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Sample records for intermolecular systems formed

  1. Intermolecular interactions and solvent diffusion in ordered nanostructures formed by self-assembly of block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhiyong

    Hydrogels formed by Poloxamer poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) (PEO-PPO) block copolymers find various pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. A variety of ordered structures can be exhibited by Poloxamer block copolymers in selective solvents such as water, for example, micellar cubic phase, hexagonal phase, lamellar phase, etc. We are interested in the thermodynamic and transport properties of water in such hydrogels that have an ordered (lyotropic liquid crystalline) structure. We have investigated the time evolution of water loss from Poloxamer gel films under a driving force of known water vapor pressure in the air in contact with the film. The experimental data on the drying process have been fitted to the diffusion equation for water in the film, under a boundary condition that includes the water concentration in the gel at infinite time; the water diffusion coefficient and other parameters have thus been obtained. The water chemical potential and osmotic pressure in the gel have been obtained from osmotic stress measurements. The osmotic pressure (force), together with data on the corresponding lyotropic liquid crystal spacing (distance) that we obtained from Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) measurements, have been analyzed to provide information on the prevailing intermolecular (inter-assembly) forces in the gel. The forces in the gel reveal interactions that occur at two levels, that of the PEO coil and that of the PEO segment.

  2. Permutationally invariant fitting of intermolecular potential energy surfaces: A case study of the Ne-C2H2 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Guo, Hua

    2015-12-01

    The permutation invariant polynomial-neural network (PIP-NN) approach is extended to fit intermolecular potential energy surfaces (PESs). Specifically, three PESs were constructed for the Ne-C2H2 system. PES1 is a full nine-dimensional PIP-NN PES directly fitted to ˜42 000 ab initio points calculated at the level of CCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pCVTZ-F12, while the other two consist of the six-dimensional PES for C2H2 [H. Han, A. Li, and H. Guo, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 244312 (2014)] and an intermolecular PES represented in either the PIP (PES2) or PIP-NN (PES3) form. The comparison of fitting errors and their distributions, one-dimensional cuts and two-dimensional contour plots of the PESs, as well as classical trajectory collisional energy transfer dynamics calculations shows that the three PESs are very similar. We conclude that full-dimensional PESs for non-covalent interacting molecular systems can be constructed efficiently and accurately by the PIP-NN approach for both the constituent molecules and intermolecular parts.

  3. A functional fragment of Tau forms fibers without the need for an intermolecular cysteine bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Huvent, Isabelle; Kamah, Amina; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Barois, Nicolas; Slomianny, Christian; Smet-Nocca, Caroline; Landrieu, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • A functional fragment of Tau forms bundled ribbon-like fibrils. • Nucleation of its fibril formation is faster than for full-length Tau. • In contrast to full-length Tau, without cysteines, the fragment still forms fibers. - Abstract: We study the aggregation of a fragment of the neuronal protein Tau that contains part of the proline rich domain and of the microtubule binding repeats. When incubated at 37 °C with heparin, the fragment readily forms fibers as witnessed by Thioflavin T fluorescence. Electron microscopy and NMR spectroscopy show bundled ribbon like structures with most residues rigidly incorporated in the fibril. Without its cysteines, this fragment still forms fibers of a similar morphology, but with lesser Thioflavin T binding sites and more mobility for the C-terminal residues.

  4. Calculation of the absolute thermodynamic properties of association of host-guest systems from the intermolecular potential of mean force.

    PubMed

    Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2006-12-14

    The authors report calculations of the intermolecular potential of mean force (PMF) in the case of the host-guest interaction. The host-guest system is defined by a water soluble calixarene and a cation. With an organic cation such as the tetramethylammonium cation, the calixarene forms an insertion complex, whereas with the Lanthane cation, the supramolecular assembly is an outer-sphere complex. The authors apply a modified free energy perturbation method and the force constraint technique to establish the PMF profiles as a function of the separation distance between the host and guest. They use the PMF profile for the calculation of the absolute thermodynamic properties of association that they compare to the experimental values previously determined. They finish by giving some structural features of the insertion and outer-sphere complexes at the Gibbs free energy minimum. PMID:17176145

  5. Low-valent niobium-catalyzed intermolecular [2 + 2 + 2] cycloaddition of tert-butylacetylene and arylnitriles to form 2,3,6-trisubstituted pyridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yasushi; Obora, Yasushi

    2013-08-01

    A catalytic system based on low-valent niobium has been developed, consisting of NbCl5, Zn, and an alkoxysilane. This combination has been shown to be an efficient catalyst for the synthesis of pyridine derivatives from the intermolecular cycloaddition of alkynes and nitriles via a niobacyclopentadiene intermediate. PMID:23848456

  6. Desensitization of metastable intermolecular composites

    DOEpatents

    Busse, James R.; Dye, Robert C.; Foley, Timothy J.; Higa, Kelvin T.; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Sanders, Victor E.; Son, Steven F.

    2011-04-26

    A method to substantially desensitize a metastable intermolecular composite material to electrostatic discharge and friction comprising mixing the composite material with an organic diluent and removing enough organic diluent from the mixture to form a mixture with a substantially putty-like consistency, as well as a concomitant method of recovering the metastable intermolecular composite material.

  7. Ground state analytical ab initio intermolecular potential for the Cl{sub 2}-water system

    SciTech Connect

    Hormain, Laureline; Monnerville, Maurice Toubin, Céline; Duflot, Denis; Pouilly, Brigitte; Briquez, Stéphane; Bernal-Uruchurtu, Margarita I.; Hernández-Lamoneda, Ramón

    2015-04-14

    The chlorine/water interface is of crucial importance in the context of atmospheric chemistry. Modeling the structure and dynamics at this interface requires an accurate description of the interaction potential energy surfaces. We propose here an analytical intermolecular potential that reproduces the interaction between the Cl{sub 2} molecule and a water molecule. Our functional form is fitted to a set of high level ab initio data using the coupled-cluster single double (triple)/aug-cc-p-VTZ level of electronic structure theory for the Cl{sub 2} − H{sub 2}O complex. The potential fitted to reproduce the three minima structures of 1:1 complex is validated by the comparison of ab initio results of Cl{sub 2} interacting with an increasing number of water molecules. Finally, the model potential is used to study the physisorption of Cl{sub 2} on a perfectly ordered hexagonal ice slab. The calculated adsorption energy, in the range 0.27 eV, shows a good agreement with previous experimental results.

  8. Effect of donor orientation on ultrafast intermolecular electron transfer in coumarin-amine systems.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Nath, S; Bhasikuttan, A C; Kumbhakar, M; Mohanty, J; Sarkar, S K; Mukherjee, T; Pal, H

    2008-09-21

    Effect of donor amine orientation on nondiffusive ultrafast intermolecular electron transfer (ET) reactions in coumarin-amine systems has been investigated using femtosecond fluorescence upconversion measurements. Intermolecular ET from different aromatic and aliphatic amines used as donor solvents to the excited coumarin-151 (C151) acceptor occurs with ultrafast rates such that the shortest fluorescence lifetime component (tau(1)) is the measure of the fastest ET rate (tau(1)=tau(ET) (fast)=(k(ET) (fast))(-1)), assigned to the C151-amine contact pairs in which amine donors are properly oriented with respect to C151 to maximize the acceptor-donor electronic coupling (V(el)). It is interestingly observed that as the amine solvents are diluted by suitable diluents (either keeping solvent dielectric constant similar or with increasing dielectric constant), the tau(1) remains almost in the similar range as long as the amine dilution does not cross a certain critical limit, which in terms of the amine mole fraction (x(A)) is found to be approximately 0.4 for aromatic amines and approximately 0.8 for aliphatic amines. Beyond these dilutions in the two respective cases of the amine systems, the tau(1) values are seen to increase very sharply. The large difference in the critical x(A) values involving aromatic and aliphatic amine donors has been rationalized in terms of the largely different orientational restrictions for the ET reactions as imposed by the aliphatic (n-type) and aromatic (pi-type) nature of the amine donors [A. K. Satpati et al., J. Mol. Struct. 878, 84 (2008)]. Since the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the n-type aliphatic amines is mostly centralized at the amino nitrogen, only some specific orientations of these amines with respect to the close-contact acceptor dye [also of pi-character; A. K. Satpati et al., J. Mol. Struct. 878, 84 (2008) and E. W. Castner et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 104, 2869 (2000)] can give suitable V(el) and thus

  9. Universal scaling of potential energy functions describing intermolecular interactions. I. Foundations and scalable forms of new generalized Mie, Lennard-Jones, Morse, and Buckingham exponential-6 potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Werhahn, Jasper C.

    2014-08-14

    Based on the formulation of the analytical expression of the potential V(r) describing intermolecular interactions in terms of the dimensionless variables r*=r/rm and !*=V/!, where rm is the separation at the minimum and ! the well depth, we propose more generalized scalable forms for the commonly used Lennard-Jones, Mie, Morse and Buckingham exponential-6 potential energy functions (PEFs). These new generalized forms have an additional parameter from and revert to the original ones for some choice of that parameter. In this respect, the original forms can be considered as special cases of the more general forms that are introduced. We also propose a scalable, but nonrevertible to the original one, 4-parameter extended Morse potential.

  10. Studies on the stability and intermolecular interactions of cellulose and polylactide systems using molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karst, David T.

    The stability and intermolecular interactions of cellulose and polylactide (PLA) systems were studied using molecular modeling. This work explains how grafting various groups onto cellulose increases hydrolysis of the glycosidic linkages of cellulose. A substituent increases hydrolysis of cellulose by serving as an anchor to the end of the cleaved cellulose to which it is bonded, making it less mobile, and allowing it to have stronger interactions than those in pure hydrolyzed cellulose. Hydrolysis increases with the size of the substituent. Molecules sorbed but not grafted to cellulose do not increase hydrolysis. Hydrolysis mainly occurs at glucoses bonded to the substituent. A substituent on the sixth carbon position of cellulose increases hydrolysis to a greater extent than does one on the second or third carbon position. The effect of blending poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) and poly(D-lactide) (PDLA) and the effect of various arrangements of L-lactide and D-lactide in poly(L-lactide-co-D-lactide) on the resistance of polylactide (PLA) to hydrolysis has been explained. Among the homopolymer blends, the 50/50 PLLA/PDLA blend has the greatest resistance to hydrolysis due to its having stronger hydrogen-bonding and van der Waals forces than pure PLLA or PDLA. The change in potential energy for hydrolysis decreases linearly with increasing % PLLA or % PDLA from 0 to 50%. Among the copolymers containing a given percentage of L-lactide and D-lactide, those containing longer blocks of L-lactide and D-lactide have greater resistance to hydrolysis compared to those with shorter blocks or random copolymers because copolymers with longer blocks are more stable before hydrolysis compared to the other copolymers. Among the copolymers with long blocks of L- and D-lactide, those containing 50% L-lactide have a greater resistance to hydrolysis compared to the copolymers with 26% or 74% L-lactide. Blends or copolymers that are mirror images of each other have the same resistance to

  11. Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds Formed Between Amino Acid Molecules in Aqueous Solution Investigated by Temperature-jump Nanosecond Time-resolved Transient Mid-IR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Man-ping; Li, Heng; Zhang, Qing-li; Weng, Yu-xiang; Qiu, Xiang-gang

    2007-08-01

    Carboxyl (COO-) vibrational modes of two amino acids histidine and glycine in D2O solution were investigated by temperature-dependent FTIR spectroscopy and temperature-jump nanosecond time-resolved IR difference absorbance spectroscopy. The results show that hydrogen bonds are formed between amino acid molecules as well as between the amino acid molecule and the solvent molecules. The asymmetric vibrational frequency of COO- around 1600-1610 cm-1 is blue shifted when raising temperature, indicating that the strength of the hydrogen bonds becomes weaker at higher temperature. Two bleaching peaks at 1604 and 1612 cm-1 were observed for histidine in response to a temperature jump from 10 °C to 20 °C. The lower vibrational frequency at 1604 cm-1 is assigned to the chain COO- group which forms the intermolecular hydrogen bond with NH3+ group, while the higher frequency at 1612 cm-1 is assigned to the end COO- group forming hydrogen bonds with the solvent molecules. This is because that the hydrogen bonds in the former are expected to be stronger than the latter. In addition the intensities of these two bleaching peaks are almost the same. In contrast, only the lower frequency at 1604 cm-1 bleaching peak has been observed for glycine. The fact indicates that histidine molecules form a dimer-like intermolecular chain while glycine forms a relatively longer chain in the solution. The rising phase of the IR absorption kinetics in response to the temperature-jump detected at 1604 cm-1 for histidine is about 30+/-10 ns, within the resolution limit of our instrument, indicating that breaking or weakening the hydrogen bond is a very fast process.

  12. Insights into the Complexity of Weak Intermolecular Interactions Interfering in Host-Guest Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; Chatelet, Bastien; Serrano, Eloisa; Perraud, Olivier; Dutasta, Jean-Pierre; Robert, Vincent; Martinez, Alexandre

    2015-10-01

    The recognition properties of heteroditopic hemicryptophane hosts towards anions, cations, and neutral pairs, combining both cation-π and anion-π interaction sites, were investigated to probe the complexity of interfering weak intermolecular interactions. It is suggested from NMR experiments, and supported by CASSCF/CASPT2 calculations, that the binding constants of anions can be modulated by a factor of up to 100 by varying the fluorination sites on the electron-poor aromatic rings. Interestingly, this subtle chemical modification can also reverse the sign of cooperativity in ion-pair recognition. Wavefunction calculations highlight how short- and long-range interactions interfere in this recognition process, suggesting that a disruption of anion-π interactions can occur in the presence of a co-bound cation. Such molecules can be viewed as prototypes for examining complex processes controlled by the competition of weak interactions. PMID:26401973

  13. Shell forming system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor); Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for forming gas-filled spheres of metal, glass or other material, which produces spheres (12) of uniform size and wall thickness in a relatively simple system. The system includes concentric nozzles, including an inner nozzle (18) through which gas flows and and an outer nozzle (20), which jointly define an annular passageway (50) through which a liquid flows. The flow rates are adjusted so that the gas flows at greater velocity than does the liquid, out of their respective nozzles, e.g. three times as great, in order to produce an extrusion (30) which undergoes axisymmetric oscillations resulting in the pinch off into hollow spheres with very uniform spacing. The system is useful not only where gas-filled spheres are required, but also is useful to accurately control the dispensing of solid, liquid, or gaseous materials.

  14. Methyl group dynamics in paracetamol and acetanilide: probing the static properties of intermolecular hydrogen bonds formed by peptide groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. R.; Prager, M.; Grimm, H.; Neumann, M. A.; Kearley, G. J.; Wilson, C. C.

    1999-06-01

    Measurements of tunnelling and librational excitations for the methyl group in paracetamol and tunnelling excitations for the methyl group in acetanilide are reported. In both cases, results are compared with molecular mechanics calculations, based on the measured low temperature crystal structures, which follow an established recipe. Agreement between calculated and measured methyl group observables is not as good as expected and this is attributed to the presence of comprehensive hydrogen bond networks formed by the peptide groups. Good agreement is obtained with a periodic quantum chemistry calculation which uses density functional methods, these calculations confirming the validity of the one-dimensional rotational model used and the crystal structures. A correction to the Coulomb contribution to the rotational potential in the established recipe using semi-emipircal quantum chemistry methods, which accommodates the modified charge distribution due to the hydrogen bonds, is investigated.

  15. Desensitization and recovery of metastable intermolecular composites

    DOEpatents

    Busse, James R.; Dye, Robert C.; Foley, Timothy J.; Higa, Kelvin T.; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Sanders, Victor E.; Son, Steven F.

    2010-09-07

    A method to substantially desensitize a metastable intermolecular composite material to electrostatic discharge and friction comprising mixing the composite material with an organic diluent and removing enough organic diluent from the mixture to form a mixture with a substantially putty-like consistency, as well as a concomitant method of recovering the metastable intermolecular composite material.

  16. An approach to the origin of self-replicating system. I - Intermolecular interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, R. D.; Coeckelenbergh, Y.; Rein, R.

    1978-01-01

    The present paper deals with the characteristics and potentialities of a recently developed computer-based molecular modeling system. Some characteristics of current coding systems are examined and are extrapolated to the apparent requirements of primitive prebiological coding systems.

  17. Forming different planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ji-Lin; Xie, Ji-Wei; Liu, Hui-Gen; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Yi-Sui

    2012-08-01

    With the increasing number of detected exoplanet samples, the statistical properties of planetary systems have become much clearer. In this review, we summarize the major statistical results that have been revealed mainly by radial velocity and transiting observations, and try to interpret them within the scope of the classical core-accretion scenario of planet formation, especially in the formation of different orbital architectures for planetary systems around main sequence stars. Based on the different possible formation routes for different planet systems, we tentatively classify them into three major catalogs: hot Jupiter systems, standard systems and distant giant planet systems. The standard system can be further categorized into three sub-types under different circumstances: solar-like systems, hot Super-Earth systems, and subgiant planet systems. We also review the theory of planet detection and formation in binary systems as well as planets in star clusters.

  18. Shell forming system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor); Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Hollow shells of high uniformity are formed by emitting liquid through an outer nozzle and gas through an inner nozzle, to form a hollow extrusion, by flowing the gas at a velocity between about 1.3 and 10 times the liquid velocity. The natural breakup rate of the extrusion can be increased to decrease shell size by applying periodic perturbations to one of the materials prior to exiting the nozzles, to a nozzle, or to the extrusion.

  19. Canonical forms for nonlinear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, R.; Hunt, L. R.; Meyer, G.

    1983-01-01

    Necessary and sufficient conditions for transforming a nonlinear system to a controllable linear system have been established, and this theory has been applied to the automatic flight control of aircraft. These transformations show that the nonlinearities in a system are often not intrinsic, but are the result of unfortunate choices of coordinates in both state and control variables. Given a nonlinear system (that may not be transformable to a linear system), we construct a canonical form in which much of the nonlinearity is removed from the system. If a system is not transformable to a linear one, then the obstructions to the transformation are obvious in canonical form. If the system can be transformed (it is called a linear equivalent), then the canonical form is a usual one for a controllable linear system. Thus our theory of canonical forms generalizes the earlier transformation (to linear systems) results. Our canonical form is not unique, except up to solutions of certain partial differential equations we discuss. In fact, the important aspect of this paper is the constructive procedure we introduce to reach the canonical form. As is the case in many areas of mathematics, it is often easier to work with the canonical form than in arbitrary coordinate variables.

  20. Spin radical enhanced magnetocapacitance effect in intermolecular excited states.

    PubMed

    Zang, Huidong; Wang, Jianguo; Li, Mingxing; He, Lei; Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Deqing; Hu, Bin

    2013-11-14

    This article reports the magnetocapacitance effect (MFC) based on both pristine polymer MEH-PPV and its composite system doped with spin radicals (6R-BDTSCSB). We observed that a photoexcitation leads to a significant positive MFC in the pristine MEH-PPV. Moreover, we found that a low doping of spin radicals in polymer MEH-PPV causes a significant change on the MFC signal: an amplitude increase and a line-shape narrowing under light illumination at room temperature. However, no MFC signal was observed under dark conditions in either the pristine MEH-PPV or the radical-doped MEH-PPV. Furthermore, the magnitude increase and line-shape narrowing caused by the doped spin radicals are very similar to the phenomena induced by increasing the photoexcitation intensity. Our studies suggest that the MFC is essentially originated from the intermolecular excited states, namely, intermolecular electron-hole pairs, generated by a photoexcitation in the MEH-PPV. More importantly, by comparing the effects of spin radicals and electrically polar molecules on the MFC magnitude and line shape, we concluded that the doped spin radicals can have the spin interaction with intermolecular excited states and consequently affect the internal spin-exchange interaction within intermolecular excited states in the development of MFC. Clearly, our experimental results indicate that dispersing spin radicals forms a convenient method to enhance the magnetocapacitance effect in organic semiconducting materials. PMID:24144347

  1. Morphology and the Strength of Intermolecular Contact in Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuura, Yoshiki; Chernov, Alexander A.

    2002-01-01

    The strengths of intermolecular contacts (macrobonds) in four lysozyme crystals were estimated based on the strengths of individual intermolecular interatomic interaction pairs. The periodic bond chain of these macrobonds accounts for the morphology of protein crystals as shown previously. Further in this paper, the surface area of contact, polar coordinate representation of contact site, Coulombic contribution on the macrobond strength, and the surface energy of the crystal have been evaluated. Comparing location of intermolecular contacts in different polymorphic crystal modifications, we show that these contacts can form a wide variety of patches on the molecular surface. The patches are located practically everywhere on this surface except for the concave active site. The contacts frequently include water molecules, with specific intermolecular hydrogen-bonds on the background of non-specific attractive interactions. The strengths of macrobonds are also compared to those of other protein complex systems. Making use of the contact strengths and taking into account bond hydration we also estimated crystal-water interfacial energies for different crystal faces.

  2. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2002-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  3. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2000-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  4. Centrosymmetric resonance-assisted intermolecular hydrogen bonding chains in the enol form of β-diketone: Crystal structure and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Franca, Eduardo F; Guilardi, Silvana; Paixão, Drielly A; Teixeira, Róbson R; Pereira, Wagner L; Ellena, Javier A

    2016-07-01

    Isobenzofuran-1(3H)-ones (phtalides) are heterocycles that present a benzene ring fused to a γ-lactone functionality. This structural motif is found in several natural and synthetic compounds that present relevant biological activities. In the present investigation, the 3-(2-hydroxy-4,4-dimethyl-6-oxocyclohexen-1-yl)isobenzofuran-1(3H)-one was characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis. In the crystal structure, there are two molecules per asymmetric unit. One of them exhibits resonance assisted hydrogen bonds (RAHBs). Semi-empirical and DFT calculations were performed to obtain electronic structure and π-delocalization parameters, in order to better understand the energy stabilization of RAHBs in the crystal packing of the studied molecule. The structural parameters showed good agreement between theoretical and experimental data. The theoretical investigation revealed that the RAHBs stabilization energy is directly related to the electronic delocalization of the enol form fragment. In addition, RAHBs significantly affected the HOMO and charge distribution around the conjugated system. PMID:27410224

  5. Intermolecular perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, I. C.; Hurst, G. J. B.; Stone, A. J.

    The new intermolecular perturbation theory described in the preceding papers is applied to some van der Waals molecules. HeBe is used as a test case, and the perturbation method converges well at interatomic distances down to about 4 a0, giving results in excellent agreement with supermolecule calculations. ArHF and ArHCl have been studied using large basis sets, and the results agree well with experimental data. The ArHX configuration is favoured over the ArXH configuration mainly because of larger polarization and charge-transfer contributions. In NeH2 the equilibrium geometry is determined by a delicate balance between opposing effects; with a double-zeta-polarization basis the correct configuration is predicted.

  6. Mapping intermolecular bonding in C60

    PubMed Central

    Sundqvist, Bertil

    2014-01-01

    The formation of intermolecular bonds in C60 has been investigated in detail at pressures below 2.2 GPa and up to 750 K. Fullerene samples were heated in a temperature gradient to obtain data on the formation of dimers and low-dimensional polymers along isobars. Intermolecular bonding was analyzed ex situ by Raman scattering, using both intramolecular modes and intermolecular stretching modes. Semi-quantitative reaction maps are given for the formation of dimers and chains. The activation energy for dimer formation decreases by 0.2 meV pm−1 when intermolecular distances decrease and dimer formation is noticeably affected by the rotational state of molecules. Above 400–450 K larger oligomers are formed; below 1.4 GPa most of these are disordered, with small domains of linear chains, but above this the appearance of stretching modes indicates the existence of ordered one-dimensional polymers. At the highest pressures and temperatures two-dimensional polymers are also observed. PMID:25145952

  7. The structure of a tetrameric α-carbonic anhydrase from Thermovibrio ammonificans reveals a core formed around intermolecular disulfides that contribute to its thermostability.

    PubMed

    James, Paul; Isupov, Michail N; Sayer, Christopher; Saneei, Vahid; Berg, Svein; Lioliou, Maria; Kotlar, Hans Kristian; Littlechild, Jennifer A

    2014-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase enzymes catalyse the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate. A thermophilic Thermovibrio ammonificans α-carbonic anhydrase (TaCA) has been expressed in Escherichia coli and structurally and biochemically characterized. The crystal structure of TaCA has been determined in its native form and in two complexes with bound inhibitors. The tetrameric enzyme is stabilized by a unique core in the centre of the molecule formed by two intersubunit disulfides and a single lysine residue from each monomer that is involved in intersubunit ionic interactions. The structure of this core protects the intersubunit disulfides from reduction, whereas the conserved intrasubunit disulfides are not formed in the reducing environment of the E. coli host cytosol. When oxidized to mimic the environment of the periplasmic space, TaCA has increased thermostability, retaining 90% activity after incubation at 70°C for 1 h, making it a good candidate for industrial carbon-dioxide capture. The reduction of all TaCA cysteines resulted in dissociation of the tetrameric molecule into monomers with lower activity and reduced thermostability. Unlike other characterized α-carbonic anhydrases, TaCA does not display esterase activity towards p-nitrophenyl acetate, which appears to result from the increased rigidity of its protein scaffold. PMID:25286845

  8. Intermolecular shielding from molecular magnetic susceptibility. A new view of intermolecular ring current effects.

    PubMed

    Facelli, Julio C

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents calculations of the NICS (nuclear independent chemical shieldings) in a rectangular grid surrounding the molecules of benzene, naphthalene and coronene. Using the relationship between calculated NICS and the induced magnetic field, the calculated NICS are used to predict intermolecular effects due to molecular magnetic susceptibility or ring current effects. As expected from approximate ring current models, these intermolecular shielding effects are concentrated along the direction perpendicular to the molecular plane and they approach asymptotically to a dipolar functional dependence, i.e. (1-3 cos(2)theta)/r(3)). The deviations from the dipolar functional form require that the calculations of these intermolecular effects be done using a suitable interpolation scheme of the NICS calculated on the grid. The analysis of the NICS tensor components shows that these intermolecular shielding effects should be primarily expected on shielding components of the neighboring molecules nuclei, which are perpendicular to the molecular plane of the aromatic compound generating the induced field. The analysis of the calculated NICS along the series benzene, naphthalene and coronene shows that these intermolecular effects increase monotonically with the number of aromatic rings. PMID:16477673

  9. System for forming janus particles

    DOEpatents

    Hong, Liang; Jiang, Shan; Granick, Steve

    2011-01-25

    The invention is a method of forming Janus particles, that includes forming an emulsion that contains initial particles, a first liquid, and a second liquid; solidifying the first liquid to form a solid that contains at least a portion of the initial particles on a surface of the solid; and treating the exposed particle sides with a first surface modifying agent, to form the Janus particles. Each of the initial particles on the surface has an exposed particle side and a blocked particle side.

  10. White polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells using emission from exciplexes with long intermolecular distances formed between polyfluorene and π-conjugated amine molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikitani, Y.; Takeuchi, H.; Nishide, H.; Uchida, S.; Yazaki, S.; Nishimura, S.

    2015-12-01

    The authors present white polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells (PLECs) fabricated with polymer blend films of poly(9,9-di-n-dodecylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PFD) and π-conjugated triphenylamine molecules. The PLECs have bulk heterojunction structures composed of van der Waals interfaces between the PFD segments and the amine molecules. White-light electroluminescence (EL) can be achieved via light-mixing of the blue exciton emission from PFD and long-wavelength exciplex emission from excited complexes consisting of PFD segments (acceptors (As)) and the amine molecules (donors (Ds)). Precise control of the distances between the PFD and the amine molecules, affected through proper choice of the concentrations of PFD, amine molecules, and polymeric solid electrolytes, is critical to realizing white emission. White PLECs can be fabricated with PFD and amine molecules whose highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) levels range from -5.3 eV to -5.0 eV. Meanwhile, PLECs fabricated with amine molecules whose HOMO levels are lower than -5.6 eV cannot produce exciplex emission. The distances between the PFD and amine molecules of the exciplexes appear to be larger than 0.4 nm. These experimental data are explained by perturbation theory using the charge-transfer state ( A - D + ), the locally excited state ( A * D ), which is assumed to be the locally excited acceptor state in which there is no interaction with the donor molecule; and the energy gap between the HOMO levels of the PFD and the amine molecules. Color-stable white PLECs were fabricated using 4,4',4″-tris[N-(2-naphthyl)-N-phenylamino]-triphenylamine, which has a HOMO level of -5.2 eV, as the amine molecule, and the color stability of the device is a function of the fact that PFD forms exciplexes with these molecules.

  11. A canonical form for nonlinear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, R.; Hunt, L. R.

    1986-01-01

    The concepts of transformation and canonical form have been used in analyzing linear systems. These ideas are extended to nonlinear systems. A coordinate system and a corresponding canonical form are developed for general nonlinear control systems. Their usefulness is demonstrated by showing that every feedback linearizable system becomes a system with only feedback paths in the canonical form. For control design involving a nonlinear system, one approach is to put the system in its canonical form and approximate by that part having only feedback paths.

