Science.gov

Sample records for international isa biomedical

  1. ISAE- The International Society for Applied Ethology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Society for Applied Ethology (ISAE) was created in 1966 as the Society for Veterinary Ethology, with a primary membership of U.K.-based veterinarians. It quickly expanded to encompass researchers and clinicians working in all areas of applied animal behavior and all over the world....

  2. Early Stirrings in International Education, Part V: The ISA Primary Curriculum and Early Donors to the IB Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Ian

    2003-01-01

    Briefly describes the little-known ISA international primary education and its link with Desmond Cole-Baker. Also details contributions of UNESCO and other organizations to the continuing development of the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme from 1960 to the present. (Contains 19 references.) (AUTH/NB)

  3. Internal Structure of a Strike-Slip Dilational Fault Jog: Overlander Fault, Mt Isa Inlier, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, R. H.; Ghisetti, F.; Begbie, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    The Overlander Fault is one of a set of NE-SW subvertical dextral strike-slip faults which, together with a NW-SE conjugate sinistral set, disrupt the Mt Isa Proterozoic orogen (1590-1500 Ma) in NW Queensland, Australia. These late- to post-orogenic faults thus define a regional stress field with σ 1 oriented approximately E-W and σ 3 oriented approximately N-S. The Overlander Fault trends ˜060° across the metamorphic assemblage except where it refracts to 070-074° across an outcropping granitic pluton, the margins of which it offsets dextrally by ˜1.5 km. The stepover width of this dilational fault jog approaches 1 km, comparable to dilational stepovers within active strike-slip faults (e.g. the San Andreas fault at Parkfield). In the surrounding amphibolite facies metamorphic assemblage the fault trace is comparatively inconspicuous and unmineralized but where it crosses the granite it is defined by upstanding ridges of silicified microbreccia and associated quartz veining. The stepover region provides opportunities for studying incremental and finite dilatation associated with slip transfer across the jog, and associated influx of hydrothermal fluids. Shearing across the stepover region is accommodated by a mesh structure with principal components that include: (1) a series of silicified microbreccia-cataclasite `walls' <10 m or so thick with associated quartz veins <1 m or so thick trending 070° and defining a `main zone' about 100±20 m wide; (2) parallel subsidiary strike-slip cataclastic shear zones occurring <200 m laterally from the main zone; (3) a set of subvertical <1-2 m thick extension veins oriented 090-100° , some with evidence of marginal shearing (both sinistral and dextral); (4) a conspicuous sinistral extensional-shear curving eastwards for ˜250 m from the main fault core on a trend of 100-115° ; and (5) a set of unmineralized faults with sinistral separations trending 120-130° . Slickenfibers and striations along the main fault

  4. linkedISA: semantic representation of ISA-Tab experimental metadata

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reporting and sharing experimental metadata- such as the experimental design, characteristics of the samples, and procedures applied, along with the analysis results, in a standardised manner ensures that datasets are comprehensible and, in principle, reproducible, comparable and reusable. Furthermore, sharing datasets in formats designed for consumption by humans and machines will also maximize their use. The Investigation/Study/Assay (ISA) open source metadata tracking framework facilitates standards-compliant collection, curation, visualization, storage and sharing of datasets, leveraging on other platforms to enable analysis and publication. The ISA software suite includes several components used in increasingly diverse set of life science and biomedical domains; it is underpinned by a general-purpose format, ISA-Tab, and conversions exist into formats required by public repositories. While ISA-Tab works well mainly as a human readable format, we have also implemented a linked data approach to semantically define the ISA-Tab syntax. Results We present a semantic web representation of the ISA-Tab syntax that complements ISA-Tab's syntactic interoperability with semantic interoperability. We introduce the linkedISA conversion tool from ISA-Tab to the Resource Description Framework (RDF), supporting mappings from the ISA syntax to multiple community-defined, open ontologies and capitalising on user-provided ontology annotations in the experimental metadata. We describe insights of the implementation and how annotations can be expanded driven by the metadata. We applied the conversion tool as part of Bio-GraphIIn, a web-based application supporting integration of the semantically-rich experimental descriptions. Designed in a user-friendly manner, the Bio-GraphIIn interface hides most of the complexities to the users, exposing a familiar tabular view of the experimental description to allow seamless interaction with the RDF representation, and visualising

  5. International Summit on Prevention of Mental Retardation from Biomedical Causes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Jean, Ed.

    Proceedings from the International Summit on Prevention of Mental Retardation from Biomedical Causes are provided. After a list of participants and summary of the highlights of the conference, the keynote address by H. Moser is presented. The following 13 papers are provided along with workshop recommendations and a list of main points elicited…

  6. International biomedical law in search for its normative status.

    PubMed

    Krajewska, Atina

    2012-01-01

    The broad and multifaceted problem of global health law and global health governance has been attracting increasing attention in the last few decades. The global community has failed to establish international legal regime that deals comprehensively with the 'technological revolution'. The latter has posed complex questions to regions of the world with widely differing cultural perspectives. At the same time, an increasing number of governmental and non-state actors have become significantly involved in the sector. They use legal, political, and other forms of decision-making that result in regulatory instruments of contrasting normative status. Law created in this heterogeneous environment has been said to be fragmented, inconsistent, and exacerbating uncertainties. Therefore, claims have been made that a centralised and institutionalised system would help address the problems of transparency, legitimacy and efficiency. Nevertheless, little scholarly consideration is paid to the normative status of international biomedical law. This paper explores whether formalisation and "constitutionalisation" of biomedical law are indeed inevitable for its establishment as a separate regulatory regime. It does so by analysing the proliferation of biomedical law in light of two the theory of fragmentation and the theory of global legal pluralism. Investigating the problem in this way helps determine the theoretical framework and methodology of future studies of biomedical law at the international level. This in turn should help its future development in a more consistent and harmonised manner. PMID:23115826

  7. ISA accelerometer and Lunar science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, Valerio; Peron, Roberto; Lucchesi, David; Santoli, Francesco; Lefevre, Carlo; Fiorenza, Emiliano; Nozzoli, Sergio; Lucente, Marco; Magnafico, Carmelo; Milyukov, Vadim

    In recent years the Moon has become again a target for exploration activities, as shown by many missions, performed, ongoing or foreseen. The reasons for this new wave are manifold. The knowledge of formation and evolution of the Moon to its current state is important in order to trace the overall history of the Solar System. An effective driving factor is the possibility of building a human settlement on its surface, with all the related issues of environment characterization, safety, resources, communication and navigation. Our natural satellite is also an important laboratory for fundamental physics: Lunar Laser Ranging is continuing to provide important data for testing gravitation theories. All these topics are providing stimulus and inspirations for new experiments: in fact a wide variety of them has been proposed to be conducted on the lunar surface. ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) can provide an important tool for lunar studies. Thanks to its design it works on-ground with the same configuration developed for in-orbit applications. It can therefore be used onboard a spacecraft, as a support to a radio science mission, and on the surface of the Moon, as a seismometer. This second option in particular has been the subject of preliminary studies and has been proposed as a candidate to be hosted on NASA ILN (International Lunar Network) and ESA First Lunar Lander. ISA-S (ISA-Seismometer) has a very high sensitivity, which has already been demonstrated with long time periods of usage on Earth. It features also a wide bandwidth, extended towards the low frequencies. After a description of the instrument, its use in the context of landing missions will be described and discussed, giving emphasis on its integration with the other components of the systems.

  8. Comparative study on the immunopotentiator effect of ISA 201, ISA 61, ISA 50, ISA 206 used in trivalent foot and mouth disease vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ehab El-Sayed; Gamal, Wael Mossad; Hassan, Amr Ismail; Mahdy, Safy El-Din; Hegazy, Akram Zakria; Abdel-Atty, Magdy Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Aim: A comparison study was conducted to explore the best internationally available adjuvant that could be used in production of a highly potent foot and mouth disease (FMD) vaccine, that could stimulate a strong immune response and possibly give greater protection against FMD. Materials and Methods: Four experimental batches of trivalent FMD vaccine were prepared with different available oil adjuvants which included Montanide ISA 201, 206, 61 and 50. Results: The results indicated that vaccines emulsified using Montanide ISA 201 and Montanide ISA 206 adjuvants elicited a protective humoral immune response from the 2nd week postvaccination (WPV) as for ISA 201 with serum neutralization test (SNT) and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA) antibody titers of 1.62±0.047a and 1.8±0.049a, 1.59±0.076a and 1.836±0.077a, and 1.71±0.06b and 1.96±0.074b for serotypes O, A, SAT2, respectively, and for ISA 206 at SNT and ELISA antibody titers of 1.5±0.082a and 1.84±0.084a, 1.56±0.037a and 1.818±0.052a, and 1.5±0.106a,b and 1.81±0.104a,b for FMD virus serotypes O, A and SAT2, respectively. For ISA 61 and ISA 50, the protective antibody titer appeared in the 3rd WPV. In the ISA 61 FMD vaccine, SNT and ELISA titer were 1.59±0.076a and 1.9±0.094a, 1.53±0.056a and 1.83±0.070a, and 1.5±0.082a and 1.84±0.094a for serotypes O, A and SAT2, respectively, and in the case of ISA 50 FMD vaccine, the SNT, and ELISA titer were recorded for serotypes O, A and SAT2 respectively, 1.59±0.037a and 1.8±0.030a, 1.68±0.056a,b and 1.916±0.065a,b, and 1.65±0.082a and 1.9±0.09a. On estimating the cellular immune response, the highest delta optical density levels for ISA 201 (0.395-0.460) and ISA 206 (0.375-0.428) were observed on 14 and 21 days post vaccination (DPV) respectively, while the highest levels of lymphoproliferation for ISA 61 (0.375-0.455) and ISA 50 (0.411-0.430) were on 21 and 28 DPV, respectively. Conclusion: The duration of immunity from Montanide ISA oils

  9. Proceedings of the fifth PTCOG meeting and international workshop on biomedical accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    This volume contains the proceeding and individual papers presented at the Fifth PTCOG meeting and International Workshop on Biomedical Accelerators. The meeting was divided into sessions on the biomedical aspects of therapy delivery, new biomedical accelerators, facilities, and beam localization and status report. Individual papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base.

  10. 78 FR 52777 - Implementation of the Revised International Guiding Principles for Biomedical Research Involving...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Implementation of the Revised International Guiding Principles for Biomedical Research Involving Animals SUMMARY: The National Institutes of Health (NIH)...

  11. The distribution of biomedical research resources and international justice.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2004-05-01

    According to some estimates, less than 10% of the world's biomedical research funds are dedicated to addressing problems that are responsible for 90% of the world's burden of disease. This paper explains why this disparity exists and what should be done about it. It argues that the disparity exists because: 1) multinational pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies do not regard research and development investments on the health problems of developing nations to be economically lucrative; and 2) governmental agencies that sponsor biomedical research face little political pressure to allocate funds for the problems of developing nations. This paper argues that developed nations have an obligation to address disparities related to biomedical research funding. To facilitate this effort, developed countries should establish a trust fund dedicated to research on the health problems of developing nations similar to the Global AIDS Fund. PMID:15086373

  12. ISA accelerometer and Lunar science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Carmisciano, C.; Fiorenza, E.; Lefevre, C.; Magnafico, C.; Peron, R.; Santoli, F.; Nozzoli, S.; Ungaro, D.; Argada, S.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years the Moon has become again a target for exploration activities, as shown by many missions, performed, ongoing or foreseen. The reasons for this new wave are manifold. The knowledge of formation and evolution of the Moon to its current state is important in order to trace the overall history of Solar System. An effective driving factor is the possibility of building a human settlement on its surface, with all the related issues of environment characterization, safety, resources, communication and navigation. Our natural satellite is also an important laboratory for fundamental physics: Lunar Laser Ranging is continuing to provide important data for testing gravitation theories. All these topics are providing stimulus and inspirations for new experiments. ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) can provide an important tool for lunar studies. Thanks to its structure (three one--dimensional sensors assembled in a composite structure) it works both in--orbit and on--ground, with the same configuration. It can therefore be used onboard a spacecraft, as a support to a radio science mission, and on the surface of the Moon, as a seismometer. This second option in particular has been proposed as a candidate to be hosted on NASA ILN (International Lunar Network) and ESA First Lunar Lander. After a description of the instrument, its use in the context of the missions will be described and discussed, giving emphasis on its integration with the other components of the respective experiments.

  13. The ISA accelerometer and Lunar science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, Valerio; Fiorenza, Emiliano; Lefevre, Carlo; Massimo Lucchesi, David; Lucente, Marco; Magnafico, Carmelo; Milyukov, Vadim; Nozzoli, Sergio; Peron, Roberto; Santoli, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    In recent years the Moon has become again a target for exploration activities, as shown by many missions, performed, ongoing or foreseen. The reasons for this new wave are manifold. The knowledge of formation and evolution of the Moon to its current state is important in order to trace the overall history of Solar System. An effective driving factor is the possibility of building a human settlement on its surface, with all the related issues of environment characterization, safety, resources, communication and navigation. Our natural satellite is also an important laboratory for fundamental physics: Lunar Laser Ranging is continuing to provide important data for testing gravitation theories. All these topics are providing stimulus and inspirations for new experiments: in fact a wide variety of them has been proposed to be conducted on the lunar surface. ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) can provide an important tool for lunar studies. Thanks to its structure (three one-dimensional sensors assembled in a composite structure) it works both in-orbit and on-ground, with the same configuration. It can therefore be used onboard a spacecraft, as a support to a radio science mission, and on the surface of the Moon, as a seismometer. This second option in particular has been the subject of preliminary studies and has been proposed as a candidate to be hosted on NASA ILN (International Lunar Network) and ESA First Lunar Lander. ISA-S (ISA-Seismometer) has a very high sensitivity, which has already been demonstrated with long time periods of usage on Earth. After a description of the instrument, its use in the context of landing missions will be described and discussed, giving emphasis on its integration with the other components of the systems.

  14. International Conference on Bio-Medical Instrumentation and related Engineering and Physical Sciences (BIOMEP 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-09-01

    The International Conference on Bio-Medical Instrumentation and related Engineering and Physical Sciences (BIOMEP 2015) took place in the Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Athens, Greece on June 18-20, 2015 and was organized by the Department of Biomedical Engineering. The scope of the conference was to provide a forum on the latest developments in Biomedical Instrumentation and related principles of Physical and Engineering sciences. Scientists and engineers from academic, industrial and health disciplines were invited to participate in the Conference and to contribute both in the promotion and dissemination of the scientific knowledge.

  15. ISA accelerometer and Moon science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, Valerio; Peron, Roberto; Santoli, Francesco; Fiorenza, Emiliano; Lefevre, Carlo; Nozzoli, Sergio; Reale, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    In recent years the Moon has become again a target for exploration activities, as shown by many performed, ongoing or foreseen missions. The reason for this new wave are manifold. The knowledge of formation and evolution of the Moon to current state is important in order to trace the overall history of Solar System. An effective driving factor is the possibility of building a human settlement on its surface, with all the related issues of environment characterization, safety, resources, communication and navigation. Our natural satellite is also an important laboratory for fundamental physics: Lunar Laser Ranging is continuing to provide important data that constrain possible theories of gravitation. All these topics are providing stimulus and inspirations for new experiments. ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) can provide an important tool for lunar studies. Thanks to its structure (three one-dimensional sensors assembled in a composite structure) it works both in-orbit and on-ground, with the same configuration. It therefore can be used onboard a spacecraft, as a support to a radio science mission, and on the surface of the Moon, as a seismometer. The first option has been explorated in the context of MAGIA (Missione Altimetrica Gravimetrica geochImica lunAre), a proposal for an exploration mission with a noteworthy part dedicated to gravimetry and fundamental physics. The second option is candidate to be hosted on NASA ILN (International Lunar Network) and ESA First Lunar Lander. After a description of the instrument, both of them will be described and discussed, giving emphasis on the integration of the instrument with the other components of the respective experiments.

  16. GAME/ISAS development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, M.; Riva, A.; Busonero, D.; Vecchiato, A.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Gallieni, D.; Lazzarini, P.; Guglieri, G.; Musso, Ivano; Navone, P.

    2014-08-01

    The Gravitation Astrometric Measurement Experiment (GAME) is a space mission for Fundamental Physics tests in the Solar system, through coronagraphy and Fizeau interferometry for differential astrometry. The precision goal on the γ and β General Relativity PPN parameters is respectively in the 10-8 and 10-6 range. The design is focused on systematic error control through multiple field simultaneous observation and calibration. The GAME instrument concept is based on multiple aperture Fizeau interferometry, observing simultaneously regions close to the Solar limb (requiring the adoption of coronagraphic techniques), and others away from the Sun. The diluted optics approach is selected to achieve an efficient rejection of the scattered solar radiation, while retaining an acceptable angular resolution on the science targets. The Interferometric Stratospheric Astrometry for Solar system (ISAS) project is a GAME technology demonstrator, providing milli-arcsec level astrometry on the main planets of the Solar System. The ISAS technical goal is the validation of basic concepts for GAME, in particular integration of Fizeau interferometry and coronagraphic techniques by means of pierced silicon carbide (SiC) mirrors, intermediate angle dual field astrometry, smart focal plane management for increased dynamic range and pointing correction. The ISAS instrument concept is a dual field, multiple aperture Fizeau interferometer, using coronagraphy for observation of Solar System planets also close to the Sun. A prototype SiC multi-aperture mirror was manufactured by Boostec (F), and has been investigated by thermo-elastic analysis to define the applicability to both GAME and ISAS designs. We describe the development status of both stratospheric and space options, as well as the current extrapolation of the SiC prototype characteristics to the GAME and ISAS optical configurations.

  17. National Library of Medicine: international cooperation for biomedical communications.

    PubMed Central

    Corning, M E

    1975-01-01

    The international programs of the National Library of Medicine may vary in mechanism, but all share the common objective of improved medical research, education, and practice. They are a natural extension of domestic responsibilities and represent a sharing of time, talent, and resources. The programs may be service-oriented, cooperative efforts based on the computerized information storage and retrieval system (MEDLARS), or establishment of regional medical library programs. Policy and operational aspects are presented. PMID:1109613

  18. Railgun experiment (HYPAC) at ISAS

    SciTech Connect

    Yamori, A.; Yanagisawa, M.; Sabo, K.; Kawashima, N. ); Furukawa, T.; Teii, S. )

    1991-01-01

    Rail gun is developed in ISAS for the study of the interaction of meteorites with planetary surface and the interaction of space debris. The authors of this paper attained an velocity constantly higher than 5 km/sec with a maximum of 6 km/sec. The importance of a good confinement of plasma behind the projectile to prevent a leakage of plasma ahead of it is shown to realize a high velocity. An effective acceleration using an aluminum rail is also shown.

  19. Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals. International Committee of Medical Journal Editors.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In the 13 years since it was first published the "Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals" (the Vancouver style), developed by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, has been widely accepted by both authors and editors; over 400 journals have stated that they will consider manuscripts that conform to its requirements. This is the fourth edition of the "Uniform requirements." PMID:8287338

  20. Basic biomedical sciences and the future of medical education: implications for internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Brass, Eric P

    2009-11-01

    The academic model of medical education in the United States is facing substantial challenges. Apprenticeship experiences with clinical faculty are increasingly important in most medical schools and residency programs. This trend threatens to separate clinical education from the scientific foundations of medical practice. Paradoxically, this devaluation of biomedical science is occurring as the ability to use new discoveries to rationalize clinical decision making is rapidly expanding. Understanding the scientific foundations of medical practice and the ability to apply them in the care of patients separates the physician from other health care professionals. The de-emphasis of biomedical science in medical education poses particular dangers for the future of internal medicine as the satisfaction derived from the application of science to the solving of a clinical problem has been a central attraction of the specialty. Internists should be engaged in the ongoing discussions of medical education reform and provide a strong voice in support of rigorous scientific training for the profession. PMID:19882372

  1. Research Workforce Diversity: The Case of Balancing National versus International Postdocs in US Biomedical Research

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffarzadegan, Navid; Hawley, Joshua; Desai, Anand

    2013-01-01

    The US government has been increasingly supporting postdoctoral training in biomedical sciences to develop the domestic research workforce. However, current trends suggest that mostly international researchers benefit from the funding, many of whom might leave the USA after training. In this paper, we describe a model used to analyse the flow of national versus international researchers into and out of postdoctoral training. We calibrate our model in the case of the USA and successfully replicate the data. We use the model to conduct simulation-based analyses of effects of different policies on the diversity of postdoctoral researchers. Our model shows that capping the duration of postdoctoral careers, a policy proposed previously, favours international postdoctoral researchers. The analysis suggests that the leverage point to help the growth of domestic research workforce is in the pregraduate education area, and many policies implemented at the postgraduate level have minimal or unintended effects on diversity. PMID:25368504

  2. ISAS: interferometric stratospheric astrometry for solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, M.; Fienga, A.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Riva, A.; Vecchiato, A.; Gallieni, D.; Chaillot, S.; Ligori, S.; Loreggia, D.

    2012-09-01

    The Interferometric Stratospheric Astrometry for Solar system (ISAS) project is designed for high precision astrometry on the brightest planets of the Solar System, with reference to many field stars, at the milli-arcsec (mas) level or better. The science goal is the improvement on our knowledge of the dynamics of the Solar System, complementing the Gaia observations of fainter objects. The technical goal is the validation of basic concepts for the proposed Gamma Astrometric Measurement Experiment (GAME) space mission, in particular, combination of Fizeau interferometry and coronagraphic techniques by means of pierced mirrors, intermediate angle dual field astrometry, smart focal plane management for increased dynamic range and pointing correction. We discuss the suitability of the stratospheric environment, close to space conditions, to the astrometric requirements. The instrument concept is a multiple field, multiple aperture Fizeau interferometer, observing simultaneously four fields, in order to improve on the available number of reference stars. Coronagraphic solutions are introduced to allow observation of internal planets (Mercury and Venus), as well as of external planets over a large fraction of their orbit, i.e. also close to conjunction with the Sun. We describe the science motivation, the proposed experiment profile and the expected performance.

  3. Review of the complexation of tetravalent actinides by ISA and gluconate under alkaline to hyperalkaline conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaona, X.; Montoya, V.; Colàs, E.; Grivé, M.; Duro, L.

    2008-12-01

    Isosaccharinic (ISA) and gluconic acids (GLU) are polyhydroxy carboxylic compounds showing a high affinity to metal complexation. Both organic ligands are expected in the cementitious environments usually considered for the disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The hyperalkaline conditions imposed by cementitious materials contribute to the formation of ISA through cellulose degradation, whereas GLU is commonly used as a concrete additive. Despite the high stability attributed to ISA/GLU complexes of tetravalent actinides, the number and reliability of available experimental studies is still limited. This work aims at providing a general and comprehensive overview of the state of the art regarding Th, U(IV), Np(IV), and Pu(IV) complexes with ISA and GLU. In the presence of ISA/GLU concentrations in the range 10 - 5 -10 - 2 M and absence of calcium, An(IV)(OH) x(L) y complexes (An(IV) = Th, U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(IV); L = ISA, GLU) are expected to dominate the aqueous speciation of tetravalent actinides in the alkaline pH range. There is a moderate agreement among their stability, although the stoichiometry of certain An(IV)-GLU complexes is still ill-defined. Under hyperalkaline conditions and presence of calcium, the species CaTh(OH) 4(L) 2(aq) has been described for both ISA and GLU, and similar complexes may be expected to form with other tetravalent actinides. In the present work, the available thermodynamic data for An(IV)-ISA/GLU complexes have been reviewed and re-calculated to ensure the internal consistency of the stability constants assessed. Further modelling exercises, estimations based on Linear Free-Energy Relationships (LFER) among tetravalent actinides, as well as direct analogies between ISA and GLU complexes have also been performed. This approach has led to the definition of a speciation scheme for the complexes of Th, U(IV), Np(IV) and Pu(IV) with ISA and GLU forming in alkaline to hyperalkaline pH conditions, both in the

  4. NASA ISAS Collaboration on the ISAS MUSES C Asteroid Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R.; Weinstein, S.; Wilcox, B.; Yeomans, D.

    1998-01-01

    NASA and Japan's Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) have agreed to cooperate on the first mission to collect samples from the surface of an asteroid and return them to Earth for in-depth study.

  5. Ten years of international collaboration in biomedical informatics and beyond: the AMAUTA program in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Sherrilynne; Garcia, Patricia J; Holmes, King K; Kimball, Ann Marie

    2010-01-01

    Well-trained people are urgently needed to tackle global health challenges through information and communication technologies. In this report, AMAUTA, a joint international collaborative training program between the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia and the University of Washington, which has been training Peruvian health professionals in biomedical and health informatics since 1999, is described. Four short-term courses have been organized in Lima, offering training to more than 200 graduate-level students. Long-term training to masters or doctorate level has been undertaken by eight students at the University of Washington. A combination of short-term and long-term strategies was found to be effective for enhancing institutional research and training enterprise. The AMAUTA program promoted the development and institution of informatics research and training capacity in Peru, and has resulted in a group of trained people playing important roles at universities, non-government offices, and the Ministry of Health in Peru. At present, the hub is being extended into Latin American countries, promoting South-to-South collaborations. PMID:20595317

  6. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference and Young Scientist School ''Magnetic resonance imaging in biomedical research''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumova, A. V.; Khodanovich, M. Y.; Yarnykh, V. L.

    2016-02-01

    The Second International Conference and Young Scientist School ''Magnetic resonance imaging in biomedical research'' was held on the campus of the National Research Tomsk State University (Tomsk, Russia) on September 7-9, 2015. The conference was focused on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications for biomedical research. The main goal was to bring together basic scientists, clinical researchers and developers of new MRI techniques to bridge the gap between clinical/research needs and advanced technological solutions. The conference fostered research and development in basic and clinical MR science and its application to health care. It also had an educational purpose to promote understanding of cutting-edge MR developments. The conference provided an opportunity for researchers and clinicians to present their recent theoretical developments, practical applications, and to discuss unsolved problems. The program of the conference was divided into three main topics. First day of the conference was devoted to educational lectures on the fundamentals of MRI physics and image acquisition/reconstruction techniques, including recent developments in quantitative MRI. The second day was focused on developments and applications of new contrast agents. Multinuclear and spectroscopic acquisitions as well as functional MRI were presented during the third day of the conference. We would like to highlight the main developments presented at the conference and introduce the prominent speakers. The keynote speaker of the conference Dr. Vasily Yarnykh (University of Washington, Seattle, USA) presented a recently developed MRI method, macromolecular proton fraction (MPF) mapping, as a unique tool for modifying image contrast and a unique tool for quantification of the myelin content in neural tissues. Professor Yury Pirogov (Lomonosov Moscow State University) described development of new fluorocarbon compounds and applications for biomedicine. Drs. Julia Velikina and Alexey

  7. Propagation of infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) virus in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Dannevig, B H; Falk, K; Press, C M

    1995-01-01

    A long-term cell line supporting growth of the infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) virus has been established. The cell line (SHK-1) was developed from a culture of head kidney leucocytes from Atlantic salmon, and exhibited macrophage-like enzyme reactivities. By means of transmission experiments, ISA infectivity of cell culture medium could be demonstrated from day 5 after infection of SHK-1 cells with ISA-infective tissue homogenate. ISA infectivity of cell culture medium increased following repeated passages of virus. ISA-infected cell cultures develop cytopathic effects (CPE), making quantitation of virus possible. The development of CPE in ISA virus infected cells was inhibited by ammonium chloride, chloroquine and bafilomycin A, suggesting that infection of SHK-1 cells with ISA virus requires a low-pH step. PMID:8581019

  8. Applications of ISA accelerometer for the exploration of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, Valerio; Peron, Roberto; Nozzoli, Sergio; Santoli, Francesco; Fiorenza, Emiliano; Lefevre, Carlo; Reale, Andrea

    The recent years have seen again the Moon as a target for exploration activities. The reasons for this new wave are manifold, from the knowledge of formation and evolution of the Moon towards its current state to the possibility of building a human settlement on its surface, with all the related issues of environment characterization, safety, resources, communication and navigation. Our natural satellite is also an important laboratory for fundamental physics: Lunar Laser Ranging is continuing to provide important data that constrain possible theories of gravitation. ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) can provide an important tool in this respect. Thanks to its concept it works both in-orbit and on-ground, with essentially the same configuration. It therefore can be used onboard a spacecraft, as a support to a radio science mission, and on the surface of the Moon, as a seismometer. Two options have been considered. The first one is the support to space gravimetric measurements to be performed in the context of the proposed MAGIA (Missione Altimetrica Gravimetrica geochImica lunAre) mission. The second one concerns ISA as a candidate seismometer to be hosted on NASA ILN (International Lunar Network) and ESA First Lunar Lander. Both options will be discussed, giving emphasis on the integration of the instrument in the overall mission scenarios.

  9. [International regulation of ethics committees on biomedical research as protection mechanisms for people: analysis of the Additional Protocol to the Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine, concerning Biomedical Research of the Council of Europe].

    PubMed

    de Lecuona, Itziar

    2013-01-01

    The article explores and analyses the content of the Council of Europe's Additional Protocol to the Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine concerning Biomedical Research regarding the standard legal instrument in biomedical research, issued by an international organization with leadership in bioethics. This implies ethics committees are mechanisms of protection of humans in biomedical research and not mere bureaucratic agencies and that a sound inescapable international regulatory framework exists for States to regulate biomedical research. The methodology used focuses on the analysis of the background, the context in which it is made and the nature and scope of the Protocol. It also identifies and analyses the characteristics and functions of ethics committees in biomedical research and, in particular, the information that should be provided to this bodies to develop their functions previously, during and at the end of research projects. This analysis will provide guidelines, suggestions and conclusions for the awareness and training of members of these committees in order to influence the daily practice. This paper may also be of interest to legal practitioners who work in different areas of biomedical research. From this practical perspective, the article examines the legal treatment of the Protocol to meet new challenges and classic issues in research: the treatment of human biological samples, the use of placebos, avoiding double standards, human vulnerability, undue influence and conflicts of interest, among others. Also, from a critical view, this work links the legal responses to develop work procedures that are required for an effective performance of the functions assigned of ethics committees in biomedical research. An existing international legal response that lacks doctrinal standards and provides little support should, however, serve as a guide and standard to develop actions that allow ethics committees -as key bodies for States- to advance in

  10. International Space Station as Analog of Interplanetary Transit Vehicle For Biomedical Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.

    2012-01-01

    Astronaut missions lasting up to six months aboard the International Space Station (ISS) have much in common with interplanetary flights, especially the outbound, Earth-to-Mars transit portion of a Mars mission. Utilization of ISS and other appropriate platforms to prepare for crewed expeditions to planetary destinations including Mars has been the work of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) since 2005. HRP is charged specifically to understand and reduced the risks to astronaut health and performance in space exploration missions: everything HRP does and has done is directly related to that responsibility. Two major categories of human research have capitalized on ISS capabilities. The first category centers on the biomedical aspects of long-duration exposure to spaceflight factors, including prolonged weightlessness, radiation exposure, isolation and confinement, and actual risk to life and limb. These studies contribute to astronaut safety, health and efficiency on any long-duration missions, whether in low Earth orbit (LEO) or beyond. Qualitatively, weightlessness is weightlessness, whether in LEO or en route to Mars. The HRP sponsors investigations into losses in muscle and bone integrity, cardiovascular function, sensory-motor capability, immune capacity and psychosocial health, and development and demonstration of appropriate treatments and preventative measures. The second category includes studies that are focused on planetary expeditions beyond LEO. For these, ISS offers a high fidelity analog to investigate the combined effects of spaceflight factors (described above) plus the isolation and autonomy associated with simulated increasing distance from Earth. Investigations address crew cohesion, performance and workload, and mission control performance. The behavioral health and performance and space human factors aspects of planetary missions dominate this category. Work has already begun on a new investigation in this category which will examine the

  11. Potential commercial use of the International Space Station by the biotechnology/pharmaceutical/biomedical sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenthaler, George W.; Stodieck, Louis

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is the linch-pin of NASA's future space plans. It emphasizes scientific research by providing a world-class scientific laboratory in which to perform long-term basic science experiments in the space environment of microgravity, radiation, vacuum, vantage-point, etc. It will serve as a test-bed for determining human system response to long-term space flight and for developing the life support equipment necessary for NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise. The ISS will also provide facilities (up to 30% of the U.S. module) for testing material, agricultural, cellular, human, aquatic, and plant/animal systems to reveal phenomena heretofore shrouded by the veil of 1-g. These insights will improve life on Earth and will provide a commercial basis for new products and services. In fact, some products, e.g., rare metal-alloys, semiconductor chips, or protein crystals that cannot now be produced on Earth may be found to be sufficiently valuable to be manufactured on-orbit. Biotechnology, pharmaceutical and biomedical experiments have been regularly flown on 10-16 day Space Shuttle flights and on three-month Mir flights for basic science knowledge and for life support system and commercial product development. Since 1985, NASA has created several Commercial Space Centers (CSCs) for the express purpose of bringing university, government and industrial researchers together to utilize space flight and space technology to develop new industrial products and processes. BioServe Space Technologies at the University of Colorado at Boulder and Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas, is such a NASA sponsored CSC that has worked with over 65 companies and institutions in the Biotech Sector in the past 11 years and has successfully discovered and transferred new product and process information to its industry partners. While tests in the space environment have been limited to about two weeks on Shuttle or a few

  12. ISA 247: trans-ISA 247, trans-R 1524, ISA(TX)247, ISAtx 247, ISATx247, LX 211, LX211, R 1524, R-1524.

    PubMed

    2007-01-01

    Isotechnika is developing the immunosuppressive drug ISA 247, a calcineurin inhibitor that is undergoing clinical development for the treatment of psoriasis (phase III) and prevention of organ rejection after transplantation (phase II). Preclinical development for uveitis is also underway. Other autoimmune disease indications that could be explored include arthritis, type I diabetes and Crohn's disease. ISA 247 was being co-developed as R 1524 by Isotechnika and Roche. However, Roche is no longer involved in the development of this compound. Based on analysis of previously collected data, the trans-ISA 247 isomer was found to be more bioavailable and it is expected that this isomer can be administered at a lower dose compared with the previous formulation that consisted of an equivalent mixture of the two geometric isomers (cis and trans). Preclinical observations indicate that ISA 247 has the potential to be more potent and less toxic than other marketed immunosuppressants in its class used for the prevention of transplant rejection. Experiments to date suggest that ISA 247 is about three times as potent as ciclosporin, while genotoxicity studies in animals have shown that the compound has a significantly reduced tendency to cause renal toxicity. The combination of reduced toxicity and improved potency would give ISA 247 a therapeutic benefit over existing calcineurin-based treatments. Isotechnika and Roche entered into a co-development and commercialisation agreement in April 2002, with Roche gaining the exclusive worldwide marketing rights for ISA 247; Isotechnika received milestone payments of $US4 million and $CAN21.9 million in September 2002 and May 2003, respectively. The agreement was restructured in April 2004, under which Isotechnika will now solely manage and fund the clinical development of trans-ISA 247. Upon successful completion of these trials, Isotechnika will conduct at its own expense a phase IIb study in renal transplantation and phase III

  13. Critically engaging: integrating the social and the biomedical in international microbicides research

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials and critical social theory are known not to be happy bedfellows. Such trials are embedded in a positivist view of the world, seeking definitive answers to testable questions; critical social theory questions the methods by which we deem the world knowable and may consider experiments in the biomedical sciences as social artifacts. Yet both of these epistemologically and methodologically divergent fields offer potentially important advances in HIV research. In this paper, we describe collaboration between social and biomedical researchers on a large, publicly funded programme to develop vaginal microbicides for HIV prevention. In terms of critical engagement, having integrated and qualitative social science components in the protocol meant potentially nesting alternative epistemologies at the heart of the randomized controlled trial. The social science research highlighted the fallibility and fragility of trial data by demonstrating inconsistencies in key behavioural measurements. It also foregrounded the disjuncture between biomedical conceptions of microbicides and the meanings and uses of the study gel in the context of users’ everyday lives. These findings were communicated to the clinical and epidemiological members of the team on an ongoing basis via a feedback loop, through which new issues of concern could also be debated and, in theory, data collection adjusted to the changing needs of the programme. Although critical findings were taken on board by the trialists, a hierarchy of evidence nonetheless remained that limited the utility of some social science findings. This was in spite of mutual respect between clinical epidemiologists and social scientists, equal representation in management and coordination bodies, and equity in funding for the different disciplines. We discuss the positive role that social science integrated into an HIV prevention trial can play, but nonetheless highlight tensions that remain where a hierarchy

  14. Critically engaging: integrating the social and the biomedical in international microbicides research.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Catherine M; Pool, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials and critical social theory are known not to be happy bedfellows. Such trials are embedded in a positivist view of the world, seeking definitive answers to testable questions; critical social theory questions the methods by which we deem the world knowable and may consider experiments in the biomedical sciences as social artifacts. Yet both of these epistemologically and methodologically divergent fields offer potentially important advances in HIV research. In this paper, we describe collaboration between social and biomedical researchers on a large, publicly funded programme to develop vaginal microbicides for HIV prevention. In terms of critical engagement, having integrated and qualitative social science components in the protocol meant potentially nesting alternative epistemologies at the heart of the randomized controlled trial. The social science research highlighted the fallibility and fragility of trial data by demonstrating inconsistencies in key behavioural measurements. It also foregrounded the disjuncture between biomedical conceptions of microbicides and the meanings and uses of the study gel in the context of users' everyday lives. These findings were communicated to the clinical and epidemiological members of the team on an ongoing basis via a feedback loop, through which new issues of concern could also be debated and, in theory, data collection adjusted to the changing needs of the programme. Although critical findings were taken on board by the trialists, a hierarchy of evidence nonetheless remained that limited the utility of some social science findings. This was in spite of mutual respect between clinical epidemiologists and social scientists, equal representation in management and coordination bodies, and equity in funding for the different disciplines. We discuss the positive role that social science integrated into an HIV prevention trial can play, but nonetheless highlight tensions that remain where a hierarchy

  15. Legal aspects of genetic databases for international biomedical research: the example of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC).

    PubMed

    Romeo-Casabona, Carlos; Nicolás, Pilar; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Joly, Yann; Wallace, Susan E; Chalmers, Don; Dyke, Stephanie; Kennedy, Karen; Troncoso, Antonio; Kaan, Terry; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle

    2012-01-01

    There is a noticeable lack of international regulation on personal data exchange and management in research. This article sheds light in this area by describing how the International Cancer Genome Consortium is developing policies and procedures to address the ethical and legal issues raised by the international transfer of data and results. These policies and procedures aim, first and most importantly, to safeguard the interests of the research participants and other involved stakeholders and, secondly, to facilitate the sharing of data and results to realize greater benefits from this kind of internationally collaborative genetic research. PMID:23520913

  16. Evaluation of Montanide ISA 71 VG adjuvant during profilin vaccination against experimental coccidiosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chickens were immunized subcutaneously with an Eimeria recombinant profilin protein plus ISA 70 VG (ISA 70) or ISA 71 VG (ISA 71) water-in-oil adjuvants, or with profilin alone, and comparative RNA microarray hybridizations were performed to ascertain global transcriptome changes induced by profilin...

  17. Integrated Sensor Architecture (ISA) for Live Virtual Constructive (LVC) environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, Christine L.; Harkrider, Susan; Harrell, John; Hepp, Jared

    2014-06-01

    The Integrated Sensor Architecture (ISA) is an interoperability solution that allows for the sharing of information between sensors and systems in a dynamic tactical environment. The ISA created a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) that identifies common standards and protocols which support a net-centric system of systems integration. Utilizing a common language, these systems are able to connect, publish their needs and capabilities, and interact with other systems even on disadvantaged networks. Within the ISA project, three levels of interoperability were defined and implemented and these levels were tested at many events. Extensible data models and capabilities that are scalable across multi-echelons are supported, as well as dynamic discovery of capabilities and sensor management. The ISA has been tested and integrated with multiple sensors, platforms, and over a variety of hardware architectures in operational environments.

  18. The ISAS Synchrotron Microprobe at DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlen, Alex von; Kraemer, Markus; Hergenroeder, Roland; Berges, Ulf

    2007-01-19

    Since 2004 ISAS operates a dipole beamline at the synchrotron radiation facility DELTA at University of Dortmund. Synchrotron radiation is used at this beamline as an excellent excitation source for X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF). Among others, the high brilliance of the synchrotron radiation in contrast to conventional X-ray tubes, the strong polarization of the synchrotron radiation and the low divergence of the electron beam can be applied to XRF offering several advantages for spectroscopy. These outstanding features encouraged us to develop and operate a synchrotron radiation induced X-ray micro fluorescence probe connected to a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (SR-WDXRF). A relevant characteristic of such a device, namely, good lateral resolution at high spectral resolution can be applied for single spot-, line-scan and area map analyses of a variety of objects. The instrumentation of the SR-WDXRF and the performed experiments will be presented. Main task is the detection of light elements by their fluorescence K-lines and the specification of element compounds.

  19. Recommendations of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) on Education in Biomedical and Health Informatics. First Revision.

    PubMed

    Mantas, John; Ammenwerth, Elske; Demiris, George; Hasman, Arie; Haux, Reinhold; Hersh, William; Hovenga, Evelyn; Lun, K C; Marin, Heimar; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Wright, Graham

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) agreed on revising the existing international recommendations in health informatics/medical informatics education. These should help to establish courses, course tracks or even complete programs in this field, to further develop existing educational activities in the various nations and to support international initiatives concerning education in biomedical and health informatics (BMHI), particularly international activities in educating BMHI specialists and the sharing of courseware. Method: An IMIA task force, nominated in 2006, worked on updating the recommendations' first version. These updates have been broadly discussed and refined by members of IMIA's National Member Societies, IMIA's Academic Institutional Members and by members of IMIA's Working Group on Health and Medical Informatics Education. Results and Conclusions: The IMIA recommendations center on educational needs for health care professionals to acquire knowledge and skills in information processing and information and communication technology. The educational needs are described as a three-dimensional framework. The dimensions are: 1) professionals in health care (e.g. physicians, nurses, BMHI professionals), 2) type of specialization in BMHI (IT users, BMHI specialists), and 3) stage of career progression (bachelor, master, doctorate). Learning outcomes are defined in terms of knowledge and practical skills for health care professionals in their role a) as IT user and b) as BMHI specialist. Recommendations are given for courses/course tracks in BMHI as part of educational programs in medicine, nursing, health care management, dentistry, pharmacy, public health, health record administration, and informatics/computer science as well as for dedicated programs in BMHI (with bachelor, master or doctor degree). To support education in BMHI, IMIA offers to award a certificate for high-quality BMHI education. It supports information

  20. Multilateral Biomedical Data Sharing in the One-year Joint US-Russian Mission on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.; Haven, C.; Johnson-Throop, K.; Van Baalen, M.; McFather, J.

    2014-01-01

    The One Year Mission (1YM) by two astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS), starting in March 2015, offers a unique opportunity to expand multilateral collaboration by sharing data and resources among the partner agencies in preparation for planned space exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit. Agreements and protocols will be established for the collection, distribution, analysis and reporting of both research and clinical data. Data will be shared between the agencies sponsoring the investigators, and between the research and clinical medicine communities where common interests are identified. The assignment of only two astronauts, one Russian and the other American, to the 1YM necessitated creativity in bilateral efforts to maximize the biomedical return from the opportunity. Addition of Canadian, European and Japanese investigations make the effort even more integrative. There will be three types of investigations: joint, cross-participation and data-exchange. The joint investigations have US and Russian coprincipal investigators, and the data acquired will be their common responsibility. The other two types must develop data sharing agreements and processes specific to their needs. A multilateral panel of ISS partner space agencies will develop policies for international exchange of scientific information to meet their science objectives and priorities. They will promote archiving of space flight data and will inform each other and the scientific community at large about the results obtained from space life sciences studies. Integration tasks for the 1YM are based on current experience from the ISS and previous efforts on the Russian space station Mir. Closer coordination between international partners requires more common approaches to remove barriers to multilateral resource utilization on the ISS. Greater integration in implementation should increase utilization efficiency to benefit all participants in spaceflight human research. This

  1. ISA-MIP: A co-ordinated intercomparison of Interactive Stratospheric Aerosol models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmreck, Claudia; Mann, Graham; Aquila, Valentina; Bruehl, Christoph; Chin, Mian; Dohmse, Sandip; English, Jason; Lee, Lindsay; Mills, Michael; Hommel, Rene; Neely, Ryan; Schmidt, Anja; Sheng, Jianxiong; Toohey, Matthew; Weisenstein, Debra

    2016-04-01

    The SPARC activity, "Stratospheric Sulfur and its Role in Climate" (SSiRC) was initiated to coordinate international research activities on modelling and observation of stratospheric sulphate aerosols (and precursor gases) in order to assess its climate forcing and feedback. With several international activities to extend and improve observational stratospheric aerosol capabilities and data sets, and a growing number of global models treating stratospheric aerosol interactively, a new model intercomparison activity "ISA-MIP" has been established in the frame of SSIRC. ISA-MIP will compare interactive stratospheric aerosol (ISA) models using a range of observations to constrain and improve the models and to provide a sound scientific basis for future work. Four ISA-MIP experiments have been designed to assess different periods of the obervational stratospheric aerosol record, and to explore key processes which influence the formation and temporal development of stratospheric aerosol. The "Background" experiment will focus on the role of microphysical and transport processes under volcanically quiescent conditions, where the stratospheric aerosol size distribution is only modulated by seasonal circulations. The "Model intercomparison of Transient Aerosol Record" (MiTAR) experiment will focus on addressing the role of small- to moderate-magnitude volcanic eruptions and transport processes in the upper troposphere - lower stratosphere (UTLS) aerosols loading over the period 1998-2011. Background and MiTAR simulations will be compared to recent in-situ and satellite observations to evaluate the performances of the model and understand their strengths and weaknesses. Two further experiments investigate the radiative forcing from historical major eruptions. The Historical Eruptions SO2 Emission Assessment (HErSEA) will involve models carrying out mini-ensembles of the stratospheric aerosol perturbations from each of the 1963 Agung, 1982 El Chichon and 1991 Pinatubo

  2. Observation Platform for Dynamic Biomedical and Biotechnology Experiments Using the International Space Station (ISS) Light Microscopy Module (LMM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurk, Michael A. (Andy)

    2015-01-01

    Techshot, Inc., has developed an observation platform for the LMM on the ISS that will enable biomedical and biotechnology experiments. The LMM Dynamic Stage consists of an electronics module and the first two of a planned suite of experiment modules. Specimens and reagent solutions can be injected into a small, hollow microscope slide-the heart of the innovation-via a combination of small reservoirs, pumps, and valves. A life science experiment module allows investigators to load up to two different fluids for on-orbit, real-time image cytometry. Fluids can be changed to initiate a process, fix biological samples, or retrieve suspended cells. A colloid science experiment module conducts microparticle and nanoparticle tests for investigation of colloid self-assembly phenomena. This module includes a hollow glass slide and heating elements for the creation of a thermal gradient from one end of the slide to the other. The electronics module supports both experiment modules and contains a unique illuminator/condenser for bright and dark field and phase contrast illumination, power supplies for two piezoelectric pumps, and controller boards for pumps and valves. This observation platform safely contains internal fluids and will greatly accelerate the research and development (R&D) cycle of numerous experiments, products, and services aboard the ISS.

  3. Adapting ISA system warnings to enhance user acceptance.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Felipe; Liang, Yingzhen; Aparicio, Francisco

    2012-09-01

    Inappropriate speed is a major cause of traffic accidents. Different measures have been considered to control traffic speed, and intelligent speed adaptation (ISA) systems are one of the alternatives. These systems know the speed limits and try to improve compliance with them. This paper deals with an informative ISA system that provides the driver with an advance warning before reaching a road section with singular characteristics that require a lower safe speed than the current speed. In spite of the extensive tests performed using ISA systems, few works show how warnings can be adapted to the driver. This paper describes a method to adapt warning parameters (safe speed on curves, zone of influence of a singular stretch, deceleration process and reaction time) to normal driving behavior. The method is based on a set of tests with and without the ISA system. This adjustment, as well as the analysis of driver acceptance before and after the adaptation and changes in driver behavior (changes in speed and path) resulting from the tested ISA regarding a driver's normal driving style, is shown in this paper. The main conclusion is that acceptance by drivers increased significantly after redefining the warning parameters, but the effect of speed homogenization was not reduced. PMID:22664666

  4. Working with Concepts: The Role of Community in International Collaborative Biomedical Research.

    PubMed

    Marsh, V M; Kamuya, D K; Parker, M J; Molyneux, C S

    2011-04-01

    The importance of communities in strengthening the ethics of international collaborative research is increasingly highlighted, but there has been much debate about the meaning of the term 'community' and its specific normative contribution. We argue that 'community' is a contingent concept that plays an important normative role in research through the existence of morally significant interplay between notions of community and individuality. We draw on experience of community engagement in rural Kenya to illustrate two aspects of this interplay: (i) that taking individual informed consent seriously involves understanding and addressing the influence of communities in which individuals' lives are embedded; (ii) that individual participation can generate risks and benefits for communities as part of the wider implications of research. We further argue that the contingent nature of a community means that defining boundaries is generally a normative process itself, with ethical implications. Community engagement supports the enactment of normative roles; building mutual understanding and trust between researchers and community members have been important goals in Kilifi, requiring a broad range of approaches. Ethical dilemmas are continuously generated as part of these engagement activities, including the risks of perverse outcomes related to existing social relations in communities and conditions of 'half knowing' intrinsic to processes of developing new understandings. PMID:21416064

  5. Assessment of Knowledge and Practices regarding Injection Safety and Related Biomedical Waste Management amongst Interns in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital, Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Anita Shankar; Priyanka; Khandekar, Jyoti; Bachani, Damodar

    2014-01-01

    Injuries caused by needle sticks and sharps due to unsafe injection practices are the most common occupational hazard amongst health care personnel. The objectives of our study were to determine the existing knowledge and practices of interns and change in their level following an information education and communication (IEC) package regarding safe injection practices and related biomedical waste management and to determine the status of hepatitis B vaccination. We conducted a follow-up study among all (106) interns in a tertiary care teaching hospital, Delhi. A predesigned semistructured questionnaire was used. IEC package in the form of hands-on workshop and power point presentation was used. A highly significant (P < 0.001) improvement in the knowledge of interns was observed after intervention with respect to the “three criteria of a safe injection” and cleaning of injection site. Thus, the baseline knowledge of interns was good in certain aspects of injection safety, namely, diseases transmitted by unsafe injections and their prevention. We conclude that IEC intervention package was effective in significantly improving the interns' knowledge regarding safe injection practices and biomedical waste management. Almost two-thirds of interns were immunised against hepatitis B before the intervention and this proportion rose significantly after the intervention.

  6. 2008 Final Report: Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Sulfur Oxides – Health Criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    isa_cover.jpg" vspace = "2" hspace="2" align="right" width="195" height="277" border="1" alt="Cover of the SOx ISA 2008 Report"> EPA has announced the release of the Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Su...

  7. Replacement of the Endogenous Starch Debranching Enzymes ISA1 and ISA2 of Arabidopsis with the Rice Orthologs Reveals a Degree of Functional Conservation during Starch Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Streb, Sebastian; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the interchangeability of enzymes in starch metabolism between dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous plant species. Amylopectin - a branched glucose polymer - is the major component of starch and is responsible for its semi-crystalline property. Plants synthesize starch with distinct amylopectin structures, varying between species and tissues. The structure determines starch properties, an important characteristic for cooking and nutrition, and for the industrial uses of starch. Amylopectin synthesis involves at least three enzyme classes: starch synthases, branching enzymes and debranching enzymes. For all three classes, several enzyme isoforms have been identified. However, it is not clear which enzyme(s) are responsible for the large diversity of amylopectin structures. Here, we tested whether the specificities of the debranching enzymes (ISA1 and ISA2) are major determinants of species-dependent differences in amylopectin structure by replacing the dicotyledonous Arabidopsis isoamylases (AtISA1 and AtISA2) with the monocotyledonous rice (Oryza sativa) isoforms. We demonstrate that the ISA1 and ISA2 are sufficiently well conserved between these species to form heteromultimeric chimeric Arabidopsis/rice isoamylase enzymes. Furthermore, we were able to reconstitute the endosperm-specific rice OsISA1 homomultimeric complex in Arabidopsis isa1isa2 mutants. This homomultimer was able to facilitate normal rates of starch synthesis. The resulting amylopectin structure had small but significant differences in comparison to wild-type Arabidopsis amylopectin. This suggests that ISA1 and ISA2 have a conserved function between plant species with a major role in facilitating the crystallization of pre-amylopectin synthesized by starch synthases and branching enzymes, but also influencing the final structure of amylopectin. PMID:24642810

  8. Collisions in space: A retrospective overview of ISAS studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesugi, K.

    A chronological review of studies in ISAS concerning collisions in space is presented. The collision probability in space with artificial orbiting bodies was estimated, and a Space Traffic Control System was proposed, in 1971. The design of a space station for safety against collision hazards was discussed in 1972. A trajectory optimization technique for low-thrust multiple rendezvous mission in order ti sweep space debris around the earth was developed in 1977. In 1984, the collision probability was reestimated using space bedris data accumulated for more than a decade. Several experimental projects in ISAS, such as hypervelocity impact experiments using a railgun system, sampling and measuring of alumina particles in exhaust plume of solid-propellant propellant rocket motors, and a result of analysis on the behavior of such alumina particles in orbit are also introduced.

  9. The in-depth safety assessment (ISA) pilot projects in Ukraine.

    SciTech Connect

    Kot, C. A.

    1998-02-10

    Ukraine operates pressurized water reactors of the Soviet-designed type, VVER. All Ukrainian plants are currently operating with annually renewable permits until they update their safety analysis reports (SARs). After approval of the SARS by the Ukrainian Nuclear Regulatory Authority, the plants will be granted longer-term operating licenses. In September 1995, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority and the Government Nuclear Power Coordinating Committee of Ukraine issued a new contents requirement for the safety analysis reports of VVERs in Ukraine. It contains requirements in three major areas: design basis accident (DBA) analysis, probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), and beyond design-basis accident (BDBA) analysis. The DBA requirements are an expanded version of the older SAR requirements. The last two requirements, on PRA and BDBA, are new. The US Department of Energy (USDOE), through the International Nuclear Safety Program (INSP), has initiated an assistance and technology transfer program to Ukraine to assist their nuclear power stations in developing a Western-type technical basis for the new SARS. USDOE sponsored In-Depth Safety Assessments (ISAs) have been initiated at three pilot nuclear reactor units in Ukraine, South Ukraine Unit 1, Zaporizhzhya Unit 5, and Rivne Unit 1. USDOE/INSP have structured the ISA program in such a way as to provide maximum assistance and technology transfer to Ukraine while encouraging and supporting the Ukrainian plants to take the responsibility and initiative and to perform the required assessments.

  10. Pay as You Speed, ISA with incentive for not speeding: results and interpretation of speed data.

    PubMed

    Lahrmann, Harry; Agerholm, Niels; Tradisauskas, Nerius; Berthelsen, Kasper K; Harms, Lisbeth

    2012-09-01

    To simulate a market introduction of Intelligent Speed Adaptation (ISA) and to study the effect of a Pay as You Speed (PAYS) concept, a field trial with 153 drivers was conducted during 2007-2009. The participants drove under PAYS conditions for a shorter or a longer period. The PAYS concept consisted of informative ISA linked with economic incentive for not speeding, measured through automatic count of penalty points whenever the speed limit was exceeded. The full incentive was set to 30% of a participant's insurance premium. The participants were exposed to different treatments, with and without incentive crossed with informative ISA present or absent. The results showed that ISA is an efficient tool for reducing speeding particularly on rural roads. The analysis of speed data demonstrated that the proportion of distance driven above the speed where the ISA equipment responded (PDA) was a sensitive measure for reflecting the effect of ISA, whereas mean free flow speed and the 85th percentile speed, were less sensitive to ISA effects. The PDA increased a little over time but still remained at a low level; however, when ISA was turned off, the participants' speeding relapsed to the baseline level. Both informative ISA and incentive ISA reduced the PDA, but there was no statistically significant interaction. Informative reduced it more than the incentive. PMID:22664664

  11. ISA implementation and uncertainty: a literature review and expert elicitation study.

    PubMed

    van der Pas, J W G M; Marchau, V A W J; Walker, W E; van Wee, G P; Vlassenroot, S H

    2012-09-01

    Each day, an average of over 116 people die from traffic accidents in the European Union. One out of three fatalities is estimated to be the result of speeding. The current state of technology makes it possible to make speeding more difficult, or even impossible, by placing intelligent speed limiters (so called ISA devices) in vehicles. Although the ISA technology has been available for some years now, and reducing the number of road traffic fatalities and injuries has been high on the European political agenda, implementation still seems to be far away. Experts indicate that there are still too many uncertainties surrounding ISA implementation, and dealing with these uncertainties is essential for implementing ISA. In this paper, a systematic and representative inventory of the uncertainties is made based upon the literature. Furthermore, experts in the field of ISA were surveyed and asked which uncertainties are barriers for ISA implementation, and how uncertain these uncertainties are. We found that the long-term effects and the effects of large-scale implementation of ISA are still uncertain and are the most important barriers for the implementation of the most effective types of ISA. One way to deal with these uncertainties would be to start implementation on a small scale and gradually expand the penetration, in order to learn how ISA influences the transport system over time. PMID:22664671

  12. Prospective integration of cultural consideration in biomedical research for patients with advanced cancer: recommendations from an international conference on malignant bowel obstruction in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Fineberg, Iris Cohen; Grant, Marcia; Aziz, Noreen M; Payne, Richard; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Dunn, Geoffrey P; Kinzbrunner, Barry M; Palos, Guadalupe; Shinagawa, Susan Matsuko; Krouse, Robert S

    2007-07-01

    In the setting of an international conference on malignant bowel obstruction as a model for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in palliative care, we discuss the importance of incorporating prospective cultural considerations into research design. The approach commonly used in biomedical research has traditionally valued the RCT as the ultimate "way of knowing" about how to best treat a medical condition. The foremost limitation of this approach is the lack of recognition of the impact of cultural viewpoints on research outcomes. We propose that interest relevant to cultural viewpoints should be emphasized in conceptualizing and interpreting research questions, designs, and results. In addition to recognizing our cultural biases as individuals and researchers, we recommend two major shifts in designing and implementing RCTs: 1) inclusion of a multidisciplinary team of researchers to inform the diversity of perspectives and expertise brought to the research, and 2) use of mixed methods of inquiry, reflecting both deductive and inductive modes of inference. PMID:17532174

  13. Biomedical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Biomedical problems encountered by man in space which have been identified as a result of previous experience in simulated or actual spaceflight include cardiovascular deconditioning, motion sickness, bone loss, muscle atrophy, red cell alterations, fluid and electrolyte loss, radiation effects, radiation protection, behavior, and performance. The investigations and the findings in each of these areas were reviewed. A description of how biomedical research is organized within NASA, how it is funded, and how it is being reoriented to meet the needs of future manned space missions is also provided.

