to have an opposite dependence on the monolayer spontaneous curvature. Analysis of the further stages of the process demonstrates that in all practically important cases the hemifission intermediate decays spontaneously into two separate membranes, thereby completing the fission process. We formulate the “job description” for fission proteins by calculating the energy they have to deliver and the radii of the protein coat aperture which have to be reached to drive the fission process. PMID:12829467

  19. Enhanced prediction of conformational flexibility and phosphorylation in proteins.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Karthikeyan; Adamczak, Rafal; Porollo, Aleksey; Meller, Jarosław

    2010-01-01

    Many sequence-based predictors of structural and functional properties of proteins have been developed in the past. In this study, we developed new methods for predicting measures of conformational flexibility in proteins, including X-ray structure-derived temperature (B-) factors and the variance within NMR structural ensemble, as effectively measured by the solvent accessibility standard deviations (SASDs). We further tested whether these predicted measures of conformational flexibility in crystal lattices and solution, respectively, can be used to improve the prediction of phosphorylation in proteins. The latter is an example of a common post-translational modification that modulates protein function, e.g., by affecting interactions and conformational flexibility of phosphorylated sites. Using robust epsilon-insensitive support vector regression (ε-SVR) models, we assessed two specific representations of protein sequences: one based on the position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) derived from multiple sequence alignments, and an augmented representation that incorporates real-valued solvent accessibility and secondary structure predictions (RSA/SS) as additional measures of local structural propensities. We showed that a combination of PSSMs and real-valued SS/RSA predictions provides systematic improvements in the accuracy of both B-factors and SASD prediction. These intermediate predictions were subsequently combined into an enhanced predictor of phosphorylation that was shown to significantly outperform methods based on PSSM alone. We would like to stress that to the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of using predicted from sequence NMR structure-based measures of conformational flexibility in solution for the prediction of other properties of proteins. Phosphorylation prediction methods typically employ a two-class classification approach with the limitation that the set of negative examples used for training may include some sites that are

  20. Experiments in intermediate energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Dehnhard, D.

    2003-02-28

    Research in experimental nuclear physics was done from 1979 to 2002 primarily at intermediate energy facilities that provide pion, proton, and kaon beams. Particularly successful has been the work at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) on unraveling the neutron and proton contributions to nuclear ground state and transition densities. This work was done on a wide variety of nuclei and with great detail on the carbon, oxygen, and helium isotopes. Some of the investigations involved the use of polarized targets which allowed the extraction of information on the spin-dependent part of the triangle-nucleon interaction. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) we studied proton-induced charge exchange reactions with results of importance to astrophysics and the nuclear few-body problem. During the first few years, the analysis of heavy-ion nucleus scattering data that had been taken prior to 1979 was completed. During the last few years we created hypernuclei by use of a kaon beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and an electron beam at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The data taken at BNL for a study of the non-mesonic weak decay of the A particle in a nucleus are still under analysis by our collaborators. The work at JLab resulted in the best resolution hypernuclear spectra measured thus far with magnetic spectrometers.

  1. A Mechanochemical Switch to Control Radical Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    B12-dependent enzymes employ radical species with exceptional prowess to catalyze some of the most chemically challenging, thermodynamically unfavorable reactions. However, dealing with highly reactive intermediates is an extremely demanding task, requiring sophisticated control strategies to prevent unwanted side reactions. Using hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations, we follow the full catalytic cycle of an AdoB12-dependent enzyme and present the details of a mechanism that utilizes a highly effective mechanochemical switch. When the switch is “off”, the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical moiety is stabilized by releasing the internal strain of an enzyme-imposed conformation. Turning the switch “on,” the enzyme environment becomes the driving force to impose a distinct conformation of the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical to avoid deleterious radical transfer. This mechanochemical switch illustrates the elaborate way in which enzymes attain selectivity of extremely chemically challenging reactions. PMID:24846280

  2. A mechanochemical switch to control radical intermediates.

    PubMed

    Brunk, Elizabeth; Kellett, Whitney F; Richards, Nigel G J; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2014-06-17

    B₁₂-dependent enzymes employ radical species with exceptional prowess to catalyze some of the most chemically challenging, thermodynamically unfavorable reactions. However, dealing with highly reactive intermediates is an extremely demanding task, requiring sophisticated control strategies to prevent unwanted side reactions. Using hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations, we follow the full catalytic cycle of an AdoB₁₂-dependent enzyme and present the details of a mechanism that utilizes a highly effective mechanochemical switch. When the switch is "off", the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical moiety is stabilized by releasing the internal strain of an enzyme-imposed conformation. Turning the switch "on," the enzyme environment becomes the driving force to impose a distinct conformation of the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical to avoid deleterious radical transfer. This mechanochemical switch illustrates the elaborate way in which enzymes attain selectivity of extremely chemically challenging reactions. PMID:24846280

  3. Cisplatin stimulates protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Shrivastava, A; Sodhi, A

    1995-03-01

    Cisplatin [cis-dichlorodiamine platinum (II)], a potent anti-tumor compound, stimulates immune responses by activating monocyte-macrophages and other cells of the immune system. The mechanism by which cisplatin activates these cells is poorly characterized. Since protein tyrosine phosphorylation appears to be a major intracellular signalling event that mediates cellular responses, we examined whether cisplatin alters tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. We found that cisplatin increased tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins in peritoneal macrophages and in P388D1 and IC-21 macrophage cell lines. Treatment of macrophages with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, genestein and lavendustin A, inhibited cisplatin-stimulated protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. Macrophages treated with cisplatin also exhibit increased fluorescence with anti-phosphotyrosine-FITC antibody. These data indicate that protein tyrosine phosphorylation plays a role in cisplatin-induced activation of macrophages. PMID:7539662

  4. Keratin 8 phosphorylation regulates keratin reorganization and migration of epithelial tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Tobias; Armacki, Milena; Eiseler, Tim; Joodi, Golsa; Temme, Claudia; Jansen, Julia; von Wichert, Götz; Omary, M. Bishr; Spatz, Joachim; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cell migration and invasion are largely dependent on the complex organization of the various cytoskeletal components. Whereas the role of actin filaments and microtubules in cell motility is well established, the role of intermediate filaments in this process is incompletely understood. Organization and structure of the keratin cytoskeleton, which consists of heteropolymers of at least one type 1 and one type 2 intermediate filament, are in part regulated by post-translational modifications. In particular, phosphorylation events influence the properties of the keratin network. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) is a bioactive lipid with the exceptional ability to change the organization of the keratin cytoskeleton, leading to reorganization of keratin filaments, increased elasticity, and subsequently increased migration of epithelial tumor cells. Here we investigate the signaling pathways that mediate SPC-induced keratin reorganization and the role of keratin phosphorylation in this process. We establish that the MEK–ERK signaling cascade regulates both SPC-induced keratin phosphorylation and reorganization in human pancreatic and gastric cancer cells and identify Ser431 in keratin 8 as the crucial residue whose phosphorylation is required and sufficient to induce keratin reorganization and consequently enhanced migration of human epithelial tumor cells. PMID:22344252

  5. Density Functional Theory Insights into the Role of the Methionine-Tyrosine-Tryptophan Adduct Radical in the KatG Catalase Reaction: O2 Release from the Oxyheme Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Kruft, Bonnie I; Magliozzo, Richard S; Jarzęcki, Andrzej A

    2015-07-01

    Density functional theory was employed for a comprehensive study that provided electronic and structural insights into the KatG catalase reaction that involves oxyheme. The catalytic role of a unique amino acid cofactor Met-Tyr-Trp (MYW) in its radical form found in KatG was thereby elucidated. It was established that the MYW-radical is flexible such that a "hinge-like opening" rotation of the Trp-107 ring with respect to the Tyr-229 ring along their covalent C-C bond is an inherent feature of its catalytic properties. Also, an H-bond between the Tyr-229 and the mobile side chain of Arg-418 further enables the catalytic events. The opening process breaks an H-bond between the N-H of Trp-107 and the inner oxygen of the Fe-O2 (oxyheme) complex present in the closed conformation of the MYW-radical. This motion lowers the spin-crossing energy barrier between the ground state and the catalytically active high-spin states and enables electron transfer from the oxyheme group to the MYW-radical. The release of molecular oxygen is thereby catalyzed and leaves ferric-heme poised for another catalytic cycle. The energy barrier for the oxyheme state to complete the catalytic event, when assisted by the radical opening process, is thereby reduced and estimated to be 5.6 kcal/mol. PMID:26050709

  6. Protein phosphorylation and intermolecular electron transfer: a joint experimental and computational study of a hormone biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Zöllner, Andy; Pasquinelli, Melissa A; Bernhardt, Rita; Beratan, David N

    2007-04-11

    Protein phosphorylation is a common regulator of enzyme activity. Chemical modification of a protein surface, including phosphorylation, could alter the function of biological electron-transfer reactions. However, the sensitivity of intermolecular electron-transfer kinetics to post-translational protein modifications has not been widely investigated. We have therefore combined experimental and computational studies to assess the potential role of phosphorylation in electron-transfer reactions. We investigated the steroid hydroxylating system from bovine adrenal glands, which consists of adrenodoxin (Adx), adrenodoxin reductase (AdR), and a cytochrome P450, CYP11A1. We focused on the phosphorylation of Adx at Thr-71, since this residue is located in the acidic interaction domain of Adx, and a recent study has demonstrated that this residue is phosphorylated by casein kinase 2 (CK2) in vitro.1 Optical biosensor experiments indicate that the presence of this phosphorylation slightly increases the binding affinity of oxidized Adx with CYP11A1ox but not AdRox. This tendency was confirmed by KA values extracted from Adx concentration-dependent stopped-flow experiments that characterize the interaction between AdRred and Adxox or between Adxred and CYP11A1ox. In addition, acceleration of the electron-transfer kinetics measured with stopped-flow is seen only for the phosphorylated Adx-CYP11A1 reaction. Biphasic reaction kinetics are observed only when Adx is phosphorylated at Thr-71, and the Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations suggest that this phosphorylation may enhance the formation of a secondary Adx-CYP11A1 binding complex that provides an additional electron-transfer pathway with enhanced coupling. PMID:17358057

  7. Electronic energy levels of intermediates in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, I. A.; Horlick, G.

    1980-12-01

    Using the multiple scattering X-alpha method, electronic energy levels have been found self-consistently for the intermediates Ni(CO)(n), n = 1,2,3 in the formation of nickel tetracarbonyl via the Ni-CO surface reaction. Linear geometries have been assumed for NiCO and Ni(CO)2, and a trigonal planar conformation for Ni(CO)3, in accordance with previously published IR spectra. The intermediates were assumed to be in the gas phase, free of surface interaction. From the energy level structure found, all three of the intermediates were determined to be diamagnetic, as Ni(CO)4 is known to be.

  8. Oxidative phosphorylation and lacunar stroke

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christopher D.; Hurford, Robert; Bevan, Steve; Markus, Hugh S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We investigated whether oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) abnormalities were associated with lacunar stroke, hypothesizing that these would be more strongly associated in patients with multiple lacunar infarcts and leukoaraiosis (LA). Methods: In 1,012 MRI-confirmed lacunar stroke cases and 964 age-matched controls recruited from general practice surgeries, we investigated associations between common genetic variants within the OXPHOS pathway and lacunar stroke using a permutation-based enrichment approach. Cases were phenotyped using MRI into those with multiple infarcts or LA (MLI/LA) and those with isolated lacunar infarcts (ILI) based on the number of subcortical infarcts and degree of LA, using the Fazekas grading. Using gene-level association statistics, we tested for enrichment of genes in the OXPHOS pathway with all lacunar stroke and the 2 subtypes. Results: There was a specific association with strong evidence of enrichment in the top 1% of genes in the MLI/LA (subtype p = 0.0017) but not in the ILI subtype (p = 1). Genes in the top percentile for the all lacunar stroke analysis were not significantly enriched (p = 0.07). Conclusions: Our results implicate the OXPHOS pathway in the pathogenesis of lacunar stroke, and show the association is specific to patients with the MLI/LA subtype. They show that MRI-based subtyping of lacunar stroke can provide insights into disease pathophysiology, and imply that different radiologic subtypes of lacunar stroke subtypes have distinct underlying pathophysiologic processes. PMID:26674331

  9. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 phosphorylation of familial prion protein mutants exacerbates conversion into amyloid structure.