  12. Frontier orbital symmetry control of intermolecular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, B.

    1990-11-01

    Research continued on the study of intermolecular electron transfer. This report discusses the following topics: fluorescence quenching by electron transfer and the modification of quenching dynamics by solvent properties and net free energy change; transient absorption measurements following selective excitation of 1:1 EDA complex isomers; selective quenching of dual fluorescence from linked EDA systems; electron-transfer sensitized cycloreversion of rubrene endoperoxide; and vibronic modification of adiabatic requirements for intermolecular electron transfer. (CBS)

  13. Intermolecular electrostatic energies using density fitting

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, G. Andrés; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Darden, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented to calculate the electron-electron and nuclear-electron intermolecular Coulomb interaction energy between two molecules by separately fitting the unperturbed molecular electron density of each monomer. This method is based on the variational Coulomb fitting method which relies on the expansion of the ab initio molecular electron density in site-centered auxiliary basis sets. By expanding the electron density of each monomer in this way the integral expressions for the intermolecular electrostatic calculations are simplified, lowering the operation count as well as the memory usage. Furthermore, this method allows the calculation of intermolecular Coulomb interactions with any level of theory from which a one-electron density matrix can be obtained. Our implementation is initially tested by calculating molecular properties with the density fitting method using three different auxiliary basis sets and comparing them to results obtained from ab initio calculations. These properties include dipoles for a series of molecules, as well as the molecular electrostatic potential and electric field for water. Subsequently, the intermolecular electrostatic energy is tested by calculating ten stationary points on the water dimer potential-energy surface. Results are presented for electron densities obtained at four different levels of theory using two different basis sets, fitted with three auxiliary basis sets. Additionally, a one-dimensional electrostatic energy surface scan is performed for four different systems (H2O dimer, Mg2+–H2O, Cu+–H2O, and n-methyl-formamide dimer). Our results show a very good agreement with ab initio calculations for all properties as well as interaction energies. PMID:16095348

  14. Evaluation of Questions in General Chemistry Textbooks According to the Form of the Questions and the Question-Answer Relationship (QAR): The Case of Intra-and Intermolecular Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappa, Eleni T.; Tsaparlis, Georgios

    2011-01-01

    One way of checking to what extent instructional textbooks achieve their aim is to evaluate the questions they contain. In this work, we analyze the questions that are included in the chapters on chemical bonding of ten general chemistry textbooks. We study separately the questions on intra- and on intermolecular bonding, with the former…

  15. Studies on intermolecular interaction on binary mixtures of methyl orange-water system: excess molar functions of ultrasonic parameters at different concentrations and at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Thanuja, B; Kanagam, Charles; Sreedevi, S

    2011-11-01

    Density (ρ), viscosity (η) and ultrasonic velocity (u) of binary mixtures of methyl orange and water were measured at different concentrations and at different temperatures; several useful parameters such as excess volume, excess velocity, and excess adiabatic compressibility have been calculated. These parameters are used to explain the nature of intermolecular interactions taking place in the binary mixture. The above study is helpful in understanding the dye/solvent interaction at different concentration and temperatures. PMID:21596612

  16. Plasma formed ion beam projection lithography system

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette; Ngo, Vinh; Zahir, Nastaran

    2002-01-01

    A plasma-formed ion-beam projection lithography (IPL) system eliminates the acceleration stage between the ion source and stencil mask of a conventional IPL system. Instead a much thicker mask is used as a beam forming or extraction electrode, positioned next to the plasma in the ion source. Thus the entire beam forming electrode or mask is illuminated uniformly with the source plasma. The extracted beam passes through an acceleration and reduction stage onto the resist coated wafer. Low energy ions, about 30 eV, pass through the mask, minimizing heating, scattering, and sputtering.

  17. Cross linking molecular systems to form ultrathin dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Danqin

    Dehydrogenation leads to cross linking of polymer or polymer like formation in very different systems: self-assembled monolayers and in closo -carboranes leading to the formation of semiconducting and dielectric boron carbide. We find evidence of intermolecular interactions for a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formed from a large molecular adsorbate, [1,1';4',1"-terphenyl]-4,4"-dimethanethiol, from the dispersion of the molecular orbitals with changing the wave vector k and from the changes with temperature. With the formation self assembled molecular (SAM) layer, the molecular orbitals hybridize to electronic bands, with indications of significant band dispersion of the unoccupied molecular orbitals. Although organic adsorbates and thin films are generally regarded as "soft" materials, the effective Debye temperature, indicative of the dynamic motion of the lattice normal to the surface, can be very high, e.g. in the multilayer film formed from [1,1'-biphenyl]-4,4'-dimethanethiol (BPDMT). Depending on molecular orientation, the effective Debye temperature can be comparable to that of graphite due to the 'stiffness' of the benzene rings, but follows the expected Debye-Waller behavior for the core level photoemission intensities with temperature. This is not always the case. We find that a monomolecular film formed from [1,1';4',1"-terphenyl]-4,4"-dimethanethiol deviates from Debye-Waller temperature behavior and is likely caused by temperature dependent changes in molecular orientation. We also find evidence for the increase in dielectric character with polymerization (cross-linking) in spite of the decrease in the HOMO-LUMO gap upon irradiation of TPDMT. The changes in the HOMO-LUMO gap, with cross-linking, are roughly consistent with the band dispersion. The decomposition and cross-linking processes are also accompanied by changes in molecular orientation. The energetics of the three isomeric carborane cage compounds [ closo-1,2-orthocarborane, closo-1

  18. Intermolecular interactions in rifabutin—2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin—water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anshakova, A. V.; Yermolenko, Yu. V.; Konyukhov, V. Yu.; Polshakov, V. I.; Maksimenko, O. O.; Gelperina, S. E.

    2015-05-01

    The possibility of a intermolecular complex rifabutin (RB)-2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) formed as a result of the interaction of the piperidine fragment of the RB molecule and the hydrophobic cavity of the HP-β-CD molecule was found. The stability constant of the intermolecular complex was determined.

  19. Intermolecular Silacarbonyl Ylide Cycloadditions: A Direct Pathway to Oxasilacyclopentenes

    PubMed Central

    Bourque, Laura E.; Woerpel, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    Silacarbonyl ylides, generated by metal-catalyzed silylene transfer to carbonyls, participate in formal intermolecular 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions with carbonyl compounds and alkynes to form dioxasilacyclopentane acetals and oxasilacyclopentenes in an efficient, one-step process. PMID:18922005

  20. Dancing Crystals: A Dramatic Illustration of Intermolecular Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundell, Donald W.

    2007-01-01

    Crystals of naphthalene form on the surface of an acetone solution and dance about in an animated fashion illustrating surface tension, crystallization, and intermolecular forces. Additional experiments reveal the properties of the solution. Flows within the solutions can be visualized by various means. Previous demonstrations of surface motion…

  1. Slab edge insulating form system and methods

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Brain E.; Barsun, Stephan K.; Bourne, Richard C.; Hoeschele, Marc A.; Springer, David A.

    2009-10-06

    A method of forming an insulated concrete foundation is provided comprising constructing a foundation frame, the frame comprising an insulating form having an opening, inserting a pocket former into the opening; placing concrete inside the foundation frame; and removing the pocket former after the placed concrete has set, wherein the concrete forms a pocket in the placed concrete that is accessible through the opening. The method may further comprise sealing the opening by placing a sealing plug or sealing material in the opening. A system for forming an insulated concrete foundation is provided comprising a plurality of interconnected insulating forms, the insulating forms having a rigid outer member protecting and encasing an insulating material, and at least one gripping lip extending outwardly from the outer member to provide a pest barrier. At least one insulating form has an opening into which a removable pocket former is inserted. The system may also provide a tension anchor positioned in the pocket former and a tendon connected to the tension anchor.

  2. Plastic instability in omega forming alloy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, S.

    2006-11-01

    The plastic flow behaviour of two ω forming systems namely ordered Nb-40Ti-15Al and metastable Zr-Nb alloys has been studied over a range of strain rate and temperature to establish the domain of serrated flow or Protevin-Le Chatelier (PLC) effect. The observed features of serrated flow in these alloys are strikingly similar to that observed during PLC effect of solid solution alloys. Samples deformed in the serrated flow regime have been studied at different levels of magnification using light, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. A very characteristic feature of deformation in these alloys has been the presence precipitate free channels, microbands and deformation bands. The proposed mechanism of serrated flow involves creation of soft channels formed by shearing of ω-particles and dynamic restoration of ω-particles within the soft channel resulting in pinning of dislocation. It appears that this is the characteristic feature of deformation of ω forming system exhibiting PLC effect.

  3. Maximizing Singlet Fission by Intermolecular Packing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linjun; Olivier, Yoann; Prezhdo, Oleg V; Beljonne, David

    2014-10-01

    A novel nonadiabatic molecular dynamics scheme is applied to study the singlet fission (SF) process in pentacene dimers as a function of longitudinal and lateral displacements of the molecular backbones. Detailed two-dimensional mappings of both instantaneous and long-term triplet yields are obtained, characterizing the advantageous and unfavorable stacking arrangements, which can be achieved by chemical substitutions to the bare pentacene molecule. We show that the SF rate can be increased by more than an order of magnitude through tuning the intermolecular packing, most notably when going from cofacial to the slipped stacked arrangements encountered in some pentacene derivatives. The simulations indicate that the SF process is driven by thermal electron-phonon fluctuations at ambient and high temperatures, expected in solar cell applications. Although charge-transfer states are key to construct continuous channels for SF, a large charge-transfer character of the photoexcited state is found to be not essential for efficient SF. The reported time domain study mimics directly numerous laser experiments and provides novel guidelines for designing efficient photovoltaic systems exploiting the SF process with optimum intermolecular packing. PMID:26278443

  4. Forming the Solar System from Pebbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretke, Katherine A.; Levison, H. F.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, theories surrounding the formation of small-bodies and planets have been undergoing a radical shift. Particles with stopping times comparable to their orbital times, often called "pebbles" (although they range from sub-centimeter to meter sizes), interact with gaseous protoplanetary disks in very special ways. This allows them to be not only be concentrated, allowing them to gravitationally collapse and directly produce the planetesimal building blocks of planetary systems, but also later be efficiently accreted on to these planetesimals, rapidly producing larger planets. Here we present simulations using the planet formation code LIPAD, which can follow the dynamical evolution of planetary system all the way from pebbles and planetesimals to mature planetary systems. We show how pebble accretion can explain the observed structure of our Solar System, by forming a system of giant planets, ice giants, and a system of terrestrial planets; even providing an explanation the for the low mass of Mars and of the Asteroid Belt.

  5. Reducing quasilinear systems to block triangular form

    SciTech Connect

    Tunitsky, Dmitry V

    2013-03-31

    The paper is concerned with systems of n quasilinear partial differential equations of the first order with 2 independent variables. Using a geometric formalism for such equations, which goes back to Riemann, it is possible to assign a field of linear operators on an appropriate vector bundle to this type of quasilinear system. Several tests for a quasilinear system to be reducible to triangular or block triangular form are obtained in terms of this field; they supplement well known results on diagonalization and block diagonalization due to Haantjes and Bogoyavlenskij. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  6. Identification and measurement of intermolecular interaction in polyester/polystyrene blends by FTIR-photoacoustic spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectrometry was used to reveal and identify n-p type intermolecular interaction formed in plastic comprising binary blends of polystyrene and a biodegradable polymer, either polylactic acid, polycaprolactone or poly(tetramethyleneadipate-co-terephthalate)....

  7. Correlation functions for glass-forming systems

    PubMed

    Jacobs

    2000-07-01

    We present a simple, linear, partial-differential equation for the density-density correlation function in a glass-forming system. The equation is written down on the basis of fundamental and general considerations of linearity, symmetry, stability, thermodynamic irreversibility and consistency with the equation of continuity (i.e. , conservation of matter). The dynamical properties of the solutions show a change in behavior characteristic of the liquid-glass transition as a function of one of the parameters (temperature). The equation can be shown to lead to the simplest mode-coupling theory of glasses and provides a partial justification of this simplest theory. It provides also a method for calculating the space dependence of the correlation functions not available otherwise. The results suggest certain differences in behavior between glassy solids and glass-forming liquids which may be accessible to experiment. A brief discussion is presented of how the method can be applied to other systems such as sandpiles and vortex glasses in type II superconductors. PMID:11088609

  8. Determination of Multidimensional Intermolecular Potential Energy Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Ronald Carl

    High resolution spectroscopy of the low frequency van der Waals vibrations (also referred to as Vibration -Rotation-Tunneling (VRT) spectroscopy) in weakly bound complexes provides the means to probe intermolecular forces with unprecedented detail and precision. We present an overview of the experimental information on intermolecular forces and intermolecular dynamics which has been obtained by far infrared VRT spectroscopy of 18 complexes. We then turn to a detailed examination of the Ar-H_2O complex, a simple prototype for the study of intermolecular forces. The measurement and analysis of 9 VRT bands is described. These data are first used to obtain a qualitative description of the intermolecular potential energy surface (IPS). A new simple and efficient method for calculating the eigenvalues of the multidimensional intermolecular dynamics on the IPS has been developed. This algorithm (an adaptation of the Collocation Method) was then used in a direct fit to obtain an accurate and detailed description of the intermolecular forces acting within the Ar-H_2O complex.

  9. Pressure Modulation of Backbone Conformation and Intermolecular Distance of Conjugated Polymers Toward Understanding the Dynamism of π-Figuration of their Conjugated System.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Yuki; Saeki, Akinori; Fujiwara, Takenori; Yamanaka, Sho; Kumano, Masataka; Sakurai, Tsuneaki; Matsuyama, Naoto; Nakano, Motohiro; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo; Seki, Shu

    2015-06-18

    Continuous tuning of the backbone conformation and interchain distance of a π-conjugated polymer is an essential prerequisite to unveil the inherent electrical and optical features of organic electronics. To this end, applying pressure in a hydrostatic medium or diamond anvil cell is a facile approach without the need for side-chain synthetic engineering. We report the development of high-pressure, time-resolved microwave conductivity (HP-TRMC) and evaluation of transient photoconductivity in the regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) film and its bulk heterojunction blend with methanofullerene (PCBM). X-ray diffraction experiments under high pressure were performed to detail the pressure dependence of π-stacking and interlamellar distances in P3HT crystallites and PCBM aggregates. The HP-TRMC results were further correlated with high-pressure Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculation. The increased HP-TRMC conductivity of P3HT under pressure was found to be relevant to the planarity of the backbone conformation and intramolecular hole mobility. The effects of pressure on the backbone planarity are estimated to be ∼0.3 kJ mol(-1) based on the compressibility derived from the X-ray diffraction under high pressure, suggesting the high enough energy to cause modulation of the planarity in terms of the Landau-de Gennes free energy of isolated P3HT chains as 0.23 kJ mol(-1). In contrast, the P3HT:PCBM blend showed a simple decrease in photoconductivity irrespective of the identical compressive behavior of P3HT. A mechanistic insight into the interplay of intra- and intermolecular mobilities is a key to tailoring the dynamic π-figuration associated with electrical properties, which may lead to the use of HP-TRMC for exploring divergent π-conjugated materials at the desired molecular arrangement and conformation. PMID:25563063

  10. Kinetic theory for flows of nonhomogeneous rodlike liquid crystalline polymers with a nonlocal intermolecular potential.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; E, Weinan; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Pingwen

    2002-05-01

    The Doi kinetic theory for flows of homogeneous, rodlike liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) is extended to model flows of nonhomogeneous, rodlike LCPs through a nonlocal (long-range) intermolecular potential. The theory features (i) a nonlocal, anisotropic, effective intermolecular potential in an integral form that is consistent with the chemical potential, (ii) short-range elasticity as well as long-range isotropic and anisotropic elasticity, (iii) a closed-form stress expression accounting for the nonlocal molecular interaction, and (iv) an extra elastic body force exclusively associated with the integral form of the intermolecular potential. With the effective intermolecular potential, the theory is proven to be well posed in that it warrants a positive entropy production and thereby the second law of thermodynamics. Approximate theories are obtained by gradient expansions of the number density function in the free energy density. PMID:12059561

  11. Mechanism of Intermolecular Electron Transfer in Bionanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruodis, A.; Galikova, N.; Šarka, K.; Saulė, R.; Batiuškaitė, D.; Saulis, G.

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. Most patients are inoperable and hepatoma cells are resistant to conventional chemotherapies. Thus, the development of novel therapies for HCC treatment is of paramount importance. Amongst different alimentary factors, vitamin C and vitamin K3 In the present work, it has been shown that the treatment of mouse hepatoma MH-22A cells by vitamin C and vitamin K3 at the ratio of 100:1 greatly enhanced their cytotoxicity. When cells were subjected to vitamin C at 200 μM or to vitamin K3 at 2 μM separately, their viability reduced by only about 10%. However, when vitamins C and K3 were combined at the same concentrations, they killed more than 90% of cells. To elucidate the mechanism of the synergistic cytotoxicity of the C&K3 mixture, theoretical quantum-chemical analysis of the dynamics of intermolecular electron transfer (IET) processes within the complexes containing C (five forms) and K3 (one form) has been carried out. Optimization of the ground state complex geometry has been provided by means of GAUSSIAN03 package. Simulation of the IET has been carried out using NUVOLA package, in the framework of molecular orbitals (MO). The rate of IET has been calculated using Fermi Golden rule. The results of simulations allow us to create the preliminary model of the reaction pathway.

  12. Electric Field Effects on the Intermolecular Interactions in Water Whiskers: Insight from Structures, Energetics, and Properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bai, Yang; He, Hui-Min; Li, Ying; Zhou, Zhong-Jun; Wang, Jia-Jun; Wu, Di; Chen, Wei; Gu, Feng-Long; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Huang, Jingsong

    2015-02-19

    Modulation of intermolecular interactions in response to external electric fields could be fundamental to the formation of unusual forms of water, such as water whiskers. However, a detailed understanding of the nature of intermolecular interactions in such systems is lacking. In this study, we present novel theoretical results based on electron correlation calculations regarding the nature of H-bonds in water whiskers, which is revealed by studying their evolution under external electric fields with various field strengths. We find that the water whiskers consisting of 2-7 water molecules all have a chain-length dependent critical electric field. Under the critical electric field,more » the most compact chain structures are obtained, featuring very strong H-bonds, herein referred to as covalent H-bonds. In the case of a water dimer whisker, the bond length of the novel covalent H-bond shortens by 25%, the covalent bond order increases by 9 times, and accordingly the H-bond energy is strengthened by 5 times compared to the normal H-bond in a (H2O)2 cluster. Below the critical electric field, it is observed that with increasing field strength, H-bonding orbitals display gradual evolutions in the orbital energy, orbital ordering, and orbital nature (i.e., from typical -style orbital to unusual -style double H-bonding orbital). We also show that beyond the critical electric field, a single water whisker may disintegrate to form a loosely bound zwitterionic chain due to a relay-style proton transfer, whereas two water whiskers may undergo intermolecular cross-linking to form a quasi-two-dimensional water network. In conclusion, these results help shed new insight on the effects of electric fields on water whisker formation.« less

  13. Electric Field Effects on the Intermolecular Interactions in Water Whiskers: Insight from Structures, Energetics, and Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Yang; He, Hui-Min; Li, Ying; Zhou, Zhong-Jun; Wang, Jia-Jun; Wu, Di; Chen, Wei; Gu, Feng-Long; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Huang, Jingsong

    2015-02-19

    Modulation of intermolecular interactions in response to external electric fields could be fundamental to the formation of unusual forms of water, such as water whiskers. However, a detailed understanding of the nature of intermolecular interactions in such systems is lacking. In this study, we present novel theoretical results based on electron correlation calculations regarding the nature of H-bonds in water whiskers, which is revealed by studying their evolution under external electric fields with various field strengths. We find that the water whiskers consisting of 2-7 water molecules all have a chain-length dependent critical electric field. Under the critical electric field, the most compact chain structures are obtained, featuring very strong H-bonds, herein referred to as covalent H-bonds. In the case of a water dimer whisker, the bond length of the novel covalent H-bond shortens by 25%, the covalent bond order increases by 9 times, and accordingly the H-bond energy is strengthened by 5 times compared to the normal H-bond in a (H2O)2 cluster. Below the critical electric field, it is observed that with increasing field strength, H-bonding orbitals display gradual evolutions in the orbital energy, orbital ordering, and orbital nature (i.e., from typical -style orbital to unusual -style double H-bonding orbital). We also show that beyond the critical electric field, a single water whisker may disintegrate to form a loosely bound zwitterionic chain due to a relay-style proton transfer, whereas two water whiskers may undergo intermolecular cross-linking to form a quasi-two-dimensional water network. In conclusion, these results help shed new insight on the effects of electric fields on water whisker formation.

  14. Intermolecular domain docking in the hairpin ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Sumita, Minako; White, Neil A.; Julien, Kristine R.; Hoogstraten, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The hairpin ribozyme is a prototype small, self-cleaving RNA motif. It exists naturally as a four-way RNA junction containing two internal loops on adjoining arms. These two loops interact in a cation-driven docking step prior to chemical catalysis to form a tightly integrated structure, with dramatic changes occurring in the conformation of each loop upon docking. We investigate the thermodynamics and kinetics of the docking process using constructs in which loop A and loop B reside on separate molecules. Using a novel CD difference assay to isolate the effects of metal ions linked to domain docking, we find the intermolecular docking process to be driven by sub-millimolar concentrations of the exchange-inert Co(NH3)63+. RNA self-cleavage requires binding of lower-affinity ions with greater apparent cooperativity than the docking process itself, implying that, even in the absence of direct coordination to RNA, metal ions play a catalytic role in hairpin ribozyme function beyond simply driving loop-loop docking. Surface plasmon resonance assays reveal remarkably slow molecular association, given the relatively tight loop-loop interaction. This observation is consistent with a “double conformational capture” model in which only collisions between loop A and loop B molecules that are simultaneously in minor, docking-competent conformations are productive for binding. PMID:23324606

  15. 46 CFR 108.474 - Aqueous film forming foam systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aqueous film forming foam systems. 108.474 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.474 Aqueous film forming foam systems. Aqueous film forming foam systems may be installed if approved by the Commandant....

  16. 46 CFR 108.474 - Aqueous film forming foam systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aqueous film forming foam systems. 108.474 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.474 Aqueous film forming foam systems. Aqueous film forming foam systems may be installed if approved by the Commandant....

  17. 46 CFR 108.474 - Aqueous film forming foam systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aqueous film forming foam systems. 108.474 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.474 Aqueous film forming foam systems. Aqueous film forming foam systems may be installed if approved by the Commandant....

  18. 46 CFR 108.474 - Aqueous film forming foam systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aqueous film forming foam systems. 108.474 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.474 Aqueous film forming foam systems. Aqueous film forming foam systems may be installed if approved by the Commandant....

  19. 46 CFR 108.474 - Aqueous film forming foam systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aqueous film forming foam systems. 108.474 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.474 Aqueous film forming foam systems. Aqueous film forming foam systems may be installed if approved by the Commandant....

  20. Quantitative tomographic imaging of intermolecular FRET in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Vivek; Chen, Jin; Barroso, Margarida; Intes, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a nonradiative transfer of energy between two fluorescent molecules (a donor and an acceptor) in nanometer range proximity. FRET imaging methods have been applied to proteomic studies and drug discovery applications based on intermolecular FRET efficiency measurements and stoichiometric measurements of FRET interaction as quantitative parameters of interest. Importantly, FRET provides information about biomolecular interactions at a molecular level, well beyond the diffraction limits of standard microscopy techniques. The application of FRET to small animal imaging will allow biomedical researchers to investigate physiological processes occurring at nanometer range in vivo as well as in situ. In this work a new method for the quantitative reconstruction of FRET measurements in small animals, incorporating a full-field tomographic acquisition system with a Monte Carlo based hierarchical reconstruction scheme, is described and validated in murine models. Our main objective is to estimate the relative concentration of two forms of donor species, i.e., a donor molecule involved in FRETing to an acceptor close by and a nonFRETing donor molecule. PMID:23243567

  1. Calculations of helical twisting powers from intermolecular torques.

    PubMed

    Earl, David J; Wilson, Mark R

    2004-05-22

    We present a Monte Carlo molecular simulation method that calculates the helical twisting power of a chiral molecule by sampling intermolecular torques. The approach is applied to an achiral nematic liquid crystalline system, composed of Gay-Berne particles, that is doped with chiral molecules. Calculations are presented for six chiral dopant molecules and the results show a good correlation with the sign and magnitude of experimentally determined helical twisting powers. PMID:15267981

  2. Femtosecond Fourier-transform spectroscopy of low-frequency intermolecular motions in weakly interacting liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Castner, E.W. Jr.; Chang, Y.J.; Melinger, J.S.; McMorrow, D.

    1993-07-01

    Recent work on the subject of solvation dynamics has concentrated on understanding the ultrafast dynamics of intermolecular interactions in strongly interacting, polar, and hydrogen-bonding solvents. In general, investigations into the effects of solvation dynamics on chemical reactions have concentrated on the highly polar liquids because it is in these solvents that the largest spectroscopic changes with solvent relaxation are observed. In these very polar liquids, however, the intermolecular dynamics are very complex, consisting of contributions from reorientational diffusion, inertially limited rotations, intermolecular vibrations involving both reorientational (librational) and translational degrees of freedom, and interaction-induced collisional effects. The role of collisional interaction-induced effects in shaping the intermolecular dynamics of molecular liquids has been a subject of considerable discussion. Molecular dynamics simulations have suggested that collisional effects can have a significant role in shaping the femtosecond dynamics and nonlinear-optical properties of molecular liquids. However, for anisotropic molecules, it is difficult to separate experimentally the collisional effects from other phenomena. In this paper the authors examine the intermolecular dynamics of the weakly interacting liquid carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}). Because carbon tetrachloride is a spherical top molecule (belonging to the T{sub d} point group), its intermolecular light-scattering spectrum is purely interaction-induced. By studying this purely collision-induced feature in CCl{sub 4}, the authors hope to gain insight on the lowest-frequency intermolecular vibrational behavior of more complex systems.

  3. Fluorescence photoactivation by intermolecular proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Subramani; Petriella, Marco; Deniz, Erhan; Cusido, Janet; Baker, James D; Bossi, Mariano L; Raymo, Françisco M

    2012-10-11

    We designed a strategy to activate fluorescence under the influence of optical stimulations based on the intermolecular transfer of protons. Specifically, the illumination of a 2-nitrobenzyl derivative at an activating wavelength is accompanied by the release of hydrogen bromide. In turn, the photogenerated acid encourages the opening of an oxazine ring embedded within a halochromic compound. This structural transformation extends the conjugation of an adjacent coumarin fluorophore and enables its absorption at an appropriate excitation wavelength. Indeed, this bimolecular system offers the opportunity to activate fluorescence in liquid solutions, within rigid matrixes and inside micellar assemblies, relying on the interplay of activating and exciting beams. Furthermore, this strategy permits the permanent imprinting of fluorescent patterns on polymer films, the monitoring of proton diffusion within such materials in real time on a millisecond time scale, and the acquisition of images with spatial resolution at the nanometer level. Thus, our operating principles for fluorescence activation can eventually lead to the development of valuable photoswitchable probes for imaging applications and versatile mechanisms for the investigation of proton transport. PMID:22994311

  4. Covalent intermolecular interaction of the nitric oxide dimer (NO)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Zheng, Gui-Li; Lv, Gang; Geng, Yi-Zhao; Ji, Qing

    2015-09-01

    Covalent bonds arise from the overlap of the electronic clouds in the internucleus region, which is a pure quantum effect and cannot be obtained in any classical way. If the intermolecular interaction is of covalent character, the result from direct applications of classical simulation methods to the molecular system would be questionable. Here, we analyze the special intermolecular interaction between two NO molecules based on quantum chemical calculation. This weak intermolecular interaction, which is of covalent character, is responsible for the formation of the NO dimer, (NO)2, in its most stable conformation, a cis conformation. The natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis gives an intuitive illustration of the formation of the dimer bonding and antibonding orbitals concomitant with the breaking of the π bonds with bond order 0.5 of the monomers. The dimer bonding is counteracted by partially filling the antibonding dimer orbital and the repulsion between those fully or nearly fully occupied nonbonding dimer orbitals that make the dimer binding rather weak. The direct molecular mechanics (MM) calculation with the UFF force fields predicts a trans conformation as the most stable state, which contradicts the result of quantum mechanics (QM). The lesson from the investigation of this special system is that for the case where intermolecular interaction is of covalent character, a specific modification of the force fields of the molecular simulation method is necessary. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 90403007 and 10975044), the Key Subject Construction Project of Hebei Provincial Universities, China, the Research Project of Hebei Education Department, China (Grant Nos. Z2012067 and Z2011133), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11147103), and the Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Grant No. Y5

  5. Intermolecular Vibrations of Hydrophobic Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Michael Roy Casselman

    Hydrophobic amino acids interact with their chemical environment through a combination of electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, dipole, induced dipole, and dispersion forces. These interactions all have their own characteristic energy scale and distance dependence. The low-frequency (0.1-5 THz, 5-150 cm-1) vibrational modes of amino acids in the solid state are a direct indicator of the interactions between the molecules, which include interactions between an amino acid functional group and its surroundings. This information is central to understanding the dynamics and morphology of proteins. The alpha-carbon is a chiral center for all of the hydrophobic amino acids, meaning that they exist in two forms, traditionally referred to as L- and D-enantiomers. This nomenclature indicates which direction the molecule rotates plane-polarized visible light (levorotory and dextrorotory). Chiral a-amino acids in proteins are exclusively the L-variety In the solid state, the crystal lattice of the pure L-enantiomer is the mirror image of the D-enantiomer crystal lattice. These solids are energetically identical. Enantiomers also have identical spectroscopic properties except when the measurement is polarization sensitive. A mixture of equal amounts D- and L-amino acid enantiomers can crystallize into a racemic (DL-) structure that is different from that of the pure enantiomers. Whether a solution of both enantiomers will crystallize into a racemic form or spontaneously resolve into a mixture of separate D- and L-crystals largely depends on the interactions between molecules available in the various possible configurations. This is an active area of research. Low-frequency vibrations with intermolecular character are very sensitive to changes in lattice geometry, and consequently the vibrational spectra of racemic crystals are usually quite distinct from the spectra of the crystals of the corresponding pure enantiomers in the far-infrared (far-IR). THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz

  6. Separation of intra- and intermolecular contributions to the PELDOR signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöps, Philipp; Plackmeyer, Jörn; Marko, Andriy

    2016-08-01

    Pulsed Electron-electron Double Resonance (PELDOR) is commonly used to measure distances between native paramagnetic centers or spin labels attached to complex biological macromolecules. In PELDOR the energies of electron magnetic dipolar interactions are measured by analyzing the oscillation frequencies of the recorded time resolved signal. Since PELDOR is an ensemble method, the detected signal contains contributions from intramolecular, as well as intermolecular electron spin interactions. The intramolecular part of the signal contains the information about the structure of the studied molecules, thus it is very important to accurately separate intra- and intermolecular contributions to the total signal. This separation can become ambiguous, when the length of the PELDOR signal is not much longer than twice the oscillation period of the signal. In this work we suggest a modulation depth scaling method, which can use short PELDOR signals in order to extract the intermolecular contribution. Using synthetic data we demonstrate the advantages of the new approach and analyze its stability with regard to signal noise. The method was also successfully tested on experimental data of three systems measured at Q-Band frequencies, two model compounds in deuterated and protonated solvents and one biological sample, namely BetP. The application of the new method with an assigned value of the signal modulation depth enables us to determine the interspin distances in all cases. This is especially interesting for the model compound with an interspin distance of 5.2 nm in the protonated solvent and the biological sample, since an accurate separation of the intra- and intermolecular PELDOR signal contributions would be difficult with the standard approach in those cases.