  14. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Sulfur Oxides – Health Criteria (First External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has announced that the First External Review Draft of the Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Sulfur Oxides – Health Criteria has been made available for independent peer review and public review. This draft ISA document represents a concise synthesis and evaluatio...

  15. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Sulfur Oxides – Health Criteria (Second External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has announced that the Second External Review Draft of the Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Sulfur Oxides – Health Criteria has been made available for independent peer review and public review. This draft ISA document represents a concise synthesis and evaluati...

  16. Who Has Used Internal Company Documents for Biomedical and Public Health Research and Where Did They Find Them?

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, L. Susan; Rutkow, Lainie; Vedula, S. Swaroop; Kaufmann, Christopher N.; Rosman, Lori M.; Twose, Claire; Mahendraratnam, Nirosha; Dickersin, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the sources of internal company documents used in public health and healthcare research. Methods We searched PubMed and Embase for articles using internal company documents to address a research question about a health-related topic. Our primary interest was where authors obtained internal company documents for their research. We also extracted information on type of company, type of research question, type of internal documents, and funding source. Results Our searches identified 9,305 citations of which 357 were eligible. Scanning of reference lists and consultation with colleagues identified 4 additional articles, resulting in 361 included articles. Most articles examined internal tobacco company documents (325/361; 90%). Articles using documents from pharmaceutical companies (20/361; 6%) were the next most common. Tobacco articles used documents from repositories; pharmaceutical documents were from a range of sources. Most included articles relied upon internal company documents obtained through litigation (350/361; 97%). The research questions posed were primarily about company strategies to promote or position the company and its products (326/361; 90%). Most articles (346/361; 96%) used information from miscellaneous documents such as memos or letters, or from unspecified types of documents. When explicit information about study funding was provided (290/361 articles), the most common source was the US-based National Cancer Institute. We developed an alternative and more sensitive search targeted at identifying additional research articles using internal pharmaceutical company documents, but the search retrieved an impractical number of citations for review. Conclusions Internal company documents provide an excellent source of information on health topics (e.g., corporate behavior, study data) exemplified by articles based on tobacco industry documents. Pharmaceutical and other industry documents appear to have been less used for

  17. Biomedical Conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    As a result of Biomedical Conferences, Vivo Metric Systems Co. has produced cardiac electrodes based on NASA technology. Frequently in science, one highly specialized discipline is unaware of relevant advances made in other areas. In an attempt to familiarize researchers in a variety of disciplines with medical problems and needs, NASA has sponsored conferences that bring together university scientists, practicing physicians and manufacturers of medical instruments.

  18. Microflow1, a sheathless fiber-optic flow cytometry biomedical platform: demonstration onboard the international space station.

    PubMed

    Dubeau-Laramée, Geneviève; Rivière, Christophe; Jean, Isabelle; Mermut, Ozzy; Cohen, Luchino Y

    2014-04-01

    A fiber-optic based flow cytometry platform was designed to build a portable and robust instrument for space applications. At the core of the Microflow1 is a unique fiber-optic flow cell fitted to a fluidic system and fiber coupled to the source and detection channels. A Microflow1 engineering unit was first tested and benchmarked against a commercial flow cytometer as a reference in a standard laboratory environment. Testing in parabolic flight campaigns was performed to establish Microflow1's performance in weightlessness, before operating the new platform on the International Space Station. Microflow1 had comparable performances to commercial systems, and operated remarkably and robustly in weightlessness (microgravity). Microflow1 supported immunophenotyping as well as microbead-based multiplexed cytokine assays in the space environment and independently of gravity levels. Results presented here provide evidence that this fiber-optic cytometer technology is inherently compatible with the space environment with negligible compromise to analytical performance. PMID:24339248

  19. Biomedical technology in Franconia.

    PubMed

    Efferth, T

    2000-01-01

    Medical instrumentation and biotechnology business is developing rapidly in Franconia. The universities of Bayreuth, Erlangen-Nürnberg, and Würzburg hold upper ranks in biomedical extramural funding research. They have a high competence in biomedical research, medical instrumentation, and biotechnology. The association "BioMedTec Franken e.V" has been founded at the beginning of 1999 both to foster the information exchange between universities, industry and politics and to facilitate the establishment of biomedical companies by means of science parks. In the IGZ (Innovation and Foundation Center Nürnberg-Fürth-Erlangen) 4,500 square meters of space are currently shared by 19 novel companies. Since 1985 60 companies in the IGZ had a total turnover of about 74 Mio Euro. The TGZ (Technologie- und Gründerzentrum) in Würzburg provides space for 11 companies. For the specific needs of biomedical technology companies further science parks will be set up in the near future. A science park for medical instrumentation will be founded in Erlangen (IZMP, Innovations- und Gründerzentrum für Medizintechnik und Pharma in der Region Nürnberg, Fürch, Erlangen). Furthermore, a Biomedical Technology Center and a Research Center for Bicompatible Materials are to be founded in Würzburg and Bayreuth, respectively. Several communication platforms (Bayern Innovativ, FORWISS, FTT, KIM, N-TEC-VISIT, TBU, WETTI etc.) allow the transfer of local academic research activities to industrial utilization and open new co-operation possibilities. International pharmaceutical companies (Novartis, Nürnberg; Pharmacia Upjohn, Erlangen) are located in Franconia. Central Franconia represents a national focus for medical instrumentation. The Erlangen settlement of the Medical Engineering Section of Siemens employs 4,500 people including approximately 1,000 employees in the Siemens research center. PMID:10683721

  20. Enhancing quality and integrity in biomedical research in Africa: an international call for greater focus, investment and standardisation in capacity strengthening for frontline staff.

    PubMed

    Kombe, Francis

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of biomedical research depends heavily on the quality of research data collected. In turn, data quality depends on processes of data collection, a task undertaken by frontline research staff in many research programmes in Africa and elsewhere. These frontline research staff often have additional responsibilities including translating and communicating research in local languages, seeking informed consent for study participation and maintaining supportive relationships between research institutions and study participants and wider communities. The level of skills that fieldworkers need to undertake these responsibilities clearly affects the quality of data collected, the ethics of research 'on the ground' and the short and long term acceptability of research.We organised an international workshop in Kenya in July 2014 to discuss the role of frontline staff in scientific research. A total of 25 field managers from 9 African countries and the UK met for 2.5 days to discuss the relationship between data quality and institutional performance management systems and how they affect career progression and supportive supervision policies of research frontline staff.From this workshop, and supporting an expanding literature on the role of fieldworkers in international health research, participants agreed that fieldworkers' roles present them with practical and ethical challenges that their routine training does not adequately prepare them for. We argue that the common and complex challenges facing fieldworkers should in part be addressed through increased investment and collaborative agreements across types of research institutions in Africa. We call for standardization of core elements of training for this critically important cadre of research staff who perform similar roles and encounter similar challenges in many African settings. Although many valuable training elements are offered in institutions, there is a need to develop broader, more grounded and

  1. BepiColombo ISA accelerometer: ready for launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francesco, Santoli; Valerio, Iafolla; Emiliano, Fiorenza; Carlo, Lefevre; Lucchesi David, M.; Marco, Lucente; Carmelo, Magnafico; Sergio, Nozzoli; Roberto, Peron

    2016-04-01

    To be launched in 2017, ESA mission BepiColombo will perform a thorough study of the planet Mercury and its environment. Among the wide range of its scientific objectives, an important set is constituted by the so-called Radio Science Experiments (RSE), which will study the gravitational field and rotation of the planet, and will perform very precise tests of general relativity theory. The fulfilment of these scientific objectives will be made possible by a precise orbit determination of the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), at the same time estimating a number of relevant parameters. In order to reach the required level of accuracy in recovering these parameters, the data coming from the high-sensitivity ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) instrument onboard the MPO probe will be used: the first time for a deep-space probe. After a long path of design and development, the instrument is now ready for integration into MPO. Following a brief description of the RSE in the context of the mission, the instrument and its capabilities will be reviewed. Emphasis will be given to the foreseen strategies for its operation in the various phases of the mission, along with the manifold calibration possibilities.

  2. Spanish personal name variations in national and international biomedical databases: implications for information retrieval and bibliometric studies

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Pérez, R.; López-Cózar, E. Delgado; Jiménez-Contreras, E.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: The study sought to investigate how Spanish names are handled by national and international databases and to identify mistakes that can undermine the usefulness of these databases for locating and retrieving works by Spanish authors. Methods: The authors sampled 172 articles published by authors from the University of Granada Medical School between 1987 and 1996 and analyzed the variations in how each of their names was indexed in Science Citation Index (SCI), MEDLINE, and Índice Médico Español (IME). The number and types of variants that appeared for each author's name were recorded and compared across databases to identify inconsistencies in indexing practices. We analyzed the relationship between variability (number of variants of an author's name) and productivity (number of items the name was associated with as an author), the consequences for retrieval of information, and the most frequent indexing structures used for Spanish names. Results: The proportion of authors who appeared under more then one name was 48.1% in SCI, 50.7% in MEDLINE, and 69.0% in IME. Productivity correlated directly with variability: more than 50% of the authors listed on five to ten items appeared under more than one name in any given database, and close to 100% of the authors listed on more than ten items appeared under two or more variants. Productivity correlated inversely with retrievability: as the number of variants for a name increased, the number of items retrieved under each variant decreased. For the most highly productive authors, the number of items retrieved under each variant tended toward one. The most frequent indexing methods varied between databases. In MEDLINE and IME, names were indexed correctly as “first surname second surname, first name initial middle name initial” (if present) in 41.7% and 49.5% of the records, respectively. However, in SCI, the most frequent method was “first surname, first name initial second name initial” (48.0% of

  3. PREFACE: 17th International School on Condensed Matter Physics (ISCMP): Open Problems in Condensed Matter Physics, Biomedical Physics and their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimova-Malinovska, Doriana; Nesheva, Diana; Pecheva, Emilia; Petrov, Alexander G.; Primatarowa, Marina T.

    2012-12-01

    We are pleased to introduce the Proceedings of the 17th International School on Condensed Matter Physics: Open Problems in Condensed Matter Physics, Biomedical Physics and their Applications, organized by the Institute of Solid State Physics of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. The Chairman of the School was Professor Alexander G Petrov. Like prior events, the School took place in the beautiful Black Sea resort of Saints Constantine and Helena near Varna, going back to the refurbished facilities of the Panorama hotel. Participants from 17 different countries delivered 31 invited lecturers and 78 posters, contributing through three sessions of poster presentations. Papers submitted to the Proceedings were refereed according to the high standards of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series and the accepted papers illustrate the diversity and the high level of the contributions. Not least significant factor for the success of the 17 ISCMP was the social program, both the organized events (Welcome and Farewell Parties) and the variety of pleasant local restaurants and beaches. Visits to the Archaeological Museum (rich in valuable gold treasures of the ancient Thracian culture) and to the famous rock monastery Aladja were organized for the participants from the Varna Municipality. These Proceedings are published for the second time by the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. We are grateful to the Journal's staff for supporting this idea. The Committee decided that the next event will take place again in Saints Constantine and Helena, 1-5 September 2014. It will be entitled: Challenges of the Nanoscale Science: Theory, Materials and Applications. Doriana Dimova-Malinovska, Diana Nesheva, Emilia Pecheva, Alexander G Petrov and Marina T Primatarowa Editors

  4. Biomedical ultrasonoscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. D. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    The combination of a "C" mode scan electronics in a portable, battery powered biomedical ultrasonoscope having "A" and "M" mode scan electronics, the latter including a clock generator for generating clock pulses, a cathode ray tube having X, Y and Z axis inputs, a sweep generator connected between the clock generator and the X axis input of the cathode ray tube for generating a cathode ray sweep signal synchronized by the clock pulses, and a receiver adapted to be connected to the Z axis input of the cathode ray tube. The "C" mode scan electronics comprises a plurality of transducer elements arranged in a row and adapted to be positioned on the skin of the patient's body for converting a pulsed electrical signal to a pulsed ultrasonic signal, radiating the ultrasonic signal into the patient's body, picking up the echoes reflected from interfaces in the patient's body and converting the echoes to electrical signals; a plurality of transmitters, each transmitter being coupled to a respective transducer for transmitting a pulsed electrical signal thereto and for transmitting the converted electrical echo signals directly to the receiver, a sequencer connected between the clock generator and the plurality of transmitters and responsive to the clock pulses for firing the transmitters in cyclic order; and a staircase voltage generator connected between the clock generator and the Y axis input of the cathode ray tube for generating a staircase voltage having steps synchronized by the clock pulses.

  5. The Genomes and Metagenomes (GEM) Catalogue (first presentation) and The ISA-GCDML Workshop (second presentation) (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Field, Dawn [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology]; Sansone, Susanna [EBI

    2011-04-29

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding ''Research Coordination Network'' from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Dawn Field of the NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology briefly introduces the GEM Catalogue, followed by Susanna Sansone of the European Bioinformatics Institute who talks about the ISA-GCDML workshop at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

  6. The Genomes and Metagenomes (GEM) Catalogue (first presentation) and The ISA-GCDML Workshop (second presentation) (GSC8 Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Dawn; Sansone, Susanna

    2009-09-09

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding ''Research Coordination Network'' from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Dawn Field of the NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology briefly introduces the GEM Catalogue, followed by Susanna Sansone of the European Bioinformatics Institute who talks about the ISA-GCDML workshop at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

  7. "Fly-by-Wireless" Vehicles and Evaluations of ISA 100 Applications to Space-Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studor, George F.

    2009-01-01

    "Fly-by-Wireless" (What is it?) Vision: To minimize cables and connectors and increase functionality across the aerospace industry by providing reliable, lower cost, modular, and higher performance alternatives to wired data connectivity to benefit the entire vehicle/program life-cycle. Focus Areas: 1. System Engineering and Integration to reduce cables and connectors. 2. Provisions for modularity and accessibility in the vehicle architecture. 3. Develop Alternatives to wired connectivity (the "tool box").NASA and Aerospace depend more and more on cost-effective solutions that can meet our requirements. ISA-100.11 a is a promising new standard and NASA wants to evaluate it. NASA should be involved in understanding and contributing to other ISA-100 efforts that contribute to "Fly-by-Wireless" and it's objectives. ISA can engage other aerospace groups that are working on similar goals and obtain more aerospace industry perspective.

  8. Autoradiography: Biomedical applications. January, 1975-August, 1981 (citations from the International Information Service for the Physics and Engineering Communities Data Base). Report for January 75-August 81

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the methods, equipment, and biomedical applications of autoradiography. Electron microscopy (EM) is discussed at length, and sample preparation for EM is detailed. Numerous biological, biochemical and biophysical studies are discussed. (Contains 84 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  9. Biomedical Research and Technology. A Prognosis for International Economic Leadership. Commission on Academic Medical Centers and the Economy of New England [Report].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New England Board of Higher Education, Boston, MA.

    The focus of the work of the Commission on Academic Medical Centers and the Economy of New England is the financing competitors strength and future development of academic centers and biomedical companies in New England. Among the findings and recommendations of the Commission are the following: (1) the New England region will require several…

  10. Tannic Acid Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Surface Colonization in an IsaA-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Payne, David E.; Martin, Nicholas R.; Parzych, Katherine R.; Rickard, Alex H.; Underwood, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal and pathogen that is capable of forming biofilms on a variety of host tissues and implanted medical devices. Biofilm-associated infections resist antimicrobial chemotherapy and attack from the host immune system, making these infections particularly difficult to treat. In order to gain insight into environmental conditions that influence S. aureus biofilm development, we screened a library of small molecules for the ability to inhibit S. aureus biofilm formation. This led to the finding that the polyphenolic compound tannic acid inhibits S. aureus biofilm formation in multiple biofilm models without inhibiting bacterial growth. We present evidence that tannic acid inhibits S. aureus biofilm formation via a mechanism dependent upon the putative transglycosylase IsaA. Tannic acid did not inhibit biofilm formation of an isaA mutant. Overexpression of wild-type IsaA inhibited biofilm formation, whereas overexpression of a catalytically dead IsaA had no effect. Tannin-containing drinks like tea have been found to reduce methicillin-resistant S. aureus nasal colonization. We found that black tea inhibited S. aureus biofilm development and that an isaA mutant resisted this inhibition. Antibiofilm activity was eliminated from tea when milk was added to precipitate the tannic acid. Finally, we developed a rodent model for S. aureus throat colonization and found that tea consumption reduced S. aureus throat colonization via an isaA-dependent mechanism. These findings provide insight into a molecular mechanism by which commonly consumed polyphenolic compounds, such as tannins, influence S. aureus surface colonization. PMID:23208606

  11. ISA-TAB-Nano: A Specification for Sharing Nanomaterial Research Data in Spreadsheet-based Format

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and motivation The high-throughput genomics communities have been successfully using standardized spreadsheet-based formats to capture and share data within labs and among public repositories. The nanomedicine community has yet to adopt similar standards to share the diverse and multi-dimensional types of data (including metadata) pertaining to the description and characterization of nanomaterials. Owing to the lack of standardization in representing and sharing nanomaterial data, most of the data currently shared via publications and data resources are incomplete, poorly-integrated, and not suitable for meaningful interpretation and re-use of the data. Specifically, in its current state, data cannot be effectively utilized for the development of predictive models that will inform the rational design of nanomaterials. Results We have developed a specification called ISA-TAB-Nano, which comprises four spreadsheet-based file formats for representing and integrating various types of nanomaterial data. Three file formats (Investigation, Study, and Assay files) have been adapted from the established ISA-TAB specification; while the Material file format was developed de novo to more readily describe the complexity of nanomaterials and associated small molecules. In this paper, we have discussed the main features of each file format and how to use them for sharing nanomaterial descriptions and assay metadata. Conclusion The ISA-TAB-Nano file formats provide a general and flexible framework to record and integrate nanomaterial descriptions, assay data (metadata and endpoint measurements) and protocol information. Like ISA-TAB, ISA-TAB-Nano supports the use of ontology terms to promote standardized descriptions and to facilitate search and integration of the data. The ISA-TAB-Nano specification has been submitted as an ASTM work item to obtain community feedback and to provide a nanotechnology data-sharing standard for public development and adoption. PMID

  12. Crystal structure of the Chlamydomonas starch debranching enzyme isoamylase ISA1 reveals insights into the mechanism of branch trimming and complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Sim, Lyann; Beeren, Sophie R; Findinier, Justin; Dauvillée, David; Ball, Steven G; Henriksen, Anette; Palcic, Monica M

    2014-08-15

    The starch debranching enzymes isoamylase 1 and 2 (ISA1 and ISA2) are known to exist in a large complex and are involved in the biosynthesis and crystallization of starch. It is suggested that the function of the complex is to remove misplaced branches of growing amylopectin molecules, which would otherwise prevent the association and crystallization of adjacent linear chains. Here, we investigate the function of ISA1 and ISA2 from starch producing alga Chlamydomonas. Through complementation studies, we confirm that the STA8 locus encodes for ISA2 and sta8 mutants lack the ISAISA2 heteromeric complex. However, mutants retain a functional dimeric ISA1 that is able to partly sustain starch synthesis in vivo. To better characterize ISA1, we have overexpressed and purified ISA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrISA1) and solved the crystal structure to 2.3 Å and in complex with maltoheptaose to 2.4 Å. Analysis of the homodimeric CrISA1 structure reveals a unique elongated structure with monomers connected end-to-end. The crystal complex reveals details about the mechanism of branch binding that explains the low activity of CrISA1 toward tightly spaced branches and reveals the presence of additional secondary surface carbohydrate binding sites. PMID:24993830

  13. One-Year Test-Retest Reliability of the Inventory of Statements about Self-Injury (ISAS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Catherine R.; Klonsky, E. David

    2011-01-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a growing public health problem among adolescents and young adults. The Inventory of Statements About Self-Injury (ISAS) is a self-report measure designed to assess NSSI behaviors and functions. The current study examines the one-year test-retest reliability of the ISAS in a sample of young adult self-injurers.…

  14. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur Environmental Criteria (First External Review Draft, Dec 2007)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is announcing that the First External Review Draft of the Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur – Environmental Criteria has been made available for independent peer review and public review. This draft ISA document represents a concise ...

  15. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur Environmental Criteria (Second External Review Draft, Aug 2008)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has announced that the Second External Review Draft of the Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur - Environmental Criteria has been made available for independent peer review and public review. This draft ISA document represents a conci...

  16. Pay as You Speed, ISA with incentives for not speeding: a case of test driver recruitment.

    PubMed

    Lahrmann, Harry; Agerholm, Niels; Tradisauskas, Nerius; Næss, Teresa; Juhl, Jens; Harms, Lisbeth

    2012-09-01

    The Intelligent Speed Adaptation (ISA) project we describe in this article is based on Pay as You Drive principles. These principles assume that the ISA equipment informs a driver of the speed limit, warns the driver when speeding and calculates penalty points. Each penalty point entails the reduction of a 30% discount on the driver's car insurance premium, which therefore produced the name, Pay as You Speed. The ISA equipment consists of a GPS-based On Board Unit with a mobile phone connection to a web server. The project was planned for a three-year test period with 300 young car drivers, but it never succeeded in recruiting that number of drivers. After several design changes, the project eventually went forward with 153 test drivers of all ages. This number represents approximately one thousandth of all car owners in the proving ground of North Jutland in Denmark. Furthermore the project was terminated before its scheduled closing date. This article describes the project with an emphasis on recruitment efforts and the project's progress. We include a discussion of possible explanations for the failure to recruit volunteers for the project and reflect upon the general barriers to using ISA with ordinary drivers. PMID:22664663

  17. 75 FR 69078 - Workshop To Review Draft Materials for the Lead (Pb) Integrated Science Assessment (ISA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Workshop To Review Draft Materials for the Lead (Pb) Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) AGENCY... quality criteria and National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Lead (Pb), EPA is announcing...

  18. Year 2000 compliance concerns with the ISA Thermoluminescent Dosimetry Data Processing (TL-DP) software system

    SciTech Connect

    Saviz, K.

    1998-05-26

    The year 2000 is rapidly approaching, and there is a good chance that computer systems that utilize two digit year dates will experience problems in retrieval of date information. The ISA Thermoluminescent Dosimetry Data Processing (TL-DP) software and computer system has been reviewed for Year 2000 compliance issues.

  19. [Cluster analysis in biomedical researches].

    PubMed

    Akopov, A S; Moskovtsev, A A; Dolenko, S A; Savina, G D

    2013-01-01

    Cluster analysis is one of the most popular methods for the analysis of multi-parameter data. The cluster analysis reveals the internal structure of the data, group the separate observations on the degree of their similarity. The review provides a definition of the basic concepts of cluster analysis, and discusses the most popular clustering algorithms: k-means, hierarchical algorithms, Kohonen networks algorithms. Examples are the use of these algorithms in biomedical research. PMID:24640781

  20. A stochastic model for infectious salmon anemia (ISA) in Atlantic salmon farming.

    PubMed

    Scheel, Ida; Aldrin, Magne; Frigessi, Arnoldo; Jansen, Peder A

    2007-08-22

    Infectious salmon anemia (ISA) is one of the main infectious diseases in Atlantic salmon farming with major economical implications. Despite the strong regulatory interventions, the ISA epidemic is not under control, worldwide. We study the data covering salmon farming in Norway from 2002 to 2005 and propose a stochastic space-time model for the transmission of the virus. We model seaway transmission between farm sites, transmission through shared management and infrastructure, biomass effects and other potential pathways within the farming industry. We find that biomass has an effect on infectiousness, the local contact network and seaway distance of 5 km represent similar risks, but a large component of risk originates from other sources, among which are possibly infected salmon smolt and boat traffic. PMID:17301014

  1. ISA and IBFVS: image space-based visualization of flow on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Laramee, Robert S; van Wijk, Jarke J; Jobard, Bruno; Hauser, Helwig

    2004-01-01

    We present a side-by-side analysis of two recent image space approaches for the visualization of vector fields on surfaces. The two methods, Image Space Advection (ISA) and Image-Based Flow Visualization for Curved Surfaces (IBFVS) generate dense representations of time-dependent vector fields with high spatio-temporal correlation. While the 3D vector fields are associated with arbitrary surfaces represented by triangular meshes, the generation and advection of texture properties is confined to image space. Fast frame rates are achieved by exploiting frame-to-frame coherency and graphics hardware. In our comparison of ISA and IBFVS, we point out the strengths and weaknesses of each approach and give recommendations as to when and where they are best applied. PMID:15527046

  2. Open architecture design and approach for the Integrated Sensor Architecture (ISA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, Christine L.; Krzywicki, Alan T.; Hepp, Jared J.; Harrell, John; Kogut, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Integrated Sensor Architecture (ISA) is designed in response to stovepiped integration approaches. The design, based on the principles of Service Oriented Architectures (SOA) and Open Architectures, addresses the problem of integration, and is not designed for specific sensors or systems. The use of SOA and Open Architecture approaches has led to a flexible, extensible architecture. Using these approaches, and supported with common data formats, open protocol specifications, and Department of Defense Architecture Framework (DoDAF) system architecture documents, an integration-focused architecture has been developed. ISA can help move the Department of Defense (DoD) from costly stovepipe solutions to a more cost-effective plug-and-play design to support interoperability.

  3. Insertion sequence AS5 (ISAS5) is involved in the genomic plasticity of Aeromonas salmonicida

    PubMed Central

    Trudel, Mélanie V.; Tanaka, Katherine H.; Filion, Geneviève; Daher, Rana K.; Frenette, Michel; Charette, Steve J.

    2013-01-01

    The genome of the fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida subsp salmonicida harbors a large number of insertion sequences (ISs), many of which are located on plasmids. In the present study, we analyzed the small plasmid profile of A. salmonicida strains to identify evidences of plasmid alterations. Ten out of 78 strains analyzed displayed an unconventional plasmid profile. However the HER1104 strain was unique, having a positive PCR signal for pAsal1 plasmid despite not carrying this plasmid. Instead, HER1104 was bearing a plasmid at higher molecular weight than pAsal1. We characterized this new larger plasmid, which we called pAsal1B since it is a derivative of pAsal1 containing one more complete IS (ISAS5) than the parental plasmid. An additional 96 bp relic of ISAS5 was also present in pAsal1B. These results propose that ISAS5 is another active mobile genetic element in A. salmonicida subsp salmonicida and provided further proof of the genomic plasticity of this bacterium. PMID:23956951

  4. Changes in Soil Chemistry and Agricultural Return Flow in an Integrated Seawater Agriculture System (ISAS) Demonstration in Abu Dhabi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Q.; Matiin, W. A.; Ahmad, F.

    2012-12-01

    Growing halophytes using Integrated Seawater Agriculture Systems (ISAS) offers a sustainable solution for the generation of biomass feedstock for carbon neutral biofuels - halophytes do not enter the foodchain and they do not compete with food-crops for natural resources. A field demonstration of ISAS in the coastal regions of Abu Dhabi, UAE, scheduled to start in 2013, will likely face a number of region-specific challenges not encountered in past demonstrations of ISAS at coastal locations in Mexico and Eritrea. The arid climate, unique soil chemistry (evaporite deposits, especially gypsum), and hypersaline coastal hydrogeology of Abu Dhabi will affect long-term halophyte agricultural productivity when Arabian Gulf seawater is applied to coastal soils as part of ISAS. Therefore, the changes in irrigation return flow quality and soil chemistry must be monitored closely over time to establish transient salt and water balances in order to assess the sustainability of ISAS in the region. As an initial phase of the ISAS demonstration project, numerical modeling of different seawater loadings onto coastal soils was conducted to estimate the chemical characteristics of soil and the irrigation return flow over time. These modeling results will be validated with field monitoring data upon completion of one year of ISAS operation. The results from this study could be used to (i) determine the optimal saline water loading that the soils at the ISAS site can tolerate, (ii) potential for sodicity of the soil with saline water application, (iii) impacts of land application of saline water on underlying coastal groundwater, and (iv) develop strategies to control soil water activities in favor of halophyte agricultural productivity.

  5. Biomedical applications engineering tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laenger, C. J., Sr.

    1976-01-01

    The engineering tasks performed in response to needs articulated by clinicians are described. Initial contacts were made with these clinician-technology requestors by the Southwest Research Institute NASA Biomedical Applications Team. The basic purpose of the program was to effectively transfer aerospace technology into functional hardware to solve real biomedical problems.

  6. Trends in Biomedical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peppas, Nicholas A.; Mallinson, Richard G.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis of trends in biomedical education within chemical education is presented. Data used for the analysis included: type/level of course, subjects taught, and textbook preferences. Results among others of the 1980 survey indicate that 28 out of 79 schools responding offer at least one course in biomedical engineering. (JN)

  7. Improvements of SMILES Level 2 products on ISAS/JAXA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuda, Chihiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Iwata, Yoshitaka; Manago, Naohiro; Takahashi, Chikako; Imai, Koji; Shiotani, Masato; Sano, Takuki; Takayanagi, Masahiro; Taniguchi, Hirotomo

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES),which was jointly developed by JAXA and NICT, had been launched and aboard the Japanese Experiment Mod-ule (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS) in September, 2009. The SMILES carries 4 K-cooled Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor (SIS) mixers to demonstrate a sensitive instrument for sub-millimeter limb sounding. SMILES system noise temperature (Tsys) is less than 500K (random noise ¡ 1 K). Since ISS has a non-sun-synchronous orbit, SMILES can observe diurnal variations of ClO, BrO, HO2 and mesospheric O3 etc. Standard L2 products, which are defined as O3, HCl, ClO, HNO3, CH3CN, HOCl, HO2, BrO, O3-isotopes on stratospheres, began to be released to RA PIs on January, 2010. The L2 data is currently 4 85 km, with 3 km interval (geometrical altitude) in HDF ver.5 file format similar to EOS-HDF including time, location etc.However, release data (ver. 005-06-0024) is a test version which is retrieved by prelaunch algorithms (Rodgers 1976. SMILES mission plan 2002. Takahashi et al., 2010. Imai et al., 2010.), and has some known issues. The one of the main issue is less product data. SMILES observes 1630 scans per a day. However, release products include only 60 percents of observation data. There are two reasons for this. The first is that antenna main beam is interfered by the ISS solar paddles. The second is that star tracker cameras, which determine SMILES observation points, are interfered by the Sun. In latter case, if we estimate the points by other information, geophysical parameters are retrieved since observed spectrums are useful. In new release data, we use both STT and ISS information and 80 percents of the data are included to products. In this presentation, we will introduce improvements of operational level 2 processing for new release product version.

  8. Methods of the international study on soccer at altitude 3600 m (ISA3600)

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Christopher J; Aughey, Robert J; Bourdon, Pitre C; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Soria, Rudy; Claros, Jesus C Jimenez; Sargent, Charli; Roach, Gregory D; Buchheit, Martin; Simpson, Ben M; Hammond, Kristal; Kley, Marlen; Wachsmuth, Nadine; Pepper, Mark; Edwards, Alistair; Cuenca, Douglas; Vidmar, Tony; Spielvogel, Hilde; Schmidt, Walter F

    2013-01-01

    Background We describe here the 3-year process underpinning a multinational collaboration to investigate soccer played at high altitude—La Paz, Bolivia (3600 m). There were two main aims: first, to quantify the extent to which running performance would be altered at 3600 m compared with near sea level; and second, to characterise the time course of acclimatisation of running performance and underlying physiology to training and playing at 3600 m. In addition, this project was able to measure the physiological changes and the effect on running performance of altitude-adapted soccer players from 3600 m playing at low altitude. Methods A U20 Bolivian team (‘The Strongest’ from La Paz, n=19) played a series of five games against a U17 team from sea level in Australia (The Joeys, n=20). 2 games were played near sea level (Santa Cruz 430 m) over 5 days and then three games were played in La Paz over the next 12 days. Measures were (1) game and training running performance—including global positioning system (GPS) data on distance travelled and velocity of movement; (2) blood—including haemoglobin mass, blood volume, blood gases and acid–base status; (3) acclimatisation—including resting heart rate variability, perceived altitude sickness, as well as heart rate and perceived exertion responses to a submaximal running test; and (4) sleep patterns. Conclusions Pivotal to the success of the project were the strong professional networks of the collaborators, with most exceeding 10 years, the links of several of the researchers to soccer federations, as well as the interest and support of the two head coaches. PMID:24282214

  9. Monothiol glutaredoxin Grx5 interacts with Fe-S scaffold proteins Isa1 and Isa2 and supports Fe-S assembly and DNA integrity in mitochondria of fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Chung, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Kyung-Chang; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2010-02-12

    Mitochondrial monothiol glutaredoxins that bind Fe-S cluster are known to participate in Fe-S cluster assembly. However, their precise role has not been well understood. Among three monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3, 4, and 5) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe only Grx5 resides in mitochondria. The {Delta}grx5 mutant requires cysteine on minimal media, and does not grow on non-fermentable carbon source such as glycerol. We found that the mutant is low in the activity of Fe-S enzymes in mitochondria as well as in the cytoplasm. Screening of multi-copy suppressor of growth defects of the mutant identified isa1{sup +} gene encoding a putative A-type Fe-S scaffold, in addition to mas5{sup +} and hsc1{sup +} genes encoding putative chaperones for Fe-S assembly process. Examination of other scaffold and chaperone genes revealed that isa2{sup +}, but not isu1{sup +} and ssc1{sup +}, complemented the growth phenotype of {Delta}grx5 mutant as isa1{sup +} did, partly through restoration of Fe-S enzyme activities. The mutant also showed a significant decrease in the amount of mitochondrial DNA. We demonstrated that Grx5 interacts in vivo with Isa1 and Isa2 proteins in mitochondria by observing bimolecular fluorescence complementation. These results indicate that Grx5 plays a central role in Fe-S assembly process through interaction with A-type Fe-S scaffold proteins Isa1 and Isa2, each of which is an essential protein in S. pombe, and supports mitochondrial genome integrity as well as Fe-S assembly.

  10. The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Bandrowski, Anita; Brinkman, Ryan; Brochhausen, Mathias; Brush, Matthew H.; Chibucos, Marcus C.; Clancy, Kevin; Courtot, Mélanie; Derom, Dirk; Dumontier, Michel; Fan, Liju; Fostel, Jennifer; Fragoso, Gilberto; Gibson, Frank; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Haendel, Melissa A.; He, Yongqun; Heiskanen, Mervi; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Jensen, Mark; Lin, Yu; Lister, Allyson L.; Lord, Phillip; Malone, James; Manduchi, Elisabetta; McGee, Monnie; Morrison, Norman; Overton, James A.; Parkinson, Helen; Peters, Bjoern; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Ruttenberg, Alan; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Scheuermann, Richard H.; Schober, Daniel; Smith, Barry; Soldatova, Larisa N.; Stoeckert, Christian J.; Taylor, Chris F.; Torniai, Carlo; Turner, Jessica A.; Vita, Randi; Whetzel, Patricia L.; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI) is an ontology that provides terms with precisely defined meanings to describe all aspects of how investigations in the biological and medical domains are conducted. OBI re-uses ontologies that provide a representation of biomedical knowledge from the Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) project and adds the ability to describe how this knowledge was derived. We here describe the state of OBI and several applications that are using it, such as adding semantic expressivity to existing databases, building data entry forms, and enabling interoperability between knowledge resources. OBI covers all phases of the investigation process, such as planning, execution and reporting. It represents information and material entities that participate in these processes, as well as roles and functions. Prior to OBI, it was not possible to use a single internally consistent resource that could be applied to multiple types of experiments for these applications. OBI has made this possible by creating terms for entities involved in biological and medical investigations and by importing parts of other biomedical ontologies such as GO, Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI) and Phenotype Attribute and Trait Ontology (PATO) without altering their meaning. OBI is being used in a wide range of projects covering genomics, multi-omics, immunology, and catalogs of services. OBI has also spawned other ontologies (Information Artifact Ontology) and methods for importing parts of ontologies (Minimum information to reference an external ontology term (MIREOT)). The OBI project is an open cross-disciplinary collaborative effort, encompassing multiple research communities from around the globe. To date, OBI has created 2366 classes and 40 relations along with textual and formal definitions. The OBI Consortium maintains a web resource (http://obi-ontology.org) providing details on the people, policies, and issues being addressed

  11. The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations.

    PubMed

    Bandrowski, Anita; Brinkman, Ryan; Brochhausen, Mathias; Brush, Matthew H; Bug, Bill; Chibucos, Marcus C; Clancy, Kevin; Courtot, Mélanie; Derom, Dirk; Dumontier, Michel; Fan, Liju; Fostel, Jennifer; Fragoso, Gilberto; Gibson, Frank; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Haendel, Melissa A; He, Yongqun; Heiskanen, Mervi; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Jensen, Mark; Lin, Yu; Lister, Allyson L; Lord, Phillip; Malone, James; Manduchi, Elisabetta; McGee, Monnie; Morrison, Norman; Overton, James A; Parkinson, Helen; Peters, Bjoern; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Ruttenberg, Alan; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Scheuermann, Richard H; Schober, Daniel; Smith, Barry; Soldatova, Larisa N; Stoeckert, Christian J; Taylor, Chris F; Torniai, Carlo; Turner, Jessica A; Vita, Randi; Whetzel, Patricia L; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI) is an ontology that provides terms with precisely defined meanings to describe all aspects of how investigations in the biological and medical domains are conducted. OBI re-uses ontologies that provide a representation of biomedical knowledge from the Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) project and adds the ability to describe how this knowledge was derived. We here describe the state of OBI and several applications that are using it, such as adding semantic expressivity to existing databases, building data entry forms, and enabling interoperability between knowledge resources. OBI covers all phases of the investigation process, such as planning, execution and reporting. It represents information and material entities that participate in these processes, as well as roles and functions. Prior to OBI, it was not possible to use a single internally consistent resource that could be applied to multiple types of experiments for these applications. OBI has made this possible by creating terms for entities involved in biological and medical investigations and by importing parts of other biomedical ontologies such as GO, Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI) and Phenotype Attribute and Trait Ontology (PATO) without altering their meaning. OBI is being used in a wide range of projects covering genomics, multi-omics, immunology, and catalogs of services. OBI has also spawned other ontologies (Information Artifact Ontology) and methods for importing parts of ontologies (Minimum information to reference an external ontology term (MIREOT)). The OBI project is an open cross-disciplinary collaborative effort, encompassing multiple research communities from around the globe. To date, OBI has created 2366 classes and 40 relations along with textual and formal definitions. The OBI Consortium maintains a web resource (http://obi-ontology.org) providing details on the people, policies, and issues being addressed

  12. Rising Expectations: Access to Biomedical Information

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, D. A. B.; Humphreys, B. L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Objective To provide an overview of the expansion in public access to electronic biomedical information over the past two decades, with an emphasis on developments to which the U.S. National Library of Medicine contributed. Methods Review of the increasingly broad spectrum of web-accessible genomic data, biomedical literature, consumer health information, clinical trials data, and images. Results The amount of publicly available electronic biomedical information has increased dramatically over the past twenty years. Rising expectations regarding access to biomedical information were stimulated by the spread of the Internet, the World Wide Web, advanced searching and linking techniques. These informatics advances simplified and improved access to electronic information and reduced costs, which enabled inter-organizational collaborations to build and maintain large international information resources and also aided outreach and education efforts The demonstrated benefits of free access to electronic biomedical information encouraged the development of public policies that further increase the amount of information available. Conclusions Continuing rapid growth of publicly accessible electronic biomedical information presents tremendous opportunities and challenges, including the need to ensure uninterrupted access during disasters or emergencies and to manage digital resources so they remain available for future generations. PMID:18587496

  13. Improving AMS Detection of the Biomedical Radiotracer 41Ca with Segmented Radio-Frequency Quadrupoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alary, Jean-Francois; Javahery, Gholamreza; Kieser, William E.; Litherland, Albert E.; Cousins, Lisa M.

    41Ca is an important biomedical radiotracer finding many applications in biological, nutritional and medical studies. The detection of 41Ca by AMS is however limited by an important background signal of 41K originating from biological samples and from contaminated cesium in the source. An approach consisting of using PbF2-assisted in-source fluorination in combination with an Isobar Separator for Anions (ISA), a device incorporating a low energy radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) gas cell, promises to push down the limit of detection of 41Ca attainable on small (<3 MV) accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) systems by several orders of magnitude. Such on-line reduction of 41K should also result in a simplification of biological sample preparation and less concern about variable 41K contamination of the cesium beam. The selective collision-induced fragmentation of KF3- versus CaF3-, occurring in the gas cell of an ISA equipped with a double segment RFQ, have been reported earlier1), leading to K being suppressed by a factor of 1e4 over Ca. We present here the future configuration of the ISA, redesigned using multi-segmented RFQ to enhance further this effect and improve transmission through the gas cell. A segmented RFQ is an appropriate tool to finely control ion energy down to the few eV's separating the fragmentation energies of the two fluoride species. This pre-commercial ISA destined to be used at the newly established A. E. Lalonde AMS laboratory at University of Ottawa (Canada) will be presented. Some practicalities of integrating a low energy RFQ-based device in a high energy AMS system will also be discussed.

  14. Discovering IS-A relationships from Text: a method based on Dependencies between Nouns and Verbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakawatase, Hidekazu; Aizawa, Akio

    When extracting IS-A relationship between nouns from texts, the majority of conventional methods rely on specific expression patterns such as ``A such as B''. However, those expressions cover only a restricted subset of nouns comparing to the entire set contained in the corpus. Based on the observation, this paper investigates a method for identifying IS-A relationship that does not depend on particular expression patterns. In the paper, we first clarify our notion of ``IS-A relationship'' as a subset relation between the instance sets represented by two distinct nouns. This follows the assumption that hyponyms that appear in texts are most likely substituted by their hypernyms while the substitutionality does not hold in the opposite cases. Based on this, we propose a new method for detecting possible hypernym-hyponym pairs by examining the substitutionality of the two nouns using their co-occurring verbs and their dependency/case structure. Then, the effectiveness of the proposed method is confirmed through some experimental study. In the experiments, 47 target words were first selected from the Word List by Semantic Principles. Next, using 11-years newspaper articles as input texts, a list of candidate hyponyms was generated for each selected word using the proposed method. Also, a conventional pattern-based method was applied to the same newspaper articles to obtain hypernym-hyponym candidate pairs. Then, the candidate lists were examined by a human reviewer. Through the experiments, it is confirmed that 94.3% pairs obtained by our method were not covered by the conventional method. Also, the average accuracy was about 36% for the top 200 ranked candidates of the proposed method, the performance of which was quite comparable to the 31% of the existing method.

  15. The Encyclopedia of Systems Biology and OMICS (first presentation) and The ISA Infrastructure for Multi-omics Data (second presentation) (GSC8 Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Kolker, Eugene; Sansone, Susanna

    2011-09-11

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Eugene Kolker from Seattle Children's Hospital briefly discusses "The Encyclopedia of Systems Biology and OMICS," followed by Susanna Sansone from the EBI on "The ISA Infrastructure for multi-omics data" at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 11, 2009.

  16. The Encyclopedia of Systems Biology and OMICS (first presentation) and The ISA Infrastructure for Multi-omics Data (second presentation) (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Kolker, Eugene [Seattle Children's Hospital]; Sansone, Susanna [EBI

    2011-04-28

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Eugene Kolker from Seattle Children's Hospital briefly discusses "The Encyclopedia of Systems Biology and OMICS," followed by Susanna Sansone from the EBI on "The ISA Infrastructure for multi-omics data" at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 11, 2009.

  17. Topics in Biomedical Optics: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebden, Jeremy C.; Boas, David A.; George, John S.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2003-06-01

    The field of biomedical optics is experiencing tremendous growth. Biomedical technologies contribute in the creation of devices used in healthcare of various specialties (ophthalmology, cardiology, anesthesiology, and immunology, etc.). Recent research in biomedical optics is discussed. Overviews of meetings held at the 2002 Optical Society of America Biomedical Topical Meetings are presented.

  18. Montanide ISA 71 VG is Advantageous to Freund's Adjuvant in Immunization Against S. aureus Infection of Mice.

    PubMed

    Klimka, A; Michels, L; Glowalla, E; Tosetti, B; Krönke, M; Krut, O

    2015-05-01

    The enormous capacity of Staphylococcus aureus to acquire antibiotic resistance makes it a permanent task to search for and to develop new anti-infectives. One of the possible approaches is the early active immunization of risk patients and animal stocks to prevent S. aureus infections. Based on a S. aureus proteome screen with S. aureus-specific human antiserum, we have previously identified several anchorless cell wall proteins to be used as novel vaccine candidates. To develop an efficient anti-S. aureus vaccine, the supplemented adjuvants Montanide(™) ISA 71 VG and ISA 206 were compared to Freund's adjuvant in terms of handling, induction of cytokine profile, triggering antigen-specific immunoglobulin production of different IgG subclasses and provision of increased survival rates in our S. aureus sepsis mouse model. Immunization with ISA 71 VG in comparison with Freund's adjuvant induced slightly delayed but comparably strong increase of antigen-specific antibody titres and conferred protective effect against S. aureus challenge. In contrast using ISA 206 as adjuvant, significantly lower IgG titres and consequently, no protective effect against S. aureus infection were observed. Handling and tolerability of the Montanide is superior to Freund's adjuvant. Montanide(™) ISA 71 VG can serve as an effective adjuvant replacement for Freund's adjuvant in research with a prospective usage in animal and human vaccines against bacterial pathogens. PMID:25689117

  19. Research-Doctorate Programs in the Biomedical Sciences: Selected Findings from the NRC Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorden, Joan F., Ed.; Kuh, Charlotte V., Ed.; Voytuk, James A., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Research Doctorate Programs in the Biomedical Sciences: Selected Findings from the NRC Assessment" examines data on the biomedical sciences programs to gather additional insight about the talent, training environment, outcomes, diversity, and international participation in the biomedical sciences workforce. This report supports an earlier…

  20. Strain variation, based on the hemagglutinin gene, in Norwegian ISA virus isolates collected from 1987 to 2001: indications of recombination.

    PubMed

    Devold, M; Falk, K; Dale, B; Krossøy, B; Biering, E; Aspehaug, V; Nilsen, F; Nylund, A

    2001-11-01

    Infectious salmon anemia (ISA) is caused by a virus that probably belongs to the Orthomyxoviridae and was first recorded in Norway in 1984. The disease has since spread along the Norwegian coast and has later been found in Canada, Scotland, the Faroe Islands, Chile, and the USA. This study presents sequence variation of the hemagglutinin gene from 37 ISA virus isolates, viz. one isolate from Scotland, one from Canada and 35 from Norway. The hemagglutinin gene contains a highly polymorphic region (HPR), which together with the rest of the gene sequence provides a good tool for studies of epizootics. The gene shows temporal and geographical sequence variation, where certain areas are dominated by distinct groups of isolates. Evidence of transmission of ISA virus isolates within and between regions is given. It is suggested that the hemagglutinin gene from different isolates may recombine. Possible recombination sites are found within the HPR and in the 5'-end flanking region close to the HPR. PMID:11775793

  1. Using SHRIMP Zircon Geochronology to Characterise the Evolution of the Proterozoic Mount Isa Inlier, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, N. L.; Southgate, P. N.; Gibson, G. M.

    2008-12-01

    The Proterozoic Mount Isa Inlier of northern Australia records an extensive record of basin evolution between 1800 Ma and 1575 Ma, and contains a number of world-class Pb-Zn-Ag, U and Iron Oxide Cu-Au deposits. Understanding the timing and nature of basin development is a critical component in understanding these mineral systems. The integration of U-Pb zircon SHIRMP geochronology with structural and facies analysis has allowed basin packages across this area to be divided into three superbasins; the Leichhardt, Calvert and Isa Superbasins. Detrital zircon geochronology of stratigraphic units within these basins has been used in conjunction with syn-sedimentary volcanics to constrain depositional ages, and to identify and characterise changes in provenance through time. Sedimentation between 1790 Ma and 1740 Ma associated with the Leichhardt Superbasin is characterised by fluvial to shallow marine sandstones deposited in half-grabens. Between 1690 Ma and 1670 Ma, deep-water turbidites in the eastern-most parts of the inlier were deposited during an interval of missing rock record on the platform to the west, and are coincident with the initiation of a break-up unconformity. Sedimentation between 1790 Ma and 1670 Ma is also associated with voluminous felsic and mafic magmatism, and mafic rocks emplaced during this time period record a change in geochemical signature from continental flood basalts to oceanic tholeiites. We interpret these changes to be consistent with an evolution in tectonic setting from intercontinental rifting to near passive margin development.

  2. Nanoparticles for biomedical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nune, Satish K; Gunda, Padmaja; Thallapally, Praveen K; Lin, Ying-Ying; Forrest, M Laird; Berkland, Cory J

    2011-01-01

    Background Synthetic nanoparticles are emerging as versatile tools in biomedical applications, particularly in the area of biomedical imaging. Nanoparticles 1 – 100 nm in diameter have dimensions comparable to biological functional units. Diverse surface chemistries, unique magnetic properties, tunable absorption and emission properties, and recent advances in the synthesis and engineering of various nanoparticles suggest their potential as probes for early detection of diseases such as cancer. Surface functionalization has expanded further the potential of nanoparticles as probes for molecular imaging. Objective To summarize emerging research of nanoparticles for biomedical imaging with increased selectivity and reduced nonspecific uptake with increased spatial resolution containing stabilizers conjugated with targeting ligands. Methods This review summarizes recent technological advances in the synthesis of various nanoparticle probes, and surveys methods to improve the targeting of nanoparticles for their application in biomedical imaging. Conclusion Structural design of nanomaterials for biomedical imaging continues to expand and diversify. Synthetic methods have aimed to control the size and surface characteristics of nanoparticles to control distribution, half-life and elimination. Although molecular imaging applications using nanoparticles are advancing into clinical applications, challenges such as storage stability and long-term toxicology should continue to be addressed. PMID:19743894

  3. Montanide ISA 71 VG adjuvant enhances antibody and cell-ediated immune responses to profilin subunit antigen vaccination and promotes protection against Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria tenella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study was conducted to investigate the immunoenhancing effects of ISA 71 VG adjuvant on profilin subunit antigen vaccination. Broiler chickens were immunized subcutaneously with a purified Eimeria acervulina recombinant profilin protein, either alone or mixed with ISA 71 VG, and host imm...

  4. Vaccination with Clostridium perfringens recombinant proteins in combination with Montanide™ ISA 71 VG adjuvant increases protection against experimental necrotic enteritis in commercial broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was performed to compare four Clostridium perfringens recombinant proteins as vaccine candidates using the Montanide™ ISA 71 VG adjuvant in an experimental model of necrotic enteritis. Broiler chickens were immunized with clostridial recombinant proteins with ISA 71 VG, and intestinal le...

  5. International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanford, R.; Muhonen, D.; Sizemore, K. O.

    1991-01-01

    The International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Program is a large, multi-national program involving three space agencies and up to eight spacecraft. NASA, together with the Institute of Space and Astronomical Science (ISAS) and the European Space Agency (ESA), has agreed in principle to coordinate their efforts in investigating the Sun and the Earth. Each agency is planning to construct and operate different spacecraft as part of this cooperative venture: Geotail provided by ISAS, the Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and Cluster (four spacecraft) contributed by ESA, and Wind and Polar by NASA. A general description of the program is presented.

  6. Biomedical materials and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hanker, J. S. ); Giammara, B. L. )

    1989-01-01

    This conference reports on how biomedical materials and devices are undergoing important changes that require interdisciplinary approaches, innovation expertise, and access to sophisticated preparative and analytical equipment and methodologies. The interaction of materials scientists with biomedical, biotechnological, bioengineering and clinical scientists in the last decade has resulted in major advances in therapy. New therapeutic modalities and bioengineering methods and devices for the continuous removal of toxins or pathologic products present in arthritis, atherosclerosis and malignancy are presented. Novel monitoring and controlled drug delivery systems and discussions of materials such as blood or plasma substitutes, artificial organs, and bone graft substitutes are discussed.

  7. Commercial Biomedical Experiments Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Experiments to seek solutions for a range of biomedical issues are at the heart of several investigations that will be hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates (ITA), Inc. The biomedical experiments CIBX-2 payload is unique, encompassing more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments, and student hands-on experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the stars program. Here, Astronaut Story Musgrave activates the CMIX-5 (Commercial MDA ITA experiment) payload in the Space Shuttle mid deck during the STS-80 mission in 1996 which is similar to CIBX-2. The experiments are sponsored by NASA's Space Product Development Program (SPD).

  8. Commercial Biomedical Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Experiments to seek solutions for a range of biomedical issues are at the heart of several investigations that will be hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates (ITA), Inc. Biomedical Experiments (CIBX-2) payload. CIBX-2 is unique, encompassing more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments, and student hands-on experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the Stars program. Valerie Cassanto of ITA checks the Canadian Protein Crystallization Experiment (CAPE) carried by STS-86 to Mir in 1997. The experiments are sponsored by NASA's Space Product Development Program (SPD).

  9. Supporting undergraduate biomedical entrepreneurship.

    PubMed

    Patterson, P E

    2004-01-01

    As biomedical innovations become more sophisticated and expensive to bring to market, an approach is needed to ensure the survival of the best ideas. The tactic used by Iowa State University to provide entrepreneurship opportunities for undergraduate students in biomedical areas is a model that has proven to be both distinctive and effective. Iowa State supports and fosters undergraduate student entrepreneurship efforts through the Pappajohn Center for Entrepreneurship. This unique partnership encourages ISU faculty, researchers, and students to become involved in the world of entrepreneurship, while allowing Iowa's business communities to gain access to a wide array of available resources, skills, and information from Iowa State University. PMID:15134007

  10. Elastomers for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Yoda, R

    1998-01-01

    Current topics in elastomers for biomedical applications are reviewed. Elastomeric biomaterials, such as silicones, thermoplastic elastomers, polyolefin and polydiene elastomers, poly(vinyl chloride), natural rubber, heparinized polymers, hydrogels, polypeptides elastomers and others are described. In addition biomedical applications, such as cardiovascular devices, prosthetic devices, general medical care products, transdermal therapeutic systems, orthodontics, and ophthalmology are reviewed as well. Elastomers will find increasing use in medical products, offering biocompatibility, durability, design flexibility, and favorable performance/cost ratios. Elastomers will play a key role in medical technology of the future. PMID:9659600

  11. Noninvasive biomedical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Daniel; Bullock, Audra

    2003-07-01

    A non-invasive biomedical sensor for monitoring glucose levels is described. The sensor utilizes laser light to determine glucose levels in urine, but could also be used for drug screening and diagnosis of other medical conditions. The glucose measurement is based on modulation spectroscopy with harmonic analysis. Active signal processing and filtering are used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and decreases the measurement time to allow for real time sample analysis. Preliminary data are given which show the concentration of glucose in a control sample. Future applications of this technology, for example, as a portable multipurpose bio-medical analysis tool, are explored.

  12. Biomedical enhancements as justice.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jeesoo

    2015-02-01

    Biomedical enhancements, the applications of medical technology to make better those who are neither ill nor deficient, have made great strides in the past few decades. Using Amartya Sen's capability approach as my framework, I argue in this article that far from being simply permissible, we have a prima facie moral obligation to use these new developments for the end goal of promoting social justice. In terms of both range and magnitude, the use of biomedical enhancements will mark a radical advance in how we compensate the most disadvantaged members of society. PMID:24117708

  13. Five biomedical experiments flown in an Earth orbiting laboratory: Lessons learned from developing these experiments on the first international microgravity mission from concept to landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Lashbrook, J. J.; Callahan, P. X.; Schaefer, R. L.

    1993-01-01

    There are numerous problems associated with accommodating complex biological systems in microgravity in the flexible laboratory systems installed in the Orbiter cargo bay. This presentation will focus upon some of the lessons learned along the way from the University laboratory to the IML-1 Microgravity Laboratory. The First International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-1) mission contained a large number of specimens, including: 72 million nematodes, US-1; 3 billion yeast cells, US-2; 32 million mouse limb-bud cells, US-3; and 540 oat seeds (96 planted), FOTRAN. All five of the experiments had to undergo significant redevelopment effort in order to allow the investigator's ideas and objectives to be accommodated within the constraints of the IML-1 mission. Each of these experiments were proposed as unique entities rather than part of the mission, and many procedures had to be modified from the laboratory practice to meet IML-1 constraints. After a proposal is accepted by NASA for definition, an interactive process is begun between the Principal Investigator and the developer to ensure a maximum science return. The success of the five SLSPO-managed experiments was the result of successful completion of all preflight biological testing and hardware verification finalized at the KSC Life Sciences Support Facility housed in Hangar L. The ESTEC Biorack facility housed three U.S. experiments (US-1, US-2, and US-3). The U.S. Gravitational Plant Physiology Facility housed GTHRES and FOTRAN. The IML-1 mission (launched from KSC on 22 Jan. 1992, and landed at Dryden Flight Research Facility on 30 Jan. 1992) was an outstanding success--close to 100 percent of the prelaunch anticipated science return was achieved and, in some cases, greater than 100 percent was achieved (because of an extra mission day).