    PubMed

    Rouget, Raphaël; Sharma, Gyanesh; LeBlanc, Andréa C

    2015-02-27

    Familial prion protein (PrP) mutants undergo conversion from soluble and protease-sensitive to insoluble and partially protease-resistant proteins. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) phosphorylation of wild type PrP (pPrP) at serine 43 induces a conversion of PrP into aggregates and fibrils. Here, we investigated whether familial PrP mutants are predisposed to Cdk5 phosphorylation and whether phosphorylation of familial PrP mutants increases conversion. PrP mutants representing three major familial PrP diseases and different PrP structural domains were studied. We developed a novel in vitro kinase reaction coupled with Thioflavin T binding to amyloid structure assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent amyloid conversion. Although non-phosphorylated full-length wild type or PrP mutants did not convert into amyloid, Cdk5 phosphorylation rapidly converted these into Thioflavin T-positive structures following first order kinetics. Dephosphorylation partially reversed conversion. Phosphorylation-dependent conversion of PrP from α-helical structures into β-sheet structures was confirmed by circular dichroism. Relative to wild type pPrP, most PrP mutants showed increased rate constants of conversion. In contrast, non-phosphorylated truncated PrP Y145X (where X represents a stop codon) and Q160X mutants converted spontaneously into Thioflavin T-positive fibrils after a lag phase of over 20 h, indicating nucleation-dependent polymerization. Phosphorylation reduced the lag phase by over 50% and thus accelerated the formation of the nucleating event. Consistently, phosphorylated Y145X and phosphorylated Q160X exacerbated conversion in a homologous seeding reaction, whereas WT pPrP could not seed WT PrP. These results demonstrate an influence of both the N terminus and the C terminus of PrP on conversion. We conclude that post-translational modifications of the flexible N terminus of PrP can cause or exacerbate PrP mutant conversion. PMID:25572400

  10. Conformational dynamics through an intermediate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, Ashok; Zhang, Yaojun; Dudko, Olga K.

    2014-04-01

    The self-assembly of biological and synthetic nanostructures commonly proceeds via intermediate states. In living systems in particular, the intermediates have the capacity to tilt the balance between functional and potentially fatal behavior. This work develops a statistical mechanical treatment of conformational dynamics through an intermediate under a variable force. An analytical solution is derived for the key experimentally measurable quantity—the distribution of forces at which a conformational transition occurs. The solution reveals rich kinetics over a broad range of parameters and enables one to locate the intermediate and extract the activation barriers and rate constants.

  11. In the Beginning, There Was Protein Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kyriakis, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of reversible protein phosphorylation to cellular regulation cannot be overstated. In eukaryotic cells, protein kinase/phosphatase signaling pathways regulate a staggering number of cellular processes, including cell proliferation, cell death (apoptosis, necroptosis, necrosis), metabolism (at both the cellular and organismal levels), behavior and neurological function, development, and pathogen resistance. Although protein phosphorylation as a mode of eukaryotic cell regulation is familiar to most biochemists, many are less familiar with protein kinase/phosphatase signaling networks that function in prokaryotes. In this thematic minireview series, we present four minireviews that cover the important field of prokaryotic protein phosphorylation. PMID:24554697

  12. Noncanonical Reactions of Flavoenzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sobrado, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes containing flavin cofactors are predominantly involved in redox reactions in numerous cellular processes where the protein environment modulates the chemical reactivity of the flavin to either transfer one or two electrons. Some flavoenzymes catalyze reactions with no net redox change. In these reactions, the protein environment modulates the reactivity of the flavin to perform novel chemistries. Recent mechanistic and structural data supporting novel flavin functionalities in reactions catalyzed by chorismate synthase, type II isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase, UDP-galactopyranose mutase, and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase are presented in this review. In these enzymes, the flavin plays either a direct role in acid/base reactions or as a nucleophile or electrophile. In addition, the flavin cofactor is proposed to function as a “molecular scaffold” in the formation of UDP-galactofuranose and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate by forming a covalent adduct with reaction intermediates. PMID:23203060

  13. Glutamyl Phosphate Is an Activated Intermediate in Actin Crosslinking by Actin Crosslinking Domain (ACD) Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Kudryashova, Elena; Kalda, Caitlin; Kudryashov, Dmitri S.

    2012-01-01

    Actin Crosslinking Domain (ACD) is produced by several life-threatening Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria as part of larger toxins and delivered into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic host cells via Type I or Type VI secretion systems. Upon delivery, ACD disrupts the actin cytoskeleton by catalyzing intermolecular amide bond formation between E270 and K50 residues of actin, leading to the formation of polymerization-deficient actin oligomers. Ultimately, accumulation of the crosslinked oligomers results in structural and functional failure of the actin cytoskeleton in affected cells. In the present work, we advanced in our understanding of the ACD catalytic mechanism by discovering that the enzyme transfers the gamma-phosphoryl group of ATP to the E270 actin residue, resulting in the formation of an activated acyl phosphate intermediate. This intermediate is further hydrolyzed and the energy of hydrolysis is utilized for the formation of the amide bond between actin subunits. We also determined the pH optimum for the reaction and the kinetic parameters of ACD catalysis for its substrates, ATP and actin. ACD showed sigmoidal, non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics for actin (K0.5 = 30 µM) reflecting involvement of two actin molecules in a single crosslinking event. We established that ACD can also utilize Mg2+-GTP to support crosslinking, but the kinetic parameters (KM = 8 µM and 50 µM for ATP and GTP, respectively) suggest that ATP is the primary substrate of ACD in vivo. The optimal pH for ACD activity was in the range of 7.0–9.0. The elucidated kinetic mechanism of ACD toxicity adds to understanding of complex network of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:23029200

  14. Mixtures of opposing phosphorylations within hexamers precisely time feedback in the cyanobacterial circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jenny; Chew, Justin; Chockanathan, Udaysankar; Rust, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian oscillations are generated by the purified cyanobacterial clock proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC, through rhythmic interactions that depend on multisite phosphorylation of KaiC. However, the mechanisms that allow these phosphorylation reactions to robustly control the timing of oscillations over a range of protein stoichiometries are not clear. We show that when KaiC hexamers consist of a mixture of differentially phosphorylated subunits, the two phosphorylation sites have opposing effects on the ability of each hexamer to bind to the negative regulator KaiB. We likewise show that the ability of the positive regulator KaiA to act on KaiC depends on the phosphorylation state of the hexamer and that KaiA and KaiB recognize alternative allosteric states of the KaiC ring. Using mathematical models with kinetic parameters taken from experimental data, we find that antagonism of the two KaiC phosphorylation sites generates an ultrasensitive switch in negative feedback strength necessary for stable circadian oscillations over a range of component concentrations. Similar strategies based on opposing modifications may be used to support robustness in other timing systems and in cellular signaling more generally. PMID:25197081

  15. Reaction coordinates for electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rasaiah, Jayendran C.; Zhu Jianjun

    2008-12-07

    The polarization fluctuation and energy gap formulations of the reaction coordinate for outer sphere electron transfer are linearly related to the constant energy constraint Lagrangian multiplier m in Marcus' theory of electron transfer. The quadratic dependence of the free energies of the reactant and product intermediates on m and m+1, respectively, leads to similar dependence of the free energies on the reaction coordinates and to the same dependence of the activation energy on the reorganization energy and the standard reaction free energy. Within the approximations of a continuum model of the solvent and linear response of the longitudinal polarization to the electric field in Marcus' theory, both formulations of the reaction coordinate are expected to lead to the same results.

  16. Intermediate BL Lac objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondi, M.; Marchã, M. J. M.; Dallacasa, D.; Stanghellini, C.

    2001-08-01

    The 200-mJy sample, defined by Marchã et al., contains about 60 nearby, northern, flat-spectrum radio sources. In particular, the sample has proved effective at finding nearby radio-selected BL Lac objects with radio luminosities comparable to those of X-ray-selected objects, and low-luminosity flat-spectrum weak emission-line radio galaxies (WLRGs). The 200-mJy sample contains 23 BL Lac objects (including 6 BL Lac candidates) and 19 WLRGs. We will refer to these subsamples as the 200-mJy BL Lac sample and the 200-mJy WLRG sample, respectively. We have started a systematic analysis of the morphological pc-scale properties of the 200-mJy radio sources using VLBI observations. This paper presents VLBI observations at 5 and 1.6GHz of 14 BL Lac objects and WLRGs selected from the 200-mJy sample. The pc-scale morphology of these objects is briefly discussed. We derive the radio beaming parameters of the 200-mJy BL Lac objects and WLRGs and compare them with those of other BL Lac samples and with a sample of FR I radio galaxies. The overall broad-band radio, optical and X-ray properties of the 200-mJy BL Lac sample are discussed and compared with those of other BL Lac samples, radio- and X-ray-selected. We find that the 200-mJy BL Lac objects fill the gap between HBL and LBL objects in the colour-colour plot, and have intermediate αXOX as expected in the spectral energy distribution unification scenario. Finally, we briefly discuss the role of the WLRGs.

  17. The Chemical Biology of Protein Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, Mary Katherine; Cole, Philip A.

    2011-01-01

    The explosion of scientific interest in protein kinase-mediated signaling networks has led to the infusion of new chemical methods and their applications related to the analysis of phosphorylation pathways. We highlight some of these chemical biology approaches across three areas. First, we discuss the development of chemical tools to modulate the activity of protein kinases to explore kinase mechanisms and their contributions to phosphorylation events and cellular processes. Second, we describe chemical techniques developed in the past few years to dissect the structural and functional effects of phosphate modifications at specific sites in proteins. Third, we cover newly developed molecular imaging approaches to elucidate the spatiotemporal aspects of phosphorylation cascades in live cells. Exciting advances in our understanding of protein phosphorylation have been obtained with these chemical biology approaches, but continuing opportunities for technological innovation remain. PMID:19489734

  18. Quantitative and dynamic analysis of PTEN phosphorylation by NMR.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Florence; Chaffotte, Alain; Wolff, Nicolas

    2015-05-01

    The dual lipid and protein phosphatase PTEN is a tumor suppressor controlling key biological processes, such as cell growth, proliferation and neuro-survival. Its activity and intracellular trafficking is finely regulated notably by multi-site phosphorylation of its C-terminal tail. The reversible and highly dynamic character of these regulatory events confers a temporal dimension to the cell for triggering crucial decisions. In this review, we describe how a recently developed time-resolved NMR spectroscopy approach unveils the dynamic establishment of the phosphorylation events of PTEN C-terminal tail controlled by CK2 and GSK3β kinases. Two cascades of reactions have been identified, in vitro and in extracts of human neuroblastoma cells. They are triggered independently on two nearby clusters of sites (S380-S385 and S361-S370) and occur on different timescales. In each cascade, the reactions follow an ordered model with a distributive kinetic mechanism. The vision of these cascades as two delay timers activating distinct or time-delayed regulatory responses gives a temporal dimension on PTEN regulation and is discussed in relation to the known functional roles of each cluster. PMID:25449899

  19. Masonry. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Moses

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of 13 terminal objectives for an intermediate masonry course. These materials, developed for a two-semester (3 hours daily) course, are designed to provide the student with the skills and knowledge necessary for entry level employment in the field…

  20. Printing. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seivert, Chester

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of 13 terminal objectives for an intermediate printing course. The materials were developed for a two-semester (3 hours daily) course with specialized classroom, shop, and practical experiences designed to enable the student to develop proficiency…

  1. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  2. Kinetics and control of oxidative phosphorylation in rat liver mitochondria after dexamethasone treatment

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken in order to evaluate the contributions of ATP synthesis and proton leak reactions to the rate of active respiration of liver mitochondria, which is altered following dexamethasone treatment (1.5 mg/kg per day for 5 days). We applied top-down metabolic control analysis and its extension, elasticity analysis, to gain insight into the mechanisms of glucocorticoid regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics. Liver mitochondria were isolated from dexamethasone-treated, pair-fed and control rats when in a fed or overnight fasted state. Injection of dexamethasone for 5 days resulted in an increase in the fraction of the proton cycle of phosphorylating liver mitochondria, which was associated with a decrease in the efficiency of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation process in liver. This increase in proton leak activity occurred with little change in the mitochondrial membrane potential, despite a significant decrease in the rate of oxidative phosphorylation. Regulation analysis indicates that mitochondrial membrane potential homoeostasis is achieved by equal inhibition of the mitochondrial substrate oxidation and phosphorylation reactions in rats given dexamethasone. Our results also suggest that active liver mitochondria from dexamethasone-treated rats are capable of maintaining phosphorylation flux for cellular purposes, despite an increase in the energetic cost of mitochondrial ATP production due to increased basal proton permeability of the inner membrane. They also provide a complete description of the effects of dexamethasone treatment on liver mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:15175015