  7. Separation of intra- and intermolecular contributions to the PELDOR signal.

    PubMed

    Schöps, Philipp; Plackmeyer, Jörn; Marko, Andriy

    2016-08-01

    Pulsed Electron-electron Double Resonance (PELDOR) is commonly used to measure distances between native paramagnetic centers or spin labels attached to complex biological macromolecules. In PELDOR the energies of electron magnetic dipolar interactions are measured by analyzing the oscillation frequencies of the recorded time resolved signal. Since PELDOR is an ensemble method, the detected signal contains contributions from intramolecular, as well as intermolecular electron spin interactions. The intramolecular part of the signal contains the information about the structure of the studied molecules, thus it is very important to accurately separate intra- and intermolecular contributions to the total signal. This separation can become ambiguous, when the length of the PELDOR signal is not much longer than twice the oscillation period of the signal. In this work we suggest a modulation depth scaling method, which can use short PELDOR signals in order to extract the intermolecular contribution. Using synthetic data we demonstrate the advantages of the new approach and analyze its stability with regard to signal noise. The method was also successfully tested on experimental data of three systems measured at Q-Band frequencies, two model compounds in deuterated and protonated solvents and one biological sample, namely BetP. The application of the new method with an assigned value of the signal modulation depth enables us to determine the interspin distances in all cases. This is especially interesting for the model compound with an interspin distance of 5.2nm in the protonated solvent and the biological sample, since an accurate separation of the intra- and intermolecular PELDOR signal contributions would be difficult with the standard approach in those cases. PMID:27243966

  8. Competing Intramolecular vs. Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Peter I.

    2014-01-01

    A hydrogen bond for a local-minimum-energy structure can be identified according to the definition of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC recommendation 2011) or by finding a special bond critical point on the density map of the structure in the framework of the atoms-in-molecules theory. Nonetheless, a given structural conformation may be simply favored by electrostatic interactions. The present review surveys the in-solution competition of the conformations with intramolecular vs. intermolecular hydrogen bonds for different types of small organic molecules. In their most stable gas-phase structure, an intramolecular hydrogen bond is possible. In a protic solution, the intramolecular hydrogen bond may disrupt in favor of two solute-solvent intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The balance of the increased internal energy and the stabilizing effect of the solute-solvent interactions regulates the new conformer composition in the liquid phase. The review additionally considers the solvent effects on the stability of simple dimeric systems as revealed from molecular dynamics simulations or on the basis of the calculated potential of mean force curves. Finally, studies of the solvent effects on the type of the intermolecular hydrogen bond (neutral or ionic) in acid-base complexes have been surveyed. PMID:25353178

  9. Competing intramolecular vs. intermolecular hydrogen bonds in solution.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Peter I

    2014-01-01

    A hydrogen bond for a local-minimum-energy structure can be identified according to the definition of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC recommendation 2011) or by finding a special bond critical point on the density map of the structure in the framework of the atoms-in-molecules theory. Nonetheless, a given structural conformation may be simply favored by electrostatic interactions. The present review surveys the in-solution competition of the conformations with intramolecular vs. intermolecular hydrogen bonds for different types of small organic molecules. In their most stable gas-phase structure, an intramolecular hydrogen bond is possible. In a protic solution, the intramolecular hydrogen bond may disrupt in favor of two solute-solvent intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The balance of the increased internal energy and the stabilizing effect of the solute-solvent interactions regulates the new conformer composition in the liquid phase. The review additionally considers the solvent effects on the stability of simple dimeric systems as revealed from molecular dynamics simulations or on the basis of the calculated potential of mean force curves. Finally, studies of the solvent effects on the type of the intermolecular hydrogen bond (neutral or ionic) in acid-base complexes have been surveyed. PMID:25353178

  10. Estimation of intermolecular interactions in polymer networks

    SciTech Connect

    Subrananian, P.R.; Galiatsatos, V.

    1993-12-31

    Strain-birefringence measurements have been used to estimate intermolecular interactions in polymer networks. The intensity of the interaction has been quantified through a theoretical scheme recently proposed by Erman. The results show that these interactions diminish with decreasing molecular weight between cross-links and decreasing cross-link functionality.

  11. An improved intermolecular potential for sulfur hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, R.A.; Slaman, M.J. ); Taylor, W.L.; Hurly, J.J. Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 )

    1991-01-15

    Second virial coefficient data and viscosity were used to evaluate effective isotropic intermolecular potential functions proposed in the literature for sulfur hexafluoride. It was found that none of the potentials could predict the properties simultaneously. We have constructed a Morse--Morse--Spline--van der Waals (MMSV) potential which satisfactorily correlates second virial coefficient and viscosity data at the same time.

  12. Vibrational nano-spectroscopic imaging correlating structure with intermolecular coupling and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Benjamin; Muller, Eric A.; Hinrichs, Karsten; Raschke, Markus B.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly, the function of biomembranes and the performance of organic solar cells rely on nanoscale molecular interactions. Understanding and control of such materials have been impeded by difficulties in imaging their properties with the desired nanometre spatial resolution, attomolar sensitivity and intermolecular spectroscopic specificity. Here we implement vibrational scattering-scanning near-field optical microscopy with high spectral precision to investigate the structure–function relationship in nano-phase separated block copolymers. A vibrational resonance is used as a sensitive reporter of the local chemical environment and we image, with few nanometre spatial resolution and 0.2 cm−1 spectral precision, solvatochromic Stark shifts and line broadening correlated with molecular-scale morphologies. We discriminate local variations in electric fields between nano-domains with quantitative agreement with dielectric continuum models. This ability to directly resolve nanoscale morphology and associated intermolecular interactions can form a basis for the systematic control of functionality in multicomponent soft matter systems. PMID:24721995

  13. Co-operative intermolecular kinetics of 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases may be essential for system-level regulation of plant cell physiology

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Siddhartha

    2015-01-01

    Can the stimulus-driven synergistic association of 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases be influenced by the kinetic parameters of binding and catalysis?In this manuscript, I posit that these indices are necessary and specific for a particular stimulus, and are key determinants of a dynamic clustering that may function to mitigate the effects of this trigger. The protein(s)/sequence(s) that comprise this group are representative of all major kingdoms of life, and catalyze a generic hydroxylation, which is, in most cases accompanied by a specialized conversion of the substrate molecule. Iron is an essential co-factor for this transformation and the response to waning levels is systemic, and mandates the simultaneous participation of molecular sensors, transporters, and signal transducers. Here, I present a proof-of-concept model, that an evolving molecular network of 2OG-dependent enzymes can maintain iron homeostasis in the cytosol of root hair cells of members of the family Gramineae by actuating a non-reductive compensatory chelation by the phytosiderophores. Regression models of empirically available kinetic data (iron and alpha-ketoglutarate) were formulated, analyzed, and compared. The results, when viewed in context of the superfamily responding as a unit, suggest that members can indeed, work together to accomplish system-level function. This is achieved by the establishment of transient metabolic conduits, wherein the flux is dictated by kinetic compatibility of the participating enzymes. The approach adopted, i.e., predictive mathematical modeling, is integral to the hypothesis-driven acquisition of experimental data points and, in association with suitable visualization aids may be utilized for exploring complex plant biochemical systems. PMID:26236316

  14. System and method for incremental forming

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, Michael; Cao, Jian; Roth, John T.

    2015-12-29

    A system includes a frame configured to hold a workpiece and first and second tool positioning assemblies configured to be opposed to each other on opposite sides of the workpiece. The first and second tool positioning assemblies each include a toolholder configured to secure a tool to the tool positioning assembly, a first axis assembly, a second axis assembly, and a third axis assembly. The first, second, and third axis assemblies are each configured to articulate the toolholder along a respective axis. Each axis assembly includes first and second guides extending generally parallel to the corresponding axis and disposed on opposing sides of the toolholder with respect to the corresponding axis. Each axis assembly includes first and second carriages articulable along the first and second guides of the axis assembly, respectively, in the direction of the corresponding axis.

  15. Cutting tool form compensation system and method

    DOEpatents

    Barkman, W.E.; Babelay, E.F. Jr.; Klages, E.J.

    1993-10-19

    A compensation system for a computer-controlled machining apparatus having a controller and including a cutting tool and a workpiece holder which are movable relative to one another along a preprogrammed path during a machining operation utilizes a camera and a vision computer for gathering information at a preselected stage of a machining operation relating to the actual shape and size of the cutting edge of the cutting tool and for altering the preprogrammed path in accordance with detected variations between the actual size and shape of the cutting edge and an assumed size and shape of the cutting edge. The camera obtains an image of the cutting tool against a background so that the cutting tool and background possess contrasting light intensities, and the vision computer utilizes the contrasting light intensities of the image to locate points therein which correspond to points along the actual cutting edge. Following a series of computations involving the determining of a tool center from the points identified along the tool edge, the results of the computations are fed to the controller where the preprogrammed path is altered as aforedescribed. 9 figures.

  16. Cutting tool form compensaton system and method

    DOEpatents

    Barkman, William E.; Babelay, Jr., Edwin F.; Klages, Edward J.

    1993-01-01

    A compensation system for a computer-controlled machining apparatus having a controller and including a cutting tool and a workpiece holder which are movable relative to one another along a preprogrammed path during a machining operation utilizes a camera and a vision computer for gathering information at a preselected stage of a machining operation relating to the actual shape and size of the cutting edge of the cutting tool and for altering the preprogrammed path in accordance with detected variations between the actual size and shape of the cutting edge and an assumed size and shape of the cutting edge. The camera obtains an image of the cutting tool against a background so that the cutting tool and background possess contrasting light intensities, and the vision computer utilizes the contrasting light intensities of the image to locate points therein which correspond to points along the actual cutting edge. Following a series of computations involving the determining of a tool center from the points identified along the tool edge, the results of the computations are fed to the controller where the preprogrammed path is altered as aforedescribed.

  17. Rorschach Form Quality in Two Editions of Exner's Comprehensive System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barley, William D.; And Others

    Form level is a major element in the scoring and interpretation of Rorschach responses. Exner's 1974 text and 1976 comprehensive system workbook provided helpful norms and scoring conventions for determining form quality, but its 1985 revision appeared to lead to generally lower levels of form quality. To examine this clinical impression, the…

  18. Evidence of pressure induced intermolecular proton transfer via mutarotation: the case of supercooled d-fructose.

    PubMed

    Cecotka, Adam; Tripathy, Satya N; Paluch, Marian

    2015-07-15

    This paper describes a systematic investigation on the role of pressure in mutarotation kinetics of supercooled d-fructose using dielectric spectroscopy. The structural relaxation time acts as a suitable dynamical observable to monitor the mutarotation process that enables the construction of the kinetic curves. The reaction kinetic shapes have been analyzed using the Avrami model. At low temperature, sigmoidal kinetic curves are noted, which correspond to the high concentration of furanosidic forms. The magnitude of activation energy of the process significantly decreases with increasing pressure and is comparable to the solvated systems at 100 MPa. A potential connection between cooperative motion and the origin of intermolecular proton transfer via mutarotation at elevated pressure is also discussed. These experimental observations have fundamental significance on theoretical explanation of the mechanism involving mutarotation in sugars. PMID:26144525

  19. Single-molecule magnets ``without'' intermolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernsdorfer, W.; Vergnani, L.; Rodriguez-Douton, M. J.; Cornia, A.; Neugebauer, P.; Barra, A. L.; Sorace, L.; Sessoli, R.

    2012-02-01

    Intermolecular magnetic interactions (dipole-dipole and exchange) affect strongly the magnetic relaxation of crystals of single-molecule magnets (SMMs), especially at low temperature, where quantum tunneling of the magnetization (QTM) dominates. This leads to complex many-body problems [l]. Measurements on magnetically diluted samples are desirable to clearly sort out the behaviour of magnetically-isolated SMMs and to reveal, by comparison, the effect of intermolecular interactions. Here, we diluted a Fe4 SMM into a diamagnetic crystal lattice, affording arrays of independent and iso-oriented magnetic units. We found that the resonant tunnel transitions are much sharper, the tunneling efficiency changes significantly, and two-body QTM transitions disappear. These changes have been rationalized on the basis of a dipolar shuffling mechanism and of transverse dipolar fields, whose effect has been analyzed using a multispin model. Our findings directly prove the impact of intermolecular magnetic couplings on the SMM behaviour and disclose the magnetic response of truly-isolated giant spins in a diamagnetic crystalline environment.[4pt] [1] W. Wernsdorfer, at al, PRL 82, 3903 (1999); PRL 89, 197201 (2002); Nature 416, 406 (2002); IS Tupitsyn, PCE Stamp, NV Prokof'ev, PRB 69, 132406 (2004).

  20. An isotopic mass effect on the intermolecular potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Michael F.; Currier, Robert P.; Clegg, Samuel M.

    2015-10-01

    The impact of isotopic variation on the electronic energy and intermolecular potentials is often suppressed when calculating isotopologue thermodynamics. Intramolecular potential energy surfaces for distinct isotopologues are in fact equivalent under the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, which is sometimes used to imply that the intermolecular interactions are independent of isotopic mass. In this communication, the intermolecular dipole-dipole interaction between hetero-nuclear diatomic molecules is considered. It is shown that the intermolecular potential contains mass-dependent terms even though each nucleus moves on a Born-Oppenheimer surface. The analysis suggests that mass dependent variations in intermolecular potentials should be included in comprehensive descriptions of isotopologue thermodynamics.

  1. Computing free energy hypersurfaces for anisotropic intermolecular associations.

    PubMed

    Strümpfer, Johan; Naidoo, Kevin J

    2010-01-30

    We previously used an adaptive reaction coordinate force biasing method for calculating the free energy of conformation (Naidoo and Brady, J Am Chem Soc 1999, 121, 2244) and chemical reactions (Rajamani et al., J Comput Chem 2003, 24, 1775) amongst others. Here, we describe a generalized version able to produce free energies in multiple dimensions, descriptively named the free energies from adaptive reaction coordinate forces method. To illustrate it, we describe how we calculate a multidimensional intermolecular orientational free energy, which can be used to investigate complex systems such as protein conformation and liquids. This multidimensional intermolecular free energy W(r, theta(1), theta(2), phi) provides a measure of orientationally dependent interactions that are appropriate for applications in systems that inherently have molecular anisotropic features. It is a highly informative free energy volume, which can be used to parameterize key terms such as the Gay-Berne intermolecular potential in coarse grain simulations. To demonstrate the value of the information gained from the W(r, theta(1), theta(2), phi) hypersurfaces we calculated them for TIP3P, TIP4P, and TIP5P dimer water models in vacuum. A comparison with a commonly used one-dimensional distance free energy profile is made to illustrate the significant increase in configurational information. The W(r) plots show little difference between the three models while the W(r, theta(1), theta(2), phi) hypersurfaces reveal the underlying energetic reasons why these potentials reproduce tetrahedrality in the condensed phase so differently from each. PMID:19462397

  2. Bile salt–induced intermolecular disulfide bond formation activates Vibrio cholerae virulence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Menghua; Liu, Zhi; Hughes, Chambers; Stern, Andrew M.; Wang, Hui; Zhong, Zengtao; Kan, Biao; Fenical, William; Zhu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    To be successful pathogens, bacteria must often restrict the expression of virulence genes to host environments. This requires a physical or chemical marker of the host environment as well as a cognate bacterial system for sensing the presence of a host to appropriately time the activation of virulence. However, there have been remarkably few such signal–sensor pairs identified, and the molecular mechanisms for host-sensing are virtually unknown. By directly applying a reporter strain of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, to a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate containing mouse intestinal extracts, we found two host signals that activate virulence gene transcription. One of these was revealed to be the bile salt taurocholate. We then show that a set of bile salts cause dimerization of the transmembrane transcription factor TcpP by inducing intermolecular disulfide bonds between cysteine (C)-207 residues in its periplasmic domain. Various genetic and biochemical analyses led us to propose a model in which the other cysteine in the periplasmic domain, C218, forms an inhibitory intramolecular disulfide bond with C207 that must be isomerized to form the active C207–C207 intermolecular bond. We then found bile salt–dependent effects of these cysteine mutations on survival in vivo, correlating to our in vitro model. Our results are a demonstration of a mechanism for direct activation of the V. cholerae virulence cascade by a host signal molecule. They further provide a paradigm for recognition of the host environment in pathogenic bacteria through periplasmic cysteine oxidation. PMID:23341592

  3. Orthogonal canonical forms for second-order systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Trevor; Laub, Alan

    1989-01-01

    The authors prove that a linear second-order system with arbitrary damping cannot be reduced to Hessenberg-triangular form by means of orthogonal transformations, while this reduction is always possible for the modal damping commonly assumed for models of flexible structures. The type of canonical form obtainable by means of orthogonal transformations acting on a second-order system is heavily dependent on the type of damping considered. If the damping matrix is merely positive semi-definite symmetric, it is generally not possible to obtain a reduction to Hessenberg-triangular form, while this reduction is trivial for zero or Rayleigh damping. If damping is modal, however, as is commonly assumed in structural models, the reduction exists and is nontrivial. Furthermore, reduction to triangular second-order Schur form is always possible for such damping: this canonical form appears likely to have applications to second-order system theory.

  4. Further Reductions of Normal Forms for Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoting; Della Dora, Jean

    2000-09-01

    We propose in this paper a method for obtaining a significant refinement of normal forms for dynamical systems or vector fields, with concrete and interesting applications. We use lower order nonlinear terms in the normal form for the simplifications of higher order terms. Our approach is applicable for both the non nilpotent and the nilpotent cases. For dynamical systems of dimensions 2 and 3 we give an algorithm that leads to interesting finite order normal forms which are optimal (or unique) with respect to equivalence by formal near identity transformations. We can compute at the same time a formal diffeormorphism that realizes the normalization. Comparisons with other methods are given for several examples.

  5. Molecular and ionic diffusion in aqueous - deep eutectic solvent mixtures: probing inter-molecular interactions using PFG NMR.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Carmine; Gladden, Lynn F; Mantle, Mick D; Abbott, Andrew P; Ahmed, Essa I; Al-Murshedi, Azhar Y M; Harris, Robert C

    2015-06-21

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR has been used to probe self-diffusion of molecular and ionic species in aqueous mixtures of choline chloride (ChCl) based deep eutectic solvents (DESs), in order to elucidate the effect of water on motion and inter-molecular interactions between the different species in the mixtures, namely the Ch(+) cation and hydrogen bond donor (HBD). The results reveal an interesting and complex behaviour of such mixtures at a molecular level. In general, it is observed that the hydroxyl protons ((1)H) of Ch(+) and the hydrogen bond donor have diffusion coefficients significantly different from those measured for their parent molecules when water is added. This indicates a clear and significant change in inter-molecular interactions. In aqueous Ethaline, the hydroxyl species of Ch(+) and HBD show a stronger interaction with water as water is added to the system. In the case of Glyceline, water has little effect on both hydroxyl proton diffusion of Ch(+) and HBD. In Reline, it is likely that water allows the formation of small amounts of ammonium hydroxide. The most surprising observation is from the self-diffusion of water, which is considerably higher that expected from a homogeneous liquid. This leads to the conclusion that Reline and Glyceline form mixtures that are inhomogeneous at a microscopic level despite the hydrophilicity of the salt and HBD. This work shows that PFG NMR is a powerful tool to elucidate both molecular dynamics and inter-molecular interactions in complex liquid mixtures, such as the aqueous DES mixtures. PMID:25994171

  6. Cooling system optimization analysis for hot forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoo, Bonyoung; Umezu, Yasuyoshi; Watanabe, Yuko

    2013-12-01

    Hot forming technology was developed to produce automotive panels having ultra-high tensile stress over 1500MPa. The elevated temperature corresponds with decreased flow stress and increased ductility. Furthermore, hot forming products have almost zero springback amounts. This advanced forming technology accelerates the needs for numerical simulations coupling with thermal-mechanical formulations. In the present study, 3-dimensional finite element analyses for hot forming processes are conducted using JSTAMP/NV and LS-DYNA considering cooling system. Special attention is paid to the optimization of cooling system using thermo-mechanical finite element analysis through the influence of various cooling parameters. The presented work shows an adequate cooling system functions and microstructural phase transformation material model together with a proper set of numerical parameters can give both efficient and accurate design insight in hot forming manufacturing process. JSTAMP/NV and LS-DYNA can become a robust combination set for complex hot forming analysis which needs thermo-mechanical and microstructural material modeling and various process modeling. The use of the new JSTAMP/NV function for multishot manufacturing process is shown good capabilities in cooling system evaluation. And the use of the advanced LS-DYNA microstructural phase transformation model is shown good evaluation results in martensite amount and Vickers hardness after quenching.

  7. A New Sheet Metal Forming System Based on Incremental Punching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yuanxin

    Stamping is one of the most commonly used manufacturing processes. Everyday, millions of parts are formed by this process. The conventional stamping is to form a part in one or several operations with a press machine and a set/sets of dies. It is very efficient but is not cost effective for small batch production parts and prototypes as the dies are expensive and time consuming to make. Recently, with the increasing demands for low-volume and customer-made products, a die-less forming method, Incremental Sheet Metal Forming (ISMF), has become one of the leading R&D topics in the industry. ISMF uses a small generic tool to apply a sequence of operations along the given path to deform the sheet incrementally. These small deformations accumulate to form the final shape of the part. As a result, different parts can be made by the same setup. Despite of some 30 years of research and development, however, ISMF technology is still premature for industrial applications due to the following reasons: The accuracy of the part is limited; the surface roughness is poor; and the productivity is low. This motivates the presented research. In this research, a new incremental forming system based on incremental punching is designed and built. The system consists of a 3-axes CNC platform, a high speed hydraulic cylinder with a hemispherical forming tool, and a PC-based CNC control system. The hydraulic system provides the forming force to deform the sheet metal with constant stokes, while the CNC system positions the part. When forming a part, the forming tool punches the sheet metal along the given contour of the part punch by punch; when one layer of the part is completed, the forming tool moves down to the next layer; and the process is finished till all layers are completed. The CNC control system works with standard NC code, and hence, is easy to use. In order to ensure the desirable performance of the machine, dynamic analysis of the machine is necessary. The analysis is

  8. Van der Waals Interactions in Density Functional Theory: Intermolecular Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannemann, Felix; Becke, Axel

    2010-03-01

    Conventional density functional theory (GGA and hybrid functionals) fails to account for dispersion interactions and is therefore not applicable to systems where van der Waals interactions play a dominant role, such as intermolecular complexes and biomolecules. The exchange-hole dipole moment (XDM) dispersion model of Becke and Johnson [A. D. Becke and E. R. Johnson, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 154108 (2007)] corrects for this deficiency. We have previously shown that the XDM dispersion model can be combined with standard GGA functionals (PW86 for exchange and PBE for correlation) to give accurate binding energy curves for rare-gas diatomics [F. O. Kannemann and A. D. Becke, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 5, 719 (2009)]. Here we present further tests of the GGA-XDM method using benchmark sets including hydrogen bonding, electrostatic, dispersion and stacking interactions, and systems ranging from rare-gas diatomics to biomolecular complexes.

  9. Enhanced Two-Stage Reactive Polymer Network Forming Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Devatha P.; Cramer, Neil B.; McBride, Matthew K.; Gaipa, John C.; Shandas, Robin; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we develop thiol/acrylate two-stage reactive network forming polymer systems that exhibit two distinct and orthogonal stages of curing. Using a thiol-acrylate system with excess acrylate functional groups, a first stage polymer network is formed via a 1 to 1 stoichiometric thiol-acrylate Michael addition reaction (stage 1). At a later point in time, the excess acrylate functional groups are homopolymerized via a photoinitiated free radical polymerization to form a second stage polymer network (stage 2). By varying the monomers within the system as well as the stoichiometery of the thiol to acrylate functional groups, we demonstrate the ability of the two-stage polymer network forming systems to encompass a wide range of properties at the end of both the stage 1 and stage 2 polymerizations. Using urethane di- and hexa-acrylates within the formulations led to two-stage reactive polymeric systems with stage 1 Tgs that ranged from −12 to 30 °C. The systems were then photocured, upon which the Tg of the systems increases by up to 90 °C while also achieving a nearly 20 fold modulus increase. PMID:22798700

  10. Orthogonal canonical forms for second-order systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Trevor; Laub, Alan J.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that a linear second-order system with arbitrary damping cannot be reduced to Hessenberg-triangular form by means of orthogonal transformations. However, it is also shown that such an orthogonal reduction is always possible for the modal damping commonly assumed for models of flexible structures. It is shown that modally damped models can be orthogonally reduced to a new triangular second-order Schur form.

  11. Spray forming system for producing molds, dies and related tooling

    DOEpatents

    McHugh, Kevin M.

    2000-01-01

    A system for the spray forming manufacturing of near-net-shape molds, dies and related toolings, wherein liquid material such as molten metal, metallic alloys, or polymers are atomized into fine droplets by a high temperature, high velocity gas and deposited onto a pattern. Quenching of the atomized droplets provides a heat sink, thereby allowing undercooled and partially solidified droplets to be formed in-flight. Composites can be formed by combining the atomized droplets with solid particles such as powders, whiskers or fibers.

  12. Frontier orbital symmetry control of intermolecular electron transfer. Final report, September 15, 1988--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, B.

    1997-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics: the recovery of intermolecular transfer parameters from fluorescence quenching in liquids; photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer in flexible donor/space/acceptor systems containing an extended unsaturated spacer; electron transfer sensitized reaction; the recovery of solute and fractal dimensions from electron transfer quenching data; and frontier orbital symmetry control of back electron transfer.

  13. Intermolecular vibrations and fast relaxations in supercooled ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Mauro C. C.

    2011-06-01

    Short-time dynamics of ionic liquids has been investigated by low-frequency Raman spectroscopy (4 < ω < 100 cm-1) within the supercooled liquid range. Raman spectra are reported for ionic liquids with the same anion, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, and different cations: 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium, 1-butyl-1-methylpiperidinium, trimethylbutylammonium, and tributylmethylammonium. It is shown that low-frequency Raman spectroscopy provides similar results as optical Kerr effect (OKE) spectroscopy, which has been used to study intermolecular vibrations in ionic liquids. The comparison of ionic liquids containing aromatic and non-aromatic cations identifies the characteristic feature in Raman spectra usually assigned to librational motion of the imidazolium ring. The strength of the fast relaxations (quasi-elastic scattering, QES) and the intermolecular vibrational contribution (boson peak) of ionic liquids with non-aromatic cations are significantly lower than imidazolium ionic liquids. A correlation length assigned to the boson peak vibrations was estimated from the frequency of the maximum of the boson peak and experimental data of sound velocity. The correlation length related to the boson peak (˜19 Å) does not change with the length of the alkyl chain in imidazolium cations, in contrast to the position of the first-sharp diffraction peak observed in neutron and X-ray scattering measurements of ionic liquids. The rate of change of the QES intensity in the supercooled liquid range is compared with data of excess entropy, free volume, and mean-squared displacement recently reported for ionic liquids. The temperature dependence of the QES intensity in ionic liquids illustrates relationships between short-time dynamics and long-time structural relaxation that have been proposed for glass-forming liquids.

  14. Advanced manufacturing by spray forming: Aluminum strip and microelectromechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    McHugh, K.M.

    1994-12-31

    Spray forming is an advanced materials processing technology that converts a bulk liquid metal to a near-net-shape solid by depositing atomized droplets onto a suitably shaped substrate. By combining rapid solidification processing with product shape control, spray forming can reduce manufacturing costs while improving product quality. INEL is developing a unique spray-forming method based on de Laval (converging/diverging) nozzle designs to produce near-net-shape solids and coatings of metals, polymers, and composite materials. Properties of the spray-formed material are tailored by controlling the characteristics of the spray plume and substrate. Two examples are described: high-volume production of aluminum alloy strip, and the replication of micron-scale features in micropatterned polymers during the production of microelectromechanical systems.

  15. Glassy behavior of two-dimensional stripe-forming systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro Teixeira, Ana C.; Stariolo, Daniel A.; Barci, Daniel G.

    2013-06-01

    We study two-dimensional frustrated but nondisordered systems applying a replica approach to a stripe-forming model with competing interactions. The phenomenology of the model is representative of several well-known systems, like high-Tc superconductors and ultrathin ferromagnetic films, which have been the subject of intense research. We establish the existence of a glass transition to a nonergodic regime accompanied by an exponential number of long-lived metastable states, responsible for slow dynamics and nonequilibrium effects.

  16. Influence of intermolecular interactions on solid state luminescence of imidazopyridines: theoretical interpretations using FMO-TDDFT and ONIOM approaches.

    PubMed

    Shigemitsu, Yasuhiro; Mutai, Toshiki; Houjou, Hirohiko; Araki, Koji

    2014-07-28

    6-Cyano-2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)imidazo[1,2-a]-pyridine (6CN-HPIP) shows polymorph-dependent luminescence with the three different crystal forms exhibiting the packing-controlled tuning of bright colors, orange, yellow, and red. The distinctive emission in aggregated states was treated with finite cluster models and analyzed by means of quantum chemistry calculations. The influence of structural displacements and intermolecular interactions in the crystalline state on solid state luminescence was examined in detail using the Fragment Molecular Orbital (FMO) scheme, suitable for studies of aggregated molecular systems. The FMO pair interaction analysis of the S1-S0 emission maxima indicated that the intermolecular side-to-side interactions cause hypsochromic shifts; facial interactions induce bathochromic shifts; and crystal packing effects in total induce hypsochromic shifts. The FMO predictions of the emission maxima offered qualitatively satisfactory agreements with the experiments. However, the small cluster models including up to 17 molecules did not reach quantitative convergence, i.e., the emission colour order among them was not well reproduced. PMID:24598819

  17. Resolving Intra- and Inter-Molecular Structure with Non-Contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Samuel Paul

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in molecular investigations at surfaces has been to image individual molecules, and the assemblies they form, with single-bond resolution. Scanning probe microscopy, with its exceptionally high resolution, is ideally suited to this goal. With the introduction of methods exploiting molecularly-terminated tips, where the apex of the probe is, for example, terminated with a single CO, Xe or H2 molecule, scanning probe methods can now achieve higher resolution than ever before. In this review, some of the landmark results related to attaining intramolecular resolution with non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) are summarised before focussing on recent reports probing molecular assemblies where apparent intermolecular features have been observed. Several groups have now highlighted the critical role that flexure in the tip-sample junction plays in producing the exceptionally sharp images of both intra- and apparent inter-molecular structure. In the latter case, the features have been identified as imaging artefacts, rather than real intermolecular bonds. This review discusses the potential for NC-AFM to provide exceptional resolution of supramolecular assemblies stabilised via a variety of intermolecular forces and highlights the potential challenges and pitfalls involved in interpreting bonding interactions. PMID:26307976

  18. Resolving Intra- and Inter-Molecular Structure with Non-Contact Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Samuel Paul

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in molecular investigations at surfaces has been to image individual molecules, and the assemblies they form, with single-bond resolution. Scanning probe microscopy, with its exceptionally high resolution, is ideally suited to this goal. With the introduction of methods exploiting molecularly-terminated tips, where the apex of the probe is, for example, terminated with a single CO, Xe or H2 molecule, scanning probe methods can now achieve higher resolution than ever before. In this review, some of the landmark results related to attaining intramolecular resolution with non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) are summarised before focussing on recent reports probing molecular assemblies where apparent intermolecular features have been observed. Several groups have now highlighted the critical role that flexure in the tip-sample junction plays in producing the exceptionally sharp images of both intra- and apparent inter-molecular structure. In the latter case, the features have been identified as imaging artefacts, rather than real intermolecular bonds. This review discusses the potential for NC-AFM to provide exceptional resolution of supramolecular assemblies stabilised via a variety of intermolecular forces and highlights the potential challenges and pitfalls involved in interpreting bonding interactions. PMID:26307976

  19. X-ray Intermolecular Structure Factor (XISF): separation of intra- and intermolecular interactions from total X-ray scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, Q.; Benmore, C. J.; Yarger, J. L.