  14. Risk factors perceived predictive of ISA spread in Chile: applications to decision support.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, L; Antognoli, M; Lara Fica, M; Ibarra, R; Mancilla, J; Sandoval Del Valle, O; Enriquez Sais, R; Perez, A; Aguilar, D; Madrid, E; Bustos, P; Clement, A; Godoy, M G; Johnson, C; Remmenga, M

    2014-11-01

    Aquaculture is anticipated to be a critical element in future solutions to global food shortage. However, diseases can impede industry efficiency and sustainability. Consequently, diseases can and have led to dramatic re-structuring in industry or regulatory practices. The emergence of infectious salmon anemia (ISA) in Chile is one such example. As in other countries, many mitigations were instituted universally, and many incurred considerable costs as they introduced a new layer of coordination of farming activities of marine sites within common geographic areas (termed 'neighborhoods' or 'barrios'). The aggregate response led to a strong reduction in ISA incidence and impact. However, the relative value of individual mitigations is less clear, especially where response policies were universally applied and retrospective analyses are missing 'controls' (i.e., areas where a mitigation was not applied). Further, re-focusing policies around disease prevention following resolution of an outbreak is important to renew sustainable production; though, again, field data to guide this shift in purpose are often lacking. Expert panels can offer timely decision support in the absence of empirical data. We convened a panel of fish health experts to weight risk factors predictive of ISA virus (ISAV) introduction or spread between Atlantic salmon barrios in Chile. Barrios, rather than sites, were the unit of interest because many of the new mitigations operate at this level and few available studies examine their efficacy. Panelists identified barrio processing plant biosecurity, fallowing strategies, adult live fish transfers, fish and site density, smolt quality, hydrographic connection with other neighborhoods, presence of sea lice (Caligus rogercresseyi), and harvest vessel biosecurity as factors with the greatest predictive strength for ISAV virulent genotype ('HPR-deleted') occurrence. Fewer factors were considered predictive of ISAV HPR0 genotype ('HPR0') occurrence

  15. Pinatubo Emulation in Multiple Models (POEMs): co-ordinated experiments in the ISA-MIP model intercomparison activity component of the SPARC Stratospheric Sulphur and it's Role in Climate initiative (SSiRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Lindsay; Mann, Graham; Carslaw, Ken; Toohey, Matthew; Aquila, Valentina

    2016-04-01

    The World Climate Research Program's SPARC initiative has a new international activity "Stratospheric Sulphur and its Role in Climate" (SSiRC) to better understand changes in stratospheric aerosol and precursor gaseous sulphur species. One component of SSiRC involves an intercomparison "ISA-MIP" of composition-climate models that simulate the stratospheric aerosol layer interactively. Within PoEMS each modelling group will run a "perturbed physics ensemble" (PPE) of interactive stratospheric aerosol (ISA) simulations of the Pinatubo eruption, varying several uncertain parameters associated with the eruption's SO2 emissions and model processes. A powerful new technique to quantify and attribute sources of uncertainty in complex global models is described by Lee et al. (2011, ACP). The analysis uses Gaussian emulation to derive a probability density function (pdf) of predicted quantities, essentially interpolating the PPE results in multi-dimensional parameter space. Once trained on the ensemble, a Monte Carlo simulation with the fast Gaussian emulator enabling a full variance-based sensitivity analysis. The approach has already been used effectively by Carslaw et al., (2013, Nature) to quantify the uncertainty in the cloud albedo effect forcing from a 3D global aerosol-microphysics model allowing to compare the sensitivy of different predicted quantities to uncertainties in natural and anthropogenic emissions types, and structural parameters in the models. Within ISA-MIP, each group will carry out a PPE of runs, with the subsequent analysis with the emulator assessing the uncertainty in the volcanic forcings predicted by each model. In this poster presentation we will give an outline of the "PoEMS" analysis, describing the uncertain parameters to be varied and the relevance to further understanding differences identified in previous international stratospheric aerosol assessments.

  16. [Electronic health records and biomedical research].

    PubMed

    Daniel, Christel; Jais, Jean-Philippe; El Fadly, Naji; Landais, Paul

    2009-10-01

    The rapid progress in Web technology has led to the multiplication of health and research records for any given patient. Initiatives such as the personal medical record or the communicating cancer communicable records have recently been introduced. However, their primary aim is not for biomedical research. Several international groups of researchers are analyzing the appropriate role of the electronic health record as a support to biomedical research. The need to complete several distinct records for a given patient is a limiting factor, in view of the lack of medical and paramedical resources and the rising quality demands for both medical care and biomedical research. The impediments to "secondary reuse" of clinical data stored in electronic health records for biomedical research purposes are statutory, organizational, and technical. The international Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) initiative has proposed a promising approach that uses an integration profile known as a Retrieve Form for Data Capture (RFD). A joint project by the North American Association of Cancer Registries and the Centers for Disease Control has made possible the automated transmission of pathology reports to the registries and thus limited the need for registry technicians to come copy these forms at the hospital. PMID:19766440

  17. Biomedical Engineering in Modern Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attinger, E. O.

    1971-01-01

    Considers definition of biomedical engineering (BME) and how biomedical engineers should be trained. State of the art descriptions of BME and BME education are followed by a brief look at the future of BME. (TS)

  18. An ISA-TAB-Nano based data collection framework to support data-driven modelling of nanotoxicology

    PubMed Central

    Marchese Robinson, Richard L; Richarz, Andrea-Nicole; Rallo, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Summary Analysis of trends in nanotoxicology data and the development of data driven models for nanotoxicity is facilitated by the reporting of data using a standardised electronic format. ISA-TAB-Nano has been proposed as such a format. However, in order to build useful datasets according to this format, a variety of issues has to be addressed. These issues include questions regarding exactly which (meta)data to report and how to report them. The current article discusses some of the challenges associated with the use of ISA-TAB-Nano and presents a set of resources designed to facilitate the manual creation of ISA-TAB-Nano datasets from the nanotoxicology literature. These resources were developed within the context of the NanoPUZZLES EU project and include data collection templates, corresponding business rules that extend the generic ISA-TAB-Nano specification as well as Python code to facilitate parsing and integration of these datasets within other nanoinformatics resources. The use of these resources is illustrated by a “Toy Dataset” presented in the Supporting Information. The strengths and weaknesses of the resources are discussed along with possible future developments. PMID:26665069

  19. Immunogenicity in rhesus of the Plasmodium vivax mosquito stage antigen Pvs25H with Alhydrogel and Montanide ISA 720.

    PubMed

    Saul, A; Hensmann, M; Sattabongkot, J; Collins, W E; Barnwell, J W; Langermans, J A M; Wu, Y; Long, C A; Dubovsky, F; Thomas, A W

    2007-10-01

    Pvs25 is an ookinete surface protein from Plasmodium vivax that is the target of transmission-blocking antibodies. Two immunogenicity trials in rhesus monkeys with a recombinant form of the protein, Pvs25H, were undertaken. Monkeys were vaccinated with Pvs25H adsorbed to Alhydrogel or emulsified in Montanide ISA 720 at 0, 4 and 27 weeks (study 1) or in Montanide ISA 720 at 0 and 18 weeks (study 2) with 1.5 or 15 microg Pvs25H in 0.1 or 0.5 mL of emulsion (four combinations). Immunogenicity was assessed by ELISA and by membrane-feeding experiments using P. vivax-infected blood from human volunteers (studies 1 and 2) or from chimpanzees (study 1). Both vaccine trials generated antibodies that blocked transmission of P. vivax to mosquitoes. Antibody titres and transmission blocking were higher with Montanide ISA 720 than with Alhydrogel in the first trial and with the 15 microg Pvs25H/0.5 mL ISA 720 combination in the second trial. PMID:17883455

  20. What is biomedical informatics?

    PubMed Central

    Bernstam, Elmer V.; Smith, Jack W.; Johnson, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    Biomedical informatics lacks a clear and theoretically grounded definition. Many proposed definitions focus on data, information, and knowledge, but do not provide an adequate definition of these terms. Leveraging insights from the philosophy of information, we define informatics as the science of information, where information is data plus meaning. Biomedical informatics is the science of information as applied to or studied in the context of biomedicine. Defining the object of study of informatics as data plus meaning clearly distinguishes the field from related fields, such as computer science, statistics and biomedicine, which have different objects of study. The emphasis on data plus meaning also suggests that biomedical informatics problems tend to be difficult when they deal with concepts that are hard to capture using formal, computational definitions. In other words, problems where meaning must be considered are more difficult than problems where manipulating data without regard for meaning is sufficient. Furthermore, the definition implies that informatics research, teaching, and service should focus on biomedical information as data plus meaning rather than only computer applications in biomedicine. PMID:19683067

  1. Biomedical applications in EELA.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Miguel; Hernández, Vicente; Mayo, Rafael; Blanquer, Ignacio; Perez-Griffo, Javier; Isea, Raul; Nuñez, Luis; Mora, Henry Ricardo; Fernández, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    The current demand for Grid Infrastructures to bring collabarating groups between Latina America and Europe has created the EELA proyect. This e-infrastructure is used by Biomedical groups in Latina America and Europe for the studies of ocnological analisis, neglected diseases, sequence alignments and computation plygonetics. PMID:16823158

  2. Texture in Biomedical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrou, Maria

    An overview of texture analysis methods is given and the merits of each method for biomedical applications are discussed. Methods discussed include Markov random fields, Gibbs distributions, co-occurrence matrices, Gabor functions and wavelets, Karhunen-Loève basis images, and local symmetry and orientation from the monogenic signal. Some example applications of texture to medical image processing are reviewed.

  3. Holography In Biomedical Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bally, G.

    1988-01-01

    Today not only physicists and engineers but also biological and medical scientists are exploring the potentials of holographic methods in their special field of work. Most of the underlying physical principles such as coherence, interference, diffraction and polarization as well as general features of holography e.g. storage and retrieval of amplitude and phase of a wavefront, 3-d-imaging, large field of depth, redundant storage of information, spatial filtering, high-resolving, non-contactive, 3-d form and motion analysis are explained in detail in other contributions to this book. Therefore, this article is confined to the applications of holography in biomedical sciences. Because of the great number of contributions and the variety of applications [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8] in this review the investigations can only be mentioned briefly and the survey has to be confined to some examples. As in all fields of optics and laser metrology, a review of biomedical applications of holography would be incomplete if military developments and their utilization are not mentioned. As will be demonstrated by selected examples the increasing interlacing of science with the military does not stop at domains that traditionally are regarded as exclusively oriented to human welfare like biomedical research [9]. This fact is actually characterized and stressed by the expression "Star Wars Medicine", which becomes increasingly common as popular description for laser applications (including holography) in medicine [10]. Thus, the consequence - even in such highly specialized fields like biomedical applications of holography - have to be discussed.

  4. Implantable CMOS Biomedical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Jun; Tokuda, Takashi; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Noda, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    The results of recent research on our implantable CMOS biomedical devices are reviewed. Topics include retinal prosthesis devices and deep-brain implantation devices for small animals. Fundamental device structures and characteristics as well as in vivo experiments are presented. PMID:22291554

  5. Principles of Biomedical Ethics

    PubMed Central

    Athar, Shahid

    2012-01-01

    In this presentation, I will discuss the principles of biomedical and Islamic medical ethics and an interfaith perspective on end-of-life issues. I will also discuss three cases to exemplify some of the conflicts in ethical decision-making. PMID:23610498

  6. Biomedical Results of Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, R. S. (Editor); Dietlein, L. F. (Editor); Berry, C. A. (Editor); Parker, James F. (Compiler); West, Vita (Compiler)

    1975-01-01

    The biomedical program developed for Apollo is described in detail. The findings are listed of those investigations which are conducted to assess the effects of space flight on man's physiological and functional capacities, and significant medical events in Apollo are documented. Topics discussed include crew health and inflight monitoring, preflight and postflight medical testing, inflight experiments, quarantine, and life support systems.

  7. Anatomy for Biomedical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmichael, Stephen W.; Robb, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    There is a perceived need for anatomy instruction for graduate students enrolled in a biomedical engineering program. This appeared especially important for students interested in and using medical images. These students typically did not have a strong background in biology. The authors arranged for students to dissect regions of the body that…

  8. Ethics and biomedical information.

    PubMed

    France, F H

    1998-03-01

    Ethical rules are similar for physicians in most countries that follow the Hippocratic oath. They have no formal legal force, but can be used as a reference to provide answers to solve individual cases. It appears erroneous to believe that privacy is about information. It is about relationship. In medicine, there is a contract between a patient and a physician, where health care personnel has to respect secrecy, while integrity and availability of information should be obtained for continuity of care. These somewhat contradictory objectives have to be applied very carefully to computerised biomedical information. Ethical principles have to be made clear to everyone, and society should take the necessary steps to organise their enforcement. Several examples are given in the delivery of health care, telediagnosis, patient follow-up. clinical research as well as possible breakthroughs that could jeopardise privacy, using biomedical information. PMID:9723809

  9. Graphene for Biomedical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas; Podila, Ramakrishna; Alexis, Frank; Rao, Apparao; Clemson Bioengineering Team; Clemson Physics Team

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we used graphene, a one-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms, to modify the surfaces of existing implant materials to enhance both bio- and hemo-compatibility. This novel effort meets all functional criteria for a biomedical implant coating as it is chemically inert, atomically smooth and highly durable, with the potential for greatly enhancing the effectiveness of such implants. Specifically, graphene coatings on nitinol, a widely used implant and stent material, showed that graphene coated nitinol (Gr-NiTi) supports excellent smooth muscle and endothelial cell growth leading to better cell proliferation. We further determined that the serum albumin adsorption on Gr-NiTi is greater than that of fibrinogen, an important and well understood criterion for promoting a lower thrombosis rate. These hemo-and biocompatible properties and associated charge transfer mechanisms, along with high strength, chemical inertness and durability give graphene an edge over most antithrombogenic coatings for biomedical implants and devices.

  10. Biomedical Applications of Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Shen, He; Zhang, Liming; Liu, Min; Zhang, Zhijun

    2012-01-01

    Graphene exhibits unique 2-D structure and exceptional phyiscal and chemical properties that lead to many potential applications. Among various applications, biomedical applications of graphene have attracted ever-increasing interests over the last three years. In this review, we present an overview of current advances in applications of graphene in biomedicine with focus on drug delivery, cancer therapy and biological imaging, together with a brief discussion on the challenges and perspectives for future research in this field. PMID:22448195

  11. Biomedical term mapping databases.

    PubMed

    Wren, Jonathan D; Chang, Jeffrey T; Pustejovsky, James; Adar, Eytan; Garner, Harold R; Altman, Russ B

    2005-01-01

    Longer words and phrases are frequently mapped onto a shorter form such as abbreviations or acronyms for efficiency of communication. These abbreviations are pervasive in all aspects of biology and medicine and as the amount of biomedical literature grows, so does the number of abbreviations and the average number of definitions per abbreviation. Even more confusing, different authors will often abbreviate the same word/phrase differently. This ambiguity impedes our ability to retrieve information, integrate databases and mine textual databases for content. Efforts to standardize nomenclature, especially those doing so retrospectively, need to be aware of different abbreviatory mappings and spelling variations. To address this problem, there have been several efforts to develop computer algorithms to identify the mapping of terms between short and long form within a large body of literature. To date, four such algorithms have been applied to create online databases that comprehensively map biomedical terms and abbreviations within MEDLINE: ARGH (http://lethargy.swmed.edu/ARGH/argh.asp), the Stanford Biomedical Abbreviation Server (http://bionlp.stanford.edu/abbreviation/), AcroMed (http://medstract.med.tufts.edu/acro1.1/index.htm) and SaRAD (http://www.hpl.hp.com/research/idl/projects/abbrev.html). In addition to serving as useful computational tools, these databases serve as valuable references that help biologists keep up with an ever-expanding vocabulary of terms. PMID:15608198

  12. Biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Vogel, John S.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasensitive SIMS with accelerator based spectrometers has recently begun to be applied to biomedical problems. Certain very long-lived radioisotopes of very low natural abundances can be used to trace metabolism at environmental dose levels ( [greater-or-equal, slanted] z mol in mg samples). 14C in particular can be employed to label a myriad of compounds. Competing technologies typically require super environmental doses that can perturb the system under investigation, followed by uncertain extrapolation to the low dose regime. 41Ca and 26Al are also used as elemental tracers. Given the sensitivity of the accelerator method, care must be taken to avoid contamination of the mass spectrometer and the apparatus employed in prior sample handling including chemical separation. This infant field comprises the efforts of a dozen accelerator laboratories. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been particularly active. In addition to collaborating with groups further afield, we are researching the kinematics and binding of genotoxins in-house, and we support innovative uses of our capability in the disciplines of chemistry, pharmacology, nutrition and physiology within the University of California. The field can be expected to grow further given the numerous potential applications and the efforts of several groups and companies to integrate more the accelerator technology into biomedical research programs; the development of miniaturized accelerator systems and ion sources capable of interfacing to conventional HPLC and GMC, etc. apparatus for complementary chemical analysis is anticipated for biomedical laboratories.

  13. Recent advances in natural language processing for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Collier, Nigel; Nazarenko, Adeline; Baud, Robert; Ruch, Patrick

    2006-06-01

    We survey a set a recent advances in natural language processing applied to biomedical applications, which were presented in Geneva, Switzerland, in 2004 at an international workshop. While text mining applied to molecular biology and biomedical literature can report several interesting achievements, we observe that studies applied to clinical contents are still rare. In general, we argue that clinical corpora, including electronic patient records, must be made available to fill the gap between bioinformatics and medical informatics. PMID:16139564

  14. Hyperspectral remote sensing for mineral mapping of structural related mineralizations around Mount Isa, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Sandra; Salati, Sanaz; Gloaguen, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Alone or combined with other remote sensing data, hyperspectral mineral mapping can be used to investigate mineralizations and deposits via alteration minerals. Their kind, abundance and spatial distribution can deliver important statements about the occurrence and formation of mineralizations and their relation to structural features. The high spectral and spatial resolution of HyMap data exceeds multispectral data distinctly and makes the recognition of even smaller geological structures possible. The spectral unmixing of single endmembers can be used for the accurate mapping of specific materials or minerals. The support of hyperspectral imaging by spectral data gathered in the field and the analysis of the composition of rock samples can help to determine endmembers and to identify absorption features. This study demonstrates the possibilities and limitations of remote sensing, especially hyperspectral data, for mineral mapping purposes, using the example of the Mount Isa Inlier. This geological area is situated in Northern Queensland, Australia, and is known for its considerable ore deposits and consequent mining of predominantly copper, zinc, lead, silver and gold. Beside hyperspectral HyMap data, multispectral Landsat 8 and SRTM digital elevation data were analyzed. A three-week field study in 2014 supported the investigations. After preprocessing and vegetation masking the data were analyzed using Spectral Feature Fitting (SFF) and Mixture Tuned Matched Filtering (MTMF) for alteration mineral mapping. The outcomes were combined with results from decorrelation stretch, band ratioing, topographic indices and automated lineament analysis. Additional information was provided by field spectrometer measurements and the XRF and XRD analysis of rock samples. Throughout the study, mineral mapping using remote sensing data, especially hyperspectral data, turned out to deliver high qualitative results when it is supported by additional information. In situ

  15. NASA Participation in the ISAS MUSES C Asteroid Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ross

    2000-01-01

    NASA and Japan's Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) have agreed to cooperate on the first mission to collect samples from the surface of an asteroid and return them to Earth for in-depth study. The MUSES-C mission will be launched on a Japanese MV launch vehicle in January 2002 from Kagoshima Space Center, Japan, toward a touchdown on the asteroid Nereus in September 2003. A NASA-provided miniature rover will conduct in-situ measurements on the surface. The asteroid samples will be returned to Earth by MUSES-C via a parachute-borne recovery capsule in January 2006. NASA and ISAS will cooperate on several aspects of the mission, including mission support and scientific analysis. In addition to providing the rover, NASA will arrange for the testing of the MUSES-C re-entry heat shield at NASA/Ames Research Center, provide supplemental Deep Space Network tracking of the spacecraft, assist in navigating the spacecraft and provide arrangements for the recovery of the sample capsule at a landing site in the U. S. Scientific coinvestigators from the U.S. and Japan will share data from the instruments on the rover and the spacecraft. They will also collaborate on the investigations of the returned samples. With a mass of about I kg, the rover experiment will be a direct descendant of the technology used to build the Sojourner rover. The rover will carry three science instruments: a visible imaging camera, a near-infrared point spectrometer and an alpha X ray spectrometer. The solarpowered rover will move around the surface of Nereus collecting imagery data which are complimentary to the spacecraft investigation. The imaging system will be capable of making surface texture, composition, and morphology measurements at resolutions better than 1 cm. The rover will transmit this data to the spacecraft for relay back to Earth. Due to the microgravity environment on Nereus, the rover has been designed to right itself in case it flips over. Solar panels on all

  16. NIH Funding for Biomedical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Richard

    Biomedical imaging, and in particular MRI and CT, is often identified as among the top 10 most significant advances in healthcare in the 20th century. This presentation will describe some of the recent advances in medical physics and imaging being funded by NIH in this century and current funding opportunities. The presentation will also highlight the role of multidisciplinary research in bringing concepts from the physical sciences and applying them to challenges in biological and biomedical research.. NIH Funding for Biomedical Imaging.

  17. Quantitative biomedical mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leenheer, Andrép; Thienpont, Linda M.

    1992-09-01

    The scope of this contribution is an illustration of the capabilities of isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) for quantification of target substances in the biomedical field. After a brief discussion of the general principles of quantitative MS in biological samples, special attention will be paid to new technological developments or trends in IDMS from selected examples from the literature. The final section will deal with the use of IDMS for accuracy assessment in clinical chemistry. Methodological aspects considered crucial for avoiding sources of error will be discussed.

  18. Biomedical systems analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Biomedical monitoring programs which were developed to provide a system analysis context for a unified hypothesis for adaptation to space flight are presented and discussed. A real-time system of data analysis and decision making to assure the greatest possible crew safety and mission success is described. Information about man's abilities, limitations, and characteristic reactions to weightless space flight was analyzed and simulation models were developed. The predictive capabilities of simulation models for fluid-electrolyte regulation, erythropoiesis regulation, and calcium regulation are discussed.

  19. Laboratory simulation of intact capture of cometary and asteroidal dust particles in ISAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujiwara, A.; Nakamura, A.; Kadono, T.

    1994-01-01

    In order to develop a collector for intact capturing of cometary dust particles in the SOCCER mission and regolith dust particles released from asteroid surfaces by the impact of projectiles launched from a flying-by spacecraft, various kinds of materials as the collector candidates have been exposed to hypervelocity projectiles in our laboratory. Data based on the penetration characteristics of various materials (penetration depth, hole profile, effectiveness for intact capturing) are greatly increased. The materials tested for these simulation experiments include various kinds of low-density media and multisheet stacks; these are foamed plastics (polystyrene 0.01 g/cc), silica aerogels (0.04 g/cc), air (0.001 g/cc), liquid, and multisheet stack consisting of thin Al sheets (thickness 0.002 to 0.1 mm) or polyethylene sheets. Projectiles used are spheres or cylinders of nylon, polycarbonate, basalt, copper, iron, and volatile organics (e.g.,paradichlorobenzene) of size ranging from 30 micrometers to 1 cm launched by a two-stage light gas gun and a rail gun in ISAS at velocity up to about 7 km/s. Some results obtained by using nylon projectiles of velocity less than about 5 km/s are presented; the penetration depth vs. bulk density of the collector material for several kinds of materials and the velocity at which the projectiles begin to fragment vs. material density for foamed polystyrene.

  20. [Open access :an opportunity for biomedical research].

    PubMed

    Duchange, Nathalie; Autard, Delphine; Pinhas, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Open access within the scientific community depends on the scientific context and the practices of the field. In the biomedical domain, the communication of research results is characterised by the importance of the peer reviewing process, the existence of a hierarchy among journals and the transfer of copyright to the editor. Biomedical publishing has become a lucrative market and the growth of electronic journals has not helped lower the costs. Indeed, it is difficult for today's public institutions to gain access to all the scientific literature. Open access is thus imperative, as demonstrated through the positions taken by a growing number of research funding bodies, the development of open access journals and efforts made in promoting open archives. This article describes the setting up of an Inserm portal for publication in the context of the French national protocol for open-access self-archiving and in an international context. PMID:18789227

  1. Biomedical Interdisciplinary Curriculum Project: BIP (Biomedical Instrumentation Package) User's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biomedical Interdisciplinary Curriculum Project, Berkeley, CA.

    Described is the Biomedical Instrument Package (BIP) and its use. The BIP was developed for use in understanding colorimetry, sound, electricity, and bioelectric phenomena. It can also be used in a wide range of measurements such as current, voltage, resistance, temperature, and pH. Though it was developed primarily for use in biomedical science…

  2. Biomedical Knowledge and Clinical Expertise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boshuizen, Henny P. A.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    A study examined the application and availability of clinical and biomedical knowledge in the clinical reasoning of physicians as well as possible mechanisms responsible for changes in the organization of clinical and biomedical knowledge in the development from novice to expert. Subjects were 28 students (10 second year, 8 fourth year, and 10…

  3. Professional Identification for Biomedical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Francis M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses four methods of professional identification in biomedical engineering including registration, certification, accreditation, and possible membership qualification of the societies. Indicates that the destiny of the biomedical engineer may be under the control of a new profession, neither the medical nor the engineering. (CC)

  4. Biomedical informatics and translational medicine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Biomedical informatics involves a core set of methodologies that can provide a foundation for crossing the "translational barriers" associated with translational medicine. To this end, the fundamental aspects of biomedical informatics (e.g., bioinformatics, imaging informatics, clinical informatics, and public health informatics) may be essential in helping improve the ability to bring basic research findings to the bedside, evaluate the efficacy of interventions across communities, and enable the assessment of the eventual impact of translational medicine innovations on health policies. Here, a brief description is provided for a selection of key biomedical informatics topics (Decision Support, Natural Language Processing, Standards, Information Retrieval, and Electronic Health Records) and their relevance to translational medicine. Based on contributions and advancements in each of these topic areas, the article proposes that biomedical informatics practitioners ("biomedical informaticians") can be essential members of translational medicine teams. PMID:20187952

  5. Zirconium: biomedical and nephrological applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, David B N; Roberts, Martin; Bluchel, Christian G; Odell, Ross A

    2010-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid increase in the use of zirconium (Zr)-containing compounds in artificial internal organs. Examples include dental implants and other restorative practices, total knee and hip replacement, and middle-ear ossicular chain reconstruction. In nephrological practice, Zr-containing sorbents have been used in hemofiltration, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and in the design and construction of wearable artificial kidneys. Zr compounds continue to be widely and extensively used in deodorant and antiperspirant preparations. In the public health arena, Zr compounds have been studied or used in controlling phosphorus pollution and in the reclamation of poison and bacteria-contaminated water. Experimental and clinical studies support the general consensus that Zr compounds are biocompatible and exhibit low toxicity. Reports on possible Zr-associated adverse reactions are rare and, in general, have not rigorously established a cause-and-effect relationship. Although publications on the use of Zr compounds have continued to increase in recent years, reports on Zr toxicity have virtually disappeared from the medical literature. Nevertheless, familiarity with, and continued vigilant monitoring of, the use of these compounds are warranted. This article provides an updated review on the biomedical use of Zr compounds. PMID:21245802

  6. Biomedical applications of collagens.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, John A M

    2016-05-01

    Collagen-based biomedical materials have developed into important, clinically effective materials used in a range of devices that have gained wide acceptance. These devices come with collagen in various formats, including those based on stabilized natural tissues, those that are based on extracted and purified collagens, and designed composite, biosynthetic materials. Further knowledge on the structure and function of collagens has led to on-going developments and improvements. Among these developments has been the production of recombinant collagen materials that are well defined and are disease free. Most recently, a group of bacterial, non-animal collagens has emerged that may provide an excellent, novel source of collagen for use in biomaterials and other applications. These newer collagens are discussed in detail. They can be modified to direct their function, and they can be fabricated into various formats, including films and sponges, while solutions can also be adapted for use in surface coating technologies. PMID:26448097

  7. Biomedical studies by PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afarideh, H.; Amirabadi, A.; Hadji-Saeid, S. M.; Mansourian, N.; Kaviani, K.; Zibafar, E.

    1996-04-01

    In the present biomedical research, PIXE a powerful technique for elemental analysis was employed to illustrate the importance of multi-elemental determination of serum trace elements in two cases of great medical interest. Those are evaluation of the desferroxamine drug (DPO), a widely used therapy for patient with β-thalassemia-Major (β-thal-M), and investigation of elemental variations in blood-serum in hyperbilirubinamia new-borns before and after blood transfusion (BT). The purpose of the work is to demonstrate the various aspects of PIXE analysis by some practical examples as well as to draw some general conclusions regarding the cure of those patients with the above mentioned disorders or diseases. To present in details each case, we divide the paper in two parts: part 1 and part 2 to consider the experimental procedure as well as the results individually.

  8. Biomedical applications of nisin.

    PubMed

    Shin, J M; Gwak, J W; Kamarajan, P; Fenno, J C; Rickard, A H; Kapila, Y L

    2016-06-01

    Nisin is a bacteriocin produced by a group of Gram-positive bacteria that belongs to Lactococcus and Streptococcus species. Nisin is classified as a Type A (I) lantibiotic that is synthesized from mRNA and the translated peptide contains several unusual amino acids due to post-translational modifications. Over the past few decades, nisin has been used widely as a food biopreservative. Since then, many natural and genetically modified variants of nisin have been identified and studied for their unique antimicrobial properties. Nisin is FDA approved and generally regarded as a safe peptide with recognized potential for clinical use. Over the past two decades the application of nisin has been extended to biomedical fields. Studies have reported that nisin can prevent the growth of drug-resistant bacterial strains, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococci and Clostridium difficile. Nisin has now been shown to have antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative disease-associated pathogens. Nisin has been reported to have anti-biofilm properties and can work synergistically in combination with conventional therapeutic drugs. In addition, like host-defence peptides, nisin may activate the adaptive immune response and have an immunomodulatory role. Increasing evidence indicates that nisin can influence the growth of tumours and exhibit selective cytotoxicity towards cancer cells. Collectively, the application of nisin has advanced beyond its role as a food biopreservative. Thus, this review will describe and compare studies on nisin and provide insight into its future biomedical applications. PMID:26678028

  9. Comparison of Montanide adjuvants, IMS 3012 (Nanoparticle), ISA 206 and ISA 35 (Emulsion based) along with incomplete Freund's adjuvant for hyperimmunization of equines used for production of polyvalent snake antivenom.

    PubMed

    Waghmare, Arun; Deopurkar, R L; Salvi, Nitin; Khadilkar, Milind; Kalolikar, Milind; Gade, S K

    2009-02-11

    The use of adjuvant is of fundamental importance in vaccines formulations and antisera production. Currently selection and use of adjuvant systems in snake antivenom preparation has become a major issue in terms of animal welfare as well as economics. In order to minimize disadvantages associated with traditionally used Freund's adjuvant (FA) in equines and to produce potent polyvalent antivenom against four Indian snake venoms in minimum possible period, a comparison was made between various commercially available non-emulsion/emulsion based adjuvants like IMS 3012, ISA 206 and ISA 35 with Incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) for their immunopotentiation capacity and safety in donor animals. The present study was conducted in 33 new horses, randomly divided into four groups and hyperimmunized using crude mixture of snake venoms, viz.; Cobra venom (CV), Russell's viper venom (RV), Krait venom (KV) and Saw-scaled viper (EV) along with four above mentioned adjuvants through subcutaneous (s.c.) route at intervals of two weeks. Periodic standard safety assessments were done. Immunopotentiation ability of each adjuvant group in terms of percent responders were estimated at 14th, 21st, 30th and 43rd week. The neutralization activity (ED(50)) of pooled sera samples by 43(rd) week, obtained with IMS 3012 group for CV, RV, KV and EV venoms were 0.133, 0.143, 0.070 and 0.270 mg venom/ml of serum respectively. The antivenom potency with IMS 3012 and overall responding horses (100%) even against weak immunogen like CV was significantly higher (p<0.05) than other three adjuvants studied. The horses of IMS 3012 group showed minimum local reactions at injection site, while horses from other three groups exhibited moderate (++) reactions; 66.7% in ISA 206, 12.5% in ISA 35 and 14.3% in IFA respectively, however these were transient and reabsorbed or healed subsequently. Finally, we conclude that, nanoparticle adjuvant IMS 3012 could be a possible alternative to the emulsion adjuvants

  10. Semantic Similarity in Biomedical Ontologies

    PubMed Central

    Pesquita, Catia; Faria, Daniel; Falcão, André O.; Lord, Phillip; Couto, Francisco M.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, ontologies have become a mainstream topic in biomedical research. When biological entities are described using a common schema, such as an ontology, they can be compared by means of their annotations. This type of comparison is called semantic similarity, since it assesses the degree of relatedness between two entities by the similarity in meaning of their annotations. The application of semantic similarity to biomedical ontologies is recent; nevertheless, several studies have been published in the last few years describing and evaluating diverse approaches. Semantic similarity has become a valuable tool for validating the results drawn from biomedical studies such as gene clustering, gene expression data analysis, prediction and validation of molecular interactions, and disease gene prioritization. We review semantic similarity measures applied to biomedical ontologies and propose their classification according to the strategies they employ: node-based versus edge-based and pairwise versus groupwise. We also present comparative assessment studies and discuss the implications of their results. We survey the existing implementations of semantic similarity measures, and we describe examples of applications to biomedical research. This will clarify how biomedical researchers can benefit from semantic similarity measures and help them choose the approach most suitable for their studies. Biomedical ontologies are evolving toward increased coverage, formality, and integration, and their use for annotation is increasingly becoming a focus of both effort by biomedical experts and application of automated annotation procedures to create corpora of higher quality and completeness than are currently available. Given that semantic similarity measures are directly dependent on these evolutions, we can expect to see them gaining more relevance and even becoming as essential as sequence similarity is today in biomedical research. PMID:19649320

  11. National Space Biomedical Research Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In June 1996, NASA released a Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN) inviting proposals to establish a National Space Biomedical Research Institute (9-CAN-96-01). This CAN stated that: The Mission of the Institute will be to lead a National effort for accomplishing the integrated, critical path, biomedical research necessary to support the long term human presence, development, and exploration of space and to enhance life on Earth by applying the resultant advances in human knowledge and technology acquired through living and working in space. The Institute will be the focal point of NASA sponsored space biomedical research. This statement has not been amended by NASA and remains the mission of the NSBRI.

  12. Two sulphur isotope provinces deduced from ores in the Mount Isa Eastern Succession, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, G. J.; Dixon, G. H.

    1992-01-01

    The sulphur isotopic characteristics of ore deposits in the Australian Mount Isa Eastern Succession are not well known, unlike those of the Western Succession. In this study new detailed analyses are provided for recently discovered Eastern Succession mineralisation, such as the Starra and Osborne BIF-hosted Cu-Au ores, the Dugald River sediment-hosted Pb-Zn prospect, and four vein-hosted Cloncurry-style Cu±Au deposits (Hampden, Mt Elliot/Swan, Mt Cobalt, and the Answer Mine). All of the deposits of the Eastern Succession have δ34Ssulphide between -8 and +9%., regardless of their genesis. Empirically a moderate (δ34S range averaging close to 0%. characterises Starra-style Cu-Au and Pegmont Pb-Zn BIF ores, whereas shear and vein-style Cu mineralisation populations are tighter and do not average close to 0%. This is a particularly surprising result for Dugald River, where a larger isotopic variation more typical of stratiform sediment-hosted Pb-Zn ores in the region might have been expected. By comparison, Western Succession stratiform Pb-Zn and vein-style Cu deposits span a huge range of-15 to 51%. Large sulphur isotope ranges typify sulphate evaporite or organic sulphur-rich sedimentary successions. The lack of such variation in the Eastern Succession in turn suggests that primary evaporite sequences there were halite-dominated but sulphate-poor, and/or contained only limited volumes of organic-sulphur-rich sediment. Eastern Succession sequences were therefore less likely hosts for giant stratiform Pb-Zn deposits, because of their paucity of sulphur, although local sulphur sources permitted small deposits such as Dugald River to develop. Sedimentary conditions were more favourable for the development of sulphur-poor synsedimentary hydrothermal systems such as Starra, Osborne, and Pegmont, although sulphur isotope evidence is equivocal about the origin of these. Epigenetic deposits close to the Williams Batholith (Mt Dore, Hampden) owe their clustering around 0

  13. Nanocontrollers for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Frenger, P

    1996-01-01

    Several semiconductor companies now manufacture low cost single-chip microcontrollers in dual inline packages having twenty or fewer pins. The controllers are field programmable by means of inexpensive development boards linked to personal computers. These processors were designed with a minimalist philosophy which provide them with only a few dozen bytes of on-chip RAM, hundreds of bytes of PROM, a parallel port, a counter/timer, and reduced instruction sets. The better-equipped members of this class may have special on-chip hardware, such as analog-to-digital input, pulse-width modulation output and a serial port. Most must be programmed in assembler, although some support BASIC, "C" or other languages. Their tiny size, design simplicity and operational single-mindedness earn them the nickname "nanocontrollers". Despite meager resources, these controllers can be successfully employed in a variety of biomedical applications. Such uses include: consolidation of multi-chip "glue logic" circuitry; functioning as subsystem elements in complex designs; serving as device drivers or protocol converters; and forming the building blocks of hypercube processor arrays or artificial neural networks. This paper describes the general capabilities, special features, and some application examples of "nanocontroller" technology. PMID:8672686

  14. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Eroğlu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity. PMID:23091380

  15. Biomedical research publications, 1982 - 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcik, C.; Pleasant, L. G.

    1983-01-01

    Cardiovascular deconditioning, motion sickness, bone alterations, muscle atrophy, blood cell alterations, fluid and electrolyte changes, radiation effects and protection, behavior and performance, and general biomedical research are covered in a bibliography of 444 items.

  16. New Directions for Biomedical Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plonsey, Robert

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the definition of "biomedical engineering" and the development of educational programs in the field. Includes detailed descriptions of the roles of bioengineers, medical engineers, and chemical engineers. (CC)

  17. John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nall, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium is an inter-institutional research and technology development, beginning with ten projects in FY02 that are aimed at applying GRC expertise in fluid physics and sensor development with local biomedical expertise to mitigate the risks of space flight on the health, safety, and performance of astronauts. It is anticipated that several new technologies will be developed that are applicable to both medical needs in space and on earth.

  18. National Space Biomedical Research Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) sponsors and performs fundamental and applied space biomedical research with the mission of leading a world-class, national effort in integrated, critical path space biomedical research that supports NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Strategic Plan. It focuses on the enabling of long-term human presence in, development of, and exploration of space. This will be accomplished by: designing, implementing, and validating effective countermeasures to address the biological and environmental impediments to long-term human space flight; defining the molecular, cellular, organ-level, integrated responses and mechanistic relationships that ultimately determine these impediments, where such activity fosters the development of novel countermeasures; establishing biomedical support technologies to maximize human performance in space, reduce biomedical hazards to an acceptable level, and deliver quality medical care; transferring and disseminating the biomedical advances in knowledge and technology acquired through living and working in space to the benefit of mankind in space and on Earth, including the treatment of patients suffering from gravity- and radiation-related conditions on Earth; and ensuring open involvement of the scientific community, industry, and the public at large in the Institute's activities and fostering a robust collaboration with NASA, particularly through Johnson Space Center.

  19. NASA's Biomedical Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The biomedical research program has been established to investigate the major physiological and psychological problems encountered by man when he undertakes spaceflight. The program seeks to obtain a better definition of each problem, an understanding of its underlying mechanism, and ultimately a means of prevention. In pursuing these goals the program also includes a major effort to develop the research tools and procedures it needs where these are not being developed elsewhere. After almost twenty years of manned spaceflight activities and after a much longer period of space related ground-based research, the program now recognizes two characteristics of spaceflight which are truly unique to space. These are weightlessness and one specific form of radiation. In its present stage of maturity much of the research focuses on mechanisms underlying the basic responses of man and animals to weightlessness. The program consists of nine elements. Eight of these are referable to specific physiological problems that have either been encountered in previous manned spaceflight or which are anticipated to occur as spaceflights last longer, traverse steeper orbital inclinations, or are otherwise different from previous missions. The ninth addresses problems that have neither arisen nor can be reasonably predicted but are suspected on the basis of theoretical models, ground-based animal research, or for other reasons. The program's current emphasis is directed toward the motion sickness problem because of its relevance to Space Shuttle operations. Increased awareness and understanding of the radiation hazard has resulted in more emphasis being placed on the biological effects of high energy, high mass number particulate radiation and upon radiation protection . Cardiovascular and musculoskeleta1 studies are pursued in recognition of the considerable fundamental knowledge that must be acquired in these areas before effective countermeasures to the effects of repetitive or long

  20. Biomedical photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, also called optoacoustic imaging, is a new biomedical imaging modality based on the use of laser-generated ultrasound that has emerged over the last decade. It is a hybrid modality, combining the high-contrast and spectroscopic-based specificity of optical imaging with the high spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging. In essence, a PA image can be regarded as an ultrasound image in which the contrast depends not on the mechanical and elastic properties of the tissue, but its optical properties, specifically optical absorption. As a consequence, it offers greater specificity than conventional ultrasound imaging with the ability to detect haemoglobin, lipids, water and other light-absorbing chomophores, but with greater penetration depth than purely optical imaging modalities that rely on ballistic photons. As well as visualizing anatomical structures such as the microvasculature, it can also provide functional information in the form of blood oxygenation, blood flow and temperature. All of this can be achieved over a wide range of length scales from micrometres to centimetres with scalable spatial resolution. These attributes lend PA imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine, preclinical research and basic biology for studying cancer, cardiovascular disease, abnormalities of the microcirculation and other conditions. With the emergence of a variety of truly compelling in vivo images obtained by a number of groups around the world in the last 2–3 years, the technique has come of age and the promise of PA imaging is now beginning to be realized. Recent highlights include the demonstration of whole-body small-animal imaging, the first demonstrations of molecular imaging, the introduction of new microscopy modes and the first steps towards clinical breast imaging being taken as well as a myriad of in vivo preclinical imaging studies. In this article, the underlying physical principles of the technique, its practical

  1. Biomedical photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Beard, Paul

    2011-08-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, also called optoacoustic imaging, is a new biomedical imaging modality based on the use of laser-generated ultrasound that has emerged over the last decade. It is a hybrid modality, combining the high-contrast and spectroscopic-based specificity of optical imaging with the high spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging. In essence, a PA image can be regarded as an ultrasound image in which the contrast depends not on the mechanical and elastic properties of the tissue, but its optical properties, specifically optical absorption. As a consequence, it offers greater specificity than conventional ultrasound imaging with the ability to detect haemoglobin, lipids, water and other light-absorbing chomophores, but with greater penetration depth than purely optical imaging modalities that rely on ballistic photons. As well as visualizing anatomical structures such as the microvasculature, it can also provide functional information in the form of blood oxygenation, blood flow and temperature. All of this can be achieved over a wide range of length scales from micrometres to centimetres with scalable spatial resolution. These attributes lend PA imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine, preclinical research and basic biology for studying cancer, cardiovascular disease, abnormalities of the microcirculation and other conditions. With the emergence of a variety of truly compelling in vivo images obtained by a number of groups around the world in the last 2-3 years, the technique has come of age and the promise of PA imaging is now beginning to be realized. Recent highlights include the demonstration of whole-body small-animal imaging, the first demonstrations of molecular imaging, the introduction of new microscopy modes and the first steps towards clinical breast imaging being taken as well as a myriad of in vivo preclinical imaging studies. In this article, the underlying physical principles of the technique, its practical

  2. The BepiColombo Mission to Mercury: reaction wheels desaturation manoeuvres and the ISA accelerometer Δ →V measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, Valerio; Nozzoli, Sergio; Lucchesi, David; Santoli, Francesco; Peron, Roberto; Fiorenza, Emiliano; Lefevre, Carlo; Reale, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    The MPO will be a three-axis stabilized spacecraft and nadir pointing to Mercury center-of-mass. Such a pointing, needed for the very ambitious goals of the ESA space mission to Mercury denominated BepiColombo, is reached thanks to the onboard reaction wheels, and it is also required during the unobserved (from Earth) arcs. The unavoidable manoeuvres of desaturation of the reaction wheels, which are necessary to remove the accumulated angular momentum, represent a clear reduction of the accuracy of the objectives of the ESA space mission. Indeed, during these manoeuvres the spacecraft thrusters are fired -- to guarantee the planet center-of-mass pointing -- and directly impact the accuracy of the propagated state-vector of the satellite at the beginning of the subsequent observed arc. Their impact is quantified by their number, position along the orbit and, especially, in the uncertainty in the linear momentum transferred to the spacecraft. This presentation is devoted to prove the feasibility of the measurements of the transferred momentum by the thruster thanks to the onboard accelerometer ISA. Therefore, such measurements will be an essential ingredient in order to preserve the accuracy of the BepiColombo Radio Science Experiments and of the pointing accuracy of other onboard instruments, as is the case of BELA. This additional capability of ISA strengthen once more the key rôle of the accelerometer in the BepiColombo mission to Mercury.

  3. The BepiColombo mission to Mercury: Reaction wheels desaturation manoeuvres and the ISA accelerometer Δ V⇒ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Lucchesi, D.-M.; Nozzoli, S.; Santoli, F.

    2011-01-01

    The Mercury Planetary Orbiter will be a three-axis stabilized spacecraft and nadir pointing to Mercury center-of-mass. The pointing accuracy, needed for the very ambitious goals of the ESA space mission to Mercury denominated BepiColombo, is reached thanks to the onboard reaction wheels, and it is also required during the unobserved arcs. The unavoidable manoeuvres of desaturation of the reaction wheels, which are necessary to remove the accumulated angular momentum, represent a clear reduction of the accuracy of the objectives of the ESA space mission. Indeed, these manoeuvres are performed through the spacecraft thrusters and directly impact the accuracy of the propagated state-vector of the satellite at the beginning of the subsequent observed arc. Their impact is quantified by their number, position along the orbit and, especially, in the uncertainty in the linear momentum transferred to the spacecraft. The present paper is devoted to prove the feasibility of the speed variation measurements produced by the thruster thanks to the onboard accelerometer, ISA. Therefore, such measurements may be an essential ingredient in order to preserve the accuracy of the BepiColombo Radio Science Experiments and of other onboard instruments pointing accuracy, as is the case of BELA. This additional capability of ISA strengthens once more the key role of the accelerometer in the BepiColombo mission to Mercury.

  4. Biomedical Results of ISS Expeditions 1-12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer; Sams, Clarence F.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on biomedical data from International Space Station (ISS) Expeditions 1-12 is shown. The topics include: 1) ISS Expeditions 1-12; 2) Biomedical Data; 3) Physiological Assessments; 4) Bone Mineral Density; 5) Bone Mineral Density Recovery; 6) Orthostatic Tolerance; 7) Postural Stability Set of Sensory Organ Test 6; 8) Performance Assessment; 9) Aerobic Capacity of the Astronaut Corps; 10) Pre-flight Aerobic Fitness of ISS Astronauts; 11) In-flight and Post-flight Aerobic Capacity of the Astronaut Corps; and 12) ISS Functional Fitness Expeditions 1-12.

  5. The Genome Sequence of the Highly Acetic Acid-Tolerant Zygosaccharomyces bailii-Derived Interspecies Hybrid Strain ISA1307, Isolated From a Sparkling Wine Plant

    PubMed Central

    Mira, Nuno P.; Münsterkötter, Martin; Dias-Valada, Filipa; Santos, Júlia; Palma, Margarida; Roque, Filipa C.; Guerreiro, Joana F.; Rodrigues, Fernando; Sousa, Maria João; Leão, Cecília; Güldener, Ulrich; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    In this work, it is described the sequencing and annotation of the genome of the yeast strain ISA1307, isolated from a sparkling wine continuous production plant. This strain, formerly considered of the Zygosaccharomyces bailii species, has been used to study Z. bailii physiology, in particular, its extreme tolerance to acetic acid stress at low pH. The analysis of the genome sequence described in this work indicates that strain ISA1307 is an interspecies hybrid between Z. bailii and a closely related species. The genome sequence of ISA1307 is distributed through 154 scaffolds and has a size of around 21.2 Mb, corresponding to 96% of the genome size estimated by flow cytometry. Annotation of ISA1307 genome includes 4385 duplicated genes (∼90% of the total number of predicted genes) and 1155 predicted single-copy genes. The functional categories including a higher number of genes are ‘Metabolism and generation of energy’, ‘Protein folding, modification and targeting’ and ‘Biogenesis of cellular components’. The knowledge of the genome sequence of the ISA1307 strain is expected to contribute to accelerate systems-level understanding of stress resistance mechanisms in Z. bailii and to inspire and guide novel biotechnological applications of this yeast species/strain in fermentation processes, given its high resilience to acidic stress. The availability of the ISA1307 genome sequence also paves the way to a better understanding of the genetic mechanisms underlying the generation and selection of more robust hybrid yeast strains in the stressful environment of wine fermentations. PMID:24453040

  6. Discrimination of precious/base metal mineralising systems by fractal analysis, Mt Isa, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blenkinsop, T.; Oliver, N.

    2003-04-01

    Fractal analysis of deposit and prospect distribution provides a new and valuable tool in interpreting mineralisation patterns and developing exploration strategies, as demonstrated here for the Mount Isa block in Queensland, Australia. The district is one of the world’s most richly endowed base metal provinces; it also has significant precious metal deposits. Genetic models for the base metal deposits have included syngenetic and epigenetic extremes. The comprehensive data base in the North West Queensland Mineral Province Report is used to analyse copper (n=1867), copper-gold (n=211), gold (n=80), zinc-lead-silver (n=186) and uranium (n=212) mineral occurrences, prospects, existing and abandoned mines. Spatial distributions are analysed by counting the number of boxes (N[r]) of size r containing one or more localities as a function of r. Spectacularly different relationships between N[r] and r are observed for the different metals. In all cases, the trend of N[r] with r becomes almost flat at values of r on the order of hundreds of metres. This ``roll-off" effect may be due to lack of discovery of deposits. Relationships between N[r] and r at the largest box sizes may be influenced by a truncation effect. Approximate fractal dimensions (D) of the spatial distribution of each deposit type were evaluated avoiding both roll-off and truncation. The most clustered distributions were observed for Au (D ˜0.29) followed by Zn-Pb-Ag (D ˜0.41), U (D ˜0.87), Cu-Au (D ˜0.93) and Cu (D ˜1.3). This implies that there are strong differences between the mineralising systems of Au and Cu, and that neither Cu nor Au is clearly related to the family of Cu-Au deposits in the district. Au mineralization is highly clustered, implying localisation of mineralising fluid flow. In contrast, the Cu pattern indicates a more pervasive mineralising system. The latter is compatible with popular models which suggest that fluid mixing led to copper deposition, and that both metal source

  7. Spintronic platforms for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Freitas, P P; Cardoso, F A; Martins, V C; Martins, S A M; Loureiro, J; Amaral, J; Chaves, R C; Cardoso, S; Fonseca, L P; Sebastião, A M; Pannetier-Lecoeur, M; Fermon, C

    2012-02-01

    Since the fundamental discovery of the giant magnetoresistance many spintronic devices have been developed and implemented in our daily life (e.g. information storage and automotive industry). Lately, advances in the sensors technology (higher sensitivity, smaller size) have potentiated other applications, namely in the biological area, leading to the emergence of novel biomedical platforms. In particular the investigation of spintronics and its application to the development of magnetoresistive (MR) biomolecular and biomedical platforms are giving rise to a new class of biomedical diagnostic devices, suitable for bench top bioassays as well as point-of-care and point-of-use devices. Herein, integrated spintronic biochip platforms for diagnostic and cytometric applications, hybrid systems incorporating magnetoresistive sensors applied to neuroelectronic studies and biomedical imaging, namely magneto-encephalography and magneto-cardiography, are reviewed. Also lab-on-a-chip MR-based platforms to perform biological studies at the single molecule level are discussed. Overall the potential and main characteristics of such MR-based biomedical devices, comparing to the existing technologies while giving particular examples of targeted applications, are addressed. PMID:22146898

  8. Montanide™ ISA 71 VG adjuvant enhances antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to profilin subunit antigen vaccination and promotes protection against Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria tenella. Experimental Parasitology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study was conducted to investigate the immunoenhancing effects of MontanideTM ISA 71 VG adjuvant on profilin subunit antigen vaccination. Broiler chickens were immunized subcutaneously with a purified Eimeria acervulina recombinant profilin protein, either alone or mixed with ISA 71 VG, ...

  9. Implantable biomedical devices on bioresorbable substrates

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan; Huang, Yonggang; Amsden, Jason

    2014-03-04

    Provided herein are implantable biomedical devices, methods of administering implantable biomedical devices, methods of making implantable biomedical devices, and methods of using implantable biomedical devices to actuate a target tissue or sense a parameter associated with the target tissue in a biological environment. Each implantable biomedical device comprises a bioresorbable substrate, an electronic device having a plurality of inorganic semiconductor components supported by the bioresorbable substrate, and a barrier layer encapsulating at least a portion of the inorganic semiconductor components. Upon contact with a biological environment the bioresorbable substrate is at least partially resorbed, thereby establishing conformal contact between the implantable biomedical device and the target tissue in the biological environment.

  10. Biomedical Polar Research Workshop Minutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This workshop was conducted to provide a background of NASA and National Science Foundation goals, an overview of previous and current biomedical research, and a discussion about areas of potential future joint activities. The objectives of the joint research were: (1) to develop an understanding of the physiological, psychological, and behavioral alterations and adaptations to extreme environments of the polar regions; (2) to ensure the health, well-being, and performance of humans in these environments; and (3) to promote the application of biomedical research to improve the quality of life in all environments.

  11. Flexible sensors for biomedical technology.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Diana; Romeo, Agostino; Sánchez, Samuel

    2016-02-01

    Flexible sensing devices have gained a great deal of attention among the scientific community in recent years. The application of flexible sensors spans over several fields, including medicine, industrial automation, robotics, security, and human-machine interfacing. In particular, non-invasive health-monitoring devices are expected to play a key role in the improvement of patient life and in reducing costs associated with clinical and biomedical diagnostic procedures. Here, we focus on recent advances achieved in flexible devices applied on the human skin for biomedical and healthcare purposes. PMID:26675174

  12. Alginate: properties and biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuen Yong; Mooney, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Alginate is a biomaterial that has found numerous applications in biomedical science and engineering due to its favorable properties, including biocompatibility and ease of gelation. Alginate hydrogels have been particularly attractive in wound healing, drug delivery, and tissue engineering applications to date, as these gels retain structural similarity to the extracellular matrices in tissues and can be manipulated to play several critical roles. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of general properties of alginate and its hydrogels, their biomedical applications, and suggest new perspectives for future studies with these polymers. PMID:22125349

  13. Induction of protective cytotoxic T cells to murine cytomegalovirus by using a nonapeptide and a human-compatible adjuvant (Montanide ISA 720).

    PubMed Central

    Scalzo, A A; Elliott, S L; Cox, J; Gardner, J; Moss, D J; Suhrbier, A

    1995-01-01

    The use of synthetic peptides representing cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) epitopes for human vaccination requires the identification of a suitable adjuvant formulation. A single immunization with Montanide ISA720/tetanus toxoid/YPHFMPTNL protected mice against murine cytomegalovirus and induced epitope-specific CTL. Such formulations will find application in peptide-based CTL anti-viral vaccines. PMID:7815511

  14. EDITORIAL: Recent developments in biomedical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruikang K.; Hebden, Jeremy C.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2004-04-01

    The rapid growth in laser and photonic technology has resulted in new tools being proposed and developed for use in the medical and biological sciences. Specifically, a discipline known as biomedical optics has emerged which is providing a broad variety of optical techniques and instruments for diagnostic, therapeutic and basic science applications. New laser sources, detectors and measurement techniques are yielding powerful new methods for the study of diseases on all scales, from single molecules, to specific tissues and whole organs. For example, novel laser microscopes permit spectroscopic and force measurements to be performed on single protein molecules; new optical devices provide information on molecular dynamics and structure to perform `optical biopsy' non-invasively and almost instantaneously; and optical coherence tomography and diffuse optical tomography allow visualization of specific tissues and organs. Using genetic promoters to derive luciferase expression, bioluminescence methods can generate molecular light switches, which serve as functional indicator lights reporting cellular conditions and responses in living animals. This technique could allow rapid assessment of and response to the effects of anti-tumour drugs, antibiotics, or antiviral drugs. This issue of Physics in Medicine and Biology highlights recent research in biomedical optics, and is based on invited contributions to the International Conference on Advanced Laser Technology (Focused on Biomedical Optics) held at Cranfield University at Silsoe on 19--23 September 2003. This meeting included sessions devoted to: diffuse optical imaging and spectroscopy; optical coherence tomography and coherent domain techniques; optical sensing and applications in life science; microscopic, spectroscopic and opto-acoustic imaging; therapeutic and diagnostic applications; and laser interaction with organic and inorganic materials. Twenty-one papers are included in this special issue. The first paper

  15. Mining and urban impacts on semi-arid freshwater aquatic systems: the example of Mount Isa, Queensland.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark P; Mackay, Alana; Kuypers, Tabitha; Hudson-Edwards, Karen

    2009-05-01

    This paper examines the environmental risk and impact of trace metals affecting river water and sediment in and around Mount Isa, Queensland, Australia. Bacterial indicator densities are also analysed throughout the catchment to assess the impacts and the potential hazards arising from agricultural activities, sewage treatment plant releases and urban runoff. The area is drained by the ephemeral Leichhardt River, which bisects Mount Isa City and the major Pb, Zn, Cu and Ag Mount Isa Mine. Runoff is captured downstream in Lake Moondarra, with the water being used following natural filtration via a lagoon-reed bed system for potable purposes by the residents of Mount Isa City. During the dry season, the channel is characterised by numerous pools that act as storage zones for sediment and water-soluble metals as well as urban and agriculturally derived nutrients and pathogens. Our results show that sediment and water quality within the Leichhardt River adjacent to and downstream of the mine frequently exceed Australian government sediment guidelines with average values of Cu, Pb and Zn found adjacent to the footprint of the mine being 1550, 510 and 470 mg kg(-1), respectively. Dry season analysis of water-soluble Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations within pools showed that Australian government low trigger guidelines are exceeded in 100, 46 and 100% cases, respectively. The densities of bacterial indicators in remnant pools throughout the Leichhardt River also exceeded acceptable guidelines. Maximum dry season faecal coliform densities of 2000 colony forming units (CFU) per 100 mL and Enterococcus counts of 900 organisms per 100 mL were recorded in dry season remnant pools compared to wet season maximum faecal coliform and Enterococcus densities of 119 000 CFU per 100 mL and 95 000 organisms per 100 mL, respectively. The impacts on biota were also examined by assessing the metal content of the tissue of seven fish from Lake Moondarra for their Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb and Zn

  16. The Soft X-Ray Spectrometer (SXS) for the ISAS/JAXA New Exploration X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; McCammon, D.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Okajima, T.; Petre, R.; Porter, F. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Smith, R. K.; Soong, Y.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Mitsuda, K.; Ohashi, T.; Ishisaki, Y.; Ezoe, Y.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Shinozaki, K.; Fujimoto, R.; Kawaharada, M.