  3. Effect of Calcium on the Oxidative Phosphorylation Cascade in Skeletal Muscle Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Glancy, Brian; Willis, Wayne T; Chess, David J; Balaban, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Calcium is believed to regulate mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, thereby contributing to the maintenance of cellular energy homeostasis. Skeletal muscle, with an energy conversion dynamic range of up to 100-fold, is an extreme case for evaluating the cellular balance of ATP production and consumption. This study examined the role of Ca2+ on the entire oxidative phosphorylation reaction network in isolated skeletal muscle mitochondria and attempted to extrapolate these results back to the muscle, in vivo. Kinetic analysis was conducted to evaluate the dose response effect of Ca2+ on the maximum velocity of oxidative phosphorylation (VmaxO) and the ADP affinity. Force-flow analysis evaluated the interplay between energetic driving forces and flux to determine the conductance, or effective activity, of individual steps within oxidative phosphorylation. Measured driving forces (extramitochondrial phosphorylation potential (ΔGATP), membrane potential, and redox states of NADH and cytochromes bH, bL, c1, c, and a,a3) were compared with flux (oxygen consumption) at 37°C. 840 nM Ca2+ generated a ∼2 fold increase in VmaxO with no change in ADP affinity (∼43 μM). Force-flow analysis revealed that Ca2+ activation of VmaxO was distributed throughout the oxidative phosphorylation reaction sequence. Specifically, Ca2+ increased the conductance of Complex IV (2.3-fold), Complexes I+III (2.2-fold), ATP production/transport (2.4-fold), and fuel transport/dehydrogenases (1.7-fold). These data support the notion that Ca2+ activates the entire muscle oxidative phosphorylation cascade, while extrapolation of these data to the exercising muscle predicts a significant role of Ca2+ in maintaining cellular energy homeostasis. PMID:23547908

  4. Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.T. )

    1991-08-01

    The effect of Ca2+ and calmodulin on phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins was studied. Secretory granules were incubated in a phosphorylation reaction mixture containing (32P)ATP and test reagents. The 32P-labeled proteins were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the 32P content was visualized by autoradiography, and the relative intensities of specific bands were quantitated. When the reaction mixture contained EGTA and no added Ca2+, 32P was incorporated into two proteins with molecular weights of 45,000 and 13,000. When 10(-4) M Ca2+ was added without EGTA, two additional proteins (58,000 and 48,000 Mr) were phosphorylated, and the 13,000-Mr protein was absent. The addition of 2.4 microM calmodulin markedly enhanced the phosphorylation of the 58,000- and 48,000-Mr proteins and resulted in the phosphorylation of a major protein whose molecular weight (64,000 Mr) is identical to that of one of the calmodulin binding proteins located on the granule surface. Calmodulin had no effect on phosphorylation in the absence of Ca2+ but was effective in the presence of calcium between 10 nM and 50 microM. Trifluoperazine and calmidazolium, calmodulin antagonists, produced a dose-dependent inhibition of the calmodulin effect. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate, a phorbol ester that activates protein kinase C, produced no increase in phosphorylation, and 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methyl piperazine dihydrochloride, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, had no effect. These results indicate that Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and endogenous substrates are present in islet secretory granules.

  5. Protein phosphorylation: Localization in regenerating optic axons

    SciTech Connect

    Larrivee, D. )

    1990-09-01

    A number of axonal proteins display changes in phosphorylation during goldfish optic nerve regeneration. (1) To determine whether the phosphorylation of these proteins was closely linked to their synthesis in the retinal ganglion cell body, cycloheximide was injected intraocularly into goldfish whose optic nerves had been regenerating for 3 weeks. Cycloheximide reduced the incorporation of (3H)proline and 32P orthophosphate into total nerve protein by 84% and 46%, respectively. Of the 20 individual proteins examined, 17 contained less than 15% of the (3H)proline label measured in corresponding controls, whereas 18 proteins contained 50% or more of the 32P label, suggesting that phosphorylation was largely independent of synthesis. (2) To determine whether the proteins were phosphorylated in the ganglion cell axons, axonal transport of proteins was blocked by intraocular injection of vincristine. Vincristine reduced (3H)proline labeling of total protein by 88% and 32P labeling by 49%. Among the individual proteins (3H)proline labeling was reduced by 90% or more in 18 cases but 32P labeling was reduced only by 50% or less. (3) When 32P was injected into the cranial cavity near the ends of the optic axons, all of the phosphoproteins were labeled more intensely in the optic tract than in the optic nerve. These results suggest that most of the major phosphoproteins that undergo changes in phosphorylation in the course of regeneration are phosphorylated in the optic axons.

  6. Phosphorylation of human skeletal muscle myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, M.E.; Lingley, M.D.; Stuart, D.S.; Hoffman-Goetz, L.

    1986-03-01

    Phosphorylation of the P-light chains (phosphorylatable light chains) in human skeletal muscle myosin was studied in vitro and in vivo under resting an d contracted conditions. biopsy samples from rested vastus lateralis muscle of male and female subjects were incubated in oxygenated physiological solution at 30/sup 0/C. Samples frozen following a quiescent period showed the presence of only unphosphorylated P-light chains designated LC2f (light chain two of fast myosin) CL2s and LC2s'(light chains two of slow myosin). Treatment with caffeine (10 mM) or direct electrical stimulation resulted in the appearance of three additional bands which were identified as the phosphorylated forms of the P-light chains i.e. LC2f-P, LC2s-P and LC2s'-P. The presence of phosphate was confirmed by prior incubation with (/sup 30/P) orthophosphate. Muscle samples rapidly frozen from resting vastus lateralis muscle revealed the presence of unphosphorylated and phosphorylated P-light chains in approximately equal ratios. Muscle samples rapidly frozen following a maximal 10 second isometric contraction showed virtually only phosphorylated fast and slow P-light chains. These results reveal that the P-light chains in human fast and slow myosin may be rapidly phosphorylated, but the basal level of phosphorylation in rested human muscle considerably exceeds that observed in animal muscles studied in vitro or in situ.

  7. Protein phosphorylation in neurodegeneration: friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Tenreiro, Sandra; Eckermann, Katrin; Outeiro, Tiago F.

    2014-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation is a common hallmark in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and fronto-temporal dementia (FTD). In these disorders, the misfolding and aggregation of specific proteins occurs alongside neuronal degeneration in somewhat specific brain areas, depending on the disorder and the stage of the disease. However, we still do not fully understand the mechanisms governing protein aggregation, and whether this constitutes a protective or detrimental process. In PD, alpha-synuclein (aSyn) forms protein aggregates, known as Lewy bodies, and is phosphorylated at serine 129. Other residues have also been shown to be phosphorylated, but the significance of phosphorylation in the biology and pathophysiology of the protein is still controversial. In AD and in FTD, hyperphosphorylation of tau protein causes its misfolding and aggregation. Again, our understanding of the precise consequences of tau phosphorylation in the biology and pathophysiology of the protein is still limited. Through the use of a variety of model organisms and technical approaches, we are now gaining stronger insight into the effects of phosphorylation in the behavior of these proteins. In this review, we cover recent findings in the field and discuss how targeting phosphorylation events might be used for therapeutic intervention in these devastating diseases of the nervous system. PMID:24860424

  8. Protein phosphorylation during Plasmodium berghei gametogenesis.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Morales, Alberto; González-López, Lorena; Cázares-Raga, Febe Elena; Cortés-Martínez, Leticia; Torres-Monzón, Jorge Aurelio; Gallegos-Pérez, José Luis; Rodríguez, Mario Henry; James, Anthony A; Hernández-Hernández, Fidel de la Cruz

    2015-09-01

    Plasmodium gametogenesis within the mosquito midgut is a complex differentiation process involving signaling mediated by phosphorylation, which modulate metabolic routes and protein synthesis required to complete this development. However, the mechanisms leading to gametogenesis activation are poorly understood. We analyzed protein phosphorylation during Plasmodium berghei gametogenesis in vitro in serum-free medium using bidimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with immunoblotting (IB) and antibodies specific to phosphorylated serine, threonine and tyrosine. Approximately 75 protein exhibited phosphorylation changes, of which 23 were identified by mass spectrometry. These included components of the cytoskeleton, heat shock proteins, and proteins involved in DNA synthesis and signaling pathways among others. Novel phosphorylation events support a role for these proteins during gametogenesis. The phosphorylation sites of six of the identified proteins, HSP70, WD40 repeat protein msi1, enolase, actin-1 and two isoforms of large subunit of ribonucleoside reductase were investigated using TiO2 phosphopeptides enrichment and tandem mass spectrometry. In addition, transient exposure to hydroxyurea, an inhibitor of ribonucleoside reductase, impaired male gametocytes exflagellation in a dose-dependent manner, and provides a resource for functional studies. PMID:26008612

  9. Fibronectin phosphorylation by ecto-protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, Sumi; Sugiyama, Yayoi; Imada, Masaru )

    1988-12-01

    The presence of membrane-associated, extracellular protein kinase (ecto-protein kinase) and its substrate proteins was examined with serum-free cultures of Swiss 3T3 fibroblast. When cells were incubated with ({gamma}-{sup 32})ATP for 10 min at 37{degree}C, four proteins with apparent molecular weights between 150 and 220 kDa were prominently phosphorylated. These proteins were also radiolabeled by lactoperoxidase catalyzed iodination and were sensitive to mild tryptic digestion, suggesting that they localized on the cell surface or in the extracellular matrix. Phosphorylation of extracellular proteins with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in intact cell culture is consistent with the existence of ecto-protein kinase. Anti-fibronectin antibody immunoprecipitated one of the phosphoproteins which comigrated with a monomer and a dimer form of fibronectin under reducing and nonreducing conditions of electrophoresis, respectively. The protein had affinity for gelatin as demonstrated by retention with gelatin-conjugated agarose. This protein substrate of ecto-protein kinase was thus concluded to be fibronectin. The sites of phosphorylation by ecto-protein kinase were compared with those of intracellularly phosphorylated fibronectin by the analysis of radiolabeled amino acids and peptides. Ecto-protein kinase phosphorylated fibronectin at serine and threonine residues which were distinct from the sites of intracellular fibronectin phosphorylation.

  10. Compartment-Specific Phosphorylation of Squid Neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Grant, Philip; Pant, Harish C

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the giant axon and synapse of third-order neurons in the squid stellate ganglion have provided a vast literature on neuronal physiology and axon transport. Large neuronal size also lends itself to comparative biochemical studies of cell body versus axon. These have focused on the regulation of synthesis, assembly, posttranslational modification and function of neuronal cytoskeletal proteins (microtubules (MTs) and neurofilaments (NFs)), the predominant proteins in axoplasm. These contribute to axonal organization, stability, transport, and impulse transmission responsible for rapid contractions of mantle muscles underlying jet propulsion. Studies of vertebrate NFs have established an extensive literature on NF structure, organization, and function; studies of squid NFs, however, have made it possible to compare compartment-specific regulation of NF synthesis, assembly, and function in soma versus axoplasm. Since NFs contain over 100 eligible sites for phosphorylation by protein kinases, the compartment-specific patterns of phosphorylation have been a primary focus of biochemical studies. We have learned that NF phosphorylation is tightly compartmentalized; extensive phosphorylation occurs only in the axonal compartment in squid and in vertebrate neurons. This extensive phosphorylation plays a key role in organizing NFs, in association with microtubules (MTs), into a stable, dynamic functional lattice that supports axon growth, diameter, impulse transmission, and synaptic activity. To understand how cytoskeletal phosphorylation is topographically regulated, the kinases and phosphatases, bound to NFs isolated from cell bodies and axoplasm, have also been studied. PMID:26795486

  11. Phosphorylation meets nuclear import: a review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the most common and pleiotropic modification in biology, which plays a vital role in regulating and finely tuning a multitude of biological pathways. Transport across the nuclear envelope is also an essential cellular function and is intimately linked to many degeneration processes that lead to disease. It is therefore not surprising that phosphorylation of cargos trafficking between the cytoplasm and nucleus is emerging as an important step to regulate nuclear availability, which directly affects gene expression, cell growth and proliferation. However, the literature on phosphorylation of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking cargos is often confusing. Phosphorylation, and its mirror process dephosphorylation, has been shown to have opposite and often contradictory effects on the ability of cargos to be transported across the nuclear envelope. Without a clear connection between attachment of a phosphate moiety and biological response, it is difficult to fully understand and predict how phosphorylation regulates nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. In this review, we will recapitulate clue findings in the field and provide some general rules on how reversible phosphorylation can affect the nuclear-cytoplasmic localization of substrates. This is only now beginning to emerge as a key regulatory step in biology. PMID:21182795