    2015-06-01

    XISF is a MATLAB program developed to separate intermolecular structure factors from total X-ray scattering structure factors for molecular liquids and amorphous solids. The program is built on a trust-region-reflective optimization routine with the r.m.s. deviations of atoms physically constrained. XISF has been optimized for performance and can separate intermolecular structure factors of complex molecules.

  20. Are polymers standard glass-forming systems? The role of intramolecular barriers on the glass-transition phenomena of glass-forming polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmenero, J.

    2015-03-01

    Traditionally, polymer melts have been considered archetypal glass-formers. This has been mainly due to the fact that these systems can easily be obtained as glasses by cooling from the melt, even at low cooling rates. However, the macromolecules, i.e. the structural units of polymer systems in general, are rather different from the standard molecules. They are long objects (‘chains’) made by repetition of a given chemical motif (monomer) and have intra-macromolecular barriers that limit their flexibility. The influence of these properties on, for instance, the glass-transition temperature of polymers, is a topic that has been widely studied by the polymer community almost from the early times of polymer science. However, in the framework of the glass-community, the relevant influence of intra-macromolecular barriers and chain connectivity on glass-transition phenomena of polymers has started to be recognized only recently. The aim of this review is to give an overview and to critically revise the results reported on this topic over the last years. From these results, it seems to be evident that there are two different mechanisms involved in the dynamic arrest in glass-forming polymers: (i) the intermolecular packing effects, which dominate the dynamic arrest of low molecular weight glass-forming systems; and (ii) the effect of intra-macromolecular barriers combined with chain connectivity. It has also been shown that the mode coupling theory (MCT) is a suitable theoretical framework to discuss these questions. The values found for polymers for the central MCT parameter—the so-called λ-exponent—are of the order of 0.9, clearly higher than the standard values (λ ≈ 0.7) found in systems where the dynamic arrest is mainly driven by packing effects (‘standard’ glass-formers). Within the MCT, this is a signature of the presence of two competing mechanisms of dynamic arrest, as it has been observed in short-ranged attractive colloids or two component

  1. Are polymers standard glass-forming systems? The role of intramolecular barriers on the glass-transition phenomena of glass-forming polymers.

    PubMed

    Colmenero, J

    2015-03-18

    Traditionally, polymer melts have been considered archetypal glass-formers. This has been mainly due to the fact that these systems can easily be obtained as glasses by cooling from the melt, even at low cooling rates. However, the macromolecules, i.e. the structural units of polymer systems in general, are rather different from the standard molecules. They are long objects ('chains') made by repetition of a given chemical motif (monomer) and have intra-macromolecular barriers that limit their flexibility. The influence of these properties on, for instance, the glass-transition temperature of polymers, is a topic that has been widely studied by the polymer community almost from the early times of polymer science. However, in the framework of the glass-community, the relevant influence of intra-macromolecular barriers and chain connectivity on glass-transition phenomena of polymers has started to be recognized only recently. The aim of this review is to give an overview and to critically revise the results reported on this topic over the last years. From these results, it seems to be evident that there are two different mechanisms involved in the dynamic arrest in glass-forming polymers: (i) the intermolecular packing effects, which dominate the dynamic arrest of low molecular weight glass-forming systems; and (ii) the effect of intra-macromolecular barriers combined with chain connectivity. It has also been shown that the mode coupling theory (MCT) is a suitable theoretical framework to discuss these questions. The values found for polymers for the central MCT parameter--the so-called λ-exponent--are of the order of 0.9, clearly higher than the standard values (λ ≈ 0.7) found in systems where the dynamic arrest is mainly driven by packing effects ('standard' glass-formers). Within the MCT, this is a signature of the presence of two competing mechanisms of dynamic arrest, as it has been observed in short-ranged attractive colloids or two component mixtures with

  2. Intermolecular interactions of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasensky, Joshua; Junaid Farooqi, M.; Urayama, Paul

    2008-10-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD^+/NADH) is a coenzyme involved in cellular respiration as an electron transporter. In aqueous solution, the molecule exhibits a folding transition characterized by the stacking of its aromatic moieties. A transition to an unfolded conformation is possible using chemical denaturants like methanol. Because the reduced NADH form is fluorescent, the folding transition can be monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy, e.g., via a blue-shift in the UV-excited emission peak upon methanol unfolding. Here we present evidence of interactions between NADH molecules in solution. We measure the excited-state emission from NADH at various concentrations (1-100 μM in MOPS buffer, pH 7.5; 337-nm wavelength excitation). Unlike for the folded form, the emission peak wavelength of the unfolded form is concentration dependent, exhibiting a red-shift with higher NADH concentration, suggesting the presence of intermolecular interactions. An understanding of NADH spectra in solution would assist in interpreting intercellular NADH measurements used for the in vivo monitoring cellular energy metabolism.

  3. Intermolecular Sulfur···Oxygen Interactions: Theoretical and Statistical Investigations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejin; Gong, Zhen; Li, Jian; Lu, Tao

    2015-10-26

    Intermolecular S···O interactions are very common and are important in biological systems, but until recently, the presence of these contacts in protein-ligand systems largely depended on serendipitous discovery instead of rational design. Here we provide insight into the phenomenon of intermolecular S···O contacts by focusing on three sulfur-containing aromatic rings. Quantum mechanics is employed to characterize the strength and directionality of the S···O interactions and to determine their energy dependence on their geometric parameters. Protein Data Bank mining is performed to systematically determine the occurrence and geometry of intermolecular S···O interactions, and several representative examples are discussed. Three typical cases are investigated using a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach to demonstrate the potential of these interactions in improving binding affinities and physiochemical properties. Overall, our work elucidates the structures and energy features of intermolecular S···O interactions and addresses their use in molecular design. PMID:26393532

  4. Contrasting intermolecular and intramolecular exciplex formation of a 1,4-dicyano-2-methylnaphthalene-N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine dyad.

    PubMed

    Imoto, Mitsutaka; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Fujii, Takayuki; Taniguchi, Hisaji; Tamaki, Akihiro; Takeda, Motonori; Mizuno, Kazuhiko

    2010-05-01

    An intramolecular exciplex is formed upon excitation of the cyclohexane solution of the 1,4-dicyano-2-methylnaphthalene-N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine dyad, but little if any intramolecular CT complex exists in the ground state of this substance in solution. In contrast, in the crystalline state, the dyad forms an intermolecular mixed-stack CT complex in the ground state and an intermolecular exciplex when it is photoexcited. PMID:20353197

  5. Distinguishability and chiral stability in solution: Effects of decoherence and intermolecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Heekyung; Wardlaw, David M.; Frolov, Alexei M.

    2014-05-28

    We examine the effect of decoherence and intermolecular interactions (chiral discrimination energies) on the chiral stability and the distinguishability of initially pure versus mixed states in an open chiral system. Under a two-level approximation for a system, intermolecular interactions are introduced by a mean-field theory, and interaction between a system and an environment is modeled by a continuous measurement of a population difference between the two chiral states. The resultant equations are explored for various parameters, with emphasis on the combined effects of the initial condition of the system, the chiral discrimination energies, and the decoherence in determining: the distinguishability as measured by a population difference between the initially pure and mixed states, and the decoherence process; the chiral stability as measured by the purity decay; and the stationary state of the system at times long relative to the time scales of the system dynamics and of the environmental effects.

  6. Strong orbital interaction in a weak CH-π hydrogen bonding system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfu; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, the intermolecular orbital interaction between benzene and methane in the benzene-methane complex, a representative of weak interaction system, has been studied by us using ab initio calculations based on different methods and basis sets. Our results demonstrate obvious intermolecular orbital interaction between benzene and methane involving orbital overlaps including both occupied and unoccupied orbitals. Similar to interatomic orbital interaction, the intermolecular interaction of orbitals forms "bonding" and "antibonding" orbitals. In the interaction between occupied orbitals, the total energy of the complex increases because of the occupation of the antibonding orbital. The existence of the CH-π hydrogen bond between benzene and methane causes a decrease in rest energy level, leading to at least -1.51 kcal/mol intermolecular interaction energy. Our finding extends the concept of orbital interaction from the intramolecular to the intermolecular regime and gives a reliable explanation of the deep orbital reformation in the benzene-methane complex. PMID:26927609

  7. Propagation studies of metastable intermolecular composites (MIC).

    SciTech Connect

    Son, S. F.; Busse, J. R.; Asay, B. W.; Peterson, P. D.; Mang, J. T.; Bockmon, B.; Pantoya, M.

    2002-01-01

    Thermite materials are attractive energetic materials because the reactions are highly exothermic, have high energy densities, and high temperatures of combustion. However, the application of thermite materials has been limited because of the relative slow release of energy compared to other energetic materials. Engineered nano-scale composite energetic materials, such as Al/MoO{sub 3}, show promise for additional energetic material applications because they can react very rapidly. The composite material studied in this work consists of tailored, ultra-fine grain (30-200 nm diameter) aluminum particles that dramatically increase energy release rates of these thermite materials. These reactant clusters of fuel and oxidizer particles are in nearly atomic scale proximity to each other but are constrained from reaction until triggered. Despite the growing importance of nano-scale energetic materials, even the most basic combustion characteristics of these materials have not been thoroughly studied. This paper reports initial studies of the ignition and combustion of metastable intermolecular composites (MIC) materials. The goals were lo obtain an improved understanding of flame propagation mechanisms and combustion behaviors associated with nano-structured energetic materials. Information on issues such as reaction rate and behavior as a function of composition (mixture ratio), initial static charge, and particle size are essential and will allow scientists to design applications incorporating the benefits of these compounds. The materials have been characterized, specifically focusing on particle size, shape, distribution and morphology.

  8. [Form of the psyche. Psychoanalysis and recent systems theory].

    PubMed

    Simon, F B

    1994-01-01

    Modern systems theory is not concerned with objects but with the form of processes and structures. It is thus equipped to provide a unified theoretical framework for those varieties of phenomena that psychoanalysis has to deal with. The author discusses recent systems theory models and demonstrates the critique of epistemology that they by their nature imply. These models proceed from the process of observation and show that in the interaction between observers--say, analyst and analysand--observing each other observe, observation may either change or stabilise what is being observed. This is not without consequence for the way psychoanalysis envisions its own identity. Psychoanalysis can no longer naively apply "knowledge" in the traditional sense but must always be aware of the self-reflective nature of that knowledge. Its "application" is thus invariably a form of social intervention. PMID:8127976

  9. Minimum-variance fixed-form compensation of linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. L.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of determining the linear time-invariant compensator of a specified dimension which minimizes the asymptotic expected value of a quadratic form in the state variables of a linear stochastic system of arbitrary order, is considered. It is shown that under appropriate assumptions, the solution of this problem can be interpreted as a minimum-order observer-based or dual observer-based compensator for an optimally aggregated model of the plant.

  10. Intermolecular interactions in rifabutin-2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-water solutions, according to solubility data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anshakova, A. V.; Vinogradov, E. V.; Sedush, N. G.; Kurtikyan, T. S.; Zhokhov, S. S.; Polshakov, V. I.; Ermolenko, Yu. V.; Konyukhov, V. Yu.; Maksimenko, O. O.; Gelperin, S. E.

    2016-05-01

    The formulations of rifabutin (RB) and 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD), obtained using different preparation techniques, are studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry and molecular spectroscopy (FTIR, NMR, Raman scattering, and photon correlation light scattering). It is established that molecules of RB do not form inclusion complexes with the molecules of HP-β-CD, and an increase in the solubility of RB determined earlier is caused by the formation of weak intermolecular associates.

  11. Transformations of PTCDA structures on rutile TiO2 induced by thermal annealing and intermolecular forces.

    PubMed

    Godlewski, Szymon; Prauzner-Bechcicki, Jakub S; Glatzel, Thilo; Meyer, Ernst; Szymoński, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Transformations of molecular structures formed by perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) molecules on a rutile TiO2(110) surface are studied with low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy. We demonstrate that metastable molecular assemblies transform into differently ordered structures either due to additional energy provided by thermal annealing or when the influence of intermolecular forces is increased by the enlarged amount of deposited molecules. Proper adjustment of molecular coverage and substrate temperature during deposition allows for fabrication of desired assemblies. Differences between PTCDA/TiO2(110) and PTCDA/TiO2(011) systems obtained through identical experimental procedures are discussed. PMID:26199854

  12. Transformations of PTCDA structures on rutile TiO2 induced by thermal annealing and intermolecular forces

    PubMed Central

    Godlewski, Szymon; Glatzel, Thilo; Meyer, Ernst; Szymoński, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Summary Transformations of molecular structures formed by perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) molecules on a rutile TiO2(110) surface are studied with low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy. We demonstrate that metastable molecular assemblies transform into differently ordered structures either due to additional energy provided by thermal annealing or when the influence of intermolecular forces is increased by the enlarged amount of deposited molecules. Proper adjustment of molecular coverage and substrate temperature during deposition allows for fabrication of desired assemblies. Differences between PTCDA/TiO2(110) and PTCDA/TiO2(011) systems obtained through identical experimental procedures are discussed. PMID:26199854

  13. Control and monitoring method and system for electromagnetic forming process

    DOEpatents

    Kunerth, Dennis C.; Lassahn, Gordon D.

    1990-01-01

    A process, system, and improvement for a process for electromagnetic forming of a workpiece in which characteristics of the workpiece such as its geometry, electrical conductivity, quality, and magnetic permeability can be determined by monitoring the current and voltage in the workcoil. In an electromagnet forming process in which a power supply provides current to a workcoil and the electromagnetic field produced by the workcoil acts to form the workpiece, the dynamic interaction of the electromagnetic fields produced by the workcoil with the geometry, electrical conductivity, and magnetic permeability of the workpiece, provides information pertinent to the physical condition of the workpiece that is available for determination of quality and process control. This information can be obtained by deriving in real time the first several time derivatives of the current and voltage in the workcoil. In addition, the process can be extended by injecting test signals into the workcoil during the electromagnetic forming and monitoring the response to the test signals in the workcoil.

  14. Dimorphic intra- and intermolecular aryl motifs in symmetrical hexafaceted molecules (ArnX)3Y-Z-Y(XArn)3.

    PubMed

    Scudder, Marcia; Dance, Ian

    2002-12-01

    A variety of crystals containing molecules formulated generally as (ArnX)3Y-Z-Y(XArn)3 with exact or pseudo S6 symmetry have been analysed for the presence of intra- and intermolecular multiple aryl embraces composed of offset-face-to-face (OFF) and edge-to-face (EF) local motifs. Ar is phenyl or substituted phenyl; n = 1, 2 or 3; the linkage Z is linear diatomic, linear monatomic, absent (Y-Y bond), or void (Y atoms unconnected). Representative molecular systems analysed are (PhCH2)3Si-O-Si(CH2Ph)3, (PhCH2)3Sn-Sn(CH2Ph)3, (4-Me-C6H4CH2)3Ge-O-Ge(CH2C6H4-4-Me)3, [(PhS)3Fe-O-Fe(SPh)3]-, [(PhCH2)3P-Cu-P(CH2Ph)3]+ and [(Ph3P)3Ag-CN-Ag(PPh3)3]+. One characteristic intramolecular motif is a sixfold phenyl embrace (6PE) in which aryl groups fold back to the central domain of the molecule forming a rhombohedral box maintained by (EF)6. When the aryl groups are in exo positions there is an (EF)3 motif, like a tractor wheel, at each end of the molecule: [(Ph2N)3Ti-O-Ti(NPh2)3] possesses both intramolecular motifs as (EF)3-(EF)6-(EF)3. The molecules in this set are hexafaceted, and the crystal packing is generally based on intermolecular EF or OFF motifs with these faces, either from the central (EF)6 set or the end (EF)3-(EF)3 sets. Three types of subtle crystal packing isomerism occur: 1) the faces of the rhombohedral boxlike molecules slide over each other with variation of the intermolecular motifs, forming dimorphic crystals in space groups R3 or P1; 2) the faces of the tractor wheels (EF)3 slide over each other or 3) very similar molecules crystallise with the rhombohedral box or tractor wheel structures. In general the molecules considered are shape auspicious rather than shape awkward; solvent is included in a small proportion of the crystals and the crystal packing in these compounds is evidently efficient. Some principles for elaboration of these systems and the design of molecular crystal lattices are considered. PMID:12561318

  15. The origins of the directionality of noncovalent intermolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changwei; Guan, Liangyu; Danovich, David; Shaik, Sason; Mo, Yirong

    2016-01-01

    The recent σ-hole concept emphasizes the contribution of electrostatic attraction to noncovalent bonds, and implies that the electrostatic force has an angular dependency. Here a set of clusters, which includes hydrogen bonding, halogen bonding, chalcogen bonding, and pnicogen bonding systems, is investigated to probe the magnitude of covalency and its contribution to the directionality in noncovalent bonding. The study is based on the block-localized wavefunction (BLW) method that decomposes the binding energy into the steric and the charge transfer (CT) (hyperconjugation) contributions. One unique feature of the BLW method is its capability to derive optimal geometries with only steric effect taken into account, while excluding the CT interaction. The results reveal that the overall steric energy exhibits angular dependency notably in halogen bonding, chalcogen bonding, and pnicogen bonding systems. Turning on the CT interactions further shortens the intermolecular distances. This bond shortening enhances the Pauli repulsion, which in turn offsets the electrostatic attraction, such that in the final sum, the contribution of the steric effect to bonding is diminished, leaving the CT to dominate the binding energy. In several other systems particularly hydrogen bonding systems, the steric effect nevertheless still plays the major role whereas the CT interaction is minor. However, in all cases, the CT exhibits strong directionality, suggesting that the linearity or near linearity of noncovalent bonds is largely governed by the charge-transfer interaction whose magnitude determines the covalency in noncovalent bonds. PMID:26010349

  16. Portable Electron-Beam Free-Form Fabrication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J. Kevin; Petersen, Daniel D.; Taminger, Karen M.; Hafley, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    A portable electron-beam free-form fabrication (EB F3) system, now undergoing development, is intended to afford a capability for manufacturing metal parts in nearly net sizes and shapes. Although the development effort is oriented toward the eventual use of systems like this one to supply spare metal parts aboard spacecraft in flight, the basic system design could also be adapted to terrestrial applications in which there are requirements to supply spare parts on demand at locations remote from warehouses and conventional manufacturing facilities. Prior systems that have been considered for satisfying the same requirements (including prior free-form fabrication systems) are not easily portable because of their bulk and massive size. The mechanical properties of the components that such systems produce are often inferior to the mechanical properties of the corresponding original, conventionally fabricated components. In addition, the prior systems are not efficient in the utilization of energy and of feedstock. In contrast, the present developmental system is designed to be sufficiently compact and lightweight to be easily portable, to utilize both energy and material more efficiently, and to produce components that have mechanical properties approximating those of the corresponding original components. The developmental EB F3 system will include a vacuum chamber and associated vacuum pumps, an electron-beam gun and an associated power supply, a multiaxis positioning subsystem, a precise wire feeder, and an instrumentation system for monitoring and control. The electron-beam gun, positioning subsystem, and wire feeder will be located inside the vacuum chamber (see figure). The electron beam gun and the wire feeder will be mounted in fixed positions inside the domed upper portion of the vacuum chamber. The positioning subsystem and ports for the vacuum pumps will be located on a base that could be dropped down to provide full access to the interior of the chamber

  17. Interatomic (Intermolecular) Decay Processes in Clusters: Current Status and Outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Averbukh, V.; Cederbaum, L. S.

    2007-11-29

    Since their theoretical prediction a decade ago, interatomic (intermolecular) Coulombic decay (ICD) and related processes have been in the focus of intensive theoretical and experimental research. The spectacular progress in this direction has been stimulated both by the fundamental importance of the new electronic decay phenomena and by the exciting possibility of their practical application, for example in spectroscopy. We review the current status of the research of interatomic (intermolecular) decay phenomena in clusters and discuss some perspectives of this new field.

  18. Evolutionary meandering of intermolecular interactions along the drift barrier

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Michael; Hagner, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    Many cellular functions depend on highly specific intermolecular interactions, for example transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, microRNAs and their RNA binding sites, the interfaces between heterodimeric protein molecules, the stems in RNA molecules, and kinases and their response regulators in signal-transduction systems. Despite the need for complementarity between interacting partners, such pairwise systems seem to be capable of high levels of evolutionary divergence, even when subject to strong selection. Such behavior is a consequence of the diminishing advantages of increasing binding affinity between partners, the multiplicity of evolutionary pathways between selectively equivalent alternatives, and the stochastic nature of evolutionary processes. Because mutation pressure toward reduced affinity conflicts with selective pressure for greater interaction, situations can arise in which the expected distribution of the degree of matching between interacting partners is bimodal, even in the face of constant selection. Although biomolecules with larger numbers of interacting partners are subject to increased levels of evolutionary conservation, their more numerous partners need not converge on a single sequence motif or be increasingly constrained in more complex systems. These results suggest that most phylogenetic differences in the sequences of binding interfaces are not the result of adaptive fine tuning but a simple consequence of random genetic drift. PMID:25535374

  19. Evolutionary meandering of intermolecular interactions along the drift barrier.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Michael; Hagner, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    Many cellular functions depend on highly specific intermolecular interactions, for example transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, microRNAs and their RNA binding sites, the interfaces between heterodimeric protein molecules, the stems in RNA molecules, and kinases and their response regulators in signal-transduction systems. Despite the need for complementarity between interacting partners, such pairwise systems seem to be capable of high levels of evolutionary divergence, even when subject to strong selection. Such behavior is a consequence of the diminishing advantages of increasing binding affinity between partners, the multiplicity of evolutionary pathways between selectively equivalent alternatives, and the stochastic nature of evolutionary processes. Because mutation pressure toward reduced affinity conflicts with selective pressure for greater interaction, situations can arise in which the expected distribution of the degree of matching between interacting partners is bimodal, even in the face of constant selection. Although biomolecules with larger numbers of interacting partners are subject to increased levels of evolutionary conservation, their more numerous partners need not converge on a single sequence motif or be increasingly constrained in more complex systems. These results suggest that most phylogenetic differences in the sequences of binding interfaces are not the result of adaptive fine tuning but a simple consequence of random genetic drift. PMID:25535374

  20. Probing acid-amide intermolecular hydrogen bonding by NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Sachin Rama; Suryaprakash, N.

    2012-05-01

    Benzene carboxylic acids and benzamide act as their self-complement in molecular recognition to form inter-molecular hydrogen bonded dimers between amide and carboxylic acid groups, which have been investigated by 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy. Extensive NMR studies using diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY), variable temperature 1D, 2D NMR, established the formation of heterodimers of benzamide with benzoic acid, salicylic acid and phenyl acetic acid in deuterated chloroform solution. Association constants for the complex formation in the solution state have been determined. The results are ascertained by X-ray diffraction in the solid state. Intermolecular interactions in solution and in solid state were found to be similar. The structural parameters obtained by X-ray diffraction studies are compared with those obtained by DFT calculations.

  1. Polyelectrolyte brushes in mixed ionic medium studied via intermolecular forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, Robert; Laugel, Nicolas; Pincus, Philip; Tirrell, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    The vast uses and applications of polyelectrolyte brushes make them an attractive field of research especially with the growing interest in responsive materials. Polymers which respond via changes in temperature, pH, and ionic strength are increasingly being used for applications in drug delivery, chemical gating, etc. When polyelectrolyte brushes are found in either nature (e.g., surfaces of cartilage and mammalian lung interiors) or commercially (e.g., skin care products, shampoo, and surfaces of medical devices) they are always surrounded by mixed ionic medium. This makes the study of these brushes in varying ionic environments extremely relevant for both current and future potential applications. The polyelectrolyte brushes in this work are diblock co-polymers of poly-styrene sulfonate (N=420) and poly-t-butyl styrene (N=20) which tethers to a hydrophobic surface allowing for a purely thermodynamic study of the polyelectrolyte chains. Intermolecular forces between two brushes are measured using the SFA. As multi-valent concentrations are increased, the brushes collapse internally and form strong adhesion between one another after contact (properties not seen in a purely mono-valent environment).

  2. Comparison of interionic/intermolecular vibrational dynamics between ionic liquids and concentrated electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Tomotsumi; Nishikawa, Keiko; Shirota, Hideaki

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we have compared the interionic/intermolecular vibrational dynamics of ionic liquids (ILs) and concentrated electrolyte solutions measured by femtosecond optically heterodyne-detected Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy. A typical anion in ILs, bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ([NTf2]-), has been chosen as the anion for the sample ILs and concentrated electrolyte solutions. ILs used in this study are 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium, 1-butylpyridinium, N-butyl-N,N,N-triethylammonium, and 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium with [NTf2]-. Li[NTf2] solutions (˜3.3M) of water, methanol, propylene carbonate, and poly(ethylene glycol) have been selected as control samples. Kerr transients of the ILs and electrolyte solutions show intra- and interionic/intermolecular vibrational dynamics followed by slow picosecond overdamped relaxation. Fourier transform Kerr spectra have shown a difference in the relative intensities of intraionic vibrational bands of [NTf2]- (280-350 cm-1) between the ILs and electrolyte solutions. The origin of the difference is attributed to the change in the conformational equilibrium between cisoid and transoid forms of [NTf2]-, which is caused by a favorable stabilization of dipolar cisoid form due to Li+ and dipolar solvent molecules in the electrolyte solutions. Low-frequency Kerr spectra (0-200 cm-1) exhibit unique features with the variation of cation and solvent species. The aromatic ILs have a prominent high-frequency librational motion at about 100 cm-1 in contrast to the case for the nonaromatic ones. The common structure of the spectra observed at about 20 cm-1 likely comes from an interionic motion of [NTf2]-. The nonaromatic ILs allow a fair comparison with the electrolyte solutions of propylene carbonate and poly(ethylene glycol) because of the structural similarities. The comparison based on the first moment of the interionic/intermolecular vibrational spectrum suggests the stronger interionic/intermolecular interaction in

  3. Comparison of interionic/intermolecular vibrational dynamics between ionic liquids and concentrated electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Tomotsumi; Nishikawa, Keiko; Shirota, Hideaki

    2009-12-28

    In this study, we have compared the interionic/intermolecular vibrational dynamics of ionic liquids (ILs) and concentrated electrolyte solutions measured by femtosecond optically heterodyne-detected Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy. A typical anion in ILs, bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ([NTf(2)](-)), has been chosen as the anion for the sample ILs and concentrated electrolyte solutions. ILs used in this study are 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium, 1-butylpyridinium, N-butyl-N,N,N-triethylammonium, and 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium with [NTf(2)](-). Li[NTf(2)] solutions (approximately 3.3 M) of water, methanol, propylene carbonate, and poly(ethylene glycol) have been selected as control samples. Kerr transients of the ILs and electrolyte solutions show intra- and interionic/intermolecular vibrational dynamics followed by slow picosecond overdamped relaxation. Fourier transform Kerr spectra have shown a difference in the relative intensities of intraionic vibrational bands of [NTf(2)](-) (280-350 cm(-1)) between the ILs and electrolyte solutions. The origin of the difference is attributed to the change in the conformational equilibrium between cisoid and transoid forms of [NTf(2)](-), which is caused by a favorable stabilization of dipolar cisoid form due to Li(+) and dipolar solvent molecules in the electrolyte solutions. Low-frequency Kerr spectra (0-200 cm(-1)) exhibit unique features with the variation of cation and solvent species. The aromatic ILs have a prominent high-frequency librational motion at about 100 cm(-1) in contrast to the case for the nonaromatic ones. The common structure of the spectra observed at about 20 cm(-1) likely comes from an interionic motion of [NTf(2)](-). The nonaromatic ILs allow a fair comparison with the electrolyte solutions of propylene carbonate and poly(ethylene glycol) because of the structural similarities. The comparison based on the first moment of the interionic/intermolecular vibrational spectrum suggests the

  4. Evidence for a strong intermolecular bond in the phenolṡN2 cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. R.; Geppert, W. D.; Chapman, D. M.; Watkins, M. J.; Dessent, C. E. H.; Cockett, M. C. R.; Müller-Dethlefs, K.

    1998-12-01

    The phenolṡN2 complex cation has been studied with a combination of two-color resonant zero kinetic energy (ZEKE) and mass analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopies to probe the interaction of a polar cation with a quadrupolar solvent molecule. Extended vibrational progressions are observed in three modes which are assigned as the in-plane bend (35 cm-1), the stretch (117 cm-1), and in-plane wag (130 cm-1) intermolecular vibrations, and are consistent with a structure where the N2 forms a directional bond to the phenol OH group in the plane of the aromatic ring. Ab initio calculations at the UMP2/6-31G*, UHF/cc-pVDZ, and UMP2/cc-pVDZ levels of theory support this assignment. The spectra also provide a value for the adiabatic ionization energy (67 423 cm-1±4.5 cm-1) and an estimate of the dissociation energy of the cluster (1650±20 cm-1) which illustrate that the quadrupolar nitrogen molecule binds considerably more strongly to the phenol cation than a rare gas atom. These results constitute the first report of an aromaticṡN2 complex where the interaction can be described in terms of weak hydrogen bonding, rather than in terms of a van der Waals bond to the π-system of the benzene ring.