    2008-03-01

    The ISAS/JAXA New Exploration X-Ray Telescope (NEXT) is now under development for launch in 2013. The observatory is designed to provide extremely high spectral resolution with large collecting area below 10 keV using an x-ray calorimeter, and a very large band pass (up to 300 keV) with extraordinary sensitivity over the range 10-80 keV using focusing x-ray optics. In this talk we will discuss plans for the Soft X-Ray Spectrometer (SXS), which uses an x-ray calorimeter array to provide the high spectral resolution. The SXS is a joint effort between ISAS and NASA and recently proposed to NASA as a Mission of Opportunity for the US participation. The SXS incorporates a 6x6 calorimeter array that has strong heritage in the Suzaku program and better than 7 eV energy resolution, with 4-5 eV expected based on recent laboratory tests. The cryogenic system will be a hybrid design with both liquid helium and mechanical coolers to provide a robust, redundant system with long life (> 3 years). The x-ray optical system (6 m focal length) uses thin-foil conical optics to provide at least 220 square cm at 6 keV. The SXS will enable a wide variety of interesting science topics to be pursued, including testing theories of structure formation using velocity measurements of clusters of galaxies and inferring the energy output from the jets and winds of active galaxies. The SXS will accurately measure metal abundances in the oldest galaxies, providing unique information on the origin of the elements, and observe matter in extreme gravitational fields, enabling time-resolved spectra from material approaching the event horizon of a black hole. Along with providing the instrument, we have proposed a well supported guest investigator program that will enable full US participation.

  17. [The role of science in policy making--EuSANH-ISA project, framework for science advice for health].

    PubMed

    Cianciara, Dorota; Piotrowicz, Maria; Bielska-Lasota, Magdalena; Wysocki, Mirosław J

    2012-01-01

    Governments and other authorities (including MPs) should be well informed on issues of science and technology. This is particularly important in the era of evidence-based practice. This implies the need to get expert advice. The process by which scientific knowledge is transmitted, along with proposals how to solve the problem, is called science advice. The main aim of the article is to discuss the issue of science advice--definitions, interaction between science and policymaking, and its position in contemporary policies. The second aim is to present European Science Advisory Network for Health (EuSANH), EuSANH-ISA project, and framework for science advice for health which was developed by participants. Furthermore, the role of civil society in decision-making process and science advice is also discussed. Interaction between scientists and policy-makers are described in terms of science-push approach (technocratic model), policy-pull (decisionistic) and simultaneous push-pull approach (pragmatic). The position of science advice is described in historical perspective from the 50s, especially in the last two decades. Description relies to USA, Canada and UK. Principles of scientific advice to government (Government Office for Science, UK) are quoted. Some important documents related to science advice in EU and UN are mentioned. EuSANH network is described as well as EuSANH-ISA project, with its objectives and outcomes. According to findings of this project, the process of science advice for health should follow some steps: framing the issue to be covered; planning entire process leading to the conclusion; drafting the report; reviewing the report and revision; publishing report and assessing the impact on policy. PMID:23230726

  18. Advancing biomedical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Imaging reveals complex structures and dynamic interactive processes, located deep inside the body, that are otherwise difficult to decipher. Numerous imaging modalities harness every last inch of the energy spectrum. Clinical modalities include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and light-based methods [endoscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT)]. Research modalities include various light microscopy techniques (confocal, multiphoton, total internal reflection, superresolution fluorescence microscopy), electron microscopy, mass spectrometry imaging, fluorescence tomography, bioluminescence, variations of OCT, and optoacoustic imaging, among a few others. Although clinical imaging and research microscopy are often isolated from one another, we argue that their combination and integration is not only informative but also essential to discovering new biology and interpreting clinical datasets in which signals invariably originate from hundreds to thousands of cells per voxel. PMID:26598657

  19. Boosting production yield of biomedical peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique is employed to monitor synthesis of biomedical peptides. Application of NMR technique may improve production yields of insulin, ACTH, and growth hormones, as well as other synthesized biomedical peptides.

  20. National Space Biomedical Research Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This report outlines the National Space Biomedical Research Institute's (NSBRI) activities during FY 2004, the Institute's seventh year. It is prepared in accordance with Cooperative Agreement NCC 9-58 between NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) and the Institute's lead institution, Baylor College of Medicine.

  1. The SWAN biomedical discourse ontology.

    PubMed

    Ciccarese, Paolo; Wu, Elizabeth; Wong, Gwen; Ocana, Marco; Kinoshita, June; Ruttenberg, Alan; Clark, Tim

    2008-10-01

    Developing cures for highly complex diseases, such as neurodegenerative disorders, requires extensive interdisciplinary collaboration and exchange of biomedical information in context. Our ability to exchange such information across sub-specialties today is limited by the current scientific knowledge ecosystem's inability to properly contextualize and integrate data and discourse in machine-interpretable form. This inherently limits the productivity of research and the progress toward cures for devastating diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. SWAN (Semantic Web Applications in Neuromedicine) is an interdisciplinary project to develop a practical, common, semantically structured, framework for biomedical discourse initially applied, but not limited, to significant problems in Alzheimer Disease (AD) research. The SWAN ontology has been developed in the context of building a series of applications for biomedical researchers, as well as in extensive discussions and collaborations with the larger bio-ontologies community. In this paper, we present and discuss the SWAN ontology of biomedical discourse. We ground its development theoretically, present its design approach, explain its main classes and their application, and show its relationship to other ongoing activities in biomedicine and bio-ontologies. PMID:18583197

  2. National Space Biomedical Research Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This report outlines National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) activities during FY 2001, the fourth year of the NSBRI's programs. It is prepared in accordance with Cooperative Agreement NCC 9-58 between NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center and Baylor College of Medicine (NSBRI).

  3. National Space Biomedical Research Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This report outlines the activities of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) during FY 2003, the sixth year of the NSBRI's programs. It is prepared in accordance with Cooperative Agreement NCC 9-58 between NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) and the Institute's lead institution, Baylor College of Medicine.

  4. Biomedical research publications: 1980 - 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pleasant, L. G.; Limbach, L.

    1982-01-01

    Publications concerning the major physiological and psychological problems encountered by man when he undertakes space flight are listed. Nine research areas are included: cardiovascular deconditioning, motion sickness, bone alterations, muscle atrophy, blood cell alterations, fluid and eletrolyte changes, radiation effects and protection, behavior and performance, and general biomedical research.

  5. The Politics of Biomedical Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Robert H.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a college course designed to explicate the political dimensions of biomedical issues now emerging in American society. The course combines a rigorous overview of the technologies and the accompanying value changes which are producing these issues with a discussion of the problems being raised. (RM)

  6. Biomedical Engineering Education in Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gowen, Richard J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses recent developments in the health care industry and their impact on the future of biomedical engineering education. Indicates that a more thorough understanding of the complex functions of the living organism can be acquired through the application of engineering techniques to problems of life sciences. (CC)

  7. Optical Microspherical Resonators for Biomedical Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Soria, Silvia; Berneschi, Simone; Brenci, Massimo; Cosi, Franco; Conti, Gualtiero Nunzi; Pelli, Stefano; Righini, Giancarlo C.

    2011-01-01

    Optical resonators play an ubiquitous role in modern optics. A particular class of optical resonators is constituted by spherical dielectric structures, where optical rays are total internal reflected. Due to minimal reflection losses and to potentially very low material absorption, these guided modes, known as whispering gallery modes, can confer the resonator an exceptionally high quality factor Q, leading to high energy density, narrow resonant-wavelength lines and a lengthy cavity ringdown. These attractive characteristics make these miniaturized optical resonators especially suited as laser cavities and resonant filters, but also as very sensitive sensors. First, a brief analysis is presented of the characteristics of microspherical resonators, of their fabrication methods, and of the light coupling techniques. Then, we attempt to overview some of the recent advances in the development of microspherical biosensors, underlining a number of important applications in the biomedical field. PMID:22346603

  8. Advanced Biomedical Computing Center (ABCC) | DSITP

    Cancer.gov

    The Advanced Biomedical Computing Center (ABCC), located in Frederick Maryland (MD), provides HPC resources for both NIH/NCI intramural scientists and the extramural biomedical research community. Its mission is to provide HPC support, to provide collaborative research, and to conduct in-house research in various areas of computational biology and biomedical research.

  9. U.S. Biomedical Science and Technology: The Contribution of New Knowledge to the Nation's Economic Competitiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Christopher; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of biomedical science and technology focuses on factors important to a vital health care industry. Topics addressed include high expectations about health care, spending for health care, aspects related to international competitiveness, constraints on growth in the biomedical industry, the role of research, and research and employment…

  10. ISA Bulletin Special Workshop Report Edition No. 76. "Will Your Teaching Survive the Seventies?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, A. D., Comp.

    This is a report of the first teachers' inservice training workshop sponsored by the International Schools Association. It begins with some introductory statements concerning the workshop and its theme--"Will your teaching survive the seventies?" It also indicated in these introductory remarks that the workshop was intended as a conference…

  11. Advances in the biomedical applications of the EELA Project.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Vicente; Blanquer, Ignacio; Aparicio, Gabriel; Isea, Raúl; Chaves, Juan Luis; Hernández, Alvaro; Mora, Henry Ricardo; Fernández, Manuel; Acero, Alicia; Montes, Esther; Mayo, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    In the last years an increasing demand for Grid Infrastructures has resulted in several international collaborations. This is the case of the EELA Project, which has brought together collaborating groups of Latin America and Europe. One year ago we presented this e-infrastructure used, among others, by the biomedical groups for the studies of oncological analysis, neglected diseases, sequence alignments and computational phylogenetics. After this period, the achieved advances are summarised in this paper. PMID:17476045

  12. Nanocomposite hydrogels for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogels mimic native tissue microenvironment due to their porous and hydrated molecular structure. An emerging approach to reinforce polymeric hydrogels and to include multiple functionalities focuses on incorporating nanoparticles within the hydrogel network. A wide range of nanoparticles, such as carbon-based, polymeric, ceramic, and metallic nanomaterials can be integrated within the hydrogel networks to obtain nanocomposites with superior properties and tailored functionality. Nanocomposite hydrogels can be engineered to possess superior physical, chemical, electrical, and biological properties. This review focuses on the most recent developments in the field of nanocomposite hydrogels with emphasis on biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. In particular, we discuss synthesis and fabrication of nanocomposite hydrogels, examine their current limitations and conclude with future directions in designing more advanced nanocomposite hydrogels for biomedical and biotechnological applications. PMID:24264728

  13. On-Chip Biomedical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Göröcs, Zoltán; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip systems have been rapidly emerging to pave the way toward ultra-compact, efficient, mass producible and cost-effective biomedical research and diagnostic tools. Although such microfluidic and micro electromechanical systems achieved high levels of integration, and are capable of performing various important tasks on the same chip, such as cell culturing, sorting and staining, they still rely on conventional microscopes for their imaging needs. Recently several alternative on-chip optical imaging techniques have been introduced, which have the potential to substitute conventional microscopes for various lab-on-a-chip applications. Here we present a critical review of these recently emerging on-chip biomedical imaging modalities, including contact shadow imaging, lensfree holographic microscopy, fluorescent on-chip microscopy and lensfree optical tomography. PMID:23558399

  14. New biomedical applications of radiocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.C.

    1990-12-01

    The potential of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and radiocarbon in biomedical applications is being investigated by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A measurement of the dose-response curve for DNA damage caused by a carcinogen in mouse liver cells was an initial experiment. This demonstrated the sensitivity and utility of AMS for detecting radiocarbon tags and led to numerous follow-on experiments. The initial experiment and follow-on experiments are discussed in this report. 12 refs., 4 figs. (SM)

  15. The Proterozoic Mount Isa Fault Zone, northeastern Australia: is it really a ca. 1.9 Ga terrane-bounding suture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierlein, Frank P.; Betts, Peter G.

    2004-09-01

    In marked contrast to Palaeoproterozoic Laurentia, the location of sutures and boundaries of discrete crustal fragments amalgamated during Palaeoproterozoic formation of the North Australian Craton remain highly speculative. Interpretations of suture locations have relied heavily on the analysis of regional geophysical datasets because of sparse exposure of rocks of the appropriate age. The Mount Isa Fault Zone has been interpreted as one such Palaeoproterozoic terrane-bounding suture. Furthermore, the coincidence of this fault zone with major shale-hosted massive sulphide Pb-Zn-Ag orebodies has led to speculations that trans-lithospheric faults may be an important ingredient for the development of this deposit type. This study has integrated geophysical and geochemical data to test the statute of the Mount Isa Fault as a terrane-bounding suture. Forward modelling of gravity data shows that basement rocks on either side of the Mount Isa Fault have similar densities. These interpretations are consistent with geochemical observations and Sm-Nd data that suggest that basement lithologies on either side of the Mount Isa Fault are geochemically and isotopically indistinguishable from each other, and that the Mount Isa Fault is unlikely to represent a suture zone that separates different Palaeoproterozoic terranes. Our data indicate that the crustal blocks on both sides of the Mount Isa Fault Zone must have been in within close proximity of each other since the Palaeoproterozoic, and that the Western Fold Belt was part of the (ancestral) North Australian Craton well before the ˜1.89-1.87 Ga Barramundi Orogeny. It appears that deep crustal variations in density may be related to the boundary between a shallowly west-dipping high-density mafic to ultramafic plate and low-density basement rocks. This interpretation in turn impacts on crustal-scale models for the development of shale-hosted massive sulphide Pb-Zn mineralisation, which do not require trans

  16. National Space Biomedical Research Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NSBRI partners with NASA to develop countermeasures against the deleterious effects of long duration space flight. NSBRI's science and technology projects are directed toward this goal, which is accomplished by: 1. Designing, testing and validating effective countermeasures to address the biological and environmental impediments to long-term human space flight. 2. Defining the molecular, cellular, organ-level, integrated responses and mechanistic relationships that ultimately determine these impediments, where such activity fosters the development of novel countermeasures. 3. Establishing biomedical support technologies to maximize human performance in space, reduce biomedical hazards to an acceptable level and deliver quality medical care. 4. Transferring and disseminating the biomedical advances in knowledge and technology acquired through living and working in space to the general benefit of humankind; including the treatment of patients suffering from gravity- and radiation-related conditions on Earth. and 5. ensuring open involvement of the scientific community,industry and the public in the Institute's activities and fostering a robust collaboration with NASA, particularly through JSC.

  17. Biomedical applications of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cabuzu, Daniela; Cirja, Andreea; Puiu, Rebecca; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles may be used in different domains, one of most important being the biomedical field. They have suitable properties for controlled drug delivery, cancer treatment, biomedical imaging, diagnosis and many others, due to their excellent compatibility with the human organism, low toxicity and tunable stability, small dimensions, and possibility to interact with a variety of substances. They also have optical properties, being able to absorb infrared light. Moreover, due to their large surface and the ability of being coated with a variety of therapeutic agents, gold nanoparticles have been showed a great potential to be used as drug delivery systems. Gold nanoparticles are intensively studied in biomedicine, and recent studies revealed the fact that they can cross the blood-brain barrier, may interact with the DNA and produce genotoxic effects. Because of their ability of producing heat, they can target and kill the tumors, being used very often in photodynamic therapy. Gold nanoparticles can be synthesized in many ways, but the most common are the biological and chemical methods, however the chemical method offers the advantage of better controlling the size and shape of the nanoparticles. In this review, we present the principal applications of gold nanoparticles in the biomedical field, like cancer treatment, amyloid-like fibrillogenesis inhibitors, transplacental treatment, the development of specific scaffolds and drug delivery systems. PMID:25877087

  18. The possibility of a universal declaration of biomedical ethics

    PubMed Central

    Hedayat, K M

    2007-01-01

    Statements on issues in biomedical ethics, purporting to represent international interests, have been put forth by numerous groups. Most of these groups are composed of thinkers in the tradition of European secularism, and do not take into account the values of other ethical systems. One fifth of the world's population is accounted for by Islam, which is a universal religion, with more than 1400 years of scholarship. Although many values are held in common by secular ethical systems and Islam, their inferences are different. The question, “Is it possible to derive a truly universal declaration of biomedical ethics?” is discussed here by examining the value and extent of personal autonomy in Western and Islamic biomedical ethical constructs. These constructs are then tested vis‐à‐vis the issue of abortion. It is concluded that having a universal declaration of biomedical ethics in practice is not possible, although there are many conceptual similarities and agreements between secular and Islamic value systems, unless a radical paradigm shift occurs in segments of the world's deliberative bodies. The appellation “universal” should not be used on deliberative statements unless the ethical values of all major schools of thought are satisfied. PMID:17209104

  19. The ISA-MIP Historical Eruption SO2 Emissions Assessment (HErSEA): an intercomparison for interactive stratospheric aerosol models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Graham; Dhomse, Sandip; Sheng, Jianxiong; Mills, Mike

    2016-04-01

    Major historical volcanic eruptions have injected huge amounts of sulphur dioxide into the stratosphere with observations showing an enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer for several years (ASAP, 2006). Such long-lasting increases in stratospheric aerosol loading cool the Earth's surface by scattering incoming solar radiation and warm the stratosphere via absorption of near infra-red solar and long-wave terrestrial radiation with complex effects on climate (e.g. Robock, 2000). Two recent modelling studies of Mount Pinatubo (Dhomse et al., 2014; Sheng et al. 2015) have highlighted that observations suggest the sulphur loading of the volcanically enhanced stratospheric aerosol may have been considerably lower than suggested by measurements of the injected SO2. This poster describes a new model intercomparison activity "ISA-MIP" for interactive stratospheric aerosol models within the framework of the SPARC initiative on Stratospheric Sulphur and its Role in Climate (SSiRC). The new "Historical Eruption SO2 emissions Assessment" (HErSEA) will intercompare model simulations of the three largest volcanic perturbations to the stratosphere in the last 50 years, 1963 Mt Agung, 1982 El Chichon and 1991 Mt Pinatubo. The aim is to assess how effectively the emitted SO2 translates into perturbations to stratospheric aerosol properties and simulated radiative forcings in different composition-climate models with interactive stratospheric aerosol (ISA). Each modelling group will run a mini-ensemble of transient AMIP-type runs for the 3 eruptions with a control no-eruption run followed by upper and lower bound injection amount estimates and 3 different injection height settings for two shallow (e.g. 19-21km amd 23-25km) and one deep (e.g. 19-25km) injection. First order analysis will intercompare stratospheric aerosol metrics such as 2D-monthly AOD(550nm, 1020nm) and timeseries of tropical and NH/SH mid-visible extinction at three different models levels (15, 20 and 25km

  20. Data acquisition and pulse generation system for nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers on a single PC-ISA compatible board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosetti, R.; Ranieri, G. A.; Ricci, D.

    1998-08-01

    A data acquisition and pulse generation system for NMR spectrometers is described. It has been implemented on a single board for MS-DOS personal computers with an ISA standard bus interface and uses a simple architecture optimizing the integration of the hardware and software resources. The system, owing to its versatility and low cost, is particularly suitable to upgrade old pulsed NMR instruments with outdated data and control systems, for applications where expensive new cryomagnetic instruments would be inappropriate, such as in industrial control or as educational tools. The board provides two simultaneous data acquisition channels allowing 250 000 12-bit conversions per second per channel, including real-time signal averaging, and is able to produce essentially any pulse sequence on several output lines. The duration of each pulse can range from 0957-0233/9/8/024/img6s to 180 s with a minimum pulse separation of 0957-0233/9/8/024/img7s and with a resolution of 0957-0233/9/8/024/img6s. All classic NMR pulse sequences are allowed in addition to those required for self-diffusion coefficient measurements using pulsed magnetic field gradients. All functions of the system are managed by machine-language routines callable from within a VisualBASIC program. The cost of the hardware of this device is under US500.

  1. Text mining patents for biomedical knowledge.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Bundschus, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Biomedical text mining of scientific knowledge bases, such as Medline, has received much attention in recent years. Given that text mining is able to automatically extract biomedical facts that revolve around entities such as genes, proteins, and drugs, from unstructured text sources, it is seen as a major enabler to foster biomedical research and drug discovery. In contrast to the biomedical literature, research into the mining of biomedical patents has not reached the same level of maturity. Here, we review existing work and highlight the associated technical challenges that emerge from automatically extracting facts from patents. We conclude by outlining potential future directions in this domain that could help drive biomedical research and drug discovery. PMID:27179985

  2. Developing a new perspective for biomedical Communications.

    PubMed

    Rupnow, D E

    1979-07-01

    A three-dimensional model is utilized in an attempt to develop a complete picture of the many facets of biomedical communications. This model provides a suitable visual structure from which to explore the complex interactions of individuals, institutions, and activities in defining the field of biomedical communications. The first dimension of the model was developed through a historical overview of the environment of the biomedical communicator and suggests that changing organization goals, client needs, technology, and resources have influenced the evolution of different types of biomedical communicators. The second dimension of the model identifies five major work roles that may be performed by the biomedical communicator of today. The final dimension of the model is developed by a consideration of the major communication methods (illustration, photography, cinematography, television, audiovisual, and computer) of the biomedical communicator. PMID:88444

  3. Performance Comparison of Wireless Sensor Network Standard Protocols in an Aerospace Environment: ISA100.11a and ZigBee Pro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Raymond S.; Barton, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Standards-based wireless sensor network (WSN) protocols are promising candidates for spacecraft avionics systems, offering unprecedented instrumentation flexibility and expandability. Ensuring reliable data transport is key, however, when migrating from wired to wireless data gathering systems. In this paper, we conduct a rigorous laboratory analysis of the relative performances of the ZigBee Pro and ISA100.11a protocols in a representative crewed aerospace environment. Since both operate in the 2.4 GHz radio frequency (RF) band shared by systems such as Wi-Fi, they are subject at times to potentially debilitating RF interference. We compare goodput (application-level throughput) achievable by both under varying levels of 802.11g Wi-Fi traffic. We conclude that while the simpler, more inexpensive ZigBee Pro protocol performs well under moderate levels of interference, the more complex and costly ISA100.11a protocol is needed to ensure reliable data delivery under heavier interference. This paper represents the first published, rigorous analysis of WSN protocols in an aerospace environment that we are aware of and the first published head-to-head comparison of ZigBee Pro and ISA100.11a.

  4. Chapter 1: Biomedical Knowledge Integration

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Philip R. O.

    2012-01-01

    The modern biomedical research and healthcare delivery domains have seen an unparalleled increase in the rate of innovation and novel technologies over the past several decades. Catalyzed by paradigm-shifting public and private programs focusing upon the formation and delivery of genomic and personalized medicine, the need for high-throughput and integrative approaches to the collection, management, and analysis of heterogeneous data sets has become imperative. This need is particularly pressing in the translational bioinformatics domain, where many fundamental research questions require the integration of large scale, multi-dimensional clinical phenotype and bio-molecular data sets. Modern biomedical informatics theory and practice has demonstrated the distinct benefits associated with the use of knowledge-based systems in such contexts. A knowledge-based system can be defined as an intelligent agent that employs a computationally tractable knowledge base or repository in order to reason upon data in a targeted domain and reproduce expert performance relative to such reasoning operations. The ultimate goal of the design and use of such agents is to increase the reproducibility, scalability, and accessibility of complex reasoning tasks. Examples of the application of knowledge-based systems in biomedicine span a broad spectrum, from the execution of clinical decision support, to epidemiologic surveillance of public data sets for the purposes of detecting emerging infectious diseases, to the discovery of novel hypotheses in large-scale research data sets. In this chapter, we will review the basic theoretical frameworks that define core knowledge types and reasoning operations with particular emphasis on the applicability of such conceptual models within the biomedical domain, and then go on to introduce a number of prototypical data integration requirements and patterns relevant to the conduct of translational bioinformatics that can be addressed via the design and

  5. Chapter 1: Biomedical knowledge integration.

    PubMed

    Payne, Philip R O

    2012-01-01

    The modern biomedical research and healthcare delivery domains have seen an unparalleled increase in the rate of innovation and novel technologies over the past several decades. Catalyzed by paradigm-shifting public and private programs focusing upon the formation and delivery of genomic and personalized medicine, the need for high-throughput and integrative approaches to the collection, management, and analysis of heterogeneous data sets has become imperative. This need is particularly pressing in the translational bioinformatics domain, where many fundamental research questions require the integration of large scale, multi-dimensional clinical phenotype and bio-molecular data sets. Modern biomedical informatics theory and practice has demonstrated the distinct benefits associated with the use of knowledge-based systems in such contexts. A knowledge-based system can be defined as an intelligent agent that employs a computationally tractable knowledge base or repository in order to reason upon data in a targeted domain and reproduce expert performance relative to such reasoning operations. The ultimate goal of the design and use of such agents is to increase the reproducibility, scalability, and accessibility of complex reasoning tasks. Examples of the application of knowledge-based systems in biomedicine span a broad spectrum, from the execution of clinical decision support, to epidemiologic surveillance of public data sets for the purposes of detecting emerging infectious diseases, to the discovery of novel hypotheses in large-scale research data sets. In this chapter, we will review the basic theoretical frameworks that define core knowledge types and reasoning operations with particular emphasis on the applicability of such conceptual models within the biomedical domain, and then go on to introduce a number of prototypical data integration requirements and patterns relevant to the conduct of translational bioinformatics that can be addressed via the design and

  6. Biomedical Compounds from Marine organisms

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Rajeev Kumar; Zi-rong, Xu

    2004-01-01

    The Ocean, which is called the ‘mother of origin of life’, is also the source of structurally unique natural products that are mainly accumulated in living organisms. Several of these compounds show pharmacological activities and are helpful for the invention and discovery of bioactive compounds, primarily for deadly diseases like cancer, acquired immuno-deficiency syndrome (AIDS), arthritis, etc., while other compounds have been developed as analgesics or to treat inflammation, etc. The life-saving drugs are mainly found abundantly in microorganisms, algae and invertebrates, while they are scarce in vertebrates. Modern technologies have opened vast areas of research for the extraction of biomedical compounds from oceans and seas.

  7. GPU programming for biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caucci, Luca; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-08-01

    Scientific computing is rapidly advancing due to the introduction of powerful new computing hardware, such as graphics processing units (GPUs). Affordable thanks to mass production, GPU processors enable the transition to efficient parallel computing by bringing the performance of a supercomputer to a workstation. We elaborate on some of the capabilities and benefits that GPU technology offers to the field of biomedical imaging. As practical examples, we consider a GPU algorithm for the estimation of position of interaction from photomultiplier (PMT) tube data, as well as a GPU implementation of the MLEM algorithm for iterative image reconstruction.

  8. National Space Biomedical Research Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) during FY 1999, the second full year of existence of the NSBRI's research program, and is prepared in accordance with Cooperative Agreement NCC9-58 between NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center and Baylor College of Medicine (NSBRI). The report consists of progress reports on projects related to the effects of microgravity and space on physiology. The research is broken up in nine areas: (1) Bone loss, (2) Cardiovascular alterations, (3) human performance, (3) immunology, infection and hematology, (4) muscle alterations and atrophy,(5) Neurovestibular adaptation, radiation effects, (6) technology development, and (7) synergy projects.

  9. Telemedicine optoelectronic biomedical data processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosolovska, Vita V.

    2010-08-01

    The telemedicine optoelectronic biomedical data processing system is created to share medical information for the control of health rights and timely and rapid response to crisis. The system includes the main blocks: bioprocessor, analog-digital converter biomedical images, optoelectronic module for image processing, optoelectronic module for parallel recording and storage of biomedical imaging and matrix screen display of biomedical images. Rated temporal characteristics of the blocks defined by a particular triggering optoelectronic couple in analog-digital converters and time imaging for matrix screen. The element base for hardware implementation of the developed matrix screen is integrated optoelectronic couples produced by selective epitaxy.

  10. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J.B.

    1983-04-01

    This bibliography contains 725 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1982. There are 553 references to articles published in journals and books and 172 references to reports. The citations appear once ordered by the first author's division or by the performing division. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly, bimonthly, and quarterly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions are represented alphabetically. Indexes are provided by author, title, and journal reference. Reprints of articles referenced in this bibliography can be obtained from the author or the author's division.

  11. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Pfuderer, H.A.; Moody, J.B.

    1981-07-01

    This bibliography contains 690 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1980. There are 529 references to articles published in journals and books and 161 references to reports. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly and bimonthly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions represented in the order that they appear in the bibliography are Analytical Chemistry, Biology, Chemical Technology, Information R and D, Health and Safety Research, Energy, Environmental Sciences, and Computer Sciences.

  12. Getting to zero the biomedical way in Africa: outcomes of deliberation at the 2013 Biomedical HIV Prevention Forum in Abuja, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Over the last few decades, biomedical HIV prevention research had engaged multiple African stakeholders. There have however been few platforms to enable regional stakeholders to engage with one another. In partnership with the World AIDS Campaign International, the Institute of Public Health of Obafemi Awolowo University, and the National Agency for the Control of AIDS in Nigeria, the New HIV Vaccine and Microbicide Advocacy Society hosted a forum on biomedical HIV prevention research in Africa. Stakeholders’ present explored evidences related to biomedical HIV prevention research and development in Africa, and made recommendations to inform policy, guidelines and future research agenda. Discussion The BHPF hosted 342 participants. Topics discussed included the use of antiretrovirals for HIV prevention, considerations for biomedical HIV prevention among key populations; HIV vaccine development; HIV cure; community and civil society engagement; and ethical considerations in implementation of biomedical HIV prevention research. Participants identified challenges for implementation of proven efficacious interventions and discovery of other new prevention options for Africa. Concerns raised included limited funding by African governments, lack of cohesive advocacy and policy agenda for biomedical HIV prevention research and development by Africa, varied ethical practices, and limited support to communities’ capacity to actively engaged with clinical trial conducts. Participants recommended that the African Government implement the Abuja +12 declaration; the civil society build stronger partnerships with diverse stakeholders, and develop a coherent advocacy agenda that also enhances community research literacy; and researchers and sponsors of trials on the African continent establish a process for determining appropriate standards for trial conduct on the continent. Conclusion By highlighting key considerations for biomedical HIV prevention research and

  13. Biomedical information retrieval across languages.

    PubMed

    Daumke, Philipp; Markü, Kornél; Poprat, Michael; Schulz, Stefan; Klar, Rüdiger

    2007-06-01

    This work presents a new dictionary-based approach to biomedical cross-language information retrieval (CLIR) that addresses many of the general and domain-specific challenges in current CLIR research. Our method is based on a multilingual lexicon that was generated partly manually and partly automatically, and currently covers six European languages. It contains morphologically meaningful word fragments, termed subwords. Using subwords instead of entire words significantly reduces the number of lexical entries necessary to sufficiently cover a specific language and domain. Mediation between queries and documents is based on these subwords as well as on lists of word-n-grams that are generated from large monolingual corpora and constitute possible translation units. The translations are then sent to a standard Internet search engine. This process makes our approach an effective tool for searching the biomedical content of the World Wide Web in different languages. We evaluate this approach using the OHSUMED corpus, a large medical document collection, within a cross-language retrieval setting. PMID:17541863

  14. Superhydrophobic materials for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Falde, Eric J; Yohe, Stefan T; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-10-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are actively studied across a wide range of applications and industries, and are now finding increased use in the biomedical arena as substrates to control protein adsorption, cellular interaction, and bacterial growth, as well as platforms for drug delivery devices and for diagnostic tools. The commonality in the design of these materials is to create a stable or metastable air layer at the material surface, which lends itself to a number of unique properties. These activities are catalyzing the development of new materials, applications, and fabrication techniques, as well as collaborations across material science, chemistry, engineering, and medicine given the interdisciplinary nature of this work. The review begins with a discussion of superhydrophobicity, and then explores biomedical applications that are utilizing superhydrophobicity in depth including material selection characteristics, in vitro performance, and in vivo performance. General trends are offered for each application in addition to discussion of conflicting data in the literature, and the review concludes with the authors' future perspectives on the utility of superhydrophobic biomaterials for medical applications. PMID:27449946

  15. Monitoring of Biomedical License Agreements

    PubMed Central

    Keller, George H.; Ferguson, Steven M.; Pan, Percy

    2009-01-01

    Because technology licensed from research organizations can play a significant role in drug innovation and the generation of novel biomedical products, licensee performance under such agreements must be effectively monitored. This is necessary so that resultant benefits, including public health improvement, may be returned to the innovator(s) as well as society at large. The tasks that comprise monitoring are varied, but all come under the general heading of ‘enforcement of license provisions’. Since 1996, the license monitoring and enforcement program established by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) Group has collected about $US17 million in unpaid and underpaid license royalties through formal financial audits and other investigative activities. During the same period, the Office of Technology Transfer (OTT) settled more than 60 cases of suspected patent infringement, generating around 60 new licenses and collected both back and ongoing royalties. As these numbers show, an active and effective monitoring program is an essential part of any technology transfer or biomedical licensing program. PMID:19960074

  16. Polymetamorphism accompanied switching in horizontal shortening during Isan Orogeny: Example from the Eastern Fold Belt, Mount Isa Inlier, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Sharib, A. S. A. A.; Sanislav, I. V.

    2013-03-01

    Mesoproterozoic low-P/high-T volcano-sedimentary rocks of the Soldiers Cap Group, the southeastern corner of Mount Isa Inlier, record a complex polymetamorphic history that accompanied four periods of bulk horizontal shortening directed NE-SW, N-S, W-E and NW-SE during the long-lived Isan Orogeny (~ 1650-1500 Ma). Low-P/high-T metamorphism (M1) prevailed during a period of NE-SW bulk horizontal shortening as indicated by the early growth of cordierite porphyroblasts, which entrap monazite grains that gave an average age of 1649 ± 12 Ma. This was followed by medium-P/high-T (M2) and high-P/high-T (M3) metamorphisms that accompanied periods of N-S and W-E bulk horizontal shortening, respectively. Growth of first generation garnet, andalusite and staurolite porphyroblasts having an average age of 1645 ± 7 Ma identify the former, whereas growth of the 1591 ± 10 Ma second generation garnet, staurolite and andalusite porphyroblasts together with fewer kyanite porphyroblasts characterizes the latter. The sediments of the Soldiers Cap Group were deposited in a tectonic setting that has the characteristics of an intra-continental rift basin. The upper limit of the age of sedimentation is constrained by detrital zircons at 1654 ± 4 Ma suggesting that tectonism and metamorphism were either active during the final stage of the basin filling or immediate after deposition. Introduction of mafic dykes and sills at different stratigraphic levels over a wide time span was the major source of heat.

  17. Biomedical Communication Skills for Minority Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubois, Betty Lou

    A course in communications skills for the biomedical sciences is a component unique to the New Mexico State University MARC Honors Undergraduate Program. The program seeks to identify and assist minority students who show evidence of having clear potential to perform at a high level in the biomedical sciences and who show a determination to enter…

  18. Changing Postdoctoral Career Patterns for Biomedical Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coggeshall, Porter E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Examines the postdoctoral buildup between 1973 and 1977 and its implications for the Ph.D. candidate planning a career in a biomedical field. The effect of the continued growth in postdoctorals on biomedical research, research training and employment opportunities is also investigated. (HM)

  19. Publishing priorities of biomedical research funders

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To understand the publishing priorities, especially in relation to open access, of 10 UK biomedical research funders. Design Semistructured interviews. Setting 10 UK biomedical research funders. Participants 12 employees with responsibility for research management at 10 UK biomedical research funders; a purposive sample to represent a range of backgrounds and organisation types. Conclusions Publicly funded and large biomedical research funders are committed to open access publishing and are pleased with recent developments which have stimulated growth in this area. Smaller charitable funders are supportive of the aims of open access, but are concerned about the practical implications for their budgets and their funded researchers. Across the board, biomedical research funders are turning their attention to other priorities for sharing research outputs, including data, protocols and negative results. Further work is required to understand how smaller funders, including charitable funders, can support open access. PMID:24154520

  20. Biomedical Wireless Ambulatory Crew Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmiel, Alan; Humphreys, Brad

    2009-01-01

    A compact, ambulatory biometric data acquisition system has been developed for space and commercial terrestrial use. BioWATCH (Bio medical Wireless and Ambulatory Telemetry for Crew Health) acquires signals from biomedical sensors using acquisition modules attached to a common data and power bus. Several slots allow the user to configure the unit by inserting sensor-specific modules. The data are then sent real-time from the unit over any commercially implemented wireless network including 802.11b/g, WCDMA, 3G. This system has a distributed computing hierarchy and has a common data controller on each sensor module. This allows for the modularity of the device along with the tailored ability to control the cards using a relatively small master processor. The distributed nature of this system affords the modularity, size, and power consumption that betters the current state of the art in medical ambulatory data acquisition. A new company was created to market this technology.

  1. Biomedical Applications of Biodegradable Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Ulery, Bret D.; Nair, Lakshmi S.; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2011-01-01

    Utilization of polymers as biomaterials has greatly impacted the advancement of modern medicine. Specifically, polymeric biomaterials that are biodegradable provide the significant advantage of being able to be broken down and removed after they have served their function. Applications are wide ranging with degradable polymers being used clinically as surgical sutures and implants. In order to fit functional demand, materials with desired physical, chemical, biological, biomechanical and degradation properties must be selected. Fortunately, a wide range of natural and synthetic degradable polymers has been investigated for biomedical applications with novel materials constantly being developed to meet new challenges. This review summarizes the most recent advances in the field over the past 4 years, specifically highlighting new and interesting discoveries in tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. PMID:21769165

  2. Biomedical wellness challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangney, John F.

    2012-06-01

    The mission of ONR's Human and Bioengineered Systems Division is to direct, plan, foster, and encourage Science and Technology in cognitive science, computational neuroscience, bioscience and bio-mimetic technology, social/organizational science, training, human factors, and decision making as related to future Naval needs. This paper highlights current programs that contribute to future biomedical wellness needs in context of humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. ONR supports fundamental research and related technology demonstrations in several related areas, including biometrics and human activity recognition; cognitive sciences; computational neurosciences and bio-robotics; human factors, organizational design and decision research; social, cultural and behavioral modeling; and training, education and human performance. In context of a possible future with automated casualty evacuation, elements of current science and technology programs are illustrated.

  3. Animals in biomedical space research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Robert W.

    The use of experimental animals has been a major component of biomedical research progress. Using animals in space presents special problems, but also provides special opportunities. Rat and squirrel monkeys experiments have been planned in concert with human experiments to help answer fundamental questions concerning the effect of weightlessness on mammalian function. For the most part, these experiments focus on identified changes noted in humans during space flight. Utilizing space laboratory facilities, manipulative experiments can be completed while animals are still in orbit. Other experiments are designed to study changes in gravity receptor structure and function and the effect of weightlessness on early vertebrate development. Following these preliminary animals experiments on Spacelab Shuttle flights, longer term programs of animal investigation will be conducted on Space Station.

  4. Peptide nanostructures in biomedical technology.

    PubMed

    Feyzizarnagh, Hamid; Yoon, Do-Young; Goltz, Mark; Kim, Dong-Shik

    2016-09-01

    Nanostructures of peptides have been investigated for biomedical applications due to their unique mechanical and electrical properties in addition to their excellent biocompatibility. Peptides may form fibrils, spheres and tubes in nanoscale depending on the formation conditions. These peptide nanostructures can be used in electrical, medical, dental, and environmental applications. Applications of these nanostructures include, but are not limited to, electronic devices, biosensing, medical imaging and diagnosis, drug delivery, tissue engineering and stem cell research. This review offers a discussion of basic synthesis methods, properties and application of these nanomaterials. The review concludes with recommendations and future directions for peptide nanostructures. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:730-743. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1393 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26846352

  5. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, M; Mazare, A; Gongadze, E; Perutkova, Š; Kralj-Iglič, V; Milošev, I; Schmuki, P; A Iglič; Mozetič, M

    2015-02-13

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties. PMID:25611515

  6. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, M.; Mazare, A.; Gongadze, E.; Perutkova, Š.; Kralj-Iglič, V.; Milošev, I.; Schmuki, P.; Iglič, A.; Mozetič, M.

    2015-02-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties.

  7. Metrological reliability of optical coherence tomography in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloni, C. M.; Temporão, G. P.; Monteiro, E. C.

    2013-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been proving to be an efficient diagnostics technique for imaging in vivo tissues, an optical biopsy with important perspectives as a diagnostic tool for quantitative characterization of tissue structures. Despite its established clinical use, there is no international standard to address the specific requirements for basic safety and essential performance of OCT devices for biomedical imaging. The present work studies the parameters necessary for conformity assessment of optoelectronics equipment used in biomedical applications like Laser, Intense Pulsed Light (IPL), and OCT, targeting to identify the potential requirements to be considered in the case of a future development of a particular standard for OCT equipment. In addition to some of the particular requirements standards for laser and IPL, also applicable for metrological reliability analysis of OCT equipment, specific parameters for OCT's evaluation have been identified, considering its biomedical application. For each parameter identified, its information on the accompanying documents and/or its measurement has been recommended. Among the parameters for which the measurement requirement was recommended, including the uncertainty evaluation, the following are highlighted: optical radiation output, axial and transverse resolution, pulse duration and interval, and beam divergence.

  8. Education of biomedical engineering in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kang-Ping; Kao, Tsair; Wang, Jia-Jung; Chen, Mei-Jung; Su, Fong-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical Engineers (BME) play an important role in medical and healthcare society. Well educational programs are important to support the healthcare systems including hospitals, long term care organizations, manufacture industries of medical devices/instrumentations/systems, and sales/services companies of medical devices/instrumentations/system. In past 30 more years, biomedical engineering society has accumulated thousands people hold a biomedical engineering degree, and work as a biomedical engineer in Taiwan. Most of BME students can be trained in biomedical engineering departments with at least one of specialties in bioelectronics, bio-information, biomaterials or biomechanics. Students are required to have internship trainings in related institutions out of campus for 320 hours before graduating. Almost all the biomedical engineering departments are certified by IEET (Institute of Engineering Education Taiwan), and met the IEET requirement in which required mathematics and fundamental engineering courses. For BMEs after graduation, Taiwanese Society of Biomedical Engineering (TSBME) provides many continue-learning programs and certificates for all members who expect to hold the certification as a professional credit in his working place. In current status, many engineering departments in university are continuously asked to provide joint programs with BME department to train much better quality students. BME is one of growing fields in Taiwan. PMID:25571153

  9. Nonlinear aspects of acoustic radiation force in biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrovsky, Lev; Tsyuryupa, Sergey; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2015-10-28

    In the past decade acoustic radiation force (ARF) became a powerful tool in numerous biomedical applications. ARF from a focused ultrasound beam acts as a virtual “finger” for remote probing of internal anatomical structures and obtaining diagnostic information. This presentation deals with generation of shear waves by nonlinear focused beams. Albeit the ARF has intrinsically nonlinear origin, in most cases the primary ultrasonic wave was considered in the linear approximation. In this presentation, we consider the effects of nonlinearly distorted beams on generation of shear waves by such beams.

  10. EXACT2: the semantics of biomedical protocols

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The reliability and reproducibility of experimental procedures is a cornerstone of scientific practice. There is a pressing technological need for the better representation of biomedical protocols to enable other agents (human or machine) to better reproduce results. A framework that ensures that all information required for the replication of experimental protocols is essential to achieve reproducibility. Methods We have developed the ontology EXACT2 (EXperimental ACTions) that is designed to capture the full semantics of biomedical protocols required for their reproducibility. To construct EXACT2 we manually inspected hundreds of published and commercial biomedical protocols from several areas of biomedicine. After establishing a clear pattern for extracting the required information we utilized text-mining tools to translate the protocols into a machine amenable format. We have verified the utility of EXACT2 through the successful processing of previously 'unseen' (not used for the construction of EXACT2) protocols. Results The paper reports on a fundamentally new version EXACT2 that supports the semantically-defined representation of biomedical protocols. The ability of EXACT2 to capture the semantics of biomedical procedures was verified through a text mining use case. In this EXACT2 is used as a reference model for text mining tools to identify terms pertinent to experimental actions, and their properties, in biomedical protocols expressed in natural language. An EXACT2-based framework for the translation of biomedical protocols to a machine amenable format is proposed. Conclusions The EXACT2 ontology is sufficient to record, in a machine processable form, the essential information about biomedical protocols. EXACT2 defines explicit semantics of experimental actions, and can be used by various computer applications. It can serve as a reference model for for the translation of biomedical protocols in natural language into a semantically

  11. Shape-Memory Polymers for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakacki, Christopher M.; Gall, Ken

    Shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are a class of mechanically functional "smart" materials that have generated substantial interest for biomedical applications. SMPs offer the ability to promote minimally invasive surgery, provide structural support, exert stabilizing forces, elute therapeutic agents, and biodegrade. This review focuses on several areas of biomedicine including vascular, orthopedic, and neuronal applications with respect to the progress and potential for SMPs to improve the standard of treatment in these areas. Fundamental studies on proposed biomedical SMP systems are discussed with regards to biodegradability, tailorability, sterilization, and biocompatibility. Lastly, a proposed research and development pathway for SMP-based biomedical devices is proposed based on trends in the recent literature.

  12. Biomedical Applications of Tetrazine Cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    Devaraj, Neal K.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Conspectus Disease mechanisms are increasingly being resolved at the molecular level. Biomedical success at this scale creates synthetic opportunities for combining specifically designed orthogonal reactions in applications such as imaging, diagnostics, and therapy. For practical reasons, it would be helpful if bioorthogonal coupling reactions proceeded with extremely rapid kinetics (k > 103 M−1 sec−1) and high specificity. Improving kinetics would minimize both the time and amount of labeling agent required to maintain high coupling yields. In this Account, we discuss our recent efforts to design extremely rapid bioorthogonal coupling reactions between tetrazines and strained alkenes. These selective reactions were first used to covalently couple conjugated tetrazine near-infrared-emitting fluorophores to dienophile-modifed extracellular proteins on living cancer cells. Confocal fluorescence microscopy demonstrated efficient and selective labeling, and control experiments showed minimal background fluorescence. Multistep techniques were optimized to work with nanomolar concentrations of labeling agent over a timescale of minutes: the result was successful real-time imaging of covalent modification. We subsequently discovered fluorogenic probes that increase in fluorescence intensity after the chemical reaction, leading to an improved signal-to-background ratio. Fluorogenic probes were used for intracellular imaging of dienophiles. We further developed strategies to react and image chemotherapeutics, such as trans-cyclooctene taxol analogs, inside living cells. Because the coupling partners are small molecules (<300 daltons), they offer unique steric advantages in multistep amplification. We also describe recent success in using tetrazine reactions to label biomarkers on cells with magneto-fluorescent nanoparticles. Two-step protocols that use bioorthogonal chemistry can significantly amplify signals over both one-step labeling procedures as well as two

  13. Biomedical Monitoring and Countermeasures Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Donald F.

    1992-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) represents the transition within the US Space program from the 'heroic' era of space flight (characterized most vividly by the Mercury and Apollo programs) to an epoch characterized by routine access to the space environment. In this new era, the unique characteristics of the microgravity environment will enable new types of research activities, primarily in the life sciences, materials science, and biotechnology fields. In addition to its role as a'microgravity science laboratory,' Space Station Freedom (SSF) constitutes the operational platform on which the knowledge and skills needed to continue our exploration of space will be acquired. In the area of spacecraft operations, these skills include the ability to assemble, operate, and maintain large structures in space. In the area of crew operations, the potentially harmful effects of extended exposure to microgravity must be understood in order to keep the crew mission capable. To achieve this goal, the complex process of physiological deconditioning must be monitored, and countermeasures utilized as needed to keep the individual crew members within acceptable physiological limits. The countermeasures program under development for the SSF Program is titled the Biomedical Monitoring and Countermeasures (BMAC) program. As implied by the name, this activity has two primary products, a biomedical monitoring element and a countermeasures development effort. The program is a critical path element in the overall SSF Program, and should be considered an essential element of operations on board the space station. It is readily apparent that the capability to both protect and optimize the health and performance of the human operators on board SSF will be a critical element in the overall success of the SSFP. Previous experience within the Russian space program has demonstrated that the time required for countermeasures on extended missions can become a monumental operational burden

  14. Nanoporous materials for biomedical devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Adiga, S. P.; Curtiss, L. A.; Elam, J. W.; Pellin, M. J.; Shih, C.-C.; Shin, C.-M.; Lin, S.-J.; Su, Y.-Y.; Gittard, S. D.; Zhang, J.; Narayan, R. J.; National Yang-Ming Univ.; Taipei Medical Univ.; Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    2008-01-01

    Nanoporous materials are currently being developed for use in implantable drug delivery systems, bioartificial organs, and other novel medical devices. Advances in nanofabrication have made it possible to precisely control the pore size, pore distribution, porosity, and chemical properties of pores in nanoporous materials. As a result, these materials are attractive for regulating and sensing transport at the molecular level. In this work, the use of nanoporous membranes for biomedical applications is reviewed. The basic concepts underlying membrane transport are presented in the context of design considerations for efficient size sorting. Desirable properties of nanoporous membranes used in implantable devices, including biocompatibility and antibiofouling behavior, are also discussed. In addition, the use of surface modification techniques to improve the function of nanoporous membranes is reviewed. An intriguing possibility involves functionalizing nanoporous materials with smart polymers in order to modulate biomolecular transport in response to pH, temperature, ionic concentration, or other stimuli. These efforts open up avenues to develop smart medical devices that respond to specific physiological conditions.

  15. Status of marine biomedical research.

    PubMed Central

    Bessey, O

    1976-01-01

    A meeting on Marine Biomedical Research, sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), National Institutes of Health and the Smithsonian Institution Museum of Natural History, was attended by approximately 125 scientists, directors and representatives from many of the country's marine biological laboratories, and government agencies whose interests and responsibilites are in the marine biology and health areas. The purpose of the meeting was to explore the undeveloped research opportunities in the area of marine biology for the advancement of our understanding of human health problems and to provide information on the current status of marine biology laboratories. The meeting was devoted to presentations and discussions in four general areas: (1)Marine Species as Models for Human Disease; (2)Environmental Carcinogenesis and Mutagenesis; (3)Human Health and the Marine Environment--infectious agents and naturally occurring and foreign toxins; and (4)Drugs from the seas. Representatives from twelve of the country's approximatley 40 marine laboratories discussed their organization, developmental history, scientific programs, facilities, and present status of their support. The presentations served as a background and stimulated very lively analytical and constructive discussions of the undeveloped research and education potential residing in the marine environment and biological laboratories for a better understanding of many human health problems; some scientific areas that should be developed to realize this potential; and the needs and problems of marine laboratories that require attention and support if they are to survive and realize their possibilities. PMID:944630

  16. Biomedical Use of Isothermal Microcalorimeters

    PubMed Central

    Braissant, Olivier; Wirz, Dieter; Göpfert, Beat; Daniels, A.U.

    2010-01-01

    Isothermal microcalorimetry is becoming widely used for monitoring biological activities in vitro. Microcalorimeters are now able to measure heat production rates of less than a microwatt. As a result, metabolism and growth of relatively small numbers of cultured bacteria, protozoans, human cells and even small animals can be monitored continuously and extremely accurately at any chosen temperature. Dynamic effects on these organisms of changes in the culture environment—or of additions to it—are easily assessed over periods from hours to days. In addition microcalorimetry is a non-destructive method that does not require much sample preparation. It is also completely passive and thus allows subsequent evaluations of any kind on the undisturbed sample. In this review, we present a basic description of current microcalorimetry instruments and an overview of their use for various biomedical applications. These include detecting infections, evaluating effects of pharmaceutical or antimicrobial agents on cells, monitoring growth of cells harvested for tissue eingineering, and assessing medical and surgical device material physico-chemical stability and cellular biocompatibility. PMID:22163413

  17. Educating about biomedical research ethics.

    PubMed

    Stankovic, Bratislav; Stankovic, Mirjana

    2014-11-01

    This article examines the global and worsening problem of research misconduct as it relates to bio-medico-legal education. While research misconduct has serious legal implications, few adequate legal remedies exist to deal with it. With respect to teaching, research ethics education should be mandatory for biomedical students and physicians. Although teaching alone will not prevent misconduct, it promotes integrity, accountability, and responsibility in research. Policies and law enforcement should send a clear message that researchers should adhere to the highest standards of ethics in research. It is vital that researchers and physicians understand basic aspects of law and the legal system in order to develop understanding of the medico-legal issues not just in the legal context, but with a sound grounding in ethics, social and theoretical contexts so that they can practice good medicine. Routine and holistic research ethics education across the curriculum for medical students and resident physicians, and continuing medical education for practicing doctors, are probably the best ways to accomplish this goal. PMID:24752379

  18. Understanding Metabolomics in Biomedical Research

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Jung; Kim, Su Hee; Kim, Ji Hyun; Hwang, Shin

    2016-01-01

    The term "omics" refers to any type of specific study that provides collective information on a biological system. Representative omics includes genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, and new omics is constantly being added, such as lipidomics or glycomics. Each omics technique is crucial to the understanding of various biological systems and complements the information provided by the other approaches. The main strengths of metabolomics are that metabolites are closely related to the phenotypes of living organisms and provide information on biochemical activities by reflecting the substrates and products of cellular metabolism. The transcriptome does not always correlate with the proteome, and the translated proteome might not be functionally active. Therefore, their changes do not always result in phenotypic alterations. Unlike the genome or proteome, the metabolome is often called the molecular phenotype of living organisms and is easily translated into biological conditions and disease states. Here, we review the general strategies of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Targeted metabolome or lipidome analysis is discussed, as well as nontargeted approaches, with a brief explanation of the advantages and disadvantages of each platform. Biomedical applications that use mass spectrometry-based metabolomics are briefly introduced. PMID:26676338

  19. Ceramide synthases in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Cingolani, Francesca; Futerman, Anthony H; Casas, Josefina

    2016-05-01

    Sphingolipid metabolism consists of multiple metabolic pathways that converge upon ceramide, one of the key molecules among sphingolipids (SLs). In mammals, ceramide synthesis occurs via N-acylation of sphingoid backbones, dihydrosphingosine (dhSo) or sphingosine (So). The reaction is catalyzed by ceramide synthases (CerS), a family of enzymes with six different isoforms, with each one showing specificity towards a restricted group of acyl-CoAs, thus producing ceramides (Cer) and dihydroceramides (dhCer) with different fatty acid chain lengths. A large body of evidence documents the role of both So and dhSo as bioactive molecules, as well as the involvement of dhCer and Cer in physiological and pathological processes. In particular, the fatty acid composition of Cer has different effects in cell biology and in the onset and progression of different diseases. Therefore, modulation of CerS activity represents an attractive target in biomedical research and in finding new treatment modalities. In this review, we discuss functional, structural and biochemical features of CerS and examine CerS inhibitors that are currently available. PMID:26248326

  20. Holographic lithography for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankevicius, E.; Balciunas, E.; Malinauskas, M.; Raciukaitis, G.; Baltriukiene, D.; Bukelskiene, V.

    2012-06-01

    Fabrication of scaffolds for cell growth with appropriate mechanical characteristics is top-most important for successful creation of tissue. Due to ability of fast fabrication of periodic structures with a different period, the holographic lithography technique is a suitable tool for scaffolds fabrication. The scaffolds fabricated by holographic lithography can be used in various biomedical investigations such as the cellular adhesion, proliferation and viability. These investigations allow selection of the suitable material and geometry of scaffolds which can be used in creation of tissue. Scaffolds fabricated from di-acrylated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-DA-258) over a large area by holographic lithography technique are presented in this paper. The PEG-DA scaffolds fabricated by holographic lithography showed good cytocompatibility for rabbit myogenic stem cells. It was observed that adult rabbit muscle-derived myogenic stem cells grew onto PEG-DA scaffolds. They were attached to the pillars and formed cell-cell interactions. It demonstrates that the fabricated structures have potential to be an interconnection channel network for cell-to-cell interactions, flow transport of nutrients and metabolic waste as well as vascular capillary ingrowth. These results are encouraging for further development of holographic lithography by improving its efficiency for microstructuring three-dimensional scaffolds out of biodegradable hydrogels

  1. National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Olympics for advanced-assistive devices FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Enhancing the Efficiency and Effectiveness of Digital Curation for Biomedical Big Data (U01) BRAIN Initiative: Non-Invasive Neuromodulation - New Tools ...

  2. NIH/NSF accelerate biomedical research innovations

    Cancer.gov

    A collaboration between the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health will give NIH-funded researchers training to help them evaluate their scientific discoveries for commercial potential, with the aim of accelerating biomedical in

  3. A Program on Biochemical and Biomedical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San, Ka-Yiu; McIntire, Larry V.