  12. Identification of a novel phosphorylation site in c-jun directly targeted in vitro by protein kinase D

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, Richard T. . E-mail: rwaldron@mednet.ucla.edu; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Faull, Kym F.; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2007-05-04

    Protein kinase D (PKD) phosphorylates the c-jun amino-terminal in vitro at site(s) distinct from JNK [C. Hurd, R.T. Waldron, E. Rozengurt, Protein kinase D complexes with c-jun N-terminal kinase via activation loop phosphorylation and phosphorylates the c-jun N-terminus, Oncogene 21 (2002) 2154-2160], but the sites have not been identified. Here, metabolic {sup 32}P-labeling of c-jun protein in COS-7 cells indicated that PKD phosphorylates c-jun in vivo at a site(s) between aa 43-93, a region containing important functional elements. On this basis, the PKD-mediated phosphorylation site(s) was further characterized in vitro using GST-c-jun fusion proteins. PKD did not incorporate phosphate into Ser63 and Ser73, the JNK sites in GST-c-jun(1-89). Rather, PKD and JNK could sequentially phosphorylate distinct site(s) simultaneously. By mass spectrometry of tryptic phosphopeptides, Ser58 interposed between the JNK-binding portion of the delta domain and the adjacent TAD1 was identified as a prominent site phosphorylated in vitro by PKD. These data were further supported by kinase reactions using truncations or point-mutations of GST-c-jun. Together, these data suggest that PKD-mediated phosphorylation modulates c-jun at the level of its N-terminal functional domains.

  13. Pr-specific phytochrome phosphorylation in vitro by a protein kinase present in anti-phytochrome maize immunoprecipitates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, B. J.; Pao, L. I.; Feldman, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    Protein kinase activity has repeatedly been found to co-purify with the plant photoreceptor phytochrome, suggesting that light signals received by phytochrome may be transduced or modulated through protein phosphorylation. In this study immunoprecipitation techniques were used to characterize protein kinase activity associated with phytochrome from maize (Zea mays L.). A protein kinase that specifically phosphorylated phytochrome was present in washed anti-phytochrome immunoprecipitates of etiolated coleoptile proteins. No other substrate tested was phosphorylated by this kinase. Adding salts or detergents to disrupt low-affinity protein interactions reduced background phosphorylation in immunoprecipitates without affecting phytochrome phosphorylation, indicating that the protein kinase catalytic activity is either intrinsic to the phytochrome molecule or associated with it by high-affinity interactions. Red irradiation (of coleoptiles or extracts) sufficient to approach photoconversion saturation reduced phosphorylation of immunoprecipitated phytochrome. Subsequent far-red irradiation reversed the red-light effect. Phytochrome phosphorylation was stimulated about 10-fold by a co-immunoprecipitated factor. The stimulatory factor was highest in immunoprecipitates when Mg2+ was present in immunoprecipitation reactions but remained in the supernatant in the absence of Mg2+. These observations provide strong support for the hypothesis that phytochrome-associated protein kinase modulates light responses in vivo. Since only phytochrome was found to be phosphorylated, the co-immunoprecipitated protein kinase may function to regulate receptor activity.

  14. PKA regulates calcineurin function through the phosphorylation of RCAN1: Identification of a novel phosphorylation site

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seon Sook; Lee, Eun Hye; Lee, Kooyeon; Jo, Su-Hyun; Seo, Su Ryeon

    2015-04-17

    Calcineurin is a calcium/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase that has been implicated in T cell activation through the induction of nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFAT). We have previously suggested that endogenous regulator of calcineurin (RCAN1, also known as DSCR1) is targeted by protein kinase A (PKA) for the control of calcineurin activity. In the present study, we characterized the PKA-mediated phosphorylation site in RCAN1 by mass spectrometric analysis and revealed that PKA directly phosphorylated RCAN1 at the Ser 93. PKA-induced phosphorylation and the increase in the half-life of the RCAN1 protein were prevented by the substitution of Ser 93 with Ala (S93A). Furthermore, the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of RCAN1 at Ser 93 potentiated the inhibition of calcineurin-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression by RCAN1. Our results suggest the presence of a novel phosphorylation site in RCAN1 and that its phosphorylation influences calcineurin-dependent inflammatory target gene expression. - Highlights: • We identify novel phosphorylation sites in RCAN1 by LC-MS/MS analysis. • PKA-dependent phosphorylation of RCAN1 at Ser 93 inhibits calcineurin-mediated intracellular signaling. • We show the immunosuppressive function of RCAN1 phosphorylation at Ser 93 in suppressing cytokine expression.

  15. Molecular Basis of 1,6-Anhydro Bond Cleavage and Phosphoryl Transfer by Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1,6-Anhydro-N-acetylmuramic Acid Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Bacik, John-Paul; Whitworth, Garrett E.; Stubbs, Keith A.; Yadav, Anuj K.; Martin, Dylan R.; Bailey-Elkin, Ben A.; Vocadlo, David J.; Mark, Brian L.

    2011-01-01

    Anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid kinase (AnmK) catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of the Gram-negative peptidoglycan (PG) recycling intermediate 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid (anhMurNAc) to N-acetylmuramic acid-6-phosphate (MurNAc-6-P). Here we present crystal structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa AnmK in complex with its natural substrate, anhMurNAc, and a product of the reaction, ADP. AnmK is homodimeric, with each subunit comprised of two subdomains that are separated by a deep active site cleft, which bears similarity to the ATPase core of proteins belonging to the hexokinase-hsp70-actin superfamily of proteins. The conversion of anhMurNAc to MurNAc-6-P involves both cleavage of the 1,6-anhydro ring of anhMurNAc along with addition of a phosphoryl group to O6 of the sugar, and thus represents an unusual enzymatic mechanism involving the formal addition of H3PO4 to anhMurNAc. The structural complexes and NMR analysis of the reaction suggest that a water molecule, activated by Asp-182, attacks the anomeric carbon of anhMurNAc, aiding cleavage of the 1,6-anhydro bond and facilitating the capture of the γ phosphate of ATP by O6 via an in-line phosphoryl transfer. AnmK is active only against anhMurNAc and not the metabolically related 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramyl peptides, suggesting that the cytosolic N-acetyl-anhydromuramyl-l-alanine amidase AmpD must first remove the stem peptide from these PG muropeptide catabolites before anhMurNAc can be acted upon by AnmK. Our studies provide the foundation for a mechanistic model for the dual activities of AnmK as a hydrolase and a kinase of an unusual heterocyclic monosaccharide. PMID:21288904

  16. Novel Reagents for Multi-Component Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanguang; Basso, Andrea; Nenajdenko, Valentine G.; Gulevich, Anton V.; Krasavin, Mikhail; Bushkova, Ekaterina; Parchinsky, Vladislav; Banfi, Luca; Basso, Andrea; Cerulli, Valentina; Guanti, Giuseppe; Riva, Renata; Rozentsveig, Igor B.; Rozentsveig, Gulnur N.; Popov, Aleksandr V.; Serykh, Valeriy J.; Levkovskaya, Galina G.; Cao, Song; Shen, Li; Liu, Nianjin; Wu, Jingjing; Li, Lina; Qian, Xuhong; Chen, Xiaopeng; Wang, Hongbo; Feng, Jinwu; Wang, Yanguang; Lu, Ping; Heravi, Majid M.; Sadjadi, Samaheh; Kazemizadeh, Ali Reza; Ramazani, Ali; Kudyakova, Yulia S.; Goryaeva, Marina V.; Burgart, Yanina V.; Saloutin, Victor I.; Mossetti, Riccardo; Pirali, Tracey; Tron, Gian Cesare; Rozhkova, Yulia S.; Mayorova, Olga A.; Shklyaev, Yuriy V.; Zhdanko, Alexander G.; Nenajdenko, Valentine G.; Stryapunina, Olga G.; Plekhanova, Irina V.; Glushkov, Vladimir A.; Shklyaev, Yurii V.

    Ketenimines are a class of versatile and highly reactive intermediates that can participate in a variety of organic reactions, such as nucleophilic additions, radical additions, [2 + 2] and [2 + 4] cycloadditions, and sigmatropic rearrangements. In this presentation, we report on a series of multi-component reactions that involve a ketenimine intermediate. These reactions could furnish diverse heterocyclic compounds, including functionalized iminocoumarin, iminodihydroqunolines, iminothiochromens, pyrrolines, isoquinolines, pyridines, β-lactams, imino-1,2-dihydrocoumarins, and benzimidazoles.

  17. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 (GRK2) and 5 (GRK5) Exhibit Selective Phosphorylation of the Neurotensin Receptor in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) play an important role in the desensitization of G protein-mediated signaling of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The level of interest in mapping their phosphorylation sites has increased because recent studies suggest that the differential pattern of receptor phosphorylation has distinct biological consequences. In vitro phosphorylation experiments using well-controlled systems are useful for deciphering the complexity of these physiological reactions and understanding the targeted event. Here, we report on the phosphorylation of the class A GPCR neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) by GRKs under defined experimental conditions afforded by nanodisc technology. Phosphorylation of NTSR1 by GRK2 was agonist-dependent, whereas phosphorylation by GRK5 occurred in an activation-independent manner. In addition, the negatively charged lipids in the immediate vicinity of NTSR1 directly affect phosphorylation by GRKs. Identification of phosphorylation sites in agonist-activated NTSR1 revealed that GRK2 and GRK5 target different residues located on the intracellular receptor elements. GRK2 phosphorylates only the C-terminal Ser residues, whereas GRK5 phosphorylates Ser and Thr residues located in intracellular loop 3 and the C-terminus. Interestingly, phosphorylation assays using a series of NTSR1 mutants show that GRK2 does not require acidic residues upstream of the phospho-acceptors for site-specific phosphorylation, in contrast to the β2-adrenergic and μ-opioid receptors. Differential phosphorylation of GPCRs by GRKs is thought to encode a particular signaling outcome, and our in vitro study revealed NTSR1 differential phosphorylation by GRK2 and GRK5. PMID:26120872

  18. Endogenous phosphorylation of microsomal proteins in bovine corpus luteum. Tenfold activation by adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Hardie, D. Grahame; Stansfield, David A.

    1977-01-01

    Free ribosomes and a smooth-microsomal fraction were prepared from bovine corpus luteum. Both preparations will self-phosphorylate when incubated with Mg2+ and ATP, but at low concentrations of Mg2+ and ATP the self-phosphorylation of the smooth-microsomal fraction was much more dependent on cyclic AMP than was that of free ribosomes, stimulation by the nucleotide being up to 10-fold in the former case. The self-phosphorylation of the smooth-microsomal fraction was studied further. The reaction bears similarities to that brought about by soluble cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, being inhibited by Ca2+ and the heat-stable inhibitor protein from skeletal muscle. Cyclic GMP will activate the reaction at concentrations higher than those required for full activation by cyclic AMP. In the presence of cyclic AMP, phosphate bound to protein is found almost exclusively as phosphoserine. Several proteins are phosphorylated, as judged by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, and the phosphorylation of all of them is markedly stimulated by cyclic AMP. If the reaction is carried out at high concentrations of Mg2+ and ATP, a distinct cyclic AMP-independent phosphorylation is observed. This activity is not inhibited by the heat-stable inhibitor protein, and phosphate is found esterified with both threonine and serine residues. PMID:195580

  19. Intermediate depth seismicity - a reflection seismic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberland, C.; Rietbrock, A.