  5. Simulation of Absorption Systems in Flexible and Modular Form

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-09-23

    The computer code has been developed for simulation of absorption systems at steady-state in a flexible and modular form, making it possible to investigate various cycle configurations with different working fluids. The code is based on unit subroutines containing the governing equations for the system''s components. When all the equations have been established, a mathematical solver routine is employed to solve them simultaneously. Property subroutines contained in a separate data base serve to provide thermodynamicmore » properties of the working fluids. The code is user-oriented and requires a relatively simple input containing the given operating conditions and the working fluid at each state point. the user conveys to the computer an image of the cycle by specifying the different components and their interconnections. Based on this information, the program calculates the temperature, flowrate, concentration, pressure and vapor fraction at each state point in the system and the heat duty at each unit, from which the coefficient of performance may be determined. A graphical user-interface is provided to facilitate interactive input and study of the output.« less

  6. Interpreting the widespread nonlinear force spectra of intermolecular bonds

    PubMed Central

    Friddle, Raymond W.; Noy, Aleksandr; De Yoreo, James J.

    2012-01-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy probes the strength, lifetime, and energetic details of intermolecular interactions in a simple experiment. A growing number of these studies have reported distinctly nonlinear trends in rupture force with loading rate that are typically explained in conventional models by invoking complex escape pathways. Recent analyses suggested that these trends should be expected even for simple barriers based on the basic assumptions of bond rupture dynamics and thus may represent the norm rather than the exception. Here we explore how these nonlinear trends reflect the two fundamental regimes of bond rupture: (i) a near-equilibrium regime, produced either by bond reforming in the case of a single bond or by asynchronized rupture of multiple individual bonds, and (ii) a kinetic regime produced by fast, non-equilibrium bond rupture. We analyze both single- and multi-bonded cases, describe the full evolution of the system as it transitions between near- and far-from-equilibrium loading regimes, and show that both interpretations produce essentially identical force spectra. Data from 10 different molecular systems show that this model provides a comprehensive description of force spectra for a diverse suite of bonds over experimentally relevant loading rates, removes the inconsistencies of previous interpretations of transition state distances, and gives ready access to both kinetic and thermodynamic information about the interaction. These results imply that single-molecule binding free energies for a vast number of bonds have already been measured. PMID:22869712

  7. The speakers' bureau system: a form of peer selling.

    PubMed

    Reid, Lynette; Herder, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    In the speakers' bureau system, physicians are recruited and trained by pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device companies to deliver information about products to other physicians, in exchange for a fee. Using publicly available disclosures, we assessed the thesis that speakers' bureau involvement is not a feature of academic medicine in Canada, by estimating the prevalence of participation in speakers' bureaus among Canadian faculty in one medical specialty, cardiology. We analyzed the relevant features of an actual contract made public by the physician addressee and applied the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) guidelines on physician-industry relations to participation in a speakers' bureau. We argue that speakers' bureau participation constitutes a form of peer selling that should be understood to contravene the prohibition on product endorsement in the CMA Code of Ethics. Academic medical institutions, in conjunction with regulatory colleges, should continue and strengthen their policies to address participation in speakers' bureaus. PMID:24348883

  8. System and method for accumulative double sided incremental forming

    DOEpatents

    Cao, Jian; Malhotra, Rajiv

    2015-10-27

    A forming system includes first and second tools, moving assemblies, and a control unit. The moving assemblies move the first tool and the second tool relative to the sheet. The control unit is configured to control movement of the first tool and the second tool by the one or more moving assemblies by moving at least one of the first tool or the second tool in a first deformation direction to deform the sheet, then moving the first and second tools laterally relative to the sheet to a subsequent location while engaging the sheet, then moving at least one of the first tool or the second tool in the first deformation direction or an opposite second deformation direction to deform the sheet, and then continue moving the first and second tools to deform the sheet in order to create a three-dimensional component from the sheet.

  9. Detection of the water reservoir in a forming planetary system.

    PubMed

    Hogerheijde, Michiel R; Bergin, Edwin A; Brinch, Christian; Cleeves, L Ilsedore; Fogel, Jeffrey K J; Blake, Geoffrey A; Dominik, Carsten; Lis, Dariusz C; Melnick, Gary; Neufeld, David; Panić, Olja; Pearson, John C; Kristensen, Lars; Yildiz, Umut A; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2011-10-21

    Icy bodies may have delivered the oceans to the early Earth, yet little is known about water in the ice-dominated regions of extrasolar planet-forming disks. The Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared on board the Herschel Space Observatory has detected emission lines from both spin isomers of cold water vapor from the disk around the young star TW Hydrae. This water vapor likely originates from ice-coated solids near the disk surface, hinting at a water ice reservoir equivalent to several thousand Earth oceans in mass. The water's ortho-to-para ratio falls well below that of solar system comets, suggesting that comets contain heterogeneous ice mixtures collected across the entire solar nebula during the early stages of planetary birth. PMID:22021851

  10. The speakers’ bureau system: a form of peer selling

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Lynette; Herder, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In the speakers’ bureau system, physicians are recruited and trained by pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device companies to deliver information about products to other physicians, in exchange for a fee. Using publicly available disclosures, we assessed the thesis that speakers’ bureau involvement is not a feature of academic medicine in Canada, by estimating the prevalence of participation in speakers’ bureaus among Canadian faculty in one medical specialty, cardiology. We analyzed the relevant features of an actual contract made public by the physician addressee and applied the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) guidelines on physician–industry relations to participation in a speakers’ bureau. We argue that speakers’ bureau participation constitutes a form of peer selling that should be understood to contravene the prohibition on product endorsement in the CMA Code of Ethics. Academic medical institutions, in conjunction with regulatory colleges, should continue and strengthen their policies to address participation in speakers’ bureaus. PMID:24348883

  11. An old disk still capable of forming a planetary system.

    PubMed

    Bergin, Edwin A; Cleeves, L Ilsedore; Gorti, Uma; Zhang, Ke; Blake, Geoffrey A; Green, Joel D; Andrews, Sean M; Evans, Neal J; Henning, Thomas; Oberg, Karin; Pontoppidan, Klaus; Qi, Chunhua; Salyk, Colette; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2013-01-31

    From the masses of the planets orbiting the Sun, and the abundance of elements relative to hydrogen, it is estimated that when the Solar System formed, the circumstellar disk must have had a minimum mass of around 0.01 solar masses within about 100 astronomical units of the star. (One astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance.) The main constituent of the disk, gaseous molecular hydrogen, does not efficiently emit radiation from the disk mass reservoir, and so the most common measure of the disk mass is dust thermal emission and lines of gaseous carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide emission generally indicates properties of the disk surface, and the conversion from dust emission to gas mass requires knowledge of the grain properties and the gas-to-dust mass ratio, which probably differ from their interstellar values. As a result, mass estimates vary by orders of magnitude, as exemplified by the relatively old (3-10 million years) star TW Hydrae, for which the range is 0.0005-0.06 solar masses. Here we report the detection of the fundamental rotational transition of hydrogen deuteride from the direction of TW Hydrae. Hydrogen deuteride is a good tracer of disk gas because it follows the distribution of molecular hydrogen and its emission is sensitive to the total mass. The detection of hydrogen deuteride, combined with existing observations and detailed models, implies a disk mass of more than 0.05 solar masses, which is enough to form a planetary system like our own. PMID:23364742

  12. Intermolecular Interactions and Cooperative Effects from Electronic Structure Calculations: An Effective Means for Developing Interaction Potentials for Condensed Phase Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2004-05-01

    The modeling of the macroscopic properties of homogeneous and inhomogeneous systems via atomistic simulations such as molecular dynamics (MD) or Monte Carlo (MC) techniques is based on the accurate description of the relevant solvent-solute and solvent-solvent intermolecular interactions. The total energy (U) of an n-body molecular system can be formally written as [1,2,3

  13. Determination of stepsize parameters for intermolecular vibrational energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Tardy, D.C.

    1992-03-01

    Intermolecular energy transfer of highly excited polyatomic molecules plays an important role in many complex chemical systems: combustion, high temperature and atmospheric chemistry. By monitoring the relaxation of internal energy we have observed trends in the collisional efficiency ({beta}) for energy transfer as a function of the substrate's excitation energy and the complexities of substrate and deactivator. For a given substrate {beta} increases as the deactivator's mass increase to {approximately}30 amu and then exhibits a nearly constant value; this is due to a mass mismatch between the atoms of the colliders. In a homologous series of substrate molecules (C{sub 3}{minus}C{sub 8}) {beta} decreases as the number of atoms in the substrate increases; replacing F with H increases {beta}. All substrates, except for CF{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and CF{sub 2}HCl below 10,000 cm{sup {minus}1}, exhibited that {beta} is independent of energy, i.e. <{Delta}E>{sub all} is linear with energy. The results are interpreted with a simple model which considers that {beta} is a function of the ocillators energy and its vibrational frequency. Limitations of current approximations used in high temperature unimolecular reactions were evaluated and better approximations were developed. The importance of energy transfer in product yields was observed for the photoactivation of perfluorocyclopropene and the photoproduction of difluoroethyne. 3 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Combined Electrostatics and Hydrogen Bonding Determine PIP2 Intermolecular Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Levental, Ilya; Cebers, Andrejs; Janmey, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Membrane lipids are active contributors to cell function as key mediators in signaling pathways of inflammation, apoptosis, migration, and proliferation. Recent work on multimolecular lipid structures suggests a critical role for lipid organization in regulating the function of both lipids and proteins. Of particular interest in this context are the polyphosphoinositides (PPI’s), specifically phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate (PIP2). The cellular functions of PIP2 are numerous but the factors controlling targeting of PIP2 to specific proteins and organization of PIP2 in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane remain poorly understood. To analyze the organization of PIP2 in a simplified planar system, we used Langmuir monolayers to study the effects of subphase conditions on monolayers of purified naturally derived PIP2 and other anionic or zwitterionic phospholipids. We report a significant molecular area expanding effect of subphase monovalent salts on PIP2 at biologically relevant surface densities. This effect is shown to be specific to PIP2 and independent of subphase pH. Chaotropic agents (e.g. salts, trehalose, urea, temperature) that disrupt water structure and the ability of water to mediate intermolecular hydrogen bonding also specifically expanded PIP2 monolayers. These results suggest a combination of water-mediated hydrogen bonding and headgroup charge in determining the organization of PIP2, and may provide an explanation for the unique functionality of PIP2 compared to other anionic phospholipids. PMID:18572937

  15. Intermolecular structure determination of amyloid fibrils with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bayro, Marvin J.; Debelouchina, Galia T.; Eddy, Matthew T.; Birkett, Neil R.; MacPhee, Catherine E.; Rosay, Melanie; Maas, Werner E.; Dobson, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    We describe magic-angle spinning NMR experiments designed to elucidate the interstrand architecture of amyloid fibrils. Three methods are introduced for this purpose, two being based on the analysis of long-range 13C-13C correlation spectra and a third based on the identification of intermolecular interactions in 13C-15N spectra. We show, in studies of fibrils formed by the 86-residue SH3 domain of PI3 kinase (PI3-SH3), that efficient 13C-13C correlation spectra display a resonance degeneracy that establishes a parallel, in-register alignment of the proteins in the amyloid fibrils. In addition, this degeneracy can be circumvented to yield direct intermolecular constraints. The 13C-13C experiments are corroborated by 15N-13C correlation spectrum obtained from a mixed [15N,12C]/[14N,13C] sample which directly quantifies interstrand distances. Furthermore, when the spectra are recorded with signal enhancement provided by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 100 K, we demonstrate a dramatic increase (from 23 to 52) in the number of intermolecular 15N-13C constraints present in the spectra. The increase in the information content is due to the enhanced signal intensities and to the fact that dynamic processes, leading to spectral intensity losses, are quenched at low temperatures. Thus, acquisition of low temperature spectra addresses a problem that is frequently encountered in MAS spectra of proteins. In total the experiments provide 111 intermolecular 13C-13C and 15N-13C constraints that establish that the PI3-SH3 protein strands are aligned in a parallel, in-register arrangement within the amyloid fibril. PMID:21774549

  16. Raft forming system-an upcoming approach of gastroretentive drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Vipul D; Jani, Girish K; Khutliwala, Tohra A; Zala, Bhumi S

    2013-06-10

    In recent era various technologies have been made in research and development of controlled release oral drug delivery system to overcome various physiological difficulties such as variation in gastric retention and emptying time. To overcome this drawback and to maximize the oral absorption of various drugs, novel drug delivery systems have been developed. Gastroretentive drug delivery system is facing many challenges which can be overcome by upcoming newly emerging approach i.e. raft forming system. The purpose of writing this review is to focus on recent development of stomach specific floating drug delivery system to circumvent the difficulties associated with formulation design. Various gastroretentive approaches that have been developed till now are also discussed. The present study provides valuable information & highlights advances in this raft forming system. This review attempts to discuss various factors like physiological factors, physicochemical factors and formulation factors to be considered in the development of the raft forming system. Different types of smart polymers used for their formulation have also been summarized. The review focuses on the mechanism, formulation and development of the raft forming system. This review also summarizes the studies to evaluate the performance and application of these systems. The study finally highlights advantages, disadvantages, and marketed preparation of the raft forming system. PMID:23500062

  17. New compact forms of the trigonometric Ruijsenaars-Schneider system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehér, L.; Kluck, T. J.

    2014-05-01

    The reduction of the quasi-Hamiltonian double of SU(n) that has been shown to underlie Ruijsenaars' compactified trigonometric n-body system is studied in its natural generality. The constraints contain a parameter y, restricted in previous works to 0forms of two qualitatively different types depending on the value of y. The type (i) cases are similar to the standard case in that the reduced phase space comes equipped with globally smooth action and position variables, and turns out to be symplectomorphic to CP as a Hamiltonian toric manifold. In the type (ii) cases both the position variables and the action variables develop singularities on a nowhere dense subset. A full classification is derived for the parameter y according to the type (i) versus type (ii) dichotomy. The simplest new type (i) systems, for which π/n

  18. Fast dynamics in glass forming systems: Vibrations vs relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, A.P.

    1997-12-31

    Two contributions specific for the spectra of the fast dynamics in glass forming systems, a broad quasielastic scattering and the boson peak, are analyzed. It is shown that the vibrational contribution (the boson peak) decreases strongly in fragile systems. Some speculations about dependence of the degree of fragility (a la Angell) on peculiarity of the spectrum of fast dynamics are presented. The existence of some intrinsic relation between the broad quasielastic contribution and the boson peak is demonstrated from analysis of the recent neutron and Raman scattering data. It is shown that this relation can be explained in framework of the model of damped oscillator. The model ascribes the quasielastic contribution to the scattering of light or neutrons on the vibrations around the boson peak, which are damped by some relaxation channel and have a quasielastic part in their response function. It is demonstrated that the model can explain many peculiar properties of the fast dynamics in the Raman, neutron and far-infrared absorption spectra.

  19. Study of intermolecular interactions in binary mixtures of ethanol in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharolkar, Aruna P.; Khirade, P. W.; Murugkar, A. G.

    2016-05-01

    Present paper deals with study of physicochemical properties like viscosity, density and refractive index for the binary mixtures of ethanol and methanol over the entire concentration range were measured at 298.15 K. The experimental data further used to determine the excess properties viz. excess molar volume, excess viscosity, excess molar refraction. The values of excess properties further fitted with Redlich-Kister (R-K Fit) equation to calculate the binary coefficients and standard deviation. The resulting excess parameters are used to indicate the presence of intermolecular interactions and strength of intermolecular interactions between the molecules in the binary mixtures. Excess parameters indicate structure making factor in the mixture predominates in the system.

  20. Tip relaxation in atomic force microscopy imaging simulations to resolve intermolecular bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alex; Sakai, Yuki; Chelikowsky, Jim

    Experimental noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies have reported distinct lines in regions with no electron density for a variety of systems. The appearance of these lines is unexpected because Pauli repulsion is thought to be the dominant factor in the AFM imaging mechanism. These lines have been proposed to represent intermolecular bonding. Recent theoretical studies have shown that accounting for tip probe relaxation can sharpen images and highlight features that make simulations more comparable to experiment. We will apply a similar tip relaxation scheme to our computational method-which uses an ab initio real-space pseudopotential formalism with frozen density embedding theory added-to the study of dibenzo[a,h]thianthrene and an 8-hydroxyquinoline dimer to develop our interpretation of imaged intermolecular bonds. Work is supported by the DOE under DOE/DE-FG02-06ER46286 and by the Welch Foundation under Grant F-1837. Computational resources were provided by NERSC and XSEDE.

  1. Intermolecular artifacts in probe microscope images of C60 assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Samuel Paul; Rashid, Mohammad Abdur; Sweetman, Adam; Leaf, Jeremy; Taylor, Simon; Moriarty, Philip; Dunn, Janette

    2015-12-01

    Claims that dynamic force microscopy has the capability to resolve intermolecular bonds in real space continue to be vigorously debated. To date, studies have been restricted to planar molecular assemblies with small separations between neighboring molecules. Here we report the observation of intermolecular artifacts over much larger distances in 2D assemblies of C60 molecules, with compelling evidence that in our case the tip apex is terminated by a C60 molecule (rather than the CO termination typically exploited in ultrahigh resolution force microscopy). The complete absence of directional interactions such as hydrogen or halogen bonding, the nonplanar structure of C60, and the fullerene termination of the tip apex in our case highlight that intermolecular artifacts are ubiquitous in dynamic force microscopy.

  2. Qualitative change of character of dispersive interaction with intermolecular distance.

    PubMed

    Haslmayr, Johannes; Renger, Thomas

    2013-07-28

    The dispersive interaction between molecules results from Coulomb-correlated fluctuations of electrons and for large intermolecular distances it can be related to the molecular polarizabilities as in London's theory (F. London, Trans. Faraday Soc. 33, 8-26 (1937)). Here, we investigate the interaction between molecules with anisotropic polarizabilities at arbitrary distances using symmetry adapted perturbation theory, which allows us to analyze the different parts of the intermolecular potential separately. Whereas at large distances, in accordance with London's theory, there is no way to describe the dispersive interaction by a sum over pairwise isotropic atom-centered energy terms, at short distances such a description becomes possible. This surprising result has consequences for the development of molecular mechanics force fields, supports the dispersion energy terms applied in dispersion corrected density functional theory, and indicates that there is a qualitative change in electron correlation with distance. Apparently, at short distances intermolecular electron correlation is less influenced by intramolecular electron delocalization. PMID:23901956

  3. Visualizing coherent intermolecular dipole-dipole coupling in real space.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Luo, Yang; Zhang, Yao; Yu, Yun-Jie; Kuang, Yan-Min; Zhang, Li; Meng, Qiu-Shi; Luo, Yi; Yang, Jin-Long; Dong, Zhen-Chao; Hou, J G

    2016-03-31

    Many important energy-transfer and optical processes, in both biological and artificial systems, depend crucially on excitonic coupling that spans several chromophores. Such coupling can in principle be described in a straightforward manner by considering the coherent intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions involved. However, in practice, it is challenging to directly observe in real space the coherent dipole coupling and the related exciton delocalizations, owing to the diffraction limit in conventional optics. Here we demonstrate that the highly localized excitations that are produced by electrons tunnelling from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, in conjunction with imaging of the resultant luminescence, can be used to map the spatial distribution of the excitonic coupling in well-defined arrangements of a few zinc-phthalocyanine molecules. The luminescence patterns obtained for excitons in a dimer, which are recorded for different energy states and found to resemble σ and π molecular orbitals, reveal the local optical response of the system and the dependence of the local optical response on the relative orientation and phase of the transition dipoles of the individual molecules in the dimer. We generate an in-line arrangement up to four zinc-phthalocyanine molecules, with a larger total transition dipole, and show that this results in enhanced 'single-molecule' superradiance from the oligomer upon site-selective excitation. These findings demonstrate that our experimental approach provides detailed spatial information about coherent dipole-dipole coupling in molecular systems, which should enable a greater understanding and rational engineering of light-harvesting structures and quantum light sources. PMID:27029277

  4. Visualizing coherent intermolecular dipole–dipole coupling in real space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Luo, Yang; Zhang, Yao; Yu, Yun-Jie; Kuang, Yan-Min; Zhang, Li; Meng, Qiu-Shi; Luo, Yi; Yang, Jin-Long; Dong, Zhen-Chao; Hou, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    Many important energy-transfer and optical processes, in both biological and artificial systems, depend crucially on excitonic coupling that spans several chromophores. Such coupling can in principle be described in a straightforward manner by considering the coherent intermolecular dipole–dipole interactions involved. However, in practice, it is challenging to directly observe in real space the coherent dipole coupling and the related exciton delocalizations, owing to the diffraction limit in conventional optics. Here we demonstrate that the highly localized excitations that are produced by electrons tunnelling from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, in conjunction with imaging of the resultant luminescence, can be used to map the spatial distribution of the excitonic coupling in well-defined arrangements of a few zinc-phthalocyanine molecules. The luminescence patterns obtained for excitons in a dimer, which are recorded for different energy states and found to resemble σ and π molecular orbitals, reveal the local optical response of the system and the dependence of the local optical response on the relative orientation and phase of the transition dipoles of the individual molecules in the dimer. We generate an in-line arrangement up to four zinc-phthalocyanine molecules, with a larger total transition dipole, and show that this results in enhanced ‘single-molecule’ superradiance from the oligomer upon site-selective excitation. These findings demonstrate that our experimental approach provides detailed spatial information about coherent dipole–dipole coupling in molecular systems, which should enable a greater understanding and rational engineering of light-harvesting structures and quantum light sources.

  5. Effect of the electronic structure of quinoline and its derivatives on the capacity for intermolecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Privalova, N.Yu.; Sokolova, I.V.

    1985-05-01

    Calculations of the ground and excited states of quinoline and its 20H-, 70H-, 7NH2-, 7N(CH3)2-, and 7N(C2H5)2- substituted derivatives were undertaken by the INDO method, and the effect of intramolecular proton transfer (IPT) on their electronic structure was studied. The proton-accepting capacity of the compounds for intermolecular interactions was estimated by the molecular electrostatic potential method. It was shown that the proton-accepting capacity with respect to intermolecular interactions increases during the tautomeric transformation of the enolic form of 2-OH-quinoline to its keto form. The change in the basicity of the two forms of the molecules is affected by the orbital nature, and the multiplicity of the state is also important for the keto form. Substitution by electron-donating groups leads to increase in the proton-accepting capacity of both forms of the compounds in the S0, S/sub */, and T/sub */ states.

  6. Intermolecular Vibrational Modes Speed Up Singlet Fission in Perylenediimide Crystals.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Nicolas; Grozema, Ferdinand C

    2015-02-01

    We report numerical simulations based on a non-Markovian density matrix propagation scheme of singlet fission (SF) in molecular crystals. Ab initio electronic structure calculations were used to parametrize the exciton and phonon Hamiltonian as well as the interactions between the exciton and the intramolecular and intermolecular vibrational modes. We demonstrate that the interactions of the exciton with intermolecular vibrational modes are highly sensitive to the stacking geometry of the crystal and can, in certain cases, significantly accelerate SF. This result may help in understanding the fast SF experimentally observed in a broad range of molecular crystals and offers a new direction for the engineering of efficient SF sensitizers. PMID:26261948

  7. Competing resonances in spatially forced pattern-forming systems.

    PubMed

    Mau, Yair; Haim, Lev; Hagberg, Aric; Meron, Ehud

    2013-09-01

    Spatial periodic forcing can entrain a pattern-forming system in the same way as temporal periodic forcing can entrain an oscillator. The forcing can lock the pattern's wave number to a fraction of the forcing wave number within tonguelike domains in the forcing parameter plane, it can increase the pattern's amplitude, and it can also create patterns below their onset. We derive these results using a multiple-scale analysis of a spatially forced Swift-Hohenberg equation in one spatial dimension. In two spatial dimensions the one-dimensional forcing can induce a symmetry-breaking instability that leads to two-dimensional (2D) patterns, rectangular or oblique. These patterns resonate with the forcing by locking their wave-vector component in the forcing direction to half the forcing wave number. The range of this type of 2:1 resonance overlaps with the 1:1 resonance tongue of stripe patterns. Using a multiple-scale analysis in the overlap region we show that the 2D patterns can destabilize the 1:1 resonant stripes even at exact resonance. This result sheds new light on the use of spatial periodic forcing for controlling patterns. PMID:24125335

  8. Simulating two-dimensional infrared-Raman and Raman spectroscopies for intermolecular and intramolecular modes of liquid water.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hironobu; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2016-02-21

    Full classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of two-dimensional (2D) infrared-Raman and 2D Raman spectroscopies of liquid water were carried out to elucidate a mode-mode coupling mechanism using a polarizable water model for intermolecular and intramolecular vibrational spectroscopy (POLI2VS). This model is capable of describing both infrared and Raman spectra. Second-order response functions, which consist of one molecular polarizability and two molecular dipole moments for 2D IR-Raman and three molecular polarizabilities for 2D Raman spectroscopies, were calculated using an equilibrium-non-equilibrium hybrid MD approach. The obtained signals were analyzed using a multi-mode Brownian oscillator (BO) model with nonlinear system-bath interactions representing the intramolecular OH stretching, intramolecular HOH bending, hydrogen bonded (HB)-intermolecular librational motion and HB-intermolecular vibrational (translational) motion of liquid water. This model was applied through use of hierarchal Fokker-Planck equations. The qualitative features of the peak profiles in the 2D spectra obtained from the MD simulations are accurately reproduced with the BO model. This indicates that this model captures the essential features of the intermolecular and intramolecular motion. We elucidate the mechanisms governing the 2D signal profiles involving anharmonic mode-mode coupling, the nonlinearities of the polarizability and dipole moment, and the vibrational dephasing processes of liquid water even in the case that the 2D spectral peaks obtained from the MD simulation overlap or are unclear. The mode coupling peaks caused by electrical anharmonic coupling (EAHC) and mechanical anharmonic coupling (MAHC) are observed in all of the 2D spectra. We find that the strength of the MAHC between the OH-stretching and HB-intermolecular vibrational modes is comparable to that between the OH-stretching and HOH bending modes. Moreover, we find that this OH-stretching and HB-intermolecular

  9. Mikrokristallbildung und intermolekulare Triplett-Triplett-Energieiibertragung in festen transparenten Glasern bei 77 K. Das System N-Methylcarbazol/Naphthalin / Microcrystal Formation and Intermolecular Triplet-Triplet Energy Transfer in Rigid Transparent Glasses at 77 K. The System N-Methyl-earbazole / Naphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zander, M.

    1984-05-01

    The efficient intermolecular triplet-triplet energy transfer between N-methylcarbazole (donor) and naphthalene (acceptor) observed at 10-2 ᴍ concentration of donor and acceptor in a rigid transparent methylcyclohexane/n-pentane glass at 77 K is shown to occur in microcrystals of the donor containing small amounts of the acceptor

  10. Theory of specific heat in glass-forming systems.

    PubMed

    Hentschel, H G E; Ilyin, Valery; Procaccia, Itamar; Schupper, Nurith

    2008-12-01

    Experimental measurements of the specific heat in glass-forming systems are obtained from the linear response to either slow cooling (or heating) or to oscillatory perturbations with a given frequency about a constant temperature. The latter method gives rise to a complex specific heat with the constraint that the zero frequency limit of the real part should be identified with thermodynamic measurements. Such measurements reveal anomalies in the temperature dependence of the specific heat, including the so called "specific heat peak" in the vicinity of the glass transition. The aim of this paper is to provide theoretical explanations of these anomalies in general and a quantitative theory in the case of a simple model of glass formation. We first present interesting simulation results for the specific heat in a classical model of a binary mixture glass former. We show that in addition to the formerly observed specific heat peak there is a second peak at lower temperatures which was not observable in earlier simulations. Second, we present a general relation between the specific heat, a caloric quantity, and the bulk modulus of the material, a mechanical quantity, and thus offer a smooth connection between the liquid and amorphous solid states. The central result of this paper is a connection between the micromelting of clusters in the system and the appearance of specific heat peaks; we explain the appearance of two peaks by the micromelting of two types of clusters. We relate the two peaks to changes in the bulk and shear moduli. We propose that the phenomenon of glass formation is accompanied by a fast change in the bulk and the shear moduli, but these fast changes occur in different ranges of the temperature. Last, we demonstrate how to construct a theory of the frequency dependent complex specific heat, expected from heterogeneous clustering in the liquid state of glass formers. A specific example is provided in the context of our model for the dynamics of

  11. Intermolecular energy-band dispersion in PTCDA multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Hiroyuki; Kera, Satoshi; Okudaira, Koji K.; Yoshimura, Daisuke; Seki, Kazuhiko; Ueno, Nobuo

    2003-07-01

    The electronic structure of a well-oriented perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic acid-dianhydride multilayer prepared on MoS2 single crystal surface were studied by angle-resolved ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. From the photon energy dependence of normal emission spectra, we observed an intermolecular energy-band dispersion of about 0.2 eV for the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) band of single π character. The observed energy-band dispersion showed a cosine curve, which originates from the intermolecular π-π interaction. Analyses using the tight-binding model gave that the transfer integral of about 0.05 eV for the π-π interaction, the effective mass of HOMO hole m*h=5.28m0, and the hole mobility μh>3.8 cm2/V s. This is the first observation of the intermolecular energy-band dispersion of a conventional single-component organic semiconductor only with the weak intermolecular van der Waals interaction.

  12. Learning about Intermolecular Interactions from the Cambridge Structural Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    A clear understanding and appreciation of noncovalent interactions, especially hydrogen bonding, are vitally important to students of chemistry and the life sciences, including biochemistry, molecular biology, pharmacology, and medicine. The opportunities afforded by the IsoStar knowledge base of intermolecular interactions to enhance the…

  13. Direct observation of intermolecular interactions mediated by hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, Luigi; Thämer, Martin; Reppert, Mike; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2014-07-01

    Although intermolecular interactions are ubiquitous in physicochemical phenomena, their dynamics have proven difficult to observe directly, and most experiments rely on indirect measurements. Using broadband two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2DIR), we have measured the influence of hydrogen bonding on the intermolecular vibrational coupling between dimerized N-methylacetamide molecules. In addition to strong intramolecular coupling between N-H and C=O oscillators, cross-peaks in the broadband 2DIR spectrum appearing upon dimerization reveal strong intermolecular coupling that changes the character of the vibrations. In addition, dimerization changes the effects of intramolecular coupling, resulting in Fermi resonances between high and low-frequency modes. These results illustrate how hydrogen bonding influences the interplay of inter- and intramolecular vibrations, giving rise to correlated nuclear motions and significant changes in the vibrational structure of the amide group. These observations have direct impact on modeling and interpreting the IR spectra of proteins. In addition, they illustrate a general approach to direct molecular characterization of intermolecular interactions.