    1989-01-01

    Presents an introduction to the Biochemical and Biomedical Engineering program at Rice University. Describes the development of the academic and enhancement programs, including organizational structure and research project titles. (YP)

  4. The Obligation to Participate in Biomedical Research

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, G. Owen; Emanuel, Ezekiel J.; Wertheimer, Alan

    2009-01-01

    The prevailing view is that participation in biomedical research is above and beyond the call of duty. While some commentators have offered reasons against this, we propose a novel public goods argument for an obligation to participate in biomedical research. Biomedical knowledge is a public good, available to any individual even if that individual does not contribute to it. Participation in research is a critical way to support that important public good. Consequently, we all have a duty to participate. The current social norm is that people participate only if they have a good reason to do so. The public goods argument implies that people should participate unless they have a good reason not to. Such a shift would be of great aid to the progress of biomedical research, eventually making our society significantly healthier and longer-lived. PMID:19567441

  5. Photonic crystal fibres in biomedical investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Skibina, Yu S; Tuchin, Valerii V; Beloglazov, V I; Shteinmaeer, G; Betge, I L; Wedell, R; Langhoff, N

    2011-04-30

    The state of the art in the field of design and study of photonic crystal fibres for biomedical applications is considered and some original results recently obtained by the authors are presented. Optical properties of the fibres that offer prospects of their wide application as biological sensors, 'labs-on-a-chip', and facilities of electromagnetic radiation control in a wide range of wavelengths aimed at designing novel biomedical instrumentation are considered (optical technologies in biophysics and medicine)

  6. Teaching biomedical applications to secondary students.

    PubMed

    Openshaw, S; Fleisher, A; Ljunggren, C

    1999-01-01

    Certain aspects of biomedical engineering applications lend themselves well to experimentation that can be done by high school students. This paper describes two experiments done during a six-week summer internship program in which two high school students used electrodes, circuit boards, and computers to mimic a sophisticated heart monitor and also to control a robotic car. Our experience suggests that simple illustrations of complex instrumentation can be effective in introducing adolescents to the biomedical engineering field. PMID:11143394

  7. European virtual campus for biomedical engineering EVICAB.

    PubMed

    Malmivuo, Jaakko A; Nousiainen, Juha O; Lindroos, Kari V

    2007-01-01

    European Commission has funded building a curriculum on Biomedical Engineering to the Internet for European universities under the project EVICAB. EVICAB forms a curriculum which will be free access and available free of charge. Therefore, in addition to the European universities, it will be available worldwide. EVICAB will make high quality education available for everyone, not only for the university students, and facilitate the development of the discipline of Biomedical Engineering. PMID:18002654

  8. The growth of biomedical terahertz research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shuting; He, Yuezhi; Ung, Benjamin S.; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma

    2014-09-01

    Interest in biomedical terahertz research is growing rapidly and there are now several terahertz groups in Asia, Europe and the US investigating potential applications such as pharmaceutical quality control, protein characterization and cancer detection. This review article outlines the technological bottlenecks that have been overcome which have made biomedical terahertz research possible. Key research findings will be presented, and the limitations that remain and the research initiatives that strive to address them will also be discussed.

  9. Is biomedical research a good investment?

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Norman R.

    2014-01-01

    As the US addresses its budget dilemma, the easiest items to cut are those with the longest-term payoff. Research stands out among this group. Biomedical research has already been markedly reduced, and further reductions appear to be in store. As a frequent witness in Congressional hearings on such matters, here I discuss the challenge of assessing the value of investments in biomedical research. PMID:25438057

  10. Automatic discourse connective detection in biomedical text

    PubMed Central

    Polepalli Ramesh, Balaji; Prasad, Rashmi; Miller, Tim; Harrington, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Objective Relation extraction in biomedical text mining systems has largely focused on identifying clause-level relations, but increasing sophistication demands the recognition of relations at discourse level. A first step in identifying discourse relations involves the detection of discourse connectives: words or phrases used in text to express discourse relations. In this study supervised machine-learning approaches were developed and evaluated for automatically identifying discourse connectives in biomedical text. Materials and Methods Two supervised machine-learning models (support vector machines and conditional random fields) were explored for identifying discourse connectives in biomedical literature. In-domain supervised machine-learning classifiers were trained on the Biomedical Discourse Relation Bank, an annotated corpus of discourse relations over 24 full-text biomedical articles (∼112 000 word tokens), a subset of the GENIA corpus. Novel domain adaptation techniques were also explored to leverage the larger open-domain Penn Discourse Treebank (∼1 million word tokens). The models were evaluated using the standard evaluation metrics of precision, recall and F1 scores. Results and Conclusion Supervised machine-learning approaches can automatically identify discourse connectives in biomedical text, and the novel domain adaptation techniques yielded the best performance: 0.761 F1 score. A demonstration version of the fully implemented classifier BioConn is available at: http://bioconn.askhermes.org. PMID:22744958

  11. Exploring subdomain variation in biomedical language

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Applications of Natural Language Processing (NLP) technology to biomedical texts have generated significant interest in recent years. In this paper we identify and investigate the phenomenon of linguistic subdomain variation within the biomedical domain, i.e., the extent to which different subject areas of biomedicine are characterised by different linguistic behaviour. While variation at a coarser domain level such as between newswire and biomedical text is well-studied and known to affect the portability of NLP systems, we are the first to conduct an extensive investigation into more fine-grained levels of variation. Results Using the large OpenPMC text corpus, which spans the many subdomains of biomedicine, we investigate variation across a number of lexical, syntactic, semantic and discourse-related dimensions. These dimensions are chosen for their relevance to the performance of NLP systems. We use clustering techniques to analyse commonalities and distinctions among the subdomains. Conclusions We find that while patterns of inter-subdomain variation differ somewhat from one feature set to another, robust clusters can be identified that correspond to intuitive distinctions such as that between clinical and laboratory subjects. In particular, subdomains relating to genetics and molecular biology, which are the most common sources of material for training and evaluating biomedical NLP tools, are not representative of all biomedical subdomains. We conclude that an awareness of subdomain variation is important when considering the practical use of language processing applications by biomedical researchers. PMID:21619603

  12. A ground calibration of the engineering model of the SXT onboard ASTRO-H using the ISAS 30m pencil beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, K.; Hayashi, T.; Ishida, M.; Maeda, Y.; Mori, H.; Sato, T.; Tomikawa, K.; Ishibashi, K.; Iizuka, R.; Okajima, T.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Soong, Y.

    2012-09-01

    The Japanese ASTRO-H mission, planned to be launched in 2014, will carry several instruments for covering a wide energy range from a few keV to 600 keV. Among them there are four thin-foil-nested Wolter-I X-ray telescopes. Two of them are Soft X-ray Telescopes (SXTs) covering up to ~12 keV. Each of them focuses an image on the focal plane detectors of the CCD camera (SXI) and the calorimeter (SXS-XCS), respectively. In 2011, we performed a ground calibration of a quadrant engineering model (EM) of SXT that was fabricated at MASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The ground calibration was made with a combination of the measurements at the GSFC and Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) facilities. In this paper we report the results of the calibration at the ISAS 30m beamline facility. We used a raster san method with a pencil beam at the baseline length of 30m. An effective area and angular resolution of the EM quadrant were measured. The effective area is 147 cm2 at 1.49 keV and 116 cm2 at 4.51 keV, respectively, while the angular longer by ~20mm from nominal length. We also measured imaging performance in separate parts of nested mirrors. The angular resolution of parts at outer radius is larger than those at inner radius, and the quadrant have different focal lengths in radius.

  13. Protein-based nanotubes for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Teruyuki

    2012-03-01

    This review presents highlights of our latest results of studies directed at developing protein-based smart nanotubes for biomedical applications. These practical biocylinders were prepared using an alternate layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of protein and oppositely charged poly(amino acid) into a nanoporous polycarbonate (PC) membrane (pore diameter, 400 nm), with subsequent dissolution of the template. The tube wall typically comprises six layers of poly-l-arginine (PLA) and human serum albumin (HSA) [(PLA/HSA)3]. The obtained (PLA/HSA)3 nanotubes (NTs) can be dispersed in aqueous medium and are hydrated significantly. Several ligands for HSA, such as zinc(ii) protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), were bound to the HSA component in the cylindrical wall. Similar NTs comprising recombinant HSA mutant, which has a strong binding affinity for ZnPP, captured the ligand more tightly. The Fe3O4-coated NTs can be collected easily by exposure to a magnetic field. The hybrid NTs bearing a single avidin layer as an internal wall captured biotin-labeled nanoparticles into the central channel when their particle size is sufficiently small to enter the pores. The NTs with an antibody surface interior entrapped human hepatitis B virus with size selectivity. It is noteworthy that the infectious Dane particles were encapsulated completely into the hollows. Other HSA-based NTs having an α-glucosidase inner wall hydrolysed a glucopyranoside to yield α-d-glucose. A perspective of the practical use of the protein-based NTs is also described.

  14. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ying

    Nanotechnology is revolutionizing human's life. Synthesis and application of magnetic nanoparticles is a fast burgeoning field which has potential to bring significant advance in many fields, for example diagnosis and treatment in biomedical area. Novel nanoparticles to function efficiently and intelligently are in desire to improve the current technology. We used a magnetron-sputtering-based nanocluster deposition technique to synthesize magnetic nanoparticles in gas phase, and specifically engineered nanoparticles for different applications. Alternating magnetic field heating is emerging as a technique to assist cancer treatment or drug delivery. We proposed high-magnetic-moment Fe3Si particles with relatively large magnetic anisotropy energy should in principle provide superior performance. Such nanoparticles were experimentally synthesized and characterized. Their promising magnetic properties can contribute to heating performance under suitable alternating magnetic field conditions. When thermal energy is used for medical treatment, it is ideal to work in a designed temperature range. Biocompatible and "smart" magnetic nanoparticles with temperature self-regulation were designed from both materials science and biomedicine aspects. We chose Fe-Si material system to demonstrate the concept. Temperature dependent physical property was adjusted by tuning of exchange coupling between Fe atoms through incorporation of various amount of Si. The magnetic moment can still be kept in a promising range. The two elements are both biocompatible, which is favored by in-vivo medical applications. A combination of "smart" magnetic particles and thermo-sensitive polymer were demonstrated to potentially function as a platform for drug delivery. Highly sensitive diagnosis for point-of-care is in desire nowadays. We developed composition- and phase-controlled Fe-Co nanoparticles for bio-molecule detection. It has been demonstrated that Fe70Co30 nanoparticles and giant

  15. Performance Comparison of Wireless Sensor Network Standard Protocols in an Aerospace Environment: ISA100.11a and ZigBee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Raymond S.; Barton, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) can provide a substantial benefit in spacecraft systems, reducing launch weight and providing unprecedented flexibility by allowing instrumentation capabilities to grow and change over time. Achieving data transport reliability on par with that of wired systems, however, can prove extremely challenging in practice. Fortunately, much progress has been made in developing standard WSN radio protocols for applications from non-critical home automation to mission-critical industrial process control. The relative performances of candidate protocols must be compared in representative aerospace environments, however, to determine their suitability for spaceflight applications. In this paper, we will present the results of a rigorous laboratory analysis of the performance of two standards-based, low power, low data rate WSN protocols: ZigBee Pro and ISA100.11a. Both are based on IEEE 802.15.4 and augment that standard's specifications to build complete, multi-hop networking stacks. ZigBee Pro targets primarily the home and office automation markets, providing an ad-hoc protocol that is computationally lightweight and easy to implement in inexpensive system-on-a-chip components. As a result of this simplicity, however, ZigBee Pro can be susceptible to radio frequency (RF) interference. ISA100.11a, on the other hand, targets the industrial process control market, providing a robust, centrally-managed protocol capable of tolerating a significant amount of RF interference. To achieve these gains, a coordinated channel hopping mechanism is employed, which entails a greater computational complexity than ZigBee and requires more sophisticated and costly hardware. To guide future aerospace deployments, we must understand how well these standards relatively perform in analog environments under expected operating conditions. Specifically, we are interested in evaluating goodput -- application level throughput -- in a representative crewed environment

  16. Nonlinear acoustics in biomedical ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Robin O.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound is widely used to image inside the body; it is also used therapeutically to treat certain medical conditions. In both imaging and therapy applications the amplitudes employed in biomedical ultrasound are often high enough that nonlinear acoustic effects are present in the propagation: the effects have the potential to be advantageous in some scenarios but a hindrance in others. In the case of ultrasound imaging the nonlinearity produces higher harmonics that result in images of greater quality. However, nonlinear effects interfere with the imaging of ultrasound contrast agents (typically micron sized bubbles with a strong nonlinear response of their own) and nonlinear effects also result in complications when derating of pressure measurements in water to in situ values in tissue. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as a non-invasive therapeutic modality which can result in thermal ablation of tissue. For thermal ablation, the extra effective attenuation resulting from nonlinear effects can result in enhanced heating of tissue if shock formation occurs in the target region for ablation - a highly desirable effect. However, if nonlinearity is too strong it can also result in undesired near-field heating and reduced ablation in the target region. The disruption of tissue (histotripsy) and fragmentation of kidney stones (lithotripsy) exploits shock waves to produce mechanically based effects, with minimal heating present. In these scenarios it is necessary for the waves to be of sufficient amplitude that a shock exists when the waveform reaches the target region. This talk will discuss how underlying nonlinear phenomenon act in all the diagnostic and therapeutic applications described above.

  17. Entity linking for biomedical literature

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The Entity Linking (EL) task links entity mentions from an unstructured document to entities in a knowledge base. Although this problem is well-studied in news and social media, this problem has not received much attention in the life science domain. One outcome of tackling the EL problem in the life sciences domain is to enable scientists to build computational models of biological processes with more efficiency. However, simply applying a news-trained entity linker produces inadequate results. Methods Since existing supervised approaches require a large amount of manually-labeled training data, which is currently unavailable for the life science domain, we propose a novel unsupervised collective inference approach to link entities from unstructured full texts of biomedical literature to 300 ontologies. The approach leverages the rich semantic information and structures in ontologies for similarity computation and entity ranking. Results Without using any manual annotation, our approach significantly outperforms state-of-the-art supervised EL method (9% absolute gain in linking accuracy). Furthermore, the state-of-the-art supervised EL method requires 15,000 manually annotated entity mentions for training. These promising results establish a benchmark for the EL task in the life science domain. We also provide in depth analysis and discussion on both challenges and opportunities on automatic knowledge enrichment for scientific literature. Conclusions In this paper, we propose a novel unsupervised collective inference approach to address the EL problem in a new domain. We show that our unsupervised approach is able to outperform a current state-of-the-art supervised approach that has been trained with a large amount of manually labeled data. Life science presents an underrepresented domain for applying EL techniques. By providing a small benchmark data set and identifying opportunities, we hope to stimulate discussions across natural language processing

  18. Silicification Strengthening and Non-Localization of Slip in Dilational Sites Along Strike-Slip Faults, Mt Isa Inlier, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, R. H.; Ghisetti, F. C.; Begbie, M. J.

    2006-12-01

    Sets of late- or post-orogenic brittle strike-slip faults disrupt the complex of subgreenschist to amphibolite facies metasediments and metavolcanics intruded by granites that make up the Proterozoic Mt Isa inlier of NW Queensland, Australia. Subvertical dextral faults with offsets <25 km generally strike NE-SW to NNE- SSW and mutually cross-cut a conjugate set of sinistral faults striking NW-SE to NNW-SSE. Together, they define a regional stress field with horizontal maximum compression, σ1, at an azimuth of ~100° and horizontal σ3 trending ~010°. The strike-slip faults are recessive except in dilational sites where upwelling hydrothermal fluids have led to silicification of the cataclastic shear zones which then form prominent blade-like ridges sometimes extending for kilometres across the semi-arid terrain. Silicification textures suggest the faults have been exhumed from epizonal boiling environments (<1-2 km depth). The mineralized fault segments include sinuous releasing bends where the fault trace is deflected <10° as well as more abrupt dilational stepovers linking en echelon fault segments. Particularly noticeable is the change from recessive to upstanding wall-like character of the faults as they approach dilational stepovers linking en echelon fault segments. Where recessive, limited outcrop is consistent with standard models of brittle infrastructure with a fault core localized in a damage zone tens of metres in width. By contrast, along the dilational segments the faults are defined by one or more subvertical cataclastic shear zones (CSZ), commonly ranging up to 10 m or so in thickness, made up of silicified microbreccia-cataclasite containing a mixture of protolith and hydrothermal vein fragments. The composite fabric of the CSZ includes: (1) local grain-size banding developed subparallel to margins; (2) irregular quartz-cemented breccias of varying dilation; (3) innumerable subvertical, cm - dm quartz-veins of variable planarity lying

  19. Crustal-scale structures in the Proterozoic Mount Isa Inlier of north Australia: their seismic response and influence on mineralisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Barry J.; Goleby, Bruce R.; Goncharov, Alexey G.; Wyborn, L. A. I.; Collins, C. D. N.; MacCready, Tyler

    1998-03-01

    The Proterozoic Mount Isa Inlier in northern Australia is prospective for base metals and gold. It contains a Western Fold Belt (including the Leichhardt River Fault Trough) and an Eastern Fold Belt, separated by older basement rocks of the Kalkadoon Leichhardt Belt. Sediments and volcanics in both fold belts were deposited in rifts which were subsequently shortened by up to 50%. Mineralisation appears to be partitioned: large-tonnage lead and zinc deposits are more prevalent in the Leichhardt River Fault Trough, and most gold and copper occurrences are in the Eastern Fold Belt. Cross-sections of the inlier derived from coincident seismic reflection and refraction profiling are dominated by the youngest tectonic events. The refraction data imply a west-dipping lens of high-velocity intermediate-to-mafic rock in the middle to upper crust in the east of the inlier. It is collinear with another lens in the lower crust in the west of the inlier. The lenses form a belt of high-velocity rock cutting the crust from top to bottom and from east to west. The reflection data reveal different styles of compression-related structures in the east and west of the inlier. Thin-skinned tectonics dominate in the Eastern Fold Belt. The sediments and volcanics are thrust to the west along a number of shallowly east-dipping upper-crustal detachments. The detachments in turn are cut by steeply east-dipping reverse faults which link into the zone of high-velocity rocks defined by the refraction data. In contrast, faults in the Western Fold Belt are steep and penetrate to mid-crustal levels and probably also link into the belt of high-velocity material deeper in the crust. The partitioning into different tectonic styles occurs across the Kalkadoon Leichhardt Belt, which appears to have acted as a buttress during the crustal shortening. Published mineralisation models attribute the lead-zinc mineralisation to circulating fluids at shallow crustal levels within the Leichhardt River Fault

  20. Manpower development for the biomedical industry space.

    PubMed

    Goh, James C H

    2013-01-01

    The Biomedical Sciences (BMS) Cluster is one of four key pillars of the Singapore economy. The Singapore Government has injected research funding for basic and translational research to attract companies to carry out their commercial R&D activities. To further intensify the R&D efforts, the National Research Foundation (NRF) was set up to coordinate the research activities of different agencies within the larger national framework and to fund strategic R&D initiatives. In recent years, funding agencies began to focus on support of translational and clinical research, particularly those with potential for commercialization. Translational research is beginning to have traction, in particular research funding for the development of innovation medical devices. Therefore, the Biomedical Sciences sector is projected to grow which means that there is a need to invest in human capital development to achieve sustainable growth. In support of this, education and training programs to strengthen the manpower capabilities for the Biomedical Sciences industry have been developed. In recent years, undergraduate and graduate degree courses in biomedical engineering/bioengineering have been developing at a rapid rate. The goal is to train students with skills to understand complex issues of biomedicine and to develop and implement of advanced technological applications to these problems. There are a variety of career opportunities open to graduates in biomedical engineering, however regardless of the type of career choices, students must not only focus on achieving good grades. They have to develop their marketability to employers through internships, overseas exchange programs, and involvement in leadership-type activities. Furthermore, curriculum has to be developed with biomedical innovation in mind and ensure relevance to the industry. The objective of this paper is to present the NUS Bioengineering undergraduate program in relation to manpower development for the biomedical

  1. Biomedical and development paradigms in AIDS prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Wolffers, I.

    2000-01-01

    In the fight against the HIV/AIDS pandemic different approaches can be distinguished, reflecting professional backgrounds, world views and political interests. One important distinction is between the biomedical and the development paradigms. The biomedical paradigm is characterized by individualization and the concept of "risk". This again is related to the concept of the market where health is a product of services and progress a series of new discoveries that can be marketed. The development paradigm is characterized by participation of the different stakeholders and by community work. The concept "vulnerability" is important in the development paradigm and emphasis is placed on efforts to decrease this vulnerability in a variety of sustainable ways. Biomedical technology is definitely one of the tools in these efforts. In the beginning of the pandemic the biomedical approach was important for the discovery of the virus and understanding its epidemiology. Later, stakeholders became involved. In the light of absence of treatment or vaccines, the development paradigm became more important and the two approaches were more in balance. However, since the reports about effective treatment of AIDS and hope of development of vaccines, the biomedical paradigm has become a leading principle in many HIV/AIDS prevention programmes. There is a need for a better balance between the two paradigms. Especially in developing countries, where it is not realistic to think that sustainable biomedical interventions can be organized on a short-term basis, it would be counterproductive to base our efforts to deal with HIV/AIDS exclusively on the biomedical approach. PMID:10743300

  2. The Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG): infrastructure and applications for a worldwide research community.

    PubMed

    2007-01-01

    Information explosion and new advances in high throughput experiments have challenged biomedical research, and suggested a future in which inter-institutional and international collaborations will be the norm. The cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid is an ambitious initiative launched by the US National Cancer Institute to develop a network of tools, data, and researchers to support translational and clinical research in oncology, with an ultimate goal to improve cancer care for patients. The three year pilot phase of caBIG ends in 2007, and has engaged over 900 clinicians, scientists, and patient advocates as developers, adopters, and workspace participants. Progress has been demonstrated in creating tools and building prototype grid architecture for collaborative research. Accomplishments in the pilot phase set the stage for extension of the community into other biomedical domains and for federation of the caBIG enterprise with similar initiatives in other scientific areas and in other countries. PMID:17911733

  3. Simbody: multibody dynamics for biomedical research

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Michael A.; Seth, Ajay; Delp, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Multibody software designed for mechanical engineering has been successfully employed in biomedical research for many years. For real time operation some biomedical researchers have also adapted game physics engines. However, these tools were built for other purposes and do not fully address the needs of biomedical researchers using them to analyze the dynamics of biological structures and make clinically meaningful recommendations. We are addressing this problem through the development of an open source, extensible, high performance toolkit including a multibody mechanics library aimed at the needs of biomedical researchers. The resulting code, Simbody, supports research in a variety of fields including neuromuscular, prosthetic, and biomolecular simulation, and related research such as biologically-inspired design and control of humanoid robots and avatars. Simbody is the dynamics engine behind OpenSim, a widely used biomechanics simulation application. This article reviews issues that arise uniquely in biomedical research, and reports on the architecture, theory, and computational methods Simbody uses to address them. By addressing these needs explicitly Simbody provides a better match to the needs of researchers than can be obtained by adaptation of mechanical engineering or gaming codes. Simbody is a community resource, free for any purpose. We encourage wide adoption and invite contributions to the code base at https://simtk.org/home/simbody. PMID:25866705

  4. Ranking Biomedical Annotations with Annotator's Semantic Relevancy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical annotation is a common and affective artifact for researchers to discuss, show opinion, and share discoveries. It becomes increasing popular in many online research communities, and implies much useful information. Ranking biomedical annotations is a critical problem for data user to efficiently get information. As the annotator's knowledge about the annotated entity normally determines quality of the annotations, we evaluate the knowledge, that is, semantic relationship between them, in two ways. The first is extracting relational information from credible websites by mining association rules between an annotator and a biomedical entity. The second way is frequent pattern mining from historical annotations, which reveals common features of biomedical entities that an annotator can annotate with high quality. We propose a weighted and concept-extended RDF model to represent an annotator, a biomedical entity, and their background attributes and merge information from the two ways as the context of an annotator. Based on that, we present a method to rank the annotations by evaluating their correctness according to user's vote and the semantic relevancy between the annotator and the annotated entity. The experimental results show that the approach is applicable and efficient even when data set is large. PMID:24899918

  5. Ranking biomedical annotations with annotator's semantic relevancy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Aihua

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical annotation is a common and affective artifact for researchers to discuss, show opinion, and share discoveries. It becomes increasing popular in many online research communities, and implies much useful information. Ranking biomedical annotations is a critical problem for data user to efficiently get information. As the annotator's knowledge about the annotated entity normally determines quality of the annotations, we evaluate the knowledge, that is, semantic relationship between them, in two ways. The first is extracting relational information from credible websites by mining association rules between an annotator and a biomedical entity. The second way is frequent pattern mining from historical annotations, which reveals common features of biomedical entities that an annotator can annotate with high quality. We propose a weighted and concept-extended RDF model to represent an annotator, a biomedical entity, and their background attributes and merge information from the two ways as the context of an annotator. Based on that, we present a method to rank the annotations by evaluating their correctness according to user's vote and the semantic relevancy between the annotator and the annotated entity. The experimental results show that the approach is applicable and efficient even when data set is large. PMID:24899918

  6. Medical and biomedical research productivity from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (2008-2012)

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Biomedical publications from a country mirror the standard of Medical Education and practice in that country. It is important that the performance of the health profession is occasionally documented. Aims: This study aimed to analyze the quantity and quality of biomedical publications from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) in international journals indexed in PubMed between 2008 and 2012. Materials and Methods: PubMed was searched for publications associated with KSA from 2008 to 2012. The search was limited to medical and biomedical subjects. Results were saved in a text file and later checked carefully to exclude false positive errors. The quality of the publication was assessed using Journal Citation Report 2012. Results: Biomedical research production in KSA in those 5 years showed a clear linear progression. Riyadh was the main hub of medical and biomedical research activity. Most of the publications (40.9%) originated from King Saud University (KSU). About half of the articles were published in journals with an Impact Factor (IF) of < 1, one-fourth in journals with no IF, and the remaining one-fourth in journals with a high IF (≥1). Conclusion: This study revealed that research activity in KSA is increasing. However, there is an increasing trend of publishing in local journals with a low IF. More effort is required to promote medical research in Saudi Arabia. PMID:25657608

  7. Legacy of Biomedical Research During the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Judith C.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Program provided many opportunities to study the role of spaceflight on human life for over 30 years and represented the longest and largest US human spaceflight program. Outcomes of the research were understanding the effect of spaceflight on human physiology and performance, countermeasures, operational protocols, and hardware. The Shuttle flights were relatively short, < 16 days and routinely had 4 to 6 crewmembers for a total of 135 flights. Biomedical research was conducted on the Space Shuttle using various vehicle resources. Specially constructed pressurized laboratories called Spacelab and SPACEHAB housed many laboratory instruments to accomplish experiments in the Shuttle s large payload bay. In addition to these laboratory flights, nearly every mission had dedicated human life science research experiments conducted in the Shuttle middeck. Most Shuttle astronauts participated in some life sciences research experiments either as test subjects or test operators. While middeck experiments resulted in a low sample per mission compared to many Earth-based studies, this participation allowed investigators to have repetition of tests over the years on successive Shuttle flights. In addition, as a prelude to the International Space Station (ISS), NASA used the Space Shuttle as a platform for assessing future ISS hardware systems and procedures. The purpose of this panel is to provide an understanding of science integration activities required to implement Shuttle research, review biomedical research, characterize countermeasures developed for Shuttle and ISS as well as discuss lessons learned that may support commercial crew endeavors. Panel topics include research integration, cardiovascular physiology, neurosciences, skeletal muscle, and exercise physiology. Learning Objective: The panel provides an overview from the Space Shuttle Program regarding research integration, scientific results, lessons learned from biomedical research and

  8. Modeling biomedical experimental processes with OBI

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Experimental descriptions are typically stored as free text without using standardized terminology, creating challenges in comparison, reproduction and analysis. These difficulties impose limitations on data exchange and information retrieval. Results The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI), developed as a global, cross-community effort, provides a resource that represents biomedical investigations in an explicit and integrative framework. Here we detail three real-world applications of OBI, provide detailed modeling information and explain how to use OBI. Conclusion We demonstrate how OBI can be applied to different biomedical investigations to both facilitate interpretation of the experimental process and increase the computational processing and integration within the Semantic Web. The logical definitions of the entities involved allow computers to unambiguously understand and integrate different biological experimental processes and their relevant components. Availability OBI is available at http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/obi/2009-11-02/obi.owl PMID:20626927

  9. Term identification in the biomedical literature.

    PubMed

    Krauthammer, Michael; Nenadic, Goran

    2004-12-01

    Sophisticated information technologies are needed for effective data acquisition and integration from a growing body of the biomedical literature. Successful term identification is key to getting access to the stored literature information, as it is the terms (and their relationships) that convey knowledge across scientific articles. Due to the complexities of a dynamically changing biomedical terminology, term identification has been recognized as the current bottleneck in text mining, and--as a consequence--has become an important research topic both in natural language processing and biomedical communities. This article overviews state-of-the-art approaches in term identification. The process of identifying terms is analysed through three steps: term recognition, term classification, and term mapping. For each step, main approaches and general trends, along with the major problems, are discussed. By assessing previous work in context of the overall term identification process, the review also tries to delineate needs for future work in the field. PMID:15542023

  10. NASA Biomedical Informatics Capabilities and Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

    2009-01-01

    To improve on-orbit clinical capabilities by developing and providing operational support for intelligent, robust, reliable, and secure, enterprise-wide and comprehensive health care and biomedical informatics systems with increasing levels of autonomy, for use on Earth, low Earth orbit & exploration class missions. Biomedical Informatics is an emerging discipline that has been defined as the study, invention, and implementation of structures and algorithms to improve communication, understanding and management of medical information. The end objective of biomedical informatics is the coalescing of data, knowledge, and the tools necessary to apply that data and knowledge in the decision-making process, at the time and place that a decision needs to be made.

  11. UMLS knowledge for biomedical language processing.

    PubMed Central

    McCray, A T; Aronson, A R; Browne, A C; Rindflesch, T C; Razi, A; Srinivasan, S

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes efforts to provide access to the free text in biomedical databases. The focus of the effort is the development of SPECIALIST, an experimental natural language processing system for the biomedical domain. The system includes a broad coverage parser supported by a large lexicon, modules that provide access to the extensive Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Knowledge Sources, and a retrieval module that permits experiments in information retrieval. The UMLS Metathesaurus and Semantic Network provide a rich source of biomedical concepts and their interrelationships. Investigations have been conducted to determine the type of information required to effect a map between the language of queries and the language of relevant documents. Mappings are never straightforward and often involve multiple inferences. PMID:8472004

  12. National Space Biomedical Research Institute Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) during FY 2000. The NSBRI is responsible for the development of countermeasures against the deleterious effects of long-duration space flight and performs fundamental and applied space biomedical research directed towards this specific goal. Its mission is to lead a world-class, national effort in integrated, critical path space biomedical research that supports NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Strategic Plan by focusing on the enabling of long-term human presence in, development of, and exploration of space. This is accomplished by: designing, testing and validating effective countermeasures to address the biological and environmental impediments to long-term human space flight; defining the molecular, cellular, organ-level, integrated responses and mechanistic relationships that ultimately determine these impediments, where such activity fosters the development of novel countermeasures; establishing biomedical support technologies to maximize human performance in space, reduce biomedical hazards to an acceptable level, and deliver quality medical care; transferring and disseminating the biomedical advances in knowledge and technology acquired through living and working in space to the general benefit of mankind, including the treatment of patients suffering from gravity- and radiation-related conditions on Earth; and ensuring open involvement of the scientific community, industry and the public at large in the Institute's activities and fostering a robust collaboration with NASA, particularly through NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. Attachment:Appendices (A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M,N,O, and P.).

  13. Biomedical sensor design using analog compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2015-05-01

    The main drawback of current healthcare systems is the location-specific nature of the system due to the use of fixed/wired biomedical sensors. Since biomedical sensors are usually driven by a battery, power consumption is the most important factor determining the life of a biomedical sensor. They are also restricted by size, cost, and transmission capacity. Therefore, it is important to reduce the load of sampling by merging the sampling and compression steps to reduce the storage usage, transmission times, and power consumption in order to expand the current healthcare systems to Wireless Healthcare Systems (WHSs). In this work, we present an implementation of a low-power biomedical sensor using analog Compressed Sensing (CS) framework for sparse biomedical signals that addresses both the energy and telemetry bandwidth constraints of wearable and wireless Body-Area Networks (BANs). This architecture enables continuous data acquisition and compression of biomedical signals that are suitable for a variety of diagnostic and treatment purposes. At the transmitter side, an analog-CS framework is applied at the sensing step before Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) in order to generate the compressed version of the input analog bio-signal. At the receiver side, a reconstruction algorithm based on Restricted Isometry Property (RIP) condition is applied in order to reconstruct the original bio-signals form the compressed bio-signals with high probability and enough accuracy. We examine the proposed algorithm with healthy and neuropathy surface Electromyography (sEMG) signals. The proposed algorithm achieves a good level for Average Recognition Rate (ARR) at 93% and reconstruction accuracy at 98.9%. In addition, The proposed architecture reduces total computation time from 32 to 11.5 seconds at sampling-rate=29 % of Nyquist rate, Percentage Residual Difference (PRD)=26 %, Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE)=3 %.

  14. Locally Learning Biomedical Data Using Diffusion Frames

    PubMed Central

    Filbir, F.; Mhaskar, H.N.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Diffusion geometry techniques are useful to classify patterns and visualize high-dimensional datasets. Building upon ideas from diffusion geometry, we outline our mathematical foundations for learning a function on high-dimension biomedical data in a local fashion from training data. Our approach is based on a localized summation kernel, and we verify the computational performance by means of exact approximation rates. After these theoretical results, we apply our scheme to learn early disease stages in standard and new biomedical datasets. PMID:23101786

  15. Ontology-Oriented Programming for Biomedical Informatics.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Ontologies are now widely used in the biomedical domain. However, it is difficult to manipulate ontologies in a computer program and, consequently, it is not easy to integrate ontologies with databases or websites. Two main approaches have been proposed for accessing ontologies in a computer program: traditional API (Application Programming Interface) and ontology-oriented programming, either static or dynamic. In this paper, we will review these approaches and discuss their appropriateness for biomedical ontologies. We will also present an experience feedback about the integration of an ontology in a computer software during the VIIIP research project. Finally, we will present OwlReady, the solution we developed. PMID:27071878

  16. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo. PMID:24707488

  17. Effective written communication in biomedical sciences.

    PubMed

    Rugh, K S; Hahn, A W

    1996-01-01

    The written word is the biomedical scientist's most important and most enduring communication tool. Nevertheless, the development of writing skills receives little attention in most scientific disciplines and the ability to conduct research is often viewed as more important than the ability to communicate the results of that research. Consequently, many scientists lack the writing skills necessary to effectively convey essential aspects of their research. In this paper, we will discuss the importance of good writing skills, give examples of common mistakes that are made in biomedical science writing and offer suggestions on how to improve written communication. PMID:8672681

  18. Polymer/metal nanocomposites for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zare, Yasser; Shabani, Iman

    2016-03-01

    Polymer/metal nanocomposites consisting of polymer as matrix and metal nanoparticles as nanofiller commonly show several attractive advantages such as electrical, mechanical and optical characteristics. Accordingly, many scientific and industrial communities have focused on polymer/metal nanocomposites in order to develop some new products or substitute the available materials. In the current paper, characteristics and applications of polymer/metal nanocomposites for biomedical applications are extensively explained in several categories including strong and stable materials, conductive devices, sensors and biomedical products. Moreover, some perspective utilizations are suggested for future studies. PMID:26706522

  19. Biomedical applications of AMS at ANU

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, L.K.; Cresswell, R.G.; Day, J.P.; King, S.J.

    1995-12-01

    Studies utilising {sup 26}Al have constituted the bulk of the biomedical AMS program at the ANU`s 14UD accelerator. Projects underway or completed include: the dependence on chemical form of aluminum uptake from the gut; the partitioning of Al among the various components of cells and blood; and uptake of Al by Alzheimer`s patients. In addition, capabilities for measuring {sup 32}Si, {sup 41}Ca and plutonium in a biomedical context have been established during the past year. Results of the {sup 26}Al studies and an outline of the methodology for the other isotopes will be presented and discussed.

  20. Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates, Biomedical Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Experiments to seek solutions for a range of biomedical issues are at the heart of several investigations that will be hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates (ITA), Inc. Biomedical Experiments (CIBX-2) payload. CIBX-2 is unique, encompassing more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments, and student hands-on experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the Stars program. A number of Liquids Mixing Apparatus (LMA) syringes like this one will be used in the experiments. The experiments are sponsored by NASA's Space Product Development Program (SPD).

  1. Stigma, biomedical efficacy, and institutional control.

    PubMed

    Goldin, C S

    1990-01-01

    This paper explores the role of biomedical efficacy in the rehabilitation of the disabled. Ethnographic data are presented from two studies, one concerned with the prevocationally blind, the other with the institutionalized chronically mentally ill. A comparison of rehabilitation for these two groups suggests that when disabilities do not respond well to biomedical interventions, inconsistent and contradictory interpretations and policies about etiology, therapy, and post-treatment prognosis are likely to flourish. These conflicts may, in turn, increase pressure on rehabilitation institutions to maintain control over their clients. This paper addresses these issues in order to stimulate discussion about the relationship of different kinds of disability to stigma and rehabilitation. PMID:2315755

  2. Uncharted ground: patterns of professional interaction among complementary/alternative and biomedical practitioners in integrative health care settings.

    PubMed

    Hollenberg, Daniel

    2006-02-01

    The development of "integrative health care" (IHC) settings combining various aspects of Western biomedicine and complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) is a relatively recent phenomenon among biomedical and CAM professions. While IHC is recognised internationally and occurs in many different contexts (e.g. clinic or hospital), patterns of interaction between biomedical and CAM practitioners, and the nature of IHC settings, are largely unknown. This paper presents findings from a research study of two newly established IHC settings in Canada. The main research question was: how are biomedical and CAM practitioners integrating or not integrating with each other at the level of professional interaction in IHC settings? Using a case study design, in-depth interviews were conducted with 13 biomedical and eight CAM practitioners during 2002-2003, and ethnographic observation and document analysis was conducted at each site. Drawing from closure theory of the professions, comparative analysis of the sites revealed that biomedical practitioners enact patterns of exclusionary and demarcationary closure, in addition to the use of "esoteric knowledge", by: (a) dominating patient charting, referrals and diagnostic tests; (b) regulating CAM practitioners to a specific "sphere of competence"; (c) appropriating certain CAM techniques from less powerful CAM professions; and (d) using biomedical language as the primary mode of communication. CAM practitioners, in turn, perform usurpationary closure strategies, by: (a) employing their own "esoteric knowledge" in relation to biomedicine and other CAM professions; (b) appropriating biomedical language and terminology; (c) increasing their professional status by working with biomedicine; and (d) referring among CAM practitioners to increase patient flow. The findings suggest that when attempts are made to integrate biomedicine and CAM, dominant biomedical patterns of professional interaction continue to exist. Despite continued

  3. Vaccination with NY-ESO-1 overlapping peptides mixed with Picibanil OK-432 and montanide ISA-51 in patients with cancers expressing the NY-ESO-1 antigen.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hisashi; Isobe, Midori; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Mizote, Yu; Eikawa, Shingo; Sato, Eiichi; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Yamasaki, Makoto; Miyata, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Udono, Heiichiro; Seto, Yasuyuki; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Pan, Linda; Venhaus, Ralph; Oka, Mikio; Doki, Yuichiro; Nakayama, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a clinical trial of an NY-ESO-1 cancer vaccine using 4 synthetic overlapping long peptides (OLP; peptides #1, 79-108; #2, 100-129; #3, 121-150; and #4, 142-173) that include a highly immunogenic region of the NY-ESO-1 molecule. Nine patients were immunized with 0.25 mg each of three 30-mer and a 32-mer long NY-ESO-1 OLP mixed with 0.2 KE Picibanil OK-432 and 1.25 mL Montanide ISA-51. The primary endpoints of this study were safety and NY-ESO-1 immune responses. Five to 18 injections of the NY-ESO-1 OLP vaccine were well tolerated. Vaccine-related adverse events observed were fever and injection site reaction (grade 1 and 2). Two patients showed stable disease after vaccination. An NY-ESO-1-specific humoral immune response was observed in all patients and an antibody against peptide #3 (121-150) was detected firstly and strongly after vaccination. NY-ESO-1 CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses were elicited in these patients and their epitopes were identified. Using a multifunctional cytokine assay, the number of single or double cytokine-producing cells was increased in NY-ESO-1-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells after vaccination. Multiple cytokine-producing cells were observed in PD-1 (-) and PD-1 (+) CD4 T cells. In conclusion, our study indicated that the NY-ESO-1 OLP vaccine mixed with Picibanil OK-432 and Montanide ISA-51 was well tolerated and elicited NY-ESO-1-specific humoral and CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in immunized patients. PMID:24509171

  4. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J.B.

    1982-07-01

    This bibliography contains 698 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1981. There are 520 references to articles published in journals and books and 178 references to reports. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly, bimonthly, and quarterly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions represented in the order that they appear in the bibliography are Analytical Chemistry, Biology, Chemical Technology, Information R and D, Health and Safety Research, Instrumentation and Controls, Computer Sciences, Energy, Engineering Technology, Solid State, Central Management, Operations, and Environmental Sciences. Indexes are provided by author, title, and journal reference.

  5. Making light work: illuminating the future of biomedical optics.

    PubMed

    Elwell, Clare E; Cooper, Chris E

    2011-11-28

    In 1996, the Royal Society held a Discussion Meeting entitled 'Near-infrared spectroscopy and imaging of living systems'. In 2010, this topic was revisited in a Theo Murphy Royal Society Scientific Discussion Meeting entitled 'Making light work: illuminating the future of biomedical optics'. The second meeting provided the opportunity for leading researchers to reflect on how the technology, methods and applications have evolved over the past 14 years and assess where they have made a major impact. Particular emphasis was placed on discussions of future prospects and associated challenges. This Introduction provides an overview of the state of the art of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and biomedical optics, with specific reference to the contributed papers from the invited speakers included in this issue. Importantly, we also reflect on the contributions from all of the attendees by highlighting the issues raised during oral presentations, facilitated panel sessions and discussions, and use these to summarize the current opinion on the development and application of optical systems for use in the clinical and life sciences. A notable outcome from the meeting was a plan to establish a biennial international conference for developers and users of NIRS technologies. PMID:22006895

  6. Biomedical Biopolymers, their Origin and Evolution in Biomedical Sciences: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Harsh; Shah, Veena Gowri; Shah, Gaurav; Dhaka, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Biopolymers provide a plethora of applications in the pharmaceutical and medical applications. A material that can be used for biomedical applications like wound healing, drug delivery and tissue engineering should possess certain properties like biocompatibility, biodegradation to non-toxic products, low antigenicity, high bio-activity, processability to complicated shapes with appropriate porosity, ability to support cell growth and proliferation and appropriate mechanical properties, as well as maintaining mechanical strength. This paper reviews biodegradable biopolymers focusing on their potential in biomedical applications. Biopolymers most commonly used and most abundantly available have been described with focus on the properties relevant to biomedical importance. PMID:26501034

  7. Bio-Medical Factors and External Hazards in Space Station Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olling, Edward H.

    1966-01-01

    The design of space-station configurations is influenced by many factors, Probably the most demanding and critical are the biomedical and external hazards requirements imposed to provide the proper environment and supporting facilities for the crew and the adequate protective measures necessary to provide a configuration in which the crew can live and work efficiently in relative comfort and safety. The major biomedical factors, such as physiology, psychology, nutrition, personal hygiene, waste management, and recreation, all impose their own peculiar requirements. The commonality and integration of these requirements demand the utmost ingenuity and inventiveness be exercised in order to achieve effective configuration compliance. The relationship of biomedical factors for the internal space-station environment will be explored with respect to internal atmospheric constituency, atmospheric pressure levels, oxygen positive pressure, temperature, humidity, CO2 concentration, and atmospheric contamination. The range of these various parameters and the recommended levels for design use will be analyzed. Requirements and criteria for specific problem areas such as zero and artificial gravity and crew private quarters will be reviewed and the impact on the design of representative solutions will be presented. In the areas of external hazards, the impact of factors such as meteoroids, radiation, vacuum, temperature extremes, and cycling on station design will be evaluated. Considerations with respect to operational effectiveness and crew safety will be discussed. The impact of such factors on spacecraft design to achieve acceptable launch and reentry g levels, crew rotation intervals, etc., will be reviewed. Examples of configurations, subsystems, and internal a arrangement and installations to comply with such biomedical factor requirements will ber presented. The effects of solutions to certain biomedical factors on configuration weight, operational convenience, and

  8. Communication Patterns in a Biomedical Research Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorry, G. Anthony; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Studies of the communication patterns among scientists in a biomedical research center should help in the assessment of the center's impact on research processes. Such a study at the National Heart and Blood Vessel Research and Demonstration Center (NRDC) at Baylor College of Medicine is reported. (LBH)

  9. Capturing the Value of Biomedical Research.

    PubMed

    Bertuzzi, Stefano; Jamaleddine, Zeina

    2016-03-24

    Assessing the real-world impact of biomedical research is notoriously difficult. Here, we present the framework for building a prospective science-centered information system from scratch that has been afforded by the Sidra Medical and Research Center in Qatar. This experiment is part of the global conversation on maximizing returns on research investment. PMID:27015300

  10. Advances in Swine Biomedical Model Genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The swine has been a major biomedical model species, for transplantation, heart disease, allergies and asthma, as well as normal neonatal development and reproductive physiology. Swine have been used extensively for studies of infectious disease processes and analyses of preventative strategies, inc...

  11. Improved conductive paste secures biomedical electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Nontoxic paste consisting of a dispersion of graphite or silver granules in a mixture of polyvinylpyrolidone and diluted glycerol secures biomedical electrodes to human skin. Silver paste has a high electrical conductivity and forms a bond between metal and moist or dry skin.

  12. Biomedical Relation Extraction: From Binary to Complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Dayou

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical relation extraction aims to uncover high-quality relations from life science literature with high accuracy and efficiency. Early biomedical relation extraction tasks focused on capturing binary relations, such as protein-protein interactions, which are crucial for virtually every process in a living cell. Information about these interactions provides the foundations for new therapeutic approaches. In recent years, more interests have been shifted to the extraction of complex relations such as biomolecular events. While complex relations go beyond binary relations and involve more than two arguments, they might also take another relation as an argument. In the paper, we conduct a thorough survey on the research in biomedical relation extraction. We first present a general framework for biomedical relation extraction and then discuss the approaches proposed for binary and complex relation extraction with focus on the latter since it is a much more difficult task compared to binary relation extraction. Finally, we discuss challenges that we are facing with complex relation extraction and outline possible solutions and future directions. PMID:25214883

  13. Unique Ownership Issues in Biomedical Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Allen B.

    1988-01-01

    The application of the principles of property law to the results of the research are examined, specifically as applied to the use of human tissue in biomedical research. It concludes that lawful access of research material provides sufficient dominion to preclude any asserted claim by the source of research material. (Author/MLW)

  14. Educating the Handicapped in Biomedical Instrumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbrier, Gilbert N.

    1974-01-01

    Handicapped community college students recruited for a one-year pilot career program (Biomedical Equipment Technology) proved that when architectual barriers are removed, educational and career fulfillment become possible. Innovations introduced to assist handicapped students now benifit every college student; new programs for paraplegics and the…

  15. Biomedical Equipment Technology: How Much Math?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Philip

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the level of mathematics needed in biomedical technology programs. Technical institutes and community colleges across the country have varying math requirements, from first-year college algebra on into calculus. He suggests a study to determine the reasons for the variance, leading eventually to uniform quality. (MF)

  16. An appraisal of future space biomedical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinograd, S. P.

    1975-01-01

    Three general classes of manned space flight missions of the future are described. These include: earth-orbital, lunar, and planetary. Biomedical science and technology is analyzed emphasizing areas of research needed to support future manned space flights and the information to be obtained from them.

  17. Advances in Swine biomedical Model Genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This manuscript is a short update on the diversity of swine biomedical models and the importance of genomics in their continued development. The swine has been used as a major mammalian model for human studies because of the similarity in size and physiology, and in organ development and disease pro...

  18. Biomedical Visual Computing: Case Studies and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Chris R.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in computational geometric modeling, imaging, and simulation let researchers build and test models of increasing complexity, generating unprecedented amounts of data. As recent research in biomedical applications illustrates, visualization will be critical in making this vast amount of data usable; it’s also fundamental to understanding models of complex phenomena. PMID:22545005

  19. Biomedical computing facility interface design plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puckett, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    The results are presented of a design study performed to establish overall system interface requirements for the Biomedical Laboratories Division's Sigma-3 computer system. Emphasis has been placed upon the definition of an overall implementation plan and associated schedule to meet both near-term and long-range requirements within the constraints at available resources.

  20. Review of biomedical signal and image processing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This article is a review of the book “Biomedical Signal and Image Processing” by Kayvan Najarian and Robert Splinter, which is published by CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group. It will evaluate the contents of the book and discuss its suitability as a textbook, while mentioning highlights of the book, and providing comparison with other textbooks.

  1. Biomedical Engineering Education: A Conservative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemi, Eugene E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the demand for graduates from biomedical engineering programs as being not yet fully able to absorb the supply. Suggests small schools interested in entering the field consider offering their programs at the undergraduate level via a minor or an option. Examples of such options and student projects are included. (CC)

  2. Status of Research in Biomedical Engineering 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of General Medical Sciences (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This status report is divided into eight sections. The first four represent the classical engineering or building aspects of bioengineering and deal with biomedical instrumentation, prosthetics, man-machine systems and computer and information systems. The next three sections are related to the scientific, intellectual and academic influence of…

  3. A modular framework for biomedical concept recognition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Concept recognition is an essential task in biomedical information extraction, presenting several complex and unsolved challenges. The development of such solutions is typically performed in an ad-hoc manner or using general information extraction frameworks, which are not optimized for the biomedical domain and normally require the integration of complex external libraries and/or the development of custom tools. Results This article presents Neji, an open source framework optimized for biomedical concept recognition built around four key characteristics: modularity, scalability, speed, and usability. It integrates modules for biomedical natural language processing, such as sentence splitting, tokenization, lemmatization, part-of-speech tagging, chunking and dependency parsing. Concept recognition is provided through dictionary matching and machine learning with normalization methods. Neji also integrates an innovative concept tree implementation, supporting overlapped concept names and respective disambiguation techniques. The most popular input and output formats, namely Pubmed XML, IeXML, CoNLL and A1, are also supported. On top of the built-in functionalities, developers and researchers can implement new processing modules or pipelines, or use the provided command-line interface tool to build their own solutions, applying the most appropriate techniques to identify heterogeneous biomedical concepts. Neji was evaluated against three gold standard corpora with heterogeneous biomedical concepts (CRAFT, AnEM and NCBI disease corpus), achieving high performance results on named entity recognition (F1-measure for overlap matching: species 95%, cell 92%, cellular components 83%, gene and proteins 76%, chemicals 65%, biological processes and molecular functions 63%, disorders 85%, and anatomical entities 82%) and on entity normalization (F1-measure for overlap name matching and correct identifier included in the returned list of identifiers: species 88

  4. Mining biomedical images towards valuable information retrieval in biomedical and life sciences

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zeeshan; Zeeshan, Saman; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical images are helpful sources for the scientists and practitioners in drawing significant hypotheses, exemplifying approaches and describing experimental results in published biomedical literature. In last decades, there has been an enormous increase in the amount of heterogeneous biomedical image production and publication, which results in a need for bioimaging platforms for feature extraction and analysis of text and content in biomedical images to take advantage in implementing effective information retrieval systems. In this review, we summarize technologies related to data mining of figures. We describe and compare the potential of different approaches in terms of their developmental aspects, used methodologies, produced results, achieved accuracies and limitations. Our comparative conclusions include current challenges for bioimaging software with selective image mining, embedded text extraction and processing of complex natural language queries. PMID:27538578

  5. Mining biomedical images towards valuable information retrieval in biomedical and life sciences.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zeeshan; Zeeshan, Saman; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical images are helpful sources for the scientists and practitioners in drawing significant hypotheses, exemplifying approaches and describing experimental results in published biomedical literature. In last decades, there has been an enormous increase in the amount of heterogeneous biomedical image production and publication, which results in a need for bioimaging platforms for feature extraction and analysis of text and content in biomedical images to take advantage in implementing effective information retrieval systems. In this review, we summarize technologies related to data mining of figures. We describe and compare the potential of different approaches in terms of their developmental aspects, used methodologies, produced results, achieved accuracies and limitations. Our comparative conclusions include current challenges for bioimaging software with selective image mining, embedded text extraction and processing of complex natural language queries. PMID:27538578

  6. Biomedical digital assistant for ubiquitous healthcare.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Soo; Hong, Joo-Hyun; Cho, Myeong-Chan

    2007-01-01

    The concept of ubiquitous healthcare service, which emerged as one of measures to solve healthcare problems in aged society, means that patients can receive services such as prevention, diagnosis, therapy and prognosis management at any time and in any place with the help of advanced information and communication technology. This service requires not only biomedical digital assistant that can monitor continuously the patients' health condition regardless of time and place, but also wired and wireless communication devices and telemedicine servers that provide doctors with data on patients' present health condition. In order to implement a biomedical digital assistant that is portable and wearable to patients, the present study developed a device that minimizes size, weight and power consumption, measures ECG and PPG signals, and even monitors moving patients' state. The biomedical sensor with the function of wireless communication was designed to be highly portable and wearable, to be operable 24 hours with small-size batteries, and to monitor the subject's heart rate, step count and respiratory rate in his daily life. The biomedical signal receiving device was implemented in two forms, PDA and cellular phone. The movement monitoring device embedded in the battery pack of a cellular phone does not have any problem in operating 24 hours, but the real-time biomedical signal receiving device implemented with PDA operated up to 6 hours due to the limited battery capacity of PDA. This problem is expected to be solved by reducing wireless communication load through improving the processing and storage functions of the sensor. The developed device can transmit a message on the patient's emergency to the remote server through the cellular phone network, and is expected to play crucial roles in the health management of chronic-aged patients in their daily life. PMID:18002325

  7. Biomedical technology prosperity game{trademark}

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, M.; Boyack, K.W.; Wesenberg, D.L.

    1996-07-01

    Prosperity Games{trademark} are an outgrowth and adaptation of move/countermove and seminar War Games. Prosperity Games{trademark} are simulations that explore complex issues in a variety of areas including economics, politics, sociology, environment, education and research. These issues can be examined from a variety of perspectives ranging from a global, macroeconomic and geopolitical viewpoint down to the details of customer/supplier/market interactions in specific industries. All Prosperity Games{trademark} are unique in that both the game format and the player contributions vary from game to game. This report documents the Biomedical Technology Prosperity Game{trademark} conducted under the sponsorship of Sandia National Laboratories, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and the Koop Foundation, Inc. Players were drawn from all stakeholders involved in biomedical technologies including patients, hospitals, doctors, insurance companies, legislators, suppliers/manufacturers, regulators, funding organizations, universities/laboratories, and the legal profession. The primary objectives of this game were to: (1) Identify advanced/critical technology issues that affect the cost and quality of health care. (2) Explore the development, patenting, manufacturing and licensing of needed technologies that would decrease costs while maintaining or improving quality. (3) Identify policy and regulatory changes that would reduce costs and improve quality and timeliness of health care delivery. (4) Identify and apply existing resources and facilities to develop and implement improved technologies and policies. (5) Begin to develop Biomedical Technology Roadmaps for industry and government cooperation. The deliberations and recommendations of these players provided valuable insights as to the views of this diverse group of decision makers concerning biomedical issues. Significant progress was made in the roadmapping of key areas in the biomedical technology field.

  8. Wireless powering and data telemetry for biomedical implants.

    PubMed

    Young, Darrin J

    2009-01-01

    Wireless powering and data telemetry techniques for two biomedical implant studies based on (1) wireless in vivo EMG sensor for intelligent prosthetic control and (2) adaptively RF powered implantable bio-sensing microsystem for real-time genetically engineered mice monitoring are presented. Inductive-coupling-based RF powering and passive data telemetry is effective for wireless in vivo EMG sensing, where the internal and external RF coils are positioned with a small separation distance and fixed orientation. Adaptively controlled RF powering and active data transmission are critical for mobile implant application such as real-time physiological monitoring of untethered laboratory animals. Animal implant studies have been successfully completed to demonstrate the wireless and batteryless in vivo sensing capabilities. PMID:19964060

  9. The Importance of Proper Citation of References in Biomedical Articles

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet

    2013-01-01

    In scientific circles, the reference is the information that is necessary to the reader in identifying and finding used sources. The basic rule when listing the sources used is that references must be accurate, complete and should be consistently applied. On the other hand, quoting implies verbatim written or verbal repetition of parts of the text or words written by others that can be checked in original. Authors of every new scientific article need to explain how their study or research fits with previous one in the same or similar fields. A typical article in the health sciences refers to approximately 20-30 other articles published in peer reviewed journals, cite once or hundreds times. Citations typically appear in two formats: a) as in-text citations where the sources of information are briefly identified in the text; or b) in the reference list at the end of the publication (book chapter, manuscript, article, etc.) that provides full bibliographic information for each source. Group of publishers met in Vancouver in 1978 and decided to prescribe uniform technical propositions for publication. Adopted in the 1979 by the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, then the International Committee of Medical Journals Editors (ICMJE), whose review in 1982 entered the official application by 300 international biomedical journals. Authors writing articles for publication in biomedical publications used predominantly citation styles: Vancouver style, Harward style, PubMed style, ICMJE, APA, etc. The paper gives examples of all of these styles of citation to the authors in order to facilitate their applications. Also in this paper is given the review about the problem of plagiarism which becomes more common in the writing of scientific and technical articles in biomedicine. PMID:24167381

  10. The importance of proper citation of references in biomedical articles.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet

    2013-01-01

    In scientific circles, the reference is the information that is necessary to the reader in identifying and finding used sources. The basic rule when listing the sources used is that references must be accurate, complete and should be consistently applied. On the other hand, quoting implies verbatim written or verbal repetition of parts of the text or words written by others that can be checked in original. Authors of every new scientific article need to explain how their study or research fits with previous one in the same or similar fields. A typical article in the health sciences refers to approximately 20-30 other articles published in peer reviewed journals, cite once or hundreds times. Citations typically appear in two formats: a) as in-text citations where the sources of information are briefly identified in the text; or b) in the reference list at the end of the publication (book chapter, manuscript, article, etc.) that provides full bibliographic information for each source. Group of publishers met in Vancouver in 1978 and decided to prescribe uniform technical propositions for publication. Adopted in the 1979 by the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, then the International Committee of Medical Journals Editors (ICMJE), whose review in 1982 entered the official application by 300 international biomedical journals. Authors writing articles for publication in biomedical publications used predominantly citation styles: Vancouver style, Harward style, PubMed style, ICMJE, APA, etc. The paper gives examples of all of these styles of citation to the authors in order to facilitate their applications. Also in this paper is given the review about the problem of plagiarism which becomes more common in the writing of scientific and technical articles in biomedicine. PMID:24167381

  11. Trends in biochemical and biomedical applications of mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelpi, Emilio

    1992-09-01

    This review attempts an in-depth evaluation of progress and achievements made since the last 11th International Mass Spectrometry Conference in the application of mass spectrometric techniques to biochemistry and biomedicine. For this purpose, scientific contributions in this field at major international meetings have been monitored, together with an extensive appraisal of literature data covering the period from 1988 to 1991. A bibliometric evaluation of the MEDLINE database for this period provides a total of almost 4000 entries for mass spectrometry. This allows a detailed study of literature and geographical sources of the most frequent applications, of disciplines where mass spectrometry is most active and of types of sample and instrumentation most commonly used. In this regard major efforts according to number of publications (over 100 literature reports) are concentrated in countries like Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Sweden, UK and the USA. Also, most of the work using mass spectrometry in biochemistry and biomedicine is centred on studies on biotransformation, metabolism, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and toxicology, which have been carried out on samples of blood, urine, plasma and tissue, by order of frequency of use. Human and animal studies appear to be evenly distributed in terms of the number of reports published in the literature in which the authors make use of experimental animals or describe work on human samples. Along these lines, special attention is given to the real usefulness of mass spectrometry (MS) technology in routine medical practice. Thus the review concentrates on evaluating the progress made in disease diagnosis and overall patient care. As regards prevailing techniques, GCMS continues to be the mainstay of the state of the art methods for multicomponent analysis, stable isotope tracer studies and metabolic profiling, while HPLC--MS and tandem MS are becoming increasingly important in biomedical research. However

  12. Symposium on Career Opportunities in Biomedical and Public Health Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Walter W.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of the Symposium on Career Opportunities in Biomedical and Public Health Sciences is to encourage minority collegiate and junior and senior high school students to pursue careers in biomedical and public health sciences. The objectives of the Symposium are to: (1) Provide information to participants concerning biomedical and public health science careers in government, academe and industry; (2) Provide information to minority students about training activities necessary to pursue a biomedical or public health science career and the fiscal support that one can obtain for such training; and (3) Provide opportunities for participating minority biomedical and public health role models to interact with participants.