    2004-12-01

    During subduction the descending oceanic lithosphere is subject to metamorphic reactions, some of them associated with the release of fluids. It is now widely accepted, that these reactions and associated dehydration processes are directly related with the generation of intermediate depth earthquakes (dehydration embrittlement). However, the structure of the layered oceanic plate at depth and the location of the earthquakes relative to structural units of the subducting plate (sources within the oceanic crust and/or in the upper oceanic mantle lithosphere?) are still not resolved yet. This is in mainly due to the fact that the observational resolution needed to address these topics (in the range of only a few kilometers) is hardly achieved in field experiments and related studies. Here we study the wavefields of intermediate depth earthquakes typically observed by temporary networks in order to assess their high-resolution potential in resolving structure of the down going slab and locus of seismicity. In particular we study whether the subducted oceanic Moho can be detected by the analysis of secondary phases of local earthquakes (near vertical reflection). Due to the irregular geometry of sources and receivers we apply an imaging technique similar to diffraction stack migration. The method is tested using synthetic data both based on 2-D finite difference simulations and 3-D kinematic ray tracing. The accuracy of the hypocenter location and onset times crucial for the successful application of stacking techniques (coherency) was achieved by the use of relatively relocated intermediate depth seismicity. Additionally, we simulate the propagation of the wavefields at larger distance (wide angle) indicating the development of guided waves traveling in the low-velocity waveguide associated with the modeled oceanic crust. We also present application on local earthquake data from the South American subduction zone.

  20. Noncovalent Intermediate of Thymidylate Synthase: Fact or Fiction?

    PubMed

    Kholodar, Svetlana A; Kohen, Amnon

    2016-07-01

    Thymidylate synthase is an attractive target for antibiotic and anticancer drugs due to its essential role in the de novo biosynthesis of the DNA nucleotide thymine. The enzymatic reaction is initiated by a nucleophilic activation of the substrate via formation of a covalent bond to an active site cysteine. The traditionally accepted mechanism is then followed by a series of covalently bound intermediates, where that bond is only cleaved upon product release. Recent computational and experimental studies suggest that the covalent bond between the protein and substrate is actually quite labile. Importantly, these findings predict the existence of a noncovalently bound bisubstrate intermediate, not previously anticipated, which could be the target of a novel class of drugs inhibiting DNA biosynthesis. Here we report the synthesis of the proposed intermediate and findings supporting its chemical and kinetic competence. These findings substantiate the predicted nontraditional mechanism and the potential of this intermediate as a new drug lead. PMID:27327197

  1. How much can an intermediate state influence competing reactive pathways?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despa, Florin; Berry, R. Stephen

    2004-03-01

    A molecule undergoing reaction may form a short-lived intermediate. Under certain conditions, the rate at which the reaction proceeds toward the product state via the intermediate may exceed that of a simple, direct path. The competition of two alternative reactive pathways is analyzed here in terms of a stochastic model. The approach allows one to diagnose this competition as a function of the energy of the intermediate relative to the barrier heights of the potential surface and values of the reactive vibrational modes. The result has applications to a variety of problems in chemical physics, ranging from the "lock-and-key" mechanism for the enzymatic activity to control of temporal evolution of complex systems by optimal laser fields.

  2. Criegee intermediates in the indoor environment. New insights

    SciTech Connect

    Shallcross, D. E.; Taatjes, C. A.; Percival, C. J.

    2014-03-25

    Criegee intermediates are formed in the ozonolysis of alkenes and play an important role in indoor chemistry, notably as a source of OH radicals. Recent studies have shown that these Criegee intermediates react very quickly with NO2, SO2, and carbonyls, and in this study, steady-state calculations are used to inspect the potential impact of these data on indoor chemistry. It is shown that these reactions could accelerate NO3 formation and SO2 removal in the indoor environment significantly. In addition, reaction between Criegee intermediates and halogenated carbonyls could provide a significant loss process indoors, where currently one does not exist.

  3. Correlations in Intermediate Energy Two-Proton Removal Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, K.; Bazin, D.; Gade, A.; Tostevin, J. A.; Baugher, T.; Chajecki, Z.; Coupland, D.; Famiano, M. A.; Ghosh, T. K.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hodges, R.; Howard, M. E.; Kilburn, M.; Lynch, W. G.; Manning, B.; Meierbachtol, K.; Quarterman, P.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Sanetullaev, A.; Simpson, E. C.; Stroberg, S. R.; Tsang, M. B.; Weisshaar, D.; Winkelbauer, J.; Winkler, R.; Youngs, M.

    2012-11-01

    We report final-state-exclusive measurements of the light charged fragments in coincidence with Ne26 residual nuclei following the direct two-proton removal from a neutron-rich Mg28 secondary beam. A Dalitz-plot analysis and comparisons with simulations show that a majority of the triple-coincidence events with two protons display phase-space correlations consistent with the (two-body) kinematics of a spatially correlated pair-removal mechanism. The fraction of such correlated events, 56(12)%, is consistent with the fraction of the calculated cross section, 64%, arising from spin S=0 two-proton configurations in the entrance-channel (shell-model) Mg28 ground state wave function. This result promises access to an additional and more specific probe of the spin and spatial correlations of valence nucleon pairs in exotic nuclei produced as fast secondary beams.

  4. Photoreactions of cyclic sulfite esters: Evidence for diradical intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Arney, Benny E; Ihmels, Heiko

    2012-01-01

    Summary The photochemistry of a phenyl and 1,2-diphenyl substituted sulfite ester is reported. The performance of photoreactions under relatively mild reaction conditions enables the detection of products that have not been observed in previous studies. It is concluded that, complementary to the initially proposed carbene intermediates, diradicals may also be considered. PMID:23019449

  5. Neutrino interactions with nucleons and nuclei at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Leitner, T.; Mosel, U.

    2006-07-11

    We investigate neutrino-nucleus collisions at intermediate energies incorporating quasielastic scattering and {delta}(1232) excitation as elementary processes, together with Fermi motion, Pauli blocking and mean-field potentials in the nuclear medium. A full coupled-channel treatment of final state interactions is achieved with a semiclassical BUU transport model. Results for inclusive reactions and nucleon knockout are presented.

  6. Phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 in human malonyl-CoA decarboxylase expressed in silkworm Bombyx mori regulates catalytic decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Wook; Makishima, Yu; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Sungjo; Terzic, Andre; Chung, Shin-Kyo; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-11-01

    Decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA by malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD; EC 4.1.1.9) is a vital catalytic reaction of lipid metabolism. While it is established that phosphorylation of MCD modulates the enzymatic activity, the specific phosphorylation sites associated with the catalytic function have not been documented due to lack of sufficient production of MCD with proper post-translational modifications. Here, we used the silkworm-based Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) bacmid system to express human MCD (hMCD) and mapped phosphorylation effects on enzymatic function. Purified MCD from silkworm displayed post-translational phosphorylation and demonstrated coherent enzymatic activity with high yield (-200 μg/silkworm). Point mutations in putative phosphorylation sites, Ser-204 or Tyr-405 of hMCD, identified by bioinformatics and proteomics analyses reduced the catalytic activity, underscoring the functional significance of phosphorylation in modulating decarboxylase-based catalysis. Identified phosphorylated residues are distinct from the decarboxylation catalytic site, implicating a phosphorylation-induced global conformational change of MCD as responsible in altering catalytic function. We conclude that phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 regulates the decarboxylase function of hMCD leveraging the silkworm-based BmNPV bacmid expression system that offers a fail-safe eukaryotic production platform implementing proper post-translational modification such as phosphorylation. PMID:26004805

  7. Functional Implications of O-GlcNAcylation-dependent Phosphorylation at a Proximal Site on Keratin 18.

    PubMed

    Kakade, Poonam S; Budnar, Srikanth; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Vaidya, Milind M

    2016-06-01

    Keratins 8/18 (K8/18) are phosphoglycoproteins and form the major intermediate filament network of simple epithelia. The three O-GlcNAcylation (Ser(29), Ser(30), and Ser(48)) and two phosphorylation (Ser(33) and Ser(52)) serine sites on K18 are well characterized. Both of these modifications have been reported to increase K18 solubility and regulate its filament organization. In this report, we investigated the site-specific interplay between these two modifications in regulating the functional properties of K18, like solubility, stability, and filament organization. An immortalized hepatocyte cell line (HHL-17) stably expressing site-specific single, double, and triple O-GlcNAc and phosphomutants of K18 were used to identify the site(s) critical for regulating these functions. Keratin 18 mutants where O-GlcNAcylation at Ser(30) was abolished (K18-S30A) exhibited reduced phosphorylation induced solubility, increased stability, defective filament architecture, and slower migration. Interestingly, K18-S30A mutants also showed loss of phosphorylation at Ser(33), a modification known to regulate the solubility of K18. Further to this, the K18 phosphomutant (K18-S33A) mimicked K18-S30A in its stability, filament organization, and cell migration. These results indicate that O-GlcNAcylation at Ser(30) promotes phosphorylation at Ser(33) to regulate the functional properties of K18 and also impact cellular processes like migration. O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation on the same or adjacent sites on most proteins antagonize each other in regulating protein functions. Here we report a novel, positive interplay between O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation at adjacent sites on K18 to regulate its fundamental properties. PMID:27059955

  8. Lactose metabolism in Streptococcus lactis: phosphorylation of galactose and glucose moieties in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J

    1979-01-01

    Starved cells of Streptococcus lactis ML3 grown previously on lactose, galactose, or maltose were devoid of adenosine 5'-triphosphate contained only three glycolytic intermediates: 3-phosphoglycerate, 2-phosphoglycerate, and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). The three metabolites (total concentration, ca 40 mM) served as the intracellular PEP potential for sugar transport via PEP-dependent phosphotransferase systems. When accumulation of [14C]lactose by iodoacetate-inhibited starved cells was abolished within 1 s of commencement of transport, a phosphorylated disaccharide was identified by autoradiography. The compound was isolated by ion-exchange (borate) chromatography, and enzymatic analysis showed that the derivative was 6-phosphoryl-O-beta-D-galactopyranosyl (1 leads to 4')-alpha-D-glucopyranose (lactose 6-phosphate). After maximum lactose uptake (ca. 15 mM in 15 s) the cells were collected by membrane filtration and extracted with trichloroacetic acid. Neither free nor phosphorylated lactose was detected in cell extracts, but enzymatic analysis revealed high levels of galactose 6-phosphate and glucose 6-phosphate. The starved organisms rapidly accumulated glucose, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, methyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside, and o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside in phosphorylated form to intracellular concentrations of 32, 32, 42, and 38.5 mM, respectively. In contrast, maximum accumulation of lactose (ca. 15 mM) was only 40 to 50% that of the monosaccharides. From the stoichiometry of PEP-dependent lactose transport and the results of enzymatic analysis, it was concluded that (i) ca. 60% of the PEP potential was utilized via the lactose phosphotransferase system for phosphorylation of the galactosyl moiety of the disaccharide, and (ii) the residual potential (ca. 40%) was consumed during phosphorylation of the glucose moiety. Images PMID:118155

  9. Acyl silicates and acyl aluminates as activated intermediates in peptide formation on clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. H.; Kennedy, R. M.; Macklin, J.

    1984-01-01

    Glycine reacts with heating on dried clays and other minerals to give peptides in much better yield than in the absence of mineral. This reaction was proposed to occur by way of an activated intermediate such as an acyl silicate or acyl aluminate analogous to acyl phosphates involved in several biochemical reactions including peptide bond synthesis. The proposed mechanism has been confirmed by trapping the intermediate, as well as by direct spectroscopic observation of a related intermediate. The reaction of amino acids on periodically dried mineral surfaces represents a widespead, geologically realistic setting for prebiotic peptide formation via in situ activation.

  10. Phosphorylation Modulates Catalytic Activity of Mycobacterial Sirtuins

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Ghanshyam S.; Ravala, Sandeep K.; Malhotra, Neha; Chakraborti, Pradip K.