  14. Direct observation of intermolecular interactions mediated by hydrogen bonding

    SciTech Connect

    De Marco, Luigi; Reppert, Mike; Thämer, Martin; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2014-07-21

    Although intermolecular interactions are ubiquitous in physicochemical phenomena, their dynamics have proven difficult to observe directly, and most experiments rely on indirect measurements. Using broadband two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2DIR), we have measured the influence of hydrogen bonding on the intermolecular vibrational coupling between dimerized N-methylacetamide molecules. In addition to strong intramolecular coupling between N–H and C=O oscillators, cross-peaks in the broadband 2DIR spectrum appearing upon dimerization reveal strong intermolecular coupling that changes the character of the vibrations. In addition, dimerization changes the effects of intramolecular coupling, resulting in Fermi resonances between high and low-frequency modes. These results illustrate how hydrogen bonding influences the interplay of inter- and intramolecular vibrations, giving rise to correlated nuclear motions and significant changes in the vibrational structure of the amide group. These observations have direct impact on modeling and interpreting the IR spectra of proteins. In addition, they illustrate a general approach to direct molecular characterization of intermolecular interactions.

  15. Intermolecular potentials from shock structure experiments. [for monatomic gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturtevant, B.; Steinhilper, E. A.

    1974-01-01

    Ground-state intermolecular interaction potentials determined from shock structure experiments with four monatomic gases are reported. These potentials are assessed for self-consistency, using the law of corresponding states, and their suitability for engineering applications in rarefied gas dynamics is discussed.

  16. Student Understanding of Intermolecular Forces: A Multimodal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Williams, Leah C.; Underwood, Sonia M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to use representations of molecular structure to predict the macroscopic properties of a substance is central to the development of a robust understanding of chemistry. Intermolecular forces (IMFs) play an important role in this process because they provide a mechanism for how and why molecules interact. In this study, we investigate…

  17. Hydrogen-hydrogen intermolecular structure of polyethylene in the melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londono, J. D.; Annis, B. K.; Habenschuss, A.; Smith, G. D.; Borodin, O.; Tso, C.; Hsieh, E. T.; Soper, A. K.

    1999-05-01

    Three polyethylene samples, which differed in their degree of deuteration, were studied in neutron diffraction isotopic substitution (NDIS) experiments at 428 K. These results were complemented at small wavevectors by small angle neutron measurements. The intermolecular hydrogen-hydrogen (HH) structure function, hHH(Q), was obtained without recourse to intramolecular structure models, as demonstrated in a prior report. The PE experimental results are compared to computer simulation results for the alkanes C100 at 509 K and C44 at 350, 400, and 450 K. The small temperature dependence of the HH intermolecular radial distribution functions, gHH(r) for C44 indicates that the differences observed between the PE, C100, and C44 (450 K) results are, for the most part, not due to just temperature differences. It is shown that the string model, an analytic result from an integral equation theory of polymers (PRISM), can account approximately for the overall shape of the gHH(r) functions, and that this overall shape is dependent on the radius of gyration of the molecule. Further analysis shows that there are two other contributions to gHH(r), both of which are independent of chain length to first order. The first is due to chain-chain packing, and the second is due to local HH intermolecular correlations. These results are significant because they demonstrate that hHH(Q) is a useful function for studying intermolecular polymer structure, which has been shown to underpin phase behavior in polyolefin blends.

  18. Copper-catalyzed intermolecular asymmetric propargylic dearomatization of indoles.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wen; Li, He; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Chen-Jiang; You, Shu-Li

    2015-06-22

    The first copper-catalyzed intermolecular dearomatization of indoles by an asymmetric propargylic substitution reaction was developed. This method provides a highly efficient synthesis of versatile furoindoline and pyrroloindoline derivatives containing a quaternary carbon stereogenic center and a terminal alkyne moiety with up to 86 % yield and 98 % ee. PMID:25968474

  19. Interatomic and intermolecular Coulombic decay: the coming of age story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, T.

    2015-04-01

    In pioneering work by Cederbaum et al an excitation mechanism was proposed that occurs only in loosely bound matter (Cederbaum et al 1997 Phys. Rev. Lett. 79 4778): it turned out, that (in particular) in cases where a local Auger decay is energetically forbidden, an excited atom or molecule is able to decay in a scheme which was termed ‘interatomic Coulombic decay’ (or ‘intermolecular Coulombic decay’) (ICD). As ICD occurs, the excitation energy is released by transferring it to an atomic or molecular neighbor of the initially excited particle. As a consequence the neighboring atom or molecule is ionized as it receives the energy. A few years later the existence of ICD was confirmed experimentally (Marburger et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 203401; Jahnke et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 163401; Öhrwall et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 173401) by different techniques. Since this time it has been found that ICD is not (as initially suspected) an exotic feature of van der Waals or hydrogen bonded systems, but that ICD is a very general and common feature occurring after a manifold of excitation schemes and in numerous weakly bound systems, as revealed by more than 200 publications. It was even demonstrated, that ICD can become more efficient than a local Auger decay in some system. This review will concentrate on recent experimental investigations on ICD. It will briefly introduce the phenomenon and give a short summary of the ‘early years’ of ICD (a detailed view on this episode of investigations can be found in the review article by U Hergenhahn with the same title (Hergenhahn 2011 J. Electron Spectrosc. Relat. Phenom. 184 78)). More recent articles will be presented that investigate the relevance of ICD in biological systems and possible radiation damage of such systems due to ICD. The occurrence of ICD and ICD-like processes after different excitation schemes and in different systems is covered in the middle section: in that context the helium dimer (He2

  20. Weak Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds with Fluorine: Detection and Implications for Enzymatic/Chemical Reactions, Chemical Properties, and Ligand/Protein Fluorine NMR Screening.

    PubMed

    Dalvit, Claudio; Vulpetti, Anna

    2016-05-23

    It is known that strong hydrogen-bonding interactions play an important role in many chemical and biological systems. However, weak or very weak hydrogen bonds, which are often difficult to detect and characterize, may also be relevant in many recognition and reaction processes. Fluorine serving as a hydrogen-bond acceptor has been the subject of many controversial discussions and there are different opinions about it. It now appears that there is compelling experimental evidence for the involvement of fluorine in weak intramolecular or intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Using established NMR methods, we have previously characterized and measured the strengths of intermolecular hydrogen-bond complexes involving the fluorine moieties CH2 F, CHF2 , and CF3 , and have compared them with the well-known hydrogen-bond complex formed between acetophenone and the strong hydrogen-bond donor p-fluorophenol. We now report evidence for the formation of hydrogen bonds involving fluorine with significantly weaker donors, namely 5-fluoroindole and water. A simple NMR method is proposed for the simultaneous measurement of the strengths of hydrogen bonds between an acceptor and a donor or water. Important implications of these results for enzymatic/chemical reactions involving fluorine, for chemical and physical properties, and for ligand/protein (19) F NMR screening are analyzed through experiments and theoretical simulations. PMID:27112430

  1. Intermolecular interaction and the extended wormlike chain conformation of chitin in NaOH/urea aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yan; Duan, Bo; Lu, Ang; Liu, Maili; Liu, Huili; Xu, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Lina

    2015-04-13

    The intra- and intermolecular interactions of chitin in NaOH/urea aqueous system were studied by a combination of NMR measurements (including (13)C NMR, (23)Na NMR, and (15)N NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry. The results revealed that the NaOH and chitin formed a hydrogen-bonded complex that was surrounded by the urea hydrates to form a sheath-like structure, leading to the good dissolution. The optimal concentration range, in which chitin was molecularly dispersed in NaOH/urea aqueous, was found to investigate the chain conformation in the dilute solution with a combination of static and dynamic light scattering. The weight-average molecular weight (Mw), radii of gyration (⟨Rg⟩z), and hydrodynamic radii (⟨Rh⟩z) values of chitin were determined, and the structure-sensitive parameter (ρ) and persistent length (Lp) were calculated to be >2.0 and ∼30 nm, respectively, suggesting an extended wormlike chain conformation. The visualized images from TEM, cryo-TEM, and AFM indicated that, chitin nanofibers were fabricated from the parallel aggregation of chitin chains in NaOH/urea system. This work would provide a theoretical guidance for constructing novel chitin-based nanomaterials via "bottom-up" method at the molecular level. PMID:25712045

  2. Using electronic polarization from the internal continuum (EPIC) for intermolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Truchon, Jean-François; Nicholl's, Anthony; Grant, J Andrew; Iftimie, Radu I; Roux, Benoît; Bayly, Christopher I

    2010-03-01

    Recently, the vacuum-phase molecular polarizability tensor of various molecules has been accurately modeled (Truchon et al., J Chem Theory Comput 2008, 4, 1480) with an intramolecular continuum dielectric model. This preliminary study showed that electronic polarization can be accurately modeled when combined with appropriate dielectric constants and atomic radii. In this article, using the parameters developed to reproduce ab initio quantum mechanical (QM) molecular polarizability tensors, we extend the application of the "electronic polarization from internal continuu" (EPIC) approach to intermolecular interactions. We first derive a dielectric-adapted least-square-fit procedure similar to RESP, called DRESP, to generate atomic partial charges based on a fit to a QM abinitio electrostatic potential (ESP). We also outline a procedure to adapt any existing charge model to EPIC. The ability of this to reproduce local polarization, as opposed to uniform polarization, is also examined leading to an induced ESP relative root mean square deviation of 1%, relative to ab initio, when averaged over 37 molecules including aromatics and alkanes. The advantage of using a continuum model as opposed to an atom-centered polarizable potential is illustrated with a symmetrically perturbed atom and benzene. We apply EPIC to a cation-pi binding system formed by an atomic cation and benzene and show that the EPIC approach can accurately account for the induction energy. Finally, this article shows that the ab initio electrostatic component in the difficult case of the H-bonded 4-pyridone dimer, a highly polar and polarized interaction, is well reproduced without adjusting the vacuum-phase parameters. PMID:19598266

  3. Spectroscopic proof for intermolecular or intramolecular hydrogen bonds in ketoenol tautomers of 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Toyotoshi; Akama, Yoshifumi

    1994-06-01

    The broad infrared bands of the polymorphic crystals of 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone (PMBP) were assigned unequivocally by examining the IR spectra of solutions and Raman spectra. The strong band at 2550 cm -1 of a colourless crystal was attributed to an intermolecular hydrogen bond NH…OC of the NH keto form, and the strong band at 3100 cm -1 of a yellow crystal, to an intermolecular hydrogen bond OH…OC of the O(1)H enol forms.

  4. Intermolecular vs molecule–substrate interactions: A combined STM and theoretical study of supramolecular phases on graphene/Ru(0001)

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Michael; Uhl, Benedikt; Künzel, Daniela; Hoster, Harry E; Groß, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Summary The competition between intermolecular interactions and long-range lateral variations in the substrate–adsorbate interaction was studied by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and force field based calculations, by comparing the phase formation of (sub-) monolayers of the organic molecules (i) 2-phenyl-4,6-bis(6-(pyridin-3-yl)-4-(pyridin-3-yl)pyridin-2-yl)pyrimidine (3,3'-BTP) and (ii) 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) on graphene/Ru(0001). For PTCDA adsorption, a 2D adlayer phase was formed, which extended over large areas, while for 3,3'-BTP adsorption linear or ring like structures were formed, which exclusively populated the areas between the maxima of the moiré structure of the buckled graphene layer. The consequences for the competing intermolecular interactions and corrugation in the adsorption potential are discussed and compared with the theoretical results. PMID:22003444

  5. Intermolecular vs molecule-substrate interactions: A combined STM and theoretical study of supramolecular phases on graphene/Ru(0001).

    PubMed

    Roos, Michael; Uhl, Benedikt; Künzel, Daniela; Hoster, Harry E; Groß, Axel; Behm, R Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    The competition between intermolecular interactions and long-range lateral variations in the substrate-adsorbate interaction was studied by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and force field based calculations, by comparing the phase formation of (sub-) monolayers of the organic molecules (i) 2-phenyl-4,6-bis(6-(pyridin-3-yl)-4-(pyridin-3-yl)pyridin-2-yl)pyrimidine (3,3'-BTP) and (ii) 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) on graphene/Ru(0001). For PTCDA adsorption, a 2D adlayer phase was formed, which extended over large areas, while for 3,3'-BTP adsorption linear or ring like structures were formed, which exclusively populated the areas between the maxima of the moiré structure of the buckled graphene layer. The consequences for the competing intermolecular interactions and corrugation in the adsorption potential are discussed and compared with the theoretical results. PMID:22003444

  6. Validation of intermolecular transfer integral and bandwidth calculations for organic molecular materials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingsong; Kertesz, Miklos

    2005-06-15

    We present an interpretation of the intermolecular transfer integral that is independent from the origin of the energy scale allowing convergence studies of this important parameter of organic molecular materials. We present extensive numerical studies by using an ethylene pi dimer to investigate the dependence of transfer integrals on the level of theory and intermolecular packing. Transfer integrals obtained from semiempirical calculations differ substantially from one another and from ab initio results. The ab initio results are consistent across all the levels used including Hartree-Fock, outer valence Green's function, and various forms of density functional theory (DFT). Validation of transfer integrals and bandwidths is performed by comparing the calculated values with the experimental values of tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ), bis[1,2,5]thiadiazolo-p-quinobis(1,3-dithiole), (BTQBT) K-TCNQ, and hexagonal graphite. DFT in one of its presently popular forms, such as Perdew-Wang functionals (PW91), in combination with sufficient basis sets provides reliable transfer integrals, and therefore can serve as a basis for energy band calculations for soft organic materials with van der Waals gaps. PMID:16008473

  7. Conformational diversity in prion protein variants influences intermolecular [beta]-sheet formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seungjoo; Antony, Lizamma; Hartmann, Rune; Knaus, Karen J.; Surewicz, Krystyna; Surewicz, Witold K.; Yee, Vivien C.

    2010-04-19

    A conformational transition of normal cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) to its pathogenic form (PrP{sup Sc}) is believed to be a central event in the transmission of the devastating neurological diseases known as spongiform encephalopathies. The common methionine/valine polymorphism at residue 129 in the PrP influences disease susceptibility and phenotype. We report here seven crystal structures of human PrP variants: three of wild-type (WT) PrP containing V129, and four of the familial variants D178N and F198S, containing either M129 or V129. Comparison of these structures with each other and with previously published WT PrP structures containing M129 revealed that only WT PrPs were found to crystallize as domain-swapped dimers or closed monomers; the four mutant PrPs crystallized as non-swapped dimers. Three of the four mutant PrPs aligned to form intermolecular {beta}-sheets. Several regions of structural variability were identified, and analysis of their conformations provides an explanation for the structural features, which can influence the formation and conformation of intermolecular {beta}-sheets involving the M/V129 polymorphic residue.

  8. The Nature of Intermolecular Interactions Between Aromatic Amino Acid Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Gervasio, Francesco; Chelli, Riccardo; Procacci, Piero; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2002-05-01

    The nature of intermolecular interactions between aromatic amino acid residues has been investigated by a combination of molecular dynamics and ab initio methods. The potential energy surface of various interacting pairs, including tryptophan, phenilalanine, and tyrosine, was scanned for determining all the relevant local minima by a combined molecular dynamics and conjugate gradient methodology with the AMBER force field. For each of these minima, single-point correlated ab initio calculations of the binding energy were performed. The agreement between empirical force field and ab initio binding energies of the minimum energy structures is excellent. Aromatic-aromatic interactions can be rationalized on the basis of electrostatic and van der Waals interactions, whereas charge transfer or polarization phenomena are small for all intermolecular complexes and, particularly, for stacked structures.

  9. Intermolecular interactions between imidazole derivatives intercalated in layered solids. Substituent group effect

    SciTech Connect

    González, M.; Lemus-Santana, A.A.; Rodríguez-Hernández, J.; Aguirre-Velez, C.I.; Knobel, M.; Reguera, E.

    2013-08-15

    This study sheds light on the intermolecular interactions between imidazole derive molecules (2-methyl-imidazole, 2-ethyl-imidazole and benzimidazole) intercalated in T[Ni(CN){sub 4}] layers to form a solid of formula unit T(ImD){sub 2}[Ni(CN){sub 4}]. These hybrid inorganic–organic solids were prepared by soft chemical routes and their crystal structures solved and refined from X-ray powder diffraction data. The involved imidazole derivative molecules were found coordinated through the pyridinic N atom to the axial positions for the metal T in the T[Ni(CN){sub 4}] layer. In the interlayers region ligand molecules from neighboring layers remain stacked in a face-to-face configuration through dipole–dipole and quadrupole–quadrupole interactions. These intermolecular interactions show a pronounced dependence on the substituent group and are responsible for an ImD-pillaring concatenation of adjacent layers. This is supported by the structural information and the recorded magnetic data in the 2–300 K temperature range. The samples containing Co and Ni are characterized by presence of spin–orbit coupling and pronounced temperature dependence for the effective magnetic moment except for 2-ethyl-imidazole related to the local distortion for the metal coordination environment. For this last one ligand a weak ferromagnetic ordering ascribed to a super-exchange interaction between T metals from neighboring layers through the ligands π–π interaction was detected. - Graphical abstract: In the interlayers region imidazole derivative molecules are oriented according to their dipolar and quadrupolar interactions and minimizing the steric impediment. Highlights: • Imidazole derivatives intercalation compounds. • Intermolecular interaction between intercalated imidazole derivatives. • Hybrid inorganic–organic solids. • Pi–pi interactions and ferromagnetic coupling. • Dipolar and quadrupolar interactions between intercalated imidazole derivatives.

  10. Using corresponding state theory to obtain intermolecular potentials to calculate pure liquid shock Hugoniots

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.L.

    1997-12-01

    Determination of product species, equations-of-state (EOS) and thermochemical properties of high explosives and pyrotechnics remains a major unsolved problem. Although, empirical EOS models may be calibrated to replicate detonation conditions within experimental variability (5--10%), different states, e.g. expansion, may produce significant discrepancy with data if the basic form of the EOS model is incorrect. A more physically realistic EOS model based on intermolecular potentials, such as the Jacobs Cowperthwaite Zwisler (JCZ3) EOS, is needed to predict detonation states as well as expanded states. Predictive capability for any EOS requires a large species data base composed of a wide variety of elements. Unfortunately, only 20 species have known JCZ3 molecular force constants. Of these 20 species, only 10 have been adequately compared to experimental data such as molecular scattering or shock Hugoniot data. Since data in the strongly repulsive region of the molecular potential is limited, alternative methods must be found to deduce force constants for a larger number of species. The objective of the present study is to determine JCZ3 product species force constants by using a corresponding states theory. Intermolecular potential parameters were obtained for a variety of gas species using a simple corresponding states technique with critical volume and critical temperature. A more complex, four parameter corresponding state method with shape and polarity corrections was also used to obtain intermolecular potential parameters. Both corresponding state methods were used to predict shock Hugoniot data obtained from pure liquids. The simple corresponding state method is shown to give adequate agreement with shock Hugoniot data.

  11. Thermal history of caldera-forming magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, R. W.; Kent, A. J.; Cooper, K. M.; Huber, C.

    2015-12-01

    Large, caldera-forming silicic eruptions require the assembly and storage of a large volume of magma, and are though to result from either (1) rare high magma flux events needed to maintain melt-rich (eruptible) magma for extended timescales, or (2) magma accumulation at lower magma fluxes, storage for extended timescales as low temperature crystal mushes and rapid rejuvenation prior to eruption. The thermal history of these magmas prior to eruption thus provides an important clue into the processes that lead to eruption, but has been difficult to quantify. However in-situ measurement of Sr and other trace elements in plagioclase, coupled with diffusion models, can be used to constrain the time magmas spend at different temperatures. Progressive differentiation of plagioclase from a silicic magma produces plagioclase with lower Sr at low An—producing a positive correlation between Sr and An, which is the opposite of what is predicted by equilibrium partitioning. Forward modeling of the temperature-dependent diffusion of Sr from this initial disequilibrium condition toward equilibrium concentrations, based on partitioning relationships of An and Sr, gives an estimate of the time individual crystals spend at specific temperatures. Preliminary high spatial resolution LA-ICP-MS analysis of Sr in plagioclase from five caldera-forming eruptions show overall positive correlations of Sr and An, suggesting that little diffusive re-equilibration has occurred. Thus, over the lifetime that these magmas reside in the upper crust (>10 k.y.) they likely spend less than a few thousand years at temperatures above 750 °C (the approximate temperature of rheological lockup). These results suggest that the magmas that feed many large caldera-forming eruptions are kept in cold storage for long timescales, and that rapid rejuvenation of mush occurs without extended thermal conditioning prior to eruption.

  12. Planetary science: How the Solar System didn't form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiganis, Kleomenis

    2015-12-01

    Standard planet-formation models have been unable to reconstruct the distributions of the Solar System's small, rocky planets and asteroids in the same simulation. A new analysis suggests that it cannot be done.

  13. Geometric method for forming periodic orbits in the Lorenz system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, S. B.; Kim, Eun-jin

    2016-04-01

    Many systems in nature are out of equilibrium and irreversible. The non-detailed balance observable representation (NOR) provides a useful methodology for understanding the evolution of such non-equilibrium complex systems, by mapping out the correlation between two states to a metric space where a small distance represents a strong correlation [1]. In this paper, we present the first application of the NOR to a continuous system and demonstrate its utility in controlling chaos. Specifically, we consider the evolution of a continuous system governed by the Lorenz equation and calculate the NOR by following a sufficient number of trajectories. We then show how to control chaos by converting chaotic orbits to periodic orbits by utilizing the NOR. We further discuss the implications of our method for potential applications given the key advantage that this method makes no assumptions of the underlying equations of motion and is thus extremely general.

  14. Isotopic enrichment of forming planetary systems from supernova pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberg, Tim; Parker, Richard J.; Meyer, Michael R.

    2016-08-01

    Heating by short-lived radioisotopes (SLRs) such as 26Al and 60Fe fundamentally shaped the thermal history and interior structure of Solar System planetesimals during the early stages of planetary formation. The subsequent thermo-mechanical evolution, such as internal differentiation or rapid volatile degassing, yields important implications for the final structure, composition and evolution of terrestrial planets. SLR-driven heating in the Solar System is sensitive to the absolute abundance and homogeneity of SLRs within the protoplanetary disk present during the condensation of the first solids. In order to explain the diverse compositions found for extrasolar planets, it is important to understand the distribution of SLRs in active planet formation regions (star clusters) during their first few Myr of evolution. By constraining the range of possible effects, we show how the imprint of SLRs can be extrapolated to exoplanetary systems and derive statistical predictions for the distribution of 26Al and 60Fe based on N-body simulations of typical to large clusters (103-104 stars) with a range of initial conditions. We quantify the pollution of protoplanetary disks by supernova ejecta and show that the likelihood of enrichment levels similar to or higher than the Solar System can vary considerably, depending on the cluster morphology. Furthermore, many enriched systems show an excess in radiogenic heating compared to Solar System levels, which implies that the formation and evolution of planetesimals could vary significantly depending on the birth environment of their host stars.

  15. Energetics of Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds in a Hydrophobic Protein Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lan; Baergen, Alyson; Michelsen, Klaus; Kitova, Elena N.; Schnier, Paul D.; Klassen, John S.

    2014-05-01

    This work explores the energetics of intermolecular H-bonds inside a hydrophobic protein cavity. Kinetic measurements were performed on the gaseous deprotonated ions (at the -7 charge state) of complexes of bovine β-lactoglobulin (Lg) and three monohydroxylated analogs of palmitic acid (PA): 3-hydroxypalmitic acid (3-OHPA), 7-hydroxypalmitic acid (7-OHPA), and 16-hydroxypalmitic acid (16-OHPA). From the increase in the activation energy for the dissociation of the (Lg + X-OHPA)7- ions, compared with that of the (Lg + PA)7- ion, it is concluded that the -OH groups of the X-OHPA ligands participate in strong (5 - 11 kcal mol-1) intermolecular H-bonds in the hydrophobic cavity of Lg. The results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that the -OH groups of 3-OHPA and 16-OHPA act as H-bond donors and interact with backbone carbonyl oxygens, whereas the -OH group of 7-OHPA acts as both H-bond donor and acceptor with nearby side chains. The capacity for intermolecular H-bonds within the Lg cavity, as suggested by the gas-phase measurements, does not necessarily lead to enhanced binding in aqueous solution. The association constant (Ka) measured for 7-OHPA [(2.3 ± 0.2) × 105 M-1] is similar to the value for the PA [(3.8 ± 0.1) × 105 M-1]; Ka for 3-OHPA [(1.1 ± 0.3) × 106 M-1] is approximately three-times larger, whereas Ka for 16-OHPA [(2.3 ± 0.2) × 104 M-1] is an order of magnitude smaller. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the energetic penalty to desolvating the ligand -OH groups, which is necessary for complex formation, is similar in magnitude to the energetic contribution of the intermolecular H-bonds.

  16. Studies of interdiffusion, chemical bonding, and intermolecular interactions in fiber-matrix adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Chiate.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the key factors involved in adhesion was conducted to determine a quantitative relation between the underlying physicochemical mechanisms of adhesion and the adhesive performance at the fiber-matrix interface. Aramid fiber was modified by attaching pendent chains to its surface to change the nature of its interaction with matrix materials. The relative importance of the three fundamental factors of adhesion (interdiffusion, intermolecular interactions, and chemical bonding) was studied by evaluating the fiber-matrix adhesive performance of these modified fiber-matrix systems.

  17. Intermolecular forces in phase-change heat transfer: 1998 Kern award review

    SciTech Connect

    Wayner, P.C. Jr.

    1999-10-01

    The variation of long-range intermolecular forces near interfaces profoundly affects the performance of change-of-phase heat exchangers. Starting with the fundamental electromagnetic force between molecules (dielectric properties), the effects of shape (Kelvin effect), temperature (Clapeyron effect) and concentration on the heat-transfer characteristics of thin films and larger systems are reviewed and connected. A judicious selection of literature gives a consistent set of models of particular use in heat transfer. Examples of experimental verification of these interfacial models in this rapidly developing field are also presented.

  18. Intermolecular interactions of thrombospondins drive their accumulation in extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Joong; Christofidou, Elena D.; Keene, Douglas R.; Hassan Milde, Marwah; Adams, Josephine C.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombospondins participate in many aspects of tissue organization in adult tissue homeostasis, and their dysregulation contributes to pathological processes such as fibrosis and tumor progression. The incorporation of thrombospondins into extracellular matrix (ECM) as discrete puncta has been documented in various tissue and cell biological contexts, yet the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We find that collagen fibrils are disorganized in multiple tissues of Thbs1−/− mice. In investigating how thrombospondins become retained within ECM and thereby affect ECM organization, we find that accumulation of thrombospondin-1 or thrombospondin-5 puncta within cell-derived ECM is controlled by a novel, conserved, surface-exposed site on the thrombospondin L-type lectin domain. This site acts to recruit thrombospondin molecules into ECM by intermolecular interactions in trans. This mechanism is fibronectin independent, can take place extracellularly, and is demonstrated to be direct in vitro. The trans intermolecular interactions can also be heterotypic—for example, between thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-5. These data identify a novel concept of concentration-dependent, intermolecular “matrix trapping” as a conserved mechanism that controls the accumulation and thereby the functionality of thrombospondins in ECM. PMID:25995382

  19. Towards a Functionally-Formed Air Traffic System-of-Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Sheila R.; Consiglio, Maria C.

    2005-01-01

    Incremental improvements to the national aviation infrastructure have not resulted in sufficient increases in capacity and flexibility to meet emerging demand. Unfortunately, revolutionary changes capable of substantial and rapid increases in capacity have proven elusive. Moreover, significant changes have been difficult to implement, and the operational consequences of such change, difficult to predict due to the system s complexity. Some research suggests redistributing air traffic control functions through the system, but this work has largely been dismissed out of hand, accused of being impractical. However, the case for functionally-based reorganization of form can be made from a theoretical, systems perspective. This paper investigates Air Traffic Management functions and their intrinsic biases towards centralized/distributed operations, grounded in systems engineering and information technology theories. Application of these concepts to a small airport operations design is discussed. From this groundwork, a robust, scalable system transformation plan may be made in light of uncertain demand.

  20. System and method of forming nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Dial, Laura Cerully; DiDomizio, Richard; Alinger, Matthew Joseph; Huang, Shenyan

    2016-07-26

    A system for mechanical milling and a method of mechanical milling are disclosed. The system includes a container, a feedstock, and milling media. The container encloses a processing volume. The feedstock and the milling media are disposed in the processing volume of the container. The feedstock includes metal or alloy powder and a ceramic compound. The feedstock is mechanically milled in the processing volume using metallic milling media that includes a surface portion that has a carbon content less than about 0.4 weight percent.

  1. Methods of forming thermal management systems and thermal management methods

    DOEpatents

    Gering, Kevin L.; Haefner, Daryl R.

    2012-06-05

    A thermal management system for a vehicle includes a heat exchanger having a thermal energy storage material provided therein, a first coolant loop thermally coupled to an electrochemical storage device located within the first coolant loop and to the heat exchanger, and a second coolant loop thermally coupled to the heat exchanger. The first and second coolant loops are configured to carry distinct thermal energy transfer media. The thermal management system also includes an interface configured to facilitate transfer of heat generated by an internal combustion engine to the heat exchanger via the second coolant loop in order to selectively deliver the heat to the electrochemical storage device. Thermal management methods are also provided.

  2. Lake phosphorus loading form septic systems by seasonally perched groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilliom, R.J.; Patmont, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    The movement of effluent phosphorus (P) from old septic systems by seasonally perched groundwater was investigated. A previous study indicated a correlation between P loadings and the presence of old homes. Water samples were taken from shallow wells installed 10 to 50 m downgradient from seven septic systems 20 to 40 years old. The equivalent volumetric fraction of each sample consisting of undiluted effluent was estimated from chloride concentration. A Monte Carlo analysis was used to account for the various sources of uncertainty. Movement of diluted septic effluent to the lake was common, but transport of more than 1% of effluent P through the soil was probable for only 4 of 26 samples. The greatest apparent P movement was associated with persistently saturated conditions.

  3. Local normal forms of smooth weakly hyperbolic integrable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    In the smooth ( C∞) category, a completely integrable system near a nondegenerate singularity is geometrically linearizable if the action generated by the vector fields is weakly hyperbolic. This proves partially a conjecture of Nguyen Tien Zung [11]. The main tool used in the proof is a theorem of Marc Chaperon [3] and the slight hypothesis of weak hyperbolicity is generic when all the eigenvalues of the differentials of the vector fields at the non-degenerate singularity are real.

  4. Rodlike localized structure in isotropic pattern-forming systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeu, Ignacio; Clerc, Marcel G.