  13. NASA Now: Biology: Astronaut Health on the International Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    The space environment is extreme. Hear how Stephanie Carrizales Flint, a biomedical engineer at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, and her team develop and monitor systems making the International Spac...

  14. NASA Now Minute: Astronaut Health on the International Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    The space environment is extreme. Hear how Stephanie Carrizales Flint,a biomedical engineer at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, and her teamdevelop and monitor systems making the International Spac...

  15. On the crisis in biomedical education: is there an overproduction of biomedical PhDs?

    PubMed

    Domer, J E; Garry, R F; Guth, P S; Walters, M R; Fisher, J W

    1996-08-01

    The United States is the world leader in biomedical science (BMS) education and research. This preeminence is reflected in superior medical education, the attraction of U.S. educational institutions to foreign visitors seeking advanced training, and a high rate of transfer of knowledge between basic biomedical research and the delivery of health care at the bedside. The foundation for this excellence and leadership has been the research carried out by MD and PhD biomedical scientists. It has been suggested that there is now an oversupply of BMS PhDs, and thus that BMS PhD programs should be downsized. Full examination of the issues involved, including a case study of doctoral graduates and postdoctoral fellows at Tulane Medical Center, leads the authors to conclude that a biomedical PhD "glut" does not exist at the present time, that downsizing training programs would have a serious, long-term negative impact on biomedical research, and that medical school administrators and faculty should resist attempts to reduce biomedical research and training at the local and national level. However, times have changed and training programs must evolve to adapt to the technologic changes occurring in the workplace. Alternatives, such as new alliances with industry, must be sought to compensate for decreased resources at federal and institutional levels; new and innovative curricula must be developed to prepare biomedical scientists for nonacademic, as well as academic, job opportunities in the twenty-first century; and medical center administrators and faculties must work together to increase the visibility of BMS and stress its critical relationship to the research base of the nation. PMID:9125964

  16. Laser scanners: from industrial to biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, Virgil-Florin

    2013-11-01

    We present a brief overview of our contributions in the field of laser scanning technologies, applied for a variety of applications, from industrial, dimensional measurements to high-end biomedical imaging, such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Polygon Mirror (PM) scanners are presented, as applied from optical micrometers to laser sources scanned in frequency for Swept Sources (SSs) OCT. Galvanometer-based scanners (GSs) are approached to determine the optimal scanning function in order to obtain the highest possible duty cycle. We demonstrated that this optimal scanning function is linear plus parabolic, and not linear plus sinusoidal, as it has been previously considered in the literature. Risley prisms (rotational double wedges) scanners are pointed out, with our exact approach to determine and simulate their scan patterns in order to optimize their use in several types of applications, including OCT. A discussion on the perspectives of scanning in biomedical imaging, with a focus on OCT concludes the study.

  17. ESR Microscopy for Biological and Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Shin, C. S.; Dunnam, C. R.; Borbat, P. P.; Dzikovski, B.; Barth, E. D.; Halpern, H. J.; Freed, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    We report on electron-spin resonance microscopy (ESRM) providing sub-micron resolution (~700nm) with a high spin concentration sample, i.e. lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) crystal. For biomedical applications of our ESRM, we have imaged samples containing rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells as well as cancerous tissue samples with a resolution of several microns using a water soluble spin probe, Trityl_OX063_d24. Phantom samples with the nitroxide spin label, 15N PDT, were also imaged to demonstrate that nitroxides, which are commonly used as spin labels, may also be used for ESRM applications. ESRM tissue imaging would therefore be valuable for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. Also, ESRM can be used to study the motility or the metabolism of cells in various environments. With further modification and/or improvement of imaging probe and spectrometer instrumentation sub-micron biological images should be obtainable, thereby providing a useful tool for various biomedical applications. PMID:21984955

  18. Functional Electrospun Nanofibrous Scaffolds for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Dehai; Hsiao, Benjamin S.; Chu, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Functional nanofibrous scaffolds produced by electrospinning have great potential in many biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering, wound dressing, enzyme immobilization and drug (gene) delivery. For a specific successful application, the chemical, physical and biological properties of electrospun scaffolds should be adjusted to match the environment by using a combination of multi-component compositions and fabrication techniques where electrospinning has often become a pivotal tool. The property of the nanofibrous scaffold can be further improved with innovative development in electrospinning processes, such as two-component electrospinning and in-situ mixing electrospinning. Post modifications of electrospun membranes also provide effective means to render the electrospun scaffolds with controlled anisotropy and porosity. In this review, we review the materials, techniques and post modification methods to functionalize electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:17884240

  19. Author Keywords in Biomedical Journal Articles

    PubMed Central

    Névéol, Aurélie; Doğan, Rezarta Islamaj; Lu, Zhiyong

    2010-01-01

    As an information retrieval system, PubMed® aims at providing efficient access to documents cited in MEDLINE®. For this purpose, it relies on matching representations of documents, as provided by authors and indexers to user queries. In this paper, we describe the growth of author keywords in biomedical journal articles and present a comparative study of author keywords and MeSH® indexing terms assigned by MEDLINE indexers to PubMed Central Open Access articles. A similarity metric is used to assess automatically the relatedness between pairs of author keywords and indexing terms. A set of 300 pairs is manually reviewed to evaluate the metric and characterize the relationships between author keywords and indexing terms. Results show that author keywords are increasingly available in biomedical articles and that over 60% of author keywords can be linked to a closely related indexing term. Finally, we discuss the potential impact of this work on indexing and terminology development. PMID:21347036

  20. Frontiers of biomedical text mining: current progress.

    PubMed

    Zweigenbaum, Pierre; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Yu, Hong; Cohen, Kevin B

    2007-09-01

    It is now almost 15 years since the publication of the first paper on text mining in the genomics domain, and decades since the first paper on text mining in the medical domain. Enormous progress has been made in the areas of information retrieval, evaluation methodologies and resource construction. Some problems, such as abbreviation-handling, can essentially be considered solved problems, and others, such as identification of gene mentions in text, seem likely to be solved soon. However, a number of problems at the frontiers of biomedical text mining continue to present interesting challenges and opportunities for great improvements and interesting research. In this article we review the current state of the art in biomedical text mining or 'BioNLP' in general, focusing primarily on papers published within the past year. PMID:17977867

  1. Thermoresponsive hydrogels in biomedical applications - a review

    PubMed Central

    Klouda, Leda; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2011-01-01

    Environmentally responsive hydrogels have the ability to turn from solution to gel when a specific stimulus is applied. Thermoresponsive hydrogels utilize temperature change as the trigger that determines their gelling behavior without any additional external factor. These hydrogels have been interesting for biomedical uses as they can swell in situ under physiological conditions and provide the advantage of convenient administration. The scope of this paper is to review the aqueous polymer solutions that exhibit transition to gel upon temperature change. Typically, aqueous solutions of hydrogels used in biomedical applications are liquid at ambient temperature and gel at physiological temperature. The review focuses mainly on hydrogels based on natural polymers, N-isopropylacrylamide polymers, poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) polymers as well as poly(ethylene glycol)-biodegradable polyester copolymers. PMID:17881200

  2. Microbubble Compositions, Properties and Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sirsi, Shashank

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been significant progress towards the development of microbubbles as theranostics for a wide variety of biomedical applications. The unique ability of microbubbles to respond to ultrasound makes them useful agents for contrast ultrasound imaging, molecular imaging, and targeted drug and gene delivery. The general composition of a microbubble is a gas core stabilized by a shell comprised of proteins, lipids or polymers. Each type of microbubble has its own unique advantages and can be tailored for specialized functions. In this review, different microbubbles compositions and physiochemical properties are discussed in the context of current progress towards developing novel constructs for biomedical applications, with specific emphasis on molecular imaging and targeted drug/gene delivery. PMID:20574549

  3. Stress and morale of academic biomedical scientists.

    PubMed

    Holleman, Warren L; Cofta-Woerpel, Ludmila M; Gritz, Ellen R

    2015-05-01

    Extensive research has shown high rates of burnout among physicians, including those who work in academic health centers. Little is known, however, about stress, burnout, and morale of academic biomedical scientists. The authors interviewed department chairs at one U.S. institution and were told that morale has plummeted in the past five years. Chairs identified three major sources of stress: fear of not maintaining sufficient funding to keep their positions and sustain a career; frustration over the amount of time spent doing paperwork and administrative duties; and distrust due to an increasingly adversarial relationship with the executive leadership.In this Commentary, the authors explore whether declining morale and concerns about funding, bureaucracy, and faculty-administration conflict are part of a larger national pattern. The authors also suggest ways that the federal government, research sponsors, and academic institutions can address these concerns and thereby reduce stress and burnout, increase productivity, and improve overall morale of academic biomedical scientists. PMID:25340366

  4. Leveraging the national cyberinfrastructure for biomedical research

    PubMed Central

    LeDuc, Richard; Vaughn, Matthew; Fonner, John M; Sullivan, Michael; Williams, James G; Blood, Philip D; Taylor, James; Barnett, William

    2014-01-01

    In the USA, the national cyberinfrastructure refers to a system of research supercomputer and other IT facilities and the high speed networks that connect them. These resources have been heavily leveraged by scientists in disciplines such as high energy physics, astronomy, and climatology, but until recently they have been little used by biomedical researchers. We suggest that many of the ‘Big Data’ challenges facing the medical informatics community can be efficiently handled using national-scale cyberinfrastructure. Resources such as the Extreme Science and Discovery Environment, the Open Science Grid, and Internet2 provide economical and proven infrastructures for Big Data challenges, but these resources can be difficult to approach. Specialized web portals, support centers, and virtual organizations can be constructed on these resources to meet defined computational challenges, specifically for genomics. We provide examples of how this has been done in basic biology as an illustration for the biomedical informatics community. PMID:23964072

  5. Modeling atmospheric pressure plasmas for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, David

    2007-10-01

    The use of cold, atmospheric pressure plasmas for biomedical treatments is an exciting new application in gaseous electronics. Investigations to date include various tissue treatments and surgery, bacterial destruction, and the promotion of wound healing, among others. In this talk, I will present results from modeling the `plasma needle,' an atmospheric pressure plasma configuration that has been explored by several groups around the world. The biomedical efficacy of the plasma needle has been demonstrated but the mechanisms of cell and tissue modification or bacterial destruction are only just being established. One motivation for developing models is to help interpret experiments and evaluate postulated mechanisms. The model reveals important elements of the plasma needle sustaining mechanisms and operating modes. However, the extraordinary complexity of plasma-tissue interactions represents a long-term challenge for this burgeoning field.

  6. Frontiers of biomedical text mining: current progress

    PubMed Central

    Zweigenbaum, Pierre; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Yu, Hong; Cohen, Kevin B.

    2008-01-01

    It is now almost 15 years since the publication of the first paper on text mining in the genomics domain, and decades since the first paper on text mining in the medical domain. Enormous progress has been made in the areas of information retrieval, evaluation methodologies and resource construction. Some problems, such as abbreviation-handling, can essentially be considered solved problems, and others, such as identification of gene mentions in text, seem likely to be solved soon. However, a number of problems at the frontiers of biomedical text mining continue to present interesting challenges and opportunities for great improvements and interesting research. In this article we review the current state of the art in biomedical text mining or ‘BioNLP’ in general, focusing primarily on papers published within the past year. PMID:17977867

  7. Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates' Biomedical Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Experiments to seek solutions for a range of biomedical issues are at the heart of several investigations that will be hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates (ITA), Inc. Biomedical Experiments (CIBX-2) payload. CIBX-2 is unique, encompassing more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments, and student hands-on experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the Stars program. Student Marnix Aklian and ITA's Mark Bem prepare biological samples for flight as part of ITA's hands-on student outreach program on STS-95. Similar activities are a part of the CIBX-2 payload. The experiments are sponsored by NASA's Space Product Development Program (SPD).

  8. [Paradigm errors in the old biomedical science].

    PubMed

    Skurvydas, Albertas

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the basic drawbacks of the deterministic and reductionistic thinking in biomedical science and to provide ways for dealing with them. The present paradigm of research in biomedical science has not got rid of the errors of the old science yet, i.e. the errors of absolute determinism and reductionism. These errors restrict the view and thinking of scholars engaged in the studies of complex and dynamic phenomena and mechanisms. Recently, discussions on science paradigm aimed at spreading the new science paradigm that of complex dynamic systems as well as chaos theory are in progress all over the world. It is for the nearest future to show which of the two, the old or the new science, will be the winner. We have come to the main conclusion that deterministic and reductionistic thinking applied in improper way can cause substantial damage rather than prove benefits for biomedicine science. PMID:18541951

  9. Toxicity of inorganic nanomaterials in biomedical imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinxia; Chang, Xueling; Chen, Xiaoxia; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhao, Feng; Chai, Zhifang; Zhao, Yuliang

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles have shown promising potentials as novel biomedical imaging agents with high sensitivity, high spatial and temporal resolution. To translate the laboratory innovations into clinical applications, their potential toxicities are highly concerned and have to be evaluated comprehensively both in vitro and in vivo before their clinical applications. In this review, we first summarized the in vivo and in vitro toxicities of the representative inorganic nanoparticles used in biomedical imagings. Then we further discuss the origin of nanotoxicity of inorganic nanomaterials, including ROS generation and oxidative stress, chemical instability, chemical composition, the surface modification, dissolution of nanoparticles to release excess free ions of metals, metal redox state, and left-over chemicals from synthesis, etc. We intend to provide the readers a better understanding of the toxicology aspects of inorganic nanomaterials and knowledge for achieving optimized designs of safer inorganic nanomaterials for clinical applications. PMID:24389087

  10. Biodegradable polymers for electrospinning: towards biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kai, Dan; Liow, Sing Shy; Loh, Xian Jun

    2014-12-01

    Electrospinning has received much attention recently due to the growing interest in nano-technologies and the unique material properties. This review focuses on recent progress in applying electrospinning technique in production of biodegradable nanofibers to the emerging field of biomedical. It first introduces the basic theory and parameters of nanofibers fabrication, with focus on factors affecting the morphology and fiber diameter of biodegradable nanofibers. Next, commonly electrospun biodegradable nanofibers are discussed, and the comparison of the degradation rate of nanoscale materials with macroscale materials are highlighted. The article also assesses the recent advancement of biodegradable nanofibers in different biomedical applications, including tissue engineering, drug delivery, biosensor and immunoassay. Future perspectives of biodegradable nanofibers are discussed in the last section, which emphasizes on the innovation and development in electrospinning of hydrogels nanofibers, pore size control and scale-up productions. PMID:25491875

  11. Bioengineered collagens: emerging directions for biomedical materials.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, John A M; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24717980

  12. Body motion for powering biomedical devices.

    PubMed

    Romero, Edwar; Warrington, Robert O; Neuman, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    Kinetic energy harvesting has been demonstrated as a useful technique for powering portable electronic devices. Body motion can be used to generate energy to power small electronic devices for biomedical applications. These scavengers can recharge batteries, extending their operation lifetime or even replace them. This paper addresses the generation of energy from human activities. An axial flux generator is presented using body motion for powering miniature biomedical devices. This generator presents a gear-shaped planar coil and a multipole NdFeB permanent magnet (PM) ring with an attached eccentric weight. The device generates energy by electromagnetic induction on the planar coil when subject to a changing magnetic flux due to the generator oscillations produced by body motion. A 1.5 cm(3) prototype has generated 3.9 microW of power while walking with the generator placed laterally on the ankle. PMID:19964048

  13. Biomedical Applications of Nanodiamonds: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Passeri, D; Rinaldi, F; Ingallina, C; Carafa, M; Rossi, M; Terranova, M L; Marianecci, C

    2015-02-01

    Nanodiamonds are a novel class of nanomaterials which have raised much attention for application in biomedical field, as they combine the possibility of being produced on large scale using relatively inexpensive synthetic processes, of being fluorescent as a consequence of the presence of nitrogen vacancies, of having their surfaces functionalized, and of having good biocompatibility. Among other applications, we mainly focus on drug delivery, including cell interaction, targeting, cancer therapy, gene and protein delivery. In addition, nanodiamonds for bone and dental implants and for antibacterial use is discussed. Techniques for detection and imaging of nanodiamonds in biological tissues are also reviewed, including electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, Raman mapping, atomic force microscopy, thermal imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography, either in vitro, in vivo, or ex vivo. Toxicological aspects related to the use of nanodiamonds are also discussed. Finally, patents, preclinical and clinical trials based on the use of nanodiamonds for biomedical applications are reviewed. PMID:26353603

  14. Biomedical applications reviewed: Hot topic areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, D. A.; Wells, K.

    2013-04-01

    Making reference to the British Journal of Radiology and competitor journal titles, we look at the general area of biomedical physics, reviewing some of the associated topics in ionising radiation research attracting interest over the past 2 years. We also reflect on early developments that have paved the way for these endeavours. The talk is illustrated by referring to a number of biomedical physics areas in which this group has been directly involved, including novel imaging techniques that address compositional and structural makeup as well as use of elastically scattered X-ray phase contrast, radiation damage linking to possible pericardial effects in radiotherapy, simulation of microvascularity and oxygenation with a focus of radiation resistant hypoxic tumours, issues of high spatial resolution dosimetry and tissue interface radiotherapy with doses enhanced through use of high atomic number photoelectron conversion media.

  15. Wireless tuning fork gyroscope for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Jose K.; Varadan, Vijay K.; Whitchurch, Ashwin K.; Sarukesi, K.

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents the development of a Bluetooth enabled wireless tuning fork gyroscope for the biomedical applications, including gait phase detection system, human motion analysis and physical therapy. This gyroscope is capable of measuring rotation rates between -90 and 90 and it can read the rotation information using a computer. Currently, the information from a gyroscope can trigger automobile airbag deployment during rollover, improve the accuracy and reliability of GPS navigation systems and stabilize moving platforms such as automobiles, airplanes, robots, antennas, and industrial equipment. Adding wireless capability to the existing gyroscope could help to expand its applications in many areas particularly in biomedical applications, where a continuous patient monitoring is quite difficult. This wireless system provides information on several aspects of activities of patients for real-time monitoring in hospitals.

  16. Surface functionalized selenium nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Savita; Umar, Ahmad; Mehta, S K

    2014-10-01

    Selenium nanoparticles present an enhanced genetic actions and possess superior adsorptive capacity due to the interaction between the nanoparticles and NH, C=O, COO- and C-N groups of proteins. This review is focused on the biomedical applications of surafce funtionalized selenium nanoparticles. The engineering of exterior surface of the selenium nanoparticles has further emphasizing on the recent progresses in regulating monolayer structures for competent delivery of drugs and biomolecules. Crucial queries of transport, uptake, and clearance are discussed and illustrated through the prospects of selenium nanoparticles. The work presents an insight of how biomedical research can evolve with selenium nanoparticles and where we see the field is heading in the near future. PMID:25992427

  17. Microcomputer statistics packages for biomedical scientists.

    PubMed

    Ludbrook, J

    1995-12-01

    1. There are hundreds of commercially available microcomputer statistics packages, ranging from the very cheap and elementary to the very expensive and complex, and from the very general to the very specialized. This review covers only those that appear to be popular with biomedical investigators who deal with fairly small sets of data but may wish to use relatively complex analytical techniques. 2. It is highly desirable, if not essential, that biomedical investigators who use microcomputer statistics packages have access to a spreadsheet program. These provide sample statistics and simple statistical analyses but, more importantly, they are often the best way of entering data into the files of the statistics packages proper. 3. A vital component of any statistics package is its manual. This should be easy to follow, but at the same time it must provide full documentation of, and references to, precisely how the various statistical tests are performed. 4. Some packages are elementary and offer only a narrow range of test procedures (mini-packages). Some are designed to be used as statistical libraries and programming tools for professional statisticians. Between these extremes are the general purpose packages (mid-range, maxi- and supermaxi-packages) that constitute the main body of this review. 5. All the packages reviewed have some shortcomings or flaws. It is argued that the ideal package for biomedical investigators should have the following features: (i) it should provide a wide range of test procedures for analysing continuous, rank-ordered, and categorical data; (ii) the way in which these tests are carried out should be clearly stated in the manual; and (iii) lastly, although not unimportantly, the package should be easy to use. 6. It is recommended that biomedical investigators purchase a package that provides many more statistical routines than they use in their everyday practice. Provided the manual is a good one and the package itself has no serious

  18. Building interdisciplinary biomedical research using novel collaboratives.

    PubMed

    Ravid, Katya; Faux, Russell; Corkey, Barbara; Coleman, David

    2013-02-01

    Traditionally, biomedical research has been carried out mainly within departmental boundaries. However, successful biomedical research increasingly relies on development of methods and concepts crossing these boundaries, requiring expertise in different disciplines. Recently, major research institutes have begun experimenting with ways to foster an interdisciplinary ethos. The Evans Center for Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research ("the Evans Center") at Boston University is a new organizational paradigm to address this challenge. The Evans Center is built around interdisciplinary research groups termed affinity research collaboratives (ARCs). Each ARC consists of investigators from several academic departments and at least two research disciplines, bound by a common goal to investigate biomedical problems concerning human disease. Novel aspects of the Evans Center include a "bottom-up" approach to identifying areas of ARC research (research vision and strategy are typically initiated by a core group of faculty with input from the center director); a pre-ARC period of faculty affiliation/project(s)' self-selection prior to formation of a peer-reviewed ARC; and Evans Center support for innovative ARCs for up to three years pending yearly metric evaluation, followed by continued administrative support as a group matures into an ARC program.Since its inception in early 2009, the Evans Center has documented achievements at discovery/publication, grant award, and educational levels. Enhanced interactions between members of individual ARCs, as assessed by quantitative networking analysis, are discussed in the context of high productivity. As universities seek new approaches to stimulate interdisciplinary research, the Evans Center and its ARCs are offered as a productive model for leveraging discovery. PMID:23269301

  19. Biomedical Applications of NASA Science and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, James N., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    During the period 15 September 1968 to 14 December 1968, the NASA supported Biomedical Application Team at the Research Triangle Institute has identified 6 new problems, performed significant activities on 15 of the active problems identified previously, performed 5 computer searches of the NASA aerospace literature, and maintained one current awareness search. As a partial result of these activities, one technology transfer was accomplished. As a part of continuing problem review, 13 problems were classified inactive. Activities during the quarter involved all phases of team activity with respect to biomedical problems. As has been observed in preceding years, it has been exceedingly difficult to arrange meetings with medical investigators during the fourth quarter of the calendar year. This is a result of a combination of factors. Teaching requirements, submission of grant applications and holidays are the most significant factors involved. As a result, the numbers of new problems identified and of transfers and potential transfers are relatively low during this quarter. Most of our activities have thus been directed toward obtaining information related to problems already identified. Consequently, during the next quarter we will follow up on these activities with the expectation that transfers will be accomplished on a number of them. In addition, the normal availability of researchers to the team is expected to be restored during this quarter, permitting an increase in new problem identification activities as well as follow-up with other researchers on old problems. Another activity scheduled for the next quarter is consultation with several interested biomedical equipment manufacturers to explore means of effective interaction between the Biomedical Application Team and these companies.

  20. Biomedical applications of graphene and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chul; Kim, Young-Kwan; Shin, Dolly; Ryoo, Soo-Ryoon; Hong, Byung Hee; Min, Dal-Hee

    2013-10-15

    Graphene has unique mechanical, electronic, and optical properties, which researchers have used to develop novel electronic materials including transparent conductors and ultrafast transistors. Recently, the understanding of various chemical properties of graphene has facilitated its application in high-performance devices that generate and store energy. Graphene is now expanding its territory beyond electronic and chemical applications toward biomedical areas such as precise biosensing through graphene-quenched fluorescence, graphene-enhanced cell differentiation and growth, and graphene-assisted laser desorption/ionization for mass spectrometry. In this Account, we review recent efforts to apply graphene and graphene oxides (GO) to biomedical research and a few different approaches to prepare graphene materials designed for biomedical applications. Because of its excellent aqueous processability, amphiphilicity, surface functionalizability, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and fluorescence quenching ability, GO chemically exfoliated from oxidized graphite is considered a promising material for biological applications. In addition, the hydrophobicity and flexibility of large-area graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) allow this material to play an important role in cell growth and differentiation. The lack of acceptable classification standards of graphene derivatives based on chemical and physical properties has hindered the biological application of graphene derivatives. The development of an efficient graphene-based biosensor requires stable biofunctionalization of graphene derivatives under physiological conditions with minimal loss of their unique properties. For the development graphene-based therapeutics, researchers will need to build on the standardization of graphene derivatives and study the biofunctionalization of graphene to clearly understand how cells respond to exposure to graphene derivatives. Although several

  1. [Issues of biomedical support of explorations missions].

    PubMed

    Potapov, A N; Sinyak, Yu E; Petrov, V M

    2013-01-01

    Sine qua non for piloted exploration missions is a system of biomedical support. The future system will be considerably different from the analogous systems applied in current orbital missions. The reason is the challenging conditions in expeditions to remote space. In a mission to Mars, specifically, these are high levels of radiation, hypomagnetic environment, alternation of micro- and hypogravity, very long mission duration and autonomy. The paper scrutinizes the major issues of medical support to future explorers of space. PMID:23700618

  2. Containerless polymeric microsphere production for biomedical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Hyson, M. T.; Chung, S. K.; Colvin, M.; Chang, M.

    1987-01-01

    A containerless method that produces highly uniform microspheres (greater than 50 microns in diameter) from many materials has been developed for biomedical applications. A piezoelectrically vibrated drop generator forms uniform (monodisperse) monomer droplets that are either electrostatistically levitated and polymerized using UV irradiation, or free-radical polymerized. Spheres of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate polymer have been produced with diameters of 155 microns + or - 1.57 percent.

  3. Biomedical equipment and medical services in India.

    PubMed

    Sahay, K B; Saxena, R K

    Varieties of Biomedical Equipment (BME) are now used for quick diagnosis, flawless surgery and therapeutics etc. Use of a malfunctioning BME could result in faulty diagnosis and wrong treatment and can lead to damaging or even devastating aftermath. Modern Biomedical Equipments inevitably employ highly sophisticated technology and use complex systems and instrumentation for best results. To the best of our knowledge the medical education in India does not impart any knowledge on the theory and design of BME and it is perhaps not possible also. Hence there is need for a permanent mechanism which can maintain and repair the biomedical equipments routinely before use and this can be done only with the help of qualified Clinical Engineers. Thus there is a genuine need for well organized cadre of Clinical Engineers who would be persons with engineering background with specialization in medical instrumentation. These Clinical engineers should be made responsible for the maintenance and proper functioning of BME. Every hospital or group of hospitals in the advanced countries has a clinical engineering unit that takes care of the biomedical equipments and systems in the hospital by undertaking routine and preventive maintenance, regular calibration of equipments and their timely repairs. Clinical engineers should be thus made an essential part of modern health care system and services. Unfortunately such facilities and mechanism do not exist in India. To make BME maintenance efficient and flawless in India, study suggests following measures and remedies: (i) design and development of comprehensive computerized database for BME (ii) cadre of Clinical engineers (iii) online maintenance facility and (iv) farsighted managerial skill to maximize accuracy, functioning and cost effectiveness. PMID:10166967

  4. University of Vermont Center for Biomedical Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Dr. Ira

    2013-08-02

    This grant was awarded in support of Phase 2 of the University of Vermont Center for Biomedical Imaging. Phase 2 outlined several specific aims including: The development of expertise in MRI and fMRI imaging and their applications The acquisition of peer reviewed extramural funding in support of the Center The development of a Core Imaging Advisory Board, fee structure and protocol review and approval process.

  5. Structure-Preserving Smoothing of Biomedical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Debora; Hernàndez-Sabaté, Aura; Burnat, Mireia; Jansen, Steven; Martínez-Villalta, Jordi

    Smoothing of biomedical images should preserve gray-level transitions between adjacent tissues, while restoring contours consistent with anatomical structures. Anisotropic diffusion operators are based on image appearance discontinuities (either local or contextual) and might fail at weak inter-tissue transitions. Meanwhile, the output of block-wise and morphological operations is prone to present a block structure due to the shape and size of the considered pixel neighborhood.

  6. ISO Standards for the Presentation of Scientific Periodicals: Little Known and Little Used by Spanish Biomedical Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Cozar, Emilio Delgado

    1999-01-01

    Compliance with International Standardization Organization (ISO) standards for the presentation of periodical publications was evaluated in 221 Spanish biomedical journals to determine the degree to which the standards are actually used, and to develop recommendations for improving standards and increasing familiarity with them among authors,…

  7. A Phase 1 Trial of MSP2-C1, a Blood-Stage Malaria Vaccine Containing 2 Isoforms of MSP2 Formulated with Montanide® ISA 720

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, James S.; Marjason, Joanne; Elliott, Suzanne; Fahey, Paul; Bang, Gilles; Malkin, Elissa; Tierney, Eveline; Aked-Hurditch, Hayley; Adda, Christopher; Cross, Nadia; Richards, Jack S.; Fowkes, Freya J. I.; Boyle, Michelle J.; Long, Carole; Druilhe, Pierre; Beeson, James G.; Anders, Robin F.

    2011-01-01

    Background In a previous Phase 1/2b malaria vaccine trial testing the 3D7 isoform of the malaria vaccine candidate Merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2), parasite densities in children were reduced by 62%. However, breakthrough parasitemias were disproportionately of the alternate dimorphic form of MSP2, the FC27 genotype. We therefore undertook a dose-escalating, double-blinded, placebo-controlled Phase 1 trial in healthy, malaria-naïve adults of MSP2-C1, a vaccine containing recombinant forms of the two families of msp2 alleles, 3D7 and FC27 (EcMSP2-3D7 and EcMSP2-FC27), formulated in equal amounts with Montanide® ISA 720 as a water-in-oil emulsion. Methodology/Principal Findings The trial was designed to include three dose cohorts (10, 40, and 80 µg), each with twelve subjects receiving the vaccine and three control subjects receiving Montanide® ISA 720 adjuvant emulsion alone, in a schedule of three doses at 12-week intervals. Due to unexpected local reactogenicity and concern regarding vaccine stability, the trial was terminated after the second immunisation of the cohort receiving the 40 µg dose; no subjects received the 80 µg dose. Immunization induced significant IgG responses to both isoforms of MSP2 in the 10 µg and 40 µg dose cohorts, with antibody levels by ELISA higher in the 40 µg cohort. Vaccine-induced antibodies recognised native protein by Western blots of parasite protein extracts and by immunofluorescence microscopy. Although the induced anti-MSP2 antibodies did not directly inhibit parasite growth in vitro, IgG from the majority of individuals tested caused significant antibody-dependent cellular inhibition (ADCI) of parasite growth. Conclusions/Significance As the majority of subjects vaccinated with MSP2-C1 developed an antibody responses to both forms of MSP2, and that these antibodies mediated ADCI provide further support for MSP2 as a malaria vaccine candidate. However, in view of the reactogenicity of this formulation, further

  8. Assessing the origin of old apparent ages derived by Pb stepwise leaching of vein-hosted epidote from Mount Isa, northwest Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Robert J.; Maas, Roland

    2014-12-01

    Epidote metasomatism affected large areas of tholeiitic metabasalts of the ~1,780 Ma Eastern Creek Volcanics in the Western Fold Belt of the Proterozoic Mount Isa inlier. Hydrothermal epidote generally occurs in quartz veins parallel to or boudinaged within the dominant S2 fabrics which formed during the regional metamorphic peak at ~1,570 Ma associated with the Isan orogeny. Previously published stable isotopic and halogen data suggest that the fluids responsible for epidote formation are metamorphic in origin (with an evaporitic component). Application of the Pb stepwise leaching technique to the epidote does not separate radiogenic Pb4+ and common Pb2+, generating little spread in 206Pb/204Pb (between 16.0 and 30.5). The causes for this relatively low range are twofold: There is little radiogenic Pb in the epidotes (the most radiogenic steps account for <1 % of Pb released) and both Pb2+ and uranogenic Pb4+ substitute into the same site in the epidote crystal lattice. Consequently, age regressions using the Pb stepwise leaching data give ages between 150 and 1,500 myrs older than the host rocks and over 450 myrs older than the thermal metamorphic peak. These old ages are attributed to chemical inheritance from the host metabasalts, via radiogenic Pb release by breakdown of phases such as zircon, monazite, titanomagnetite, and ilmenite during metamorphism. This idea is supported by trace element data and chrondrite-normalized rare earth element patterns that are similar to both the metabasalts and epidotes (except for a variable Eu anomaly in the latter). Relatively high fO2 during vein formation (Fe3+ dominates in the epidote crystal lattice) would allow the incorporation of Th4+ and exclusion of U6+ and would explain elevated Th/U ratios (up to 12) in epidote compared with the host metabasalts. Non-incorporation of U would explain the relatively low U/Pb ratios and non-radiogenic character of the epidote. This process may provide a source of metal for the small

  9. Functional modification of chitosan for biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ruogu

    Chitosan is a linear polysaccharide. Normally commercial chitosan consists of randomly distributed beta-(1-4)-linked D-glucosamine (deacetylated proportion) and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (acetylated proportion) together. Chitosan has been proved to be a multifunctional biopolymer that presents several unique properties due to free amino groups in the repeating unit therefore chitosan has been widely applied in various areas. To be specific, provided by the excellent biocompatibility, chitosan is expected to be used in biological and medical applications including wound dressing, implants, drug carrier/delivery, etc. In this thesis, we worked on chitosan functionalization for biomedical application. The thesis are composed of three parts: In the first part, we focused on modifying the chitosan thin film, chemically introducing the nitric oxide functional groups on chitosan film. We covalently bonded small molecule diazeniumdiolates onto the chitosan films and examined the antimicrobial function and biocompatibility. Commercial chitosan was cast into films from acidic aqueous solutions. Glutaraldehyde reacted with the chitosan film to introduce aldehyde groups onto the chitosan film (GA-CS film). GA-CS reacted with a small molecule NO donor, NOC-18, to covalently immobilize NONO groups onto the polymer (NO-CS film). The-CHO and [NONO] group were verified by FT IR, UV and Griess reagent. The NO releasing rate in aqueous solution and and thermal stability were studied quantitatively to prove its effectiveness. A series of antimicrobial tests indicated that NO-CS films have multiple functions: 1. It could inhibit the bacteria growth in nutrient rich environment; 2. It could directly inactivate bacteria and biofilm; 3. It could reduce the bacteria adherence on the film surface as well as inhibit biofilm formation. In addition, the NO-CS film was proved to be biocompatible with cell and it was also compatible with other antibiotics like Amoxicillin. In the second part, we

  10. Inorganic nanolayers: structure, preparation, and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Saifullah, Bullo; Hussein, Mohd Zobir B

    2015-01-01

    Hydrotalcite-like compounds are two-dimensional inorganic nanolayers also known as clay minerals or anionic clays or layered double hydroxides/layered hydroxy salts, and have emerged as a single type of material with numerous biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, gene delivery, cosmetics, and biosensing. Inorganic nanolayers are promising materials due to their fascinating properties, such as ease of preparation, ability to intercalate different type of anions (inorganic, organic, biomolecules, and even genes), high thermal stability, delivery of intercalated anions in a sustained manner, high biocompatibility, and easy biodegradation. Inorganic nanolayers have been the focus for researchers over the last decade, resulting in widening application horizons, especially in the field of biomedical science. These nanolayers have been widely applied in drug and gene delivery. They have also been applied in biosensing technology, and most recently in bioimaging science. The suitability of inorganic nanolayers for application in drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing technology, and bioimaging science makes them ideal materials to be applied for theranostic purposes. In this paper, we review the structure, methods of preparation, and latest advances made by inorganic nanolayers in such biomedical applications as drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing, and bioimaging. PMID:26366081

  11. Computational Approaches for Predicting Biomedical Research Collaborations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Yu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical research is increasingly collaborative, and successful collaborations often produce high impact work. Computational approaches can be developed for automatically predicting biomedical research collaborations. Previous works of collaboration prediction mainly explored the topological structures of research collaboration networks, leaving out rich semantic information from the publications themselves. In this paper, we propose supervised machine learning approaches to predict research collaborations in the biomedical field. We explored both the semantic features extracted from author research interest profile and the author network topological features. We found that the most informative semantic features for author collaborations are related to research interest, including similarity of out-citing citations, similarity of abstracts. Of the four supervised machine learning models (naïve Bayes, naïve Bayes multinomial, SVMs, and logistic regression), the best performing model is logistic regression with an ROC ranging from 0.766 to 0.980 on different datasets. To our knowledge we are the first to study in depth how research interest and productivities can be used for collaboration prediction. Our approach is computationally efficient, scalable and yet simple to implement. The datasets of this study are available at https://github.com/qingzhanggithub/medline-collaboration-datasets. PMID:25375164

  12. Inorganic nanolayers: structure, preparation, and biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Saifullah, Bullo; Hussein, Mohd Zobir B

    2015-01-01

    Hydrotalcite-like compounds are two-dimensional inorganic nanolayers also known as clay minerals or anionic clays or layered double hydroxides/layered hydroxy salts, and have emerged as a single type of material with numerous biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, gene delivery, cosmetics, and biosensing. Inorganic nanolayers are promising materials due to their fascinating properties, such as ease of preparation, ability to intercalate different type of anions (inorganic, organic, biomolecules, and even genes), high thermal stability, delivery of intercalated anions in a sustained manner, high biocompatibility, and easy biodegradation. Inorganic nanolayers have been the focus for researchers over the last decade, resulting in widening application horizons, especially in the field of biomedical science. These nanolayers have been widely applied in drug and gene delivery. They have also been applied in biosensing technology, and most recently in bioimaging science. The suitability of inorganic nanolayers for application in drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing technology, and bioimaging science makes them ideal materials to be applied for theranostic purposes. In this paper, we review the structure, methods of preparation, and latest advances made by inorganic nanolayers in such biomedical applications as drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing, and bioimaging. PMID:26366081

  13. Biomedical research in a Digital Health Framework.

    PubMed

    Cano, Isaac; Lluch-Ariet, Magí; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Maier, Dieter; Kalko, Susana; Cascante, Marta; Tegnér, Jesper; Miralles, Felip; Herrera, Diego; Roca, Josep

    2014-11-28

    This article describes a Digital Health Framework (DHF), benefitting from the lessons learnt during the three-year life span of the FP7 Synergy-COPD project. The DHF aims to embrace the emerging requirements--data and tools--of applying systems medicine into healthcare with a three-tier strategy articulating formal healthcare, informal care and biomedical research. Accordingly, it has been constructed based on three key building blocks, namely, novel integrated care services with the support of information and communication technologies, a personal health folder (PHF) and a biomedical research environment (DHF-research). Details on the functional requirements and necessary components of the DHF-research are extensively presented. Finally, the specifics of the building blocks strategy for deployment of the DHF, as well as the steps toward adoption are analyzed. The proposed architectural solutions and implementation steps constitute a pivotal strategy to foster and enable 4P medicine (Predictive, Preventive, Personalized and Participatory) in practice and should provide a head start to any community and institution currently considering to implement a biomedical research platform. PMID:25472554

  14. Biomedical research in a Digital Health Framework

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a Digital Health Framework (DHF), benefitting from the lessons learnt during the three-year life span of the FP7 Synergy-COPD project. The DHF aims to embrace the emerging requirements - data and tools - of applying systems medicine into healthcare with a three-tier strategy articulating formal healthcare, informal care and biomedical research. Accordingly, it has been constructed based on three key building blocks, namely, novel integrated care services with the support of information and communication technologies, a personal health folder (PHF) and a biomedical research environment (DHF-research). Details on the functional requirements and necessary components of the DHF-research are extensively presented. Finally, the specifics of the building blocks strategy for deployment of the DHF, as well as the steps toward adoption are analyzed. The proposed architectural solutions and implementation steps constitute a pivotal strategy to foster and enable 4P medicine (Predictive, Preventive, Personalized and Participatory) in practice and should provide a head start to any community and institution currently considering to implement a biomedical research platform. PMID:25472554

  15. Environmental practices for biomedical research facilities.

    PubMed Central

    Medlin, E L; Grupenhoff, J T

    2000-01-01

    As a result of the Leadership Conference on Biomedical Research and the Environment, the Facilities Committee focused its work on the development of best environmental practices at biomedical research facilities at the university and independent research facility level as well as consideration of potential involvement of for-profit companies and government agencies. The designation "facilities" includes all related buildings and grounds, "green auditing" of buildings and programs, purchasing of furnishings and sources, energy efficiency, and engineering services (lighting, heating, air conditioning), among other activities. The committee made a number of recommendations, including development of a national council for environmental stewardship in biomedical research, development of a system of green auditing of such research facilities, and creation of programs for sustainable building and use. In addition, the committee recommended extension of education and training programs for environmental stewardship, in cooperation with facilities managers, for all research administrators and researchers. These programs would focus especially on graduate fellows and other students, as well as on science labs at levels K--12. PMID:11121360

  16. Genetically engineered livestock for biomedical models.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Christopher S

    2016-06-01

    To commemorate Transgenic Animal Research Conference X, this review summarizes the recent progress in developing genetically engineered livestock species as biomedical models. The first of these conferences was held in 1997, which turned out to be a watershed year for the field, with two significant events occurring. One was the publication of the first transgenic livestock animal disease model, a pig with retinitis pigmentosa. Before that, the use of livestock species in biomedical research had been limited to wild-type animals or disease models that had been induced or were naturally occurring. The second event was the report of Dolly, a cloned sheep produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. Cloning subsequently became an essential part of the process for most of the models developed in the last 18 years and is stilled used prominently today. This review is intended to highlight the biomedical modeling achievements that followed those key events, many of which were first reported at one of the previous nine Transgenic Animal Research Conferences. Also discussed are the practical challenges of utilizing livestock disease models now that the technical hurdles of model development have been largely overcome. PMID:26820410

  17. Biomedical Applications of Zinc Oxide Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Nayak, Tapas R.; Hong, Hao; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement over the last several decades. Zinc oxide (ZnO), which can exhibit a wide variety of nanostructures, possesses unique semiconducting, optical, and piezoelectric properties hence has been investigated for a wide variety of applications. One of the most important features of ZnO nanomaterials is low toxicity and biodegradability. Zn2+ is an indispensable trace element for adults (~10 mg of Zn2+ per day is recommended) and it is involved in various aspects of metabolism. Chemically, the surface of ZnO is rich in -OH groups, which can be readily functionalized by various surface decorating molecules. In this review article, we summarized the current status of the use of ZnO nanomaterials for biomedical applications, such as biomedical imaging (which includes fluorescence, magnetic resonance, positron emission tomography, as well as dual-modality imaging), drug delivery, gene delivery, and biosensing of a wide array of molecules of interest. Research in biomedical applications of ZnO nanomaterials will continue to flourish over the next decade, and much research effort will be needed to develop biocompatible/biodegradable ZnO nanoplatforms for potential clinical translation. PMID:24206130

  18. Biomedical semantics in the Semantic Web.

    PubMed

    Splendiani, Andrea; Burger, Albert; Paschke, Adrian; Romano, Paolo; Marshall, M Scott

    2011-01-01

    The Semantic Web offers an ideal platform for representing and linking biomedical information, which is a prerequisite for the development and application of analytical tools to address problems in data-intensive areas such as systems biology and translational medicine. As for any new paradigm, the adoption of the Semantic Web offers opportunities and poses questions and challenges to the life sciences scientific community: which technologies in the Semantic Web stack will be more beneficial for the life sciences? Is biomedical information too complex to benefit from simple interlinked representations? What are the implications of adopting a new paradigm for knowledge representation? What are the incentives for the adoption of the Semantic Web, and who are the facilitators? Is there going to be a Semantic Web revolution in the life sciences?We report here a few reflections on these questions, following discussions at the SWAT4LS (Semantic Web Applications and Tools for Life Sciences) workshop series, of which this Journal of Biomedical Semantics special issue presents selected papers from the 2009 edition, held in Amsterdam on November 20th. PMID:21388570

  19. Analysis of biomedical data with multilevel glyphs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper presents multilevel data glyphs optimized for the interactive knowledge discovery and visualization of large biomedical data sets. Data glyphs are three- dimensional objects defined by multiple levels of geometric descriptions (levels of detail) combined with a mapping of data attributes to graphical elements and methods, which specify their spatial position. Methods In the data mapping phase, which is done by a biomedical expert, meta information about the data attributes (scale, number of distinct values) are compared with the visual capabilities of the graphical elements in order to give a feedback to the user about the correctness of the variable mapping. The spatial arrangement of glyphs is done in a dimetric view, which leads to high data density, a simplified 3D navigation and avoids perspective distortion. Results We show the usage of data glyphs in the disease analyser a visual analytics application for personalized medicine and provide an outlook to a biomedical web visualization scenario. Conclusions Data glyphs can be successfully applied in the disease analyser for the analysis of big medical data sets. Especially the automatic validation of the data mapping, selection of subgroups within histograms and the visual comparison of the value distributions were seen by experts as an important functionality. PMID:25079119

  20. Biomedical semantics in the Semantic Web

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Semantic Web offers an ideal platform for representing and linking biomedical information, which is a prerequisite for the development and application of analytical tools to address problems in data-intensive areas such as systems biology and translational medicine. As for any new paradigm, the adoption of the Semantic Web offers opportunities and poses questions and challenges to the life sciences scientific community: which technologies in the Semantic Web stack will be more beneficial for the life sciences? Is biomedical information too complex to benefit from simple interlinked representations? What are the implications of adopting a new paradigm for knowledge representation? What are the incentives for the adoption of the Semantic Web, and who are the facilitators? Is there going to be a Semantic Web revolution in the life sciences? We report here a few reflections on these questions, following discussions at the SWAT4LS (Semantic Web Applications and Tools for Life Sciences) workshop series, of which this Journal of Biomedical Semantics special issue presents selected papers from the 2009 edition, held in Amsterdam on November 20th. PMID:21388570

  1. Efficient 41Ca measurements for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vockenhuber, C.; Schulze-König, T.; Synal, H.-A.; Aeberli, I.; Zimmermann, M. B.

    2015-10-01

    We present the performance of 41Ca measurements using low-energy Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the 500 kV facility TANDY at ETH Zurich. We optimized the measurement procedure for biomedical applications where reliability and high sample throughput is required. The main challenge for AMS measurements of 41Ca is the interfering stable isobar 41K. We use a simplified sample preparation procedure to produce calcium fluoride (CaF2) and extract calcium tri-fluoride ions (CaF3-) ions to suppress the stable isobar 41K. Although 41K is not completely suppressed we reach 41Ca/40Ca background level in the 10-12 range which is adequate for biomedical studies. With helium as a stripper gas we can use charge state 2+ at high transmission (∼50%). The new measurement procedure with the approximately 10 × improved efficiency and the higher accuracy due to 41K correction allowed us to measure more than 600 samples for a large biomedical study within only a few weeks of measurement time.

  2. Alternative methods for the use of non-human primates in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Burm, Saskia M; Prins, Jan-Bas; Langermans, Jan; Bajramovic, Jeffrey J

    2014-01-01

    The experimental use of non-human primates (NHP) in Europe is tightly regulated and is only permitted when there are no alternatives available. As a result, NHP are most often used in late, pre-clinical phases of biomedical research. Although the impetus for scientists, politicians and the general public to replace, reduce and refine NHP in biomedical research is strong, the development of 3Rs technology for NHP poses specific challenges. In February 2014 a workshop on "Alternative methods for the use of NHP in biomedical research" was organized within the international exchange program of EUPRIM-Net II, a European infrastructure initiative that links biomedical primate research centers. The workshop included lectures by key scientists in the field of alternatives as well as by experts from governmental and non-governmental organizations. Furthermore, parallel sessions were organized to stimulate discussion on the challenges of advancing the use of alternative methods for NHP. Subgroups voted on four statements and together composed a list with opportunities and priorities. This report summarizes the presentations that were held, the content of the discussion sessions and concludes with recommendations on 3Rs development for NHP specifically. These include technical, conceptual as well as political topics. PMID:25058455

  3. Community outreach at biomedical research facilities.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, M; Hedetniemi, J N; Herbert, E R; Sassaman, J S; Walker, B C

    2000-01-01

    For biomedical researchers to fulfill their responsibility for protecting the environment, they must do more than meet the scientific challenge of reducing the number and volume of hazardous materials used in their laboratories and the engineering challenge of reducing pollution and shifting to cleaner energy sources. They must also meet the public relations challenge of informing and involving their neighbors in these efforts. The experience of the Office of Community Liaison of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in meeting the latter challenge offers a model and several valuable lessons for other biomedical research facilities to follow. This paper is based on presentations by an expert panel during the Leadership Conference on Biomedical Research and the Environment held 1--2 November 1999 at NIH, Bethesda, Maryland. The risks perceived by community members are often quite different from those identified by officials at the biomedical research facility. The best antidote for misconceptions is more and better information. If community organizations are to be informed participants in the decision-making process, they need a simple but robust mechanism for identifying and evaluating the environmental hazards in their community. Local government can and should be an active and fully informed partner in planning and emergency preparedness. In some cases this can reduce the regulatory burden on the biomedical research facility. In other cases it might simplify and expedite the permitting process or help the facility disseminate reliable information to the community. When a particular risk, real or perceived, is of special concern to the community, community members should be involved in the design, implementation, and evaluation of targeted risk assessment activities. Only by doing so will the community have confidence in the results of those activities. NIH has involved community members in joint efforts to deal with topics as varied as recycling and soil

  4. Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) isolated from the ISA disease outbreaks in Chile diverged from ISAV isolates from Norway around 1996 and was disseminated around 2005, based on surface glycoprotein gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Kibenge, Frederick SB; Godoy, Marcos G; Wang, Yingwei; Kibenge, Molly JT; Gherardelli, Valentina; Mansilla, Soledad; Lisperger, Angelica; Jarpa, Miguel; Larroquete, Geraldine; Avendaño, Fernando; Lara, Marcela; Gallardo, Alicia

    2009-01-01

    Background Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) virus (ISAV) is a pathogen of marine-farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar); a disease first diagnosed in Norway in 1984. For over 25 years ISAV has caused major disease outbreaks in the Northern hemisphere, and remains an emerging fish pathogen because of the asymptomatic infections in marine wild fish and the potential for emergence of new epidemic strains. ISAV belongs to the family Orthomyxoviridae, together with influenza viruses but is sufficiently different to be assigned to its own genus, Isavirus. The Isavirus genome consists of eight single-stranded RNA species, and the virions have two surface glycoproteins; fusion (F) protein encoded on segment 5 and haemagglutinin-esterase (HE) protein encoded on segment 6. However, comparision between different ISAV isolates is complicated because there is presently no universally accepted nomenclature system for designation of genetic relatedness between ISAV isolates. The first outbreak of ISA in marine-farmed Atlantic salmon in the Southern hemisphere occurred in Chile starting in June 2007. In order to describe the molecular characteristics of the virus so as to understand its origins, how ISAV isolates are maintained and spread, and their virulence characteristics, we conducted a study where the viral sequences were directly amplified, cloned and sequenced from tissue samples collected from several ISA-affected fish on the different fish farms with confirmed or suspected ISA outbreaks in Chile. This paper describes the genetic characterization of a large number of ISAV strains associated with extensive outbreaks in Chile starting in June 2007, and their phylogenetic relationships with selected European and North American isolates that are representative of the genetic diversity of ISAV. Results RT-PCR for ISAV F and HE glycoprotein genes was performed directly on tissue samples collected from ISA-affected fish on different farms among 14 fish companies in Chile during the

  5. Mission Possible: BioMedical Experiments on the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, E.; Kreutzberg, K.

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical research, both applied and basic, was conducted on every Shuttle mission from 1981 to 2011. The Space Shuttle Program enabled NASA investigators and researchers from around the world to address fundamental issues concerning living and working effectively in space. Operationally focused occupational health investigations and tests were given priority by the Shuttle crew and Shuttle Program management for the resolution of acute health issues caused by the rigors of spaceflight. The challenges of research on the Shuttle included: limited up and return mass, limited power, limited crew time, and requirements for containment of hazards. The sheer capacity of the Shuttle for crew and equipment was unsurpassed by any other launch and entry vehicle and the Shuttle Program provided more opportunity for human research than any program before or since. To take advantage of this opportunity, life sciences research programs learned how to: streamline the complicated process of integrating experiments aboard the Shuttle, design experiments and hardware within operational constraints, and integrate requirements between different experiments and with operational countermeasures. We learned how to take advantage of commercial-off-the-shelf hardware and developed a hardware certification process with the flexibility to allow for design changes between flights. We learned the importance of end-to-end testing for experiment hardware with humans-in-the-loop. Most importantly, we learned that the Shuttle Program provided an excellent platform for conducting human research and for developing the systems that are now used to optimize research on the International Space Station. This presentation will include a review of the types of experiments and medical tests flown on the Shuttle and the processes that were used to manifest and conduct the experiments. Learning Objective: This paper provides a description of the challenges related to launching and implementing biomedical

  6. The role of Montanide ISA 70 as an adjuvant in immune responses against Leishmania major induced by thiol-specific antioxidant-based protein vaccine.