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are NAD+-dependent deacetylases involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes and are conserved throughout phylogeny. Here we report about in vitro transphosphorylation of the only NAD+-dependent deacetylase (mDAC) present in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinases, particularly PknA. The phosphorylated mDAC displayed decreased deacetylase activity compared to its unphosphorylated counterpart. Mass-spectrometric study identified seven phosphosites in mDAC; however, mutational analysis highlighted major contribution of Thr-214 for phosphorylation of the protein. In concordance to this observation, variants of mDAC substituting Thr-214 with either Ala (phospho-ablated) or Glu (phosphomimic) exhibited significantly reduced deacetylase activity suggesting phosphorylation mediated control of enzymatic activity. To assess the role of phosphorylation towards functionality of mDAC, we opted for a sirtuin knock-out strain of Escherichia coli (Δdac), where interference of endogenous mycobacterial kinases could be excluded. The Δdac strain in nutrient deprived acetate medium exhibited compromised growth and complementation with mDAC reversed this phenotype. The phospho-ablated or phosphomimic variant, on the other hand, was unable to restore the functionality of mDAC indicating the role of phosphorylation per se in the process. We further over-expressed mDAC or mDAC-T214A as His-tagged protein in M. smegmatis, where endogenous eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinases are present. Anti-phosphothreonine antibody recognized both mDAC and mDAC-T214A proteins in western blotting. However, the extent of phosphorylation as adjudged by scanning the band intensity, was significantly low in the mutant protein (mDAC-T214A) compared to that of the wild-type (mDAC). Furthermore, expression of PknA in the mDAC complemented Δdac strain was able to phosphorylate M. tuberculosis sirtuin. The growth profile of this culture in acetate medium was

  11. Silver-Catalyzed Allylation of Ketones and Intramolecular Cyclization through Carbene Intermediates from Cyclopropenes Under Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takeo; Endo, Kohei; Ukaji, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Tandem C-C bond formation was achieved through silver-catalyzed ring-opening of cyclopropenes via carbene intermediates. The reaction of cyclopropenes in the presence of a silver catalyst gave indene derivatives under ambient conditions. In contrast, the insertion of organozinc reagents to silver carbene or allylic cation intermediates afforded allylmetal intermediates for the tandem allylation of carbonyl compounds. PMID:26611195

  12. Phosphorylated tau and the neurodegenerative foldopathies.

    PubMed

    Kosik, Kenneth S; Shimura, Hideki

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have implicated phosphorylated tau in the Alzheimer disease process. However, the cellular fate of phosphorylated tau has only recently been described. Recent work has shown that tau phosphorylation at substrate sites for the kinases Cdk5 and GSK3-beta can trigger the binding of tau to the chaperones Hsc70 and Hsp27. The binding of phosphorylated tau to Hsc70 implied that the complex may be a substrate for the E3 ligase CHIP and this possibility was experimentally verified. The presence of this system in cells suggests that phosphorylated tau may hold toxic dangers for cell viability, and the response of the cell is to harness a variety of protective mechanisms. These include binding to chaperones, which may prevent more toxic conformations of the protein, ubiquitination which will direct the protein to the proteasome, segregation of tau aggregates from the cellular machinery, and recruitment of Hsp27 which will confer anti-apoptotic properties to the cell. PMID:15615647

  13. Extensive phosphorylation of AMPA receptors in neurons.

    PubMed

    Diering, Graham H; Heo, Seok; Hussain, Natasha K; Liu, Bian; Huganir, Richard L

    2016-08-16

    Regulation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) function is a fundamental mechanism controlling synaptic strength during long-term potentiation/depression and homeostatic scaling. AMPAR function and membrane trafficking is controlled by protein-protein interactions, as well as by posttranslational modifications. Phosphorylation of the GluA1 AMPAR subunit at S845 and S831 play especially important roles during synaptic plasticity. Recent controversy has emerged regarding the extent to which GluA1 phosphorylation may contribute to synaptic plasticity. Here we used a variety of methods to measure the population of phosphorylated GluA1-containing AMPARs in cultured primary neurons and mouse forebrain. Phosphorylated GluA1 represents large fractions from 12% to 50% of the total population under basal and stimulated conditions in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a large fraction of synapses are positive for phospho-GluA1-containing AMPARs. Our results support the large body of research indicating a prominent role of GluA1 phosphorylation in synaptic plasticity. PMID:27482106

  14. Protein phosphorylation systems in postmortem human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Walaas, S.I.; Perdahl-Wallace, E.; Winblad, B.; Greengard, P. )

    1989-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation systems regulated by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP), or calcium in conjunction with calmodulin or phospholipid/diacylglycerol, have been studied by phosphorylation in vitro of particulate and soluble fractions from human postmortem brain samples. One-dimensional or two-dimensional gel electrophoretic protein separations were used for analysis. Protein phosphorylation catalyzed by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase was found to be highly active in both particulate and soluble preparations throughout the human CNS, with groups of both widely distributed and region-specific substrates being observed in different brain nuclei. Dopamine-innervated parts of the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex contained the phosphoproteins previously observed in rodent basal ganglia. In contrast, calcium/phospholipid-dependent and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation systems were less prominent in human postmortem brain than in rodent brain, and only a few widely distributed substrates for these protein kinases were found. Protein staining indicated that postmortem proteolysis, particularly of high-molecular-mass proteins, was prominent in deeply located, subcortical regions in the human brain. Our results indicate that it is feasible to use human postmortem brain samples, when obtained under carefully controlled conditions, for qualitative studies on brain protein phosphorylation. Such studies should be of value in studies on human neurological and/or psychiatric disorders.

  15. Sugar phosphorylation activity in ruminal acetogens.

    PubMed

    Jiang, W; Pinder, R S; Patterson, J A; Ricke, S C

    2012-01-01

    Acetogenic bacteria Acetitomaculum ruminis, Acetobacterium woodii, and Eubacterium limosum were compared for phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and ATP-dependent phosphorylation of glucose and 2-deoxy-glucose. Rate of phosphorylation activity was measured in toluene-treated acetogenic cells using PEP and ATP and radiolabled glucose or 2-deoxy glucose. Eubacterium limosum, most likely has a glucose phosphotransferase system (PTS). In contrast, A. ruminis, and A. woodii had PEP-dependent glucose phosphorylation rates very similar to control rates, suggesting the lack of PTS activity. These results were confirmed by PEP dependent 2-deoxyglucose phosphorylation data. The rates of ATP-dependent glucose phosphorylation were higher than PEP-dependent glucose dependent in all organisms surveyed. Only E. limosum appeared to have PTS. The presence of PTS in E. limosum could explain why it is not capable of utilizing sugars and H(2)/CO(2) simultaneously and why acetogenesis is not as prominant in the rumen because of the availability of carbohydrates as alternative energy substrates. PMID:22423990

  16. Coarse-grained molecular simulation of epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase multi-site self-phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Koland, John G

    2014-01-01

    Upon the ligand-dependent dimerization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity of one receptor monomer is activated, and the dimeric receptor undergoes self-phosphorylation at any of eight candidate phosphorylation sites (P-sites) in either of the two C-terminal (CT) domains. While the structures of the extracellular ligand binding and intracellular PTK domains are known, that of the ∼225-amino acid CT domain is not, presumably because it is disordered. Receptor phosphorylation on CT domain P-sites is critical in signaling because of the binding of specific signaling effector molecules to individual phosphorylated P-sites. To investigate how the combination of conventional substrate recognition and the unique topological factors involved in the CT domain self-phosphorylation reaction lead to selectivity in P-site phosphorylation, we performed coarse-grained molecular simulations of the P-site/catalytic site binding reactions that precede EGFR self-phosphorylation events. Our results indicate that self-phosphorylation of the dimeric EGFR, although generally believed to occur in trans, may well occur with a similar efficiency in cis, with the P-sites of both receptor monomers being phosphorylated to a similar extent. An exception was the case of the most kinase-proximal P-site-992, the catalytic site binding of which occurred exclusively in cis via an intramolecular reaction. We discovered that the in cis interaction of P-site-992 with the catalytic site was facilitated by a cleft between the N-terminal and C-terminal lobes of the PTK domain that allows the short CT domain sequence tethering P-site-992 to the PTK core to reach the catalytic site. Our work provides several new mechanistic insights into the EGFR self-phosphorylation reaction, and demonstrates the potential of coarse-grained molecular simulation approaches for investigating the complexities of self-phosphorylation in molecules such as EGFR

  17. A quantitative model of myosin phosphorylation and the photomechanical response of the isolated sphincter pupillae of the frog iris.

    PubMed Central

    Barr, L; Gu, F J

    1987-01-01

    The time courses of isometrically recorded photomechanical responses of isolated sphincter pupillae of Rana pipiens can be accurately predicted by a set of differential equations derived from phosphorylation theory of smooth muscle contraction. We compared actual light-stimulated contractions with calculated ones over a wide range of stimulus intensities (56-fold) and durations (0.4-4.0 s). The hypothetical Ca++-calmodulin-myosin light chain kinase cascade acts as a "valve" to control the flow of ATP through a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle. When the rate of flow of ATP through the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle is increased, the percentage of phosphorylated myosin increases. The time courses of the concentrations of phosphorylated myosin during different responses are seen to be functions of the time courses of the opening and closing of the coupling cascade "valve." The calculations predict experimentally measurable intermediate variables, which can aid the investigation of the application of quantitative phosphorylation theory to amphibian sphincter pupillae and to smooth muscle in general. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:3496922

  18. Phosphorylation state-dependent interaction between AKAP7δ/γ and phospholamban increases phospholamban phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Rigatti, Marc; Le, Andrew V; Gerber, Claire; Moraru, Ion I; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly L

    2015-09-01

    Changes in heart rate and contractility in response to sympathetic stimulation occur via activation of cAMP dependent protein kinase A (PKA), leading to phosphorylation of numerous substrates that alter Ca(2+) cycling. Phosphorylation of these substrates is coordinated by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), which recruit PKA to specific substrates [1]. Phosphorylation of the PKA substrate phospholamban (PLB) is a critical determinant of Ca(2+) re-entry into the sarcoplasmic reticulum and is coordinated by AKAP7δ/γ [2,3]. Here, we further these findings by showing that phosphorylation of PLB requires interaction with AKAP7δ/γ and that this interaction occurs only when PLB is unphosphorylated. Additionally, we find that two mutants of PLB (R9C and Δ14), which are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in humans, prevent association with AKAP7δ/γ and display reduced phosphorylation in vitro. This finding implicates the AKAP7δ/γ-PLB interaction in the pathology of the disease phenotype. Further exploration of the AKAP7δ/γ-PLB association demonstrated a phosphorylation state-dependence of the interaction. Computational modeling revealed that this mode of interaction allows for small amounts of AKAP and PKA (100-200nM) to regulate the phosphorylation of large quantities of PLB (50μM). Our results confirm that AKAP7γ/δ binding to PLB is important for phosphorylation of PLB, and describe a novel phosphorylation state-dependent binding mechanism that explains how phosphorylation of highly abundant PKA substrates can be regulated by AKAPs present at ~100-200 fold lower concentrations. PMID:26027516

  19. Conversion of graded phosphorylation into switch-like nuclear translocation via autoregulatory mechanisms in ERK signalling

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, Yuki; Iwamoto, Kazunari; Mouri, Kazunari; Hibino, Kayo; Tomita, Masaru; Kosako, Hidetaka; Sako, Yasushi; Takahashi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    The phosphorylation cascade in the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is a versatile reaction network motif that can potentially act as a switch, oscillator or memory. Nevertheless, there is accumulating evidence that the phosphorylation response is mostly linear to extracellular signals in mammalian cells. Here we find that subsequent nuclear translocation gives rise to a switch-like increase in nuclear ERK concentration in response to signal input. The switch-like response disappears in the presence of ERK inhibitor, suggesting the existence of autoregulatory mechanisms for ERK nuclear translocation involved in conversion from a graded to a switch-like response. In vitro reconstruction of ERK nuclear translocation indicates that ERK-mediated phosphorylation of nucleoporins regulates ERK translocation. A mathematical model and knockdown experiments suggest a contribution of nucleoporins to regulation of the ERK nuclear translocation response. Taken together, this study provides evidence that nuclear translocation with autoregulatory mechanisms acts as a switch in ERK signalling. PMID:26786866

  20. Phosphorylated silk fibroin matrix for methotrexate release.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Vadim; Sárria, Marisa P; Gomes, Andreia C; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Silk-based matrix was produced for delivery of a model anticancer drug, methotrexate (MTX). The calculation of net charge of silk fibroin and MTX was performed to better understand the electrostatic interactions during matrix formation upon casting. Silk fibroin films were cast at pH 7.2 and pH 3.5. Protein kinase A was used to prepare phosphorylated silk fibroin. The phosphorylation content of matrix was controlled by mixing at specific ratios the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated solutions. In vitro release profiling data suggest that the observed interactions are mainly structural and not electrostatical. The release of MTX is facilitated by use of proteolytic enzymes and higher pHs. The elevated β-sheet content and crystallinity of the acidified-cast fibroin solution seem not to favor drug retention. All the acquired data underline the prevalence of structural interactions over electrostatical interactions between methotrexate and silk fibroin. PMID:25435334

  1. Phosphorylation of RACK1 in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jay -Gui

    2015-08-31

    Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that interacts with a large, diverse group of proteins to regulate various signaling cascades. RACK1 has been shown to regulate hormonal signaling, stress responses and multiple processes of growth and development in plants. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Arabidopsis RACK1 is phosphorylated by an atypical serine/threonine protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE 8 (WNK8). Furthermore, RACK1 phosphorylation by WNK8 negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability. In conclusion, these findings promote a new regulatory system in which the action of RACK1 is controlled by phosphorylation and subsequent protein degradation.