    2015-10-01

    Stationary two-dimensional localized structures have been observed in a wide variety of dissipative systems. The existence, stability properties, dynamical evolution, and bifurcation diagram of an azimuthal symmetry breaking, rodlike localized structure in the isotropic prototype model of pattern formation, the Swift-Hohenberg model, is studied. These rodlike structures persist under the presence of nongradient perturbations. Interaction properties of the rodlike structures are studied. This allows us to envisage the possibility of different crystal-like configurations.

  5. Configurational entropy of glass-forming systems from graph isomorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuxing; Milner, Scott

    The configurational entropy plays a central role in the thermodynamic scenarios of glass transition, such as Adam-Gibbs theory and random first-order transition theory. By definition, the configurational entropy Sc is the difference between the entropy of liquid and the vibrational entropy with structural rearrangement restricted, both of which can be obtained by means of thermodynamic integration. On the other hand, Sc is essentially a measure of the number of basins in the energy landscape, and therefore it can also be estimated by explicitly enumerating inherent structures. To this end, we first coarse-grain the vibrational motions by mapping configurations to Voronoi diagrams and then categorize them using canonical labelling. The Voronoi graph entropy is calculated as SG /kB = - ∑pi log (pi) , where pi is the probability of finding distinct graph i. We find for an n-particle subsystem of glass-forming hard-disk/sphere fluids, SG (n) scales linearly with n, and Sc can be estimated from the slope.

  6. Molecular cooperativity in the dynamics of glass-forming systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Liang; Gujrati, Purushottam; Novikov, Vladimier; Sokolov, Alexei

    2010-03-01

    The mechanism behind the sharp slowing down of the main structural relaxation in a glass-forming liquid upon approaching the glass transition remains a great puzzle. Most of the theories relate this mechanism to the cooperativity in molecular motion. On the other hand, the collective vibration in the pico-second time region, the so-called boson peak, is also described as a cooperative process. In our recent work (L. Hong, et al., J. Chem. Phys., in print), we demonstrated that the collective vibrations and the main structural relaxation involve a similar length scale of cooperative molecular motions. More importantly, we found that the cooperativity length scale in different materials directly correlates to only one part of the mechanism of slowing down the structural relaxation, i.e., the dependence of the structural relaxation on volume. In this presentation, we will further demonstrate that this correlation holds true not only for different chemical species, but also for the same chemical specie with different molecular weight or under pressure. The results are compared to predictions of theoretical models.

  7. Spatial rogue waves in a photorefractive pattern-forming system.

    PubMed

    Marsal, N; Caullet, V; Wolfersberger, D; Sciamanna, M

    2014-06-15

    We have experimentally analyzed pattern formation in an optical system composed of a bulk photorefractive crystal subjected to a single optical feedback. In a highly nonlinear regime far above the modulational instability threshold, we are reporting on turbulent spatiotemporal dynamics that leads to rare, intense localized optical peaks. We have proven that the statistics and features of those peaks correspond to the signatures of two-dimensional spatial rogue events. These optical rogue waves occur erratically in space and time and live typically the same amount of time as the response time of the photorefractive material. PMID:24978569

  8. Invariants reveal multiple forms of robustness in bifunctional enzyme systems.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Joseph P; Dasgupta, Tathagata; Gunawardena, Jeremy

    2015-08-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies have suggested that bifunctional enzymes catalyzing opposing modification and demodification reactions can confer steady-state concentration robustness to their substrates. However, the types of robustness and the biochemical basis for them have remained elusive. Here we report a systematic study of the most general biochemical reaction network for a bifunctional enzyme acting on a substrate with one modification site, along with eleven sub-networks with more specialized biochemical assumptions. We exploit ideas from computational algebraic geometry, introduced in previous work, to find a polynomial expression (an invariant) between the steady state concentrations of the modified and unmodified substrate for each network. We use these invariants to identify five classes of robust behavior: robust upper bounds on concentration, robust two-sided bounds on concentration ratio, hybrid robustness, absolute concentration robustness (ACR), and robust concentration ratio. This analysis demonstrates that robustness can take a variety of forms and that the type of robustness is sensitive to many biochemical details, with small changes in biochemistry leading to very different steady-state behaviors. In particular, we find that the widely-studied ACR requires highly specialized assumptions in addition to bifunctionality. An unexpected result is that the robust bounds derived from invariants are strictly tighter than those derived by ad hoc manipulation of the underlying differential equations, confirming the value of invariants as a tool to gain insight into biochemical reaction networks. Furthermore, invariants yield multiple experimentally testable predictions and illuminate new strategies for inferring enzymatic mechanisms from steady-state measurements. PMID:26021467

  9. Cyclopropenium Cations Break the Rules of Attraction to Form Closely Bound Dimers.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Andrew J; Jayasinghe, Chaminda D; Polson, Matthew I J; Curnow, Owen J; Crittenden, Deborah L

    2015-12-16

    The crystal structures of tris(ethylmethylamino)-cyclopropenium chloride and tris(diethylamino)-cyclopropenium iodide reveal the presence of closely bound dicationic dimers formed from two closed-shell monomer units. The distances between the C3 centroids of the staggered monomers are at the short end of those normally found in π-stacked neutral arenes, let alone charged aromatic rings. Computational analysis reveals that short-range interactions are dominated by strong dispersion forces, enabling metastable dicationic dimers to form without covalent intermolecular bonding. Surrounding counterions then provide a background source of charge balance, imparting strong thermodynamic stability to the system. Additionally, these counterions form a weak but attractive electrostatic bridge between the monomer units, contributing to the surprisingly short observed intermolecular C3-C3 centroid distance. PMID:26584632

  10. The effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on the planarity of amides.

    PubMed

    Platts, James A; Maarof, Hasmerya; Harris, Kenneth D M; Lim, Gin Keat; Willock, David J

    2012-09-14

    Ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) calculations on some model systems are presented to assess the extent to which intermolecular hydrogen bonding can affect the planarity of amide groups. Formamide and urea are examined as archetypes of planar and non-planar amides, respectively. DFT optimisations suggest that appropriately disposed hydrogen-bond donor or acceptor molecules can induce non-planarity in formamide, with OCNH dihedral angles deviating by up to ca. 20° from planarity. Ab initio energy calculations demonstrate that the energy required to deform an amide molecule from the preferred geometry of the isolated molecule is more than compensated by the stabilisation due to hydrogen bonding. Similarly, the NH(2) group in urea can be made effectively planar by the presence of appropriately positioned hydrogen-bond acceptors, whereas hydrogen-bond donors increase the non-planarity of the NH(2) group. Small clusters (a dimer, two trimers and a pentamer) extracted from the crystal structure of urea indicate that the crystal field acts to force planarity of the urea molecule; however, the interaction with nearest neighbours alone is insufficient to induce the molecule to become completely planar, and longer-range effects are required. Finally, the potential for intermolecular hydrogen bonding to induce non-planarity in a model of a peptide is explored. Inter alia, the insights obtained in the present work on the extent to which the geometry of amide groups may be deformed under the influence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding provide structural guidelines that can assist the interpretation of the geometries of such groups in structure determination from powder X-ray diffraction data. PMID:22847473

  11. Intermolecular stabilization of 3,3'-diamino-4,4'-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) compressed to 20 GPa.

    PubMed

    Chellappa, Raja S; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Coe, Joshua D; Velisavljevic, Nenad; Stevens, Lewis L; Liu, Zhenxian

    2014-08-01

    The room temperature stability of 3,3'-diamino-4,4'-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) has been investigated using synchrotron far-infrared, mid-infrared, Raman spectroscopy, and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) up to 20 GPa. The as-loaded DAAF samples exhibited subtle pressure-induced ordering phenomena (associated with positional disorder of the azoxy "O" atom) resulting in doubling of the a-axis, to form a superlattice similar to the low-temperature polymorph. Neither high pressure synchrotron XRD, nor high pressure infrared or Raman spectroscopies indicated the presence of structural phase transitions up to 20 GPa. Compression was accommodated in the unit cell by a reduction of the c-axis between the planar DAAF layers, distortion of the β-angle of the monoclinic lattice, and an increase in intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Changes in the ring and -NH2 deformation modes and increased intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions with compression suggest molecular reorganizations and electronic transitions at ∼ 5 GPa and ∼ 10 GPa that are accompanied by a shifting of the absorption band edge into the visible. A fourth-order Birch-Murnaghan fit to the room temperature isotherm afforded an estimate of the zero-pressure isothermal bulk modulus, K0 = 12.4 ± 0.6 GPa and its pressure derivative K0' = 7.7 ± 0.3. PMID:25011055

  12. Effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, vibrational analysis and molecular structure of 4-chlorobenzothioamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çırak, Çağrı; Sert, Yusuf; Ucun, Fatih

    2013-09-01

    In the present work, the experimental and theoretical vibrational spectra of 4-chlorobenzothioamide were investigated. The FT-IR (400-4000 cm-1) and μ-Raman spectra (100-4000 cm-1) of 4-chlorobenzothioamide in the solid phase were recorded. The geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles), vibrational frequencies, Infrared and Raman intensities of the title molecule in the ground state were calculated using ab initio Hartree-Fock and density functional theory (B3LYP) methods with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set for the first time. The optimized geometric parameters and the theoretical vibrational frequencies were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data and with the results found in the literature. The vibrational frequencies were assigned based on the potential energy distribution using the VEDA 4 program. The dimeric form of 4-chlorobenzothioamide was also simulated to evaluate the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on the vibrational frequencies. It was observed that the Nsbnd H stretching modes shifted to lower frequencies, while the in-plane and out-of-plane bending modes shifted to higher frequencies due to the intermolecular Nsbnd H⋯S hydrogen bond. Also, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies and diagrams were presented.

  13. Effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, vibrational analysis and molecular structure of a biomolecule: 5-Hydroxymethyluracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çırak, Çağrı; Sert, Yusuf; Ucun, Fatih

    2014-06-01

    In the present work, the experimental and theoretical vibrational spectra of 5-hydroxymethyluracil were investigated. The FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) spectrum of the molecule in the solid phase was recorded. The geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles), vibrational frequencies, Infrared intensities of the title molecule in the ground state were calculated using density functional B3LYP and M06-2X methods with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set for the first time. The optimized geometric parameters and theoretical vibrational frequencies were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data, and with the results found in the literature. The vibrational frequencies were assigned based on the potential energy distribution using the VEDA 4 program. The dimeric form of 5-hydroxymethyluracil molecule was also simulated to evaluate the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on its vibrational frequencies. It was observed that the Nsbnd H stretching modes shifted to lower frequencies, while its in-plane and out-of-plane bending modes shifted to higher frequencies due to the intermolecular Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond. Also, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies and diagrams were presented.

  14. Optimization of intermolecular potential parameters for the CO2/H2O mixture.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Gustavo A; Economou, Ioannis G; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2014-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations in the Gibbs ensemble were used to obtain optimized intermolecular potential parameters to describe the phase behavior of the mixture CO2/H2O, over a range of temperatures and pressures relevant for carbon capture and sequestration processes. Commonly used fixed-point-charge force fields that include Lennard-Jones 12-6 (LJ) or exponential-6 (Exp-6) terms were used to describe CO2 and H2O intermolecular interactions. For force fields based on the LJ functional form, changes of the unlike interactions produced higher variations in the H2O-rich phase than in the CO2-rich phase. A major finding of the present study is that for these potentials, no combination of unlike interaction parameters is able to adequately represent properties of both phases. Changes to the partial charges of H2O were found to produce significant variations in both phases and are able to fit experimental data in both phases, at the cost of inaccuracies for the pure H2O properties. By contrast, for the Exp-6 case, optimization of a single parameter, the oxygen-oxygen unlike-pair interaction, was found sufficient to give accurate predictions of the solubilities in both phases while preserving accuracy in the pure component properties. These models are thus recommended for future molecular simulation studies of CO2/H2O mixtures. PMID:25198539

  15. A structural study of the intermolecular interactions of tyramine in the solid state and in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quevedo, Rodolfo; Nuñez-Dallos, Nelson; Wurst, Klaus; Duarte-Ruiz, Álvaro

    2012-12-01

    The nature of the interactions between tyramine units was investigated in the solid state and in solution. Crystals of tyramine in its free base form were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). The crystal structure shows a linear molecular organization held together by "head-to-tail" intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the amino groups and the phenolic hydroxyl groups. These chains are arranged in double layers that can geometrically favor the formation of templates in solution, which may facilitate macrocyclization reactions to form azacyclophane-type compounds. Computational calculations using the PM6-DH+ method and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-HRMS) reveal that the formation of a hydrogen-bonded tyramine dimer is favored in solution.

  16. Subunit–subunit interactions are critical for proton sensitivity of ROMK: Evidence in support of an intermolecular gating mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Qiang; MacGregor, Gordon G.; Dong, Ke; Giebisch, Gerhard; Hebert, Steven C.

    2006-01-01

    The tetrameric K channel ROMK provides an important pathway for K secretion by the mammalian kidney, and the gating of this channel is highly sensitive to changes in cytosolic pH. Although charge–charge interactions have been implicated in pH sensing by this K channel tetramer, the molecular mechanism linking pH sensing and the gating of ion channels is poorly understood. The x-ray crystal structure KirBac1.1, a prokaryotic ortholog of ROMK, has suggested that channel gating involves intermolecular interactions of the N- and C-terminal domains of adjacent subunits. Here we studied channel gating behavior to changes in pH using giant patch clamping of Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing WT or mutant ROMK, and we present evidence that no single charged residue provides the pH sensor. Instead, we show that N–C- and C–C-terminal subunit–subunit interactions form salt bridges, which function to stabilize ROMK in the open state and which are modified by protons. We identify a highly conserved C–C-terminal arginine–glutamate (R-E) ion pair that forms an intermolecular salt bridge and responds to changes in proton concentration. Our results support the intermolecular model for pH gating of inward rectifier K channels. PMID:16446432

  17. Forming Stereogenic Centers in Acyclic Systems from Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Vabre, Roxane; Island, Biana; Diehl, Claudia J; Schreiner, Peter R; Marek, Ilan

    2015-08-17

    The combined carbometalation/zinc homologation followed by reactions with α-heterosubstituted aldehydes and imines proceed through a chair-like transition structure with the substituent of the incoming aldehyde residue preferentially occupying a pseudo-axial position to avoid the two gauche interactions. The heteroatom in the axial position produces a chelated intermediate (and not a Cornforth-Evans transition structure for α-chloro aldehydes and imines) leading to a face differentiation in the allylation reaction. This method provides access to functionalized products in which three new carbon-carbon bonds and two to three stereogenic centers, including a quaternary one, were created in acyclic systems in a single-pot operation from simple alkynes. PMID:26130570

  18. Are there environmental forms of systemic autoimmune diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Hess, E V

    1999-01-01

    A large number of drugs and an increasing number of environmental agents reportedly result in the appearance of a number of autoantibodies and in many instances in the appearance of a range of autoimmune clinical syndromes. The major disorders so recognized have marked resemblances to the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus. The commonly used term is drug-induced lupus; a better term is drug-related lupus. There is considerable interest at the present time in an increasing number of environmental agents. There have been two epidemics in recent years--one in Spain to a contaminant of rapeseed oil and one in the United States to a contaminant of l-tryptophan that caused an eosinophilic myositis. It is important for physicians and others involved in health care to recognize the potential associations of these diseases of unknown cause or causes. PMID:10502535

  19. The forms of knowledge mobilized in some machine vision systems.

    PubMed Central

    Brady, M

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a number of computer vision systems that we have constructed, and which are firmly based on knowledge of diverse sorts. However, that knowledge is often represented in a way that is only accessible to a limited set of processes, that make limited use of it, and though the knowledge is amenable to change, in practice it can only be changed in rather simple ways. The rest of the paper addresses the questions: (i) what knowledge is mobilized in the furtherance of a perceptual task?; (ii) how is that knowledge represented?; and (iii) how is that knowledge mobilized? First we review some cases of early visual processing where the mobilization of knowledge seems to be a key contributor to success yet where the knowledge is deliberately represented in a quite inflexible way. After considering the knowledge that is involved in overcoming the projective nature of images, we move the discussion to the knowledge that was required in programs to match, register, and recognize shapes in a range of applications. Finally, we discuss the current state of process architectures for knowledge mobilization. PMID:9304690

  20. Transition Metal Free Intermolecular Direct Oxidative C-N Bond Formation to Polysubstituted Pyrimidines Using Molecular Oxygen as the Sole Oxidant.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Li, Chunsheng; Liao, Jianhua; Ji, Fanghua; Liu, Dongqing; Wu, Wanqing; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2016-07-01

    Various polysubstituted pyrimidines are smoothly formed via a base-promoted intermolecular oxidation C-N bond formation of allylic C(sp(3))-H and vinylic C(sp(2))-H of allyllic compounds with amidines using O2 as the sole oxidant. This protocol features protecting group free nitrogen sources, good functional group tolerance, high atom economy, and environmental advantages. PMID:27275869

  1. Combination Bands of the Nonpolar OCS Dimer Involving Intermolecular Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, M.; Oliaee, J. Norooz; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.; McKellar, A. R. W.

    2012-06-01

    Spectra of the nonpolar carbonyl sulfide in the region of the OCS ν_1 fundamental band were observed in a supersonic slit-jet apparatus. The expansion gas was probed using radiation from a tunable diode laser employed in a rapid-scan signal averaging mode. Three bands centered at 2085.906, 2103.504, and 2114.979 cm-1 were observed and anlysed. The rotational assignment and fitting of the bands were made by fixing the lower state parameters to those for the ground state of nonpolar (OCS)_2, thus confirming that they were indeed combination bands of the of the most stable isomer of OCS dimer. The band centered at 2085.906 cm-1 is a combination of the forbidden A_g intramolecular mode plus the geared bend intermolecular mode and that centered at 2114.979 cm-1 is a combination of the allowed B_u intramolecular mode plus the intermolecular van der Waals stretch. The combination at 2103.504 cm-1 can be assigned as a band whose upper state involves four quanta of the intramolecular bend or the B_u intramolecular mode plus two quanta of the intermolecular torsional mode. Isotopic work is needed to conclusively identify the vibrational assignment of this band. Our experimental frequencies for the geared bend and van der Waals modes are in good agreement with a recent high level ab initio calculation by Brown et al. J. Brown, Xiao-Gang Wang, T. Carrington Jr. and Richard Dawes, Journal of Chemical Physics, submitted.

  2. Structurally Defined Molecular Hypervalent Iodine Catalysts for Intermolecular Enantioselective Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Haubenreisser, Stefan; Wöste, Thorsten H.; Martínez, Claudio; Ishihara, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Molecular structures of the most prominent chiral non‐racemic hypervalent iodine(III) reagents to date have been elucidated for the first time. The formation of a chirally induced supramolecular scaffold based on a selective hydrogen‐bonding arrangement provides an explanation for the consistently high asymmetric induction with these reagents. As an exploratory example, their scope as chiral catalysts was extended to the enantioselective dioxygenation of alkenes. A series of terminal styrenes are converted into the corresponding vicinal diacetoxylation products under mild conditions and provide the proof of principle for a truly intermolecular asymmetric alkene oxidation under iodine(I/III) catalysis. PMID:26596513

  3. Photon Antibunching in Complex Intermolecular Fluorescence Quenching Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arjun; Enderlein, Jörg; Kumbhakar, Manoj

    2016-08-18

    We present a novel fluorescence spectroscopic method, which combines fluorescence antibunching, time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC), and steady-state emission spectroscopy, to study chemical reactions at the single molecule level. We exemplify our method on investigating intermolecular fluorescence quenching of Rhodamine110 by aniline. We demonstrate that the combination of measurements of fluorescence antibunching, fluorescence lifetime, and fluorescence steady state intensity, captures the full picture of the complex quenching kinetics, which involves static and dynamics quenching, and which cannot be seen by steady-state or lifetime measurements alone. PMID:27468007

  4. Intermolecular interactions in the bilirubin-cholate-silica system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasova, N. N.; Golovkova, L. P.; Severinovskaya, O. V.

    2007-06-01

    Bilirubin-cholate interactions in aqueous solutions were studied. The constants of binding of bilirubin with taurocholate dimers and taurodeoxycholate trimers were calculated. The adsorption of bilirubin and cholates on the surface of highly dispersed silica was studied. It was shown that taurine-conjugated cholates are poorly adsorbed from micellar solutions on the silica surface, the specific amount of bilirubin adsorbed decreases with increasing concentration of cholates in the solution, the affinity of free bilirubin for the silica surface is independent of the nature of the cholic acid, and that the affinity of cholate-bilirubin complexes for the silica surface is lower than the affinity of free bilirubin.

  5. Systems and methods for forming defects on graphitic materials and curing radiation-damaged graphitic materials

    DOEpatents

    Ryu, Sunmin; Brus, Louis E.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Liu, Haitao

    2012-09-25

    Systems and methods are disclosed herein for forming defects on graphitic materials. The methods for forming defects include applying a radiation reactive material on a graphitic material, irradiating the applied radiation reactive material to produce a reactive species, and permitting the reactive species to react with the graphitic material to form defects. Additionally, disclosed are methods for removing defects on graphitic materials.

  6. Systemic study on fluorescent switching systems composed of naphthopyran and benzimidazole in solution and film forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi; Wang, Guang; Wang, Mingxin

    2016-07-01

    The fluorescent photo-switching systems were prepared based on fluorescent benzimidazole and photochromic naphthopyran. Naphthopyran in this systems displayed excellent photochromic performance in tetrahydrofuran solutions and in PMMA films. The fluorescent emission of benzimidazole was modulated between "on" and "off" via the photoisomerization of naphthopyran in high-contrast due to the photoinduced energy transfer from benzimidazole to the open-form naphthopyran. Both the fluorescent photoswitching and the photochromism of benzimidazole-naphthopyran dyads in solutions and films displayed excellent fatigue resistance. The spaces between benzimidazole and naphthopyran affect the absorbance and fluorescence spectra of benzimidazole-naphthopyran dyads. The non-destructive readout ability of synthesized dyads in doped PMMA film was achieved.

  7. Polarizable intermolecular potentials for water and benzene interacting with halide and metal ions

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, Fabien; Soteras, Ignacio; Luque, F. Javier; Schulten, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    A complete derivation of polarizable intermolecular potentials based on high-level, gas-phase quantum-mechanical calculations is proposed. The importance of appreciable accuracy together with inherent simplicity represents a significant endeavor when enhancement of existing force fields for biological systems is sought. Toward this end, symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) can provide an expansion of the total interaction energy into physically meaningful e.g. electrostatic, induction and van der Waals terms. Each contribution can be readily compared with its counterpart in classical force fields. Since the complexity of the different intermolecular terms cannot be fully embraced using a minimalist description, it is necessary to resort to polyvalent expressions capable of encapsulating overlooked contributions from the quantum-mechanical expansion. This choice results in consistent force field components that reflect the underlying physical principles of the phenomena. This simplified potential energy function is detailed and definitive guidelines are drawn. As a proof of concept, the methodology is illustrated through a series of test cases that include the interaction of water and benzene with halide and metal ions. In each case considered, the total energy is reproduced accurately over a range of biologically relevant distances. PMID:21113276

  8. Probing Intermolecular Interactions in Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with 2D IR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krummel, Amber

    2014-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in the environment and impact geochemical processes that are critical to sustainable energy resources. For example, asphaltenes exist naturally in geologic formations and their aggregates heavily impact the petroleum economy. Unfortunately, the chemical dynamics that drive asphaltene nanoaggregation processes are still poorly understood. Solvent dynamics and intermolecular interactions such as π-stacking interactions play integral roles in asphaltene nanoaggregation. Linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy including two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2DIR), are well suited to explore these fundamental interactions. Teasing apart the vibrational characteristics in PAHs that model asphaltenic compounds represents an important step towards utilizing 2D IR spectroscopy to understand the intermolecular interactions that are prevalent in asphaltene nanoaggregation. A solar dye, N,N'-Dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide, is used in this work to model aphaltenes. Carbonyl and ring vibrations are used to probe the nanoaggregates of the model compounds. However, the characteristics of these normal modes change as a function of the size of the conjugated ring system. Thus, in order to fully understand the nature of these normal modes, we include a systematic study of a series of quinones. Our investigation employs a combination of 2DIR spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations to explore vibrational coupling in quinones and PAHs. We compare the calculated vibrational characteristics to those extracted from 2DIR spectra. ATK acknowledges the Donors of the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund for support of this research.

  9. A new hydrate form of diflunisal precipitated from a microemulsion system.

    PubMed

    Sung, Hsuan-Lei; Fan, Yueh-Lin; Yeh, Kimberly; Chen, Yen-Fu; Chen, Li-Jen

    2013-09-01

    Three microemulsion systems were applied as solvents for polymorph screening of seven active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs): carbamazepine, piroxicam, sulfaguanidine, nitrofurantoin, theophylline, quercetin, and diflunisal. All the recrystallized compounds were examined by using powder X-ray diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry, elemental analysis, Karl Fischer titration and dissolution rate. A new crystal form of diflunisal hydrate was discovered by the cooling method of recrystallization in a water-in-oil microemulsion system, composed of water, alkane and dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate. The new hydrate form of diflunisal was characterized and confirmed to be a stoichiometry of diflunisal:water of 1:1. The other two microemulsion systems were able to convert the anhydrous diflunisal Form I to Form III. The dissolution rate of diflunisal hydrate is unexpectedly much higher than that of anhydrous ones (Forms I and III). All the other six APIs (carbamazepine, piroxicam, sulfaguanidine, nitrofurantoin, theophylline and quercetin) recrystallized from the microemulsion systems were all converted into hydrate form. PMID:23624616

  10. Quantitative analysis of intermolecular interactions in orthorhombic rubrene

    SciTech Connect

    Hathwar, Venkatesha R.; Sist, Mattia; Jørgensen, Mads R. V.; Mamakhel, Aref H.; Wang, Xiaoping; Hoffmann, Christina M.; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Overgaard, Jacob; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2015-08-14

    Rubrene is one of the most studied organic semiconductors to date due to its high charge carrier mobility which makes it a potentially applicable compound in modern electronic devices. Previous electronic device characterizations and first principles theoretical calculations assigned the semiconducting properties of rubrene to the presence of a large overlap of the extended π-conjugated core between molecules. We present here the electron density distribution in rubrene at 20 K and at 100 K obtained using a combination of high-resolution X-ray and neutron diffraction data. The topology of the electron density and energies of intermolecular interactions are studied quantitatively. Specifically, the presence of Cπ...Cπinteractions between neighbouring tetracene backbones of the rubrene molecules is experimentally confirmed from a topological analysis of the electron density, Non-Covalent Interaction (NCI) analysis and the calculated interaction energy of molecular dimers. A significant contribution to the lattice energy of the crystal is provided by H—H interactions. The electron density features of H—H bonding, and the interaction energy of molecular dimers connected by H—H interaction clearly demonstrate an importance of these weak interactions in the stabilization of the crystal structure. Finally, the quantitative nature of the intermolecular interactions is virtually unchanged between 20 K and 100 K suggesting that any changes in carrier transport at these low temperatures would have a different origin. The obtained experimental results are further supported by theoretical calculations.

  11. Quantitative analysis of intermolecular interactions in orthorhombic rubrene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hathwar, Venkatesha R.; Sist, Mattia; Jørgensen, Mads R. V.; Mamakhel, Aref H.; Wang, Xiaoping; Hoffmann, Christina M.; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Overgaard, Jacob; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2015-08-14

    Rubrene is one of the most studied organic semiconductors to date due to its high charge carrier mobility which makes it a potentially applicable compound in modern electronic devices. Previous electronic device characterizations and first principles theoretical calculations assigned the semiconducting properties of rubrene to the presence of a large overlap of the extended π-conjugated core between molecules. We present here the electron density distribution in rubrene at 20 K and at 100 K obtained using a combination of high-resolution X-ray and neutron diffraction data. The topology of the electron density and energies of intermolecular interactions are studied quantitatively. Specifically,more » the presence of Cπ...Cπinteractions between neighbouring tetracene backbones of the rubrene molecules is experimentally confirmed from a topological analysis of the electron density, Non-Covalent Interaction (NCI) analysis and the calculated interaction energy of molecular dimers. A significant contribution to the lattice energy of the crystal is provided by H—H interactions. The electron density features of H—H bonding, and the interaction energy of molecular dimers connected by H—H interaction clearly demonstrate an importance of these weak interactions in the stabilization of the crystal structure. Finally, the quantitative nature of the intermolecular interactions is virtually unchanged between 20 K and 100 K suggesting that any changes in carrier transport at these low temperatures would have a different origin. The obtained experimental results are further supported by theoretical calculations.« less

  12. Intermolecular Hybridization Creating Nanopore Orbital in a Supramolecular Hydrocarbon Sheet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Qi; Björk, Jonas; Barth, Johannes V; Klappenberger, Florian

    2016-07-13

    Molecular orbital engineering is a key ingredient for the design of organic devices. Intermolecular hybridization promises efficient charge carrier transport but usually requires dense packing for significant wave function overlap. Here we use scanning tunneling spectroscopy to spatially resolve the electronic structure of a surface-confined nanoporous supramolecular sheet of a prototypical hydrocarbon compound featuring terminal alkyne (-CCH) groups. Surprisingly, localized nanopore orbitals are observed, with their electron density centered in the cavities surrounded by the functional moieties. Density functional theory calculations reveal that these new electronic states originate from the intermolecular hybridization of six in-plane π-orbitals of the carbon-carbon triple bonds, exhibiting significant electronic splitting and an energy downshift of approximately 1 eV. Importantly, these nanopore states are distinct from previously reported interfacial states. We unravel the underlying connection between the formation of nanopore orbital and geometric arrangements of functional groups, thus demonstrating the generality of applying related orbital engineering concepts in various types of porous organic structures. PMID:27253516

  13. Quantitative analysis of intermolecular interactions in orthorhombic rubrene

    PubMed Central

    Hathwar, Venkatesha R.; Sist, Mattia; Jørgensen, Mads R. V.; Mamakhel, Aref H.; Wang, Xiaoping; Hoffmann, Christina M.; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Overgaard, Jacob; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2015-01-01

    Rubrene is one of the most studied organic semiconductors to date due to its high charge carrier mobility which makes it a potentially applicable compound in modern electronic devices. Previous electronic device characterizations and first principles theoretical calculations assigned the semiconducting properties of rubrene to the presence of a large overlap of the extended π-conjugated core between molecules. We present here the electron density distribution in rubrene at 20 K and at 100 K obtained using a combination of high-resolution X-ray and neutron diffraction data. The topology of the electron density and energies of intermolecular interactions are studied quantitatively. Specifically, the presence of Cπ⋯Cπ interactions between neighbouring tetracene backbones of the rubrene molecules is experimentally confirmed from a topological analysis of the electron density, Non-Covalent Interaction (NCI) analysis and the calculated interaction energy of molecular dimers. A significant contribution to the lattice energy of the crystal is provided by H—H interactions. The electron density features of H—H bonding, and the interaction energy of molecular dimers connected by H—H interaction clearly demonstrate an importance of these weak interactions in the stabilization of the crystal structure. The quantitative nature of the intermolecular interactions is virtually unchanged between 20 K and 100 K suggesting that any changes in carrier transport at these low temperatures would have a different origin. The obtained experimental results are further supported by theoretical calculations. PMID:26306198

  14. Factor Structure of the BASC-2 Behavioral and Emotional Screening System Student Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowdy, Erin; Twyford, Jennifer M.; Chin, Jenna K.; DiStefano, Christine A.; Kamphaus, Randy W.; Mays, Kristen L.