    PubMed

    Khabazzadeh Tehrani, Narges; Mahdavi, Mehdi; Maleki, Fatemeh; Zarrati, Somayeh; Tabatabaie, Fatemeh

    2016-09-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease caused by several species of the genus Leishmania. Montanide ISA 70 is an adjuvant composed of a natural metabolizable oil and a very refined emulsifier from the manide monooleate family. The TSA (thiol-specific antioxidant) is a important antigen of Leishmania major. The purpose of this work was protein-vaccine efficacy as an protection and excellent candidate in the presence Montanide. The expression of recombinant protein was confirmed with SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) page and Western bloting. 48 BALB/c mice were divided into four groups (TSA/Freund,TSA/Alum + BCG, TSA/Montanide and PBS groups) and immunized with 20 μg of vaccine subcutaneously three times intervals on days 0, 14 and 28. The mice were challenged with parasite 21 days after final immunization. The lymphocyte proliferation was evaluated with Brdu method. Cytokines and also total antibody and subclasses were evaluated with ELISA method. The vaccine formulated with the recombinant TSA protein with Montanide induced lymphocytes proliferation cytokines and total antibody and subclasses as compared with the control group. PMID:27605780

  7. Utilisation of ISA Reverse Genetics and Large-Scale Random Codon Re-Encoding to Produce Attenuated Strains of Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus within Days

    PubMed Central

    Aubry, Fabien; Gould, Ernest A.; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale codon re-encoding is a new method of attenuating RNA viruses. However, the use of infectious clones to generate attenuated viruses has inherent technical problems. We previously developed a bacterium-free reverse genetics protocol, designated ISA, and now combined it with large-scale random codon-re-encoding method to produce attenuated tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), a pathogenic flavivirus which causes febrile illness and encephalitis in humans. We produced wild-type (WT) and two re-encoded TBEVs, containing 273 or 273+284 synonymous mutations in the NS5 and NS5+NS3 coding regions respectively. Both re-encoded viruses were attenuated when compared with WT virus using a laboratory mouse model and the relative level of attenuation increased with the degree of re-encoding. Moreover, all infected animals produced neutralizing antibodies. This novel, rapid and efficient approach to engineering attenuated viruses could potentially expedite the development of safe and effective new-generation live attenuated vaccines. PMID:27548676

  8. The development of biomedical engineering as experienced by one biomedical engineer.

    PubMed

    Newell, Jonathan C

    2012-01-01

    This personal essay described the development of the field of Biomedical Engineering from its early days, from the perspective of one who lived through that development. It describes the making of a major invention using data that had been rejected by other scientists, the re-discovery of an obscure fact of physiology and its use in developing a major medical instrument, the development of a new medical imaging modality, and the near-death rescue of a research project. The essay concludes with comments about the development and present status of impedance imaging, and recent changes in the evolution of biomedical engineering as a field. PMID:23234267

  9. International Perspectives on Plagiarism and Considerations for Teaching International Trainees

    PubMed Central

    Heitman, Elizabeth; Litewka, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    In the increasingly global community of biomedical science and graduate science education, many US academic researchers work with international trainees whose views on scientific writing and plagiarism can be strikingly different from US norms. Although a growing number of countries and international professional organizations identify plagiarism as research misconduct, many international trainees come from research environments where plagiarism is ill-defined and even commonly practiced. Two research-ethics educators consider current perspectives on plagiarism around the world and contend that US research-training programs should focus on trainees’ scientific writing skills and acculturation, not simply on preventing plagiarism. PMID:21194646

  10. International perspectives on plagiarism and considerations for teaching international trainees.

    PubMed

    Heitman, Elizabeth; Litewka, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    In the increasingly global community of biomedical science and graduate science education, many US academic researchers work with international trainees whose views on scientific writing and plagiarism can be strikingly different from US norms. Although a growing number of countries and international professional organizations identify plagiarism as research misconduct, many international trainees come from research environments where plagiarism is ill-defined and even commonly practiced. Two research-ethics educators consider current perspectives on plagiarism around the world and contend that US research-training programs should focus on trainees' scientific writing skills and acculturation, not simply on preventing plagiarism. PMID:21194646

  11. Improving Validity of Informed Consent for Biomedical Research in Zambia Using a Laboratory Exposure Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Zulu, Joseph Mumba; Lisulo, Mpala Mwanza; Besa, Ellen; Kaonga, Patrick; Chisenga, Caroline C.; Chomba, Mumba; Simuyandi, Michelo; Banda, Rosemary; Kelly, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Complex biomedical research can lead to disquiet in communities with limited exposure to scientific discussions, leading to rumours or to high drop-out rates. We set out to test an intervention designed to address apprehensions commonly encountered in a community where literacy is uncommon, and where complex biomedical research has been conducted for over a decade. We aimed to determine if it could improve the validity of consent. Methods Data were collected using focus group discussions, key informant interviews and observations. We designed an intervention that exposed participants to a detailed demonstration of laboratory processes. Each group was interviewed twice in a day, before and after exposure to the intervention in order to assess changes in their views. Results Factors that motivated people to participate in invasive biomedical research included a desire to stay healthy because of the screening during the recruitment process, regular advice from doctors, free medical services, and trust in the researchers. Inhibiting factors were limited knowledge about samples taken from their bodies during endoscopic procedures, the impact of endoscopy on the function of internal organs, and concerns about the use of biomedical samples. The belief that blood can be used for Satanic practices also created insecurities about drawing of blood samples. Further inhibiting factors included a fear of being labelled as HIV positive if known to consult heath workers repeatedly, and gender inequality. Concerns about the use and storage of blood and tissue samples were overcome by a laboratory exposure intervention. Conclusion Selecting a group of members from target community and engaging them in a laboratory exposure intervention could be a useful tool for enhancing specific aspects of consent for biomedical research. Further work is needed to determine the extent to which improved understanding permeates beyond the immediate group participating in the intervention

  12. How to Search, Write, Prepare and Publish the Scientific Papers in the Biomedical Journals

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the methodology of preparation, writing and publishing scientific papers in biomedical journals. given is a concise overview of the concept and structure of the System of biomedical scientific and technical information and the way of biomedical literature retreival from worldwide biomedical databases. Described are the scientific and professional medical journals that are currently published in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Also, given is the comparative review on the number and structure of papers published in indexed journals in Bosnia and Herzegovina, which are listed in the Medline database. Analyzed are three B&H journals indexed in MEDLINE database: Medical Archives (Medicinski Arhiv), Bosnian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences and Medical Gazette (Medicinki Glasnik) in 2010. The largest number of original papers was published in the Medical Archives. There is a statistically significant difference in the number of papers published by local authors in relation to international journals in favor of the Medical Archives. True, the Journal Bosnian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences does not categorize the articles and we could not make comparisons. Journal Medical Archives and Bosnian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences by percentage published the largest number of articles by authors from Sarajevo and Tuzla, the two oldest and largest university medical centers in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The author believes that it is necessary to make qualitative changes in the reception and reviewing of papers for publication in biomedical journals published in Bosnia and Herzegovina which should be the responsibility of the separate scientific authority/ committee composed of experts in the field of medicine at the state level. PMID:23572850

  13. How to search, write, prepare and publish the scientific papers in the biomedical journals.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet

    2011-06-01

    This article describes the methodology of preparation, writing and publishing scientific papers in biomedical journals. given is a concise overview of the concept and structure of the System of biomedical scientific and technical information and the way of biomedical literature retreival from worldwide biomedical databases. Described are the scientific and professional medical journals that are currently published in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Also, given is the comparative review on the number and structure of papers published in indexed journals in Bosnia and Herzegovina, which are listed in the Medline database. Analyzed are three B&H journals indexed in MEDLINE database: Medical Archives (Medicinski Arhiv), Bosnian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences and Medical Gazette (Medicinki Glasnik) in 2010. The largest number of original papers was published in the Medical Archives. There is a statistically significant difference in the number of papers published by local authors in relation to international journals in favor of the Medical Archives. True, the Journal Bosnian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences does not categorize the articles and we could not make comparisons. Journal Medical Archives and Bosnian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences by percentage published the largest number of articles by authors from Sarajevo and Tuzla, the two oldest and largest university medical centers in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The author believes that it is necessary to make qualitative changes in the reception and reviewing of papers for publication in biomedical journals published in Bosnia and Herzegovina which should be the responsibility of the separate scientific authority/ committee composed of experts in the field of medicine at the state level. PMID:23572850

  14. New roles & responsibilities of hospital biomedical engineering.

    PubMed

    Frisch, P H; Stone, B; Booth, P; Lui, W

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the changing healthcare environment has required hospitals and specifically Biomedical Engineering to critically evaluate, optimize and adapt their operations. The focus is now on new technologies, changes to the environment of care, support requirements and financial constraints. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), an NIH-designated comprehensive cancer center, has been transitioning to an increasing outpatient care environment. This transition is driving an increase in-patient acuity coupled with the need for added urgency of support and response time. New technologies, regulatory requirements and financial constraints have impacted operating budgets and in some cases, resulted in a reduction in staffing. Specific initiatives, such as the Joint Commission's National Patient Safety Goals, requirements for an electronic medical record, meaningful use and ICD10 have caused institutions to reevaluate their operations and processes including requiring Biomedical Engineering to manage new technologies, integrations and changes in the electromagnetic environment, while optimizing operational workflow and resource utilization. This paper addresses the new and expanding responsibilities and approach of Biomedical Engineering organizations, specifically at MSKCC. It is suggested that our experience may be a template for other organizations facing similar problems. Increasing support is necessary for Medical Software - Medical Device Data Systems in the evolving wireless environment, including RTLS and RFID. It will be necessary to evaluate the potential impact on the growing electromagnetic environment, on connectivity resulting in the need for dynamic and interactive testing and the growing demand to establish new and needed operational synergies with Information Technology operations and other operational groups within the institution, such as nursing, facilities management, central supply, and the user departments. PMID:25570742

  15. Bio-Medical Factors and External Hazards in Space Station Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olling, E. H.

    1966-01-01

    The design of space-station configurations is influenced by many factors. Probably the most demanding and critical are the biomedical and external hazards requirements imposed to provide the proper environment and supporting facilities for the crew and the adequate protective measures necessary to provide a configuration'in which the crew can live and work efficiently in relative comfort and safety. The major biomedical factors, such as physiology, psychology, nutrition, personal hygiene, waste management, and recreation, all impose their own peculiar requirements. The commonality and integration of these requirements demand the utmost ingenuity and inventiveness be exercised in order to achieve effective configuration compliance. The relationship of biomedical factors for the internal space-station environment will be explored with respect to internal atmospheric constituency, atmospheric pressure levels, oxygen positive pressure, temperature, humidity, CO2 concentration, and atmospheric contamination. The range of these various parameters and the recommended levels for design use will be analyzed. Requirements and criteria for specific problem areas such as zero and artificial gravity and crew private quarters will be reviewed and the impact on the design of representative solutions will be presented. In the areas of external hazards, the impact of factors such as meteoroids, radiation, vacuum, temperature extremes, and cycling on station design will be evaluated. Considerations with respect to operational effectiveness and crew safety will be discussed. The impact of such factors on spacecraft design to achieve acceptable launch and reentry g levels, crew rotation intervals, etc., will be reviewed.

  16. Biomedical technology transfer applications of NASA science and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The identification and solution of research and clinical problems in cardiovascular medicine which were investigated by means of biomedical data transfer are reported. The following are sample areas that were focused upon by the Stanford University Biomedical Technology Transfer Team: electrodes for hemiplegia research; vectorcardiogram computer analysis; respiration and phonation electrodes; radiotelemetry of intracranial pressure; and audiotransformation of the electrocardiographic signal. It is concluded that this biomedical technology transfer is significantly aiding present research in cardiovascular medicine.

  17. Psychoneuroimmunology Psychology's Gateway to the Biomedical Future

    PubMed Central

    Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.

    2009-01-01

    How do stressful events and negative emotions influence the immune system, and how big are the effects? This broad question has been intensely interesting to psychoneuroimmunology researchers over the last three decades. Many promising lines of work underscore the reasons why this question is still so important and pivotal to understanding and other advances. New multidisciplinary permutations provide fresh vistas and emphasize the importance of training psychologists more broadly so that they will be central and essential players in the advancement of biomedical science. PMID:19750133

  18. CMT for biomedical and other applications

    SciTech Connect

    Spanne, P.

    1997-02-01

    This session includes two presentations describing applications for x-ray tomography using synchrotron radiation for biomedical uses and fluid flow modeling, and outlines advantages for using monoenergetic x-rays. Contrast mechanisms are briefly described and several graphs of absorbed doses and scattering of x-rays are included. Also presented are schematic diagrams of computerized tomographic instrumentation with camera head. A brief description of goals for a real time tomographic system and expected improvements to the system are described. Color photomicrographs of the Berea Sandstone and human bone are provided, as well as a 3-D microtomographic reconstruction of a human vertebra sample.

  19. Production and Biomedical Applications of Probiotic Biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Fariq, Anila; Saeed, Ayesha

    2016-04-01

    Biosurfactants have been widely used for environmental and industrial applications. However, their use in medical field is still limited. Probiotic biosurfactants possess an immense antimicrobial, anti-adhesive, antitumor, and antibiofilm potential. Moreover, they have an additional advantage over conventional microbial surfactants because probiotics are an integral part of normal human microflora and their biosurfactants are innocuous to human. So, they can be effectively exploited for medicinal use. Present review is aimed to discourse the production and biomedical applications of probiotic biosurfactants. PMID:26742771

  20. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Babbush, C. A.; Vankampen, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    Electron bombardment ion thrusters used as ion sources have demonstrated a unique capability to vary the surface morphology of surgical implant materials. The microscopically rough surface texture produced by ion beam sputtering of these materials may result in improvements in the biological response and/or performance of implanted devices. Control of surface roughness may result in improved attachment of the implant to soft tissue, hard tissue, bone cement, or components deposited from blood. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam texturing discussed include: vascular prostheses, artificial heart pump diaphragms, pacemaker fixation, percutaneous connectors, orthopedic pros-thesis fixtion, and dental implants.

  1. High performance flexible electronics for biomedical devices.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Giovanni A; Munzenrieder, Niko; Zysset, Christoph; Kinkeldei, Thomas; Petti, Luisa; Troster, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Plastic electronics is soft, deformable and lightweight and it is suitable for the realization of devices which can form an intimate interface with the body, be implanted or integrated into textile for wearable and biomedical applications. Here, we present flexible electronics based on amorphous oxide semiconductors (a-IGZO) whose performance can achieve MHz frequency even when bent around hair. We developed an assembly technique to integrate complex electronic functionalities into textile while preserving the softness of the garment. All this and further developments can open up new opportunities in health monitoring, biotechnology and telemedicine. PMID:25570912

  2. NASA Johnson Space Center Biomedical Research Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, W. H.

    1999-01-01

    Johnson Space Center (JSC) medical sciences laboratories constitute a national resource for support of medical operations and life sciences research enabling a human presence in space. They play a critical role in evaluating, defining, and mitigation the untoward effect of human adaption to space flight. Over the years they have developed the unique facilities and expertise required to perform: biomedical sample analysis and physiological performance tests supporting medical evaluations of space flight crew members and scientific investigations of the operationally relevant medical, physiological, cellular, and biochemical issues associated with human space flight. A general overview of these laboratories is presented in viewgraph form.

  3. Focus on: Deaconess Hospital Biomedical Services Department.

    PubMed

    Pastorello, R A

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the Biomedical Services Department of Deaconess Hospital, which is centrally located in Oklahoma City, OK. The hospital provides family-centered general and acute care with practically all medical specialties represented. The Department consists of one department supervisor, one technician, and one part-time shared-service secretary. The Department is responsible for the repair, safety testing, and calibration of over 600 instruments, and serves an important role in the selection and support of patient care equipment. Training of users is another major role for this department. PMID:10279020

  4. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Van Kampen, C. L.; Babbush, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    Electron bombardment ion thrusters used as ion sources have demonstrated a unique capability to vary the surface morphology of surgical implant materials. The microscopically rough surface texture produced by ion beam sputtering of these materials may result in improvements in the biological response and/or performance of implanted devices. Control of surface roughness may result in improved attachment of the implant to soft tissue, hard tissue, bone cement, or components deposited from blood. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam texturing discussed include: vascular prostheses, artificial heart pump diaphragms, pacemaker fixation, percutaneous connectors, orthopedic prosthesis fixation, and dental implants.

  5. Data literacy training needs of biomedical researchers

    PubMed Central

    Federer, Lisa M.; Lu, Ya-Ling; Joubert, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The research investigated topic priorities for data literacy training for biomedical researchers and staff. Methods An electronic survey was used to assess researchers' level of knowledge related to data literacy skills and the relevance of these skills to their work. Results Most respondents did not have any formal training in data literacy. Respondents considered most tasks highly relevant to their work but rated their expertise in tasks lower. Conclusion Among this group, researchers have diverse data literacy training needs. Librarians' expertise makes them well suited to provide such training. PMID:26807053

  6. Batteries used to Power Implantable Biomedical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Bock, David C.; Marschilok, Amy C.; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Takeuchi, Esther S.

    2012-01-01

    Battery systems have been developed that provide years of service for implantable medical devices. The primary systems utilize lithium metal anodes with cathode systems including iodine, manganese oxide, carbon monofluoride, silver vanadium oxide and hybrid cathodes. Secondary lithium ion batteries have also been developed for medical applications where the batteries are charged while remaining implanted. While the specific performance requirements of the devices vary, some general requirements are common. These include high safety, reliability and volumetric energy density, long service life, and state of discharge indication. Successful development and implementation of these battery types has helped enable implanted biomedical devices and their treatment of human disease. PMID:24179249

  7. Stochastic monotony signature and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Demongeot, Jacques; Galli Carminati, Giuliana; Carminati, Federico; Rachdi, Mustapha

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a new concept, the stochastic monotony signature of a function, made of the sequence of the signs that indicate if the function is increasing or constant (sign +), or decreasing (sign -). If the function results from the averaging of successive observations with errors, the monotony sign is a random binary variable, whose density is studied under two hypotheses for the distribution of errors: uniform and Gaussian. Then, we describe a simple statistical test allowing the comparison between the monotony signatures of two functions (e.g., one observed and the other as reference) and we apply the test to four biomedical examples, coming from genetics, psychology, gerontology, and morphogenesis. PMID:26563556

  8. Empirical Distributional Semantics: Methods and Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Trevor; Widdows, Dominic

    2009-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, a range of methods have been developed that are able to learn human-like estimates of the semantic relatedness between terms from the way in which these terms are distributed in a corpus of unannotated natural language text. These methods have also been evaluated in a number of applications in the cognitive science, computational linguistics and the information retrieval literatures. In this paper, we review the available methodologies for derivation of semantic relatedness from free text, as well as their evaluation in a variety of biomedical and other applications. Recent methodological developments, and their applicability to several existing applications are also discussed. PMID:19232399

  9. Emerging trend prediction in biomedical literature.

    PubMed

    Moerchen, Fabian; Fradkin, Dmitriy; Dejori, Mathaeus; Wachmann, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    We present a study on how to predict new emerging trends in the biomedical domain based on textual data. We thereby propose a way of anticipating the transformation of arbitrary information into ground truth knowledge by predicting the inclusion of new terms into the MeSH ontology. We also discuss the preparation of a dataset for the evaluation of emerging trend prediction algorithms that is based on PubMed abstracts and related MeSH terms. The results suggest that early prediction of emerging trends is possible. PMID:18999010

  10. Single-domain antibodies for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Krah, Simon; Schröter, Christian; Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Valldorf, Bernhard; Kolmar, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies are the smallest antigen-binding units of antibodies, consisting either only of one variable domain or one engineered constant domain that solely facilitates target binding. This class of antibody derivatives comprises naturally occurring variable domains derived from camelids and sharks as well as engineered human variable or constant antibody domains of the heavy or light chain. Because of their high affinity and specificity as well as stability, small size and benefit of multiple re-formatting opportunities, those molecules emerged as promising candidates for biomedical applications and some of these entities have already proven to be successful in clinical development. PMID:26551147

  11. Recent metallic materials for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinomi, Mitsuo

    2002-03-01

    Metallic biomaterials are mainly used for replacing failed hard tissue. The main metallic biomaterials are stainless steels, Co-based alloys, and titanium and its alloys. Recently, titanium alloys are getting much attention for biomaterials. The various kinds of new high strength α+ β and low-modulus β-type titanium alloys composed of nontoxic elements, such as Nb, Ta, Zr, etc., are developed for biomedical applications because of the toxicity of alloying elements and lack of mechanical biocompatibility of conventional titanium alloys, such as Ti-6Al-4V. Recent research and development in other metallic alloys, such as stainless steels and Co-based alloys, also will be discussed.

  12. How granularity issues concern biomedical ontology integration.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Stefan; Boeker, Martin; Stenzhorn, Holger

    2008-01-01

    The application of upper ontologies has been repeatedly advocated for supporting interoperability between domain ontologies in order to facilitate shared data use both within and across disciplines. We have developed BioTop as a top-domain ontology to integrate more specialized ontologies in the biomolecular and biomedical domain. In this paper, we report on concrete integration problems of this ontology with the domain-independent Basic Formal Ontology (BFO) concerning the issue of fiat and aggregated objects in the context of different granularity levels. We conclude that the third BFO level must be ignored in order not to obviate cross-granularity integration. PMID:18487840

  13. Miniature biotelemeter gives multichannel wideband biomedical data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carraway, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    A miniature biotelemeter was developed for sensing and transmitting multiple channels of biomedical data over a radio link. The design of this miniature, 10-channel, wideband (5 kHz/channel), pulse amplitude modulation/ frequency modulation biotelemeter takes advantage of modern device technology (e.g., integrated circuit operational amplifiers, complementary symmetry/metal oxide semiconductor logic, and solid state switches) and hybrid packaging techniques. The telemeter is being used to monitor 10 channels of neuron firings from specific regions of the brain in rats implanted with chronic electrodes. Design, fabrication, and testing of an engineering model biotelemeter are described.

  14. Research on pressure sensors for biomedical instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a piezo-resistive pressure transducer is discussed suitable for recording pressures typically encountered in biomedical applications. The pressure transducer consists of a thin silicon diaphragm containing four strain-sensitive resistors, and is fabricated using silicon monolithic integrated-circuit technology. The pressure transducers can be as small as 0.7 mm outer diameter, and are, as a result, suitable for mounting at the tip of a catheter. Pressure-induced stress in the diaphragm is sensed by the resistors, which are interconnected to form a Wheatstone bridge.

  15. Photoactivatable Nanostructured Surfaces for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Mosinger, Jiří; Lang, Kamil; Kubát, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    This review aims to summarize the current status of photoactivatable nanostructured film and polymeric nanofiber surfaces used in biomedical applications with emphasis on their photoantimicrobial activity, oxygen-sensing in biological media, light-triggered release of drugs, and physical or structural transformations. Many light-responsive functions have been considered as novel ways to alter surfaces, i.e., in terms of their reactivities and structures. We describe the design of surfaces, nano/micro-fabrication, the properties affected by light, and the application principles. Additionally, we compare the various approaches reported in the literature. PMID:26589508

  16. Biomedical applications of radiation technology in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Pardo, Ma. Esther; Vera-Graziano, R.; Ramos-Durón, L. E.

    1998-06-01

    Mexican Health Institutions continuously require suitable medical grade prosthetic materials for reconstructive and plastic surgery. In particular, the requirements of polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS, for soft tissue replacements are rapidly growing. In addition to molecular weight, the properties of PDMS in biomedicine strongly depend on its purity, formulation and processing. High energy radiation has been used for both the synthesis of highly pure PDMS, free of catalyst and chemicals, and for sterilization of biomedical products. Here, are discussed the gamma radiation polymerization of different siloxane precursors to obtain PDMS with specific functionality and molecular structure as well as the radiation sterilization of amniotic membranes used as wound dressing.

  17. Biomedical Applications of Advanced Multifunctional Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Long, Nguyen Viet; Yang, Yong; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Thi, Cao Minh; Cao, Yanqin; Nogami, Masayuki

    2015-12-01

    In this review, we have presented the latest results and highlights on biomedical applications of a class of noble metal nanoparticles, such as gold, silver and platinum, and a class of magnetic nanoparticles, such as cobalt, nickel and iron. Their most important related compounds are also discussed for biomedical applications for treating various diseases, typically as cancers. At present, both physical and chemical methods have been proved very successful to synthesize, shape, control, and produce metal- and oxide-based homogeneous particle systems, e.g., nanoparticles and microparticles. Therefore, we have mainly focused on functional magnetic nanoparticles for nanomedicine because of their high bioadaptability to the organs inside human body. Here, bioconjugation techniques are very crucial to link nanoparticles with conventional drugs, nanodrugs, biomolecules or polymers for biomedical applications. Biofunctionalization of engineered nanoparticles for biomedicine is shown respective to in vitro and in vivo analysis protocols that typically include drug delivery, hyperthermia therapy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and recent outstanding progress in sweep imaging technique with Fourier transformation (SWIFT) MRI. The latter can be especially applied using magnetic nanoparticles, such as Co-, Fe-, Ni-based nanoparticles, α-Fe2O3, and Fe3O4 oxide nanoparticles for analysis and treatment of malignancies. Therefore, this review focuses on recent results of scientists, and related research on diagnosis and treatment methods of common and dangerous diseases by biomedical engineered nanoparticles. Importantly, nanosysems (nanoparticles) or microsystems (microparticles) or hybrid micronano systems are shortly introduced into nanomedicine. Here, Fe oxide nanoparticles ultimately enable potential and applicable technologies for tumor-targeted imaging and therapy. Finally, we have shown the latest aspects of the most important Fe-based particle systems, such as Fe,

  18. Measuring revolutionary biomedical science 1992-2006 using Nobel prizes, Lasker (clinical medicine) awards and Gairdner awards (NLG metric).

    PubMed

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    The Nobel prize for medicine or physiology, the Lasker award for clinical medicine, and the Gairdner international award are given to individuals for their role in developing theories, technologies and discoveries which have changed the direction of biomedical science. These distinctions have been used to develop an NLG metric to measure research performance and trends in 'revolutionary' biomedical science with the aim of identifying the premier revolutionary science research institutions and nations from 1992-2006. I have previously argued that the number of Nobel laureates in the biomedical field should be expanded to about nine per year and the NLG metric attempts to predict the possible results of such an expansion. One hundred and nineteen NLG prizes and awards were made during the past fifteen years (about eight per year) when overlapping awards had been removed. Eighty-five were won by the USA, revealing a massive domination in revolutionary biomedical science by this nation; the UK was second with sixteen awards; Canada had five, Australia four and Germany three. The USA had twelve elite centres of revolutionary biomedical science, with University of Washington at Seattle and MIT in first position with six awards and prizes each; Rockefeller University and Caltech were jointly second placed with five. Surprisingly, Harvard University--which many people rank as the premier world research centre--failed to reach the threshold of three prizes and awards, and was not included in the elite list. The University of Oxford, UK, was the only institution outside of the USA which featured as a significant centre of revolutionary biomedical science. Long-term success at the highest level of revolutionary biomedical science (and probably other sciences) probably requires a sufficiently large number of individually-successful large institutions in open competition with one another--as in the USA. If this model cannot be replicated within smaller nations, then it implies

  19. The exploration of Halley's comet - An example of international cooperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahe, Jurgen H.; Newburn, Ray L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The history of international cooperation in studies of comets started with observations in 1577 and 1680, when Tycho Brahe and Newton, respectively, collected position measurements made in different countries to determine the paths of the comets observed. In the fall of 1979, a worldwide Comet Halley watch was proposed. As a result of international cooperation, Comet Halley was explored during its recent appearance from the ground, earth orbit, Venus orbit, interplanetary space, and from within the comet itself. The various activities in space were coordinated by the ESA, the USSR Intercosmos, the Japanese ISAS, and NASA, through the Inter-Agency Consultative Group. The activities of the ground-based observers were coordinated by the International Halley Watch.

  20. Facilitating biomedical researchers' interrogation of electronic health record data: Ideas from outside of biomedical informatics.

    PubMed

    Hruby, Gregory W; Matsoukas, Konstantina; Cimino, James J; Weng, Chunhua

    2016-04-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) are a vital data resource for research uses, including cohort identification, phenotyping, pharmacovigilance, and public health surveillance. To realize the promise of EHR data for accelerating clinical research, it is imperative to enable efficient and autonomous EHR data interrogation by end users such as biomedical researchers. This paper surveys state-of-art approaches and key methodological considerations to this purpose. We adapted a previously published conceptual framework for interactive information retrieval, which defines three entities: user, channel, and source, by elaborating on channels for query formulation in the context of facilitating end users to interrogate EHR data. We show the current progress in biomedical informatics mainly lies in support for query execution and information modeling, primarily due to emphases on infrastructure development for data integration and data access via self-service query tools, but has neglected user support needed during iteratively query formulation processes, which can be costly and error-prone. In contrast, the information science literature has offered elaborate theories and methods for user modeling and query formulation support. The two bodies of literature are complementary, implying opportunities for cross-disciplinary idea exchange. On this basis, we outline the directions for future informatics research to improve our understanding of user needs and requirements for facilitating autonomous interrogation of EHR data by biomedical researchers. We suggest that cross-disciplinary translational research between biomedical informatics and information science can benefit our research in facilitating efficient data access in life sciences. PMID:26972838

  1. Engineering β-sheet peptide assemblies for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiqiang; Cai, Zheng; Chen, Qiling; Liu, Menghua; Ye, Ling; Ren, Jiaoyan; Liao, Wenzhen; Liu, Shuwen

    2016-02-23

    Hydrogels have been widely studied in various biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering, cell culture, immunotherapy and vaccines, and drug delivery. Peptide-based nanofibers represent a promising new strategy for current drug delivery approaches and cell carriers for tissue engineering. This review focuses on the recent advances in the use of self-assembling engineered β-sheet peptide assemblies for biomedical applications. The applications of peptide nanofibers in biomedical fields, such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, immunotherapy, and vaccines, are highlighted. The current challenges and future perspectives for self-assembling peptide nanofibers in biomedical applications are discussed. PMID:26700207

  2. High-Fidelity Simulation in Biomedical and Aerospace Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Introduction / Background. Modeling and Simulation Challenges in Aerospace Engineering. Modeling and Simulation Challenges in Biomedical Engineering. Digital Astronaut. Project Columbia. Summary and Discussion.

  3. Group of R&D on biomedical engineering: Its development and results.

    PubMed

    Yabar, Leopoldo F; Torres, Miguel A; Garcia, Daniel O; Villavicencio, Emilio A; Navarro, Luis A; Nakamura, Orlando K; Huamani, Robinson

    2010-01-01

    Conducting research and development activities generates new knowledge that can then be applied properly. In this sense, the groups of research and development on biomedical engineering (GRDBE) can contribute a lot in various areas such as teaching (theory and laboratory), as well as the development of prototypes, but mainly with the results they can provide. These contributions should response to specific needs of some sector, for example: health, environment, biology, and others. The present paper provides a description of the development of a GRDBE into a private university. Also, it's presented the amount of papers developed by this group and accepted by international congress on biomedical engineering (BE) on the 2007-2009 period. This paper also shows comparative charts with papers produced by other GRDBE that exist in our country, which are matter of analysis and conclusions. PMID:21096761

  4. Load-Bearing Biomedical Applications of Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings - Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Alakoski, Esa; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Soininen, Antti; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2008-01-01

    The current status of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings for biomedical applications is reviewed with emphasis on load-bearing coatings. Although diamond-like carbon coating materials have been studied for decades, no indisputably successful commercial biomedical applications for high load situations exist today. High internal stress, leading to insufficient adhesion of thick coatings, is the evident reason behind this delay of the break-through of DLC coatings for applications. Excellent adhesion of thick DLC coatings is of utmost importance for load-bearing applications. According to this review superior candidate material for articulating implants is thick and adherent DLC on both sliding surfaces. With the filtered pulsed arc discharge method, all the necessary requirements for the deposition of thick and adherent DLC are fulfilled, provided that the substrate material is selected properly. PMID:19478929

  5. Battling the biomedical information explosion: a plan for implementing a quality filtered database.

    PubMed

    Moore, M

    1989-01-01

    In 1980 an article appeared in the Archives of Internal Medicine stating that two-thirds of the studies appearing in the best medical journals contain unwarranted conclusions. In order to deal with the ever increasing mass of biomedical information (termed a "journalistic blastoma" by one editor), IAIMS has extolled the use of quality filters, devices to sort through the literature and sift the good from the bad. The complexity of the task is staggering. Quality is obviously subjective, and its nature raises the question of whether our users can be taught the necessary skills to systematically evaluate the literature. This report is based on a research project that grew into an elective course for medical students at Texas Tech University School of Medicine on "Critical Appraisal of the Biomedical Literature." PMID:10303951

  6. Load-bearing biomedical applications of diamond-like carbon coatings - current status.

    PubMed

    Alakoski, Esa; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Soininen, Antti; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2008-01-01

    The current status of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings for biomedical applications is reviewed with emphasis on load-bearing coatings. Although diamond-like carbon coating materials have been studied for decades, no indisputably successful commercial biomedical applications for high load situations exist today. High internal stress, leading to insufficient adhesion of thick coatings, is the evident reason behind this delay of the break-through of DLC coatings for applications. Excellent adhesion of thick DLC coatings is of utmost importance for load-bearing applications. According to this review superior candidate material for articulating implants is thick and adherent DLC on both sliding surfaces. With the filtered pulsed arc discharge method, all the necessary requirements for the deposition of thick and adherent DLC are fulfilled, provided that the substrate material is selected properly. PMID:19478929

  7. Nano-engineered materials based on fullerenes: synthesis and biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierascu, Radu Claudiu; Dumitriu, Irina; Ion, Rodica Mariana; Neagu, Monica; Constantin, Carolina; Stavaru, Crina

    2010-11-01

    The nanoengineering of various materials for biomedical application has became in the last decade one of the most important research areas, due to the continuous struggle to find new and more efficient instruments for the therapy of cancer and other diseases. Attempts to obtain functionalized derivatives of fullerene seek the synthesis of watersoluble materials, in order to investigate their effects in physiological conditions. International studies on the biological properties of fullerenes and their derivatives, are now targeted towards anti-tumor effects, pharmacology and their involvement in oxidative stress. Their toxicity, demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo is important for characterization and selection of applications. Phototoxicity of some molecules of fullerenes has been identified as future therapeutic tool. The present paper describes the synthesis, characterization and some biomedical applications of some nanomaterials based on fullerenes.

  8. Biomedical imaging and sensing using flatbed scanners.

    PubMed

    Göröcs, Zoltán; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-09-01

    In this Review, we provide an overview of flatbed scanner based biomedical imaging and sensing techniques. The extremely large imaging field-of-view (e.g., ~600-700 cm(2)) of these devices coupled with their cost-effectiveness provide unique opportunities for digital imaging of samples that are too large for regular optical microscopes, and for collection of large amounts of statistical data in various automated imaging or sensing tasks. Here we give a short introduction to the basic features of flatbed scanners also highlighting the key parameters for designing scientific experiments using these devices, followed by a discussion of some of the significant examples, where scanner-based systems were constructed to conduct various biomedical imaging and/or sensing experiments. Along with mobile phones and other emerging consumer electronics devices, flatbed scanners and their use in advanced imaging and sensing experiments might help us transform current practices of medicine, engineering and sciences through democratization of measurement science and empowerment of citizen scientists, science educators and researchers in resource limited settings. PMID:24965011

  9. [Research Biomedical Ethics and Practical Wisdom].

    PubMed

    Vergara, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    As is well known, in the field of Biomedical Ethics some methodological proposals have been put forward. They try to provide some guidelines in order to take proper decisions. These methodologies are quite useful insofar as they supply reasons for action, but they are essentially insufficient. In fact, taking a good decision requires a special skill that goes beyond sheer technique, and this skill is traditionally called practical wisdom. Not in the usual and more outlying sense of sheer caution, but in the more central one of phronesis or prudentia. Although it is not a new notion, it usually appears blurred in biomedical decision-making theory, playing the wrong role, or in a marginal or indefinite way. From this postulate, we will try to make a double analysis. First, we will try to show the need for a proper understanding of the core role that phronesis plays in decision making. Second, we will try to get the original meaning of Aristotelian phronesis back. For reasons of space, in this paper the second question will be just partially addressed. PMID:26378599

  10. Career Development among American Biomedical Postdocs.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Kenneth D; McGready, John; Griffin, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Recent biomedical workforce policy efforts have centered on enhancing career preparation for trainees, and increasing diversity in the research workforce. Postdoctoral scientists, or postdocs, are among those most directly impacted by such initiatives, yet their career development remains understudied. This study reports results from a 2012 national survey of 1002 American biomedical postdocs. On average, postdocs reported increased knowledge about career options but lower clarity about their career goals relative to PhD entry. The majority of postdocs were offered structured career development at their postdoctoral institutions, but less than one-third received this from their graduate departments. Postdocs from all social backgrounds reported significant declines in interest in faculty careers at research-intensive universities and increased interest in nonresearch careers; however, there were differences in the magnitude and period of training during which these changes occurred across gender and race/ethnicity. Group differences in interest in faculty careers were explained by career interest differences formed during graduate school but not by differences in research productivity, research self-efficacy, or advisor relationships. These findings point to the need for enhanced career development earlier in the training process, and interventions sensitive to distinctive patterns of interest development across social identity groups. PMID:26582238

  11. Engineering Stem Cells for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Yin, Perry T; Han, Edward; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by a number of useful properties, including their ability to migrate, differentiate, and secrete a variety of therapeutic molecules such as immunomodulatory factors. As such, numerous pre-clinical and clinical studies have utilized stem cell-based therapies and demonstrated their tremendous potential for the treatment of various human diseases and disorders. Recently, efforts have focused on engineering stem cells in order to further enhance their innate abilities as well as to confer them with new functionalities, which can then be used in various biomedical applications. These engineered stem cells can take on a number of forms. For instance, engineered stem cells encompass the genetic modification of stem cells as well as the use of stem cells for gene delivery, nanoparticle loading and delivery, and even small molecule drug delivery. The present Review gives an in-depth account of the current status of engineered stem cells, including potential cell sources, the most common methods used to engineer stem cells, and the utilization of engineered stem cells in various biomedical applications, with a particular focus on tissue regeneration, the treatment of immunodeficiency diseases, and cancer. PMID:25772134

  12. A vision for a biomedical cloud.

    PubMed

    Grossman, R L; White, K P

    2012-02-01

    We present a vision for a Biomedical Cloud that draws on progress in the fields of Genomics, Systems Biology and biomedical data mining. The successful fusion of these areas will combine the use of biomarkers, genetic variants, and environmental variables to build predictive models that will drastically increase the specificity and timeliness of diagnosis for a wide range of common diseases, whilst delivering accurate predictions about the efficacy of treatment options. However, the amount of data being generated by each of these fields is staggering, as is the task of managing and analysing it. Adequate computing infrastructure needs to be developed to assemble, manage and mine the enormous and rapidly growing corpus of 'omics' data along with clinical information. We have now arrived at an intersection point between genome technology, cloud computing and biological data mining. This intersection point provides a launch pad for developing a globally applicable cloud computing platform capable of supporting a new paradigm of data intensive, cloud-enabled predictive medicine. PMID:22142244

  13. Diversifying Biomedical Training: A Synergistic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Gibau, Gina Sanchez; Foertsch, Julie; Blum, Janice; Brutkiewicz, Randy; Queener, Sherry; Roman, Ann; Rhodes, Simon; Sturek, Michael; Wilkes, David; Broxmeyer, Hal

    2011-01-01

    For over three decades, the scientific community has expressed concern over the paucity of African American, Latino and Native American researchers in the biomedical training pipeline. Concern has been expressed regarding what is forecasted as a shortage of these underrepresented minority (URM) scientists given the demographic shifts occurring worldwide and particularly in the United States. Increased access to graduate education has made a positive contribution in addressing this disparity. This article describes the multiple pathway approaches that have been employed by a school of medicine at an urban Midwest research institution to increase the number of URM students enrolled in, and graduating from, doctoral programs within basic science departments, through the combination of R25 grants and other grant programs funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This article outlines the process of implementing a strong synergistic approach to the training of URM students through linkages between the NIH-funded “Bridges to the Doctorate (BRIDGES)” and “Initiative for Maximizing Graduate Student Diversity (IMGSD)” programs. The article documents the specific gains witnessed by this particular institution and identifies key components of the interventions that may prove useful for institutions seeking to increment the biomedical pipeline with scientists from diverse backgrounds. PMID:21796238

  14. Functionalization of metal nanoclusters for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-Rong; Goswami, Nirmal; Yang, Huang-Hao; Xie, Jianping

    2016-06-01

    Metal nanoclusters (NCs) are emerging as a new class of functional nanomaterials in the area of biological sensing, labelling, imaging and therapy due to their unique physical and chemical properties, such as ultrasmall size, HOMO-LUMO transition, strong luminescence together with good photostability and biocompatibility. A recent surge of interest in this field is the surface functionalization of these metal NCs through which one can tailor their physicochemical properties, such as stability in solution, and strong luminescence, as well as their biodistribution and toxicity in biological systems, which in turn can empower these functionalized NCs with desirable targeting, imaging, and therapeutic ability for biomedical applications. In this review, we first introduce the functionalization strategies for the metal NCs developed in the past few years, followed by highlighting some biomedical applications of these functionalized metal NCs. We then discuss the difference of in vitro and in vivo fate as well as toxicity between various functionalized metal NCs. Finally, we present a short discussion on the current challenges and provide an outlook of the future developments of these functional metal NCs. PMID:27146244

  15. Commercializing biomedical research through securitization techniques.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Jose-Maria; Stein, Roger M; Lo, Andrew W

    2012-10-01

    Biomedical innovation has become riskier, more expensive and more difficult to finance with traditional sources such as private and public equity. Here we propose a financial structure in which a large number of biomedical programs at various stages of development are funded by a single entity to substantially reduce the portfolio's risk. The portfolio entity can finance its activities by issuing debt, a critical advantage because a much larger pool of capital is available for investment in debt versus equity. By employing financial engineering techniques such as securitization, it can raise even greater amounts of more-patient capital. In a simulation using historical data for new molecular entities in oncology from 1990 to 2011, we find that megafunds of $5–15 billion may yield average investment returns of 8.9–11.4% for equity holders and 5–8% for 'research-backed obligation' holders, which are lower than typical venture-capital hurdle rates but attractive to pension funds, insurance companies and other large institutional investors. PMID:23023199

  16. Visual parameter optimisation for biomedical image processing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Biomedical image processing methods require users to optimise input parameters to ensure high-quality output. This presents two challenges. First, it is difficult to optimise multiple input parameters for multiple input images. Second, it is difficult to achieve an understanding of underlying algorithms, in particular, relationships between input and output. Results We present a visualisation method that transforms users' ability to understand algorithm behaviour by integrating input and output, and by supporting exploration of their relationships. We discuss its application to a colour deconvolution technique for stained histology images and show how it enabled a domain expert to identify suitable parameter values for the deconvolution of two types of images, and metrics to quantify deconvolution performance. It also enabled a breakthrough in understanding by invalidating an underlying assumption about the algorithm. Conclusions The visualisation method presented here provides analysis capability for multiple inputs and outputs in biomedical image processing that is not supported by previous analysis software. The analysis supported by our method is not feasible with conventional trial-and-error approaches. PMID:26329538

  17. Biocompatible electrospun polymer blends for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Munj, Hrishikesh Ramesh; Nelson, M Tyler; Karandikar, Prathamesh Sadanand; Lannutti, John Joseph; Tomasko, David Lane

    2014-10-01

    Blends of natural and synthetic polymers have received considerable attention as biomaterials due to the potential to optimize both mechanical and bioactive properties. Electrospinning of biocompatible polymers is an efficient method producing biomimetic topographies suited to various applications. In the ultimate application, electrospun scaffolds must also incorporate drug/protein delivery for effective cell growth and tissue repair. This study explored the suitability of a ternary Polymethylmethacrylate-Polycaprolactone-gelatin blend in the preparation of electrospun scaffolds for biomedical applications. Tuning the blend composition allows control over scaffold mechanical properties and degradation rate. Significant improvements were observed in the mechanical properties of the blend compared with the individual components. In order to study drug delivery potential, triblends were impregnated with the model compound Rhodamine-B using sub/supercritical CO₂ infusion under benign conditions. Results show significantly distinct release profiles of the impregnated dye from the triblends. Specific factors such as porosity, degradation rate, stress relaxation, dye-polymer interactions, play key roles in impregnation and release. Each polymer component of the triblends shows distinct behavior during impregnation and release process. This affects the aforementioned factors and the release profiles of the dye. Careful control over blend composition and infusion conditions creates the flexibility needed to produce biocompatible electrospun scaffolds for a variety of biomedical applications. PMID:24604876

  18. Automatically generating gene summaries from biomedical literature.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xu; Jiang, Jing; He, Xin; Mei, Qiaozhu; Zhai, Chengxiang; Schatz, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Biologists often need to find information about genes whose function is not described in the genome databases. Currently they must try to search disparate biomedical literature to locate relevant articles, and spend considerable efforts reading the retrieved articles in order to locate the most relevant knowledge about the gene. We describe our software, the first that automatically generates gene summaries from biomedical literature. We present a two-stage summarization method, which involves first retrieving relevant articles and then extracting the most informative sentences from the retrieved articles to generate a structured gene summary. The generated summary explicitly covers multiple aspects of a gene, such as the sequence information, mutant phenotypes, and molecular interaction with other genes. We propose several heuristic approaches to improve the accuracy in both stages. The proposed methods are evaluated using 10 randomly chosen genes from FlyBase and a subset of Medline abstracts about Drosophila. The results show that the precision of the top selected sentences in the 6 aspects is typically about 50-70%, and the generated summaries are quite informative, indicating that our approaches are effective in automatically summarizing literature information about genes. The generated summaries not only are directly useful to biologists but also serve as useful entry points to enable them to quickly digest the retrieved literature articles. PMID:17094226

  19. Nanomaterials driven energy, environmental and biomedical research

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Prakash C.; Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Wilson, Jeremiah F.

    2014-03-31

    We have developed state-of-the-art nanomaterials such as nanofibers, nanotubes, nanoparticles, nanocatalysts and nanostructures for clean energy, environmental and biomedical research. Energy can neither be created nor be destroyed, but it can be converted from one form to another. Based on this principle, chemical energy such as hydrogen has been produced from water electrolysis at a much lower voltage using RuO{sub 2} nanoparticles on the Si wafer substrate. Once the hydrogen is produced from the clean sources such as solar energy and water, it has to be stored by physisorption or chemisorption processes on to the solid state systems. For the successful physical adsorption of hydrogen molecule, we have developed novel polyaniline nanostructures via chemical templating and electrospinning routes. Chemical or complex hydrides involving nano MgH{sub 2} and transition metal nanocatalysts have been synthesized to tailor both the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen (chemi) sorption respectively. Utilization of solar energy (UV-Vis) and a coupling of novel semiconductor oxide nanoparticles have been recently demonstrated with enhancement in photo-oxidation and/or photo-reduction processes for the water/air detoxification and sustainable liquid fuel production respectively. Magnetic nanoparticles such as ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} have been synthesized and optimized for biomedical applications such as targeted drug delivery and tumor diagnostic sensing (MRI)

  20. Aminophosphonate metal complexes of biomedical potential.

    PubMed

    Tušek-Božić, L J

    2013-01-01

    Metals and their complexes with organic ligands have an important role in biochemical systems such as enzymatic catalysis, metal ion transfer across the cell membranes, treatment of malignancy, rheumatoid arthritis, ulcer and other types of diseases. Special attention is directed to metal complexes with ligands which are important in biological systems, as their incorporation into metallo-organic compounds offers much scope for design of potential metal-based agents that provide new opportunities in the medicinal chemistry. In view of this, derivatives of aminophosphonic acids, owing to their broad spectrum of biological activities and wide range of applications in the medicinal and agrochemical fields, are very attractive metal-ligand agents that might form biomedical important metal complexes. Thus, a number of aminophosphonate complexes of platinum group metals have been found to possess remarkable antitumor activity while complexes of some other transition and rare-earth metals like technetium, rhenium, samarium and gadolinium have been used either as therapeutic and diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals or as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. In addition, the high phosphonate affinity towards bone and other calcified tissues may be utilized for the drug targeting based on synthesis of metal complexes linked to bioactive carrier systems, affording better modalities of attack to the site of pathology. In this review article, aminophosphonate metal-based compounds with potential biomedical applications are described. PMID:23432587

  1. Predicting the Extension of Biomedical Ontologies

    PubMed Central

    Pesquita, Catia; Couto, Francisco M.

    2012-01-01

    Developing and extending a biomedical ontology is a very demanding task that can never be considered complete given our ever-evolving understanding of the life sciences. Extension in particular can benefit from the automation of some of its steps, thus releasing experts to focus on harder tasks. Here we present a strategy to support the automation of change capturing within ontology extension where the need for new concepts or relations is identified. Our strategy is based on predicting areas of an ontology that will undergo extension in a future version by applying supervised learning over features of previous ontology versions. We used the Gene Ontology as our test bed and obtained encouraging results with average f-measure reaching 0.79 for a subset of biological process terms. Our strategy was also able to outperform state of the art change capturing methods. In addition we have identified several issues concerning prediction of ontology evolution, and have delineated a general framework for ontology extension prediction. Our strategy can be applied to any biomedical ontology with versioning, to help focus either manual or semi-automated extension methods on areas of the ontology that need extension. PMID:23028267

  2. Career Development among American Biomedical Postdocs

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Kenneth D.; McGready, John; Griffin, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Recent biomedical workforce policy efforts have centered on enhancing career preparation for trainees, and increasing diversity in the research workforce. Postdoctoral scientists, or postdocs, are among those most directly impacted by such initiatives, yet their career development remains understudied. This study reports results from a 2012 national survey of 1002 American biomedical postdocs. On average, postdocs reported increased knowledge about career options but lower clarity about their career goals relative to PhD entry. The majority of postdocs were offered structured career development at their postdoctoral institutions, but less than one-third received this from their graduate departments. Postdocs from all social backgrounds reported significant declines in interest in faculty careers at research-intensive universities and increased interest in nonresearch careers; however, there were differences in the magnitude and period of training during which these changes occurred across gender and race/ethnicity. Group differences in interest in faculty careers were explained by career interest differences formed during graduate school but not by differences in research productivity, research self-efficacy, or advisor relationships. These findings point to the need for enhanced career development earlier in the training process, and interventions sensitive to distinctive patterns of interest development across social identity groups. PMID:26582238

  3. Nanomaterials driven energy, environmental and biomedical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prakash C.; Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Wilson, Jeremiah F.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed state-of-the-art nanomaterials such as nanofibers, nanotubes, nanoparticles, nanocatalysts and nanostructures for clean energy, environmental and biomedical research. Energy can neither be created nor be destroyed, but it can be converted from one form to another. Based on this principle, chemical energy such as hydrogen has been produced from water electrolysis at a much lower voltage using RuO2 nanoparticles on the Si wafer substrate. Once the hydrogen is produced from the clean sources such as solar energy and water, it has to be stored by physisorption or chemisorption processes on to the solid state systems. For the successful physical adsorption of hydrogen molecule, we have developed novel polyaniline nanostructures via chemical templating and electrospinning routes. Chemical or complex hydrides involving nano MgH2 and transition metal nanocatalysts have been synthesized to tailor both the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen (chemi) sorption respectively. Utilization of solar energy (UV-Vis) and a coupling of novel semiconductor oxide nanoparticles have been recently demonstrated with enhancement in photo-oxidation and/or photo-reduction processes for the water/air detoxification and sustainable liquid fuel production respectively. Magnetic nanoparticles such as ZnFe2O4 have been synthesized and optimized for biomedical applications such as targeted drug delivery and tumor diagnostic sensing (MRI).

  4. Management of mixed wastes from biomedical research

    SciTech Connect

    Linins, I.; Klein, R.C.; Gershey, E.L. )

    1991-09-01

    Mixed radioactive and chemical wastes generated by biomedical research were characterized, and various treatment methods for reducing their volume were evaluated. These wastes consist primarily of organic solvents used in the extraction and purification of radiolabeled biomolecules that are contaminated with low levels of the long-lived radionuclides, 3H and 14C. The Rockefeller University's mixed wastes fall into three broad chemical categories: phenol/chloroform, acetonitrile/water, and mixtures of miscellaneous solvents such as carbon tetrachloride, benzene, and other hazardous chemicals. Currently, with the exception of liquid scintillation cocktails (deregulated in 1981), there are no commercial disposal outlets for mixed wastes nor may they be stored legally for more than 90-180 d. Most of these mixed wastes can be effectively rendered into nonradioactive chemical and aqueous radioactive waste, both of which can be disposed of in accordance with existing regulations. However, to do so requires a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit for licensure as a treatment, storage, and disposal facility. For many university research facilities, this may require financial and personnel resources disproportionate to the small amounts of waste produced. Also, such treatment, if not done properly, presents potential occupational hazards from the direct handling of waste materials. Deregulation of certain mixed wastes would be the safest, most cost-effective, and practical method for dealing with many mixed wastes of biomedical origin. In any event, a national regulatory solution must be found.

  5. Biomedical journals: keeping up and reading critically.

    PubMed

    Chase, Karen L; DiGiacomo, Ronald F; Van Hoosier, Gerald L

    2006-09-01

    By extrapolation from studies of physicians, knowledge and practice of laboratory animal medicine and science are expected to become progressively more outdated the longer practitioners are out of school. Keeping up with current literature and practice is a challenge that necessitates the use of many different sources of continuing education. Both veterinarians and physicians consistently list journals as the most beneficial source of new information. Accordingly, they must select from the veterinary and biomedical literature articles that report original studies and systematic reviews and recognize and respond to valid new knowledge to improve diagnostic and therapeutic approaches and maintain consistent clinical skills. Other objectives include selecting journals for general information and for information relevant or specific to one's field of research. Lastly, candidates for board certification need to read articles from journals that potentially provide the basis for questions on the examination. 'High-impact' journals should be identified, and articles should be reviewed critically. In a survey of recent candidates for laboratory animal medicine board examination, these journals included Contemporary Topics (now JAALAS), Comparative Medicine, ILAR Journal, and Laboratory Animals. Strategies for coping with the challenge of staying current with the literature include wise use of technology, journal clubs, and consultation with colleagues. A laboratory animal practitioner can become a better scientist and clinician by evaluating the research performed by others. Thorough, critical review of biomedical literature is paramount to these goals. PMID:16995641

  6. Scalable representations of diseases in biomedical ontologies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The realm of pathological entities can be subdivided into pathological dispositions, pathological processes, and pathological structures. The latter are the bearer of dispositions, which can then be realized by their manifestations — pathologic processes. Despite its ontological soundness, implementing this model via purpose-oriented domain ontologies will likely require considerable effort, both in ontology construction and maintenance, which constitutes a considerable problem for SNOMED CT, presently the largest biomedical ontology. Results We describe an ontology design pattern which allows ontologists to make assertions that blur the distinctions between dispositions, processes, and structures until necessary. Based on the domain upper-level ontology BioTop, it permits ascriptions of location and participation in the definition of pathological phenomena even without an ontological commitment to a distinction between these three categories. An analysis of SNOMED CT revealed that numerous classes in the findings/disease hierarchy are ambiguous with respect to process vs. disposition. Here our proposed approach can easily be applied to create unambiguous classes. No ambiguities could be defined regarding the distinction of structure and non-structure classes, but here we have found problematic duplications. Conclusions We defend a judicious use of disjunctive, and therefore ambiguous, classes in biomedical ontologies during the process of ontology construction and in the practice of ontology application. The use of these classes is permitted to span across several top-level categories, provided it contributes to ontology simplification and supports the intended reasoning scenarios. PMID:21624161

  7. Management of mixed wastes from biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Linins, I; Klein, R C; Gershey, E L

    1991-09-01

    Mixed radioactive and chemical wastes generated by biomedical research were characterized, and various treatment methods for reducing their volume were evaluated. These wastes consist primarily of organic solvents used in the extraction and purification of radiolabeled biomolecules that are contaminated with low levels of the long-lived radionuclides, 3H and 14C. The Rockefeller University's mixed wastes fall into three broad chemical categories: phenol/chloroform, acetonitrile/water, and mixtures of miscellaneous solvents such as carbon tetrachloride, benzene, and other hazardous chemicals. Currently, with the exception of liquid scintillation cocktails (deregulated in 1981), there are no commercial disposal outlets for mixed wastes nor may they be stored legally for more than 90-180 d. Most of these mixed wastes can be effectively rendered into nonradioactive chemical and aqueous radioactive waste, both of which can be disposed of in accordance with existing regulations. However, to do so requires a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit for licensure as a treatment, storage, and disposal facility. For many university research facilities, this may require financial and personnel resources disproportionate to the small amounts of waste produced. Also, such treatment, if not done properly, presents potential occupational hazards from the direct handling of waste materials. Deregulation of certain mixed wastes would be the safest, most cost-effective, and practical method for dealing with many mixed wastes of biomedical origin. In any event, a national regulatory solution must be found. PMID:1880030

  8. Biomedical Use of Aerospace Personal Cooling Garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, Bruce W.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Callaway, Robert K.

    1994-01-01

    Personal thermoregulatory systems are required during extravehicular activity (EVA) to remove the metabolic heat generated by the suited astronaut. The Extravehicular and Protective Systems (STE) Branch of NASA Ames Research Center has developed advanced concepts or liquid cooling garments for both industrial and biomedical applications for the past 25 years. Examples of this work include: (1) liquid cooled helmets for helicopter pilots and race car drivers; (2) vests for fire and mine rescue personnel; (3) bras to increase the definition of tumors during thermography; (4) lower body garments for young women with erythomelaigia; and (5) whole body garments used by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The benefits of the biomedical application of artificial thermoregulation received national attention through two recent events: (1) the liquid-cooled garment technology was inducted into the United States Space Foundation's Space Technology Hall of Fame (1993); and (2) NASA has signed a joint Memorandum of Understanding with the Multiple Sclerosis Association (1994) to share this technology for use with MS patient treatment. The STE Branch is currently pursuing a program to refine thermoregulatory design in light of recent technology developments that might be applicable for use by several medical patient populations. Projects have been initiated to apply thermoregulatory technology for the treatment and/or rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord injuries, multiple sclerosis, migraine headaches, and to help prevent the loss of hair during chemotherapy.

  9. Biomedical Imaging and Sensing using Flatbed Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Göröcs, Zoltán; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-01-01

    In this Review, we provide an overview of flatbed scanner based biomedical imaging and sensing techniques. The extremely large imaging field-of-view (e.g., ~600–700 cm2) of these devices coupled with their cost-effectiveness provide unique opportunities for digital imaging of samples that are too large for regular optical microscopes, and for collection of large amounts of statistical data in various automated imaging or sensing tasks. Here we give a short introduction to the basic features of flatbed scanners also highlighting the key parameters for designing scientific experiments using these devices, followed by a discussion of some of the significant examples, where scanner-based systems were constructed to conduct various biomedical imaging and/or sensing experiments. Along with mobile phones and other emerging consumer electronics devices, flatbed scanners and their use in advanced imaging and sensing experiments might help us transform current practices of medicine, engineering and sciences through democratization of measurement science and empowerment of citizen scientists, science educators and researchers in resource limited settings. PMID:24965011

  10. Golden Helix Institute of Biomedical Research: Interdisciplinary research and educational activities in pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mitropoulos, Konstantinos; Innocenti, Federico; van Schaik, Ron H.; Lezhava, Alexander; Tzimas, Giannis; Kollia, Panagoula; Macek, Milan; Fortina, Paolo; Patrinos, George P.

    2013-01-01

    The Golden Helix Institute of Biomedical Research is an international non-profit scientific organization with interdisciplinary research and educational activities in the field of genome medicine in Europe, Asia and Latin America. These activities are supervised by an international scientific advisory council, consisting of world leaders in the field of genomics and translational medicine. Research activities include the regional coordination of the Pharmacogenomics for Every Nation Initiative in Europe, in an effort to integrate pharmacogenomics in developing countries, the development of several National/Ethnic Genetic databases and related web services and the critical assessment of the impact of genetics and genomic medicine to society in various countries. Also, educational activities include the organization of the Golden Helix Symposia®, which are high profile scientific research symposia in the field of personalized medicine, and the Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Days, an international educational activity focused on pharmacogenomics, as part of its international pharmacogenomics education and outreach efforts. PMID:22379996

  11. Solution transfer syn-S 2: an inferred means of deriving fault fill in the lake Moondarra area, Mt. Isa, Queensland, Australia, based on oxygen isotope results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsor, C. N.