  2. Phosphorylation of RACK1 in plants

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Jay -Gui

    2015-08-31

    Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that interacts with a large, diverse group of proteins to regulate various signaling cascades. RACK1 has been shown to regulate hormonal signaling, stress responses and multiple processes of growth and development in plants. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Arabidopsis RACK1 is phosphorylated by an atypical serine/threonine protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE 8 (WNK8). Furthermore, RACK1 phosphorylation by WNK8 negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability. In conclusion, these findings promote a new regulatory systemmore » in which the action of RACK1 is controlled by phosphorylation and subsequent protein degradation.« less

  3. Effect of protein kinase P on phosphorylations catalyzed by the epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Ghany, M; Kole, H K; Racker, E

    1987-01-01

    Protein kinase P (PK-P) activated by histones or certain other basic compounds has been purified previously from yeast [Yanagita, Y., Abdel-Ghany, M., Raden, D., Nelson, N. & Racker, E. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84, 925-929]. It is shown here that PK-P is present in solubilized membranes of A-431 carcinoma cells where it changes the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor kinase activity. Polylysine, a weak PK-P activator, inhibited the autophosphorylation of the EGF receptor both in the absence and presence of EGF. Increased PK-P activity induced by histone 1, a potent activator, gave rise to increased autophosphorylation of the EGF receptor as well as phosphorylation at tyrosine residues of numerous other endogenous membrane components. The stimulation by histone was particularly striking in the presence of EGF. A similar stimulation was achieved with polylysine and EGF on addition of yeast PK-P. However, addition of yeast PK-P in the presence of histone 1 markedly inhibited the EGF-stimulated phosphorylation of endogenous membrane proteins. We conclude from these results that the effect of PK-P on the EGF receptor takes place in three phases: at low levels PK-P inhibits the autophosphorylation, at intermediate levels it stimulates the autophosphorylation as well as the EGF-dependent phosphorylation of numerous other membrane proteins, and at high levels it inhibits the phosphorylation of these proteins. Images PMID:3501120

  4. Bloom Syndrome Radials are Non-homologous and are Suppressed by Phosphorylated BLM

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, Scott; Mitchell, Asia; Newell, Amy Hanlon; Ziaie, Navid; Moses, Robb E.; Olson, Susan B.

    2015-01-01

    Biallelic mutations in BLM cause Bloom syndrome (BS), a genome instability disorder characterized by growth retardation, sun sensitivity and a predisposition to cancer. As evidence of decreased genome stability, BS cells demonstrate not only elevated levels of spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), but also exhibit chromosomal radial formation. The molecular nature and mechanism of radial formation is not known, but they have been thought to be DNA recombination intermediates between homologs that failed to resolve. However, we find that radials in BS cells occur over 95% between non-homologous chromosomes, and occur non-randomly throughout the genome. BLM must be phosphorylated at T99 and T122 for certain cell cycle checkpoints, but it is not known whether these modifications are necessary to suppress radial formation. We find that exogenous BLM constructs preventing phosphorylation at T99 and T122 are not able to suppress radial formation in BS cells, but are able to inhibit SCE formation. These findings indicate that BLM functions in two distinct pathways requiring different modifications. In one pathway—for which the phosphorylation marks appear dispensable—BLM functions to suppress SCE formation. In a second pathway, T99 and T122 phosphorylation are essential for suppression of chromosomal radial formation, both those formed spontaneously and those formed following interstrand crosslink (ICL) damage. PMID:25766002

  5. Vimentin expression influences flow dependent VASP phosphorylation and regulates cell migration and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Natalie; Henrion, Daniel; Tiede, Petra; Ziche, Marina; Schunkert, Heribert; Ito, Wulf D.

    2010-05-07

    The cytoskeleton plays a central role for the integration of biochemical and biomechanical signals across the cell required for complex cellular functions. Recent studies indicate that the intermediate filament vimentin is necessary for endothelial cell morphogenesis e.g. in the context of leukocyte transmigration. Here, we present evidence, that the scaffold provided by vimentin is essential for VASP localization and PKG mediated VASP phosphorylation and thus controls endothelial cell migration and proliferation. Vimentin suppression using siRNA technique significantly decreased migration velocity by 50% (videomicroscopy), diminished transmigration activity by 42.5% (Boyden chamber) and reduced proliferation by 43% (BrdU-incorporation). In confocal microscopy Vimentin colocalized with VASP and PKG in endothelial cells. Vimentin suppression was accompanied with a translocation of VASP from focal contacts to the perinuclear region. VASP/Vimentin and PKG/Vimentin colocalization appeared to be essential for proper PKG mediated VASP phosphorylation because we detected a diminished expression of PKG and p{sup Ser239}-VASP in vimentin-suppressed cells, Furthermore, the induction of VASP phosphorylation in perfused arteries was markedly decreased in vimentin knockout mice compared to wildtypes. A link is proposed between vimentin, VASP phosphorylation and actin dynamics that delivers an explanation for the important role of vimentin in controlling endothelial cell morphogenesis.

  6. Src kinase regulation by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Roskoski, Robert . E-mail: biocrr@lsuhsc.edu

    2005-05-27

    Src and Src-family protein-tyrosine kinases are regulatory proteins that play key roles in cell differentiation, motility, proliferation, and survival. The initially described phosphorylation sites of Src include an activating phosphotyrosine 416 that results from autophosphorylation, and an inhibiting phosphotyrosine 527 that results from phosphorylation by C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and Csk homologous kinase. Dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine 527 increases Src kinase activity. Candidate phosphotyrosine 527 phosphatases include cytoplasmic PTP1B, Shp1 and Shp2, and transmembrane enzymes include CD45, PTP{alpha}, PTP{epsilon}, and PTP{lambda}. Dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine 416 decreases Src kinase activity. Thus far PTP-BL, the mouse homologue of human PTP-BAS, has been shown to dephosphorylate phosphotyrosine 416 in a regulatory fashion. The platelet-derived growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinase mediates the phosphorylation of Src Tyr138; this phosphorylation has no direct effect on Src kinase activity. The platelet-derived growth factor receptor and the ErbB2/HER2 growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinases mediate the phosphorylation of Src Tyr213 and activation of Src kinase activity. Src kinase is also a substrate for protein-serine/threonine kinases including protein kinase C (Ser12), protein kinase A (Ser17), and CDK1/cdc2 (Thr34, Thr46, and Ser72). Of the three protein-serine/threonine kinases, only phosphorylation by CDK1/cdc2 has been demonstrated to increase Src kinase activity. Although considerable information on the phosphoprotein phosphatases that catalyze the hydrolysis of Src phosphotyrosine 527 is at hand, the nature of the phosphatases that mediate the hydrolysis of phosphotyrosine 138 and 213, and phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues has not been determined.

  7. Intermediate ions in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, Hannes; Komsaare, Kaupo; Hõrrak, Urmas

    2014-01-01

    Intermediate air ions are charged nanometer-sized aerosol particles with an electric mobility of about 0.03-0.5 cm2 V- 1 s- 1 and a diameter of about 1.5-7.5 nm. Intensive studies of new particle formation provided good knowledge about intermediate ions during burst events of atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Information about intermediate ions during quiet periods between the bursts remained poor. The new mobility analyzer SIGMA can detect air ions at concentrations of mobility fractions of about 1 cm- 3 and enables studying intermediate ions during quiet periods. It became evident that intermediate ions always exist in atmospheric air and should be considered an indicator and a mediator of aerosol nucleation. The annual average concentration of intermediate ions of one polarity in Tartu, Estonia, was about 40 cm- 3 while 5% of the measurements showed a concentration of less than 10 cm- 3. The fraction concentrations in logarithmic 1/8-decade mobility bins between 0.1 and 0.4 cm2 V- 1 s- 1 often dropped below 1 cm- 3. The bursts of intermediate ions at stations separated by around 100 km appeared to be correlated. The lifespan of intermediate ions in the atmosphere is a few minutes, and they cannot be carried by wind over long distances. Thus the observed long-range correlation of intermediate ions is explained by simultaneous changes in air composition in widely spaced stations. A certain amount of intermediate ion bursts, predominantly of negative polarity, are produced by the balloelectric effect at the splashing of water drops during rain. These bursts are usually excluded when speaking about new particle formation because the balloelectric particles are assumed not to grow to the size of the Aitken mode. The mobility distribution of balloelectric ions is uniform in shape in all measurements. The maximum is located at a mobility of about 0.2 cm2 V- 1 s- 1, which corresponds to the diameter of particles of about 2.5 nm.

  8. In Vivo and in Vitro Phosphorylation of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase from Wheat Seeds during Germination.

    PubMed Central

    Osuna, L.; Gonzalez, M. C.; Cejudo, F. J.; Vidal, J.; Echevarria, C.

    1996-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity was detected in the aleurone endosperm of wheat (Triticum aestivum cv Chinese Spring) seeds, and specific anti-Sorghum C4 PEPC polyclonal anti-bodies cross-reacted with 103- and 100-kD polypeptides present in dry seeds and seeds that had imbibed; in addition, a new, 108-kD polypeptide was detected 6 h after imbibition. The use of specific anti-phosphorylation-site immunoglobulin G (APS-IgG) identified the presence of a phosphorylation motif equivalent to that found in other plant PEPCs studied so far. The binding of this APS-IgG to the target protein promoted changes in the properties of seed PEPC similar to those produced by phosphorylation, as previously shown for the recombinant Sorghum leaf C4 PEPC. In desalted seed extracts, an endogenous PEPC kinase activity catalyzed a bona fide phosphorylation of the target protein, as deduced from the immunoinhibition of the in vitro phosphorylation reaction by the APS- IgG. In addition, the major, 103-kD PEPC polypeptide was also shown to be radiolabeled in situ 48 h after imbibition in [32P]orthophosphate. The ratio between optimal (pH 8) and suboptimal (pH 7.3 or 7.1) PEPC activity decreased during germination, thereby suggesting a change in catalytic rate related to an in vivo phosphorylation process. These collective data document that the components needed for the regulatory phosphorylation of PEPC are present and functional during germination of wheat seeds. PMID:12226309

  9. Protein phosphorylation is involved in bacterial chemotaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Hess, J F; Oosawa, K; Matsumura, P; Simon, M I

    1987-01-01

    The nature of the biochemical signal that is involved in the excitation response in bacterial chemotaxis is not known. However, ATP is required for chemotaxis. We have purified all of the proteins involved in signal transduction and show that the product of the cheA gene is rapidly autophosphorylated, while some mutant CheA proteins cannot be phosphorylated. The presence of stoichiometric levels of two other purified components in the chemotaxis system, the CheY and CheZ proteins, induces dephosphorylation. We suggest that the phosphorylation of CheA by ATP plays a central role in signal transduction in chemotaxis. Images PMID:3313398

  10. Characterization of Bidentate Phosphoryl Compounds on Soil Particulates using SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold; Gary L. Gresham; Recep Avci; Muhammedin Deliorman

    2009-03-01

    The presence of organic compounds as surface contaminants on particles can provide valuable data about the particles environment, but identification can be analytically challenging. This is true particularly for compounds that have the potential for strong surface binding, such as compounds capable of multidentate attachment. Direct analysis using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry was evaluated for characterization of soil particles contaminated with low concentrations of two bidentate organophosphoryl compounds, diphenyl-N,N-di-n-butylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and tetraphenylmethylene diphosphine dioxide. Molecular ions were formed by cationization with H+ and alkali elements Na+ and K+ that are indigenous to the particle surface chemistry. Spectra generated from a contaminated calcareous soil were dominated by K+-containing ions, whereas spectra from a sandy loam had more abundant Na+-species. Cation-bound dimers were also formed which favored incorporation of K+, and a unique aluminosilicate-phosphoryl conjugate cation was also formed when the diphosphoryl ligand was present on the surface. The phosphoryl ligands also underwent fragmentation reactions, the course of which varied depending on the cation that was bound. Minimum detectable surface concentrations were evaluated and were in the 0.04-0.2 monolayer range, depending on the compound and soil particle matrix they was bound to. The ion signature was detected on soil particle surfaces for time periods exceeding six months, suggesting that the characterization approach could be used for environmental exposure history at times well beyond initial exposure.