    2011-01-01

    The BASC-2 Behavioral and Emotional Screening System (BESS) Student Form (Kamphaus & Reynolds, 2007) is a recently developed youth self-report rating scale designed to identify students at risk for behavioral and emotional problems. The BESS Student Form was derived from the Behavior Assessment System for Children-Second Edition Self-Report of…

  15. Intermolecular symmetry-adapted perturbation theory study of large organic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Heßelmann, Andreas; Korona, Tatiana

    2014-09-07

    Binding energies for the complexes of the S12L database by Grimme [Chem. Eur. J. 18, 9955 (2012)] were calculated using intermolecular symmetry-adapted perturbation theory combined with a density-functional theory description of the interacting molecules. The individual interaction energy decompositions revealed no particular change in the stabilisation pattern as compared to smaller dimer systems at equilibrium structures. This demonstrates that, to some extent, the qualitative description of the interaction of small dimer systems may be extrapolated to larger systems, a method that is widely used in force-fields in which the total interaction energy is decomposed into atom-atom contributions. A comparison of the binding energies with accurate experimental reference values from Grimme, the latter including thermodynamic corrections from semiempirical calculations, has shown a fairly good agreement to within the error range of the reference binding energies.

  16. Gibb's energy and intermolecular free length of 'Borassus Flabellifier' (BF) and Adansonia digitata (AnD) aqueous binary mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadke, Sushil; Darshan Shrivastava, Bhakt; Ujle, S. K.; Mishra, Ashutosh; Dagaonkar, N.

    2014-09-01

    One of the potential driving forces behind a chemical reaction is favourable a new quantity known as the Gibbs free energy (G) of the system, which reflects the balance between these forces. Ultrasonic velocity and absorption measurements in liquids and liquid mixtures find extensive application to study the nature of intermolecular forces. Ultrasonic velocity measurements have been successfully employed to detect weak and strong molecular interactions present in binary and ternary liquid mixtures. After measuring the density and ultrasonic velocity of aqueous solution of 'Borassus Flabellifier' BF and Adansonia digitata And, we calculated Gibb's energy and intermolecular free length. The velocity of ultrasonic waves was measured, using a multi-frequency ultrasonic interferometer with a high degree of accuracy operating Model M-84 by M/s Mittal Enterprises, New Delhi, at a fixed frequency of 2MHz. Natural sample 'Borassus Flabellifier' BF fruit pulp and Adansonia digitata AnD powder was collected from Dhar, District of MP, India for this study.

  17. Dynamics of intermolecular interactions in CCl4via the isotope effect by femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Konarska, Jadwiga; Gadomski, Wojciech; Ratajska-Gadomska, Bożena; Polok, Kamil; Pudłowski, Grzegorz; Kardaś, Tomasz M

    2016-06-21

    We report our study on the ultrafast dynamics of intermolecular interactions in liquid CCl4. A transient transmission time domain signal, obtained in the 40 ps delay range, exhibits beating at the difference frequency of the totally symmetric stretching vibrations of the tetrachloride isotopologues. We show that the spectra obtained as the windowed Fourier transform of different parts of the time domain signal in the range of this totally symmetric vibration, split due to the isotope effect, carry the information about the dynamics of the coherently excited, coupled molecules. We use a simple theoretical model in order to prove that the intermolecular interaction influences the relative amplitudes of the isotopologue peaks in the spectrum. Moreover, we demonstrate that the pump induced coherence in the system leads to additional strengthening of the interaction, which can be observed in the spectra obtained from the experimental time domain signal. PMID:27244535

  18. Intermolecular control of thermoswitching and photoswitching phenomena in two spin-crossover polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buron-Le Cointe, M.; Hébert, J.; Baldé, C.; Moisan, N.; Toupet, L.; Guionneau, P.; Létard, J. F.; Freysz, E.; Cailleau, H.; Collet, E.

    2012-02-01

    We discuss here the important role of intermolecular coupling for the thermal- and light-induced molecular state switching in the solid state. Investigations were performed on the two crystalline polymorphs of the spin-crossover [Fe-(PM-BIA)2(NCS)2] material. In addition to structural studies at thermal equilibrium, light-induced phenomena were investigated through photocrystallography, photomagnetic, and dynamical optical measurements. Strong similarities between the thermal-equilibrium and the out-of-equilibrium light-induced transformations are observed in each polymorph: strong cooperative phenomena in one polymorph versus weak cooperative ones in the second polymorph. These different responses of the two crystalline forms of the compound to external perturbations are discussed at the microscopic level in terms of Ising-like model and two-mode description of on-site molecular potentials.

  19. Intermolecular interactions during complex coacervation of pea protein isolate and gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuanghui; Cao, Yuan-Long; Ghosh, Supratim; Rousseau, Dérick; Low, Nicholas H; Nickerson, Michael T

    2010-01-13

    The nature of intermolecular interactions during complexation between pea protein isolate (PPI) and gum arabic (GA) was investigated as a function of pH (4.30-2.40) by turbidimetric analysis and confocal scanning microscopy in the presence of destabilizing agents (100 mM NaCl or 100 mM urea) and at different temperatures (6-60 degrees C). Complex formation followed two pH-dependent structure-forming events associated with the formation of soluble and insoluble complexes and involved interactions between GA and PPI aggregates. Complex formation was driven by electrostatic attractive forces between complementary charged biopolymers, with secondary stabilization by hydrogen bonding. Hydrophobic interactions were found to enhance complex stability at lower pH (pH 3.10), but not with its formation. PMID:19938857

  20. Substituent-induced intermolecular interaction in organic crystals revealed by precise band-dispersion measurements.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Nobuhiro

    2013-08-23

    We reveal quite small but different intermolecular valence band dispersions of sub-100-meV scale in crystalline films of Zn and Mn phthalocyanine (ZnPc and MnPc) and fluorinated ZnPc (F16ZnPc). The intermolecular transfer integrals are found to be reasonably dependent on the intermolecular distance with the 75±5 meV/Å relation. Furthermore, the angle-resolved photoemission spectra show anomalous dispersive behaviors such as phase flips and local-dimerization-derived periodicities, which originate from the site-specific intermolecular interaction induced by substituents. PMID:24010459

  1. Substituent-Induced Intermolecular Interaction in Organic Crystals Revealed by Precise Band-Dispersion Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Nobuhiro

    2013-08-01

    We reveal quite small but different intermolecular valence band dispersions of sub-100-meV scale in crystalline films of Zn and Mn phthalocyanine (ZnPc and MnPc) and fluorinated ZnPc (F16ZnPc). The intermolecular transfer integrals are found to be reasonably dependent on the intermolecular distance with the 75±5meV/Å relation. Furthermore, the angle-resolved photoemission spectra show anomalous dispersive behaviors such as phase flips and local-dimerization-derived periodicities, which originate from the site-specific intermolecular interaction induced by substituents.

  2. Stability of linear systems in second-order form based on structure preserving similarity transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Pommer, Christian; Kliem, Wolfhard

    2015-10-31

    This paper deals with two stability aspects of linear systems of the form I ¨ x +B˙ x +Cx = 0 given by the triple (I;B;C). A general transformation scheme is given for a structure and Jordan form preserving transformation of the triple. We investigate how a system can be transformed by suitable choices of the transformation parameters into a new system (I;B1;C1) with a symmetrizable matrix C1. This procedure facilitates stability investigations. We also consider systems with a Hamiltonian spectrum which discloses marginal stability after a Jordan form preserving transformation.

  3. Intermolecular Association Provides Specific Optical and NMR Signatures for Serotonin at Intravesicular Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Suman; Balaji, J.; Madhu, P. K.; Maiti, S.

    2008-01-01

    Neurotransmitter vesicles contain biomolecules at extraordinarily high concentrations (hundreds of millimoles/liter). Such concentrations can drive intermolecular associations, which may affect vesicular osmolarity and neuronal signaling. Here we investigate whether aqueous serotonin (a monoamine neurotransmitter) forms oligomers at intravesicular concentrations and whether these oligomers have specific spectroscopic signatures that can potentially be used for monitoring neuronal storage and release. We report that, as serotonin concentration is increased from 60 μM to 600 mM, the normalized fluorescence spectrum of serotonin displays a growing long-wavelength tail, with an isoemissive point at 376 nm. The fluorescence decay is monoexponential with a lifetime of 4 ns at low concentrations but is multiexponential with an average lifetime of 0.41 ns at 600 mM. A 600 mM serotonin solution has 30% less osmolarity than expected for monomeric serotonin, indicating oligomer formation. The proton NMR chemical shifts move upfield by as much as 0.3 ppm at 600 mM compared to those at 10 mM, indicating a stacking of the serotonin indole moieties. However, no intermolecular crosspeak is evident in the two-dimensional NMR rotating frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy spectrum even at 600 mM, suggesting that oligomeric structures are possibly weakly coupled. The appearance of a single peak for each proton suggests that the rate of interconversion between the monomeric and the oligomeric structures is faster than 240 Hz. A stopped-flow kinetic experiment also confirms that the rate of dissociation is faster than 100 ms. We conclude that serotonin forms oligomers at intravesicular concentrations but becomes monomeric quickly on dilution. NMR signatures of the oligomers provide potential contrast agents for monitoring the activity of serotonergic neurons in vivo. PMID:18234835

  4. Interfacial and intermolecular interactions determining the rotational orientation of C60 adsorbed on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paßens, Michael; Karthäuser, Silvia

    2015-12-01

    Close-packed monolayers of fullerenes on metallic substrates are very rich systems with respect to their rotational degrees of freedom and possible interactions with different adsorption sites or next neighbours. In this connection, we report in detail on the (2√3 × 2√3)R30°-superstructure of C60 with respect to the Au(111)-surface. We use molecular orbital imaging in systematic UHV-STM studies to reveal the delicate balance of interfacial and intermolecular interactions in this system. Thus, bright C60-molecules in 5:6-top and 6:6-top geometries are observed depending on the respective next neighbours. Moreover, tiny changes in the appearance of the unoccupied molecular orbitals of dim C60-molecules in hex-vac positions are identified which are caused by the respective interaction with the facets surrounding the Au-vacancy.

  5. On the symmetric form of systems of conservation laws with entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation has the objective to review the general structure of system of conservation laws with entropy, giving particular attention to a presentation of symmetric formulations of the equations of gas dynamics. Systems of hyperbolic conservation laws are considered, taking into account the case in which a system of equations is symmetric hyperbolic, questions of symmetrization, and entropy functions. The Euler equations for a polytropic gas in conservation form are considered. The symmetric form retains the conservation properties of the equations. Weak solutions remain, therefore, unchanged. Of particular computational interest is the possibility of using the symmetric form.

  6. Transetherification on Polyols by Intra- and Intermolecular Nucleophilic Substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Muraoka, Takahiro; Adachi, Kota; Chowdhury, Rainy; Kinbara, Kazushi

    2014-01-01

    Transetherification on polyols involving intra- and intermolecular nucleophilic substitutions is reported. Di- or trialkoxide formation of propane-1,3-diol or 2-(hydroxymethyl)propane-1,3-diol derivatives by NaH triggers the reaction via oxetanes formation, where the order to add NaH and a polyol significantly influences the yields of products. It was demonstrated that the protective group on the pentaerythritol skeleton is apparently transferred to the hydrophilic and hydrophobic chain molecules bearing a leaving group in one-step, and a protective group conversion from tosyl to benzyl was successful using a benzyl-appending triol to afford a desired product in 67% yield. PMID:24663293

  7. Visualizing the orientational dependence of an intermolecular potential

    PubMed Central

    Sweetman, Adam; Rashid, Mohammad A.; Jarvis, Samuel P.; Dunn, Janette L.; Rahe, Philipp; Moriarty, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Scanning probe microscopy can now be used to map the properties of single molecules with intramolecular precision by functionalization of the apex of the scanning probe tip with a single atom or molecule. Here we report on the mapping of the three-dimensional potential between fullerene (C60) molecules in different relative orientations, with sub-Angstrom resolution, using dynamic force microscopy (DFM). We introduce a visualization method which is capable of directly imaging the variation in equilibrium binding energy of different molecular orientations. We model the interaction using both a simple approach based around analytical Lennard–Jones potentials, and with dispersion-force-corrected density functional theory (DFT), and show that the positional variation in the binding energy between the molecules is dominated by the onset of repulsive interactions. Our modelling suggests that variations in the dispersion interaction are masked by repulsive interactions even at displacements significantly larger than the equilibrium intermolecular separation. PMID:26879386

  8. Intermolecular forces and energies between ligands and receptors.

    PubMed

    Moy, V T; Florin, E L; Gaub, H E

    1994-10-14

    The recognition mechanisms and dissociation pathways of the avidin-biotin complex and of actin monomers in actin filaments were investigated. The unbinding forces of discrete complexes of avidin or streptavidin with biotin analogs are proportional to the enthalpy change of the complex formation but independent of changes in the free energy. This result indicates that the unbinding process is adiabatic and that entropic changes occur after unbinding. On the basis of the measured forces and binding energies, an effective rupture length of 9.5 +/- 1 angstroms was calculated for all biotin-avidin pairs and approximately 1 to 3 angstroms for the actin monomer-monomer interaction. A model for the correlation among binding forces, intermolecular potential, and molecular function is proposed. PMID:7939660

  9. Visualizing the orientational dependence of an intermolecular potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetman, Adam; Rashid, Mohammad A.; Jarvis, Samuel P.; Dunn, Janette L.; Rahe, Philipp; Moriarty, Philip

    2016-02-01

    Scanning probe microscopy can now be used to map the properties of single molecules with intramolecular precision by functionalization of the apex of the scanning probe tip with a single atom or molecule. Here we report on the mapping of the three-dimensional potential between fullerene (C60) molecules in different relative orientations, with sub-Angstrom resolution, using dynamic force microscopy (DFM). We introduce a visualization method which is capable of directly imaging the variation in equilibrium binding energy of different molecular orientations. We model the interaction using both a simple approach based around analytical Lennard-Jones potentials, and with dispersion-force-corrected density functional theory (DFT), and show that the positional variation in the binding energy between the molecules is dominated by the onset of repulsive interactions. Our modelling suggests that variations in the dispersion interaction are masked by repulsive interactions even at displacements significantly larger than the equilibrium intermolecular separation.

  10. An assay for intermolecular exchange of alpha crystallin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    An affinity column of alpha crystallin linked to cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose was developed to study the exchange of alpha subunits. Alpha crystallin bound to the Sepharose-alpha complex was dissociated with 8 mol/l urea, followed by quantitation using high-performance reverse-phase liquid chromatography. The time course of binding at 37 degrees C showed a hyperbolic binding pattern reaching equilibrium between 6-18 hr. Under these conditions, binding of beta and gamma crystallins to the same matrix was less than 10% of the alpha values, as was binding of alpha to glycine-coupled Sepharose. This assay was used to demonstrate changes in the subunit exchange of alpha crystallins present in high molecular weight versus lower molecular weight aggregates of the human lens. These results show that this binding procedure was a specific reproducible assay that might be used to study intermolecular interactions of the alpha crystallins.

  11. Intermolecular interactions in the crystalline state of some organotellurium antioxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engman, L.; Kania, I.; Oleksyn, B. J.; Śliwiński, J.; Wojtoń, A.

    2002-05-01

    The X-ray crystal structure analysis was performed for single crystals of bis (4-aminophenyl) telluride ( 1), bis [4-( N, N-dimethylamino)phenyl] telluride ( 2) and bis (4-hydroxyphenyl) telluride hemihydrate ( 3). The molecules of the diaryl tellurides 1- 3 display two types of non-planar conformations: 'butterfly' and 'T-shaped'. They differ in the torsion angles around Te-C bonds. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds occur between water molecules and hydroxyl groups in compound 3 and also between phenyl rings and proton donors in compounds 2 and 3 with -H⋯π distances 2.56(8)-2.95(6) Å. Also, in compounds 1 and 2 short -H⋯π contacts (3.02(4)-3.29(5) Å) were observed.

  12. MOLECULAR PACKING AND NPT-MOLECULAR DYNAMICS INVESTIGATION OF THE TRANSFERABILITY OF THE RDX INTERMOLECULAR POTENTIAL TO 2,4,6,8,1O,12- HEXANITROHEXAAZAISOWURTZITANE (HNIW)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have explored the degree to which an intermolecular potential for the explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-s-triazine (RDX) is transferable for predictions of crystal structures (within the approximation of rigid molecules) of a similar chemical system,in this case, polymo...

  13. Exploring How Technology Mediates the Types of Relationships Formed in Sociotechnical Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Kar-Hai

    2012-01-01

    This work presents an exploratory study of how technology mediates the different types of relationships that are formed in sociotechnical systems. More people each day are connecting with each other through social networks, online communities, and other forms of virtual environments. Whether for education, information seeking, friendship,…

  14. Work Organisation, Forms of Employee Learning and National Systems of Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenz, Edward; Lundvall, Bengt-Åke; Kraemer-Mbula, Erika; Rasmussen, Palle

    2016-01-01

    This article uses a multi-level framework to investigate for 17 European nations the links between forms of work organisation and style of employee learning at the workplace on the one hand, and the characteristics of national educational and training systems on the other. The analysis shows that forms of work organisation characterised by…

  15. Arginine-phosphate salt bridges between histones and DNA: Intermolecular actuators that control nucleosome architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.; Li, Yun; Singh, Gautam; Olson, Wilma K.

    2014-10-01

    Structural bioinformatics and van der Waals density functional theory are combined to investigate the mechanochemical impact of a major class of histone-DNA interactions, namely, the formation of salt bridges between arginine residues in histones and phosphate groups on the DNA backbone. Principal component analysis reveals that the configurational fluctuations of the sugar-phosphate backbone display sequence-specific directionality and variability, and clustering of nucleosome crystal structures identifies two major salt-bridge configurations: a monodentate form in which the arginine end-group guanidinium only forms one hydrogen bond with the phosphate, and a bidentate form in which it forms two. Density functional theory calculations highlight that the combination of sequence, denticity, and salt-bridge positioning enables the histones to apply a tunable mechanochemical stress to the DNA via precise and specific activation of backbone deformations. The results suggest that selection for specific placements of van der Waals contacts, with high-precision control of the spatial distribution of intermolecular forces, may serve as an underlying evolutionary design principle for the structure and function of nucleosomes, a conjecture that is corroborated by previous experimental studies.

  16. Problem-Based Learning in 9th Grade Chemistry Class: "Intermolecular Forces"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarhan, Leman; Ayar-Kayali, Hulya; Urek, Raziye Ozturk; Acar, Burcin

    2008-01-01

    This research study aims to examine the effectiveness of a problem-based learning (PBL) on 9th grade students' understanding of intermolecular forces (dipole-dipole forces, London dispersion forces and hydrogen bonding). The student's alternate conceptions about intermolecular bonding and their beliefs about PBL were also measured. Seventy-eight…

  17. The use of intermolecular potential functions in fitting pressure induced spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorvitch, D.; Silvaggio, P. M.; Boese, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    An example is presented which demonstrates the importance of using physically realistic derivatives of the intermolecular potential when fitting pressure-induced spectra. The use of nonrealistic derivatives may mask second-order temperature effects in the theory. As the temperature decreases, the intermolecular potential may have an important angular dependence.

  18. 75 FR 4101 - Enterprise Income Verification (EIV) System User Access Authorization Form and Rules of Behavior...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Enterprise Income Verification (EIV) System User Access Authorization Form and Rules.... This notice also lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Enterprise Income...

  19. Crystal structures and intermolecular interactions of two novel antioxidant triazolyl-benzimidazole compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karayel, A.; Özbey, S.; Ayhan-Kılcıgil, G.; Kuş, C.

    2015-12-01

    The crystal structures of 5-(2-( p-chlorophenylbenzimidazol-1-yl-methyl)-4-(3-fluorophenyl)-2,4-dihydro-[1,2,4]-triazole-3-thione (G6C) and 5-(2-( p-chlorophenylbenzimidazol-1-yl-methyl)-4-(2-methylphenyl)-2,4-dihydro-[1,2,4]-triazole-3-thione (G4C) have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Benzimidazole ring systems in both molecules are planar. The triazole part is almost perpendicular to the phenyl and the benzimidazole parts of the molecules in order to avoid steric interactions between the rings. The crystal structures are stabilized by intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the amino group of the triazole and the nitrogen atom of benzimidazole of a neighboring molecule.

  20. Graphene-enhanced intermolecular interaction at interface between copper- and cobalt-phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Wei-Dong; Huang, Shu-Ping; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2015-10-01

    Interfacial electronic structures of copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc), cobalt-phthalocyanine (CoPc), and graphene were investigated experimentally by using photoelectron spectroscopy. While the CuPc/graphene interface shows flat band structure and negligible interfacial dipole indicating quite weak molecule-substrate interaction, the CuPc/CoPc/graphene interface shows a large interfacial dipole and obvious energy level bending. Controlled experiments ruled out possible influences from the change in film structure of CuPc and pure π-π interaction between CoPc and CuPc. Analysis based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory reveals that the decrease in the work function for the CuPc/CoPc/graphene system is induced by the intermolecular interaction between CuPc and CoPc which is enhanced owning to the peculiar electronic properties at the CoPc-graphene interface.

  1. Graphene-enhanced intermolecular interaction at interface between copper- and cobalt-phthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wei-Dong; Huang, Shu-Ping; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2015-10-01

    Interfacial electronic structures of copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc), cobalt-phthalocyanine (CoPc), and graphene were investigated experimentally by using photoelectron spectroscopy. While the CuPc/graphene interface shows flat band structure and negligible interfacial dipole indicating quite weak molecule-substrate interaction, the CuPc/CoPc/graphene interface shows a large interfacial dipole and obvious energy level bending. Controlled experiments ruled out possible influences from the change in film structure of CuPc and pure π-π interaction between CoPc and CuPc. Analysis based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory reveals that the decrease in the work function for the CuPc/CoPc/graphene system is induced by the intermolecular interaction between CuPc and CoPc which is enhanced owning to the peculiar electronic properties at the CoPc-graphene interface. PMID:26450327

  2. Graphene-enhanced intermolecular interaction at interface between copper- and cobalt-phthalocyanines

    SciTech Connect

    Dou, Wei-Dong; Huang, Shu-Ping; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2015-10-07

    Interfacial electronic structures of copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc), cobalt-phthalocyanine (CoPc), and graphene were investigated experimentally by using photoelectron spectroscopy. While the CuPc/graphene interface shows flat band structure and negligible interfacial dipole indicating quite weak molecule-substrate interaction, the CuPc/CoPc/graphene interface shows a large interfacial dipole and obvious energy level bending. Controlled experiments ruled out possible influences from the change in film structure of CuPc and pure π–π interaction between CoPc and CuPc. Analysis based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory reveals that the decrease in the work function for the CuPc/CoPc/graphene system is induced by the intermolecular interaction between CuPc and CoPc which is enhanced owning to the peculiar electronic properties at the CoPc-graphene interface.

  3. Metal-Free Intermolecular Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition Promoted by Glycerol.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Marta; Gras, Emmanuel; Pericàs, Miquel A; Gómez, Montserrat

    2015-12-14

    Metal-free intermolecular Huisgen cycloadditions using nonactivated internal alkynes have been successfully performed in neat glycerol, both under thermal and microwave dielectric heating. In sharp contrast, no reaction occurs in other protic solvents, such as water, ethanol, or diols. DFT calculations have shown that the BnN3/glycerol adduct promotes a more important stabilization of the corresponding LUMO than that produced in the analogous BnN3/alcohol adducts, favoring the reactivity with the alkyne in the first case. The presence of copper salts in the medium did not change the reaction pathway (Cu(I) acts as spectator), except for disubstituted silylalkynes, for which desilylation takes place in contrast to the metal-free system. PMID:26541267

  4. Density Analysis of Intra- and Intermolecular Vibronic Couplings toward Bath Engineering for Singlet Fission.

    PubMed

    Ito, Soichi; Nagami, Takanori; Nakano, Masayoshi

    2015-12-17

    Vibronic coupling plays a crucial role in singlet fission whereby a singlet exciton splits into two triplet excitons. In order to reveal the physicochemical origin of the vibronic coupling associated with singlet fission as well as to clarify its relationship with chemical structure, we evaluate relevant vibronic couplings from the viewpoint of their spatial contributions described by vibronic coupling density. From the analysis using a model tetracene dimer, a typical singlet fission system, the frequency dependence of vibronic couplings in each electronic state is found to be significantly different from that of another depending on the nature of the electronic structure (intra/intermolecular excitation) and the related vibrational motion. These findings contribute not only to the fundamental understanding of the singlet fission mechanism from the viewpoint of vibronic couplings but also to opening a new path to designing highly efficient singlet fission materials through phonon-bath engineering. PMID:26673196

  5. Crystal structures and intermolecular interactions of two novel antioxidant triazolyl-benzimidazole compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Karayel, A. E-mail: yccaoh@hotmail.com; Özbey, S.; Ayhan-Kılcıgil, G.; Kuş, C.

    2015-12-15

    The crystal structures of 5-(2-(p-chlorophenylbenzimidazol-1-yl-methyl)-4-(3-fluorophenyl)-2, 4-dihydro-[1,2,4]-triazole-3-thione (G6C) and 5-(2-(p-chlorophenylbenzimidazol-1-yl-methyl)-4-(2-methylphenyl)-2, 4-dihydro-[1,2,4]-triazole-3-thione (G4C) have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Benzimidazole ring systems in both molecules are planar. The triazole part is almost perpendicular to the phenyl and the benzimidazole parts of the molecules in order to avoid steric interactions between the rings. The crystal structures are stabilized by intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the amino group of the triazole and the nitrogen atom of benzimidazole of a neighboring molecule.

  6. Genetic analysis of response regulator activation in bacterial chemotaxis suggests an intermolecular mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Re, Sandra Da; Tolstykh, Tatiana; Wolanin, Peter M.; Stock, Jeffry B.

    2002-01-01

    Response regulator proteins of two-component systems are usually activated by phosphorylation. The phosphorylated response regulator protein CheY∼P mediates the chemotaxis response in Escherichia coli. We performed random mutagenesis and selected CheY mutants that are constitutively active in the absence of phosphorylation. Although a single amino acid substitution can lead to constitutive activation, no single DNA base change can effect such a transition. Numerous different sets of mutations that activate in synergy were selected in several different combinations. These mutations were all located on the side of CheY defined by α4, β5, α5, and α1. Our findings argue against the two-state hypothesis for response regulator activation. We propose an alternative intermolecular mechanism that involves a dynamic interplay between response regulators and their effector targets. PMID:12381847

  7. Carleman linearization and normal forms for differential systems with quasi-periodic coefficients.

    PubMed

    Chermnykh, Sergey V

    2016-01-01

    We study the matrix representation of Poincaré normalization using the Carleman linearization technique for non-autonomous differential systems with quasi-periodic coefficients. We provide a rigorous proof of the validity of the matrix representation of the normalization and obtain a recursive algorithm for computing the normalizing transformation and the normal form of the differential systems. The algorithm provides explicit formulas for the coefficients of the normal form and the corresponding transformation. PMID:27588240

  8. Intermolecular Tl···H-C anagostic interactions in luminescent pyridyl functionalized thallium(I) dithiocarbamates.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Vikram; Gupta, Ajit N; Drew, Michael G B; Singh, Nanhai

    2015-01-28

    Crystal structures of novel pyridyl functionalised [Tl(L)]∞ (L = (N-benzyl-N-methylpyridyl) dithiocarbamate(L1) 1, bis(N-methylpyridyl) dithiocarbamate(L2) 2, (N-methyl(1,4-benzodioxane-6-yl)-N-methylpyridyl)dithiocarbamate(L3) 3, (N-ferrocenyl-N-methylpyridyl) dithiocarbamate(L4) 4) complexes revealed rare intermolecular C-H···Tl anagostic and C-S···Tl interactions forming a six-membered chelate ring about the metal center, which have been assessed by DFT calculations. The strong thallophilic bonding is responsible for the strong luminescent characteristics of the complexes in the solid phase. PMID:25461980

  9. The Divergent Synthesis of Nitrogen Heterocycles by Rhodium(I)-Catalyzed Intermolecular Cycloadditions of Vinyl Aziridines and Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jian-Jun; Lin, Tao-Yan; Zhu, Chao-Ze; Wang, Huamin; Wu, Hai-Hong; Zhang, Junliang

    2016-02-24

    Catalyst-controlled divergent intermolecular cycloadditions of vinylaziridines with alkynes have been developed. By using [Rh(NBD)2]BF4 as the catalyst, a [3 + 2] cycloaddition reaction was achieved with broad substrate scope and high stereoselectivity under mild reaction conditions. Moreover, the chirality of vinylaziridines can be completely transferred to the [3 + 2] cycloadducts. When the catalyst was changed to [Rh(η(6)-C10H8) (COD)]SbF6, the alternative [5 + 2] cycloadducts were selectively formed under otherwise identical conditions. PMID:26859710

  10. Noncovalent intermolecular interactions between dehydroepiandrosterone and the active site of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulphotransferase: A density functional theory based treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astani, Elahe; Heshmati, Emran; Chen, Chun-Jung; Hadipour, Nasser L.; Shekarsaraei, Setareh

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical study was performed to characterize noncovalent intermolecular interactions, especially hydrogen bond (HB), in the active site of enzyme human dehydroepiandrosterone sulphotransferase (SULT2A1/DHEA) using the local (M06-L) and hybrid (M06, M06-2X) meta-GGA functionals of density functional theory (DFT). Results revealed that DHEA is able to form HBs with residues His99, Tyr231, Met137 and Met16 in the active site of the SULT2A1/DHEA. It was found that DHEA interacts with the other residues through electrostatic and Van der Waals interactions.