    Many of the faults within the Lake Moondarra area cropout as wide zones which are filled with massive or fibrous milky quartz. Additionally, a variety of rock fragments from the surrounding metasediments are present in the fault zones. The second regional slaty cleavage, S2, is locally observed through the quartz and country rock fragments within some of the zones, indicating that these fault fills originated pre- or early syn- S2. The absence of the first regional slaty cleavage, S1, suggests that the fault fills developed post or late syn- S1. Evidence supporting an early syn- S2 timing for the development of these fills is provided by the results of oxygen isotope analysis carried out on quartz specimens collected from the faults and also by the nature of the quartz. Specimens of quartz taken from the various fault zones have δ18O values between 12.4 and 14.5‰. This suggests that metamorphic water isotopically equilibrated with connate formation water was the aqueous fluid which transported the silica. δ18O values for the silica in the quartz-rich, sometimes dolomitic, metasediments of the Mount Isa and Haslingden Groups within the Lake Moondarra area are similar to the quartz within the fault fills. The lack of any metamorphic event between the first and second deformation, together with the sometimes fibrous nature of the fault-filling material with fibres parallel to the mineral elongation in S2 (i.e. L22), suggests that the quartz in the faults was derived syntectonically at grain to grain contacts in the metasediments within the Lake Moondarra area, early in the development of S2. The quartz is believed to have moved by the process of solution transfer to the faults as they underwent dilation during D2. Subsequently the quartz was precipitated as a result of a chemical potential gradient.

  12. Lipid profile in eggs of Araucana hens compared with Lohmann Selected Leghorn and ISA Brown hens given diets with different fat sources.

    PubMed

    Millet, S; De Ceulaer, K; Van Paemel, M; Raes, K; De Smet, S; Janssens, G P J

    2006-06-01

    1. In a cross-over trial, the egg cholesterol and fatty acid composition of Araucana hens was compared with those of two commercial breeds (Lohmann Selected Leghorn and ISA Brown) under two feeding regimes, either high (Hn-3) or low (Ln-3) in long-chain n-3 fatty acids. 2. The Hn-3 diet was formed by isocaloric substitution of animal fat in the control diet (Ln-3) by a dry product containing stabilised fish oil with standardised concentrations of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). 3. Both breed and diet had influences on egg composition, without interactions. 4. The Araucana breed showed lower feed intake and lower egg weights than the other two breeds. The yolk weight was similar, leading to a much higher yolk:albumen ratio in the Araucana eggs. 5. In comparison to commercial breeds, Araucanas produced eggs with higher cholesterol content per g of yolk, which was even more pronounced when expressed per g of egg, due to the high yolk content of the eggs. The cholesterol content of an egg remained unchanged by the diet, irrespective of the dietary fat source. 6. Changing to the Hn-3 diet led to greater concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and lower concentrations of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) contents in the yolk, without a change in the ratio of saturated (SFA) to unsaturated fatty acids (UFA). 7. Within the PUFA, the n-3 fatty acids increased at the expense of the n-6 fatty acids, indicating a competition between n-3 and n-6 fatty acids for incorporation in the yolk. PMID:16787853

  13. The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durosinmi, Brenda Braxton

    2011-01-01

    The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations Since 1974 Federal regulations have governed the use of human subjects in biomedical and social science research. The regulations are known as the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, and often referred to as the "Common Rule" because 18 Federal…

  14. The California State University, Los Angeles Biomedical Sciences Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Carlos G.; Brown, Costello L.

    The Biomedical Sciences Program at California State University, Los Angeles (CSULA), is described. The federally funded program was designed to help economically disadvantaged students to pursue careers in biomedical sciences. The program provided academic support in mathematics, science, and English; study skills development; experiences in…

  15. The Challenge of Infectious Diseases to the Biomedical Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foladori, Guillermo

    2005-01-01

    The resurgence of infectious diseases and the emergence of infectious diseases raise questions on how to cope with the situation. The germ or clinical approach is the hegemonic biomedical paradigm. In this article, the author argues that the spread of infectious diseases has posted a challenge to the biomedical paradigm and shows how lock-in…

  16. Personnel Needs and Training for Biomedical and Behavioral Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Human Resources.

    The fourth in a series of annual reports assessing the role of and need for federal training programs in the biomedical and behavioral sciences is presented. Highlights of this 1978 report include: (1) the results of surveys of the chairpersons of 1,324 basic biomedical science departments and 474 behavioral science departments in Ph.D.-granting…

  17. Biomedical engineering: A platform for research and innovation in ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Christy K.

    2001-05-01

    An undergraduate or graduate degree in biomedical engineering prepares students to solve problems at the interface between engineering and medicine. Biomedical engineering encompasses evolving areas such as advanced medical imaging for diagnosis and treatment of disease, tissue engineering for designing and manufacturing biological implants for damaged or diseased tissues and organs, and bioinformatics for determining which genes play a major role in health and disease. Biomedical engineering academic programs produce graduates with the ability to pursue successful careers in the biomedical device industry or to obtain advanced degrees leading to careers in biomedical engineering research, medicine, law or business. Biomedical engineering majors take courses in biology, anatomy, physics, chemistry, engineering, mathematics and medical product design and value life-long learning. Students learn to work effectively in interdisciplinary teams comprised of individuals with diverse social, cultural and technical backgrounds. Biomedical engineering is becoming increasingly important in imaging and image-guided research. Some examples of innovative ultrasound technology under development are ultrasound devices to accelerate the dissolution of blood clots, advanced surgical instruments with ultrasound guidance and ultrasound contrast agents for targeted drug delivery. Biomedical engineering is a great career choice for technically minded individuals who endeavor to work on applied problems that are medically relevant.

  18. A Novel Approach to Physiology Education for Biomedical Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCecco, J.; Wu, J.; Kuwasawa, K.; Sun, Y.

    2007-01-01

    It is challenging for biomedical engineering programs to incorporate an indepth study of the systemic interdependence of cells, tissues, and organs into the rigorous mathematical curriculum that is the cornerstone of engineering education. To be sure, many biomedical engineering programs require their students to enroll in anatomy and physiology…

  19. Biomedical Research Division significant accomplishments for FY 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martello, N. V.

    1984-01-01

    Various research and technology activities of Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division are described. Contributions to the Space Administration's goals in the life sciences include research in operational medicine, cardiovascular deconditioning, motion sickness, bone alterations, muscle atrophy, fluid and electrolyte changes, radiation effects and protection, human behavior and performance, general biomedical research, and gravitational biology.

  20. The AIBS In Yugoslavia: Programs in Biomedical Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Mary-Frances

    1978-01-01

    Programs in biomedical engineering have been developing worldwide since World War II. This article describes a multidisciplinary program which operates in Yugoslavia through a cooperative effort between that county and the AIBS. A major problem has been the slowness with which hospitals accept the concept of biomedical engineering. (MA)

  1. Coherent inductive communications link for biomedical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogrefe, Arthur F. (Inventor); Radford, Wade E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A two-way coherent inductive communications link between an external transceiver and an internal transceiver located in a biologically implanted programmable medical device. Digitally formatted command data and programming data is transmitted to the implanted medical device by frequency shift keying the inductive communications link. Internal transceiver is powered by the inductive field between internal and external transceivers. Digitally formatted data is transmitted to external transceiver by internal transceiver amplitude modulating inductive field. Immediate verification of the establishment of a reliable communications link is provided by determining existence of frequency lock and bit phase lock between internal and external transceivers.

  2. Nanomaterials and nanofabrication for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chao-Min; Chia-Wen Wu, Kevin

    2013-08-01

    Traditional boundaries between materials science and engineering and life sciences are rapidly disintegrating as interdisciplinary research teams develop new materials-science-based tools for exploring fundamental issues in both medicine and biology. With recent technological advances in multiple research fields such as materials science, cell and molecular biology and micro-/nano-technology, much attention is shifting toward evaluating the functional advantages of nanomaterials and nanofabrication, at the cellular and molecular levels, for specific, biomedically relevant applications. The pursuit of this direction enhances the understanding of the mechanisms of, and therapeutic potentials for, some of the most lethal diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, organ fibrosis and cancers. This interdisciplinary approach has generated great interest among researchers working in a wide variety of communities including industry, universities and research laboratories. The purpose of this focus issue in Science and Technology of Advanced Materials is to bridge nanotechnology and biology with medicine, focusing more on the applications of nanomaterials and nanofabrication in biomedically relevant issues. This focus issue, we believe, will provide a more comprehensive understanding of (i) the preparation of nanomaterials and the underlying mechanisms of nanofabrication, and (ii) the linkage of nanomaterials and nanofabrication with biomedical applications. The multidisciplinary focus issue that we have attempted to organize is of interest to various research fields including biomaterials and tissue engineering, bioengineering, nanotechnology and nanomaterials, i.e. chemistry, physics and engineering. Nanomaterials and nanofabrication topics addressed in this focus issue include sensing and diagnosis (e.g. immunosensing and diagnostic devices for diseases), cellular and molecular biology (e.g. probing cellular behaviors and stem cell differentiation) and drug delivery

  3. Extracting semantically enriched events from biomedical literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Research into event-based text mining from the biomedical literature has been growing in popularity to facilitate the development of advanced biomedical text mining systems. Such technology permits advanced search, which goes beyond document or sentence-based retrieval. However, existing event-based systems typically ignore additional information within the textual context of events that can determine, amongst other things, whether an event represents a fact, hypothesis, experimental result or analysis of results, whether it describes new or previously reported knowledge, and whether it is speculated or negated. We refer to such contextual information as meta-knowledge. The automatic recognition of such information can permit the training of systems allowing finer-grained searching of events according to the meta-knowledge that is associated with them. Results Based on a corpus of 1,000 MEDLINE abstracts, fully manually annotated with both events and associated meta-knowledge, we have constructed a machine learning-based system that automatically assigns meta-knowledge information to events. This system has been integrated into EventMine, a state-of-the-art event extraction system, in order to create a more advanced system (EventMine-MK) that not only extracts events from text automatically, but also assigns five different types of meta-knowledge to these events. The meta-knowledge assignment module of EventMine-MK performs with macro-averaged F-scores in the range of 57-87% on the BioNLP’09 Shared Task corpus. EventMine-MK has been evaluated on the BioNLP’09 Shared Task subtask of detecting negated and speculated events. Our results show that EventMine-MK can outperform other state-of-the-art systems that participated in this task. Conclusions We have constructed the first practical system that extracts both events and associated, detailed meta-knowledge information from biomedical literature. The automatically assigned meta-knowledge information

  4. 75 FR 4091 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 959, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  5. 75 FR 81630 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Person: Ruth Grossman, DDS, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging...

  6. 75 FR 74068 - National Institute Of Biomedical Imaging And Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute Of Biomedical Imaging And Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, 6707 Democracy...

  7. 77 FR 54581 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, 6707 Democracy Boulevard... Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Suite...

  8. 76 FR 69748 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imagin and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health,6707... Biomedical Imagin and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health,6707 Democracy Boulevard, Rm....

  9. 76 FR 58023 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, 6707...: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special Emphasis Panel; Health Disparities...

  10. 75 FR 54641 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special.... Contact Person: Manana Sukhareva, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Biomedical...

  11. Camera systems in human motion analysis for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Lim Chee; Basah, Shafriza Nisha; Yaacob, Sazali; Juan, Yeap Ewe; Kadir, Aida Khairunnisaa Ab.

    2015-05-01

    Human Motion Analysis (HMA) system has been one of the major interests among researchers in the field of computer vision, artificial intelligence and biomedical engineering and sciences. This is due to its wide and promising biomedical applications, namely, bio-instrumentation for human computer interfacing and surveillance system for monitoring human behaviour as well as analysis of biomedical signal and image processing for diagnosis and rehabilitation applications. This paper provides an extensive review of the camera system of HMA, its taxonomy, including camera types, camera calibration and camera configuration. The review focused on evaluating the camera system consideration of the HMA system specifically for biomedical applications. This review is important as it provides guidelines and recommendation for researchers and practitioners in selecting a camera system of the HMA system for biomedical applications.

  12. Project definition study for the National Biomedical Tracer Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Roozen, K.

    1995-02-15

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) has conducted a study of the proposed National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). In collaboration with General Atomics, RUST International, Coleman Research Corporation (CRC), IsoMed, Ernst and Young and the advisory committees, they have examined the issues relevant to the NBTF in terms of facility design, operating philosophy, and a business plan. They have utilized resources within UAB, CRC and Chem-Nuclear to develop recommendations on environmental, safety and health issues. The Institute of Medicine Panel`s Report on Isotopes for Medicine and the Life Sciences took the results of prior workshops further in developing recommendations for the mission of the NBTF. The IOM panel recommends that the NBTF accelerator have the capacity to accelerate protons to 80 MeV and a minimum of 750 microamperes of current. The panel declined to recommend a cyclotron or a linac. They emphasized a clear focus on research and development for isotope production including target design, separation chemistry and generator development. The facility needs to emphasize education and training in its mission. The facility must focus on radionuclide production for the research and clinical communities. The formation of a public-private partnership resembling the TRIUMF-Nordion model was encouraged. An advisory panel should assist with the NBTF operations and prioritization.

  13. Design Advances in Particulate Systems for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Lima, Ana Catarina; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Mano, João F

    2016-07-01

    The search for more efficient therapeutic strategies and diagnosis tools is a continuous challenge. Advances in understanding the biological mechanisms behind diseases and tissues regeneration have widened the field of applications of particulate systems. Particles are no more just protective systems for the encapsulated drugs, but they play an active role in the success of the therapy. Moreover, particles have been explored for innovative purposes as templates for cells growth and as diagnostic tools. Until few years ago the most relevant parameters in particles formulation were the chemistry and the size. Currently, it is known that other physical characteristics can remarkably affect the performance of particulate systems. Particles with non-conventional shapes exhibit advantages due to the increasing circulation time in blood stream, less clearance by the immune system and more efficient cell internalization and trafficking. Creation of compartments has been found useful to control drug release, to tune the transport of substances across biological barriers, to supply the target with more than one bioactive agent or even to act as theranostic systems. It is expected that such complex shaped and compartmentalized systems improve the therapeutic outcomes and also the patient's compliance, acting as advanced devices that serve for simultaneous diagnosis and treatment of the disease, combining agents of very different features, at the same time. In this review, we overview and analyse the most recent advances in particle shape and compartmentalization and applications of newly designed particulate systems in the biomedical field. PMID:27332041

  14. A versatile biosensor device for continuous biomedical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rhemrev-Boom, M M; Korf, J; Venema, K; Urban, G; Vadgama, P

    2001-12-01

    Although biosensors are by means suitable for continuous biomedical monitoring, due to fouling and blood clotting, in vivo performance is far from optimal. For this reason, ultrafiltration, microdialysis or open tubular flow is frequently used as interface. To secure quantitative recoveries of the analyte of interest, sampling at submicrolitre level will be necessary which in turn necessitates the development of small and versatile biosensor devices. Here, a miniaturised biosensor device, which directly can be connected to various interfaces will be presented. The biosensor device consists of a pulsefree pump and a biosensor with an internal volume of 10-20 nl. In this article, the production as well as the construction of the flow-through cell of the biosensor will be discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of several production processes will be demonstrated and a detailed protocol for the production of such a nanoliter flow-through cell will be presented. With respect to the bio-selector, several permselective membranes have been tested on their performance characteristics. Results obtained with these biosensors will be presented and discussed. Finally, a protocol based upon in situ electropolymerisation for the immobilisation of the biological component was defined and several biosensors based upon this principle have been produced and tested for the monitoring of glucose respectively lactate. To demonstrate, data obtained during a variety of in vivo studies at different clinical relevant applications will be presented. PMID:11679262

  15. Polymer-based stimuli-responsive nanosystems for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Joglekar, Madhura; Trewyn, Brian G

    2013-08-01

    The application of organic polymers and inorganic/organic hybrid systems in numerous fields of biotechnology has seen a considerable growth in recent years. Typically, organic polymers with diverse structures, compositional variations and differing molecular weights have been utilized to assemble polymeric nanosystems such as polymeric micelles, polymersomes, and nanohydrogels with unique features and structural properties. The architecture of these polymeric nanosystems involves the use of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic polymeric blocks, making them suitable as vehicles for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Recently, "smart" or "intelligent" polymers have attracted significant attention in the biomedical field wherein careful introduction of specific polymeric modalities changes a banal polymeric nanosystem to an advanced stimuli-responsive nanosystem capable of performing extraordinary functions in response to an internal or external trigger such as pH, temperature, redox, enzymes, light, magnetic, or ultrasound. Further, incorporation of inorganic nanoparticles such as gold, silica, or iron oxide with surface-bound stimuli-responsive polymers offers additional advantages and multifunctionality in the field of nanomedicine. This review covers the physical properties and applications of both organic and organic/inorganic hybrid nanosystems with specific recent breakthroughs in drug delivery, imaging, tissue engineering, and separations and provides a brief discussion on the future direction. PMID:23843342

  16. Modulation Techniques for Biomedical Implanted Devices and Their Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Mahammad A.; Abbas, Saad M.; Samad, Salina A.; Hussain, Aini

    2012-01-01

    Implanted medical devices are very important electronic devices because of their usefulness in monitoring and diagnosis, safety and comfort for patients. Since 1950s, remarkable efforts have been undertaken for the development of bio-medical implanted and wireless telemetry bio-devices. Issues such as design of suitable modulation methods, use of power and monitoring devices, transfer energy from external to internal parts with high efficiency and high data rates and low power consumption all play an important role in the development of implantable devices. This paper provides a comprehensive survey on various modulation and demodulation techniques such as amplitude shift keying (ASK), frequency shift keying (FSK) and phase shift keying (PSK) of the existing wireless implanted devices. The details of specifications, including carrier frequency, CMOS size, data rate, power consumption and supply, chip area and application of the various modulation schemes of the implanted devices are investigated and summarized in the tables along with the corresponding key references. Current challenges and problems of the typical modulation applications of these technologies are illustrated with a brief suggestions and discussion for the progress of implanted device research in the future. It is observed that the prime requisites for the good quality of the implanted devices and their reliability are the energy transformation, data rate, CMOS size, power consumption and operation frequency. This review will hopefully lead to increasing efforts towards the development of low powered, high efficient, high data rate and reliable implanted devices. PMID:22368470

  17. The human cadaver in the age of biomedical informatics.

    PubMed

    Aziz, M Ashraf; McKenzie, James C; Wilson, James S; Cowie, Robert J; Ayeni, Sylvanus A; Dunn, Barbara K

    2002-02-15

    Major national and international critiques of the medical curriculum in the 1980s noted the following significant flaws: (1) over-reliance on learning by rote memory, (2) insufficient exercise in analysis and synthesis/conceptualization, and (3) failure to connect the basic and clinical aspects of training. It was argued that the invention of computers and related imaging techniques called to question the traditional instruction based on the faculty-centered didactic lecture. In the ensuing reform, which adopted case-based, small group, problem-based learning, time allotted to anatomical instruction was severely truncated. Many programs replaced dissection with prosections and computer-based learning. We argue that cadaver dissection is still necessary for (1) establishing the primacy of the patient, (2) apprehension of the multidimensional body, (3) touch-mediated perception of the cadaver/patient, (4) anatomical variability, (5) learning the basic language of medicine, (6) competence in diagnostic imaging, (7) cadaver/patient-centered computer-assisted learning, (8) peer group learning, (9) training for the medical specialties. Cadaver-based anatomical education is a prerequisite of optimal training for the use of biomedical informatics. When connected to dissection, medical informatics can expedite and enhance preparation for a patient-based medical profession. Actual dissection is equally necessary for acquisition of scientific skills and for a communicative, moral, ethical, and humanistic approach to patient care. Anat Rec (New Anat) 269:20-32, 2002. PMID:11891622

  18. A Virtual Notebook for biomedical work groups.

    PubMed Central

    Gorry, G A; Burger, A M; Chaney, R J; Long, K B; Tausk, C M

    1988-01-01

    During the past several years, Baylor College of Medicine has made a substantial commitment to the use of information technology in support of its corporate and academic programs. The concept of an Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) has proved central in our planning, and the IAIMS activities that we have undertaken with funding from the National Library of Medicine have proved to be important extensions of our technology development. Here we describe our Virtual Notebook system, a conceptual and technologic framework for task coordination and information management in biomedical work groups. When fully developed and deployed, the Virtual Notebook will improve the functioning of basic and clinical research groups in the college, and it currently serves as a model for the longer-term development of our entire information management environment. PMID:3046694

  19. Optimized gold nanoshell ensembles for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically study the properties of the optimal size distribution in the ensemble of hollow gold nanoshells (HGNs) that exhibits the best performance at in vivo biomedical applications. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we analyze the dependence of the optimal geometric means of the nanoshells’ thicknesses and core radii on the excitation wavelength and the type of human tissue, while assuming lognormal fit to the size distribution in a real HGN ensemble. Regardless of the tissue type, short-wavelength, near-infrared lasers are found to be the most effective in both absorption- and scattering-based applications. We derive approximate analytical expressions enabling one to readily estimate the parameters of optimal distribution for which an HGN ensemble exhibits the maximum efficiency of absorption or scattering inside a human tissue irradiated by a near-infrared laser. PMID:23537206

  20. XCEDE: An Extensible Schema For Biomedical Data

    PubMed Central

    Gadde, Syam; Aucoin, Nicole; Grethe, Jeffrey S.; Keator, David B.; Marcus, Daniel S.; Pieper, Steve

    2013-01-01

    The XCEDE (XML-based Clinical and Experimental Data Exchange) XML schema, developed by members of the BIRN (Biomedical Informatics Research Network), provides an extensive metadata hierarchy for storing, describing and documenting the data generated by scientific studies. Currently at version 2.0, the XCEDE schema serves as a specification for the exchange of scientific data between databases, analysis tools, and web services. It provides a structured metadata hierarchy, storing information relevant to various aspects of an experiment (project, subject, protocol, etc.). Each hierarchy level also provides for the storage of data provenance information allowing for a traceable record of processing and/or changes to the underlying data. The schema is extensible to support the needs of various data modalities and to express types of data not originally envisioned by the developers. The latest version of the XCEDE schema and manual are available from http://www.xcede.org/ PMID:21479735

  1. Extruded ceramic microelectrodes for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Perale, G; Giordano, C; Daniele, F; Tunesi, M; Colombo, P; Gottardo, L; Maccagnan, S; Masi, M

    2008-03-01

    A new process, based on the micro-co-extrusion of preceramic precursors, has been studied for manufacturing ceramic microelectrodes to be used in biomedical applications. Commercially available silicon polymers were applied and proper doping resulted in electrically conductive ceramic filaments. Chemical reticulation and high-temperature pyrolysis were applied to convert the polymeric resins into Si-O-C ceramic materials. Circular microelectrodes were manufactured with diameters between 100 microm and 5 mm with a different number of inner conductive lines (from 1 to 80). The flexural strength of the filaments depended on the outer diameter size; doping with carbon black produced filaments with an average conductivity of approximately 0.4 S/cm for a 50% weight carbon black load. The results achieved by in vitro studies confirmed a good biological performance of Si-O-C ceramic structures with both hard and soft tissue cell models. PMID:18373322

  2. Accelerator mass spectrometry in biomedical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, J. S.; Turteltaub, K. W.

    1994-06-01

    Biological effects occur in natural systems at chemical concentrations of parts per billion (1:10 9) or less. Affected biomolecules may be separable in only milligram or microgram quantities. Quantification at attomole sensitivity is needed to study these interactions. AMS measures isotope concentrations to parts per 10 13-15 on milligram-sized samples and is ideal for quantifying long-lived radioisotopic labels for tracing biochemical pathways in natural systems. 14C-AMS has now been coupled to a variety of organic separation and definition technologies. Our primary research investigates pharmacokinetics and genotoxicities of toxins and drugs at very low doses. Human subjects research using AMS includes nutrition, toxicity and elemental balance studies. 3H, 41Ca and 26Al are also traced by AMS for fundamental biochemical kinetic research. Expansion of biomedical AMS awaits further development of biochemical and accelerator technologies designed specifically for these applications.

  3. Magnetic electrical connectors for biomedical percutaneous implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A biomedical percutaneous connector is described which includes a socket having an enlarged disk shaped base portion for being implanted below the patient's skin and cylindrical portion which is integral with the base portion and extends outwardly of the skin. A conical recess in an upper end of the cylindrical portion has a magnet located in the base. Inclined conductive strips are carried on an upper end of the cylindrical portion to which electrical conductors are attached and extend into the patient's body. A complementary shaped plug which also has electrical contacts provided thereon is adapted to fit within the conical recess of the socket. The plug is held in the socket by magnetic force.

  4. Receptor-ligand interactions: Advanced biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Guryanov, Ivan; Fiorucci, Stefano; Tennikova, Tatiana

    2016-11-01

    Receptor-ligand interactions (RLIs) are at the base of all biological events occurring in living cells. The understanding of interactions between complementary macromolecules in biological systems represents a high-priority research area in bionanotechnology to design the artificial systems mimicking natural processes. This review summarizes and analyzes RLIs in some cutting-edge biomedical fields, in particular, for the preparation of novel stationary phases to separate complex biological mixtures in medical diagnostics, for the design of ultrasensitive biosensors for identification of biomarkers of various diseases at early stages, as well as in the development of innovative biomaterials and approaches for regenerative medicine. All these biotechnological fields are closely related, because their success depends on a proper choice, combination and spatial disposition of the single components of ligand-receptor pairs on the surface of appropriately designed support. PMID:27524092

  5. Biomedical silver-109m isotope generator

    DOEpatents

    Wanek, Philip M.; Steinkruger, Frederick J.; Moody, David C.

    1987-01-01

    A method, composition of matter, and apparatus for producing substantially pure Ag-109m for use in biomedical imaging techniques. Cd-109, which decays with a half-life of 453 days to Ag-109m is loaded onto an ion exchange column consisting of particulate tin phosphate. After secular equilibrium is reached in about ten minutes, Ag-109m may be selectively eluted from the column by means of a physiologically acceptable aqueous buffered eluent solution of sodium thiosulfate, and either ascorbic acid or dextrose. The breakthrough of toxic Cd-109 is on the order of 1.times.10.sup.-7, which is sufficiently low to permit administration of the Ag-109m-containing eluate, with but a minor pH adjustment, directly to a human patient within a matter of seconds.

  6. Biomedical silver-109m isotope generator

    DOEpatents

    Wanek, P.M.; Steinkruger, F.J.; Moody, D.C.

    1985-03-05

    A method, composition of matter, and apparatus for producing substantially pure Ag-109m for use in biomedical imaging techniques. Cd-109, which decays with a half-life of 453 days to Ag-109m, is loaded onto an ion exchange column consisting of particulate tin phosphate. After secular equilibrium is reached in about ten minutes, Ag-109m may be selectively eluted from the column by means of a physiologically acceptable aqueous buffered eluent solution of sodium thiosulfate, and either ascorbic acid or dextrose. The breakthrough of toxic Cd-109 is on the order of 1 x 10-7, which is sufficiently low to permit administration of the Ag-109m-containing eluate, with but a minor pH adjustment, directly to a human patient within a matter of seconds. 1 fig.

  7. Glyconanomaterials: Emerging applications in biomedical research

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuan; Ramström, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates constitute the most abundant organic matter in nature, serving as structural components and energy sources, and mediating a wide range of cellular activities. The emergence of nanomaterials with distinct optical, magnetic, and electronic properties has witnessed a rapid adoption of these materials for biomedical research and applications. Nanomaterials of various shapes and sizes having large specific surface areas can be used as multivalent scaffolds to present carbohydrate ligands. The resulting glyconanomaterials effectively amplify the glycan-mediated interactions, making it possible to use these materials for sensing, imaging, diagnosis, and therapy. In this review, we summarize the synthetic strategies for the preparation of various glyconanomaterials. Examples are given where these glyconanomaterials have been used in sensing and differentiation of proteins and cells, as well as in imaging glycan-medicated cellular responses. PMID:26500721

  8. Bio-medical flow sensor. [intrvenous procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, H. E. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A bio-medical flow sensor including a packageable unit of a bottle, tubing and hypodermic needle which can be pre-sterilized and is disposable. The tubing has spaced apart tubular metal segments. The temperature of the metal segments and fluid flow therein is sensed by thermistors and at a downstream location heat is input by a resistor to the metal segment by a control electronics. The fluids flow and the electrical power required for the resisto to maintain a constant temperature differential between the tubular metal segments is a measurable function of fluid flow through the tubing. The differential temperature measurement is made in a control electronics and also can be used to control a flow control valve or pump on the tubing to maintain a constant flow in the tubing and to shut off the tubing when air is present in the tubing.

  9. Computer detection of features in biomedical images

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    Two projects under way at LLNL require the detection of spots in biomedical images: physical mapping of DNA in chromosomes, for the Human Genome Project, and finding microcalcifications, which may be an early sign of breast cancer, in mammograms. We have developed several computational algorithms to analyze these two kinds of images. The two detection methods described here use morphological imaging techniques to obtain size, shape, texture, and other information inherent in am image without trying to fit the data to a rigid mathematical model. The spot-finding algorithm has been incorporated into a DNA mapping tool for chromosomes in the metaphase of cell division; it is heavily used by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, and may soon be distributed to other universities. Our computerized mammography work is in progress; when completed, we plan to transfer the technology to a medical imaging company.

  10. Irradiation effects on hydrases for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuta, Masakazu; Ohashi, Isao; Oka, Masahito; Hayashi, Toshio

    2000-03-01

    To apply an irradiation technique to sterilize "Hybrid" biomedical materials including enzymes, we selected papain, a well-characterized plant endopeptidase as a model to examine durability of enzyme activity under the practical irradiation condition in which limited data were available for irradiation inactivation of enzymes. Dry powder and frozen aqueous solution of papain showed significant durability against 60Co-gamma irradiation suggesting that, the commercial irradiation sterilizing method is applicable without modification. Although irradiation of unfrozen aqueous papain solution showed an unusual change of the enzymatic activity with the increasing doses, and was totally inactivated at 15 kGy, we managed to keep the residual activity more than 50% of initial activity after 30-kGy irradiation, taking such optimum conditions as increasing enzyme concentration from 10 to 100 mg/ml and purging with N 2 gas to suppress the formation of free radicals.

  11. Degradable vinyl polymers for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delplace, Vianney; Nicolas, Julien

    2015-10-01

    Vinyl polymers have been the focus of intensive research over the past few decades and are attractive materials owing to their ease of synthesis and their broad diversity of architectures, compositions and functionalities. Their carbon-carbon backbones are extremely resistant to degradation, however, and this property limits their uses. Degradable polymers are an important field of research in polymer science and have been used in a wide range of applications spanning from (nano)medicine to microelectronics and environmental protection. The development of synthetic strategies to enable complete or partial degradation of vinyl polymers is, therefore, of great importance because it will offer new opportunities for the application of these materials. This Review captures the most recent and promising approaches to the design of degradable vinyl polymers and discusses the potential of these materials for biomedical applications.

  12. Optimal rate filters for biomedical point processes.

    PubMed

    McNames, James

    2005-01-01

    Rate filters are used to estimate the mean event rate of many biomedical signals that can be modeled as point processes. Historically these filters have been designed using principles from two distinct fields. Signal processing principles are used to optimize the filter's frequency response. Kernel estimation principles are typically used to optimize the asymptotic statistical properties. This paper describes a design methodology that combines these principles from both fields to optimize the frequency response subject to constraints on the filter's order, symmetry, time-domain ripple, DC gain, and minimum impulse response. Initial results suggest that time-domain ripple and a negative impulse response are necessary to design a filter with a reasonable frequency response. This suggests that some of the common assumptions about the properties of rate filters should be reconsidered. PMID:17282132

  13. Micromachined fragment capturer for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young-Soo; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2011-11-01

    Due to changes in modern diet, a form of heart disease called chronic total occlusion has become a serious disease to be treated as an emergency. In this study, we propose a micromachined capturer that is designed and fabricated to collect plaque fragments generated during surgery to remove the thrombus. The fragment capturer consists of a plastic body made by rapid prototyping, SU-8 mesh structures using MEMS techniques, and ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) actuators. An array of IPMC actuators combined with the SU-8 net structure was optimized to effectively collect plaque fragments. The evaporation of solvent through the actuator's surface was prevented using a coating of SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane thin film on the actuator. This approach improved the available operating time of the IPMC, which primarily depends on solvent loss. Our preliminary results demonstrate the possibility of using the capturer for biomedical applications.

  14. The biomedical challenges of space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David R.

    2003-01-01

    Space medicine has evolved considerably through past U.S. missions. It has been proven that humans can live and work in space for long durations and that humans are integral to mission success. The space medicine program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) looks toward future long-duration missions. Its goal is to overcome the biomedical challenges associated with maintaining the safety, health, and optimum performance of astronauts and cosmonauts. This program investigates the health effects of adaptation to microgravity: the nature of their pathologies, the effects of microgravity on pathophysiology, and the alterations in pharmacodynamics and treatment. A critical capability in performing research is the monitoring of the health of all astronauts and of the spacecraft environment. These data support the evidence-based approach to space medicine, incorporating past studies of microgravity-related conditions and their terrestrial counterparts. This comprehensive approach will enable safe and effective exploration beyond low Earth orbit.

  15. Sensing Mercury for Biomedical and Environmental Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Selid, Paul D.; Xu, Hanying; Collins, E. Michael; Face-Collins, Marla Striped; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2009-01-01

    Mercury is a very toxic element that is widely spread in the atmosphere, lithosphere, and surface water. Concentrated mercury poses serious problems to human health, as bioaccumulation of mercury within the brain and kidneys ultimately leads to neurological diseases. To control mercury pollution and reduce mercury damage to human health, sensitive determination of mercury is important. This article summarizes some current sensors for the determination of both abiotic and biotic mercury. A wide array of sensors for monitoring mercury is described, including biosensors and chemical sensors, while piezoelectric and microcantilever sensors are also described. Additionally, newly developed nanomaterials offer great potential for fabricating novel mercury sensors. Some of the functional fluorescent nanosensors for the determination of mercury are covered. Afterwards, the in vivo determination of mercury and the characterization of different forms of mercury are discussed. Finally, the future direction for mercury detection is outlined, suggesting that nanomaterials may provide revolutionary tools in biomedical and environmental monitoring of mercury. PMID:22346707

  16. Nanoscale assemblies and their biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Tais A. P. F.; Raman, Senthilkumar; Dey, Raja; Burkhard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale assemblies are a unique class of materials, which can be synthesized from inorganic, polymeric or biological building blocks. The multitude of applications of this class of materials ranges from solar and electrical to uses in food, cosmetics and medicine. In this review, we initially highlight characteristic features of polymeric nanoscale assemblies as well as those built from biological units (lipids, nucleic acids and proteins). We give special consideration to protein nanoassemblies found in nature such as ferritin protein cages, bacterial microcompartments and vaults found in eukaryotic cells and designed protein nanoassemblies, such as peptide nanofibres and peptide nanotubes. Next, we focus on biomedical applications of these nanoscale assemblies, such as cell targeting, drug delivery, bioimaging and vaccine development. In the vaccine development section, we report in more detail the use of virus-like particles and self-assembling polypeptide nanoparticles as new vaccine delivery platforms. PMID:23303217

  17. Moire Techniques In Biomedical Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, O. D. D.

    1983-07-01

    Optical metrology of three-dimensional objects is a subject of major interest for science and technology. Several methods have been proposed and research is pursuing on the study of various principles. The method to be described employes a coded illumination of the three-dimensional space by fringes projection and the information of the object is decoded with a moire technique. The principle of the method ranges a large spectrum of applications. The emphasis for practical applications is given on the field of biomedical studies. The analysis of dismorphosises in static (anatomy) and dynamical (functional) situations is presented, in particular for the study of feet-system and locomotor movement, face aesthetic morphology and trunk studies. Capabilities and advantages of the method are described and demonstrated including video recording.

  18. Biomedical studies by TOF-SIMS imaging.

    PubMed

    Bich, Claudia; Touboul, David; Brunelle, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Imaging by secondary ion mass spectrometry coupled to time-of-flight mass analysis (TOF-SIMS) is a method of which the applications have greatly increased since 10 years. Taking advantage of the development of cluster ion sources, TOF-SIMS offers images of molecular ions at a micrometer lateral resolution or slightly below and does not require complex sample preparation. Although TOF-SIMS has been primarily dedicated to surface analysis of inorganic or polymeric samples, several groups have successfully demonstrated that TOF-SIMS imaging is also perfectly suited for mapping organic compounds, such as drugs or lipids, directly on tissue sections from animals or from human biopsies. This minireview will enlighten some of these developments in the field of biomedical applications. PMID:25708628

  19. Cardiovascular system simulation in biomedical engineering education.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rideout, V. C.

    1972-01-01

    Use of complex cardiovascular system models, in conjunction with a large hybrid computer, in biomedical engineering courses. A cardiovascular blood pressure-flow model, driving a compartment model for the study of dye transport, was set up on the computer for use as a laboratory exercise by students who did not have the computer experience or skill to be able to easily set up such a simulation involving some 27 differential equations running at 'real time' rate. The students were given detailed instructions regarding the model, and were then able to study effects such as those due to septal and valve defects upon the pressure, flow, and dye dilution curves. The success of this experiment in the use of involved models in engineering courses was such that it seems that this type of laboratory exercise might be considered for use in physiology courses as an adjunct to animal experiments.

  20. Bulk metallic glasses for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroers, Jan; Kumar, Golden; Hodges, Thomas M.; Chan, Stephen; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2009-09-01

    The selection criteria for biomaterials include the material’s properties and biocompatibility, and the ability to fabricate the desired shapes. Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are relative newcomers in the field of biomaterials but they exhibit an excellent combination of properties and processing capabilities desired for versatile implant applications. To further evaluate the suitability of BMGs for biomedical applications, we analyzed the biological responses they elicited in vitro and in vivo. The BMGs promoted cell adhesion and growth in vitro and induced improved foreign body responses in vivo suggesting their potential use as biomaterials. Because of the BMGs’ flexible chemistry, atomic structure, and surface topography, they offer a unique opportunity to fabricate complex implants and devices with a desirable biological response from a material with superior properties over currently used metallic biomaterials.

  1. SLA Wear Study in Biomedical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Kyla; Blatchley, Charles; Namavar, Fereydoon; Haider, Hani

    2004-05-01

    Monitoring of surface loss by detecting radionuclide markers or tracers (Surface Layer Activation) has been a popular approach in mechanical systems, such as engines, power plants, and corrosive environments for several decades. We report calibrations of activity versus depth profiles generated by Van de Graaff bombardment in CoCrMo and titanium, materials commonly used for biomedical implants, in preparation for mechanical wear simulations planned for later this year at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Nuclides monitored include Mn-52, Co-58, and V-48. We will also discuss plans to extend the technique to zirconia ceramics and polymers. Calibrations will be used to translate changes in gamma ray intensity measured by NaI(Tl) spectrometry into precise determinations of surface loss. Typical exposure levels are barely distinguishable from natural background, because small amounts are effective; counting intervals can be long; and characteristic source gamma rays can be isolated to insure safety.

  2. Biomedical Simulation Models of Human Auditory Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bicak, Mehmet M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Detailed acoustic engineering models that explore noise propagation mechanisms associated with noise attenuation and transmission paths created when using hearing protectors such as earplugs and headsets in high noise environments. Biomedical finite element (FE) models are developed based on volume Computed Tomography scan data which provides explicit external ear, ear canal, middle ear ossicular bones and cochlea geometry. Results from these studies have enabled a greater understanding of hearing protector to flesh dynamics as well as prioritizing noise propagation mechanisms. Prioritization of noise mechanisms can form an essential framework for exploration of new design principles and methods in both earplug and earcup applications. These models are currently being used in development of a novel hearing protection evaluation system that can provide experimentally correlated psychoacoustic noise attenuation. Moreover, these FE models can be used to simulate the effects of blast related impulse noise on human auditory mechanisms and brain tissue.

  3. Radiation synthesis and fabrication for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaetsu, Isao

    1995-09-01

    Radiation synthesis and fabrication techniques can make various specific forms and structures of materials enhancedly which are useful for biomedical applications. Those materials are a porous gel and membrane, an interpenetrating networked(IPN) hydrogel, a heterogeneous surface phase membrane, an ultra-thin membrane, a biofunctional laminate and an ultra-fine particle. Radiation techniques can attach various biofunctionalities to those materials effectively by means of immobilization of biofunctional components such as enzymes, proteins, hormones, drugs, microbial cells and tissue cells. It is convenient that the immobilization can be finished at the same time as the synthesis and fabrication in many cases. The applications to bioreactors, biosensors, artificial organs, drug delivery systems and recently to signal responsive chemical delivery systems, have been studied and developed based on those techniques.

  4. Accelerator mass spectrometry in biomedical research

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    1993-10-20

    Biological effects occur in natural systems at chemical concentrations of parts per billion (1:10{sup 9}) or less. Affected biomolecules may be separable in only milligram or microgram quantities. Quantification at attomole sensitivity is needed to study these interactions. AMS measures isotope concentrations to parts per 10{sup 13--15} on milligram-sized samples and is ideal for quantifying long-lived radioisotopic labels that are commonly used to trace biochemical pathways in natural systems. {sup 14}C-AMS has now been coupled to a variety of organic separation and definition technologies. The primary research investigates pharmacokinetics and genotoxicities of toxins and drugs at very low doses. Human subject research using AMS includes nutrition, toxicity and elemental balance studies. {sup 3} H, {sup 41}Ca and {sup 26}Al are also traced by AMS for fundamental biochemical kinetic research. Expansion of biomedical AMS awaits further development of biochemical and accelerator technologies designed specifically for these applications.

  5. Optical nanoparticles: synthesis and biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhung Tran, Hong; Nghiem, Thi Ha Lien; Thuy Duong Vu, Thi; Chu, Viet Ha; Huan Le, Quang; Nhung Hoang, Thi My; Thanh Nguyen, Lai; Pham, Duc Minh; Thuan Tong, Kim; Hoa Do, Quang; Vu, Duong; Nghia Nguyen, Trong; Tan Pham, Minh; Nguyen Duong, Cao; Thuy Tran, Thanh; Son Vu, Van; Thuy Nguyen, Thi; Nguyen, Thi Bich Ngoc; Tran, Anh Duc; Thuong Trinh, Thi; Nguyen, Thi Thai An

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of our results on studies of synthesis and biomedical application of optical nanoparticles. Gold, dye-doped silica based and core-shell multifunctional multilayer (SiO2/Au, Fe3O4/SiO2, Fe3O4/SiO2/Au) water-monodispersed nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical route and surface modified with proteins and biocompatible chemical reagents. The particles were conjugated with antibody or aptamer for specific detecting and imaging bacteria and cancer cells. The photothermal effects of gold nanoshells (SiO2/Au and Fe3O4/SiO2/Au) on cells and tissues were investigated. The nano silver substrates were developed for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy to detect melamine.

  6. National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, R.

    1995-02-14

    We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H{sup -}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +}). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H{sup -} cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes.

  7. Biomedical techniques in context: on the appropriation of biomedical procedures and artifacts.

    PubMed

    Hadolt, Bernhard; Hörbst, Viola; Müller-Rockstroh, Babette

    2012-01-01

    On the assumption that technical practices and artifacts are fundamental constituents of individual and collective attempts to order lives and bodies in health and sickness, in this introduction, we set out three central propositions. First, medical techniques have to take center stage in research on biomedicine. Second, as medical artifacts travel worldwide, they become part of the processes of sociocultural appropriation. Third, anthropologists have to consider how to study the transformations associated with such appropriation and how much they need to know about the technical aspects of their objects of study. The mutual transformative potential of both biomedical artifacts and practices and the new contexts of application have so far been undertheorized in medical anthropology--a gap that we aim to close with our reflections and the collection of empirical studies of various biomedical techniques in this issue. PMID:22540313

  8. Silk fibroin nanostructured materials for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitropoulos, Alexander N.

    Nanostructured biopolymers have proven to be promising to develop novel biomedical applications where forming structures at the nanoscale normally occurs by self-assembly. However, synthesizing these structures can also occur by inducing materials to transition into other forms by adding chemical cross-linkers, changing pH, or changing ionic composition. Understanding the generation of nanostructures in fluid environments, such as liquid organic solvents or supercritical fluids, has not been thoroughly examined, particularly those that are based on protein-based block-copolymers. Here, we examine the transformation of reconstituted silk fibroin, which has emerged as a promising biopolymer due to its biocompatibility, biodegradability, and ease of functionalization, into submicron spheres and gel networks which offer applications in tissue engineering and advanced sensors. Two types of gel networks, hydrogels and aerogels, have small pores and large surface areas that are defined by their structure. We design and analyze silk nanoparticle formation using a microfluidic device while offering an application for drug delivery. Additionally, we provide a model and characterize hydrogel formation from micelles to nanoparticles, while investigating cellular response to the hydrogel in an in vitro cell culture model. Lastly, we provide a second model of nanofiber formation during near-critical and supercritical drying and characterize the silk fibroin properties at different drying pressures which, when acting as a stabilizing matrix, shows to improve the activity of entrapped enzymes dried at different pressures. This work has created new nanostructured silk fibroin forms to benefit biomedical applications that could be applied to other fibrous proteins.

  9. Aggregated Indexing of Biomedical Time Series Data

    PubMed Central

    Woodbridge, Jonathan; Mortazavi, Bobak; Sarrafzadeh, Majid; Bui, Alex A.T.

    2016-01-01

    Remote and wearable medical sensing has the potential to create very large and high dimensional datasets. Medical time series databases must be able to efficiently store, index, and mine these datasets to enable medical professionals to effectively analyze data collected from their patients. Conventional high dimensional indexing methods are a two stage process. First, a superset of the true matches is efficiently extracted from the database. Second, supersets are pruned by comparing each of their objects to the query object and rejecting any objects falling outside a predetermined radius. This pruning stage heavily dominates the computational complexity of most conventional search algorithms. Therefore, indexing algorithms can be significantly improved by reducing the amount of pruning. This paper presents an online algorithm to aggregate biomedical times series data to significantly reduce the search space (index size) without compromising the quality of search results. This algorithm is built on the observation that biomedical time series signals are composed of cyclical and often similar patterns. This algorithm takes in a stream of segments and groups them to highly concentrated collections. Locality Sensitive Hashing (LSH) is used to reduce the overall complexity of the algorithm, allowing it to run online. The output of this aggregation is used to populate an index. The proposed algorithm yields logarithmic growth of the index (with respect to the total number of objects) while keeping sensitivity and specificity simultaneously above 98%. Both memory and runtime complexities of time series search are improved when using aggregated indexes. In addition, data mining tasks, such as clustering, exhibit runtimes that are orders of magnitudes faster when run on aggregated indexes.

  10. Biomedical cloud computing with Amazon Web Services.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Vincent A; Patil, Prasad; Gafni, Erik; Wall, Dennis P; Tonellato, Peter J

    2011-08-01

    In this overview to biomedical computing in the cloud, we discussed two primary ways to use the cloud (a single instance or cluster), provided a detailed example using NGS mapping, and highlighted the associated costs. While many users new to the cloud may assume that entry is as straightforward as uploading an application and selecting an instance type and storage options, we illustrated that there is substantial up-front effort required before an application can make full use of the cloud's vast resources. Our intention was to provide a set of best practices and to illustrate how those apply to a typical application pipeline for biomedical informatics, but also general enough for extrapolation to other types of computational problems. Our mapping example was intended to illustrate how to develop a scalable project and not to compare and contrast alignment algorithms for read mapping and genome assembly. Indeed, with a newer aligner such as Bowtie, it is possible to map the entire African genome using one m2.2xlarge instance in 48 hours for a total cost of approximately $48 in computation time. In our example, we were not concerned with data transfer rates, which are heavily influenced by the amount of available bandwidth, connection latency, and network availability. When transferring large amounts of data to the cloud, bandwidth limitations can be a major bottleneck, and in some cases it is more efficient to simply mail a storage device containing the data to AWS (http://aws.amazon.com/importexport/). More information about cloud computing, detailed cost analysis, and security can be found in references. PMID:21901085

  11. Biomedical Nanocrystal Agents: Design, Synthesis, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minjung

    In these days, nanomaterials are applied in a variety of biomedical applications including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cell imaging, drug delivery, and cell separation. Most MRI contrast agents affect the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and transverse relaxation time (T2 ) of water protons in the tissue and result in increased positive or negative contrast. Here, we report the optimization of r1 (1/T 1) or r2 (1/T2) relaxivity dynamics with diameter controlled gadolinium oxide nanocrystals (2˜22 nm) and iron based magnetic nanocrystals (4 ˜33 nm). The r1 and r2 MR relaxivity values of hydrated nanocrystals were optimized and examined depending on their core diameter, surface coating, and compositions; the high r1 value of gadolinium oxide was 40-60 S-1mM-1, which is 10-15 fold higher than that of commercial Gd (III) chelates (4.3˜4.6 S-1mM-1). Moreover, in vitro toxicological studies revealed that polymer coated nanocrystals suspensions had no significant effect on human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells even at high concentration. Towards multimodal imaging or multifunctional ability, we developed the iron oxide/QDs complexes, which consist of cores of iron oxide that act as nucleation sites for fluorescent QDs. The choice of variable QDs helped to visualize and remove large iron oxide materials in a magnetic separation. Additionally, diluted materials concentrated on the magnet could be fluorescently detected even at very low concentration. The designed MRI or multifunctional nanomaterials will give great and powerful uses in biomedical applications.

  12. Library Bulletin, International Planned Parenthood Federation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    The current issue of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) Library Bulletin combines an acquisitions list with that of special bibliographies. The broad classes follow the IPPF general organization by topics: (1) general reference, (2) IPPF, (3) family planning and maternal and child health and care, (4) bio-medical study and…

  13. Antarctica: A Keystone in a Changing World--Online Proceedings for the Tenth International Symposium on Antarctic Earth Sciences. Santa Barbara, California, U.S.A.--August 26 to September 1, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2007-01-01

    Overview: The International Symposium on Antarctic Earth Sciences (ISAES) is held once every four years to provide an international forum for presenting research results and new ideas and for planning future Antarctic geoscience research projects. This Tenth ISAES coincides with the International Polar Year (IPY; 50th Anniversary of the International Geophysical Year) and has been structured to showcase the great breadth of geoscience research being done in Antarctic regions by more than more than 100 institutions located in over 30 countries. The science program of the Symposium encompasses six broad themes that cover key topics on evolution and interactions of the geosphere, cryosphere and biosphere and their cross-linkages with past and historic paleoclimates. Emphasis is also on deciphering the climate records in ice cores, geologic cores, rock outcrops and those inferred from climate models. New technologies for the coming decades of geoscience data collection are also highlighted. Ten keynote presentations at the symposium outline the foundation for the research sessions of the symposium and the structure of the Online Proceedings and Proceedings Book for the Tenth ISAES. The ISAES is traditionally a cornerstone meeting for the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR). In recognition of the Tenth ISAES being held in the U.S. for the first time in 30 years and during IPY, the publication of the symposium proceedings is being handled as a special collaborative effort of the U.S. National Science Foundation, the U.S. Geological Survey, The National Academies Polar Research Board and The National Academies Press. The National Academies Polar Research Board oversees the activities of SCAR in the U.S. Special attention has been directed at publication formats for the symposium, to expedite the open and wide sharing of mature and preliminary research results presented in talks and posters at the Tenth ISAES. All symposium presentations are documented by a

  14. Approaches to the development of biomedical support systems for piloted exploration missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, A. I.; Potapov, A. N.

    2014-01-01

    Many aspects of the biomedical systems developed and realized aboard orbital stations, the International space station in the first place, deserve to be regarded as predecessors of the systems for health monitoring and maintenance of future exploration crews. At the same time, there are issues and tasks which have not been yet fully resolved. Specifically, these are prevention of the adverse changes in body systems and organs due to microgravity, reliable protection from the spectrum of space radiation, and elucidation of possible effects of hypomagnetic environment. We should not walk away from search and development of key biomedical technologies such as a system of automated fitness evaluation and a psychodiagnostic complex for testing and optimization of operator‧s efficiency, and others. We have to address a large number of issues related to designing the composite life support systems of the utmost autonomy, closure and ecological safety of the human environment that will provide transformation of all kinds of waste. Another crucial task is to define a concept of the onboard medical center and dataware including the telemedicine technology. All the above developments should assimilate the most recent achievements in physiology, molecular biology, genetics, and advanced medical technologies. Biomedical researches on biosatellites also do not lose topicality.

  15. Biomedical HIV prevention research and epidemic control in Thailand: two sides of the same coin.

    PubMed

    van Griensven, Frits; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Srithanaviboonchai, Kriengkrai

    2014-07-01

    For a country with a moderate adult HIV prevalence of just over 1% in 2012, Thailand is widely perceived as having made some extraordinary contributions to the global management of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. It has been promoted as a model of effective HIV control and applauded for its leadership in providing access to antiretroviral treatment. Thailand has also received international recognition for its contribution to biomedical HIV prevention research, which is generally perceived as exceptional. In this paper, Thailand's global role model function as an example of effective HIV/AIDS control and high-quality biomedical HIV prevention research is re-evaluated against the background of currently available data and more recent insights. The results indicate that Thailand's initial response in raising the level of the political significance of HIV/AIDS was indeed extraordinary, which probably prevented a much larger epidemic from occurring. However, this response transpired in unusual extraconstitutional circumstances and its effectiveness declined once the country returned to political normalcy. Available data confirm the country's more than exceptional contribution to biomedical HIV prevention research. Thailand has made a huge contribution to the global management and control of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. PMID:25000363

  16. In-line phase contrast micro-CT reconstruction for biomedical specimens.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Tan, Renbo

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase contrast micro computed tomography (micro-CT) can non-destructively provide the internal structure information of soft tissues and low atomic number materials. It has become an invaluable analysis tool for biomedical specimens. Here an in-line phase contrast micro-CT reconstruction technique is reported, which consists of a projection extraction method and the conventional filter back-projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. The projection extraction is implemented by applying the Fourier transform to the forward projections of in-line phase contrast micro-CT. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a biomedical specimen dataset measured at an X-ray tube source micro-CT setup. The numerical and experimental results demonstrate that the presented technique can improve the imaging contrast of biomedical specimens. It will be of interest for a wide range of in-line phase contrast micro-CT applications in medicine and biology. PMID:24211924

  17. Publication ethics in biomedical journals from countries in Central and Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Broga, Mindaugas; Mijaljica, Goran; Waligora, Marcin; Keis, Aime; Marusic, Ana

    2014-03-01

    Publication ethics is an important aspect of both the research and publication enterprises. It is particularly important in the field of biomedical science because published data may directly affect human health. In this article, we examine publication ethics policies in biomedical journals published in Central and Eastern Europe. We were interested in possible differences between East European countries that are members of the European Union (Eastern EU) and South-East European countries (South-East Europe) that are not members of the European Union. The most common ethical issues addressed by all journals in the region were redundant publication, peer review process, and copyright or licensing details. Image manipulation, editors' conflicts of interest and registration of clinical trials were the least common ethical policies. Three aspects were significantly more common in journals published outside the EU: statements on the endorsement of international editorial standards, contributorship policy, and image manipulation. On the other hand, copyright or licensing information were more prevalent in journals published in the Eastern EU. The existence of significant differences among biomedical journals' ethical policies calls for further research and active measures to harmonize policies across journals. PMID:23456142

  18. Liberty to decide on dual use biomedical research: an acknowledged necessity.

    PubMed

    Keuleyan, Emma

    2010-03-01

    Humanity entered the twenty-first century with revolutionary achievements in biomedical research. At the same time multiple "dual-use" results have been published. The battle against infectious diseases is meeting new challenges, with newly emerging and re-emerging infections. Both natural disaster epidemics, such as SARS, avian influenza, haemorrhagic fevers, XDR and MDR tuberculosis and many others, and the possibility of intentional mis-use, such as letters containing anthrax spores in USA, 2001, have raised awareness of the real threats. Many great men, including Goethe, Spinoza, J.B. Shaw, Fr. Engels, J.F. Kennedy and others, have recognized that liberty is also a responsibility. That is why the liberty to decide now represents an acknowledged necessity: biomedical research should be supported, conducted and published with appropriate measures to prevent potential "dual use". Biomedical scientists should work according to the ethical principles of their Code of Conduct, an analogue of Hippocrates Oath of doctors; and they should inform government, society and their juniors about the problem. National science consulting boards of experts should be created to prepare guidelines and control the problem at state level. An international board should develop minimum standards to be applicable by each country. Bio-preparedness is considered another key-measure. PMID:18427955

  19. PaperChase: a user-friendly program for searching the biomedical literature.

    PubMed

    Lawson, R

    1990-06-01

    PaperChase is a computer program which provides an efficient interface to the National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE database of references to the biomedical literature. The database includes references (citations) and abstracts compiled from Index Medicus, the International Nursing Index and the Index to Dental Literature. PaperChase may be accessed using any computer terminal or personal computer with modem. No special knowledge of computers or biomedical terms is necessary. Simple menus enable the novice to search the biomedical literature without training. A command language speeds searching for the experienced user. PaperChase does not require the user to know the database's indexing terminology, called Medical Subject Headings. Everyday language may be used and PaperChase will translate, or "map", the user's search term into the required Medical Subject Heading. PaperChase monitors a search in progress and suggests additional Medical Subject Headings which can be used to broaden or narrow a search. The searcher can order a full-text photocopy of any reference found in PaperChase. Support documentation and a subscriber newsletter are provided at no charge. Trained search specialists are available to offer assistance and to answer questions. PMID:2192743

  20. International solar-terrestrial physics program: A plan for the core spaceflight missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This brochure has been prepared by NASA on behalf of the European Space Agency (ESA), the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan) (ISAS), and the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to describe the scope of the science problems to be investigated and the mission plan for the core International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Program. This information is intended to stimulate discussions and plans for the comprehensive worldwide ISTP Program. The plan for the study of the solar - terrestrial system is included. The Sun, geospace, and Sun-Earth interaction is discussed as is solar dynamics and the origins of solar winds.