  11. Gas-Phase Acidities of Phosphorylated Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Stover, Michele L; Plummer, Chelsea E; Miller, Sean R; Cassady, Carolyn J; Dixon, David A

    2015-11-19

    Gas-phase acidities and heats of formation have been predicted at the G3(MP2)/SCRF-COSMO level of theory for 10 phosphorylated amino acids and their corresponding amides, including phospho-serine (pSer), -threonine (pThr), and -tyrosine (pTyr), providing the first reliable set of these values. The gas-phase acidities (GAs) of the three named phosphorylated amino acids and their amides have been determined using proton transfer reactions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental and predicted GAs. The phosphate group is the deprotonation site for pSer and pThr and deprotonation from the carboxylic acid generated the lowest energy anion for pTyr. The infrared spectra were calculated for six low energy anions of pSer, pThr, and pTyr. For deprotonated pSer and pThr, good agreement is found between the experimental IRMPD spectra and the calculated spectra for our lowest energy anion structure. For pTyr, the IR spectra for a higher energy phosphate deprotonated structure is in good agreement with experiment. Additional experiments tested electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions for pTyr and determined that variations in solvent, temperature, and voltage can result in a different experimental GA value, indicating that ESI conditions affect the conformation of the pTyr anion. PMID:26492552

  12. Reaction efficiency effects on binary chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaridis, Filippos; Savara, Aditya; Argyrakis, Panos

    2014-09-01

    We study the effect of the variation of reaction efficiency in binary reactions. We use the well-known A + B → 0 model, which has been extensively studied in the past. We perform simulations on this model where we vary the efficiency of reaction, i.e., when two particles meet they do not instantly react, as has been assumed in previous studies, but they react with a probability γ, where γ is in the range 0 < γ < 1. Our results show that at small γ values the system is reaction limited, but as γ increases it crosses over to a diffusion limited behavior. At early times, for small γ values, the particle density falls slower than for larger γ values. This fall-off goes over a crossover point, around the value of γ = 0.50 for high initial densities. Under a variety of conditions simulated, we find that the crossover point was dependent on the initial concentration but not on the lattice size. For intermediate and long times simulations, all γ values (in the depleted reciprocal density versus time plot) converge to the same behavior. These theoretical results are useful in models of epidemic reactions and epidemic spreading, where a contagion from one neighbor to the next is not always successful but proceeds with a certain probability, an analogous effect with the reaction probability examined in the current work.

  13. Enhancement of tunability of MAPK cascade due to coexistence of processive and distributive phosphorylation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianqiang; Yi, Ming; Yang, Lijian; Wei, Wenbin; Ding, Yiming; Jia, Ya

    2014-03-01

    The processive phosphorylation mechanism becomes important when there is macromolecular crowding in the cytoplasm. Integrating the processive phosphorylation mechanism with the traditional distributive one, we propose a mixed dual-site phosphorylation (MDP) mechanism in a single-layer phosphorylation cycle. Further, we build a degree model by applying the MDP mechanism to a three-layer mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. By bifurcation analysis, our study suggests that the crowded-environment-induced pseudoprocessive mechanism can qualitatively change the response of this biological network. By adjusting the degree of processivity in our model, we find that the MAPK cascade is able to switch between the ultrasensitivity, bistability, and oscillatory dynamical states. Sensitivity analysis shows that the theoretical results remain unchanged within a reasonably chosen variation of parameter perturbation. By scaling the reaction rates and also introducing new connections into the kinetic scheme, we further construct a proportion model of the MAPK cascade to validate our findings. Finally, it is illustrated that the spatial propagation of the activated MAPK signal can be improved (or attenuated) by increasing the degree of processivity of kinase (or phosphatase). Our research implies that the MDP mechanism makes the MAPK cascade become a flexible signal module, and the coexistence of processive and distributive phosphorylation mechanisms enhances the tunability of the MAPK cascade. PMID:24606945

  14. Phosphorylation of Deinococcus radiodurans RecA Regulates Its Activity and May Contribute to Radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Rajpurohit, Yogendra S; Bihani, Subhash C; Waldor, Matthew K; Misra, Hari S

    2016-08-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans has a remarkable capacity to survive exposure to extreme levels of radiation that cause hundreds of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). DSB repair in this bacterium depends on its recombinase A protein (DrRecA). DrRecA plays a pivotal role in both extended synthesis-dependent strand annealing and slow crossover events of DSB repair during the organism's recovery from DNA damage. The mechanisms that control DrRecA activity during the D. radiodurans response to γ radiation exposure are unknown. Here, we show that DrRecA undergoes phosphorylation at Tyr-77 and Thr-318 by a DNA damage-responsive serine threonine/tyrosine protein kinase (RqkA). Phosphorylation modifies the activity of DrRecA in several ways, including increasing its affinity for dsDNA and its preference for dATP over ATP. Strand exchange reactions catalyzed by phosphorylated versus unphosphorylated DrRecA also differ. In silico analysis of DrRecA structure support the idea that phosphorylation can modulate crucial functions of this protein. Collectively, our findings suggest that phosphorylation of DrRecA enables the recombinase to selectively use abundant dsDNA substrate present during post-irradiation recovery for efficient DSB repair, thereby promoting the extraordinary radioresistance of D. radiodurans. PMID:27255712

  15. An MRM-based Workflow for Quantifying Cardiac Mitochondrial Protein Phosphorylation in Murine and Human Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Maggie P.Y.; Scruggs, Sarah B.; Kim, Tae-Young; Zong, Chenggong; Lau, Edward; Wang, Ding; Ryan, Christopher M.; Faull, Kym F.; Ping, Peipei

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of mitochondrial function is essential for cardiomyocyte adaptation to cellular stress. While it has long been understood that phosphorylation regulates flux through metabolic pathways, novel phosphorylation sites are continually being discovered in all functionally distinct areas of the mitochondrial proteome. Extracting biologically meaningful information from these phosphorylation sites requires an adaptable, sensitive, specific and robust method for their quantification. Here we report a multiple reaction monitoring-based mass spectrometric workflow for quantifying site-specific phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins. Specifically, chromatographic and mass spectrometric conditions for 68 transitions derived from 23 murine and human phosphopeptides, and their corresponding unmodified peptides, were optimized. These methods enabled the quantification of endogenous phosphopeptides from the outer mitochondrial membrane protein VDAC, and the inner membrane proteins ANT and ETC complexes I, III and V. The development of this quantitative workflow is a pivotal step for advancing our knowledge and understanding of the regulatory effects of mitochondrial protein phosphorylation in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:22387130

  16. Rapid alteration of protein phosphorylation during postmortem: implication in the study of protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Yanchong; Hu, Wen; Xie, Shutao; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification of proteins. Postmortem tissues are widely being utilized in the biomedical studies, but the effects of postmortem on protein phosphorylation have not been received enough attention. In the present study, we found here that most proteins in mouse brain, heart, liver, and kidney were rapidly dephosphorylated to various degrees during 20 sec to 10 min postmortem. Phosphorylation of tau at Thr212 and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) at Ser9 was reduced by 50% in the brain with 40 sec postmortem, a regular time for tissue processing. During postmortem, phosphorylation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and AMP activated kinase (AMPK) was increased in the brain, but not in other organs. Perfusion of the brain with cold or room temperature phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) also caused significant alteration of protein phosphorylation. Cooling down and maintaining mouse brains in the ice-cold buffer prevented the alteration effectively. This study suggests that phosphorylation of proteins is rapidly changed during postmortem. Thus, immediate processing of tissues followed by cooling down in ice-cold buffer is vitally important and perfusion has to be avoided when protein phosphorylation is to be studied. PMID:26511732

  17. Rapid alteration of protein phosphorylation during postmortem: implication in the study of protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Yanchong; Hu, Wen; Xie, Shutao; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification of proteins. Postmortem tissues are widely being utilized in the biomedical studies, but the effects of postmortem on protein phosphorylation have not been received enough attention. In the present study, we found here that most proteins in mouse brain, heart, liver, and kidney were rapidly dephosphorylated to various degrees during 20 sec to 10 min postmortem. Phosphorylation of tau at Thr212 and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) at Ser9 was reduced by 50% in the brain with 40 sec postmortem, a regular time for tissue processing. During postmortem, phosphorylation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and AMP activated kinase (AMPK) was increased in the brain, but not in other organs. Perfusion of the brain with cold or room temperature phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) also caused significant alteration of protein phosphorylation. Cooling down and maintaining mouse brains in the ice-cold buffer prevented the alteration effectively. This study suggests that phosphorylation of proteins is rapidly changed during postmortem. Thus, immediate processing of tissues followed by cooling down in ice-cold buffer is vitally important and perfusion has to be avoided when protein phosphorylation is to be studied. PMID:26511732

  18. Directional Phosphorylation and Nuclear Transport of the Splicing Factor SRSF1 Is Regulated by an RNA Recognition Motif.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Pedro; Aubol, Brandon E; Keshwani, Malik M; Forli, Stefano; Ma, Chen-Ting; Dutta, Samit K; Geralt, Michael; Wüthrich, Kurt; Adams, Joseph A

    2016-06-01

    Multisite phosphorylation is required for the biological function of serine-arginine (SR) proteins, a family of essential regulators of mRNA splicing. These modifications are catalyzed by serine-arginine protein kinases (SRPKs) that phosphorylate numerous serines in arginine-serine-rich (RS) domains of SR proteins using a directional, C-to-N-terminal mechanism. The present studies explore how SRPKs govern this highly biased phosphorylation reaction and investigate biological roles of the observed directional phosphorylation mechanism. Using NMR spectroscopy with two separately expressed domains of SRSF1, we showed that several residues in the RNA-binding motif 2 interact with the N-terminal region of the RS domain (RS1). These contacts provide a structural framework that balances the activities of SRPK1 and the protein phosphatase PP1, thereby regulating the phosphoryl content of the RS domain. Disruption of the implicated intramolecular RNA-binding motif 2-RS domain interaction impairs both the directional phosphorylation mechanism and the nuclear translocation of SRSF1 demonstrating that the intrinsic phosphorylation bias is obligatory for SR protein biological function. PMID:27091468

  19. Trifluoromethanesulfonamide anthelmintics. Protonophoric uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    McCracken, R O; Carr, A W; Stillwell, W H; Lipkowitz, K B; Boisvenue, R; O'Doherty, G O; Wickiser, D I

    1993-05-01

    A series of trifluoromethanesulfonamides (TFMS) was synthesized and tested for uncoupling activity in rat liver mitochondria. With succinate as the mitochondrial substrate, and the respiratory control index (RCI) as an indicator of their uncoupling ability, we found that all of the TFMS tested were uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation; the effective concentration (RCI I50) ranged from less than 1 microM to greater than 1000 microM. Correlation techniques were used to assess the strength of the relationship between the ability of a TFMS to uncouple oxidative phosphorylation and its ability to lower the electrical resistance of planar bimolecular lipid membranes. There was a highly significant (P < 0.001) positive linear relationship (r = 0.97) between the ability of a TFMS to uncouple oxidative phosphorylation and its ability to lower electrical resistance. These findings are consistent with the view that the TFMS are lipophilic protonophoric uncouplers of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Quantitative structure-activity relationship studies using experiment and semiempirical molecular orbital theory revealed that the hydrophobicity of a TFMS and its molecular dipole moment were the principal determinants of mitochondrial uncoupling activity within the pKa range examined. PMID:8388210

  20. Identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Burghoff, Sandra; Willberg, Wibke; Schrader, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Ecto-protein kinases phosphorylate extracellular membrane proteins and exhibit similarities to casein kinases and protein kinases A and C. However, the identification of their protein substrates still remains a challenge because a clear separation from intracellular phosphoproteins is difficult. Here, we describe a straightforward method for the identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and K562 cells which used the protease bromelain to selectively remove ectoproteins from intact cells and combined this with the subsequent analysis using IMAC and LC-MS/MS. A "false-positive" strategy in which cells without protease treatment served as controls was applied. Using this approach we identified novel phosphorylation sites on five ectophosphoproteins (NOTCH1, otopetrin 1, regulator of G-protein signalling 13 (RGS13), protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type D isoform 3 (PTPRD), usherin isoform B (USH2A)). Use of bromelain appears to be a reliable technique for the further identification of phosphorylated surface-exposed peptides when extracellular adenosine-5'-triphosphate is elevated during purinergic signalling. PMID:26152529